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Sample records for high-power pulsed sputtering

  1. Plasma regimes in high power pulsed magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Los Arcos, Teresa

    2013-09-01

    High Power Pulsed Magnetron Sputtering (HPPMS) is a relatively recent variation of magnetron sputtering where high power is applied to the magnetron in short pulses. The result is the formation of dense transient plasmas with a high fraction of ionized species, ideally leading to better control of film growth through substrate bias. However, the broad range of experimental conditions accessible in pulsed discharges results in bewildering variations in current and voltage pulse shapes, pulse power densities, etc, which represent different discharge behaviors, making it difficult to identify relevant deposition conditions. The complexity of the plasma dynamics is evident. Within each pulse, plasma characteristics such as plasma composition, density, gas rarefaction, spatial distribution, degree of self-sputtering, etc. vary with time. A recent development has been the discovery that the plasma emission can self-organize into well-defined regions of high and low plasma emissivity above the racetrack (spokes), which rotate in the direction given by the E ×B drift and that significantly influence the transport mechanisms in HPPMS. One seemingly universal characteristic of HPPMS plasmas is the existence of well defined plasma regimes for different power ranges. These regimes are clearly differentiated in terms of plasma conductivity, plasma composition and spatial plasma self-organization. We will discuss the global characteristics of these regimes in terms of current-voltage characteristics, energy-resolved QMS and OES analysis, and fast imaging. In particular we will discuss how the reorganization of the plasma emission into spokes is associated only to specific regimes of high plasma conductivity. We will also briefly discuss the role of the target in shaping the characteristics of the HPPMS plasma, since sputtering is a surface-driven process. This work was supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) within the framework of the SFB-TR87.

  2. Modification of film structure by plasma potential control using triode high power pulsed magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Takeo; Umahashi, Takuya; Baba, Shigeru

    2014-02-01

    We have designed a new triode configuration in a magnetron sputtering apparatus to control the plasma potential of the discharge. An additional chimney electrode was introduced above the conventional sputter gun to apply a positive voltage. The discharge power was provided by a pulse power source to achieve high power pulsed magnetron sputtering operation. We confirmed that the plasma potential increased with increasing positive electrode voltage. Copper films with substantially flatter surfaces could be obtained on a water-cooled and electrically grounded substrate at an Ar gas pressure of 5 Pa.

  3. Comparative Study of Cu Films Prepared by DC, High-Power Pulsed and Burst Magnetron Sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovyev, A. A.; Oskirko, V. O.; Semenov, V. A.; Oskomov, K. V.; Rabotkin, S. V.

    2016-05-01

    A comparative study of deposition rate, adhesion, structural and electrical properties of nanocrystalline copper thin films deposited using direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) and different regimes of high power pulsed magnetron sputtering is presented. High-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) and burst regime (pulse packages) of magnetron sputtering are investigated. The ion and atomic flows toward the growing film during magnetron sputtering of a Cu target are determined. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to observe the structural characterization of the films. The resistivity of the films was measured using four-point probe technique. In all sputtering regimes, Cu films have mixture crystalline orientations of [111], [200], [311] and [220] in the direction of the film growth. As peak power density in studied deposition regimes was different in order of magnitude (from 15 W/cm2 in DC regime to 3700 W/cm2 in HIPIMS), film properties were also greatly different. DCMS Cu films exhibit a porous columnar grain structure. In contrast, HIPIMS Cu films have a slightly columnar and denser composition. Cu films deposited using burst regimes at peak power density of 415 W cm-2 and ion-to-atom ratio of about 5 have the densest composition and smallest electrical resistance.

  4. Comparative Study of Cu Films Prepared by DC, High-Power Pulsed and Burst Magnetron Sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovyev, A. A.; Oskirko, V. O.; Semenov, V. A.; Oskomov, K. V.; Rabotkin, S. V.

    2016-08-01

    A comparative study of deposition rate, adhesion, structural and electrical properties of nanocrystalline copper thin films deposited using direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) and different regimes of high power pulsed magnetron sputtering is presented. High-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) and burst regime (pulse packages) of magnetron sputtering are investigated. The ion and atomic flows toward the growing film during magnetron sputtering of a Cu target are determined. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to observe the structural characterization of the films. The resistivity of the films was measured using four-point probe technique. In all sputtering regimes, Cu films have mixture crystalline orientations of [111], [200], [311] and [220] in the direction of the film growth. As peak power density in studied deposition regimes was different in order of magnitude (from 15 W/cm2 in DC regime to 3700 W/cm2 in HIPIMS), film properties were also greatly different. DCMS Cu films exhibit a porous columnar grain structure. In contrast, HIPIMS Cu films have a slightly columnar and denser composition. Cu films deposited using burst regimes at peak power density of 415 W cm-2 and ion-to-atom ratio of about 5 have the densest composition and smallest electrical resistance.

  5. High power pulsed magnetron sputtering: A method to increase deposition rate

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, Priya McLain, Jake; Ruzic, David N; Shchelkanov, Ivan A.

    2015-05-15

    High power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HPPMS) is a state-of-the-art physical vapor deposition technique with several industrial applications. One of the main disadvantages of this process is its low deposition rate. In this work, the authors report a new magnetic field configuration, which produces deposition rates twice that of conventional magnetron's dipole magnetic field configuration. Three different magnet pack configurations are discussed in this paper, and an optimized magnet pack configuration for HPPMS that leads to a higher deposition rate and nearly full-face target erosion is presented. The discussed magnetic field produced by a specially designed magnet assembly is of the same size as the conventional magnet assembly and requires no external fields. Comparison of deposition rates with different power supplies and the electron trapping efficiency in complex magnetic field arrangements are discussed.

  6. High power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Gudmundsson, J. T.; Brenning, N.; Lundin, D.; Helmersson, U.

    2012-05-15

    The high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge is a recent addition to plasma based sputtering technology. In HiPIMS, high power is applied to the magnetron target in unipolar pulses at low duty cycle and low repetition frequency while keeping the average power about 2 orders of magnitude lower than the peak power. This results in a high plasma density, and high ionization fraction of the sputtered vapor, which allows better control of the film growth by controlling the energy and direction of the deposition species. This is a significant advantage over conventional dc magnetron sputtering where the sputtered vapor consists mainly of neutral species. The HiPIMS discharge is now an established ionized physical vapor deposition technique, which is easily scalable and has been successfully introduced into various industrial applications. The authors give an overview of the development of the HiPIMS discharge, and the underlying mechanisms that dictate the discharge properties. First, an introduction to the magnetron sputtering discharge and its various configurations and modifications is given. Then the development and properties of the high power pulsed power supply are discussed, followed by an overview of the measured plasma parameters in the HiPIMS discharge, the electron energy and density, the ion energy, ion flux and plasma composition, and a discussion on the deposition rate. Finally, some of the models that have been developed to gain understanding of the discharge processes are reviewed, including the phenomenological material pathway model, and the ionization region model.

  7. Influence of inert gases on the reactive high power pulsed magnetron sputtering process of carbon-nitride thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Susann; Czigany, Zsolt; Greczynski, Grzegorz; Jensen, Jens; Hultman, Lars

    2013-01-15

    The influence of inert gases (Ne, Ar, Kr) on the sputter process of carbon and carbon-nitride (CN{sub x}) thin films was studied using reactive high power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS). Thin solid films were synthesized in an industrial deposition chamber from a graphite target. The peak target current during HiPIMS processing was found to decrease with increasing inert gas mass. Time averaged and time resolved ion mass spectroscopy showed that the addition of nitrogen, as reactive gas, resulted in less energetic ion species for processes employing Ne, whereas the opposite was noticed when Ar or Kr were employed as inert gas. Processes in nonreactive ambient showed generally lower total ion fluxes for the three different inert gases. As soon as N{sub 2} was introduced into the process, the deposition rates for Ne and Ar-containing processes increased significantly. The reactive Kr-process, in contrast, showed slightly lower deposition rates than the nonreactive. The resulting thin films were characterized regarding their bonding and microstructure by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Reactively deposited CN{sub x} thin films in Ar and Kr ambient exhibited an ordering toward a fullerene-like structure, whereas carbon and CN{sub x} films deposited in Ne atmosphere were found to be amorphous. This is attributed to an elevated amount of highly energetic particles observed during ion mass spectrometry and indicated by high peak target currents in Ne-containing processes. These results are discussed with respect to the current understanding of the structural evolution of a-C and CN{sub x} thin films.

  8. HIGH POWER PULSED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Singer, S.; Neher, L.K.

    1957-09-24

    A high powered, radio frequency pulse oscillator is described for generating trains of oscillations at the instant an input direct voltage is impressed, or immediately upon application of a light pulse. In one embodiment, the pulse oscillator comprises a photo-multiplier tube with the cathode connected to the first dynode by means of a resistor, and adjacent dynodes are connected to each other through adjustable resistors. The ohmage of the resistors progressively increases from a very low value for resistors adjacent the cathode to a high value adjacent the plate, the last dynode. Oscillation occurs with this circuit when a high negative voltage pulse is applied to the cathode and the photo cathode is bombarded. Another embodiment adds capacitors at the resistor connection points of the above circuit to increase the duration of the oscillator train.

  9. Influence of Ar/Kr ratio and pulse parameters in a Cr-N high power pulse magnetron sputtering process on plasma and coating properties

    SciTech Connect

    Bobzin, Kirsten; Bagcivan, Nazlim; Theiß, Sebastian; Trieschmann, Jan; Brugnara, Ricardo Henrique; Preissing, Sven; Hecimovic, Ante

    2014-03-15

    Krypton is sometimes used in physical vapor deposition processes due to its greater atomic mass and size compared to argon, which leads to a lower gas incorporation and may have beneficial effects on kinetics of the coating growth. In this paper, the authors investigate the plasma composition and properties of deposited high power pulse magnetron sputtering Cr-N coatings for discharges with various Ar/Kr ratios and for various pulse lengths of 40 μs, 80 μs, and 200 μs, keeping the average discharge power constant. The results show that an addition of Kr influences the discharge process by altering the ignition and peak values of the discharge current. This influences the metal ion generation and growth conditions on the substrate by reducing the nucleation site densities, leading to a predominantly columnar grow. However, the deposition rate is highest for an Ar/Kr ratio of 120/80. The integral of the metal ion and atom emission exhibits the same trend, having a maximum for Ar/Kr ratio of 120/80. By decreasing the pulse length, the deposition rate of coatings decreases, while the hardness increases.

  10. Method and apparatus for improved high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre

    2013-11-05

    A high power impulse magnetron sputtering apparatus and method using a vacuum chamber with a magnetron target and a substrate positioned in the vacuum chamber. A field coil being positioned between the magnetron target and substrate, and a pulsed power supply and/or a coil bias power supply connected to the field coil. The pulsed power supply connected to the field coil, and the pulsed power supply outputting power pulse widths of greater that 100 .mu.s.

  11. On reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, J. T.

    2016-01-01

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) is an ionized physical vapor deposition (IPVD) technique that is particularly promising for reactive sputtering applications. However, there are few issues that have to be resolved before the full potential of this technique can be realized. Here we give an overview of the key experimental findings for the reactive HiPIMS discharge. An increase in the discharge current is commonly observed with increased partial pressure of the reactive gas or decreased repetition pulse frequency. There are somewhat conflicting claims regarding the hysteresis effect in the reactive HiPIMS discharge as some report reduction or elimination of the hysteresis effect while others claim a feedback control is essential. The ion energy distribution of the metal ion and the atomic ion of the reactive gas are similar and extend to very high energies while the ion energy distribution of the working gas and the molecular ion of the reactive gas are similar and are much less energetic.

  12. Ion mass spectrometry investigations of the discharge during reactive high power pulsed and direct current magnetron sputtering of carbon in Ar and Ar/N{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, S.; Greczynski, G.; Jensen, J.; Hultman, L.; Czigany, Zs.

    2012-07-01

    Ion mass spectrometry was used to investigate discharges formed during high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) and direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) of a graphite target in Ar and Ar/N{sub 2} ambient. Ion energy distribution functions (IEDFs) were recorded in time-averaged and time-resolved mode for Ar{sup +}, C{sup +}, N{sub 2}{sup +}, N{sup +}, and C{sub x}N{sub y}{sup +} ions. An increase of N{sub 2} in the sputter gas (keeping the deposition pressure, pulse width, pulse frequency, and pulse energy constant) results for the HiPIMS discharge in a significant increase in C{sup +}, N{sup +}, and CN{sup +} ion energies. Ar{sup +}, N{sub 2}{sup +}, and C{sub 2}N{sup +} ion energies, in turn, did not considerably vary with the changes in working gas composition. The HiPIMS process showed higher ion energies and fluxes, particularly for C{sup +} ions, compared to DCMS. The time evolution of the plasma species was analyzed for HiPIMS and revealed the sequential arrival of working gas ions, ions ejected from the target, and later during the pulse-on time molecular ions, in particular CN{sup +} and C{sub 2}N{sup +}. The formation of fullerene-like structured CN{sub x} thin films for both modes of magnetron sputtering is explained by ion mass-spectrometry results and demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy as well as diffraction.

  13. Origin of the energetic ions at the substrate generated during high power pulsed magnetron sputtering of titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maszl, C.; Breilmann, W.; Benedikt, J.; von Keudell, A.

    2014-06-01

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) plasmas generate energetic metal ions at the substrate as a major difference to conventional direct current magnetron sputtering (dcMS). The origin of these very energetic ions in HiPIMS is still an open issue, which is unravelled using two fast diagnostics: time-resolved mass spectrometry with a temporal resolution of 2 µs and phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy with a temporal resolution of 1 µs. A power scan from dcMS-like to HiPIMS plasmas was performed, with a 2 inch magnetron and a titanium target as sputter source and argon as working gas. Clear differences in the transport as well as the energetic properties of Ar+, Ar2+, Ti+ and Ti2+ were observed. For discharges with highest peak power densities a high energetic group of Ti+ and Ti2+ could be identified with energies of approximately 25 eV and of 50 eV, respectively. A cold group of ions was always present. It is found that hot ions are observed only when the plasma enters the spokes regime, which can be monitored by oscillations in the IV characteristics in the MHz range that are picked up by the used VI probes. These oscillations are correlated with the spokes phenomenon and are explained as an amplification of the Hall current inside the spokes as hot ionization zones. To explain the presence of energetic ions, we propose a double layer (DL) confining the hot plasma inside a spoke: if an atom becomes ionized inside the spokes region it is accelerated because of the DL to higher energies whereas its energy remains unchanged if it is ionized outside. In applying this DL model to our measurements the observed phenomena as well as several measurements from other groups can be explained. Only if spokes and a DL are present can the confined particles gain enough energy to leave the magnetic trap. We conclude from our findings that the spoke phenomenon represents the essence of HiPIMS plasmas, explaining their good performance for material synthesis

  14. Nanomesh of Cu fabricated by combining nanosphere lithography and high power pulsed magnetron sputtering and a preliminary study about its function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Wanchuan; Chen, Jiang; Jiang, Lang; Yang, Ping; Sun, Hong; Huang, Nan

    2013-10-01

    The Cu nanomesh was obtained by a combination of nanosphere lithography (NSL) and high power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HiPPMS). A deposition mask was formed on TiO2 substrates by the self-assembly of polystyrene latex spheres with a diameter of 1 μm, then Cu nanomesh structure was produced on the substrate using sputtering. The structures were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show the increase of temperature of the polystyrene mask caused by the thermal radiation from the target and the bombardment of sputtering particles would affect the quality of the final nanopattern. The tests of photocatalytic degradation, platelet adhesion and human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (HUASMCs) culture show Cu deposition could promote the photocatalytic efficiency of TiO2, affect platelet adhesion and inhibit smooth muscle cell adhesion and proliferation. It is highlighted that these findings may serve as a guide for the research of multifunctional surface structure.

  15. Preparation of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films by reactive Ar/CH4 high power impulse magnetron sputtering with negative pulse voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Takashi; Kamata, Hikaru

    2015-09-01

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) has been attracted, because sputtered target species are highly ionized. High densities of active species such as radical ions and neutral radicals can be also achieved owing to high density reactive HiPIMS plasmas. We investigate properties of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films prepared by reactive HiPIMS of Ar/CH4 gas mixture. The properties of the films strongly depend on the plasma compositions and the kinetic energy of the carbon-containing ions which can enter into the films. The film preparation is performed at an average power of 60 W and a repetition frequency of 110 Hz, changing CH4 fraction up to 15%. Total pressure ranges between 0.3 and 2 Pa. The maximum of instantaneous power is about 20-25 kW, and the magnitude of the current is 36 A. A negative pulse voltage is applied to the substrates for about 10 μs after the target voltage changed from about -600 V to 0 V. The structural properties are characterized by Raman spectroscopy and nano-indentation method. Film hardness strongly depends on the magnitude of negative pulse voltage. By adjusting the magnitude of negative voltage, the film hardness ranges between about 10 and 22 GPa. This work is partially supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26420230.

  16. Preparation of diamond-like carbon films using reactive Ar/CH4 high power impulse magnetron sputtering system with negative pulse voltage source for substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Takashi; Kamata, Hikaru

    2016-04-01

    Diamond-like carbon films were prepared using a reactive Ar/CH4 high-power impulse magnetron sputtering system with a negative pulse voltage source for the substrate, changing the CH4 fraction up to 15% in the total pressure range from 0.3 to 2 Pa. The magnitude of the negative pulse voltage for the substrate was also varied up to about 500 V. The hardness of films monotonically increased with increasing magnitude of the negative pulse voltage. The films with hardnesses between 16.5 and 23 GPa were prepared at total pressures less than 0.5 Pa and CH4 fractions less than 10% by applying an appropriate negative pulse voltage of 300-400 V. In X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the area ratio C-C sp3/(C-C sp2 + C-C sp3) in the C 1s core level was higher than 30% at pressures less than 0.5 Pa and CH4 fractions less than 15%. On the other hand, the films with hardnesses between 5 and 10 GPa were prepared with a relatively high growth rate at the partial pressures of CH4 higher than 0.1 Pa. However, the observation of the photoluminescence background in Raman spectroscopy indicated a relatively high hydrogen content.

  17. Microstructure and surface properties of chromium-doped diamond-like carbon thin films fabricated by high power pulsed magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhongzhen; Tian, Xiubo; Gui, Gang; Gong, Chunzhi; Yang, Shiqin; Chu, Paul K.

    2013-07-01

    High power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HPPMS) has attracted much interest due to the large plasma density and high ionization rate of sputtered materials. It is expected to produce a highly ionized C flux from a graphite target but unfortunately, the ionization rate of carbon is still very small and the discharge on a solid carbon target is unstable as well. In this work, a stable discharged chromium target is used in the preparation of chromium-doped diamond-like carbon (Cr-DLC) films in HPPMS in reactive C2H2 gas, but the unstable graphite. The chromium concentration in the Cr-DLC films is limited by surface poisoning due to reactive gas. Less than 2% of Cr is incorporated into the DLC films at C2H2 flow rate of 5 sccm or higher. However, as a result of the high ionization rate of the reactive gas in HPPMS, intense ion bombardment of the substrate is realized. The films show a smooth surface and a dense structure with a large sp3 concentration. As the C2H2 flow increase, the sp3 fraction increase and the sp3 to sp2 ratio increase to 0.75 at a C2H2 flow rate of 10 sccm. Compared to the substrate, the Cr-DLC films have lower friction and exhibit excellent corrosion resistance.

  18. Mixed-mode high-power impulse magnetron sputter deposition of tetrahedral amorphous carbon with pulse-length control of ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, M. D.; Ganesan, R.; McCulloch, D. G.; Partridge, J. G.; Stueber, M.; Ulrich, S.; Bilek, M. M. M.; McKenzie, D. R.; Marks, N. A.

    2016-04-01

    High-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) is used to deposit amorphous carbon thin films with sp3 fractions of 13% to 82%. Increasing the pulse length results in a transition from conventional HiPIMS deposition to a "mixed-mode" in which an arc triggers on the target surface, resulting in a large flux of carbon ions. The films are characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, ellipsometry, nanoindentation, elastic recoil detection analysis, and measurements of stress and contact angle. All properties vary in a consistent manner, showing a high tetrahedral character only for long pulses, demonstrating that mixed-mode deposition is the source of the high carbon ion flux. Varying the substrate bias reveals an "energy window" effect, where the sp3 fraction of the films is greatest for a substrate bias around -100 V and decreases for higher or lower bias values. In the absence of bias, the films' properties show little dependence on the pulse length, showing that energetic ions are the origin of the highly tetrahedral character.

  19. Discharge Physics of High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2010-10-13

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) is pulsed sputtering where the peak power exceeds the time-averaged power by typically two orders of magnitude. The peak power density, averaged over the target area, can reach or exceed 107 W/m2, leading to plasma conditions that make ionization of the sputtered atoms very likely. A brief review of HIPIMS operation is given in a tutorial manner, illustrated by some original data related to the self-sputtering of niobium in argon and krypton. Emphasis is put on the current-voltage-time relationships near the threshold of self-sputtering runaway. The great variety of current pulse shapes delivers clues on the very strong gas rarefaction, self-sputtering runaway conditions, and the stopping of runaway due to the evolution of atom ionization and ion return probabilities as the gas plasma is replaced by metal plasma. The discussions are completed by considering instabilities and the special case of ?gasless? self-sputtering.

  20. Very low pressure high power impulse triggered magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Andersson, Joakim

    2013-10-29

    A method and apparatus are described for very low pressure high powered magnetron sputtering of a coating onto a substrate. By the method of this invention, both substrate and coating target material are placed into an evacuable chamber, and the chamber pumped to vacuum. Thereafter a series of high impulse voltage pulses are applied to the target. Nearly simultaneously with each pulse, in one embodiment, a small cathodic arc source of the same material as the target is pulsed, triggering a plasma plume proximate to the surface of the target to thereby initiate the magnetron sputtering process. In another embodiment the plasma plume is generated using a pulsed laser aimed to strike an ablation target material positioned near the magnetron target surface.

  1. Effect of oxygen incorporation on the structure and elasticity of Ti-Al-O-N coatings synthesized by cathodic arc and high power pulsed magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Hans, M. Baben, M. to; Music, D.; Ebenhöch, J.; Schneider, J. M.; Primetzhofer, D.; Kurapov, D.; Arndt, M.; Rudigier, H.

    2014-09-07

    Ti-Al-O-N coatings were synthesized by cathodic arc and high power pulsed magnetron sputtering. The chemical composition of the coatings was determined by means of elastic recoil detection analysis and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The effect of oxygen incorporation on the stress-free lattice parameters and Young's moduli of Ti-Al-O-N coatings was investigated by X-ray diffraction and nanoindentation, respectively. As nitrogen is substituted by oxygen, implications for the charge balance may be expected. A reduction in equilibrium volume with increasing O concentration is identified by X-ray diffraction and density functional theory calculations of Ti-Al-O-N supercells reveal the concomitant formation of metal vacancies. Hence, the oxygen incorporation-induced formation of metal vacancies enables charge balancing. Furthermore, nanoindentation experiments reveal a decrease in elastic modulus with increasing O concentration. Based on ab initio data, two causes can be identified for this: First, the metal vacancy-induced reduction in elasticity; and second, the formation of, compared to the corresponding metal nitride bonds, relatively weak Ti-O and Al-O bonds.

