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Sample records for high-level gentamicin-resistant enterococci

  1. In vitro antibacterial activity of seven Indian spices against high level gentamicin resistant strains of enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Bipin, Chapagain; Chitra, Pai (Bhat); Minakshi, Bhattacharjee

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to explore the in vitro antibacterial activity of seven ethanolic extracts of spices against high level gentamicin resistant (HLGR) enterococci isolated from human clinical samples. Material and methods Two hundred and fifteen enterococcal strains were isolated from clinical samples. High level gentamicin resistance in ethanolic extracts of cumin (Cuminum cyminum), cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum), ginger (Zingiber officinale), fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum), cloves (Syzygium aromaticum), cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum Maton) and black pepper (Piper nigrum) were prepared using Soxhlet apparatus. The antibacterial effect of the extracts was studied using the well diffusion method. Statistical analysis was carried out by χ2 test using SPSS 17 software. Results Only cinnamon and ginger were found to have activity against all the isolates, whereas cumin and cloves had a variable effect on the strains. Fenugreek, black pepper and cardamom did not show any effect on the isolates. The zone diameter of inhibition obtained for cinnamon, ginger, cloves and cumin was in the range 31–34 mm, 27–30 mm, 25–26 mm and 19–20 mm respectively. Conclusions Cinnamomum zeylanicum and Z. officinale showed the maximum antibacterial activity against the enterococcal isolates followed by S. aromaticum and C. cyminum. The findings of the study show that spices used in the study can contribute to the development of potential antimicrobial agents for inclusion in the anti-enterococcal treatment regimen. PMID:26322099

  2. Chromosomally and Extrachromosomally Mediated High-Level Gentamicin Resistance in Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Sendi, Parham; Furitsch, Martina; Mauerer, Stefanie; Florindo, Carlos; Kahl, Barbara C; Shabayek, Sarah; Berner, Reinhard; Spellerberg, Barbara

    2016-03-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus [GBS]) is a leading cause of sepsis in neonates. The rate of invasive GBS disease in nonpregnant adults also continues to climb. Aminoglycosides alone have little or no effect on GBS, but synergistic killing with penicillin has been shown in vitro. High-level gentamicin resistance (HLGR) in GBS isolates, however, leads to the loss of a synergistic effect. We therefore performed a multicenter study to determine the frequency of HLGR GBS isolates and to elucidate the molecular mechanisms leading to gentamicin resistance. From eight centers in four countries, 1,128 invasive and colonizing GBS isolates were pooled and investigated for the presence of HLGR. We identified two strains that displayed HLGR (BSU1203 and BSU452), both of which carried the aacA-aphD gene, typically conferring HLGR. However, only one strain (BSU1203) also carried the previously described chromosomal gentamicin resistance transposon designated Tn3706. For the other strain (BSU452), plasmid purification and subsequent DNA sequencing resulted in the detection of plasmid pIP501 carrying a remnant of a Tn3 family transposon. Its ability to confer HLGR was proven by transfer into an Enterococcus faecalis isolate. Conversely, loss of HLGR was documented after curing both GBS BSU452 and the transformed E. faecalis strain from the plasmid. This is the first report showing plasmid-mediated HLGR in GBS. Thus, in our clinical GBS isolates, HLGR is mediated both chromosomally and extrachromosomally. PMID:26729498

  3. High-level plasmid-mediated gentamicin resistance and pheromone response of plasmids present in clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed Central

    Shiojima, M; Tomita, H; Tanimoto, K; Fujimoto, S; Ike, Y

    1997-01-01

    Eleven pheromone-responding plasmids encoding erythromycin or gentamicin resistance were isolated from multiresistant clinical Enterococcus faecalis isolates. The plasmids were classified into six types with respect to their pheromone responses. The three erythromycin resistance plasmids responded to different pheromones. Of the eight gentamicin resistance plasmids, four plasmids responded to same pheromone. Southern hybridization studies showed that the genes involved in regulation of the pheromone response were conserved in the drug resistance plasmids. PMID:9056018

  4. The prevalence of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme and virulence genes among enterococci with high-level aminoglycoside resistance in Inner Mongolia, China.

    PubMed

    Niu, Haiying; Yu, Hui; Hu, Tangping; Tian, Gailin; Zhang, Lixia; Guo, Xiang; Hu, Hai; Wang, Zhanli

    2016-01-01

    This study highlights the prevalence of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes and virulence determinants among clinical enterococci with high-level aminoglycoside resistance in Inner Mongolia, China. Screening for high-level aminoglycoside resistance against 117 enterococcal clinical isolates was performed using the agar-screening method. Out of the 117 enterococcal isolates, 46 were selected for further detection and determination of the distribution of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme-encoding genes and virulence determinants using polymerase chain reaction -based methods. Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis were identified as the species of greatest clinical importance. The aac(6')-Ie-aph(2″)-Ia and ant(6')-Ia genes were found to be the most common aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes among high-level gentamicin resistance and high-level streptomycin resistance isolates, respectively. Moreover, gelE was the most common virulence gene among high-level aminoglycoside resistance isolates. Compared to Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis harbored multiple virulence determinants. The results further indicated no correlation between aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme gene profiles and the distribution of virulence genes among the enterococcal isolates with high-level gentamicin resistance or high-level streptomycin resistance evaluated in our study. PMID:27268115

  5. Diversity of enterococcal species and characterization of high-level aminoglycoside resistant enterococci of samples of wastewater and surface water in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Ben Said, Leila; Klibi, Naouel; Lozano, Carmen; Dziri, Raoudha; Ben Slama, Karim; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Torres, Carmen

    2015-10-15

    One hundred-fourteen samples of wastewater (n=64) and surface-water (n=50) were inoculated in Slanetz-Bartley agar plates supplemented or not with gentamicin (SB-Gen and SB plates, respectively) for enterococci recovery. Enterococci were obtained from 75% of tested samples in SB media (72% in wastewater; 78% in surface-water), and 85 enterococcal isolates (one/positive-sample) were obtained. Enterococcus faecium was the most prevalent species (63.5%), followed by Enterococcus faecalis (20%), Enterococcus hirae (9.4%), Enterococcus casseliflavus (4.7%), and Enterococcus gallinarum/Enterococcus durans (2.4%). Antibiotic resistance detected among these enterococci was as follows [percentage/detected gene (number isolates)]: kanamycin [29%/aph(3')-IIIa (n=22)], streptomycin [8%/ant(6)-Ia (n=4)], erythromycin [44%/erm(B) (n=34)], tetracycline [18%/tet(M) (n=6)/tet(M)-tet(L) (n=9)], chloramphenicol [2%/cat(A) (n=1)], ciprofloxacin [7%] and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole [94%]. High-level-gentamicin resistant (HLR-G) enterococci were recovered from 15 samples in SB-Gen or SB plates [12/64 samples of wastewater (19%) and 3/50 samples of surface-water (6%)]; HLR-G isolates were identified as E. faecium (n=7), E. faecalis (n=6), and E. casseliflavus (n=2). These HLR-G enterococci carried the aac(6')-Ie-aph(2")-Ia and erm(B) genes, in addition to aph(3')-IIIa (n=10), ant(6)-Ia (n=9), tet(M) (n=13), tet(L) (n=8) and cat(A) genes (n=2). Three HLR-G enterococci carried the esp virulence gene. Sequence-types detected among HLR-G enterococci were as follows: E. faecalis (ST480, ST314, ST202, ST55, and the new ones ST531 and ST532) and E. faecium (ST327, ST12, ST296, and the new ones ST985 and ST986). Thirty-two different PFGE patterns were detected among 36 high-level-aminoglycoside-resistant enterococci recovered in water samples. Diverse genetic lineages of HLR-G enterococci were detected in wastewater and surface-water in Tunisia. Water can represent an important source for the

  6. OCCURRENCE OF HIGH-LEVEL AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL ISOLATES OF ENTEROCOCCI

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-level resistance fo aminoglycosides was observed in environmental isolates of enterococci. Various aquatic habitats, including agricultural runoff, creeks, rivers, wastewater, and wells, were analyzed. Strains of Enterococcus faecalis, e.faecium, E. gallinarum, and other Ent...

  7. Gentamicin resistance among Escherichia coli strains isolated in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Hasvold, J; Bradford, L; Nelson, C; Harrison, C; Attar, M; Stillwell, T

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality among term and preterm infants. Ampicillin and gentamicin are standard empiric therapy for early onset sepsis. Four cases of neonatal sepsis secondary to Escherichia coli (E. coli) found to be gentamicin resistant occurred within a five week period in one neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). To determine whether these cases could be tied to a single vector of transmission, and to more broadly evaluate the incidence of gentamicin resistant strains of E. coli in the neonatal population at our institution compared to other centers, we reviewed the charts of the four neonates (Infants A through D) and their mothers. The E. coli isolates were sent for Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) to evaluate for genetic similarity between strains. We also reviewed all positive E. coli cultures from one NICU over a two year period. Infants A and B had genetically indistinguishable strains which matched that of urine and placental cultures of Infant B's mother. Infant C had a genetically distinct organism. Infant D, the identical twin of Infant C, did not have typing performed. Review of all cultures positive for E. coli at our institution showed a 12.9 percent incidence of gentamicin-resistance. A review of other studies showed that rates of resistance vary considerably by institution. We conclude that gentamicin-resistant E. coli is a relatively uncommon cause of neonatal sepsis, but should remain a consideration in patients who deteriorate despite initiation of empiric antibiotics. PMID:24246520

  8. Vancomycin and High Level Aminoglycoside Resistance in Enterococcus spp. in a Tertiary Health Care Centre: A Therapeutic Concern.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Seema; Singla, Pooja; Deep, Antariksha; Bala, Kiran; Sikka, Rama; Garg, Meenu; Chaudhary, Uma

    2016-01-01

    Aims. This study was aimed at knowing the prevalence of vancomycin and high level aminoglycoside resistance in enterococcal strains among clinical samples. Study Design. It was an investigational study. Place and Duration of Study. It was conducted on 100 Enterococcus isolates, in the Department of Microbiology, Pt. BDS PGIMS, Rohtak, over a period of six months from July to December 2014. Methodology. Clinical specimens including urine, pus, blood, semen, vaginal swab, and throat swab were processed and Enterococcus isolates were identified by standard protocols. Antibiotic sensitivity testing of enterococci was performed using Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Results. High level gentamicin resistance (HLGR) was more common in urine samples (41.5%) followed by blood (36%) samples. High level streptomycin resistance (HLSR) was more common in pus samples (52.6%) followed by blood samples (36%). Resistance to vancomycin was maximum in blood isolates. Conclusion. Enterococci resistant to multiple antimicrobial agents have been recognized. Thus, it is crucial for laboratories to provide accurate antimicrobial resistance patterns for enterococci so that effective therapy and infection control measures can be initiated. PMID:27047693

  9. Vancomycin and High Level Aminoglycoside Resistance in Enterococcus spp. in a Tertiary Health Care Centre: A Therapeutic Concern

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Pooja; Deep, Antariksha; Bala, Kiran; Sikka, Rama; Garg, Meenu; Chaudhary, Uma

    2016-01-01

    Aims. This study was aimed at knowing the prevalence of vancomycin and high level aminoglycoside resistance in enterococcal strains among clinical samples. Study Design. It was an investigational study. Place and Duration of Study. It was conducted on 100 Enterococcus isolates, in the Department of Microbiology, Pt. BDS PGIMS, Rohtak, over a period of six months from July to December 2014. Methodology. Clinical specimens including urine, pus, blood, semen, vaginal swab, and throat swab were processed and Enterococcus isolates were identified by standard protocols. Antibiotic sensitivity testing of enterococci was performed using Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Results. High level gentamicin resistance (HLGR) was more common in urine samples (41.5%) followed by blood (36%) samples. High level streptomycin resistance (HLSR) was more common in pus samples (52.6%) followed by blood samples (36%). Resistance to vancomycin was maximum in blood isolates. Conclusion. Enterococci resistant to multiple antimicrobial agents have been recognized. Thus, it is crucial for laboratories to provide accurate antimicrobial resistance patterns for enterococci so that effective therapy and infection control measures can be initiated. PMID:27047693

  10. Functional Metagenome Mining of Soil for a Novel Gentamicin Resistance Gene.

    PubMed

    Im, Hyunjoo; Kim, Kyung Mo; Lee, Sang-Heon; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2016-03-01

    Extensive use of antibiotics over recent decades has led to bacterial resistance against antibiotics, including gentamicin, one of the most effective aminoglycosides. The emergence of resistance is problematic for hospitals, since gentamicin is an important broad-spectrum antibiotic for the control of bacterial pathogens in the clinic. Previous study to identify gentamicin resistance genes from environmental samples have been conducted using culture-dependent screening methods. To overcome these limitations, we employed a metagenome-based culture-independent protocol to identify gentamicin resistance genes. Through functional screening of metagenome libraries derived from soil samples, a fosmid clone was selected as it conferred strong gentamicin resistance. To identify a specific functioning gene conferring gentamicin resistance from a selected fosmid clone (35-40 kb), a shot-gun library was constructed and four shot-gun clones (2-3 kb) were selected. Further characterization of these clones revealed that they contained sequences similar to that of the RNA ligase, T4 rnlA that is known as a toxin gene. The overexpression of the rnlA-like gene in Escherichia coli increased gentamicin resistance, indicating that this toxin gene modulates this trait. The results of our metagenome library analysis suggest that the rnlA-like gene may represent a new class of gentamicin resistance genes in pathogenic bacteria. In addition, we demonstrate that the soil metagenome can provide an important resource for the identification of antibiotic resistance genes, which are valuable molecular targets in efforts to overcome antibiotic resistance. PMID:26699755

  11. Eradication of epidemic methicillin-gentamicin-resistant staphylococcus aureus in an intensive care nursery.

    PubMed

    Dunkle, L M; Naqvi, S H; McCallum, R; Lofgren, J P

    1981-02-01

    A methicillin-resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus (phage type 47,54,75,83A) became epidemic in our 50 bed level III nursery, with a colonization rate of 70 percent and an infection rate of more than 25 percent. This prevalence and the appearance of gentamicin resistance necessitated epidemic control measures. Standard measures included separate housing for infants in whom colonization had occurred and infants in whom it had not, low nurse to patient ratios, and cohorting of all personnel. Use of all antibiotics was curtailed by the requirement of infectious disease consultation. Gentamicin was available only on order of the Director. The colonization rate fell from 55 percent to 25.4 percent, the first-week colonization rate from 31 percent to 0 percent, and the infection rate from 29.3 percent to 15.9 percent over eight weeks. The mean duration of antibiotic therapy decreased from 12.21 to 9.05 days per treated patient; however, the frequency of gentamicin usage and the proportion of gentamicin resistance were unchanged. Nurse to patient ratios were modified to allow increased admissions, but cohorting was continued for 12 weeks until all infants in whom colonization had occurred were discharged. With the elimination of the reservoir, no further colonization occurred and antibiotic resistance did not reappear. Standard infection control measures can eliminate epidemics of multiple antibiotic-resistant Staph. aureus, and control of antibiotic usage may present re-emergence of resistant strains. PMID:6906946

  12. Antimicrobial-resistant enterococci in animals and meat: a human health hazard?

    PubMed

    Hammerum, Anette M; Lester, Camilla H; Heuer, Ole E

    2010-10-01

    Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis belong to the gastrointestinal flora of humans and animals. Although normally regarded harmless commensals, enterococci may cause a range of different infections in humans, including urinary tract infections, sepsis, and endocarditis. The use of avoparcin, gentamicin, and virginiamycin for growth promotion and therapy in food animals has lead to the emergence of vancomycin- and gentamicin-resistant enterococci and quinupristin/dalfopristin-resistant E. faecium in animals and meat. This implies a potential risk for transfer of resistance genes or resistant bacteria from food animals to humans. The genes encoding resistance to vancomycin, gentamicin, and quinupristin/dalfopristin have been found in E. faecium of human and animal origin; meanwhile, certain clones of E. faecium are found more frequently in samples from human patients, while other clones predominate in certain animal species. This may suggest that antimicrobial-resistant E. faecium from animals could be regarded less hazardous to humans; however, due to their excellent ability to acquire and transfer resistance genes, E. faecium of animal origin may act as donors of antimicrobial resistance genes for other more virulent enterococci. For E. faecalis, the situation appears different, as similar clones of, for example, vancomycin- and gentamicin-resistant E. faecalis have been obtained from animals and from human patients. Continuous surveillance of antimicrobial resistance in enterococci from humans and animals is essential to follow trends and detect emerging resistance. PMID:20578915

  13. Mobility of gentamicin resistance genes from staphylococci isolated in the United States: identification of Tn4031, a gentamicin resistance transposon from Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, W D; Archer, G L

    1989-01-01

    Homologous genes encoding resistance to gentamicin, tobramycin, and kanamycin through the bifunctional acetylating [AAC(6')] and phosphorylating [APH(2")] aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme were identified in staphylococci isolated from patients in the United States. The mobility of gentamicin resistance (Gmr) genes found on a prototype conjugative plasmid (pGO1) was compared with that of genes cloned from chromosomal sites. Plasmid-encoded Gmr genes and flanking sequences were introduced onto a temperature-sensitive plasmid (pRN3208) from pGO1 by homologous recombination between insertion sequence-like elements present on both replicons. Growth of Staphylococcus aureus strains containing the temperature-sensitive recombinant (pGO161) at the nonpermissive temperature for plasmid replication (42 degrees C) revealed no translocation of Gmr from its plasmid location. A transposon (Tn551) resident on the same replicon did translocate. Chromosomal Gmr determinants were cloned, together with the gene for trimethoprim resistance (dfrA), from three geographically distinct S. epidermidis isolates; two were subcloned onto temperature-sensitive Escherichia coli-S. aureus shuttle plasmids as 7.2-kilobase BglII fragments. Growth of both recombination-deficient and-proficient S. aureus strains containing the cloned genes at 42 degrees C allowed detection of transposition of Gmr sequences and identification of insertion into random chromosomal sites. We have designated this 5-kilobase transposon from S. epidermidis as Tn4031. Images PMID:2552907

  14. Replacement of gentamicin by amikacin as a means of decreasing gentamicin resistance of gram-negative rods in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Wielunsky, E; Drucker, M; Cohen, T; Reisner, S H

    1983-11-01

    The emergence of resistance in bacteria that colonize infants in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is of great concern and a serious therapeutic problem. During the years 1980 to 1981, continuous surveillance of bacterial colonization was carried out on 499 infants admitted to the NICU of the Beilinson Medical Center. Antibiotic sensitivity testing was performed on all organisms isolated. At the end of 1980 and the beginning of 1981, an increased number of gram-negative rods became gentamicin-resistant. It was assumed that the discontinuation of gentamicin usage and replacement with another aminoglycoside, amikacin, would bring about a reduction in gentamicin resistance. Replacement of gentamicin by amikacin resulted in a significant decrease in gentamicin-resistant Escherichia coli and Klebsiella within 3 to 6 months. The emergence of resistant strains can be detected by surveillance methods and overcome by a change in the antibiotic regimen. PMID:6662682

  15. Novel Glycoconjugate of 8-Fluoro Norfloxacin Derivatives as Gentamicin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Inhibitors: Synthesis and Molecular Modelling Studies.

    PubMed

    Azad, Chandra S; Bhunia, Shome S; Krishna, Atul; Shukla, Praveen K; Saxena, Anil K

    2015-10-01

    Antibiotic resistance has been the subject of interest in clinical practice due to high prevalence of antibiotic-resistant pathogenic organisms. In view of the prevalence of lesser resistance in antibiotics belonging to aminoglycoside class of compounds viz. Food and Drug Administration-approved gentamicin for the treatment of Staphylococcus infections, which also has instances of resistance in the clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, a series of novel glycoconjugates of 8-fluoro norfloxacin analogues with high regio-selectivity by employing copper (I)-catalyzed 1, 3-dipolar cycloaddition of 1-O-propargyl monosaccharides has been synthesized and evaluated for the antibacterial activity against gentamicin resistance Staphylococcus aureus. Among these compounds, the compound 10g showed better antibacterial activity (MIC = 3.12 μg/ml) than gentamicin (Escherichia coli (12.5 μg/ml), Staphylococcus aureus (6.25 μg/ml) and Klebsiella pneumonia (6.25 μg/ml), including gentamicin resistant (>50 μg/ml) strain in vitro). The docking studies suggest DNA gyrase of Staphylococcus aureus as a probable target for the antibacterial action of compound 10g. PMID:25546316

  16. Enterococci in the environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Nevers, Meredith B.; Korajkic, Asja; Staley, Zachery R.; Harwood, Valerie J.

    2012-01-01

    Enterococci are common, commensal members of gut communities in mammals and birds, yet they are also opportunistic pathogens that cause millions of human and animal infections annually. Because they are shed in human and animal feces, are readily culturable, and predict human health risks from exposure to polluted recreational waters, they are used as surrogates for waterborne pathogens and as fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in research and in water quality testing throughout the world. Evidence from several decades of research demonstrates, however, that enterococci may be present in high densities in the absence of obvious fecal sources and that environmental reservoirs of these FIB are important sources and sinks, with the potential to impact water quality. This review focuses on the distribution and microbial ecology of enterococci in environmental (secondary) habitats, including the effect of environmental stressors; an outline of their known and apparent sources, sinks, and fluxes; and an overview of the use of enterococci as FIB. Finally, the significance of emerging methodologies, such as microbial source tracking (MST) and empirical predictive models, as tools in water quality monitoring is addressed. The mounting evidence for widespread extraenteric sources and reservoirs of enterococci demonstrates the versatility of the genus Enterococcus and argues for the necessity of a better understanding of their ecology in natural environments, as well as their roles as opportunistic pathogens and indicators of human pathogens.

  17. Enterococci in the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Nevers, Meredith B.; Korajkic, Asja; Staley, Zachery R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Enterococci are common, commensal members of gut communities in mammals and birds, yet they are also opportunistic pathogens that cause millions of human and animal infections annually. Because they are shed in human and animal feces, are readily culturable, and predict human health risks from exposure to polluted recreational waters, they are used as surrogates for waterborne pathogens and as fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in research and in water quality testing throughout the world. Evidence from several decades of research demonstrates, however, that enterococci may be present in high densities in the absence of obvious fecal sources and that environmental reservoirs of these FIB are important sources and sinks, with the potential to impact water quality. This review focuses on the distribution and microbial ecology of enterococci in environmental (secondary) habitats, including the effect of environmental stressors; an outline of their known and apparent sources, sinks, and fluxes; and an overview of the use of enterococci as FIB. Finally, the significance of emerging methodologies, such as microbial source tracking (MST) and empirical predictive models, as tools in water quality monitoring is addressed. The mounting evidence for widespread extraenteric sources and reservoirs of enterococci demonstrates the versatility of the genus Enterococcus and argues for the necessity of a better understanding of their ecology in natural environments, as well as their roles as opportunistic pathogens and indicators of human pathogens. PMID:23204362

  18. Enterococci in the Environment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enterococci are common, commensal members of gut communities in mammals and birds, yet they are also opportunistic pathogens that cause millions of human and animal infections annually. Because they are shed in human and animal feces, are readily culturable, and predict human hea...

  19. Virulence of enterococci.

    PubMed Central

    Jett, B D; Huycke, M M; Gilmore, M S

    1994-01-01

    Enterococci are commensal organisms well suited to survival in intestinal and vaginal tracts and the oral cavity. However, as for most bacteria described as causing human disease, enterococci also possess properties that can be ascribed roles in pathogenesis. The natural ability of enterococci to readily acquire, accumulate, and share extrachromosomal elements encoding virulence traits or antibiotic resistance genes lends advantages to their survival under unusual environmental stresses and in part explains their increasing importance as nosocomial pathogens. This review discusses the current understanding of enterococcal virulence relating to (i) adherence to host tissues, (ii) invasion and abscess formation, (iii) factors potentially relevant to modulation of host inflammatory responses, and (iv) potentially toxic secreted products. Aggregation substance, surface carbohydrates, or fibronectin-binding moieties may facilitate adherence to host tissues. Enterococcus faecalis appears to have the capacity to translocate across intact intestinal mucosa in models of antibiotic-induced superinfection. Extracellular toxins such as cytolysin can induce tissue damage as shown in an endophthalmitis model, increase mortality in combination with aggregation substance in an endocarditis model, and cause systemic toxicity in a murine peritonitis model. Finally, lipoteichoic acid, superoxide production, or pheromones and corresponding peptide inhibitors each may modulate local inflammatory reactions. Images PMID:7834601

  20. Enterococci in Insects

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jonathan D.; Mundt, J. Orvin

    1972-01-01

    Enterococci were obtained from 213 of 403 insects cultured during a 14-month period, in numbers from 103 to 3 × 107/g of insect. Insects were taken only from nonurban, wild, and cultivated fields and woods. In species of insects carrying them, enterococci were not always present in every individual cultured, and often more than one species of enterococcus occurred within a species. Enterococci were obtained from certain insects taken in the field during the dormant season, suggesting their role as overwintering agents. They were generally present in species feeding on nectar, succulent plant parts, and on and ir forest litter, but not from insects feeding on less succulent leaves and stems. Streptococcus faecalis was recovered from 32%, Streptococcus faecium from 22.4%, and Streptococcus faecium var. casseliflavus from 43.5% of members of the 37 taxa of insects. S. faecalis and S. faecium var. casseliflavus exhibit a high percent of conformity to the properties published for them. The heterogeneity in properties of S. faecium is similar to that found for the species taken from plants. Many fail to grow in broth at 45 C or in broth containing 6.5% NaCl; 50% of the cultures ferment both melezitose and melibiose, and a few ferment neither sugar. The remainder ferment melibiose only. Failure to reduce methylene blue in milk by S. faecalis and S. faecium is correlated with the inability to ferment lactose. More than 93% of the cultures of S. faecalis digest casein in milk from the top downward, following the production of a soft, flowing curd. Because this property is not characteristic of S. faecalis taken from humans, the reaction in litmus milk is suggested as a means of differentiation between cultures of remote and innocent origin in nature and recent, human pollution. PMID:4628796

  1. Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Cetinkaya, Yesim; Falk, Pamela; Mayhall, C. Glen

    2000-01-01

    After they were first identified in the mid-1980s, vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) spread rapidly and became a major problem in many institutions both in Europe and the United States. Since VRE have intrinsic resistance to most of the commonly used antibiotics and the ability to acquire resistance to most of the current available antibiotics, either by mutation or by receipt of foreign genetic material, they have a selective advantage over other microorganisms in the intestinal flora and pose a major therapeutic challenge. The possibility of transfer of vancomycin resistance genes to other gram-positive organisms raises significant concerns about the emergence of vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. We review VRE, including their history, mechanisms of resistance, epidemiology, control measures, and treatment. PMID:11023964

  2. Enterococci at the crossroads of food safety?

    PubMed

    Franz, C M; Holzapfel, W H; Stiles, M E

    1999-03-01

    Enterococci are gram-positive bacteria and fit within the general definition of lactic acid bacteria. Modern classification techniques resulted in the transfer of some members of the genus Streptococcus, notably some of the Lancefield's group D streptococci, to the new genus Enterococcus. Enterococci can be used as indicators of faecal contamination. They have been implicated in outbreaks of foodborne illness, and they have been ascribed a beneficial or detrimental role in foods. In processed meats, enterococci may survive heat processing and cause spoilage, though in certain cheeses the growth of enterococci contributes to ripening and development of product flavour. Some enterococci of food origin produce bacteriocins that exert anti-Listeria activity. Enterococci are used as probiotics to improve the microbial balance of the intestine, or as a treatment for gastroenteritis in humans and animals. On the other hand, enterococci have become recognised as serious nosocomial pathogens causing bacteraemia, endocarditis, urinary tract and other infections. This is in part explained by the resistance of some of these bacteria to most antibiotics that are currently in use. Resistance is acquired by gene transfer systems, such as conjugative or nonconjugative plasmids or transposons. Virulence of enterococci is not well understood but adhesins, haemolysin, hyaluronidase, aggregation substance and gelatinase are putative virulence factors. It appears that foods could be a source of vancomycin-resistant enterococci. This review addresses the issue of the health risk of foods containing enterococci. PMID:10357269

  3. Characterisation of Phenotypic and Genotypic Antibiotic Resistance Profile of Enterococci from Cheeses in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kürekci, Cemil; Önen, Sevda Pehlivanlar; Yipel, Mustafa; Aslantaş, Özkan; Gündoğdu, Aycan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of enterococci in cheese samples and to characterize their antimicrobial resistance profiles as well as the associated resistance genes. A total of 139 enterococci were isolated from 99 cheese samples, the isolates were identified as E. faecalis (61.2%), E. faecium (15.1%), E. gallinarum (12.9%), E. durans (5.0%), E. casseliflavis (2.9%) and E. avium (2.9%). The most frequent antimicrobial resistance observed in enterococci isolates was to lincomycin (88.5%), followed by kanamycin (84.2%), gentamycin (low level, 51.1%), rifampin (46.8%) and tetracycline (33.8%). Among the isolates, the frequencies of high level gentamycin and streptomycin resistant enterococci strains were 2.2% and 5.8%, respectively. Apart from the mentioned antibiotics, low levels of resistance to ciprofloxacin, erythromycin and chloramphenicol were found. Moreover no resistance was observed against penicillin and ampicillin. The antimicrobial resistance genes including tetM, tetL, ermB, cat, aph(3')-IIIa, ant(6)-Ia and aac(6')-Ieaph(2")-Ia were found in enterococci from Turkish cheese samples. In the current study, we provided data for antibiotic resistance and the occurrence of resistance genes among enterococci. Regulatory and quality control programs for milk and other dairy products from farms to retail outlets has to be established and strengthened to monitor trends in antimicrobial resistance among emerging food borne pathogens in Turkey. PMID:27433106

  4. Characterisation of Phenotypic and Genotypic Antibiotic Resistance Profile of Enterococci from Cheeses in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Yipel, Mustafa; Aslantaş, Özkan; Gündoğdu, Aycan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of enterococci in cheese samples and to characterize their antimicrobial resistance profiles as well as the associated resistance genes. A total of 139 enterococci were isolated from 99 cheese samples, the isolates were identified as E. faecalis (61.2%), E. faecium (15.1%), E. gallinarum (12.9%), E. durans (5.0%), E. casseliflavis (2.9%) and E. avium (2.9%). The most frequent antimicrobial resistance observed in enterococci isolates was to lincomycin (88.5%), followed by kanamycin (84.2%), gentamycin (low level, 51.1%), rifampin (46.8%) and tetracycline (33.8%). Among the isolates, the frequencies of high level gentamycin and streptomycin resistant enterococci strains were 2.2% and 5.8%, respectively. Apart from the mentioned antibiotics, low levels of resistance to ciprofloxacin, erythromycin and chloramphenicol were found. Moreover no resistance was observed against penicillin and ampicillin. The antimicrobial resistance genes including tetM, tetL, ermB, cat, aph(3’)-IIIa, ant(6)-Ia and aac(6’)-Ieaph(2”)-Ia were found in enterococci from Turkish cheese samples. In the current study, we provided data for antibiotic resistance and the occurrence of resistance genes among enterococci. Regulatory and quality control programs for milk and other dairy products from farms to retail outlets has to be established and strengthened to monitor trends in antimicrobial resistance among emerging food borne pathogens in Turkey. PMID:27433106

  5. Proficiency of clinical laboratories in and near Monterrey, Mexico, to detect vancomycin-resistant enterococci.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, L. C.; Garza, L. R.; Jarvis, W. R.

    1999-01-01

    Early detection of vancomycin-resistant enterococci is important for preventing its spread among hospitalized patients. We surveyed the ability of eight hospital laboratories in and near Monterrey, Mexico, to detect vancomycin resistance in Enterococcus spp. and found that although laboratories can reliably detect high-level vancomycin resistance, many have difficulty detecting low-level resistance. PMID:10081682

  6. Sources of enterococci in Idiazábal-type cheese.

    PubMed

    Ortigosa, M; Irigoyen, A; Urdin, M; García, S; Ibañez, F C; Torre, P

    2008-07-15

    Enterococci are a ubiquitous group and are natural constituents of the intestinal flora of nearly all animals and humans and can reach high levels in a variety of farmhouse cheeses. The purpose of this study was to determine the origin of the different enterococcal strains present in cheeses at different stages of ripening by typing the enterococci isolated from the raw milk, the cheeses, the cheesemaking environment, and from the faecal matter of the ewes and humans associated with cheese production. The potential presence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) at all stages of the process and in the cheeses was also considered. The study was carried out at two separate cheesemaking dairy plants, and samples of the ewes' faeces, the shepherds' and cheesemakers' stools, teat cups, vat, brine, holding tank milk, vat milk, and the cheeses after brining and after 1, 15, and 60 days of ripening were collected. Cheesemaking procedures at the two plants were similar, yet the enterococcal levels and species observed differed at all the sample collection points, though E. faecalis predominated in all the milk and cheese samples. The traceability study performed for the species E. faecalis present at all the sample collection points suggested that the cheesemaker and the cheesemaking equipment were the source of the enterococci in the cheeses, though other possible non-faecal sources remain to be determined. VanC1 and vanC2/C3 enterococcal strains were isolated from the ovine faeces, teat cup, brine, and vat samples at cheesemaking dairy plant A, while only two vanC2/C3 strains were isolated from ovine faeces samples at dairy plant B. No VRE strains were detected in any of the milk or cheese samples. PMID:18495280

  7. Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Miller, William R; Munita, Jose M; Arias, Cesar A

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) enterococci are important nosocomial pathogens and a growing clinical challenge. These organisms have developed resistance to virtually all antimicrobials currently used in clinical practice using a diverse number of genetic strategies. Due to this ability to recruit antibiotic resistance determinants, MDR enterococci display a wide repertoire of antibiotic resistance mechanisms including modification of drug targets, inactivation of therapeutic agents, overexpression of efflux pumps and a sophisticated cell envelope adaptive response that promotes survival in the human host and the nosocomial environment. MDR enterococci are well adapted to survive in the gastrointestinal tract and can become the dominant flora under antibiotic pressure, predisposing the severely ill and immunocompromised patient to invasive infections. A thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying antibiotic resistance in enterococci is the first step for devising strategies to control the spread of these organisms and potentially establish novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:25199988

  8. Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE):Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... not as familiar as staphylococcus (staph) or Escherichia coli ( E. coli ) bacteria, enterococci infections are among the most common ... capable of causing disease than staph or E. coli but still can complicate and prolong hospital stays. ...

  9. High level nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, J L

    1980-01-01

    The DOE Division of Waste Products through a lead office at Savannah River is developing a program to immobilize all US high-level nuclear waste for terminal disposal. DOE high-level wastes include those at the Hanford Plant, the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, and the Savannah River Plant. Commercial high-level wastes, for which DOE is also developing immobilization technology, include those at the Nuclear Fuel Services Plant and any future commercial fuels reprocessing plants. The first immobilization plant is to be the Defense Waste Processing Facility at Savannah River, scheduled for 1983 project submission to Congress and 1989 operation. Waste forms are still being selected for this plant. Borosilicate glass is currently the reference form, but alternate candidates include concretes, calcines, other glasses, ceramics, and matrix forms.

  10. LIGHT-INDUCED PROCESSES AFFECTING ENTEROCOCCI IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fecal indicator bacteria such as enterococci have been used to assess contamination of freshwater and marine environments by pathogenic microorganisms. Various past studies have shown that sunlight plays an important role in reducing concentrations of culturable enterococci and ...

  11. An optimized mouse thigh infection model for enterococci and its impact on antimicrobial pharmacodynamics.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Carlos A; Agudelo, Maria; Gonzalez, Javier M; Vesga, Omar; Zuluaga, Andres F

    2015-01-01

    Negligible in vivo growth of enterococci and high-level dispersion of data have led to inaccurate estimations of antibiotic pharmacodynamics (PD). Here we improved an in vivo model apt for PD studies by optimizing the in vitro culture conditions for enterococci. The PD of vancomycin (VAN), ampicillin-sulbactam (SAM), and piperacillin-tazobactam (TZP) against enterococci were determined in vivo, comparing the following different conditions of inoculum preparation: aerobiosis, aerobiosis plus mucin, and anaerobiosis plus mucin. Drug exposure was expressed as the ratio of the area under the concentration-time curve for the free, unbound fraction of the drug to the MIC (fAUC/MIC) (VAN) or the time in a 24-h period that the drug concentration for the free, unbound fraction exceeded the MIC under steady-state pharmacokinetic conditions (fT(>MIC)) (SAM and TZP) and linked to the change in log10 CFU/thigh. Only anaerobiosis plus mucin enhanced the in vivo growth, yielding significant PD parameters with all antibiotics. In conclusion, robust in vivo growth of enterococci was crucial for better determining the PD of tested antibacterial agents, and this was achieved by optimizing the procedure for preparing the inoculum. PMID:25348523

  12. An Optimized Mouse Thigh Infection Model for Enterococci and Its Impact on Antimicrobial Pharmacodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Carlos A.; Agudelo, Maria; Gonzalez, Javier M.; Vesga, Omar

    2014-01-01

    Negligible in vivo growth of enterococci and high-level dispersion of data have led to inaccurate estimations of antibiotic pharmacodynamics (PD). Here we improved an in vivo model apt for PD studies by optimizing the in vitro culture conditions for enterococci. The PD of vancomycin (VAN), ampicillin-sulbactam (SAM), and piperacillin-tazobactam (TZP) against enterococci were determined in vivo, comparing the following different conditions of inoculum preparation: aerobiosis, aerobiosis plus mucin, and anaerobiosis plus mucin. Drug exposure was expressed as the ratio of the area under the concentration-time curve for the free, unbound fraction of the drug to the MIC (fAUC/MIC) (VAN) or the time in a 24-h period that the drug concentration for the free, unbound fraction exceeded the MIC under steady-state pharmacokinetic conditions (fT>MIC) (SAM and TZP) and linked to the change in log10 CFU/thigh. Only anaerobiosis plus mucin enhanced the in vivo growth, yielding significant PD parameters with all antibiotics. In conclusion, robust in vivo growth of enterococci was crucial for better determining the PD of tested antibacterial agents, and this was achieved by optimizing the procedure for preparing the inoculum. PMID:25348523

  13. Abundance and characteristics of the recreational water quality indicator bacteria Escherichia coli and enterococci in gull faeces

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fogarty, L.R.; Haack, S.K.; Wolcott, M.J.; Whitman, R.L.

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the numbers and selected phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of the faecal indicator bacteria Escherichia coli and enterococci in gull faeces at representative Great Lakes swimming beaches in the United States. Methods and Results: E. coli and enterococci were enumerated in gull faeces by membrane filtration. E. coli genotypes (rep-PCR genomic profiles) and E. coli (Vitek?? GNI+) and enterococci (API?? rapid ID 32 Strep and resistance to streptomycin, gentamicin, vancomycin, tetracycline and ampicillin) phenotypes were determined for isolates obtained from gull faeces both early and late in the swimming season. Identical E. coli genotypes were obtained only from single gull faecal samples but most faecal samples yielded more than one genotype (median of eight genotypes for samples with 10 isolates). E. coli isolates from the same site that clustered at ???85% similarity were from the same sampling date and shared phenotypic characteristics, and at this similarity level there was population overlap between the two geographically isolated beach sites. Enterococcus API?? profiles varied with sampling date. Gull enterococci displayed wide variation in antibiotic resistance patterns, and high-level resistance to some antibiotics. Conclusions: Gull faeces could be a major contributor of E. coli (105-109 CFU g-1) and enterococci (104-108 CFU g-1) to Great Lakes recreational waters. E. coli and enterococci in gull faeces are highly variable with respect to their genotypic and phenotypic characteristics and may exhibit temporal or geographic trends in these features. Significance and Impact of the Study: The high degree of variation in genotypic or phenotypic characteristics of E. coli or enterococci populations within gull hosts will require extensive sampling for adequate characterization, and will influence methods that use these characteristics to determine faecal contamination sources for recreational waters.

  14. Genome Sequencing Reveals the Environmental Origin of Enterococci and Potential Biomarkers for Water Quality Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enterococci are common members of the gut microbiome and frequent causative agents of nosocomial infection. Because of their enteric lifestyle and ease of culturing, enterococci have been used worldwide as indicators of fecal pollution of waters. However, enterococci were recentl...

  15. OCCURRENCE OF INTRINSIC VANCOMYCIN RESISTANT ENTEROCOCCI IN ANIMAL FECES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A survey was conducted to determine the occurrence of vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) in animal and human fecal samples. Fecal samples from 14 animal species and humans were analyzed by quantitative culture for enterococci and VRE. Over 800 VRE isolates were characterize...

  16. Functional and safety aspects of enterococci in dairy foods.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Arun; Malik, R K; Chauhan, Prashant

    2008-09-01

    The genus Enterococcus like other LAB has also been featured in dairy industry for decades due to its specific biochemical traits such as lipolysis, proteolysis, and citrate breakdown, hence contributing typical taste and flavor to the dairy foods. Furthermore, the production of bacteriocins by enterococci (enterocins) is well documented. These technological applications have led to propose enterococci as adjunct starters or protective cultures in fermented foods. Moreover, enterococci are nowadays promoted as probiotics, which are claimed for the maintenance of normal intestinal microflora, stimulation of the immune system and improvement of nutritional value of foods. At the same time, enterococci present an emerging pool of opportunistic pathogens for humans as they cause disease, possess agents for antibiotic resistance, and are frequently armed with potential virulence factors. Because of this "dualistic" nature, the use of enterococci remains a debatable issue. However, based on a long history of safe association of particular enterococci with some traditional food fermentations, the use of such strains appears to bear no particular risk for human health. Abundance of knowledge as well as progress in molecular techniques has, however, enabled exact characterization and safety assessment of strains. Therefore, a balanced evaluation of both, beneficial and undesirable nature of enterococci is required. A clear understanding of their status may, therefore, allow their safe use as a starter, or a probiotic strain. The present review describes the broader insight of the benefits and risks of enterococci in dairy foods and their safety assessment. PMID:23100728

  17. The role and application of enterococci in food and health.

    PubMed

    Foulquié Moreno, M R; Sarantinopoulos, P; Tsakalidou, E; De Vuyst, L

    2006-01-15

    The genus Enterococcus is the most controversial group of lactic acid bacteria. Studies on the microbiota of many traditional cheeses in the Mediterranean countries have indicated that enterococci play an important role in the ripening of these cheeses, probably through proteolysis, lipolysis, and citrate breakdown, hence contributing to their typical taste and flavour. Enterococci are also present in other fermented foods, such as sausages and olives. However, their role in these products has not been fully elucidated. Furthermore, the production of bacteriocins by enterococci is well documented. Moreover, enterococci are nowadays used as probiotics. At the same time, however, enterococci have been associated with a number of human infections. Several virulence factors have been described and the number of vancomycin-resistant enterococci is increasing. The controversial nature of enterococci has prompted an enormous increase in scientific papers and reviews in recent years, where researchers have been divided into two groups, namely pro and contra enterococci. To the authors' impression, the negative traits have been focused on very extensively. The aim of the present review is to give a balanced overview of both beneficial and virulence features of this divisive group of microorganisms, because it is only acquaintance with both sides that may allow their safe exploitation as starter cultures or co-cultures. PMID:16216368

  18. Heat and chemical resistance of enterococci.

    PubMed

    Bradley, C R; Fraise, A P

    1996-11-01

    Recent reports have highlighted the tolerance of vancomycin-resistant strains of enterococci to heat. This study examined the tolerance of vancomycin-resistant and sensitive strains of enterococci and an NCTC type strain to 65, 71 and 80 degrees C, and also to low concentrations of a chlorine-releasing agent, alcohol and glutaraldehyde. Variation in the tolerance to chemicals was observed but there was no correlation between vancomycin resistance and tolerance to chemical disinfectants. The NCTC type strain was killed within the time/temperature parameters set by the Department of Health for thermal washer/disinfectors, i.e. 65 degrees C for 10 min, 71 degrees C for 3 min and 80 degrees C for 1 min. However, the clinical strains showed varying resistance to heat, irrespective of their vancomycin susceptibility. One strain survived 80 degrees C for 3 min. These results showed that clinical isolates can be resistant to commonly used disinfection processes, although the practical significance of these results is debatable. PMID:8923273

  19. The mysterious appearance of enterococci in filled root canals.

    PubMed

    Zehnder, M; Guggenheim, B

    2009-04-01

    In this narrative review, the potential reasons for the high occurrence of enterococci in filled root canals are explored. The pulpless root canal appears to be a habitat for these bacteria, particularly for Enterococcus faecalis. However, re-surveying the literature in caries research, it can be concluded that, contrary to earlier belief, enterococci are rare if ever found at the advancing front of dentinal lesions. The same is the case for true primary endodontic infections, but some uncertainty remains, because the coronal seal and the history of teeth harbouring enterococci have rarely been accurately investigated. Furthermore, from longitudinal studies with a known infection at the initiation of treatment, which was carried out under controlled asepsis, it is questionable whether enterococci are as difficult to eliminate from the canal system as is commonly held. A more likely explanation for the high occurrence of enterococci in filled root canals is that they enter after treatment, but from which source? The intriguing finding in this context is that enterococci do not appear to be colonizers of the oral cavity. They are merely transient oral bacteria, unless there is a predilection site such as the unsealed necrotic or filled root canal. The origin of this infection is most likely food. Using the example of enterococci in filled root canals, this paper highlights the possible importance of transient microorganisms in the oral cavity and changes in a microenvironment that can create favourable conditions for infection. PMID:19220511

  20. High-level vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecium related to humans and pigs found in dust from pig breeding facilities.

    PubMed

    Braga, Teresa M; Pomba, Constança; Lopes, M Fátima Silva

    2013-01-25

    Environmental dust from animal breeding facilities was never screened for the presence of enterococci, nor of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), despite the possibility of being a vehicle of transmission of strains and antibiotic resistance genes between food-producing animals and man. Bio-security measures in pig facilities include disinfection with biocides to avoid the dissemination of opportunistic pathogenic bacteria, namely enterococci and in particular VRE. We thus undertook collection of enterococci and VRE in a representative number of breeding pig facilities in Portugal (n=171) and analyzed their susceptibility to benzalkonium chloride (BC) and chlorhexidine (CHX). A prevalence of 15% of VRE was found, with 6% high-level resistance found, and MIC values for CHX and BC were similar to those commonly found among enterococcal isolates from related environments, 8 μg/ml and 4 μg/ml, respectively. Among the isolated high-level vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecium carrying the vanA genotype, we found multilocus sequence types closely related to pig and human isolates from European countries and Brazil. These results strongly advise constant surveillance of this environment and its inclusion in future epidemiologic studies on VRE. PMID:22909989

  1. High-level-waste immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, J L

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of risks, environmental effects, process feasibility, and costs for disposal of immobilized high-level wastes in geologic repositories indicates that the disposal system safety has a low sensitivity to the choice of the waste disposal form.

  2. COMPARATIVE RESISTANCE OF ESCHERICHIA COLI AND ENTEROCOCCI TO CHLORINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pure cultures of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecium were inactivated by free chlorine and monochloramine. ndigenous E. coli and enterococci in wastewater effluents were also inactivated. elective bacteriological media specifically designed for the enumeration of the target...

  3. Development of a PCR Assay for Rapid Detection of Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Danbing; Picard, François J.; Martineau, Francis; Ménard, Christian; Roy, Paul H.; Ouellette, Marc; Bergeron, Michel G.

    1999-01-01

    Enterococci are becoming major nosocomial pathogens, and increasing resistance to vancomycin has been well documented. Conventional identification methods, which are based on culturing, require 2 to 3 days to provide results. PCR has provided a means for the culture-independent detection of enterococci in a variety of clinical specimens and is capable of yielding results in just a few hours. However, all PCR-based assays developed so far are species specific only for clinically important enterococci. We have developed a PCR-based assay which allows the detection of enterococci at the genus level by targeting the tuf gene, which encodes elongation factor EF-Tu. Initially, we compared the nucleotide sequences of the tuf gene from several bacterial species (available in public databases) and designed degenerate PCR primers derived from conserved regions. These primers were used to amplify a target region of 803 bp from four enterococcal species (Enterococcus avium, E. faecalis, E. faecium, and E. gallinarum). Subsequently, the complete nucleotide sequences of these amplicons were determined. The analysis of a multiple alignment of these sequences revealed regions conserved among enterococci but distinct from those of other bacteria. PCR primers complementary to these regions allowed amplification of genomic DNAs from 14 of 15 species of enterococci tested (E. solitarius DNA could not be amplified). There was no amplification with a majority of 79 nonenterococcal bacterial species, except for 2 Abiotrophia species and several Listeria species. Furthermore, this assay efficiently amplified all 159 clinical isolates of enterococci tested (61 E. faecium, 77 E. faecalis, 9 E. gallinarum, and 12 E. casseliflavus isolates). Interestingly, the preliminary sequence comparison of the amplicons for four enterococcal species demonstrated that there were some sequence variations which may be used to generate species-specific internal probes. In conclusion, this rapid PCR

  4. High-Level Radioactive Waste.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Howard C.

    1995-01-01

    Presents a method to calculate the amount of high-level radioactive waste by taking into consideration the following factors: the fission process that yields the waste, identification of the waste, the energy required to run a 1-GWe plant for one year, and the uranium mass required to produce that energy. Briefly discusses waste disposal and…

  5. Emergence and nosocomial transmission of ampicillin-resistant enterococci.

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, J M; Opal, S M; Potter-Bynoe, G; LaForge, R G; Zervos, M J; Furtado, G; Victor, G; Medeiros, A A

    1992-01-01

    Between 1986 and 1988, the incidence of ampicillin-resistant enterococci increased sevenfold at a university-affiliated hospital. Forty-three patients acquired nosocomial infections with ampicillin-resistant enterococci, most of which were also resistant to mezlocillin, piperacillin, and imipenem. An analysis of plasmid and chromosomal DNAs of isolates revealed that the increase was due to an epidemic of 19 nosocomial infections that yielded closely related strains of Enterococcus faecium and to a significant increase in the incidence of nonepidemic, largely unrelated strains of ampicillin-resistant enterococci. The nonepidemic strains were identified as E. faecium, E. raffinosus, E. durans, and E. gallinarum. A logistic regression analysis revealed that patients with nonepidemic resistant strains were 16 times more likely than controls to have received preceding therapy with imipenem. In our institution, the increase in the incidence of ampicillin-resistant enterococci appears to be due to the selection of various strains of resistant enterococci by the use of imipenem and to the nosocomial transmission of E. faecium and E. raffinosus. Images PMID:1510390

  6. Attachment of Escherichia coli and enterococci to particles in runoff.

    PubMed

    Soupir, Michelle L; Mostaghimi, Saied; Dillaha, Theo

    2010-01-01

    Association of Escherichia coli and enterococci with particulates present in runoff from erodible soils has important implications for modeling the fate and transport of bacteria from agricultural sources and in the selection of management practices to reduce bacterial movement to surface waters. Three soils with different textures were collected from the Ap horizon (silty loam, silty clay loam, and loamy fine sand), placed in portable box plots, treated with standard cowpats, and placed under a rainfall simulator. Rainfall was applied to the plots until saturation-excess flow occurred for 30 min, and samples were collected 10, 20, and 30 min after initiation of the runoff event. The attachment of E. coli and enterococci to particles present in runoff was determined by a screen filtration and centrifugation procedure. Percentage of E. coli and enterococci attached to particulates in runoff ranged from 28 to 49%, with few statistically significant differences in attachment among the three soils. Similar partitioning release patterns were observed between E. coli and enterococci from the silty loam (r = 0.57) and silty clay loam soils (r = 0.60). At least 60% of all attached E. coli and enterococci were associated particles within an 8- to 62-microm particle size category. The results indicate that the majority of fecal bacteria attach to and are transported with manure colloids in sediment-laden flow regardless of the soil texture. PMID:20400597

  7. The CMS high level trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gori, Valentina

    2014-05-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a 2-level trigger system: the Level 1 Trigger, implemented on custom-designed electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. A software trigger system requires a tradeoff between the complexity of the algorithms running on the available computing power, the sustainable output rate, and the selection efficiency. Here we will present the performance of the main triggers used during the 2012 data taking, ranging from simpler single-object selections to more complex algorithms combining different objects, and applying analysis-level reconstruction and selection. We will discuss the optimisation of the triggers and the specific techniques to cope with the increasing LHC pile-up, reducing its impact on the physics performance.

  8. The CMS High Level Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trocino, Daniele

    2014-06-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a two-level trigger system: the Level-1 Trigger, implemented in custom-designed electronics, and the High-Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. A software trigger system requires a tradeoff between the complexity of the algorithms running with the available computing power, the sustainable output rate, and the selection efficiency. We present the performance of the main triggers used during the 2012 data taking, ranging from simple single-object selections to more complex algorithms combining different objects, and applying analysis-level reconstruction and selection. We discuss the optimisation of the trigger and the specific techniques to cope with the increasing LHC pile-up, reducing its impact on the physics performance.

  9. Membrane Filter Technique for Enumeration of Enterococci in Marine Waters

    PubMed Central

    Levin, M. A.; Fischer, J. R.; Cabelli, V. J.

    1975-01-01

    A membrane filter procedure is described for the enumeration of enterococci in marine waters. The procedure utilizes a highly selective and somewhat differential primary isolation medium followed by an in situ substrate test for identifying colonies of those organisms capable of hydrolyzing esculin. The procedure (mE) was evaluated with known streptococci strains and field samples with regard to its accuracy, sensitivity, selectivity, specificity, precision, and comparability to existing methods. Essentially quantitative recovery was obtained with seawater-stressed cells of Streptococcus faecalis and S. faccium. Neither S. bovis, S. equinus, S. mitis, nor S. salivarius grew on the medium. The selectivity of the medium was such that a 10,000-fold reduction in background organisms was obtained relative to a medium which contained no inhibitors and was incubated at 35 C. About 90% of those typical colonies designated as enterococci confirmed as such and about 12% of the colonies not so designated were, in fact, identified as enterococci. Plate to plate variability across samples approximated that expected by chance alone. Verified recoveries of enterococci from natural samples by the mE procedure, on the average, exceeded those by the KF method by one order of magnitude. PMID:807165

  10. OCCURRENCE OF VANCOMYCIN RESISTANT ENTEROCOCCI IN ANIMAL FECES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A survey was conducted to determine the occurrence of vancomycin resistant Enterococci (VRE) in animal and human fecal samples. A selective agar mEI, and mEI supplemented with 4 micrograms/ml vancomycin was used in a membrane filtration procedure to determine quantitative levels ...

  11. DETECTION OF FECAL ENTEROCOCCI USING A REAL TIME PCR METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    In spite of their importance in public health, the detection of fecal enterococci is performed via culturing methods that are time consuming and that are subject to inaccuracies that relate to their culturable status. In order to address these problems, a real time PCR (TaqMan) ...

  12. Prevalence of enterococci from dogs and cats in the US.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The contribution of dogs and cats as reservoirs of antimicrobial resistant enterococci remains largely undefined. This is increasingly important considering the possibility of transfer of bacteria from companion animals to the human host. In this study, dogs and cats from veterinary clinics were s...

  13. Molecular characterization of antimicrobial resistance in enterococci and Escherichia coli isolates from European wild rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

    PubMed

    Silva, Nuno; Igrejas, Gilberto; Figueiredo, Nicholas; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Radhouani, Hajer; Rodrigues, Jorge; Poeta, Patrícia

    2010-09-15

    A total of 44 Escherichia coli and 64 enterococci recovered from 77 intestinal samples of wild European rabbits in Portugal were analyzed for resistance to antimicrobial agents. Resistance in E. coli isolates was observed for ampicillin, tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, streptomycin, gentamicin, tobramycin, nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin and chloramphenicol. None of the E. coli isolates produced extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs). The bla(TEM), aadA, aac(3)-II, tet(A) and/or tet(B), and the catA genes were demonstrated in all ampicillin, streptomycin, gentamicin, tetracycline, and chloramphenicol-resistant isolates respectively, and the sul1 and/or sul2 and/or sul3 genes in 4 of 5 sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim resistant isolates. Of the enterococcal isolates, Enterococcus faecalis was the most prevalent detected species (39 isolates), followed by E. faecium (21 isolates) and E. hirae (4 isolates). More than one-fourth (29.7%) of the isolates were resistant to tetracycline; 20.3% were resistant to erythromycin, 14.1% were resistant to ciprofloxacin and 10.9% were resistant to high-level-kanamycin. Lower level of resistance (<10%) was detected for ampicillin, quinupristin/dalfopristin and high-level-gentamicin, -streptomycin. No vancomycin-resistance was detected in the enterococci isolates. Resistance genes detected included aac(6')-aph(2''), ant(6)-Ia, tet(M) and/or tet(L) in all gentamicin, streptomycin and tetracycline-resistant isolates respectively. The aph(3')-IIIa gene was detected in 6 of 7 kanamycin-resistant isolates, the erm(B) gene in 11 of 13 erythromycin-resistant isolates and the vat(D) gene in the quinupristin/dalfopristin-resistant E. faecium isolate. This survey showed that faecal bacteria such as E. coli and enterococci of wild rabbits could be a reservoir of antimicrobial resistance genes. PMID:20624632

  14. Modeling system for predicting enterococci levels at Holly Beach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zaihong; Deng, Zhiqiang; Rusch, Kelly A; Walker, Nan D

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a new modeling system for nowcasting and forecasting enterococci levels in coastal recreation waters at any time during the day. The modeling system consists of (1) an artificial neural network (ANN) model for predicting the enterococci level at sunrise time, (2) a clear-sky solar radiation and turbidity correction to the ANN model, (3) remote sensing algorithms for turbidity, and (4) nowcasting/forecasting data. The first three components are also unique features of the new modeling system. While the component (1) is useful to beach monitoring programs requiring enterococci levels in early morning, the component (2) in combination with the component (1) makes it possible to predict the bacterial level in beach waters at any time during the day if the data from the components (3) and (4) are available. Therefore, predictions from the component (2) are of primary interest to beachgoers. The modeling system was developed using three years of swimming season data and validated using additional four years of independent data. Testing results showed that (1) the sunrise-time model correctly reproduced 82.63% of the advisories issued in seven years with a false positive rate of 2.65% and a false negative rate of 14.72%, and (2) the new modeling system was capable of predicting the temporal variability in enterococci levels in beach waters, ranging from hourly changes to daily cycles. The results demonstrate the efficacy of the new modeling system in predicting enterococci levels in coastal beach waters. Applications of the modeling system will improve the management of recreational beaches and protection of public health. PMID:26186681

  15. Optimizing High Level Waste Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Dirk Gombert

    2005-09-01

    If society is ever to reap the potential benefits of nuclear energy, technologists must close the fuel-cycle completely. A closed cycle equates to a continued supply of fuel and safe reactors, but also reliable and comprehensive closure of waste issues. High level waste (HLW) disposal in borosilicate glass (BSG) is based on 1970s era evaluations. This host matrix is very adaptable to sequestering a wide variety of radionuclides found in raffinates from spent fuel reprocessing. However, it is now known that the current system is far from optimal for disposal of the diverse HLW streams, and proven alternatives are available to reduce costs by billions of dollars. The basis for HLW disposal should be reassessed to consider extensive waste form and process technology research and development efforts, which have been conducted by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), international agencies and the private sector. Matching the waste form to the waste chemistry and using currently available technology could increase the waste content in waste forms to 50% or more and double processing rates. Optimization of the HLW disposal system would accelerate HLW disposition and increase repository capacity. This does not necessarily require developing new waste forms, the emphasis should be on qualifying existing matrices to demonstrate protection equal to or better than the baseline glass performance. Also, this proposed effort does not necessarily require developing new technology concepts. The emphasis is on demonstrating existing technology that is clearly better (reliability, productivity, cost) than current technology, and justifying its use in future facilities or retrofitted facilities. Higher waste processing and disposal efficiency can be realized by performing the engineering analyses and trade-studies necessary to select the most efficient methods for processing the full spectrum of wastes across the nuclear complex. This paper will describe technologies being

  16. Antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes in enterococci from wild game meat in Spain.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Ramos, Emilia; Cordero, Jorge; Molina-González, Diana; Poeta, Patrícia; Igrejas, Gilberto; Alonso-Calleja, Carlos; Capita, Rosa

    2016-02-01

    A total of 55 enterococci (45 Enterococcus faecium, 7 Enterococcus faecalis, and three Enterococcus durans) isolated from the meat of wild game animals (roe deer, boar, rabbit, pheasant, and pigeon) in North-Western Spain were tested for susceptibility to 14 antimicrobials by the disc diffusion method. All strains showed a multi-resistant phenotype (resistance to between three and 10 antimicrobials). The strains exhibited high percentages of resistance to erythromycin (89.1%), tetracycline (67.3%), ciprofloxacin (92.7%), nitrofurantoin (67.3%), and quinupristin-dalfopristin (81.8%). The lowest values (9.1%) were observed for high-level resistance to gentamicin, kanamycin, and streptomycin. The average number of resistances per strain was 5.8 for E. faecium isolates, 7.9 for E. faecalis, and 5.7 for E. durans. Genes encoding antimicrobial resistance and virulence were studied by polymerase chain reaction. A total of 15 (57.7%) of the 26 vancomycin-resistant isolates harboured the vanA gene. Other resistance genes detected included vanB, erm(B) and/or erm(C), tet(L) and/or tet(M), acc(6')-aph(2″), and aph(3')-IIIa in strains resistant to vancomycin, erythromycin, tetracycline, gentamicin, and kanamycin, respectively. Specific genes of the Tn5397 transposon were detected in 54.8% of the tet(M)-positive enterococci. Nine virulence factors (gelE, agg, ace, cpd, frs, esp, hyl, efaAfs and efaAfm) were studied. All virulence genes, with the exception of the frs gene, were found to be present in the enterococcal isolates. At least one virulence gene was detected in 20.0% of E. faecium, 71.4% of E. faecalis and 33.3% of E. durans isolates, with ace and cpd being the most frequently detected genes (6 isolates each). This suggests that wild game meat might play a role in the spreading through the food chain of enterococci with antimicrobial resistance and virulence determinants to humans. PMID:26678143

  17. Environmental contamination by vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) in Swedish broiler production

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Vancomycin resistant enterococci are a frequent cause of nosocomial infections and their presence among farm animals is unwanted. Using media supplemented with vancomycin an increase in the proportion of samples from Swedish broilers positive for vancomycin resistant enterococci has been detected. The situation at farm level is largely unknown. The aims of this study were to obtain baseline knowledge about environmental contamination with vancomycin resistant enterococci in Swedish broiler production and the association between environmental contamination and colonisation of birds. Methods Environmental samples were taken before, during and after a batch of broilers at three farms. Samples were cultured both qualitatively and semi-quantitatively for vancomycin resistant enterococci. In addition, caecal content from birds in the batch following at each farm was cultured qualitatively for vancomycin resistant enterococci. Results The number of samples positive for vancomycin resistant enterococci varied among the farms. Also the amount of vancomycin resistant enterococci in the positive samples and the proportion of caecal samples containing vancomycin resistant enterococci varied among the farms. Still, the temporal changes in environmental contamination followed a similar pattern in all farms. Conclusion Vancomycin resistant enterococci persist in the compartments even after cleaning and the temporal changes in environmental contamination were similar among farms. There were however differences among farms regarding both degree of contamination and proportion of birds colonized with vancomycin resistant enterococci. The proportion of colonized birds and the amount of vancomycin resistant enterococci in the compartments seems to be associated. If the factor(s) causing the differences among farms could be identified, it might be possible to reduce both the risk for colonisation by vancomycin resistant enterococci of the subsequent flock and the risk for

  18. Occurrence of Enterococci: Bud, Blossom, and Soil Studies1

    PubMed Central

    Mundt, J. Orvin

    1961-01-01

    The occurrence of enterococci (group D streptococci) on buds and flowers of plants and in soils has been studied. They were recovered from 27.5% of the flowers of seven species of plants, and from 6.8% of the buds of the same plants. They were recovered from 34% of the flowers of nonagricultural plants, from 32.2% of the flowers of ten species of agricultural dicotyledonous plants, and from 10.4% of the flowers of five species of grasses and cereals. The enterococci were invariably present or invariably absent from all samples taken from very few species. They occurred in small numbers on enclosed tassels and silks of corn of 22 of 60 samples, and in greater numbers on 90% or more of these after their floral parts had emerged. Interposition of a mechanical barrier reduced the incidence of recovery from flowers. The occurrence in soil, generally at a low level of population, may be correlated with occurrence on the plant growing on the soil or with nearby enterococcal-bearing plants. It is concluded that enterococci may be regarded as temporary residents on plants, capable of limited reproduction, and that they are disseminated among plants by the action of insects and wind, and spread to the ground by these agencies, gravity, and rain. PMID:16349612

  19. Vancomycin resistant enterococci in farm animals – occurrence and importance

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Oskar

    2012-01-01

    The view on enterococci has over the years shifted from harmless commensals to opportunistic but important pathogens mainly causing nosocomial infections. One important part of this development is the emergence of vancomycin resistance enterococci (VRE). The term VRE includes several combinations of bacterial species and resistance genes of which the most clinically important is Enterococcus faecium with vanA type vancomycin resistance. This variant is also the most common VRE among farm animals. The reason for VRE being present among farm animals is selection by extensive use of the vancomycin analog avoparcin for growth promotion. Once the use of avoparcin was discontinued, the prevalence of VRE among farm animals decreased. However, VRE are still present among farm animals and by spread via food products they could potentially have a negative impact on public health. This review is based on the PhD thesis Vancomycin Resistant Enterococci in Swedish Broilers – Emergence, Epidemiology and Elimination and makes a short summary of VRE in humans and food producing animals. The specific situation regarding VRE in Swedish broiler production is also mentioned. PMID:22957131

  20. Vancomycin resistant enterococci in farm animals - occurrence and importance.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Oskar

    2012-01-01

    The view on enterococci has over the years shifted from harmless commensals to opportunistic but important pathogens mainly causing nosocomial infections. One important part of this development is the emergence of vancomycin resistance enterococci (VRE). The term VRE includes several combinations of bacterial species and resistance genes of which the most clinically important is Enterococcus faecium with vanA type vancomycin resistance. This variant is also the most common VRE among farm animals. The reason for VRE being present among farm animals is selection by extensive use of the vancomycin analog avoparcin for growth promotion. Once the use of avoparcin was discontinued, the prevalence of VRE among farm animals decreased. However, VRE are still present among farm animals and by spread via food products they could potentially have a negative impact on public health. This review is based on the PhD thesis Vancomycin Resistant Enterococci in Swedish Broilers - Emergence, Epidemiology and Elimination and makes a short summary of VRE in humans and food producing animals. The specific situation regarding VRE in Swedish broiler production is also mentioned. PMID:22957131

  1. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance: Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE) Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understanding Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Examples of Antimicrobial Resistance Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE) Overview Transmission Diagnosis ...

