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Sample records for high-power laser diode

  1. High power diode pumped alkali vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Krupke, B.

    2008-05-01

    Diode pumped alkali lasers have developed rapidly since their first demonstration. These lasers offer a path to convert highly efficient, but relatively low brightness, laser diodes into a single high power, high brightness beam. General Atomics has been engaged in the development of DPALs with scalable architectures. We have examined different species and pump characteristics. We show that high absorption can be achieved even when the pump source bandwidth is several times the absorption bandwidth. In addition, we present experimental results for both potassium and rubidium systems pumped with a 0.2 nm bandwidth alexandrite laser. These data show slope efficiencies of 67% and 72% respectively.

  2. High power diode lasers for solid-state laser pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linden, Kurt J.; McDonnell, Patrick N.

    1994-02-01

    The development and commercial application of high power diode laser arrays for use as solid-state laser pumps is described. Such solid-state laser pumps are significantly more efficient and reliable than conventional flash-lamps. This paper describes the design and fabrication of diode lasers emitting in the 780 - 900 nm spectral region, and discusses their performance and reliability. Typical measured performance parameters include electrical-to-optical power conversion efficiencies of 50 percent, narrow-band spectral emission of 2 to 3 nm FWHM, pulsed output power levels of 50 watts/bar with reliability values of over 2 billion shots to date (tests to be terminated after 10 billion shots), and reliable operation to pulse lengths of 1 ms. Pulse lengths up to 5 ms have been demonstrated at derated power levels, and CW performance at various power levels has been evaluated in a 'bar-in-groove' laser package. These high-power 1-cm stacked-bar arrays are now being manufactured for OEM use. Individual diode laser bars, ready for package-mounting by OEM customers, are being sold as commodity items. Commercial and medical applications of these laser arrays include solid-state laser pumping for metal-working, cutting, industrial measurement and control, ranging, wind-shear/atmospheric turbulence detection, X-ray generation, materials surface cleaning, microsurgery, ophthalmology, dermatology, and dental procedures.

  3. High power diode lasers for solid-state laser pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linden, Kurt J.; Mcdonnell, Patrick N.

    1994-01-01

    The development and commercial application of high power diode laser arrays for use as solid-state laser pumps is described. Such solid-state laser pumps are significantly more efficient and reliable than conventional flash-lamps. This paper describes the design and fabrication of diode lasers emitting in the 780 - 900 nm spectral region, and discusses their performance and reliability. Typical measured performance parameters include electrical-to-optical power conversion efficiencies of 50 percent, narrow-band spectral emission of 2 to 3 nm FWHM, pulsed output power levels of 50 watts/bar with reliability values of over 2 billion shots to date (tests to be terminated after 10 billion shots), and reliable operation to pulse lengths of 1 ms. Pulse lengths up to 5 ms have been demonstrated at derated power levels, and CW performance at various power levels has been evaluated in a 'bar-in-groove' laser package. These high-power 1-cm stacked-bar arrays are now being manufactured for OEM use. Individual diode laser bars, ready for package-mounting by OEM customers, are being sold as commodity items. Commercial and medical applications of these laser arrays include solid-state laser pumping for metal-working, cutting, industrial measurement and control, ranging, wind-shear/atmospheric turbulence detection, X-ray generation, materials surface cleaning, microsurgery, ophthalmology, dermatology, and dental procedures.

  4. Laser welding of polymers using high-power diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Friedrich G.; Russek, Ulrich A.

    2002-06-01

    Laser welding of polymers using high power diode lasers offers specific process advantages over conventional technologies, such as short process times while providing optically and qualitatively valuable weld seams, contactless yielding of the joining energy, absence of process induced vibrations, imposing minimal thermal stress and avoiding particle generation. Furthermore, this method exhibits high integration capabilities and automatization potential. Moreover, because of the current favorable cost development within the high power diode laser market laser welding of polymers has become more and more an industrially accepted joining method. This novel technology permits both, reliable high quality joining of mechanically and electronically highly sensitive micro components and hermetic sealing of macro components. There are different welding strategies available, which are adaptable to the current application. Within the frame of this discourse scientific and also application oriented result concerning laser transmission welding of polymers using preferably diode lasers are presented. Besides the sue laser system the fundamental process strategies as well as decisive process parameters are illustrated. The importance of optical, thermal and mechanical properties is discussed. Applications at real technical components will be presented, demonstrating the industrial implementation capability and the advantages of a novel technology.

  5. Laser welding of polymers using high-power diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Friedrich G.; Russek, Ulrich A.

    2003-09-01

    Laser welding of polymers using high power diode lasers offers specific process advantages over conventional technologies, such as short process times while providing optically and qualitatively valuable weld seams, contactless yielding of the joining energy, absence of process induced vibrations, imposing minimal thermal stress and avoiding particle generation. Furthermore this method exhibits high integration capabilities and automatization potential. Moreover, because of the current favorable cost development within the high power diode laser market laser welding of polymers has become more and more an industrially accepted joining method. This novel technology permits both, reliable high quality joining of mechanically and electronically highly sensitive micro components and hermetic sealing of macro components. There are different welding strategies available, which are adaptable to the current application. Within the frame of this discourse scientific and also application oriented results concerning laser transmission welding of polymers using preferably diode lasers are presented. Besides the used laser systems the fundamental process strategies as well as decisive process parameters are illustrated. The importance of optical, thermal and mechanical properties is discussed. Applications at real technical components will be presented, demonstrating the industrial implementation capability and the advantages of a novel technology.

  6. Thermal Regime of High-power Laser Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezotosnyi, V. V.; Krokhin, O. N.; Oleshchenko, V. A.; Pevtsov, V. F.; Popov, Yu. M.; Cheshev, E. A.

    We discuss the design and application perspectives of different crystal, ceramic and composite-type submounts with thermo-compensating properties as well as submounts from materials with high thermal conductivity for overcoming thermal problem in high-power laser diodes (LD) and improving thermal management of other high-power optoelectronic and electronic semiconductor devices. Thermal fields in high-power laser diodes were calculated in 3 D thermal model at CW operation for some heatsink designs taking into account the experimental dependence of laser total efficiency against pumping current in order to extend the range of reliable operation up to thermal loads 20-30 W and corresponding output optical power up to 15-20 W for 100 μm stripe laser diodes.

  7. Diode pumped alkali vapor lasers for high power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Krupke, B.; Komashko, A.

    2008-02-01

    General Atomics has been engaged in the development of diode pumped alkali vapor lasers. We have been examining the design space looking for designs that are both efficient and easily scalable to high powers. Computationally, we have looked at the effect of pump bandwidth on laser performance. We have also looked at different lasing species. We have used an alexandrite laser to study the relative merits of different designs. We report on the results of our experimental and computational studies.

  8. In-volume heating using high-power laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisenkov, Valentin S.; Kiyko, Vadim V.; Vdovin, Gleb V.

    2015-03-01

    High-power lasers are useful instruments suitable for applications in various fields; the most common industrial applications include cutting and welding. We propose a new application of high-power laser diodes as in-bulk heating source for food industry. Current heating processes use surface heating with different approaches to make the heat distribution more uniform and the process more efficient. High-power lasers can in theory provide in-bulk heating which can sufficiently increase the uniformity of heat distribution thus making the process more efficient. We chose two media (vegetable fat and glucose) for feasibility experiments. First, we checked if the media have necessary absorption coefficients on the wavelengths of commercially available laser diodes (940-980 nm). This was done using spectrophotometer at 700-1100 nm which provided the dependences of transmission from the wavelength. The results indicate that vegetable fat has noticeable transmission dip around 925 nm and glucose has sufficient dip at 990 nm. Then, after the feasibility check, we did numerical simulation of the heat distribution in bulk using finite elements method. Based on the results, optimal laser wavelength and illuminator configuration were selected. Finally, we carried out several pilot experiments with high-power diodes heating the chosen media.

  9. Materials processing with a high power diode laser

    SciTech Connect

    Li, L.; Lawrence, J.; Spencer, J.T.

    1996-12-31

    This paper reports on work exploring the feasibility of a range of materials processing applications using a Diomed 60W diode laser delivered through a 600{mu}m diameter optical fibre to a 3 axis CNC workstation. The applications studied include: marking/engraving natural stones (marble and granite), marking ceramic tiles, sealing tile grouts, cutting and marking glass, marking/engraving wood, stripping paint and lacquer, and welding metallic wires. The study shows that even at the present limited power level of diode lasers, many materials processing applications can be accomplished with satisfactory results. Through the study an initial understanding of interaction of high power diode laser (HPDL) beam with various materials has been gained. Also, within the paper basic beam characteristics, and current R&D activities in HPDL technology and materials processing applications are reviewed.

  10. High power diode lasers: technology and application in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behringer, Martin; Eberhard, Franz; Herrmann, Gerhard; Luft, Johann; Maric, J.; Morgott, Stefan; Philippens, Marc; Teich, W.

    2003-03-01

    The application field of high power semiconductor lasers is growing rapidly and covers e.g. solid state laser pumping, metal and plastic welding, hard and soft soldering, suface treatment and others. Preferably those applications are attractive, which do not require extremely high beam quality. We have investigated high power diode-laser bars from 808 nm to 980 nm. The scope of this presentation is on focusability and beam quality. For better beam shaping structures with reduced fill factor of 25% to 30% were developed. They were operated in continuous wave operation at power levels of up to 55 W. Tests indicate extrapolated lifetimes of more than 100,000 hours at 40 W at 980 nm cw and about 10,000 hours at 45 W - 50 W at 940 nm and 808 nm. Monolithically stacked NonostacksR were investigated. Operation up to 100°C with excellent lifetimes could be demonstrated. New concepts and applications for low mode number high power diode lasers like tapered laser bars are presented. Examples for various current areas of interest in European research facilities will be given.

  11. Passively cooled diode laser for high-power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonati, Guido F.; Hennig, Petra; Schmidt, Karsten

    2004-06-01

    For the usage of diode lasers in industrial applications, customers ask today for expected lifetimes of more then 30.000 hours. To match the request for low costs per Watt as well, the output power has to be as high as possible. To achieve a maximum power out of a diode laser bar, heat removal must be extremely efficient. Today, micro channel heatsinks (MCHS) are the only way to achieve the high power level of 50W. But due to erosion/corrosion effects the lifetime of MCHS is limited at 15000...20.000 hours today. Finally we have to determine that for selected semiconductor materials not the semiconductor but the heatsink is limiting the expected lifetime of high power diode lasers today. Passive heat sinks based on solid copper are not limiting lifetime expectations in any way. But as cooling efficiency is lower, the power has to be reduced to a level of 30...40W. The first time ever, the JENOPTIK Laserdiode can present today a cooling technique that combines the passive cooling of a diode laser bar with the optical output a power of a bar, mounted on a MCHS. Using a special heat exchanger called DCB (patent pending) we were able to increase the power to 50W per bar while looking forward to extend the expected lifetime to more than 30.000 hours for selected materials. Restrictions on the quality of the water by means of deionization grade or PH- level are no longer necessary. The device is operating with regular water. The flow rate is as low as on MCHS, the pressure drop over the DCB is comparable. Additionally, the measurements will show an even lower thermal resistance compared to MCHS. The second generationof engineering samples is built up for pumping rows. A vertical stack design will be available for evaluating purposes soon. All these efforts are part of the JENOPTIK Laserdiode's LongLifeTechnology.

  12. Two photon absorption in high power broad area laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Mehmet; Michael, Christopher P.; Zheng, Yan; Zhu, Lin; Jacob, Jonah H.

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances in thermal management and improvements in fabrication and facet passivation enabled extracting unprecedented optical powers from laser diodes (LDs). However, even in the absence of thermal roll-over or catastrophic optical damage (COD), the maximum achievable power is limited by optical non-linear effects. Due to its non-linear nature, two-photon absorption (TPA) becomes one of the dominant factors that limit efficient extraction of laser power from LDs. In this paper, theoretical and experimental analysis of TPA in high-power broad area laser diodes (BALD) is presented. A phenomenological optical extraction model that incorporates TPA explains the reduction in optical extraction efficiency at high intensities in BALD bars with 100μm-wide emitters. The model includes two contributions associated with TPA: the straightforward absorption of laser photons and the subsequent single photon absorption by the holes and electrons generated by the TPA process. TPA is a fundamental limitation since it is inherent to the LD semiconductor material. Therefore scaling the LDs to high power requires designs that reduce the optical intensity by increasing the mode size.

  13. High power laser diodes for the NASA direct detection laser transceiver experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seery, Bernard D.; Holcomb, Terry L.

    1988-01-01

    High-power semiconductor laser diodes selected for use in the NASA space laser communications experiments are discussed. The diode selection rationale is reviewed, and the laser structure is shown. The theory and design of the third mirror lasers used in the experiments are addressed.

  14. Improving Reliability of High Power Quasi-CW Laser Diode Arrays for Pumping Solid State Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Baker, Nathaniel R.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Baggott, Renee S.; Lockard, George E.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    Most Lidar applications rely on moderate to high power solid state lasers to generate the required transmitted pulses. However, the reliability of solid state lasers, which can operate autonomously over long periods, is constrained by their laser diode pump arrays. Thermal cycling of the active regions is considered the primary reason for rapid degradation of the quasi-CW high power laser diode arrays, and the excessive temperature rise is the leading suspect in premature failure. The thermal issues of laser diode arrays are even more drastic for 2-micron solid state lasers which require considerably longer pump pulses compared to the more commonly used pump arrays for 1-micron lasers. This paper describes several advanced packaging techniques being employed for more efficient heat removal from the active regions of the laser diode bars. Experimental results for several high power laser diode array devices will be reported and their performance when operated at long pulsewidths of about 1msec will be described.

  15. High-power diode lasers in spray process diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larjo, Jussi

    2005-03-01

    Spray processes are commonly employed in many kinds of surface treatment applications, most prominently in medical, material processing and manufacturing industries. While spraying is a well established technology, we still lack complete understanding of all interactions within a given spray process. This is because the physical models of many subprocesses, like turbulent gas flow, particle formation and gas-particle interaction, are limited and often provide only qualitative predictions on the real process. Imaging measurements are essential in gaining better understanding of a spray process. They offer a way to measure properties of both the complete spray plume and individual droplets. A spray analysis system typically requires a high-power stroboscopic light source; Xe flashlamps and Q-switched solid state lasers have been the most common choice until recently. The development of high-power diode lasers has provided a versatile, low-cost and easy to use light source for the analysis of spray processes. We present a real-time diode laser based imaging system to measure droplet density, size and velocity distributions in a spray, together with the spray plume geometry.

  16. High power, high efficiency diode pumped Raman fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, Yaakov; Fromzel, Viktor; Zhang, Jun; Dahan, Asaf; Ter-Gabrielyan, Nikolay; Pattnaik, Radha K.; Dubinskii, Mark

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a high power high efficiency Raman fiber laser pumped directly by a laser diode module at 976 nm. 80 Watts of CW power were obtained at a wavelength of 1020 nm with an optical-to-optical efficiency of 53%. When working quasi-CW, at a duty cycle of 30%, 85 W of peak power was produced with an efficiency of 60%. A commercial graded-index (GRIN) core fiber acts as the Raman fiber in a power oscillator configuration, which includes spectral selection to prevent generation of the 2nd Stokes. In addition, significant brightness enhancement of the pump beam is attained due to the Raman gain distribution profile in the GRIN fiber. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest power Raman fiber laser directly pumped by laser diodes, which also exhibits a record efficiency for such a laser. In addition, it is the highest power Raman fiber laser (regardless of pumping source) demonstrated based on a GRIN fiber.

  17. High-power diode lasers for optical communications applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlin, D. B.; Goldstein, B.; Channin, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    High-power, single-mode, double-heterojunction AlGaAs diode lasers are being developed to meet source requirements for both fiber optic local area network and free space communications systems. An individual device, based on the channeled-substrate-planar (CSP) structure, has yielded single spatial and longitudinal mode outputs of up to 90 mW CW, and has maintained a single spatial mode to 150 mW CW. Phase-locked arrays of closely spaced index-guided lasers have been designed and fabricated with the aim of multiplying the outputs of the individual devices to even higher power levels in a stable, single-lobe, anastigmatic beam. The optical modes of the lasers in such arrays can couple together in such a way that they appear to be emanating from a single source, and can therefore be efficiently coupled into optical communications systems. This paper will review the state of high-power laser technology and discuss the communication system implications of these devices.

  18. Liquid metal heat sink for high-power laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetrovec, John; Litt, Amardeep S.; Copeland, Drew A.; Junghans, Jeremy; Durkee, Roger

    2013-02-01

    We report on the development of a novel, ultra-low thermal resistance active heat sink (AHS) for thermal management of high-power laser diodes (HPLD) and other electronic and photonic components. AHS uses a liquid metal coolant flowing at high speed in a miniature closed and sealed loop. The liquid metal coolant receives waste heat from an HPLD at high flux and transfers it at much reduced flux to environment, primary coolant fluid, heat pipe, or structure. Liquid metal flow is maintained electromagnetically without any moving parts. Velocity of liquid metal flow can be controlled electronically, thus allowing for temperature control of HPLD wavelength. This feature also enables operation at a stable wavelength over a broad range of ambient conditions. Results from testing an HPLD cooled by AHS are presented.

  19. Advancement of High Power Quasi-CW Laser Diode Arrays For Space-based Laser Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Baker, nathaniel R.; Baggott, Renee S.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Space-based laser and lidar instruments play an important role in NASA s plans for meeting its objectives in both Earth Science and Space Exploration areas. Almost all the lidar instrument concepts being considered by NASA scientist utilize moderate to high power diode-pumped solid state lasers as their transmitter source. Perhaps the most critical component of any solid state laser system is its pump laser diode array which essentially dictates instrument efficiency, reliability and lifetime. For this reason, premature failures and rapid degradation of high power laser diode arrays that have been experienced by laser system designers are of major concern to NASA. This work addresses these reliability and lifetime issues by attempting to eliminate the causes of failures and developing methods for screening laser diode arrays and qualifying them for operation in space.

  20. Effect of interface layer on the performance of high power diode laser arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pu; Wang, Jingwei; Xiong, Lingling; Li, Xiaoning; Hou, Dong; Liu, Xingsheng

    2015-02-01

    Packaging is an important part of high power diode laser (HPLD) development and has become one of the key factors affecting the performance of high power diode lasers. In the package structure of HPLD, the interface layer of die bonding has significant effects on the thermal behavior of high power diode laser packages and most degradations and failures in high power diode laser packages are directly related to the interface layer. In this work, the effects of interface layer on the performance of high power diode laser array were studied numerically by modeling and experimentally. Firstly, numerical simulations using finite element method (FEM) were conducted to analyze the effects of voids in the interface layer on the temperature rise in active region of diode laser array. The correlation between junction temperature rise and voids was analyzed. According to the numerical simulation results, it was found that the local temperature rise of active region originated from the voids in the solder layer will lead to wavelength shift of some emitters. Secondly, the effects of solder interface layer on the spectrum properties of high power diode laser array were studied. It showed that the spectrum shape of diode laser array appeared "right shoulder" or "multi-peaks", which were related to the voids in the solder interface layer. Finally, "void-free" techniques were developed to minimize the voids in the solder interface layer and achieve high power diode lasers with better optical-electrical performances.

  1. High power diode laser Master Oscillator-Power Amplifier (MOPA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, John R.; Mouroulis, P.; Wicks, G.

    1994-01-01

    High power multiple quantum well AlGaAs diode laser master oscillator - power amplifier (MOPA) systems were examined both experimentally and theoretically. For two pass operation, it was found that powers in excess of 0.3 W per 100 micrometers of facet length were achievable while maintaining diffraction-limited beam quality. Internal electrical-to-optical conversion efficiencies as high as 25 percent were observed at an internal amplifier gain of 9 dB. Theoretical modeling of multiple quantum well amplifiers was done using appropriate rate equations and a heuristic model of the carrier density dependent gain. The model gave a qualitative agreement with the experimental results. In addition, the model allowed exploration of a wider design space for the amplifiers. The model predicted that internal electrical-to-optical conversion efficiencies in excess of 50 percent should be achievable with careful system design. The model predicted that no global optimum design exists, but gain, efficiency, and optical confinement (coupling efficiency) can be mutually adjusted to meet a specific system requirement. A three quantum well, low optical confinement amplifier was fabricated using molecular beam epitaxial growth. Coherent beam combining of two high power amplifiers injected from a common master oscillator was also examined. Coherent beam combining with an efficiency of 93 percent resulted in a single beam having diffraction-limited characteristics. This beam combining efficiency is a world record result for such a system. Interferometric observations of the output of the amplifier indicated that spatial mode matching was a significant factor in the less than perfect beam combining. Finally, the system issues of arrays of amplifiers in a coherent beam combining system were investigated. Based upon experimentally observed parameters coherent beam combining could result in a megawatt-scale coherent beam with a 10 percent electrical-to-optical conversion efficiency.

  2. Injection locking of a high power ultraviolet laser diode for laser cooling of ytterbium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Hosoya, Toshiyuki; Miranda, Martin; Inoue, Ryotaro; Kozuma, Mikio

    2015-07-15

    We developed a high-power laser system at a wavelength of 399 nm for laser cooling of ytterbium atoms with ultraviolet laser diodes. The system is composed of an external cavity laser diode providing frequency stabilized output at a power of 40 mW and another laser diode for amplifying the laser power up to 220 mW by injection locking. The systematic method for optimization of our injection locking can also be applied to high power light sources at any other wavelengths. Our system does not depend on complex nonlinear frequency-doubling and can be made compact, which will be useful for providing light sources for laser cooling experiments including transportable optical lattice clocks.

  3. Reliability of high power laser diodes with external optical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonsendorf, Dennis; Schneider, Stephan; Meinschien, Jens; Tomm, Jens W.

    2016-03-01

    Direct diode laser systems gain importance in the fields of material processing and solid-state laser pumping. With increased output power, also the influence of strong optical feedback has to be considered. Uncontrolled optical feedback is known for its spectral and power fluctuation effects, as well as potential emitter damage. We found that even intended feedback by use of volume Bragg gratings (VBG) for spectral stabilization may result in emitter lifetime reduction. To provide stable and reliable laser systems design, guidelines and maximum feedback ratings have to be found. We present a model to estimate the optical feedback power coupled back into the laser diode waveguide. It includes several origins of optical feedback and wide range of optical elements. The failure thresholds of InGaAs and AlGaAs bars have been determined not only at standard operation mode but at various working points. The influence of several feedback levels to laser diode lifetime is investigated up to 4000h. The analysis of the semiconductor itself leads to a better understanding of the degradation process by defect spread. Facet microscopy, LBIC- and electroluminescence measurements deliver detailed information about semiconductor defects before and after aging tests. Laser diode protection systems can monitor optical feedback. With this improved understanding, the emergency shutdown threshold can be set low enough to ensure laser diode reliability but also high enough to provide better machine usability avoiding false alarms.

  4. GaAs Substrates for High-Power Diode Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Georg; Berwian, Patrick; Buhrig, Eberhard; Weinert, Berndt

    GaAs substrate crystals with low dislocation density (Etch-Pit Density (EPD) < 500,^-2) and Si-doping ( ~10^18,^-3) are required for the epitaxial production of high-power diode-lasers. Large-size wafers (= 3 mathrm{in} -> >=3,) are needed for reducing the manufacturing costs. These requirements can be fulfilled by the Vertical Bridgman (VB) and Vertical Gradient Freeze (VGF) techniques. For that purpose we have developed proper VB/VGF furnaces and optimized the thermal as well as the physico-chemical process conditions. This was strongly supported by extensive numerical process simulation. The modeling of the VGF furnaces and processes was made by using a new computer code called CrysVUN++, which was recently developed in the Crystal Growth Laboratory in Erlangen.GaAs crystals with diameters of 2 and 3in were grown in pyrolytic Boron Nitride (pBN) crucibles having a small-diameter seed section and a conical part. Boric oxide was used to fully encapsulate the crystal and the melt. An initial silicon content in the GaAs melt of c (melt) = 3 x10^19,^-3 has to be used in order to achieve a carrier concentration of n = (0.8- 2) x10^18,^-3, which is the substrate specification of the device manufacturer of the diode-laser. The EPD could be reduced to values between 500,^-2 and 50,^-2 with a Si-doping level of 8 x10^17 to 1 x10^18,^-3. Even the 3in wafers have rather large dislocation-free areas. The lowest EPDs ( <100,^-2) are achieved for long seed wells of the crucible.

  5. Characterization of High-power Quasi-cw Laser Diode Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephen, Mark A.; Vasilyev, Aleksey; Troupaki, Elisavet; Allan, Graham R.; Kashem, Nasir B.

    2005-01-01

    NASA s requirements for high reliability, high performance satellite laser instruments have driven the investigation of many critical components; specifically, 808 nm laser diode array (LDA) pump devices. Performance and comprehensive characterization data of Quasi-CW, High-power, laser diode arrays is presented.

  6. High power diode laser stack development using gold-tin bonding technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Dong; Wang, Jingwei; Zhang, Pu; Cai, Lei; Dai, Ye; Li, Yingjie; Liu, Xingsheng

    2015-02-01

    High power diode lasers have increased application in many fields. In this work, a sophisticated high power and high performance conduction cooled diode laser stack has been developed for long pulse duration and high duty cycle using gold-tin (AuSn) bonding technology. The transient thermal behavior and optical simulation of the laser diode stack module are investigated to optimize the laser device structure. CTE-matched submount and AuSn hard solder are used for bonding the laser diode bar to achieve higher reliability and longer lifetime. Guided by the numerical simulation and analytical results, conduction cooled diode laser stack with high power, long pulse duration and high duty cycle is fabricated and characterized. Compared with the conventional indium bonding technology, the new design is a promising approach to obtain improved performance with high reliability and long lifetime.

  7. Case studies of industrial applications of high-power diode laser in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovikorpi, Jari; Jansson, Anssi; Salminen, Antti

    2003-06-01

    The high power diode laser is a new industrial tool. It has several advantages and disadvantages compared to the conventional industrially used CO2 and Nd:YAG laser. The most promising areas of application of diode laser have been considered to be thin sheet welding and hardening. Quite a few feasibility studies of the use of diode laser have been carried out in Finland. So far there has been some application in which diode laser is the most suitable laser. Typically, the HPDL is integrated to an industrial robot. The welding of stainless steel housing, car door lock and catalytic converters are typical examples of applications in which diode laser has technological as well as economical advantages over the conventional laser and welding techniques. The welding of these products requires good control over the heat input, short through put time and low investment. The weld cross-section of a diode laser weld is, because of conduction limited welding process, more suitable for these applications than the keyhole welding. Hardening of a large gear wheel presents also a good example of an application in which the diode laser makes it possible to economically produce structures that have not earlier been possible. Hardening requires a special form of heat delivery in order to ensure evenly hardened zone and acceptable quality. The application was performed with two high power diode lasers. The case studies of these four applications are presented and discussed in details in this paper.

  8. High power diode laser array development using completely indium free packaging technology with narrow spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Dong; Wang, Jingwei; Gao, Lijun; Liang, Xuejie; Li, Xiaoning; Liu, Xingsheng

    2016-03-01

    The high power diode lasers have been widely used in many fields. In this work, a sophisticated high power and high performance horizontal array of diode laser stacks have been developed and fabricated with high duty cycle using hard solder bonding technology. CTE-matched submount and Gold Tin (AuSn) hard solder are used for bonding the diode laser bar to achieve the performances of anti-thermal fatigue, higher reliability and longer lifetime. This array consists of 30 bars with the expected optical output peak power of 6000W. By means of numerical simulation and analytical results, the diode laser bars are aligned on suitable positions along the water cooled cooler in order to achieve the uniform wavelength with narrow spectrum and accurate central wavelength. The performance of the horizontal array, such as output power, spectrum, thermal resistance, life time, etc., is characterized and analyzed.

  9. Reliability of high-power AlGaAs/GaAs QW laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabkowski, Ferdynand P.; Pendse, D. R.; Barrett, Richard J.; Chin, Aland K.; Jollay, Richard A.; Clausen, Edward M., Jr.; Hughes, L. C.; Sanders, Neil B.

    1996-09-01

    High power laser diodes have been continuously gaining more practical applications. In the majority of these applications, device performance is a determining factor. However, device reliability determines whether a laser diode can be successfully introduced in a commercial product. We review some device reliability problems and their solutions found through customer experience while supplying packaged high power AlGaAs/GaAs quantum well laser diodes, utilized in medical, high resolution printers. The reliability problems were related to either photo-induced chemical reactions on the output facet leading to visible optical damage or the propensity of the material to rapidly develop dark line defects. To improve the reliability of high power laser diodes, we have performed numerous aging studies, followed by detailed failure mode analysis. Both hermetically packaged devices and devices exposed to air ambient were evaluated. The devices whose parameters deteriorated during aging were examined with optical microscopy, infrared microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Auger spectroscopy, residual gas analysis and also electron beam induced current. We report the results of the failure mode analysis and suggest solutions to eliminate failures of high power laser diodes.

  10. High power visible diode laser for the treatment of eye diseases by laser coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Arne; Hagen, Clemens; Harlander, Maximilian; Nussbaumer, Bernhard

    2015-03-01

    We present a high power visible diode laser enabling a low-cost treatment of eye diseases by laser coagulation, including the two leading causes of blindness worldwide (diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration) as well as retinopathy of prematurely born children, intraocular tumors and retinal detachment. Laser coagulation requires the exposure of the eye to visible laser light and relies on the high absorption of the retina. The need for treatment is constantly increasing, due to the demographic trend, the increasing average life expectancy and medical care demand in developing countries. The World Health Organization reacts to this demand with global programs like the VISION 2020 "The right to sight" and the following Universal Eye Health within their Global Action Plan (2014-2019). One major point is to motivate companies and research institutes to make eye treatment cheaper and easily accessible. Therefore it becomes capital providing the ophthalmology market with cost competitive, simple and reliable technologies. Our laser is based on the direct second harmonic generation of the light emitted from a tapered laser diode and has already shown reliable optical performance. All components are produced in wafer scale processes and the resulting strong economy of scale results in a price competitive laser. In a broader perspective the technology behind our laser has a huge potential in non-medical applications like welding, cutting, marking and finally laser-illuminated projection.

  11. Laser remelting of Ti6AL4V using high power diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaya-Vázquez, M. R.; Sánchez-Amaya, J. M.; Boukha, Z.; El Amrani, K.; Botana, F. J.

    2012-04-01

    Titanium alloys present excellent mechanical and corrosion properties, being widely employed in different industries such as medical, aerospace, automotive, petrochemical, nuclear and power generation, etc. Ti6Al4V is the α-β alloy most employed in industry. The modification of its properties can be achieved with convectional heat treatments and/or with laser processing. Laser remelting (LR) is a technology applied to Ti6Al4V by other authors with excimer and Nd-Yag laser with pure argon shielding gas to prevent risk of oxidation. In the present contribution, laser remelting has been applied for the first time to Ti6Al4V with a high power diode laser (with pure argon as shielding gas). Results showed that remelted samples (with medium energy densities) have higher microhardness and better corrosion resistance than Ti6Al4V base metal.

  12. High-power AlGaAs channeled substrate planar diode lasers for spaceborne communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, J. C.; Goldstein, B.; Pultz, G. N.; Slavin, S. E.; Carlin, D. B.; Ettenberg, M.

    1988-01-01

    A high power channeled substrate planar AlGaAs diode laser with an emission wavelength of 8600 to 8800 A was developed. The optoelectronic behavior (power current, single spatial and spectral behavior, far field characteristics, modulation, and astigmatism properties) and results of computer modeling studies on the performance of the laser are discussed. Lifetest data on these devices at high output power levels is also included. In addition, a new type of channeled substrate planar laser utilizing a Bragg grating to stabilize the longitudinal mode was demonstrated. The fabrication procedures and optoelectronic properties of this new diode laser are described.

  13. DIAL monitoring of atmospheric climate-determining gases employing high-power pulsed laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penchev, Stoyan P.; Naboko, Sergei V.; Naboko, Vassily N.; Pencheva, Vasilka H.; Donchev, T.; Pavlov, Lyubomir Y.; Simeonov, P.

    2003-11-01

    High-power pulsed laser diodes are employed for determining atmospheric humidity and methane. The proposed DIAL method optimizes the spectral properties of laser radiation within the molecular absorption bands of 0.86 - 0.9 μm of these major greenhouse gases. The explicit absorption spectrum is explored by computational convolution method based on reference data on spectral linestrengths modulated by the characteristic broad laser line of the selected laser diodes. The lidar scheme is ultimately compact, of low-energy consumption and suggests a large potential for ecological monitoring.

  14. High Power Diode Pumped 1.06 Micron Solid State Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvind, Mukundarajan A.; Martin, Dan W.; Osterhage, R. J.

    1989-07-01

    Diode pumped solid state lasers have been attracting significant interest in recent years due to advances in high power semiconductor diode lasers. They offer considerable advantages over flashlamp pumped lasers such as compact size, high efficiency, lower heat dissipation and solid-state reliability. In this paper, we report on the results of a Nd:YAG laser, transverse pumped by diode laser arrays. We have measured an output power of 1.14 Watts at 1.06 microns with a laser diode power consumption of 40 Watts. This represents the highest reported electrical efficiency (2.85%) for a transverse pumped, CW, TEM00 laser. The diode arrays were selected and tuned to emit at wavelengths close to the peak neodymium absorption line at 0.808 microns with Peltier coolers. Two diode laser bars side pumped a 20 mm long, 1.5 mm diameter Nd:YAG laser rod. The optical cavity is 13.8 cm long consisting of a high reflectivity mirror and a 95% reflectivity output mirror. The output beam divergence was measured to be near diffraction limited at 1.4 milliradians, and the beam diameter was 1 mm.

  15. High-power narrow-vertical-divergence photonic band crystal laser diodes with optimized epitaxial structure

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Lei; Qu, Hongwei; Liu, Yun; Zhang, Yejin; Zheng, Wanhua; Wang, Yufei; Qi, Aiyi

    2014-12-08

    900 nm longitudinal photonic band crystal (PBC) laser diodes with optimized epitaxial structure are fabricated. With a same calculated fundamental-mode divergence, stronger mode discrimination is achieved by a quasi-periodic index modulation in the PBC waveguide than a periodic one. Experiments show that the introduction of over 5.5 μm-thick PBC waveguide contributes to only 10% increment of the internal loss for the laser diodes. For broad area PBC lasers, output powers of 5.75 W under continuous wave test and over 10 W under quasi-continuous wave test are reported. The vertical divergence angles are 10.5° at full width at half maximum and 21.3° with 95% power content, in conformity with the simulated angles. Such device shows a prospect for high-power narrow-vertical-divergence laser emission from single diode laser and laser bar.

  16. Laser assisted die bending: a new application of high power diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuöcker, D.; Schumi, T.; Spitzer, O.; Bammer, F.; Schuöcker, G.; Sperrer, G.

    2015-02-01

    Nowadays high power lasers are mainly used for cutting of sheet metals, for welding, hardening and rapid prototyping. In the forming of sheet metals as bending or deep drawing lasers are not used. Nevertheless a few years ago a new application of high power lasers has been invented, where bending of materials that break at room temperature becomes possible by heating them along the bending edge with high power lasers thus allowing their treatment without cracks and rupture. For this purpose a large number of diode lasers are arranged in the bottom tool of a bending machine (a V-shaped die) which heat up the initially flat sheet metal during the bending process what is performed by pressing it into the die with a knife shaped upper tool where due to the laser heating the material is softened and thus cracks are avoided. For the technical realization of the new process of laser assisted die bending, modules equipped with numerous laser diodes and a total beam power of 2,5 kW are used. The light emitted by these modules enters a tool with a length of 15cm and is deflected towards the workpiece. By using ten of these modules with adjacent dies and by integrating those in a bending press a bending edge of sheet metals with a length of 1500mm can be realized. Such a bending press with laser assistance also needs energization with a power of practically 50kW, a respective water flow, a heat exchanger system and also a control for all functions of this system. Special measures have also been developed to avoid radiating of those tools that are not covered by a workpiece in the case of bending edges shorter than the full length of the bending tools whereas individual short circuiting of diode modules can be performed. Specific measures to ensure a safe operation without any harm to the operational person have been realized. Exploitation of the bending process has been carried out for titanium, where material thicknesses up to 3mm have been bent successfully.

  17. Improving Reliability of High Power Quasi-CW Laser Diode Arrays Operating in Long Pulse Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Lockard, George E.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Baker, Nathaniel R.

    2006-01-01

    Operating high power laser diode arrays in long pulse regime of about 1 msec, which is required for pumping 2-micron thulium and holmium-based lasers, greatly limits their useful lifetime. This paper describes performance of laser diode arrays operating in long pulse mode and presents experimental data of the active region temperature and pulse-to-pulse thermal cycling that are the primary cause of their premature failure and rapid degradation. This paper will then offer a viable approach for determining the optimum design and operational parameters leading to the maximum attainable lifetime.

  18. Generation of high-power nanosecond pulses from laser diode-pumped Nd:YAG lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Kinpui

    1988-01-01

    Simulation results are used to compare the pulse energy levels and pulse energy widths that can be achieved with LD-pumped Nd:YAG lasers for both the pulse-transmission mode (PTM) and pulse-reflection mode (PRM) Q-switching methods for pulse energy levels up to hundreds of microjoules and pulse widths as short as 1 ns. It is shown that high-power pulses with pulse widths as short as 1 ns can be generated with PTM Q-switched in LD-pumped Nd:YAG lasers. With the PRM Q-switching method, pulse widths as short as 2 ns and pulse energy at the level of a few hundred microjoules can also be achieved but require pumping with 8-10-mJ AlGaAs laser diode arrays.

  19. Injection locking of a low cost high power laser diode at 461 nm.

    PubMed

    Pagett, C J H; Moriya, P H; Celistrino Teixeira, R; Shiozaki, R F; Hemmerling, M; Courteille, Ph W

    2016-05-01

    Stable laser sources at 461 nm are important for optical cooling of strontium atoms. In most existing experiments, this wavelength is obtained by frequency doubling infrared lasers, since blue laser diodes either have low power or large emission bandwidths. Here, we show that injecting less than 10 mW of monomode laser radiation into a blue multimode 500 mW high power laser diode is capable of slaving at least 50% of the power to the desired frequency. We verify the emission bandwidth reduction by saturation spectroscopy on a strontium gas cell and by direct beating of the slave with the master laser. We also demonstrate that the laser can efficiently be used within the Zeeman slower for optical cooling of a strontium atomic beam. PMID:27250390

  20. Injection locking of a low cost high power laser diode at 461 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagett, C. J. H.; Moriya, P. H.; Celistrino Teixeira, R.; Shiozaki, R. F.; Hemmerling, M.; Courteille, Ph. W.

    2016-05-01

    Stable laser sources at 461 nm are important for optical cooling of strontium atoms. In most existing experiments, this wavelength is obtained by frequency doubling infrared lasers, since blue laser diodes either have low power or large emission bandwidths. Here, we show that injecting less than 10 mW of monomode laser radiation into a blue multimode 500 mW high power laser diode is capable of slaving at least 50% of the power to the desired frequency. We verify the emission bandwidth reduction by saturation spectroscopy on a strontium gas cell and by direct beating of the slave with the master laser. We also demonstrate that the laser can efficiently be used within the Zeeman slower for optical cooling of a strontium atomic beam.

  1. High power diode lasers emitting from 639 nm to 690 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, L.; Grimshaw, M.; DeVito, M.; Kanskar, M.; Dong, W.; Guan, X.; Zhang, S.; Patterson, J.; Dickerson, P.; Kennedy, K.; Li, S.; Haden, J.; Martinsen, R.

    2014-03-01

    There is increasing market demand for high power reliable red lasers for display and cinema applications. Due to the fundamental material system limit at this wavelength range, red diode lasers have lower efficiency and are more temperature sensitive, compared to 790-980 nm diode lasers. In terms of reliability, red lasers are also more sensitive to catastrophic optical mirror damage (COMD) due to the higher photon energy. Thus developing higher power-reliable red lasers is very challenging. This paper will present nLIGHT's released red products from 639 nm to 690nm, with established high performance and long-term reliability. These single emitter diode lasers can work as stand-alone singleemitter units or efficiently integrate into our compact, passively-cooled Pearl™ fiber-coupled module architectures for higher output power and improved reliability. In order to further improve power and reliability, new chip optimizations have been focused on improving epitaxial design/growth, chip configuration/processing and optical facet passivation. Initial optimization has demonstrated promising results for 639 nm diode lasers to be reliably rated at 1.5 W and 690nm diode lasers to be reliably rated at 4.0 W. Accelerated life-test has started and further design optimization are underway.

  2. High power, 1060-nm diode laser with an asymmetric hetero-waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, T.; Hao, E.; Zhang, Yu

    2015-07-01

    By introducing an asymmetric hetero-waveguide into the epitaxial structure of a diode laser, a 6.21-W output is achieved at a wavelength of 1060 nm. A different design in p- and n-confinement, based on optimisation of energy bands, is used to reduce voltage loss and meet the requirement of high power and high wall-plug efficiency. A 1060-nm diode laser with a single quantum well and asymmetric hetero-structure waveguide is fabricated and analysed. Measurement results show that the asymmetric hetero-structure waveguide can be efficiently used for reducing voltage loss and improving the confinement of injection carriers and wall-plug efficiency.

  3. High-power diode-pumped mode-locked Yb:YAG ceramic laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Shinki; Hikita, Yuto; Sone, Hiroyasu; Ogawa, Takayo; Wada, Satoshi

    2014-05-01

    A high-power diode-pumped passively mode-locked Yb:YAG ceramic laser was demonstrated. An average output power of 3.80W with a pulse duration of 433 fs at a repetition rate of 90.9MHz was obtained at a wavelength of 1050 nm using a 2% output coupler. A peak power of 96.5kW was also obtained. To the best of our knowledge, these are the highest reported average power and peak power for a diode-pumped mode-locked Yb:YAG ceramic laser.

  4. Temperature evaluation of dental implant surface irradiated with high-power diode laser.

    PubMed

    Rios, F G; Viana, E R; Ribeiro, G M; González, J C; Abelenda, A; Peruzzo, D C

    2016-09-01

    The prevalence of peri-implantitis and the absence of a standard approach for decontamination of the dental implant surface have led to searches for effective therapies. Since the source of diode lasers is portable, has reduced cost, and does not cause damage to the titanium surface of the implant, high-power diode lasers have been used for this purpose. The effect of laser irradiation on the implants is the elevation of the temperature surface. If this elevation exceeds 47 °C, the bone tissue is irreversibly damaged, so for a safety therapy, the laser parameters should be controlled. In this study, a diode laser of GaAsAl was used to irradiate titanium dental implants, for powers 1.32 to 2.64 W (real) or 2.00 to 4.00 W (nominal), in continuous/pulsed mode DC/AC, with exposure time of 5/10 s, with/without air flow for cooling. The elevation of the temperature was monitored in real time in two positions: cervical and apical. The best results for decontamination using a 968-nm diode laser were obtained for a power of 1.65 and 1.98 W (real) for 10 s, in DC or AC mode, with an air flow of 2.5 l/min. In our perspective in this article, we determine a suggested approach for decontamination of the dental implant surface using a 968-nm diode laser. PMID:27365109

  5. Optical injection and spectral filtering of high-power ultraviolet laser diodes.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, V M; Ballance, C J; Tock, C J; Lucas, D M

    2015-09-15

    We demonstrate injection locking of high-power laser diodes operating at 397 nm. We achieve stable operation with an injection power of ∼100  μW and a slave laser output power of up to 110 mW. We investigate the spectral purity of the slave laser light via photon scattering experiments on a single trapped (40)Ca(+) ion. We show that it is possible to achieve a scattering rate indistinguishable from that of monochromatic light by filtering the laser light with a diffraction grating to remove amplified spontaneous emission. PMID:26371912

  6. High-power laser diodes based on InGaAsP alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razeghi, Manijeh

    1994-06-01

    HIGH-POWER, high-coherence solid-state lasers, based on dielectric materials such as ruby or Nd:YAG (yttrium aluminium garnet), have many civilian and military applications. The active media in these lasers are insulating, and must therefore be excited (or `pumped') by optical, rather than electrical, means. Conventional gas-discharge lamps can be used as the pumping source, but semiconductor diode lasers are more efficient, as their wavelength can be tailored to match the absorption properties of the lasing material. Semiconducting AlGaAs alloys are widely used for this purpose1, 2, but oxidation of the aluminium and the spreading of defects during device operation limit the lifetime of the diodes3, and hence the reliability of the system as a whole. Aluminium-free InGaAsP compounds, on the other hand, do not have these lifetime-limiting properties4-8. We report here the fabrication of high-power lasers based on InGaAsP (lattice-matched to GaAs substrates), which operate over the same wavelength range as conventional AlGaAs laser diodes and show significantly improved reliability. The other optical and electrical properties of these diodes are either comparable or superior to those of the AlGaAs system.

  7. Improvements of high-power diode laser line generators open up new application fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinschien, J.; Bayer, A.; Bruns, P.; Aschke, L.; Lissotschenko, V. N.

    2009-02-01

    Beam shaping improvements of line generators based on high power diode lasers lead to new application fields as hardening, annealing or cutting of various materials. Of special interest is the laser treatment of silicon. An overview of the wide variety of applications is presented with special emphasis of the relevance of unique laser beam parameters like power density and beam uniformity. Complementary to vision application and plastic processing, these new application markets become more and more important and can now be addressed by high power diode laser line generators. Herewith, a family of high power diode laser line generators is presented that covers this wide spectrum of application fields with very different requirements, including new applications as cutting of silicon or glass, as well as the beam shaping concepts behind it. A laser that generates a 5m long and 4mm wide homogeneous laser line is shown with peak intensities of 0.2W/cm2 for inspection of railway catenaries as well as a laser that generates a homogeneous intensity distribution of 60mm x 2mm size with peak intensities of 225W/cm2 for plastic processing. For the annealing of silicon surfaces, a laser was designed that generates an extraordinary uniform intensity distribution with residual inhomogeneities (contrast ratio) of less than 3% over a line length of 11mm and peak intensities of up to 75kW/cm2. Ultimately, a laser line is shown with a peak intensity of 250kW/cm2 used for cutting applications. Results of various application tests performed with the above mentioned lasers are discussed, particularly the surface treatment of silicon and the cutting of glass.

  8. High-Power Broad-Area Diode Lasers and Laser Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erbert, Goetz; Baerwolff, Arthur; Sebastian, Juergen; Tomm, Jens

    This review presents the basic ideas and some examples of the chip technology of high-power diode lasers ( λ= 650,-1060,) in connection with the achievements of mounted single-stripe emitters in recent years.In the first section the optimization of the epitaxial layer structure for a low facet load and high conversion efficiency is discussed. The so-called broadened waveguide Large Optical Cavity (LOC) concept is described and also some advantages and disadvantages of Al-free material. The next section deals with the processing steps of epitaxial wafers to make single emitters and bars. Several possibilities to realize contact windows (implantation, insulators, and wet chemical oxidation) and laser mirrors are presented. The impact of heating in the CW regime and some aspects of reliability are the following topics. The calculation of thermal distributions in diode lasers, which shows the need for sophisticated mounting, will be given. In the last part the current state-of-the-art of single-stripe emitters will be reviewed.

  9. High-power fiber-coupled 100W visible spectrum diode lasers for display applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unger, Andreas; Küster, Matthias; Köhler, Bernd; Biesenbach, Jens

    2013-02-01

    Diode lasers in the blue and red spectral range are the most promising light sources for upcoming high-brightness digital projectors in cinemas and large venue displays. They combine improved efficiency, longer lifetime and a greatly improved color space compared to traditional xenon light sources. In this paper we report on high-power visible diode laser sources to serve the demands of this emerging market. A unique electro-optical platform enables scalable fiber coupled sources at 638 nm with an output power of up to 100 W from a 400 μm NA0.22 fiber. For the blue diode laser we demonstrate scalable sources from 5 W to 100 W from a 400 μm NA0.22 fiber.

  10. Reviews of a Diode-Pumped Alkali Laser (DPAL): a potential high powered light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, He; Wang, You; Han, Juhong; An, Guofei; Zhang, Wei; Xue, Liangping; Wang, Hongyuan; Zhou, Jie; Gao, Ming; Jiang, Zhigang

    2015-03-01

    Diode pumped alkali vapor lasers (DPALs) were first developed by in W. F. Krupke at the beginning of the 21th century. In the recent years, DPALs have been rapidly developed because of their high Stokes efficiency, good beam quality, compact size and near-infrared emission wavelengths. The Stokes efficiency of a DPAL can achieve a miraculous level as high as 95.3% for cesium (Cs), 98.1% for rubidium (Rb), and 99.6% for potassium (K), respectively. The thermal effect of a DPAL is theoretically smaller than that of a normal diode-pumped solid-state laser (DPSSL). Additionally, generated heat of a DPAL can be removed by circulating the gases inside a sealed system. Therefore, the thermal management would be relatively simple for realization of a high-powered DPAL. In the meantime, DPALs combine the advantages of both DPSSLs and normal gas lasers but evade the disadvantages of them. Generally, the collisionally broadened cross sections of both the D1 and the D2 lines for a DPAL are much larger than those for the most conventional solid-state, fiber and gas lasers. Thus, DPALs provide an outstanding potentiality for realization of high-powered laser systems. It has been shown that a DPAL is now becoming one of the most promising candidates for simultaneously achieving good beam quality and high output power. With a lot of marvelous merits, a DPAL becomes one of the most hopeful high-powered laser sources of next generation.

  11. Sequential description of the catastrophic optical damage of high power laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souto, J.; Pura, J. L.; Torres, A.; Jiménez, J.; Bettiati, M.; Laruelle, F. J.

    2016-03-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) analysis of high power laser diodes permits to reveal the main defects issued from the catastrophic optical degradation (COD). These defects are revealed as discontinuous dark lines along the ridge. The different levels of damage are analysed, and a thermomechanical model taking account of the thermal and mechanical properties of the laser structure is settled up. In this model the COD is described as a local temperature enhancement, which generates thermal stresses leading to the generation of dislocations, which are responsible for the degradation of the thermal conductivity of the of the active zone of the laser.

  12. High-power operation of coherently coupled tapered laser diodes in an external cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimmel, G.; Doyen, I.; Janicot, S.; Hanna, M.; Georges, P.; Lucas-Leclin, G.; Decker, J.; Crump, P.; Erbert, G.; Kaunga-Nyirenda, S.; Moss, D.; Bull, S.; Larkins, E. C.; Witte, U.; Traub, M.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate a rear-side phase-locking architecture with two high-brightness diode lasers. This technique is based on the passive phase-locking of emitters in an external cavity on their rear facet, and their coherent combination on the front facet. Two high-brightness high-power tapered laser diodes are coherently combined using a Michelson-based cavity. The combining efficiency is above 80% and results in an output power of 6.7 W in a nearly diffraction-limited beam. The rear-side architecture is then used with a laser bar of 5 tapered emitters using an interferometric extended cavity, based on a diffractive optical element. We describe the experimental evaluation of the diffractive optical element, and the phase-locked operation of the laser bar.

  13. High Power Laser Diode Arrays for 2-Micron Solid State Coherent Lidars Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra; Sudesh, Vikas; Baker, Nathaniel

    2003-01-01

    Laser diode arrays are critical components of any diode-pumped solid state laser systems, constraining their performance and reliability. Laser diode arrays (LDAs) are used as the pump source for energizing the solid state lasing media to generate an intense coherent laser beam with a high spatial and spectral quality. The solid state laser design and the characteristics of its lasing materials define the operating wavelength, pulse duration, and power of the laser diodes. The pump requirements for high pulse energy 2-micron solid state lasers are substantially different from those of more widely used 1-micron lasers and in many aspects more challenging [1]. Furthermore, the reliability and lifetime demanded by many coherent lidar applications, such as global wind profiling from space and long-range clear air turbulence detection from aircraft, are beyond the capability of currently available LDAs. In addition to the need for more reliable LDAs with longer lifetime, further improvement in the operational parameters of high power quasi-cw LDAs, such as electrical efficiency, brightness, and duty cycle, are also necessary for developing cost-effective 2-micron coherent lidar systems for applications that impose stringent size, heat dissipation, and power constraints. Global wind sounding from space is one of such applications, which is the main driver for this work as part of NASA s Laser Risk Reduction Program. This paper discusses the current state of the 792 nm LDA technology and the technology areas being pursued toward improving their performance. The design and development of a unique characterization facility for addressing the specific issues associated with the LDAs for pumping 2-micron coherent lidar transmitters and identifying areas of technological improvement will be described. Finally, the results of measurements to date on various standard laser diode packages, as well as custom-designed packages with potentially longer lifetime, will be reported.

  14. High power diode pumped solid state laser development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Solarz, R.; Albrecht, G.; Hackel, L.

    1994-03-01

    The authors recent developments in high powered diode pumped solid state lasers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Over the past year the authors have made continued improvements to semiconductor pump array technology which includes the development of higher average power and lower cost pump modules. They report the performance of high power AlGaAs, InGaAs, and AlGaInP arrays. They also report on improvement to the integrated micro-optics designs in conjunction with lensing duct technology which gives rise to very high performance end pumping designs for solid state lasers which have major advantages which they detail. Substantial progress on beam quality improvements to near the diffraction limit at very high power have also been made and will be reported. They also will discuss recent experiments on high power non-linear materials for q-switches, harmonic converters, and parametric oscillators. Advances in diode pumped devices at LLNL which include tunable Cr:LiSrAlF{sub 6}, mid-IR Er:YAG, holmium based lasers and other developments will also be outlined. Concepts for delivering up to 30 kilowatts of average power from a DPSSL oscillator will be described.

  15. Thermal modelling of high-power laser diodes mounted using various types of submounts

    SciTech Connect

    Bezotosnyi, V V; Krokhin, O N; Oleshchenko, V A; Pevtsov, V F; Popov, Yu M; Cheshev, E A

    2014-10-31

    Using three-dimensional thermal modelling of a highpower 980-nm laser diode with a stripe contact width of 100 μm as an example, we analyse the thermal parameters of high-power laser diodes mounted using submounts. We consider a range of thermal conductivities of submounts that includes parameters of widely used thermal compensators based on AlN, BeO and SiC, as well as on CuW and CuMo composites and polycrystalline and single-crystal synthetic diamond with high thermal conductivity. Taking into account experimental overall efficiency vs. pump current data, we calculate the temperature of the active layer as a function of the width, thickness and thermal conductivity of the submount at thermal loads corresponding to cw output powers of 10, 15 and 20 W. (lasers)

  16. Emission parameters and thermal management of single high-power 980-nm laser diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Bezotosnyi, V V; Krokhin, O N; Oleshchenko, V A; Pevtsov, V F; Popov, Yu M; Cheshev, E A

    2014-02-28

    We report emission parameters of high-power cw 980-nm laser diodes (LDs) with a stripe contact width of 100 μm. On copper heat sinks of the C-mount type, a reliable output power of 10 W is obtained at a pump current of 10 A. Using a heat flow model derived from analysis of calculated and measured overall efficiencies at pump currents up to 20 A, we examine the possibility of raising the reliable power limit of a modified high-power LD mounted on heat sinks of the F-mount type using submounts with optimised geometric parameters and high thermal conductivity. The possibility of increasing the maximum reliable cw output power to 20 W with the use of similar laser crystals is discussed. (lasers)

  17. A study of laser ablation propulsion using polyoxymethelyne and a high power diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesar, Michael D.

    With an increased interest by universities, government and commercial groups in using constellations of pico and nano satellites, the need for micro-thrusters to aid in the station-keeping capabilities has become strong. This report examines using polymers and a laser to ablate material as a potential propulsion option for station-keeping. Homopolymer polyoxymethelyne (POM), commonly known as Delrin(TM), was tested as a fuel for a high powered (20 Watt 980 nm) solid state diode laser ablation thruster to be used for station-keeping on pico and nano sized satellites. The experiments required a partial vacuum to reduce the effects of air decomposition and remove water vapor during the ablation event. The vacuum chamber, shadowgraph, and an impulse measurement system were all designed and built around the 20-Watt laser. Three different sample thicknesses were tested (.005", .010", and .020") to determine the behavior of the polymer. The laser was focused onto the POM sample, which was mounted to a load cell and calibrated to measure the impulse of the system imparted by the laser pulse. The calculated thrust values ranged from 600 microN to 1300 microN with a high uncertainty due to the small sample size. The exhaust plume from the ablation event was captured using a shadowgraph. A low velocity was recorded because the chamber was not a complete vacuum, causing the exhaust plume to collide with the air molecules in the test chamber. However the load cell results suggested that 1.30 mN per burst can be produced with an uncertainty of 30%. With the work outlined in this paper, POM shows the promise and challenge of being a good candidate as a fuel material. POM warrants further development and investment as a fuel to be used with a laser ablation micro-thruster.

  18. Advances in 808nm high power diode laser bars and single emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, J.; Lehkonen, S.; Liu, G.; Schleuning, D.; Acklin, B.

    2016-03-01

    Key applications for 780-830nm high power diode lasers include the pumping of various gas, solid state, and fiber laser media; medical and aesthetic applications including hair removal; direct diode materials processing; and computer-to-plate (CtP) printing. Many of these applications require high brightness fiber coupled beam delivery, in turn requiring high brightness optical output at the bar and chip level. Many require multiple bars per system, with aggregate powers on the order of kWs, placing a premium on high power and high power conversion efficiency. This paper presents Coherent's recent advances in the production of high power, high brightness, high efficiency bars and chips at 780-830nm. Results are presented for bars and single emitters of various geometries. Performance data is presented demonstrating peak power conversion efficiencies of 63% in CW mode. Reliability data is presented demonstrating <50k hours lifetime for products including 60W 18% fill factor and 80W 28% fill factor conduction cooled bars, and <1e9 shots lifetime for 500W QCW bars.

  19. Advancements in high-power diode laser stacks for defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Rajiv; Merchen, David; Stapleton, Dean; Patterson, Steve; Kissel, Heiko; Fassbender, Wilhlem; Biesenbach, Jens

    2012-06-01

    This paper reports on the latest advancements in vertical high-power diode laser stacks using micro-channel coolers, which deliver the most compact footprint, power scalability and highest power/bar of any diode laser package. We present electro-optical (E-O) data on water-cooled stacks with wavelengths ranging from 7xx nm to 9xx nm and power levels of up to 5.8kW, delivered @ 200W/bar, CW mode, and a power-conversion efficiency of >60%, with both-axis collimation on a bar-to-bar pitch of 1.78mm. Also, presented is E-O data on a compact, conductively cooled, hardsoldered, stack package based on conventional CuW and AlN materials, with bar-to-bar pitch of 1.8mm, delivering average power/bar >15W operating up to 25% duty cycle, 10ms pulses @ 45C. The water-cooled stacks can be used as pump-sources for diode-pumped alkali lasers (DPALs) or for more traditional diode-pumped solid-state lasers (DPSSL). which are power/brightness scaled for directed energy weapons applications and the conductively-cooled stacks as illuminators.

  20. Recent advances in actively cooled high-power laser diode bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrom, Nels P.; Roh, S. D.; Grasso, Daniel M.; Kane, Thomas J.

    2007-02-01

    In order to meet the ever increasing demands of many high power laser diode customers, Nuvonyx has worked to improve a number of key metrics of the diode laser package. The most often challenged specifications are power per bar, efficiency, and reliability in both hard pulse and constant current mode. In response to these requests, Nuvonyx has worked to offer commercial component devices in excess of 100 and 150 watts per bar package in multiple wavelengths. The packages are routinely combined to form single stacks that generate greater than 3.5 kilowatts each and two-dimensional arrays which produce light in excess of 10 kilowatts. These parts all demonstrate predicted lifetimes in excess of 10,000 hours. The micro-channel cooled heat sink has also been improved by closer matching the coefficient of thermal expansion of the cooler to the laser diode bar, which allows for harder solders such as gold-tin to be employed. All of this work has helped to meet the specifications of the most demanding laser diode customers.

  1. Bright laser source with high-power single-mode-emitting diode laser stacked array assembly and fiber coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrer, M.; Moser, H.; Gisler, T.; Spinola Durante, G.; Pierer, J.; Bosshard, C.; Krejci, M.; Lichtenstein, N.

