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Sample records for high-isoelectric-point superoxide dismutase1cw

  1. pH-Responsive poly(itaconic acid-co-N-vinylpyrrolidone) hydrogels with reduced ionic strength loading solutions offer improved oral delivery potential for high isoelectric point-exhibiting therapeutic proteins.

    PubMed

    Koetting, Michael C; Peppas, Nicholas A

    2014-08-25

    pH-Responsive hydrogels comprised of itaconic acid copolymerized with N-vinylpyrrolidone (P(IA-co-NVP)) were synthesized and tested as carriers for the oral delivery of high isoelectric point (pI) exhibiting therapeutic proteins. Swelling studies show that P(IA-co-NVP) hydrogels exhibit significantly greater and faster pH-responsive swelling than previously studied methacrylic acid-based hydrogels, achieving up to 68% greater equilibrium swelling and 10.4 times greater swelling in time-limited experiments. Using salmon calcitonin as a model high pI protein therapeutic, we show that P(IA-co-NVP) hydrogels exhibit significantly greater delivery potential than methacrylic acid-based hydrogels. Additionally, we show that utilizing a lower ionic strength solution during drug loading significantly improves drug delivery potential for high pI therapeutics. By using a 1.5mM PBS buffer rather than the standard 150 mM PBS buffer during loading, up to 83 times as much calcitonin can be delivered in neutral conditions, with up to a 9.6-fold improvement in percent release. Using P(IA-co-NVP) hydrogel microparticles and a low ionic strength loading solution, up to 48 μg calcitonin/mg hydrogel can be delivered in small intestinal conditions. Based on expected absorption in the small intestine, this is sufficient delivery potential for achieving therapeutic dosage via a single, regularly-sized pill taken daily. PMID:24853463

  2. Superoxide Flashes

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qi; Fang, Huaqiang; Shang, Wei; Liu, Lei; Xu, Zhengshuang; Ye, Tao; Wang, Xianhua; Zheng, Ming; Chen, Quan; Cheng, Heping

    2011-01-01

    Irreversible mitochondrial permeability transition and the resultant cytochrome c release signify the commitment of a cell to apoptotic death. However, the role of transient MPT (tMPT) because of flickering opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore remains elusive. Here we show that tMPT and the associated superoxide flashes (i.e. tMPT/superoxide flashes) constitute early mitochondrial signals during oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. Selenite (a ROS-dependent insult) but not staurosporine (a ROS-independent insult) stimulated an early and persistent increase in tMPT/superoxide flash activity prior to mitochondrial fragmentation and a global ROS rise, independently of Bax translocation and cytochrome c release. Selectively targeting tMPT/superoxide flash activity by manipulating cyclophilin D expression or scavenging mitochondrial ROS markedly impacted the progression of selenite-induced apoptosis while exerting little effect on the global ROS response. Furthermore, the tMPT/superoxide flash served as a convergence point for pro- and anti-apoptotic regulation mediated by cyclophilin D and Bcl-2 proteins. These results indicate that tMPT/superoxide flashes act as early mitochondrial signals mediating the apoptotic response during oxidative stress, and provide the first demonstration of highly efficacious local mitochondrial ROS signaling in deciding cell fate. PMID:21659534

  3. Air Revitalization Using Superoxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, Theodore; Wood, Peter C.; Spitze, L. A.

    1988-01-01

    Pellets made from powder mixtures of potassium superoxide, KO2, and calcium superoxide, Ca(O2)2, proven markedly superior to pellets of pure KO2 for adding O2 to and removing CO2 from atmospheric-pressure flow of humidified CO2 in He. Superoxides used extensively to supply O2 and scrub CO2 in variety of ambient-pressure life-support applications, including portable self-contained breathing apparatuses, spacecraft, and undersea submersible craft.

  4. Synthesis of calcium superoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rewick, R. T.; Blucher, W. G.; Estacio, P. L.

    1972-01-01

    Efforts to prepare Ca(O2) sub 2 from reactions of calcium compounds with 100% O3 and with O(D-1) atoms generated by photolysis of O3 at 2537 A are described. Samples of Ca(OH) sub 2, CaO, CaO2, Ca metal, and mixtures containing suspected impurities to promote reaction have been treated with excess O3 under static and flow conditions in the presence and absence of UV irradiation. Studies with KO2 suggest that the superoxide anion is stable to radiation at 2537 A but reacts with oxygen atoms generated by the photolysis of O3 to form KO3. Calcium superoxide is expected to behave in an analogous.

  5. OnPLS integration of transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic data shows multi-level oxidative stress responses in the cambium of transgenic hipI- superoxide dismutase Populus plants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in the regulation of diverse physiological processes in plants, including various biotic and abiotic stress responses. Thus, oxidative stress tolerance mechanisms in plants are complex, and diverse responses at multiple levels need to be characterized in order to understand them. Here we present system responses to oxidative stress in Populus by integrating data from analyses of the cambial region of wild-type controls and plants expressing high-isoelectric-point superoxide dismutase (hipI-SOD) transcripts in antisense orientation showing a higher production of superoxide. The cambium, a thin cell layer, generates cells that differentiate to form either phloem or xylem and is hypothesized to be a major reason for phenotypic perturbations in the transgenic plants. Data from multiple platforms including transcriptomics (microarray analysis), proteomics (UPLC/QTOF-MS), and metabolomics (GC-TOF/MS, UPLC/MS, and UHPLC-LTQ/MS) were integrated using the most recent development of orthogonal projections to latent structures called OnPLS. OnPLS is a symmetrical multi-block method that does not depend on the order of analysis when more than two blocks are analysed. Significantly affected genes, proteins and metabolites were then visualized in painted pathway diagrams. Results The main categories that appear to be significantly influenced in the transgenic plants were pathways related to redox regulation, carbon metabolism and protein degradation, e.g. the glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathways (PPP). The results provide system-level information on ROS metabolism and responses to oxidative stress, and indicate that some initial responses to oxidative stress may share common pathways. Conclusion The proposed data evaluation strategy shows an efficient way of compiling complex, multi-platform datasets to obtain significant biological information. PMID:24341908

  6. Models of Superoxide Dismutases

    SciTech Connect

    Cabelli, Diane E.; Riley, Dennis; Rodriguez, Jorge A.; Valentine, Joan Selverstone; Zhu, Haining

    1998-05-20

    In this review we have focused much of our discussion on the mechanistic details of how the native enzymes function and how mechanistic developments/insights with synthetic small molecule complexes possessing SOD activity have influenced our understanding of the electron transfer processes involved with the natural enzymes. A few overriding themes have emerged. Clearly, the SOD enzymes operate at near diffusion controlled rates and to achieve such catalytic turnover activity, several important physical principles must be operative. Such fast electron transfer processes requires a role for protons; i.e., proton-coupled electron transfer (''H-atom transfer'') solves the dilemma of charge separation developing in the transition state for the electron transfer step. Additionally, outer-sphere electron transfer is likely a most important pathway for manganese and iron dismutases. This situation arises because the ligand exchange rates on these two ions in water never exceed {approx}10{sup +7} s{sup -1}; consequently, 10{sup +9} catalytic rates require more subtle mechanistic insights. In contrast, copper complexes can achieve diffusion controlled (>10{sup +9}) exchange rates in water; thus inner-sphere electron transfer processes are more likely to be operative in the Cu/Zn enzymes. Recent studies have continued to expand our understanding of the mechanism of action of this most important class of redox active enzymes, the superoxide dismutases, which have been critical in the successful adaptation of life on this planet to an oxygen-based metabolism. The design of SOD mimic drugs, synthetic models compounds that incorporate this superoxide dismutase catalytic activity and are capable of functioning in vivo, offers clear potential benefits in the control of diseases, ranging from the control of neurodegenerative conditions, such as Parkinson's or Alzheimer's disease, to cancer.

  7. Superoxide production by phagocytic leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Drath, D B; Karnovsky, M L

    1975-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytic leukocytes, as well as polymorphonuclear leukocytes, produce and release superoxide at rest, and this is stimulated by phagocytosis. Of the mouse monocytic cells studied, alveolar macrophages released the largest amounts of superoxide during phagocytosis, followed by normal peritoneal macrophages. Casein-elicited and "activated" macrophages released smaller quantities. In the guinea pig, polymorphonuclear leukocytes and casein-elicited macrophages were shown to release superoxide during phagocytosis whereas alveolar macrophages did not. Superoxide release accounted for only a small fraction of the respiratory burst of phagocytosis in all but the normal mouse peritoneal macrophage, the guinea pig polymorphonuclear leukocyte, and probably the mouse alveolar macrophage. There are obviously considerable species differences in O2-release by various leukocytes that might reflect both the production and/or destruction (e.g. by dismutase) of that substance. PMID:804030

  8. Economical synthesis of potassium superoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, A. T.; Sadhukhan, P.

    1979-01-01

    High-frequency discharge in oxygen can be used to prepare superoxides of alkali and alkaline-earth metals. Since no direct-current discharge at the electrodes is present, no sputtering can contaminate the product, hence a high conversion efficiency.

  9. Superoxide and peroxynitrite in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    White, C R; Brock, T A; Chang, L Y; Crapo, J; Briscoe, P; Ku, D; Bradley, W A; Gianturco, S H; Gore, J; Freeman, B A

    1994-01-01

    The role of reactive oxygen species in the vascular pathology associated with atherosclerosis was examined by testing the hypothesis that impaired vascular reactivity results from the reaction of nitric oxide (.NO) with superoxide (O2-), yielding the oxidant peroxynitrite (ONOO-). Contractility studies were performed on femoral arteries from rabbits fed a cholesterol-supplemented diet. Cholesterol feeding shifted the EC50 for acetylcholine (ACh)-induced relaxation and impaired the maximal response to ACh. We used pH-sensitive liposomes to deliver CuZn superoxide dismutase (SOD; superoxide:superoxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.15.1.1) to critical sites of .NO reaction with O2-. Intravenously injected liposomes (3000 units of SOD per ml) augmented ACh-induced relaxation in the cholesterol-fed group to a greater extent than in controls. Quantitative immunocytochemistry demonstrated enhanced distribution of SOD in both endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells as well as in the extracellular matrix. SOD activity in vessel homogenates of liposome-treated rabbits was also increased. Incubation of beta very low density lipoprotein with ONOO- resulted in the rapid formation of conjugated dienes and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances. Our results suggest that the reaction of O2- with .NO is involved in the development of atherosclerotic disease by yielding a potent mediator of lipoprotein oxidation, as well as by limiting .NO stimulation of vascular smooth muscle guanylate cyclase activity. Images PMID:8302829

  10. Superoxide dismutase: an evolutionary puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.M.; Friedman, D.J.; Ayala, F.J.

    1985-02-01

    The authors have obtained the complete amino acid sequence of copper/zinc-containing superoxide dismutase (SOD, superoxide:superoxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.15.1.1) from Drosophila melanogaster. The sequence of this enzyme is also known for man, horse, cow, and the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The rate of evolution of this enzyme is far from constant. The number of amino acid substitutions per 100 residues per 100 million years is 30.9 when the three mammals are compared to each other, 10.6 when Drosophila is compared to the three mammals, and 5.8 when the yeast is compared to the four animals. The first value represents one of the fastest evolutionary rates for any protein, the second is similar to the globin rate, and the third is similar to some cytochromes and other slowly evolving proteins. Hence, SOD is not acceptable evolutionary clock. Another peculiarity of this enzyme is that a two-amino-acid deletion must have occurred independently in the lineages going to the cow and to Drosophila. The authors conclude that using the primary structure of a single gene or protein to time evolutionary events or to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships is potentially fraught with error.

  11. Superoxide dismutases in chronic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Švagelj, Dražen; Terzić, Velimir; Dovhanj, Jasna; Švagelj, Marija; Cvrković, Mirta; Švagelj, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    Human gastric diseases have shown significant changes in the activity and expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD) isoforms. The aim of this study was to detect Mn-SOD activity and expression in the tissue of gastric mucosa, primarily in chronic gastritis (immunohistochemical Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis, without other pathohistological changes) and to evaluate their possible connection with pathohistological diagnosis. We examined 51 consecutive outpatients undergoing endoscopy for upper gastrointestinal symptoms. Patients were classified based on their histopathological examinations and divided into three groups: 51 patients (archive samples between 2004-2009) with chronic immunohistochemical Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis (mononuclear cells infiltration were graded as absent, moderate, severe) divided into three groups. Severity of gastritis was graded according to the updated Sydney system. Gastric tissue samples were used to determine the expression of Mn-SOD with anti-Mn-SOD Ab immunohistochemically. The Mn-SOD expression was more frequently present in specimens with severe and moderate inflammation of gastric mucosa than in those with normal mucosa. In patients with normal histological finding, positive immunoreactivity of Mn-SOD was not found. Our results determine the changes in Mn-SOD expression occurring in the normal gastric mucosa that had undergone changes in the intensity of chronic inflammatory infiltrates in the lamina propria. PMID:26765960

  12. Superoxide targets calcineurin signaling in vascular endothelium

    SciTech Connect

    Namgaladze, Dmitry . E-mail: dmitry@zbc.kgu.de; Shcherbyna, Ivanna; Kienhoefer, Joachim; Hofer, H. Werner; Ullrich, Volker

    2005-09-09

    Superoxide emerges as key regulatory molecule in many aspects of vascular physiology and disease, but identification of superoxide targets in the vasculature remains elusive. In this work, we investigated the possibility of inhibition of protein phosphatase calcineurin by superoxide in endothelial cells. We employed a redox cycler 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (DMNQ) to generate superoxide inside the cells. DMNQ caused inhibition of cellular calcineurin phosphatase activity, which was reversible upon DMNQ removal. Inhibition was suppressed by pre-incubating the cells with copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu,ZnSOD). In addition, reducing cellular Cu,ZnSOD activity by diethylthiocarbamic acid treatment resulted in calcineurin inhibition and enhanced sensitivity to DMNQ. Further, we could show that DMNQ inhibits calcineurin-dependent nuclear translocation and transcriptional activation of NFAT transcription factor, and Cu,ZnSOD or superoxide scavenger Tiron reduced the inhibition. Thus, superoxide generation in endothelial cells results in inhibition of calcineurin signaling, which could have important pathophysiological implications in the vasculature.

  13. Metal Uptake by Manganese Superoxide Dismutase

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, James W.

    2009-01-01

    Manganese superoxide dismutase is an important antioxidant defense metalloenzyme that protects cells from damage by the toxic oxygen metabolite, superoxide free radical, formed as an unavoidable by-product of aerobic metabolism. Many years of research have gone into understanding how the metal cofactor interacts with small molecules in its catalytic role. In contrast, very little is presently known about how the protein acquires its metal cofactor, an important step in the maturation of the protein and one that is absolutely required for its biological function. Recent work is beginning to provide insight into the mechanisms of metal delivery to manganese superoxide dismutase in vivo and in vitro. PMID:19699328

  14. Oxygen plasmas used to synthesize superoxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollahan, J. R.; Wydeven, T.

    1972-01-01

    Production of alkali metal superoxides by interaction of molecular oxygen with alkali metals or their salts is discussed. Diagram of reactor to show components and operating principles is provided. Analysis of chemical reactions involved is developed.

  15. Biological Superoxide In Manganese Oxide Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansel, C.; Learman, D.; Zeiner, C.; Santelli, C. M.

    2011-12-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the strongest sorbents and oxidants within the environment, controlling the fate and transport of numerous elements and the degradation of recalcitrant carbon. Both bacteria and fungi mediate the oxidation of Mn(II) to Mn(III/IV) oxides but the genetic and biochemical mechanisms responsible remain poorly understood. Furthermore, the physiological basis for microbial Mn(II) oxidation remains an enigma. We have recently reported that a common marine bacterium (Roseobacter sp. AzwK-3b) oxidizes Mn(II) via reaction with extracellular superoxide (O2-) produced during exponential growth. Here we expand this superoxide-mediated Mn(II) oxidation pathway to fungi, introducing a surprising homology between prokaryotic and eukaryotic metal redox processes. For instance, Stibella aciculosa, a common soil Ascomycete filamentous fungus, precipitates Mn oxides at the base of asexual reproductive structures (synnemata) used to support conidia (Figure 1). This distribution is a consequence of localized production of superoxide (and it's dismutation product hydrogen peroxide, H2O2), leading to abiotic oxidation of Mn(II) by superoxide. Disruption of NADPH oxidase activity using the oxidoreductase inhibitor DPI leads to diminished cell differentiation and subsequent Mn(II) oxidation inhibition. Addition of Cu(II) (an effective superoxide scavenger) leads to a concentration dependent decrease in Mn oxide formation. We predict that due to the widespread production of extracellular superoxide within the fungal and likely bacterial kingdoms, biological superoxide may be an important contributor to the cycling of Mn, as well as other metals (e.g., Hg, Fe). Current and future explorations of the genes and proteins involved in superoxide production and Mn(II) oxidation will ideally lend insight into the physiological and biochemical basis for these processes.

  16. Tetraorganylammonium superoxide compounds: close to unperturbed superoxide ions in the solid state.

    PubMed

    Dietzel, Pascal D C; Kremer, Reinhard K; Jansen, Martin

    2004-04-14

    Trimethylphenylammonium superoxide (1) and tetrabutylammonium superoxide (2) were prepared by ion-exchange reaction in liquid ammonia. Both compounds were structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The crystal structure of 2 contains solvent ammonia molecules that are hydrogen bonded to the superoxide ion and therefore may influence the bonding properties of the superoxide ion. The crystal structure of 1 does not contain any solvent molecules. Therefore, it represents the best known approximation to the virtually isolated superoxide ion in the solid state to date. The O-O bond length is 1.332(2) A in 1 and 1.312(2) A in 2. Magnetization measurements show that the susceptibilities of both compounds follow an ideal Curie law down to 2 K reflecting an absence of intermolecular exchange effects between the superoxide ions. The effective magnetic moments of both compounds are larger than the spin-only value due to contributions of the orbital momentum in the superoxide ion. The values of the magnetic moment comply well with the g factors obtained from electron paramagnetic resonance spectra. The g tensors themselves reflect the anisotropic environment of the superoxide ions. The Pi(g) energy levels which are degenerate in the free superoxide ion split up in crystal fields of lower than tetragonal symmetry. The energy splitting is estimated from the diagonal elements of the g tensor of 1. PMID:15070387

  17. Periplasmic Superoxide Dismutase in Meningococcal Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Wilks, Kathryn E.; Dunn, Kate L. R.; Farrant, Jayne L.; Reddin, Karen M.; Gorringe, Andrew R.; Langford, Paul R.; Kroll, J. Simon

    1998-01-01

    Meningococcal sodC encodes periplasmic copper- and zinc-cofactored superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn SOD) which catalyzes the conversion of the superoxide radical anion to hydrogen peroxide, preventing a sequence of reactions leading to production of toxic hydroxyl free radicals. From its periplasmic location, Cu,Zn SOD was inferred to acquire its substrate from outside the bacterial cell and was speculated to play a role in preserving meningococci from the action of microbicidal oxygen free radicals produced in the context of host defense. A sodC mutant was constructed by allelic exchange and was used to investigate the role of Cu,Zn SOD in pathogenicity. Wild-type and mutant meningococci grew at comparable rates and survived equally long in aerobic liquid culture. The mutant showed no increased sensitivity to paraquat, which generates superoxide within the cytosol, but was approximately 1,000-fold more sensitive to the toxicity of superoxide generated in solution by the xanthine/xanthine oxidase system. These data support a role for meningococcal Cu,Zn SOD in protection against exogenous superoxide. In experiments to translate this into a role in pathogenicity, wild-type and mutant organisms were used in an intraperitoneal mouse infection model. The sodC mutant was significantly less virulent. We conclude that periplasmic Cu,Zn SOD contributes to the virulence of Neisseria meningitidis, most likely by reducing the effectiveness of toxic oxygen host defenses. PMID:9423860

  18. Process for the preparation of calcium superoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballou, E. V.; Wood, P. C.; Wydeven, T. J.; Spitze, L. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Calcium superoxide is prepared in high yields by spreading a quantity of calcium peroxide diperoxyhydrate on the surface of a container, positioning said container in a vacuum chamber on a support structure through which a coolant fluid can be circulated, partially evacuating said vacuum chamber, allowing the temperature of the diperoxyhydrate to reach the range of about 0 to about 40 C; maintaining the temperature selected for a period of time sufficient to complete the disproproriation of the diperoxyhydrate to calcium superoxide, calcium hydroxide, oxygen, and water; constantly and systematically removing the water as it is formed by sweeping the reacting material with a current of dry inert gas and/or by condensation of said water on a cold surface; backfilling the chamber with a dry inert gas; and finally, recovering the calcium superoxide produced.

  19. Superoxide radical production by sponges Sycon sp.

    PubMed

    Peskin, A V; Labas, Y A; Tikhonov, A N

    1998-08-28

    Using the catechol Tiron as an O2-. scavenger, we showed that sea sponges (Sycon sp.) produce superoxide radicals in sea water at a high rate without any stimuli added. The rate of O2-. outflow from sponges to their water surroundings reaches a value of 0.5 nmol/min per sponge at pH 6.5. The generation of O2-. was inhibited by Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase, and restored by the addition of KCN. We also confirmed the abiotic production of O2-. in sea water, detected earlier with a different method by Petasne and Zika [Nature 325 (1987) 516-518]. PMID:9738478

  20. Superoxide dismutases of heavy metal resistant streptomycetes.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Astrid; Schmidt, André; Haferburg, Götz; Kothe, Erika

    2007-02-01

    Heavy metal tolerant and resistant strains of streptomycetes isolated from a former uranium mining site were screened for their superoxide dismutase expression. From the strains tolerating high concentrations of different heavy metals, one was selected for its tolerance of concentrations of heavy metals (Ni, Cu, Cd, Cr, Mn, Zn, Fe). This strain, Streptomyces acidiscabies E13, was chosen for the purpose of superoxide dismutase analysis. Gel electrophoresis and activity staining revealed only one each of a nickel (NiSOD) and an iron (FeZnSOD) containing superoxide dismutase as shown by differential enzymatic repression studies. The gene for nickel containing superoxide dismutase, sodN, was cloned and sequenced from this strain. The genomic sequence shows 92.7% nucleotide identity and 96.1% amino acid identity to sodN of S. coelicolor. Expression can be activated by nickel as well as other heavy metals and active enzyme is produced in media lacking nickel but containing copper, iron or zinc. Thus, the selected strain is well suited for further characterization of the enzyme encoded by sodN. PMID:17304620

  1. Therapeutic Targeting of Mitochondrial Superoxide in Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Dikalova, Anna E.; Bikineyeva, Alfiya T.; Budzyn, Klaudia; Nazarewicz, Rafal R.; McCann, Louise; Lewis, William; Harrison, David G.; Dikalov, Sergey I.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Superoxide (O2∸) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many human diseases including hypertension, however commonly employed antioxidants have proven ineffective in clinical trials. It is possible that these agents are not adequately delivered to the subcellular sites of superoxide production. Objective: Because the mitochondria are important sources of reactive oxygen species, we postulated that mitochondrial targeting of superoxide scavenging would have therapeutic benefit. Methods and Results: In this study, we found that the hormone angiotensin II increased endothelial mitochondrial superoxide production. Treatment with the mitochondrial targeted antioxidant mitoTEMPO decreased mitochondrial O2∸, inhibited the total cellular O2∸, reduced cellular NADPH oxidase activity and restored the level of bioavailable NO. These effects were mimicked by overexpressing the mitochondrial MnSOD (SOD2), while SOD2 depletion with siRNA increased both basal and angiotensin II-stimulated cellular O2∸. Treatment of mice in vivo with mitoTEMPO attenuated hypertension when given at the onset of angiotensin II infusion and decreased blood pressure by 30 mm Hg following establishment of both angiotensin II-induced and DOCA-salt hypertension, while a similar dose of non-targeted TEMPOL was not effective. In vivo, mitoTEMPO decreased vascular O2∸, increased vascular NO• production and improved endothelial-dependent relaxation. Interestingly, transgenic mice overexpressing mitochondrial SOD2 demonstrated attenuated angiotensin II-induced hypertension and vascular oxidative stress similar to mice treated with mitoTEMPO. Conclusions: These studies show that mitochondrial O2∸ is important for the development of hypertension and that antioxidant strategies specifically targeting this organelle could have therapeutic benefit in this and possibly other diseases. PMID:20448215

  2. Superoxide anion radical scavenging property of catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Kładna, Aleksandra; Berczyński, Paweł; Kruk, Irena; Michalska, Teresa; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2013-01-01

    The direct effect of the four catecholamines (adrenaline, noradrenaline, dopamine and isoproterenol) on superoxide anion radicals (O2•) was investigated. The reaction between 18-crown-6-ether and potassium superoxide in dimethylsulfoxide was used as a source of O2•. The reactivity of catecholamines with O2• was examined using chemiluminescence, reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium and electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trapping techniques. 5,5-Dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide was included as the spin trap. The results showed that the four catecholamines were effective and efficient in inhibiting chemiluminescence accompanying the potassium superoxide/18-crown-6-ether system in a dose-dependent manner over the range 0.05-2 mM in the following order: adrenaline > noradrenaline > dopamine > isoproterenol, with, IC50 = 0.15 ± 0.02 mM 0.21 ± 0.03 mM, 0.27 ± 0.03 mM and 0.50 ± 0.04 mM, respectively. The catecholamines examined also exhibited a strong scavenging effect towards O2• when evaluated this property by the inhibition of nitroblue tetrazolium reduction (56-73% at 1 M concentration). A very similar capacity of O2• scavenging was monitored in the 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide spin-trapping assay. The results suggest that catecholamines tested may involve a direct effect on scavenging O2- radicals. PMID:23319391

  3. Singlet oxygen production in superoxide ion-halocarbon systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kanofsky, J.R.

    1986-05-28

    A search for singlet oxygen chemiluminescence at 1268 nm was made in a number of reactions of superoxide ion. Carbon tetrachloride and carbon tetrabromide reacted with suspended potassium superoxide to produce 1268-nm emission consistent with singlet oxygen. Chloroform was less reactive but produced 1268-nm emission when the concentration of superoxide ion in the halocarbon phase was increased with 1,4,7,10,13,16-hexaoxacyclooctadecane (18-crown-6). The dismutation of superoxide ion in deuterium oxide was not accompanied by 1268-nm chemiluminescence. Less than 0.02 mol of singlet oxygen was produced per mole of superoxide ion between p/sup 2/H 6 and 9.

  4. Superoxide Dismutase in the Symbiont Anabaena azollae Strasb.

    PubMed

    Canini, A; Galiazzo, F; Rotilio, G; Caiola, M G

    1991-09-01

    Superoxide dismutase was investigated in the symbiont Anabaena azollae Strasb. living in Azolla filiculoides Lam. In vegetative cells, three isoenzymatic forms of superoxide dismutase, containing manganese, iron, and the hybrid iron-manganese, respectively, were present. Hybrid superoxide dismutase, detected for the first time in cyanobacteria, was 7% of the total superoxide dismutase present in vegetative cells. All three superoxide dismutase forms increased in the Anabaena vegetative cells obtained from irradiated plants grown in winter. In heterocysts, only an iron superoxide dismutase was present, which amounted to 25% of total vegetative cell superoxide dismutase activity. Hybrid superoxide dismutase appeared in heterocysts after irradiation. In vegetative cells of Anabaena from plants grown in summer, the basal level of total superoxide dismutase increased by 60% as compared with winter, and was unaffected by irradiation. The levels of superoxide dismutase in heterocysts from control and exposed plants grown in summer were comparable to those observed in heterocysts obtained from the plants grown during winter. No direct correlation was found between nitrogenase activity and superoxide dismutase in heterocysts. The presence of cyanophycin granules, either within the heterocyst pore channel or close to the transversal septum of vegetative cells, suggested a mechanism to stop communications between vegetative cells and heterocysts. PMID:16668392

  5. Superoxide Dismutase in the Symbiont Anabaena azollae Strasb. 1

    PubMed Central

    Canini, A.; Galiazzo, F.; Rotilio, G.; Caiola, M. Grilli

    1991-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase was investigated in the symbiont Anabaena azollae Strasb. living in Azolla filiculoides Lam. In vegetative cells, three isoenzymatic forms of superoxide dismutase, containing manganese, iron, and the hybrid iron-manganese, respectively, were present. Hybrid superoxide dismutase, detected for the first time in cyanobacteria, was 7% of the total superoxide dismutase present in vegetative cells. All three superoxide dismutase forms increased in the Anabaena vegetative cells obtained from irradiated plants grown in winter. In heterocysts, only an iron superoxide dismutase was present, which amounted to 25% of total vegetative cell superoxide dismutase activity. Hybrid superoxide dismutase appeared in heterocysts after irradiation. In vegetative cells of Anabaena from plants grown in summer, the basal level of total superoxide dismutase increased by 60% as compared with winter, and was unaffected by irradiation. The levels of superoxide dismutase in heterocysts from control and exposed plants grown in summer were comparable to those observed in heterocysts obtained from the plants grown during winter. No direct correlation was found between nitrogenase activity and superoxide dismutase in heterocysts. The presence of cyanophycin granules, either within the heterocyst pore channel or close to the transversal septum of vegetative cells, suggested a mechanism to stop communications between vegetative cells and heterocysts. ImagesFigure 1Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:16668392

  6. Differential effects of superoxide dismutase and superoxide dismutase/catalase mimetics on human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shah, Manisha H; Liu, Guei-Sheung; Thompson, Erik W; Dusting, Gregory J; Peshavariya, Hitesh M

    2015-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) have been implicated in development and progression of breast cancer. In the present study, we have evaluated the effects of the superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetic MnTmPyP and the SOD/catalase mimetic EUK 134 on superoxide and H2O2 formation as well as proliferation, adhesion, and migration of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Superoxide and H2O2 production was examined using dihydroethidium and Amplex red assays, respectively. Cell viability and adhesion were measured using a tetrazolium-based MTT assay. Cell proliferation was determined using trypan blue assay. Cell cycle progression was analyzed using flow cytometry. Clonal expansion of a single cell was performed using a colony formation assay. Cell migration was measured using transwell migration assay. Dual luciferase assay was used to determine NF-κB reporter activity. EUK 134 effectively reduced both superoxide and H2O2, whereas MnTmPyP removed superoxide but enhanced H2O2 formation. EUK 134 effectively attenuated viability, proliferation, clonal expansion, adhesion, and migration of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. In contrast, MnTmPyP only reduced clonal expansion of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells but had no effect on adhesion and cell cycle progression. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced NF-κB activity was reduced by EUK 134, whereas MnTmPyP enhanced this activity. These data indicate that the SOD mimetic MnTmPyP and the SOD/catalase mimetic EUK 134 exert differential effects on breast cancer cell growth. Inhibition of H2O2 signaling using EUK 134-like compound might be a promising approach to breast cancer therapy. PMID:25794772

  7. Superoxide Radical Lifetime on the Martian Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zent, A. P.; Ichimura, A.; Quinn, R. C.

    2005-08-01

    We have examined the formation and stability of the superoxide radical O2-, which has been hypothesized as a potential Mars oxidant. Rutile (TiO2) was heated to ˜ 400 degrees C under vacuum. The samples were tipped off in ampules under 8-9 torr O2, photolyzed with a Hg lamp for 30 minutes; EPR spectra were immediately obtained at 77K. The signature of O2- was clearly observed in the rutile. The sealed ampules were stored at room temperature for up to 2 weeks without any decrease in the number of spins. The same process, applied to rutile that was not baked out yielded superoxide signals that could not be detected once the photolyzing flux was cut off. To examine the effects of partial dehydration, we carried out the same series of experiments on rutile that was baked out at 200 degrees C. This material showed decay of superoxide spins to zero in less than 10 minutes. This qualitative pattern is also observed in experiments on anatase (Attwood, et al., , 2003). We hypothesize that O2- can be stabilized against reaction with H2O and OH by crystalline surface defects. On hydrated surfaces, O2- must compete for stabilizing sites, and the population is quickly extinguished; in dehydrated samples, it can migrate to stabilizing defects. Once sorbed, the O2- radical is stable in the presence of H2O. OMEGA Mars Express data (Poullet et al, 2005) suggest one to several percent adsorbed H2O across the Martian surface, which will significantly decrease O2- lifetime. One possibility for subsurface stabilization of O2- can be postulated based on EPR spectra of anatase, exposed to H2O2 in our lab in 1996, and which in 2005 shows the signature of O2-. Evidently, H2O2 can convert to stable O2- on some surfaces. This hypothesis might allow subsurface diffusion of H2O2, followed by conversion to O2-.

  8. Subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar mitochondria display distinct superoxide production profiles.

    PubMed

    Crochemore, C; Mekki, M; Corbière, C; Karoui, A; Noël, R; Vendeville, C; Vaugeois, J-M; Monteil, C

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM) and interfibrillar mitochondria (IFM) subpopulations display distinct biochemical, morphological, and functional characteristics. Moreover, they appear to be differently influenced during cardiac pathologies or toxic injuries. Although mitochondrial reactive oxygen species seem to play a critical role in cardiac function and diseases, limited information exists about the superoxide production characteristics of these mitochondrial subpopulations. In this work, using direct measurement of superoxide by electron paramagnetic resonance, we showed that differences in superoxide production profiles were present between cardiac IFM and SSM, in terms of intensity and major sites of superoxide generation. In SSM incubated with glutamate plus malate as substrates, the total observed superoxide levels were significantly higher than those observed with IFM, with an important contribution of the NADH-oxidizing site of complex I (site If) and the quinol-oxidizing site of complex III (site IIIQ0). In both IFM and SSM, succinate leads to similar rates of total superoxide levels with a substantial role for contribution of reverse electron transfer. Finally, using two spin probes with different membrane permeabilities, our data on complex III showed direct intra- and extra-mitochondrial superoxide release whereas complex I- and II-dependent superoxide were exclusively released inside the mitochondria, confirming previous studies. Feasibility of this approach to measure intra- and extra-mitochondrial superoxide levels and to characterize distinct superoxide production profiles of cardiac IFM and SSM has been demonstrated. PMID:25689624

  9. Superoxide reduction by a superoxide reductase lacking the highly conserved lysine residue

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Teixeira, Miguel; Cabelli, Diane; Pinto, Ana F.; Romao, Celia V.; Pinto, Liliana C.; Huber, Harald; Saraiva, Ligia M.; Todorovic, Smilja

    2014-12-05

    Superoxide reductases (SORs) are the most recently identified superoxide detoxification systems, being found in microorganisms from the three domains of life. These enzymes are characterized by a catalytic mononuclear iron site, with one cysteine and four histidine ligands of the ferrous active form. A lysine residue in the –EKHVP– motif, located close to the active site, has been considered to be essential for the enzyme function, by contributing to the positive surface patch that attracts the superoxide anion and by controlling the chemistry of the catalytic mechanism through a hydrogen bond network. However, we show here that this residue ismore » substituted by non-equivalent amino acids in several putative SORs from Archaea and unicellular Eukarya. In this work, we focus on mechanistic and spectroscopic studies of one of these less common enzymes, the SOR from the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Ignicoccus hospitalis. We employ pulse radiolysis fast kinetics and spectroscopic approaches to study the wild-type enzyme (₋E₂₃T₂₄HVP₋), and two mutants, T24K and E23A, the later mimicking enzymes lacking both the lysine and glutamate (a ferric ion ligand) of the motif. The efficiency of the wild type protein and mutants in reducing superoxide is comparable to other SORs, revealing the robustness of these enzymes to single mutations.« less

  10. Superoxide reduction by a superoxide reductase lacking the highly conserved lysine residue

    SciTech Connect

    Teixeira, Miguel; Cabelli, Diane; Pinto, Ana F.; Romao, Celia V.; Pinto, Liliana C.; Huber, Harald; Saraiva, Ligia M.; Todorovic, Smilja

    2014-12-05

    Superoxide reductases (SORs) are the most recently identified superoxide detoxification systems, being found in microorganisms from the three domains of life. These enzymes are characterized by a catalytic mononuclear iron site, with one cysteine and four histidine ligands of the ferrous active form. A lysine residue in the –EKHVP– motif, located close to the active site, has been considered to be essential for the enzyme function, by contributing to the positive surface patch that attracts the superoxide anion and by controlling the chemistry of the catalytic mechanism through a hydrogen bond network. However, we show here that this residue is substituted by non-equivalent amino acids in several putative SORs from Archaea and unicellular Eukarya. In this work, we focus on mechanistic and spectroscopic studies of one of these less common enzymes, the SOR from the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Ignicoccus hospitalis. We employ pulse radiolysis fast kinetics and spectroscopic approaches to study the wild-type enzyme (₋E₂₃T₂₄HVP₋), and two mutants, T24K and E23A, the later mimicking enzymes lacking both the lysine and glutamate (a ferric ion ligand) of the motif. The efficiency of the wild type protein and mutants in reducing superoxide is comparable to other SORs, revealing the robustness of these enzymes to single mutations.

  11. Can superoxide dismutase prevent postburn dermal ischemia?

    PubMed

    Tan, Q; Ma, W X; Wang, L; Chen, H R

    1997-05-01

    Decreasing progressive dermal ischemia after burning could theoretically limit the amount of skin necrosis. It is controversial whether the use of free radical scavengers could prevent the progressive dermal ischemia of the postburn stasis zone. We evaluated the effect of superoxide dismutase (SOD) on preventing postburn dermal ischemia in animal models by the India ink perfusion and skin transparent preparation techniques. The closely clipped backs of guinea-pigs were bathed in 75 degrees C water for 10 s. Within 5 min postburn, SOD-treated groups were administered SOD (10,000 u/kg) intra-peritoneally every 6 h. All animals were perfused with 70 per cent India ink via cervical artery cannula by 16 kPa constant pressure at 0, 8, 16, 24 h postburn, and the skin transparent preparations were made, while the level of malonyl dialdehyde (MDA) in skin tissue was assessed. The results showed that with prolongation of postburn time, the rate of filling of India ink in skin capillary plexuses decreased gradually (p < 0.01). MDA increased continuously, which was related to postburn dermal ischemia (r = 0.689, p < 0.01). Though the level of MDA decreased in SOD-treated groups, the India ink filling rates showed no significant difference between controls and experimental groups (p > 0.05). The results were also confirmed by observation of skin transparent preparations and TEM. This study suggests that superoxide dismutase fails to prevent progressive dermal ischemia after burning. PMID:9232283

  12. Superoxide production and decay in the subtropical North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roe, K.; Voelker, B. M.; Hansel, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), which include superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, can be generated through photochemical reactions or biological activity in seawater. The generation of ROS, especially superoxide, by photochemical or biological processes can influence trace metal speciation and cycling in the ocean since superoxide can react quickly with metals (Cu and Fe) and is capable of both oxidation and reduction of trace metals. In this study superoxide was detected and measured in the oligotrophic waters at station ALOHA by a MCLA chemiluminescence flow injection method. The superoxide concentrations ranged between 0.037-0.099 nM, had observed decay rates of 0.004-0.014 s-1, and production rates of 0.88-4.81 nM hr-1 during a 16 day period during July 2012. The influence of biological activity vs photochemical production on superoxide concentration, decay and production rates are discussed.

  13. Nucleophilic reactivity of a copper(II)-superoxide complex.

    PubMed

    Pirovano, Paolo; Magherusan, Adriana M; McGlynn, Ciara; Ure, Andrew; Lynes, Amy; McDonald, Aidan R

    2014-06-01

    Metal-bound superoxide intermediates are often implicated as electrophilic oxidants in dioxygen-activating metalloenzymes. In the nonheme iron α-ketoglutarate dependent oxygenases and pterin-dependent hydroxylases, however, Fe(III)-superoxide intermediates are postulated to react by nucleophilic attack on electrophilic carbon atoms. By reacting a Cu(II)-superoxide complex (1) with acyl chloride substrates, we have found that a metal-superoxide complex can be a very reactive nucleophile. Furthermore, 1 was found to be an efficient nucleophilic deformylating reagent, capable of Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of a number of aldehyde substrates. The observed nucleophilic chemistry represents a new domain for metal-superoxide reactivity. Our observations provide support for the postulated role of metal-superoxide intermediates in nonheme iron α-ketoglutarate dependent and pterin-dependent enzymes. PMID:24753290

  14. Superoxide-dependent oxidation of melatonin by myeloperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Ximenes, Valdecir F; Silva, Sueli de O; Rodrigues, Maria R; Catalani, Luiz H; Maghzal, Ghassan J; Kettle, Anthony J; Campa, Ana

    2005-11-18

    Myeloperoxidase uses hydrogen peroxide to oxidize numerous substrates to hypohalous acids or reactive free radicals. Here we show that neutrophils oxidize melatonin to N(1)-acetyl-N(2)-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AFMK) in a reaction that is catalyzed by myeloperoxidase. Production of AFMK was highly dependent on superoxide but not hydrogen peroxide. It did not require hypochlorous acid, singlet oxygen, or hydroxyl radical. Purified myeloperoxidase and a superoxide-generating system oxidized melatonin to AFMK and a dimer. The dimer would result from coupling of melatonin radicals. Oxidation of melatonin was partially inhibited by catalase or superoxide dismutase. Formation of AFMK was almost completely eliminated by superoxide dismutase but weakly inhibited by catalase. In contrast, production of melatonin dimer was enhanced by superoxide dismutase and blocked by catalase. We propose that myeloperoxidase uses superoxide to oxidize melatonin by two distinct pathways. One pathway involves the classical peroxidation mechanism in which hydrogen peroxide is used to oxidize melatonin to radicals. Superoxide adds to these radicals to form an unstable peroxide that decays to AFMK. In the other pathway, myeloperoxidase uses superoxide to insert dioxygen into melatonin to form AFMK. This novel activity expands the types of oxidative reactions myeloperoxidase can catalyze. It should be relevant to the way neutrophils use superoxide to kill bacteria and how they metabolize xenobiotics. PMID:16148002

  15. Superoxide is an associated signal for apoptosis in axonal injury

    PubMed Central

    Catrinescu, Maria-Magdalena; Kanamori, Noriko; Mears, Katrina A.; Beaubien, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Optic neuropathy is the leading cause of irreversible blindness, and a paradigm for central nervous system axonal disease. The primary event is damage to retinal ganglion cell axons, with subsequent death of the cell body by apoptosis. Trials of neuroprotection for these and other neuronal diseases have mostly failed, primarily because mechanisms of neuroprotection in animals do not necessarily translate to humans. We developed a methodology for imaging an intracellular transduction pathway that signals neuronal death in the living animal. Using longitudinal confocal scanning multilaser ophthalmoscopy, we identified the production of superoxide within retrograde-labelled rat retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve transection. Superoxide was visualized by real-time imaging of its reaction product with intravitreally administered hydroethidine and confirmed by differential spectroscopy of the specific product 2-hydroxyethidium. Retinal ganglion cell superoxide increased within 24 h after axotomy, peaking at 4 days, and was not observed in contralateral untransected eyes. The superoxide signal preceded phosphatidylserine externalization, indicating that superoxide generation was an early event and preceded apoptosis. Intravitreal pegylated superoxide dismutase blocked superoxide generation after axotomy and delayed retinal ganglion cell death. Together, these results are consistent with superoxide being an upstream signal for retinal ganglion cell apoptosis after optic nerve injury. Early detection of axonal injury with superoxide could serve as a predictive biomarker for patients with optic neuropathy. PMID:20495185

  16. A mitochondrial superoxide theory for oxidative stress diseases and aging.

    PubMed

    Indo, Hiroko P; Yen, Hsiu-Chuan; Nakanishi, Ikuo; Matsumoto, Ken-Ichiro; Tamura, Masato; Nagano, Yumiko; Matsui, Hirofumi; Gusev, Oleg; Cornette, Richard; Okuda, Takashi; Minamiyama, Yukiko; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Suenaga, Shigeaki; Oki, Misato; Sato, Tsuyoshi; Ozawa, Toshihiko; Clair, Daret K St; Majima, Hideyuki J

    2015-01-01

    Fridovich identified CuZnSOD in 1969 and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) in 1973, and proposed "the Superoxide Theory," which postulates that superoxide (O2 (•-)) is the origin of most reactive oxygen species (ROS) and that it undergoes a chain reaction in a cell, playing a central role in the ROS producing system. Increased oxidative stress on an organism causes damage to cells, the smallest constituent unit of an organism, which can lead to the onset of a variety of chronic diseases, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other neurological diseases caused by abnormalities in biological defenses or increased intracellular reactive oxygen levels. Oxidative stress also plays a role in aging. Antioxidant systems, including non-enzyme low-molecular-weight antioxidants (such as, vitamins A, C and E, polyphenols, glutathione, and coenzyme Q10) and antioxidant enzymes, fight against oxidants in cells. Superoxide is considered to be a major factor in oxidant toxicity, and mitochondrial MnSOD enzymes constitute an essential defense against superoxide. Mitochondria are the major source of superoxide. The reaction of superoxide generated from mitochondria with nitric oxide is faster than SOD catalyzed reaction, and produces peroxynitrite. Thus, based on research conducted after Fridovich's seminal studies, we now propose a modified superoxide theory; i.e., superoxide is the origin of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) and, as such, causes various redox related diseases and aging. PMID:25834301

  17. A mitochondrial superoxide theory for oxidative stress diseases and aging

    PubMed Central

    Indo, Hiroko P.; Yen, Hsiu-Chuan; Nakanishi, Ikuo; Matsumoto, Ken-ichiro; Tamura, Masato; Nagano, Yumiko; Matsui, Hirofumi; Gusev, Oleg; Cornette, Richard; Okuda, Takashi; Minamiyama, Yukiko; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Suenaga, Shigeaki; Oki, Misato; Sato, Tsuyoshi; Ozawa, Toshihiko; Clair, Daret K. St.; Majima, Hideyuki J.

    2015-01-01

    Fridovich identified CuZnSOD in 1969 and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) in 1973, and proposed ”the Superoxide Theory,” which postulates that superoxide (O2•−) is the origin of most reactive oxygen species (ROS) and that it undergoes a chain reaction in a cell, playing a central role in the ROS producing system. Increased oxidative stress on an organism causes damage to cells, the smallest constituent unit of an organism, which can lead to the onset of a variety of chronic diseases, such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other neurological diseases caused by abnormalities in biological defenses or increased intracellular reactive oxygen levels. Oxidative stress also plays a role in aging. Antioxidant systems, including non-enzyme low-molecular-weight antioxidants (such as, vitamins A, C and E, polyphenols, glutathione, and coenzyme Q10) and antioxidant enzymes, fight against oxidants in cells. Superoxide is considered to be a major factor in oxidant toxicity, and mitochondrial MnSOD enzymes constitute an essential defense against superoxide. Mitochondria are the major source of superoxide. The reaction of superoxide generated from mitochondria with nitric oxide is faster than SOD catalyzed reaction, and produces peroxynitrite. Thus, based on research conducted after Fridovich’s seminal studies, we now propose a modified superoxide theory; i.e., superoxide is the origin of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) and, as such, causes various redox related diseases and aging. PMID:25834301

  18. Diabetic Retinopathy, Superoxide Damage and Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Julia M.; Mohammad, Ghulam; Zhong, Qing; Kowluru, Renu A.

    2011-01-01

    Retinopathy, the leading cause of acquired blindness in young adults, is one of the most feared complications of diabetes, and hyperglycemia is considered as the major trigger for its development. The microvasculature of the retina is constantly bombarded by high glucose, and this insult results in many metabolic, structural and functional changes. Retinal mitochondria become dysfunctional, its DNA is damaged and proteins encoded by its DNA are decreased. The electron transport chain system becomes compromised, further producing superoxide and providing no relief to the retina from a continuous cycle of damage. Although the retina attempts to initiate repair mechanisms by inducing gene expressions of the repair enzymes, their mitochondrial accumulation remains deficient. Understanding the molecular mechanism of mitochondrial damage should help identify therapies to treat/retard this sight threatening complication of diabetes. Our hope is that if the retinal mitochondria are maintained healthy with adjunct therapies, the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy can be inhibited. PMID:20939803

  19. Biomimetic superoxide dismutase stabilized by photopolymerization for superoxide anions biosensing and cell monitoring.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ling; Liu, Suli; Tu, Wenwen; Zhang, Zengsong; Bao, Jianchun; Dai, Zhihui

    2014-05-20

    Photopolymerization strategy, as one of the immobilization methods, has attracted considerable interest because of some advantages, such as easy operation, harmlessness to the biomolecules, and long storage stability. (E)-4-(4-Formylstyryl) pyridine (formylstyrylpyridine) was prepared through Heck reaction and used as a photopolymer material to immobilize biomimetic superoxide dismutase under ultraviolet irradiation (UV) irradiation in a short time. The styrylpyridinium moiety of Formylstyrylpyridine was photoreactive and formed a dimer under UV irradiation. Mn2P2O7 multilayer sheet, a novel superoxide dismutase mimic, was synthesized. The formed photopolymer can immobilize Mn2P2O7 firmly under UV irradiation. On the basis of high catalytic activity of Mn2P2O7 biomimetic enzyme and long-term stability of Mn2P2O7-formylstyrylpyridine film, after introducing multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), a novel electrochemical biosensing platform called MWCNTs/Mn2P2O7-formylstyrylpyridine for superoxide anion (O2(•-)) detection was constructed. The biosensor displayed good performance for O2(•-) detection and provided a reliable platform to adhere living cells directly on the modified electrode surface. Therefore, the biosensor was successfully applied to vitro determination of O2(•-) released from living cells, which had a promising prospect for living cells monitoring and diagnosis of reactive oxygen species-related diseases. PMID:24773067

  20. Manganese superoxide dismutase: guardian of the powerhouse.

    PubMed

    Holley, Aaron K; Bakthavatchalu, Vasudevan; Velez-Roman, Joyce M; St Clair, Daret K

    2011-01-01

    The mitochondrion is vital for many metabolic pathways in the cell, contributing all or important constituent enzymes for diverse functions such as β-oxidation of fatty acids, the urea cycle, the citric acid cycle, and ATP synthesis. The mitochondrion is also a major site of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the cell. Aberrant production of mitochondrial ROS can have dramatic effects on cellular function, in part, due to oxidative modification of key metabolic proteins localized in the mitochondrion. The cell is equipped with myriad antioxidant enzyme systems to combat deleterious ROS production in mitochondria, with the mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) acting as the chief ROS scavenging enzyme in the cell. Factors that affect the expression and/or the activity of MnSOD, resulting in diminished antioxidant capacity of the cell, can have extraordinary consequences on the overall health of the cell by altering mitochondrial metabolic function, leading to the development and progression of numerous diseases. A better understanding of the mechanisms by which MnSOD protects cells from the harmful effects of overproduction of ROS, in particular, the effects of ROS on mitochondrial metabolic enzymes, may contribute to the development of novel treatments for various diseases in which ROS are an important component. PMID:22072939

  1. Manganese Superoxide Dismutase in Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Delira

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States. Considering the quality of life and treatment cost, the best way to fight against cancer is to prevent or suppress cancer development. Cancer is preventable as indicated by human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination and tamoxifen/raloxifen treatment in breast cancer prevention. The activities of superoxide dismutases (SODs) are often lowered during early cancer development, making it a rational candidate for cancer prevention. Recent Advances: SOD liposome and mimetics have been shown to be effective in cancer prevention animal models. They've also passed safety tests during early phase clinical trials. Dietary supplement-based SOD cancer prevention provides another opportunity for antioxidant-based cancer prevention. New mechanistic studies have revealed that SOD inhibits not only oncogenic activity, but also subsequent metabolic shifts during early tumorigenesis. Critical Issues: Lack of sufficient animal model studies targeting specific cancers; and lack of clinical trials and support from pharmaceutical industries also hamper efforts in further advancing SOD-based cancer prevention. Future Directions: To educate and obtain support from our society that cancer is preventable. To combine SOD-based therapeutics with other cancer preventive agents to obtain synergistic effects. To formulate a dietary supplementation-based antioxidant approach for cancer prevention. Lastly, targeting specific populations who are prone to carcinogens, which can trigger oxidative stress as the mechanism of carcinogenesis. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1628–1645. PMID:23706068

  2. Superoxide Ion: Generation and Chemical Implications.

    PubMed

    Hayyan, Maan; Hashim, Mohd Ali; AlNashef, Inas M

    2016-03-01

    Superoxide ion (O2(•-)) is of great significance as a radical species implicated in diverse chemical and biological systems. However, the chemistry knowledge of O2(•-) is rather scarce. In addition, numerous studies on O2(•-) were conducted within the latter half of the 20th century. Therefore, the current advancement in technology and instrumentation will certainly provide better insights into mechanisms and products of O2(•-) reactions and thus will result in new findings. This review emphasizes the state-of-the-art research on O2(•-) so as to enable researchers to venture into future research. It comprises the main characteristics of O2(•-) followed by generation methods. The reaction types of O2(•-) are reviewed, and its potential applications including the destruction of hazardous chemicals, synthesis of organic compounds, and many other applications are highlighted. The O2(•-) environmental chemistry is also discussed. The detection methods of O2(•-) are categorized and elaborated. Special attention is given to the feasibility of using ionic liquids as media for O2(•-), addressing the latest progress of generation and applications. The effect of electrodes on the O2(•-) electrochemical generation is reviewed. Finally, some remarks and future perspectives are concluded. PMID:26875845

  3. Manganese Superoxide Dismutase: Guardian of the Powerhouse

    PubMed Central

    Holley, Aaron K.; Bakthavatchalu, Vasudevan; Velez-Roman, Joyce M.; St. Clair, Daret K.

    2011-01-01

    The mitochondrion is vital for many metabolic pathways in the cell, contributing all or important constituent enzymes for diverse functions such as β-oxidation of fatty acids, the urea cycle, the citric acid cycle, and ATP synthesis. The mitochondrion is also a major site of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the cell. Aberrant production of mitochondrial ROS can have dramatic effects on cellular function, in part, due to oxidative modification of key metabolic proteins localized in the mitochondrion. The cell is equipped with myriad antioxidant enzyme systems to combat deleterious ROS production in mitochondria, with the mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) acting as the chief ROS scavenging enzyme in the cell. Factors that affect the expression and/or the activity of MnSOD, resulting in diminished antioxidant capacity of the cell, can have extraordinary consequences on the overall health of the cell by altering mitochondrial metabolic function, leading to the development and progression of numerous diseases. A better understanding of the mechanisms by which MnSOD protects cells from the harmful effects of overproduction of ROS, in particular, the effects of ROS on mitochondrial metabolic enzymes, may contribute to the development of novel treatments for various diseases in which ROS are an important component. PMID:22072939

  4. Superoxide-mediated protection of Escherichia coli from antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Mosel, Michael; Li, Liping; Drlica, Karl; Zhao, Xilin

    2013-11-01

    Antimicrobial lethality is promoted by reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide, peroxide, and hydroxyl radical. Pretreatment with subinhibitory concentrations of plumbagin or paraquat, metabolic generators of superoxide, paradoxically reduced killing for oxolinic acid, kanamycin, and ampicillin. These pretreatments also reduced an oxolinic acid-mediated ROS surge. Defects in SoxS MarA or AcrB eliminated plumbagin- and paraquat-mediated MIC increases but maintained protection from killing. Thus, superoxide has both protective and detrimental roles in response to antimicrobial stress. PMID:23979754

  5. Superoxide-Mediated Protection of Escherichia coli from Antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Mosel, Michael; Li, Liping; Drlica, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial lethality is promoted by reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide, peroxide, and hydroxyl radical. Pretreatment with subinhibitory concentrations of plumbagin or paraquat, metabolic generators of superoxide, paradoxically reduced killing for oxolinic acid, kanamycin, and ampicillin. These pretreatments also reduced an oxolinic acid-mediated ROS surge. Defects in SoxS MarA or AcrB eliminated plumbagin- and paraquat-mediated MIC increases but maintained protection from killing. Thus, superoxide has both protective and detrimental roles in response to antimicrobial stress. PMID:23979754

  6. Manganese superoxide dismutase: beyond life and death

    PubMed Central

    Holley, Aaron K.; Dhar, Sanjit Kumar; Xu, Yong

    2010-01-01

    Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is a nuclear-encoded antioxidant enzyme that localizes to the mitochondria. Expression of MnSOD is essential for the survival of aerobic life. Transgenic mice expressing a luciferase reporter gene under the control of the human MnSOD promoter demonstrate that the level of MnSOD is reduced prior to the formation of cancer. Overexpression of MnSOD in transgenic mice reduces the incidences and multiplicity of papillomas in a DMBA/TPA skin carcinogenesis model. However, MnSOD deficiency does not lead to enhanced tumorigenicity of skin tissue similarly treated because MnSOD can modulate both the p53-mediated apoptosis and AP-1-mediated cell proliferation pathways. Apoptosis is associated with an increase in mitochondrial levels of p53 suggesting a link between MnSOD deficiency and mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis. Activation of p53 is preventable by application of a SOD mimetic (MnTE-2-PyP5+). Thus, p53 translocation to mitochondria and subsequent inactivation of MnSOD explain the observed mitochondrial dysfunction that leads to transcription-dependent mechanisms of p53-induced apoptosis. Administration of MnTE-2-PyP5+ following apoptosis but prior to proliferation leads to suppression of protein carbonyls and reduces the activity of AP-1 and the level of the proliferating cellular nuclear antigen, without reducing the activity of p53 or DNA fragmentation following TPA treatment. Remarkably, the incidence and multiplicity of skin tumors are drastically reduced in mice that receive MnTE-2-PyP5+ prior to cell proliferation. The results demonstrate the role of MnSOD beyond its essential role for survival and suggest a novel strategy for an antioxidant approach to cancer intervention. PMID:20454814

  7. Magnetoreception through Cryptochrome May Involve Superoxide

    PubMed Central

    Solov'yov, Ilia A.; Schulten, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Abstract In the last decades, it has been demonstrated that many animal species orient in the Earth magnetic field. One of the best-studied examples is the use of the geomagnetic field by migratory birds for orientation and navigation. However, the biophysical mechanism underlying animal magnetoreception is still not understood. One theory for magnetoreception in birds invokes the so-called radical-pair model. This mechanism involves a pair of reactive radicals, whose chemical fate can be influenced by the orientation with respect to the magnetic field of the Earth through Zeeman and hyperfine interactions. The fact that the geomagnetic field is weak, i.e., ∼0.5 G, puts a severe constraint on the radical pair that can establish the magnetic compass sense. For a noticeable change of the reaction yield in a redirected geomagnetic field, the hyperfine interaction has to be as weak as the Earth field Zeeman interaction, i.e., unusually weak for an organic compound. Such weak hyperfine interaction can be achieved if one of the radicals is completely devoid of this interaction as realized in a radical pair containing an oxygen molecule as one of the radicals. Accordingly, we investigate here a possible radical pair-based reaction in the photoreceptor cryptochrome that reduces the protein's flavin group from its signaling state FADH• to the inactive state FADH– (which reacts to the likewise inactive FAD) by means of the superoxide radical, O2•–. We argue that the spin dynamics in the suggested reaction can act as a geomagnetic compass and that the very low physiological concentration (nM-μM) of otherwise toxic O2•– is sufficient, even favorable, for the biological function. PMID:19527640

  8. Magnetoreception through cryptochrome may involve superoxide.

    PubMed

    Solov'yov, Ilia A; Schulten, Klaus

    2009-06-17

    In the last decades, it has been demonstrated that many animal species orient in the Earth magnetic field. One of the best-studied examples is the use of the geomagnetic field by migratory birds for orientation and navigation. However, the biophysical mechanism underlying animal magnetoreception is still not understood. One theory for magnetoreception in birds invokes the so-called radical-pair model. This mechanism involves a pair of reactive radicals, whose chemical fate can be influenced by the orientation with respect to the magnetic field of the Earth through Zeeman and hyperfine interactions. The fact that the geomagnetic field is weak, i.e., approximately 0.5 G, puts a severe constraint on the radical pair that can establish the magnetic compass sense. For a noticeable change of the reaction yield in a redirected geomagnetic field, the hyperfine interaction has to be as weak as the Earth field Zeeman interaction, i.e., unusually weak for an organic compound. Such weak hyperfine interaction can be achieved if one of the radicals is completely devoid of this interaction as realized in a radical pair containing an oxygen molecule as one of the radicals. Accordingly, we investigate here a possible radical pair-based reaction in the photoreceptor cryptochrome that reduces the protein's flavin group from its signaling state FADH* to the inactive state FADH- (which reacts to the likewise inactive FAD) by means of the superoxide radical, O2*-. We argue that the spin dynamics in the suggested reaction can act as a geomagnetic compass and that the very low physiological concentration (nM-microM) of otherwise toxic O2*- is sufficient, even favorable, for the biological function. PMID:19527640

  9. Widespread Production of Extracellular Superoxide by Heterotrophic Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Julia M.; Hansel, Colleen M.; Voelker, Bettina M.; Mendes, Chantal M.; Andeer, Peter F.; Zhang, Tong

    2013-06-01

    Superoxide and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) originate from several natural sources and profoundly influence numerous elemental cycles, including carbon and trace metals. In the deep ocean, the permanent absence of light precludes currently known ROS sources, yet ROS production mysteriously occurs. Here, we show that taxonomically and ecologically diverse heterotrophic bacteria from aquatic and terrestrial environments are a vast, unrecognized, and light-independent source of superoxide, and perhaps other ROS derived from superoxide. Superoxide production by a model bacterium within the ubiquitous Roseobacter clade involves an extracellular oxidoreductase that is stimulated by the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), suggesting a surprising homology with eukaryotic organisms. The consequences of ROS cycling in immense aphotic zones representing key sites of nutrient regeneration and carbon export must now be considered, including potential control of carbon remineralization and metal bioavailability.

  10. Suppression of neutrophil superoxide production by conventional peritoneal dialysis solution.

    PubMed

    Ing, B L; Gupta, D K; Nawab, Z M; Zhou, F Q; Rahman, M A; Daugirdas, J T

    1988-09-01

    The pH of conventional peritoneal dialysis solution is normally in the range of 5.0 to 5.5, because acid has been added during the manufacturing process to prevent caramelization of dextrose during sterilization. We studied the effects of normalizing the pH of conventional peritoneal dialysis solution on superoxide production by normal human neutrophils. At a pH of 6.0, superoxide generation was 4.07 +/- 2.56 (SD) nanomoles per million cells. With normalization of pH to 7.4, superoxide production was 19.3 +/- 7.3 (p less than 0.001). The results suggest that the unphysiologic acidity of conventional peritoneal dialysis solution has deleterious consequences on neutrophil superoxide formation. PMID:2847987

  11. Superoxide dismutase protects cultured neurons against death by starvation.

    PubMed Central

    Sáez, J C; Kessler, J A; Bennett, M V; Spray, D C

    1987-01-01

    Brief substrate deprivation resulted in high mortality of superior cervical ganglion neurons in culture, assayed 2 hr later by trypan blue exclusion. Involvement of superoxide anions was indicated by several observations. Survival was increased significantly by prior treatment that induced cells to take up superoxide dismutase. During starvation, neurons reduced nitroblue tetrazolium to form the blue precipitate formazan, and the color change was blocked in neurons preloaded with superoxide dismutase. The incidence of staining was comparable to the mortality. In many cells, brief starvation caused the appearance of fluorescence due to oxidation of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin to dichlorofluorescein, which indicates that oxidants were generated intracellularly. In some cells fluorescence was transient, as would be caused by membrane breakdown, and these cells were then shown to be dead. Superoxide generation caused by substrate deprivation may contribute importantly to cell damage in a variety of pathological conditions. Images PMID:3472251

  12. Suppressors of superoxide production from mitochondrial complex III

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Adam L.; Vargas, Leonardo; Turk, Carolina N.; Baaten, Janine E.; Matzen, Jason T.; Dardov, Victoria J.; Attle, Stephen J.; Li, Jing; Quackenbush, Douglas C.; Goncalves, Renata L. S.; Perevoshchikova, Irina V.; Petrassi, H. Michael; Meeusen, Shelly L.; Ainscow, Edward K.; Brand, Martin D.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial electron transport drives ATP synthesis but also generates reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are both cellular signals and damaging oxidants. Superoxide production by respiratory complex III is implicated in diverse signaling events and pathologies but its role remains controversial. Using high-throughput screening we identified compounds that selectively eliminate superoxide production by complex III without altering oxidative phosphorylation; they modulate retrograde signaling including cellular responses to hypoxic and oxidative stress. PMID:26368590

  13. Suppressors of superoxide production from mitochondrial complex III.

    PubMed

    Orr, Adam L; Vargas, Leonardo; Turk, Carolina N; Baaten, Janine E; Matzen, Jason T; Dardov, Victoria J; Attle, Stephen J; Li, Jing; Quackenbush, Douglas C; Goncalves, Renata L S; Perevoshchikova, Irina V; Petrassi, H Michael; Meeusen, Shelly L; Ainscow, Edward K; Brand, Martin D

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial electron transport drives ATP synthesis but also generates reactive oxygen species, which are both cellular signals and damaging oxidants. Superoxide production by respiratory complex III is implicated in diverse signaling events and pathologies, but its role remains controversial. Using high-throughput screening, we identified compounds that selectively eliminate superoxide production by complex III without altering oxidative phosphorylation; they modulate retrograde signaling including cellular responses to hypoxic and oxidative stress. PMID:26368590

  14. Clastogenic Factors as Potential Biomarkers of Increased Superoxide Production

    PubMed Central

    Emerit, Ingrid

    2007-01-01

    The formation of clastogenic factors (CF) and their damaging effects are mediated by superoxide, since superoxide dismutase is regularly protective. CF are produced via superoxide and stimulate the production of superoxide by monocytes and neutrophils. This results in a selfsustaining and longlasting process of clastogenesis, which may exceed the DNA repair system and ultimately lead to cancer (Emerit, 1994). An increased cancer risk is indeed observed in conditions accompanied by CF formation. These include irradiated persons, patients with chronic inflammatory diseases, HIV-infected persons and the chromosomal breakage syndromes ataxia telangiectasia, Bloom’s syndrome and Fanconi’s anemia. Biochemical analysis has identified lipid peroxidation products, arachidonic acid metabolites, nucleotides of inosine and cytokines, in particular tumor necrosis factor alpha, as the clastogenic and also superoxide stimulating components of CF. Due to their chromosome damaging effects, these oxidants can be detected with classical cytogenetic techniques. Their synergistic action renders the CF-test particularly sensitive for the detection of a pro-oxidant state. Correlations were observed between CF and other biomarkers of oxidative stress such as decreases in total plasma thiols or increases in TBARS or chemiluminescence. Correlations between CF and disease activity, between CF and radiation exposure, suggest the study of CF for monitoring these conditions. CF may also be useful as biochemical markers and intermediate endpoints for the evaluation of promising antioxidant drugs. CF formation represents a link between chronic inflammation and carcinogenesis. Prophylactic use of superoxide scavengers as anticarcinogens is therefore suggested. PMID:19662223

  15. Efficiency of superoxide anions in the inactivation of selected dehydrogenases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodacka, Aleksandra; Serafin, Eligiusz; Puchala, Mieczyslaw

    2010-09-01

    The most ubiquitous of the primary reactive oxygen species, formed in all aerobes, is the superoxide free radical. It is believed that the superoxide anion radical shows low reactivity and in oxidative stress it is regarded mainly as an initiator of more reactive species such as rad OH and ONOO -. In this paper, the effectiveness of inactivation of selected enzymes by radiation-generated superoxide radicals in comparison with the effectiveness of the other products of water radiolysis is examined. We investigate three enzymes: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). We show that the direct contribution of the superoxide anion radical to GAPDH and ADH inactivation is significant. The effectiveness of the superoxide anion in the inactivation of GAPDH and ADG was only 2.4 and 2.8 times smaller, respectively, in comparison with hydroxyl radical. LDH was practically not inactivated by the superoxide anion. Despite the fact that the studied dehydrogenases belong to the same class of enzymes (oxidoreductases), all have a similar molecular weight and are tetramers, their susceptibility to free-radical damage varies. The differences in the radiosensitivity of the enzymes are not determined by the basic structural parameters analyzed. A significant role in inactivation susceptibility is played by the type of amino acid residues and their localization within enzyme molecules.

  16. Superoxide dismutase during glucose repression of Hansenula polymorpha CBS 4732.

    PubMed

    Hristozova, Tsonka; Rasheva, Tanya; Nedeva, Trayana; Kujumdzieva, Anna

    2002-01-01

    Hansenula polymorpha CBS 4732 was studied during cultivation on methanol and different glucose concentrations. Activities of Cu/Zn and Mn superoxide dismutase, catalase and methanol oxidase were investigated. During cultivation on methanol, increased superoxide dismutase and catalase activities and an induced methanol oxidase were achieved. Transfer of a methanol grown culture to medium with a high glucose concentration caused growth inhibition, low consumption of carbon, nitrogen and phosphate substrates, methanol oxidase inactivation as well as decrease of catalase activity (21.8 +/- 0.61 deltaE240 x min(-1) x mg protein(-1)). At the same time, a high value for superoxide dismutase enzyme was found (42.9 +/- 0.98 U x mg protein(-1), 25% of which was represented by Mn superoxide dismutase and 75% - by the Cu/Zn type). During derepression methanol oxidase was negligible (0.005 +/- 0.0001 U x mg protein(-1)), catalase tended to be the same as in the repressed culture, while superoxide dismutase activity increased considerably (63.67 +/- 1.72 U x mg protein(-1), 69% belonging to the Cu/Zn containing enzyme). Apparently, the cycle of growth inhibition and reactivation of Hansenula polymorpha CBS 4732 cells is strongly connected with the activity of the enzyme superoxide dismutase. PMID:12064733

  17. A flow-system comparison of the reactivities of calcium superoxide and potassium superoxide with carbon dioxide and water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, P. C.; Ballou, E. V.; Spitze, L. A.; Wydeven, T.

    1982-01-01

    A single pass flow system was used to test the reactivity of calcium superoxide with respiratory gases and the performance was compared to that of potassium superoxide. The KO2 system is used by coal miners as a self-contained unit in rescue operations. Particular attention was given to the reactivity with carbon dioxide and water vapor at different temperatures and partial pressures of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor. The calcium superoxide beds were found to absorb CO2 and H2O vapor, releasing O2. The KO2 bed, however, released O2 at twice the rate of CO2 absorption at 37 C. It is concluded that the calcium superoxide material is not a suitable replacement for the KO2 bed, although Ca(O2)2 may be added to the KO2 bed to enhance the CO2 absorption.

  18. Skeletal Muscle Contractions Induce Acute Changes in Cytosolic Superoxide, but Slower Responses in Mitochondrial Superoxide and Cellular Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Timothy; Kabayo, Tabitha; Ng, Rainer; Chamberlain, Jeffrey; McArdle, Anne; Jackson, Malcolm J.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is increased following contractile activity and these species interact with multiple signaling pathways to mediate adaptations to contractions. The sources and time course of the increase in ROS during contractions remain undefined. Confocal microscopy with specific fluorescent probes was used to compare the activities of superoxide in mitochondria and cytosol and the hydrogen peroxide content of the cytosol in isolated single mature skeletal muscle (flexor digitorum brevis) fibers prior to, during, and after electrically stimulated contractions. Superoxide in mitochondria and cytoplasm were assessed using MitoSox red and dihydroethidium (DHE) respectively. The product of superoxide with DHE, 2-hydroxyethidium (2-HE) was acutely increased in the fiber cytosol by contractions, whereas hydroxy-MitoSox showed a slow cumulative increase. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthases increased the contraction-induced formation of hydroxy-MitoSox only with no effect on 2-HE formation. These data indicate that the acute increases in cytosolic superoxide induced by contractions are not derived from mitochondria. Data also indicate that, in muscle mitochondria, nitric oxide (NO) reduces the availability of superoxide, but no effect of NO on cytosolic superoxide availability was detected. To determine the relationship of changes in superoxide to hydrogen peroxide, an alternative specific approach was used where fibers were transduced using an adeno-associated viral vector to express the hydrogen peroxide probe, HyPer within the cytoplasmic compartment. HyPer fluorescence was significantly increased in fibers following contractions, but surprisingly followed a relatively slow time course that did not appear directly related to cytosolic superoxide. These data demonstrate for the first time temporal and site specific differences in specific ROS that occur in skeletal muscle fibers during and after contractile activity. PMID

  19. Superoxide Dismutase and Oxygen Toxicity in a Eukaryote

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Eugene M.; Goscin, Stephen A.; Fridovich, Irwin

    1974-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. ellipsoideus contained 6.5 times more superoxide dismutase and 2.3 times more catalase when grown under 100% O2 than when grown anaerobically. Growth under oxygen caused equal increases in both the cyanide-sensitive and the cyanide-insensitive superoxide dismutases of this organism. Experience with other eukaryotes has shown that cyanide sensitivity is a property of the cupro-zinc superoxide dismutase of the cytosol, whereas cyanide insensitivity is a property of the corresponding mangani-enzyme found in mitochondria. Cu2+, which has been shown to increase the radioresistance of yeast, also caused an increase of both of the superoxide dismutases of S. cerevisiae. Yeast which had been grown under 1 atm of O2 were more resistant toward the lethal effects of 20 atm of O2 than were yeast which had been grown in the absence of O2. Escherichia coli K-12 his− responded to growth under 1 atm of O2 by increasing its content of catalase and of peroxidase, but not of superoxide dismutase. This contrasts with E. coli B, which was previously shown to respond to O2 by a striking increase in superoxide dismutase. E. coli K-12 his− did not gain resistance toward 20 atm of O2 because of having been grown under 1 atm of O2. Once again, this contrasts with the behavior of E. coli B. These data indicate that, in both prokaryotes and in eukaryotes, superoxide dismutase is an important component of the defenses against oxygen toxicity. PMID:4590469

  20. Characterization of superoxide production by isolated pea thylakoids

    SciTech Connect

    Grace, S.; Osmond, B. )

    1991-05-01

    During photosynthesis chloroplasts univalently reduce molecular oxygen to superoxide through autoxidations in the electron transport chain. Cytochrome c reduction was used to assay superoxide production in illuminate pea thylakoids under a variety of conditions. Superoxide dismutase was found to inhibit the reaction by 80%, indicating that cytochrome c reduction is primarily mediated by superoxide. This was further supported by the observation that the highest rates of cytochrome c reduction occurred in the presence of methyl viologen, an autoxidizable redox carrier that accepts electrons from photosystem I. The reaction was fully suppressed by DCMU, demonstrating a requirement for electron transport. In the presence of the plastoquinone antagonist DBMIB the rate of cytochrome c reduction increased substantially. This indicates that under conditions where electron transport to photosystem I is blocked, autoxidation reactions can occur on the reducing side of photosystem II to maintain Q{sub A} in the oxidized state. Superoxide production at sites other than the reducing side of photosystem I may thus represent an important pathway for dissipating excess excitation energy.

  1. The preparation of calcium superoxide from calcium peroxide diperoxyhydrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballou, E. V.; Wood, P. C.; Spitze, L. A.; Wydeven, T.

    1977-01-01

    There is interest in solid materials containing a high percentage of stored oxygen for use in emergency breathing apparatus for miners and as auxiliary oxygen sources for astronauts. In theory, the amount of available oxygen in calcium superoxide, Ca(O2)2 is higher than in potassium superoxide, KO2, and its availability during use should be unhindered by the formation of a low melting and hydrous coating. The decomposition of solid calcium peroxide diperoxyhydrate, CaO2.2H2O2 has been studied, using an apparatus which allows good control of the critical reaction parameters. Samples have been prepared showing apparent superoxide contents in excess of those previously reported and higher than the theoretical 58.4% expected from a disproportionation reaction.

  2. Reactions of superoxide with myeloperoxidase and its products.

    PubMed

    Winterbourn, Christine C; Kettle, Anthony J

    2004-10-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) uses hydrogen peroxide to oxidize chloride to hypochlorous acid. It also converts numerous substrates to reactive free radicals. When released by neutrophils, the enzyme operates in the presence of a flux of superoxide. We show that superoxide has a profound influence on oxidative reactions catalysed by MPO. It reacts directly with the enzyme to modulate production of hypochlorous acid. Within neutrophil phagosomes, where MPO functions to kill micro-organisms, it may be the preferred substrate for the enzyme. Superoxide also reacts rapidly with radicals generated by MPO, e.g. from tyrosine and tyrosyl peptides. Initial products are organic peroxides. These species are likely to be toxic and contribute to the pathophysiological actions of MPO. PMID:15507767

  3. Constraints on superoxide mediated formation of manganese oxides

    PubMed Central

    Learman, Deric R.; Voelker, Bettina M.; Madden, Andrew S.; Hansel, Colleen M.

    2013-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the most reactive sorbents and oxidants within the environment, where they play a central role in the cycling of nutrients, metals, and carbon. Recent discoveries have identified superoxide (O2−) both of biogenic and abiogenic origin as an effective oxidant of Mn(II) leading to the formation of Mn oxides. Here we examined the conditions under which abiotically produced superoxide led to oxidative precipitation of Mn and the solid-phases produced. Oxidized Mn, as both aqueous Mn(III) and Mn(III/IV) oxides, was only observed in the presence of active catalase, indicating that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a product of the reaction of O2− with Mn(II), inhibits the oxidation process presumably through the reduction of Mn(III). Citrate and pyrophosphate increased the yield of oxidized Mn but decreased the amount of Mn oxide produced via formation of Mn(III)-ligand complexes. While complexing ligands played a role in stabilizing Mn(III), they did not eliminate the inhibition of net Mn(III) formation by H2O2. The Mn oxides precipitated were highly disordered colloidal hexagonal birnessite, similar to those produced by biotically generated superoxide. Yet, in contrast to the large particulate Mn oxides formed by biogenic superoxide, abiotic Mn oxides did not ripen to larger, more crystalline phases. This suggests that the deposition of crystalline Mn oxides within the environment requires a biological, or at least organic, influence. This work provides the first direct evidence that, under conditions relevant to natural waters, oxidation of Mn(II) by superoxide can occur and lead to formation of Mn oxides. For organisms that oxidize Mn(II) by producing superoxide, these findings may also point to other microbially mediated processes, in particular enzymatic hydrogen peroxide degradation and/or production of organic ligand metabolites, that allow for Mn oxide formation. PMID:24027565

  4. Theoretical study of the superoxide anion assisted firefly oxyluciferin formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto da Silva, Luís; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C. G.

    2013-12-01

    This a theoretical Letter based on density functional theory, on the role of superoxide anion in firefly chemiluminescence in DMSO. We have found that this anion can attack luciferin radical molecules, thus forming a luciferin-like trianion. This latter molecule transfers an oxygen atom, which results in the formation of oxyluciferyl radical dianion and carbon dioxide molecules. Oxyluciferin is finally formed after an electron transfer from oxyluciferyl radical dianion to tert-BuOrad radical molecules. Thus, we have found evidence that firefly oxyluciferin can be formed in a energetically favorable superoxide anion-assisted reaction, without the need for the formation of firefly dioxetanone.

  5. Superoxide-forming NADPH oxidase preparation of pig polymorphonuclear leucocyte.

    PubMed Central

    Wakeyama, H; Takeshige, K; Takayanagi, R; Minakami, S

    1982-01-01

    A phagocytic vesicle fraction with high NADPH-dependent superoxide-forming activity was obtained in large quantity from pig blood polymorphonuclear leucocytes, phagocytosing oil droplets in the presence of cyanide. The activity of the homogenate of the phagocytosing cells was 40 times that of the resting cells, and 70% of the activity in the homogenate was recovered in the phagocytic vesicle fraction. Essentially all of the superoxide-forming activity was extracted by repeated extraction with a mixture containing deoxycholate and Tween 20. The extract had a superoxide-forming activity of 1 mumol/min per mg of protein with NADPH, and one-fifth of this with NADH, Km values being similar to those of the vesicle fraction (40 microM for NADPH and 400 microM for NADH). A stoichiometric relationship of 1:2 for NADPH oxidation and superoxide formation was obtained, in agreement with the reaction NADPH +2O2 leads to NADP+ + 2O2 -. + H+. The activity of the extract was enhanced 2-fold by the addition of FAD, suggesting that the flavin is a component of the enzyme system. The Km value for FAD was 0.077 microM. The activities in both vesicle fraction and extract were labile even on refrigeration, but could be kept for several months at -70 degrees C. PMID:6293459

  6. Chemical and physical differentiation of superoxide dismutases in anaerobes.

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, E M; Dapper, C H

    1980-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase activity in crude or partially purified cell extracts from several species and strains of obligate anaerobe Bacteroides was inhibited instantaneously by NaN3 and was inactivated rapidly upon incubation with H2O2. The extent of NaN3 inhibition varied from 41 to 93%, and the half-life of the enzymatic activity in 5 mM H2O2 ranged from 1.2 to 6.1 min, depending upon the organism tests. When grown in a defined medium containing 59Fe, Bacteroides fragilis (VPI 2393) incorporated radiolabel into a 40,000-molecular-weight NaN3- and H2O2-sensitive superoxide dismutase but did not incorporate 54Mn into that protein under similar growth conditions. The anaerobe Actinomyces naeslundii (VPI 9985) incorporated 54Mn but not 59Fe into a NaN3-insensitive and H2O2-resistant superoxide dismutase. The apparent molecular weight of the superoxide dismutase from this and several other Actinomyces spp. was estimated to be 110,000 to 140,000. Comparison of these data with studies of homogeneous metallosuperoxide dismutases suggests that the Bacteroides spp. studied contain a ferrisuperoxide dismutase, whereas Actinomyces spp. contain a managanisuperoxide dismutase. PMID:7440509

  7. Cu/Zn superoxide dismutases in developing cotton fibers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important signaling molecules in diverse physiological processes. Previously, we discovered superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in extracellular protein preparations from fiber-bearing cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) seeds. We sho...