  2. High-power pulsed lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Holzrichter, J.F.

    1980-04-02

    The ideas that led to the successful construction and operation of large multibeam fusion lasers at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory are reviewed. These lasers are based on the use of Nd:glass laser materials. However, most of the concepts are applicable to any laser being designed for fusion experimentation. This report is a summary of lectures given by the author at the 20th Scottish University Summer School in Physics, on Laser Plasma Interaction. This report includes basic concepts of the laser plasma system, a discussion of lasers that are useful for short-pulse, high-power operation, laser design constraints, optical diagnostics, and system organization.

  3. Characterization of high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hala, Matej

    Paper I: In the first paper, we present a new approach in the characterization of the high power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge evolution—time- and species-resolved plasma imaging—employing a set of band-pass optical interference filters suitable for the isolation of the emission originating from different species populating the plasma. We demonstrate that the introduction of such filters can be used to distinguish different phases of the discharge, and to visualize numerous plasma effects including background gas excitations during the discharge ignition, gas shock waves, and expansion of metal-rich plasmas. In particular, the application of this technique is shown on the diagnostics of the 200 µs long non-reactive HiPIMS discharges using a Cr target. Paper II: In order to gain further information about the dynamics of reactive HiPIMS discharges, both fast plasma imaging and time- and space-resolved optical emission spectroscopy (OES) are used for a systematic investigation of the 200 µs long HiPIMS pulses operated in Ar, N2 and N 2/Ar mixtures and at various pressures. It is observed that the dense metal plasma created next to the target propagates in the reactor at a speed ranging from 0.7 to 3.5 km s-1, depending on the working gas composition and the pressure. In fact, it increases with higher N 2 concentration and with lower pressure. The visible form of the propagating plasma wave changes from a hemispherical shape in Ar to a drop-like shape extending far from the target with increasing N2 concentration, owing to the significant emission from molecular N2. Interestingly, the evidence of the target self-sputtering is found for all investigated conditions, including pure N2 atmosphere. Paper III: Here, we report on the time- and species-resolved plasma imaging analysis of the dynamics of the 200 µs long HiPIMS discharges above a Cr target ignited in pure O2. It is shown that the discharge emission is dominated solely by neutral and

  4. Metal versus rare-gas ion irradiation during Ti{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}N film growth by hybrid high power pulsed magnetron/dc magnetron co-sputtering using synchronized pulsed substrate bias

    SciTech Connect

    Greczynski, Grzegorz; Lu Jun; Jensen, Jens; Petrov, Ivan; Greene, Joseph E.; Bolz, Stephan; Koelker, Werner; Schiffers, Christoph; Lemmer, Oliver; Hultman, Lars

    2012-11-15

    Metastable NaCl-structure Ti{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}N is employed as a model system to probe the effects of metal versus rare-gas ion irradiation during film growth using reactive high-power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) of Al and dc magnetron sputtering of Ti. The alloy film composition is chosen to be x = 0.61, near the kinetic solubility limit at the growth temperature of 500 Degree-Sign C. Three sets of experiments are carried out: a -60 V substrate bias is applied either continuously, in synchronous with the full HIPIMS pulse, or in synchronous only with the metal-rich-plasma portion of the HIPIMS pulse. Alloy films grown under continuous dc bias exhibit a thickness-invariant small-grain, two-phase nanostructure (wurtzite AlN and cubic Ti{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}N) with random orientation, due primarily to intense Ar{sup +} irradiation leading to Ar incorporation (0.2 at. %), high compressive stress (-4.6 GPa), and material loss by resputtering. Synchronizing the bias with the full HIPIMS pulse results in films that exhibit much lower stress levels (-1.8 GPa) with no measureable Ar incorporation, larger grains elongated in the growth direction, a very small volume fraction of wurtzite AlN, and random orientation. By synchronizing the bias with the metal-plasma phase of the HIPIMS pulses, energetic Ar{sup +} ion bombardment is greatly reduced in favor of irradiation predominantly by Al{sup +} ions. The resulting films are single phase with a dense competitive columnar structure, strong 111 orientation, no measureable trapped Ar concentration, and even lower stress (-0.9 GPa). Thus, switching from Ar{sup +} to Al{sup +} bombardment, while maintaining the same integrated incident ion/metal ratio, eliminates phase separation, minimizes renucleation during growth, and reduces the high concentration of residual point defects, which give rise to compressive stress.

  5. Compression and strong rarefaction in high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Horwat, David; Anders, Andre

    2010-11-11

    Gas compression and strong rarefaction have been observed for high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) discharges using a copper target in argon. Time-resolved ion saturation currents of 35 probes were simultaneously recorded for HIPIMS discharges operating far above the self-sputtering runaway threshold. The argon background pressure was a parameter for the evaluation of the spatial and temporal development of the plasma density distribution. The data can be interpreted by a massive onset of the sputtering flux (sputter wind) that causes a transient densification of the gas, followed by rarefaction and the replacement of gas plasma by the metal plasma of sustained self-sputtering. The plasma density pulse follows closely the power pulse at low pressure. At high pressure, the relatively remote probes recorded a density peak only after the discharge pulse, indicative for slow, diffusive ion transport.

  6. Plasma potential mapping of high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, Albert; Mendelsberg, Rueben J.; Sanders, Jason M.; Anders, Andre

    2011-12-20

    Pulsed emissive probe techniques have been used to determine the plasma potential distribution of high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharges. An unbalanced magnetron with a niobium target in argon was investigated for pulse length of 100 μs at a pulse repetition rate of 100 Hz, giving a peak current of 170 A. The probe data were taken with a time resolution of 20 ns and a spatial resolution of 1 mm. It is shown that the local plasma potential varies greatly in space and time. The lowest potential was found over the target’s racetrack, gradually reaching anode potential (ground) several centimeters away from the target. The magnetic pre-sheath exhibits a funnel-shaped plasma potential resulting in an electric field which accelerates ions toward the racetrack. In certain regions and times, the potential exhibits weak local maxima which allow for ion acceleration to the substrate. Knowledge of the local E and static B fields lets us derive the electrons’ E×B drift velocity, which is about 105 m/s and shows structures in space and time.

  7. Plasma potential mapping of high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, Albert; Mendelsberg, Rueben J.; Sanders, Jason M.; Anders, Andre

    2012-04-15

    Pulsed emissive probe techniques have been used to determine the plasma potential distribution of high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharges. An unbalanced magnetron with a niobium target in argon was investigated for a pulse length of 100 {mu}s at a pulse repetition rate of 100 Hz, giving a peak current of 170 A. The probe data were recorded with a time resolution of 20 ns and a spatial resolution of 1 mm. It is shown that the local plasma potential varies greatly in space and time. The lowest potential was found over the target's racetrack, gradually reaching anode potential (ground) several centimeters away from the target. The magnetic presheath exhibits a funnel-shaped plasma potential resulting in an electric field which accelerates ions toward the racetrack. In certain regions and times, the potential exhibits weak local maxima which allow for ion acceleration to the substrate. Knowledge of the local E and static B fields lets us derive the electrons'ExB drift velocity, which is about 10{sup 5} m/s and shows structures in space and time.

  8. High Power Pulsed Gas Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witteman, W. J.

    1987-09-01

    Gas lasers have shown to be capable of delivering tens of terrawatt aspeak power or tens of kilowatt as average power. The efficiencies of most high power gas lasers are relatively high compared with other types of lasers. For instance molecular lasers, oscillating on low lying vibrational levels, and excimer lasers may have intrinsic efficiencies above 10%.The wavelengths of these gas lasers cover the range from the far infrared to the ultra-violet region, say from 12000 to 193 nm. The most important properties are the scalability, optical homogeneity of the excited medium, and the relatively low price per watt of output power. The disadvantages may be the large size of the systems and the relatively narrow line width with limited tunability compared with solid state systems producing the same peak power. High power gas lasers group into three main categories depending on the waste-heat handling capacity.

  9. Pulsed high-power beams

    SciTech Connect

    Reginato, L.L.; Birx, D.L.

    1988-06-01

    The marriage of induction linac technology with nonlinear magnetic modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It is now possible to produce short-pulse electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients approaching 1-MeV/m, and with power efficiencies exceeding 50%. A 70-Mev, 3-kA induction accelerator (ETA II) constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory incorporates the pulse technology concepts that have evolved over the past several years. The ETA II is a linear induction accelerator and provides a test facility for demonstration of the high-average-power components and high-brightness sources used in such accelerators. The pulse drive for the accelerator is based on state-of-the-art magnetic pulse compressors with very high peak-power capability, repetition rates exceeding 1 kHz, and excellent reliability. 6 figs.

  10. High power ultrashort pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, M.D.

    1994-10-07

    Small scale terawatt and soon even petawatt (1000 terawatt) class laser systems are made possible by application of the chirped-pulse amplification technique to solid-state lasers combined with the availability of broad bandwidth materials. These lasers make possible a new class of high gradient accelerators based on the large electric fields associated with intense laser-plasma interactions or from the intense laser field directly. Here, we concentrate on the laser technology to produce these intense pulses. Application of the smallest of these systems to the production of high brightness electron sources is also introduced.

  11. High Power Picosecond Laser Pulse Recirculation

    SciTech Connect

    Shverdin, M Y; Jovanovic, I; Semenov, V A; Betts, S M; Brown, C; Gibson, D J; Shuttlesworth, R M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P

    2010-04-12

    We demonstrate a nonlinear crystal-based short pulse recirculation cavity for trapping the second harmonic of an incident high power laser pulse. This scheme aims to increase the efficiency and flux of Compton-scattering based light sources. We demonstrate up to 36x average power enhancement of frequency doubled sub-millijoule picosecond pulses, and 17x average power enhancement of 177 mJ, 10 ps, 10 Hz pulses.

  12. Are the argon metastables important in high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges?

    SciTech Connect

    Gudmundsson, J. T.; Lundin, D.; Minea, T. M.; Stancu, G. D.; Brenning, N.

    2015-11-15

    We use an ionization region model to explore the ionization processes in the high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge in argon with a titanium target. In conventional dc magnetron sputtering (dcMS), stepwise ionization can be an important route for ionization of the argon gas. However, in the HiPIMS discharge stepwise ionization is found to be negligible during the breakdown phase of the HiPIMS pulse and becomes significant (but never dominating) only later in the pulse. For the sputtered species, Penning ionization can be a significant ionization mechanism in the dcMS discharges, while in the HiPIMS discharge Penning ionization is always negligible as compared to electron impact ionization. The main reasons for these differences are a higher plasma density in the HiPIMS discharge, and a higher electron temperature. Furthermore, we explore the ionization fraction and the ionized flux fraction of the sputtered vapor and compare with recent experimental work.

  13. Discharge current modes of high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zhongzhen Xiao, Shu; Ma, Zhengyong; Cui, Suihan; Ji, Shunping; Pan, Feng; Tian, Xiubo; Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-09-15

    Based on the production and disappearance of ions and electrons in the high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasma near the target, the expression of the discharge current is derived. Depending on the slope, six possible modes are deduced for the discharge current and the feasibility of each mode is discussed. The discharge parameters and target properties are simplified into the discharge voltage, sputtering yield, and ionization energy which mainly affect the discharge plasma. The relationship between these factors and the discharge current modes is also investigated.

  14. Pulse shortening in high power microwave sources

    SciTech Connect

    Benford, J.; Benford, G.

    1996-12-31

    The authors review the current state of understanding of the universal phenomena that high power microwave pulses are shorter than the applied electrical pulse. Higher power reduces pulse duration, limiting present-day sources to a few hundred joules. Is this limitation fundamental, or are there means to avoid it entirely? There is no reason to think that only one mechanism is responsible. Rather, there are layers of effects which may need to be addressed separately. The authors categories experimental observations in terms of candidate pulse shortening mechanisms such as gap closure, primary and secondary electron bombardment of walls, and RF breakdown. Pulse shortening mechanism theory (microwave field interaction with the beam, resistive filamentation, enhanced closure, etc.) is summarized and compared to observations. They make suggestions for additional experiments and diagnostics to help separate out causes. Finally, means of reducing or eliminating pulse shortening are reviewed.

  15. High-power ultrawideband electromagnetic pulse radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshelev, Vladimir I.; Buyanov, Yuri I.; Koval'chuk, Boris M.; Andreev, Yuri A.; Belichenko, Victor P.; Efremov, Anatoly M.; Plisko, Vyacheslav V.; Sukhushin, Konstantin N.; Vizir, Vadim A.; Zorin, Valery B.

    1997-10-01

    Basing on energetic processes studying in the near-field radiator zone, a new concept of antenna synthesizing for ultrawideband electromagnetic pulse radiation has been suggested. The results of experimental investigations of the antennae developed with using of this concept for high-power applications are presented. The antennae have small dimensions, high electrical strength, cardioid pattern with linear polarization of the pulse radiated and they are ideally adapted to be used as a steering antenna array element. A high-voltage nanosecond bipolar pulse generator design to excite antennae is described.

  16. High power impulse magnetron sputtering: Current-voltage-timecharacteristics indicate the onset of sustained self-sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Andersson, Joakim; Ehiasarian, Arutiun

    2007-08-03

    The commonly used current-voltage characteristics are foundinadequate for describing the pulsed nature of the high power impulsemagnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) discharge, rather, the description needs tobe expanded to current-voltage-time characteristics for each initial gaspressure. Using different target materials (Cu, Ti, Nb, C, W, Al, Cr) anda pulsed constant-voltage supply it is shown that the HIPIMS dischargestypically exhibit an initial pressure dependent current peak followed bya second phase that is power and material dependent. This suggests thatthe initial phase of a HIPIMS discharge pulse is dominated by gas ionswhereas the later phase has a strong contribution from self-sputtering.For some materials the discharge switches into a mode of sustainedself-sputtering. The very large differences between materials cannot beascribed to the different sputter yields but they indicate thatgeneration and trapping ofsecondary electrons plays a major role forcurrent-voltage-time characteristics. In particular, it is argued thatthe sustained self-sputtering phase is associated with thegeneration ofmultiply charged ions because only they can cause potential emission ofsecondary electrons whereas the yield caused by singly charged metal ionsis negligibly small.

  17. On the road to self-sputtering in high power impulse magnetron sputtering: particle balance and discharge characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Chunqing; Lundin, Daniel; Raadu, Michael A.; Anders, André; Tomas Gudmundsson, Jon; Brenning, Nils

    2014-04-01

    The onset and development of self-sputtering (SS) in a high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge have been studied using a plasma chemical model and a set of experimental data, taken with an aluminum target and argon gas. The model is tailored to duplicate the discharge in which the data are taken. The pulses are long enough to include both an initial transient and a following steady state. The model is used to unravel how the internal discharge physics evolves with pulse power and time, and how it is related to features in the discharge current-voltage-time characteristics such as current densities, maxima, kinks and slopes. The connection between the self-sputter process and the discharge characteristics is quantified and discussed in terms of three parameters: a critical target current density Jcrit based on the maximum refill rate of process (argon) gas above the target, an SS recycling factor ΠSS-recycle, and an approximation \\tilde{\\alpha} of the probabilities of ionization of species that come from the target (both sputtered metal and embedded argon atoms). For low power pulses, discharge voltages UD ⩽ 380 V with peak current densities below ≈ 0.2 A cm-2, the discharge is found to be dominated by process gas sputtering. In these pulses there is an initial current peak in time, associated with partial gas rarefaction, which is followed by a steady-state-like plateau in all parameters similar to direct current magnetron sputtering. In contrast, high power pulses, with UD ⩾ 500 V and peak current densities above JD ≈ 1.6 A cm-2, make a transition to a discharge mode where SS dominates. The transition is found not to be driven by process gas rarefaction which is only about 10% at this time. Maximum gas rarefaction is found later in time and always after the initial peak in the discharge current. With increasing voltage, and pulse power, the discharge can be described as following a route where the role of SS increases in four steps

  18. Plasma"anti-assistance" and"self-assistance" to high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.

    2009-01-30

    A plasma assistance system was investigated with the goal to operate high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) at lower pressure than usual, thereby to enhance the utilization of the ballistic atoms and ions with high kinetic energy in the film growth process. Gas plasma flow from a constricted plasma source was aimed at the magnetron target. Contrary to initial expectations, such plasma assistance turned out to be contra-productive because it led to the extinction of the magnetron discharge. The effect can be explained by gas rarefaction. A better method of reducing the necessary gas pressure is operation at relatively high pulse repetition rates where the afterglow plasma of one pulse assists in the development of the next pulse. Here we show that this method, known from medium-frequency (MF) pulsed sputtering, is also very important at the much lower pulse repetition rates of HiPIMS. A minimum in the possible operational pressure is found in the frequency region between HiPIMS and MF pulsed sputtering.

  19. High power impulse magnetron sputtering and related discharges: scalable plasma sources for plasma-based ion implantation and deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2009-09-01

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) and related self-sputtering techniques are reviewed from a viewpoint of plasma-based ion implantation and deposition (PBII&D). HIPIMS combines the classical, scalable sputtering technology with pulsed power, which is an elegant way of ionizing the sputtered atoms. Related approaches, such as sustained self-sputtering, are also considered. The resulting intense flux of ions to the substrate consists of a mixture of metal and gas ions when using a process gas, or of metal ions only when using `gasless? or pure self-sputtering. In many respects, processing with HIPIMS plasmas is similar to processing with filtered cathodic arc plasmas, though the former is easier to scale to large areas. Both ion implantation and etching (high bias voltage, without deposition) and thin film deposition (low bias, or bias of low duty cycle) have been demonstrated.

  20. Earthquake Triggering by High Power Electric Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, Victor; Konev, Yuri; Zeigarnik, Vladimir

    2010-05-01

    The study carried out by the Joint Institute for High Temperatures in cooperation with the Institute of Physics of the Earth and the Research Station in Bishkek of Russian Academy of Sciences in 1999-2008 showed a response of weak seismicity at field experiments with electric pulsed power systems, as well as acoustic emission of rock specimens under laboratory conditions on high-power electric current pulses applied to the rocks. It was suggested that the phenomenon discovered may be used in practice for partial release of tectonic stresses in the Earth crust for earthquake hazard mitigation. Nevertheless, the mechanism of the influence of man-made electromagnetic field on the regional seismicity is not clear yet. One of possible cause of the phenomenon may be pore fluid pressure increase in the rocks under stressed conditions due to Joule heat generation by electric current injected into the Earth crust. It is known that increase of pore fluid pressure in the fault zone over a critical pressure of about 0.05 MPa is sufficient to trigger an earthquake if the fault is near the critical state due to accumulated tectonic deformations. Detailed 3D-calculaton of electric current density in the Earth crust of the Northern Tien Shan provided by pulsed electric high-power system connected to grounded electric dipole showed that at the depth of earthquake epicenters (over 5 km) the electric current density is lower than 10-7 A/m2 that is not sufficient for increase of pressure in the fluid-saturated porous geological medium due to Joule heat generation, which may provide formation of cracks resulting in the fault propagation and release of tectonic stresses in the Earth crust. Nevertheless, under certain conditions, when electric current will be injected into the fault through the casing pipes of two deep wells with preliminary injection of conductive fluid into the fault, the current density may be high enough for significant increase of mechanic pressure in the porous two

  1. Rarefaction windows in a high-power impulse magnetron sputtering plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Palmucci, Maria; Britun, Nikolay; Konstantinidis, Stephanos; Snyders, Rony

    2013-09-21

    The velocity distribution function of the sputtered particles in the direction parallel to the planar magnetron cathode is studied by spatially- and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in a short-duration (20 μs) high-power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge. The experimental evidence for the neutral and ionized sputtered particles to have a constant (saturated) velocity at the end of the plasma on-time is demonstrated. The velocity component parallel to the target surface reaches the values of about 5 km/s for Ti atoms and ions, which is higher that the values typically measured in the direct current sputtering discharges before. The results point out on the presence of a strong gas rarefaction significantly reducing the sputtered particles energy dissipation during a certain time interval at the end of the plasma pulse, referred to as “rarefaction window” in this work. The obtained results agree with and essentially clarify the dynamics of HiPIMS discharge studied during the plasma off-time previously in the work: N. Britun, Appl. Phys. Lett. 99, 131504 (2011)

  2. Plasma reactivity in high-power impulse magnetron sputtering through oxygen kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Vitelaru, Catalin; Lundin, Daniel; Brenning, Nils; Minea, Tiberiu

    2013-09-02

    The atomic oxygen metastable dynamics in a Reactive High-Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (R-HiPIMS) discharge has been characterized using time-resolved diode laser absorption in an Ar/O{sub 2} gas mixture with a Ti target. Two plasma regions are identified: the ionization region (IR) close to the target and further out the diffusion region (DR), separated by a transition region. The μs temporal resolution allows identifying the main atomic oxygen production and destruction routes, which are found to be very different during the pulse as compared to the afterglow as deduced from their evolution in space and time.

  3. Deposition of highly textured AlN thin films by reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, Milena A.; Törndahl, Tobias; Katardjiev, Ilia; Kubart, Tomas

    2015-03-15

    Aluminum nitride thin films were deposited by reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) and pulsed direct-current on Si (100) and textured Mo substrates, where the same deposition conditions were used for both techniques. The films were characterized by x-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. The results show a pronounced improvement in the AlN crystalline texture for all films deposited by HiPIMS on Si. Already at room temperature, the HiPIMS films exhibited a strong preferred (002) orientation and at 400 °C, no contributions from other orientations were detected. Despite the low film thickness of only 200 nm, an ω-scan full width at half maximum value of 5.1° was achieved on Si. The results are attributed to the high ionization of sputtered material achieved in HiPIMS. On textured Mo, there was no significant difference between the deposition techniques.

  4. High power pulsed magnicon at 34-GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Nezhevenko, O.A.; Yakovlev, V.P.; Ganguly, A.K.; Hirshfield, J.L.

