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Sample records for high-isoelectric-point superoxide dismutase1cw

  1. pH-Responsive poly(itaconic acid-co-N-vinylpyrrolidone) hydrogels with reduced ionic strength loading solutions offer improved oral delivery potential for high isoelectric point-exhibiting therapeutic proteins.

    PubMed

    Koetting, Michael C; Peppas, Nicholas A

    2014-08-25

    pH-Responsive hydrogels comprised of itaconic acid copolymerized with N-vinylpyrrolidone (P(IA-co-NVP)) were synthesized and tested as carriers for the oral delivery of high isoelectric point (pI) exhibiting therapeutic proteins. Swelling studies show that P(IA-co-NVP) hydrogels exhibit significantly greater and faster pH-responsive swelling than previously studied methacrylic acid-based hydrogels, achieving up to 68% greater equilibrium swelling and 10.4 times greater swelling in time-limited experiments. Using salmon calcitonin as a model high pI protein therapeutic, we show that P(IA-co-NVP) hydrogels exhibit significantly greater delivery potential than methacrylic acid-based hydrogels. Additionally, we show that utilizing a lower ionic strength solution during drug loading significantly improves drug delivery potential for high pI therapeutics. By using a 1.5mM PBS buffer rather than the standard 150 mM PBS buffer during loading, up to 83 times as much calcitonin can be delivered in neutral conditions, with up to a 9.6-fold improvement in percent release. Using P(IA-co-NVP) hydrogel microparticles and a low ionic strength loading solution, up to 48 μg calcitonin/mg hydrogel can be delivered in small intestinal conditions. Based on expected absorption in the small intestine, this is sufficient delivery potential for achieving therapeutic dosage via a single, regularly-sized pill taken daily. PMID:24853463

  2. Superoxide Flashes

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qi; Fang, Huaqiang; Shang, Wei; Liu, Lei; Xu, Zhengshuang; Ye, Tao; Wang, Xianhua; Zheng, Ming; Chen, Quan; Cheng, Heping

    2011-01-01

    Irreversible mitochondrial permeability transition and the resultant cytochrome c release signify the commitment of a cell to apoptotic death. However, the role of transient MPT (tMPT) because of flickering opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore remains elusive. Here we show that tMPT and the associated superoxide flashes (i.e. tMPT/superoxide flashes) constitute early mitochondrial signals during oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. Selenite (a ROS-dependent insult) but not staurosporine (a ROS-independent insult) stimulated an early and persistent increase in tMPT/superoxide flash activity prior to mitochondrial fragmentation and a global ROS rise, independently of Bax translocation and cytochrome c release. Selectively targeting tMPT/superoxide flash activity by manipulating cyclophilin D expression or scavenging mitochondrial ROS markedly impacted the progression of selenite-induced apoptosis while exerting little effect on the global ROS response. Furthermore, the tMPT/superoxide flash served as a convergence point for pro- and anti-apoptotic regulation mediated by cyclophilin D and Bcl-2 proteins. These results indicate that tMPT/superoxide flashes act as early mitochondrial signals mediating the apoptotic response during oxidative stress, and provide the first demonstration of highly efficacious local mitochondrial ROS signaling in deciding cell fate. PMID:21659534

  3. Air Revitalization Using Superoxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, Theodore; Wood, Peter C.; Spitze, L. A.

    1988-01-01

    Pellets made from powder mixtures of potassium superoxide, KO2, and calcium superoxide, Ca(O2)2, proven markedly superior to pellets of pure KO2 for adding O2 to and removing CO2 from atmospheric-pressure flow of humidified CO2 in He. Superoxides used extensively to supply O2 and scrub CO2 in variety of ambient-pressure life-support applications, including portable self-contained breathing apparatuses, spacecraft, and undersea submersible craft.

  4. Synthesis of calcium superoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rewick, R. T.; Blucher, W. G.; Estacio, P. L.

    1972-01-01

    Efforts to prepare Ca(O2) sub 2 from reactions of calcium compounds with 100% O3 and with O(D-1) atoms generated by photolysis of O3 at 2537 A are described. Samples of Ca(OH) sub 2, CaO, CaO2, Ca metal, and mixtures containing suspected impurities to promote reaction have been treated with excess O3 under static and flow conditions in the presence and absence of UV irradiation. Studies with KO2 suggest that the superoxide anion is stable to radiation at 2537 A but reacts with oxygen atoms generated by the photolysis of O3 to form KO3. Calcium superoxide is expected to behave in an analogous.

  5. OnPLS integration of transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic data shows multi-level oxidative stress responses in the cambium of transgenic hipI- superoxide dismutase Populus plants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in the regulation of diverse physiological processes in plants, including various biotic and abiotic stress responses. Thus, oxidative stress tolerance mechanisms in plants are complex, and diverse responses at multiple levels need to be characterized in order to understand them. Here we present system responses to oxidative stress in Populus by integrating data from analyses of the cambial region of wild-type controls and plants expressing high-isoelectric-point superoxide dismutase (hipI-SOD) transcripts in antisense orientation showing a higher production of superoxide. The cambium, a thin cell layer, generates cells that differentiate to form either phloem or xylem and is hypothesized to be a major reason for phenotypic perturbations in the transgenic plants. Data from multiple platforms including transcriptomics (microarray analysis), proteomics (UPLC/QTOF-MS), and metabolomics (GC-TOF/MS, UPLC/MS, and UHPLC-LTQ/MS) were integrated using the most recent development of orthogonal projections to latent structures called OnPLS. OnPLS is a symmetrical multi-block method that does not depend on the order of analysis when more than two blocks are analysed. Significantly affected genes, proteins and metabolites were then visualized in painted pathway diagrams. Results The main categories that appear to be significantly influenced in the transgenic plants were pathways related to redox regulation, carbon metabolism and protein degradation, e.g. the glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathways (PPP). The results provide system-level information on ROS metabolism and responses to oxidative stress, and indicate that some initial responses to oxidative stress may share common pathways. Conclusion The proposed data evaluation strategy shows an efficient way of compiling complex, multi-platform datasets to obtain significant biological information. PMID:24341908

  6. Models of Superoxide Dismutases

    SciTech Connect

    Cabelli, Diane E.; Riley, Dennis; Rodriguez, Jorge A.; Valentine, Joan Selverstone; Zhu, Haining

    1998-05-20

    In this review we have focused much of our discussion on the mechanistic details of how the native enzymes function and how mechanistic developments/insights with synthetic small molecule complexes possessing SOD activity have influenced our understanding of the electron transfer processes involved with the natural enzymes. A few overriding themes have emerged. Clearly, the SOD enzymes operate at near diffusion controlled rates and to achieve such catalytic turnover activity, several important physical principles must be operative. Such fast electron transfer processes requires a role for protons; i.e., proton-coupled electron transfer (''H-atom transfer'') solves the dilemma of charge separation developing in the transition state for the electron transfer step. Additionally, outer-sphere electron transfer is likely a most important pathway for manganese and iron dismutases. This situation arises because the ligand exchange rates on these two ions in water never exceed {approx}10{sup +7} s{sup -1}; consequently, 10{sup +9} catalytic rates require more subtle mechanistic insights. In contrast, copper complexes can achieve diffusion controlled (>10{sup +9}) exchange rates in water; thus inner-sphere electron transfer processes are more likely to be operative in the Cu/Zn enzymes. Recent studies have continued to expand our understanding of the mechanism of action of this most important class of redox active enzymes, the superoxide dismutases, which have been critical in the successful adaptation of life on this planet to an oxygen-based metabolism. The design of SOD mimic drugs, synthetic models compounds that incorporate this superoxide dismutase catalytic activity and are capable of functioning in vivo, offers clear potential benefits in the control of diseases, ranging from the control of neurodegenerative conditions, such as Parkinson's or Alzheimer's disease, to cancer.

  7. Superoxide production by phagocytic leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Drath, D B; Karnovsky, M L

    1975-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytic leukocytes, as well as polymorphonuclear leukocytes, produce and release superoxide at rest, and this is stimulated by phagocytosis. Of the mouse monocytic cells studied, alveolar macrophages released the largest amounts of superoxide during phagocytosis, followed by normal peritoneal macrophages. Casein-elicited and "activated" macrophages released smaller quantities. In the guinea pig, polymorphonuclear leukocytes and casein-elicited macrophages were shown to release superoxide during phagocytosis whereas alveolar macrophages did not. Superoxide release accounted for only a small fraction of the respiratory burst of phagocytosis in all but the normal mouse peritoneal macrophage, the guinea pig polymorphonuclear leukocyte, and probably the mouse alveolar macrophage. There are obviously considerable species differences in O2-release by various leukocytes that might reflect both the production and/or destruction (e.g. by dismutase) of that substance. PMID:804030

  8. Economical synthesis of potassium superoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, A. T.; Sadhukhan, P.

    1979-01-01

    High-frequency discharge in oxygen can be used to prepare superoxides of alkali and alkaline-earth metals. Since no direct-current discharge at the electrodes is present, no sputtering can contaminate the product, hence a high conversion efficiency.

  9. Superoxide and peroxynitrite in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    White, C R; Brock, T A; Chang, L Y; Crapo, J; Briscoe, P; Ku, D; Bradley, W A; Gianturco, S H; Gore, J; Freeman, B A

    1994-01-01

    The role of reactive oxygen species in the vascular pathology associated with atherosclerosis was examined by testing the hypothesis that impaired vascular reactivity results from the reaction of nitric oxide (.NO) with superoxide (O2-), yielding the oxidant peroxynitrite (ONOO-). Contractility studies were performed on femoral arteries from rabbits fed a cholesterol-supplemented diet. Cholesterol feeding shifted the EC50 for acetylcholine (ACh)-induced relaxation and impaired the maximal response to ACh. We used pH-sensitive liposomes to deliver CuZn superoxide dismutase (SOD; superoxide:superoxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.15.1.1) to critical sites of .NO reaction with O2-. Intravenously injected liposomes (3000 units of SOD per ml) augmented ACh-induced relaxation in the cholesterol-fed group to a greater extent than in controls. Quantitative immunocytochemistry demonstrated enhanced distribution of SOD in both endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells as well as in the extracellular matrix. SOD activity in vessel homogenates of liposome-treated rabbits was also increased. Incubation of beta very low density lipoprotein with ONOO- resulted in the rapid formation of conjugated dienes and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances. Our results suggest that the reaction of O2- with .NO is involved in the development of atherosclerotic disease by yielding a potent mediator of lipoprotein oxidation, as well as by limiting .NO stimulation of vascular smooth muscle guanylate cyclase activity. Images PMID:8302829

  10. Superoxide dismutase: an evolutionary puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.M.; Friedman, D.J.; Ayala, F.J.

    1985-02-01

    The authors have obtained the complete amino acid sequence of copper/zinc-containing superoxide dismutase (SOD, superoxide:superoxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.15.1.1) from Drosophila melanogaster. The sequence of this enzyme is also known for man, horse, cow, and the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The rate of evolution of this enzyme is far from constant. The number of amino acid substitutions per 100 residues per 100 million years is 30.9 when the three mammals are compared to each other, 10.6 when Drosophila is compared to the three mammals, and 5.8 when the yeast is compared to the four animals. The first value represents one of the fastest evolutionary rates for any protein, the second is similar to the globin rate, and the third is similar to some cytochromes and other slowly evolving proteins. Hence, SOD is not acceptable evolutionary clock. Another peculiarity of this enzyme is that a two-amino-acid deletion must have occurred independently in the lineages going to the cow and to Drosophila. The authors conclude that using the primary structure of a single gene or protein to time evolutionary events or to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships is potentially fraught with error.

  11. Superoxide dismutases in chronic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Švagelj, Dražen; Terzić, Velimir; Dovhanj, Jasna; Švagelj, Marija; Cvrković, Mirta; Švagelj, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    Human gastric diseases have shown significant changes in the activity and expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD) isoforms. The aim of this study was to detect Mn-SOD activity and expression in the tissue of gastric mucosa, primarily in chronic gastritis (immunohistochemical Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis, without other pathohistological changes) and to evaluate their possible connection with pathohistological diagnosis. We examined 51 consecutive outpatients undergoing endoscopy for upper gastrointestinal symptoms. Patients were classified based on their histopathological examinations and divided into three groups: 51 patients (archive samples between 2004-2009) with chronic immunohistochemical Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis (mononuclear cells infiltration were graded as absent, moderate, severe) divided into three groups. Severity of gastritis was graded according to the updated Sydney system. Gastric tissue samples were used to determine the expression of Mn-SOD with anti-Mn-SOD Ab immunohistochemically. The Mn-SOD expression was more frequently present in specimens with severe and moderate inflammation of gastric mucosa than in those with normal mucosa. In patients with normal histological finding, positive immunoreactivity of Mn-SOD was not found. Our results determine the changes in Mn-SOD expression occurring in the normal gastric mucosa that had undergone changes in the intensity of chronic inflammatory infiltrates in the lamina propria. PMID:26765960

  12. Superoxide targets calcineurin signaling in vascular endothelium

    SciTech Connect

    Namgaladze, Dmitry . E-mail: dmitry@zbc.kgu.de; Shcherbyna, Ivanna; Kienhoefer, Joachim; Hofer, H. Werner; Ullrich, Volker

    2005-09-09

    Superoxide emerges as key regulatory molecule in many aspects of vascular physiology and disease, but identification of superoxide targets in the vasculature remains elusive. In this work, we investigated the possibility of inhibition of protein phosphatase calcineurin by superoxide in endothelial cells. We employed a redox cycler 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (DMNQ) to generate superoxide inside the cells. DMNQ caused inhibition of cellular calcineurin phosphatase activity, which was reversible upon DMNQ removal. Inhibition was suppressed by pre-incubating the cells with copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu,ZnSOD). In addition, reducing cellular Cu,ZnSOD activity by diethylthiocarbamic acid treatment resulted in calcineurin inhibition and enhanced sensitivity to DMNQ. Further, we could show that DMNQ inhibits calcineurin-dependent nuclear translocation and transcriptional activation of NFAT transcription factor, and Cu,ZnSOD or superoxide scavenger Tiron reduced the inhibition. Thus, superoxide generation in endothelial cells results in inhibition of calcineurin signaling, which could have important pathophysiological implications in the vasculature.

  13. Metal Uptake by Manganese Superoxide Dismutase

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, James W.

    2009-01-01

    Manganese superoxide dismutase is an important antioxidant defense metalloenzyme that protects cells from damage by the toxic oxygen metabolite, superoxide free radical, formed as an unavoidable by-product of aerobic metabolism. Many years of research have gone into understanding how the metal cofactor interacts with small molecules in its catalytic role. In contrast, very little is presently known about how the protein acquires its metal cofactor, an important step in the maturation of the protein and one that is absolutely required for its biological function. Recent work is beginning to provide insight into the mechanisms of metal delivery to manganese superoxide dismutase in vivo and in vitro. PMID:19699328

  14. Oxygen plasmas used to synthesize superoxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollahan, J. R.; Wydeven, T.

    1972-01-01

    Production of alkali metal superoxides by interaction of molecular oxygen with alkali metals or their salts is discussed. Diagram of reactor to show components and operating principles is provided. Analysis of chemical reactions involved is developed.

  15. Biological Superoxide In Manganese Oxide Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansel, C.; Learman, D.; Zeiner, C.; Santelli, C. M.

    2011-12-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the strongest sorbents and oxidants within the environment, controlling the fate and transport of numerous elements and the degradation of recalcitrant carbon. Both bacteria and fungi mediate the oxidation of Mn(II) to Mn(III/IV) oxides but the genetic and biochemical mechanisms responsible remain poorly understood. Furthermore, the physiological basis for microbial Mn(II) oxidation remains an enigma. We have recently reported that a common marine bacterium (Roseobacter sp. AzwK-3b) oxidizes Mn(II) via reaction with extracellular superoxide (O2-) produced during exponential growth. Here we expand this superoxide-mediated Mn(II) oxidation pathway to fungi, introducing a surprising homology between prokaryotic and eukaryotic metal redox processes. For instance, Stibella aciculosa, a common soil Ascomycete filamentous fungus, precipitates Mn oxides at the base of asexual reproductive structures (synnemata) used to support conidia (Figure 1). This distribution is a consequence of localized production of superoxide (and it's dismutation product hydrogen peroxide, H2O2), leading to abiotic oxidation of Mn(II) by superoxide. Disruption of NADPH oxidase activity using the oxidoreductase inhibitor DPI leads to diminished cell differentiation and subsequent Mn(II) oxidation inhibition. Addition of Cu(II) (an effective superoxide scavenger) leads to a concentration dependent decrease in Mn oxide formation. We predict that due to the widespread production of extracellular superoxide within the fungal and likely bacterial kingdoms, biological superoxide may be an important contributor to the cycling of Mn, as well as other metals (e.g., Hg, Fe). Current and future explorations of the genes and proteins involved in superoxide production and Mn(II) oxidation will ideally lend insight into the physiological and biochemical basis for these processes.

  16. Tetraorganylammonium superoxide compounds: close to unperturbed superoxide ions in the solid state.

    PubMed

    Dietzel, Pascal D C; Kremer, Reinhard K; Jansen, Martin

    2004-04-14

    Trimethylphenylammonium superoxide (1) and tetrabutylammonium superoxide (2) were prepared by ion-exchange reaction in liquid ammonia. Both compounds were structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The crystal structure of 2 contains solvent ammonia molecules that are hydrogen bonded to the superoxide ion and therefore may influence the bonding properties of the superoxide ion. The crystal structure of 1 does not contain any solvent molecules. Therefore, it represents the best known approximation to the virtually isolated superoxide ion in the solid state to date. The O-O bond length is 1.332(2) A in 1 and 1.312(2) A in 2. Magnetization measurements show that the susceptibilities of both compounds follow an ideal Curie law down to 2 K reflecting an absence of intermolecular exchange effects between the superoxide ions. The effective magnetic moments of both compounds are larger than the spin-only value due to contributions of the orbital momentum in the superoxide ion. The values of the magnetic moment comply well with the g factors obtained from electron paramagnetic resonance spectra. The g tensors themselves reflect the anisotropic environment of the superoxide ions. The Pi(g) energy levels which are degenerate in the free superoxide ion split up in crystal fields of lower than tetragonal symmetry. The energy splitting is estimated from the diagonal elements of the g tensor of 1. PMID:15070387

  17. Periplasmic Superoxide Dismutase in Meningococcal Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Wilks, Kathryn E.; Dunn, Kate L. R.; Farrant, Jayne L.; Reddin, Karen M.; Gorringe, Andrew R.; Langford, Paul R.; Kroll, J. Simon

    1998-01-01

    Meningococcal sodC encodes periplasmic copper- and zinc-cofactored superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn SOD) which catalyzes the conversion of the superoxide radical anion to hydrogen peroxide, preventing a sequence of reactions leading to production of toxic hydroxyl free radicals. From its periplasmic location, Cu,Zn SOD was inferred to acquire its substrate from outside the bacterial cell and was speculated to play a role in preserving meningococci from the action of microbicidal oxygen free radicals produced in the context of host defense. A sodC mutant was constructed by allelic exchange and was used to investigate the role of Cu,Zn SOD in pathogenicity. Wild-type and mutant meningococci grew at comparable rates and survived equally long in aerobic liquid culture. The mutant showed no increased sensitivity to paraquat, which generates superoxide within the cytosol, but was approximately 1,000-fold more sensitive to the toxicity of superoxide generated in solution by the xanthine/xanthine oxidase system. These data support a role for meningococcal Cu,Zn SOD in protection against exogenous superoxide. In experiments to translate this into a role in pathogenicity, wild-type and mutant organisms were used in an intraperitoneal mouse infection model. The sodC mutant was significantly less virulent. We conclude that periplasmic Cu,Zn SOD contributes to the virulence of Neisseria meningitidis, most likely by reducing the effectiveness of toxic oxygen host defenses. PMID:9423860

  18. Process for the preparation of calcium superoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballou, E. V.; Wood, P. C.; Wydeven, T. J.; Spitze, L. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Calcium superoxide is prepared in high yields by spreading a quantity of calcium peroxide diperoxyhydrate on the surface of a container, positioning said container in a vacuum chamber on a support structure through which a coolant fluid can be circulated, partially evacuating said vacuum chamber, allowing the temperature of the diperoxyhydrate to reach the range of about 0 to about 40 C; maintaining the temperature selected for a period of time sufficient to complete the disproproriation of the diperoxyhydrate to calcium superoxide, calcium hydroxide, oxygen, and water; constantly and systematically removing the water as it is formed by sweeping the reacting material with a current of dry inert gas and/or by condensation of said water on a cold surface; backfilling the chamber with a dry inert gas; and finally, recovering the calcium superoxide produced.

  19. Superoxide radical production by sponges Sycon sp.

    PubMed

    Peskin, A V; Labas, Y A; Tikhonov, A N

    1998-08-28

    Using the catechol Tiron as an O2-. scavenger, we showed that sea sponges (Sycon sp.) produce superoxide radicals in sea water at a high rate without any stimuli added. The rate of O2-. outflow from sponges to their water surroundings reaches a value of 0.5 nmol/min per sponge at pH 6.5. The generation of O2-. was inhibited by Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase, and restored by the addition of KCN. We also confirmed the abiotic production of O2-. in sea water, detected earlier with a different method by Petasne and Zika [Nature 325 (1987) 516-518]. PMID:9738478

  20. Superoxide dismutases of heavy metal resistant streptomycetes.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Astrid; Schmidt, André; Haferburg, Götz; Kothe, Erika

    2007-02-01

    Heavy metal tolerant and resistant strains of streptomycetes isolated from a former uranium mining site were screened for their superoxide dismutase expression. From the strains tolerating high concentrations of different heavy metals, one was selected for its tolerance of concentrations of heavy metals (Ni, Cu, Cd, Cr, Mn, Zn, Fe). This strain, Streptomyces acidiscabies E13, was chosen for the purpose of superoxide dismutase analysis. Gel electrophoresis and activity staining revealed only one each of a nickel (NiSOD) and an iron (FeZnSOD) containing superoxide dismutase as shown by differential enzymatic repression studies. The gene for nickel containing superoxide dismutase, sodN, was cloned and sequenced from this strain. The genomic sequence shows 92.7% nucleotide identity and 96.1% amino acid identity to sodN of S. coelicolor. Expression can be activated by nickel as well as other heavy metals and active enzyme is produced in media lacking nickel but containing copper, iron or zinc. Thus, the selected strain is well suited for further characterization of the enzyme encoded by sodN. PMID:17304620

  1. Therapeutic Targeting of Mitochondrial Superoxide in Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Dikalova, Anna E.; Bikineyeva, Alfiya T.; Budzyn, Klaudia; Nazarewicz, Rafal R.; McCann, Louise; Lewis, William; Harrison, David G.; Dikalov, Sergey I.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Superoxide (O2∸) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many human diseases including hypertension, however commonly employed antioxidants have proven ineffective in clinical trials. It is possible that these agents are not adequately delivered to the subcellular sites of superoxide production. Objective: Because the mitochondria are important sources of reactive oxygen species, we postulated that mitochondrial targeting of superoxide scavenging would have therapeutic benefit. Methods and Results: In this study, we found that the hormone angiotensin II increased endothelial mitochondrial superoxide production. Treatment with the mitochondrial targeted antioxidant mitoTEMPO decreased mitochondrial O2∸, inhibited the total cellular O2∸, reduced cellular NADPH oxidase activity and restored the level of bioavailable NO. These effects were mimicked by overexpressing the mitochondrial MnSOD (SOD2), while SOD2 depletion with siRNA increased both basal and angiotensin II-stimulated cellular O2∸. Treatment of mice in vivo with mitoTEMPO attenuated hypertension when given at the onset of angiotensin II infusion and decreased blood pressure by 30 mm Hg following establishment of both angiotensin II-induced and DOCA-salt hypertension, while a similar dose of non-targeted TEMPOL was not effective. In vivo, mitoTEMPO decreased vascular O2∸, increased vascular NO• production and improved endothelial-dependent relaxation. Interestingly, transgenic mice overexpressing mitochondrial SOD2 demonstrated attenuated angiotensin II-induced hypertension and vascular oxidative stress similar to mice treated with mitoTEMPO. Conclusions: These studies show that mitochondrial O2∸ is important for the development of hypertension and that antioxidant strategies specifically targeting this organelle could have therapeutic benefit in this and possibly other diseases. PMID:20448215

  2. Superoxide anion radical scavenging property of catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Kładna, Aleksandra; Berczyński, Paweł; Kruk, Irena; Michalska, Teresa; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2013-01-01

    The direct effect of the four catecholamines (adrenaline, noradrenaline, dopamine and isoproterenol) on superoxide anion radicals (O2•) was investigated. The reaction between 18-crown-6-ether and potassium superoxide in dimethylsulfoxide was used as a source of O2•. The reactivity of catecholamines with O2• was examined using chemiluminescence, reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium and electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trapping techniques. 5,5-Dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide was included as the spin trap. The results showed that the four catecholamines were effective and efficient in inhibiting chemiluminescence accompanying the potassium superoxide/18-crown-6-ether system in a dose-dependent manner over the range 0.05-2 mM in the following order: adrenaline > noradrenaline > dopamine > isoproterenol, with, IC50 = 0.15 ± 0.02 mM 0.21 ± 0.03 mM, 0.27 ± 0.03 mM and 0.50 ± 0.04 mM, respectively. The catecholamines examined also exhibited a strong scavenging effect towards O2• when evaluated this property by the inhibition of nitroblue tetrazolium reduction (56-73% at 1 M concentration). A very similar capacity of O2• scavenging was monitored in the 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide spin-trapping assay. The results suggest that catecholamines tested may involve a direct effect on scavenging O2- radicals. PMID:23319391

  3. Singlet oxygen production in superoxide ion-halocarbon systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kanofsky, J.R.

    1986-05-28

    A search for singlet oxygen chemiluminescence at 1268 nm was made in a number of reactions of superoxide ion. Carbon tetrachloride and carbon tetrabromide reacted with suspended potassium superoxide to produce 1268-nm emission consistent with singlet oxygen. Chloroform was less reactive but produced 1268-nm emission when the concentration of superoxide ion in the halocarbon phase was increased with 1,4,7,10,13,16-hexaoxacyclooctadecane (18-crown-6). The dismutation of superoxide ion in deuterium oxide was not accompanied by 1268-nm chemiluminescence. Less than 0.02 mol of singlet oxygen was produced per mole of superoxide ion between p/sup 2/H 6 and 9.

  4. Superoxide Dismutase in the Symbiont Anabaena azollae Strasb.

    PubMed

    Canini, A; Galiazzo, F; Rotilio, G; Caiola, M G

    1991-09-01

    Superoxide dismutase was investigated in the symbiont Anabaena azollae Strasb. living in Azolla filiculoides Lam. In vegetative cells, three isoenzymatic forms of superoxide dismutase, containing manganese, iron, and the hybrid iron-manganese, respectively, were present. Hybrid superoxide dismutase, detected for the first time in cyanobacteria, was 7% of the total superoxide dismutase present in vegetative cells. All three superoxide dismutase forms increased in the Anabaena vegetative cells obtained from irradiated plants grown in winter. In heterocysts, only an iron superoxide dismutase was present, which amounted to 25% of total vegetative cell superoxide dismutase activity. Hybrid superoxide dismutase appeared in heterocysts after irradiation. In vegetative cells of Anabaena from plants grown in summer, the basal level of total superoxide dismutase increased by 60% as compared with winter, and was unaffected by irradiation. The levels of superoxide dismutase in heterocysts from control and exposed plants grown in summer were comparable to those observed in heterocysts obtained from the plants grown during winter. No direct correlation was found between nitrogenase activity and superoxide dismutase in heterocysts. The presence of cyanophycin granules, either within the heterocyst pore channel or close to the transversal septum of vegetative cells, suggested a mechanism to stop communications between vegetative cells and heterocysts. PMID:16668392

  5. Superoxide Dismutase in the Symbiont Anabaena azollae Strasb. 1

    PubMed Central

    Canini, A.; Galiazzo, F.; Rotilio, G.; Caiola, M. Grilli

    1991-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase was investigated in the symbiont Anabaena azollae Strasb. living in Azolla filiculoides Lam. In vegetative cells, three isoenzymatic forms of superoxide dismutase, containing manganese, iron, and the hybrid iron-manganese, respectively, were present. Hybrid superoxide dismutase, detected for the first time in cyanobacteria, was 7% of the total superoxide dismutase present in vegetative cells. All three superoxide dismutase forms increased in the Anabaena vegetative cells obtained from irradiated plants grown in winter. In heterocysts, only an iron superoxide dismutase was present, which amounted to 25% of total vegetative cell superoxide dismutase activity. Hybrid superoxide dismutase appeared in heterocysts after irradiation. In vegetative cells of Anabaena from plants grown in summer, the basal level of total superoxide dismutase increased by 60% as compared with winter, and was unaffected by irradiation. The levels of superoxide dismutase in heterocysts from control and exposed plants grown in summer were comparable to those observed in heterocysts obtained from the plants grown during winter. No direct correlation was found between nitrogenase activity and superoxide dismutase in heterocysts. The presence of cyanophycin granules, either within the heterocyst pore channel or close to the transversal septum of vegetative cells, suggested a mechanism to stop communications between vegetative cells and heterocysts. ImagesFigure 1Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:16668392

  6. Differential effects of superoxide dismutase and superoxide dismutase/catalase mimetics on human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shah, Manisha H; Liu, Guei-Sheung; Thompson, Erik W; Dusting, Gregory J; Peshavariya, Hitesh M

    2015-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) have been implicated in development and progression of breast cancer. In the present study, we have evaluated the effects of the superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetic MnTmPyP and the SOD/catalase mimetic EUK 134 on superoxide and H2O2 formation as well as proliferation, adhesion, and migration of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Superoxide and H2O2 production was examined using dihydroethidium and Amplex red assays, respectively. Cell viability and adhesion were measured using a tetrazolium-based MTT assay. Cell proliferation was determined using trypan blue assay. Cell cycle progression was analyzed using flow cytometry. Clonal expansion of a single cell was performed using a colony formation assay. Cell migration was measured using transwell migration assay. Dual luciferase assay was used to determine NF-κB reporter activity. EUK 134 effectively reduced both superoxide and H2O2, whereas MnTmPyP removed superoxide but enhanced H2O2 formation. EUK 134 effectively attenuated viability, proliferation, clonal expansion, adhesion, and migration of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. In contrast, MnTmPyP only reduced clonal expansion of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells but had no effect on adhesion and cell cycle progression. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced NF-κB activity was reduced by EUK 134, whereas MnTmPyP enhanced this activity. These data indicate that the SOD mimetic MnTmPyP and the SOD/catalase mimetic EUK 134 exert differential effects on breast cancer cell growth. Inhibition of H2O2 signaling using EUK 134-like compound might be a promising approach to breast cancer therapy. PMID:25794772

  7. Superoxide Radical Lifetime on the Martian Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zent, A. P.; Ichimura, A.; Quinn, R. C.

    2005-08-01

    We have examined the formation and stability of the superoxide radical O2-, which has been hypothesized as a potential Mars oxidant. Rutile (TiO2) was heated to ˜ 400 degrees C under vacuum. The samples were tipped off in ampules under 8-9 torr O2, photolyzed with a Hg lamp for 30 minutes; EPR spectra were immediately obtained at 77K. The signature of O2- was clearly observed in the rutile. The sealed ampules were stored at room temperature for up to 2 weeks without any decrease in the number of spins. The same process, applied to rutile that was not baked out yielded superoxide signals that could not be detected once the photolyzing flux was cut off. To examine the effects of partial dehydration, we carried out the same series of experiments on rutile that was baked out at 200 degrees C. This material showed decay of superoxide spins to zero in less than 10 minutes. This qualitative pattern is also observed in experiments on anatase (Attwood, et al., , 2003). We hypothesize that O2- can be stabilized against reaction with H2O and OH by crystalline surface defects. On hydrated surfaces, O2- must compete for stabilizing sites, and the population is quickly extinguished; in dehydrated samples, it can migrate to stabilizing defects. Once sorbed, the O2- radical is stable in the presence of H2O. OMEGA Mars Express data (Poullet et al, 2005) suggest one to several percent adsorbed H2O across the Martian surface, which will significantly decrease O2- lifetime. One possibility for subsurface stabilization of O2- can be postulated based on EPR spectra of anatase, exposed to H2O2 in our lab in 1996, and which in 2005 shows the signature of O2-. Evidently, H2O2 can convert to stable O2- on some surfaces. This hypothesis might allow subsurface diffusion of H2O2, followed by conversion to O2-.

  8. Subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar mitochondria display distinct superoxide production profiles.

    PubMed

    Crochemore, C; Mekki, M; Corbière, C; Karoui, A; Noël, R; Vendeville, C; Vaugeois, J-M; Monteil, C

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM) and interfibrillar mitochondria (IFM) subpopulations display distinct biochemical, morphological, and functional characteristics. Moreover, they appear to be differently influenced during cardiac pathologies or toxic injuries. Although mitochondrial reactive oxygen species seem to play a critical role in cardiac function and diseases, limited information exists about the superoxide production characteristics of these mitochondrial subpopulations. In this work, using direct measurement of superoxide by electron paramagnetic resonance, we showed that differences in superoxide production profiles were present between cardiac IFM and SSM, in terms of intensity and major sites of superoxide generation. In SSM incubated with glutamate plus malate as substrates, the total observed superoxide levels were significantly higher than those observed with IFM, with an important contribution of the NADH-oxidizing site of complex I (site If) and the quinol-oxidizing site of complex III (site IIIQ0). In both IFM and SSM, succinate leads to similar rates of total superoxide levels with a substantial role for contribution of reverse electron transfer. Finally, using two spin probes with different membrane permeabilities, our data on complex III showed direct intra- and extra-mitochondrial superoxide release whereas complex I- and II-dependent superoxide were exclusively released inside the mitochondria, confirming previous studies. Feasibility of this approach to measure intra- and extra-mitochondrial superoxide levels and to characterize distinct superoxide production profiles of cardiac IFM and SSM has been demonstrated. PMID:25689624

  9. Superoxide reduction by a superoxide reductase lacking the highly conserved lysine residue

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Teixeira, Miguel; Cabelli, Diane; Pinto, Ana F.; Romao, Celia V.; Pinto, Liliana C.; Huber, Harald; Saraiva, Ligia M.; Todorovic, Smilja

    2014-12-05

    Superoxide reductases (SORs) are the most recently identified superoxide detoxification systems, being found in microorganisms from the three domains of life. These enzymes are characterized by a catalytic mononuclear iron site, with one cysteine and four histidine ligands of the ferrous active form. A lysine residue in the –EKHVP– motif, located close to the active site, has been considered to be essential for the enzyme function, by contributing to the positive surface patch that attracts the superoxide anion and by controlling the chemistry of the catalytic mechanism through a hydrogen bond network. However, we show here that this residue ismore » substituted by non-equivalent amino acids in several putative SORs from Archaea and unicellular Eukarya. In this work, we focus on mechanistic and spectroscopic studies of one of these less common enzymes, the SOR from the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Ignicoccus hospitalis. We employ pulse radiolysis fast kinetics and spectroscopic approaches to study the wild-type enzyme (₋E₂₃T₂₄HVP₋), and two mutants, T24K and E23A, the later mimicking enzymes lacking both the lysine and glutamate (a ferric ion ligand) of the motif. The efficiency of the wild type protein and mutants in reducing superoxide is comparable to other SORs, revealing the robustness of these enzymes to single mutations.« less

  10. Superoxide reduction by a superoxide reductase lacking the highly conserved lysine residue

    SciTech Connect

    Teixeira, Miguel; Cabelli, Diane; Pinto, Ana F.; Romao, Celia V.; Pinto, Liliana C.; Huber, Harald; Saraiva, Ligia M.; Todorovic, Smilja

    2014-12-05

    Superoxide reductases (SORs) are the most recently identified superoxide detoxification systems, being found in microorganisms from the three domains of life. These enzymes are characterized by a catalytic mononuclear iron site, with one cysteine and four histidine ligands of the ferrous active form. A lysine residue in the –EKHVP– motif, located close to the active site, has been considered to be essential for the enzyme function, by contributing to the positive surface patch that attracts the superoxide anion and by controlling the chemistry of the catalytic mechanism through a hydrogen bond network. However, we show here that this residue is substituted by non-equivalent amino acids in several putative SORs from Archaea and unicellular Eukarya. In this work, we focus on mechanistic and spectroscopic studies of one of these less common enzymes, the SOR from the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Ignicoccus hospitalis. We employ pulse radiolysis fast kinetics and spectroscopic approaches to study the wild-type enzyme (₋E₂₃T₂₄HVP₋), and two mutants, T24K and E23A, the later mimicking enzymes lacking both the lysine and glutamate (a ferric ion ligand) of the motif. The efficiency of the wild type protein and mutants in reducing superoxide is comparable to other SORs, revealing the robustness of these enzymes to single mutations.