    2011-03-01

    Single-mode-emitting high-power diode laser arrays (SM-HPDLA) are available industrially with more than 50 W emission power per bar. Based on this platform an expandable prototype solution is realized for fiber coupling of a stacked array with more than 100 W to an optical fiber with diameter of 200 micron and NA of 0.11. Advanced methods of controlled assembly of micro-optics by infrared laser-soldering have been developed therefore. We present a compact and scalable concept with scalability on 2 internal and 2 external factors. Internal factors are the increasing beam quality and power stability of high-power single-mode-emitting arrays and the improved assembly accuracy for diode bar and micro-optics. External factors are the interlaced coupling of stacked beam emission from the stacked array and the further option to use optimized polarisation coupling with several diode laser stacks.

  2. Generation of neutral atomic beams utilizing photodetachment by high power diode laser stacks.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, A P; Grussie, F; Bruhns, H; de Ruette, N; Koenning, T P; Miller, K A; Savin, D W; Stützel, J; Urbain, X; Kreckel, H

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate the use of high power diode laser stacks to photodetach fast hydrogen and carbon anions and produce ground term neutral atomic beams. We achieve photodetachment efficiencies of ∼7.4% for H(-) at a beam energy of 10 keV and ∼3.7% for C(-) at 28 keV. The diode laser systems used here operate at 975 nm and 808 nm, respectively, and provide high continuous power levels of up to 2 kW, without the need of additional enhancements like optical cavities. The alignment of the beams is straightforward and operation at constant power levels is very stable, while maintenance is minimal. We present a dedicated photodetachment setup that is suitable to efficiently neutralize the majority of stable negative ions in the periodic table. PMID:26628128

  3. High power cascade diode lasers emitting near 2 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoda, Takashi; Feng, Tao; Shterengas, Leon; Kipshidze, Gela; Belenky, Gregory

    2016-03-01

    High-power two-stage cascade GaSb-based type-I quantum well diode lasers emitting near 2 μm were designed and fabricated. Coated devices with cavity length of 3 mm generated about 2 W of continuous wave power from 100-μm-wide aperture at the current of 6 A. The power conversion efficiency peaked at 20%. Carrier recycling between quantum well gain stages was realized using band-to-band tunneling in GaSb/AlSb/InAs heterostructure complemented with optimized electron and hole injector regions. Design optimization eliminated parasitic optical absorption and thermionic emission, and included modification of the InAs quantum wells of electron and composition and doping profile of hole injectors. Utilization of the cascade pumping scheme yielded 2 μm lasers with improved output power and efficiency compared to existing state-of-the-art diodes.

  4. Methods for improving the beam quality of high-power diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raab, Volker; Ostermeyer, Martin; Menzel, Ralf

    2000-04-01

    Current commercially available diode lasers with output powers above a few watts lack beam quality, i.e. they have only limited possibility of small foci in combination with long Rayleigh lengths. Recent advances in coherent coupling of such lasers open view to a new generation of high power, high beam quality, low cost lasers suitable for a wide range of technical applications such as microshaping or cutting. Therefore, we performed experiments to couple the 25 diode lasers of a bar with specially coated low-reflection front facets. Mutual coherence can be improved in external resonators as opposed to the internal resonator absent in our case. Additional elements like mode stops can improve beam quality. Here we present results on the coupling of gain- guided broad-area diode lasers in external resonators, both of single emitters and bars of 25 emitters. In the single emitter case we achieved output powers up to 0.8 W at a beam quality of M2 equals 16 or 0.4 W with M2 equals 3.5 along slow axis. For the bars we achieved 10 W with M2 equals 304.

  5. Numerical simulations of novel high-power high-brightness diode laser structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucke, Konstantin; Rogg, Joseph; Kelemen, Marc T.; Poprawe, Reinhart; Weimann, Guenter

    2001-07-01

    One of the key topics in today's semiconductor laser development activities is to increase the brightness of high-power diode lasers. Although structures showing an increased brightness have been developed specific draw-backs of these structures lead to a still strong demand for investigation of alternative concepts. Especially for the investigation of basically novel structures easy-to-use and fast simulation tools are essential to avoid unnecessary, cost and time consuming experiments. A diode laser simulation tool based on finite difference representations of the Helmholtz equation in 'wide-angle' approximation and the carrier diffusion equation has been developed. An optimized numerical algorithm leads to short execution times of a few seconds per resonator round-trip on a standard PC. After each round-trip characteristics like optical output power, beam profile and beam parameters are calculated. A graphical user interface allows online monitoring of the simulation results. The simulation tool is used to investigate a novel high-power, high-brightness diode laser structure, the so-called 'Z-Structure'. In this structure an increased brightness is achieved by reducing the divergency angle of the beam by angular filtering: The round trip path of the beam is two times folded using internal total reflection at surfaces defined by a small index step in the semiconductor material, forming a stretched 'Z'. The sharp decrease of the reflectivity for angles of incidence above the angle of total reflection leads to a narrowing of the angular spectrum of the beam. The simulations of the 'Z-Structure' indicate an increase of the beam quality by a factor of five to ten compared to standard broad-area lasers.

  6. Fabrication of High power, High-Efficiency Linear Array Diode Lasers by Pulse Anodic Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin; Zhang, Jing; Li, Hui; Qu, Yi; Bo, Baoxue

    2006-09-01

    InGaAlAs/AlGaAs/GaAs double-quantum-well (DQW) linear array diode lasers with asymmetric wide waveguide have been successfully fabricated by pulse anodic oxidation upon molecular beam epitaxy material growth. High-efficiency and high-power quasi-continuous-wave (QCW) output has been realized at 808 nm wavelength. The threshold current and slope efficiency of the prepared high-fill-factor QCW devices are 24 A and 1.25 A/W, respectively, and a maximum wall-plug efficiency of 51% has been achieved.

  7. High-power CW diode-laser-array-pumped solid-state lasers and efficient nonlinear optical frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shine, Robert J.; Byer, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    During the interim period of this bridging contract, we have continued to work on the development of high-power cw diode-laser-array-pumped solid-state lasers. Towards that end, we have built lower power lasers in order to test individual components needed for the high-power laser, specifically we have built a 1 watt ring laser and a 5 watt slab laser. The 1 watt laser was used to study the injection locking process while assembling all the necessary electronics. We have demonstrated that it is possible to injection lock a diode-pumped laser using a single piezo-mounted mirror due to the lower intrinsic laser noise compared to an arc-lamp-pumped system. This allows us to optimize the injection locking servo loop and build a more stable locking system. The 5 watt laser was used as a test bed to find a practical way to mount the slab laser while minimizing the losses that occur at the total internal reflection (TIR) points in the slab. After trying many different means of protecting the TIR surfaces, we found that a new product from DuPont, Teflon AF 1600, has all the properties needed to provide a low loss protective coating. Using this material, the laser had a cavity loss of below 2%, which allowed for efficient operation of the laser in a side-pumped design. This laser produced 5 watts of output power with a slope efficiency near 20%.

  8. Fiber coupling of high-power diode laser stack for direct polycarbonate processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, E.; Quintana, I.; Azkorbebeitia, U.; Mendez, E.; Viera, G.; Galán, M.; Otaduy, D.

    2010-02-01

    We present a novel optical system for fiber coupling of a commercial high power diode laser stack and the application of this laser system to transmission welding of engineering thermoplastics. The diode laser stack is made up of two 20% fill factor bars, emitting at 808 nm and with a total maximum output power of 120W CW. The stack was collimated using FSAC micro-optics lenses in the fast and slow axis, with a full angle divergence of <4mrad and <25mrad respectively. The optical design and simulations were carried out using ZEMAX®. Based on the design we built an optical set up, which is divided in two subsystems. The first one collimates the laser beam in order to achieve the best focus and couple it into the 400μm core fiber with NA0.22 and 70% efficiency. The second subsystem is designed for beam conformation after the fiber output, using collimation and beam shaping to have a Gaussian beam profile on the work piece. The laser system was applied to study the welding of polycarbonate plastics, based on the effects of selected welding parameters on the seam geometry and surface integrity. The quality of the spot welding has been analyzed obtaining welded seams with a mean diameter about 500-600μm, preserving the good technological properties of the thermoplastic considered in this work. The results show that we have successfully developed a novel laser system which is highly efficient for thermoplastics processing.

  9. Reliability of High Power Laser Diode Arrays Operating in Long Pulse Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Lockard, George E.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Baker, Nathaniel R.

    2006-01-01

    Reliability and lifetime of quasi-CW laser diode arrays are greatly influenced by their thermal characteristics. This paper examines the thermal properties of laser diode arrays operating in long pulse duration regime.

  10. High power, high efficiency, 2D laser diode arrays for pumping solid state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, A.; McShea, J.C.; Bogdan, A.R.; Petheram, J.C.; Rosen, A.

    1987-11-01

    This document reports the current performance of 2D laser diode arrays operating at 770 nm and 808 nm for pumping promethium and neodymium solid state lasers, respectively. Typical power densities are in excess of 2kw/cm/sup 2/ with overall efficiencies greater than 30%.

  11. High Power Laser Diode Array Qualification and Guidelines for Space Flight Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, Melanie N.; Eegholm, Niels; Stephen, Mark; Leidecker, Henning; Plante, Jeannette; Meadows, Byron; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Jamison, Tracee; LaRocca, Frank

    2006-01-01

    High-power laser diode arrays (LDAs) are used for a variety of space-based remote sensor laser programs as an energy source for diode-pumped solid-state lasers. LDAs have been flown on NASA missions including MOLA, GLAS and MLA and have continued to be viewed as an important part of the laser-based instrument component suite. There are currently no military or NASA-grade, -specified, or - qualified LDAs available for "off-the-shelf" use by NASA programs. There has also been no prior attempt to define a standard screening and qualification test flow for LDAs for space applications. Initial reliability studies have also produced good results from an optical performance and stability standpoint. Usage experience has shown, howeve that the current designs being offered may be susceptible to catastrophic failures due to their physical construction (packaging) combined with the electro-optical operational modes and the environmental factors of space application. design combined with operational mode was at the root of the failures which have greatly reduced the functionality of the GLAS instrument. The continued need for LDAs for laser-based science instruments and past catastrophic failures of this part type demand examination of LDAs in a manner which enables NASA to select, buy, validate and apply them in a manner which poses as little risk to the success of the mission as possible.

  12. Reliability comparison of GaAlAs/GaAs and aluminum-free high-power laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendse, D. R.; Chin, Aland K.; Dabkowski, Ferdynand P.; Clausen, Edward M., Jr.

    1998-08-01

    Aluminum-free laser diodes are InGaAsP/GaAs devices whose epitaxial layers do not contain aluminum. Studies comparing the GaAslAs/GaAs and InGaAsP/GaAs high power laser diodes allegedly indicate that aluminum-free lasers are more reliable due to a reduction of dark-line defects, sudden failures, and gradual degradation. The improved reliability of aluminum-free lasers is presumed to result from the elimination of oxidation of the aluminum-containing epitaxial layers of the laser facets. In this presentation, the performance and reliability of GaAlAs/GaAs and InGaAsP/GaAs high power laser diodes will be reviewed and compared. The present data shows that high reliable GaAlAs/GaAs lasers can be produced with good manufacturing practices.

  13. Developments in laser joining and welding of plastics using high-power laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoult, Tony; Ong, Raymond

    2002-02-01

    Diode lasers are now being employed in industry for a range of applications, in particular they are starting to be used as alternatives to conventional techniques for thermal joining of plastics. This is being assisted by the use of improved reliability aluminum-free diodes and diode laser systems, partly due to a better understanding of failure mechanisms. The laser welding and related techniques are dependent on transmission of part of an infra-red beam through the upper layer of a joint and semi-quantitative assessment of this is required for specific applications. The technique is applicable not only to high average powers, but also to very low average power, in this regime delicate thin-walled components may be joined. Recent developments using derivatives of this technique have shown that a wide range of similar and dissimilar material combinations may be joined.

  14. Removal of graffiti from quarry stone by high power diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penide, J.; Quintero, F.; Riveiro, A.; Sánchez-Castillo, A.; Comesaña, R.; del Val, J.; Lusquiños, F.; Pou, J.

    2013-04-01

    The integrity of architectural monuments in urban areas is threatened by numerous attacks, among which the graffiti is sometimes one of the most important. Particularly, Morelia's historic center (Mexico) (appointed World Heritage Site by UNESCO) suffers, for some years, a high number of graffiti. Most of these monuments in Morelia were built using a local stone called Pink Morelia Quarry. In this paper, we present the results of a study on the feasibility to remove the graffiti from Pink Morelia Quarry using a high power diode laser treatment. An extensive experimental analysis of the operating conditions has been carried out leading to successful results. The optimal parameters to achieve a total removal of graffiti have been determined. We concluded that continuous wave regime leads to better results than modulated wave regime, additionally, a two laser passes process demonstrated a high performance.

  15. Spectroscopic analysis of packaging concepts for high-power diode laser bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hempel, Martin; Ziegler, Mathias; Schwirzke-Schaaf, Sandy; Tomm, Jens W.; Jankowski, Denny; Schröder, Dominic

    2012-05-01

    Double-side cooled high-power diode laser bars packaged by different techniques on different types of passive heat sinks are analyzed in terms of packaging-induced strain. Reference data from standard devices being single-side cooled only and packaged by conventional soft and hard soldering are also presented. Thermal profiling across the devices complements the results. The most suitable packaging architecture and technique for double-side cooled bars is identified. Measurements of the laser emission near field and electroluminescence pattern provide direct reference to the functionality of the devices. Furthermore, a type of cross calibration of the methods used for strain analysis is made, since all techniques are applied to the same set of bars. This involves micro photoluminescence, micro Raman, and degree-of-polarization electroluminescence spectroscopy.

  16. High-power high-brightness ridge-waveguide tapered diode lasers at 14xx nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallenbach, Senta; Kelemen, Marc T.; Aidam, Rolf; Losch, Rainer; Kaufel, Gudrun; Mikulla, Michael; Weimann, Guenter

    2005-04-01

    High-power spatially single-mode diode lasers at 1.4 - 1.5 μm wavelength are of interest as pump lasers for Raman and rare-earth doped fiber amplifiers as well as for material processing and for Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) at eye-safe wavelengths. A cost-efficient way to realize high-power high-brightness devices is the tapered resonator concept. We demonstrate InGaAsP/InP based diode lasers with compressively strained quantum wells and wavelengths around 1480 nm which were grown by solid source MBE. From broad area lasers with variations in quantum well number and waveguide layer thickness, parameters for the logarithmic gain model are deduced. With their implementation in 2-dimensional BPM simulations, an optimized resonator geometry is derived. Devices employ a 500 μm ridge section followed by a 2000 μm taper section with 6° angle. Continuous-wave (cw) output powers reach more than 1.5 W. Beam quality is characterized in terms of near field and far field distribution, M2, and astigmatism. An excellent agreement is found between measurement and simulation. For narrow-linewidth operation, devices are provided with anti-reflection coatings on both facets and spectrally stabilized with an external grating. We achieve 0.7 W single mode power and a side mode suppression ratio (SMSR) of 42 dB. Reliability is tested in terms of facet stability and lifetime. Pulsed measurements reveal a power stability up to more than 5 MW/cm2. From cw aging tests at 1 W output power, lifetimes of about 6,000 h are extrapolated.

  17. High-power high-brightness 808nm QCW laser diode mini bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hua; Wang, Jun; DeVito, Mark; Bao, Ling; Hodges, Aaron; Zhang, Shiguo; Wise, Damian; Grimshaw, Mike; Xu, Dapeng; Bai, Chendong

    2010-02-01

    A new class of high power high brightness 808 nm QCW laser diode mini bars has been developed. With nLight's nXLT facet passivation technology and improvements in epitaxial structure, mini bars of 3 mm bar width with high efficiency design have tested to over 280 W peak power with peak efficiency over 64% on conduction cooled CS packages, equivalent to output power density near 130 mW/μm. These mini laser bars open up new applications as compact, portable, and low current pump sources. Liftests have been carried out on conduction cooled CS packages and on QCW stacks. Over 370 million (M) shots lifetest with high efficiency design has been demonstrated on CS so far without failure, and over 80 M shots on QCW stacks with accelerated stress lifetest have also proven high reliability on mini bars with high temperature design. Failure analysis determined that the failure mechanism was related to bulk defects, showing that mini laser bars are not prone to facet failure, which is consistent with the large current pulse test and failure analysis on high power single emitters.

  18. LASER BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE: Medical instruments based on high-power diode and fibre lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gapontsev, V. P.; Minaev, V. P.; Savin, V. I.; Samartsev, I. E.

    2002-11-01

    The characteristics and possible applications of scalpels based on diode and fibre lasers emitting at 0.97, 1.06, 1.56, and 1.9 μm, which are produced and developed by the IRE-Polyus Co., are presented. The advantages of such devices and the possibilities for increasing their output power and extending their spectral range are shown.

  19. Effects of atmospheric transmission of high power diode pumped alkali lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Christopher A.; Perram, Glen P.

    2013-03-01

    As diode pumped alkali lasers (DPAL) are scaled to powers exceeding 1 kW, the effects of atmospheric transmission, including thermal blooming, is explored. The cesium and rubidium lasers operate near 894 and 795 nm, respectively, in the vicinity of atmospheric water vapor absorption lines. The potassium laser line lies in the high rotational limit of the O2 X-b (0,0) band near 770 nm. We assess the effects of atmospheric transmission on high power propagation using the High Energy Laser End-to End Operational Simulation. HELEEOS uses the scaling laws of the Scaling the High energy laser And Relay Engagements (SHaRE) toolbox which is anchored to the wave optics code WaveTrain and all significant degradation effects, including thermal blooming due to molecular and aerosol absorption, scattering extinction, and optical turbulence, are represented in the model. The HELEEOS model enables the evaluation of uncertainty in low-altitude high energy laser engagements due to all major low altitude atmospheric effects to include physically-based representations of water clouds, fog, light rain, and aerosols. Worldwide seasonal, diurnal, and geographical spatial-temporal variability in key climatological parameters is organized into probability density function databases in HELEEOS using a variety of recently available resources to include the Extreme and Percentile Environmental Reference Tables (ExPERT) for 408 sites worldwide, the Surface Marine Gridded Climatology (SMGC) database which provides coverage over all ocean areas, the Master Database for Optical Turbulence Research in support of the Airborne Laser, and the Global Aerosol Data Set (GADS) used to provide worldwide aerosol densities. The spectral transmission model is anchored to field data from an open-path Tunable Diode Laser Absorption (TDLAS) system composed of narrow band (~300 kHz) diode laser fiber coupled to a 12" Ritchey-Chrétien transmit telescope. The ruggedized system has been field deployed and tested

  20. Impurity-free quantum well intermixing for large optical cavity high-power laser diode structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahraman, Abdullah; Gür, Emre; Aydınlı, Atilla

    2016-08-01

    We report on the correlation of atomic concentration profiles of diffusing species with the blueshift of the quantum well luminescence from both as-grown and impurity free quantum wells intermixed on actual large optical cavity high power laser diode structures. Because it is critical to suppress catastrophic optical mirror damage, sputtered SiO2 and thermally evaporated SrF2 were used both to enhance and suppress quantum well intermixing, respectively, in these (Al)GaAs large optical cavity structures. A luminescence blueshift of 55 nm (130 meV) was obtained for samples with 400 nm thick sputtered SiO2. These layers were used to generate point defects by annealing the samples at 950 °C for 3 min. The ensuing Ga diffusion observed as a shifting front towards the surface at the interface of the GaAs cap and AlGaAs cladding, as well as Al diffusion into the GaAs cap layer, correlates well with the observed luminescence blue shift, as determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Although this technique is well-known, the correlation between the photoluminescence peak blue shift and diffusion of Ga and Al during impurity free quantum well intermixing on actual large optical cavity laser diode structures was demonstrated with both x ray photoelectron and photoluminescence spectroscopy, for the first time.

  1. High-power directly diode-pumped femtosecond Yb:KGW lasers with optimized parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, G. H.; Yang, J.; Kulik, A. V.; Sall, E. G.; Chizhov, S. A.; Yashin, V. E.; Kang, U.

    2014-02-01

    We report a diode-pumped Yb:KGW laser that is capable of operating as a Q-switched oscillator or as a regenerative amplifier with average power of more than 20 W. The laser is based on a dual-crystal configuration where the pump thermal load is distributed over relatively long two crystals. It permits a sufficiently large number of passes with low passive losses and maximizes the energy extraction efficiency. The amplification bandwidth was extended by spectral combining of two Yb:KGW crystals with spectrally shifted gain maxima, that allows to mitigate spectral gain narrowing and provides pulse length down to 200 fs after compression in a stretcher-compressor module. The output power saturated with increasing pump power and output beam quality was defined by aberration of thermal lenses. Optimization of laser cavity allows us to compensate thermal lens partially and provide output beams with quality M2<1.2. Efficient frequency doubling and tripling of high-power femtosecond Yb:KGW laser is demonstrated in a nonlinear BBO crystal. Second or third harmonic generation with respective conversion efficiency of 55% or 24% was achieved in a single-pass configuration.

  2. High power 355 nm diode-pumped solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang; Cheng, Chee Yuen; Peng, Xiaoyuan; Yong, Saw Soon

    2015-07-01

    This paper reported a high-power diode-pumped solid-state laser for material processing applications with a target of more than 60 ns pulse width at 355 nm. As known, long pulse width IR laser (around 70-100 ns) is difficult to get high conversion efficiency to UV since the peak power is more than 2 times lower than 20-30 ns laser. However, the unique long pulse width characteristic makes the laser an ideal tool for flexible PCB drilling with 30-50 μm holes and for cutting portable devices. Up to 52.2% IR to UV conversion efficiency was obtained by our novel intra-cavity harmonic generation cavity design. A 9.3W UV output at 30 kHz was demonstrated with compact intra-cavity sum frequency design. Special conduction cooling-designed LD side-pumped module provided 17.8 W fundamental IR output power with AOM q-switching. The UV output pulse width is 76 ns at 30 kHz and 140 ns at 70 kHz. The type I and type II phase matching LBOs were used for intra-cavity harmonic generations of 355 nm. The output characteristics of the IR and the harmonic generations varying with the pulse repetition rate were also investigated. The experimental results are in agreement with the theoretical modelling. This system will also be useful for many material processing applications such as PCB cutting and wafer scribing.

  3. Reliable high-power diode lasers: thermo-mechanical fatigue aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klumel, Genady; Gridish, Yaakov; Szafranek, Igor; Karni, Yoram

    2006-02-01

    High power water-cooled diode lasers are finding increasing demand in biomedical, cosmetic and industrial applications, where repetitive cw (continuous wave) and pulsed cw operation modes are required. When operating in such modes, the lasers experience numerous complete thermal cycles between "cold" heat sink temperature and the "hot" temperature typical of thermally equilibrated cw operation. It is clearly demonstrated that the main failure mechanism directly linked to repetitive cw operation is thermo-mechanical fatigue of the solder joints adjacent to the laser bars, especially when "soft" solders are used. Analyses of the bonding interfaces were carried out using scanning electron microscopy. It was observed that intermetallic compounds, formed already during the bonding process, lead to the solders fatigue both on the p- and n-side of the laser bar. Fatigue failure of solder joints in repetitive cw operation reduces useful lifetime of the stacks to hundreds hours, in comparison with more than 10,000 hours lifetime typically demonstrated in commonly adopted non-stop cw reliability testing programs. It is shown, that proper selection of package materials and solders, careful design of fatigue sensitive parts and burn-in screening in the hard pulse operation mode allow considerable increase of lifetime and reliability, without compromising the device efficiency, optical power density and compactness.

  4. Advances in high-power 9XXnm laser diodes for pumping fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skidmore, Jay; Peters, Matthew; Rossin, Victor; Guo, James; Xiao, Yan; Cheng, Jane; Shieh, Allen; Srinivasan, Raman; Singh, Jaspreet; Wei, Cailin; Duesterberg, Richard; Morehead, James J.; Zucker, Erik

    2016-03-01

    A multi-mode 9XXnm-wavelength laser diode was developed to optimize the divergence angle and reliable ex-facet power. Lasers diodes were assembled into a multi-emitter pump package that is fiber coupled via spatial and polarization multiplexing. The pump package has a 135μm diameter output fiber that leverages the same optical train and mechanical design qualified previously. Up to ~ 270W CW power at 22A is achieved at a case temperature ~ 30ºC. Power conversion efficiency is 60% (peak) that drops to 53% at 22A with little thermal roll over. Greater than 90% of the light is collected at < 0.12NA at 16A drive current that produces 3.0W/(mm-mr)2 radiance from the output fiber.

  5. Combining high power diode lasers using fiber bundles for beam delivery in optoacoustic endoscopy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawali, Sandeep Babu; Leggio, Luca; Sánchez, Miguel; Rodríguez, Sergio; Dadrasnia, Ehsan; Gallego, Daniel C.; Lamela, Horacio

    2016-05-01

    Optoacoustic (OA) effect refers to the generation of the acoustic waves due to absorption of light energy in a biological tissue. The incident laser pulse is absorbed by the tissue, resulting in the generation of ultrasound that is typically detected by a piezoelectric detector. Compared to other techniques, the advantage of OA imaging (OAI) technique consists in combining the high resolution of ultrasound technique with the high contrast of optical imaging. Generally, Nd:YAG and OPO systems are used for the generation of OA waves but their use in clinical environment is limited for many aspects. On the other hand, high-power diode lasers (HPDLs) emerge as potential alternative. However, the power of HPDLs is still relatively low compared to solid-state lasers. We show a side-by-side combination of several HPDLs in an optical fiber bundle to increase the amount of power for OA applications. Initially, we combine the output optical power of several HPDLs at 905 nm using two 7 to 1 round optical fiber bundles featuring a 675 μm and 1.2 mm bundle aperture. In a second step, we couple the output light of these fiber bundles to a 600 μm core diameter endoscopic fiber, reporting the corresponding coupling efficiencies. The fiber bundles with reasonable small diameter are likely to be used for providing sufficient light energy to potential OA endoscopy (OAE) applications.

  6. High-power laser diodes at SCD: performance and reliability for defence and space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risemberg, Shlomo; Karni, Yoram; Klumel, Genadi; Levy, Moshe; Berk, Yuri; Rech, Markus; Becht, Hubert; Frei, Bruno

    2009-05-01

    High Power Laser Diode Arrays developed and produced at SCD-SemiConductor Devices support a number of advanced defence and space programs. High efficiency and unsurpassed reliability at high operating temperatures are mandatory features for those applications. We report lifetime results of high power bar stacks, operating in QCW mode that rely on a field-proven design comprising Al-free wafer material technology and hard soldering robust packaging. A variety of packaging platforms have been implemented and tested at very harsh environmental conditions. Results include a long operational lifetime study totaling 20 billion pulses monitored in the course of several years for 808 nm QCW bar stacks.. Additionally, we report results of demanding lifetime tests for space qualification performed on these stacks at different levels of current load in a unique combination with operational temperature cycles in the range of -10 ÷60 °C. Novel solutions for highly reliable water cooled devices designed for operation in long pulses at different levels of PRF, are also discussed. The cooling efficiency of microchannel coolers is preserved while reliability is improved.

  7. Catastrophic optical degradation of the output facet of high-power single-transverse-mode diode lasers. 1. Physical model

    SciTech Connect

    Miftakhutdinov, D R; Bogatov, Alexandr P; Drakin, A E

    2010-09-10

    The physical model of catastrophic optical degradation (COD) of the output facet of high-power single- transverse-mode diode lasers is developed. The model excels other models both in completeness of the physical analysis of the processes leading to COD and in allowance for design feature of lasers used to increase the COD threshold - protective coating of the output facet and current limitations near it. (lasers)

  8. High-power diode lasers at 1178  nm with high beam quality and narrow spectra.

    PubMed

    Paschke, K; Bugge, F; Blume, G; Feise, D; Erbert, G

    2015-01-01

    High-power distributed Bragg reflector tapered diode lasers (DBR-TPLs) at 1180 nm were developed based on highly strained InGaAs quantum wells. The lasers emit a nearly diffraction-limited beam with more than two watts with a narrow spectral width. These features are believed to make this type of diode laser a key component for the manufacturing of miniaturized laser modules in the yellow and orange spectral range by second-harmonic generation to cover a spectral region currently not accessible with direct emitting diode lasers. Future applications might be the laser-cooling of sodium, high-resolution glucose-content measurements, as well as spectroscopy on rare earth elements. PMID:25531619

  9. High power 2 {mu}m diode-pumped Tm:YAG laser

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R.J.; Sutton, S.B.; Honea, E.C.; Skidmore, J.A.; Emanuel, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    Using a scaleable diode end-pumping technology developed at LLNL, we have demonstrated a compact Tm:YAG laser capable of generating more than 50 W of cw 2 {mu}m laser output power. The design and operational characteristics of this laser, which was built originally for use in assessing laser surgical techniques, are discussed.

  10. Parametric Study and Multi-Criteria Optimization in Laser Cladding by a High Power Direct Diode Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahmand, Parisa; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2014-12-01

    In laser cladding, the performance of the deposited layers subjected to severe working conditions (e.g., wear and high temperature conditions) depends on the mechanical properties, the metallurgical bond to the substrate, and the percentage of dilution. The clad geometry and mechanical characteristics of the deposited layer are influenced greatly by the type of laser used as a heat source and process parameters used. Nowadays, the quality of fabricated coating by laser cladding and the efficiency of this process has improved thanks to the development of high-power diode lasers, with power up to 10 kW. In this study, the laser cladding by a high power direct diode laser (HPDDL) as a new heat source in laser cladding was investigated in detail. The high alloy tool steel material (AISI H13) as feedstock was deposited on mild steel (ASTM A36) by a HPDDL up to 8kW laser and with new design lateral feeding nozzle. The influences of the main process parameters (laser power, powder flow rate, and scanning speed) on the clad-bead geometry (specifically layer height and depth of the heat affected zone), and clad microhardness were studied. Multiple regression analysis was used to develop the analytical models for desired output properties according to input process parameters. The Analysis of Variance was applied to check the accuracy of the developed models. The response surface methodology (RSM) and desirability function were used for multi-criteria optimization of the cladding process. In order to investigate the effect of process parameters on the molten pool evolution, in-situ monitoring was utilized. Finally, the validation results for optimized process conditions show the predicted results were in a good agreement with measured values. The multi-criteria optimization makes it possible to acquire an efficient process for a combination of clad geometrical and mechanical characteristics control.

  11. High-Power Diode Laser-Treated 13Cr4Ni Stainless Steel for Hydro Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, B. S.

    2014-06-01

    The cast martensitic chromium nickel stainless steels such as 13Cr4Ni, 16Cr5Ni, and 17Cr4Ni PH have found wide application in hydro turbines. These steels have adequate corrosion resistance with good mechanical properties because of chromium content of more than 12%. The 13Cr4Ni stainless steel is most widely used among these steels; however, lacks silt, cavitation, and water impingement erosion resistances (SER, CER, and WIER). This article deals with characterizing 13Cr4Ni stainless steel for silt, cavitation, and water impingement erosion; and studying its improved SER, CER, and WIER behavior after high-power diode laser (HPDL) surface treatment. The WIER and CER have improved significantly after laser treatment, whereas there is a marginal improvement in SER. The main reason for improved WIER and CER is due to its increased surface hardness and formation of fine-grained microstructure after HPDL surface treatment. CER and WIER of HPDL-treated 13Cr4Ni stainless steel samples have been evaluated as per ASTM G32-2003 and ASTM G73-1978, respectively; and these were correlated with microstructure and mechanical properties such as ultimate tensile strength, modified ultimate resilience, and microhardness. The erosion damage mechanism, compared on the basis of scanning electron micrographs and mechanical properties, is discussed and reported in this article.

  12. Present status and future aspects of high-power diode laser materials processing under the view of a German national research project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Friedrich G.

    2000-06-01

    High power diode lasers from a few Watts up to several Kilowatts have entered industrial manufacturing environment for materials processing applications. The technology has proven to show unique features, e.g. high efficiency, small size, low energy consumption and high reliability. In the first part of this paper a short description of state-of- the-art high power diode laser technology and applications is provided and the benefits and restrictions of this laser technology will be evaluated. For large scale penetration into the manufacture market, the restrictions, especially the rather poor beam quality of high power diode lasers compared to conventional lasers have to be overcome. Also, the specialities of the high power diode lasers, i.e. their modular structure and their extremely small size have to be translated into laser manufacturing technology. The further improvement of high power diode lasers as well as the development of new diode laser specific manufacturing technologies are the essential topics of a National German Minister Priority Project entitled 'Modular Diode Laser Beam Tools': 22 Partners from industry and institutions, 4 semiconductor experts, 5 laser manufacturers and 14 applicants are working together in frame of this project to work out and transfer a joint strategy and system technology to the benefits of the future of high power diode laser technology. The goals, the structure and the work of this project will be described in the second part of this paper.

  13. High-Power Diode Laser Surface Treated HVOF Coating to Combat High Energy Particle Impact Wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, B. S.; Arya, Vivek; Pant, B. K.

    2013-07-01

    High-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF)-sprayed coatings have performed exceptionally well in low-energy particle impact wear and are accepted worldwide. However, their application for high-energy particle impact wear (HEPIW) requires a different approach and more efforts. HVOF-coating systems typically use WC-Co, WC-Co-Cr, WC-Ni-Cr, and FeCrAlY-Cr3C2 powders. WC-Co-Cr powders are preferred when there is a high demand for corrosion resistance. WC-10Co-4Cr coating powder has been selected in the current study. To improve coating properties such as microhardness, fracture toughness, and HEPIW resistance, a new approach of surface treatment with robotically controlled high-power diode laser (HPDL) is attempted. The robotically controlled HVOF-coating deposition and laser surface treatment were monitored using real-time diagnostic control. The HPDL-treated coating has been compared with "as-sprayed" HVOF coating for HEPIW resistance, fracture toughness, microhardness and microstructure. The coating characteristics and properties after laser surface treatment have improved many times compared with "as-sprayed" HVOF coating. This is due to the elimination of pores in the coating and formation of a metallurgical bond between coating and substrate. This new development opens up a possibility of using such laser treatments in specialized areas where HEPIW damages are acute. The fracture toughness and HEPIW resistance along with optical micrographs of HPDL-treated and untreated HVOF coatings are discussed and reported in this article. HEPIW resistance is observed to be proportional to the product of fracture toughness and microhardness of the HVOF coating.

  14. Feasibility of High-Power Diode Laser Array Surrogate to Support Development of Predictive Laser Lethality Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lowdermilk, W H; Rubenchik, A M; Springer, H K

    2011-01-13

    Predictive modeling and simulation of high power laser-target interactions is sufficiently undeveloped that full-scale, field testing is required to assess lethality of military directed-energy (DE) systems. The cost and complexity of such testing programs severely limit the ability to vary and optimize parameters of the interaction. Thus development of advanced simulation tools, validated by experiments under well-controlled and diagnosed laboratory conditions that are able to provide detailed physics insight into the laser-target interaction and reduce requirements for full-scale testing will accelerate development of DE weapon systems. The ultimate goal is a comprehensive end-to-end simulation capability, from targeting and firing the laser system through laser-target interaction and dispersal of target debris; a 'Stockpile Science' - like capability for DE weapon systems. To support development of advanced modeling and simulation tools requires laboratory experiments to generate laser-target interaction data. Until now, to make relevant measurements required construction and operation of very high power and complex lasers, which are themselves costly and often unique devices, operating in dedicated facilities that don't permit experiments on targets containing energetic materials. High power diode laser arrays, pioneered by LLNL, provide a way to circumvent this limitation, as such arrays capable of delivering irradiances characteristic of De weapon requires are self-contained, compact, light weight and thus easily transportable to facilities, such as the High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) where testing with energetic materials can be performed. The purpose of this study was to establish the feasibility of using such arrays to support future development of advanced laser lethality and vulnerability simulation codes through providing data for materials characterization and laser-material interaction

  15. Effect of thermal processes on critical operation conditions of high-power laser diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Parashchuk, V V; Vu Doan Mien

    2013-10-31

    Using numerical and analytical techniques in a threedimensional approximation, we have modelled the effect of spatial thermoelastic stress nonuniformity in a laser diode – heat sink system on the output characteristics of the device in different operation modes. We have studied the influence of the pulse duration, the geometry of the laser system and its thermophysical parameters on the critical pump current density, in particular for state-of-the-art heat conductive substrate materials. The proposed approach has been used to optimise the laser diode assembly process in terms of the quality of laser crystal positioning (bonding) on a heat sink. (lasers)

  16. High-power single spatial mode AlGaAs channeled-substrate-planar semiconductor diode lasers for spaceborne communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, J. C.; Carlin, D. B.; Ettenberg, M.

    1989-01-01

    A high power single spatial mode channeled substrate planar AlGaAs semiconductor diode laser was developed. The emission wavelength was optimized at 860 to 880 nm. The operating characteristics (power current, single spatial mode behavior, far field radiation patterns, and spectral behavior) and results of computer modeling studies on the performance of the laser are discussed. Reliability assessment at high output levels is included. Performance results on a new type of channeled substrate planar diode laser incorporating current blocking layers, grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition, to more effectively focus the operational current to the lasing region was demonstrated. The optoelectronic behavior and fabrication procedures for this new diode laser are discussed. The highlights include single spatial mode devices with up to 160 mW output at 8600 A, and quantum efficiencies of 70 percent (1 W/amp) with demonstrated operating lifetimes of 10,000 h at 50 mW.

  17. High-power high-T0 native oxide stripe-geometry 980-nm laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhard, Herbert; Piataev, Valeri; Schlapp, Winfried

    1996-04-01

    We present results of an experimental investigation of the temperature sensitivity of separate confinement strained InGaAs/GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs quantum well single-mode and multimode high power laser diodes (HPLDs). The HPLDs have been fabricated by use of MBE material and a 'wet' thermal oxidation process. Due to the high carrier confinement in the structure with two quantum wells (DQW) and Al-content x greater than 0.7 in the cladding layers an extremely high characteristic temperature T0 equals 350 K for broad area and T0 of 400 K around room temperature for single mode HPLDs with extremely low threshold current density were obtained. In spite of the high Al-content in the cladding layers (0.5 less than x less than 0.8) a very high catastrophic optical damage (COD) level (greater than 10 MW/cm2) and lifetimes of more than 10 kh at 100 mW (T equals 50 degrees Celsius) have been observed.

  18. Effect of thermal processes on critical operation conditions of high-power laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parashchuk, V. V.; Doan Mien, Vu

    2013-10-01

    Using numerical and analytical techniques in a threedimensional approximation, we have modelled the effect of spatial thermoelastic stress nonuniformity in a laser diode - heat sink system on the output characteristics of the device in different operation modes. We have studied the influence of the pulse duration, the geometry of the laser system and its thermophysical parameters on the critical pump current density, in particular for state-of-the-art heat conductive substrate materials. The proposed approach has been used to optimise the laser diode assembly process in terms of the quality of laser crystal positioning (bonding) on a heat sink.

  19. High power laser diodes at 14xx nm wavelength range for industrial and medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telkkälä, Jarkko; Boucart, Julien; Krejci, Martin; Crum, Trevor; Lichtenstein, Norbert

    2014-03-01

    We report on the development of the latest generation of high power laser diodes at 14xx nm wavelength range suitable for industrial applications such as plastics welding and medical applications including acne treatment, skin rejuvenation and surgery. The paper presents the newest chip generation developed at II-VI Laser Enterprise, increasing the output power and the power conversion efficiency while retaining the reliability of the initial design. At an emission wavelength around 1440 nm we applied the improved design to a variety of assemblies exhibiting maximum power values as high as 7 W for broad-area single emitters. For 1 cm wide bars on conductive coolers and for bars on active micro channel coolers we have obtained 50 W and 72 W in continuous wave (cw) operation respectively. The maximum power measured for a 1 cm bar operated with 50 μs pulse width and 0.01% duty cycle was 184 W, demonstrating the potential of the chip design for optimized cooling. Power conversion efficiency values as high as 50% for a single emitter device and over 40% for mounted bars have been demonstrated, reducing the required power budget to operate the devices. Both active and conductive bar assembly configurations show polarization purity greater than 98%. Life testing has been conducted at 95 A, 50% duty cycle and 0.5 Hz hard pulsed operation for bars which were soldered to conductive copper CS mounts using our hard solder technology. The results after 5500 h, or 10 million "on-off" cycles show stable operation.

  20. Coupling of DBR tapered diode laser radiation into a single-mode-fiber at high powers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedrzejczyk, D.; Asbahr, P.; Pulka, M.; Eppich, B.; Paschke, K.

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we investigate experimentally coupling of diode laser radiation into a single-mode-fiber (SMF) at high optical power. In particular, nearly diffraction-limited, single-frequency continuous wave (CW) radiation around 1064 nm generated by a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) tapered diode laser is coupled in a bench-top experiment into an SMF with a core diameter of approx. 6 μm. Misalignment tolerances for efficient SMF coupling are determined through two-dimensional coupling efficiency scans, conducted for an attenuated diode laser beam. The coupling efficiency and the laser beam properties behind the SMF are investigated in dependence on the optical power in front of the SMF. A maximum power ex fiber of 3.5 W at a coupling efficiency of 65 % is reached.

  1. Optical design and development of a fiber coupled high-power diode laser system for laser transmission welding of plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Vidal, Eva; Quintana, Iban; Etxarri, Jon; Azkorbebeitia, Urko; Otaduy, Deitze; González, Francisco; Moreno, Fernando

    2012-12-01

    Laser transmission welding (LTW) of thermoplastics is a direct bonding technique already used in different industrial applications sectors such as automobiles, microfluidics, electronics, and biomedicine. LTW evolves localized heating at the interface of two pieces of plastic to be joined. One of the plastic pieces needs to be optically transparent to the laser radiation whereas the other part has to be absorbent, being that the radiation produced by high power diode lasers is a good alternative for this process. As consequence, a tailored laser system has been designed and developed to obtain high quality weld seams with weld widths between 0.7 and 1.4 mm. The developed laser system consists of two diode laser bars (50 W per bar) coupled into an optical fiber using a nonimaging solution: equalization of the beam parameter product (BPP) in the slow and fast axes by a pair of step-mirrors. The power scaling was carried out by means of a multiplexing polarization technique. The analysis of energy balance and beam quality was performed considering ray tracing simulation (ZEMAX) and experimental validation. The welding experiments were conducted on acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene (ABS), a thermoplastic frequently used in automotive, electronics and aircraft applications, doped with two different concentrations of carbon nanotubes (0.01% and 0.05% CNTs). Quality of the weld seams on ABS was analyzed in terms of the process parameters (welding speed, laser power and clamping pressure) by visual and optical microscope inspections. Mechanical properties of weld seams were analyzed by mechanical shear tests. High quality weld seams were produced in ABS, revealing the potential of the laser developed in this work for a wide range of plastic welding applications.

  2. Reliable high-power long-pulse 8XX-nm diode laser bars and arrays operating at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Li; Cao, Chuanshun; Thaler, Gerald; Nonnemacher, Dustin; Lapinski, Feliks; Ai, Irene; Caliva, Brian; Das, Suhit; Walker, Robert; Zeng, Linfei; McElhinney, Mark; Thiagarajan, Prabhu

    2011-03-01

    We report on the high-power high-temperature long-pulse performance of the 8XX-nm diode laser bars and arrays, which were recently developed at Lasertel Inc. for diode laser pumping within high-temperature (130 °C) environment without any cooling. Since certain energy in each pulse is required, the diode laser bars have to provide both high peak power and a nice pulse shape at 130 °C. Optimizing the epi-structure of the diode laser, the laser cavity and the distribution of waste heat, we demonstrate over 40-millisecond long-pulse operation of the 8XX-nm CS bars at 130 °C and 100 A. Pumping the bar with 5-Hz frequency 15-millisecond rectangular current pulses, we generate over 60 W peak power at 100 A and 130 °C. During the pulse duration, the pulse shape of the CS bars is well-maintained and the power almost linearly decays with a rate of 1.9% peak power per millisecond at 130 °C and 100 A. Regardless of the pulse shape, this laser bar can lase at very high temperature and output pulse can last for 8 ms/2ms at 170 °C/180 °C (both driven by 60 A current pulses with 5-Hz frequency, 10 millisecond pulse width), respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest operating temperature for a long-pulse 8XX-nm laser bar. Under the condition of 130 °C and 100 A, the laser bars do not show any degradation after 310,000 10-millisecond current pulse shots. The performance of stack arrays at 130 °C and 100 A are also presented. The development of reliable high-temperature diode laser bar paves the way for diode laser long-pulse pumping within a high-temperature environment without any cooling.

  3. High-power diode-pumped AlGaAs surface-emitting laser.

    PubMed

    Holm, M A; Burns, D; Cusumano, P; Ferguson, A I; Dawson, M D

    1999-09-20

    We report the development and characterization of an efficient diode-pumped surface-emitting semiconductor laser operating at approximately 870 nm. By using a semiconductor Bragg reflector stack/multiple GaAs quantum well structure, mounted within a conventional laser cavity, we achieved single transverse mode laser output powers of 153 mW. Self-tuning over a 15-nm spectral range has been obtained. PMID:18324092

  4. Unveiling laser diode "fossil" and the dynamic analysis for heliotropic growth of catastrophic optical damage in high power laser diodes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Xiong, Yihan; An, Haiyan; Boucke, Konstantin; Treusch, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Taking advantage of robust facet passivation, we unveil a laser "fossil" buried within a broad area laser diode (LD) cavity when the LD was damaged by applying a high current. For the first time, novel physical phenomena have been observed at these dramatically elevated energy densities within the nanoscale LD waveguide. The observation of the laser "fossil" is interpreted with different mechanisms, including: the origination of bulk catastrophic optical damage (COD) due to locally high energy densities, heliotropic COD growth, solid-liquid-gas phase transformations, strong longitudinal phonon cooling effect on the molten COD wave front, and the formation of patterns due to laser lateral modes. For the first time the COD propagation is analyzed temporally by an acoustic phonon bouncing model and the COD velocity is extrapolated to be exponentially decreasing from more than 800 μm/μs to a few μm/μs within a 20 μs time period as the energy density dissipates. PMID:26740303

  5. Corrosion resistant nickel superalloy coatings laser-clad with a 6 kW high power diode laser (HPDL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuominen, Jari; Honkanen, Mari; Hovikorpi, Jari; Vihinen, Jorma; Vuoristo, Petri; Maentylae, Tapio

    2003-03-01

    A series of exerpiments were performed to investigate the one-step laser cladding of Inconel 625 powder, injected off-axially onto Fe37 and 42CrMo4 substrates. The experiments were carried out using a 6 kW high power diode laser (HPDL) mounted to a 6 axis robot system. The rectangular shape of the delivering beam was focused to a spot size of 22 x 5 mm on the work piece. The coating samples were produced using different levels of powder feed rate (77 - 113 g/min), traveling speed (300 - 400 mm/min) and laser power (4.8 - 6 kW). Hot corrosion resistance of laser-clad Inconel 625 coatings were tested in Na2SO4 - V2O5 at 650°C for 1000 hours. Wet corrosion properties of the obtained coatings were tested in immersion tests in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. Diode laser power of 6 kW (808 and 940 nm) was high enough to produce 20 mm wide laser-clad tracks with a thickness of 2.5 mm in a single pass, when powder feed rate was more than 6 kg/h and traverse speed was 400 mm/min. Wet corrosion properties of laser-clad Inconel 625 coatings were found to be superior to sprayed and welded coatings. Hot corrosion resistance was even slightly better than corresponding wrought alloy. Finally, one-step HPDL cladding was demonstrated in coating of shaft for hydraulic cylinder with Inconel 625 powder. Due to high coating quality, high deposition rate and traverse speed HPDL devices are very promising for large area cladding applications.

  6. High-power multi-beam diode laser transmitter for a flash imaging lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmlund, Christer; Aitta, Petteri; Kivi, Sini; Mitikka, Risto; Tyni, Lauri; Heikkinen, Veli

    2013-10-01

    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland is developing the transmitter for the "Flash Optical Sensor for TErrain Relative NAVigation" (FOSTERNAV) multi-beam flash imaging lidar. FOSTERNAV is a concept demonstrator for new guidance, navigation and control (GNC) technologies to fulfil the requirements for landing and docking of spacecraft as well as for navigation of rovers. This paper presents the design, realisation and testing of the multi-beam continuous-wave (CW) laser transmitter to be used in a 256x256 pixel flash imaging lidar. Depending on the target distance, the lidar has three operation modes using either several beams with low divergence or one single beam with a large divergence. This paper describes the transmitter part of the flash imaging lidar with focus on the electronics and especially the laser diode drivers. The transmitter contains eight fibre coupled commercial diode laser modules with a total peak optical power of 32 W at 808 nm. The main requirement for the laser diode drivers was linear modulation up to a frequency of 20 MHz allowing, for example, low distortion chirps or pseudorandom binary sequences. The laser modules contain the laser diode, a monitoring photodiode, a thermo-electric cooler, and a thermistor. The modules, designed for non-modulated and low-frequency operation, set challenging demands on the design of the drivers. Measurement results are presented on frequency response, and eye diagrams for pseudo-random binary sequences.

  7. Ex vivo efficacy evaluation of laser vaporization for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia using a 300-W high-power laser diode with a wavelength of 980 nm

    PubMed Central

    Takada, Junya; Honda, Norihiro; Hazama, Hisanao

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective: Laser vaporization of the prostate is considered to be a promising treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and efficiency of vaporization and hemostasis are both important parameters for such treatment. In this study, we used a high-power laser diode with a wavelength of 980 nm to obtain high vaporization efficiency with good hemostasis. The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of laser vaporization for treatment of BPH in ex vivo experiments using a 300-W high-power laser diode with a wavelength of 980 nm quantitatively. Materials and Methods: An ex vivo experimental setup simulating clinical treatment situation was constructed. Bovine prostate tissue was used as a sample. The power setting was 100, 150, 200, 250, or 300 W, and the irradiation time was 0.5, 1, or 2 s. After laser irradiation, vaporized and coagulated depths were measured. Results: The vaporized depth increased with the laser power and irradiation time, and the results confirmed that the high-power laser diode could efficiently vaporize the prostate tissue. Coagulated depth increased as the laser power became higher. Conclusions: Laser vaporization of prostate tissue using a high-power laser diode with a wavelength of 980 nm represents a promising treatment for BPH; this method exhibits high vaporization efficiency and good hemostasis. However, operators must be aware of the risk of postoperative perforation of the prostatic capsule caused by coagulation of deep regions that cannot be visualized by endoscopic observation. PMID:25368442

  8. Compact deep UV laser system at 222.5 nm by single-pass frequency doubling of high-power GaN diode laser emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhnke, Norman; Müller, André; Eppich, Bernd; Güther, Reiner; Maiwald, Martin; Sumpf, Bernd; Erbert, Götz; Tränkle, Günther

    2016-03-01

    Deep ultraviolet (DUV) lasers emitting below 300 nm are of great interest for many applications, for instance in medical diagnostics or for detecting biological agents. Established DUV lasers, e.g. gas lasers or frequency quadrupled solid-state lasers, are relatively bulky and have high power consumptions. A compact and reliable laser diode based system emitting in the DUV could help to address applications in environments where a portable and robust light source with low power consumption is needed. In this work, a compact DUV laser system based on single-pass frequency doubling of highpower GaN diode laser emission is presented. A commercially available high-power GaN laser diode from OSRAM Opto Semiconductors serves as a pump source. The laser diode is spectrally stabilized in an external cavity diode laser (ECDL) setup in Littrow configuration. The ECDL system reaches a maximum optical output power of 700 mW, maintaining narrowband emission below 60 pm (FWHM) at 445 nm over the entire operating range. By direct single pass frequency doubling in a BBO crystal with a length of 7.5 mm a maximum DUV output power of 16 μW at a wavelength of 222.5 nm is generated. The presented concept enables compact and efficient diode laser based light sources emitting in the DUV spectral range that are potentially suitable for in situ applications where a small footprint and low power consumption is essential.

  9. Improving the efficiency of high-power diode lasers using diamond heat sinks

    SciTech Connect

    Parashchuk, Valentin V; Baranov, V V; Telesh, E V; Mien, Vu Doan; Luc, Vu Van; Truong, Pham Van; Belyaeva, A K

    2010-06-23

    Using multifunctional ion beam and magnetron sputtering systems, we have developed chemical and vacuum techniques for producing metallic coatings firmly adherent to various surfaces, with application to copper and diamond heat sinks for diode lasers. Conditions have been optimised for mounting diode lasers and bars using the proposed metallisation processes, and significant improvements in the output parameters of the devices have been achieved. The power output of cw laser diodes on diamond heat sinks increases by up to a factor of 2, the linear (working) portion of their power-current characteristic becomes markedly broader, and their slope efficiency increases by a factor of 1.5 - 2 relative to that of lasers on copper heat spreaders. The use of diamond heat sinks extends the drive current range of pulsed diode bars by a factor of 2 - 3 and enables them to operate at more than one order of magnitude longer pump pulse durations (up to milliseconds) when the pulse repetition rate is at least 10 Hz. (lasers)

  10. Orofacial hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia: high power diode laser in early and advanced lesion treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tempesta, Angela; Franco, Simonetta; Miccoli, Simona; Suppressa, Patrizia; De Falco, Vincenzo; Crincoli, Vito; Lacaita, Mariagrazia; Giuliani, Michele; Favia, Gianfranco

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) is a muco-cutaneous inherited disease. Symptoms are epistaxis, visceral arterio-venous malformations, multiple muco-cutaneous telangiectasia with the risk of number increasing enlargement, bleeding, and super-infection. The aim of this work is to show the dual Diode Laser efficacy in preventive treatment of Early Lesions (EL < 2mm) and therapeutic treatment of Advanced Lesions (AL < 2mm). 21 patients affected by HHT with 822 muco-cutaneous telangiectatic nodules have been treated in several sessions with local anaesthesia and cooling of treated sites. EL preventive treatment consists of single Laser impulse (fibre 320) in ultrapulsed mode (2 mm single point spot). AL therapeutic treatment consists of repeated Laser impulses in pulsed mode (on 200ms / off 400ms). According to the results, Diode Laser used in pulsed and ultra-pulsed mode is very effective as noninvasive treatment both in early and advanced oral and perioral telangiectasia.

  11. High-power diode-pumped passively mode-locked Yb:YAG lasers.

    PubMed

    Aus der Au, J; Schaer, S F; Paschotta, R; Hönninger, C; Keller, U; Moser, M

    1999-09-15

    We obtained 74-kW peak power and 3.5-W average output power in 1-ps pulses from a diode-pumped Yb:YAG laser at 1030 nm that was passively mode locked with a semiconductor saturable-absorber mirror. Another laser produced 57-kW peak power and as much as 8.1-W average output power in 2.2-ps pulses, split into two nearly diffraction-limited beams (M(2)<1.2) . To our knowledge, these are by far the highest reported peak and average output powers from a diode-pumped mode-locked laser in this pulse-duration regime. PMID:18079780

  12. Fabrication processes for GaAs-based high-power diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meehan, Kathleen; Heath, Linda S.; Williams, Jeannie E.; Wang, Tien Yang; Beyea, Dana M.; Chin, Aland K.; Stutius, Wolfgang

    1993-06-01

    GaAs-based, edge-emitting diode lasers have become important light sources for numerous applications, e.g., in ophthalmology and dentistry, pumping of solid-state lasers, and printing on thermal media. The general performance requirements for these devices are high brightness, high reliability, stable optical-characteristics, and low system-cost to performance ratio. Device processing procedures such as dry etching, anodic oxidation, anti-reflection coatings, ion-implantation, and epitaxial growth on non-planar substrates impact the operation of the laser, both positively as well as negatively. The effect of these fabrication procedures on device reliability is discussed where applicable.

  13. Correction of beam errors in high power laser diode bars and stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monjardin, J. F.; Nowak, K. M.; Baker, H. J.; Hall, D. R.

    2006-09-01

    The beam errors of an 11 bar laser diode stack fitted with fast-axis collimator lenses have been corrected by a single refractive plate, produced by laser cutting and polishing. The so-called smile effect is virtually eliminated and collimator aberration greatly reduced, improving the fast-axis beam quality of each bar by a factor of up to 5. The single corrector plate for the whole stack ensures that the radiation from all the laser emitters is parallel to a common axis. Beam-pointing errors of the bars have been reduced to below 0.7 mrad.

  14. High-power mode-locked hybrid pulse source using two-section laser diodes.

    PubMed

    Morton, P A; Mizrahi, V; Tanbun-Ek, T; Logan, R A; Lemaire, P; Erdogan, T; Sciortino, P F; Sergent, A M; Wecht, K W

    1994-05-15

    We describe a mode-locked hybrid pulse source with a two-section laser diode to obtain short mode-locked pulses (23 ps) with an average power of 7.8 mW, a high peak power of 137 mW, and a repetition rate of 2.51 GHz. The hybrid laser incorporates a two-section laser and an optical fiber cavity with an integrated Bragg reflector. The Bragg reflector controls the operating wavelength to subnanometer precision and also confines the bandwidth of the pulses so as to keep the time-bandwidth product below 1. PMID:19844425

  15. Advancements in high-power high-brightness laser bars and single emitters for pumping and direct diode application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Haiyan; Jiang, Ching-Long J.; Xiong, Yihan; Zhang, Qiang; Inyang, Aloysius; Felder, Jason; Lewin, Alexander; Roff, Robert; Heinemann, Stefan; Schmidt, Berthold; Treusch, Georg

    2015-03-01

    We have continuously optimized high fill factor bar and packaging design to increase power and efficiency for thin disc laser system pump application. On the other hand, low fill factor bars packaged on the same direct copper bonded (DCB) cooling platform are used to build multi-kilowatt direct diode laser systems. We have also optimized the single emitter designs for fiber laser pump applications. In this paper, we will give an overview of our recent advances in high power high brightness laser bars and single emitters for pumping and direct diode application. We will present 300W bar development results for our next generation thin disk laser pump source. We will also show recent improvements on slow axis beam quality of low fill factor bar and its application on performance improvement of 4-5 kW TruDiode laser system with BPP of 30 mm*mrad from a 600 μm fiber. Performance and reliability results of single emitter for multiemitter fiber laser pump source will be presented as well.

  16. Tunable high-power narrow-spectrum external-cavity diode laser based on tapered amplifier at 668 nm.

    PubMed

    Chi, Mingjun; Erbert, G; Sumpf, B; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2010-05-15

    A 668 nm tunable high-power narrow-spectrum diode laser system based on a tapered semiconductor optical amplifier in external cavity is demonstrated. The laser system is tunable from 659to675 nm. As high as 1.38 W output power is obtained at 668.35 nm. The emission spectral bandwidth is less than 0.07 nm throughout the tuning range, and the beam quality factor M(2) is 2.0 with the output power of 1.27 W. PMID:20479803

  17. Finite element analysis of expansion-matched submounts for high-power laser diodes packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuxi, Ni; Xiaoyu, Ma; Hongqi, Jing; Suping, Liu

    2016-06-01

    In order to improve the output power and increase the lifetime of laser diodes, expansion-matched submounts were investigated by finite element analysis. The submount was designed as sandwiched structure. By varying the vertical structure and material of the middle layer, the thermal expansion behavior on the mounting surface was simulated to obtain the expansion-matched design. In addition, the thermal performance of laser diodes packaged by different submounts was compared. The numerical results showed that, changing the thickness ratio of surface copper to middle layer will lead the stress and junction temperature to the opposite direction. Thus compromise needs to be made in the design of the vertical structure. In addition, the silicon carbide (SiC) is the most promising material candidate for the middle layer among the materials discussed in this paper. The simulated results were aimed at providing guidance for the optimal design of sandwich-structure submounts.

  18. High power AlGaAs-GaAs visible diode lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Tihanyi, P.L.; Jain, F.C. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Robinson, M.J.; Dixon, J.E. ); Williams, J.E.; Meehan, K.; O'Neill, M.S.; Heath, L.S.; Beyea, D.M. . Microelectronics and Materials Center)

    1994-07-01

    A high-power room-temperature AlGaAs graded index separately confined heterostructure (GRINSCH) laser emitting in the visible spectral regime ([approx equal]715 nm) is reported for the first time. The device is gain-guided and consists of 12 stripes, each 5 [mu]m in width with a centerline separation of 9 [mu]m. This high-power visible laser has been successfully fabricated using a GaAlAs active layer. The epitaxial layer was grown with significantly lower levels of oxygen compared to those grown using standard metalorganic sources. Threshold currents of 310 mA at 10 C were routinely measured on uncoated devices. The uncoated device had a catastrophic optical damage limit of 540 mW and has a slope efficiency as high as 0.48. No degradation in device performance was observed during a 50-hour 150-mW burn-in.