    1999-05-01

    A high efficiency, high power magnicon amplifier at 34.272 GHz has been designed as a radiation source to drive multi-TeV electron-positron linear colliders. Simulations show peak output power of 45 MW in a 1.5 microsecond wide pulse with an efficiency of 45{percent} and gain of 55 dB. The repetition rate is 10 Hz. The amplifier is a frequency tripler, or third harmonic amplifier, in that the output frequency of 34.272 GHz is three times the input drive frequency of 11.424 GHz. Thus the rotating TM{sub 110} modes in the drive cavity, 3 gain cavities and double decoupled penultimate cavities are resonant near 11.424 GHz; and the rotating TM{sub 310} mode in the output cavity is resonant at 34.272 GHz. A 500 kV, 200 A high area compression electron gun will provide a low emittance electron beam with a diameter of about 0.8 mm. A superconducting solenoid magnet will provide a magnetic field of 13 kG in the deflection system and 22 kG in the output cavity. A collector for the spent beam has also been designed. Detailed simulation results for the operation of the entire magnicon amplifier (gun, magnetic system, rf system and collector) will be given. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. High power linear pulsed beam annealer

    DOEpatents

    Strathman, Michael D.; Sadana, Devendra K.; True, Richard B.

    1983-01-01

    A high power pulsed electron beam is produced in a system comprised of an electron gun having a heated cathode, control grid, focus ring, and a curved drift tube. The drift tube is maintained at a high positive voltage with respect to the cathode to accelerate electrons passing through the focus ring and to thereby eliminate space charge. A coil surrounding the curved drift tube provides a magnetic field which maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the tube and imparts motion on electrons in a spiral path for shallow penetration of the electrons into a target. The curvature of the tube is selected so there is no line of sight between the cathode and a target holder positioned within a second drift tube spaced coaxially from the curved tube. The second tube and the target holder are maintained at a reference voltage that decelerates the electrons. A second coil surrounding the second drift tube maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the second drift tube and compresses the electron beam to the area of the target. The target holder can be adjusted to position the target where the cross section of the beam matches the area of the target.

  6. Current-voltage-time characteristics of the reactive Ar/N{sub 2} high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Magnus, F.; Sveinsson, O. B.; Olafsson, S.; Gudmundsson, J. T.

    2011-10-15

    The discharge current and voltage waveforms have been measured in a reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) Ar/N{sub 2} discharge with a Ti target for 400 {mu}s long pulses. We observe that the current waveform in the reactive Ar/N{sub 2} HiPIMS discharge is highly dependent on the pulse repetition frequency, unlike the non-reactive Ar discharge. The current is found to increase significantly as the frequency is lowered. This is attributed to an increase in the secondary electron emission yield during the self-sputtering phase, when the nitride forms on the target at low frequencies. In addition, self-sputtering runaway occurs at lower discharge voltages when nitrogen is added to the discharge. This illustrates the crucial role of self-sputtering in the behavior of the reactive HiPIMS discharge.

  7. Duty cycle control in reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering of hafnium and niobium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, R.; Treverrow, B.; Murdoch, B.; Xie, D.; Ross, A. E.; Partridge, J. G.; Falconer, I. S.; McCulloch, D. G.; McKenzie, D. R.; Bilek, M. M. M.

    2016-06-01

    Instabilities in reactive sputtering have technological consequences and have been attributed to the formation of a compound layer on the target surface (‘poisoning’). Here we demonstrate how the duty cycle of high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) can be used to control the surface conditions of Hf and Nb targets. Variations in the time resolved target current characteristics as a function of duty cycle were attributed to gas rarefaction and to the degree of poisoning of the target surface. As the operation transitions from Ar driven sputtering to metal driven sputtering, the secondary electron emission changes and reduces the target current. The target surface transitions smoothly from a poisoned state at low duty cycles to a quasi-metallic state at high duty cycles. Appropriate selection of duty cycle increases the deposition rate, eliminates the need for active regulation of oxygen flow and enables stable reactive deposition of stoichiometric metal oxide films. A model is presented for the reactive HIPIMS process in which the target operates in a partially poisoned mode with different degrees of oxide layer distribution on its surface that depends on the duty cycle. Finally, we show that by tuning the pulse characteristics, the refractive indices of the metal oxides can be controlled without increasing the absorption coefficients, a result important for the fabrication of optical multilayer stacks.

  8. Pulsed high-voltage dc RF sputtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przybyszewski, J. S., Jr.; Shaltens, R. K.

    1969-01-01

    Sputtering technique uses pulsed high voltage direct current to the object to be plated and a radio frequency sputtered film source. Resultant film has excellent adhesion, and objects can be plated uniformly on all sides.

  9. Plasma diagnostics of low pressure high power impulse magnetron sputtering assisted by electron cyclotron wave resonance plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Stranak, Vitezslav; Herrendorf, Ann-Pierra; Drache, Steffen; Bogdanowicz, Robert; Hippler, Rainer; Cada, Martin; Hubicka, Zdenek; Tichy, Milan

    2012-11-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of the hybrid pulsed sputtering source based on the combination of electron cyclotron wave resonance (ECWR) inductively coupled plasma and high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) of a Ti target. The plasma source, operated in an Ar atmosphere at a very low pressure of 0.03 Pa, provides plasma where the major fraction of sputtered particles is ionized. It was found that ECWR assistance increases the electron temperature during the HiPIMS pulse. The discharge current and electron density can achieve their stable maximum 10 {mu}s after the onset of the HiPIMS pulse. Further, a high concentration of double charged Ti{sup ++} with energies of up to 160 eV was detected. All of these facts were verified experimentally by time-resolved emission spectroscopy, retarding field analyzer measurement, Langmuir probe, and energy-resolved mass spectrometry.

  10. Silicon oxynitride films deposited by reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering using nitrous oxide as a single-source precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Hänninen, Tuomas Schmidt, Susann; Jensen, Jens; Hultman, Lars; Högberg, Hans

    2015-09-15

    Silicon oxynitride thin films were synthesized by reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering of silicon in argon/nitrous oxide plasmas. Nitrous oxide was employed as a single-source precursor supplying oxygen and nitrogen for the film growth. The films were characterized by elastic recoil detection analysis, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray reflectivity, scanning electron microscopy, and spectroscopic ellipsometry. Results show that the films are silicon rich, amorphous, and exhibit a random chemical bonding structure. The optical properties with the refractive index and the extinction coefficient correlate with the film elemental composition, showing decreasing values with increasing film oxygen and nitrogen content. The total percentage of oxygen and nitrogen in the films is controlled by adjusting the gas flow ratio in the deposition processes. Furthermore, it is shown that the film oxygen-to-nitrogen ratio can be tailored by the high power impulse magnetron sputtering-specific parameters pulse frequency and energy per pulse.

  11. Origin of the Delayed Current Onset in High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Yushkov, Georgy Yu.; Anders, Andre

    2010-07-19

    Repetitive pulses of voltage and current are applied in high power impulse magnetron sputtering. The current pulse usually lags the applied voltage by a significant time, which in some cases can reach many 10s of microseconds. The current time lag is generally highly reproducible and jitters less than 1percent of the delay time. This work investigates the time lag experimentally and theoretically. The experiments include several different target and gas combinations, voltage and current amplitudes, gas pressures, pulse repetition rates, and pulse durations. It is shown that in all cases the inverse delay is approximately proportional to the applied voltage, where the proportionality factor depends on the combination of materials and the conditions selected. The proportionality factor contains the parameters of ionization and secondary electron emission. The statistical time lag is negligible while the formative time lag is large and usually dominated by the ion motion (inertia), although, at low pressure, the long free path of magnetized electrons causing ionization contributes to the delay.

  12. High-power pulse propagation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, R.A.

    1986-12-01

    One of the questions that must be answered in assessing the potential of pulsed microwave beams as directed energy weapons is, ''What is the maximum pulse energy (and/or peak power) that can be delivered from a source to a target.'' Atmospheric breakdown caused by the electromagnetic fields of the pulse sets one limit on energy propagation, and the breakdown threshold was the subject of fairly extensive investigation a number of years ago. The evolution of microwave source technology has extended the parameter range over which propagation needs to be understood, and additional issues that have not previously been investigated experimentally have assumed a new importance. A new generation of experiments is underway, planned, or proposed to investigate these issues. 13 refs.

  13. High power UV and VUV pulsed excilamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, V.; Erofeev, M.; Lomaev, M.; Rybka, D.

    2008-07-01

    Emission characteristics of a nanosecond discharge in inert gases and its halogenides without preionization of the gap from an auxiliary source have been investigated. A volume discharge, initiated by an avalanche electron beam (VDIAEB) was realized at pressures up to 12 atm. In xenon at pressure of 1.2 atm, the energy of spontaneous radiation in the full solid angle was sim 45 mJ/cm^3, and the FWHM of a radiation pulse was sim 110 ns. The spontaneous radiation power rise in xenon was observed at pressures up to 12 atm. Pulsed radiant exitance of inert gases halogenides excited by VDIAEB was sim 4.5 kW/cm^2 at efficiency up to 5.5 %.

  14. DEPOSITION OF NIOBIUM AND OTHER SUPERCONDUCTING MATERIALS WITH HIGH POWER IMPULSE MAGNETRON SPUTTERING: CONCEPT AND FIRST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    High Current Electronics Institute, Tomsk, Russia; Anders, Andre; Mendelsberg, Rueben J.; Lim, Sunnie; Mentink, Matthijs; Slack, Jonathan L.; Wallig, Joseph G.; Nollau, Alexander V.; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.

    2011-07-24

    Niobium coatings on copper cavities have been considered as a cost-efficient replacement of bulk niobium RF cavities, however, coatings made by magnetron sputtering have not quite lived up to high expectations due to Q-slope and other issues. High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) is a promising emerging coatings technology which combines magnetron sputtering with a pulsed power approach. The magnetron is turned into a metal plasma source by using very high peak power density of ~ 1 kW/cm{sup 2}. In this contribution, the cavity coatings concept with HIPIMS is explained. A system with two cylindrical, movable magnetrons was set up with custom magnetrons small enough to be inserted into 1.3 GHz cavities. Preliminary data on niobium HIPIMS plasma and the resulting coatings are presented. The HIPIMS approach has the potential to be extended to film systems beyond niobium, including other superconducting materials and/or multilayer systems.

  15. Narrow high power microwave pulses from a free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, T.C.; Zhang, T.B.

    1995-11-01

    The authors have explored high power microwave ({lambda} = 1.5mm) pulse amplification along a tapered undulator FEL using the 1D Compton FEL equations with slippage. For an appropriate taper, sideband instabilities are suppressed and a short ({approximately}50psec) Gaussian pulse will propagate in a nearly self-similar way as it grows in power, slipping through a much longer electron pulse (beam energy, 750kV; current, 100A; radius = 2mm; length = 200 radiation periods). This is in contrast to the example of pulse propagation in a constant parameter undulator, where the Gaussian pulse breaks up into irregularities identified with sidebanding. Variation of initial pulse width shows convergence to a 50psec wide output pulse. Because of the slippage of the radiation pulse through the electron pulse, the peak microwave pulse intensity, {approximately}3GW/cm2, is about three times the kinetic energy density of the electron beam.

  16. Method to control deposition rate instabilities—High power impulse magnetron sputtering deposition of TiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Kossoy, Anna E-mail: anna.kossoy@gmail.com; Magnusson, Rögnvaldur L.; Tryggvason, Tryggvi K.; Leosson, Kristjan; Olafsson, Sveinn

    2015-03-15

    The authors describe how changes in shutter state (open/closed) affect sputter plasma conditions and stability of the deposition rate of Ti and TiO{sub 2} films. The films were grown by high power impulse magnetron sputtering in pure Ar and in Ar/O{sub 2} mixture from a metallic Ti target. The shutter state was found to have an effect on the pulse waveform for both pure Ar and reactive sputtering of Ti also affecting stability of TiO{sub 2} deposition rate. When the shutter opened, the shape of pulse current changed from rectangular to peak-plateau and pulse energy decreased. The authors attribute it to the change in plasma impedance and gas rarefaction originating in geometry change in front of the magnetron. TiO{sub 2} deposition rate was initially found to be high, 1.45 Å/s, and then dropped by ∼40% during the first 5 min, while for Ti the change was less obvious. Instability of deposition rate poses significant challenge for growing multilayer heterostructures. In this work, the authors suggest a way to overcome this by monitoring the integrated average energy involved in the deposition process. It is possible to calibrate and control the film thickness by monitoring the integrated pulse energy and end growth when desired integrated pulse energy level has been reached.

  17. Compensating for inconsistent high power vircator microwave radar pulse sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAulay, Alastair D.

    2012-06-01

    We investigate a vircator as an economical high power pulsed microwave source for radar. Because of the inconsistency of spark gaps in the driver and operation of the tube based vircator, the resulting ringing pulse has a different pulse shape each time a pulse is generated. Therefore every time we pulse the source we must remove the effects of the ringing source pulse from the data resulting from that pulse. Scattering from a scene is considered random (white noise) with a superimposed non-white component due to the pulse. We propose a whitening filter to remove the effects of the ringing pulse from the random data. This produces a similar result as spectral factorization in which we first determine the pulse from the power spectrum of the data and then deconvolve the ringing pulse out of the received data. The removal of pulse specific ringing increases range resolution and allows data from sequential pulses from a single vircator or pulses from separate vircators to be combined for joint processing in a synthetic aperture radar.

  18. Deposition Rates of High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering: Physics and Economics

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2009-11-22

    Deposition by high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) is considered by some as the new paradigm of advanced sputtering technology, yet this is met with skepticism by others for the reported lower deposition rates, if compared to rates of more conventional sputtering of equal average power. In this contribution, the underlying physical reasons for the rate changes are discussed, including (i) ion return to the target and self-sputtering, (ii) the less-than-linear increase of the sputtering yield with increasing ion energy, (iii) yield changes due to the shift of species responsible for sputtering, (iv) changes to due to greater film density, limited sticking, and self-sputtering on the substrate, (v) noticeable power losses in the switch module, (vi) changes of the magnetic balance and particle confinement of the magnetron due to self-fields at high current, and (vii) superposition of sputtering and sublimation/evaporation for selected materials. The situation is even more complicated for reactive systems where the target surface chemistry is a function of the reactive gas partial pressure and discharge conditions. While most of these factors imply a reduction of the normalized deposition rate, increased rates have been reported for certain conditions using hot targets and less poisoned targets. Finally, some points of economics and HIPIMS benefits considered.

  19. Deposition rates of high power impulse magnetron sputtering: Physics and economics

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2010-07-15

    Deposition by high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) is considered by some as the new paradigm of advanced sputtering technology, yet this is met with skepticism by others for the reported lower deposition rates, if compared to rates of more conventional sputtering of equal average power. In this contribution, the underlying physical reasons for the rate changes are discussed, including (i) ion return to the target and self-sputtering, (ii) the less-than-linear increase in the sputtering yield with increasing ion energy, (iii) yield changes due to the shift of species responsible for sputtering, (iv) changes due to greater film density, limited sticking, and self-sputtering on the substrate, (v) noticeable power losses in the switch module, (vi) changes in the magnetic balance and particle confinement of the magnetron due to self-fields at high current, and (vii) superposition of sputtering and sublimation/evaporation for selected materials. The situation is even more complicated for reactive systems where the target surface chemistry is a function of the reactive gas partial pressure and discharge conditions. While most of these factors imply a reduction in the normalized deposition rate, increased rates have been reported for certain conditions using hot targets and less poisoned targets. Finally, some points of economics and HIPIMS benefits are considered.

  20. Evaporation-assisted high-power impulse magnetron sputtering: The deposition of tungsten oxide as a case study

    SciTech Connect

    Hemberg, Axel; Dauchot, Jean-Pierre; Snyders, Rony; Konstantinidis, Stephanos

    2012-07-15

    The deposition rate during the synthesis of tungsten trioxide thin films by reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) of a tungsten target increases, above the dc threshold, as a result of the appropriate combination of the target voltage, the pulse duration, and the amount of oxygen in the reactive atmosphere. This behavior is likely to be caused by the evaporation of the low melting point tungsten trioxide layer covering the metallic target in such working conditions. The HiPIMS process is therefore assisted by thermal evaporation of the target material.

  1. Investigation of ionized metal flux in enhanced high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Stranak, Vitezslav; Hubicka, Zdenek; Cada, Martin; Drache, Steffen; Hippler, Rainer; Tichy, Milan

    2014-04-21

    The metal ionized flux fraction and production of double charged metal ions Me{sup 2+} of different materials (Al, Cu, Fe, Ti) by High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HiPIMS) operated with and without a pre-ionization assistance is compared in the paper. The Electron Cyclotron Wave Resonance (ECWR) discharge was employed as the pre-ionization agent providing a seed of charge in the idle time of HiPIMS pulses. A modified grid-free biased quartz crystal microbalance was used to estimate the metal ionized flux fraction ξ. The energy-resolved mass spectrometry served as a complementary method to distinguish particular ion contributions to the total ionized flux onto the substrate. The ratio between densities of doubly Me{sup 2+} and singly Me{sup +} charged metal ions was determined. It is shown that ECWR assistance enhances Me{sup 2+} production with respect of absorbed rf-power. The ECWR discharge also increases the metal ionized flux fraction of about 30% especially in the region of lower pressures. Further, the suppression of the gas rarefaction effect due to enhanced secondary electron emission of Me{sup 2+} was observed.

  2. Hollow-core fibers for high power pulse delivery.

    PubMed

    Michieletto, Mattia; Lyngsø, Jens K; Jakobsen, Christian; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Bang, Ole; Alkeskjold, Thomas T

    2016-04-01

    We investigate hollow-core fibers for fiber delivery of high power ultrashort laser pulses. We use numerical techniques to design an anti-resonant hollow-core fiber having one layer of non-touching tubes to determine which structures offer the best optical properties for the delivery of high power picosecond pulses. A novel fiber with 7 tubes and a core of 30µm was fabricated and it is here described and characterized, showing remarkable low loss, low bend loss, and good mode quality. Its optical properties are compared to both a 10µm and a 18µm core diameter photonic band gap hollow-core fiber. The three fibers are characterized experimentally for the delivery of 22 picosecond pulses at 1032nm. We demonstrate flexible, diffraction limited beam delivery with output average powers in excess of 70W. PMID:27137004

  3. Plasma Switch for High-Power Active Pulse Compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2013-11-04

    Results are presented from experiments carried out at the Naval Research Laboratory X-band magnicon facility on a two-channel X-band active RF pulse compressor that employed plasma switches. Experimental evidence is shown to validate the basic goals of the project, which include: simultaneous firing of plasma switches in both channels of the RF circuit, operation of quasi-optical 3-dB hybrid directional coupler coherent superposition of RF compressed pulses from both channels, and operation of the X-band magnicon directly in the RF pulse compressor. For incident 1.2 ?s pulses in the range 0.63 ? 1.35 MW, compressed pulses of peak powers 5.7 ? 11.3 MW were obtained, corresponding to peak power gain ratios of 8.3 ? 9.3. Insufficient bakeout and conditioning of the high-power RF circuit prevented experiments from being conducted at higher RF input power levels.

  4. Process stabilization by peak current regulation in reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering of hafnium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, T.; Villamayor, M.; Lundin, D.; Helmersson, U.

    2016-02-01

    A simple and cost effective approach to stabilize the sputtering process in the transition zone during reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) is proposed. The method is based on real-time monitoring and control of the discharge current waveforms. To stabilize the process conditions at a given set point, a feedback control system was implemented that automatically regulates the pulse frequency, and thereby the average sputtering power, to maintain a constant maximum discharge current. In the present study, the variation of the pulse current waveforms over a wide range of reactive gas flows and pulse frequencies during a reactive HiPIMS process of Hf-N in an Ar-N2 atmosphere illustrates that the discharge current waveform is a an excellent indicator of the process conditions. Activating the reactive HiPIMS peak current regulation, stable process conditions were maintained when varying the N2 flow from 2.1 to 3.5 sccm by an automatic adjustment of the pulse frequency from 600 Hz to 1150 Hz and consequently an increase of the average power from 110 to 270 W. Hf-N films deposited using peak current regulation exhibited a stable stoichiometry, a nearly constant power-normalized deposition rate, and a polycrystalline cubic phase Hf-N with (1 1 1)-preferred orientation over the entire reactive gas flow range investigated. The physical reasons for the change in the current pulse waveform for different process conditions are discussed in some detail.

  5. Active high-power RF switch and pulse compression system

    DOEpatents

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Ruth, Ronald D.; Zolotorev, Max

    1998-01-01

    A high-power RF switching device employs a semiconductor wafer positioned in the third port of a three-port RF device. A controllable source of directed energy, such as a suitable laser or electron beam, is aimed at the semiconductor material. When the source is turned on, the energy incident on the wafer induces an electron-hole plasma layer on the wafer, changing the wafer's dielectric constant, turning the third port into a termination for incident RF signals, and. causing all incident RF signals to be reflected from the surface of the wafer. The propagation constant of RF signals through port 3, therefore, can be changed by controlling the beam. By making the RF coupling to the third port as small as necessary, one can reduce the peak electric field on the unexcited silicon surface for any level of input power from port 1, thereby reducing risk of damaging the wafer by RF with high peak power. The switch is useful to the construction of an improved pulse compression system to boost the peak power of microwave tubes driving linear accelerators. In this application, the high-power RF switch is placed at the coupling iris between the charging waveguide and the resonant storage line of a pulse compression system. This optically controlled high power RF pulse compression system can handle hundreds of Megawatts of power at X-band.

  6. A review comparing cathodic arcs and high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, André

    2014-09-02

    In this study, high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) has been in the center of attention over the last years as it is an emerging physical vapor deposition (PVD) technology that combines advantages of magnetron sputtering with various forms of energetic deposition of films such as ion plating and cathodic arc plasma deposition. It should not come at a surprise that many extension and variations of HiPIMS make use, intentionally or unintentionally, of previously discovered approaches to film processing such as substrate surface preparation by metal ion sputtering and phased biasing for film texture and stress control. Therefore, in this review, an overview is given on some historical developments and features of cathodic arc and HiPIMS plasmas, showing commonalities and differences. To limit the scope, emphasis is put on plasma properties, as opposed to surveying the vast literature on specific film materials and their properties.

  7. A review comparing cathodic arcs and high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Anders, André

    2014-09-02

    In this study, high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) has been in the center of attention over the last years as it is an emerging physical vapor deposition (PVD) technology that combines advantages of magnetron sputtering with various forms of energetic deposition of films such as ion plating and cathodic arc plasma deposition. It should not come at a surprise that many extension and variations of HiPIMS make use, intentionally or unintentionally, of previously discovered approaches to film processing such as substrate surface preparation by metal ion sputtering and phased biasing for film texture and stress control. Therefore, in thismore » review, an overview is given on some historical developments and features of cathodic arc and HiPIMS plasmas, showing commonalities and differences. To limit the scope, emphasis is put on plasma properties, as opposed to surveying the vast literature on specific film materials and their properties.« less

  8. Plasma relaxation mechanics of pulsed high power microwave surface flashover

    SciTech Connect

    Beeson, S.; Dickens, J.; Neuber, A.