  11. Can superoxide dismutase prevent postburn dermal ischemia?

    PubMed

    Tan, Q; Ma, W X; Wang, L; Chen, H R

    1997-05-01

    Decreasing progressive dermal ischemia after burning could theoretically limit the amount of skin necrosis. It is controversial whether the use of free radical scavengers could prevent the progressive dermal ischemia of the postburn stasis zone. We evaluated the effect of superoxide dismutase (SOD) on preventing postburn dermal ischemia in animal models by the India ink perfusion and skin transparent preparation techniques. The closely clipped backs of guinea-pigs were bathed in 75 degrees C water for 10 s. Within 5 min postburn, SOD-treated groups were administered SOD (10,000 u/kg) intra-peritoneally every 6 h. All animals were perfused with 70 per cent India ink via cervical artery cannula by 16 kPa constant pressure at 0, 8, 16, 24 h postburn, and the skin transparent preparations were made, while the level of malonyl dialdehyde (MDA) in skin tissue was assessed. The results showed that with prolongation of postburn time, the rate of filling of India ink in skin capillary plexuses decreased gradually (p < 0.01). MDA increased continuously, which was related to postburn dermal ischemia (r = 0.689, p < 0.01). Though the level of MDA decreased in SOD-treated groups, the India ink filling rates showed no significant difference between controls and experimental groups (p > 0.05). The results were also confirmed by observation of skin transparent preparations and TEM. This study suggests that superoxide dismutase fails to prevent progressive dermal ischemia after burning. PMID:9232283

  12. Superoxide production and decay in the subtropical North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roe, K.; Voelker, B. M.; Hansel, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), which include superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, can be generated through photochemical reactions or biological activity in seawater. The generation of ROS, especially superoxide, by photochemical or biological processes can influence trace metal speciation and cycling in the ocean since superoxide can react quickly with metals (Cu and Fe) and is capable of both oxidation and reduction of trace metals. In this study superoxide was detected and measured in the oligotrophic waters at station ALOHA by a MCLA chemiluminescence flow injection method. The superoxide concentrations ranged between 0.037-0.099 nM, had observed decay rates of 0.004-0.014 s-1, and production rates of 0.88-4.81 nM hr-1 during a 16 day period during July 2012. The influence of biological activity vs photochemical production on superoxide concentration, decay and production rates are discussed.

  13. Nucleophilic reactivity of a copper(II)-superoxide complex.

    PubMed

    Pirovano, Paolo; Magherusan, Adriana M; McGlynn, Ciara; Ure, Andrew; Lynes, Amy; McDonald, Aidan R

    2014-06-01

    Metal-bound superoxide intermediates are often implicated as electrophilic oxidants in dioxygen-activating metalloenzymes. In the nonheme iron α-ketoglutarate dependent oxygenases and pterin-dependent hydroxylases, however, Fe(III)-superoxide intermediates are postulated to react by nucleophilic attack on electrophilic carbon atoms. By reacting a Cu(II)-superoxide complex (1) with acyl chloride substrates, we have found that a metal-superoxide complex can be a very reactive nucleophile. Furthermore, 1 was found to be an efficient nucleophilic deformylating reagent, capable of Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of a number of aldehyde substrates. The observed nucleophilic chemistry represents a new domain for metal-superoxide reactivity. Our observations provide support for the postulated role of metal-superoxide intermediates in nonheme iron α-ketoglutarate dependent and pterin-dependent enzymes. PMID:24753290

  14. Superoxide-dependent oxidation of melatonin by myeloperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Ximenes, Valdecir F; Silva, Sueli de O; Rodrigues, Maria R; Catalani, Luiz H; Maghzal, Ghassan J; Kettle, Anthony J; Campa, Ana

    2005-11-18

    Myeloperoxidase uses hydrogen peroxide to oxidize numerous substrates to hypohalous acids or reactive free radicals. Here we show that neutrophils oxidize melatonin to N(1)-acetyl-N(2)-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AFMK) in a reaction that is catalyzed by myeloperoxidase. Production of AFMK was highly dependent on superoxide but not hydrogen peroxide. It did not require hypochlorous acid, singlet oxygen, or hydroxyl radical. Purified myeloperoxidase and a superoxide-generating system oxidized melatonin to AFMK and a dimer. The dimer would result from coupling of melatonin radicals. Oxidation of melatonin was partially inhibited by catalase or superoxide dismutase. Formation of AFMK was almost completely eliminated by superoxide dismutase but weakly inhibited by catalase. In contrast, production of melatonin dimer was enhanced by superoxide dismutase and blocked by catalase. We propose that myeloperoxidase uses superoxide to oxidize melatonin by two distinct pathways. One pathway involves the classical peroxidation mechanism in which hydrogen peroxide is used to oxidize melatonin to radicals. Superoxide adds to these radicals to form an unstable peroxide that decays to AFMK. In the other pathway, myeloperoxidase uses superoxide to insert dioxygen into melatonin to form AFMK. This novel activity expands the types of oxidative reactions myeloperoxidase can catalyze. It should be relevant to the way neutrophils use superoxide to kill bacteria and how they metabolize xenobiotics. PMID:16148002

  15. Superoxide is an associated signal for apoptosis in axonal injury

    PubMed Central

    Catrinescu, Maria-Magdalena; Kanamori, Noriko; Mears, Katrina A.; Beaubien, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Optic neuropathy is the leading cause of irreversible blindness, and a paradigm for central nervous system axonal disease. The primary event is damage to retinal ganglion cell axons, with subsequent death of the cell body by apoptosis. Trials of neuroprotection for these and other neuronal diseases have mostly failed, primarily because mechanisms of neuroprotection in animals do not necessarily translate to humans. We developed a methodology for imaging an intracellular transduction pathway that signals neuronal death in the living animal. Using longitudinal confocal scanning multilaser ophthalmoscopy, we identified the production of superoxide within retrograde-labelled rat retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve transection. Superoxide was visualized by real-time imaging of its reaction product with intravitreally administered hydroethidine and confirmed by differential spectroscopy of the specific product 2-hydroxyethidium. Retinal ganglion cell superoxide increased within 24 h after axotomy, peaking at 4 days, and was not observed in contralateral untransected eyes. The superoxide signal preceded phosphatidylserine externalization, indicating that superoxide generation was an early event and preceded apoptosis. Intravitreal pegylated superoxide dismutase blocked superoxide generation after axotomy and delayed retinal ganglion cell death. Together, these results are consistent with superoxide being an upstream signal for retinal ganglion cell apoptosis after optic nerve injury. Early detection of axonal injury with superoxide could serve as a predictive biomarker for patients with optic neuropathy. PMID:20495185

  16. A mitochondrial superoxide theory for oxidative stress diseases and aging.

    PubMed

    Indo, Hiroko P; Yen, Hsiu-Chuan; Nakanishi, Ikuo; Matsumoto, Ken-Ichiro; Tamura, Masato; Nagano, Yumiko; Matsui, Hirofumi; Gusev, Oleg; Cornette, Richard; Okuda, Takashi; Minamiyama, Yukiko; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Suenaga, Shigeaki; Oki, Misato; Sato, Tsuyoshi; Ozawa, Toshihiko; Clair, Daret K St; Majima, Hideyuki J

    2015-01-01

    Fridovich identified CuZnSOD in 1969 and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) in 1973, and proposed "the Superoxide Theory," which postulates that superoxide (O2 (•-)) is the origin of most reactive oxygen species (ROS) and that it undergoes a chain reaction in a cell, playing a central role in the ROS producing system. Increased oxidative stress on an organism causes damage to cells, the smallest constituent unit of an organism, which can lead to the onset of a variety of chronic diseases, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other neurological diseases caused by abnormalities in biological defenses or increased intracellular reactive oxygen levels. Oxidative stress also plays a role in aging. Antioxidant systems, including non-enzyme low-molecular-weight antioxidants (such as, vitamins A, C and E, polyphenols, glutathione, and coenzyme Q10) and antioxidant enzymes, fight against oxidants in cells. Superoxide is considered to be a major factor in oxidant toxicity, and mitochondrial MnSOD enzymes constitute an essential defense against superoxide. Mitochondria are the major source of superoxide. The reaction of superoxide generated from mitochondria with nitric oxide is faster than SOD catalyzed reaction, and produces peroxynitrite. Thus, based on research conducted after Fridovich's seminal studies, we now propose a modified superoxide theory; i.e., superoxide is the origin of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) and, as such, causes various redox related diseases and aging. PMID:25834301

  17. A mitochondrial superoxide theory for oxidative stress diseases and aging

    PubMed Central

    Indo, Hiroko P.; Yen, Hsiu-Chuan; Nakanishi, Ikuo; Matsumoto, Ken-ichiro; Tamura, Masato; Nagano, Yumiko; Matsui, Hirofumi; Gusev, Oleg; Cornette, Richard; Okuda, Takashi; Minamiyama, Yukiko; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Suenaga, Shigeaki; Oki, Misato; Sato, Tsuyoshi; Ozawa, Toshihiko; Clair, Daret K. St.; Majima, Hideyuki J.

    2015-01-01

    Fridovich identified CuZnSOD in 1969 and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) in 1973, and proposed ”the Superoxide Theory,” which postulates that superoxide (O2•−) is the origin of most reactive oxygen species (ROS) and that it undergoes a chain reaction in a cell, playing a central role in the ROS producing system. Increased oxidative stress on an organism causes damage to cells, the smallest constituent unit of an organism, which can lead to the onset of a variety of chronic diseases, such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other neurological diseases caused by abnormalities in biological defenses or increased intracellular reactive oxygen levels. Oxidative stress also plays a role in aging. Antioxidant systems, including non-enzyme low-molecular-weight antioxidants (such as, vitamins A, C and E, polyphenols, glutathione, and coenzyme Q10) and antioxidant enzymes, fight against oxidants in cells. Superoxide is considered to be a major factor in oxidant toxicity, and mitochondrial MnSOD enzymes constitute an essential defense against superoxide. Mitochondria are the major source of superoxide. The reaction of superoxide generated from mitochondria with nitric oxide is faster than SOD catalyzed reaction, and produces peroxynitrite. Thus, based on research conducted after Fridovich’s seminal studies, we now propose a modified superoxide theory; i.e., superoxide is the origin of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) and, as such, causes various redox related diseases and aging. PMID:25834301

  18. Diabetic Retinopathy, Superoxide Damage and Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Julia M.; Mohammad, Ghulam; Zhong, Qing; Kowluru, Renu A.

    2011-01-01

    Retinopathy, the leading cause of acquired blindness in young adults, is one of the most feared complications of diabetes, and hyperglycemia is considered as the major trigger for its development. The microvasculature of the retina is constantly bombarded by high glucose, and this insult results in many metabolic, structural and functional changes. Retinal mitochondria become dysfunctional, its DNA is damaged and proteins encoded by its DNA are decreased. The electron transport chain system becomes compromised, further producing superoxide and providing no relief to the retina from a continuous cycle of damage. Although the retina attempts to initiate repair mechanisms by inducing gene expressions of the repair enzymes, their mitochondrial accumulation remains deficient. Understanding the molecular mechanism of mitochondrial damage should help identify therapies to treat/retard this sight threatening complication of diabetes. Our hope is that if the retinal mitochondria are maintained healthy with adjunct therapies, the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy can be inhibited. PMID:20939803

  19. Biomimetic superoxide dismutase stabilized by photopolymerization for superoxide anions biosensing and cell monitoring.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ling; Liu, Suli; Tu, Wenwen; Zhang, Zengsong; Bao, Jianchun; Dai, Zhihui

    2014-05-20

    Photopolymerization strategy, as one of the immobilization methods, has attracted considerable interest because of some advantages, such as easy operation, harmlessness to the biomolecules, and long storage stability. (E)-4-(4-Formylstyryl) pyridine (formylstyrylpyridine) was prepared through Heck reaction and used as a photopolymer material to immobilize biomimetic superoxide dismutase under ultraviolet irradiation (UV) irradiation in a short time. The styrylpyridinium moiety of Formylstyrylpyridine was photoreactive and formed a dimer under UV irradiation. Mn2P2O7 multilayer sheet, a novel superoxide dismutase mimic, was synthesized. The formed photopolymer can immobilize Mn2P2O7 firmly under UV irradiation. On the basis of high catalytic activity of Mn2P2O7 biomimetic enzyme and long-term stability of Mn2P2O7-formylstyrylpyridine film, after introducing multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), a novel electrochemical biosensing platform called MWCNTs/Mn2P2O7-formylstyrylpyridine for superoxide anion (O2(•-)) detection was constructed. The biosensor displayed good performance for O2(•-) detection and provided a reliable platform to adhere living cells directly on the modified electrode surface. Therefore, the biosensor was successfully applied to vitro determination of O2(•-) released from living cells, which had a promising prospect for living cells monitoring and diagnosis of reactive oxygen species-related diseases. PMID:24773067

  20. Manganese Superoxide Dismutase: Guardian of the Powerhouse

    PubMed Central

    Holley, Aaron K.; Bakthavatchalu, Vasudevan; Velez-Roman, Joyce M.; St. Clair, Daret K.

    2011-01-01

    The mitochondrion is vital for many metabolic pathways in the cell, contributing all or important constituent enzymes for diverse functions such as β-oxidation of fatty acids, the urea cycle, the citric acid cycle, and ATP synthesis. The mitochondrion is also a major site of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the cell. Aberrant production of mitochondrial ROS can have dramatic effects on cellular function, in part, due to oxidative modification of key metabolic proteins localized in the mitochondrion. The cell is equipped with myriad antioxidant enzyme systems to combat deleterious ROS production in mitochondria, with the mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) acting as the chief ROS scavenging enzyme in the cell. Factors that affect the expression and/or the activity of MnSOD, resulting in diminished antioxidant capacity of the cell, can have extraordinary consequences on the overall health of the cell by altering mitochondrial metabolic function, leading to the development and progression of numerous diseases. A better understanding of the mechanisms by which MnSOD protects cells from the harmful effects of overproduction of ROS, in particular, the effects of ROS on mitochondrial metabolic enzymes, may contribute to the development of novel treatments for various diseases in which ROS are an important component. PMID:22072939

  1. Manganese Superoxide Dismutase in Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Delira

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States. Considering the quality of life and treatment cost, the best way to fight against cancer is to prevent or suppress cancer development. Cancer is preventable as indicated by human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination and tamoxifen/raloxifen treatment in breast cancer prevention. The activities of superoxide dismutases (SODs) are often lowered during early cancer development, making it a rational candidate for cancer prevention. Recent Advances: SOD liposome and mimetics have been shown to be effective in cancer prevention animal models. They've also passed safety tests during early phase clinical trials. Dietary supplement-based SOD cancer prevention provides another opportunity for antioxidant-based cancer prevention. New mechanistic studies have revealed that SOD inhibits not only oncogenic activity, but also subsequent metabolic shifts during early tumorigenesis. Critical Issues: Lack of sufficient animal model studies targeting specific cancers; and lack of clinical trials and support from pharmaceutical industries also hamper efforts in further advancing SOD-based cancer prevention. Future Directions: To educate and obtain support from our society that cancer is preventable. To combine SOD-based therapeutics with other cancer preventive agents to obtain synergistic effects. To formulate a dietary supplementation-based antioxidant approach for cancer prevention. Lastly, targeting specific populations who are prone to carcinogens, which can trigger oxidative stress as the mechanism of carcinogenesis. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1628–1645. PMID:23706068

  2. Superoxide Ion: Generation and Chemical Implications.

    PubMed

    Hayyan, Maan; Hashim, Mohd Ali; AlNashef, Inas M

    2016-03-01

    Superoxide ion (O2(•-)) is of great significance as a radical species implicated in diverse chemical and biological systems. However, the chemistry knowledge of O2(•-) is rather scarce. In addition, numerous studies on O2(•-) were conducted within the latter half of the 20th century. Therefore, the current advancement in technology and instrumentation will certainly provide better insights into mechanisms and products of O2(•-) reactions and thus will result in new findings. This review emphasizes the state-of-the-art research on O2(•-) so as to enable researchers to venture into future research. It comprises the main characteristics of O2(•-) followed by generation methods. The reaction types of O2(•-) are reviewed, and its potential applications including the destruction of hazardous chemicals, synthesis of organic compounds, and many other applications are highlighted. The O2(•-) environmental chemistry is also discussed. The detection methods of O2(•-) are categorized and elaborated. Special attention is given to the feasibility of using ionic liquids as media for O2(•-), addressing the latest progress of generation and applications. The effect of electrodes on the O2(•-) electrochemical generation is reviewed. Finally, some remarks and future perspectives are concluded. PMID:26875845

  3. Manganese superoxide dismutase: guardian of the powerhouse.

    PubMed

    Holley, Aaron K; Bakthavatchalu, Vasudevan; Velez-Roman, Joyce M; St Clair, Daret K

    2011-01-01

    The mitochondrion is vital for many metabolic pathways in the cell, contributing all or important constituent enzymes for diverse functions such as β-oxidation of fatty acids, the urea cycle, the citric acid cycle, and ATP synthesis. The mitochondrion is also a major site of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the cell. Aberrant production of mitochondrial ROS can have dramatic effects on cellular function, in part, due to oxidative modification of key metabolic proteins localized in the mitochondrion. The cell is equipped with myriad antioxidant enzyme systems to combat deleterious ROS production in mitochondria, with the mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) acting as the chief ROS scavenging enzyme in the cell. Factors that affect the expression and/or the activity of MnSOD, resulting in diminished antioxidant capacity of the cell, can have extraordinary consequences on the overall health of the cell by altering mitochondrial metabolic function, leading to the development and progression of numerous diseases. A better understanding of the mechanisms by which MnSOD protects cells from the harmful effects of overproduction of ROS, in particular, the effects of ROS on mitochondrial metabolic enzymes, may contribute to the development of novel treatments for various diseases in which ROS are an important component. PMID:22072939

  4. Superoxide-mediated protection of Escherichia coli from antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Mosel, Michael; Li, Liping; Drlica, Karl; Zhao, Xilin

    2013-11-01

    Antimicrobial lethality is promoted by reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide, peroxide, and hydroxyl radical. Pretreatment with subinhibitory concentrations of plumbagin or paraquat, metabolic generators of superoxide, paradoxically reduced killing for oxolinic acid, kanamycin, and ampicillin. These pretreatments also reduced an oxolinic acid-mediated ROS surge. Defects in SoxS MarA or AcrB eliminated plumbagin- and paraquat-mediated MIC increases but maintained protection from killing. Thus, superoxide has both protective and detrimental roles in response to antimicrobial stress. PMID:23979754

  5. Superoxide-Mediated Protection of Escherichia coli from Antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Mosel, Michael; Li, Liping; Drlica, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial lethality is promoted by reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide, peroxide, and hydroxyl radical. Pretreatment with subinhibitory concentrations of plumbagin or paraquat, metabolic generators of superoxide, paradoxically reduced killing for oxolinic acid, kanamycin, and ampicillin. These pretreatments also reduced an oxolinic acid-mediated ROS surge. Defects in SoxS MarA or AcrB eliminated plumbagin- and paraquat-mediated MIC increases but maintained protection from killing. Thus, superoxide has both protective and detrimental roles in response to antimicrobial stress. PMID:23979754

  6. Magnetoreception through Cryptochrome May Involve Superoxide

    PubMed Central

    Solov'yov, Ilia A.; Schulten, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Abstract In the last decades, it has been demonstrated that many animal species orient in the Earth magnetic field. One of the best-studied examples is the use of the geomagnetic field by migratory birds for orientation and navigation. However, the biophysical mechanism underlying animal magnetoreception is still not understood. One theory for magnetoreception in birds invokes the so-called radical-pair model. This mechanism involves a pair of reactive radicals, whose chemical fate can be influenced by the orientation with respect to the magnetic field of the Earth through Zeeman and hyperfine interactions. The fact that the geomagnetic field is weak, i.e., ∼0.5 G, puts a severe constraint on the radical pair that can establish the magnetic compass sense. For a noticeable change of the reaction yield in a redirected geomagnetic field, the hyperfine interaction has to be as weak as the Earth field Zeeman interaction, i.e., unusually weak for an organic compound. Such weak hyperfine interaction can be achieved if one of the radicals is completely devoid of this interaction as realized in a radical pair containing an oxygen molecule as one of the radicals. Accordingly, we investigate here a possible radical pair-based reaction in the photoreceptor cryptochrome that reduces the protein's flavin group from its signaling state FADH• to the inactive state FADH– (which reacts to the likewise inactive FAD) by means of the superoxide radical, O2•–. We argue that the spin dynamics in the suggested reaction can act as a geomagnetic compass and that the very low physiological concentration (nM-μM) of otherwise toxic O2•– is sufficient, even favorable, for the biological function. PMID:19527640

  7. Manganese superoxide dismutase: beyond life and death

    PubMed Central

    Holley, Aaron K.; Dhar, Sanjit Kumar; Xu, Yong

    2010-01-01

    Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is a nuclear-encoded antioxidant enzyme that localizes to the mitochondria. Expression of MnSOD is essential for the survival of aerobic life. Transgenic mice expressing a luciferase reporter gene under the control of the human MnSOD promoter demonstrate that the level of MnSOD is reduced prior to the formation of cancer. Overexpression of MnSOD in transgenic mice reduces the incidences and multiplicity of papillomas in a DMBA/TPA skin carcinogenesis model. However, MnSOD deficiency does not lead to enhanced tumorigenicity of skin tissue similarly treated because MnSOD can modulate both the p53-mediated apoptosis and AP-1-mediated cell proliferation pathways. Apoptosis is associated with an increase in mitochondrial levels of p53 suggesting a link between MnSOD deficiency and mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis. Activation of p53 is preventable by application of a SOD mimetic (MnTE-2-PyP5+). Thus, p53 translocation to mitochondria and subsequent inactivation of MnSOD explain the observed mitochondrial dysfunction that leads to transcription-dependent mechanisms of p53-induced apoptosis. Administration of MnTE-2-PyP5+ following apoptosis but prior to proliferation leads to suppression of protein carbonyls and reduces the activity of AP-1 and the level of the proliferating cellular nuclear antigen, without reducing the activity of p53 or DNA fragmentation following TPA treatment. Remarkably, the incidence and multiplicity of skin tumors are drastically reduced in mice that receive MnTE-2-PyP5+ prior to cell proliferation. The results demonstrate the role of MnSOD beyond its essential role for survival and suggest a novel strategy for an antioxidant approach to cancer intervention. PMID:20454814

  8. Magnetoreception through cryptochrome may involve superoxide.

    PubMed

    Solov'yov, Ilia A; Schulten, Klaus

    2009-06-17

    In the last decades, it has been demonstrated that many animal species orient in the Earth magnetic field. One of the best-studied examples is the use of the geomagnetic field by migratory birds for orientation and navigation. However, the biophysical mechanism underlying animal magnetoreception is still not understood. One theory for magnetoreception in birds invokes the so-called radical-pair model. This mechanism involves a pair of reactive radicals, whose chemical fate can be influenced by the orientation with respect to the magnetic field of the Earth through Zeeman and hyperfine interactions. The fact that the geomagnetic field is weak, i.e., approximately 0.5 G, puts a severe constraint on the radical pair that can establish the magnetic compass sense. For a noticeable change of the reaction yield in a redirected geomagnetic field, the hyperfine interaction has to be as weak as the Earth field Zeeman interaction, i.e., unusually weak for an organic compound. Such weak hyperfine interaction can be achieved if one of the radicals is completely devoid of this interaction as realized in a radical pair containing an oxygen molecule as one of the radicals. Accordingly, we investigate here a possible radical pair-based reaction in the photoreceptor cryptochrome that reduces the protein's flavin group from its signaling state FADH* to the inactive state FADH- (which reacts to the likewise inactive FAD) by means of the superoxide radical, O2*-. We argue that the spin dynamics in the suggested reaction can act as a geomagnetic compass and that the very low physiological concentration (nM-microM) of otherwise toxic O2*- is sufficient, even favorable, for the biological function. PMID:19527640

  9. Widespread Production of Extracellular Superoxide by Heterotrophic Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Julia M.; Hansel, Colleen M.; Voelker, Bettina M.; Mendes, Chantal M.; Andeer, Peter F.; Zhang, Tong

    2013-06-01

    Superoxide and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) originate from several natural sources and profoundly influence numerous elemental cycles, including carbon and trace metals. In the deep ocean, the permanent absence of light precludes currently known ROS sources, yet ROS production mysteriously occurs. Here, we show that taxonomically and ecologically diverse heterotrophic bacteria from aquatic and terrestrial environments are a vast, unrecognized, and light-independent source of superoxide, and perhaps other ROS derived from superoxide. Superoxide production by a model bacterium within the ubiquitous Roseobacter clade involves an extracellular oxidoreductase that is stimulated by the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), suggesting a surprising homology with eukaryotic organisms. The consequences of ROS cycling in immense aphotic zones representing key sites of nutrient regeneration and carbon export must now be considered, including potential control of carbon remineralization and metal bioavailability.

  10. Superoxide dismutase protects cultured neurons against death by starvation.

    PubMed Central

    Sáez, J C; Kessler, J A; Bennett, M V; Spray, D C

    1987-01-01

    Brief substrate deprivation resulted in high mortality of superior cervical ganglion neurons in culture, assayed 2 hr later by trypan blue exclusion. Involvement of superoxide anions was indicated by several observations. Survival was increased significantly by prior treatment that induced cells to take up superoxide dismutase. During starvation, neurons reduced nitroblue tetrazolium to form the blue precipitate formazan, and the color change was blocked in neurons preloaded with superoxide dismutase. The incidence of staining was comparable to the mortality. In many cells, brief starvation caused the appearance of fluorescence due to oxidation of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin to dichlorofluorescein, which indicates that oxidants were generated intracellularly. In some cells fluorescence was transient, as would be caused by membrane breakdown, and these cells were then shown to be dead. Superoxide generation caused by substrate deprivation may contribute importantly to cell damage in a variety of pathological conditions. Images PMID:3472251

  11. Suppression of neutrophil superoxide production by conventional peritoneal dialysis solution.

    PubMed

    Ing, B L; Gupta, D K; Nawab, Z M; Zhou, F Q; Rahman, M A; Daugirdas, J T

    1988-09-01

    The pH of conventional peritoneal dialysis solution is normally in the range of 5.0 to 5.5, because acid has been added during the manufacturing process to prevent caramelization of dextrose during sterilization. We studied the effects of normalizing the pH of conventional peritoneal dialysis solution on superoxide production by normal human neutrophils. At a pH of 6.0, superoxide generation was 4.07 +/- 2.56 (SD) nanomoles per million cells. With normalization of pH to 7.4, superoxide production was 19.3 +/- 7.3 (p less than 0.001). The results suggest that the unphysiologic acidity of conventional peritoneal dialysis solution has deleterious consequences on neutrophil superoxide formation. PMID:2847987

  12. Suppressors of superoxide production from mitochondrial complex III

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Adam L.; Vargas, Leonardo; Turk, Carolina N.; Baaten, Janine E.; Matzen, Jason T.; Dardov, Victoria J.; Attle, Stephen J.; Li, Jing; Quackenbush, Douglas C.; Goncalves, Renata L. S.; Perevoshchikova, Irina V.; Petrassi, H. Michael; Meeusen, Shelly L.; Ainscow, Edward K.; Brand, Martin D.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial electron transport drives ATP synthesis but also generates reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are both cellular signals and damaging oxidants. Superoxide production by respiratory complex III is implicated in diverse signaling events and pathologies but its role remains controversial. Using high-throughput screening we identified compounds that selectively eliminate superoxide production by complex III without altering oxidative phosphorylation; they modulate retrograde signaling including cellular responses to hypoxic and oxidative stress. PMID:26368590

  13. Suppressors of superoxide production from mitochondrial complex III.

    PubMed

    Orr, Adam L; Vargas, Leonardo; Turk, Carolina N; Baaten, Janine E; Matzen, Jason T; Dardov, Victoria J; Attle, Stephen J; Li, Jing; Quackenbush, Douglas C; Goncalves, Renata L S; Perevoshchikova, Irina V; Petrassi, H Michael; Meeusen, Shelly L; Ainscow, Edward K; Brand, Martin D

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial electron transport drives ATP synthesis but also generates reactive oxygen species, which are both cellular signals and damaging oxidants. Superoxide production by respiratory complex III is implicated in diverse signaling events and pathologies, but its role remains controversial. Using high-throughput screening, we identified compounds that selectively eliminate superoxide production by complex III without altering oxidative phosphorylation; they modulate retrograde signaling including cellular responses to hypoxic and oxidative stress. PMID:26368590

  14. Clastogenic Factors as Potential Biomarkers of Increased Superoxide Production

    PubMed Central

    Emerit, Ingrid

    2007-01-01

    The formation of clastogenic factors (CF) and their damaging effects are mediated by superoxide, since superoxide dismutase is regularly protective. CF are produced via superoxide and stimulate the production of superoxide by monocytes and neutrophils. This results in a selfsustaining and longlasting process of clastogenesis, which may exceed the DNA repair system and ultimately lead to cancer (Emerit, 1994). An increased cancer risk is indeed observed in conditions accompanied by CF formation. These include irradiated persons, patients with chronic inflammatory diseases, HIV-infected persons and the chromosomal breakage syndromes ataxia telangiectasia, Bloom’s syndrome and Fanconi’s anemia. Biochemical analysis has identified lipid peroxidation products, arachidonic acid metabolites, nucleotides of inosine and cytokines, in particular tumor necrosis factor alpha, as the clastogenic and also superoxide stimulating components of CF. Due to their chromosome damaging effects, these oxidants can be detected with classical cytogenetic techniques. Their synergistic action renders the CF-test particularly sensitive for the detection of a pro-oxidant state. Correlations were observed between CF and other biomarkers of oxidative stress such as decreases in total plasma thiols or increases in TBARS or chemiluminescence. Correlations between CF and disease activity, between CF and radiation exposure, suggest the study of CF for monitoring these conditions. CF may also be useful as biochemical markers and intermediate endpoints for the evaluation of promising antioxidant drugs. CF formation represents a link between chronic inflammation and carcinogenesis. Prophylactic use of superoxide scavengers as anticarcinogens is therefore suggested. PMID:19662223

  15. Efficiency of superoxide anions in the inactivation of selected dehydrogenases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodacka, Aleksandra; Serafin, Eligiusz; Puchala, Mieczyslaw

    2010-09-01

    The most ubiquitous of the primary reactive oxygen species, formed in all aerobes, is the superoxide free radical. It is believed that the superoxide anion radical shows low reactivity and in oxidative stress it is regarded mainly as an initiator of more reactive species such as rad OH and ONOO -. In this paper, the effectiveness of inactivation of selected enzymes by radiation-generated superoxide radicals in comparison with the effectiveness of the other products of water radiolysis is examined. We investigate three enzymes: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). We show that the direct contribution of the superoxide anion radical to GAPDH and ADH inactivation is significant. The effectiveness of the superoxide anion in the inactivation of GAPDH and ADG was only 2.4 and 2.8 times smaller, respectively, in comparison with hydroxyl radical. LDH was practically not inactivated by the superoxide anion. Despite the fact that the studied dehydrogenases belong to the same class of enzymes (oxidoreductases), all have a similar molecular weight and are tetramers, their susceptibility to free-radical damage varies. The differences in the radiosensitivity of the enzymes are not determined by the basic structural parameters analyzed. A significant role in inactivation susceptibility is played by the type of amino acid residues and their localization within enzyme molecules.

  16. Superoxide dismutase during glucose repression of Hansenula polymorpha CBS 4732.

    PubMed

    Hristozova, Tsonka; Rasheva, Tanya; Nedeva, Trayana; Kujumdzieva, Anna

    2002-01-01

    Hansenula polymorpha CBS 4732 was studied during cultivation on methanol and different glucose concentrations. Activities of Cu/Zn and Mn superoxide dismutase, catalase and methanol oxidase were investigated. During cultivation on methanol, increased superoxide dismutase and catalase activities and an induced methanol oxidase were achieved. Transfer of a methanol grown culture to medium with a high glucose concentration caused growth inhibition, low consumption of carbon, nitrogen and phosphate substrates, methanol oxidase inactivation as well as decrease of catalase activity (21.8 +/- 0.61 deltaE240 x min(-1) x mg protein(-1)). At the same time, a high value for superoxide dismutase enzyme was found (42.9 +/- 0.98 U x mg protein(-1), 25% of which was represented by Mn superoxide dismutase and 75% - by the Cu/Zn type). During derepression methanol oxidase was negligible (0.005 +/- 0.0001 U x mg protein(-1)), catalase tended to be the same as in the repressed culture, while superoxide dismutase activity increased considerably (63.67 +/- 1.72 U x mg protein(-1), 69% belonging to the Cu/Zn containing enzyme). Apparently, the cycle of growth inhibition and reactivation of Hansenula polymorpha CBS 4732 cells is strongly connected with the activity of the enzyme superoxide dismutase. PMID:12064733

  17. A flow-system comparison of the reactivities of calcium superoxide and potassium superoxide with carbon dioxide and water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, P. C.; Ballou, E. V.; Spitze, L. A.; Wydeven, T.

    1982-01-01

    A single pass flow system was used to test the reactivity of calcium superoxide with respiratory gases and the performance was compared to that of potassium superoxide. The KO2 system is used by coal miners as a self-contained unit in rescue operations. Particular attention was given to the reactivity with carbon dioxide and water vapor at different temperatures and partial pressures of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor. The calcium superoxide beds were found to absorb CO2 and H2O vapor, releasing O2. The KO2 bed, however, released O2 at twice the rate of CO2 absorption at 37 C. It is concluded that the calcium superoxide material is not a suitable replacement for the KO2 bed, although Ca(O2)2 may be added to the KO2 bed to enhance the CO2 absorption.

  18. Skeletal Muscle Contractions Induce Acute Changes in Cytosolic Superoxide, but Slower Responses in Mitochondrial Superoxide and Cellular Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Timothy; Kabayo, Tabitha; Ng, Rainer; Chamberlain, Jeffrey; McArdle, Anne; Jackson, Malcolm J.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is increased following contractile activity and these species interact with multiple signaling pathways to mediate adaptations to contractions. The sources and time course of the increase in ROS during contractions remain undefined. Confocal microscopy with specific fluorescent probes was used to compare the activities of superoxide in mitochondria and cytosol and the hydrogen peroxide content of the cytosol in isolated single mature skeletal muscle (flexor digitorum brevis) fibers prior to, during, and after electrically stimulated contractions. Superoxide in mitochondria and cytoplasm were assessed using MitoSox red and dihydroethidium (DHE) respectively. The product of superoxide with DHE, 2-hydroxyethidium (2-HE) was acutely increased in the fiber cytosol by contractions, whereas hydroxy-MitoSox showed a slow cumulative increase. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthases increased the contraction-induced formation of hydroxy-MitoSox only with no effect on 2-HE formation. These data indicate that the acute increases in cytosolic superoxide induced by contractions are not derived from mitochondria. Data also indicate that, in muscle mitochondria, nitric oxide (NO) reduces the availability of superoxide, but no effect of NO on cytosolic superoxide availability was detected. To determine the relationship of changes in superoxide to hydrogen peroxide, an alternative specific approach was used where fibers were transduced using an adeno-associated viral vector to express the hydrogen peroxide probe, HyPer within the cytoplasmic compartment. HyPer fluorescence was significantly increased in fibers following contractions, but surprisingly followed a relatively slow time course that did not appear directly related to cytosolic superoxide. These data demonstrate for the first time temporal and site specific differences in specific ROS that occur in skeletal muscle fibers during and after contractile activity. PMID

  19. Superoxide Dismutase and Oxygen Toxicity in a Eukaryote

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Eugene M.; Goscin, Stephen A.; Fridovich, Irwin

    1974-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. ellipsoideus contained 6.5 times more superoxide dismutase and 2.3 times more catalase when grown under 100% O2 than when grown anaerobically. Growth under oxygen caused equal increases in both the cyanide-sensitive and the cyanide-insensitive superoxide dismutases of this organism. Experience with other eukaryotes has shown that cyanide sensitivity is a property of the cupro-zinc superoxide dismutase of the cytosol, whereas cyanide insensitivity is a property of the corresponding mangani-enzyme found in mitochondria. Cu2+, which has been shown to increase the radioresistance of yeast, also caused an increase of both of the superoxide dismutases of S. cerevisiae. Yeast which had been grown under 1 atm of O2 were more resistant toward the lethal effects of 20 atm of O2 than were yeast which had been grown in the absence of O2. Escherichia coli K-12 his− responded to growth under 1 atm of O2 by increasing its content of catalase and of peroxidase, but not of superoxide dismutase. This contrasts with E. coli B, which was previously shown to respond to O2 by a striking increase in superoxide dismutase. E. coli K-12 his− did not gain resistance toward 20 atm of O2 because of having been grown under 1 atm of O2. Once again, this contrasts with the behavior of E. coli B. These data indicate that, in both prokaryotes and in eukaryotes, superoxide dismutase is an important component of the defenses against oxygen toxicity. PMID:4590469

  20. Characterization of superoxide production by isolated pea thylakoids

    SciTech Connect

    Grace, S.; Osmond, B. )

    1991-05-01

    During photosynthesis chloroplasts univalently reduce molecular oxygen to superoxide through autoxidations in the electron transport chain. Cytochrome c reduction was used to assay superoxide production in illuminate pea thylakoids under a variety of conditions. Superoxide dismutase was found to inhibit the reaction by 80%, indicating that cytochrome c reduction is primarily mediated by superoxide. This was further supported by the observation that the highest rates of cytochrome c reduction occurred in the presence of methyl viologen, an autoxidizable redox carrier that accepts electrons from photosystem I. The reaction was fully suppressed by DCMU, demonstrating a requirement for electron transport. In the presence of the plastoquinone antagonist DBMIB the rate of cytochrome c reduction increased substantially. This indicates that under conditions where electron transport to photosystem I is blocked, autoxidation reactions can occur on the reducing side of photosystem II to maintain Q{sub A} in the oxidized state. Superoxide production at sites other than the reducing side of photosystem I may thus represent an important pathway for dissipating excess excitation energy.

  1. Reactions of superoxide with myeloperoxidase and its products.

    PubMed

    Winterbourn, Christine C; Kettle, Anthony J

    2004-10-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) uses hydrogen peroxide to oxidize chloride to hypochlorous acid. It also converts numerous substrates to reactive free radicals. When released by neutrophils, the enzyme operates in the presence of a flux of superoxide. We show that superoxide has a profound influence on oxidative reactions catalysed by MPO. It reacts directly with the enzyme to modulate production of hypochlorous acid. Within neutrophil phagosomes, where MPO functions to kill micro-organisms, it may be the preferred substrate for the enzyme. Superoxide also reacts rapidly with radicals generated by MPO, e.g. from tyrosine and tyrosyl peptides. Initial products are organic peroxides. These species are likely to be toxic and contribute to the pathophysiological actions of MPO. PMID:15507767

  2. The preparation of calcium superoxide from calcium peroxide diperoxyhydrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballou, E. V.; Wood, P. C.; Spitze, L. A.; Wydeven, T.