  19. High-power distributed Bragg reflector ridge-waveguide diode laser with very small spectral linewidth.

    PubMed

    Paschke, K; Spiessberger, S; Kaspari, C; Feise, D; Fiebig, C; Blume, G; Wenzel, H; Wicht, A; Erbert, G

    2010-02-01

    We manufactured and investigated distributed Bragg reflector ridge-waveguide diode lasers having sixth-order surface gratings and an emission wavelength around 974 nm. The single-mode output power of the lasers with a total length of 4 mm exceeded 1 W. A very small spectral linewidth of 1.4 MHz (3 dB) consisting of a Lorentzian part of 146 kHz and a Gaussian part of 1308 MHz was measured using a self-delayed heterodyne measurement technique. PMID:20125735

  20. New Class of CW High-Power Diode-Pumped Alkali Lasers (DPALs)

    SciTech Connect

    Krupke, W F; Beach, R J; Kanz, V K; Payne, S A; Early, J T

    2004-03-23

    The new class of diode-pumped alkali vapor lasers (DPALs) offers high efficiency cw laser radiation at near-infrared wavelengths: cesium 895 nm, rubidium 795 nm, and potassium 770 nm. The working physical principles of DPALs will be presented. Initial 795 nm Rb and 895 nm Cs laser experiments performed using a titanium sapphire laser as a surrogate pump source demonstrated DPAL slope power conversion efficiencies in the 50-70% range, in excellent agreement with device models utilizing only literature spectroscopic and kinetic data. Using these benchmarked models for Rb and Cs, optimized DPALs with optical-optical efficiencies >60%, and electrical efficiencies of 25-30% are projected. DPAL device architectures for near-diffraction-limited power scaling into the high kilowatt power regime from a single aperture will be described. DPAL wavelengths of operation offer ideal matches to silicon and gallium arsenide based photovoltaic power conversion cells for efficient power beaming.

  1. High-power diode lasers with an aluminium-free active region at 915 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, N.; Hassiaoui, I.; Calligaro, M.; Lecomte, M.; Parillaud, O.; Krakowski, M.; Borruel, L.; García-Tijero, J.-M.; Esquivias, I.; Sukecki, S.; Larkins, E. C.

    2005-11-01

    We have developed high-power lasers, which are based on an Al-free active region at 915 nm. The laser structure has very low internal losses of 0.5 cm-1, a very low transparency current density of 86 A/cm2, and a high internal quantum efficiency of 86%. Based on these good results, we have realised narrow-aperture, index-guided tapered lasers which deliver 1 W CW with and M2 beam quality factor of 3.0 using both the 1/e2 and standard-deviation methods. We have also fabricated index-guided tapered lasers with a Clarinet shape, which deliver 0.65 W CW with an M2 beam quality factor of less than 1.5 at 1/e2, and less than 2.5 using the standard deviation method.

  2. High-power 660.5 nm red laser from diode-side-pumped intracavity frequency-doubled Nd:YLF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhichao; Wang, Baoshan; Chen, Ming; Yang, Feng; Zhang, Shenjin; Zhang, Xiaowen; Bo, Yong; Xu, Yiting; Zong, Nan; Xu, Jialin; Peng, Qinjun; Cui, Dafu; Xu, Zuyan

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate a high-power red laser at 660.5 nm from intracavity frequency doubling of a diode-side-pumped 1321 nm Nd:LiYF4 (Nd:YLF) ring laser in a LiB3O5 (LBO) crystal. The maximum average output power of the red laser is obtained to be 23 W with beam quality factor M 2  =  1.3.

  3. High-power, mode-locking, external-cavity feedback diode-pumped laser based on SHG in PPKTP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenchao; Liu, Zhengjun; Zhao, Hongdong; Li, Zhiquan

    2010-11-01

    The generation of high-power green laser is important for the numerous applications in industry, medicine, research and even entertainment. In addition, mode-locked lasers operating at {100 MHz repetition rate, are particularly attractive for nonlinear optics and spectroscopy. Characteristics of high-power, mode-locking green radiation obtained by Nd:YVO4 at 1064nm in the nonlinear crystals of PPKTP are studied. Two identical highly efficient diode-pumped laser heads placed in a plane-plane resonator are used for the input laser based on theoretically investigation of the thermally stable region of Nd:YVO4 rod. The PPKTP crystal of Brewster-cut is used in the external cavity configuration, the cavity losses is significantly smaller than for an antireflection(AR) coated crystal cut for normal incident, however, the effective nonlinearity is reduction. Frequency doubling nonlinear mirror(FDNLM) based on intensity dependent reflection in the laser cavity is used for the laser mode-locking. A stable green output power of 510W with pulse repetition rate of 100MHz and net conversion efficiency of η=50% at an input mode-matched power of 2KW are obtained. Meanwhile, thermal effects in the nonlinear crystal severely limit the efficiency of the laser configuration when using high pump power.

  4. All-optical Q-switching limiter for high-power gigahertz modelocked diode-pumped solid-state lasers.

    PubMed

    Klenner, Alexander; Keller, Ursula

    2015-04-01

    Passively modelocked diode-pumped solid-state lasers (DPSSLs) with pulse repetition rates in the gigahertz regime suffer from an increased tendency for Q-switching instabilities. Low saturation fluence intracavity saturable absorbers - such as the semiconductor saturable absorber mirrors (SESAMs) - can solve this problem up to a certain average output power limited by the onset of SESAM damage. Here we present a passive stabilization mechanism, an all-optical Q-switching limiter, to reduce the impact of Q-switching instabilities and increase the potential output power of SESAM modelocked lasers in the gigahertz regime. With a proper cavity design a Kerr lens induced negative saturable absorber clamps the maximum fluence on the SESAM and therefore limits the onset of Q-switching instabilities. No critical cavity alignment is required because this Q-switching limiter acts well within the cavity stability regime. Using a proper cavity design, a high-power diode-pumped Yb:CALGO solid-state laser generated sub-100 fs pulses with an average output power of 4.1 W at a pulse repetition rate of 5 GHz. With a pulse duration of 96 fs we can achieve a peak power as high as 7.5 kW directly from the SESAM modelocked laser oscillator without any further external pulse amplification and/or pulse compression. We present a quantitative analysis of this Kerr lens induced Q-switching limiter and its impact on modelocked operation. Our work provides a route to compact high-power multi-gigahertz frequency combs based on SESAM modelocked diode-pumped solid-state lasers without any additional external amplification or pulse compression. PMID:25968691

  5. Experimental studies for improvement of thermal effects in a high-power fiber-coupled diode laser module operating at 808 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sherif, Ashraf F.; Hussein, Khalid; Hassan, Mahmoud F.; Talat, Mahmoud M.

    2012-03-01

    High power diode laser module operating at 808 nm is required for different applications, such as developing an efficient high power Nd3+-doped solid state laser and Tm3+ -doped silica fiber laser, industrial, medical and military applications. Optical and thermal images characterization for a fiber-coupled high power diode laser module is presented experimentally for 6.6 Watt output optical power .An external temperature controller system was designed, which stabilizes the central wavelength at 808 nm at 25°C over a wide range of diode laser driving current from 1A to 6 A. without this cooling system, the wavelength changes by 0.35nm/°C for temperature changes from 20°C to 40°C at the same range of the driving current. In this paper we have present a methodology for temperature reduction of a 808 nm high power diode laser module, based on dynamically thermal control, which is known as dynamic thermal management. Stabilization of the output wavelength has been done by using proportional speed control (PSC) of a CPU cooling fan with certain scheme of straight fins heat sink. Two electronic circuits based on pulse width modulation (PWM) in microcontroller and comparators IC have been used. This technique can be considered as an effective mechanism for reducing temperature and power dissipation to make stabilization of the diode laser output wavelength by preventing heat accumulation from the thermo electric cooling (TEC) inside the diode laser module confirmed by thermal images.

  6. Beam combining techniques for high-power high-brightness diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruschke, Bastian; Fritsche, Haro; Kern, Holger; Hagen, Thomas; Pahl, Ulrich; Koch, Ralf; Grohe, Andreas; Gries, Wolfgang

    2015-02-01

    Laser diodes are efficient and compact devices operating in a wide range of wavelengths. Boosting power by beam combining while maintaining good beam quality has been a long-standing challenge. We discuss various approaches for beam combining with emphasis on solutions pursued at DirectPhotonics. Our design employs single emitter diodes as they exhibit highest brightness and excellent reliability. In a first step, after fast axis collimation, all single emitter diodes on one subunit are stacked side-by-side by a monolithic slow-axis-collimator thus scaling the power without enhancing the brightness. The emissions of all diodes on a subunit are locked by a common Volume Bragg grating (VBG), resulting in a bandwidth < 0.5nm and high wavelength stability. Second, two subunits with identical wavelength are polarization coupled forming one wavelength channel with doubled power and brightness. Third, up to five channels are serially spectrally combined using dichroic filters. The stabilized wavelengths enable dense spectral combining, i.e. narrow channel spacing. This module features over 500W output power within 20nm bandwidth and a beam parameter product better than 3.5mm*mrad x 5mm*mrad (FA x SA) allowing for a 100μm, 0.15NA delivery fiber [1]. The small bandwidth of a 500-W-module enables subsequent coarse spectral combining by thin film filters, thus further enhancing the brightness. This potential can only be fully utilized by automated manufacturing ensuring reproducibility and high yield. A precision robotic system handles and aligns the individual fast axis lenses. Similar technologies are deployed for aligning the VBGs and dichroic filters.

  7. High power gain-switched diode laser master oscillator and amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Poelker, M.

    1995-11-06

    A tapered-stripe, traveling-wave semiconductor optical amplifier was seeded with 3.3 mW of gain-switched diode laser light to obtain over 200 mW average power with pulse widths{approx}105 ps full width at half-maximum (FWHM) and a pulse repetition rate of 499 MHz corresponding to a peak power of 3.8 W. Shorter pulse widths were obtained when the amplifier was driven with less current at the expense of reduced output power. Pulse widths as short as 31 ps FWHM and an average power of 98 mW corresponding to a peak power of 6.3 W were obtained when a different, lower power seed laser was used. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  8. High-power fiber-coupled diode lasers with superior brightness, efficiency, and reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Keith; Hemenway, Marty; Urbanek, Wolfram; Hoener, Kylan; Price, Kirk; Bao, Ling; Dawson, David; Kanskar, Manoj; Haden, Jim

    2014-03-01

    Advances in high performance fiber coupled diode lasers continue to enable new applications as well as strengthen existing uses through progressive improvements in power and brightness [1]. These improvements are most notable in multi-kW direct diode systems and kW fiber laser platforms that effectively transform better beam quality into superior system performance and in DPSS (Diode pumped solid state) application striving to scale TEM00 (fundamental transverse mode) power. We report on our recent single-emitter based fiber-coupled product platform, the elementTM, that addressed these applications at 8xx/9xx nm with optical powers over 200W in a range of fiber core sizes down to 105um and 0.14NA (Numerical Aperture). The product is a culmination of numerous packaging improvements: improving wall plug efficiencies ( 50% electrical-to-optical) while improving volume manufacturability, enabling lower costs, improving usable chip brightness by, < 20% over previous generation chips, and increasing the reliable output power to 15W per chip. We additionally report on current developments to extend the power of the product platform to as high as 300W. This will be realized primarily through new chip architectures projected to further increase the useable chip brightness by an additional 20 % and correspondingly scaling reliable output powers. Second order improvements are proposed in packaging enhancements that capitalize on the increased chip power and brightness as well as expand the package's thermal capabilities. Finally, an extended performance roadmap will translate expected power advances and increasing volumes into a projection of relative $/W decreases over the next several years.

  9. Thermal analysis in high power GaAs-based laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xueqin, Gong; Shiwei, Feng; Yuan, Yue; Junwei, Yang; Jingwei, Li

    2016-04-01

    The thermal characteristics of 808 nm AlGaAs/GaAs laser diodes (LDs) are analyzed via electrical transient measurements and infrared thermography. The temperature rise and thermal resistance are measured at various input currents and powers. From the electrical transient measurements, it is found that there is a significant reduction in thermal resistance with increasing power because of the device power conversion efficiency. The component thermal resistance that was obtained from the structure function showed that the total thermal resistance is mainly composed of the thermal resistance of the sub-mount rather than that of the LD chip, and the thermal resistance of the sub-mount decreases with increasing current. The temperature rise values are also measured by infrared thermography and are calibrated based on a reference image, with results that are lower than those determined by electrical transient measurements. The difference in the results is caused by the limited spatial resolution of the measurements and by the signal being captured from the facet rather than from the junction of the laser diode. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61376077, 61201046, 61204081).

  10. Ultrasensitive, real-time trace gas detection using a high-power, multimode diode laser and cavity ringdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Karpf, Andreas; Qiao, Yuhao; Rao, Gottipaty N

    2016-06-01

    We present a simplified cavity ringdown (CRD) trace gas detection technique that is insensitive to vibration, and capable of extremely sensitive, real-time absorption measurements. A high-power, multimode Fabry-Perot (FP) diode laser with a broad wavelength range (Δλlaser∼0.6  nm) is used to excite a large number of cavity modes, thereby reducing the detector's susceptibility to vibration and making it well suited for field deployment. When detecting molecular species with broad absorption features (Δλabsorption≫Δλlaser), the laser's broad linewidth removes the need for precision wavelength stabilization. The laser's power and broad linewidth allow the use of on-axis cavity alignment, improving the signal-to-noise ratio while maintaining its vibration insensitivity. The use of an FP diode laser has the added advantages of being inexpensive, compact, and insensitive to vibration. The technique was demonstrated using a 1.1 W (λ=400  nm) diode laser to measure low concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in zero air. A sensitivity of 38 parts in 1012 (ppt) was achieved using an integration time of 128 ms; for single-shot detection, 530 ppt sensitivity was demonstrated with a measurement time of 60 μs, which opens the door to sensitive measurements with extremely high temporal resolution; to the best of our knowledge, these are the highest speed measurements of NO2 concentration using CRD spectroscopy. The reduced susceptibility to vibration was demonstrated by introducing small vibrations into the apparatus and observing that there was no measurable effect on the sensitivity of detection. PMID:27411209

  11. Laser performance and thermal lensing in high-power diode-pumped Yb:KGW with athermal orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellström, J. E.; Bjurshagen, S.; Pasiskevicius, V.

    2006-04-01

    A comparative, experimental study of the high-power diode-pumped laser performance and thermal lensing properties between standard b-cut Yb:KGW and Yb:KGW cut along an athermal direction is presented. The results show that thermal lens properties in both the b-cut and the athermal direction-cut crystals are determined by anisotropic thermal expansion in Yb:KGW. Thermal gradients due to the pump beam cause thermal lensing even in the athermal direction-cut geometry. The thermal lens is much weaker and less astigmatic in the athermal direction-cut crystal, for the same absorbed power. These properties allow generation of better-quality laser beams with the athermal direction-cut crystal as compared to the b-cut crystal.

  12. High-efficiency high-power QCW diode-side-pumped zigzag Nd:YAG ceramic slab laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Liu, W.; Bo, Y.; Jiang, B.; Xu, J.; Li, J.; Xu, Y.; Pan, Y.; Xu, J. L.; Feng, X.; Guo, Y.; Shen, Y.; Yang, F.; Yuan, L.; Yuan, H.; Peng, Q.; Cui, D.; Xu, Z.

    2013-04-01

    A high-efficiency high-power diode-side-pumped quasi-continuous wave (QCW) Nd:YAG ceramic slab laser using zigzag optical path was demonstrated. With an integrating sphere technique, the scattering and absorption coefficient of the ceramic slab were measured to be 0.0024 and 0.0016 cm-1 at 1,064 nm, respectively. Under a pump power of 6.69 kW, an average output power of 2.44 kW at 1,064 nm with a repetition rate of 400 Hz was achieved, corresponding to an optical-to-optical efficiency of 36.5 %. As far as we know, this is the highest conversion efficiency reported for QCW side-pumped single slab Nd:YAG ceramic laser.

  13. Thermal Lensing in a High Power Diode-Pumped Continuous Wave Yb+3:KY(WO4)2 Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaeian, Hamidreza

    High power diode-pumped solid state (DPSS) lasers are a rapidly growing technology that is attractive for various applications in scientific and industrial fields. DPSS lasers are highly efficient, reliable and durable with superior beam quality when compared to flash-lamp pumped lasers. Double-tungstate crystals such as potassium yttrium tungstate Yb:KY(WO4)2 (Yb:KYW) are one of the most popular active materials used in DPSS lasers for generation of continuous wave radiation and ultrashort (i.e. femtosecond, 10-15 s) pulses with high average output power. The high pump power of laser diodes results in considerable heat generation in a laser crystal that in turn causes thermal lensing effect. Thermal lensing affects the performance and stability of a resonator, and plays an important role in limiting the output power and degrading the beam quality of solid state lasers. Despite these facts, no detailed studies of thermal effects in Yb:KYW lasers were reported to date. In this work thermal lensing in a diode-pumped Ng-cut Yb:KYW laser operating at the wavelength of 1.04 ?m was characterized. A maximum output power of 3.5 W with a nearly diffraction limited output beam (M 2 < 1.2) was achieved under the absorbed pump power of 13.8 W. The focal lengths of the induced thermal lenses were obtained from the laser output beam size measurements at various incident pump power levels and ABCD matrix analysis. At maximum output power the focal length of the induced thermal lens was found to be 814 mm for the Nm direction (horizontal) and 144 mm for the Np direction (vertical). Thermal lens sensitivity factors were 1.26 m-1/W and 0.32 m-1/W for the Np and Nm directions, respectively. This highly astigmatic thermal lensing can be explained by strong anisotropy of thermo-optical properties of the crystal and its cooling geometry. In addition, the finite element analysis (FEA) method was employed to obtain the focal lengths of the induced thermal lens inside the crystal

  14. Laser diode-pumped dual-cavity high-power fiber laser emitting at 1150  nm employing hybrid gain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yizhu; Xiao, Hu; Xu, Jiangming; Leng, Jinyong; Zhou, Pu

    2016-05-10

    We demonstrate a laser diode-pumped dual-cavity high-power fiber laser emitting at 1150 nm. The laser employs Yb and Raman gains simultaneously. The fiber laser with a simple structure achieves high-efficiency operation while efficiently suppressing the amplified spontaneous emission and parasitic oscillation. The maximum output power at 1150 nm is 110.8 W, with an optical-to-optical efficiency of 57%. Further power scaling at 1150 nm is expected with the optimization of the system design. PMID:27168299

  15. High-power pulsed laser diodes emitting in the range 1.5 – 1.6 μm

    SciTech Connect

    Gorlachuk, P V; Ryaboshtan, Yu L; Ladugin, M A; Padalitsa, A A; Marmalyuk, A A; Kurnosov, V D; Kurnosov, K V; Zhuravleva, O V; Romantsevich, V I; Chernov, R V; Ivanov, A V; Simakov, V A

    2013-09-30

    This paper examines approaches for increasing the output pulse power of laser diodes based on MOVPE InGaAs/AlGaInAs/InP heterostructures and emitting in the range 1.5 – 1.6 μm. We demonstrate that optimising waveguide layer parameters may ensure an increase in the quantum efficiency of the laser diodes and a reduction in their internal optical loss. Characterisation results are presented for laser diodes based on the proposed heterostructures. (lasers)

  16. Miniature long-range light beam transmitter resorting to a high-power broad area laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Wenjing; Lee, Sang-Shin

    2014-08-01

    A miniature long-range light beam transmitter, which taps into a high-power broad area laser diode (BALD), was realized to exhibit a uniform detectable width. An effective model was proposed to practically emulate the multimode characteristics of the beam generated by the BALD. The model, solely based on the emitting region and far-field divergence angle pertaining to the LD, is established through an incoherent superposition of multiple normalized Hermit-Gaussian modes. The feasibility of the proposed model was successfully verified in terms of the calculated and observed irradiance distributions of the light beams. A long-range light beam transmitter was then designed and constructed taking advantage of the BALD source in conjunction with a beam shaper. The manufactured transmitter was corroborated to provide an infrared beam with a constant detectable width of ~1 m, over a distance ranging up to 400 m, for a predefined threshold level.

  17. Experimental investigation of factors limiting slow axis beam quality in 9xx nm high power broad area diode lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Winterfeldt, M. Crump, P.; Wenzel, H.; Erbert, G.; Tränkle, G.

    2014-08-14

    GaAs-based broad-area diode lasers are needed with improved lateral beam parameter product (BPP{sub lat}) at high power. An experimental study of the factors limiting BPP{sub lat} is therefore presented, using extreme double-asymmetric (EDAS) vertical structures emitting at 910 nm. Continuous wave, pulsed and polarization-resolved measurements are presented and compared to thermal simulation. The importance of thermal and packaging-induced effects is determined by comparing junction -up and -down devices. Process factors are clarified by comparing diodes with and without index-guiding trenches. We show that in all cases studied, BPP{sub lat} is limited by a non-thermal BPP ground-level and a thermal BPP, which depends linearly on self-heating. Measurements as a function of pulse width confirm that self-heating rather than bias-level dominates. Diodes without trenches show low BPP ground-level, and a thermal BPP which depends strongly on mounting, due to changes in the temperature profile. The additional lateral guiding in diodes with trenches strongly increases the BPP ground-level, but optically isolates the stripe from the device edges, suppressing the influence of the thermal profile, leading to a BPP-slope that is low and independent of mounting. Trenches are also shown to initiate strain fields that cause parasitic TM-polarized emission with large BPP{sub lat}, whose influence on total BPP{sub lat} remains small, provided the overall polarization purity is >95%.

  18. About the physical meaning of the critical temperature for catastrophic optical damage in high power quantum well laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souto, J.; Pura, J. L.; Jiménez, J.

    2016-02-01

    It is usually assumed that the catastrophic optical damage of high power laser diodes is launched when a critical local temperature (T c) is reached; temperatures ranging from 120 °C to 200 °C were experimentally reported. However, the physical meaning of T c in the degradation process is still unclear. In this work we show that, in the presence of a local heat source in the active region, the temperature of the laser structure, calculated using finite element methods, is widely inhomogeneously distributed among the different layers forming the device. This is due to the impact that the low dimensionality and the thermal boundary resistances have on the thermal transport across the laser structure. When these key factors are explicitly considered, the quantum well (QW) temperature can be several hundred degrees higher than the temperature of the guides and cladding layers. Due to the size of the experimental probes, the measured critical temperature is a weighted average over the QW, guides, and claddings. We show the existence of a large difference between the calculated average temperature, equivalent to the experimentally measured temperature, and the peak temperature localized in the QW. A parallel study on double heterostructure lasers is also included for comparison.

  19. Research on synchronization of 15 parallel high gain photoconductive semiconductor switches triggered by high power pulse laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Xia, Liansheng; Chen, Yi; Liu, Yi; Yang, Chao; Ye, Mao; Deng, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    The synchronization of 15 parallel high gain gallium arsenide photoconductive semiconductor switches (GaAs PCSS) has been researched aiming to get higher output voltage. Each PCSS is triggered independently by a high power pulse laser diode. The pulse width, energy, peak power, and central wavelength of the laser pulse are approximately 18 ns, 360 μJ, 20 kW, and 905 nm, respectively. In the stacked Blumlein transmission lines structure, the synchronous conduction of 15 parallel GaAs PCSSs has been achieved by offering optimized bias voltage and laser parameters. The method of synchronization calculation is given, and the synchronization of the 15 parallel GaAs PCSSs is measured as 775 ps. Furthermore, influences of the bias voltage, laser parameters on the synchronization are analyzed. In the output terminal, superimposed by the output voltages of 15 Blumlein transmission lines, the total output voltage reaches up to 328 kV, which is the highest output voltage of GaAs PCSSs that has been reported so far.

  20. Single-pass UV generation at 222.5 nm based on high-power GaN external cavity diode laser.

    PubMed

    Ruhnke, N; Müller, A; Eppich, B; Güther, R; Maiwald, M; Sumpf, B; Erbert, G; Tränkle, G

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate a compact system for single-pass frequency doubling of high-power GaN diode laser radiation. The deep UV laser light at 222.5 nm is generated in a β-BaB2O4 (BBO) crystal. A high-power GaN external cavity diode laser (ECDL) system in Littrow configuration with narrowband emission at 445 nm is used as pump source. At a pump power of 680 mW, a maximum UV power of 16 μW in continuous-wave operation at 222.5 nm is achieved. This concept enables a compact diode laser-based system emitting in the deep ultraviolet spectral range. PMID:25927802

  1. High-power and highly efficient diode-cladding-pumped holmium-doped fluoride fiber laser operating at 2.94 microm.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Stuart D

    2009-08-01

    A high-power diode-cladding-pumped Ho(3+), Pr(3+)-doped fluoride glass fiber laser is demonstrated. The laser produced a maximum output power of 2.5 W at a slope efficiency of 32% using diode lasers emitting at 1,150 nm. The long-emission wavelength of 2.94 microm measured at maximum pump power, which is particularly suited to medical applications, indicates that tailoring of the proportion of Pr(3+) ions can provide specific emission wavelengths while providing sufficient de-excitation of the lower laser level. PMID:19649086

  2. Cr,Nd:Gd3Sc2Ga3O12 laser pumped by high-power visible laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheps, Richard

    1992-06-01

    Visible laser diodes are used to pump a co-doped Cr,Nd:Gd3Sc2Ga3O12 (Cr,Nd:GSGG) laser rod, demonstrating efficient operation at 1.06 (mu) . Using a 10 cm ROC HR output coupler, the absorbed power required to reach threshold was 938 (mu) W. The round trip losses in the 5 mm long rod were measured to be 4 X 10-3. The best slope efficiency was 42.1%, obtained with a 97% R output coupler. The photon slope efficiency was 66.8%.

  3. High-efficiency high-power diode laser beam shaping and focusing with constant optical-path length equalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonora, Stefano; Villoresi, Paolo

    2006-04-01

    In this work we report on a novel optical design for beam shaping and focalization of high-power diode laser bars. The goals of our study are: the increase the optical throughput of the beam shaping device with respect to standard solutions and either to enhance the irradiance on a target or to inject the laser beam into a smaller fibre than with respect to beam shaping system based on plane surfaces. The high power diode laser bars pose serious difficulties in their optical handling due to their strong difference between the two transverse axes, which induce a strong astigmatic and asymmetric output radiation. As is well known, the beam quality is very different in the two axes called slow axis and fast axis, and in particular the slow axis is composed by the superposition of several multimodal sources. The beam quality in this axis is very low (its etendue may exceed 2000 mm mrad). On the other hand, the fast axis has a very high beam quality, near diffraction limited, although with very high divergence (30°-50°). The common solution for the application of the laser radiation is a fast axis aspheric micro lens in front of the emitters, in order to achieve its collimation. Typical values of the fast axis collimated beam are 0.7mm and less than 6mrad. However, the so obtained collimated beam is poorly focusable with a standard lens, and a few methods were proposed to overcome the problem. The more relevant solutions include: the stepped mirror technique, the plane parallel mirrors pair, micro prisms array and confocal micro lens array. Each of these techniques is based on the equalization of the beam parameter product by the subdivision of the beam in the slow axis and its reshaping. For all these techniques the efficiency spans from 50% to 70%. The best focalization results allow the coupling in a fibre of 400μm diameter, with NA-0.22. The aim of this work is the design and the realization of a new device, that is considered as target the following aspects: 1

  4. Experimental and numerical investigation on cladding of corrosion-erosion resistant materials by a high power direct diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahmand, Parisa

    advantages due to creating coating layers with superior properties in terms of purity, homogeneity, low dilution, hardness, bonding, and microstructure. In the development of modern materials for hardfacing applications, the functionality is often improved by combining materials with different properties into composites. Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) coating is a composite material with two constituent parts, i.e., matrix and the reinforcement. This class of composites are addressing improved mechanical properties such as stiffness, strength, toughness, and tribological and chemical resistance. Fabrication of MMCs is to achieve a combination of properties not achievable by any of the materials acting alone. MMCs have attracted significant attention for decades due to their combination of wear-resistivity, corrosion-resistivity, thermal, electrical and magnetic properties. Presently, there is a strong emphasis on the development of advanced functional coatings for corrosion, erosion, and wear protection for different industrial applications. In this research, a laser cladding system equipped with a high power direct diode laser associated with gas driven metal powder delivery system was used to develop advanced MMC coatings. The high power direct diode laser used in this study offers wider beam spot, shorter wavelength and uniform power distribution. These properties make the cladding set-up ideal for coating due to fewer cladding tracks, lower operation cost, higher laser absorption, and improved coating qualities. In order to prevent crack propagation, porosity, and uniform dispersion of carbides in MMC coating, cladding procedure was assisted by an induction heater as a second heat source. The developed defect free MMC coatings were combined with nano-size particles of WC, rare earth (RE) element (La2O3), and Mo as a refractory metal to enhance mechanical properties, chemical composition, and subsequently improve the tribological performance of the coatings. The resistance

  5. Advances in single mode and high power AlGaInN laser diode technology for systems applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najda, Stephen P.; Perlin, Piotr; Suski, Tadek; Marona, Lujca; Boćkowski, Michal; Leszczyński, Mike; Wisniewski, Przemek; Czernecki, Robert; Kucharski, Robert; Targowski, Grzegorz; Smalc-Koziorowska, Julita; Stanczyk, Szymon; Watson, Scott; Kelly, Antony E.

    2015-03-01

    The AlGaInN material system allows for laser diodes to be fabricated over a very wide range of wavelengths from u.v., ~380nm, to the visible ~530nm, by tuning the indium content of the laser GaInN quantum well. Thus AlGaInN laser diode technology is a key enabler for the development of new disruptive system level applications in displays, telecom, defence and other industries.

  6. High Power Diode-End-Pumped Nd:YAG 946-nm Laser and Its Efficient Frequency Doubling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Rui; Zhao, Shi-Yong; Cai, Zhi-Qiang; Zhang, Qiang; Wen, Wu-Qi; Ding, Xin; Wang, Peng; Ding, Li-Li; Yao, Jian-Quan

    2005-06-01

    We report a high power operation of the 4F3/2→4I9/2 transition in diode-end-pumped laser at 946 nm. The maximum output of 5.1 W is obtained with a short linear plano-concave cavity, and the slope efficiency is 24.5% at incident pump power of 23.3 W. To our knowledge, this is the highest value of the LD-pumped Nd:YAG 946 nm lasers that employ the conversional Nd:YAG rod as the gain medium. By intracavity frequency doubling with an LBO crystal, up to 982 mW cw output power in the blue spectral range at 473 nm is achieved at an incident pump power of 10.9 W with a compact three-element cavity, leading to optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 9%. The conversion efficiency should be increased to 15.1%, if the rather low absorption coefficient of this Nd:YAG is considered.

  7. Alloying the X40CrMoV5-1 steel surface layer with tungsten carbide by the use of a high power diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrzański, L. A.; Bonek, M.; Hajduczek, E.; Klimpel, A.

    2005-07-01

    The paper presents the effect of alloying with tungsten carbide on properties of the X40CrMoV5-1 steel surface layer, using the high power diode laser (HPDL). Selection of laser operating conditions is discussed, as well as thickness of the alloying layer, and their influence on structure and chemical composition of the steel. Analysis of the influence of the process conditions on the thicknesses of the alloyed layer and heat-affected zone is presented.

  8. The Use of Large Transparent Ceramics in a High Powered, Diode Pumped Solid State Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, R; Bhachu, B; Cutter, K; Fochs, S; Letts, S; Parks, C; Rotter, M; Soules, T

    2007-09-24

    The advent of large transparent ceramics is one of the key enabling technological advances that have shown that the development of very high average power compact solid state lasers is achievable. Large ceramic neodymium doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) amplifier slabs are used in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Solid State Heat Capacity Laser (SSHCL), which has achieved world record average output powers in excess of 67 kilowatts. We will describe the attributes of using large transparent ceramics, our present system architecture and corresponding performance; as well as describe our near term future plans.

  9. Effect of mechanical polishing on corrosion behavior of Hastelloy C22 coating prepared by high power diode laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qin-Ying; Bai, Shu-Lin; Zhao, Yun-Hong; Liu, Zong-De

    2014-06-01

    Hastelloy C22 coatings were prepared on mild steel by high power diode laser cladding technique. In order to investigate the effect of mechanical polishing on corrosion behavior, the coatings with original surface (coating C1) and new surfaces after mechanical polishing away of 0.3 mm (coating C2) and 0.6 mm (coating C3) in depth were studied. Their microstructures and compositions were measured, and corrosion resistance in seawater was studied. The planar, cellular and dendritic solidifications were found from the coating/substrate interface to the top surface of coatings. In coating C1, smallest size primary solidification containing mainly Ni and largest quantity of eutectic networks composed of Cr, Mo and W are dominant, and harmful carbide M(Cr, W)2C is found. While Mo6Ni6C phase exists only in coatings C2 and C3. The open circuit potential and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of coating C1 are higher within two days, and then lower later than the other two coatings. Coatings C2 and C3 display larger stable radius of capacitive loop and lower corrosion current density owing to higher contents of Cr and Mo, as well as no harmful carbide at surface, which reveals higher corrosion resistance and lower corrosion rate than coating C1. Consequently, properly mechanical polishing of original coating surface is beneficial for improving its corrosion resistance.

  10. Water Droplet Erosion Behavior of High-Power Diode Laser Treated 17Cr4Ni PH Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, B. S.

    2014-05-01

    This article deals with water droplet erosion (WDE) behavior of high-power diode laser (HPDL) treated 17Cr4Ni PH stainless steel. After HPDL treatment, the water droplet erosion resistance (WDER) of 17Cr4Ni PH stainless steel has not improved. The main reason is the surface hardness, which has not improved after HPDL treatment though the microstructure has become much finer. On the other hand, precipitation hardening of the alloy at 490°C for 3 h has resulted in improved WDER more than twice. This is because of its increased microhardness and improved modified ultimate resilience (MUR), and formation of fine grained microstructure. The WDER has been correlated with MUR, a single mechanical property, based upon microhardness, ultimate tensile strength, and Young's modulus. WDERs of HPDL treated, untreated, and precipitation hardened 17Cr4Ni PH stainless steel samples were determined using a WDE test facility as per ASTM G73-1978. The WDE damage mechanism, compared on the basis of MUR and scanning electron micrographs, is discussed and reported in this article.

  11. Adjustable mounting device for high-volume production of beam-shaping systems for high-power diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haag, Sebastian; Bernhardt, Henning; Rübenach, Olaf; Haverkamp, Tobias; Müller, Tobias; Zontar, Daniel; Brecher, Christian

    2015-02-01

    In many applications for high-power diode lasers, the production of beam-shaping and homogenizing optical systems experience rising volumes and dynamical market demands. The automation of assembly processes on flexible and reconfigurable machines can contribute to a more responsive and scalable production. The paper presents a flexible mounting device designed for the challenging assembly of side-tab based optical systems. It provides design elements for precisely referencing and fixating two optical elements in a well-defined geometric relation. Side tabs are presented to the machine allowing the application of glue and a rotating mechanism allows the attachment to the optical elements. The device can be adjusted to fit different form factors and it can be used in high-volume assembly machines. The paper shows the utilization of the device for a collimation module consisting of a fast-axis and a slow-axis collimation lens. Results regarding the repeatability and process capability of bonding side tab assemblies as well as estimates from 3D simulation for overall performance indicators achieved such as cycle time and throughput will be discussed.

  12. Maximizing coupling-efficiency of high-power diode lasers utilizing hybrid assembly technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zontar, D.; Dogan, M.; Fulghum, S.; Müller, T.; Haag, S.; Brecher, C.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we present hybrid assembly technology to maximize coupling efficiency for spatially combined laser systems. High quality components, such as center-turned focusing units, as well as suitable assembly strategies are necessary to obtain highest possible output ratios. Alignment strategies are challenging tasks due to their complexity and sensitivity. Especially in low-volume production fully automated systems are economically at a disadvantage, as operator experience is often expensive. However reproducibility and quality of automatically assembled systems can be superior. Therefore automated and manual assembly techniques are combined to obtain high coupling efficiency while preserving maximum flexibility. The paper will describe necessary equipment and software to enable hybrid assembly processes. Micromanipulator technology with high step-resolution and six degrees of freedom provide a large number of possible evaluation points. Automated algorithms are necess ary to speed-up data gathering and alignment to efficiently utilize available granularity for manual assembly processes. Furthermore, an engineering environment is presented to enable rapid prototyping of automation tasks with simultaneous data ev aluation. Integration with simulation environments, e.g. Zemax, allows the verification of assembly strategies in advance. Data driven decision making ensures constant high quality, documents the assembly process and is a basis for further improvement. The hybrid assembly technology has been applied on several applications for efficiencies above 80% and will be discussed in this paper. High level coupling efficiency has been achieved with minimized assembly as a result of semi-automated alignment. This paper will focus on hybrid automation for optimizing and attaching turning mirrors and collimation lenses.

  13. Low-profile flat pack: a high-power fiber coupled laser diode package for low-cost high-reliability applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Raj; Heminway, Trebor; Krasnick, Richard; Griffin, Peter; Powers, Michael

    2004-06-01

    In recent years, high power diode lasers have become established in many applications like material processing, fiber laser and amplifier pumping, free space communication, direct printing and medical diagnosis and procedures. In particular, advances in laser diode packaging have resulted in devices with high wall-plug efficiency, enhanced reliability and low cost of ownership. Despite the advances of recent years, packaging, testing and reliability assurance still account for a majority of the cost of a fiber coupled laser diode. At MKPA-Panasonic, we are developing new fiber coupled laser diode package designs to enable low cost, high reliability assemblies that are amenable to high volume manufacturing. In this paper, we present a new low-profile, uncooled package for single-emitter high power laser diode packaging applications. Detailed design information, thermal modeling and reliability data for this small footprint, low profile optical flat package (OFP) with 4W output power in a 0.15NA, 100 micron core fiber is presented. The unique packaging technology resulting in good thermal and reliability performance in uncooled environments is discussed. All the assembly processes for the package are performed in a flux-free environment. The package is devoid of epoxy and can be hermetically sealed for high reliability operation. A reduced bill of materials and assembly steps result in significant cost savings. The design eliminates all non-vertical assembly processes for ease of assembly. Other features include passive die attach and integrated fiber mount. This package is specifically designed to address the fiber laser pump, industrial material processing, solid state laser pumping, printing and medical application markets.

  14. High power resonantly diode-pumped σ-configuration Er3+:YVO4 laser at 1593.5 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ter-Gabrielyan, N.; Fromzel, V.; Lukasiewicz, T.; Ryba-Romanowski, W.; Dubinskii, M.

    2011-07-01

    Laser operation of an eyesafe 1593.5-nm laser based on Er3+-doped yttrium orthovanadate single crystal resonantly-pumped by a spectrally-narrowed InGaAsP/InP diode bar stack is demonstrated for the first time. Cryogenically-cooled Er3+:YVO4 laser pumped at 1534 nm performed with maximum slope efficiency of ~ 70% and maximum quasi-continuous-wave (Q-CW) power of 59.8 W.

  15. High power and high efficiency kW 88x-nm multi-junction pulsed diode laser bars and arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhigang; Bai, John; Dong, Weimin; Guan, Xingguo; Zhang, Shiguo; Elim, Sandrio; Bao, Ling; Grimshaw, Mike; Devito, Mark; Kanskar, Manoj

    2014-03-01

    There is great interest in the development of high-power, high-efficiency and low cost QCW 88x-nm diode laser bars and arrays for pumping solid state lasers. We report on the development of kW 88x-nm diode laser bars that are based on a bipolar cascade design, in which multiple lasers are epitaxially grown in electrical series on a single substrate. Multiple laser junctions, each of which is based on nLight's high performance 88x-nm epitaxial design, are separated by low resistance tunnel junctions with resistance as low as 8.0x10-6 Ω-cm2. Optimization of bar geometry and wafer fabrication processes was explored for electrical and optical performance improvement in double-junction diode lasers. A QCW power of 630 W was demonstrated in a 3-mm wide mini-bar with 3-mm cavity length. Peak efficiency of 61% was measured with 200 s and 14 Hz pulses, at a heatsink temperature of 10 °C. Further power scaling was demonstrated in a 1-cm wide bar with 3-mm cavity length, where a record high peak power of 1.77 kW was measured at 1 kA drive current. Ongoing work for further power scaling includes development of triple-junction diode laser bars and double-junction bar-stack that emits < 10kW optical power.

  16. A portable high-power diode laser-based single-stage ceramic tile grout sealing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, J.; Schmidt, M. J. J.; Li, L.; Edwards, R. E.; Gale, A. W.

    2002-02-01

    By means of a 60 W high-power diode laser (HPDL) and a specially developed grout material the void between adjoining ceramic tiles has been successfully sealed. A single-stage process has been developed which uses a crushed ceramic tile mix to act as a tough, inexpensive bulk substrate and a glazed enamel surface to provide an impervious surface glaze. The single-stage ceramic tile grout sealing process yielded seals produced in normal atmospheric conditions that displayed no discernible cracks and porosities. The single-stage grout is simple to formulate and easy to apply. Tiles were successfully sealed with power densities as low as 200 kW/ mm2 and at rates of up to 600 mm/ min. Bonding of the enamel to the crushed ceramic tile mix was identified as being primarily due to van der Waals forces and, on a very small scale, some of the crushed ceramic tile mix material dissolving into the glaze. In terms of mechanical, physical and chemical characteristics, the single-stage ceramic tile grout was found to be far superior to the conventional epoxy tile grout and, in many instances, matched and occasionally surpassed that of the ceramic tiles themselves. What is more, the development of a hand-held HPDL beam delivery unit and the related procedures necessary to lead to the commercialisation of the single-stage ceramic tile grout sealing process are presented. Further, an appraisal of the potential hazards associated with the use of the HPDL in an industrial environment and the solutions implemented to ensure that the system complies with the relevant safety standards are given.

  17. High-power 880-nm diode-directly-pumped passively mode-locked Nd:YVO₄ laser at 1342 nm with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang-Qin; Liu, Ke; Han, Lin; Zong, Nan; Bo, Yong; Zhang, Jing-Yuan; Peng, Qin-Jun; Cui, Da-Fu; Xu, Zu-Yan

    2011-04-15

    A high-power 880-nm diode-directly-pumped passively mode-locked 1342 nm Nd:YVO₄ laser was demonstrated with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM). The laser mode radii in the laser crystal and on the SESAM were optimized carefully using the ABCD matrix formalism. An average output power of 2.3 W was obtained with a repetition rate of 76 MHz and a pulse width of 29.2 ps under an absorbed pump power of 12.1 W, corresponding to an optical-optical efficiency of 19.0% and a slope efficiency of 23.9%, respectively. PMID:21499398

  18. High-power diode lasers for the 1.9 to 2.2 μm wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, Márc T.; Gilly, Jürgen; Moritz, Rudolf; Rattunde, Marcel; Schmitz, Johannes; Wagner, Joachim

    2008-02-01

    GaSb based diode laser both as single emitters and as arrays, emitting between 1.9 and 2.2 μm, have a huge potential especially for materials processing, medical applications and as optical pump sources for solid state laser systems emitting in the 2-4 μm wavelength range. Determined by the absorption characteristics of thermoplastic materials at wavelengths around 2 μm, the light emitted by the diode laser will be absorbed by the material itself and can thus be used for marking and welding without the addition of e.g. colour pigments. We will present results on different (AlGaIn)(AsSb) quantum-well diode laser single emitters and linear laser arrays, the latter consisting of 20 emitters on a 1 cm long bar, emitting at different wavelengths between 1.9 and 2.2 μm. To improve on the typically poor fast axis beam divergence of diode lasers emitting at these wavelengths, we abandoned the broadened waveguide concept and changed over to a new waveguide design which features a rather narrow waveguide core. This results in a remarkable reduction in fast axis beam divergence to 43° FWHM for the new waveguide design. Electro-optical and thermal behaviour and the wavelength tunability by current and temperature have been carefully investigated in detail. For single emitters cw output powers of 2 W have been demonstrated. For diode laser arrays mounted on actively cooled heat sinks, more than 20 W in continuous-wave mode have been achieved at a heat sink temperature of 20 °C resulting in wall-plug efficiencies of more than 26%.

  19. High-power efficient cw and pulsed lasers based on bulk Yb : KYW crystals with end diode pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, G H; Yang, G H; Lee, D S; Kulik, Alexander V; Sall', E G; Chizhov, S A; Yashin, V E; Kang, U

    2012-04-30

    End-diode-pumped lasers based on one and two Yb : KYW crystals operating in cw and Q-switched regimes, as well as in the regime of mode-locking, are studied. The single-crystal laser generated stable ultrashort (shorter than 100 fs) laser pulses at wavelengths of 1035 and 1043 nm with an average power exceeding 1 W. The average output power of the two-crystal laser exceeded 18 W in the cw regime and 16 W in the Q-switched regime with a slope efficiency exceeding 30%.

  20. Coupling of a high-power tapered diode laser beam into a single-mode-fiber within a compact module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedrzejczyk, D.; Sahm, A.; Carstens, C.; Urban, G.; Pulka, M.; Eppich, B.; Scholz, F.; Paschke, K.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, coupling of radiation generated by a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) tapered diode laser around 1064 nm into a single-mode-fiber (SMF) within a butterfly module with a footprint < 10 cm2 is demonstrated. The module comprises temperature stabilizing components, a brightness maintaining micro optical assembly mounted with submicrometer precision and a standard FC/APC output connector. The aim of the introduced concept is to improve the beam quality and to eliminate the current dependent beam astigmatism, characteristic for tapered diode lasers and amplifiers, and, thus, provide an efficient, multi-Watt laser light source characterized by a narrow-band spectrum and a stigmatic, nearly Gaussian laser beam independent of the operating point. A maximum power ex SMF of 2.5 W at a coupling efficiency of 57 % is reached in the presented butterfly module.

  1. High-power dual-wavelength external-cavity diode laser based on tapered amplifier with tunable terahertz frequency difference.

    PubMed

    Chi, Mingjun; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2011-07-15

    Tunable dual-wavelength operation of a diode laser system based on a tapered diode amplifier with double-Littrow external-cavity feedback is demonstrated around 800 nm. The two wavelengths can be tuned individually, and the frequency difference of the two wavelengths is tunable from 0.5 to 5.0 THz. An output power of 1.54 W is achieved with a frequency difference of 0.86 THz, the output power is higher than 1.3 W in the 5.0 THz range of frequency difference, and the amplified spontaneous emission intensity is more than 20 dB suppressed in the range of frequency difference. To our knowledge, this is the highest output power from a dual-wavelength diode laser system operating with tunable terahertz frequency difference. PMID:21765489

  2. AlGaInN laser diode bar and array technology for high-power and individual addressable applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najda, S. P.; Perlin, P.; Suski, T.; Marona, L.; Boćkowski, M.; Leszczyński, M.; Wisniewski, P.; Czernecki, R.; Kucharski, R.; Targowski, G.

    2016-04-01

    The AlGaInN material system allows for laser diodes to be fabricated over a very wide range of wavelengths from u.v., ~380nm, to the visible ~530nm, by tuning the indium content of the laser GaInN quantum well, giving rise to new and novel applications for medical, industrial, display and scientific purposes. Ridge waveguide laser diode structures are fabricated to achieve single mode operation with high optical powers of >100mW with high reliability. Low defectivity and highly uniform GaN substrates allow arrays and bars of nitride lasers to be fabricated. We demonstrate the operation of monolithic AlGaInN laser bars with up to 20 emitters giving optical powers up to 4W cw at ~395nm with a common contact configuration. These bars are suitable for optical pumps and novel extended cavity systems. An alternative package configuration for AlGaInN laser arrays allows for each individual laser to be individually addressable allowing complex free-space and/or fibre optic system integration within a very small form-factor.

  3. Studies of the degradation mechanisms in high-power diode lasers using multi-channel micro-thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozłowska, Anna; Tomm, Jens W.; Wawrzyniak, Piotr; Maląg, Andrzej; Weik, Fritz; Latoszek, Mateusz

    2005-09-01

    We demonstrate the applicability of imaging thermography for investigations of mechanisms associated with gradual degradation in diode lasers. The introduction of two spectral channels provides the means for separate observation of deep level luminescence and thermal radiation emitted according to Planck's law. In the near IR region we found the signal detected by the camera to be mainly affected by mid-gap deep-level luminescence. An intensity increase of the luminescence signal for an aged diode laser compared to an unaged device is noticed. It can be explained by an increase of deep level defect concentration during the aging. In the mid IR, we mainly encounter thermal radiation, which can be used for the analysis of the thermal properties of devices. In present work the thermal behavior of the device subjected to an aging of 3000 hours is analyzed. A significant increase of device temperature is noticed.

  4. Unveiling laser diode “fossil” and the dynamic analysis for heliotropic growth of catastrophic optical damage in high power laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiang; Xiong, Yihan; An, Haiyan; Boucke, Konstantin; Treusch, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Taking advantage of robust facet passivation, we unveil a laser “fossil” buried within a broad area laser diode (LD) cavity when the LD was damaged by applying a high current. For the first time, novel physical phenomena have been observed at these dramatically elevated energy densities within the nanoscale LD waveguide. The observation of the laser “fossil” is interpreted with different mechanisms, including: the origination of bulk catastrophic optical damage (COD) due to locally high energy densities, heliotropic COD growth, solid-liquid-gas phase transformations, strong longitudinal phonon cooling effect on the molten COD wave front, and the formation of patterns due to laser lateral modes. For the first time the COD propagation is analyzed temporally by an acoustic phonon bouncing model and the COD velocity is extrapolated to be exponentially decreasing from more than 800 μm/μs to a few μm/μs within a 20 μs time period as the energy density dissipates.

  5. Unveiling laser diode “fossil” and the dynamic analysis for heliotropic growth of catastrophic optical damage in high power laser diodes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Xiong, Yihan; An, Haiyan; Boucke, Konstantin; Treusch, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Taking advantage of robust facet passivation, we unveil a laser “fossil” buried within a broad area laser diode (LD) cavity when the LD was damaged by applying a high current. For the first time, novel physical phenomena have been observed at these dramatically elevated energy densities within the nanoscale LD waveguide. The observation of the laser “fossil” is interpreted with different mechanisms, including: the origination of bulk catastrophic optical damage (COD) due to locally high energy densities, heliotropic COD growth, solid-liquid-gas phase transformations, strong longitudinal phonon cooling effect on the molten COD wave front, and the formation of patterns due to laser lateral modes. For the first time the COD propagation is analyzed temporally by an acoustic phonon bouncing model and the COD velocity is extrapolated to be exponentially decreasing from more than 800 μm/μs to a few μm/μs within a 20 μs time period as the energy density dissipates. PMID:26740303

  6. High-power laser diodes emitting light above 1100 nm with a small vertical divergence angle of 13 degrees.

    PubMed

    Pietrzak, Agnieszka; Wenzel, Hans; Erbert, Götz; Tränkle, Günther

    2008-10-01

    Laser diodes with highly strained InGaAs quantum wells, emitting at 1130 nm, embedded in a GaAs waveguide were investigated. This Letter reviews the design of the vertical structure for enclosing high output power in angles smaller than 18 degrees . Example designs were processed to 200 microm stripe-width lasers with an 8-mm-long optical cavity. When these are mounted on C mounts, they give an output power of 38 W under quasi-cw operation from a single emitter. PMID:18830347

  7. High-power diode side-pumped Nd:YAG laser on the low gain three lines near 1.1 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Bo, Y.; Xie, S.; Li, C.; Xu, Y.; Yang, F.; Xu, J.; Peng, Q.; Zhang, J.; Cui, D.; Xu, Z.

    2011-07-01

    We demonstrate a high-power diode side-pumped Nd:YAG laser on the low gain three lines near 1.1 μm. By tuning the tilting angle of a solid etalon in the cavity, the laser can be selectively operated at 1112, 1116 and 1123 nm either in continuous-wave (CW) mode or in actively Q-switched (QS) mode, respectively. The highest average CW output powers were 75, 47 and 71 W at 1112, 1116 and 1123 nm, respectively. The transmittances of the etalon were calculated to analyze the performance of the laser at the three lines. Furthermore, a computational model of a three-wavelength laser based on rate equations was employed to examine the line selectivity of the three lines near 1.1 μm at different tilting angles of the etalon.

  8. High-power diode-end-pumped laser with multi-segmented Nd-doped yttrium vanadate.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y J; Chen, Y F

    2013-07-01

    A Nd:YVO4 crystal consisting of three segments with different doping concentrations is originally developed for power scaling in diode-end-pumped solid-state laser. We systematically make a comparison of laser characteristics between the multi-segmented and conventional composite crystals to show the feasibility of using gain medium with multiple doping concentrations for power scale-up in end-pumped laser without introducing significant thermally accompanied effects. We further construct a dual-end-pumped actively Q-switched oscillator at 1064 nm to verify the usefulness of our crystal design, where the largest pulse energy of 1.06 mJ and the highest output power of 45 W are efficiently generated. PMID:23842393

  9. High-power, micro-integrated diode laser modules at 767 and 780 nm for portable quantum gas experiments.

    PubMed

    Schiemangk, Max; Lampmann, Kai; Dinkelaker, Aline; Kohfeldt, Anja; Krutzik, Markus; Kürbis, Christian; Sahm, Alexander; Spießberger, Stefan; Wicht, Andreas; Erbert, Götz; Tränkle, Günther; Peters, Achim

    2015-06-10

    We present micro-integrated diode laser modules operating at wavelengths of 767 and 780 nm for cold quantum gas experiments on potassium and rubidium. The master-oscillator-power-amplifier concept provides both narrow linewidth emission and high optical output power. With a linewidth (10 μs) below 1 MHz and an output power of up to 3 W, these modules are specifically suited for quantum optics experiments and feature the robustness required for operation at a drop tower or on-board a sounding rocket. This technology development hence paves the way toward precision quantum optics experiments in space. PMID:26192832

  10. Ex vivo evaluation of safety and efficacy of vaporization of the prostate using a 300 W high-power laser diode with the wavelength of 980 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Junya; Honda, Norihiro; Hazama, Hisanao; Awazu, Kunio

    2014-03-01

    Laser vaporization of the prostate is one of the promising technique for less-invasive treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. However, shorter operative duration and higher hemostatic ability are expected. The wavelength of 980 nm offers a high simultaneous absorption by water and hemoglobin, so that it combines the efficient vaporization with good hemostasis. Therefore, we have evaluated the safety and efficacy of vaporization of the prostate using a recently developed 300 W high-power laser diode with the wavelength of 980 nm. First, validity of bovine prostate tissue as the sample was confirmed by measuring the optical properties of bovine and human prostate tissue using a double integrating sphere optical system. Next, contact and non-contact ex vivo irradiations were performed for various irradiation powers and times, and vaporized and coagulated depths were measured. In the contact irradiation, the vaporized depth at the power of 300 W was significantly deeper than that at the power of 100 W, while the difference was relatively smaller for the coagulated depths at 300 and 100 W. In the non-contact irradiation, coagulation as thick as that in the contact irradiation was observed almost without vaporization. Therefore, it is suggested that the treatment in the contact irradiation using the high-power laser diode can vaporize the prostate more efficiently without increasing the risk of perforation. Hemostasis with the coagulation would be possible in both irradiation methods. To prevent the postoperative perforation, operators need to understand the relationship between the coagulated depth and the irradiation conditions.

  11. High power solid state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, H.

    1988-01-01

    These proceedings discuss the following subjects: trends in materials processing with laser radiation; slabs and high power systems; glasses and new crystals; solid state lasers at HOYA Corp.; lamps, resonators and transmission; glasses as active materials for high average power solid state lasers; flashlamp pumped GGG-crystals; alexandrite lasers; designing telescope resonators; mode operation of neodymium: YAG lasers; intracavity frequency doubling with KTP crystal and thermal effects in cylinder lasers.

  12. High-power dense wavelength division multiplexing (HP-DWDM) of frequency stabilized 9xx diode laser bars with a channel spacing of 1.5 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hengesbach, Stefan; Holly, Carlo; Krauch, Niels; Witte, Ulrich; Westphalen, Thomas; Traub, Martin; Hoffmann, Dieter

    2014-03-01

    We present a compact High-Power DenseWavelength Division Multiplexer (HP-DWDM) based on Volume Bragg Gratings (VBGs) for spectrally stabilized diode lasers with a low average beam quality M2 <=50. The center wavelengths of the five input channels with a spectral spacing of 1.5 nm are 973 nm, 974.5 nm, 976 nm, 977.5 nm and 979 nm. Multiplexing efficiencies of 97%+/-2% have been demonstrated with single mode, frequency stabilized laser radiation. Since the diffraction efficiency strongly depends on the beam quality, the multiplexing efficiency decreases to 94% (M2 = 25) and 85%+/-3% (M2 = 45) if multimode radiation is overlaid. Besides, the calculated multiplexing efficiency of the radiation with M2 = 45 amounts to 87:5 %. Thus, calculations and measurements are in good agreement. In addition, we developed a dynamic temperature control for the multiplexing VBGs which adapts the Bragg wavelengths to the diode laser center wavelengths. In short, the prototype with a radiance of 70GWm-2 sr-1 consists of five spectrally stabilized and passively cooled diode laser bars with 40Woutput after beam transformation. To achieve a good stabilization performance ELOD (Extreme LOw Divergence) diode laser bars have been chosen in combination with an external resonator based on VBGs. As a result, the spectral width defined by 95% power inclusion is < 120pm for each beam source across the entire operating range from 30 A to 120 A. Due to the spectral stabilization, the output power of each bar decreases in the range of < 5 %.

  13. A convenient high power high efficiency blue cw single frequency laser by IR diode laser doubling with PPKTP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danekar, Koustubh; Khademian, Ali; Hassan Rezaeian, Nima; Shiner, David

    2010-03-01

    We report on high efficiency resonant doubling to 486nm using periodically poled KTP. A stable blue power of 680 ± 5 mW was obtained using the 840 mW output power of a FBG stabilized PM fiber coupled IR semiconductor laser. This gives an overall conversion efficiency of 80% for generating blue. To obtain this result, all losses in the system were carefully studied and minimized. Using a similar cavity design replacing PPKTP with CLBO we are additionally investigating a second doubling stage for efficient UV generation to 243nm.

  14. High-power pulsed lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Holzrichter, J.F.

    1980-04-02

    The ideas that led to the successful construction and operation of large multibeam fusion lasers at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory are reviewed. These lasers are based on the use of Nd:glass laser materials. However, most of the concepts are applicable to any laser being designed for fusion experimentation. This report is a summary of lectures given by the author at the 20th Scottish University Summer School in Physics, on Laser Plasma Interaction. This report includes basic concepts of the laser plasma system, a discussion of lasers that are useful for short-pulse, high-power operation, laser design constraints, optical diagnostics, and system organization.

  15. Thermal properties of high-power InGaAsP/InP stripe-geometry laser diode: calculation and analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongyan; Li, Hong; Shi, Jiawei; Jin, Enshun; Gao, Dingsan

    1998-08-01

    In this paper, theoretical calculation results of dynamically thermal properties of high-power InGaAsP/InP stripe-geometry laser diode has been given based on the 2D thermal conduction model by means of finite difference. In this calculation, except for active layer heating due to nonradiative recombination and partial reabsorption of radiation, the radiative transfer of the spontaneous radiation through the wide-gap passive layers, the Joule heating is taken into account. At the same time, active region heat source is simplified as line heat source. Through the temperature profiles acquired by changing construction parameters and supplied power, we can see that temperature profiles have a certain relation with the construction parameters and supplied power. At last, the thermal resistance achieved by theory calculation compares with the laser diode thermal resistance achieved by measuring, the proportion of the crystal, the heat sink and the shell's thermal resistance is obtained. The calculation shows that a diamond film sandwiched between the crystal and the heat sink can improve the diode's thermal properties obviously.