    2013-09-15

    Microwave transmission and reflection characteristics of pulsed radio frequency field generated plasmas are elucidated for air, N{sub 2}, and He environments under pressure conditions ranging from 10 to 600 torr. The pulsed, low temperature plasma is generated along the atmospheric side of the dielectric boundary between the source (under vacuum) and the radiating environment with a thickness on the order of 5 mm and a cross sectional area just smaller than that of the waveguide. Utilizing custom multi-standard waveguide couplers and a continuous low power probing source, the scattering parameters were measured before, during, and after the high power microwave pulse with emphasis on the latter. From these scattering parameters, temporal electron density estimations (specifically the longitudinal integral of the density) were calculated using a 1D plane wave-excited model for analysis of the relaxation processes associated. These relaxation characteristics ultimately determine the maximum repetition rate for many pulsed electric field applications and thus are applicable to a much larger scope in the plasma community than just those related to high power microwaves. This manuscript discusses the diagnostic setup for acquiring the power measurements along with a detailed description of the kinematic and chemical behavior of the plasma as it decays down to its undisturbed state under various gas type and pressure conditions.

  9. Physics of Plasma-Based Ion Implantation&Deposition (PBIID)and High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HIPIMS): A Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2007-08-28

    The emerging technology of High Power Impulse MagnetronSputtering (HIPIMS) has much in common with the more establishedtechnology of Plasma Based Ion Implantation&Deposition (PBIID):both use pulsed plasmas, the pulsed sheath periodically evolves andcollapses, the plasma-sheath system interacts with the pulse-drivingpower supply, the plasma parameters are affected by the power dissipated,surface atoms are sputtered and secondary electrons are emitted, etc.Therefore, both fields of science and technology could learn from eachother, which has not been fully explored. On the other hand, there aresignificant differences, too. Most importantly, the operation of HIPIMSheavilyrelies on the presence of a strong magnetic field, confiningelectrons and causing their ExB drift, which is closed for typicalmagnetron configurations. Second, at the high peak power levels used forHIPIMS, 1 kW/cm2 or greater averaged over the target area, the sputteredmaterial greatly affects plasma generation. For PBIID, in contrast,plasma generation and ion processing of the surface (ion implantation,etching, and deposition) are considered rela-tively independentprocesses. Third, secondary electron emission is generally considered anuisance for PBIID, especially at high voltages, whereas it is a criticalingredient to the operation of HIPIMS. Fourth, the voltages in PBIID areoften higher than in HIPIMS. For the first three reasons listed above,modelling of PBIID seems to be easier and could give some guidance forfuture HIPIMS models, which, clearly, will be more involved.

  10. Possible high power limitations from RF pulsed heating

    SciTech Connect

    Pritzkau, D.P.; Bowden, G.B.; Menegat, A.; Siemann, R.H.

    1999-05-01

    One of the possible limitations to achieving high power in RF structures is damage to metal surfaces due to RF pulsed heating. Such damage may lead to degradation of RF performance. An experiment to study RF pulsed heating on copper has been developed at SLAC. The experiment consists of operating two pillbox cavities in the TE{sub 011} mode using a 50 MW X-Band klystron. The estimated temperature rise of the surface of copper is 350&hthinsp;{degree}C for a power input of 20 MW to each cavity with a pulse length of 1.5 {mu}s. Preliminary results from an experiment performed earlier are presented. A revised design for continued experiments is also presented along with relevant theory and calculations. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. High Power Particle Beams and Pulsed Power for Industrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluhm, Hansjoachim; An, Wladimir; Engelko, Wladimir; Giese, Harald; Frey, Wolfgang; Heinzel, Annette; Hoppé, Peter; Mueller, Georg; Schultheiss, Christoph; Singer, Josef; Strässner, Ralf; Strauß, Dirk; Weisenburger, Alfons; Zimmermann, Fritz

    2002-12-01

    Several industrial scale projects with economic and ecologic potential are presently emanating from research and development in the fields of high power particle beams and pulsed power in Europe. Material surface modifications with large area pulsed electron beams are used to protect high temperature gas turbine blades and steel structures in Pb/Bi cooled accelerator driven nuclear reactor systems against oxidation and corrosion respectively. Channel spark electron beams are applied to deposit bio-compatible or bio-active layers on medical implants. Cell membranes are perforated with strong pulsed electric fields to extract nutritive substances or raw materials from the cells and to kill bacteria for sterilization of liquids. Eletrodynamic fragmentation devices are developed to reutilize concrete aggregates for the production of high quality secondary concrete. All activities have a large potential to contribute to a more sustainable economy.

  12. High power amplification of a tailored-pulse fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saby, Julien; Sangla, Damien; Caplette, Stéphane; Boula-Picard, Reynald; Drolet, Mathieu; Reid, Benoit; Salin, François

    2013-02-01

    We demonstrate the amplification of a 1064nm pulse-programmable fiber laser with Large Pitch Rod-Type Fibers of various Mode field diameters from 50 to 70 μm. We have developed a high power fiber amplifier at 1064nm delivering up to 100W/1mJ at 15ns pulses and 30W/300μJ at 2ns with linearly polarized and diffraction limited output beam (M²<1.2). The specific seeder from ESI - Pyrophotonics Lasers used in the experiment allowed us to obtain tailored-pulse programmable on demand at the output from 2ns to 600ns for various repetition rates from 10 to 500 kHz. We could demonstrate square pulses or any other shapes (also multi-pulses) whatever the repetition rate or the pulse duration. We also performed frequency conversion with LBO crystals leading to 50W at 532nm and 25W at 355nm with a diffraction limited output. Similar experiments performed at 1032nm are also reported.

  13. Innovation on high-power long-pulse gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvak, Alexander; Sakamoto, Keishi; Thumm, Manfred

    2011-12-01

    Progress in the worldwide development of high-power gyrotrons for magnetic confinement fusion plasma applications is described. After technology breakthroughs in research on gyrotron components in the 1990s, significant progress has been achieved in the last decade, in particular, in the field of long-pulse and continuous wave (CW) gyrotrons for a wide range of frequencies. At present, the development of 1 MW-class CW gyrotrons has been very successful; these are applicable for self-ignition experiments on fusion plasmas and their confinement in the tokamak ITER, for long-pulse confinement experiments in the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) and for EC H&CD in the future tokamak JT-60SA. For this progress in the field of high-power long-pulse gyrotrons, innovations such as the realization of high-efficiency stable oscillation in very high order cavity modes, the use of single-stage depressed collectors for energy recovery, highly efficient internal quasi-optical mode converters and synthetic diamond windows have essentially contributed. The total tube efficiencies are around 50% and the purity of the fundamental Gaussian output mode is 97% and higher. In addition, activities for advanced gyrotrons, e.g. a 2 MW gyrotron using a coaxial cavity, multi-frequency 1 MW gyrotrons and power modulation technology, have made progress.

  14. 94 GHz pulsed coherent radar for high power amplifier evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Duncan A.; Hunter, Robert I.; Gallacher, Thomas F.

    2016-05-01

    We present the design and characterization of a 94 GHz pulsed coherent radar to be used for the evaluation and demonstration of novel wideband, high power vacuum tube amplifier technology. The radar is designed to be fully coherent and exploits a low phase noise architecture to maximize Doppler performance. We selected to use horn-fed Fresnel zone plate lens antennas (FZPs) with 4-level phase quantization as a low cost method of realizing large aperture (0.5 m) antennas. The measured performance of these FZPs agrees closely with the design predictions and exceeds that obtainable with a Cassegrain of an equivalent size.

  15. Study of cobalt mononitride thin films prepared using DC and high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Rachana; Pandey, Nidhi; Behera, Layanta; Gupta, Mukul

    2016-05-01

    In this work we studied cobalt mononitride (CoN) thin films deposited using dc magnetron sputtering (dcMS) and high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS). A Co target was sputtered using pure N2 gas alone as the sputtering medium. Obtained long-range structural ordering was studies using x-ray diffraction (XRD), short-range structure using Co L2,3 and N K absorption edges using soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and the surface morphology using atomic force microscopy (AFM). It was found that HiPIMS deposited films have better long-range ordering, better stoichiometric ratio for mononitride composition and smoother texture as compared to dcMS deposited films. In addition, the thermal stability of HiPIMS deposited CoN film seems to be better. On the basis of different type of plasma conditions generated in HiPIMS and dcMS process, obtained results are presented and discussed.

  16. Distance-dependent plasma composition and ion energy in high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Ehiasarian, Arutiun P; Andersson, Joakim; Anders, André

    2010-04-18

    The plasma composition of high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) has been studied for titanium and chromium targets using a combined energy analyser and quadrupole mass spectrometer. Measurements were done at distances from 50 to 300 mm from the sputtering target. Ti and Cr are similar in atomic mass but have significantly different sputter yields, which gives interesting clues on the effect of the target on plasma generation and transport of atoms. The Ti and Cr HIPIMS plasmas operated at a peak target current density of ~;;0.5 A cm-2. The measurements of the argon and metal ion content as well as the ion energy distribution functions showed that (1) singly and doubly charged ions were found for argon as well as for the target metal, (2) the majority of ions were singly charged argon for both metals at all distances investigated, (3) the Cr ion density was maintained to distances further from the target than Ti. Gas rarefaction was identified as a main factor promoting transport of metal ions, with the stronger effect observed for Cr, the material with higher sputter yield. Cr ions were found to displace a significant portion of the gas ions, whereas this was less evident in the Ti case. The observations indicate that the presence of metal vapour promotes charge exchange and reduces the electron temperature and thereby practically prevents the production of Ar2+ ions near the target. The content of higher charge states of metal ions depends on the probability of charge exchange with argon.

  17. Particle visualization in high-power impulse magnetron sputtering. I. 2D density mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Britun, Nikolay Palmucci, Maria; Konstantinidis, Stephanos; Snyders, Rony

    2015-04-28

    Time-resolved characterization of an Ar-Ti high-power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge has been performed. This paper deals with two-dimensional density mapping in the discharge volume obtained by laser-induced fluorescence imaging. The time-resolved density evolution of Ti neutrals, singly ionized Ti atoms (Ti{sup +}), and Ar metastable atoms (Ar{sup met}) in the area above the sputtered cathode is mapped for the first time in this type of discharges. The energetic characteristics of the discharge species are additionally studied by Doppler-shift laser-induced fluorescence imaging. The questions related to the propagation of both the neutral and ionized discharge particles, as well as to their spatial density distributions, are discussed.

  18. An explosively driven high-power microwave pulsed power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsayed, M. A.; Neuber, A. A.; Dickens, J. C.; Walter, J. W.; Kristiansen, M.; Altgilbers, L. L.

    2012-02-01

    The increased popularity of high power microwave systems and the various sources to drive them is the motivation behind the work to be presented. A stand-alone, self-contained explosively driven high power microwave pulsed power system has been designed, built, and tested at Texas Tech University's Center for Pulsed Power and Power Electronics. The system integrates four different sub-units that are composed of a battery driven prime power source utilizing capacitive energy storage, a dual stage helical flux compression generator as the main energy amplification device, an integrated power conditioning system with inductive energy storage including a fast opening electro-explosive switch, and a triode reflex geometry virtual cathode oscillator as the microwave radiating source. This system has displayed a measured electrical source power level of over 5 GW and peak radiated microwaves of about 200 MW. It is contained within a 15 cm diameter housing and measures 2 m in length, giving a housing volume of slightly less than 39 l. The system and its sub-components have been extensively studied, both as integrated and individual units, to further expand on components behavior and operation physics. This report will serve as a detailed design overview of each of the four subcomponents and provide detailed analysis of the overall system performance and benchmarks.

  19. Characterization of polycrystalline VO2 thin film with low phase transition temperature fabricated by high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tiegui; Wang, Langping; Wang, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Yufen

    2016-04-01

    VO2 is a unique material that undergoes a reversible phase transformation around 68∘C. Currently, applications of VO2 on smart windows are limited by its high transition temperature. In order to reduce the temperature, VO2 thin film was fabricated on quartz glass substrate by high power impulse magnetron sputtering with a modulated pulsed power. The phase transition temperature has been reduced to as low as 32∘C. In addition, the VO2 film possesses a typical metal-insulator transition. X-ray diffraction and selected area electron diffraction patterns reveal that an obvious lattice distortion has been formed in the as-deposited polycrystalline VO2 thin film. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy proves that oxygen vacancies have been formed in the as-deposited thin film, which will induce a lattice distortion in the VO2 thin film.

  20. Ion energies in high power impulse magnetron sputtering with and without localized ionization zones

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yuchen; Tanaka, Koichi; Liu, Jason; Anders, André

    2015-03-23

    High speed imaging of high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges has revealed that ionization is localized in moving ionization zones but localization disappears at high currents for high yield targets. This offers an opportunity to study the effect ionization zones have on ion energies. We measure that ions have generally higher energies when ionization zones are present, supporting the concept that these zones are associated with moving potential humps. We propose that the disappearance of ionization zones is caused by an increased supply of atoms from the target which cools electrons and reduces depletion of atoms to be ionized.

  1. Spectroscopic imaging of self-organization in high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 2, 117543 Singapore, Singapore; Andersson, Joakim; Ni, Pavel; Anders, Andre

    2013-07-17

    Excitation and ionization conditions in traveling ionization zones of high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasmas were investigated using fast camera imaging through interference filters. The images, taken in end-on and side on views using light of selected gas and target atom and ion spectral lines, suggest that ionization zones are regions of enhanced densities of electrons, and excited atoms and ions. Excited atoms and ions of the target material (Al) are strongly concentrated near the target surface. Images from the highest excitation energies exhibit the most localized regions, suggesting localized Ohmic heating consistent with double layer formation.

  2. Alfven's critical ionization velocity observed in high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Brenning, N.; Lundin, D.

    2012-09-15

    Azimuthally rotating dense plasma structures, spokes, have recently been detected in several high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) devices used for thin film deposition and surface treatment, and are thought to be important for plasma buildup, energizing of electrons, as well as cross-B transport of charged particles. In this work, the drift velocities of these spokes are shown to be strongly correlated with the critical ionization velocity, CIV, proposed by Alfven. It is proposed as the most promising approach in combining the CIV and HiPIMS research fields is to focus on the role of spokes in the process of electron energization.

  3. Influence of high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasma ionization on the microstructure of TiN thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehiasarian, A. P.; Vetushka, A.; Gonzalvo, Y. Aranda; Sáfrán, G.; Székely, L.; Barna, P. B.

    2011-05-01

    HIPIMS (High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering) discharge is a new PVD technology for the deposition of high-quality thin films. The deposition flux contains a high degree of metal ionization and nitrogen dissociation. The microstructure of HIPIMS-deposited nitride films is denser compared to conventional sputter technologies. However, the mechanisms acting on the microstructure, texture and properties have not been discussed in detail so far. In this study, the growth of TiN by HIPIMS of Ti in mixed Ar and N2 atmosphere has been investigated. Varying degrees of metal ionization and nitrogen dissociation were produced by increasing the peak discharge current (Id) from 5 to 30 A. The average power was maintained constant by adjusting the frequency. Mass spectrometry measurements of the deposition flux revealed a high content of ionized film-forming species, such as Ti1+, Ti2+ and atomic nitrogen N1+. Ti1+ ions with energies up to 50 eV were detected during the pulse with reducing energy in the pulse-off times. Langmuir probe measurements showed that the peak plasma density during the pulse was 3 × 1016 m-3. Plasma density, and ion flux ratios of N1+: N21+ and Ti1+: Ti0 increased linearly with peak current. The ratios exceeded 1 at 30 A. TiN films deposited by HIPIMS were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. At high Id, N1+: N21+> 1 and Ti1+: Ti0> 1 were produced; a strong 002 texture was present and column boundaries in the films were atomically tight. As Id reduced and N1+: N21+ and Ti1+: Ti0 dropped below 1, the film texture switched to strong 111 with a dense structure. At very low Id, porosity between columns developed. The effects of the significant activation of the deposition flux observed in the HIPIMS discharge on the film texture, microstructure, morphology and properties are discussed.

  4. Investigation of a high power electromagnetic pulse source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuwei; Chen, Dongqun; Zhang, Jiande; Cao, Shengguang; Li, Da; Liu, Chebo

    2012-09-01

    A high power electromagnetic pulse source with a resonant antenna driven by a compact power supply was investigated in this paper. To match the impedance of the resonant antenna and initial power source, a compact power conditioning circuit based on electro exploding opening switch (EEOS) and pulsed transformer was adopted. In the preliminary experiments, an impulse capacitor was used to drive the system. With the opening of the EEOS at the current of 15 kA flowing trough the primary of the transformer, the resonant antenna was rapidly charged to about -370 kV within a time of about 100 ns. When the switch in the resonant antenna closed at the charging voltage of about -202 kV, the peak intensity of the detected electric field at a distance of about 10 m from the center of the source was 7.2 kV/m. The corresponding peak power of the radiated electromagnetic field reached 76 MW, while the total radiated electromagnetic energy was about 0.65 J. The total energy efficiency of the resonant antenna was about 22% which can be improved by increasing the closing rapidity of the switch in the antenna.

  5. Investigation of a high power electromagnetic pulse source.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuwei; Chen, Dongqun; Zhang, Jiande; Cao, Shengguang; Li, Da; Liu, Chebo

    2012-09-01

    A high power electromagnetic pulse source with a resonant antenna driven by a compact power supply was investigated in this paper. To match the impedance of the resonant antenna and initial power source, a compact power conditioning circuit based on electro exploding opening switch (EEOS) and pulsed transformer was adopted. In the preliminary experiments, an impulse capacitor was used to drive the system. With the opening of the EEOS at the current of 15 kA flowing trough the primary of the transformer, the resonant antenna was rapidly charged to about -370 kV within a time of about 100 ns. When the switch in the resonant antenna closed at the charging voltage of about -202 kV, the peak intensity of the detected electric field at a distance of about 10 m from the center of the source was 7.2 kV∕m. The corresponding peak power of the radiated electromagnetic field reached 76 MW, while the total radiated electromagnetic energy was about 0.65 J. The total energy efficiency of the resonant antenna was about 22% which can be improved by increasing the closing rapidity of the switch in the antenna. PMID:23020399

  6. High power linear pulsed beam annealer. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Strathman, M.D.; Sadana, D.K.; True, R.B.

    1980-11-26

    A high power pulsed electron beam system for annealing semiconductors is comprised of an electron gun having a heated cathode, control grid and focus ring for confining the pulsed beam of electrons to a predetermined area, and a curved drift tube. The drift tube and an annular Faraday shield between the focus ring and the drift tube are maintained at a high positive voltage with respect to the cathode to accelerate electrons passing through the focus ring, thereby eliminating space charge limitations on the emission of electrons from said gun. A coil surrounding the curved drift tube provides a magnetic field which maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the tube. The magnetic field produced by the coil around the curved tube imparts motion to electrons in a spiral path for shallow penetration of the electrons into a target. It also produces a scalloped profile of the electron beam. A second drift tube spaced a predetermined distance from the curved tube is positioned with its axis aligned with the axis of the first drift tube. The second drift tube and the target holder are maintained at a reference voltage between the cathode voltage and the curved tube voltage to decelerate the electrons. A second coil surrounding the second drift tube, maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the second drift tube. The magnetic field of the second coil comprises the electron beam to the area of the semiconductor on the target holder.

  7. Pulsed high-power yellow-orange VECSEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantola, Emmi; Leinonen, Tomi; Ranta, Sanna; Tavast, Miki; Guina, Mircea

    2014-05-01

    We report on the development of a pulsed high-power frequency doubled vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser (VECSEL) with a peak output power of 14 W and emission spectrum near 588 nm. The semiconductor gain chip was grown by molecular beam epitaxy and comprised 10 GaInAs quantum wells. The gain structure was designed to be antiresonant at 1180 nm. The fundamental wavelength was frequency doubled to the yellow-orange spectral range using a 10-mm long critically phase matched lithium triborate nonlinear crystal, situated at the mode waist of the V-shaped laser cavity. The emission spectrum was narrowed down to FWHM of < 0.2 nm by employing a 1.5 mm birefringent filter and a 100-μm-thick etalon inside the cavity. By directly modulating the pump laser of the VECSEL, we were able to produce pulse widths down to 570 ns with average and peak output power of 81 mW and 14 W, respectively. The repetition rate was kept constant at 10 kHz throughout the measurements. The maximum peak power obtained was pump power limited. In comparison, at the same coolant temperature, a maximum of 8.5 W was achieved in continuous wave. The maximum optical-to-optical conversion efficiency (absorbed peak pump power to peak output power) was calculated to be 20-21 %.

  8. Particle visualization in high-power impulse magnetron sputtering. II. Absolute density dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Britun, Nikolay Palmucci, Maria; Konstantinidis, Stephanos; Snyders, Rony

    2015-04-28

    Time-resolved characterization of an Ar-Ti high-power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge has been performed. The present, second, paper of the study is related to the discharge characterization in terms of the absolute density of species using resonant absorption spectroscopy. The results on the time-resolved density evolution of the neutral and singly-ionized Ti ground state atoms as well as the metastable Ti and Ar atoms during the discharge on- and off-time are presented. Among the others, the questions related to the inversion of population of the Ti energy sublevels, as well as to re-normalization of the two-dimensional density maps in terms of the absolute density of species, are stressed.

  9. Novel high power impulse magnetron sputtering enhanced by an auxiliary electrical field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunwei; Tian, Xiubo

    2016-08-01

    The high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) technique is a novel highly ionized physical vapor deposition method with a high application potential. However, the electron utilization efficiency during sputtering is rather low and the metal particle ionization rate needs to be considerably improved to allow for a large-scale industrial application. Therefore, we enhanced the HIPIMS technique by simultaneously applying an electric field (EF-HIPIMS). The effect of the electric field on the discharge process was studied using a current sensor and an optical emission spectrometer. Furthermore, the spatial distribution of the electric potential and electric field during the EF-HIPIMS process was simulated using the ANSYS software. The results indicate that a higher electron utilization efficiency and a higher particle ionization rate could be achieved. The auxiliary anode obviously changed the distribution of the electric potential and the electric field in the discharge region, which increased the plasma density and enhanced the degree of ionization of the vanadium and argon gas. Vanadium films were deposited to further compare both techniques, and the morphology of the prepared films was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The films showed a smaller crystal grain size and a denser growth structure when the electric field was applied during the discharge process.