    1977-01-01

    There is interest in solid materials containing a high percentage of stored oxygen for use in emergency breathing apparatus for miners and as auxiliary oxygen sources for astronauts. In theory, the amount of available oxygen in calcium superoxide, Ca(O2)2 is higher than in potassium superoxide, KO2, and its availability during use should be unhindered by the formation of a low melting and hydrous coating. The decomposition of solid calcium peroxide diperoxyhydrate, CaO2.2H2O2 has been studied, using an apparatus which allows good control of the critical reaction parameters. Samples have been prepared showing apparent superoxide contents in excess of those previously reported and higher than the theoretical 58.4% expected from a disproportionation reaction.

  3. Constraints on superoxide mediated formation of manganese oxides

    PubMed Central

    Learman, Deric R.; Voelker, Bettina M.; Madden, Andrew S.; Hansel, Colleen M.

    2013-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the most reactive sorbents and oxidants within the environment, where they play a central role in the cycling of nutrients, metals, and carbon. Recent discoveries have identified superoxide (O2−) both of biogenic and abiogenic origin as an effective oxidant of Mn(II) leading to the formation of Mn oxides. Here we examined the conditions under which abiotically produced superoxide led to oxidative precipitation of Mn and the solid-phases produced. Oxidized Mn, as both aqueous Mn(III) and Mn(III/IV) oxides, was only observed in the presence of active catalase, indicating that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a product of the reaction of O2− with Mn(II), inhibits the oxidation process presumably through the reduction of Mn(III). Citrate and pyrophosphate increased the yield of oxidized Mn but decreased the amount of Mn oxide produced via formation of Mn(III)-ligand complexes. While complexing ligands played a role in stabilizing Mn(III), they did not eliminate the inhibition of net Mn(III) formation by H2O2. The Mn oxides precipitated were highly disordered colloidal hexagonal birnessite, similar to those produced by biotically generated superoxide. Yet, in contrast to the large particulate Mn oxides formed by biogenic superoxide, abiotic Mn oxides did not ripen to larger, more crystalline phases. This suggests that the deposition of crystalline Mn oxides within the environment requires a biological, or at least organic, influence. This work provides the first direct evidence that, under conditions relevant to natural waters, oxidation of Mn(II) by superoxide can occur and lead to formation of Mn oxides. For organisms that oxidize Mn(II) by producing superoxide, these findings may also point to other microbially mediated processes, in particular enzymatic hydrogen peroxide degradation and/or production of organic ligand metabolites, that allow for Mn oxide formation. PMID:24027565

  4. Theoretical study of the superoxide anion assisted firefly oxyluciferin formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto da Silva, Luís; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C. G.

    2013-12-01

    This a theoretical Letter based on density functional theory, on the role of superoxide anion in firefly chemiluminescence in DMSO. We have found that this anion can attack luciferin radical molecules, thus forming a luciferin-like trianion. This latter molecule transfers an oxygen atom, which results in the formation of oxyluciferyl radical dianion and carbon dioxide molecules. Oxyluciferin is finally formed after an electron transfer from oxyluciferyl radical dianion to tert-BuOrad radical molecules. Thus, we have found evidence that firefly oxyluciferin can be formed in a energetically favorable superoxide anion-assisted reaction, without the need for the formation of firefly dioxetanone.

  5. Chemical and physical differentiation of superoxide dismutases in anaerobes.

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, E M; Dapper, C H

    1980-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase activity in crude or partially purified cell extracts from several species and strains of obligate anaerobe Bacteroides was inhibited instantaneously by NaN3 and was inactivated rapidly upon incubation with H2O2. The extent of NaN3 inhibition varied from 41 to 93%, and the half-life of the enzymatic activity in 5 mM H2O2 ranged from 1.2 to 6.1 min, depending upon the organism tests. When grown in a defined medium containing 59Fe, Bacteroides fragilis (VPI 2393) incorporated radiolabel into a 40,000-molecular-weight NaN3- and H2O2-sensitive superoxide dismutase but did not incorporate 54Mn into that protein under similar growth conditions. The anaerobe Actinomyces naeslundii (VPI 9985) incorporated 54Mn but not 59Fe into a NaN3-insensitive and H2O2-resistant superoxide dismutase. The apparent molecular weight of the superoxide dismutase from this and several other Actinomyces spp. was estimated to be 110,000 to 140,000. Comparison of these data with studies of homogeneous metallosuperoxide dismutases suggests that the Bacteroides spp. studied contain a ferrisuperoxide dismutase, whereas Actinomyces spp. contain a managanisuperoxide dismutase. PMID:7440509

  6. Cu/Zn superoxide dismutases in developing cotton fibers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important signaling molecules in diverse physiological processes. Previously, we discovered superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in extracellular protein preparations from fiber-bearing cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) seeds. We sho...

  7. Superoxide-forming NADPH oxidase preparation of pig polymorphonuclear leucocyte.

    PubMed Central

    Wakeyama, H; Takeshige, K; Takayanagi, R; Minakami, S

    1982-01-01

    A phagocytic vesicle fraction with high NADPH-dependent superoxide-forming activity was obtained in large quantity from pig blood polymorphonuclear leucocytes, phagocytosing oil droplets in the presence of cyanide. The activity of the homogenate of the phagocytosing cells was 40 times that of the resting cells, and 70% of the activity in the homogenate was recovered in the phagocytic vesicle fraction. Essentially all of the superoxide-forming activity was extracted by repeated extraction with a mixture containing deoxycholate and Tween 20. The extract had a superoxide-forming activity of 1 mumol/min per mg of protein with NADPH, and one-fifth of this with NADH, Km values being similar to those of the vesicle fraction (40 microM for NADPH and 400 microM for NADH). A stoichiometric relationship of 1:2 for NADPH oxidation and superoxide formation was obtained, in agreement with the reaction NADPH +2O2 leads to NADP+ + 2O2 -. + H+. The activity of the extract was enhanced 2-fold by the addition of FAD, suggesting that the flavin is a component of the enzyme system. The Km value for FAD was 0.077 microM. The activities in both vesicle fraction and extract were labile even on refrigeration, but could be kept for several months at -70 degrees C. PMID:6293459

  8. Reduction of Renal Superoxide Dismutase in Progressive Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Hiroki; Fujishima, Hiromi; Chida, Shinsuke; Takahashi, Keiko; Qi, Zhonghua; Kanetsuna, Yukiko; Breyer, Matthew D.; Harris, Raymond C.; Yamada, Yuichiro; Takahashi, Takamune

    2009-01-01

    Superoxide excess plays a central role in tissue damage that results from diabetes, but the mechanisms of superoxide overproduction in diabetic nephropathy (DN) are incompletely understood. In the present study, we investigated the enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD), a major defender against superoxide, in the kidneys during the development of murine DN. We assessed SOD activity and the expression of SOD isoforms in the kidneys of two diabetic mouse models (C57BL/6-Akita and KK/Ta-Akita) that exhibit comparable levels of hyperglycemia but different susceptibility to DN. We observed down-regulation of cytosolic CuZn-SOD (SOD1) and extracellular CuZn-SOD (SOD3), but not mitochondrial Mn-SOD (SOD2), in the kidney of KK/Ta-Akita mice which exhibit progressive DN. In contrast, we did not detect a change in renal SOD expression in DN-resistant C57BL/6-Akita mice. Consistent with these findings, there was a significant reduction in total SOD activity in the kidney of KK/Ta-Akita mice compared with C57BL/6-Akita mice. Finally, treatment of KK/Ta-Akita mice with a SOD mimetic, tempol, ameliorated the nephropathic changes in KK/Ta-Akita mice without altering the level of hyperglycemia. Collectively, these results indicate that down-regulation of renal SOD1 and SOD3 may play a key role in the pathogenesis of DN. PMID:19470681

  9. Real time monitoring of superoxide dynamics in vivo through fluorescent proteins using a sensitive fiber probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yu-Chung; Ken, Chuian-Fu; Hsu, Che-Wei; Liu, Ya-Ging

    2014-03-01

    Superoxide anion is the primary oxygen free radical generated in mitochondria that causes intracellular oxidative stress. The lack of a method to directly monitor superoxide concentration in vivo in real time has severely hindered our understanding on its pathophysiology. We made transgenic zebrafish to specifically express fluorescent proteins, which are recently developed as reversible superoxide-specific indicators, in the liver. A fiber-optic fluorescent probe was used to noninvasively monitor superoxide generation in the liver in real time. The fish were placed in microfluidic channels for manipulation and reagents administration. Several superoxide-inducing and scavenging reagents were administrated onto the fish to investigate their effects on superoxide anion balancing. The biochemical dynamics of superoxide due to the application reagents were revealed in the transient behaviors of fluorescence time courses. With the ability to monitor superoxide dynamics in vivo in real time, this method can be used as an in vivo pharmaceutical screening platform.

  10. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of the Megavirus superoxide dismutase

    PubMed Central

    Lartigue, Audrey; Philippe, Nadège; Jeudy, Sandra; Abergel, Chantal

    2012-01-01

    Megavirus chilensis, a close relative of the Mimivirus giant virus, is able to replicate in Acanthamoeba castellanii. The first step of viral infection involves the internalization of the virions in host vacuoles. It has been experimentally demonstrated that Mimivirus particles contain many proteins capable of resisting oxidative stress, as encountered in the phagocytic process. These proteins are conserved in Megavirus, which has an additional gene (Mg277) encoding a putative superoxide dismutase. The Mg277 ORF product was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. A SAD data set was collected to 2.24 Å resolution at the selenium peak wavelength on the BM30 beamline at the ESRF from a single crystal of selenomethionine-substituted recombinant superoxide dismutase protein. PMID:23192047

  11. Pulse radiolysis studies on superoxide reductase from Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed

    Nivière, V; Lombard, M; Fontecave, M; Houée-Levin, C

    2001-05-25

    Superoxide reductases (SORs) are small metalloenzymes, which catalyze reduction of O2*- to H2O2. The reaction of the enzyme from Treponema pallidum with superoxide was studied by pulse radiolysis methods. The first step is an extremely fast bi-molecular reaction of the ferrous center with O2, with a rate constant of 6 x 10 (8) M(-1) s(-1). A first intermediate is formed which is converted to a second one with a slower rate constant of 4800 s(-1). This latter value is 10 times higher than the corresponding one previously reported in the case of SOR from Desulfoarculus baarsii. The reconstituted spectra for the two intermediates are consistent with formation of transient iron-peroxide species. PMID:11377434

  12. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of the Megavirus superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Lartigue, Audrey; Philippe, Nadège; Jeudy, Sandra; Abergel, Chantal

    2012-12-01

    Megavirus chilensis, a close relative of the Mimivirus giant virus, is able to replicate in Acanthamoeba castellanii. The first step of viral infection involves the internalization of the virions in host vacuoles. It has been experimentally demonstrated that Mimivirus particles contain many proteins capable of resisting oxidative stress, as encountered in the phagocytic process. These proteins are conserved in Megavirus, which has an additional gene (Mg277) encoding a putative superoxide dismutase. The Mg277 ORF product was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. A SAD data set was collected to 2.24 Å resolution at the selenium peak wavelength on the BM30 beamline at the ESRF from a single crystal of selenomethionine-substituted recombinant superoxide dismutase protein. PMID:23192047

  13. Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase: Growth Promoter or Tumor Suppressor?

    PubMed Central

    Laukkanen, Mikko O.

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3) gene transfer to tissue damage results in increased healing, increased cell proliferation, decreased apoptosis, and decreased inflammatory cell infiltration. At molecular level, in vivo SOD3 overexpression reduces superoxide anion (O2−) concentration and increases mitogen kinase activation suggesting that SOD3 could have life-supporting characteristics. The hypothesis is further strengthened by the observations showing significantly increased mortality in conditional knockout mice. However, in cancer SOD3 has been shown to either increase or decrease cell proliferation and survival depending on the model system used, indicating that SOD3-derived growth mechanisms are not completely understood. In this paper, the author reviews the main discoveries in SOD3-dependent growth regulation and signal transduction. PMID:27293512

  14. Heterodimeric structure of superoxide dismutase in complex with its metallochaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, A.L.; Torres, A.S.; O'Halloran, T.V.; Rosenzweig, A.C.

    2010-03-08

    The copper chaperone for superoxide dismutase (CCS) activates the eukaryotic antioxidant enzyme copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1). The 2.9 {angstrom} resolution structure of yeast SOD1 complexed with yeast CCS (yCCS) reveals that SOD1 interacts with its metallochaperone to form a complex comprising one monomer of each protein. The heterodimer interface is remarkably similar to the SOD1 and yCCS homodimer interfaces. Striking conformational rearrangements are observed in both the chaperone and target enzyme upon complex formation, and the functionally essential C-terminal domain of yCCS is well positioned to play a key role in the metal ion transfer mechanism. This domain is linked to SOD1 by an intermolecular disulfide bond that may facilitate or regulate copper delivery.

  15. Cupric yersiniabactin is a virulence-associated superoxide dismutase mimic.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Kaveri S; Hung, Chia S; Giblin, Daryl E; Urushidani, Saki; Austin, Anthony M; Dinauer, Mary C; Henderson, Jeffrey P

    2014-02-21

    Many Gram-negative bacteria interact with extracellular metal ions by expressing one or more siderophore types. Among these, the virulence-associated siderophore yersiniabactin (Ybt) is an avid copper chelator, forming stable cupric (Cu(II)-Ybt) complexes that are detectable in infected patients. Here we show that Ybt-expressing E. coli are protected from intracellular killing within copper-replete phagocytic cells. This survival advantage is highly dependent upon the phagocyte respiratory burst, during which superoxide is generated by the NADPH oxidase complex. Chemical fractionation links this phenotype to a previously unappreciated superoxide dismutase (SOD)-like activity of Cu(II)-Ybt. Unlike previously described synthetic copper-salicylate (Cu(II)-SA) SOD mimics, the salicylate-based natural product Cu(II)-Ybt retains catalytic activity at physiologically plausible protein concentrations. These results reveal a new virulence-associated adaptation based upon spontaneous assembly of a non-protein catalyst. PMID:24283977

  16. Cupric Yersiniabactin Is a Virulence-Associated Superoxide Dismutase Mimic

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Many Gram-negative bacteria interact with extracellular metal ions by expressing one or more siderophore types. Among these, the virulence-associated siderophore yersiniabactin (Ybt) is an avid copper chelator, forming stable cupric (Cu(II)-Ybt) complexes that are detectable in infected patients. Here we show that Ybt-expressing E. coli are protected from intracellular killing within copper-replete phagocytic cells. This survival advantage is highly dependent upon the phagocyte respiratory burst, during which superoxide is generated by the NADPH oxidase complex. Chemical fractionation links this phenotype to a previously unappreciated superoxide dismutase (SOD)-like activity of Cu(II)-Ybt. Unlike previously described synthetic copper-salicylate (Cu(II)-SA) SOD mimics, the salicylate-based natural product Cu(II)-Ybt retains catalytic activity at physiologically plausible protein concentrations. These results reveal a new virulence-associated adaptation based upon spontaneous assembly of a non-protein catalyst. PMID:24283977

  17. Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase: Growth Promoter or Tumor Suppressor?

    PubMed

    Laukkanen, Mikko O

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3) gene transfer to tissue damage results in increased healing, increased cell proliferation, decreased apoptosis, and decreased inflammatory cell infiltration. At molecular level, in vivo SOD3 overexpression reduces superoxide anion (O2 (-)) concentration and increases mitogen kinase activation suggesting that SOD3 could have life-supporting characteristics. The hypothesis is further strengthened by the observations showing significantly increased mortality in conditional knockout mice. However, in cancer SOD3 has been shown to either increase or decrease cell proliferation and survival depending on the model system used, indicating that SOD3-derived growth mechanisms are not completely understood. In this paper, the author reviews the main discoveries in SOD3-dependent growth regulation and signal transduction. PMID:27293512

  18. The Superoxide Reductase from the Early Diverging Eukaryote Giardia Intestinalis

    SciTech Connect

    Cabelli, D.E.; Testa, F.; Mastronicola, D.; Bordi, E.; Pucillo, L.P.; Sarti, P.; Saraiva, L.M.; Giuffre, A.; Teixeira, M.

    2011-10-15

    Unlike superoxide dismutases (SODs), superoxidereductases (SORs) eliminate superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup {sm_bullet}-}) not through its dismutation, but via reduction to hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in the presence of an electron donor. The microaerobic protist Giardia intestinalis, responsible for a common intestinal disease in humans, though lacking SOD and other canonical reactive oxygen species-detoxifying systems, is among the very few eukaryotes encoding a SOR yet identified. In this study, the recombinant SOR from Giardia (SOR{sub Gi}) was purified and characterized by pulse radiolysis and stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The protein, isolated in the reduced state, after oxidation by superoxide or hexachloroiridate(IV), yields a resting species (T{sub final}) with Fe{sup 3+} ligated to glutamate or hydroxide depending on pH (apparent pK{sub a} = 8.7). Although showing negligible SOD activity, reduced SOR{sub Gi} reacts with O{sub 2}{sup {sm_bullet}-} with a pH-independent second-order rate constant k{sub 1} = 1.0 x 10{sup 9} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} and yields the ferric-(hydro)peroxo intermediate T{sub 1}; this in turn rapidly decays to the T{sub final} state with pH-dependent rates, without populating other detectable intermediates. Immunoblotting assays show that SOR{sub Gi} is expressed in the disease-causing trophozoite of Giardia. We propose that the superoxide-scavenging activity of SOR in Giardia may promote the survival of this air-sensitive parasite in the fairly aerobic proximal human small intestine during infection.

  19. Faropenem enhances superoxide anion production by human neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Sato, N; Shimizu, H; Tsutiya, T; Takahashi, H; Kakizaki, S; Takayama, H; Takagi, H; Mori, M

    1999-09-01

    Neutrophils are important cellular components in the defence against infections and many studies in vitro have shown that some antibiotics affect neutrophil function. We examined the effect of faropenem, a new oral penem antibiotic on neutrophil killing function by determining the generation of superoxide anion in vitro. The production of superoxide anion was measured by chemiluminescence amplified by a Cypridina luciferin analogue in the presence of N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP). Faropenem significantly enhanced chemiluminescence in a dose-dependent manner. The effect of faropenem was maximal at 5 min of incubation time and continued for at least 30 min. The effect of faropenem was also observed when neutrophils were stimulated by a calcium ionophore (ionomycin), while the effect of faropenem did not change in the presence of 12-O-tetra-decanoylphorbolmyristate acetate. Cytosol Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) monitored with Fura-2 increased in response to fMLP, however, faropenem did not influence the response of [Ca2+]i to fMLP. Our results suggest that faropenem enhanced the generation of superoxide anion by neutrophils, probably at the site where cytosol Ca2+ regulates NADPH oxidase. Faropenem might be potentially advantageous in the treatment of infections because a synergic interaction of antibodies and cytocidal neutrophils is necessary for the early eradication of the pathogenic bacteria. PMID:10511400

  20. SORGOdb: Superoxide Reductase Gene Ontology curated DataBase

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Superoxide reductases (SOR) catalyse the reduction of superoxide anions to hydrogen peroxide and are involved in the oxidative stress defences of anaerobic and facultative anaerobic organisms. Genes encoding SOR were discovered recently and suffer from annotation problems. These genes, named sor, are short and the transfer of annotations from previously characterized neelaredoxin, desulfoferrodoxin, superoxide reductase and rubredoxin oxidase has been heterogeneous. Consequently, many sor remain anonymous or mis-annotated. Description SORGOdb is an exhaustive database of SOR that proposes a new classification based on domain architecture. SORGOdb supplies a simple user-friendly web-based database for retrieving and exploring relevant information about the proposed SOR families. The database can be queried using an organism name, a locus tag or phylogenetic criteria, and also offers sequence similarity searches using BlastP. Genes encoding SOR have been re-annotated in all available genome sequences (prokaryotic and eukaryotic (complete and in draft) genomes, updated in May 2010). Conclusions SORGOdb contains 325 non-redundant and curated SOR, from 274 organisms. It proposes a new classification of SOR into seven different classes and allows biologists to explore and analyze sor in order to establish correlations between the class of SOR and organism phenotypes. SORGOdb is freely available at http://sorgo.genouest.org/index.php. PMID:21575179

  1. Superoxide radical and iron modulate aconitase activity in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Gardner, P R; Raineri, I; Epstein, L B; White, C W

    1995-06-01

    Aconitase is a member of a family of iron-sulfur-containing (de)hydratases whose activities are modulated in bacteria by superoxide radical (O2-.)-mediated inactivation and iron-dependent reactivation. The inactivation-reactivation of aconitase(s) in cultured mammalian cells was explored since these reactions may impact important and diverse aconitase functions in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. Conditions which increase O2-. production including exposure to the redox-cycling agent phenazine methosulfate (PMS), inhibitors of mitochondrial ubiquinol-cytochrome c oxidoreductase, or hyperoxia inactivated aconitase in mammalian cells. Overproduction of mitochondrial Mn-superoxide dismutase protected aconitase from inactivation by PMS or inhibitors of ubiquinol-cytochrome c oxidoreductase, but not from normobaric hyperoxia. Aconitase activity was reactivated (t1/2 of 12 +/- 3 min) upon removal of PMS. The iron chelator deferoxamine impaired reactivation and increased net inactivation of aconitase by O2-.. The ability of ubiquinol-cytochrome c oxidoreductase-generated O2-. to inactivate aconitase in several cell types correlated with the fraction of the aconitase activity localized in mitochondria. Extracellular O2-. generated with xanthine oxidase did not affect aconitase activity nor did exogenous superoxide dismutase decrease aconitase inactivation by PMS. The results demonstrate a dynamic and cyclical O2-.-mediated inactivation and iron-dependent reactivation of the mammalian [4Fe-4S] aconitases under normal and stress conditions and provide further evidence for the membrane compartmentalization of O2-.. PMID:7768942

  2. Mice lacking extracellular superoxide dismutase are more sensitive to hyperoxia.

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, L M; Jonsson, J; Edlund, T; Marklund, S L

    1995-01-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD; superoxide:superoxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.15.1.1) is a secreted Cu- and Zn-containing tetrameric glycoprotein, the bulk of which is bound to heparan sulfate proteoglycans in the interstitium of tissues. To test the function of EC-SOD in vivo, mice carrying a targeted disruption of the EC-SOD gene were generated. The EC-SOD null mutant mice develop normally and remain healthy until at least 14 months of age. No compensatory induction of other SOD isoenzymes or other antioxidant enzymes was observed. When stressed by exposure to > 99% oxygen, the EC-SOD null mutant mice display a considerable reduction in survival time compared to wild-type mice and an earlier onset of severe lung edema. These findings suggest that while under normal physiological conditions other antioxidant systems may substitute for the loss of EC-SOD; when the animal is stressed these systems are unable to provide adequate protection. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7603981

  3. Superoxide generation and cytotactic response of irradiated neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Eastlund, D.T.; Charbonneau, T.T.

    1988-07-01

    Irradiation of blood components has been used to prevent transfusion-related graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in immunocompromised patients. This study was designed to determine the effect of irradiation on neutrophil aggregation, chemotaxis, and superoxide generation. Purified neutrophils were irradiated with a Cesium source at four doses ranging from 0 to 17,500 rads. Formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) and zymosan-treated serum (ZTS) cytotaxin-induced chemotaxis and migration were determined in the agarose assay. Neutrophil aggregation to FMLP was determined by aggregometry. Superoxide generation and random migration were not affected by irradiation at doses up to 17,500 rads. When compared to nonirradiated controls, the chemotactic response to ZTS remained normal, with an insignificant decline from 174 +/- 31.0 to 150 +/- 42.3 (mean +/- SD) units. The chemotactic response to FMLP declined insignificantly, from 228 +/- 31.3 at 0 rad to 207 +/- 26.4 at 17,500 rads. The aggregation response to FMLP remained within the normal range but declined from 0.78 +/- 0.11 to 0.61 +/- 0.18. At the radiation doses currently used to reduce the risk of transfusion-related GVHD, neutrophil superoxide generation and chemotactic response remain essentially normal.

  4. Superoxide dismutase is dispensable for normal animal lifespan.

    PubMed

    Van Raamsdonk, Jeremy Michael; Hekimi, Siegfried

    2012-04-10

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are toxic oxygen-containing molecules that can damage multiple components of the cell and have been proposed to be the primary cause of aging. The antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) is the only eukaryotic enzyme capable of detoxifying superoxide, one type of ROS. The fact that SOD is present in all aerobic organisms raises the question as to whether SOD is absolutely required for animal life and whether the loss of SOD activity will result in decreased lifespan. Here we use the genetic model organism Caenorhabditis elegans to generate an animal that completely lacks SOD activity (sod-12345 worms). We show that sod-12345 worms are viable and exhibit a normal lifespan, despite markedly increased sensitivity to multiple stresses. This is in stark contrast to what is observed in other genetic model organisms where the loss of a single sod gene can result in severely decreased survival. Investigating the mechanism underlying the normal lifespan of sod-12345 worms reveals that their longevity results from a balance between the prosurvival signaling and the toxicity of superoxide. Overall, our results demonstrate that SOD activity is dispensable for normal animal lifespan but is required to survive acute stresses. Moreover, our findings indicate that maintaining normal stress resistance is not crucial to the rate of aging. PMID:22451939

  5. Reactions of superoxide dismutases with HS(-)/H2S and superoxide radical anion: An in vitro EPR study.

    PubMed

    Bolić, Bojana; Mijušković, Ana; Popović-Bijelić, Ana; Nikolić-Kokić, Aleksandra; Spasić, Snežana; Blagojević, Duško; Spasić, Mihajlo B; Spasojević, Ivan

    2015-12-01

    Interactions of hydrogen sulfide (HS(-)/H2S), a reducing signaling species, with superoxide dimutases (SOD) are poorly understood. We applied low-T EPR spectroscopy to examine the effects of HS(-)/H2S and superoxide radical anion O2.- on metallocenters of FeSOD, MnSOD, and CuZnSOD. HS(-)/H2S did not affect FeSOD, whereas active centers of MnSOD and CuZnSOD were open to this agent. Cu(2+) was reduced to Cu(1+), while manganese appears to be released from MnSOD active center. Untreated and O2.- treated FeSOD and MnSOD predominantly show 5 d-electron systems, i.e. Fe(3+) and Mn(2+). Our study provides new details on the mechanisms of (patho)physiological effects of HS(-)/H2S. PMID:26436856

  6. The photoproduction of superoxide radicals and the superoxide dismutase activity of Photosystem II. The possible involvement of cytochrome b559.

    PubMed

    Ananyev, G; Renger, G; Wacker, U; Klimov, V

    1994-08-01

    In the present study the light induced formation of superoxide and intrinsic superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in PS II membrane fragments and D1/D2/Cytb559-complexes from spinach have been analyzed by the use of ferricytochrome c (cyt c(III)) reduction and xanthine/xanthine oxidase as assay systems. The following results were obtained: 1.) Photoreduction of Cyt c (III) by PS II membrane fragments is induced by addition of sodium azide, tetracyane ethylene (TCNE) or carbonylcyanide-p-trifluoromethoxy-phenylhydrazone (FCCP) and after removal of the extrinsic polypeptides by a 1M CaCl2-treatment. This activity which is absent in control samples becomes completely inhibited by the addition of exogenous SOD. 2.) The TCNE induced cyt c(III) photoreduction by PS II membrane fragments was found to be characterized by a half maximal concentration of c1/2=10 μM TCNE. Simultaneously, TCNE inhibits the oxygen evolution rate of PS II membrane fragments with c1/2≈ 3 μM. 3.) The photoproduction of O2 (-) is coupled with H(+)-uptake. This effect is diminished by the addition of the O2 (-)-trap cyt c(III). 4.) D1/D2/Cytb559-complexes and PS II membrane fragments deprived of the extrinsic proteins and manganese exhibit no SOD-activity but are capable of producing O2 (-) in the light if a PS II electron donor is added.Based on these results the site(s) of light induced superoxide formation in PS II is (are) inferred to be located at the acceptor side. A part of the PS II donor side and Cyt b559 in its HP-form are proposed to provide an intrinsic superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. PMID:24310115

  7. Cobalt substitution studies on bovine erythrocyte superoxide dismutase: evidence for a novel cobalt-superoxide dismutase derivative.

    PubMed

    Salvato, B; Beltramini, M; Ricchelli, F; Tallandini, L

    1989-09-14

    Three cobalt derivatives of bovine erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (superoxide:superoxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.15.1.1) have been prepared under different pH conditions using a cobalt-thiocyanate complex which has already proved to yield specific substitutions on other copper proteins. The cobalt-protein derivatives have been characterized by optical, circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopies. One derivative, referred to as Co2Co2-protein, contains Co(II) ions specifically bound at both Zn(II) and Cu(II) sites. On the basis of their spectroscopic properties, the other two derivatives can be referred as E2Co2- and Co2E2-superoxide dismutase, with cobalt substituting, respectively, at the zinc and the copper sites leaving the contiguous site empty (E). The Co2E2-protein complex represents a novel derivative, since it has never been described in literature. The optical spectrum in the visible region of Co2-Co2-protein well corresponds to the sum of the spectra of the other two derivatives. The circular dichroism spectrum of Co2Co2-derivative, however, is not the sum of individual E2Co2- and Co2E2-proteins, suggesting that the presence of Co(II) in one site strongly affects the geometry of the neighbouring site. Some discrepancies between our spectroscopic data and those reported in literature are discussed. The results obtained from fluorescence experiments indicate that Co(II) ions exert a different quenching effect on the tyrosine emission, depending on whether they are located in the Zn(II) or in the Cu(II) site. The fluorescence quenching can be attributed to a 'heavy atom' and 'paramagnetic ion' effect by Co(II) ions. PMID:2790051

  8. Localization of superoxide dismutases in Alzheimer's disease and Down's syndrome neocortex and hippocampus.

    PubMed Central

    Furuta, A.; Price, D. L.; Pardo, C. A.; Troncoso, J. C.; Xu, Z. S.; Taniguchi, N.; Martin, L. J.

    1995-01-01

    Abnormalities in the cellular regulation and expression of antioxidant enzymes may have a role in mechanisms of central nervous system aging and neurodegeneration. We therefore examined, using isozyme-specific antibodies and immunohistochemistry, the localization of copper, zinc-superoxide dismutase and manganese-superoxide dismutase in the frontal and temporal neocortices and hippocampi of aged controls and individuals with Alzheimer's disease or Down's syndrome. Two different antibodies to copper, zinc-superoxide dismutase and one antibody to manganese-superoxide dismutase were evaluated by immunoblotting of homogenates of human brain before use in immunohistochemistry. The copper, zinc-superoxide dismutase antibodies recognized a single band of proteins at 16 kd. The manganese-superoxide dismutase antibody detected a single band of proteins at 25 kd. Immunohistochemically, copper, zinc-superoxide dismutase and manganese-superoxide dismutase immunoreactivities were localized predominantly to neocortical and hippocampal pyramidal neurons and scarcely seen in glial cells in controls. In Alzheimer's disease and Down's syndrome, the distributions and intensities of these two forms of superoxide dismutase immunoreactivities were different as compared with controls. Copper, zinc-superoxide dismutase was enriched in pyramidal neurons undergoing degeneration, whereas manganese-superoxide dismutase was more enriched in reactive astrocytes than in neurons. In senile plaques, copper, zinc-superoxide dismutase-positive globular structures were surrounded by astrocytes highly enriched in manganese-superoxide dismutase. By double label immunohistochemistry, some pyramidal neurons coexpressed superoxide dismutases and tau, and a few copper, zinc-superoxide dismutase-positive structures in senile plaques colocalized with tau. Amyloid cores, diffuse plaques, and microglia scarcely showed colocalization with superoxide dismutase-positive structures. The observed changes in the

  9. Cu,Zn Superoxide Dismutase is a Peroxisomal Enzyme in Human Fibroblast and Hepatoma Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Gilbert-Andre; Warner, Thomas G.; Steimer, Kathelyn S.; Hallewell, Robert A.

    1991-08-01

    The intracellular localization of Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (superoxide:superoxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.15.1.1) has been examined by immunofluorescence using four monoclonal anti-Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase antibodies raised against a recombinant human Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase derivative produced and purified from Escherichia coli. Colocalization with catalase, a peroxisomal matrix enzyme, was used to demonstrate the peroxisomal localization of Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase in human fibroblasts and hepatoma cells. In the fibroblasts of Zellweger syndrome patients, the enzyme is not transported to the peroxisomal ghosts but, like catalase, remains in the cytoplasm. In addition, immunocryoelectron microscopy of yeast cells expressing human Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase showed that the enzyme is translocated to the peroxisomes.

  10. Mechanical overloading causes mitochondrial superoxide and SOD2 imbalance in chondrocytes resulting in cartilage degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Koike, Masato; Nojiri, Hidetoshi; Ozawa, Yusuke; Watanabe, Kenji; Muramatsu, Yuta; Kaneko, Haruka; Morikawa, Daichi; Kobayashi, Keiji; Saita, Yoshitomo; Sasho, Takahisa; Shirasawa, Takuji; Yokote, Koutaro; Kaneko, Kazuo; Shimizu, Takahiko

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical stress and aging are major risk factors of cartilage degeneration. Human studies have previously reported that oxidative damage increased, while SOD2 protein was reciprocally downregulated in osteoarthritic degenerated cartilage. However, it remains unclear whether mitochondrial superoxide imbalance in chondrocytes causes cartilage degeneration. We herein demonstrate that mechanical loading promoted mitochondrial superoxide generation and selective Sod2 downregulation in chondrocytes in vivo and that mitochondrial superoxide inducer also downregulated Sod2 expression in chondrocytes in vitro. A genetically manipulated model revealed that Sod2 deficiency in chondrocytes also resulted in mitochondrial superoxide overproduction and dysfunction, thus leading to cartilage degeneration. Intra-articular injection of a permeable antioxidant effectively suppressed the mechanical loading-induced mitochondrial superoxide generation and cartilage degeneration in mice. Our findings demonstrate that mitochondrial superoxide plays a pivotal role in the development and progression of osteoarthritis, and the mitochondrial superoxide balance may therefore be a promising target for the treatment of cartilage degeneration. PMID:26108578

  11. Mechanical overloading causes mitochondrial superoxide and SOD2 imbalance in chondrocytes resulting in cartilage degeneration.

    PubMed

    Koike, Masato; Nojiri, Hidetoshi; Ozawa, Yusuke; Watanabe, Kenji; Muramatsu, Yuta; Kaneko, Haruka; Morikawa, Daichi; Kobayashi, Keiji; Saita, Yoshitomo; Sasho, Takahisa; Shirasawa, Takuji; Yokote, Koutaro; Kaneko, Kazuo; Shimizu, Takahiko

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical stress and aging are major risk factors of cartilage degeneration. Human studies have previously reported that oxidative damage increased, while SOD2 protein was reciprocally downregulated in osteoarthritic degenerated cartilage. However, it remains unclear whether mitochondrial superoxide imbalance in chondrocytes causes cartilage degeneration. We herein demonstrate that mechanical loading promoted mitochondrial superoxide generation and selective Sod2 downregulation in chondrocytes in vivo and that mitochondrial superoxide inducer also downregulated Sod2 expression in chondrocytes in vitro. A genetically manipulated model revealed that Sod2 deficiency in chondrocytes also resulted in mitochondrial superoxide overproduction and dysfunction, thus leading to cartilage degeneration. Intra-articular injection of a permeable antioxidant effectively suppressed the mechanical loading-induced mitochondrial superoxide generation and cartilage degeneration in mice. Our findings demonstrate that mitochondrial superoxide plays a pivotal role in the development and progression of osteoarthritis, and the mitochondrial superoxide balance may therefore be a promising target for the treatment of cartilage degeneration. PMID:26108578

  12. A lithium-oxygen battery based on lithium superoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jun; Jung Lee, Yun; Luo, Xiangyi; Chun Lau, Kah; Asadi, Mohammad; Wang, Hsien-Hau; Brombosz, Scott; Wen, Jianguo; Zhai, Dengyun; Chen, Zonghai; Miller, Dean J.; Sub Jeong, Yo; Park, Jin-Bum; Zak Fang, Zhigang; Kumar, Bijandra; Salehi-Khojin, Amin; Sun, Yang-Kook; Curtiss, Larry A.; Amine, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Batteries based on sodium superoxide and on potassium superoxide have recently been reported. However, there have been no reports of a battery based on lithium superoxide (LiO2), despite much research into the lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) battery because of its potential high energy density. Several studies of Li-O2 batteries have found evidence of LiO2 being formed as one component of the discharge product along with lithium peroxide (Li2O2). In addition, theoretical calculations have indicated that some forms of LiO2 may have a long lifetime. These studies also suggest that it might be possible to form LiO2 alone for use in a battery. However, solid LiO2 has been difficult to synthesize in pure form because it is thermodynamically unstable with respect to disproportionation, giving Li2O2 (refs 19, 20). Here we show that crystalline LiO2 can be stabilized in a Li-O2 battery by using a suitable graphene-based cathode. Various characterization techniques reveal no evidence for the presence of Li2O2. A novel templating growth mechanism involving the use of iridium nanoparticles on the cathode surface may be responsible for the growth of crystalline LiO2. Our results demonstrate that the LiO2 formed in the Li-O2 battery is stable enough for the battery to be repeatedly charged and discharged with a very low charge potential (about 3.2 volts). We anticipate that this discovery will lead to methods of synthesizing and stabilizing LiO2, which could open the way to high-energy-density batteries based on LiO2 as well as to other possible uses of this compound, such as oxygen storage.