  2. Antimicrobial resistance and the mechanisms implicated in faecal enterococci from healthy humans, poultry and pets in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Poeta, Patrícia; Costa, Daniela; Rodrigues, Jorge; Torres, Carmen

    2006-02-01

    Antimicrobial resistance and the mechanisms implicated were studied in 440 enterococci (227 Enterococcus faecium, 177 Enterococcus faecalis, 32 Enterococcus hirae and 4 Enterococcus durans) recovered from 220 faecal samples of healthy humans, poultry and pets in Portugal. Higher levels of resistance were detected for ampicillin, tetracycline, erythromycin and chloramphenicol in poultry isolates (10.5%, 97%, 87.5% and 16%, respectively) compared with human isolates (0%, 26%, 31.5% and 5%, respectively); intermediate levels of resistance for these antibiotics were found in pet isolates. Thirty-three per cent of the E. faecium isolates of poultry origin showed quinupristin/dalfopristin resistance. High-level resistance to gentamicin or streptomycin was detected in 1-7% of isolates in our series of enterococci. The aac(6')-aph(2''), aph(3')-IIIa, erm(B) and tet(M) genes were demonstrated in most of the gentamicin-, kanamycin-, erythromycin- and tetracycline-resistant isolates, respectively. The vat(E) gene was found in 39% of the quinupristin/dalfopristin-resistant E. faecium isolates of poultry origin. PMID:16388931

  3. Mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance and genetic relatedness among enterococci isolated from dogs and cats in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: In this study, mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance and genetic relatedness among resistant enterococci from dogs and cats in the United States were determined. Methods and Results: Enterococci resistant to chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, gentamicin, kanamycin, streptomycin,...

  4. Genotyping of Vancomycin Resistant Enterococci in Arak Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Hoseini Zadeh, Adeleh; Shojapour, Mana; Nazari, Raziyeh; Akbari, Majid; Sofian, Masumeh; Abtahi, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Enterococcal species have emerged as important pathogens in Iran as well as throughout the world. With the increased use of vancomycin, Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE) has become an important nosocomial pathogen. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to determine the incidence and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of VRE and also to determine the most important genes that cause resistance to vancomycin in clinical samples in Arak, Iran. Materials and Methods: In total, 200 enterococci samples were collected from clinical specimens of Arak hospitals. Enterococcal species were identified using standard biochemical tests. Antibiotic susceptibility was tested by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) disk diffusion. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MICs) was determined by broth micro dilution. All of the VRE isolates were examined by PCR to detect the presence of VRE genes. Results: Disk diffusion agar showed that 96 strains (48%) were resistant to gentamicin, 89 (44.5%) to ciprofloxacin, 127 (63.5%) to erythromycin, 142 (71%) to tetracycline, 11 (5.5%) to teicoplanin, 32 (16%) to vancomycin, none to linezolid and 96 (48%) to co-trimoxazole. The MICs of the resistant isolates were as follows; 88 strains had MIC ≥ 32 μg/mL to vancomycin and 59 strains had MIC ≥ 32 μg/mL to teicoplanin. Molecular studies revealed that 59.09% of VRE contained VanA genes and 7.95% of VRE contained the VanB genes. None of the strains had vanC1 and vanC2/3 gene. Conclusions: According to the results of this study, rates of vancomycin-resistance in enterococci, in Iran like other parts of the world, is increasing. Therefore accurate methods are required for identifying strains that possess resistance genes because many cases of hospital infections are caused by these strains. PMID:26034536

  5. A RAPID, SPECIFIC MEMBRANE FILTRATION PROCEDURE FOR ENUMERATION OF ENTEROCOCCI IN RECREATIONAL WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A two-step membrane filter (MP) method with mE medium, upon which the membrane must be incubated for 48 h and then transferred to a substrate medium to differentiate enterococci, is recommended by the U.S.Environmental Protection Agency to measure enterococci in fresh and marine ...

  6. DETECTION OF INTRINSIC VANCOMYCIN RESISTANT ENTEROCOCCI IN ANIMAL AND HUMAN FECES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A survey was conducted to determine the occurrence of vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) in animal and human fecal samples. Fecal samples from 14 animal species and humans were analyzed by quantitative culture for enterococci and VRE. Over 800 VRE isolates were characterize...

  7. FINGERPRINTING OF FECAL ENTEROCOCCI BY MATRIX ASSISTED LASER DESORPTION IONIZATION MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fecal enterococci group has been suggested as an indicator of fecal contamination in freshwater and marine water systems and as a potential target for bacterial source tracking of fecal pollution. While many studies have described the diversity of enterococci in environmenta...

  8. Prevalence, species distribution and antimicrobial resistance of enterococci isolated from U.S. dairy cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: To estimate prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of enterococci in feces collected in 2007 from U.S. dairy cattle. Methods and Results: A total of 718 fecal samples from 122 dairy cattle operations from 17 U.S. states were collected and cultured for the presence of enterococci. One ...

  9. Pathogenicity of enterococci in a rat model of fecal peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Matlow, A G; Bohnen, J M; Nohr, C; Christou, N; Meakins, J

    1989-07-01

    The pathogenicity of enterococci in intraabdominal sepsis has not been clarified. Therefore, fecal-type peritonitis was induced in rats by intraperitoneal injection of barium sulfate along with a bacterial inoculum consisting of Escherichia coli, Bacteroides fragilis, and Clostridium perfringens with or without Streptococcus faecalis. Mortality at 19 d and characteristics of intraabdominal abscesses in survivors at 19 d were analyzed. The presence of S. faecalis in the original inoculum was significantly associated with death or large (greater than 20 mm) abscess formation when these two end points were examined together. S. faecalis may synergize with other bacteria in intraabdominal sepsis to augment morbidity and possibly mortality. PMID:2543707

  10. Linking non-culturable (qPCR) and culturable enterococci densities with hydrometeorological conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Whitman, Richard L.; Shively, Dawn A.; Nevers, Meredith B.

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) measurement of enterococci has been proposed as a rapid technique for assessment of beach water quality, but the response of qPCR results to environmental conditions has not been fully explored. Culture-based E. coli and enterococci have been used in empirical predictive models to characterize their responses to environmental conditions and to increase monitoring frequency and efficiency. This approach has been attempted with qPCR results only in few studies. During the summer of 2006, water samples were collected from two southern Lake Michigan beaches and the nearby river outfall (Burns Ditch) and were analyzed for enterococci by culture-based and non-culture-based (i.e., qPCR) methods, as well as culture-based E. coli. Culturable enterococci densities (log CFU/100 ml) for the beaches were significantly correlated with enterococci qPCR cell equivalents (CE) (R = 0.650, P N = 32). Enterococci CE and CFU densities were highest in Burns Ditch relative to the beach sites; however, only CFUs were significantly higher (P R = 0.565, P N = 32). Culturable E. coli and enterococci densities were significantly correlated (R = 0.682, P N = 32). Regression analyses suggested that enterococci CFU could be predicted by lake turbidity, Burns Ditch discharge, and wind direction (adjusted R2 = 0.608); enterococci CE was best predicted by Burns Ditch discharge and log-transformed lake turbidity × wave height (adjusted R2 = 0.40). In summary, our results show that analytically, the qPCR method compares well to the non-culture-based method for measuring enterococci densities in beach water and that both these approaches can be predicted by hydrometeorological conditions. Selected predictors and model results highlight the differences between the environmental responses of the two method endpoints and the potentially high variance in qPCR results

  11. Contribution of Sand-Associated Enterococci to Dry Weather Water Quality

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Culturable enterococci and a suite of environmental variables were collected during a predominantly dry summer at a beach impacted by nonpoint source pollution. These data were used to evaluate sands as a source of enterococci to nearshore waters, and to assess the relationship between environmental factors and dry-weather enterococci abundance. Best-fit multiple linear regressions used environmental variables to explain more than half of the observed variation in enterococci in water and dry sands. Notably, during dry weather the abundance of enterococci in dry sands at the mean high-tide line was significantly positively related to sand moisture content (ranging from <1–4%), and the daily mean ENT in water could be predicted by a linear regression with turbidity alone. Temperature was also positively correlated with ENT abundance in this study, which may indicate an important role of seasonal warming in temperate regions. Inundation by spring tides was the primary rewetting mechanism that sustained culturable enterococci populations in high-tide sands. Tidal forcing modulated the abundance of enterococci in the water, as both turbidity and enterococci were elevated during ebb and flood tides. The probability of samples violating the single-sample maximum was significantly greater when collected during periods with increased tidal range: spring ebb and flood tides. Tidal forcing also affected groundwater mixing zones, mobilizing enterococci from sand to water. These data show that routine monitoring programs using discrete enterococci measurements may be biased by tides and other environmental factors, providing a flawed basis for beach closure decisions. PMID:25479559

  12. Isolation and Characterization of Glycopeptide-Resistant Enterococci from Hospitalized Patients over a 30-Month Period

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, R. R. S.; McGregor, K. F.; Brown, A. R.; Amyes, S. G. B.; Young, H.-K.

    2000-01-01

    In February 1996, a Hospital Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee-style screening program was commenced to isolate and subsequently characterize glycopeptide-resistant enterococci (GRE) from patients at a hospital trust in Glasgow, Scotland. Over the next 30 months, GRE were isolated from 154 patients. GRE were isolated from patients in traditionally high-risk areas such as the renal unit and intensive care unit and also in areas considered to be lower risk, including medical wards and associated long-stay geriatric hospitals. The majority (90%) of isolates were Enterococcus faecium vanB. The remaining isolates consisted of seven E. faecalis (vanA), three E. gallinarum (vanC), and a further six E. faecium (five vanA, one both vanA and vanB) isolates. Analysis of SmaI-digested DNA by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed that 34 of 40 (85%) VanB E. faecium isolates were identical or closely related, while 11 of 13 (85%) VanA GRE were distinct. High-level aminoglycoside resistance was seen in less than 8% of isolates. VanB E. faecium isolates were almost uniformly resistant to ampicillin and tetracycline. In this study, GRE have been isolated over a prolonged period from a broad range of patients. Glycopeptide resistance within the study hospital trust appeared to be mainly due to the clonal dissemination of a single strain of E. faecium VanB. PMID:10834962

  13. Enterococci isolated from farm ostriches and their relation to enterocins.

    PubMed

    Lauková, Andrea; Kandričáková, Anna; Ščerbová, Jana; Strompfová, Viola

    2016-07-01

    The present study focuses on the detection of enterococci in ostrich faeces. Forty-six bacterial colonies from 140 ostriches were identified at the species level using the MALDI-TOF MS identification system. According to the score value evaluation, they were allotted to the species Enterococcus hirae, Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus mundtii confirmed also by phenotypic testing. Dominated species E. hirae (34 strains) were submitted to more detailed testing. Those strains E. hirae produced either no or only slight amount of the enzymes related to disorders (N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase, β-glucuronidase, α-chymotrypsin, trypsin). Most of the strains were not hemolytic. They did not harbour the hiracin-producing gene. Five E. hirae strains harboured virulence factor gene gelE; however, they were phenotypically gelatinase negative. They also harboured other virulence factor genes such as esp, efaAfm and ccf. E. hirae strains were mostly sensitive to antibiotics and those resistant at least to one antibiotic were sensitive to enterocins (200-25,600 AU/mL). This study represents original and novel results concerning the enterococcal microflora in ostriches; enterococci in ostriches have not been described in detail up to now; sensitivity to enterocins of E. hirae strains harbouring virulence factor genes to enterocins is also new. PMID:26603748

  14. Antibiotic Resistance Patterns of Enterococci and Occurrence of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci in Raw Minced Beef and Pork in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Günter; Pack, Alexander; Reuter, Gerhard

    1998-01-01

    The food chain, especially raw minced meat, is thought to be responsible for an increase in the incidence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in human nosocomial infections. Therefore, 555 samples from 115 batches of minced beef and pork from a European Union-licensed meat-processing plant were screened for the occurrence of VRE. The processed meat came from 45 different slaughterhouses in Germany. Enterococci were isolated directly from Enterococcosel selective agar plates and also from Enterococcosel selective agar plates supplemented with 32 mg of vancomycin per liter. In addition, peptone broth was used in a preenrichment procedure, and samples were subsequently plated onto Enterococcosel agar containing vancomycin. To determine resistance, 209 isolates from 275 samples were tested with the glycopeptides vancomycin, teicoplanin, and avoparcin and 19 other antimicrobial substances by using a broth microdilution test. When the direct method was used, VRE were found in 3 of 555 samples (0.5%) at a concentration of 1.0 log CFU/g of minced meat. When the preenrichment procedure was used, 8% of the samples were VRE positive. Our findings indicate that there is a low incidence of VRE in minced meat in Germany. In addition, the resistance patterns of the VRE isolates obtained were different from the resistance patterns of clinical isolates. A connection between the occurrence of VRE in minced meat and nosocomial infections could not be demonstrated on the basis of our findings. PMID:9572958

  15. Antibiotic resistance patterns of enterococci and occurrence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci in raw minced beef and pork in Germany.

    PubMed

    Klein, G; Pack, A; Reuter, G

    1998-05-01

    The food chain, especially raw minced meat, is thought to be responsible for an increase in the incidence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in human nosocomial infections. Therefore, 555 samples from 115 batches of minced beef and pork from a European Union-licensed meat-processing plant were screened for the occurrence of VRE. The processed meat came from 45 different slaughterhouses in Germany. Enterococci were isolated directly from Enterococcosel selective agar plates and also from Enterococcosel selective agar plates supplemented with 32 mg of vancomycin per liter. In addition, peptone broth was used in a preenrichment procedure, and samples were subsequently plated onto Enterococcosel agar containing vancomycin. To determine resistance, 209 isolates from 275 samples were tested with the glycopeptides vancomycin, teicoplanin, and avoparcin and 19 other antimicrobial substances by using a broth microdilution test. When the direct method was used, VRE were found in 3 of 555 samples (0.5%) at a concentration of 1.0 log CFU/g of minced meat. When the preenrichment procedure was used, 8% of the samples were VRE positive. Our findings indicate that there is a low incidence of VRE in minced meat in Germany. In addition, the resistance patterns of the VRE isolates obtained were different from the resistance patterns of clinical isolates. A connection between the occurrence of VRE in minced meat and nosocomial infections could not be demonstrated on the basis of our findings. PMID:9572958

  16. Enterococci as indicator of potential growth of Salmonella in fresh minced meat at retail.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Tina Beck; Nielsen, Niels L; Christensen, Bjarke Bak; Aabo, Søren

    2016-10-01

    The present study had the purpose of demonstrating a positive correlation between enterococci and Salmonella in minced pork and beef. Data from 2001 to 2002 from retail minced pork and beef in Denmark were used and the association between concentration of enterococci and prevalence and concentration of Salmonella was examined. A total of 2187 and 2747 samples of minced pork and beef, respectively, were collected from butcher shops and supermarkets throughout the country. In pork, 2.1% of all samples were positive for Salmonella whereas 1.5% of beef samples were positive. Among samples with ≥100 CFU/g of enterococci, prevalence of Salmonella positive samples was 3.4%, which was significantly higher than 1.2% observed in minced meat with less than 100 CFU/g of enterococci (P < 0.001). A positive association between occurrence of enterococci and presence of Salmonella in retail minced meat was supported as both prevalence and concentration of Salmonella in positive samples increased with increasing concentrations of enterococci in minced meat. From our data, we suggest that minced meat containing more than 500 enterococci per gram is suspected of having been exposed to temperatures allowing growth of Salmonella. This is to our knowledge the first report, which links presence of an indicator to potential growth of Salmonella. PMID:27375248

  17. Diversity of VanA Glycopeptide Resistance Elements in Enterococci from Humans and Nonhuman Sources

    PubMed Central

    Woodford, Neil; Adebiyi, Antoinette-Mary A.; Palepou, Marie-France I.; Cookson, Barry D.

    1998-01-01

    Elements mediating VanA glycopeptide resistance in 106 diverse enterococci from humans and nonhuman sources were compared with the prototype VanA transposon, Tn1546, in Enterococcus faecium BM4147. The isolates included 64 from individual patients at 15 hospitals in the United Kingdom (isolated between 1987 and 1996) and 42 from nonhuman sources in the United Kingdom (27 from raw meat, 7 from animal feces, and 8 from sewage). VanA elements were assigned to 24 groups (designated groups A to X) with primers that amplified 10 overlapping fragments of Tn1546. Ten groups of elements were found only in human enterococci, eight groups of elements were unique to nonhuman strains, and six groups of elements were common in enterococci from all sources. Elements indistinguishable from Tn1546 (group A) were observed more frequently in enterococci from nonhuman sources (34 versus 9%) but were identified in enterococci that caused outbreaks in hospital patients between 1987 and 1995. The most common group found in human enterococci (group H; 33%) was rarely observed in enterococci from other sources (5%). Group H elements differed from Tn1546 in three regions and included a novel insertion sequence, designated IS1542, between orf2 and vanR. The VanA elements of 14 other groups had a similar insertion at this position and/or distinct insertions at other positions. We conclude that VanA elements in enterococci are heterogeneous, although all show regions of homology with Tn1546. Furthermore, the elements most common among the human and nonhuman enterococci studied were different. This approach may be useful for monitoring the evolution of VanA resistance and may also be applicable in local “snapshot” epidemiological studies. However, as transposition events involving insertion sequences accounted for the differences observed between several groups, the stability of the elements must be assessed before their true epidemiological significance can be determined. PMID:9517923

  18. Enterococci as probiotics and their implications in food safety.

    PubMed

    Franz, Charles M A P; Huch, Melanie; Abriouel, Hikmate; Holzapfel, Wilhelm; Gálvez, Antonio

    2011-12-01

    Enterococci belong to the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and they are of importance in foods due to their involvement in food spoilage and fermentations, as well as their utilisation as probiotics in humans and slaughter animals. However, they are also important nosocomial pathogens that cause bacteraemia, endocarditis and other infections. Some strains are resistant to many antibiotics and possess virulence factors such as adhesins, invasins, pili and haemolysin. The role of enterococci in disease has raised questions on their safety for use in foods or as probiotics. Studies on the incidence of virulence traits among enterococcal strains isolated from food showed that some can harbour virulence traits, but it is also thought that virulence is not the result of the presence of specific virulence determinants alone, but is rather a more intricate process. Specific genetic lineages of hospital-adapted strains have emerged, such as E. faecium clonal complex (CC) 17 and E. faecalis CC2, CC9, CC28 and CC40, which are high risk enterococcal clonal complexes. These are characterised by the presence of antibiotic resistance determinants and/or virulence factors, often located on pathogenicity islands or plasmids. Mobile genetic elements thus are considered to play a major role in the establishment of problematic lineages. Although enterococci occur in high numbers in certain types of fermented cheeses and sausages, they are not deliberately added as starter cultures. Some E. faecium and E. faecalis strains are used as probiotics and are ingested in high numbers, generally in the form of pharmaceutical preparations. Such probiotics are administered to treat diarrhoea, antibiotic-associated diarrhoea or irritable bowel syndrome, to lower cholesterol levels or to improve host immunity. In animals, enterococcal probiotics are mainly used to treat or prevent diarrhoea, for immune stimulation or to improve growth. From a food microbiological point of view, the safety of the

  19. Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci: Therapeutic Challenges in the 21st Century.

    PubMed

    Miller, William R; Murray, Barbara E; Rice, Louis B; Arias, Cesar A

    2016-06-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci are serious health threats due in part to their ability to persist in rugged environments and their propensity to acquire antibiotic resistance determinants. Enterococci have now established a home in our hospitals and possess mechanisms to defeat most currently available antimicrobials. This article reviews the history of the struggle with this pathogen, what is known about the traits associated with its rise in the modern medical environment, and the current understanding of therapeutic approaches in severe infections caused by these microorganisms. As the 21st century progresses, vancomycin-resistant enterococci continue to pose a daunting clinical challenge. PMID:27208766

  20. Prevalence, seasonality, and growth of enterococci in raw and pasteurized milk in Victoria, Australia.

    PubMed

    McAuley, Catherine M; Britz, Margaret L; Gobius, Kari S; Craven, Heather M

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the prevalence, seasonality, and species variety of enterococci present in raw milk factory silos and pasteurized milk in 3 dairying regions in Victoria, Australia, over a 1-yr period. Additionally, the growth ability of thermoduric enterococci isolated in this study (Enterococcus faecalis, E. faecium, E. hirae, and E. durans) was determined in milk at temperatures likely to occur during storage, transport, and distribution, and before domestic consumption (4 and 7°C). Enterococci were detected in 96% of 211 raw milk samples, with an average count of 2.48 log10 cfu/mL. Counts were significantly lower in winter than summer (average 1.84 log10 cfu/mL) and were different between factories but not regions. Enterococcus faecalis was the most prevalent species isolated from raw milk in every factory, comprising between 61.5 and 83.5% of enterococcal species across each season. Enterococci were detected in lower numbers in pasteurized milk than in raw milk and were below the limit of detection on spread plates (<10 cfu/mL) after factory pasteurization. Residual viable cells were only detected following enrichment using 100-mL samples of milk, with 20.8% of the samples testing positive; this equated to a decrease in the average raw milk enterococci count of >4 log10 cfu/mL following pasteurization. Although E. faecalis predominated in raw milk and E. durans was found in only 2.9% of raw milk samples, E. durans was the most prevalent species detected in pasteurized milk. The detection of enterococci in the pasteurized milk did not correlate with higher enterococci counts in the raw milk. This suggested that the main enterococci populations in raw milk were heat-sensitive and that thermoduric enterococci survived pasteurization in a small numbers of instances. All of the thermoduric enterococci that were assessed for growth at likely refrigeration temperatures were able to grow at both 4 and 7°C in sterile milk, with generation times of 35 to 41h

  1. A Software Architecture for High Level Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shen,G.

    2009-05-04

    A modular software platform for high level applications is under development at the National Synchrotron Light Source II project. This platform is based on client-server architecture, and the components of high level applications on this platform will be modular and distributed, and therefore reusable. An online model server is indispensable for model based control. Different accelerator facilities have different requirements for the online simulation. To supply various accelerator simulators, a set of narrow and general application programming interfaces is developed based on Tracy-3 and Elegant. This paper describes the system architecture for the modular high level applications, the design of narrow and general application programming interface for an online model server, and the prototype of online model server.

  2. High-level waste processing and disposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crandall, J. L.; Drause, H.; Sombret, C.; Uematsu, K.

    The national high level waste disposal plans for France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Japan, and the United States are covered. Three conclusions are reached. The first conclusion is that an excellent technology already exists for high level waste disposal. With appropriate packaging, spent fuel seems to be an acceptable waste form. Borosilicate glass reprocessing waste forms are well understood, in production in France, and scheduled for production in the next few years in a number of other countries. For final disposal, a number of candidate geological repository sites have been identified and several demonstration sites opened. The second conclusion is that adequate financing and a legal basis for waste disposal are in place in most countries. Costs of high level waste disposal will probably and about 5 to 10% to the costs of nuclear electric power. Third conclusion is less optimistic.

  3. A Novel Way of Treating Multidrug-resistant Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Hem; Wong, Ryan; Pasha, Ahmed Khurshid

    2016-01-01

    Context: Daptomycin is the only antibiotic available with in vitro bactericidal activity against vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). Its increased use has resulted in cases of decreased daptomycin efficacy. Recent in vitro studies have shown effective use of beta (β)-lactam and daptomycin antibiotics, as a combination therapy, in the treatment of VRE. We describe a case of effective treatment in a patient with VRE infection using dual ampicillin and daptomycin therapy that shows bench-to-bedside application of the abovementioned finding. Case Report: A 76-year-old gentleman with a history of bilateral arthroplasty was admitted with a swollen left knee. Blood cultures were positive for Enterococcus faecium. Left knee joint aspiration showed leukocytosis and alpha defensins. Extensive imaging did not show any other source of infection. Culture sensitivity results showed multidrug-resistant enterococci sensitive to daptomycin. The patient was started on intravenous (IV) daptomycin. His left knee prosthesis was explanted and a spacer was placed. The patient continued to be bacteremic for 10 days after removing the knee prosthesis. The patient was trialed on combination IV ampicillin and daptomycin. His blood culture turned negative 2 days later. The patient was discharged home to continue 6 weeks of IV ampicillin and daptomycin. Conclusion: The exact mechanism of the daptomycin/ampicillin synergy effect is unclear. Current hypothesis suggests that ampicillin causes a reduction in the net positive charge of the bacterial surface, possibly by releasing lipoteichoic acid (LTA) from the cell wall. This process increases the ability of the cationic daptomycin/calcium complex to bind to the cell wall more effectively. Our case shows the clinical application of the same. A prospective randomized control trial to explore the effectiveness of dual antibiotic therapy in vivo is needed. If proven, daptomycin/β-lactam can become a standard of care to treat VRE and decrease

  4. Occurrence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci in turkey flocks.

    PubMed

    Sting, R; Richter, A; Popp, C; Hafez, H M

    2013-02-01

    In the present study, the prevalence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in turkeys in the southwest of Germany was investigated. For this purpose, 200 cloacal swab samples and 5 environmental dust samples (tested as a pooled sample) of each of the 20 flocks (10 female and 10 male flocks) included in this study were examined. The VRE could be isolated by means of a procedure combining bacterial cultivation in an enrichment broth and on a selective solid media. Enterococci were identified biochemically and subsequently tested on the presence of the vancomycin resistance genes vanA, vanB (B1/B2/B3), and vanC (C1/C2/C3) using real-time PCR assays. In 54 (27%) turkeys originating from 11 (55%) flocks and in 14 (70%) of the dust samples, exclusively vanA and vanC1 genes could be detected. Of the turkeys examined, 46 were colonized with VRE bearing the resistance gene vanC1 and 8 vanA, originating from 9 and 2 flocks, respectively. None of the birds carried vanB, vanC2, or vanC3 positive VRE. The results obtained from the birds are largely confirmed by the dust samples originating from 4 vanA and 10 vanC1 positive flocks. However, one flock housing animals colonized with vanC1 positive VRE could not be confirmed by the dust samples that revealed vanA bearing VRE. However, in one case vanA and in 3 cases vanC1 carrying VRE could be detected in dust samples of the turkey houses, but not in the turkeys of the associated flock. In 5 flocks the turkeys as well as the dust samples were free of VRE. PMID:23300299

  5. High-Level Application Framework for LCLS

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, P; Chevtsov, S.; Fairley, D.; Larrieu, C.; Rock, J.; Rogind, D.; White, G.; Zalazny, M.; /SLAC

    2008-04-22

    A framework for high level accelerator application software is being developed for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The framework is based on plug-in technology developed by an open source project, Eclipse. Many existing functionalities provided by Eclipse are available to high-level applications written within this framework. The framework also contains static data storage configuration and dynamic data connectivity. Because the framework is Eclipse-based, it is highly compatible with any other Eclipse plug-ins. The entire infrastructure of the software framework will be presented. Planned applications and plug-ins based on the framework are also presented.

  6. High-level radioactive wastes. Supplement 1

    SciTech Connect

    McLaren, L.H.

    1984-09-01

    This bibliography contains information on high-level radioactive wastes included in the Department of Energy's Energy Data Base from August 1982 through December 1983. These citations are to research reports, journal articles, books, patents, theses, and conference papers from worldwide sources. Five indexes, each preceded by a brief description, are provided: Corporate Author, Personal Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number. 1452 citations.

  7. PAIRWISE BLENDING OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE (HLW)

    SciTech Connect

    CERTA, P.J.

    2006-02-22

    The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate a mission scenario that uses pairwise and incidental blending of high level waste (HLW) to reduce the total mass of HLW glass. Secondary objectives include understanding how recent refinements to the tank waste inventory and solubility assumptions affect the mass of HLW glass and how logistical constraints may affect the efficacy of HLW blending.

  8. Differential decay of Enterococci and Escherichia coli originating from two fecal pollution sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using in situ subtropical aquatic mesocosms, fecal source (cattle manure versus sewage) was shown to be the most important contributor to differential loss in viability of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), specifically enterococci in freshwater and Escherichia coli in marine habita...

  9. FACTORS INFLUENCING LIGHT-INDUCED MORTALITY OF ENTEROCOCCI IN SEDIMENT SUSPENSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contamination of recreational waters by pathogenic microorganisms occurs through complex, poorly understood interactions involving variable microbial sources, hydrodynamic transport, arid microbial fate processes. Fecal indicator bacteria such as enterococci have been used to ass...

  10. NEW TARGET AND CONTROL ASSAYS FOR QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION (QPCR) ANALYSIS OF ENTEROCOCCI IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enterococci are frequently monitored in water samples as indicators of fecal pollution. Attention is now shifting from culture based methods for enumerating these organisms to more rapid molecular methods such as QPCR. Accurate quantitative analyses by this method requires highly...

  11. In vitro antibacterial activity of panduratin A against enterococci clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Rukayadi, Yaya; Han, Sunghwa; Yong, Dongeun; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2010-01-01

    Panduratin A, a natural chalcone compound isolated from the rhizome of fingerroot (Boesenbergia rotunda (L.) MANSF. A). The antibacterial activity of panduratin A against clinical enterococci isolates was compared in terms of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) to those of commonly used antimicrobials, according to the CLSI guidelines. Time-kill curves were constructed to assess the concentration between MIC and bactericidal activity of panduratin A at concentrations ranging from 0x MIC to 4x MIC. The activity of panduratin A against biofilm-producing enterococcal strains was also evaluated. The growth of all clinical enterococci isolates (n=23) were inhibited by panduratin A at a concentration of 2 microg/ml. Panduratin A was able to kill all clinical enterococci isolates with a MBC of 8 microg/ml. The time-kill curves demonstrated that the bactericidal endpoint for clinical enterococci was reached after 30 min of incubation at a panduratin A concentration of 4x MIC. The growth of biofilm-producing enterococcal strains can be inhibited and eradicated by panduratin A at concentrations of enterococci isolates was generally more potent than commonly used antimicrobials. Panduratin A has stronger activity against biofilm-producing enterococcal strains than daptomycin and linezolid. Panduratin A is an antimicrobial agent with high in vitro activity against clinical enterococci, including organisms resistant to other antimicrobials. PMID:20823562

  12. High-Level Waste Melter Study Report

    SciTech Connect

    Perez Jr, Joseph M; Bickford, Dennis F; Day, Delbert E; Kim, Dong-Sang; Lambert, Steven L; Marra, Sharon L; Peeler, David K; Strachan, Denis M; Triplett, Mark B; Vienna, John D; Wittman, Richard S

    2001-07-13

    At the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, the path to site cleanup involves vitrification of the majority of the wastes that currently reside in large underground tanks. A Joule-heated glass melter is the equipment of choice for vitrifying the high-level fraction of these wastes. Even though this technology has general national and international acceptance, opportunities may exist to improve or change the technology to reduce the enormous cost of accomplishing the mission of site cleanup. Consequently, the U.S. Department of Energy requested the staff of the Tanks Focus Area to review immobilization technologies, waste forms, and modifications to requirements for solidification of the high-level waste fraction at Hanford to determine what aspects could affect cost reductions with reasonable long-term risk. The results of this study are summarized in this report.

  13. Molecular Characterization of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci from Hospitalized Patients and Poultry Products in The Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    van den Braak, Nicole; van Belkum, Alex; van Keulen, Marrit; Vliegenthart, John; Verbrugh, Henri A.; Endtz, Hubert P.

    1998-01-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) pose an emerging health risk, but little is known about the precise epidemiology of the genes coding for vancomycin resistance. To determine whether the bacterial flora of consumer poultry serves as a gene reservoir, the level of contamination of poultry products with VRE was determined. VRE were genotyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and transposon structure mapping was done by PCR. The vanX-vanY intergenic regions of several strains were further analyzed by sequencing. A total of 242 of 305 (79%) poultry products were found to be contaminated with VRE. Of these VRE, 142 (59%) were high-level-vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium strains (VREF). PFGE revealed extensive VREF heterogeneity. Two genotypes were found nationwide on multiple occasions: type A (22 of 142 VREF [15%]) and type B (14 of 142 VREF [10%]). No PFGE-deduced genetic overlap was found when VREF from humans were compared with VREF from poultry. Two vanA transposon types were identified among poultry strains. In 59 of 142 (42%) of the poultry VREF, the size of the intergenic region between vanX and vanY was ∼1,300 bp. This transposon type was not found in human VREF. In contrast, all human strains and 83 of 142 (58%) of the poultry VREF contained an intergenic region 543 bp in size. Sequencing of this 543-bp intergenic vanX-vanY region demonstrated full sequence conservation. Though preliminary, these data suggest that dissemination of the resistance genes carried on transposable elements may be of greater importance than clonal dissemination of resistant strains. This observation is important for developing strategies to control the spread of glycopeptide resistance. PMID:9650938

  14. Utilizing a gentamicin resistant Campylobacter (C. coli) in poultry research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The capability to perform inoculation studies with Campylobacter is limited without a suitable marker. Performing inoculation studies without a marker requires utilization of molecular techniques for confirmation. The objective of this study was to screen over 3,000 Campylobacter isolates obtained...

  15. A hospital epidemic caused by gentamicin-resistant Klebsiella aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Curie, K; Speller, D C; Simpson, R A; Stephens, M; Cooke, D I

    1978-02-01

    In the 15 months, February 1976 to April 1977, more than 241 patients became colonized with a strain of Klebsiella aerogenes, capsular serotype K2, resistant to most antibiotics. Urinary tract infection was the most common clinical manifestation but bacteraemia and, occasionally, infections of other sites were encountered. The main reservoir of the epidemic klebsiella was the gut, urine and skin of colonized patients. Gut carriage among staff was very uncommon. The most susceptible patients were elderly males, with debilitating illnesses and urinary tract abnormalities, especially if they were catheterized or receiving antibiotics. Likely vehicles for spread were the hands of staff, and contaminated bedpans and urinals. Control measures were directed at these factors. At the end of April 1977 no new cases had occurred for 3 months in the ward in which the outbreak began, and which had been the main focus of infection, and only 5 patients in the affected hospitals were known to be colonized by the epidemic klebsiella. PMID:340580

  16. A hospital epidemic caused by gentamicin-resistant Klebsiella aerogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Curie, K.; Speller, D. C.; Simpson, R. A.; Stephens, M.; Cooke, D. I.

    1978-01-01

    In the 15 months, February 1976 to April 1977, more than 241 patients became colonized with a strain of Klebsiella aerogenes, capsular serotype K2, resistant to most antibiotics. Urinary tract infection was the most common clinical manifestation but bacteraemia and, occasionally, infections of other sites were encountered. The main reservoir of the epidemic klebsiella was the gut, urine and skin of colonized patients. Gut carriage among staff was very uncommon. The most susceptible patients were elderly males, with debilitating illnesses and urinary tract abnormalities, especially if they were catheterized or receiving antibiotics. Likely vehicles for spread were the hands of staff, and contaminated bedpans and urinals. Control measures were directed at these factors. At the end of April 1977 no new cases had occurred for 3 months in the ward in which the outbreak began, and which had been the main focus of infection, and only 5 patients in the affected hospitals were known to be colonized by the epidemic klebsiella. PMID:340580

  17. EAP high-level product architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudlaugsson, T. V.; Mortensen, N. H.; Sarban, R.

    2013-04-01

    EAP technology has the potential to be used in a wide range of applications. This poses the challenge to the EAP component manufacturers to develop components for a wide variety of products. Danfoss Polypower A/S is developing an EAP technology platform, which can form the basis for a variety of EAP technology products while keeping complexity under control. High level product architecture has been developed for the mechanical part of EAP transducers, as the foundation for platform development. A generic description of an EAP transducer forms the core of the high level product architecture. This description breaks down the EAP transducer into organs that perform the functions that may be present in an EAP transducer. A physical instance of an EAP transducer contains a combination of the organs needed to fulfill the task of actuator, sensor, and generation. Alternative principles for each organ allow the function of the EAP transducers to be changed, by basing the EAP transducers on a different combination of organ alternatives. A model providing an overview of the high level product architecture has been developed to support daily development and cooperation across development teams. The platform approach has resulted in the first version of an EAP technology platform, on which multiple EAP products can be based. The contents of the platform have been the result of multi-disciplinary development work at Danfoss PolyPower, as well as collaboration with potential customers and research institutions. Initial results from applying the platform on demonstrator design for potential applications are promising. The scope of the article does not include technical details.

  18. Vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) in Swedish sewage sludge

    PubMed Central

    Sahlström, Leena; Rehbinder, Verena; Albihn, Ann; Aspan, Anna; Bengtsson, Björn

    2009-01-01

    Background Antimicrobial resistance is a serious threat in veterinary medicine and human healthcare. Resistance genes can spread from animals, through the food-chain, and back to humans. Sewage sludge may act as the link back from humans to animals. The main aims of this study were to investigate the occurrence of vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) in treated sewage sludge, in a Swedish waste water treatment plant (WWTP), and to compare VRE isolates from sewage sludge with isolates from humans and chickens. Methods During a four month long study, sewage sludge was collected weekly and cultured for VRE. The VRE isolates from sewage sludge were analysed and compared to each other and to human and chicken VRE isolates by biochemical typing (PhenePlate), PFGE and antibiograms. Results Biochemical typing (PhenePlate-FS) and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) revealed prevalence of specific VRE strains in sewage sludge for up to 16 weeks. No connection was found between the VRE strains isolated from sludge, chickens and humans, indicating that human VRE did not originate from Swedish chicken. Conclusion This study demonstrated widespread occurrence of VRE in sewage sludge in the studied WWTP. This implies a risk of antimicrobial resistance being spread to new farms and to the society via the environment if the sewage sludge is used on arable land. PMID:19480649

  19. Investigation of Linezolid Resistance in Staphylococci and Enterococci.

    PubMed

    Doern, Christopher D; Park, Jason Y; Gallegos, Michael; Alspaugh, Debbie; Burnham, Carey-Ann D

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate an apparent increase in linezolid-nonsusceptible staphylococci and enterococci following a laboratory change in antimicrobial susceptibility testing from disk diffusion to an automated susceptibility testing system. Isolates with nonsusceptible results (n = 27) from Vitek2 were subjected to a battery of confirmatory testing which included disk diffusion, Microscan broth microdilution, Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) reference broth microdilution, gradient diffusion (Etest), 23S rRNA gene sequencing, and cfr PCR. Our results show that there is poor correlation between methods and that only 70 to 75% of isolates were confirmed as linezolid resistant with alternative phenotypic testing methods (disk diffusion, Microscan broth microdilution, CLSI broth microdilution, and Etest). 23S rRNA gene sequencing identified mutations previously associated with linezolid resistance in 16 (59.3%) isolates, and the cfr gene was detected in 3 (11.1%) isolates. Mutations located at positions 2576 and 2534 of the 23S rRNA gene were most common. In addition, two previously undescribed variants (at positions 2083 and 2345 of the 23S rRNA gene) were also identified and may contribute to linezolid resistance. PMID:26935728

  20. The CMS High-Level Trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Covarelli, R.

    2009-12-17

    At the startup of the LHC, the CMS data acquisition is expected to be able to sustain an event readout rate of up to 100 kHz from the Level-1 trigger. These events will be read into a large processor farm which will run the 'High-Level Trigger'(HLT) selection algorithms and will output a rate of about 150 Hz for permanent data storage. In this report HLT performances are shown for selections based on muons, electrons, photons, jets, missing transverse energy, {tau} leptons and b quarks: expected efficiencies, background rates and CPU time consumption are reported as well as relaxation criteria foreseen for a LHC startup instantaneous luminosity.

  1. The effects of high level infrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.L.

    1980-02-01

    This paper will attempt to survey the current knowledge on the effects of relative high levels of infrasound on humans. While this conference is concerned mainly about hearing, some discussion of other physiological effects is appropriate. Such discussion also serves to highlight a basic question, 'Is hearing the main concern of infrasound and low frequency exposure, or is there a more sensitive mechanism'. It would be comforting to know that the focal point of this conference is indeed the most important concern. Therefore, besides hearing loss and auditory threshold of infrasonic and low frequency exposure, four other effects will be provided. These are performance, respiration, annoyance, and vibration.

  2. High-level waste qualification: Managing uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Pulsipher, B.A.

    1993-09-01

    A vitrification facility is being developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the West Valley Demonstration Plant (WVDP) near Buffalo, New York, where approximately 300 canisters of high-level nuclear waste glass will be produced. To assure that the produced waste form is acceptable, uncertainty must be managed. Statistical issues arise due to sampling, waste variations, processing uncertainties, and analytical variations. This paper presents elements of a strategy to characterize and manage the uncertainties associated with demonstrating that an acceptable waste form product is achieved. Specific examples are provided within the context of statistical work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL).

  3. Service Oriented Architecture for High Level Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Chungming; Chevtsov, Sergei; Wu, Juhao; Shen, Guobao; /Brookhaven

    2012-06-28

    Standalone high level applications often suffer from poor performance and reliability due to lengthy initialization, heavy computation and rapid graphical update. Service-oriented architecture (SOA) is trying to separate the initialization and computation from applications and to distribute such work to various service providers. Heavy computation such as beam tracking will be done periodically on a dedicated server and data will be available to client applications at all time. Industrial standard service architecture can help to improve the performance, reliability and maintainability of the service. Robustness will also be improved by reducing the complexity of individual client applications.

  4. Rapid Ultrafiltration Concentration and Biosensor Detection of Enterococci from Large Volumes of Florida Recreational Water▿

    PubMed Central

    Leskinen, Stephaney D.; Lim, Daniel V.

    2008-01-01

    Monitoring recreational waters for fecal contamination by standard methodologies involves culturing indicator bacteria, such as fecal coliforms and enterococci. Delayed reporting of microbial water quality parameters increases the likelihood of public exposure to pathogens of fecal origin, making the development of rapid methods important for public health protection. A rapid assay for enterococci was developed using a combined ultrafiltration-biosensor procedure. Twelve 100-liter water samples were collected from upper Tampa Bay over a 9-month period. The samples were collected on site by dead-end hollow-fiber ultrafiltration. Postfiltration processing of the initial retentates included sonication and micrometer-level sieve passage to remove interfering particles. Centrifugation was utilized for secondary concentration. Grab samples were collected simultaneously with the ultrafiltered samples. Concentrations of enterococci in all grab and ultrafiltration samples were determined by the standard method (EPA method 1600) for calculation of recovery efficiencies and concentration factors. Levels of enterococci increased twofold in initial retentates and by 4 orders of magnitude in final retentates over ambient concentrations. An aliquot of each final retentate was adsorbed onto polystyrene waveguides for immunoassay analysis of enterococci with a microfluidic fiber optic biosensor, the Raptor. Enterococci were detected when concentrations in the ambient water exceeded the regulatory standard for a single sample (≥105 CFU/100 ml). The combined ultrafiltration-biosensor procedure required 2.5 h for detection compared to 24 for the standard method. This study demonstrated that enterococci can be detected rapidly using on-site ultrafiltration, secondary concentration, and biosensor analysis. PMID:18515479

  5. High level intelligent control of telerobotics systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckee, James

    1988-01-01

    A high level robot command language is proposed for the autonomous mode of an advanced telerobotics system and a predictive display mechanism for the teleoperational model. It is believed that any such system will involve some mixture of these two modes, since, although artificial intelligence can facilitate significant autonomy, a system that can resort to teleoperation will always have the advantage. The high level command language will allow humans to give the robot instructions in a very natural manner. The robot will then analyze these instructions to infer meaning so that is can translate the task into lower level executable primitives. If, however, the robot is unable to perform the task autonomously, it will switch to the teleoperational mode. The time delay between control movement and actual robot movement has always been a problem in teleoperations. The remote operator may not actually see (via a monitor) the results of high actions for several seconds. A computer generated predictive display system is proposed whereby the operator can see a real-time model of the robot's environment and the delayed video picture on the monitor at the same time.

  6. Technetium Chemistry in High-Level Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, Nancy J.

    2006-06-01

    Tc contamination is found within the DOE complex at those sites whose mission involved extraction of plutonium from irradiated uranium fuel or isotopic enrichment of uranium. At the Hanford Site, chemical separations and extraction processes generated large amounts of high level and transuranic wastes that are currently stored in underground tanks. The waste from these extraction processes is currently stored in underground High Level Waste (HLW) tanks. However, the chemistry of the HLW in any given tank is greatly complicated by repeated efforts to reduce volume and recover isotopes. These processes ultimately resulted in mixing of waste streams from different processes. As a result, the chemistry and the fate of Tc in HLW tanks are not well understood. This lack of understanding has been made evident in the failed efforts to leach Tc from sludge and to remove Tc from supernatants prior to immobilization. Although recent interest in Tc chemistry has shifted from pretreatment chemistry to waste residuals, both needs are served by a fundamental understanding of Tc chemistry.

  7. Biofilm formation, gel and esp gene carriage among recreational beach Enterococci.

    PubMed

    Asmat, Ahmad; Dada, Ayokunle Christopher; Gires, Usup

    2014-09-01

    Biofilm production, gel and esp gene carriage was enumerated among forty six vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) and vancomycin susceptible enterococci (VSE) beach isolates. A higher proportion (61.54%) of biofilm producers was observed among beach sand as compared to beach water enterococci isolates (30%) indicating that enterococci within the sand column may be more dependent on biofilm production for survival than their beach water counterparts. Correlation analysis revealed strongly negative correlation (r=-0.535, p=0.015) between vancomycin resistance and biofilm formation. Given the observation of high prevalence of biofilm production among beach sand and the concomitant absence of esp gene carriage in any of the isolate, esp gene carriage may not be necessary for the production of biofilms among beach sand isolates. On the whole beach sand and water isolates demonstrated clearly different prevalence levels of vancomycin resistance, biofilm formation, esp and gel gene carriage. Application of these differences may be found useful in beach microbial source tracking studies. Tested starved cells still produced biofilm albeit at lower efficiencies. Non-dividing enterococci in beach sand can survive extended periods of environmental hardship and can resume growth or biofilm production in appropriate conditions thus making them infectious agents with potential health risk to recreational beach users. PMID:25168975

  8. Occurrence, Genetic Diversity, and Persistence of Enterococci in a Lake Superior Watershed

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Qinghong; Badgley, Brian D.; Dillon, Nicholas; Dunny, Gary M.

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, the U.S. EPA suggested that coastal and Great Lakes states adopt enterococci as an alternative indicator for the monitoring of recreational water quality. Limited information, however, is available about the presence and persistence of enterococci in Lake Superior. In this study, the density, species composition, and persistence of enterococci in sand, sediment, water, and soil samples were examined at two sites in a Lake Superior watershed from May to September over a 2-year period. The genetic diversity of Enterococcus faecalis isolates collected from environmental samples was also studied by using the horizontal, fluorophore-enhanced repetitive PCR DNA fingerprinting technique. Results obtained by most-probable-number analyses indicated that enterococci were present in 149 (94%) of 159 samples and their densities were generally higher in the summer than in the other months examined. The Enterococcus species composition displayed spatial and temporal changes, with the dominant species being E. hirae, E. faecalis, E. faecium, E. mundtii, and E. casseliflavus. DNA fingerprint analyses indicated that the E. faecalis population in the watershed was genetically diverse and changed spatially and temporally. Moreover, some DNA fingerprints reoccurred over multiple sampling events. Taken together, these results suggest that some enterococci are able to persist and grow in the Lake Superior watershed, especially in soil, for a prolonged time after being introduced. PMID:23455345

  9. Viability and stability of Escherichia coli and enterococci populations in fecal samples upon freezing.

    PubMed

    Masters, N; Christie, M; Stratton, H; Katouli, M

    2015-07-01

    We studied the survival of Escherichia coli and enterococci populations in fecal samples of 7 host species after storage at -20 and -80 °C for 30 days. Composite fecal samples were collected from cows, chickens, horses, pigs, dogs, birds, and humans, and bacteria were enumerated before and after storage. Twenty-eight colonies of each bacterial species were typed before and after storage and the strains were assigned to different biochemical phenotypes (BPTs). A significant reduction in the number of E. coli was observed in all samples stored at -20 °C but in only 3 of those samples stored at -80 °C. However, the numbers of enterococci were similar in most stored samples (except cow and birds). The number and the distribution of E. coli and enterococci BPTs in fresh samples did not vary significantly from those stored at either temperature. Furthermore, the population structure of E. coli and enterococci did not change significantly after storage at -80 °C, this was always the case for those samples stored at -20 °C. We conclude that for those studies investigating E. coli or enterococci population structure, short-term storage (≤ 30 days) of fecal samples in a glycerol broth at -80 °C is a preferable option. PMID:26053765

  10. High-level connectionist models. Semiannual report

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, J.B.

    1989-08-01

    The major achievement of this semiannum was the significant revision and extension of the Recursive Auto-Associative Memory (RAAM) work for publication in the journal Artificial Intelligence. Included as an appendix to this report, the article includes several new elements: (1) Background - The work was more clearly set into the area of recursive distributed representations, machine learning, and the adequacy of the connectionist approach for high-level cognitive modeling; (2) New Experiment - RAAM was applied to finding compact representations for sequences of letters; (3) Analysis - The developed representations were analyzed as features which range from categorical to distinctive. Categorical features distinguish between conceptual categories while distinctive features vary within categories and discriminate or label the members. The representations were also analyzed geometrically; and (4) Applications - Feasibility studies were performed and described on inference by association, and on using RAAM-generated patterns along with cascaded networks for natural language parsing. Both of these remain long-term goals of the project.

  11. Umbra's High Level Architecture (HLA) Interface

    SciTech Connect

    GOTTLIEB, ERIC JOSEPH; MCDONALD, MICHAEL J.; OPPEL III, FRED J.

    2002-04-01

    This report describes Umbra's High Level Architecture HLA library. This library serves as an interface to the Defense Simulation and Modeling Office's (DMSO) Run Time Infrastructure Next Generation Version 1.3 (RTI NG1.3) software library and enables Umbra-based models to be federated into HLA environments. The Umbra library was built to enable the modeling of robots for military and security system concept evaluation. A first application provides component technologies that ideally fit the US Army JPSD's Joint Virtual Battlespace (JVB) simulation framework for Objective Force concept analysis. In addition to describing the Umbra HLA library, the report describes general issues of integrating Umbra with RTI code and outlines ways of building models to support particular HLA simulation frameworks like the JVB.

  12. Airway injury during high-level exercise.

    PubMed

    Kippelen, Pascale; Anderson, Sandra D

    2012-05-01

    Airway epithelial cells act as a physical barrier against environmental toxins and injury, and modulate inflammation and the immune response. As such, maintenance of their integrity is critical. Evidence is accumulating to suggest that exercise can cause injury to the airway epithelium. This seems the case particularly for competitive athletes performing high-level exercise, or when exercise takes place in extreme environmental conditions such as in cold dry air or in polluted air. Dehydration of the small airways and increased forces exerted on to the airway surface during severe hyperpnoea are thought to be key factors in determining the occurrence of injury of the airway epithelium. The injury-repair process of the airway epithelium may contribute to the development of the bronchial hyper-responsiveness that is documented in many elite athletes. PMID:22247295

  13. The High Level Data Reduction Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballester, P.; Gabasch, A.; Jung, Y.; Modigliani, A.; Taylor, J.; Coccato, L.; Freudling, W.; Neeser, M.; Marchetti, E.

    2015-09-01

    The European Southern Observatory (ESO) provides pipelines to reduce data for most of the instruments at its Very Large telescope (VLT). These pipelines are written as part of the development of VLT instruments, and are used both in the ESO's operational environment and by science users who receive VLT data. All the pipelines are highly specific geared toward instruments. However, experience showed that the independently developed pipelines include significant overlap, duplication and slight variations of similar algorithms. In order to reduce the cost of development, verification and maintenance of ESO pipelines, and at the same time improve the scientific quality of pipelines data products, ESO decided to develop a limited set of versatile high-level scientific functions that are to be used in all future pipelines. The routines are provided by the High-level Data Reduction Library (HDRL). To reach this goal, we first compare several candidate algorithms and verify them during a prototype phase using data sets from several instruments. Once the best algorithm and error model have been chosen, we start a design and implementation phase. The coding of HDRL is done in plain C and using the Common Pipeline Library (CPL) functionality. HDRL adopts consistent function naming conventions and a well defined API to minimise future maintenance costs, implements error propagation, uses pixel quality information, employs OpenMP to take advantage of multi-core processors, and is verified with extensive unit and regression tests. This poster describes the status of the project and the lesson learned during the development of reusable code implementing algorithms of high scientific quality.

  14. Application of multiplex PCR, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and BOX-PCR for molecular analysis of enterococci

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the study was to use band-based molecular methods including BOX-PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) to determine if genetically related enterococci were found among different stores, food types, or years. Enterococci were also characterized f...

  15. Effect of carbapenem administration on establishment of intestinal colonization by vancomycin-resistant enterococci and Klebsiella pneumoniae in mice.

    PubMed

    Stiefel, Usha; Pultz, Nicole J; Donskey, Curtis J

    2007-01-01

    In a mouse model, ertapenem inhibited the anaerobic intestinal microflora and promoted overgrowth of enterococci, whereas imipenem-cilastatin had no effect on the indigenous microflora. Ertapenem, but not imipenem-cilastatin, promoted modest overgrowth of vancomycin-resistant enterococci when exposure occurred during treatment. Neither agent promoted colonization with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae. PMID:17043115

  16. Detection of vancomycin resistances in enterococci within 3 1/2 hours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, U. -Ch.; Beleites, C.; Assmann, C.; Glaser, U.; Hübner, U.; Pfister, W.; Fritzsche, W.; Popp, J.; Neugebauer, U.

    2015-02-01

    Vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) constitute a challenging problem in health care institutions worldwide. Novel methods to rapidly identify resistances are highly required to ensure an early start of tailored therapy and to prevent further spread of the bacteria. Here, a spectroscopy-based rapid test is presented that reveals resistances of enterococci towards vancomycin within 3.5 hours. Without any specific knowledge on the strain, VRE can be recognized with high accuracy in two different enterococci species. By means of dielectrophoresis, bacteria are directly captured from dilute suspensions, making sample preparation very easy. Raman spectroscopic analysis of the trapped bacteria over a time span of two hours in absence and presence of antibiotics reveals characteristic differences in the molecular response of sensitive as well as resistant Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium. Furthermore, the spectroscopic fingerprints provide an indication on the mechanisms of induced resistance in VRE.

  17. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of enterococci isolated from hospitalized patients.

    PubMed Central

    Venditti, M; Tarasi, A; Gelfusa, V; Nicastri, E; Penni, A; Martino, P

    1993-01-01

    One hundred and one isolates of Enterococcus species isolated recently from hospitalized patients were evaluated in vitro for antibiotic susceptibility. Teicoplanin and mideplanin were the most active agents, followed by ramoplanin, vancomycin, ciprofloxacin, ampicillin, and imipenem. High-level resistance to gentamicin (MIC > 500 micrograms/ml) and/or streptomycin (MIC > 2,000 micrograms/ml) was found in 60 isolates. High-level resistance to ampicillin (MIC > or = 16 micrograms/ml) was found in 17 isolates. MBC studies revealed that ramoplanin possesses significant bactericidal activity. PMID:8517714

  18. Performance of the CMS High Level Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrotta, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a 2-level trigger system. The first level is implemented using custom-designed electronics. The second level is the so-called High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. For Run II of the Large Hadron Collider, the increases in center-of-mass energy and luminosity will raise the event rate to a level challenging for the HLT algorithms. The increase in the number of interactions per bunch crossing, on average 25 in 2012, and expected to be around 40 in Run II, will be an additional complication. We present here the expected performance of the main triggers that will be used during the 2015 data taking campaign, paying particular attention to the new approaches that have been developed to cope with the challenges of the new run. This includes improvements in HLT electron and photon reconstruction as well as better performing muon triggers. We will also present the performance of the improved tracking and vertexing algorithms, discussing their impact on the b-tagging performance as well as on the jet and missing energy reconstruction.

  19. CMS High Level Trigger Timing Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Clint

    2015-12-01

    The two-level trigger system employed by CMS consists of the Level 1 (L1) Trigger, which is implemented using custom-built electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a farm of commercial CPUs running a streamlined version of the offline CMS reconstruction software. The operational L1 output rate of 100 kHz, together with the number of CPUs in the HLT farm, imposes a fundamental constraint on the amount of time available for the HLT to process events. Exceeding this limit impacts the experiment's ability to collect data efficiently. Hence, there is a critical need to characterize the performance of the HLT farm as well as the algorithms run prior to start up in order to ensure optimal data taking. Additional complications arise from the fact that the HLT farm consists of multiple generations of hardware and there can be subtleties in machine performance. We present our methods of measuring the timing performance of the CMS HLT, including the challenges of making such measurements. Results for the performance of various Intel Xeon architectures from 2009-2014 and different data taking scenarios are also presented.

  20. HIGH LEVEL RF FOR THE SNS RING.

    SciTech Connect

    ZALTSMAN,A.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; BRENNAN,J.; BRODOWSKI,J.; METH,M.; SPITZ,R.; SEVERINO,F.

    2002-06-03

    A high level RF system (HLRF) consisting of power amplifiers (PA's) and ferrite loaded cavities is being designed and built by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project. It is a fixed frequency, two harmonic system whose main function is to maintain a gap for the kicker rise time. Three cavities running at the fundamental harmonic (h=l) will provide 40 kV and one cavity at the second harmonic (h=2) will provide 20 kV. Each cavity has two gaps with a design voltage of 10 kV per gap and will be driven by a power amplifier (PA) directly adjacent to it. The PA uses a 600kW tetrode to provide the necessary drive current. The anode of the tetrode is magnetically coupled to the downstream cell of the cavity. Drive to the PA will be provided by a wide band, solid state amplifier located remotely. A dynamic tuning scheme will be implemented to help compensate for the effect of beam loading.

  1. Decontamination of high-level waste canisters

    SciTech Connect

    Nesbitt, J.F.; Slate, S.C.; Fetrow, L.K.

    1980-12-01

    This report presents evaluations of several methods for the in-process decontamination of metallic canisters containing any one of a number of solidified high-level waste (HLW) forms. The use of steam-water, steam, abrasive blasting, electropolishing, liquid honing, vibratory finishing and soaking have been tested or evaluated as potential techniques to decontaminate the outer surfaces of HLW canisters. Either these techniques have been tested or available literature has been examined to assess their applicability to the decontamination of HLW canisters. Electropolishing has been found to be the most thorough method to remove radionuclides and other foreign material that may be deposited on or in the outer surface of a canister during any of the HLW processes. Steam or steam-water spraying techniques may be adequate for some applications but fail to remove all contaminated forms that could be present in some of the HLW processes. Liquid honing and abrasive blasting remove contamination and foreign material very quickly and effectively from small areas and components although these blasting techniques tend to disperse the material removed from the cleaned surfaces. Vibratory finishing is very capable of removing the bulk of contamination and foreign matter from a variety of materials. However, special vibratory finishing equipment would have to be designed and adapted for a remote process. Soaking techniques take long periods of time and may not remove all of the smearable contamination. If soaking involves pickling baths that use corrosive agents, these agents may cause erosion of grain boundaries that results in rough surfaces.

  2. Gastrointestinal Colonization with Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci In Hospitalized and Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Trajkovska-Dokic, Elena; Kaftandzieva, Ana; Stojkovska, Snezana; Kuzmanovska, Aneta; Panovski, Nikola

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The incidence of infection and intestinal colonization with vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) is increasing in many countries in the last decade. Concerning the difficult antimicrobial treatment of infections caused by VRE, decreasing the incidence and prevalence of these infections is an important factor in VRE-induced morbidity and mortality control. AIM: To determine the prevalence of gastrointestinal colonization with vancomycin resistant enterococci in hospitalized and outpatients, and to determine the genetic base of the vancomycin resistance in VRE isolates. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Seven hundred and eighty stool specimens were investigated for the gastrointestinal carriage of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). Susceptibility to vancomycin was tested in all isolates by disk-diffusion test and E-test (AB Biodisk, Sweden). Determined vancomycin resistant enterococci were than tested for detection of vanA, vanB and vanC genes by PCR. RESULTS: Vancomycin resistant strains of enterococci were isolated from 46 (16.1 %) of the 285 hospitalized patients and 5 (7.7 %) of the 65 patients living in the community (p < 0.05). The most of the highly resistant enterococci strains to vancomycin (95.2 %), were identified as E. faecium. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) to vancomycin in all 39 vanA genotypes of E. faecium and two vanA genotypes of E. fecalis were > 256 μg/ml. Three vanB genotypes of E. faecium and one vanB genotype of E. faecalis had MICs of 32 μg/ml. All six vanC genotypes of E. gallinarum had MICs of 8 μg/ml. All vanA genotypes of VRE were highly resistant to vancomycin, with MICs above 256 μg/ml. Three vanB genotypes of VR E. faecium and one VR E. fecalis were resistant, with MICs 32 μg/ml. vanC genotypes of VR E. gallinarum were intermediate resistant to vancomycin with MICs of 8 μg/ml. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of vancomycin resistant enterococci in Republic of Macedonia was 2-fold higher in hospitalized than in

  3. Escherichia coli and enterococci at beaches in the Grand Traverse Bay, Lake Michigan: Sources, characteristics, and environmental pathways

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haack, S.K.; Fogarty, L.R.; Wright, C.

    2003-01-01

    This study quantified Escherichia coli(EC) and enterococci (ENT) in beach waters and dominant source materials, correlated these with ambient conditions, and determined selected EC genotypes and ENT phenotypes. Bathing-water ENT criteria were exceeded more frequently than EC criteria, providing conflicting interpretations of water quality. Dominant sources of EC and ENT were bird feces (108/d/bird), storm drains (107/d), and river water (1011/d); beach sands, shallow groundwater and detritus were additional sources. Beach-water EC genotypes and ENT phenotypes formed clusters with those from all source types, reflecting diffuse inputs. Some ENT isolates had phenotypes similar to those of human pathogens and/or exhibited high-level resistance to human-use antibiotics. EC and ENT concentrations were influenced by collection time and wind direction. There was a 48-72-h lag between rainfall and elevated EC concentrations at three southern shoreline beaches, but no such lag at western and eastern shoreline beaches, reflecting the influence of beach orientation with respect to cyclic (3-5 d) summer weather patterns. In addition to local contamination sources and processes, conceptual or predictive models of Great Lakes beach water quality should consider regional weather patterns, lake hydrodynamics, and the influence of monitoring method variables (time of day, frequency).

  4. DEFENSE HIGH LEVEL WASTE GLASS DEGRADATION

    SciTech Connect

    W. Ebert

    2001-09-20

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the analyses that were done to develop models for radionuclide release from high-level waste (HLW) glass dissolution that can be integrated into performance assessment (PA) calculations conducted to support site recommendation and license application for the Yucca Mountain site. This report was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report for SR'' (CRWMS M&O 2000a). It specifically addresses the item, ''Defense High Level Waste Glass Degradation'', of the product technical work plan. The AP-3.15Q Attachment 1 screening criteria determines the importance for its intended use of the HLW glass model derived herein to be in the category ''Other Factors for the Postclosure Safety Case-Waste Form Performance'', and thus indicates that this factor does not contribute significantly to the postclosure safety strategy. Because the release of radionuclides from the glass will depend on the prior dissolution of the glass, the dissolution rate of the glass imposes an upper bound on the radionuclide release rate. The approach taken to provide a bound for the radionuclide release is to develop models that can be used to calculate the dissolution rate of waste glass when contacted by water in the disposal site. The release rate of a particular radionuclide can then be calculated by multiplying the glass dissolution rate by the mass fraction of that radionuclide in the glass and by the surface area of glass contacted by water. The scope includes consideration of the three modes by which water may contact waste glass in the disposal system: contact by humid air, dripping water, and immersion. The models for glass dissolution under these contact modes are all based on the rate expression for aqueous dissolution of borosilicate glasses. The mechanism and rate expression for aqueous dissolution are adequately understood; the analyses in this AMR were conducted to

  5. The high-level trigger of ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilsner, H.; Alt, T.; Aurbakken, K.; Grastveit, G.; Helstrup, H.; Lindenstruth, V.; Loizides, C.; Nystrand, J.; Roehrich, D.; Skaali, B.; Steinbeck, T.; Ullaland, K.; Vestbo, A.; Vik, T.

    One of the main tracking detectors of the forthcoming ALICE Experiment at the LHC is a cylindrical Time Projection Chamber (TPC) with an expected data volume of about 75 MByte per event. This data volume, in combination with the presumed maximum bandwidth of 1.2 GByte/s to the mass storage system, would limit the maximum event rate to 20 Hz. In order to achieve higher event rates, online data processing has to be applied. This implies either the detection and read-out of only those events which contain interesting physical signatures or an efficient compression of the data by modeling techniques. In order to cope with the anticipated data rate, massive parallel computing power is required. It will be provided in form of a clustered farm of SMP-nodes, based on off-the-shelf PCs, which are connected with a high bandwidth low overhead network. This High-Level Trigger (HLT) will be able to process a data rate of 25 GByte/s online. The front-end electronics of the individual sub-detectors is connected to the HLT via an optical link and a custom PCI card which is mounted in the clustered PCs. The PCI card is equipped with an FPGA necessary for the implementation of the PCI-bus protocol. Therefore, this FPGA can also be used to assist the host processor with first-level processing. The first-level processing done on the FPGA includes conventional cluster-finding for low multiplicity events and local track finding based on the Hough Transformation of the raw data for high multiplicity events. PACS: 07.05.-t Computers in experimental physics - 07.05.Hd Data acquisition: hardware and software - 29.85.+c Computer data analysis

  6. Enterococci concentrations in diverse coastal environments exhibit extreme variability.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Alexandria B

    2007-12-15

    Fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) concentrations in a single grab sample of water are used to notify the public about the safety of swimming in coastal waters. If concentrations are over a single-sample standard, waters are closed or placed under an advisory. Previous work has shown that notification errors occur often because FIB vary more quickly than monitoring results can be obtained (typically 24 h). Rapid detection technologies (such as quantitative polymerase chain reaction) that allow FIB quantification in hours have been suggested as a solution to notification errors. In the present study, I explore variability of enterococci (ENT) over time scales less than a day that might affect interpretation of FIB concentrations from a single grab sample, even if obtained rapidly. Five new data sets of ENT collected at 10 and 1 min periodicities for 24 and 1 h, respectively, are presented. Data sets are collected in diverse marine environments from a turbulent surf zone to a quiescent bay. ENT vary with solar and tidal cycles, as has been observed in previous studies. Over short time scales, ENT are extremely variable in each environment even the quiescent bay. Changes in ENT concentrations between consecutive samples (1 or 10 min apart) greater than the single-sample standard (104 most probable number per 100 mL) are not unusual. Variability, defined as the change in concentration between consecutive samples, is not distinct between environments. ENT change by 60% on average between consecutive samples, and by as much as 700%. Spectral analyses reveal no spectral peaks, but power-law decline of spectral density with frequency. Power-law exponents are close to 1 suggesting ENT time series share properties with 1/f noise and are fractal in nature. Since fractal time series have no characteristic time scale associated with them, it is not obvious how the fractal nature of ENT can be exploited for adaptive sampling or management. Policy makers, as well as scientists

  7. Discontinuation of Reflex Testing of Stool Samples for Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci Resulted in Increased Prevalence

    PubMed Central

    Bodily, Mandy; McMullen, Kathleen M.; Russo, Anthony J.; Kittur, Nupur D.; Hoppe-Bauer, Joan; Warren, David K.