  8. Reduction of Renal Superoxide Dismutase in Progressive Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Hiroki; Fujishima, Hiromi; Chida, Shinsuke; Takahashi, Keiko; Qi, Zhonghua; Kanetsuna, Yukiko; Breyer, Matthew D.; Harris, Raymond C.; Yamada, Yuichiro; Takahashi, Takamune

    2009-01-01

    Superoxide excess plays a central role in tissue damage that results from diabetes, but the mechanisms of superoxide overproduction in diabetic nephropathy (DN) are incompletely understood. In the present study, we investigated the enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD), a major defender against superoxide, in the kidneys during the development of murine DN. We assessed SOD activity and the expression of SOD isoforms in the kidneys of two diabetic mouse models (C57BL/6-Akita and KK/Ta-Akita) that exhibit comparable levels of hyperglycemia but different susceptibility to DN. We observed down-regulation of cytosolic CuZn-SOD (SOD1) and extracellular CuZn-SOD (SOD3), but not mitochondrial Mn-SOD (SOD2), in the kidney of KK/Ta-Akita mice which exhibit progressive DN. In contrast, we did not detect a change in renal SOD expression in DN-resistant C57BL/6-Akita mice. Consistent with these findings, there was a significant reduction in total SOD activity in the kidney of KK/Ta-Akita mice compared with C57BL/6-Akita mice. Finally, treatment of KK/Ta-Akita mice with a SOD mimetic, tempol, ameliorated the nephropathic changes in KK/Ta-Akita mice without altering the level of hyperglycemia. Collectively, these results indicate that down-regulation of renal SOD1 and SOD3 may play a key role in the pathogenesis of DN. PMID:19470681

  9. Real time monitoring of superoxide dynamics in vivo through fluorescent proteins using a sensitive fiber probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yu-Chung; Ken, Chuian-Fu; Hsu, Che-Wei; Liu, Ya-Ging

    2014-03-01

    Superoxide anion is the primary oxygen free radical generated in mitochondria that causes intracellular oxidative stress. The lack of a method to directly monitor superoxide concentration in vivo in real time has severely hindered our understanding on its pathophysiology. We made transgenic zebrafish to specifically express fluorescent proteins, which are recently developed as reversible superoxide-specific indicators, in the liver. A fiber-optic fluorescent probe was used to noninvasively monitor superoxide generation in the liver in real time. The fish were placed in microfluidic channels for manipulation and reagents administration. Several superoxide-inducing and scavenging reagents were administrated onto the fish to investigate their effects on superoxide anion balancing. The biochemical dynamics of superoxide due to the application reagents were revealed in the transient behaviors of fluorescence time courses. With the ability to monitor superoxide dynamics in vivo in real time, this method can be used as an in vivo pharmaceutical screening platform.

  10. Heterodimeric structure of superoxide dismutase in complex with its metallochaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, A.L.; Torres, A.S.; O'Halloran, T.V.; Rosenzweig, A.C.

    2010-03-08

    The copper chaperone for superoxide dismutase (CCS) activates the eukaryotic antioxidant enzyme copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1). The 2.9 {angstrom} resolution structure of yeast SOD1 complexed with yeast CCS (yCCS) reveals that SOD1 interacts with its metallochaperone to form a complex comprising one monomer of each protein. The heterodimer interface is remarkably similar to the SOD1 and yCCS homodimer interfaces. Striking conformational rearrangements are observed in both the chaperone and target enzyme upon complex formation, and the functionally essential C-terminal domain of yCCS is well positioned to play a key role in the metal ion transfer mechanism. This domain is linked to SOD1 by an intermolecular disulfide bond that may facilitate or regulate copper delivery.

  11. Pulse radiolysis studies on superoxide reductase from Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed

    Nivière, V; Lombard, M; Fontecave, M; Houée-Levin, C

    2001-05-25

    Superoxide reductases (SORs) are small metalloenzymes, which catalyze reduction of O2*- to H2O2. The reaction of the enzyme from Treponema pallidum with superoxide was studied by pulse radiolysis methods. The first step is an extremely fast bi-molecular reaction of the ferrous center with O2, with a rate constant of 6 x 10 (8) M(-1) s(-1). A first intermediate is formed which is converted to a second one with a slower rate constant of 4800 s(-1). This latter value is 10 times higher than the corresponding one previously reported in the case of SOR from Desulfoarculus baarsii. The reconstituted spectra for the two intermediates are consistent with formation of transient iron-peroxide species. PMID:11377434

  12. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of the Megavirus superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Lartigue, Audrey; Philippe, Nadège; Jeudy, Sandra; Abergel, Chantal

    2012-12-01

    Megavirus chilensis, a close relative of the Mimivirus giant virus, is able to replicate in Acanthamoeba castellanii. The first step of viral infection involves the internalization of the virions in host vacuoles. It has been experimentally demonstrated that Mimivirus particles contain many proteins capable of resisting oxidative stress, as encountered in the phagocytic process. These proteins are conserved in Megavirus, which has an additional gene (Mg277) encoding a putative superoxide dismutase. The Mg277 ORF product was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. A SAD data set was collected to 2.24 Å resolution at the selenium peak wavelength on the BM30 beamline at the ESRF from a single crystal of selenomethionine-substituted recombinant superoxide dismutase protein. PMID:23192047

  13. Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase: Growth Promoter or Tumor Suppressor?

    PubMed Central

    Laukkanen, Mikko O.

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3) gene transfer to tissue damage results in increased healing, increased cell proliferation, decreased apoptosis, and decreased inflammatory cell infiltration. At molecular level, in vivo SOD3 overexpression reduces superoxide anion (O2−) concentration and increases mitogen kinase activation suggesting that SOD3 could have life-supporting characteristics. The hypothesis is further strengthened by the observations showing significantly increased mortality in conditional knockout mice. However, in cancer SOD3 has been shown to either increase or decrease cell proliferation and survival depending on the model system used, indicating that SOD3-derived growth mechanisms are not completely understood. In this paper, the author reviews the main discoveries in SOD3-dependent growth regulation and signal transduction. PMID:27293512

  14. Cupric yersiniabactin is a virulence-associated superoxide dismutase mimic.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Kaveri S; Hung, Chia S; Giblin, Daryl E; Urushidani, Saki; Austin, Anthony M; Dinauer, Mary C; Henderson, Jeffrey P

    2014-02-21

    Many Gram-negative bacteria interact with extracellular metal ions by expressing one or more siderophore types. Among these, the virulence-associated siderophore yersiniabactin (Ybt) is an avid copper chelator, forming stable cupric (Cu(II)-Ybt) complexes that are detectable in infected patients. Here we show that Ybt-expressing E. coli are protected from intracellular killing within copper-replete phagocytic cells. This survival advantage is highly dependent upon the phagocyte respiratory burst, during which superoxide is generated by the NADPH oxidase complex. Chemical fractionation links this phenotype to a previously unappreciated superoxide dismutase (SOD)-like activity of Cu(II)-Ybt. Unlike previously described synthetic copper-salicylate (Cu(II)-SA) SOD mimics, the salicylate-based natural product Cu(II)-Ybt retains catalytic activity at physiologically plausible protein concentrations. These results reveal a new virulence-associated adaptation based upon spontaneous assembly of a non-protein catalyst. PMID:24283977

  15. Cupric Yersiniabactin Is a Virulence-Associated Superoxide Dismutase Mimic

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Many Gram-negative bacteria interact with extracellular metal ions by expressing one or more siderophore types. Among these, the virulence-associated siderophore yersiniabactin (Ybt) is an avid copper chelator, forming stable cupric (Cu(II)-Ybt) complexes that are detectable in infected patients. Here we show that Ybt-expressing E. coli are protected from intracellular killing within copper-replete phagocytic cells. This survival advantage is highly dependent upon the phagocyte respiratory burst, during which superoxide is generated by the NADPH oxidase complex. Chemical fractionation links this phenotype to a previously unappreciated superoxide dismutase (SOD)-like activity of Cu(II)-Ybt. Unlike previously described synthetic copper-salicylate (Cu(II)-SA) SOD mimics, the salicylate-based natural product Cu(II)-Ybt retains catalytic activity at physiologically plausible protein concentrations. These results reveal a new virulence-associated adaptation based upon spontaneous assembly of a non-protein catalyst. PMID:24283977

  16. Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase: Growth Promoter or Tumor Suppressor?

    PubMed

    Laukkanen, Mikko O

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3) gene transfer to tissue damage results in increased healing, increased cell proliferation, decreased apoptosis, and decreased inflammatory cell infiltration. At molecular level, in vivo SOD3 overexpression reduces superoxide anion (O2 (-)) concentration and increases mitogen kinase activation suggesting that SOD3 could have life-supporting characteristics. The hypothesis is further strengthened by the observations showing significantly increased mortality in conditional knockout mice. However, in cancer SOD3 has been shown to either increase or decrease cell proliferation and survival depending on the model system used, indicating that SOD3-derived growth mechanisms are not completely understood. In this paper, the author reviews the main discoveries in SOD3-dependent growth regulation and signal transduction. PMID:27293512

  17. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of the Megavirus superoxide dismutase

    PubMed Central

    Lartigue, Audrey; Philippe, Nadège; Jeudy, Sandra; Abergel, Chantal

    2012-01-01

    Megavirus chilensis, a close relative of the Mimivirus giant virus, is able to replicate in Acanthamoeba castellanii. The first step of viral infection involves the internalization of the virions in host vacuoles. It has been experimentally demonstrated that Mimivirus particles contain many proteins capable of resisting oxidative stress, as encountered in the phagocytic process. These proteins are conserved in Megavirus, which has an additional gene (Mg277) encoding a putative superoxide dismutase. The Mg277 ORF product was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. A SAD data set was collected to 2.24 Å resolution at the selenium peak wavelength on the BM30 beamline at the ESRF from a single crystal of selenomethionine-substituted recombinant superoxide dismutase protein. PMID:23192047

  18. The Superoxide Reductase from the Early Diverging Eukaryote Giardia Intestinalis

    SciTech Connect

    Cabelli, D.E.; Testa, F.; Mastronicola, D.; Bordi, E.; Pucillo, L.P.; Sarti, P.; Saraiva, L.M.; Giuffre, A.; Teixeira, M.

    2011-10-15

    Unlike superoxide dismutases (SODs), superoxidereductases (SORs) eliminate superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup {sm_bullet}-}) not through its dismutation, but via reduction to hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in the presence of an electron donor. The microaerobic protist Giardia intestinalis, responsible for a common intestinal disease in humans, though lacking SOD and other canonical reactive oxygen species-detoxifying systems, is among the very few eukaryotes encoding a SOR yet identified. In this study, the recombinant SOR from Giardia (SOR{sub Gi}) was purified and characterized by pulse radiolysis and stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The protein, isolated in the reduced state, after oxidation by superoxide or hexachloroiridate(IV), yields a resting species (T{sub final}) with Fe{sup 3+} ligated to glutamate or hydroxide depending on pH (apparent pK{sub a} = 8.7). Although showing negligible SOD activity, reduced SOR{sub Gi} reacts with O{sub 2}{sup {sm_bullet}-} with a pH-independent second-order rate constant k{sub 1} = 1.0 x 10{sup 9} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} and yields the ferric-(hydro)peroxo intermediate T{sub 1}; this in turn rapidly decays to the T{sub final} state with pH-dependent rates, without populating other detectable intermediates. Immunoblotting assays show that SOR{sub Gi} is expressed in the disease-causing trophozoite of Giardia. We propose that the superoxide-scavenging activity of SOR in Giardia may promote the survival of this air-sensitive parasite in the fairly aerobic proximal human small intestine during infection.

  19. Mice lacking extracellular superoxide dismutase are more sensitive to hyperoxia.

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, L M; Jonsson, J; Edlund, T; Marklund, S L

    1995-01-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD; superoxide:superoxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.15.1.1) is a secreted Cu- and Zn-containing tetrameric glycoprotein, the bulk of which is bound to heparan sulfate proteoglycans in the interstitium of tissues. To test the function of EC-SOD in vivo, mice carrying a targeted disruption of the EC-SOD gene were generated. The EC-SOD null mutant mice develop normally and remain healthy until at least 14 months of age. No compensatory induction of other SOD isoenzymes or other antioxidant enzymes was observed. When stressed by exposure to > 99% oxygen, the EC-SOD null mutant mice display a considerable reduction in survival time compared to wild-type mice and an earlier onset of severe lung edema. These findings suggest that while under normal physiological conditions other antioxidant systems may substitute for the loss of EC-SOD; when the animal is stressed these systems are unable to provide adequate protection. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7603981

  20. Faropenem enhances superoxide anion production by human neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Sato, N; Shimizu, H; Tsutiya, T; Takahashi, H; Kakizaki, S; Takayama, H; Takagi, H; Mori, M

    1999-09-01

    Neutrophils are important cellular components in the defence against infections and many studies in vitro have shown that some antibiotics affect neutrophil function. We examined the effect of faropenem, a new oral penem antibiotic on neutrophil killing function by determining the generation of superoxide anion in vitro. The production of superoxide anion was measured by chemiluminescence amplified by a Cypridina luciferin analogue in the presence of N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP). Faropenem significantly enhanced chemiluminescence in a dose-dependent manner. The effect of faropenem was maximal at 5 min of incubation time and continued for at least 30 min. The effect of faropenem was also observed when neutrophils were stimulated by a calcium ionophore (ionomycin), while the effect of faropenem did not change in the presence of 12-O-tetra-decanoylphorbolmyristate acetate. Cytosol Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) monitored with Fura-2 increased in response to fMLP, however, faropenem did not influence the response of [Ca2+]i to fMLP. Our results suggest that faropenem enhanced the generation of superoxide anion by neutrophils, probably at the site where cytosol Ca2+ regulates NADPH oxidase. Faropenem might be potentially advantageous in the treatment of infections because a synergic interaction of antibodies and cytocidal neutrophils is necessary for the early eradication of the pathogenic bacteria. PMID:10511400

  1. SORGOdb: Superoxide Reductase Gene Ontology curated DataBase

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Superoxide reductases (SOR) catalyse the reduction of superoxide anions to hydrogen peroxide and are involved in the oxidative stress defences of anaerobic and facultative anaerobic organisms. Genes encoding SOR were discovered recently and suffer from annotation problems. These genes, named sor, are short and the transfer of annotations from previously characterized neelaredoxin, desulfoferrodoxin, superoxide reductase and rubredoxin oxidase has been heterogeneous. Consequently, many sor remain anonymous or mis-annotated. Description SORGOdb is an exhaustive database of SOR that proposes a new classification based on domain architecture. SORGOdb supplies a simple user-friendly web-based database for retrieving and exploring relevant information about the proposed SOR families. The database can be queried using an organism name, a locus tag or phylogenetic criteria, and also offers sequence similarity searches using BlastP. Genes encoding SOR have been re-annotated in all available genome sequences (prokaryotic and eukaryotic (complete and in draft) genomes, updated in May 2010). Conclusions SORGOdb contains 325 non-redundant and curated SOR, from 274 organisms. It proposes a new classification of SOR into seven different classes and allows biologists to explore and analyze sor in order to establish correlations between the class of SOR and organism phenotypes. SORGOdb is freely available at http://sorgo.genouest.org/index.php. PMID:21575179

  2. Superoxide radical and iron modulate aconitase activity in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Gardner, P R; Raineri, I; Epstein, L B; White, C W

    1995-06-01

    Aconitase is a member of a family of iron-sulfur-containing (de)hydratases whose activities are modulated in bacteria by superoxide radical (O2-.)-mediated inactivation and iron-dependent reactivation. The inactivation-reactivation of aconitase(s) in cultured mammalian cells was explored since these reactions may impact important and diverse aconitase functions in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. Conditions which increase O2-. production including exposure to the redox-cycling agent phenazine methosulfate (PMS), inhibitors of mitochondrial ubiquinol-cytochrome c oxidoreductase, or hyperoxia inactivated aconitase in mammalian cells. Overproduction of mitochondrial Mn-superoxide dismutase protected aconitase from inactivation by PMS or inhibitors of ubiquinol-cytochrome c oxidoreductase, but not from normobaric hyperoxia. Aconitase activity was reactivated (t1/2 of 12 +/- 3 min) upon removal of PMS. The iron chelator deferoxamine impaired reactivation and increased net inactivation of aconitase by O2-.. The ability of ubiquinol-cytochrome c oxidoreductase-generated O2-. to inactivate aconitase in several cell types correlated with the fraction of the aconitase activity localized in mitochondria. Extracellular O2-. generated with xanthine oxidase did not affect aconitase activity nor did exogenous superoxide dismutase decrease aconitase inactivation by PMS. The results demonstrate a dynamic and cyclical O2-.-mediated inactivation and iron-dependent reactivation of the mammalian [4Fe-4S] aconitases under normal and stress conditions and provide further evidence for the membrane compartmentalization of O2-.. PMID:7768942

  3. Superoxide dismutase is dispensable for normal animal lifespan.

    PubMed

    Van Raamsdonk, Jeremy Michael; Hekimi, Siegfried

    2012-04-10

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are toxic oxygen-containing molecules that can damage multiple components of the cell and have been proposed to be the primary cause of aging. The antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) is the only eukaryotic enzyme capable of detoxifying superoxide, one type of ROS. The fact that SOD is present in all aerobic organisms raises the question as to whether SOD is absolutely required for animal life and whether the loss of SOD activity will result in decreased lifespan. Here we use the genetic model organism Caenorhabditis elegans to generate an animal that completely lacks SOD activity (sod-12345 worms). We show that sod-12345 worms are viable and exhibit a normal lifespan, despite markedly increased sensitivity to multiple stresses. This is in stark contrast to what is observed in other genetic model organisms where the loss of a single sod gene can result in severely decreased survival. Investigating the mechanism underlying the normal lifespan of sod-12345 worms reveals that their longevity results from a balance between the prosurvival signaling and the toxicity of superoxide. Overall, our results demonstrate that SOD activity is dispensable for normal animal lifespan but is required to survive acute stresses. Moreover, our findings indicate that maintaining normal stress resistance is not crucial to the rate of aging. PMID:22451939

  4. Superoxide generation and cytotactic response of irradiated neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Eastlund, D.T.; Charbonneau, T.T.

    1988-07-01

    Irradiation of blood components has been used to prevent transfusion-related graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in immunocompromised patients. This study was designed to determine the effect of irradiation on neutrophil aggregation, chemotaxis, and superoxide generation. Purified neutrophils were irradiated with a Cesium source at four doses ranging from 0 to 17,500 rads. Formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) and zymosan-treated serum (ZTS) cytotaxin-induced chemotaxis and migration were determined in the agarose assay. Neutrophil aggregation to FMLP was determined by aggregometry. Superoxide generation and random migration were not affected by irradiation at doses up to 17,500 rads. When compared to nonirradiated controls, the chemotactic response to ZTS remained normal, with an insignificant decline from 174 +/- 31.0 to 150 +/- 42.3 (mean +/- SD) units. The chemotactic response to FMLP declined insignificantly, from 228 +/- 31.3 at 0 rad to 207 +/- 26.4 at 17,500 rads. The aggregation response to FMLP remained within the normal range but declined from 0.78 +/- 0.11 to 0.61 +/- 0.18. At the radiation doses currently used to reduce the risk of transfusion-related GVHD, neutrophil superoxide generation and chemotactic response remain essentially normal.

  5. Reactions of superoxide dismutases with HS(-)/H2S and superoxide radical anion: An in vitro EPR study.

    PubMed

    Bolić, Bojana; Mijušković, Ana; Popović-Bijelić, Ana; Nikolić-Kokić, Aleksandra; Spasić, Snežana; Blagojević, Duško; Spasić, Mihajlo B; Spasojević, Ivan

    2015-12-01

    Interactions of hydrogen sulfide (HS(-)/H2S), a reducing signaling species, with superoxide dimutases (SOD) are poorly understood. We applied low-T EPR spectroscopy to examine the effects of HS(-)/H2S and superoxide radical anion O2.- on metallocenters of FeSOD, MnSOD, and CuZnSOD. HS(-)/H2S did not affect FeSOD, whereas active centers of MnSOD and CuZnSOD were open to this agent. Cu(2+) was reduced to Cu(1+), while manganese appears to be released from MnSOD active center. Untreated and O2.- treated FeSOD and MnSOD predominantly show 5 d-electron systems, i.e. Fe(3+) and Mn(2+). Our study provides new details on the mechanisms of (patho)physiological effects of HS(-)/H2S. PMID:26436856

  6. The photoproduction of superoxide radicals and the superoxide dismutase activity of Photosystem II. The possible involvement of cytochrome b559.

    PubMed

    Ananyev, G; Renger, G; Wacker, U; Klimov, V

    1994-08-01

    In the present study the light induced formation of superoxide and intrinsic superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in PS II membrane fragments and D1/D2/Cytb559-complexes from spinach have been analyzed by the use of ferricytochrome c (cyt c(III)) reduction and xanthine/xanthine oxidase as assay systems. The following results were obtained: 1.) Photoreduction of Cyt c (III) by PS II membrane fragments is induced by addition of sodium azide, tetracyane ethylene (TCNE) or carbonylcyanide-p-trifluoromethoxy-phenylhydrazone (FCCP) and after removal of the extrinsic polypeptides by a 1M CaCl2-treatment. This activity which is absent in control samples becomes completely inhibited by the addition of exogenous SOD. 2.) The TCNE induced cyt c(III) photoreduction by PS II membrane fragments was found to be characterized by a half maximal concentration of c1/2=10 μM TCNE. Simultaneously, TCNE inhibits the oxygen evolution rate of PS II membrane fragments with c1/2≈ 3 μM. 3.) The photoproduction of O2 (-) is coupled with H(+)-uptake. This effect is diminished by the addition of the O2 (-)-trap cyt c(III). 4.) D1/D2/Cytb559-complexes and PS II membrane fragments deprived of the extrinsic proteins and manganese exhibit no SOD-activity but are capable of producing O2 (-) in the light if a PS II electron donor is added.Based on these results the site(s) of light induced superoxide formation in PS II is (are) inferred to be located at the acceptor side. A part of the PS II donor side and Cyt b559 in its HP-form are proposed to provide an intrinsic superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. PMID:24310115

  7. Cobalt substitution studies on bovine erythrocyte superoxide dismutase: evidence for a novel cobalt-superoxide dismutase derivative.

    PubMed

    Salvato, B; Beltramini, M; Ricchelli, F; Tallandini, L

    1989-09-14

    Three cobalt derivatives of bovine erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (superoxide:superoxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.15.1.1) have been prepared under different pH conditions using a cobalt-thiocyanate complex which has already proved to yield specific substitutions on other copper proteins. The cobalt-protein derivatives have been characterized by optical, circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopies. One derivative, referred to as Co2Co2-protein, contains Co(II) ions specifically bound at both Zn(II) and Cu(II) sites. On the basis of their spectroscopic properties, the other two derivatives can be referred as E2Co2- and Co2E2-superoxide dismutase, with cobalt substituting, respectively, at the zinc and the copper sites leaving the contiguous site empty (E). The Co2E2-protein complex represents a novel derivative, since it has never been described in literature. The optical spectrum in the visible region of Co2-Co2-protein well corresponds to the sum of the spectra of the other two derivatives. The circular dichroism spectrum of Co2Co2-derivative, however, is not the sum of individual E2Co2- and Co2E2-proteins, suggesting that the presence of Co(II) in one site strongly affects the geometry of the neighbouring site. Some discrepancies between our spectroscopic data and those reported in literature are discussed. The results obtained from fluorescence experiments indicate that Co(II) ions exert a different quenching effect on the tyrosine emission, depending on whether they are located in the Zn(II) or in the Cu(II) site. The fluorescence quenching can be attributed to a 'heavy atom' and 'paramagnetic ion' effect by Co(II) ions. PMID:2790051

  8. Localization of superoxide dismutases in Alzheimer's disease and Down's syndrome neocortex and hippocampus.

    PubMed Central

    Furuta, A.; Price, D. L.; Pardo, C. A.; Troncoso, J. C.; Xu, Z. S.; Taniguchi, N.; Martin, L. J.

    1995-01-01

    Abnormalities in the cellular regulation and expression of antioxidant enzymes may have a role in mechanisms of central nervous system aging and neurodegeneration. We therefore examined, using isozyme-specific antibodies and immunohistochemistry, the localization of copper, zinc-superoxide dismutase and manganese-superoxide dismutase in the frontal and temporal neocortices and hippocampi of aged controls and individuals with Alzheimer's disease or Down's syndrome. Two different antibodies to copper, zinc-superoxide dismutase and one antibody to manganese-superoxide dismutase were evaluated by immunoblotting of homogenates of human brain before use in immunohistochemistry. The copper, zinc-superoxide dismutase antibodies recognized a single band of proteins at 16 kd. The manganese-superoxide dismutase antibody detected a single band of proteins at 25 kd. Immunohistochemically, copper, zinc-superoxide dismutase and manganese-superoxide dismutase immunoreactivities were localized predominantly to neocortical and hippocampal pyramidal neurons and scarcely seen in glial cells in controls. In Alzheimer's disease and Down's syndrome, the distributions and intensities of these two forms of superoxide dismutase immunoreactivities were different as compared with controls. Copper, zinc-superoxide dismutase was enriched in pyramidal neurons undergoing degeneration, whereas manganese-superoxide dismutase was more enriched in reactive astrocytes than in neurons. In senile plaques, copper, zinc-superoxide dismutase-positive globular structures were surrounded by astrocytes highly enriched in manganese-superoxide dismutase. By double label immunohistochemistry, some pyramidal neurons coexpressed superoxide dismutases and tau, and a few copper, zinc-superoxide dismutase-positive structures in senile plaques colocalized with tau. Amyloid cores, diffuse plaques, and microglia scarcely showed colocalization with superoxide dismutase-positive structures. The observed changes in the

  9. Cu,Zn Superoxide Dismutase is a Peroxisomal Enzyme in Human Fibroblast and Hepatoma Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Gilbert-Andre; Warner, Thomas G.; Steimer, Kathelyn S.; Hallewell, Robert A.

    1991-08-01

    The intracellular localization of Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (superoxide:superoxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.15.1.1) has been examined by immunofluorescence using four monoclonal anti-Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase antibodies raised against a recombinant human Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase derivative produced and purified from Escherichia coli. Colocalization with catalase, a peroxisomal matrix enzyme, was used to demonstrate the peroxisomal localization of Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase in human fibroblasts and hepatoma cells. In the fibroblasts of Zellweger syndrome patients, the enzyme is not transported to the peroxisomal ghosts but, like catalase, remains in the cytoplasm. In addition, immunocryoelectron microscopy of yeast cells expressing human Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase showed that the enzyme is translocated to the peroxisomes.

  10. Mechanical overloading causes mitochondrial superoxide and SOD2 imbalance in chondrocytes resulting in cartilage degeneration.

    PubMed

    Koike, Masato; Nojiri, Hidetoshi; Ozawa, Yusuke; Watanabe, Kenji; Muramatsu, Yuta; Kaneko, Haruka; Morikawa, Daichi; Kobayashi, Keiji; Saita, Yoshitomo; Sasho, Takahisa; Shirasawa, Takuji; Yokote, Koutaro; Kaneko, Kazuo; Shimizu, Takahiko

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical stress and aging are major risk factors of cartilage degeneration. Human studies have previously reported that oxidative damage increased, while SOD2 protein was reciprocally downregulated in osteoarthritic degenerated cartilage. However, it remains unclear whether mitochondrial superoxide imbalance in chondrocytes causes cartilage degeneration. We herein demonstrate that mechanical loading promoted mitochondrial superoxide generation and selective Sod2 downregulation in chondrocytes in vivo and that mitochondrial superoxide inducer also downregulated Sod2 expression in chondrocytes in vitro. A genetically manipulated model revealed that Sod2 deficiency in chondrocytes also resulted in mitochondrial superoxide overproduction and dysfunction, thus leading to cartilage degeneration. Intra-articular injection of a permeable antioxidant effectively suppressed the mechanical loading-induced mitochondrial superoxide generation and cartilage degeneration in mice. Our findings demonstrate that mitochondrial superoxide plays a pivotal role in the development and progression of osteoarthritis, and the mitochondrial superoxide balance may therefore be a promising target for the treatment of cartilage degeneration. PMID:26108578

  11. Mechanical overloading causes mitochondrial superoxide and SOD2 imbalance in chondrocytes resulting in cartilage degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Koike, Masato; Nojiri, Hidetoshi; Ozawa, Yusuke; Watanabe, Kenji; Muramatsu, Yuta; Kaneko, Haruka; Morikawa, Daichi; Kobayashi, Keiji; Saita, Yoshitomo; Sasho, Takahisa; Shirasawa, Takuji; Yokote, Koutaro; Kaneko, Kazuo; Shimizu, Takahiko

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical stress and aging are major risk factors of cartilage degeneration. Human studies have previously reported that oxidative damage increased, while SOD2 protein was reciprocally downregulated in osteoarthritic degenerated cartilage. However, it remains unclear whether mitochondrial superoxide imbalance in chondrocytes causes cartilage degeneration. We herein demonstrate that mechanical loading promoted mitochondrial superoxide generation and selective Sod2 downregulation in chondrocytes in vivo and that mitochondrial superoxide inducer also downregulated Sod2 expression in chondrocytes in vitro. A genetically manipulated model revealed that Sod2 deficiency in chondrocytes also resulted in mitochondrial superoxide overproduction and dysfunction, thus leading to cartilage degeneration. Intra-articular injection of a permeable antioxidant effectively suppressed the mechanical loading-induced mitochondrial superoxide generation and cartilage degeneration in mice. Our findings demonstrate that mitochondrial superoxide plays a pivotal role in the development and progression of osteoarthritis, and the mitochondrial superoxide balance may therefore be a promising target for the treatment of cartilage degeneration. PMID:26108578

  12. A lithium-oxygen battery based on lithium superoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jun; Jung Lee, Yun; Luo, Xiangyi; Chun Lau, Kah; Asadi, Mohammad; Wang, Hsien-Hau; Brombosz, Scott; Wen, Jianguo; Zhai, Dengyun; Chen, Zonghai; Miller, Dean J.; Sub Jeong, Yo; Park, Jin-Bum; Zak Fang, Zhigang; Kumar, Bijandra; Salehi-Khojin, Amin; Sun, Yang-Kook; Curtiss, Larry A.; Amine, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Batteries based on sodium superoxide and on potassium superoxide have recently been reported. However, there have been no reports of a battery based on lithium superoxide (LiO2), despite much research into the lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) battery because of its potential high energy density. Several studies of Li-O2 batteries have found evidence of LiO2 being formed as one component of the discharge product along with lithium peroxide (Li2O2). In addition, theoretical calculations have indicated that some forms of LiO2 may have a long lifetime. These studies also suggest that it might be possible to form LiO2 alone for use in a battery. However, solid LiO2 has been difficult to synthesize in pure form because it is thermodynamically unstable with respect to disproportionation, giving Li2O2 (refs 19, 20). Here we show that crystalline LiO2 can be stabilized in a Li-O2 battery by using a suitable graphene-based cathode. Various characterization techniques reveal no evidence for the presence of Li2O2. A novel templating growth mechanism involving the use of iridium nanoparticles on the cathode surface may be responsible for the growth of crystalline LiO2. Our results demonstrate that the LiO2 formed in the Li-O2 battery is stable enough for the battery to be repeatedly charged and discharged with a very low charge potential (about 3.2 volts). We anticipate that this discovery will lead to methods of synthesizing and stabilizing LiO2, which could open the way to high-energy-density batteries based on LiO2 as well as to other possible uses of this compound, such as oxygen storage.

  13. A lithium-oxygen battery based on lithium superoxide.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Lee, Yun Jung; Luo, Xiangyi; Lau, Kah Chun; Asadi, Mohammad; Wang, Hsien-Hau; Brombosz, Scott; Wen, Jianguo; Zhai, Dengyun; Chen, Zonghai; Miller, Dean J; Jeong, Yo Sub; Park, Jin-Bum; Fang, Zhigang Zak; Kumar, Bijandra; Salehi-Khojin, Amin; Sun, Yang-Kook; Curtiss, Larry A; Amine, Khalil

    2016-01-21

    Batteries based on sodium superoxide and on potassium superoxide have recently been reported. However, there have been no reports of a battery based on lithium superoxide (LiO2), despite much research into the lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) battery because of its potential high energy density. Several studies of Li-O2 batteries have found evidence of LiO2 being formed as one component of the discharge product along with lithium peroxide (Li2O2). In addition, theoretical calculations have indicated that some forms of LiO2 may have a long lifetime. These studies also suggest that it might be possible to form LiO2 alone for use in a battery. However, solid LiO2 has been difficult to synthesize in pure form because it is thermodynamically unstable with respect to disproportionation, giving Li2O2 (refs 19, 20). Here we show that crystalline LiO2 can be stabilized in a Li-O2 battery by using a suitable graphene-based cathode. Various characterization techniques reveal no evidence for the presence of Li2O2. A novel templating growth mechanism involving the use of iridium nanoparticles on the cathode surface may be responsible for the growth of crystalline LiO2. Our results demonstrate that the LiO2 formed in the Li-O2 battery is stable enough for the battery to be repeatedly charged and discharged with a very low charge potential (about 3.2 volts). We anticipate that this discovery will lead to methods of synthesizing and stabilizing LiO2, which could open the way to high-energy-density batteries based on LiO2 as well as to other possible uses of this compound, such as oxygen storage. PMID:26751057

  14. Theoretical determination of the alkali-metal superoxide bond energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Harry; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Sodupe, Mariona; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1992-01-01

    The bond dissociation energies for the alkali-metal superoxides have been computed using extensive Gaussian basis sets and treating electron correlation at the modified coupled-pair functional level. Our computed D0 values are 61.4, 37.2, 40.6, and 38.4 kcal/mol for LiO2, NaO2, KO2, and RbO2, respectively. These values, which are expected to be lower bounds and accurate to 2 kcal/mol, agree well with some of the older flame data, but rule out several recent experimental measurements.

  15. Superoxide anion-induced pain and inflammation depends on TNFα/TNFR1 signaling in mice.

    PubMed

    Yamacita-Borin, Fabiane Y; Zarpelon, Ana C; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Fattori, Victor; Alves-Filho, Jose C; Cunha, Fernando Q; Cunha, Thiago M; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2015-09-25

    Inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) and superoxide anion production reduces inflammation and pain. The present study investigated whether superoxide anion-induced pain depends on TNFα signaling and the role of superoxide anion in TNFα-induced hyperalgesia to clarify the interrelation between these two mediators in the context of pain. Intraplantar injection of a superoxide anion donor (potassium superoxide) induced mechanical hyperalgesia (0.5-5h after injection), neutrophil recruitment (myeloperoxidase activity), and overt pain-like behaviors (paw flinching, paw licking, and abdominal writhings) in wild-type mice. Tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 deficiency (TNFR1-/-) and treatment of wild-type mice with etanercept (a soluble TNFR2 receptor that inhibits TNFα actions) inhibited superoxide anion-induced pain-like behaviors. TNFR1(-/-) mice were also protected from superoxide anion donor-induced oxidative stress, suggesting the role of this pathway in the maintenance of oxidative stress. Finally, we demonstrated that Apocynin (an NADPH oxidase inhibitor) or Tempol (a superoxide dismutase mimetic) treatment inhibited TNFα-induced paw mechanical hyperalgesia and neutrophil recruitment (myeloperoxidase activity). These results demonstrate that TNFα/TNFR1 signaling is important in superoxide anion-triggered pain and that TNFα/TNFR1 signaling amplifies the oxidative stress triggered by superoxide anion, which contributes to sustaining pain and inflammation. PMID:26291484

  16. Detoxification of superoxide without production of H2O2: Antioxidant activity of superoxide reductase complexed with ferrocyanide

    PubMed Central

    Molina-Heredia, Fernando P.; Houée-Levin, Chantal; Berthomieu, Catherine; Touati, Danièle; Tremey, Emilie; Favaudon, Vincent; Adam, Virgile; Nivière, Vincent

    2006-01-01

    The superoxide radical O2·̅ is a toxic by-product of oxygen metabolism. Two O2·̅ detoxifying enzymes have been described so far, superoxide dismutase and superoxide reductase (SOR), both forming H2O2 as a reaction product. Recently, the SOR active site, a ferrous iron in a [Fe2+ (N-His)4 (S-Cys)] pentacoordination, was shown to have the ability to form a complex with the organometallic compound ferrocyanide. Here, we have investigated in detail the reactivity of the SOR–ferrocyanide complex with O2·̅ by pulse and γ-ray radiolysis, infrared, and UV-visible spectroscopies. The complex reacts very efficiently with O2·̅. However, the presence of the ferrocyanide adduct markedly modifies the reaction mechanism of SOR, with the formation of transient intermediates different from those observed for SOR alone. A one-electron redox chemistry appears to be carried out by the ferrocyanide moiety of the complex, whereas the SOR iron site remains in the reduced state. Surprisingly, the toxic H2O2 species is no longer the reaction product. Accordingly, in vivoexperiments showed that formation of the SOR–ferrocyanide complex increased the antioxidant capabilities of SOR expressed in an Escherichia coli sodA sodB recA mutant strain. Altogether, these data describe an unprecedented O2·̅ detoxification activity, catalyzed by the SOR–ferrocyanide complex, which does not conduct to the production of the toxic H2O2 species. PMID:17001016

  17. Superoxide Dismutase Mimics: Chemistry, Pharmacology, and Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Rebouças, Júlio S.; Spasojević, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Oxidative stress has become widely viewed as an underlying condition in a number of diseases, such as ischemia–reperfusion disorders, central nervous system disorders, cardiovascular conditions, cancer, and diabetes. Thus, natural and synthetic antioxidants have been actively sought. Superoxide dismutase is a first line of defense against oxidative stress under physiological and pathological conditions. Therefore, the development of therapeutics aimed at mimicking superoxide dismutase was a natural maneuver. Metalloporphyrins, as well as Mn cyclic polyamines, Mn salen derivatives and nitroxides were all originally developed as SOD mimics. The same thermodynamic and electrostatic properties that make them potent SOD mimics may allow them to reduce other reactive species such as peroxynitrite, peroxynitrite-derived CO3·−, peroxyl radical, and less efficiently H2O2. By doing so SOD mimics can decrease both primary and secondary oxidative events, the latter arising from the inhibition of cellular transcriptional activity. To better judge the therapeutic potential and the advantage of one over the other type of compound, comparative studies of different classes of drugs in the same cellular and/or animal models are needed. We here provide a comprehensive overview of the chemical properties and some in vivo effects observed with various classes of compounds with a special emphasis on porphyrin-based compounds. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 13, 877–918. PMID:20095865

  18. Molecular characterization of two superoxide dismutases from Hydra vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Bhagirathi; Metz, Richard; Huebner, Henry J.; Porter, Weston; Phillips, Timothy D.

    2007-01-01

    Apparent full-length cDNA sequences coding for manganese superoxide dismutase (HvMnSOD) and extracellular superoxide dismutase (HvEC-SOD) were isolated from Hydra vulgaris in order to understand their expression and 3D structures; and explore their possibility of being used as for biomarkers for environmental stress and toxicity. The deduced HvMnSOD protein consists of 219 amino acids of which first 21 amino acids constitute a presumed mitochondria-targeting signal peptide whereas HvEC-SOD protein consists of 189 amino acids of which first 19 amino acids constitute a presumed signal peptide. Molecular model generated for HvMnSOD displayed the N-terminal long alpha antiparallel hairpin and the C-terminal mixed alpha/beta fold characteristic of MnSODs and that for HvEC-SOD displayed the characteristic CuZnSOD beta-barrel fold. Hydrae subjected to thermal, starvation, metal and oxidative stress responded by regulating MnSOD and EC-SOD mRNA transcription. These results indicated that these genes are involved in the cellular stress response and (anti)oxidative processes triggered by stressor and contaminant exposure. Hence the expression of these SODs in hydra may have potential as molecular biomarkers for assessing stress, toxicity and pro-oxidant quality of chemicals and aquatic environmental quality. PMID:17150313

  19. Superoxide generation by the respiratory chain of tumor mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Konstantinov, A A; Peskin, A V; Popova EYu; Khomutov, G B; Ruuge, E K

    1987-10-29

    O2-. generation by the succinate oxidase segment of the respiratory chain of mitochondria and submitochondrial particles from hepatoma 22a and hepatoma Zajdela has been studied with the use of the Tiron method. In the presence of succinate, superoxide generation is induced by antimycin, 2-n-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide or funiculosin, and is inhibited by mucidin, myxothiazol or cyanide. The rate of O2-. generation in the antimycin-inhibited state is maximal at the [succinate]/[fumarate] ratio of 1:10 and diminishes at more positive and more negative redox potentials. These characteristics of O2-.-generation are the same as observed earlier in submitochondrial particles from normal tissues. Accordingly, the mechanism of superoxide production is suggested to be the same in tumor and normal mitochondria, namely, autoxidation of the unstable ubisemiquinone in the ubiquinol-oxidizing centre o of cytochrome bc1 complex. With respect to the rate of O2-. generation, the hepatoma mitochondrial membranes are approximately twice as active as bovine heart submitochondrial particles and exceed those from rat liver by more than one order of magnitude. PMID:2822106

  20. A novel nickel-containing superoxide dismutase from Streptomyces spp.

    PubMed Central

    Youn, H D; Kim, E J; Roe, J H; Hah, Y C; Kang, S O

    1996-01-01

    A novel type of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was purified to apparent homogeneity from the cytosolic fractions of Streptomyces sp. IMSNU-1 and Strep. coelicolor ATCC 10147 respectively. Both enzymes were composed of four identical subunits of 13.4 kDa, were stable at pH 4.0-8.0 and up to 70 degrees C, and were inhibited by cyanide and H2O2 but little inhibited by azide. The atomic absorption analyses revealed that both enzymes contain 0.74 g-atom of nickel per mol of subunit. Both enzymes were different from iron-containing SOD and manganese-containing SOD from Escherichia coli, and copper- and zinc-containing SODs from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and bovine erythrocytes, with respect to amino acid composition, N-terminal amino acid sequence and cross-reactivity against antibody. The absorption spectra of both enzymes were identical, exhibiting maxima at 276 and 378 nm, and a broad peak at 531 nm. The EPR spectra of both enzymes were almost identical with that of NiIII in a tetragonal symmetry of NiIII-oligopeptides especially containing histidine. The apoenzymes, lacking in nickel, had no ability to mediate the conversion of superoxide anion radical to hydrogen peroxide, strongly indicating that NiIII plays a main role in these enzymes. PMID:8836134

  1. Superoxide overproduction and kidney fibrosis: a new animal model

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães-Souza, Nadia Karina; Yamaleyeva, Liliya Marsovna; Lu, Baisong; Ramos, Ana Claudia Mallet de Souza; Bishop, Colin Edward; Andersson, Karl Erik

    2015-01-01

    Objective To establish whether the mutation in the Immp2L gene induces renal fibrosis and whether aging exacerbates renal morphology in mice. Methods Female mutant mice with mutation in the inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like protein at 3 and 18 months of age were used. Renal fibrosis was analyzed using classic fibrosis score, Masson’s trichrome staining, and analysis of profibrotic markers using real time polymerase chain reaction (superoxide dismutase 1, metalloproteinase-9, erythropoietin, transforming growth factor beta), and immunostaining (fibroblasts and Type IV collagen). Oxidative stress markers were determined by immunohistochemistry. The number of renal apoptotic cells was determined. Renal function was estimated by serum creatinine. Results Young mutant mice had significantly more glomerulosclerosis than age-matched mice (p=0.034). Mutant mice had more tubular casts (p=0.025), collagen deposition (p=0.019), and collagen type IV expression (p<0.001). Superoxide dismutase 1 expression was significantly higher in young mutants (p=0.038). Old mutants exhibited significantly higher expression of the fibroblast marker and macrophage marker (p=0.007 and p=0.012, respectively). The real time polymerase chain reaction of metalloproteinase-9 and erythropoietin were enhanced 2.5- and 6-fold, respectively, in old mutants. Serum creatinine was significantly higher in old mutants (p<0.001). Conclusion This mutation altered renal architecture by increasing the deposition of extracellular matrix, oxidative stress, and inflammation, suggesting a protective role of Immp2L against renal fibrosis. PMID:25993073

  2. Physical and chemical stability of different formulations with superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Di Mambro, V M; Campos, P M B G Maia; Fonseca, M J V

    2004-10-01

    Topical formulations with superoxide dismutase (SOD), a scavenger of superoxide radicals, have proved to be effective against some skin diseases. Nevertheless, formulations with proteins are susceptible to both chemical and physical instability. Three different formulations (anionic and non-ionic gel and emulsion) were developed and supplemented with SOD in order to determine the most stable formulation that would maintain SOD activity. Physical stability was evaluated by assessing the rheological behavior of the formulations stored at room temperature, 37 and 45 degrees C. Chemical stability was evaluated by the measurement of enzymatic activity in the formulations stored at room temperature and at 45 degrees C. Formulations showed a flow index less than one, characterizing pseudoplastic behavior. There was no significant difference in initial values of flow index, tixotropy or minimum apparent viscosity. Neither gel showed significant changes in minimum apparent viscosity concerning storage time or temperature, as well, SOD presence and its activity. The emulsion showed decreased viscosity by the 28th day, but no significant changes concerning storage temperature or SOD presence, although it showed a decreased activity. The addition of SOD to the formulations studied did not affect their physical stability but gel formulations seem to be better bases for enzyme addition. PMID:15544058

  3. An Enzyme-Based Theory of Obligate Anaerobiosis: The Physiological Function of Superoxide Dismutase

    PubMed Central

    McCord, Joe M.; Keele, Bernard B.; Fridovich, Irwin

    1971-01-01

    The distribution of catalase and superoxide dismutase has been examined in various micro-organisms. Strict anaerobes exhibited no superoxide dismutase and, generally, no catalase activity. All aerobic organisms containing cytochrome systems were found to contain both superoxide dismutase and catalase. Aerotolerant anaerobes, which survive exposure to air and metabolize oxygen to a limited extent but do not contain cytochrome systems, were found to be devoid of catalase activity but did exhibit superoxide dismutase activity. This distribution is consistent with the proposal that the prime physiological function of superoxide dismutase is protection of oxygen-metabolizing organisms against the potentially detrimental effects of the superoxide free radical, a biologically produced intermediate resulting from the univalent reduction of molecular oxygen. PMID:4995818

  4. Superoxide dismutase activity in needles of Norwegian spruce trees (Picea abies L. )

    SciTech Connect

    Polle, A.; Krings, B.; Rennenberg, H. Universitaet zu Koeln )

    1989-08-01

    The activity of superoxide dismutase was investigated in needles of spruce trees. To obtain maximum activity, needles were homogenized in the presence of Triton X-100 and polyvinylpyrrolidone. Superoxide dismutase activity was measured in dialyzed extracts with a modified epinephrine assay at pH 10.2. The extracts contained 70 to 120 units of superoxide dismutase per milligram protein. One unit of superoxide dismutase was completely inhibited in the presence of 20 micromolar NaCN. On native polyacrylamide gels three electromorphs were visualized after staining for activity. All three species were sensitive to CN{sup {minus}} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and were therefore assumed to be Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutases. Superoxide dismutase activity was dependent on the age of the needles and declined by approximately 25% within 3 to 4 years.

  5. Mechanism of Action of Sulforaphane as a Superoxide Radical Anion and Hydrogen Peroxide Scavenger by Double Hydrogen Transfer: A Model for Iron Superoxide Dismutase.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Ajit Kumar; Mishra, P C

    2015-06-25

    The mechanism of action of sulforaphane as a scavenger of superoxide radical anion (O2(•-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was investigated using density functional theory (DFT) in both gas phase and aqueous media. Iron superoxide dismutase (Fe-SOD) involved in scavenging superoxide radical anion from biological media was modeled by a complex consisting of the ferric ion (Fe(3+)) attached to three histidine rings. Reactions related to scavenging of superoxide radical anion by sulforaphane were studied using DFT in the presence and absence of Fe-SOD represented by this model in both gas phase and aqueous media. The scavenging action of sulforaphane toward both superoxide radical anion and hydrogen peroxide was found to involve the unusual mechanism of double hydrogen transfer. It was found that sulforaphane alone, without Fe-SOD, cannot scavenge superoxide radical anion in gas phase or aqueous media efficiently as the corresponding reaction barriers are very high. However, in the presence of Fe-SOD represented by the above-mentioned model, the scavenging reactions become barrierless, and so sulforaphane scavenges superoxide radical anion by converting it to hydrogen peroxide efficiently. Further, sulforaphane was found to scavenge hydrogen peroxide also very efficiently by converting it into water. Thus, the mechanism of action of sulforaphane as an excellent antioxidant has been unravelled. PMID:26020652

  6. Pluronic-modified superoxide dismutase 1 attenuates angiotensin II-induced increase in intracellular superoxide in neurons.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xiang; Zimmerman, Matthew C; Yang, Ruifang; Tong, Jing; Vinogradov, Serguei; Kabanov, Alexander V

    2010-08-15

    Overexpressing superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1; also called Cu/ZnSOD), an intracellular superoxide (O(2)(*-))-scavenging enzyme, in central neurons inhibits angiotensin II (AngII) intraneuronal signaling and normalizes cardiovascular dysfunction in diseases associated with enhanced AngII signaling in the brain, including hypertension and heart failure. However, the blood-brain barrier and neuronal cell membranes impose a tremendous impediment for the delivery of SOD1 to central neurons, which hinders the potential therapeutic impact of SOD1 treatment on these diseases. To address this, we developed conjugates of SOD1 with poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) block copolymer (Pluronic) (SOD1-P85 and SOD1-L81), which retained significant SOD1 enzymatic activity. The modified SOD1 effectively scavenged xanthine oxidase/hypoxanthine-derived O(2)(*-), as determined by HPLC and the measurement of 2-hydroxyethidium. Using catecholaminergic neurons, we observed an increase in neuronal uptake of SOD1-Pluronic after 1, 6, or 24h, compared to neurons treated with pure SOD1 or PEG-SOD1. Importantly, without inducing neuronal toxicity, SOD1-Pluronic conjugates significantly inhibited AngII-induced increases in intraneuronal O(2)(*-) levels. These data indicate that SOD1-Pluronic conjugates penetrate neuronal cell membranes, which results in elevated intracellular levels of functional SOD1. Pluronic conjugation may be a new delivery system for SOD1 into central neurons and therapeutically beneficial for AngII-related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:20493251

  7. Theoretical study of the correlation between superoxide anion consumption and firefly luciferin chemiluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto da Silva, Luís; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C. G.

    2013-07-01

    This is the first theoretical study of the relationship between superoxide anion and firefly chemiluminescence, in DMSO. Electron transfer reactions between luciferin dianionic/carbanionic/radical species and superoxide were studied in order see if an alternative explanation existed for the consumption of the latter species, without correlating it with a role on luciferin chemiluminescence. Despite the finding that luciferin may indeed inhibit the formation of the superoxide anion, no theoretical evidence was found that showed that this molecule is consumed in a non-chemiluminescence reaction. Therefore, it is concluded that the superoxide anion is indeed related to the firefly luciferin chemiluminescence.

  8. Selective superoxide generation within mitochondria by the targeted redox cycler MitoParaquat.

    PubMed

    Robb, Ellen L; Gawel, Justyna M; Aksentijević, Dunja; Cochemé, Helena M; Stewart, Tessa S; Shchepinova, Maria M; Qiang, He; Prime, Tracy A; Bright, Thomas P; James, Andrew M; Shattock, Michael J; Senn, Hans M; Hartley, Richard C; Murphy, Michael P

    2015-12-01

    Superoxide is the proximal reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by the mitochondrial respiratory chain and plays a major role in pathological oxidative stress and redox signaling. While there are tools to detect or decrease mitochondrial superoxide, none can rapidly and specifically increase superoxide production within the mitochondrial matrix. This lack impedes progress, making it challenging to assess accurately the roles of mitochondrial superoxide in cells and in vivo. To address this unmet need, we synthesized and characterized a mitochondria-targeted redox cycler, MitoParaquat (MitoPQ) that comprises a triphenylphosphonium lipophilic cation conjugated to the redox cycler paraquat. MitoPQ accumulates selectively in the mitochondrial matrix driven by the membrane potential. Within the matrix, MitoPQ produces superoxide by redox cycling at the flavin site of complex I, selectively increasing superoxide production within mitochondria. MitoPQ increased mitochondrial superoxide in isolated mitochondria and cells in culture ~a thousand-fold more effectively than untargeted paraquat. MitoPQ was also more toxic than paraquat in the isolated perfused heart and in Drosophila in vivo. MitoPQ enables the selective generation of superoxide within mitochondria and is a useful tool to investigate the many roles of mitochondrial superoxide in pathology and redox signaling in cells and in vivo. PMID:26454075

  9. Permeability Transition Pore-Mediated Mitochondrial Superoxide Flashes Regulate Cortical Neural Progenitor Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yan; Mattson, Mark P.; Cheng, Aiwu

    2013-01-01

    In the process of neurogenesis, neural progenitor cells (NPCs) cease dividing and differentiate into postmitotic neurons that grow dendrites and an axon, become excitable, and establish synapses with other neurons. Mitochondrial biogenesis and aerobic metabolism provide energy substrates required to support the differentiation, growth and synaptic activity of neurons. Mitochondria may also serve signaling functions and, in this regard, it was recently reported that mitochondria can generate rapid bursts of superoxide (superoxide flashes), the frequency of which changes in response to environmental conditions and signals including oxygen levels and Ca2+ fluxes. Here we show that the frequency of mitochondrial superoxide flashes increases as embryonic cerebral cortical neurons differentiate from NPCs, and provide evidence that the superoxide flashes serve a signaling function that is critical for the differentiation process. The superoxide flashes are mediated by mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening, and pharmacological inhibition of the mPTP suppresses neuronal differentiation. Moreover, superoxide flashes and neuronal differentiation are inhibited by scavenging of mitochondrial superoxide. Conversely, manipulations that increase superoxide flash frequency accelerate neuronal differentiation. Our findings reveal a regulatory role for mitochondrial superoxide flashes, mediated by mPTP opening, in neuronal differentiation. PMID:24116142

  10. Superoxide-mediated activation of uncoupling protein 2 causes pancreatic β cell dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, Stefan; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Scorrano, Luca; Dalgaard, Louise T.; St-Pierre, Julie; Grey, Shane T.; Lowell, Bradford B.

    2003-01-01

    Failure to secrete adequate amounts of insulin in response to increasing concentrations of glucose is an important feature of type 2 diabetes. The mechanism for loss of glucose responsiveness is unknown. Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), by virtue of its mitochondrial proton leak activity and consequent negative effect on ATP production, impairs glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Of interest, it has recently been shown that superoxide, when added to isolated mitochondria, activates UCP2-mediated proton leak. Since obesity and chronic hyperglycemia increase mitochondrial superoxide production, as well as UCP2 expression in pancreatic β cells, a superoxide-UCP2 pathway could contribute importantly to obesity- and hyperglycemia-induced β cell dysfunction. This study demonstrates that endogenously produced mitochondrial superoxide activates UCP2-mediated proton leak, thus lowering ATP levels and impairing glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Furthermore, hyperglycemia- and obesity-induced loss of glucose responsiveness is prevented by reduction of mitochondrial superoxide production or gene knockout of UCP2. Importantly, reduction of superoxide has no beneficial effect in the absence of UCP2, and superoxide levels are increased further in the absence of UCP2, demonstrating that the adverse effects of superoxide on β cell glucose sensing are caused by activation of UCP2. Therefore, superoxide-mediated activation of UCP2 could play an important role in the pathogenesis of β cell dysfunction and type 2 diabetes. PMID:14679178

  11. Inhibition of superoxide anion production by extracellular acidification in neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Murata, Naoya; Mogi, Chihiro; Tobo, Masayuki; Nakakura, Takashi; Sato, Koichi; Tomura, Hideaki; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular acidification inhibited formyl-Met-Leu-Phe- or C5a-induced superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) production in differentiated HL-60 neutrophil-like cells and human neutrophils. A cAMP-increasing agonist, prostaglandin E(1), also inhibited the formyl peptide-induced O(2)(-) production. The inhibitory action on the O(2)(-) production by extracellular acidic pH was associated with cAMP accumulation and partly attenuated by H89, a protein kinase A inhibitor. A significant amount of mRNAs for T-cell death-associated gene 8 (TDAG8) and other proton-sensing ovarian cancer G-protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1)-family receptors is expressed in these cells. These results suggest that cAMP/protein kinase A, possibly through proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptors, may be involved in extracellular acidic pH-induced inhibition of O(2)(-) production. PMID:19539899

  12. Sources of marine superoxide dismutases: Characteristics and applications.

    PubMed

    Zeinali, Farrokhzad; Homaei, Ahmad; Kamrani, Ehsan

    2015-08-01

    The ability of marine organism to cope with oxidative stress is one of the main factors that influence its survival in the marine environment, when senescence conditions prevail. The antioxidative defense system includes enzymatic and non-enzymatic components. Among the enzymatic system, superoxide dismutases are the first and most important of the antioxidant metalloenzymes. Four different types of metal centers have been detected in SODs, dividing this family into Cu/Zn, Ni, Mn and Fe-SODs. Its use was limited to non-drug applications in humans (include: cosmetic, food, agriculture, and chemical industries) and drug applications in animals. This paper is a review of the recent literatures on sources of marine SODs, the need for SOD and different applications in industry, covering the last decades. The most recent paper, patents and reviews on characterization and application are reviewed. PMID:26047895

  13. Basal superoxide as a sex-specific immune constraint

    PubMed Central

    Tobler, Michael; Healey, Mo; Wilson, Mark; Olsson, Mats

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that reactive oxygen species (ROS), a group of unstable and highly reactive chemical molecules, play a key role in regulating and maintaining life-history trade-offs. Upregulation of ROS in association with immune activation is costly because it may result in an imbalance between pro- and antioxidants and, hence, oxidative damage. Previous research aimed at quantifying this cost has mostly focused on changes in the pro-/antioxidant balance subsequent to an immune response. Here, we test the hypothesis that systemic ROS may constrain immune activation. We show that systemic, pre-challenge superoxide (SO) levels are negatively related to the strength of the subsequent immune response towards the mitogen phytohaemagglutinin in male, but not female painted dragon lizards (Ctenophorus pictus). We therefore suggest that systemic SO constrains immune activation in painted dragon males. We speculate that this may be due to sex-specific selection pressures on immune investment. PMID:21632618

  14. Stability of ALS-related Superoxide Dismutase Protein variants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusebrink, Daniel; Plotkin, Steven

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is a metal binding, homodimeric protein, whose misfolding is implicated in the neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Monomerization is believed to be a key step in the propagation of the disease. The dimer stability is often difficult to measure experimentally however, because it is entangled with protein unfolding and metal loss. We thus computationally investigate the dimer stability of mutants of SOD1 known to be associated with ALS. We report on systematic trends in dimer stability, as well as intriguing allosteric communication between mutations and the dimer interface. We study the dimer stabilities in molecular dynamics simulations and obtain the binding free energies of the dimers from pulling essays. Mutations are applied in silicoand we compare the differences of binding free energies compared to the wild type.

  15. Methylglyoxal as a scavenger for superoxide anion-radical.

    PubMed

    Shumaev, K B; Lankin, V Z; Konovalova, G G; Grechnikova, M A; Tikhaze, A K

    2016-07-01

    Methylglyoxal at a concentration of 5 mM caused a significant inhibition of superoxide anion radical (O2 (·-)) comparable to the effect of Tirone. In the process of O2 (·-) generation in the system of egg phosphatidylcholine liposome peroxidation induced by the azo-initiator AIBN, a marked inhibition of chemiluminescence in the presence of 100 mM methylglyoxal was found. At the same time, methylglyoxal did not inhibit free radical peroxidation of low-density lipoprotein particles, which indicates the absence of interaction with methylglyoxal alkoxyl and peroxyl polyenoic lipid radicals. These findings deepen information about the role of methylglyoxal in the regulation of free radical processes. PMID:27599518

  16. Basal superoxide as a sex-specific immune constraint.

    PubMed

    Tobler, Michael; Healey, Mo; Wilson, Mark; Olsson, Mats

    2011-12-23

    There is increasing evidence that reactive oxygen species (ROS), a group of unstable and highly reactive chemical molecules, play a key role in regulating and maintaining life-history trade-offs. Upregulation of ROS in association with immune activation is costly because it may result in an imbalance between pro- and antioxidants and, hence, oxidative damage. Previous research aimed at quantifying this cost has mostly focused on changes in the pro-/antioxidant balance subsequent to an immune response. Here, we test the hypothesis that systemic ROS may constrain immune activation. We show that systemic, pre-challenge superoxide (SO) levels are negatively related to the strength of the subsequent immune response towards the mitogen phytohaemagglutinin in male, but not female painted dragon lizards (Ctenophorus pictus). We therefore suggest that systemic SO constrains immune activation in painted dragon males. We speculate that this may be due to sex-specific selection pressures on immune investment. PMID:21632618

  17. Superoxide and the production of oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed Central

    Keyer, K; Gort, A S; Imlay, J A

    1995-01-01

    The conventional model of oxidative DNA damage posits a role for superoxide (O2-) as a reductant for iron, which subsequently generates a hydroxyl radical by transferring the electron to H2O2. The hydroxyl radical then attacks DNA. Indeed, mutants of Escherichia coli that lack superoxide dismutase (SOD) were 10-fold more vulnerable to DNA oxidation by H2O2 than were wild-type cells. Even the pace of DNA damage by endogenous oxidants was great enough that the SOD mutants could not tolerate air if enzymes that repair oxidative DNA lesions were inactive. However, DNA oxidation proceeds in SOD-proficient cells without the involvement of O2-, as evidenced by the failure of SOD overproduction or anaerobiosis to suppress damage by H2O2. Furthermore, the mechanism by which excess O2- causes damage was called into question when the hypersensitivity of SOD mutants to DNA damage persisted for at least 20 min after O2- had been dispelled through the imposition of anaerobiosis. That behavior contradicted the standard model, which requires that O2- be present to rereduce cellular iron during the period of exposure to H2O2. Evidently, DNA oxidation is driven by a reductant other than O2-, which leaves the mechanism of damage promotion by O2- unsettled. One possibility is that, through its well-established ability to leach iron from iron-sulfur clusters, O2- increases the amount of free iron that is available to catalyze hydroxyl radical production. Experiments with iron transport mutants confirmed that increases in free-iron concentration have the effect of accelerating DNA oxidation. Thus, O2- may be genotoxic only in doses that exceed those found in SOD-proficient cells, and in those limited circumstances it may promote DNA damage by increasing the amount of DNA-bound iron. PMID:7592468

  18. Paving the way for therapeutic prevention of tumor metastasis with agents targeting mitochondrial superoxide

    PubMed Central

    Porporato, Paolo E; Sonveaux, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic dissemination is associated with poor prognosis of cancer patients. While exploring glucose metabolism in metastatic progenitor cells, we recently found that several different dysfunctions that share the ability to induce mitochondrial superoxide production also promote tumor metastasis. Selective targeting of mitochondrial superoxide prevented spontaneous metastasis in mice, opening a new avenue for therapy. PMID:27308448

  19. Superoxide reacts with nitric oxide to nitrate tyrosine at physiological pH via peroxynitrite.

    PubMed

    Reiter, C D; Teng, R J; Beckman, J S

    2000-10-20

    Tyrosine nitration is a widely used marker of peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) produced from the reaction of nitric oxide with superoxide. Pfeiffer and Mayer (Pfeiffer, S., and Mayer, B. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 27280-27285) reported that superoxide produced from hypoxanthine plus xanthine oxidase in combination with nitric oxide produced from spermine NONOate did not nitrate tyrosine at neutral pH. They suggested that nitric oxide and superoxide at neutral pH form a less reactive intermediate distinct from preformed alkaline peroxynitrite that does not nitrate tyrosine. Using a stopped-flow spectrophotometer to rapidly mix potassium superoxide with nitric oxide at pH 7.4, we report that an intermediate spectrally and kinetically identical to preformed alkaline cis-peroxynitrite was formed in 100% yield. Furthermore, this intermediate nitrated tyrosine in the same yield and at the same rate as preformed peroxynitrite. Equivalent concentrations of nitric oxide under aerobic conditions in the absence of superoxide did not produce detectable concentrations of nitrotyrosine. Carbon dioxide increased the efficiency of nitration by nitric oxide plus superoxide to the same extent as peroxynitrite. In experiments using xanthine oxidase as a source of superoxide, tyrosine nitration was substantially inhibited by urate formed from hypoxanthine oxidation, which was sufficient to account for the lack of tyrosine nitration previously reported. We conclude that peroxynitrite formed from the reaction of nitric oxide with superoxide at physiological pH remains an important species responsible for tyrosine nitration in vivo. PMID:10906340

  20. Detection and Imaging of Superoxide in Roots by an Electron Spin Resonance Spin-Probe Method

    PubMed Central

    Warwar, Nasim; Mor, Avishai; Fluhr, Robert; Pandian, Ramasamy P.; Kuppusamy, Periannan; Blank, Aharon

    2011-01-01

    The detection, quantification, and imaging of short-lived reactive oxygen species, such as superoxide, in live biological specimens have always been challenging and controversial. Fluorescence-based methods are nonspecific, and electron spin resonance (ESR) spin-trapping methods require high probe concentrations and lack the capability for sufficient image resolution. In this work, a novel (to our knowledge), sensitive, small ESR imaging resonator was used together with a stable spin probe that specifically reacts with superoxide with a high reaction rate constant. This ESR spin-probe-based methodology was used to examine superoxide generated in a plant root as a result of an apical leaf injury. The results show that the spin probe rapidly permeated the plant's extracellular space. Upon injury of the plant tissue, superoxide was produced and the ESR signal decreased rapidly in the injured parts as well as in the distal part of the root. This is attributed to superoxide production and thus provides a means of quantifying the level of superoxide in the plant. The spin probe's narrow single-line ESR spectrum, together with the sensitive imaging resonator, facilitates the quantitative measurement of superoxide in small biological samples, such as the plant's root, as well as one-dimensional imaging along the length of the root. This type of methodology can be used to resolve many questions involving the production of apoplastic superoxide in plant biology. PMID:21943435

  1. Do Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) and Catalase (CAT) protect Cells from DNA Damage Induced by Active Arsenicals?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) catalyzes the conversion of superoxide to hydrogen peroxide, which can be converted to water and oxygen through the action of catalase. Heterozygous mice of strain B6: 129S7-SodltmlLeb/J were obtained from Jackson Laboratories and bred to produce offspr...

  2. The French Paradox: Determining the Superoxide-Scavenging Capacity of Red Wine and Other Beverages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Barry A.; Hammond, Matthew P.; Stormo, Benjamin M.

    2008-01-01

    Plant-derived phenolic compounds such as those found in red wine, tea, and certain fruit juices may protect against cardiovascular disease by detoxifying (scavenging) superoxide and other unstable reactive oxygen species. We present a laboratory exercise that can be used to assess the superoxide-scavenging capacity of beverages. Among the…

  3. Superoxide Dismutase Protects Cells from DNA Damage Induced by Trivalent Methylated Arsenicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) catalyzes the conversion of superoxide to hydrogen peroxide. Heterozygous mice of strain B6; 129S7-Sod1(tm1Leb)/J were obtained from Jackson Laboratories and bred to produce offspring that were heterozygous (+/Sod1(tm1Leb)), homozygous wild-type (+/+), ...

  4. ROLE OF COPPER,ZINC-SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE IN CATALYZING NITROTYROSINE FORMATION IN MURINE LIVER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The solely known function of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is to catalyze the dismutation of superoxide anion into hydrogen peroxide. Our objective was to determine if SOD1 catalyzed murine liver protein nitration induced by acetaminophen (APAP) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Liver and plasma ...

  5. Sensitive spectrophotometric method for the determination of superoxide dismutase activity in tissue extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Paoletti, F.; Aldinucci, D.; Mocali, A.; Caparrini, A.

    1986-05-01

    Superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1) has been assayed by a spectrophotometric method based on the inhibition of a superoxide-driven NADH oxidation. The assay consists of a purely chemical reaction sequence which involves EDTA. Mn(II), mercaptoethanol, and molecular oxygen, requiring neither auxiliary enzymes nor sophisticated equipment. The method is very flexible and rapid and is applicable with high sensitivity to the determination of both pure and crude superoxide dismutase preparations. The decrease of the rate of NADH oxidation is a function of enzyme concentration, and saturation levels are attainable. Fifty percent inhibition, corresponding to one unit of the enzyme, is produced by approximately 15 ng of pure superoxide dismutase. Experiments on rat liver cytosol have shown the specificity of the method for superoxide dismutase. Moreover, common cellular components do not interfere with the measurement, except for hemoglobin when present at relatively high concentrations. The assay is performed at physiological pH and is unaffected by catalase.

  6. Inhibitory effects of cardols and related compounds on superoxide anion generation by xanthine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Masuoka, Noriyoshi; Nihei, Ken-ichi; Maeta, Ayami; Yamagiwa, Yoshiro; Kubo, Isao

    2015-01-01

    5-Pentadecatrienylresorcinol, isolated from cashew nuts and commonly known as cardol (C₁₅:₃), prevented the generation of superoxide radicals catalysed by xanthine oxidase without the inhibition of uric acid formation. The inhibition kinetics did not follow the Michelis-Menten equation, but instead followed the Hill equation. Cardol (C₁₀:₀) also inhibited superoxide anion generation, but resorcinol and cardol (C₅:₀) did not inhibit superoxide anion generation. The related compounds 3,5-dihydroxyphenyl alkanoates and alkyl 2,4-dihydroxybenzoates, had more than a C9 chain, cooperatively inhibited but alkyl 3,5-dihydroxybenzoates, regardless of their alkyl chain length, did not inhibit the superoxide anion generation. These results suggested that specific inhibitors for superoxide anion generation catalysed by xanthine oxidase consisted of an electron-rich resorcinol group and an alkyl chain having longer than C9 chain. PMID:25053055

  7. Bosentan, a mixed endothelin receptor antagonist, inhibits superoxide anion-induced pain and inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Serafim, Karla G G; Navarro, Suelen A; Zarpelon, Ana C; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Fattori, Victor; Cunha, Thiago M; Alves-Filho, Jose C; Cunha, Fernando Q; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2015-11-01

    Bosentan is a mixed endothelin receptor antagonist widely used to treat patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, and the emerging literature suggests bosentan as a potent anti-inflammatory drug. Superoxide anion is produced in large amounts during inflammation, stimulates cytokine production, and thus contributes to inflammation and pain. However, it remains to be determined whether endothelin contributes to the inflammatory response triggered by the superoxide anion. The present study investigated the effects of bosentan in a mouse model of inflammation and pain induced by potassium superoxide, a superoxide anion donor. Male Swiss mice were treated with bosentan (10-100 mg/kg) by oral gavage, 1 h before potassium superoxide injection, and the inflammatory response was evaluated locally and at spinal cord (L4-L6) levels. Bosentan (100 mg/kg) inhibited superoxide anion-induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia, overt pain-like behavior (abdominal writhings, paw flinching, and licking), paw edema, myeloperoxidase activity (neutrophil marker) in the paw skin, and leukocyte recruitment in the peritoneal cavity. Bosentan also inhibited superoxide anion-induced interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) production, while it enhanced IL-10 production in the paw skin and spinal cord. Bosentan inhibited the reduction of antioxidant capacity (reduced glutathione, ferric reducing antioxidant power, and ABTS radical scavenging ability) induced by the superoxide anion. Finally, we demonstrated that intraplantar injection of potassium superoxide induces the mRNA expression of prepro-endothelin-1 in the paw skin and spinal cord. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that superoxide anion-induced inflammation, pain, cytokine production, and oxidative stress depend on endothelin; therefore, these responses are amenable to bosentan treatment. PMID:26246053

  8. The superoxide anion donor, potassium superoxide, induces pain and inflammation in mice through production of reactive oxygen species and cyclooxygenase-2

    PubMed Central

    Maioli, N.A.; Zarpelon, A.C.; Mizokami, S.S.; Calixto-Campos, C.; Guazelli, C.F.S.; Hohmann, M.S.N.; Pinho-Ribeiro, F.A.; Carvalho, T.T.; Manchope, M.F.; Ferraz, C.R.; Casagrande, R.; Verri, W.A.

    2015-01-01

    It is currently accepted that superoxide anion (O2 •−) is an important mediator in pain and inflammation. The role of superoxide anion in pain and inflammation has been mainly determined indirectly by modulating its production and inactivation. Direct evidence using potassium superoxide (KO2), a superoxide anion donor, demonstrated that it induced thermal hyperalgesia, as assessed by the Hargreaves method. However, it remains to be determined whether KO2 is capable of inducing other inflammatory and nociceptive responses attributed to superoxide anion. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the nociceptive and inflammatory effects of KO2. The KO2-induced inflammatory responses evaluated in mice were: mechanical hyperalgesia (electronic version of von Frey filaments), thermal hyperalgesia (hot plate), edema (caliper rule), myeloperoxidase activity (colorimetric assay), overt pain-like behaviors (flinches, time spent licking and writhing score), leukocyte recruitment, oxidative stress, and cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA expression (quantitative PCR). Administration of KO2 induced mechanical hyperalgesia, thermal hyperalgesia, paw edema, leukocyte recruitment, the writhing response, paw flinching, and paw licking in a dose-dependent manner. KO2 also induced time-dependent cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA expression in the paw skin. The nociceptive, inflammatory, and oxidative stress components of KO2-induced responses were responsive to morphine (analgesic opioid), quercetin (antioxidant flavonoid), and/or celecoxib (anti-inflammatory cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor) treatment. In conclusion, the well-established superoxide anion donor KO2 is a valuable tool for studying the mechanisms and pharmacological susceptibilities of superoxide anion-triggered nociceptive and inflammatory responses ranging from mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia to overt pain-like behaviors, edema, and leukocyte recruitment. PMID:25714890

  9. The superoxide anion donor, potassium superoxide, induces pain and inflammation in mice through production of reactive oxygen species and cyclooxygenase-2.

    PubMed

    Maioli, N A; Zarpelon, A C; Mizokami, S S; Calixto-Campos, C; Guazelli, C F S; Hohmann, M S N; Pinho-Ribeiro, F A; Carvalho, T T; Manchope, M F; Ferraz, C R; Casagrande, R; Verri, W A

    2015-04-01

    It is currently accepted that superoxide anion (O2•-) is an important mediator in pain and inflammation. The role of superoxide anion in pain and inflammation has been mainly determined indirectly by modulating its production and inactivation. Direct evidence using potassium superoxide (KO2), a superoxide anion donor, demonstrated that it induced thermal hyperalgesia, as assessed by the Hargreaves method. However, it remains to be determined whether KO2 is capable of inducing other inflammatory and nociceptive responses attributed to superoxide anion. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the nociceptive and inflammatory effects of KO2. The KO2-induced inflammatory responses evaluated in mice were: mechanical hyperalgesia (electronic version of von Frey filaments), thermal hyperalgesia (hot plate), edema (caliper rule), myeloperoxidase activity (colorimetric assay), overt pain-like behaviors (flinches, time spent licking and writhing score), leukocyte recruitment, oxidative stress, and cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA expression (quantitative PCR). Administration of KO2 induced mechanical hyperalgesia, thermal hyperalgesia, paw edema, leukocyte recruitment, the writhing response, paw flinching, and paw licking in a dose-dependent manner. KO2 also induced time-dependent cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA expression in the paw skin. The nociceptive, inflammatory, and oxidative stress components of KO2-induced responses were responsive to morphine (analgesic opioid), quercetin (antioxidant flavonoid), and/or celecoxib (anti-inflammatory cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor) treatment. In conclusion, the well-established superoxide anion donor KO2 is a valuable tool for studying the mechanisms and pharmacological susceptibilities of superoxide anion-triggered nociceptive and inflammatory responses ranging from mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia to overt pain-like behaviors, edema, and leukocyte recruitment. PMID:25714890

  10. NADPH Oxidase-Dependent Superoxide Production in Plant Reproductive Tissues.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Quesada, María J; Traverso, José Á; Alché, Juan de Dios

    2016-01-01

    In the life cycle of a flowering plant, the male gametophyte (pollen grain) produced in the anther reaches the stigmatic surface and initiates the pollen-pistil interaction, an important step in plant reproduction, which ultimately leads to the delivery of two sperm cells to the female gametophyte (embryo sac) inside the ovule. The pollen tube undergoes a strictly apical expansion characterized by a high growth rate, whose targeting should be tightly regulated. A continuous exchange of signals therefore takes place between the haploid pollen and diploid tissue of the pistil until fertilization. In compatible interactions, theses processes result in double fertilization to form a zygote (2n) and the triploid endosperm. Among the large number of signaling mechanisms involved, the redox network appears to be particularly important. Respiratory burst oxidase homologs (Rbohs) are superoxide-producing enzymes involved in a broad range of processes in plant physiology. In this study, we review the latest findings on understanding Rboh activity in sexual plant reproduction, with a particular focus on the male gametophyte from the anther development stages to the crowning point of fertilization. Rboh isoforms have been identified in both the male and female gametophyte and have proven to be tightly regulated. Their role at crucial points such as proper growth of pollen tube, self-incompatibility response and eventual fertilization is discussed. PMID:27066025

  11. Amelioration of hepatic reperfusion injury by superoxide dismutase and catalase

    SciTech Connect

    Clemens, M.G.; Burke, F.; Chaudry, I.H.

    1986-03-05

    Oxygen-derived free radicals have been implicated in reperfusion injury in various tissues. The present study determined if enzymatic scavenging of free radicals could improve recovery of hepatic function following ischemia. Livers from fasted rats were perfused with Krebs-HCO/sub 3/ buffer with substrates for gluconeogenesis for 30 min (control) followed by 60 min warm ischemia and 90 min reperfusion. At the beginning and end of ischemia the liver was flushed with buffered Ringer's with superoxide dismutase + catalase (150,000 U/L each)(SOD) or without additions (Untreated). Bile flow and glucose release were monitored during control and reperfusion periods and tissue sampled at the end of the experiment to determine tissue water and electrolytes. Bile flow and gluconeogenesis were markedly depressed after ischemia in both groups. At the end of 90 min reperfusion bile flow in Untreated and SOD were 23 +/- 6 and 46 +/- 8 ..mu..l/15 min (20% and 41% of control respectively, p < .01). Gluconeogenesis recovered to 83 +/- 4% of control in Untreated vs 103 +/- 6% with SOD (p < .05). Tissue water and electrolytes were not different. These results suggest that generation of oxygen-derived free radicals contributes to functional deficits in the liver following ischemia and that these defects can be attenuated by enzymatic scavenging.

  12. A manganese porphyrin superoxide dismutase mimetic enhances tumor radioresponsiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, Benjamin J.; Batinic-Haberle, Ines; Spasojevic, Ivan; Rabbani, Zahid N.; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Dewhirst, Mark W. D.V.M. . E-mail: dewhirst@radonc.duke.edu

    2005-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of the superoxide dismutase mimetic Mn(III) tetrakis(N-ethylpyridinium-2-yl)porphyrin (MnTE-2-PyP{sup 5+}) on tumor radioresponsiveness. Methods and Materials: Various rodent tumor (4T1, R3230, B16) and endothelial (SVEC) cell lines were exposed to MnTE-2-PyP{sup 5+} and assayed for viability and radiosensitivity in vitro. Next, tumors were treated with radiation and MnTE-2-PyP{sup 5+} in vivo, and the effects on tumor growth and vascularity were monitored. Results: In vitro, MnTE-2-PyP{sup 5+} was not significantly cytotoxic. However, at concentrations as low as 2 {mu}mol/L it caused 100% inhibition of secretion by tumor cells of cytokines protective of irradiated endothelial cells. In vivo, combined treatment with radiation and MnTE-2-PyP{sup 5+} achieved synergistic tumor devascularization, reducing vascular density by 78.7% within 72 h of radiotherapy (p < 0.05 vs. radiation or drug alone). Co-treatment of tumors also resulted in synergistic antitumor effects, extending tumor growth delay by 9 days (p < 0.01). Conclusions: These studies support the conclusion that MnTE-2-PyP{sup 5+}, which has been shown to protect normal tissues from radiation injury, can also improve tumor control through augmenting radiation-induced damage to the tumor vasculature.

  13. Superoxide dismutase activity of Cu-bound prion protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodak, Miroslav; Lu, Wenchang; Bernholc, Jerry

    2009-03-01

    Misfolding of the prion protein, PrP, has been linked to a group of neurodegenerative diseases, including the mad cow disease in cattle and the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans. The normal function of PrP is still unknown, but it was found that the PrP can efficiently bind Cu(II) ions. Early experiments suggested that Cu-PrP complex possesses significant superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, but later experiments failed to confirm it and at present this issue remains unresolved. Using a recently developed hybrid DFT/DFT method, which combines Kohn-Sham DFT for the solute and its first solvation shells with orbital-free DFT for the remainder of the solvent, we have investigated SOD activity of PrP. The PrP is capable of incorporating Cu(II) ions in several binding modes and our calculations find that each mode has a different SOD activity. The highest activity found is comparable to those of well-known SOD proteins, suggesting that the conflicting experimental results may be due to different bindings of Cu(II) in those experiments.