  13. A lithium-oxygen battery based on lithium superoxide.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Lee, Yun Jung; Luo, Xiangyi; Lau, Kah Chun; Asadi, Mohammad; Wang, Hsien-Hau; Brombosz, Scott; Wen, Jianguo; Zhai, Dengyun; Chen, Zonghai; Miller, Dean J; Jeong, Yo Sub; Park, Jin-Bum; Fang, Zhigang Zak; Kumar, Bijandra; Salehi-Khojin, Amin; Sun, Yang-Kook; Curtiss, Larry A; Amine, Khalil

    2016-01-21

    Batteries based on sodium superoxide and on potassium superoxide have recently been reported. However, there have been no reports of a battery based on lithium superoxide (LiO2), despite much research into the lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) battery because of its potential high energy density. Several studies of Li-O2 batteries have found evidence of LiO2 being formed as one component of the discharge product along with lithium peroxide (Li2O2). In addition, theoretical calculations have indicated that some forms of LiO2 may have a long lifetime. These studies also suggest that it might be possible to form LiO2 alone for use in a battery. However, solid LiO2 has been difficult to synthesize in pure form because it is thermodynamically unstable with respect to disproportionation, giving Li2O2 (refs 19, 20). Here we show that crystalline LiO2 can be stabilized in a Li-O2 battery by using a suitable graphene-based cathode. Various characterization techniques reveal no evidence for the presence of Li2O2. A novel templating growth mechanism involving the use of iridium nanoparticles on the cathode surface may be responsible for the growth of crystalline LiO2. Our results demonstrate that the LiO2 formed in the Li-O2 battery is stable enough for the battery to be repeatedly charged and discharged with a very low charge potential (about 3.2 volts). We anticipate that this discovery will lead to methods of synthesizing and stabilizing LiO2, which could open the way to high-energy-density batteries based on LiO2 as well as to other possible uses of this compound, such as oxygen storage. PMID:26751057

  14. Theoretical determination of the alkali-metal superoxide bond energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Harry; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Sodupe, Mariona; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1992-01-01

    The bond dissociation energies for the alkali-metal superoxides have been computed using extensive Gaussian basis sets and treating electron correlation at the modified coupled-pair functional level. Our computed D0 values are 61.4, 37.2, 40.6, and 38.4 kcal/mol for LiO2, NaO2, KO2, and RbO2, respectively. These values, which are expected to be lower bounds and accurate to 2 kcal/mol, agree well with some of the older flame data, but rule out several recent experimental measurements.

  15. Superoxide anion-induced pain and inflammation depends on TNFα/TNFR1 signaling in mice.

    PubMed

    Yamacita-Borin, Fabiane Y; Zarpelon, Ana C; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Fattori, Victor; Alves-Filho, Jose C; Cunha, Fernando Q; Cunha, Thiago M; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2015-09-25

    Inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) and superoxide anion production reduces inflammation and pain. The present study investigated whether superoxide anion-induced pain depends on TNFα signaling and the role of superoxide anion in TNFα-induced hyperalgesia to clarify the interrelation between these two mediators in the context of pain. Intraplantar injection of a superoxide anion donor (potassium superoxide) induced mechanical hyperalgesia (0.5-5h after injection), neutrophil recruitment (myeloperoxidase activity), and overt pain-like behaviors (paw flinching, paw licking, and abdominal writhings) in wild-type mice. Tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 deficiency (TNFR1-/-) and treatment of wild-type mice with etanercept (a soluble TNFR2 receptor that inhibits TNFα actions) inhibited superoxide anion-induced pain-like behaviors. TNFR1(-/-) mice were also protected from superoxide anion donor-induced oxidative stress, suggesting the role of this pathway in the maintenance of oxidative stress. Finally, we demonstrated that Apocynin (an NADPH oxidase inhibitor) or Tempol (a superoxide dismutase mimetic) treatment inhibited TNFα-induced paw mechanical hyperalgesia and neutrophil recruitment (myeloperoxidase activity). These results demonstrate that TNFα/TNFR1 signaling is important in superoxide anion-triggered pain and that TNFα/TNFR1 signaling amplifies the oxidative stress triggered by superoxide anion, which contributes to sustaining pain and inflammation. PMID:26291484

  16. Detoxification of superoxide without production of H2O2: Antioxidant activity of superoxide reductase complexed with ferrocyanide

    PubMed Central

    Molina-Heredia, Fernando P.; Houée-Levin, Chantal; Berthomieu, Catherine; Touati, Danièle; Tremey, Emilie; Favaudon, Vincent; Adam, Virgile; Nivière, Vincent

    2006-01-01

    The superoxide radical O2·̅ is a toxic by-product of oxygen metabolism. Two O2·̅ detoxifying enzymes have been described so far, superoxide dismutase and superoxide reductase (SOR), both forming H2O2 as a reaction product. Recently, the SOR active site, a ferrous iron in a [Fe2+ (N-His)4 (S-Cys)] pentacoordination, was shown to have the ability to form a complex with the organometallic compound ferrocyanide. Here, we have investigated in detail the reactivity of the SOR–ferrocyanide complex with O2·̅ by pulse and γ-ray radiolysis, infrared, and UV-visible spectroscopies. The complex reacts very efficiently with O2·̅. However, the presence of the ferrocyanide adduct markedly modifies the reaction mechanism of SOR, with the formation of transient intermediates different from those observed for SOR alone. A one-electron redox chemistry appears to be carried out by the ferrocyanide moiety of the complex, whereas the SOR iron site remains in the reduced state. Surprisingly, the toxic H2O2 species is no longer the reaction product. Accordingly, in vivoexperiments showed that formation of the SOR–ferrocyanide complex increased the antioxidant capabilities of SOR expressed in an Escherichia coli sodA sodB recA mutant strain. Altogether, these data describe an unprecedented O2·̅ detoxification activity, catalyzed by the SOR–ferrocyanide complex, which does not conduct to the production of the toxic H2O2 species. PMID:17001016

  17. Superoxide generation by the respiratory chain of tumor mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Konstantinov, A A; Peskin, A V; Popova EYu; Khomutov, G B; Ruuge, E K

    1987-10-29

    O2-. generation by the succinate oxidase segment of the respiratory chain of mitochondria and submitochondrial particles from hepatoma 22a and hepatoma Zajdela has been studied with the use of the Tiron method. In the presence of succinate, superoxide generation is induced by antimycin, 2-n-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide or funiculosin, and is inhibited by mucidin, myxothiazol or cyanide. The rate of O2-. generation in the antimycin-inhibited state is maximal at the [succinate]/[fumarate] ratio of 1:10 and diminishes at more positive and more negative redox potentials. These characteristics of O2-.-generation are the same as observed earlier in submitochondrial particles from normal tissues. Accordingly, the mechanism of superoxide production is suggested to be the same in tumor and normal mitochondria, namely, autoxidation of the unstable ubisemiquinone in the ubiquinol-oxidizing centre o of cytochrome bc1 complex. With respect to the rate of O2-. generation, the hepatoma mitochondrial membranes are approximately twice as active as bovine heart submitochondrial particles and exceed those from rat liver by more than one order of magnitude. PMID:2822106

  18. A novel nickel-containing superoxide dismutase from Streptomyces spp.

    PubMed Central

    Youn, H D; Kim, E J; Roe, J H; Hah, Y C; Kang, S O

    1996-01-01

    A novel type of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was purified to apparent homogeneity from the cytosolic fractions of Streptomyces sp. IMSNU-1 and Strep. coelicolor ATCC 10147 respectively. Both enzymes were composed of four identical subunits of 13.4 kDa, were stable at pH 4.0-8.0 and up to 70 degrees C, and were inhibited by cyanide and H2O2 but little inhibited by azide. The atomic absorption analyses revealed that both enzymes contain 0.74 g-atom of nickel per mol of subunit. Both enzymes were different from iron-containing SOD and manganese-containing SOD from Escherichia coli, and copper- and zinc-containing SODs from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and bovine erythrocytes, with respect to amino acid composition, N-terminal amino acid sequence and cross-reactivity against antibody. The absorption spectra of both enzymes were identical, exhibiting maxima at 276 and 378 nm, and a broad peak at 531 nm. The EPR spectra of both enzymes were almost identical with that of NiIII in a tetragonal symmetry of NiIII-oligopeptides especially containing histidine. The apoenzymes, lacking in nickel, had no ability to mediate the conversion of superoxide anion radical to hydrogen peroxide, strongly indicating that NiIII plays a main role in these enzymes. PMID:8836134

  19. Superoxide Dismutase Mimics: Chemistry, Pharmacology, and Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Rebouças, Júlio S.; Spasojević, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Oxidative stress has become widely viewed as an underlying condition in a number of diseases, such as ischemia–reperfusion disorders, central nervous system disorders, cardiovascular conditions, cancer, and diabetes. Thus, natural and synthetic antioxidants have been actively sought. Superoxide dismutase is a first line of defense against oxidative stress under physiological and pathological conditions. Therefore, the development of therapeutics aimed at mimicking superoxide dismutase was a natural maneuver. Metalloporphyrins, as well as Mn cyclic polyamines, Mn salen derivatives and nitroxides were all originally developed as SOD mimics. The same thermodynamic and electrostatic properties that make them potent SOD mimics may allow them to reduce other reactive species such as peroxynitrite, peroxynitrite-derived CO3·−, peroxyl radical, and less efficiently H2O2. By doing so SOD mimics can decrease both primary and secondary oxidative events, the latter arising from the inhibition of cellular transcriptional activity. To better judge the therapeutic potential and the advantage of one over the other type of compound, comparative studies of different classes of drugs in the same cellular and/or animal models are needed. We here provide a comprehensive overview of the chemical properties and some in vivo effects observed with various classes of compounds with a special emphasis on porphyrin-based compounds. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 13, 877–918. PMID:20095865

  20. Molecular characterization of two superoxide dismutases from Hydra vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Bhagirathi; Metz, Richard; Huebner, Henry J.; Porter, Weston; Phillips, Timothy D.

    2007-01-01

    Apparent full-length cDNA sequences coding for manganese superoxide dismutase (HvMnSOD) and extracellular superoxide dismutase (HvEC-SOD) were isolated from Hydra vulgaris in order to understand their expression and 3D structures; and explore their possibility of being used as for biomarkers for environmental stress and toxicity. The deduced HvMnSOD protein consists of 219 amino acids of which first 21 amino acids constitute a presumed mitochondria-targeting signal peptide whereas HvEC-SOD protein consists of 189 amino acids of which first 19 amino acids constitute a presumed signal peptide. Molecular model generated for HvMnSOD displayed the N-terminal long alpha antiparallel hairpin and the C-terminal mixed alpha/beta fold characteristic of MnSODs and that for HvEC-SOD displayed the characteristic CuZnSOD beta-barrel fold. Hydrae subjected to thermal, starvation, metal and oxidative stress responded by regulating MnSOD and EC-SOD mRNA transcription. These results indicated that these genes are involved in the cellular stress response and (anti)oxidative processes triggered by stressor and contaminant exposure. Hence the expression of these SODs in hydra may have potential as molecular biomarkers for assessing stress, toxicity and pro-oxidant quality of chemicals and aquatic environmental quality. PMID:17150313

  1. Physical and chemical stability of different formulations with superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Di Mambro, V M; Campos, P M B G Maia; Fonseca, M J V

    2004-10-01

    Topical formulations with superoxide dismutase (SOD), a scavenger of superoxide radicals, have proved to be effective against some skin diseases. Nevertheless, formulations with proteins are susceptible to both chemical and physical instability. Three different formulations (anionic and non-ionic gel and emulsion) were developed and supplemented with SOD in order to determine the most stable formulation that would maintain SOD activity. Physical stability was evaluated by assessing the rheological behavior of the formulations stored at room temperature, 37 and 45 degrees C. Chemical stability was evaluated by the measurement of enzymatic activity in the formulations stored at room temperature and at 45 degrees C. Formulations showed a flow index less than one, characterizing pseudoplastic behavior. There was no significant difference in initial values of flow index, tixotropy or minimum apparent viscosity. Neither gel showed significant changes in minimum apparent viscosity concerning storage time or temperature, as well, SOD presence and its activity. The emulsion showed decreased viscosity by the 28th day, but no significant changes concerning storage temperature or SOD presence, although it showed a decreased activity. The addition of SOD to the formulations studied did not affect their physical stability but gel formulations seem to be better bases for enzyme addition. PMID:15544058

  2. Superoxide overproduction and kidney fibrosis: a new animal model

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães-Souza, Nadia Karina; Yamaleyeva, Liliya Marsovna; Lu, Baisong; Ramos, Ana Claudia Mallet de Souza; Bishop, Colin Edward; Andersson, Karl Erik

    2015-01-01

    Objective To establish whether the mutation in the Immp2L gene induces renal fibrosis and whether aging exacerbates renal morphology in mice. Methods Female mutant mice with mutation in the inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like protein at 3 and 18 months of age were used. Renal fibrosis was analyzed using classic fibrosis score, Masson’s trichrome staining, and analysis of profibrotic markers using real time polymerase chain reaction (superoxide dismutase 1, metalloproteinase-9, erythropoietin, transforming growth factor beta), and immunostaining (fibroblasts and Type IV collagen). Oxidative stress markers were determined by immunohistochemistry. The number of renal apoptotic cells was determined. Renal function was estimated by serum creatinine. Results Young mutant mice had significantly more glomerulosclerosis than age-matched mice (p=0.034). Mutant mice had more tubular casts (p=0.025), collagen deposition (p=0.019), and collagen type IV expression (p<0.001). Superoxide dismutase 1 expression was significantly higher in young mutants (p=0.038). Old mutants exhibited significantly higher expression of the fibroblast marker and macrophage marker (p=0.007 and p=0.012, respectively). The real time polymerase chain reaction of metalloproteinase-9 and erythropoietin were enhanced 2.5- and 6-fold, respectively, in old mutants. Serum creatinine was significantly higher in old mutants (p<0.001). Conclusion This mutation altered renal architecture by increasing the deposition of extracellular matrix, oxidative stress, and inflammation, suggesting a protective role of Immp2L against renal fibrosis. PMID:25993073

  3. An Enzyme-Based Theory of Obligate Anaerobiosis: The Physiological Function of Superoxide Dismutase

    PubMed Central

    McCord, Joe M.; Keele, Bernard B.; Fridovich, Irwin

    1971-01-01

    The distribution of catalase and superoxide dismutase has been examined in various micro-organisms. Strict anaerobes exhibited no superoxide dismutase and, generally, no catalase activity. All aerobic organisms containing cytochrome systems were found to contain both superoxide dismutase and catalase. Aerotolerant anaerobes, which survive exposure to air and metabolize oxygen to a limited extent but do not contain cytochrome systems, were found to be devoid of catalase activity but did exhibit superoxide dismutase activity. This distribution is consistent with the proposal that the prime physiological function of superoxide dismutase is protection of oxygen-metabolizing organisms against the potentially detrimental effects of the superoxide free radical, a biologically produced intermediate resulting from the univalent reduction of molecular oxygen. PMID:4995818

  4. Superoxide dismutase activity in needles of Norwegian spruce trees (Picea abies L. )

    SciTech Connect

    Polle, A.; Krings, B.; Rennenberg, H. Universitaet zu Koeln )

    1989-08-01

    The activity of superoxide dismutase was investigated in needles of spruce trees. To obtain maximum activity, needles were homogenized in the presence of Triton X-100 and polyvinylpyrrolidone. Superoxide dismutase activity was measured in dialyzed extracts with a modified epinephrine assay at pH 10.2. The extracts contained 70 to 120 units of superoxide dismutase per milligram protein. One unit of superoxide dismutase was completely inhibited in the presence of 20 micromolar NaCN. On native polyacrylamide gels three electromorphs were visualized after staining for activity. All three species were sensitive to CN{sup {minus}} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and were therefore assumed to be Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutases. Superoxide dismutase activity was dependent on the age of the needles and declined by approximately 25% within 3 to 4 years.

  5. Mechanism of Action of Sulforaphane as a Superoxide Radical Anion and Hydrogen Peroxide Scavenger by Double Hydrogen Transfer: A Model for Iron Superoxide Dismutase.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Ajit Kumar; Mishra, P C

    2015-06-25

    The mechanism of action of sulforaphane as a scavenger of superoxide radical anion (O2(•-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was investigated using density functional theory (DFT) in both gas phase and aqueous media. Iron superoxide dismutase (Fe-SOD) involved in scavenging superoxide radical anion from biological media was modeled by a complex consisting of the ferric ion (Fe(3+)) attached to three histidine rings. Reactions related to scavenging of superoxide radical anion by sulforaphane were studied using DFT in the presence and absence of Fe-SOD represented by this model in both gas phase and aqueous media. The scavenging action of sulforaphane toward both superoxide radical anion and hydrogen peroxide was found to involve the unusual mechanism of double hydrogen transfer. It was found that sulforaphane alone, without Fe-SOD, cannot scavenge superoxide radical anion in gas phase or aqueous media efficiently as the corresponding reaction barriers are very high. However, in the presence of Fe-SOD represented by the above-mentioned model, the scavenging reactions become barrierless, and so sulforaphane scavenges superoxide radical anion by converting it to hydrogen peroxide efficiently. Further, sulforaphane was found to scavenge hydrogen peroxide also very efficiently by converting it into water. Thus, the mechanism of action of sulforaphane as an excellent antioxidant has been unravelled. PMID:26020652

  6. Pluronic-modified superoxide dismutase 1 attenuates angiotensin II-induced increase in intracellular superoxide in neurons.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xiang; Zimmerman, Matthew C; Yang, Ruifang; Tong, Jing; Vinogradov, Serguei; Kabanov, Alexander V

    2010-08-15

    Overexpressing superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1; also called Cu/ZnSOD), an intracellular superoxide (O(2)(*-))-scavenging enzyme, in central neurons inhibits angiotensin II (AngII) intraneuronal signaling and normalizes cardiovascular dysfunction in diseases associated with enhanced AngII signaling in the brain, including hypertension and heart failure. However, the blood-brain barrier and neuronal cell membranes impose a tremendous impediment for the delivery of SOD1 to central neurons, which hinders the potential therapeutic impact of SOD1 treatment on these diseases. To address this, we developed conjugates of SOD1 with poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) block copolymer (Pluronic) (SOD1-P85 and SOD1-L81), which retained significant SOD1 enzymatic activity. The modified SOD1 effectively scavenged xanthine oxidase/hypoxanthine-derived O(2)(*-), as determined by HPLC and the measurement of 2-hydroxyethidium. Using catecholaminergic neurons, we observed an increase in neuronal uptake of SOD1-Pluronic after 1, 6, or 24h, compared to neurons treated with pure SOD1 or PEG-SOD1. Importantly, without inducing neuronal toxicity, SOD1-Pluronic conjugates significantly inhibited AngII-induced increases in intraneuronal O(2)(*-) levels. These data indicate that SOD1-Pluronic conjugates penetrate neuronal cell membranes, which results in elevated intracellular levels of functional SOD1. Pluronic conjugation may be a new delivery system for SOD1 into central neurons and therapeutically beneficial for AngII-related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:20493251

  7. Theoretical study of the correlation between superoxide anion consumption and firefly luciferin chemiluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto da Silva, Luís; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C. G.

    2013-07-01

    This is the first theoretical study of the relationship between superoxide anion and firefly chemiluminescence, in DMSO. Electron transfer reactions between luciferin dianionic/carbanionic/radical species and superoxide were studied in order see if an alternative explanation existed for the consumption of the latter species, without correlating it with a role on luciferin chemiluminescence. Despite the finding that luciferin may indeed inhibit the formation of the superoxide anion, no theoretical evidence was found that showed that this molecule is consumed in a non-chemiluminescence reaction. Therefore, it is concluded that the superoxide anion is indeed related to the firefly luciferin chemiluminescence.

  8. Selective superoxide generation within mitochondria by the targeted redox cycler MitoParaquat.

    PubMed

    Robb, Ellen L; Gawel, Justyna M; Aksentijević, Dunja; Cochemé, Helena M; Stewart, Tessa S; Shchepinova, Maria M; Qiang, He; Prime, Tracy A; Bright, Thomas P; James, Andrew M; Shattock, Michael J; Senn, Hans M; Hartley, Richard C; Murphy, Michael P

    2015-12-01

    Superoxide is the proximal reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by the mitochondrial respiratory chain and plays a major role in pathological oxidative stress and redox signaling. While there are tools to detect or decrease mitochondrial superoxide, none can rapidly and specifically increase superoxide production within the mitochondrial matrix. This lack impedes progress, making it challenging to assess accurately the roles of mitochondrial superoxide in cells and in vivo. To address this unmet need, we synthesized and characterized a mitochondria-targeted redox cycler, MitoParaquat (MitoPQ) that comprises a triphenylphosphonium lipophilic cation conjugated to the redox cycler paraquat. MitoPQ accumulates selectively in the mitochondrial matrix driven by the membrane potential. Within the matrix, MitoPQ produces superoxide by redox cycling at the flavin site of complex I, selectively increasing superoxide production within mitochondria. MitoPQ increased mitochondrial superoxide in isolated mitochondria and cells in culture ~a thousand-fold more effectively than untargeted paraquat. MitoPQ was also more toxic than paraquat in the isolated perfused heart and in Drosophila in vivo. MitoPQ enables the selective generation of superoxide within mitochondria and is a useful tool to investigate the many roles of mitochondrial superoxide in pathology and redox signaling in cells and in vivo. PMID:26454075

  9. Superoxide-mediated activation of uncoupling protein 2 causes pancreatic β cell dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, Stefan; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Scorrano, Luca; Dalgaard, Louise T.; St-Pierre, Julie; Grey, Shane T.; Lowell, Bradford B.

    2003-01-01

    Failure to secrete adequate amounts of insulin in response to increasing concentrations of glucose is an important feature of type 2 diabetes. The mechanism for loss of glucose responsiveness is unknown. Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), by virtue of its mitochondrial proton leak activity and consequent negative effect on ATP production, impairs glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Of interest, it has recently been shown that superoxide, when added to isolated mitochondria, activates UCP2-mediated proton leak. Since obesity and chronic hyperglycemia increase mitochondrial superoxide production, as well as UCP2 expression in pancreatic β cells, a superoxide-UCP2 pathway could contribute importantly to obesity- and hyperglycemia-induced β cell dysfunction. This study demonstrates that endogenously produced mitochondrial superoxide activates UCP2-mediated proton leak, thus lowering ATP levels and impairing glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Furthermore, hyperglycemia- and obesity-induced loss of glucose responsiveness is prevented by reduction of mitochondrial superoxide production or gene knockout of UCP2. Importantly, reduction of superoxide has no beneficial effect in the absence of UCP2, and superoxide levels are increased further in the absence of UCP2, demonstrating that the adverse effects of superoxide on β cell glucose sensing are caused by activation of UCP2. Therefore, superoxide-mediated activation of UCP2 could play an important role in the pathogenesis of β cell dysfunction and type 2 diabetes. PMID:14679178

  10. Permeability Transition Pore-Mediated Mitochondrial Superoxide Flashes Regulate Cortical Neural Progenitor Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yan; Mattson, Mark P.; Cheng, Aiwu

    2013-01-01

    In the process of neurogenesis, neural progenitor cells (NPCs) cease dividing and differentiate into postmitotic neurons that grow dendrites and an axon, become excitable, and establish synapses with other neurons. Mitochondrial biogenesis and aerobic metabolism provide energy substrates required to support the differentiation, growth and synaptic activity of neurons. Mitochondria may also serve signaling functions and, in this regard, it was recently reported that mitochondria can generate rapid bursts of superoxide (superoxide flashes), the frequency of which changes in response to environmental conditions and signals including oxygen levels and Ca2+ fluxes. Here we show that the frequency of mitochondrial superoxide flashes increases as embryonic cerebral cortical neurons differentiate from NPCs, and provide evidence that the superoxide flashes serve a signaling function that is critical for the differentiation process. The superoxide flashes are mediated by mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening, and pharmacological inhibition of the mPTP suppresses neuronal differentiation. Moreover, superoxide flashes and neuronal differentiation are inhibited by scavenging of mitochondrial superoxide. Conversely, manipulations that increase superoxide flash frequency accelerate neuronal differentiation. Our findings reveal a regulatory role for mitochondrial superoxide flashes, mediated by mPTP opening, in neuronal differentiation. PMID:24116142

  11. Sources of marine superoxide dismutases: Characteristics and applications.

    PubMed

    Zeinali, Farrokhzad; Homaei, Ahmad; Kamrani, Ehsan

    2015-08-01

    The ability of marine organism to cope with oxidative stress is one of the main factors that influence its survival in the marine environment, when senescence conditions prevail. The antioxidative defense system includes enzymatic and non-enzymatic components. Among the enzymatic system, superoxide dismutases are the first and most important of the antioxidant metalloenzymes. Four different types of metal centers have been detected in SODs, dividing this family into Cu/Zn, Ni, Mn and Fe-SODs. Its use was limited to non-drug applications in humans (include: cosmetic, food, agriculture, and chemical industries) and drug applications in animals. This paper is a review of the recent literatures on sources of marine SODs, the need for SOD and different applications in industry, covering the last decades. The most recent paper, patents and reviews on characterization and application are reviewed. PMID:26047895

  12. Basal superoxide as a sex-specific immune constraint

    PubMed Central

    Tobler, Michael; Healey, Mo; Wilson, Mark; Olsson, Mats

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that reactive oxygen species (ROS), a group of unstable and highly reactive chemical molecules, play a key role in regulating and maintaining life-history trade-offs. Upregulation of ROS in association with immune activation is costly because it may result in an imbalance between pro- and antioxidants and, hence, oxidative damage. Previous research aimed at quantifying this cost has mostly focused on changes in the pro-/antioxidant balance subsequent to an immune response. Here, we test the hypothesis that systemic ROS may constrain immune activation. We show that systemic, pre-challenge superoxide (SO) levels are negatively related to the strength of the subsequent immune response towards the mitogen phytohaemagglutinin in male, but not female painted dragon lizards (Ctenophorus pictus). We therefore suggest that systemic SO constrains immune activation in painted dragon males. We speculate that this may be due to sex-specific selection pressures on immune investment. PMID:21632618

  13. Stability of ALS-related Superoxide Dismutase Protein variants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusebrink, Daniel; Plotkin, Steven

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is a metal binding, homodimeric protein, whose misfolding is implicated in the neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Monomerization is believed to be a key step in the propagation of the disease. The dimer stability is often difficult to measure experimentally however, because it is entangled with protein unfolding and metal loss. We thus computationally investigate the dimer stability of mutants of SOD1 known to be associated with ALS. We report on systematic trends in dimer stability, as well as intriguing allosteric communication between mutations and the dimer interface. We study the dimer stabilities in molecular dynamics simulations and obtain the binding free energies of the dimers from pulling essays. Mutations are applied in silicoand we compare the differences of binding free energies compared to the wild type.

  14. Inhibition of superoxide anion production by extracellular acidification in neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Murata, Naoya; Mogi, Chihiro; Tobo, Masayuki; Nakakura, Takashi; Sato, Koichi; Tomura, Hideaki; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular acidification inhibited formyl-Met-Leu-Phe- or C5a-induced superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) production in differentiated HL-60 neutrophil-like cells and human neutrophils. A cAMP-increasing agonist, prostaglandin E(1), also inhibited the formyl peptide-induced O(2)(-) production. The inhibitory action on the O(2)(-) production by extracellular acidic pH was associated with cAMP accumulation and partly attenuated by H89, a protein kinase A inhibitor. A significant amount of mRNAs for T-cell death-associated gene 8 (TDAG8) and other proton-sensing ovarian cancer G-protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1)-family receptors is expressed in these cells. These results suggest that cAMP/protein kinase A, possibly through proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptors, may be involved in extracellular acidic pH-induced inhibition of O(2)(-) production. PMID:19539899

  15. Basal superoxide as a sex-specific immune constraint.

    PubMed

    Tobler, Michael; Healey, Mo; Wilson, Mark; Olsson, Mats

    2011-12-23

    There is increasing evidence that reactive oxygen species (ROS), a group of unstable and highly reactive chemical molecules, play a key role in regulating and maintaining life-history trade-offs. Upregulation of ROS in association with immune activation is costly because it may result in an imbalance between pro- and antioxidants and, hence, oxidative damage. Previous research aimed at quantifying this cost has mostly focused on changes in the pro-/antioxidant balance subsequent to an immune response. Here, we test the hypothesis that systemic ROS may constrain immune activation. We show that systemic, pre-challenge superoxide (SO) levels are negatively related to the strength of the subsequent immune response towards the mitogen phytohaemagglutinin in male, but not female painted dragon lizards (Ctenophorus pictus). We therefore suggest that systemic SO constrains immune activation in painted dragon males. We speculate that this may be due to sex-specific selection pressures on immune investment. PMID:21632618

  16. Methylglyoxal as a scavenger for superoxide anion-radical.

    PubMed

    Shumaev, K B; Lankin, V Z; Konovalova, G G; Grechnikova, M A; Tikhaze, A K

    2016-07-01

    Methylglyoxal at a concentration of 5 mM caused a significant inhibition of superoxide anion radical (O2 (·-)) comparable to the effect of Tirone. In the process of O2 (·-) generation in the system of egg phosphatidylcholine liposome peroxidation induced by the azo-initiator AIBN, a marked inhibition of chemiluminescence in the presence of 100 mM methylglyoxal was found. At the same time, methylglyoxal did not inhibit free radical peroxidation of low-density lipoprotein particles, which indicates the absence of interaction with methylglyoxal alkoxyl and peroxyl polyenoic lipid radicals. These findings deepen information about the role of methylglyoxal in the regulation of free radical processes. PMID:27599518

  17. Superoxide and the production of oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed Central

    Keyer, K; Gort, A S; Imlay, J A

    1995-01-01

    The conventional model of oxidative DNA damage posits a role for superoxide (O2-) as a reductant for iron, which subsequently generates a hydroxyl radical by transferring the electron to H2O2. The hydroxyl radical then attacks DNA. Indeed, mutants of Escherichia coli that lack superoxide dismutase (SOD) were 10-fold more vulnerable to DNA oxidation by H2O2 than were wild-type cells. Even the pace of DNA damage by endogenous oxidants was great enough that the SOD mutants could not tolerate air if enzymes that repair oxidative DNA lesions were inactive. However, DNA oxidation proceeds in SOD-proficient cells without the involvement of O2-, as evidenced by the failure of SOD overproduction or anaerobiosis to suppress damage by H2O2. Furthermore, the mechanism by which excess O2- causes damage was called into question when the hypersensitivity of SOD mutants to DNA damage persisted for at least 20 min after O2- had been dispelled through the imposition of anaerobiosis. That behavior contradicted the standard model, which requires that O2- be present to rereduce cellular iron during the period of exposure to H2O2. Evidently, DNA oxidation is driven by a reductant other than O2-, which leaves the mechanism of damage promotion by O2- unsettled. One possibility is that, through its well-established ability to leach iron from iron-sulfur clusters, O2- increases the amount of free iron that is available to catalyze hydroxyl radical production. Experiments with iron transport mutants confirmed that increases in free-iron concentration have the effect of accelerating DNA oxidation. Thus, O2- may be genotoxic only in doses that exceed those found in SOD-proficient cells, and in those limited circumstances it may promote DNA damage by increasing the amount of DNA-bound iron. PMID:7592468

  18. Superoxide Dismutase Protects Cells from DNA Damage Induced by Trivalent Methylated Arsenicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) catalyzes the conversion of superoxide to hydrogen peroxide. Heterozygous mice of strain B6; 129S7-Sod1(tm1Leb)/J were obtained from Jackson Laboratories and bred to produce offspring that were heterozygous (+/Sod1(tm1Leb)), homozygous wild-type (+/+), ...

  19. Do Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) and Catalase (CAT) protect Cells from DNA Damage Induced by Active Arsenicals?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) catalyzes the conversion of superoxide to hydrogen peroxide, which can be converted to water and oxygen through the action of catalase. Heterozygous mice of strain B6: 129S7-SodltmlLeb/J were obtained from Jackson Laboratories and bred to produce offspr...

  20. Paving the way for therapeutic prevention of tumor metastasis with agents targeting mitochondrial superoxide

    PubMed Central

    Porporato, Paolo E; Sonveaux, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic dissemination is associated with poor prognosis of cancer patients. While exploring glucose metabolism in metastatic progenitor cells, we recently found that several different dysfunctions that share the ability to induce mitochondrial superoxide production also promote tumor metastasis. Selective targeting of mitochondrial superoxide prevented spontaneous metastasis in mice, opening a new avenue for therapy. PMID:27308448

  1. Superoxide reacts with nitric oxide to nitrate tyrosine at physiological pH via peroxynitrite.

    PubMed

    Reiter, C D; Teng, R J; Beckman, J S

    2000-10-20

    Tyrosine nitration is a widely used marker of peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) produced from the reaction of nitric oxide with superoxide. Pfeiffer and Mayer (Pfeiffer, S., and Mayer, B. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 27280-27285) reported that superoxide produced from hypoxanthine plus xanthine oxidase in combination with nitric oxide produced from spermine NONOate did not nitrate tyrosine at neutral pH. They suggested that nitric oxide and superoxide at neutral pH form a less reactive intermediate distinct from preformed alkaline peroxynitrite that does not nitrate tyrosine. Using a stopped-flow spectrophotometer to rapidly mix potassium superoxide with nitric oxide at pH 7.4, we report that an intermediate spectrally and kinetically identical to preformed alkaline cis-peroxynitrite was formed in 100% yield. Furthermore, this intermediate nitrated tyrosine in the same yield and at the same rate as preformed peroxynitrite. Equivalent concentrations of nitric oxide under aerobic conditions in the absence of superoxide did not produce detectable concentrations of nitrotyrosine. Carbon dioxide increased the efficiency of nitration by nitric oxide plus superoxide to the same extent as peroxynitrite. In experiments using xanthine oxidase as a source of superoxide, tyrosine nitration was substantially inhibited by urate formed from hypoxanthine oxidation, which was sufficient to account for the lack of tyrosine nitration previously reported. We conclude that peroxynitrite formed from the reaction of nitric oxide with superoxide at physiological pH remains an important species responsible for tyrosine nitration in vivo. PMID:10906340

  2. Detection and Imaging of Superoxide in Roots by an Electron Spin Resonance Spin-Probe Method

    PubMed Central

    Warwar, Nasim; Mor, Avishai; Fluhr, Robert; Pandian, Ramasamy P.; Kuppusamy, Periannan; Blank, Aharon

    2011-01-01

    The detection, quantification, and imaging of short-lived reactive oxygen species, such as superoxide, in live biological specimens have always been challenging and controversial. Fluorescence-based methods are nonspecific, and electron spin resonance (ESR) spin-trapping methods require high probe concentrations and lack the capability for sufficient image resolution. In this work, a novel (to our knowledge), sensitive, small ESR imaging resonator was used together with a stable spin probe that specifically reacts with superoxide with a high reaction rate constant. This ESR spin-probe-based methodology was used to examine superoxide generated in a plant root as a result of an apical leaf injury. The results show that the spin probe rapidly permeated the plant's extracellular space. Upon injury of the plant tissue, superoxide was produced and the ESR signal decreased rapidly in the injured parts as well as in the distal part of the root. This is attributed to superoxide production and thus provides a means of quantifying the level of superoxide in the plant. The spin probe's narrow single-line ESR spectrum, together with the sensitive imaging resonator, facilitates the quantitative measurement of superoxide in small biological samples, such as the plant's root, as well as one-dimensional imaging along the length of the root. This type of methodology can be used to resolve many questions involving the production of apoplastic superoxide in plant biology. PMID:21943435

  3. The French Paradox: Determining the Superoxide-Scavenging Capacity of Red Wine and Other Beverages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Barry A.; Hammond, Matthew P.; Stormo, Benjamin M.

    2008-01-01

    Plant-derived phenolic compounds such as those found in red wine, tea, and certain fruit juices may protect against cardiovascular disease by detoxifying (scavenging) superoxide and other unstable reactive oxygen species. We present a laboratory exercise that can be used to assess the superoxide-scavenging capacity of beverages. Among the…

  4. ROLE OF COPPER,ZINC-SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE IN CATALYZING NITROTYROSINE FORMATION IN MURINE LIVER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The solely known function of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is to catalyze the dismutation of superoxide anion into hydrogen peroxide. Our objective was to determine if SOD1 catalyzed murine liver protein nitration induced by acetaminophen (APAP) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Liver and plasma ...

  5. Inhibitory effects of cardols and related compounds on superoxide anion generation by xanthine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Masuoka, Noriyoshi; Nihei, Ken-ichi; Maeta, Ayami; Yamagiwa, Yoshiro; Kubo, Isao

    2015-01-01

    5-Pentadecatrienylresorcinol, isolated from cashew nuts and commonly known as cardol (C₁₅:₃), prevented the generation of superoxide radicals catalysed by xanthine oxidase without the inhibition of uric acid formation. The inhibition kinetics did not follow the Michelis-Menten equation, but instead followed the Hill equation. Cardol (C₁₀:₀) also inhibited superoxide anion generation, but resorcinol and cardol (C₅:₀) did not inhibit superoxide anion generation. The related compounds 3,5-dihydroxyphenyl alkanoates and alkyl 2,4-dihydroxybenzoates, had more than a C9 chain, cooperatively inhibited but alkyl 3,5-dihydroxybenzoates, regardless of their alkyl chain length, did not inhibit the superoxide anion generation. These results suggested that specific inhibitors for superoxide anion generation catalysed by xanthine oxidase consisted of an electron-rich resorcinol group and an alkyl chain having longer than C9 chain. PMID:25053055

  6. Sensitive spectrophotometric method for the determination of superoxide dismutase activity in tissue extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Paoletti, F.; Aldinucci, D.; Mocali, A.; Caparrini, A.

    1986-05-01

    Superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1) has been assayed by a spectrophotometric method based on the inhibition of a superoxide-driven NADH oxidation. The assay consists of a purely chemical reaction sequence which involves EDTA. Mn(II), mercaptoethanol, and molecular oxygen, requiring neither auxiliary enzymes nor sophisticated equipment. The method is very flexible and rapid and is applicable with high sensitivity to the determination of both pure and crude superoxide dismutase preparations. The decrease of the rate of NADH oxidation is a function of enzyme concentration, and saturation levels are attainable. Fifty percent inhibition, corresponding to one unit of the enzyme, is produced by approximately 15 ng of pure superoxide dismutase. Experiments on rat liver cytosol have shown the specificity of the method for superoxide dismutase. Moreover, common cellular components do not interfere with the measurement, except for hemoglobin when present at relatively high concentrations. The assay is performed at physiological pH and is unaffected by catalase.