    2015-01-01

    Discontinuation of reflex testing stool submitted for Clostridium difficile testing for vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) led to an increase of patients with healthcare-associated VRE bacteremia and bacteriuria (2.1 versus 3.6 per 10,000 patient days; p<0.01 ). Cost-benefit analysis showed reflex screening and isolation of VRE reduced hospital costs. PMID:23838226

  8. A CRITICAL EVALUATION OF A FLOW CYTOMETER USED FOR DETECTING ENTEROCOCCI IN RECREATIONAL WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current U. S. Environmental Protection Agency-approved method for enterococci (Method 1600) in recreational water is a membrane filter (MF) method that takes 24 hours to obtain results. If the recreational water is not in compliance with the standard, the risk of exposure to...

  9. A RAPID, SPECIFIC MEMBRANE FILTRATION PROCEDURE FOR ENUMERATION OF ENTEROCOCCI IN RECREATIONAL WATER (COPY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A two-step membrane filter (MF) method with mE medium, upon which the membrane must be incubated for 48 h and then transferred to a substrate medium to differentiate enterococci, is recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to measure entrococci in fresh and marine ...

  10. Draft Genome Sequences of Nine Clinical Isolates of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Paul G.; Koehler, Daniela; Chan, Jacqueline Z. M.; Cornely, Oliver A.; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Gillis, Meyke; Pallen, Mark J.; Tien, Johanna; Seifert, Harald; Vehreschild, Maria J. G. T.

    2016-01-01

    In 2012, there was an increase in vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) isolated from the intensive care unit at the University Hospital of Cologne. Using whole-genome sequencing it was possible to establish that bloodstream infections with VRE were not the result of an outbreak or cross infections. PMID:27540059

  11. Efficient Inactivation of Multi-Antibiotics Resistant Nosocomial Enterococci by Purified Hiracin Bacteriocin

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Maryam; Brede, Dag Anders; Diep, Dzung B.; Nes, Ingolf F.; Lotfipour, Farzaneh; Hojabri, Zoya

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Because of the emergence of multi-antibiotic resistant bacteria, a number of infectious diseases have become a major concern to treat in health care services worldwide. This situation is worsened by the fact that very limited progress has been made in developing new and potent antibiotics in recent years. In this context antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) represent new potential therapeutic compounds with bactericidal or bacteriostatic activity against closely related bacterial strains. Methods: In this study, a collection of enterococci (n=170) from clinical sources were investigated for their potential to inhibit multiresistant nosocomial enterococci from Iranian hospitals. Results: Four isolates produced antimicrobial peptides that inhibited all the antibiotic resistant enterococci. This included three Enterococcus faecium isolates producing combinations of enterocin A, B and L50 AB. The most potent antagonism was produced by E. faecalis HO91. Purification and subsequent characterization by MALDI-TOF MS, Edman degradation and DNA-sequencing revealed that the antimicrobial compound was Hiracin. The purified Hiracin was evaluated for antibacterial activity against 12 multiresistant enterococcal isolates from clinical samples. The results demonstrated that Hiracin is highly effective towards enterococci which were resistant even to antibiotics from four distinct classes. Conclusion: The present research addresses Hiracin as a promising alternative to conventional antibiotics in treatment of multiresistant enterococcal infections. PMID:26504762

  12. Prevalence of vancomycin resistant enterococci on poultry farms established after the ban of avoparcin.

    PubMed

    Sørum, Marit; Holstad, Gudmund; Lillehaug, Atle; Kruse, Hilde

    2004-12-01

    Fecal samples from poultry on farms established after the ban of avoparcin (study farms) and from poultry on farms previously exposed to avoparcin (control farms) were examined for the presence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). The samples were collected during the autumn and winter of 2001-2002. One isolate from each positive sample was selected, identified to species level, and examined for the presence of the vanA gene. The concentration of VRE and generic enterococci in the samples were also determined. In addition, the susceptibility to the ionophoric coccidiostat narasin was examined in a number of enterococcal isolates from poultry and in some enterococci of porcine origin that had not been exposed to narasin. VanA-type VRE was detected in samples from 64% of the study farms and 96% of the control farms. However, the concentration of VRE in the control samples was about six times larger than in the samples from the study farms. The minimum inhibitory concentration values for narasin differed between the poultry (1-4 mg/liter) and the porcine (0.25-0.5 mg/liter) isolates, indicating a decreased susceptibility towards narasin among enterococci from poultry. PMID:15666863

  13. Application of a plasmid classification system to determine prevalence of replicon families among multidrug resistant enterococci

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The presence and transfer of plasmids from commensal bacteria to more pathogenic bacteria may contribute to dissemination of antimicrobial resistance. However, prevalence of plasmids from commensal bacteria in food animals such as the enterococci remains largely unknown. In this study, the prevale...

  14. Effect of Environmental Parameters on the qPCR Signal of Enterococci in Tropical Waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fecal contamination is the major source of pathogens in recreational waters. The need for quick public notifications has expanded the interest in the use of a rapid, quantitative polymerase chain reaction method (qPCR) to determine enterococci density. However, very little info...

  15. Effects of tylosin use on erythromycin resistance in enterococci isolated from swine.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Charlene R; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J; Barrett, John B; Ladely, Scott R

    2004-07-01

    The effect of tylosin on erythromycin-resistant enterococci was examined on three farms; farm A used tylosin for growth promotion, farm B used tylosin for treatment of disease, and farm C did not use tylosin for either growth promotion or disease treatment. A total of 1,187 enterococci were isolated from gestation, farrowing, suckling, nursery, and finishing swine from the farms. From a subset of those isolates (n = 662), 59% (124 out of 208), 28% (80 out of 281), and 2% (4 out of 170) were resistant to erythromycin (MIC >/= 8 microg/ml) from farms A, B, and C, respectively. PCR analysis and Southern blotting revealed that 95% (65 out of 68) of isolates chosen from all three farms for further study were positive for ermB, but all were negative for ermA and ermC. By using Southern blotting, ermB was localized to the chromosome in 56 of the isolates while 9 isolates from farms A and B contained ermB on two similar-sized plasmid bands (12 to 16 kb). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed that the isolates were genetically diverse and represented a heterogeneous population of enterococci. This study suggests that although there was resistance to a greater number of enterococcal isolates on a farm where tylosin was used as a growth promotant, resistant enterococci also existed on a farm where no antimicrobial agents were used. PMID:15240302

  16. Immunochemical characterization of polysaccharide antigens from six clinical strains of Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Carolyn T; Ganong, Amanda L; Reinap, Barbara; Mourelatos, Zafiria; Huebner, Johannes; Wang, Julia Y

    2006-01-01

    Background Enterococci have become major nosocomial pathogens due to their intrinsic and acquired resistance to a broad spectrum of antibiotics. Their increasing drug resistance prompts us to search for prominent antigens to develop vaccines against enterococci. Given the success of polysaccharide-based vaccines against various bacterial pathogens, we isolated and characterized the immunochemical properties of polysaccharide antigens from five strains of Enterococcus faecalis and one strain of vancomycin-resistant E. faecium. Results We cultured large batches of each strain, isolated sufficient quantities of polysaccharides, analyzed their chemical structures, and compared their antigenic specificity. Three classes of polysaccharides were isolated from each strain, including a polyglucan, a teichoic acid, and a heteroglycan composed of rhamnose, glucose, galactose, mannosamine, and glucosamine. The polyglucans from all six strains are identical and appear to be dextran. Yields of the teichoic acids were generally low. The most abundant polysaccharides are the heteroglycans. The six heteroglycans are structurally different as evidenced by NMR spectroscopy. They also differ in their antigenic specificities as revealed by competitive ELISA. The heteroglycans are not immunogenic by themselves but conjugation to protein carriers significantly enhanced their ability to induce antibodies. Conclusion The six clinical strains of enterococci express abundant, strain-specific cell-surface heteroglycans. These polysaccharides may provide a molecular basis for serological typing of enterococcal strains and antigens for the development of vaccines against multi-drug resistant enterococci. PMID:16836754

  17. Development of a caseinase assay for PCR independent detection of esp gene carriage among enterococci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dada, Ayokunle Christopher; Asmat, Ahmad; Lee, Yook Heng; Usup, Gires

    2013-11-01

    Currently, there is no known relationship between caseinase and carriage of esp gene. Also, no breakpoints exist for phenotypic assays that are used to infer virulence characteristics among Enterococci. In the present study, caseinase activity was measured by a radial diffusion assay for 113 enterococci isolates. A standard curve with predictive r2 value of 0.939 was produced by dispensing several doubling dilutions of proteinase K into 3% skimmed milk agar wells. Caseinase activity for all tested enterococci was subsequently converted into proteinase K activity, using the obtained chart. Caseinase activity ranged from 1.74 × 10-8 to 4.47 × 10-7ug/ml and 6.37 × 10-8 to 8.82 × 10-8 ug/ml per colony of environmental and clinical enterocococci tested, proportionate to proteinase K activity. Caseinase activity among environmental strains was five-fold higher than was observed among clinical strains. Fishers exact test revealed significant associations between esp gene carriage and caseinase activity (diameter on skimmed milk, z=8 to 13mm) at p<0.1. However, the probability of association was strongest at z=13 mm (p=0.033) suggesting a range of diameter cut-offs that was exclusive to and may be used to predict the presence of environmental enterococci strains harbouring esp gene. Results obtained from sensitivity analysis showed increasing assay sensitivity from cut-off of 9 mm (61.54%) up to 84.62% (13 mm). Specificity of the caseinase assay slightly decreased from 50% to 42.86% as cut-off increased from 9 to 13 mm. The caseinase assay described here potentially proves useful in preliminary PCR independent screening of environmental enterococci isolates for the detection of strains which carry the esp gene known to increase the severity of enterococcal infections.

  18. Evidence for occurrence, persistence, and growth potential of Escherichia coli and enterococci in Hawaii’s soil environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Roll, Bruce M.; Fujioka, Roger S.

    2012-01-01

    High densities of Escherichia coli and enterococci are common in freshwaters on Oahu and other Hawaiian Islands. Soil along stream banks has long been suspected as the likely source of these bacteria; however, the extent of their occurrence and distribution in a wide range of soils remained unknown until the current investigation. Soil samples representing the seven major soil associations were collected on the island of Oahu and analyzed for fecal coliforms, E. coli, and enterococci by the most probable number method. Fecal coliforms, E. coli, and enterococci were found in most of the samples analyzed; log mean densities (MPN ± SE g soil−1) were 1.96±0.18, n=61; 1.21±0.17, n=57; and 2.99±0.12, n=62, respectively. Representative, presumptive cultures of E. coli and enterococci collected from the various soils were identified and further speciated using the API scheme; at least six species of Enterococcus, including Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium, were identified. In mesocosm studies, E. coli and enterococci increased by 100-fold in 4 days, after mixing sewage-spiked soil (one part) with autoclaved soil (nine parts). E. coli remained metabolically active in the soil and readily responded to nutrients, as evidenced by increased dehydrogenase activity. Collectively, these findings indicate that populations of E. coli and enterococci are part of the natural soil microflora, potentially influencing the quality of nearby water bodies.

  19. Impact of erosion and accretion on the distribution of enterococci in beach sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gast, Rebecca J.; Gorrell, Levi; Raubenheimer, Britt; Elgar, Steve

    2011-09-01

    Bacterial pathogens in coastal sediments may pose a health risk to users of beaches. Although recent work shows that beach sands harbor both indicator bacteria and potential pathogens, it is neither known how deep within beach sands the organisms may persist nor if they may be exposed during natural physical processes. In this study, sand cores of approximately 100 cm depth were collected at three sites across the beach face in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, before, during, and after large waves from an offshore hurricane. The presence of DNA from the fecal indicator bacterium Enterococci was detected in subsamples at different depths within the cores by PCR amplification. Erosion and accretion of beach sand at the three sites were also determined for each sampling day. The results indicate that ocean beach sands with persisting enterococci signals could be exposed and redistributed when wind, waves, and currents cause beach erosion or accretion.

  20. Virulence traits and antibiotic resistance among enterococci isolated from dogs with periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Manuela; Tavares, Marta; Gomes, Diana; Touret, Tiago; São Braz, Berta; Tavares, Luís; Semedo-Lemsaddek, Teresa

    2016-06-01

    Periodontal disease - PD - is one of the most widespread diseases in dogs, but the role of this odontogenic infection in the dissemination of pathogenic bacteria present in the oral mucosa to other animals or pet owners is understudied. Trying to unveil the putative pathogenicity of enterococci present in the gums of dogs diagnosed with PD, thirty-two animals were investigated during routine visits to a private veterinary clinic. Seventy-one enterococci were recovered and characterized regarding species, genomic variability, virulence traits, antimicrobial resistance and biofilm-forming ability. Isolates were mainly identified as Enterococcus faecalis, with the large majority (95%) being able to produce biofilm. Regarding antibiotic resistance, all dog-enterococci were susceptible to ampicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanate, gentamicin-120, imipenem and vancomycin; while distinct levels of resistance were observed for chloramphenicol (10%), erythromycin (20%), streptomycin-300 (35%) and tetracycline (95%). For virulence traits incidence levels of 35% were observed for β-hemolysis and 25% for cylA, 25% for gelatinase and 35% for gelE; 85% harbor efaAfs and ebpABC; while ace, agg and esp are present respectively in 50, 30 and 10% of the dog-enterococci; efaAfm and acm were detected in all the Enterococcus faecium. Overall, the widespread prevalence of PD in dogs, associated with the close contact between companion animals, other animals and humans, may act as source for the dissemination of opportunistic pathogenic bacteria. Hence, aforementioned data on virulence and resistance features, emphasizes the need for active surveillance measures, such as the diagnose of PD in companion animals during routine visits to the veterinary clinic. PMID:27260807

  1. Identification and antimicrobial susceptibility of enterococci isolated from dogs and cats subjected to differing antibiotic pressures.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Yasushi; Ito, Chieko; Kawashima, Aya; Ishii, Miki; Yamashiro, Satoko; Harada, Kazuki; Ochi, Hiroki; Sawada, Takuo

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant enterococci in dogs and cats subjected to differing antibiotic pressures, and the prevalence of vancomycin resistance genes in isolates from these animals. Enterococci were isolated from fecal samples of 65 healthy dogs and 29 healthy cats brought to animal hospitals, from rectal swabs of 73 puppies and 15 kittens from five breeders and two pet shops, and from fecal samples of 20 dogs and 9 cats that were treated with antibiotics in Nippon Veterinary and Life Science University Animal Medical Center. The rates of resistance to ampicillin among isolates from the kitten-puppy group and healthy dog-cat group were 6.8 and 4.3%, respectively. In contrast, the rates of resistance to ampicillin in enterococci from the treatment group under antibiotic pressure were 37.5%. There was a significant difference between the antibiotic-treated group and the untreated group (P<0.01). Similarly, in the treatment group, the rate of resistance to enrofloxacin was extremely high (75.0%). In comparison, in the healthy group and kitten-puppy group, the rates of resistance to enrofloxacin were 23.4 and 12.1%, respectively. Among these groups, a significant difference was also observed in the apparent resistance rates (P<0.01). Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) harboring vanA or vanB were not detected in any groups. Therefore, contamination of VRE in dogs and cats is still considered to be minimal in Japan. PMID:23358495

  2. Cadazolid Does Not Promote Intestinal Colonization of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Enderlin-Paput, Michel; Pfaff, Philippe; Weiss, Maria; Ritz, Daniel; Clozel, Martine; Locher, Hans H.

    2015-01-01

    The promotion of colonization with vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) is one potential side effect during treatment of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD), resulting from disturbances in gut microbiota. Cadazolid (CDZ) is an investigational antibiotic with potent in vitro activity against C. difficile and against VRE and is currently in clinical development for the treatment of CDAD. We report that CDZ treatment did not lead to intestinal VRE overgrowth in mice. PMID:26503650

  3. Solar Inactivation of Enterococci and Escherichia coli in Natural Waters: Effects of Water Absorbance and Depth.

    PubMed

    Maraccini, Peter A; Mattioli, Mia Catharine M; Sassoubre, Lauren M; Cao, Yiping; Griffith, John F; Ervin, Jared S; Van De Werfhorst, Laurie C; Boehm, Alexandria B

    2016-05-17

    The decay of sewage-sourced Escherichia coli and enterococci was measured at multiple depths in a freshwater marsh, a brackish water lagoon, and a marine site, all located in California. The marine site had very clear water, while the waters from the marsh and lagoon contained colored dissolved organic matter that not only blocked light but also produced reactive oxygen species. First order decay rate constants of both enterococci and E. coli were between 1 and 2 d(-1) under low light conditions and as high as 6 d(-1) under high light conditions. First order decay rate constants were well correlated to the daily average UVB light intensity corrected for light screening incorporating water absorbance and depth, suggesting endogenous photoinactivation is a major pathway for bacterial decay. Additional laboratory experiments demonstrated the presence of colored dissolved organic matter in marsh water enhanced photoinactivation of a laboratory strain of Enterococcus faecalis, but depressed photoinactivation of sewage-sourced enterococci and E. coli after correcting for UVB light screening, suggesting that although the exogenous indirect photoinactivation mechanism may be active against Ent. faecalis, it is not for the sewage-source organisms. A simple linear regression model based on UVB light intensity appears to be a useful tool for predicting inactivation rate constants in natural waters of any depth and absorbance. PMID:27119980

  4. Intestinal carriage of vancomycin-resistant enterococci in a community setting in Casablanca, Morocco.

    PubMed

    Hannaoui, Imane; Barguigua, Abouddihaj; Serray, Bahija; El Mdaghri, Naima; Timinouni, Mohammed; Ait Chaoui, Ahmed; El Azhari, Mohamed

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to determine the rate of intestinal carriage of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and to perform a phenotypic and genotypic characterisation of VRE isolates in the community in Casablanca, Morocco. During 6 months in 2014, 113 faecal samples were examined for the presence of enterococci. Antibiotic susceptibility of the isolates was determined by the disk diffusion method. Phenotypic and genotypic species identification was performed, and the vanA, vanB and vanC genes were detected by PCR. Each bacterial isolate resistant to vancomycin was subjected to amplification and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. In total, 100 strains were collected from a community population of 80 persons; 55% of the isolates were identified as Enterococcus faecium and 45% as Enterococcus faecalis. The resistance profile showed that 88% of the strains were multiresistant. The rate of faecal carriage of VRE was 21% (n=21), among which 8 strains were E. faecalis (17.8% of all E. faecalis) and 13 strains were E. faecium (23.6% of all E. faecium). PCR analysis revealed that all of the strains were resistant to vancomycin owing to possession of the vanA gene. The emergence of VRE and the high rate of colonisation by multiresistant enterococci are alarming. Strict measures are required to control the further spread of these strains in the Moroccan community. PMID:27530846

  5. Mycobacterium behavior in wastewater treatment plant, a bacterial model distinct from Escherichia coli and Enterococci.

    PubMed

    Radomski, Nicolas; Betelli, Laetitia; Moilleron, Régis; Haenn, Sophie; Moulin, Laurent; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Rocher, Vincent; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Lucas, Françoise S

    2011-06-15

    Mycobacteria are waterborne emerging pathogens causing infections in human. Mycobacteria have been previously isolated from wastewater and sludge, but their densities were not estimated due to cultural biases. In order to evaluate the impact of wastewater treatment processes on mycobacteria removal, we used a real time PCR method. First we compared six DNA extraction methods and second we used the more efficient DNA extraction procedure (i.e., enzymatic lysis combined with hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide-NaCl procedure) in order to quantify Mycobacterium. With the aim to identify parameters that could serve as indicator of mycobacterial behavior, mycobacterial densities were measured in parallel to those of Escherichia coli and enterococci, and to concentrations of chemical parameters usually monitored in wastewater. Mycobacterium reached 5.5 × 10⁵ ± 3.9 × 10⁵ copies/L in the influent, but was not detected in the effluent after decantation and biofiltration. Most mycobacteria (98.6 ± 2.7%, i.e. 2.4 ± 0.7 log₁₀) were removed by the physical-chemical decantation, and the remaining mycobacteria were removed by biofiltration. In contrast, enterococci and E. coli were lightly removed by decantation step and mainly removed by biofiltration. Our results showed that Mycobacterium corresponds to a hydrophobic behavior linked to insoluble compound removal, whereas enterococci and E. coli refer to hydrophilic behaviors linked to soluble compound removals. PMID:21591688

  6. Multiple-drug resistant enterococci: the nature of the problem and an agenda for the future.

    PubMed Central

    Huycke, M. M.; Sahm, D. F.; Gilmore, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    Enterococci, leading causes of nosocomial bacteremia, surgical wound infection, and urinary tract infection, are becoming resistant to many and sometimes all standard therapies. New rapid surveillance methods are highlighting the importance of examining enterococcal isolates at the species level. Most enterococcal infections are caused by Enterococcus faecalis, which are more likely to express traits related to overt virulence but--for the moment--also more likely to retain sensitivity to at least one effective antibiotic. The remaining infections are mostly caused by E. faecium, a species virtually devoid of known overt pathogenic traits but more likely to be resistant to even antibiotics of last resort. Effective control of multiple-drug resistant enterococci will require 1) better understanding of the interaction between enterococci, the hospital environment, and humans, 2) prudent antibiotic use, 3) better contact isolation in hospitals and other patient care environments, and 4) improved surveillance. Equally important is renewed vigor in the search for additional drugs, accompanied by the evolution of new therapeutic paradigms less vulnerable to the cycle of drug introduction and drug resistance. PMID:9621194

  7. Low Level of Resistance in Enterococci Isolated in Four Hospitals, Marseille, France.

    PubMed

    Abat, Cédric; Raoult, Didier; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2016-04-01

    Enterococci are gram-positive cocci responsible for various infections worldwide, and their prevalence of antibiotic resistance greatly varies worldwide. This study investigates the prevalence of resistance to antibiotics in enterococci from patients admitted in the four university hospitals of Marseille between January 2013 and September 2014. Two thousand nine hundred seventy-six patients-bacteria couples were identified (2,507 Enterococcus faecalis and 469 Enterococcus faecium) in the four university hospitals of Marseille. 1.3%, 8.9%, 1.4%, and 0% of E. faecalis strains were resistant to amoxicillin, gentamicin, teicoplanin, and vancomycin, respectively, and 83.9%, 49.2%, 1.3%, and 0.2% of E. faecium strains were resistant to amoxicillin, gentamicin, teicoplanin, and vancomycin, respectively. Resistance to aminoglycosides and vancomycin in strains isolated from blood cultures was significantly lower than that of most European countries included in the 2012 European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance Network report. Our low percentage of antibiotic resistance in enterococci is likely due to a low level of E. faecium infections, underlining the need to implement surveillance systems, especially to monitor the E. faecalis/E. faecium ratio evolution in blood cultures and others. PMID:26247097

  8. Safety and potential risks of enterococci isolated from traditional fermented capers.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pulido, R; Abriouel, H; Ben Omar, N; Lucas, R; Martínez-Cañamero, M; Gálvez, A

    2006-12-01

    A collection of 17 enterococci isolates obtained from fermentations of capers (the fruits of Capparis sp.) were investigated for incidence of known virulence determinants, antibiotic resistance and production of biogenic amines. Molecular identification revealed the presence of Enterococcus faecium (nine isolates), Enterococcus faecalis (4), E. avium (3) and Enterococcus casseliflavus/flavescens (1). Alpha-haemolytic activity was detected in two E. avium and one E. faecalis isolates, and beta-haemolytic activity was detected in E. casseliflavus/flavescens. The haemolytic component cylB was detected by PCR amplification in three non-haemolytic isolates and in E. casseliflavus/flavescens. The collagen adhesin ace gene and the endocarditis associated antigen gene efaA(fm) were detected in two isolates each. Genes encoding sex pheromone precursors (cpd, cob, ccf) were detected in E. faecalis and E. casseliflavus/flavescens. Other presumed virulence genes (agg, gelE, cylM, cylA and efaA(fs)) were not detected. All isolates were resistant to rifampicin, erythromycin and ciprofloxacin, and some were also resistant to quinupristin/dalfopristin, tetracycline, levofloxacin, gentamicin and streptomycin. Vancomycin resistance was not detected. Tyrosine decarboxylation was detected in all E. faecium isolates. Given the high resistance of enterococci to environmental conditions, and their implication in opportunistic infections, the incidence of potential virulent enterococci in foods (especially those of a higher risk-like home-made foods) should be carefully studied. PMID:16971033

  9. Antibiotic-Resistant Enterococci and Fecal Indicators in Surface Water and Groundwater Impacted by a Concentrated Swine Feeding Operation

    PubMed Central

    Sapkota, Amy R.; Curriero, Frank C.; Gibson, Kristen E.; Schwab, Kellogg J.

    2007-01-01

    Background The nontherapeutic use of antibiotics in swine feed can select for antibiotic resistance in swine enteric bacteria. Leaking swine waste storage pits and the land-application of swine manure can result in the dispersion of resistant bacteria to water sources. However, there are few data comparing levels of resistant bacteria in swine manure–impacted water sources versus unaffected sources. Objectives The goal of this study was to analyze surface water and groundwater situated up and down gradient from a swine facility for antibiotic-resistant enterococci and other fecal indicators. Methods Surface water and groundwater samples (n = 28) were collected up and down gradient from a swine facility from 2002 to 2004. Fecal indicators were isolated by membrane filtration, and enterococci (n = 200) were tested for susceptibility to erythromycin, tetracycline, clindamycin, virginiamycin, and vancomycin. Results Median concentrations of enterococci, fecal coliforms, and Escherichia coli were 4- to 33-fold higher in down-gradient versus up-gradient surface water and groundwater. We observed higher minimal inhibitory concentrations for four antibiotics in enterococci isolated from down-gradient versus up-gradient surface water and groundwater. Elevated percentages of erythromycin- (p = 0.02) and tetracycline-resistant (p = 0.06) enterococci were detected in down-gradient surface waters, and higher percentages of tetracycline- (p = 0.07) and clindamycin-resistant (p < 0.001) enterococci were detected in down-gradient groundwater. Conclusions We detected elevated levels of fecal indicators and antibiotic-resistant enterococci in water sources situated down gradient from a swine facility compared with up-gradient sources. These findings provide additional evidence that water contaminated with swine manure could contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance. PMID:17637920

  10. Effect of in-feed administration and withdrawal of tylosin phosphate on antibiotic resistance in enterococci isolated from feedlot steers.

    PubMed

    Beukers, Alicia G; Zaheer, Rahat; Cook, Shaun R; Stanford, Kim; Chaves, Alexandre V; Ward, Michael P; McAllister, Tim A

    2015-01-01

    Tylosin phosphate is a macrolide commonly administered to cattle in North America for the control of liver abscesses. This study investigated the effect of in-feed administration of tylosin phosphate to cattle at subtherapeutic levels and its subsequent withdrawal on macrolide resistance using enterococci as an indicator bacterium. Fecal samples were collected from steers that received no antibiotics and steers administered tylosin phosphate (11 ppm) in-feed for 197 days and withdrawn 28 days before slaughter. Enterococcus species isolated from fecal samples were identified through sequencing the groES-EL intergenic spacer region and subject to antimicrobial susceptibility testing, identification of resistance determinants and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiling. Tylosin increased (P < 0.05) the proportion of ery(R) and tyl(R) enterococci within the population. Just prior to its removal, the proportion of ery(R) and tyl(R) resistant enterococci began decreasing and continued to decrease after tylosin was withdrawn from the diet until there was no difference (P > 0.05) between treatments on d 225. This suggests that antibiotic withdrawal prior to slaughter contributes to a reduction in the proportion of macrolide resistant enterococci entering the food chain. Among the 504 enterococci isolates characterized, Enterococcus hirae was found to predominate (n = 431), followed by Enterococcus villorum (n = 32), Enterococcus faecium (n = 21), Enterococcus durans (n = 7), Enterococcus casseliflavus (n = 4), Enterococcus mundtii (n = 4), Enterococcus gallinarum (n = 3), Enterococcus faecalis (n = 1), and Enterococcus thailandicus (n = 1). The diversity of enterococci was greater in steers at arrival than at exit from the feedlot. Erythromycin resistant isolates harbored the erm(B) and/or msrC gene. Similar PFGE profiles of ery(R) E. hirae pre- and post-antibiotic treatment suggest that increased abundance of ery(R) enterococci after administration of tylosin phosphate

  11. Effect of in-feed administration and withdrawal of tylosin phosphate on antibiotic resistance in enterococci isolated from feedlot steers

    PubMed Central

    Beukers, Alicia G.; Zaheer, Rahat; Cook, Shaun R.; Stanford, Kim; Chaves, Alexandre V.; Ward, Michael P.; McAllister, Tim A.

    2015-01-01

    Tylosin phosphate is a macrolide commonly administered to cattle in North America for the control of liver abscesses. This study investigated the effect of in-feed administration of tylosin phosphate to cattle at subtherapeutic levels and its subsequent withdrawal on macrolide resistance using enterococci as an indicator bacterium. Fecal samples were collected from steers that received no antibiotics and steers administered tylosin phosphate (11 ppm) in-feed for 197 days and withdrawn 28 days before slaughter. Enterococcus species isolated from fecal samples were identified through sequencing the groES-EL intergenic spacer region and subject to antimicrobial susceptibility testing, identification of resistance determinants and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiling. Tylosin increased (P < 0.05) the proportion of eryR and tylR enterococci within the population. Just prior to its removal, the proportion of eryR and tylR resistant enterococci began decreasing and continued to decrease after tylosin was withdrawn from the diet until there was no difference (P > 0.05) between treatments on d 225. This suggests that antibiotic withdrawal prior to slaughter contributes to a reduction in the proportion of macrolide resistant enterococci entering the food chain. Among the 504 enterococci isolates characterized, Enterococcus hirae was found to predominate (n = 431), followed by Enterococcus villorum (n = 32), Enterococcus faecium (n = 21), Enterococcus durans (n = 7), Enterococcus casseliflavus (n = 4), Enterococcus mundtii (n = 4), Enterococcus gallinarum (n = 3), Enterococcus faecalis (n = 1), and Enterococcus thailandicus (n = 1). The diversity of enterococci was greater in steers at arrival than at exit from the feedlot. Erythromycin resistant isolates harbored the erm(B) and/or msrC gene. Similar PFGE profiles of eryR E. hirae pre- and post-antibiotic treatment suggest that increased abundance of eryR enterococci after administration of tylosin phosphate reflects

  12. 40 CFR 227.30 - High-level radioactive waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false High-level radioactive waste. 227.30 Section 227.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING...-level radioactive waste. High-level radioactive waste means the aqueous waste resulting from...

  13. 40 CFR 227.30 - High-level radioactive waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false High-level radioactive waste. 227.30 Section 227.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING...-level radioactive waste. High-level radioactive waste means the aqueous waste resulting from...

  14. 40 CFR 227.30 - High-level radioactive waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true High-level radioactive waste. 227.30 Section 227.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING...-level radioactive waste. High-level radioactive waste means the aqueous waste resulting from...

  15. 40 CFR 227.30 - High-level radioactive waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false High-level radioactive waste. 227.30 Section 227.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING...-level radioactive waste. High-level radioactive waste means the aqueous waste resulting from...

  16. 46 CFR 182.530 - Bilge high level alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Bilge high level alarms. 182.530 Section 182.530... TONS) MACHINERY INSTALLATION Bilge and Ballast Systems § 182.530 Bilge high level alarms. (a) On a... operating station to indicate a high water level in each of the following normally unmanned spaces: (1)...

  17. 46 CFR 182.530 - Bilge high level alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Bilge high level alarms. 182.530 Section 182.530... TONS) MACHINERY INSTALLATION Bilge and Ballast Systems § 182.530 Bilge high level alarms. (a) On a... operating station to indicate a high water level in each of the following normally unmanned spaces: (1)...

  18. 46 CFR 119.530 - Bilge high level alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Bilge high level alarms. 119.530 Section 119.530... Bilge and Ballast Systems § 119.530 Bilge high level alarms. (a) Each vessel must be provided with a visual and audible alarm at the operating station to indicate a high water level in each of the...

  19. 46 CFR 119.530 - Bilge high level alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Bilge high level alarms. 119.530 Section 119.530... Bilge and Ballast Systems § 119.530 Bilge high level alarms. (a) Each vessel must be provided with a visual and audible alarm at the operating station to indicate a high water level in each of the...

  20. 46 CFR 182.530 - Bilge high level alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Bilge high level alarms. 182.530 Section 182.530... TONS) MACHINERY INSTALLATION Bilge and Ballast Systems § 182.530 Bilge high level alarms. (a) On a... operating station to indicate a high water level in each of the following normally unmanned spaces: (1)...

  1. 46 CFR 182.530 - Bilge high level alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Bilge high level alarms. 182.530 Section 182.530... TONS) MACHINERY INSTALLATION Bilge and Ballast Systems § 182.530 Bilge high level alarms. (a) On a... operating station to indicate a high water level in each of the following normally unmanned spaces: (1)...

  2. 46 CFR 119.530 - Bilge high level alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Bilge high level alarms. 119.530 Section 119.530... Bilge and Ballast Systems § 119.530 Bilge high level alarms. (a) Each vessel must be provided with a visual and audible alarm at the operating station to indicate a high water level in each of the...

  3. 46 CFR 119.530 - Bilge high level alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Bilge high level alarms. 119.530 Section 119.530... Bilge and Ballast Systems § 119.530 Bilge high level alarms. (a) Each vessel must be provided with a visual and audible alarm at the operating station to indicate a high water level in each of the...

  4. 46 CFR 119.530 - Bilge high level alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bilge high level alarms. 119.530 Section 119.530... Bilge and Ballast Systems § 119.530 Bilge high level alarms. (a) Each vessel must be provided with a visual and audible alarm at the operating station to indicate a high water level in each of the...

  5. Process for solidifying high-level nuclear waste

    DOEpatents

    Ross, Wayne A.

    1978-01-01

    The addition of a small amount of reducing agent to a mixture of a high-level radioactive waste calcine and glass frit before the mixture is melted will produce a more homogeneous glass which is leach-resistant and suitable for long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste products.

  6. 46 CFR 153.409 - High level alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false High level alarms. 153.409 Section 153.409 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Gauging Systems § 153.409 High level alarms. When Table...

  7. Comparative Study of Bacteremias Caused by Enterococcus spp. with and without High-Level Resistance to Gentamicin

    PubMed Central

    Caballero-Granado, Francisco Javier; Cisneros, J. M.; Luque, R.; Torres-Tortosa, M.; Gamboa, F.; Díez, F.; Villanueva, J. L.; Pérez-Cano, R.; Pasquau, J.; Merino, D.; Menchero, A.; Mora, D.; López-Ruz, M. A.; Vergara, A.; Infecciosas, for the Grupo Andaluz Para El Estudio De Las Enfermedades

    1998-01-01

    A prospective, multicenter study was carried out over a period of 10 months. All patients with clinically significant bacteremia caused by Enterococcus spp. were included. The epidemiological, microbiological, clinical, and prognostic features and the relationship of these features to the presence of high-level resistance to gentamicin (HLRG) were studied. Ninety-three patients with enterococcal bacteremia were included, and 31 of these cases were caused by HLRG (33%). The multivariate analysis selected chronic renal failure, intensive care unit stay, previous use of antimicrobial agents, and Enterococcus faecalis species as the independent risk factors that influenced the development of HLRG. The strains with HLRG showed lower levels of susceptibility to penicillin and ciprofloxacin. Clinical features (except for chronic renal failure) were similar in both groups of patients. HLRG did not influence the prognosis for patients with enterococcal bacteremia in terms of either the crude mortality rate (29% for patients with bacteremia caused by enterococci with HLRG and 28% for patients not infected with strains with HLRG) or the hospital stay after the acquisition of enterococcal bacteremia. Hemodynamic compromise, inappropriate antimicrobial therapy, and mechanical ventilation were revealed in the multivariate analysis to be the independent risk factors for mortality. Prolonged hospitalization was associated with the nosocomial acquisition of bacteremia and polymicrobial infections. PMID:9466769

  8. Reference commercial high-level waste glass and canister definition.

    SciTech Connect

    Slate, S.C.; Ross, W.A.; Partain, W.L.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents technical data and performance characteristics of a high-level waste glass and canister intended for use in the design of a complete waste encapsulation package suitable for disposal in a geologic repository. The borosilicate glass contained in the stainless steel canister represents the probable type of high-level waste product that will be produced in a commercial nuclear-fuel reprocessing plant. Development history is summarized for high-level liquid waste compositions, waste glass composition and characteristics, and canister design. The decay histories of the fission products and actinides (plus daughters) calculated by the ORIGEN-II code are presented.

  9. Neptunium estimation in dissolver and high-level-waste solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, P.N.; Prabhu, D.R.; Kanekar, A.S.; Manchanda, V.K.

    2008-07-01

    This papers deals with the optimization of the experimental conditions for the estimation of {sup 237}Np in spent-fuel dissolver/high-level waste solutions using thenoyltrifluoroacetone as the extractant. (authors)

  10. HIGH-LEVEL OZONE DISINFECTION OF MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER EFFLUENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A 20 month operating experimental program was conducted at Marlborough, Massachusetts to evaluate the feasibility, engineering, and economic aspects of achieving high levels of effluent disinfection with ozone. The ozone research pilot facility was designed to operate at a consta...

  11. Decision Document for Heat Removal from High Level Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    WILLIS, W.L.

    2000-07-31

    This document establishes the combination of design and operational configurations that will be used to provide heat removal from high-level waste tanks during Phase 1 waste feed delivery to prevent the waste temperature from exceeding tank safety requirement limits. The chosen method--to use the primary and annulus ventilation systems to remove heat from the high-level waste tanks--is documented herein.

  12. 46 CFR 182.530 - Bilge high level alarms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bilge high level alarms. 182.530 Section 182.530 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) MACHINERY INSTALLATION Bilge and Ballast Systems § 182.530 Bilge high level alarms. (a) On a vessel of at least 7.9 meters (26 feet) in...

  13. High-Level Waste System Process Interface Description

    SciTech Connect

    d'Entremont, P.D.

    1999-01-14

    The High-Level Waste System is a set of six different processes interconnected by pipelines. These processes function as one large treatment plant that receives, stores, and treats high-level wastes from various generators at SRS and converts them into forms suitable for final disposal. The three major forms are borosilicate glass, which will be eventually disposed of in a Federal Repository, Saltstone to be buried on site, and treated water effluent that is released to the environment.

  14. Ecology of Antibiotic Resistance Genes: Characterization of Enterococci from Houseflies Collected in Food Settings†

    PubMed Central

    Macovei, Lilia; Zurek, Ludek

    2006-01-01

    In this project, enterococci from the digestive tracts of 260 houseflies (Musca domestica L.) collected from five restaurants were characterized. Houseflies frequently (97% of the flies were positive) carried enterococci (mean, 3.1 × 103 CFU/fly). Using multiplex PCR, 205 of 355 randomly selected enterococcal isolates were identified and characterized. The majority of these isolates were Enterococcus faecalis (88.2%); in addition, 6.8% were E. faecium, and 4.9% were E. casseliflavus. E. faecalis isolates were phenotypically resistant to tetracycline (66.3%), erythromycin (23.8%), streptomycin (11.6%), ciprofloxacin (9.9%), and kanamycin (8.3%). Tetracycline resistance in E. faecalis was encoded by tet(M) (65.8%), tet(O) (1.7%), and tet(W) (0.8%). The majority (78.3%) of the erythromycin-resistant E. faecalis isolates carried erm(B). The conjugative transposon Tn916 and members of the Tn916/Tn1545 family were detected in 30.2% and 34.6% of the identified isolates, respectively. E. faecalis carried virulence genes, including a gelatinase gene (gelE; 70.7%), an aggregation substance gene (asa1; 33.2%), an enterococcus surface protein gene (esp; 8.8%), and a cytolysin gene (cylA; 8.8%). Phenotypic assays showed that 91.4% of the isolates with the gelE gene were gelatinolytic and that 46.7% of the isolates with the asa1 gene aggregated. All isolates with the cylA gene were hemolytic on human blood. This study showed that houseflies in food-handling and -serving facilities carry antibiotic-resistant and potentially virulent enterococci that have the capacity for horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes to other bacteria. PMID:16751512

  15. Vancomycin-Variable Enterococci Can Give Rise to Constitutive Resistance during Antibiotic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Thaker, Maulik N.; Kalan, Lindsay; Waglechner, Nicholas; Eshaghi, Alireza; Patel, Samir N.; Poutanen, Susan; Willey, Barbara; Coburn, Bryan; McGeer, Allison; Low, Donald E.

    2014-01-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) are notorious clinical pathogens restricting the use of glycopeptide antibiotics in the clinic setting. Routine surveillance to detect VRE isolated from patients relies on PCR bioassays and chromogenic agar-based test methods. In recent years, we and others have reported the emergence of enterococcal strains harboring a “silent” copy of vancomycin resistance genes that confer a vancomycin-susceptible phenotype (vancomycin-susceptible enterococci [VSE]) and thus escape detection using drug sensitivity screening tests. Alarmingly, these strains are able to convert to a resistance phenotype (VSE→VRE) during antibiotic treatment, severely compromising the success of therapy. Such strains have been termed vancomycin-variable enterococci (VVE). We have investigated the molecular mechanisms leading to the restoration of resistance in VVE isolates through the whole-genome sequencing of resistant isolates, measurement of resistance gene expression, and quantification of the accumulation of drug-resistant peptidoglycan precursors. The results demonstrate that VVE strains can revert to a VRE phenotype through the constitutive expression of the vancomycin resistance cassette. This is accomplished through a variety of changes in the DNA region upstream of the resistance genes that includes both a deletion of a likely transcription inhibitory secondary structure and the introduction of a new unregulated promoter. The VSE→VRE transition of VVE can occur in patients during the course of antibiotic therapy, resulting in treatment failure. These VVE strains therefore pose a new challenge to the current regimen of diagnostic tests used for VRE detection in the clinic setting. PMID:25512425

  16. Identification and prevalence of tetracycline resistance in enterococci isolated from poultry in Ilishan, Ogun State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ayeni, Funmilola A.; Odumosu, Bamidele Tolulope; Oluseyi, Adekola E.; Ruppitsch, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tetracycline is one of the most frequently used antibiotics in Nigeria both for human and animal infections because of its cheapness and ready availability. The use of tetracycline in animal husbandry could lead to horizontal transfer of tet genes from poultry to human through the gut microbiota, especially enterococci. Therefore, this study is designed to identify different enterococcal species from poultry feces in selected farms in Ilishan, Ogun State, Nigeria, determine the prevalence of tetracycline resistance/genes and presence of IS256 in enterococcal strains. Materials and Methods: Enterococci strains were isolated from 100 fresh chicken fecal samples collected from seven local poultry farms in Ilishan, Ogun State, Nigeria. The strains were identified by partial sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Antibiotic susceptibility of the isolates to vancomycin, erythromycin, tetracycline, gentamicin, amoxycillin/claulanate, and of loxacin were performed by disc diffusion method. Detection of tet, erm, and van genes and IS256 insertion element were done by polymerase chain reaction amplification. Results: Sixty enterococci spp. were identified comprising of Enterococcus faecalis 33 (55%), Enterococcus casseliflavus 21 (35%), and Enterococcus gallinarium 6 (10%). All the isolates were resistant to erythromycin (100%), followed by tetracycline (81.67%), amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (73.33%), ofloxacin (68.33%), vancomycin (65%), and gentamicin (20%). None of the enterococcal spp. harbored the van and erm genes while tet(M) was detected among 23% isolates and is distributed mostly among E. casseliflavus. IS256 elements were detected only in 33% of E. casseliflavus that were also positive for tet(M) gene. Conclusion: This study provides evidence that tetracycline resistance gene is present in the studied poultry farms in Ilishan, Ogun State, Nigeria and underscores the need for strict regulation on tetracycline usage in poultry farming in the studied location and

  17. Ecology of antibiotic resistance genes: characterization of enterococci from houseflies collected in food settings.

    PubMed

    Macovei, Lilia; Zurek, Ludek

    2006-06-01

    In this project, enterococci from the digestive tracts of 260 houseflies (Musca domestica L.) collected from five restaurants were characterized. Houseflies frequently (97% of the flies were positive) carried enterococci (mean, 3.1 x 10(3) CFU/fly). Using multiplex PCR, 205 of 355 randomly selected enterococcal isolates were identified and characterized. The majority of these isolates were Enterococcus faecalis (88.2%); in addition, 6.8% were E. faecium, and 4.9% were E. casseliflavus. E. faecalis isolates were phenotypically resistant to tetracycline (66.3%), erythromycin (23.8%), streptomycin (11.6%), ciprofloxacin (9.9%), and kanamycin (8.3%). Tetracycline resistance in E. faecalis was encoded by tet(M) (65.8%), tet(O) (1.7%), and tet(W) (0.8%). The majority (78.3%) of the erythromycin-resistant E. faecalis isolates carried erm(B). The conjugative transposon Tn916 and members of the Tn916/Tn1545 family were detected in 30.2% and 34.6% of the identified isolates, respectively. E. faecalis carried virulence genes, including a gelatinase gene (gelE; 70.7%), an aggregation substance gene (asa1; 33.2%), an enterococcus surface protein gene (esp; 8.8%), and a cytolysin gene (cylA; 8.8%). Phenotypic assays showed that 91.4% of the isolates with the gelE gene were gelatinolytic and that 46.7% of the isolates with the asa1 gene aggregated. All isolates with the cylA gene were hemolytic on human blood. This study showed that houseflies in food-handling and -serving facilities carry antibiotic-resistant and potentially virulent enterococci that have the capacity for horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes to other bacteria. PMID:16751512

  18. A comparison of BOX-PCR and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to determine genetic relatedness of enterococci from different environments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: The genetic relatedness of enterococci from poultry litter to enterococci from nearby surface water and groundwater in the Lower Fraser Valley regions of British Columbia, Canada was determined. Methods and Results: BOX-PCR and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) were used to subtype en...

  19. Transport and persistence of tylosin-resistant enterococci, erm genes, and tylosin in soil and drainage water from fields receiving swine manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Land application of manure from tylosin-treated swine introduces tylosin-resistant enterococci, erm genes, which confer resistance to tylosin, and tylosin. This study documents the occurrence and transport of tylosin-resistant enterococci, erm genes, and tylosin in tile-drained chisel plow and no-ti...

  20. Oritavancin Activity Tested against Molecularly Characterized Staphylococci and Enterococci Displaying Elevated Linezolid MIC Results.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Rodrigo E; Farrell, David J; Sader, Helio S; Flamm, Robert K; Jones, Ronald N

    2016-06-01

    Oritavancin (MIC50/90, 0.03/0.06 to 0.12 μg/ml) had potent activity against linezolid-resistant staphylococci, as well as Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium (oritavancin MIC50/90, 0.015/0.12 μg/ml against both species). All linezolid-resistant isolates were inhibited by oritavancin at ≤0.12 μg/ml. These results confirmed the absence of cross-resistance between linezolid and oritavancin in staphylococci and enterococci. PMID:27001823

  1. Temporal Variabilities in Genetic Patterns and Antibiotic Resistance Profiles of Enterococci Isolated from Human Feces

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Masateru; Shimauchi, Hidetaka; Suzuki, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Temporal variabilities in the genetic patterns and antibiotic resistance profiles of enterococci were monitored over a 7-month period. Enterococcus faecalis isolates (103 strains) collected from feces showed only one genetic pattern and antibiotic resistance profile within 0 d and 30 d. In contrast, after 60 d and 90 d, the genetic patterns and antibiotic resistance profiles of all E. faecalis isolates (8 strains) clearly differed within 30 d. These results indicate that the genetic patterns and antibiotic resistance profiles of E. faecalis in human feces changed to completely dissimilar patterns between 1 and 2 months. PMID:27265342

  2. Molecular Characterization of Virulence Genes in Vancomycin-Resistant and Vancomycin-Sensitive Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Priyanka Paul; Dey, Sangeeta; Sen, Aninda; Adhikari, Luna

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to find out the correlation between presence of virulence (gelatinase [gel E], enterococcal surface protein [esp], cytolysin A [cyl A], hyaluronidase [hyl], and aggregation substance [asa1]) and vancomycin-resistant genes (van A and van B) in enterococci, with their phenotypic expression. Materials and Methods: A total of 500 isolates (250 each clinical and fecal) were processed. Enterococci were isolated from various clinical samples and from fecal specimens of colonized patients. Various virulence determinants namely asa1, esp, hyl, gel E, and cyl were detected by phenotypic methods. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of vancomycin was determined by agar dilution method. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect the presence of virulence and van genes. Results: Out of all the samples processed, 12.0% (60/500) isolates carried van A or van B genes as confirmed by MIC test and PCR methods. Genes responsible for virulence were detected by multiplex PCR and at least one of the five was detected in all the clinical vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and vancomycin-sensitive enterococci (VSE). gel E, esp, and hyl genes were found to be significantly higher in clinical VRE. Of the fecal isolates, presence of gel E, esp, and asa1 was significantly higher in VRE as compared to VSE. The presence of hyl gene in the clinical VRE was found to be statistically significant (P = 0.043) as against the fecal VRE. Correlation between the presence of virulence genes and their expression as detected by phenotypic tests showed that while biofilm production was seen in 61.1% (22/36) of clinical VRE, the corresponding genes, i.e., asa1 and esp were detected in 30.5% (11/36) and 27.8% (10/36) of strains only. Conclusion: Enterococcus faecium isolates were found to carry esp gene, a phenomenon that has been described previously only for Enterococcus faecalis, but we were unable to correlate the presence of esp with their

  3. Evaluation of the BD Phoenix Automated Microbiology System for Identification and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Staphylococci and Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Karen C.; Borek, Anita P.; Burger, Chad; Glanz, Brian; Bhally, Hasan; Henciak, Susan; Flayhart, Diane C.

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the Phoenix automated microbiology system (BD Diagnostic Systems, Sparks, MD) for the identification (ID) and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) of challenge and clinical staphylococci and enterococci recovered from patients in a tertiary-care medical center. In total, 424 isolates were tested: 90 enterococci; 232 Staphylococcus aureus isolates, including 14 vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus isolates; and 102 staphylococci other than S. aureus (non-S. aureus). The Phoenix panels were inoculated according to the manufacturer's instructions. The reference methods for ID comparisons were conventional biochemicals and cell wall fatty acid analysis with the Sherlock microbial identification system (v 3.1; MIDI, Inc. Newark, DE). Agar dilution was the reference AST method. The overall rates of agreement for identification to the genus and the species levels were 99.7% and 99.3%, respectively. All S. aureus isolates and enterococci were correctly identified by the Phoenix panels. For the non-S. aureus staphylococci, there was 98.0% agreement for the ID of 16 different species. The AST results were stratified by organism group. For S. aureus, the categorical agreement (CA) and essential agreement (EA) were 98.2% and 98.8%, respectively. Three of three very major errors (VMEs; 1.7%) were with oxacillin. For non-S. aureus staphylococci, the CA, EA, VME, major errors, and minor error rates were 95.7%, 96.8%, 0.7%, 1.7%, and 2.9%, respectively. The two VMEs were with oxacillin. For the enterococci, there was 100% CA and 99.3% EA. All 36 vancomycin-resistant enterococci were detected by the Phoenix system. The Phoenix system compares favorably to traditional methods for the ID and AST of staphylococci and enterococci. PMID:16757600

  4. Antibiotic resistance, virulence determinants and production of biogenic amines among enterococci from ovine, feline, canine, porcine and human milk

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown that mammalian milk represents a continuous supply of commensal bacteria, including enterococci. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the presence of enterococci in milk of different species and to screen them for several genetic and phenotypic traits of clinical significance among enterococci. Results Samples were obtained from, at least, nine porcine, canine, ovine, feline and human healthy hosts. Enterococci could be isolated, at a concentration of 1.00 × 102 -1.16 × 103 CFU/ml, from all the porcine samples and, also from 85, 50, 25 and 25% of the human, canine, feline and ovine ones, respectively. They were identified as Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus hirae, Enterococcus casseliflavus and Enterococcus durans. Among the 120 initial enterococcal isolates, 36 were selected on the basis of their different PFGE profiles and further characterized. MLST analysis revealed a wide diversity of STs among the E. faecalis and E. faecium strains, including some frequently associated to hospital infections and novel STs. All the E. faecalis strains possessed some of the potential virulence determinants (cad, ccf, cob, cpd, efaAfs, agg2, gelE, cylA, espfs) assayed while the E. faecium ones only harboured the efaAfm gene. All the tested strains were susceptible to tigecycline, linezolid and vancomycin, and produced tyramine. Their susceptibility to the rest of the antimicrobials and their ability to produce other biogenic amines varied depending on the strain. Enterococci strains isolated from porcine samples showed the widest spectrum of antibiotic resistance. Conclusions Enterococci isolated from milk of different mammals showed a great genetic diversity. The wide distribution of virulence genes and/or antibiotic resistance among the E. faecalis and E. faecium isolates indicates that they can constitute a reservoir of such traits and a risk to animal and human health. PMID:24325647

  5. Occurrence of Escherichia coli and enterococci in Cladophora (Clorophyta) in nearshore water and beach sand of Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitman, Richard L.; Shively, Dawn A.; Pawlik, Heather; Nevers, Meredith B.; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.

    2003-01-01

    Each summer, the nuisance green alga Cladophora (mostly Cladophora glomerata) amasses along Lake Michigan beaches, creating nearshore anoxia and unsightly, malodorous mats that can attract problem animals and detract from visitor enjoyment. Traditionally, elevated counts of Escherichia coli are presumed to indicate the presence of sewage, mostly derived from nearby point sources. The relationship between fecal indicator bacteria and Cladophora remains essentially unstudied. This investigation describes the local and regional density of Escherichia coli and enterococci in Cladophora mats along beaches in the four states (Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, and Michigan) bordering Lake Michigan. Samples of Cladophora strands collected from 10 beaches (n = 41) were assayed for concentrations of E. coli and enterococci during the summer of 2002. Both E. coli and enterococci were ubiquitous (up to 97% occurrence), with overall log mean densities (± standard errors) of 5.3 (± 4.8) and 4.8 (± 4.5) per g (dry weight). E. coli and enterococci were strongly correlated in southern Lake Michigan beaches (P R2 = 0.73, n = 17) but not in northern beaches (P = 0.892, n = 16). Both E. coli and enterococci survived for over 6 months in sun-dried Cladophora mats stored at 4°C; the residual bacteria in the dried alga readily grew upon rehydration. These findings suggest that Cladophora amassing along the beaches of Lake Michigan may be an important environmental source of indicator bacteria and call into question the reliability of E. coli and enterococci as indicators of water quality for freshwater recreational beaches.

  6. Occurrence of Escherichia coli and enterococci in Cladophora (Chlorophyta) in nearshore water and beach sand of Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitman, Richard L.; Shively, Dawn A.; Pawlik, Heather; Nevers, Meredith; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.

    2003-01-01

    Each summer, the nuisance green alga Cladophora (mostly Cladophora glomerata) amasses along Lake Michigan beaches, creating nearshore anoxia and unsightly, malodorous mats that can attract problem animals and detract from visitor enjoyment. Traditionally, elevated counts of Escherichia coli are presumed to indicate the presence of sewage, mostly derived from nearby point sources. The relationship between fecal indicator bacteria and Cladophora remains essentially unstudied. This investigation describes the local and regional density ofEscherichia coli and enterococci in Cladophora mats along beaches in the four states (Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, and Michigan) bordering Lake Michigan. Samples of Cladophora strands collected from 10 beaches (n = 41) were assayed for concentrations of E. coli and enterococci during the summer of 2002. Both E. coli and enterococci were ubiquitous (up to 97% occurrence), with overall log mean densities (± standard errors) of 5.3 (± 4.8) and 4.8 (± 4.5) per g (dry weight). E. coli and enterococci were strongly correlated in southern Lake Michigan beaches (P< 0.001, R2 = 0.73, n = 17) but not in northern beaches (P = 0.892, n = 16). BothE. coli and enterococci survived for over 6 months in sun-dried Cladophora mats stored at 4°C; the residual bacteria in the dried alga readily grew upon rehydration. These findings suggest that Cladophora amassing along the beaches of Lake Michigan may be an important environmental source of indicator bacteria and call into question the reliability of E. coli and enterococci as indicators of water quality for freshwater recreational beaches.

  7. Validation of the Enterococci indicator for bacteriological quality monitoring of beaches in Malaysia using a multivariate approach.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Asmat; Dada, Ayokunle C; Usup, Gires; Heng, Lee Y

    2013-01-01

    There is currently no established bacteriological beach quality monitoring (BQM) program in place in Malaysia. To initiate cost-effective, sustainable bacteriological BQM schemes for the ultimate goal of protecting public health, policy decision makers need to be provided robust, indigenous empirical findings that validate appropriate water quality parameters for inclusion in such monitoring programs. This is the first study that assesses the validity of enterococci as an ideal indicator for bacteriological BQM in Malaysia using a multivariate approach. Beach water and sand samples from 7 beach locations were analyzed for a total of twenty-one microbial and non-microbial water quality parameters. A multivariate approach incorporating cluster analyses (CA), principal component analyses (PCA), and factor analysis (FA) was also adopted. Apart from the weak correlations of Staphylococcus aureus with concentrations of Vibro species (r = 0.302, p = 0.037) and total coliforms (r = 0.392, p = 0.006) in seawater, no correlation existed between S. aureus concentration and other parameters. Faecal coliforms failed to correlate with any of the tested parameters. Enterococci also correlated with more quality parameters than faecal coliforms or any other indicator. Multiple linear regressions highlighted a significant, best fit model that could predict enterococci concentrations in relation to other parameters with a maximum predictive success of 69.64%. PCA/FA clearly delineated enterococci and faecal coliforms as parameters that weighed strongly for BQM while Staphylococcus aureus, faecal coliforms and enterococci weighed strongly for beach sand quality monitoring. On the whole, higher correlations of enterococci levels with other parameters than was observed for faecal coliforms suggest that the former be considered a preferred parameter of choice for BQM in Malaysia. Our findings provide meaningful evidence particularly as it relates to the correlation of

  8. Synergistic effect of [10]-gingerol and aminoglycosides against vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE).

    PubMed

    Nagoshi, Chihiro; Shiota, Sumiko; Kuroda, Teruo; Hatano, Tsutomu; Yoshida, Takashi; Kariyama, Reiko; Tsuchiya, Tomofusa

    2006-03-01

    An extract from ginger (root of Zingiber officinale) reduced the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of aminoglycosides in vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). The effective compound was isolated and identified as [10]-gingerol. In the presence of [10]-gingerol at 1/10 concentration of its own MIC, the MIC of arbekacin was lowered by 1/32 to 1/16. [10]-Gingerol also reduced the MICs of other aminoglycosides, and of bacitracin and polymixin B, but not of other antimicrobial agents tested. Because [10]-gingerol reduced the MICs of several aminoglycosides both in strains possessing or lacking aminoglycoside-modification enzymes, it seems that the effect of [10]-gingerol is not related to these enzymes, which mainly confer bacterial resistance against aminoglycosides. It seemed that a detergent-like effect of [10]-gingerol potentiated the antimicrobial activity of the aminoglycosides. In fact, some detergents such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and Triton X-100 reduced the MICs of aminoglycosides, bacitracin and polymixin B in VRE. Since the intrinsic resistance to aminoglycosides in enterococci is due to low level of entry of the drugs into the cells, increase in the membrane permeability caused by [10]-gingerol will enhance the influx of aminoglycosides into enterococcal cells. PMID:16508142

  9. Growth and survival of Escherichia coli and enterococci populations in the macro-alga Cladophora (Chlorophyta)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byappanahalli, M.N.; Shively, D.A.; Nevers, M.B.; Sadowsky, M.J.; Whitman, R.L.

    2003-01-01

    The macro-alga Cladophora glomerata is found in streams and lakes worldwide. High concentrations of Escherichia coli and enterococci have been reported in Cladophora along the Lake Michigan shore. The objective of this study was to determine if Cladophora supported growth of these indicator bacteria. Algal leachate readily supported in vitro multiplication of E. coli and enterococci, suggesting that leachates contain necessary growth-promoting substances. Growth was directly related to the concentration of algal leachate. E. coli survived for over 6 months in dried Cladophora stored at 4°C; residual E. coli grew after mat rehydration, reaching a carrying capacity of 8 log CFU g-1 in 48 h. Results of this study also show that the E. coli strains associated with Cladophora are highly related; in most instances they are genetically different from each other, suggesting that the relationship between E. coli and Cladophora may be casual. These findings indicate that Cladophora provides a suitable environment for indicator bacteria to persist for extended periods and to grow under natural conditions.

  10. Relationship of human-associated microbial source tracking markers with Enterococci in Gulf of Mexico waters.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Katrina V; Brownell, Miriam; Wang, Shiao Y; Lepo, Joe Eugene; Mott, Joanna; Nathaniel, Rajkumar; Kilgen, Marilyn; Hellein, Kristen N; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Harwood, Valerie J

    2013-03-01

    Human and ecosystem health can be damaged by fecal contamination of recreational waters. Microbial source tracking (MST) can be used to specifically detect domestic sewage containing human waste, thereby informing both risk assessment and remediation strategies. Previously, an inter-laboratory collaboration developed standardized PCR methods for a bacterial, an archaeal, and a viral indicator of human sewage. Here we present results for two subsequent years of field testing in fresh and salt water by five laboratories across the U.S. Gulf Coast (two in Florida and one each in Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas) using common standard operating procedures (SOPs) developed previously. Culturable enterococci were enumerated by membrane filtration, and PCR was used to detect three MST markers targeting domestic sewage: human-associated Bacteroides (HF183), Methanobrevibacter smithii and human polyomaviruses BK and JC (HPyVs). Detection of sewage markers in surface waters was significantly associated with higher enterococci levels and with exceedance of the recreational water quality standard in four or three regions, respectively. Sewage markers were frequently co-detected in single samples, e.g., M. smithii and HF183 were co-detected in 81% of Louisiana samples, and HPyVs and M. smithii were co-detected in over 40% of southwest Florida and Mississippi samples. This study demonstrates the robustness and inter-laboratory transferability of these three markers for the detection of pollution from domestic sewage in the waters impacting the Gulf of Mexico over a coastal range of over 1000 miles. PMID:23260177

  11. Toxin–antitoxin systems are ubiquitous and plasmid-encoded in vancomycin-resistant enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Moritz, Elizabeth M.; Hergenrother, Paul J.

    2007-01-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) are common hospital pathogens that are resistant to most major classes of antibiotics. The incidence of VRE is increasing rapidly, to the point where over one-quarter of enterococcal infections in intensive care units are now resistant to vancomycin. The exact mechanism by which VRE maintains its plasmid-encoded resistance genes is ill-defined, and novel targets for the treatment of VRE are lacking. In an effort to identify novel protein targets for the treatment of VRE infections, we probed the plasmids obtained from 75 VRE isolates for the presence of toxin–antitoxin (TA) gene systems. Remarkably, genes for one particular TA pair, the mazEF system (originally identified on the Escherichia coli chromosome), were present on plasmids from 75/75 (100%) of the isolates. Furthermore, mazEF was on the same plasmid as vanA in the vast majority of cases (>90%). Plasmid stability tests and RT-PCR raise the possibility that this plasmid-encoded mazEF is indeed functional in enterococci. Given this ubiquity of mazEF in VRE and the deleterious activity of the MazF toxin, disruption of mazEF with pharmacological agents is an attractive strategy for tailored antimicrobial therapy. PMID:17190821

  12. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci with reduced daptomycin susceptibility in Singapore: prevalence and associated factors.

    PubMed

    Chow, A; Win, N N; Ng, P Y; Lee, W; Win, M K

    2016-09-01

    Prevalence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and use of daptomycin are increasing in Asia. To determine the prevalence of daptomycin non-susceptible enterococci (DNSE) and understand factors associated with reduced daptomycin susceptibility in VRE, we conducted a case-control study in a 1600-bed adult tertiary hospital in Singapore. All VRE isolates from inpatients in 2012 were tested for daptomycin susceptibility. Patients with VRE isolates of daptomycin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ⩾3 µg/ml were classified as daptomycin-reduced susceptible VRE (DRS-VRE) and those with daptomycin MIC 4 µg/ml (DNSE). About half (135, 55%) had reduced susceptibility to daptomycin (MIC 3-4 µg/ml). None in the DS-VRE group had prior exposure to daptomycin. After adjusting for age, gender, comorbidity, hospitalization duration, surgical history, indwelling device use, and duration of antibiotic exposure in the prior 3 months, >1 movement between wards [odds ratio (OR) 0·35, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0·16-0·74, P = 0·006] and minocycline resistance (OR 0·45, 95% CI 0·25-0·84, P = 0·011) were independently associated with DRS-VRE. Our study suggests that daptomycin exposure, >1 movement between wards, and resistance to minocycline, were associated with reduced daptomycin susceptibility in VRE. PMID:27174845

  13. Eradication of enterococci biofilms by lactic acid alone and combined with chlorhexidine and cetrimide

    PubMed Central

    Baca, Pilar; Ordóñez-Becerra, Santiago; González-Rodríguez, María P.; Ferrer-Luque, Carmen M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The antimicrobial activity of lactic acid (LA) alone or in combination with chlorhexidine (CHX) and cetrimide (CTR) against three Enterococcus faecalis strains, E. faecalis ATCC 29212, E. faecalis EF-D1 and E. faecalis U-1765, one Enterococcus durans strain and one dual-species biofilm was investigated. Study Design: The irrigating solutions tested were 20%, 15%, 10%, 5% and 2.5% LA, alone and in combination with 2% CHX and with 0.2% CTR. The biofilms were grown in the MBECTM high-throughput device for 24 hours and exposed to the solutions for 30 seconds and 1 minute. “Eradication” was defined as 100% bacterial kill. Results: Twenty percent LA eradicated all enterococci biofilms after 30 seconds contact time. The association of LA + 0.2% CTR achieved better results than LA alone, in contrast with the results obtained using LA + 2% CHX. E. durans was eradicated by all the tested solutions at 1 minute. The dual-species biofilm, E. faecalis ATCC 29212 + E. durans, gave intermediate values of the pure cultures. Conclusions: LA is capable of eradicating enterococci biofilm at a concentration of 20%. The combination of lower concentrations with 0.2% CTR achieved eradication after 1 minute. Key words:Biofilm, cetrimide, chlorhexidine, enterococcus durans, enterococcus faecalis. PMID:22549691

  14. An overview of very high level software design methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asdjodi, Maryam; Hooper, James W.

    1988-01-01

    Very High Level design methods emphasize automatic transfer of requirements to formal design specifications, and/or may concentrate on automatic transformation of formal design specifications that include some semantic information of the system into machine executable form. Very high level design methods range from general domain independent methods to approaches implementable for specific applications or domains. Applying AI techniques, abstract programming methods, domain heuristics, software engineering tools, library-based programming and other methods different approaches for higher level software design are being developed. Though one finds that a given approach does not always fall exactly in any specific class, this paper provides a classification for very high level design methods including examples for each class. These methods are analyzed and compared based on their basic approaches, strengths and feasibility for future expansion toward automatic development of software systems.