  16. Optoacoustic response from graphene-based solutions embedded in optical phantoms by using 905-nm high-power diode-laser assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leggio, Luca; Gallego, Daniel C.; Gawali, Sandeep Babu; Dadrasnia, Ehsan; Sánchez, Miguel; Rodríguez, Sergio; González, Marta; Carpintero, Guillermo; Osiński, Marek; Lamela, Horacio

    2016-03-01

    During the last two decades, optoacoustic imaging has been developed as a novel biomedical imaging technique based on the generation of ultrasound waves by means of laser light. In this work, we investigate the optoacoustic response from graphene-based solutions by using a compact and cost-effective system based on an assembly of several 905-nm pulsed high-power diode lasers coupled to a bundle of 200-μm diameter- core optical fibers. The coupled light is conveyed into a lens system and focused on an absorber consisting of graphene-based nanomaterials (graphene oxide, reduced graphene oxide, and reduced graphene-oxide/gold-nanoparticle hybrid, respectively) diluted in ethanol and hosted in slightly scattering optical phantoms. The high absorption of these graphene-based solutions suggests their potential future use in optoacoustic applications as contrast agents.

  17. High-power diode-directly-pumped tenth-order harmonic mode-locked TEM00 Nd:YVO4 laser with 1 GHz repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, F.-Q.; Zong, N.; Han, L.; Tian, C.-Y.; Bo, Y.; Peng, Q.-J.; Cui, D.-F.; Xu, Z.-Y.

    2011-02-01

    A high-efficiency high-power diode-directly-pumped tenth-order harmonic mode-locked TEM00 Nd:YVO4 laser with 1 GHz repetition rate was first demonstrated. The maximum output power was 10.4 W with optical-optical efficiency of 41.8% and slope efficiency of 78.1%, respectively, the pulse width was about 30 ps at the output power of 9.6 W. Based on the large third-order nonlinearity of Nd:YVO4, the tenth-order harmonic mode-locked pulses were induced by the intensity-dependent Kerr effect and the cooperative action of counter-propagating pulses colliding in the laser crystal for a colliding-pulse-modelocking-like cavity. The pulses were further modulated by a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror.

  18. High-Power Single-Mode 2.65-micron InGaAsSb/AlInGaAsSb Diode Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frez, Clifford F.; Briggs, Ryan M.; Forouhar, Siamak; Borgentun, Carl E.; Gupta, James

    2013-01-01

    Central to the advancement of both satellite and in-situ science are improvements in continuous-wave and pulsed infrared laser systems coupled with integrated miniaturized optics and electronics, allowing for the use of powerful, single-mode light sources aboard both satellite and unmanned aerial vehicle platforms. There is a technological gap in supplying adequate laser sources to address the mid-infrared spectral window for spectroscopic characterization of important atmospheric gases. For high-power applications between 2 to 3 micron, commercial laser technologies are unsuitable because of limitations in output power. For instance, existing InP-based laser systems developed for fiber-based telecommunications cannot be extended to wavelengths longer than 2 micron. For emission wavelengths shorter than 3 micron, intersubband devices, such as infrared quantum cascade lasers, become inefficient due to band-offset limitations. To date, successfully demonstrated singlemode GaSb-based laser diodes emitting between 2 and 3 micron have employed lossy metal Bragg gratings for distributed- feedback coupling, which limits output power due to optical absorption. By optimizing both the quantum well design and the grating fabrication process, index-coupled distributed-feedback 2.65-micron lasers capable of emitting in excess of 25 mW at room temperature have been demonstrated. Specifically, lasers at 3,777/cm (2.65 micron) have been realized to interact with strong absorption lines of HDO and other isotopologues of H2O. With minor modifications of the optical cavity and quantum well designs, lasers can be fabricated at any wavelength within the 2-to-3-micron spectral window with similar performance. At the time of this reporting, lasers with this output power and wavelength accuracy are not commercially available. Monolithic ridge-waveguide GaSb lasers were fabricated that utilize secondorder lateral Bragg gratings to generate single-mode emission from InGaAsSb/ Al

  19. High Power Pulsed Gas Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witteman, W. J.

    1987-09-01

    Gas lasers have shown to be capable of delivering tens of terrawatt aspeak power or tens of kilowatt as average power. The efficiencies of most high power gas lasers are relatively high compared with other types of lasers. For instance molecular lasers, oscillating on low lying vibrational levels, and excimer lasers may have intrinsic efficiencies above 10%.The wavelengths of these gas lasers cover the range from the far infrared to the ultra-violet region, say from 12000 to 193 nm. The most important properties are the scalability, optical homogeneity of the excited medium, and the relatively low price per watt of output power. The disadvantages may be the large size of the systems and the relatively narrow line width with limited tunability compared with solid state systems producing the same peak power. High power gas lasers group into three main categories depending on the waste-heat handling capacity.

  20. The future of high power laser techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poprawe, Reinhart; Loosen, Peter; Hoffmann, Hans-Dieter

    2007-05-01

    High Power Lasers have been used for years in corresponding applications. Constantly new areas and new processes have been demonstrated, developed and transferred to fruitful use in industry. With the advent of diode pumped solid state lasers in the multi-kW-power regime at beam qualities not far away from the diffraction limit, a new area of applicability has opened. In welding applications speeds could be increased and systems could be developed with higher efficiently leading also to new perspectives for increased productivity, e.g. in combined processing. Quality control is increasingly demanded by the applying industries, however applications still are rare. Higher resolution of coaxial process control systems in time and space combined with new strategies in signal processing could give rise to new applications. The general approach described in this paper emphasizes the fact, that laser applications can be developed more efficiently, more precisely and with higher quality, if the laser radiation is tailored properly to the corresponding application. In applying laser sources, the parameter ranges applicable are by far wider and more flexible compared to heat, mechanical or even electrical energy. The time frame ranges from several fs to continuous wave and this spans approximately 15 orders of magnitude. Spacewise, the foci range from several µm to cm and the resulting intensities suitable for materials processing span eight orders of magnitude from 10 3 to 10 11 W/cm2. In addition to space (power, intensity) and time (pulse) the wavelength can be chosen as a further parameter of optimization. As a consequence, the resulting new applications are vast and can be utilized in almost every market segment of our global economy (Fig. 1). In the past and only partly today, however, this flexibility of laser technology is not exploited in full in materials processing, basically because in the high power regime the lasers with tailored beam properties are not

  1. Accurate electro-optical characterization of high power density GaAs-based laser diodes for screening strategies improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Vecchio, Pamela; Deshayes, Y.; Joly, Simon; Bettiati, M.; Laruelle, F.; Béchou, L.

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we report on a methodology based on reverse and forward current-voltage curves (I-V) and on Degree of Polarization (DoP) of electroluminescence measurements on 980 nm laser diodes chip-on-submount (CoS) for the improvement of screening tests. Current-voltage curves are performed at reverse bias up to breakdown voltage (VBR) using both a high current accuracy (< 1 pA) and high voltage resolution (< 10 mV) at different submount-temperatures (20-50°C). The DoP of luminescence of such devices, related to strains in materials and effect of shear strain on the birefringence, is calculated from the simultaneous measurement of TE (LTE) and TM (LTM) polarized light emissions. We observe that application of high reverse voltages occasionally produces significant micro-plasma (MP) pre-breakdown on reverse I-V characteristics as recently observed in InGaN/GaN LEDs and assumed to be a response of electrically active defects. Comparisons between breakdown voltages and number of MP, and changes of leakage current at low forward voltage (< 0.1 V) are considered. DoP measurements are also analyzed versus temperature. Finally the usefulness of these measurements for effective screening of devices is discussed.

  2. Development of high-power diode lasers with beam parameter product below 2 mm×mrad within the BRIDLE project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crump, P.; Decker, J.; Winterfeldt, M.; Fricke, J.; Maaßdorf, A.; Erbert, G.; Tränkle, G.

    2015-03-01

    High power broad-area diode lasers are the most efficient source of optical energy, but cannot directly address many applications due to their high lateral beam parameter product BPP = 0.25 × ΘL 95%× W95% (ΘL95% and W95% are emission angle and aperture at 95% power content), with BPP > 3 mm×mrad for W95%~90μm. We review here progress within the BRIDLE project, that is developing diode lasers with BPP < 2 mm×mrad for use in direct metal cutting systems, where the highest efficiencies and powers are required. Two device concepts are compared: narrow-stripe broad-area (NBA) and tapered lasers (TPL), both with monolithically integrated gratings. NBAs use W95% ~ 30 μm to cut-off higher order lateral modes and reduce BPP. TPLs monolithically combine a single mode region at the rear facet with a tapered amplifier, restricting the device to one lateral mode for lowest BPP. TPLs fabricated using ELoD (Extremely Low Divergence) epitaxial designs are shown to operate with BPP below 2mm×mrad, but at cost of low efficiency (<35%, due to high threshold current). In contrast, NBAs operate with BPP < 2 mm×mrad, but maintain efficiency >50% to output of > 7 W, so are currently the preferred design. In studies to further reduce BPP, lateral resonant anti-guiding structures have also been assessed. Optimized anti-guiding designs are shown to reduce BPP by 1 mm×mrad in conventional 90 μm stripe BA-lasers, without power penalty. In contrast, no BPP improvement is observed in NBA lasers, even though their spectrum indicates they are restricted to single mode operation. Mode filtering alone is therefore not sufficient, and further measures will be needed for reduced BPP.

  3. High-power blue laser diodes with indium tin oxide cladding on semipolar (202{sup ¯}1{sup ¯}) GaN substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Pourhashemi, A. Farrell, R. M.; Cohen, D. A.; Speck, J. S.; DenBaars, S. P.; Nakamura, S.

    2015-03-16

    We demonstrate a high power blue laser diode (LD) using indium tin oxide as a cladding layer on semipolar oriented GaN. These devices show peak output powers and external quantum efficiencies comparable to state-of-the-art commercial c-plane devices. Ridge waveguide LDs were fabricated on (202{sup ¯}1{sup ¯}) oriented GaN substrates using InGaN waveguiding layers and GaN cladding layers. At a lasing wavelength of 451 nm at room temperature, an output power of 2.52 W and an external quantum efficiency of 39% were measured from a single facet under a pulsed injection current of 2.34 A. The measured differential quantum efficiency was 50%.

  4. Gain saturation and high-power pulsed operation of GaSb-based tapered diode lasers with separately contacted ridge and tapered section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfahler, C.; Eichhorn, M.; Kelemen, M. T.; Kaufel, G.; Mikulla, M.; Schmitz, J.; Wagner, J.

    2006-07-01

    (AlGaIn)(AsSb) ridge-waveguide tapered diode lasers with separately contacted ridge and tapered sections, emitting at 1.93μm, have been analyzed in pulsed mode with respect to their high-power capability and wavelength tunability. Operating the ridge section above saturation, a variation of the current through this section resulted in a change in lasing wavelength, while changing the current injected into the tapered section at a constant ridge current allowed to vary the output power at constant lasing wavelength. Furthermore, the optical power required to saturate the tapered amplifier section has been derived from a comparison of the experimental characteristics with beam propagation method calculations.

  5. High-power 390-nm laser source based on efficient frequency doubling of a tapered diode laser in an external resonant cavity.

    PubMed

    Bhawalkar, J D; Mao, Y; Po, H; Goyal, A K; Gavrilovic, P; Conturie, Y; Singh, S

    1999-06-15

    We frequency doubled the single-frequency beam from an external-cavity tapered laser diode operating at 780 nm in a resonant cavity containing a beta -barium borate crystal to generate an output at 390 nm with high efficiency. Output powers as great as 233 mW were obtained, corresponding to an efficiency of 65%/W . The resonant-cavity design was a low-loss three-mirror configuration that provided compensation for astigmatism and coma. The laser diode frequency was locked to the doubling-cavity resonance by use of the Hänsch-Couillaud discrimination technique. PMID:18073866

  6. High power gas laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Leland, Wallace T.; Stratton, Thomas F.

    1981-01-01

    A high power output CO.sub.2 gas laser amplifier having a number of sections, each comprising a plurality of annular pumping chambers spaced around the circumference of a vacuum chamber containing a cold cathode, gridded electron gun. The electron beam from the electron gun ionizes the gas lasing medium in the sections. An input laser beam is split into a plurality of annular beams, each passing through the sections comprising one pumping chamber.

  7. High-power diode laser at 980 nm for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia: ex vivo investigations on porcine kidneys and human cadaver prostates.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Michael; Reich, Oliver; Gratzke, Christian; Schlenker, Boris; Karl, Alexander; Bader, Markus; Khoder, Wael; Fischer, Florian; Stief, Christian; Sroka, Ronald

    2009-03-01

    Diode laser systems at 980 nm have been introduced for the treatment of lower-urinary-tract-symptoms (LUTS) suggestive of benign prostatic enlargement (BPE). However, the coagulation and vaporization properties are unknown. We therefore aimed to evaluate these properties in ex vivo models in comparison with the kalium-titanyl-phosphate-(KTP) laser. The diode laser treatment was applied to isolated, blood-perfused porcine kidneys and fresh human cadaver prostates (HCPs) at different generator settings. We performed histological examination to compare the depth of coagulation and vaporization. The diode laser showed larger ablation and coagulation characteristics than the KTP laser did. Ablation of the diode laser was found to be 1.79-times (120 W in porcine kidney, P < 0.0001) and 3.0-5 times (200 W in HCP, P < 0.0005) larger. The diode laser created a nine-times (120 W in porcine kidney, P < 0.0001) and seven-times (200 W in HCP, P < 0.0001) deeper necrosis zone. The diode laser vaporization was highly effective ex vivo. Owing to the laser's deep coagulation zones, in vivo animal experiments are mandatory before the diode laser (980 nm) is applied in a clinical setting, so that damage to underlying structures is prevented. PMID:18270761

  8. A compact multi-wavelength optoacoustic system based on high-power diode lasers for characterization of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leggio, Luca; de Varona, Omar; Escudero, Pedro; Carpintero del Barrio, Guillermo; Osiński, Marek; Lamela Rivera, Horacio

    2015-06-01

    During the last decade, Optoacoustic Imaging (OAI), or Optoacoustic Tomography (OAT), has evolved as a novel imaging technique based on the generation of ultrasound waves with laser light. OAI may become a valid alternative to techniques currently used for the detection of diseases at their early stages. It has been shown that OAI combines the high contrast of optical imaging techniques with high spatial resolution of ultrasound systems in deep tissues. In this way, the use of nontoxic biodegradable contrast agents that mark the presence of diseases in near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths range (0.75-1.4 um) has been considered. The presence of carcinomas and harmful microorganisms can be revealed by means of the fluorescence effect exhibited by biopolymer nanoparticles. A different approach is to use carbon nanotubes (CNTs) which are a contrast agent in NIR range due to their absorption characteristics in the range between 800 to 1200 nm. We report a multi-wavelength (870 and 905 nm) laser diode-based optoacoustic (OA) system generating ultrasound signals from a double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) solution arranged inside a tissue-like phantom, mimicking the scattering of a biological soft tissue. Optoacoustic signals obtained with DWCNTs inclusions within a tissue-like phantom are compared with the case of ink-filled inclusions, with the aim to assess their absorption. These measurements are done at both 870 and 905 nm, by using high power laser diodes as light sources. The results show that the absorption is relatively high when the inclusion is filled with ink and appreciable with DWCNTs.

  9. Efficient Nd:YAG laser end pumped by a high-power multistripe laser-diode bar with multiprism array coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Saito, Y.; Chiba, K.

    1996-03-01

    A 10-W laser-diode bar, a multistripe monolithic laser-diode array, has been used to end pump Nd:YAG. Twelve beams emitted from 12 stripes, spaced 800 {mu}m apart, of a 1-cm linear diode array were collimated with a multiprism array consisting of 14 prismlets with 800-{mu}m width to pump the Nd:YAG facet. The maximum Nd:YAG cw output power at 1064 nm of 3 W was obtained at 10-W laser-diode-bar power with a slope efficiency of 35{percent}, and a TEM{sub 00} spatial mode with values of beam-quality factor {ital M}{sup 2} of 1.29 and 1.76 in the planes perpendicular and parallel to the junction, respectively. A pulse width of 25.2 ns (1-kHz repetition) was obtained in acousto-optic {ital Q}-switched operation. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  10. High power excimer laser micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, Ludolf; Paetzel, Rainer

    2006-02-01

    Today's excimer lasers are well-established UV laser sources for a wide variety of micromachining applications. The excimer's high pulse energy and average power at short UV wavelengths make them ideal for ablation of various materials, e. g., polyimide, PMMA, copper, and diamond. Excimer micromachining technology, driven by the ever-shrinking feature sizes of micro-mechanical and micro-electronic devices, is used for making semiconductor packaging microvias, ink jet nozzle arrays, and medical devices. High-power excimer laser systems are capable of processing large areas with resolution down to several microns without using wet chemical processes. For instance, drilling precise tapered holes and reel-to-reel manufacturing of disposable sensors have proven to be very cost-effective manufacturing techniques for volume production. Specifically, the new industrial excimer laser-the LAMBDA SX 315C-easily meets the high demands of cost-effective production. The stabilized output power of 315 watts at 300 Hz (308 nm) and its outstanding long-term stability make this laser ideal for high-duty-cycle, high-throughput micromachining. In this paper, high-power excimer laser technology, products, applications, and beam delivery systems will be discussed.

  11. High power disk lasers: advances and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havrilla, David; Holzer, Marco

    2011-02-01

    Though the genesis of the disk laser concept dates to the early 90's, the disk laser continues to demonstrate the flexibility and the certain future of a breakthrough technology. On-going increases in power per disk, and improvements in beam quality and efficiency continue to validate the genius of the disk laser concept. As of today, the disk principle has not reached any fundamental limits regarding output power per disk or beam quality, and offers numerous advantages over other high power resonator concepts, especially over monolithic architectures. With well over 1000 high power disk lasers installations, the disk laser has proven to be a robust and reliable industrial tool. With advancements in running cost, investment cost and footprint, manufacturers continue to implement disk laser technology with more vigor than ever. This paper will explain important details of the TruDisk laser series and process relevant features of the system, like pump diode arrangement, resonator design and integrated beam guidance. In addition, advances in applications in the thick sheet area and very cost efficient high productivity applications like remote welding, remote cutting and cutting of thin sheets will be discussed.

  12. High-power high-efficiency acousto-optically Q-switched rod Nd:YAG laser with 885 nm diode laser pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, K.; Li, F. Q.; Xu, H. Y.; Wang, Z. C.; Zong, N.; Du, S. F.; Bo, Y.; Peng, Q. J.; Cui, D. F.; Xu, Z. Y.

    2013-01-01

    We have demonstrated a compact Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm with 885 nm diode-laser (LD) direct pumping. At a repetition rate of 100 kHz, an average output power of 53 W with beam quality factor M2 of 1.6 was achieved under the absorbed pump power of 122 W, corresponding to an optical-optical efficiency of 43.5% and a slope efficiency of 57.6%, respectively. The pulse width and the peak power at this output power were 112 ns and 4.74 kW, respectively.

  13. Optics assembly for high power laser tools

    DOEpatents

    Fraze, Jason D.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Zediker, Mark S.

    2016-06-07

    There is provided a high power laser rotational optical assembly for use with, or in high power laser tools for performing high power laser operations. In particular, the optical assembly finds applications in performing high power laser operations on, and in, remote and difficult to access locations. The optical assembly has rotational seals and bearing configurations to avoid contamination of the laser beam path and optics.

  14. Assessing the influence of the vertical epitaxial layer design on the lateral beam quality of high-power broad area diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterfeldt, M.; Rieprich, J.; Knigge, S.; Maaßdorf, A.; Hempel, M.; Kernke, R.; Tomm, J. W.; Erbert, G.; Crump, P.

    2016-03-01

    GaAs-based high-power broad-area diode lasers deliver optical output powers Popt > 10W with efficiency > 60%. However, their application is limited due to poor in-plane beam parameter product BPPlat=0.25×Θ95%×w95% (Θ95% and w95% are emission angle and aperture, 95% power content). We present experimental investigations on λ = 9xx nm broad area lasers that aim to identify regulating factors of the BPPlat connected to the epitaxial layer design. First, we assess the thermal lens of vertical designs with varying asymmetry, using thermal camera images to determine its strength. Under study are an extreme-double-asymmetric (EDAS) vertical structure and a reference (i.e. more symmetric) design. The lateral thermal profiles clearly show that BPPlat increase is correlated to the bowing of the thermal lens. The latter is derived out of a quadratic temperature fit in the active region beneath the current injection of the laser device and depends on the details of the epitaxial layers. Second, we test the benefit of low modal gain factor Γg0, predicted to improve BPPlat via a suppression of filamentation. EDAS-based lasers with single quantum well (SQW) and double quantum well (DQW) active regions were compared, with 2.5x reduced Γg0, for 2.2x reduced filament gain. However, no difference is seen in measured BPPlat, giving evidence that filamentary processes are no longer a limit. In contrast, devices with lower Γg0 demonstrate an up to twofold reduced near field modulation depth, potentially enabling higher facet loads and increased device facet reliability, when operated near to the COD limit.

  15. Continuous improvement of high-efficiency high-power 800-980nm diode lasers at Spectra-Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hanxuan; Towe, Terry; Chyr, Irving; Jin, Xu; Miller, Robert; Romero, Oscar; Liu, Daming; Brown, Denny; Truchan, Tom; Nguyen, Touyen; Crum, Trevor; Wolak, Ed; Bullock, Robert; Mott, Jeff; Harrison, James

    2009-02-01

    New-generation multi-mode 9xx mini-bars used in fiber pump modules have been developed. The epitaxial designs have been improved for lower fast-axis and slow-axis divergence, higher slope efficiency and PCE by optimizing layer structures as well as minimizing internal loss. For 915nm mini-bars with 5-mm cavity length, maximum PCE is as high as ~61% for 35W operation and remains above 59% at 45W. For 808nm, a PCE of 56% at 135W CW operation has been demonstrated with 36%-fill-factor, 3-mm-cavity-length, water-cooled bars at 50°C coolant temperature. On passive-cooled standard CS heatsinks, PCE of >51% is measured for 100W operation at 50°C heatsink temperature. Leveraging these improvements has enabled low-cost bars for high-power, high-temperature applications.

  16. High power semiconductor laser beam combining technology and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lijun; Tong, Cunzhu; Peng, Hangyu; Zhang, Jun

    2013-05-01

    With the rapid development of laser applications, single elements of diode lasers are not able to meet the increasing requirements on power and beam quality in the material processing and defense filed, whether are used as pumping sources or directly laser sources. The coupling source with high power and high beam quality, multiplexed by many single elements, has been proven to be a promising technical solution. In this paper, the authors review the development tendency of efficiency, power, and lifetime of laser elements firstly, and then introduce the progress of laser beam combining technology. The authors also present their recent progress on the high power diode laser sources developed by beam combining technology, including the 2600W beam combining direct laser source, 1000W fiber coupled semiconductor lasers and the 1000W continuous wave (CW) semiconductor laser sources with beam quality of 12.5×14[mm. mrad]2.

  17. Improving the Reliability and Modal Stability of High Power 870 nm AlGaAs CSP Laser Diodes for Applications to Free Space Communication Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, J. C.; Alphonse, G. A.; Carlin, D. B.; Ettenberg, M.

    1991-01-01

    The operating characteristics (power-current, beam divergence, etc.) and reliability assessment of high-power CSP lasers is discussed. The emission wavelength of these lasers was optimized at 860 to 880 nm. The operational characteristics of a new laser, the inverse channel substrate planar (ICSP) laser, grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), is discussed and the reliability assessment of this laser is reported. The highlights of this study include a reduction in the threshold current value for the laser to 15 mA and a degradation rate of less than 2 kW/hr for the lasers operating at 60 mW of peak output power.

  18. Catastrophic optical degradation of the output facet of high-power single-transverse-mode diode lasers. 2. Calculation of the spatial temperature distribution and threshold of the catastrophic optical degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Miftakhutdinov, D R; Bogatov, Alexandr P; Drakin, A E

    2010-09-10

    The temperature distribution and the power threshold during the catastrophic optical degradation are calculated within the framework of the developed model of the COD of the output facet in high-power single-transverse-mode diode lasers. Comparison of the calculation results and the experiment show the model adequacy. The contribution of different physical mechanisms into the heating of the laser output facet is analysed. It is shown that the model under study can help to develop the method for predicting the laser lifetime by the accelerated ageing tests. (lasers)

  19. Bidirectional pumped high power Raman fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Q; Yan, P; Li, D; Sun, J; Wang, X; Huang, Y; Gong, M

    2016-03-21

    This paper presents a 3.89 kW 1123 nm Raman all-fiber laser with an overall optical-to-optical efficiency of 70.9%. The system consists of a single-wavelength (1070nm) seed and one-stage bidirectional 976 nm non-wavelength-stabilized laser diodes (LDs) pumped Yb-doped fiber amplifier. The unique part of this system is the application of non-wavelength-stabilized LDs in high power bidirectional pumping configuration fiber amplifier via refractive index valley fiber combiners. This approach not only increases the pump power, but also shortens the length of fiber by avoiding the usage of multi-stage amplifier. Through both theoretical research and experiment, the bidirectional pumping configuration presented in this paper proves to be able to convert 976 nm pump laser to 1070 nm laser via Yb3+ transfer, which is then converted into 1123 nm Raman laser via the first-order Raman effect without the appearance of any higher-order Raman laser. PMID:27136862

  20. Laser transmission welding of Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene (ABS) using a tailored high power diode-laser optical fiber coupled system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Vidal, E.; Quintana, I.; Etxarri, J.; Otaduy, D.; González, F.; Moreno, F.

    2012-06-01

    Laser transmission welding (LTW) of polymers is a direct bonding technique which is already used in different industrial applications sectors such as automobile, microfluidic, electronic and biomedicine. This technique offers several advantages over conventional methods, especially when a local deposition of energy and minimum thermal distortions are required. In LTW one of the polymeric materials needs to be transparent to the laser wavelength and the second part needs to be designed to be absorbed in IR spectrum. This report presents a study of laser weldability of ABS (acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene) filled with two different concentrations of carbon nanotubes (0.01% and 0.05% CNTs). These additives are used as infrared absorbing components in the laser welding process, affecting the thermal and optical properties of the material and, hence, the final quality of the weld seam. A tailored laser system has been designed to obtain high quality weld seams with widths between 0.4 and 1.0mm. It consists of two diode laser bars (50W per bar) coupled into an optical fiber using a non-imaging solution: equalization of the beam quality factor (M2) in the slow and fast axes by a pair of micro step-mirrors. The beam quality factor has been analyzed at different laser powers with the aim to guarantee a coupling efficiency to the multimode optical fiber. The power scaling is carried out by means of multiplexing polarization technique. The analysis of energy balance and beam quality is performed in two linked steps: first by means ray tracing simulations (ZEMAX®) and second, by validation. Quality of the weld seams is analyzed in terms of the process parameters (welding speed, laser power and clamping pressure) by visual and optical microscope inspections. The optimum laser power range for three different welding speeds is determinate meanwhile the clamping pressure is held constant. Additionally, the corresponding mechanical shear tests were carried out to analyze the

  1. Advanced Gunn diode as high power terahertz source for a millimetre wave high power multiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amir, F.; Mitchell, C.; Farrington, N.; Missous, M.

    2009-09-01

    An advanced step-graded Gunn diode is reported, which has been developed through joint modelling-experimental work. The ~ 200 GHz fundamental frequency devices have been realized to test GaAs based Gunn oscillators at sub-millimetre wave for use as a high power (multi mW) Terahertz source in conjunction with a mm-wave multiplier, with novel Schottky diodes. The epitaxial growth of both the Gunn diode and Schottky diode wafers were performed using an industrial scale Molecular Beam Epitaxy (V100+) reactor. The Gunn diodes were then manufactured and packaged by e2v Technologies (UK) Plc. Physical models of the high power Gunn diode sources, presented here, are developed in SILVACO.

  2. High power laser perforating tools and systems

    DOEpatents

    Zediker, Mark S; Rinzler, Charles C; Faircloth, Brian O; Koblick, Yeshaya; Moxley, Joel F

    2014-04-22

    ystems devices and methods for the transmission of 1 kW or more of laser energy deep into the earth and for the suppression of associated nonlinear phenomena. Systems, devices and methods for the laser perforation of a borehole in the earth. These systems can deliver high power laser energy down a deep borehole, while maintaining the high power to perforate such boreholes.

  3. High-power 808 nm ridge-waveguide diode lasers with very small divergence, wavelength-stabilized by an external volume Bragg grating.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, H; Häusler, K; Blume, G; Fricke, J; Spreemann, M; Zorn, M; Erbert, G

    2009-06-01

    We present data on ridge-waveguide diode lasers having a vertical far-field divergence of only 11.5 degrees (FWHM) owing to an appropriate waveguide design. The lasers emitted an optical power of more than 1 W into the spatial fundamental mode from a ridge width of 5 microm. The emission wavelength was stabilized to a narrow range around 808 nm by placing a volume Bragg grating in front of the outcoupling facet. PMID:19488129

  4. Stable, high-power, single-frequency generation at 532 nm from a diode-bar-pumped Nd:YAG ring laser with an intracavity LBO frequency doubler.

    PubMed

    Martin, K I; Clarkson, W A; Hanna, D C

    1997-06-20

    We obtained 2.5 W of single-frequency TEM(00) output at 532 nm using a Brewster-angled LBO crystal for intracavity second-harmonic generation in a diode-bar-pumped Nd:YAG laser. By inserting a thin uncoated étalon, the 1061.4-nm laser transition can be selected, generating 1.6 W of output at 530.7 nm. PMID:18253441

  5. Ceramic tile grout removal & sealing using high power lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, J.; Li, L.; Spencer, J.T.

    1996-12-31

    Work has been conducted using a Nd:YAG laser, a CO{sub 2} laser and a high power diode laser (HPDL) in order to determine the feasibility of removing contaminated tile grout from the void between adjoining vitrified ceramic tiles, and to seal the void permanently with a material having an impermeable surface glaze. Reported on in the paper are; the basic process phenomena, the process effectiveness, suitable vitrifiable material development, a heat affect study and a morphological and compositional analysis.

  6. Fabrication and optimization of 1.55-μm InGaAsP/InP high-power semiconductor diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Ke; Shaoyang, Tan; Songtao, Liu; Dan, Lu; Ruikang, Zhang; Wei, Wang; Chen, Ji

    2015-09-01

    A comprehensive design optimization of 1.55-μm high power InGaAsP/InP board area lasers is performed aiming at increasing the internal quantum efficiency (ηi) while maintaining the low internal loss (αi) of the device, thereby achieving high power operation. Four different waveguide structures of broad area lasers were fabricated and characterized in depth. Through theoretical analysis and experiment verifications, we show that laser structures with stepped waveguide and thin upper separate confinement layer will result in high ηi and overall slope efficiency. A continuous wave (CW) single side output power of 160 mW was obtained for an uncoated laser with a 50-μm active area width and 1 mm cavity length. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61274046, 61201103) and the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (No. 2013AA014202).

  7. High Power Diode Laser-Treated HP-HVOF and Twin Wire Arc-Sprayed Coatings for Fossil Fuel Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, B. S.

    2013-08-01

    This article deals with high power diode laser (HPDL) surface modification of twin wire arc-sprayed (TWAS) and high pressure high velocity oxy-fuel (HP-HVOF) coatings to combat solid particle erosion occurring in fossil fuel power plants. To overcome solid particle impact wear above 673 K, Cr3C2-NiCr-, Cr3C2-CoNiCrAlY-, and WC-CrC-Ni-based HVOF coatings are used. WC-CoCr-based HVOF coatings are generally used below 673 K. Twin wire arc (TWA) spraying of Tafa 140 MXC and SHS 7170 cored wires is used for a wide range of applications for a temperature up to 1073 K. Laser surface modification of high chromium stainless steels for steam valve components and LPST blades is carried out regularly. TWA spraying using SHS 7170 cored wire, HP-HVOF coating using WC-CoCr powder, Ti6Al4V alloy, and high chromium stainless steels (X20Cr13, AISI 410, X10CrNiMoV1222, 13Cr4Ni, 17Cr4Ni) were selected in the present study. Using robotically controlled parameters, HPDL surface treatments of TWAS-coated high strength X10CrNiMoV1222 stainless steel and HP-HVOF-coated AISI 410 stainless steel samples were carried out and these were compared with HPDL-treated high chromium stainless steels and titanium alloy for high energy particle impact wear (HEPIW) resistance. The HPDL surface treatment of the coatings has improved the HEPIW resistance manifold. The improvement in HPDL-treated stainless steels and titanium alloys is marginal and it is not comparable with that of HPDL-treated coatings. These coatings were also compared with "as-sprayed" coatings for fracture toughness, microhardness, microstructure, and phase analyses. The HEPIW resistance has a strong relationship with the product of fracture toughness and microhardness of the HPDL-treated HP-HVOF and TWAS SHS 7170 coatings. This development opens up a possibility of using HPDL surface treatments in specialized areas where the problem of HEPIW is very severe. The HEPIW resistance of HPDL-treated high chromium stainless steels and

  8. Improvement and characterization of high-reflective and anti-reflective nanostructured mirrors by ion beam assisted deposition for 944 nm high power diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadimi-Mahani, A.; Farsad, E.; Goodarzi, A.; Tahamtan, S.; Abbasi, S. P.; Zabihi, M. S.

    2015-11-01

    Single-layer and multi-layer coatings were applied on the surface of diode laser facets as mirrors. This thin film mirrors were designed, deposited, optimized and characterized. The effects of mirrors on facet passivation and optical properties of InGaAs/AlGaAs/GaAs diode lasers were investigated. High-Reflective (HR) and Anti-Reflective (AR) mirrors comprising of four double-layers of Al2O3/Si and a single layer of Al2O3, respectively, were designed and optimized by Macleod software for 944 nm diode lasers. Optimization of Argon flow rate was studied through Alumina thin film deposition by Ion Beam Assisted Deposition (IBAD) for mirror improvement. The nanostructured HR and AR mirrors were deposited on the front and back facet of the laser respectively, by IBAD system under optimum condition. Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), Vis-IR Spectrophotometer, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and laser characterization Test (P-I) were used to characterize various properties of mirrors and lasers. AFM images show mirror's root mean square roughness is nearly 1 nm. The Spectrophotometer results of the front facet transmission and the back facet reflection are in good agreement with the simulation results. Optical output power (P) versus driving current (I) characteristics, measured before and after coating the facet, revealed a significant output power enhancement due to optimized AR and HR optical coatings on facets.

  9. Low-loss smile-insensitive external frequency-stabilization of high power diode lasers enabled by vertical designs with extremely low divergence angle and high efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crump, Paul; Knigge, Steffen; Maaßdorf, Andre; Bugge, Frank; Hengesbach, Stefan; Witte, Ulrich; Hoffmann, Hans-Dieter; Köhler, Bernd; Hubrich, Ralf; Kissel, Heiko; Biesenbach, Jens; Erbert, Götz; Traenkle, Guenther

    2013-02-01

    Broad area lasers with narrow spectra are required for many pumping applications and for wavelength beam combination. Although monolithically stabilized lasers show high performance, some applications can only be addressed with external frequency stabilization, for example when very narrow spectra are required. When conventional diode lasers with vertical far field angle, ΘV 95% ~ 45° (95% power) are stabilized using volume holographic gratings (VHGs), optical losses are introduced, limiting both efficiency and reliable output power, with the presence of any bar smile compounding the challenge. Diode lasers with designs optimized for extremely low vertical divergence (ELOD lasers) directly address these challenges. The vertical far field angle in conventional laser designs is limited by the waveguiding of the active region itself. In ELOD designs, quantum barriers are used that have low refractive index, enabling the influence of the active region to be suppressed, leading to narrow far field operation from thin vertical structures, for minimal electrical resistance and maximum power conversion efficiency. We review the design process, and show that 975 nm diode lasers with 90 μm stripes that use ELOD designs operate with ΘV 95% = 26° and reach 58% power conversion efficiency at a CW output power of 10 W. We demonstrate directly that VHG stabilized ELOD lasers have significantly lower loss and larger operation windows than conventional lasers in the collimated feedback regimes, even in the presence of significant (≥ 1 μm) bar smile. We also discuss the potential influence of ELOD designs on reliable output power and options for further performance improvement.

  10. A Preliminary In Vitro Study on the Efficacy of High-Power Photodynamic Therapy (HLLT): Comparison between Pulsed Diode Lasers and Superpulsed Diode Lasers and Impact of Hydrogen Peroxide with Controlled Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Baldoni, Marco; Ghisalberti, Carlo Angelo; Paiusco, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    Aim. In periodontology lasers have been suggested for the photodynamic therapy (PDT): such therapy can be defined as the inactivation of cells, microorganisms, or molecules induced by light and not by heat. The aim of this study was to evaluate results of PDT using a 980 nm diode laser (Wiser Doctor Smile, Lambda SPA, Italy) combined with hydrogen peroxide, comparing a pulsed diode laser (LI) activity to a high-frequency superpulsed diode laser (LII). Materials and Methods. Primary fibroblasts and keratinocytes cell lines, isolated from human dermis, were irradiated every 48 h for 10 days using LI and LII combined with SiOxyL+™ Solution (hydrogen peroxide (HP) stabilized with a glycerol phosphate complex). Two days after the last irradiation, the treated cultures were analyzed by flow cytofluorometry (FACS) and western blotting to quantify keratin 5 and keratin 8 with monoclonal antibodies reactive to cytokeratin 5 and cytokeratin 8. Antimicrobial activity was also evaluated. Results. Both experimental models show the superiority of LII against LI. In parallel, stabilized HP provided better results in the regeneration test in respect to common HP, while the biocidal activity remains comparable. Conclusion. The use of high-frequency lasers combined with stabilized hydrogen peroxide can provide optimal results for a substantial decrease of bacterial count combined with a maximal biostimulation induction of soft tissues and osteogenesis.

  11. High power laser apparatus and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. C., Jr.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A high-power, continuous-wave laser was designed for use in power transmission and energy-collecting systems, and for producing incoherent light for pumping a laser material. The laser has a high repetitive pulsing rate per unit time, resulting in a high-power density beam. The laser is composed of xenon flash tubes powered by fast-charging capacitors flashed in succession by a high-speed motor connected to an automobile-type distributor.

  12. Optical mode engineering and high power density per facet length (>8.4 kW/cm) in tilted wave laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledentsov, N. N.; Shchukin, V. A.; Maximov, M. V.; Gordeev, N. Y.; Kaluzhniy, N. A.; Mintairov, S. A.; Payusov, A. S.; Shernyakov, Yu. M.

    2016-03-01

    Tilted Wave Lasers (TWLs) based on optically coupled thin active waveguide and thick passive waveguide offer an ultimate solution for thick-waveguide diode laser, preventing catastrophic optical mirror damage and thermal smile in laser bars, providing robust operation in external cavity modules thus enabling wavelength division multiplexing and further increase in brightness enabling direct applications of laser diodes in the mainstream material processing. We show that by proper engineering of the waveguide one can realize high performance laser diodes at different tilt angles of the vertical lobes. Two vertical lobes directed at various angles (namely, +/-27° or +/-9°) to the junction plane are experimentally realized by adjusting the compositions and the thicknesses of the active and the passive waveguide sections. The vertical far field of a TWL with the two +/-9° vertical beams allows above 95% of all the power to be concentrated within a vertical angle below 25°, the fact which is important for laser stack applications using conventional optical coupling schemes. The full width at half maximum of each beam of the value of 1.7° evidences diffraction- limited operation. The broad area (50 μm) TWL chips at the cavity length of 1.5 mm reveal a high differential efficiency ~90% and a current-source limited pulsed power >42W for as-cleaved TWL device. Thus the power per facet length in a laser bar in excess of 8.4 kW/cm can be realized. Further, an ultimate solution for the smallest tilt angle is that where the two vertical lobes merge forming a single lobe directed at the zero angle is proposed.

  13. Electron beam current in high power cylindrical diode

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Amitava; Menon, R.; Mitra, S.; Sharma, Vishnu; Singh, S. K.; Nagesh, K. V.; Chakravarthy, D. P.

    2010-01-15

    Intense electron beam generation studies were carried out in high power cylindrical diode to investigate the effect of the accelerating gap and diode voltage on the electron beam current. The diode voltage has been varied from 130 to 356 kV, whereas the current density has been varied from 87 to 391 A/cm{sup 2} with 100 ns pulse duration. The experimentally obtained electron beam current in the cylindrical diode has been compared with the Langmuir-Blodgett law. It was found that the diode current can be explained by a model of anode and cathode plasma expanding toward each other. However, the diode voltage and current do not follow the bipolar space-charge limited flow model. It was also found that initially only a part of the cathode take part in the emission process. The plasma expands at 4.2 cm/mus for 1.7 cm anode-cathode gap and the plasma velocity decreases for smaller gaps. The electrode plasma expansion velocity of the cylindrical diode is much smaller as compared with the planar diode for the same accelerating gap and diode voltage. Therefore, much higher voltage can be obtained for the cylindrical diodes as compared with the planar diodes for the same accelerating gap.

  14. Endoscopic cystoventriculostomy and ventriculocysternostomy using a recently developed 2.0-micron fiber-guided high-power diode-pumped solid state laser in children with hydrocephalus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Hans C.; Kruschat, Thomas; Knobloch, Torsten; Rostasy, Kevin; Buchfelder, Michael

    2005-04-01

    Preterm infants have a high incidence of post hemorrhagic or post infectious hydrocephalus often associated with ventricular or arachnoic cysts which carry a high risk of entrapment of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In these cases fenestration and opening of windows within the separating membranes are neurosurgical options. Although Nd:YAG- and diode-lasers have already been used in neuroendoscopic procedures, neurosurgeons avoid the use of high energy lasers in proximity to vital structures because of potential side effects. We have used a recently developed diode pumped solid state (DPSS) laser emitting light at a wavelength of 2.0 μm (Revolix TM LISA laser products, Katlenburg, Germany), which can be delivered through silica fibres towards endoscopic targets. From July 2002 until June 2004 fourteen endoscopic procedures in 12 consecutive patients (age 3 months to 12 years old) were performed. Most children suffered from complex post hemorrhagic and post infectious hydrocephalus, in whom ventriculoperitoneal shunt devices failed to restore a CSF equilibrium due to entrapment of CSF pathways by the cysts. We used two different endoscopes, a 6 mm Neuroendoscope (Braun Aesculap, Melsungen, Germany; a 4 mm miniature Neuroscope (Storz, Tuttlingen, Germany). The endoscopes were connected to a standard camera and TV monitor, the laser energy was introduced through a 365 μm core diameter bare ended silica fibre (PercuFib, LISA laser products, Katlenburg, Germany) through the endoscope"s working channel. The continuous wave laser was operated at power levels from 5 to 15 Watt in continuous and chopped mode. The frequency of the laser in chopped mode was varied between 5 and 20 Hz. All patients tolerated the procedure well. No immediate or long term side effects were noted. In 3 patients with cystic compression of the 4th ventricle, insertion of a shunt device could be avoided. The authors conclude that the use of the new RevolixTM laser enables safe and effective procedures

  15. Diode-end-pumped passively mode-locked high-power Nd:YVO4 laser with a relaxed saturable Bragg reflector.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y F; Tsai, S W; Lan, Y P; Wang, S C; Huang, K F

    2001-02-15

    We demonstrate a high-power passively mode-locked Nd:YVO (4) laser that uses a saturable Bragg reflector (SBR) with strain relaxation. 23.5 W of average power with ~21.5-ps cw mode-locked pulse trains was generated at a 50-W pump power. Experimental results show that appropriate strain relaxation in the SBR makes the mode-locking operation less sensitive to temperature variation. PMID:18033546

  16. High power eye-safe Er3+:YVO4 laser diode-pumped at 976 nm and emitting at 1603 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newburgh, G. A.; Dubinskii, M.

    2016-02-01

    We report on the performance of an eye-safe laser based on a Er:YVO4 single crystal, diode-pumped at 976 nm (4I15/2-->4I11/2 transition) and operating at 1603 nm (4I13/2-->4I15/2 transition) with good beam quality. A 10 mm long Er3+:YVO4 slab, cut with its c-axis perpendicular to the laser cavity axis, was pumped in σ-polarization and lased in π-polarization. The laser operated in a quasi-continuous wave (Q-CW) regime with nearly 9 W output power, and with a slope efficiency of about 39% with respect to absorbed power. This is believed to be the highest efficiency and highest power achieved from an Er3+:YVO4 laser pumped in the 970-980 nm absorption band.

  17. High power ultrashort pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, M.D.

    1994-10-07

    Small scale terawatt and soon even petawatt (1000 terawatt) class laser systems are made possible by application of the chirped-pulse amplification technique to solid-state lasers combined with the availability of broad bandwidth materials. These lasers make possible a new class of high gradient accelerators based on the large electric fields associated with intense laser-plasma interactions or from the intense laser field directly. Here, we concentrate on the laser technology to produce these intense pulses. Application of the smallest of these systems to the production of high brightness electron sources is also introduced.

  18. Freeform beam shaping for high-power multimode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Vadim

    2014-03-01

    Widening of using high power multimode lasers in industrial laser material processing is accompanied by special requirements to irradiance profiles in such technologies like metal or plastics welding, cladding, hardening, brazing, annealing, laser pumping and amplification in MOPA lasers. Typical irradiance distribution of high power multimode lasers: free space solid state, fiber-coupled solid state and diodes lasers, fiber lasers, is similar to Gaussian. Laser technologies can be essentially improved when irradiance distribution on a workpiece is uniform (flattop) or inverse-Gauss; when building high-power pulsed lasers it is possible to enhance efficiency of pumping and amplification by applying super-Gauss irradiance distribution with controlled convexity. Therefore, "freeform" beam shaping of multimode laser beams is an important task. A proved solution is refractive field mapping beam shaper like Shaper capable to control resulting irradiance profile - with the same unit it is possible to get various beam profiles and choose optimum one for a particular application. Operational principle of these devices implies transformation of laser irradiance distribution by conserving beam consistency, high transmittance, providing collimated low divergent output beam. Using additional optics makes it possible to create resulting laser spots of necessary size and round, elliptical or linear shape. Operation out of focal plane and, hence, in field of lower wavefront curvature, allows extending depth of field. The refractive beam shapers are implemented as telescopes and collimating systems, which can be connected directly to fiber-coupled lasers or fiber lasers, thus combining functions of beam collimation and irradiance transformation.

  19. Assessment of high-power kW-class single-diode bars for use in highly efficient pulsed solid state laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucianetti, Antonio; Pilar, Jan; Pranovich, Alina; Divoky, Martin; Mocek, Tomas; Ertel, K.; Jelinkova, Helena; Crump, P.; Frevert, C.; Staske, R.; Erbert, Götz; Traenkle, Günther

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we present measurements of efficiency-optimized 940 nm diode laser bars with long resonators that are constructed with robustly passivated output facets at the Ferdinand-Braun-Institut (FBH). The measurements were performed at room temperature on a test bench developed at HiLASE Centre, as a function of operating condition. The single-diode bars generated < 1.0 kW when tested with 1 ms pulses at 1-10Hz operating frequency, corresponding to < 1 J per pulse. The maximum electrical-to-optical efficiency was < 60 %, with operating efficiency at 1 kW of < 50%, limited by the ~ 200 μΩ resistance of the bar packaging. In addition, slow axis divergence at 1 kW was below 6° FWHM and spectral width at 1 kW was below 7 nm FWHM, as needed for pumping Yb-doped solid state amplifier crystals.

  20. Integration of high power lasers in bending tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bammer, F.; Holzinger, B.; Humenberger, G.; Schuöcker, D.; Schumi, T.

    The integration of high power lasers into bending tools creates a possibility to bend brittle materials with conventional presses. A diode laser, which is based on 200W-laser-bars and a solid state laser with 3 kW are used in this work. By heating the material within a narrow zone the ductility is increased and the forming process can be enabled. The assembly of the heat source within the bending tools is a prerequisite in order to feed energy into the workpiece before, during and after the forming process. As a result the heating and forming process can be optimized regarding any material.

  1. High-power fibre lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauregui, Cesar; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2013-11-01

    Fibre lasers are now associated with high average powers and very high beam qualities. Both these characteristics are required by many industrial, defence and scientific applications, which explains why fibre lasers have become one of the most popular laser technologies. However, this success, which is largely founded on the outstanding characteristics of fibres as an active medium, has only been achieved through researchers around the world striving to overcome many of the limitations imposed by the fibre architecture. This Review focuses on these limitations, both past and current, and the creative solutions that have been proposed for overcoming them. These solutions have enabled fibre lasers to generate the highest diffraction-limited average power achieved to date by solid-state lasers.

  2. Diode end-pumped high-power Q-switched double Nd:YAG slab laser and its efficient near-field second-harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Peng; Li, Daijun; Qi, Bingsong; Schell, Alexander; Shi, Peng; Haas, Claus; Fu, Shaojun; Wu, Nianle; Du, Keming

    2008-10-01

    We reported on an all-solid-state double Nd:YAG slab laser. The laser was based on two diode end-pumped Nd:YAG slabs and a stable-unstable hybrid resonator. A cw output of 189 W and an average Q-switched output of 169 W at 10 kHz with an M(2) factor of 1.5 in the slow direction and 1.7 in the fast direction were obtained. We demonstrated efficient near-field frequency doubling by imaging the one-dimensional top-hat near-field to a lithium triborate frequency doubler. We obtained 93 W green light at 10 kHz with a pulse width of 10.7 ns. The efficiency of second-harmonic generation was up to 57%. PMID:18830367

  3. Laser Diode Ignition (LDI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kass, William J.; Andrews, Larry A.; Boney, Craig M.; Chow, Weng W.; Clements, James W.; Merson, John A.; Salas, F. Jim; Williams, Randy J.; Hinkle, Lane R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the status of the Laser Diode Ignition (LDI) program at Sandia National Labs. One watt laser diodes have been characterized for use with a single explosive actuator. Extensive measurements of the effect of electrostatic discharge (ESD) pulses on the laser diode optical output have been made. Characterization of optical fiber and connectors over temperature has been done. Multiple laser diodes have been packaged to ignite multiple explosive devices and an eight element laser diode array has been recently tested by igniting eight explosive devices at predetermined 100 ms intervals.

  4. A High Power Frequency Doubled Fiber Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert J.; Tu, Meirong; Aveline, Dave; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reports on the development of a high power 780 nm laser suitable for space applications of laser cooling. A possible solution is to use frequency doubling of high power 1560 nm telecom lasers. The presentation shows a diagram of the frequency conversion, and a graph of the second harmonic generation in one crystal, and the use of the cascading crystals. Graphs show the second harmonic power as a function of distance between crystals, second harmonic power vs. pump power, tunability of laser systems.

  5. Laser diode protection circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Burgyan, L.; Hand, W.L.

    1990-05-08

    This patent describes a method for protecting a laser diode included within an electro-optical circuit. It comprises: the laser diode, a DC bias supply for supplying forward conduction current to the laser diode to cause it to emit light energy at a predetermined quiescent operating point, and an RF amplifier means for supplying an RF amplitude of an analog modulating signal to the laser diode for modulating the intensity of the emitted light energy about the quiescent operating point thereof, the method including providing a very high impedance to the laser diode during its nominal operating conditions about the quiescent point and, sensing an instantaneous amplitude of the RF amplitude modulating signal to detect amplitude surges therein, and responding to the sensing means by removing forward conduction current from the laser diode during the sense amplitude surges int he RF amplitude of the analog modulating signal, thereby causing the laser diode to reduce emission of light energy to a safe level.

  6. Integrated injection-locked semiconductor diode laser

    DOEpatents

    Hadley, G.R.; Hohimer, J.P.; Owyoung, A.

    1991-02-19

    A continuous wave integrated injection-locked high-power diode laser array is provided with an on-chip independently-controlled master laser. The integrated injection locked high-power diode laser array is capable of continuous wave lasing in a single near-diffraction limited output beam at single-facet power levels up to 125 mW (250 mW total). Electronic steering of the array emission over an angle of 0.5 degrees is obtained by varying current to the master laser. The master laser injects a laser beam into the slave array by reflection of a rear facet. 18 figures.

  7. Integrated injection-locked semiconductor diode laser

    DOEpatents

    Hadley, G. Ronald; Hohimer, John P.; Owyoung, Adelbert

    1991-01-01

    A continuous wave integrated injection-locked high-power diode laser array is provided with an on-chip independently-controlled master laser. The integrated injection locked high-power diode laser array is capable of continuous wave lasing in a single near-diffraction limited output beam at single-facet power levels up to 125 mW (250 mW total). Electronic steering of the array emission over an angle of 0.5 degrees is obtained by varying current to the master laser. The master laser injects a laser beam into the slave array by reflection of a rear facet.

  8. Characteristic optimization of 1.55-μm InGaAsP/InP high-power diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Qing; Tan, Shaoyang; Zhai, Teng; Zhang, Ruikang; Lu, Dan; Ji, Chen

    2014-11-01

    A comprehensive design optimization of 1.55-μm high power InGaAsP/InP board area lasers is performed aiming at increasing the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) while maintaing a low internal loss of the device as well. The P-doping profile and separate confinement heterostructure (SCH) layer band gap are optimized respectively with commercial software Crosslight. Analysis of lasers with different p-doping profiles shows that, although heavy doping in P-cladding layer increases the internal loss of the device, it ensures a high IQE because higher energy barrier at the SCH/P-cladding interface as a result of heavy doping helps reduce the carrier leakage from the waveguide to the InP-cladding layer. The band gap of the SCH layer are also optimized for high slope efficiency. Smaller band gap helps reduce the vertical carrier leakage from the waveguide to the P-cladding layer, but the corresponding higher carrier concentration in SCH layer will cause some radiative recombination, thus influencing the IQE. And as the injection current increases, the carrier concentration increases faster with smaller band gap, therefore, the output power saturates sooner. An optimized band gap in SCH layer of approximately 1.127eV and heavy doping up to 1e18/cm3 at the SCH/P-cladding interface are identified for our high power laser design, and we achieved a high IQE of 94% and internal loss of 2.99/cm for our design.

  9. The high-power iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brederlow, G.; Fill, E.; Witte, K. J.

    The book provides a description of the present state of the art concerning the iodine laser, giving particular attention to the design and operation of pulsed high-power iodine lasers. The basic features of the laser are examined, taking into account aspects of spontaneous emission lifetime, hyperfine structure, line broadening and line shifts, stimulated emission cross sections, the influence of magnetic fields, sublevel relaxation, the photodissociation of alkyl iodides, flashlamp technology, excitation in a direct discharge, chemical excitation, and questions regarding the chemical kinetics of the photodissociation iodine laser. The principles of high-power operation are considered along with aspects of beam quality and losses, the design and layout of an iodine laser system, the scalability and prospects of the iodine laser, and the design of the single-beam Asterix III laser.

  10. High Power Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    George Neil

    2004-04-12

    FEL Oscillators have been around since 1977 providing not only a test bed for the physics of Free Electron Lasers and electron/photon interactions but as a workhorse of scientific research. The characteristics that have driven the development of these sources are the desire for high peak and average power, high pulse energies, wavelength tunability, timing flexibility, and wavelengths that are unavailable from more conventional laser sources. User programs have been performed using such sources encompassing medicine, biology, solid state research, atomic and molecular physics, effects of non-linear fields, surface science, polymer science, pulsed laser vapor deposition, to name just a few. Recently the incorporation of energy recovery systems has permitted extension of the average power capabilities to the kW level and beyond. Development of substantially higher power systems with applications in defense and security is believed feasible with modest R&D efforts applied to a few technology areas. This paper will discuss at a summary level the physics of such devices, survey existing and planned facilities, and touch on the applications that have driven the development of these popular light sources.

  11. Single event burnout of high-power diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, K. H.; Denker, A.; Voss, P.; Becker, H.-W.

    1998-12-01

    High-power diodes might be damaged by a single particle of cosmic radiation. This particle has first to produce a secondary nucleus, that ionizes more densely, through a nuclear reaction with the silicon of the diode. A multiplication of the number of charge carriers, primarily produced by this nucleus, can occur and eventually lead to a break down. The onset of this charge carrier multiplication is investigated with accelerated heavy ions under well controlled conditions. Clear trends are revealed, but the process is not yet understood.

  12. Generation of high-power laser light with Gigahertz splitting.

    PubMed

    Unks, B E; Proite, N A; Yavuz, D D

    2007-08-01

    We demonstrate the generation of two high-power laser beams whose frequencies are separated by the ground state hyperfine transition frequency in (87)Rb. The system uses a single master diode laser appropriately shifted by high frequency acousto-optic modulators and amplified by semiconductor tapered amplifiers. This produces two 1 W laser beams with a frequency spacing of 6.834 GHz and a relative frequency stability of 1 Hz. We discuss possible applications of this apparatus, including electromagnetically induced transparency-like effects and ultrafast qubit rotations. PMID:17764314

  13. High power, diode pumped Er:YAG for dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, C.; Heinrich, A.; Nussbaumer, B.

    2011-03-01

    Pantec Medical Laser presents a diode pumped Er:YAG laser for dental and hard tissue applications. The diode pumped laser is practically maintenance free and ensures reliable operation over several thousand hours. The high repetition rate with up to 15 W average output power, allows treatments otherwise not feasible with low repetition rate, lamp pumped Er:YAG systems. The variable pulse duration of 10 to 200 μs combined with the good beam quality ensures precise and fast treatment. First results on enamel ablation as well as the power scalability of the technology to 200 mJ and 30 W average power are also shown.

  14. Stark spectroscopy of a probe lithium beam excited with two dye lasers as a technique to study a high-power ion-beam diode.

    PubMed

    Knyazev, B A; An, W; Bluhm, H

    2012-03-01

    A non-disturbing measurement of electric field distributions is a subject of special interest in plasma physics and high-voltage devices. In this paper we describe a diagnostic technique for remote sensing of electric fields via injection of a probe beam of lithium atoms and cascade excitation of resonance fluorescence with two broadband dye lasers. The fluorescence spectrum was recorded using a monochromator equipped with an optical multi-channel analyser. The magnitude of the local electric field was retrieved from the Stark-shifted components of the 3d-2p lithium spectral line. The technique was applied to measurements of the electric field in the applied-B-field high-voltage diode of the 1 TW KALIF ion-beam accelerator. PMID:22462900

  15. High power regenerative laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Miller, J.L.; Hackel, L.A.; Dane, C.B.; Zapata, L.E.

    1994-02-08

    A regenerative amplifier design capable of operating at high energy per pulse, for instance, from 20-100 Joules, at moderate repetition rates, for instance from 5-20 Hertz is provided. The laser amplifier comprises a gain medium and source of pump energy coupled with the gain medium; a Pockels cell, which rotates an incident beam in response to application of a control signal; an optical relay system defining a first relay plane near the gain medium and a second relay plane near the rotator; and a plurality of reflectors configured to define an optical path through the gain medium, optical relay and Pockels cell, such that each transit of the optical path includes at least one pass through the gain medium and only one pass through the Pockels cell. An input coupler, and an output coupler are provided, implemented by a single polarizer. A control circuit coupled to the Pockels cell generates the control signal in timed relationship with the input pulse so that the input pulse is captured by the input coupler and proceeds through at least one transit of the optical path, and then the control signal is applied to cause rotation of the pulse to a polarization reflected by the polarizer, after which the captured pulse passes through the gain medium at least once more and is reflected out of the optical path by the polarizer before passing through the rotator again to provide an amplified pulse. 7 figures.

  16. High power regenerative laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Miller, John L.; Hackel, Lloyd A.; Dane, Clifford B.; Zapata, Luis E.

    1994-01-01

    A regenerative amplifier design capable of operating at high energy per pulse, for instance, from 20-100 Joules, at moderate repetition rates, for instance from 5-20 Hertz is provided. The laser amplifier comprises a gain medium and source of pump energy coupled with the gain medium; a Pockels cell, which rotates an incident beam in response to application of a control signal; an optical relay system defining a first relay plane near the gain medium and a second relay plane near the rotator; and a plurality of reflectors configured to define an optical path through the gain medium, optical relay and Pockels cell, such that each transit of the optical path includes at least one pass through the gain medium and only one pass through the Pockels cell. An input coupler, and an output coupler are provided, implemented by a single polarizer. A control circuit coupled to the Pockels cell generates the control signal in timed relationship with the input pulse so that the input pulse is captured by the input coupler and proceeds through at least one transit of the optical path, and then the control signal is applied to cause rotation of the pulse to a polarization reflected by the polarizer, after which the captured pulse passes through the gain medium at least once more and is reflected out of the optical path by the polarizer before passing through the rotator again to provide an amplified pulse.