  7. Bosentan, a mixed endothelin receptor antagonist, inhibits superoxide anion-induced pain and inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Serafim, Karla G G; Navarro, Suelen A; Zarpelon, Ana C; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Fattori, Victor; Cunha, Thiago M; Alves-Filho, Jose C; Cunha, Fernando Q; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2015-11-01

    Bosentan is a mixed endothelin receptor antagonist widely used to treat patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, and the emerging literature suggests bosentan as a potent anti-inflammatory drug. Superoxide anion is produced in large amounts during inflammation, stimulates cytokine production, and thus contributes to inflammation and pain. However, it remains to be determined whether endothelin contributes to the inflammatory response triggered by the superoxide anion. The present study investigated the effects of bosentan in a mouse model of inflammation and pain induced by potassium superoxide, a superoxide anion donor. Male Swiss mice were treated with bosentan (10-100 mg/kg) by oral gavage, 1 h before potassium superoxide injection, and the inflammatory response was evaluated locally and at spinal cord (L4-L6) levels. Bosentan (100 mg/kg) inhibited superoxide anion-induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia, overt pain-like behavior (abdominal writhings, paw flinching, and licking), paw edema, myeloperoxidase activity (neutrophil marker) in the paw skin, and leukocyte recruitment in the peritoneal cavity. Bosentan also inhibited superoxide anion-induced interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) production, while it enhanced IL-10 production in the paw skin and spinal cord. Bosentan inhibited the reduction of antioxidant capacity (reduced glutathione, ferric reducing antioxidant power, and ABTS radical scavenging ability) induced by the superoxide anion. Finally, we demonstrated that intraplantar injection of potassium superoxide induces the mRNA expression of prepro-endothelin-1 in the paw skin and spinal cord. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that superoxide anion-induced inflammation, pain, cytokine production, and oxidative stress depend on endothelin; therefore, these responses are amenable to bosentan treatment. PMID:26246053

  8. The superoxide anion donor, potassium superoxide, induces pain and inflammation in mice through production of reactive oxygen species and cyclooxygenase-2

    PubMed Central

    Maioli, N.A.; Zarpelon, A.C.; Mizokami, S.S.; Calixto-Campos, C.; Guazelli, C.F.S.; Hohmann, M.S.N.; Pinho-Ribeiro, F.A.; Carvalho, T.T.; Manchope, M.F.; Ferraz, C.R.; Casagrande, R.; Verri, W.A.

    2015-01-01

    It is currently accepted that superoxide anion (O2 •−) is an important mediator in pain and inflammation. The role of superoxide anion in pain and inflammation has been mainly determined indirectly by modulating its production and inactivation. Direct evidence using potassium superoxide (KO2), a superoxide anion donor, demonstrated that it induced thermal hyperalgesia, as assessed by the Hargreaves method. However, it remains to be determined whether KO2 is capable of inducing other inflammatory and nociceptive responses attributed to superoxide anion. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the nociceptive and inflammatory effects of KO2. The KO2-induced inflammatory responses evaluated in mice were: mechanical hyperalgesia (electronic version of von Frey filaments), thermal hyperalgesia (hot plate), edema (caliper rule), myeloperoxidase activity (colorimetric assay), overt pain-like behaviors (flinches, time spent licking and writhing score), leukocyte recruitment, oxidative stress, and cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA expression (quantitative PCR). Administration of KO2 induced mechanical hyperalgesia, thermal hyperalgesia, paw edema, leukocyte recruitment, the writhing response, paw flinching, and paw licking in a dose-dependent manner. KO2 also induced time-dependent cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA expression in the paw skin. The nociceptive, inflammatory, and oxidative stress components of KO2-induced responses were responsive to morphine (analgesic opioid), quercetin (antioxidant flavonoid), and/or celecoxib (anti-inflammatory cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor) treatment. In conclusion, the well-established superoxide anion donor KO2 is a valuable tool for studying the mechanisms and pharmacological susceptibilities of superoxide anion-triggered nociceptive and inflammatory responses ranging from mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia to overt pain-like behaviors, edema, and leukocyte recruitment. PMID:25714890

  9. The superoxide anion donor, potassium superoxide, induces pain and inflammation in mice through production of reactive oxygen species and cyclooxygenase-2.

    PubMed

    Maioli, N A; Zarpelon, A C; Mizokami, S S; Calixto-Campos, C; Guazelli, C F S; Hohmann, M S N; Pinho-Ribeiro, F A; Carvalho, T T; Manchope, M F; Ferraz, C R; Casagrande, R; Verri, W A

    2015-04-01

    It is currently accepted that superoxide anion (O2•-) is an important mediator in pain and inflammation. The role of superoxide anion in pain and inflammation has been mainly determined indirectly by modulating its production and inactivation. Direct evidence using potassium superoxide (KO2), a superoxide anion donor, demonstrated that it induced thermal hyperalgesia, as assessed by the Hargreaves method. However, it remains to be determined whether KO2 is capable of inducing other inflammatory and nociceptive responses attributed to superoxide anion. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the nociceptive and inflammatory effects of KO2. The KO2-induced inflammatory responses evaluated in mice were: mechanical hyperalgesia (electronic version of von Frey filaments), thermal hyperalgesia (hot plate), edema (caliper rule), myeloperoxidase activity (colorimetric assay), overt pain-like behaviors (flinches, time spent licking and writhing score), leukocyte recruitment, oxidative stress, and cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA expression (quantitative PCR). Administration of KO2 induced mechanical hyperalgesia, thermal hyperalgesia, paw edema, leukocyte recruitment, the writhing response, paw flinching, and paw licking in a dose-dependent manner. KO2 also induced time-dependent cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA expression in the paw skin. The nociceptive, inflammatory, and oxidative stress components of KO2-induced responses were responsive to morphine (analgesic opioid), quercetin (antioxidant flavonoid), and/or celecoxib (anti-inflammatory cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor) treatment. In conclusion, the well-established superoxide anion donor KO2 is a valuable tool for studying the mechanisms and pharmacological susceptibilities of superoxide anion-triggered nociceptive and inflammatory responses ranging from mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia to overt pain-like behaviors, edema, and leukocyte recruitment. PMID:25714890

  10. Modifications of Superoxide Dismutase (SOD1) in Human Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Kyle C.; Zhou, Li; Jordon, Joshua K.; Huang, Yi; Yu, Yanbao; Redler, Rachel L.; Chen, Xian; Caplow, Michael; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    2009-01-01

    Over 100 mutations in Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) result in familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Dimer dissociation is the first step in SOD1 aggregation, and studies suggest nearly every amino acid residue in SOD1 is dynamically connected to the dimer interface. Post-translational modifications of SOD1 residues might be expected to have similar effects to mutations, but few modifications have been identified. Here we show, using SOD1 isolated from human erythrocytes, that human SOD1 is phosphorylated at threonine 2 and glutathionylated at cysteine 111. A second SOD1 phosphorylation was observed and mapped to either Thr-58 or Ser-59. Cysteine 111 glutathionylation promotes SOD1 monomer formation, a necessary initiating step in SOD1 aggregation, by causing a 2-fold increase in the Kd. This change in the dimer stability is expected to result in a 67% increase in monomer concentration, 315 nm rather than 212 nm at physiological SOD1 concentrations. Because protein glutathionylation is associated with redox regulation, our finding that glutathionylation promotes SOD1 monomer formation supports a model in which increased oxidative stress promotes SOD1 aggregation. PMID:19299510

  11. NADPH Oxidase-Dependent Superoxide Production in Plant Reproductive Tissues.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Quesada, María J; Traverso, José Á; Alché, Juan de Dios

    2016-01-01

    In the life cycle of a flowering plant, the male gametophyte (pollen grain) produced in the anther reaches the stigmatic surface and initiates the pollen-pistil interaction, an important step in plant reproduction, which ultimately leads to the delivery of two sperm cells to the female gametophyte (embryo sac) inside the ovule. The pollen tube undergoes a strictly apical expansion characterized by a high growth rate, whose targeting should be tightly regulated. A continuous exchange of signals therefore takes place between the haploid pollen and diploid tissue of the pistil until fertilization. In compatible interactions, theses processes result in double fertilization to form a zygote (2n) and the triploid endosperm. Among the large number of signaling mechanisms involved, the redox network appears to be particularly important. Respiratory burst oxidase homologs (Rbohs) are superoxide-producing enzymes involved in a broad range of processes in plant physiology. In this study, we review the latest findings on understanding Rboh activity in sexual plant reproduction, with a particular focus on the male gametophyte from the anther development stages to the crowning point of fertilization. Rboh isoforms have been identified in both the male and female gametophyte and have proven to be tightly regulated. Their role at crucial points such as proper growth of pollen tube, self-incompatibility response and eventual fertilization is discussed. PMID:27066025

  12. Amelioration of hepatic reperfusion injury by superoxide dismutase and catalase

    SciTech Connect

    Clemens, M.G.; Burke, F.; Chaudry, I.H.

    1986-03-05

    Oxygen-derived free radicals have been implicated in reperfusion injury in various tissues. The present study determined if enzymatic scavenging of free radicals could improve recovery of hepatic function following ischemia. Livers from fasted rats were perfused with Krebs-HCO/sub 3/ buffer with substrates for gluconeogenesis for 30 min (control) followed by 60 min warm ischemia and 90 min reperfusion. At the beginning and end of ischemia the liver was flushed with buffered Ringer's with superoxide dismutase + catalase (150,000 U/L each)(SOD) or without additions (Untreated). Bile flow and glucose release were monitored during control and reperfusion periods and tissue sampled at the end of the experiment to determine tissue water and electrolytes. Bile flow and gluconeogenesis were markedly depressed after ischemia in both groups. At the end of 90 min reperfusion bile flow in Untreated and SOD were 23 +/- 6 and 46 +/- 8 ..mu..l/15 min (20% and 41% of control respectively, p < .01). Gluconeogenesis recovered to 83 +/- 4% of control in Untreated vs 103 +/- 6% with SOD (p < .05). Tissue water and electrolytes were not different. These results suggest that generation of oxygen-derived free radicals contributes to functional deficits in the liver following ischemia and that these defects can be attenuated by enzymatic scavenging.

  13. A manganese porphyrin superoxide dismutase mimetic enhances tumor radioresponsiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, Benjamin J.; Batinic-Haberle, Ines; Spasojevic, Ivan; Rabbani, Zahid N.; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Dewhirst, Mark W. D.V.M. . E-mail: dewhirst@radonc.duke.edu

    2005-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of the superoxide dismutase mimetic Mn(III) tetrakis(N-ethylpyridinium-2-yl)porphyrin (MnTE-2-PyP{sup 5+}) on tumor radioresponsiveness. Methods and Materials: Various rodent tumor (4T1, R3230, B16) and endothelial (SVEC) cell lines were exposed to MnTE-2-PyP{sup 5+} and assayed for viability and radiosensitivity in vitro. Next, tumors were treated with radiation and MnTE-2-PyP{sup 5+} in vivo, and the effects on tumor growth and vascularity were monitored. Results: In vitro, MnTE-2-PyP{sup 5+} was not significantly cytotoxic. However, at concentrations as low as 2 {mu}mol/L it caused 100% inhibition of secretion by tumor cells of cytokines protective of irradiated endothelial cells. In vivo, combined treatment with radiation and MnTE-2-PyP{sup 5+} achieved synergistic tumor devascularization, reducing vascular density by 78.7% within 72 h of radiotherapy (p < 0.05 vs. radiation or drug alone). Co-treatment of tumors also resulted in synergistic antitumor effects, extending tumor growth delay by 9 days (p < 0.01). Conclusions: These studies support the conclusion that MnTE-2-PyP{sup 5+}, which has been shown to protect normal tissues from radiation injury, can also improve tumor control through augmenting radiation-induced damage to the tumor vasculature.

  14. Superoxide dismutase activity of Cu-bound prion protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodak, Miroslav; Lu, Wenchang; Bernholc, Jerry

    2009-03-01

    Misfolding of the prion protein, PrP, has been linked to a group of neurodegenerative diseases, including the mad cow disease in cattle and the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans. The normal function of PrP is still unknown, but it was found that the PrP can efficiently bind Cu(II) ions. Early experiments suggested that Cu-PrP complex possesses significant superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, but later experiments failed to confirm it and at present this issue remains unresolved. Using a recently developed hybrid DFT/DFT method, which combines Kohn-Sham DFT for the solute and its first solvation shells with orbital-free DFT for the remainder of the solvent, we have investigated SOD activity of PrP. The PrP is capable of incorporating Cu(II) ions in several binding modes and our calculations find that each mode has a different SOD activity. The highest activity found is comparable to those of well-known SOD proteins, suggesting that the conflicting experimental results may be due to different bindings of Cu(II) in those experiments.

  15. Superoxide scavenging activity of pirfenidone-iron complex

    SciTech Connect

    Mitani, Yoshihiro; Sato, Keizo Muramoto, Yosuke; Karakawa, Tomohiro; Kitamado, Masataka; Iwanaga, Tatsuya; Nabeshima, Tetsuji; Maruyama, Kumiko; Nakagawa, Kazuko; Ishida, Kazuhiko; Sasamoto, Kazumi

    2008-07-18

    Pirfenidone (PFD) is focused on a new anti-fibrotic drug, which can minimize lung fibrosis etc. We evaluated the superoxide (O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -}) scavenging activities of PFD and the PFD-iron complex by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, luminol-dependent chemiluminescence assay, and cytochrome c reduction assay. Firstly, we confirmed that the PFD-iron complex was formed by mixing iron chloride with threefold molar PFD, and the complex was stable in distillated water and ethanol. Secondary, the PFD-iron complex reduced the amount of O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -} produced by xanthine oxidase/hypoxanthine without inhibiting the enzyme activity. Thirdly, it also reduced the amount of O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -} released from phorbor ester-stimulated human neutrophils. PFD alone showed few such effects. These results suggest the possibility that the O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -} scavenging effect of the PFD-iron complex contributes to the anti-fibrotic action of PFD used for treating idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  16. NADPH Oxidase-Dependent Superoxide Production in Plant Reproductive Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Quesada, María J.; Traverso, José Á.; Alché, Juan de Dios

    2016-01-01

    In the life cycle of a flowering plant, the male gametophyte (pollen grain) produced in the anther reaches the stigmatic surface and initiates the pollen–pistil interaction, an important step in plant reproduction, which ultimately leads to the delivery of two sperm cells to the female gametophyte (embryo sac) inside the ovule. The pollen tube undergoes a strictly apical expansion characterized by a high growth rate, whose targeting should be tightly regulated. A continuous exchange of signals therefore takes place between the haploid pollen and diploid tissue of the pistil until fertilization. In compatible interactions, theses processes result in double fertilization to form a zygote (2n) and the triploid endosperm. Among the large number of signaling mechanisms involved, the redox network appears to be particularly important. Respiratory burst oxidase homologs (Rbohs) are superoxide-producing enzymes involved in a broad range of processes in plant physiology. In this study, we review the latest findings on understanding Rboh activity in sexual plant reproduction, with a particular focus on the male gametophyte from the anther development stages to the crowning point of fertilization. Rboh isoforms have been identified in both the male and female gametophyte and have proven to be tightly regulated. Their role at crucial points such as proper growth of pollen tube, self-incompatibility response and eventual fertilization is discussed. PMID:27066025

  17. Superoxide Dismutase 1 Nanozyme for Treatment of Eye Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kost, Olga A.; Beznos, Olga V.; Davydova, Nina G.; Manickam, Devika S.; Nikolskaya, Irina I.; Guller, Anna E.; Binevski, Petr V.; Chesnokova, Natalia B.; Shekhter, Anatoly B.; Klyachko, Natalia L.; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    Use of antioxidants to mitigate oxidative stress during ocular inflammatory diseases has shown therapeutic potential. This work examines a nanoscale therapeutic modality for the eye on the base of antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), termed “nanozyme.” The nanozyme is produced by electrostatic coupling of the SOD1 with a cationic block copolymer, poly(L-lysine)-poly(ethyleneglycol), followed by covalent cross-linking of the complexes with 3,3′-dithiobis(sulfosuccinimidylpropionate) sodium salt. The ability of SOD1 nanozyme as well as the native SOD1 to reduce inflammatory processes in the eye was examined in vivo in rabbits with immunogenic uveitis. Results suggested that topical instillations of both enzyme forms demonstrated anti-inflammatory activity; however, the nanozyme was much more effective compared to the free enzyme in decreasing uveitis manifestations. In particular, we noted statistically significant differences in such inflammatory signs in the eye as the intensities of corneal and iris edema, hyperemia of conjunctiva, lens opacity, fibrin clots, and the protein content in aqueous humor. Clinical findings were confirmed by histological data. Thus, SOD1-containing nanozyme is potentially useful therapeutic agent for the treatment of ocular inflammatory disorders. PMID:26697135

  18. Unexpected superoxide dismutase antioxidant activity of ferric chloride in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Foti, Mario C; Ingold, K U

    2003-11-14

    The azobis(isobutyronitrile)-initiated autoxidation of gamma-terpinene in acetonitrile at 50 degrees C yields only p-cymene and hydrogen peroxide (1:1) in a chain reaction carried by the hydroperoxyl radical, HOO. (Foti, M. C.; Ingold, K. U. J. Agric. Food Chem. 2003, 51, 2758-2765). This reaction is retarded by very low (microM) concentrations of FeCl(3) and CuCl(2). The kinetics of the FeCl(3)-inhibited autoxidation are consistent with chain-termination via the following: Fe(3+) + HOO. <==>[Fe(IV)-OOH](3+) and [Fe(IV)-OOH](3+) + HOO. --> Fe(3+) + H2O2 + O2. Thus, FeCl(3) in acetonitrile can be regarded as a very effective (and very simple) superoxide dismutase. The kinetics of the CuCl(2)-inhibited autoxidation indicate that chain transfer occurs and becomes more and more important as the reaction proceeds, i.e., the inhibition is replaced by autocatalysis. These kinetics are consistent withreduction of Cu2+ to Cu+ by HOO. and then the reoxidation of Cu+ to Cu2+ by both HOO.and the H2O2 product. The latter reaction yields HO. radicals which continue the chain. PMID:14604404

  19. Biologically Relevant Mechanism For Catalytic Removal of Superoxide by Simple Manganese Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Barnese K.; Cabelli D.; Gralla, E.B.; Valentine, J.S.

    2012-05-01

    Nonenzymatic manganese was first shown to provide protection against superoxide toxicity in vivo in 1981, but the chemical mechanism responsible for this protection subsequently became controversial due to conflicting reports concerning the ability of Mn to catalyze superoxide disproportionation in vitro. In a recent communication, we reported that low concentrations of a simple Mn phosphate salt under physiologically relevant conditions will indeed catalyze superoxide disproportionation in vitro. We report now that two of the four Mn complexes that are expected to be most abundant in vivo, Mn phosphate and Mn carbonate, can catalyze superoxide disproportionation at physiologically relevant concentrations and pH, whereas Mn pyrophosphate and citrate complexes cannot. Additionally, the chemical mechanisms of these reactions have been studied in detail, and the rates of reactions of the catalytic removal of superoxide by Mn phosphate and carbonate have been modeled. Physiologically relevant concentrations of these compounds were found to be sufficient to mimic an effective concentration of enzymatic superoxide dismutase found in vivo. This mechanism provides a likely explanation as to how Mn combats superoxide stress in cellular systems.

  20. Purification and characterization of Ag,Zn-superoxide dismutase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae exposed to silver.

    PubMed

    Ciriolo, M R; Civitareale, P; Carrì, M T; De Martino, A; Galiazzo, F; Rotilio, G

    1994-10-14

    Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase plays an important role in protecting cells from oxygen toxicity by catalyzing the dismutation of superoxide anion into hydrogen peroxide and oxygen. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase is coregulated with copper-thionein by copper via the transcription factor ACE 1. We demonstrate here that presence of AgNO3 in the culture medium leads to a five times increase of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase mRNA, with a concomitant six times decrease of the enzyme activity. Susceptibility of yeast to silver was apparently inversely related to Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase activity. From silver-treated yeast a Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase with impaired dismutase function was purified and was shown to contain silver, which was located to the copper site. These data suggest that Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase may play an additional direct role in the defense of S. cerevisiae against metal stress by functioning as metal chelator. PMID:7929283

  1. Evidence for the role of superoxide radicals in neutrophil-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Simchowitz, L; Spilberg, I

    1979-01-01

    Human peripheral neutrophils became cytotoxic to chicken red blood cells (CRBC) in the presence of lectins as assessed by release of 51chromium from labelled target cells. Phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (Con A), which caused time-dependent and dose-dependent cytotoxicity over a concentration range of 25--400 microgram/ml, also caused significant generation of superoxide radicals as measured by ferricytochrome C reduction. Pokeweed mitogen, which does not induce cytotoxicity over the same concentration range, was unable to promote superoxide generation by neutrophils. PHA-induced generation of superoxide paralleled and appeared to precede PHA-dependent cytotoxicity. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), which enzymatically destroys superoxide, caused moderate inhibition of PHA-dependent cytotoxicity over the concentration range of 100--500 microgram/ml whereas catalytically inactive enzyme had no effect. Incubation under oxygen-depleted conditions caused a marked decrease in both PHA-induced superoxide generation and cytotoxicity relative to that obtained with neutrophils incubated aerobically. These findings suggest a central role for superoxide radicals in causing target cell damage in this model of neutrophil-mediated cytotoxicity. PMID:223976

  2. Effects of asbestos and silica on superoxide anion production in the guinea pig alveolar macrophage

    SciTech Connect

    Roney, P.L.

    1988-01-01

    This study examined the effect of asbestos and silica on the activation pathway of the guinea pig alveolar macrophage. Activation of macrophages by physiological agents results in stimulation of phospholipase C causing phosphatidyl inositol turnover and intracellular calcium mobilization. Phosphatidyl inositol turnover produces diacylglycerol which activates protein kinase C causing superoxide anion production. Chrysotile stimulated alveolar macrophages to produce superoxide anion. This stimulation proceeded via phospholipase C, since chrysotile stimulated phosphatidyl inositol turnover and intracellular calcium mobilization. The possible involvement of a coupling protein was evaluated by pretreating cells with pertussis toxin. Potential binding sites for chrysotile stimulation were examined using a series of nine lectins. Chrysotile-stimulated superoxide anion production was blocked by pretreatment with lectins which bound to mannose, fucose, or N-acetylgalactosamine. In addition, incubation with the N-acetylglucosamine, but not by lectins which bound to mannose, fucose, or N-acetylgalactosamine. In addition, incubation with the N-acetylglucosamine polymer, chitin, inhibited chrysotile-stimulated superoxide anion production, suggesting that chrysotile stimulated superoxide anion production by binding to N-acetylglucosamine residues. On the other hand, silica did not stimulate superoxide anion production. The effect of silica on agonist stimulation of this pathway was examined using two stimulants of superoxide anion production, N-formyl-nle-leu-phe (FNLP, which stimulates through phospholipase C) and phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate (which directly activates protein kinase C).

  3. Ceruloplasmin copper induces oxidant damage by a redox process utilizing cell-derived superoxide as reductant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Fox, P. L.

    1998-01-01

    Oxidative damage by transition metals bound to proteins may be an important pathogenic mechanism. Ceruloplasmin (Cp) is a Cu-containing plasma protein thought to be involved in oxidative modification of lipoproteins. We have previously shown that Cp increased cell-mediated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation by a process requiring cell-derived superoxide, but the underlying chemical mechanism(s) is (are) unknown. We now show that superoxide reduction of Cp Cu is a critical reaction in cellular LDL oxidation. By bathocuproine disulfonate (BCS) binding and by superoxide utilization, we showed that exogenous superoxide reduces a single Cp Cu atom, the same Cu required for LDL oxidation. The Cu atom remained bound to Cp during the redox cycle. Three avenues of evidence showed that vascular cells reduce Cp Cu by a superoxide-dependent process. The 2-fold higher rate of Cp Cu reduction by smooth muscle cells (SMC) compared to endothelial cells (EC) was consistent with their relative rates of superoxide release. Furthermore, Cp Cu reduction by cells was blocked by Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1). Finally, the level of superoxide produced by EC and SMC was sufficient to cause the amount of Cu reduction observed. An important role of Cp Cu reduction in LDL oxidation was suggested by results showing that SOD1 inhibited Cp Cu reduction and LDL oxidation by SMC with equal potency, while tumor necrosis factor-alpha stimulated both processes. In summary, these results show that superoxide is a critical cellular reductant of divalent transition metals involved in oxidation, and that protein-bound Cu is a substrate for this reaction. The role of these mechanisms in oxidative processes in vivo has yet to be defined.

  4. Mn(II) oxidation by an ascomycete fungus is linked to superoxide production during asexual reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Hansel, Colleen M.; Zeiner, Carolyn A.; Santelli, Cara M.; Webb, Samuel M.

    2012-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the most reactive minerals within the environment, where they control the bioavailability of carbon, nutrients, and numerous metals. Although the ability of microorganisms to oxidize Mn(II) to Mn(III/IV) oxides is scattered throughout the bacterial and fungal domains of life, the mechanism and physiological basis for Mn(II) oxidation remains an enigma. Here, we use a combination of compound-specific chemical assays, microspectroscopy, and electron microscopy to show that a common Ascomycete filamentous fungus, Stilbella aciculosa, oxidizes Mn(II) to Mn oxides by producing extracellular superoxide during cell differentiation. The reactive Mn oxide phase birnessite and the reactive oxygen species superoxide and hydrogen peroxide are colocalized at the base of asexual reproductive structures. Mn oxide formation is not observed in the presence of superoxide scavengers (e.g., Cu) and inhibitors of NADPH oxidases (e.g., diphenylene iodonium chloride), enzymes responsible for superoxide production and cell differentiation in fungi. Considering the recent identification of Mn(II) oxidation by NADH oxidase-based superoxide production by a common marine bacterium (Roseobacter sp.), these results introduce a surprising homology between some prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms in the mechanisms responsible for Mn(II) oxidation, where oxidation appears to be a side reaction of extracellular superoxide production. Given the versatility of superoxide as a redox reactant and the widespread ability of fungi to produce superoxide, this microbial extracellular superoxide production may play a central role in the cycling and bioavailability of metals (e.g., Hg, Fe, Mn) and carbon in natural systems. PMID:22802654

  5. Mn(II) oxidation by an ascomycete fungus is linked to superoxide production during asexual reproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Hansel, C. M.; Zeiner, C. A.; Santelli, C. M.; Webb, S. M.

    2012-07-16

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the most reactive minerals within the environment, where they control the bioavailability of carbon, nutrients, and numerous metals. Although the ability of microorganisms to oxidize Mn(II) to Mn(III/IV) oxides is scattered throughout the bacterial and fungal domains of life, the mechanism and physiological basis for Mn(II) oxidation remains an enigma. Here, we use a combination of compound-specific chemical assays, microspectroscopy, and electron microscopy to show that a common Ascomycete filamentous fungus, Stilbella aciculosa, oxidizes Mn(II) to Mn oxides by producing extracellular superoxide during cell differentiation. The reactive Mn oxide phase birnessite and the reactive oxygen species superoxide and hydrogen peroxide are colocalized at the base of asexual reproductive structures. Mn oxide formation is not observed in the presence of superoxide scavengers (e.g., Cu) and inhibitors of NADPH oxidases (e.g., diphenylene iodonium chloride), enzymes responsible for superoxide production and cell differentiation in fungi. Considering the recent identification of Mn(II) oxidation by NADH oxidase-based superoxide production by a common marine bacterium (Roseobacter sp.), these results introduce a surprising homology between some prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms in the mechanisms responsible for Mn(II) oxidation, where oxidation appears to be a side reaction of extracellular superoxide production. Finally, given the versatility of superoxide as a redox reactant and the widespread ability of fungi to produce superoxide, this microbial extracellular superoxide production may play a central role in the cycling and bioavailability of metals (e.g., Hg, Fe, Mn) and carbon in natural systems.

  6. Overexpression of Superoxide Dismutase Protects Plants from Oxidative Stress (Induction of Ascorbate Peroxidase in Superoxide Dismutase-Overexpressing Plants).

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, A. S.; Webb, R. P.; Holaday, A. S.; Allen, R. D.

    1993-01-01

    Photosynthesis of leaf discs from transgenic tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum) that express a chimeric gene that encodes chloroplast-localized Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD+) was protected from oxidative stress caused by exposure to high light intensity and low temperature. Under the same conditions, leaf discs of plants that did not express the pea SOD isoform (SOD-) had substantially lower photosynthetic rates. Young plants of both genotypes were more sensitive to oxidative stress than mature plants, but SOD+ plants retained higher photosynthetic rates than SOD- plants at all developmental stages tested. Not surprisingly, SOD+ plants had approximately 3-fold higher SOD specific activity than SOD- plants. However, SOD+ plants also exhibited a 3- to 4-fold increase in ascorbate peroxidase (APX) specific activity and had a corresponding increase in levels of APX mRNA. Dehydroascorbate reductase and glutathione reductase specific activities were the same in both SOD+ and SOD- plants. These results indicate that transgenic tobacco plants that overexpress pea Cu/Zn SOD II can compensate for the increased levels of SOD with increased expression of the H2O2-scavenging enzyme APX. Therefore, the enhancement of the active oxygen-scavenging system that leads to increased oxidative stress protection in SOD+ plants could result not only from increased SOD levels but from the combined increases in SOD and APX activity. PMID:12232001

  7. Chaperonin 20 might be an iron chaperone for superoxide dismutase in activating iron superoxide dismutase (FeSOD)

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Wen-Yu; Huang, Chien-Hsun; Jinn, Tsung-Luo

    2013-01-01

    Activation of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutases (CuZnSODs) is aided by Cu incorporation and disulfide isomerization by Cu chaperone of SOD (CCS). As well, an Fe-S cluster scaffold protein, ISU, might alter the incorporation of Fe or Mn into yeast MnSOD (ySOD2), thus leading to active or inactive ySOD2. However, metallochaperones involved in the activation of FeSODs are unknown. Recently, we found that a chloroplastic chaperonin cofactor, CPN20, could mediate FeSOD activity. To investigate whether Fe incorporation in FeSOD is affected by CPN20, we used inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to analyze the ability of CPN20 to bind Fe. CPN20 could bind Fe, and the Fe binding to FeSOD was increased with CPN20 incubation. Thus, CPN20 might be an Fe chaperone for FeSOD activation, a role independent of its well-known co-chaperonin activity. PMID:23299425

  8. Endogenous superoxide-like species and antioxidant activity in ocular tissues detected by luminol luminescence.

    PubMed

    Trevithick, J R; Dzialoszynski, T

    1997-04-01

    A new luminescent method was used to detect the reactive oxygen species in aqueous and vitreous humors and in homogenates of the lens and retina of laboratory rats. Superoxide-like activity per microgram protein increased in all tissues with weight of the rat, a good indicator of animal age. Superoxide dismutase, centrophenoxine, soluble vitamin E (D-alpha-Locopherol (polyethlyene glycol 1000) succinate, and N'-diphenyl-p-phenylenediamine (DPPD) reduced the luminescence. Catalase had no effect. These results are consistent with the detected species being superoxide-like. PMID:9111931

  9. A non-glycosylated extracellular superoxide dismutase variant.

    PubMed Central

    Edlund, A; Edlund, T; Hjalmarsson, K; Marklund, S L; Sandström, J; Strömqvist, M; Tibell, L

    1992-01-01

    The secretory tetrameric extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is the only glycosylated SOD isoenzyme. The importance of the carbohydrate moiety for the properties of the enzyme is unknown. An expression vector defining nonglycosylated EC-SOD (ngEC-SOD) was constructed by mutagenesis of the codon for Asn-89 into a codon for Gln. The vector was transfected into Chinese hamster ovary DXB-11 cells and ngEC-SOD was isolated to 70% purity from the culture media of selected clones. The absence of glycosylation was established by the lack of affinity for various lectins, the absence of staining with the periodic acid-Schiff reagent, the change in mobility and composition of the tryptic peptide containing the mutated glycosylation site, and the reduction in apparent molecular mass upon SDS/PAGE and size-exclusion chromatography. The tetrameric state was retained. The heparin affinity, a fundamental and distinguishing property of EC-SOD, was found to be slightly increased. The enzymic activity was essentially retained. The major difference from native glycosylated enzyme in physical properties was a marked reduction in solubility. Like glycosylated EC-SOD, ngEC-SOD was, after intravenous injection into rabbits, rapidly sequestered by the vessel endothelium, and was promptly released into plasma after injection of heparin. The only difference from glycosylated EC-SOD in this behaviour, was a slightly more rapid elimination of the mutant enzyme from the vasculature. It is concluded that no specific biological role for the EC-SOD carbohydrate moiety could be revealed. Images Fig. 1. PMID:1463450

  10. Superoxide dismutase and oxygen toxicity defenses in the genus Neisseria.

    PubMed Central

    Archibald, F S; Duong, M N

    1986-01-01

    Among aerotolerant cells, Neisseria gonorrhoeae is very unusual because despite its obligately aerobic lifestyle and frequent isolation from purulent exudates containing polymorphonuclear leukocytes vigorously evolving O2- and H2O2, it contains no superoxide dismutase (SOD). Strains (14) of N. gonorrhoeae were compared with each other and with strains of Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria mucosa, and Neisseria subflava under identical growth conditions for their contents of the oxy-protective enzymes catalase, peroxidase, and SOD, as well as respiratory chain proteins and activity. The absence of SOD from N. gonorrhoeae strains was demonstrated under a variety of oxygen-stress conditions. The neisserial species showed very different SOD, catalase, and peroxidase profiles. These profiles correlated well with the tolerance of the species to various intra- and extracellular oxygen insults. The high tolerance of N. gonorrhoeae for extracellular O2- and H2O2 appeared to be due to very high constitutive levels of peroxidase and catalase activity combined with a cell envelope impervious to O2-. Nevertheless, N. gonorrhoeae 19424 was much more sensitive to an intracellular flux of O2- than were the other (SOD-containing) neisserial species. The responses of N. gonorrhoeae and N. meningitidis respiratory and oxy-protective enzymes to growth under high and low oxygen tensions were followed, and a novel response, the apparent repression of the respiratory chain intermediates, respiration, and SOD, peroxidase, and catalase activity, was observed. The gonococcal catalase was partially purified and characterized. The results suggest that the very active terminal oxidase, low pO2 natural habitat, O2-stable catalase, and possibly the high glutathione content of the organism explain its aerobic survival in the absence of SOD. PMID:3943903

  11. Cytosolic superoxide dismutase can provide protection against Fasciola gigantica.

    PubMed

    Jaikua, Wipaphorn; Kueakhai, Pornanan; Chaithirayanon, Kulathida; Tanomrat, Rataya; Wongwairot, Sirima; Riengrojpitak, Suda; Sobhon, Prasert; Changklungmoa, Narin

    2016-10-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SOD), antioxidant metallo-enzymes, are a part of the first line of defense in the trematode parasites which act as the chief scavengers for reactive oxygen species (ROS). A recombinant Fasciola gigantica cytosolic SOD (FgSOD) was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and used for immunizing rabbits to obtain polyclonal antibodies (anti-rFgSOD). This rabbit anti-rFgSOD reacted with the native FgSOD at a molecular weight of 17.5kDa. The FgSOD protein was expressed at high level in parenchyma, caecal epithelium and egg of the parasite. The rFgSOD reacted with antisera from rabbits infected with F. gigantica metacercariae collected at 2, 5, and 7 weeks after infection, and reacted with sera of infected mice. Anti-rFgSOD exhibited cross reactivity with the other parasites' antigens, including Eurytrema pancreaticum, Cotylophoron cotylophorum, Fischoederius cobboldi, Gastrothylax crumenifer, Paramphistomum cervi, and Setaria labiato papillosa. A vaccination was performed in imprinting control region (ICR) mice by subcutaneous injection with 50μg of rFgSOD combined with Freund's adjuvant. At 2 weeks after the second boost, mice were infected with 15 metacercariae by oral route. IgG1 and IgG2a in the immune sera were determined to indicate Th2 and Th1 immune responses. It was found that the parasite burden was reduced by 45%, and both IgG1 and IgG2a levels showed correlation with the numbers of worm recoveries. PMID:27338185

  12. Characterization of the Single Superoxide Dismutase of Staphylococcus xylosus

    PubMed Central

    Barrière, Charlotte; Brückner, Reinhold; Talon, Régine

    2001-01-01

    Staphylococcus xylosus is a facultative anaerobic bacterium used as a starter culture for fermented meat products. In an attempt to analyze the antioxidant capacities of this organism, the superoxide dismutase (SOD) was characterized. S. xylosus contains a single cytoplasmic SOD, which was not inhibited by H2O2. The SOD activity in crude extracts was completely lost upon metal depletion, but it could be recovered by manganese and very weakly by iron. It is therefore suggested that the S. xylosus SOD is a manganese-preferring enzyme. The corresponding gene, sod, was isolated from a genomic library of S. xylosus DNA and complemented the growth defect of an Escherichia coli SOD-deficient mutant. As deduced from the nucleotide sequence, sod encodes a protein of 199 amino acids with a molecular mass of 22.5 kDa. Two transcriptional start sites 25 and 120 bp upstream of the sod start codon were identified. A terminator-like structure downstream of the gene suggested a monocistronic sod mRNA. Regulation of sod expression was studied using fusions of the sod promoters to a genomic promoterless β-galactosidase gene. The sod expression was not affected by manganese and increased slightly with paraquat. It was induced during stationary phase in a complex medium but not in a chemically defined medium. To investigate the physiological role of SOD, a mutant devoid of SOD activity was constructed. Growth experiments showed that sod is not essential for aerobic growth in complex medium. However, in chemically defined medium without leucine, isoleucine, and valine, the sod mutant hardly grew, in contrast to the wild-type strain. In addition, the mutant was sensitive to hyperbaric oxygen and to paraquat. Therefore, sod plays an important role in the protection of S. xylosus from oxidative stress. PMID:11526011

  13. Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase Regulates Cardiac Function and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kliment, Corrine R; Suliman, Hagir B; Tobolewski, Jacob M; Reynolds, Crystal M; Day, Brian J; Zhu, Xiaodong; McTiernan, Charles F; McGaffin, Kenneth R; Piantadosi, Claude A; Oury, Tim D

    2009-01-01

    Aims Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is an antioxidant that protects the heart from ischemia and the lung from inflammation and fibrosis. The role of cardiac EC-SOD under normal conditions and injury remains unclear. Cardiac toxicity, a common side effect of doxorubicin, involves oxidative stress. We hypothesize that EC-SOD is critical for normal cardiac function and protects the heart from oxidant-induced fibrosis and loss of function. Methods C57BL/6 and EC-SOD-null mice were treated with doxorubicin, 15 mg/kg (i.p.). After 15 days, echocardiography was used to assess cardiac function. Left ventricle (LV) tissue was used to assess fibrosis and inflammation by staining, western blot, and hydroxyproline analysis. Results At baseline EC-SOD-null mice have LV wall thinning and increases in LV end diastolic dimensions compared to wild type mice, but have normal cardiac function. After doxorubicin, EC-SOD-null mice have decreases in fractional shortening not apparent in WT mice. Lack of EC-SOD also leads to increases in myocardial apoptosis and significantly more LV fibrosis and inflammatory cell infiltration. Administration of the metalloporphyrin AEOL 10150 abrogates the loss of cardiac function, and potentially fibrosis, associated with doxorubicin treatment in both wild type and EC-SOD KO mice. Conclusions EC-SOD is critical for normal cardiac morphology and protects the heart from oxidant-induced fibrosis, apoptosis and loss of function. The antioxidant metalloporphyrin, AEOL 10150 effectively protects cardiac function from doxorubicin-induced oxidative stress, in vivo. These findings identify targets for the use of antioxidant agents in oxidant-induced cardiac fibrosis. PMID:19695260

  14. A Manganese Superoxide Dismutase (SOD2)-Mediated Adaptive Response

    PubMed Central

    Grdina, David J.; Murley, Jeffrey S.; Miller, Richard C.; Mauceri, Helena J.; Sutton, Harold G.; Thirman, Michael J.; Li, Jian Jian; Woloschak, Gayle E.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.