  15. High Level Waste (HLW) Feed Process Control Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    STAEHR, T.W.

    2000-06-14

    The primary purpose of this document is to describe the overall process control strategy for monitoring and controlling the functions associated with the Phase 1B high-level waste feed delivery. This document provides the basis for process monitoring and control functions and requirements needed throughput the double-shell tank system during Phase 1 high-level waste feed delivery. This document is intended to be used by (1) the developers of the future Process Control Plan and (2) the developers of the monitoring and control system.

  16. Disposal of high-level nuclear waste in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coopersmith, Jonathan

    1992-08-01

    A solution of launching high-level nuclear waste into space is suggested. Disposal in space includes solidifying the wastes, embedding them in an explosion-proof vehicle, and launching it into earth orbit, and then into a solar orbit. The benefits of such a system include not only the safe disposal of high-level waste but also the establishment of an infrastructure for large-scale space exploration and development. Particular attention is given to the wide range of technical choices along with the societal, economic, and political factors needed for success.

  17. Sterilization, high-level disinfection, and environmental cleaning.

    PubMed

    Rutala, William A; Weber, David J

    2011-03-01

    Failure to perform proper disinfection and sterilization of medical devices may lead to introduction of pathogens, resulting in infection. New techniques have been developed for achieving high-level disinfection and adequate environmental cleanliness. This article examines new technologies for sterilization and high-level disinfection of critical and semicritical items, respectively, and because semicritical items carry the greatest risk of infection, the authors discuss reprocessing semicritical items such as endoscopes and automated endoscope reprocessors, endocavitary probes, prostate biopsy probes, tonometers, laryngoscopes, and infrared coagulation devices. In addition, current issues and practices associated with environmental cleaning are reviewed. PMID:21315994

  18. High level radioactive waste management facility design criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Sheikh, N.A.; Salaymeh, S.R.

    1993-10-01

    This paper discusses the engineering systems for the structural design of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). At the DWPF, high level radioactive liquids will be mixed with glass particles and heated in a melter. This molten glass will then be poured into stainless steel canisters where it will harden. This process will transform the high level waste into a more stable, manageable substance. This paper discuss the structural design requirements for this unique one of a kind facility. A special emphasis will be concentrated on the design criteria pertaining to earthquake, wind and tornado, and flooding.

  19. The Use of ARTEMIS with High-Level Applications

    SciTech Connect

    B. A. Bowling; H. Shoaee; S. Witherspoon

    1995-10-01

    ARTEMIS is an online accelerator modeling server developed at CEBAF. One of the design goals of ARTEMIS was to provide an integrated modeling environment for high- level accelerator diagnostic and control applications such as automated beam steering, Linac Energy management (LEM) and the fast feedback system. This report illustrates the use of ARTEMIS in these applications as well as the application interface using the EPICS cdev device support API. Concentration is placed on the design and implementation aspects of high- level applications which utilize the ARTEMIS server for information on beam dynamics. Performance benchmarks for various model operations provided by ARTEMIS are also discussed.

  20. Final report on cermet high-level waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Kobisk, E.H.; Quinby, T.C.; Aaron, W.S.

    1981-08-01

    Cermets are being developed as an alternate method for the fixation of defense and commercial high level radioactive waste in a terminal disposal form. Following initial feasibility assessments of this waste form, consisting of ceramic particles dispersed in an iron-nickel base alloy, significantly improved processing methods were developed. The characterization of cermets has continued through property determinations on samples prepared by various methods from a variety of simulated and actual high-level wastes. This report describes the status of development of the cermet waste form as it has evolved since 1977. 6 tables, 18 figures.

  1. DIFFERENCES IN RELEASE AND TRANSPORT OF MANURE-BORNE E. COLI AND ENTEROCOCCI IN GRASS BUFFER CONDITIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Echerichia coli and Enterococci are common indicator organisms used to detect potential fecal contamination of surface and ground water and to determine water quality. Coupled monitoring of both organisms in karst demonstrated differences in dynamics of their concentrations in waters that were reach...

  2. Application of multilocus sequence analysis for molecular characterization of enterococci with virulence factors recovered from a tropical recreational beach.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Asmat; Dada, Ayokunle Christopher; Usup, Gires

    2014-05-01

    Partial gene sequences of phenylalanyl-tRNA synthase alpha subunit (pheS) and RNA polymerase alpha subunit (rpoA) were evaluated for species delineation and detection of recombination among enterococci populations recovered from a bathing beach impacted by low tide river flow. At inter-species level, a maximum similarity of 86.5% and 94.8% was observed among the enterococci pheS and rpoA sequence, respectively. A superimposed plot of delimited pairwise similarity values obtained for 266 pair-wise observations revealed that while there was a harmony between species identity obtained from both genes, pheS was more discriminatory than rpoA. The difference was more pronounced for inter-species comparison. A number of putative recombination events between indigenous and non-indigenous strains was detected based on a library of aligned sequences. Virulence genes cyl, esp, gelE and asa were detected in 7, 22, 100 and 63%, respectively among river isolates but at lower proportion of 0, 20, 67 and 42%, respectively among beach water isolates. Random amplified polymorphic DNA profiling presented evidence suggesting low tide river as a source of fecal enterococci entering the recreation beach water. Multilocus sequence typing analysis of a number of Enterococcus faecalis isolates presented four sequence types, ST59, 117, 181 and 474. The presence of genetically diverse fecal enterococci with associated virulence traits and a background of recombination events in surface recreational water could present a potential public health risk. PMID:24974655

  3. A review of the factors affecting sunlight inactivation of micro-organisms in waste stabilisation ponds: preliminary results for enterococci.

    PubMed

    Bolton, N F; Cromar, N J; Hallsworth, P; Fallowfield, H J

    2010-01-01

    Waste stabilisation ponds (WSP) are efficient, cost-effective methods of treating wastewater in rural and remote communities in Australia. It is recognised that sunlight plays a significant role in their disinfection, however, due to the poor penetration of light in turbid waters it has been hypothesised that other mechanisms may also contribute to disinfection in WSPs. To date, studies have reported various and conflicting results with regards to the relative contributions of UVA, UVB, PAR and environmental factors including pH, DO and photo-sensitisers on micro-organism disinfection. Initially we investigated the role of these environmental factors on the solar disinfection of enterococci in buffered distilled water to control for potential confounding factors within the wastewater. Die-off rate constants were measured, in sterile buffered distilled water at varying pH and dissolved oxygen concentrations, for enterococci irradiated with UVA and UVB. Enterococci were found to be predominantly inactivated by UVB (p<0.001), however, UVA was also observed to increase inactivation rates relative to the dark control (p<0.001). DO and pH were found to have no effect on inactivation rate when enterococci were irradiated with UVB (p>0.05), however, when irradiated with UVA, both DO and pH were observed to further increase inactivation rates (p<0.01). PMID:20182066

  4. Diversity and antibiotic susceptibility of autochthonous dairy enterococci isolates: are they safe candidates for autochthonous starter cultures?

    PubMed Central

    Terzić-Vidojević, Amarela; Veljović, Katarina; Begović, Jelena; Filipić, Brankica; Popović, Dušanka; Tolinački, Maja; Miljković, Marija; Kojić, Milan; Golić, Nataša

    2015-01-01

    Enterococci represent the most controversial group of dairy bacteria. They are found to be the main constituent of many traditional Mediterranean dairy products and contribute to their characteristic taste and flavor. On the other hand, during the last 50 years antibiotic-resistant enterococci have emerged as leading causes of nosocomial infections worldwide. The aim of this study was to determine the diversity, technological properties, antibiotic susceptibility and virulence traits of 636 enterococci previously isolated from 55 artisan dairy products from 12 locations in the Western Balkan countries (WBC) of Serbia, Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina. All strains were identified both by microbiological and molecular methods. The predominant species was Enterococcus durans, followed by Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium. Over 44% of the isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin and erythromycin, while 26.2% of the isolates were multi-resistant to three or more antibiotics belonging to different families. 185 isolates (29.1%) were susceptible to all 13 of the antibiotics tested. The antibiotic-susceptible isolates were further tested for possible virulence genes and the production of biogenic amines. Finally, five enterococci isolates were found to be antibiotic susceptible with good technological characteristics and without virulence traits or the ability to produce biogenic amines, making them possible candidates for biotechnological application as starter cultures in the dairy industry. PMID:26441888

  5. Analysis of Enterococci and Bacteriodales Fecal Indicator Bacteria in a Lake Michigan Tributary by Real-Time Quantitative PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Salt Creek watershed in northwest Indiana drains into Lake Michigan near several heavily used recreational beaches. This study aimed to investigate the levels of fecal indicator bacteria, enterococci and Bacteroidales, in Salt Creek using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) an...

  6. Prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in faecal enterococci from vet-visiting pets and assessment of risk factors.

    PubMed

    Leite-Martins, L; Mahú, M I; Costa, A L; Bessa, L J; Vaz-Pires, P; Loureiro, L; Niza-Ribeiro, J; de Matos, A J F; Martins da Costa, P

    2015-06-27

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) exhibited by enterococci isolated from faeces of pets and its underlying risk factors. From September 2009 to May 2012, rectal swabs were collected from 74 dogs and 17 cats, selected from the population of animals visiting the Veterinary Hospital of University of Porto, UPVet, through a systematic random procedure. Animal owners answered a questionnaire about the risk factors that could influence the presence of AMR in faecal enterococci. Enterococci isolation, identification and antimicrobial (AM) susceptibility testing were performed. Data analyses of multilevel, univariable and multivariable generalised linear mixed models were conducted. From all enterococci isolated (n=315), 61 per cent were considered multidrug-resistant, whereas only 9.2 per cent were susceptible to all AMs tested. Highest resistance was found to tetracycline (67.0 per cent), rifampicin (60.3 per cent), azithromycin (58.4 per cent), quinupristin/dalfopristin (54.0 per cent) and erythromycin (53.0 per cent). Previous fluoroquinolone treatments and coprophagic habits were the features more consistently associated with the presence of AMR for three (chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin and azithromycin) and seven (tetracycline, rifampicin, gentamicin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin and azithromycin), respectively, out of nine AMs assessed. Evaluating risk factors that determine the presence of drug-resistant bacteria in pets, a possible source of resistance determinants to human beings, is crucial for the selection of appropriate treatment guidelines by veterinary practitioners. PMID:26078332

  7. Prevalence of streptogramin resistance in enterococci from animals: Identification of vatD from animal sources in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is considerable debate over the use of virginiamycin in animals to the contribution of Quinupristin/Dalfopristin (Q/D) resistance in humans as both are of the streptogramin class of antimicrobials. In this study, the prevalence and mechanisms of streptogramin resistance in enterococci from an...

  8. Prevalence, species distribution and antimicrobial resistance of enterococci isolated from dogs and cats in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The contribution of dogs and cats as reservoirs of antimicrobial resistant enterococci remains largely undefined. This is increasingly important considering the possibility of transfer of bacteria from companion animals to the human host. In this study, dogs and cats from veterinary clinics were s...

  9. COMPARISON OF RELEASE AND TRANSPORT OF MANURE-BORNE E. COLI AND ENTEROCOCCI UNDER GRASS BUFFER CONDITIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: To test the hypothesis that Escherichia coli and enterococci bacteria have similar release rates and transport characteristics after being released from land-applied manure. Methods and Results: Turfgrass soil sod was placed into 200-cm long boxes that had the top 25-cm sections separated to ...

  10. Rapid detection of Escherichia coli and enterococci in recreational water using an immunomagnetic separation/adenosine triphosphate technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bushon, R.N.; Brady, A.M.; Likirdopulos, C.A.; Cireddu, J.V.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to examine a rapid method for detecting Escherichia coli and enterococci in recreational water. Methods and Results: Water samples were assayed for E. coli and enterococci by traditional and immunomagnetic separation/adenosine triphosphate (IMS/ATP) methods. Three sample treatments were evaluated for the IMS/ATP method: double filtration, single filtration, and direct analysis. Pearson's correlation analysis showed strong, significant, linear relations between IMS/ATP and traditional methods for all sample treatments; strongest linear correlations were with the direct analysis (r = 0.62 and 0.77 for E. coli and enterococci, respectively). Additionally, simple linear regression was used to estimate bacteria concentrations as a function of IMS/ATP results. The correct classification of water-quality criteria was 67% for E. coli and 80% for enterococci. Conclusions: The IMS/ATP method is a viable alternative to traditional methods for faecal-indicator bacteria. Significance and Impact of the Study: The IMS/ATP method addresses critical public health needs for the rapid detection of faecal-indicator contamination and has potential for satisfying US legislative mandates requiring methods to detect bathing water contamination in 2 h or less. Moreover, IMS/ATP equipment is considerably less costly and more portable than that for molecular methods, making the method suitable for field applications. ?? 2009 The Authors.

  11. The ATLAS Data Acquisition and High Level Trigger system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The ATLAS TDAQ Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes the data acquisition and high level trigger system of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, as deployed during Run 1. Data flow as well as control, configuration and monitoring aspects are addressed. An overview of the functionality of the system and of its performance is presented and design choices are discussed.

  12. A comparison of high-level waste form characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Salmon, R.; Notz, K.J.

    1991-01-01

    There are currently about 1055 million curies of high-level waste with a thermal output of about 2950 kilowatts (KW) at four sites in the United States: West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), Savannah River Site (SRS), Hanford Site (HANF), and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These quantities are expected to increase to about 1200 million curies and 3570 kw by the end of year 2020. Under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, this high-level waste must ultimately be disposed of in a geologic repository. Accordingly, canisters of high-level waste immobilized in borosilicate glass or glass-ceramic mixtures are to be produced at the four sites and stored there until a repository becomes available. Data on the estimated production schedules and on the physical, chemical, and radiological characteristics of the canisters of immobilized high-level waste have been collected in OCRWM's Waste Characteristics Data Base, including recent updates an revisions. Comparisons of some of these data for the four sites are presented in this report. 14 refs., 3 tabs.

  13. 40 CFR 227.30 - High-level radioactive waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false High-level radioactive waste. 227.30 Section 227.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING CRITERIA FOR THE EVALUATION OF PERMIT APPLICATIONS FOR OCEAN DUMPING OF MATERIALS Definitions § 227.30...

  14. MIXING PROCESSES IN HIGH-LEVEL WASTE TANKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Flammable gases can be generated in DOE high-level waste tanks, including radiolytic hydrogen, and during cesium precipitation from salt solutions, benzene. Under normal operating conditions the potential for deflagration or detonation from these gases is precluded by purging and...

  15. THE XAL INFRASTRUCTURE FOR HIGH LEVEL CONTROL ROOM APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Shishlo, Andrei P; Allen, Christopher K; Chu, Paul; Galambos, John D; Pelaia II, Tom

    2009-01-01

    XAL is a Java programming framework for building high-level control applications related to accelerator physics. The structure, details of implementation, and interaction between components, auxiliary XAL packages, and the latest modifications are discussed. A general overview of XAL applications created for the SNS project is presented.

  16. High-Level waste process and product data annotated bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Stegen, G.E.

    1996-02-13

    The objective of this document is to provide information on available issued documents that will assist interested parties in finding available data on high-level waste and transuranic waste feed compositions, properties, behavior in candidate processing operations, and behavior on candidate product glasses made from those wastes. This initial compilation is only a partial list of available references.

  17. Typewriter Modifications for Persons Who Are High-Level Quadriplegics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reagan, James R.; And Others

    Standard, common electric typewriters are not completely suited to the needs of a high-level quadriplegic typing with a mouthstick. Experiences show that for complete control of a typewriter a mouthstick user needs the combined features of one-button correction, electric forward and reverse indexing, and easy character viewing. To modify a…

  18. The Politics of High-Level Manpower Supply in Tanzania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooke-Smith, Robin

    1978-01-01

    In its policies related to high-level manpower, the Tanzanian Government attaches great importance to the university, viewing it as a key institution in its policies for national development. Describes the difficulties the administration of President Nyerere has had in using the university as a political tool and analyzes various instances of…

  19. Evaluation of marine bacteriocinogenic enterococci strains with inhibitory activity against fish-pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ghomrassi, Hamdi; ben Braiek, Olfa; Choiset, Yvan; Haertlé, Thomas; Hani, Khaled; Chobert, Jean-Marc; Ghrairi, Taoufik

    2016-02-11

    Use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as probiotics may provide an alternative to the use of antibiotics in aquaculture. LAB strains isolated from wild fish viscera and skin were evaluated for bacteriocin production and safety aspects (lack of antibiotic resistance, production of virulence factors). 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed the presence of Enterococcus faecium (13 isolates) and Lactococcus lactis (3 isolates) from fish samples. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analyses of the 13 enterococci isolates showed that they were all clustered, with greater than 95% similarity. However, RAPD analysis revealed significant molecular diversity between enterococci strains. Six enterococci strains were chosen and evaluated for their antibacterial activities. These strains produced a bacteriocin-like substance and exhibited a broad spectrum of inhibition against pathogenic bacteria isolated from diseased fish, including Streptococcus parauberis, Vagococcus spp., and Carnobacterium maltaromaticum, and in particular against the Gram-negative bacteria Flavobacterium frigidarium, Vibrio pectenicida, V. penaeicida, and Photobacterium damselae. The inhibition activity towards bacterial indicator strains was at a maximum when bacteria were grown at 37°C. However, bacteriocin production was observed at 15°C after 12 h of incubation. Only structural genes of enterocins A and B were detected by PCR in the 6 enterococci strains, suggesting the production of these enterocins. In addition, these strains did not harbor any virulence factors or any significant antibiotic resistance, and they tolerated bile. Our results suggest that enterococci are an important part of the bacterial flora of fish and that some strains have the potential to be used as probiotics. PMID:26865233

  20. Prevalence of streptogramin resistance in enterococci from animals: identification of vatD from animal sources in the USA.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Charlene R; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J; Barrett, John B; Hiott, Lari M; Woodley, Tiffanie A

    2007-07-01

    There is considerable debate over the contribution of virginiamycin use in animals to quinupristin/dalfopristin (Q/D) resistance in humans. In this study, the prevalence and mechanisms of streptogramin resistance in enterococci from animals and the environment were investigated. From 2000-2004, enterococci from samples were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. Q/D-resistant isolates (minimum inhibitory concentration >or=4 microg/mL) were subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers for streptogramin resistance genes (ermB, msrC, vatD and vatE). From the analysis, 1029/6227 (17%) Q/D-resistant non-Enterococcus faecalis enterococci were identified. The majority of Q/D-resistant isolates were Enterococcus hirae (n=349; 34%), Enterococcus casseliflavus (n=271; 26%) and Enterococcus faecium (n=259; 25%). Using PCR, 55.5% (n=571) were positive for ermB, 3% (n=34) for msrC, 2% (n=20) for vatE and 0.3% (n=3) for vatD; 39% (n=401) were negative for all four genes. The vatD-positive samples comprised two E. faecium from chicken and one E. hirae from swine. The nucleotide sequence of vatD from the three isolates was 100% homologous to published vatD sequences. These data indicate that Q/D resistance among enterococci from animals remains low despite the long history of virginiamycin use. To date, this is the first report of vatD from enterococci in animals in the USA. PMID:17532190

  1. Visual high-level regions respond to high-level stimulus content in the absence of low-level confounds.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Andreas; Bartels, Andreas

    2016-05-15

    High-level regions of the ventral stream exhibit strong category selectivity to stimuli such as faces, houses, or objects. However, recent studies suggest that at least part of this selectivity stems from low-level differences inherent to images of the different categories. For example, visual outdoor and indoor scenes as well as houses differ in spatial frequency, rectilinearity and obliqueness when compared to face or object images. Correspondingly, scene responsive para-hippocampal place area (PPA) showed strong preference to low-level properties of visual scenes also in the absence of high-level scene content. This raises the question whether all high-level responses in PPA, the fusiform face area (FFA), or the object-responsive lateral occipital compex (LOC) may actually be explained by systematic differences in low-level features. In the present study we contrasted two classes of simple stimuli consisting of ten rectangles each. While both were matched in visual low-level features only one class of rectangle arrangements gave rise to a percept compatible with a high-level 3D layout such as a scene or an object. We found that areas PPA, transverse occipital sulcus (TOS, also referred to as occipital place area, OPA), as well as FFA and LOC showed robust responses to the visual scene class compared to the low-level matched control. Our results suggest that visual category responsive regions are not purely driven by low-level visual features but also by the high-level perceptual stimulus interpretation. PMID:26975552

  2. Daptomycin for the treatment of bacteraemia due to vancomycin-resistant enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Munita, Jose M.; Murray, Barbara E.; Arias, Cesar A.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of severe infections caused by vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) is challenging due to the scarcity of reliable therapeutic alternatives. In this context, daptomycin (DAP), a lipopeptide antibiotic, has emerged as an interesting alternative as it is one of the few compounds that retain in vitro bactericidal activity against VRE isolates, although it has not been approved for this purpose by regulatory agencies. In this review, we will summarise the clinical, animal and in vitro evidence evaluating the efficacy of DAP for the management of deep-seated VRE infections. In addition, we will address important clinical concerns such as the emergence of DAP resistance during therapy and reports of therapeutic failure with DAP monotherapy. Finally, we will discuss possible future strategies (such as the use of higher doses and/or combination therapies) to optimise the use of this antibiotic against VRE. PMID:25261158

  3. Enterococcus faecalis cytolysin without effect on the intestinal growth of susceptible enterococci in mice.

    PubMed

    Huycke, M M; Joyce, W A; Gilmore, M S

    1995-07-01

    A murine model was developed to determine whether the Enterococcus faecalis cytolysin, through its bacteriolytic action on gram-positive bacteria, could promote intestinal overgrowth of cytolytic strains. Sets of E. faecalis strains with varying cytolytic production and susceptibility to cytolytic activity were mixed 1:1 and allowed to compete in vitro in broth or in vivo after orogastric administration in mice pretreated with antibiotics. In general, cytolytic strains outgrew, by as much as 2000-fold, competing cytolysin-susceptible or -hypersusceptible strains in vitro. In contrast, no growth advantage was observed in vivo, despite similar transient colonization of the murine intestinal tract by both cytolytic and cytolysin-susceptible strains. These data suggest that cytolysin plays little role in promoting intestinal overgrowth of enterococci through bacteriolytic activity. PMID:7797930

  4. Consumption of Camembert cheese stimulates commensal enterococci in healthy human intestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Firmesse, Olivier; Rabot, Sylvie; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G; Corthier, Gérard; Furet, Jean-Pierre

    2007-11-01

    Enterococci are natural inhabitants of the human gastrointestinal tract and the main Gram-positive and facultative anaerobic cocci recovered in human faeces. They are also present in a variety of fermented dairy and meat products, and some rare isolates are responsible for severe infections such as endocarditis and meningitis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of Camembert cheese consumption by healthy human volunteers on the faecal enterococcal population. A highly specific real-time quantitative PCR approach was designed and used to type enterococcal species in human faeces. Two species were found, Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium, and only the Enterococcus faecalis population was significantly enhanced after Camembert cheese consumption, whereas Escherichia coli population and the dominant microbiota remained unaffected throughout the trial. PMID:17956425

  5. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of enterococci isolated from faeces of broiler and layer chickens.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, H; Ishimaru, M; Endoh, Y S; Kojima, A

    2000-12-01

    Enterococci were isolated from faecal droppings of chickens in broiler and layer farms and the susceptibilities to nine therapeutic antimicrobial agents and six growth-promoting antibiotics were determined by the agar dilution method. Resistance to therapeutic antimicrobial agents such as ampicillin, clindamycin, erythromycin, streptomycin, tetracycline or tylosin was more frequent in enterococcal isolates from broiler farms than in those from layer farms. Resistance to ofloxacin was rare, occurring in only one (0.7%) of the Enterococcus faecium isolates from broiler farms. Resistance to growth-promoting antibiotics such as avilamycin, salinomycin and virginiamycin was common among isolates from broiler farms. Of the E. faecium isolates from broiler farms, 12.4% were resistant to avilamycin and 27.4% were resistant to virginiamycin. Resistance to salinomycin was detected in all enterococcal species, ranging from 12.4% of E. faecium isolates to 50% of E. hirae isolates. PMID:11123550

  6. Management of data quality of high level waste characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, W.I., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-06-12

    Over the past 10 years, the Hanford Site has been transitioning from nuclear materials production to Site cleanup operations. High-level waste characterization at the Hanford Site provides data to support present waste processing operations, tank safety programs, and future waste disposal programs. Quality elements in the high-level waste characterization program will be presented by following a sample through the data quality objective, sampling, laboratory analysis and data review process. Transition from production to cleanup has resulted in changes in quality systems and program; the changes, as well as other issues in these quality programs, will be described. Laboratory assessment through quality control and performance evaluation programs will be described, and data assessments in the laboratory and final reporting in the tank characterization reports will be discussed.

  7. Evaluation and selection of candidate high-level waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Bernadzikowski, T. A.; Allender, J. S.; Butler, J. L.; Gordon, D. E.; Gould, Jr., T. H.; Stone, J. A.

    1982-03-01

    Seven candidate waste forms being developed under the direction of the Department of Energy's National High-Level Waste (HLW) Technology Program, were evaluated as potential media for the immobilization and geologic disposal of high-level nuclear wastes. The evaluation combined preliminary waste form evaluations conducted at DOE defense waste-sites and independent laboratories, peer review assessments, a product performance evaluation, and a processability analysis. Based on the combined results of these four inputs, two of the seven forms, borosilicate glass and a titanate based ceramic, SYNROC, were selected as the reference and alternative forms for continued development and evaluation in the National HLW Program. Both the glass and ceramic forms are viable candidates for use at each of the DOE defense waste-sites; they are also potential candidates for immobilization of commercial reprocessing wastes. This report describes the waste form screening process, and discusses each of the four major inputs considered in the selection of the two forms.

  8. Multipurpose optimization models for high level waste vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Hoza, M.

    1994-08-01

    Optimal Waste Loading (OWL) models have been developed as multipurpose tools for high-level waste studies for the Tank Waste Remediation Program at Hanford. Using nonlinear programming techniques, these models maximize the waste loading of the vitrified waste and optimize the glass formers composition such that the glass produced has the appropriate properties within the melter, and the resultant vitrified waste form meets the requirements for disposal. The OWL model can be used for a single waste stream or for blended streams. The models can determine optimal continuous blends or optimal discrete blends of a number of different wastes. The OWL models have been used to identify the most restrictive constraints, to evaluate prospective waste pretreatment methods, to formulate and evaluate blending strategies, and to determine the impacts of variability in the wastes. The OWL models will be used to aid in the design of frits and the maximize the waste in the glass for High-Level Waste (HLW) vitrification.

  9. Radioactive high level waste insight modelling for geological disposal facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Alexander; Kelly, Martin; Bailey, Lucy

    Within this paper we present a simplified analytical model to provide insight into the key performance measures of a generic disposal system for high level waste within a geological disposal facility. The model assumes a low solubility waste matrix within a corrosion resistant disposal container surrounded by a low permeability buffer. Radionuclides migrate from the disposal area through a porous geosphere to the biosphere and give a radiological dose to a receptor. The system of equations describing the migration is transformed into Laplace space and an approximation used to determine peak values for the radionuclide mass transfer rate entering the biosphere. Results from the model are compared with those from more detailed numerical models for key radionuclides in the UK high level waste inventory. Such an insight model can provide a valuable second line of argument to assist in confirming the results of more detailed models and build confidence in the safety case for a geological disposal facility.

  10. RETENTION OF SULFATE IN HIGH LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE GLASS

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.

    2010-09-07

    High level radioactive wastes are being vitrified at the Savannah River Site for long term disposal. Many of the wastes contain sulfate at concentrations that can be difficult to retain in borosilicate glass. This study involves efforts to optimize the composition of a glass frit for combination with the waste to improve sulfate retention while meeting other process and product performance constraints. The fabrication and characterization of several series of simulated waste glasses are described. The experiments are detailed chronologically, to provide insight into part of the engineering studies used in developing frit compositions for an operating high level waste vitrification facility. The results lead to the recommendation of a specific frit composition and a concentration limit for sulfate in the glass for the next batch of sludge to be processed at Savannah River.

  11. The tracking of high level waste shipments-TRANSCOM system

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.E.; Joy, D.S.; Pope, R.B.

    1995-12-31

    The TRANSCOM (transportation tracking and communication) system is the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) real-time system for tracking shipments of spent fuel, high-level wastes, and other high-visibility shipments of radioactive material. The TRANSCOM system has been operational since 1988. The system was used during FY1993 to track almost 100 shipments within the US.DOE complex, and it is accessed weekly by 10 to 20 users.

  12. Automatic rule generation for high-level vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhee, Frank Chung-Hoon; Krishnapuram, Raghu

    1992-01-01

    Many high-level vision systems use rule-based approaches to solving problems such as autonomous navigation and image understanding. The rules are usually elaborated by experts. However, this procedure may be rather tedious. In this paper, we propose a method to generate such rules automatically from training data. The proposed method is also capable of filtering out irrelevant features and criteria from the rules.

  13. Case for retrievable high-level nuclear waste disposal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roseboom, Eugene H., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Plans for the nation's first high-level nuclear waste repository have called for permanently closing and sealing the repository soon after it is filled. However, the hydrologic environment of the proposed site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, should allow the repository to be kept open and the waste retrievable indefinitely. This would allow direct monitoring of the repository and maintain the options for future generations to improve upon the disposal methods or use the uranium in the spent fuel as an energy resource.

  14. Mixing Processes in High-Level Waste Tanks - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, P.F.

    1999-05-24

    The mixing processes in large, complex enclosures using one-dimensional differential equations, with transport in free and wall jets is modeled using standard integral techniques. With this goal in mind, we have constructed a simple, computationally efficient numerical tool, the Berkeley Mechanistic Mixing Model, which can be used to predict the transient evolution of fuel and oxygen concentrations in DOE high-level waste tanks following loss of ventilation, and validate the model against a series of experiments.

  15. [Corrosion testing of high level radioactive waste. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    Alloys under consideration as candidates for the high level nuclear waste containers at Yucca Mountain were exposed to a range of corrosion conditions and their performance measured. The alloys tested were Incoloy 825, 70/30 Copper-Nickel, Monel 400, Hastelloy C- 22, and low carbon steel. The test conditions varied were: temperature, concentration, agitation, and crevice simulation. Only in the case of carbon steel was significant attack noted. This attack appeared to be transport limited.

  16. Clonal Diversity in Multi Drug Resistant (MDR) Enterococci Isolated from Fecal Normal Flora.

    PubMed

    Hasannejad Bibalan, Meysam; Eshaghi, Morteza; Sadeghi, Javad; Asadian, Mahla; Narimani, Tahmineh; Talebi, Malihe

    2015-01-01

    Enterococci are Gram positive and catalase- negative cocci that are found in the gastrointestinal tract of mammals and birds, and are readily isolated from soil, surface and waters. The aim of this study was to discriminate between Enterococcus isolates based on repetitive element sequence based -PCR (Rep-PCR) with the BOXA2R primer and their antibiotics profile. Enterococci isolates were obtained from 180 fecal samples. The isolates were identified by biochemical reaction and specific identification was confirmed by PCR with species specific primers. All isolates were subjected to Rep typing and antimicrobial susceptibility tests. Rep-PCR analysis of 180 isolates revealed 93 REP types with forty-five single types (ST1 to ST45) and forty-eight common types (CT1 to 48). Antibiotic susceptibility tests exhibited that 53 (29.4%), 43 (23.8%), 11 (6.1%) and 9 (5%) were resistant to erythromycin, tetracycline, gentamicin and ciprofloxacin respectively but among the isolates, sixteen were multi drug resistant (MDR). These MDR isolates showed 11 Rep types with seven single types and four common types. In addition, 81.2% of MDR isolates were from male subjects and the average age of these persons was more than fifty years. This study showed that 56.2% of MDR isolates were homogeneous with 95 % similarity, and high rate of resistance to tetracycline and erythromycin (81.2%) were observed in these isolates. The concern about these normal flora isolates are the pathogenic potential of these bacteria through the horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance and virulence genes. PMID:27014649

  17. American crows as carriers of vancomycin-resistant enterococci with vanA gene.

    PubMed

    Oravcova, Veronika; Zurek, Ludek; Townsend, Andrea; Clark, Anne B; Ellis, Julie C; Cizek, Alois; Literak, Ivan

    2014-04-01

    We studied the vanA-carrying vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) isolated from American crows in the United States during the winter 2011/2012. Faecal samples from crows were cultured selectively for VRE and characterized. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) were used to examine epidemiological relationships of vanA-containing VRE. Isolates were tested in vitro for their ability to horizontally transfer the vancomycin resistance trait. VRE with the vanA gene were found in 15 (2.5%) of 590 crows samples, from which we obtained 22 different isolates. Enterococcal species were Enterococcus faecium (14) and E. faecalis (8). One, two and 19 isolates originated from Kansas, New York State and Massachusetts, respectively. Based on MLST analysis, E. faecium isolates were grouped as ST18 (6 isolates), ST555 (2), and novel types ST749 (1), ST750 (3), ST751 (1), ST752 (1). Enterococcus faecalis isolates belonged to ST6 (1), ST16 (3) and ST179 (4). All isolates were able to transfer the vancomycin resistance trait via filter mating with very high transfer range. Clinically important enterococci with the vanA gene occur in faeces of wild American crows throughout the United States. These migrating birds may contribute to the dissemination of VRE in environment over large distances. [Correction added after first online publication on 06 August 2013: The number of E. faecium ST752 isolate is now amended to '1', consistent with that shown in the 'Results' section and Figure 2.]. PMID:23919480

  18. Human health risks associated with antimicrobial-resistant enterococci and Staphylococcus aureus on poultry meat.

    PubMed

    Bortolaia, V; Espinosa-Gongora, C; Guardabassi, L

    2016-02-01

    Enterococci and staphylococci are frequent contaminants on poultry meat. Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium and Staphylococcus aureus are also well-known aetiological agents of a wide variety of infections resulting in major healthcare costs. This review provides an overview of the human health risks associated with the occurrence of these opportunistic human pathogens on poultry meat with particular focus on the risk of food-borne transmission of antimicrobial resistance. In the absence of conclusive evidence of transmission, this risk was inferred using data from scientific articles and national reports on prevalence, bacterial load, antimicrobial resistance and clonal distribution of these three species on poultry meat. The risks associated with ingestion of antimicrobial-resistant enterococci of poultry origin comprise horizontal transfer of resistance genes and transmission of multidrug-resistant E. faecalis lineages such as sequence type ST16. Enterococcus faecium lineages occurring in poultry meat products are distantly related to those causing hospital-acquired infections but may act as donors of quinupristin/dalfopristin resistance and other resistance determinants of clinical interest to the human gut microbiota. Ingestion of poultry meat contaminated with S. aureus may lead to food poisoning. However, antimicrobial resistance in the toxin-producing strains does not have clinical implications because food poisoning is not managed by antimicrobial therapy. Recently methicillin-resistant S. aureus of livestock origin has been reported on poultry meat. In theory handling or ingestion of contaminated meat is a potential risk factor for colonization by methicillin-resistant S. aureus. However, this risk is presently regarded as negligible by public health authorities. PMID:26706616

  19. Biofilm synthesis and presence of virulence factors among enterococci isolated from patients and water samples.

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou-Olivgeris, Matthaios; Filippidou, Sevasti; Drougka, Eleanna; Fligou, Fotini; Kolonitsiou, Fevronia; Dodou, Vasiliki; Marangos, Markos; Anastassiou, Evangelos D; Vantarakis, Apostolos; Spiliopoulou, Iris

    2015-11-01

    The goal of this study was to compare biofilm synthesis among enterococci recovered from clinical samples (infection or colonization) of patients as well as environmental samples in order to determine possible virulence factors and clonal relationship. During a two-year period, clinical samples (blood, catheter tips, bronchial secretions, wounds, peritoneal fluid, urine) and rectal swabs collected from hospitalized patients as well as environmental water samples were tested for the presence of Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by the disc diffusion method and Etest. Strains were tested for the presence of vanA, vanB, esp, ace and asp genes by PCR. Clones were identified by PFGE (SmaI). From infected patients, 48 strains were identified: 24 Enterococcus faecium (10 vanA-positive, 14 vancomycin-susceptible) and 24 Enterococcus faecalis (one vanA-positive, 23 vancomycin-susceptible). Among 143 colonizing isolates, 134 were Enterococcus faecium (58 vanA-positive, 11 vanB-positive, 65 vancomycin-susceptible) and nine Enterococcus faecalis (three vanA-positive, two vanB-positive, four vancomycin-susceptible). Among 167 environmental water samples, 51 Enterococcus faecalis and 19 Enterococcus faecium isolates, all glycopeptide-susceptible, were recovered. In total, 64 strains produced biofilm, whereas 34 were esp-positive, 64 asp-positive and 54 ace-positive. Biofilm production was associated with the presence of esp (P < 0.001) and ace genes (P = 0.021), being higher in infecting (P < 0.001) and water (P 0.005) isolates as compared with colonizing ones. Clones of environmental water-strains were different than the patients' clones. The differences found in the incidence of antibiotic resistance, virulence factors and clones suggest that hospital and water enterococci are of different origin. PMID:26242895

  20. Persistence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci in New Zealand broilers after discontinuation of avoparcin use.

    PubMed

    Manson, Janet M; Smith, John M B; Cook, Gregory M

    2004-10-01

    Large amounts of tylosin, zinc-bacitracin, and avilamycin are currently used as prophylactics in New Zealand broiler production. Avoparcin was also used from 1977 to 2000. A total of 382 enterococci were isolated from 213 fecal samples (147 individual poultry farms) using enrichment broths plated on m-Enterococcus agar lacking antimicrobials. These isolates were then examined to determine the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance. Of the 382 isolates, 5.8% (22 isolates) were resistant to vancomycin, and 64.7% were resistant to erythromycin. The bacitracin MIC was > or =256 microg/ml for 98.7% of isolates, and the avilamycin MIC was > or =8 microg/ml for 14.9% of isolates. No resistance to ampicillin or gentamicin was detected. Of the 22 vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) isolates, 18 (81.8%) were Enterococcus faecalis, 3 were Enterococcus faecium, and 1 was Enterococcus durans. However, when the 213 fecal enrichment broths were plated on m-Enterococcus agar containing vancomycin, 86 VRE were recovered; 66% of these isolates were E. faecium and the remainder were E. faecalis. Vancomycin-resistant E. faecium isolates were found to have heterogenous pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns of SmaI-digested DNA, whereas the PFGE patterns of vancomycin-resistant E. faecalis isolates were identical or closely related, suggesting that this VRE clone is widespread throughout New Zealand. These data demonstrate that vancomycin-resistant E. faecalis persists in the absence and presence of vancomycin-selective pressure, thus explaining the dominance of this VRE clone even in the absence of avoparcin. PMID:15466512

  1. Handbook of high-level radioactive waste transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Sattler, L.R.

    1992-10-01

    The High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Handbook serves as a reference to which state officials and members of the general public may turn for information on radioactive waste transportation and on the federal government`s system for transporting this waste under the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The Handbook condenses and updates information contained in the Midwestern High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Primer. It is intended primarily to assist legislators who, in the future, may be called upon to enact legislation pertaining to the transportation of radioactive waste through their jurisdictions. The Handbook is divided into two sections. The first section places the federal government`s program for transporting radioactive waste in context. It provides background information on nuclear waste production in the United States and traces the emergence of federal policy for disposing of radioactive waste. The second section covers the history of radioactive waste transportation; summarizes major pieces of legislation pertaining to the transportation of radioactive waste; and provides an overview of the radioactive waste transportation program developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE). To supplement this information, a summary of pertinent federal and state legislation and a glossary of terms are included as appendices, as is a list of publications produced by the Midwestern Office of The Council of State Governments (CSG-MW) as part of the Midwestern High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Project.

  2. High level cognitive information processing in neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnden, John A.; Fields, Christopher A.

    1992-01-01

    Two related research efforts were addressed: (1) high-level connectionist cognitive modeling; and (2) local neural circuit modeling. The goals of the first effort were to develop connectionist models of high-level cognitive processes such as problem solving or natural language understanding, and to understand the computational requirements of such models. The goals of the second effort were to develop biologically-realistic model of local neural circuits, and to understand the computational behavior of such models. In keeping with the nature of NASA's Innovative Research Program, all the work conducted under the grant was highly innovative. For instance, the following ideas, all summarized, are contributions to the study of connectionist/neural networks: (1) the temporal-winner-take-all, relative-position encoding, and pattern-similarity association techniques; (2) the importation of logical combinators into connection; (3) the use of analogy-based reasoning as a bridge across the gap between the traditional symbolic paradigm and the connectionist paradigm; and (4) the application of connectionism to the domain of belief representation/reasoning. The work on local neural circuit modeling also departs significantly from the work of related researchers. In particular, its concentration on low-level neural phenomena that could support high-level cognitive processing is unusual within the area of biological local circuit modeling, and also serves to expand the horizons of the artificial neural net field.

  3. Overview of high-level waste management accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Lawroski, H; Berreth, J R; Freeby, W A

    1980-01-01

    Storage of power reactor spent fuel is necessary at present because of the lack of reprocessing operations particularly in the U.S. By considering the above solidification and storage scenario, there is more than reasonable assurance that acceptable, stable, low heat generation rate, solidified waste can be produced, and safely disposed. The public perception of no waste disposal solutions is being exploited by detractors of nuclear power application. The inability to even point to one overall system demonstration lends credibility to the negative assertions. By delaying the gathering of on-line information to qualify repository sites, and to implement a demonstration, the actions of the nuclear power detractors are self serving in that they can continue to point out there is no demonstration of satisfactory high-level waste disposal. By maintaining the liquid and solidified high-level waste in secure above ground storage until acceptable decay heat generation rates are achieved, by producing a compatible, high integrity, solid waste form, by providing a second or even third barrier as a compound container and by inserting the enclosed waste form in a qualified repository with spacing to assure moderately low temperature disposal conditions, there appears to be no technical reason for not progressing further with the disposal of high-level wastes and needed implementation of the complete nuclear power fuel cycle.

  4. Materials Science of High-Level Nuclear Waste Immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, William J.; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Stefanovsky, S. V.; Vance, E. R.; Vernaz, Etienne Y.

    2009-01-09

    With the increasing demand for the development of more nuclear power comes the responsibility to address the technical challenges of immobilizing high-level nuclear wastes in stable solid forms for interim storage or disposition in geologic repositories. The immobilization of high-level nuclear wastes has been an active area of research and development for over 50 years. Borosilicate glasses and complex ceramic composites have been developed to meet many technical challenges and current needs, although regulatory issues, which vary widely from country to country, have yet to be resolved. Cooperative international programs to develop advanced proliferation-resistant nuclear technologies to close the nuclear fuel cycle and increase the efficiency of nuclear energy production might create new separation waste streams that could demand new concepts and materials for nuclear waste immobilization. This article reviews the current state-of-the-art understanding regarding the materials science of glasses and ceramics for the immobilization of high-level nuclear waste and excess nuclear materials and discusses approaches to address new waste streams.

  5. Process Relationships for Evaluating the Role of Light-induced Inactivation of Enterococci at Selected Beaches and Nearby Tributaries of the Great Lakes

    EPA Science Inventory

    One approach to predictive modeling of biological contamination of recreational waters and drinking water sources involves applying process-based models that consider microbial sources, hydrodynamic transport, and microbial fate. Fecal indicator bacteria such as enterococci have ...

  6. Antimicrobial resistance of enterococcal blood isolates at a pediatric care hospital in India.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Lata; Randhawa, V S; Deb, Monorama

    2005-04-01

    Enterococci are one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections. In recent years, enterococci have become increasingly resistant to a wide range of antimicrobial agents. From April to October 2001, a study was conducted to speciate and determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of 50 isolates of enterococci from bacteremic children. These isolates were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility to the commonly used antibiotics. Screening for vancomycin resistance was done by the agar screen method, and the results were confirmed by determining the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) using the agar dilution method. It was observed that 33 isolates were Enterococcus faecium, followed by E. faecalis (10), E. durans (4), and E. dispar (3). Seventy-two percent of strains were resistant to ampicillin, 46% to amoxicillin + clavulanic acid, 72% to ciprofloxacin, 54% to doxycyclin, and 74% to erythromycin. Sixty-six percent of isolates showed high-level gentamicin resistance and 42% showed high-level streptomycin resistance. Four strains showed raised MIC to vancomycin (8 microg/ml). It was concluded that multidrug resistant E. faecium is emerging as an important agent of bacteremia in children. PMID:15858289

  7. Development of a High Level Waste Tank Inspection System

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, D.K.; Loibl, M.W.; Meese, D.C.

    1995-03-21

    The Westinghouse Savannah River Technology Center was requested by it`s sister site, West Valley Nuclear Service (WVNS), to develop a remote inspection system to gather wall thickness readings of their High Level Waste Tanks. WVNS management chose to take a proactive approach to gain current information on two tanks t hat had been in service since the early 70`s. The tanks contain high level waste, are buried underground, and have only two access ports to an annular space between the tank and the secondary concrete vault. A specialized remote system was proposed to provide both a visual surveillance and ultrasonic thickness measurements of the tank walls. A magnetic wheeled crawler was the basis for the remote delivery system integrated with an off-the-shelf Ultrasonic Data Acquisition System. A development program was initiated for Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) to design, fabricate, and test a remote system based on the Crawler. The system was completed and involved three crawlers to perform the needed tasks, an Ultrasonic Crawler, a Camera Crawler, and a Surface Prep Crawler. The crawlers were computer controlled so that their operation could be done remotely and their position on the wall could be tracked. The Ultrasonic Crawler controls were interfaced with ABB Amdata`s I-PC, Ultrasonic Data Acquisition System so that thickness mapping of the wall could be obtained. A second system was requested by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), to perform just ultrasonic mapping on their similar Waste Storage Tanks; however, the system needed to be interfaced with the P-scan Ultrasonic Data Acquisition System. Both remote inspection systems were completed 9/94. Qualifications tests were conducted by WVNS prior to implementation on the actual tank and tank development was achieved 10/94. The second inspection system was deployed at WSRC 11/94 with success, and the system is now in continuous service inspecting the remaining high level waste tanks at WSRC.

  8. High-level waste management technology program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, H.D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this plan is to document the integrated technology program plan for the Savannah River Site (SRS) High-Level Waste (HLW) Management System. The mission of the SRS HLW System is to receive and store SRS high-level wastes in a see and environmentally sound, and to convert these wastes into forms suitable for final disposal. These final disposal forms are borosilicate glass to be sent to the Federal Repository, Saltstone grout to be disposed of on site, and treated waste water to be released to the environment via a permitted outfall. Thus, the technology development activities described herein are those activities required to enable successful accomplishment of this mission. The technology program is based on specific needs of the SRS HLW System and organized following the systems engineering level 3 functions. Technology needs for each level 3 function are listed as reference, enhancements, and alternatives. Finally, FY-95 funding, deliverables, and schedules are s in Chapter IV with details on the specific tasks that are funded in FY-95 provided in Appendix A. The information in this report represents the vision of activities as defined at the beginning of the fiscal year. Depending on emergent issues, funding changes, and other factors, programs and milestones may be adjusted during the fiscal year. The FY-95 SRS HLW technology program strongly emphasizes startup support for the Defense Waste Processing Facility and In-Tank Precipitation. Closure of technical issues associated with these operations has been given highest priority. Consequently, efforts on longer term enhancements and alternatives are receiving minimal funding. However, High-Level Waste Management is committed to participation in the national Radioactive Waste Tank Remediation Technology Focus Area. 4 refs., 5 figs., 9 tabs.

  9. Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System Description Document

    SciTech Connect

    N. E. Pettit

    2001-07-13

    The Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System supports the confinement and isolation of waste within the Engineered Barrier System of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). Disposal containers are loaded and sealed in the surface waste handling facilities, transferred to the underground through the accesses using a rail mounted transporter, and emplaced in emplacement drifts. The defense high level waste (HLW) disposal container provides long-term confinement of the commercial HLW and defense HLW (including immobilized plutonium waste forms [IPWF]) placed within disposable canisters, and withstands the loading, transfer, emplacement, and retrieval loads and environments. US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in disposable canisters may also be placed in a defense HLW disposal container along with commercial HLW waste forms, which is known as co-disposal. The Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System provides containment of waste for a designated period of time, and limits radionuclide release. The disposal container/waste package maintains the waste in a designated configuration, withstands maximum handling and rockfall loads, limits the individual canister temperatures after emplacement, resists corrosion in the expected handling and repository environments, and provides containment of waste in the event of an accident. Defense HLW disposal containers for HLW disposal will hold up to five HLW canisters. Defense HLW disposal containers for co-disposal will hold up to five HLW canisters arranged in a ring and one DOE SNF canister inserted in the center and/or one or more DOE SNF canisters displacing a HLW canister in the ring. Defense HLW disposal containers also will hold two Multi-Canister Overpacks (MCOs) and two HLW canisters in one disposal container. The disposal container will include outer and inner cylinders, outer and inner cylinder lids, and may include a canister guide. An exterior label will provide a means by

  10. Modern Alchemy: Solidifying high-level nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, C.C.

    1997-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is putting a modern version of alchemy to work to produce an answer to a decades-old problem. It is taking place at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina and at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) near Buffalo, New York. At both locations, contractor Westinghouse Electric Corporation is applying technology that is turning liquid high-level radioactive waste (HLW) into a stabilized, durable glass for safer and easier management. The process is called vitrification. SRS and WVDP are now operating the nation`s first full-scale HLW vitrification plants.

  11. Corrosion and failure processes in high-level waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Mahidhara, R.K.; Elleman, T.S.; Murty, K.L.

    1992-11-01

    A large amount of radioactive waste has been stored safely at the Savannah River and Hanford sites over the past 46 years. The aim of this report is to review the experimental corrosion studies at Savannah River and Hanford with the intention of identifying the types and rates of corrosion encountered and indicate how these data contribute to tank failure predictions. The compositions of the High-Level Wastes, mild steels used in the construction of the waste tanks and degradation-modes particularly stress corrosion cracking and pitting are discussed. Current concerns at the Hanford Site are highlighted.

  12. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR DEFENSE HIGH LEVEL WASTE DISPOSAL CONTIANER

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Ziegler

    1999-08-31

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) defense high-level waste disposal container system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333PY ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998).

  13. Ionization chamber for measurements of high-level tritium gas

    SciTech Connect

    Carstens, D.H.W.; David, W.R.

    1980-01-01

    The construction and calibration of a simple ionization-chamber apparatus for measurement of high level tritium gas is described. The apparatus uses an easily constructed but rugged chamber containing the unknown gas and an inexpensive digital multimeter for measuring the ion current. The equipment after calibration is suitable for measuring 0.01 to 100% tritium gas in hydrogen-helium mixes with an accuracy of a few percent. At both the high and low limits of measurements deviations from the predicted theoretical current are observed. These are briefly discussed.

  14. Solidification of Savannah River Plant high-level waste

    SciTech Connect

    Maher, R; Shafranek, L F; Stevens, III, W R

    1983-01-01

    The Department of Energy, in accord with recommendations from the Du Pont Company, has started construction of a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Plant. The facility should be completed by the end of 1988, and full-scale operation should begin in 1990. This facility will immobilize in borosilicate glass the large quantity of high-level radioactive waste now stored at the plant plus the waste to be generated from continued chemical reprocessing operations. The existing wastes at the Savannah River Plant will be completely converted by about 2010. 21 figures.

  15. High-level neutron coincidence counter maintenance manual

    SciTech Connect

    Swansen, J.; Collinsworth, P.

    1983-05-01

    High-level neutron coincidence counter operational (field) calibration and usage is well known. This manual makes explicit basic (shop) check-out, calibration, and testing of new units and is a guide for repair of failed in-service units. Operational criteria for the major electronic functions are detailed, as are adjustments and calibration procedures, and recurrent mechanical/electromechanical problems are addressed. Some system tests are included for quality assurance. Data on nonstandard large-scale integrated (circuit) components and a schematic set are also included.

  16. Market Designs for High Levels of Variable Generation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Milligan, M.; Holttinen, H.; Kiviluoma, J.; Orths, A.; Lynch, M.; Soder, L.

    2014-10-01

    Variable renewable generation is increasing in penetration in modern power systems, leading to higher variability in the supply and price of electricity as well as lower average spot prices. This raises new challenges, particularly in ensuring sufficient capacity and flexibility from conventional technologies. Because the fixed costs and lifetimes of electricity generation investments are significant, designing markets and regulations that ensure the efficient integration of renewable generation is a significant challenge. This papers reviews the state of play of market designs for high levels of variable generation in the United States and Europe and considers new developments in both regions.

  17. Spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste transportation report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-11-01

    This publication is intended to provide its readers with an introduction to the issues surrounding the subject of transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, especially as those issues impact the southern region of the United States. It was originally issued by the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) in July 1987 as the Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Primer, a document patterned on work performed by the Western Interstate Energy Board and designed as a ``comprehensive overview of the issues.`` This work differs from that earlier effort in that it is designed for the educated layman with little or no background in nuclear waste issues. In addition, this document is not a comprehensive examination of nuclear waste issues but should instead serve as a general introduction to the subject. Owing to changes in the nuclear waste management system, program activities by the US Department of Energy and other federal agencies and developing technologies, much of this information is dated quickly. While this report uses the most recent data available, readers should keep in mind that some of the material is subject to rapid change. SSEB plans periodic updates in the future to account for changes in the program. Replacement pages sew be supplied to all parties in receipt of this publication provided they remain on the SSEB mailing list.

  18. High level radioactive waste glass production and product description

    SciTech Connect

    Sproull, J.F.; Marra, S.L.; Jantzen, C.M.

    1993-12-01

    This report examines borosilicate glass as a means of immobilizing high-level radioactive wastes. Borosilicate glass will encapsulate most of the defense and some of the commercial HLW in the US. The resulting waste forms must meet the requirements of the WA-SRD and the WAPS, which include a short term PCT durability test. The waste form producer must report the composition(s) of the borosilicate waste glass(es) produced but can choose the composition(s) to meet site-specific requirements. Although the waste form composition is the primary determinant of durability, the redox state of the glass; the existence, content, and composition of crystals; and the presence of glass-in-glass phase separation can affect durability. The waste glass should be formulated to avoid phase separation regions. The ultimate result of this effort will be a waste form which is much more stable and potentially less mobile than the liquid high level radioactive waste is currently.

  19. Executive functions in kindergarteners with high levels of disruptive behaviours.

    PubMed

    Monette, Sébastien; Bigras, Marc; Guay, Marie-Claude

    2015-11-01

    Executive function (EF) deficits have yet to be demonstrated convincingly in children with disruptive behaviour disorders (DBD), as only a few studies have reported these. The presence of EF weaknesses in children with DBD has often been contested on account of the high comorbidity between DBD and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and of methodological shortcomings regarding EF measures. Against this background, the link between EF and disruptive behaviours in kindergarteners was investigated using a carefully selected battery of EF measures. Three groups of kindergarteners were compared: (1) a group combining high levels of disruptive behaviours and ADHD symptoms (COMB); (2) a group presenting high levels of disruptive/aggressive behaviours and low levels of ADHD symptoms (AGG); and (3) a normative group (NOR). Children in the COMB and AGG groups presented weaker inhibition capacities compared with normative peers. Also, only the COMB group showed weaker working memory capacities compared with the NOR group. Results support the idea that preschool children with DBD have weaker inhibition capacities and that this weakness could be common to both ADHD and DBD. PMID:26198079

  20. How to achieve high-level expression of microbial enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Long; Yang, Haiquan; Shin, Hyun-dong; Chen, Rachel R.; Li, Jianghua; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Microbial enzymes have been used in a large number of fields, such as chemical, agricultural and biopharmaceutical industries. The enzyme production rate and yield are the main factors to consider when choosing the appropriate expression system for the production of recombinant proteins. Recombinant enzymes have been expressed in bacteria (e.g., Escherichia coli, Bacillus and lactic acid bacteria), filamentous fungi (e.g., Aspergillus) and yeasts (e.g., Pichia pastoris). The favorable and very advantageous characteristics of these species have resulted in an increasing number of biotechnological applications. Bacterial hosts (e.g., E. coli) can be used to quickly and easily overexpress recombinant enzymes; however, bacterial systems cannot express very large proteins and proteins that require post-translational modifications. The main bacterial expression hosts, with the exception of lactic acid bacteria and filamentous fungi, can produce several toxins which are not compatible with the expression of recombinant enzymes in food and drugs. However, due to the multiplicity of the physiological impacts arising from high-level expression of genes encoding the enzymes and expression hosts, the goal of overproduction can hardly be achieved, and therefore, the yield of recombinant enzymes is limited. In this review, the recent strategies used for the high-level expression of microbial enzymes in the hosts mentioned above are summarized and the prospects are also discussed. We hope this review will contribute to the development of the enzyme-related research field. PMID:23686280

  1. Space augmentation of military high-level waste disposal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, T.; Lees, L.; Divita, E.

    1979-01-01

    Space disposal of selected components of military high-level waste (HLW) is considered. This disposal option offers the promise of eliminating the long-lived radionuclides in military HLW from the earth. A space mission which meets the dual requirements of long-term orbital stability and a maximum of one space shuttle launch per week over a period of 20-40 years, is a heliocentric orbit about halfway between the orbits of earth and Venus. Space disposal of high-level radioactive waste is characterized by long-term predictability and short-term uncertainties which must be reduced to acceptably low levels. For example, failure of either the Orbit Transfer Vehicle after leaving low earth orbit, or the storable propellant stage failure at perihelion would leave the nuclear waste package in an unplanned and potentially unstable orbit. Since potential earth reencounter and subsequent burn-up in the earth's atmosphere is unacceptable, a deep space rendezvous, docking, and retrieval capability must be developed.

  2. Spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste transportation report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    This publication is intended to provide its readers with an introduction to the issues surrounding the subject of transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, especially as those issues impact the southern region of the United States. It was originally issued by the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) in July 1987 as the Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Primer, a document patterned on work performed by the Western Interstate Energy Board and designed as a ``comprehensive overview of the issues.`` This work differs from that earlier effort in that it is designed for the educated layman with little or no background in nuclear waste issues. In addition, this document is not a comprehensive examination of nuclear waste issues but should instead serve as a general introduction to the subject. Owing to changes in the nuclear waste management system, program activities by the US Department of Energy and other federal agencies and developing technologies, much of this information is dated quickly. While this report uses the most recent data available, readers should keep in mind that some of the material is subject to rapid change. SSEB plans periodic updates in the future to account for changes in the program. Replacement pages will be supplied to all parties in receipt of this publication provided they remain on the SSEB mailing list.

  3. Spent Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This publication is intended to provide its readers with an introduction to the issues surrounding the subject of transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, especially as those issues impact the southern region of the United States. It was originally issued by SSEB in July 1987 as the Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Primer, a document patterned on work performed by the Western Interstate Energy Board and designed as a ``comprehensive overview of the issues.`` This work differs from that earlier effort in that it is designed for the educated layman with little or no background in nuclear waste Issues. In addition. this document is not a comprehensive examination of nuclear waste issues but should instead serve as a general introduction to the subject. Owing to changes in the nuclear waste management system, program activities by the US Department of Energy and other federal agencies and developing technologies, much of this information is dated quickly. While this report uses the most recent data available, readers should keep in mind that some of the material is subject to rapid change. SSEB plans periodic updates in the future to account for changes in the program. Replacement pages will be supplied to all parties in receipt of this publication provided they remain on the SSEB mailing list.

  4. High level language-based robotic control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Guillermo (Inventor); Kruetz, Kenneth K. (Inventor); Jain, Abhinandan (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    This invention is a robot control system based on a high level language implementing a spatial operator algebra. There are two high level languages included within the system. At the highest level, applications programs can be written in a robot-oriented applications language including broad operators such as MOVE and GRASP. The robot-oriented applications language statements are translated into statements in the spatial operator algebra language. Programming can also take place using the spatial operator algebra language. The statements in the spatial operator algebra language from either source are then translated into machine language statements for execution by a digital control computer. The system also includes the capability of executing the control code sequences in a simulation mode before actual execution to assure proper action at execution time. The robot's environment is checked as part of the process and dynamic reconfiguration is also possible. The languages and system allow the programming and control of multiple arms and the use of inward/outward spatial recursions in which every computational step can be related to a transformation from one point in the mechanical robot to another point to name two major advantages.

  5. High level language-based robotic control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Guillermo (Inventor); Kreutz, Kenneth K. (Inventor); Jain, Abhinandan (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    This invention is a robot control system based on a high level language implementing a spatial operator algebra. There are two high level languages included within the system. At the highest level, applications programs can be written in a robot-oriented applications language including broad operators such as MOVE and GRASP. The robot-oriented applications language statements are translated into statements in the spatial operator algebra language. Programming can also take place using the spatial operator algebra language. The statements in the spatial operator algebra language from either source are then translated into machine language statements for execution by a digital control computer. The system also includes the capability of executing the control code sequences in a simulation mode before actual execution to assure proper action at execution time. The robot's environment is checked as part of the process and dynamic reconfiguration is also possible. The languages and system allow the programming and control of multiple arms and the use of inward/outward spatial recursions in which every computational step can be related to a transformation from one point in the mechanical robot to another point to name two major advantages.

  6. VITRIFICATION OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.; Peeler, D.

    2009-06-17

    The objective of this study was to experimentally measure the properties and performance of a series of glasses with compositions that could represent high level waste Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) as vitrified at the Savannah River Site Defense Waste Processing Facility. These data were used to guide frit optimization efforts as the SB5 composition was finalized. Glass compositions for this study were developed by combining a series of SB5 composition projections with a group of candidate frits. The study glasses were fabricated using depleted uranium and their chemical compositions, crystalline contents and chemical durabilities were characterized. Trevorite was the only crystalline phase that was identified in a few of the study glasses after slow cooling, and is not of concern as spinels have been shown to have little impact on the durability of high level waste glasses. Chemical durability was quantified using the Product Consistency Test (PCT). All of the glasses had very acceptable durability performance. The results of this study indicate that a frit composition can be identified that will provide a processable and durable glass when combined with SB5.

  7. Permitting plan for the high-level waste interim storage

    SciTech Connect

    Deffenbaugh, M.L.

    1997-04-23

    This document addresses the environmental permitting requirements for the transportation and interim storage of solidified high-level waste (HLW) produced during Phase 1 of the Hanford Site privatization effort. Solidified HLW consists of canisters containing vitrified HLW (glass) and containers that hold cesium separated during low-level waste pretreatment. The glass canisters and cesium containers will be transported to the Canister Storage Building (CSB) in a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-provided transportation cask via diesel-powered tractor trailer. Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) Milestone M-90 establishes a new major milestone, and associated interim milestones and target dates, governing acquisition and/or modification of facilities necessary for: (1) interim storage of Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) immobilized HLW (IHLW) and other canistered high-level waste forms; and (2) interim storage and disposal of TWRS immobilized low-activity tank waste (ILAW). An environmental requirements checklist and narrative was developed to identify the permitting path forward for the HLW interim storage (HLWIS) project (See Appendix B). This permitting plan will follow the permitting logic developed in that checklist.

  8. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING ENABLING ORGANIC HIGH LEVEL WASTE DISPOSAL

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M

    2008-05-09

    Waste streams planned for generation by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) and existing radioactive High Level Waste (HLW) streams containing organic compounds such as the Tank 48H waste stream at Savannah River Site have completed simulant and radioactive testing, respectfully, by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). GNEP waste streams will include up to 53 wt% organic compounds and nitrates up to 56 wt%. Decomposition of high nitrate streams requires reducing conditions, e.g. provided by organic additives such as sugar or coal, to reduce NOX in the off-gas to N2 to meet Clean Air Act (CAA) standards during processing. Thus, organics will be present during the waste form stabilization process regardless of the GNEP processes utilized and exists in some of the high level radioactive waste tanks at Savannah River Site and Hanford Tank Farms, e.g. organics in the feed or organics used for nitrate destruction. Waste streams containing high organic concentrations cannot be stabilized with the existing HLW Best Developed Available Technology (BDAT) which is HLW vitrification (HLVIT) unless the organics are removed by pretreatment. The alternative waste stabilization pretreatment process of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) operates at moderate temperatures (650-750 C) compared to vitrification (1150-1300 C). The FBSR process has been demonstrated on GNEP simulated waste and radioactive waste containing high organics from Tank 48H to convert organics to CAA compliant gases, create no secondary liquid waste streams and create a stable mineral waste form.

  9. High-level power analysis and optimization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunathan, Anand

    1997-12-01

    This thesis combines two ubiquitous trends in the VLSI design world--the move towards designing at higher levels of design abstraction, and the increasing importance of power consumption as a design metric. Power estimation and optimization tools are becoming an increasingly important part of design flows, driven by a variety of requirements such as prolonging battery life in portable computing and communication devices, thermal considerations and system cooling and packaging costs, reliability issues (e.g. electromigration, ground bounce, and I-R drops in the power network), and environmental concerns. This thesis presents a suite of techniques to automatically perform power analysis and optimization for designs at the architecture or register-transfer, and behavior or algorithm levels of the design hierarchy. High-level synthesis refers to the process of synthesizing, from an abstract behavioral description, a register-transfer implementation that satisfies the desired constraints. High-level synthesis tools typically perform one or more of the following tasks: transformations, module selection, clock selection, scheduling, and resource allocation and assignment (also called resource sharing or hardware sharing). High-level synthesis techniques for minimizing the area, maximizing the performance, and enhancing the testability of the synthesized designs have been investigated. This thesis presents high-level synthesis techniques that minimize power consumption in the synthesized data paths. This thesis investigates the effects of resource sharing on the power consumption in the data path, provides techniques to efficiently estimate power consumption during resource sharing, and resource sharing algorithms to minimize power consumption. The RTL circuit that is obtained from the high-level synthesis process can be further optimized for power by applying power-reducing RTL transformations. This thesis presents macro-modeling and estimation techniques for switching

  10. Molecular characterization of vancomycin-resistant enterococci and extended-spectrum β-lactamase-containing Escherichia coli isolates in wild birds from the Azores Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Silva, Nuno; Igrejas, Gilberto; Rodrigues, Pedro; Rodrigues, Tiago; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Felgar, Ana Carolina; Pacheco, Rui; Gonçalves, David; Cunha, Regina; Poeta, Patrícia

    2011-10-01

    To study the prevalence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-containing Escherichia coli isolates, and the mechanisms of resistance implicated, 220 faecal samples from wild birds were collected between 2006 and 2010 in the Azores Archipelago. Samples were spread on Slanetz-Bartley agar plates supplemented with 4 mg/l vancomycin and on Levine agar plates supplemented with 2 mg/l cefotaxime for VRE and ESBL-containing E. coli isolation, respectively. vanA-containing enterococcal isolates (four Enterococcus faecium and two Enterococcus durans) and vanC-1 Enterococcus gallinarum isolates were detected in six and seven faecal samples, respectively. VRE isolates showed ampicillin (n=11), ciprofloxacin (n=9), tetracycline (n=6), erythromycin (n=5), quinupristin/dalfopristin (n=3) and high-level kanamycin resistance (n=1). The tet(L) and/or tet(M) gene was found in all tetracycline-resistant isolates and the erm(B) gene in all erythromycin-resistant isolates. Three vanA-containing E. faecium and two E. gallinarum presented specific sequences of the Tn5397 transposon. Four VRE isolates harboured the ace virulence gene. One faecal sample revealed one ESBL-containing E. coli isolate that belongs to the A phylogenetic group, showed a phenotype of resistance to β-lactams and tetracycline, and harboured the bla (CTX-M-14), bla (SHV-12) and the tet(A) genes. To our knowledge, this is the first study to focus on defining the prevalence of VRE and/or ESBL-containing E. coli strains in wild birds from the Azores. The data recovered are essential to improve knowledge about the dissemination of resistant strains through wild ecosystems and their possible implications by transferring these resistances to other animals or to humans. PMID:21834624

  11. Historical Associations of Molecular Measurements of Escherichia coli and Enterococci to Anthropogenic Activities and Climate Variables in Freshwater Sediment Cores.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Yolanda M; Baustian, Melissa M; Baskaran, Mark; Ostrom, Nathaniel E; Rose, Joan B

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the long-term associations of anthropogenic (sedimentary P, C, and N concentrations, and human population in the watershed), and climatic variables (air temperature, and river discharge) with Escherichia coli uidA and enterococci 23S rRNA concentrations in sediment cores from Anchor Bay (AB) in Lake St. Clair, and near the mouth of the Clinton River (CR), Michigan. Calendar year was estimated from vertical abundances of (137)Cs. The AB and CR cores spanned c.1760-2012 and c.1895-2012, respectively. There were steady state concentrations of enterococci in AB during c.1760-c.1860 and c.1910-c.2003 at ∼0.1 × 10(5) and ∼2.0 × 10(5) cell equivalents (CE) per g-dry wt, respectively. Enterococci concentrations in CR increased toward present day, and ranged from ∼0.03 × 10(5) to 9.9 × 10(5) CE/g-dry wt. The E. coli concentrations in CR and AB increased toward present day, and ranged from 0.14 × 10(7) to 1.7 × 10(7) CE/g-dry wt, and 1.8 × 10(6) to 8.5 × 10(6) CE/g-dry wt, respectively. Enterococci was associated with population and river discharge, while E. coli was associated with population, air temperature, and N and C concentrations (p < 0.05). Sediments retain records of the abundance of fecal indicator bacteria, and offer a way to evaluate responses to increased population, nutrient loading, and environmental policies. PMID:27322138

  12. Selection of Fecal Enterococci Exhibiting tcrB-Mediated Copper Resistance in Pigs Fed Diets Supplemented with Copper † ▿

    PubMed Central

    Amachawadi, R. G.; Shelton, N. W.; Shi, X.; Vinasco, J.; Dritz, S. S.; Tokach, M. D.; Nelssen, J. L.; Scott, H. M.; Nagaraja, T. G.