  10. ZrN coatings deposited by high power impulse magnetron sputtering and cathodic arc techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Purandare, Yashodhan Ehiasarian, Arutiun; Hovsepian, Papken; Santana, Antonio

    2014-05-15

    Zirconium nitride (ZrN) coatings were deposited on 1 μm finish high speed steel and 316L stainless steel test coupons. Cathodic Arc (CA) and High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HIPIMS) + Unbalanced Magnetron Sputtering (UBM) techniques were utilized to deposit coatings. CA plasmas are known to be rich in metal and gas ions of the depositing species as well as macroparticles (droplets) emitted from the arc sports. Combining HIPIMS technique with UBM in the same deposition process facilitated increased ion bombardment on the depositing species during coating growth maintaining high deposition rate. Prior to coating deposition, substrates were pretreated with Zr{sup +} rich plasma, for both arc deposited and HIPIMS deposited coatings, which led to a very high scratch adhesion value (L{sub C2}) of 100 N. Characterization results revealed the overall thickness of the coatings in the range of 2.5 μm with hardness in the range of 30–40 GPa depending on the deposition technique. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and tribological experiments such as dry sliding wear tests and corrosion studies have been utilized to study the effects of ion bombardment on the structure and properties of these coatings. In all the cases, HIPIMS assisted UBM deposited coating fared equal or better than the arc deposited coatings, the reasons being discussed in this paper. Thus H+U coatings provide a good alternative to arc deposited where smooth, dense coatings are required and macrodroplets cannot be tolerated.

  11. Novel high power impulse magnetron sputtering enhanced by an auxiliary electrical field.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunwei; Tian, Xiubo

    2016-08-01

    The high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) technique is a novel highly ionized physical vapor deposition method with a high application potential. However, the electron utilization efficiency during sputtering is rather low and the metal particle ionization rate needs to be considerably improved to allow for a large-scale industrial application. Therefore, we enhanced the HIPIMS technique by simultaneously applying an electric field (EF-HIPIMS). The effect of the electric field on the discharge process was studied using a current sensor and an optical emission spectrometer. Furthermore, the spatial distribution of the electric potential and electric field during the EF-HIPIMS process was simulated using the ANSYS software. The results indicate that a higher electron utilization efficiency and a higher particle ionization rate could be achieved. The auxiliary anode obviously changed the distribution of the electric potential and the electric field in the discharge region, which increased the plasma density and enhanced the degree of ionization of the vanadium and argon gas. Vanadium films were deposited to further compare both techniques, and the morphology of the prepared films was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The films showed a smaller crystal grain size and a denser growth structure when the electric field was applied during the discharge process. PMID:27587123

  12. Investigation of high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) discharge using fast ICCD camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecimovic, Ante

    2012-10-01

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) combines impulse glow discharges at power levels up to the MW range with conventional magnetron cathodes to achieve a highly ionised sputtered flux. The dynamics of the HIPIMS discharge was investigated using fast Intensified Charge Coupled Device (ICCD) camera. In the first experiment the HIPIMS plasma was recorded from the side with goal to analyse the plasma intensity using Abel inversion to obtain the emissivity maps of the plasma species. Resulting emissivity maps provide the information on the spatial distribution of Ar and sputtered material and evolution of the plasma chemistry above the cathode. In the second experiment the plasma emission was recorded with camera facing the target. The images show that the HIPIMS plasma develops drift wave type instabilities characterized by well defined regions of high and low plasma emissivity along the racetrack of the magnetron. The instabilities cause periodic shifts in the floating potential. The structures rotate in ExB direction at velocities of 10 kms-1 and frequencies up to 200 kHz. The high emissivity regions comprise Ar and metal ion emission with strong Ar and metal neutral emission depletion. A detailed analysis of the temporal evolution of the saturated instabilities using four consequently triggered fast ICCD cameras is presented. Furthermore working gas pressure and discharge current variation showed that the shape and the speed of the instability strongly depend on the working gas and target material combination. In order to better understand the mechanism of the instability, different optical interference band pass filters (of metal and gas atom, and ion lines) were used to observe the spatial distribution of each species within the instability.

  13. Downstream plasma transport and metal ionization in a high-powered pulsed-plasma magnetron

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Liang; Szott, Matthew M.; McLain, Jake T.; Ruzic, David N.; Yu, He

    2014-06-14

    Downstream plasma transport and ionization processes in a high-powered pulsed-plasma magnetron were studied. The temporal evolution and spatial distribution of electron density (n{sub e}) and temperature (T{sub e}) were characterized with a 3D scanning triple Langmuir probe. Plasma expanded from the racetrack region into the downstream region, where a high n{sub e} peak was formed some time into the pulse-off period. The expansion speed and directionality towards the substrate increased with a stronger magnetic field (B), largely as a consequence of a larger potential drop in the bulk plasma region during a relatively slower sheath formation. The fraction of Cu ions in the deposition flux was measured on the substrate using a gridded energy analyzer. It increased with higher pulse voltage. With increased B field from 200 to 800 Gauss above racetrack, n{sub e} increased but the Cu ion fraction decreased from 42% to 16%. A comprehensive model was built, including the diffusion of as-sputtered Cu flux, the Cu ionization in the entire plasma region using the mapped n{sub e} and T{sub e} data, and ion extraction efficiency based on the measured plasma potential (V{sub p}) distribution. The calculations matched the measurements and indicated the main causes of lower Cu ion fractions in stronger B fields to be the lower T{sub e} and inefficient ion extraction in a larger pre-sheath potential.

  14. Downstream plasma transport and metal ionization in a high-powered pulsed-plasma magnetron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Liang; Yu, He; Szott, Matthew M.; McLain, Jake T.; Ruzic, David N.

    2014-06-01

    Downstream plasma transport and ionization processes in a high-powered pulsed-plasma magnetron were studied. The temporal evolution and spatial distribution of electron density (ne) and temperature (Te) were characterized with a 3D scanning triple Langmuir probe. Plasma expanded from the racetrack region into the downstream region, where a high ne peak was formed some time into the pulse-off period. The expansion speed and directionality towards the substrate increased with a stronger magnetic field (B), largely as a consequence of a larger potential drop in the bulk plasma region during a relatively slower sheath formation. The fraction of Cu ions in the deposition flux was measured on the substrate using a gridded energy analyzer. It increased with higher pulse voltage. With increased B field from 200 to 800 Gauss above racetrack, ne increased but the Cu ion fraction decreased from 42% to 16%. A comprehensive model was built, including the diffusion of as-sputtered Cu flux, the Cu ionization in the entire plasma region using the mapped ne and Te data, and ion extraction efficiency based on the measured plasma potential (Vp) distribution. The calculations matched the measurements and indicated the main causes of lower Cu ion fractions in stronger B fields to be the lower Te and inefficient ion extraction in a larger pre-sheath potential.

  15. SiNx Coatings Deposited by Reactive High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering: Process Parameters Influencing the Nitrogen Content.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Susann; Hänninen, Tuomas; Goyenola, Cecilia; Wissting, Jonas; Jensen, Jens; Hultman, Lars; Goebbels, Nico; Tobler, Markus; Högberg, Hans

    2016-08-10

    Reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering (rHiPIMS) was used to deposit silicon nitride (SiNx) coatings for biomedical applications. The SiNx growth and plasma characterization were conducted in an industrial coater, using Si targets and N2 as reactive gas. The effects of different N2-to-Ar flow ratios between 0 and 0.3, pulse frequencies, target power settings, and substrate temperatures on the discharge and the N content of SiNx coatings were investigated. Plasma ion mass spectrometry shows high amounts of ionized isotopes during the initial part of the pulse for discharges with low N2-to-Ar flow ratios of <0.16, while signals from ionized molecules rise with the N2-to-Ar flow ratio at the pulse end and during pulse-off times. Langmuir probe measurements show electron temperatures of 2-3 eV for nonreactive discharges and 5.0-6.6 eV for discharges in transition mode. The SiNx coatings were characterized with respect to their composition, chemical bond structure, density, and mechanical properties by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray reflectivity, X-ray diffraction, and nanoindentation, respectively. The SiNx deposition processes and coating properties are mainly influenced by the N2-to-Ar flow ratio and thus by the N content in the SiNx films and to a lower extent by the HiPIMS frequencies and power settings as well as substrate temperatures. Increasing N2-to-Ar flow ratios lead to decreasing growth rates, while the N content, coating densities, residual stresses, and the hardness increase. These experimental findings were corroborated by density functional theory calculations of precursor species present during rHiPIMS. PMID:27414283

  16. The use of segmented cathodes to determine the spoke current density distribution in high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Poolcharuansin, Phitsanu; Estrin, Francis Lockwood; Bradley, James W.

    2015-04-28

    The localized target current density associated with quasi-periodic ionization zones (spokes) has been measured in a high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge using an array of azimuthally separated and electrical isolated probes incorporated into a circular aluminum target. For a particular range of operating conditions (pulse energies up to 2.2 J and argon pressures from 0.2 to 1.9 Pa), strong oscillations in the probe current density are seen with amplitudes up to 52% above a base value. These perturbations, identified as spokes, travel around the discharge above the target in the E×B direction. Using phase information from the angularly separated probes, the spoke drift speeds, angular frequencies, and mode number have been determined. Generally, at low HiPIMS pulse energies E{sub p} < 0.8 J, spokes appear to be chaotic in nature (with random arrival times), however as E{sub p} increases, coherent spokes are observed with velocities between 6.5 and 10 km s{sup −1} and mode numbers m = 3 or above. At E{sub p} > 1.8 J, the plasma becomes spoke-free. The boundaries between chaotic, coherent, and no-spoke regions are weakly dependent on pressure. During each HiPIMS pulse, the spoke velocities increase by about 50%. Such an observation is explained by considering spoke velocities to be determined by the critical ionization velocity, which changes as the plasma composition changes during the pulse. From the shape of individual current density oscillations, it appears that the leading edge of the spoke is associated with a slow increase in local current density to the target and the rear with a more rapid decrease. The measurements show that the discharge current density associated with individual spokes is broadly spread over a wide region of the target.

  17. Enhancement of bioactivity on medical polymer surface using high power impulse magnetron sputtered titanium dioxide film.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi-Ju; Tsou, Hsi-Kai; Chen, Ying-Hung; Chung, Chi-Jen; He, Ju-Liang

    2015-12-01

    This study utilizes a novel technique, high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS), which provides a higher ionization rate and ion bombardment energy than direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS), to deposit high osteoblast compatible titanium dioxide (TiO2) coatings with anatase (A-TiO2) and rutile (R-TiO2) phases onto the biomedical polyetheretherketone (PEEK) polymer substrates at low temperature. The adhesions of TiO2 coatings that were fabricated using HIPIMS and DCMS were compared. The in vitro biocompatibility of these coatings was confirmed. The results reveal that HIPIMS can be used to prepare crystallinic columnar A-TiO2 and R-TiO2 coatings on PEEK substrate if the ratio of oxygen to argon is properly controlled. According to a tape adhesion test, the HIPIMS-TiO2 coatings had an adhesion grade of 5B even after they were immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) environments for 28days. Scratch tests proved that HIPIMS-TiO2 coatings undergo cohesive failure. These results demonstrate that the adhesive force between HIPIMS-TiO2 coating/PEEK is stronger than that between DCMS-TiO2 coating/PEEK. After a long period (28days) of immersion in SBF, a bone-like crystallinic hydroxyapatite layer with a corresponding Ca/P stoichiometry was formed on both HIPIMS-TiO2. The osteoblast compatibility of HIPIMS-TiO2 exceeded that of the bare PEEK substrate. It is also noticeable that the R-TiO2 performed better in vitro than the A-TiO2 due to the formation of many negatively charged hydroxyl groups (-OH(-)) groups on R-TiO2 (110) surface. In summary, the HIPIMS-TiO2 coatings satisfied the requirements for osseointegration, suggesting the possibility of using HIPIMS to modify the PEEK surface with TiO2 for spinal implants. PMID:26354240

  18. Reactive sputtering of δ-ZrH{sub 2} thin films by high power impulse magnetron sputtering and direct current magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Högberg, Hans Tengdelius, Lina; Eriksson, Fredrik; Broitman, Esteban; Lu, Jun; Jensen, Jens; Hultman, Lars; Samuelsson, Mattias

    2014-07-01

    Reactive sputtering by high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) and direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) of a Zr target in Ar/H{sub 2} plasmas was employed to deposit Zr-H films on Si(100) substrates, and with H content up to 61 at. % and O contents typically below 0.2 at. % as determined by elastic recoil detection analysis. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals a chemical shift of ∼0.7 eV to higher binding energies for the Zr-H films compared to pure Zr films, consistent with a charge transfer from Zr to H in a zirconium hydride. X-ray diffraction shows that the films are single-phase δ-ZrH{sub 2} (CaF{sub 2} type structure) at H content >∼55 at. % and pole figure measurements give a 111 preferred orientation for these films. Scanning electron microscopy cross-section images show a glasslike microstructure for the HiPIMS films, while the DCMS films are columnar. Nanoindentation yield hardness values of 5.5–7 GPa for the δ-ZrH{sub 2} films that is slightly harder than the ∼5 GPa determined for Zr films and with coefficients of friction in the range of 0.12–0.18 to compare with the range of 0.4–0.6 obtained for Zr films. Wear resistance testing show that phase-pure δ-ZrH{sub 2} films deposited by HiPIMS exhibit up to 50 times lower wear rate compared to those containing a secondary Zr phase. Four-point probe measurements give resistivity values in the range of ∼100–120 μΩ cm for the δ-ZrH{sub 2} films, which is slightly higher compared to Zr films with values in the range 70–80 μΩ cm.

  19. Influence of high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasma ionization on the microstructure of TiN thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Ehiasarian, A. P.; Vetushka, A.; Gonzalvo, Y. Aranda; Safran, G.; Szekely, L.; Barna, P. B.

    2011-05-15

    HIPIMS (High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering) discharge is a new PVD technology for the deposition of high-quality thin films. The deposition flux contains a high degree of metal ionization and nitrogen dissociation. The microstructure of HIPIMS-deposited nitride films is denser compared to conventional sputter technologies. However, the mechanisms acting on the microstructure, texture and properties have not been discussed in detail so far. In this study, the growth of TiN by HIPIMS of Ti in mixed Ar and N{sub 2} atmosphere has been investigated. Varying degrees of metal ionization and nitrogen dissociation were produced by increasing the peak discharge current (I{sub d}) from 5 to 30 A. The average power was maintained constant by adjusting the frequency. Mass spectrometry measurements of the deposition flux revealed a high content of ionized film-forming species, such as Ti{sup 1+}, Ti{sup 2+} and atomic nitrogen N{sup 1+}. Ti{sup 1+} ions with energies up to 50 eV were detected during the pulse with reducing energy in the pulse-off times. Langmuir probe measurements showed that the peak plasma density during the pulse was 3 x 10{sup 16} m{sup -3}. Plasma density, and ion flux ratios of N{sup 1+}: N{sub 2}{sup 1+} and Ti{sup 1+}: Ti{sup 0} increased linearly with peak current. The ratios exceeded 1 at 30 A. TiN films deposited by HIPIMS were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. At high I{sub d}, N{sup 1+}: N{sub 2}{sup 1+} > 1 and Ti{sup 1+}: Ti{sup 0} > 1 were produced; a strong 002 texture was present and column boundaries in the films were atomically tight. As I{sub d} reduced and N{sup 1+}: N{sub 2}{sup 1+} and Ti{sup 1+}: Ti{sup 0} dropped below 1, the film texture switched to strong 111 with a dense structure. At very low I{sub d}, porosity between columns developed. The effects of the significant activation of the deposition flux observed in the HIPIMS discharge on the film texture, microstructure, morphology and

  20. Current-Voltage Characteristics and Deposition of AlTiN Thin Films by High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wan-Yu; Su, Amei; Liu, Yawei; Yeh, Chi-Ming; Chen, Wei-Chih; Chang, Chi-Lung

    2015-09-01

    In this study, AlTiN thin films were deposited using a high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) process under a unipolar mode. The AlTi target had a composition of 70 at% Al and 30 at% Ti. Nitrogen was used as the reactive gas to deposite AlTiN thin films along with Ar gas at a working pressure of 1 ×10-3 torr. The target voltage and current were measured at different conditions including various duty cycles from 1 to 5%, pulse durations from 50 to 400 μs, target powers from 0.6 to 1.8 kW, and N2/Ar ratios from 0 to 1. Depending on the deposition condition, peak powers in the range of 104 to 105 W were observed. The effect of deposition conditions were discussed. For film deposition, the pulse duration and the duty cycle were fixed at 100 μs and 3%, respectively. A fixed bias of -150 V was applied to the substrates, including Si wafer, 304 stainless steel, and tungsten carbide.It was found that the nitrogen content increases with the N2/Ar ratio and then saturates. With increasing target power, a higher N2/Ar ratio was required for the AlTiN thin films to have a better mechanical properties. Meanwhile, the hardness of the AlTiN thin films also increases with the target power. The highest hardness of 41 GPa was observed as the N2/Ar ratio was 0.9 and the power was 1.8 kW. It was found that the amount Al-N bonding and the distribution of AlN phase within the AlTiN thin films play an important role in determining the mechanical properties.

  1. A parametric model for reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering of films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozák, Tomáš; Vlček, Jaroslav

    2016-02-01

    We present a time-dependent parametric model for reactive HiPIMS deposition of films. Specific features of HiPIMS discharges and a possible increase in the density of the reactive gas in front of the reactive gas inlets placed between the target and the substrate are considered in the model. The model makes it possible to calculate the compound fractions in two target layers and in one substrate layer, and the deposition rate of films at fixed partial pressures of the reactive and inert gas. A simplified relation for the deposition rate of films prepared using a reactive HiPIMS is presented. We used the model to simulate controlled reactive HiPIMS depositions of stoichiometric \\text{Zr}{{\\text{O}}2} films, which were recently carried out in our laboratories with two different configurations of the {{\\text{O}}2} inlets in front of the sputtered target. The repetition frequency was 500 Hz at the deposition-averaged target power densities of 5 Wcm-2and 50 Wcm-2 with a pulse-averaged target power density up to 2 kWcm-2. The pulse durations were 50 μs and 200 μs. Our model calculations show that the to-substrate {{\\text{O}}2} inlet provides systematically lower compound fractions in the target surface layer and higher compound fractions in the substrate surface layer, compared with the to-target {{\\text{O}}2} inlet. The low compound fractions in the target surface layer (being approximately 10% at the deposition-averaged target power density of 50 Wcm-2 and the pulse duration of 200 μs) result in high deposition rates of the films produced, which are in agreement with experimental values.

  2. PCF based high power narrow line width pulsed fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Yan, P.; Xiao, Q.; Wang, Y.; Gong, M.

    2012-09-01

    Based on semiconductor diode seeded multi-stage cascaded fiber amplifiers, we have obtained 88-W average power of a 1063-nm laser with high repetition rate of up to 1.5 MHz and a constant 2-ns pulse duration. No stimulated Brillouin scattering pulse or optical damage occurred although the maximum pulse peak power has exceeded 112 kW. The output laser exhibits excellent beam quality (M2x = 1.24 and M2y = 1.18), associated with a spectral line width as narrow as 0.065 nm (FWHM). Additionally, we demonstrate high polarization extinction ratio of 18.4 dB and good pulse stabilities superior to 1.6 % (RMS).

  3. High-power megavolt pulse generator with nanosecond rise time

    SciTech Connect

    Basov, G.F.; Bastrikov, A.N.; Koval`chuk, B.M.

    1995-10-01

    A pulse generator with a power of 0.1 TW, an amplitude of up to 2 MV and {approximately}1.5-nsec rise time is described. A Marx voltage pulse generator charges a low-inductance capacitor (1.8 nF) and a radial line (0.9 nF) to a voltage of {approximately}2 MV in 200 nsec. At the peak voltage, a water switch is actuated at the center of the radial line resulting in {approximately} 2.5-MV voltage pulse at the end of the line. This pulse propagates along the oil-insulated line. The line is connected to an oil-filled peaking switch with a metal diaphragm, which reduces the transfer capacitance of the discharge gap to 5 pF to match the radial-line wave impedance to the load connected to the switch output. A crossover switch may be used when operating in the short-pulse mode. A pulse with a width of up to 20 nsec has been generated across a load equivalent matched to the line.

  4. Novel plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition hardware and technique based on high power pulsed magnetron discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Zhongzhen; Tian Xiubo; Shi Jingwei; Wang Zeming; Gong Chunzhi; Yang Shiqin; Chu, Paul K.

    2011-03-15

    A novel plasma immersion ion implantation technique based on high power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HPPMS) discharge that can produce a high density metal plasma is described. The metal plasma is clean and does not suffer from contamination from macroparticles, and the process can be readily scaled up for industrial production. The hardware, working principle, and operation modes are described. A matching circuit is developed to modulate the high-voltage and HPPMS pulses to enable operation under different modes such as simultaneous implantation and deposition, pure implantation, and selective implantation. To demonstrate the efficacy of the system and technique, CrN films with a smooth and dense surface without macroparticles were produced. An excellent adhesion with a critical load of 59.9 N is achieved for the pure implantation mode.

  5. Optical ablation by high-power short-pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, B.C.; Feit, M.D.; Herman, S.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Shore, B.W.; Perry, M.D.

    1996-02-01

    Laser-induced damage threshold measurements were performed on homogeneous and multilayer dielectrics and gold-coated optics at 1053 and 526 nm for pulse durations {tau} ranging from 140 fs to 1 ns. Gold coatings were found, both experimentally and theoretically, to be limited to 0.6 J/cm{sup 2} in the subpicosecond range for 1053-nm pulses. In dielectrics, we find qualitative differences in the morphology of damage and a departure from the diffusion-dominated {tau}{sup 1/2} scaling that indicate that damage results from plasma formation and ablation for {tau}{le}10 ps and from conventional heating and melting for {tau}{approx_gt}50 ps. A theoretical model based on electron production by multiphoton ionization, joule heating, and collisional (avalanche) ionization is in quantitative agreement with both the pulse-width and the wavelength scaling of experimental results. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  6. Experiments with very-high-power RF pulses at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Hogg, H.A.; Loew, G.A.; Price, V.G.

    1983-03-01

    Experiments in which the powers of two SLAC klystrons were combined and fed into a resonant cavity pulse-compression system (SLED) are described. Pulse powers up to 65 MW into SLED were reached. The corresponding instantaneous peak power out of SLED was 390 MW. After normal initial aging, no persistent RF breakdown problems were encountered. X-radiation at the SLED cavities was generally less than 400 mR/h after aging. The theoretical relationship between x-radiation intensity and RF electric field strength is discussed.

  7. Micro-ablation with high power pulsed copper vapor lasers.

    PubMed

    Knowles, M

    2000-07-17

    Visible and UV lasers with nanosecond pulse durations, diffraction-limited beam quality and high pulse repetition rates have demonstrated micro-ablation in a wide variety of materials with sub-micron precision and sub-micron-sized heat-affected zones. The copper vapour laser (CVL) is one of the important industrial lasers for micro-ablation applications. Manufacturing applications for the CVL include orifice drilling in fuel injection components and inkjet printers, micro-milling of micromoulds, via hole drilling in printed circuit boards and silicon machining. Recent advances in higher power (100W visible, 5W UV), diffraction-limited, compact CVLs are opening new possibilities for manufacturing with this class of nanosecond laser. PMID:19404369

  8. Propagation of high-power microwave pulses in air breakdown environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, S. P.; Zhang, Y. S.; Kossey, Paul

    1990-01-01

    A chamber experiment is conducted to study the propagation of high-power microwave pulses through the air. Two mechanisms responsible for two different degrees of tail erosion have been identified experimentally. The optimum pulse amplitude for maximum energy transfer through the air has also been determined.