    2013-01-01

    Very low doses of ionizing radiation, 5 to 100 mGy, can induce adaptive responses characterized by elevation in cell survival and reduction in micronuclei formation. Utilizing these end points, RKO human colon carcinoma and transformed mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEF), wild-type or knockout cells missing TNF receptors 1 and 2 (TNFR1−R2−), and C57BL/6 and TNFR1−R2− knockout mice, we demonstrate that intact TNF signaling is required for induction of elevated manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) activity (P < 0.001) and the subsequent expression of these SOD2-mediated adaptive responses when cells are challenged at a later time with 2 Gy. In contrast, amifostine’s free thiol form WR1065 can directly activate NF-κB giving rise to elevated SOD2 activity 24 h later and induce an adaptive response in both MEF wild-type and TNF signaling defective TNFR1−R2− cells. Transfection of cells with SOD2 siRNA completely abolishes both the elevation in SOD2 activity and expression of the adaptive responses. These results were confirmed in vivo using a micronucleus assay in splenocytes derived from C57BL/6 and TNFR1−R2− knockout mice that were exposed to 100 mGy or 400 mg/kg amifostine 24 h prior to exposure to a 2 Gy whole-body dose. A dose of 100 mGy also conferred enhanced protection to C57BL/6 mice exposed 24 h later to 100 mg/kg of N-Ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU). While very low radiation doses require an intact TNF signaling process to induce a SOD2-mediated adaptive response, amifostine can induce a similar adaptive response in both TNF receptor competent and knockout cells, respectively. PMID:23237540

  15. Cryo-Trapping the Distorted Octahedral Reaction Intermediate of Manganese Superoxide Dismutase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borgstahl, Gloria; Snell, Edward H.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase protects organisms from potentially damaging oxygen radicals by catalyzing the disproportion of superoxide to oxygen and hydrogen peroxide. We report the use of cryogenic temperatures to kinetically trap the 6th ligand bound to the active site of manganese superoxide dismutase. Using cryocrystallography and synchrotron radiation, we describe at 1.55A resolution the six-coordinate, distorted octahedral geometry assumed by the active site during catalysis and compare it to the room temperature, five-coordinate trigonal-bipyramidal active site. Gateway residues Tyr34, His30 and a tightly bound water molecule are implicated in closing off the active site and blocking the escape route of superoxide during dismutation.

  16. Chloramphenicol Mediates Superoxide Production in Photosystem II and Enhances Its Photodamage in Isolated Membrane Particles

    PubMed Central

    Rehman, Ateeq Ur; Kodru, Sandeesha; Vass, Imre

    2016-01-01

    Chloramphenicol (CAP) is an inhibitor of protein synthesis, which is frequently used to decouple photodamage and protein synthesis dependent repair of Photosystem II during the process of photoinhibition. It has been reported earlier that CAP is able to mediate superoxide production by transferring electrons from the acceptor side of Photosystem I to oxygen. Here we investigated the interaction of CAP with Photosystem II electron transport processes by oxygen uptake and variable chlorophyll fluorescence measurements. Our data show that CAP can accept electrons at the acceptor side of Photosystem II, most likely from Pheophytin, and deliver them to molecular oxygen leading to superoxide production. In addition, the presence of CAP enhances photodamage of Photosystem II electron transport in isolated membrane particles, which effect is reversible by superoxide dismutase. It is concluded that CAP acts as electron acceptor in Photosystem II and mediates its superoxide dependent photodamage. This effect has potential implications for the application of CAP in photoinhibitory studies in intact systems. PMID:27092170

  17. Structures of two superoxide dismutases from Bacillus anthracis reveal a novel active centre

    SciTech Connect

    Boucher, Ian W.; Kalliomaa, Anne K.; Levdikov, Vladimir M.; Blagova, Elena V.; Fogg, Mark J.; Brannigan, James A. Wilson, Keith S.; Wilkinson, Anthony J.

    2005-07-01

    The crystal structures of two manganese superoxide dismutases from B. anthracis were solved by X-ray crystallography using molecular replacement. The BA4499 and BA5696 genes of Bacillus anthracis encode proteins homologous to manganese superoxide dismutase, suggesting that this organism has an expanded repertoire of antioxidant proteins. Differences in metal specificity and quaternary structure between the dismutases of prokaryotes and higher eukaryotes may be exploited in the development of therapeutic antibacterial compounds. Here, the crystal structure of two Mn superoxide dismutases from B. anthracis solved to high resolution are reported. Comparison of their structures reveals that a highly conserved residue near the active centre is substituted in one of the proteins and that this is a characteristic feature of superoxide dismutases from the B. cereus/B. anthracis/B. thuringiensis group of organisms.

  18. A genetic system involving superoxide causes F1 necrosis in wheat (T. aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Khanna-Chopra, R; Dalal, M; Kumar, G P; Laloraya, M

    1998-07-30

    A genetic system in wheat is described in which F1 produced by crossing a drought tolerant cultivar C306 and high yielding cultivar WL711 exhibits leaf necrosis leading to the death of the plant. The mechanism underlying hybrid necrosis is not yet known. The hybrid exhibited a higher level of superoxide anion compared to the healthy leaves of parents at similar developmental stages. This increase in superoxide generation preceded necrotic lesion formation and displayed a gradient from the leaf tip to base. The leaf tip where necrotic lesions make their first appearance exhibited a higher level of superoxide compared to the base. Superoxide anion thus appears to play a vital role in necrosis of leaves in F1 hybrid. This genetic system can be a model system for understanding cell death in higher plants. PMID:9703992

  19. Molecular cloning and expression patterns of copper/zinc superoxide dismutase and manganese superoxide dismutase in Musca domestica.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ting; Huang, Da-Wei; Zhou, Chuan-Qi; Li, Xiang; Xie, Qi-Jing; Liu, Feng-Song

    2012-09-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are metalloenzymes that represent one important line of defense against reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this paper, two novel SOD genes, MdSOD1 and MdSOD2, which putatively encode 261 and 214 amino acid residues respectively were identified and characterized from the housefly Musca domestica. The high similarity of MdSOD1 and MdSOD2 with SODs from other organisms indicated that they should be two new members of the SOD family. qPCR exhibited a universal expression of MdSOD1 and MdSOD2 detected in various tissues of housefly larva, including the fat body, gut, hemocyte and epidermis. Expression profiling reveals that MdSOD1 and MdSOD2 can be induced significantly via not only heat shock and cadmium (Cd) stress but also Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus challenge. The two genes were cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pET-28a to obtain the fusion proteins rMdSOD1 and rMdSOD2. Between them, the activity of rMdSOD2 was found by visual assay methods. ESI-LC-MS/MS analysis showed that three peptide fragments of the protein rMdSOD2 were identical to the corresponding sequence of M. domestica MdSOD2. MdSOD1 and MdSOD2 in housefly larvae were abrogated by feeding bacteria expressing dsRNA. High mortalities were observed in the larvae treated with dsRNA of SODs at heat shock, Cd stress and bacterial invasion. This phenomenon indicated that MdSOD1 and MdSOD2 are related to the survival of M. domestica under stress. This may provide new insights into the role of the two SOD genes in protecting M. domestica against both stress and bacterial invasion. PMID:22750315

  20. Superoxide enhances Ca2+ entry through L-type channels in the renal afferent arteriole.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Paul A; Yang, Xi; Moss, Nicholas G; Arendshorst, William J

    2015-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species regulate cardiovascular and renal function in health and disease. Superoxide participates in acute calcium signaling in afferent arterioles and renal vasoconstriction produced by angiotensin II, endothelin, thromboxane, and pressure-induced myogenic tone. Known mechanisms by which superoxide acts include quenching of nitric oxide and increased ADP ribosyl cyclase/ryanodine-mediated calcium mobilization. The effect(s) of superoxide on other calcium signaling pathways in the renal microcirculation is poorly understood. The present experiments examined the acute effect of superoxide generated by paraquat on calcium entry pathways in isolated rat afferent arterioles. The peak increase in cytosolic calcium concentration caused by KCl (40 mmol/L) was 99±14 nmol/L. The response to this membrane depolarization was mediated exclusively by L-type channels because it was abolished by nifedipine but was unaffected by the T-type channel blocker mibefradil. Paraquat increased superoxide production (dihydroethidium fluorescence), tripled the peak response to KCl to 314±68 nmol/L (P<0.001) and doubled the plateau response. These effects were abolished by tempol and nitroblue tetrazolium, but not by catalase, confirming actions of superoxide and not of hydrogen peroxide. Unaffected by paraquat and superoxide was calcium entry through store-operated calcium channels activated by thapsigargin-induced calcium depletion of sarcoplasmic reticular stores. Also unresponsive to paraquat was ryanodine receptor-mediated calcium-induced calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Our results provide new evidence that superoxide enhances calcium entry through L-type channels activated by membrane depolarization in rat cortical afferent arterioles, without affecting calcium entry through store-operated entry or ryanodine receptor-mediated calcium mobilization. PMID:26034201

  1. Purification of human copper, zinc superoxide dismutase by copper chelate affinity chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Weslake, R.J.; Chesney, S.L.; Petkau, A.; Friesen, A.D.

    1986-05-15

    Copper, zinc superoxide dismutase was isolated from human red blood cell hemolysate by DEAE-Sepharose and copper chelate affinity chromatography. Enzyme preparations had specific activities ranging from 3400 to 3800 U/mg and recoveries were approximately 60% of the enzyme activity in the lysate. Copper chelate affinity chromatography resulted in a purification factor of about 60-fold. The homogeneity of the superoxide dismutase preparation was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis, analytical gel filtration chromatography, and isoelectric focusing.

  2. Early life stress in male mice induces superoxide production and endothelial dysfunction in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Ho, Dao H; Burch, Mariah L; Musall, Benjamin; Musall, Jacqueline B; Hyndman, Kelly A; Pollock, Jennifer S

    2016-05-01

    Early life stress (ELS) is a risk for cardiovascular disease in adulthood although very little mechanistic insight is available. Because oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction are major contributors to cardiovascular risk, we hypothesized that ELS induces endothelial dysfunction in adult male mice via increased superoxide production. Studies employed a mouse model of ELS, maternal separation with early weaning (MSEW), in which litters were separated from the dam for 4 h/day [postnatal days (PD) 2-5] and 8 h/day (PD6-16), and weaned at PD17. Control litters remained undisturbed until weaning at PD21. When compared with control mice, thoracic aortic rings from adult male MSEW mice displayed significant endothelial dysfunction that was reversed by the superoxide scavenger, polyethylene glycol-superoxide dismutase (PEG-SOD). PEG-SOD-inhibitable superoxide production by aortae from MSEW mice was significantly greater than observed in control aortae, although unaffected by nitric oxide synthase inhibition, suggesting that uncoupled nitric oxide synthase was not responsible for the accelerated superoxide production. Aortic SOD expression, plasma SOD activity, and total antioxidant activity were similar in MSEW and control mice, indicating unaltered antioxidant capacity in MSEW mice. Increased expression of the NADPH oxidase subunits, NOX2 and NOX4, was evident in the aortae of MSEW mice. Moreover, endothelial dysfunction and superoxide production in MSEW mice was reversed with the NADPH oxidase inhibitor, apocynin, indicating increased NADPH oxidase-dependent superoxide production and endothelial dysfunction. The finding that MSEW induces superoxide production and endothelial dysfunction in adult mice may provide a mechanistic link between ELS and adult cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:26921433

  3. Real time in vivo investigation of superoxide dynamics in zebrafish liver using a single-fiber fluorescent probe

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Chung; Ken, Chuian-Fu; Hsu, Che-Wei; Liu, Ya-Ging

    2013-01-01

    Superoxide anion is the key radical that causes intracellular oxidative stress. The lack of a method to directly monitor superoxide concentration in vivo in real time has severely hindered our understanding on its pathophysiology. We made transgenic zebrafish to specifically express yellow fluorescent proteins, a reversible superoxide-specific indicator, in the liver and used a fiber-optic fluorescent probe to noninvasively monitor the superoxide concentration in real time. Several superoxide-inducing and scavenging reagents were administrated onto the fish to alter superoxide concentrations. The distinct biochemical pathways of the reagents can be discerned from the transient behaviors of fluorescence time courses. These results demonstrate the feasibility of this method for analyzing superoxide dynamics and its potential as an in vivo pharmaceutical screening platform. PMID:24049691

  4. Characterization of heparin binding of human extracellular superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Lookene, A; Stenlund, P; Tibell, L A

    2000-01-11

    The C-terminal domain of human extracellular superoxide dismutase (hEC-SOD) plays a crucial role in the protein's interaction with heparin. Here we investigated this interaction in more detail by comparing the heparin-binding characteristics of two variants of hEC-SOD: the two fusion proteins containing the hEC-SOD C-terminal domain and a synthetic peptide homologous to the C-terminal. The interaction studies were performed using a surface plasmon resonance based technique on a BIAcore system. It should be emphasized that this is a model system. However, the kinetic constants, as measured, are valid in a comparative sense. Comparison of affinities for size-fractionated heparins revealed that octa- or decasaccharides are the smallest heparin fragments that can efficiently interact with the C-terminal domain of hEC-SOD. At physiological salt concentration, and pH 7.4, the hEC-SOD/heparin interaction was found to be of a high-affinity type, with an equilibrium dissociation constant, K(d), of 0.12 microM, which is 700 and 10-20 times lower than the K(d) values for the synthetic peptide and the fusion proteins, respectively. However, when an alpha-helical structure was induced in the synthetic peptide, by addition of 10% trifluoroethanol, the K(d) decreased to 0.64 microM. The differences in the K(d) values were mainly governed by differences in the association rate constants (k(ass)). The hEC-SOD/heparin interaction itself was found to have a fairly high dissociation rate constant (0.1 s(-)(1)), and a very high association rate constant (8 x 10(5) M(-)(1) s(-)(1)), suggesting that the interaction is mainly controlled by the association. These results together with circular dichroism spectra of the synthetic peptide suggest that an alpha-helical structure in the C-terminal is essential for optimal binding to heparin and that other parts of hEC-SOD moderate the affinity. Our data also demonstrate that the tetramerization itself does not substantially increase the

  5. Mechanisms of Superoxide Signaling in Epigenetic Processes: Relation to Aging and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Afanas’ev, Igor

    2015-01-01

    Superoxide is a precursor of many free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in biological systems. It has been shown that superoxide regulates major epigenetic processes of DNA methylation, histone methylation, and histone acetylation. We suggested that superoxide, being a radical anion and a strong nucleophile, could participate in DNA methylation and histone methylation and acetylation through mechanism of nucleophilic substitution and free radical abstraction. In nucleophilic reactions superoxide is able to neutralize positive charges of methyl donors S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) and acetyl-coenzyme A (AcCoA) enhancing their nucleophilic capacity or to deprotonate cytosine. In the reversed free radical reactions of demethylation and deacetylation superoxide is formed catalytically by the (Tet) family of dioxygenates and converted into the iron form of hydroxyl radical with subsequent oxidation and final eradication of methyl substituents. Double role of superoxide in these epigenetic processes might be of importance for understanding of ROS effects under physiological and pathological conditions including cancer and aging. PMID:26029480

  6. Chemiluminescence Imaging of Superoxide Anion Detects Beta-Cell Function and Mass

    PubMed Central

    Bronsart, Laura L.; Stokes, Christian; Contag, Christopher H.

    2016-01-01

    Superoxide anion is produced during normal cellular respiration and plays key roles in cellular physiology with its dysregulation being associated with a variety of diseases. Superoxide anion is a short-lived molecule and, therefore, its homeostatic regulation and role in biology and disease requires dynamic quantification with fine temporal resolution. Here we validated coelenterazine as a reporter of intracellular superoxide anion concentration and used it as a dynamic measure both in vitro and in vivo. Chemiluminescence was dependent upon superoxide anion levels, including those produced during cellular respiration, and concentrations varied both kinetically and temporally in response to physiologically relevant fluctuations in glucose levels. In vivo imaging with coelenterazine revealed that beta cells of the pancreas have increased levels of superoxide anion, which acted as a measure of beta-cell function and mass and could predict the susceptibility of mice to diabetes mellitus. Glucose response and regulation are key elements of cellular physiology and organismal biology, and superoxide anion appears to play a fundamental and dynamic role in both of these processes. PMID:26752052

  7. Growth signaling promotes chronological aging in budding yeast by inducing superoxide anions that inhibit quiescence

    PubMed Central

    Weinberger, Martin; Mesquita, Ana; Carroll, Timothy; Marks, Laura; Yang, Hui; Zhang, Zhaojie; Ludovico, Paula; Burhans, William C.

    2010-01-01

    Inhibition of growth signaling pathways protects against aging and age-related diseases in parallel with reduced oxidative stress. The relationships between growth signaling, oxidative stress and aging remain unclear. Here we report that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, alterations in growth signaling pathways impact levels of superoxide anions that promote chronological aging and inhibit growth arrest of stationary phase cells in G0/G1. Factors that decrease intracellular superoxide anions in parallel with enhanced longevity and more efficient G0/G1 arrest include genetic inactivation of growth signaling pathways that inhibit Rim15p, which activates oxidative stress responses, and downregulation of these pathways by caloric restriction. Caloric restriction also reduces superoxide anions independently of Rim15p by elevating levels of H2O2, which activates superoxide dismutases. In contrast, high glucose or mutations that activate growth signaling accelerate chronological aging in parallel with increased superoxide anions and reduced efficiency of stationary phase G0/G1 arrest. High glucose also activates DNA damage responses and preferentially kills stationary phase cells that fail to arrest growth in G0/G1. These findings suggest that growth signaling promotes chronological aging in budding yeast by elevating superoxide anions that inhibit quiescence and induce DNA replication stress. A similar mechanism likely contributes to aging and age-related diseases in complex eukaryotes. PMID:21076178

  8. Exhaled 8-isoprostane in sarcoidosis: relation to superoxide anion production by bronchoalveolar lavage cells

    PubMed Central

    Kurmanowska, Zofia; Antczak, Adam; Marczak, Jerzy; Ciebiada, Maciej; Górski, Paweł

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study was designed to examine the mutual relationship between 8-isoprostane in exhaled breath condensate (EBC) and superoxide anion generation by bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cells in patients with sarcoidosis. Design About 29 patients with sarcoidosis, 34 healthy never smokers (control group for EBC) and 15 healthy never smokers (control group for BAL) were examined. EBC was collected directly before bronchoscopy. 8-Isoprostane was measured by ELISA, and superoxide anion by colorimetry. Results Exhaled breath condensate 8-isoprostane is increased in sarcoidosis (median, 25–75 percentile): 2.50; 2.50–3.90 versus 6.20; 2.50–16.95 pg/ml, p ≤ 0.05). Spontaneous superoxide anion release from BALF cells was significantly elevated only in patients with a high percentage of lymphocytes in BALF (6.42 ± 1.24 vs. 23.52 ± 4.30 nmol/106 cells, p ≤ 0.01). There were no correlations between 8-isoprostane and spontaneous or stimulated superoxide anion release. Conclusions We confirmed higher concentrations of EBC 8-isoprostane in sarcoidosis and higher spontaneous release of superoxide anion from BALF cells in patients with sarcoidosis. The increase of EBC 8-isoprostane is not directly related to superoxide anion released from BALF cells. PMID:20521080

  9. Neonatal developmental pattern of superoxide dismutase and aniline hydroxylase in rat lung

    SciTech Connect

    Kakkar, P.; Jaffery, F.N.; Viswanathan, P.N.

    1986-10-01

    The developmental biology of superoxide dismutase and aniline hydroxylase was followed in rat lungs from prenatal stage to 3 months old. Total superoxide dismutase activity as determined by spectrophotometry as well as electrophoresis was high in the prenatal rat lung, decreased in the first 24 hr postpartum, increased within 7 days, and then decreased gradually to adult levels. On polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis only two isozymic forms of superoxide dismutase were located as achromatic zones in the fetal lung. In the adult rat lung, there were three molecular forms of superoxide dismutase, two in the postmitochondrial supernatant and one in the mitochondrial fraction. Unlike superoxide dismutase, aniline hydroxylase was detectable only after 5 days of age and the activity exhibited a gradual increase afterward up to 1 month of age. The developmental pattern of superoxide dismutase and aniline hydroxylase activities in lung may be significant in understanding the mechanism of body defenses and their regulatory modulations in response to toxic air pollutants and environmental stress.

  10. Serine protease inhibitors block priming of monocytes for enhanced release of superoxide.

    PubMed Central

    Megyeri, P; Pabst, K M; Pabst, M J

    1995-01-01

    Monocytes freshly isolated from human blood produced large amounts of superoxide when triggered by phorbol ester. After monocytes were cultured for 18-24 hr in endotoxin-free, non-adherent conditions, they produced low amounts of superoxide. Addition of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), or platelet-activating factor (PAF) at the beginning of culture 'primed' the monocytes, causing them to maintain a high superoxide response for at least 96 hr. Also, in response to LPS, monocytes secreted TNF-alpha. The ability of LPS, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha or PAF to maintain the high superoxide response was blocked by addition of inhibitors of serine proteases, either 4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulphonyl fluoride (AEBSF) or 3,4-dichloroisocoumarin. AEBSF was most effective at 200 microns, and required 6 hr for maximum effect. AEBSF did not affect phorbol-triggered superoxide release by unprimed monocytes. AEBSF did not affect cell viability, nor did it interfere with the TNF-alpha secretion in response to LPS. An analogue of AEBSF that lacked ability to inhibit proteases did not affect monocyte responses. 3,4-Dichloroisocoumarin blocked priming at a low concentration, 1 microM. We conclude that activity of a monocyte serine protease is required to maintain the high superoxide response in monocytes primed with LPS, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, or PAF. PMID:8567031

  11. Superoxide dismutase: correlation with life-span and specific metabolic rate in primate species.

    PubMed Central

    Tolmasoff, J M; Ono, T; Cutler, R G

    1980-01-01

    Much evidence now suggests that superoxide dismutase (superoxide:superoxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.15.1.1) may be a major intracellular protective enzyme against oxygen toxicity by catalyzing the removal of the superoxide radical. We examined the possible role this enzyme may have in determining the life-span of primate species. Superoxide dismutase specific activity levels were measured in cytoplasmic fractions of liver, brain, and heart of 2 rodent and 12 primate species. These species had maximum life-span potentials ranging from 3.5 to 95 years. Liver, brain, and heart had similar specific activity levels for a given species, but the levels for different species varied over 2-fold, with man having the highest level. No general correlation was found in the levels with life-span. However, the ratio of superoxide dismutase specific activity to specific metabolic rate of the tissue or of the whole adult organism was found to increase with increasing maximum lifespan potential for all the species. This correlation suggests that longer-lived species have a higher degree of protection against by-products of oxygen metabolism. PMID:6771758

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Metabolic Activity, Accompanied by Overproduction of Superoxide.

    PubMed

    Bakalova, Rumiana; Georgieva, Ekaterina; Ivanova, Donika; Zhelev, Zhivko; Aoki, Ichio; Saga, Tsuneo

    2015-12-16

    This study shows that a mitochondria-penetrating nitroxide probe (mito-TEMPO) allows detection of superoxide and visualization of mitochondrial dysfunction in living cells due to the effect of T1 shortening in MRI. Mitochondrial dysfunction was induced by treatment of cells with rotenone and 2-methoxyestradiol (2-ME/Rot). The MRI measurements were performed on 7T MRI. The 2-ME/Rot-treated cells were characterized by overproduction of superoxide, which was confirmed by a conventional dihydroethidium test. In the presence of mito-TEMPO, the intensity of MRI signal in 2-ME/Rot-treated cells was ∼30-40% higher, in comparison with that in untreated cells or culture media. In model (cell-free) systems, we observed that superoxide, but not hydrogen peroxide, increased the intensity of T1-weighted MRI signal of mito-TEMPO. Moreover, the superoxide restores the T1-weighted MRI contrast of mito-TEMPOH, a noncontrast (diamagnetic) analogue of mito-TEMPO. This was also confirmed by using EPR spectroscopy. The results demonstrate that superoxide radical is involved in the enhancement of T1-weighted MRI contrast in living cells, in the absence and presence of mito-TEMPO. This report gives a direction for discovering new opportunities for functional MRI, for detection of metabolic activity, accompanied by overproduction of superoxide, as well as by disturbance of the balance between superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, a very important approach to clarify the fine molecular mechanisms in the regulation of many pathologies. The visualization of mitochondrial activity in real-time can be crucial to clarify the molecular mechanism of the functional MRI in its commonly accepted definition, as a method for detection of neurovascular coupling. PMID:26367059

  13. Endothelin-1 critically influences cardiac function via superoxide-MMP9 cascade

    PubMed Central

    Hathaway, Catherine K.; Grant, Ruriko; Hagaman, John R.; Hiller, Sylvia; Li, Feng; Xu, Longquan; Chang, Albert S.; Madden, Victoria J.; Bagnell, C. Robert; Rojas, Mauricio; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Wu, Bingruo; Zhou, Bin; Smithies, Oliver; Kakoki, Masao

    2015-01-01

    We have generated low-expressing and high-expressing endothelin-1 genes (L and H) and have bred mice with four levels of expression: L/L, ∼20%; L/+, ∼65%; +/+ (wild type), 100%; and H/+, ∼350%. The hypomorphic L allele can be spatiotemporally switched to the hypermorphic H allele by Cre-loxP recombination. Young adult L/L and L/+ mice have dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertension, and increased plasma volumes, together with increased ventricular superoxide levels, increased matrix metalloproteinase 9 (Mmp9) expression, and reduced ventricular stiffness. H/+ mice have decreased plasma volumes and significantly heavy stiff hearts. Global or cardiomyocyte-specific switching expression from L to H normalized the abnormalities already present in young adult L/L mice. An epithelial sodium channel antagonist normalized plasma volume and blood pressure, but only partially corrected the cardiomyopathy. A superoxide dismutase mimetic made superoxide levels subnormal, reduced Mmp9 overexpression, and substantially improved cardiac function. Genetic absence of Mmp9 also improved cardiac function, but increased superoxide remained. We conclude that endothelin-1 is critical for maintaining normal contractile function, for controlling superoxide and Mmp9 levels, and for ensuring that the myocardium has sufficient collagen to prevent overstretching. Even a modest (∼35%) decrease in endothelin-1 gene (Edn1) expression is sufficient to cause cardiac dysfunction. PMID:25848038

  14. Metabolic stability of superoxide adducts derived from newly developed cyclic nitrone spin traps.

    PubMed

    Bézière, Nicolas; Hardy, Micael; Poulhès, Florent; Karoui, Hakim; Tordo, Paul; Ouari, Olivier; Frapart, Yves-Michel; Rockenbauer, Antal; Boucher, Jean-Luc; Mansuy, Daniel; Peyrot, Fabienne

    2014-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species are by-products of aerobic metabolism involved in the onset and evolution of various pathological conditions. Among them, the superoxide radical is of special interest as the origin of several damaging species such as H2O2, hydroxyl radical, or peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)). Spin trapping coupled with ESR is a method of choice to characterize these species in chemical and biological systems and the metabolic stability of the spin adducts derived from reaction of superoxide and hydroxyl radicals with nitrones is the main limit to the in vivo application of the method. Recently, new cyclic nitrones bearing a triphenylphosphonium or permethylated β-cyclodextrin moiety have been synthesized and their spin adducts demonstrated increased stability in buffer. In this article, we studied the stability of the superoxide adducts of four new cyclic nitrones in the presence of liver subcellular fractions and biologically relevant reductants using an original setup combining a stopped-flow device and an ESR spectrometer. The kinetics of disappearance of the spin adducts were analyzed using an appropriate simulation program. Our results highlight the interest of the new spin trapping agents CD-DEPMPO and CD-DIPPMPO for specific detection of superoxide with high stability of the superoxide adducts in the presence of liver microsomes. PMID:24161442

  15. Superoxide dismutase and catalase conjugated to polyethylene glycol increases endothelial enzyme activity and oxidant resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Beckman, J.S.; Minor, R.L. Jr.; White, C.W.; Repine, J.E.; Rosen, G.M.; Freeman, B.A.

    1988-05-15

    Covalent conjugation of superoxide dismutase and catalase with polyethylene glycol (PEG) increases the circulatory half-lives of these enzymes from <10 min to 40 h, reduced immunogenicity, and decreases sensitivity to proteolysis. Because PEG has surface active properties and can induce cell fusion, the authors hypothesized that PEG conjugation could enhance cell binding and association of normally membrane-impermeable enzymes. Incubation of cultured porcine aortic endothelial cells with /sup 125/I-PEG-catalase or /sup 125/I-PEG-superoxide dismutase produced a linear, concentration-dependent increase in cellular enzyme activity and radioactivity. Fluorescently labeled PEG-superoxide dismutase incubated with endothelial cells showed a vesicular localization. Mechanical injury to cell monolayers, which is known to stimulate endocytosis, further increased the uptake of fluorescent PEG-superoxide dismutase. Addition of PEG and PEG-conjugated enzymes perturbed the spin-label binding environment, indicative of producing an increase in plasma membrane fluidity. Thus, PEG conjugation to superoxide dismutase and catalase enhances cell association of these enzymes in a manner which increases cellular enzyme activities and provides prolonged protection from partially reduced oxygen species.

  16. Superoxide dismutase C is required for intracellular survival and virulence of Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Vanaporn, Muthita; Wand, Matthew; Michell, Stephen L; Sarkar-Tyson, Mitali; Ireland, Philip; Goldman, Stan; Kewcharoenwong, Chidchamai; Rinchai, Darawan; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana; Titball, Richard W

    2011-08-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is an intracellular pathogen and the causative agent of melioidosis, a life-threatening disease of humans. Within host cells, superoxide is an important mediator of pathogen killing. In this study, we have identified the B. pseudomallei K96243 sodC gene, shown that it has superoxide dismutase activity, and constructed an allelic deletion mutant of this gene. Compared with the wild-type, the mutant was more sensitive to killing by extracellular superoxide, but not to superoxide generated intracellularly. The sodC mutant showed a markedly decreased survival in J774A.1 mouse macrophages, and reduced numbers of bacteria were recovered from human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) when compared with the wild-type. The numbers of wild-type or mutant bacteria recovered from human diabetic neutrophils were significantly lower than from normal human neutrophils. The sodC mutant was attenuated in BALB/c mice. Our results indicate that SodC plays a key role in the virulence of B. pseudomallei, but that diabetics are not more susceptible to infection because of a reduced ability of PMNs to kill by superoxide. PMID:21659326

  17. Superoxide anion radical generation during the oxidation of various amines by diamine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Silva, I J; Azevedo, M S; Manso, C F

    1996-03-01

    Diamine oxidase (DAO) or histaminase is an enzyme which deaminates histamine and several aliphatic amines to their corresponding aldehydes. Hydrogen peroxide and ammonia are side products of this reaction. The purpose of the present work was to evaluate if determination of produced hydrogen peroxide reflects DAO activity or if intermediate formation of the superoxide radical could be a reason for lack of correspondence between oxygen uptake and hydrogen peroxide production at different pH. Superoxide radical formation was determined by cytochrome c reduction in the presence and absence of superoxide dismutase (SOD). Oxygen uptake was measured with an oxygen electrode and hydrogen peroxide production by a spectrophotometric method. At pH 6.6 there was no superoxide production, but at pH 7.4 there was some, and it increased markedly at pH 9.5. Oxygen uptake also increased with increasing pH, especially with histamine as substrate. These results lead us to suggest that the mechanism of action of DAO involves the intermediate generation of superoxide radicals. PMID:8728118

  18. Ab initio molecular dynamics of the reaction of quercetin with superoxide radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lespade, Laure

    2016-08-01

    Superoxide plays an important role in biology but in unregulated concentrations it is implicated in a lot of diseases such as cancer or atherosclerosis. Antioxidants like flavonoids are abundant in plant and are good scavengers of superoxide radical. The modeling of superoxide scavenging by flavonoids from the diet still remains a challenge. In this study, ab initio molecular dynamics of the reaction of the flavonoid quercetin toward superoxide radical has been carried out using Car-Parrinello density functional theory. The study has proven different reactant solvation by modifying the number of water molecules surrounding superoxide. The reaction consists in the gift of a hydrogen atom of one of the hydroxyl groups of quercetin to the radical. When it occurs, it is relatively fast, lower than 100 fs. Calculations show that it depends largely on the environment of the hydroxyl group giving its hydrogen atom, the geometry of the first water layer and the presence of a certain number of water molecules in the second layer, indicating a great influence of the solvent on the reactivity.

  19. Nitration and Inactivation of Manganese Superoxide Dismutase in Chronic Rejection of Human Renal Allografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMillan-Crow, L. A.; Crow, John P.; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Beckman, Joseph S.; Thompson, John A.

    1996-10-01

    Inflammatory processes in chronic rejection remain a serious clinical problem in organ transplantation. Activated cellular infiltrate produces high levels of both superoxide and nitric oxide. These reactive oxygen species interact to form peroxynitrite, a potent oxidant that can modify proteins to form 3-nitrotyrosine. We identified enhanced immunostaining for nitrotyrosine localized to tubular epithelium of chronically rejected human renal allografts. Western blot analysis of rejected tissue demonstrated that tyrosine nitration was restricted to a few specific polypeptides. Immunoprecipitation and amino acid sequencing techniques identified manganese superoxide dismutase, the major antioxidant enzyme in mitochondria, as one of the targets of tyrosine nitration. Total manganese superoxide dismutase protein was increased in rejected kidney, particularly in the tubular epithelium; however, enzymatic activity was significantly decreased. Exposure of recombinant human manganese superoxide dismutase to peroxynitrite resulted in a dose-dependent (IC50 = 10 μ M) decrease in enzymatic activity and concomitant increase in tyrosine nitration. Collectively, these observations suggest a role for peroxynitrite during development and progression of chronic rejection in human renal allografts. In addition, inactivation of manganese superoxide dismutase by peroxynitrite may represent a general mechanism that progressively increases the production of peroxynitrite, leading to irreversible oxidative injury to mitochondria.

  20. Catalytic spectrofluorimetric determination of superoxide anion radical and superoxide dismutase activity using N, N-dimethylaniline as the substrate for horseradish peroxidase (HRP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Bo; Wang, Yan; Chen, Zhen-zhen

    2002-10-01

    The coupled reaction of N, N-dimethylaniline (DMA) with 4-aminoantipyrine (4-AAP) using superoxide anion radical (O 2-) as oxidizing agent under the catalysis of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was studied. Based on the reaction, O 2- produced by irradiating Vitamin B 2, (V B2) was spectrophotometricly determined at 554 nm. The linear range of this method was 1.8×10 -6-1.2×10 -4 mol l -1 with a detection limit of 5.3×10 -7 mol l -1. The effect of interferences on the determination of O 2- was investigated. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in human blood and mouse blood.

  1. Dehydroepiandrosterone inhibits the spontaneous release of superoxide radical by alveolar macrophages in vitro in asbestosis

    SciTech Connect

    Rom, W.N.; Harkin, T. )

    1991-08-01

    Asbestosis is characterized by an alveolar macrophage alveolitis with injury and fibrosis of the lower respiratory tract. Alveolar macrophages recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage spontaneously release exaggerated amounts of oxidants including superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide that may mediate alveolar epithelial cell injury. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is a normally occurring adrenal androgen that inhibits glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, the initial enzyme in the pentose phosphate shunt necessary for NADPH generation and superoxide anion formation. In this regard, the authors hypothesized that DHEA may reduce asbestos-induced oxidant release. DHEA added in vitro to alveolar macrophages lavaged from 11 nonsmoking asbestos workers significantly reduced superoxide anion release. DHEA is an antioxidant and potential anticarcinogenic agent that may have a therapeutic role in reducing the increased oxidant burden in asbestos-induced alveolitis of the lower respiratory tract.