    2011-01-01

    Copper, as copper sulfate, is increasingly used as an alternative to in-feed antibiotics for growth promotion in weaned piglets. Acquired copper resistance, conferred by a plasmid-borne, transferable copper resistance (tcrB) gene, has been reported in Enterococcus faecium and E. faecalis. A longitudinal field study was undertaken to determine the relationship between copper supplementation and the prevalence of tcrB-positive enterococci in piglets. The study was done with weaned piglets, housed in 10 pens with 6 piglets per pen, fed diets supplemented with a normal (16.5 ppm; control) or an elevated (125 ppm) level of copper. Fecal samples were randomly collected from three piglets per pen on days 0, 14, 28, and 42 and plated on M-Enterococcus agar, and three enterococcal isolates were obtained from each sample. The overall prevalence of tcrB-positive enterococci was 21.1% (38/180) in piglets fed elevated copper and 2.8% (5/180) in the control. Among the 43 tcrB-positive isolates, 35 were E. faecium and 8 were E. faecalis. The mean MICs of copper for tcrB-negative and tcrB-positive enterococci were 6.2 and 22.2 mM, respectively. The restriction digestion of the genomic DNA of E. faecium or E. faecalis with S1 nuclease yielded a band of ∼194-kbp size to which both tcrB and the erm(B) gene probes hybridized. A conjugation assay demonstrated cotransfer of tcrB and erm(B) genes between E. faecium and E. faecalis strains. The higher prevalence of tcrB-positive enterococci in piglets fed elevated copper compared to that in piglets fed normal copper suggests that supplementation of copper in swine diets selected for resistance. PMID:21705534

  13. The Emergence of Linezolid Resistance among Enterococci in Intestinal Microbiota of Treated Patients Is Unrelated to Individual Pharmacokinetic Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, T. T.; Defrance, G.; Massias, L.; Alavoine, L.; Lefort, A; Noel, V.; Senneville, E.; Doucet-Populaire, F.; Mentré, F.; Andremont, A.; Duval, X.

    2014-01-01

    Linezolid is an antimicrobial agent for the treatment of multiresistant Gram-positive infections. We assessed the impact of linezolid on the microbiota and the emergence of resistance and investigated its relationship with plasma pharmacokinetics of the antibiotic. Twenty-eight patients were treated for the first time with linezolid administered orally (n = 17) or parenterally (n = 11) at 600 mg twice a day. Linezolid plasma pharmacokinetic analysis was performed on day 7. Colonization by fecal enterococci, pharyngeal streptococci, and nasal staphylococci were assessed using selective media with or without supplemental linezolid. The resistance to linezolid was characterized. The treatment led to a decrease of enterococci, staphylococci, and streptococci in the fecal (P = 0.03), nasal, and pharyngeal (P < 0.01) microbiotas. The appearance of resistant strains was observed only in enterococci from the fecal microbiota between the 7th and 21st days of treatment in four patients (14.3%). The resistance was mainly due for the first time to the mutation G2447T in the 23S rRNA gene. No pharmacokinetic parameters were significantly different between the patients, regardless of the appearance of resistance. The emergence of linezolid resistance during treatment was observed only in the intestinal microbiota and unrelated to pharmacokinetic parameters. However, colonization by Gram-positive bacteria was reduced as a result of treatment in all microbiotas. PMID:24566182

  14. Cultivation of vancomycin-resistant enterococci and methicillin-resistant staphylococci from input and output samples of German biogas plants.

    PubMed

    Glaeser, Stefanie P; Sowinsky, Olivia; Brunner, Jana S; Dott, Wolfgang; Kämpfer, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRS) were detected in two mesophilic German biogas plants (BGPs) using selective pre-enrichment methods combined with cultivation on CHROMagar media and antibiotic resistance gene screening. Genetic fingerprinting and 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed the presence of enterococci isolated by the VRE selective cultivation (67 isolates) in input and output samples of BGPs. In contrast, MRS (44 isolates) were detected in input, but in none of the output samples. Enterococcus isolates showed highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity (>99.8%) to E. lemanii, E. casseliflavus/E. gallinarium or E. devriesei/E. pseudoavium/E. viikkiensis and carried vanA, vanB and/or vanC1 genes. Enterococcus faecium and E. faecalis VRE were not detected, but isolates closely related to those species (>99.9% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity) were detected by the MRS selective cultivation methods. Staphylococcus isolates shared highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity (>99.9%) with S. haemolyticus, S. lentus and S. sciuri and carried mecA genes. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) were not detected. In summary, manure from livestock husbandry contained both, VRE and MRS. VRE were also detected in output samples, indicating that enterococci with vancomycin resistance genes could be release into the environment by the application of BGP output material as biofertilizers. PMID:26790463

  15. Molecular characterization of antibiotic resistance in enterococci recovered from seagulls (Larus cachinnans) representing an environmental health problem.

    PubMed

    Radhouani, Hajer; Igrejas, Gilberto; Pinto, Luís; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Coelho, Céline; Rodrigues, Jorge; Poeta, Patrícia

    2011-08-01

    Antimicrobial resistance and the mechanisms implicated were studied in 54 enterococci recovered from 57 seagull fecal samples. Almost 78% of the recovered enterococci showed resistance against one or more antibiotics and these isolates were identified to the species level. E. faecium was the most prevalent species (52.4%). High percentages of erythromycin and tetracycline resistances were found among our isolates (95.2%), and lower percentages were identified to other antibiotics. Most of the tetracycline-resistant strains carried the tet(M) and/or tet(L) genes. Genes associated with Tn916/Tn1545 and/or Tn5397 transposons were detected in 45% of tetracycline-resistant isolates. The erm(B) gene was detected in 65% of erythromycin-resistant isolates. The vat(D) and vat(E) genes were present in 5.9% and 11.8% of quinupristin/dalfopristin-resistant isolates, respectively. The ant(6)-Ia gene was identified in 57.1% of streptomycin-resistant isolates. All nine kanamycin-resistant isolates carried the aph(3)'-IIIa gene. The cat(A) gene was found in two chloramphenicol-resistant isolates. Seagulls should be considered a risk species for spreading in the environment antimicrobial resistant enterococci and can serve as a sentinel for antibiotic pressure from the surrounding farm and urban setting. PMID:21674073

  16. Modeling and optimization of defense high level waste removal sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Pran Krishna

    A novel methodology has been developed which makes possible a very fast running computational tool, capable of performing 30 to 50 years of simulation of the entire Savannah River Site (SRS) high level waste complex in less than 2 minutes on a work station. The methodology has been implemented in the Production Planning Model (ProdMod) simulation code which uses Aspen Technology's dynamic simulation software development package SPEEDUP. ProdMod is a pseudo-dynamic simulation code solely based on algebraic equations, using no differential equations. The dynamic nature of the plant process is captured using linear constructs in which the time dependence is implicit. Another innovative approach implemented in ProdMod development is the mapping of event-space on to time-space and vice versa, which accelerates the computation without sacrificing the necessary details in the event-space. ProdMod uses this approach in coupling the time-space continuous simulation with the event-space batch simulation, avoiding the discontinuities inherent in dynamic simulation batch processing. In addition, a general purpose optimization scheme has been devised based on the pseudo-dynamic constructs and the event- and time-space algorithms of ProdMod. The optimization scheme couples a FORTRAN based stand-alone optimization driver with the SPEEDUP based ProdMod simulator to perform dynamic optimization. The scheme is capable of generating single or multiple optimal input conditions for different types of objective functions over single or multiple years of operations depending on the nature of the objective function and operating constraints. The resultant optimal inputs are then interfaced with ProdMod to simulate the dynamic behavior of the waste processing operations. At the conclusion on an optimized advancement step, the simulation parameters are then passed to the optimization driver to generate the next set of optimized parameters. An optimization algorithm using linear programming

  17. Impacts of Stormwater Management Measures on E. coli and Enterococci Populations in Stormwater Effluent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildey, R. A.; Ballestero, T. P.; Roseen, R. M.; Houle, J.

    2005-05-01

    In our efforts to improve the quality of runoff entering our streams and waterways, stormwater management measures (or BMPs) are being implemented at a rapid pace. Usually designed to treat one or more specific types of contamination or loading, these measures may have unintended consequences that are not well understood. One issue that has not been fully explored is the potential effect these systems have on microbial contamination of the treated runoff. This study evaluates 11 types of treatment systems and their impact on E. coli and Enterococci contamination. Recent research has demonstrated that near-shore sediment may act as a continuous source of bacterial loading in the overlying waters, rather than bacterial loading being solely a temporal, storm-driven phenomenon. Similarly, stormwater management measures that utilize a soil media for filtration or incorporate a sediment sump may also provide conditions conducive to the incubation of fecal coliforms that can then be released into the environment during runoff events. Following with EPA regulatory guidelines for receiving waters, E. coli and Enterococci are used as surrogates for the presence of other potential disease-causing pathogens typically associated with mammalian and avian enteric bacteria. The stormwater management measures being investigated include: subsurface infiltration, surface sand filter, standard detention pond, bioretention area, hydrodynamic separation, subsurface gravel wetland, street sweeping, and vegetated swale. An adjacent porous parking area and a standard asphalt lot that drains to a tree filter are similarly monitored. Influent is supplied by runoff generated by a 9-acre commuter parking lot at the University of New Hampshire in Durham, NH. This influent is distributed equally to the different treatment devices that operate in parallel. Water quality parameters (DO, pH, specific conductivity, temperature) and flow are continuously monitored upstream from the distribution

  18. Enhancing the Anti-Enterococci Activity of Different Antibiotics by Combining With Metal Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Iram, Saira; Akbar Khan, Jawad; Aman, Nargis; Nadhman, Akhtar; Zulfiqar, Zikra; Arfat Yameen, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Background Enterococci have emerged as more virulent and multidrug-resistant in community and hospital settings. The emergence of vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) in hospitals has posed a serious threat to public health. The widespread use of antibiotics to treat VRE infections has resulted in the development of resistant forms of these organisms. Objectives Present study deals with the efficacy of antibiotic-nanoparticle combination against clinical isolates of VRE. This study has effectively evaluated the anti-enterococcal activity of metallic nanoparticles and their combination with antibiotics with the aim to search for new biocidal combinations. Materials and Methods Initially, the isolates were identified by various biochemical tests and also by PCR, targeting ddl, vanA and vanB genes. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was carried out by disc diffusion method. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of both antibiotics and metal nanoparticles against VRE was done using broth dilution method. On the basis of MICs, a combination of both antibiotics and nanoparticles was used by physical mixing of antibiotics and different concentrations of nanoparticles. Results The MIC of metal nanoparticles were found in the range of 0.31 - 30 mM. The combination of both antibiotics and nanoparticles has effectively reduced the MICs of ciprofloxacin from 16 - 256 μg/mL to 2 - 16 μg/mL, erythromycin 1024 - 2048 μg/mL to 128 - 512 μg/mL, methicillin 32 - 256 μg/mL to 8 - 64 μg/mL and vancomycin 2 - 512 μg/mL to 0.5 - 64 μg/mL. Conclusions Among the nanoparticles, ZnO was found as a potent metallic nanoparticle which effectively reduced the MIC upon combination with the antibiotics. The combination exhibited enhanced bactericidal activity against multidrug resistant clinical strains of VRE with dose dependency. Further extensive study on this aspect can prove their beneficial clinical use against resistant pathogens to combat increasing resistance to antibiotics

  19. Exceptionally high levels of multiple mating in an army ant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denny, A. Jay; Franks, Nigel R.; Powell, Scott; Edwards, Keith J.

    Most species of social insects have singly mated queens, although there are notable exceptions. Competing hypotheses have been proposed to explain the evolution of high levels of multiple mating, but this issue is far from resolved. Here we use microsatellites to investigate mating frequency in the army ant Eciton burchellii and show that queens mate with an exceptionally large number of males, eclipsing all but one other social insect species for which data are available. In addition we present evidence that suggests that mating is serial, continuing throughout the lifetime of the queen. This is the first demonstration of serial mating among social hymenoptera. We propose that high paternity within colonies is most likely to have evolved to increase genetic diversity and to counter high pathogen and parasite loads.

  20. ALICE: Project Overview and High Level Science Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soummer, Remi; Choquet, Elodie; Pueyo, Laurent; Brendan Hagan, J.; Gofas-Salas, Elena; Rajan, Abhijith; Perrin, Marshall D.; Chen, Christine; Debes, John H.; Golimowski, David A.; Hines, Dean C.; Schneider, Glenn; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Mawet, Dimitri; Marois, Christian; Barman, Travis

    2015-01-01

    We report on the status of the ALICE project (Archival Legacy Investigation of Circumstellar Environments), which consists in a consistent reanalysis of the entire HST-NICMOS coronagraphic archive. Over the last two years, we have developed a sophisticated pipeline able to handle the data of the 400 stars of the archive. This pipeline builds on the Karhunen-Loeve Image Projection (KLIP) algorithm, and was completed in the fall of 2014. We discuss the first processing and analysis results of the overall reduction campaign. As we will deliver high-level science products to the STScI MAST archive, we are defining a new standard format for high-contrast science products, which will be compatible with every new high-contrast imaging instrument (GPI, SPHERE, P1640, CHARIS, etc.) and used by the JWST coronagraphs. We present here the specifications of this standard.

  1. High-level waste tank farm set point document

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony, J.A. III

    1995-01-15

    Setpoints for nuclear safety-related instrumentation are required for actions determined by the design authorization basis. Minimum requirements need to be established for assuring that setpoints are established and held within specified limits. This document establishes the controlling methodology for changing setpoints of all classifications. The instrumentation under consideration involve the transfer, storage, and volume reduction of radioactive liquid waste in the F- and H-Area High-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Farms. The setpoint document will encompass the PROCESS AREA listed in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) (DPSTSA-200-10 Sup 18) which includes the diversion box HDB-8 facility. In addition to the PROCESS AREAS listed in the SAR, Building 299-H and the Effluent Transfer Facility (ETF) are also included in the scope.

  2. High Level Waste System Impacts from Acid Dissolution of Sludge

    SciTech Connect

    KETUSKY, EDWARD

    2006-04-20

    This research evaluates the ability of OLI{copyright} equilibrium based software to forecast Savannah River Site High Level Waste system impacts from oxalic acid dissolution of Tank 1-15 sludge heels. Without further laboratory and field testing, only the use of oxalic acid can be considered plausible to support sludge heel dissolution on multiple tanks. Using OLI{copyright} and available test results, a dissolution model is constructed and validated. Material and energy balances, coupled with the model, identify potential safety concerns. Overpressurization and overheating are shown to be unlikely. Corrosion induced hydrogen could, however, overwhelm the tank ventilation. While pH adjustment can restore the minimal hydrogen generation, resultant precipitates will notably increase the sludge volume. OLI{copyright} is used to develop a flowsheet such that additional sludge vitrification canisters and other negative system impacts are minimized. Sensitivity analyses are used to assess the processability impacts from variations in the sludge/quantities of acids.

  3. Using the CMS High Level Trigger as a Cloud Resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colling, David; Huffman, Adam; McCrae, Alison; Lahiff, Andrew; Grandi, Claudio; Cinquilli, Mattia; Gowdy, Stephen; Coarasa, Jose Antonio; Tiradani, Anthony; Ozga, Wojciech; Chaze, Olivier; Sgaravatto, Massimo; Bauer, Daniela

    2014-06-01

    The CMS High Level Trigger is a compute farm of more than 10,000 cores. During data taking this resource is heavily used and is an integral part of the experiment's triggering system. However, outside of data taking periods this resource is largely unused. We describe why CMS wants to use the HLT as a cloud resource (outside of data taking periods) and how this has been achieved. In doing this we have turned a single-use cluster into an agile resource for CMS production computing. While we are able to use the HLT as a production cloud resource, there is still considerable further work that CMS needs to carry out before this resource can be used with the desired agility. This report, therefore, represents a snapshot of this activity at the time of CHEP 2013.

  4. Socioeconomic studies of high-level nuclear waste disposal.

    PubMed

    White, G F; Bronzini, M S; Colglazier, E W; Dohrenwend, B; Erikson, K; Hansen, R; Kneese, A V; Moore, R; Page, E B; Rappaport, R A

    1994-11-01

    The socioeconomic investigations of possible impacts of the proposed repository for high-level nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, have been unprecedented in several respects. They bear on the public decision that sooner or later will be made as to where and how to dispose permanently of the waste presently at military weapons installations and that continues to accumulate at nuclear power stations. No final decision has yet been made. There is no clear precedent from other countries. The organization of state and federal studies is unique. The state studies involve more disciplines than any previous efforts. They have been carried out in parallel to federal studies and have pioneered in defining some problems and appropriate research methods. A recent annotated bibliography provides interested scientists with a compact guide to the 178 published reports, as well as to relevant journal articles and related documents. PMID:7971963

  5. Socioeconomic studies of high-level nuclear waste disposal.

    PubMed Central

    White, G F; Bronzini, M S; Colglazier, E W; Dohrenwend, B; Erikson, K; Hansen, R; Kneese, A V; Moore, R; Page, E B; Rappaport, R A

    1994-01-01

    The socioeconomic investigations of possible impacts of the proposed repository for high-level nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, have been unprecedented in several respects. They bear on the public decision that sooner or later will be made as to where and how to dispose permanently of the waste presently at military weapons installations and that continues to accumulate at nuclear power stations. No final decision has yet been made. There is no clear precedent from other countries. The organization of state and federal studies is unique. The state studies involve more disciplines than any previous efforts. They have been carried out in parallel to federal studies and have pioneered in defining some problems and appropriate research methods. A recent annotated bibliography provides interested scientists with a compact guide to the 178 published reports, as well as to relevant journal articles and related documents. PMID:7971963

  6. A High-Level Language for Rule-Based Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Michael; Phillips, Andrew; Plotkin, Gordon D.

    2015-01-01

    Rule-based languages such as Kappa excel in their support for handling the combinatorial complexities prevalent in many biological systems, including signalling pathways. But Kappa provides little structure for organising rules, and large models can therefore be hard to read and maintain. This paper introduces a high-level, modular extension of Kappa called LBS-κ. We demonstrate the constructs of the language through examples and three case studies: a chemotaxis switch ring, a MAPK cascade, and an insulin signalling pathway. We then provide a formal definition of LBS-κ through an abstract syntax and a translation to plain Kappa. The translation is implemented in a compiler tool which is available as a web application. We finally demonstrate how to increase the expressivity of LBS-κ through embedded scripts in a general-purpose programming language, a technique which we view as generally applicable to other domain specific languages. PMID:26043208

  7. SIMULANT DEVELOPMENT FOR SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M; Russell Eibling, R; David Koopman, D; Dan Lambert, D; Paul Burket, P

    2007-09-04

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site vitrifies High Level Waste (HLW) for repository internment. The process consists of three major steps: waste pretreatment, vitrification, and canister decontamination/sealing. The HLW consists of insoluble metal hydroxides (primarily iron, aluminum, magnesium, manganese, and uranium) and soluble sodium salts (carbonate, hydroxide, nitrite, nitrate, and sulfate). The HLW is processed in large batches through DWPF; DWPF has recently completed processing Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) and is currently processing Sludge Batch 4 (SB4). The composition of metal species in SB4 is shown in Table 1 as a function of the ratio of a metal to iron. Simulants remove radioactive species and renormalize the remaining species. Supernate composition is shown in Table 2.

  8. Linearization of the Fermilab recycler high level RF

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph E Dey; Tom Kubicki; John Reid

    2003-05-28

    In studying the Recycler high level RF, it was found that at 89 kHz, the lowest frequency required by the system, some nonlinearities in magnitude and phase were discovered. The visible evidence of this was that beam injected in a barrier bucket had a definite slope at the top. Using a network analyzer, the S-parameter S{sub 21} was realized for the overall system and from mathematical modeling a second order numerator and denominator transfer function was found. The inverse of this transfer function gives their linearization transfer function. The linearization transfer function was realized in hardware by summing a high pass, band pass and low pass filter together. The resulting magnitude and phase plots, along with actual beam response will be shown.

  9. High level radioactive waste vitrification process equipment component testing

    SciTech Connect

    Siemens, D.H.; Heath, W.O.; Larson, D.E.; Craig, S.N.; Berger, D.N.; Goles, R.W.

    1985-04-01

    Remote operability and maintainability of vitrification equipment were assessed under shielded-cell conditions. The equipment tested will be applied to immobilize high-level and transuranic liquid waste slurries that resulted from plutonium production for defense weapons. Equipment tested included: a turntable for handling waste canisters under the melter; a removable discharge cone in the melter overflow section; a thermocouple jumper that extends into a shielded cell; remote instrument and electrical connectors; remote, mechanical, and heat transfer aspects of the melter glass overflow section; a reamer to clean out plugged nozzles in the melter top; a closed circuit camera to view the melter interior; and a device to retrieve samples of the glass product. A test was also conducted to evaluate liquid metals for use in a liquid metal sealing system.

  10. High-Level Language Production in Parkinson's Disease: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Altmann, Lori J. P.; Troche, Michelle S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses impairments of high-level, complex language production in Parkinson's disease (PD), defined as sentence and discourse production, and situates these impairments within the framework of current psycholinguistic theories of language production. The paper comprises three major sections, an overview of the effects of PD on the brain and cognition, a review of the literature on language production in PD, and a discussion of the stages of the language production process that are impaired in PD. Overall, the literature converges on a few common characteristics of language production in PD: reduced information content, impaired grammaticality, disrupted fluency, and reduced syntactic complexity. Many studies also document the strong impact of differences in cognitive ability on language production. Based on the data, PD affects all stages of language production including conceptualization and functional and positional processing. Furthermore, impairments at all stages appear to be exacerbated by impairments in cognitive abilities. PMID:21860777

  11. Review of High Level Waste Tanks Ultrasonic Inspection Data

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B

    2006-03-09

    A review of the data collected during ultrasonic inspection of the Type I high level waste tanks has been completed. The data was analyzed for relevance to the possibility of vapor space corrosion and liquid/air interface corrosion. The review of the Type I tank UT inspection data has confirmed that the vapor space general corrosion is not an unusually aggressive phenomena and correlates well with predicted corrosion rates for steel exposed to bulk solution. The corrosion rates are seen to decrease with time as expected. The review of the temperature data did not reveal any obvious correlations between high temperatures and the occurrences of leaks. The complex nature of temperature-humidity interaction, particularly with respect to vapor corrosion requires further understanding to infer any correlation. The review of the waste level data also did not reveal any obvious correlations.

  12. 4.5 Meter high level waste canister study

    SciTech Connect

    Calmus, R. B.

    1997-10-01

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Storage and Disposal Project has established the Immobilized High-Level Waste (IBLW) Storage Sub-Project to provide the capability to store Phase I and II BLW products generated by private vendors. A design/construction project, Project W-464, was established under the Sub-Project to provide the Phase I capability. Project W-464 will retrofit the Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB) to accommodate the Phase I I-ILW products. Project W-464 conceptual design is currently being performed to interim store 3.0 m-long BLW stainless steel canisters with a 0.61 in diameter, DOE is considering using a 4.5 in canister of the same diameter to reduce permanent disposal costs. This study was performed to assess the impact of replacing the 3.0 in canister with the 4.5 in canister. The summary cost and schedule impacts are described.

  13. Midwestern High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Dantoin, T.S.

    1990-12-01

    For more than half a century, the Council of State Governments has served as a common ground for the states of the nation. The Council is a nonprofit, state-supported and -directed service organization that provides research and resources, identifies trends, supplies answers and creates a network for legislative, executive and judicial branch representatives. This List of Available Resources was prepared with the support of the US Department of Energy, Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC02-89CH10402. However, any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed herein are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of DOE. The purpose of the agreement, and reports issued pursuant to it, is to identify and analyze regional issues pertaining to the transportation of high-level radioactive waste and to inform Midwestern state officials with respect to technical issues and regulatory concerns related to waste transportation.

  14. Calculates Neutron Production in Canisters of High-level Waste

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1993-01-15

    ALPHN calculates the (alpha,n) neutron production rate of a canister of vitrified high-level waste. The user supplies the chemical composition of the glass or glass-ceramic and the curies of the alpha-emitting actinides present. The output of the program gives the (alpha,n) neutron production of each actinide in neutrons per second and the total for the canister. The (alpha,n) neutron production rates are source terms only; that is, they are production rates within the glass andmore » do not take into account the shielding effect of the glass. For a given glass composition, the user can calculate up to eight cases simultaneously; these cases are based on the same glass composition but contain different quantities of actinides per canister.« less

  15. A high-level language for rule-based modelling.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Michael; Phillips, Andrew; Plotkin, Gordon D

    2015-01-01

    Rule-based languages such as Kappa excel in their support for handling the combinatorial complexities prevalent in many biological systems, including signalling pathways. But Kappa provides little structure for organising rules, and large models can therefore be hard to read and maintain. This paper introduces a high-level, modular extension of Kappa called LBS-κ. We demonstrate the constructs of the language through examples and three case studies: a chemotaxis switch ring, a MAPK cascade, and an insulin signalling pathway. We then provide a formal definition of LBS-κ through an abstract syntax and a translation to plain Kappa. The translation is implemented in a compiler tool which is available as a web application. We finally demonstrate how to increase the expressivity of LBS-κ through embedded scripts in a general-purpose programming language, a technique which we view as generally applicable to other domain specific languages. PMID:26043208

  16. High Level Information Fusion (HLIF) with nested fusion loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodley, Robert; Gosnell, Michael; Fischer, Amber

    2013-05-01

    Situation modeling and threat prediction require higher levels of data fusion in order to provide actionable information. Beyond the sensor data and sources the analyst has access to, the use of out-sourced and re-sourced data is becoming common. Through the years, some common frameworks have emerged for dealing with information fusion—perhaps the most ubiquitous being the JDL Data Fusion Group and their initial 4-level data fusion model. Since these initial developments, numerous models of information fusion have emerged, hoping to better capture the human-centric process of data analyses within a machine-centric framework. 21st Century Systems, Inc. has developed Fusion with Uncertainty Reasoning using Nested Assessment Characterizer Elements (FURNACE) to address challenges of high level information fusion and handle bias, ambiguity, and uncertainty (BAU) for Situation Modeling, Threat Modeling, and Threat Prediction. It combines JDL fusion levels with nested fusion loops and state-of-the-art data reasoning. Initial research has shown that FURNACE is able to reduce BAU and improve the fusion process by allowing high level information fusion (HLIF) to affect lower levels without the double counting of information or other biasing issues. The initial FURNACE project was focused on the underlying algorithms to produce a fusion system able to handle BAU and repurposed data in a cohesive manner. FURNACE supports analyst's efforts to develop situation models, threat models, and threat predictions to increase situational awareness of the battlespace. FURNACE will not only revolutionize the military intelligence realm, but also benefit the larger homeland defense, law enforcement, and business intelligence markets.

  17. High-level hepatitis B virus replication in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Guidotti, L G; Matzke, B; Schaller, H; Chisari, F V

    1995-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) transgenic mice whose hepatocytes replicate the virus at levels comparable to that in the infected livers of patients with chronic hepatitis have been produced, without any evidence of cytopathology. High-level viral gene expression was obtained in the liver and kidney tissues in three independent lineages. These animals were produced with a terminally redundant viral DNA construct (HBV 1.3) that starts just upstream of HBV enhancer I, extends completely around the circular viral genome, and ends just downstream of the unique polyadenylation site in HBV. In these animals, the viral mRNA is more abundant in centrilobular hepatocytes than elsewhere in the hepatic lobule. High-level viral DNA replication occurs inside viral nucleocapsid particles that preferentially form in the cytoplasm of these centrilobular hepatocytes, suggesting that an expression threshold must be reached for nucleocapsid assembly and viral replication to occur. Despite the restricted distribution of the viral replication machinery in centrilobular cytoplasmic nucleocapsids, nucleocapsid particles are detectable in the vast majority of hepatocyte nuclei throughout the hepatic lobule. The intranuclear nucleocapsid particles are empty, however, suggesting that viral nucleocapsid particle assembly occurs independently in the nucleus and the cytoplasm of the hepatocyte and implying that cytoplasmic nucleocapsid particles do not transport the viral genome across the nuclear membrane into the nucleus during the viral life cycle. This model creates the opportunity to examine the influence of viral and host factors on HBV pathogenesis and replication and to assess the antiviral potential of pharmacological agents and physiological processes, including the immune response. PMID:7666518

  18. High-level waste program integration within the DOE complex

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, J.H.; Davis, N.R.; Malone, K.; Schaus, P.S.

    1998-03-01

    Eleven major Department of Energy (DOE) site contractors were chartered by the Assistant Secretary to use a systems engineering approach to develop and evaluate technically defensible cost savings opportunities across the complex. Known as the complex-wide Environmental Management Integration (EMI), this process evaluated all the major DOE waste streams including high level waste (HLW). Across the DOE complex, this waste stream has the highest life cycle cost and is scheduled to take until at least 2035 before all HLW is processed for disposal. Technical contract experts from the four DOE sites that manage high level waste participated in the integration analysis: Hanford, Savannah River Site (SRS), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), and West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). In addition, subject matter experts from the Yucca Mountain Project and the Tanks Focus Area participated in the analysis. Also, departmental representatives from the US Department of Energy Headquarters (DOE-HQ) monitored the analysis and results. Workouts were held throughout the year to develop recommendations to achieve a complex-wide integrated program. From this effort, the HLW Environmental Management (EM) Team identified a set of programmatic and technical opportunities that could result in potential cost savings and avoidance in excess of $18 billion and an accelerated completion of the HLW mission by seven years. The cost savings, schedule improvements, and volume reduction are attributed to a multifaceted HLW treatment disposal strategy which involves waste pretreatment, standardized waste matrices, risk-based retrieval, early development and deployment of a shipping system for glass canisters, and reasonable, low cost tank closure.

  19. Molecular Analysis of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci Isolated from Regional Hospitals in Trinidad and Tobago

    PubMed Central

    Akpaka, Patrick E.; Kissoon, Shivnarine; Jayaratne, Padman

    2016-01-01

    Geographic spread of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) clones in cities, countries, or even continents has been identified by molecular techniques. This study aimed at characterizing virulent genes and determining genetic relatedness of 45 VRE isolates from Trinidad and Tobago using molecular tools, including polymerase chain reaction, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and Random Amplification Polymorphic DNA (RAPD). The majority (84%) of the isolates were Enterococcus faecium possessing vanA gene while the rest (16%) were Enterococcus faecalis possessing vanB. The esp gene was found in all 45 VRE isolates while hyl genes were found only in E. faecium species. The E. faecium species expressed five distinct PFGE patterns. The predominant clones with similar or common patterns belonged to clones one and three, and each had 11 (29%) of the VRE isolates. Plasmid content was identified in representative isolates from each clonal group. By contrast, the E. faecalis species had one PFGE pattern suggesting the presence of an occult and limited clonal spread. The emergence of VRE in the country seems to be related to intra/interhospital dissemination of an epidemic clone carrying the vanA element. Therefore, infection control measures will be warranted to prevent any potential outbreak and spread of VRE in the country. PMID:27299153

  20. Modelling importance of sediment effects on fate and transport of enterococci in the Severn Estuary, UK.

    PubMed

    Gao, Guanghai; Falconer, Roger A; Lin, Binliang

    2013-02-15

    The paper detailed a water quality modelling study of a hyper-tidal estuary, undertaken to assess the impact of various bacteria input loads on the receiving waters in a coastal basin in the UK, by using the model developed in previous study of the same authors enterococci, used as the indicators for bathing water quality under the new European Union (EU) Bathing Water Directive, were numerically modelled using a hydro-environmental model. In particular, the numerical model used in this study includes the effects of sediment on bacteria transport processes in surface water. Finally, the importance of sediment bacteria inputs on the bathing water quality was also investigated under different weather and tidal condition. During spring tide, the bacteria input from the bed sediments are dominant for both wet and dry weather conditions. During neap tides and during dry weather conditions the inputs of bacteria from the bed sediment were still dominant, but during wet weather conditions the inputs from river were dominant. Under different tidal flow conditions some parameters had a more significant role than others. During high flow conditions the sediment re-suspensions processes were dominant, therefore the bed bacteria concentrations played a dominant role on the overall bacteria concentration levels in the water column. In contrast, during low flow conditions sediment deposition prevails and bacteria are removed from the water column. The partition coefficient was found to be more important than the bed bacteria concentrations, during low flow conditions. PMID:23290609

  1. Regrowth of enterococci indicator in an open recycled-water impoundment.

    PubMed

    Derry, Chris; Attwater, Roger

    2014-01-15

    The purpose of the research was to assess the potential for enterococci faecal-indicator to regrow in recycled water while under environmentally-open storage. Regrowth would result in false-positive indicator results with possible downgrading, rejection or over-chlorination of recycled water. The research setting was the main 93-megalitre storage impoundment of the Hawkesbury Water Recycling Scheme in Sydney's North West, receiving tertiary treated (chlorinated) effluent from the Richmond sewage treatment plant. The water is used to irrigate horticultural food crops, pasture for dairy cattle, sheep, deer and horses, and for the maintenance of lawns and sports fields. Highly significant positive relationships were noted in multivariate analysis between indicator counts and the growth factors atmospheric temperature and UV254 unfiltered as proxy for total organic carbon (p=0.001 and 0.003 respectively). Nitrate and phosphate did not show significant relationships suggesting that these nutrients may not be growth-limiting at levels found in recycled water. Rainfall and wild duck presence did not appear to have an impact on enterococcal growth in the study. The overall predictive power of the regression model was shown to be highly significant (p=0.001). These findings will assist in recycled water monitoring and the revision of guidelines, with potential for the reduction of the chlorination by-product burden on the environment. A formula derived for the relationship between the indicator and atmospheric temperature could be used in food-production and climate-change modelling. PMID:24008073

  2. Non-susceptibility to tigecycline in enterococci from hospitalised patients, food products and community sources.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Ana R; Novais, Carla; Correia, Rosa; Monteiro, Márcia; Coque, Teresa M; Peixe, Luísa

    2011-08-01

    In this study, the in vitro activity of tigecycline against 1140 enterococci collected from humans, food products, animals and the environment in Portugal (1996-2008) was analysed. Ten isolates (seven Enterococcus faecalis and three Enterococcus spp.) non-susceptible to tigecycline (minimum inhibitory concentrations of 0.5-1.0 mg/L), which were also resistant to tetracycline and minocycline, were mostly observed in samples collected before the introduction of tigecycline in the therapeutic arsenal. The E. faecalis isolates were recovered from hospitalised patients (n=2; ST319/CC2 and ST34), healthy humans (n=2; ST21/CC21), chicken meat (n=1; ST260) as well as from two swine samples. The remaining isolates were also recovered from chicken meat (n=1; Enterococcus gallinarum) and swine (n=2; Enterococcus hirae and Enterococcus spp.). Recovery of enterococcal isolates with reduced susceptibility to tigecycline amongst different reservoirs, including animals for food consumption, suggests that selection of tigecycline-resistant isolates by antibiotics other than tigecycline might occur in non-clinical settings. PMID:21664110

  3. Transport of enterococci and F+ coliphage through the saturated zone of the beach aquifer.

    PubMed

    de Sieyes, Nicholas R; Russell, Todd L; Brown, Kendra I; Mohanty, Sanjay K; Boehm, Alexandria B

    2016-02-01

    Coastal groundwater has been implicated as a source of microbial pollution to recreational beaches. However, there is little work investigating the transport of fecal microbes through beach aquifers where waters of variable salinity are present. In this study, the potential for fecal indicator organisms enterococci (ENT) and F+ coliphage to be transported through marine beach aquifers was investigated. Native sediment and groundwaters were collected from the fresh and saline sections of the subterranean estuary at three beaches along the California coast where coastal communities utilize septic systems for wastewater treatment. Groundwaters were seeded with sewage and removal of F+ coliphage and ENT by the sediments during saturated flow was tested in laboratory column experiments. Removal varied significantly between beach and organism. F+ coliphage was removed to a greater extent than ENT, and removal was greater in saline sediments and groundwater than fresh. At one of the three beaches, a field experiment was conducted to investigate the attenuation of F+ coliphage and ENT down gradient of a septic leach field. ENT were detected up to 24 m from the leach field. The column study and field observations together suggest ENT can be mobile within native aquifer sediments and groundwater under certain conditions. PMID:26837827

  4. Fumarate Reductase-Producing Enterococci Reduce Methane Production in Rumen Fermentation In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seon-Ho; Mamuad, Lovelia L; Kim, Dong-Woon; Kim, Soo-Ki; Lee, Sang-Suk

    2016-03-28

    Biotic agents such as fumarate-reducing bacteria can be used for controlling methane (CH4) production in the rumen. Fumarate-reducing bacteria convert fumarate to succinate by fumarate reductase, ultimately leading to the production of propionate. Fumarate-reducing bacteria in the genus Enterococcus were isolated from rumen fluid samples from slaughtered Korean native goats. The enterococci were identified as Enterococcus faecalis SROD5 and E. faecium SROD by phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences. The fumarate reductase activities of the SROD5 and SROD strains were 42.13 and 37.05 mM NADH oxidized/min/mg of cellular nitrogen (N), respectively. Supplementation of rumen fermentation in vitro with the SROD5 and SROD strains produced significantly higher propionate, butyrate, and total volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentrations than controls at 12 h; VFA concentrations tended to increase after 24 h of incubation. The generated CH4 concentration was significantly lower in the SROD5 and SROD treatment groups after 24 h of incubation. These findings indicate that E. faecium SROD has potential as a direct-fed microbial additive for increasing total VFAs while decreasing CH4 production in rumen fermentation in vitro. PMID:26767574

  5. Optimal control of vancomycin-resistant enterococci using preventive care and treatment of infections.

    PubMed

    Lowden, Jonathan; Miller Neilan, Rachael; Yahdi, Mohammed

    2014-03-01

    The rising prevalence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) is a major health problem in intensive care units (ICU) because of its association with increased mortality and high health care costs. We present a mathematical framework for determining cost-effective strategies for prevention and treatment of VRE in the ICU. A system of five ordinary differential equations describes the movement of ICU patients in and out of five VRE-related states. Two control variables representing the prevention and treatment of VRE are incorporated into the system. The basic reproductive number is derived and calculated for different levels of the two controls. An optimal control problem is formulated to minimize VRE-related deaths and costs associated with prevention and treatment controls over a finite time period. Numerical solutions illustrate optimal single and dual allocations of the controls for various cost values. Results show that preventive care has the greatest impact in reducing the basic reproductive number, while treatment of VRE infections has the most impact on reducing VRE-related deaths. PMID:24480735

  6. Saponins increase susceptibility of vancomycin-resistant enterococci to antibiotic compounds

    PubMed Central

    Heimesaat, Markus M.; Fischer, André; Bereswill, Stefan; Melzig, Matthias F.

    2014-01-01

    The resistance of commensal bacteria to first and second line antibiotics has reached an alarming level in many parts of the world and endangers the effective treatment of infectious diseases. In this study, the influence of the plant-derived natural saponins glycyrrhizic acid, β-aescin, α-hederin, hederacoside C, and primulic acid 1 on the susceptibility of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) against antibiotics of clinical relevance was investigated in 20 clinical isolates. Furthermore, the antibacterial properties of saponins under study against VRE were determined in vitro. Results reveal that the susceptibility of VRE against gentamicin, teicoplanin, and daptomycin was enhanced in the presence of the saponin glycyrrhizic acid. Most importantly, glycyrrhizic acid (1 mg/ml) diminished the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of gentamicin in gentamicin low-level intrinsic resistant VRE from 2 – >8 mg/l to ≤ 0.125–1 mg/l. The adding of β-aescin, α-hederin, hederacoside C, and primulic acid 1 to the antibiotics under study showed, compared to glycyrrhizic acid, less influence on the antibiotic potency. Only glycyrrhizic acid (1 mg/ml) and α‑hederin (0.2 mg/ml) showed weak antibacterial properties against the clinical isolates. Our study points towards a therapeutic potential of saponins in the coapplication with antibiotics for bacterial infections. PMID:25544893

  7. Saponins increase susceptibility of vancomycin-resistant enterococci to antibiotic compounds.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Sebastian; Heimesaat, Markus M; Fischer, André; Bereswill, Stefan; Melzig, Matthias F

    2014-12-01

    The resistance of commensal bacteria to first and second line antibiotics has reached an alarming level in many parts of the world and endangers the effective treatment of infectious diseases. In this study, the influence of the plant-derived natural saponins glycyrrhizic acid, β-aescin, α-hederin, hederacoside C, and primulic acid 1 on the susceptibility of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) against antibiotics of clinical relevance was investigated in 20 clinical isolates. Furthermore, the antibacterial properties of saponins under study against VRE were determined in vitro. Results reveal that the susceptibility of VRE against gentamicin, teicoplanin, and daptomycin was enhanced in the presence of the saponin glycyrrhizic acid. Most importantly, glycyrrhizic acid (1 mg/ml) diminished the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of gentamicin in gentamicin low-level intrinsic resistant VRE from 2 - >8 mg/l to ≤ 0.125-1 mg/l. The adding of β-aescin, α-hederin, hederacoside C, and primulic acid 1 to the antibiotics under study showed, compared to glycyrrhizic acid, less influence on the antibiotic potency. Only glycyrrhizic acid (1 mg/ml) and α‑hederin (0.2 mg/ml) showed weak antibacterial properties against the clinical isolates. Our study points towards a therapeutic potential of saponins in the coapplication with antibiotics for bacterial infections. PMID:25544893

  8. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci from nosocomial, community, and animal sources in the United States.

    PubMed Central

    Coque, T M; Tomayko, J F; Ricke, S C; Okhyusen, P C; Murray, B E

    1996-01-01

    The presence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) was looked for in fecal samples from 104 healthy volunteers (3 with hospital exposure), 100 selected hospitalized patients, and various environmental sources (44 commercial chickens, 5 farm-raised chickens, 3 turkeys, and 2 chicken farm lagoon slurries). Five probiotic preparations were also studied. No VRE with vanA or vanB genes were isolated from the healthy volunteers without hospital exposure, environmental sources, or probiotic preparations. VRE with vanB were found in the stools of 16% of the high-risk hospitalized patients and in one volunteer with hospital contact. All VRE examined could be classified into one of two clones by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. VRE from 11 of the colonized patients were quantified and ranged from 10(3) to 10(6) CFU/g of stool. This study, in contrast to findings in Europe, failed to find evidence of VanA- or VanB-type VRE in the community or environmental sources in Houston, Texas, and suggests that these settings are not a likely source of VRE in hospitals in this geographic area. PMID:8913473

  9. Nosocomial outbreak of Enteroccocus gallinarum: untaming of rare species of enterococci.

    PubMed

    Contreras, G A; DiazGranados, C A; Cortes, L; Reyes, J; Vanegas, S; Panesso, D; Rincón, S; Díaz, L; Prada, G; Murray, B E; Arias, C A

    2008-12-01

    An unusual increase in infections caused by vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus gallinarum (VREG) was identified in May 2004, in a Colombian tertiary care teaching hospital. A case-control study was subsequently designed to identify risk factors associated with the development of infections due to these organisms. All VREG isolates were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing, vancomycin resistance gene detection and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing. Additionally, the presence of genes associated with an acquired pathogenicity island of E. faecalis and a hyl-like gene of E. faecium was assessed by hybridisation assays. Eleven cases of VREG were identified between May through June 2004. VREG was isolated from blood (N=4), surgical secretions (N=4), paranasal sinus secretion (N=1), lung abscess (N=1) and urine (N=1). Infections with VREG were associated with mucositis, hospitalisation in the haematology ward and surgical unit, length of hospital stay prior to culture and invasive procedures within 30 days prior to the culture. Logistic regression found that female sex and hospitalisation in the surgical unit were independent factors for VREG infection. All isolates were identified as E. gallinarum, harboured the vanC1 gene and exhibited indistinguishable restriction patterns by PFGE. Virulence-associated genes were not detected. This is the first documented hospital-wide outbreak of VREG and highlights the fact that uncommon species of enterococci are capable of nosocomial dissemination. PMID:18799242

  10. Mobilization and transport of naturally occurring enterococci in beach sands subject to transient infiltration of seawater.

    PubMed

    Russell, Todd L; Yamahara, Kevan M; Boehm, Alexandria B

    2012-06-01

    This study explores the transport of enterococci (ENT) from naturally contaminated beach sands to the groundwater table via infiltrating seawater using field, laboratory, and modeling experiments. ENT were readily mobilized and transported through the unsaturated zone during infiltration events in both the field and laboratory column experiments. Detachment mechanisms were investigated using a modified version of HYDRUS-1D. Three models for detachment kinetics were tested. Detachment kinetics that are first order with respect to the rate of change in the water content and attached surface bacterial concentrations were found to provide a best fit between predicted and observed data. From these experimental and model results we conclude that detachment mechanisms associated with the rapid increases in pore water content such as air-water interface scouring and thin film expansion are likely drivers of ENT mobilization in the investigated system. These findings suggest that through-beach transport of ENT may be an important pathway through which ENT from beach sands are transported to beach groundwater where they may be discharged to coastal waters via submarine groundwater discharge. PMID:22533299

  11. Phylogeny and Identification of Enterococci by atpA Gene Sequence Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Naser, S.; Thompson, F. L.; Hoste, B.; Gevers, D.; Vandemeulebroecke, K.; Cleenwerck, I.; Thompson, C. C.; Vancanneyt, M.; Swings, J.

    2005-01-01

    The relatedness among 91 Enterococcus strains representing all validly described species was investigated by comparing a 1,102-bp fragment of atpA, the gene encoding the alpha subunit of ATP synthase. The relationships observed were in agreement with the phylogeny inferred from 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. However, atpA gene sequences were much more discriminatory than 16S rRNA for species differentiation. All species were differentiated on the basis of atpA sequences with, at a maximum, 92% similarity. Six members of the Enterococcus faecium species group (E. faecium, E. hirae, E. durans, E. villorum, E. mundtii, and E. ratti) showed >99% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, but the highest value of atpA gene sequence similarity was only 89.9%. The intraspecies atpA sequence similarities for all species except E. faecium strains varied from 98.6 to 100%; the E. faecium strains had a lower atpA sequence similarity of 96.3%. Our data clearly show that atpA provides an alternative tool for the phylogenetic study and identification of enterococci. PMID:15872246

  12. Modeling the regional spread and control of vancomycin-resistant enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bruce Y.; Yilmaz, S. Levent; Wong, Kim F.; Bartsch, Sarah M.; Eubank, Stephen; Song, Yeohan; Avery, Taliser R.; Christie, Richard; Brown, Shawn T.; Epstein, Joshua M.; Parker, Jon I.; Huang, Susan S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Because patients can remain colonized with vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) for long periods of time, VRE may spread from one health care facility to another. Methods Using the Regional Healthcare Ecosystem Analyst, an agent-based model of patient flow among all Orange County, California, hospitals and communities, we quantified the degree and speed at which changes in VRE colonization prevalence in a hospital may affect prevalence in other Orange County hospitals. Results A sustained 10% increase in VRE colonization prevalence in any 1 hospital caused a 2.8% (none to 62%) average relative increase in VRE prevalence in all other hospitals. Effects took from 1.5 to >10 years to fully manifest. Larger hospitals tended to have greater affect on other hospitals. Conclusions When monitoring and controlling VRE, decision makers may want to account for regional effects. Knowing a hospital’s connections with other health care facilities via patient sharing can help determine which hospitals to include in a surveillance or control program. PMID:23896284

  13. Virulence, antibiotic resistance and biogenic amines of bacteriocinogenic lactococci and enterococci isolated from goat milk.

    PubMed

    Perin, Luana Martins; Miranda, Rodrigo Otávio; Todorov, Svetoslav Dimitrov; Franco, Bernadette Dora Gombossy de Melo; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2014-08-18

    The present study aimed to investigate the virulence, antibiotic resistance and biogenic amine production in bacteriocinogenic lactococci and enterococci isolated from goat milk in order to evaluate their safety. Twenty-nine bacteriocinogenic lactic acid bacteria (LAB: 11 Lactococcus spp., and 18 Enterococcus spp.) isolated from raw goat milk were selected and subjected to PCR to identify gelE, cylA, hyl, asa1, esp, efaA, ace, vanA, vanB, hdc1, hdc2, tdc and odc genes. The expression of virulence factors (gelatinase, hemolysis, lipase, DNAse, tyramine, histamine, putrescine) in different incubation temperatures was assessed by phenotypic methods, as well as the resistance to vancomycin, gentamicin, chloramphenicol, ampicillin and rifampicin (using Etest®). The tested isolates presented distinct combinations of virulence related genes, but not necessarily the expression of such factors. The relevance of identifying virulence-related genes in bacteriocinogenic LAB was highlighted, demanding for care in their usage as starter cultures or biopreservatives due to the possibility of horizontal gene transfer to other bacteria in food systems. PMID:24960293

  14. Patient-level analysis of incident vancomycin-resistant enterococci colonization and antibiotic days of therapy.

    PubMed

    McKINNELL, J A; Kunz, D F; Moser, S A; Vangala, S; Tseng, C-H; Shapiro, M; Miller, L G

    2016-06-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) infections are a public health threat associated with increased patient mortality and healthcare costs. Antibiotic usage, particularly cephalosporins, has been associated with VRE colonization and VRE bloodstream infections (VRE BSI). We examined the relationship between antimicrobial usage and incident VRE colonization at the individual patient level. Prospective, weekly surveillance was undertaken for incident VRE colonization defined by negative admission but positive surveillance swab in a medical intensive care unit over a 17-month period. Antimicrobial exposure was quantified as days of therapy (DOT)/1000 patient-days. Multiple logistic regression was used to analyse incident VRE colonization and antibiotic DOT, controlling for demographic and clinical covariates. Ninety-six percent (1398/1454) of admissions were swabbed within 24 h of intensive care unit (ICU) arrival and of the 380 patients in the ICU long enough for weekly surveillance, 83 (22%) developed incident VRE colonization. Incident colonization was associated in bivariate analysis with male gender, more previous hospital admissions, longer previous hospital stay, and use of cefepime/ceftazidime, fluconazole, azithromycin, and metronidazole (P < 0·05). After controlling for demographic and clinical covariates, metronidazole was the only antibiotic independently associated with incident VRE colonization (odds ratio 2·0, 95% confidence interval 1·2-3·3, P < 0·009). Our findings suggest that risk of incident VRE colonization differs between individual antibiotic agents and support the possibility that antimicrobial stewardship may impact VRE colonization and infection. PMID:27125574

  15. Molecular Analysis of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci Isolated from Regional Hospitals in Trinidad and Tobago.

    PubMed

    Akpaka, Patrick E; Kissoon, Shivnarine; Jayaratne, Padman

    2016-01-01

    Geographic spread of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) clones in cities, countries, or even continents has been identified by molecular techniques. This study aimed at characterizing virulent genes and determining genetic relatedness of 45 VRE isolates from Trinidad and Tobago using molecular tools, including polymerase chain reaction, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and Random Amplification Polymorphic DNA (RAPD). The majority (84%) of the isolates were Enterococcus faecium possessing vanA gene while the rest (16%) were Enterococcus faecalis possessing vanB. The esp gene was found in all 45 VRE isolates while hyl genes were found only in E. faecium species. The E. faecium species expressed five distinct PFGE patterns. The predominant clones with similar or common patterns belonged to clones one and three, and each had 11 (29%) of the VRE isolates. Plasmid content was identified in representative isolates from each clonal group. By contrast, the E. faecalis species had one PFGE pattern suggesting the presence of an occult and limited clonal spread. The emergence of VRE in the country seems to be related to intra/interhospital dissemination of an epidemic clone carrying the vanA element. Therefore, infection control measures will be warranted to prevent any potential outbreak and spread of VRE in the country. PMID:27299153

  16. Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System Description

    SciTech Connect

    2000-10-12

    The Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System supports the confinement and isolation of waste within the Engineered Barrier System of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). Disposal containers are loaded and sealed in the surface waste handling facilities, transferred to the underground through the accesses using a rail mounted transporter, and emplaced in emplacement drifts. The defense high level waste (HLW) disposal container provides long-term confinement of the commercial HLW and defense HLW (including immobilized plutonium waste forms (IPWF)) placed within disposable canisters, and withstands the loading, transfer, emplacement, and retrieval loads and environments. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in disposable canisters may also be placed in a defense HLW disposal container along with commercial HLW waste forms, which is known as 'co-disposal'. The Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System provides containment of waste for a designated period of time, and limits radionuclide release. The disposal container/waste package maintains the waste in a designated configuration, withstands maximum handling and rockfall loads, limits the individual canister temperatures after emplacement, resists corrosion in the expected handling and repository environments, and provides containment of waste in the event of an accident. Defense HLW disposal containers for HLW disposal will hold up to five HLW canisters. Defense HLW disposal containers for co-disposal will hold up to five HLW canisters arranged in a ring and one DOE SNF canister in the ring. Defense HLW disposal containers also will hold two Multi-Canister Overpacks (MCOs) and two HLW canisters in one disposal container. The disposal container will include outer and inner cylinders, outer and inner cylinder lids, and may include a canister guide. An exterior label will provide a means by which to identify the disposal container and its contents. Different materials

  17. Spent nuclear fuel project high-level information management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Main, G.C.

    1996-09-13

    This document presents the results of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) Information Management Planning Project (IMPP), a short-term project that identified information management (IM) issues and opportunities within the SNFP and outlined a high-level plan to address them. This high-level plan for the SNMFP IM focuses on specific examples from within the SNFP. The plan`s recommendations can be characterized in several ways. Some recommendations address specific challenges that the SNFP faces. Others form the basis for making smooth transitions in several important IM areas. Still others identify areas where further study and planning are indicated. The team`s knowledge of developments in the IM industry and at the Hanford Site were crucial in deciding where to recommend that the SNFP act and where they should wait for Site plans to be made. Because of the fast pace of the SNFP and demands on SNFP staff, input and interaction were primarily between the IMPP team and members of the SNFP Information Management Steering Committee (IMSC). Key input to the IMPP came from a workshop where IMSC members and their delegates developed a set of draft IM principles. These principles, described in Section 2, became the foundation for the recommendations found in the transition plan outlined in Section 5. Availability of SNFP staff was limited, so project documents were used as a basis for much of the work. The team, realizing that the status of the project and the environment are continually changing, tried to keep abreast of major developments since those documents were generated. To the extent possible, the information contained in this document is current as of the end of fiscal year (FY) 1995. Programs and organizations on the Hanford Site as a whole are trying to maximize their return on IM investments. They are coordinating IM activities and trying to leverage existing capabilities. However, the SNFP cannot just rely on Sitewide activities to meet its IM requirements

  18. Crystalline plutonium hosts derived from high-level waste formulations.

    SciTech Connect

    O'Holleran, T. P.

    1998-04-24

    The Department of Energy has selected immobilization for disposal in a repository as one approach for disposing of excess plutonium (1). Materials for immobilizing weapons-grade plutonium for repository disposal must meet the ''spent fuel standard'' by providing a radiation field similar to spent fuel (2). Such a radiation field can be provided by incorporating fission products from high-level waste into the waste form. Experiments were performed to evaluate the feasibility of incorporating high-level waste (HLW) stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) into plutonium dispositioning materials to meet the spent fuel standard. A variety of materials and preparation techniques were evaluated based on prior experience developing waste forms for immobilizing HLW. These included crystalline ceramic compositions prepared by conventional sintering and hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and glass formulations prepared by conventional melting. Because plutonium solubility in silicate melts is limited, glass formulations were intentionally devitrified to partition plutonium into crystalline host phases, thereby allowing increased overall plutonium loading. Samarium, added as a representative rare earth neutron absorber, also tended to partition into the plutonium host phases. Because the crystalline plutonium host phases are chemically more inert, the plutonium is more effectively isolated from the environment, and its attractiveness for proliferation is reduced. In the initial phase of evaluating each material and preparation method, cerium was used as a surrogate for plutonium. For promising materials, additional preparation experiments were performed using plutonium to verify the behavior of cerium as a surrogate. These experiments demonstrated that cerium performed well as a surrogate for plutonium. For the most part, cerium and plutonium partitioned onto the same crystalline phases, and no anomalous changes in oxidation state were observed. The only observed

  19. CEMENTITIOUS GROUT FOR CLOSING SRS HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANKS - #12315

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.; Burns, H.; Stefanko, D.

    2012-01-10

    In 1997, the first two United States Department of Energy (US DOE) high level waste tanks (Tanks 17-F and 20-F: Type IV, single shell tanks) were taken out of service (permanently closed) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). In 2012, the DOE plans to remove from service two additional Savannah River Site (SRS) Type IV high-level waste tanks, Tanks 18-F and 19-F. These tanks were constructed in the late 1950's and received low-heat waste and do not contain cooling coils. Operational closure of Tanks 18-F and 19-F is intended to be consistent with the applicable requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and will be performed in accordance with South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). The closure will physically stabilize two 4.92E+04 cubic meter (1.3 E+06 gallon) carbon steel tanks and isolate and stabilize any residual contaminants left in the tanks. The closure will also fill, physically stabilize and isolate ancillary equipment abandoned in the tanks. A Performance Assessment (PA) has been developed to assess the long-term fate and transport of residual contamination in the environment resulting from the operational closure of the F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) waste tanks. Next generation flowable, zero-bleed cementitious grouts were designed, tested, and specified for closing Tanks 18-F and 19-F and for filling the abandoned equipment. Fill requirements were developed for both the tank and equipment grouts. All grout formulations were required to be alkaline with a pH of 12.4 and chemically reduction potential (Eh) of -200 to -400 to stabilize selected potential contaminants of concern. This was achieved by including Portland cement and Grade 100 slag in the mixes, respectively. Ingredients and proportions of cementitious reagents were selected and adjusted, respectively, to support the mass placement strategy developed by closure

  20. Interventions for Individuals With High Levels of Needle Fear

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Melanie; Taddio, Anna; Antony, Martin M.; Asmundson, Gordon J.G.; Riddell, Rebecca Pillai; Chambers, Christine T.; Shah, Vibhuti

    2015-01-01

    Background: This systematic review evaluated the effectiveness of exposure-based psychological and physical interventions for the management of high levels of needle fear and/or phobia and fainting in children and adults. Design/Methods: A systematic review identified relevant randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials of children, adults, or both with high levels of needle fear, including phobia (if not available, then populations with other specific phobias were included). Critically important outcomes were self-reported fear specific to the feared situation and stimulus (psychological interventions) or fainting (applied muscle tension). Data were pooled using standardized mean difference (SMD) or relative risk with 95% confidence intervals. Results: The systematic review included 11 trials. In vivo exposure-based therapy for children 7 years and above showed benefit on specific fear (n=234; SMD: −1.71 [95% CI: −2.72, −0.7]). In vivo exposure-based therapy with adults reduced fear of needles posttreatment (n=20; SMD: −1.09 [−2.04, −0.14]) but not at 1-year follow-up (n=20; SMD: −0.28 [−1.16, 0.6]). Compared with single session, a benefit was observed for multiple sessions of exposure-based therapy posttreatment (n=93; SMD: −0.66 [−1.08, −0.24]) but not after 1 year (n=83; SMD: −0.37 [−0.87, 0.13]). Non in vivo e.g., imaginal exposure-based therapy in children reduced specific fear posttreatment (n=41; SMD: −0.88 [−1.7, −0.05]) and at 3 months (n=24; SMD: −0.89 [−1.73, −0.04]). Non in vivo exposure-based therapy for adults showed benefit on specific fear (n=68; SMD: −0.62 [−1.11, −0.14]) but not procedural fear (n=17; SMD: 0.18 [−0.87, 1.23]). Applied tension showed benefit on fainting posttreatment (n=20; SMD: −1.16 [−2.12, −0.19]) and after 1 year (n=20; SMD: −0.97 [−1.91, −0.03]) compared with exposure alone. Conclusions: Exposure-based psychological interventions and applied muscle tension show

  1. High-Level Performance Modeling of SAR Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Curtis

    2006-01-01

    SAUSAGE (Still Another Utility for SAR Analysis that s General and Extensible) is a computer program for modeling (see figure) the performance of synthetic- aperture radar (SAR) or interferometric synthetic-aperture radar (InSAR or IFSAR) systems. The user is assumed to be familiar with the basic principles of SAR imaging and interferometry. Given design parameters (e.g., altitude, power, and bandwidth) that characterize a radar system, the software predicts various performance metrics (e.g., signal-to-noise ratio and resolution). SAUSAGE is intended to be a general software tool for quick, high-level evaluation of radar designs; it is not meant to capture all the subtleties, nuances, and particulars of specific systems. SAUSAGE was written to facilitate the exploration of engineering tradeoffs within the multidimensional space of design parameters. Typically, this space is examined through an iterative process of adjusting the values of the design parameters and examining the effects of the adjustments on the overall performance of the system at each iteration. The software is designed to be modular and extensible to enable consideration of a variety of operating modes and antenna beam patterns, including, for example, strip-map and spotlight SAR acquisitions, polarimetry, burst modes, and squinted geometries.

  2. THERMAL ANALYSIS OF GEOLOGIC HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE PACKAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Hensel, S.; Lee, S.

    2010-04-20

    The engineering design of disposal of the high level waste (HLW) packages in a geologic repository requires a thermal analysis to provide the temperature history of the packages. Calculated temperatures are used to demonstrate compliance with criteria for waste acceptance into the geologic disposal gallery system and as input to assess the transient thermal characteristics of the vitrified HLW Package. The objective of the work was to evaluate the thermal performance of the supercontainer containing the vitrified HLW in a non-backfilled and unventilated underground disposal gallery. In order to achieve the objective, transient computational models for a geologic vitrified HLW package were developed by using a computational fluid dynamics method, and calculations for the HLW disposal gallery of the current Belgian geological repository reference design were performed. An initial two-dimensional model was used to conduct some parametric sensitivity studies to better understand the geologic system's thermal response. The effect of heat decay, number of co-disposed supercontainers, domain size, humidity, thermal conductivity and thermal emissivity were studied. Later, a more accurate three-dimensional model was developed by considering the conduction-convection cooling mechanism coupled with radiation, and the effect of the number of supercontainers (3, 4 and 8) was studied in more detail, as well as a bounding case with zero heat flux at both ends. The modeling methodology and results of the sensitivity studies will be presented.

  3. PLUTONIUM/HIGH-LEVEL VITRIFIED WASTE BDBE DOSE CALCULATION

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Ziegler

    2000-11-20

    The purpose of this calculation is to provide a dose consequence analysis of high-level waste (HLW) consisting of plutonium immobilized in vitrified HLW to be handled at the proposed Monitored Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain for a beyond design basis event (BDBE) under expected conditions using best estimate values for each calculation parameter. In addition to the dose calculation, a plutonium respirable particle size for dose calculation use is derived. The current concept for this waste form is plutonium disks enclosed in cans immobilized in canisters of vitrified HLW (i.e., glass). The plutonium inventory at risk used for this calculation is selected from Plutonium Immobilization Project Input for Yucca Mountain Total Systems Performance Assessment (Shaw 1999). The BDBE examined in this calculation is a nonmechanistic initiating event and the sequence of events that follow to cause a radiological release. This analysis will provide the radiological releases and dose consequences for a postulated BDBE. Results may be considered in other analyses to determine or modify the safety classification and quality assurance level of repository structures, systems, and components. This calculation uses best available technical information because the BDBE frequency is very low (i.e., less than 1.0E-6 events/year) and is not required for License Application for the Monitored Geologic Repository. The results of this calculation will not be used as part of a licensing or design basis.

  4. Ultrafilter Conditions for High Level Waste Sludge Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Geeting, John GH; Hallen, Richard T.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2006-08-28

    An evaluation of the optimal filtration conditions was performed based on test data obtained from filtration of a High Level Waste Sludge sample from the Hanford tank farms. This evaluation was performed using the anticipated configuration for the Waste Treatment Plant at the Hanford site. Testing was performed to identify the optimal pressure drop and cross flow velocity for filtration at both high and low solids loading. However, this analysis indicates that the actual filtration rate achieved is relatively insensitive to these conditions under anticipated operating conditions. The maximum filter flux was obtained by adjusting the system control valve pressure from 400 to 650 kPa while the filter feed concentration increased from 5 to 20 wt%. However, operating the system with a constant control valve pressure drop of 500 kPa resulted in a less than 1% reduction in the average filter flux. Also note that allowing the control valve pressure to swing as much as +/- 20% resulted in less than a 5% decrease in filter flux.