  17. A High Power Amplifier for a Single Mode 1064 Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stites, R. W.; O'Hara, K. M.

    2011-05-01

    We report on the construction of a high power amplifier system for a single mode 1064 nm laser. At the heart of this device is a 0.27% neodymium doped yttrium orthovanadate crystal that is double end pumped by two 30 Watt broadband diode arrays at 808 nm. For a 50 Watt TEM00 single freqency seed laser, we have observed an amplified power output in excess of 60 Watts for single pass configuration. A further increase in output power can be attained by retroreflecting the beam back through the crystal a second time. Such a device has direct application in the construction of optical lattices where high power single frequency lasers are required.

  18. Cryogenic cooling for high power laser amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perin, J. P.; Millet, F.; Divoky, M.; Rus, B.

    2013-11-01

    Using DPSSL (Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers) as pumping technology, PW-class lasers with enhanced repetition rates are developed. Each of the Yb YAG amplifiers will be diode-pumped at a wavelength of 940 nm. This is a prerequisite for achieving high repetition rates (light amplification duration 1 millisecond and repetition rate 10 Hz). The efficiency of DPSSL is inversely proportional to the temperature, for this reason the slab amplifier have to be cooled at a temperature in the range of 100 K-170 K with a heat flux of 1 MW*m-2. This paper describes the thermo-mechanical analysis for the design of the amplification laser head, presents a preliminary proposal for the required cryogenic cooling system and finally outlines the gain of cryogenic operation for the efficiency of high pulsed laser.

  19. Early history of high-power lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, George W.

    2002-02-01

    This paper gives the history of the invention and development of early high power lasers, to which the author contributed and had personal knowledge. The earliest hint that a high power laser could be built came from the electric CO2-N2-He laser of Javan. It happened that the director of the Avco-Everett Research Laboratory had written his Ph.D. dissertation on the deactivation of the vibrational excitation of N2 in an expanding flow under Edward Teller, then at Columbia Univ. The director then started an in-house project to determine if gain could be achieved in a mixture similar to Javan's by means of a shock tunnel where a shock heated mixture of N2, CO2, and He gas was expanded through a supersonic nozzle into a cavity. This concept was named by the author as the gasdynamic laser (GDL). The paper traces the history of the initial gain measurements, the Mark II laser, the RASTA laser, the Tri-Service laser, its troubles and solutions, the United Technology's XLD gasdynamic laser, and their ALL laser. The history of the coastal Crusader will also be mentioned. Also discussed are the early experiments on a combustion-driven chemical laser, and its subsequent rejection by the director.

  20. An optically-triggered semiconductor switch for high power laser beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, Weng W.; Warren, M.E.

    1995-04-01

    The work involves research leading to an optically triggered switch for a high power laser pulse. The switch uses a semiconductor heterostructure whose optical properties are modified by a low power laser trigger such as a laser diode. Potential applications include optical control of pulsed power systems, control of medical lasers and implementation of security features in optical warhead architectures.

  1. High-power disk lasers: advances and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havrilla, David; Ryba, Tracey; Holzer, Marco

    2012-03-01

    Though the genesis of the disk laser concept dates to the early 90's, the disk laser continues to demonstrate the flexibility and the certain future of a breakthrough technology. On-going increases in power per disk, and improvements in beam quality and efficiency continue to validate the genius of the disk laser concept. As of today, the disk principle has not reached any fundamental limits regarding output power per disk or beam quality, and offers numerous advantages over other high power resonator concepts, especially over monolithic architectures. With about 2,000 high power disk lasers installations, and a demand upwards of 1,000 lasers per year, the disk laser has proven to be a robust and reliable industrial tool. With advancements in running cost, investment cost and footprint, manufacturers continue to implement disk laser technology with more vigor than ever. This paper will explain recent advances in disk laser technology and process relevant features of the laser, like pump diode arrangement, resonator design and integrated beam guidance. In addition, advances in applications in the thick sheet area and very cost efficient high productivity applications like remote welding, remote cutting and cutting of thin sheets will be discussed.

  2. Photoionization of optically trapped ultracold atoms with a high-power light-emitting diode

    SciTech Connect

    Goetz, Simone; Hoeltkemeier, Bastian; Amthor, Thomas; Weidemueller, Matthias

    2013-04-15

    Photoionization of laser-cooled atoms using short pulses of a high-power light-emitting diode (LED) is demonstrated. Light pulses as short as 30 ns have been realized with the simple LED driver circuit. We measure the ionization cross section of {sup 85}Rb atoms in the first excited state, and show how this technique can be used for calibrating efficiencies of ion detector assemblies.

  3. Performance and trends of high power light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierhuizen, Serge; Krames, Michael; Harbers, Gerard; Weijers, Gon

    2007-09-01

    We will discuss the performance, progress and trend of High Power Light Emitting Diodes (HP-LEDs), suitable for high luminance applications like micro-display projection, car headlamps, spot lamps, theatre lamps, etc. Key drivers for the high luminance applications are LED parameters such as internal quantum efficiency, extraction efficiency, drive current, operating temperature and optical coupling efficiency, which are important for most applications as they also enable higher lumen/$ ratios. Historical progress, prospects for improving these parameters and potential optical luminance enhancement methods to meet the demands for the various illumination applications are presented.

  4. Deformable mirror for high power laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrň; a, Libor; Sarbort, Martin; Hola, Miroslava

    2015-01-01

    The modern trend in high power laser applications such as welding, cutting and surface hardening lies in the use of solid-state lasers. The output beam of these lasers is characterized by a Gaussian intensity distribution. However, the laser beams with different intensity distributions, e.g. top-hat, are preferable in various applications. In this paper we present a new type of deformable mirror suitable for the corresponding laser beam shaping. The deformation of the mirror is achieved by an underlying array of actuators and a pressurized coolant that also provides the necessary cooling. We describe the results of the surface shape measurement using a 3D scanner for different settings of actuators. Further, we show the achieved intensity distributions measured by a beam profiler for a low power laser beam reflected from the mirror.

  5. Nd:YAG laser side pumped by diode laser arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Hua; Huang, Weiling; Zhou, Zhouyou; Wang, Hailin; Cao, Hongbing; Wang, Ying

    1999-09-01

    The major limitation of flashlamp-pumped solid-state lasers is the low overall efficiency. Replacing flashlamps with high power laser diodes allows an increase of system efficiency by over an order of magnitude. Because of the thermally induced stress fracture of the laser materials, power-scaling possibilities of end-pumped configurations are limited. Therefore side pump geometry has to be used for high power laser. The theory and the design of high power diode side-pumped Nd:YAG laser system is described. The Nd:YAG rod is side-pumped by diode laser arrays with wavelength at 808 nm. We analyze the result of our experiments and make some conclusions about the design of side-pumped laser.

  6. Improved Thermoelectrically Cooled Laser-Diode Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glesne, Thomas R.; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Famiglietti, Joe

    1994-01-01

    Cooling decreases wavelength and increases efficiency and lifetime. Two improved thermoelectrically cooled laser-diode assemblies incorporate commercial laser diodes providing combination of both high wavelength stability and broad wavelength tuning which are broadly tunable, highly stable devices for injection seeding of pulsed, high-power tunable alexandrite lasers used in lidar remote sensing of water vapor at wavelengths in vicinity of 727 nanometers. Provide temperature control needed to take advantage of tunability of commercial AlGaAs laser diodes in present injection-seeding application.

  7. High Power Picosecond Laser Pulse Recirculation

    SciTech Connect

    Shverdin, M Y; Jovanovic, I; Semenov, V A; Betts, S M; Brown, C; Gibson, D J; Shuttlesworth, R M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P

    2010-04-12

    We demonstrate a nonlinear crystal-based short pulse recirculation cavity for trapping the second harmonic of an incident high power laser pulse. This scheme aims to increase the efficiency and flux of Compton-scattering based light sources. We demonstrate up to 36x average power enhancement of frequency doubled sub-millijoule picosecond pulses, and 17x average power enhancement of 177 mJ, 10 ps, 10 Hz pulses.

  8. High speed micromachining with high power UV laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Rajesh S.; Bovatsek, James M.

    2013-03-01

    Increasing demand for creating fine features with high accuracy in manufacturing of electronic mobile devices has fueled growth for lasers in manufacturing. High power, high repetition rate ultraviolet (UV) lasers provide an opportunity to implement a cost effective high quality, high throughput micromachining process in a 24/7 manufacturing environment. The energy available per pulse and the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of diode pumped solid state (DPSS) nanosecond UV lasers have increased steadily over the years. Efficient use of the available energy from a laser is important to generate accurate fine features at a high speed with high quality. To achieve maximum material removal and minimal thermal damage for any laser micromachining application, use of the optimal process parameters including energy density or fluence (J/cm2), pulse width, and repetition rate is important. In this study we present a new high power, high PRF QuasarR 355-40 laser from Spectra-Physics with TimeShiftTM technology for unique software adjustable pulse width, pulse splitting, and pulse shaping capabilities. The benefits of these features for micromachining include improved throughput and quality. Specific example and results of silicon scribing are described to demonstrate the processing benefits of the Quasar's available power, PRF, and TimeShift technology.

  9. High power Nd:YAG spinning disk laser.

    PubMed

    Ongstad, Andrew P; Guy, Matthew; Chavez, Joeseph R

    2016-01-11

    We report on a high power Nd:YAG spinning disk laser. The eight cm diameter disk generated 200 W CW output with 323 W of absorbed pump in a near diffraction-limited beam. The power conversion efficiency was 64%. The pulsed result, 5 ms pulses at 10 Hz PRF, was nearly identical to the CW result indicating good thermal management. Rotated at 1200-1800 RPM with He impingement cooling the disk temperature increased by only 17 °C reaching a maximum temperature of ~31 °C. The thermal dissipation per unit of output power was 0.61 watt of heat generated per watt of laser output, which is below the typical range of 0.8-1.1 for 808 nm diode pumped Nd:YAG lasers. PMID:26832242

  10. Diode laser (980nm) cartilage reshaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kharbotly, A.; El Tayeb, T.; Mostafa, Y.; Hesham, I.

    2011-03-01

    Loss of facial or ear cartilage due to trauma or surgery is a major challenge to the otolaryngologists and plastic surgeons as the complicated geometric contours are difficult to be animated. Diode laser (980 nm) has been proven effective in reshaping and maintaining the new geometric shape achieved by laser. This study focused on determining the optimum laser parameters needed for cartilage reshaping with a controlled water cooling system. Harvested animal cartilages were angulated with different degrees and irradiated with different diode laser powers (980nm, 4x8mm spot size). The cartilage specimens were maintained in a deformation angle for two hours after irradiation then released for another two hours. They were serially measured and photographed. High-power Diode laser irradiation with water cooling is a cheep and effective method for reshaping the cartilage needed for reconstruction of difficult situations in otorhinolaryngologic surgery. Key words: cartilage,diode laser (980nm), reshaping.

  11. Improvement of signal-to-noise ratio of optoacoustic signals from double-walled carbon nanotubes by using an array of dual-wavelength high-power diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leggio, Luca; de Varona, Omar E.; Escudero, Pedro; Carpintero del Barrio, Guillermo; Osiński, Marek; Lamela Rivera, Horacio

    2015-07-01

    Optoacoustic (OA) imaging is a rising biomedical technique that has attracted much interest over the last 15 years. This technique permits to visualize the internal soft tissues in depth by using short laser pulses, able to generate ultrasonic signals in a large frequency range. It combines the high contrast of optical imaging with the high resolution of ultrasound systems. The OA signals detected from the whole surface of the body serve to reconstruct in detail the image of the internal tissues, where the absorbed optical energy distribution outlines the regions of interest. In fact, the use of contrast agents could improve the detection of growing anomalies in soft tissues, such as carcinomas. This work proposes the use of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) as a potential nontoxic biodegradable contrast agent applicable in OA to reveal the presence of malignant in-depth tissues in near infrared (NIR) wavelength range (0.75-1.4 μm), where the biological tissues are fairly transparent to optical radiation. A dual-wavelength (870 and 905 nm) OA system is presented, based on arrays of high power diode lasers (HPDLs) that generate ultrasound signals from a DWCNT solution embedded within a biological phantom. The OA signals generated by DWCNTs are compared with those obtained using black ink, considered to be a very good absorber at these wavelengths. The experiments prove that DWCNTs are a potential contrast agent for optoacoustic spectroscopy (OAS).

  12. Advanced laser diodes for sensing applications

    SciTech Connect

    VAWTER,GREGORY A.; MAR,ALAN; CHOW,WENG W.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.

    2000-01-01

    The authors have developed diode lasers for short pulse duration and high peak pulse power in the 0.01--100.0 m pulsewidth regime. A primary goal of the program was producing up to 10 W while maintaining good far-field beam quality and ease of manufacturability for low cost. High peak power, 17 W, picosecond pulses have been achieved by gain switching of flared geometry waveguide lasers and amplifiers. Such high powers area world record for this type of diode laser. The light emission pattern from diode lasers is of critical importance for sensing systems such as range finding and chemical detection. They have developed a new integrated optical beam transformer producing rib-waveguide diode lasers with a symmetric, low divergence, output beam and increased upper power limits for irreversible facet damage.

  13. Innovations in high power fiber laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, Eckhard; Mahrle, Achim; Lütke, Matthias; Standfuss, Jens; Brückner, Frank

    2012-02-01

    Diffraction-limited high power lasers represent a new generation of lasers for materials processing, characteristic traits of which are: smaller, cost-effective and processing "on the fly". Of utmost importance is the high beam quality of fiber lasers which enables us to reduce the size of the focusing head incl. scanning mirrors. The excellent beam quality of the fiber laser offers a lot of new applications. In the field of remote cutting and welding the beam quality is the key parameter. By reducing the size of the focusing head including the scanning mirrors we can reach scanning frequencies up to 1.5 kHz and in special configurations up to 4 kHz. By using these frequencies very thin and deep welding seams can be generated experienced so far with electron beam welding only. The excellent beam quality of the fiber laser offers a high potential for developing new applications from deep penetration welding to high speed cutting. Highly dynamic cutting systems with maximum speeds up to 300 m/min and accelerations up to 4 g reduce the cutting time for cutting complex 2D parts. However, due to the inertia of such systems the effective cutting speed is reduced in real applications. This is especially true if complex shapes or contours are cut. With the introduction of scanner-based remote cutting systems in the kilowatt range, the effective cutting speed on the contour can be dramatically increased. The presentation explains remote cutting of metal foils and sheets using high brightness single mode fiber lasers. The presentation will also show the effect of optical feedback during cutting and welding with the fiber laser, how those feedbacks could be reduced and how they have to be used to optimize the cutting or welding process.

  14. Apparatus for advancing a wellbore using high power laser energy

    DOEpatents

    Zediker, Mark S.; Land, Mark S.; Rinzler, Charles C.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Koblick, Yeshaya; Moxley, Joel F.

    2014-09-02

    Delivering high power laser energy to form a borehole deep into the earth using laser energy. Down hole laser tools, laser systems and laser delivery techniques for advancement, workover and completion activities. A laser bottom hole assembly (LBHA) for the delivery of high power laser energy to the surfaces of a borehole, which assembly may have laser optics, a fluid path for debris removal and a mechanical means to remove earth.

  15. Vibration characteristic of high power CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kuo

    2015-02-01

    High power CO2 laser is widely used in various scientific, industrial and military applications. Vibration is a common phenomenon during laser working process, it will affect the working performance of high power CO2 laser, vibration must be strictly controlled in the condition where the laser pointing is required. This paper proposed a method to investigate the vibration characteristic of high power CO2 laser. An experiment device with vibration acceleration sensor was established to measure vibration signal of CO2 laser, the measured vibration signal was mathematically treated using space-frequency conversion, and then the vibration characteristic of high power CO2 laser can be obtained.

  16. Tapered fiber based high power random laser.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanwei; Du, Xueyuan; Zhou, Pu; Wang, Xiaolin; Xu, Xiaojun

    2016-04-18

    We propose a novel high power random fiber laser (RFL) based on tapered fiber. It can overcome the power scaling limitation of RFL while maintaining good beam quality to a certain extent. An output power of 26.5 W has been achieved in a half-open cavity with one kilometer long tapered fiber whose core diameter gradually changes from 8 μm to 20 μm. The steady-state light propagation equations have been modified by taking into account the effective core area to demonstrate the tapered RFL through numerical calculations. The numerical model effectively describes the power characteristics of the tapered fiber based RFL, and both the calculating and experimental results show higher power exporting potential compared with the conventional single mode RFL. PMID:27137338

  17. High power gas laser - Applications and future developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertzberg, A.

    1977-01-01

    Fast flow can be used to create the population inversion required for lasing action, or can be used to improve laser operation, for example by the removal of waste heat. It is pointed out that at the present time all lasers which are capable of continuous high-average power employ flow as an indispensable aspect of operation. High power laser systems are discussed, taking into account the gasdynamic laser, the HF supersonic diffusion laser, and electric discharge lasers. Aerodynamics and high power lasers are considered, giving attention to flow effects in high-power gas lasers, aerodynamic windows and beam manipulation, and the Venus machine. Applications of high-power laser technology reported are related to laser material working, the employment of the laser in controlled fusion machines, laser isotope separation and photochemistry, and laser power transmission.

  18. Advances in high power and high brightness laser bars with enhanced reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Haiyan; Jiang, Ching-Long (John); Xiong, Yihan; Inyang, Aloysius; Zhang, Qiang; Lewin, Alexander; Strohmaier, Stephan; Treusch, Georg

    2013-02-01

    The advances in laser-diode technology have enabled high efficiency direct diode base modules to emerge as a building block for industrial high power laser systems. Consequently, these systems have been implemented with advance robust, higher-brightness and reliable laser sources for material processing application. Here at the company, we use low-fill factor bars to build fiber-coupled and passively cooled modules, which form the foundation for "TruDiode," the series of TRUMPF direct diode laser systems that can perform in the multi-kilowatt arena with high beam quality. However, higher reliable output power, additional efficiency and greater slow axis beam quality of the high power laser bars are necessary to further increase the brightness and reduce the cost of the systems. In order to improve the slow axis beam quality, we have optimized the bar epitaxial structures as well as the lateral design. The detailed near field and far field studies of the slow axis for each individual emitters on the bar provide us with information about the dependency of beam quality as a function of the drive current. Based on these study results for direct diode application, we have optimized the high brightness bar designs at 900-1070nm wavelengths. In addition, high power and high efficiency laser bars with high fill factors have been used to build the pump sources for thin disc laser systems at TRUMPF Photonics. For better system performances with lower costs, we have further optimized bar designs for this application. In this paper, we will give an overview of our recent advances in high power and brightness laser bars with enhanced reliability. We will exhibit beam quality study, polarization and reliability test results of our laser bars in the 900-1070nm wavelengths region for coarse wavelength multiplexing. Finally, we will also present the performance and reliability results of the 200W bar, which will be used for our next generation thin disk laser pump source.

  19. Flow lasers. [fluid mechanics of high power continuous output operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, W. H.; Russell, D. A.; Hertzberg, A.

    1975-01-01

    The present work reviews the fluid-mechanical aspects of high-power continuous-wave (CW) lasers. The flow characteristics of these devices appear as classical fluid-mechanical phenomena recast in a complicated interactive environment. The fundamentals of high-power lasers are reviewed, followed by a discussion of the N2-CO2 gas dynamic laser. Next, the HF/DF supersonic diffusion laser is described, and finally the CO electrical-discharge laser is discussed.

  20. Thermal investigation on high power dfb broad area lasers at 975 nm, with 60% efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostallino, R.; Garcia, M.; Deshayes, Y.; Larrue, A.; Robert, Y.; Vinet, E.; Bechou, L.; Lecomte, M.; Parillaud, O.; Krakowski, M.

    2016-03-01

    The demand of high power diode lasers in the range of 910-980nm is regularly growing. This kind of device for many applications, such as fiber laser pumping [1], material processing [1], solid-state laser pumping [1], defense and medical/dental. The key role of this device lies in the efficiency (𝜂𝐸) of converting input electrical power into output optical power. The high value of 𝜂𝐸 allows high power level and reduces the need in heat dissipation. The requirement of wavelength stabilization with temperature is more obvious in the case of multimode 975nm diode lasers used for pumping Yb, Er and Yb/Er co-doped solid-state lasers, due to the narrow absorption line close to this wavelength. Such spectral width property (<1 nm), combined with wavelength thermal stabilization (0.07 𝑛𝑚 • °𝐶-1), provided by a uniform distributed feedback grating (DFB) introduced by etching and re-growth process techniques, is achievable in high power diode lasers using optical feedback. This paper reports on the development of the diode laser structure and the process techniques required to write the gratings taking into account of the thermal dissipation and optical performances. Performances are particularly determined in terms of experimental electro-optical characterizations. One of the main objectives is to determine the thermal resistance of the complete assembly to ensure the mastering of the diode laser temperature for operating condition. The classical approach to determine junction temperature is based on the infrared thermal camera, the spectral measurement and the pulse electrical method. In our case, we base our measurement on the spectral measurement but this approach is not well adapted to the high power diodes laser studied. We develop a new measurement based on the pulse electrical method and using the T3STERequipment. This method is well known for electronic devices and LEDs but is weakly developed for the high

  1. A High Power Frequency Doubled Fiber Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Rob; Tu, Meirong; Aveline, Dave; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute

    2003-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the power frequencies for the doubled fiber laser. It includes information on the 780 nm laser, second harmonic generation in one crystal, cascading crystals, the tenability of laser systems, laser cooling, and directions for future work.

  2. High power laser workover and completion tools and systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zediker, Mark S; Rinzler, Charles C; Faircloth, Brian O; Koblick, Yeshaya; Moxley, Joel F

    2014-10-28

    Workover and completion systems, devices and methods for utilizing 10 kW or more laser energy transmitted deep into the earth with the suppression of associated nonlinear phenomena. Systems and devices for the laser workover and completion of a borehole in the earth. These systems and devices can deliver high power laser energy down a deep borehole, while maintaining the high power to perform laser workover and completion operations in such boreholes deep within the earth.

  3. 1 W of blue 465-nm radiation generated by frequency doubling of the output of a high-power diode laser in critically phase-matched LiB3O5.

    PubMed

    Woll, D; Beier, B; Boller, K J; Wallenstein, R; Hagberg, M; O'Brien, S

    1999-05-15

    Blue 465-nm radiation is generated by frequency doubling of the output of an InGaAs diode-laser oscillator-amplifier system in critically phase-matched LiB(3)O(5) (LBO). The diode-laser system emitted 4 W of single-frequency 930-nm radiation in a near-diffraction-limited beam (M(2)<1.2) . The laser power is enhanced to values of up to 150 W in a resonant external ring cavity. The LBO crystal is placed at a resonator internal focus. The frequency doubling in the LBO crystal generates blue radiation at 465 nm with a power of 1 W. The spectral width of the blue radiation is less than 3 MHz, and the value of the M(2) beam parameter is less than 1.2. PMID:18073825

  4. Diode laser applications in urology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sam, Richard C.; Esch, Victor C.

    1995-05-01

    Diode lasers are air-cooled, efficient, compact devices which have the potential of very low cost when produced in quantity. The characteristics of diode lasers are discussed. Their applications in interstitial thermal treatment of the prostate, and laser ablation of prostate tissues, will be presented.

  5. Making an ultrastable diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archibald, James; Washburn, Matt; van Zijll, Marshall; Erickson, Christopher; Neyenhuis, Brian; Doermann, Greg; Durfee, Dallin

    2006-10-01

    We have constructed a 657nm diode laser with excellent stability for use in an atom interferometer. The laser is a grating-stabilized diode laser is locked to a high-finesse cavity using the Pound-Drever-Hall method. We have measured a linewidth of about 1 kHz and are working on several improvements which should further reduce our linewidth.

  6. High power laser beam delivery monitoring for laser safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corder, D. A.; Evans, D. R.; Tyrer, J. R.; Freeland, C. M.; Myler, J. K.

    1997-07-01

    The output of high power lasers used for material processing presents extreme radiation hazards. In normal operation this hazard is removed by the use of local shielding to prevent accidental exposure and system design to ensure efficient coupling of radiation into the workpiece. Faults in laser beam delivery or utilization can give rise to hazardous levels of laser radiation. A passive hazard control strategy requires that the laser system be enclosed such that the full laser power cannot burn through the housing under fault conditions. Usually this approach is too restrictive. Instead, active control strategies can be used in which a fault condition is detected and the laser cut off. This reduces the requirements for protective housing. In this work a distinction is drawn between reactive and proactive strategies. Reactive strategies rely on detecting the effects of an errant laser beam, whereas proactive strategies can anticipate as well as detect fault conditions. This can avoid the need for a hazardous situation to exist. A proactive strategy in which the laser beam is sampled at the final turning mirror is described in this work. Two control systems have been demonstrated; the first checks that beam power is within preset limits, the second monitors incoming beam power and position, and the radiation reflected back from the cutting head. In addition to their safety functions the accurate monitoring of power provides an additional benefit to the laser user.

  7. High-power, high-intensity laser propagation and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sprangle, Phillip; Hafizi, Bahman

    2014-05-15

    This paper presents overviews of a number of processes and applications associated with high-power, high-intensity lasers, and their interactions. These processes and applications include: free electron lasers, backward Raman amplification, atmospheric propagation of laser pulses, laser driven acceleration, atmospheric lasing, and remote detection of radioactivity. The interrelated physical mechanisms in the various processes are discussed.

  8. High power laser downhole cutting tools and systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zediker, Mark S; Rinzler, Charles C; Faircloth, Brian O; Koblick, Yeshaya; Moxley, Joel F

    2015-01-20

    Downhole cutting systems, devices and methods for utilizing 10 kW or more laser energy transmitted deep into the earth with the suppression of associated nonlinear phenomena. Systems and devices for the laser cutting operations within a borehole in the earth. These systems and devices can deliver high power laser energy down a deep borehole, while maintaining the high power to perform cutting operations in such boreholes deep within the earth.

  9. System and method for high power diode based additive manufacturing

    DOEpatents

    El-Dasher, Bassem S.; Bayramian, Andrew; Demuth, James A.; Farmer, Joseph C.; Torres, Sharon G.

    2016-04-12

    A system is disclosed for performing an Additive Manufacturing (AM) fabrication process on a powdered material forming a substrate. The system may make use of a diode array for generating an optical signal sufficient to melt a powdered material of the substrate. A mask may be used for preventing a first predetermined portion of the optical signal from reaching the substrate, while allowing a second predetermined portion to reach the substrate. At least one processor may be used for controlling an output of the diode array.

  10. High Power Fiber Lasers and Applications to Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Martin; McComb, Timothy; Sudesh, Vikas

    2008-09-01

    We summarize recent developments in high power fiber laser technologies and discuss future trends, particularly in their current and future use in manufacturing technologies. We will also describe our current research programs in fiber laser development, ultra-fast and new lasers, and will mention the expectations in these areas for the new Townes Laser Institute. It will focus on new core laser technologies and their applications in medical technologies, advanced manufacturing technologies and defense applications. We will describe a program on large mode area fiber development that includes results with the new gain-guiding approach, as well as high power infra-red fiber lasers. We will review the opportunities for high power fiber lasers in various manufacturing technologies and illustrate this with applications we are pursuing in the areas of femtosecond laser applications, advanced lithographies, and mid-IR technologies.

  11. Diode laser potential in laser cleaning of stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimbeni, Renzo; Pini, Roberto; Siano, Salvatore; Bachmann, Friedrich G.; Meyer, Frank

    2001-10-01

    In this work we investigated for the first time the laser cleaning process of encrusted stones by employing a high power diode laser system. The test have been carried out using a Rofin-Sinar mod. DL025S emitting up to 2.5 kW CW power to clean various samples representing natural encrustation by pollution exposition and graffiti, typically encountered on historical monuments and buildings in urban environment.

  12. Robotics For High Power Laser Beam Manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Henry E.

    1989-03-01

    The research and development programs in manufacturing science at The Pennsylvania State University have a major emphasis on laser materials processing technology development. A major thrust of this program is the development of an intelligent robotic system which can manipulate a laser beam in three dimension with the precision required for welding. The robot is called LARS for Laser Articulated Robotic System. A gantry based robot was selected as the foundation for LARS and the system is divided into five major subsystems: robot, electronic control, vision, workhead, beam transport, and software. An overview of the Laser Robotics program including laser materials processing research programs will be provided.

  13. Damage-controlled high power lasers and plasma mirror application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiriyama, Hiromitsu; Ochi, Yoshihiro; Nishikino, Masaharu; Nagashima, Keisuke; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Itakura, Ryoji; Sugiyama, Akira; Kando, Masaki; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Bulanov, Sergei V.; Kondo, Kimonori; Kato, Yoshiaki

    2015-07-01

    Following three different types of high power lasers at Kansai Photon Science Institute are overviewed and controlling the laser damages in these laser systems are described: (1) PW-class Ti:sapphire laser for high field science, (2) zig-zag slab Nd:glass laser for x-ray laser pumping, and (3) high-repetition Yb:YAG thin-slab laser for THz generation. Also reported is the use of plasma mirror for characterization of short-wavelength ultrashort laser pulses. This new method will be useful to study evolution of plasma formation which leads to laser damages.

  14. Zr/oxidized diamond interface for high power Schottky diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Traoré, A. Muret, P.; Fiori, A.; Eon, D.; Gheeraert, E.; Pernot, J.

    2014-02-03

    High forward current density of 10{sup 3} A/cm{sup 2} (at 6 V) and a breakdown field larger than 7.7 MV/cm for diamond diodes with a pseudo-vertical architecture, are demonstrated. The power figure of merit is above 244 MW/cm{sup 2} and the relative standard deviation of the reverse current density over 83 diodes is 10% with a mean value of 10{sup −9} A/cm{sup 2}. These results are obtained with zirconium as Schottky contacts on the oxygenated (100) oriented surface of a stack comprising an optimized lightly boron doped diamond layer on a heavily boron doped one, epitaxially grown on a Ib substrate. The origin of such performances are discussed.

  15. High power femtosecond lasers at ELI-NP

    SciTech Connect

    Dabu, Razvan

    2015-02-24

    Specifications of the high power laser system (HPLS) designed for nuclear physics experiments are presented. Configuration of the 2 × 10 PW femtosecond laser system is described. In order to reach the required laser beam parameters, advanced laser techniques are proposed for the HPLS: parametric amplification and cross-polarized wave generation for the intensity contrast improvement and spectral broadening, acousto-optic programmable filters to compensate for spectral phase dispersion, optical filters for spectrum management, combined methods for transversal laser suppression.

  16. Overview on the high power excimer laser technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingru

    2013-05-01

    High power excimer laser has essential applications in the fields of high energy density physics, inertial fusion energy and industry owing to its advantages such as short wavelength, high gain, wide bandwidth, energy scalable and repetition operating ability. This overview is aimed at an introduction and evaluation of enormous endeavor of the international high power excimer laser community in the last 30 years. The main technologies of high power excimer laser are reviewed, which include the pumping source technology, angular multiplexing and pulse compressing, beam-smoothing and homogenous irradiation, high efficiency and repetitive operation et al. A high power XeCl laser system developed in NINT of China is described in detail.

  17. Diode Laser Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botez, Dan; Scifres, Don R.

    1994-08-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of the fundamental principles and applications of semiconductor diode laser arrays. All of the major types of arrays are discussed in detail, including coherent, incoherent, edge- and surface-emitting, horizontal- and vertical-cavity, individually addressed, lattice- matched and strained-layer systems. The initial chapters cover such topics as lasers, amplifiers, external-cavity control, theoretical modeling, and operational dynamics. Spatially incoherent arrays are then described in detail, and the uses of vertical-cavity surface emitter and edge-emitting arrays in parallel optical-signal processing and multi-channel optical recording are discussed. Researchers and graduate students in solid state physics and electrical engineering studying the properties and applications of such arrays will find this book invaluable.

  18. High-power lasers for directed-energy applications.

    PubMed

    Sprangle, Phillip; Hafizi, Bahman; Ting, Antonio; Fischer, Richard

    2015-11-01

    In this article, we review and discuss the research programs at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) on high-power lasers for directed-energy (DE) applications in the atmosphere. Physical processes affecting propagation include absorption/scattering, turbulence, and thermal blooming. The power levels needed for DE applications require combining a number of lasers. In atmospheric turbulence, there is a maximum intensity that can be placed on a target that is independent of the initial beam spot size and laser beam quality. By combining a number of kW-class fiber lasers, scientists at the NRL have successfully demonstrated high-power laser propagation in a turbulent atmosphere and wireless recharging. In the NRL experiments, four incoherently combined fiber lasers having a total power of 5 kW were propagated to a target 3.2 km away. These successful high-power experiments in a realistic atmosphere formed the basis of the Navy's Laser Weapon System. We compare the propagation characteristics of coherently and incoherently combined beams without adaptive optics. There is little difference in the energy on target between coherently and incoherently combined laser beams for multi-km propagation ranges and moderate to high levels of turbulence. Unlike incoherent combining, coherent combining places severe constraints on the individual lasers. These include the requirement of narrow power spectral linewidths in order to have long coherence times as well as polarization alignment of all the lasers. These requirements are extremely difficult for high-power lasers. PMID:26560609

  19. Beam-path conditioning for high-power laser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, T.; Johnson, D.; Languirand, M.

    1990-01-01

    Heating of mirrors and windows by high-power radiation from a laser transmitter produces turbulent density gradients in the gas near the optical surfaces. If the gradients are left uncontrolled, the resulting phase errors reduce the intensity on the target and degrade the signal returned to a receiver. Beam path conditioning maximizes the efficiency of the optical system by alleviating thermal turbulence within the beam path. Keywords: High power radiation, Beam path, Optical surface, Laser beams, Reprints. (JHD)

  20. Alpha high-power chemical laser program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordi, Anthony J.; Lurie, Henry; Callahan, David W.; Thomson, Matthew

    1993-06-01

    Alpha is a megawatt-class ground demonstration of a hydrogen fluoride, continuous wave, space-based chemical laser. The laser operates in the infrared at 2.8 microns. The basic device consists of a cylindrical combustion chamber that exhausts radially outward through circumferential nozzles into an annular lasing area. An annular ring resonator is used to extract the laser energy from this area. Technical firsts include: (1) use of aluminum combustion chamber/nozzle ring modules, (2) diamond turned, water-cooled optics made of molybdenum for low thermal distortion with good heat transfer, (3) use of uncooled silicon mirrors in a megawatt-class laser system, (4) an optical bench made of aluminum honeycomb, and (5) active controls to adjust alignment of selected mirrors and the optical bench.

  1. Automated optical manufacturing test system for high power multi- bar diode modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadra, Sriraj K.; Humble, Chuck; Nguyen, Hoa; Treusch, Georg; Pandey, Rajiv; Bell, John

    2005-11-01

    This paper describes an innovative, high throughput manufacturing test system for testing high power laser-diode stacks. These stacks are based on a single high power bar building block, which can be stacked either vertically or horizontally to deliver extremely high output power (>3kW) from a compact package which can range from a single bar to over 25 bars in one package. Testing these various form-factors presents many challenges in high-volume manufacturing e.g. repeated changes of tooling and set-up to accommodate mixture of configurations. The automated test system described in this paper can accommodate any configuration of multi-bar stacks to test critical optical characteristics (LIV, Optical Spectrum Characteristics, Optical Power, Optical Divergence, water flow rate, water pressure etc.). Key to the automated station is a custom designed integrating sphere and universal stack holder with automated water flow configuration. The automated test system significantly improves the throughput by decreasing the test time by 50% (compared to manual testing). Individual bars comprising stack have different spectrum and the custom designed integrating sphere enables accurate spectrum analysis (centroid wavelength, FWHM) of the combined spectrum, as well as accurate power measurement.

  2. Beam Stop For High-Power Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdermid, Iain S.; Williamson, William B.

    1990-01-01

    Graphite/aluminum plate absorbs most of light. Beam stop fits on standard optical mounting fixture. Graphite plate thick enough to absorb incident laser beam but thin enough to transfer heat quickly to heat sink. Device used for variety of blocking purposes. For example, blocks laser beam after it passes through experimental setup, or at each stage of setup so stages checked and tested in sequence. Negligible reflectance of device is valuable safety feature, protecting both users and equipment from reflections.

  3. Generation of doughnut spot for high-power laser technologies using refractive beam shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Vadim; Ostrun, Aleksei

    2015-03-01

    Doughnut and inverse-Gauss intensity distributions of laser spot are required in laser technologies like welding, cladding where high power fiber coupled diode or solid-state lasers as well as fiber lasers are used. In comparison to Gaussian and flat-top distributions the doughnut and inverse-Gauss profiles provide more uniform temperature distribution on a work piece - this improves the technology, increase stability of processes and efficiency of using the laser energy, reduce the heat affected zone (HAZ). This type of beam shaping has become frequently asked by users of multimode lasers, especially multimode fiber coupled diode lasers. Refractive field mapping beam shapers are applied as one of solutions for the task to manipulate intensity distribution of multimode lasers. The operation principle of these devices presumes almost lossless transformation of laser beam irradiance from Gaussian to flat-top, doughnut or inverse-Gauss through controlled wavefront manipulation inside a beam shaper using lenses with smooth optical surfaces. This paper will describe some design basics of refractive beam shapers of the field mapping type and optical layouts of their applying with high-power multimode lasers. Examples of real implementations and experimental results will be presented as well.

  4. High power continuous-wave GaSb-based superluminescent diodes as gain chips for widely tunable laser spectroscopy in the 1.95-2.45 μm wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vizbaras, K.; Dvinelis, E.; ŠimonytÄ--, I.; TrinkÅ«nas, A.; Greibus, M.; Songaila, R.; Žukauskas, T.; Kaušylas, M.; Vizbaras, A.

    2015-07-01

    We present high-power single-spatial mode electrically pumped GaSb-based superluminescent diodes (SLDs) operating in the 1.95 to 2.45 μm wavelength range in continuous-wave (CW). MBE grown GaSb-based heterostructures were fabricated into single-angled facet ridge-waveguide devices that demonstrate more than 40 mW CW output power at 2.05 μm, to >5 mW at 2.40 μm at room-temperature. We integrated these SLDs into an external cavity (Littrow configuration) as gain chips and achieved single-mode CW lasing with maximum output powers exceeding 18 mW. An extremely wide tuning range of 120 nm per chip with side-mode-suppression-ratios >25 dB was demonstrated while maintaining optical output power level above 3 mW across the entire tuning range.

  5. Visible fiber lasers excited by GaN laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Yasushi; Nakanishi, Jun; Yamada, Tsuyoshi; Ishii, Osamu; Yamazaki, Masaaki

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes and discusses visible fiber lasers that are excited by GaN laser diodes. One of the attractive points of visible light is that the human eye is sensitive to it between 400 and 700 nm, and therefore we can see applications in display technology. Of course, many other applications exist. First, we briefly review previously developed visible lasers in the gas, liquid, and solid-state phases and describe the history of primary solid-state visible laser research by focusing on rare-earth doped fluoride media, including glasses and crystals, to clarify the differences and the merits of primary solid-state visible lasers. We also demonstrate over 1 W operation of a Pr:WPFG fiber laser due to high-power GaN laser diodes and low-loss optical fibers (0.1 dB/m) made by waterproof fluoride glasses. This new optical fiber glass is based on an AlF3 system fluoride glass, and its waterproof property is much better than the well known fluoride glass of ZBLAN. The configuration of primary visible fiber lasers promises highly efficient, cost-effective, and simple laser systems and will realize visible lasers with photon beam quality and quantity, such as high-power CW or tunable laser systems, compact ultraviolet lasers, and low-cost ultra-short pulse laser systems. We believe that primary visible fiber lasers, especially those excited by GaN laser diodes, will be effective tools for creating the next generation of research and light sources.

  6. High power laser and cathode structure thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, K. H.; Seguin, H. J.; Tulip, J.

    1981-09-08

    A cathode structure for gas lasers is disclosed that is comprised of a flat plate of non-conducting material positioned in the laser in spaced relation to the laser anode to define a discharge region therebetween, a two-dimensional array of metal sub-electrode rods passing through the plate and having their upper ends lying flush with the surface of the plate, a block of dielectric material positioned below the plate and containing a series of transverse channels therein, electric current conductors lying in the channels and adapted for connection to a power supply, the lower ends of the said rods passing through openings in the block into the channels to define a predetermined uniform gap between the ends of the rods and the electrical conductor, and a liquid electrolyte solution filling the channels and electrically connecting the sub-electrode rods and the conductors.

  7. Atmospheric propagation and combining of high-power lasers.

    PubMed

    Nelson, W; Sprangle, P; Davis, C C

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we analyze beam combining and atmospheric propagation of high-power lasers for directed-energy (DE) applications. The large linewidths inherent in high-power fiber and slab lasers cause random phase and intensity fluctuations that occur on subnanosecond time scales. Coherently combining these high-power lasers would involve instruments capable of precise phase control and operation at rates greater than ∼10  GHz. To the best of our knowledge, this technology does not currently exist. This presents a challenging problem when attempting to phase lock high-power lasers that is not encountered when phase locking low-power lasers, for example, at milliwatt power levels. Regardless, we demonstrate that even if instruments are developed that can precisely control the phase of high-power lasers, coherent combining is problematic for DE applications. The dephasing effects of atmospheric turbulence typically encountered in DE applications will degrade the coherent properties of the beam before it reaches the target. Through simulations, we find that coherent beam combining in moderate turbulence and over multikilometer propagation distances has little advantage over incoherent combining. Additionally, in cases of strong turbulence and multikilometer propagation ranges, we find nearly indistinguishable intensity profiles and virtually no difference in the energy on the target between coherently and incoherently combined laser beams. Consequently, we find that coherent beam combining at the transmitter plane is ineffective under typical atmospheric conditions. PMID:26974640

  8. Method and apparatus for tuning high power lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hutchinson, Donald P.; Vandersluis, Kenneth L.

    1977-04-19

    This invention relates to high power gas lasers that are adapted to be tuned to a desired lasing wavelength through the use of a gas cell to lower the gain at a natural lasing wavelength and "seeding" the laser with a beam from a low power laser which is lasing at the desired wavelength. This tuning is accomplished with no loss of power and produces a pulse with an altered pulse shape. It is potentially applicable to all gas lasers.

  9. Intense relativistic electron beam generation and prepulse effect in high power cylindrical diode

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Amitava; Menon, R.; Mitra, S.; Kumar, D. D. P.; Kumar, Senthil; Sharma, Archana; Mittal, K. C.; Nagesh, K. V.; Chakravarthy, D. P.

    2008-01-01

    Intense gigawatt relativistic electron beam has been generated in a high power cylindrical diode in the presence of prepulse. A bipolar prepulse voltage, recorded at the diode, varies both in amplitude and time duration with the Marx generator voltage. It was found that only at the accelerating gap {<=}1.65 cm there is some shot to shot variation in the diode voltage and current for the same Marx generator voltage. The anode and cathode plasma expansion velocities were calculated using the perveance data. The plasma expands at 5 cm/{mu}s for 1.85 cm radial anode-cathode gap and the plasma velocity decreases for smaller gap. It was found that the effect of the prepulse is less pronounced in the cylindrical diode as compared to planar diode that allows one operation of the cylindrical diode with the gap {<=}1.85 cm.

  10. Laser beam application with high power fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, Eckhard; Brenner, Berndt; Morgenthal, Lothar

    2007-05-01

    With the new industrial high power fiber lasers we have already stepped into a new generation of laser applications. These lasers are smaller, better, more cost-effective, and offer a processing "on the fly." Of utmost importance is their excellent beam quality which enables us to reduce the size of the focussing head including the scanning mirrors. With the reduced mass of the mirrors we can reach scanning frequencies up to 1.5 kHz and in special configurations up to 4 kHz. Using such mirrors with this high beam quality we can shape the key hole geometry, and thus it is possible to decrease the keyhole spiking, which always occur in the case of deep penetration welding. We can generate very thin and deep welding seams, which we have only experienced with electron beam welding. The excellent beam quality of the fiber lasers offers us a lot of new applications from deep penetration welding to high speed welding. By using beam scanning we are able to easily change the beam and the seam geometry. Furthermore, it is possible to work with this kind of laser from a distance of some meters between focussing/scanning head and the work piece. This technique is called remote processing or processing "on the fly." The excellent beam quality also enables us to cut very precisely, and due to the small cutting widths with a very high speed. In this case the main problem is that the roughness of the cutting edge increases a little bit. One reason for this is that we cannot blow out the mold as easily as we can do it with higher cutting widths. There are also polarized fiber lasers on the market where we can use the Brewster effect for different applications. The presentation will cover some physical basics including different industrial applications.

  11. 600 mW optical output power at 488 nm by use of a high-power hybrid laser diode system and a periodically poled MgO:LiNbO3 bulk crystal.

    PubMed

    Maiwald, Martin; Schwertfeger, Sven; Güther, Reiner; Sumpf, Bernd; Paschke, Katrin; Dzionk, Christian; Erbert, Götz; Tränkle, Günther

    2006-03-15

    600 mW second-harmonic blue light at 488 nm has been generated by use of a master-oscillator power amplifier diode laser system as a pump source with a maximum optical output power of 4 W in continuous-wave operation. For frequency doubling, a periodically poled MgO:LiNbO3 bulk crystal was used in a single-pass configuration. A conversion efficiency of 15% and an overall wall-plug efficiency of 4% were achieved. PMID:16544629

  12. New diode wavelengths for pumping solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Skidmore, J.A.; Emanuel, M.A.; Beach, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    High-power laser-diode arrays have been demonstrated to be viable pump sources for solid-state lasers. The diode bars (fill factor of 0.7) were bonded to silicon microchannel heatsinks for high-average-power operation. Over 12 W of CW output power was achieved from a one cm AlGaInP tensile-strained single-quantum-well laser diode bar. At 690 nm, a compressively-strained single-quantum-well laser-diode array produced 360 W/cm{sup 2} per emitting aperture under CW operation, and 2.85 kW of pulsed power from a 3.8 cm{sup 2} emitting-aperture array. InGaAs strained single-quantum-well laser diodes emitting at 900 nm produced 2.8 kW pulsed power from a 4.4 cm{sup 2} emitting-aperture array.

  13. Laser diode array and transmission optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwon, Jin H.

    1989-01-01

    Information on laser diode array and transmission optics is given in viewgraph form. Information is given on coherent combining of laser diode arrays, amplification through a laser diode array, the far field pattern of a laser diode transmitter, and beam diameter at receiver vs. transmission distance.

  14. Design and experimental studies of foilless diode for high power terahertz wave generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guangqiang; Li, Xiaoze; Wang, Jianguo; Wang, Xingzhou; Tong, Changjiang

    2009-07-01

    A high beam quality foilless diode for high power 0.14 Terahertz backward wave oscillator (BWO) is presented in this paper. Limited by the wavelength in terahertz region, the diode is so small that its cathode radius is only 2.5 mm, and its anode radius is 9 mm. Based on an empirical formula for foilless diode, the initial structural parameters are estimated. Then the static electric field simulations with Superfish code and particle simulations using a 2.5 dimensional UNIPIC code are performed to optimize these parameters. The simulation results show that the beam parameters satisfy our design requirements. Finally, the experiments of the diode are carried out. The copper targets by beam bombardment are measured to prove that the electron beam is azimuthally uniform with an inner radius of 2.0 mm and outer radius of 2.54 mm. From the experimental results, the diode can provide a high quality beam over a wide range of diode voltage (160 kVdiode resistance versus the distance between the cathode and anode is compared with numerical simulations. This foilless diode is being used in the experiment of high power terahertz wave generation.

  15. High-power laser source evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Back, C.A.; Decker, C.D.; Dipeso, G.J.; Gerassimenko, M.; Managan, R.A.; Serduke, F.J.D.; Simonson, G.F.; Suter, L.J.

    1997-07-01

    This document reports progress in these areas: EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM NOVA: TAMPED XENON UNDERDENSE X-RAY EMITTERS; MODELING MULTI-KEV RADIATION PRODUCTION OF XENON-FILLED BERYLLIUM CANS; MAPPING A CALCULATION FROM LASNEX TO CALE; HOT X RAYS FROM SEEDED NIF CAPSULES; HOHLRAUM DEBRIS MEASUREMENTS AT NOVA; FOAM AND STRUCTURAL RESPONSE CALCULATIONS FOR NIF NEUTRON EXPOSURE SAMPLE CASE ASSEMBLY DESIGN; NON-IGNITION X-RAY SOURCE FLUENCE-AREA PRODUCTS FOR NUCLEAR EFFECTS TESTING ON NIF. Also appended are reprints of two papers. The first is on the subject of ``X-Ray Production in Laser-Heated Xe Gas Targets.`` The second is on ``Efficient Production and Applications of 2- to 10-keV X Rays by Laser-Heated Underdense Radiators.``

  16. Improved Spatial Filter for high power Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Estabrook, Kent G.; Celliers, Peter M.; Murray, James E.; DaSilva, Luiz; MacGowan, Brian J.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Manes, Kenneth R.; Drake, Robert P.; Afeyan, Bedros

    1998-06-01

    A new pinhole architecture incorporates features intended to reduce the rate of plasma generation in a spatial filter for high-energy laser pulse beams. An elongated pinhole aperture is provided in an apertured body for rejecting off-axis rays of the laser pulse beam. The internal surface of the elongated aperture has a diameter which progressively tapers from a larger entrance cross-sectional area at an inlet to a smaller output cross-sectional area at an outlet. The tapered internal surface causes off-axis rays to be refracted in a low density plasma layer that forms on the internal surface or specularly reflected at grazing incidence from the internal surface. Off-axis rays of the high-energy pulse beam are rejected by this design. The external surface of the apertured body adjacent to the larger entrance cross-sectional area at the inlet to the elongated aperture is angled obliquely with respect to the to direction of the path of the high-energy laser pulse beam to backscatter off-axis rays away from the high-energy pulse beam. The aperture is formed as a truncated cone or alternatively with a tapered square cross-section. The internal surface of the aperture is coated with an ablative material, preferably high-density material which can be deposited with an exploding wire.

  17. Unstable-Resonator Oscillator/Amplifier Diode Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Robert J.; Mittelstein, Michael; Tiberio, Richard C.; Forouhar, Siamak; Crawford, Deborah

    1994-01-01

    Fabricated as single-chip integrated circuit. Device based partly on concept proved in commercial solid-state lasers: using unstable-resonator oscillator to define electromagnetic mode and, following oscillator, traveling-wave amplifier to generate high power. Mode-definition and power-amplification functions optimized separately. Hyperbolic-grating, unstable-resonator oscillator/amplifier diode laser produces single-longitudinal-mode, broad, laterally coherent, diffraction-limited, high-power beam.

  18. Unstable resonator diode laser

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, G.L.

    1988-04-19

    In a semiconductor diode laser, a structure is described comprising: a generally planar active layer, across which a forward bias voltage is applied, cladding layers adjacent to the active layer, to confine light in a direction perpendicular to the active layer, and first and second facets; in which the first facet is curved to present a concave part-cylindrical reflective surface toward the active layer, and in which the second facet includes a curved portion presenting a convex part-cylindrical reflective surface toward the active layer and a planar portion that is non-reflective. The curvatures of the two curved surfaces have axes of curvature that are approximately perpendicular to the active layer, the curvatures being selected to form an unstable resonator, in which light is confined in a particular sense by the cladding layers and from which energy is out-coupled through the planar portion of the second facet.

  19. Overview of the NASA high power laser program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundholm, J. G.

    1976-01-01

    The overall objectives of the NASA High Power Laser Program are reviewed along with their structure and center responsibilities. Present and future funding, laser power transmission in space, selected program highlights, the research and technology schedule, and the expected pace of the program are briefly considered.

  20. Device for wavefront correction in an ultra high power laser

    DOEpatents

    Ault, Earl R.; Comaskey, Brian J.; Kuklo, Thomas C.

    2002-01-01

    A system for wavefront correction in an ultra high power laser. As the laser medium flows past the optical excitation source and the fluid warms its index of refraction changes creating an optical wedge. A system is provided for correcting the thermally induced optical phase errors.

  1. High power cooled mini-DIL pump lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Bo; Zayer, Nadhum; Chen, Bob; He, Dylan; Pliska, Tomas

    2009-11-01

    The miniature dual-inline (mini-DIL) pump laser becomes more attactive for compact optical amplifiers designs due to the advantage of smaller footprint, lower power consumption and lower cost. In this paper we report the development of a new generation of small form factor, high power "cooled" mini-DIL 980-nm pump lasers module for compact EDFA application.

  2. Broad-Area Laser Diode With Fiber-Optic Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazel, Geoffrey; Mead, Patricia; Davis, Christopher; Cornwell, Donald

    1992-01-01

    Fiber-optic injection-locked broad-area laser diode features single-mode output via fiber-optic injection and serves as compact, rugged, high-power near-infrared source. Useful in free-space and fiber-optic communication links, as communication-receiver preamplifier, and pump source for solid-state lasers.

  3. Stretchers and compressors for ultra-high power laser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yakovlev, I V

    2014-05-30

    This review is concerned with pulse stretchers and compressors as key components of ultra-high power laser facilities that take advantage of chirped-pulse amplification. The potentialities, characteristics, configurations and methods for the matching and alignment of these devices are examined, with particular attention to the history of the optics of ultra-short, ultra-intense pulses before and after 1985, when the chirped-pulse amplification method was proposed, which drastically changed the view of the feasibility of creating ultra-high power laser sources. The review is intended primarily for young scientists and experts who begin to address the amplification and compression of chirped pulses, experts in laser optics and all who are interested in scientific achievements in the field of ultra-high power laser systems. (review)

  4. High-power efficient diode-pumped Nd:YVO4/LiB3O5 457 nm blue laser with 4.6 W of output power.

    PubMed

    Xue, Q H; Zheng, Q; Bu, Y K; Jia, F Q; Qian, L S

    2006-04-15

    Continuous-wave 457 blue laser emission at powers as high as 4.6 W is achieved by using a fiber-coupled laser diode array with a power of 30 W to pump 0.1 at. % low-doped bulk Nd:YVO4 crystal, with intracavity frequency doubling in a 15 mm long type I critical phase-matched LiB3O5 (LBO) crystal in a compact three-fold cavity with a length of less than 100 mm. The optical-optical conversion efficiency is greater than 15.3%, and the stability of the output power is better than 3% for an hour. PMID:16625906

  5. Electron accleration using high power laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najmudin, Zulfikar

    1998-04-01

    The 30 TW Nd:Glass Vulcan laser has been used to extensively study the Forward Raman Scatter instability in plasmas. This instability is of interest since it produces large amplitude relativistic plasma waves, which can trap and accelerate plasma electrons to high energies. Recently we have accelerated particles up to 100 MeV with this process. This is beyond the expected classical dephasing energy, for the plasma waves in our experiment which have a Lorentz factor γ ≈ 7. The greater acceleration has been attributed to the dynamics of the beam loading process of the plasma waves due to wavebreaking. By imaging the small angle Thomson scattered light from an orthogonally injected probe beam, we observe the dimensions of the accelerating plasma wave. It is seen that electron energies are almost independent of the length of the plasma wave. This is because the dephasing length is of the order of the Rayleigh length (≈ 100 μm). However the plasma wave is seen to extend to lengths as great as 3.5 mm. This is indicative of a high intensity being present throughout the length of the gas jet used, and indicates the presence of channelling of the laser beam. However the unstable nature of FRS, means that it is unsuitable for next generation high energy particle acclerators. For this we require much more controllable acceleration over greater distances. This can be achieved with the laser wakefield accelerator. For this purpose we have also been performing experiments at the LULI short pulse facility at Ecole Polytechnique. In these experiments we have been able to accelerate large numbers of injected electrons at 3 MeV to 4 MeV and above, after carefully taking into consideration sources of noise.

  6. High-power laser source evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Back, C. A.; Decker, C. D.; Davis, J. F.; Dixit, S.; Grun, J.; Managan, R. A.; Serduke, F. J. D.; Simonson, G. F.; Suter, L. J.; Wuest, C. R.; Ze, F.

    1998-07-01

    Robust Nuclear-Weapons-Effects Testing (NWET) capability will be needed for the foreseeable future to ensure the performance and reliability, in nuclear environments, of the evolving U.S. stockpile of weapons and other assets. Ongoing research on the use of high-energy lasers to generate environments of utility in nuclear weapon radiation effects simulations is addressed in the work described in this report. Laser-driven hohlraums and a variety of other targets have been considered in an effort to develop NWET capability of the highest possible fidelity in above-ground experiments. The envelope of large-system test needs is shown as the gray region in fig. 1. It does not represent the spectrum of any device; it is just the envelope of the spectral region of outputs from a number of possible devices. It is a goal of our laser-only and ignition-capsule source development work to generate x rays that fall somewhere in this envelope. One of the earlier appearances of this envelope is in ref. 1. The Defense Special Weapons Agency provided important support for the work described herein. A total of $520K was provided in the 1997 IACROs 97-3022 for Source Development and 97-3048 for Facilitization. The period of performance specified in the Statement of Work ran from 28 February 1997 until 30 November 1997. This period was extended, by agreement with DSWA, for two reasons: 1) despite the stated period of performance, funds were not available at LLNL to begin this work until somewhat later in the fiscal year, and 2) we agreed to stretch the current resources until follow-on funds were in hand, to minimize effects of ramping down and up again. The tasks addressed in this report are the following: 1) Non-ignition-source model benchmarking and design. This involves analysis of existing and new data on laser-only sources to benchmark LASNEX predictions 2) Non-ignition-source development experiments 3) Ignition capsule design to improve total x-ray output and simplify target

  7. High power solid state laser modulator

    DOEpatents

    Birx, Daniel L.; Ball, Don G.; Cook, Edward G.

    2004-04-27

    A multi-stage magnetic modulator provides a pulse train of .+-.40 kV electrical pulses at a 5-7 kHz repetition rate to a metal vapor laser. A fractional turn transformer steps up the voltage by a factor of 80 to 1 and magnetic pulse compression is used to reduce the pulse width of the pulse train. The transformer is fabricated utilizing a rod and plate stack type of construction to achieve a high packing factor. The pulses are controlled by an SCR stack where a plurality of SCRs are electrically connected in parallel, each SCR electrically connected to a saturable inductor, all saturable inductors being wound on the same core of magnetic material for enhanced power handling characteristics.

  8. A High Power and High Repetition Rate Modelocked Ti-Sapphire Laser for Photoinjectors

    SciTech Connect

    J. Hansknecht; M. Poelker

    2001-07-01

    A high power cw mode-locked Ti-sapphire laser has been constructed to drive the Jefferson Lab polarized photoinjector and provide > 500 mW average power with 50 ps pulsewidths at 499 MHz or 1497 MHz pulse repetition rates. This laser allows efficient, high current synchronous photoinjection for extended periods of time before intrusive steps must be taken to restore the quantum efficiency of the strained layer GaAs photocathode. The use of this laser has greatly enhanced the maximum high polarization beam current capability and operating lifetime of the Jefferson Lab photoinjector compared with previous performance using diode laser systems. A novel modelocking technique provides a simple means to phase-lock the optical pulse train of the laser to the accelerator and allows for operation at higher pulse repetition rates to {approx} 3 GHz without modification of the laser cavity. The laser design and characteristics are described below.

  9. Diode laser welding of aluminum to steel

    SciTech Connect

    Santo, Loredana; Quadrini, Fabrizio; Trovalusci, Federica

    2011-05-04

    Laser welding of dissimilar materials was carried out by using a high power diode laser to join aluminum to steel in a butt-joint configuration. During testing, the laser scan rate was changed as well as the laser power: at low values of fluence (i.e. the ratio between laser power and scan rate), poor joining was observed; instead at high values of fluence, an excess in the material melting affected the joint integrity. Between these limiting values, a good aesthetics was obtained; further investigations were carried out by means of tensile tests and SEM analyses. Unfortunately, a brittle behavior was observed for all the joints and a maximum rupture stress about 40 MPa was measured. Apart from the formation of intermeltallic phases, poor mechanical performances also depended on the chosen joining configuration, particularly because of the thickness reduction of the seam in comparison with the base material.