  14. Modifications of Superoxide Dismutase (SOD1) in Human Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Kyle C.; Zhou, Li; Jordon, Joshua K.; Huang, Yi; Yu, Yanbao; Redler, Rachel L.; Chen, Xian; Caplow, Michael; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    2009-01-01

    Over 100 mutations in Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) result in familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Dimer dissociation is the first step in SOD1 aggregation, and studies suggest nearly every amino acid residue in SOD1 is dynamically connected to the dimer interface. Post-translational modifications of SOD1 residues might be expected to have similar effects to mutations, but few modifications have been identified. Here we show, using SOD1 isolated from human erythrocytes, that human SOD1 is phosphorylated at threonine 2 and glutathionylated at cysteine 111. A second SOD1 phosphorylation was observed and mapped to either Thr-58 or Ser-59. Cysteine 111 glutathionylation promotes SOD1 monomer formation, a necessary initiating step in SOD1 aggregation, by causing a 2-fold increase in the Kd. This change in the dimer stability is expected to result in a 67% increase in monomer concentration, 315 nm rather than 212 nm at physiological SOD1 concentrations. Because protein glutathionylation is associated with redox regulation, our finding that glutathionylation promotes SOD1 monomer formation supports a model in which increased oxidative stress promotes SOD1 aggregation. PMID:19299510

  15. Unexpected superoxide dismutase antioxidant activity of ferric chloride in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Foti, Mario C; Ingold, K U

    2003-11-14

    The azobis(isobutyronitrile)-initiated autoxidation of gamma-terpinene in acetonitrile at 50 degrees C yields only p-cymene and hydrogen peroxide (1:1) in a chain reaction carried by the hydroperoxyl radical, HOO. (Foti, M. C.; Ingold, K. U. J. Agric. Food Chem. 2003, 51, 2758-2765). This reaction is retarded by very low (microM) concentrations of FeCl(3) and CuCl(2). The kinetics of the FeCl(3)-inhibited autoxidation are consistent with chain-termination via the following: Fe(3+) + HOO. <==>[Fe(IV)-OOH](3+) and [Fe(IV)-OOH](3+) + HOO. --> Fe(3+) + H2O2 + O2. Thus, FeCl(3) in acetonitrile can be regarded as a very effective (and very simple) superoxide dismutase. The kinetics of the CuCl(2)-inhibited autoxidation indicate that chain transfer occurs and becomes more and more important as the reaction proceeds, i.e., the inhibition is replaced by autocatalysis. These kinetics are consistent withreduction of Cu2+ to Cu+ by HOO. and then the reoxidation of Cu+ to Cu2+ by both HOO.and the H2O2 product. The latter reaction yields HO. radicals which continue the chain. PMID:14604404

  16. NADPH Oxidase-Dependent Superoxide Production in Plant Reproductive Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Quesada, María J.; Traverso, José Á.; Alché, Juan de Dios

    2016-01-01

    In the life cycle of a flowering plant, the male gametophyte (pollen grain) produced in the anther reaches the stigmatic surface and initiates the pollen–pistil interaction, an important step in plant reproduction, which ultimately leads to the delivery of two sperm cells to the female gametophyte (embryo sac) inside the ovule. The pollen tube undergoes a strictly apical expansion characterized by a high growth rate, whose targeting should be tightly regulated. A continuous exchange of signals therefore takes place between the haploid pollen and diploid tissue of the pistil until fertilization. In compatible interactions, theses processes result in double fertilization to form a zygote (2n) and the triploid endosperm. Among the large number of signaling mechanisms involved, the redox network appears to be particularly important. Respiratory burst oxidase homologs (Rbohs) are superoxide-producing enzymes involved in a broad range of processes in plant physiology. In this study, we review the latest findings on understanding Rboh activity in sexual plant reproduction, with a particular focus on the male gametophyte from the anther development stages to the crowning point of fertilization. Rboh isoforms have been identified in both the male and female gametophyte and have proven to be tightly regulated. Their role at crucial points such as proper growth of pollen tube, self-incompatibility response and eventual fertilization is discussed. PMID:27066025

  17. Superoxide Dismutase 1 Nanozyme for Treatment of Eye Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kost, Olga A.; Beznos, Olga V.; Davydova, Nina G.; Manickam, Devika S.; Nikolskaya, Irina I.; Guller, Anna E.; Binevski, Petr V.; Chesnokova, Natalia B.; Shekhter, Anatoly B.; Klyachko, Natalia L.; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    Use of antioxidants to mitigate oxidative stress during ocular inflammatory diseases has shown therapeutic potential. This work examines a nanoscale therapeutic modality for the eye on the base of antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), termed “nanozyme.” The nanozyme is produced by electrostatic coupling of the SOD1 with a cationic block copolymer, poly(L-lysine)-poly(ethyleneglycol), followed by covalent cross-linking of the complexes with 3,3′-dithiobis(sulfosuccinimidylpropionate) sodium salt. The ability of SOD1 nanozyme as well as the native SOD1 to reduce inflammatory processes in the eye was examined in vivo in rabbits with immunogenic uveitis. Results suggested that topical instillations of both enzyme forms demonstrated anti-inflammatory activity; however, the nanozyme was much more effective compared to the free enzyme in decreasing uveitis manifestations. In particular, we noted statistically significant differences in such inflammatory signs in the eye as the intensities of corneal and iris edema, hyperemia of conjunctiva, lens opacity, fibrin clots, and the protein content in aqueous humor. Clinical findings were confirmed by histological data. Thus, SOD1-containing nanozyme is potentially useful therapeutic agent for the treatment of ocular inflammatory disorders. PMID:26697135

  18. Superoxide scavenging activity of pirfenidone-iron complex

    SciTech Connect

    Mitani, Yoshihiro; Sato, Keizo Muramoto, Yosuke; Karakawa, Tomohiro; Kitamado, Masataka; Iwanaga, Tatsuya; Nabeshima, Tetsuji; Maruyama, Kumiko; Nakagawa, Kazuko; Ishida, Kazuhiko; Sasamoto, Kazumi

    2008-07-18

    Pirfenidone (PFD) is focused on a new anti-fibrotic drug, which can minimize lung fibrosis etc. We evaluated the superoxide (O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -}) scavenging activities of PFD and the PFD-iron complex by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, luminol-dependent chemiluminescence assay, and cytochrome c reduction assay. Firstly, we confirmed that the PFD-iron complex was formed by mixing iron chloride with threefold molar PFD, and the complex was stable in distillated water and ethanol. Secondary, the PFD-iron complex reduced the amount of O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -} produced by xanthine oxidase/hypoxanthine without inhibiting the enzyme activity. Thirdly, it also reduced the amount of O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -} released from phorbor ester-stimulated human neutrophils. PFD alone showed few such effects. These results suggest the possibility that the O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -} scavenging effect of the PFD-iron complex contributes to the anti-fibrotic action of PFD used for treating idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  19. Evidence for the role of superoxide radicals in neutrophil-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Simchowitz, L; Spilberg, I

    1979-01-01

    Human peripheral neutrophils became cytotoxic to chicken red blood cells (CRBC) in the presence of lectins as assessed by release of 51chromium from labelled target cells. Phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (Con A), which caused time-dependent and dose-dependent cytotoxicity over a concentration range of 25--400 microgram/ml, also caused significant generation of superoxide radicals as measured by ferricytochrome C reduction. Pokeweed mitogen, which does not induce cytotoxicity over the same concentration range, was unable to promote superoxide generation by neutrophils. PHA-induced generation of superoxide paralleled and appeared to precede PHA-dependent cytotoxicity. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), which enzymatically destroys superoxide, caused moderate inhibition of PHA-dependent cytotoxicity over the concentration range of 100--500 microgram/ml whereas catalytically inactive enzyme had no effect. Incubation under oxygen-depleted conditions caused a marked decrease in both PHA-induced superoxide generation and cytotoxicity relative to that obtained with neutrophils incubated aerobically. These findings suggest a central role for superoxide radicals in causing target cell damage in this model of neutrophil-mediated cytotoxicity. PMID:223976

  20. Purification and characterization of Ag,Zn-superoxide dismutase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae exposed to silver.

    PubMed

    Ciriolo, M R; Civitareale, P; Carrì, M T; De Martino, A; Galiazzo, F; Rotilio, G

    1994-10-14

    Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase plays an important role in protecting cells from oxygen toxicity by catalyzing the dismutation of superoxide anion into hydrogen peroxide and oxygen. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase is coregulated with copper-thionein by copper via the transcription factor ACE 1. We demonstrate here that presence of AgNO3 in the culture medium leads to a five times increase of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase mRNA, with a concomitant six times decrease of the enzyme activity. Susceptibility of yeast to silver was apparently inversely related to Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase activity. From silver-treated yeast a Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase with impaired dismutase function was purified and was shown to contain silver, which was located to the copper site. These data suggest that Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase may play an additional direct role in the defense of S. cerevisiae against metal stress by functioning as metal chelator. PMID:7929283

  1. Effects of asbestos and silica on superoxide anion production in the guinea pig alveolar macrophage

    SciTech Connect

    Roney, P.L.

    1988-01-01

    This study examined the effect of asbestos and silica on the activation pathway of the guinea pig alveolar macrophage. Activation of macrophages by physiological agents results in stimulation of phospholipase C causing phosphatidyl inositol turnover and intracellular calcium mobilization. Phosphatidyl inositol turnover produces diacylglycerol which activates protein kinase C causing superoxide anion production. Chrysotile stimulated alveolar macrophages to produce superoxide anion. This stimulation proceeded via phospholipase C, since chrysotile stimulated phosphatidyl inositol turnover and intracellular calcium mobilization. The possible involvement of a coupling protein was evaluated by pretreating cells with pertussis toxin. Potential binding sites for chrysotile stimulation were examined using a series of nine lectins. Chrysotile-stimulated superoxide anion production was blocked by pretreatment with lectins which bound to mannose, fucose, or N-acetylgalactosamine. In addition, incubation with the N-acetylglucosamine, but not by lectins which bound to mannose, fucose, or N-acetylgalactosamine. In addition, incubation with the N-acetylglucosamine polymer, chitin, inhibited chrysotile-stimulated superoxide anion production, suggesting that chrysotile stimulated superoxide anion production by binding to N-acetylglucosamine residues. On the other hand, silica did not stimulate superoxide anion production. The effect of silica on agonist stimulation of this pathway was examined using two stimulants of superoxide anion production, N-formyl-nle-leu-phe (FNLP, which stimulates through phospholipase C) and phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate (which directly activates protein kinase C).

  2. Biologically Relevant Mechanism For Catalytic Removal of Superoxide by Simple Manganese Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Barnese K.; Cabelli D.; Gralla, E.B.; Valentine, J.S.

    2012-05-01

    Nonenzymatic manganese was first shown to provide protection against superoxide toxicity in vivo in 1981, but the chemical mechanism responsible for this protection subsequently became controversial due to conflicting reports concerning the ability of Mn to catalyze superoxide disproportionation in vitro. In a recent communication, we reported that low concentrations of a simple Mn phosphate salt under physiologically relevant conditions will indeed catalyze superoxide disproportionation in vitro. We report now that two of the four Mn complexes that are expected to be most abundant in vivo, Mn phosphate and Mn carbonate, can catalyze superoxide disproportionation at physiologically relevant concentrations and pH, whereas Mn pyrophosphate and citrate complexes cannot. Additionally, the chemical mechanisms of these reactions have been studied in detail, and the rates of reactions of the catalytic removal of superoxide by Mn phosphate and carbonate have been modeled. Physiologically relevant concentrations of these compounds were found to be sufficient to mimic an effective concentration of enzymatic superoxide dismutase found in vivo. This mechanism provides a likely explanation as to how Mn combats superoxide stress in cellular systems.

  3. Mn(II) oxidation by an ascomycete fungus is linked to superoxide production during asexual reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Hansel, Colleen M.; Zeiner, Carolyn A.; Santelli, Cara M.; Webb, Samuel M.

    2012-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the most reactive minerals within the environment, where they control the bioavailability of carbon, nutrients, and numerous metals. Although the ability of microorganisms to oxidize Mn(II) to Mn(III/IV) oxides is scattered throughout the bacterial and fungal domains of life, the mechanism and physiological basis for Mn(II) oxidation remains an enigma. Here, we use a combination of compound-specific chemical assays, microspectroscopy, and electron microscopy to show that a common Ascomycete filamentous fungus, Stilbella aciculosa, oxidizes Mn(II) to Mn oxides by producing extracellular superoxide during cell differentiation. The reactive Mn oxide phase birnessite and the reactive oxygen species superoxide and hydrogen peroxide are colocalized at the base of asexual reproductive structures. Mn oxide formation is not observed in the presence of superoxide scavengers (e.g., Cu) and inhibitors of NADPH oxidases (e.g., diphenylene iodonium chloride), enzymes responsible for superoxide production and cell differentiation in fungi. Considering the recent identification of Mn(II) oxidation by NADH oxidase-based superoxide production by a common marine bacterium (Roseobacter sp.), these results introduce a surprising homology between some prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms in the mechanisms responsible for Mn(II) oxidation, where oxidation appears to be a side reaction of extracellular superoxide production. Given the versatility of superoxide as a redox reactant and the widespread ability of fungi to produce superoxide, this microbial extracellular superoxide production may play a central role in the cycling and bioavailability of metals (e.g., Hg, Fe, Mn) and carbon in natural systems. PMID:22802654

  4. Ceruloplasmin copper induces oxidant damage by a redox process utilizing cell-derived superoxide as reductant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Fox, P. L.

    1998-01-01

    Oxidative damage by transition metals bound to proteins may be an important pathogenic mechanism. Ceruloplasmin (Cp) is a Cu-containing plasma protein thought to be involved in oxidative modification of lipoproteins. We have previously shown that Cp increased cell-mediated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation by a process requiring cell-derived superoxide, but the underlying chemical mechanism(s) is (are) unknown. We now show that superoxide reduction of Cp Cu is a critical reaction in cellular LDL oxidation. By bathocuproine disulfonate (BCS) binding and by superoxide utilization, we showed that exogenous superoxide reduces a single Cp Cu atom, the same Cu required for LDL oxidation. The Cu atom remained bound to Cp during the redox cycle. Three avenues of evidence showed that vascular cells reduce Cp Cu by a superoxide-dependent process. The 2-fold higher rate of Cp Cu reduction by smooth muscle cells (SMC) compared to endothelial cells (EC) was consistent with their relative rates of superoxide release. Furthermore, Cp Cu reduction by cells was blocked by Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1). Finally, the level of superoxide produced by EC and SMC was sufficient to cause the amount of Cu reduction observed. An important role of Cp Cu reduction in LDL oxidation was suggested by results showing that SOD1 inhibited Cp Cu reduction and LDL oxidation by SMC with equal potency, while tumor necrosis factor-alpha stimulated both processes. In summary, these results show that superoxide is a critical cellular reductant of divalent transition metals involved in oxidation, and that protein-bound Cu is a substrate for this reaction. The role of these mechanisms in oxidative processes in vivo has yet to be defined.

  5. Mn(II) oxidation by an ascomycete fungus is linked to superoxide production during asexual reproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Hansel, C. M.; Zeiner, C. A.; Santelli, C. M.; Webb, S. M.

    2012-07-16

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the most reactive minerals within the environment, where they control the bioavailability of carbon, nutrients, and numerous metals. Although the ability of microorganisms to oxidize Mn(II) to Mn(III/IV) oxides is scattered throughout the bacterial and fungal domains of life, the mechanism and physiological basis for Mn(II) oxidation remains an enigma. Here, we use a combination of compound-specific chemical assays, microspectroscopy, and electron microscopy to show that a common Ascomycete filamentous fungus, Stilbella aciculosa, oxidizes Mn(II) to Mn oxides by producing extracellular superoxide during cell differentiation. The reactive Mn oxide phase birnessite and the reactive oxygen species superoxide and hydrogen peroxide are colocalized at the base of asexual reproductive structures. Mn oxide formation is not observed in the presence of superoxide scavengers (e.g., Cu) and inhibitors of NADPH oxidases (e.g., diphenylene iodonium chloride), enzymes responsible for superoxide production and cell differentiation in fungi. Considering the recent identification of Mn(II) oxidation by NADH oxidase-based superoxide production by a common marine bacterium (Roseobacter sp.), these results introduce a surprising homology between some prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms in the mechanisms responsible for Mn(II) oxidation, where oxidation appears to be a side reaction of extracellular superoxide production. Finally, given the versatility of superoxide as a redox reactant and the widespread ability of fungi to produce superoxide, this microbial extracellular superoxide production may play a central role in the cycling and bioavailability of metals (e.g., Hg, Fe, Mn) and carbon in natural systems.

  6. Overexpression of Superoxide Dismutase Protects Plants from Oxidative Stress (Induction of Ascorbate Peroxidase in Superoxide Dismutase-Overexpressing Plants).

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, A. S.; Webb, R. P.; Holaday, A. S.; Allen, R. D.

    1993-01-01

    Photosynthesis of leaf discs from transgenic tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum) that express a chimeric gene that encodes chloroplast-localized Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD+) was protected from oxidative stress caused by exposure to high light intensity and low temperature. Under the same conditions, leaf discs of plants that did not express the pea SOD isoform (SOD-) had substantially lower photosynthetic rates. Young plants of both genotypes were more sensitive to oxidative stress than mature plants, but SOD+ plants retained higher photosynthetic rates than SOD- plants at all developmental stages tested. Not surprisingly, SOD+ plants had approximately 3-fold higher SOD specific activity than SOD- plants. However, SOD+ plants also exhibited a 3- to 4-fold increase in ascorbate peroxidase (APX) specific activity and had a corresponding increase in levels of APX mRNA. Dehydroascorbate reductase and glutathione reductase specific activities were the same in both SOD+ and SOD- plants. These results indicate that transgenic tobacco plants that overexpress pea Cu/Zn SOD II can compensate for the increased levels of SOD with increased expression of the H2O2-scavenging enzyme APX. Therefore, the enhancement of the active oxygen-scavenging system that leads to increased oxidative stress protection in SOD+ plants could result not only from increased SOD levels but from the combined increases in SOD and APX activity. PMID:12232001

  7. Chaperonin 20 might be an iron chaperone for superoxide dismutase in activating iron superoxide dismutase (FeSOD)

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Wen-Yu; Huang, Chien-Hsun; Jinn, Tsung-Luo

    2013-01-01

    Activation of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutases (CuZnSODs) is aided by Cu incorporation and disulfide isomerization by Cu chaperone of SOD (CCS). As well, an Fe-S cluster scaffold protein, ISU, might alter the incorporation of Fe or Mn into yeast MnSOD (ySOD2), thus leading to active or inactive ySOD2. However, metallochaperones involved in the activation of FeSODs are unknown. Recently, we found that a chloroplastic chaperonin cofactor, CPN20, could mediate FeSOD activity. To investigate whether Fe incorporation in FeSOD is affected by CPN20, we used inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to analyze the ability of CPN20 to bind Fe. CPN20 could bind Fe, and the Fe binding to FeSOD was increased with CPN20 incubation. Thus, CPN20 might be an Fe chaperone for FeSOD activation, a role independent of its well-known co-chaperonin activity. PMID:23299425

  8. Endogenous superoxide-like species and antioxidant activity in ocular tissues detected by luminol luminescence.

    PubMed

    Trevithick, J R; Dzialoszynski, T

    1997-04-01

    A new luminescent method was used to detect the reactive oxygen species in aqueous and vitreous humors and in homogenates of the lens and retina of laboratory rats. Superoxide-like activity per microgram protein increased in all tissues with weight of the rat, a good indicator of animal age. Superoxide dismutase, centrophenoxine, soluble vitamin E (D-alpha-Locopherol (polyethlyene glycol 1000) succinate, and N'-diphenyl-p-phenylenediamine (DPPD) reduced the luminescence. Catalase had no effect. These results are consistent with the detected species being superoxide-like. PMID:9111931

  9. Superoxide dismutase and oxygen toxicity defenses in the genus Neisseria.

    PubMed Central

    Archibald, F S; Duong, M N

    1986-01-01

    Among aerotolerant cells, Neisseria gonorrhoeae is very unusual because despite its obligately aerobic lifestyle and frequent isolation from purulent exudates containing polymorphonuclear leukocytes vigorously evolving O2- and H2O2, it contains no superoxide dismutase (SOD). Strains (14) of N. gonorrhoeae were compared with each other and with strains of Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria mucosa, and Neisseria subflava under identical growth conditions for their contents of the oxy-protective enzymes catalase, peroxidase, and SOD, as well as respiratory chain proteins and activity. The absence of SOD from N. gonorrhoeae strains was demonstrated under a variety of oxygen-stress conditions. The neisserial species showed very different SOD, catalase, and peroxidase profiles. These profiles correlated well with the tolerance of the species to various intra- and extracellular oxygen insults. The high tolerance of N. gonorrhoeae for extracellular O2- and H2O2 appeared to be due to very high constitutive levels of peroxidase and catalase activity combined with a cell envelope impervious to O2-. Nevertheless, N. gonorrhoeae 19424 was much more sensitive to an intracellular flux of O2- than were the other (SOD-containing) neisserial species. The responses of N. gonorrhoeae and N. meningitidis respiratory and oxy-protective enzymes to growth under high and low oxygen tensions were followed, and a novel response, the apparent repression of the respiratory chain intermediates, respiration, and SOD, peroxidase, and catalase activity, was observed. The gonococcal catalase was partially purified and characterized. The results suggest that the very active terminal oxidase, low pO2 natural habitat, O2-stable catalase, and possibly the high glutathione content of the organism explain its aerobic survival in the absence of SOD. PMID:3943903

  10. Cytosolic superoxide dismutase can provide protection against Fasciola gigantica.

    PubMed

    Jaikua, Wipaphorn; Kueakhai, Pornanan; Chaithirayanon, Kulathida; Tanomrat, Rataya; Wongwairot, Sirima; Riengrojpitak, Suda; Sobhon, Prasert; Changklungmoa, Narin

    2016-10-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SOD), antioxidant metallo-enzymes, are a part of the first line of defense in the trematode parasites which act as the chief scavengers for reactive oxygen species (ROS). A recombinant Fasciola gigantica cytosolic SOD (FgSOD) was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and used for immunizing rabbits to obtain polyclonal antibodies (anti-rFgSOD). This rabbit anti-rFgSOD reacted with the native FgSOD at a molecular weight of 17.5kDa. The FgSOD protein was expressed at high level in parenchyma, caecal epithelium and egg of the parasite. The rFgSOD reacted with antisera from rabbits infected with F. gigantica metacercariae collected at 2, 5, and 7 weeks after infection, and reacted with sera of infected mice. Anti-rFgSOD exhibited cross reactivity with the other parasites' antigens, including Eurytrema pancreaticum, Cotylophoron cotylophorum, Fischoederius cobboldi, Gastrothylax crumenifer, Paramphistomum cervi, and Setaria labiato papillosa. A vaccination was performed in imprinting control region (ICR) mice by subcutaneous injection with 50μg of rFgSOD combined with Freund's adjuvant. At 2 weeks after the second boost, mice were infected with 15 metacercariae by oral route. IgG1 and IgG2a in the immune sera were determined to indicate Th2 and Th1 immune responses. It was found that the parasite burden was reduced by 45%, and both IgG1 and IgG2a levels showed correlation with the numbers of worm recoveries. PMID:27338185

  11. A Manganese Superoxide Dismutase (SOD2)-Mediated Adaptive Response

    PubMed Central

    Grdina, David J.; Murley, Jeffrey S.; Miller, Richard C.; Mauceri, Helena J.; Sutton, Harold G.; Thirman, Michael J.; Li, Jian Jian; Woloschak, Gayle E.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.

    2013-01-01

    Very low doses of ionizing radiation, 5 to 100 mGy, can induce adaptive responses characterized by elevation in cell survival and reduction in micronuclei formation. Utilizing these end points, RKO human colon carcinoma and transformed mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEF), wild-type or knockout cells missing TNF receptors 1 and 2 (TNFR1−R2−), and C57BL/6 and TNFR1−R2− knockout mice, we demonstrate that intact TNF signaling is required for induction of elevated manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) activity (P < 0.001) and the subsequent expression of these SOD2-mediated adaptive responses when cells are challenged at a later time with 2 Gy. In contrast, amifostine’s free thiol form WR1065 can directly activate NF-κB giving rise to elevated SOD2 activity 24 h later and induce an adaptive response in both MEF wild-type and TNF signaling defective TNFR1−R2− cells. Transfection of cells with SOD2 siRNA completely abolishes both the elevation in SOD2 activity and expression of the adaptive responses. These results were confirmed in vivo using a micronucleus assay in splenocytes derived from C57BL/6 and TNFR1−R2− knockout mice that were exposed to 100 mGy or 400 mg/kg amifostine 24 h prior to exposure to a 2 Gy whole-body dose. A dose of 100 mGy also conferred enhanced protection to C57BL/6 mice exposed 24 h later to 100 mg/kg of N-Ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU). While very low radiation doses require an intact TNF signaling process to induce a SOD2-mediated adaptive response, amifostine can induce a similar adaptive response in both TNF receptor competent and knockout cells, respectively. PMID:23237540

  12. A non-glycosylated extracellular superoxide dismutase variant.

    PubMed Central

    Edlund, A; Edlund, T; Hjalmarsson, K; Marklund, S L; Sandström, J; Strömqvist, M; Tibell, L

    1992-01-01

    The secretory tetrameric extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is the only glycosylated SOD isoenzyme. The importance of the carbohydrate moiety for the properties of the enzyme is unknown. An expression vector defining nonglycosylated EC-SOD (ngEC-SOD) was constructed by mutagenesis of the codon for Asn-89 into a codon for Gln. The vector was transfected into Chinese hamster ovary DXB-11 cells and ngEC-SOD was isolated to 70% purity from the culture media of selected clones. The absence of glycosylation was established by the lack of affinity for various lectins, the absence of staining with the periodic acid-Schiff reagent, the change in mobility and composition of the tryptic peptide containing the mutated glycosylation site, and the reduction in apparent molecular mass upon SDS/PAGE and size-exclusion chromatography. The tetrameric state was retained. The heparin affinity, a fundamental and distinguishing property of EC-SOD, was found to be slightly increased. The enzymic activity was essentially retained. The major difference from native glycosylated enzyme in physical properties was a marked reduction in solubility. Like glycosylated EC-SOD, ngEC-SOD was, after intravenous injection into rabbits, rapidly sequestered by the vessel endothelium, and was promptly released into plasma after injection of heparin. The only difference from glycosylated EC-SOD in this behaviour, was a slightly more rapid elimination of the mutant enzyme from the vasculature. It is concluded that no specific biological role for the EC-SOD carbohydrate moiety could be revealed. Images Fig. 1. PMID:1463450

  13. Characterization of the Single Superoxide Dismutase of Staphylococcus xylosus

    PubMed Central

    Barrière, Charlotte; Brückner, Reinhold; Talon, Régine

    2001-01-01

    Staphylococcus xylosus is a facultative anaerobic bacterium used as a starter culture for fermented meat products. In an attempt to analyze the antioxidant capacities of this organism, the superoxide dismutase (SOD) was characterized. S. xylosus contains a single cytoplasmic SOD, which was not inhibited by H2O2. The SOD activity in crude extracts was completely lost upon metal depletion, but it could be recovered by manganese and very weakly by iron. It is therefore suggested that the S. xylosus SOD is a manganese-preferring enzyme. The corresponding gene, sod, was isolated from a genomic library of S. xylosus DNA and complemented the growth defect of an Escherichia coli SOD-deficient mutant. As deduced from the nucleotide sequence, sod encodes a protein of 199 amino acids with a molecular mass of 22.5 kDa. Two transcriptional start sites 25 and 120 bp upstream of the sod start codon were identified. A terminator-like structure downstream of the gene suggested a monocistronic sod mRNA. Regulation of sod expression was studied using fusions of the sod promoters to a genomic promoterless β-galactosidase gene. The sod expression was not affected by manganese and increased slightly with paraquat. It was induced during stationary phase in a complex medium but not in a chemically defined medium. To investigate the physiological role of SOD, a mutant devoid of SOD activity was constructed. Growth experiments showed that sod is not essential for aerobic growth in complex medium. However, in chemically defined medium without leucine, isoleucine, and valine, the sod mutant hardly grew, in contrast to the wild-type strain. In addition, the mutant was sensitive to hyperbaric oxygen and to paraquat. Therefore, sod plays an important role in the protection of S. xylosus from oxidative stress. PMID:11526011

  14. Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase Regulates Cardiac Function and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kliment, Corrine R; Suliman, Hagir B; Tobolewski, Jacob M; Reynolds, Crystal M; Day, Brian J; Zhu, Xiaodong; McTiernan, Charles F; McGaffin, Kenneth R; Piantadosi, Claude A; Oury, Tim D

    2009-01-01

    Aims Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is an antioxidant that protects the heart from ischemia and the lung from inflammation and fibrosis. The role of cardiac EC-SOD under normal conditions and injury remains unclear. Cardiac toxicity, a common side effect of doxorubicin, involves oxidative stress. We hypothesize that EC-SOD is critical for normal cardiac function and protects the heart from oxidant-induced fibrosis and loss of function. Methods C57BL/6 and EC-SOD-null mice were treated with doxorubicin, 15 mg/kg (i.p.). After 15 days, echocardiography was used to assess cardiac function. Left ventricle (LV) tissue was used to assess fibrosis and inflammation by staining, western blot, and hydroxyproline analysis. Results At baseline EC-SOD-null mice have LV wall thinning and increases in LV end diastolic dimensions compared to wild type mice, but have normal cardiac function. After doxorubicin, EC-SOD-null mice have decreases in fractional shortening not apparent in WT mice. Lack of EC-SOD also leads to increases in myocardial apoptosis and significantly more LV fibrosis and inflammatory cell infiltration. Administration of the metalloporphyrin AEOL 10150 abrogates the loss of cardiac function, and potentially fibrosis, associated with doxorubicin treatment in both wild type and EC-SOD KO mice. Conclusions EC-SOD is critical for normal cardiac morphology and protects the heart from oxidant-induced fibrosis, apoptosis and loss of function. The antioxidant metalloporphyrin, AEOL 10150 effectively protects cardiac function from doxorubicin-induced oxidative stress, in vivo. These findings identify targets for the use of antioxidant agents in oxidant-induced cardiac fibrosis. PMID:19695260

  15. Chloramphenicol Mediates Superoxide Production in Photosystem II and Enhances Its Photodamage in Isolated Membrane Particles

    PubMed Central

    Rehman, Ateeq Ur; Kodru, Sandeesha; Vass, Imre

    2016-01-01

    Chloramphenicol (CAP) is an inhibitor of protein synthesis, which is frequently used to decouple photodamage and protein synthesis dependent repair of Photosystem II during the process of photoinhibition. It has been reported earlier that CAP is able to mediate superoxide production by transferring electrons from the acceptor side of Photosystem I to oxygen. Here we investigated the interaction of CAP with Photosystem II electron transport processes by oxygen uptake and variable chlorophyll fluorescence measurements. Our data show that CAP can accept electrons at the acceptor side of Photosystem II, most likely from Pheophytin, and deliver them to molecular oxygen leading to superoxide production. In addition, the presence of CAP enhances photodamage of Photosystem II electron transport in isolated membrane particles, which effect is reversible by superoxide dismutase. It is concluded that CAP acts as electron acceptor in Photosystem II and mediates its superoxide dependent photodamage. This effect has potential implications for the application of CAP in photoinhibitory studies in intact systems. PMID:27092170

  16. Structures of two superoxide dismutases from Bacillus anthracis reveal a novel active centre

    SciTech Connect

    Boucher, Ian W.; Kalliomaa, Anne K.; Levdikov, Vladimir M.; Blagova, Elena V.; Fogg, Mark J.; Brannigan, James A. Wilson, Keith S.; Wilkinson, Anthony J.

    2005-07-01

    The crystal structures of two manganese superoxide dismutases from B. anthracis were solved by X-ray crystallography using molecular replacement. The BA4499 and BA5696 genes of Bacillus anthracis encode proteins homologous to manganese superoxide dismutase, suggesting that this organism has an expanded repertoire of antioxidant proteins. Differences in metal specificity and quaternary structure between the dismutases of prokaryotes and higher eukaryotes may be exploited in the development of therapeutic antibacterial compounds. Here, the crystal structure of two Mn superoxide dismutases from B. anthracis solved to high resolution are reported. Comparison of their structures reveals that a highly conserved residue near the active centre is substituted in one of the proteins and that this is a characteristic feature of superoxide dismutases from the B. cereus/B. anthracis/B. thuringiensis group of organisms.

  17. A genetic system involving superoxide causes F1 necrosis in wheat (T. aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Khanna-Chopra, R; Dalal, M; Kumar, G P; Laloraya, M

    1998-07-30

    A genetic system in wheat is described in which F1 produced by crossing a drought tolerant cultivar C306 and high yielding cultivar WL711 exhibits leaf necrosis leading to the death of the plant. The mechanism underlying hybrid necrosis is not yet known. The hybrid exhibited a higher level of superoxide anion compared to the healthy leaves of parents at similar developmental stages. This increase in superoxide generation preceded necrotic lesion formation and displayed a gradient from the leaf tip to base. The leaf tip where necrotic lesions make their first appearance exhibited a higher level of superoxide compared to the base. Superoxide anion thus appears to play a vital role in necrosis of leaves in F1 hybrid. This genetic system can be a model system for understanding cell death in higher plants. PMID:9703992

  18. Cryo-Trapping the Distorted Octahedral Reaction Intermediate of Manganese Superoxide Dismutase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borgstahl, Gloria; Snell, Edward H.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase protects organisms from potentially damaging oxygen radicals by catalyzing the disproportion of superoxide to oxygen and hydrogen peroxide. We report the use of cryogenic temperatures to kinetically trap the 6th ligand bound to the active site of manganese superoxide dismutase. Using cryocrystallography and synchrotron radiation, we describe at 1.55A resolution the six-coordinate, distorted octahedral geometry assumed by the active site during catalysis and compare it to the room temperature, five-coordinate trigonal-bipyramidal active site. Gateway residues Tyr34, His30 and a tightly bound water molecule are implicated in closing off the active site and blocking the escape route of superoxide during dismutation.

  19. Molecular cloning and expression patterns of copper/zinc superoxide dismutase and manganese superoxide dismutase in Musca domestica.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ting; Huang, Da-Wei; Zhou, Chuan-Qi; Li, Xiang; Xie, Qi-Jing; Liu, Feng-Song

    2012-09-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are metalloenzymes that represent one important line of defense against reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this paper, two novel SOD genes, MdSOD1 and MdSOD2, which putatively encode 261 and 214 amino acid residues respectively were identified and characterized from the housefly Musca domestica. The high similarity of MdSOD1 and MdSOD2 with SODs from other organisms indicated that they should be two new members of the SOD family. qPCR exhibited a universal expression of MdSOD1 and MdSOD2 detected in various tissues of housefly larva, including the fat body, gut, hemocyte and epidermis. Expression profiling reveals that MdSOD1 and MdSOD2 can be induced significantly via not only heat shock and cadmium (Cd) stress but also Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus challenge. The two genes were cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pET-28a to obtain the fusion proteins rMdSOD1 and rMdSOD2. Between them, the activity of rMdSOD2 was found by visual assay methods. ESI-LC-MS/MS analysis showed that three peptide fragments of the protein rMdSOD2 were identical to the corresponding sequence of M. domestica MdSOD2. MdSOD1 and MdSOD2 in housefly larvae were abrogated by feeding bacteria expressing dsRNA. High mortalities were observed in the larvae treated with dsRNA of SODs at heat shock, Cd stress and bacterial invasion. This phenomenon indicated that MdSOD1 and MdSOD2 are related to the survival of M. domestica under stress. This may provide new insights into the role of the two SOD genes in protecting M. domestica against both stress and bacterial invasion. PMID:22750315

  20. Superoxide enhances Ca2+ entry through L-type channels in the renal afferent arteriole.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Paul A; Yang, Xi; Moss, Nicholas G; Arendshorst, William J

    2015-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species regulate cardiovascular and renal function in health and disease. Superoxide participates in acute calcium signaling in afferent arterioles and renal vasoconstriction produced by angiotensin II, endothelin, thromboxane, and pressure-induced myogenic tone. Known mechanisms by which superoxide acts include quenching of nitric oxide and increased ADP ribosyl cyclase/ryanodine-mediated calcium mobilization. The effect(s) of superoxide on other calcium signaling pathways in the renal microcirculation is poorly understood. The present experiments examined the acute effect of superoxide generated by paraquat on calcium entry pathways in isolated rat afferent arterioles. The peak increase in cytosolic calcium concentration caused by KCl (40 mmol/L) was 99±14 nmol/L. The response to this membrane depolarization was mediated exclusively by L-type channels because it was abolished by nifedipine but was unaffected by the T-type channel blocker mibefradil. Paraquat increased superoxide production (dihydroethidium fluorescence), tripled the peak response to KCl to 314±68 nmol/L (P<0.001) and doubled the plateau response. These effects were abolished by tempol and nitroblue tetrazolium, but not by catalase, confirming actions of superoxide and not of hydrogen peroxide. Unaffected by paraquat and superoxide was calcium entry through store-operated calcium channels activated by thapsigargin-induced calcium depletion of sarcoplasmic reticular stores. Also unresponsive to paraquat was ryanodine receptor-mediated calcium-induced calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Our results provide new evidence that superoxide enhances calcium entry through L-type channels activated by membrane depolarization in rat cortical afferent arterioles, without affecting calcium entry through store-operated entry or ryanodine receptor-mediated calcium mobilization. PMID:26034201

  1. Early life stress in male mice induces superoxide production and endothelial dysfunction in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Ho, Dao H; Burch, Mariah L; Musall, Benjamin; Musall, Jacqueline B; Hyndman, Kelly A; Pollock, Jennifer S

    2016-05-01

    Early life stress (ELS) is a risk for cardiovascular disease in adulthood although very little mechanistic insight is available. Because oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction are major contributors to cardiovascular risk, we hypothesized that ELS induces endothelial dysfunction in adult male mice via increased superoxide production. Studies employed a mouse model of ELS, maternal separation with early weaning (MSEW), in which litters were separated from the dam for 4 h/day [postnatal days (PD) 2-5] and 8 h/day (PD6-16), and weaned at PD17. Control litters remained undisturbed until weaning at PD21. When compared with control mice, thoracic aortic rings from adult male MSEW mice displayed significant endothelial dysfunction that was reversed by the superoxide scavenger, polyethylene glycol-superoxide dismutase (PEG-SOD). PEG-SOD-inhibitable superoxide production by aortae from MSEW mice was significantly greater than observed in control aortae, although unaffected by nitric oxide synthase inhibition, suggesting that uncoupled nitric oxide synthase was not responsible for the accelerated superoxide production. Aortic SOD expression, plasma SOD activity, and total antioxidant activity were similar in MSEW and control mice, indicating unaltered antioxidant capacity in MSEW mice. Increased expression of the NADPH oxidase subunits, NOX2 and NOX4, was evident in the aortae of MSEW mice. Moreover, endothelial dysfunction and superoxide production in MSEW mice was reversed with the NADPH oxidase inhibitor, apocynin, indicating increased NADPH oxidase-dependent superoxide production and endothelial dysfunction. The finding that MSEW induces superoxide production and endothelial dysfunction in adult mice may provide a mechanistic link between ELS and adult cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:26921433

  2. Purification of human copper, zinc superoxide dismutase by copper chelate affinity chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Weslake, R.J.; Chesney, S.L.; Petkau, A.; Friesen, A.D.

    1986-05-15

    Copper, zinc superoxide dismutase was isolated from human red blood cell hemolysate by DEAE-Sepharose and copper chelate affinity chromatography. Enzyme preparations had specific activities ranging from 3400 to 3800 U/mg and recoveries were approximately 60% of the enzyme activity in the lysate. Copper chelate affinity chromatography resulted in a purification factor of about 60-fold. The homogeneity of the superoxide dismutase preparation was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis, analytical gel filtration chromatography, and isoelectric focusing.

  3. Real time in vivo investigation of superoxide dynamics in zebrafish liver using a single-fiber fluorescent probe

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Chung; Ken, Chuian-Fu; Hsu, Che-Wei; Liu, Ya-Ging

    2013-01-01

    Superoxide anion is the key radical that causes intracellular oxidative stress. The lack of a method to directly monitor superoxide concentration in vivo in real time has severely hindered our understanding on its pathophysiology. We made transgenic zebrafish to specifically express yellow fluorescent proteins, a reversible superoxide-specific indicator, in the liver and used a fiber-optic fluorescent probe to noninvasively monitor the superoxide concentration in real time. Several superoxide-inducing and scavenging reagents were administrated onto the fish to alter superoxide concentrations. The distinct biochemical pathways of the reagents can be discerned from the transient behaviors of fluorescence time courses. These results demonstrate the feasibility of this method for analyzing superoxide dynamics and its potential as an in vivo pharmaceutical screening platform. PMID:24049691

  4. Characterization of heparin binding of human extracellular superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Lookene, A; Stenlund, P; Tibell, L A

    2000-01-11

    The C-terminal domain of human extracellular superoxide dismutase (hEC-SOD) plays a crucial role in the protein's interaction with heparin. Here we investigated this interaction in more detail by comparing the heparin-binding characteristics of two variants of hEC-SOD: the two fusion proteins containing the hEC-SOD C-terminal domain and a synthetic peptide homologous to the C-terminal. The interaction studies were performed using a surface plasmon resonance based technique on a BIAcore system. It should be emphasized that this is a model system. However, the kinetic constants, as measured, are valid in a comparative sense. Comparison of affinities for size-fractionated heparins revealed that octa- or decasaccharides are the smallest heparin fragments that can efficiently interact with the C-terminal domain of hEC-SOD. At physiological salt concentration, and pH 7.4, the hEC-SOD/heparin interaction was found to be of a high-affinity type, with an equilibrium dissociation constant, K(d), of 0.12 microM, which is 700 and 10-20 times lower than the K(d) values for the synthetic peptide and the fusion proteins, respectively. However, when an alpha-helical structure was induced in the synthetic peptide, by addition of 10% trifluoroethanol, the K(d) decreased to 0.64 microM. The differences in the K(d) values were mainly governed by differences in the association rate constants (k(ass)). The hEC-SOD/heparin interaction itself was found to have a fairly high dissociation rate constant (0.1 s(-)(1)), and a very high association rate constant (8 x 10(5) M(-)(1) s(-)(1)), suggesting that the interaction is mainly controlled by the association. These results together with circular dichroism spectra of the synthetic peptide suggest that an alpha-helical structure in the C-terminal is essential for optimal binding to heparin and that other parts of hEC-SOD moderate the affinity. Our data also demonstrate that the tetramerization itself does not substantially increase the

  5. Chemiluminescence Imaging of Superoxide Anion Detects Beta-Cell Function and Mass

    PubMed Central

    Bronsart, Laura L.; Stokes, Christian; Contag, Christopher H.

    2016-01-01

    Superoxide anion is produced during normal cellular respiration and plays key roles in cellular physiology with its dysregulation being associated with a variety of diseases. Superoxide anion is a short-lived molecule and, therefore, its homeostatic regulation and role in biology and disease requires dynamic quantification with fine temporal resolution. Here we validated coelenterazine as a reporter of intracellular superoxide anion concentration and used it as a dynamic measure both in vitro and in vivo. Chemiluminescence was dependent upon superoxide anion levels, including those produced during cellular respiration, and concentrations varied both kinetically and temporally in response to physiologically relevant fluctuations in glucose levels. In vivo imaging with coelenterazine revealed that beta cells of the pancreas have increased levels of superoxide anion, which acted as a measure of beta-cell function and mass and could predict the susceptibility of mice to diabetes mellitus. Glucose response and regulation are key elements of cellular physiology and organismal biology, and superoxide anion appears to play a fundamental and dynamic role in both of these processes. PMID:26752052

  6. Growth signaling promotes chronological aging in budding yeast by inducing superoxide anions that inhibit quiescence

    PubMed Central

    Weinberger, Martin; Mesquita, Ana; Carroll, Timothy; Marks, Laura; Yang, Hui; Zhang, Zhaojie; Ludovico, Paula; Burhans, William C.

    2010-01-01

    Inhibition of growth signaling pathways protects against aging and age-related diseases in parallel with reduced oxidative stress. The relationships between growth signaling, oxidative stress and aging remain unclear. Here we report that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, alterations in growth signaling pathways impact levels of superoxide anions that promote chronological aging and inhibit growth arrest of stationary phase cells in G0/G1. Factors that decrease intracellular superoxide anions in parallel with enhanced longevity and more efficient G0/G1 arrest include genetic inactivation of growth signaling pathways that inhibit Rim15p, which activates oxidative stress responses, and downregulation of these pathways by caloric restriction. Caloric restriction also reduces superoxide anions independently of Rim15p by elevating levels of H2O2, which activates superoxide dismutases. In contrast, high glucose or mutations that activate growth signaling accelerate chronological aging in parallel with increased superoxide anions and reduced efficiency of stationary phase G0/G1 arrest. High glucose also activates DNA damage responses and preferentially kills stationary phase cells that fail to arrest growth in G0/G1. These findings suggest that growth signaling promotes chronological aging in budding yeast by elevating superoxide anions that inhibit quiescence and induce DNA replication stress. A similar mechanism likely contributes to aging and age-related diseases in complex eukaryotes. PMID:21076178

  7. Exhaled 8-isoprostane in sarcoidosis: relation to superoxide anion production by bronchoalveolar lavage cells

    PubMed Central

    Kurmanowska, Zofia; Antczak, Adam; Marczak, Jerzy; Ciebiada, Maciej; Górski, Paweł

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study was designed to examine the mutual relationship between 8-isoprostane in exhaled breath condensate (EBC) and superoxide anion generation by bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cells in patients with sarcoidosis. Design About 29 patients with sarcoidosis, 34 healthy never smokers (control group for EBC) and 15 healthy never smokers (control group for BAL) were examined. EBC was collected directly before bronchoscopy. 8-Isoprostane was measured by ELISA, and superoxide anion by colorimetry. Results Exhaled breath condensate 8-isoprostane is increased in sarcoidosis (median, 25–75 percentile): 2.50; 2.50–3.90 versus 6.20; 2.50–16.95 pg/ml, p ≤ 0.05). Spontaneous superoxide anion release from BALF cells was significantly elevated only in patients with a high percentage of lymphocytes in BALF (6.42 ± 1.24 vs. 23.52 ± 4.30 nmol/106 cells, p ≤ 0.01). There were no correlations between 8-isoprostane and spontaneous or stimulated superoxide anion release. Conclusions We confirmed higher concentrations of EBC 8-isoprostane in sarcoidosis and higher spontaneous release of superoxide anion from BALF cells in patients with sarcoidosis. The increase of EBC 8-isoprostane is not directly related to superoxide anion released from BALF cells. PMID:20521080

  8. Mechanisms of Superoxide Signaling in Epigenetic Processes: Relation to Aging and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Afanas’ev, Igor

    2015-01-01

    Superoxide is a precursor of many free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in biological systems. It has been shown that superoxide regulates major epigenetic processes of DNA methylation, histone methylation, and histone acetylation. We suggested that superoxide, being a radical anion and a strong nucleophile, could participate in DNA methylation and histone methylation and acetylation through mechanism of nucleophilic substitution and free radical abstraction. In nucleophilic reactions superoxide is able to neutralize positive charges of methyl donors S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) and acetyl-coenzyme A (AcCoA) enhancing their nucleophilic capacity or to deprotonate cytosine. In the reversed free radical reactions of demethylation and deacetylation superoxide is formed catalytically by the (Tet) family of dioxygenates and converted into the iron form of hydroxyl radical with subsequent oxidation and final eradication of methyl substituents. Double role of superoxide in these epigenetic processes might be of importance for understanding of ROS effects under physiological and pathological conditions including cancer and aging. PMID:26029480

  9. Superoxide dismutase: correlation with life-span and specific metabolic rate in primate species.

    PubMed Central

    Tolmasoff, J M; Ono, T; Cutler, R G

    1980-01-01

    Much evidence now suggests that superoxide dismutase (superoxide:superoxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.15.1.1) may be a major intracellular protective enzyme against oxygen toxicity by catalyzing the removal of the superoxide radical. We examined the possible role this enzyme may have in determining the life-span of primate species. Superoxide dismutase specific activity levels were measured in cytoplasmic fractions of liver, brain, and heart of 2 rodent and 12 primate species. These species had maximum life-span potentials ranging from 3.5 to 95 years. Liver, brain, and heart had similar specific activity levels for a given species, but the levels for different species varied over 2-fold, with man having the highest level. No general correlation was found in the levels with life-span. However, the ratio of superoxide dismutase specific activity to specific metabolic rate of the tissue or of the whole adult organism was found to increase with increasing maximum lifespan potential for all the species. This correlation suggests that longer-lived species have a higher degree of protection against by-products of oxygen metabolism. PMID:6771758

  10. Serine protease inhibitors block priming of monocytes for enhanced release of superoxide.

    PubMed Central

    Megyeri, P; Pabst, K M; Pabst, M J

    1995-01-01

    Monocytes freshly isolated from human blood produced large amounts of superoxide when triggered by phorbol ester. After monocytes were cultured for 18-24 hr in endotoxin-free, non-adherent conditions, they produced low amounts of superoxide. Addition of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), or platelet-activating factor (PAF) at the beginning of culture 'primed' the monocytes, causing them to maintain a high superoxide response for at least 96 hr. Also, in response to LPS, monocytes secreted TNF-alpha. The ability of LPS, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha or PAF to maintain the high superoxide response was blocked by addition of inhibitors of serine proteases, either 4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulphonyl fluoride (AEBSF) or 3,4-dichloroisocoumarin. AEBSF was most effective at 200 microns, and required 6 hr for maximum effect. AEBSF did not affect phorbol-triggered superoxide release by unprimed monocytes. AEBSF did not affect cell viability, nor did it interfere with the TNF-alpha secretion in response to LPS. An analogue of AEBSF that lacked ability to inhibit proteases did not affect monocyte responses. 3,4-Dichloroisocoumarin blocked priming at a low concentration, 1 microM. We conclude that activity of a monocyte serine protease is required to maintain the high superoxide response in monocytes primed with LPS, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, or PAF. PMID:8567031

  11. Neonatal developmental pattern of superoxide dismutase and aniline hydroxylase in rat lung

    SciTech Connect

    Kakkar, P.; Jaffery, F.N.; Viswanathan, P.N.

    1986-10-01

    The developmental biology of superoxide dismutase and aniline hydroxylase was followed in rat lungs from prenatal stage to 3 months old. Total superoxide dismutase activity as determined by spectrophotometry as well as electrophoresis was high in the prenatal rat lung, decreased in the first 24 hr postpartum, increased within 7 days, and then decreased gradually to adult levels. On polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis only two isozymic forms of superoxide dismutase were located as achromatic zones in the fetal lung. In the adult rat lung, there were three molecular forms of superoxide dismutase, two in the postmitochondrial supernatant and one in the mitochondrial fraction. Unlike superoxide dismutase, aniline hydroxylase was detectable only after 5 days of age and the activity exhibited a gradual increase afterward up to 1 month of age. The developmental pattern of superoxide dismutase and aniline hydroxylase activities in lung may be significant in understanding the mechanism of body defenses and their regulatory modulations in response to toxic air pollutants and environmental stress.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Metabolic Activity, Accompanied by Overproduction of Superoxide.

    PubMed

    Bakalova, Rumiana; Georgieva, Ekaterina; Ivanova, Donika; Zhelev, Zhivko; Aoki, Ichio; Saga, Tsuneo

    2015-12-16

    This study shows that a mitochondria-penetrating nitroxide probe (mito-TEMPO) allows detection of superoxide and visualization of mitochondrial dysfunction in living cells due to the effect of T1 shortening in MRI. Mitochondrial dysfunction was induced by treatment of cells with rotenone and 2-methoxyestradiol (2-ME/Rot). The MRI measurements were performed on 7T MRI. The 2-ME/Rot-treated cells were characterized by overproduction of superoxide, which was confirmed by a conventional dihydroethidium test. In the presence of mito-TEMPO, the intensity of MRI signal in 2-ME/Rot-treated cells was ∼30-40% higher, in comparison with that in untreated cells or culture media. In model (cell-free) systems, we observed that superoxide, but not hydrogen peroxide, increased the intensity of T1-weighted MRI signal of mito-TEMPO. Moreover, the superoxide restores the T1-weighted MRI contrast of mito-TEMPOH, a noncontrast (diamagnetic) analogue of mito-TEMPO. This was also confirmed by using EPR spectroscopy. The results demonstrate that superoxide radical is involved in the enhancement of T1-weighted MRI contrast in living cells, in the absence and presence of mito-TEMPO. This report gives a direction for discovering new opportunities for functional MRI, for detection of metabolic activity, accompanied by overproduction of superoxide, as well as by disturbance of the balance between superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, a very important approach to clarify the fine molecular mechanisms in the regulation of many pathologies. The visualization of mitochondrial activity in real-time can be crucial to clarify the molecular mechanism of the functional MRI in its commonly accepted definition, as a method for detection of neurovascular coupling. PMID:26367059

  13. Superoxide dismutase and catalase conjugated to polyethylene glycol increases endothelial enzyme activity and oxidant resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Beckman, J.S.; Minor, R.L. Jr.; White, C.W.; Repine, J.E.; Rosen, G.M.; Freeman, B.A.

    1988-05-15

    Covalent conjugation of superoxide dismutase and catalase with polyethylene glycol (PEG) increases the circulatory half-lives of these enzymes from <10 min to 40 h, reduced immunogenicity, and decreases sensitivity to proteolysis. Because PEG has surface active properties and can induce cell fusion, the authors hypothesized that PEG conjugation could enhance cell binding and association of normally membrane-impermeable enzymes. Incubation of cultured porcine aortic endothelial cells with /sup 125/I-PEG-catalase or /sup 125/I-PEG-superoxide dismutase produced a linear, concentration-dependent increase in cellular enzyme activity and radioactivity. Fluorescently labeled PEG-superoxide dismutase incubated with endothelial cells showed a vesicular localization. Mechanical injury to cell monolayers, which is known to stimulate endocytosis, further increased the uptake of fluorescent PEG-superoxide dismutase. Addition of PEG and PEG-conjugated enzymes perturbed the spin-label binding environment, indicative of producing an increase in plasma membrane fluidity. Thus, PEG conjugation to superoxide dismutase and catalase enhances cell association of these enzymes in a manner which increases cellular enzyme activities and provides prolonged protection from partially reduced oxygen species.

  14. Superoxide dismutase C is required for intracellular survival and virulence of Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Vanaporn, Muthita; Wand, Matthew; Michell, Stephen L; Sarkar-Tyson, Mitali; Ireland, Philip; Goldman, Stan; Kewcharoenwong, Chidchamai; Rinchai, Darawan; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana; Titball, Richard W

    2011-08-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is an intracellular pathogen and the causative agent of melioidosis, a life-threatening disease of humans. Within host cells, superoxide is an important mediator of pathogen killing. In this study, we have identified the B. pseudomallei K96243 sodC gene, shown that it has superoxide dismutase activity, and constructed an allelic deletion mutant of this gene. Compared with the wild-type, the mutant was more sensitive to killing by extracellular superoxide, but not to superoxide generated intracellularly. The sodC mutant showed a markedly decreased survival in J774A.1 mouse macrophages, and reduced numbers of bacteria were recovered from human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) when compared with the wild-type. The numbers of wild-type or mutant bacteria recovered from human diabetic neutrophils were significantly lower than from normal human neutrophils. The sodC mutant was attenuated in BALB/c mice. Our results indicate that SodC plays a key role in the virulence of B. pseudomallei, but that diabetics are not more susceptible to infection because of a reduced ability of PMNs to kill by superoxide. PMID:21659326

  15. Superoxide anion radical generation during the oxidation of various amines by diamine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Silva, I J; Azevedo, M S; Manso, C F

    1996-03-01

    Diamine oxidase (DAO) or histaminase is an enzyme which deaminates histamine and several aliphatic amines to their corresponding aldehydes. Hydrogen peroxide and ammonia are side products of this reaction. The purpose of the present work was to evaluate if determination of produced hydrogen peroxide reflects DAO activity or if intermediate formation of the superoxide radical could be a reason for lack of correspondence between oxygen uptake and hydrogen peroxide production at different pH. Superoxide radical formation was determined by cytochrome c reduction in the presence and absence of superoxide dismutase (SOD). Oxygen uptake was measured with an oxygen electrode and hydrogen peroxide production by a spectrophotometric method. At pH 6.6 there was no superoxide production, but at pH 7.4 there was some, and it increased markedly at pH 9.5. Oxygen uptake also increased with increasing pH, especially with histamine as substrate. These results lead us to suggest that the mechanism of action of DAO involves the intermediate generation of superoxide radicals. PMID:8728118

  16. Ab initio molecular dynamics of the reaction of quercetin with superoxide radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lespade, Laure

    2016-08-01

    Superoxide plays an important role in biology but in unregulated concentrations it is implicated in a lot of diseases such as cancer or atherosclerosis. Antioxidants like flavonoids are abundant in plant and are good scavengers of superoxide radical. The modeling of superoxide scavenging by flavonoids from the diet still remains a challenge. In this study, ab initio molecular dynamics of the reaction of the flavonoid quercetin toward superoxide radical has been carried out using Car-Parrinello density functional theory. The study has proven different reactant solvation by modifying the number of water molecules surrounding superoxide. The reaction consists in the gift of a hydrogen atom of one of the hydroxyl groups of quercetin to the radical. When it occurs, it is relatively fast, lower than 100 fs. Calculations show that it depends largely on the environment of the hydroxyl group giving its hydrogen atom, the geometry of the first water layer and the presence of a certain number of water molecules in the second layer, indicating a great influence of the solvent on the reactivity.

  17. Endothelin-1 critically influences cardiac function via superoxide-MMP9 cascade

    PubMed Central

    Hathaway, Catherine K.; Grant, Ruriko; Hagaman, John R.; Hiller, Sylvia; Li, Feng; Xu, Longquan; Chang, Albert S.; Madden, Victoria J.; Bagnell, C. Robert; Rojas, Mauricio; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Wu, Bingruo; Zhou, Bin; Smithies, Oliver; Kakoki, Masao

    2015-01-01

    We have generated low-expressing and high-expressing endothelin-1 genes (L and H) and have bred mice with four levels of expression: L/L, ∼20%; L/+, ∼65%; +/+ (wild type), 100%; and H/+, ∼350%. The hypomorphic L allele can be spatiotemporally switched to the hypermorphic H allele by Cre-loxP recombination. Young adult L/L and L/+ mice have dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertension, and increased plasma volumes, together with increased ventricular superoxide levels, increased matrix metalloproteinase 9 (Mmp9) expression, and reduced ventricular stiffness. H/+ mice have decreased plasma volumes and significantly heavy stiff hearts. Global or cardiomyocyte-specific switching expression from L to H normalized the abnormalities already present in young adult L/L mice. An epithelial sodium channel antagonist normalized plasma volume and blood pressure, but only partially corrected the cardiomyopathy. A superoxide dismutase mimetic made superoxide levels subnormal, reduced Mmp9 overexpression, and substantially improved cardiac function. Genetic absence of Mmp9 also improved cardiac function, but increased superoxide remained. We conclude that endothelin-1 is critical for maintaining normal contractile function, for controlling superoxide and Mmp9 levels, and for ensuring that the myocardium has sufficient collagen to prevent overstretching. Even a modest (∼35%) decrease in endothelin-1 gene (Edn1) expression is sufficient to cause cardiac dysfunction. PMID:25848038

  18. Metabolic stability of superoxide adducts derived from newly developed cyclic nitrone spin traps.

    PubMed

    Bézière, Nicolas; Hardy, Micael; Poulhès, Florent; Karoui, Hakim; Tordo, Paul; Ouari, Olivier; Frapart, Yves-Michel; Rockenbauer, Antal; Boucher, Jean-Luc; Mansuy, Daniel; Peyrot, Fabienne

    2014-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species are by-products of aerobic metabolism involved in the onset and evolution of various pathological conditions. Among them, the superoxide radical is of special interest as the origin of several damaging species such as H2O2, hydroxyl radical, or peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)). Spin trapping coupled with ESR is a method of choice to characterize these species in chemical and biological systems and the metabolic stability of the spin adducts derived from reaction of superoxide and hydroxyl radicals with nitrones is the main limit to the in vivo application of the method. Recently, new cyclic nitrones bearing a triphenylphosphonium or permethylated β-cyclodextrin moiety have been synthesized and their spin adducts demonstrated increased stability in buffer. In this article, we studied the stability of the superoxide adducts of four new cyclic nitrones in the presence of liver subcellular fractions and biologically relevant reductants using an original setup combining a stopped-flow device and an ESR spectrometer. The kinetics of disappearance of the spin adducts were analyzed using an appropriate simulation program. Our results highlight the interest of the new spin trapping agents CD-DEPMPO and CD-DIPPMPO for specific detection of superoxide with high stability of the superoxide adducts in the presence of liver microsomes. PMID:24161442

  19. Nitration and Inactivation of Manganese Superoxide Dismutase in Chronic Rejection of Human Renal Allografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMillan-Crow, L. A.; Crow, John P.; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Beckman, Joseph S.; Thompson, John A.

    1996-10-01

    Inflammatory processes in chronic rejection remain a serious clinical problem in organ transplantation. Activated cellular infiltrate produces high levels of both superoxide and nitric oxide. These reactive oxygen species interact to form peroxynitrite, a potent oxidant that can modify proteins to form 3-nitrotyrosine. We identified enhanced immunostaining for nitrotyrosine localized to tubular epithelium of chronically rejected human renal allografts. Western blot analysis of rejected tissue demonstrated that tyrosine nitration was restricted to a few specific polypeptides. Immunoprecipitation and amino acid sequencing techniques identified manganese superoxide dismutase, the major antioxidant enzyme in mitochondria, as one of the targets of tyrosine nitration. Total manganese superoxide dismutase protein was increased in rejected kidney, particularly in the tubular epithelium; however, enzymatic activity was significantly decreased. Exposure of recombinant human manganese superoxide dismutase to peroxynitrite resulted in a dose-dependent (IC50 = 10 μ M) decrease in enzymatic activity and concomitant increase in tyrosine nitration. Collectively, these observations suggest a role for peroxynitrite during development and progression of chronic rejection in human renal allografts. In addition, inactivation of manganese superoxide dismutase by peroxynitrite may represent a general mechanism that progressively increases the production of peroxynitrite, leading to irreversible oxidative injury to mitochondria.

  20. Catalytic spectrofluorimetric determination of superoxide anion radical and superoxide dismutase activity using N, N-dimethylaniline as the substrate for horseradish peroxidase (HRP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Bo; Wang, Yan; Chen, Zhen-zhen

    2002-10-01

    The coupled reaction of N, N-dimethylaniline (DMA) with 4-aminoantipyrine (4-AAP) using superoxide anion radical (O 2-) as oxidizing agent under the catalysis of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was studied. Based on the reaction, O 2- produced by irradiating Vitamin B 2, (V B2) was spectrophotometricly determined at 554 nm. The linear range of this method was 1.8×10 -6-1.2×10 -4 mol l -1 with a detection limit of 5.3×10 -7 mol l -1. The effect of interferences on the determination of O 2- was investigated. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in human blood and mouse blood.

  1. Superoxide Dismutase 1 Loss Disturbs Intracellular Redox Signaling, Resulting in Global Age-Related Pathological Changes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aging is characterized by increased oxidative stress, chronic inflammation, and organ dysfunction, which occur in a progressive and irreversible manner. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) serves as a major antioxidant and neutralizes superoxide radicals throughout the body. In vivo studies have demonstrated that copper/zinc superoxide dismutase-deficient (Sod1−/−) mice show various aging-like pathologies, accompanied by augmentation of oxidative damage in organs. We found that antioxidant treatment significantly attenuated the age-related tissue changes and oxidative damage-associated p53 upregulation in Sod1−/− mice. This review will focus on various age-related pathologies caused by the loss of Sod1 and will discuss the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis in Sod1−/− mice. PMID:25276767

  2. MEASUREMENT OF SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE, CATALASE, AND GLUTATHIONE PEROXIDASE IN CULTURED CELLS AND TISSUE

    PubMed Central

    Weydert, Christine J.; Cullen, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    Cells contain a large number of antioxidants to prevent or repair the damage caused by ROS, as well as to regulate redox-sensitive signaling pathways General protocols are described to measure the antioxidant enzyme activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase. The SODs convert superoxide radical into hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen, while the catalase and peroxidases convert hydrogen peroxide into water. In this way, two toxic species, superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide, are converted to the harmless product water. Western blots, activity gels and activity assays are various methods used to determine protein and activity in both cells and tissue depending on the amount of protein needed for each assay. Other techniques including immunohistochemistry and immunogold can further evaluate the levels of the various antioxidant enzymes in tissue and cells. In general, these assays require 24 to 48 hours to complete. PMID:20057381

  3. Superoxide dismutase 1 acts as a nuclear transcription factor to regulate oxidative stress resistance

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Chi Kwan; Liu, Yuan; Thomas, Janice; Zhang, Yanjie; Zheng, X. F. Steven

    2015-01-01

    Summary Superoxide dismutase 1 (Sod1) has been known for nearly half a century for catalysis of superoxide to hydrogen peroxide. Here we report a new Sod1 function in oxidative signaling: in response to elevated endogenous and exogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS), Sod1 rapidly relocates into the nucleus, which is important for maintaining genomic stability. Interestingly, H2O2 is sufficient to promote Sod1 nuclear localization, indicating that it is responding to general ROS rather than Sod1 substrate superoxide. ROS signaling is mediated by Mec1/ATM and its effector Dun1/Cds1 kinase, through Dun1 interaction with Sod1 and regulation of Sod1 by phosphorylation at S60, 99. In the nucleus, Sod1 binds to the promoters and regulates the expression of oxidative resistance and repair genes. Altogether, our study unravels an unorthodox function of Sod1 as a transcription factor and elucidates the regulatory mechanism for its localization. PMID:24647101

  4. Tissue-specific activity of two manganese superoxide dismutase promoters in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed Central

    Van Camp, W; Hérouart, D; Willekens, H; Takahashi, H; Saito, K; Van Montagu, M; Inzé, D

    1996-01-01

    In eukaryotes, manganese superoxide dismutase is a nuclear-encoded protein that scavenges superoxide radicals in the mitochondrial matrix. We have isolated two manganese superoxide dismutase genes from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia L. and fused the 5' upstream regulatory region of these genes to the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene. The two gene fusions displayed a differential tissue specificity in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Promoter activity of the SodA1 gene fusion was found in the pollen, middle layer, and stomium of anthers, but was usually undetectable in vegetative organs of mature plants. The SodA2 gene fusion was expressed in the leaves, stems, roots, and flowers. SodA2 promoter activity was most prominent in the vascular bundles, stomata, axillary buds, pericycle, stomium, and pollen. Histochemical analysis of succinate dehydrogenase activity suggested that the spatial expression of the two gene fusions is generally correlated with mitochondrial respiratory activity. PMID:8883376

  5. Immunologic and Nonimmunologic Generation of Superoxide from Mast Cells and Basophils

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, William R.; Kaliner, Michael

    1978-01-01

    Mediator release from rat peritoneal and human lung mast cells as well as human leukemic basophils was examined to determine whether super-oxide (O−2) was concomitantly generated. Immunologic or nonimmunologic stimulation of each preparation induced parallel release of histamine and O−2 within 2 min. O−2 production was quantitated by superoxide dismutase (SOD)-inhibitable chemiluminescence and cytochrome c reduction. SOD was detected in basophil and mast cell lysates and was also released by rat mast cells stimulated by anti-IgE. Secretory granules isolated from purified rat mast cells released histamine, O−2, and SOD upon exposure to cations. Thus, both superoxide radicals and SOD may play a role in host defenses involved in immediate hypersensitivity reactions. Images PMID:73548

  6. Identification of a superoxide-generating NADPH oxidase system in human fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Meier, B; Cross, A R; Hancock, J T; Kaup, F J; Jones, O T

    1991-01-01

    Human fibroblasts have the capacity to release superoxide radicals upon stimulation of an electron transport system similar to the NADPH oxidase of leukocytes. Two components of the NADPH oxidase system, (1) a flavoprotein of 45 kDa which binds diphenylene iodonium (a compound described as a specific inhibitor of the leukocyte NADPH oxidase), and (2) a low-potential cytochrome b, are present in fibroblast membranes. Fibroblasts exhibit these compounds at lower concentrations than do polymorphonuclear leukocytes or B-lymphocytes. The superoxide-generating system is rather uniformly associated with the outer cell membrane, as shown by light and electron microscopy. Superoxide release upon stimulation with various agents was prevented by the addition of micromolar concentrations of diphenylene iodonium, making an NADPH oxidase a likely source. Images Fig. 4. PMID:1850240

  7. Structures of two superoxide dismutases from Bacillus anthracis reveal a novel active centre

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Ian W.; Kalliomaa, Anne K.; Levdikov, Vladimir M.; Blagova, Elena V.; Fogg, Mark J.; Brannigan, James A.; Wilson, Keith S.; Wilkinson, Anthony J.

    2005-01-01

    The BA4499 and BA5696 genes of Bacillus anthracis encode proteins homologous to manganese superoxide dismutase, suggesting that this organism has an expanded repertoire of antioxidant proteins. Differences in metal specificity and quaternary structure between the dismutases of prokaryotes and higher eukaryotes may be exploited in the development of therapeutic antibacterial compounds. Here, the crystal structure of two Mn superoxide dismutases from B. anthracis solved to high resolution are reported. Comparison of their structures reveals that a highly conserved residue near the active centre is substituted in one of the proteins and that this is a characteristic feature of superoxide dismutases from the B. cereus/B. anthracis/B. thuringiensis group of organisms. PMID:16511113

  8. Molecular and biochemical characterization of manganese-containing superoxide dismutase from the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kohji; Zhang, Pingbo; He, Ningjia; Wang, Yongqiang; Aso, Yoichi; Banno, Yutaka; Fujii, Hiroshi

    2005-12-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is responsible for the removal of superoxide anion from living organisms. In this study, cDNA encoding the manganese-containing SOD (MnSOD) from the silkworm, Bombyx mori, was isolated by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence of the MnSOD revealed 62% identity to that of the Drosophila melanogaster; both were close to each other in a phylogenetic tree. The MnSOD was overproduced in Escherichia coli and purified. The internal structure of the recombinant MnSOD was confirmed by peptide mass fingerprinting method. The recombinant MnSOD facilitating the reduction reaction of superoxide anion retained 75% of its original activity after incubation at pH 4-11 for 24 h at 4 degrees C. Its activity was never affected by incubation at pH 7 for 30 min below 50 degrees C. PMID:16236537

  9. Redox-activated expression of the cytosolic copper/zinc superoxide dismutase gene in Nicotiana.

    PubMed Central

    Hérouart, D; Van Montagu, M; Inzé, D

    1993-01-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs; superoxide: superoxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.15.1.1) play a key role in protection against oxygen radicals, and SOD gene expression is highly induced during environmental stress. To determine the conditions of SOD induction, the promoter of the cytosolic copper/zinc SOD (Cu/ZnSODcyt) gene was isolated in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia and fused to the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene. Oxidative stress is likely to alter the cellular redox in favor of the oxidized status. Surprisingly, the expression of the Cu/ZnSODcyt gene is induced by sulfhydryl antioxidants such as reduced glutathione, cysteine, and dithiothreitol, whereas the oxidized forms of glutathione and cysteine have no effect. It is therefore possible that reduced glutathione directly acts as an antioxidant and simultaneously activates the Cu/ZnSODcyt gene during oxidative stress. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8464930

  10. Endogenous antioxidant defense induction by melon superoxide dismutase reduces cardiac hypertrophy in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Carillon, Julie; Rugale, Caroline; Rouanet, Jean-Max; Cristol, Jean-Paul; Lacan, Dominique; Jover, Bernard

    2014-08-01

    We assessed the influence of SODB, a melon superoxide dismutase (SOD), on left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy in SHR. SODB (4 or 40U SOD) was given orally for 4 or 28 days to SHR. For each treatment period, LV weight index (LVWI) and cardiomyocytes size were measured. SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase expressions, and LV production and presence of superoxide anion were determined. Pro-inflammatory markers were also measured. SODB reduced LVWI and cardiomyocytes size after 4 or 28 days. Cardiac SOD and GPx increased by 30-40% with SODB. The presence but not production of superoxide anion was significantly reduced by SODB. No effect of SODB was detected on inflammatory status in any group. The beneficial effect of SODB on cardiac hypertrophy seems to be related to the stimulation of endogenous antioxidant defense, suggesting that SODB may be of interest as a dietary supplementation during conventional antihypertensive therapy. PMID:24601674

  11. Influence of Catalase and Superoxide Dismutase on Ozone Inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Christopher W.; Lee, Dongha; Dodge, Beth-Anne; Hamman, Kristen M.; Robbins, Justin B.; Martin, Scott E.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of ozone at 0.25, 0.40, and 1.00 ppm on Listeria monocytogenes were evaluated in distilled water and phosphate-buffered saline. Differences in sensitivity to ozone were found to exist among the six strains examined. Greater cell death was found following exposure at lower temperatures. Early stationary-phase cells were less sensitive to ozone than mid-exponential- and late stationary-phase cells. Ozonation at 1.00 ppm of cabbage inoculated with L. monocytogenes effectively inactivated all cells after 5 min. The abilities of in vivo catalase and superoxide dismutase to protect the cells from ozone were also examined. Three listerial test strains were inactivated rapidly upon exposure to ozone. Both catalase and superoxide dismutase were found to protect listerial cells from ozone attack, with superoxide dismutase being more important than catalase in this protection. PMID:10742219

  12. Reactions of Co(III)-nitrosyl complexes with superoxide and their mechanistic insights.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pankaj; Lee, Yong-Min; Park, Young Jun; Siegler, Maxime A; Karlin, Kenneth D; Nam, Wonwoo

    2015-04-01

    New Co(III)-nitrosyl complexes bearing N-tetramethylated cyclam (TMC) ligands, [(12-TMC)Co(III)(NO)](2+) (1) and [(13-TMC)Co(III)(NO)](2+) (2), were synthesized via [(TMC)Co(II)(CH3CN)](2+) + NO(g) reactions. Spectroscopic and structural characterization showed that these compounds bind the nitrosyl moiety in a bent end-on fashion. Complexes 1 and 2 reacted with KO2/2.2.2-cryptand to produce [(12-TMC)Co(II)(NO2)](+) (3) and [(13-TMC)Co(II)(NO2)](+) (4), respectively; these possess O,O'-chelated nitrito ligands. Mechanistic studies using (18)O-labeled superoxide ((18)O2(•-)) showed that one O atom in the nitrito ligand is derived from superoxide and the O2 produced comes from the other superoxide O atom. Evidence supporting the formation of a Co-peroxynitrite intermediate is also presented. PMID:25793706

  13. Dehydroepiandrosterone inhibits the spontaneous release of superoxide radical by alveolar macrophages in vitro in asbestosis

    SciTech Connect

    Rom, W.N.; Harkin, T. )

    1991-08-01

    Asbestosis is characterized by an alveolar macrophage alveolitis with injury and fibrosis of the lower respiratory tract. Alveolar macrophages recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage spontaneously release exaggerated amounts of oxidants including superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide that may mediate alveolar epithelial cell injury. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is a normally occurring adrenal androgen that inhibits glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, the initial enzyme in the pentose phosphate shunt necessary for NADPH generation and superoxide anion formation. In this regard, the authors hypothesized that DHEA may reduce asbestos-induced oxidant release. DHEA added in vitro to alveolar macrophages lavaged from 11 nonsmoking asbestos workers significantly reduced superoxide anion release. DHEA is an antioxidant and potential anticarcinogenic agent that may have a therapeutic role in reducing the increased oxidant burden in asbestos-induced alveolitis of the lower respiratory tract.

  14. Superoxide metabolism is correlated to the post-anoxic injury of soybean (Glycine max) roots

    SciTech Connect

    Bolles, C.S.; Van Toai, T.T. )

    1990-05-01

    Post-anoxic injury of root tips of soybean seedlings is more severe following a very short (1 hour) period of anoxia than a longer (3-5 hour) period. Anaerobic incubation of root tips in the presence of 100 mM ascorbate, an antioxidant and free-radical-scavenging compound, alleviates the detrimental post-anoxia effects of a very short anoxic treatment. Extracts of root tips which have been treated anoxically for 1 hour have an elevated capacity to produce superoxide anions when subsequently exposed to air, than extracts from seedlings treated anoxically for longer time. Changes in superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzyme activity and SOD-specific RNA sequences will be presented. The results support that post-anoxic injury occurs in soybean roots and that SOD plays a role in the detoxification of superoxide anions.

  15. Superoxide Dismutase (Sod-1) Null Mutants of Neurospora Crassa: Oxidative Stress Sensitivity, Spontaneous Mutation Rate and Response to Mutagens

    PubMed Central

    Chary, P.; Dillon, D.; Schroeder, A. L.; Natvig, D. O.

    1994-01-01

    Enzymatic superoxide-dismutase activity is believed to be important in defense against the toxic effects of superoxide. Although superoxide dismutases are among the best studied proteins, numerous questions remain concerning the specific biological roles of the various superoxide-dismutase types. In part, this is because the proposed damaging effects of superoxide are manifold, ranging from inactivation of certain metabolic enzymes to DNA damage. Studies with superoxide-deficient mutants have proven valuable, but surprisingly few such studies have been reported. We have constructed and characterized Neurospora crassa mutants that are null for sod-1, the gene that encodes copper-zinc superoxide dismutase. Mutant strains are sensitive to paraquat and elevated oxygen concentrations, and they exhibit an increased spontaneous mutation rate. They appear to have near wild-type sensitivities to near- and far-UV, heat shock and γ-irradiation. Unlike the equivalent Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant and the sodA sodB double mutant of Escherichia coli, they do not exhibit aerobic auxotrophy. These results are discussed in the context of an attempt to identify consensus phenotypes among superoxide dismutase-deficient mutants. N. crassa sod-1 null mutant strains were also employed in genetic and subcellular fractionation studies. Results support the hypothesis that a single gene (sod-1), located between Fsr-12 and leu-3 on linkage group I, is responsible for most or all CuZn superoxide dismutase activity in this organism. PMID:8088518

  16. Characterization of the Bacillus stearothermophilus manganese superoxide dismutase gene and its ability to complement copper/zinc superoxide dismutase deficiency in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Bowler, C.; Inze, D.; Van Camp, W.; Kaer, L.V.; Dhaese, P. )

    1990-03-01

    Recombinant clones containing the manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) gene of Bacillus stearothermophilus were isolated with an oligonucleotide probe designed to match a part of the previously determined amino acid sequence. Complementation analyses, performed by introducing each plasmid into a superoxide dismutase-deficient mutant of Escherichia coli, allowed us to define the region of DNA which encodes the MnSOD structural gene and to identify a promoter region immediately upstream from the gene. These data were subsequently confirmed by DNA sequencing. Since MnSOD is normally restricted to the mitochondria in eucaryotes, we were interested (i) in determining whether B. stearothermophilus MnSOD could function in eucaryotic cytosol and (ii) in determining whether MnSOD could replace the structurally unrelated copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/ZnSOD) which is normally found there. To test this, the sequence encoding bacterial MnSOD was cloned into a yeast expression vector and subsequently introduced into a Cu/ZnSOD-deficient mutant of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Functional expression of the protein was demonstrated, and complementation tests revealed that the protein was able to provide tolerance at wild-type levels to conditions which are normally restrictive for this mutant. Thus, in spite of the evolutionary unrelatedness of these two enzymes, Cu/ZnSOD can be functionally replaced by MnSOD in yeast cytosol.