  5. Wind resource quality affected by high levels of renewables

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Diakov, Victor

    2015-06-17

    For solar photovoltaic (PV) and wind resources, the capacity factor is an important parameter describing the quality of the resource. As the share of variable renewable resources (such as PV and wind) on the electric system is increasing, so does curtailment (and the fraction of time when it cannot be avoided). At high levels of renewable generation, curtailments effectively change the practical measure of resource quality from capacity factor to the incremental capacity factor. The latter accounts only for generation during hours of no curtailment and is directly connected with the marginal capital cost of renewable generators for a givenmore » level of renewable generation during the year. The Western U.S. wind generation is analyzed hourly for a system with 75% of annual generation from wind, and it is found that the value for the system of resources with equal capacity factors can vary by a factor of 2, which highlights the importance of using the incremental capacity factor instead. Finally, the effect is expected to be more pronounced in smaller geographic areas (or when transmission limitations imposed) and less pronounced at lower levels of renewable energy in the system with less curtailment.« less

  6. High Level Waste Feed Certification in Hanford Double Shell Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Thien, Micheal G.; Wells, Beric E.; Adamson, Duane J.

    2010-03-01

    The ability to effectively mix, sample, certify, and deliver consistent batches of High Level Waste (HLW) feed from the Hanford Double Shell Tanks (DST) to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) presents a significant mission risk with potential to impact mission length and the quantity of HLW glass produced. DOE’s River Protection Project (RPP) mission modeling and WTP facility modeling assume that individual 3785 cubic meter (1 million gallon) HLW feed tanks are homogenously mixed, representatively sampled, and consistently delivered to the WTP. It has been demonstrated that homogenous mixing of HLW sludge in Hanford DSTs is not likely achievable with the baseline design thereby causing representative sampling and consistent feed delivery to be more difficult. Inconsistent feed to the WTP could cause additional batch to batch operational adjustments that reduces operating efficiency and has the potential to increase the overall mission length. The Hanford mixing and sampling demonstration program will identify DST mixing performance capability, will evaluate representative sampling techniques, and will estimate feed batch consistency. An evaluation of demonstration program results will identify potential mission improvement considerations that will help ensure successful mission completion. This paper will discuss the history, progress, and future activities that will define and mitigate the mission risk.

  7. High Level Rule Modeling Language for Airline Crew Pairing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutlu, Erdal; Birbil, Ş. Ilker; Bülbül, Kerem; Yenigün, Hüsnü

    2011-09-01

    The crew pairing problem is an airline optimization problem where a set of least costly pairings (consecutive flights to be flown by a single crew) that covers every flight in a given flight network is sought. A pairing is defined by using a very complex set of feasibility rules imposed by international and national regulatory agencies, and also by the airline itself. The cost of a pairing is also defined by using complicated rules. When an optimization engine generates a sequence of flights from a given flight network, it has to check all these feasibility rules to ensure whether the sequence forms a valid pairing. Likewise, the engine needs to calculate the cost of the pairing by using certain rules. However, the rules used for checking the feasibility and calculating the costs are usually not static. Furthermore, the airline companies carry out what-if-type analyses through testing several alternate scenarios in each planning period. Therefore, embedding the implementation of feasibility checking and cost calculation rules into the source code of the optimization engine is not a practical approach. In this work, a high level language called ARUS is introduced for describing the feasibility and cost calculation rules. A compiler for ARUS is also implemented in this work to generate a dynamic link library to be used by crew pairing optimization engines.

  8. ATW system impact on high-level waste

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, E.D.

    1992-12-01

    This report discusses the Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) concept which aims at destruction of key long-lived radionuclides in high-level nuclear waste (HLW), both fission products and actinides. This focus makes it different from most other transmutation concepts which concentrate primarily on actinide burning. The ATW system uses an accelerator-driven, sub-critical assembly to create an intense thermal neutron environment for radionuclide transmutation. This feature allows rapid transmutation under low-inventory system conditions, which in turn, has a direct impact on the size of chemical separations and materials handling components of the system. Inventories in ATW are factors of eight to thirty times smaller than reactor systems of equivalent thermal power. Chemical separations systems are relatively small in scale and can be optimized to achieve high decontamination factors and minimized waste streams. The low-inventory feature also directly impacts material amounts remaining in the system at its end of life. In addition to its low-inventory operation, the accelerator-driven neutron source features of ATW are key to providing a sufficient level of neutrons to allow transmutation of long-lived fission products.

  9. The GRAVITY instrument software/high-level software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtscher, Leonard; Wieprecht, Ekkehard; Ott, Thomas; Kok, Yitping; Yazici, Senol; Anugu, Narsireddy; Dembet, Roderick; Fedou, Pierre; Lacour, Sylvestre; Ott, Jürgen; Paumard, Thibaut; Lapeyrere, Vincent; Kervella, Pierre; Abuter, Roberto; Pozna, Eszter; Eisenhauer, Frank; Blind, Nicolas; Genzel, Reinhard; Gillessen, Stefan; Hans, Oliver; Haug, Marcus; Haussmann, Frank; Kellner, Stefan; Lippa, Magdalena; Pfuhl, Oliver; Sturm, Eckhard; Weber, Johannes; Amorim, Antonio; Brandner, Wolfgang; Rousselet-Perraut, Karine; Perrin, Guy S.; Straubmeier, Christian; Schöller, Markus

    2014-07-01

    GRAVITY is the four-beam, near-infrared, AO-assisted, fringe tracking, astrometric and imaging instrument for the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). It is requiring the development of one of the most complex instrument software systems ever built for an ESO instrument. Apart from its many interfaces and interdependencies, one of the most challenging aspects is the overall performance and stability of this complex system. The three infrared detectors and the fast reflective memory network (RMN) recorder contribute a total data rate of up to 20 MiB/s accumulating to a maximum of 250 GiB of data per night. The detectors, the two instrument Local Control Units (LCUs) as well as the five LCUs running applications under TAC (Tools for Advanced Control) architecture, are interconnected with fast Ethernet, RMN fibers and dedicated fiber connections as well as signals for the time synchronization. Here we give a simplified overview of all subsystems of GRAVITY and their interfaces and discuss two examples of high-level applications during observations: the acquisition procedure and the gathering and merging of data to the final FITS file.

  10. Anthropometric characteristics of high level European junior basketball players.

    PubMed

    Jelicić, M; Sekulić, D; Marinović, M

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of the research was to assess anthropometric status of European high-level junior basketball players and to determine anthropometric differences between the players playing in different game positions (guards, forwards, centers). The sample consisted of 132 young basketball players, participants of the European Junior Basketball Championship, Zadar, 2000. Participants were measured with 31 measures (anthropometric variables), on the basis of which two body composition measures (BMI and relative body fat) and somatotype were calculated. The basic statistical parameters were computed. The analysis of variance and discriminant canonical analysis were employed to determine the differences between positions in play. Results indicate that prominent longitudinal and transversal skeletal dimensions as well as circumference measures characterize players on the position of centers, but they do not have significantly larger skinfold measures in relation to forwards. Centers are also predominantly ectomorphic compared with other players. Guards achieved significantly lower values in all spaces and they are predominantly mesomorphic. Further investigations are necessary in order to assess potential changes in status of these parameters when the participants will reach the age of senior players and afterwards, as well as to determine relations between anthropometric status and skill related variables. PMID:12674837

  11. High-Level Fluorescence Labeling of Gram-Positive Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Aymanns, Simone; Mauerer, Stefanie; van Zandbergen, Ger; Wolz, Christiane; Spellerberg, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence labeling of bacterial pathogens has a broad range of interesting applications including the observation of living bacteria within host cells. We constructed a novel vector based on the E. coli streptococcal shuttle plasmid pAT28 that can propagate in numerous bacterial species from different genera. The plasmid harbors a promoterless copy of the green fluorescent variant gene egfp under the control of the CAMP-factor gene (cfb) promoter of Streptococcus agalactiae and was designated pBSU101. Upon transfer of the plasmid into streptococci, the bacteria show a distinct and easily detectable fluorescence using a standard fluorescence microscope and quantification by FACS-analysis demonstrated values that were 10–50 times increased over the respective controls. To assess the suitability of the construct for high efficiency fluorescence labeling in different gram-positive pathogens, numerous species were transformed. We successfully labeled Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus anginosus and Staphylococcus aureus strains utilizing the EGFP reporter plasmid pBSU101. In all of these species the presence of the cfb promoter construct resulted in high-level EGFP expression that could be further increased by growing the streptococcal and enterococcal cultures under high oxygen conditions through continuous aeration. PMID:21731607

  12. High levels of molecular chlorine in the Arctic atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jin; Huey, L. Gregory; Liu, Zhen; Tanner, David J.; Cantrell, Chris A.; Orlando, John J.; Flocke, Frank M.; Shepson, Paul B.; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Hall, Samuel R.; Ullmann, Kirk; Beine, Harry J.; Wang, Yuhang; Ingall, Ellery D.; Stephens, Chelsea R.; Hornbrook, Rebecca S.; Apel, Eric C.; Riemer, Daniel; Fried, Alan; Mauldin, Roy L.; Smith, James N.; Staebler, Ralf M.; Neuman, J. Andrew; Nowak, John B.

    2014-02-01

    Chlorine radicals can function as a strong atmospheric oxidant, particularly in polar regions, where levels of hydroxyl radicals are low. In the atmosphere, chlorine radicals expedite the degradation of methane and tropospheric ozone, and the oxidation of mercury to more toxic forms. Here we present direct measurements of molecular chlorine levels in the Arctic marine boundary layer in Barrow, Alaska, collected in the spring of 2009 over a six-week period using chemical ionization mass spectrometry. We report high levels of molecular chlorine, of up to 400 pptv. Concentrations peaked in the early morning and late afternoon, and fell to near-zero levels at night. Average daytime molecular chlorine levels were correlated with ozone concentrations, suggesting that sunlight and ozone are required for molecular chlorine formation. Using a time-dependent box model, we estimate that the chlorine radicals produced from the photolysis of molecular chlorine oxidized more methane than hydroxyl radicals, on average, and enhanced the abundance of short-lived peroxy radicals. Elevated hydroperoxyl radical levels, in turn, promoted the formation of hypobromous acid, which catalyses mercury oxidation and the breakdown of tropospheric ozone. We therefore suggest that molecular chlorine exerts a significant effect on the atmospheric chemistry of the Arctic.

  13. The ALICE High Level Trigger: status and plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Rohr, David; Gorbunov, Sergey; Breitner, Timo; Lehrbach, Johannes; Lindenstruth, Volker; Berzano, Dario

    2015-12-01

    The ALICE High Level Trigger (HLT) is an online reconstruction, triggering and data compression system used in the ALICE experiment at CERN. Unique among the LHC experiments, it extensively uses modern coprocessor technologies like general purpose graphic processing units (GPGPU) and field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) in the data flow. Realtime data compression is performed using a cluster finder algorithm implemented on FPGA boards. These data, instead of raw clusters, are used in the subsequent processing and storage, resulting in a compression factor of around 4. Track finding is performed using a cellular automaton and a Kalman filter algorithm on GPGPU hardware, where both CUDA and OpenCL technologies can be used interchangeably. The ALICE upgrade requires further development of online concepts to include detector calibration and stronger data compression. The current HLT farm will be used as a test bed for online calibration and both synchronous and asynchronous processing frameworks already before the upgrade, during Run 2. For opportunistic use as a Grid computing site during periods of inactivity of the experiment a virtualisation based setup is deployed.

  14. Defense High-Level Waste Leaching Mechanisms Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, J.E.

    1984-08-01

    The Defense High-Level Waste Leaching Mechanisms Program brought six major US laboratories together for three years of cooperative research. The participants reached a consensus that solubility of the leached glass species, particularly solubility in the altered surface layer, is the dominant factor controlling the leaching behavior of defense waste glass in a system in which the flow of leachant is constrained, as it will be in a deep geologic repository. Also, once the surface of waste glass is contacted by ground water, the kinetics of establishing solubility control are relatively rapid. The concentrations of leached species reach saturation, or steady-state concentrations, within a few months to a year at 70 to 90/sup 0/C. Thus, reaction kinetics, which were the main subject of earlier leaching mechanisms studies, are now shown to assume much less importance. The dominance of solubility means that the leach rate is, in fact, directly proportional to ground water flow rate. Doubling the flow rate doubles the effective leach rate. This relationship is expected to obtain in most, if not all, repository situations.

  15. Application of SYNROC to high-level defense wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Tewhey, J.D.; Hoenig, C.L.; Newkirk, H.W.; Rozsa, R.B.; Coles, D.G.; Ryerson, F.J.

    1981-01-01

    The SYNROC method for immobilization of high-level nuclear reactor wastes is currently being applied to US defense wastes in tank storage at Savannah River, South Carolina. The minerals zirconolite, perovskite, and hollandite are used in SYNROC D formulations to immobilize fission products and actinides that comprise up to 10% of defense waste sludges and coexisting solutions. Additional phases in SYNROC D are nepheline, the host phase for sodium; and spinel, the host for excess aluminum and iron. Up to 70 wt % of calcined sludge can be incorporated with 30 wt % of SYNROC additives to produce a waste form consisting of 10% nepheline, 30% spinel, and approximately 20% each of the radioactive waste-bearing phases. Urea coprecipitation and spray drying/calcining methods have been used in the laboratory to produce homogeneous, reactive ceramic powders. Hot pressing and sintering at temperatures from 1000 to 1100/sup 0/C result in waste form products with greater than 97% of theoretical density. Hot isostatic pressing has recently been implemented as a processing alternative. Characterization of waste-form mineralogy has been done by means of XRD, SEM, and electron microprobe. Leaching of SYNROC D samples is currently being carried out. Assessment of radiation damage effects and physical properties of SYNROC D will commence in FY 81.

  16. Why consider subseabed disposal of high-level nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, G. R.; Hollister, C. D.; Anderson, D. R.; Leinen, M.

    1980-01-01

    Large areas of the deep seabed warrant assessment as potential disposal sites for high-level radioactive waste because: (1) they are far from seismically and tectonically active lithospheric plate boundaries; (2) they are far from active or young volcanos; (3) they contain thick layers of very uniform fine-grained clays; (4) they are devoid of natural resources likely to be exploited in the forseeable future; (5) the geologic and oceanographic processes governing the deposition of sediments in such areas are well understood, and are remarkably insensitive to past oceanographic and climatic changes; and (6) sedmentary records of tens of millions of years of slow, uninterrupted deposition of fine grained clay support predictions of the future stability of such sites. Data accumulated to date on the permeability, ion-retardation properties, and mechanical strength of pelagic clay sediments indicate that they can act as a primary barrier to the escape of buried nuclides. Work in progress should determine within the current decade whether subseabed disposal is environmentally acceptable and technically feasible, as well as address the legal, political and social issues raised by this new concept.

  17. Wind resource quality affected by high levels of renewables

    SciTech Connect

    Diakov, Victor

    2015-06-17

    For solar photovoltaic (PV) and wind resources, the capacity factor is an important parameter describing the quality of the resource. As the share of variable renewable resources (such as PV and wind) on the electric system is increasing, so does curtailment (and the fraction of time when it cannot be avoided). At high levels of renewable generation, curtailments effectively change the practical measure of resource quality from capacity factor to the incremental capacity factor. The latter accounts only for generation during hours of no curtailment and is directly connected with the marginal capital cost of renewable generators for a given level of renewable generation during the year. The Western U.S. wind generation is analyzed hourly for a system with 75% of annual generation from wind, and it is found that the value for the system of resources with equal capacity factors can vary by a factor of 2, which highlights the importance of using the incremental capacity factor instead. Finally, the effect is expected to be more pronounced in smaller geographic areas (or when transmission limitations imposed) and less pronounced at lower levels of renewable energy in the system with less curtailment.

  18. Attenuation of high-level impulses by earmuffs.

    PubMed

    Zera, Jan; Mlynski, Rafal

    2007-10-01

    Attenuation of high-level acoustic impulses (noise reduction) by various types of earmuffs was measured using a laboratory source of type A impulses and an artificial test fixture compatible with the ISO 4869-3 standard. The measurements were made for impulses of peak sound-pressure levels (SPLs) from 150 to 170 dB. The rise time and A duration of the impulses depended on their SPL and were within a range of 12-400 mus (rise time) and 0.4-1.1 ms (A duration). The results showed that earmuff peak level attenuation increases by about 10 dB when the impulse's rise time and the A duration are reduced. The results also demonstrated that the signals under the earmuff cup have a longer rise and A duration than the original impulses recorded outside the earmuff. Results of the measurements were used to check the validity of various hearing damage risk criteria that specify the maximum permissible exposure to impulse noise. The present data lead to the conclusion that procedures in which hearing damage risk is assessed only from signal attenuation, without taking into consideration changes in the signal waveform under the earmuff, tend to underestimate the risk of hearing damage. PMID:17902846

  19. The LHCb Data Acquisition and High Level Trigger Processing Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, M.; Gaspar, C.; Jost, B.; Neufeld, N.

    2015-12-01

    The LHCb experiment at the LHC accelerator at CERN collects collisions of particle bunches at 40 MHz. After a first level of hardware trigger with an output rate of 1 MHz, the physically interesting collisions are selected by running dedicated trigger algorithms in the High Level Trigger (HLT) computing farm. This farm consists of up to roughly 25000 CPU cores in roughly 1750 physical nodes each equipped with up to 4 TB local storage space. This work describes the LHCb online system with an emphasis on the developments implemented during the current long shutdown (LS1). We will elaborate the architecture to treble the available CPU power of the HLT farm and the technicalities to determine and verify precise calibration and alignment constants which are fed to the HLT event selection procedure. We will describe how the constants are fed into a two stage HLT event selection facility using extensively the local disk buffering capabilities on the worker nodes. With the installed disk buffers, the CPU resources can be used during periods of up to ten days without beams. These periods in the past accounted to more than 70% of the total time.

  20. Hemipelvectomy: high-level amputation surgery and prosthetic rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Houdek, Matthew T; Kralovec, Michael E; Andrews, Karen L

    2014-07-01

    The hemipelvectomy, most commonly performed for pelvic tumor resection, is one of the most technically demanding and invasive surgical procedures performed today. Adequate soft tissue coverage and wound complications after hemipelvectomy are important considerations. Rehabilitation after hemipelvectomy is optimally managed by a multidisciplinary integrated team. Understanding the functional outcomes for this population assists the rehabilitation team to counsel patients, plan goals, and determine discharge needs. The most important rehabilitation goal is the optimal restoration of the patient's functional independence. Factors such as age, sex, etiology, level of amputation, and general health play important roles in determining prosthetic use. The three main criteria for successful prosthetic rehabilitation of patients with high-level amputation are comfort, function, and cosmesis. Recent advances in hip and knee joints have contributed to increased function. Prosthetic use after hemipelvectomy improves balance and decreases the need for a gait aid. Using a prosthesis helps maintain muscle strength and tone, cardiovascular health, and functional mobility. With new advances in prosthetic components, patients are choosing to use their prostheses for primary mobility. PMID:24508940

  1. The CMS High Level Trigger System: Experience and Future Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, G.; Behrens, U.; Bowen, M.; Branson, J.; Bukowiec, S.; Cittolin, S.; Coarasa, J. A.; Deldicque, C.; Dobson, M.; Dupont, A.; Erhan, S.; Flossdorf, A.; Gigi, D.; Glege, F.; Gomez-Reino, R.; Hartl, C.; Hegeman, J.; Holzner, A.; Hwong, Y. L.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Meschi, E.; Mommsen, R. K.; O'Dell, V.; Orsini, L.; Paus, C.; Petrucci, A.; Pieri, M.; Polese, G.; Racz, A.; Raginel, O.; Sakulin, H.; Sani, M.; Schwick, C.; Shpakov, D.; Simon, S.; Spataru, A. C.; Sumorok, K.

    2012-12-01

    The CMS experiment at the LHC features a two-level trigger system. Events accepted by the first level trigger, at a maximum rate of 100 kHz, are read out by the Data Acquisition system (DAQ), and subsequently assembled in memory in a farm of computers running a software high-level trigger (HLT), which selects interesting events for offline storage and analysis at a rate of order few hundred Hz. The HLT algorithms consist of sequences of offline-style reconstruction and filtering modules, executed on a farm of 0(10000) CPU cores built from commodity hardware. Experience from the operation of the HLT system in the collider run 2010/2011 is reported. The current architecture of the CMS HLT, its integration with the CMS reconstruction framework and the CMS DAQ, are discussed in the light of future development. The possible short- and medium-term evolution of the HLT software infrastructure to support extensions of the HLT computing power, and to address remaining performance and maintenance issues, are discussed.

  2. Adaptation, high-level vision, and the phenomenology of perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Michael A.

    2002-06-01

    To what extent do we have shared or unique visual experiences? This paper examines how the answer to this question is constrained by known processes of visual adaptation. Adaptation constantly recalibrates visual sensitivity so that our vision is matched to the stimuli that we are currently exposed to. These processes normalize perception not only to low-level features in the image, but to high-level, biologically relevant properties of the visual world. They can therefore strongly impact many natural perceptual judgments. To the extent that observers are exposed to and thus adapted by a different environment, their vision will be normalized in different ways and their subjective visual experience will differ. These differences are illustrated by considering how adaptation can influence human face perception. To the extent that observers are exposed and adapted to common properties in the environment, their vision will be adjusted toward common states, and in this respect they will have a common visual experience. This is illustrated by reviewing the effects of adaptation on the perception of image blur. In either case, it is the similarities or differences in the stimuli - and not the intrinsic similarities or differences in the observers - which determine the relative states of adaptation. Thus at least some aspects of our private internal experience are controlled by external factors that are accessible to objective measurement.

  3. Process Design Concepts for Stabilization of High Level Waste Calcine

    SciTech Connect

    T. R. Thomas; A. K. Herbst

    2005-06-01

    The current baseline assumption is that packaging ¡§as is¡¨ and direct disposal of high level waste (HLW) calcine in a Monitored Geologic Repository will be allowed. The fall back position is to develop a stabilized waste form for the HLW calcine, that will meet repository waste acceptance criteria currently in place, in case regulatory initiatives are unsuccessful. A decision between direct disposal or a stabilization alternative is anticipated by June 2006. The purposes of this Engineering Design File (EDF) are to provide a pre-conceptual design on three low temperature processes under development for stabilization of high level waste calcine (i.e., the grout, hydroceramic grout, and iron phosphate ceramic processes) and to support a down selection among the three candidates. The key assumptions for the pre-conceptual design assessment are that a) a waste treatment plant would operate over eight years for 200 days a year, b) a design processing rate of 3.67 m3/day or 4670 kg/day of HLW calcine would be needed, and c) the performance of waste form would remove the HLW calcine from the hazardous waste category, and d) the waste form loadings would range from about 21-25 wt% calcine. The conclusions of this EDF study are that: (a) To date, the grout formulation appears to be the best candidate stabilizer among the three being tested for HLW calcine and appears to be the easiest to mix, pour, and cure. (b) Only minor differences would exist between the process steps of the grout and hydroceramic grout stabilization processes. If temperature control of the mixer at about 80„aC is required, it would add a major level of complexity to the iron phosphate stabilization process. (c) It is too early in the development program to determine which stabilizer will produce the minimum amount of stabilized waste form for the entire HLW inventory, but the volume is assumed to be within the range of 12,250 to 14,470 m3. (d) The stacked vessel height of the hot process vessels

  4. High-level disinfection of gastrointestinal endoscope reprocessing

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, King-Wah; Lu, Lung-Sheng; Chiou, Shue-Shian

    2015-01-01

    High level disinfection (HLD) of the gastrointestinal (GI) endoscope is not simply a slogan, but rather is a form of experimental monitoring-based medicine. By definition, GI endoscopy is a semicritical medical device. Hence, such medical devices require major quality assurance for disinfection. And because many of these items are temperature sensitive, low-temperature chemical methods, such as liquid chemical germicide, must be used rather than steam sterilization. In summarizing guidelines for infection prevention and control for GI endoscopy, there are three important steps that must be highlighted: manual washing, HLD with automated endoscope reprocessor, and drying. Strict adherence to current guidelines is required because compared to any other medical device, the GI endoscope is associated with more outbreaks linked to inadequate cleaning or disinfecting during HLD. Both experimental evaluation on the surveillance bacterial cultures and in-use clinical results have shown that, the monitoring of the stringent processes to prevent and control infection is an essential component of the broader strategy to ensure the delivery of safe endoscopy services, because endoscope reprocessing is a multistep procedure involving numerous factors that can interfere with its efficacy. Based on our years of experience in the surveillance of culture monitoring of endoscopic reprocessing, we aim in this study to carefully describe what details require attention in the GI endoscopy disinfection and to share our experience so that patients can be provided with high quality and safe medical practices. Quality management encompasses all aspects of pre- and post-procedural care including the efficiency of the endoscopy unit and reprocessing area, as well as the endoscopic procedure itself. PMID:25699232

  5. High levels of untreated distress and fatigue in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Carlson, L E; Angen, M; Cullum, J; Goodey, E; Koopmans, J; Lamont, L; MacRae, J H; Martin, M; Pelletier, G; Robinson, J; Simpson, J S A; Speca, M; Tillotson, L; Bultz, B D

    2004-06-14

    The purpose of the study was to assess a large representative sample of cancer patients on distress levels, common psychosocial problems, and awareness and use of psychosocial support services. A total of 3095 patients were assessed over a 4-week period with the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI-18), a common problems checklist, and on awareness and use of psychosocial resources. Full data was available on 2776 patients. On average, patients were 60 years old, Caucasian (78.3%), and middle class. Approximately, half were attending for follow-up care. Types of cancer varied, with the largest groups being breast (23.5%), prostate (16.9%), colorectal (7.5%), and lung (5.8%) cancer patients. Overall, 37.8% of all patients met criteria for general distress in the clinical range. A higher proportion of men met case criteria for somatisation, and more women for depression. There were no gender differences in anxiety or overall distress severity. Minority patients were more likely to be distressed, as were those with lower income, cancers other than prostate, and those currently on active treatment. Lung, pancreatic, head and neck, Hodgkin's disease, and brain cancer patients were the most distressed. Almost half of all patients who met distress criteria had not sought professional psychosocial support nor did they intend to in the future. In conclusion, distress is very common in cancer patients across diagnoses and across the disease trajectory. Many patients who report high levels of distress are not taking advantage of available supportive resources. Barriers to such use, and factors predicting distress and use of psychosocial care, require further exploration. PMID:15162149

  6. Stability of High-Level Radioactive Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.

    2001-06-22

    High-level waste (HLW) glass compositions, processing schemes, limits on waste content, and corrosion/dissolution release models are dependent on an accurate knowledge of melting temperatures and thermochemical values. Unfortunately, existing models for predicting these temperatures are empirically-based, depending on extrapolations of experimental information. In addition, present models of leaching behavior of glass waste forms use simplistic assumptions or experimentally measured values obtained under non-realistic conditions. There is thus a critical need for both more accurate and more widely applicable models for HLW glass behavior, which this project addressed. Significant progress was made in this project on modeling HLW glass. Borosilicate glass was accurately represented along with the additional important components that contain iron, lithium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium. The formation of crystalline inclusions in the glass, an issue in Hanford HLW formulations, was modeled and shown to be predictive. Thus the results of this work have already demonstrated practical benefits with the ability to map compositional regions where crystalline material forms, and therefore avoid that detrimental effect. With regard to a fundamental understanding, added insights on the behavior of the components of glass have been obtained, including the potential formation of molecular clusters. The EMSP project had very significant effects beyond the confines of Environmental Management. The models developed for glass have been used to solve a very costly problem in the corrosion of refractories for glass production. The effort resulted in another laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories-Livermore, to become conversant in the techniques and to apply those through a DOE Office of Industrial Technologies project joint with PPG Industries. The glass industry as a whole is now cognizant of these capabilities, and there is a Glass Manufacturer's Research Institute proposal

  7. Review of high-level waste form properties. [146 bibliographies

    SciTech Connect

    Rusin, J.M.

    1980-12-01

    This report is a review of waste form options for the immobilization of high-level-liquid wastes from the nuclear fuel cycle. This review covers the status of international research and development on waste forms as of May 1979. Although the emphasis in this report is on waste form properties, process parameters are discussed where they may affect final waste form properties. A summary table is provided listing properties of various nuclear waste form options. It is concluded that proposed waste forms have properties falling within a relatively narrow range. In regard to crystalline versus glass waste forms, the conclusion is that either glass of crystalline materials can be shown to have some advantage when a single property is considered; however, at this date no single waste form offers optimum properties over the entire range of characteristics investigated. A long-term effort has been applied to the development of glass and calcine waste forms. Several additional waste forms have enough promise to warrant continued research and development to bring their state of development up to that of glass and calcine. Synthetic minerals, the multibarrier approach with coated particles in a metal matrix, and high pressure-high temperature ceramics offer potential advantages and need further study. Although this report discusses waste form properties, the total waste management system should be considered in the final selection of a waste form option. Canister design, canister materials, overpacks, engineered barriers, and repository characteristics, as well as the waste form, affect the overall performance of a waste management system. These parameters were not considered in this comparison.

  8. High Levels of Molecular Chlorine found in the Arctic Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, J.; Huey, L. G.; Liu, Z.; Tanner, D.; Cantrell, C. A.; Orlando, J. J.; Flocke, F. M.; Shepson, P. B.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Hall, S. R.; Beine, H.; Wang, Y.; Ingall, E. D.; Thompson, C. R.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Apel, E. C.; Fried, A.; Mauldin, L.; Smith, J. N.; Staebler, R. M.; Neuman, J. A.; Nowak, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    Chlorine radicals are a strong atmospheric oxidant, particularly in polar regions where levels of hydroxyl radicals can be quite low. In the atmosphere, chlorine radicals expedite the degradation of methane and tropospheric ozone and the oxidation of mercury to more toxic forms. Here, we present direct measurements of molecular chlorine levels in the Arctic marine boundary layer in Barrow, Alaska, collected in the spring of 2009 over a six-week period using chemical ionization mass spectrometry. We detected high levels of molecular chlorine of up to 400 pptv. Concentrations peaked in the early morning and late afternoon and fell to near-zero levels at night. Average daytime molecular chlorine levels were correlated with ozone concentrations, suggesting that sunlight and ozone are required for molecular chlorine formation. Using a time-dependent box model, we estimated that the chlorine radicals produced from the photolysis of molecular chlorine on average oxidized more methane than hydroxyl radicals and enhanced the abundance of short-lived peroxy radicals. Elevated hydroperoxyl radical levels, in turn, promoted the formation of hypobromous acid, which catalyzed mercury oxidation and the breakdown of tropospheric ozone. Therefore, we propose that molecular chlorine exerts a significant effect on the atmospheric chemistry in the Arctic. While the formation mechanisms of molecular chlorine are not yet understood, the main potential sources of chlorine include snowpack, sea salt, and sea ice. There is recent evidence of molecular halogen (Br2 and Cl2) formation in the Arctic snowpack. The coverage and composition of the snow may control halogen chemistry in the Arctic. Changes of sea ice and snow cover in the changing climate may affect air-snow-ice interaction and have a significant impact on the levels of radicals, ozone, mercury and methane in the Arctic troposphere.

  9. PLUTONIUM/HIGH-LEVEL VITRIFIED WASTE BDBE DOSE CALCULATION

    SciTech Connect

    D.C. Richardson

    2003-03-19

    In accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, Yucca Mountain was designated as the site to be investigated as a potential repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The Yucca Mountain site is an undeveloped area located on the southwestern edge of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), about 100 miles northwest of Las Vegas. The site currently lacks rail service or an existing right-of-way. If the Yucca Mountain site is found suitable for the repository, rail service is desirable to the Office of Civilian Waste Management (OCRWM) Program because of the potential of rail transportation to reduce costs and to reduce the number of shipments relative to highway transportation. A Preliminary Rail Access Study evaluated 13 potential rail spur options. Alternative routes within the major options were also developed. Each of these options was then evaluated for potential land use conflicts and access to regional rail carriers. Three potential routes having few land use conflicts and having access to regional carriers were recommended for further investigation. Figure 1-1 shows these three routes. The Jean route is estimated to be about 120 miles long, the Carlin route to be about 365 miles long, and Caliente route to be about 365 miles long. The remaining ten routes continue to be monitored and should any of the present conflicts change, a re-evaluation of that route will be made. Complete details of the evaluation of the 13 routes can be found in the previous study. The DOE has not identified any preferred route and recognizes that the transportation issues need a full and open treatment under the National Environmental Policy Act. The issue of transportation will be included in public hearings to support development of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) proceedings for either the Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility or the Yucca Mountain Project or both.

  10. Activity profile of high-level Australian lacrosse players.

    PubMed

    Polley, Chris S; Cormack, Stuart J; Gabbett, Tim J; Polglaze, Ted

    2015-01-01

    Despite lacrosse being one of the fastest growing team sports in the world, there is a paucity of information detailing the activity profile of high-level players. Microtechnology systems (global positioning systems and accelerometers) provide the opportunity to obtain detailed information on the activity profile in lacrosse. Therefore, this study aimed to analyze the activity profile of lacrosse match-play using microtechnology. Activity profile variables assessed relative to minutes of playing time included relative distance (meter per minute), distance spent standing (0-0.1 m·min), walking (0.2-1.7 m·min), jogging (1.8-3.2 m·min), running (3.3-5.6 m·min), sprinting (≥5.7 m·min), number of high, moderate, low accelerations and decelerations, and player load (PL per minute), calculated as the square root of the sum of the squared instantaneous rate of change in acceleration in 3 vectors (medio-lateral, anterior-posterior, and vertical). Activity was recorded from 14 lacrosse players over 4 matches during a national tournament. Players were separated into positions of attack, midfield, or defense. Differences (effect size [ES] ± 90% confidence interval) between positions and periods of play were considered likely positive when there was ≥75% likelihood of the difference exceeding an ES threshold of 0.2. Midfielders had likely covered higher (mean ± SD) meters per minute (100 ± 11) compared with attackers (87 ± 14; ES = 0.89 ± 1.04) and defenders (79 ± 14; ES = 1.54 ± 0.94) and more moderate and high accelerations and decelerations. Almost all variables across positions were reduced in quarter 4 compared with quarter 1. Coaches should accommodate for positional differences when preparing lacrosse players for competition. PMID:25264672

  11. Deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste.

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, Joshua S.; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Brady, Patrick Vane; Swift, Peter N.; Rechard, Robert Paul; Arnold, Bill Walter; Kanney, Joseph F.; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2009-07-01

    Preliminary evaluation of deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel indicates the potential for excellent long-term safety performance at costs competitive with mined repositories. Significant fluid flow through basement rock is prevented, in part, by low permeabilities, poorly connected transport pathways, and overburden self-sealing. Deep fluids also resist vertical movement because they are density stratified. Thermal hydrologic calculations estimate the thermal pulse from emplaced waste to be small (less than 20 C at 10 meters from the borehole, for less than a few hundred years), and to result in maximum total vertical fluid movement of {approx}100 m. Reducing conditions will sharply limit solubilities of most dose-critical radionuclides at depth, and high ionic strengths of deep fluids will prevent colloidal transport. For the bounding analysis of this report, waste is envisioned to be emplaced as fuel assemblies stacked inside drill casing that are lowered, and emplaced using off-the-shelf oilfield and geothermal drilling techniques, into the lower 1-2 km portion of a vertical borehole {approx}45 cm in diameter and 3-5 km deep, followed by borehole sealing. Deep borehole disposal of radioactive waste in the United States would require modifications to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act and to applicable regulatory standards for long-term performance set by the US Environmental Protection Agency (40 CFR part 191) and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (10 CFR part 60). The performance analysis described here is based on the assumption that long-term standards for deep borehole disposal would be identical in the key regards to those prescribed for existing repositories (40 CFR part 197 and 10 CFR part 63).

  12. Engineering Escherichia coli for high-level production of propionate.

    PubMed

    Akawi, Lamees; Srirangan, Kajan; Liu, Xuejia; Moo-Young, Murray; Perry Chou, C

    2015-07-01

    Mounting environmental concerns associated with the use of petroleum-based chemical manufacturing practices has generated significant interest in the development of biological alternatives for the production of propionate. However, biological platforms for propionate production have been limited to strict anaerobes, such as Propionibacteria and select Clostridia. In this work, we demonstrated high-level heterologous production of propionate under microaerobic conditions in engineered Escherichia coli. Activation of the native Sleeping beauty mutase (Sbm) operon not only transformed E. coli to be propionogenic (i.e., propionate-producing) but also introduced an intracellular "flux competition" between the traditional C2-fermentative pathway and the novel C3-fermentative pathway. Dissimilation of the major carbon source of glycerol was identified to critically affect such "flux competition" and, therefore, propionate synthesis. As a result, the propionogenic E. coli was further engineered by inactivation or overexpression of various genes involved in the glycerol dissimilation pathways and their individual genetic effects on propionate production were investigated. Generally, knocking out genes involved in glycerol dissimilation (except glpA) can minimize levels of solventogenesis and shift more dissimilated carbon flux toward the C3-fermentative pathway. For optimal propionate production with high C3:C2-fermentative product ratios, glycerol dissimilation should be channeled through the respiratory pathway and, upon suppressed solventogenesis with minimal production of highly reduced alcohols, the alternative NADH-consuming route associated with propionate synthesis can be critical for more flexible redox balancing. With the implementation of various biochemical and genetic strategies, high propionate titers of more than 11 g/L with high yields up to 0.4 g-propionate/g-glycerol (accounting for ~50 % of dissimilated glycerol) were achieved, demonstrating the

  13. High-Level Waste Systems Plan. Revision 7

    SciTech Connect

    Brooke, J.N.; Gregory, M.V.; Paul, P.; Taylor, G.; Wise, F.E.; Davis, N.R.; Wells, M.N.

    1996-10-01

    This revision of the High-Level Waste (HLW) System Plan aligns SRS HLW program planning with the DOE Savannah River (DOE-SR) Ten Year Plan (QC-96-0005, Draft 8/6), which was issued in July 1996. The objective of the Ten Year Plan is to complete cleanup at most nuclear sites within the next ten years. The two key principles of the Ten Year Plan are to accelerate the reduction of the most urgent risks to human health and the environment and to reduce mortgage costs. Accordingly, this System Plan describes the HLW program that will remove HLW from all 24 old-style tanks, and close 20 of those tanks, by 2006 with vitrification of all HLW by 2018. To achieve these goals, the DWPF canister production rate is projected to climb to 300 canisters per year starting in FY06, and remain at that rate through the end of the program in FY18, (Compare that to past System Plans, in which DWPF production peaked at 200 canisters per year, and the program did not complete until 2026.) An additional $247M (FY98 dollars) must be made available as requested over the ten year planning period, including a one-time $10M to enhance Late Wash attainment. If appropriate resources are made available, facility attainment issues are resolved and regulatory support is sufficient, then completion of the HLW program in 2018 would achieve a $3.3 billion cost savings to DOE, versus the cost of completing the program in 2026. Facility status information is current as of October 31, 1996.

  14. Engineering neural systems for high-level problem solving.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, Jared; Reggia, James

    2016-07-01

    There is a long-standing, sometimes contentious debate in AI concerning the relative merits of a symbolic, top-down approach vs. a neural, bottom-up approach to engineering intelligent machine behaviors. While neurocomputational methods excel at lower-level cognitive tasks (incremental learning for pattern classification, low-level sensorimotor control, fault tolerance and processing of noisy data, etc.), they are largely non-competitive with top-down symbolic methods for tasks involving high-level cognitive problem solving (goal-directed reasoning, metacognition, planning, etc.). Here we take a step towards addressing this limitation by developing a purely neural framework named galis. Our goal in this work is to integrate top-down (non-symbolic) control of a neural network system with more traditional bottom-up neural computations. galis is based on attractor networks that can be "programmed" with temporal sequences of hand-crafted instructions that control problem solving by gating the activity retention of, communication between, and learning done by other neural networks. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach by showing that it can be applied successfully to solve sequential card matching problems, using both human performance and a top-down symbolic algorithm as experimental controls. Solving this kind of problem makes use of top-down attention control and the binding together of visual features in ways that are easy for symbolic AI systems but not for neural networks to achieve. Our model can not only be instructed on how to solve card matching problems successfully, but its performance also qualitatively (and sometimes quantitatively) matches the performance of both human subjects that we had perform the same task and the top-down symbolic algorithm that we used as an experimental control. We conclude that the core principles underlying the galis framework provide a promising approach to engineering purely neurocomputational systems for problem

  15. High-level disinfection of gastrointestinal endoscope reprocessing.

    PubMed

    Chiu, King-Wah; Lu, Lung-Sheng; Chiou, Shue-Shian

    2015-02-20

    High level disinfection (HLD) of the gastrointestinal (GI) endoscope is not simply a slogan, but rather is a form of experimental monitoring-based medicine. By definition, GI endoscopy is a semicritical medical device. Hence, such medical devices require major quality assurance for disinfection. And because many of these items are temperature sensitive, low-temperature chemical methods, such as liquid chemical germicide, must be used rather than steam sterilization. In summarizing guidelines for infection prevention and control for GI endoscopy, there are three important steps that must be highlighted: manual washing, HLD with automated endoscope reprocessor, and drying. Strict adherence to current guidelines is required because compared to any other medical device, the GI endoscope is associated with more outbreaks linked to inadequate cleaning or disinfecting during HLD. Both experimental evaluation on the surveillance bacterial cultures and in-use clinical results have shown that, the monitoring of the stringent processes to prevent and control infection is an essential component of the broader strategy to ensure the delivery of safe endoscopy services, because endoscope reprocessing is a multistep procedure involving numerous factors that can interfere with its efficacy. Based on our years of experience in the surveillance of culture monitoring of endoscopic reprocessing, we aim in this study to carefully describe what details require attention in the GI endoscopy disinfection and to share our experience so that patients can be provided with high quality and safe medical practices. Quality management encompasses all aspects of pre- and post-procedural care including the efficiency of the endoscopy unit and reprocessing area, as well as the endoscopic procedure itself. PMID:25699232

  16. Radiative Lifetimes for High Levels of Neutral Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawler, James E.; Den Hartog, E.; Guzman, A.

    2013-01-01

    New radiative lifetime measurements for ~ 50 high lying levels of Fe I are reported. Laboratory astrophysics faces a challenge to provide basic spectroscopic data, especially reliable atomic transition probabilities, in the IR region for abundance studies. The availability of HgCdTe (HAWAII) detector arrays has opened IR spectral regions for extensive new spectroscopic studies. The SDSS III APOGEE project in the H-Band is an important example which will penetrate the dust obscuring the Galactic bulge. APOGEE will survey elemental abundances of 100,000 red giant stars in the bulge, bar, disk, and halo of the Milky Way. Many stellar spectra in the H-Band are, as expected, dominated by transitions of Fe I. Most of these IR transitions connect high levels of Fe. Our program has started an effort to meet this challenge with new radiative lifetime measurements on high lying levels of Fe I using time resolved laser induced fluorescence (TRLIF). The TRLIF method is typically accurate to 5% and is efficient. Our goal is to combine these accurate, absolute radiative lifetimes with emission branching fractions [1] to determine log(gf) values of the highest quality for Fe I lines in the UV, visible, and IR. This method was used very successfully by O’Brian et al. [2] on lower levels of Fe I. This method is still the best available for all but very simple spectra for which ab-initio theory is more accurate. Supported by NSF grant AST-0907732. [1] Branching fractions are being measured by M. Ruffoni and J. C. Pickering at Imperial College London. [2] O'Brian, T. R., Wickliffe, M. E., Lawler, J. E., Whaling, W., & Brault, J. W. 1991, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 8, 1185

  17. Development of predictive models for determining enterococci levels at Gulf Coast beaches.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zaihong; Deng, Zhiqiang; Rusch, Kelly A

    2012-02-01

    The US EPA BEACH Act requires beach managers to issue swimming advisories when water quality standards are exceeded. While a number of methods/models have been proposed to meet the BEACH Act requirement, no systematic comparisons of different methods against the same data series are available in terms of relative performance of existing methods. This study presents and compares three models for nowcasting and forecasting enterococci levels at Gulf Coast beaches in Louisiana, USA. One was developed using the artificial neural network (ANN) in MATLAB Toolbox and the other two were based on the US EPA Virtual Beach (VB) Program. A total of 944 sets of environmental and bacteriological data were utilized. The data were collected and analyzed weekly during the swimming season (May-October) at six sites of the Holly Beach by Louisiana Beach Monitoring Program in the six year period of May 2005-October 2010. The ANN model includes 15 readily available environmental variables such as salinity, water temperature, wind speed and direction, tide level and type, weather type, and various combinations of antecedent rainfalls. The ANN model was trained, validated, and tested using 308, 103, and 103 data sets (collected in 2007, 2008, and 2009) with an average linear correlation coefficient (LCC) of 0.857 and a Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) of 0.336. The two VB models, including a linear transformation-based model and a nonlinear transformation-based model, were constructed using the same data sets. The linear VB model with 6 input variables achieved an LCC of 0.230 and an RMSE of 1.302 while the nonlinear VB model with 5 input variables produced an LCC of 0.337 and an RMSE of 1.205. In order to assess the predictive performance of the ANN and VB models, hindcasting was conducted using a total of 430 sets of independent environmental and bacteriological data collected at six Holly Beach sites in 2005, 2006, and 2010. The hindcasting results show that the ANN model is capable of

  18. Global Emergence and Dissemination of Enterococci as Nosocomial Pathogens: Attack of the Clones?

    PubMed Central

    Guzman Prieto, Ana M.; van Schaik, Willem; Rogers, Malbert R. C.; Coque, Teresa M.; Baquero, Fernando; Corander, Jukka; Willems, Rob J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Enterococci are Gram-positive bacteria that are found in plants, soil and as commensals of the gastrointestinal tract of humans, mammals, and insects. Despite their commensal nature, they have also become globally important nosocomial pathogens. Within the genus Enterococcus, Enterococcus faecium, and Enterococcus faecalis are clinically most relevant. In this review, we will discuss how E. faecium and E. faecalis have evolved to become a globally disseminated nosocomial pathogen. E. faecium has a defined sub-population that is associated with hospitalized patients and is rarely encountered in community settings. These hospital-associated clones are characterized by the acquisition of adaptive genetic elements, including genes involved in metabolism, biofilm formation, and antibiotic resistance. In contrast to E. faecium, clones of E. faecalis isolated from hospitalized patients, including strains causing clinical infections, are not exclusively found in hospitals but are also present in healthy individuals and animals. This observation suggests that the division between commensals and hospital-adapted lineages is less clear for E. faecalis than for E. faecium. In addition, genes that are reported to be associated with virulence of E. faecalis are often not unique to clinical isolates, but are also found in strains that originate from commensal niches. As a reflection of more ancient association of E. faecalis with different hosts, these determinants Thus, they may not represent genuine virulence genes but may act as host-adaptive functions that are useful in a variety of intestinal environments. The scope of the review is to summarize recent trends in the emergence of antibiotic resistance and explore recent developments in the molecular epidemiology, population structure and mechanisms of adaptation of E. faecium and E. faecalis. PMID:27303380

  19. Prevalence, Antimicrobial Resistance, and Genotypic Characterization of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci in Meat Preparations.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Ramos, Emilia; Molina-González, Diana; Blanco-Morán, Sonia; Igrejas, Gilberto; Poeta, Patrícia; Alonso-Calleja, Carlos; Capita, Rosa

    2016-05-01

    A total of 160 samples of poultry (80), pork (40), and beef (40) preparations (red sausages, white sausages, hamburgers, meatballs, nuggets, minced meat, escalope, and crepes) were tested in northwestern Spain to determine the prevalence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). VRE were detected in 38 (23.8%) samples (37.5% of poultry, 15.0% of pork, and 5.0% of beef samples). One strain per food sample was further characterized. Isolates were identified as Enterococcus faecium (14 strains), E. durans (10), E. hirae (7), E. gallinarum (5), and E. casseliflavus-E. flavescens (2). All strains showed resistance or intermediate susceptibility to three or more antimicrobials of clinical significance, in addition to vancomycin. High rates of resistance or intermediate susceptibility were observed for teicoplanin (81.6% of isolates), chloramphenicol (81.6%), erythromycin (100%), quinupristin-dalfopristin (89.5%), and ciprofloxacin (81.6%). A moderate rate of resistance or intermediate susceptibility emerged for ampicillin (34.2%) and tetracycline (36.8%). Genes encoding antimicrobial resistance and virulence were studied by PCR. The vanA, vanB, vanC-1, and vanC-2/3 genes were identified in 27, 1, 5, and 2 isolates, respectively. Other resistance genes or transposon sequences found were tet(L), tet(M), Tn5397 (tetracycline), erm(A), erm(B) (erythromycin), vat(D), and vat(E) (quinupristin-dalfopristin). Most isolates were free of virulence determinants (agg, hyl, and efaAfm genes were detected in one, one, and five strains, respectively). Strains were classified as not biofilm producers (crystal violet assay; 4 isolates) or weak biofilm producers (34 isolates). Cluster analysis (EcoRI ribotyping) suggested a strong genetic relationship among isolates from different types of meat preparations, animal species, and retail outlets. Meat preparations might play a role in the spread through the food chain of VRE with several resistance and virulence genes. PMID:27296421

  20. Comparative decay of Catellicoccus marimmalium and enterococci in beach sand and seawater.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kendra I; Boehm, Alexandria B

    2015-10-15

    Most studies characterize microbial source tracking (MST) target performance using sensitivity and specificity metrics. However, it is important to also consider the temporal stability of MST targets in relation to regulated microbial pollutants. Differences among bacterial target stabilities may lead to erroneous conclusions about sources of contamination. The present study evaluates the relative stability of MST targets and fecal indicator organisms using the gull/pigeon-associated Catellicoccus marimammalium (CAT) marker and enterococci (ENT). The decay rates of CAT and ENT measured by culture (cENT) and QPCR (tENT) were compared in sand and seawater laboratory microcosms under environmentally relevant conditions (subject to tidal wetting versus no wetting in sand, and sunlit versus dark conditions in seawater). Bacterial targets were more persistent in beach sand than in seawater with decay rates on the order of 0.01-0.1 per day and 1 to 10 per day, respectively. Targets were more persistent in unwetted compared to wetted sand, and dark compared to sunlit seawater. During the first 8 days of the sand experiment, the decay rate k of CAT was greater than that of cENT. The decay rates of CAT, tENT, and cENT were similar in sand after day 8 and in dark seawater. In sunlit seawater, the decay rates were different between targets with kcENT > kCAT > ktENT. The decay rates presented here are useful for fate and transport models and also inform the use of MST marker concentrations to infer ENT sources in the environment. PMID:26196307

  1. Clinical and epidemiological significance of enterococci intrinsically resistant to vancomycin (possessing the vanC genotype)

    PubMed Central

    Toye, B; Shymanski, J; Bobrowska, M; Woods, W; Ramotar, K

    1997-01-01

    Constitutive low-level vancomycin resistance is found intrinsically in certain enterococcal species and is encoded by vanC ligase genes. These intrinsically vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) will be referred to as VANC VRE. A prospective study to determine the clinical and epidemiologic significance of VANC VRE was conducted. VANC VRE were recovered from the stools of 34 of 601 (5.7%) patients, a rate similar to that obtained for the stools of 100 outpatients in the community (5%). VANC VRE were also isolated from the nonstool specimens of 9 of 538 patients (1.7%), including two patients with bacteremia. No VRE of the vanA or vanB genotypes were detected in nonstool specimens. Eighty-two hospital contacts of the first 23 patients found to be colonized or infected with VANC VRE were screened, and 6 contacts were found to be gastrointestinal carriers of VANC VRE. However, typing of isolates from these 6 contacts by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis with SmaI showed the isolates to be unique and different from those recovered from the index patients. In fact, all VANC VRE isolates from different patients in this study were unique. A case-control study with patients who were negative when screened for VANC VRE as controls failed to identify any risk factor associated with colonization or infection with this organism. VANC VRE were infrequently recovered from clinical specimens but were occasionally found as part of the normal stool flora. Since no transmission between patients was documented, additional isolation procedures may not be necessary for patients colonized or infected with VANC VRE. PMID:9399514

  2. Virulence factors and antibiotic susceptibility in enterococci isolated from oral mucosal and deep infections

    PubMed Central

    Dahlén, Gunnar; Blomqvist, Susanne; Almståhl, Annica; Carlén, Anette

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study evaluates the presence of virulence factors and antibiotic susceptibility among enterococcal isolates from oral mucosal and deep infections. Methods Forty-three enterococcal strains from oral mucosal lesions and 18 from deep infections were isolated from 830 samples that were sent during 2 years to Oral Microbiology, University of Gothenburg, for analysis. The 61 strains were identified by 16S rDNA, and characterized by the presence of the virulence genes efa A (endocarditis gene), gel E (gelatinase gene), ace (collagen binding antigen gene), asa (aggregation substance gene), cyl A (cytolysin activator gene) and esp (surface adhesin gene), tested for the production of bacteriocins and presence of plasmids. MIC determination was performed using the E-test method against the most commonly used antibiotics in dentistry, for example, penicillin V, amoxicillin and clindamycin. Vancomycin was included in order to detect vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) strains. Results Sixty strains were identified as Enterococcus faecalis and one as Enterococcus faecium. All the virulence genes were detected in more than 93.3% (efa A and esp) of the E. faecalis strains, while the presence of phenotypic characteristics was much lower (gelatinase 10% and hemolysin 16.7%). Forty-six strains produced bacteriocins and one to six plasmids were detected in half of the isolates. Conclusions Enterococcal strains from oral infections had a high virulence capacity, showed bacteriocin production and had numerous plasmids. They were generally susceptible to ampicillins but were resistant to clindamycin, commonly used in dentistry, and no VRE-strain was found. PMID:22368771

  3. High level waste interim storge architecture selection - decision report

    SciTech Connect

    Calmus, R.B.

    1996-09-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has embarked upon a course to acquire Hanford Site tank waste treatment and immobilization services using privatized facilities (RL 1996a). This plan contains a two-phased approach. Phase I is a proof-of-principle/connnercial demonstration- scale effort and Phase II is a fiill-scale production effort. In accordance with the planned approach, interim storage and disposal of various products from privatized facilities are to be DOE fumished. The high-level waste (BLW) interim storage options, or alternative architectures, were identified and evaluated to provide the framework from which to select the most viable method of Phase I BLW interim storage (Calmus 1996). This evaluation, hereafter referred to as the Alternative Architecture Evaluation, was performed to established performance and risk criteria (technical merit, cost, schedule, etc.). Based on evaluation results, preliminary architectures and path forward reconunendations were provided for consideration in the architecture decision- maldng process. The decision-making process used for selection of a Phase I solidified BLW interim storage architecture was conducted in accordance with an approved Decision Plan (see the attachment). This decision process was based on TSEP-07,Decision Management Procedure (WHC 1995). The established decision process entailed a Decision Board, consisting of Westinghouse Hanford Company (VY`HC) management staff, and included appointment of a VTHC Decision Maker. The Alternative Architecture Evaluation results and preliminary recommendations were presented to the Decision Board members for their consideration in the decision-making process. The Alternative Architecture Evaluation was prepared and issued before issuance of @C-IP- 123 1, Alternatives Generation and Analysis Procedure (WI-IC 1996a), but was deemed by the Board to fully meet the intent of WHC-IP-1231. The Decision Board members concurred with the bulk of the Alternative Architecture

  4. Impact testing of simulated high-level waste glass canisters

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, M.E.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Slate, S.C.

    1985-01-01

    Three Savannah River Laboratory reference high-level waste canisters were subjected to impact tests at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory in Richland, Washington, in June 1983. The purpose of the test was to determine the integrity of the canister, nozzle, and final closure weld and to assess the effects of impacts on the glass. Two of the canisters were fabricated from 304L stainless steel and the third canister from titanium. The titanium canister was subjected to two drops. The first drop was vertical from 9.14 m onto an unyielding surface with the bottom corner of the canister receiving the impact. No failure occurred during this drop. The second drop was vertical from 9.14 m onto an unyielding surface with the corner of the fill nozzle receiving the impact. A large breach in the canister occurred in the region where the fill nozzle joins the dished head. The first stainless steel canister was dropped with the corner of the fill nozzle receiving the impact. The canister showed significant strain with no rupturing in the region where the fill nozzle joins the dished head. The second canister was dropped with the bottom corner receiving the impact and also, dropped horizontally onto an unyielding vertical solid steel cylinder in a puncture test. The bottom drop did not damage the weld and the puncture test did not rupture the canister body. The glass particles in the damaged zone of these canisters were sampled and analyzed for particle size. A comparison was made with control canister in which no impact had occurred. The particle size distribution for the control canisters and the zones of damaged glass were determined down to 1.5 ..mu..m. The quantity of glass fines, smaller than 10 ..mu..m, which must be determined for transportation safety studies, was found to be the largest in the bottom-damaged zone. The total amount of fines smaller than 10 ..mu..m after impact was less than 0.01 wt % of the total amount of glass in the canister.

  5. JET MIXING ANALYSIS FOR SRS HIGH-LEVEL WASTE RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.

    2011-07-05

    The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank to ensure uniformity of the discharge stream. Mixing is accomplished with one to four slurry pumps located within the tank liquid. The slurry pump may be fixed in position or they may rotate depending on the specific mixing requirements. The high-level waste in Tank 48 contains insoluble solids in the form of potassium tetraphenyl borate compounds (KTPB), monosodium titanate (MST), and sludge. Tank 48 is equipped with 4 slurry pumps, which are intended to suspend the insoluble solids prior to transfer of the waste to the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) process. The FBSR process is being designed for a normal feed of 3.05 wt% insoluble solids. A chemical characterization study has shown the insoluble solids concentration is approximately 3.05 wt% when well-mixed. The project is requesting a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) mixing study from SRNL to determine the solids behavior with 2, 3, and 4 slurry pumps in operation and an estimate of the insoluble solids concentration at the suction of the transfer pump to the FBSR process. The impact of cooling coils is not considered in the current work. The work consists of two principal objectives by taking a CFD approach: (1) To estimate insoluble solids concentration transferred from Tank 48 to the Waste Feed Tank in the FBSR process and (2) To assess the impact of different combinations of four slurry pumps on insoluble solids suspension and mixing in Tank 48. For this work, several different combinations of a maximum of four pumps are considered to determine the resulting flow patterns and local flow velocities which are thought to be associated with sludge particle mixing. Two different elevations of pump nozzles are used for an assessment of the flow patterns on the tank mixing. Pump design and operating parameters used for the analysis are summarized in Table 1. The baseline

  6. Reusable, Extensible High-Level Data-Distribution Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark; Zima, Hans; Diaconescua, Roxana

    2007-01-01

    A framework for high-level specification of data distributions in data-parallel application programs has been conceived. [As used here, distributions signifies means to express locality (more specifically, locations of specified pieces of data) in a computing system composed of many processor and memory components connected by a network.] Inasmuch as distributions exert a great effect on the performances of application programs, it is important that a distribution strategy be flexible, so that distributions can be adapted to the requirements of those programs. At the same time, for the sake of productivity in programming and execution, it is desirable that users be shielded from such error-prone, tedious details as those of communication and synchronization. As desired, the present framework enables a user to refine a distribution type and adjust it to optimize the performance of an application program and conceals, from the user, the low-level details of communication and synchronization. The framework provides for a reusable, extensible, data-distribution design, denoted the design pattern, that is independent of a concrete implementation. The design pattern abstracts over coding patterns that have been found to be commonly encountered in both manually and automatically generated distributed parallel programs. The following description of the present framework is necessarily oversimplified to fit within the space available for this article. Distributions are among the elements of a conceptual data-distribution machinery, some of the other elements being denoted domains, index sets, and data collections (see figure). Associated with each domain is one index set and one distribution. A distribution class interface (where "class" is used in the object-oriented-programming sense) includes operations that enable specification of the mapping of an index to a unit of locality. Thus, "Map(Index)" specifies a unit, while "LocalLayout(Index)" specifies the local address

  7. Cementitious Grout for Closing SRS High Level Waste Tanks - 12315

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.A.; Stefanko, D.B.; Burns, H.H.; Waymer, J.; Mhyre, W.B.; Herbert, J.E.; Jolly, J.C. Jr.

    2012-07-01

    In 1997, the first two United States Department of Energy (US DOE) high level waste tanks (Tanks 17-F and 20-F: Type IV, single shell tanks) were taken out of service (permanently closed) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). In 2012, the DOE plans to remove from service two additional Savannah River Site (SRS) Type IV high-level waste tanks, Tanks 18-F and 19-F. These tanks were constructed in the late 1950's and received low-heat waste and do not contain cooling coils. Operational closure of Tanks 18-F and 19-F is intended to be consistent with the applicable requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and will be performed in accordance with South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). The closure will physically stabilize two 4.92E+04 cubic meter (1.3 E+06 gallon) carbon steel tanks and isolate and stabilize any residual contaminants left in the tanks. Ancillary equipment abandoned in the tanks will also be filled to the extent practical. A Performance Assessment (PA) has been developed to assess the long-term fate and transport of residual contamination in the environment resulting from the operational closure of the F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) waste tanks. Next generation flowable, zero-bleed cementitious grouts were designed, tested, and specified for closing Tanks 18-F and 19-F and for filling the abandoned equipment. Fill requirements were developed for both the tank and equipment grouts. All grout formulations were required to be alkaline with a pH of 12.4 and to be chemically reducing with a reduction potential (Eh) of -200 to -400. Grouts with this chemistry stabilize potential contaminants of concern. This was achieved by including Portland cement and Grade 100 slag in the mixes, respectively. Ingredients and proportions of cementitious reagents were selected and adjusted to support the mass placement strategy developed by

  8. Fecal carriage of vancomycin- and ampicillin-resistant Enterococci observed in Swedish adult patients with diarrhea but not among healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Olofsson, M B; Pörnull, K J; Karnell, A; Telander, B; Svenungsson, B

    2001-01-01

    During a 1-y prospective study between 1 October 1996 and 30 September 1997, fecal samples from 786 adult patients with diarrhea and 203 healthy control subjects were screened for vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE) and ampicillin-resistant Enterococci (ARE). The carriage rates of VRE and ARE were 0.4% and 6%, respectively among patients and 0% among controls. The 3 VRE isolates were all VanA and were obtained from patients who had been abroad (Thailand, Spain, France) within the previous 3 months. Thirteen of the 45 patients with ARE (29%) had been abroad within 2 weeks of the onset of diarrhea. These findings suggest a potential risk of introduction of antibiotic-resistant Enterococci in Swedish hospitals by patients receiving treatment for diarrhea after traveling abroad. PMID:11669222

  9. Screening probiotic strains for safety: Evaluation of virulence and antimicrobial susceptibility of enterococci from healthy Chinese infants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fen; Jiang, Meiling; Wan, Cuixiang; Chen, Xiaoyan; Chen, Xiaoyong; Tao, Xueying; Shah, Nagendra P; Wei, Hua

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety of enterococci isolated from Chinese infants and screen out potential probiotic candidates. One hundred eight strains were isolated from feces of 34 healthy infants, and 38 strains of Enterococcus spp. were categorized as follows: E. faecalis (22), E. faecium (10), E. hirae (3), E. durans (2), and E. casseliflavus (1). Of these, 72.7% of E. faecalis came from infants delivered by cesarean and 62.5% of E. faecium from infants delivered vaginally. For safety evaluation of strains, we determined presence of virulence genes; production of hemolysin, gelatinase, and biofilm; and antimicrobial susceptibility of enterococci. Six out of 14 virulence genes were detected with a distribution of gelE (26.3%), cylA (39.4%), esp (15.8%), efaA (63.2%), asa1 (50.0%), and ace (50.0%). In phenotype analysis, 36.8% of the strains exhibited positive hemolytic activity and 17.5% were positive for production of gelatinase. Results of antimicrobial susceptibility showed that different percentages of the strains were resistant to ciprofloxacin (5.2%), vancomycin (7.8%), rifampicin (10.5%), erythromycin (52.6%), and gentamycin (52.6%); remarkably, none of the strains were resistant to ampicillin or chloramphenicol. In total, 10 strains, including 6 E. faecium, which are free of virulence determinants and sensitive to common antimicrobial agents (e.g., ampicillin and vancomycin), were further assessed for their probiotic properties. All strains survived well in simulated gastric fluid and intestinal tract, with maximum reductions of 0.600 and 0.887 log cfu/mL, respectively. Six strains of E. faecium could resist 0.3 to 1.0% bile salt, of which E. faecium WEFA23 presented the highest growth (75.06%) at 1.0% bile salt. All strains showed bile salt hydrolase activity on glycodeoxycholic acid, but only 3 of E. faecium showed activity on taurodeoxycholic acid. These results deliver useful information on the safety of enterococci in infants in

  10. Mortality in kittens is associated with a shift in ileum mucosa-associated enterococci from Enterococcus hirae to biofilm-forming Enterococcus faecalis and adherent Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Anuradha; Borst, Luke; Stauffer, Stephen H; Suyemoto, Mitsu; Moisan, Peter; Zurek, Ludek; Gookin, Jody L

    2013-11-01

    Approximately 15% of foster kittens die before 8 weeks of age, with most of these kittens demonstrating clinical signs or postmortem evidence of enteritis. While a specific cause of enteritis is not determined in most cases, these kittens are often empirically administered probiotics that contain enterococci. The enterococci are members of the commensal intestinal microbiota but also can function as opportunistic pathogens. Given the complicated role of enterococci in health and disease, it would be valuable to better understand what constitutes a "healthy" enterococcal community in these kittens and how this microbiota is impacted by severe illness. In this study, we characterized the ileum mucosa-associated enterococcal community of 50 apparently healthy and 50 terminally ill foster kittens. In healthy kittens, Enterococcus hirae was the most common species of ileum mucosa-associated enterococci and was often observed to adhere extensively to the small intestinal epithelium. These E. hirae isolates generally lacked virulence traits. In contrast, non-E. hirae enterococci, notably Enterococcus faecalis, were more commonly isolated from the ileum mucosa of kittens with terminal illness. Isolates of E. faecalis had numerous virulence traits and multiple antimicrobial resistances. Moreover, the attachment of Escherichia coli to the intestinal epithelium was significantly associated with terminal illness and was not observed in any kitten with adherent E. hirae. These findings identify a significant difference in the species of enterococci cultured from the ileum mucosa of kittens with terminal illness compared to the species cultured from healthy kittens. In contrast to prior case studies that associated enteroadherent E. hirae with diarrhea in young animals, these controlled studies identified E. hirae as more often isolated from healthy kittens and adherence of E. hirae as more common and extensive in healthy kittens than in sick kittens. PMID:23966487

  11. Effects of In-Feed Copper, Chlortetracycline, and Tylosin on the Prevalence of Transferable Copper Resistance Gene, tcrB, Among Fecal Enterococci of Weaned Piglets.