  2. Superoxide metabolism is correlated to the post-anoxic injury of soybean (Glycine max) roots

    SciTech Connect

    Bolles, C.S.; Van Toai, T.T. )

    1990-05-01

    Post-anoxic injury of root tips of soybean seedlings is more severe following a very short (1 hour) period of anoxia than a longer (3-5 hour) period. Anaerobic incubation of root tips in the presence of 100 mM ascorbate, an antioxidant and free-radical-scavenging compound, alleviates the detrimental post-anoxia effects of a very short anoxic treatment. Extracts of root tips which have been treated anoxically for 1 hour have an elevated capacity to produce superoxide anions when subsequently exposed to air, than extracts from seedlings treated anoxically for longer time. Changes in superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzyme activity and SOD-specific RNA sequences will be presented. The results support that post-anoxic injury occurs in soybean roots and that SOD plays a role in the detoxification of superoxide anions.

  3. Redox-activated expression of the cytosolic copper/zinc superoxide dismutase gene in Nicotiana.

    PubMed Central

    Hérouart, D; Van Montagu, M; Inzé, D

    1993-01-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs; superoxide: superoxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.15.1.1) play a key role in protection against oxygen radicals, and SOD gene expression is highly induced during environmental stress. To determine the conditions of SOD induction, the promoter of the cytosolic copper/zinc SOD (Cu/ZnSODcyt) gene was isolated in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia and fused to the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene. Oxidative stress is likely to alter the cellular redox in favor of the oxidized status. Surprisingly, the expression of the Cu/ZnSODcyt gene is induced by sulfhydryl antioxidants such as reduced glutathione, cysteine, and dithiothreitol, whereas the oxidized forms of glutathione and cysteine have no effect. It is therefore possible that reduced glutathione directly acts as an antioxidant and simultaneously activates the Cu/ZnSODcyt gene during oxidative stress. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8464930

  4. Superoxide Dismutase 1 Loss Disturbs Intracellular Redox Signaling, Resulting in Global Age-Related Pathological Changes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aging is characterized by increased oxidative stress, chronic inflammation, and organ dysfunction, which occur in a progressive and irreversible manner. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) serves as a major antioxidant and neutralizes superoxide radicals throughout the body. In vivo studies have demonstrated that copper/zinc superoxide dismutase-deficient (Sod1−/−) mice show various aging-like pathologies, accompanied by augmentation of oxidative damage in organs. We found that antioxidant treatment significantly attenuated the age-related tissue changes and oxidative damage-associated p53 upregulation in Sod1−/− mice. This review will focus on various age-related pathologies caused by the loss of Sod1 and will discuss the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis in Sod1−/− mice. PMID:25276767

  5. MEASUREMENT OF SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE, CATALASE, AND GLUTATHIONE PEROXIDASE IN CULTURED CELLS AND TISSUE

    PubMed Central

    Weydert, Christine J.; Cullen, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    Cells contain a large number of antioxidants to prevent or repair the damage caused by ROS, as well as to regulate redox-sensitive signaling pathways General protocols are described to measure the antioxidant enzyme activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase. The SODs convert superoxide radical into hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen, while the catalase and peroxidases convert hydrogen peroxide into water. In this way, two toxic species, superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide, are converted to the harmless product water. Western blots, activity gels and activity assays are various methods used to determine protein and activity in both cells and tissue depending on the amount of protein needed for each assay. Other techniques including immunohistochemistry and immunogold can further evaluate the levels of the various antioxidant enzymes in tissue and cells. In general, these assays require 24 to 48 hours to complete. PMID:20057381

  6. Superoxide dismutase 1 acts as a nuclear transcription factor to regulate oxidative stress resistance

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Chi Kwan; Liu, Yuan; Thomas, Janice; Zhang, Yanjie; Zheng, X. F. Steven

    2015-01-01

    Summary Superoxide dismutase 1 (Sod1) has been known for nearly half a century for catalysis of superoxide to hydrogen peroxide. Here we report a new Sod1 function in oxidative signaling: in response to elevated endogenous and exogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS), Sod1 rapidly relocates into the nucleus, which is important for maintaining genomic stability. Interestingly, H2O2 is sufficient to promote Sod1 nuclear localization, indicating that it is responding to general ROS rather than Sod1 substrate superoxide. ROS signaling is mediated by Mec1/ATM and its effector Dun1/Cds1 kinase, through Dun1 interaction with Sod1 and regulation of Sod1 by phosphorylation at S60, 99. In the nucleus, Sod1 binds to the promoters and regulates the expression of oxidative resistance and repair genes. Altogether, our study unravels an unorthodox function of Sod1 as a transcription factor and elucidates the regulatory mechanism for its localization. PMID:24647101

  7. Tissue-specific activity of two manganese superoxide dismutase promoters in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed Central

    Van Camp, W; Hérouart, D; Willekens, H; Takahashi, H; Saito, K; Van Montagu, M; Inzé, D

    1996-01-01

    In eukaryotes, manganese superoxide dismutase is a nuclear-encoded protein that scavenges superoxide radicals in the mitochondrial matrix. We have isolated two manganese superoxide dismutase genes from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia L. and fused the 5' upstream regulatory region of these genes to the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene. The two gene fusions displayed a differential tissue specificity in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Promoter activity of the SodA1 gene fusion was found in the pollen, middle layer, and stomium of anthers, but was usually undetectable in vegetative organs of mature plants. The SodA2 gene fusion was expressed in the leaves, stems, roots, and flowers. SodA2 promoter activity was most prominent in the vascular bundles, stomata, axillary buds, pericycle, stomium, and pollen. Histochemical analysis of succinate dehydrogenase activity suggested that the spatial expression of the two gene fusions is generally correlated with mitochondrial respiratory activity. PMID:8883376

  8. Immunologic and Nonimmunologic Generation of Superoxide from Mast Cells and Basophils

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, William R.; Kaliner, Michael

    1978-01-01

    Mediator release from rat peritoneal and human lung mast cells as well as human leukemic basophils was examined to determine whether super-oxide (O−2) was concomitantly generated. Immunologic or nonimmunologic stimulation of each preparation induced parallel release of histamine and O−2 within 2 min. O−2 production was quantitated by superoxide dismutase (SOD)-inhibitable chemiluminescence and cytochrome c reduction. SOD was detected in basophil and mast cell lysates and was also released by rat mast cells stimulated by anti-IgE. Secretory granules isolated from purified rat mast cells released histamine, O−2, and SOD upon exposure to cations. Thus, both superoxide radicals and SOD may play a role in host defenses involved in immediate hypersensitivity reactions. Images PMID:73548

  9. Identification of a superoxide-generating NADPH oxidase system in human fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Meier, B; Cross, A R; Hancock, J T; Kaup, F J; Jones, O T

    1991-01-01

    Human fibroblasts have the capacity to release superoxide radicals upon stimulation of an electron transport system similar to the NADPH oxidase of leukocytes. Two components of the NADPH oxidase system, (1) a flavoprotein of 45 kDa which binds diphenylene iodonium (a compound described as a specific inhibitor of the leukocyte NADPH oxidase), and (2) a low-potential cytochrome b, are present in fibroblast membranes. Fibroblasts exhibit these compounds at lower concentrations than do polymorphonuclear leukocytes or B-lymphocytes. The superoxide-generating system is rather uniformly associated with the outer cell membrane, as shown by light and electron microscopy. Superoxide release upon stimulation with various agents was prevented by the addition of micromolar concentrations of diphenylene iodonium, making an NADPH oxidase a likely source. Images Fig. 4. PMID:1850240

  10. Structures of two superoxide dismutases from Bacillus anthracis reveal a novel active centre

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Ian W.; Kalliomaa, Anne K.; Levdikov, Vladimir M.; Blagova, Elena V.; Fogg, Mark J.; Brannigan, James A.; Wilson, Keith S.; Wilkinson, Anthony J.

    2005-01-01

    The BA4499 and BA5696 genes of Bacillus anthracis encode proteins homologous to manganese superoxide dismutase, suggesting that this organism has an expanded repertoire of antioxidant proteins. Differences in metal specificity and quaternary structure between the dismutases of prokaryotes and higher eukaryotes may be exploited in the development of therapeutic antibacterial compounds. Here, the crystal structure of two Mn superoxide dismutases from B. anthracis solved to high resolution are reported. Comparison of their structures reveals that a highly conserved residue near the active centre is substituted in one of the proteins and that this is a characteristic feature of superoxide dismutases from the B. cereus/B. anthracis/B. thuringiensis group of organisms. PMID:16511113

  11. Molecular and biochemical characterization of manganese-containing superoxide dismutase from the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kohji; Zhang, Pingbo; He, Ningjia; Wang, Yongqiang; Aso, Yoichi; Banno, Yutaka; Fujii, Hiroshi

    2005-12-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is responsible for the removal of superoxide anion from living organisms. In this study, cDNA encoding the manganese-containing SOD (MnSOD) from the silkworm, Bombyx mori, was isolated by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence of the MnSOD revealed 62% identity to that of the Drosophila melanogaster; both were close to each other in a phylogenetic tree. The MnSOD was overproduced in Escherichia coli and purified. The internal structure of the recombinant MnSOD was confirmed by peptide mass fingerprinting method. The recombinant MnSOD facilitating the reduction reaction of superoxide anion retained 75% of its original activity after incubation at pH 4-11 for 24 h at 4 degrees C. Its activity was never affected by incubation at pH 7 for 30 min below 50 degrees C. PMID:16236537

  12. Reactions of Co(III)-nitrosyl complexes with superoxide and their mechanistic insights.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pankaj; Lee, Yong-Min; Park, Young Jun; Siegler, Maxime A; Karlin, Kenneth D; Nam, Wonwoo

    2015-04-01

    New Co(III)-nitrosyl complexes bearing N-tetramethylated cyclam (TMC) ligands, [(12-TMC)Co(III)(NO)](2+) (1) and [(13-TMC)Co(III)(NO)](2+) (2), were synthesized via [(TMC)Co(II)(CH3CN)](2+) + NO(g) reactions. Spectroscopic and structural characterization showed that these compounds bind the nitrosyl moiety in a bent end-on fashion. Complexes 1 and 2 reacted with KO2/2.2.2-cryptand to produce [(12-TMC)Co(II)(NO2)](+) (3) and [(13-TMC)Co(II)(NO2)](+) (4), respectively; these possess O,O'-chelated nitrito ligands. Mechanistic studies using (18)O-labeled superoxide ((18)O2(•-)) showed that one O atom in the nitrito ligand is derived from superoxide and the O2 produced comes from the other superoxide O atom. Evidence supporting the formation of a Co-peroxynitrite intermediate is also presented. PMID:25793706

  13. Endogenous antioxidant defense induction by melon superoxide dismutase reduces cardiac hypertrophy in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Carillon, Julie; Rugale, Caroline; Rouanet, Jean-Max; Cristol, Jean-Paul; Lacan, Dominique; Jover, Bernard

    2014-08-01

    We assessed the influence of SODB, a melon superoxide dismutase (SOD), on left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy in SHR. SODB (4 or 40U SOD) was given orally for 4 or 28 days to SHR. For each treatment period, LV weight index (LVWI) and cardiomyocytes size were measured. SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase expressions, and LV production and presence of superoxide anion were determined. Pro-inflammatory markers were also measured. SODB reduced LVWI and cardiomyocytes size after 4 or 28 days. Cardiac SOD and GPx increased by 30-40% with SODB. The presence but not production of superoxide anion was significantly reduced by SODB. No effect of SODB was detected on inflammatory status in any group. The beneficial effect of SODB on cardiac hypertrophy seems to be related to the stimulation of endogenous antioxidant defense, suggesting that SODB may be of interest as a dietary supplementation during conventional antihypertensive therapy. PMID:24601674

  14. Influence of Catalase and Superoxide Dismutase on Ozone Inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Christopher W.; Lee, Dongha; Dodge, Beth-Anne; Hamman, Kristen M.; Robbins, Justin B.; Martin, Scott E.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of ozone at 0.25, 0.40, and 1.00 ppm on Listeria monocytogenes were evaluated in distilled water and phosphate-buffered saline. Differences in sensitivity to ozone were found to exist among the six strains examined. Greater cell death was found following exposure at lower temperatures. Early stationary-phase cells were less sensitive to ozone than mid-exponential- and late stationary-phase cells. Ozonation at 1.00 ppm of cabbage inoculated with L. monocytogenes effectively inactivated all cells after 5 min. The abilities of in vivo catalase and superoxide dismutase to protect the cells from ozone were also examined. Three listerial test strains were inactivated rapidly upon exposure to ozone. Both catalase and superoxide dismutase were found to protect listerial cells from ozone attack, with superoxide dismutase being more important than catalase in this protection. PMID:10742219

  15. Superoxide Dismutase (Sod-1) Null Mutants of Neurospora Crassa: Oxidative Stress Sensitivity, Spontaneous Mutation Rate and Response to Mutagens

    PubMed Central

    Chary, P.; Dillon, D.; Schroeder, A. L.; Natvig, D. O.

    1994-01-01

    Enzymatic superoxide-dismutase activity is believed to be important in defense against the toxic effects of superoxide. Although superoxide dismutases are among the best studied proteins, numerous questions remain concerning the specific biological roles of the various superoxide-dismutase types. In part, this is because the proposed damaging effects of superoxide are manifold, ranging from inactivation of certain metabolic enzymes to DNA damage. Studies with superoxide-deficient mutants have proven valuable, but surprisingly few such studies have been reported. We have constructed and characterized Neurospora crassa mutants that are null for sod-1, the gene that encodes copper-zinc superoxide dismutase. Mutant strains are sensitive to paraquat and elevated oxygen concentrations, and they exhibit an increased spontaneous mutation rate. They appear to have near wild-type sensitivities to near- and far-UV, heat shock and γ-irradiation. Unlike the equivalent Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant and the sodA sodB double mutant of Escherichia coli, they do not exhibit aerobic auxotrophy. These results are discussed in the context of an attempt to identify consensus phenotypes among superoxide dismutase-deficient mutants. N. crassa sod-1 null mutant strains were also employed in genetic and subcellular fractionation studies. Results support the hypothesis that a single gene (sod-1), located between Fsr-12 and leu-3 on linkage group I, is responsible for most or all CuZn superoxide dismutase activity in this organism. PMID:8088518

  16. Characterization of the Bacillus stearothermophilus manganese superoxide dismutase gene and its ability to complement copper/zinc superoxide dismutase deficiency in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Bowler, C.; Inze, D.; Van Camp, W.; Kaer, L.V.; Dhaese, P. )

    1990-03-01

    Recombinant clones containing the manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) gene of Bacillus stearothermophilus were isolated with an oligonucleotide probe designed to match a part of the previously determined amino acid sequence. Complementation analyses, performed by introducing each plasmid into a superoxide dismutase-deficient mutant of Escherichia coli, allowed us to define the region of DNA which encodes the MnSOD structural gene and to identify a promoter region immediately upstream from the gene. These data were subsequently confirmed by DNA sequencing. Since MnSOD is normally restricted to the mitochondria in eucaryotes, we were interested (i) in determining whether B. stearothermophilus MnSOD could function in eucaryotic cytosol and (ii) in determining whether MnSOD could replace the structurally unrelated copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/ZnSOD) which is normally found there. To test this, the sequence encoding bacterial MnSOD was cloned into a yeast expression vector and subsequently introduced into a Cu/ZnSOD-deficient mutant of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Functional expression of the protein was demonstrated, and complementation tests revealed that the protein was able to provide tolerance at wild-type levels to conditions which are normally restrictive for this mutant. Thus, in spite of the evolutionary unrelatedness of these two enzymes, Cu/ZnSOD can be functionally replaced by MnSOD in yeast cytosol.

  17. Superoxide mediates tight junction complex dissociation in cyclically stretched lung slices.

    PubMed

    Song, Min Jae; Davidovich, Nurit; Lawrence, Gladys G; Margulies, Susan S

    2016-05-24

    We found that stretching Type I rat alveolar epithelial cell (RAEC) monolayers at magnitudes that correspond to high tidal-volume mechanical ventilation results in the production of reactive oxygen species, including nitric oxide and superoxide. Scavenging superoxide with Tiron eliminated the stretch-induced increase in cell monolayer permeability, and similar results were reported for rats ventilated at large tidal volumes, suggesting that oxidative stress plays an important role in barrier impairment in ventilator-induced lung injury associated with large stretch and tidal volumes. In this communication we show that mechanisms that involve oxidative injury are also present in a novel precision cut lung slices (PCLS) model under identical mechanical loads. PCLSs from healthy rats were stretched cyclically to 37% change in surface area for 1 hour. Superoxide was visualized using MitoSOX. To evaluate functional relationships, in separate stretch studies superoxide was scavenged using Tiron or mito-Tempo. PCLS and RAEC permeability was assessed as tight junction (TJ) protein (occludin, claudin-4 and claudin-7) dissociation from zona occludins-1 (ZO-1) via co-immunoprecipitation and Western blot, after 1h (PCLS) or 10min (RAEC) of stretch. Superoxide was increased significantly in PCLS, and Tiron and mito-Tempo dramatically attenuated the response, preventing claudin-4 and claudin-7 dissociation from ZO-1. Using a novel PCLS model for ventilator-induced lung injury studies, we have shown that uniform, biaxial, cyclic stretch generates ROS in the slices, and that superoxide scavenging that can protect the lung tissue under stretch conditions. We conclude that PCLS offer a valuable platform for investigating antioxidant treatments to prevent ventilation-induced lung injury. PMID:26592435

  18. Effect of superoxide anion scavenger on rat hearts with chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Pai, Peiying; Lai, Ching Jung; Lin, Ching-Yuang; Liou, Yi-Fan; Huang, Chih-Yang; Lee, Shin-Da

    2016-04-15

    Only very limited information regarding the protective effects of the superoxide anion scavenger on chronic intermittent hypoxia-induced cardiac apoptosis is available. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of the superoxide anion scavenger on cardiac apoptotic and prosurvival pathways in rats with sleep apnea. Forty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups, rats with normoxic exposure (Control, 21% O2, 1 mo), rats with chronic intermittent hypoxia exposure (Hypoxia, 3-7% O2vs. 21% O2per 40 s cycle, 8 h per day, 1 mo), and rats with pretreatment of the superoxide anion scavenger and chronic intermittent hypoxia exposure (Hypoxia-O2 (-)-Scavenger, MnTMPyP pentachloride, 1 mg/kg ip per day; 3-7% O2vs. 21% O2per 40 s cycle, 8 h per day, 1 mo) at 5-6 mo of age. After 1 mo, the protein levels and apoptotic cells of excised hearts from three groups were measured by Western blotting and terminal deoxynucleotide transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. The superoxide anion scavenger decreased hypoxia-induced myocardial architecture abnormalities, left ventricular hypertrophy, and TUNEL-positive apoptosis. The superoxide anion scavenger decreased hypoxia-induced Fas ligand, Fas death receptors, Fas-associated death domain (FADD), activated caspase-8, and activated caspase-3 (Fas-dependent apoptotic pathway) as well as Bad, activated caspase-9 and activated caspase-3 (mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathway), endonuclease G (EndoG), apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), and TUNEL-positive apoptosis. The superoxide anion scavenger increased IGF-1, IGF-1R, p-PI3k, p-Akt, p-Bad, Bcl-2, and Bcl-xL (survival pathway). Our findings imply that the superoxide anion scavenger might prevent cardiac Fas-mediated and mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis and enhance the IGF-1-related survival pathway in chronic intermittent hypoxia. The superoxide anion scavenger may prevent chronic sleep apnea-enhanced cardiac apoptotic pathways and enhances

  19. Construction of a Fusion Enzyme Exhibiting Superoxide Dismutase and Peroxidase Activity.

    PubMed

    Sharapov, M G; Novoselov, V I; Ravin, V K

    2016-04-01

    A chimeric gene construct encoding human peroxiredoxin 6 and Mn-superoxide dismutase from Escherichia coli was developed. Conditions for expression of the fusion protein in E. coli cell were optimized. Fusing of the enzymes into a single polypeptide chain with peroxiredoxin 6 at the N-terminus (PSH) did not affect their activities. On the contrary, the chimeric protein with reverse order of enzymes (SPH) was not obtained in a water-soluble active form. The active chimeric protein (PSH) exhibiting both peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities was prepared and its physicochemical properties were characterized. PMID:27293100

  20. Serine 1179 Phosphorylation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Increases Superoxide Generation and Alters Cofactor Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Harbeck, Mark C.; He, Donghong; Xie, Lishi; Chen, Weiguo

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is responsible for maintaining systemic blood pressure, vascular remodeling and angiogenesis. In addition to producing NO, eNOS can also generate superoxide (O2-.) in the absence of the cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4). Previous studies have shown that bovine eNOS serine 1179 (Serine 1177/human) phosphorylation critically modulates NO synthesis. However, the effect of serine 1179 phosphorylation on eNOS superoxide generation is unknown. Here, we used the phosphomimetic form of eNOS (S1179D) to determine the effect of S1179 phosphorylation on superoxide generating activity, and its sensitivity to regulation by BH4, Ca2+, and calmodulin (CAM). S1179D eNOS exhibited significantly increased superoxide generating activity and NADPH consumption compared to wild-type eNOS (WT eNOS). The superoxide generating activities of S1179D eNOS and WT eNOS did not differ significantly in their sensitivity to regulation by either Ca2+ or CaM. The sensitivity of the superoxide generating activity of S1179D eNOS to inhibition by BH4 was significantly reduced compared to WT eNOS. In eNOS-overexpressing 293 cells, BH4 depletion with 10mM DAHP for 48 hours followed by 50ng/ml VEGF for 30 min to phosphorylate eNOS S1179 increased ROS accumulation compared to DAHP-only treated cells. Meanwhile, MTT assay indicated that overexpression of eNOS in HEK293 cells decreased cellular viability compared to control cells at BH4 depletion condition (P<0.01). VEGF-mediated Serine 1179 phosphorylation further decreased the cellular viability in eNOS-overexpressing 293 cells (P<0.01). Our data demonstrate that eNOS serine 1179 phosphorylation, in addition to enhancing NO production, also profoundly affects superoxide generation: S1179 phosphorylation increases superoxide production while decreasing sensitivity to the inhibitory effect of BH4 on this activity. PMID:26560496

  1. Extraction of Erythrocyte Enzymes for the Preparation of Polyhemoglobin-catalase-superoxide Dismutase

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jingsong; Chang, Thomas Ming Swi

    2012-01-01

    In sustained severe ischemia, reperfusion with oxygen carriers may result in ischemia-reperfusion injuries because of the release of damaging oxygen radicals. A nanobiotechnology-based polyhemogloin-calatase-superoxide dismutase can prevent this because the oxygen carrier, polyhemoglobin, is linked to antioxidant enzymes, catalase and superoxide dismutase. However, these antioxidant enzymes come from nonhuman sources and recombinant human enzymes are expensive. This paper describes our study on extracting these enzymes from red blood cells and analyzing the amount of enzymes needed for adequate protection from ischemia-reperfusion. PMID:19229698

  2. A new formula to calculate activity of superoxide dismutase in indirect assays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Bruins, Marieke E; Yang, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Shu-Tao; Rao, Ping-Fan

    2016-06-15

    To calculate superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity rapidly and accurately by indirect SOD assays, a formula based on the ratio of the catalytic speed of SOD to the reaction speed of the indicator with superoxide anion was deduced. The accuracy of this formula was compared with the conventional formula based on inhibition in five indirect SOD assays. The new formula was validated in nearly the entire SOD activity range, whereas the conventional formula was validated only during inhibition of 40-60%. This formula might also be used for the assays of other enzymes. PMID:27033009

  3. Evidence that the reactivity of the martian soil is due to superoxide ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, A. S.; Kim, S. S.; Hecht, M. H.; Frant, M. S.; Murray, B.

    2000-01-01

    The Viking Landers were unable to detect evidence of life on Mars but, instead, found a chemically reactive soil capable of decomposing organic molecules. This reactivity was attributed to the presence of one or more as-yet-unidentified inorganic superoxides or peroxides in the martian soil. Using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, we show that superoxide radical ions (O2-) form directly on Mars-analog mineral surfaces exposed to ultraviolet radiation under a simulated martian atmosphere. These oxygen radicals can explain the reactive nature of the soil and the apparent absence of organic material at the martian surface.

  4. Human Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Tyrosine 34 Contribution to Structure and Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Perry, J. Jefferson P.; Hearn, Amy S.; Cabelli, Diane E.; Nick, Harry S.; Tainer, John A.; Silverman, David N.

    2009-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzymes are critical in controlling levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are linked to aging, cancer and neurodegenerative disease. Superoxide (O2 •−) produced during respiration is removed by the product of the SOD2 gene, the homotetrameric manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). Here, we examine the structural and catalytic roles of the highly conserved active-site residue Tyr34, based upon structure-function studies of MnSOD enzymes with mutations at this site. Substitution of Tyr34 with five different amino acids retained the active site protein structure and assembly, but causes a substantial decrease in the catalytic rate constant for the reduction of superoxide. The rate constant for formation of product inhibition complex also decreases but to a much lesser extent, resulting in a net increase in the product inhibition form of the mutant enzymes. Comparisons of crystal structures and catalytic rates also suggest that one mutation, Y34V, interrupts the hydrogen-bonded network, which is associated with a rapid dissociation of the product-inhibited complex. Notably, with three of the Tyr34 mutants we also observe an intermediate in catalysis, which has not been reported previously. Thus, these mutants establish a means to trap a catalytic intermediate that promises to help elucidate the mechanism of catalysis. PMID:19265433

  5. SUPEROXIDE-DEPENDENT IRON UPTAKE: A NEW ROLE FOR ANION EXCHANGE PROTEIN 2

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lung cells import iron across the plasma membrane as ferrous (Fe2+) ion by incompletely understood mechanisms. We tested the hypothesis that human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells import non-transferrin-bound iron (NTBI) using superoxide-dependent ferri-reductase activity involvi...

  6. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Increase Superoxide Anion Production by Acting on NADPH Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Trepout, Sylvain; Wien, Frank; Marco, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) anatase nanoparticles (NPs) are metal oxide NPs commercialized for several uses of everyday life. However their toxicity has been poorly investigated. Cellular internalization of NPs has been shown to activate macrophages and neutrophils that contribute to superoxide anion production by the NADPH oxidase complex. Transmission electron micrososcopy images showed that the membrane fractions were close to the NPs while fluorescence indicated an interaction between NPs and cytosolic proteins. Using a cell-free system, we have investigated the influence of TiO2 NPs on the behavior of the NADPH oxidase. In the absence of the classical activator molecules of the enzyme (arachidonic acid) but in the presence of TiO2 NPs, no production of superoxide ions could be detected indicating that TiO2 NPs were unable to activate by themselves the complex. However once the NADPH oxidase was activated (i.e., by arachidonic acid), the rate of superoxide anion production went up to 140% of its value without NPs, this effect being dependent on their concentration. In the presence of TiO2 nanoparticles, the NADPH oxidase produces more superoxide ions, hence induces higher oxidative stress. This hyper-activation and the subsequent increase in ROS production by TiO2 NPs could participate to the oxidative stress development. PMID:26714308

  7. Dual gene therapy with extracellular superoxide dismutase and catalase attenuates experimental optic neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xiaoping; Hauswirth, William W.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To ameliorate experimental optic neuritis by combining scavenging of superoxide by germ line increases in the extracellular superoxide dismutase (ECSOD) and hydrogen peroxide by viral-mediated gene transfer of the human catalase gene. Methods The human catalase gene inserted into recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) was injected into the right eyes of transgenic mice overexpressing human ECSOD and wild-type littermates. Animals were simultaneously sensitized for experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and then sacrificed one month later. The effects of antioxidant genes (ECSOD and catalase) on the histologic lesions of EAE were measured by computerized analysis of myelin area, optic disc area, extent of the cellular infiltrate, cerium derived H2O2 reaction product and extravasation of serum albumin detected by immunogold. Results Combined scavenging of H2O2 and superoxide with ECSOD and catalase suppressed demyelination by 72%, 54% due to catalase, and 19% due to ECSOD. Disruption of the blood-brain barrier was reduced 63% by the combined effects of catalase and ECSOD, 35% due to catalase and 29% due to ECSOD. Conclusions Transgene modulation of antioxidant enzyme defenses against both superoxide and its metabolite H2O2 provide a substantial suppressive effect against EAE in the optic nerve that may be a new therapeutic strategy for suppression of optic neuritis and multiple sclerosis. PMID:17242675

  8. The ‘mitoflash’ probe cpYFP does not respond to superoxide

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzländer, Markus; Wagner, Stephan; Ermakova, Yulia G.; Belousov, Vsevolod V.; Radi, Rafael; Beckman, Joseph S.; Buettner, Garry R.; Demaurex, Nicolas; Duchen, Michael R.; Forman, Henry J.; Fricker, Mark D.; Gems, David; Halestrap, Andrew P.; Halliwell, Barry; Jakob, Ursula; Johnston, Iain G.; Jones, Nick S.; Logan, David C.; Morgan, Bruce; Müller, Florian L.; Nicholls, David G.; Remington, S. James; Schumacker, Paul T.; Winterbourn, Christine C.; Sweetlove, Lee J.; Meyer, Andreas J.; Dick, Tobias P.; Murphy, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Ageing and lifespan of organisms are determined by complicated interactions between their genetics and the environment, but the cellular mechanisms remain controversial. There have been a number of studies suggesting that cellular energy metabolism and free radical dynamics affect lifespan, implicating mitochondrial function. Recently, Shen et al.1 provided apparent mechanistic insight by reporting that mitochondrial oscillations of ‘free radical production’, called ‘mitoflashes’, in the pharynx of 3-day old Caenorhabditis elegans correlated inversely with lifespan. The interpretation of ‘mitoflashes’ as ‘bursts of superoxide’ radicals assumes that circularly permuted yellow fluorescent protein (cpYFP) is a reliable indicator of mitochondrial superoxide2. This interpretation has been criticised because experiments and theoretical considerations both show that changes in cpYFP fluorescence are due to alterations in pH, not superoxide3-7. We now provide direct evidence that purified cpYFP is completely unresponsive to superoxide. Therefore ‘mitoflashes’ do not reflect superoxide generation and are not evidence for a link between mitochondrial free radical dynamics and lifespan. PMID:25341790

  9. Superoxide dismutase activity in mesocarp tissue from divergent Cucumis melo L. genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.) fruit matrix is unique among plant foods in being able to provide a protective medium in which the antioxidant activity of the enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) is preserved during the digestive process, and therefore, being able to elicit in vivo pharmacological effects ...

  10. Isolation and characterization of Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase in Fasciola gigantica.

    PubMed

    Lalrinkima, H; Raina, O K; Chandra, Dinesh; Jacob, Siju Susan; Bauri, R K; Chandra, Subhash; Yadav, H S; Singh, M N; Rialch, A; Varghese, A; Banerjee, P S; Kaur, Navneet; Sharma, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    A full-length complementary DNA (cDNA) encoding Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase was isolated from Fasciola gigantica that on nucleotide sequencing showed a close homology (98.9%) with Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD) of the temperate liver fluke, F. hepatica. Expression of the gene was found in all the three developmental stages of the parasite viz. adult, newly excysted juvenile and metacercaria at transcriptional level by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and at the protein level by Western blotting. F. gigantica Cu/Zn-SOD cDNA was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Enzyme activity of the recombinant protein was determined by nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and this activity was inactivated by hydrogen peroxide but not by sodium azide, indicating that the recombinant protein is Cu/Zn-SOD. The enzyme activity was relatively stable at a broad pH range of pH 4.0-10.0. Native Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase protein was detected in the somatic extract and excretory-secretory products of the adult F. gigantica by Western blotting. NBT-PAGE showed a single Cu/Zn-SOD present in the somatic extract while three SODs are released ex vivo by the adult parasite. The recombinant superoxide dismutase did not react with the serum from buffaloes infected with F. gigantica. The role of this enzyme in defense by the parasite against the host reactive oxygen species is discussed. PMID:25655406

  11. URBAN PARTICLE-INDUCED PULMONARY ARTERY CONSTRUCTION IS MEDIATED BY SUPEROXIDE PRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    URBAN PARTICLE-INDUCED PULMONARY ARTERY CONSTRICTION IS MEDIATED BY SUPEROXIDE PRODUCTION.Jacqueline D. Carter, Zhuowei Li, Lisa A. Dailey, Yuh-Chin T. Huang. CEMALB, University of North Carolina, and ORD, US EPA, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

    Exposure to particulate matter...

  12. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-derived NADPH fuels superoxide production in the failing heart

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the failing heart, NADPH oxidase and uncoupled NO synthase utilize cytosolic NADPH to form superoxide. NADPH is supplied principally by the pentose phosphate pathway, whose rate-limiting enzyme is glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). Therefore, we hypothesized that cardiac G6PD activation dr...

  13. CATALASE AND SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE OF ROOT-COLONIZING SAPROPHYTIC FLUORESCENT PSEUDOMONADS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Root-colonizing, saprophytic fluorescent pseudomonads of the Pseudomonas putida-P. fluorescens group express similar levels of catalase and superoxide dismutase activities during growth on a sucrose- and amino acid-rich medium. ncreased specific activities of catalase but not sup...

  14. Rate of reaction of superoxide radical with chloride-containing species

    SciTech Connect

    Long, C.A.; Bielski, B.H.J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper evaluates the rate constants for the reaction of superoxide radical with five common chloride-containing species (Cl/sup -/, ClO/sup -/, ClO/sub 2//sup -/, ClO/sub 3//sup -/, and ClO/sub 4//sup -/ and proposes a mechanism for those which react.

  15. Parasitization by Scleroderma guani influences expression of superoxide dismutase genes in Tenebrio molitor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is an antioxidant enzyme involved in detoxifying reactive oxygen species. In this study, we identified genes encoding the extracellular and intracellular copper-zinc SODs (ecCuZnSOD and icCuZnSOD) and a manganese SOD (MnSOD) in the yellow mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor....

  16. Mitochondria-targeted spin traps: synthesis, superoxide spin trapping, and mitochondrial uptake.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Micael; Poulhés, Florent; Rizzato, Egon; Rockenbauer, Antal; Banaszak, Karol; Karoui, Hakim; Lopez, Marcos; Zielonka, Jacek; Vasquez-Vivar, Jeannette; Sethumadhavan, Savitha; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Tordo, Paul; Ouari, Olivier

    2014-07-21

    Development of reliable methods and site-specific detection of free radicals is an active area of research. Here, we describe the synthesis and radical-trapping properties of new derivatives of DEPMPO and DIPPMPO, bearing a mitochondria-targeting triphenylphosphonium cationic moiety or guanidinium cationic group. All of the spin traps prepared have been observed to efficiently trap superoxide radical anions in a cell-free system. The superoxide spin adducts exhibited similar spectral properties, indicating no significant differences in the geometry of the cyclic nitroxide moieties of the spin adducts. The superoxide adduct stability was measured and observed to be highest (t1/2 = 73 min) for DIPPMPO nitrone linked to triphenylphosphonium moiety via a short carbon chain (Mito-DIPPMPO). The experimental results and DFT quantum chemical calculations indicate that the cationic property of the triphenylphosphonium group may be responsible for increased superoxide trapping efficiency and adduct stability of Mito-DIPPMPO, as compared to the DIPPMPO spin trap. The studies of uptake of the synthesized traps into isolated mitochondria indicated the importance of both cationic and lipophilic properties, with the DEPMPO nitrone linked to the triphenylphosphonium moiety via a long carbon chain (Mito10-DEPMPO) exhibiting the highest mitochondrial uptake. We conclude that, of the synthesized traps, Mito-DIPPMPO and Mito10-DEPMPO are the best candidates for potential mitochondria-specific spin traps for use in biologically relevant systems. PMID:24890552

  17. Induction of peroxidases and superoxide dismutases in transformed embryogenic calli of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Activities of peroxidase (POD) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzymes were analyzed in non-regenerative transformed embryogenic lines of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) carrying wound-inducible oryzacystatin I (OC-I), wound-inducible oryzacystatin I antisense (OC-Ias) or hygromycin phosphotransferase (...