  10. Effects of diode current on high power microwave generation in a vircator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guozhi; Huang, Wenhua; Shao, Hao; Qiu, Shi; Wang, Hongjun; Liu, Jingyue; Wang, Feng; Yang, Zhanfeng; Qiao, Yongzhi

    2009-12-01

    An experiment of a virtual cathode oscillator (vircator) built on the low impedance intense electron beam accelerator Flash II is reported. A novel spectrum diagnosis method—a circulating dispersion line—is proposed. A thin oil layer coated graphite cathode is introduced in the experiment to decrease the delay time of the explosive emission process and obtain a homogeneous electron beam emission for improving the high-power microwave (HPM) generation efficiency. The effect of diode current on HPM generation in the vircator system is discussed. The HPM pulse width has a strong connection with the diode current waveform. For most shots, corresponding to the time that microwave emission starts, there is an inflection point in the diode current pulse. Compared with the case that no microwave is generated, the diode current increases more slowly following the inflection point. HPM generation terminates when the beam current reaches the self-pinching critical current of the diode.

  11. Enhanced vbasis laser diode package

    SciTech Connect

    Deri, Robert J.; Chen, Diana; Bayramian, Andy; Freitas, Barry; Kotovsky, Jack

    2014-08-19

    A substrate having an upper surface and a lower surface is provided. The substrate includes a plurality of v-grooves formed in the upper surface. Each v-groove includes a first side and a second side perpendicular to the first side. A laser diode bar assembly is disposed within each of the v-grooves and attached to the first side. The laser diode bar assembly includes a first adhesion layer disposed on the first side of the v-groove, a metal plate attached to the first adhesion layer, a second adhesion layer disposed over the metal plate, and a laser diode bar attached to the second adhesion layer. The laser diode bar has a coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) substantially similar to that of the metal plate.

  12. Phosphate glass useful in high power lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hayden, Joseph S.; Sapak, David L.; Ward, Julia M.

    1990-01-01

    A low- or no-silica phosphate glass useful as a laser medium and having a high thermal conductivity, K.sub.90.degree. C. >0.8 W/mK, and a low coefficient of thermal expansion, .alpha..sub.20.degree.-40.degree. C. <80.times.10.sup.-7 /.degree.C., consists essentially of (on a batch composition basis): the amounts of Li.sub.2 O and Na.sub.2 O providing an average alkali metal ionic radius sufficiently low whereby said glass has K.sub.90.degree. C. >0.8 W/mK and .alpha..sub.20.degree.-40.degree. C. <80.times.10.sup.-7 /.degree.C., and wherein, when the batch composition is melted in contact with a silica-containing surface, the final glass composition contains at most about 3.5 mole % of additional silica derived from such contact during melting. The Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3 can be replaced by other lasing species.

  13. Phosphate glass useful in high power lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hayden, J.S.; Sapak, D.L.; Ward, J.M.

    1990-05-29

    A low- or no-silica phosphate glass useful as a laser medium and having a high thermal conductivity, K[sub 90 C] > 0.8 W/mK, and a low coefficient of thermal expansion, [alpha][sub 20--40 C] < 80[times]10[sup [minus]7]/C, consists essentially of (on a batch composition basis Mole %): P[sub 2]O[sub 5], 45-70; Li[sub 2]O, 15-35; Na[sub 2]O, 0-10; Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], 10-15; Nd[sub 2]O[sub 3], 0.01-6; La[sub 2]O[sub 3], 0-6; SiO[sub 2], 0-8; B[sub 2]O[sub 3], 0-8; MgO, 0-18; CaO, 0-15; SrO, 0-9; BaO, 0-9; ZnO, 0-15; the amounts of Li[sub 2]O and Na[sub 2]O providing an average alkali metal ionic radius sufficiently low whereby said glass has K[sub 90 C] > 0.8 W/mK and [alpha][sub 20--40 C] < 80[times]10[sup [minus]7]/C, and wherein, when the batch composition is melted in contact with a silica-containing surface, the final glass composition contains at most about 3.5 mole % of additional silica derived from such contact during melting. The Nd[sub 2]O[sub 3] can be replaced by other lasing species. 3 figs.

  14. Diode-pumped laser research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramos-Izquierdo, L.; Bufton, J. L.; Chan, K.

    1988-01-01

    The Laboratory for Oceans is currently working on the development of compact laser diode array (LD) pumped Nd:YAG lasers for use in space-based altimetry and ranging. Laser diode-array pumping technology promises to increase the electrical to optical efficiency of solid state lasers by an order of magnitude with a lifetime increase of nearly three orders of magnitude relative to today's conventional flashlamp-pumped laser systems. The small size, efficiency, and ruggedness make LD-pumped solid state lasers ideal for space based applications. In an in-house RTOP effort, a novel multiple-pass LD-pumped Nd:YAG laser amplifier was designed and tested to increase the 100 microjoule output pulse energy of the Lightwave laser oscillator. Preliminary results have yielded a round trip amplifier gain of about 15 percent using 7 microjoule LD-pump energy. As a parallel activity, funding was recently obtained to investigate the possible use of custom made fiber optic arrays to obtain an efficient optical coupling mechanism between the emitting laser diode-arrays and the target solid state laser material. Fiber optic coupling arrays would allow for the easy manipulation of the spatial emitting pattern of the diode pump sources to match either an end or side pumping laser configuration.

  15. Novel developments in laser diode Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claps, Ricardo Javier

    2000-11-01

    This thesis presents the last developments of a laser diode Raman spectrometer for gases, gas flows and vapors, at medium-low pressures. Results are shown for atmospheric gases under STP conditions, and also gas flows from nozzles in subsonic-sonic regimes. The system is unique in that it uses a high power laser diode passively locked by an external grating cavity in Littman/Metcalf configuration, with side-band modes suppressed by 1:10-5, and a reduced bandwidth of <500MHz. The use of Rb vapor cells as notch filters with unprecedented narrow bandwidth (<7 cm-1), allow to collect Stokes and a-Stokes rotational Raman spectra simultaneously. The spectrometer is used to perform studies of thermodynamic equilibrium of gas flows; further studies of samples seeded in the flow (alkali- halides) are discussed, together with potential applications for environmental and industrial monitoring.

  16. Outlook for diode lasers in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arons, Irving J.

    1994-07-01

    From their use in compact disc players and telecommunications to supermarket scanners, semi-conductor diode lasers now play an ever important role in medicine. Beginning in ophthalmology, as replacements for ion photocoagulator lasers, and used for several years outside of the United States for biostimulation of aching muscles and to treat chronic ulcers and wounds, high-powered diode systems are now finding their way into surgery and, in the future, will be used to activate photoactive dyes in the photodynamic therapy treatment of cancers, and perhaps to weld tissue to replace sutures. In this presentation, we attempt to cover the above applications as well as some newer ones, discussing the companies involved, the systems in use or under development, and some exciting new developments about to unfold.

  17. Transient Plasma Photonic Crystals for High-Power Lasers.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, G; Spatschek, K H

    2016-06-01

    A new type of transient photonic crystals for high-power lasers is presented. The crystal is produced by counterpropagating laser beams in plasma. Trapped electrons and electrically forced ions generate a strong density grating. The lifetime of the transient photonic crystal is determined by the ballistic motion of ions. The robustness of the photonic crystal allows one to manipulate high-intensity laser pulses. The scheme of the crystal is analyzed here by 1D Vlasov simulations. Reflection or transmission of high-power laser pulses are predicted by particle-in-cell simulations. It is shown that a transient plasma photonic crystal may act as a tunable mirror for intense laser pulses. Generalizations to 2D and 3D configurations are possible. PMID:27314721

  18. Transient Plasma Photonic Crystals for High-Power Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, G.; Spatschek, K. H.

    2016-06-01

    A new type of transient photonic crystals for high-power lasers is presented. The crystal is produced by counterpropagating laser beams in plasma. Trapped electrons and electrically forced ions generate a strong density grating. The lifetime of the transient photonic crystal is determined by the ballistic motion of ions. The robustness of the photonic crystal allows one to manipulate high-intensity laser pulses. The scheme of the crystal is analyzed here by 1D Vlasov simulations. Reflection or transmission of high-power laser pulses are predicted by particle-in-cell simulations. It is shown that a transient plasma photonic crystal may act as a tunable mirror for intense laser pulses. Generalizations to 2D and 3D configurations are possible.

  19. Completely monolithic linearly polarized high-power fiber laser oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belke, Steffen; Becker, Frank; Neumann, Benjamin; Ruppik, Stefan; Hefter, Ulrich

    2014-03-01

    We have demonstrated a linearly polarized cw all-in-fiber oscillator providing 1 kW of output power and a polarization extinction ratio (PER) of up to 21.7 dB. The design of the laser oscillator is simple and consists of an Ytterbium-doped polarization maintaining large mode area (PLMA) fiber and suitable fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) in matching PLMA fibers. The oscillator has nearly diffraction-limited beam quality (M² < 1.2). Pump power is delivered via a high power 6+1:1 pump coupler. The slope efficiency of the laser is 75 %. The electro/optical efficiency of the complete laser system is ~30 % and hence in the range of Rofin's cw non-polarized fiber lasers. Choosing an adequate bending diameter for the Yb-doped PLMA fiber, one polarization mode as well as higher order modes are sufficiently supressed1. Resulting in a compact and robust linearly polarized high power single mode laser without external polarizing components. Linearly polarized lasers are well established for one dimensional cutting or welding applications. Using beam shaping optics radially polarized laser light can be generated to be independent from the angle of incident to the processing surface. Furthermore, high power linearly polarized laser light is fundamental for nonlinear frequency conversion of nonlinear materials.

  20. Wavelength stabilized multi-kW diode laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Bernd; Unger, Andreas; Kindervater, Tobias; Drovs, Simon; Wolf, Paul; Hubrich, Ralf; Beczkowiak, Anna; Auch, Stefan; Müntz, Holger; Biesenbach, Jens

    2015-03-01

    We report on wavelength stabilized high-power diode laser systems with enhanced spectral brightness by means of Volume Holographic Gratings. High-power diode laser modules typically have a relatively broad spectral width of about 3 to 6 nm. In addition the center wavelength shifts by changing the temperature and the driving current, which is obstructive for pumping applications with small absorption bandwidths. Wavelength stabilization of high-power diode laser systems is an important method to increase the efficiency of diode pumped solid-state lasers. It also enables power scaling by dense wavelength multiplexing. To ensure a wide locking range and efficient wavelength stabilization the parameters of the Volume Holographic Grating and the parameters of the diode laser bar have to be adapted carefully. Important parameters are the reflectivity of the Volume Holographic Grating, the reflectivity of the diode laser bar as well as its angular and spectral emission characteristics. In this paper we present detailed data on wavelength stabilized diode laser systems with and without fiber coupling in the spectral range from 634 nm up to 1533 nm. The maximum output power of 2.7 kW was measured for a fiber coupled system (1000 μm, NA 0.22), which was stabilized at a wavelength of 969 nm with a spectral width of only 0.6 nm (90% value). Another example is a narrow line-width diode laser stack, which was stabilized at a wavelength of 1533 nm with a spectral bandwidth below 1 nm and an output power of 835 W.

  1. High-power continuous-wave mid-infrared radiation generated by difference frequency mixing of diode-laser-seeded fiber amplifiers and its application to dual-beam spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancaster, D. G.; Richter, D.; Curl, R. F.; Tittel, F. K.; Goldberg, L.; Koplow, J.

    1999-01-01

    We report the generation of up to 0.7 mW of narrow-linewidth (<60-MHz) radiation at 3.3 micrometers by difference frequency mixing of a Nd:YAG-seeded 1.6-W Yb fiber amplifier and a 1.5-micrometers diode-laser-seeded 0.6-W Er/Yb fiber amplifier in periodically poled LiNbO3. A conversion efficiency of 0.09%/W (0.47 mWW-2 cm-1) was achieved. A room-air CH4 spectrum acquired with a compact 80-m multipass cell and a dual-beam spectroscopic configuration indicates an absorption sensitivity of +/-2.8 x 10(-5) (+/-1 sigma), corresponding to a sub-parts-in-10(9) (ppb) CH4 sensitivity (0.8 ppb).

  2. Diode laser array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Nils W. (Inventor); Evans, Gary A. (Inventor); Kaiser, Charlie J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A diode laser array comprises a substrate of a semiconductor material having first and second opposed surfaces. On the first surface is a plurality of spaced gain sections and a separate distributed Bragg reflector passive waveguide at each end of each gain section and optically connecting the gain sections. Each gain section includes a cavity therein wherein charge carriers are generated and recombine to generate light which is confined in the cavity. Also, the cavity, which is preferably a quantum well cavity, provides both a high differential gain and potentially large depth of loss modulation. Each waveguide has a wavelength which is preferably formed by an extension of the cavity of the gain sections and a grating. The grating has a period which provides a selective feedback of light into the gain sections to supporting lasing, which allows some of the light to be emitted from the waveguide normal to the surface of the substrate and which allows optical coupling of the gain sections. Also, the grating period provides an operating wavelength which is on the short wavelength side of the gain period of the gain sections required for laser oscillation. An RF pulse is applied so as to maximize the magnitude of the loss modulation and the differential gain in the gain sections. The array is operated by applying a DC bias to all the gain sections at a level just below the threshold of the gain sections to only one of the gain sections which raises the bias in all of the gain sections to a level that causes all of the gain sections to oscillate. Thus, a small bias can turn the array on and off.

  3. High-power laser applications in Nippon Steel Corporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamida, Katsuhiro

    2000-02-01

    The laser, which was invented in 1960, has been developed using various substances of solids, liquids, gases and semiconductors as laser active media. Applications of laser utilizing the coherent properties of laser light and the high power density light abound in many industries and in heavy industries respectively. The full-scale use of lasers in the steel industry began nearly 23 years ago with their applications as controllable light sources. Its contribution to the increase in efficiency and quality of the steel making process has been important and brought us the saving of the energy, the resource and the labor. Laser applications in the steel making process generally require high input energy, so it is essential to consider the interaction between the laser beam and the irradiated material. In particular, the reflectivity of the laser beam on the surface of material and the quantity of the laser-induced plasma are critical parameters for high efficient processes with low energy losses. We have developed plenty of new laser systems for the steel making process with their considerations in mind. A review of the following high-power-laser applications is given in the present paper: (1) Use of plasma as a secondary heat source in CO2 laser welding for connecting steel sheets of various grades. (2) Laser-assisted electric resistance welding of pipes. (3) New type all-laser-welded honeycomb panels for high-speed transport. (4) Laser flying welder for continuous hot rolling mill using two 45 kW CO2 lasers.

  4. High-power, efficient, semiconductor saturable absorber mode-locked Yb:KGW bulk laser.

    PubMed

    Kisel, V E; Rudenkov, A S; Pavlyuk, A A; Kovalyov, A A; Preobrazhenskii, V V; Putyato, M A; Rubtsova, N N; Semyagin, B R; Kuleshov, N V

    2015-06-15

    A high-power, diode-pumped, semiconductor saturable absorber mode-locked Yb(5%):KGW bulk laser was demonstrated with high optical-to-optical efficiency. Average output power as high as 8.8 W with optical-to-optical efficiency of 37.5% was obtained for Nm-polarized laser output with 162 fs pulse duration and 142 nJ pulse energy at a pulse repetition frequency of 62 MHz. For Np polarization, 143 fs pulses with pulse energy of 139 nJ and average output power of up to 8.6 W with optical-to-optical efficiency of 31% were generated. PMID:26076242

  5. High-power synchronously pumped femtosecond Raman fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Churin, D; Olson, J; Norwood, R A; Peyghambarian, N; Kieu, K

    2015-06-01

    We report a high-power synchronously pumped femtosecond Raman fiber laser operating in the normal dispersion regime. The Raman laser is pumped by a picosecond Yb(3+)-doped fiber laser. It produces highly chirped pulses with energy up to 18 nJ, average power of 0.76 W and 88% efficiency. The pulse duration is measured to be 147 fs after external compression. We observed two different regimes of operation of the laser: coherent and noise-like regime. Both regimes were experimentally characterized. Numerical simulations are in a good agreement with experimental results. PMID:26030549

  6. High Power Laser Hybrid Welding - Challenges and Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Steen Erik

    High power industrial lasers at power levels up to 100 kW is now available on the market. Therefore, welding of thicker materials has become of interest for the heavy metal industry e.g. shipyards and wind mill producers. Further, the power plant industry, producers of steel pipes, heavy machinery and steel producers are following this new technology with great interest. At Lindø Welding Technology (LWT), which is a subsidiary to FORCE Technology, a 32-kwatt disc laser is installed. At this laser facility, welding procedures related to thick section steel applications are developed. Material thicknesses between 40 and 100 mm are currently of interest. This paper describes some of the challenges that are related to the development of the high power hybrid laser welding process as well as to the perspectives for the technology as a production tool for the heavy metal industry.

  7. Long distance high power optical laser fiber break detection and continuity monitoring systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Rinzler, Charles C.; Gray, William C.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Zediker, Mark S.

    2016-02-23

    A monitoring and detection system for use on high power laser systems, long distance high power laser systems and tools for performing high power laser operations. In particular, the monitoring and detection systems provide break detection and continuity protection for performing high power laser operations on, and in, remote and difficult to access locations.

  8. High-power AlInGaN light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierer, Jonathan J.; Bhat, Jerome C.; Chen, Chien-Hua; Christenson, G.; Cook, Lou W.; Craford, M. G.; Gardner, Nathan F.; Goetz, Werner K.; Kern, R. Scott; Khare, Reena; Kim, A.; Krames, Michael R.; Ludowise, Mike J.; Mann, Richard; Martin, Paul S.; Misra, Mira; O'Shea, J.; Shen, Yu-Chen; Steranka, Frank M.; Stockman, Steve A.; Subramanya, Sudhir G.; Rudaz, S. L.; Steigerwald, Dan A.; Yu, Jingxi

    2001-05-01

    High-power light-emitting diodes (LEDs) in both the AlInGaP (red to amber) and the AlGaInN (blue-green) material systems are now commercially available. These high-power LEDs enable applications wherein high flux is necessary, opening up new markets that previously required a large number of conventional LEDs. Data are presented on high-power AlGaInN LEDs utilizing flip-chip device structures. The high-power flip-chip LED is contained in a package that provides high current and temperature operation, high reliability, and optimized radiation patterns. These LEDs produce record powers of 350 mW (1A dc, 300 K) with low (<4V) forward voltages. The performance of these LEDs is demonstrated in terms of output power, efficiency, and electrical characteristics.

  9. Note: An online testing method for lifetime projection of high power light-emitting diode under accelerated reliability test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qi; Chen, Quan; Luo, Xiaobing

    2014-09-01

    In recent years, due to the fast development of high power light-emitting diode (LED), its lifetime prediction and assessment have become a crucial issue. Although the in situ measurement has been widely used for reliability testing in laser diode community, it has not been applied commonly in LED community. In this paper, an online testing method for LED life projection under accelerated reliability test was proposed and the prototype was built. The optical parametric data were collected. The systematic error and the measuring uncertainty were calculated to be within 0.2% and within 2%, respectively. With this online testing method, experimental data can be acquired continuously and sufficient amount of data can be gathered. Thus, the projection fitting accuracy can be improved (r2 = 0.954) and testing duration can be shortened.

  10. Submillimeter sources for radiometry using high power Indium Phosphide Gunn diode oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deo, Naresh C.

    1990-01-01

    A study aimed at developing high frequency millimeter wave and submillimeter wave local oscillator sources in the 60-600 GHz range was conducted. Sources involved both fundamental and harmonic-extraction type Indium Phosphide Gunn diode oscillators as well as varactor multipliers. In particular, a high power balanced-doubler using varactor diodes was developed for 166 GHz. It is capable of handling 100 mW input power, and typically produced 25 mW output power. A high frequency tripler operating at 500 GHz output frequency was also developed and cascaded with the balanced-doubler. A dual-diode InP Gunn diode combiner was used to pump this cascaded multiplier to produce on the order of 0.5 mW at 500 GHz. In addition, considerable development and characterization work on InP Gunn diode oscillators was carried out. Design data and operating characteristics were documented for a very wide range of oscillators. The reliability of InP devices was examined, and packaging techniques to enhance the performance were analyzed. A theoretical study of a new class of high power multipliers was conducted for future applications. The sources developed here find many commercial applications for radio astronomy and remote sensing.

  11. Thermal lensing compensation optics for high power lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaggs, Michael; Haas, Gil

    2011-03-01

    Athermalization of focusing objectives is a common technique for optimizing imaging systems in the infrared where thermal effects are a major concern. The athermalization is generally done within the spectrum of interest and not generally applied to a single wavelength. The predominate glass used with high power infrared lasers in the near infrared of one micron, such as Nd:YAG and fiber lasers, is fused silica which has excellent thermal properties. All glasses, however, have a temperature coefficient of index of refraction (dn/dT) where as the glass heats up its index of refraction changes. Most glasses, fused silica included, have a positive dn/dT. A positive dn/dT will cause the focal length of the lens to decrease with a temperature rise. Many of the fluoride glasses, like CaF2, BaF2, LiF2, etc. have a negative dn/dT. By applying athermalization techniques of glass selection and optical design, the thermal lensing in a laser objective of a high power laser system can be substantially mitigated. We describe a passive method for minimizing thermal lensing of high power laser optics.

  12. High power continuous-wave Alexandrite laser with green pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari, Shirin; Major, Arkady

    2016-07-01

    We report on a continuous-wave (CW) Alexandrite (Cr:BeAl2O4) laser, pumped by a high power green source at 532 nm with a diffraction limited beam. An output power of 2.6 W at 755 nm, a slope efficiency of 26%, and wavelength tunability of 85 nm have been achieved using 11 W of green pump. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest CW output power of a high brightness laser pumped Alexandrite laser reported to date. The results obtained in this experiment can lead to the development of a high power tunable CW and ultrafast sources of the near-infrared or ultraviolet radiation through frequency conversion.

  13. Generation of strongly coupled plasmas by high power excimer laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yongxiang; Liu, Jingru; Zhang, Yongsheng; Hu, Yun; Zhang, Jiyan; Zheng, Zhijian; Ye, Xisheng

    2013-05-01

    (ultraviolet). To generate strongly coupled plasmas (SCP) by high power excimer laser, an Au-CH-Al-CH target is used to make the Al sample reach the state of SCP, in which the Au layer transforms laser energy to X-ray that heating the sample by volume and the CH layers provides necessary constraints. With aid of the MULTI-1D code, we calculate the state of the Al sample and its relationship with peak intensity, width and wavelength of laser pulses. The calculated results suggest that an excimer laser with peak intensity of the magnitude of 1013W/cm2 and pulse width being 5ns - 10ns is suitable to generate SCP with the temperature being tens of eV and the density of electron being of the order of 1022/cm-3. Lasers with shorter wavelength, such as KrF laser, are preferable.

  14. Stabilized High Power Laser for Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willke, B.; Danzmann, K.; Fallnich, C.; Frede, M.; Heurs, M.; King, P.; Kracht, D.; Kwee, P.; Savage, R.; Seifert, F.; Wilhelm, R.

    2006-03-01

    Second generation gravitational wave detectors require high power lasers with several 100W of output power and with very low temporal and spatial fluctuations. In this paper we discuss possible setups to achieve high laser power and describe a 200W prestabilized laser system (PSL). The PSL noise requirements for advanced gravitational wave detectors will be discussed in general and the stabilization scheme proposed for the Advanced LIGO PSL will be described. Special emphasis will be given to the most demanding power stabilization requiremets and new results (RIN <= 4×10-9/surdHz) will be presented.

  15. Epitaxial design of ultra high power tunable laser gain section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yaping; Benson, Trevor M.

    2005-09-01

    High power widely tunable lasers are extremely desirable for telecom applications as a replacement for distributed feedback (DFB) lasers in wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) systems, due to their dynamic provision properties. They are also sought after for many other applications, such as phased radar systems, optical switching and routing. This paper introduces novel design ideas and approaches on how to achieve ultra high power in the design of an InGaAsP-InP based widely tunable laser gain section. The inventive ideas are basically composed of two parts. Firstly, to increase the facet optical output power by the inclusion of an InP spacer layer below the ridge and above the multiple quantum wells (MQWs) stack, in order to have extra freedom in the control of widening the single mode ridge width. Secondly, to reduce the free-carrier absorption loss by the inclusion of a bulk balance layer structure below the MQWs stack and above the buffer layer, so as to largely shift the optical mode distribution to the intrinsic and n-doped side of the epilayer structure where the free-carrier absorption loss is lower than that of the p-doped side. Simulation results show that the proposed epilayer designs of the ultra high power gain sections would greatly increase the facet optical output power of a tunable laser, by up to about 80%. It should be noted that these novel epilayer design ideas and approaches developed for the gain section are applicable to the designs of ultra high power DFB lasers and other InGaAsP-InP based lasers.

  16. Modular package for cooling a laser diode array

    DOEpatents

    Mundinger, David C.; Benett, William J.; Beach, Raymond J.

    1992-01-01

    A laser diode array is disclosed that includes a plurality of planar packages and active cooling. The laser diode array may be operated in a long duty cycle, or in continuous operation. A laser diode bar and a microchannel heat sink are thermally coupled in a compact, thin planar package having the laser diode bar located proximate to one edge. In an array, a number of such thin planar packages are secured together in a stacked configuration, in close proximity so that the laser diodes are spaced closely. The cooling means includes a microchannel heat sink that is attached proximate to the laser bar so that it absorbs heat generated by laser operation. To provide the coolant to the microchannels, each thin planar package comprises a thin inlet manifold and a thin outlet manifold connected to an inlet corridor and an outlet corridor. The inlet corridor comprises a hole extending through each of the packages in the array, and the outlet corridor comprises a hole extending through each of the packages in the array. The inlet and outlet corridors are connected to a conventional coolant circulation system. The laser diode array with active cooling has application as an optical pump for high power solid state lasers. Further, it can be incorporated in equipment such as communications devices and active sensors, and in military and space applications, and it can be useful in applications having space constraints and energy limitations.

  17. New Submount Requirement of Conductively Cooled Laser Diodes for Lidar Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, S. Y.; Cutler, A. D.; Choi, S. H.; Lee, M. H.; Singh, U. N.

    2000-01-01

    New submount technology is essential for the development of conductively cooled high power diode laser. The simulation and experimental results indicate that thermal conductivity of submount for high power laser-diode must be at least 600 W/m/k or higher for stable operation. We have simulated several theoretical thermal model based on new submount designs and characterized high power diode lasers to determine temperature effects on the performances of laser diodes. The characterization system measures the beam power, output beam profile, temperature distribution, and spectroscopic property of high power diode laser. The characterization system is composed of four main parts: an infrared imaging camera, a CCD camera, a monochromator, and a power meter. Thermal characteristics of two commercial-grade CW 20-W diode laser bars with open heat-sink type were determined with respect to the line shift of emission spectra and beam power stability. The center wavelength of laser emission has a tendency to shift toward longer wavelength as the driving current and heat sink temperature are increased. The increase of heat sink temperature decreases the output power of the laser bar too. Such results lay the guidelines for the design of new submount for high power laser-diodes.

  18. Numerical Studies of Electrode Plasma Formation and Expansion in High Power Charged Particle Beam Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittersdorf, I. M.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Richardson, A. S.; Allen, R. J.; Schumer, J. W.

    2014-10-01

    High-power diodes that generate intense electron beams are useful in many applications, such as producing x-rays for flash radiography and nuclear weapon effects simulations. Desorption and ionization of gases from electrodes can form a plasma during operation. Expansion of this plasma into the gap leads to a short circuit, which limits the radiation production. It is difficult for particle-in-cell codes to model the surface physics or the subsequent expansion of the plasma. NRL is beginning a multi-year research effort to study such plasmas. This paper will summarize the relevant literature on plasma formation in high-power diodes with a goal of developing dynamic models that describe the formation and expansion of these plasmas that are suitable for PIC codes. This work was supported by the NRL Basic and Applied Research Program.

  19. Design of intrinsically single-mode double clad crystalline fiber waveguides for high power lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Da; Hong, Pengda; Meissner, Stephanie K.; Meissner, Helmuth E.

    2016-03-01

    Recently, double-clad crystalline fiber waveguides (CFWs), consisting of single crystalline or ceramic RE3+:YAG cores of square cross section and inner claddings of either undoped or laser-inactive-ion-doped YAG and outer claddings of sapphire, have been successfully demonstrated. These waveguides, manufactured by an Adhesive-Free Bonding (AFB®) technique, can be precisely engineered and fabricated with predictable beam propagation behavior. In this work, with high power laser designs in mind, minimum thicknesses for inner cladding are derived for different core cross sections and refractive index differences between the core and inner cladding and sapphire as outer cladding material for common laser core dopants such as Nd3+, Yb3+, Er3+, Tm3+ and Ho3+. All designs are intended to use high NA high power laser diode pumping to obtain high power intrinsically single transverse mode laser output. The obtained data are applicable to any crystalline fiber waveguide design, regardless of fabrication technique. As an example, a CFW with 40 μm × 40 μm 4% Tm:YAG core, 5% Yb:YAG inner cladding, and sapphire outer cladding was calculated to be intrinsically single transverse mode, with the minimum inner cladding width of 21.7 μm determined by the effective index technique [1].

  20. New laser materials for laser diode pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenssen, H. P.

    1990-01-01

    The potential advantages of laser diode pumped solid state lasers are many with high overall efficiency being the most important. In order to realize these advantages, the solid state laser material needs to be optimized for diode laser pumping and for the particular application. In the case of the Nd laser, materials with a longer upper level radiative lifetime are desirable. This is because the laser diode is fundamentally a cw source, and to obtain high energy storage, a long integration time is necessary. Fluoride crystals are investigated as host materials for the Nd laser and also for IR laser transitions in other rare earths, such as the 2 micron Ho laser and the 3 micron Er laser. The approach is to investigate both known crystals, such as BaY2F8, as well as new crystals such as NaYF8. Emphasis is on the growth and spectroscopy of BaY2F8. These two efforts are parallel efforts. The growth effort is aimed at establishing conditions for obtaining large, high quality boules for laser samples. This requires numerous experimental growth runs; however, from these runs, samples suitable for spectroscopy become available.

  1. All solid-state high power visible laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, William M.

    1993-01-01

    The overall objective of this Phase 2 effort was to develop and deliver to NASA a high repetition rate laser-diode-pumped solid-state pulsed laser system with output in the green portion of the spectrum. The laser is for use in data communications, and high efficiency, short pulses, and low timing jitter are important features. A short-pulse 1 micron laser oscillator, a new multi-pass amplifier to boost the infrared power, and a frequency doubler to take the amplified infrared pulsed laser light into the green. This produced 1.5 W of light in the visible at a pulse repetition rate of 20 kHz in the laboratory. The pulses have a full-width at half maximum of near 1 ns. The results of this program are being commercialized.

  2. High Energy Density Sciences with High Power Lasers at SACLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Ryosuke

    2013-10-01

    One of the interesting topics on high energy density sciences with high power lasers is creation of extremely high pressures in material. The pressures of more than 0.1 TPa are the energy density corresponding to the chemical bonding energy, resulting in expectation of dramatic changes in the chemical reactions. At pressures of more than TPa, most of material would be melted on the shock Hugoniot curve. However, if the temperature is less than 1eV or lower than a melting point at pressures of more than TPa, novel solid states of matter must be created through a pressured phase transition. One of the interesting materials must be carbon. At pressures of more than TPa, the diamond structure changes to BC and cubic at more than 3TPa. To create such novel states of matter, several kinds of isentropic-like compression techniques are being developed with high power lasers. To explore the ``Tera-Pascal Science,'' now we have a new tool which is an x-ray free electron laser as well as high power lasers. The XFEL will clear the details of the HED states and also efficiently create hot dense matter. We have started a new project on high energy density sciences using an XFEL (SACLA) in Japan, which is a HERMES (High Energy density Revolution of Matter in Extreme States) project.

  3. Cascaded combiners for a high power CW fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Qirui; Ge, Tingwu; Zhang, Xuexia; Wang, Zhiyong

    2016-02-01

    We report cascaded combiners for a high power continuous wave (CW) fiber laser in this paper. The cascaded combiners are fabricated with an improved lateral splicing process. During the fusing process, there is no stress or tension between the pump fiber and the double-cladding fiber. Thus, the parameters of the combiner are better than those that have been reported. The coupling efficiency is 98.5%, and the signal insertion loss is 1%. The coupling efficiency of the cascaded combiners is 97.5%. The pump lights are individually coupled into the double-cladding fiber via five combiners. The thermal effects cannot cause damage to the combiners and the cascaded combiners can operate stably in high power CW fiber lasers. We also develop a high power CW fiber laser that generates a maximum 780 W of CW signal power at 1080 nm with 71% optical-to-optical conversion efficiency. The fiber laser is pumped via five intra-cavity cascaded combiners and five extra-cavity cascaded combiners with a maximum pump power of 1096 W and a pump wavelength of 975 nm.

  4. Overview on new diode lasers for defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neukum, Joerg

    2012-11-01

    Diode lasers have a broad wavelength range, from the visible to beyond 2.2μm. This allows for various applications in the defense sector, ranging from classic pumping of DPSSL in range finders or target designators, up to pumping directed energy weapons in the 50+ kW range. Also direct diode applications for illumination above 1.55μm, or direct IR countermeasures are of interest. Here an overview is given on some new wavelengths and applications which are recently under discussion. In this overview the following aspects are reviewed: • High Power CW pumps at 808 / 880 / 940nm • Pumps for DPAL - Diode Pumped Alkali LasersHigh Power Diode Lasers in the range < 1.0 μm • Scalable Mini-Bar concept for high brightness fiber coupled modules • The Light Weight Fiber Coupled module based on the Mini-Bar concept Overall, High Power Diode Lasers offer many ways to be used in new applications in the defense market.

  5. Quantum Noise in Laser Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giacobino, E.; Marin, F.; Bramati, A.; Jost, V.; Poizat, J. Ph.; Roch, J.-F.; Grangier, P.; Zhang, T.-C.

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the intensity noise of single mode laser diodes, either free-running or using different types of line narrowing techniques at room temperature. We have measured an intensity squeezing of 1.2 dB with grating-extended cavity lasers and 1.4 dB with injection locked lasers (respectively 1.6 dB and 2.3 dB inferred at the laser output). We have observed that the intensity noise of a free-running nominally single mode laser diode results from a cancellation effect between large anti-correlated fluctuations of the main mode and of weak longitudinal side modes. Reducing the side modes by line narrowing techniques results in intensity squeezing.

  6. Simulative research on the anode plasma dynamics in the high-power electron beam diode

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Dan; Liu, Lie; Ju, Jin-Chuan; Zhang, Tian-Yang; Zhao, Xue-Long; Zhou, Hong-Yu

    2015-07-15

    Anode plasma generated by electron beams could limit the electrical pulse-length, modify the impedance and stability of diode, and affect the generator to diode power coupling. In this paper, a particle-in-cell code is used to study the dynamics of anode plasma in the high-power electron beam diode. The effect of gas type, dynamic characteristic of ions on the diode operation with bipolar flow model are presented. With anode plasma appearing, the amplitude of diode current is increased due to charge neutralizations of electron flow. The lever of neutralization can be expressed using saturation factor. At same pressure of the anode gas layer, the saturation factor of CO{sub 2} is bigger than the H{sub 2}O vapor, namely, the generation rate of C{sup +} ions is larger than the H{sup +} ions at the same pressure. The transition time of ions in the anode-cathode gap could be used to estimate the time of diode current maximum.

  7. Resection of Gingival Fibromatosis with High-power Laser.

    PubMed

    Camilotti, Renata Stifelman; Jasper, Juliana; Ferreira, Thaiana Barreto; Antonini, Fernando; Poli, Vladimir Dourado; Pagnoncelli, Rogério Miranda

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF), also known as hereditary gingival hyperplasia, idiopathic gingival fibromatosis, and hereditary gingival overgrowth, is a rare condition but the most common form of gingival hyperplasia. Overgrowth of gingival tissue is usually slow and progressive and may delay or prevent tooth eruption, resulting in cosmetic and functional impairments. Hypertrichosis, epilepsy, and intellectual disability may be associated with HGF, which can occur in isolation or as part of a syndrome. The purpose of this case report is to describe a diode laser resection of gingival hyperplasia in a seven-year-old patient with nonsyndromic HGF and hypertrichosis. The diode laser enabled efficient removal of hypertrophic gingival tissue with good healing and minimal postoperative discomfort. PMID:25909843

  8. High-power dual-rod Yb:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Honea, E C; Beach, R J; Mitchell, S C; Skidmore, J A; Emanuel, M A; Sutton, S B; Payne, S A; Avizonis, P V; Monroe, R S; Harris, D G

    2000-06-01

    We describe a diode-pumped Yb:YAG laser that produces 1080 W of power cw with 27.5% optical optical efficiency and 532 W Q-switched with M(2)=2.2 and 17% optical-optical efficiency. The laser uses two composite Yb:YAG rods separated by a 90 degrees quartz rotator for bifocusing compensation. A microlensed diode array end pumps each rod, using a hollow lens duct for pump delivery. By changing resonator parameters we can adjust the fundamental mode size and the output beam quality. Using a flattened Gaussian intensity profile to calculate the mode-fill efficiency and clipping losses, we compare experimental data with modeled output power versus beam quality. PMID:18064190

  9. High-power and low-intensity noise laser at 1064  nm.

    PubMed

    Guiraud, Germain; Traynor, Nicholas; Santarelli, Giorgio

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a single-frequency, narrow-linewidth (Δν<50  kHz) laser operating at 1064 nm with a high output power (50 W). The laser is based on an ytterbium-doped fiber master oscillator power amplifier architecture with an output beam at the diffraction limit. An output power of 50 W is obtained with two amplification stages using a 50 mW diode laser seeder. We have carefully studied the relative intensity noise at each amplification stage. The detrimental effect due to stimulated Brillouin scattering on residual amplitude noise has been observed on the high-power booster stage. After careful optimization, this laser exhibits low intensity noise with a RMS value equal to 0.012% (1 kHz/10 MHz) at 50 W. PMID:27607967

  10. High power laser applications in Nippon Steel Corporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamida, Katsuhiro

    2003-03-01

    The full-scale use of lasers in the steel industry began 25 years ago with their applications as controllable light sources. The laser systems contribute to increase efficiency and quality of the steel making processes, and also save energy of resources and labor. Laser applications in the steel making process generally require high input energy, however, it is essential to consider the interaction between the laser beam and materials. In particular, the reflectivity of the laser beam on the surface of material and the quantity of the laser-induced plasma are critical parameters for high efficient processes. We newly developed methods and systems of high power 45 kW CO2 laser welding of hot steel specimens with their applications as welding characteristics of hot steel specimens that temperature is about 1000 degree C, have been examined. Using laser induced plasma as a secondary heat source, the penetration depth improves about 30% compared to that at room temperature. The bead width is also enlarged by 10%. The maximum depth is 38 mm at 1m/min welding velocity at 40 kW. A beam weaving method is adopted for further enlargement of bead width without degrading fusion efficiency. It is also effective for suppressing the bead depth deviation. Additionally, several new applications, for example, new type all-laser-welded honeycomb panels for high- speed civil transport, will be talked.

  11. High power nd:glass laser for fusion applications.

    PubMed

    Soures, J; Kumpan, S; Hoose, J

    1974-09-01

    Experiments on laser-induced thermonuclear fusion require high brightness lasers capable of producing subnanosecond pulses with total energy content of several kilojoules. Of existing laser media, Nd:glass appears to be the best choice for meeting these criteria. In this paper we discuss the problems of designing a high power Nd:glass laser system. A detailed description of an operating two-beam system producing subnanosecond pulses with a maximum energy of 350 J per beam is presented, along with an extensive description of beam diagnostic techniques. A four beam version of this system became operational on 3 April 1974 and is now producing energies in excess of a kilojoule in subnanosecond pulses. PMID:20134633

  12. The role of anode and cathode plasmas in high power ion diode performance

    SciTech Connect

    Mehlhorn, T.A.; Bailey, J.E.; Bernard, M.A.

    1996-06-01

    We describe measurements, modeling, and mitigation experiments on the effects of anode and cathode plasmas in applied-B ion diodes. We have performed experiments with electrode conditioning and cleaning techniques including RF discharges, anode heating, cryogenic cathode cooling and anode surface coatings that have been successful in mitigating some of the effects of electrode contamination on ion diode performance on both the SABRE and PBFA accelerators. We are developing sophisticated spectroscopic diagnostic techniques that allow us to measure the electric and magnetic fields in the A-K gap, we compare these measured fields with those predicted by our 3-D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of ion diodes, and we measure anode and cathode plasma densities and expansion velocities. We are continuing to develop E-M simulation codes with fluid-PIC hybrid models for dense plasmas, in order to understand the role of electrode plasmas in ion diode performance. Our strategy for improving high power ion diode performance is to employ and expand our capabilities in measuring and modeling A-K gap plasmas and leverage our increased knowledge into an increase in total ion beam brightness to High Yield Facility (HYF) levels.

  13. Diode-Laser Phase Conjugation 03-FS-030 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R H; Beach, R J; Payne, S A; Holzrichter, J F

    2005-02-14

    Arrays of lasers are often considered when a need exists to increase laser optical output power, for a variety of purposes. Similarly, individual semiconductor laser-diodes, generating 0.01-1.0 W each, are commonly placed in arrays in order to increase total optical power onto targeted objects. Examples of such usage are diode-laser pump arrays for solid-slab heat-capacity lasers, laser arrays for heat-treating materials, and arrays for efficient solid state laser systems. The commercial and defense communities also use such arrays for many applications from laser range-finders, laser designators, to laser machining systems, etc. However, the arraying process does not automatically increase ''focusable'' light on target (i.e., intensity/steradian). For those applications requiring the highest focusability, it is necessary that the collective output beam from arrays of individual lasers be phase-coherent. Under this condition, the individual laser-element optical outputs are ''fused together'' into a larger area, phase coherent (i.e., all wavefronts are ''in step''), high-power combined beam. The process of joining multiple laser beams together to produce a single coherent wave, is in general very difficult and seldom accomplished. Thus joining together many hundreds to thousands of beams from individual laser-diodes, in large arrays, is still an unsolved problem. There are 2 major reasons for this. Firstly, the phase of each output laser beam (i.e. the wave-fronts) from each laser diode often fluctuates within nanosecond time periods, making a control loop with sufficient bandwidth difficult to build. In fact, phase fluctuations (related to laser linewidth) limit the size of an extended system of arrayed diodes because of speed-of-light restrictions on information flow. Secondly, the output power per prior laser diode has been low ( < 1W,) so that the size, expense, and complexity of control systems for correcting a multitude of output phases of the individual

  14. Finite element analysis of laser-diode heat emission and design of PI fuzzy cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fusheng; Shen, Xiaoqin; Leng, Changlin; Li, Zhi

    2005-01-01

    In order to realize the coupling of the crystal spectrum line, the wavelength output by the laser-diode must be adjusted to be accordant with the peak value absorbed by laser crystal in the solid laser of the laser-diode pump. In this paper, the finite element analysis (FEA) of the heat emission of the to-3 encapsulated laser-diode was researched and an accurate PI+Fuzzy temperature control system was developed. The refrigeration and the accurate temperature control of the high-power laser-diode was realized by the semiconductor refrigerator. Combined with fussy control and PI control, a full solid refrigerator of the laser-diode was developed. AT89C51 MCU and CRI[1] fussy control arithmetic were used in this system. So the system has high temperature control precision and little chatting. The rate of change of the optical power peak value output by the laser-diode was less than 1%.

  15. Investigation of the light field of a semiconductor diode laser.

    PubMed

    Ankudinov, A V; Yanul, M L; Slipchenko, S O; Shelaev, A V; Dorozhkin, P S; Podoskin, A A; Tarasov, I S

    2014-10-20

    Scanning near-field optical microscopy was applied to study, with sub-wavelength spatial resolution, the near- and the far-field distributions of propagating modes from a high-power laser diode. Simple modeling was also performed and compared with experimental results. The simulated distributions were consistent with the experiment and permitted clarification of the configuration of the transverse modes of the laser. PMID:25401675

  16. Safety approaches for high power modular laser operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handren, R. T.

    1993-03-01

    Approximately 20 years ago, a program was initiated at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to study the feasibility of using lasers to separate isotopes of uranium and other materials. Of particular interest was the development of a uranium enrichment method for the production of commercial nuclear power reactor fuel to replace current more expensive methods. The Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) Program progressed to the point where a plant-scale facility to demonstrate commercial feasibility was built and is being tested. The U-AVLIS Program uses copper vapor lasers which pump frequency selective dye lasers to photoionize uranium vapor produced by an electron beam. The selectively ionized isotopes are electrostatically collected. The copper lasers are arranged in oscillator/amplifier chains. The current configuration consists of 12 chains, each with a nominal output of 800 W for a system output in excess of 9 kW. The system requirements are for continuous operation (24 h a day, 7 days a week) and high availability. To meet these requirements, the lasers are designed in a modular form allowing for rapid change-out of the lasers requiring maintenance. Since beginning operation in early 1985, the copper lasers have accumulated over 2 million unit hours at a greater than 90% availability. The dye laser system provides approximately 2.5 kW average power in the visible wavelength range. This large-scale laser system has many safety considerations, including high-power laser beams, high voltage, and large quantities (approximately 3000 gal) of ethanol dye solutions. The Laboratory's safety policy requires that safety controls be designed into any process, equipment, or apparatus in the form of engineering controls. Administrative controls further reduce the risk to an acceptable level. Selected examples of engineering and administrative controls currently being used in the U-AVLIS Program are described.

  17. A wireless remote high-power laser device for optogenetic experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Gong, Q.; Li, Y. Y.; Li, A. Z.; Zhang, Y. G.; Cao, C. F.; Xu, H. X.; Cui, J.; Gao, J. J.

    2015-04-01

    Optogenetics affords the ability to stimulate genetically targeted neurons in a relatively innocuous manner. Reliable and targetable tools have enabled versatile new classes of investigation in the study of neural systems. However, current hardware systems are generally limited to acute measurements or require external tethering of the system to the light source. Here we provide a low-cost, high-power, remotely controlled blue laser diode (LD) stimulator for the application of optogenetics in neuroscience, focusing on wearable and intelligent devices, which can be carried by monkeys, rats and any other animals under study. Compared with the conventional light emitting diode (LED) device, this LD stimulator has higher efficiency, output power, and stability. Our system is fully wirelessly controlled and suitable for experiments with a large number of animals.

  18. High power free-electron laser concepts and problems

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, J.C.

    1995-03-01

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) have long been thought to offer the potential of high average power operation. That potential exists because of several unique properties of FELs, such as the removal of ``waste heat`` at the velocity of light, the ``laser medium`` (the electron beam) is impervious to damage by very high optical intensitites, and the technology of generating very high average power relativistic electron beams. In particular, if one can build a laser with a power extraction efficiency 11 which is driven by an electron beam of average Power P{sub EB}, one expects a laser output power of P{sub L} = {eta} P{sub EB}. One approach to FEL devices with large values of {eta} (in excess of 10 %) is to use a ``tapered`` (or nonuniform) wiggler. This approach was followed at several laboratories during the FEL development Program for the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) project. In this paper, we review some concepts and technical requirements for high-power tapered-wiggler FELs driven by radio-frequency linear accelerators (rf-linacs) which were developed during the SDI project. Contributions from three quite different technologies - rf-accelerators, optics, and magnets - are needed to construct and operate an FEL oscillator. The particular requirements on these technologies for a high-power FEL were far beyond the state of the art in those areas when the SDI project started, so significant advances had to be made before a working device could be constructed. Many of those requirements were not clearly understood when the project started, but were developed during the course of the experimental and theoretical research for the project. This information can be useful in planning future high-power FEL projects.

  19. High-power Nd:YAP blue laser by intracavity summing frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yong-ji; Jin, Guang-yong; Wang, Chao; Hao, Da-wei; Guo, Jia-xi; Liang, Zhu

    2009-07-01

    Recently, continue-wave blue laser generated by frequency doubling of the diode-end pumped neodymium doped lasers operating at the 4F3/2→4I9/2 transition have been extensively explored. But this way is limited by the considerable re-absorption loss caused by thermal population of the lower laser level for the oscillation of quasi-three-level laser. Another efficient way to obtain blue laser is based on summing frequency of the neodymium doped laser operating at the 4F3/2→4I13/2 transition. Unlike the three-level system of the 4F3/2→4I9/2 transition, stimulated emission at the 4F3/2→4I13/2 transition is a four-level system that can provide a low-threshold and stable laser output due to the lack of sensitive temperature dependence of the transition rate. High power blue laser has been achieved in this way. In this paper, we report a high power blue laser output is obtained by intracavity sum-frequency-mixing of a diode-side-pumped Q-switched Nd:YAP laser operating at 1.3μm with two LBO crystals. An LBO crystal with type-I critical phase matching and the other crystal with type-II critical phase matching were used for the second harmonic generation and the third harmonic generation, respectively. In view of the analysis of the cavity stability, a four-mirror folded cavity was designed and the output characteristics were theoretically analyzed. Experimental characteristics obtained were shown to be in agreement with the theoretical analysis. 3.2W average power at 447nm and 1.3W average power at 446nm blue laser outputs were achieved at 1kHz with pulse width of 10ns from the 1341.4nm laser beam polarized along the c crystalline axis and the 1339.2nm laser beam polarized along the a crystalline axis, respectively. The 447nm blue laser corresponds to a red-to-blue conversion efficiency of 30%.

  20. Applications of microlens-conditioned laser diode arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R.J.; Emanuel, M.A.; Freitas, B.L.

    1995-01-01

    The ability to condition the radiance of laser diodes using shaped-fiber cylindrical-microlens technology has dramatically increased the number of applications that can be practically engaged by diode laser arrays. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has actively pursued optical efficiency and engineering improvements in this technology in an effort to supply large radiance-conditioned laser diode array sources for its own internal programs. This effort has centered on the development of a modular integrated laser diode packaging technology with the goal of enabling the simple and flexible construction of high average power, high density, two-dimensional arrays with integrated cylindrical microlenses. Within LLNL, the principal applications of microlens-conditioned laser diode arrays are as high intensity pump sources for diode pumped solid state lasers (DPSSLs). A simple end-pumping architecture has been developed and demonstrated that allows the radiation from microlens-conditioned, two-dimensional diode array apertures to be efficiently delivered to the end of rod lasers. To date, pump powers as high as 2.5 kW have been delivered to 3 mm diameter laser rods. Such high power levels are critical for pumping solid state lasers in which the terminal laser level is a Stark level lying in the ground state manifold. Previously, such systems have often required operation of the solid state gain medium at low temperature to freeze out the terminal laser Stark level population. The authors recently developed high intensity pump sources overcome this difficulty by effectively pumping to much higher inversion levels, allowing efficient operation at or near room temperature. Because the end-pumping technology is scalable in absolute power, the number of rare-earth ions and transitions that can be effectively accessed for use in practical DPSSL systems has grown tremendously.

  1. High-Power Fiber Lasers Using Photonic Band Gap Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiDomenico, Leo; Dowling, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    High-power fiber lasers (HPFLs) would be made from photonic band gap (PBG) materials, according to the proposal. Such lasers would be scalable in the sense that a large number of fiber lasers could be arranged in an array or bundle and then operated in phase-locked condition to generate a superposition and highly directed high-power laser beam. It has been estimated that an average power level as high as 1,000 W per fiber could be achieved in such an array. Examples of potential applications for the proposed single-fiber lasers include welding and laser surgery. Additionally, the bundled fibers have applications in beaming power through free space for autonomous vehicles, laser weapons, free-space communications, and inducing photochemical reactions in large-scale industrial processes. The proposal has been inspired in part by recent improvements in the capabilities of single-mode fiber amplifiers and lasers to produce continuous high-power radiation. In particular, it has been found that the average output power of a single strand of a fiber laser can be increased by suitably changing the doping profile of active ions in its gain medium to optimize the spatial overlap of the electromagnetic field with the distribution of active ions. Such optimization minimizes pump power losses and increases the gain in the fiber laser system. The proposal would expand the basic concept of this type of optimization to incorporate exploitation of the properties (including, in some cases, nonlinearities) of PBG materials to obtain power levels and efficiencies higher than are now possible. Another element of the proposal is to enable pumping by concentrated sunlight. Somewhat more specifically, the proposal calls for exploitation of the properties of PBG materials to overcome a number of stubborn adverse phenomena that have impeded prior efforts to perfect HPFLs. The most relevant of those phenomena is amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), which causes saturation of gain and power

  2. High power industrial picosecond laser from IR to UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saby, Julien; Sangla, Damien; Pierrot, Simonette; Deslandes, Pierre; Salin, François

    2013-02-01

    Many industrial applications such as glass cutting, ceramic micro-machining or photovoltaic processes require high average and high peak power Picosecond pulses. The main limitation for the expansion of the picosecond market is the cost of high power picosecond laser sources, which is due to the complexity of the architecture used for picosecond pulse amplification, and the difficulty to keep an excellent beam quality at high average power. Amplification with fibers is a good technology to achieve high power in picosecond regime but, because of its tight confinement over long distances, light undergoes dramatic non linearities while propagating in fibers. One way to avoid strong non linearities is to increase fiber's mode area. Nineteen missing holes fibers offering core diameter larger than 80μm have been used over the past few years [1-3] but it has been shown that mode instabilities occur at approximately 100W average output power in these fibers [4]. Recently a new fiber design has been introduced, in which HOMs are delocalized from the core to the clad, preventing from HOMs amplification [5]. In these so-called Large Pitch Fibers, threshold for mode instabilities is increased to 294W offering robust single-mode operation below this power level [6]. We have demonstrated a high power-high efficiency industrial picosecond source using single-mode Large Pitch rod-type fibers doped with Ytterbium. Large Pitch Rod type fibers can offer a unique combination of single-mode output with a very large mode area from 40 μm up to 100μm and very high gain. This enables to directly amplify a low power-low energy Mode Locked Fiber laser with a simple amplification architecture, achieving very high power together with singlemode output independent of power level or repetition rate.

  3. IC Fabrication Methods Improve Laser Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M.; Pickhardt, V.

    1984-01-01

    Family of high-performance, tunable diode lasers developed for use as local oscillators in passive laser heterodyne spectrometer. Diodes fabricated using standard IC processes include photolithography, selective etching and vacuum deposition of metals and insulators. Packaging refinements improved thermal-cycling characteristics of diodes and increased room-temperature shelf life.

  4. High-power single-frequency fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Weihua

    Single frequency laser sources are desired in many applications. Various architectures for achieving high power single frequency fiber laser outputs have been investigated and demonstrated. Axial gain apodization can affect the lasing threshold and spectral modal discrimination of DFB lasers. Modeling results show that if properly tailored, the lasing threshold can be reduced by 21% without sacrificing modal discrimination, while simultaneously increasing the differential output power between both ends of the laser. A dual-frequency 2 cm silica fiber laser with a wavelength spacing of 0.3 nm was demonstrated using a polarization maintaining (PM) fiber Bragg grating (FBG) reflector. The output power reached 43 mW with the optical signal to noise ratio (OSNR) greater than 60 dB. By thermally tuning the overlap between the spectra of PM FBG and SM FBG, a single polarisation, single frequency fibre laser was also demonstrated with an output power of 35 mW. From the dual frequency fiber laser, dual frequency switching was achieved by tuning the pump power of the laser. The dual frequency switching was generated by the thermal effects of the absorbed pump in the ytterbium doped fiber. Suppression and elimination of self pulsing in a watt level, dual clad ytterbium doped fiber laser was demonstrated. Self pulsations are caused by the dynamic interaction between the photon population and the population inversion. The addition of a long section of passive fiber in the laser cavity makes the gain recovery faster than the self pulsation dynamics, allowing only stable continuous wave lasing. A single frequency, hybrid Brillouin/ytterbium fiber laser was demonstrated in a 12 m ring cavity The output power reached 40 mW with an OSNR greater than 50 dB. To scale up the output power, a dual clad hybrid Brillouin/ytterbium fiber laser was studied. A numerical model including third order SBS was used to calculate the laser power performance. Simulation shows that 5 W single

  5. High-power light-emitting diode based facility for plant cultivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamulaitis, G.; Duchovskis, P.; Bliznikas, Z.; Breive, K.; Ulinskaite, R.; Brazaityte, A.; Novickovas, A.; Zukauskas, A.

    2005-09-01

    Based on perspectives of the development of semiconductor materials systems for high-power light-emitting diodes (LEDs), an illumination facility for greenhouse plant cultivation was designed with the dominating 640 nm photosynthetically active component delivered by AlGaInP LEDs and supplementary components from AlGaN (photothropic action, 455 nm) and AlGaAs (photosynthetic 660 nm and photomorphogenetic 735 nm) LEDs. Photosynthesis intensity, photosynthetic productivity and growth morphology as well as chlorophyll and phytohormone concentrations were investigated in radish and lettuce grown in phytotron chambers under the LED-based illuminators and under high-pressure sodium (HPS) lamps with an equivalent photon flux density. Advantages of the high-power LED-based illuminators over conventional HPS lamps, applicability of AlGaInP LEDs for photosynthesis and control of plant growth by circadian manipulation of a relatively weak far-red component were demonstrated.

  6. Research and Development of Laser Diode Based Instruments for Applications in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael; Abshire, James; Cornwell, Donald; Dragic, Peter; Duerksen, Gary; Switzer, Gregg

    1999-01-01

    Laser diode technology continues to advance at a very rapid rate due to commercial applications such as telecommunications and data storage. The advantages of laser diodes include, wide diversity of wavelengths, high efficiency, small size and weight and high reliability. Semiconductor and fiber optical-amplifiers permit efficient, high power master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) transmitter systems. Laser diode systems which incorporate monolithic or discrete (fiber optic) gratings permit single frequency operation. We describe experimental and theoretical results of laser diode based instruments currently under development at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center including miniature lidars for measuring clouds and aerosols, water vapor and wind for Earth and planetary (Mars Lander) use.