  9. Autonomous portable pulsed-periodical generator of high-power radiofrequency-pulses based on gas discharge with hollow cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulychev, Sergey V.; Dubinov, Alexander E.; L'vov, Igor L.; Popolev, Vyacheslav L.; Sadovoy, Sergey A.; Sadchikov, Eugeny A.; Selemir, Victor D.; Valiulina, Valeria K.; Vyalykh, Dmitry V.; Zhdanov, Victor S.

    2016-05-01

    Portable autonomous generator of high-power RF-pulses based on the gas discharge with hollow cathode has been designed, fabricated, and tested. Input and output characteristics are the following: discharge current amplitude is 800 A, duration of generated RF-pulses is 350 ns, carrier frequency is ˜90 MHz, power in RF-pulse is 0.5 MW, pulse repetition rate is 0.5 kHz, and device efficiency is ˜25%.

  10. Autonomous portable pulsed-periodical generator of high-power radiofrequency-pulses based on gas discharge with hollow cathode.

    PubMed

    Bulychev, Sergey V; Dubinov, Alexander E; L'vov, Igor L; Popolev, Vyacheslav L; Sadovoy, Sergey A; Sadchikov, Eugeny A; Selemir, Victor D; Valiulina, Valeria K; Vyalykh, Dmitry V; Zhdanov, Victor S

    2016-05-01

    Portable autonomous generator of high-power RF-pulses based on the gas discharge with hollow cathode has been designed, fabricated, and tested. Input and output characteristics are the following: discharge current amplitude is 800 A, duration of generated RF-pulses is 350 ns, carrier frequency is ∼90 MHz, power in RF-pulse is 0.5 MW, pulse repetition rate is 0.5 kHz, and device efficiency is ∼25%. PMID:27250451

  11. Generation of high-power nanosecond pulses from laser diode-pumped Nd:YAG lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Kinpui

    1988-01-01

    Simulation results are used to compare the pulse energy levels and pulse energy widths that can be achieved with LD-pumped Nd:YAG lasers for both the pulse-transmission mode (PTM) and pulse-reflection mode (PRM) Q-switching methods for pulse energy levels up to hundreds of microjoules and pulse widths as short as 1 ns. It is shown that high-power pulses with pulse widths as short as 1 ns can be generated with PTM Q-switched in LD-pumped Nd:YAG lasers. With the PRM Q-switching method, pulse widths as short as 2 ns and pulse energy at the level of a few hundred microjoules can also be achieved but require pumping with 8-10-mJ AlGaAs laser diode arrays.

  12. Drifting potential humps in ionization zones: The “propeller blades” of high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, André; Ni, Pavel; Panjan, Matjaž; Franz, Robert; Andersson, Joakim

    2013-09-30

    Ion energy distribution functions measured for high power impulse magnetron sputtering show features, such as a broad peak at several 10 eV with an extended tail, as well as asymmetry with respect to E×B, where E and B are the local electric and magnetic field vectors, respectively. Here it is proposed that those features are due to the formation of a potential hump of several 10 V in each of the traveling ionization zones. Potential hump formation is associated with a negative-positive-negative space charge that naturally forms in ionization zones driven by energetic drifting electrons.

  13. High-Power Multimode X-Band RF Pulse Compression System for Future Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Tantawi, S.G.; Nantista, C.D.; Dolgashev, V.A.; Pearson, C.; Nelson, J.; Jobe, K.; Chan, J.; Fant, K.; Frisch, J.; Atkinson, D.; /LLNL, Livermore

    2005-08-10

    We present a multimode X-band rf pulse compression system suitable for a TeV-scale electron-positron linear collider such as the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The NLC main linac operating frequency is 11.424 GHz. A single NLC rf unit is required to produce 400 ns pulses with 475 MW of peak power. Each rf unit should power approximately 5 m of accelerator structures. The rf unit design consists of two 75 MW klystrons and a dual-moded resonant-delay-line pulse compression system that produces a flat output pulse. The pulse compression system components are all overmoded, and most components are designed to operate with two modes. This approach allows high-power-handling capability while maintaining a compact, inexpensive system. We detail the design of this system and present experimental cold test results. We describe the design and performance of various components. The high-power testing of the system is verified using four 50 MW solenoid-focused klystrons run off a common 400 kV solid-state modulator. The system has produced 400 ns rf pulses of greater than 500 MW. We present the layout of our system, which includes a dual-moded transmission waveguide system and a dual-moded resonant line (SLED-II) pulse compression system. We also present data on the processing and operation of this system, which has set high-power records in coherent and phase controlled pulsed rf.

  14. Evolution of the plasma composition of a high power impulse magnetron sputtering system studied with a time-of-flight spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Oks, Efim

    2009-05-01

    The plasma of a high power impulse magnetron sputtering system has been investigated using a time-of-flight spectrometer. The target materials included high sputter yield materials (Cu, Ag), transition metals (Nb, Cr, Ti), and carbon (graphite); the sputtering gases were argon, krypton, and nitrogen, and two different target thicknesses were selected to consider the role of the magnetic field strength. Measurements for selected combinations of those parameters give quantitative information on the transition from gas-dominated to metal-dominated (self-sputtering) plasma, on the fractions of ion charge states, and in the case of molecular gases, on the fraction of atomic and molecular ions.

  15. Evolution of the plasma composition of a high power impulse magnetron sputtering system studied with a time-of-flight spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Oks, Efim; Anders, Andre

    2008-12-31

    The plasma of a high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) system has been investigated using a time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer. The target materials included high sputter yield materials (Cu, Ag), transition metals (Nb, Cr, Ti), and carbon (graphite); the sputtering gases were argon, krypton and nitrogen, and two different target thicknesses were selected to consider the role of the magnetic field strength. Measurements for selected combinations of those parameters give quantitative information on the transition from gas-dominated to metal-dominated (self-sputtering) plasma, on the fractions of ion charge states, and in the case of molecular gases, on the fraction of atomic and molecular ions.

  16. Improving Reliability of High Power Quasi-CW Laser Diode Arrays Operating in Long Pulse Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Lockard, George E.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Baker, Nathaniel R.

    2006-01-01

    Operating high power laser diode arrays in long pulse regime of about 1 msec, which is required for pumping 2-micron thulium and holmium-based lasers, greatly limits their useful lifetime. This paper describes performance of laser diode arrays operating in long pulse mode and presents experimental data of the active region temperature and pulse-to-pulse thermal cycling that are the primary cause of their premature failure and rapid degradation. This paper will then offer a viable approach for determining the optimum design and operational parameters leading to the maximum attainable lifetime.

  17. Generation of high-power ultrawideband electromagnetic pulses in a system with a coaxial tem horn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubanov, V. P.; Korovin, S. D.; Pegel', I. V.; Rostov, V. V.; Stepchenko, A. S.; Tarakanov, V. P.

    1996-12-01

    A coaxial TEM horn was designed on the basis of results from nonstationary computer modeling using code KARAT. With its high dielectric strength, this antenna is capable of radiating high-power ultrawideband nanosecond pulses. The pulse source used was a compact generator built around a coaxial forming line with a built-in Tesla transformer, which shapes pulses up to 1 GW high at repetition frequencies up to 1 kHz. The amplitude of the pulses on a matched load was 20 kV at a duration of 4 nsec. Returns of ultrawideband signals from objects with simple geometric shapes were studied in laboratory experiments using this radiator.

  18. Fiber laser pumped high power mid-infrared laser with picosecond pulse bunch output.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kaihua; Chen, Tao; Jiang, Peipei; Yang, Dingzhong; Wu, Bo; Shen, Yonghang

    2013-10-21

    We report a novel quasi-synchronously pumped PPMgLN-based high power mid-infrared (MIR) laser with picosecond pulse bunch output. The pump laser is a linearly polarized MOPA structured all fiberized Yb fiber laser with picosecond pulse bunch output. The output from a mode-locked seed fiber laser was directed to pass through a FBG reflector via a circulator to narrow the pulse duration from 800 ps to less than 50 ps and the spectral FWHM from 9 nm to 0.15 nm. The narrowed pulses were further directed to pass through a novel pulse multiplier through which each pulse was made to become a pulse bunch composing of 13 sub-pulses with pulse to pulse time interval of 1.26 ns. The pulses were then amplified via two stage Yb fiber amplifiers to obtain a linearly polarized high average power output up to 85 W, which were then directed to pass through an isolator and to pump a PPMgLN-based optical parametric oscillator via quasi-synchronization pump scheme for ps pulse bunch MIR output. High MIR output with average power up to 4 W was obtained at 3.45 micron showing the feasibility of such pump scheme for ps pulse bunch MIR output. PMID:24150378

  19. High-Power Laser Pulse Recirculation for Inverse Compton Scattering-Produced Gamma-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Jovanovic, I; Shverdin, M; Gibson, D; Brown, C

    2007-04-17

    Inverse Compton scattering of high-power laser pulses on relativistic electron bunches represents an attractive method for high-brightness, quasi-monoenergetic {gamma}-ray production. The efficiency of {gamma}-ray generation via inverse Compton scattering is severely constrained by the small Thomson scattering cross section. Furthermore, repetition rates of high-energy short-pulse lasers are poorly matched with those available from electron accelerators, resulting in low repetition rates for generated {gamma}-rays. Laser recirculation has been proposed as a method to address those limitations, but has been limited to only small pulse energies and peak powers. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate an alternative method for laser pulse recirculation that is uniquely capable of recirculating short pulses with energies exceeding 1 J. Inverse Compton scattering of recirculated Joule-level laser pulses has a potential to produce unprecedented peak and average {gamma}-ray brightness in the next generation of sources.

  20. High-Power Plasma Switch for 11.4 GHz Microwave Pulse Compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2010-03-04

    Results obtained in several experiments on active RF pulse compression at X-band using a magnicon as the high-power RF source are presented. In these experiments, microwave energy was stored in high-Q TE01 and TE02 modes of two parallel-fed resonators, and then discharged using switches activated with rapidly fired plasma discharge tubes. Designs and high-power tests of several versions of the compressor are described. In these experiments, coherent pulse superposition was demonstrated at a 5–9 MW level of incident power. The compressed pulses observed had powers of 50–70 MW and durations of 40–70 ns. Peak power gains were measured to be in the range of 7:1–11:1 with efficiency in the range of 50–63%.

  1. Experiment and theoretical study of the propagation of high power microwave pulse in air breakdown environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, S. P.; Ren, A.; Zhang, Y. S.

    1991-01-01

    In the study of the propagation of high power microwave pulse, one of the main concerns is how to minimize the energy loss of the pulse before reaching the destination. In the very high power region, one has to prevent the cutoff reflection caused by the excessive ionization in the background air. A frequency auto-conversion process which can lead to reflectionless propagation of powerful EM pulses in self-generated plasmas is studied. The theory shows that under the proper conditions the carrier frequency, omega, of the pulse will indeed shift upward with the growth of plasma frequency, omega(sub pe). Thus, the plasma during breakdown will always remain transparent to the pulse (i.e., omega greater than omega(sub pe)). A chamber experiment to demonstrate the frequency auto-conversion during the pulse propagation through the self-generated plasma is then conducted in a chamber. The detected frequency shift is compared with the theoretical result calculated y using the measured electron density distribution along the propagation path of the pulse. Good agreement between the theory and the experiment results is obtained.

  2. Dynamics of reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge studied by time- and space-resolved optical emission spectroscopy and fast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hala, M.; Viau, N.; Zabeida, O.; Klemberg-Sapieha, J. E.; Martinu, L.

    2010-02-15

    Time- and space-resolved optical emission spectroscopy and fast imaging were used for the investigation of the plasma dynamics of high-power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges. 200 {mu}s pulses with a 50 Hz repetition frequency were applied to a Cr target in Ar, N{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}/Ar mixtures and in a pressure range from 0.7 to 2.66 Pa. The power density peaked at 2.2-6 kW cm{sup -2}. Evidence of dominating self-sputtering was found for all investigated conditions. Up to four different discharge phases within each pulse were identified: (i) the ignition phase, (ii) the high-current metal-dominated phase, (iii) the transient phase, and (iv) the low-current gas-dominated phase. The emission of working gas excited by fast electrons penetrating the space in-between the electrodes during the ignition phase spread far outwards from the target at a speed of 24 km s{sup -1} in 1.3 Pa of Ar and at 7.5 km s{sup -1} in 1.3 Pa of N{sub 2}. The dense metal plasma created next to the target propagated in the reactor at a speed ranging from 0.7 to 3.5 km s{sup -1}, depending on the working gas composition and the pressure. In fact, it increased with higher N{sub 2} concentration and lower pressure. The form of the propagating plasma wave changed from a hemispherical shape in Ar, to a droplike shape extending far from the target in N{sub 2}. An important N{sub 2} emission rise in the latter case was detected during the transition at the end of the metal-dominated phase.

  3. Spatial distribution of average charge state and deposition rate in high power impulse magnetron sputtering of copper

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Horwat, David; Anders, Andre

    2008-05-10

    The spatial distribution of copper ions and atoms in high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) discharges was determined by (i) measuring the ion current to electrostatic probes and (ii) measuring the film thickness by profilometry. A set of electrostatic and collection probes were placed at different angular positions and distances from the target surface. The angular distribution of the deposition rate and the average charge state of the copper species (including ions and neutrals) were deduced.The discharge showed a distinct transition to a high current mode dominated by copper self-sputtering when the applied voltage exceeded the threshold of 535 V. For a lower voltage, the deposition rate was very low and the average charge state was found to be less than 0.4. For higher voltage (and average power), the absolute deposition rates were much higher, but they were smaller than the corresponding direct current (DC) rates if normalized to the same average power. At the high voltage level, the spatial distribution of the average charge state showed some similarities with the distribution of the magnetic field, suggesting that the generation and motion of copper ions is affected by magnetized electrons. At higher voltage, the average charge state increases with the distance from the target and locally may exceed unity, indicating the presence of significant amounts of doubly charged copper ions.

  4. Method and apparatus for sputtering utilizing an apertured electrode and a pulsed substrate bias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przybyszewski, J. S.; Shaltens, R. K. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    The method and equipment used for sputtering by use of an apertured electrode and a pulsed substrate bias are discussed. The technique combines the advantages of ion plating with the versatility of a radio frequency sputtered source. Electroplating is accomplished by passing a pulsed high voltage direct current to the article being plated during radio frequency sputtering.

  5. Observation of a periodic runaway in the reactive Ar/O{sub 2} high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Shayestehaminzadeh, Seyedmohammad E-mail: shayesteh@mch.rwth-aachen.de; Arnalds, Unnar B.; Magnusson, Rögnvaldur L.; Olafsson, Sveinn

    2015-11-15

    This paper reports the observation of a periodic runaway of plasma to a higher density for the reactive discharge of the target material (Ti) with moderate sputter yield. Variable emission of secondary electrons, for the alternating transition of the target from metal mode to oxide mode, is understood to be the main reason for the runaway occurring periodically. Increasing the pulsing frequency can bring the target back to a metal (or suboxide) mode, and eliminate the periodic transition of the target. Therefore, a pulsing frequency interval is defined for the reactive Ar/O{sub 2} discharge in order to sustain the plasma in a runaway-free mode without exceeding the maximum power that the magnetron can tolerate.

  6. Spectral variation of high power microwave pulse propagating in a self-generated plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ren, A.; Kuo, S. P.; Kossey, Paul

    1995-01-01

    A systematic study to understand the spectral variation of a high power microwave pulse propagating in a self-generated plasma is carried out. It includes the theoretical formulation, experimental demonstration, and computer simulations and computer experiments. The experiment of pulse propagation is conducted in a vacuum chamber filled with dry air (approximately 0.2 torr); the chamber is made of a 2 ft. cube of Plexiglas. A rectangular microwave pulse (1 microsec pulse width and 3.27 GHz carrier frequency) is fed into the cube through an S band microwave horn placed at one side of the chamber. A second S-band horn placed at the opposite side of the chamber is used to receive the transmitted pulse. The spectra of the incident pulse and transmitted pulse are then compared. As the power of the incident pulse is only slightly (less than 15%) above the breakdown threshold power of the background air, the peak of the spectrum of the transmitted pulse is upshifted from the carrier frequency 3.27 GHz of the incident pulse. However, as the power of the incident pulse exceeds the breakdown threshold power of the background air by 30%, a different phenomenon appears. The spectrum of the transmitted pulse begins to have two peaks. One is upshifted and the other one downshifted from the single peak location of the incident pulse. The amount of frequency downshift is comparable to that of the upshifted frequency. A theoretical model describing the experiment of pulse propagation in a self-generated plasma is developed. There are excellent agreements between the experimental results and computer simulations based on this theoretical model, which is also used to further carry out computer experiments identifying the role of plasma introduced wave loss on the result of frequency downshift phenomenon.

  7. Influence of a falling edge on high power microwave pulse combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiawei; Huang, Wenhua; Zhu, Qi; Xiao, Renzhen; Shao, Hao

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents an explanation of the influence of a microwave falling edge on high-power microwave pulse combination. Through particle-in-cell simulations, we discover that the falling edge is the driving factor that limits the output power of the combined pulses. We demonstrate that the space charge field, which accumulates to become comparable to the E-field at the falling edge of the former pulse, will trap the electrons in the gas layer and decrease its energy to attain a high ionization rate. Hence, avalanche discharge, caused by trapped electrons, makes the plasma density to approach the critical density and cuts off the latter microwave pulse. An X-band combination experiment is conducted with different pulse intervals. This experiment confirms that the high density plasma induced by the falling edge can cut off the latter pulse, and that the time required for plasma recombination in the transmission channel is several microseconds. To ensure a high output power for combined pulses, the latter pulse should be moved ahead of the falling edge of the former one, and consequently, a beat wave with high peak power becomes the output by adding two pulses with normal amplitudes.

  8. Design of pulsed guiding magnetic field for high power microwave generators.

    PubMed

    Ju, J-C; Zhang, H; Zhang, J; Shu, T; Zhong, H-H

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we present a comprehensive study on designing solenoid together with the corresponding power supply system to excite pulsed magnetic field required for high power microwave generators. Particularly, a solenoid is designed and the excited magnetic field is applied to a Ku-band overmoded Cerenkov generator. It is found in experiment that the electron beam is properly guided by the magnetic field and a 1.1 GW high power microwave is achieved at a central frequency of 13.76 GHz. Pulsed solenoid system has the advantages of compactness and low energy consumption, which are of great interest for repetitive operation. The reported studies and results can be generalized to other applications which require magnetic fields. PMID:25273750

  9. Design of pulsed guiding magnetic field for high power microwave generators

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, J.-C. Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Shu, T.; Zhong, H.-H.

    2014-09-15

    In this paper, we present a comprehensive study on designing solenoid together with the corresponding power supply system to excite pulsed magnetic field required for high power microwave generators. Particularly, a solenoid is designed and the excited magnetic field is applied to a Ku-band overmoded Cerenkov generator. It is found in experiment that the electron beam is properly guided by the magnetic field and a 1.1 GW high power microwave is achieved at a central frequency of 13.76 GHz. Pulsed solenoid system has the advantages of compactness and low energy consumption, which are of great interest for repetitive operation. The reported studies and results can be generalized to other applications which require magnetic fields.

  10. Genetic algorithm based optimization of pulse profile for MOPA based high power fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiawei; Tang, Ming; Shi, Jun; Fu, Songnian; Li, Lihua; Liu, Ying; Cheng, Xueping; Liu, Jian; Shum, Ping

    2015-03-01

    Although the Master Oscillator Power-Amplifier (MOPA) based fiber laser has received much attention for laser marking process due to its large tunabilty of pulse duration (from 10ns to 1ms), repetition rate (100Hz to 500kHz), high peak power and extraordinary heat dissipating capability, the output pulse deformation due to the saturation effect of fiber amplifier is detrimental for many applications. We proposed and demonstrated that, by utilizing Genetic algorithm (GA) based optimization technique, the input pulse profile from the master oscillator (current-driven laser diode) could be conveniently optimized to achieve targeted output pulse shape according to real parameters' constraints. In this work, an Yb-doped high power fiber amplifier is considered and a 200ns square shaped pulse profile is the optimization target. Since the input pulse with longer leading edge and shorter trailing edge can compensate the saturation effect, linear, quadratic and cubic polynomial functions are used to describe the input pulse with limited number of unknowns(<5). Coefficients of the polynomial functions are the optimization objects. With reasonable cost and hardware limitations, the cubic input pulse with 4 coefficients is found to be the best as the output amplified pulse can achieve excellent flatness within the square shape. Considering the bandwidth constraint of practical electronics, we examined high-frequency component cut-off effect of input pulses and found that the optimized cubic input pulses with 300MHz bandwidth is still quite acceptable to satisfy the requirement for the amplified output pulse and it is feasible to establish such a pulse generator in real applications.

  11. High-power, high-pressure pulsed CO{sub 2} lasers and their applications

    SciTech Connect

    Baranov, G A; Kuchinsky, A A

    2005-03-31

    The paper is devoted to problems associated with the construction of high-power pulsed CO{sub 2} lasers and high-pressure amplifiers and to an analysis of the possible ways of their solution. Prospects of the development of such lasers and their applications in technological processes are considered. Original designs of a laser complex for obtaining the carbon-13 isotope and a superatmospheric-pressure CO{sub 2} amplifier are presented. (lasers)

  12. Long pulse H- beam extraction with a rf driven ion source on a high power level.

    PubMed

    Kraus, W; Fantz, U; Franzen, P

    2010-02-01

    IPP Garching is investigating the applicability of rf driven negative ion sources for the neutral beam injection of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. The setup of the tested source was improved to enable long pulses up to 100 kW rf power. The efficiency of negative ion production decreases at high power. The extracted H(-) currents as well as the symmetry of the plasma density close to the plasma grid and of the beam divergence depend on the magnetic filter field. The pulse duration is limited by the increase in coextracted electrons, which depends on the rf power and the caesium conditions on the plasma grid. PMID:20192417

  13. Hardware-Software Complex for a Study of High-Power Microwave Pulse Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal'chenko, V. G.; Gladkova, T. A.

    2016-06-01

    An instrumental complex is developed for a study of high-power microwave pulse parameters. The complex includes a bench for calibrating detectors and a measuring instrument for evaluating the microwave pulse parameters. The calibration of the measurement channels of microwave pulses propagating through different elements of the experimental setup is an important problem of experimental research. The available software for calibration of the measuring channels has a significant disadvantage related with the necessity of input of a number of additional parameters directly into the program. The software realized in the Qt 4.5 C++ medium is presented, which significantly simplifies the process of calibration data input in the dialog mode of setting the parameters of the medium of microwave pulse propagation.