  17. Superoxide mediates tight junction complex dissociation in cyclically stretched lung slices.

    PubMed

    Song, Min Jae; Davidovich, Nurit; Lawrence, Gladys G; Margulies, Susan S

    2016-05-24

    We found that stretching Type I rat alveolar epithelial cell (RAEC) monolayers at magnitudes that correspond to high tidal-volume mechanical ventilation results in the production of reactive oxygen species, including nitric oxide and superoxide. Scavenging superoxide with Tiron eliminated the stretch-induced increase in cell monolayer permeability, and similar results were reported for rats ventilated at large tidal volumes, suggesting that oxidative stress plays an important role in barrier impairment in ventilator-induced lung injury associated with large stretch and tidal volumes. In this communication we show that mechanisms that involve oxidative injury are also present in a novel precision cut lung slices (PCLS) model under identical mechanical loads. PCLSs from healthy rats were stretched cyclically to 37% change in surface area for 1 hour. Superoxide was visualized using MitoSOX. To evaluate functional relationships, in separate stretch studies superoxide was scavenged using Tiron or mito-Tempo. PCLS and RAEC permeability was assessed as tight junction (TJ) protein (occludin, claudin-4 and claudin-7) dissociation from zona occludins-1 (ZO-1) via co-immunoprecipitation and Western blot, after 1h (PCLS) or 10min (RAEC) of stretch. Superoxide was increased significantly in PCLS, and Tiron and mito-Tempo dramatically attenuated the response, preventing claudin-4 and claudin-7 dissociation from ZO-1. Using a novel PCLS model for ventilator-induced lung injury studies, we have shown that uniform, biaxial, cyclic stretch generates ROS in the slices, and that superoxide scavenging that can protect the lung tissue under stretch conditions. We conclude that PCLS offer a valuable platform for investigating antioxidant treatments to prevent ventilation-induced lung injury. PMID:26592435

  18. Construction of a Fusion Enzyme Exhibiting Superoxide Dismutase and Peroxidase Activity.

    PubMed

    Sharapov, M G; Novoselov, V I; Ravin, V K

    2016-04-01

    A chimeric gene construct encoding human peroxiredoxin 6 and Mn-superoxide dismutase from Escherichia coli was developed. Conditions for expression of the fusion protein in E. coli cell were optimized. Fusing of the enzymes into a single polypeptide chain with peroxiredoxin 6 at the N-terminus (PSH) did not affect their activities. On the contrary, the chimeric protein with reverse order of enzymes (SPH) was not obtained in a water-soluble active form. The active chimeric protein (PSH) exhibiting both peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities was prepared and its physicochemical properties were characterized. PMID:27293100

  19. Serine 1179 Phosphorylation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Increases Superoxide Generation and Alters Cofactor Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Harbeck, Mark C.; He, Donghong; Xie, Lishi; Chen, Weiguo

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is responsible for maintaining systemic blood pressure, vascular remodeling and angiogenesis. In addition to producing NO, eNOS can also generate superoxide (O2-.) in the absence of the cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4). Previous studies have shown that bovine eNOS serine 1179 (Serine 1177/human) phosphorylation critically modulates NO synthesis. However, the effect of serine 1179 phosphorylation on eNOS superoxide generation is unknown. Here, we used the phosphomimetic form of eNOS (S1179D) to determine the effect of S1179 phosphorylation on superoxide generating activity, and its sensitivity to regulation by BH4, Ca2+, and calmodulin (CAM). S1179D eNOS exhibited significantly increased superoxide generating activity and NADPH consumption compared to wild-type eNOS (WT eNOS). The superoxide generating activities of S1179D eNOS and WT eNOS did not differ significantly in their sensitivity to regulation by either Ca2+ or CaM. The sensitivity of the superoxide generating activity of S1179D eNOS to inhibition by BH4 was significantly reduced compared to WT eNOS. In eNOS-overexpressing 293 cells, BH4 depletion with 10mM DAHP for 48 hours followed by 50ng/ml VEGF for 30 min to phosphorylate eNOS S1179 increased ROS accumulation compared to DAHP-only treated cells. Meanwhile, MTT assay indicated that overexpression of eNOS in HEK293 cells decreased cellular viability compared to control cells at BH4 depletion condition (P<0.01). VEGF-mediated Serine 1179 phosphorylation further decreased the cellular viability in eNOS-overexpressing 293 cells (P<0.01). Our data demonstrate that eNOS serine 1179 phosphorylation, in addition to enhancing NO production, also profoundly affects superoxide generation: S1179 phosphorylation increases superoxide production while decreasing sensitivity to the inhibitory effect of BH4 on this activity. PMID:26560496

  20. Extraction of Erythrocyte Enzymes for the Preparation of Polyhemoglobin-catalase-superoxide Dismutase

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jingsong; Chang, Thomas Ming Swi

    2012-01-01

    In sustained severe ischemia, reperfusion with oxygen carriers may result in ischemia-reperfusion injuries because of the release of damaging oxygen radicals. A nanobiotechnology-based polyhemogloin-calatase-superoxide dismutase can prevent this because the oxygen carrier, polyhemoglobin, is linked to antioxidant enzymes, catalase and superoxide dismutase. However, these antioxidant enzymes come from nonhuman sources and recombinant human enzymes are expensive. This paper describes our study on extracting these enzymes from red blood cells and analyzing the amount of enzymes needed for adequate protection from ischemia-reperfusion. PMID:19229698

  1. A new formula to calculate activity of superoxide dismutase in indirect assays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Bruins, Marieke E; Yang, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Shu-Tao; Rao, Ping-Fan

    2016-06-15

    To calculate superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity rapidly and accurately by indirect SOD assays, a formula based on the ratio of the catalytic speed of SOD to the reaction speed of the indicator with superoxide anion was deduced. The accuracy of this formula was compared with the conventional formula based on inhibition in five indirect SOD assays. The new formula was validated in nearly the entire SOD activity range, whereas the conventional formula was validated only during inhibition of 40-60%. This formula might also be used for the assays of other enzymes. PMID:27033009

  2. Effect of superoxide anion scavenger on rat hearts with chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Pai, Peiying; Lai, Ching Jung; Lin, Ching-Yuang; Liou, Yi-Fan; Huang, Chih-Yang; Lee, Shin-Da

    2016-04-15

    Only very limited information regarding the protective effects of the superoxide anion scavenger on chronic intermittent hypoxia-induced cardiac apoptosis is available. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of the superoxide anion scavenger on cardiac apoptotic and prosurvival pathways in rats with sleep apnea. Forty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups, rats with normoxic exposure (Control, 21% O2, 1 mo), rats with chronic intermittent hypoxia exposure (Hypoxia, 3-7% O2vs. 21% O2per 40 s cycle, 8 h per day, 1 mo), and rats with pretreatment of the superoxide anion scavenger and chronic intermittent hypoxia exposure (Hypoxia-O2 (-)-Scavenger, MnTMPyP pentachloride, 1 mg/kg ip per day; 3-7% O2vs. 21% O2per 40 s cycle, 8 h per day, 1 mo) at 5-6 mo of age. After 1 mo, the protein levels and apoptotic cells of excised hearts from three groups were measured by Western blotting and terminal deoxynucleotide transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. The superoxide anion scavenger decreased hypoxia-induced myocardial architecture abnormalities, left ventricular hypertrophy, and TUNEL-positive apoptosis. The superoxide anion scavenger decreased hypoxia-induced Fas ligand, Fas death receptors, Fas-associated death domain (FADD), activated caspase-8, and activated caspase-3 (Fas-dependent apoptotic pathway) as well as Bad, activated caspase-9 and activated caspase-3 (mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathway), endonuclease G (EndoG), apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), and TUNEL-positive apoptosis. The superoxide anion scavenger increased IGF-1, IGF-1R, p-PI3k, p-Akt, p-Bad, Bcl-2, and Bcl-xL (survival pathway). Our findings imply that the superoxide anion scavenger might prevent cardiac Fas-mediated and mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis and enhance the IGF-1-related survival pathway in chronic intermittent hypoxia. The superoxide anion scavenger may prevent chronic sleep apnea-enhanced cardiac apoptotic pathways and enhances

  3. Evidence that the reactivity of the martian soil is due to superoxide ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, A. S.; Kim, S. S.; Hecht, M. H.; Frant, M. S.; Murray, B.

    2000-01-01

    The Viking Landers were unable to detect evidence of life on Mars but, instead, found a chemically reactive soil capable of decomposing organic molecules. This reactivity was attributed to the presence of one or more as-yet-unidentified inorganic superoxides or peroxides in the martian soil. Using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, we show that superoxide radical ions (O2-) form directly on Mars-analog mineral surfaces exposed to ultraviolet radiation under a simulated martian atmosphere. These oxygen radicals can explain the reactive nature of the soil and the apparent absence of organic material at the martian surface.

  4. Induction of peroxidases and superoxide dismutases in transformed embryogenic calli of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Activities of peroxidase (POD) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzymes were analyzed in non-regenerative transformed embryogenic lines of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) carrying wound-inducible oryzacystatin I (OC-I), wound-inducible oryzacystatin I antisense (OC-Ias) or hygromycin phosphotransferase (...

  5. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Increase Superoxide Anion Production by Acting on NADPH Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Masoud, Rawand; Bizouarn, Tania; Trepout, Sylvain; Wien, Frank; Baciou, Laura; Marco, Sergio; Houée Levin, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) anatase nanoparticles (NPs) are metal oxide NPs commercialized for several uses of everyday life. However their toxicity has been poorly investigated. Cellular internalization of NPs has been shown to activate macrophages and neutrophils that contribute to superoxide anion production by the NADPH oxidase complex. Transmission electron micrososcopy images showed that the membrane fractions were close to the NPs while fluorescence indicated an interaction between NPs and cytosolic proteins. Using a cell-free system, we have investigated the influence of TiO2 NPs on the behavior of the NADPH oxidase. In the absence of the classical activator molecules of the enzyme (arachidonic acid) but in the presence of TiO2 NPs, no production of superoxide ions could be detected indicating that TiO2 NPs were unable to activate by themselves the complex. However once the NADPH oxidase was activated (i.e., by arachidonic acid), the rate of superoxide anion production went up to 140% of its value without NPs, this effect being dependent on their concentration. In the presence of TiO2 nanoparticles, the NADPH oxidase produces more superoxide ions, hence induces higher oxidative stress. This hyper-activation and the subsequent increase in ROS production by TiO2 NPs could participate to the oxidative stress development. PMID:26714308

  6. Superoxide anions mediate veratridine-induced cytochrome c release and caspase activity in bovine chromaffin cells

    PubMed Central

    Jordán, Joaquín; Galindo, María F; Tornero, Daniel; Benavides, Amparo; González, Constancio; Agapito, María T; González-Garcia, Carmen; Ceña, Valentín

    2002-01-01

    Mitochondrial mechanisms involved in veratridine-induced chromaffin cell death have been explored. Exposure to veratridine (30 μM, 1 h) produces cytochrome c release to the cytoplasm that seems to be mediated by superoxide anions and that is blocked by cyclosporin A (10 μM), MnTBAP (10 nM), catalase (100 IU ml−1) and vitamin E (50 μM). Following veratridine treatment, there is an increase in caspase-like activity, blocked by vitamin E (50 μM) and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore blocker cyclosporin A (10 μM). Superoxide anions open the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in isolated mitochondria, an effect that is blocked by vitamin E (50 μM) and cyclosporin A (10 μM), but not by the Ca2+ uniporter blocker ruthenium red (5 μM). These results strongly suggest that under the stress situation caused by veratridine, superoxide anions become important regulators of mitochondrial function in chromaffin cells. Exposure of isolated bovine chromaffin mitochondria to Ca2+ results in mitochondrial swelling. This effect was prevented by ruthenium red (5 μM) and cyclosporin A (10 μM), while it was not modified by vitamin E (50 μM). Veratridine (30 μM, 1 h) markedly decreased total glutathione and GSH content in bovine chromaffin cells. In conclusion, superoxide anions seem to mediate veratridine-induced cytochrome c release, decrease in total glutathione, caspase activation and cell death in bovine chromaffin cells. PMID:12429571

  7. Superoxide dismutase activity in healthy and inflamed pulp tissues of permanent teeth in children.

    PubMed

    Tulunoglu, O; Alacam, A; Bastug, M; Yavuzer, S

    1998-01-01

    The free radicals play an important role in the tissue damage. Oxygen-derived free radicals are controlled by various cellular defense mechanisms consisting of enzymatic such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathion peroxidase and nonenzymatic scavenger components. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is responsible for the dismutation of the superoxide radicals into hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen. In this study, pulp samples extirpated from the teeth of the 27 children between 10-15 ages which diagnosed to be healthy, reversible pulpitis or symptomatic irreversible pulpitis were evaluated for the activity of superoxide dismutase enzyme. There were statistically significant differences between healthy and reversible pulpitis, and between reversible and symptomatic irreversible pulpitis groups. The SOD activity of the reversible pulpitis group were significantly lower than the irreversible pulpitis and healthy pulp groups. The evaluation of the data revealed that the quantity of SOD as a vitality protector enzyme is low at the beginning of the inflammation as a consequence of rapidly depletion and/or destruction of this enzyme, but as the inflammation proceeds the pulp tissue showed adaptation to this situation. PMID:9796506

  8. NADH induces the generation of superoxide radicals in leaf peroxisomes. [Pisum sativum L

    SciTech Connect

    del Rio, L.A.; Sandalio, L.M.; Palma, J.M. ); Fernandez, V.M.; Ruperez, F.L. )

    1989-03-01

    In peroxisomes isolated from pea leaves (Pisum sativum L.) the production of superoxide free radicals (O{sub 2}{sup {minus}}) by xanthine and NADH was investigated. In peroxisomal membranes, 100 micromolar NADH induced the production of O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} radicals. In the soluble fractions of peroxisomes, no generation of O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} radicals was observed by incubation with either NADH or xanthine, although xanthine oxidase was found located predominantly in the matrix of peroxisomes. The failure of xanthine to induce superoxide generation was probably due to the inability to fully suppress the endogenous Mn-superoxide dismutase activity by inhibitors which were inactive against xanthine oxidase. The generation of superoxide radicals in leaf peroxisomes together with the recently described production of these oxygen radicals in glyoxysomes suggests that O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} generation could be a common metabolic property of peroxisomes and further supports the existence of active oxygen-related roles for peroxisomes in cellular metabolism.

  9. Salicylate selectively kills cochlear spiral ganglion neurons by paradoxically up-regulating superoxide.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lili; Ding, Dalian; Su, Jiping; Manohar, Senthilvelan; Salvi, Richard

    2013-10-01

    Aspirin and its active ingredient salicylate are potent antioxidants that have been reported to be neuro- and otoprotective. However, when consumed in large quantities, these drugs can cause temporary hearing loss and tinnitus. Moreover, recent studies indicate that after several days of treatment, salicylate selectively destroys the spiral ganglion neurons and auditory nerve fibers that relay sounds from the sensory hair cells to the brain. Why salicylate selectively damages spiral ganglion neurons while sparing the hair cells and supports cells is unclear. Here we show that high dose of salicylate trigger an apoptotic response in spiral ganglion neurons characterized morphologically by soma shrinkage and nuclear condensation and fragmentation plus activation of extrinsic initiator caspase-8 and intrinsic initiator caspase-9 several days after the onset of drug treatment. Salicylate treatment triggered an upsurge in the toxic superoxide radical only in spiral ganglion neurons, but not in neighboring hair cells and support cells. Mn TMPyP pentachloride, a cell permeable scavenger of superoxide blocked the expression of superoxide staining in spiral ganglion neurons and almost completely blocked the damage to the nerve fibers and spiral ganglion neurons. NMDA receptor activation is known to increase neuronal superoxide levels. Since NMDA receptors are mainly found on spiral ganglion neurons and since salicylate enhances NMDA receptor currents, the selective killing of spiral ganglion neurons is likely a consequence of enhanced and sustained activation of NMDA receptors by salicylate. PMID:23494753

  10. Inhibition of the Ca sup 2+ -ATPase of vascular smooth muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum by superoxide radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Yuichiro; Ford, G.D. )

    1991-03-15

    The effect of oxygen free radicals generated by hypoxanthine plus xanthine oxidase on the Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase of sarcoplasmic reticulum from bovine aortic smooth muscle were studied. Exogenous hypoxanthine plus xanthine oxidase produced an hypoxanthine concentration dependent inhibition of the Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase. The inhibition could be completely blocked by superoxide dismutase but not by either mannitol or deferoxamine. Direct addition of reagent hydrogen peroxide in the {mu}M range did not cause significant inhibition. These results suggest that superoxide is the primary damaging species. Additionally, 1.16 {plus minus} 0.17 mU/g wet wt of xanthine oxidase activity were detected in the post-nuclear supernatant of bovine aortic smooth muscle, suggesting the existence of a possible intracellular source of superoxide. This value was calculated to be approximately 5 mU/ml by using a usual value of vascular smooth muscle cellular volume. Thus the level of endogenous xanthine oxidase resident in vascular smooth muscle is comparable with the level of exogenous xanthine oxidase used in the present study. These findings suggest a potential role of xanthine oxidase-generated superoxide in free radical injury to vascular smooth muscle.

  11. Copper-Zinc Superoxide Dismutase: A Unique Biological "Ligand" for Bioinorganic Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valentine, Joan Selverstone; de Freitas, Duarte Mota

    1985-01-01

    Discusses superoxide dismutase (SOD) research and the properties of copper, zinc (Cu, Zn)-SOD. Emphasizes the controversy concerning the role of Cu,Zn-SOD and other SOD enzymes as protective agents in reactions involving dioxygen metabolism, and the properties of Cu, Zn-SOD that make it an interesting biological ligand for physical studies of…

  12. A cambialistic superoxide dismutase in the thermophilic photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Vanessa L; LoBrutto, Russell; Selvaraj, Fabiyola M; Blankenship, Robert E

    2004-06-01

    Superoxide dismutase from the thermophilic anoxygenic photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus was cloned, purified, and characterized. This protein is in the manganese- and iron-containing family of superoxide dismutases and is able to use both manganese and iron catalytically. This appears to be the only soluble superoxide dismutase in C. aurantiacus. Iron and manganese cofactors were identified by using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and were quantified by atomic absorption spectroscopy. By metal enrichment of growth media and by performing metal fidelity studies, the enzyme was found to be most efficient with manganese incorporated, yet up to 30% of the activity was retained with iron. Assimilation of iron or manganese ions into superoxide dismutase was also found to be affected by the growth conditions. This enzyme was also found to be remarkably thermostable and was resistant to H2O2 at concentrations up to 80 mM. Reactive oxygen defense mechanisms have not been previously characterized in the organisms belonging to the phylum Chloroflexi. These systems are of interest in C. aurantiacus since this bacterium lives in a hyperoxic environment and is subject to high UV radiation fluxes. PMID:15150226

  13. Human Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Tyrosine 34 Contribution to Structure and Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Perry, J. Jefferson P.; Hearn, Amy S.; Cabelli, Diane E.; Nick, Harry S.; Tainer, John A.; Silverman, David N.

    2009-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzymes are critical in controlling levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are linked to aging, cancer and neurodegenerative disease. Superoxide (O2 •−) produced during respiration is removed by the product of the SOD2 gene, the homotetrameric manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). Here, we examine the structural and catalytic roles of the highly conserved active-site residue Tyr34, based upon structure-function studies of MnSOD enzymes with mutations at this site. Substitution of Tyr34 with five different amino acids retained the active site protein structure and assembly, but causes a substantial decrease in the catalytic rate constant for the reduction of superoxide. The rate constant for formation of product inhibition complex also decreases but to a much lesser extent, resulting in a net increase in the product inhibition form of the mutant enzymes. Comparisons of crystal structures and catalytic rates also suggest that one mutation, Y34V, interrupts the hydrogen-bonded network, which is associated with a rapid dissociation of the product-inhibited complex. Notably, with three of the Tyr34 mutants we also observe an intermediate in catalysis, which has not been reported previously. Thus, these mutants establish a means to trap a catalytic intermediate that promises to help elucidate the mechanism of catalysis. PMID:19265433

  14. SUPEROXIDE-DEPENDENT IRON UPTAKE: A NEW ROLE FOR ANION EXCHANGE PROTEIN 2

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lung cells import iron across the plasma membrane as ferrous (Fe2+) ion by incompletely understood mechanisms. We tested the hypothesis that human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells import non-transferrin-bound iron (NTBI) using superoxide-dependent ferri-reductase activity involvi...

  15. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Increase Superoxide Anion Production by Acting on NADPH Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Trepout, Sylvain; Wien, Frank; Marco, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) anatase nanoparticles (NPs) are metal oxide NPs commercialized for several uses of everyday life. However their toxicity has been poorly investigated. Cellular internalization of NPs has been shown to activate macrophages and neutrophils that contribute to superoxide anion production by the NADPH oxidase complex. Transmission electron micrososcopy images showed that the membrane fractions were close to the NPs while fluorescence indicated an interaction between NPs and cytosolic proteins. Using a cell-free system, we have investigated the influence of TiO2 NPs on the behavior of the NADPH oxidase. In the absence of the classical activator molecules of the enzyme (arachidonic acid) but in the presence of TiO2 NPs, no production of superoxide ions could be detected indicating that TiO2 NPs were unable to activate by themselves the complex. However once the NADPH oxidase was activated (i.e., by arachidonic acid), the rate of superoxide anion production went up to 140% of its value without NPs, this effect being dependent on their concentration. In the presence of TiO2 nanoparticles, the NADPH oxidase produces more superoxide ions, hence induces higher oxidative stress. This hyper-activation and the subsequent increase in ROS production by TiO2 NPs could participate to the oxidative stress development. PMID:26714308

  16. Dual gene therapy with extracellular superoxide dismutase and catalase attenuates experimental optic neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xiaoping; Hauswirth, William W.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To ameliorate experimental optic neuritis by combining scavenging of superoxide by germ line increases in the extracellular superoxide dismutase (ECSOD) and hydrogen peroxide by viral-mediated gene transfer of the human catalase gene. Methods The human catalase gene inserted into recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) was injected into the right eyes of transgenic mice overexpressing human ECSOD and wild-type littermates. Animals were simultaneously sensitized for experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and then sacrificed one month later. The effects of antioxidant genes (ECSOD and catalase) on the histologic lesions of EAE were measured by computerized analysis of myelin area, optic disc area, extent of the cellular infiltrate, cerium derived H2O2 reaction product and extravasation of serum albumin detected by immunogold. Results Combined scavenging of H2O2 and superoxide with ECSOD and catalase suppressed demyelination by 72%, 54% due to catalase, and 19% due to ECSOD. Disruption of the blood-brain barrier was reduced 63% by the combined effects of catalase and ECSOD, 35% due to catalase and 29% due to ECSOD. Conclusions Transgene modulation of antioxidant enzyme defenses against both superoxide and its metabolite H2O2 provide a substantial suppressive effect against EAE in the optic nerve that may be a new therapeutic strategy for suppression of optic neuritis and multiple sclerosis. PMID:17242675

  17. The ‘mitoflash’ probe cpYFP does not respond to superoxide

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzländer, Markus; Wagner, Stephan; Ermakova, Yulia G.; Belousov, Vsevolod V.; Radi, Rafael; Beckman, Joseph S.; Buettner, Garry R.; Demaurex, Nicolas; Duchen, Michael R.; Forman, Henry J.; Fricker, Mark D.; Gems, David; Halestrap, Andrew P.; Halliwell, Barry; Jakob, Ursula; Johnston, Iain G.; Jones, Nick S.; Logan, David C.; Morgan, Bruce; Müller, Florian L.; Nicholls, David G.; Remington, S. James; Schumacker, Paul T.; Winterbourn, Christine C.; Sweetlove, Lee J.; Meyer, Andreas J.; Dick, Tobias P.; Murphy, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Ageing and lifespan of organisms are determined by complicated interactions between their genetics and the environment, but the cellular mechanisms remain controversial. There have been a number of studies suggesting that cellular energy metabolism and free radical dynamics affect lifespan, implicating mitochondrial function. Recently, Shen et al.1 provided apparent mechanistic insight by reporting that mitochondrial oscillations of ‘free radical production’, called ‘mitoflashes’, in the pharynx of 3-day old Caenorhabditis elegans correlated inversely with lifespan. The interpretation of ‘mitoflashes’ as ‘bursts of superoxide’ radicals assumes that circularly permuted yellow fluorescent protein (cpYFP) is a reliable indicator of mitochondrial superoxide2. This interpretation has been criticised because experiments and theoretical considerations both show that changes in cpYFP fluorescence are due to alterations in pH, not superoxide3-7. We now provide direct evidence that purified cpYFP is completely unresponsive to superoxide. Therefore ‘mitoflashes’ do not reflect superoxide generation and are not evidence for a link between mitochondrial free radical dynamics and lifespan. PMID:25341790

  18. Superoxide dismutase activity in mesocarp tissue from divergent Cucumis melo L. genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.) fruit matrix is unique among plant foods in being able to provide a protective medium in which the antioxidant activity of the enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) is preserved during the digestive process, and therefore, being able to elicit in vivo pharmacological effects ...

  19. Isolation and characterization of Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase in Fasciola gigantica.

    PubMed

    Lalrinkima, H; Raina, O K; Chandra, Dinesh; Jacob, Siju Susan; Bauri, R K; Chandra, Subhash; Yadav, H S; Singh, M N; Rialch, A; Varghese, A; Banerjee, P S; Kaur, Navneet; Sharma, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    A full-length complementary DNA (cDNA) encoding Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase was isolated from Fasciola gigantica that on nucleotide sequencing showed a close homology (98.9%) with Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD) of the temperate liver fluke, F. hepatica. Expression of the gene was found in all the three developmental stages of the parasite viz. adult, newly excysted juvenile and metacercaria at transcriptional level by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and at the protein level by Western blotting. F. gigantica Cu/Zn-SOD cDNA was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Enzyme activity of the recombinant protein was determined by nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and this activity was inactivated by hydrogen peroxide but not by sodium azide, indicating that the recombinant protein is Cu/Zn-SOD. The enzyme activity was relatively stable at a broad pH range of pH 4.0-10.0. Native Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase protein was detected in the somatic extract and excretory-secretory products of the adult F. gigantica by Western blotting. NBT-PAGE showed a single Cu/Zn-SOD present in the somatic extract while three SODs are released ex vivo by the adult parasite. The recombinant superoxide dismutase did not react with the serum from buffaloes infected with F. gigantica. The role of this enzyme in defense by the parasite against the host reactive oxygen species is discussed. PMID:25655406

  20. URBAN PARTICLE-INDUCED PULMONARY ARTERY CONSTRUCTION IS MEDIATED BY SUPEROXIDE PRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    URBAN PARTICLE-INDUCED PULMONARY ARTERY CONSTRICTION IS MEDIATED BY SUPEROXIDE PRODUCTION.Jacqueline D. Carter, Zhuowei Li, Lisa A. Dailey, Yuh-Chin T. Huang. CEMALB, University of North Carolina, and ORD, US EPA, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

    Exposure to particulate matter...

  1. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-derived NADPH fuels superoxide production in the failing heart

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the failing heart, NADPH oxidase and uncoupled NO synthase utilize cytosolic NADPH to form superoxide. NADPH is supplied principally by the pentose phosphate pathway, whose rate-limiting enzyme is glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). Therefore, we hypothesized that cardiac G6PD activation dr...

  2. CATALASE AND SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE OF ROOT-COLONIZING SAPROPHYTIC FLUORESCENT PSEUDOMONADS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Root-colonizing, saprophytic fluorescent pseudomonads of the Pseudomonas putida-P. fluorescens group express similar levels of catalase and superoxide dismutase activities during growth on a sucrose- and amino acid-rich medium. ncreased specific activities of catalase but not sup...

  3. Rate of reaction of superoxide radical with chloride-containing species

    SciTech Connect

    Long, C.A.; Bielski, B.H.J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper evaluates the rate constants for the reaction of superoxide radical with five common chloride-containing species (Cl/sup -/, ClO/sup -/, ClO/sub 2//sup -/, ClO/sub 3//sup -/, and ClO/sub 4//sup -/ and proposes a mechanism for those which react.

  4. Curcumin Rescues Diabetic Renal Fibrosis by Targeting Superoxide-Mediated Wnt Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Ho, Cheng; Hsu, Yung-Chien; Lei, Chen-Chou; Mau, Shu-Ching; Shih, Ya-Hsueh; Lin, Chun-Liang

    2016-03-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate whether curcumin can weaken diabetic nephropathy by modulating both oxidative stress and renal injury from Wnt signaling mediation. Wnt5a/β-catenin depression and induction of superoxide synthesis are associated with high glucose (HG) induced transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and fibronectin expression in mesangial cells. Curcumin resumes HG depression of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and alleviates HG induction of superoxide, TGF-β1 and fibronectin expression in renal mesangial cell. Exogenous curcumin alleviated urinary total proteinuria and serum superoxide level in diabetic rats. Based on laser-captured microdissection for quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, it was found that diabetes significantly increased TGF-β1 and fibronectin expression in line with depressed Wnt5a expression. Curcumin treatment reduced the TGF-β1 and fibronectin activation and the inhibiting effect of diabetes on Wnt5a/β-catenin expression in renal glomeruli. Immunohistochemistry showed that curcumin treatment significantly reduced 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, TGF-β1 and fibronectin, and was in line with the restoration of the suppressed Wnt5a expression immunoreactivities in glomeruli of diabetic rats. Curcumin alleviated extracellular matrix accumulation in diabetic nephropathy by not only preventing the diabetes-mediated superoxide synthesis but also resuming downregulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. These findings suggest that regulation of Wnt activity by curcumin is a feasible alternative strategy to rescue diabetic renal injury. PMID:26992258

  5. Molecular Cloning and Expression of Sequence Variants of Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Genes from Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are very harmful to living organisms due to the potential oxidation of membrane lipids, DNA, proteins, and carbohydrates. Transformed E.coli strain QC 871, superoxide dismutase (SOD) double-mutant, with three sequence variant MnSOD1, MnSOD2, and MnSOD3 manganese supero...

  6. Novel reversible and selective nerve agent simulant detection in conjunction with superoxide "turn-on" probing.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yoon Jeong; Murale, Dhiraj P; Churchill, David G

    2014-04-01

    Herein, we present fluorescein as a reversible fluorescent sensor for nerve agent simulants diethylchlorophosphate (DCP), diethyl methylphosphonate (DEMP), and diethyl cyanophosphonate (DECP). The superoxide allows for an "off-on" mechanism to regenerate fluorescein. The order of decrease in fluorescence intensity for nerve agent simulants is DCP > DEMP ≫ DECP. PMID:24558644

  7. Parasitization by Scleroderma guani influences expression of superoxide dismutase genes in Tenebrio molitor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is an antioxidant enzyme involved in detoxifying reactive oxygen species. In this study, we identified genes encoding the extracellular and intracellular copper-zinc SODs (ecCuZnSOD and icCuZnSOD) and a manganese SOD (MnSOD) in the yellow mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor....

  8. Mitochondria-targeted spin traps: synthesis, superoxide spin trapping, and mitochondrial uptake.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Micael; Poulhés, Florent; Rizzato, Egon; Rockenbauer, Antal; Banaszak, Karol; Karoui, Hakim; Lopez, Marcos; Zielonka, Jacek; Vasquez-Vivar, Jeannette; Sethumadhavan, Savitha; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Tordo, Paul; Ouari, Olivier

    2014-07-21

    Development of reliable methods and site-specific detection of free radicals is an active area of research. Here, we describe the synthesis and radical-trapping properties of new derivatives of DEPMPO and DIPPMPO, bearing a mitochondria-targeting triphenylphosphonium cationic moiety or guanidinium cationic group. All of the spin traps prepared have been observed to efficiently trap superoxide radical anions in a cell-free system. The superoxide spin adducts exhibited similar spectral properties, indicating no significant differences in the geometry of the cyclic nitroxide moieties of the spin adducts. The superoxide adduct stability was measured and observed to be highest (t1/2 = 73 min) for DIPPMPO nitrone linked to triphenylphosphonium moiety via a short carbon chain (Mito-DIPPMPO). The experimental results and DFT quantum chemical calculations indicate that the cationic property of the triphenylphosphonium group may be responsible for increased superoxide trapping efficiency and adduct stability of Mito-DIPPMPO, as compared to the DIPPMPO spin trap. The studies of uptake of the synthesized traps into isolated mitochondria indicated the importance of both cationic and lipophilic properties, with the DEPMPO nitrone linked to the triphenylphosphonium moiety via a long carbon chain (Mito10-DEPMPO) exhibiting the highest mitochondrial uptake. We conclude that, of the synthesized traps, Mito-DIPPMPO and Mito10-DEPMPO are the best candidates for potential mitochondria-specific spin traps for use in biologically relevant systems. PMID:24890552

  9. Exogenous superoxide dismutase may lose its antidotal ability on rice leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaf diffusates of the resistant rice cultivars suppressed spore germination of blast fungus (Magnaporthe grisea). Bovine Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) added to the diffusate abolished its toxicity. However, the enzyme added to the inoculum did not affect the toxicity of the diffusate. Even the s...

  10. Involvement of Extracellular Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase in Cotton Fiber Primary and Secondary Cell Wall Biosynthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extracellular Cu/Zn superoxide dismutases (CSDs) that catalyze the conversion of superoxide to hydrogen peroxide have been suggested to be involved in lignification of secondary walls in spinach, pine and aspen. In cotton fibers, hydrogen peroxide was proposed to be involved in the induction of seco...

  11. Modulation of pulmonary macrophage superoxide release and tumoricidal activity following activation by biological response modifiers.

    PubMed

    Drath, D B

    1986-10-01

    Following immunologic activation, pulmonary macrophages may prevent or cause regression of lung metastases by mechanisms which remain largely unknown. The studies described here were designed to determine if enhanced oxygen metabolite release was related to postactivation tumoricidal activity. We have shown that in vitro activation of Fischer 344 rat pulmonary macrophages by either free or liposome-encapsulated muramyl dipeptide leads to both enhanced release of superoxide anions and marked tumoricidal activity against syngenic (Fischer 13762), allogeneic (Schmidt-Ruppin RR 1022) and xenogeneic (Fibrosarcoma MCA-F) 125I-deoxyuridine-labeled target cells. This immune modulator did not, however, metabolically activate pulmonary macrophages as effectively as liposome-encapsulated lipopolysaccharide. A 24-h in vitro incubation with either 150 U or 300 U of interferon-gamma (3 X 10(6) U/mg) or 30 U, 150 U or 300 U of interferon-alpha (6 X 10(5) U/mg) caused a significant elevation in superoxide release above controls, whereas short-term exposure (2 or 4 h) had little or no effect. Free or encapsulated 6-O-stearoyl muramyl dipeptide, on the other hand, did increase superoxide levels at all 3 time periods. When either interferon-gamma or free or encapsulated muramyl dipeptide derivative were administered to intact rats by either i.v. injection, intratracheal instillation or osmotic minipump infusion, pulmonary macrophage tumoricidal activity was observed 96 h after cell harvesting. Zymosan-stimulated superoxide release, however, was not consistently elevated above control or empty liposome treatment following this course of in vivo activation. The data collectively suggest that in vivo pulmonary macrophage activation to a tumoricidal state and metabolic activation resulting in enhanced superoxide may be separable events. PMID:3021650

  12. Unraveling the role of animal heme peroxidases in superoxide mediated Mn oxide formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Learman, D. R.; Hansel, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    Manganese(III,IV) oxides are important in the environment as they can impact the fate of a broad range of nutrients (e.g. carbon and phosphate) and contaminates (e.g. lead and chromium). Bacteria play a valuable role in the production of Mn oxides, yet the mechanisms and physiological reasons remain unclear. Roseobacter sp. AzwK-3b, an organism within the abundant and ubiquitous Roseobacter clade, has recently been shown to oxidize Mn(II) via a novel pathway that involves enzymatic extracellular superoxide production. However, in reactions with only Mn(II) and abiotically generated superoxide, we find superoxide alone is not enough to produce Mn(III,IV) oxides. Scavenging of the byproduct hydrogen peroxide (via the addition of catalase) is required to generate Mn oxides via abiotic reaction of Mn(II) with superoxide. Thus, R. AzwK-3b must produce superoxide and also scavenge hydrogen peroxide to form Mn oxides. Further, in-gel Mn(II) oxidation assay revealed a protein band that could generate Mn oxides in the presence of soluble Mn(II). This Mn(II)-oxidizing protein band was excised from the gel and the peptides identified via mass spectrometry. An animal heme peroxidase (AHP) was the predominant protein found in this band. This protein is homologous to the AHPs previously implicated as a Mn(II)-oxidizing enzyme within the Alphaproteobacteria, Erythrobacter SD-21 and Aurantimonas manganoxydans strain SI85-9A1. Currently, protein expression of the AHPs in R. AzwK-3b is being examined to determine if expression is correlated with Mn(II) concentration or oxidative stress. Our data suggests that AHPs do not directly oxidize Mn(II) but rather plays a role in scavenging hydrogen peroxide and/or producing an organic Mn(III) ligand that complexes Mn(III) and likely aids in Mn oxide precipitation.

  13. NADPH Oxidase-Derived Superoxide Provides a Third Signal for CD4 T Cell Effector Responses.

    PubMed

    Padgett, Lindsey E; Tse, Hubert M

    2016-09-01

    Originally recognized for their direct induced toxicity as a component of the innate immune response, reactive oxygen species (ROS) can profoundly modulate T cell adaptive immune responses. Efficient T cell activation requires: signal 1, consisting of an antigenic peptide-MHC complex binding with the TCR; signal 2, the interaction of costimulatory molecules on T cells and APCs; and signal 3, the generation of innate immune-derived ROS and proinflammatory cytokines. This third signal, in particular, has proven essential in generating productive and long-lasting immune responses. Our laboratory previously demonstrated profound Ag-specific hyporesponsiveness in the absence of NADPH oxidase-derived superoxide. To further examine the consequences of ROS deficiency on Ag-specific T cell responses, our laboratory generated the OT-II.Ncf1(m1J) mouse, possessing superoxide-deficient T cells recognizing the nominal Ag OVA323-339 In this study, we demonstrate that OT-II.Ncf1(m1J) CD4 T cells displayed a severe reduction in Th1 T cell responses, in addition to blunted IL-12R expression and severely attenuated proinflammatory chemokine ligands. Conversely, IFN-γ synthesis and IL-12R synthesis were rescued by the addition of exogenous superoxide via the paramagnetic superoxide donor potassium dioxide or superoxide-sufficient dendritic cells. Ultimately, these data highlight the importance of NADPH oxidase-derived ROS in providing a third signal for adaptive immune maturation by modulating the IL-12/IL-12R pathway and the novelty of the OT-II.Ncf1(m1J) mouse model to determine the role of redox-dependent signaling on effector responses. Thus, targeting ROS represents a promising therapeutic strategy in dampening Ag-specific T cell responses and T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes. PMID:27474077

  14. Detection of superoxide production in stimulated and unstimulated living cells using new cyclic nitrone spin traps.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Kahina; Hardy, Micael; Poulhès, Florent; Karoui, Hakim; Tordo, Paul; Ouari, Olivier; Peyrot, Fabienne

    2014-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), including superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), have a diverse array of physiological and pathological effects within living cells depending on the extent, timing, and location of their production. For measuring ROS production in cells, the ESR spin trapping technique using cyclic nitrones distinguishes itself from other methods by its specificity for superoxide and hydroxyl radical. However, several drawbacks, such as the low spin trapping rate and the spontaneous and cell-enhanced decomposition of the spin adducts to ESR-silent products, limit the application of this method to biological systems. Recently, new cyclic nitrones bearing a triphenylphosphonium (Mito-DIPPMPO) or a permethylated β-cyclodextrin moiety (CD-DIPPMPO) have been synthesized and their spin adducts demonstrated increased stability in buffer. In this study, a comparison of the spin trapping efficiency of these new compounds with commonly used cyclic nitrone spin traps, i.e., 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO), and analogs BMPO, DEPMPO, and DIPPMPO, was performed on RAW 264.7 macrophages stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Our results show that Mito-DIPPMPO and CD-DIPPMPO enable a higher detection of superoxide adduct, with a low (if any) amount of hydroxyl adduct. CD-DIPPMPO, especially, appears to be a superior spin trap for extracellular superoxide detection in living macrophages, allowing measurement of superoxide production in unstimulated cells for the first time. The main rationale put forward for this extreme sensitivity is that the extracellular localization of the spin trap prevents the reduction of the spin adducts by ascorbic acid and glutathione within cells. PMID:24662195

  15. soxR, a locus governing a superoxide response regulon in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Tsaneva, I R; Weiss, B

    1990-01-01

    The nfo (endonuclease IV) gene of Escherichia coli is induced by superoxide generators such as paraquat (methyl viologen). An nfo'-lacZ operon fusion was used to isolate extragenic mutations affecting its expression. The mutations also affected the expression of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, Mn2(+)-superoxide dismutase (sodA), and three lacZ fusions to soi (superoxide-inducible) genes of unknown function. The mutations were located 2 kilobases clockwise of ssb at 92 min on the current linkage map. One set of mutations, in a new gene designated soxR, caused constitutive overexpression of nfo and the other genes. It included insertions or deletions affecting the carboxyl end of a 17-kilodalton polypeptide. In a soxR mutant, the expression of sodA, unlike that of nfo, was also regulated independently by oxygen tension. Two other mutants were isolated in which the target genes were noninducible; they had an increased sensitivity to killing by superoxide-generating compounds. One had a Tn10 insertion in or near soxR; the other had a multigene deletion encompassing soxR. Therefore, the region functions as a positive regulator because it encodes one or more products needed for the induction of nfo. Regulation is likely to be at the level of transcription because the mutations were able to affect the expression of an nfo'-lac operon fusion that contained the ribosome-binding site for lacZ. Some mutant plasmids that failed to suppress (or complement) constitutivity in trans had insertion mutations several hundred nucleotides upstream of soxR in the general region of a gene for a 13-kilodalton protein encoded by the opposite strand, raising the possibility of a second regulatory gene in this region. The result define a new regulon, controlled by soxR, mediating at least part of the global response to superoxide in E. coli. Images PMID:1695893

  16. Concerted action of reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase in preventing redox cycling of dihydroxypyrimidines, and their role in antioxidant defence.

    PubMed

    Winterbourn, C C; Munday, R

    1990-01-01

    Dialuric Acid, the reduced form of the beta-cell toxin alloxan, and the related fava bean derivatives divicine and isouramil, autoxidize rapidly in neutral solution by a radical mechanism. GSH promotes redox cycling of each compound, with concomitant GSH oxidation and H2O2 production. With superoxide dismutase present, there is a lag period in which little oxidation occurs, followed by rapid oxidation. GSH extends this lag and decreases the subsequent rate of oxidation, so that with superoxide dismutase and a sufficient excess of GSH, coupled oxidation of GSH and each pyrimidine is almost completely suppressed. This mechanism may be a means whereby GSH in combination with superoxide dismutase protects against the cytotoxic effects of these reactive pyrimidines. Superoxide dismutase may also protect cells against oxidative stress in other situations where GSH acts as a radical scavenger, and we propose that the concerted action of GSH and superoxide dismutase constitutes an important antioxidant defence. PMID:2354807

  17. Kinetic investigation of catalytic disproportionation of superoxide ions in the non-aqueous electrolyte used in Li–air batteries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Dong; McKinnon, Meaghan E.; Yang, Xiao -Qing; Qu, Deyang

    2014-10-28

    Superoxide reacts with carbonate solvents in Li–air batteries. Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane is found to catalyze a more rapid superoxide (O2-) disproportionation reaction than the reaction between superoxide and propylene carbonate (PC). With this catalysis, the negative impact of the reaction between the electrolyte and O2-produced by the O2 reduction can be minimized. A simple kinetic study using ESR spectroscopy was reported to determine reaction orders and rate constants for the reaction between PC and superoxide, and the disproportionation of superoxide catalyzed by Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane and Li ions. As a result, the reactions are found to be first order and the rate constants aremore » 0.033 s-1 M-1, 0.020 s-1 M-1and 0.67 s-1M-1 for reactions with PC, Li ion and Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane, respectively.« less

  18. Kinetic investigation of catalytic disproportionation of superoxide ions in the non-aqueous electrolyte used in Li-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Dong; McKinnon, Meaghan E.; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Qu, Deyang

    2015-01-01

    Superoxide reacts with carbonate solvents in Li-air batteries. Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane is found to catalyze a more rapid superoxide (O2-) disproportionation reaction than the reaction between superoxide and propylene carbonate (PC). With this catalysis, the negative impact of the reaction between the electrolyte and O2- produced by the O2 reduction can be minimized. A simple kinetic study using ESR spectroscopy was reported to determine reaction orders and rate constants for the reaction between PC and superoxide, and the disproportionation of superoxide catalyzed by Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane and Li ions. The reactions are found to be first order and the rate constants are 0.033 s-1 M-1, 0.020 s-1 M-1 and 0.67 s-1 M-1 for reactions with PC, Li ion and Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane, respectively.

  19. Dynamics of Superoxide Production and Decay in Natural Trichodesmium Colonies from the Sargasso Sea: Implications for Cell Signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansel, C. M.; Buchwald, C.; Diaz, J. M.; Dyhrman, S.; Van Mooy, B. A. S.

    2014-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key players in the biogeochemistry of the ocean, where they serve a critical role in the cycling of carbon and metals. Research in the past decade has introduced phytoplankton and, most recently, heterotrophic bacteria as significant sources of ROS, including superoxide, within both photic and aphotic regions of the ocean. ROS are both beneficial and detrimental to life. For instance, superoxide is a vital inter- and intra-cellular signaling molecule, yet at high concentrations it induces lipid peroxidation and initiates programmed cell death (PCD). In fact, superoxide has been implicated in PCD in the nitrogen-fixing diazotroph Trichodesmium, presumably leading to the demise of blooms within oligotrophic marine systems. Here, we explore the rates of superoxide production and decay by natural Trichodesmium populations obtained from various surface waters in the Sargasso Sea. We investigate also the role of light and colony density and morphology (puff v. raft) on superoxide fluxes. We find that Trichodesmium colonies produce extracellular superoxide at extremely high rates in the dark that are on par with those of the toxic raphidophyte Chattonella. The rates of superoxide production, however, rapidly decline with increasing cell density pointing to a role for superoxide in cell signaling in these organisms. We also find extremely rapid extracellular superoxide degradation by Trichodesmium. Together, this likely reflects a need for these organisms to maintain ROS at levels that will support signaling but below the threshold level that triggers PCD or oxidative damage. We also show differences in the effect of light on superoxide fluxes as a function of Trichodesmium colony morphology, suggesting differences in either colony physiology or associated bacterial symbionts. These findings point to complex physiological, ecological, and physical influences on ROS dynamics in phytoplankton that require further exploration.

  20. Superoxide radicals increase transforming growth factor-{beta}1 and collagen release from human lung fibroblasts via cellular influx through chloride channels

    SciTech Connect

    Qi Shufan Hartog, Gertjan J.M. den; Bast, Aalt

    2009-05-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of fibrosis. However, it remains unclear which ROS is the major cause. We hypothesize that superoxide elicits specific toxicity to human lung fibroblasts and plays an important role in the development of pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, superoxide generated from xanthine and xanthine oxidase activated lung fibroblasts by increasing the release of TGF-{beta}1 and collagen. This was associated with increased levels of intracellular superoxide. SOD and tempol, by scavenging respectively extracellular and intracellular superoxide, prevented the activation of fibroblasts induced by exposure to exogenous superoxide, whereas catalase did not. Moreover, hydrogen peroxide did not activate fibroblasts. Apparently, superoxide rather than hydrogen peroxide is involved in the regulation of TGF-{beta}1 and collagen release in lung fibroblasts. The chloride channel blocker, DIDS, inhibited the increase of intracellular superoxide levels induced by exogenous superoxide and consequently prevented the activation of fibroblasts. This suggests that the cellular influx of superoxide through chloride channels is essential for superoxide-induced activation of fibroblasts. ERK1/2 and p38 MAPKs are involved in the intracellular pathway leading to superoxide-induced fibroblasts activation. Superoxide possesses until now undiscovered specific pro-fibrotic properties in human lung fibroblasts. This takes place via the cellular influx of superoxide through chloride channels rather than via the formation of hydrogen peroxide.

  1. Extracellular Production and Degradation of Superoxide in the Coral Stylophora pistillata and Cultured Symbiodinium

    PubMed Central

    Saragosti, Eldad; Tchernov, Dan; Katsir, Adi; Shaked, Yeala

    2010-01-01

    Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are thought to play a major role in cell death pathways and bleaching in scleractinian corals. Direct measurements of ROS in corals are conspicuously in short supply, partly due to inherent problems with ROS quantification in cellular systems. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we characterized the dynamics of the reactive oxygen species superoxide anion radical (O2−) in the external milieu of the coral Stylophora pistillata. Using a sensitive, rapid and selective chemiluminesence-based technique, we measured extracellular superoxide production and detoxification activity of symbiont (non-bleached) and aposymbiont (bleached) corals, and of cultured Symbiodinium (from clades A and C). Bleached and non-bleached Stylophora fragments were found to produce superoxide at comparable rates of 10−11–10−9 mol O2− mg protein−1 min−1 in the dark. In the light, a two-fold enhancement in O2− production rates was observed in non-bleached corals, but not in bleached corals. Cultured Symbiodinium produced superoxide in the dark at a rate of . Light was found to markedly enhance O2− production. The NADPH Oxidase inhibitor Diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI) strongly inhibited O2− production by corals (and more moderately by algae), possibly suggesting an involvement of NADPH Oxidase in the process. An extracellular O2− detoxifying activity was found for bleached and non-bleached Stylophora but not for Symbiodinium. The O2− detoxifying activity was partially characterized and found to resemble that of the enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD). Conclusions/Significance The findings of substantial extracellular O2− production as well as extracellular O2− detoxifying activity may shed light on the chemical interactions between the symbiont and its host and between the coral and its environment. Superoxide production by Symbiodinium possibly implies that algal bearing corals are more susceptible to an internal

  2. Superoxide release by confluent endothelial cells, an electron spin resonance (ESR) study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbacanne, M.-A.; Margeat, E.; Arnal, J.-F.; Nepveu, F.; Souchard, J.-P.

    1999-01-01

    In the present study we used ESR to detect the release of oxygen radicals by endothelial cells stimulated with calcium ionophore A23187. Dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) was used as a spin trap. Although the observed adduct (DMPO-OH) suggested the presence of the hydroxyl radical, the use of superoxide dismutase and catalase revealed that superoxide anion was released in the medium. Superoxide production was more efficient when the cells were post-confluent for a few days. The release of superoxide was 3-fold greater in growth arrested cells (D6-D9) than in proliferating cells (D0). Although two inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain carbanyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), antimycine decreased the ESR signal by 35%, the use of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) suggested that the release of O2- occurred in the cell membrane. The physiological significance of this extracellular superoxide release by post-confluent cells deserves further study. Ce travail présente une étude par RSE de la libération des radicaux oxygénés par les cellules endothéliales bovines (BAEC) sous l'effet de l'ionophore calcique A23187. Le diméthyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxyde (DMPO) est utilisé comme piégeur de spin. Bien que l'adduit formé (DMPO-OH) semble traduire la présence du radical hydroxyle .OH, l'utilisation de superoxyde dismutase et de catalase a révélé que les cellules endothéliales libéraient l'anion superoxyde. La production du radical superoxyde est plus abondante lorsque les cellules sont à confluence depuis plusieurs jours. Lorsque les cellules sont entre J6 et J9, la production de superoxyde est trois fois supérieure à celle observée lorsque les cellules sont en prolifération (J0). Bien que deux inhibiteurs de la chaîne mitochondriale 1-carbonyldinitrile-m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), antimycineinhibent de 35 % le signal RPE, l'utilisation de superoxyde dismutase (SOD) et du tumor necrosis factor (TNF) sugg

  3. Regulation of an in vivo metal-exchangeable superoxide dismutase from Propionibacterium shermanii exhibiting activity with different metal cofactors.

    PubMed Central

    Sehn, A P; Meier, B

    1994-01-01

    The anaerobic, but aerotolerant Propionibacterium freudenreichii sp. shermanii contains a single superoxide dismutase [EC 1.15.1.1.] exhibiting comparable activity with iron or manganese as metal cofactor. The formation of superoxide dismutase is not depending on the supplementation of iron or manganese to the culture medium. Even in the absence of these metals the protein is built in comparable amounts. Bacteria grown in the absence of iron and manganese synthesize a superoxide dismutase with very low activity which had incorporated copper. If the medium was also depleted of copper, cobalt was incorporated, leading to an enzymically inactive form. In the absence of cobalt an enzymically inactive superoxide dismutase was built with unknown metal contents. Upon aeration the amount of superoxide dismutase activity increased continuously up to 9 h, due to a de novo synthesis of the protein. This superoxide dismutase had incorporated iron into the active centre. The superoxide dismutase of Propionibacterium shermanii is able to form a much wider variety of complexes with trace metal ions in vivo than previously recognized, leading to the hypothesis that the original function of these proteins was the binding of cytoplasmic trace metals present in excess. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7818484

  4. Paraquat Suicide in a Young Woman: Results of Therapy Directed Against the Superoxide Radical

    PubMed Central

    Harley, John B.; Grinspan, Salomon; Root, Richard K.

    1977-01-01

    The clinical course of a young woman following two separate suicide attempts using the herbicide paraquat is reported. The patient survived an intramuscular injection of paraquat almost asymptomatically, but later exhibited a typical fatal course with fulminant proliferative pulmonary fibrosis after an intravenous injection. Fibrosis and death occurred despite a therapeutic regimen based upon a known action of paraquat, the generation of superoxide (O2[unk]), using superoxide dismutase, α-tocopherol, and ascorbic acid in conjunction with forced diuresis and prednisone. While treatment failed explanations for the failure of therapy in this case and current therapeutic alternatives are discussed so that they may be considered when future cases are encountered. ImagesFIG. 2FIG. 3 PMID:203128

  5. Enzyme release and superoxide anion production by human alveolar macrophages stimulated with immunoglobulin E.

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, M; Tonnel, A B; Capron, A; Voisin, C

    1980-01-01

    Human alveolar macrophages specifically released lysosomal beta-glucuronidase and neutral proteases when successively incubated with IgE, and then, for 30 min, with anti-IgE. Superoxide anion O2- generation was obtained when anti-IgE-opsonized zymosan was added to IgE-incubated cells. Macrophages from smokers excreted twice as much enzymes and superoxide as cells from non-smokers. It was possible to induce the specific release of beta-glucuronidase with normal alveolar macrophages successively incubated with the serum of patients allergic to house dust or to grass pollen and then with the specific allergen. This characteristic opens the field to a direct test for allergic sera by analogy with the allergen-induced degranulation test of sensitized basophils. PMID:6254706

  6. Observation of superoxide production during catalysis of Bacillus subtilis oxalate decarboxylase at pH 4.

    PubMed

    Twahir, Umar T; Stedwell, Corey N; Lee, Cory T; Richards, Nigel G J; Polfer, Nicolas C; Angerhofer, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    This contribution describes the trapping of the hydroperoxyl radical at a pH of 4 during turnover of wild-type oxalate decarboxylase and its T165V mutant using the spin-trap BMPO. Radicals were detected and identified by a combination of EPR and mass spectrometry. Superoxide, or its conjugate acid, the hydroperoxyl radical, is expected as an intermediate in the decarboxylation and oxidation reactions of the oxalate monoanion, both of which are promoted by oxalate decarboxylase. Another intermediate, the carbon dioxide radical anion was also observed. The quantitative yields of superoxide trapping are similar in the wild type and the mutant while it is significantly different for the trapping of the carbon dioxide radical anion. This suggests that the two radicals are released from different sites of the protein. PMID:25526893

  7. Silibinin induces protective superoxide generation in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Jun; Jiang, Yuan-Yuan; Wei, Xiao-Feng; Huang, Huai; Tashiro, Shin-Ichi; Onodera, Satoshi; Ikejima, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    The pharmacological activity of polyphenolic silibinin from milk thistle (Silybum marianum) is primarily due to its antioxidant property. However, this study found that silibinin promoted sustained superoxide (O(2)(.-)) production that was specifically scavenged by exogenous superoxide dismutase (SOD) in MCF-7 cells, while the activity of endogenous SOD was not changed by silibinin. Previous work proved that silibinin induced MCF-7 cell apoptosis through mitochondrial pathway and this study further proved that O(2)(.-) generation induced by silibinin was also related to mitochondria. It was found that respiratory chain complexes I, II and III were all involved in silibinin-induced O(2)(.-) generation. Moreover, it was found that silibinin-induced O(2)(.-) had protective effect, as exogenous SOD markedly enhanced silibinin-induced apoptosis. PMID:19968587

  8. Observation of Superoxide Production During Catalysis of Bacillus subtilis Oxalate Decarboxylase at pH4

    PubMed Central

    Twahir, Umar T.; Stedwell, Corey N.; Lee, Cory T.; Richards, Nigel G. J.; Polfer, Nicolas C.; Angerhofer, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    This contribution describes the trapping of the hydroperoxyl radical at a pH of 4 during turnover of wild-type oxalate decarboxylase and its T165V mutant using the spin trap BMPO. Radicals were detected and identified by a combination of EPR and mass spectrometry. Superoxide, or its conjugate acid, the hydroperoxyl radical, is expected as an intermediate in the decarboxylation and oxidation reactions of the oxalate monoanion both of which are promoted by oxalate decarboxylase. Another intermediate, the carbon dioxide radical anion was also observed. The quantitative yields of superoxide trapping is similar in the wild type and the mutant while it is significantly different for the trapping of the carbon dioxide radical anion. This suggests that the two radicals are released from different sites of the protein. PMID:25526893

  9. Iron superoxide dismutases in eukaryotic pathogens: new insights from Apicomplexa and Trypanosoma structures

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Isabelle Q. H.; Davies, Douglas R.; Moretti, Nilmar Silvio; Shanmugam, Dhanasekaran; Cestari, Igor; Anupama, Atashi; Fairman, James W.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Stuart, Kenneth; Schenkman, Sergio; Myler, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Prior studies have highlighted the potential of superoxide dismutases as drug targets in eukaryotic pathogens. This report presents the structures of three iron-dependent superoxide dismutases (FeSODs) from Trypanosoma cruzi, Leishmania major and Babesia bovis. Comparison with existing structures from Plasmodium and other trypanosome isoforms shows a very conserved overall fold with subtle differences. In particular, structural data suggest that B. bovis FeSOD may display similar resistance to peroxynitrite-mediated inactivation via an intramolecular electron-transfer pathway as previously described in T. cruzi FeSOD isoform B, thus providing valuable information for structure-based drug design. Furthermore, lysine-acetylation results in T. cruzi indicate that acetylation occurs at a position close to that responsible for the regulation of acetylation-mediated activity in the human enzyme. PMID:25961325

  10. Tandem arrangement of photolyase and superoxide dismutase genes in Halobacterium halobium.

    PubMed Central

    Takao, M; Kobayashi, T; Oikawa, A; Yasui, A

    1989-01-01

    A DNA fragment containing the photolyase gene was cloned from Halobacterium halobium. The deduced amino acid sequence is highly similar to those of four known photolyases from eubacteria and a eucaryote. The cloned gene expressed in Escherichia coli cells the survival of UV-irradiated host cells by photoreactivation. These results indicate that photolyases of eucaryotes, eubacteria, and archaebacteria are derived from a common origin. In this cloned DNA fragment, two additional open reading frames (ORFs), ORF 151 and ORF 200, were found in the 5' and 3' adjacent flanking regions of the photolyase gene. ORF 200 shows unequivocal amino acid sequence homology to all known manganese and iron superoxide dismutases. Northern (RNA) hybridization analysis of H. halobium RNA revealed the existence of three transcripts, one of which covered all three ORFs, indicating that photolyase and superoxide dismutase are partly cotranscribed in this bacterium. Images PMID:2681164

  11. Bovine superoxide dismutase and copper ions potentiate the bactericidal effect of autoxidizing cysteine.

    PubMed Central

    Nyberg, G K; Granberg, G P; Carlsson, J

    1979-01-01

    When cysteine is oxidized by oxygen, hydrogen peroxide is formed, and hydrogen peroxide is very toxic to Peptostreptococcus anaerobius VPI 4330-1. Native and inactivated superoxide dismutase increased the rate of oxidation of cysteine and thereby potentiated the toxic effect of cysteine. A similar increase in the rate of oxidation of cysteine and in the toxicity of cysteine was obtained with Cu2+. PMID:573589

  12. Superoxide Production by a Manganese-Oxidizing Bacterium Facilitates Iodide Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hsiu-Ping; Daniel, Benjamin; Creeley, Danielle; Grandbois, Russell; Zhang, Saijin; Xu, Chen; Ho, Yi-Fang; Schwehr, Kathy A.; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Santschi, Peter H.; Hansel, Colleen M.

    2014-01-01

    The release of radioactive iodine (i.e., iodine-129 and iodine-131) from nuclear reprocessing facilities is a potential threat to human health. The fate and transport of iodine are determined primarily by its redox status, but processes that affect iodine oxidation states in the environment are poorly characterized. Given the difficulty in removing electrons from iodide (I−), naturally occurring iodide oxidation processes require strong oxidants, such as Mn oxides or microbial enzymes. In this study, we examine iodide oxidation by a marine bacterium, Roseobacter sp. AzwK-3b, which promotes Mn(II) oxidation by catalyzing the production of extracellular superoxide (O2−). In the absence of Mn2+, Roseobacter sp. AzwK-3b cultures oxidized ∼90% of the provided iodide (10 μM) within 6 days, whereas in the presence of Mn(II), iodide oxidation occurred only after Mn(IV) formation ceased. Iodide oxidation was not observed during incubations in spent medium or with whole cells under anaerobic conditions or following heat treatment (boiling). Furthermore, iodide oxidation was significantly inhibited in the presence of superoxide dismutase and diphenylene iodonium (a general inhibitor of NADH oxidoreductases). In contrast, the addition of exogenous NADH enhanced iodide oxidation. Taken together, the results indicate that iodide oxidation was mediated primarily by extracellular superoxide generated by Roseobacter sp. AzwK-3b and not by the Mn oxides formed by this organism. Considering that extracellular superoxide formation is a widespread phenomenon among marine and terrestrial bacteria, this could represent an important pathway for iodide oxidation in some environments. PMID:24561582

  13. [Role of superoxide anion radicals in the bacterial corrosion of metals].

    PubMed

    Belov, D V; Kalinina, A A; Sokolova, T N; Smirnov, V F; Chelnokova, M V; Kartashov, V R

    2012-01-01

    It was found that seven strains of bacteria can cause corrosion damage to aluminum, its alloys, and zinc. With respect to the studied metals, the most active bacteria were Proteus vulgaris 1212 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 969. Superoxide anion radicals were demonstrated to play a role in the initiation of corrosive damage to aluminum and zinc, while bacterial exometabolites participate in the later stages of this process. PMID:22834301

  14. Nucleotide sequence, transcription and phylogeny of the gene encoding the superoxide dismutase of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    PubMed

    Klenk, H P; Schleper, C; Schwass, V; Brudler, R

    1993-07-18

    The gene encoding the superoxide dismutase (SOD) of the thermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius has been isolated and sequenced. Both the start site and the termination sites of the corresponding transcript were mapped. The deduced amino acid sequence of the protein is very similar to the sequence of manganese- or iron-containing SODs. Phylogenetic sequence analysis corroborated the monophyletic nature of the archaeal domain. PMID:8334170

  15. Thermodynamic and kinetic considerations for the reaction of semiquinone radicals to form superoxide and hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yang; Buettner, Garry R.

    2010-01-01

    The quinone/semiquinone/hydroquinone triad (Q/SQ•−/H2Q) represents a class of compounds that has great importance in a wide range of biological processes. The half-cell reduction potentials of these redox couples in aqueous solutions at neutral pH, E°′, provide a window to understanding the thermodynamic and kinetic characteristics of this triad and their associated chemistry and biochemistry in vivo. Substituents on the quinone ring can significantly influence the electron density “on the ring” and thus modify E°′ dramatically. E°′ of the quinone governs the reaction of semiquinone with dioxygen to form superoxide. At near-neutral pH the pKa's of the hydroquinone are outstanding indicators of the electron density in the aromatic ring of the members of these triads (electrophilicity) and thus are excellent tools to predict half-cell reduction potentials for both the one-electron and two-electron couples, which in turn allow estimates of rate constants for the reactions of these triads. For example, the higher the pKa's of H2Q, the lower the reduction potentials and the higher the rate constants for the reaction of SQ•− with dioxygen to form superoxide. However, hydroquinone autoxidation is controlled by the concentration of di-ionized hydroquinone; thus, the lower the pKa's the less stable H2Q to autoxidation. Catalysts, e.g., metals and quinone, can accelerate oxidation processes; by removing superoxide and increasing the rate of formation of quinone, superoxide dismutase can accelerate oxidation of hydroquinones and thereby increase the flux of hydrogen peroxide. The principal reactions of quinones are with nucleophiles via Michael addition, for example, with thiols and amines. The rate constants for these addition reactions are also related to E°′. Thus, pKa's of a hydroquinone and E°′ are central to the chemistry of these triads. PMID:20493944

  16. Neelaredoxin, an iron-binding protein from the syphilis spirochete, Treponema pallidum, is a superoxide reductase.

    PubMed

    Jovanović, T; Ascenso, C; Hazlett, K R; Sikkink, R; Krebs, C; Litwiller, R; Benson, L M; Moura, I; Moura, J J; Radolf, J D; Huynh, B H; Naylor, S; Rusnak, F

    2000-09-15

    Treponema pallidum, the causative agent of venereal syphilis, is a microaerophilic obligate pathogen of humans. As it disseminates hematogenously and invades a wide range of tissues, T. pallidum presumably must tolerate substantial oxidative stress. Analysis of the T. pallidum genome indicates that the syphilis spirochete lacks most of the iron-binding proteins present in many other bacterial pathogens, including the oxidative defense enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, and peroxidase, but does possess an orthologue (TP0823) for neelaredoxin, an enzyme of hyperthermophilic and sulfate-reducing anaerobes shown to possess superoxide reductase activity. To analyze the potential role of neelaredoxin in treponemal oxidative defense, we examined the biochemical, spectroscopic, and antioxidant properties of recombinant T. pallidum neelaredoxin. Neelaredoxin was shown to be expressed in T. pallidum by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. Recombinant neelaredoxin is a 26-kDa alpha(2) homodimer containing, on average, 0.7 iron atoms/subunit. Mössbauer and EPR analysis of the purified protein indicates that the iron atom exists as a mononuclear center in a mixture of high spin ferrous and ferric oxidation states. The fully oxidized form, obtained by the addition of K(3)(Fe(CN)(6)), exhibits an optical spectrum with absorbances at 280, 320, and 656 nm; the last feature is responsible for the protein's blue color, which disappears upon ascorbate reduction. The fully oxidized protein has a A(280)/A(656) ratio of 10.3. Enzymatic studies revealed that T. pallidum neelaredoxin is able to catalyze a redox equilibrium between superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, a result consistent with it being a superoxide reductase. This finding, the first description of a T. pallidum iron-binding protein, indicates that the syphilis spirochete copes with oxidative stress via a primitive mechanism, which, thus far, has not been described in pathogenic

  17. Some aspects of the chemistry and biology of the superoxide radical anion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraggi, M.; Houée-Levin, C.

    1999-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the superoxide radical anion is produced in many biological reactions and especially in respiration. Also, there are many indications that the participation of this radical in certain biological reactions can ultimately have deleterious effects on the health and well being of certain individuals. Based on pulse radiolytic method of generating superoxide its physical and chemical properties are described. This review gives the present state of research on the formation and reactivity of the superoxide radical anion in biological systems, the physiological function of superoxide dismutase, as well as several enzymatic reactions for which the participation of the radical has not yet been conclusively established. Les signes de la production du radical anion superoxyde lors de nombreuses réactions biologiques et surtout lors de la respiration sont maintenant bien établis. De nombreux résultats montrent que la participation de ce radical dans certaines réactions biologiques peut conduire a des effets délétères préjudiciables à la santé. Bases sur la génération du radical superoxyde par la méthode de radiolyse pulsée, ses propriétés physiques et chimiques seront analysées. La présentation inclura l'état actuel de la recherche sur la formation et la réactivité de l'anion superoxyde dans les systèmes biologiques, la fonction physiologiques de la superoxyde dismutase aussi bien que celles de plusieurs autres réactions enzymatiques, pour lesquelles la participation de ce radical n'a pas encore été clairement établie.

  18. Simple Biological Systems for Assessing the Activity of Superoxide Dismutase Mimics

    PubMed Central

    Tovmasyan, Artak; Reboucas, Julio S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Half a century of research provided unambiguous proof that superoxide and species derived from it—reactive oxygen species (ROS)—play a central role in many diseases and degenerative processes. This stimulated the search for pharmaceutical agents that are capable of preventing oxidative damage, and methods of assessing their therapeutic potential. Recent Advances: The limitations of superoxide dismutase (SOD) as a therapeutic tool directed attention to small molecules, SOD mimics, that are capable of catalytically scavenging superoxide. Several groups of compounds, based on either metal complexes, including metalloporphyrins, metallocorroles, Mn(II) cyclic polyamines, and Mn(III) salen derivatives, or non-metal based compounds, such as fullerenes, nitrones, and nitroxides, have been developed and studied in vitro and in vivo. Very few entered clinical trials. Critical Issues and Future Directions: Development of SOD mimics requires in-depth understanding of their mechanisms of biological action. Elucidation of both molecular features, essential for efficient ROS-scavenging in vivo, and factors limiting the potential side effects requires biologically relevant and, at the same time, relatively simple testing systems. This review discuses the advantages and limitations of genetically engineered SOD-deficient unicellular organisms, Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae as tools for investigating the efficacy and mechanisms of biological actions of SOD mimics. These simple systems allow the scrutiny of the minimal requirements for a functional SOD mimic: the association of a high catalytic activity for superoxide dismutation, low toxicity, and an efficient cellular uptake/biodistribution. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2416–2436. PMID:23964890

  19. Continuous detection of superoxide in situ during ischemia and reperfusion in the rabbit heart.

    PubMed

    Ushiroda, S; Maruyama, Y; Nakano, M

    1997-01-01

    In order to clarify the time course of superoxide generation in situ during ischemia and reperfusion in the rabbit heart, we used a method of enhanced chemiluminescence (CL) with 2-methyl-6-[p-methoxyphenyl]-3, 7-dihydroimidazo [1, 2-alpha]pyrazin-3-one (MCLA) as a specific probe for detecting superoxide radicals. The surface of the rabbit heart was exposed to a photomultiplier tube in a light-proof box. We introduced a reversible snare occluder into the box to continuously observe the light emission. An ischemia-reperfusion group (I/R, n = 7) was subjected to 30 mins of coronary occlusion, followed by 90 mins of reperfusion. We performed the same procedure (except for coronary occlusion) in the sham-operated group (n = 4). Another group of rabbits (n = 4) subjected to I/R received superoxide dismutase (SOD: 20 mg/kg, i.v.) during reperfusion to observe the CL response. In the I/R-group, the increase in CL began at 13 +/- 2 (mean +/- SEM) mins and peaked at 52 +/- 12 mins of reperfusion. CL in the I/R-group gradually increased from 818 +/- 350 counts/10 secs in the preischemic period to 1077 +/- 401 counts/10 secs during reperfusion (p < 0.01). In contrast, there was no increase in CL in the sham-operated group. The administration of SOD briefly attenuated CL by 24.1 +/- 6.8% for a period of 24.3 +/- 6.8 mins. The superoxide generation in situ in the ischemic rabbit heart appears to increase gradually and persists for a period following reperfusion. PMID:9186285

  20. Mitochondrial superoxide flashes: metabolic biomarkers of skeletal muscle activity and disease

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Lan; Salahura, Gheorghe; Boncompagni, Simona; Kasischke, Karl A.; Protasi, Feliciano; Sheu, Shey-Shing; Dirksen, Robert T.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial superoxide flashes (mSOFs) are stochastic events of quantal mitochondrial superoxide generation. Here, we used flexor digitorum brevis muscle fibers from transgenic mice with muscle-specific expression of a novel mitochondrial-targeted superoxide biosensor (mt-cpYFP) to characterize mSOF activity in skeletal muscle at rest, following intense activity, and under pathological conditions. Results demonstrate that mSOF activity in muscle depended on electron transport chain and adenine nucleotide translocase functionality, but it was independent of cyclophilin-D-mediated mitochondrial permeability transition pore activity. The diverse spatial dimensions of individual mSOF events were found to reflect a complex underlying morphology of the mitochondrial network, as examined by electron microscopy. Muscle activity regulated mSOF activity in a biphasic manner. Specifically, mSOF frequency was significantly increased following brief tetanic stimulation (18.1±1.6 to 22.3±2.0 flashes/1000 μm2·100 s before and after 5 tetani) and markedly decreased (to 7.7±1.6 flashes/1000 μm2·100 s) following prolonged tetanic stimulation (40 tetani). A significant temperature-dependent increase in mSOF frequency (11.9±0.8 and 19.8±2.6 flashes/1000 μm2·100 s at 23°C and 37°C) was observed in fibers from RYR1Y522S/WT mice, a mouse model of malignant hyperthermia and heat-induced hypermetabolism. Together, these results demonstrate that mSOF activity is a highly sensitive biomarker of mitochondrial respiration and the cellular metabolic state of muscle during physiological activity and pathological oxidative stress.—Wei, L., Salahura, G., Boncompagni, S., Kasischke, K. A., Protasi, F., Sheu, S.-S., Dirksen, R. T. Mitochondrial superoxide flashes: metabolic biomarkers of skeletal muscle activity and disease. PMID:21646399

  1. Nox4-generated superoxide drives angiotensin II-induced neural stem cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Topchiy, Elena; Panzhinskiy, Evgeniy; Griffin, W. Sue T.; Barger, Steven W.; Das, Mita; Zawada, W. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been reported to affect neural stem cell self-renewal and therefore may be important for normal development and may influence neurodegenerative processes when ROS activity is elevated. To determine if increasing production of superoxide, via activation of NADPH oxidase (Nox), increases neural stem cell proliferation, 100nM angiotensin II (Ang II) – a strong stimulator of Nox – was applied to cultures of a murine neural stem cell line C17.2. Twelve hours following a single treatment with Ang II there was a doubling of the number of neural stem cells. This increase in neural stem cell numbers was preceded by a gradual elevation of superoxide levels (detected by dihydroethidium, DHE, fluorescence) from the steady state at 0, 5, and 30 minutes and gradually increasing from one hour to the maximum at 12 h, and returning to baseline at 24 h. Ang II-dependent proliferation was blocked by the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Confocal microscopy revealed the presence of two sources of intracellular ROS in C17.2 cells: i) mitochondrial and ii) extramitochondrial; the latter indicative of involvement of one or more specific isoforms of Nox. Of the Nox family, mRNA expression for one member, Nox4, is abundant in neural stem cell cultures, and Ang II treatment resulted in elevation of the relative levels of Nox4 protein. SiRNA targeting of Nox4 mRNA reduced both the constitutive and Ang II-induced Nox4 protein levels and attenuated Ang II-driven increases in superoxide levels and stem cell proliferation. Our findings are consistent with our hypothesis that Ang II-induced proliferation of neural stem cells occurs via Nox4-generated superoxide, suggesting that an Ang II/Nox4 axis is an important regulator of neural stem cell self-renewal and as such may fine-tune normal or stress- or disease-modifying neurogenesis. PMID:23751520

  2. Absence of superoxide dismutase activity causes nuclear DNA fragmentation during the aging process

    SciTech Connect

    Muid, Khandaker Ashfaqul; Karakaya, Hüseyin Çaglar; Koc, Ahmet

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • Aging process increases ROS accumulation. • Aging process increases DNA damage levels. • Absence of SOD activity does not cause DNA damage in young cells. • Absence of SOD activity accelerate aging and increase oxidative DNA damages during the aging process. - Abstract: Superoxide dismutases (SOD) serve as an important antioxidant defense mechanism in aerobic organisms, and deletion of these genes shortens the replicative life span in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Even though involvement of superoxide dismutase enzymes in ROS scavenging and the aging process has been studied extensively in different organisms, analyses of DNA damages has not been performed for replicatively old superoxide dismutase deficient cells. In this study, we investigated the roles of SOD1, SOD2 and CCS1 genes in preserving genomic integrity in replicatively old yeast cells using the single cell comet assay. We observed that extend of DNA damage was not significantly different among the young cells of wild type, sod1Δ and sod2Δ strains. However, ccs1Δ mutants showed a 60% higher amount of DNA damage in the young stage compared to that of the wild type cells. The aging process increased the DNA damage rates 3-fold in the wild type and more than 5-fold in sod1Δ, sod2Δ, and ccs1Δ mutant cells. Furthermore, ROS levels of these strains showed a similar pattern to their DNA damage contents. Thus, our results confirm that cells accumulate DNA damages during the aging process and reveal that superoxide dismutase enzymes play a substantial role in preserving the genomic integrity in this process.

  3. Feijoa sellowiana Berg fruit juice: anti-inflammatory effect and activity on superoxide anion generation.

    PubMed

    Monforte, Maria T; Fimiani, Vincenzo; Lanuzza, Francesco; Naccari, Clara; Restuccia, Salvatore; Galati, Enza M

    2014-04-01

    Feijoa sellowiana Berg var. coolidge fruit juice was studied in vivo for the anti-inflammatory activity by carrageenin-induced paw edema test and in vitro for the effects on superoxide anion release from neutrophils in human whole blood. The fruit juice was analyzed by the high-performance liquid chromatography method, and quercetin, ellagic acid, catechin, rutin, eriodictyol, gallic acid, pyrocatechol, syringic acid, and eriocitrin were identified. The results showed a significant anti-inflammatory activity of F. sellowiana fruit juice, sustained also by an effective antioxidant activity observed in preliminary studies on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) test. In particular, the anti-inflammatory activity edema inhibition is significant since the first hour (44.11%) and persists until the fifth hour (44.12%) of the treatment. The effect on superoxide anion release was studied in human whole blood, in the presence of activators affecting neutrophils by different mechanisms. The juice showed an inhibiting response on neutrophils basal activity in all experimental conditions. In stimulated neutrophils, the higher inhibition of superoxide anion generation was observed at concentration of 10(-4) and 10(-2) mg/mL in whole blood stimulate with phorbol-myristate-13-acetate (PMA; 20% and 40%) and with N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP; 15% and 48%). The significant reduction of edema and the inhibition of O2(-) production, occurring mainly through interaction with protein-kinase C pathway, confirm the anti-inflammatory effect of F. sellowiana fruit juice. PMID:24433073

  4. Cloning, Purification, and Characterization of Recombinant Human Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase in SF9 Insect Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Pravesh; Yun, Ji-Hye; Kim, Woo Taek; Kim, Tae-Yoon; Lee, Weontae

    2016-01-01

    A balance between production and degradation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is critical for maintaining cellular homeostasis. Increased levels of ROS during oxidative stress are associated with disease conditions. Antioxidant enzymes, such as extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD), in the extracellular matrix (ECM) neutralize the toxicity of superoxide. Recent studies have emphasized the importance of EC-SOD in protecting the brain, lungs, and other tissues from oxidative stress. Therefore, EC-SOD would be an excellent therapeutic drug for treatment of diseases caused by oxidative stress. We cloned both the full length (residues 1–240) and truncated (residues 19–240) forms of human EC-SOD (hEC-SOD) into the donor plasmid pFastBacHTb. After transposition, the bacmid was transfected into the Sf9-baculovirus expression system and the expressed hEC-SOD purified using FLAG-tag. Western blot analysis revealed that hEC-SOD is present both as a monomer (33 kDa) and a dimer (66 kDa), as detected by the FLAG antibody. A water-soluble tetrazolium (WST-1) assay showed that both full length and truncated hEC-SOD proteins were enzymatically active. We showed that a potent superoxide dismutase inhibitor, diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC), inhibits hEC-SOD activity. PMID:26912083

  5. Inhibition of autoxidation of divicine and isouramil by the combination of superoxide dismutase and reduced glutathione.

    PubMed

    Winterbourn, C C

    1989-06-01

    The effects of GSH on the autoxidation of the fava bean pyrimidine aglycones, divicine and isouramil, and on acid-hydrolyzed vicine (provisional identification 2-amino-4,5,6-trihydroxypyrimidine) have been studied. GSH alone promoted redox cycling of each compound, with concomitant GSH oxidation and H2O2 production. In the presence of superoxide dismutase, there is a lag period during which little pyrimidine oxidation occurs, followed by a period of accelerated oxidation. With the three pyrimidines, increasing concentrations of GSH extended this lag period and progressively decreased subsequent rates of both pyrimidine oxidation and O2 uptake. No GSH oxidation or O2 uptake occurred during the lag. These results show that the combination of GSH and superoxide dismutase is able to inhibit redox cycling of the pyrimidines. With a 10-fold excess of GSH over isouramil or acid-hydrolyzed vicine (20-fold with divicine) this coupled oxidation of GSH and the pyrimidine is almost completely suppressed. This mechanism may be a means whereby GSH in combination with superoxide dismutase protects against the cytotoxic effects of these reactive pyrimidines. PMID:2730000

  6. Cloning, Purification, and Characterization of Recombinant Human Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase in SF9 Insect Cells.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Pravesh; Yun, Ji-Hye; Kim, Woo Taek; Kim, Tae-Yoon; Lee, Weontae

    2016-03-01

    A balance between production and degradation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is critical for maintaining cellular homeostasis. Increased levels of ROS during oxidative stress are associated with disease conditions. Antioxidant enzymes, such as extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD), in the extracellular matrix (ECM) neutralize the toxicity of superoxide. Recent studies have emphasized the importance of EC-SOD in protecting the brain, lungs, and other tissues from oxidative stress. Therefore, EC-SOD would be an excellent therapeutic drug for treatment of diseases caused by oxidative stress. We cloned both the full length (residues 1-240) and truncated (residues 19-240) forms of human EC-SOD (hEC-SOD) into the donor plasmid pFastBacHTb. After transposition, the bacmid was transfected into the Sf9-baculovirus expression system and the expressed hEC-SOD purified using FLAG-tag. Western blot analysis revealed that hEC-SOD is present both as a monomer (33 kDa) and a dimer (66 kDa), as detected by the FLAG antibody. A water-soluble tetrazolium (WST-1) assay showed that both full length and truncated hEC-SOD proteins were enzymatically active. We showed that a potent superoxide dismutase inhibitor, diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC), inhibits hEC-SOD activity. PMID:26912083

  7. Superoxide dismutase overexpression protects against glucocorticoid-induced depressive-like behavioral phenotypes in mice.