  18. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Increase Superoxide Anion Production by Acting on NADPH Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Masoud, Rawand; Bizouarn, Tania; Trepout, Sylvain; Wien, Frank; Baciou, Laura; Marco, Sergio; Houée Levin, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) anatase nanoparticles (NPs) are metal oxide NPs commercialized for several uses of everyday life. However their toxicity has been poorly investigated. Cellular internalization of NPs has been shown to activate macrophages and neutrophils that contribute to superoxide anion production by the NADPH oxidase complex. Transmission electron micrososcopy images showed that the membrane fractions were close to the NPs while fluorescence indicated an interaction between NPs and cytosolic proteins. Using a cell-free system, we have investigated the influence of TiO2 NPs on the behavior of the NADPH oxidase. In the absence of the classical activator molecules of the enzyme (arachidonic acid) but in the presence of TiO2 NPs, no production of superoxide ions could be detected indicating that TiO2 NPs were unable to activate by themselves the complex. However once the NADPH oxidase was activated (i.e., by arachidonic acid), the rate of superoxide anion production went up to 140% of its value without NPs, this effect being dependent on their concentration. In the presence of TiO2 nanoparticles, the NADPH oxidase produces more superoxide ions, hence induces higher oxidative stress. This hyper-activation and the subsequent increase in ROS production by TiO2 NPs could participate to the oxidative stress development. PMID:26714308

  19. Superoxide anions mediate veratridine-induced cytochrome c release and caspase activity in bovine chromaffin cells

    PubMed Central

    Jordán, Joaquín; Galindo, María F; Tornero, Daniel; Benavides, Amparo; González, Constancio; Agapito, María T; González-Garcia, Carmen; Ceña, Valentín

    2002-01-01

    Mitochondrial mechanisms involved in veratridine-induced chromaffin cell death have been explored. Exposure to veratridine (30 μM, 1 h) produces cytochrome c release to the cytoplasm that seems to be mediated by superoxide anions and that is blocked by cyclosporin A (10 μM), MnTBAP (10 nM), catalase (100 IU ml−1) and vitamin E (50 μM). Following veratridine treatment, there is an increase in caspase-like activity, blocked by vitamin E (50 μM) and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore blocker cyclosporin A (10 μM). Superoxide anions open the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in isolated mitochondria, an effect that is blocked by vitamin E (50 μM) and cyclosporin A (10 μM), but not by the Ca2+ uniporter blocker ruthenium red (5 μM). These results strongly suggest that under the stress situation caused by veratridine, superoxide anions become important regulators of mitochondrial function in chromaffin cells. Exposure of isolated bovine chromaffin mitochondria to Ca2+ results in mitochondrial swelling. This effect was prevented by ruthenium red (5 μM) and cyclosporin A (10 μM), while it was not modified by vitamin E (50 μM). Veratridine (30 μM, 1 h) markedly decreased total glutathione and GSH content in bovine chromaffin cells. In conclusion, superoxide anions seem to mediate veratridine-induced cytochrome c release, decrease in total glutathione, caspase activation and cell death in bovine chromaffin cells. PMID:12429571

  20. Superoxide dismutase activity in healthy and inflamed pulp tissues of permanent teeth in children.

    PubMed

    Tulunoglu, O; Alacam, A; Bastug, M; Yavuzer, S

    1998-01-01

    The free radicals play an important role in the tissue damage. Oxygen-derived free radicals are controlled by various cellular defense mechanisms consisting of enzymatic such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathion peroxidase and nonenzymatic scavenger components. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is responsible for the dismutation of the superoxide radicals into hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen. In this study, pulp samples extirpated from the teeth of the 27 children between 10-15 ages which diagnosed to be healthy, reversible pulpitis or symptomatic irreversible pulpitis were evaluated for the activity of superoxide dismutase enzyme. There were statistically significant differences between healthy and reversible pulpitis, and between reversible and symptomatic irreversible pulpitis groups. The SOD activity of the reversible pulpitis group were significantly lower than the irreversible pulpitis and healthy pulp groups. The evaluation of the data revealed that the quantity of SOD as a vitality protector enzyme is low at the beginning of the inflammation as a consequence of rapidly depletion and/or destruction of this enzyme, but as the inflammation proceeds the pulp tissue showed adaptation to this situation. PMID:9796506

  1. NADH induces the generation of superoxide radicals in leaf peroxisomes. [Pisum sativum L

    SciTech Connect

    del Rio, L.A.; Sandalio, L.M.; Palma, J.M. ); Fernandez, V.M.; Ruperez, F.L. )

    1989-03-01

    In peroxisomes isolated from pea leaves (Pisum sativum L.) the production of superoxide free radicals (O{sub 2}{sup {minus}}) by xanthine and NADH was investigated. In peroxisomal membranes, 100 micromolar NADH induced the production of O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} radicals. In the soluble fractions of peroxisomes, no generation of O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} radicals was observed by incubation with either NADH or xanthine, although xanthine oxidase was found located predominantly in the matrix of peroxisomes. The failure of xanthine to induce superoxide generation was probably due to the inability to fully suppress the endogenous Mn-superoxide dismutase activity by inhibitors which were inactive against xanthine oxidase. The generation of superoxide radicals in leaf peroxisomes together with the recently described production of these oxygen radicals in glyoxysomes suggests that O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} generation could be a common metabolic property of peroxisomes and further supports the existence of active oxygen-related roles for peroxisomes in cellular metabolism.

  2. Salicylate selectively kills cochlear spiral ganglion neurons by paradoxically up-regulating superoxide.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lili; Ding, Dalian; Su, Jiping; Manohar, Senthilvelan; Salvi, Richard

    2013-10-01

    Aspirin and its active ingredient salicylate are potent antioxidants that have been reported to be neuro- and otoprotective. However, when consumed in large quantities, these drugs can cause temporary hearing loss and tinnitus. Moreover, recent studies indicate that after several days of treatment, salicylate selectively destroys the spiral ganglion neurons and auditory nerve fibers that relay sounds from the sensory hair cells to the brain. Why salicylate selectively damages spiral ganglion neurons while sparing the hair cells and supports cells is unclear. Here we show that high dose of salicylate trigger an apoptotic response in spiral ganglion neurons characterized morphologically by soma shrinkage and nuclear condensation and fragmentation plus activation of extrinsic initiator caspase-8 and intrinsic initiator caspase-9 several days after the onset of drug treatment. Salicylate treatment triggered an upsurge in the toxic superoxide radical only in spiral ganglion neurons, but not in neighboring hair cells and support cells. Mn TMPyP pentachloride, a cell permeable scavenger of superoxide blocked the expression of superoxide staining in spiral ganglion neurons and almost completely blocked the damage to the nerve fibers and spiral ganglion neurons. NMDA receptor activation is known to increase neuronal superoxide levels. Since NMDA receptors are mainly found on spiral ganglion neurons and since salicylate enhances NMDA receptor currents, the selective killing of spiral ganglion neurons is likely a consequence of enhanced and sustained activation of NMDA receptors by salicylate. PMID:23494753

  3. Inhibition of the Ca sup 2+ -ATPase of vascular smooth muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum by superoxide radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Yuichiro; Ford, G.D. )

    1991-03-15

    The effect of oxygen free radicals generated by hypoxanthine plus xanthine oxidase on the Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase of sarcoplasmic reticulum from bovine aortic smooth muscle were studied. Exogenous hypoxanthine plus xanthine oxidase produced an hypoxanthine concentration dependent inhibition of the Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase. The inhibition could be completely blocked by superoxide dismutase but not by either mannitol or deferoxamine. Direct addition of reagent hydrogen peroxide in the {mu}M range did not cause significant inhibition. These results suggest that superoxide is the primary damaging species. Additionally, 1.16 {plus minus} 0.17 mU/g wet wt of xanthine oxidase activity were detected in the post-nuclear supernatant of bovine aortic smooth muscle, suggesting the existence of a possible intracellular source of superoxide. This value was calculated to be approximately 5 mU/ml by using a usual value of vascular smooth muscle cellular volume. Thus the level of endogenous xanthine oxidase resident in vascular smooth muscle is comparable with the level of exogenous xanthine oxidase used in the present study. These findings suggest a potential role of xanthine oxidase-generated superoxide in free radical injury to vascular smooth muscle.

  4. Copper-Zinc Superoxide Dismutase: A Unique Biological "Ligand" for Bioinorganic Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valentine, Joan Selverstone; de Freitas, Duarte Mota

    1985-01-01

    Discusses superoxide dismutase (SOD) research and the properties of copper, zinc (Cu, Zn)-SOD. Emphasizes the controversy concerning the role of Cu,Zn-SOD and other SOD enzymes as protective agents in reactions involving dioxygen metabolism, and the properties of Cu, Zn-SOD that make it an interesting biological ligand for physical studies of…

  5. A cambialistic superoxide dismutase in the thermophilic photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Vanessa L; LoBrutto, Russell; Selvaraj, Fabiyola M; Blankenship, Robert E

    2004-06-01

    Superoxide dismutase from the thermophilic anoxygenic photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus was cloned, purified, and characterized. This protein is in the manganese- and iron-containing family of superoxide dismutases and is able to use both manganese and iron catalytically. This appears to be the only soluble superoxide dismutase in C. aurantiacus. Iron and manganese cofactors were identified by using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and were quantified by atomic absorption spectroscopy. By metal enrichment of growth media and by performing metal fidelity studies, the enzyme was found to be most efficient with manganese incorporated, yet up to 30% of the activity was retained with iron. Assimilation of iron or manganese ions into superoxide dismutase was also found to be affected by the growth conditions. This enzyme was also found to be remarkably thermostable and was resistant to H2O2 at concentrations up to 80 mM. Reactive oxygen defense mechanisms have not been previously characterized in the organisms belonging to the phylum Chloroflexi. These systems are of interest in C. aurantiacus since this bacterium lives in a hyperoxic environment and is subject to high UV radiation fluxes. PMID:15150226

  6. Molecular Cloning and Expression of Sequence Variants of Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Genes from Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are very harmful to living organisms due to the potential oxidation of membrane lipids, DNA, proteins, and carbohydrates. Transformed E.coli strain QC 871, superoxide dismutase (SOD) double-mutant, with three sequence variant MnSOD1, MnSOD2, and MnSOD3 manganese supero...

  7. Novel reversible and selective nerve agent simulant detection in conjunction with superoxide "turn-on" probing.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yoon Jeong; Murale, Dhiraj P; Churchill, David G

    2014-04-01

    Herein, we present fluorescein as a reversible fluorescent sensor for nerve agent simulants diethylchlorophosphate (DCP), diethyl methylphosphonate (DEMP), and diethyl cyanophosphonate (DECP). The superoxide allows for an "off-on" mechanism to regenerate fluorescein. The order of decrease in fluorescence intensity for nerve agent simulants is DCP > DEMP ≫ DECP. PMID:24558644

  8. Exogenous superoxide dismutase may lose its antidotal ability on rice leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaf diffusates of the resistant rice cultivars suppressed spore germination of blast fungus (Magnaporthe grisea). Bovine Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) added to the diffusate abolished its toxicity. However, the enzyme added to the inoculum did not affect the toxicity of the diffusate. Even the s...

  9. Curcumin Rescues Diabetic Renal Fibrosis by Targeting Superoxide-Mediated Wnt Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Ho, Cheng; Hsu, Yung-Chien; Lei, Chen-Chou; Mau, Shu-Ching; Shih, Ya-Hsueh; Lin, Chun-Liang

    2016-03-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate whether curcumin can weaken diabetic nephropathy by modulating both oxidative stress and renal injury from Wnt signaling mediation. Wnt5a/β-catenin depression and induction of superoxide synthesis are associated with high glucose (HG) induced transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and fibronectin expression in mesangial cells. Curcumin resumes HG depression of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and alleviates HG induction of superoxide, TGF-β1 and fibronectin expression in renal mesangial cell. Exogenous curcumin alleviated urinary total proteinuria and serum superoxide level in diabetic rats. Based on laser-captured microdissection for quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, it was found that diabetes significantly increased TGF-β1 and fibronectin expression in line with depressed Wnt5a expression. Curcumin treatment reduced the TGF-β1 and fibronectin activation and the inhibiting effect of diabetes on Wnt5a/β-catenin expression in renal glomeruli. Immunohistochemistry showed that curcumin treatment significantly reduced 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, TGF-β1 and fibronectin, and was in line with the restoration of the suppressed Wnt5a expression immunoreactivities in glomeruli of diabetic rats. Curcumin alleviated extracellular matrix accumulation in diabetic nephropathy by not only preventing the diabetes-mediated superoxide synthesis but also resuming downregulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. These findings suggest that regulation of Wnt activity by curcumin is a feasible alternative strategy to rescue diabetic renal injury. PMID:26992258

  10. Involvement of Extracellular Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase in Cotton Fiber Primary and Secondary Cell Wall Biosynthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extracellular Cu/Zn superoxide dismutases (CSDs) that catalyze the conversion of superoxide to hydrogen peroxide have been suggested to be involved in lignification of secondary walls in spinach, pine and aspen. In cotton fibers, hydrogen peroxide was proposed to be involved in the induction of seco...

  11. NADPH Oxidase-Derived Superoxide Provides a Third Signal for CD4 T Cell Effector Responses.

    PubMed

    Padgett, Lindsey E; Tse, Hubert M

    2016-09-01

    Originally recognized for their direct induced toxicity as a component of the innate immune response, reactive oxygen species (ROS) can profoundly modulate T cell adaptive immune responses. Efficient T cell activation requires: signal 1, consisting of an antigenic peptide-MHC complex binding with the TCR; signal 2, the interaction of costimulatory molecules on T cells and APCs; and signal 3, the generation of innate immune-derived ROS and proinflammatory cytokines. This third signal, in particular, has proven essential in generating productive and long-lasting immune responses. Our laboratory previously demonstrated profound Ag-specific hyporesponsiveness in the absence of NADPH oxidase-derived superoxide. To further examine the consequences of ROS deficiency on Ag-specific T cell responses, our laboratory generated the OT-II.Ncf1(m1J) mouse, possessing superoxide-deficient T cells recognizing the nominal Ag OVA323-339 In this study, we demonstrate that OT-II.Ncf1(m1J) CD4 T cells displayed a severe reduction in Th1 T cell responses, in addition to blunted IL-12R expression and severely attenuated proinflammatory chemokine ligands. Conversely, IFN-γ synthesis and IL-12R synthesis were rescued by the addition of exogenous superoxide via the paramagnetic superoxide donor potassium dioxide or superoxide-sufficient dendritic cells. Ultimately, these data highlight the importance of NADPH oxidase-derived ROS in providing a third signal for adaptive immune maturation by modulating the IL-12/IL-12R pathway and the novelty of the OT-II.Ncf1(m1J) mouse model to determine the role of redox-dependent signaling on effector responses. Thus, targeting ROS represents a promising therapeutic strategy in dampening Ag-specific T cell responses and T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes. PMID:27474077

  12. Detection of superoxide production in stimulated and unstimulated living cells using new cyclic nitrone spin traps.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Kahina; Hardy, Micael; Poulhès, Florent; Karoui, Hakim; Tordo, Paul; Ouari, Olivier; Peyrot, Fabienne

    2014-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), including superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), have a diverse array of physiological and pathological effects within living cells depending on the extent, timing, and location of their production. For measuring ROS production in cells, the ESR spin trapping technique using cyclic nitrones distinguishes itself from other methods by its specificity for superoxide and hydroxyl radical. However, several drawbacks, such as the low spin trapping rate and the spontaneous and cell-enhanced decomposition of the spin adducts to ESR-silent products, limit the application of this method to biological systems. Recently, new cyclic nitrones bearing a triphenylphosphonium (Mito-DIPPMPO) or a permethylated β-cyclodextrin moiety (CD-DIPPMPO) have been synthesized and their spin adducts demonstrated increased stability in buffer. In this study, a comparison of the spin trapping efficiency of these new compounds with commonly used cyclic nitrone spin traps, i.e., 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO), and analogs BMPO, DEPMPO, and DIPPMPO, was performed on RAW 264.7 macrophages stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Our results show that Mito-DIPPMPO and CD-DIPPMPO enable a higher detection of superoxide adduct, with a low (if any) amount of hydroxyl adduct. CD-DIPPMPO, especially, appears to be a superior spin trap for extracellular superoxide detection in living macrophages, allowing measurement of superoxide production in unstimulated cells for the first time. The main rationale put forward for this extreme sensitivity is that the extracellular localization of the spin trap prevents the reduction of the spin adducts by ascorbic acid and glutathione within cells. PMID:24662195

  13. Modulation of pulmonary macrophage superoxide release and tumoricidal activity following activation by biological response modifiers.

    PubMed

    Drath, D B

    1986-10-01

    Following immunologic activation, pulmonary macrophages may prevent or cause regression of lung metastases by mechanisms which remain largely unknown. The studies described here were designed to determine if enhanced oxygen metabolite release was related to postactivation tumoricidal activity. We have shown that in vitro activation of Fischer 344 rat pulmonary macrophages by either free or liposome-encapsulated muramyl dipeptide leads to both enhanced release of superoxide anions and marked tumoricidal activity against syngenic (Fischer 13762), allogeneic (Schmidt-Ruppin RR 1022) and xenogeneic (Fibrosarcoma MCA-F) 125I-deoxyuridine-labeled target cells. This immune modulator did not, however, metabolically activate pulmonary macrophages as effectively as liposome-encapsulated lipopolysaccharide. A 24-h in vitro incubation with either 150 U or 300 U of interferon-gamma (3 X 10(6) U/mg) or 30 U, 150 U or 300 U of interferon-alpha (6 X 10(5) U/mg) caused a significant elevation in superoxide release above controls, whereas short-term exposure (2 or 4 h) had little or no effect. Free or encapsulated 6-O-stearoyl muramyl dipeptide, on the other hand, did increase superoxide levels at all 3 time periods. When either interferon-gamma or free or encapsulated muramyl dipeptide derivative were administered to intact rats by either i.v. injection, intratracheal instillation or osmotic minipump infusion, pulmonary macrophage tumoricidal activity was observed 96 h after cell harvesting. Zymosan-stimulated superoxide release, however, was not consistently elevated above control or empty liposome treatment following this course of in vivo activation. The data collectively suggest that in vivo pulmonary macrophage activation to a tumoricidal state and metabolic activation resulting in enhanced superoxide may be separable events. PMID:3021650

  14. Unraveling the role of animal heme peroxidases in superoxide mediated Mn oxide formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Learman, D. R.; Hansel, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    Manganese(III,IV) oxides are important in the environment as they can impact the fate of a broad range of nutrients (e.g. carbon and phosphate) and contaminates (e.g. lead and chromium). Bacteria play a valuable role in the production of Mn oxides, yet the mechanisms and physiological reasons remain unclear. Roseobacter sp. AzwK-3b, an organism within the abundant and ubiquitous Roseobacter clade, has recently been shown to oxidize Mn(II) via a novel pathway that involves enzymatic extracellular superoxide production. However, in reactions with only Mn(II) and abiotically generated superoxide, we find superoxide alone is not enough to produce Mn(III,IV) oxides. Scavenging of the byproduct hydrogen peroxide (via the addition of catalase) is required to generate Mn oxides via abiotic reaction of Mn(II) with superoxide. Thus, R. AzwK-3b must produce superoxide and also scavenge hydrogen peroxide to form Mn oxides. Further, in-gel Mn(II) oxidation assay revealed a protein band that could generate Mn oxides in the presence of soluble Mn(II). This Mn(II)-oxidizing protein band was excised from the gel and the peptides identified via mass spectrometry. An animal heme peroxidase (AHP) was the predominant protein found in this band. This protein is homologous to the AHPs previously implicated as a Mn(II)-oxidizing enzyme within the Alphaproteobacteria, Erythrobacter SD-21 and Aurantimonas manganoxydans strain SI85-9A1. Currently, protein expression of the AHPs in R. AzwK-3b is being examined to determine if expression is correlated with Mn(II) concentration or oxidative stress. Our data suggests that AHPs do not directly oxidize Mn(II) but rather plays a role in scavenging hydrogen peroxide and/or producing an organic Mn(III) ligand that complexes Mn(III) and likely aids in Mn oxide precipitation.

  15. soxR, a locus governing a superoxide response regulon in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Tsaneva, I R; Weiss, B

    1990-01-01

    The nfo (endonuclease IV) gene of Escherichia coli is induced by superoxide generators such as paraquat (methyl viologen). An nfo'-lacZ operon fusion was used to isolate extragenic mutations affecting its expression. The mutations also affected the expression of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, Mn2(+)-superoxide dismutase (sodA), and three lacZ fusions to soi (superoxide-inducible) genes of unknown function. The mutations were located 2 kilobases clockwise of ssb at 92 min on the current linkage map. One set of mutations, in a new gene designated soxR, caused constitutive overexpression of nfo and the other genes. It included insertions or deletions affecting the carboxyl end of a 17-kilodalton polypeptide. In a soxR mutant, the expression of sodA, unlike that of nfo, was also regulated independently by oxygen tension. Two other mutants were isolated in which the target genes were noninducible; they had an increased sensitivity to killing by superoxide-generating compounds. One had a Tn10 insertion in or near soxR; the other had a multigene deletion encompassing soxR. Therefore, the region functions as a positive regulator because it encodes one or more products needed for the induction of nfo. Regulation is likely to be at the level of transcription because the mutations were able to affect the expression of an nfo'-lac operon fusion that contained the ribosome-binding site for lacZ. Some mutant plasmids that failed to suppress (or complement) constitutivity in trans had insertion mutations several hundred nucleotides upstream of soxR in the general region of a gene for a 13-kilodalton protein encoded by the opposite strand, raising the possibility of a second regulatory gene in this region. The result define a new regulon, controlled by soxR, mediating at least part of the global response to superoxide in E. coli. Images PMID:1695893

  16. Kinetic investigation of catalytic disproportionation of superoxide ions in the non-aqueous electrolyte used in Li-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Dong; McKinnon, Meaghan E.; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Qu, Deyang

    2015-01-01

    Superoxide reacts with carbonate solvents in Li-air batteries. Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane is found to catalyze a more rapid superoxide (O2-) disproportionation reaction than the reaction between superoxide and propylene carbonate (PC). With this catalysis, the negative impact of the reaction between the electrolyte and O2- produced by the O2 reduction can be minimized. A simple kinetic study using ESR spectroscopy was reported to determine reaction orders and rate constants for the reaction between PC and superoxide, and the disproportionation of superoxide catalyzed by Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane and Li ions. The reactions are found to be first order and the rate constants are 0.033 s-1 M-1, 0.020 s-1 M-1 and 0.67 s-1 M-1 for reactions with PC, Li ion and Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane, respectively.

  17. Concerted action of reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase in preventing redox cycling of dihydroxypyrimidines, and their role in antioxidant defence.

    PubMed

    Winterbourn, C C; Munday, R

    1990-01-01

    Dialuric Acid, the reduced form of the beta-cell toxin alloxan, and the related fava bean derivatives divicine and isouramil, autoxidize rapidly in neutral solution by a radical mechanism. GSH promotes redox cycling of each compound, with concomitant GSH oxidation and H2O2 production. With superoxide dismutase present, there is a lag period in which little oxidation occurs, followed by rapid oxidation. GSH extends this lag and decreases the subsequent rate of oxidation, so that with superoxide dismutase and a sufficient excess of GSH, coupled oxidation of GSH and each pyrimidine is almost completely suppressed. This mechanism may be a means whereby GSH in combination with superoxide dismutase protects against the cytotoxic effects of these reactive pyrimidines. Superoxide dismutase may also protect cells against oxidative stress in other situations where GSH acts as a radical scavenger, and we propose that the concerted action of GSH and superoxide dismutase constitutes an important antioxidant defence. PMID:2354807

  18. Kinetic investigation of catalytic disproportionation of superoxide ions in the non-aqueous electrolyte used in Li–air batteries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Dong; McKinnon, Meaghan E.; Yang, Xiao -Qing; Qu, Deyang

    2014-10-28

    Superoxide reacts with carbonate solvents in Li–air batteries. Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane is found to catalyze a more rapid superoxide (O2-) disproportionation reaction than the reaction between superoxide and propylene carbonate (PC). With this catalysis, the negative impact of the reaction between the electrolyte and O2-produced by the O2 reduction can be minimized. A simple kinetic study using ESR spectroscopy was reported to determine reaction orders and rate constants for the reaction between PC and superoxide, and the disproportionation of superoxide catalyzed by Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane and Li ions. As a result, the reactions are found to be first order and the rate constants aremore » 0.033 s-1 M-1, 0.020 s-1 M-1and 0.67 s-1M-1 for reactions with PC, Li ion and Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane, respectively.« less

  19. Dynamics of Superoxide Production and Decay in Natural Trichodesmium Colonies from the Sargasso Sea: Implications for Cell Signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansel, C. M.; Buchwald, C.; Diaz, J. M.; Dyhrman, S.; Van Mooy, B. A. S.

    2014-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key players in the biogeochemistry of the ocean, where they serve a critical role in the cycling of carbon and metals. Research in the past decade has introduced phytoplankton and, most recently, heterotrophic bacteria as significant sources of ROS, including superoxide, within both photic and aphotic regions of the ocean. ROS are both beneficial and detrimental to life. For instance, superoxide is a vital inter- and intra-cellular signaling molecule, yet at high concentrations it induces lipid peroxidation and initiates programmed cell death (PCD). In fact, superoxide has been implicated in PCD in the nitrogen-fixing diazotroph Trichodesmium, presumably leading to the demise of blooms within oligotrophic marine systems. Here, we explore the rates of superoxide production and decay by natural Trichodesmium populations obtained from various surface waters in the Sargasso Sea. We investigate also the role of light and colony density and morphology (puff v. raft) on superoxide fluxes. We find that Trichodesmium colonies produce extracellular superoxide at extremely high rates in the dark that are on par with those of the toxic raphidophyte Chattonella. The rates of superoxide production, however, rapidly decline with increasing cell density pointing to a role for superoxide in cell signaling in these organisms. We also find extremely rapid extracellular superoxide degradation by Trichodesmium. Together, this likely reflects a need for these organisms to maintain ROS at levels that will support signaling but below the threshold level that triggers PCD or oxidative damage. We also show differences in the effect of light on superoxide fluxes as a function of Trichodesmium colony morphology, suggesting differences in either colony physiology or associated bacterial symbionts. These findings point to complex physiological, ecological, and physical influences on ROS dynamics in phytoplankton that require further exploration.

  20. Superoxide radicals increase transforming growth factor-{beta}1 and collagen release from human lung fibroblasts via cellular influx through chloride channels

    SciTech Connect

    Qi Shufan Hartog, Gertjan J.M. den; Bast, Aalt

    2009-05-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of fibrosis. However, it remains unclear which ROS is the major cause. We hypothesize that superoxide elicits specific toxicity to human lung fibroblasts and plays an important role in the development of pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, superoxide generated from xanthine and xanthine oxidase activated lung fibroblasts by increasing the release of TGF-{beta}1 and collagen. This was associated with increased levels of intracellular superoxide. SOD and tempol, by scavenging respectively extracellular and intracellular superoxide, prevented the activation of fibroblasts induced by exposure to exogenous superoxide, whereas catalase did not. Moreover, hydrogen peroxide did not activate fibroblasts. Apparently, superoxide rather than hydrogen peroxide is involved in the regulation of TGF-{beta}1 and collagen release in lung fibroblasts. The chloride channel blocker, DIDS, inhibited the increase of intracellular superoxide levels induced by exogenous superoxide and consequently prevented the activation of fibroblasts. This suggests that the cellular influx of superoxide through chloride channels is essential for superoxide-induced activation of fibroblasts. ERK1/2 and p38 MAPKs are involved in the intracellular pathway leading to superoxide-induced fibroblasts activation. Superoxide possesses until now undiscovered specific pro-fibrotic properties in human lung fibroblasts. This takes place via the cellular influx of superoxide through chloride channels rather than via the formation of hydrogen peroxide.

  1. Superoxide release by confluent endothelial cells, an electron spin resonance (ESR) study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbacanne, M.-A.; Margeat, E.; Arnal, J.-F.; Nepveu, F.; Souchard, J.-P.

    1999-01-01

    In the present study we used ESR to detect the release of oxygen radicals by endothelial cells stimulated with calcium ionophore A23187. Dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) was used as a spin trap. Although the observed adduct (DMPO-OH) suggested the presence of the hydroxyl radical, the use of superoxide dismutase and catalase revealed that superoxide anion was released in the medium. Superoxide production was more efficient when the cells were post-confluent for a few days. The release of superoxide was 3-fold greater in growth arrested cells (D6-D9) than in proliferating cells (D0). Although two inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain carbanyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), antimycine decreased the ESR signal by 35%, the use of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) suggested that the release of O2- occurred in the cell membrane. The physiological significance of this extracellular superoxide release by post-confluent cells deserves further study. Ce travail présente une étude par RSE de la libération des radicaux oxygénés par les cellules endothéliales bovines (BAEC) sous l'effet de l'ionophore calcique A23187. Le diméthyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxyde (DMPO) est utilisé comme piégeur de spin. Bien que l'adduit formé (DMPO-OH) semble traduire la présence du radical hydroxyle .OH, l'utilisation de superoxyde dismutase et de catalase a révélé que les cellules endothéliales libéraient l'anion superoxyde. La production du radical superoxyde est plus abondante lorsque les cellules sont à confluence depuis plusieurs jours. Lorsque les cellules sont entre J6 et J9, la production de superoxyde est trois fois supérieure à celle observée lorsque les cellules sont en prolifération (J0). Bien que deux inhibiteurs de la chaîne mitochondriale 1-carbonyldinitrile-m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), antimycineinhibent de 35 % le signal RPE, l'utilisation de superoxyde dismutase (SOD) et du tumor necrosis factor (TNF) sugg

  2. Extracellular Production and Degradation of Superoxide in the Coral Stylophora pistillata and Cultured Symbiodinium

    PubMed Central

    Saragosti, Eldad; Tchernov, Dan; Katsir, Adi; Shaked, Yeala

    2010-01-01

    Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are thought to play a major role in cell death pathways and bleaching in scleractinian corals. Direct measurements of ROS in corals are conspicuously in short supply, partly due to inherent problems with ROS quantification in cellular systems. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we characterized the dynamics of the reactive oxygen species superoxide anion radical (O2−) in the external milieu of the coral Stylophora pistillata. Using a sensitive, rapid and selective chemiluminesence-based technique, we measured extracellular superoxide production and detoxification activity of symbiont (non-bleached) and aposymbiont (bleached) corals, and of cultured Symbiodinium (from clades A and C). Bleached and non-bleached Stylophora fragments were found to produce superoxide at comparable rates of 10−11–10−9 mol O2− mg protein−1 min−1 in the dark. In the light, a two-fold enhancement in O2− production rates was observed in non-bleached corals, but not in bleached corals. Cultured Symbiodinium produced superoxide in the dark at a rate of . Light was found to markedly enhance O2− production. The NADPH Oxidase inhibitor Diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI) strongly inhibited O2− production by corals (and more moderately by algae), possibly suggesting an involvement of NADPH Oxidase in the process. An extracellular O2− detoxifying activity was found for bleached and non-bleached Stylophora but not for Symbiodinium. The O2− detoxifying activity was partially characterized and found to resemble that of the enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD). Conclusions/Significance The findings of substantial extracellular O2− production as well as extracellular O2− detoxifying activity may shed light on the chemical interactions between the symbiont and its host and between the coral and its environment. Superoxide production by Symbiodinium possibly implies that algal bearing corals are more susceptible to an internal

  3. Regulation of an in vivo metal-exchangeable superoxide dismutase from Propionibacterium shermanii exhibiting activity with different metal cofactors.

    PubMed Central

    Sehn, A P; Meier, B

    1994-01-01

    The anaerobic, but aerotolerant Propionibacterium freudenreichii sp. shermanii contains a single superoxide dismutase [EC 1.15.1.1.] exhibiting comparable activity with iron or manganese as metal cofactor. The formation of superoxide dismutase is not depending on the supplementation of iron or manganese to the culture medium. Even in the absence of these metals the protein is built in comparable amounts. Bacteria grown in the absence of iron and manganese synthesize a superoxide dismutase with very low activity which had incorporated copper. If the medium was also depleted of copper, cobalt was incorporated, leading to an enzymically inactive form. In the absence of cobalt an enzymically inactive superoxide dismutase was built with unknown metal contents. Upon aeration the amount of superoxide dismutase activity increased continuously up to 9 h, due to a de novo synthesis of the protein. This superoxide dismutase had incorporated iron into the active centre. The superoxide dismutase of Propionibacterium shermanii is able to form a much wider variety of complexes with trace metal ions in vivo than previously recognized, leading to the hypothesis that the original function of these proteins was the binding of cytoplasmic trace metals present in excess. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7818484

  4. Enzyme release and superoxide anion production by human alveolar macrophages stimulated with immunoglobulin E.

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, M; Tonnel, A B; Capron, A; Voisin, C

    1980-01-01

    Human alveolar macrophages specifically released lysosomal beta-glucuronidase and neutral proteases when successively incubated with IgE, and then, for 30 min, with anti-IgE. Superoxide anion O2- generation was obtained when anti-IgE-opsonized zymosan was added to IgE-incubated cells. Macrophages from smokers excreted twice as much enzymes and superoxide as cells from non-smokers. It was possible to induce the specific release of beta-glucuronidase with normal alveolar macrophages successively incubated with the serum of patients allergic to house dust or to grass pollen and then with the specific allergen. This characteristic opens the field to a direct test for allergic sera by analogy with the allergen-induced degranulation test of sensitized basophils. PMID:6254706

  5. Observation of superoxide production during catalysis of Bacillus subtilis oxalate decarboxylase at pH 4.

    PubMed

    Twahir, Umar T; Stedwell, Corey N; Lee, Cory T; Richards, Nigel G J; Polfer, Nicolas C; Angerhofer, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    This contribution describes the trapping of the hydroperoxyl radical at a pH of 4 during turnover of wild-type oxalate decarboxylase and its T165V mutant using the spin-trap BMPO. Radicals were detected and identified by a combination of EPR and mass spectrometry. Superoxide, or its conjugate acid, the hydroperoxyl radical, is expected as an intermediate in the decarboxylation and oxidation reactions of the oxalate monoanion, both of which are promoted by oxalate decarboxylase. Another intermediate, the carbon dioxide radical anion was also observed. The quantitative yields of superoxide trapping are similar in the wild type and the mutant while it is significantly different for the trapping of the carbon dioxide radical anion. This suggests that the two radicals are released from different sites of the protein. PMID:25526893

  6. Silibinin induces protective superoxide generation in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Jun; Jiang, Yuan-Yuan; Wei, Xiao-Feng; Huang, Huai; Tashiro, Shin-Ichi; Onodera, Satoshi; Ikejima, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    The pharmacological activity of polyphenolic silibinin from milk thistle (Silybum marianum) is primarily due to its antioxidant property. However, this study found that silibinin promoted sustained superoxide (O(2)(.-)) production that was specifically scavenged by exogenous superoxide dismutase (SOD) in MCF-7 cells, while the activity of endogenous SOD was not changed by silibinin. Previous work proved that silibinin induced MCF-7 cell apoptosis through mitochondrial pathway and this study further proved that O(2)(.-) generation induced by silibinin was also related to mitochondria. It was found that respiratory chain complexes I, II and III were all involved in silibinin-induced O(2)(.-) generation. Moreover, it was found that silibinin-induced O(2)(.-) had protective effect, as exogenous SOD markedly enhanced silibinin-induced apoptosis. PMID:19968587

  7. Paraquat Suicide in a Young Woman: Results of Therapy Directed Against the Superoxide Radical

    PubMed Central

    Harley, John B.; Grinspan, Salomon; Root, Richard K.

    1977-01-01

    The clinical course of a young woman following two separate suicide attempts using the herbicide paraquat is reported. The patient survived an intramuscular injection of paraquat almost asymptomatically, but later exhibited a typical fatal course with fulminant proliferative pulmonary fibrosis after an intravenous injection. Fibrosis and death occurred despite a therapeutic regimen based upon a known action of paraquat, the generation of superoxide (O2[unk]), using superoxide dismutase, α-tocopherol, and ascorbic acid in conjunction with forced diuresis and prednisone. While treatment failed explanations for the failure of therapy in this case and current therapeutic alternatives are discussed so that they may be considered when future cases are encountered. ImagesFIG. 2FIG. 3 PMID:203128

  8. Tandem arrangement of photolyase and superoxide dismutase genes in Halobacterium halobium.

    PubMed Central

    Takao, M; Kobayashi, T; Oikawa, A; Yasui, A

    1989-01-01

    A DNA fragment containing the photolyase gene was cloned from Halobacterium halobium. The deduced amino acid sequence is highly similar to those of four known photolyases from eubacteria and a eucaryote. The cloned gene expressed in Escherichia coli cells the survival of UV-irradiated host cells by photoreactivation. These results indicate that photolyases of eucaryotes, eubacteria, and archaebacteria are derived from a common origin. In this cloned DNA fragment, two additional open reading frames (ORFs), ORF 151 and ORF 200, were found in the 5' and 3' adjacent flanking regions of the photolyase gene. ORF 200 shows unequivocal amino acid sequence homology to all known manganese and iron superoxide dismutases. Northern (RNA) hybridization analysis of H. halobium RNA revealed the existence of three transcripts, one of which covered all three ORFs, indicating that photolyase and superoxide dismutase are partly cotranscribed in this bacterium. Images PMID:2681164

  9. Iron superoxide dismutases in eukaryotic pathogens: new insights from Apicomplexa and Trypanosoma structures

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Isabelle Q. H.; Davies, Douglas R.; Moretti, Nilmar Silvio; Shanmugam, Dhanasekaran; Cestari, Igor; Anupama, Atashi; Fairman, James W.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Stuart, Kenneth; Schenkman, Sergio; Myler, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Prior studies have highlighted the potential of superoxide dismutases as drug targets in eukaryotic pathogens. This report presents the structures of three iron-dependent superoxide dismutases (FeSODs) from Trypanosoma cruzi, Leishmania major and Babesia bovis. Comparison with existing structures from Plasmodium and other trypanosome isoforms shows a very conserved overall fold with subtle differences. In particular, structural data suggest that B. bovis FeSOD may display similar resistance to peroxynitrite-mediated inactivation via an intramolecular electron-transfer pathway as previously described in T. cruzi FeSOD isoform B, thus providing valuable information for structure-based drug design. Furthermore, lysine-acetylation results in T. cruzi indicate that acetylation occurs at a position close to that responsible for the regulation of acetylation-mediated activity in the human enzyme. PMID:25961325

  10. Observation of Superoxide Production During Catalysis of Bacillus subtilis Oxalate Decarboxylase at pH4

    PubMed Central

    Twahir, Umar T.; Stedwell, Corey N.; Lee, Cory T.; Richards, Nigel G. J.; Polfer, Nicolas C.; Angerhofer, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    This contribution describes the trapping of the hydroperoxyl radical at a pH of 4 during turnover of wild-type oxalate decarboxylase and its T165V mutant using the spin trap BMPO. Radicals were detected and identified by a combination of EPR and mass spectrometry. Superoxide, or its conjugate acid, the hydroperoxyl radical, is expected as an intermediate in the decarboxylation and oxidation reactions of the oxalate monoanion both of which are promoted by oxalate decarboxylase. Another intermediate, the carbon dioxide radical anion was also observed. The quantitative yields of superoxide trapping is similar in the wild type and the mutant while it is significantly different for the trapping of the carbon dioxide radical anion. This suggests that the two radicals are released from different sites of the protein. PMID:25526893