    PubMed

    Amachawadi, Raghavendra G; Scott, H Morgan; Vinasco, Javier; Tokach, Mike D; Dritz, Steve S; Nelssen, Jim L; Nagaraja, Tiruvoor G

    2015-08-01

    Heavy metals, such as copper, are increasingly supplemented in swine diets as an alternative to antibiotics to promote growth. Enterococci, a common gut commensal, acquire plasmid-borne, transferable copper resistance (tcrB) gene-mediated resistance to copper. The plasmid also carried resistance genes to tetracyclines and macrolides. The potential genetic link between copper and antibiotic resistance suggests that copper supplementation may exert a selection pressure for antimicrobial resistance. Therefore, a longitudinal study was conducted to investigate the effects of in-feed copper, chlortetracycline, and tylosin alone or in combination on the selection and co-selection of antimicrobial-resistant enterococci. The study included 240 weaned piglets assigned randomly to 6 dietary treatment groups: control, copper, chlortetracycline, tylosin, copper and chlortetracycline, and copper and tylosin. Feces were collected before (day 0), during (days 7, 14, 21), and after (days 28 and 35) initiating treatment, and enterococcal isolates were obtained from each fecal sample and tested for genotypic and phenotypic resistance to copper and antibiotics. A total of 2592 enterococcal isolates were tested for tcrB by polymerase chain reaction. The overall prevalence of tcrB-positive enterococci was 14.3% (372/2592). Among the tcrB-positive isolates, 331 were Enterococcus faecium and 41 were E. faecalis. All tcrB-positive isolates contained both erm(B) and tet(M) genes. The median minimum inhibitory concentration of copper for tcrB-negative and tcrB-positive enterococci was 6 and 18 mM, respectively. The majority of isolates (95/100) were resistant to multiple antibiotics. In conclusion, supplementing copper or antibiotics alone did not increase copper-resistant enterococci; however, supplementing antibiotics with copper increased the prevalence of the tcrB gene among fecal enterococci of piglets. PMID:26258261

  12. Mortality in Kittens Is Associated with a Shift in Ileum Mucosa-Associated Enterococci from Enterococcus hirae to Biofilm-Forming Enterococcus faecalis and Adherent Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Anuradha; Borst, Luke; Stauffer, Stephen H.; Suyemoto, Mitsu; Moisan, Peter; Zurek, Ludek

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 15% of foster kittens die before 8 weeks of age, with most of these kittens demonstrating clinical signs or postmortem evidence of enteritis. While a specific cause of enteritis is not determined in most cases, these kittens are often empirically administered probiotics that contain enterococci. The enterococci are members of the commensal intestinal microbiota but also can function as opportunistic pathogens. Given the complicated role of enterococci in health and disease, it would be valuable to better understand what constitutes a “healthy” enterococcal community in these kittens and how this microbiota is impacted by severe illness. In this study, we characterized the ileum mucosa-associated enterococcal community of 50 apparently healthy and 50 terminally ill foster kittens. In healthy kittens, Enterococcus hirae was the most common species of ileum mucosa-associated enterococci and was often observed to adhere extensively to the small intestinal epithelium. These E. hirae isolates generally lacked virulence traits. In contrast, non-E. hirae enterococci, notably Enterococcus faecalis, were more commonly isolated from the ileum mucosa of kittens with terminal illness. Isolates of E. faecalis had numerous virulence traits and multiple antimicrobial resistances. Moreover, the attachment of Escherichia coli to the intestinal epithelium was significantly associated with terminal illness and was not observed in any kitten with adherent E. hirae. These findings identify a significant difference in the species of enterococci cultured from the ileum mucosa of kittens with terminal illness compared to the species cultured from healthy kittens. In contrast to prior case studies that associated enteroadherent E. hirae with diarrhea in young animals, these controlled studies identified E. hirae as more often isolated from healthy kittens and adherence of E. hirae as more common and extensive in healthy kittens than in sick kittens. PMID:23966487

  13. Transport and persistence of tylosin-resistant enterococci, genes, and tylosin in soil and drainage water from fields receiving Swine manure.

    PubMed

    Garder, Jason L; Moorman, Thomas B; Soupir, Michelle L

    2014-07-01

    Land application of manure from tylosin-treated swine introduces tylosin, tylosin-resistant enterococci, and erythromycin resistant rRNA methylase () genes, which confer resistance to tylosin. This study documents the persistence and transport of tylosin-resistant enterococci, genes, and tylosin in tile-drained chisel plow and no-till agricultural fields treated with liquid swine manure in alternating years. Between 70 and 100% of the enterococci in manure were resistant to tylosin and B concentrations exceeded 10 copies g manure, while the mean F concentrations exceeded 10 copies g manure (T was not detected). The mean concentration of tylosin was 73 ng g manure. Soil collected from the manure injection band closely following application contained >10 copies g soil of both B and F in 2010 and >10 copies g soil after the 2011 application compared to 3 × 10 to 3 × 10 copies g soil in the no-manure control plots. Gene abundances declined over the subsequent 2-yr period to levels similar to those in the no-manure controls. Concentrations of enterococci in tile water were low, while tylosin-resistant enterococci were rarely detected. In approximately 75% of tile water samples, B was detected, and F was detected in 30% of tile water samples, but levels of these genes were not elevated due to manure application, and no difference was found between tillage practices. These results show that tylosin usage increased the short-term occurrence of tylosin-resistant enterococci, genes, and tylosin in soils but had minimal effect on tile drainage water quality in years of average to below average precipitation. PMID:25603096

  14. Advanced High-Level Waste Glass Research and Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, David K.; Vienna, John D.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Fox, Kevin M.

    2015-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection (ORP) has implemented an integrated program to increase the loading of Hanford tank wastes in glass while meeting melter lifetime expectancies and process, regulatory, and product quality requirements. The integrated ORP program is focused on providing a technical, science-based foundation from which key decisions can be made regarding the successful operation of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) facilities. The fundamental data stemming from this program will support development of advanced glass formulations, key process control models, and tactical processing strategies to ensure safe and successful operations for both the low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) vitrification facilities with an appreciation toward reducing overall mission life. The purpose of this advanced HLW glass research and development plan is to identify the near-, mid-, and longer-term research and development activities required to develop and validate advanced HLW glasses and their associated models to support facility operations at WTP, including both direct feed and full pretreatment flowsheets. This plan also integrates technical support of facility operations and waste qualification activities to show the interdependence of these activities with the advanced waste glass (AWG) program to support the full WTP mission. Figure ES-1 shows these key ORP programmatic activities and their interfaces with both WTP facility operations and qualification needs. The plan is a living document that will be updated to reflect key advancements and mission strategy changes. The research outlined here is motivated by the potential for substantial economic benefits (e.g., significant increases in waste throughput and reductions in glass volumes) that will be realized when advancements in glass formulation continue and models supporting facility operations are implemented. Developing and applying advanced

  15. Development of Crystal-Tolerant High-Level Waste Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Matyas, Josef; Vienna, John D.; Schaible, Micah J.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Arrigoni, Alyssa L.; Tate, Rachel M.

    2010-12-17

    Twenty five glasses were formulated. They were batched from HLW AZ-101 simulant or raw chemicals and melted and tested with a series of tests to elucidate the effect of spinel-forming components (Ni, Fe, Cr, Mn, and Zn), Al, and noble metals (Rh2O3 and RuO2) on the accumulation rate of spinel crystals in the glass discharge riser of the high-level waste (HLW) melter. In addition, the processing properties of glasses, such as the viscosity and TL, were measured as a function of temperature and composition. Furthermore, the settling of spinel crystals in transparent low-viscosity fluids was studied at room temperature to access the shape factor and hindered settling coefficient of spinel crystals in the Stokes equation. The experimental results suggest that Ni is the most troublesome component of all the studied spinel-forming components producing settling layers of up to 10.5 mm in just 20 days in Ni-rich glasses if noble metals or a higher concentration of Fe was not introduced in the glass. The layer of this thickness can potentially plug the bottom of the riser, preventing glass from being discharged from the melter. The noble metals, Fe, and Al were the components that significantly slowed down or stopped the accumulation of spinel at the bottom. Particles of Rh2O3 and RuO2, hematite and nepheline, acted as nucleation sites significantly increasing the number of crystals and therefore decreasing the average crystal size. The settling rate of ≤10-μm crystal size around the settling velocity of crystals was too low to produce thick layers. The experimental data for the thickness of settled layers in the glasses prepared from AZ-101 simulant were used to build a linear empirical model that can predict crystal accumulation in the riser of the melter as a function of concentration of spinel-forming components in glass. The developed model predicts the thicknesses of accumulated layers quite well, R2 = 0.985, and can be become an efficient tool for the formulation

  16. Apramycin and gentamicin resistance in Escherichia coli and salmonellas isolated from farm animals.

    PubMed Central

    Wray, C.; Hedges, R. W.; Shannon, K. P.; Bradley, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    Since the aminoglycoside antibiotic apramycin was licensed for veterinary use in 1980, all isolates of Escherichia coli and salmonellas received at the Central Veterinary Laboratory have been monitored for resistance to apramycin and the related antibiotic gentamicin. During the period 1982-4, the incidence of resistance in E. coli to apramycin increased from 0.6% in 1982 to 2.6% in 1984. In salmonellas the incidence of resistance to apramycin increased from 0.1% in 1982 to 1.4% in 1984. Resistance to both apramycin and gentamicin was detected in six different salmonella serotypes, although an isolate of Salmonella thompson from poultry was resistant to gentamicin but not apramycin. Most of the cultures were isolated from pigs, although the incidence of apramycin resistance in S. typhimurium (DT 204C) from calves has shown a recent dramatic increase. All the isolates with one exception produced the enzyme aminoglycoside 3-N-acetyltransferase IV (ACC(3)IV). The resistance was transferable by conjugation in most of the strains examined, and the plasmids specifying the resistance have been found to belong to a number of different incompatibility groups. Plasmids from three E. coli strains were compatible with all the reference plasmids and belonged to a previously undescribed group which was investigated further. It is suggested that bacteria from humans should be examined for resistance to apramycin and gentamicin to determine the possibility of the antibiotic-resistance bacteria, and their genes, spreading from animals to humans. Images Fig. 1 PMID:3540112

  17. Temperature-Dependent Gentamicin Resistance of Francisella tularensis is Mediated by Uptake Modulation.

    PubMed

    Loughman, Kathleen; Hall, Jesse; Knowlton, Samantha; Sindeldecker, Devin; Gilson, Tricia; Schmitt, Deanna M; Birch, James W-M; Gajtka, Tara; Kobe, Brianna N; Florjanczyk, Aleksandr; Ingram, Jenna; Bakshi, Chandra S; Horzempa, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Gentamicin (Gm) is an aminoglycoside commonly used to treat bacterial infections such as tularemia - the disease caused by Francisella tularensis. In addition to being pathogenic, F. tularensis is found in environmental niches such as soil where this bacterium likely encounters Gm producers (Micromonospora sp.). Here we show that F. tularensis exhibits increased resistance to Gm at ambient temperature (26°C) compared to mammalian body temperature (37°C). To evaluate whether F. tularensis was less permeable to Gm at 26°C, a fluorescent marker [Texas Red (Tr)] was conjugated with Gm, yielding Tr-Gm. Bacteria incubated at 26°C showed reduced fluorescence compared to those at 37°C when exposed to Tr-Gm suggesting that uptake of Gm was reduced at 26°C. Unconjugated Gm competitively inhibited uptake of Tr-Gm, demonstrating that this fluorescent compound was taken up similarly to unconjugated Gm. Lysates of F. tularensis bacteria incubated with Gm at 37°C inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli significantly more than lysates from bacteria incubated at 26°C, further indicating reduced uptake at this lower temperature. Other facultative pathogens (Listeria monocytogenes and Klebsiella pneumoniae) exhibited increased resistance to Gm at 26°C suggesting that the results generated using F. tularensis may be generalizable to diverse bacteria. Regulation of the uptake of antibiotics provides a mechanism by which facultative pathogens survive alongside antibiotic-producing microbes in nature. PMID:26858709

  18. Temperature-Dependent Gentamicin Resistance of Francisella tularensis is Mediated by Uptake Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Loughman, Kathleen; Hall, Jesse; Knowlton, Samantha; Sindeldecker, Devin; Gilson, Tricia; Schmitt, Deanna M.; Birch, James W.-M.; Gajtka, Tara; Kobe, Brianna N.; Florjanczyk, Aleksandr; Ingram, Jenna; Bakshi, Chandra S.; Horzempa, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Gentamicin (Gm) is an aminoglycoside commonly used to treat bacterial infections such as tularemia – the disease caused by Francisella tularensis. In addition to being pathogenic, F. tularensis is found in environmental niches such as soil where this bacterium likely encounters Gm producers (Micromonospora sp.). Here we show that F. tularensis exhibits increased resistance to Gm at ambient temperature (26°C) compared to mammalian body temperature (37°C). To evaluate whether F. tularensis was less permeable to Gm at 26°C, a fluorescent marker [Texas Red (Tr)] was conjugated with Gm, yielding Tr-Gm. Bacteria incubated at 26°C showed reduced fluorescence compared to those at 37°C when exposed to Tr-Gm suggesting that uptake of Gm was reduced at 26°C. Unconjugated Gm competitively inhibited uptake of Tr-Gm, demonstrating that this fluorescent compound was taken up similarly to unconjugated Gm. Lysates of F. tularensis bacteria incubated with Gm at 37°C inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli significantly more than lysates from bacteria incubated at 26°C, further indicating reduced uptake at this lower temperature. Other facultative pathogens (Listeria monocytogenes and Klebsiella pneumoniae) exhibited increased resistance to Gm at 26°C suggesting that the results generated using F. tularensis may be generalizable to diverse bacteria. Regulation of the uptake of antibiotics provides a mechanism by which facultative pathogens survive alongside antibiotic-producing microbes in nature. PMID:26858709

  19. Corrosion issues in high-level nuclear waste containers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asl, Samin Sharifi

    In this dissertation different aspects of corrosion and electrochemistry of copper, candidate canister material in Scandinavian high-level nuclear waste disposal program, including the thermodynamics and kinetics of the reactions that are predicted to occur in the practical system have been studied. A comprehensive thermodynamic study of copper in contact with granitic groundwater of the type and composition that is expected in the Forsmark repository in Sweden has been performed. Our primary objective was to ascertain whether copper would exist in the thermodynamically immune state in the repository, in which case corrosion could not occur and the issue of corrosion in the assessment of the storage technology would be moot. In spite of the fact that metallic copper has been found to exist for geological times in granitic geological formations, copper is well-known to be activated from the immune state to corrode by specific species that may exist in the environment. The principal activator of copper is known to be sulfur in its various forms, including sulfide (H2S, HS-, S2-), polysulfide (H2Sx, HSx -, Sx 2-), poly sulfur thiosulfate ( SxO3 2-), and polythionates (SxO6 2-). A comprehensive study of this aspect of copper chemistry has never been reported, and yet an understanding of this issue is vital for assessing whether copper is a suitable material for fabricating canisters for the disposal of HLNW. Our study identifies and explores those species that activate copper; these species include sulfur-containing entities as well as other, non-sulfur species that may be present in the repository. The effects of temperature, solution pH, and hydrogen pressure on the kinetics of the hydrogen electrode reaction (HER) on copper in borate buffer solution have been studied by means of steady-state polarization measurements, including electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). In order to obtain electrokinetic parameters, such as the exchange current density and the

  20. Presence of UDP-N-acetylmuramyl-hexapeptides and -heptapeptides in enterococci and staphylococci after treatment with ramoplanin, tunicamycin, or vancomycin.

    PubMed Central

    Billot-Klein, D; Shlaes, D; Bryant, D; Bell, D; Legrand, R; Gutmann, L; van Heijenoort, J

    1997-01-01

    Analyses of the peptidoglycan nucleotide precursor contents of enterococci and staphylococci treated with ramoplanin, tunicamycin, or vancomycin were carried out by high-pressure liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (MS). In all cases, a sharp increase in the UDP-N-actetylmuramoyl-pentapeptide or -pentadepsipeptide pool was observed. Concomitantly, new peptidoglycan nucleotide peptides of higher molecular masses with hexa- or heptapeptide moieties were identified: UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide-Asp or pentadepsipeptide-Asp in enterococci and UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide-Gly or -Ala and UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide-Gly-Gly or -Ala-Gly in staphylococci. These new compounds are derivatives of normal UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide or -pentadepsipeptide precursors with the extra amino acid(s) linked to the lysine epsilon-amino group as established by various analytical procedures (MS, MS-MS fragmentation, chemical analysis, and digestion with R39 D,D carboxypeptidase). Except for tunicamycin-treated cells, it was not possible to ascertain whether these unusual nucleotides were formed by direct addition of the amino acids to UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide (or -pentadepsipeptide) or whether they arose by reverse reactions from lipid I intermediates to which the amino acids had been added. PMID:9244253

  1. Relationship and variation of qPCR and culturable enterococci estimates in ambient surface waters are predictable

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitman, Richard L.; Ge, Zhongfu; Nevers, Meredith B.; Boehm, Alexandria B.; Chern, Eunice C.; Haugland, Richard A.; Lukasik, Ashley M.; Molina, Marirosa; Przybyla-Kelly, Kasia; Shively, Dawn A.; White, Emily M.; Zepp, Richard G.; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.

    2010-01-01

    The quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method provides rapid estimates of fecal indicator bacteria densities that have been indicated to be useful in the assessment of water quality. Primarily because this method provides faster results than standard culture-based methods, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is currently considering its use as a basis for revised ambient water quality criteria. In anticipation of this possibility, we sought to examine the relationship between qPCR-based and culture-based estimates of enterococci in surface waters. Using data from several research groups, we compared enterococci estimates by the two methods in water samples collected from 37 sites across the United States. A consistent linear pattern in the relationship between cell equivalents (CCE), based on the qPCR method, and colony-forming units (CFU), based on the traditional culturable method, was significant (P 10CFU > 2.0/100 mL) while uncertainty increases at lower CFU values. It was further noted that the relative error in replicated qPCR estimates was generally higher than that in replicated culture counts even at relatively high target levels, suggesting a greater need for replicated analyses in the qPCR method to reduce relative error. Further studies evaluating the relationship between culture and qPCR should take into account analytical uncertainty as well as potential differences in results of these methods that may arise from sample variability, different sources of pollution, and environmental factors.

  2. Resistance to antimicrobial agents among enterococci isolated from fecal samples of wild marine species in the southern coast of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Prichula, Janira; Pereira, Rebeca Inhoque; Wachholz, Guilherme Raffo; Cardoso, Leonardo Almansa; Tolfo, Neidimar Cezar Correa; Santestevan, Naiara Aguiar; Medeiros, Aline Weber; Tavares, Maurício; Frazzon, Jeverson; d'Azevedo, Pedro Alves; Frazzon, Ana Paula Guedes

    2016-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate species distribution, antimicrobial resistance profiles, and presence of resistance genes in enterococci isolated from fecal samples of wild marine species, including seabirds (n=12), sea turtles (n=8), and mammals (n=3) found alive or dead in southern coast of Brazil. Enterococci were classified based on phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, tested for antibiotic susceptibility, and the presence of tet(S), tet(M), tet(L), mrsC, and erm(B) genes by PCR. Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium were the most common species. Single (37.09%), double (25.80%), and multiple (16.12%) antibiotic resistance patterns were observed. Resistance to rifampicin occurred most frequently. The msrC, tet(M), and/or tet(L) genes were detected in 60.15%, 73.07%, and 23.07% of the resistant strains, respectively. In conclusion, the presence of antibiotic resistant strains in these species could be related to food web interactions and aquatic pollutants or linked to environmental resistome. PMID:26952995

  3. Effects of different test conditions on MICs of food animal growth-promoting antibacterial agents for enterococci.

    PubMed

    Butaye, P; Devriese, L A; Haesebrouck, F

    1998-07-01

    The influence of the addition of sheep blood to Mueller-Hinton II agar and the effects of aerobic incubation with or without CO2 and of anaerobic incubation were tested with bacitracin, tylosin, avoparcin, virginiamycin, avilamycin, narasin, and flavomycin on enterococci. The antibacterial activity of bambermycin (Flavomycin) was strongly inhibited by the addition of blood, except with the species Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus mundtii, Enterococcus hirae, Enterococcus casseliflavus, and Enterococcus gallinarum, which were not susceptible to this antibiotic on blood-free medium. With all other antimicrobials except avoparcin and tylosin, the presence of blood resulted in MIC increases of 1 to 3 log2 differences. Incubation in aerobic or anaerobic atmospheres enriched with CO2 lowered the susceptibility of enterococci to tylosin and increased their susceptibility to avilamycin, narasin, and avoparcin. This effect was most pronounced in tests on blood-free media. Results of susceptibility tests incubated under anaerobiosis and in a CO2-enriched atmosphere did not differ. For all enterococcal species, the preferred conditions for testing the susceptibility are Mueller-Hinton II medium supplemented with blood and incubation in a CO2-enriched atmosphere. However, when only E. faecium and Enterococcus faecalis are being tested, Mueller-Hinton II medium without blood incubated aerobically gives satisfactory results. PMID:9650934

  4. Fecal carriage of vancomycin-resistant enterococci in hospitalized patients and those living in the community in The Netherlands.

    PubMed Central

    Endtz, H P; van den Braak, N; van Belkum, A; Kluytmans, J A; Koeleman, J G; Spanjaard, L; Voss, A; Weersink, A J; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C M; Buiting, A G; van Duin, A; Verbrugh, H A

    1997-01-01

    In order to determine the prevalence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in The Netherlands, 624 hospitalized patients from intensive care units or hemato-oncology wards in nine hospitals and 200 patients living in the community were screened for VRE colonization. Enterococci were found in 49% of the hospitalized patients and in 80% of the patients living in the community. Of these strains, 43 and 32%, respectively, were Enterococcus faecium. VRE were isolated from 12 of 624 (2%) and 4 of 200 (2%) hospitalized patients and patients living in the community, respectively. PCR analysis of these 16 strains and 11 additional clinical VRE isolates from one of the participating hospitals revealed 24 vanA gene-containing, 1 vanB gene-containing, and 2 vanC1 gene-containing strains. All strains were cross-resistant to avoparcin but were sensitive to the novel glycopeptide antibiotic LY333328. Genotyping of the strains by arbitrarily primed PCR and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed a high degree of genetic heterogeneity. This underscores a lack of hospital-driven endemicity of VRE clones. It is suggested that the VRE in hospitalized patients have originated from unknown sources in the community. PMID:9399488

  5. In Vitro Activity of Daptomycin in Combination with β-Lactams, Gentamicin, Rifampin, and Tigecycline against Daptomycin-Nonsusceptible Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Hindler, Janet A.; Wong-Beringer, Annie; Charlton, Carmen L.; Miller, Shelley A.; Kelesidis, Theodoros; Carvalho, Marissa; Sakoulas, George; Nonejuie, Poochit; Pogliano, Joseph; Nizet, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Enterococci that are nonsusceptible (NS; MIC > 4 μg/ml) to daptomycin are an emerging clinical concern. The synergistic combination of daptomycin plus beta-lactams has been shown to be effective against vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) species in vitro. This study systematically evaluated by in vitro time-kill studies the effect of daptomycin in combination with ampicillin, cefazolin, ceftriaxone, ceftaroline, ertapenem, gentamicin, tigecycline, and rifampin, for a collection of 9 daptomycin-NS enterococci that exhibited a broad range of MICs and different resistance-conferring mutations. We found that ampicillin plus daptomycin yielded the most consistent synergy but did so only for isolates with mutations to the liaFSR system. Daptomycin binding was found to be enhanced by ampicillin in a representative isolate with such mutations but not for an isolate with mutation to the yycFGHIJ system. In contrast, ampicillin enhanced the killing of the LL-37 human antimicrobial peptide against daptomycin-NS E. faecium with either the liaFSR or yycFGHIJ mutation. Antagonism was noted only for rifampin and tigecycline and only for 2 or 3 isolates. These data add support to the growing body of evidence indicating that therapy combining daptomycin and ampicillin may be helpful in eradicating refractory VRE infections. PMID:25963982

  6. High-level waste program progress report, April 1, 1980-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    1980-08-01

    The highlights of this report are on: waste management analysis for nuclear fuel cycles; fixation of waste in concrete; study of ceramic and cermet waste forms; alternative high-level waste forms development; and high-level waste container development.

  7. 21 CFR 880.6885 - Liquid chemical sterilants/high level disinfectants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Liquid chemical sterilants/high level... and Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6885 Liquid chemical sterilants/high level disinfectants. (a) Identification. A liquid chemical sterilant/high level disinfectant is a germicide that...

  8. 21 CFR 880.6885 - Liquid chemical sterilants/high level disinfectants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Liquid chemical sterilants/high level... and Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6885 Liquid chemical sterilants/high level disinfectants. (a) Identification. A liquid chemical sterilant/high level disinfectant is a germicide that...

  9. 21 CFR 880.6885 - Liquid chemical sterilants/high level disinfectants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Liquid chemical sterilants/high level... and Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6885 Liquid chemical sterilants/high level disinfectants. (a) Identification. A liquid chemical sterilant/high level disinfectant is a germicide that...

  10. 21 CFR 880.6885 - Liquid chemical sterilants/high level disinfectants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Liquid chemical sterilants/high level... and Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6885 Liquid chemical sterilants/high level disinfectants. (a) Identification. A liquid chemical sterilant/high level disinfectant is a germicide that...

  11. 21 CFR 880.6885 - Liquid chemical sterilants/high level disinfectants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Liquid chemical sterilants/high level... and Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6885 Liquid chemical sterilants/high level disinfectants. (a) Identification. A liquid chemical sterilant/high level disinfectant is a germicide that...

  12. The impact of pond depth and environmental conditions on sunlight inactivation of Escherichia coli and enterococci in wastewater in a warm climate.

    PubMed

    Maïga, Ynoussa; Wethe, Joseph; Denyigba, Kokou; Ouattara, Aboubakar Sidiki

    2009-12-01

    Microcosm experiments were carried out under dark and real sunlight conditions in Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso) to investigate the survival of faecal indicators (Escherichia coli and enterococci) in secondary wastewater. Light damage was estimated by loss of bacterial culturability. The results clearly show that sunlight has a deleterious effect on the survival of both indicators. The mean dark inactivation coefficients for E. coli and enterococci were 0.045 and 0.047 h(-1), respectively, whereas inactivation coefficients in the shallowest microcosm (0.1 m) in illuminated conditions were 0.796 and 0.559 h(-1), respectively. No significant effect of pond depth (0.1-0.9 m) on the inactivation of both indicators was observed in the dark. However, the effect of depth was significant in the microcosms exposed to sunlight, probably because of attenuation. In illuminated conditions, enterococci were broadly inactivated more rapidly than E. coli (T90 = 26.81 h for E. coli and 15.67 h for enterococci in the 0.4 m microcosm). However, E. coli presented greater variability in the survival capabilities, suggesting difficulties in interpreting data using only E. coli as an indicator. Therefore, the use of both indicators together should be advisable for the assessment of effluent quality from waste stabilization ponds in the Sahelian region. PMID:20029528

  13. Evaluation of Commercial Cell Preparations as Sources of Calibration Standards for Real-Time qPCR Analysis of Enterococci in Recreational Waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    In response to the Beach Act, the U.S. EPA has developed a quantitative PCR (qPCR) method for enterococci that meets requirements for rapid, risk-based water quality assessments of recreational waters. Widespread implementation of this method will require that different laborator...

  14. Standardization of enterococci density estimates by EPA qPCR methods and comparison of beach action value exceedances in river waters with culture methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S.EPA has published recommendations for calibrator cell equivalent (CCE) densities of enterococci in recreational waters determined by a qPCR method in its 2012 Recreational Water Quality Criteria (RWQC). The CCE quantification unit stems from the calibration model used to ...

  15. Activity of vancomycin, linezolid, and daptomycin against staphylococci and enterococci isolated in 5 Greek hospitals during a 5-year period (2008-2012).

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou-Olivgeris, Matthaios; Kolonitsiou, Fevronia; Zerva, Loukia; Lebessi, Evangelia; Koutsia, Chryssa; Drougka, Eleanna; Sarrou, Styliani; Giormezis, Nikolaos; Vourli, Sofia; Doudoulakakis, Anastassios; Konsolakis, Christos; Marangos, Markos; Anastassiou, Evangelos D; Petinaki, Efthimia; Spiliopoulou, Iris

    2015-12-01

    The tendency of vancomycin, linezolid, and daptomycin MICs was investigated among 6920 staphylococci and enterococci during a 5-year period. Antimicrobial consumption was determined. Decrease of vancomycin MIC was detected associated with reduction in consumption. Linezolid and daptomycin remained active. An upward trend of linezolid MIC for methicillin-resistant staphylococci was observed. PMID:26341703

  16. 23S rRNA gene-based enterococci community signatures in Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana, USA, following urban runoff inputs after Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hee-Sung; Hou, Aixin

    2013-02-01

    Little is known about the impacts of fecal polluted urban runoff inputs on the structure of enterococci communities in estuarine waters. This study employed a 23S rRNA gene-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay with newly designed genus-specific primers, Ent127F-Ent907R, to determine the possible impacts of Hurricane Katrina floodwaters via the 17th Street Canal discharge on the community structure of enterococci in Lake Pontchartrain. A total of 94 phylotypes were identified through the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) screening of 494 clones while only 8 phylotypes occurred among 88 cultivated isolates. Sequence analyses of representative phylotypes and their temporal and spatial distribution in the lake and the canal indicated the Katrina floodwater input introduced a large portion of Enterococcus flavescens, Enterococcus casseliflavus, and Enterococcus dispar into the lake; typical fecal groups Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus durans, Enterococcus hirae, and Enterococcus mundtii were detected primarily in the floodwater-impacted waters. This study provides a global picture of enterococci in estuarine waters impacted by Hurricane Katrina-derived urban runoff. It also demonstrates the culture-independent PCR approach using 23S rRNA gene as a molecular marker could be a good alternative in ecological studies of enterococci in natural environments to overcome the limitation of conventional cultivation methods. PMID:23269456

  17. Fecal coliform and Enterococci relationships to rainfall and runoff in a rural watershed reveal intrinsic differences between these fecal pollution indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albritton, H. L.; Schulz, C. J.; Childers, G. W.

    2009-12-01

    Fecal coliforms and Enterococci, the two most commonly used fecal pollution indicators, were enumerated on a weekly basis for eight years at a USGS real time water station located on the Tangipahoa River in southeast Louisiana. This river provides drainage for 520 sq. mi. and receives both domestic and agricultural runoff. The fecal pollution data set was used to construct a nonparametric multiplicative regression hydrologic model that was able to forecast fecal coliform concentrations (cross-validated R2 = 0.57); however, Enterococci forecasting was unsuccessful. This result was surprising as it was expected that both fecal pollution indicators would have similar routes of entry in receiving waters. It was also found that Enterococci exceeded recreational water quality standards (33cfu / 100ml) in 91% of samples and fecal coliforms exceeded water quality standards (200cfu / 100ml) 46% of the time. The differing conclusions that could be reached depending upon the fecal pollution indicator used pose a dilemma from a public health perspective and the underlying causes of these discrepancies were investigated. The role of measurement uncertainty stemming from sampling error (spatial and temporal) and lab error (operator and systematic error) in both fecal coliform and Enterococci hydrologic modeling was examined. Measurement error between the two indicator species did not account for differences between hydrologic modeling results. Alternative possibilities for the observations included differential survival and environmental reservoirs (growth/regrowth) of each indicator organism. Time series analysis demonstrated distinct trends for each indicator organism. Fecal coliforms had peak densities in the winter months, corresponding to higher rainfall, runoff, and lower temperatures. Enterococci had relatively stable densities, with a slight increase in density in the summer months. These trends also show that Enterococci to fecal coliform ratios are relatively greater

  18. Loss of Antibiotic Tolerance in Sod-Deficient Mutants Is Dependent on the Energy Source and Arginine Catabolism in Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Ladjouzi, Rabia; Bizzini, Alain; van Schaik, Willem; Zhang, Xinglin; Rincé, Alain; Benachour, Abdellah

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enterococci are naturally tolerant to typically bactericidal cell wall-active antibiotics, meaning that their growth is inhibited but they are not killed even when exposed to a high concentration of the drug. The molecular reasons for this extraordinary tolerance are still incompletely understood. Previous work showed that resistance to killing collapsed specifically in mutants affected in superoxide dismutase (Sod) activity, arguing that bactericidal antibiotic treatment led to induction of a superoxide burst. In the present work, we show that loss of antibiotic tolerance in ΔsodA mutants of pathogenic enterococci is dependent on the energy source present during antibiotic treatment. Hexoses induce greater killing than the pentose ribose, and no killing was observed with glycerol as the energy source. These results point to glycolytic reactions as crucial for antibiotic-mediated killing of ΔsodA mutants. A transposon mutant library was constructed in Enterococcus faecalis ΔsodA mutants and screened for restored tolerance of vancomycin. Partially restored tolerance was observed in mutants with transposon integrations into intergenic regions upstream of regulators implicated in arginine catabolism. In these mutants, the arginine deiminase operon was highly upregulated. A model for the action of cell wall-active antibiotics in tolerant and nontolerant bacteria is proposed. IMPORTANCE Antibiotic tolerance is a serious clinical concern, since tolerant bacteria have considerably increased abilities to resist killing by bactericidal drugs. Using enterococci as models for highly antibiotic-tolerant pathogens, we showed that tolerance of these bacteria is linked to their superoxide dismutase (Sod), arguing that bactericidal antibiotics induce generation of reactive oxygen species inside cells. Wild-type strains are tolerant because they detoxify these deleterious molecules by the activity of Sod, whereas Sod-deficient strains are killed. This study showed that

  19. Occurrence of the transferable copper resistance gene tcrB among fecal enterococci of U.S. feedlot cattle fed copper-supplemented diets.

    PubMed

    Amachawadi, R G; Scott, H M; Alvarado, C A; Mainini, T R; Vinasco, J; Drouillard, J S; Nagaraja, T G

    2013-07-01

    Copper, an essential micronutrient, is supplemented in the diet at elevated levels to reduce morbidity and mortality and to promote growth in feedlot cattle. Gut bacteria exposed to copper can acquire resistance, which among enterococci is conferred by a transferable copper resistance gene (tcrB) borne on a plasmid. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether the feeding of copper at levels sufficient to promote growth increases the prevalence of the tcrB gene among the fecal enterococci of feedlot cattle. The study was performed with 261 crossbred yearling heifers housed in 24 pens, with pens assigned randomly to a 2×2 factorial arrangement of treatments consisting of dietary copper and a commercial linseed meal-based energy protein supplement. A total of 22 isolates, each identified as Enterococcus faecium, were positive for tcrB with an overall prevalence of 3.8% (22/576). The prevalence was higher among the cattle fed diets supplemented with copper (6.9%) compared to normal copper levels (0.7%). The tcrB-positive isolates always contained both erm(B) and tet(M) genes. Median copper MICs for tcrB-positive and tcrB-negative enterococci were 22 and 4 mM, respectively. The transferability of the tcrB gene was demonstrated via a filter-mating assay. Multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis revealed a genetically diverse population of enterococci. The finding of a strong association between the copper resistance gene and other antibiotic (tetracycline and tylosin) resistance determinants is significant because enterococci remain potential pathogens and have the propensity to transfer resistance genes to other bacteria in the gut. PMID:23666328

  20. The effect of pH on enterococci removal in Pistia-, duckweed- and algae-based stabilization ponds for domestic wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Awuah, E; Lubberding, H J; Asante, K; Gijzen, H J

    2002-01-01

    A batch scale experiment was conducted to determine the effect of pH on enterococci die-off. A continuous flow system was also established to determine the environmental conditions and their effects on enterococci removal. The batch experiment was conducted for pHs: 4, 5, 7, 9, and 11 under light and dark conditions. Enterococci and DO were measured every day and every other day respectively for nine days. Pathogen removal rates at pH 4, 5, 7, 9 and 11 in the light/dark were (expressed as d(-1)) -2.1/-2.1, -2.1/-1.5, -2.1/-1.5, -2.1/-1.4 and -1.1/-1.0, respectively. DO levels were low, between 0.17 mg/L at pH 4 (light) to 0.56 mg/L at pH 7 (light). The continuous flow system consisted of Pistia (water lettuce), duckweed and algal treatments in series of four ponds with a total retention period of 28 days after two days of anaerobic pre-treatment. After two months of operation, temperature, pH, DO, TDS, and enterococci populations were monitored. A low pH of 4.4 was obtained in the Pistia ponds. Neutral conditions were observed in the duckweed system, while pH values >9 were observed in the algal system. Enterococci decreased from 7.8 x 10(6) to <500/100 ml in all treatment systems after 28 days of treatment with no significant differences between treatments. PMID:11833733

  1. Occurrence and growth characteristics of Escherichia coli and enterococci within the accumulated fluid of the northern pitcher plant (Sarracenia purpurea L.)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitman, Richard L.; Byers, Stacey E.; Shively, Dawn A.; Ferguson, Donna M.; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.

    2005-01-01

    Sarracenia purpurea L., a carnivorous bog plant (also known as the pitcher plant), represents an excellent model of a well-defined, self-contained ecosystem; the individual pitchers of the plant serve as a microhabitat for a variety of micro- and macro-organisms. Previously, fecal indicator bacteria (Escherichia coli and enterococci) were shown as incidental contaminants in pitcher fluid; however, whether their occurrence in pitcher fluid is incidental or common has not been established. The purpose of this study was to investigate the occurrence, distribution, and growth potential of E. coli and enterococci in pitcher plant fluid from a protected bog in northwest Indiana. Escherichia coli and enterococci were recovered in pitcher fluids (n = 43 plants), with mean densities (log CFU mL-1) of 1.28 ± 0.23 and 1.97 ± 0.27, respectively. In vitro experiments showed that E. coli growth in fluid not containing insects or indigenous organisms was directly proportional to the fluid concentration (growth was 10-fold in 24 h in 100% fluid); however, in the presence of other indigenous organisms, E. coli and enterococci were only sustained for 5 days at 26 °C. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis showed that the plant Enterococcus faecalis isolates were genetically distinct from the human isolates; identical PFGE patterns were observed among plant isolates that fell into one of six clonal groups. These findings suggest that (i) E. coli and enterococci occurrence in pitcher plants is rather common in the bog studied, although their originating source is unclear, and (ii) the pitcher fluid contains adequate nutrients, especially carbon and energy sources, to promote the growth of indicator bacteria; however, under natural conditions, the biotic factors (e.g., competition for nutrients) may restrict their growth.

  2. Nasal and perirectal colonization of vancomycin sensitive and resistant enterococci in patients of paediatrics ICU (PICU) of tertiary health care facilities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Enterococci normally inhabit the intestinal tract of humans and are also a potential pathogen in causing nosocomial infections. The increase in antibiotic resistance and transfer of antibiotic resistance gene to Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) due to co-colonization has increased its importance in research. The aim of the study was to evaluate local epidemiology of nasal and rectal colonization with Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) and Enterococcus faecium (E. faecium) in patients of Paediatrics Intensive Care Unit (PICU) and correlation with clinical and socioeconomic factors. Methods The nasal and perirectal swab samples were collected from 110 patients admitted in PICUs of three tertiary care hospitals of Rawalpindi Medical College, Pakistan. The identification of enterococci was done by biochemical tests and by PCR for ddl, vanA and vanB genes. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by disc diffusion and MICs were determined for vancomycin, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin and oxacillin only. Results Out of 220 nasal and perirectal samples, 09 vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and 76 vancomycin-susceptible enterococci (VSE), consisting of 40 E. faecalis and 45 E. faecium were isolated. PCR successfully identified both species with ddl primers and VRE with vanA primer. With disc diffusion method, all isolates were resistant to most of the antibiotics tested except linezolid, quinupristin/dalfopristin, teicoplanin and vancomycin. VRE showed resistance to teicoplanin and vancomycin both and none was resistant to linezolid and quinupristin/dalfopristin. Generally, E. faecium isolates were more resistant than E. faecalis. MICs of vancomycin for nasal and perirectal VRE were 512 mg/L and 64 to 512 mg/L respectively. VRE were more in patients with prolonged hospitalization, from urban localities and those having pneumonia. Conclusion Present study reveals high colonization and antibiotic resistance in enterococcal isolates from nasal and

  3. Occurrence and growth characteristics of Escherichia coli and enterococci within the accumulated fluid of the northern pitcher plant (Sarracenia purpurea L.).

    PubMed

    Whitman, Richard L; Byers, Stacey E; Shively, Dawn A; Ferguson, Donna M; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara

    2005-12-01

    Sarracenia purpurea L., a carnivorous bog plant (also known as the pitcher plant), represents an excellent model of a well-defined, self-contained ecosystem; the individual pitchers of the plant serve as a microhabitat for a variety of micro- and macro-organisms. Previously, fecal indicator bacteria (Escherichia coli and enterococci) were shown as incidental contaminants in pitcher fluid; however, whether their occurrence in pitcher fluid is incidental or common has not been established. The purpose of this study was to investigate the occurrence, distribution, and growth potential of E. coli and enterococci in pitcher plant fluid from a protected bog in northwest Indiana. Escherichia coli and enterococci were recovered in pitcher fluids (n=43 plants), with mean densities (log CFU mL-1) of 1.28+/-0.23 and 1.97+/-0.27, respectively. In vitro experiments showed that E. coli growth in fluid not containing insects or indigenous organisms was directly proportional to the fluid concentration (growth was 10-fold in 24 h in 100% fluid); however, in the presence of other indigenous organisms, E. coli and enterococci were only sustained for 5 days at 26 degrees C. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis showed that the plant Enterococcus faecalis isolates were genetically distinct from the human isolates; identical PFGE patterns were observed among plant isolates that fell into one of six clonal groups. These findings suggest that (i) E. coli and enterococci occurrence in pitcher plants is rather common in the bog studied, although their originating source is unclear, and (ii) the pitcher fluid contains adequate nutrients, especially carbon and energy sources, to promote the growth of indicator bacteria; however, under natural conditions, the biotic factors (e.g., competition for nutrients) may restrict their growth. PMID:16462861

  4. Occurrence of the Transferable Copper Resistance Gene tcrB among Fecal Enterococci of U.S. Feedlot Cattle Fed Copper-Supplemented Diets

    PubMed Central

    Amachawadi, R. G.; Alvarado, C. A.; Mainini, T. R.; Vinasco, J.; Drouillard, J. S.; Nagaraja, T. G.

    2013-01-01

    Copper, an essential micronutrient, is supplemented in the diet at elevated levels to reduce morbidity and mortality and to promote growth in feedlot cattle. Gut bacteria exposed to copper can acquire resistance, which among enterococci is conferred by a transferable copper resistance gene (tcrB) borne on a plasmid. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether the feeding of copper at levels sufficient to promote growth increases the prevalence of the tcrB gene among the fecal enterococci of feedlot cattle. The study was performed with 261 crossbred yearling heifers housed in 24 pens, with pens assigned randomly to a 2×2 factorial arrangement of treatments consisting of dietary copper and a commercial linseed meal-based energy protein supplement. A total of 22 isolates, each identified as Enterococcus faecium, were positive for tcrB with an overall prevalence of 3.8% (22/576). The prevalence was higher among the cattle fed diets supplemented with copper (6.9%) compared to normal copper levels (0.7%). The tcrB-positive isolates always contained both erm(B) and tet(M) genes. Median copper MICs for tcrB-positive and tcrB-negative enterococci were 22 and 4 mM, respectively. The transferability of the tcrB gene was demonstrated via a filter-mating assay. Multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis revealed a genetically diverse population of enterococci. The finding of a strong association between the copper resistance gene and other antibiotic (tetracycline and tylosin) resistance determinants is significant because enterococci remain potential pathogens and have the propensity to transfer resistance genes to other bacteria in the gut. PMID:23666328

  5. Evaluation of BBL CHROMagar VanRE for Detection of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci in Rectal Swab Specimens▿

    PubMed Central

    Stamper, Paul D.; Shulder, Stephanie; Bekalo, Pearl; Manandhar, Deepika; Ross, Tracy L.; Speser, Sharon; Kingery, Julie; Carroll, Karen C.

    2010-01-01

    A study was performed on 517 surveillance rectal swabs to evaluate a selective and differential chromogenic medium, the BBL CHROMagar VanRE (CVRE), which enables recovery and identification of VanA- and VanB-containing Enterococcus faecium (ENFM) and Enterococcus faecalis (ENFS) isolates. Compared to BBL Enterococcosel agar, a bile-esculin-azide-vancomycin (BEAV) agar, the initial overall sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of CVRE for the detection of vancomycin-resistant ENFM and ENFS were 99.1% and 94.8% and 84.2% and 99.7%, respectively. Among our patient population, more vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) were recovered with CVRE than BEAV. PMID:20739492

  6. Susceptibility of Glycopeptide-Resistant Enterococci to Linezolid, Quinupristin/dalfopristin, Tigecycline and Daptomycin in a Tertiary Greek Hospital.

    PubMed

    Maraki, Sofia; Samonis, George; Dimopoulou, Dimitra; Mantadakis, Elpis

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the antibiotic susceptibility of glycopeptide-resistant enterococci (GRE). Seventy consecutive GRE were tested. Sixty-two isolates were identified as Enterococcus faecium (88.6%), and 8 (11.4%) as Enterococcus faecalis. All strains were susceptible to linezolid and daptomycin, while 17.1% (12/70) and 11.4% (8/70) were resistant to quinupristin/dalfopristin (QD) and tigecycline, respectively. All E. faecalis isolates were resistant to QD, while 4 of 62 (6.5%) E. faecium isolates were resistant to QD. All E. faecalis isolates were susceptible to tigecycline, while 14.5% (9/62) E. faecium isolates were resistant. Continued surveillance of GRE antibiotic susceptibilities is important for combating these multi-resistant nosocomial pathogens. PMID:25566405

  7. Susceptibility of Glycopeptide-Resistant Enterococci to Linezolid, Quinupristin/dalfopristin, Tigecycline and Daptomycin in a Tertiary Greek Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Dimopoulou, Dimitra; Mantadakis, Elpis

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the antibiotic susceptibility of glycopeptide-resistant enterococci (GRE). Seventy consecutive GRE were tested. Sixty-two isolates were identified as Enterococcus faecium (88.6%), and 8 (11.4%) as Enterococcus faecalis. All strains were susceptible to linezolid and daptomycin, while 17.1% (12/70) and 11.4% (8/70) were resistant to quinupristin/dalfopristin (QD) and tigecycline, respectively. All E. faecalis isolates were resistant to QD, while 4 of 62 (6.5%) E. faecium isolates were resistant to QD. All E. faecalis isolates were susceptible to tigecycline, while 14.5% (9/62) E. faecium isolates were resistant. Continued surveillance of GRE antibiotic susceptibilities is important for combating these multi-resistant nosocomial pathogens. PMID:25566405

  8. Development of a novel immunochromatographic assay for rapid detection of VanA ligase-producing vancomycin-resistant enterococci.

    PubMed

    Ji, Gil Yong; Song, Hyung Geun; Son, Bo Ra; Hong, Seung Bok; Kim, Jong Wan; Shin, Kyeong Seob

    2014-03-28

    We developed a novel immunochromatographic assay (ICA) (EZ-Step VanA rapid kit; Dinona, Korea) for the detection of VanA ligase from vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). Of eight monoclonal antibodies screened by ELISAs, the VanA ligase ICA constructed with 1H9 plus 3G11 showed the greatest reactivity. The detection limit of the kit was 6.3 × 10(6) CFU per test. Of 127 vancomycin-resistant microorganisms, 100 vanA VRE were positive in the VanA ligase ICA, and 27 non-vanA vancomycin-resistant isolates were negative. These results were consistent with those of the PCR analyses. Thus, our ICA is a reliable and easy-to-use immunological assay for detecting VanA-producing VRE in clinical laboratories. PMID:24346470

  9. A Silenced vanA Gene Cluster on a Transferable Plasmid Caused an Outbreak of Vancomycin-Variable Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Sivertsen, Audun; Pedersen, Torunn; Larssen, Kjersti Wik; Bergh, Kåre; Rønning, Torunn Gresdal; Radtke, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We report an outbreak of vancomycin-variable vanA+ enterococci (VVE) able to escape phenotypic detection by current guidelines and demonstrate the molecular mechanisms for in vivo switching into vancomycin resistance and horizontal spread of the vanA cluster. Forty-eight vanA+ Enterococcus faecium isolates and one Enterococcus faecalis isolate were analyzed for clonality with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and their vanA gene cluster compositions were assessed by PCR and whole-genome sequencing of six isolates. The susceptible VVE strains were cultivated in brain heart infusion broth containing vancomycin at 8 μg/ml for in vitro development of resistant VVE. The transcription profiles of susceptible VVE and their resistant revertants were assessed using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. Plasmid content was analyzed with S1 nuclease PFGE and hybridizations. Conjugative transfer of vanA was assessed by filter mating. The only genetic difference between the vanA clusters of susceptible and resistant VVE was an ISL3-family element upstream of vanHAX, which silenced vanHAX gene transcription in susceptible VVE. Furthermore, the VVE had an insertion of IS1542 between orf2 and vanR that attenuated the expression of vanHAX. Growth of susceptible VVE occurred after 24 to 72 h of exposure to vancomycin due to excision of the ISL3-family element. The vanA gene cluster was located on a transferable broad-host-range plasmid also detected in outbreak isolates with different pulsotypes, including one E. faecalis isolate. Horizontally transferable silenced vanA able to escape detection and revert into resistance during vancomycin therapy represents a new challenge in the clinic. Genotypic testing of invasive vancomycin-susceptible enterococci by vanA-PCR is advised. PMID:27139479

  10. Effect of Fidaxomicin versus Vancomycin on Susceptibility to Intestinal Colonization with Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci and Klebsiella pneumoniae in Mice.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Abhishek; Hurless, Kelly; Cadnum, Jennifer L; Chesnel, Laurent; Gao, Lihong; Chan, Luisa; Kundrapu, Sirisha; Polinkovsky, Alexander; Donskey, Curtis J

    2016-07-01

    The use of oral vancomycin or metronidazole for treatment of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) may promote colonization by health care-associated pathogens due to disruption of the intestinal microbiota. Because the macrocyclic antibiotic fidaxomicin causes less alteration of the intestinal microbiota than vancomycin, we hypothesized that it would not lead to a loss of colonization resistance to vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and extended-spectrum-β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (ESBL-Kp). Mice (8 per group) received orogastric saline, vancomycin, or fidaxomicin daily for 5 days at doses resulting in stool concentrations in mice similar to those measured in humans. The mice were challenged with 10(5) CFU of orogastric VRE or ESBL-Kp on day 2 of treatment and concentrations of the pathogens in stool were monitored. The impact of drug exposure on the microbiome was measured by cultures, real-time PCR for selected anaerobic bacteria, and deep sequencing. In comparison to saline controls, oral vancomycin promoted establishment of high-density colonization by VRE and ESBL-Kp in stool (8 to 10 log10 CFU/g; P < 0.001), whereas fidaxomicin did not (<4 log10 CFU; P > 0.5). Vancomycin treatment resulted in significant reductions in enterococci, Bacteroides spp., and Clostridium leptum, whereas the population of aerobic and facultative Gram-negative bacilli increased; deep-sequencing analysis demonstrated suppression of Firmicutes and expansion of Proteobacteria during vancomycin treatment. Fidaxomicin did not cause significant alteration of the microbiota. In summary, in contrast to vancomycin, fidaxomicin treatment caused minimal disruption of the intestinal microbiota and did not render the microbiota susceptible to VRE and ESBL-Kp colonization. PMID:27090175

  11. Contribution of enterococci to the spread of antibiotic resistance in the production chain of swine meat commodities.

    PubMed

    Rizzotti, Lucia; Simeoni, Desj; Cocconcelli, Piersandro; Gazzola, Simona; Dellaglio, Franco; Torriani, Sandra

    2005-05-01

    Thirty-six samples, including fecal specimens, dry feedstuffs, raw and processed pork meat products, and dry fermented sausages, were collected from two production chains of swine meat commodities and analyzed for the presence of 11 antibiotic resistance (AR) genes. Specific PCR assays carried out on DNA extracted directly from the samples revealed a high incidence of the genes tet(K) (80.5%), ermB (66.7%), and tet(M) (66.7%). Feces and feedstuffs gave the largest number of positive amplifications. To elucidate the contribution of enterococci to the occurrence and spread of AR, 146 resistant enterococci were isolated, and their identity, genetic fingerprints, and AR gene profiles were determined by means of molecular techniques. Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium were the predominant isolated species (43.8 and 38.4%, respectively); Other Enterococcus species identified were E. durans (8.9%), E. hirae (2.7%), E. gallinarum (2.1%), E. mundtii (2.1%), and E. casseliflavus (2.1%). A number of isolates displayed a complex AR gene profile comprising up to four different resistance determinants. The genes tet(M) and ermB were highly diffused, being present in 86.9 and 84.9%, respectively, of the isolates. The application of amplified fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting was particularly valuable to monitor the resistant enterococcal isolates along the production chain and to individuate steps in which contamination might occur. In fact, isolates of E. faecalis and E. faecium showing the same amplified fragment length polymorphism profile and AR gene pattern were detected in samples taken at different steps of the food chain suggesting three cases of bacterial clonal spread. PMID:15895727

  12. Risk factors in enterococci isolated from foods in Morocco: determination of antimicrobial resistance and incidence of virulence traits.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Antonio Sánchez; Omar, Nabil Ben; Abriouel, Hikmate; López, Rosario Lucas; Ortega, Elena; Cañamero, Magdalena Martínez; Gálvez, Antonio

    2008-08-01

    A collection of enterococci isolated from meat, dairy and vegetable foods from Morocco including 23 Enterococus faecalis and 15 Enterococcus faecium isolates was studied. All isolates were sensitive to ampicillin, penicillin, and gentamicin. Many E. faecalis isolates were resistant to tetracycline (86.95%), followed by rifampicin (78.26% ciprofloxacin (60.87%), quinupristin/dalfopristin (56.52%), nitrofurantoin (43.47%), levofloxacin (39.13%), erythromycin (21.73%), streptomycin (17.39%), chloramphenicol (8.69%), vancomycin (8.69%), and teicoplanin (4.34%). E. faecium isolates showed a different antibiotic resistance profile: a high percentage were resistant to nitrofurantoin (73.33%), followed by erythromycin (66.60%), ciprofloxacin (66.66%), levofloxacin (60.00%), and rifampicin (26.66%), and only a very low percentage were resistant to tetracycline (6.66%). One isolate was resistant to vancomycin and teicoplanin. The incidence of virulence factors was much higher among E. faecalis isolates, especially for genes encoding for sex pheromones, collagen adhesin, enterococcal endocarditis antigen, and enterococcal surface protein. Isolates with multiple factors (both antibiotic resistance and virulence traits) were also more frequent among E. faecalis isolates, in which one isolate cumulated up to 15 traits. By contrast, several isolates of E. faecium had only very few unwanted traits as compared to only two isolates in E. faecalis. The high abundance of isolates carrying virulence factors and antibiotic resistance traits suggests that the sanitary quality of foods should be improved in order to decrease the incidence of enterococci. PMID:18514994

  13. Depth-Dependent Survival of Escherichia coli and Enterococci in Soil after Manure Application and Simulated Rainfall

    PubMed Central

    Pachepsky, Y. A.; Hill, R. L.; Shelton, D. R.

    2015-01-01

    Once released, manure-borne bacteria can enter runoff via interaction with the thin mixing layer near the soil surface. The objectives of this work were to document temporal changes in profile distributions of manure-borne Escherichia coli and enterococci in the near-surface soil layers after simulated rainfalls and to examine differences in survival of the two fecal indicator bacteria. Rainfall simulations were performed in triplicate on soil-filled boxes with grass cover and solid manure application for 1 h with rainfall depths of 30, 60, and 90 mm. Soil samples were collected weekly from depth ranges of 0 to 1, 1 to 2, 2 to 5, and 5 to 10 cm for 1 month. Rainfall intensity was found to have a significant impact on the initial concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria in the soil. While total numbers of enterococci rapidly declined over time, E. coli populations experienced initial growth with concentration increases of 4, 10, and 25 times the initial levels at rainfall treatment depths of 30, 60, and 90 mm, respectively. E. coli populations grew to the approximately the same level in all treatments. The 0- to 1-cm layer contained more indicator bacteria than the layers beneath it, and survival of indicator bacteria was better in this layer, with decimation times between 12 and 18 days after the first week of growth. The proportion of bacteria in the 0- to 1-cm layer grew with time as the total number of bacteria in the 0- to 10-cm layer declined. The results of this work indicate the need to revisit the bacterial survival patterns that are assumed in water quality models. PMID:25956764

  14. Depth-Dependent Survival of Escherichia coli and Enterococci in Soil after Manure Application and Simulated Rainfall.

    PubMed

    Stocker, M D; Pachepsky, Y A; Hill, R L; Shelton, D R

    2015-07-01

    Once released, manure-borne bacteria can enter runoff via interaction with the thin mixing layer near the soil surface. The objectives of this work were to document temporal changes in profile distributions of manure-borne Escherichia coli and enterococci in the near-surface soil layers after simulated rainfalls and to examine differences in survival of the two fecal indicator bacteria. Rainfall simulations were performed in triplicate on soil-filled boxes with grass cover and solid manure application for 1 h with rainfall depths of 30, 60, and 90 mm. Soil samples were collected weekly from depth ranges of 0 to 1, 1 to 2, 2 to 5, and 5 to 10 cm for 1 month. Rainfall intensity was found to have a significant impact on the initial concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria in the soil. While total numbers of enterococci rapidly declined over time, E. coli populations experienced initial growth with concentration increases of 4, 10, and 25 times the initial levels at rainfall treatment depths of 30, 60, and 90 mm, respectively. E. coli populations grew to the approximately the same level in all treatments. The 0- to 1-cm layer contained more indicator bacteria than the layers beneath it, and survival of indicator bacteria was better in this layer, with decimation times between 12 and 18 days after the first week of growth. The proportion of bacteria in the 0- to 1-cm layer grew with time as the total number of bacteria in the 0- to 10-cm layer declined. The results of this work indicate the need to revisit the bacterial survival patterns that are assumed in water quality models. PMID:25956764

  15. High level language for measurement complex control based on the computer E-100I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubkov, B. V.

    1980-01-01

    A high level language was designed to control the process of conducting an experiment using the computer "Elektrinika-1001". Program examples are given to control the measuring and actuating devices. The procedure of including these programs in the suggested high level language is described.

  16. Alternatives Generation and Analysis for Heat Removal from High Level Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    WILLIS, W.L.

    2000-06-15

    This document addresses the preferred combination of design and operational configurations to provide heat removal from high-level waste tanks during Phase 1 waste feed delivery to prevent the waste temperature from exceeding tank safety requirement limits. An interim decision for the preferred method to remove the heat from the high-level waste tanks during waste feed delivery operations is presented herein.

  17. Teaching a High-Level Contextualized Mathematics Curriculum to Adult Basic Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Showalter, Daniel A.; Wollett, Chelsie; Reynolds, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the implementation of a high level contextualized mathematics curriculum by 12 adult basic instructors in a midwestern state. The 10-week pilot curriculum embedded high level mathematics in contexts that were familiar to adult learners. Instructors' weekly online posts were coded, and the following themes emerged: (a)…

  18. 40 CFR 1065.725 - High-level ethanol-gasoline blends.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ethanol used for blending must be either denatured ethanol meeting the specifications in 40 CFR 80.1610... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false High-level ethanol-gasoline blends... Calibration Standards § 1065.725 High-level ethanol-gasoline blends. For testing vehicles capable of...

  19. Hi-LAB: A New Measure of Aptitude for High-Level Language Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linck, Jared A.; Hughes, Meredith M.; Campbell, Susan G.; Silbert, Noah H.; Tare, Medha; Jackson, Scott R.; Smith, Benjamin K.; Bunting, Michael F.; Doughty, Catherine J.

    2013-01-01

    Few adult second language (L2) learners successfully attain high-level proficiency. Although decades of research on beginning to intermediate stages of L2 learning have identified a number of predictors of the rate of acquisition, little research has examined factors relevant to predicting very high levels of L2 proficiency. The current study,…

  20. Inspection and evaluation of Nuclear Fuel Services high-level waste storage system, program plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-01-01

    Information concerning the condition of the high-level waste tanks at the Western New York State Nuclear Service center near West Valley, New York is presented. This information is to be used in evaluating the safety of continued storage and in the development of alternatives for final disposition of the high-level waste.

  1. Characteristics Data Base: Programmer's guide to the High-Level Waste Data Base

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.E. ); Salmon, R. )

    1990-08-01

    The High-Level Waste Data Base is a menu-driven PC data base developed as part of OCRWM's technical data base on the characteristics of potential repository wastes, which also includes spent fuel and other materials. This programmer's guide completes the documentation for the High-Level Waste Data Base, the user's guide having been published previously. 3 figs.

  2. Centromere anatomy in the multidrug-resistant pathogen Enterococcus faecium

    PubMed Central

    Derome, Andrew; Hoischen, Christian; Bussiek, Malte; Grady, Ruth; Adamczyk, Malgorzata; Kędzierska, Barbara; Diekmann, Stephan; Barillà, Daniela; Hayes, Finbarr

    2008-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant variants of the opportunistic human pathogen Enterococcus have recently emerged as leading agents of nosocomial infection. The acquisition of plasmid-borne resistance genes is a driving force in antibiotic-resistance evolution in enterococci. The segregation locus of a high-level gentamicin-resistance plasmid, pGENT, in Enterococcus faecium was identified and dissected. This locus includes overlapping genes encoding PrgP, a member of the ParA superfamily of segregation proteins, and PrgO, a site-specific DNA binding homodimer that recognizes the cenE centromere upstream of prgPO. The centromere has a distinctive organization comprising three subsites, CESII separates CESI and CESIII, each of which harbors seven TATA boxes spaced by half-helical turns. PrgO independently binds both CESI and CESIII, but with different affinities. The topography of the complex was probed by atomic force microscopy, revealing discrete PrgO foci positioned asymmetrically at the CESI and CESIII subsites. Bending analysis demonstrated that cenE is intrinsically curved. The organization of the cenE site and of certain other plasmid centromeres mirrors that of yeast centromeres, which may reflect a common architectural requirement during assembly of the mitotic apparatus in yeast and bacteria. Moreover, segregation modules homologous to that of pGENT are widely disseminated on vancomycin and other resistance plasmids in enterococci. An improved understanding of segrosome assembly may highlight new interventions geared toward combating antibiotic resistance in these insidious pathogens. PMID:18245388

  3. Standardization of enterococci density estimates by EPA qPCR methods and comparison of beach action value exceedances in river waters with culture methods.

    PubMed

    Haugland, Richard A; Siefring, Shawn D; Varma, Manju; Dufour, Alfred P; Brenner, Kristen P; Wade, Timothy J; Sams, Elizabeth; Cochran, Stacey; Braun, Steve; Sivaganensan, Mano

    2014-10-01

    The U.S. EPA has published recommendations for calibrator cell equivalent (CCE) densities of enterococci in recreational waters determined by a qPCR method in its 2012 recreational water quality criteria (RWQC). The CCE quantification unit stems from the calibration model used to estimate enterococci densities in recreational beach waters in the EPA National Epidemiological and Environmental Assessment of Recreational (NEEAR) Water Study and directly informed the derivation of the RWQC recommendations. Recent studies have demonstrated that CCE estimates from the method can vary when using different cultured Enterococcus cell preparations in calibrator samples. These differences have been attributed to differences in the quantities of targeted gene copies (target sequences) that are recovered per nominal calibrator cell by DNA extraction. Standardization of results from the calibration model will require the estimation of target sequence recoveries from the calibrator and water samples. In addition, comparisons of water sample results with the RWQC values will require a knowledge of target sequence recoveries from the NEEAR study calibrator samples. In this study recoveries of target sequences and the mean target sequence/cell ratio for the NEEAR study calibrator samples were retrospectively estimated with a corroborated standard curve. A modification of the calibration model was then used to estimate enterococci target sequence quantities in water samples from eight midwestern U.S. rivers. CCE estimates were obtained by dividing these target sequence quantities by the mean NEEAR study target sequence/cell ratio. This target sequence-based quantification approach resulted in a high degree of agreement in beach action decisions (determinations of whether bacterial fecal indicator densities are above or below RWQC-recommended values) from CCE results of the qPCR method and from culture dependent enumeration of both enterococci and Eschericia coli in the corresponding

  4. Detection of both vanA & vanB genes in vanA phenotypes of Enterococci by Taq Man RT-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaei, Bahman; Babaei, Ryhane; Asiabar, Akbar Pour Dadash; Bameri, Zakaria

    2015-01-01

    Twenty seven isolates of vancomycin resistant Enterococci based on the disk diffusion and E- test have been screened; being found eight (0.3%) clinical isolates of vanA & vanB through Taq Man Real Time PCR assay. This study shows the presence of both vanA & vanB genotypes in vanA phenotypes clinical isolates in the three hospitals in Iran. PMID:26221103

  5. Exogenous endophthalmitis caused by Enterococcus casseliflavus: A case report and discussion regarding treatment of intraocular infection with vancomycin-resistant enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Berenger, Byron M; Kulkarni, Shobhana; Hinz, Brad J; MD, Sarah E Forgie

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Endophthalmitis caused by enterococci is rare, and cases involving vancomycin-resistant enterococci are even more so. Due to the poor bioavailability of many antibiotics in the vitreous chamber, special considerations are required when choosing antibiotics to treat these infections. The authors report the first case of exogenous endophthalmitis caused by Enterococcus casseliflavus via the unique mechanism of high-velocity water stream trauma from a toy water gun. A previously healthy four-year old boy presented with endophthalmitis of the left eye after injury from a water gun. Empirical treatment for endophthalmitis was started on presentation to the ophthalmologist. After the identification of the pathogen and a review of the literature, the antibiotic regimen was changed to include intravitreal ampicillin and amikacin with systemic linezolid. Endophthalmitis caused by E casseliflavus and other vancomycin-resistant enterococci are challenging to treat. Rapid identification of vancomycin-resistant enterococcal endophthalmitis is important to guide appropriate antibiotic therapy. Systemic linezolid achieves excellent intravitreal concentrations, and should be used in combination with intravitreal and topical antibiotics. PMID:26744592

  6. Diversity of Tn1546 and Its Role in the Dissemination of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci in Portugal▿

    PubMed Central

    Novais, Carla; Freitas, Ana R.; Sousa, João C.; Baquero, Fernando; Coque, Teresa M.; Peixe, Luísa V.

    2008-01-01

    We characterized the molecular diversity of vanA vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE; 176 isolates/87 pulsed-field gel electrophoresis types) from different sources and cities in Portugal (1996 to 2004): (i) food animals (FA; n = 38 isolates out of 31 samples), hospitalized humans (HH; n = 101/101), healthy human volunteers (HV; n = 7/4), and environmental sources (n = 30/10). Some strains were isolated from different hosts and persistently recovered for years. Twenty-four Tn1546 variants were identified, all located on plasmids (30 to 250 kb). Some Tn1546 variants were associated with specific sources such as FA (3 types), HH (11 types), or HV (1 type), while others were recovered from isolates of different origins (8 types). Polymorphisms in the central vanRSHA region of Tn1546 were scarcely detected, while alterations upstream of vanR and downstream of vanA were frequently identified involving mutations (vanS and vanX), deletions (vanY), insertions (IS1216V, ISEf1, and IS19; sequences with or without homology with others available in GenBank databases), and different genetic rearrangements. Most Tn1546 variants contained IS1216V (14 types) or ISEf1 (6 types). IS1216V was found alone or associated with an IS3-like element at different orientations and positions in Tn1546 from human, animal, and environmental samples. ISEf1 was located within vanX-vanY region at nucleotide 9044 of Tn1546 variants mostly associated with clinical isolates, suggesting a common genetic platform. IS19 was observed within the vanX-vanY region in one Tn1546 variant from poultry. Recent spread of VRE in Portugal reflects a complex epidemiology involving both clonal spread and plasmid dissemination containing a variety of Tn1546 types. Apparent Tn1546 heterogeneity among enterococci from human, animal, and environmental sources might reflect frequent genetic exchange events and evolution of particular widely disseminated genetic elements. PMID:18180362

  7. Demonstration of Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction with Savannah River Site High Level Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.D.