    PubMed

    Uchihara, Yuki; Tanaka, Ken-ichiro; Asano, Teita; Tamura, Fumiya; Mizushima, Tohru

    2016-01-22

    In the stress response, activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and particularly the release of glucocorticoids, plays a critical role. However, dysregulation of this system and sustained high plasma levels of glucocorticoids can result in depression. Recent studies have suggested the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide anion, in depression. However, direct evidence for a role of ROS in the pathogenesis of this disorder is lacking. In this study, using transgenic mice expressing human Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1), an enzyme that catalyzes the dismutation of superoxide anions, we examined the effect of SOD1 overexpression on depressive-like behavioral phenotypes in mice. Depressive-like behaviors were induced by daily subcutaneous administration of the glucocorticoid corticosterone for 4 weeks, and was monitored with the social interaction test, the sucrose preference test and the forced swim test. These tests revealed that transgenic mice overexpressing SOD1 are more resistant to glucocorticoid-induced depressive-like behavioral disorders than wild-type animals. Furthermore, compared with wild-type mice, transgenic mice showed a reduction in the number of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (a marker of oxidative stress)-positive cells in the hippocampal CA3 region following corticosterone administration. These results suggest that overexpression of SOD1 protects mice against glucocorticoid-induced depressive-like behaviors by decreasing cellular ROS levels. PMID:26721432

  8. Superoxide dismutase, catalase, and. alpha. -tocopherol content of stored potato tubers. [Solanum tuberosum L

    SciTech Connect

    Spychalla, J.P.; Desborough, S.L. )

    1990-11-01

    Activated oxygen or oxygen free radical mediated damage to plants has been established or implicated in many plant stress situations. The extent of activated oxygen damage to potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers during low temperature storage and long-term storage is not known. Quantitation of oxygen free radical mediated damage in plant tissues is difficult. However, it is comparatively easy to quantitate endogenous antioxidants, which detoxify potentially damaging forms of activated oxygen. Three tuber antioxidants, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and {alpha}-tocopherol were assayed from four potato cultivars stored at 3{degree}C and 9{degree}C for 40 weeks. Tubers stored at 3{degree}C demonstrated increased superoxide dismutase activities (up to 72%) compared to tubers stored at 9{degree}C. Time dependent increases in the levels of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and {alpha}-tocopherol occurred during the course of the 40 week storage. The possible relationship between these increases in antioxidants and the rate of activated oxygen production in the tubers is discussed.

  9. Tumorigenic Poxviruses Up-Regulate Intracellular Superoxide To Inhibit Apoptosis and Promote Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Teoh, Melissa L. T.; Turner, Patricia V.; Evans, David H.

    2005-01-01

    Tumorigenic leporipoxviruses encode catalytically inactive homologs of cellular Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1). The function of the orthologous myxoma virus M131R and Shope fibroma virus S131R gene products is uncertain, but they inhibit SOD1 activity by a process linked to binding its copper chaperone. Using a superoxide-sensitive dye (hydroethidine), we observed that virus infection increased intracellular superoxide levels in an M/S131R-dependent manner. To see whether this effect promotes infection, we deleted the Shope fibroma virus S131R gene and compared the clinical manifestations of wild-type and mutant virus infections in rabbits. S131RΔ virus produced significantly smaller fibroxanthosarcoma-like growths in vivo and, at a point where these growths were already receding, wild-type infections still showed extensive leukocyte infiltration, necrosis, and fibromatous cell proliferation. Coincidentally, whereas Jurkat cells are protected from mitochondria- and Fas-mediated apoptosis by wild-type myxoma virus in vitro, M131RΔ virus could not block Fas-initiated apoptosis as judged by DNA laddering, terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-fluorescein nick end labeling, and caspase 3 cleavage assays. These data suggest that tumorigenic poxviruses can modulate intracellular redox status to their advantage to stimulate infected cell growth and inhibit programmed cell death. PMID:15827194

  10. Superoxide production by phagocytosing macrophages in relation to the intracellular distribution of oxygen.

    PubMed

    James, P E; Grinberg, O Y; Swartz, H M

    1998-07-01

    We simultaneously measured the concentration of oxygen ([O2]) within the phagosomal and extracellular compartments of macrophages. By combining electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry techniques with that of spin-trapping, we found that a significant difference in oxygen concentration ([O2]) exists between these two compartments and we were able to monitor (1) how [O2] in the extracellular compartment and the rate of mitochondrial consumption affected this difference in [O2], and (2) to what extent this gradient of [O2] influenced production of reactive oxygen species by phagosomes. Under conditions where the [O2] in the inflowing gas was high (210 microM; air), the [O2] in the extracellular and phagosomal compartments was 180 and 141 microM, respectively. This was sufficient to maintain maximum superoxide production in these cells. When extracellular [O2] was reduced to 84 or 36 microM, the [O2] in phagosomes within the cells (31.7 and 7.7 microM, respectively) was too low to maintain superoxide production by the NADPH-oxidase system within the phagosomes. The [O2] in the extracellular compartments of these samples, however, was always sufficient to maintain superoxide production by phagosomes at the cell surface. Our findings suggest that the distribution of oxygen surrounding and within macrophages can influence their ability to perform microbicidal and tumoricidal functions, even at an [O2] in the media that appears to be adequate. PMID:9665279

  11. Stimulation of superoxide production increases fungicidal action of miconazole against Candida albicans biofilms

    PubMed Central

    De Cremer, Kaat; De Brucker, Katrijn; Staes, Ines; Peeters, Annelies; Van den Driessche, Freija; Coenye, Tom; Cammue, Bruno P. A.; Thevissen, Karin

    2016-01-01

    We performed a whole-transcriptome analysis of miconazole-treated Candida albicans biofilms, using RNA-sequencing. Our aim was to identify molecular pathways employed by biofilm cells of this pathogen to resist action of the commonly used antifungal miconazole. As expected, genes involved in sterol biosynthesis and genes encoding drug efflux pumps were highly induced in biofilm cells upon miconazole treatment. Other processes were affected as well, including the electron transport chain (ETC), of which eight components were transcriptionally downregulated. Within a diverse set of 17 inhibitors/inducers of the transcriptionally affected pathways, the ETC inhibitors acted most synergistically with miconazole against C. albicans biofilm cells. Synergy was not observed for planktonically growing C. albicans cultures or when biofilms were treated in oxygen-deprived conditions, pointing to a biofilm-specific oxygen-dependent tolerance mechanism. In line, a correlation between miconazole’s fungicidal action against C. albicans biofilm cells and the levels of superoxide radicals was observed, and confirmed both genetically and pharmacologically using a triple superoxide dismutase mutant and a superoxide dismutase inhibitor N-N′-diethyldithiocarbamate, respectively. Consequently, ETC inhibitors that result in mitochondrial dysfunction and affect production of reactive oxygen species can increase miconazole’s fungicidal activity against C. albicans biofilm cells. PMID:27272719

  12. Nitric Oxide and Superoxide Anion Balance in Rats Exposed to Chronic and Long Term Intermittent Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Siques, Patricia; López de Pablo, Ángel Luis; Brito, Julio; Arribas, Silvia M.; Naveas, Nelson; González, M. Carmen; León-Velarde, Fabiola; López, M. Rosario

    2014-01-01

    Work at high altitude in shifts exposes humans to a new form of chronic intermittent hypoxia, with still unknown health consequences. We have established a rat model resembling this situation, which develops a milder form of right ventricular hypertrophy and pulmonary artery remodelling compared to continuous chronic exposure. We aimed to compare the alterations in pulmonary artery nitric oxide (NO) availability induced by these forms of hypoxia and the mechanisms implicated. Rats were exposed for 46 days to normoxia or hypobaric hypoxia, either continuous (CH) or intermittent (2 day shifts, CIH2x2), and assessed: NO and superoxide anion availability (fluorescent indicators and confocal microscopy); expression of phosphorylated endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), NADPH-oxidase (p22phox), and 3-nitrotyrosine (western blotting); and NADPH-oxidase location (immunohistochemistry). Compared to normoxia, (1) NO availability was reduced and superoxide anion was increased in both hypoxic groups, with a larger effect in CH, (2) eNOS expression was only reduced in CH, (3) NADPH-oxidase was similarly increased in both hypoxic groups, and (4) 3-nitrotyrosine was increased to a larger extent in CH. In conclusion, intermittent hypoxia reduces NO availability through superoxide anion destruction, without reducing its synthesis, while continuous hypoxia affects both, producing larger nitrosative damage which could be related to the more severe cardiovascular alterations. PMID:24719876

  13. Superoxide and Singlet Oxygen Produced within the Thylakoid Membranes Both Cause Photosystem I Photoinhibition1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Takumi, Shigeo; Hashiguchi, Masaki; Sejima, Takehiro

    2016-01-01

    Photosystem I (PSI) photoinhibition suppresses plant photosynthesis and growth. However, the mechanism underlying PSI photoinhibition has not been fully clarified. In this study, in order to investigate the mechanism of PSI photoinhibition in higher plants, we applied repetitive short-pulse (rSP) illumination, which causes PSI-specific photoinhibition in chloroplasts isolated from spinach leaves. We found that rSP treatment caused PSI photoinhibition, but not PSII photoinhibition in isolated chloroplasts in the presence of O2. However, chloroplastic superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase activities failed to protect PSI from its photoinhibition. Importantly, PSI photoinhibition was largely alleviated in the presence of methyl viologen, which stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the stromal region by accepting electrons from PSI, even under the conditions where CuZn-superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase activities were inactivated by KCN. These results suggest that the ROS production site, but not the ROS production rate, is critical for PSI photoinhibition. Furthermore, we found that not only superoxide (O2−) but also singlet oxygen (1O2) is involved in PSI photoinhibition induced by rSP treatment. From these results, we suggest that PSI photoinhibition is caused by both O2− and 1O2 produced within the thylakoid membranes when electron carriers in PSI become highly reduced. Here, we show, to our knowledge, new insight into the PSI photoinhibition in higher plants. PMID:26936894

  14. The Basic Understanding of Lithium Superoxide in Li-O2 Battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Kah Chun; Zhai, Dengyun; Wang, Hsien-Hau; Luo, Xiangyi; Wen, Jianguo; Miller, Dean; Redfern, Paul; Lu, Jun; Curtiss, Larry; Amine, Khalil

    The electrochemical and chemical processes that involved in Li-O2 battery are complex, and depend heavily on electrode materials, electrolytes, interfaces, and cell operating conditions. In non-aqueous Li-O2 battery, the main discharge products are commonly known to be lithium peroxide (Li2O2) , and possibly some other parasitic components (i.e. Li2CO3, LiOH, Li2O). However, the superoxide intermediates and lithium superoxide (O2-, LiO2) which are commonly known to be metastable can also be found as reported. Relative to these compounds (i.e. Li2CO3, Li2O,LiOH,Li2O2) in discharge products, little is known about LiO2. To have a basic understanding of lithium superoxide, both theoretical studies and experimental characterizations are important. In this presentation, the recent developments, studies and findings of this exotic species will be discussed. This work was primarily supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357 from the Vehicle Technologies Office, Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  15. Immunohistochemical identification and quantitative analysis of cytoplasmic Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase in mouse organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yon, Jung-Min; Baek, In-Jeoung; Lee, Se-Ra; Kim, Mi-Ra; Lee, Beom Jun; Yun, Young Won; Nam, Sang-Yoon

    2008-09-01

    Cytoplasmic Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is an antioxidant enzyme that converts superoxide to hydrogen peroxide in cells. Its spatial distribution matches that of superoxide production, allowing it to protect cells from oxidative stress. SOD1 deficiencies result in embryonic lethality and a wide range of pathologies in mice, but little is known about normal SOD1 protein expression in developing embryos. In this study, the expression pattern of SOD1 was investigated in post-implantation mouse embryos and extraembryonic tissues, including placenta, using Western blotting and immunohistochemical analyses. SOD1 was detected in embryos and extraembryonic tissues from embryonic day (ED) 8.5 to 18.5. The signal in embryos was observed at the lowest level on ED 9.5-11.5, and the highest level on ED 17.5-18.5, while levels remained constant in the surrounding extraembryonic tissues during all developmental stages examined. Immunohistochemical analysis of SOD1 expression on ED 13.5-18.5 revealed its ubiquitous distribution throughout developing organs. In particular, high levels of SOD1 expression were observed in the ependymal epithelium of the choroid plexus, ganglia, sensory cells of the olfactory and vestibulocochlear epithelia, blood cells and vessels, hepatocytes and hematopoietic cells of the liver, lymph nodes, osteogenic tissues, and skin. Thus, SOD1 is highly expressed at late stages of embryonic development in a cell- and tissue-specific manner, and can function as an important antioxidant enzyme during organogenesis in mouse embryos. PMID:18716442

  16. Cloning and differential expression of manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) of Trichinella pseudospiralis.

    PubMed

    Wu, W K; Mak, C H; Ko, R C

    2008-01-01

    The complete coding sequence of manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) of Trichinella pseudospiralis (Tp) was obtained and characterized for the first time by degenerative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of complementary DNA ends (RACE) reactions. The open reading frame of Tp Mn-SOD contained 663 nucleotides, encoding 220 amino acid residues. This included the conserved histidine and aspartate residues for metal binding, cysteine residues for disulfide bond formation, and arginine residue for directing the superoxide ion to the protein. The presence of mitochondrial transit peptides and maturation cleavage site suggest that the cloned Tp Mn-SOD gene is a mitochondrial enzyme. It is a single copy gene containing three introns. Northern blotting suggested that the expression level of Mn-SOD is lower than Cu/Zn SOD in infective stage larvae. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that a single dominant transcript of Tp Mn-SOD was highly expressed in the infective-stage larvae but not in adult worms. The information provides a better understanding of the highly compartmentalized superoxide dismutases of adenophorean nematodes. PMID:17955260

  17. A Zostera marina manganese superoxide dismutase gene involved in the responses to temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiao; Tang, Xuexi; Wang, You; Zang, Yu; Zhou, Bin

    2016-01-10

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is an essential enzyme playing a pivotal role in the protection mechanism against oxidative stress by reducing superoxide radicals. In the present study, the full-length cDNA sequence of manganese superoxide dismutase was identified from Zostera marina (ZmMnSOD) via raid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) technique and expressed sequence tags (ESTs) analysis. The open reading frame (ORF) encoded a polypeptide of 254 amino acid residues, which shared 69%-77% similarity with previous identified SODs. Analysis of the deduced amino acid revealed conserved features, including functional domains, signature motifs and metal binding sites. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that ZmMnSOD was closer to the SODs from angiosperm than those from other organisms. The mRNA expression level of ZmMnSOD at different temperatures was investigated using real-time PCR and it was significantly up-regulated from 5°C to 15°C, and then dramatically down-regulated. The recombinant ZmMnSOD protein was purified and exhibited Mn(2+) ions dependency specific enzymatic activity and strong antioxidant activity over a wide temperature range. All these results indicate that ZmMnSOD is an authentic member of the plant SOD family and may play important roles in minimizing the effect of oxidative damage in Z. marina against temperature stress and affect the adaptability of Z. marina to global warming. PMID:26410038

  18. Structure of glycosylated Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase from Kluyveromyces yeast NBIMCC 1984

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolashka-Angelova, Pavlina; Moshtanska, Vesela; Kujumdzieva, Anna; Atanasov, Boris; Petrova, Vencislava; Voelter, Wolfgang; Beeumen, Jozef Van

    2010-09-01

    The primary structure of Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase from Kluyveromyces marxianus NBIMCC 1984 was elucidated by N-terminal sequence analysis of the intact protein and by determination of the amino acid sequences of tryptic peptides by MALDI-TOF-TOF tandem mass spectrometry. The molecular mass of one subunit of the homodimer SOD, containing 152 amino acid residues, was calculated to be 15858.3 Da while a value of 17096.63 Da was obtained by MALDI-TOF MS. This difference is explained by the presence of N-glycosylation of one linkage site, -Asn-Ile/Leu-Thr-, and a glycan chain with the structure Hex 5 GlcNAc 2. Glycosylation of K.marxianus superoxide dismutase is a post-translational modification. Recent developments in mass spectrometry have enabled detailed structural analyses of covalent modifications of proteins. Therefore, in this paper, we introduce a covalent modification of Cu/Zn-SOD from K. marxianus NBIMCC 1984, by analysis of the enzymatic liberated N-glycan from the enzyme using MALDI-TOF and tandem mass spectrometry on a Q-Trap mass spectrometer. This is the first report of the structure of the oligosaccharide of a naturally-glycosylated superoxide dismutase, determined by mass spectrometry.

  19. Superoxide and Singlet Oxygen Produced within the Thylakoid Membranes Both Cause Photosystem I Photoinhibition.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Daisuke; Takumi, Shigeo; Hashiguchi, Masaki; Sejima, Takehiro; Miyake, Chikahiro

    2016-07-01

    Photosystem I (PSI) photoinhibition suppresses plant photosynthesis and growth. However, the mechanism underlying PSI photoinhibition has not been fully clarified. In this study, in order to investigate the mechanism of PSI photoinhibition in higher plants, we applied repetitive short-pulse (rSP) illumination, which causes PSI-specific photoinhibition in chloroplasts isolated from spinach leaves. We found that rSP treatment caused PSI photoinhibition, but not PSII photoinhibition in isolated chloroplasts in the presence of O2 However, chloroplastic superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase activities failed to protect PSI from its photoinhibition. Importantly, PSI photoinhibition was largely alleviated in the presence of methyl viologen, which stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the stromal region by accepting electrons from PSI, even under the conditions where CuZn-superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase activities were inactivated by KCN. These results suggest that the ROS production site, but not the ROS production rate, is critical for PSI photoinhibition. Furthermore, we found that not only superoxide (O2 (-)) but also singlet oxygen ((1)O2) is involved in PSI photoinhibition induced by rSP treatment. From these results, we suggest that PSI photoinhibition is caused by both O2 (-) and (1)O2 produced within the thylakoid membranes when electron carriers in PSI become highly reduced. Here, we show, to our knowledge, new insight into the PSI photoinhibition in higher plants. PMID:26936894

  20. Stimulation of superoxide production increases fungicidal action of miconazole against Candida albicans biofilms.

    PubMed

    De Cremer, Kaat; De Brucker, Katrijn; Staes, Ines; Peeters, Annelies; Van den Driessche, Freija; Coenye, Tom; Cammue, Bruno P A; Thevissen, Karin

    2016-01-01

    We performed a whole-transcriptome analysis of miconazole-treated Candida albicans biofilms, using RNA-sequencing. Our aim was to identify molecular pathways employed by biofilm cells of this pathogen to resist action of the commonly used antifungal miconazole. As expected, genes involved in sterol biosynthesis and genes encoding drug efflux pumps were highly induced in biofilm cells upon miconazole treatment. Other processes were affected as well, including the electron transport chain (ETC), of which eight components were transcriptionally downregulated. Within a diverse set of 17 inhibitors/inducers of the transcriptionally affected pathways, the ETC inhibitors acted most synergistically with miconazole against C. albicans biofilm cells. Synergy was not observed for planktonically growing C. albicans cultures or when biofilms were treated in oxygen-deprived conditions, pointing to a biofilm-specific oxygen-dependent tolerance mechanism. In line, a correlation between miconazole's fungicidal action against C. albicans biofilm cells and the levels of superoxide radicals was observed, and confirmed both genetically and pharmacologically using a triple superoxide dismutase mutant and a superoxide dismutase inhibitor N-N'-diethyldithiocarbamate, respectively. Consequently, ETC inhibitors that result in mitochondrial dysfunction and affect production of reactive oxygen species can increase miconazole's fungicidal activity against C. albicans biofilm cells. PMID:27272719

  1. DNA cleavage during ethanol metabolism: Role of superoxide radicals and catalytic iron

    SciTech Connect

    Rajasinghe, H.; Jayatilleke, E.; Shaw, S. )

    1990-01-01

    The generation of superoxide and related free radicals and the mobilization of catalytic iron due to ethanol metabolism have been suggested as mechanisms of alcohol-induced liver injury as well as of the increased risk of cancer observed in alcoholics. Cleavage of double stranded DNA is produced by both free radicals as well as by catalytic iron. The effects of ethanol metabolism on DNA cleavage were therefore studied in vitro as well as in vivo in isolated hepatocytes. Intactness of double stranded DNA was studied by measuring ethidium bromide fluorescence after DNA electrophoresis. In vitro, the metabolism of acetaldehyde by aldehyde oxidase caused cleavage of lambda phage DNA. Cleavage was inhibited by both superoxide dismutase and desferrioxamine indicating the role of superoxide radicals and catalytic iron respectively. Studies with HIND III digests of the lambda phage indicate a lack of specificity in the breaks with respect to nucleotide sequences. Addition of EDTA greatly enhanced cleavage. In vivo, ethanol metabolism caused minimal breakage in hepatocyte DNA and addition of acetaldehyde markedly enhanced cleavage; all cleavage was inhibited by desferrioxamine.

  2. Irradiation of titanium dioxide generates both singlet oxygen and superoxide anion.

    PubMed

    Konaka, R; Kasahara, E; Dunlap, W C; Yamamoto, Y; Chien, K C; Inoue, M

    1999-08-01

    Although photoexcited TiO2 has been known to initiate various chemical reactions, such as the generation of reactive oxygen species, precise mechanism and chemical nature of the generated species remain to be elucidated. The present work demonstrates the generation of singlet oxygen by irradiated TiO2 in ethanol as measured by ESR spectroscopy using 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidone (4-oxo-TMP) as a 1O2-sensitive trapping agent. Under identical conditions, the superoxide ion was also detected by spin trapping agent 5,5-dimethyl-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO). Kinetic analysis in the presence of both 4-oxo-TMP and DMPO revealed that singlet oxygen is produced directly at the irradiated TiO2 surface but not by a successive reaction involving superoxide anion. The basis for this view is the fact that DMPO added in the mixture increased the signals responsible for 4-oxo-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (4-oxo-TEMPO), a reaction product of 4-oxo-TMP and 1O2. The detailed mechanism for the generation of 1O2 and superoxide ion by irradiated TiO2 and reactions between these species and DMPO are discussed. PMID:10468201

  3. Purification and characterization of iron-cofactored superoxide dismutase from Enteromorpha linza

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Mingsheng; Cai, Ruanhong; Wang, Shujun; Liu, Zhaopu; Jiao, Yuliang; Fang, Yaowei; Zhang, Xiaoxin

    2013-11-01

    A superoxide dismutase was purified from Enteromorpha linza using a simple and safe procedure, which comprised phosphate buffer extraction, ammonium sulphate precipitation, ion exchange chromatography on Q-sepharose column, and gel filtration chromatography on Superdex 200 10/300GL. The E. linza superoxide dismutase ( ElSOD) was purified 103.6-fold, and a yield of 19.1% and a specific activity of 1 750 U/mg protein were obtained. The SDS-PAGE exhibited ElSOD a single band near 23 kDa and the gel filtration study showed ElSOD's molecular weight is near 46 kDa in nondenatured condition, indicating it's a homodimeric protein. El SOD is an iron-cofactored superoxide dismutase (Fe-SOD) because it was inhibited by hydrogen peroxide, insensitive to potassium cyanide. The optimal temperature for its maximal enzyme activity was 35°C, and it still had 29.8% relative activity at 0°C, then ElSOD can be classified as a cold-adapted enzyme. ElSOD was stable when temperature was below 40°C or the pH was within the range of 5-10. The first 11 N-terminal amino acids of ElSOD were ALELKAPPYEL, comparison of its N-terminal sequence with other Fe-SOD N-terminal sequences at the same position suggests it is possibly a chloroplastic Fe-SOD.

  4. Chlorovirus PBCV-1 Encodes an Active Copper-Zinc Superoxide Dismutase

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ming; Duncan, Garry A.; Kuszynski, Charles; Oyler, George; Zheng, Jiayin; Becker, Donald F.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are metalloproteins that protect organisms from toxic reactive oxygen species by catalyzing the conversion of superoxide anion to hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen. Chlorovirus PBCV-1 encodes a 187-amino-acid protein that resembles a Cu-Zn SOD with all of the conserved amino acid residues for binding copper and zinc (named cvSOD). cvSOD has an internal Met that results in a 165-amino-acid protein (named tcvSOD). Both cvSOD and tcvSOD recombinant proteins inhibited nitroblue tetrazolium reduction of superoxide anion generated in a xanthine-xanthine oxidase system in solution. tcvSOD was chosen for further characterization because it was easier to produce. Recombinant tcvSOD also inhibited a riboflavin photochemical reduction system in a polyacrylamide gel assay, which was blocked by the Cu-Zn SOD inhibitor cyanide but not by azide, which inhibits Fe and Mn SODs. A kcat/Km value for cvSOD was determined by stop-flow spectrophotometry as 1.28 × 108 M−1 s−1, suggesting that cvSOD-catalyzed O2− dismutation was not a diffusion controlled encounter. The cvsod gene was expressed as a late gene, and cvSOD activity was detected in purified virions. Superoxide accumulated rapidly during virus infection, and circumstantial evidence indicates that cvSOD aids its decomposition to benefit virus replication. Cu-Zn SOD homologs have been described to occur in 3 other families of large DNA viruses, poxviruses, baculoviruses, and mimiviruses, which group as a clade. Interestingly, cvSOD does not group in the same clade as the other virus SODs but instead groups in an expanded clade that includes Cu-Zn SODs from many cellular organisms. IMPORTANCE Virus infection often leads to an increase in toxic reactive oxygen species in the host, which can be detrimental to virus replication. Viruses have developed various ways to overcome this barrier. As reported in this article, the chloroviruses often encode and package a functional Cu

  5. Activation of Mitochondrial Uncoupling Protein 4 and ATP-Sensitive Potassium Channel Cumulatively Decreases Superoxide Production in Insect Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Slocińska, Malgorzata; Rosinski, Grzegorz; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2016-01-01

    It has been evidenced that mitochondrial uncoupling protein 4 (UCP4) and ATP-regulated potassium channel (mKATP channel) of insect Gromphadorhina coqereliana mitochondria decrease superoxide anion production. We elucidated whether the two energy-dissipating systems work together on a modulation of superoxide level in cockroach mitochondria. Our data show that the simultaneous activation of UCP4 by palmitic acid and mKATP channel by pinacidil revealed a cumulative effect on weakening mitochondrial superoxide formation. The inhibition of UCP4 by GTP (and/or ATP) and mKATP channel by ATP elevated superoxide production. These results suggest a functional cooperation of both energy-dissipating systems in protection against oxidative stress in insects. PMID:26548865

  6. Potential role of mitochondrial superoxide decreasing ferrochelatase and heme in coronary artery soluble guanylate cyclase depletion by angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dhara; Alhawaj, Raed; Kelly, Melissa R; Accarino, John J O; Lakhkar, Anand; Gupte, Sachin A; Sun, Dong; Wolin, Michael S

    2016-06-01

    Oxidation of the soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) heme promotes loss of regulation by nitric oxide (NO) and depletion of sGC. We hypothesized that angiotensin II (ANG II) stimulation of mitochondrial superoxide by its type 1 receptor could function as a potential inhibitor of heme biosynthesis by ferrochelatase, and this could decrease vascular responsiveness to NO by depleting sGC. These processes were investigated in a 24-h organoid culture model of bovine coronary arteries (BCA) with 0.1 μM ANG II. Treatment of BCA with ANG II increased mitochondrial superoxide, depleted mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (SOD2), ferrochelatase, and cytochrome oxidase subunit 4, and sGC, associated with impairment of relaxation to NO. These processes were attenuated by organoid culture with 8-bromo-cGMP and/or δ-aminolevulinic acid (a stimulator of sGC by protoporphyrin IX generation and heme biosynthesis). Organoid culture with Mito-TEMPOL, a scavenger of mitochondrial matrix superoxide, also attenuated ANG II-elicited ferrochelatase depletion and loss of relaxation to NO, whereas organoid culture with Tempol, an extramitochondrial scavenger of superoxide, attenuated the loss of relaxation to NO by ANG II, but not ferrochelatase depletion, suggesting cytosolic superoxide could be an initiating factor in the loss of sGC regulation by NO. The depletion of cytochrome oxidase subunit 4 and sGC (but not catalase) suggests that sGC expression may be very sensitive to depletion of heme caused by ANG II disrupting ferrochelatase activity by increasing mitochondrial superoxide. In addition, cGMP-dependent activation of protein kinase G appears to attenuate these ANG II-stimulated processes through both preventing SOD2 depletion and increases in mitochondrial and extramitochondrial superoxide. PMID:27037373

  7. Superoxide reductase from Desulfoarculus baarsii: reaction mechanism and role of glutamate 47 and lysine 48 in catalysis.

    PubMed

    Lombard, M; Houée-Levin, C; Touati, D; Fontecave, M; Nivière, V

    2001-04-24

    Superoxide reductase (SOR) is a small metalloenzyme that catalyzes reduction of O(2)(*)(-) to H(2)O(2) and thus provides an antioxidant mechanism against superoxide radicals. Its active site contains an unusual mononuclear ferrous center, which is very efficient during electron transfer to O(2)(*)(-) [Lombard, M., Fontecave, M., Touati, D., and Nivière, V. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 115-121]. The reaction of the enzyme from Desulfoarculus baarsii with superoxide was studied by pulse radiolysis methods. The first step is an extremely fast bimolecular reaction of superoxide reductase with superoxide, with a rate constant of (1.1 +/- 0.3) x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). A first intermediate is formed which is converted to a second one at a much slower rate constant of 500 +/- 50 s(-1). Decay of the second intermediate occurs with a rate constant of 25 +/- 5 s(-1). These intermediates are suggested to be iron-superoxide and iron-peroxide species. Furthermore, the role of glutamate 47 and lysine 48, which are the closest charged residues to the vacant sixth iron coordination site, has been investigated by site-directed mutagenesis. Mutation of glutamate 47 into alanine has no effect on the rates of the reaction. On the contrary, mutation of lysine 48 into an isoleucine led to a 20-30-fold decrease of the rate constant of the bimolecular reaction, suggesting that lysine 48 plays an important role during guiding and binding of superoxide to the iron center II. In addition, we report that expression of the lysine 48 sor mutant gene hardly restored to a superoxide dismutase-deficient Escherichia coli mutant the ability to grow under aerobic conditions. PMID:11305919

  8. Hydroethidine- and MitoSOX-derived red fluorescence is not a reliable indicator of intracellular superoxide formation: another inconvenient truth.

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Jacek; Kalyanaraman, B

    2010-04-15

    Hydroethidine (HE; or dihydroethidium) is the most popular fluorogenic probe used for detecting intracellular superoxide radical anion. The reaction between superoxide and HE generates a highly specific red fluorescent product, 2-hydroxyethidium (2-OH-E(+)). In biological systems, another red fluorescent product, ethidium, is also formed, usually at a much higher concentration than 2-OH-E(+). In this article, we review the methods to selectively detect the superoxide-specific product (2-OH-E(+)) and the factors affecting its levels in cellular and biological systems. The most important conclusion of this review is that it is nearly impossible to assess the intracellular levels of the superoxide-specific product, 2-OH-E(+), using confocal microscopy or other fluorescence-based microscopic assays and that it is essential to measure by HPLC the intracellular HE and other oxidation products of HE, in addition to 2-OH-E(+), to fully understand the origin of red fluorescence. The chemical reactivity of mitochondria-targeted hydroethidine (Mito-HE, MitoSOX red) with superoxide is similar to the reactivity of HE with superoxide, and therefore, all of the limitations attributed to the HE assay are applicable to Mito-HE (or MitoSOX) as well. PMID:20116425

  9. Hydroethidine- and Mito-SOX-derived red fluorescence is not a reliable indicator of intracellular superoxide formation: Another inconvenient truth

    PubMed Central

    Zielonka, Jacek; Kalyanaraman, B.

    2010-01-01

    Hydroethidine (or dihydroethidium) (HE) is the most popular fluorogenic probe used for detecting intracellular superoxide radical anion. The reaction between superoxide and HE generates a highly specific red fluorescent product, 2-hydroxyethidium (2-OH-E+). In biological systems, another red fluorescent product, ethidium (E+), is also formed, usually at a much higher concentration than 2-OH-E+. In this article, we have reviewed the methods to selectively detect the superoxide-specific product (2-OH-E+) and the factors affecting its levels in cellular and biological systems. The most important conclusion of the present review is that it is nearly impossible to assess the intracellular levels of the superoxide specific product, 2-OH-E+, using the confocal microscopy or other fluorescence-based microscopic assays and that it is essential to measure by HPLC the intracellular HE and other oxidation products of HE, in addition to 2-OH-E+, in order to fully understand the origin of red fluorescence. The chemical reactivity of mitochondria-targeted hydroethidine (Mito-HE, MitoSOX Red ®) with superoxide is similar to the reactivity of HE with superoxide and therefore, all of the limitations attributed to the HE assay are applicable to Mito-HE (or Mito-SOX) as well. PMID:20116425

  10. The effect of superoxide dismutase mimetic and catalase on the quality of postthawed goat semen.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, Mojtaba; Forouzanfar, Mohsen; Hosseini, Sayyed Morteza; Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein Nasr

    2015-05-01

    Manganese(III) meso-tetrakis(N-ethylpyridinium-2-yl)porphyrin chloride (MnTE) is a cell-permeable superoxide dismutase mimetic agent which can convert superoxide to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Supplementation of MnTE to a commercial semen extender can protect sperm from superoxide but not H2O2. Therefore, we proposed that addition of catalase (0.0, 200, or 400 IU/mL) in combination with MnTE (0.1 μM) may further improve the cryopreservation efficiency of goat semen in commercially optimized freezing media such as Andromed. Therefore, ejaculates were obtained from three adult bucks twice a week during the breeding season and diluted with Andromed supplemented with or without MnTE and catalase and were frozen in liquid nitrogen. Sperm parameters and reactive oxygen species contents were evaluated 2 hours after dilution (before freezing) and after freezing/thawing. The results revealed that all the treatments significantly (P ≤ 0.05) improved sperm motility, viability, and membrane integrity after freezing and reduced reactive oxygen species content compared with the control group, but maximum improvement was obtained in MnTE + 400 IU/mL catalase. In addition, supplementation with these antioxidants significantly (P ≤ 0.05) increases the cleavage rate after IVF. In conclusion, the results of present study suggest that addition of antioxidant MnTE or catalase to commercial optimized media, such as Andromed, improves total motility, membrane integrity, and viability of goat semen samples after thawing. But the degree of improvement for these parameters significantly (P ≤ 0.05) higher when MnTE and catalase were simultaneously added to the cryopreservation media. PMID:25698161

  11. Structures of the superoxide reductase from Pyrococcus furiosus in the oxidized and reduced states.

    PubMed

    Yeh, A P; Hu, Y; Jenney, F E; Adams, M W; Rees, D C

    2000-03-14

    Superoxide reductase (SOR) is a blue non-heme iron protein that functions in anaerobic microbes as a defense mechanism against reactive oxygen species by catalyzing the reduction of superoxide to hydrogen peroxide [Jenney, F. E., Jr., Verhagen, M. F. J. M., Cui, X. , and Adams, M. W. W. (1999) Science 286, 306-309]. Crystal structures of SOR from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus have been determined in the oxidized and reduced forms to resolutions of 1.7 and 2.0 A, respectively. SOR forms a homotetramer, with each subunit adopting an immunoglobulin-like beta-barrel fold that coordinates a mononuclear, non-heme iron center. The protein fold and metal center are similar to those observed previously for the homologous protein desulfoferrodoxin from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans [Coelho, A. V., Matias, P., Fülöp, V., Thompson, A., Gonzalez, A., and Carrondo, M. A. (1997) J. Bioinorg. Chem. 2, 680-689]. Each iron is coordinated to imidazole nitrogens of four histidines in a planar arrangement, with a cysteine ligand occupying an axial position normal to this plane. In two of the subunits of the oxidized structure, a glutamate carboxylate serves as the sixth ligand to form an overall six-coordinate, octahedral coordinate environment. In the remaining two subunits, the sixth coordination site is either vacant or occupied by solvent molecules. The iron centers in all four subunits of the reduced structure exhibit pentacoordination. The structures of the oxidized and reduced forms of SOR suggest a mechanism by which superoxide accessibility may be controlled and define a possible binding site for rubredoxin, the likely physiological electron donor to SOR. PMID:10704199

  12. Pulmonary inflammation by ambient air particles is mediated by superoxide anion.

    PubMed

    Rhoden, Claudia Ramos; Ghelfi, Elisa; González-Flecha, Beatriz

    2008-01-01

    Lung inflammation is a key response to increased levels of particulate air pollution (PM); however, the cellular mechanisms leading to this response remain poorly understood. We have previously shown that oxidants are critical mediators of the inflammatory response elicited by inhalation of ambient air particles. Here we tested the possible role of a specific oxidant, superoxide anion, by using the membrane-permeable analog of superoxide dismutase, Mn(III) tetrakis(4-benzoic acid)porphyrin chloride (MnTBAP). Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were instilled with either urban air particles (UAP) or saline. MnTBAP-treated rats received 10 mg/kg (ip) MnTBAP 2 h prior to exposure to UAP. Recruitment of inflammatory cells into bronchoalveolar lavage was evaluated 4 h after instillation. Rats exposed to UAP showed significant increases in the total cell number (8.9 +/- 0.6 x 10(6); sham: 5.1 +/- 0.6 x 10(6), p < .02), the numbers of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (26 +/- 4%; sham: 6 +/- 1%, p < .0001), protein levels (1.2 +/- 0.5 mg/ml, sham: 0.4 +/- 0.1 mg/ml, p < .001), and a trend of increase in myeloperoxidase levels (5 +/- 1; sham: 2 +/- 1 mU/ml) in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Pretreatment with MnTBAP at a dose that prevented UAP-induced increases in oxidants effectively prevented increase in BAL cells (2.7 +/- 0.6 x 10(6), p < .0001 vs. UAP), PMN influx into the lungs (4 +/- 3%, p < .0001 vs. UAP), and increase in myeloperoxidase (2 +/- 1 mU/ml) and protein levels in BAL (0.1 +/- 0.1 mg/ml). These data indicate that superoxide anion is a critical mediator of the inflammatory response elicited by PM deposition in the lung. PMID:18236216

  13. Predicted effects of nitric oxide and superoxide on the vasoactivity of the afferent arteriole.

    PubMed

    Layton, Anita T; Edwards, Aurélie

    2015-10-15

    We expanded a published mathematical model of an afferent arteriole smooth muscle cell in rat kidney (Edwards A, Layton, AT. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 306: F34-F48, 2014) to understand how nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide (O(2)(-)) modulate the arteriolar diameter and its myogenic response. The present model includes the kinetics of NO and O(2)(-) formation, diffusion, and reaction. Also included are the effects of NO and its second messenger cGMP on cellular Ca²⁺ uptake and efflux, Ca²⁺-activated K⁺ currents, and myosin light chain phosphatase activity. The model considers as well pressure-induced increases in O(2)(-) production, O(2)(-)-mediated regulation of L-type Ca²⁺ channel conductance, and increased O(2)(-) production in spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR). Our results indicate that elevated O(2)(-) production in SHR is sufficient to account for observed differences between normotensive and hypertensive rats in the response of the afferent arteriole to NO synthase inhibition, Tempol, and angiotensin II at baseline perfusion pressures. In vitro, whether the myogenic response is stronger in SHR remains uncertain. Our model predicts that if mechanosensitive cation channels are not modulated by O(2)(-), then fractional changes in diameter induced by pressure elevations should be smaller in SHR than in normotensive rats. Our results also suggest that most NO diffuses out of the smooth muscle cell without being consumed, whereas most O(2)(-) is scavenged, by NO and superoxide dismutase. Moreover, the predicted effects of superoxide on arteriolar constriction are not predominantly due to its scavenging of NO. PMID:26180238

  14. Superoxide scavengers augment contractile but not energetic responses to hypoxia in rat diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Wright, V P; Klawitter, P F; Iscru, D F; Merola, A J; Clanton, T L

    2005-05-01

    Acute exposure to severe hypoxia depresses contractile function and induces adaptations in skeletal muscle that are only partially understood. Previous studies have demonstrated that antioxidants (AOXs) given during hypoxia partially protect contractile function, but this has not been a universal finding. This study confirms that specific AOXs, known to act primarily as superoxide scavengers, protect contractile function in severe hypoxia. Furthermore, the hypothesis is tested that the mechanism of protection involves preservation of high-energy phosphates (ATP, creatine phosphate) and reductions of P(i). Rat diaphragm muscle strips were treated with AOXs and subjected to 30 min of hypoxia. Contractile function was examined by using twitch and tetanic stimulations and the degree of elevation in passive force occurring during hypoxia (contracture). High-energy phosphates were measured at the end of 30-min hypoxia exposure. Treatment with the superoxide scavengers 4,5-dihydroxy-1,3-benzenedisulfonic acid (Tiron, 10 mM) or Mn(III)tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphyrin pentachloride (50 microM) suppressed contracture during hypoxia and protected maximum tetanic force. N-acetylcysteine (10 or 18 mM) had no influence on tetanic force production. Contracture during hypoxia without AOXs was also shown to be dependent on the extracellular Ca(2+) concentration. Although hypoxia resulted in only small reductions in ATP concentration, creatine phosphate concentration was decreased to approximately 10% of control. There were no consistent influences of the AOX treatments on high-energy phosphates during hypoxia. The results demonstrate that superoxide scavengers can protect contractile function and reduce contracture in hypoxia through a mechanism that does not involve preservation of high-energy phosphates. PMID:15640388

  15. Superoxide-dependent consumption of nitric oxide in biological media may confound in vitro experiments.

    PubMed Central

    Keynes, Robert G; Griffiths, Charmaine; Garthwaite, John

    2003-01-01

    NO functions ubiquitously as a biological messenger but has also been implicated in various pathologies, a role supported by many reports that exogenous or endogenous NO can kill cells in tissue culture. In the course of experiments aimed at examining the toxicity of exogenous NO towards cultured cells, we found that most of the NO delivered using a NONOate (diazeniumdiolate) donor was removed by reaction with the tissue-culture medium. Two NO-consuming ingredients were identified: Hepes buffer and, under laboratory lighting, the vitamin riboflavin. In each case, the loss of NO was reversed by the addition of superoxide dismutase. The effect of Hepes was observed over a range of NONOate concentrations (producing up to 1 microM NO). Furthermore, from measurements of soluble guanylate cyclase activity, Hepes-dependent NO consumption remained significant at the low nanomolar NO concentrations relevant to physiological NO signalling. The combination of Hepes and riboflavin (in the light) acted synergistically to the extent that, instead of a steady-state concentration of about 1 microM being generated, NO was undetectable (<10 nM). Again, the consumption could be inhibited by superoxide dismutase. A scheme is proposed whereby a "vicious cycle" of superoxide radical (O(2)(.-)) formation occurs as a result of oxidation of Hepes to its radical species, fuelled by the subsequent reaction of O(2)(.-) with NO to form peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)). The inadvertent production of ONOO(-) and other reactive species in biological media, or the associated loss of NO, may contribute to the adverse effects, or otherwise, of NO in vitro. PMID:12366375

  16. [Acidity and interaction with superoxide anion radical of echinochrome and its structural analogs].

    PubMed

    Lebedev, A V; Ivanova, M V; Krasnovid, N I; Kol'tsova, E A

    1999-01-01

    Weak acid properties, autoxidation and interaction of natural polyhydroxy1,4-naphthoquinones (PHNQ) with superoxide anion-radical (O2-.) were studied by methods of potentiometric titration, polarography, and UV- and visible spectrophotometry. Sea urchin pigments 3-acetyl-2,6,7-trihydroxynaphthazarin (spinochrome C), 2,3,6,7-trihydroxynaphthazarin (spinochrome D), 2,3,6,7-trihydroxynaphthazarin (spinochrome E), 6-ethyl-2,3,7-trihydroxynaphthazarin (echinochrome A), synthetic 2,3-dihydroxy-6,7-dimethylnaphthazarin and 6-ethyl-2,3,7-trimethoxynaphthazarin (trimethoxyechinochrome A) were tested. Determined dissociation constants (pKi) were in the range of pH 5.3-8.5 (40% ethanol solvent). PHNQ autoxidation observrd in basic pH were inhibited by superoxide dismutase. Xanthine and xanthine oxidase was applied for O2-. generation. Interaction with O2-. led to sufficient time-dependent changing in spectra of echinochrome A, spinochromes D and E. There was weak O2-. influence on spinochrome C spectrum and no changing in trimethoxyechinochrome A spectrum. The spectra, that were transforming during time of reaction, contained pronounced isobestic point. It means formation the single reaction product. We proposed formation of 1,2,3,4-tetraketones from 2,3,5,8-tetrahydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinones (echinochrome A, spinochromes D and E) due to O2-.-induced oxidation of their OH-groups in 2 and 3 positions. Reaction constants were determined by competition method using nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT). The reaction constants were about 10(4)-10(5) M-1s-1. They were decreased in the order: echinochrome A > spinochrome D > spinochrome C > NBT > trimethoxyechinochrome A. Thus, we concluded that some of the natural PGNQ, containing hydroxyl groups in 2nd and 3rd positions, could operate as powerful superoxide anion-radical scavengers. PMID:10378300

  17. Acute ethanol induces apoptosis by stimulating TRPC6 via elevation of superoxide in oxygenated podocytes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao-Yu; Liu, Bing-Chen; Wang, Li-Hua; Yang, Li-Li; Bao, Qing; Zhai, Yu-Jia; Alli, Abdel A; Thai, Tiffany L; Eaton, Douglas C; Wang, Wei-Zhi; Ma, He-Ping

    2015-05-01

    Our recent studies indicate that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) only at high concentrations can cause oxidative stress in renal epithelial cells and induce apoptosis of podocytes. Consistently, the present study shows that H2O2, even at 1 mM, failed to induce intracellular oxidative stress and apoptosis of the podocytes due to efficient activity of catalase, an enzyme which degrades H2O2 to produce water and oxygen (O2). However, H2O2 acted as a source of O2 to allow acute ethanol to induce superoxide production and cause apoptosis of the podocytes. In contrast, acute ethanol alone did not elevate intracellular superoxide, even though it stimulates expression and translocation of p47phox to the plasma membrane. Inhibition of catalase abolished not only O2 production from H2O2 degradation, but also NOX2-dependent superoxide production in the podocytes challenged by both H2O2 and acute ethanol. In parallel, acute ethanol in the presence of H2O2, but neither ethanol nor H2O2 alone, stimulated transient receptor potential canonical 6 (TRPC6) channels and caused TRPC6-dependent elevation of intracellular Ca2+. These data suggest that exogenous H2O2 does not induce oxidative stress due to rapid degradation to produce O2 in the podocytes, but the oxygenated podocytes become sensitive to acute ethanol challenge and undergo apoptosis via a TRPC6-dependent elevation of intracellular Ca2+. Since cultured podocytes are considered in hypoxic conditions, H2O2 may be used as a source of O2 to establish an ischemia-reperfusion model in some type of cultured cells in which H2O2 does not directly induce intracellular oxidative stress. PMID:25601712

  18. Six-coordinate manganese(3+) in catalysis by yeast manganese superoxide dismutase

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Yuewei; Gralla, Edith Butler; Schumacher, Mikhail; Cascio, Duilio; Cabelli, Diane E.; Valentine, Joan Selverstone

    2012-10-10

    Reduction of superoxide (O{sub 2}{sup -}) by manganese-containing superoxide dismutase occurs through either a 'prompt protonation' pathway, or an 'inner-sphere' pathway, with the latter leading to formation of an observable Mn-peroxo complex. We recently reported that wild-type (WT) manganese superoxide dismutases (MnSODs) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans are more gated toward the 'prompt protonation' pathway than human and bacterial MnSODs and suggested that this could result from small structural changes in the second coordination sphere of manganese. We report here that substitution of a second-sphere residue, Tyr34, by phenylalanine (Y34F) causes the MnSOD from S. cerevisiae to react exclusively through the 'inner-sphere' pathway. At neutral pH, we have a surprising observation that protonation of the Mn-peroxo complex in the mutant yeast enzyme occurs through a fast pathway, leading to a putative six-coordinate Mn3+ species, which actively oxidizes O{sub 2}{sup -} in the catalytic cycle. Upon increasing pH, the fast pathway is gradually replaced by a slow proton-transfer pathway, leading to the well-characterized five-coordinate Mn{sup 3+}. We here propose and compare two hypothetical mechanisms for the mutant yeast enzyme, diffeeing in the structure of the Mn-peroxo complex yet both involving formation of the active six-coordinate Mn{sup 3+} and proton transfer from a second-sphere water molecule, which has substituted for the -OH of Tyr34, to the Mn-peroxo complex. Because WT and the mutant yeast MnSOD both rest in the 2+ state and become six-coordinate when oxidized up from Mn{sup 2+}, six-coordinate Mn{sup 3+} species could also actively function in the mechanism of WT yeast MnSODs.

  19. Six-coordinate manganese(3+) in catalysis by yeast manganese superoxide dismutase

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Yuewei; Butler Gralla, Edith; Schumacher, Mikhail; Cascio, Duilio; Cabelli, Diane E.; Selverstone Valentine, Joan

    2012-01-01

    Reduction of superoxide () by manganese-containing superoxide dismutase occurs through either a “prompt protonation” pathway, or an “inner-sphere” pathway, with the latter leading to formation of an observable Mn-peroxo complex. We recently reported that wild-type (WT) manganese superoxide dismutases (MnSODs) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans are more gated toward the “prompt protonation” pathway than human and bacterial MnSODs and suggested that this could result from small structural changes in the second coordination sphere of manganese. We report here that substitution of a second-sphere residue, Tyr34, by phenylalanine (Y34F) causes the MnSOD from S. cerevisiae to react exclusively through the “inner-sphere” pathway. At neutral pH, we have a surprising observation that protonation of the Mn-peroxo complex in the mutant yeast enzyme occurs through a fast pathway, leading to a putative six-coordinate Mn3+ species, which actively oxidizes in the catalytic cycle. Upon increasing pH, the fast pathway is gradually replaced by a slow proton-transfer pathway, leading to the well-characterized five-coordinate Mn3+. We here propose and compare two hypothetical mechanisms for the mutant yeast enzyme, differing in the structure of the Mn-peroxo complex yet both involving formation of the active six-coordinate Mn3+ and proton transfer from a second-sphere water molecule, which has substituted for the ─OH of Tyr34, to the Mn-peroxo complex. Because WT and the mutant yeast MnSOD both rest in the 2+ state and become six-coordinate when oxidized up from Mn2+, six-coordinate Mn3+ species could also actively function in the mechanism of WT yeast MnSODs. PMID:22908245

  20. [Determination of neutrophil function by measuring superoxide production with whole blood flow cytometry].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, S; Sasaki, Y; Hirota, M; Okumura, N; Furihata, K; Tozuka, M; Katsuyama, T

    1997-11-01

    The function of neutrophil can be evaluated by measuring oxidative metabolism using chemiluminescence, tetrazolium dye reduction or the others. Those results are not always satisfactory which would be caused by subtle difference in each preparation of the reagents and the lack of reproducibility. Recently, flow cytometric procedures for semi-quantitating superoxide production in neutrophils have been developed to evaluate their function. This procedure, which requires only small amount of whole blood, can easily and rapidly yield reproducible and reliable data. In this study, we optimized analytical conditions and then determined reference interval to evaluate neutrophil function of patients with various disorders. Optimal concentrations and incubation times of DCFH-DA and PMA were 5 mumol/l for 15 minutes and 25 micrograms/ml for 20 minutes, respectively. Production of superoxide in neutrophil was represented by relative fluorescence intensity(RFI) with assay coefficient of variance(CV) of 4.0-11.1%. Neutrophils had to be examined within 2 hours after venipuncture to obtain reliable data. Reference interval was determined as 170.4 +/- 58.7(mean +/- SD) RFI. Neutrophil function of patients with neutropenia, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria(PNH), renal failure, systemic lupus erythematosus(SLE), myeloperoxidase deficiency, myelodysplastic syndrome(MDS), and diabetes mellitus were within the reference interval as evaluated by this method. Only neutrophils of chronic granulomatous disease, which is known to give clearly low superoxide production, showed actually decreased value. These results indicate that this procedure would be clinically useful for diagnosis of patient with impaired neutrophil function. PMID:9396345

  1. Formation and disappearance of superoxide radicals in aqueous solutions. [79 references

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, A O; Bielski, B H.J.

    1980-01-01

    A literature review of superoxide radicals in aqueous solutions is presented covering the following: history; methods of formation of aqueous HO/sub 2//HO/sub 2//sup -/ by radiolysis and photolysis, electrolysis, mixing nonaqueous solutions into water, chemical reactions, enzymatic generation of O/sub 2//sup -/, and photosensitization; and properties of HO/sub 2//O/sub 2//sup -/ in aqueous solution, which cover spontaneous dismutation rates, pk and absorption spectra, catalyzed dismutation, thermodynamics and the so-called Haber-Weiss Reaction.

  2. The preparation of calcium superoxide at subambient temperatures and pressures. [oxygen source for breathing apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballou, E. V.; Wood, P. C.; Spitze, L. A.; Wydeven, T.; Stein, R.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of disproportionations at lower temperatures and also of a range of reaction chamber pressures on the preparation of calcium superoxide, Ca(O2)2, from calcium peroxide diperoxyhydrate were studied. About 60% purity of product was obtained by a disproportionation procedure. The significance of features of this procedure for a prospective scale-up of the mass prepared in a single experiment is considered. The optimum pressure for product purity was determined, and the use of a molecular sieve desiccant is described.

  3. Function of periplasmic copper-zinc superoxide dismutase in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Steinman, H M

    1993-02-01

    Caulobacter crescentus is one of a small number of bacterial species that contain a periplasmic copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD). A C. crescentus mutant, with the CuZnSOD gene interrupted by a promoterless cat gene, was constructed and characterized to analyze CuZnSOD function. Periplasmic SOD does not protect against oxyradical damage in the cytosol or play a major role in maintaining the integrity of the cell envelope. Studies of the effect of sodium citrate on plating efficiency suggest that CuZnSOD protects a periplasmic or membrane function(s) requiring magnesium or calcium. PMID:8432713

  4. Lung Macrophages “Digest” Carbon Nanotubes Using a Superoxide/Peroxynitrite Oxidative Pathway

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to short-lived neutrophils, macrophages display persistent presence in the lung of animals after pulmonary exposure to carbon nanotubes. While effective in the clearance of bacterial pathogens and injured host cells, the ability of macrophages to “digest” carbonaceous nanoparticles has not been documented. Here, we used chemical, biochemical, and cell and animal models and demonstrated oxidative biodegradation of oxidatively functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes via superoxide/NO* → peroxynitrite-driven oxidative pathways of activated macrophages facilitating clearance of nanoparticles from the lung. PMID:24871084

  5. Regulation of Cu,Zn- and Mn-superoxide dismutase transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Galiazzo, F; Labbe-Bois, R

    1993-01-01

    The regulation of Cu,Zn- and Mn-superoxide dismutases (SOD) was investigated by Northern blotting and gene fusions of SOD1 and SOD2 promoters with the beta-galactosidase reporter gene. Cu,ZnSOD expression was increased 3-fold under glucose derepressing conditions, and decreased 4- to 6-fold by oxygen or heme deficiency. MnSOD expression was increased 5-fold by glucose derepression, and decreased 8- to 10-fold by anaerobiosis and 4- to 5-fold by heme deficiency. Induction by paraquat was modest, about 50% for SOD1 and 100% for SOD2; it was apparently independent of the respiratory chain function. PMID:8417979

  6. Limitation of dietary copper and zinc decreases superoxide dismutase activity in the onion fly, Delia antiqua.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, T; Ooe, S; Ishikawa, Y

    1997-06-01

    Larvae of the onion fly, Delia antiqua, have lower superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity when they are fed a defined synthetic diet that contains no copper or zinc. SOD activity was rapidly recovered when these larvae were fed onion bulbs. Addition of copper and zinc to the synthetic diet also led to the recovery of SOD activity. Results of an immunoblotting analysis using anti-D. antiqua CuZnSOD mouse monoclonal antibody suggest that this alteration of SOD activity is dependent on the amount of CuZnSOD. PMID:9172377

  7. Activity of Superoxide Dismutase and Catalase in Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) in Response to Carbendazim.

    PubMed

    Sangeetha, R

    2010-01-01

    Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) is an annual herb, used as a spice and traditionally as medicine. Fenugreek finds its uses in treating hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia and disorders of gastro-intestinal and cardiovascular systems. Fenugreek cultivation in India is affected by fungal diseases like root-rot and damping-off and fungicides like carbendazim are used to overcome these infections. Fungicides play both positive and negative role in plants; fungicides protect plants from diseases and also exert oxidative stress simultaneously. This report is on the response of antioxidants, superoxide dismutase and catalase in fenugreek seeds and plants treated to different concentrations of carbendazim. PMID:20582202

  8. Photochemical method for generating superoxide radicals (O.sub.2.sup.-) in aqueous solutions

    DOEpatents

    Holroyd, Richard A.; Bielski, Benon H. J.

    1980-01-01

    A photochemical method and apparatus for generating superoxide radicals (ub.2.sup.-) in an aqueous solution by means of a vacuum-ultraviolet lamp of simple design. The lamp is a microwave powered rare gas device that emits far-ultraviolet light. The lamp includes an inner loop of high purity quartz tubing through which flows an oxygen-saturated sodium formate solution. The inner loop is designed so that the solution is subjected to an intense flux of far-ultraviolet light. This causes the solution to photodecompose and form the product radical (O.sub.2.sup.-).

  9. Detection, Distribution and Characterization of Novel Superoxide Dismutases from Yersinia enterocolitica Biovar 1A

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Mahesh Shanker; Gupta, Vatika; Virdi, Jugsharan Singh

    2013-01-01

    Background Superoxide dismutases (SODs) cause dismutation of superoxide radicals to hydrogen peroxide and oxygen. Besides protecting the cells against oxidative damage by endogenously generated oxygen radicals, SODs play an important role in intraphagocytic survival of pathogenic bacteria. The complete genome sequences of Yersinia enterocolitica strains show presence of three different sod genes. However, not much is known about the types of SODs present in Y. enterocolitica, their characteristics and role in virulence and intraphagocytic survival of this organism. Methodology/Principal Findings This study reports detection and distribution of the three superoxide dismutase (sodA, sodB and sodC) genes in 59 strains of Y. enterocolitica and related species. The majority (94%) of the strains carried all three genes and constitutive expression of sodA and sodB was detected in 88% of the strains. Expression of sodC was not observed in any of the strains. The sodA, sodB and sodC genes of Y. enterocolitica were cloned in pET28a (+) vector. Recombinant SodA (82 kDa) and SodB (21 kDa) were expressed as homotetramer and monomer respectively, and showed activity over a broad range of pH (3.0–8.0) and temperature (4–70°C). SodA and SodB showed optimal activity at 4°C under acidic pH of 6.0 and 4.0 respectively. The secondary structures of recombinant SodA and SodB were studied using circular dichroism. Production of YeSodC was not observed even after cloning and expression in E. coli BL21(DE3) cells. A SodA− SodB− Escherichia coli strain which was unable to grow in medium supplemented with paraquat showed normal growth after complementation with Y. enterocolitica SodA or SodB. Conclusions/Significance This is the first report on the distribution and characterization of superoxide dismutases from Y. enterocolitica. The low pH optima of both SodA and SodB encoded by Y. enterocolitica seem to implicate their role in acidic environments such as the intraphagocytic

  10. Direct Evidence of Solution-Mediated Superoxide Transport and Organic Radical Formation in Sodium-Oxygen Batteries.

    PubMed

    Xia, Chun; Fernandes, Russel; Cho, Franklin H; Sudhakar, Niranjan; Buonacorsi, Brandon; Walker, Sean; Xu, Meng; Baugh, Jonathan; Nazar, Linda F

    2016-09-01

    Advanced large-scale electrochemical energy storage requires cost-effective battery systems with high energy densities. Aprotic sodium-oxygen (Na-O2) batteries offer advantages, being comprised of low-cost elements and possessing much lower charge overpotential and higher reversibility compared to their lithium-oxygen battery cousins. Although such differences have been explained by solution-mediated superoxide transport, the underlying nature of this mechanism is not fully understood. Water has been suggested to solubilize superoxide via formation of hydroperoxyl (HO2), but direct evidence of these HO2 radical species in cells has proven elusive. Here, we use ESR spectroscopy at 210 K to identify and quantify soluble HO2 radicals in the electrolyte-cold-trapped in situ to prolong their lifetime-in a Na-O2 cell. These investigations are coupled to parallel SEM studies that image crystalline sodium superoxide (NaO2) on the carbon cathode. The superoxide radicals were spin-trapped via reaction with 5,5-dimethyl-pyrroline N-oxide at different electrochemical stages, allowing monitoring of their production and consumption during cycling. Our results conclusively demonstrate that transport of superoxide from cathode to electrolyte leads to the nucleation and growth of NaO2, which follows classical mechanisms based on the variation of superoxide content in the electrolyte and its correlation with the crystallization of cubic NaO2. The changes in superoxide content upon charge show that charge proceeds through the reverse solution process. Furthermore, we identify the carbon-centered/oxygen-centered alkyl radicals arising from attack of these solubilized HO2 species on the diglyme solvent. This is the first direct evidence of such species, which are likely responsible for electrolyte degradation. PMID:27498623

  11. The 2-Oxoacid Dehydrogenase Complexes in Mitochondria Can Produce Superoxide/Hydrogen Peroxide at Much Higher Rates Than Complex I*

    PubMed Central

    Quinlan, Casey L.; Goncalves, Renata L. S.; Hey-Mogensen, Martin; Yadava, Nagendra; Bunik, Victoria I.; Brand, Martin D.

    2014-01-01

    Several flavin-dependent enzymes of the mitochondrial matrix utilize NAD+ or NADH at about the same operating redox potential as the NADH/NAD+ pool and comprise the NADH/NAD+ isopotential enzyme group. Complex I (specifically the flavin, site IF) is often regarded as the major source of matrix superoxide/H2O2 production at this redox potential. However, the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (OGDH), branched-chain 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase (BCKDH), and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complexes are also capable of considerable superoxide/H2O2 production. To differentiate the superoxide/H2O2-producing capacities of these different mitochondrial sites in situ, we compared the observed rates of H2O2 production over a range of different NAD(P)H reduction levels in isolated skeletal muscle mitochondria under conditions that favored superoxide/H2O2 production from complex I, the OGDH complex, the BCKDH complex, or the PDH complex. The rates from all four complexes increased at higher NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+ ratios, although the 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes produced superoxide/H2O2 at high rates only when oxidizing their specific 2-oxoacid substrates and not in the reverse reaction from NADH. At optimal conditions for each system, superoxide/H2O2 was produced by the OGDH complex at about twice the rate from the PDH complex, four times the rate from the BCKDH complex, and eight times the rate from site IF of complex I. Depending on the substrates present, the dominant sites of superoxide/H2O2 production at the level of NADH may be the OGDH and PDH complexes, but these activities may often be misattributed to complex I. PMID:24515115

  12. Nox2-dependent glutathionylation of endothelial NOS leads to uncoupled superoxide production and endothelial barrier dysfunction in acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Feng; Szczepaniak, William S.; Shiva, Sruti; Liu, Huanbo; Wang, Yinna; Wang, Ling; Wang, Ying; Kelley, Eric E.; Chen, Alex F.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    Microvascular barrier integrity is dependent on bioavailable nitric oxide (NO) produced locally by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Under conditions of limited substrate or cofactor availability or by enzymatic modification, eNOS may become uncoupled, producing superoxide in lieu of NO. This study was designed to investigate how eNOS-dependent superoxide production contributes to endothelial barrier dysfunction in inflammatory lung injury and its regulation. C57BL/6J mice were challenged with intratracheal LPS. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was analyzed for protein accumulation, and lung tissue homogenate was assayed for endothelial NOS content and function. Human lung microvascular endothelial cell (HLMVEC) monolayers were exposed to LPS in vitro, and barrier integrity and superoxide production were measured. Biopterin species were quantified, and coimmunoprecipitation (Co-IP) assays were performed to identify protein interactions with eNOS that putatively drive uncoupling. Mice exposed to LPS demonstrated eNOS-dependent increased alveolar permeability without evidence for altered canonical NO signaling. LPS-induced superoxide production and permeability in HLMVEC were inhibited by the NOS inhibitor nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, eNOS-targeted siRNA, the eNOS cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin, and superoxide dismutase. Co-IP indicated that LPS stimulated the association of eNOS with NADPH oxidase 2 (Nox2), which correlated with augmented eNOS S-glutathionylation both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, Nox2-specific inhibition prevented LPS-induced eNOS modification and increases in both superoxide production and permeability. These data indicate that eNOS uncoupling contributes to superoxide production and barrier dysfunction in the lung microvasculature after exposure to LPS. Furthermore, the results implicate Nox2-mediated eNOS-S-glutathionylation as a mechanism underlying LPS-induced eNOS uncoupling in the lung microvasculature. PMID:25326583

  13. Norepinephrine increases NADPH oxidase-derived superoxide in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells via α-adrenergic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Deo, Shekhar H.; Jenkins, Nathan T.; Padilla, Jaume; Parrish, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    Many diseases associated with sympathoexcitation also exhibit elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS). A recent animal study indicated that exogenous administration of the sympathetic neurotransmitter norepinephrine (NE) increased systemic ROS via circulating leukocytes. The mechanisms contributing to this effect of NE and whether these findings can be translated to humans is unknown. Thus we tested the hypothesis that NE increases superoxide production in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) via NADPH oxidase. Primary human PBMCs were freshly isolated from healthy young men and placed in culture. After NE (50 pg/ml, 50 ng/ml, and 50 μg/ml concentrations) or control treatments, NADPH oxidase mRNA expression (gp91phox, p22phox, and p67phox) was assessed using real-time RT-PCR, and intracellular superoxide production was measured using dihydroethidium fluorescence. PBMCs were also treated with selective adrenergic agonists-antagonists to determine the receptor population involved. In addition, CD14+ monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion was determined using a fluorescent-based assay. NE significantly increased NADPH oxidase gene expression and intracellular superoxide production in a time-dependent manner (superoxide: 0.9 ± 0.2 fold, 6 h vs. 3.0 ± 0.3 fold, 36 h; NE, 50 μg/ml; P < 0.05). The sustained increase in NE-induced superoxide production was primarily mediated via α-adrenergic receptors, preferentially α2-receptors. The NADPH oxidase blocker diphenylene iodonium and protein kinase C inhibitor Staurosporine significantly attenuated NE-induced increases in superoxide production. Importantly, NE treatment increased CD14+ monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion. These findings indicate for the first time that NE increases superoxide production in freshly isolated primary human PBMCs via NADPH oxidase through α-adrenergic receptors, an effect facilitating monocyte adhesion to the endothelium. PMID:24068047

  14. Superoxide dismutase derivative prevents oxidative damage in liver and kidney of rats induced by exhausting exercise.

    PubMed

    Radák, Z; Asano, K; Inoue, M; Kizaki, T; Oh-Ishi, S; Suzuki, K; Taniguchi, N; Ohno, H

    1996-01-01

    To prevent oxidative tissue damage induced by strenuous exercise in the liver and kidney superoxide dismutase derivative (SM-SOD), which circulated bound to albumin with a half-life of 6 h, was injected intraperitoneally into rats. Exhausting treadmill running caused a significant increase in the activities of xanthine oxidase (XO), and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) in addition to concentrations of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) in hepatic tissue immediately after running. There was a definite increase in the immunoreactive content of mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) 1 day after the running. Meanwhile, the TBARS concentration in the kidney was markedly elevated 3 days after running. The activities of GPX, and catalase in the kidney increased significantly immediately and on days 1 and 3 following the test. The immunoreactive content of Mn-SOD also increased 1 day after running. The exercise induced no significant changes in immunoreactive Cu, Zn-SOD content in either tissue. The administration of SM-SOD provided effective protection against lipid peroxidation, and significantly attenuated the alterations in XO and all the anti-oxidant enzymes, measured. In summary, the present data would suggest that exhausting exercise may induce XO-derived oxidative damage in the liver, while the increase in lipid peroxidation in the kidney might be the result of washout-dependent accumulation of peroxidised metabolites. We found that the administration of SM-SOD provided excellent protection against exercise-induced oxidative stress in both liver and kidney. PMID:8820884

  15. Effects of salinity change on two superoxide dismutases (SODs) in juvenile marbled eel Anguilla marmorata

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Salinity is one of the most important factors that affect the fish growth and survival. Superoxide dismutases (SODs), as the primary antioxidant enzymes, play a first role in the process of preventing oxidative stress caused by excessive superoxide anion (O\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}${}_{2}^{-}$\\end{document}2−) in living organisms. In the present study, we investigated the effects of salinity on the gene expressions as well as enzymatic activities of MnSOD and Cu/ZnSOD in gill, intestine, kidney, liver and muscle tissues of the marbled eel Anguilla marmorata. We found that the liver might possess stronger redox capacity compared with other tissues. Furthermore, the gene expressions and enzymatic activities of SODs in juvenile marbled eels could be effectively enhanced by low salinity but inhibited when the salinity was higher than the body tolerance. Our findings indicated that MnSOD and Cu/ZnSOD played vital roles in the adaptation of marbled eels to salinity variation, which contributed to the elucidation of physiological adaptation and regulatory mechanism of SODs in eels. PMID:27547518

  16. cap alpha. -Naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT) stimulates the release of superoxide by rat neutrophils in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, R.A.; Hewett, J.

    1986-03-01

    ..cap alpha..-Naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT) is an hepatotoxicant that produces cholestasis and hyperbilirubinemia in rats. Its mechanism of action is unknown. The observation that polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) accumulate in the bile ductular region of the liver following ANIT administration prompted us to examine the ability of ANIT to stimulate these cells. PMNs elicited from rat peritoneum were treated with ANIT in vitro to test for the release of superoxide anion (O/sub 2//sup -/). ANIT stimulated O/sub 2//sup -/ release from PMNs in a concentration-dependent manner. Maximal O/sub 2//sup -/ release was achieved by an ANIT concentration of 110 ..mu.. M. O/sub 2//sup -/ release was rapid after the first few minutes of ANIT addition and ceased entirely between 10 and 15 minutes. An increase in the extracellular activity of lactate dehydrogenase also occurred after a 5-10 minute lag phase following ANIT addition. PMNs exposed to ANIT also failed to exclude trypan blue dye, either in the presence or in the absence of superoxide dismutase and catalase, suggesting a direct, oxygen radical-independent, cytotoxic effect of ANIT on PMNs. Release of the lysosomal enzyme, ..beta..-glucuronidase, also occurred within 5 min following exposure of PMNs to ANIT. These results indicate that ANIT stimulates the release of cytotoxic agents from rat PMNs in vitro and suggests that the direct stimulation of PMNs in vivo may contribute to ANIT-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

  17. Micronutrients and superoxide dismutase in postmenopausal women with chronic periodontitis: a pilot interventional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The study was aimed at investigating changes in periodontal parameters and superoxide dismutase activity triggered by root surface debridement with and without micronutrient supplementation in postmenopausal women. Methods Forty-three postmenopausal chronic periodontitis patients were divided into two groups: group 1 (n=22) were provided periodontal treatment in the form of scaling and root planing (SRP) and group 2 (n=21) patients received SRP along with systemic administration of micronutrient antioxidants. Patients in both groups were subjected to root surface debridement. Group 2 patients also received adjunctive micronutrient antioxidant supplementation. Serum and salivary superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity along with periodontal parameters were recorded at baseline and 3 months after therapy. Results Salivary and serum SOD values significantly (P<0.05) improved with periodontal treatment. Improvement in systemic enzymatic antioxidant status along with reduction in gingival inflammation and bleeding on probing (%) sites was significantly greater in group 2 as compared to group 1. Conclusions Adjunctive micronutrient supplements reduce periodontal inflammation and improve the status of systemic enzymatic antioxidants in postmenopausal women. Graphical Abstract PMID:25177523

  18. Diversity, Function and Evolution of Genes Coding for Putative Ni-Containing Superoxide Dismutases

    SciTech Connect

    Dupont,C.; Neupane, K.; Shearer, J.; Palenik, B.

    2008-01-01

    We examined the phylogenetic distribution, functionality and evolution of the sodN gene family, which has been shown to code for a unique Ni-containing isoform of superoxide dismutase (Ni-SOD) in Streptomyces. Many of the putative sodN sequences retrieved from public domain genomic and metagenomic databases are quite divergent from structurally and functionally characterized Ni-SOD. Structural bioinformatics studies verified that the divergent members of the sodN protein family code for similar three-dimensional structures and identified evolutionarily conserved amino acid residues. Structural and biochemical studies of the N-terminus 'Ni-hook' motif coded for by the putative sodN sequences confirmed both Ni (II) ligating and superoxide dismutase activity. Both environmental and organismal genomes expanded the previously noted phylogenetic distribution of sodN, and the sequences form four well-separated clusters, with multiple subclusters. The phylogenetic distribution of sodN suggests that the gene has been acquired via horizontal gene transfer by numerous organisms of diverse phylogenetic background, including both Eukaryotes and Prokaryotes. The presence of sodN correlates with the genomic absence of the gene coding for Fe-SOD, a structurally and evolutionarily distinct isoform of SOD. Given the low levels of Fe found in the marine environment from where many sequences were attained, we suggest that the replacement of Fe-SOD with Ni-SOD may be an evolutionary adaptation to reduce iron requirements.

  19. Superoxide production, oxidative damage and enzymatic antioxidant defenses in shark skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    López-Cruz, Roberto Isaac; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Galván-Magaña, Felipe

    2010-05-01

    Pelagic sharks, unlike teleost fish, require constant active swimming to obtain a suitable oxygen (O(2)) supply. An increase in O(2) consumption during exercise enhances production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We hypothesized that shark species that display vigorous exercise, such as Isurus oxyrinchus and Carcharhinus falciformis, have higher ROS production and, in consequence, higher antioxidant enzyme activities in muscle in comparison with species with less active swimming, like Sphyrna zygaena. Superoxide radical (O(2)(*-)) production, lipid peroxidation levels (TBARS) and the activity of antioxidant enzymes: superoxide dismutase (total, t-SOD; manganese-dependent, Mn-SOD, and copper and zinc-dependent, Cu, Zn-SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and glutathione reductase (GR), were measured by spectrophotometric assays in skeletal muscle extracts of three shark species (C. falciformis, I. oxyrinchus and S. zygaena). Higher O(2)(*-) production and GPx and GST activities (p<0.05) were found in C. falciformis and I. oxyrinchus than in S. zygaena. These results suggest that in antioxidant enzymes (GPx, GST) activity suffices to balance the production of ROS and to maintain lower TBARS levels (p<0.05) than in C. falciformis or S. zygaena, contributing to the capacity of I. oxyrinchus to maintain high muscular activity. PMID:20060057

  20. IFN-beta-induced reduction of superoxide anion generation by macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Boraschi, D; Ghezzi, P; Salmona, M; Tagliabue, A

    1982-01-01

    Resident mouse peritoneal macrophages (M phi) produced significant amounts of superoxide anion (O2-) in response to phagocytic stimuli. When M phi were exposed in vitro for 20 hr to fibroblast interferon (IFN-beta), their capacity to release O2- was significantly reduced, such reduction being more evident with increasing IFN-beta concentrations. In contrast, O2- production by M phi exposed for 20 hr to the lymphokine macrophage activating factor (MAF) or treated with either MAF or IFN-beta for 4 hr was not significantly different from that of control cells. This pattern of activity closely followed that of M phi-mediated suppression of lymphocyte proliferation, which was dramatically reduced by 20 hr exposure of M phi to IFN-beta, but unchanged by treatment with MAF. No correlation was however found between superoxide anion generation and enhancement of tumoricidal capacity in IFN-beta-treated M phi. We thus concluded that O2- does not play a relevant role in IFN-beta-induced M phi cytolysis, whereas the reduction of O2- production could be of major importance in the decrease of M phi suppression induced by IFN-beta. PMID:6175565

  1. Increased resistance to oxidative stress in transgenic plants that overexpress chloroplastic Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, A S; Heinen, J L; Holaday, A S; Burke, J J; Allen, R D

    1993-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants that express a chimeric gene that encodes chloroplast-localized Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) from pea have been developed. To investigate whether increased expression of chloroplast-targeted SOD could alter the resistance of photosynthesis to environmental stress, these plants were subjected to chilling temperatures and moderate (500 mumol of quanta per m2 per s) or high (1500 mumol of quanta per m2 per s) light intensity. During exposure to moderate stress, transgenic SOD plants retained rates of photosynthesis approximately 20% higher than untransformed tobacco plants, implicating active oxygen species in the reduction of photosynthesis during chilling. Unlike untransformed plants, transgenic SOD plants were capable of maintaining nearly 90% of their photosynthetic capacity (determined by their photosynthetic rates at 25 degrees C) following exposure to chilling at high light intensity for 4 hr. These plants also showed reduced levels of light-mediated cellular damage from the superoxide-generating herbicide methyl viologen. These results demonstrate that SOD is a critical component of the active-oxygen-scavenging system of plant chloroplasts and indicate that modification of SOD expression in transgenic plants can improve plant stress tolerance. Images PMID:8434026

  2. Ras Oncogene-Mediated Progressive Silencing of Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase in Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cammarota, Francesca; de Vita, Gabriella; Salvatore, Marco; Laukkanen, Mikko O.

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3) is a secreted enzyme that uses superoxide anion as a substrate in a dismutase reaction that results in the formation of hydrogen peroxide. Both of these reactive oxygen species affect growth signaling in cells. Although SOD3 has growth-supporting characteristics, the expression of SOD3 is downregulated in epithelial cancer cells. In the current work, we studied the mechanisms regulating SOD3 expression in vitro using thyroid cell models representing different stages of thyroid cancer. We demonstrate that a low level of RAS activation increases SOD3 mRNA synthesis that then gradually decreases with increasing levels of RAS activation and the decreasing degree of differentiation of the cancer cells. Our data indicate that SOD3 regulation can be divided into two classes. The first class involves RAS–driven reversible regulation of SOD3 expression that can be mediated by the following mechanisms: RAS GTPase regulatory genes that are responsible for SOD3 self-regulation; RAS-stimulated p38 MAPK activation; and RAS-activated increased expression of the mir21 microRNA, which inversely correlates with sod3 mRNA expression. The second class involves permanent silencing of SOD3 mediated by epigenetic DNA methylation in cells that represent more advanced cancers. Therefore, the work suggests that SOD3 belongs to the group of ras oncogene-silenced genes. PMID:26550576

  3. Evolutive and structural characterization of Nostoc commune iron-superoxide dismutase that is fit for modification.

    PubMed

    Ma, Y; Lu, M; Li, J-Y; Qin, Y; Gong, X-G

    2012-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) has extensive clinical applications for protecting organisms from toxic oxidation. In this study, the integrated iron-superoxide dismutase gene (fe-sod) coding sequence of Nostoc commune stain CHEN was cloned from genomic DNA and compared to sods from other reported algae. These analyses of immunology and phylogenetics indicated that this Fe-SOD is considerably homologous with SODs from lower prokaryotes (Fe-SOD or Mn-SOD) but not those from higher animals (Cu/Zn-SOD). In addition, the N. commune Fe-SOD shows 67 to 93% protein sequence identity to 10 other algal Fe-SODs (or Mn-SODs) and 69 to 93% gene sequence identity. Rare nonsynonymous substitutions imply that algal SODs are being subjected to strong natural selection. Interestingly, the N. commune Fe-SOD enzyme molecule has a compact active center that is highly conserved (38.1% of residues are absolutely conserved), and 2 loose ends localized outside the molecule and inclined to mutate (only 11.5% of residues are absolutely conserved). Based on associative analyses of evolution, structure, and function, this special phenomenon is attributed to function-dependent evolution through negative natural selection. Under strong natural selection, although the mutation is random on the gene level, the exterior region is inclined to mutate on the protein level owing to more nonsynonymous substitutions in the exterior region, which demonstrates the theoretical feasibility of modifying Fe-SOD on its ends to overcome its disadvantages in clinical applications. PMID:23096686

  4. Ubisemiquinone is the electron donor for superoxide formation by complex III of heart mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Turrens, J F; Alexandre, A; Lehninger, A L

    1985-03-01

    Much evidence indicates that superoxide is generated from O2 in a cyanide-sensitive reaction involving a reduced component of complex III of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, particularly when antimycin A is present. Although it is generally believed that ubisemiquinone is the electron donor to O2, little experimental evidence supporting this view has been reported. Experiments with succinate as electron donor in the presence of antimycin A in intact rat heart mitochondria, which contain much superoxide dismutase but little catalase, showed that myxothiazol, which inhibits reduction of the Rieske iron-sulfur center, prevented formation of hydrogen peroxide, determined spectrophotometrically as the H2O2-peroxidase complex. Similarly, depletion of the mitochondria of their cytochrome c also inhibited formation of H2O2, which was restored by addition of cytochrome c. These observations indicate that factors preventing the formation of ubisemiquinone also prevent H2O2 formation. They also exclude ubiquinol, which remains reduced under these conditions, as the reductant of O2. Since cytochrome b also remains fully reduced when myxothiazol is added to succinate- and antimycin A-supplemented mitochondria, reduced cytochrome b may also be excluded as the reductant of O2. These observations, which are consistent with the Q-cycle reactions, by exclusion of other possibilities leave ubisemiquinone as the only reduced electron carrier in complex III capable of reducing O2 to O2-. PMID:2983613

  5. Neutrophilic superoxide production can assess pharmacological and pharmacogenetic β-adrenoreceptor effects.

    PubMed

    Reinartz, M T; Wetzke, M; Happle, C; Kälble, S; Scherer, R; Kabesch, M; Seifert, R

    2016-08-01

    Asthma can be controlled well in most patients by inhaled β-adrenoreceptor (β2 AR) agonists and steroids. Poor response to β2 AR agonists is difficult to predict, especially in young children and by lung function testing, which may be affected by multiple influences. As an alternative approach, we analyzed ex vivo neutrophilic superoxide inhibition in response to β2 AR stimulation. In 60 healthy volunteers, this assay was unaffected by sex, age, smoking, atopy or asthma status. Furthermore, we assessed effects of genetic variants in β2 AR by sequencing the ADRB2 gene in our cohort and relating genotypes to β2 AR-mediated neutrophilic superoxide inhibition. Gly16Arg genotypes correlated with minor decrease in overall adrenoresponse in this small study population. Taken together, ex vivo testing of the β2 AR response in human neutrophils represents a robust tool with good signal-to-noise ratio at physiological β2 AR agonist concentrations, and this assay may be useful to complement future pharmacogenetic studies in asthma. PMID:27091647

  6. Manganese superoxide dismutase deficiency triggers mitochondrial uncoupling and the Warburg effect.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Miriyala, S; Fang, F; Bakthavatchalu, V; Noel, T; Schell, D M; Wang, C; St Clair, W H; St Clair, D K

    2015-08-01

    Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is a mitochondrially localized primary antioxidant enzyme, known to be essential for the survival of aerobic life and to have important roles in tumorigenesis. Here, we show that MnSOD deficiency in skin tissues of MnSOD-heterozygous knockout (Sod2(+/-)) mice leads to increased expresson of uncoupling proteins (UCPs). When MnSOD is deficient, superoxide radical and its resulting reactive oxygen species (ROS) activate ligand binding to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), suggesting that the activation of PPARα signaling is a major mechanism underlying MnSOD-dependent UCPs expression that consequently triggers the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway, leading to increased aerobic glycolysis. Knockdown of UCPs and mTOR suppresses lactate production and increases ATP levels, suggesting that UCPs contribute to increased glycolysis. These results highlight the existence of a free radical-mediated mechanism that activates mitochondria uncoupling to reduce ROS production, which precedes the glycolytic adaptation described as the Warburg Effect. PMID:25362851

  7. Superoxide dismutase activity and gene expression levels in Saudi women with recurrent miscarriage

    PubMed Central

    GHNEIM, HAZEM K.; AL-SHEIKH, YAZEED A.; ALSHEBLY, MASHAEL M.; ABOUL-SOUD, MOURAD A. M.