  14. Permeabilization of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell walls using nanosecond high power electrical pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stirke, A.; Zimkus, A.; Balevicius, S.; Stankevic, V.; Ramanaviciene, A.; Ramanavicius, A.; Zurauskiene, N.

    2014-12-01

    The electrical field-induced changes of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells permeabilization to tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP+) ions were studied using square-shaped, nanosecond duration high power electrical pulses. It was obtained that pulses having durations ranging from 10 ns to 60 ns, and generating electric field strengths up to 190 kV/cm significantly (up to 65 times) increase the absorption rate of TPP+ ions without any detectible influence on the yeast cell viability. The modelling of the TPP+ absorption process using a second order rate equation demonstrates that depending on the duration of the pulses, yeast cell clusters of different sizes are homogeniously permeabilized. It was concluded, that nanosecond pulse-induced permeabilization can be applied to increase the operational speed of whole cell biosensors.

  15. FERROELECTRIC SWITCH FOR A HIGH-POWER Ka-BAND ACTIVE PULSE COMPRESSOR

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2013-12-18

    Results are presented for design of a high-power microwave switch for operation at 34.3 GHz, intended for use in an active RF pulse compressor. The active element in the switch is a ring of ferroelectric material, whose dielectric constant can be rapidly changed by application of a high-voltage pulse. As envisioned, two of these switches would be built into a pair of delay lines, as in SLED-II at SLAC, so as to allow 30-MW μs-length Ka-band pulses to be compressed in time by a factor-of-9 and multiplied in amplitude to generate 200 MW peak power pulses. Such high-power pulses could be used for testing and evaluation of high-gradient mm-wave accelerator structures, for example. Evaluation of the switch design was carried out with an X-band (11.43 GHz) prototype, built to incorporate all the features required for the Ka-band version.

  16. Enhanced multi-colour gating for the generation of high-power isolated attosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haessler, S.; Balčiūnas, T.; Fan, G.; Chipperfield, L. E.; Baltuška, A.

    2015-05-01

    Isolated attosecond pulses (IAP) generated by high-order harmonic generation are valuable tools that enable dynamics to be studied on the attosecond time scale. The applicability of these IAP would be widened drastically by increasing their energy. Here we analyze the potential of using multi-colour driving pulses for temporally gating the attosecond pulse generation process. We devise how this approach can enable the generation of IAP with the available high-energy kHz-repetition-rate Ytterbium-based laser amplifiers (delivering 180-fs, 1030-nm pulses). We show theoretically that this requires a three-colour field composed of the fundamental and its second harmonic as well as a lower-frequency auxiliary component. We present pulse characterization measurements of such auxiliary pulses generated directly by white-light seeded OPA with the required significantly shorter pulse duration than that of the fundamental. This, combined with our recent experimental results on three-colour waveform synthesis, proves that the theoretically considered multi-colour drivers for IAP generation can be realized with existing high-power laser technology. The high-energy driver pulses, combined with the strongly enhanced single-atom-level conversion efficiency we observe in our calculations, thus make multi-colour drivers prime candidates for the development of unprecedented high-energy IAP sources in the near future.

  17. Enhanced multi-colour gating for the generation of high-power isolated attosecond pulses

    PubMed Central

    Haessler, S.; Balčiūnas, T.; Fan, G.; Chipperfield, L. E.; Baltuška, A.

    2015-01-01

    Isolated attosecond pulses (IAP) generated by high-order harmonic generation are valuable tools that enable dynamics to be studied on the attosecond time scale. The applicability of these IAP would be widened drastically by increasing their energy. Here we analyze the potential of using multi-colour driving pulses for temporally gating the attosecond pulse generation process. We devise how this approach can enable the generation of IAP with the available high-energy kHz-repetition-rate Ytterbium-based laser amplifiers (delivering 180-fs, 1030-nm pulses). We show theoretically that this requires a three-colour field composed of the fundamental and its second harmonic as well as a lower-frequency auxiliary component. We present pulse characterization measurements of such auxiliary pulses generated directly by white-light seeded OPA with the required significantly shorter pulse duration than that of the fundamental. This, combined with our recent experimental results on three-colour waveform synthesis, proves that the theoretically considered multi-colour drivers for IAP generation can be realized with existing high-power laser technology. The high-energy driver pulses, combined with the strongly enhanced single-atom-level conversion efficiency we observe in our calculations, thus make multi-colour drivers prime candidates for the development of unprecedented high-energy IAP sources in the near future. PMID:25997917

  18. Pulse compression of a high-power thin disk laser using rod-type fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Saraceno, C J; Heckl, O H; Baer, C R E; Südmeyer, T; Keller, U

    2011-01-17

    We report on two pulse compressors for a high-power thin disk laser oscillator using rod-type fiber amplifiers. Both systems are seeded by a standard SESAM modelocked thin disk laser that delivers 16 W of average power at a repetition rate of 10.6 MHz with a pulse energy of 1.5 μJ and a pulse duration of 1 ps. We discuss two results with different fiber parameters with different trade-offs in pulse duration, average power, damage and complexity. The first amplifier setup consists of a Yb-doped fiber amplifier with a 2200 μm2 core area and a length of 55 cm, resulting in a compressed average power of 55 W with 98-fs pulses at a repetition rate of 10.6 MHz. The second system uses a shorter 36-cm fiber with a larger core area of 4500 μm2. In a stretcher-free configuration we obtained 34 W of compressed average power and 65-fs pulses. In both cases peak powers of > 30 MW were demonstrated at several μJ pulse energies. The power scaling limitations due to damage and self-focusing are discussed. PMID:21263681

  19. Transmission line pulse system for avalanche characterization of high power semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccio, Michele; Ascione, Giovanni; De Falco, Giuseppe; Maresca, Luca; De Laurentis, Martina; Irace, Andrea; Breglio, Giovanni

    2013-05-01

    Because of the increasing in power density of electronic devices for medium and high power application, reliabilty of these devices is of great interest. Understanding the avalanche behaviour of a power device has become very important in these last years because it gives an indication of the maximum energy ratings which can be seen as an index of the device ruggedness. A good description of this behaviour is given by the static IV blocking characteristc. In order to avoid self heating, very relevant in high power devices, very short pulses of current have to be used, whose value can change from few milliamps up to tens of amps. The most used method to generate short pulses is the TLP (Transmission Line Pulse) test, which is based on charging the equivalent capacitance of a transmission line to high value of voltage and subsequently discharging it onto a load. This circuit let to obtain very short square pulses but it is mostly used for evaluate the ESD capability of semiconductor and, in this environment, it generates pulses of low amplitude which are not high enough to characterize the avalanche behaviour of high power devices . Advanced TLP circuit able to generate high current are usually very expensive and often suffer of distorption of the output pulse. In this article is proposed a simple, low cost circuit, based on a boosted-TLP configuration, which is capable to produce very square pulses of about one hundreds of nanosecond with amplitude up to some tens of amps. A prototype is implemented which can produce pulses up to 20A of amplitude with 200 ns of duration which can characterize power devices up to 1600V of breakdown voltage. Usage of microcontroller based logic make the circuit very flexible. Results of SPICE simulation are provided, together with experimental results. To prove the effectiveness of the circuit, the I-V blocking characteristics of two commercial devices, namely a 600V PowerMOS and a 1200V Trench-IGBT, are measured at different

  20. All-reflective, highly accurate polarization rotator for high-power short-pulse laser systems.

    PubMed

    Keppler, S; Hornung, M; Bödefeld, R; Kahle, M; Hein, J; Kaluza, M C

    2012-08-27

    We present the setup of a polarization rotating device and its adaption for high-power short-pulse laser systems. Compared to conventional halfwave plates, the all-reflective principle using three zero-phase shift mirrors provides a higher accuracy and a higher damage threshold. Since plan-parallel plates, e.g. these halfwave plates, generate postpulses, which could lead to the generation of prepulses during the subsequent laser chain, the presented device avoids parasitic pulses and is therefore the preferable alternative for high-contrast applications. Moreover the device is easily scalable for large beam diameters and its spectral reflectivity can be adjusted by an appropriate mirror coating to be well suited for ultra-short laser pulses. PMID:23037123

  1. A compact high power pulsed modulator based on spiral Blumlein line.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinliang; Yin, Yi; Ge, Bin; Cheng, Xinbing; Feng, Jiahuai; Zhang, Jiande; Wang, Xinxin

    2007-10-01

    A compact high power pulsed modulator based on spiral water Blumlein line, which consists of primary storage capacitors, a Tesla transformer, a spiral Blumlein line of water dielectric, and a field-emission diode, is described. The experimental results showed that the diode voltage is more than 500 kV, the electron beam current of diode is about 32 kA, and the pulse duration is about 180 ns. The distributions for electrical field in the spiral water Blumlein line were obtained by the simulations. In addition, the process of the charging a spiral Blumlein line was simulated through the PSPICE software to get the wave form of charging voltage of pulse forming line, the diode voltage, and diode current of modulator. The theoretical and simulated results are in agreement. This accelerator is very compact and works stably and reliably. PMID:17979411

  2. Two-domain formation during the epitaxial growth of GaN (0001) on c-plane Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0001) by high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Junaid, M.; Lundin, D.; Palisaitis, J.; Hsiao, C.-L.; Darakchieva, V.; Jensen, J.; Persson, P. O. A.; Sandstroem, P.; Helmersson, U.; Hultman, L.; Birch, J.; Lai, W.-J.; Chen, L.-C.; Chen, K.-H.

    2011-12-15

    We study the effect of high power pulses in reactive magnetron sputter epitaxy on the structural properties of GaN (0001) thin films grown directly on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0001) substrates. The epilayers are grown by sputtering from a liquid Ga target, using a high power impulse magnetron sputtering power supply in a mixed N{sub 2}/Ar discharge. X-ray diffraction, micro-Raman, micro-photoluminescence, and transmission electron microscopy investigations show the formation of two distinct types of domains. One almost fully relaxed domain exhibits superior structural and optical properties as evidenced by rocking curves with a full width at half maximum of 885 arc sec and a low temperature band edge luminescence at 3.47 eV with the full width at half maximum of 10 meV. The other domain exhibits a 14 times higher isotropic strain component, which is due to the higher densities of the point and extended defects, resulting from the ion bombardment during growth. Voids form at the domain boundaries. Mechanisms for the formation of differently strained domains, along with voids during the epitaxial growth of GaN are discussed.

  3. Radar Waveform Pulse Analysis Measurement System for High-Power GaN Amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thrivikraman, Tushar; Perkovic-Martin, Dragana; Jenabi, Masud; Hoffman, James

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a measurement system to characterize the pulsed response of high-power GaN amplifiers for use in space-based SAR platforms that require very strict amplitude and phase stability. The measurement system is able to record and analyze data on three different time scales: fast, slow, and long, which allows for greater detail of the mechanisms that impact amplitude and phase stability. The system is fully automated through MATLAB, which offers both instrument control capability and in-situ data processing. To validate this system, a high-power GaN HEMT amplifier operated in saturation was characterized. The fast time results show that variations to the amplitude and phase are correlated to DC supply transients, while long time characteristics are correlated to temperature changes.

  4. Use of pulsed high power ion beams to enhance tribological properties of stainless steel, Ti, and Al

    SciTech Connect

    Senft, D.C.; Renk, T.J.; Dugger, M.T.; Grabowski, K.S.; Thompson, M.O.

    1998-04-01

    Enhanced tribological properties have been observed after treatment with pulsed high power ion beams, which results in rapid melting and resolidification of the surface. The authors have treated and tested 440C martensitic stainless steel (Fe-17 Cr-1 C). Ti and Al samples were sputter coated and ion beam treated to produce surface alloying. The samples were treated at the RHEPP-I facility at Sandia National Laboratories (0.5 MV, 0.5--1 {micro}s at sample location, <10 J/cm{sup 2}, 1--5 {micro}m ion range). They have observed a reduction in size of second phase particles and other microstructural changes in 440C steel. The hardness of treated 440C increases with ion beam fluence and a maximum hardness increase of a factor of 5 is obtained. Low wear rates are observed in wear tested of treated 440C steel. Surface alloyed Ti-Pt layers show improvements in hardness up to a factor of 3 over untreated Ti, and surface alloys of Al-Si result in a hardness increase of a factor of two over untreated Al. Both surface alloys show increased durability in wear testing. Rutherford Backscattering (RBS) measurements show overlayer mixing to the depth of the melted layer. X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and TEM confirm the existence of metastable states within the treated layer. Treated layer depths have been measured from 1--10 {micro}m.

  5. Influence of the cubic spectral phase of high-power laser pulses on their self-phase modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, V. N.; Kochetkov, A. A.; Yakovlev, I. V.; Mironov, S. Yu; Shaykin, A. A.; Khazanov, E. A.

    2016-02-01

    Spectral broadening of high-power transform-limited laser pulses under self-phase modulation in a medium with cubic nonlinearity is widely used to reduce pulse duration and to increase its power. It is shown that the cubic spectral phase of the initial pulse leads to a qualitatively different broadening of its spectrum: the spectrum has narrow peaks and broadening decreases. However, the use of chirped mirrors allows such pulses to be as effectively compressed as transform-limited pulses.

  6. Characterization of Magnetron Sputtered Coatings by Pulsed Eddy Current Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Mulligan, Chris; Lee Changqing; Danon, Yaron

    2005-04-09

    A method that uses induced pulsed eddy currents for characterization of thick magnetron sputtered Nb coatings on steel is presented in this paper. The objectives of this work are to develop a system for rapid quantitative nondestructive inspection of coatings as well as to determine the correlation between coating properties, such as density and purity, and eddy current measured resistivity of coatings. A two-probe differential system having higher sensitivity and less noise than a one-probe system with 2-D scanning ability was developed.

  7. Upgrade of the SLAC SLED II Pulse Compression System Based on Recent High Power Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Vlieks, A.E.; Fowkes, W.R.; Loewen, R.J.; Tantawi, S.G.; /SLAC

    2011-09-06

    In the Next Linear Collider (NLC) it is expected that the high power rf components be able to handle peak power levels in excess of 400 MW. We present recent results of high power tests designed to investigate the RF breakdown limits of the X-band pulse compression system used at SLAC. (SLED-II). Results of these tests show that both the TE{sub 01}-TE{sub 10} mode converter and the 4-port hybrid have a maximum useful power limit of 220-250 MW. Based on these tests, modifications of these components have been undertaken to improve their peak field handling capability. Results of these modifications will be presented. As part of an international effort to develop a new 0.5-1.5 TeV electron-positron linear collider for the 21st century, SLAC has been working towards a design, referred to as 'The Next Linear Collider' (NLC), which will operate at 11.424 GHz and utilize 50-75 MW klystrons as rf power sources. One of the major challenges in this design, or any other design, is how to generate and efficiently transport extremely high rf power from a source to an accelerator structure. SLAC has been investigating various methods of 'pulse compressing' a relatively wide rf pulse ({ge} 1 {mu}s) from a klystron into a narrower, but more intense, pulse. Currently a SLED-II pulse compression scheme is being used at SLAC in the NLC Test Accelerator (NLCTA) and in the Accelerator Structures Test Area (ASTA) to provide high rf power for accelerator and component testing. In ASTA, a 1.05 {mu}s pulse from a 50 MW klystron was successfully pulse compressed to 205 MW with a pulse width of 150 ns. Since operation in NLC will require generating and transporting rf power in excess of 400 MW it was decided to test the breakdown limits of the SLED-II rf components in ASTA with rf power up to the maximum available of 400 MW. This required the combining of power from two 50 MW klystrons and feeding the summed power into the SLED-II pulse compressor. Results from this experiment demonstrated

  8. Design and fabrication of hollow-core photonic crystal fibers for high-power ultrashort pulse transportation and pulse compression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y Y; Peng, Xiang; Alharbi, M; Dutin, C Fourcade; Bradley, T D; Gérôme, F; Mielke, Michael; Booth, Timothy; Benabid, F

    2012-08-01

    We report on the recent design and fabrication of kagome-type hollow-core photonic crystal fibers for the purpose of high-power ultrashort pulse transportation. The fabricated seven-cell three-ring hypocycloid-shaped large core fiber exhibits an up-to-date lowest attenuation (among all kagome fibers) of 40 dB/km over a broadband transmission centered at 1500 nm. We show that the large core size, low attenuation, broadband transmission, single-mode guidance, and low dispersion make it an ideal host for high-power laser beam transportation. By filling the fiber with helium gas, a 74 μJ, 850 fs, and 40 kHz repetition rate ultrashort pulse at 1550 nm has been faithfully delivered at the fiber output with little propagation pulse distortion. Compression of a 105 μJ laser pulse from 850 fs down to 300 fs has been achieved by operating the fiber in ambient air. PMID:22859102

  9. DIAL monitoring of atmospheric climate-determining gases employing high-power pulsed laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penchev, Stoyan P.; Naboko, Sergei V.; Naboko, Vassily N.; Pencheva, Vasilka H.; Donchev, T.; Pavlov, Lyubomir Y.; Simeonov, P.

    2003-11-01

    High-power pulsed laser diodes are employed for determining atmospheric humidity and methane. The proposed DIAL method optimizes the spectral properties of laser radiation within the molecular absorption bands of 0.86 - 0.9 μm of these major greenhouse gases. The explicit absorption spectrum is explored by computational convolution method based on reference data on spectral linestrengths modulated by the characteristic broad laser line of the selected laser diodes. The lidar scheme is ultimately compact, of low-energy consumption and suggests a large potential for ecological monitoring.

  10. Fragments and Debris Generation Using a High Power Pulsed Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassany, Bruno; Courchinoux, Roger; Bertron, Isabelle; Malaise, Frederic; Hebert, David

    2002-12-01

    The high power Laser Megajoule (LMJ) will be constructed at CEA/DAM/CESTA near Bordeaux, in the south west part of France. Among the problems encountered in the LMJ experimental chamber, there is the impact of the debris produced after a laser shot on the silica optical windows. The production of debris as well as the behavior of optical materials under their influence can be simulated and studied with a pulsed electron beam. We present in this paper the first experimental results obtained by this original technique.

  11. Fabrication of High power, High-Efficiency Linear Array Diode Lasers by Pulse Anodic Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin; Zhang, Jing; Li, Hui; Qu, Yi; Bo, Baoxue

    2006-09-01

    InGaAlAs/AlGaAs/GaAs double-quantum-well (DQW) linear array diode lasers with asymmetric wide waveguide have been successfully fabricated by pulse anodic oxidation upon molecular beam epitaxy material growth. High-efficiency and high-power quasi-continuous-wave (QCW) output has been realized at 808 nm wavelength. The threshold current and slope efficiency of the prepared high-fill-factor QCW devices are 24 A and 1.25 A/W, respectively, and a maximum wall-plug efficiency of 51% has been achieved.

  12. High-power rf pulse compression with SLED-II at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Nantista, C.; Kroll, N.M.; Farkas, Z.D.; Lavine, T.L.; Menegat, A.; Ruth, R.D.; Tantawi, S.G.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wilson, P.B.

    1993-04-01

    Increasing the peak rf power available from X-band microwave tubes by means of rf pulse compression is envisioned as a way of achieving the few-hundred-megawatt power levels needed to drive a next-generation linear collider with 50--100 MW klystrons. SLED-II is a method of pulse compression similar in principal to the SLED method currently in use on the SLC and the LEP injector linac. It utilizes low-los resonant delay lines in place of the storage cavities of the latter. This produces the added benefit of a flat-topped output pulse. At SLAC, we have designed and constructed a prototype SLED-II pulse-compression system which operates in the circular TE{sub 01} mode. It includes a circular-guide 3-dB coupler and other novel components. Low-power and initial high-power tests have been made, yielding a peak power multiplication of 4.8 at an efficiency of 40%. The system will be used in providing power for structure tests in the ASTA (Accelerator Structures Test Area) bunker. An upgraded second prototype will have improved efficiency and will serve as a model for the pulse compression system of the NLCTA (Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator).

  13. A source of high-power pulses of elliptically polarized ultrawideband radiation.

    PubMed

    Andreev, Yu A; Efremov, A M; Koshelev, V I; Kovalchuk, B M; Petkun, A A; Sukhushin, K N; Zorkaltseva, M Yu

    2014-10-01

    Here, we describe a source of high-power ultrawideband radiation with elliptical polarization. The source consisting of a monopolar pulse generator, a bipolar pulse former, and a helical antenna placed into a radioparent container may be used in tests for electromagnetic compatibility. In the source, the helical antenna with the number of turns N = 4 is excited with a high-voltage bipolar pulse. Preliminary, we examined helical antennas at a low-voltage source aiming to select an optimal N and to estimate a radiation center position and boundary of a far-field zone. Finally, characteristics of the source in the operating mode at a pulse repetition rate of 100 Hz are presented in the paper as well. Energy efficiency of the antenna is 0.75 at the axial ratio equal to 1.3. The effective potential of radiation of the source at the voltage amplitudes of the bipolar pulse generator equal to -175/+200 kV reaches 280 kV. PMID:25362430

  14. A source of high-power pulses of elliptically polarized ultrawideband radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Yu. A. Efremov, A. M.; Koshelev, V. I.; Kovalchuk, B. M.; Petkun, A. A.; Sukhushin, K. N.; Zorkaltseva, M. Yu.

    2014-10-01

    Here, we describe a source of high-power ultrawideband radiation with elliptical polarization. The source consisting of a monopolar pulse generator, a bipolar pulse former, and a helical antenna placed into a radioparent container may be used in tests for electromagnetic compatibility. In the source, the helical antenna with the number of turns N = 4 is excited with a high-voltage bipolar pulse. Preliminary, we examined helical antennas at a low-voltage source aiming to select an optimal N and to estimate a radiation center position and boundary of a far-field zone. Finally, characteristics of the source in the operating mode at a pulse repetition rate of 100 Hz are presented in the paper as well. Energy efficiency of the antenna is 0.75 at the axial ratio equal to 1.3. The effective potential of radiation of the source at the voltage amplitudes of the bipolar pulse generator equal to -175/+200 kV reaches 280 kV.

  15. High power, short pulses ultraviolet laser for the development of a new x-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    Meixler, L.; Nam, C.H.; Robinson, J.; Tighe, W.; Krushelnick, K.; Suckewer, S.; Goldhar, J.; Seely, J.; Feldman, U.

    1989-04-01

    A high power, short pulse ultraviolet laser system (Powerful Picosecond-Laser) has been developed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) as part of experiments designed to generate shorter wavelength x-ray lasers. With the addition of pulse compression and a final KrF amplifier the laser output is expected to have reached 1/3-1/2 TW (10/sup 12/ watts) levels. The laser system, particularly the final amplifier, is described along with some initial soft x-ray spectra from laser-target experiments. The front end of the PP-Laser provides an output of 20--30 GW (10/sup 9/ watts) and can be focussed to intensities of /approximately/10/sup 16/ W/cm/sup 2/. Experiments using this output to examine the effects of a prepulse on laser-target interaction are described. 19 refs., 14 figs.