  7. Linewidth-tunable laser diode array for rubidium laser pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhiyong; Tan Rongqing; Xu Cheng; Li Lin

    2013-02-28

    To optimise the pump source for a high-power diodepumped rubidium vapour laser, we have designed a laser diode array (LDA) with a narrowed and tunable linewidth and an external cavity formed by two volume Bragg gratings (VBGs). Through controlling the temperature differences between the two VBGs, the LDA linewidth, which was 1.8 nm before mounting the two VBGs, was tunable from 100 pm to 0.2 nm, while the output power changed by no more than 4 %. By changing simultaneously the temperature in both VBGs, the centre wavelength in air of the linewidth-tunable LDA was tunable from 779.40 nm to 780.05 nm. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  8. The boron doping of single crystal diamond for high power diode applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicley, Shannon Singer

    Diamond has the potential to revolutionize the field of high power and high frequency electronic devices as a superlative electronic material. The realization of diamond electronics depends on the control of the growth process of both lightly and heavily boron doped diamond. This dissertation work is focused on furthering the state of the art of boron doped diamond (BDD) growth toward the realization of high power diamond Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs). The achievements of this work include the fabrication of a new dedicated reactor for lightly boron doped diamond deposition, the optimization of growth processes for both heavily and lightly boron doped single crystal diamond (SCD), and the proposal and realization of the corner architecture SBD. Boron doped SCD is grown in microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (MPACVD) plasma disc bell-jar reactors, with feedgas mixtures including hydrogen, methane, carbon dioxide, and diborane. Characterization methods for the analysis of BDD are described, including Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) and temperature-dependent four point probe conductivity for activation energy. The effect of adding carbon dioxide to the plasma feedgas for lightly boron doped diamond is investigated. The effect of diborane levels and other growth parameters on the incorporated boron levels are reported, and the doping efficiency is calculated over a range of boron concentrations. The presence of defects is shown to affect the doping uniformity. The substrate growth temperature dependence of the plasma gas-phase to solid-phase doping efficiency in heavily boron doped SCD deposition is investigated. The substrate temperature during growth is shown to have a significant effect on the grown sample defect morphology, and a temperature dependence of the doping efficiency is also shown. The effect of the growth rate on the doping efficiency is discussed, and the ratio of the boron

  9. High power rapidly tunable system for laser cooling.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, V M; Hernández, L; Gomez, E

    2012-01-01

    We present a laser configuration capable of fast frequency changes with a high power output and a large tuning range. The system integrates frequency tuning with an acousto-optic modulator with a double pass tapered amplifier. A compensation circuit keeps the seed power constant and prevents damage to the amplifier. A single mode fiber decouples the modulation and amplification sections and keeps the alignment fixed. The small power required to saturate the amplifier makes the system very reliable. We use the system to obtain a dipole trap that we image using a beam derived from the same configuration. PMID:22299990

  10. Broad interband semiconductor laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Chee Loon

    A semiconductor laser is a diode device that emits light via stimulated emission. Conventionally, light emitted from a semiconductor laser is spatially coherent or narrowband. The fundamental mechanism of stimulated emission process in general leads only to a single wavelength emission. However, there are some lasers emit light with a broad spectrum or different distinct wavelength subjected to various operating conditions such as external grating configuration with semiconductor laser, diode-pumped self-Q-switch fiber laser, ultrashort pulse excitation, photonic crystal fiber, ultrabroadband solid-state lasers, semiconductor optical amplifier-based multiwavelength tunable fiber lasers, nonlinear crystal, broadband semiconductor laser etc. This type of broadband laser is vital in many practical applications such as optical telecommunications, spectroscopy measurement, imaging technology, etc. Recently, an ultra-broadband semiconductor laser that utilizes intersubband optical transitions via quantum cascade configuration has been realized. Laser action with a Fabry-Perot spectrum covering all wavelengths from 6 to 8 microm simultaneously is demonstrated with this approach. More recently, broadband emission results from interband optical transitions via quantum-dot/dash nanostructures have been demonstrated in a simple p-i-n laser diode structure. To date, this latest approach offers the simplest design by proper engineering of quantized energy states as well as utilizing the high inhomogeneity of the dot/dash nanostructures, which is inherent from self-assembled growth technology. In this dissertation, modeling of semiconductor InGaAs/GaAs quantum-dot broadband laser utilizing the properties of inhomogeneous and homogeneous broadening effects on lasing spectral will be discussed, followed by a detail analysis of another type of broad interband semiconductor laser, which is InAs/InGaAlAs quantum-dash broadband laser. Based on the device characterization results

  11. Control system for high power laser drilling workover and completion unit

    DOEpatents

    Zediker, Mark S; Makki, Siamak; Faircloth, Brian O; DeWitt, Ronald A; Allen, Erik C; Underwood, Lance D

    2015-05-12

    A control and monitoring system controls and monitors a high power laser system for performing high power laser operations. The control and monitoring system is configured to perform high power laser operation on, and in, remote and difficult to access locations.

  12. PCF based high power narrow line width pulsed fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Yan, P.; Xiao, Q.; Wang, Y.; Gong, M.

    2012-09-01

    Based on semiconductor diode seeded multi-stage cascaded fiber amplifiers, we have obtained 88-W average power of a 1063-nm laser with high repetition rate of up to 1.5 MHz and a constant 2-ns pulse duration. No stimulated Brillouin scattering pulse or optical damage occurred although the maximum pulse peak power has exceeded 112 kW. The output laser exhibits excellent beam quality (M2x = 1.24 and M2y = 1.18), associated with a spectral line width as narrow as 0.065 nm (FWHM). Additionally, we demonstrate high polarization extinction ratio of 18.4 dB and good pulse stabilities superior to 1.6 % (RMS).

  13. High-power IR laser in SMT package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritsch, Benedikt; Behringer, Martin; Arzberger, Markus; Wiesner, Christoph; Fehse, Robin; Heerlein, Jörg; Maric, Josip; Giziewicz, Wojciech

    2009-02-01

    Laser dies in an optical power range of 1-3 Watts are widely assembled in popular TO- packages. TO-packages suffer from high thermal resistance and limited output power. Bad thermal contact between circuit boards and TO-devices can cause overheating of laser chips, significantly reducing the operating life time. We developed a compact high heat-load SMT package for an optical power up to 7 Watts in CW operation with good life time results. The new package for high power laser chips combines highly efficient heat dissipation with Surface-mount technology. A Direct-Bonded-Copper (DBC) substrate acts as a base plate for the laser chip and heat sink. The attached frame is used for electrical contacting and acts as beam reflector where the laser light is reflected at a 45° mirror. In the application the DBC base plate of the SMT-Laser is directly soldered to a Metal-Core-PCB by reflow soldering. The overall thermal resistance from laser chip to the bottom of a MC-PCB was measured as low as 2.5 K/W. The device placement process can be operated by modern high-speed mounting equipment. The direct link between device and MC-PCB allows CW laser operation up to 6-7 watts at wavelengths of 808nm to 940nm without facing any overheating symptom like thermal roll over. The device is suitable for CW and QCW operation. In pulsed operation short rise and fall times of <2ns have been demonstrated. New application fields like infrared illumination for sensing purposes in the automotive industry and 3D imaging systems could be opened by this new technology.

  14. Generation of turquoise light by sum frequency mixing of a diode-pumped solid-state laser and a laser diode in periodically poled KTP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Sandra; Spiekermann, Stefan; Wang, Shunhua; Pasiskevicius, Valdas; Laurell, Fredrik; Ekvall, Katrin

    2004-10-01

    We report a simple and efficient method to achieve visible light by sum-frequency mixing radiation from a diode-pumped solid-state laser and a laser diode in a periodically poled KTiOPO4 crystal. Since high-power laser diodes are available at a wide range of wavelengths, it is thereby possible to obtain essentially any wavelength in the visible spectrum by appropriate choice of lasers. For demonstration we choose to construct a light source in the blue-green region. A turquoise output power of 4.0 mW was achieved.

  15. Solutions for stability and astigmatism in high power laser resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narro, R.; Arronte, M.; de Posada, E.; Ponce, L.; Rodríguez, E.

    2009-09-01

    A method is proposed for the design of fundamental mode high power resonators, with joined stability zones. A parameter is created which gives the minimum length a laser resonator should have while having at the same time the broadest stabilities zones. For multimode and large mode volume resonators, a configuration is introduced for maximizing the laser overall efficiency due to the compensation of the astigmatism induced by the flash lamp pumping heating. The later configuration proposes a dual-active medium resonator, with 90 degree rotation around the optical axis between the astigmatic thermal lenses of the mediums. The reliability of this configuration is corroborated experimentally using a Nd:YAG dual-active medium resonator. It is found that in the pumping power range where the astigmatism compensation is possible, the overall efficiency is constant, even when increasing the excitation power with the consequent increase of the thermal lens dioptric power.

  16. High power narrowband 589 nm frequency doubled fibre laser source.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Luke; Feng, Yan; Calia, Domenico Bonaccini

    2009-08-17

    We demonstrate high-power high-efficiency cavity-enhanced second harmonic generation of an in-house built ultra-high spectral density (SBS-suppressed) 1178 nm narrowband Raman fibre amplifier. Up to 14.5 W 589 nm CW emission is achieved with linewidth Delta nu(589) < 7 MHz in a diffraction-limited beam, with peak external conversion efficiency of 86%. The inherently high spectral and spatial qualities of the 589 nm source are particularly suited to both spectroscopic and Laser Guide Star applications, given the seed laser can be easily frequency-locked to the Na D(2a) emission line. Further, we expect the technology to be extendable, at similar or higher powers, to wavelengths limited only by the seed-pump-pair availability. PMID:19687946

  17. High power metallic halide laser. [amplifying a copper chloride laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pivirotto, T. J. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A laser amplification system is disclosed whereby a metallic halide vapor such as copper chloride is caused to flow through a laser amplifier and a heat exchanger in a closed loop system so that the flow rate is altered to control the temperature rise across the length of the laser amplifier. The copper atoms within the laser amplifier should not exceed a temperature of 3000 K, so that the number of copper atoms in the metastable state will not be high enough to prevent amplification in the amplifier. A molecular dissociation apparatus is provided at the input to the laser amplifier for dissociating the copper chloride into copper atoms and ions and chlorine atoms and ions. The dissociation apparatus includes a hollow cathode tube and an annular ring spaced apart from the tube end. A voltage differential is applied between the annular ring and the hollow cathode tube so that as the copper chloride flows through, it is dissociated into copper and chlorine ions and atoms.

  18. Robust focusing optics for high-power laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAllister, Blake

    2014-02-01

    As available power levels from both fiber and disc lasers rapidly increase, so does the need for more robust beam delivery solutions. Traditional transmissive optics for 1 micron lasers have proven to be problematic in the presence of higher power densities and are more susceptible to focal shift. A new, fully-reflective, optical solution has been developed using mirrors rather than lenses and windows to achieve the required stable focal spot, while still protecting the delicate fiber end. This patent-approved beam focusing solution, referred to as high power reflective focusing optic (HPRFO), involves specialty mirrors and a flowing gas orifice that prevents ingress of contaminants into the optically sensitive region of the assembly. These mirrors also provide a unique solution for increasing the distance between the sensitive optics and the contamination-filled region at the work, without sacrificing spot size. Longer focal lengths and lower power densities on large mass, water-cooled, copper mirrors deliver the robustness needed at increasingly high power levels. The HPRFO exhibits excellent beam quality and minimal focal shift at a fraction of commercially available optics, and has demonstrated consistent reliability on applications requiring 15 kW with prolonged beam-on times.

  19. Recent advances in high-power tunable lasers (UV, visible, and near IR)

    SciTech Connect

    Smiley, V.N.

    1981-05-01

    A review of the current technology of high-power tunable lasers is presented with the emphasis on dye lasers. Among the topics covered are color center lasers, excimer lasers, picosecond techniques, and nonlinear coherent sources. (AIP)

  20. High-power 1550 nm tapered DBR lasers fabricated using soft UV-nano-imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viheriälä, Jukka; Aho, Antti T.; Mäkelä, Jaakko; Salmi, Joel; Virtanen, Heikki; Leinonen, Tomi; Dumitrescu, Mihail; Guina, Mircea

    2016-03-01

    Paper reports the DBR-RWG surface grating design, the fabrication process, and the output characteristics of tapered DBR laser diodes for the applications, like for example LIDAR and range finding, that require eye-safe high-power single-mode coherent light sources. The fabricated regrowth-free DBR AlGaInAs/InP lasers exhibited a CW output power as high as 560 mW in single-mode operation at room temperature. At maximum output power the SMSR was 38 dB, proving the excellent behavior of the surface gratings. The tapered section enabled scaling the maximum CW power at room temperature from 125 mW to 560 mW, by increasing its length from 0.5 mm to 4.0 mm. The paper discusses the limitations and performance variation associated to the power scaling by using the tapered section length as a scaling parameter.

  1. Self-Injection Locking Of Diode Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, H.

    1991-01-01

    Simple optical coupling scheme locks array of gain-guided diode lasers into oscillation in single mode and with single-lobed output beam. Selective feedback from thin etalon self-injection-locks array into desired mode. One application of new scheme for pumping of neodymium: yttrium aluminum garnet lasers with diode-laser arrays.

  2. High power continuous-wave titanium:sapphire laser

    DOEpatents

    Erbert, G.V.; Bass, I.L.; Hackel, R.P.; Jenkins, S.L.; Kanz, V.K.; Paisner, J.A.

    1993-09-21

    A high-power continuous-wave laser resonator is provided, wherein first, second, third, fourth, fifth and sixth mirrors form a double-Z optical cavity. A first Ti:sapphire rod is disposed between the second and third mirrors and at the mid-point of the length of the optical cavity, and a second Ti:sapphire rod is disposed between the fourth and fifth mirrors at a quarter-length point in the optical cavity. Each Ti:sapphire rod is pumped by two counter-propagating pump beams from a pair of argon-ion lasers. For narrow band operation, a 3-plate birefringent filter and an etalon are disposed in the optical cavity so that the spectral output of the laser consists of 5 adjacent cavity modes. For increased power, seventy and eighth mirrors are disposed between the first and second mirrors to form a triple-Z optical cavity. A third Ti:sapphire rod is disposed between the seventh and eighth mirrors at the other quarter-length point in the optical cavity, and is pumped by two counter-propagating pump beams from a third pair of argon-ion lasers. 5 figures.

  3. High power continuous-wave titanium:sapphire laser

    DOEpatents

    Erbert, Gaylen V.; Bass, Isaac L.; Hackel, Richard P.; Jenkins, Sherman L.; Kanz, Vernon K.; Paisner, Jeffrey A.

    1993-01-01

    A high-power continuous-wave laser resonator (10) is provided, wherein first, second, third, fourth, fifth and sixth mirrors (11-16) form a double-Z optical cavity. A first Ti:Sapphire rod (17) is disposed between the second and third mirrors (12,13) and at the mid-point of the length of the optical cavity, and a second Ti:Sapphire rod (18) is disposed between the fourth and fifth mirrors (14,15) at a quarter-length point in the optical cavity. Each Ti:Sapphire rod (17,18) is pumped by two counter-propagating pump beams from a pair of argon-ion lasers (21-22, 23-24). For narrow band operation, a 3-plate birefringent filter (36) and an etalon (37) are disposed in the optical cavity so that the spectral output of the laser consists of 5 adjacent cavity modes. For increased power, seventy and eighth mirrors (101, 192) are disposed between the first and second mirrors (11, 12) to form a triple-Z optical cavity. A third Ti:Sapphire rod (103) is disposed between the seventh and eighth mirrors (101, 102) at the other quarter-length point in the optical cavity, and is pumped by two counter-propagating pump beams from a third pair of argon-ion lasers (104, 105).

  4. High power KrF laser development at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, T.; Cartwright, D.; Fenstermacher, C.; Figueira, J.; Goldstone, P.; Harris, D.; Mead, W.; Rosocha, L.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of the high power laser development program at Los Alamos is to appraise the potential of the KrF laser as a driver for inertial confinement fusion (ICF), ultimately at energy levels that will produce high target gain (gain of order 100). A KrF laser system prototype, the 10-kJ Aurora laser, which is nearing initial system operation, will serve as a feasibility demonstration of KrF technology and system design concepts appropriate to large scale ICF driver systems. The issues of affordable cost, which is a major concern for all ICF drivers now under development, and technology scaling are also being examined. It is found that, through technology advances and component cost reductions, the potential exists for a KrF driver to achieve a cost goal in the neighborhood of $100 per joule. The authors suggest that the next step toward a multimegajoule laboratory microfusion facility (LMF) is an ''Intermediate Driver'' facility in the few hundred kilojoule to one megajoule range, which will help verify the scaling of driver technology and cost to an LMF size. An Intermediate Driver facility would also increase the confidence in the estimates of energy needed for an LMF and would reduce the risk in target performance. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Optical metrology devices for high-power laser large optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daurios, J.; Bouillet, S.; Gaborit, G.; Poncetta, J. C.

    2007-06-01

    High power laser systems such as the LMJ laser or the LIL laser, its prototype, require large optical components with very strict and various specifications. Technologies used for the fabrication of these components are now usually compatible of such specifications, but need the implementation at the providers' sites of different kind of metrology like interferometry, photometry, surface inspection, etc., systematically performed on the components. So, during the production for the LIL and now for the LMJ, CEA has also equipped itself with a wide range of specific metrology devices used to verify the effective quality of these large optics. These various systems are now used to characterize and validate the LMJ vendors' processes or to perform specific controls dedicated to analyzes which are going further than the simple "quality control" of the component (mechanical mount effect, environment effect, ageing effect,...). After a short introduction on the LMJ laser and corresponding optical specifications for components, we will focus on different metrology devices concerning interferometry and photometry measurements or surface inspection. These systems are individually illustrated here by the mean of different results obtained during controls done in the last few years.

  6. High power tandem-pumped thulium-doped fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao; Yang, Jianlong; Huang, Chongyuan; Luo, Yongfeng; Wang, Shiwei; Tang, Yulong; Xu, Jianqiu

    2015-02-01

    We propose a cascaded tandem pumping technique and show its high power and high efficient operation in the 2-μm wavelength region, opening up a new way to scale the output power of the 2-μm fiber laser to new levels (e.g. 10 kW). Using a 1942 nm Tm(3+) fiber laser as the pump source with the co- (counter-) propagating configuration, the 2020 nm Tm(3+) fiber laser generates 34.68 W (35.15W) of output power with 84.4% (86.3%) optical-to-optical efficiency and 91.7% (92.4%) slope efficiency, with respect to launched pump power. It provides the highest slope efficiency reported for 2-μm Tm(3+)-doped fiber lasers, and the highest output power for all-fiber tandem-pumped 2-μm fiber oscillators. This system fulfills the complete structure of the proposed cascaded tandem pumping technique in the 2-μm wavelength region (~1900 nm → ~1940 nm → ~2020 nm). Numerical analysis is also carried out to show the power scaling capability and efficiency of the cascaded tandem pumping technique. PMID:25836159

  7. Schlieren with a laser diode source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Franke, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The use of a laser diode as a light source for a schlieren system designed to study phase objects such as a wind-tunnel flow is explored. A laser diode schlieren photograph and a white light schlieren photograph (zirconium arc source) are presented for comparison. The laser diode has increased sensitivity, compared with light schlieren, without appreciable image degradiation, and is an acceptable source for schlieren flow visualization.

  8. Physics and applications of laser diode chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciamanna, M.; Shore, K. A.

    2015-03-01

    This Review Article provides an overview of chaos in laser diodes by surveying experimental achievements in the area and explaining the theory behind the phenomenon. The fundamental physics underpinning laser diode chaos and also the opportunities for harnessing it for potential applications are discussed. The availability and ease of operation of laser diodes, in a wide range of configurations, make them a convenient testbed for exploring basic aspects of nonlinear and chaotic dynamics. It also makes them attractive for practical tasks, such as chaos-based secure communications and random number generation. Avenues for future research and development of chaotic laser diodes are also identified.

  9. Effects of radiation on laser diodes.

    SciTech Connect

    Phifer, Carol Celeste

    2004-09-01

    The effects of ionizing and neutron radiation on the characteristics and performance of laser diodes are reviewed, and the formation mechanisms for nonradiative recombination centers, the primary type of radiation damage in laser diodes, are discussed. Additional topics include the detrimental effects of aluminum in the active (lasing) volume, the transient effects of high-dose-rate pulses of ionizing radiation, and a summary of ways to improve the radiation hardness of laser diodes. Radiation effects on laser diodes emitting in the wavelength region around 808 nm are emphasized.

  10. Grating rhomb diode laser power combiner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minott, Peter O.; Abshire, James B.

    1987-01-01

    A compact device for spectrally combining many laser-diode beams into a single multi-wavelength beam has been developed for use in NASA's intersatellite communications programs. The prototype device combines seven 30 milliwatt beams into a single beam with 70 percent efficiency producing an output of approximately 150 milliwatts. All beams are coaxial and can be collimated with a single transmitter optical system. The combining technique is relatively insensitive to drifts in the laser-diode wavelength and provides both increased power output and laser-diode source redundancy. Combination of more than 100 laser-diodes producing an output greater than 5 watts appears feasible with this technique.

  11. The NASA high power carbon dioxide laser: A versatile tool for laser applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancashire, R. B.; Alger, D. L.; Manista, E. J.; Slaby, J. G.; Dunning, J. W.; Stubbs, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    A closed-cycle, continuous wave, carbon dioxide high power laser has been designed and fabricated to support research for the identification and evaluation of possible high power laser applications. The device is designed to generate up to 70 kW of laser power in annular shape beams from 1 to 9 cm in diameter. Electric discharge, either self sustained or electron beam sustained, is used for excitation. This laser facility provides a versatile tool on which research can be performed to advance the state-of-the-art technology of high power CO2 lasers in such areas as electric excitation, laser chemistry, and quality of output beams. The facility provides a well defined, continuous wave beam for various application experiments, such as propulsion, power conversion, and materials processing.

  12. High power-efficiency terahertz quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Liu, Jun-Qi; Liu, Feng-Qi; Zhang, Jin-Chuan; Zhai, Shen-Qiang; Zhuo, Ning; Wang, Li-Jun; Liu, Shu-Man; Wang, Zhan-Guo

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate continuous-wave (CW) high power-efficiency terahertz quantum cascade laser based on semi-insulating surface-plasmon waveguide with epitaxial-side down (Epi-down) mounting process. The performance of the device is analyzed in detail. The laser emits at a frequency of ∼ 3.27 THz and has a maximum CW operating temperature of ∼ 70 K. The peak output powers are 177 mW in pulsed mode and 149 mW in CW mode at 10 K for 130-μm-wide Epi-down mounted lasers. The record wall-plug efficiencies in direct measurement are 2.26% and 2.05% in pulsed and CW mode, respectively. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2014CB339803 and 2013CB632801), the Special-funded Program on National Key Scientific Instruments and Equipment Development, China (Grant No. 2011YQ13001802-04), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61376051).

  13. Improving Lifetime of Quasi-CW Laser Diode Arrays for Pumping 2-Micron Solid State Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Baker, Nathaniel R.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Operating high power laser diode arrays in long pulse regime of about 1 msec, which is required for pumping 2-micron thulium and holmium-based lasers, greatly limits their useful lifetime. This paper describes performance of laser diode arrays operating in long pulse mode and presents experimental data on the active region temperature and pulse-to-pulse thermal cycling that are the primary cause of their premature failure and rapid degradation. This paper will then offer a viable approach for determining the optimum design and operational parameters leading to the maximum attainable lifetime.

  14. Laser diode package with enhanced cooling

    DOEpatents

    Deri, Robert J.; Kotovsky, Jack; Spadaccini, Christopher M.

    2012-06-12

    A laser diode package assembly includes a reservoir filled with a fusible metal in close proximity to a laser diode. The fusible metal absorbs heat from the laser diode and undergoes a phase change from solid to liquid during the operation of the laser. The metal absorbs heat during the phase transition. Once the laser diode is turned off, the liquid metal cools off and resolidifies. The reservoir is designed such that that the liquid metal does not leave the reservoir even when in liquid state. The laser diode assembly further includes a lid with one or more fin structures that extend into the reservoir and are in contact with the metal in the reservoir.

  15. Laser diode package with enhanced cooling

    DOEpatents

    Deri, Robert J.; Kotovsky, Jack; Spadaccini, Christopher M.

    2012-06-26

    A laser diode package assembly includes a reservoir filled with a fusible metal in close proximity to a laser diode. The fusible metal absorbs heat from the laser diode and undergoes a phase change from solid to liquid during the operation of the laser. The metal absorbs heat during the phase transition. Once the laser diode is turned off, the liquid metal cools off and resolidifies. The reservoir is designed such that that the liquid metal does not leave the reservoir even when in liquid state. The laser diode assembly further includes a lid with one or more fin structures that extend into the reservoir and are in contact with the metal in the reservoir.

  16. Laser diode package with enhanced cooling

    DOEpatents

    Deri, Robert J.; Kotovsky, Jack; Spadaccini, Christopher M.

    2011-09-13

    A laser diode package assembly includes a reservoir filled with a fusible metal in close proximity to a laser diode. The fusible metal absorbs heat from the laser diode and undergoes a phase change from solid to liquid during the operation of the laser. The metal absorbs heat during the phase transition. Once the laser diode is turned off, the liquid metal cools off and resolidifies. The reservoir is designed such that that the liquid metal does not leave the reservoir even when in liquid state. The laser diode assembly further includes a lid with one or more fin structures that extend into the reservoir and are in contact with the metal in the reservoir.

  17. Hermetic diode laser transmitter module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ollila, Jyrki; Kautio, Kari; Vahakangas, Jouko; Hannula, Tapio; Kopola, Harri K.; Oikarinen, Jorma; Sivonen, Matti

    1999-04-01

    In very demanding optoelectronic sensor applications it is necessary to encapsulate semiconductor components hermetically in metal housings to ensure reliable operation of the sensor. In this paper we report on the development work to package a laser diode transmitter module for a time- off-light distance sensor application. The module consists of a lens, laser diode, electronic circuit and optomechanics. Specifications include high acceleration, -40....+75 degree(s)C temperature range, very low gas leakage and mass-production capability. We have applied solder glasses for sealing optical lenses and electrical leads hermetically into a metal case. The lens-metal case sealing has been made by using a special soldering glass preform preserving the optical quality of the lens. The metal housings are finally sealed in an inert atmosphere by welding. The assembly concept to retain excellent optical power and tight optical axis alignment specifications is described. The reliability of the laser modules manufactured has been extensively tested using different aging and environmental test procedures. Sealed packages achieve MIL- 883 standard requirements for gas leakage.

  18. Effect of junction temperature on heat dissipation of high power light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae-Suk; Han, Bongtae

    2016-03-01

    The effect of junction temperature on heat dissipation of high power light emitting diodes (LEDs) is investigated. The theoretical aspect of junction temperature dependency of two major parameters—the forward voltage and the radiant flux—on heat dissipation is reviewed. Actual measurements of the heat dissipation over a wide range of junction temperatures are followed to quantify the effect of the parameters using commercially available LEDs. The results show that (1) the effect of the junction temperature dependency on heat dissipation is governed largely by the LED power efficiency and (2) each parameter contributes to the total heat dissipation in an opposite way so that the absolute changes of the heat dissipation are not significant over a wide range of junction temperature. An empirical model of heat dissipation is proposed for applications in practice.

  19. Development of high-efficiency and high-power vertical light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Berthold; Galler, Bastian; Engl, Karl

    2014-10-01

    We provide an overview of the vertical chip technology and discuss recent improvements that have enabled (AlGaIn)N-based light-emitting diodes to further extend the range of their applications. In particular, the excellent scalability of chip size and low electric losses make related devices predestinated for use in high-power and high-luminance tasks. The evolution from standard vertical chips to the advanced chip design is described from a conceptual as well as from a performance point of view. Excellent stability data under demanding conditions are shown, which are the basis for the operation of devices in automotive applications requiring high reliability at current densities exceeding 3 A/mm2. As the vertical chip technology is not directly dependent on the substrate owing to its removal in the chip process, it is highly flexible with respect to the change of substrate materials to the very promising (111) silicon, for example.

  20. Diode Lasers and Practical Trace Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imasaka, Totaro; Nobuhiko, Ishibashi

    1990-01-01

    Applications of lasers to molecular absorption spectrometry, molecular fluorescence spectrometry, visible semiconductor fluorometry, atomic absorption spectrometry, and atomic fluorescence spectrometry are discussed. Details of the use of the frequency-doubled diode laser are provided. (CW)

  1. Diode-pumped CW molecular lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellegehausen, B.; Luhs, W.

    2016-05-01

    First continuous laser oscillation on many lines in the range of 533-635 nm on different transitions of Na2 and Te2 molecules has been obtained, optically pumped with common cw blue emitting InGaN diode lasers operating around 445 and 460 nm. Spectral narrowing of the diode laser is achieved with a beamsplitter and grating setup, allowing use of more than 50 % of the diode power. Operation conditions and properties of the laser systems are presented, and perspectives for the realization of compact low cost molecular lasers are discussed.

  2. Underwater Chaotic Lidar using Blue Laser Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumbaugh, Luke K.

    cavity. The possibility of overcoming this limit by increasing optical feedback strength is discussed. 2. Power scaling in the blue-green spectrum using no optical frequency doubler. Synchronization of two 462 nm blue InGaN laser diodes by bi-directional optical injection is demonstrated for the first time in laboratory experiments. The improvement in chaotic intensity modulation signal strength is demonstrated to be 2.5x over the single-diode case. The signal strength is again shown to be limited by the onset of internal cavity lasing. The synchronized-laser arrangement is shown to be theoretically equivalent to a single-diode scenario in which the optical feedback is amplified by 2x, supporting the idea that increased optical feedback strength can be used to scale optical chaotic modulation of InGaN diodes to high powers. 3. Underwater impulse response measurements using a calibrated chaotic lidar system. An underwater chaotic lidar system using two synchronized diodes as transmitters is demonstrated in laboratory experiments for the first time. Reflective impulse response measurements using the lidar system are made in free space, and in a variety of clear and turbid water conditions, using a quasi-monostatic (i.e. co-located transmitter and receiver) arrangement. A calibration routine is implemented that increases accuracy and instantaneous dynamic range of the impulse response measurement, resulting in a baseline temporal resolution of 750 ps and a PSLR of over 10 dB. The calibrated system is shown to be able to simultaneously measure localized and distributed reflections, and to allow separation of the localized ( i.e. surface and target) reflections from the distributed ( i.e. backscatter) returns in several domains. Accurate range measurement with sub-inch typical error is demonstrated in laboratory water tank tests, which show accurate measurement through >6 feet of turbid water, as limited by the experimental water tank setup. Strong performance to the limit of

  3. High brightness diode-pumped organic solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhuang; Mhibik, Oussama; Nafa, Malik; Chénais, Sébastien; Forget, Sébastien

    2015-02-01

    High-power, diffraction-limited organic solid-state laser operation has been achieved in a vertical external cavity surface-emitting organic laser (VECSOL), pumped by a low-cost compact blue laser diode. The diode-pumped VECSOLs were demonstrated with various dyes in a polymer matrix, leading to laser emissions from 540 nm to 660 nm. Optimization of both the pump pulse duration and output coupling leads to a pump slope efficiency of 11% for a DCM based VECSOLs. We report output pulse energy up to 280 nJ with 100 ns long pump pulses, leading to a peak power of 3.5 W in a circularly symmetric, diffraction-limited beam.

  4. High brightness diode-pumped organic solid-state laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Zhuang; Mhibik, Oussama; Nafa, Malik; Chénais, Sébastien; Forget, Sébastien

    2015-02-02

    High-power, diffraction-limited organic solid-state laser operation has been achieved in a vertical external cavity surface-emitting organic laser (VECSOL), pumped by a low-cost compact blue laser diode. The diode-pumped VECSOLs were demonstrated with various dyes in a polymer matrix, leading to laser emissions from 540 nm to 660 nm. Optimization of both the pump pulse duration and output coupling leads to a pump slope efficiency of 11% for a DCM based VECSOLs. We report output pulse energy up to 280 nJ with 100 ns long pump pulses, leading to a peak power of 3.5 W in a circularly symmetric, diffraction-limited beam.

  5. High power amplification of a tailored-pulse fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saby, Julien; Sangla, Damien; Caplette, Stéphane; Boula-Picard, Reynald; Drolet, Mathieu; Reid, Benoit; Salin, François

    2013-02-01

    We demonstrate the amplification of a 1064nm pulse-programmable fiber laser with Large Pitch Rod-Type Fibers of various Mode field diameters from 50 to 70 μm. We have developed a high power fiber amplifier at 1064nm delivering up to 100W/1mJ at 15ns pulses and 30W/300μJ at 2ns with linearly polarized and diffraction limited output beam (M²<1.2). The specific seeder from ESI - Pyrophotonics Lasers used in the experiment allowed us to obtain tailored-pulse programmable on demand at the output from 2ns to 600ns for various repetition rates from 10 to 500 kHz. We could demonstrate square pulses or any other shapes (also multi-pulses) whatever the repetition rate or the pulse duration. We also performed frequency conversion with LBO crystals leading to 50W at 532nm and 25W at 355nm with a diffraction limited output. Similar experiments performed at 1032nm are also reported.

  6. Micro-scanning mirrors for high-power laser applications in laser surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandner, Thilo; Kimme, Simon; Grasshoff, Thomas; Todt, Ulrich; Graf, Alexander; Tulea, Cristian; Lenenbach, Achim; Schenk, Harald

    2014-03-01

    We present two novel micro scanning mirrors with large aperture and HR dielectric coatings suitable for high power laser applications in a miniaturized laser-surgical instrument for neurosurgery to cut skull tissue. An electrostatic driven 2D-raster scanning mirror with 5x7.1mm aperture is used for dynamic steering of a ps-laser beam of the laser cutting process. A second magnetic 2D-beam steering mirror enables a static beam correction of a hand guided laser instrument. Optimizations of a magnetic gimbal micro mirror with 6 mm x 8 mm mirror plate are presented; here static deflections of 3° were reached. Both MEMS devices were successfully tested with a high power ps-laser at 532nm up to 20W average laser power.

  7. Application and the key technology on high power fiber-optic laser in laser weapon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Zhou; Li, Qiushi; Meng, Haihong; Sui, Xin; Zhang, Hongtao; Zhai, Xuhua

    2014-12-01

    The soft-killing laser weapon plays an important role in photoelectric defense technology. It can be used for photoelectric detection, search, blinding of photoelectric sensor and other devices on fire control and guidance devices, therefore it draws more and more attentions by many scholars. High power fiber-optic laser has many virtues such as small volume, simple structure, nimble handling, high efficiency, qualified light beam, easy thermal management, leading to blinding. Consequently, it may be used as the key device of soft-killing laser weapon. The present study introduced the development of high power fiber-optic laser and its main features. Meanwhile the key technology of large mode area (LMA) optical fiber design, the beam combination technology, double-clad fiber technology and pumping optical coupling technology was stated. The present study is aimed to design high doping LMA fiber, ensure single mode output by increasing core diameter and decrease NA. By means of reducing the spontaneous emission particle absorbed by fiber core and Increasing the power density in the optical fiber, the threshold power of nonlinear effect can increase, and the power of single fiber will be improved. Meantime, high power will be obtained by the beam combination technology. Application prospect of high power fiber laser in photoelectric defense technology was also set forth. Lastly, the present study explored the advantages of high power fiber laser in photoelectric defense technology.

  8. REVIEW High-power semiconductor separate-confinement double heterostructure lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, I. S.

    2010-10-01

    The review is devoted to high-power semiconductor lasers. Historical reference is presented, physical and technological foundations are considered, and the concept of high-power semiconductor lasers is formulated. Fundamental and technological reasons limiting the optical power of a semiconductor laser are determined. The results of investigations of cw and pulsed high-power semiconductor lasers are presented. Main attention is paid to inspection of the results of experimental studies of single high-power semiconductor lasers. The review is mainly based on the data obtained in the laboratory of semiconductor luminescence and injection emitters at the A.F. Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute.

  9. High power visible light emitting diodes as pulsed excitation sources for biomedical photoacoustics

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Thomas J.; Beard, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    The use of visible light emitting diodes (LEDs) as an alternative to Q-switched lasers conventionally used as photoacoustic excitation sources has been explored. In common with laser diodes, LEDs offer the advantages of compact size, low cost and high efficiency. However, laser diodes suitable for pulsed photoacoustic generation are typically available only at wavelengths greater than 750nm. By contrast, LEDs are readily available at visible wavelengths below 650nm where haemoglobin absorption is significantly higher, offering the prospect of increased SNR for superficial vascular imaging applications. To demonstrate feasibility, a range of low cost commercially available LEDs operating in the 420-620nm spectral range were used to generate photoacoustic signals in physiologically realistic vascular phantoms. Overdriving with 200ns pulses and operating at a low duty cycle enabled pulse energies up to 10µJ to be obtained with a 620nm LED. By operating at a high pulse repetition frequency (PRF) in order to rapidly signal average over many acquisitions, this pulse energy was sufficient to generate detectable signals in a blood filled tube immersed in an Intralipid suspension (µs’ = 1mm−1) at a depth of 15mm using widefield illumination. In addition, a compact four-wavelength LED (460nm, 530nm, 590nm, 620nm) in conjunction with a coded excitation scheme was used to illustrate rapid multiwavelength signal acquisition for spectroscopic applications. This study demonstrates that LEDs could find application as inexpensive and compact multiwavelength photoacoustic excitation sources for imaging superficial vascular anatomy. Published by The Optical Society under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License. Further distribution of this work must maintain attribution to the author(s) and the published article’s title, journal citation, and DOI. PMID:27446652

  10. High power visible light emitting diodes as pulsed excitation sources for biomedical photoacoustics.

    PubMed

    Allen, Thomas J; Beard, Paul C

    2016-04-01

    The use of visible light emitting diodes (LEDs) as an alternative to Q-switched lasers conventionally used as photoacoustic excitation sources has been explored. In common with laser diodes, LEDs offer the advantages of compact size, low cost and high efficiency. However, laser diodes suitable for pulsed photoacoustic generation are typically available only at wavelengths greater than 750nm. By contrast, LEDs are readily available at visible wavelengths below 650nm where haemoglobin absorption is significantly higher, offering the prospect of increased SNR for superficial vascular imaging applications. To demonstrate feasibility, a range of low cost commercially available LEDs operating in the 420-620nm spectral range were used to generate photoacoustic signals in physiologically realistic vascular phantoms. Overdriving with 200ns pulses and operating at a low duty cycle enabled pulse energies up to 10µJ to be obtained with a 620nm LED. By operating at a high pulse repetition frequency (PRF) in order to rapidly signal average over many acquisitions, this pulse energy was sufficient to generate detectable signals in a blood filled tube immersed in an Intralipid suspension (µs' = 1mm(-1)) at a depth of 15mm using widefield illumination. In addition, a compact four-wavelength LED (460nm, 530nm, 590nm, 620nm) in conjunction with a coded excitation scheme was used to illustrate rapid multiwavelength signal acquisition for spectroscopic applications. This study demonstrates that LEDs could find application as inexpensive and compact multiwavelength photoacoustic excitation sources for imaging superficial vascular anatomy. Published by The Optical Society under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License. Further distribution of this work must maintain attribution to the author(s) and the published article's title, journal citation, and DOI. PMID:27446652

  11. Double clad YAG crystalline fiber waveguides for diode pumped high power lasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Xiaodong; Meissner, Stephanie; Meissner, Helmuth; Yu, Anthony W.

    2014-02-01

    Double-clade crystalline fiber waveguide (CFW) has been produced by using adhesive-free bond (AFB®) technology. The waveguide consists of a 1 at.% Yb:YAG core, un-doped YAG inner cladding and ceramic spinel outer cladding. It is a direct analog of the conventional double-clad glass fiber laser in the crystal domain. Signal gain of 45 or 16.5 dB has been measured in a preliminary master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) experiment. Due to the high laser gain and the weak Fresnel reflection at the uncoated waveguide ends, the CFW even starts self-lasing above a certain pump power. Laser output power of 4 W in the backward propagation direction has been measured for input pump power of 44 W. After considering the same amount of forward propagated laser power, the laser efficiency to the absorbed pump power is estimated to be about 44%. In principle, CFW can have extremely large single mode area for high efficiency and high power laser applications. So far, Single mode area < 6700 μm2 has been demonstrated in Er:YAG CFWs.

  12. Diode lasers: From laboratory to industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasim, Hira; Jamil, Yasir

    2014-03-01

    The invention of first laser in 1960 triggered the discovery of several new families of lasers. A rich interplay of different lasing materials resulted in a far better understanding of the phenomena particularly linked with atomic and molecular spectroscopy. Diode lasers have gone through tremendous developments on the forefront of applied physics that have shown novel ways to the researchers. Some interesting attributes of the diode lasers like cost effectiveness, miniature size, high reliability and relative simplicity of use make them good candidates for utilization in various practical applications. Diode lasers are being used by a variety of professionals and in several spectroscopic techniques covering many areas of pure and applied sciences. Diode lasers have revolutionized many fields like optical communication industry, medical science, trace gas monitoring, studies related to biology, analytical chemistry including elemental analysis, war fare studies etc. In this paper the diode laser based technologies and measurement techniques ranging from laboratory research to automated field and industry have been reviewed. The application specific developments of diode lasers and various methods of their utilization particularly during the last decade are discussed comprehensively. A detailed snapshot of the current state of the art diode laser applications is given along with a detailed discussion on the upcoming challenges.

  13. MOVPE growth of Al-free 808 nm high power lasers using TBP and TBA in pure N 2 ambient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiaohong; Zhang, Baolin; Bo, Baoxue; Mei, Ting; Chin, Mee-Koy

    2006-02-01

    In metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy (MOVPE) growth of III-V semiconductor compounds and device structures, arsine (AsH 3) and phosphine (PH 3) are normally used as group V precursors and hydrogen is used as the carrier gas, which is very toxic and has safety hazard. In this contribution, MOVPE growths of Al-free 808 nm high power diode lasers by using metalorganic (MO) group V sources, TBAs and TBP, and nitrogen as carrier gas has been reported. InGaAsP/InGaP/GaAs single quantum well (SQW) high power laser structure emitting at 808 nm has been adopted to characterize the material quality. Broad area stripe lasers with the stripe width of 150 μm have been fabricated from the wafers grown by the MOVPE using MO group V sources. Lasing of the device with threshold current density of 506 A/cm 2 has been successfully achieved.

  14. Multi-kW cw fiber oscillator pumped by wavelength stabilized fiber coupled diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Frank; Neumann, Benjamin; Winkelmann, Lutz; Belke, Steffen; Ruppik, Stefan; Hefter, Ulrich; Köhler, Bernd; Wolf, Paul; Biesenbach, Jens

    2013-02-01

    High power Yb doped fiber laser sources are beside CO2- and disk lasers one of the working horses of industrial laser applications. Due to their inherently given robustness, scalability and high efficiency, fiber laser sources are best suited to fulfill the requirements of modern industrial laser applications in terms of power and beam quality. Pumping Yb doped single-mode fiber lasers at 976nm is very efficient. Thus, high power levels can be realized avoiding limiting nonlinear effects like SRS. However the absorption band of Yb doped glass around 976nm is very narrow. Therefore, one has to consider the wavelength shift of the diode lasers used for pumping. The output spectrum of passively cooled diode lasers is mainly defined by the applied current and by the heat sink temperature. Furthermore the overall emission line width of a high power pump source is dominated by the large number of needed diode laser emitters, each producing an individual spectrum. Even though it is possible to operate multi-kW cw single-mode fiber lasers with free running diode laser pumps, wavelength stabilizing techniques for diode lasers (e.g. volume holographic gratings, VHG) can be utilized in future fiber laser sources to increase the output power level while keeping the energy consumption constant. To clarify the benefits of wavelength stabilized diode lasers with integrated VHG for wavelength locking the performance of a dual side pumped fiber oscillator is discussed in this article. For comparison, different pumping configurations consisting of stabilized and free-running diode lasers are presented.

  15. Concept and experimental implementation of a scalable high power and highly homogeneous laser line generator for industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodner, M.; Bayer, A.; Meinschien, J.

    2011-03-01

    High power diode laser line generators are nowadays industrial standard for applications like plastic processing, vision inspection and drying. With increased beam quality, especially peak intensity and homogeneity, they also enable new applications like hardening, annealing or cutting of various materials. All of these applications have in common that simultaneous processing is limited by the scalability of the generated line length without changing process relevant parameters of the line like working distance, peak intensity, homogeneity and depth of focus. Therefore, a patent pending beam shaping concept is presented that enables the interconnection of an arbitrary number of nearly free selectable laser sources to generate scalable laser lines with outstanding beam parameters. System design, experimental setup and results of a laser line generator are shown. It is based on a stitching concept consisting of ten fibre coupled high power diode lasers, which generates a 200mm long and 2mm wide laser line with a homogeneity level of 97% p-v over a depth of focus of +/- 5 mm with an overall output power of up to 4.2 kW. The concept is discussed regarding industrial applications and the options for even higher beam quality, especially the capability of generating lines with increased power densities up to several kW/cm² and a line length of several meters.

  16. Systems and assemblies for transferring high power laser energy through a rotating junction

    DOEpatents

    Norton, Ryan J.; McKay, Ryan P.; Fraze, Jason D.; Rinzler, Charles C.; Grubb, Daryl L.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Zediker, Mark S.

    2016-01-26

    There are provided high power laser devices and systems for transmitting a high power laser beam across a rotating assembly, including optical slip rings and optical rotational coupling assemblies. These devices can transmit the laser beam through the rotation zone in free space or within a fiber.

  17. High-Power Nd:GdVO4 Innoslab Continuous-Wave Laser under Direct 880 nm Pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Bo; Zhang, Heng-Li; Xu, Liu; Mao, Ye-Fei; He, Jing-Liang; Xin, Jian-Guo

    2014-11-01

    A high-power cw end-pumped laser device is demonstrated with a slab crystal of Nd:GdVO4 operating at 1063 nm. Diode laser stacks at 880 nm are used to pump Nd:GdVO4 into emitting level 4F3/2. The 149 W output power is presented when the absorbed pump power is 390 W and the optical-to-optical conversion efficiency is 38.2%. When the output power is 120 W, the M2 factors are 2.3 in both directions. Additionally, mode overlap inside the resonator is analyzed to explain the beam quality deterioration.

  18. Frequency stabilization of diode-laser-pumped solid state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of the NASA Sunlite program is to fly two diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers on the space shuttle and while doing so to perform a measurement of their frequency stability and temporal coherence. These measurements will be made by combining the outputs of the two lasers on an optical radiation detector and spectrally analyzing the beat note. Diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers have several characteristics that will make them useful in space borne experiments. First, this laser has high electrical efficiency. Second, it is of a technology that enables scaling to higher powers in the future. Third, the laser can be made extremely reliable, which is crucial for many space based applications. Fourth, they are frequency and amplitude stable and have high temporal coherence. Diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers are inherently efficient. Recent results have shown 59 percent slope efficiency for a diode-laser-pumped solid-state laser. As for reliability, the laser proposed should be capable of continuous operation. This is possible because the diode lasers can be remote from the solid state gain medium by coupling through optical fibers. Diode lasers are constructed with optical detectors for monitoring their output power built into their mounting case. A computer can actively monitor the output of each diode laser. If it sees any variation in the output power that might indicate a problem, the computer can turn off that diode laser and turn on a backup diode laser. As for stability requirements, it is now generally believed that any laser can be stabilized if the laser has a frequency actuator capable of tuning the laser frequency as far as it is likely to drift in a measurement time.

  19. Underwater Chaotic Lidar using Blue Laser Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumbaugh, Luke K.

    cavity. The possibility of overcoming this limit by increasing optical feedback strength is discussed. 2. Power scaling in the blue-green spectrum using no optical frequency doubler. Synchronization of two 462 nm blue InGaN laser diodes by bi-directional optical injection is demonstrated for the first time in laboratory experiments. The improvement in chaotic intensity modulation signal strength is demonstrated to be 2.5x over the single-diode case. The signal strength is again shown to be limited by the onset of internal cavity lasing. The synchronized-laser arrangement is shown to be theoretically equivalent to a single-diode scenario in which the optical feedback is amplified by 2x, supporting the idea that increased optical feedback strength can be used to scale optical chaotic modulation of InGaN diodes to high powers. 3. Underwater impulse response measurements using a calibrated chaotic lidar system. An underwater chaotic lidar system using two synchronized diodes as transmitters is demonstrated in laboratory experiments for the first time. Reflective impulse response measurements using the lidar system are made in free space, and in a variety of clear and turbid water conditions, using a quasi-monostatic (i.e. co-located transmitter and receiver) arrangement. A calibration routine is implemented that increases accuracy and instantaneous dynamic range of the impulse response measurement, resulting in a baseline temporal resolution of 750 ps and a PSLR of over 10 dB. The calibrated system is shown to be able to simultaneously measure localized and distributed reflections, and to allow separation of the localized ( i.e. surface and target) reflections from the distributed ( i.e. backscatter) returns in several domains. Accurate range measurement with sub-inch typical error is demonstrated in laboratory water tank tests, which show accurate measurement through >6 feet of turbid water, as limited by the experimental water tank setup. Strong performance to the limit of

  20. Diode-pumped dysprosium laser materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, S. R.; Condon, N. J.; O'Connor, S.; Rosenberg, A.

    2009-05-01

    We are investigating materials for direct blue solid-state lasers assuming UV excitation with GaN based laser diodes. Room temperature spectroscopy is reported relevant to a proposed quasi-three level laser from the 4F9/2 level in trivalent dysprosium. Modeling based on these measurements suggests this is a promising new laser transition.

  1. Simulation of power – current characteristics of high-power semiconductor lasers emitting in the range 1.5 – 1.55 μm

    SciTech Connect

    Gorlachuk, P V; Ivanov, A V; Kurnosov, V D; Kurnosov, K V; Romantsevich, V I; Simakov, V A; Chernov, R V

    2014-02-28

    We report the simulation of power – current characteristics of high-power semiconductor lasers emitting in the range 1.5 – 1.55 μm. A technique is described which allows one to determine the thermal resistance and characteristic temperatures of a laser diode. The radiative and nonradiative carrier recombination rates are evaluated. Simulation results are shown to agree well with experimental data. (lasers)

  2. Method and apparatus for delivering high power laser energy over long distances

    SciTech Connect

    Zediker, Mark S; Rinzler, Charles C; Faircloth, Brian O; Koblick, Yeshaya; Moxley, Joel F

    2015-04-07

    Systems, devices and methods for the transmission and delivery of high power laser energy deep into the earth and for the suppression of associated nonlinear phenomena. Systems, devices and methods for the laser drilling of a borehole in the earth. These systems can deliver high power laser energy down a deep borehole, while maintaining the high power to advance such boreholes deep into the earth and at highly efficient advancement rates.

  3. High efficiency high power blue laser by resonant doubling in PPKTP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danekar, Koustubh

    I developed a high power blue laser for use in scientific and technical applications (e.g., precision spectroscopy, semiconductor inspection, flow cytometry, etc.). It is linearly polarized, single longitudinal and single transverse mode, and a convenient fiber coupled continuous wave (cw) laser source. My technique employs external cavity frequency doubling and provides better power and beam quality than commercially available blue diode lasers. I use a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) stabilized infrared (IR) semiconductor laser source with a polarization maintaining (PM) fiber coupled output. Using a custom made optical and mechanical design this output is coupled with a mode matching efficiency of 96% into the doubling cavity. With this carefully designed and optimized cavity, measurements were carried out at various fundamental input powers. A net efficiency of 81% with an output power of 680 mW at 486 nm was obtained using 840 mW of IR input. Also I report an 87.5% net efficiency in coupling of blue light from servo locked cavity into a single mode PM fiber. Thus I have demonstrated a total fiber to fiber efficiency of 71% can be achieved in our approach using periodically poled potassium titanyl phosphate (PPKTP). To obtain these results, all losses in the system were carefully studied and minimized.

  4. Diode-pumped laser altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welford, D.; Isyanova, Y.

    1993-01-01

    TEM(sub 00)-mode output energies up to 22.5 mJ with 23 percent slope efficiencies were generated at 1.064 microns in a diode-laser pumped Nd:YAG laser using a transverse-pumping geometry. 1.32-micron performance was equally impressive at 10.2 mJ output energy with 15 percent slope efficiency. The same pumping geometry was successfully carried forward to several complex Q-switched laser resonator designs with no noticeable degradation of beam quality. Output beam profiles were consistently shown to have greater than 90 percent correlation with the ideal TEM(sub 00)-order Gaussian profile. A comparison study on pulse-reflection-mode (PRM), pulse-transmission-mode (PTM), and passive Q-switching techniques was undertaken. The PRM Q-switched laser generated 8.3 mJ pulses with durations as short as 10 ns. The PTM Q-switch laser generated 5 mJ pulses with durations as short as 5 ns. The passively Q-switched laser generated 5 mJ pulses with durations as short as 2.4 ns. Frequency doubling of both 1.064 microns and 1.32 microns with conversion efficiencies of 56 percent in lithium triborate and 10 percent in rubidium titanyl arsenate, respectively, was shown. Sum-frequency generation of the 1.064 microns and 1.32 microns radiations was demonstrated in KTP to generate 1.1 mJ of 0.589 micron output with 11.5 percent conversion efficiency.

  5. Small core fiber coupled 60-W laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernie, Douglas P.; Mannonen, Ilkka; Raven, Anthony L.

    1995-05-01

    Semiconductor laser diodes are compact, efficient and reliable sources of laser light and 25 W fiber coupled systems developed by Diomed have been in clinical use for over three years. For certain applications, particularly in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia and flexible endoscopy, higher powers are desirable. In these applications the use of flexible optical fibers of no more than 600 micrometers core diameter is essential for compatibility with most commercial delivery fibers and instrumentation. A high power 60 W diode laser system for driving these small core fibers has been developed. The design requirements for medical applications are analyzed and system performance and results of use in gastroenterology and urology with small core fibers will be presented.

  6. High duty cycle hard soldered kilowatt laser diode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klumel, Genady; Karni, Yoram; Oppenheim, Jacob; Berk, Yuri; Shamay, Moshe; Tessler, Renana; Cohen, Shalom

    2010-02-01

    High-brightness laser diode arrays operating at a duty cycle of 10% - 20% are in ever-increasing demand for the optical pumping of solid state lasers and directed energy applications. Under high duty-cycle operation at 10% - 20%, passive (conductive) cooling is of limited use, while micro-coolers using de-ionized cooling water can considerably degrade device reliability. When designing and developing actively-cooled collimated laser diode arrays for high duty cycle operation, three main problems should be carefully addressed: an effective local and total heat removal, a minimization of packaging-induced and operational stresses, and high-precision fast axis collimation. In this paper, we present a novel laser diode array incorporating a built-in tap water cooling system, all-hard-solder bonded assembly, facet-passivated high-power 940 nm laser bars and tight fast axis collimation. By employing an appropriate layout of water cooling channels, careful choice of packaging materials, proper design of critical parts, and active optics alignment, we have demonstrated actively-cooled collimated laser diode arrays with extended lifetime and reliability, without compromising their efficiency, optical power density, brightness or compactness. Among the key performance benchmarks achieved are: 150 W/bar optical peak power at 10% duty cycle, >50% wallplug efficiency and <1° collimated fast axis divergence. A lifetime of >0.5 Ghots with <2% degradation has been experimentally proven. The laser diode arrays have also been successfully tested under harsh environmental conditions, including thermal cycling between -20°C and 40°C and mechanical shocks at 500g acceleration. The results of both performance and reliability testing bear out the effectiveness and robustness of the manufacturing technology for high duty-cycle laser arrays.

  7. Laterally injected light-emitting diode and laser diode

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Mary A.; Crawford, Mary H.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2015-06-16

    A p-type superlattice is used to laterally inject holes into an III-nitride multiple quantum well active layer, enabling efficient light extraction from the active area. Laterally-injected light-emitting diodes and laser diodes can enable brighter, more efficient devices that impact a wide range of wavelengths and applications. For UV wavelengths, applications include fluorescence-based biological sensing, epoxy curing, and water purification. For visible devices, applications include solid state lighting and projection systems.

  8. High-Power Solid-State Lasers from a Laser Glass Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J H; Hayden, J S; Marker, A J

    2010-12-17

    Advances in laser glass compositions and manufacturing have enabled a new class of high-energy/high-power (HEHP), petawatt (PW) and high-average-power (HAP) laser systems that are being used for fusion energy ignition demonstration, fundamental physics research and materials processing, respectively. The requirements for these three laser systems are different necessitating different glasses or groups of glasses. The manufacturing technology is now mature for melting, annealing, fabricating and finishing of laser glasses for all three applications. The laser glass properties of major importance for HEHP, PW and HAP applications are briefly reviewed and the compositions and properties of the most widely used commercial laser glasses summarized. Proposed advances in these three laser systems will require new glasses and new melting methods which are briefly discussed. The challenges presented by these laser systems will likely dominate the field of laser glass development over the next several decades.

  9. 980nm diode laser pump modules operating at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Jenna; Semenic, Tadej; Leisher, Paul; Bhunia, Avijit; Mashanovitch, Milan; Renner, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Existing thermal management technologies for diode laser pumps place a significant load on the size, weight and power consumption of High Power Solid State and Fiber Laser systems, thus making current laser systems very large, heavy, and inefficient in many important practical applications. This problem is being addressed by the team formed by Freedom Photonics and Teledyne Scientific through the development of novel high power laser chip array architectures that can operate with high efficiency when cooled with coolants at temperatures higher than 50 degrees Celsius and also the development of an advanced thermal management system for efficient heat extraction from the laser chip array. This paper will present experimental results for the optical, electrical and thermal characteristics of 980 nm diode laser pump modules operating effectively with liquid coolant at temperatures above 50 degrees Celsius, showing a very small change in performance as the operating temperature increases from 20 to 50 degrees Celsius. These pump modules can achieve output power of many Watts per array lasing element with an operating Wall-Plug-Efficiency (WPE) of >55% at elevated coolant temperatures. The paper will also discuss the technical approach that has enabled this high level of pump module performance and opportunities for further improvement.

  10. Very high brightness diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, Stefan; Lewis, Ben; Michaelis, Karsten; Schmidt, Torsten

    2012-03-01

    Multiple Single Emitter (MSE) modules allow highest power and highest brightness diode lasers based on standard broad area diodes. 12 single emitters, each rated at 11 W, are stacked in fast axis and with polarization multiplexing 200W are achieved in a fully collimated beam with a beam quality of 7mm*mrad in both axes. Volume Bragg Gratings (VBG) stabilize the wavelength and narrow the linewidth to less than 2nm. Dichroic mirrors are used for dense wavelength multiplexing of 4 channels within 12 nm. 400W are measured from a 0.2 mm fiber, 0.1 NA. Control and drive electronics are integrated into the 200 W platform and represent a basic building block for a variety of applications, such as a flexible turn key system comprising 12 MSE modules. An integrated beam switch directs the light in six 100 μm, or in one 0.2 mm and one 0.1 mm fiber. 800W are measured from the six 0.1 mm fibers and 700W from the 0.2 mm fiber. The technologies can be transferred to other wavelengths to include 793 nm and 1530 nm. Narrow line gratings and optimized spectral combining enable further improvements in spectral brightness and power.

  11. Percutaneous diode laser disc nucleoplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menchetti, P. P.; Longo, Leonardo

    2004-09-01

    The treatment of herniated disc disease (HNP) over the years involved different miniinvasive surgical options. The classical microsurgical approach has been substituted over the years both by endoscopic approach in which is possible to practice via endoscopy a laser thermo-discoplasty, both by percutaneous laser disc nucleoplasty. In the last ten years, the percutaneous laser disc nucleoplasty have been done worldwide in more than 40000 cases of HNP. Because water is the major component of the intervertebral disc, and in HNP pain is caused by the disc protrusion pressing against the nerve root, a 980 nm Diode laser introduced via a 22G needle under X-ray guidance and local anesthesia, vaporizes a small amount of nucleous polposus with a disc shrinkage and a relief of pressure on nerve root. Most patients get off the table pain free and are back to work in 5 to 7 days. Material and method: to date, 130 patients (155 cases) suffering for relevant symptoms therapy-resistant 6 months on average before consulting our department, have been treated. Eightyfour (72%) males and 46 (28%) females had a percutaneous laser disc nucleoplasty. The average age of patients operated was 48 years (22 - 69). The level of disc removal was L3/L4 in 12 cases, L4/L5 in 87 cases and L5/S1 in 56 cases. Two different levels were treated at the same time in 25 patients. Results: the success rate at a minimum follow-up of 6 months was 88% with a complication rate of 0.5%.

  12. High power, short pulses ultraviolet laser for the development of a new x-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    Meixler, L.; Nam, C.H.; Robinson, J.; Tighe, W.; Krushelnick, K.; Suckewer, S.; Goldhar, J.; Seely, J.; Feldman, U.

    1989-04-01

    A high power, short pulse ultraviolet laser system (Powerful Picosecond-Laser) has been developed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) as part of experiments designed to generate shorter wavelength x-ray lasers. With the addition of pulse compression and a final KrF amplifier the laser output is expected to have reached 1/3-1/2 TW (10/sup 12/ watts) levels. The laser system, particularly the final amplifier, is described along with some initial soft x-ray spectra from laser-target experiments. The front end of the PP-Laser provides an output of 20--30 GW (10/sup 9/ watts) and can be focussed to intensities of /approximately/10/sup 16/ W/cm/sup 2/. Experiments using this output to examine the effects of a prepulse on laser-target interaction are described. 19 refs., 14 figs.

  13. A NASA high-power space-based laser research and applications program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, R. J.; Walberg, G. D.; Conway, E. J.; Jones, L. W.

    1983-01-01

    Applications of high power lasers are discussed which might fulfill the needs of NASA missions, and the technology characteristics of laser research programs are outlined. The status of the NASA programs or lasers, laser receivers, and laser propulsion is discussed, and recommendations are presented for a proposed expanded NASA program in these areas. Program elements that are critical are discussed in detail.