    2016-01-01

    The antioxidant activities of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and SOD2, as well as the levels of the oxidant superoxide anion (SOA) and the micronutrients zinc (Zn), copper (Cu) and manganese (Mn), were assayed in plasma, whole blood and placental tissue of non-pregnant (NP), healthy pregnant (HP) women and recurrent miscarriage (RM) patients. The results showed that SOD1 and SOD2 activities and the levels of Zn, Cu and Mn in plasma and whole blood of HP women were slightly, but significantly lower, and even more significantly decreased in RM patients compared to those observed in NP women (P<0.05 and P<0.0001, respectively). Additionally, whereas plasma SOD1 and SOD2 activities and Zn, Cu and Mn levels were significantly lower in RM patients, those of whole blood and placental tissue were significantly lower when compared to HP women (P<0.001 and P<0.0001, respectively). Concurrently, there were consistent increases of equal magnitude and statistical significance in SOA levels in all the assayed samples as identified by a comparison between the subjects. The findings thus supported oxidative metabolism and excessive reactive oxygen species generation. The resultant oxidative stress, identified in whole blood and placental tissues of RM patients, may have been a primary cause of RM. Dietary supplementation of Zn, Cu and Mn may be beneficial to these patients pre- and post-conception. PMID:26821085

  8. Extracellular haem peroxidases mediate Mn(II) oxidation in a marine Roseobacter bacterium via superoxide production.

    PubMed

    Andeer, Peter F; Learman, Deric R; McIlvin, Matt; Dunn, James A; Hansel, Colleen M

    2015-10-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the strongest sorbents and oxidants in environmental systems. A number of biotic and abiotic pathways induce the oxidation of Mn(II) to Mn oxides. Here, we use a combination of proteomic analyses and activity assays, to identify the enzyme(s) responsible for extracellular superoxide-mediated Mn oxide formation by a bacterium within the ubiquitous Roseobacter clade. We show that animal haem peroxidases (AHPs) located on the outer membrane and within the secretome are responsible for Mn(II) oxidation. These novel peroxidases have previously been implicated in direct Mn(II) oxidation by phylogenetically diverse bacteria. Yet, we show that in this Roseobacter species, AHPs mediate Mn(II) oxidation not through a direct reaction but by producing superoxide and likely also by degrading hydrogen peroxide. These findings point to a eukaryotic-like oscillatory oxidative-peroxidative enzymatic cycle by these AHPs that leads to Mn oxide formation by this organism. AHP expression appears unaffected by Mn(II), yet the large energetic investment required to produce and secrete these enzymes points to an as yet unknown physiological function. These findings are further evidence that bacterial peroxidases and secreted enzymes, in general, are unappreciated controls on the cycling of metals and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and by extension carbon, in natural systems. PMID:25923595

  9. Manganese Phosphate Self-assembled Nanoparticle Surface and Its application for Superoxide Anion Detection.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaohui; Wang, Qi; Liu, Yuhong; Xue, Wenxiao; Ma, Lie; Feng, Shuaihui; Wan, Mimi; Wang, Fenghe; Mao, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of superoxide anion (O2(·-)) has increasing importance considering its potential damages to organism. Herein, a novel Mn-superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) mimics, silica-manganous phosphate (SiO2-Mn3(PO4)2) nanoparticles, were designed and synthesized by surface self-assembly processes that occur on the surface of silica-phytic acid (SiO2-PA) nanoparticles. The composite nanoparticles were characterized by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), electron diffraction pattern, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and elemental mapping. Then the electrochemical measurements of O2(·-) based on the incorporation of SiO2-Mn3(PO4)2 onto the surface of electrodes were performed, and some satisfactory results were obtained. This is the first report that manganous phosphate (Mn3(PO4)2) nanoparticles with shape-controlled, but not multilayer sheets, were utilized for O2(·-) detection. The surface self-assembly technology we proposed will offer the ideal material to construct more types biosensor and catalytic system for its nanosized effect. PMID:27357008

  10. Cloning, expression, and characterization of thermostable manganese superoxide dismutase from Thermoascus aurantiacus var. levisporus.

    PubMed

    Song, Ning-Ning; Zheng, Yan; E, Shi-Jin; Li, Duo-Chuan

    2009-02-01

    A superoxide dismutase (SOD) gene of Thermoascus aurantiacus var. levisporus, a thermophilic fungus, was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Pichia pastoris and its gene product was characterized. The coding sequence predicted a 231 residues protein with a unique 35 amino acids extension at the N-terminus indicating a mitochondrial-targeting sequence. The content of Mn was 2.46 microg/mg of protein and Fe was not detected in the purified enzyme. The enzyme was found to be inhibited by NaN(3), but not by KCN or H(2)O(2). These results suggested that the SOD in Thermoascus aurantiacus var. levisporus was the manganese superoxide dismutase type. In comparison with other MnSODs, all manganese-binding sites were also conserved in the sequence (H88, H136, D222, H226). The molecular mass of a single band of the enzyme was estimated to be 21.7 kDa. The protein was expressed in tetramer form with molecular weight of 68.0 kDa. The activity of purified protein was 2,324 U/mg. The optimum temperature of the enzyme was 55 degrees C and it exhibited maximal activity at pH 7.5. The enzyme was thermostable at 50 and 60 degrees C and the half-life at 80 degrees C was approximately 40 min. PMID:19229500

  11. Highly efficient conversion of superoxide to oxygen using hydrophilic carbon clusters.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Errol L G; Marcano, Daniela C; Berka, Vladimir; Bitner, Brittany R; Wu, Gang; Potter, Austin; Fabian, Roderic H; Pautler, Robia G; Kent, Thomas A; Tsai, Ah-Lim; Tour, James M

    2015-02-24

    Many diseases are associated with oxidative stress, which occurs when the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) overwhelms the scavenging ability of an organism. Here, we evaluated the carbon nanoparticle antioxidant properties of poly(ethylene glycolated) hydrophilic carbon clusters (PEG-HCCs) by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, oxygen electrode, and spectrophotometric assays. These carbon nanoparticles have 1 equivalent of stable radical and showed superoxide (O2 (•-)) dismutase-like properties yet were inert to nitric oxide (NO(•)) as well as peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)). Thus, PEG-HCCs can act as selective antioxidants that do not require regeneration by enzymes. Our steady-state kinetic assay using KO2 and direct freeze-trap EPR to follow its decay removed the rate-limiting substrate provision, thus enabling determination of the remarkable intrinsic turnover numbers of O2 (•-) to O2 by PEG-HCCs at >20,000 s(-1). The major products of this catalytic turnover are O2 and H2O2, making the PEG-HCCs a biomimetic superoxide dismutase. PMID:25675492

  12. Dissolution and ionization of sodium superoxide in sodium-oxygen batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jinsoo; Park, Hyeokjun; Lee, Byungju; Seong, Won Mo; Lim, Hee-Dae; Bae, Youngjoon; Kim, Haegyeom; Kim, Won Keun; Ryu, Kyoung Han; Kang, Kisuk

    2016-02-01

    With the demand for high-energy-storage devices, the rechargeable metal-oxygen battery has attracted attention recently. Sodium-oxygen batteries have been regarded as the most promising candidates because of their lower-charge overpotential compared with that of lithium-oxygen system. However, conflicting observations with different discharge products have inhibited the understanding of precise reactions in the battery. Here we demonstrate that the competition between the electrochemical and chemical reactions in sodium-oxygen batteries leads to the dissolution and ionization of sodium superoxide, liberating superoxide anion and triggering the formation of sodium peroxide dihydrate (Na2O2.2H2O). On the formation of Na2O2.2H2O, the charge overpotential of sodium-oxygen cells significantly increases. This verification addresses the origin of conflicting discharge products and overpotentials observed in sodium-oxygen systems. Our proposed model provides guidelines to help direct the reactions in sodium-oxygen batteries to achieve high efficiency and rechargeability.

  13. Recombinant Mitochondrial Manganese Containing Superoxide Dismutase Protects Against Ochratoxin A-Induced Nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ciarcia, Roberto; Damiano, Sara; Squillacioti, Caterina; Mirabella, Nicola; Pagnini, Ugo; Florio, Alessia; Severino, Lorella; Capasso, Giovambattista; Borrelli, Antonella; Mancini, Aldo; Boffo, Silvia; Romano, Gaetano; Giordano, Antonio; Florio, Salvatore

    2016-06-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a natural mycotoxin, involved in the development of important human and animal diseases. In this work we have studied the role of oxidative stress in the development of OTA nephrotoxicity and the effect of a new recombinant mitochondrial manganese containing superoxide dismutase (rMnSOD) to prevent kidney damage induced by OTA. Blood pressure, glomerular filtration rate and renal histology were analyzed in control rats and in OTA treated rats. In addition, lipid peroxidation, catalase and superoxide dismutase productions were measured. Our data showed that animals treated with OTA presented hypertension and reduction of glomerular filtration rate (GFR). These effects are most probably related to an increase in the reactive oxygen species (ROS) productions. In fact, we have shown that treatment with rMnSOD restored the levels of blood pressure and GFR simultaneously. Moreover, we have noted that OTA induced alteration on glomerular and tubular degeneration and interstitial infiltrates and that use of rMnSOD combined with OTA prevent this renal histological damage confirming the potential therapeutic role in the treatment of rMnSOD OTA nephrotoxicity. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1352-1358, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26529273

  14. Metal bacteriochlorins which act as dual singlet oxygen and superoxide generators.

    PubMed

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Ohkubo, Kei; Zheng, Xiang; Chen, Yihui; Pandey, Ravindra K; Zhan, Riqiang; Kadish, Karl M

    2008-03-01

    A series of stable free-base, Zn(II) and Pd(II) bacteriochlorins containing a fused six- or five-member diketo- or imide ring have been synthesized as good candidates for photodynamic therapy sensitizers, and their electrochemical, photophysical, and photochemical properties were examined. Photoexcitation of the palladium bacteriochlorin affords the triplet excited state without fluorescence emission, resulting in formation of singlet oxygen with a high quantum yield due to the heavy atom effect of palladium. Electrochemical studies revealed that the zinc bacteriochlorin has the smallest HOMO-LUMO gap of the investigated compounds, and this value is significantly lower than the triplet excited-state energy of the compound in benzonitrile. Such a small HOMO-LUMO gap of the zinc bacteriochlorin enables intermolecular photoinduced electron transfer from the triplet excited state to the ground state to produce both the radical cation and the radical anion. The radical anion thus produced can transfer an electron to molecular oxygen to produce superoxide anion which was detected by electron spin resonance. The same photosensitizer can also act as an efficient singlet oxygen generator. Thus, the same zinc bacteriochlorin can function as a sensitizer with a dual role in that it produces both singlet oxygen and superoxide anion in an aprotic solvent (benzonitrile). PMID:18254618

  15. Effects of salinity change on two superoxide dismutases (SODs) in juvenile marbled eel Anguilla marmorata.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Wang, Xiaolu; Yin, Shaowu

    2016-01-01

    Salinity is one of the most important factors that affect the fish growth and survival. Superoxide dismutases (SODs), as the primary antioxidant enzymes, play a first role in the process of preventing oxidative stress caused by excessive superoxide anion (O[Formula: see text]) in living organisms. In the present study, we investigated the effects of salinity on the gene expressions as well as enzymatic activities of MnSOD and Cu/ZnSOD in gill, intestine, kidney, liver and muscle tissues of the marbled eel Anguilla marmorata. We found that the liver might possess stronger redox capacity compared with other tissues. Furthermore, the gene expressions and enzymatic activities of SODs in juvenile marbled eels could be effectively enhanced by low salinity but inhibited when the salinity was higher than the body tolerance. Our findings indicated that MnSOD and Cu/ZnSOD played vital roles in the adaptation of marbled eels to salinity variation, which contributed to the elucidation of physiological adaptation and regulatory mechanism of SODs in eels. PMID:27547518

  16. A new strategy for intracellular delivery of enzyme using mesoporous silica nanoparticles: superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Ping; Chen, Chien-Tsu; Hung, Yann; Chou, Chih-Ming; Liu, Tsang-Pai; Liang, Ming-Ren; Chen, Chao-Tsen; Mou, Chung-Yuan

    2013-01-30

    We developed mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) as a multifunctional vehicle for enzyme delivery. Enhanced transmembrane delivery of a superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzyme embedded in MSN was demonstrated. Conjugation of the cell-penetrating peptide derived from the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV) transactivator protein (TAT) to mesoporous silica nanoparticle is shown to be an effective way to enhance transmembrane delivery of nanoparticles for intracellular and molecular therapy. Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD) is a key antioxidant enzyme that detoxifies intracellular reactive oxygen species, ROS, thereby protecting cells from oxidative damage. In this study, we fused a human Cu,Zn-SOD gene with TAT in a bacterial expression vector to produce a genetic in-frame His-tagged TAT-SOD fusion protein. The His-tagged TAT-SOD fusion protein was expressed in E. coli using IPTG induction and purified using FMSN-Ni-NTA. The purified TAT-SOD was conjugated to FITC-MSN forming FMSN-TAT-SOD. The effectiveness of FMSN-TAT-SOD as an agent against ROS was investigated, which included the level of ROS and apoptosis after free radicals induction and functional recovery after ROS damage. Confocal microscopy on live unfixed cells and flow cytometry analysis showed characteristic nonendosomal distribution of FMSN-TAT-SOD. Results suggested that FMSN-TAT-SOD may provide a strategy for the therapeutic delivery of antioxidant enzymes that protect cells from ROS damage. PMID:23289802

  17. Stabilization of Superoxide and CO3- Radicals through Crystalliation of CaCO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meguro, Kazuhide; Ikeya, Motoji

    1993-08-01

    Unstable superoxide radicals (ga{=}2.010, gb{=}2.064, gc{=}2.049, and gd{=}2.006) and CO3- hole centers (gx{=}2.017, gy{=}2.011, and gz{=}2.002) were stabilized in CaCO3 when the inorganic material was crystallized from radical solution. The radicals surrounded by the lattice give strong electron spin resonance (ESR) signals at room temperature. The signal intensities of superoxide and CO3- radicals generated in H2O2 solution and doped in CaCO3 are much stronger than those obtained by adsorption. The color of radical-doped CaCO3 is different from that of the radical-adsorbed one. On heating the samples, the spectrum and the color of the radical-doped CaCO3 powder changed. The effects of impurities on the spectrum of radical-doped inorganic materials are studied. Some doping experiments have been conducted using other inorganic materials.

  18. Stabilization of superoxide and CO(-)3 radicals through crystallization of CaCO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meguro, Kazuhide; Ikeya, Motoji

    1993-08-01

    Unstable superoxide radicals (g(sub a) = 2.010, g(sub b) = 2.064, g(sub c) = 2.049, and g(sub d) = 2.066) and CO(-)3 hole centers (g(sub x) = 2.017, g(sub y) = 2.011, and g(sub z) = 2.002) were stabilized in CaCO3 when the inorganic material was crystallized from radical solution. The radicals surrounded by the lattice give strong electron spin resonance (ESR) signals at room temperature. The signal intensities of superoxide and CO(-)3 radicals generated in H2O2 solution and doped in CaCO are much stronger than those obtained by adsorption. The color of radical-doped CaCO3 is different from that of the radical-adsorbed one. On heating the samples, the spectrum and the color of the radical-doped CaCO3 powder changed. The effects of impurities on the spectrum of radical-doped inorganic materials are studied. Some doping experiments have been conducted using other inorganic materials.

  19. Domain motions and electron transfer dynamics in 2Fe-superoxide reductase.

    PubMed

    Horch, Marius; Utesch, Tillmann; Hildebrandt, Peter; Mroginski, Maria Andrea; Zebger, Ingo

    2016-08-17

    Superoxide reductases are non-heme iron enzymes that represent valuable model systems for the reductive detoxification of reactive oxygen species. In the present study, we applied different theoretical methods to study the structural dynamics of a prototypical 2Fe-superoxide reductase and its influence on electron transfer towards the active site. Using normal mode and essential dynamics analyses, we could show that enzymes of this type are capable of well-defined, electrostatically triggered domain movements, which may allow conformational proofreading for cellular redox partners involved in intermolecular electron transfer. Moreover, these global modes of motion were found to enable access to molecular configurations with decreased tunnelling distances between the active site and the enzyme's second iron centre. Using all-atom classical molecular dynamics simulations and the tunnelling pathway model, however, we found that electron transfer between the two metal sites is not accelerated under these conditions. This unexpected finding suggests that the unperturbed enzymatic structure is optimized for intramolecular electron transfer, which provides an indirect indication of the biological relevance of such a mechanism. Consistently, efficient electron transfer was found to depend on a distinct route, which is accessible via the equilibrium geometry and characterized by a quasi conserved tyrosine that could enable multistep-tunnelling (hopping). Besides these explicit findings, the present study demonstrates the importance of considering both global and local protein dynamics, and a generalized approach for the functional analysis of these aspects is provided. PMID:27491757

  20. The cytosolic manganese superoxide dismutase from the shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei: molecular cloning and expression.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Anduro, Gracia A; Barillas-Mury, Carolina-V; Peregrino-Uriarte, Alma B; Gupta, Lalita; Gollas-Galván, Teresa; Hernández-López, Jorge; Yepiz-Plascencia, Gloria

    2006-01-01

    Manganese containing superoxide dismutase (SOD) is normally a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial enzyme in eukaryotic organisms; however, a cytoplasmic manganese SOD (cMnSOD) was found in crustaceans that use hemocyanin as oxygen carrier. The complete cDNA and deduced amino acid sequence of a cMnSOD from Litopenaeus vannamei were determined. The coding sequence predicts a 287 residues protein with a unique 61 amino acids extension at the N-terminus and lacking a mitochondrial-targeting sequence. Phylogenetic analysis clusters cMnSODs and mitochondrial MnSODs in two separate groups. cMnSOD transcripts were detected in hemocytes, heart, hepatopancreas, intestine, nervous system, muscle, pleopods and gills. Since hemocytes are key defense cells and their reactions produce superoxide radicals, the infection by white spot syndrome virus on the cMnSOD transcript levels were investigated and found to increase transiently 1h post-infection and then decrease as the viral infection progressed to levels significantly lower than uninfected controls by 12h post-infection. PMID:16504292

  1. Manganese superoxide dismutase knock-down in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes impairs subsequent adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Krautbauer, Sabrina; Eisinger, Kristina; Hader, Yvonne; Neumeier, Markus; Buechler, Christa

    2014-08-01

    Adipogenesis is associated with the upregulation of the antioxidative enzyme manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) suggesting a vital function of this enzyme in adipocyte maturation. In the current work, MnSOD was knocked-down with small-interference RNA in preadipocytes to study its role in adipocyte differentiation. In mature adipocytes differentiated from these cells, proteins characteristic for mature adipocytes, which are strongly induced in late adipogenesis like adiponectin and fatty acid-binding protein 4, are markedly reduced. Triglycerides begin to accumulate after about 6 days of the induction of adipogenesis, and are strongly diminished in cells with low MnSOD. Proteins upregulated early during differentiation, like fatty acid synthase and cytochrome C oxidase-4, are not altered. Cell viability, insulin-mediated phosphorylation of Akt, antioxidative capacity (AOC), superoxide levels, and heme oxygenase 1 with the latter being induced upon oxidative stress are not affected. L-Buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO) depletes glutathione and modestly lowers AOC of mature adipocytes. Addition of BSO to 3T3-L1 cells 3 days after the initiation of differentiation impairs triglyceride accumulation and expression of proteins induced in late adipogenesis. Of note, proteins that increased early during adipogenesis are also diminished, suggesting that BSO causes de-differentiation of these cells. Preadipocyte proliferation is not considerably affected by low MnSOD and BSO. These data suggest that glutathione and MnSOD are essential for adipogenesis. PMID:24740755

  2. Rapid reaction of nanomolar Mn(II) with superoxide radical in seawater and simulated freshwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansard, S.P.; Easter, H.D.; Voelker, B.M.

    2011-01-01

    Superoxide radical (O2-) has been proposed to be an important participant in oxidation-reduction reactions of metal ions in natural waters. Here, we studied the reaction of nanomolar Mn(II) with O 2- in seawater and simulated freshwater, using chemiluminescence detection of O2- to quantify the effect of Mn(II) on the decay kinetics of O2-. With 3-24 nM added [Mn(II)] and <0.7 nM [O2-], we observed effective second-order rate constants for the reaction of Mn(II) with O2- of 6 ?? 106 to 1 ?? 107 M -1???s-1 in various seawater samples. In simulated freshwater (pH 8.6), the effective rate constant of Mn(II) reaction with O 2- was somewhat lower, 1.6 ?? 106 M -1???s-1. With higher initial [O2-], in excess of added [Mn(II)], catalytic decay of O 2- by Mn was observed, implying that a Mn(II/III) redox cycle occurred. Our results show that reactions with nanomolar Mn(II) could be an important sink of O2- in natural waters. In addition, reaction of Mn(II) with superoxide could maintain a significant fraction of dissolved Mn in the +III oxidation state. ?? 2011 American Chemical Society.

  3. Featured Article: Effect of copper on nuclear translocation of copper chaperone for superoxide dismutase-1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Ge, Yan; Kang, Y James

    2016-08-01

    Copper chaperone for superoxide dismutase-1 (CCS-1), facilitating copper insertion into superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD-1), is present in the nucleus. However, it is unknown how CCS-1 is translocated to the nucleus. The present study was undertaken to determine the effect of copper on nuclear translocation of CCS-1. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were subjected to hypoxia, causing an increase in both copper and CCS-1 in the nucleus. Treatment with tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA) not only decreased the total cellular concentration and the nuclear translocation of copper, but also completely suppressed the entry of CCS-1 to the nucleus. On the other hand, siRNA targeting CCS-1 neither inhibited the increase in total concentrations nor blocked the nuclear translocation of copper. This study thus demonstrates that under hypoxia condition, both copper and CCS-1 are transported to the nucleus. The nuclear translocation of CCS-1 is copper dependent, but the nuclear translocation of copper could take place alternatively in a CCS-1-independent pathway. PMID:27190267

  4. Cell metabolic changes of porphyrins and superoxide anions by anthracene and benzo(a)pyrene.

    PubMed

    Uribe-Hernández, Raúl; Pérez-Zapata, Aura J; Vega-Barrita, María L; Ramón-Gallegos, Eva; Amezcua-Allieri, Myriam A

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the induction of protoporphyrins IX (PpIX) activity and superoxide anions (SO) in human leukocytes exposed to anthracene (ANT) and benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P). The leukocyte LC(50)s for both hydrocarbons and the PpIX accumulation and SO overproduction were measured. The LC(50)s were 0.35 and 3.23μM for ANT and B(a)P, respectively. A linear relationship (r=0.97, p<0.01) between PpIX and ANT concentration was obtained. The induced accumulation of PpIX was proportional (r=0.63, p<0.01) to B(a)P concentration. SO overproduction showed a linear relationship (r=0.83, p<0.05) with ANT concentrations. The linear regression analysis of the effect of B(a)P on the superoxide anion overproduction showed a good coefficient (r=0.97, p<0.01), showed that ANT and B(a)P exposure induces PpIX accumulation, probably by disruption of the haem biosynthesis. ANT and B(a)P induce SO overproduction, perhaps through a process of redox cycling. PMID:21791370

  5. Manganese Phosphate Self-assembled Nanoparticle Surface and Its application for Superoxide Anion Detection

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiaohui; Wang, Qi; Liu, Yuhong; Xue, Wenxiao; Ma, Lie; Feng, Shuaihui; Wan, Mimi; Wang, Fenghe; Mao, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of superoxide anion (O2·−) has increasing importance considering its potential damages to organism. Herein, a novel Mn-superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) mimics, silica-manganous phosphate (SiO2-Mn3(PO4)2) nanoparticles, were designed and synthesized by surface self-assembly processes that occur on the surface of silica-phytic acid (SiO2-PA) nanoparticles. The composite nanoparticles were characterized by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), electron diffraction pattern, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and elemental mapping. Then the electrochemical measurements of O2·− based on the incorporation of SiO2-Mn3(PO4)2 onto the surface of electrodes were performed, and some satisfactory results were obtained. This is the first report that manganous phosphate (Mn3(PO4)2) nanoparticles with shape-controlled, but not multilayer sheets, were utilized for O2·− detection. The surface self-assembly technology we proposed will offer the ideal material to construct more types biosensor and catalytic system for its nanosized effect. PMID:27357008

  6. Dissolution and ionization of sodium superoxide in sodium–oxygen batteries

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinsoo; Park, Hyeokjun; Lee, Byungju; Seong, Won Mo; Lim, Hee-Dae; Bae, Youngjoon; Kim, Haegyeom; Kim, Won Keun; Ryu, Kyoung Han; Kang, Kisuk

    2016-01-01

    With the demand for high-energy-storage devices, the rechargeable metal–oxygen battery has attracted attention recently. Sodium–oxygen batteries have been regarded as the most promising candidates because of their lower-charge overpotential compared with that of lithium–oxygen system. However, conflicting observations with different discharge products have inhibited the understanding of precise reactions in the battery. Here we demonstrate that the competition between the electrochemical and chemical reactions in sodium–oxygen batteries leads to the dissolution and ionization of sodium superoxide, liberating superoxide anion and triggering the formation of sodium peroxide dihydrate (Na2O2·2H2O). On the formation of Na2O2·2H2O, the charge overpotential of sodium–oxygen cells significantly increases. This verification addresses the origin of conflicting discharge products and overpotentials observed in sodium–oxygen systems. Our proposed model provides guidelines to help direct the reactions in sodium–oxygen batteries to achieve high efficiency and rechargeability. PMID:26892931

  7. Dissolution and ionization of sodium superoxide in sodium-oxygen batteries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinsoo; Park, Hyeokjun; Lee, Byungju; Seong, Won Mo; Lim, Hee-Dae; Bae, Youngjoon; Kim, Haegyeom; Kim, Won Keun; Ryu, Kyoung Han; Kang, Kisuk

    2016-01-01

    With the demand for high-energy-storage devices, the rechargeable metal-oxygen battery has attracted attention recently. Sodium-oxygen batteries have been regarded as the most promising candidates because of their lower-charge overpotential compared with that of lithium-oxygen system. However, conflicting observations with different discharge products have inhibited the understanding of precise reactions in the battery. Here we demonstrate that the competition between the electrochemical and chemical reactions in sodium-oxygen batteries leads to the dissolution and ionization of sodium superoxide, liberating superoxide anion and triggering the formation of sodium peroxide dihydrate (Na2O2·2H2O). On the formation of Na2O2·2H2O, the charge overpotential of sodium-oxygen cells significantly increases. This verification addresses the origin of conflicting discharge products and overpotentials observed in sodium-oxygen systems. Our proposed model provides guidelines to help direct the reactions in sodium-oxygen batteries to achieve high efficiency and rechargeability. PMID:26892931

  8. Unique Characteristics of Recombinant Hybrid Manganese Superoxide Dismutase from Staphylococcus equorum and S. saprophyticus.

    PubMed

    Retnoningrum, Debbie S; Rahayu, Anis Puji; Mulyanti, Dina; Dita, Astrid; Valerius, Oliver; Ismaya, Wangsa T

    2016-04-01

    A recombinant hybrid of manganese dependent-superoxide dismutase of Staphylococcus equorum and S. saprophyticus has successfully been overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3), purified, and characterized. The recombinant enzyme suffered from degradation and aggregation upon storage at -20 °C, but not at room temperature nor in cold. Chromatographic analysis in a size exclusion column suggested the occurrence of dimeric form, which has been reported to contribute in maintaining the stability of the enzyme. Effect of monovalent (Na(+), K(+)), divalent (Ca(2+), Mg(2+)), multivalent (Mn(2+/4+), Zn(2+/4+)) cations and anions (Cl(-), SO4 (2-)) to the enzyme stability or dimeric state depended on type of cation or anion, its concentration, and pH. However, tremendous effect was observed with 50 mM ZnSO4, in which thermostability of both the dimer and monomer was increased. Similar situation was not observed with MnSO4, and its presence was detrimental at 200 mM. Finally, chelating agent appeared to destabilize the dimer around neutral pH and dissociate it at basic pH. The monomer remained stable upon addition of ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid. Here we reported unique characteristics and stability of manganese dependent-superoxide dismutase from S. equorum/saprophyticus. PMID:26960678

  9. The peroxidase activity of mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (MnSOD/SOD2)

    PubMed Central

    Ansenberger-Fricano, Kristine; Ganini, Douglas da Silva; Mao, Mao; Chatterjee, Saurabh; Dallas, Shannon; Mason, Ronald P.; Stadler, Krisztian; Santos, Janine H.; Bonini, Marcelo G.

    2014-01-01

    Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is an integral mitochondrial protein known as a first line antioxidant defense against superoxide radical anions produced as by-products of the electron transport chain. Recent studies have shaped the idea that by regulating the mitochondrial redox status and H2O2 outflow, MnSOD acts as a fundamental regulator of cellular proliferation, metabolism and apoptosis thereby assuming roles that extend far beyond its proposed antioxidant functions. Accordingly, allelic variations of MnSOD that have been shown to augment levels of MnSOD in mitochondria result in a 10-fold increase in prostate cancer risk. In addition, epidemiologic studies indicate that reduced glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity along with increases in H2O2 further increase cancer risk in the face MnSOD overexpression. These facts led us to hypothesize that, like the Cu, Zn-counterpart, MnSOD may work as a peroxidase, utilizing H2O2 to promote mitochondrial damage, a known cancer risk factor. Here we report that MnSOD indeed possesses peroxidase activity that manifests in mitochondria when the enzyme is overexpressed. PMID:22982047

  10. Indirect detection of superoxide in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells using microchip electrophoresis coupled to laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    de Campos, Richard P S; Siegel, Joseph M; Fresta, Claudia G; Caruso, Giuseppe; da Silva, José A F; Lunte, Susan M

    2015-09-01

    Superoxide, a naturally produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the human body, is involved in many pathological and physiological signaling processes. However, if superoxide formation is left unregulated, overproduction can lead to oxidative damage to important biomolecules, such as DNA, lipids, and proteins. Superoxide can also lead to the formation of peroxynitrite, an extremely hazardous substance, through its reaction with endogenously produced nitric oxide. Despite its importance, quantitative information regarding superoxide production is difficult to obtain due to its high reactivity and low concentrations in vivo. MitoHE, a fluorescent probe that specifically reacts with superoxide, was used in conjunction with microchip electrophoresis (ME) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection to investigate changes in superoxide production by RAW 264.7 macrophage cells following stimulation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Stimulation was performed in the presence and absence of the superoxide dismutase (SOD) inhibitors, diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) and 2-metoxyestradiol (2-ME). The addition of these inhibitors resulted in an increase in the amount of superoxide specific product (2-OH-MitoE(+)) from 0.08 ± 0.01 fmol (0.17 ± 0.03 mM) in native cells to 1.26 ± 0.06 fmol (2.5 ± 0.1 mM) after PMA treatment. This corresponds to an approximately 15-fold increase in intracellular concentration per cell. Furthermore, the addition of 3-morpholino-sydnonimine (SIN-1) to the cells during incubation resulted in the production of 0.061 ± 0.006 fmol (0.12 ± 0.01 mM) of 2-OH-MitoE(+) per cell on average. These results demonstrate that indirect superoxide detection coupled with the use of SOD inhibitors and a separation method is a viable method to discriminate the 2-OH-MitoE(+) signal from possible interferences. PMID:26159570

  11. Adrenergic and serotonin receptors affect retinal superoxide generation in diabetic mice: relationship to capillary degeneration and permeability.

    PubMed

    Du, Yunpeng; Cramer, Megan; Lee, Chieh Allen; Tang, Jie; Muthusamy, Arivalagan; Antonetti, David A; Jin, Hui; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Kern, Timothy S

    2015-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species play an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. We studied the role of adrenergic and serotonin receptors in the generation of superoxide by retina and 661W retinal cells in high glucose and of the α1-adrenergic receptor (AR) on vascular lesions of the retinopathy in experimentally diabetic C57Bl/6J mice (and controls) after 2 and 8 months. Compared with 5 mM glucose, incubating cells or retinal explants in 30 mM glucose induced superoxide generation. This response was reduced or ablated by pharmacologic inhibition of the α1-AR (a Gq-coupled receptor) or Gs-coupled serotonin (5-HT2, 5-HT4, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7) receptors or by activation of the Gi-coupled α2-AR. In elevated glucose, the α1-AR produced superoxide via phospholipase C, inositol triphosphate-induced Ca(2+) release, and NADPH oxidase, and pharmacologic inhibition of these reactions prevented the superoxide increase. Generation of retinal superoxide, expression of proinflammatory proteins, and degeneration of retinal capillaries in diabetes all were significantly inhibited with daily doxazosin or apocynin (inhibitors of α1-AR and NADPH oxidase, respectively), but increased vascular permeability was not significantly affected. Adrenergic receptors, and perhaps other GPCRs, represent novel targets for inhibiting the development of important features of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:25667222

  12. Superoxide generated from the glutathione-mediated reduction of selenite damages the iron-sulfur cluster of chloroplastic ferredoxin.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Brian; Yarmolinsky, Dmitry; Abdel-Ghany, Salah; Pilon, Marinus; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A; Sagi, Moshe; Van Hoewyk, Doug

    2016-09-01

    Selenium assimilation in plants is facilitated by several enzymes that participate in the transport and assimilation of sulfate. Manipulation of genes that function in sulfur metabolism dramatically affects selenium toxicity and accumulation. However, it has been proposed that selenite is not reduced by sulfite reductase. Instead, selenite can be non-enzymatically reduced by glutathione, generating selenodiglutathione and superoxide. The damaging effects of superoxide on iron-sulfur clusters in cytosolic and mitochondrial proteins are well known. However, it is unknown if superoxide damages chloroplastic iron-sulfur proteins. The goals of this study were twofold: to determine whether decreased activity of sulfite reductase impacts selenium tolerance in Arabidopsis, and to determine if superoxide generated from the glutathione-mediated reduction of selenite damages the iron-sulfur cluster of ferredoxin. Our data demonstrate that knockdown of sulfite reductase in Arabidopsis does not affect selenite tolerance or selenium accumulation. Additionally, we provide in vitro evidence that the non-enzymatic reduction of selenite damages the iron-sulfur cluster of ferredoxin, a plastidial protein that is an essential component of the photosynthetic light reactions. Damage to ferredoxin's iron-sulfur cluster was associated with formation of apo-ferredoxin and impaired activity. We conclude that if superoxide damages iron-sulfur clusters of ferredoxin in planta, then it might contribute to photosynthetic impairment often associated with abiotic stress, including toxic levels of selenium. PMID:27182957

  13. Kinetic investigation of catalytic disproportionation of superoxide ions in the non-aqueous electrolyte used in Li–air batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Dong; McKinnon, Meaghan E.; Yang, Xiao -Qing; Qu, Deyang

    2014-10-28

    Superoxide reacts with carbonate solvents in Li–air batteries. Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane is found to catalyze a more rapid superoxide (O2-) disproportionation reaction than the reaction between superoxide and propylene carbonate (PC). With this catalysis, the negative impact of the reaction between the electrolyte and O2-produced by the O2 reduction can be minimized. A simple kinetic study using ESR spectroscopy was reported to determine reaction orders and rate constants for the reaction between PC and superoxide, and the disproportionation of superoxide catalyzed by Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane and Li ions. As a result, the reactions are found to be first order and the rate constants are 0.033 s-1 M-1, 0.020 s-1 M-1and 0.67 s-1M-1 for reactions with PC, Li ion and Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane, respectively.

  14. The interactions of superoxide ion(O2-.) with metallo-porphyrins [(C1(8)TPP)M, M = Fe,Mn,Co Zn]; models for biological systems and superoxide dismutases.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, D T; Tsang, P K

    1991-01-01

    In dimethylformamide superoxide ion forms a 1:1 adduct with tetrakis (2,6-dichlorophenyl) porphinato-iron, (C1(8)TPP)FeOO-, as well as with its manganese analogue, (C1(8)TPP)MnOO-. On the basis of their electrochemical, spectroscopic, and magnetic properties these adducts have a metal-oxygen covalent bond (PorM-OO-), oxygen-centered redox chemistry, and reactivities that are similar to the hydroperoxide ion (HOO-). Addition of -OH to a solution of PorFe and O2 results in the formation of PorFe(OH)(OO-), which can be electrochemically oxidized to PorFeOH plus O2 (-0.2 V vs SCE). Addition of protons to the PorM-OO- adducts promotes their rapid decomposition to PorM, HOOH, and O2. This chemistry provides insight to the reactions of biological superoxide and superoxide dismutases. PMID:1649106

  15. Cloning and mapping of the manganese superoxide dismutase gene (sodA) of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Touati, D

    1983-01-01

    An Escherichia coli gene bank composed of large DNA fragments (about 40 kilobases) was constructed by using the small cosmid pHC79. From it, a clone was isolated for its ability to overproduce superoxide dismutase. The enzyme overproduced was manganese superoxide dismutase, as determined by electrophoresis and antibody precipitation. Maxicell analysis and two-dimensional O'Farrell polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated that the structural gene, sodA, of manganese superoxide dismutase was cloned. Subcloning fragments from the original cosmid located the sodA gene within a 4.8-kilobase EcoRI-BamHI fragment. This fragment was inserted into a lambda phage which was deleted for the att region and consequently could only lysogenize by recombination between the cloned bacterial DNA insertion and the bacterial chromosome. Genetic mapping of the prophage in such lysogens indicated that the chromosomal sodA locus lies near 87 min on the E. coli map. Images PMID:6309739

  16. Blockade of monocyte-endothelial trafficking by transduced Tat-superoxide dismutase protein

    PubMed Central

    PARK, SIN-HYE; SHIN, MIN JAE; KIM, DAE WON; PARK, JINSEU; CHOI, SOO YOUNG; KANG, YOUNG-HEE

    2016-01-01

    It has previously been suggested that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases, which entails the initial activation of pro-inflammatory cytokines to facilitate leukocyte transmigration. The present study investigated whether intracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD) suppressed monocyte endothelial trafficking and transmigration. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and THP-1 monocytes were activated by the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the absence and presence of cell-permeable transactivator of transcription (Tat)-SOD protein. External stimulation with SOD was conducted using endothelial cells and monocytes. Purified cell-permeable Tat-SOD, but not non-targeted SOD, at 1–3 µM was transduced into endothelial cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Non-toxic Tat-SOD at ≤0.5 µM, but not 1 µM SOD, blocked the monocyte-endothelium interactions by inhibiting the TNF-α-induced stimulation of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in HUVECs and integrin β1 in THP-1 cells. Endothelial VCAM-1 induction by TNF-α was responsible for superoxide anion production being quenched by N-acetyl-cysteine and Tat-SOD. SOD treatment markedly inhibited superoxide anion production induced by TNF-α, but no inhibition of endothelial transmigration was noted. Tat-SOD prevented transendothelial monocyte migration by firmly localizing occludin-1, platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) and vascular endothelial-cadherin present in paracellular junctions and inhibiting endothelial induction and activation of matrix-degrading membrane type-1 (MT-1) matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), MMP-2 and MMP-9. By contrast, treatment with 1 µM SOD did not have such effects. Furthermore, transduced Tat-SOD hindered nuclear transactivation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), modulating the induction of paracellular junction proteins and matrix-degrading MMP in TNF-α-stimulated HUVECs. Transduced Tat

  17. Blockade of monocyte-endothelial trafficking by transduced Tat-superoxide dismutase protein.

    PubMed

    Park, Sin-Hye; Shin, Min Jae; Kim, Dae Won; Park, Jinseu; Choi, Soo Young; Kang, Young-Hee

    2016-02-01

    It has previously been suggested that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases, which entails the initial activation of pro-inflammatory cytokines to facilitate leukocyte transmigration. The present study investigated whether intracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD) suppressed monocyte endothelial trafficking and transmigration. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and THP-1 monocytes were activated by the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the absence and presence of cell-permeable transactivator of transcription (Tat)-SOD protein. External stimulation with SOD was conducted using endothelial cells and monocytes. Purified cell-permeable Tat-SOD, but not non-targeted SOD, at 1-3 µM was transduced into endothelial cells in a time‑ and dose-dependent manner. Non-toxic Tat-SOD at ≤0.5 µM, but not 1 µM SOD, blocked the monocyte-endothelium interactions by inhibiting the TNF-α-induced stimulation of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in HUVECs and integrin β1 in THP-1 cells. Endothelial VCAM-1 induction by TNF-α was responsible for superoxide anion production being quenched by N-acetyl-cysteine and Tat-SOD. SOD treatment markedly inhibited superoxide anion production induced by TNF-α, but no inhibition of endothelial transmigration was noted. Tat-SOD prevented transendothelial monocyte migration by firmly localizing occludin-1, platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule‑1 (PECAM-1) and vascular endothelial‑cadherin present in paracellular junctions and inhibiting endothelial induction and activation of matrix-degrading membrane type-1 (MT-1) matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), MMP-2 and MMP-9. By contrast, treatment with 1 µM SOD did not have such effects. Furthermore, transduced Tat-SOD hindered nuclear transactivation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), modulating the induction of paracellular junction proteins and matrix‑degrading MMP in TNF-α‑stimulated HUVECs

  18. Effect of Calcium on Superoxide Production by Phagocytic Vesicles from Rabbit Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lew, P. Daniel; Stossel, Thomas P.

    1981-01-01

    Phagocytic vesicles from rabbit lung macrophages produced superoxide in the presence of NADH or NADPH. At 37°C, these vesicles generated 51±7.8 nmol O2−/min per mg protein in the presence of 0.5 mM NADPH. The apparent Km for NADPH and NADH (66 and 266 μM, respectively), the pH optimum for the reaction (6.9), and the cyanide insensitivity were similar to properties of plasma membrane-rich fractions of stimulated polymorphonuclear leukocytes studied by others. The activity of the phagocytic vesicles was trypsin sensitive. The specific superoxide-generating activity of macrophage phagocytic vesicles isolated from cells incubated up to 90 min with phagocytic particles remained constant. Calcium in micromolar concentrations inhibited the NADPH-dependent O2−-generating activity of phagocytic vesicles. In a physiological ionic medium (100 mM KCl, 2.5 mM MgCl2, 30 mM imidazole-HCl, pH 6.9), a maximal inhibition of O2− generation by phagocytic vesicles of 80% was observed at 40 μM free Ca2+. The half maximum inhibitory effect was at 0.7 μM Ca2+. Variations of the calcium concentration resulted in rapid and reversible alterations in O2−-forming activity. Preincubation of phagocytic vesicles in the presence of EGTA rendered their O2− generation rate in the presence of NADPH insensitive to alterations in the free calcium concentration. This desensitization by low EGTA concentrations (≤100 μM) was reversible by the addition of excess calcium, but desensitization by high EGTA concentrations (>1 mM) was not reversible by the addition of calcium either in the presence or absence of purified rabbit lung macrophage or bovine brain calmodulins. Furthermore, trifluoperazine, a drug that inhibits calmodulin-stimulated reactions, did not alter the activity or the calcium sensitivity of the superoxide-generating system of sensitive phagocytic vesicles. Peripheral plasma membrane vesicles (podosomes) prepared by gentle sonication of macrophages possessed on O2

  19. Effects of moderate electrical stimulation on reactive species production by primary rat skeletal muscle cells: cross talk between superoxide and nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Lambertucci, Rafael Herling; Silveira, Leonardo Dos Reis; Hirabara, Sandro Massao; Curi, Rui; Sweeney, Gary; Pithon-Curi, Tania Cristina

    2012-06-01

    The effects of a moderate electrical stimulation on superoxide and nitric oxide production by primary cultured skeletal muscle cells were evaluated. The involvement of the main sites of these reactive species production and the relationship between superoxide and nitric oxide production were also examined. Production of superoxide was evaluated by cytochrome c reduction and dihydroethidium oxidation assays. Electrical stimulation increased superoxide production after 1 h incubation. A xanthine oxidase inhibitor caused a partial decrease of superoxide generation and a significant amount of mitochondria-derived superoxide was also observed. Nitric oxide production was assessed by nitrite measurement and by using 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate (DAF-2-DA) assay. Using both methods an increased production of nitric oxide was obtained after electrical stimulation, which was also able to induce an increase of iNOS content and NF-κB activation. The participation of superoxide in nitric oxide production was investigated by incubating cells with DAF-2-DA in the presence or absence of electrical stimulation, a superoxide generator system (xanthine-xanthine oxidase), a mixture of NOS inhibitors and SOD-PEG. Our data show that the induction of muscle contraction by a moderate electrical stimulation protocol led to an increased nitric oxide production that can be controlled by superoxide generation. The cross talk between these reactive species likely plays a role in exercise-induced maintenance and adaptation by regulating muscular glucose metabolism, force of contraction, fatigue, and antioxidant systems activities. PMID:21898396

  20. Adrenergic and serotonin receptors affect retinal superoxide generation in diabetic mice: relationship to capillary degeneration and permeability

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yunpeng; Cramer, Megan; Lee, Chieh Allen; Tang, Jie; Muthusamy, Arivalagan; Antonetti, David A.; Jin, Hui; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Kern, Timothy S.

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species play an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. We studied the role of adrenergic and serotonin receptors in the generation of superoxide by retina and 661W retinal cells in high glucose and of the α1-adrenergic receptor (AR) on vascular lesions of the retinopathy in experimentally diabetic C57Bl/6J mice (and controls) after 2 and 8 months. Compared with 5 mM glucose, incubating cells or retinal explants in 30 mM glucose induced superoxide generation. This response was reduced or ablated by pharmacologic inhibition of the α1-AR (a Gq-coupled receptor) or Gs-coupled serotonin (5-HT2, 5-HT4, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7) receptors or by activation of the Gi-coupled α2-AR. In elevated glucose, the α1-AR produced superoxide via phospholipase C, inositol triphosphate-induced Ca2+ release, and NADPH oxidase, and pharmacologic inhibition of these reactions prevented the superoxide increase. Generation of retinal superoxide, expression of proinflammatory proteins, and degeneration of retinal capillaries in diabetes all were significantly inhibited with daily doxazosin or apocynin (inhibitors of α1-AR and NADPH oxidase, respectively), but increased vascular permeability was not significantly affected. Adrenergic receptors, and perhaps other GPCRs, represent novel targets for inhibiting the development of important features of diabetic retinopathy.—Du, Y., Cramer, M., Lee, C. A., Tang, J., Muthusamy, A., Antonetti, D. A., Jin, H., Palczewski, K., Kern, T. S. Adrenergic and serotonin receptors affect retinal superoxide generation in diabetic mice: relationship to capillary degeneration and permeability. PMID:25667222

  1. Copper-zinc alloy nanoparticle based enzyme-free superoxide radical sensing on a screen-printed electrode.

    PubMed

    Derkus, Burak; Emregul, Emel; Emregul, Kaan C

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, amperometric enzyme-free sensors using superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzyme as a catalyst for the dismutation reaction of superoxides into oxygen and hydrogen peroxide, enabling superoxide radical detection have been described. For this purpose, the surfaces of screen-printed platinum electrodes have been modified with gelatin composites of CuO, ZnO and CuZn nanoparticles with the expectation of an increase in catalytic effect toward the dismutation reaction. SOD containing electrodes were also prepared for comparative studies in which glutaraldehyde was used as a cross-linker for the immobilization of SOD to the nanocomposite materials. Electrochemical measurements were carried out using a screen-printed electrochemical system that included potassiumferrocyanide (K4[Fe(CN)6]) and potassiumferricyanide (K3[Fe(CN)6]) as the redox probes. The results revealed that the enzyme-free detection method using CuZn nanoparticles can determine superoxide radicals with high performance compared to other detection methods prepared with different nanoparticles by mimicking the active region of superoxide dismutase enzyme. The anodic (ks(a)) and cathodic (ks(c)) electron transfer rate constants and the anodic (α(a)) and cathodic (α(c)) transfer coefficients were evaluated and found to be ks(a)=6.31 s(-1) and α(a)=0.81, ks(c)=1.48 s(-1) and α(c)=0.19 for the gelatin-CuZn-SOD electrode; ks(a)=6.15 s(-1) and α(a)=0.79, ks(c)=1,63 s(-1) and α(c)=0.21 for the enzyme-free gelatin-CuZn electrode. The enzyme-free electrode showed nearly 80% amperometric performance with respect to the enzyme containing electrode indicating the superior functionality of enzyme-free electrode for the detection of superoxide radicals. PMID:25618659

  2. Nitric oxide availability is increased in contracting skeletal muscle from aged mice, but does not differentially decrease muscle superoxide

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, T.; McArdle, A.; Jackson, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species have been implicated in the loss of skeletal muscle mass and function that occurs during aging. Nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide are generated by skeletal muscle and where these are generated in proximity their chemical reaction to form peroxynitrite can compete with the superoxide dismutation to hydrogen peroxide. Changes in NO availability may therefore theoretically modify superoxide and peroxynitrite activities in tissues, but published data are contradictory regarding aging effects on muscle NO availability. We hypothesised that an age-related increase in NO generation might increase peroxynitrite generation in muscles from old mice, leading to an increased nitration of muscle proteins and decreased superoxide availability. This was examined using fluorescent probes and an isolated fiber preparation to examine NO content and superoxide in the cytosol and mitochondria of muscle fibers from adult and old mice both at rest and following contractile activity. We also examined the 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) and peroxiredoxin 5 (Prx5) content of muscles from mice as markers of peroxynitrite activity. Data indicate that a substantial age-related increase in NO levels occurred in muscle fibers during contractile activity and this was associated with an increase in muscle eNOS. Muscle proteins from old mice also showed an increased 3-NT content. Inhibition of NOS indicated that NO decreased superoxide bioavailability in muscle mitochondria, although this effect was not age related. Thus increased NO in muscles of old mice was associated with an increased 3-NT content that may potentially contribute to age-related degenerative changes in skeletal muscle. PMID:25462644

  3. Temperature and Light Effects on Extracellular Superoxide Production by Algal and Bacterial Symbionts in Corals: Implications for Coral Bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brighi, C.; Diaz, J. M.; Apprill, A.; Hansel, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Increased surface seawater temperature due to global warming is one of the main causes of coral bleaching, a phenomenon in which corals lose their photosynthetic algae. Light and temperature induced production of superoxide and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) by these symbiotic algae has been implicated in the breakdown of their symbiotic association with the coral host and subsequent coral bleaching. Nevertheless, a direct link between Symbiodinium ROS production and coral bleaching has not been demonstrated. In fact, given the abundance and diversity of microorganisms within the coral holobiont, the concentration and fluxes of ROS within corals may involve several microbial sources and sinks. Here, we explore the role of increased light and temperature on superoxide production by coral-derived cultures of Symbiodinium algae and Oceanospirillales bacteria of the genus Endozoicomonas, which are globally common and abundant associates of corals. Using a high sensitivity chemiluminescent technique, we find that heat stress (exposure to 34°C vs. 23°C for 2hr or 24hr) has no significant effect on extracellular superoxide production by Symbiodinium isolates within clades B and C, regardless of the level of light exposure. Exposure to high light, however, increased superoxide production by these organisms at both 34°C and 23°C. On the other hand, extracellular superoxide production by Endozoicomonas bacteria tested under the same conditions was stimulated by the combined effects of thermal and light stress. The results of this research suggest that the sources and physical triggers for biological superoxide production within corals are more complex than currently assumed. Thus, further investigations into the biological processes controlling ROS dynamics within corals are required to improve our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning coral bleaching and to aid in the development of mitigation strategies.

  4. Evaluation of a new copper(II)-curcumin complex as superoxide dismutase mimic and its free radical reactions.

    PubMed

    Barik, Atanu; Mishra, Beena; Shen, Liang; Mohan, Hari; Kadam, R M; Dutta, S; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Priyadarsini, K Indira

    2005-09-15

    A mononuclear (1:1) copper complex of curcumin, a phytochemical from turmeric, was synthesized and examined for its superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. The complex was characterized by elemental analysis, IR, NMR, UV-VIS, EPR, mass spectroscopic methods and TG-DTA, from which it was found that a copper atom is coordinated through the keto-enol group of curcumin along with one acetate group and one water molecule. Cyclic voltammetric studies of the complex showed a reversible Cu(2+)/Cu(+) couple with a potential of 0.402 V vs NHE. The Cu(II)-curcumin complex is soluble in lipids and DMSO, and insoluble in water. It scavenges superoxide radicals with a rate constant of 1.97 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) in DMSO determined by stopped-flow spectrometer. Subsequent to the reaction with superoxide radicals, the complex was found to be regenerated completely, indicating catalytic activity in neutralizing superoxide radicals. Complete regeneration of the complex was observed, even when the stoichiometry of superoxide radicals was 10 times more than that of the complex. This was further confirmed by EPR monitoring of superoxide radicals. The SOD mimicking activity of the complex was determined by xanthine/xanthine oxidase assay, from which it has been found that 5 microg of the complex is equivalent to 1 unit of SOD. The complex inhibits radiation-induced lipid peroxidation and shows radical-scavenging ability. It reacts with DPPH radicals with rate constant 10 times less than that of curcumin. Pulse radiolysis-induced one-electron oxidation of the complex by azide radicals in TX-100 micellar solutions produced strongly absorbing ( approximately 500 nm) phenoxyl radicals, indicating that the phenolic moiety of curcumin remained intact on complexation with copper. The results confirm that the new Cu(II)-curcumin complex possesses SOD activity, free radical neutralizing ability, and antioxidant potential. Quantum chemical calculations with density functional theory have been performed

  5. Changes in Expression of Manganese Superoxide Dismutase, Copper and Zinc Superoxide Dismutase and Catalase in Brachionus calyciflorus during the Aging Process

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianghua; Dong, Siming; Jiang, Qichen; Kuang, Tengjiao; Huang, Wenting; Yang, Jiaxin

    2013-01-01

    Rotifers are useful model organisms for aging research, owing to their small body size (0.1–1 mm), short lifespan (6–14 days) and the relative easy in which aging and senescence phenotypes can be measured. Recent studies have shown that antioxidants can extend the lifespan of rotifers. In this paper, we analyzed changes in the mRNA expression level of genes encoding the antioxidants manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), copper and zinc SOD (CuZnSOD) and catalase (CAT) during rotifer aging to clarify the function of these enzymes in this process. We also investigated the effects of common life-prolonging methods [dietary restriction (DR) and resveratrol] on the mRNA expression level of these genes. The results showed that the mRNA expression level of MnSOD decreased with aging, whereas that of CuZnSOD increased. The mRNA expression of CAT did not change significantly. This suggests that the ability to eliminate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the mitochondria reduces with aging, thus aggravating the damaging effect of ROS on the mitochondria. DR significantly increased the mRNA expression level of MnSOD, CuZnSOD and CAT, which might explain why DR is able to extend rotifer lifespan. Although resveratrol also increased the mRNA expression level of MnSOD, it had significant inhibitory effects on the mRNA expression of CuZnSOD and CAT. In short, mRNA expression levels of CAT, MnSOD and CuZnSOD are likely to reflect the ability of mitochondria to eliminate ROS and delay the aging process. PMID:23451185

  6. Progress in Understanding Algal Bloom-Mediated Fish Kills: The Role of Superoxide Radicals, Phycotoxins and Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Dorantes-Aranda, Juan José; Seger, Andreas; Mardones, Jorge I; Nichols, Peter D; Hallegraeff, Gustaaf M

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of the role of reactive oxygen species, phycotoxins and fatty acids in fish toxicity by harmful marine microalgae remains inconclusive. An in vitro fish gill (from rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss) assay was used to simultaneously assess the effect in superoxide dismutase, catalase and lactate dehydrogenase enzymatic activities caused by seven species of ichthyotoxic microalgae (Chattonella marina, Fibrocapsa japonica, Heterosigma akashiwo, Karenia mikimotoi, Alexandrium catenella, Karlodinium veneficum, Prymnesium parvum). Quantification of superoxide production by these algae was also performed. The effect of purified phycotoxins and crude extracts was compared, and the effect of fatty acids is discussed. The raphidophyte Chattonella was the most ichthyotoxic (gill cell viability down to 35%) and also the major producer of superoxide radicals (14 pmol cell-1 hr-1) especially after cell lysis. The raphidophyte Heterosigma and dinoflagellate Alexandrium were the least toxic and had low superoxide production, except when A. catenella was lysed (5.6 pmol cell-1 hr-1). Catalase showed no changes in activity in all the treatments. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and lactate dehydrogenase exhibited significant activity increases of ≤23% and 51.2% TCC (total cellular content), respectively, after exposure to C. marina, but SOD showed insignificant changes with remaining algal species. A strong relationship between gill cell viability and superoxide production or superoxide dismutase was not observed. Purified brevetoxins PbTx-2 and -3 (from Karenia brevis, LC50 of 22.1 versus 35.2 μg mL-1) and karlotoxin KmTx-2 (from Karlodinium; LC50 = 380 ng mL-1) could almost entirely account for the fish killing activity by those two dinoflagellates. However, the paralytic shellfish toxins (PST) GTX1&4, C1&C2, and STX did not account for Alexandrium ichthyotoxicity. Only aqueous extracts of Alexandrium were cytotoxic (≤65% decrease of viability), whereas crude

  7. Ursolic Acid Inhibits Superoxide Production in Activated Neutrophils and Attenuates Trauma-Hemorrhage Shock-Induced Organ Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Shen, Hsin-I; Liu, Fu-Chao; Tsai, Hsin-I; Wu, Yang-Chang; Chang, Fang-Rong; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophil activation is associated with the development of organ injury after trauma–hemorrhagic shock. In the present study, ursolic acid inhibited the superoxide anion generation and elastase release in human neutrophils. Administration of ursolic acid attenuated trauma–hemorrhagic shock-induced hepatic and lung injuries in rats. In addition, administration of ursolic acid attenuated the hepatic malondialdehyde levels and reduced the plasma aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase levels after trauma–hemorrhagic shock. In conclusion, ursolic acid, a bioactive natural compound, inhibits superoxide anion generation and elastase release in human neutrophils and ameliorates trauma–hemorrhagic shock-induced organ injury in rats. PMID:25360589

  8. Progress in Understanding Algal Bloom-Mediated Fish Kills: The Role of Superoxide Radicals, Phycotoxins and Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Dorantes-Aranda, Juan José; Seger, Andreas; Mardones, Jorge I.; Nichols, Peter D.; Hallegraeff, Gustaaf M.

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of the role of reactive oxygen species, phycotoxins and fatty acids in fish toxicity by harmful marine microalgae remains inconclusive. An in vitro fish gill (from rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss) assay was used to simultaneously assess the effect in superoxide dismutase, catalase and lactate dehydrogenase enzymatic activities caused by seven species of ichthyotoxic microalgae (Chattonella marina, Fibrocapsa japonica, Heterosigma akashiwo, Karenia mikimotoi, Alexandrium catenella, Karlodinium veneficum, Prymnesium parvum). Quantification of superoxide production by these algae was also performed. The effect of purified phycotoxins and crude extracts was compared, and the effect of fatty acids is discussed. The raphidophyte Chattonella was the most ichthyotoxic (gill cell viability down to 35%) and also the major producer of superoxide radicals (14 pmol cell-1 hr-1) especially after cell lysis. The raphidophyte Heterosigma and dinoflagellate Alexandrium were the least toxic and had low superoxide production, except when A. catenella was lysed (5.6 pmol cell-1 hr-1). Catalase showed no changes in activity in all the treatments. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and lactate dehydrogenase exhibited significant activity increases of ≤23% and 51.2% TCC (total cellular content), respectively, after exposure to C. marina, but SOD showed insignificant changes with remaining algal species. A strong relationship between gill cell viability and superoxide production or superoxide dismutase was not observed. Purified brevetoxins PbTx-2 and -3 (from Karenia brevis, LC50 of 22.1 versus 35.2 μg mL-1) and karlotoxin KmTx-2 (from Karlodinium; LC50 = 380 ng mL-1) could almost entirely account for the fish killing activity by those two dinoflagellates. However, the paralytic shellfish toxins (PST) GTX1&4, C1&C2, and STX did not account for Alexandrium ichthyotoxicity. Only aqueous extracts of Alexandrium were cytotoxic (≤65% decrease of viability), whereas crude

  9. Microencapsulation of superoxide dismutase into poly(epsilon-caprolactone) microparticles by reverse micelle solvent evaporation.

    PubMed

    Youan, Bi-Botti Célestin

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work was to encapsulate superoxide dismutase (SOD) in poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) microparticles by reverse micelle solvent evaporation. The concentration of PCL, the hydrophile-lipophile balance (HLB), and concentration of the sucrose ester used as surfactant in the organic phase were investigated as formulation variables. Relatively higher encapsulation efficiency (approximately 48%) and retained enzymatic activity (>90%) were obtained with microparticle formulation made from the 20% (w/v) PCL and 0.05% (w/v) sucrose ester of HLB = 6. This formulation allowed the in vitro release of SOD for at least 72 hr. These results showed that reverse micelle solvent evaporation can be used to efficiently encapsulate SOD in PCL microparticles. Such formulations may improve the bioavailability of SOD. PMID:14612345

  10. Carotenoids can act as antioxidants by oxidizing the superoxide radical anion.

    PubMed

    Galano, Annia; Vargas, Rubicelia; Martínez, Ana

    2010-01-01

    The electron transfer (ET) reaction between carotenoids and the superoxide radical anion is found to be not only a viable process but also a very unique one. The nature of the O(2) (-) inverts the direction of the transfer, with respect to ET involving other ROS: the O(2) (-) becomes the electron donor and carotenoids (CAR) the electron acceptor. Therefore the "antioxidant" activity of CAR when reacting with O(2) (-) lies in their capacity to prevent the formation of oxidant ROS. This peculiar charge transfer is energetically feasible in non-polar environments but not in polar media. In addition the relative reactivity of CAR towards O(2) (-) is drastically different from their reactivity to other ROS. Asthaxanthin (ASTA) is predicted to be a better O(2) (-) quencher than LYC and the other CAR. The CAR + O(2) (-) reactions were found to be diffusion controlled. The agreement with available experimental data supports the density functional theory results from the present work. PMID:20024459

  11. PEA chloroplasts under clino-rotation: lipid peroxidation and superoxide dismutase activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranenko, V. V.

    The lipid peroxidation (LP) intensity and the activity of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) were studied in chloroplasts of pea (Pisum sativum L.) plants grown for 7 and 14 days under clino-rotation. An increase in LP levels in chloroplasts during both terms of clinorotation in comparison with stationary controls was documented. SOD activity increased in chloroplasts of plants that were clino-rotated for seven days. SOD has a significant protective effect by diminishing the availability of O2-. However, under more prolonged clino-rotation (14 days), SOD activity decreased but was still higher than in the control samples. In accordance with Selye's oxidative stress theory (Selye, 1956; modified by Leshem et al., 1998), plants that were clino-rotated for seven days are presumed to be in a stage of resistance while 14-day plants reached a stage of exhaustion.

  12. Biphasic effects of muramyl dipeptide or lipopolysaccharide on superoxide anion-generating activities of macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Yagawa, K; Kaku, M; Ichinose, Y; Nagao, S; Tanaka, A; Tomoda, A

    1984-01-01

    The superoxide anion (O2-)-generating activity of guinea pig macrophages stimulated by wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), immune complexes, or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) was studied after short- and long-term exposures of the cells to muramyl dipeptide (MDP) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Neither MDP nor LPS alone induced O2- release in macrophages. Short-term (30 min) exposure to these agents caused the enhanced release of O2- in response to WGA or immune complexes, though the PMA-induced O2- generation was not affected. On the other hand, long-term exposure (more than 24 h) to MDP or LPS progressively enhanced O2- generation of the cells induced by WGA, immune complexes, or even PMA. These results suggest that the mechanism for O2- generation of macrophages stimulated by WGA or immune complexes differs from that stimulated by PMA and that the differences also exist between short- and long-term exposure to MDP or LPS. PMID:6329960

  13. Genetics of superoxide dismutase in the forest tent caterpillar and other organisms.

    PubMed

    Lorimer, N

    1979-01-01

    The electrophoretic assay of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in Malacosoma disstria revealed a total of 13 bands arranged in 9 patterns. One locus, composed of bands 28, 32, 36 was polymorphic in some locations. Band frequencies varied by location, but not by generation or by time in the laboratory. Significant interactions between sibling groups and SOD types for development time suggest that selective advantage is a function of genetic background. SOD, an important enzyme protecting diverse organisms against the toxic radicals of oxygen, has been extensively analyzed by biochemists. Geneticists have assayed individuals and populations for the smae enzyme, calling it tetrazolium oxidase (TO). The biochemistry and genetics literatures were reviewed and results from the two disciplines were discussed. PMID:489948

  14. Anti-superoxide and anti-peroxynitrite strategies in pain suppression

    PubMed Central

    Janes, Kali; Neumann, William L.; Salvemini, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Superoxide (SO, O2·−) and its reaction product peroxynitrite (PN, ONOO−) have been shown to be important in the development of pain of several etiologies. While significant progress has been made in teasing out the relative contribution of SO and PN peripherally, spinally, and supraspinally during the development and maintenance of central sensitization and pain, there is still a considerable void in our understanding. Further research is required in order to develop improved therapeutic strategies for selectively eliminating SO and/or PN. Furthermore, it may be that PN is a more attractive target, in that unlike SO it has no currently known beneficial role. Our group has been at the forefront of research concerning the role of SO and PN in pain, and our current findings have led to the development of two new classes of orally active catalysts which are selective for PN decomposition while sparing SO. PMID:22200449

  15. Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities after heat injury of listeria monocytogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Dallmier, A.W.; Martin, S.E.

    1988-02-01

    Four strains of Listeria monocytogenes were examined for catalase (CA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities. The two strains having the highest CA activities (LCDC and Scott A) also possessed the highest SOD activities. The CA activity of heated cell extracts of all four strains examined decreased sharply between 55 and 60/sup 0/C. SOD was more heat labile than CA. Two L. monocytogenes strains demonstrated a decline in SOD activity after heat treatment at 45/sup 0/C, whereas the other two strains demonstrated a decline at 50/sup 0/C. Sublethal heating of the cells at 55/sup 0/C resulted in increased sensitivity to 5.5% NaCl. Exogenous hydrogen peroxide was added to suspensions of L. monocytogenes; strains producing the highest CA levels showed the greatest H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ resistance.

  16. Transcriptional Analysis of the Rubrerythrin and Superoxide Dismutase Genes of Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Geissmann, Thomas A.; Teuber, Michael; Meile, Leo

    1999-01-01

    We cloned and sequenced a 2.7-kb fragment of chromosomal DNA from Clostridium perfringens containing the superoxide dismutase-encoding gene, sod. Previously, rubrerythrin from C. perfringens had been isolated and its gene (rbr) had been cloned (Y. Lehmann, L. Meile, and M. Teuber, J. Bacteriol. 178:7152–7158, 1996). Northern blot experiments revealed a length of approximately 800 bases for each transcript of rbr and sod of C. perfringens. Thus, rbr and sod each represent a monocistronic operon. Their transcription start points were located by primer extension analyses. sod transcription was shown to depend on the growth phase, and it reached a maximum during the transition from log phase to stationary phase. Neither sod nor rbr transcription was influenced by oxidative stress. PMID:10559182

  17. Hydrogen peroxide-independent generation of superoxide catalyzed by soybean peroxidase in response to ferrous ion

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Makoto; Kawano, Tomonori

    2015-01-01

    It is well documented that extracellular alkalization occurs in plants under the challenges by pathogenic microbes. This may eventually induce the pH-dependent extracellular peroxidase-mediated oxidative burst at the site of microbial challenges. By employing the purified proteins of horseradish peroxidase as a model, we have recently proposed a likely role for free Fe2+ in reduction of ferric enzyme of plant peroxidases into ferrous intermediate and oxygen-bound form of enzyme known as Compound III which may eventually releases superoxide anion radical (O2•−), especially under alkaline condition, possibly contributing to the plant defense mechanism. In the present study, we employed the purified protein of soybean peroxidase (SBP) as an additional model, and examined the changes in the redox status of enzyme accompanying the generation of O2•− in response to Fe2+ under alkaline condition. PMID:26417938

  18. Molecular cloning of an Onchocerca volvulus extracellular Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed Central

    James, E R; McLean, D C; Perler, F

    1994-01-01

    Onchocerca volvulus, a human parasitic nematode, is the third leading cause of preventable blindness worldwide. This study describes the molecular cloning of a novel superoxide dismutase (SOD) from the parasite. This putative O. volvulus extracellular SOD (OvEcSOD) is 628 nucleotides (nt) long, including a 22-nt 5' spliced leader (SL1) and a portion encoding an N-terminal hydrophobic 42-amino-acid signal peptide. The remainder of the cDNA shares 71% identity with an O. volvulus cytosolic SOD sequence and is 3 nt longer. All residues involved in metal ion binding, active site formation, folding, and dimer formation in SODs are conserved. Data indicate the OvEcSOD and O. volvulus cytosolic SOD are separate gene products and that the OvEcSOD appears to possess the characteristics of a membrane-bound or secreted enzyme which may be involved in the parasite defense against phagocyte-generated reactive oxygen species. Images PMID:8300230

  19. Molecular cloning of superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD) from aquatic molluscs.

    PubMed

    Geret, F; Manduzio, H; Company, R; Leboulenger, F; Bebianno, M J; Danger, J M

    2004-01-01

    The potential of the first line of the active oxygen-scavenging system, partial cDNA encoding Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) was isolated in three aquatic mollusc species: Ruditapes decussatus (marine clam), Dreissena polymorpha (continental water mussel) and Bathymodiolus azoricus (hydrothermal vent mussel). These SOD cDNA fragments were amplified by PCR with degenerate oligonucleotide primers derived from the amino acid sequence conserved in the Cu/Zn-SOD from several other organisms. A partial cDNA of CuZn-SOD was obtained for R. decussates (510 bp), D. polymorpha (510 bp) and B. azoricus (195 bp). The deduced amino acid sequence showed high similarity among the three mollusc species (57-63%) and among other species (50-65%). The residues involved in coordinating copper (His-47, 49, 64, 121) and zinc (His-64, 72, 81 and Asp-84) were well conserved among the three Cu/Zn-SOD sequences. PMID:15178089

  20. Effect of lu-duo-wei on scavenging superoxide and hydroxyl radicals in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fang, Y Z; Sun, C P; Tian, X H; Cong, J H

    1998-01-01

    Irradiation of a riboflavin-containing system by ultraviolet light was used to produce superoxide radical (.O2-). Hydroxyl radical (.OH) was generated by the system of Fe(II)-H2O2. Using electron spin resonance and spin trapping techniques, the effect of Lu-Duo-Wei, a capsule consisting extracts of green tea, Fructus Lycii and Semen Ziziphi Spinosae, on scavenging .O2- and .OH was observed. The results showed that the efficiency of scavenging .O2- and .OH by Lu-Duo-Wei was much higher than that by tea polyphenol alone. It is suggested that the synergistic action of tea polyphenol and other components are responsible for the scavenging effect of Lu-Duo-Wei on .O2- and .OH. PMID:9799967

  1. Superoxide dismutase, catalase and cell dimorphism in Candida albicans cells exposed to methanol and different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Romandini, P; Bonotto, C; Bertoloni, G; Beltramini, M; Salvato, B

    1994-05-01

    The combined effects of methanol and different temperatures on Candida albicans were studied. Growth curve, cell morphology, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activity levels have been determined. Cell growth in each medium was comparable to 28 degrees C and 37 degrees C. The growth rate was not affected by methanol, in the presence of glucose, while it was much lower in the absence of sugar. Cell dimorphism appeared after thermic stress and it was also dependent on the medium composition. In all media, both SOD and catalase levels were much higher at 37 degrees C. The presence of methanol per se did not affect the enzymatic levels, while the absence of glucose gave higher SOD levels. PMID:8061958

  2. Production and removal of superoxide anion radical by artificial metalloenzymes and redox-active metals

    PubMed Central

    Kawano, Tomonori; Kagenishi, Tomoko; Kadono, Takashi; Bouteau, François; Hiramatsu, Takuya; Lin, Cun; Tanaka, Kenichiro; Tanaka, Licca; Mancuso, Stefano; Uezu, Kazuya; Okobira, Tadashi; Furukawa, Hiroka; Iwase, Junichiro; Inokuchi, Reina; Baluška, Frantisek; Yokawa, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species is useful for various medical, engineering and agricultural purposes. These include clinical modulation of immunological mechanism, enhanced degradation of organic compounds released to the environments, removal of microorganisms for the hygienic purpose, and agricultural pest control; both directly acting against pathogenic microorganisms and indirectly via stimulation of plant defense mechanism represented by systemic acquired resistance and hypersensitive response. By aiming to develop a novel classes of artificial redox-active biocatalysts involved in production and/or removal of superoxide anion radicals, recent attempts for understanding and modification of natural catalytic proteins and functional DNA sequences of mammalian and plant origins are covered in this review article. PMID:27066179

  3. A study on scavenging effects of Chinese medicine on superoxide anion radicals by pulse radiolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fengmei, Li; Andong, Liu; Hongchun, Gu; Shaojie, Di

    1993-10-01

    A study on scavenging and dismutation effects on superoxide anion radical (·O -2) by using two Chinese antiaging medicine-Salvia Miltiorrhiza injection (S.M.) and Sulekang capsule (S.C.) were performed by pulse radiolysis. The absorption spectra of ·O -2 have been redetermined in radiolysis of aqueous solution of sodium format. The absorption maximum is at about 250nm. The results suggested that S.M. and S.C. can dismutate and scavenge ·O -2. The experimental scavenging rate of S.M. (150μg/ml) and S.C. (250μg/ml) were 89.6% and 69.5% respectively.

  4. The SODyssey: superoxide dismutases from biochemistry, through proteomics, to oxidative stress, aging and nutraceuticals.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Angelo; Zolla, Lello

    2011-06-01

    A total of 40 years have already passed since the pioneering work of McCord and Fridovich on erythrocuprein superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. This modern scientific 'Odyssey' has been accompanied by a series of successes in the fields of biochemistry, biomedicine and proteomics. In this article, we resume the main strides in these fields, mainly aiming at delivering an exhaustive portrait of SOD's involvement in several oxidative stress-triggered threats to human health, including neurodegenerative disorders (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases), cardiovascular diseases, cancer and aging. In parallel, food-derived chemical compounds appear to be intertwined with cellular redox poise modulation, as this increasingly emerges from clinical biochemical and proteomic investigations. Thus, we will also consider the involvement of these nutraceuticals in oxidative stress-triggered diseases and SOD activity modulation. Like a modern Ulysses, researchers know that the journey is not yet over. Nevertheless, much information has been gathered over the last four decades. PMID:21679120

  5. Dynamics of hydrogen atoms in superoxide dismutase by quasielastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed Central

    Andreani, C; Filabozzi, A; Menzinger, F; Desideri, A; Deriu, A; Di Cola, D

    1995-01-01

    The low energy dynamic of the enzyme Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase have been investigated by means of quasielastic neutron scattering in the temperature range 4-320 K. Below 200 K the scattering is purely elastic, while above this temperature a pronounced decrease in the elastic intensity is observed, together with the onset of a small quasielastic component. This behavior is similar to that previously observed in other more flexible globular proteins, and can be attributed to transitions between slightly different conformational substates of the protein tertiary structure. The presence of only a small quasielastic component, whose intensity is < or = 25% of the total spectrum, is related to the high structural rigidity of this protein. PMID:7647254

  6. Production and removal of superoxide anion radical by artificial metalloenzymes and redox-active metals.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Tomonori; Kagenishi, Tomoko; Kadono, Takashi; Bouteau, François; Hiramatsu, Takuya; Lin, Cun; Tanaka, Kenichiro; Tanaka, Licca; Mancuso, Stefano; Uezu, Kazuya; Okobira, Tadashi; Furukawa, Hiroka; Iwase, Junichiro; Inokuchi, Reina; Baluška, Frantisek; Yokawa, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species is useful for various medical, engineering and agricultural purposes. These include clinical modulation of immunological mechanism, enhanced degradation of organic compounds released to the environments, removal of microorganisms for the hygienic purpose, and agricultural pest control; both directly acting against pathogenic microorganisms and indirectly via stimulation of plant defense mechanism represented by systemic acquired resistance and hypersensitive response. By aiming to develop a novel classes of artificial redox-active biocatalysts involved in production and/or removal of superoxide anion radicals, recent attempts for understanding and modification of natural catalytic proteins and functional DNA sequences of mammalian and plant origins are covered in this review article. PMID:27066179

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS ON SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE AND CATALASE ACTIVITY AND EXPRESSION IN HONEY BEE.

    PubMed

    Nikolić, Tatjana V; Purać, Jelena; Orčić, Snežana; Kojić, Danijela; Vujanović, Dragana; Stanimirović, Zoran; Gržetić, Ivan; Ilijević, Konstantin; Šikoparija, Branko; Blagojević, Duško P

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the cellular stress response in honey bees will significantly contribute to their conservation. The aim of this study was to analyze the response of the antioxidative enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase in honey bees related to the presence of toxic metals in different habitats. Three locations were selected: (i) Tunovo on the mountain Golija, as control area, without industry and large human impact, (ii) Belgrade as urban area, and (iii) Zajača, as mining and industrial zone. Our results showed that the concentrations of lead (Pb) in whole body of bees vary according to habitat, but there was very significant increase of Pb in bees from investigated industrial area. Bees from urban and industrial area had increased expression of both Sod1 and Cat genes, suggesting adaptation to increased oxidative stress. However, in spite increased gene expression, the enzyme activity of catalase was lower in bees from industrial area suggesting inhibitory effect of Pb on catalase. PMID:26314562

  8. [Catalase and superoxide dismutase in the cells of strictly anaerobic microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Briukhanov, A L; Thauer, R K; Netrusov, A I

    2002-01-01

    Strictly anaerobic microorganisms relating to various physiological groups were screened for catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. All of the investigated anaerobes possessed the SOD activity, necessary for protection against toxic products of oxygen reduction. High specific activities of SOD were found in Acetobacterium woodii and Acetobacterium wieringae. Most of the investigated clostridia and acetogens were catalase-negative. A significant activity of catalase was found in Thermohydrogenium kirishiense, in representatives of the genus Desulfotomaculum, and in several methanogens. Methanobrevibacter arboriphilus had an exceptionally high catalase activity after growth in medium supplemented with hemin. Hemin also produced a strong positive effect on the catalase activity in many other anaerobic microorganisms. In methanogens, the activities of the enzymes of antioxidant defense varied in wide ranges depending on the stage of growth and the energy source. PMID:12138753

  9. Antidepressants upregulate messenger RNA levels of the neuroprotective enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD1).