    2001-08-27

    Researchers successfully demonstrated the chemistry and process equipment of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) flowsheet for the decontamination of high level waste using a 33-stage, 2-cm centrifugal contactor apparatus at the Savannah River Technology Center. This represents the first CSSX process demonstration using Savannah River Site (SRS) high level waste. Three tests lasting 6, 12, and 48 hours processed simulated average SRS waste, simulated Tank 37H/44F composite waste, and Tank 37H/44F high level waste, respectively.

  8. Preliminary estimates of cost savings for defense high level waste vitrification options

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, R.A.; Chapman, C.C.

    1993-09-01

    The potential for realizing cost savings in the disposal of defense high-level waste through process and design modificatins has been considered. Proposed modifications range from simple changes in the canister design to development of an advanced melter capable of processing glass with a higher waste loading. Preliminary calculations estimate the total disposal cost (not including capital or operating costs) for defense high-level waste to be about $7.9 billion dollars for the reference conditions described in this paper, while projected savings resulting from the proposed process and design changes could reduce the disposal cost of defense high-level waste by up to $5.2 billion.

  9. Ontological Problem-Solving Framework for Assigning Sensor Systems and Algorithms to High-Level Missions

    PubMed Central

    Qualls, Joseph; Russomanno, David J.

    2011-01-01

    The lack of knowledge models to represent sensor systems, algorithms, and missions makes opportunistically discovering a synthesis of systems and algorithms that can satisfy high-level mission specifications impractical. A novel ontological problem-solving framework has been designed that leverages knowledge models describing sensors, algorithms, and high-level missions to facilitate automated inference of assigning systems to subtasks that may satisfy a given mission specification. To demonstrate the efficacy of the ontological problem-solving architecture, a family of persistence surveillance sensor systems and algorithms has been instantiated in a prototype environment to demonstrate the assignment of systems to subtasks of high-level missions. PMID:22164081

  10. Increasing Prevalence of Aminoglycoside-Resistant Enterococcus faecalis Isolates Due to the aac(6’)-aph(2”) Gene: A Therapeutic Problem in Kermanshah, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Khani, Mitra; Fatollahzade, Mahdie; Pajavand, Hamid; Bakhtiari, Somaye; Abiri, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Enterococci are important pathogens in nosocomial infections. Various types of antibiotics, such as aminoglycosides, are used for treatment of these infections. Enterococci can acquire resistant traits, which can lead to therapeutic problems with aminoglycosides. Objectives: This study was designed to identify the prevalence of, and to compare, the aac(6’)-aph(2”) and aph(3)-IIIa genes and their antimicrobial resistance patterns among Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium isolates from patients at Imam Reza hospital in Kermanshah in 2011 - 2012. Patients and Methods: One hundred thirty-eight clinical specimens collected from different wards of Imam Reza hospital were identified to the species level by biochemical tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests against kanamycin, teicoplanin, streptomycin, imipenem, ciprofloxacin, and ampicillin were performed by the disk diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of gentamicin, streptomycin, kanamycin, and amikacin were evaluated with the microbroth dilution method. The aminoglycoside resistance genes aac(6’)-aph(2”) and aph(3”)-IIIa were analyzed with multiplex PCR. Results: The prevalence of isolates was 33 (24.1%) for E. faecium and 63 (46%) for E. faecalis. Eighty-nine percent of the isolates were high-level gentamicin resistant (HLGR), and 32.8% of E. faecium isolates and 67.2% of E. faecalis isolates carried aac(6’)-aph(2”). The prevalence of aph(3”)-IIIa among the E. faecalis and E. faecium isolates was 22.7% and 77.3%, respectively. Conclusions: Remarkably increased incidence of aac(6’)-aph(2”) among HLGR isolates explains the relationship between this gene and the high level of resistance to aminoglycosides. As the resistant gene among enterococci can be transferred, the use of new-generation antibiotics is necessary. PMID:27217920

  11. Estimation of Failure Frequency for Type I and II High Level Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, K.H.

    2001-05-15

    The failure frequency of Type I and Type II High Level Waste tanks was calculated. The degradation mechanism that could lead to large break failure and the credits taken for steps taken to prevent large break failure were considered.

  12. Assessment of high-level waste form conformance with proposed regulatory and repository criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, D E; Gray, P L; Jennings, A S; Permar, P H

    1982-04-01

    Federal regulatory criteria for geologic disposal of high-level waste are under development. Also, interim performance specifications for high-level waste forms in geologic isolation are being developed within the Federal program responsible for repository selection and operation. Two high-level waste forms, borosilicate glass and crystalline ceramic, have been selected as candidate immobilization forms for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) which is to immobilize high-level wastes at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). An assessment of how these two waste forms conform with the proposed regulatory criteria and repository specifications was performed. Both forms were determined to be in conformance with postulated rules for radionuclide releases and radiation exposures throughout the entire waste disposal system, as well as with proposed repository operation requirements.

  13. Demonstration of Small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation Process Using Savannah River Site High Level Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.B.

    2001-09-10

    This report details the experimental effort to demonstrate the continuous precipitation of cesium from Savannah River Site High Level Waste using sodium tetraphenylborate. In addition, the experiments examined the removal of strontium and various actinides through addition of monosodium titanate.

  14. Evaluation of high-level clouds in cloud resolving model simulations with ARM and KWAJEX observations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zheng; Muhlbauer, Andreas; Ackerman, Thomas

    2015-11-05

    In this paper, we evaluate high-level clouds in a cloud resolving model during two convective cases, ARM9707 and KWAJEX. The simulated joint histograms of cloud occurrence and radar reflectivity compare well with cloud radar and satellite observations when using a two-moment microphysics scheme. However, simulations performed with a single moment microphysical scheme exhibit low biases of approximately 20 dB. During convective events, two-moment microphysical overestimate the amount of high-level cloud and one-moment microphysics precipitate too readily and underestimate the amount and height of high-level cloud. For ARM9707, persistent large positive biases in high-level cloud are found, which are not sensitive to changes in ice particle fall velocity and ice nuclei number concentration in the two-moment microphysics. These biases are caused by biases in large-scale forcing and maintained by the periodic lateral boundary conditions. The combined effects include significant biases in high-level cloud amount, radiation, and high sensitivity of cloud amount to nudging time scale in both convective cases. The high sensitivity of high-level cloud amount to the thermodynamic nudging time scale suggests that thermodynamic nudging can be a powerful ‘‘tuning’’ parameter for the simulated cloud and radiation but should be applied with caution. The role of the periodic lateral boundary conditions in reinforcing the biases in cloud and radiation suggests that reducing the uncertainty in the large-scale forcing in high levels is important for similar convective cases and has far reaching implications for simulating high-level clouds in super-parameterized global climate models such as the multiscale modeling framework.

  15. Evaluation of high-level clouds in cloud resolving model simulations with ARM and KWAJEX observations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Zheng; Muhlbauer, Andreas; Ackerman, Thomas

    2015-11-05

    In this paper, we evaluate high-level clouds in a cloud resolving model during two convective cases, ARM9707 and KWAJEX. The simulated joint histograms of cloud occurrence and radar reflectivity compare well with cloud radar and satellite observations when using a two-moment microphysics scheme. However, simulations performed with a single moment microphysical scheme exhibit low biases of approximately 20 dB. During convective events, two-moment microphysical overestimate the amount of high-level cloud and one-moment microphysics precipitate too readily and underestimate the amount and height of high-level cloud. For ARM9707, persistent large positive biases in high-level cloud are found, which are not sensitivemore » to changes in ice particle fall velocity and ice nuclei number concentration in the two-moment microphysics. These biases are caused by biases in large-scale forcing and maintained by the periodic lateral boundary conditions. The combined effects include significant biases in high-level cloud amount, radiation, and high sensitivity of cloud amount to nudging time scale in both convective cases. The high sensitivity of high-level cloud amount to the thermodynamic nudging time scale suggests that thermodynamic nudging can be a powerful ‘‘tuning’’ parameter for the simulated cloud and radiation but should be applied with caution. The role of the periodic lateral boundary conditions in reinforcing the biases in cloud and radiation suggests that reducing the uncertainty in the large-scale forcing in high levels is important for similar convective cases and has far reaching implications for simulating high-level clouds in super-parameterized global climate models such as the multiscale modeling framework.« less

  16. Immobilized high-level waste interim storage alternatives generation and analysis and decision report

    SciTech Connect

    CALMUS, R.B.

    1999-05-18

    This report presents a study of alternative system architectures to provide onsite interim storage for the immobilized high-level waste produced by the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) privatization vendor. It examines the contract and program changes that have occurred and evaluates their impacts on the baseline immobilized high-level waste (IHLW) interim storage strategy. In addition, this report documents the recommended initial interim storage architecture and implementation path forward.

  17. Evaluation of high-level clouds in cloud resolving model simulations with ARM and KWAJEX observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zheng; Muhlbauer, Andreas; Ackerman, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we evaluate high-level clouds in a cloud resolving model during two convective cases, ARM9707 and KWAJEX. The simulated joint histograms of cloud occurrence and radar reflectivity compare well with cloud radar and satellite observations when using a two-moment microphysics scheme. However, simulations performed with a single moment microphysical scheme exhibit low biases of approximately 20 dB. During convective events, two-moment microphysical overestimate the amount of high-level cloud and one-moment microphysics precipitate too readily and underestimate the amount and height of high-level cloud. For ARM9707, persistent large positive biases in high-level cloud are found, which are not sensitive to changes in ice particle fall velocity and ice nuclei number concentration in the two-moment microphysics. These biases are caused by biases in large-scale forcing and maintained by the periodic lateral boundary conditions. The combined effects include significant biases in high-level cloud amount, radiation, and high sensitivity of cloud amount to nudging time scale in both convective cases. The high sensitivity of high-level cloud amount to the thermodynamic nudging time scale suggests that thermodynamic nudging can be a powerful "tuning" parameter for the simulated cloud and radiation but should be applied with caution. The role of the periodic lateral boundary conditions in reinforcing the biases in cloud and radiation suggests that reducing the uncertainty in the large-scale forcing in high levels is important for similar convective cases and has far reaching implications for simulating high-level clouds in super-parameterized global climate models such as the multiscale modeling framework.

  18. A variable DNA recognition site organization establishes the LiaR-mediated cell envelope stress response of enterococci to daptomycin

    SciTech Connect

    Davlieva, Milya; Shi, Yiwen; Leonard, Paul G.; Johnson, Troy A.; Zianni, Michael R.; Arias, Cesar A.; Ladbury, John E.; Shamoo, Yousif

    2015-04-19

    LiaR is a ‘master regulator’ of the cell envelope stress response in enterococci and many other Gram-positive organisms. Mutations to liaR can lead to antibiotic resistance to a variety of antibiotics including the cyclic lipopeptide daptomycin. LiaR is phosphorylated in response to membrane stress to regulate downstream target operons. Using DNA footprinting of the regions upstream of the liaXYZ and liaFSR operons we show that LiaR binds an extended stretch of DNA that extends beyond the proposed canonical consensus sequence suggesting a more complex level of regulatory control of target operons. We go on to determine the biochemical and structural basis for increased resistance to daptomycin by the adaptive mutation to LiaR (D191N) first identified from the pathogen Enterococcus faecalis S613. LiaRD191N increases oligomerization of LiaR to form a constitutively activated tetramer that has high affinity for DNA even in the absence of phosphorylation leading to increased resistance. The crystal structures of the LiaR DNA binding domain complexed to the putative consensus sequence as well as an adjoining secondary sequence show that upon binding, LiaR induces DNA bending that is consistent with increased recruitment of RNA polymerase to the transcription start site and upregulation of target operons.

  19. A variable DNA recognition site organization establishes the LiaR-mediated cell envelope stress response of enterococci to daptomycin

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Davlieva, Milya; Shi, Yiwen; Leonard, Paul G.; Johnson, Troy A.; Zianni, Michael R.; Arias, Cesar A.; Ladbury, John E.; Shamoo, Yousif

    2015-04-19

    LiaR is a ‘master regulator’ of the cell envelope stress response in enterococci and many other Gram-positive organisms. Mutations to liaR can lead to antibiotic resistance to a variety of antibiotics including the cyclic lipopeptide daptomycin. LiaR is phosphorylated in response to membrane stress to regulate downstream target operons. Using DNA footprinting of the regions upstream of the liaXYZ and liaFSR operons we show that LiaR binds an extended stretch of DNA that extends beyond the proposed canonical consensus sequence suggesting a more complex level of regulatory control of target operons. We go on to determine the biochemical and structuralmore » basis for increased resistance to daptomycin by the adaptive mutation to LiaR (D191N) first identified from the pathogen Enterococcus faecalis S613. LiaRD191N increases oligomerization of LiaR to form a constitutively activated tetramer that has high affinity for DNA even in the absence of phosphorylation leading to increased resistance. The crystal structures of the LiaR DNA binding domain complexed to the putative consensus sequence as well as an adjoining secondary sequence show that upon binding, LiaR induces DNA bending that is consistent with increased recruitment of RNA polymerase to the transcription start site and upregulation of target operons.« less

  20. Effect of subtherapeutic vs. therapeutic administration of macrolides on antimicrobial resistance in Mannheimia haemolytica and enterococci isolated from beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Zaheer, Rahat; Cook, Shaun R; Klima, Cassidy L; Stanford, Kim; Alexander, Trevor; Topp, Edward; Read, Ron R; McAllister, Tim A

    2013-01-01

    Macrolides are the first-line treatment against bovine respiratory disease (BRD), and are also used to treat infections in humans. The macrolide, tylosin phosphate, is often included in the diet of cattle as a preventative for liver abscesses in many regions of the world outside of Europe. This study investigated the effects of administering macrolides to beef cattle either systemically through a single subcutaneous injection (therapeutic) or continuously in-feed (subtherapeutic), on the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Mannheimia haemolytica and Enterococcus spp. isolated from the nasopharynx and faeces, respectively. Nasopharyngeal and faecal samples were collected weekly over 28 days from untreated beef steers and from steers injected once with tilmicosin or tulathromycin or continuously fed tylosin phosphate at dosages recommended by manufacturers. Tilmicosin and tulathromycin were effective in lowering (P < 0.05) the prevalence of M. haemolytica, whereas subtherapeutic tylosin had no effect. M. haemolytica isolated from control- and macrolide-treated animals were susceptible to macrolides as well as to other antibiotics. Major bacteria co-isolated with M. haemolytica from the nasopharynx included Pasteurella multocida, Staphylococcus spp., Acinetobacter spp., Escherichia coli and Bacillus spp. With the exception of M. haemolytica and P. multocida, erythromycin resistance was frequently found in other isolated species. Both methods of macrolide administration increased (P < 0.05) the proportion of erythromycin resistant enterococci within the population, which was comprised almost exclusively of Enterococcus hirae. Injectable macrolides impacted both respiratory and enteric microbes, whereas orally administered macrolides only influenced enteric bacteria. PMID:23750157

  1. Impact of different antimicrobial therapies on clinical and fiscal outcomes of patients with bacteremia due to vancomycin-resistant enterococci.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Kayoko; Martin, Emily T; Gudur, Uma Mahesh; Marchaim, Dror; Dalle, Dalia; Alshabani, Khaled; Muppavarapu, Kalyan Srinivas; Jaydev, Fnu; Bathina, Pradeep; Sundaragiri, Pranathi Rao; Rajuri, Shashi Dhar; Khatri, Jaikumar; Pogue, Jason M; Lephart, Paul R; Rybak, Michael J; Kaye, Keith S

    2014-07-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) are a growing health problem, and uncertainties exist regarding the optimal therapy for bloodstream infection due to VRE. We conducted systematic comparative evaluations of the impact of different antimicrobial therapies on the outcomes of patients with bloodstream infections due to VRE. A retrospective study from January 2008 to October 2010 was conducted at Detroit Medical Center. Unique patients with blood cultures due to VRE were included and reviewed. Three major therapeutic classes were analyzed: daptomycin, linezolid, and β-lactams. Three multivariate models were conducted for each outcome, matching for a propensity score predicting the likelihood of receipt of one of the therapeutic classes. A total of 225 cases of bacteremia due to VRE were included, including 86 (38.2%) cases of VR Enterococcus faecalis and 139 (61.8%) of VR Enterococcus faecium. Bacteremia due to VR E. faecalis was more frequent among subjects treated with β-lactams than among those treated with daptomycin or linezolid. The median dose of daptomycin was 6 mg/kg of body weight (range, 6 to 12 mg/kg). After controlling for propensity score and bacteremia due to VR E. faecalis, differences in mortality were nonsignificant among the treatment groups. Therapy with daptomycin was associated with higher median variable direct cost per day than that for linezolid. This large study revealed the three therapeutic classes (daptomycin, linezolid, and β-lactams) are similarly efficacious in the treatment of bacteremia due to susceptible strains of VRE. PMID:24798267

  2. Low Vancomycin MICs and Fecal Densities Reduce the Sensitivity of Screening Methods for Vancomycin Resistance in Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Peta; Pryce, Todd; Boehm, John; Kay, Ian; Flexman, James; Coombs, Geoffrey W.; Ingram, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Active surveillance is part of a multifaceted approach used to prevent the spread of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). The impact of fecal density, the vancomycin MIC of the isolate, and the vancomycin concentration in liquid medium on test performance are uncertain. Using fecal specimens spiked with a collection of 18 VRE (predominantly vanB) with a wide vancomycin MIC range, we compared the performances of commercial chromogenic agars (CHROMagar VRE, chromID VRE, Brilliance VRE, and VRE Select) and 1 liquid medium (Enterococcosel enrichment broth) for VRE detection. The specificity of solid media was excellent; however, the sensitivity at 48 h varied from 78 to 94%. Screening using liquid medium was less sensitive than screening with solid media, particularly as the vancomycin content increased. Sensitivity declined (i) as the fecal VRE density decreased, (ii) when the media were assessed at 24 h (versus 48 h), and (iii) for isolates with a low vancomycin MIC (sensitivity, 25 to 75% versus 100% for isolates with vancomycin MIC of <16 mg/liter versus >32 mg/liter on solid medium using 106 CFU/ml of feces). Depending on local epidemiology and in particular VRE vancomycin MICs, the sensitivity of culture-based methods for VRE screening of stool or rectal specimens may be suboptimal, potentially facilitating secondary transmission. PMID:24871216

  3. Absence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci among highly ESBL-positive crows (Corvus splendens) foraging on hospital waste in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Badrul; Järhult, Josef D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) have emerged as a growing problem in hospitals; however, domesticated animals, poultry, and wild birds are acting as potential reservoirs. There is a knowledge gap in the Epidemiology of VRE from Bangladesh. Methods To study the prevalence of VRE and the mechanisms of resistance implicated among wild birds, 238 fecal samples were collected in 2010 from house crows (Corvus splendens) foraging on hospital waste in Bangladesh. Fecal samples were screened by analyzing color change in broth and screening for vanA and vanB resistant genes by PCR. Results Neither vanA nor vanB genes were detected from the fecal samples. The house crow does not seem to constitute a reservoir for VRE. Conclusion The zero prevalence is an indication that foraging on hospital waste does not constitute a major risk of VRE carriage in house crows and this is the first study to focus on the prevalence of VRE from wild birds in Bangladesh. PMID:26679560

  4. A nested array of rRNA targeted probes for the detection and identification of enterococci by reverse hybridization.

    PubMed

    Behr, T; Koob, C; Schedl, M; Mehlen, A; Meier, H; Knopp, D; Frahm, E; Obst, U; Schleifer, K; Niessner, R; Ludwig, W

    2000-12-01

    Complete 23S and almost complete 16S rRNA gene sequences were determined for the type strains of the validly described Enterococcus species, Melissococcus pluton and Tetragenococcus halophilus. A comprehensive set of rRNA targeted specific oligonucleotide hybridization probes was designed according to the multiple probe concept. In silico probe design and evaluation was performed using the respective tools of the ARB program package in combination with the ARB databases comprising the currently available 16S as well as 23S rRNA primary structures. The probes were optimized with respect to their application for reverse hybridization in microplate format. The target comprising 16S and 23S rDNA was amplified and labeled by PCR (polymerase chain reaction) using general primers targeting a wide spectrum of bacteria. Alternatively, amplification of two adjacent rDNA fragments of enterococci was performed by using specific primers. In vitro evaluation of the probe set was done including all Enterococcus type strains, and a selection of other representatives of the gram-positive bacteria with a low genomic DNA G+C content. The optimized probe set was used to analyze enriched drinking water samples as well as original samples from waste water treatment plants. PMID:11249027

  5. A variable DNA recognition site organization establishes the LiaR-mediated cell envelope stress response of enterococci to daptomycin

    PubMed Central

    Davlieva, Milya; Shi, Yiwen; Leonard, Paul G.; Johnson, Troy A.; Zianni, Michael R.; Arias, Cesar A.; Ladbury, John E.; Shamoo, Yousif

    2015-01-01

    LiaR is a ‘master regulator’ of the cell envelope stress response in enterococci and many other Gram-positive organisms. Mutations to liaR can lead to antibiotic resistance to a variety of antibiotics including the cyclic lipopeptide daptomycin. LiaR is phosphorylated in response to membrane stress to regulate downstream target operons. Using DNA footprinting of the regions upstream of the liaXYZ and liaFSR operons we show that LiaR binds an extended stretch of DNA that extends beyond the proposed canonical consensus sequence suggesting a more complex level of regulatory control of target operons. We go on to determine the biochemical and structural basis for increased resistance to daptomycin by the adaptive mutation to LiaR (D191N) first identified from the pathogen Enterococcus faecalis S613. LiaRD191N increases oligomerization of LiaR to form a constitutively activated tetramer that has high affinity for DNA even in the absence of phosphorylation leading to increased resistance. Crystal structures of the LiaR DNA binding domain complexed to the putative consensus sequence as well as an adjoining secondary sequence show that upon binding, LiaR induces DNA bending that is consistent with increased recruitment of RNA polymerase to the transcription start site and upregulation of target operons. PMID:25897118

  6. Vancomycin resistant enterococci in urine cultures: Antibiotic susceptibility trends over a decade at a tertiary hospital in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Toner, Liam; Papa, Nathan; Aliyu, Sani H.; Dev, Harveer; Al-Hayek, Samih

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Enterococci are a common cause of urinary tract infection and vancomycin-resistant strains are more difficult to treat. The purpose of this surveillance program was to assess the prevalence of and determine the risk factors for vancomycin resistance in adults among urinary isolates of Enterococcus sp. and to detail the antibiotic susceptibility profile, which can be used to guide empirical treatment. Materials and Methods From 2005 to 2014 we retrospectively reviewed 5,528 positive Enterococcus sp. urine cultures recorded in a computerized laboratory results database at a tertiary teaching hospital in Cambridge, United Kingdom. Results Of these cultures, 542 (9.8%) were vancomycin resistant. No longitudinal trend was observed in the proportion of vancomycin-resistant strains over the course of the study. We observed emerging resistance to nitrofurantoin with rates climbing from near zero to 40%. Ampicillin resistance fluctuated between 50% and 90%. Low resistance was observed for linezolid and quinupristin/dalfopristin. Female sex and inpatient status were identified as risk factors for vancomycin resistance. Conclusions The incidence of vancomycin resistance among urinary isolates was stable over the last decade. Although resistance to nitrofurantoin has increased, it still serves as an appropriate first choice in uncomplicated urinary tract infection caused by vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus sp. PMID:26981595

  7. Fosfomycin resistance among vancomycin-resistant enterococci owing to transfer of a plasmid harbouring the fosB gene.

    PubMed

    Qu, Ting-ting; Shi, Ke-ren; Ji, Jing-shu; Yang, Qing; Du, Xiao-xing; Wei, Ze-qing; Yu, Yun-song

    2014-04-01

    The presence and characterisation of plasmid-mediated fosfomycin resistance determinants were investigated among 45 clinical vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) isolated in Zhejiang Province, China. In total, 19 VRE were resistant to fosfomycin, of which 18 isolates had conjugative fosfomycin resistance and were positive for fosB. No reported fos genes were detected in the remaining isolate. Among the 18 fosB-carrying isolates, the fosB gene was always flanked by tnpA, suggesting the same novel fosB transposon. In 10 of the 18 fosB-carrying isolates, the fosB and tnpA genes were found reversely inserted in the vanA transposon Tn1546. In the remaining eight isolates the fosB and vanA genes were located on different plasmids. These findings indicate that acquisition of the conjugative plasmid harbouring the novel fosB transposon (ISL3-like transposon) and the Tn1546-like transposon (containing vanA and fosB) may explain, at least in part, the recent increase in fosfomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium in China. PMID:24388115

  8. A variable DNA recognition site organization establishes the LiaR-mediated cell envelope stress response of enterococci to daptomycin.

    PubMed

    Davlieva, Milya; Shi, Yiwen; Leonard, Paul G; Johnson, Troy A; Zianni, Michael R; Arias, Cesar A; Ladbury, John E; Shamoo, Yousif

    2015-05-19

    LiaR is a 'master regulator' of the cell envelope stress response in enterococci and many other Gram-positive organisms. Mutations to liaR can lead to antibiotic resistance to a variety of antibiotics including the cyclic lipopeptide daptomycin. LiaR is phosphorylated in response to membrane stress to regulate downstream target operons. Using DNA footprinting of the regions upstream of the liaXYZ and liaFSR operons we show that LiaR binds an extended stretch of DNA that extends beyond the proposed canonical consensus sequence suggesting a more complex level of regulatory control of target operons. We go on to determine the biochemical and structural basis for increased resistance to daptomycin by the adaptive mutation to LiaR (D191N) first identified from the pathogen Enterococcus faecalis S613. LiaR(D191N) increases oligomerization of LiaR to form a constitutively activated tetramer that has high affinity for DNA even in the absence of phosphorylation leading to increased resistance. Crystal structures of the LiaR DNA binding domain complexed to the putative consensus sequence as well as an adjoining secondary sequence show that upon binding, LiaR induces DNA bending that is consistent with increased recruitment of RNA polymerase to the transcription start site and upregulation of target operons. PMID:25897118

  9. Effect of subtherapeutic vs. therapeutic administration of macrolides on antimicrobial resistance in Mannheimia haemolytica and enterococci isolated from beef cattle

    PubMed Central

    Zaheer, Rahat; Cook, Shaun R.; Klima, Cassidy L.; Stanford, Kim; Alexander, Trevor; Topp, Edward; Read, Ron R.; McAllister, Tim A.

    2013-01-01

    Macrolides are the first-line treatment against bovine respiratory disease (BRD), and are also used to treat infections in humans. The macrolide, tylosin phosphate, is often included in the diet of cattle as a preventative for liver abscesses in many regions of the world outside of Europe. This study investigated the effects of administering macrolides to beef cattle either systemically through a single subcutaneous injection (therapeutic) or continuously in-feed (subtherapeutic), on the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Mannheimia haemolytica and Enterococcus spp. isolated from the nasopharynx and faeces, respectively. Nasopharyngeal and faecal samples were collected weekly over 28 days from untreated beef steers and from steers injected once with tilmicosin or tulathromycin or continuously fed tylosin phosphate at dosages recommended by manufacturers. Tilmicosin and tulathromycin were effective in lowering (P < 0.05) the prevalence of M. haemolytica, whereas subtherapeutic tylosin had no effect. M. haemolytica isolated from control- and macrolide-treated animals were susceptible to macrolides as well as to other antibiotics. Major bacteria co-isolated with M. haemolytica from the nasopharynx included Pasteurella multocida, Staphylococcus spp., Acinetobacter spp., Escherichia coli and Bacillus spp. With the exception of M. haemolytica and P. multocida, erythromycin resistance was frequently found in other isolated species. Both methods of macrolide administration increased (P < 0.05) the proportion of erythromycin resistant enterococci within the population, which was comprised almost exclusively of Enterococcus hirae. Injectable macrolides impacted both respiratory and enteric microbes, whereas orally administered macrolides only influenced enteric bacteria. PMID:23750157

  10. Low-level awareness accompanies "unconscious" high-level processing during continuous flash suppression.

    PubMed

    Gelbard-Sagiv, Hagar; Faivre, Nathan; Mudrik, Liad; Koch, Christof

    2016-01-01

    The scope and limits of unconscious processing are a matter of ongoing debate. Lately, continuous flash suppression (CFS), a technique for suppressing visual stimuli, has been widely used to demonstrate surprisingly high-level processing of invisible stimuli. Yet, recent studies showed that CFS might actually allow low-level features of the stimulus to escape suppression and be consciously perceived. The influence of such low-level awareness on high-level processing might easily go unnoticed, as studies usually only probe the visibility of the feature of interest, and not that of lower-level features. For instance, face identity is held to be processed unconsciously since subjects who fail to judge the identity of suppressed faces still show identity priming effects. Here we challenge these results, showing that such high-level priming effects are indeed induced by faces whose identity is invisible, but critically, only when a lower-level feature, such as color or location, is visible. No evidence for identity processing was found when subjects had no conscious access to any feature of the suppressed face. These results suggest that high-level processing of an image might be enabled by-or co-occur with-conscious access to some of its low-level features, even when these features are not relevant to the processed dimension. Accordingly, they call for further investigation of lower-level awareness during CFS, and reevaluation of other unconscious high-level processing findings. PMID:26756173

  11. A Framework for Translating a High Level Security Policy into Low Level Security Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Ahmed A.; Bahgat, Waleed M.

    2010-01-01

    Security policies have different components; firewall, active directory, and IDS are some examples of these components. Enforcement of network security policies to low level security mechanisms faces some essential difficulties. Consistency, verification, and maintenance are the major ones of these difficulties. One approach to overcome these difficulties is to automate the process of translation of high level security policy into low level security mechanisms. This paper introduces a framework of an automation process that translates a high level security policy into low level security mechanisms. The framework is described in terms of three phases; in the first phase all network assets are categorized according to their roles in the network security and relations between them are identified to constitute the network security model. This proposed model is based on organization based access control (OrBAC). However, the proposed model extend the OrBAC model to include not only access control policy but also some other administrative security policies like auditing policy. Besides, the proposed model enables matching of each rule of the high level security policy with the corresponding ones of the low level security policy. Through the second phase of the proposed framework, the high level security policy is mapped into the network security model. The second phase could be considered as a translation of the high level security policy into an intermediate model level. Finally, the intermediate model level is translated automatically into low level security mechanism. The paper illustrates the applicability of proposed approach through an application example.

  12. Extending Automatic Parallelization to Optimize High-Level Abstractions for Multicore

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, C; Quinlan, D J; Willcock, J J; Panas, T

    2008-12-12

    Automatic introduction of OpenMP for sequential applications has attracted significant attention recently because of the proliferation of multicore processors and the simplicity of using OpenMP to express parallelism for shared-memory systems. However, most previous research has only focused on C and Fortran applications operating on primitive data types. C++ applications using high-level abstractions, such as STL containers and complex user-defined types, are largely ignored due to the lack of research compilers that are readily able to recognize high-level object-oriented abstractions and leverage their associated semantics. In this paper, we automatically parallelize C++ applications using ROSE, a multiple-language source-to-source compiler infrastructure which preserves the high-level abstractions and gives us access to their semantics. Several representative parallelization candidate kernels are used to explore semantic-aware parallelization strategies for high-level abstractions, combined with extended compiler analyses. Those kernels include an array-base computation loop, a loop with task-level parallelism, and a domain-specific tree traversal. Our work extends the applicability of automatic parallelization to modern applications using high-level abstractions and exposes more opportunities to take advantage of multicore processors.

  13. Predictors of High Level of Hostility among Homeless Men on Parole

    PubMed Central

    Nyamathi, Adeline; Salem, Benissa; Farabee, David; Hall, Elizabeth; Zhang, Sheldon; Khalilifard, Farinaz; Faucette, Mark; Leake, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    High levels of hostility present a formidable challenge among homeless ex-offenders. This cross-sectional study assessed correlates of high levels of hostility using baseline data collected on recently-released male parolees (N=472; age 18-60) participating in a randomized trial focused on prevention of illicit drug use and recidivism. Predictors of high levels of hostility included greater depressive symptomatology, lower self-esteem, having a mother who was treated for alcohol/drugs, belonging to a gang, more tangible support, having used methamphetamine and having a history of cognitive difficulties. These findings highlight the need to understand predictors of hostility among recently released homeless men and how these predictors may relate to recidivism. Research implications are discussed as these findings will shape future nurse-led harm reduction and community-based interventions. PMID:25083121

  14. The Savannah River Site Replacement High Level Radioactive Waste Evaporator Project

    SciTech Connect

    Presgrove, S.B.

    1992-08-01

    The Replacement High Level Waste Evaporator Project was conceived in 1985 to reduce the volume of the high level radioactive waste Process of the high level waste has been accomplished up to this time using Bent Tube type evaporators and therefore, that type evaporator was selected for this project. The Title I Design of the project was 70% completed in late 1990. The Department of Energy at that time hired an independent consulting firm to perform a complete review of the project. The DOE placed a STOP ORDER on purchasing the evaporator in January 1991. Essentially, no construction was to be done on this project until all findings and concerns dealing with the type and design of the evaporator are resolved. This report addresses two aspects of the DOE design review; (1) Comparing the Bent Tube Evaporator with the Forced Circulation Evaporator, (2) The design portion of the DOE Project Review - concentrated on the mechanical design properties of the evaporator. 1 ref.

  15. The Savannah River Site Replacement High Level Radioactive Waste Evaporator Project

    SciTech Connect

    Presgrove, S.B. )

    1992-01-01

    The Replacement High Level Waste Evaporator Project was conceived in 1985 to reduce the volume of the high level radioactive waste Process of the high level waste has been accomplished up to this time using Bent Tube type evaporators and therefore, that type evaporator was selected for this project. The Title I Design of the project was 70% completed in late 1990. The Department of Energy at that time hired an independent consulting firm to perform a complete review of the project. The DOE placed a STOP ORDER on purchasing the evaporator in January 1991. Essentially, no construction was to be done on this project until all findings and concerns dealing with the type and design of the evaporator are resolved. This report addresses two aspects of the DOE design review; (1) Comparing the Bent Tube Evaporator with the Forced Circulation Evaporator, (2) The design portion of the DOE Project Review - concentrated on the mechanical design properties of the evaporator. 1 ref.

  16. High-level waste processing at the Savannah River Site: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, J.E.; Bennett, W.M.; Elder, H.H.; Lee, E.D.; Marra, S.L.; Rutland, P.L.

    1997-09-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, SC mg began immobilizing high-level radioactive waste in borosilicate glass in 1996. Currently, the radioactive glass is being produced as a ``sludge-only`` composition by combining washed high-level waste sludge with glass frit. The glass is poured in stainless steel canisters which will eventually be disposed of in a permanent, geological repository. To date, DWPF has produced about 100 canisters of vitrified waste. Future processing operations will, be based on a ``coupled`` feed of washed high-level waste sludge, precipitated cesium, and glass frit. This paper provides an update of the processing activities completed to date, operational/flowsheet problems encountered, and programs underway to increase production rates.

  17. Heat transfer analysis of the geologic disposal of spent fuel and high level waste storage canisters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, G. K.

    1980-08-01

    Near-field temperatures resulting from the storage of high-level waste canisters and spent unreprocessed fuel assembly canisters in geologic formations were determined. Preliminary design of the repository was modeled for a heat transfer computer code, HEATING5, which used the finite difference method to evaluate transient heat transfer. The heat transfer system was evaluated with several two and three dimensional models which transfer heat by a combination of conduction, natural convention, and radiation. Physical properties of the materials in the model were based upon experimental values for the various geologic formations. The effects of canister spacing, fuel age, and use of an overpack were studied for the analysis of the spent fuel canisters; salt, granite, and basalt were considered as the storage media. The effects of canister diameter and use of an overpack were studied for the analysis of the high-level waste canisters; salt was considered as the only storage media for high-level waste canisters.

  18. Determination of total cyanide in Hanford Site high-level wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, W.I.; Pool, K.H.

    1994-05-01

    Nickel ferrocyanide compounds (Na{sub 2-x}Cs{sub x}NiFe (CN){sub 6}) were produced in a scavenging process to remove {sup 137}Cs from Hanford Site single-shell tank waste supernates. Methods for determining total cyanide in Hanford Site high-level wastes are needed for the evaluation of potential exothermic reactions between cyanide and oxidizers such as nitrate and for safe storage, processing, and management of the wastes in compliance with regulatory requirements. Hanford Site laboratory experience in determining cyanide in high-level wastes is summarized. Modifications were made to standard cyanide methods to permit improved handling of high-level waste samples and to eliminate interferences found in Hanford Site waste matrices. Interferences and associated procedure modifications caused by high nitrates/nitrite concentrations, insoluble nickel ferrocyanides, and organic complexants are described.

  19. PBP 4 Mediates High-Level Resistance to New-Generation Cephalosporins in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Chan, Liana C; Gilbert, Aubre; Basuino, Li; da Costa, Thaina M; Hamilton, Stephanie M; Dos Santos, Katia R; Chambers, Henry F; Chatterjee, Som S

    2016-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important cause of both hospital- and community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections worldwide. β-Lactam antibiotics are the drugs of choice to treat S. aureus infections, but resistance to these and other antibiotics make treatment problematic. High-level β-lactam resistance of S. aureus has always been attributed to the horizontally acquired penicillin binding protein 2a (PBP 2a) encoded by the mecA gene. Here, we show that S. aureus can also express high-level resistance to β-lactams, including new-generation broad-spectrum cephalosporins that are active against methicillin-resistant strains, through an uncanonical core genome-encoded penicillin binding protein, PBP 4, a nonessential enzyme previously considered not to be important for staphylococcal β-lactam resistance. Our results show that PBP 4 can mediate high-level resistance to β-lactams. PMID:27067335

  20. High-Level Clouds and Relation to Sea Surface Temperature as Inferred from Japan's GMS Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Lindzen, Richard S.; Lee, Kyu-Tae; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    High-level clouds have a significant impact on the radiation energy budgets and, hence, the climate of the Earth. Convective cloud systems, which are controlled by large-scale thermal and dynamical conditions, propagate rapidly within days. At this time scale, changes of sea surface temperature (SST) are small. Radiances measured by Japan's Geostationary Meteorological Satellite (GMS) are used to study the relation between high-level clouds and SST in the tropical western and central Pacific (30 S-30 N; 130 E-170 W), where the ocean is warm and deep convection is intensive. Twenty months (January 1998 - August, 1999) of GMS data are used, which cover the second half of the strong 1997-1998 El Nino. Brightness temperature at the 11-micron channel is used to identify high-level clouds. The core of convection is identified based on the difference in the brightness temperatures of the 11- and 12-micron channels. Because of the rapid movement of clouds, there is little correlation between clouds six hours apart. When most of deep convection moves to regions of high SST, the domain averaged high-level cloud amount decreases. A +2C change of SST in cloudy regions results in a relative change of -30% in high-level cloud amount. This large change in cloud amount is due to clouds moving from cool regions to warm regions but not the change in SST itself. A reduction in high-level cloud amount in the equatorial region implies an expanded dry upper troposphere in the off-equatorial region, and the greenhouse warming of high clouds and water vapor is reduced through enhanced longwave cooling to space. The results are important for understanding the physical processes relating SST, convection, and water vapor in the tropics. They are also important for validating climate simulations using global general circulation models.

  1. Long-term carriage of vancomycin-resistant enterococci in patients discharged from hospitals: a 12-year retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Karki, Surendra; Land, Gillian; Aitchison, Stacey; Kennon, Jacqueline; Johnson, Paul D R; Ballard, Susan A; Leder, Karin; Cheng, Allen C

    2013-10-01

    Contact precautions are recommended in hospitals to prevent the transmission of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE); however, there is no clear policy for how long patients should be under contact precautions due to a lack of information on the duration of carriage of these organisms. We conducted a retrospective cohort study to understand the duration of carriage of VRE (by screening of a single stool culture) and associated factors among patients who had been identified with VRE infection and/or colonization since the year 2000 at our health facilities. Of the 345 eligible participants, 136 did not respond, 90 declined to participate, and 16 did not send in the required specimens. Of the 103 remaining participants, 13 were found to have current VRE fecal carriage. The proportion of colonized patients fell from 40% (2/5) in the first year to 23.3% (7/30) in year 4. None of the 40 patients who had VRE detected >4 years prior were found to be colonized at the time of the study. The longest duration of detected VRE positivity was 46.5 months. Univariate analysis revealed that recent exposure to any antibiotics (P = 0.016), multiple antibiotics (P = 0.001), amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (P = 0.021), piperacillin-tazobactam (P = 0.007), glycopeptides (P < 0.001), meropenem (P = 0.007), aminoglycosides (P = 0.021), or fluoroquinolones (P = 0.021), being the index case in a clinical specimen (P = 0.016), and recent hospitalization (P < 0.001) were significantly associated with continued carriage on follow-up. In the surviving outpatients, a significant proportion appeared to clear VRE carriage. Our results suggest that in the absence of recent risk factors, such as hospitalization or antibiotic use, patients with a remote history of colonization (>4 years) may no longer require contact isolation precautions. PMID:23926167

  2. Twenty-five years of shared life with vancomycin-resistant enterococci: is it time to divorce?

    PubMed

    Cattoir, Vincent; Leclercq, Roland

    2013-04-01

    Twenty-five years ago, isolation of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREm) was reported both in the UK and in France. Since then, VREm has spread worldwide in hospitals. Hospital outbreaks appeared to be related to the evolution since the end of 1980s of a subpopulation of E. faecium highly resistant to ampicillin and fluoroquinolones (the so-called clonal complex CC17) that later acquired resistance to vancomycin. CC17 isolates are presumably better adapted than other E. faecium isolates to the constraints of the hospital environment and most contain mobile genetic elements, phage genes, genes encoding membrane proteins, regulatory genes, a putative pathogenicity island and megaplasmids. Colonization and persistence are major features of VREm. Inherent characteristics of E. faecium including a remarkable genome plasticity, in part due to acquisition of IS elements, in particular IS16, have facilitated niche adaptation of this distinct E. faecium subpopulation that is multiply resistant to antibiotics. Quinupristin/dalfopristin and linezolid are licensed for the treatment of VREm infections, with linezolid often used as a first-line treatment. However, the emergence of plasmid-mediated resistance to linezolid by production of a Cfr methyltransferase in Enterococcus faecalis is worrying. Daptomycin has not been extensively evaluated for the treatment of VREm infections and resistant mutants have been selected under daptomycin therapy. Although control of VRE is challenging, a laissez-faire policy would result in an increased number of infections and would create an irreversible situation. Although so far unsuccessful, dissemination of glycopeptide-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with van genes acquired from resistant enterococci cannot be ruled out. PMID:23208830

  3. Antimicrobial Resistance of Escherichia coli, Enterococci, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus from Raw Fish and Seafood Imported into Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Boss, Renate; Overesch, Gudrun; Baumgartner, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    A total of 44 samples of salmon, pangasius (shark catfish), shrimps, and oysters were tested for the presence of Escherichia coli, enterococci, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus, which are indicator organisms commonly used in programs to monitor antibiotic resistance. The isolated bacterial strains, confirmed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopy, were tested against a panel of 29 antimicrobial agents to obtain MICs. Across the four sample types, Enterococcus faecalis (59%) was most common, followed by E. coli (55%), P. aeruginosa (27%), and S. aureus (9%). All bacterial species were resistant to some antibiotics. The highest rates of resistance were in E. faecalis to tetracycline (16%), in E. coli to ciprofloxacin (22%), and in S. aureus to penicillin (56%). Antibiotic resistance was found among all sample types, but salmon and oysters were less burdened than were shrimps and pangasius. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains were exclusively found in shrimps and pangasius: 17% of pangasius samples (MDR E. coli and S. aureus) and 64% of shrimps (MDR E. coli, E. faecalis, and S. aureus). Two of these MDR E. coli isolates from shrimps (one from an organic sample) were resistant to seven antimicrobial agents. Based on these findings, E. coli in pangasius, shrimps, and oysters, E. faecalis in pangasius, shrimps, and salmon, and P. aeruginosa in pangasius and shrimps are potential candidates for programs monitoring antimicrobial resistance. Enrichment methods for the detection of MDR bacteria of special public health concern, such as methicillin-resistant S. aureus and E. coli producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases and carbapenemases, should be implemented. PMID:27357045

  4. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci in intensive-care hospital settings: Transmission dynamics, persistence, and the impact of infection control programs

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Daren J.; Bonten, Marc J. M.; Weinstein, Robert A.; Slaughter, Sarah; Anderson, Roy M.

    1999-01-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) recently have emerged as a nosocomial pathogen especially in intensive-care units (ICUs) worldwide. Transmission via the hands of health-care workers is an important determinant of spread and persistence in a VRE-endemic ICU. We describe the transmission of nosocomial pathogens by using a micro-epidemiological framework based on the transmission dynamics of vector-borne diseases. By using the concept of a basic reproductive number, R0, defined as the average number of secondary cases generated by one primary case, we show quantitatively how infection control measures such as hand washing, cohorting, and antibiotic restriction affect nosocomial cross-transmission. By using detailed molecular epidemiological surveillance and compliance monitoring, we found that the estimated basic reproductive number for VRE during a study at the Cook County Hospital, Chicago, was approximately 3–4 without infection control and 0.7 when infection control measures were included. The impact of infection control was to reduce the prevalence from a predicted 79% to an observed 36%. Hand washing and staff cohorting are the most powerful control measures although their efficacy depends on the magnitude of R0. Under the circumstances tested, endemicity of VRE was stabilized despite infection control measures, by the constant introduction of colonized patients. Multiple stochastic simulations of the model revealed excellent agreement with observed pattern. In conjunction with detailed microbiological surveillance, a mathematical framework provides a precise template to describe the colonization dynamics of VRE in ICUs and impact of infection control measures. Our analyses suggest that compliance for hand washing significantly in excess of reported levels, or the cohorting of nursing staff, are needed to prevent nosocomial transmission of VRE in endemic settings. PMID:10359812

  5. The clinical and molecular epidemiology of pre-transplant vancomycin-resistant enterococci colonization among liver transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Banach, David B; Peaper, David R; Fortune, Brett E; Emre, Sukru; Dembry, Louise M

    2016-03-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) infections cause significant morbidity in liver transplant recipients. The epidemiology and impact of pre-transplant colonization with VRE among patients who undergo liver transplantation are poorly understood. We conducted an observational cohort study to identify risk factors and outcomes associated with pre-transplant VRE colonization and described the molecular diversity among VRE strains colonizing patients who undergo liver transplantation. Perirectal VRE surveillance cultures were performed prior to transplantation. Repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR) testing was used to identify clonality among VRE isolates. Of 61 patients who underwent pre-transplant VRE surveillance and subsequent liver transplantation, 27 (44%) were colonized with VRE. In multivariate analysis, pre-transplant VRE colonization was associated with central venous catheterization (OR 9.4, 95% confidence interval [CI]= 1.3-70.2, p = 0.03) and rifaximin use (OR 15.4, 95% CI 1.5-159.7, p = 0.02). Pre-transplant VRE colonization was associated with more hospital days post-transplant (26.6 vs. 16.1 d, p = 0.04). Of VRE-colonized patients analyzed with rep-PCR, 68% were colonized with the same strain as another patient in the cohort. Active surveillance identifies VRE-colonized patients who may benefit from targeted antimicrobial prophylaxis and enhanced infection prevention measures to prevent VRE spread. The relationship between rifaximin receipt and VRE colonization warrants further study. The identification of similar VRE isolates may suggest linked transmission during pre-transplant hospitalizations, which should be further investigated in prospective studies. PMID:26780305

  6. Observations and modeling of enterococci release and transport in the inter-tidal zone of a subtropical recreational beach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Z.; Reniers, A. J.

    2010-12-01

    Data from an intensive 10-day field effort of hourly sampled enterococci (ENT) concentrations in the inter-tidal zone of subtropical Hobie Beach (Miami) showed large variability (by three orders of magnitude) in ENT levels, both in the water and the sand, on any given day. The ENT to the site comes from non-point sources (not related to an outfall). Spectral analysis of observed log-scale ENT levels reveal two predominant peaks centered at 1.03 and 1.98 cycles per day (CPD), which are close to diurnal cycle of solar radiation and semidiurnal cycle of local tides (M2), respectively. In addition significant variation is found in ENT levels at other time scales, which may be related to other factors, such as rainfall, runoff and ground water flow, stirring of sediment by waves, inherent spatial variability of ENT in the sand, as well as human and animal shedding. To get a better understanding of how these environmental factors and hydrodynamic conditions affect the ENT variations at a non-point source beach, the release and transport of ENT in the inter-tidal zone was simulated with a numerical model. To that end, XBeach, a coastal morphodynamic model, was extended with the physical processes of wave-induced release of ENT from sand, the entrainment of ENT by ground water flow and biological inactivation by solar radiation. Model-data comparisons for the 10-day sampling period were used to discriminate between the different processes responsible for the uptake and transport of ENT in the inter-tidal zone.

  7. The radiation characteristics of the transport packages with vitrified high-level waste

    SciTech Connect

    Bogatov, S. A.; Mitenkova, E. F. Novikov, N. V.

    2015-12-15

    The calculation method of neutron yield in the (α, n) reaction for a homogeneous material of arbitrary composition is represented. It is shown that the use of the ORIGEN 2 code excluding the real elemental composition of vitrified high-level waste leads to significant underestimation of the neutron yield in the (α, n) reaction. For vitrified high-level waste and spent nuclear fuel from VVER, the neutron fluxes are analyzed. The thickness of the protective materials for a transfer cask and a shipping cask with vitrified highlevel waste are estimated.

  8. Tank waste remediation system phase I high-level waste feed processability assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, S.L.; Stegen, G.E., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-01

    This report evaluates the effects of feed composition on the Phase I high-level waste immobilization process and interim storage facility requirements for the high-level waste glass.Several different Phase I staging (retrieval, blending, and pretreatment) scenarios were used to generate example feed compositions for glass formulations, testing, and glass sensitivity analysis. Glass models and data form laboratory glass studies were used to estimate achievable waste loading and corresponding glass volumes for various Phase I feeds. Key issues related to feed process ability, feed composition, uncertainty, and immobilization process technology are identified for future consideration in other tank waste disposal program activities.

  9. Impact of transporting defense high-level waste to a geologic repository

    SciTech Connect

    Joy, D.S.; Shappert, L.B.; Boyle, J.W.

    1984-08-01

    This transportation study assumes that defense high-level waste is stored in three locations (the Savannah River, Hanford, and Idaho Falls plants) and may be disposed of in (1) a commercial repository or (2) a defense-only repository, either of which could be located at one of the five candidate sites; also documented is a preliminary analysis of the costs and risks of transporting defense high-level waste from the three storage sites to the five potential candidate repository sites. 17 references, 4 figures, 27 tables.

  10. Avoiding the zero sum game in global cancer policy: beyond 2011 UN high level summit.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, R; Purushotham, A D

    2011-11-01

    In September 2011 a unique high level summit on non-communicable diseases will be held in New York. For cancer as for many of the other chronic diseases this marks their first high level recognition. However, the reality of cancer control in middle and low income countries is and will be very different from the trajectory experienced by developed countries. This perspective seeks to critically examine the approach being taken, mapping pitfalls and presenting alternative solutions for an international cancer control policy. PMID:22018537

  11. Talc-silicon glass-ceramic waste forms for immobilization of high- level calcined waste

    SciTech Connect

    Vinjamuri, K.

    1993-06-01

    Talc-silicon glass-ceramic waste forms are being evaluated as candidates for immobilization of the high level calcined waste stored onsite at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. These glass-ceramic waste forms were prepared by hot isostatically pressing a mixture of simulated nonradioactive high level calcined waste, talc, silicon and aluminum metal additives. The waste forms were characterized for density, chemical durability, and glass and crystalline phase compositions. The results indicate improved density and chemical durability as the silicon content is increased.

  12. Adapting high-level language programs for parallel processing using data flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Standley, Hilda M.

    1988-01-01

    EASY-FLOW, a very high-level data flow language, is introduced for the purpose of adapting programs written in a conventional high-level language to a parallel environment. The level of parallelism provided is of the large-grained variety in which parallel activities take place between subprograms or processes. A program written in EASY-FLOW is a set of subprogram calls as units, structured by iteration, branching, and distribution constructs. A data flow graph may be deduced from an EASY-FLOW program.

  13. The radiation characteristics of the transport packages with vitrified high-level waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogatov, S. A.; Mitenkova, E. F.; Novikov, N. V.

    2015-12-01

    The calculation method of neutron yield in the (α, n) reaction for a homogeneous material of arbitrary composition is represented. It is shown that the use of the ORIGEN 2 code excluding the real elemental composition of vitrified high-level waste leads to significant underestimation of the neutron yield in the (α, n) reaction. For vitrified high-level waste and spent nuclear fuel from VVER, the neutron fluxes are analyzed. The thickness of the protective materials for a transfer cask and a shipping cask with vitrified highlevel waste are estimated.

  14. In vitro activity of daptomycin & linezolid against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus & vancomycin resistant enterococci isolated from hospitalized cases in Central India

    PubMed Central

    Chitnis, Sheetal; Katara, Gunjan; Hemvani, Nanda; Pareek, Siddika; Chitnis, Dhananjay Sadashiv

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Growing incidence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin resistant enteroccoci (VRE) is posing a therapeutic problem due to limited drug options. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to check susceptibility of MRSA and VRE isolates against new antimicrobials such as daptomycin and linezolid. Methods: A total of 586 Gram-positive isolates comprising 442 S. aureus and 144 enterococci isolated from hospitalized cases included in the study, were subjected to in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing by disc diffusion method. One hundred twenty four enterococci obtained from rectal swabs of neonates were also included. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined for daptomycin, linezolid, vancomycin and teicoplanin against 50 each isolates of MRSA and VRE by E strip. Results: Among the staphylococci, 326 (73.85%) isolates were MRSA. MIC for vancomycin and teicoplanin among MRSA was ≤3 μg/ml. MIC for daptomycin among MRSA was found to be in the range of 0.064-1.5 μg/ml. Percentage of VRE among clinical samples was 14.29 per cent while it was 47.06 per cent among enterococci from rectal swabs of neonates. MIC was >256 μg/ml for vancomycin among VRE and was associated with van A genotype. MIC range for daptomycin among VRE was 0.38-3 μg/ml. MIC for linezolid among MRSA and VRE was in the range of 0.25 to 1 and 0.38 -1.5 μg/ml, respectively. Interpretation & conclusions: The present study showed a rise in MIC to vancomycin for sizable number of MRSA and growing percentage of VRE at our centre. Daptomycin and linezolid showed 100 per cent activity against MRSA and VRE. PMID:23481072

  15. Multi-laboratory survey of qPCR enterococci analysis method performance in U.S. coastal and inland surface waters.

    PubMed

    Haugland, Richard A; Siefring, Shawn; Varma, Manju; Oshima, Kevin H; Sivaganesan, Mano; Cao, Yiping; Raith, Meredith; Griffith, John; Weisberg, Stephen B; Noble, Rachel T; Blackwood, A Denene; Kinzelman, Julie; Anan'eva, Tamara; Bushon, Rebecca N; Stelzer, Erin A; Harwood, Valarie J; Gordon, Katrina V; Sinigalliano, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) has become a frequently used technique for quantifying enterococci in recreational surface waters, but there are several methodological options. Here we evaluated how three method permutations, type of mastermix, sample extract dilution and use of controls in results calculation, affect method reliability among multiple laboratories with respect to sample interference. Multiple samples from each of 22 sites representing an array of habitat types were analyzed using EPA Method 1611 and 1609 reagents with full strength and five-fold diluted extracts. The presence of interference was assessed three ways: using sample processing and PCR amplifications controls; consistency of results across extract dilutions; and relative recovery of target genes from spiked enterococci in water sample compared to control matrices with acceptable recovery defined as 50 to 200%. Method 1609, which is based on an environmental mastermix, was found to be superior to Method 1611, which is based on a universal mastermix. Method 1611 had over a 40% control assay failure rate with undiluted extracts and a 6% failure rate with diluted extracts. Method 1609 failed in only 11% and 3% of undiluted and diluted extracts analyses. Use of sample processing control assay results in the delta-delta Ct method for calculating relative target gene recoveries increased the number of acceptable recovery results. Delta-delta tended to bias recoveries from apparent partially inhibitory samples on the high side which could help in avoiding potential underestimates of enterococci--an important consideration in a public health context. Control assay and delta-delta recovery results were largely consistent across the range of habitats sampled, and among laboratories. The methodological option that best balanced acceptable estimated target gene recoveries with method sensitivity and avoidance of underestimated enterococci densities was Method 1609 without extract

  16. INCREASING SAFETY AND REDUCING ENVIRONMENTAL DAMAGE RISK FROM AGING HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE TANKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There exists a paramount need for improved understanding of the behavior of high-level nuclear waste containers and the impact on structural integrity in terms of leak tightness and mechanical stability. The current program, which at the time of this writing is in its early stage...

  17. Keeping a large-pupilled eye on high-level visual processing.

    PubMed

    Binda, Paola; Murray, Scott O

    2015-01-01

    The pupillary light response has long been considered an elementary reflex. However, evidence now shows that it integrates information from such complex phenomena as attention, contextual processing, and imagery. These discoveries make pupillometry a promising tool for an entirely new application: the study of high-level vision. PMID:25467128

  18. Chemical evolution of a high-level magma system: the Black Mountain volcanic center, southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, T.A.; Noble, D.C.; Younker, L.W.

    1983-09-01

    A comprehensive study of stratigraphically controlled samples of both lavas and ash-flow tuffs from the Black Mountain volcanic center enables us to evaluate magmatic processes. The results of this study are used to: (1) determine how this high-level magma system developed; (2) compare this system with other similar systems; and (3) correlate ash-flow sheets using their chemical characteristics.

  19. 77 FR 1778 - U.S.-EU High Level Working Group on Jobs and Growth

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-11

    ... TRADE REPRESENTATIVE U.S.-EU High Level Working Group on Jobs and Growth AGENCY: Office of the United... Working Group on Jobs and Growth, led by U.S. Trade Representative Ron Kirk and EU Trade Commissioner... and investment to support mutually beneficial job creation, economic growth, and...

  20. CHEMICAL DECOMPOSITION OF HIGH-LEVEL NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE/DISPOSAL GLASSES UNDER IRRADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Offices of Energy Research and Environmental Management are immediately concerned with the development of storage/immobilization media for high-level nuclear wastes and excess weapons plutonium. These media must be stable and free of risk to the public or to the environment f...

  1. Structural integrity and potential failure modes of hanford high-level waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Han, F.C.

    1996-09-30

    Structural Integrity of the Hanford High-Level Waste Tanks were evaluated based on the existing Design and Analysis Documents. All tank structures were found adequate for the normal operating and seismic loads. Potential failure modes of the tanks were assessed by engineering interpretation and extrapolation of the existing engineering documents.

  2. LIQUIDUS TEMPERATURE OF HIGH-LEVEL WASTE BOROSILICATE GLASSES WITH SPINEL PRIMARY PHASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Liquidus temperatures (TL) were measured for high-level waste (HLW) borosilicate glasses covering a Savannah River composition region. The primary crystallization phase for most glasses was spinel, a solid solution of trevorite (NiFe2O4) with other oxides (FeO, MnO, and Cr2O3). T...

  3. FINAL REPORT. SETTLING OF SPINEL IN A HIGH-LEVEL WASTE GLASS MELTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research on spinel settling in the high-level waste (HLW) glass melter was conducted to assist HLW retrieval, glass formulation, feed preparation, and melter design and operation for minimum-risk and minimum-cost vitrification of HLW at Hanford and other DOE sites. The main r...

  4. LIQUIDUS TEMPERATURE AND PRIMARY CRYSTALLIZATION PHASES IN HIGH-ZIRCONIA HIGH-LEVEL WASTE BOROSILICATE GLASSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Liquidus temperature (TL) studies of high-Zr high-level waste (HLW) borosilicate glasseshave identified three primary phases: baddelyite (ZrO2), zircon (ZrSiO4), and alkali-zirconiumsilicates, such as parakeldyshite (Na2ZrSi2O7). Using published TL data for HLW glasses withthe...

  5. PROGRESS REPORT. MECHANISMS AND KINETICS OF ORGANIC AGING IN HIGH-LEVEL WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective is to develop predictive models of organic degradation in high-level wastes (HLW). We make this information available to facility operators on the Hanford Site to support decision-making processes regarding safety, retrieval, and treatment issues. Emphasis is placed...

  6. Multilocus Phylogenetics Show High Levels of Endemic Fusaria Inhabiting Sardinian Soils (Tyrrhenian Islands)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Mediterranean island of Sardinia is well known for high levels of vascular plant diversity and endemism, but little is known about its microbial diversity. Under the hypothesis that Fusarium species would show similar patterns, we estimated variability in Fusarium species composition among ten ...

  7. Effects of Crowding and Attention on High-Levels of Motion Processing and Motion Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Pavan, Andrea; Greenlee, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    The motion after-effect (MAE) persists in crowding conditions, i.e., when the adaptation direction cannot be reliably perceived. The MAE originating from complex moving patterns spreads into non-adapted sectors of a multi-sector adapting display (i.e., phantom MAE). In the present study we used global rotating patterns to measure the strength of the conventional and phantom MAEs in crowded and non-crowded conditions, and when attention was directed to the adapting stimulus and when it was diverted away from the adapting stimulus. The results show that: (i) the phantom MAE is weaker than the conventional MAE, for both non-crowded and crowded conditions, and when attention was focused on the adapting stimulus and when it was diverted from it, (ii) conventional and phantom MAEs in the crowded condition are weaker than in the non-crowded condition. Analysis conducted to assess the effect of crowding on high-level of motion adaptation suggests that crowding is likely to affect the awareness of the adapting stimulus rather than degrading its sensory representation, (iii) for high-level of motion processing the attentional manipulation does not affect the strength of either conventional or phantom MAEs, neither in the non-crowded nor in the crowded conditions. These results suggest that high-level MAEs do not depend on attention and that at high-level of motion adaptation the effects of crowding are not modulated by attention. PMID:25615577

  8. Is It Really Possible to Test All Educationally Significant Achievements with High Levels of Reliability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    PISA claims that it can extend its reach from its current core subjects of Reading, Science, Maths and problem-solving. Yet given the requirement for high levels of reliability for PISA, especially in the light of its current high stakes character, proposed widening of its subject coverage cannot embrace some important aspects of the social and…

  9. 75 FR 61228 - Board Meeting: Technical Lessons Gained From High-Level Nuclear Waste Disposal Efforts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-04

    ... REVIEW BOARD Board Meeting: Technical Lessons Gained From High-Level Nuclear Waste Disposal Efforts... 1987, the U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board will meet in Dulles, Virginia, on October 26, 2010... technical issues and to review the technical validity of DOE activities related to implementing the...

  10. Conceptual design report for immobilized high-level waste interim storage facility (Phase 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Burgard, K.C.

    1998-06-02

    The Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB Bldg. 212H) will be utilized to interim store Phase 1 HLW products. Project W-464, Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage, will procure an onsite transportation system and retrofit the CSB to accommodate the Phase 1 HLW products. The Conceptual Design Report establishes the Project W-464 technical and cost basis.

  11. Chem I Supplement. Chemistry Related to Isolation of High-Level Nuclear Waste.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Darleane C.; Choppin, Gregory R.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses some of the problems associated with the safe disposal of high-level nuclear wastes. Describes several waste disposal plans developed by various nations. Outlines the multiple-barrier concept of isolation in deep geological questions associated with the implementation of such a method. (TW)

  12. Method to Determine Oxalate in High-Level Sludge by Ion Chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, C.J.

    2002-12-19

    The Sludge Batch 3 macrobatch feed to the DWPF is expected to contain a relatively high concentration of oxalate. A simple acid addition at room temperature has been shown to be in high-level sludge. This sample preparation requires only about five minutes and yields solutions suitable for oxalate determinations by ion chromatography.

  13. The Role of High Level Play as a Predictor Social Functioning in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Margaret M.; Wainwright, Laurel D.

    2010-01-01

    Play and social abilities of a group of children diagnosed with high functioning autism were compared to a second group diagnosed with a variety of developmental language disorders (DLD). The children with autism engaged in fewer acts of high level play. The children with autism also had significantly lower social functioning than the DLD group…

  14. High Level Manpower and Technological Change in the Steel Industry: Implications for Corporate Manpower Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiestand, Dale L.

    The purpose of this study was to examine the role that high level manpower plays in the establishment of new technologies at the plant and industry level. The steel industry was selected as an appropriate industry to approach these questions due to: its considerable technological changes; its straightforward, easier-to-understand technology; its…

  15. Do Highly Effective Principals Also Have High Levels of Cultural Intelligence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naughton, Whitney Michelle

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine if elementary school principals who exhibit characteristics of highly effective principals also possess high levels of cultural intelligence. Methodology: Three instruments were used in this study, combining both qualitative and quantitative approaches to the collection of data. The first…

  16. Insect cell transformation vectors that support high level expression and promoter assessment in insect cell culture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A somatic transformation vector, pDP9, was constructed that provides a simplified means of producing permanently transformed cultured insect cells that support high levels of protein expression of foreign genes. The pDP9 plasmid vector incorporates DNA sequences from the Junonia coenia densovirus th...

  17. Interaction Networks: Generating High Level Hints Based on Network Community Clustering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eagle, Michael; Johnson, Matthew; Barnes, Tiffany

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a novel data structure, the Interaction Network, for representing interaction-data from open problem solving environment tutors. We show how using network community detecting techniques are used to identify sub-goals in problems in a logic tutor. We then use those community structures to generate high level hints between sub-goals.…

  18. Advanced Inverter Functions to Support High Levels of Distributed Solar: Policy and Regulatory Considerations (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-11-01

    This paper explains how advanced inverter functions (sometimes called 'smart inverters') contribute to the integration of high levels of solar PV generation onto the electrical grid and covers the contributions of advanced functions to maintaining grid stability. Policy and regulatory considerations associated with the deployment of advanced inverter functions are also introduced.

  19. Conceptual design report for immobilized high-level waste interim storage facility (Phase 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Burgard, K.C.

    1998-04-09

    The Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB Bldg. 212H) will be utilized to interim store Phase 1 HLW products. Project W-464, Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage, will procure an onsite transportation system and retrofit the CSB to accommodate the Phase 1 HLW products. The Conceptual Design Report establishes the Project W-464 technical and cost basis.

  20. Using High Level Upperclass Undergraduates as TAs in Large Lower Division EFL Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Yeli

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to offer a feasible way to show that the problem of large EFL courses for lower division can be solved by the use of high level upperclass undergraduates as teaching assistants in and out of class. The use of UTAs fragments the large class into seemingly small classes with view to stimulating interest and effective…