  14. The NASA high-power carbon dioxide laser - A versatile tool for laser applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancashire, R. B.; Alger, D. L.; Manista, E. J.; Slaby, J. G.; Dunning, J. W.; Stubbs, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has designed and fabricated a closed-cycle, continuous wave (CW), carbon dioxide (CO2) high-power laser to support research for the identification and evaluation of possible high-power laser applications. The device is designed to generate up to 70 kW of laser power in annular-shape beams from 1 to 9 cm in diameter. Electric discharge, either self-sustained or electron-beam-sustained, is used for excitation. This laser facility can be used in two ways. First, it provides a versatile tool on which research can be performed to advance the state-of-the-art technology of high-power CO2 lasers in such areas as electric excitation, laser chemistry, and quality of output beams, all of which are important whether the laser application is government or industry oriented. Second, the facility provides a well-defined, continuous wave beam for various application experiments, such as propulsion, power conversion, and materials processing.

  15. A Diode Laser System for Synchronous Photoinjection

    SciTech Connect

    Poelker, M., Hansknecht, J.

    1997-12-31

    A laser system, which is composed of a gain switched diode seed laser and a single-pass diode optical amplifier, is used to drive the polarized electron source at Jefferson Lab. The system emits pulsed laser light synchronized to the accelerating cavity radio frequency (rf) at 1497 MHz or the third subharmonic, 499 MHz. The maximum average output power from the laser system is 500 mW and the optical pulse width is 60 to 80 ps. The laser system is compact and very reliable operating remotely for many days without attention.

  16. High-power, picosecond pulse thin-disk lasers in the Hilase project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyla, Michal; Miura, Taisuke; Smrz, Martin; Severova, Patricie; Novak, Ondrej; Nagisetty, Siva S.; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomas

    2013-05-01

    Development of high-power, picosecond laser sources is a desirable venture for both industry and research. Within the Hilase project, we are conducting research on both 500-mJ, 1-kHz and 5-mJ, 100-kHz picosecond laser sources based on the Yb:YAG thin-disk technology. We have developed a prototype thin-disk regenerative amplifier operating up to 10- kHz repetition rate pumped by the 940-nm fiber-coupled laser diodes. We achieved 5-mJ pulse energy at 10-kHz operation and 29.5-mJ at 1-kHz. Afterwards, we developed the high-energy regenerative amplifier operating at fixed repetition rate of 1-kHz and the pulse energy was achieved up to 40-mJ. Simultaneously, we elaborated the highrepetition rate regenerative amplifier operating at 100-kHz with pulse energy of 220-μJ. The amplified pulse was compressed with the efficiency of 88% using chirped volume Bragg grating.

  17. Thermal effects on spectral modulation properties of high-power light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitonis, Zenonas; Vitta, Pranciskus; Jakstas, Vytautas; Zukauskas, Arturas

    2011-10-01

    We report on the effect of transient selfheating on the spectral modulation of electroluminescence (EL) in high-power light-emitting diodes (LEDs). In AlGaInP LEDs, which emit due to the band-to-band recombination of free carriers, the oscillation of junction temperature was found to result in that the modulation depth has a drop around the peak photon energy, an increased magnitude at lower energies, and a linear increase with photon energy at higher energies. These properties of the EL modulation spectrum can be explained by a model that takes into account the thermal modulation of band gap energy and carrier distribution function. In InGaN LEDs, almost no thermal effect on EL modulation was found around the peak photon energy and at lower energies, whereas at higher energies, the modulation depth also increases with photon energy. Such a spectrum of EL modulation depth can be understood in terms of localized carrier effect at peak photon energy and lower energies and of free carrier heating at higher energies. The frequency dependence of modulation depth at particular photon energies was shown to sensitively replicate the thermal response function of the LEDs.

  18. Status and Future of High-Power Light-Emitting Diodes for Solid-State Lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krames, Michael R.; Shchekin, Oleg B.; Mueller-Mach, Regina; Mueller, Gerd O.; Zhou, Ling; Harbers, Gerard; Craford, M. George

    2007-06-01

    Status and future outlook of III-V compound semiconductor visible-spectrum light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are presented. Light extraction techniques are reviewed and extraction efficiencies are quantified in the 60%+ (AlGaInP) and ~80% (InGaN) regimes for state-of-the-art devices. The phosphor-based white LED concept is reviewed and recent performance discussed, showing that high-power white LEDs now approach the 100-lm/W regime. Devices employing multiple phosphors for “warm” white color temperatures (~3000 4000 K) and high color rendering (CRI > 80), which provide properties critical for many illumination applications, are discussed. Recent developments in chip design, packaging, and high current performance lead to very high luminance devices (~50 Mcd/m2 white at 1 A forward current in 1 x 1 mm2 chip) that are suitable for application to automotive forward lighting. A prognosis for future LED performance levels is considered given further improvements in internal quantum efficiency, which to date lag achievements in light extraction efficiency for InGaN LEDs.

  19. Thin planar package for cooling an array of edge-emitting laser diodes

    DOEpatents

    Mundinger, David C.; Benett, William J.

    1992-01-01

    A laser diode array is disclosed that includes a plurality of planar assemblies and active cooling of each assembly. The laser diode array may be operated in a long duty cycle, or in continuous operation. A laser diode bar and a microchannel heat sink are thermally coupled in a compact, thin planar assembly having the laser diode bar located proximate to one edge. In an array, a number of such thin planar assemblies are secured together in a stacked configuration, in close proximity so that the laser diodes are spaced closely. The cooling means includes a microchannel heat sink proximate to the laser diode bar to absorb heat generated by laser operation. To provide the coolant to the microchannels, each thin planar assembly comprises passageways that connect the microchannels to inlet and outlet corridors. Each inlet passageway may comprise a narrow slot that directs coolant into the microchannels and increases the velocity of flow therethrough. The corridors comprises holes extending through each of the assemblies in the array. The inlet and outlet corridors are connected to a conventional coolant circulation system. The laser diode array with active cooling has applications as an optical pump for high power solid state lasers, or by mating the diodes with fiber optic lenses. Further, the arrays can be useful in applications having space constraints and energy limitations, and in military and space applications. The arrays can be incorporated in equipment such as communications devices and active sensors.

  20. Arbitrary waveform generator to improve laser diode driver performance

    SciTech Connect

    Fulkerson, Jr, Edward Steven

    2015-11-03

    An arbitrary waveform generator modifies the input signal to a laser diode driver circuit in order to reduce the overshoot/undershoot and provide a "flat-top" signal to the laser diode driver circuit. The input signal is modified based on the original received signal and the feedback from the laser diode by measuring the actual current flowing in the laser diode after the original signal is applied to the laser diode.

  1. Packaging of hard solder 500W QCW diode laser array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoning; Wang, Jingwei; Hou, Dong; Nie, Zhiqiang; Liu, Xingsheng

    2016-03-01

    The package structure critically influences the major characteristics of diode laser, such as thermal behavior, output power, wavelength and smile effect. In this work, a novel micro channel cooler (MCC) for stack array laser with good heat dissipation capability and high reliability is presented. Numerical simulations of thermal management with different MCC structure are conducted and analyzed. Based on this new MCC packaging structure, a series of QCW 500W high power laser arrays with hard solder packaging technology has been fabricated. The performances of the laser arrays are characterized. A narrow spectrum of 3.12 nm and an excellent smile value are obtained. The lifetime of the laser array is more than 1.38×109 shots and still ongoing.

  2. LD pumped high-repetition-rate high-power 532nm Nd:YAG/LBO solid state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pingxue; Liu, Dongyu; Chi, Junjie; Yang, Chun; Zhao, Ziqiang; Hu, Haowei; Zhang, Guangju; Yao, Yifei

    2013-09-01

    Diode pumped solid state 532 nm green laser is widely required for many industrial, medical and scientific applications. Among most of these applications, high power quasi-continuous-wave (QCW) green laser output is demanded. This can be efficiently achieved through a diode-side-pumped acoustic-optic Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with an intracavity second harmonic generation (SHG). In our experiment, LBO crystal is used for the second harmonic generation of high-average-power lasers of near infrared (NIR) range, though its effective NLO coefficient deff is relatively small. It is because of its high damage threshold (greater than 2.5 GW/cm2), large acceptance angle, small walk-off angle, and the nonhygroscopic characteristic. In this paper, we reported a high-repetition-rate high-power diode-side-pumped AO Q-switched Nd:YAG 532 nm laser. A plane-plane cavity with two rods, two AO Q-switches and the type II critical phase-matched LBO at room temperature were employed. Under the LD pump power of 480 W, 95.86 W at 1064 nm wavelength was achieved when the repetition rate was 15 kHz, and the 532 nm average output power of 44.77 W was obtained, with a pulse width of 111.7 ns, corresponding to an optical to optical conversion efficiency of 46.7% from 1064 nm to 532 nm. The 532 nm average output power was 40.10 W at a repetition rate of 10 kHz with a pulse width of 78.65 ns. The output characteristics of the SHG varying with the pumping current and the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of the laser were also investigated. Further improvement of the SHG is under study.

  3. Goals and status of the German National Research Initiative BRIOLAS (brilliant diode lasers)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Friedrich

    2007-02-01

    High power diode lasers play an important role in laser and systems technology. Over the past years the necessity arose to improve power and beam quality (i.e. brilliance) of the high power diode lasers. This is not only for building pump sources but also to provide appropriate light sources for various direct applications of high power diode lasers. The funding initiative "BRIOLAS" launched by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) is the answer to this demand. In ten projects diode technology, manufacturing technology, quality, pump applications, materials processing applications, medical systems and applications and also applications in the display technology are intensively investigated; the results shall be basis for new applications, for new products and for new ideas in the field of high power diode laser technology. The individual projects are vertically structured and in each project the entire technology chain necessary for the final success is represented by the participants. The first project has been launched end of 2004 in frame BMBF's funding program "Optical Technologies", the last one was started just recently. The BMBF is supporting the BRIOLAS-initiative with about 30 M€. This article provides a general overview over the target and the actual status of the initiative.

  4. Solid-state laser-pumped high-power electric-discharge HF laser

    SciTech Connect

    Velikanov, S D; Garanin, Sergey G; Kodola, B E; Komarov, Yu N; Shchurov, V V; Efanov, V M; Efanov, M V; Yarin, P M; Kazantsev, S Yu; Kononov, I G; Firsov, K N; Domazhirov, A P; Podlesnykh, S V; Sivachev, A A

    2010-08-03

    We report the possibility of creating high-power nonchain electric-discharge HF lasers with an all-solid-state pump source. The maximum energy stored in the pump source capacitors based on solid-state FID-switches is 990 J for the open-circuit voltage of 240 kV. The pulse energy of 30 J is obtained in the hydrogen-containing SF{sub 6} mixture at the electric efficiency of the order of 3%. (lasers)

  5. Analysis of phased-array diode lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, A.; Streifer, W.

    1985-07-01

    An improved, more accurate analysis of phased-array diode lasers is presented, which yields results that differ both qualitatively and quantitatively from those previously employed. A numerical example indicating decreased splitting in array mode gains is included.

  6. Blood sugar monitoring with laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiqin; Chen, Jianhong; Yeo, Joon Hock

    2006-09-01

    In this paper, the non-invasive measurement of blood sugar level was studied by use of near infrared laser diode. The in-vivo experiments were carried out using laser diodes with wavelength 1625nm and 1650nm. Several volunteers were tested before and after drinking glucose solution. We took blood from a fingertip and measured its concentration with a glucose meter while taking signal voltage from laser diode system. The signal voltage was processed by using a computer and blood absorption was obtained. The results show that blood sugar level and blood absorption have similar trends before and after drinking glucose solution. We also compared the trends of drinking glucose solution and pure water and the results show that the difference of blood absorption is obvious. From the results we can see that laser diode is suitable for blood glucose monitoring.

  7. Diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser for precision laser machining

    SciTech Connect

    Machan, J.; Valley, M.; Holleman, G.; Mitchell, M.; Burchman, D.; Zamel, J.; Harpole, G.; Injeyan, H.; Marabella, L.

    1996-10-01

    Results are presented on a high power, diode-pumped, pulsed Nd:YAG laser for precision laser machining. The laser is an unstable resonator with a graded reflectivity outcouplers, generating a beam with excellent beam quality. The gain medium is a single zig-zag slab, pumped symmetrically by diode arrays. The use of diode arrays minimizes the thermal loading on the slab, and the zig-zag path averages thermal distortions in the zig-zag dimension. Measurements of beam divergence as a function of diode duty-cycle will be presented. Available pulse formats will also be discussed. To date, the laser has produced 720 W at 20% diode duty-cycle with a stable cavity and 550 W at 20% duty cycle with an unstable cavity in close agreement with model predictions. The beam divergence has been measured to be 1.7 times diffraction-limited at 20% duty cycle. The laser has been operated with pulse lengths from 20 {micro}s to 1 ms and is being used to obtain laser processing data, with some results shown.

  8. Physics of laser fusion. Volume III. High-power pulsed lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Holzrichter, J.F.; Eimerl, D.; George, E.V.; Trenholme, J.B.; Simmons, W.W.; Hunt, J.T.

    1982-09-01

    High-power pulsed lasers can deliver sufficient energy on inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) time scales (0.1 to 10 ns) to heat and compress deuterium-tritium fuel to fusion-reaction conditions. Several laser systems have been examined, including Nd:glass, CO/sub 2/, KrF, and I/sub 2/, for their ICF applicability. A great deal of developmental effort has been applied to the Nd:glass laser and the CO/sub 2/ gas laser systems; these systems now deliver > 10/sup 4/ J and 20 x 10/sup 12/ W to ICF targets. We are constructing the Nova Nd:glass laser at LLNL to provide > 100 kJ and > 100 x 10/sup 12/ W of 1-..mu..m radiation for fusion experimentation in the mid-1980s. For ICF target gain > 100 times the laser input, we expect that the laser driver must deliver approx. 3 to 5 MJ of energy on a time scale of 10 to 20 ns. In this paper we review the technological status of fusion-laser systems and outline approaches to constructing high-power pulsed laser drivers.

  9. Development of high coherence high power 193nm laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Arakawa, Masaki; Fuchimukai, Atsushi; Sasaki, Yoichi; Onose, Takashi; Kamba, Yasuhiro; Igarashi, Hironori; Qu, Chen; Tamiya, Mitsuru; Oizumi, Hiroaki; Ito, Shinji; Kakizaki, Koji; Xuan, Hongwen; Zhao, Zhigang; Kobayashi, Yohei; Mizoguchi, Hakaru

    2016-03-01

    We have been developing a hybrid 193 nm ArF laser system that consists of a solid state seeding laser and an ArF excimer laser amplifier for power-boosting. The solid state laser consists of an Yb-fiber-solid hybrid laser system and an Er-fiber laser system as fundamentals, and one LBO and three CLBO crystals for frequency conversion. In an ArF power amplifier, the seed laser passes through the ArF gain media three times, and an average power of 110 W is obtained. As a demonstration of the potential applications of the laser, an interference exposure test is performed.

  10. Laser diode arrays for naval reconnaissance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, John H., Jr.; Crosby, Frank J.; Petee, Danny A.; Suiter, Harold R.; Witherspoon, Ned H.

    2003-09-01

    The Airborne Littoral Reconnaissance Technologies (ALRT) Project has demonstrated a nighttime operational minefield detection capability using commercial off-the-shelf high-power Laser Diode Arrays (LDAs). Historically, optical aerial detection of minefields has primarily been limited to daytime operations but LDAs promise compact and efficient lighting to allow for enhanced reconnaissance operations for future mine detection systems. When combined with high-resolution intensified imaging systems, LDAs can illuminate otherwise unseen areas. Future wavelength options will open the way for active multispectral imaging with LDAs. The Coastal Systems Station working for the Office of Naval Research on the ALRT project has designed, developed, integrated, and tested both prototype and commercial arrays from a Cessna airborne platform. Detailed test results show the ability to detect several targets of interest in a variety of background conditions. Initial testing of the prototype arrays, reported on last year, was completed and further investigations of the commercial versions were performed. Polarization-state detection studies were performed, and advantageous properties of the source-target-sensor geometry noted. Current project plans are to expand the field-of-view coverage for Naval exercises in the summer of 2003. This paper describes the test collection, data library products, array information, on-going test analysis results, and future planned testing of the LDAs.

  11. High power continuous wave injection-locked solid state laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nabors, C.D.; Byer, R.L.

    1991-06-25

    This patent describes an injection locked laser system. It comprises a master laser, the master laser including a solid state gain medium and having a continuous wave, single frequency output; a slave laser including a solid state gain medium located in a resonant cavity and having a continuous wave output at a power at least ten times greater than the master laser, with the output of the master laser being injected into the slave laser in order to cause the slave laser to oscillate at the same frequency as the output of the master laser; and means for actively stabilizing the slave laser so that its output frequency remains locked with the output frequency of the master laser.

  12. Efficient high-brightness diode laser modules offer new industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revermann, Markus; Timmermann, Andre; Meinschien, Jens; Bruns, Peter

    2007-02-01

    We present new developed high power diode laser modules which are performing at outstanding brightness and their applications. The combination of recently designed laser diode bars on passive heat sinks and optimized micro-optics results to laser modules up to 50W out of a 100μm fibre with a 0.22 NA at one single wavelength based on broad area laser bars (BALB) and up to 50W out of 50μm fibre with a 0.22 NA based on single-mode emitter array laser (SEAL) bars. The fibre coupled systems are based on diode lasers with a collimated beam of superior beam data, namely < 10 mm x 10 mm beam diameter (FW1/e2) and < 2mrad x 2mrad divergence (FW1/e2). Such free beam diode lasers deliver 30 W or 60 W output power. The applications for such laser diode modules varies from direct marking, cutting and welding of metals and other materials up to pumping of fibre lasers and amplifiers. Marking speed with up to 30mm/s on stainless steel was observed with 20W laser power and 50μm fibre with a conventional marking setup. Cutting speed of about 1m/min of 0.2mm Kovar sheet was shown with a diode laser module with 50W laser power from a 100μm fibre.

  13. Narrowband alexandrite laser injection seeded with frequency dithered diode laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary; Lee, H. S.; Prasad, Coorg

    1991-01-01

    Narrowband radiation is produced from a pulsed alexandrite laser when injection seeded with the output of a low power, tunable, continuous wave single mode diode laser. Injection seeded power oscillators are easier to frequency stabilize than etalon narrowed lasers, are more efficient and less prone to optical damage. AlGaAs diode lasers are available with wavelengths from 760 to 770 nm in the oxygen A band that can be used for differential absorption lidar remote sensing of atmospheric pressure and temperature. Diodes with room temperature output at 740 nm may be cooled sufficiently to emit in the water vapor absorption band at 720-730 nm for humidity remote sensing. The diode laser linewidth of 200 MHz is sufficient to seed 2 or 3 longitudinal modes of the multi-transverse mode alexandrite laser, giving the pulsed laser a bandwidth of 0.007 to 0.014/cm.

  14. Macular injury resulting from a high-powered tank laser telemetry device.

    PubMed

    Durukan, Ali Hakan; Gokce, G; Guven, S; Koylu, T; Erdurman, F C

    2015-12-01

    A high-powered laser is an essential part of a modern military rangefinder; however, this paper presents three cases with macular injury resulting from a high-powered tank laser telemetry device. All injuries occurred when another user deliberately pointed the telemetry target unit at the patient's eyes. The devastating effect of this high-powered laser resulted in a permanent foveal scar in the second patient and a macular hole formation in the third patient. This report emphasises that education plays a primary role in preventing accidental laser injuries. Using general guidelines and safety regulations will prevent accidental macular injuries. PMID:25525204

  15. Research of high power and stable laser in portable Raman spectrometer based on SHINERS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yongsheng; Yin, Yu; Wu, Yulin; Ni, Xuxiang; Zhang, Xiuda; Yan, Huimin

    2013-08-01

    The intensity of Raman light is very weak, which is only from 10-12 to 10-6 of the incident light. In order to obtain the required sensitivity, the traditional Raman spectrometer tends to be heavy weight and large volume, so it is often used as indoor test device. Based on the Shell-Isolated Nanoparticle-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SHINERS) method, Raman optical spectrum signal can be enhanced significantly and the portable Raman spectrometer combined with SHINERS method will be widely used in various fields. The laser source must be stable enough and able to output monochromatic narrow band laser with stable power in the portable Raman spectrometer based on the SHINERS method. When the laser is working, the change of temperature can induce wavelength drift, thus the power stability of excitation light will be affected, so we need to strictly control the working temperature of the laser, In order to ensure the stability of laser power and output current, this paper adopts the WLD3343 laser constant current driver chip of Wavelength Electronics company and MCU P89LPC935 to drive LML - 785.0 BF - XX laser diode(LD). Using this scheme, the Raman spectrometer can be small in size and the drive current can be constant. At the same time, we can achieve functions such as slow start, over-current protection, over-voltage protection, etc. Continuous adjustable output can be realized under control, and the requirement of high power output can be satisfied. Max1968 chip is adopted to realize the accurate control of the laser's temperature. In this way, it can meet the demand of miniaturization. In term of temperature control, integral truncation effect of traditional PID algorithm is big, which is easy to cause static difference. Each output of incremental PID algorithm has nothing to do with the current position, and we can control the output coefficients to avoid full dose output and immoderate adjustment, then the speed of balance will be improved observably. Variable

  16. On-shot laser beam diagnostics for high-power laser facility with phase modulation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, X.; Veetil, S. P.; Liu, C.; Tao, H.; Jiang, Y.; Lin, Q.; Li, X.; Zhu, J.

    2016-05-01

    A coherent-modulation-imaging-based (CMI) algorithm has been employed for on-shot laser beam diagnostics in high-power laser facilities, where high-intensity short-pulsed lasers from terawatt to petawatt are designed to realize inertial confinement fusion (ICF). A single-shot intensity measurement is sufficient for wave-front reconstruction, both for the near-field and far-field at the same time. The iterative reconstruction process is computationally very efficient and was completed in dozens of seconds by the additional use of a GPU device to speed it up. The compact measurement unit—including a CCD and a piece of pre-characterized phase plate—makes it convenient for focal-spot intensity prediction in the target chamber. It can be placed almost anywhere in high-power laser facilities to achieve near-field wave-front diagnostics. The feasibility of the method has been demonstrated by conducting a series of experiments with diagnostic beams and seed pulses with deactivated amplifiers in our high-power laser system.

  17. Forward voltage short-pulse technique for measuring high power laser array junction temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meadows, Byron L. (Inventor); Amzajerdian, Frazin (Inventor); Barnes, Bruce W. (Inventor); Baker, Nathaniel R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of measuring the temperature of the P-N junction within the light-emitting region of a quasi-continuous-wave or pulsed semiconductor laser diode device. A series of relatively short and low current monitor pulses are applied to the laser diode in the period between the main drive current pulses necessary to cause the semiconductor to lase. At the sufficiently low current level of the monitor pulses, the laser diode device does not lase and behaves similar to an electronic diode. The voltage across the laser diode resulting from each of these low current monitor pulses is measured with a high degree of precision. The junction temperature is then determined from the measured junction voltage using their known linear relationship.

  18. High-power fiber laser studies at the Polaroid Corporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muendel, Martin H.

    1998-06-01

    Current work on the Polaroid double-clad fiber laser is discussed. Experiments towards testing the upper power limits of fiber lasers are described. Models for the laser output in the rate-equation approximation, for the laser polarization state, and for the axial-mode-beating noise are presented and compared to experiment.

  19. Characterization of plasma expansion dynamics in a high power diode with a carbon-fiber-aluminum cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, J.-C.; Liu, L.; Cai, D.

    2014-06-09

    Thermal plasma expansion is characterised during the operation of a high power diode with an explosive emission carbon-fiber-aluminum cathode driven by a 250 kV, 150 ns accelerating pulse. It is found that a quasi-stationary state of plasma expansion is obtained during the main part of the accelerating pulse and the whole plasma expansion exhibits an “U”-shape velocity evolution. A theoretical model describing the dynamics of plasma expansion is developed, which indicates that the plasma expansion velocity is determined by equilibrium between the diode current density and plasma thermal electron current density.

  20. Target isolation system, high power laser and laser peening method and system using same

    DOEpatents

    Dane, C. Brent; Hackel, Lloyd A.; Harris, Fritz

    2007-11-06

    A system for applying a laser beam to work pieces, includes a laser system producing a high power output beam. Target delivery optics are arranged to deliver the output beam to a target work piece. A relay telescope having a telescope focal point is placed in the beam path between the laser system and the target delivery optics. The relay telescope relays an image between an image location near the output of the laser system and an image location near the target delivery optics. A baffle is placed at the telescope focal point between the target delivery optics and the laser system to block reflections from the target in the target delivery optics from returning to the laser system and causing damage.

  1. Coherent beam combiner for a high power laser

    DOEpatents

    Dane, C. Brent; Hackel, Lloyd A.

    2002-01-01

    A phase conjugate laser mirror employing Brillouin-enhanced four wave mixing allows multiple independent laser apertures to be phase locked producing an array of diffraction-limited beams with no piston phase errors. The beam combiner has application in laser and optical systems requiring high average power, high pulse energy, and low beam divergence. A broad range of applications exist in laser systems for industrial processing, especially in the field of metal surface treatment and laser shot peening.

  2. Composite resonator vertical cavity laser diode

    SciTech Connect

    Choquette, K.D.; Hou, H.Q.; Chow, W.W.; Geib, K.M.; Hammons, B.E.

    1998-05-01

    The use of two coupled laser cavities has been employed in edge emitting semiconductor lasers for mode suppression and frequency stabilization. The incorporation of coupled resonators within a vertical cavity laser opens up new possibilities due to the unique ability to tailor the interaction between the cavities. Composite resonators can be utilized to control spectral and temporal properties within the laser; previous studies of coupled cavity vertical cavity lasers have employed photopumped structures. The authors report the first composite resonator vertical cavity laser diode consisting of two optical cavities and three monolithic distributed Bragg reflectors. Cavity coupling effects and two techniques for external modulation of the laser are described.

  3. Low-frequency wide-field fluorescence lifetime imaging using a high-power near-infrared light-emitting diode light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gioux, Sylvain; Lomnes, Stephen J.; Choi, Hak Soo; Frangioni, John V.

    2010-03-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLi) could potentially improve exogenous near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging, because it offers the capability of discriminating a signal of interest from background, provides real-time monitoring of a chemical environment, and permits the use of several different fluorescent dyes having the same emission wavelength. We present a high-power, LED-based, NIR light source for the clinical translation of wide-field (larger than 5 cm in diameter) FLi at frequencies up to 35 MHz. Lifetime imaging of indocyanine green (ICG), IRDye 800-CW, and 3,3'-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide (DTTCI) was performed over a large field of view (10 cm by 7.5 cm) using the LED light source. For comparison, a laser diode light source was employed as a gold standard. Experiments were performed both on the bench by diluting the fluorescent dyes in various chemical environments in Eppendorf tubes, and in vivo by injecting the fluorescent dyes mixed in Matrigel subcutaneously into CD-1 mice. Last, measured fluorescence lifetimes obtained using the LED and the laser diode sources were compared with those obtained using a state-of-the-art time-domain imaging system and with those previously described in the literature. On average, lifetime values obtained using the LED and the laser diode light sources were consistent, exhibiting a mean difference of 3% from the expected values and a coefficient of variation of 12%. Taken together, our study offers an alternative to laser diodes for clinical translation of FLi and explores the use of relatively low frequency modulation for in vivo imaging.

  4. High-power LD end-pumped Tm:YAG ceramic slab laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuan; Huang, Haitao; Shen, Deyuan; Fan, Xuliang; Yao, Weichao; Zhu, Heyuan; Zhang, Jian; Tang, Dingyuan

    2015-03-01

    A high-power Tm:YAG ceramic slab laser is reported. Deliberate thermal management was made to dissipate the heat effectively and release the stress in ceramics. The influence of pump wavelength on laser performance was investigated. A maximum of 52 W output power was achieved, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 27.8 % with respect to the incident pump power. As to our knowledge, this is the highest 2-μm laser output power reported in Tm:YAG ceramic lasers. This result proves that Tm:YAG laser ceramic is a promising candidate for 2-μm high-power laser applications.

  5. Method and apparatus for delivering high power laser energy over long distances

    DOEpatents

    Zediker, Mark S; Rinzler, Charles C; Faircloth, Brian O; Koblick, Yeshaya; Moxley, Joel F

    2013-08-20

    Systems, devices and methods for the transmission of 1 kW or more of laser energy deep into the earth and for the suppression of associated nonlinear phenomena. Systems, devices and methods for the laser drilling of a borehole in the earth. These systems can deliver high power laser energy down a deep borehole, while maintaining the high power to advance such boreholes deep into the earth and at highly efficient advancement rates.

  6. Method and system for advancement of a borehole using a high power laser

    SciTech Connect

    Moxley, Joel F.; Land, Mark S.; Rinzler, Charles C.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Zediker, Mark S.

    2014-09-09

    There is provided a system, apparatus and methods for the laser drilling of a borehole in the earth. There is further provided with in the systems a means for delivering high power laser energy down a deep borehole, while maintaining the high power to advance such boreholes deep into the earth and at highly efficient advancement rates, a laser bottom hole assembly, and fluid directing techniques and assemblies for removing the displaced material from the borehole.

  7. Methods for enhancing the efficiency of creating a borehole using high power laser systems

    DOEpatents

    Zediker, Mark S.; Rinzler, Charles C.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Koblick, Yeshaya; Moxley, Joel F.

    2014-06-24

    Methods for utilizing 10 kW or more laser energy transmitted deep into the earth with the suppression of associated nonlinear phenomena to enhance the formation of Boreholes. Methods for the laser operations to reduce the critical path for forming a borehole in the earth. These methods can deliver high power laser energy down a deep borehole, while maintaining the high power to perform operations in such boreholes deep within the earth.

  8. High-power ultralong-wavelength Tm-doped silica fiber laser cladding-pumped with a random distributed feedback fiber laser

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiaoxi; Du, Xueyuan; Wang, Xiong; Zhou, Pu; Zhang, Hanwei; Wang, Xiaolin; Liu, Zejin

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated a high-power ultralong-wavelength Tm-doped silica fiber laser operating at 2153 nm with the output power exceeding 18 W and the slope efficiency of 25.5%. A random distributed feedback fiber laser with the center wavelength of 1173 nm was employed as pump source of Tm-doped fiber laser for the first time. No amplified spontaneous emissions or parasitic oscillations were observed when the maximum output power reached, which indicates that employing 1173 nm random distributed feedback fiber laser as pump laser is a feasible and promising scheme to achieve high-power emission of long-wavelength Tm-doped fiber laser. The output power of this Tm-doped fiber laser could be further improved by optimizing the length of active fiber, reflectivity of FBGs, increasing optical efficiency of pump laser and using better temperature management. We also compared the operation of 2153 nm Tm-doped fiber lasers pumped with 793 nm laser diodes, and the maximum output powers were limited to ~2 W by strong amplified spontaneous emission and parasitic oscillation in the range of 1900–2000 nm. PMID:27416893

  9. High-power ultralong-wavelength Tm-doped silica fiber laser cladding-pumped with a random distributed feedback fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xiaoxi; Du, Xueyuan; Wang, Xiong; Zhou, Pu; Zhang, Hanwei; Wang, Xiaolin; Liu, Zejin

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrated a high-power ultralong-wavelength Tm-doped silica fiber laser operating at 2153 nm with the output power exceeding 18 W and the slope efficiency of 25.5%. A random distributed feedback fiber laser with the center wavelength of 1173 nm was employed as pump source of Tm-doped fiber laser for the first time. No amplified spontaneous emissions or parasitic oscillations were observed when the maximum output power reached, which indicates that employing 1173 nm random distributed feedback fiber laser as pump laser is a feasible and promising scheme to achieve high-power emission of long-wavelength Tm-doped fiber laser. The output power of this Tm-doped fiber laser could be further improved by optimizing the length of active fiber, reflectivity of FBGs, increasing optical efficiency of pump laser and using better temperature management. We also compared the operation of 2153 nm Tm-doped fiber lasers pumped with 793 nm laser diodes, and the maximum output powers were limited to ~2 W by strong amplified spontaneous emission and parasitic oscillation in the range of 1900–2000 nm.

  10. High-power ultralong-wavelength Tm-doped silica fiber laser cladding-pumped with a random distributed feedback fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaoxi; Du, Xueyuan; Wang, Xiong; Zhou, Pu; Zhang, Hanwei; Wang, Xiaolin; Liu, Zejin

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated a high-power ultralong-wavelength Tm-doped silica fiber laser operating at 2153 nm with the output power exceeding 18 W and the slope efficiency of 25.5%. A random distributed feedback fiber laser with the center wavelength of 1173 nm was employed as pump source of Tm-doped fiber laser for the first time. No amplified spontaneous emissions or parasitic oscillations were observed when the maximum output power reached, which indicates that employing 1173 nm random distributed feedback fiber laser as pump laser is a feasible and promising scheme to achieve high-power emission of long-wavelength Tm-doped fiber laser. The output power of this Tm-doped fiber laser could be further improved by optimizing the length of active fiber, reflectivity of FBGs, increasing optical efficiency of pump laser and using better temperature management. We also compared the operation of 2153 nm Tm-doped fiber lasers pumped with 793 nm laser diodes, and the maximum output powers were limited to ~2 W by strong amplified spontaneous emission and parasitic oscillation in the range of 1900-2000 nm. PMID:27416893

  11. High power, high brightness Al-free active region tapered lasers at 915 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassiaoui, I.; Michel, N.; Lecomte, M.; Parillaud, O.; Calligaro, M.; Krakowski, M.

    2006-04-01

    To achieve high power and high brightness, we have developed tapered diode lasers based on an Al-free active region at 915 nm. The material structure was grown by MOCVD (Metallorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition). It shows very low internal losses of only 0.5 cm -1, a very low transparency current density of 86 A/cm2, an excellent internal quantum efficiency of 86%, and a high characteristic temperature T 0 of 171 K. Based on these good results, at first, we have realised index-guided tapered lasers (IG1) with a narrow output width and a narrow taper angle, which deliver 1 W CW, together with an M2 beam quality parameter of 2.9 at 1/e2, and a narrow divergence angle in the slow axis of 5.1° FWHM and 7.5° at 1/e2. We have also fabricated new index-guided tapered lasers with a Clarinet shape, which were recently proposed to achieve high brightness together with a very narrow divergence angle. The Clarinet lasers deliver 0.6W CW, together with an excellent M2 beam quality factor of 1.2 at 1/e2, and a very narrow divergence angle in the slow axis of only 2.5° FWHM, and 3.9° at 1/e2, which is stable with current. These very narrow divergences are very advantageous for the collective coupling of tapered bars into optical fibers. In this work we have also investigated the influence of taper length on the output power and beam quality.

  12. Improved long-term electrical stability of pulsed high-power diodes using dense carbon fiber velvet cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Jie; Shu Ting; Wang Hui

    2012-07-15

    The influence of fibrous velvet cathodes on the electrical stability of a planar high-power diode powered by a {approx}230 kV, {approx}110 ns pulse has been investigated. The current density was on the order of {approx}123 A/cm{sup 2}. A combination of time-resolved electrical and optical diagnostics has been employed to study the basic phenomenology of the temporal and spatial evolution of the diode plasmas. Additionally, an impedance model was used to extract information about this plasma from voltage and current profiles. The results from the two diagnostics were compared. By comparison with commercial polymer velvet cathode, the dense carbon fiber velvet cathode showed superior long-term electrical stability as judged by the change in cathode turn-on field, ignition delays, diode impedance, and surface plasma characteristics during the voltage flattop, a promising result for applications where reliable operation at high power is required. Finally, it was shown that the interaction of the electron beam with the stainless steel anode did not lead to the formation of anode plasma. These results may be of interest to the high power microwave systems with cold cathodes.

  13. Edge-emitting diode lasers with narrow circular beam output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lijie; Tong, Cunzhu; Zeng, Yugang; Ning, Yongqiang; Wang, Lijun

    2015-05-01

    We report near circular beam output from 808 nm edge-emitting diode lasers based on Bragg reflection waveguide design. Increasing quantum well number combined with reducing defect layer index and thickness was used to achieve high power output and extremely low vertical far field divergence. The TQW-BRLs achieve the lowest vertical divergence of 4.91° (full width at half maximum) and 9.8° (95% power). The maximum power of 4.6 W was achieved in the mounted DQW-BRL device under continuous-wave operation, being limited by thermal rollover.

  14. High power tube solid-state laser with zigzag propagation of pump and laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savich, Michael

    2015-02-01

    A novel resonator and pumping design with zigzag propagation of pumping and laser beams permits to design an improved tube Solid State Laser (SSL), solving the problem of short absorption path to produce a high power laser beam (100 - 1000kW). The novel design provides an amplifier module and laser oscillator. The tube-shaped SSL includes a gain element fiber-optically coupled to a pumping source. The fiber optic coupling facilitates light entry at compound Brewster's angle of incidence into the laser gain element and uses internal reflection to follow a "zigzag" path in a generally spiral direction along the length of the tube. Optics are arranged for zigzag propagation of the laser beam, while the cryogenic cooling system is traditional. The novel method of lasing uses advantages of cylindrical geometry to reach the high volume of gain medium with compactness and structural rigidity, attain high pump density and uniformity, and reach a low threshold without excessive increase of the temperature of the crystal. The design minimizes thermal lensing and stress effects, and provides high gain amplification, high power extraction from lasing medium, high pumping and lasing efficiency and a high beam quality.

  15. High Power Lasers And Their Application In Materials Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohn, W. L.

    1985-02-01

    The idea of using a laser for materials processing is more than 20 years old. Although the concept of a non-contact method for processing with a beam of light has been pursued with great interest and enthusiasm, the practical use of laser beam processing was slow to develop. The lasers available in the 1960's were fragile and of relatively low power. In the 1970's lasers in the multi-kilowatt range were developed but the problem of laser acceptance by the customer had to be overcome. Today, reliable Nd-Yag and CO2-lasers are available and laser processing is a fast growing market. An additional boost is expected with the development of the next generation of lasers and with increased knowledge of the physical phenomena that underlie laser material processing. This paper will review latest developments in laser technology and laser-workpiece interaction with special emphasis on the impact of high speed photography on the research work in these areas.

  16. NASA direct detection laser diode driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seery, B. D.; Hornbuckle, C. A.

    1989-01-01

    TRW has developed a prototype driver circuit for GaAs laser diodes as part of the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center's Direct Detection Laser Transceiver (DDLT) program. The circuit is designed to drive the laser diode over a range of user-selectable data rates from 1.7 to 220 Mbps, Manchester-encoded, while ensuring compatibility with 8-bit and quaternary pulse position modulation (QPPM) formats for simulating deep space communications. The resulting hybrid circuit has demonstrated 10 to 90 percent rise and fall times of less than 300 ps at peak currents exceeding 100 mA.

  17. Absence of amorphous phase in high power femtosecond laser-ablated silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Matthew S.; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Minor, Andrew M.; Mao, Samuel S.

    2009-01-05

    As femtosecond lasers emerge as viable tools for advanced microscale materials processing, it becomes increasingly important to understand the characteristics of materials resulting from femtosecond laser microablation or micromachining. We conducted transmission electron microscopy experiments to investigate crater structures in silicon produced by repetitive high power femtosecond laser ablation. Comparable experiments of nanosecond laser ablation of silicon were also performed. We found that an amorphous silicon layer that is typically produced in nanosecond laser ablation is absent when the material is irradiated by high power femtosecond laser pulses. Instead, only a defective single crystalline layer was observed in the high power femtosecond laser-ablated silicon crater. Possible mechanisms underlying the formation of the defective single crystalline phase are discussed.

  18. Applications of high power lasers in the battlefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalisky, Yehoshua

    2009-09-01

    Laser weapon is currently considered as tactical as well as strategic beam weapons, and is considered as a part of a general layered defense system against ballistic missiles and short-range rockets. This kind of weapon can disable or destroy military targets or incoming objects used by small groups of terrorists or countries, at the speed of light. Laser weapon is effective at long or short distances, owing to beam's unique characteristics such as narrow bandwidth, high brightness, coherent both in time and space, and it travels at the speed of light. Unlike kinetic weapon, laser weapon converts the energy stored in an electromagnetic laser beam into a large amount of heat aimed on a small area spot at the skin of the missile, usually close to the liquid fuel storage tank, warhead case or engine area, following by a temperature increase and finally-catastrophic failure by material ablation or melt. The usefulness of laser light as a weapon has been studied for decades but only in recent years became feasible. There are two types of lasers being used: gas lasers and solid state lasers, including fiber lasers. All these types of lasers will be discussed below.

  19. Beam-guidance optics for high-power fiber laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohring, Bernd; Tassini, Leonardo; Protz, Rudolf; Zoz, Jürgen

    2013-05-01

    The realization of a high-energy laser weapon system by coupling a large number of industrial high-power fiber lasers is investigated. To perform the combination of the individual beams of the different fiber lasers within the optical path of the laser weapon, a special optical set-up is used. Each optical component is realized either as reflective component oras refractive optics. Both possibilities were investigated by simulations and experiments. From the results, the general aspects for the layout of the beam-guidance optics for a high-power fiber laser system are derived.

  20. High power 2 {micro}m wing-pumped Tm{sup 3+}:YAG laser

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R.J.; Sutton, S.B.; Honea, E.C.; Skidmore, J.A.; Emanuel, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    Using a scalable diode end-pumping technology developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory the authors have demonstrated a compact Tm{sup 3+}:YAG laser capable of generating greater than 50 W of cw 2 {micro}m laser output power. The design and operational characteristics of this laser will be discussed.

  1. Qualification and Selection of Flight Diode Lasers for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebe, Carl C.; Dillon, Robert P.; Gontijo, Ivair; Forouhar, Siamak; Shapiro, Andrew A.; Cooper, Mark S.; Meras, Patrick L.

    2010-01-01

    The reliability and lifetime of laser diodes is critical to space missions. The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) mission includes a metrology system that is based upon laser diodes. An operational test facility has been developed to qualify and select, by mission standards, laser diodes that will survive the intended space environment and mission lifetime. The facility is situated in an electrostatic discharge (ESD) certified clean-room and consist of an enclosed temperature-controlled stage that can accommodate up to 20 laser diodes. The facility is designed to characterize a single laser diode, in addition to conducting laser lifetime testing on up to 20 laser diodes simultaneously. A standard laser current driver is used to drive a single laser diode. Laser diode current, voltage, power, and wavelength are measured for each laser diode, and a method of selecting the most adequate laser diodes for space deployment is implemented. The method consists of creating histograms of laser threshold currents, powers at a designated current, and wavelengths at designated power. From these histograms, the laser diodes that illustrate a performance that is outside the normal are rejected and the remaining lasers are considered spaceborne candidates. To perform laser lifetime testing, the facility is equipped with 20 custom laser drivers that were designed and built by California Institute of Technology specifically to drive NuSTAR metrology lasers. The laser drivers can be operated in constant-current mode or alternating-current mode. Situated inside the enclosure, in front of the laser diodes, are 20 power-meter heads to record laser power throughout the duration of lifetime testing. Prior to connecting a laser diode to the current source for characterization and lifetime testing, a background program is initiated to collect current, voltage, and resistance. This backstage data collection enables the operational test facility to have full laser diode

  2. Industrial Applications of High Power CO2 Lasers - System Descriptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gukelberger, Armin

    1986-10-01

    The laser as a cutting tool for sheet metal cutting has beenl well accepted in industry for many years. Several hundreds of units are used for contour cutting of small and medium-sized series on plane metal sheets up to 6 mm thick. Within the last three years, cutting systems have been expanded in three ways: thicker material up to 12 mm can now be cut by using higher powered lasers (1500 W); with the introduction of flying optic systems which cover sheet dimensions up to 4 m x 3 m, the cutting of larger sized metal sheets is possible. In addition, the use of five or six axis systems allows cutting of three-dimensional plastic and metal material. Besides laser cutting, the acceptance of systems for laser welding applications is increa sing. Several systems have been running in production for a couple of years and laser wel ding will probably become the fastest growing market in laser material processing within the next five years. The laser technology is regarded as a beneficial tool for welding, whenever low heat input and, consequently, low heat distortion is requested. To day's main welding application areas are: components of car engines and transmissions, window spacer and stainless steel tube welding, and also car body welding with laser robots or five axis gantry type systems. The output power of CO2-lasers for welding applications is between 1 and 5 kw in most cases.

  3. Mapping of laser diode radiation intensity by atomic-force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, P. A.; Dunaevskii, M. S.; Slipchenko, S. O.; Podoskin, A. A.; Tarasov, I. S.

    2015-09-01

    The distribution of the intensity of laser diode radiation has been studied using an original method based on atomic-force microscopy (AFM). It is shown that the laser radiation intensity in both the near field and transition zone of a high-power semiconductor laser under room-temperature conditions can be mapped by AFM at a subwavelength resolution. The obtained patterns of radiation intensity distribution agree with the data of modeling and the results of near-field optical microscopy measurements.

  4. Phase Noise Reduction of Laser Diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, T. C.; Poizat, J.-Ph.; Grelu, P.; Roch, J.-F.; Grangier, P.; Marin, F.; Bramati, A.; Jost, V.; Levenson, M. D.; Giacobino, E.

    1996-01-01

    Phase noise of single mode laser diodes, either free-running or using line narrowing technique at room temperature, namely injection-locking, has been investigated. It is shown that free-running diodes exhibit very large excess phase noise, typically more than 80 dB above shot-noise at 10 MHz, which can be significantly reduced by the above-mentioned technique.

  5. Diode-laser-based therapy device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udrea, Mircea V.; Nica, Adriana S.; Florian, Mariana; Poenaru, Daniela; Udrea, Gabriela; Lungeanu, Mihaela; Sporea, Dan G.; Vasiliu, Virgil V.; Vieru, Roxana

    2004-10-01

    A new therapy laser device is presented. The device consists of a central unit and different types of laser probes. The laser probe model SL7-650 delivers seven red (650 nm), 5 mW diode lasers convergent beams. The beams converge at about 30 cm in front of the laser probe and the irradiated area might be varied by simple displacement of the laser probe with respect to the target. The laser probe SL1-808 emits single infrared laser beam up to 500 mW. The efficiency of the use of this device in physiotherapy, and rheumatology, has been put into evidence after years of testing. Dermatology and microsurgery are users of infrared powerful laser probes. The device has successfully passed technical and clinical tests in order to be certified. The laser device design and some medical results are given.

  6. Rugged, Tunable Extended-Cavity Diode Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Donald; Brinza, David; Seidel, David; Klipstein, William; Choi, Dong Ho; Le, Lam; Zhang, Guangzhi; Iniguez, Roberto; Tang, Wade

    2007-01-01

    A rugged, tunable extended-cavity diode laser (ECDL) has been developed to satisfy stringent requirements for frequency stability, notably including low sensitivity to vibration. This laser is designed specifically for use in an atomic-clock experiment to be performed aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Lasers of similar design would be suitable for use in terrestrial laboratories engaged in atomic-clock and atomic-physics research.

  7. Genetic algorithm based optimization of pulse profile for MOPA based high power fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiawei; Tang, Ming; Shi, Jun; Fu, Songnian; Li, Lihua; Liu, Ying; Cheng, Xueping; Liu, Jian; Shum, Ping

    2015-03-01

    Although the Master Oscillator Power-Amplifier (MOPA) based fiber laser has received much attention for laser marking process due to its large tunabilty of pulse duration (from 10ns to 1ms), repetition rate (100Hz to 500kHz), high peak power and extraordinary heat dissipating capability, the output pulse deformation due to the saturation effect of fiber amplifier is detrimental for many applications. We proposed and demonstrated that, by utilizing Genetic algorithm (GA) based optimization technique, the input pulse profile from the master oscillator (current-driven laser diode) could be conveniently optimized to achieve targeted output pulse shape according to real parameters' constraints. In this work, an Yb-doped high power fiber amplifier is considered and a 200ns square shaped pulse profile is the optimization target. Since the input pulse with longer leading edge and shorter trailing edge can compensate the saturation effect, linear, quadratic and cubic polynomial functions are used to describe the input pulse with limited number of unknowns(<5). Coefficients of the polynomial functions are the optimization objects. With reasonable cost and hardware limitations, the cubic input pulse with 4 coefficients is found to be the best as the output amplified pulse can achieve excellent flatness within the square shape. Considering the bandwidth constraint of practical electronics, we examined high-frequency component cut-off effect of input pulses and found that the optimized cubic input pulses with 300MHz bandwidth is still quite acceptable to satisfy the requirement for the amplified output pulse and it is feasible to establish such a pulse generator in real applications.

  8. A compact high power Er:Yb:glass eyesafe laser for infrared remote sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitiello, Marco; Pizzarulli, Andrea; Ruffini, Andrea

    2010-10-01

    The key features and performances of a compact, lightweight, high power Er3+:Yb3+ glass laser transmitter are reported on. The theory employed to get an optimal design of the device is also described. In free running regime high energies of about 15mJ in 3ms long pulses were obtained, with an optical efficiency close to 85%. When q-switched by a Co: MALO crystal of carefully selected initial transmittivity, a high peak power in excess of 500 kW was obtained in about 9ns pulse duration, with an optical efficiency of 60%. The laser was successfully run with no significant power losses at repetition rates up to 5Hz due to a carefully designed heat sink which allowed an efficient conduction cooling of both the diode bars and the phosphate glass. The transmitter emits at a wavelength of 1535nm in the so-called "eyesafe" region of the light spectrum thus being highly attractive for any application involving the risk of human injury as is typically the case in remote sensing activities. Moreover, the spectral band around 1,5mm corresponds to a peak in the athmospheric transmittance thus being more effective in adverse weather conditions with respect to other wavelengths. Actually, the device has been successfully integrated into a rangefinder system allowing a reliable and precise detection of small targets at distances up to 20Km. Moreover, the transmitter capabilities were used into a state of the art infrared laser illuminator for night vision allowing even the recognition of a human being at distances in excess of 5Km.

  9. Diode laser-pumped solid-state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Tso Yee; Byer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    Recently, interest in diode laser-pumped solid-state lasers has increased due to their advantages over flashlamp-pumped solid-state lasers. A historical overview is presented of semiconductor diode-pumped solid-state lasers beginning with work in the early 1960s and continuing through recent work on wavelength extension of these devices by laser operation on new transitions. Modeling of these devices by rate equations to obtain expressions for threshold, slope efficiency, and figures of merit is also given.

  10. Research with high-power short-wavelength lasers.

    PubMed

    Holzrichter, J F; Campbell, E M; Lindl, J D; Storm, E

    1985-09-13

    Three high-temperature, high-density experments were conducted recently with the 10-terawatt, short-wavelength Novette laser system at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The experiments demonstrated successful solutions to problems that arose during previous laser-plasma interaction experiments with long-wavelength (greater than 1 micrometer) lasers: (i) large-scale plasmas, with dimensions approaching those needed for high-gain inertial fusion targets, were produced in which potentially deleterious laser-plasma instabilities were collisionally damped; (ii) deuterium-tritium fuel was imploded to a density of 20 grams per cubic centimeter and a pressure of 10(10) atmospheres under the improved laser conditions, and compression conditions (preheating and pressure) were consistent with code calculations that predict efficient (high-gain) burn of a large thermonuclear fuel mass when driven with a large, short-wavelength laser; and (iii) soft x-rays were amplified by a factor of 700 by stimulated emission at 206 and 209 angstroms (62 electron volts) from selenium ions in a laser-generated plasma. These small, short-pulse x-ray sources are 10(10) to 10(11) times brighter than the most powerful x-ray generators and synchrotron sources available today. The plasma conditions for these experiments were made possible by advances in Nd:glass laser technology, in techniques to generate efficiently its short-wavelength harmonics at 0.53, 0.35, and 0.26 micrometers, and in diagnostic and computational modeling. PMID:17753271

  11. Industrial applications of high-power copper vapor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, B.E.; Boley, C.D.; Chang, J.J.; Dragon, E.P.; Havstad, M.A.; Martinez, M.; McLean, W. II

    1995-08-01

    A growing appreciation has developed in the last several years for the copper vapor laser because of its utility in ablating difficult materials at high rates. Laser ablation at high rates shows promise for numerous industrial applications such as thin film deposition, precision hole drilling, and machining of ceramics and other refractories.

  12. High power semiconductor lasers for deep space communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J.

    1981-01-01

    The parameters of semiconductor lasers pertaining to their application as optical emitters are discussed. Several methods to overcome their basic disadvantage, which is the low level of powers they emit, are reviewed. Most of these methods are based on a coherent power combining of several lasers.

  13. High Power 938nm Cladding Pumped Fiber Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J; Beach, R; Brobshoff, A; Liao, Z; Payne, S; Pennington, D; Taylor, L; Hackenberg, W; Bonaccini, D

    2002-12-26

    We have developed a Nd:doped cladding pumped fiber amplifier, which operates at 938nm with greater than 2W of output power. The core co-dopants were specifically chosen to enhance emission at 938nm. The fiber was liquid nitrogen cooled in order to achieve four-level laser operation on a laser transition that is normally three level at room temperature, thus permitting efficient cladding pumping of the amplifier. Wavelength selective attenuation was induced by bending the fiber around a mandrel, which permitted near complete suppression of amplified spontaneous emission at 1088nm. We are presently seeking to scale the output of this laser to 10W. We will discuss the fiber and laser design issues involved in scaling the laser to the 10W power level and present our most recent results.

  14. Progress in high-energy-class diode laser pump sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crump, P.; Frevert, C.; Bugge, F.; Knigge, S.; Erbert, G.; Tränkle, G.; Pietrzak, A.; Hüslewede, R.; Zorn, M.; Sebastian, J.; Lotz, J.; Fassbender, W.; Neukum, J.; Körner, J.; Hein, J.; Töpfer, T.

    2015-03-01

    A new generation of diode-pumped high-energy-class solid-state laser facilities is in development that generate multijoule pulse energies at around 10 Hz. Currently deployed quasi-continuous-wave (QCW) diode lasers deliver average inpulse pump powers of around 300 W per bar. Increased power-per-bar helps to reduce the system size, complexity and cost per Joule and the increased pump brilliance also enables more efficient operation of the solid state laser itself. It has been shown in recent studies, that optimized QCW diode laser bars centered at 940…980 nm can operate with an average in-pulse power of > 1000 W per bar, triple that of commercial sources. When operated at pulsed condition of 1 ms, 10 Hz, this corresponds to > 1 J/bar. We review here the status of these high-energy-class pump sources, showing how the highest powers are enabled by using long resonators (4…6 mm) for improved cooling and robustly passivated output facets for high reliability. Results are presented for prototype passively-cooled single bar assemblies and monolithic stacked QCW arrays. We confirm that 1 J/bar is sustained for fast-axis collimated stacks with a bar pitch of 1.7 mm, with narrow lateral far field angle (< 12° with 95% power) and spectral width (< 12 nm with 95% power). Such stacks are anticipated to enable Joule/bar pump densities to be used near-term in commercial high power diode laser systems. Finally, we briefly summarize the latest status of research into bars with higher efficiencies, including studies into operation at sub-zero temperatures (-70°C), which also enables higher powers and narrower far field and spectra.

  15. Solar Pumped High Power Solid State Laser for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fork, Richard L.; Laycock, Rustin L.; Green, Jason J. A.; Walker, Wesley W.; Cole, Spencer T.; Frederick, Kevin B.; Phillips, Dane J.

    2004-01-01

    Highly coherent laser light provides a nearly optimal means of transmitting power in space. The simplest most direct means of converting sunlight to coherent laser light is a solar pumped laser oscillator. A key need for broadly useful space solar power is a robust solid state laser oscillator capable of operating efficiently in near Earth space at output powers in the multi hundred kilowatt range. The principal challenges in realizing such solar pumped laser oscillators are: (1) the need to remove heat from the solid state laser material without introducing unacceptable thermal shock, thermal lensing, or thermal stress induced birefringence to a degree that improves on current removal rates by several orders of magnitude and (2) to introduce sunlight at an effective concentration (kW/sq cm of laser cross sectional area) that is several orders of magnitude higher than currently available while tolerating a pointing error of the spacecraft of several degrees. We discuss strategies for addressing these challenges. The need to remove the high densities of heat, e.g., 30 kW/cu cm, while keeping the thermal shock, thermal lensing and thermal stress induced birefringence loss sufficiently low is addressed in terms of a novel use of diamond integrated with the laser material, such as Ti:sapphire in a manner such that the waste heat is removed from the laser medium in an axial direction and in the diamond in a radial direction. We discuss means for concentrating sunlight to an effective areal density of the order of 30 kW/sq cm. The method integrates conventional imaging optics, non-imaging optics and nonlinear optics. In effect we use a method that combines some of the methods of optical pumping solid state materials and optical fiber, but also address laser media having areas sufficiently large, e.g., 1 cm diameter to handle the multi-hundred kilowatt level powers needed for space solar power.

  16. Optical fiber cable for transmission of high power laser energy over great distances

    DOEpatents

    Zediker, Mark S.; Rinzler, Charles C.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Moxley, Joel F.; Koblick, Yeshaya

    2016-05-24

    There is provided a system and apparatus for the transmission of high power laser energy over great distances without substantial power loss and without the presence of stimulated Raman scattering. There is further provided systems and optical fiber cable configurations and optical fiber structures for the delivering high power laser energy over great distances to a tool or surface to perform an operation or work with the tool or upon the surface.

  17. Diode pumped Nd:YAG laser development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reno, C. W.; Herzog, D. G.

    1976-01-01

    A low power Nd:YAG laser was constructed which employs GaAs injection lasers as a pump source. Power outputs of 125 mW TEM CW with the rod at 250 K and the pump at 180 K were achieved for 45 W input power to the pump source. Operation of the laser, with array and laser at a common heat sink temperature of 250 K, was inhibited by difficulties in constructing long-life GaAs LOC laser arrays. Tests verified pumping with output power of 20 to 30 mW with rod and pump at 250 K. Although life tests with single LOC GaAs diodes were somewhat encouraging (with single diodes operating as long as 9000 hours without degradation), failures of single diodes in arrays continue to occur, and 50 percent power is lost in a few hundred hours at 1 percent duty factor. Because of the large recent advances in the state of the art of CW room temperature AlGaAs diodes, their demonstrated lifetimes of greater than 5,000 hours, and their inherent advantages for this task, it is recommended that these sources be used for further CW YAG injection laser pumping work.

  18. Micro-ablation with high power pulsed copper vapor lasers.

    PubMed

    Knowles, M

    2000-07-17

    Visible and UV lasers with nanosecond pulse durations, diffraction-limited beam quality and high pulse repetition rates have demonstrated micro-ablation in a wide variety of materials with sub-micron precision and sub-micron-sized heat-affected zones. The copper vapour laser (CVL) is one of the important industrial lasers for micro-ablation applications. Manufacturing applications for the CVL include orifice drilling in fuel injection components and inkjet printers, micro-milling of micromoulds, via hole drilling in printed circuit boards and silicon machining. Recent advances in higher power (100W visible, 5W UV), diffraction-limited, compact CVLs are opening new possibilities for manufacturing with this class of nanosecond laser. PMID:19404369

  19. High-power CW laser using hydrogen-fluorine reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moynihan, P. I.

    1975-01-01

    Continuous-wave laser has been proposed based on reaction of hydrogen and fluorine. Hydrogen is produced by dissociation of hydrazine, which can be stored as liquid in light containers at room temperature.

  20. Laser surface texturization for high power cladding light stripper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berisset, Michael; Lebrun, Léo.; Faucon, Marc; Kling, Rainer; Boullet, Johan; Aguergaray, Claude

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrated herein a new type of cladding light strippers suitable for high power systems. By precisely micro-machining the surface of the fiber we create CLS with efficiencies as high as 97 % for large NA, multi-mode, cladding light (NA = 0.3), and 70 % for single-mode, low NA, light. The NA of the cladding light is reduced from 0.3 down to 0.08. The CLS exhibit a 1°C/stripped-Watt temperature elevation making them very suitable for high power applications. This fabrication method is simple and reliable. We have tested different texturization geometries on several different fibers: 20/400 from Nufern, KAGOME, and LMA 10 and LMA 15 fibers (results not shown herein) and we observed good efficiencies and temperature elevation behavior for all of them. Finally, large scale production of CLS with this method is possible since the time necessary to prepare on CLS is very small, in the order of few seconds.