    PubMed Central

    Li, X M; Chlan-Fourney, J; Juorio, A V; Bennett, V L; Shrikhande, S; Bowen, R C

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of amitriptyline, bupropion, doxepin or venlafaxine on the gene expression of the neuroprotective enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD1) in a catecholamine cell in vitro model. DESIGN: Molecular study of a cultured cell line. INTERVENTIONS: Rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells were incubated in 1 and 10 mumol/L of various antidepressant medications for 24 or 48 hours. OUTCOME MEASURES: Northern blot analysis. RESULTS: Amitriptyline up-regulated SOD1 messenger RNA in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The greatest up-regulation was following incubation with 10 mumol/L amitriptyline for 48 hours. The addition of bupropion, doxepin or venlafaxine to PC12 cell cultures also up-regulated SOD1 mRNA. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that some antidepressants have the ability to positively regulate neuroprotective genes. Images Fig. 2 PMID:10721683

  10. Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase in yeast mitochondria - a general phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Nedeva, Trayana S; Petrova, Ventzislava Y; Zamfirova, Daniela R; Stephanova, Elena V; Kujumdzieva, Anna V

    2004-01-15

    Fermentative and respiratory yeast strains of genera Saccharomyces, Kluyveromyces, Pichia, Candida and Hansenula have been investigated for mitochondrial localization of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD). Pure mitochondrial fractions were obtained and the specific activities of Cu/Zn and Mn SODs were measured in comparison with those in the corresponding cell-free extracts. The Cu/Zn SOD: Mn SOD ratio in mitochondria and crude extracts was calculated and was considered a specific characteristic of all tested strains. Electrophoretical visualization of SOD patterns provided evidence for possible migration of cytosolic Cu/Zn SOD to mitochondria. The characteristic Cu/Zn SOD profile in mitochondria of all tested strains suggested its ubiquity within the fermentative and respiratory yeasts. PMID:14734161

  11. Mitochondrial Superoxide Dismutase Has a Protumorigenic Role in Ovarian Clear Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hemachandra, L P Madhubhani P; Shin, Dong-Hui; Dier, Usawadee; Iuliano, James N; Engelberth, Sarah A; Uusitalo, Larissa M; Murphy, Susan K; Hempel, Nadine

    2015-11-15

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the fourth leading cause of death due to cancer in women and comprises distinct histologic subtypes, which vary widely in their genetic profiles and tissues of origin. It is therefore imperative to understand the etiology of these distinct diseases. Ovarian clear cell carcinoma (OCCC), a very aggressive subtype, comprises >10% of EOCs. In the present study, we show that mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (Sod2) is highly expressed in OCCC compared with other EOC subtypes. Sod2 is an antioxidant enzyme that converts highly reactive superoxide (O2 (•-)) to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and oxygen (O2), and our data demonstrate that Sod2 is protumorigenic and prometastatic in OCCC. Inhibiting Sod2 expression reduces OCCC ES-2 cell tumor growth and metastasis in a chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model. Similarly, cell proliferation, migration, spheroid attachment and outgrowth on collagen, and Akt phosphorylation are significantly decreased with reduced expression of Sod2. Mechanistically, we show that Sod2 has a dual function in supporting OCCC tumorigenicity and metastatic spread. First, Sod2 maintains highly functional mitochondria, by scavenging O2 (•-), to support the high metabolic activity of OCCC. Second, Sod2 alters the steady-state ROS balance to drive H2O2-mediated migration. While this higher steady-state H2O2 drives prometastatic behavior, it also presents a doubled-edged sword for OCCC, as it pushed the intracellular H2O2 threshold to enable more rapid killing by exogenous sources of H2O2. Understanding the complex interaction of antioxidants and ROS may provide novel therapeutic strategies to pursue for the treatment of this histologic EOC subtype. PMID:26359457

  12. Superoxide release from contracting skeletal muscle in pulmonary TNF-α overexpression mice

    PubMed Central

    Hallman, Allison H.; Roberts, William J.; Wagner, Peter D.; Hogan, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) often results in increased levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a proinflammatory cytokine, which circulates in the blood. However, it is not clear whether pulmonary TNF-α overexpression (a COPD mimic) induces excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in skeletal muscle and thereby may contribute to the muscle impairment often seen in COPD. We hypothesized that ROS generation in contracting skeletal muscle is elevated when there is TNF-α overproduction in the lung and that this can induce muscle dysfunction. Cytochrome c (cyt c) in the perfusate was used to assay superoxide (O2·−) release from isolated contracting soleus muscles from transgenic mice of pulmonary TNF-α overexpression (Tg+) and wild-type (WT) mice. Our results showed that Tg+ muscle released significantly higher levels of O2·− than WT during a period of intense contractile activity (in nmol/mg wt; 17.5 ± 2.3 vs. 4.4 ± 1.3, respectively; n = 5; P < 0.05). In addition, the soleus muscle demonstrated a significantly reduced fatigue resistance in Tg+ mice compared with WT mice. Perfusion of the contracting soleus muscle with superoxide dismutase, which specifically scavenges O2·− in the perfusate, resulted in significantly less cyt c reduction, thereby indicating that the type of ROS released from the Tg+ muscles is O2·−. Our results demonstrate that pulmonary TNF-α overexpression leads to a greater O2·− release from contracting soleus muscle in Tg+ compared with WT and that the excessive formation of O2·− in the contracting muscle of Tg+ mice leads to earlier fatigue. PMID:24196666

  13. The superoxide dismutase from red claw crayfish, Cherax quadricarinatus: molecular cloning and characterization analysis.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wei; Chen, Jing; Hou, Libo; Huang, Yanqing; Xia, Siyao; Meng, Qingguo; Wang, Wen

    2014-11-01

    In the present study, an extracellular copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (ecCuZnSOD) gene and a mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase (mtMnSOD) gene were cloned from hemocytes of red claw crayfish, Cherax quadricarinatus. The open reading frame (ORF) of ecCuZnSOD is 498 bp and encodes a 166 amino acids (aa) protein, whereas the ORF of mtMnSOD is 654 bp and encodes a 218 aa protein. The amino acid sequences of C. quadricarinatus ecCuZnSOD and mtMnSOD showed high similarities with those of ecCuZnSODs and mtMnSODs of other crustaceans, respectively. Both ecCuZnSOD and mtMnSOD of C. quadricarinatus were highly expressed in hepatopancreas, hemocytes, intestine, and gill; low transcript levels were seen in other tissues (heart, muscle, and nerve). The immune responses of ecCuZnSOD and mtMnSOD were studied following inoculation with Spiroplasma eriocheiris and Aeromonas hydrophila. After S. eriocheiris or A. hydrophila challenge, mRNA transcription of ecCuZnSOD and mtMnSOD in hemocytes and gill was upregulated. mRNA transcription of ecCuZnSOD in the hepatopancreas was also upregulated after S. eriocheiris or A. hydrophila inoculation. mtMnSOD in hepatopancreas was upregulated after A. hydrophila inoculation, whereas this was down-regulated after S. eriocheiris challenge. After S. eriocheiris and A. hydrophila challenge, total SOD activity and CuZnSOD activity both increased compared to control group. The results showed that these SODs from C. quadricarinatus likely play an important role in protecting some tissues from reactive oxygen intermediates produced during challenge from S. eriocheiris and A. hydrophila. PMID:25366155

  14. Effect of the superoxide dismutase inhibitor, diethyldithiocarbamate, on the cytotoxicity of mitomycin antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Pritsos, C A; Keyes, S R; Sartorelli, A C

    1989-10-01

    Mitomycin C (MC) and its structural analogs porfiromycin (PM), BMY-25282 and BL-6783 are toxic to EMT6 cells under aerobic and hypoxic conditions. The mitomycin antibiotics are hypothesized to exert cytotoxicity under hypoxic conditions by cross-linking DNA following reductive activation, while aerobic cytotoxicity may involve DNA cross-linking by these agents and/or damage due to the generation of oxygen radicals. Previous findings (Pritsos and Sartorelli, 1986) indicated that the rank order of cytotoxicity for a series of mitomycins was the same as the rank order for the rate of oxygen consumption induced by these agents. As an additional approach to explore the role of oxygen radicals in the aerobic cytotoxicity of the four agents studied, EMT6 cells were treated with the mitomycins in the presence of the superoxide dismutase inhibitor diethyldithiocarbamate (DETC). DETC, which decreased superoxide dismutase activity in EMT6 cells, increased the cytotoxicity of BMY-25282 and BL-6783 by half an order of magnitude, but did not affect the toxicity of PM or MC to these cells. DNA cross-links, a proposed cytotoxic lesion induced by BMY-25282, however, were not detectably increased in EMT6 cells exposed to this agent in the presence of DETC in spite of the large increase in cytotoxicity under these treatment conditions. No single strand breaks were detected in cells exposed to either BMY-25282 or BMY-25282 plus DETC. The findings support the concept that oxygen radicals may have a role in the aerobic cytotoxicity of some of the mitomycin antibiotics, and that the lesions responsible for cytotoxicity produced by oxygen radicals may not reside entirely at the level of DNA. PMID:2559790

  15. Improved human sperm recovery using superoxide dismutase and catalase supplementation in semen cryopreservation procedure.

    PubMed

    Rossi, T; Mazzilli, F; Delfino, M; Dondero, F

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of ROS scavenger supplementation in human semen samples undergoing cryopreservation procedures.After screening out andrological pathologies, we selected 25 male partners of infertile couples with the following semen profile: volume >/= 2.0 ml, normal viscosity, sperm count >/=20 x 10(6)/ml, straight progressive motility (classes 1 and 2) >/= 40% (Mazzilli, Rossi, Delfino and Nofroni (1999) Andrologia 31: 187-194), atypical forms superoxide dismutase (SOD) was added to the second, 200 U/ml of catalase to the third and both SOD (100 U/ml) and catalase (100 U/ml) were added to the fourth aliquot. Each aliquot was mixed (v/v) with TEST yolk buffer freezing medium (Irvine Scientific) and then frozen at -196 degrees C. The percent recovery of progressive motile and swollen spermatozoa was evaluated after thawing.No significant variation in the recovery of progressive motility was seen in the aliquots with added SOD or catalase alone, compared to the control group. On the other hand, a significant improvement in sperm parameter recovery was seen in the aliquot with both SOD and catalase supplementation; perhaps because of their combined and simultaneous action on superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide. These results suggest that, in some selected cases, SOD and catalase supplementation can contribute greatly to the prevention of sperm membrane lipid peroxidation by ROS and thus allow good sperm parameter recovery after freezing-thawing procedures. PMID:15256925

  16. Enhanced superoxide anion production in activated peritoneal macrophages from English sole (Pleuronectes vetulus) exposed to PACs

    SciTech Connect

    Clemons, E.; Arkoosh, M.; Casillas, E.

    1995-12-31

    In fish, as in mammals, macrophages play a vital role in the destruction of infective organisms. The purpose of this study was to determine if peritoneal macrophages (M{O}s) from English sole (Pleuronectes vetulus), a marine benthic fish, have an altered ability to produce cytotoxic reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs) after exposure to polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs). ROIs are the principle product of M{O}s used to destroy engulfed organisms. Assay conditions, including the concentration of M{O}s, type of in vitro stimulant, tissue culture media, and incubation time were optimized to measure the production of superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{minus}), the progenitor ROI, in English sole M{O}s. English sole were injected with an organic solvent extract of a PAH-contaminated sediment, equivalent to 20g sediment/kg fish, via their dorsal lymphatic sinus, and peritoneal M{O}s were harvested on days 1, 3, 5, 7, and 14 post injection. Activated peritoneal M{O}s from English sole injected with the sediment extract produced significantly more superoxide radicals after stimulation in vitro with either opsonized zymosan (OZ) or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) than the vehicle injected or control fish. Specifically, activated peritoneal M{O}s stimulated with PMA in vitro produced greater amounts (compared to controls) of O{sub 2}{minus} on days 7 and 14 after exposure, whereas the same cells stimulated with OZ showed heightened production only on day 7 after exposure. No differences in the basal amounts of O{sub 2}{minus} production from activated peritoneal M{O}s between the treatment groups were observed. This study shows that exposure of English sole to PACs altered production of O{sub 2}{minus} by macrophages, however, the consequence to the immunocompetence of exposed fish remains to be elucidated.

  17. Macrocyclic nickel(II) complexes: Synthesis, characterization, superoxide scavenging activity and DNA-binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, Abd El-Motaleb M.

    2012-05-01

    A new series of nickel(II) complexes with the tetraaza macrocyclic ligand have been synthesized as possible functional models for nickel-superoxide dismutase enzyme. The reaction of 5-amino-3-methyl-1-phenylpyrazole-4-carbaldehyde (AMPC) with itself in the presence of nickel(II) ion yields, the new macrocyclic cationic complex, [NiL(NO3)2], containing a ligand composed of the self-condensed AMPC (4 mol) bound to a single nickel(II) ion. A series of metathetical reactions have led to the isolation of a number of newly complexes of the types [NiL]X2; X = ClO4 and BF4, [NiLX2], X = Cl and Br (Scheme 1). Structures and characterizations of these complexes were achieved by several physicochemical methods namely, elemental analysis, magnetic moment, conductivity, and spectral (IR and UV-Vis) measurements. The electrochemical properties and thermal behaviors of these chelates were investigated by using cyclic voltammetry and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and DTG) techniques. A distorted octahedral stereochemistry has been proposed for the six-coordinate nitrato, and halogeno complexes. For the four-coordinate, perchlorate and fluoroborate, complex species a square-planar geometry is proposed. The measured superoxide dismutase mimetic activities of the complexes indicated that they are potent NiSOD mimics and their activities are compared with those obtained previously for nickel(II) complexes. The probable mechanistic implications of the catalytic dismutation of O2rad - by the synthesized nickel(II) complexes are discussed. The DNA-binding properties of representative complexes [NiLCl2] and [NiL](PF4)2 have been investigated by the electronic absorption and fluorescence measurements. The results obtained suggest that these complexes bind to DNA via an intercalation binding mode and the binding affinity for DNA follows the order: [NiLCl2] □ [NiL](PF4)2.

  18. Aggregation propensities of superoxide dismutase G93 hotspot mutants mirror ALS clinical phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, Ashley J.; Shin, David S.; Merz, Gregory E.; Rambo, Robert P.; Lancaster, W. Andrew; Dyer, Kevin N.; Borbat, Peter P.; Poole, Farris L.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Freed, Jack H.; Crane, Brian R.; Tainer, John A.; Getzoff, Elizabeth D.

    2014-01-01

    Protein framework alterations in heritable Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) mutants cause misassembly and aggregation in cells affected by the motor neuron disease ALS. However, the mechanistic relationship between superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutations and human disease is controversial, with many hypotheses postulated for the propensity of specific SOD mutants to cause ALS. Here, we experimentally identify distinguishing attributes of ALS mutant SOD proteins that correlate with clinical severity by applying solution biophysical techniques to six ALS mutants at human SOD hotspot glycine 93. A small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) assay and other structural methods assessed aggregation propensity by defining the size and shape of fibrillar SOD aggregates after mild biochemical perturbations. Inductively coupled plasma MS quantified metal ion binding stoichiometry, and pulsed dipolar ESR spectroscopy evaluated the Cu2+ binding site and defined cross-dimer copper–copper distance distributions. Importantly, we find that copper deficiency in these mutants promotes aggregation in a manner strikingly consistent with their clinical severities. G93 mutants seem to properly incorporate metal ions under physiological conditions when assisted by the copper chaperone but release copper under destabilizing conditions more readily than the WT enzyme. Altered intradimer flexibility in ALS mutants may cause differential metal retention and promote distinct aggregation trends observed for mutant proteins in vitro and in ALS patients. Combined biophysical and structural results test and link copper retention to the framework destabilization hypothesis as a unifying general mechanism for both SOD aggregation and ALS disease progression, with implications for disease severity and therapeutic intervention strategies. PMID:25316790

  19. Mitochondrial Dysfunction Due to Lack of Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Promotes Hepatocarcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Konzack, Anja; Jakupovic, Mirza; Kubaichuk, Kateryna; Görlach, Agnes; Dombrowski, Frank; Miinalainen, Ilkka; Sormunen, Raija

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: One of the cancer hallmarks is mitochondrial dysfunction associated with oxidative stress. Among the first line of defense against oxidative stress is the dismutation of superoxide radicals, which in the mitochondria is carried out by manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). Accordingly, carcinogenesis would be associated with a dysregulation in MnSOD expression. However, the association studies available so far are conflicting, and no direct proof concerning the role of MnSOD as a tumor promoter or suppressor has been provided. Therefore, we investigated the role of MnSOD in carcinogenesis by studying the effect of MnSOD deficiency in cells and in the livers of mice. Results: We found that loss of MnSOD in hepatoma cells contributed to their conversion toward a more malignant phenotype, affecting all cellular properties generally associated with metabolic transformation and tumorigenesis. In vivo, hepatocyte-specific MnSOD-deficient mice showed changed organ architecture, increased expression of tumor markers, and a faster response to carcinogenesis. Moreover, deficiency of MnSOD in both the in vitro and in vivo model reduced β-catenin and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α levels. Innovation: The present study shows for the first time the important correlation between MnSOD presence and the regulation of two major pathways involved in carcinogenesis, the Wnt/β-catenin and hypoxia signaling pathway. Conclusion: Our study points toward a tumor suppressive role of MnSOD in liver, where the Wnt/β-catenin and hypoxia pathway may be crucial elements. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 1059–1075. PMID:26422659

  20. Nickel Superoxide Dismutase: Structural and Functional Roles of Cys2 and Cys6

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Kelly C.; Johnson, Olivia E.; Cabelli, Diane E.; Brunold, Thomas C.; Maroney, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Nickel superoxide dismutase (NiSOD) is unique among the family of SOD enzymes in that it coordinates cysteine residues (Cys2 and Cys6) to the redox-active metal center and exhibits a hexameric quaternary structure. To assess the role of the Cys residues with respect to the activity of NiSOD, mutations of Cys2 and Cys6 to serine (C2S-, C6S-, and C2S/C6S-NiSOD) were carried out. The resulting mutants do not catalyze the disproportionation of superoxide, but retain the hexameric structure found for wild-type (WT) NiSOD and bind Ni(II) ions in a 1:1 stoichiometry. X-ray absorption spectroscopic (XAS) studies of the Cys mutants reveal that the nickel active-site structure for each mutant resembles that of C2S/C6S-NiSOD and demonstrate that mutation of either Cys2 or Cys6 inhibits coordination of the remaining Cys residue. Mutation of one or both Cys residue(s) in NiSOD induces the conversion of the low-spin Ni(II) site in the native enzyme to a high-spin Ni(II) center in the mutants. This result that indicates that coordination of both Cys residues is required to generate the native low-spin configurations and maintain catalytic activity. Analysis of the quaternary structure of the cysteine mutants by differential scanning calorimetry, mass spectrometry, and size-exclusion chromatography reveal that the cysteine ligands, particularly Cys2, are also important for stabilizing the hexameric quaternary structure of the native enzyme. PMID:20333421

  1. Molecular characterization of a cytosolic manganese superoxide dismutase from the Chinese mitten crab, Eriocheir sinensis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, D X; Chen, L Q; Qin, J G; Qin, C J; Zhang, H; Wu, P; Li, E C

    2014-01-01

    A cytosolic manganese superoxide dismutase gene (Es-cMnSOD) was cloned from the Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis, using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and the rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The open reading frame of Es-cMnSOD is 867 bp in length and encodes a 288-amino acid protein without a signal peptide. The calculated molecular mass of the translated protein of Es-cMnSOD is 31.43 kDa, with an estimated isoelectric point of 6.30. The deduced amino acid sequence of Es-cMnSOD has similarities of 90, 89, 84, 87, and 81% to those of white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei MnSOD, black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon MnSOD, giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii MnSOD, blue crab Callinectes sapidus MnSOD, and red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii MnSOD, respectively. Es-cMnSOD contains a manganese superoxide dismutase domain (DVWEHAYY) and 4 conserved amino acids responsible for binding manganese. Es-cMnSOD was expressed in the hemocytes, eyestalk, muscle, intestine, gill, and hepatopancreas. Es-cMnSOD transcripts in hemocytes of E. sinensis increased at 1.5 and 48 h after injection of Aeromonas hydrophila, indicating that the induction of the SOD system response occurred within a short period of time. This study suggests that MnSOD may play a critical role in crab immunity, allowing efficient activation of an early innate immune response in the crab. PMID:25501153

  2. Antioxidative capacity and enzyme activity in Haematococcus pluvialis cells exposed to superoxide free radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianguo; Zhang, Xiaoli; Sun, Yanhong; Lin, Wei

    2010-01-01

    The antioxidative capacity of astaxanthin and enzyme activity of reactive oxygen eliminating enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) were studied in three cell types of Haematococcus pluvialis exposed to high concentrations of a superoxide anion radical (O{2/-}). The results show that defensive enzymes and astaxanthin-related mechanisms were both active in H. pluvialis during exposure to reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as O{2/-}. Astaxanthin reacted with ROS much faster than did the protective enzymes, and had the strongest antioxidative capacity to protect against lipid peroxidation. The defensive mechanisms varied significantly between the three cell types and were related to the level of astaxanthin that had accumulated in those cells. Astaxanthin-enriched red cells had the strongest antioxidative capacity, followed by brown cells, and astaxanthin-deficient green cells. Although there was no significant increase in expression of protective enzymes, the malondialdehyde (MDA) content in red cells was sustained at a low level because of the antioxidative effect of astaxanthin, which quenched O{2/-} before the protective enzymes could act. In green cells, astaxanthin is very low or absent; therefore, scavenging of ROS is inevitably reliant on antioxidative enzymes. Accordingly, in green cells, these enzymes play the leading role in scavenging ROS, and the expression of these enzymes is rapidly increased to reduce excessive ROS. However, because ROS were constantly increased in this study, the enhance enzyme activity in the green cells was not able to repair the ROS damage, leading to elevated MDA content. Of the four defensive enzymes measured in astaxanthin-deficient green cells, SOD eliminates O{2/-}, POD eliminates H2O2, which is a by-product of SOD activity, and APX and CAT are then initiated to scavenge excessive ROS.

  3. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Profiling of the Escherichia coli Responses to Superoxide Stress and Sodium Salicylate

    PubMed Central

    Pomposiello, Pablo J.; Bennik, Marjon H. J.; Demple, Bruce

    2001-01-01

    Escherichia coli responds to oxidative stress by activating sets of coregulated genes that help the cell to maintain homeostasis. Identified previously by genetic and biochemical approaches, the soxRS system mediates the induction of 18 of these redox-inducible genes (including the soxS gene itself). An overlapping set of genes is activated by an assortment of structurally unrelated molecules with antibiotic activities; many genes in this response are controlled by the marRAB system. The activation of either the soxRS or the marRAB system results in enhanced resistance to both superoxide-generating agents and multiple antibiotics. In order to probe the extent of these regulatory networks, we have measured whole-genome transcriptional profiles of the E. coli response to the superoxide-generating agent paraquat (PQ), an inducer of the soxRS system, and to the weak acid salt sodium salicylate (NaSal), an inducer of the marRA system. A total of 112 genes was modulated in response to PQ, while 134 genes were modulated in response to NaSal. We have also obtained transcriptional profiles of the SoxS and MarA regulons in the absence of global stress, in order to establish the regulatory hierarchies within the global responses. Several previously unrelated genes were shown to be under SoxS or MarA control. The genetic responses to both environmental insults revealed several common themes, including the activation of genes coding for functions that replenish reducing potential; regulate iron transport and storage; and participate in sugar and amino acid transport, detoxification, protein modification, osmotic protection, and peptidoglycan synthesis. A large number of PQ- and NaSal-responsive genes have no known function, suggesting that many adaptive metabolic changes that ensue after stress remain uncharacterized. PMID:11395452

  4. Oxidase, superoxide dismutase, and hydrogen peroxide reductase activities of methanobactin from types I and II methanotrophs.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong W; Semrau, Jeremy D; Antholine, William E; Hartsel, Scott C; Anderson, Ryan C; Carey, Jeffrey N; Dreis, Ashley M; Kenseth, Erik M; Renstrom, Joel M; Scardino, Lori L; Van Gorden, Garrett S; Volkert, Anna A; Wingad, Aaron D; Yanzer, Paul J; McEllistrem, Marcus T; de la Mora, Arlene M; DiSpirito, Alan A

    2008-08-01

    Methanobactin (mb) is a copper-binding chromopeptide that appears to be involved in oxidation of methane by the membrane-associated or particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO). To examine this potential physiological role, the redox and catalytic properties of mb from three different methanotrophs were examined in the absence and presence of O(2). Metal free mb from the type II methanotroph Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, but not from the type I methanotrophs Methylococcus capsulatus Bath or Methylomicrobium album BG8, were reduced by a variety of reductants, including NADH and duroquinol, and catalyzed the reduction of O(2) to O(2)(-). Copper-containing mb (Cu-mb) from all three methanotrophs showed several interesting properties, including reductase dependent oxidase activity, dismutation of O(2)(-) to H(2)O(2), and the reductant dependent reduction of H(2)O(2) to H(2)O. The superoxide dismutase-like and hydrogen peroxide reductase activities of Cu-mb were 4 and 1 order(s) of magnitude higher, respectively, than the observed oxidase activity. The results demonstrate that Cu-mb from all three methanotrophs are redox-active molecules and oxygen radical scavengers, with the capacity to detoxify both superoxide and hydrogen peroxide without the formation of the hydroxyl radicals associated with Fenton reactions. As previously observed with Cu-mb from Ms. trichosporium OB3b, Cu-mb from both type I methanotrophs stimulated pMMO activity. However, in contrast to previous studies using mb from Ms. trichosporium OB3b, pMMO activity was not inhibited by mb from the two type I methanotrophs at low copper to mb ratios. PMID:18372044

  5. Quantification of superoxide radical production in thylakoid membrane using cyclic hydroxylamines.

    PubMed

    Kozuleva, Marina; Klenina, Irina; Mysin, Ivan; Kirilyuk, Igor; Opanasenko, Vera; Proskuryakov, Ivan; Ivanov, Boris

    2015-12-01

    Applicability of two lipophilic cyclic hydroxylamines (CHAs), CM-H and TMT-H, and two hydrophilic CHAs, CAT1-H and DCP-H, for detection of superoxide anion radical (O2(∙-)) produced by the thylakoid photosynthetic electron transfer chain (PETC) of higher plants under illumination has been studied. ESR spectrometry was applied for detection of the nitroxide radical originating due to CHAs oxidation by O2(∙-). CHAs and corresponding nitroxide radicals were shown to be involved in side reactions with PETC which could cause miscalculation of O2(∙-) production rate. Lipophilic CM-H was oxidized by PETC components, reducing the oxidized donor of Photosystem I, P700(+), while at the same concentration another lipophilic CHA, TMT-H, did not reduce P700(+). The nitroxide radical was able to accept electrons from components of the photosynthetic chain. Electrostatic interaction of stable cation CAT1-H with the membrane surface was suggested. Water-soluble superoxide dismutase (SOD) was added in order to suppress the reaction of CHA with O2(∙-) outside the membrane. SOD almost completely inhibited light-induced accumulation of DCP(∙), nitroxide radical derivative of hydrophilic DCP-H, in contrast to TMT(∙) accumulation. Based on the results showing that change in the thylakoid lumen pH and volume had minor effect on TMT(∙) accumulation, the reaction of TMT-H with O2(∙-) in the lumen was excluded. Addition of TMT-H to thylakoid suspension in the presence of SOD resulted in the increase in light-induced O2 uptake rate, that argued in favor of TMT-H ability to detect O2(∙-) produced within the membrane core. Thus, hydrophilic DCP-H and lipophilic TMT-H were shown to be usable for detection of O2(∙-) produced outside and within thylakoid membranes. PMID:26453925

  6. The subunit composition of human extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) regulate enzymatic activity

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Steen V; Valnickova, Zuzana; Oury, Tim D; Crapo, James D; Chr Nielsen, Niels; Enghild, Jan J

    2007-01-01

    Background Human extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is a tetrameric metalloenzyme responsible for the removal of superoxide anions from the extracellular space. We have previously shown that the EC-SOD subunit exists in two distinct folding variants based on differences in the disulfide bridge pattern (Petersen SV, Oury TD, Valnickova Z, Thøgersen IB, Højrup P, Crapo JD, Enghild JJ. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 2003;100(24):13875–80). One variant is enzymatically active (aEC-SOD) while the other is inactive (iEC-SOD). The EC-SOD subunits are associated into covalently linked dimers through an inter-subunit disulfide bridge creating the theoretical possibility of 3 dimers (aa, ai or ii) with different antioxidant potentials. We have analyzed the quaternary structure of the endogenous EC-SOD disulfide-linked dimer to investigate if these dimers in fact exist. Results The analyses of EC-SOD purified from human tissue show that all three dimer combinations exist including two homo-dimers (aa and ii) and a hetero-dimer (ai). Because EC-SOD is a tetramer the dimers may combine to generate 5 different mature EC-SOD molecules where the specific activity of each molecule is determined by the ratio of aEC-SOD and iEC-SOD subunits. Conclusion This finding shows that the aEC-SOD and iEC-SOD subunits combine in all 3 possible ways supporting the presence of tetrameric enzymes with variable enzymatic activity. This variation in enzymatic potency may regulate the antioxidant level in the extracellular space and represent a novel way of modulating enzymatic activity. PMID:17937792

  7. Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase Regulates the Expression of Small GTPase Regulatory Proteins GEFs, GAPs, and GDI

    PubMed Central

    Laukkanen, Mikko O.; Cammarota, Francesca; Esposito, Tiziana; Salvatore, Marco; Castellone, Maria D.

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3), which catalyzes the dismutation of superoxide anions to hydrogen peroxide at the cell membranes, regulates the cellular growth in a dose-dependent manner. This enzyme induces primary cell proliferation and immortalization at low expression levels whereas it activates cancer barrier signaling through the p53-p21 pathway at high expression levels, causing growth arrest, senescence, and apoptosis. Because previous reports suggested that the SOD3–induced reduction in the rates of cellular growth and migration also occurred in the absence of functional p53 signaling, in the current study we investigated the SOD3-induced growth-suppressive mechanisms in anaplastic thyroid cancer cells. Based on our data, the robust over-expression of SOD3 increased the level of phosphorylation of the EGFR, ERBB2, RYK, ALK, FLT3, and EPHA10 receptor tyrosine kinases with the consequent downstream activation of the SRC, FYN, YES, HCK, and LYN kinases. However, pull-down experiments focusing on the small GTPase RAS, RAC, CDC42, and RHO revealed a reduced level of growth and migration signal transduction, such as the lack of stimulation of the mitogen pathway, in the SOD3 over-expressing cells, which was confirmed by MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 Western blotting analysis. Interestingly, the mRNA expression analyses indicated that SOD3 regulated the expression of guanine nucleotide-exchange factors (RHO GEF16, RAL GEF RGL1), GTPase-activating proteins (ARFGAP ADAP2, RAS GAP RASAL1, RGS4), and a Rho guanine nucleotide-disassociation inhibitor (RHO GDI 2) in a dose dependent manner, thus controlling signaling through the small G protein GTPases. Therefore, our current data may suggest the occurrence of dose-dependent SOD3–driven control of the GTP loading of small G proteins indicating a novel growth regulatory mechanism of this enzyme. PMID:25751262

  8. Extracellular superoxide dismutase regulates the expression of small gtpase regulatory proteins GEFs, GAPs, and GDI.

    PubMed

    Laukkanen, Mikko O; Cammarota, Francesca; Esposito, Tiziana; Salvatore, Marco; Castellone, Maria D

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3), which catalyzes the dismutation of superoxide anions to hydrogen peroxide at the cell membranes, regulates the cellular growth in a dose-dependent manner. This enzyme induces primary cell proliferation and immortalization at low expression levels whereas it activates cancer barrier signaling through the p53-p21 pathway at high expression levels, causing growth arrest, senescence, and apoptosis. Because previous reports suggested that the SOD3-induced reduction in the rates of cellular growth and migration also occurred in the absence of functional p53 signaling, in the current study we investigated the SOD3-induced growth-suppressive mechanisms in anaplastic thyroid cancer cells. Based on our data, the robust over-expression of SOD3 increased the level of phosphorylation of the EGFR, ERBB2, RYK, ALK, FLT3, and EPHA10 receptor tyrosine kinases with the consequent downstream activation of the SRC, FYN, YES, HCK, and LYN kinases. However, pull-down experiments focusing on the small GTPase RAS, RAC, CDC42, and RHO revealed a reduced level of growth and migration signal transduction, such as the lack of stimulation of the mitogen pathway, in the SOD3 over-expressing cells, which was confirmed by MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 Western blotting analysis. Interestingly, the mRNA expression analyses indicated that SOD3 regulated the expression of guanine nucleotide-exchange factors (RHO GEF16, RAL GEF RGL1), GTPase-activating proteins (ARFGAP ADAP2, RAS GAP RASAL1, RGS4), and a Rho guanine nucleotide-disassociation inhibitor (RHO GDI 2) in a dose dependent manner, thus controlling signaling through the small G protein GTPases. Therefore, our current data may suggest the occurrence of dose-dependent SOD3-driven control of the GTP loading of small G proteins indicating a novel growth regulatory mechanism of this enzyme. PMID:25751262

  9. Superoxide Mediates Acute Liver Injury in Irradiated Mice Lacking Sirtuin 3

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Mitchell C.; Olivier, Alicia K.; Jacobus, James A.; Mapuskar, Kranti A.; Mao, Gaowei; Martin, Sean M.; Riley, Dennis P.; Gius, David

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: This study determined whether acute radiation-induced liver injury seen in Sirtuin3−/− mice after exposure to Cs-137 γ-rays was mediated by superoxide anion (O2•−). Results: Male wild-type (WT) and SIRT3−/− mice were given 2×2 Gy whole-body radiation doses separated by 24 h and livers were harvested 20 h after the second dose. Ex vivo measurements in fresh frozen liver sections demonstrated 50% increases in dihydroethidium oxidation from SIRT3−/− animals, relative to WT animals, before irradiation, but this increase was not detected 20 h after radiation exposure. In addition, irradiated livers from SIRT3−/− animals showed significant hydropic degeneration, loss of MitoTracker Green FM staining, increased immunohistochemical staining for 3-nitrotyrosine, loss of Ki67 staining, and increased mitochondrial localization of p53. These parameters of radiation-induced injury were significantly attenuated by an intraperitoneal injection of 2 mg/kg of the highly specific superoxide dismutase mimic, GC4401, 30 min before each fraction. Innovation: Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) is believed to regulate mitochondrial oxidative metabolism and antioxidant defenses in response to acute radiation-induced liver injury. This work provides strong evidence for the causal role of O2•− in the liver injury process initiated by whole-body irradiation in SIRT3−/− mice. Conclusion: These results support the hypothesis that O2•− mediates acute liver injury in SIRT3−/− animals exposed to whole-body γ-radiation and suggest that GC4401 could be used as a radio-protective compound in vivo. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1423–1435. PMID:23919724

  10. Insights into the Role of the Unusual Disulfide Bond in Copper-Zinc Superoxide Dismutase*

    PubMed Central

    Sea, Kevin; Sohn, Se Hui; Durazo, Armando; Sheng, Yuewei; Shaw, Bryan F.; Cao, Xiaohang; Taylor, Alexander B.; Whitson, Lisa J.; Holloway, Stephen P.; Hart, P. John; Cabelli, Diane E.; Gralla, Edith Butler; Valentine, Joan Selverstone

    2015-01-01

    The functional and structural significance of the intrasubunit disulfide bond in copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) was studied by characterizing mutant forms of human SOD1 (hSOD) and yeast SOD1 lacking the disulfide bond. We determined x-ray crystal structures of metal-bound and metal-deficient hC57S SOD1. C57S hSOD1 isolated from yeast contained four zinc ions per protein dimer and was structurally very similar to wild type. The addition of copper to this four-zinc protein gave properly reconstituted 2Cu,2Zn C57S hSOD, and its spectroscopic properties indicated that the coordination geometry of the copper was remarkably similar to that of holo wild type hSOD1. In contrast, the addition of copper and zinc ions to apo C57S human SOD1 failed to give proper reconstitution. Using pulse radiolysis, we determined SOD activities of yeast and human SOD1s lacking disulfide bonds and found that they were enzymatically active at ∼10% of the wild type rate. These results are contrary to earlier reports that the intrasubunit disulfide bonds in SOD1 are essential for SOD activity. Kinetic studies revealed further that the yeast mutant SOD1 had less ionic attraction for superoxide, possibly explaining the lower rates. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells lacking the sod1 gene do not grow aerobically in the absence of lysine, but expression of C57S SOD1 increased growth to 30–50% of the growth of cells expressing wild type SOD1, supporting that C57S SOD1 retained a significant amount of activity. PMID:25433341

  11. Control of Hepatic Nuclear Superoxide Production by Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase and NADPH Oxidase-4*

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Netanya Y.; Yan, Ziying; Boudreau, Ryan L.; Zhang, Yulong; Luo, Meihui; Li, Qiang; Tian, Xin; Shah, Ajay M.; Davisson, Robin L.; Davidson, Beverly; Banfi, Botond; Engelhardt, John F.

    2011-01-01

    Redox-regulated signal transduction is coordinated by spatially controlled production of reactive oxygen species within subcellular compartments. The nucleus has long been known to produce superoxide (O2⨪); however, the mechanisms that control this function remain largely unknown. We have characterized molecular features of a nuclear superoxide-producing system in the mouse liver. Using electron paramagnetic resonance, we investigated whether several NADPH oxidases (NOX1, 2, and 4) and known activators of NOX (Rac1, Rac2, p22phox, and p47phox) contribute to nuclear O2⨪ production in isolated hepatic nuclei. Our findings demonstrate that NOX4 most significantly contributes to hepatic nuclear O2⨪ production that utilizes NADPH as an electron donor. Although NOX4 protein immunolocalized to both nuclear membranes and intranuclear inclusions, fluorescent detection of NADPH-dependent nuclear O2⨪ predominantly localized to the perinuclear space. Interestingly, NADP+ and G6P also induced nuclear O2⨪ production, suggesting that intranuclear glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) can control NOX4 activity through nuclear NADPH production. Using G6PD mutant mice and G6PD shRNA, we confirmed that reductions in nuclear G6PD enzyme decrease the ability of hepatic nuclei to generate O2⨪ in response to NADP+ and G6P. NOX4 and G6PD protein were also observed in overlapping microdomains within the nucleus. These findings provide new insights on the metabolic pathways for substrate regulation of nuclear O2⨪ production by NOX4. PMID:21212270

  12. Semiquinone-induced Maturation of Bacillus anthracis Ribonucleotide Reductase by a Superoxide Intermediate*

    PubMed Central

    Berggren, Gustav; Duraffourg, Nicolas; Sahlin, Margareta; Sjöberg, Britt-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) catalyze the conversion of ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides, and represent the only de novo pathway to provide DNA building blocks. Three different classes of RNR are known, denoted I-III. Class I RNRs are heteromeric proteins built up by α and β subunits and are further divided into different subclasses, partly based on the metal content of the β-subunit. In subclass Ib RNR the β-subunit is denoted NrdF, and harbors a manganese-tyrosyl radical cofactor. The generation of this cofactor is dependent on a flavodoxin-like maturase denoted NrdI, responsible for the formation of an active oxygen species suggested to be either a superoxide or a hydroperoxide. Herein we report on the magnetic properties of the manganese-tyrosyl radical cofactor of Bacillus anthracis NrdF and the redox properties of B. anthracis NrdI. The tyrosyl radical in NrdF is stabilized through its interaction with a ferromagnetically coupled manganese dimer. Moreover, we show through a combination of redox titration and protein electrochemistry that in contrast to hitherto characterized NrdIs, the B. anthracis NrdI is stable in its semiquinone form (NrdIsq) with a difference in electrochemical potential of ∼110 mV between the hydroquinone and semiquinone state. The under anaerobic conditions stable NrdIsq is fully capable of generating the oxidized, tyrosyl radical-containing form of Mn-NrdF when exposed to oxygen. This latter observation strongly supports that a superoxide radical is involved in the maturation mechanism, and contradicts the participation of a peroxide species. Additionally, EPR spectra on whole cells revealed that a significant fraction of NrdI resides in its semiquinone form in vivo, underscoring that NrdIsq is catalytically relevant. PMID:25262022

  13. Oxoammonium cation intermediate in the nitroxide-catalyzed dismutation of superoxide.

    PubMed

    Krishna, M C; Grahame, D A; Samuni, A; Mitchell, J B; Russo, A

    1992-06-15

    Dismutation of superoxide has been shown previously to be catalyzed by stable nitroxide compounds. In the present study, the mechanism of superoxide (.O2-) dismutation by various five-membered ring and six-membered ring nitroxides was studied by electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometry, UV-visible spectrophotometry, cyclic voltammetry, and bulk electrolysis. Electron paramagnetic resonance signals from the carbocyclic nitroxide derivatives (piperidinyl, pyrrolidinyl, and pyrrolinyl) were unchanged when exposed to enzymatically generated .O2-, whereas, in the presence of .O2- and reducing agents such as NADH and NADPH, the nitroxides underwent reduction to their respective hydroxylamines. The reaction of 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-hydroxypiperidine (Tempol-H) with .O2- was measured and, in agreement with earlier reports on related compounds, the rate was found to be too slow to be consistent with a mechanism of .O2- dismutation involving the hydroxylamine as an intermediate. Voltammetric analyses of the carbocyclic nitroxide derivatives revealed a reversible one-electron redox couple at positive potentials. In contrast, oxazolidine derivatives were irreversibly oxidized. At negative potentials, all of the nitroxides studied exhibited a broad, irreversible reductive wave. The rate of .O2- dismutation correlated with the reversible midpoint redox potential. Bulk electrolysis at positive potentials was found to generate a metastable oxidized form of the nitroxide. The results indicate that the dismutation of .O2- is catalyzed by the oxoammonium/nitroxide redox couple for carbocyclic nitroxide derivatives. In addition to the one-electron mitochondrial reduction pathway, the present results suggest the possibility that cellular bioreduction by a two-electron pathway may occur subsequent to oxidation of stable nitroxides. Furthermore, the cellular destruction of persistent spin adduct nitroxides might also be facilitated by a primary univalent oxidation. PMID

  14. Oxoammonium cation intermediate in the nitroxide-catalyzed dismutation of superoxide.

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, M C; Grahame, D A; Samuni, A; Mitchell, J B; Russo, A

    1992-01-01

    Dismutation of superoxide has been shown previously to be catalyzed by stable nitroxide compounds. In the present study, the mechanism of superoxide (.O2-) dismutation by various five-membered ring and six-membered ring nitroxides was studied by electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometry, UV-visible spectrophotometry, cyclic voltammetry, and bulk electrolysis. Electron paramagnetic resonance signals from the carbocyclic nitroxide derivatives (piperidinyl, pyrrolidinyl, and pyrrolinyl) were unchanged when exposed to enzymatically generated .O2-, whereas, in the presence of .O2- and reducing agents such as NADH and NADPH, the nitroxides underwent reduction to their respective hydroxylamines. The reaction of 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-hydroxypiperidine (Tempol-H) with .O2- was measured and, in agreement with earlier reports on related compounds, the rate was found to be too slow to be consistent with a mechanism of .O2- dismutation involving the hydroxylamine as an intermediate. Voltammetric analyses of the carbocyclic nitroxide derivatives revealed a reversible one-electron redox couple at positive potentials. In contrast, oxazolidine derivatives were irreversibly oxidized. At negative potentials, all of the nitroxides studied exhibited a broad, irreversible reductive wave. The rate of .O2- dismutation correlated with the reversible midpoint redox potential. Bulk electrolysis at positive potentials was found to generate a metastable oxidized form of the nitroxide. The results indicate that the dismutation of .O2- is catalyzed by the oxoammonium/nitroxide redox couple for carbocyclic nitroxide derivatives. In addition to the one-electron mitochondrial reduction pathway, the present results suggest the possibility that cellular bioreduction by a two-electron pathway may occur subsequent to oxidation of stable nitroxides. Furthermore, the cellular destruction of persistent spin adduct nitroxides might also be facilitated by a primary univalent oxidation. PMID

  15. Identification and Analysis of the Role of Superoxide Dismutases Isoforms in the Pathogenesis of Paracoccidioides spp.

    PubMed

    Tamayo, Diana; Muñoz, José F; Lopez, Ángela; Urán, Martha; Herrera, Juan; Borges, Clayton L; Restrepo, Ángela; Soares, Celia M; Taborda, Carlos P; Almeida, Agostinho J; McEwen, Juan G; Hernández, Orville

    2016-03-01

    The ability of Paracoccidioides to defend itself against reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by host effector cells is a prerequisite to survive. To counteract these radicals, Paracoccidioides expresses, among different antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutases (SODs). In this study, we identified six SODs isoforms encoded by the Paracoccidioides genome. We determined gene expression levels of representative isolates of the phylogenetic lineages of Paracoccidioides spp. (S1, PS2, PS3 and Pb01-like) using quantitative RT-PCR. Assays were carried out to analyze SOD gene expression of yeast cells, mycelia cells, the mycelia-to-yeast transition and the yeast-to-mycelia germination, as well as under treatment with oxidative agents and during interaction with phagocytic cells. We observed an increased expression of PbSOD1 and PbSOD3 during the transition process, exposure to oxidative agents and interaction with phagocytic cells, suggesting that these proteins could assist in combating the superoxide radicals generated during the host-pathogen interaction. Using PbSOD1 and PbSOD3 knockdown strains we showed these genes are involved in the response of the fungus against host effector cells, particularly the oxidative stress response, and in a mouse model of infection. Protein sequence analysis together with functional analysis of knockdown strains seem to suggest that PbSOD3 expression is linked with a pronounced extracellular activity while PbSOD1 seems more related to intracellular requirements of the fungus. Altogether, our data suggests that P. brasiliensis actively responds to the radicals generated endogenously during metabolism and counteracts the oxidative burst of immune cells by inducing the expression of SOD isoforms. PMID:26963091

  16. Peroxiredoxin 6 (Prdx6) supports NADPH oxidase1 (Nox1)-based superoxide generation and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jaeyul; Wang, Aibing; Burke, Devin J; Boudreau, Howard E; Lekstrom, Kristen J; Korzeniowska, Agnieszka; Sugamata, Ryuichi; Kim, Yong-Soo; Yi, Liang; Ersoy, Ilker; Jaeger, Stefan; Palaniappan, Kannappan; Ambruso, Daniel R; Jackson, Sharon H; Leto, Thomas L

    2016-07-01

    Nox1 is an abundant source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in colon epithelium recently shown to function in wound healing and epithelial homeostasis. We identified Peroxiredoxin 6 (Prdx6) as a novel binding partner of Nox activator 1 (Noxa1) in yeast two-hybrid screening experiments using the Noxa1 SH3 domain as bait. Prdx6 is a unique member of the Prdx antioxidant enzyme family exhibiting both glutathione peroxidase and phospholipase A2 activities. We confirmed this interaction in cells overexpressing both proteins, showing Prdx6 binds to and stabilizes wild type Noxa1, but not the SH3 domain mutant form, Noxa1 W436R. We demonstrated in several cell models that Prdx6 knockdown suppresses Nox1 activity, whereas enhanced Prdx6 expression supports higher Nox1-derived superoxide production. Both peroxidase- and lipase-deficient mutant forms of Prdx6 (Prdx6 C47S and S32A, respectively) failed to bind to or stabilize Nox1 components or support Nox1-mediated superoxide generation. Furthermore, the transition-state substrate analogue inhibitor of Prdx6 phospholipase A2 activity (MJ-33) was shown to suppress Nox1 activity, suggesting Nox1 activity is regulated by the phospholipase activity of Prdx6. Finally, wild type Prdx6, but not lipase or peroxidase mutant forms, supports Nox1-mediated cell migration in the HCT-116 colon epithelial cell model of wound closure. These findings highlight a novel pathway in which this antioxidant enzyme positively regulates an oxidant-generating system to support cell migration and wound healing. PMID:27094494

  17. Identification and Analysis of the Role of Superoxide Dismutases Isoforms in the Pathogenesis of Paracoccidioides spp.

    PubMed Central

    Tamayo, Diana; Muñoz, José F.; Lopez, Ángela; Urán, Martha; Herrera, Juan; Borges, Clayton L.; Restrepo, Ángela; Soares, Celia M.; Taborda, Carlos P.; Almeida, Agostinho J.; McEwen, Juan G.; Hernández, Orville

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Paracoccidioides to defend itself against reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by host effector cells is a prerequisite to survive. To counteract these radicals, Paracoccidioides expresses, among different antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutases (SODs). In this study, we identified six SODs isoforms encoded by the Paracoccidioides genome. We determined gene expression levels of representative isolates of the phylogenetic lineages of Paracoccidioides spp. (S1, PS2, PS3 and Pb01-like) using quantitative RT-PCR. Assays were carried out to analyze SOD gene expression of yeast cells, mycelia cells, the mycelia-to-yeast transition and the yeast-to-mycelia germination, as well as under treatment with oxidative agents and during interaction with phagocytic cells. We observed an increased expression of PbSOD1 and PbSOD3 during the transition process, exposure to oxidative agents and interaction with phagocytic cells, suggesting that these proteins could assist in combating the superoxide radicals generated during the host-pathogen interaction. Using PbSOD1 and PbSOD3 knockdown strains we showed these genes are involved in the response of the fungus against host effector cells, particularly the oxidative stress response, and in a mouse model of infection. Protein sequence analysis together with functional analysis of knockdown strains seem to suggest that PbSOD3 expression is linked with a pronounced extracellular activity while PbSOD1 seems more related to intracellular requirements of the fungus. Altogether, our data suggests that P. brasiliensis actively responds to the radicals generated endogenously during metabolism and counteracts the oxidative burst of immune cells by inducing the expression of SOD isoforms. PMID:26963091

  18. Eosinophils from schistosome-induced hepatic granulomas produce superoxide and hydroxyl radical.

    PubMed

    McCormick, M L; Metwali, A; Railsback, M A; Weinstock, J V; Britigan, B E

    1996-12-01

    Human peripheral blood eosinophils generate superoxide (O2.-) in response to PMA stimulation. These cells are also capable of forming the highly reactive hydroxyl radical (HO.) by a process that is dependent on the presence of active eosinophil peroxidase. To extend this work to tissue-resident cells, we chose to study a murine model of Schistosoma mansoni infection in which parasite ova induce granulomas whose cellular content is 50% eosinophils. In contrast to peritoneal lavage eosinophils, dispersed granuloma cells were unable to reduce ferricytochrome c (as an indicator of O2.-) in response to PMA stimulation. Furthermore, when human neutrophils were pretreated with conditioned medium from the granuloma cells, they also failed to reduce ferricytochrome c following PMA stimulation, implying the existence of an inhibitory factor. However, using a 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide spin-trapping system, we were able to demonstrate significant generation of O2.- in response to PMA stimulation, not only in the granuloma cells, but also in the conditioned medium-treated neutrophils, demonstrating that the inhibitory factor was not affecting O2.- generation, but rather was interfering with ferricytochrome c reduction. In addition, using an alpha-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-tert-butyl-nitrone/ethanol spin-trapping system, we were able to detect HO. formation by these same cells following PMA stimulation. This HO. formation was inhibited by superoxide dismutase, azide, and thiocyanide, and NaSCN, consistent with a mechanism requiring O2.- and enzymatic peroxidase activity. These results demonstrate that tissue eosinophils associated with the schistosome-induced granuloma have the ability to form both O2.- and HO., and point out potential problems associated with the measurement of O2.- in whole tissue preparations. PMID:8943408

  19. Endothelin-1, superoxide and adeninediphosphate ribose cyclase in shark vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Fellner, Susan K; Parker, Laurel

    2005-03-01

    In vascular smooth muscle (VSM) of Squalus acanthias, endothelin-1 (ET-1) signals via the ET(B) receptor. In both shark and mammalian VSM, ET-1 induces a rise in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) via activation of the inositol trisphosphate (IP(3)) receptor (IP(3)R) and subsequent release of Ca(2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). IP(3)R-mediated release of SR Ca(2+) causes calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) via the ryanodine receptor (RyR), which can be sensitized by cyclic adeninediphosphate ribose (cADPR). cADPR is synthesized from NAD(+) by a membrane-bound bifunctional enzyme, ADPR cyclase. We have previously shown that the antagonists of the RyR, Ruthenium Red, high concentrations of ryanodine and 8-Br cADPR, diminish the [Ca(2+)](i) response to ET-1 in shark VSM. To investigate how ET-1 might influence the activity of the ADPR cyclase, we employed inhibitors of the cyclase. To explore the possibility that ET-1-induced production of superoxide (O(2)*-) might activate the cyclase, we used an inhibitor of NAD(P)H oxidase (NOX), DPI and a scavenger of O(2)*-, TEMPOL. Anterior mesenteric artery VSM was loaded with fura-2AM to measure [Ca(2+)](i). In Ca(2+)-free shark Ringers, ET-1 increased [Ca(2+)](i) by 104+/-8 nmol l(-1). The VSM ADPR cyclase inhibitors, nicotinamide and Zn(2+), diminished the response by 62% and 72%, respectively. Both DPI and TEMPOL reduced the response by 63%. The combination of the IP(3)R antagonists, 2-APB or TMB-8, with DPI or TEMPOL further reduced the response by 83%. We show for the first time that in shark VSM, inhibition of the ADPR cyclase reduces the [Ca(2+)](i) response to ET-1 and that superoxide may be involved in the activation of the cyclase. PMID:15767306

  20. Extracellular but not cytosolic superoxide dismutase protects against oxidant-mediated endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Foresman, Erin L; Miller, Francis J

    2013-01-01

    Superoxide (O2 (•-)) contributes to the development of cardiovascular disease. Generation of O2 (•-) occurs in both the intracellular and extracellular compartments. We hypothesized that the gene transfer of cytosolic superoxide dismutase (SOD1) or extracellular SOD (SOD3) to blood vessels would differentially protect against O2 (•-)-mediated endothelial-dependent dysfunction. Aortic ring segments from New Zealand rabbits were incubated with adenovirus (Ad) containing the gene for Escherichia coli β-galactosidase, SOD1, or SOD3. Activity assays confirmed functional overexpression of both SOD3 and SOD1 isoforms in aorta 24 h following gene transfer. Histochemical staining for β-galactosidase showed gene transfer occurred in the endothelium and adventitia. Next, vessels were prepared for measurement of isometric tension in Kreb's buffer containing xanthine. After precontraction with phenylephrine, xanthine oxidase impaired relaxation to the endothelium-dependent dilator acetylcholine (ACh, max relaxation 33±4% with XO vs. 64±3% without XO, p<0.05), whereas relaxation to the endothelium-independent dilator sodium nitroprusside was unaffected. In the presence of XO, maximal relaxation to ACh was improved in vessels incubated with AdSOD3 (55±2%, p<0.05 vs. control) but not AdSOD1 (34±4%). We conclude that adenoviral-mediated gene transfer of SOD3, but not SOD1, protects the aorta from xanthine/XO-mediated endothelial dysfunction. These data provide important insight into the location and enzymatic source of O2 (•-) production in vascular disease. PMID:24024163

  1. Replacement of a cytosolic copper/zinc superoxide dismutase by a novel cytosolic manganese superoxide dismutase in crustaceans that use copper (haemocyanin) for oxygen transport.

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, Marius; Hoexum Brouwer, Thea; Grater, Walter; Brown-Peterson, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    The blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, which uses the copper-dependent protein haemocyanin for oxygen transport, lacks the ubiquitous cytosolic copper-dependent enzyme copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu,ZnSOD) as evidenced by undetectable levels of Cu,ZnSOD activity, protein and mRNA in the hepatopancreas (the site of haemocyanin synthesis) and gills. Instead, the crab has an unusual cytosolic manganese SOD (cytMnSOD), which is retained in the cytosol, because it lacks a mitochondrial transit peptide. A second familiar MnSOD is present in the mitochondria (mtMnSOD). This unique phenomenon occurs in all Crustacea that use haemocyanin for oxygen transport. Molecular phylogeny analysis suggests the MnSOD gene duplication is as old as the origin of the arthropod phylum. cytMnSOD activity in the hepatopancreas changes during the moulting cycle of the crab. Activity is high in intermoult crabs and non-detectable in postmoult papershell crabs. mtMnSOD is present in all stages of the moulting cycle. Despite the lack of cytCu,ZnSOD, crabs have an extracellular Cu,ZnSOD (ecCu,ZnSOD) that is produced by haemocytes, and is part of a large, approx. 160 kDa, covalently-linked protein complex. ecCu,ZnSOD is absent from the hepatopancreas of intermoult crabs, but appears in this tissue at premoult. However, no ecCu,ZnSOD mRNA can be detected, suggesting that the protein is recruited from the haemolymph. Screening of different taxa of the arthropod phylum for Cu,ZnSOD activity shows that those crustaceans that use haemoglobin for oxygen transport have retained cytCu,ZnSOD. It appears, therefore, that the replacement of cytCu,ZnSOD with cytMnSOD is part of an adaptive response to the dynamic, haemocyanin-linked, fluctuations in copper metabolism that occur during the moulting cycle of the crab. PMID:12769817

  2. Modifications in nitric oxide and superoxide anion metabolism induced by fructose overload in rat heart are prevented by (-)-epicatechin.

    PubMed

    Calabró, Valeria; Piotrkowski, Barbara; Fischerman, Laura; Vazquez Prieto, Marcela A; Galleano, Monica; Fraga, Cesar G

    2016-04-20

    Fructose overload promotes functional and metabolic derangements in humans and in animal experimental models. Evidence suggests that dietary flavonoids have the ability to prevent/attenuate the development of metabolic diseases. In this work we investigated the effects of (-)-epicatechin on the modifications induced by fructose overload in the rat heart in terms of nitric oxide and superoxide metabolism. Male Sprague Dawley rats received 10% (w/v) fructose in the drinking water for 8 weeks, with or without (-)-epicatechin (20 mg per kg body weight per day) in the rat chow diet. These conditions of fructose overload did not lead to overt manifestations of heart hypertrophy or tissue remodeling. However, biochemical and molecular changes were observed and could represent the onset of functional alterations. (-)-Epicatechin prevented a compromised NO bioavailability and the development of oxidative stress produced by fructose overload essentially acting on superoxide anion metabolism. In this line, the increase in superoxide anion production, the overexpression of NOX2 subunit p47phox and of NOX4, the decrease in superoxide dismutase activity, and the higher oxidized/reduced glutathione ratio installed by fructose overload were absent in the rats receiving (-)-epicatechin. These results support the hypothesis that diets rich in (-)-epicatechin could prevent the onset and progression of heart dysfunctions associated with metabolic alterations. PMID:26960258

  3. Fluoride Increases Superoxide Production and Impairs the Respiratory Chain in ROS 17/2.8 Osteoblastic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fina, Brenda Lorena; Lombarte, Mercedes; Rigalli, Juan Pablo; Rigalli, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    It is known that fluoride produces oxidative stress. Inflammation in bone tissue and an impairment of the respiratory chain of liver have been described in treatments with fluoride. Whether the impairment of the respiratory chain and oxidative stress are related is not known. The aim of this work was to study the effects of fluoride on the production of superoxide radical, the function of the respiratory chain and the increase in oxidative stress in ROS 17/2.8 osteoblastic cells. We measured the effect of fluoride (100 µM) on superoxide production, oxygen consumption, lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes activities of cultured cells following the treatment with fluoride. Fluoride decreased oxygen consumption and increased superoxide production immediately after its addition. Furthermore, chronic treatment with fluoride increased oxidative stress status in osteoblastic cells. These results indicate that fluoride could damage bone tissue by inhibiting the respiratory chain, increasing the production of superoxide radicals and thus of the others reactive oxygen species. PMID:24964137

  4. Effect of xenobiotics on the respiratory activity of rat heart mitochondria and the concomitant formation of superoxide radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Stolze, K.; Nohl, H. . Inst. of Pharmacology and Toxicology)

    1994-03-01

    The effects of the xenobiotics atrazine, benzene, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), lindane, toluene, and xylenol on the respiration of isolated rate heart mitochondria were studied. Bioenergetic parameters such as respiratory control (RC) and ATP/oxygen (P/O) values decreased considerably in the presence of these substances, and a concomitant increase of superoxide radical (O[sub 2][sup [minus

  5. A cytoplasmic Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase SOD1 contributes to hyphal growth and virulence of Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Yao, Sheng-Hua; Guo, Yan; Wang, Yan-Zhang; Zhang, Dong; Xu, Ling; Tang, Wei-Hua

    2016-06-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are scavengers of superoxide radicals, one of the main reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cell. SOD-based ROS scavenging system constitutes the frontline defense against intra- and extracellular ROS, but the roles of SODs in the important cereal pathogen Fusarium graminearum are not very clear. There are five SOD genes in F. graminearum genome, encoding cytoplasmic Cu-Zn SOD1 and MnSOD3, mitochondrial MnSOD2 and FeSOD4, and extracellular CuSOD5. Previous studies reported that the expression of SOD1 increased during infection of wheat coleoptiles and florets. In this work we showed that the recombinant SOD1 protein had the superoxide dismutase activity in vitro, and that the SOD1-mRFP fusion protein localized in the cytoplasm of F. graminearum. The Δsod1 mutants had slightly reduced hyphal growth and markedly increased sensitivity to the intracellular ROS generator menadione. The conidial germination under extracellular oxidative stress was significantly delayed in the mutants. Wheat floret infection assay showed that the Δsod1 mutants had a reduced pathogenicity. Furthermore, the Δsod1 mutants had a significant reduction in production of deoxynivalenol mycotoxin. Our results indicate that the cytoplasmic Cu-Zn SOD1 affects fungal growth probably depending on detoxification of intracellular superoxide radicals, and that SOD1-mediated deoxynivalenol production contributes to the virulence of F. graminearum in wheat head infection. PMID:27037138

  6. Crystal Structure of Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase from Taenia Solium Reveals Metal-mediated Self-assembly

    SciTech Connect

    A Hernandez-Santoyo; A Landa; E Gonzalez-Mondragon; M Pedraza-Escalona; R Parra-Unda; A Rodriguez-Romero

    2011-12-31

    Taenia solium is the cestode responsible for porcine and human cysticercosis. The ability of this parasite to establish itself in the host is related to its evasion of the immune response and its antioxidant defence system. The latter includes enzymes such as cytosolic Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase. In this article, we describe the crystal structure of a recombinant T. solium Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, representing the first structure of a protein from this organism. This enzyme shows a different charge distribution at the entrance of the active channel when compared with human Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, giving it interesting properties that may allow the design of specific inhibitors against this cestode. The overall topology is similar to other superoxide dismutase structures; however, there are several His and Glu residues on the surface of the protein that coordinate metal ions both intra- and intermolecularly. Interestingly, one of these ions, located on the {beta}2 strand, establishes a metal-mediated intermolecular {beta}-{beta} interaction, including a symmetry-related molecule. The factors responsible for the abnormal protein-protein interactions that lead to oligomerization are still unknown; however, high metal levels have been implicated in these phenomena, but exactly how they are involved remains unclear. The present results suggest that this structure could be useful as a model to explain an alternative mechanism of protein aggregation commonly observed in insoluble fibrillar deposits.

  7. Different roles of protein kinase C-beta and -delta in arachidonic acid cascade, superoxide formation and phosphoinositide hydrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Duyster, J; Schwende, H; Fitzke, E; Hidaka, H; Dieter, P

    1993-01-01

    In contrast with protein kinase C (PKC)-beta, PKC-delta is exclusively detectable in the membrane fraction of liver macrophages. After long-term treatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) PKC-beta is depleted faster (within 3 h) than PKC-delta (> 7h). Simultaneously, pretreatment with PMA for 3 h inhibits the PMA- and zymosan-induced generation of superoxide and the PMA-induced formation of prostaglandin (PG) E2, whereas a preincubation of more than 7 h is required to affect the zymosan-induced release of PGE2 and inositol phosphates. These results support an involvement of PKC-beta in the PMA-induced activation of the arachidonic acid cascade and in superoxide formation and imply an involvement of PKC-delta in zymosan-induced phosphoinositide hydrolysis and PGE2 formation. Two phorbol ester derivates, sapintoxin A (SAPA) and 12-deoxyphorbol 13-phenylacetate 20-acetate (DOPPA), which have been previously reported to activate preferentially PLC-beta but not PKC-delta in vitro [Ryves, Evans, Olivier, Parker and Evans (1992) FEBS Lett. 288, 5-9], induce the formation of PGE2 and superoxide, down-regulate PKC-delta and potentiate inositol phosphate formation in parallel SAPA, but not DOPPA, down-regulates PKC-beta and inhibits the PMA-induced formation of eicosanoids and superoxide. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:8389125

  8. Modulation of renal superoxide dismutase by telmisartan therapy in C57BL/6-Ins2Akita diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Hiroki; Fujishima, Hiromi; Morii, Tsukasa; Sakamoto, Takuya; Komatsu, Koga; Hosoba, Mihoko; Narita, Takuma; Takahashi, Keiko; Takahashi, Takamune; Yamada, Yuichiro

    2012-01-01

    Renal superoxide excess, which is induced by an imbalance of the superoxide-producing enzyme NAD(P)H oxidase and the superoxide-scavenging enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) under hyperglycemia, increases oxidative stress and contributes to the development of diabetic nephropathy. In this study, we treated non-obese and hypoinsulinemic C57BL/6-Ins2Akita (C57BL/6-Akita) diabetic mice with telmisartan (5 mg kg−1 per day), an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker, or amlodipine (5 mg kg−1 per day), a calcium channel blocker, for 4 weeks and compared the effects of these two anti-hypertensive drugs on renal NAD(P)H oxidase, SOD and transcription factor Nrf2 (NF-E2-related factor 2), which is known to upregulate several antioxidant enzymes including SOD. Vehicle-treated C57BL/6-Akita mice exhibited higher renal NAD(P)H oxidase and lower renal SOD activity with increased levels of renal superoxide than the C57BL/6-wild-type non-diabetic mice. Interestingly, telmisartan treatment not only reduced NAD(P)H oxidase activity but also enhanced SOD activity in C57BL/6-Akita mouse kidneys, leading to a reduction of renal superoxide levels. Furthermore, telmisartan-treated C57BL/6-Akita mice increased the renal protein expression of SOD and Nrf2. In parallel with the reduction of renal superoxide levels, a reduction of urinary albumin levels and a normalization of elevated glomerular filtration rate were observed in telmisartan-treated C57BL/6-Akita mice. In contrast, treatment with amlodipine failed to modulate renal NAD(P)H oxidase, SOD and Nrf2. Finally, treatment of C57BL/6-Akita mice with apocynin, an NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitor, also increased the renal protein expression of SOD and Nrf2. Collectively, our data suggest that NAD(P)H oxidase negatively regulates renal SOD, possibly by downregulation of Nrf2, and that telmisartan could upregulate renal SOD by the suppression of NAD(P)H oxidase and subsequent upregulation of Nrf2, leading to the amelioration of

  9. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate inhibits superoxide anion-induced pain and inflammation in the paw skin and spinal cord by targeting NF-κB and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Fattori, Victor; Zarpelon, Ana C; Borghi, Sergio M; Staurengo-Ferrari, Larissa; Carvalho, Thacyana T; Alves-Filho, Jose C; Cunha, Fernando Q; Cunha, Thiago M; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the effect of pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) in superoxide anion-induced inflammatory pain. Male Swiss mice were treated with PDTC and stimulated with an intraplantar or intraperitoneal injection of potassium superoxide, a superoxide anion donor. Subcutaneous PDTC treatment attenuated mechanical hyperalgesia, thermal hyperalgesia, paw oedema and leukocyte recruitment (neutrophils and macrophages). Intraplantar injection of superoxide anion activated NF-κB and increased cytokine production (IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-10) and oxidative stress (nitrite and lipid peroxidation levels) at the primary inflammatory foci and in the spinal cord (L4-L6). PDTC treatment inhibited superoxide anion-induced NF-κB activation, cytokine production and oxidative stress in the paw and spinal cord. Furthermore, intrathecal administration of PDTC successfully inhibited superoxide anion-induced mechanical hyperalgesia, thermal hyperalgesia and inflammatory response in peripheral foci (paw). These results suggest that peripheral stimulus with superoxide anion activates the local and spinal cord oxidative- and NF-κB-dependent inflammatory nociceptive mechanisms. PDTC targets these events, therefore, inhibiting superoxide anion-induced inflammatory pain in mice. PMID:27160222

  10. Intracellular generation of superoxide as a by-product of Vibrio harveyi luciferase expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    González-Flecha, B; Demple, B

    1994-01-01

    Luciferase genes are widely used as reporters of gene expression because of the high sensitivity of chemiluminescence detection and the possibility of monitoring light production in intact cells. We engineered fusions of the Escherichia coli soxS promoter to the luciferase structural genes (luxAB) from Vibrio harveyi. Since soxS transcription is positively triggered by the activated SoxR protein in response to agents such as paraquat that generate intracellular superoxide, we hoped to use this construct as a sensitive reporter of redox stress agents. Although a soxR+ soxS'::luxAB fusion exhibited a paraquat-inducible synthesis of luciferase, a smaller increase was consistently observed even in the absence of known soxRS inducers. This endogenous induction was soxR dependent and was further characterized by introducing a plasmid carrying the luciferase structural genes without the soxS promoter into a strain carrying a soxS'::lacZ fusion in the bacterial chromosome. These cells exhibited increased beta-galactosidase expression as they grew into mid-log phase. This increase was ascribed to luciferase activity because beta-galactosidase induction was suppressed (but not eliminated) when the substrate n-decanal was present in the medium. The soxS'::luxAB plasmid transformed superoxide dismutase-deficient strains very poorly under aerobic conditions but just as efficiently as a control plasmid under anaerobic conditions. The production of hydrogen peroxide, the dismutation product of superoxide anion, was significantly increased in strains carrying bacterial luciferase and maximal in the absence of n-decanal. Taken collectively, these data point to the generation of significant amounts of intracellular superoxide by bacterial luciferase, the possible mechanism of which is discussed. In addition to providing insights into the role of superoxide in the activation of the SoxR protein, these results suggest caution in the interpretation of experiments using luciferase as a

  11. 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical and superoxide anion scavenging activity of Rhizophora mangle (L.) bark

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Janet Calero; García, Roberto Faure; Cors, Ma. Teresa Mitjavila

    2010-01-01

    Background: Rhizophora mangle (L.) produce a variety of substances that possesses pharmacological actions. Although it shown antioxidant properties in some assays, there is no available information about its effect on some free radical species. So the objective of the present research is to evaluate the DPPH radical and superoxide anion scavenging properties of R. mangle extract and its polyphenol fraction. Methods: Rhizophora mangle (L.) bark aqueous extract and its major constituent, polyphenols fraction, were investigated for their antioxidant activities employing 2 in vitro assay systems: 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and superoxide anion radicals scavenging. Results: IC50 for DPPH radical-scavenging activity was 6.7 µg tannins/mL for extract and 7.6 µg tannins/mL for polyphenolic fraction. The extract showed better activity than its fraction (P < 0.05) in the DPPH radicals reducing power. Polyphenolic fraction exhibited better superoxide anion scavenging ability (IC50 = 21.6 µg tannins/mL) than the extract (IC50 = 31.9 µg tannins/mL). Antioxidant activities of both samples increased with the rise of tannins concentration. The comparison of regression lines showed significant differences (P < 0.05) between extract and its polyphenolic fraction in both assays, indicating that extract was more effective in DPPH radical scavenging than its fraction at tannin concentrations below the crossing point of both lines, while that fraction was more effective than extract inhibiting the superoxide anions generation. Conclusions: R. mangle aqueous extract showed a potent antioxidant activity, achieved by the scavenging ability observed against DPPH radicals and superoxide anions. Regarding its polyphenolic composition, the antioxidant effects observed in this study are due, most probably, to the presence of polyphenolic compounds. PMID:21589751

  12. Real-time monitoring of superoxide accumulation and antioxidant activity in a brain slice model using an electrochemical cytochrome c biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Ganesana, Mallikarjunarao; Erlichman, Joseph S.; Andreescu, Silvana

    2012-01-01

    The overproduction of reactive oxygen species and resulting damage are central to the pathology of many diseases. The study of the temporal and spatial accumulation of reactive oxygen species has been limited due to the lack of specific probes and techniques capable of continuous measurement. We demonstrate the use of a miniaturized electrochemical cytochrome C (Cyt C) biosensor for real-time measurements and quantitative assessment of superoxide production and inactivation by natural and engineered antioxidants in acutely prepared brain slices from mice. During control conditions, superoxide radicals produced from the hippocampal region of the brain in 400 μm thick sections were well within the range of detection of the electrode. Exposure of the slices to ischemic conditions increased the superoxide production two fold and measurements from the slices were stable over a 3–4 hour period. The stilbene derivative and anion channel inhibitor, 4,4′-diisothiocyano-2,2′-disulfonic stilbene (DIDS), markedly reduced the extracellular superoxide signal under control conditions suggesting that a transmembrane flux of superoxide into the extracellular space may occur as part of normal redox signaling. The specificity of the electrode for superoxide released by cells in the hippocampus was verified by the exogenous addition of superoxide dismutase (SOD) which decreased the superoxide signal in a dose-dependent manner. Similar results were seen with the addition of the SOD-mimetic, cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) where the superoxide anion radical scavenging activity of nanoceria with an average diameter of 15 nm was equivalent to 527 U of SOD for each 1 μg/ml of nanoceria added. This study demonstrates the potential of electrochemical biosensors for studying real-time dynamics of reactive oxygen species in a biological model and the utility of these measurements in defining the relative contribution of superoxide to oxidative injury. PMID:23085519

  13. Detection of superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide production by cellular NADPH oxidases

    PubMed Central

    Nauseef, William M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The recent recognition that isoforms of the cellular NADPH-dependent oxidases, collectively known as the NOX protein family, participate in a wide range of physiologic and pathophysiologic processes in both the animal and plant kingdoms has stimulated interest in the identification, localization, and quantitation of their products in biological settings. Although several tools for reassuring oxidants released extracellularly are available, the specificity and selectivity of the methods for reliable analysis of intracellular oxidants have not matched the enthusiasm for studying NOX proteins. SCOPE OF REVIEW Focusing exclusively on superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide produced by NOX proteins, this review describes the ideal probe for analysis of O2· and H2O2 generated extracellularly and intracellularly by NOX proteins. An overview of the components, organization, and topology of NOX proteins provides a rationale for applying specific probes for use and a context in which to interpret results and thereby construct plausible models linking NOX-derived oxidants to biological responses. The merits and shortcomings of methods currently in use to assess NOX activity are highlighted, and those assays that provide quantitation of superoxide or H2O2 are contrasted with those intended to examine spatial and temporal aspects of NOX activity. MAJOR CONCLUSIONS Although interest in measuring the extracellular and intracellular products of the NOX protein family is great, robust analytical probes are limited. Several reliable methods for measurement of extracellular O2· and H2O2 by NOX proteins are available. Chemiluminescent probes for both extracellular and intracellular O2· and H2O2 detection have shortcomings that limit their use Options for quantitation of intracellular O2· and H2O2 are very limited However, non-redox sensitive probes and genetically encoded reporters promise to provide spatial and temporal detection of O2· and H2O2 GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE

  14. Impact of Superoxide Dismutase Mimetic AEOL 10150 on the Endothelin System of Fischer 344 Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Devi; Kumarathasan, Prem; Thomson, Errol M.; St-Germain, Carly; Blais, Erica; Crapo, James; Vincent, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    Endothelin-1 is a potent vasoconstrictor and mitogenic peptide involved in the regulation of vasomotor tone and maintenance of blood pressure. Oxidative stress activates the endothelin system, and is implicated in pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases including hypertension, congestive heart failure, and atherosclerosis. Superoxide dismutase mimetics designed with the aim of treating diseases that involve reactive oxygen species in their pathophysiology may exert a hypotensive effect, but effects on the endothelin system are unknown. Our objective was to determine the effect of the superoxide dismutase mimetic AEOL 10150 on the basal endothelin system in vivo. Male Fischer-344 rats were injected subcutaneously with 0, 2 or 5 mg/kg body weight of AEOL 10150 in saline. Plasma oxidative stress markers and endothelins (bigET-1, ET-1, ET-2, ET-3) as well as lung and heart endothelin/nitric oxide system gene expressions were measured using HPLC-Coularray, HPLC-Fluorescence and RT-PCR respectively. AEOL 10150 reduced (p<0.05) the circulating levels of isoprostane (-25%) and 3-nitrotyrosine (-50%) measured in plasma 2h and 24h after treatment, confirming delivery of a physiologically-relevant dose and the potent antioxidant activity of the drug. The reduction in markers of oxidative stress coincided with sustained 24h decrease (p<0.05) of plasma levels of ET-1 (-50%) and ET-3 (-10%). Expression of preproET-1 and endothelin converting enzyme-1 mRNA were not altered significantly in the lungs. However preproET-1 (not significant) and ECE-1 mRNA (p<0.05) were increased (10–25%) in the heart. Changes in the lungs included decrease (p<0.05) of mRNA for the ET-1 clearance receptor ETB and the vasoconstriction-signaling ETA receptor (-30%), and an early surge of inducible nitric oxide synthase expression followed by sustained decrease (-40% after 24 hours). The results indicate that interception of the endogenous physiological flux of reactive nitrogen species and reactive

  15. Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium by Human Cytochrome b5: Generation of Hydroxyl Radical and Superoxide

    PubMed Central

    Borthiry, Griselda R.; Antholine, William E.; Kalyanaraman, B.; Myers, Judith M.; Myers, Charles R.

    2007-01-01

    The reduction of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), can generate reactive Cr intermediates and various types of oxidative stress. The potential role of human microsomal enzymes in free radical generation was examined using reconstituted proteoliposomes (PLs) containing purified cytochrome b5 and NADPH:P450 reductase. Under aerobic conditions, the PLs reduced Cr(VI) to Cr(V) which was confirmed by ESR using isotopically pure 53Cr(VI). When 5-Diethoxyphos-phoryl-5-methyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DEPMPO) was included as a spin trap, a very prominent signal for the hydroxyl radical (HO•) adduct was observed as well as a smaller signal for the superoxide (O2•−) adduct. These adducts were observed even at very low Cr(VI) concentrations (10 μM). NADPH, Cr(VI), O2 and the PLs were all required for significant HO• generation. Superoxide dismutase eliminated the O2• − adduct and resulted in a 30% increase in the HO• adduct. Catalase largely diminished the HO• adduct signal indicating its dependence on H2O2. Some sources of catalase were found to have Cr(VI)-reducing contaminants which could confound results, but a source of catalase free of these contaminants was used for these studies. Exogenous H2O2 was not needed, indicating that it was generated by the PLs. Adding exogenous H2O2, however, did increase the amount of DEPMPO/HO• adduct. The inclusion of formate yielded the carbon dioxide radical adduct of DEPMPO, and experiments with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) plus the spin trap α-phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN) yielded the methoxy and methyl radical adducts of PBN, confirming the generation of HO•. Quantification of the various species over time was consistent with a stoichiometric excess of HO• relative to the net amount of Cr(VI) reduced. This also represents the first demonstration of a role for cytochrome b5 in the generation of HO•. Overall, the simultaneous generation of Cr(V) and H2O2 by the PLs and the resulting generation of HO• at low Cr

  16. The influence of amine/amide versus bisamide coordination in nickel superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Kosh P; Shearer, Jason

    2006-12-25

    Nickel superoxide dismutase (NiSOD) is a mononuclear nickel-containing metalloenzyme that catalyzes the disproportionation of superoxide by cycling between NiII and NiIII oxidation states. In the reduced NiII oxidation state, the metal center is ligated by two cysteinate sulfurs, one amide nitrogen, and one amine nitrogen (from the N-terminus), while in the oxidized NiIII state, an imidazole nitrogen coordinates to the metal center. Herein, we expand on a previous report in which we described a functional metallopeptide-based NiSOD model compound [NiII(SODM1)] (SODM1 = H2N-HCDLPCGVYDPA-COOH) by exploring how acylation of the N-terminus (producing [NiII(SODM1-Ac)]) influences the properties of the metallopeptide. Titration results, GPC data, and mass-spectrometry data demonstrate that NiII coordinates to SODM1-Ac in a 1:1 ratio, while variable pH studies show that NiII coordination is strong at a pH of 7.5 and above but not observed below a pH of 6.2. This is higher than [NiII(SODM1)] by approximately 1.0 pH unit consistent with bisamide ligation. Ni K-edge XAS demonstrates that the NiII center is coordinated in a square-planar NiN2S2 coordination environment with Ni-N distances of 1.846(4) A and Ni-S distances of 2.174(3) A. Comparison of the electronic absorption and CD spectrum of [NiII(SODM1)] versus [NiII(SODM1-Ac)] in conjunction with time-dependent DFT calculations suggests a decrease in Ni covalency in the acylated versus unacylated metallopeptide. This decrease in covalency was also supported by DFT calculations and Ni L-edge XAS. [NiII(SODM1-Ac)] has a quasireversible NiII/NiIII redox couple of 0.49(1) V vs Ag/AgCl, which represents a -0.2 V shift compared with [NiII(SODM1)], while the peak separation suggests a change in the coordination environment upon oxidation (i.e., axial imidazole ligation). Using the xanthine/xanthine oxidase assay, we determine that [NiII(SODM1-Ac)] is less active than [NiII(SODM1)] by over 2 orders of magnitude (IC50 = 3(1) x 10

  17. Stimulus specificity of prostaglandin inhibition of rabbit polymorphonuclear leukocyte lysosomal enzyme release and superoxide anion production.

    PubMed Central

    Fantone, J. C.; Marasco, W. A.; Elgas, L. J.; Ward, P. A.

    1984-01-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) of the E series and PGI2 have been shown to inhibit acute inflammatory reactions in vivo and polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN), chemotaxis, lysosomal enzyme release, and superoxide anion (O-2) production in vitro. This inhibition of neutrophil stimulation by PGEs and PGI2 has been correlated with their ability to increase intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels. However, the mechanism(s) by which PGEs and PGI2 alter the complex biochemical and biophysical events associated with stimulus-response coupling in the neutrophil are not clear. It is reported here that both PGEs and PGI2 in micromolar concentrations inhibit formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP)- and zymosan-induced lysosomal enzyme secretion and superoxide anion production in a dose-dependent manner. No preincubation time of PMNs with the prostaglandins is required for inhibition. Addition of PGEs 10 seconds or later after FMLP stimulation does not alter the biologic response of the neutrophils to the stimulus, suggesting that the prostaglandin inhibition effects early events associated with stimulus-response coupling in the neutrophil. Prostaglandin inhibition of lysosomal enzyme release by the calcium ionophore A23187 was overcome by increasing the extracellular ionophore and/or calcium concentration, suggesting that PGs may modulate intracellular free calcium levels in a manner similar to that observed with platelets. Inhibition of phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-induced neutrophil lysosomal enzyme secretion by PGEs and PGI2 was overcome by increasing concentrations of PMA. However, neither PGEs nor PGI2 altered O-2 production by PMA-treated neutrophils. These data indicate a dissociation between PMA-stimulated O-2 production and lysosomal enzyme release. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that inhibition of neutrophil stimulation by PGEs and PGI2 is a result of increased intracellular cyclic AMP levels and modulation of calcium

  18. Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase and copper deprivation and toxicity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Greco, M A; Hrab, D I; Magner, W; Kosman, D J

    1990-01-01

    A wild-type strain of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown at a medium [Cu] of less than or equal to 50 nM contained less Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) mRNA (60%), protein (50%), and activity (50%) in comparison with control cultures grown in normal synthetic dextrose medium ([Cu] approximately 150 nM). A compensating increase in the activity of MnSOD was observed, as well as a smaller increase in MnSOD mRNA. These medium [Cu]-dependent differences were observed in cultures under N2 as well. Addition of Cu2+ (100 microM) to Cu-depleted cultures resulted in a rapid (30 min) increase in Cu,ZnSOD mRNA (2.5-fold), protein (3.5-fold), and activity (4-fold). Ethidium bromide (200 micrograms/ml of culture) inhibited by 50% the increase in Cu,ZnSOD mRNA, while cycloheximide (100 micrograms/ml of culture) inhibited completely the increase in protein and activity. Addition of Cu2+ to greater than or equal to 100 microM caused no further increase in these parameters but did result in a loss of total cellular RNA and translatable RNA, a decline in the population of specific mRNAs, a decrease in total soluble protein and the activity of specific enzymes, and an inhibition of incorporation of [3H]uracil and [3H]leucine into trichloroacetic acid-insoluble material. Cu,ZnSOD mRNA, protein, and activity appeared relatively more resistant to these effects of Cu toxicity than did the other cellular constituents examined. When evaluated in cultures under N2, the cellular response to [Cu] of greater than or equal to 100 microM was limited to the inhibition of radiolabel incorporation into trichloroacetic acid-insoluble material. All other effects were absent in the absence of O2. The data indicated that medium (cellular) Cu alters the steady-state level of Cu, ZnSOD. This regulation may be at the level of transcription. In addition, Cu,ZnSOD exhibits the characteristics of Cu-stress protein in that it and its mRNA are enhanced relative to other cellular species under conditions

  19. Nickel superoxide dismutase: structural and functional roles of His1 and its H-bonding network

    SciTech Connect

    Maroney, Michael J.; Cabelli, Diane E.; Ryan, Kelly C.; Guce, Abigail I.; Johnson, Olivia E.; Brunold, Thomas C.; Garman, Scott C.

    2015-01-21

    Crystal structures of nickel-dependent superoxide dismutases (NiSODs) reveal the presence of a H-bonding network formed between the NH group of the apical imidazole ligand from His1 and the Glu17 carboxylate from a neighboring subunit in the hexameric enzyme. This interaction is supported by another intrasubunit H-bond between Glu17 and Arg47. In this study, four mutant NiSOD proteins were produced to experimentally evaluate the roles of this H-bonding network and compare the results with prior predictions from density functional theory calculations. The X-ray crystal structure of H1A-NiSOD, which lacks the apical ligand entirely, reveals that in the absence of the Glu17-His1 H-bond, the active site is disordered. Characterization of this variant using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) shows that Ni(II) is bound in the expected N₂S₂ planar coordination site. Despite these structural perturbations, the H1A-NiSOD variant retains 4% of wild-type (WT) NiSOD activity. Three other mutations were designed to preserve the apical imidazole ligand but perturb the H-bonding network: R47A-NiSOD, which lacks the intramolecular H-bonding interaction; E17R/R47A-NiSOD, which retains the intramolecular H-bond but lacks the intermolecular Glu17-His1 H-bond; and E17A/R47ANiSOD, which lacks both H-bonding interactions. These variants were characterized by a combination of techniques, including XAS to probe the nickel site structure, kinetic studies employing pulse-radiolytic production of superoxide, and electron paramagnetic resonance to assess the Ni redox activity. The results indicate that in addition to the roles in redox tuning suggested on the basis of previous computational studies, the Glu17-His1 H-bond plays an important structural role in the proper folding of the “Ni-hook” motif that is a critical feature of the active site.

  20. Nickel superoxide dismutase: structural and functional roles of His1 and its H-bonding network

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Maroney, Michael J.; Cabelli, Diane E.; Ryan, Kelly C.; Guce, Abigail I.; Johnson, Olivia E.; Brunold, Thomas C.; Garman, Scott C.

    2015-01-21

    Crystal structures of nickel-dependent superoxide dismutases (NiSODs) reveal the presence of a H-bonding network formed between the NH group of the apical imidazole ligand from His1 and the Glu17 carboxylate from a neighboring subunit in the hexameric enzyme. This interaction is supported by another intrasubunit H-bond between Glu17 and Arg47. In this study, four mutant NiSOD proteins were produced to experimentally evaluate the roles of this H-bonding network and compare the results with prior predictions from density functional theory calculations. The X-ray crystal structure of H1A-NiSOD, which lacks the apical ligand entirely, reveals that in the absence of the Glu17-His1more » H-bond, the active site is disordered. Characterization of this variant using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) shows that Ni(II) is bound in the expected N₂S₂ planar coordination site. Despite these structural perturbations, the H1A-NiSOD variant retains 4% of wild-type (WT) NiSOD activity. Three other mutations were designed to preserve the apical imidazole ligand but perturb the H-bonding network: R47A-NiSOD, which lacks the intramolecular H-bonding interaction; E17R/R47A-NiSOD, which retains the intramolecular H-bond but lacks the intermolecular Glu17-His1 H-bond; and E17A/R47ANiSOD, which lacks both H-bonding interactions. These variants were characterized by a combination of techniques, including XAS to probe the nickel site structure, kinetic studies employing pulse-radiolytic production of superoxide, and electron paramagnetic resonance to assess the Ni redox activity. The results indicate that in addition to the roles in redox tuning suggested on the basis of previous computational studies, the Glu17-His1 H-bond plays an important structural role in the proper folding of the “Ni-hook” motif that is a critical feature of the active site.« less

  1. Mechanism of the Reaction of Human Manganese Superoxide Dismutase with Peroxynitrite: Nitration of Critical Tyrosine 34.

    PubMed

    Demicheli, Verónica; Moreno, Diego M; Jara, Gabriel E; Lima, Analía; Carballal, Sebastián; Ríos, Natalia; Batthyany, Carlos; Ferrer-Sueta, Gerardo; Quijano, Celia; Estrı́n, Darío A; Martí, Marcelo A; Radi, Rafael

    2016-06-21

    Human Mn-containing superoxide dismutase (hMnSOD) is a mitochondrial enzyme that metabolizes superoxide radical (O2(•-)). O2(•-) reacts at diffusional rates with nitric oxide to yield a potent nitrating species, peroxynitrite anion (ONOO(-)). MnSOD is nitrated and inactivated in vivo, with active site Tyr34 as the key oxidatively modified residue. We previously reported a k of ∼1.0 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) for the reaction of hMnSOD with ONOO(-) by direct stopped-flow spectroscopy and the critical role of Mn in the nitration process. In this study, we further established the mechanism of the reaction of hMnSOD with ONOO(-), including the necessary re-examination of the second-order rate constant by an independent method and the delineation of the microscopic steps that lead to the regio-specific nitration of Tyr34. The redetermination of k was performed by competition kinetics utilizing coumarin boronic acid, which reacts with ONOO(-) at a rate of ∼1 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1) to yield the fluorescence product, 7-hydroxycoumarin. Time-resolved fluorescence studies in the presence of increasing concentrations of hMnSOD provided a k of ∼1.0 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1), fully consistent with the direct method. Proteomic analysis indicated that ONOO(-), but not other nitrating agents, mediates the selective modification of active site Tyr34. Hybrid quantum-classical (quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics) simulations supported a series of steps that involve the initial reaction of ONOO(-) with Mn(III) to yield Mn(IV) and intermediates that ultimately culminate in 3-nitroTyr34. The data reported herein provide a kinetic and mechanistic basis for rationalizing how MnSOD constitutes an intramitochondrial target for ONOO(-) and the microscopic events, with atomic level resolution, that lead to selective and efficient nitration of critical Tyr34. PMID:27227512

  2. Nickel Superoxide Dismutase: Structural and Functional Roles of His1 and its H-bonding Network

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Kelly C.; Guce, Abigail I.; Johnson, Olivia E.; Brunold, Thomas C.; Cabelli, Diane E.; Garman, Scott C.; Maroney, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Crystal structures of nickel-dependent superoxide dismutases (NiSODs) reveal the presence of a H-bonding network formed between the N-H of the apical imidazole ligand from His1 and the Glu17 carboxylate from a neighboring subunit in the hexameric enzyme. This interaction is supported by another intra-subunit H-bond between Glu17 and Arg47. In this study, four mutant NiSOD proteins were produced to experimentally evaluate the roles of this H-bonding network, and compare the results with prior predictions from DFT calculations. H1A-NiSOD, which lacks the apical ligand entirely, was crystallographically characterized and reveals that in the absence of the Glu17-His1 H-bond, the active site is disordered. Subsequent characterization using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) shows that Ni(II) is bound in the expected N2S2 planar coordination site. Despite these structural perturbations, the H1A-NiSOD variant is an active catalyst with 4% of WT-NiSOD activity. Three other mutations were designed to preserve the apical imidazole ligand, but perturb the H-bonding network: R47A-NiSOD, lacks the intra-molecular H-bonding interaction, E17R/R47A-NiSOD, which retains the intra-molecular H-bond, but lacks the inter-molecular Glu17-His1 H-bond, and E17A/R47A-NiSOD, which lacks both H-bonding interactions. These variants were characterized by a combination of techniques including XAS characterization of the nickel site structure, kinetic studies employing pulse-radiolytic production of superoxide, and EPR and chemical probes of the redox activity. The results indicate that in addition to the roles in redox tuning suggested by the computational models, the Glu17-His1 H-bond plays an important structural role in the formation of the Ni-hook motif that is a critical feature of the active site. PMID:25580509

  3. Chemistry of superoxide radical in seawater: Reactions with organic Cu complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Voelker, B.M.; Sedlak, D.L. Zafiriou, O.C.

    2000-03-15

    Organically complexed Cu can be a significant sink of photoproduced superoxide (O{sub 2}{sup {minus}}) in seawater. Using pulse radiolysis, the authors examined the rate constant of catalytic dismutation (k{sub cat}) of O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} in the presence of Cu complexed by strong (L{sub 1}) and weaker (L{sub 2}) organic ligands present in coastal seawater samples and produced by cultures of Synechoccoccus sp. In the coastal samples examined, CuL{sub 2} complexes were almost as reactive towards O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} as inorganically complexed Cu species. Furthermore, k{sub cat} was invariant with added Cu, implying that the added Cu formed a single type of Cu complex or a mixture of complexes with very similar O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} reactivities. Significant differences between k{sub cat} values of estuarine and coastal samples were observed, suggesting an effect of organic ligands from terrestrial sources. CuL{sub 1} complexes produced by Synechoccoccus sp. were found to be less reactive. The high reactivity of CuL{sub 2} complexes decreases estimates of steady-state concentrations of O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} in sunlit marine waters by at least a factor of 10.

  4. Characterization of the superoxide anion radical scavenging activity by tetracycline antibiotics in aprotic media.

    PubMed

    Kładna, Aleksandra; Kruk, Irena; Michalska, Teresa; Berczyński, Paweł; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2011-01-01

    The tetracycline family antibiotics are widely used as human and veterinary treatments. The drugs are effective as antibiotics and also show antimicrobial and non-microbial action. However, the antioxidant properties of tetracyclines have not been characterized in aprotic media. To better understand their biological functions, the in vitro superoxide anion radical (O2•¯) scavenging activities of tetracycline, chlortetracycline, oxytetracycline, doxycycline and methacycline were characterized, along with a very efficient O2•¯ scavenger, tiron, in dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), using ultra-weak chemiluminescence (CL). We found that tetracycline, chlortetracycline and doxycycline efficiently inhibited CL from the O2•¯-generating system at concentration levels of 0.02-1.0 mmol/L. Methacycline and oxytetracycline were the O2•¯ scavengers at concentration levels of 0.01-0.1 mmol/L, whereas when their concentration was lowered the drugs were capable of generating O2•¯, leading to CL enhancement. For all the data obtained in this study, the scavenging activity for the compounds tested decreased in the following order: tetracycline > doxycycline > chlortetracycline > tiron methacycline > oxytetracycline. These results indicate that the tetracycline drugs directly alter O2•¯ redox chemistry in aprotic media. PMID:21413138

  5. Chemiluminescence investigations of antioxidative activities of some antibiotics against superoxide anion radical.

    PubMed

    Kruk, Irena; Michalska, Teresa; Kładna, Aleksandra; Berczyński, Paweł; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2011-01-01

    A chemiluminescent technique was applied to determine antioxidative activities of adriamycin, farmorubicin, mitomycin C and bleomycin against superoxide anion radical (O(2)(•)) in aprotic medium. The antioxidant capacity was expressed as the decrease in light emission from the O(2)(•) solution by and antibiotic. A KO(2) solution in dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) and 18-crown-6 ether were used for the generation of O(2)(•). The results showed that the examined compounds decreased the chemiluminescence (CL) sum from the O(2)(•)-generating system in a dose-dependent manner. Among the antibiotics examined, adriamycin, farmorubicin and bleomycin exhibited antioxidant activity almost comparable to that of 1,2-dihydroxy benzene-3,5-disulphonic acid (tiron), an efficient of the O(2)(•) inhibitor. Mitomycin C was two-times less effective as tiron in decreasing the initial CL intensity. The proposed assay with usage of ultraweak CL technique and the KO(2)-DMSO-crown ether system was useful for the evaluation of antioxidant activity in aprotic solvents. PMID:21370385

  6. Cystatin C protects neuronal cells against mutant copper-zinc superoxide dismutase-mediated toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, S; Hayakawa, T; Wakasugi, K; Yamanaka, K

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by the selective and progressive loss of motor neurons. Cystatin C (CysC), an endogenous cysteine protease inhibitor, is a major protein component of Bunina bodies observed in the spinal motor neurons of sporadic ALS and is decreased in the cerebrospinal fluid of ALS patients. Despite prominent deposition of CysC in ALS, the roles of CysC in the central nervous system remain unknown. Here, we identified the neuroprotective activity of CysC against ALS-linked mutant Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1)-mediated toxicity. We found that exogenously added CysC protected neuronal cells including primary cultured motor neurons. Moreover, the neuroprotective property of CysC was dependent on the coordinated activation of two distinct pathways: autophagy induction through AMPK-mTOR pathway and inhibition of cathepsin B. Furthermore, exogenously added CysC was transduced into the cells and aggregated in the cytosol under oxidative stress conditions, implying a relationship between the neuroprotective activity of CysC and Bunina body formation. These data suggest CysC is an endogenous neuroprotective agent and targeting CysC in motor neurons may provide a novel therapeutic strategy for ALS. PMID:25356866

  7. Two superoxide dismutase prion strains transmit amyotrophic lateral sclerosis–like disease

    PubMed Central

    Bidhendi, Elaheh Ekhtiari; Bergh, Johan; Zetterström, Per; Andersen, Peter M.; Marklund, Stefan L.; Brännström, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an adult-onset degeneration of motor neurons that is commonly caused by mutations in the gene encoding superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). Both patients and Tg mice expressing mutant human SOD1 (hSOD1) develop aggregates of unknown importance. In Tg mice, 2 different strains of hSOD1 aggregates (denoted A and B) can arise; however, the role of these aggregates in disease pathogenesis has not been fully characterized. Here, minute amounts of strain A and B hSOD1 aggregate seeds that were prepared by centrifugation through a density cushion were inoculated into lumbar spinal cords of 100-day-old mice carrying a human SOD1 Tg. Mice seeded with A or B aggregates developed premature signs of ALS and became terminally ill after approximately 100 days, which is 200 days earlier than for mice that had not been inoculated or were given a control preparation. Concomitantly, exponentially growing strain A and B hSOD1 aggregations propagated rostrally throughout the spinal cord and brainstem. The phenotypes provoked by the A and B strains differed regarding progression rates, distribution, end-stage aggregate levels, and histopathology. Together, our data indicate that the aggregate strains are prions that transmit a templated, spreading aggregation of hSOD1, resulting in a fatal ALS-like disease. PMID:27140399

  8. Effects of copper supplementation on erythrocyte superoxide dismutase activity levels in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    SciTech Connect

    Marten, J.T.; DiSilvestro, R.A. )

    1989-02-09

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients are reported to possess lower than normal levels of Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. The contribution of copper status to these low values has not been examined. To address this issue, blood samples were obtained from 10 RA patients before and after 28 days of daily oral copper supplementation (2 mg/day). All patients were receiving gold therapy. Each RA subject, before supplementation, displayed lower erythrocyte SOD values than any of 25 age matched controls. The mean value for the RA subjects was about 40% lower than the control mean, whether expressed as units per ml packed cells or per mg hemoglobin. Erythrocyte SOD activity levels were increased in all subjects by the 4 week copper supplementation, with 7 of the patients showing at least a 22% increase. Presupplement SOD activities showed no correlation with serum C-reactive protein contents, an indicator of acute phase response. Serum levels of the copper containing acute phase protein ceruloplasmin, showed variable responses to copper supplementation. The studies described here are currently being extended to include RA subjects not being treated with gold and to include supplemented controls.

  9. Kinetic Analysis of the Metal Binding Mechanism of Escherichia coli Manganese Superoxide Dismutase

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, Mei M.; Mizuno, Kazunori; Bächinger, Hans Peter; Whittaker, James W.

    2006-01-01

    The acquisition of a catalytic metal cofactor is an essential step in the maturation of every metalloenzyme, including manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). In this study, we have taken advantage of the quenching of intrinsic protein fluorescence by bound metal ions to continuously monitor the metallation reaction of Escherichia coli MnSOD in vitro, permitting a detailed kinetic characterization of the uptake mechanism. Apo-MnSOD metallation kinetics are “gated”, zero order in metal ion for both the native Mn2+ and a nonnative metal ion (Co2+) used as a spectroscopic probe to provide greater sensitivity to metal binding. Cobalt-binding time courses measured over a range of temperatures (35–50°C) reveal two exponential kinetic processes (fast and slow phases) associated with metal binding. The amplitude of the fast phase increases rapidly as the temperature is raised, reflecting the fraction of Apo-MnSOD in an “open” conformation, and its temperature dependence allows thermodynamic parameters to be estimated for the “closed” to “open” conformational transition. The sensitivity of the metallated protein to exogenously added chelator decreases progressively with time, consistent with annealing of an initially formed metalloprotein complex (kanneal = 0.4 min−1). A domain-separation mechanism is proposed for metal uptake by apo-MnSOD. PMID:16258041

  10. A tandem duplication of manganese superoxide dismutase in Nosema bombycis and its evolutionary origins.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Heng; Pan, Guoqing; Vossbrinck, Charles R; Zhang, Ruizhi; Xu, Jinshan; Li, Tian; Zhou, Zeyang; Lu, Cheng; Xiang, Zhonghuai

    2010-12-01

    Microsporidia are a group of obligate intracellular eukaryotic parasites with small genomes. They infect animals from a wide variety of phyla, including humans. Two manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) genes, designated NbMnSOD1 and NbMnSOD2, were found to be organized in a tandem array within the Nosema bombycis genome. The genes, both 678 bp in length, were found to be more similar to each other than they are to homologous genes of other Microsporidia, suggesting that the tandem duplication occurred subsequent to the development of this lineage. Reverse transcript PCR shows that mRNA for both genes is present in the spores. Analysis of the primary structure, hydrophobic cluster analysis, target signal analysis, and phylogenetic analysis all indicate that NbMnSOD1 is dimeric and targeted to the cytosol. NbMnSOD2 seems to have changed more rapidly and is under less evolutionary constraint than NbMnSOD1 suggesting that NbMnSOD2 may function under different conditions or in different tissues of its host rather than simply resulting in an increase in expression. A phylogenetic analysis of MnSOD sequences from eukaryotes, Archaea, and bacteria shows the microsporidial MnSODs to be grouped with the bacteria suggesting a possible horizontal gene transfer. PMID:20972560

  11. Acetylation at lysine 71 inactivates superoxide dismutase 1 and sensitizes cancer cells to genotoxic agents

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Junyan; Xie, Zuoquan; Sun, Wenyi; Luo, Cheng; Ding, Jian; Yuan, Shengtao; Geng, Meiyu; Huang, Min

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells are characterized by a high dependency on antioxidant enzymes to cope with the elevated rates of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Impairing antioxidant capacity in cancer cells disturbs the ROS homeostasis and exposes cancer cells to massive oxidative stress. In this study, we have discovered that superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), a major player in maintaining the cellular redox status, was acetylated at lysine 71. This acetylation, which was primarily deacetylated by Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), suppressed the enzymatic activity of SOD1 via disrupting its association with copper chaperone for SOD1 (CCS). More importantly, genotoxic agents, such as camptothecin (CPT), induced SOD1 acetylation by disrupting its binding with SIRT1. CPT-induced SOD1 acetylation was stimulated by its provoked ROS, suggesting a positive feedback loop, in which ROS per se impairs the antioxidative defence of cancer cells and reinforces oxidative stress stimulated by anticancer agents. The intrinsic abundance of SOD1 acetylation varied among cancer cells, and high level of SOD1 acetylation was correlated with elevated sensitivity to CPT. Together, our findings gained mechanistic insights into how cytotoxic agents fine tune the intracellular ROS homeostasis to strengthen their anticancer effects, and suggested SOD1 acetylation as a candidate biomarker for predicting response to CPT-based chemotherapy. PMID:26008972

  12. Superoxide Dismutase: A Predicting Factor for Boar Semen Characteristics for Short-Term Preservation

    PubMed Central

    Nemec Svete, Alenka

    2014-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in seminal plasma were evaluated on the basis of receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis as predictors for distinguishing satisfactory from unsatisfactory boar semen samples after storage. SOD on day 0 correlated significantly with progressive motility (r = −0.686; P < 0.05) and viability (r = −0.513; P < 0.05) after storage; TBARS correlated only with motility (r = −0.480; P < 0.05). Semen samples that, after 3 days of storage, fulfilled all criteria for semen characteristics (viability > 85%, motility > 70%, progressive motility > 25%, and normal morphology > 50%) had significantly lower SOD levels on the day 0 than those with at least one criterion not fulfilled (P < 0.05) following storage. SOD levels of less than 1.05 U/mL predicted with 87.5% accuracy that fresh semen will suit the requirements for satisfactory semen characteristics after storage, while semen with SOD levels higher than 1.05 U/mL will not fulfill with 100% accuracy at least one semen characteristic after storage. These results support the proposal that SOD in fresh boar semen can be used as a predictor of semen quality after storage. PMID:24729963

  13. A Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase from Jatropha curcas enhances salt tolerance of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z B; Zhang, W J; Gong, X D; Zhang, Q; Zhou, L R

    2015-01-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are involved in protecting plants against diverse biotic and abiotic stresses. In the present study, a novel Cu/Zn-SOD gene (JcCu/Zn-SOD) was cloned from Jatropha curcas L. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that JcCu/Zn-SOD is constitutively expressed in different tissues of J. curcas and induced under NaCl treatment. To characterize the function of this gene with respect to salt tolerance, the construct p35S:JcCu/Zn-SOD was developed and transformed into Arabidopsis using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Compared with wild-type, transgenic plants over-expressing JcCu/Zn-SOD showed enhanced tolerance to salt stress during germination, seedling establishment, and growth in terms of longer root, larger rosette area, and a larger number of leaves in addition to higher SOD activity levels under NaCl stress. In addition, over-expression of JcCu/Zn-SOD resulted in lower monodialdehyde content in transgenic Arabidopsis compared to wild-type plants under the same NaCl stress. Therefore, JcCu/Zn-SOD can increase a plant salt stress tolerance potentially by reducing oxidant injury. PMID:25867355

  14. Profiling of superoxide dismutase isoenzymes in compartments of the developing bovine antral follicles.

    PubMed

    Combelles, Catherine M H; Holick, Emily A; Paolella, Louis J; Walker, David C; Wu, Qiaqia

    2010-05-01

    The antral follicle constitutes a complex and regulated ovarian microenvironment that influences oocyte quality. Oxidative stress is a cellular state that may play a role during folliculogenesis and oogenesis, although direct supporting evidence is currently lacking. We thus evaluated the expression of the three isoforms (SOD1, SOD2, and SOD3) of the enzymatic antioxidant superoxide dismutase in all the cellular (granulosa cells, cumulus cells, and oocytes) and extracellular (follicular fluid) compartments of the follicle. Comparisons were made in bovine ovaries across progressive stages of antral follicular development. Follicular fluid possessed increased amounts of SOD1, SOD2, and SOD3 in small antral follicles when compared with large antral follicles; concomitantly, total SOD activity was highest in follicular fluids from smaller diameter follicles. SOD1, SOD2, and SOD3 proteins were expressed in granulosa cells without any fluctuations in follicle sizes. All three SOD isoforms were present, but were distributed differently in oocytes from small, medium, or large antral follicles. Cumulus cells expressed high levels of SOD3, some SOD2, but no detectable SOD1. Our studies provide a temporal and spatial expression profile of the three SOD isoforms in the different compartments of the developing bovine antral follicles. These results lay the ground for future investigations into the potential regulation and roles of antioxidants during folliculogenesis and oogenesis. PMID:20197373

  15. Mechanisms of the Macrolide-Induced Inhibition of Superoxide Generation by Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Nozoe, Kohji; Aida, Yoshitomi; Fukuda, Takao; Sanui, Terukazu; Nishimura, Fusanori

    2016-06-01

    The effect of macrolides on the superoxide (O2 (-)) production by neutrophils was studied. Resting neutrophils become primed by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP), and primed neutrophils generate O2 (-) in response to fMLP or adhesion, respectively. Both LPS-primed fMLP-stimulated O2 (-) generation by macrolide-treated neutrophils and adhesion-stimulated O2 (-) generation by macrolide-treated fMLP-primed neutrophils were inhibited. Macrolide inhibition of O2 (-) generation was dependent on serum or pH. Serum could be substituted by NaHCO3. The intensity of inhibition was azithromycin = roxithromycin > clarithromycin > erythromycin, in that order. Non-antimicrobial derivatives of erythromycin, that is, EM703 and EM900, inhibited O2 (-) generation at pH 7.4. NH4Cl abolished the activity of azithromycin (AZ) only when added to neutrophils with AZ but not after incubation with AZ, suggesting that NH4Cl prevented the influx of AZ. AZ did not affect the expression of alkaline phosphatase, CD11b, and cytochrome b558 in both resting and LPS-primed neutrophils. These results suggested that macrolides did not affect granule mobilization but inhibited O2 (-) generation selectively. PMID:26983705

  16. Superoxide dismutase activity as a measure of hepatic oxidative stress in cattle following ethionine administration.

    PubMed

    Abd Ellah, Mahmoud R; Okada, Keiji; Goryo, Masanobu; Oishi, Akihiro; Yasuda, Jun

    2009-11-01

    The goal of this study was to assess if oxidative stress, as measured by alterations in the concentrations of antioxidant enzymes in the liver and erythrocytes of cattle, could be induced following dl-ethionine administration. Whole blood, serum and liver biopsy samples were collected 0, 4, 7 and 10 days after intra-peritoneal ethionine administration to five cows. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes copper zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu, Zn SOD) and catalase were assessed in the liver biopsies which were also examined histopathologically. Significant increases in hepatic Cu, Zn SOD concentrations (P<0.01) were noted on days 7 and 10 post-treatment. Hepatic catalase activity decreased significantly (P<0.01) on days 4, 7 and 10 post-treatment and erythrocyte Cu, Zn SOD activity was significantly increased on day 10. Serum biochemical analysis revealed a significant increase (P<0.01) in non-esterified fatty acid concentrations on day 4 and significant decreases in total cholesterol and phospholipid levels on days 4 (P<0.05), 7 (P<0.01) and 10 (P<0.01). In this model system, dl-ethionine administration was effective in inducing oxidative stress particularly reflected in the liver. PMID:18585936

  17. Green tea catechins upregulate superoxide dismutase and catalase in fruit flies.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuk Man; Chan, Ho Yin Edwin; Huang, Yu; Chen, Zhen Yu

    2007-05-01

    Chinese Longjing green tea is an excellent source of polyphenol antioxidants. HPLC analysis revealed that Longjing green tea catechin extract (GTC) contained 62% epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), 19% epigallocatechin (EGC), 9% epicatechin gallate (ECG), and 7% epicatechin (EC). Investigating the effect of GTC on the lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster, we observed that a 10 mg GTC/mL diet could prolong its 50% survival time by 36% and mean lifespan by 16%. This was consistent with 17% reduction in total body lipid hydroperoxide (LPO) level in GTC-treated flies compared to the control group. Supplementation of 10 mg GTC/mL diet increased the survival time only in wild type Oregon-R-C (OR) but not in two mutant fly lines, SOD(n108)/TM3 (gene for superoxide dismutase (SOD) was knocked out) and Cat(n1)/TM3 (gene for catalase was knocked out), when the flies were challenged with paraquat or hydrogen peroxide. Accordingly, SOD and catalase activities in OR wild type increased by 40 and 19%, respectively. RT-PCR analysis indicated that the genes for copper-zinc containing SOD (CuZnSOD), manganese containing SOD (MnSOD), and catalase were upregulated. It was concluded that prolonging lifespan by GTC in D. melanogaster was influenced, among others, by upregulation of endogenous antioxidant enzymes. PMID:17440995

  18. Interfacial Effects on Lithium Superoxide Disproportionation in Li-O₂ Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Dengyun; Lau, Kah Chun; Wang, Hsien-Hau; Wen, Jianguo; Miller, Dean; Lu, Jun; Kang, Feiyu; Li, Baohua; Yang, Wenge; Gao, Jing; Indacochea, Ernesto; Curtiss, Larry A.; Amine, Khalil

    2015-02-11

    During the cycling of Li-O₂ batteries the discharge process gives rise to dynamically evolving agglomerates composed of lithium-oxygen nanostructures; however, little is known about their composition. In this paper, we present results for a Li-O₂ battery based on an activated carbon cathode that indicate interfacial effects can suppress disproportionation of a LiO₂ component in the discharge product. High-intensity X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy measurements are first used to show that there is a LiO₂ component along with Li₂O₂ in the discharge product. The stability of the discharge product was then probed by investigating the dependence of the charge potential and Raman intensity of the superoxide peak with time. The results indicate that the LiO₂ component can be stable for possibly up to days when an electrolyte is left on the surface of the discharged cathode. Density functional calculations on amorphous LiO₂ reveal that the disproportionation process will be slower at an electrolyte/LiO₂ interface compared to a vacuum/LiO₂ interface. The combined experimental and theoretical results provide new insight into how interfacial effects can stabilize LiO₂ and suggest that these interfacial effects may play an important role in the charge and discharge chemistries of a Li-O₂ battery.

  19. Copper–zinc superoxide dismutase-mediated redox regulation of bortezomib resistance in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Kelley; McCormick, Michael L.; Wendlandt, Erik; Zhan, Fenghuang; Goel, Apollina

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable B-cell malignancy. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (BTZ) is a frontline MM drug; however, intrinsic or acquired resistance to BTZ remains a clinical hurdle. As BTZ induces oxidative stress in MM cells, we queried if altered redox homeostasis promotes BTZ resistance. In primary human MM samples, increased gene expression of copper–zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD or SOD1) correlated with cancer progression, high-risk disease, and adverse overall and event-free survival outcomes. As an in vitro model, human MM cell lines (MM.1S, 8226, U266) and the BTZ-resistant (BR) lines (MM.1SBR, 8226BR) were utilized to determine the role of antioxidants in intrinsic or acquired BTZ-resistance. An up-regulation of CuZnSOD, glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx-1), and glutathione (GSH) were associated with BTZ resistance and attenuated prooxidant production by BTZ. Enforced overexpression of SOD1 induced BTZ resistance and pharmacological inhibition of CuZnSOD with disulfiram (DSF) augmented BTZ cytotoxicity in both BTZ-sensitive and BTZ-resistant cell lines. Our data validates CuZnSOD as a novel therapeutic target in MM. We propose DSF as an adjuvant to BTZ in MM that is expected to overcome intrinsic and acquired BTZ resistance as well as augment BTZ cytotoxicity. PMID:25485927

  20. Candida albicans adapts to host copper during infection by swapping metal cofactors for superoxide dismutase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cissy X.; Gleason, Julie E.; Zhang, Sean X.; Bruno, Vincent M.; Cormack, Brendan P.; Culotta, Valeria Cizewski

    2015-01-01

    Copper is both an essential nutrient and potentially toxic metal, and during infection the host can exploit Cu in the control of pathogen growth. Here we describe a clever adaptation to Cu taken by the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. In laboratory cultures with abundant Cu, C. albicans expresses a Cu-requiring form of superoxide dismutase (Sod1) in the cytosol; but when Cu levels decline, cells switch to an alternative Mn-requiring Sod3. This toggling between Cu- and Mn-SODs is controlled by the Cu-sensing regulator Mac1 and ensures that C. albicans maintains constant SOD activity for cytosolic antioxidant protection despite fluctuating Cu. This response to Cu is initiated during C. albicans invasion of the host where the yeast is exposed to wide variations in Cu. In a murine model of disseminated candidiasis, serum Cu was seen to progressively rise over the course of infection, but this heightened Cu response was not mirrored in host tissue. The kidney that serves as the major site of fungal infection showed an initial rise in Cu, followed by a decline in the metal. C. albicans adjusted its cytosolic SODs accordingly and expressed Cu-Sod1 at early stages of infection, followed by induction of Mn-Sod3 and increases in expression of CTR1 for Cu uptake. Together, these studies demonstrate that fungal infection triggers marked fluctuations in host Cu and C. albicans readily adapts by modulating Cu uptake and by exchanging metal cofactors for antioxidant SODs. PMID:26351691

  1. Extracellular superoxide dismutase deficiency impairs wound healing in advanced age by reducing neovascularization and fibroblast function

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Toshihiro; Duscher, Dominik; Rustad, Kristine C.; Kosaraju, Revanth; Rodrigues, Melanie; Whittam, Alexander J.; Januszyk, Michael; Maan, Zeshaan N.; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced age is characterized by impairments in wound healing, and evidence is accumulating that this may be due in part to a concomitant increase in oxidative stress. Extended exposure to reactive oxygen species (ROS) is thought to lead to cellular dysfunction and organismal death via the destructive oxidation of intra-cellular proteins, lipids and nucleic acids. Extracellular superoxide dismutase (ecSOD/SOD3) is a prime antioxidant enzyme in the extracellular space that eliminates ROS. Here, we demonstrate that reduced SOD3 levels contribute to healing impairments in aged mice. These impairments include delayed wound closure, reduced neovascularization, impaired fibroblast proliferation and increased neutrophil recruitment. We further establish that SOD3 KO and aged fibroblasts both display reduced production of TGF-β1, leading to decreased differentiation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts. Taken together, these results suggest that wound healing impairments in ageing are associated with increased levels of ROS, decreased SOD3 expression and impaired extracellular oxidative stress regulation. Our results identify SOD3 as a possible target to correct age-related cellular dysfunction in wound healing. PMID:26663425

  2. Immature Copper-Zinc Superoxide Dismutase and Familial Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Seetharaman, Sai V.; Prudencio, Mercedes; Karch, Celeste; Holloway, Stephen P.; Borchelt, David R.; Hart, P. John

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in human copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) cause an inherited form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, Lou Gehrig’s disease, motor neuron disease). Insoluble forms of mutant SOD1 accumulate in neural tissues of human ALS patients and in spinal cords of transgenic mice expressing these polypeptides, suggesting that SOD1-linked ALS is a protein misfolding disorder. Understanding the molecular basis for how the pathogenic mutations give rise to SOD1 folding intermediates, which may themselves be toxic, is therefore of keen interest. A critical step on the SOD1 folding pathway occurs when the copper chaperone for SOD1 (CCS) modifies the nascent SOD1 polypeptide by inserting the catalytic copper cofactor and oxidizing its intrasubunit disulfide bond. Recent studies reveal that pathogenic SOD1 proteins coming from cultured cells and from the spinal cords of transgenic mice tend to be metal-deficient and/or lacking the disulfide bond, raising the possibility that the disease-causing mutations may enhance levels of SOD1-folding intermediates by preventing or hindering CCS-mediated SOD1 maturation. This mini-review explores this hypothesis by highlighting the structural and biophysical properties of the pathogenic SOD1 mutants in the context of what is currently known about CCS structure and action. Other hypotheses as to the nature of toxicity inherent in pathogenic SOD1 proteins are not covered. PMID:19596823

  3. A comprehensive study on the cell chemistry of the sodium superoxide (NaO2) battery.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Pascal; Bender, Conrad L; Sann, Joachim; Dürr, Anna Katharina; Jansen, Martin; Janek, Jürgen; Adelhelm, Philipp

    2013-07-28

    This work reports on the cell chemistry of a room temperature sodium-oxygen battery using an electrolyte of diethylene glycol dimethyl ether (diglyme) and sodium trifluoromethanesulfonate (NaSO3CF3, sodium triflate). Different from lithium-oxygen cells, where lithium peroxide is found as the discharge product, sodium superoxide (NaO2) is formed in the present cell, with overpotentials as low as 100 mV during charging. Several analytical methods are used to follow the cell reaction during discharge and charge. Changes in structure and morphology are studied by SEM and XRD. It is found that NaO2 grows as cubic particles with feed sizes in the range of 10-50 μm; upon recharge the particles consecutively decompose. Pressure monitoring during galvanostatic cycling shows that the coulombic efficiency (e(-)/O2) for discharge and charge is approx. 1.0, the expected value for NaO2 formation. Also optical spectroscopy is identified as a convenient and useful tool to follow the discharge-charge process. The maximum discharge capacity is found to be limited by oxygen transport within the electrolyte soaked carbon fiber cathode and pore blocking near the oxygen interface is observed. Finally electrolyte decomposition and sodium dendrite growth are identified as possible reasons for the limited capacity retention of the cell. The occurrence of undesired side reactions is analyzed by DEMS measurements during cycling as well as by post mortem XPS investigations. PMID:23552701

  4. Molecular interaction mechanism between 2-mercaptobenzimidazole and copper-zinc superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Teng, Yue; Zou, Luyi; Huang, Ming; Chen, Yadong

    2014-01-01

    2-Mercaptobenzimidazole (MBI) is widely utilized as a corrosion inhibitor, copper-plating brightener and rubber accelerator. The residue of MBI in the environment is potentially harmful. In the present work, the toxic interaction of MBI with the important antioxidant enzyme copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/ZnSOD) was investigated using spectroscopic and molecular docking methods. MBI can interact with Cu/ZnSOD to form an MBI-Cu/ZnSOD complex. The binding constant, number of binding sites and thermodynamic parameters were measured, which indicated that MBI could spontaneously bind with Cu/ZnSOD with one binding site through hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces. MBI bound into the Cu/ZnSOD interface of two subdomains, which caused some microenvironmental and secondary structure changes of Cu/ZnSOD and further resulted in the inhibition of Cu/ZnSOD activity. This work provides direct evidence at a molecular level to show that exposure to MBI could induce changes in the structure and function of the enzyme Cu/ZnSOD. The estimated methods in this work may be applied to probe molecular interactions of biomacromolecules and other pollutants and drugs. PMID:25157630

  5. Trichloroethylene exposure aggravates behavioral abnormalities in mice that are deficient in superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Noriyuki; Homma, Takujiro; Fujiwara, Hiroki; Kaneko, Kenya; Hozumi, Yasukazu; Shichiri, Mototada; Takashima, Mizuki; Ito, Junitsu; Konno, Tasuku; Kurahashi, Toshihiro; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Goto, Kaoru; Fujii, Satoshi; Fujii, Junichi

    2016-08-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) has been implicated as a causative agent for Parkinson's disease (PD). The administration of TCE to rodents induces neurotoxicity associated with dopaminergic neuron death, and evidence suggests that oxidative stress as a major player in the progression of PD. Here we report on TCE-induced behavioral abnormality in mice that are deficient in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). Wild-type (WT) and SOD1-deficient (Sod1(-/-)) mice were intraperitoneally administered TCE (500 mg/kg) over a period of 4 weeks. Although the TCE-administrated Sod1(-/-) mice showed marked abnormal motor behavior, no significant differences were observed among the experimental groups by biochemical and histopathological analyses. However, treating mouse neuroblastoma-derived NB2a cells with TCE resulted in the down regulation of the SOD1 protein and elevated oxidative stress under conditions where SOD1 production was suppressed. Taken together, these data indicate that SOD1 plays a pivotal role in protecting motor neuron function against TCE toxicity. PMID:27166294

  6. A superoxide dismutase/catalase mimetic nanomedicine for targeted therapy of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qixiong; Tao, Hui; Lin, Yongyao; Hu, Ying; An, Huijie; Zhang, Dinglin; Feng, Shibin; Hu, Houyuan; Wang, Ruibing; Li, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jianxiang

    2016-10-01

    Oxidative stress, resulting from excessive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), plays a pivotal role in the initiation and progression of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). To develop an efficacious and safe nanotherapy against IBD, we designed and developed a superoxide dismutase/catalase mimetic nanomedicine comprising a hydrogen peroxide-eliminating nanomatrix and a free radical scavenger Tempol (Tpl). To this end, an oxidation-responsive β-cyclodextrin material (OxbCD) was synthesized, and a Tpl-loaded OxbCD nanoparticle (Tpl/OxbCD NP) was produced. Hydrolysis of OxbCD NP could be triggered by hydrogen peroxide, leading to on-demand release of loaded Tpl molecules from Tpl/OxbCD NP. OxbCD NP was able to efficiently accumulate in the inflamed colon in mice, thereby dramatically reducing nonspecific distribution after oral delivery. In three mouse colitis models, oral administration of Tpl/OxbCD NP notably mitigated manifestations relevant to colitis, and significantly suppressed expression of proinflammatory mediators, with the efficacy superior over free Tpl or a control nanomedicine based on poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA). Accordingly, by scavenging multiple components of ROS, Tpl/OxbCD NP may effectively reduce ulcerative colitis in mice, and it can be intensively developed as a translational nanomedicine for the management of IBD and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:27525680

  7. The effect of oxygen, antioxidants, and superoxide radical on tyrosine phenoxyl radical dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, E.P.; Desrosiers, M.F.; Simic, M.G. )

    1989-01-01

    Dimerization of tyrosine phenoxyl radical yields bityrosine (BT) which can easily be monitored by its characteristic fluorescence at 400 nm. The reactivity of tyrosine phenoxyl radical with O{sub 2} was examined by a variety of techniques. BT fluorescence was measured as a function of O{sub 2} concentration. Over a range of pH values (4-12) there was no effect of oxygen on BT production ((O{sub 2}) less than or equal to 0.72 mM). In addition, oxygen uptake by the phenoxyl radical was measured directly with an oxygen electrode. It was determined by this technique that oxygen does not react with the phenoxyl radical with a rate constant greater than 10(3) M-1 s-1. Tyrosine phenoxyl radical repair by superoxide and physiological antioxidants was examined by BT fluorescence quenching as well as pulse radiolysis. Implications of these results as to the fate of tyrosine phenoxyl radicals produced in biological systems is discussed.

  8. Aortic ascorbic acid, trace elements, and superoxide dismutase activity in human aneurysmal and occlusive disease

    SciTech Connect

    Dubick, M.A.; Hunter, G.C.; Casey, S.M.; Keen, C.L.

    1987-02-01

    Altered trace elements and ascorbic acid metabolism have been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. However, their role in the disease process, or the effect of atherosclerosis on their tissue levels within plaque, is poorly understood. The presence study analyzes the concentrations of Fe, Cu, Zn, and Mn, and ascorbic acid and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in tissue samples from 29 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) and 14 patients with atherosclerotic occlusive disease (AOD). It was observed that the Fe and Mn concentrations in AAA and AOD tissue were higher than the levels in nondiseased control aorta, whereas Cu and Zn levels in AAA and AOD tissue were similar to the levels in controls. The Zn:Cu ratio was significantly lower in the AAA tissue in comparison to both AOD and control tissue. In addition, AAA and AOD tissue had low ascorbic acid levels and low Cu, Zn-SOD activity with Cu,Zn-SOD:Mn-SOD ratios of 0.27 and 0.19, respectively, compared to a ratio of 3.20 in control aorta. These data indicate that aorta affected by aneurysms and occlusive disease have altered trace element and ascorbic acid concentrations, as well as low Cu,Zn-SOD activity. Although these observations do not directly support the hypothesis that AAA is associated with aortic Cu deficiency they do suggest a role for oxygen radicals or increased lipid peroxidation in occlusive and aneurysmal disease of the aorta.

  9. Differential inhibition of Arabidopsis superoxide dismutases by peroxynitrite-mediated tyrosine nitration

    PubMed Central

    Holzmeister, Christian; Gaupels, Frank; Geerlof, Arie; Sarioglu, Hakan; Sattler, Michael; Durner, Jörg; Lindermayr, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Despite the importance of superoxide dismutases (SODs) in the plant antioxidant defence system little is known about their regulation by post-translational modifications. Here, we investigated the in vitro effects of nitric oxide derivatives on the seven SOD isoforms of Arabidopsis thaliana. S-nitrosoglutathione, which causes S-nitrosylation of cysteine residues, did not influence SOD activities. By contrast, peroxynitrite inhibited the mitochondrial manganese SOD1 (MSD1), peroxisomal copper/zinc SOD3 (CSD3), and chloroplastic iron SOD3 (FSD3), but no other SODs. MSD1 was inhibited by up to 90% but CSD3 and FSD3 only by a maximum of 30%. Down-regulation of these SOD isoforms correlated with tyrosine (Tyr) nitration and both could be prevented by the peroxynitrite scavenger urate. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that—amongst the 10 Tyr residues present in MSD1—Tyr63 was the main target responsible for nitration and inactivation of the enzyme. Tyr63 is located nearby the active centre at a distance of only 5.26 Å indicating that nitration could affect accessibility of the substrate binding pocket. The corresponding Tyr34 of human manganese SOD is also nitrated, suggesting that this might be an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for regulation of manganese SODs. PMID:25428993

  10. Cloning and expression analysis of Drosophila extracellular Cu Zn superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Blackney, Michael J; Cox, Rebecca; Shepherd, David; Parker, Joel D

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we cloned and sequenced the mRNAs of the Sod3 [extracellular Cu Zn SOD (superoxide dismutase)] gene in Drosophila and identified two mRNA products formed by alternative splicing. These products code for a long and short protein derived from the four transcripts found in global expression studies (Flybase numbers Dmel\\CG9027, FBgn0033631). Both mRNA process variants contain an extracellular signalling sequence, a region of high homology to the Sod1 (cytoplasmic Cu Zn SOD) including a conserved AUG start, with the longer form also containing a hydrophobic tail. The two fully processed transcripts are homologous to Caenorhabditis elegans Sod3 mRNA showing the same processing pattern. Using an established KG p-element+ insertion line (KG06029), we demonstrate that the Sod3 codes for an active Cu Zn SOD. We found differing expression patterns across sex with higher levels of expression of Sod3 in females. There is a correlation of Sod1 and Sod3 gene expression and activity that can explain why Sod3 was not seen in earlier studies of Sod1. Finally, we found no effect on lifespan with the Sod3 hypomorph mutation (Sod3KG06029) but did observe a significant increase in resistance to paraquat and H2O2 (hydrogen peroxide). PMID:25339624

  11. Manganese superoxide dismutase (Sod2) and redox-control of signaling events that drive metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Hempel, Nadine; Carrico, Pauline M.; Melendez, J. Andres

    2013-01-01

    Manganese superoxide dismutase (Sod2) has emerged as a key enzyme with a dual role in tumorigenic progression. Early studies were primarily directed at defining the tumor suppressive function of Sod2 based on its low level expression in many tumor types. It is now commonly held that loss of Sod2 expression is likely an early event in tumor progression allowing for further propagation of the tumorigenic phenotype resulting from steady state increases in free radical production. Increases in free radical load have also been linked to defects in mitochondrial function and metastatic disease progression. It was initially believed that Sod2 loss may propagate metastatic disease progression, in reality both epidemiologic and experimental evidence indicate that Sod2 levels increase in many tumor types as they progress from early stage non-invasive disease to late stage metastatic disease. Sod2 overexpression in many instances enhances the metastatic phenotype that is reversed by efficient H2O2 scavenging. This review evaluates the many sequelae associated with increases in Sod2 that impinge on the metastatic phenotype. The ability to use Sod2 to modulate the cellular redox-environment has allowed for the identification of redox-responsive signaling events that drive malignancy, such as invasion, migration and prolonged tumor cell survival. Further studies of these redox-driven events will help in the development of targeted therapeutic strategies to efficiently restrict redox-signaling essential for malignant progression. PMID:21434856

  12. Superoxide anion radicals induce IGF-1 resistance through concomitant activation of PTP1B and PTEN.

    PubMed

    Singh, Karmveer; Maity, Pallab; Krug, Linda; Meyer, Patrick; Treiber, Nicolai; Lucas, Tanja; Basu, Abhijit; Kochanek, Stefan; Wlaschek, Meinhard; Geiger, Hartmut; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved IGF-1 signalling pathway is associated with longevity, metabolism, tissue homeostasis, and cancer progression. Its regulation relies on the delicate balance between activating kinases and suppressing phosphatases and is still not very well understood. We report here that IGF-1 signalling in vitro and in a murine ageing model in vivo is suppressed in response to accumulation of superoxide anions (O2∙-) in mitochondria, either by chemical inhibition of complex I or by genetic silencing of O2∙--dismutating mitochondrial Sod2. The O2∙--dependent suppression of IGF-1 signalling resulted in decreased proliferation of murine dermal fibroblasts, affected translation initiation factors and suppressed the expression of α1(I), α1(III), and α2(I) collagen, the hallmarks of skin ageing. Enhanced O2∙- led to activation of the phosphatases PTP1B and PTEN, which via dephosphorylation of the IGF-1 receptor and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate dampened IGF-1 signalling. Genetic and pharmacologic inhibition of PTP1B and PTEN abrogated O2∙--induced IGF-1 resistance and rescued the ageing skin phenotype. We thus identify previously unreported signature events with O2∙-, PTP1B, and PTEN as promising targets for drug development to prevent IGF-1 resistance-related pathologies. PMID:25520316

  13. Oleuropein Prevents Neuronal Death, Mitigates Mitochondrial Superoxide Production and Modulates Autophagy in a Dopaminergic Cellular Model

    PubMed Central

    Achour, Imène; Arel-Dubeau, Anne-Marie; Renaud, Justine; Legrand, Manon; Attard, Everaldo; Germain, Marc; Martinoli, Maria-Grazia

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, primarily affecting dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. There is currently no cure for PD and present medications aim to alleviate clinical symptoms, thus prevention remains the ideal strategy to reduce the prevalence of this disease. The goal of this study was to investigate whether oleuropein (OLE), the major phenolic compound in olive derivatives, may prevent neuronal degeneration in a cellular dopaminergic model of PD, differentiated PC12 cells exposed to the potent parkinsonian toxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). We also investigated OLE’s ability to mitigate mitochondrial oxidative stress and modulate the autophagic flux. Our results obtained by measuring cytotoxicity and apoptotic events demonstrate that OLE significantly decreases neuronal death. OLE could also reduce mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species resulting from blocking superoxide dismutase activity. Moreover, quantification of autophagic and acidic vesicles in the cytoplasm alongside expression of specific autophagic markers uncovered a regulatory role for OLE against autophagic flux impairment induced by bafilomycin A1. Altogether, our results define OLE as a neuroprotective, anti-oxidative and autophagy-regulating molecule, in a neuronal dopaminergic cellular model. PMID:27517912

  14. Manganese accumulation in yeast cells. Electron-spin-resonance characterization and superoxide dismutase activity.

    PubMed

    Galiazzo, F; Pedersen, J Z; Civitareale, P; Schiesser, A; Rotilio, G

    1989-01-01

    Manganese accumulation was studied by room-temperature electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown in the presence of increasing amounts of MnSO4. Mn2+ retention was nearly linear in intact cells for fractions related to both low-molecular-mass and macromolecular complexes ('free' and 'bound' Mn2+, respectively). A deviation from linearity was observed in cell extracts between the control value and 0.1 mM Mn2+, indicating more efficient accumulation at low Mn2+ concentrations. The difference in slopes between the two straight lines describing Mn2+ retention at concentrations lower and higher than 0.1 mM, respectively, was quite large for the free Mn2+ fraction. Furthermore it was unaffected by subsequent dialyses of the extracts, showing stable retention in the form of low-molecular-mass complexes. In contrast, the slope of the line describing retention of 'bound' Mn2+ at concentrations higher than 0.1 mM became less steep after subsequent dialyses of the cell extracts. This result indicates that the macromolecule-bound Mn2+ was essentially associated with particulate structures. In contrast to Cu2+, Mn2+ had no effect on the major enzyme activities involved in oxygen metabolism except for a slight increase of cyanide-resistant Mn-superoxide dismutase activity, due to dialyzable Mn2+ complexes. PMID:2562042

  15. Posttranslational Modifications in Cu,Zn-Superoxide Dismutase and Mutations Associated with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    FURUKAWA, YOSHIAKI

    2006-01-01

    Activation of the enzyme Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) involves several posttranslational modifications including copper and zinc binding, as well as formation of the intramolecular disulfide bond. The copper chaperone for SOD1, CCS, is responsible for intracellular copper loading in SOD1 under most physiological conditions. Recent in vitro and in vivo assays reveal that CCS not only delivers copper to SOD1 under stringent copper limitation, but it also facilitates the stepwise conversion of the disulfide-reduced immature SOD1 to the active disulfide-containing enzyme. The two new functions attributed to CCS, (i.e., O2-dependent sulfhydryl oxidase- and disulfide isomerase-like activities) indicate that this protein has attributes of the larger class of molecular chaperones. The CCS-dependent activation of SOD1 is dependent upon oxygen availability, suggesting that the cell only loads copper and activates this enzyme when O2-based oxidative stress is present. Thiol/disulfide status as well as metallation state of SOD1 significantly affects its structure and protein aggregation, which are relevant in pathologies of a neurodegenerative disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The authors review here a mechanism for posttranslational activation of SOD1 and discuss models for ALS in which the most immature forms of the SOD1 polypeptide exhibits propensity to form toxic aggregates. PMID:16771675

  16. Copper/Zinc-Superoxide Dismutase Is Required for Oxytetracycline Resistance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Avery, Simon V.; Malkapuram, Srividya; Mateus, Carolina; Babb, Kimberly S.

    2000-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae, along with other eukaryotes, is resistant to tetracyclines. We found that deletion of SOD1 (encoding Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase) rendered S. cerevisiae hypersensitive to oxytetracycline (OTC): a sod1Δ mutant exhibited a >95% reduction in colony-forming ability at an OTC concentration of 20 μg ml−1, whereas concentrations of up to 1,000 μg ml−1 had no effect on the growth of the wild type. OTC resistance was restored in the sod1Δ mutant by complementation with wild-type SOD1. The effect of OTC appeared to be cytotoxic and was not evident in a ctt1Δ (cytosolic catalase) mutant or in the presence of tetracycline. SOD1 transcription was not induced by OTC, suggesting that constitutive SOD1 expression is sufficient for wild-type OTC resistance. OTC uptake levels in wild-type and sod1Δ strains were similar. However, lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation were both enhanced during exposure of the sod1Δ mutant, but not the wild type, to OTC. We propose that Sod1p protects S. cerevisiae against a mode of OTC action that is dependent on oxidative damage. PMID:10613865

  17. Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities in a Stenotrophomonas maltophilia WZ2 resistant to herbicide pollution.

    PubMed

    Lü, Zhenmei; Sang, Liya; Li, Zimu; Min, Hang

    2009-01-01

    Quinclorac bensulfuron-methyl is a mixed herbicide widely used on paddy rice field to effectively control barnyard grass and most broad-leaved grasses and sedges. We analyzed superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities in the quinclorac-highly degrading strain Stenotrophomonas maltophilia WZ2 and Gram-negative standard strain Escherichia coli K12 in an attempt to understand antioxidant enzymes in bacteria are produced in response to quinclorac or bensulfuron-methyl, which increases the virulence of the bacteria. MnSOD and two additional catalase isozymes were induced by quinclorac or bensulfuron-methyl in S. maltophilia WZ2, but not in E. coli K12. Quinclorac turned out to be a more sensitive inducer of SOD, whereas bensulfuron-methyl is a more sensitive one of catalase. A mixture of both has effects similar to quinclorac. Results indicate that catalase has a much weakly role in the defense against quinclorac or bensulfuron-methyl induced oxidative stress, whereas SOD could be critical. PMID:18304632

  18. Superoxide mediated production of hydroxyl radicals by magnetite nanoparticles: demonstration in the degradation of 2-chlorobiphenyl.

    PubMed

    Fang, Guo-Dong; Zhou, Dong-Mei; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2013-04-15

    Increasing attention has been paid to magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) due to their highly reductive reactivity toward environmental contaminants. However, there is little information related to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by MNPs, which in fact plays a vital role for the transformation of contaminants. In this paper, the degradation of 2-chlorobiphenyl (2-CB) by MNPs was investigated. The role of ROS generated by MNPs in this process was elucidated. The results demonstrated that hydroxyl radicals (OH) generated by MNPs at low pH could efficiently degrade 2-CB. The mechanism of the formation of OH by MNPs was divided into two steps: (i) the superoxide radical anion (O2(-)) mediated production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and (ii) the reaction of formed H2O2 with Fe(II) dissolved from MNPs to produce OH through Fenton reaction. Comparison of the degradation products of 2-CB by MNPs with MNPs/ethanol and Fenton reagents further supported the involvement of OH in the degradation of 2-CB. The degradation efficiency of 2-CB by MNPs under acidic conditions was higher than that in alkaline solution. These findings provide a new insight into the understanding of reactivity of MNPs for the transformation of 2-CB and possibly other relevant environmental contaminants. PMID:23434481

  19. Parasitization by Scleroderma guani influences expression of superoxide dismutase genes in Tenebrio molitor.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jia-Ying; Ze, Sang-Zi; Stanley, David W; Yang, Bin

    2014-09-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is an antioxidant enzyme involved in detoxifying reactive oxygen species. In this study, we identified genes encoding the extracellular and intracellular copper-zinc SODs (ecCuZnSOD and icCuZnSOD) and a manganese SOD (MnSOD) in the yellow mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor. The cDNAs for ecCuZnSOD, icCuZnSOD, and MnSOD, respectively, encode 24.55, 15.81, and 23.14 kDa polypeptides, which possess structural features typical of other insect SODs. They showed 20-94% identity to other known SOD sequences from Bombyx mori, Musca domestica, Nasonia vitripennis, Pediculus humanus corporis, and Tribolium castaneum. Expression of these genes was analyzed in selected tissues and developmental stages, and following exposure to Escherichia coli and parasitization by Scleroderma guani. We recorded expression of all three SODs in cuticle, fat body, and hemocytes and in the major developmental stages. Relatively higher expressions were detected in late-instar larvae and pupae, compared to other developmental stages. Transcriptional levels were upregulated following bacterial infection. Analysis of pupae parasitized by S. guani revealed that expression of T. molitor SOD genes was significantly induced following parasitization. We infer that these genes act in immune response and in host-parasitoid interactions. PMID:25042129

  20. Voltage-Induced Misfolding of Zinc-Replete ALS Mutant Superoxide Dismutase-1.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yunhua; Acerson, Mark J; Shuford, Kevin L; Shaw, Bryan F

    2015-10-21

    The monomerization of Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is an early step along pathways of misfolding linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Monomerization requires the reversal of two post-translational modifications that are thermodynamically favorable: (i) dissociation of active-site metal ions and (ii) reduction of intramolecular disulfide bonds. This study found, using amide hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange, capillary electrophoresis, and lysine-acetyl protein charge ladders, that ALS-linked A4V SOD1 rapidly monomerizes and partially unfolds in an external electric field (of physiological strength), without loss of metal ions, exposure to disulfide-reducing agents, or Joule heating. Voltage-induced monomerization was not observed for metal-free A4V SOD1, metal-free WT SOD1, or metal-loaded WT SOD1. Computational modeling suggested a mechanism for this counterintuitive effect: subunit macrodipoles of dimeric SOD1 are antiparallel and amplified 2-fold by metal coordination, which increases torque at the dimer interface as subunits rotate to align with the electric field. PMID:26207449

  1. Gibbs Energy of Superoxide Dismutase Heterodimerization Accounts for Variable Survival in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yunhua; Acerson, Mark J; Abdolvahabi, Alireza; Mowery, Richard A; Shaw, Bryan F

    2016-04-27

    The exchange of subunits between homodimeric mutant Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) and wild-type (WT) SOD1 is suspected to be a crucial step in the onset and progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The rate, mechanism, and ΔG of heterodimerization (ΔGHet) all remain undetermined, due to analytical challenges in measuring heterodimerization. This study used capillary zone electrophoresis to measure rates of heterodimerization and ΔGHet for seven ALS-variant apo-SOD1 proteins that are clinically diverse, producing mean survival times between 2 and 12 years (postdiagnosis). The ΔGHet of each ALS variant SOD1 correlated with patient survival time after diagnosis (R(2) = 0.98), with more favorable ΔGHet correlating with shorter survival by 4.8 years per kJ. Rates of heterodimerization did not correlate with survival time or age of disease onset. Metalation diminished the rate of subunit exchange by up to ∼38-fold but only altered ΔGHet by <1 kJ mol(-1). Medicinal targeting of heterodimer thermodynamics represents a plausible strategy for prolonging life in SOD1-linked ALS. PMID:27054659

  2. The structure of the Caenorhabditis elegans manganese superoxide dismutase MnSOD-3-azide complex

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hunter, Gary J.; Trinh, Chi H.; Bonetta, Rosalin; Stewart, Emma E.; Cabelli, Diane E.; Hunter, Therese

    2015-08-27

    C. elegans MnSOD-3 has been implicated in the longevity pathway and its mechanism of catalysis is relevant to the aging process and carcinogenesis. The structures of MnSOD-3 provide unique crystallographic evidence of a dynamic region of the tetrameric interface (residues 41–54). We have determined the structure of the MnSOD-3-azide complex to 1.77-Å resolution. The analysis of this complex shows that the substrate analog, azide, binds end-on to the manganese center as a sixth ligand and that it ligates directly to a third and new solvent molecule also positioned within interacting distance to the His30 and Tyr34 residues of the substratemore » access funnel. This is the first structure of a eukaryotic MnSOD-azide complex that demonstrates the extended, uninterrupted hydrogen-bonded network that forms a proton relay incorporating three outer sphere solvent molecules, the substrate analog, the gateway residues, Gln142, and the solvent ligand. This configuration supports the formation and release of the hydrogen peroxide product in agreement with the 5-6-5 catalytic mechanism for MnSOD. The high product dissociation constant k₄ of MnSOD-3 reflects low product inhibition making this enzyme efficient even at high levels of superoxide.« less

  3. Impact of Acinetobacter baumannii Superoxide Dismutase on Motility, Virulence, Oxidative Stress Resistance and Susceptibility to Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Heider, Christine; Skiebe, Evelyn; Wilharm, Gottfried

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative bacterium appearing as an opportunistic pathogen in hospital settings. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) contributes to virulence in several pathogenic bacteria by detoxifying reactive oxygen species released in the course of host defense reactions. However, the biological role of SODs in A. baumannii has not yet been elucidated. Here, we inactivated in A. baumannii ATCC 17978 gene A1S_2343, encoding a putative SOD of the Fe-Mn type by transposon insertion, resulting in mutant ATCC 17978 sod2343::Km. The mutation was also introduced in two naturally competent A. baumannii isolates by transformation with chromosomal DNA derived from mutant ATCC 17978 sod2343::Km. We demonstrate that inactivation of sod2343 leads to significant motility defects in all three A. baumannii strains. The mutant strains were more susceptible to oxidative stress compared to their parental strains. Susceptibility to colistin and tetracycline was increased in all mutant strains while susceptibility of the mutants to gentamicin, levofloxacin and imipenem was strain-dependent. In the Galleria mellonella infection model the mutant strains were significantly attenuated. In conclusion, sod2343 plays an important role in motility, resistance to oxidative stress, susceptibility to antibiotics and virulence in A. baumannii. PMID:25000585

  4. Serum Superoxide Dismutase Is Associated with Vascular Structure and Function in Hypertensive and Diabetic Patients.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Marcos, Manuel A; Blázquez-Medela, Ana M; Gamella-Pozuelo, Luis; Recio-Rodriguez, José I; García-Ortiz, Luis; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is associated with cardiac and vascular defects leading to hypertension and atherosclerosis, being superoxide dismutase (SOD) one of the main intracellular antioxidant defence mechanisms. Although several parameters of vascular function and structure have a predictive value for cardiovascular morbidity-mortality in hypertensive patients, there are no studies on the involvement of SOD serum levels with these vascular parameters. Thus, we assessed if SOD serum levels are correlated with parameters of vascular function and structure and with cardiovascular risk in hypertensive and type 2 diabetic patients. We enrolled 255 consecutive hypertensive and diabetic patients and 52 nondiabetic and nonhypertensive controls. SOD levels were measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Vascular function and structure were evaluated by pulse wave velocity, augmentation index, ambulatory arterial stiffness index, and carotid intima-media thickness. We detected negative correlations between SOD and pressure wave velocity, peripheral and central augmentation index and ambulatory arterial stiffness index, pulse pressure, and plasma HDL-cholesterol, as well as positive correlations between SOD and plasma uric acid and triglycerides. Our study shows that SOD is a marker of cardiovascular alterations in hypertensive and diabetic patients, since changes in its serum levels are correlated with alterations in vascular structure and function. PMID:26635913

  5. Homology versus analogy: possible evolutionary relationship of immunoglobulins, cupredoxins, and Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Fred J

    2008-01-01

    The 'immunoglobulin-like' fold is one of most common structural motifs observed in proteins. This topology is found in more than 80 superfamilies of proteins, including Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD) and cupredoxin. Evolutionary relationships have not been identified, but may exist. The challenge remains, therefore, of resolving the issue of whether the diverse distribution of the fold is accounted for by divergent evolution of function or convergent evolution of structure following multiple independent origins of function. Since the early studies that revealed conformational similarity of immunoglobulins and other proteins, the number of primary structures available for comparison has dramatically increased and new computational approaches for analysis of sequences have been developed. It now appears that a hypothesis of a common evolutionary origin for cupredoxins, Cu,Zn-SOD, and immunoglobulins may be credible. The distinction between protein homology and protein analogy is fundamental. The immunoglobulin-like fold may represent a robust system within which to examine again the issue of protein homology versus analogy. PMID:18080994

  6. Differential expression of superoxide dismutase genes in aphid-stressed maize (Zea mays L.) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Sytykiewicz, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the expression patterns of superoxide dismutase genes (sod2, sod3.4, sod9 and sodB) in seedling leaves of the Zea mays L. Tasty Sweet (susceptible) and Ambrozja (relatively resistant) cultivars infested with one of two hemipteran species, namely monophagous Sitobion avenae F. (grain aphid) or oligophagous Rhopalosiphum padi L. (bird cherry-oat aphid). Secondarily, aphid-elicited alternations in the antioxidative capacity towards DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) radical in insect-stressed plants were evaluated. Comprehensive comparison of expression profiles of the four sod genes showed that both insect species evoked significant upregulation of three genes sod2, sod3.4 and sod9). However, aphid infestation affected non-significant fluctuations in expression of sodB gene in seedlings of both maize genotypes. The highest levels of transcript accumulation occurred at 8 h (sod2 and sod3.4) or 24 h (sod9) post-infestation, and aphid-induced changes in the expression of sod genes were more dramatic in the Ambrozja cultivar than in the Tasty Sweet variety. Furthermore, bird cherry-oat aphid colonization had a more substantial impact on levels of DPPH radical scavenging activity in infested host seedlings than grain aphid colonization. Additionally, Ambrozja plants infested by either hemipteran species showed markedly lower antioxidative capacity compared with attacked Tasty Sweet plants. PMID:24722734

  7. Paradoxical Relationship between Mn Superoxide Dismutase Deficiency and Radiation-Induced Cognitive Defects

    PubMed Central

    Corniola, Rikki; Zou, Yani; Leu, David; Fike, John R.; Huang, Ting-Ting

    2012-01-01

    Radiation therapy of the CNS, even at low doses, can lead to deficits in neurocognitive functions. Reduction in hippocampal neurogenesis is usually, but not always, associated with cognitive deficits resulting from radiation therapy. Generation of reactive oxygen species is considered the main cause of radiation-induced tissue injuries, and elevated levels of oxidative stress persist long after the initial cranial irradiation. Consequently, mutant mice with reduced levels of the mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme, Mn superoxide dismutase (MnSOD or Sod2), are expected to be more sensitive to radiation-induced changes in hippocampal neurogenesis and the related functions. In this study, we showed that MnSOD deficiency led to reduced generation of immature neurons in Sod2−/+ mice even though progenitor cell proliferation was not affected. Compared to irradiated Sod2+/+ mice, which showed cognitive defects and reduced differentiation of newborn cells towards the neuronal lineage, irradiated Sod2−/+ mice showed normal hippocampal-dependent cognitive functions and normal differentiation pattern for newborn neurons and astroglia. However, we also observed a disproportional decrease in newborn neurons in irradiated Sod2−/+ following behavioral studies, suggesting that MnSOD deficiency may render newborn neurons more sensitive to stress from behavioral trainings following cranial irradiation. A positive correlation between normal cognitive functions and normal dendritic spine densities in dentate granule cells was observed. The data suggest that maintenance of synaptic connections, via maintenance of dendritic spines, may be important for normal cognitive functions following cranial irradiation. PMID:23145165

  8. Fluorescence assay for monitoring Zn-deficient superoxide dismutase in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martyshkin, D. V.; Mirov, S. B.; Zhuang, Y.-X.; Crow, J. P.; Ermilov, V.; Beckman, J. S.

    2003-11-01

    A method has been developed for selective detection of the zinc-deficient form of Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) in vitro. Zinc-deficient SOD1 mutants have been implicated in the death of motor neurons leading in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gerhig's disease). Thus, this method may have applicability for detecting zinc-deficient SOD1 mutants in human ALS patients samples as well as in a transgenic mouse model of ALS and in cultured motor neurons. We determined previously that structural analogs of 1,10 phenanthroline, which react specifically with Cu(I), react with the active Cu(I) of SOD1 when zinc is absent, but not when zinc is also bound, as evidenced by the fact that the reaction is inhibited by pretreatment of the enzyme with zinc. We report herein that bathocuproine, or its water-soluble derivative bathocuproine disulfonate, react with zinc-deficient SOD1 to form a complex which fluoresces at 734 nm when excited at 482 nm. Fluorescent intensity is concentration dependent, thus we propose to use fluorescent confocal microscopy to measure intracellular levels of zinc-deficient SOD1 in situ.

  9. A Superoxide Dismutase Maquette That Reproduces the Spectroscopic and Functional Properties of the Metalloenzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Shearer,J.; Long, L.

    2006-01-01

    Described herein is a nickel superoxide dismutase (NiSOD) maquette ([Ni(SOD{sup M1})]) based on the first 12 residues from the N-terminal sequence of Streptomyces coelicolor NiSOD. The apopeptide (SOD{sup M1}) was prepared by standard solid-phase Fmoc peptide synthesis. SOD{sup M1} will readily coordinate Ni{sup II} in a 1:1 ratio in slightly basic aqueous sodium phosphate buffer (0.1 M; pH = 7.2) forming a lightly colored beige/pink solution. Unlike NiSOD, which is isolated as a 1:1 mixture of oxidized (Ni{sup III}) and reduced (Ni{sup II}) forms, [Ni(SODM1)] can only be isolated in the NiII oxidation state. The UV/vis, X-ray absorption, and CD spectra of [Ni{sup II}(SOD{sup M1})] correspond well with those reported for the reduced form of NiSOD. Despite the fact that [Ni{sup III}(SOD{sup M1})] is not isolable, [Ni(SOD{sup M1})] has an appropriate redox potential to act as an SOD (E{sub 1/2} = 0.70(2) V vs. Ag/AgCl) and in fact will catalytically disproportionate >40 000 equiv of KO{sub 2}.

  10. DNA-triggered aggregation of copper, zinc superoxide dismutase in the presence of ascorbate.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Hu, Si; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Liang; Lan, Shemin; Song, Xuegang; Liu, Changlin

    2010-01-01

    The oxidative damage hypothesis proposed for the function gain of copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) maintains that both mutant and wild-type (WT) SOD1 catalyze reactions with abnormal substrates that damage cellular components critical for viability of the affected cells. However, whether the oxidative damage of SOD1 is involved in the formation of aggregates rich in SOD1 or not remains elusive. Here, we sought to explore the oxidative aggregation of WT SOD1 exposed to environments containing both ascorbate (Asc) and DNA under neutral conditions. The results showed that the WT SOD1 protein was oxidized in the presence of Asc. The oxidation results in the higher affinity of the modified protein for DNA than that of the unmodified protein. The oxidized SOD1 was observed to be more prone to aggregation than the WT SOD1, and the addition of DNA can significantly accelerate the oxidative aggregation. Moreover, a reasonable relationship can be found between the oxidation, increased hydrophobicity, and aggregation of SOD1 in the presence of DNA. The crucial step in aggregation is neutralization of the positive charges on some SOD1 surfaces by DNA binding. This study might be crucial for understanding molecular forces driving the protein aggregation. PMID:20808835

  11. Effect of nitric oxide on staphylococcal killing and interactive effect with superoxide.

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, S S; Lancaster, J R; Basford, R E; Simmons, R L

    1996-01-01

    The role of reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI) such as nitric oxide (.NO) in host defense against pyogenic microorganisms is unclear, and the actual interactive effect of RNI and reactive oxidative intermediates (ROI) for microbial killing has not been determined. Since, in nature, ROI and RNI might be generated together within any local infection, we evaluated the separate and interactive effects of .NO and O2- on staphylococcal survival by using a simplified system devoid of eukaryotic cells. These studies showed that prolonged exposure of staphylococci to .NO does not result in early loss of viability but instead is associated with a dose-related delayed loss of viability. This effect is abrogated by the presence of hemoglobin, providing further evidence that the effect is RNI associated. Superoxide-mediated killing also is dose related, but in contrast to RNI-mediated killing, it is rapid and occurs within 2 h of exposure. We further show that the interaction of .NO and O(2)- results in decreased O(2)--mediated staphylococcal killing at early time points. .NO, however, appears to enhance or stabilize microbial killing over prolonged periods of incubation. This study did not produce evidence of early synergism of ROI and RNI, but it does suggest that .NO may contribute to host defense, especially when ROI-mediated killing is compromised. PMID:8557376

  12. Conditional Radioresistance of tet-Inducible Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Epperly, Michael W.; Chaillet, J. Richard; Kalash, Ronny; Shaffer, Ben; Goff, Julie; Franicola, Darcy; Zhang, Xichen; Dixon, Tracy; Houghton, Frank; Wang, Hong; Berhane, Hebist; Romero, Cynthia; Kim, Jee-Hong; Greenberger, Joel S.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial targeted manganese superoxide dismutase is a major antioxidant enzyme, the levels of which modulate the response of cells, tissues and organs to ionizing irradiation. We developed a Tet-regulated MnSOD mouse (MnSODtet) to examine the detailed relationship between cellular MnSOD concentration and radioresistance and carried out in vitro studies using bone marrow culture derived stromal cell lines (mesenchymal stem cells). Homozygous MnSODtet/tet cells had low levels of MnSOD, reduced viability and proliferation, increased radiosensitivity, elevated overall antioxidant stores, and defects in cell proliferation and DNA strand-break repair. Doxycycline (doxy) treatment of MnSODtet/tet cells increased MnSOD levels and radioresistance from ñ of 2.79 ± 1.04 to 8.69 ± 1.09 (P = 0.0060) and normalized other biologic parameters. In contrast, MnSODtet/tet cells showed minimal difference in baseline and radiation induced mRNA and protein levels of TGF-β, Nrf2 and NF-κB and radiation induced cell cycle arrest was not dependent upon MnSOD level. These novel MnSODtet/tet mouse derived cells should be valuable for elucidating several parameters of the oxidative stress response to ionizing radiation. PMID:23862693

  13. Conditional radioresistance of Tet-inducible manganese superoxide dismutase bone marrow stromal cell lines.

    PubMed

    Epperly, Michael W; Chaillet, J Richard; Kalash, Ronny; Shaffer, Ben; Goff, Julie; Franicola, Darcy; Zhang, Xichen; Dixon, Tracy; Houghton, Frank; Wang, Hong; Berhane, Hebist; Romero, Cynthia; Kim, Jee-Hong; Greenberger, Joel S

    2013-08-01

    Mitochondrial targeted manganese superoxide dismutase is a major antioxidant enzyme, the levels of which modulate the response of cells, tissues and organs to ionizing irradiation. We developed a Tet-regulated MnSOD mouse (MnSOD(tet)) to examine the detailed relationship between cellular MnSOD concentration and radioresistance and carried out in vitro studies using bone marrow culture derived stromal cell lines (mesenchymal stem cells). Homozygous MnSOD(tet/tet) cells had low levels of MnSOD, reduced viability and proliferation, increased radiosensitivity, elevated overall antioxidant stores, and defects in cell proliferation and DNA strand-break repair. Doxycycline (doxy) treatment of MnSOD(tet/tet) cells increased MnSOD levels and radioresistance from ñ of 2.79 ± 1.04 to 8.69 ± 1.09 (P = 0.0060) and normalized other biologic parameters. In contrast, MnSOD(tet/tet) cells showed minimal difference in baseline and radiation induced mRNA and protein levels of TGF-β, Nrf2 and NF-κB and radiation induced cell cycle arrest was not dependent upon MnSOD level. These novel MnSOD(tet/tet) mouse derived cells should be valuable for elucidating several parameters of the oxidative stress response to ionizing radiation. PMID:23862693

  14. Superoxide anion and proteasomal dysfunction contribute to curcumin-induced paraptosis of malignant breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Mi Jin; Kim, Eun Hee; Lim, Jun Hee; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Choi, Kyeong Sook

    2010-03-01

    Curcumin is considered a pharmacologically safe agent that may be useful in cancer chemoprevention and therapy. Here, we show for the first time that curcumin effectively induces paraptosis in malignant breast cancer cell lines, including MDA-MB-435S, MDA-MB-231, and Hs578T cells, by promoting vacuolation that results from swelling and fusion of mitochondria and/or the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Inhibition of protein synthesis by cycloheximide blocked curcumin-induced vacuolation and subsequent cell death, indicating that protein synthesis is required for this process. The levels of AIP-1/Alix protein, a known inhibitor protein of paraptosis, were progressively downregulated in curcumin-treated malignant breast cancer cells, and AIP-1/Alix overexpression attenuated curcumin-induced death in these cells. ERK2 and JNK activation were positively associated with curcumin-induced cell death. Mitochondrial superoxide was shown to act as a critical early signal in curcumin-induced paraptosis, whereas proteasomal dysfunction was mainly responsible for the paraptotic changes associated with ER dilation. Notably, curcumin-induced paraptotic events were not observed in normal breast cells, including mammary epithelial cells and MCF-10A cells. Taken together, our findings on curcumin-induced paraptosis may provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying the selective anti-cancer effects of curcumin against malignant cancer cells. PMID:20036734

  15. Cellular distribution of copper to superoxide dismutase involves scaffolding by membranes

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Christopher R.; De Feo, Christopher J.; Unger, Vinzenz M.

    2013-01-01

    Efficient delivery of copper ions to specific intracellular targets requires copper chaperones that acquire metal cargo through unknown mechanisms. Here we demonstrate that the human and yeast copper chaperones (CCS) for superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), long thought to exclusively reside in the cytosol and mitochondrial intermembrane space, can engage negatively charged bilayers through a positively charged lipid-binding interface. The significance of this membrane-binding interface is established through SOD1 activity and genetic complementation studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, showing that recruitment of CCS to the membrane is required for activation of SOD1. Moreover, we show that a CCS:SOD1 complex binds to bilayers in vitro and that CCS can interact with human high affinity copper transporter 1. Shifting current paradigms, we propose that CCS-dependent copper acquisition and distribution largely occur at membrane interfaces and that this emerging role of the bilayer may reflect a general mechanistic aspect of cellular