  16. High power high repetition rate VCSEL array side-pumped pulsed blue laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, Robert; Zhao, Pu; Chen, Tong; Xu, Bing; Watkins, Laurence; Seurin, Jean-Francois; Xu, Guoyang; Miglo, Alexander; Wang, Qing; Ghosh, Chuni

    2013-03-01

    High power, kW-class, 808 nm pump modules based on the vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) technology were developed for side-pumping of solid-state lasers. Two 1.2 kW VCSEL pump modules were implemented in a dual side-pumped Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at 946 nm. The laser output was frequency doubled in a BBO crystal to produce pulsed blue light. With 125 μs pump pulses at a 300 Hz repetition rate 6.1 W QCW 946 nm laser power was produced. The laser power was limited by thermal lensing in the Nd:YAG rod.

  17. Design considerations for a high power, ultrabroadband optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier.

    PubMed

    Prandolini, M J; Riedel, R; Schulz, M; Hage, A; Höppner, H; Tavella, F

    2014-01-27

    A conceptual design of a high power, ultrabroadband optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier (OPCPA) was carried out comparing nonlinear crystals (LBO and BBO) for 810 nm centered, sub-7.0 fs pulses with energies above 1 mJ. These amplifiers are only possible with a parallel development of kilowatt-level OPCPA-pump amplifiers. It is therefore important to know good strategies to use the available OPCPA-pump energy efficiently. Numerical simulations, including self- and cross-phase modulation, were used to investigate the critical parameters to achieve sufficient spectral and spatial quality. At high output powers, thermal absorption in the nonlinear crystals starts to degrade the output beam quality. Strategies to minimize thermal effects and limits to the maximum average power are discussed. PMID:24515165

  18. Formation of short high-power laser radiation pulses in excimer mediums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losev, V. F., Sr.; Ivanov, N. G.; Panchenko, Yu. N.

    2007-06-01

    Presently an excimer mediums continue are examined as one of variants for formation of powerful and over powerful pulses of laser radiation with duration from units of nanosecond up to tens femtosecond. The researches on such powerful installations as "NIKE" (USA) and << SUPER ASHURA >>, Japan) proceed in this direction. The main advantage of excimer mediums is the opportunity to work in a frequency mode, absence of restriction on the size of active area, high uniformity of a gas working medium, high efficiency (up to 10 %) and wide spectral range of laser radiation (KrF, XeCl ~ 2nm, XeF (C-A), Xe IICl ~ 50-100 nanometers). Research in area of high quality laser beams formation in excimer mediums and its amplification in high power amplifiers are carried out the long time in Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, Tomsk, Russia. The wide aperture XeCl laser system of MELS-4k is used for these investigations. Last time we take part in program on development of high power excimer laser system with a petawatt level of power. This system supposes the formation and amplification high quality laser beams with different pulse duration from units of nanosecond up to tens femtosecond. We research the possibility of laser beams formation in excimer mediums with ps-ns pulse duration having the low noise and divergence near to diffraction limit. In other hand, we are developing the wide aperture XeF(C-A) amplifier with optical pump on base electron accelerator. According to our estimations of the XeF(C-A) amplifier based on the converter of e-beam energy to the Xe II* fluorescence at 172 nm will allow to obtain up to 100 TW peak power in a 30 fs pulse.

  19. Generation of Alfven waves by high power pulse at the electron plasma frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Compernolle, Bart Gilbert

    The physics of the interaction between plasmas and high power waves with frequencies in the electron plasma frequency range is of importance in many areas of space and plasma physics. A great deal of laboratory research has been done on the interaction of microwaves in a density gradient when o = ope in unmagnetized plasmas. [SWK74, WS78, KSW74]. Extensive studies of HF-ionospheric modifications have been performed [Fej79] as evidenced by experiments at Arecibo [HMD92, BHK86, CDF92, FGI85], at the HAARP facility [RKK98] in Alaska, at the EISCAT observatory in Norway [IHR99], and at SURA in Russia [FKS99]. This dissertation focusses on the interaction with a fully magnetized plasma, capable of supporting Alfven waves. The experiment is performed in the upgraded LArge Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA [GPL91] (Helium, n = 1012 cm-3, B = 1 kG - 2.5 kG). A number of experiments have been done at LAPD using antennas, skin depth scale currents and laser produced plasmas to generate Alfven waves [LGM99, GVL97a, GVL97b, VGV01]. In this work a high power pulse 6th, frequency in the electron plasma frequency range is launched into the radial density gradient, perpendicular to the background magnetic field. The microwave pulses last on the order of one ion gyro period and has a maximum power of |E|2/ nT ≃ .5 in the afterglow. The absorption of these waves leads to a pulse of field aligned suprathermal electrons. This electron current pulse then launches with Alfven wave with o ≤ o ci. The experiment was performed bath in ordinary node (O-mode) and extraordinary (X-mode), for different background magnetic fields B0, different temperatures (afterglow vs discharge) and different power levels of the incoming microwaves. It was found that the Alfven wave generation can be explained by Cherenkov radiation of Alfven waves by the suprathermal electron pulse. Theoretical solutions for the perturbed magnetic field due to a pulse of field aligned electrons were obtained, and shown to be

  20. Physics of laser fusion. Volume III. High-power pulsed lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Holzrichter, J.F.; Eimerl, D.; George, E.V.; Trenholme, J.B.; Simmons, W.W.; Hunt, J.T.

    1982-09-01

    High-power pulsed lasers can deliver sufficient energy on inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) time scales (0.1 to 10 ns) to heat and compress deuterium-tritium fuel to fusion-reaction conditions. Several laser systems have been examined, including Nd:glass, CO/sub 2/, KrF, and I/sub 2/, for their ICF applicability. A great deal of developmental effort has been applied to the Nd:glass laser and the CO/sub 2/ gas laser systems; these systems now deliver > 10/sup 4/ J and 20 x 10/sup 12/ W to ICF targets. We are constructing the Nova Nd:glass laser at LLNL to provide > 100 kJ and > 100 x 10/sup 12/ W of 1-..mu..m radiation for fusion experimentation in the mid-1980s. For ICF target gain > 100 times the laser input, we expect that the laser driver must deliver approx. 3 to 5 MJ of energy on a time scale of 10 to 20 ns. In this paper we review the technological status of fusion-laser systems and outline approaches to constructing high-power pulsed laser drivers.

  1. High-power picosecond pulse delivery through hollow core photonic band gap fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michieletto, Mattia; Johansen, Mette M.; Lyngsø, Jens K.; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Bang, Ole; Alkeskjold, Thomas T.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrated robust and bend insensitive fiber delivery of high power laser with diffraction limited beam quality for two different kinds of hollow core band gap fibers. The light source for this experiment consists of ytterbium-doped double clad fiber aeroGAIN-ROD-PM85 in a high power amplifier setup. It provided 22ps pulses with a maximum average power of 95W, 40MHz repetition rate at 1032nm (~2.4μJ pulse energy), with M2 <1.3. We determined the facet damage threshold for a 7-cells hollow core photonic bandgap fiber and showed up to 59W average power output for a 5 meters fiber. The damage threshold for a 19-cell hollow core photonic bandgap fiber exceeded the maximum power provided by the light source and up to 76W average output power was demonstrated for a 1m fiber. In both cases, no special attention was needed to mitigate bend sensitivity. The fibers were coiled on 8 centimeters radius spools and even lower bending radii were present. In addition, stimulated rotational Raman scattering arising from nitrogen molecules was measured through a 42m long 19 cell hollow core fiber.

  2. Development of superlattice CrN/NbN coatings for joint replacements deposited by high power impulse magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Hovsepian, Papken Ehiasarian; Ehiasarian, Arutiun Papken; Purandare, Yashodhan; Sugumaran, Arunprabhu Arunachalam; Marriott, Tim; Khan, Imran

    2016-09-01

    The demand for reliable coating on medical implants is ever growing. In this research, enhanced performance of medical implants was achieved by a CrN/NbN coating, utilising nanoscale multilayer/superlattice structure. The advantages of the novel high power impulse magnetron sputtering technology, namely, its unique highly ionised plasma, were exploited to deposit dense and strongly adherent coatings on CoCr implants. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed coating superlattice structure with bi-layer thickness of 3.5 nm. CrN/NbN deposited on CoCr samples showed exceptionally high adhesion, critical load values of LC2 = 50 N in scratch adhesion tests. Nanoindentation tests showed high hardness of 34 GPa and Young's modulus of 447 GPa. Low coefficient of friction (μ) 0.49 and coating wear coefficient (K C) = 4.94 × 10(-16) m(3) N(-1) m(-1) were recorded in dry sliding tests. Metal ion release studies showed a reduction in Co, Cr and Mo release at physiological and elevated temperatures (70 °C) to almost undetectable levels (<1 ppb). Rotating beam fatigue testing showed a significant increase in fatigue strength from 349 ± 59 MPa (uncoated) to 539 ± 59 MPa (coated). In vitro biological testing has been performed in order to assess the safety of the coating in biological environment; cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and sensitisation testing have been performed, all showing no adverse effects. PMID:27571960

  3. High-power, picosecond pulse thin-disk lasers in the Hilase project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyla, Michal; Miura, Taisuke; Smrz, Martin; Severova, Patricie; Novak, Ondrej; Nagisetty, Siva S.; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomas

    2013-05-01

    Development of high-power, picosecond laser sources is a desirable venture for both industry and research. Within the Hilase project, we are conducting research on both 500-mJ, 1-kHz and 5-mJ, 100-kHz picosecond laser sources based on the Yb:YAG thin-disk technology. We have developed a prototype thin-disk regenerative amplifier operating up to 10- kHz repetition rate pumped by the 940-nm fiber-coupled laser diodes. We achieved 5-mJ pulse energy at 10-kHz operation and 29.5-mJ at 1-kHz. Afterwards, we developed the high-energy regenerative amplifier operating at fixed repetition rate of 1-kHz and the pulse energy was achieved up to 40-mJ. Simultaneously, we elaborated the highrepetition rate regenerative amplifier operating at 100-kHz with pulse energy of 220-μJ. The amplified pulse was compressed with the efficiency of 88% using chirped volume Bragg grating.

  4. Sputtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1976-01-01

    The potential of using the sputtering process as a deposition technique is reviewed; however, the manufacturing and sputter etching aspects are also discussed. The basic mechanism for dc and rf sputtering is described. Sputter deposition is presented in terms of the unique advantageous features it offers such as versatility, momentum transfer, stoichiometry, sputter etching, target geometry (coating and complex surfaces), precise controls, flexibility, ecology, and sputtering rates. Sputtered film characteristics, such as strong adherence and coherence and film morphology, are briefly evaluated in terms of varying the sputtering parameters. Also discussed are some of the specific industrial areas which are turning to sputter deposition techniques.

  5. Modulated electron cyclotron drift instability in a high-power pulsed magnetron discharge.

    PubMed

    Tsikata, Sedina; Minea, Tiberiu

    2015-05-01

    The electron cyclotron drift instability, implicated in electron heating and anomalous transport, is detected in the plasma of a planar magnetron. Electron density fluctuations associated with the mode are identified via an adapted coherent Thomson scattering diagnostic, under direct current and high-power pulsed magnetron operation. Time-resolved analysis of the mode amplitude reveals that the instability, found at MHz frequencies and millimeter scales, also exhibits a kHz-scale modulation consistent with the observation of larger-scale plasma density nonuniformities, such as the rotating spoke. Sharply collimated axial fluctuations observed at the magnetron axis are consistent with the presence of escaping electrons in a region where the magnetic and electric fields are antiparallel. These results distinguish aspects of magnetron physics from other plasma sources of similar geometry, such as the Hall thruster, and broaden the scope of instabilities which may be considered to dictate magnetron plasma features. PMID:26001007

  6. Modulated Electron Cyclotron Drift Instability in a High-Power Pulsed Magnetron Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsikata, Sedina; Minea, Tiberiu

    2015-05-01

    The electron cyclotron drift instability, implicated in electron heating and anomalous transport, is detected in the plasma of a planar magnetron. Electron density fluctuations associated with the mode are identified via an adapted coherent Thomson scattering diagnostic, under direct current and high-power pulsed magnetron operation. Time-resolved analysis of the mode amplitude reveals that the instability, found at MHz frequencies and millimeter scales, also exhibits a kHz-scale modulation consistent with the observation of larger-scale plasma density nonuniformities, such as the rotating spoke. Sharply collimated axial fluctuations observed at the magnetron axis are consistent with the presence of escaping electrons in a region where the magnetic and electric fields are antiparallel. These results distinguish aspects of magnetron physics from other plasma sources of similar geometry, such as the Hall thruster, and broaden the scope of instabilities which may be considered to dictate magnetron plasma features.

  7. Experimental characterization of plasma formation and shockwave propagation induced by high power pulsed underwater electrical discharge.

    PubMed

    Claverie, A; Deroy, J; Boustie, M; Avrillaud, G; Chuvatin, A; Mazanchenko, E; Demol, G; Dramane, B

    2014-06-01

    High power pulsed electrical discharges into liquids are investigated for new industrial applications based on the efficiency of controlled shock waves. We present here new experimental data obtained by combination of detailed high speed imaging equipments. It allows the visualization of the very first instants of plasma discharge formation, and then the pulsations of the gaseous bubble with an accurate timing of events. The time history of the expansion/compression of this bubble leads to an estimation of the energy effectively transferred to water during the discharge. Finally, the consecutive shock generation driven by this pulsating bubble is optically monitored by shadowgraphs and schlieren setup. These data provide essential information about the geometrical pattern and chronometry associated with the shock wave generation and propagation. PMID:24985821

  8. Loss Analysis of High Power Stirling-Type Pulse Tube Cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, K.; Hiratsuka, Y.

    2015-12-01

    For the purpose of cooling high-temperature superconductor (HTS) devices, such as superconductor motors, superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) and current fault limiters, cryocoolers should be compact in size, light-weight, and have high efficiency and reliability. In order to meet the demand of HTS devices world-wide, the cryocooler needs to have COP efficiency >0.1. We have developed a high power Stirling-type pulse tube cryocooler (SPTC) with an in-line expander. The experimental results were reported in June 2012[1]. The cooling capacity was 210 W at 77 K and the minimum temperature was 37 K when the compressor input power was 3.8 kW. Accordingly, the COP was about 0.055. To further improve the efficiency, the energy losses in the cryocooler were analyzed. The experimental results and the numerical calculation results are reported in this paper.

  9. Effects of nitrogen pulsing on sputter-deposited beryllium films

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, E.J.; Price, C.W.; Pierce, E.L.; Wirtenson, R.G. )

    1990-05-01

    Beryllium films have been used as a heat sink'' layer between the reflective coating of a mirror and its glass substrate to improve the mirror's radiation resistance to prompt deposition of x rays. Under x-ray irradiation, the beryllium heat sink layer is subjected to tensile stresses caused by differences in thermal expansion coefficients. Test results indicated that the predominant failure mode was the film's crazing under tensile stress. The inherent columnar structure of the beryllium films deposited under normal conditions is detrimental to the tensile strength of the films and may be responsible for this type of failure. We successfully suppressed the inherent columnar growth in beryllium films by incorporating periodic N{sub 2} pulses during sputter deposition. The traditional substrate biasing approach did not seem to be as effective in modifying the grain structure. The results showed that higher N{sub 2} pulse rates during deposition were more effective in suppressing the columnar growth. However, we noticed that films deposited with nitrogen pulsing show higher secondary-electron emission in SEM micrographs, which indicates a significant incorporation of contaminants into the beryllium films. Quantitative analyses were conducted for nitrogen and oxygen contamination in the beryllium films using standards prepared by ion implantation. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) depth profiles were obtained for oxygen and nitrogen using mass isotopes {sup 16}O and 23({sup 9}Be+{sup 14}N). More than 2% of contaminants was observed in beryllium films at the higher pulse rates that were used. Thus, a minimum pulsing frequency and duration should be selected that provides grain refinement with a minimum amount of contamination.

  10. Effect of pulse frequency on the ion fluxes during pulsed dc magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Rahamathunnisa, M.; Cameron, D. C.

    2009-03-15

    The ion fluxes and energies which impinge on the substrate during the deposition of chromium nitride by asymmetric bipolar pulsed dc reactive magnetron sputtering have been analyzed using energy resolved mass spectrometry. It has been found that there is a remarkable increase in ion flux at higher pulse frequencies and that the peak ion energy is directly related to the positive voltage overshoot of the target voltage. The magnitude of the metal flux depositing on the substrate is consistent with a 'dead time' of {approx}0.7 {mu}s at the start of the on period. The variation of the ion flux with pulse frequency has been explained by a simple model in which the ion density during the on period has a large peak which is slightly delayed from the large negative voltage overshoot which occurs at the start of the on pulse due to increased ionization at that time. This is consistent with the previously observed phenomena in pulsed sputtering.

  11. Gas breakdown driven by L band short-pulse high-power microwave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi-Ming; Yuan, Cheng-Wei; Qian, Bao-Liang

    2012-12-01

    High power microwave (HPM) driven gas breakdown is a major factor in limiting the radiation and transmission of HPM. A method that HPM driven gas breakdown could be obtained by changing the aperture of horn antenna is studied in this paper. Changing the effective aperture of horn antenna can adjust the electric field in near field zone, leading to gas breakdown. With this method, measurements of air and SF6 breakdowns are carried out on a magnetically insulated transmission-line oscillators, which is capable of generating HPM with pulse duration of 30 ns, and frequency of 1.74 GHz. The typical breakdown waveforms of air and SF6 are presented. Besides, the breakdown field strengths of the two gases are derived at different pressures. It is found that the effects of air and SF6 breakdown on the transmission of HPM are different: air breakdown mainly shortens the pulse width of HPM while SF6 breakdown mainly reduces the peak output power of HPM. The electric field threshold of SF6 is about 2.4 times larger than that of air. These differences suggest that gas properties have a great effect on the transmission characteristic of HPM in gases.

  12. Gas breakdown driven by L band short-pulse high-power microwave

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yiming; Yuan Chengwei; Qian Baoliang

    2012-12-15

    High power microwave (HPM) driven gas breakdown is a major factor in limiting the radiation and transmission of HPM. A method that HPM driven gas breakdown could be obtained by changing the aperture of horn antenna is studied in this paper. Changing the effective aperture of horn antenna can adjust the electric field in near field zone, leading to gas breakdown. With this method, measurements of air and SF{sub 6} breakdowns are carried out on a magnetically insulated transmission-line oscillators, which is capable of generating HPM with pulse duration of 30 ns, and frequency of 1.74 GHz. The typical breakdown waveforms of air and SF{sub 6} are presented. Besides, the breakdown field strengths of the two gases are derived at different pressures. It is found that the effects of air and SF{sub 6} breakdown on the transmission of HPM are different: air breakdown mainly shortens the pulse width of HPM while SF{sub 6} breakdown mainly reduces the peak output power of HPM. The electric field threshold of SF{sub 6} is about 2.4 times larger than that of air. These differences suggest that gas properties have a great effect on the transmission characteristic of HPM in gases.

  13. Tribological and structural properties of titanium nitride and titanium aluminum nitride coatings deposited with modulated pulsed power magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Logan

    The demand for economical high-performance materials has brought attention to the development of advanced coatings. Recent advances in high power magnetron sputtering (HPPMS) have shown to improve tribological properties of coatings. These coatings offer increased wear and oxidation resistance, which may facilitate the use of more economical materials in harsh applications. This study demonstrates the use of novel forms of HPPMS, namely modulated pulsed-power magnetron sputtering (MPPMS) and deep oscillation magnetron sputtering (DOMS), for depositing TiN and Ti1-xAlxN tribological coatings on commonly used alloys, such as Ti-6Al-4V and Inconel 718. Both technologies have been shown to offer unique plasma characteristics in the physical vapor deposition (PVD) process. High power pulses lead to a high degree of ionization compared to traditional direct-current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) and pulsed magnetron sputtering (PMS). Such a high degree of ionization was previously only achievable by cathodic arc deposition (CAD); however, CAD can lead to increased macroparticles that are unfavorable in high friction and corrosive environments. MPPMS, DOMS, and other HPPMS techniques offer unique plasma characteristics and have been shown to produce coatings with refined grain structure, improved density, hardness, adhesion, and wear resistance. Using DOMS and MPPMS, TiN and Ti1-xAlxN coatings were deposited using PMS to compare microstructures and tribological performance. For Ti1-xAlxN, two sputtering target compositions, Ti 0.5Al0.5 and Ti0.3Al0.7, were used to evaluate the effects of MPPMS on the coating's composition and tribological properties. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize microstructure and crystallographic texture. Several tribological properties were evaluated including: wear rate, coefficient of friction, adhesion, and nanohardness. Results show that substrate

  14. Direct coupling of pulsed radio frequency and pulsed high power in novel pulsed power system for plasma immersion ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chunzhi; Tian, Xiubo; Yang, Shiqin; Fu, Ricky K Y; Chu, Paul K

    2008-04-01

    A novel power supply system that directly couples pulsed high voltage (HV) pulses and pulsed 13.56 MHz radio frequency (rf) has been developed for plasma processes. In this system, the sample holder is connected to both the rf generator and HV modulator. The coupling circuit in the hybrid system is composed of individual matching units, low pass filters, and voltage clamping units. This ensures the safe operation of the rf system even when the HV is on. The PSPICE software is utilized to optimize the design of circuits. The system can be operated in two modes. The pulsed rf discharge may serve as either the seed plasma source for glow discharge or high-density plasma source for plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII). The pulsed high-voltage glow discharge is induced when a rf pulse with a short duration or a larger time interval between the rf and HV pulses is used. Conventional PIII can also be achieved. Experiments conducted on the new system confirm steady and safe operation. PMID:18447526

  15. Electrochromic lithium nickel oxide by pulsed laser deposition and sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, M.; Wen, S.J.; Richardson, T.; Kerr, J.; Rottkay, K. von; Slack, J.

    1996-09-01

    Thin films of lithium nickel oxide were deposited by sputtering and pulsed laser deposition (PLD) from targets of pressed LiNiO{sub 2} powder. The composition and structure of these films were analyzed using a variety of techniques, such as nuclear-reaction analysis, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), x-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Crystalline structure, surface morphology and chemical composition of Li{sub x}Ni{sub 1{minus}x}O thin films depend strongly on deposition oxygen pressure, temperature as well as substrate-target distance. The films produced at temperatures lower than 600 C spontaneously absorb CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O at their surface once they are exposed to the air. The films deposited at 600 C proved to be stable in air over a long period. Even at room temperature the PLD films are denser and more stable than sputtered films. RBS determined the composition of the best films to be Li{sub 0.5}Ni{sub 0.5}O deposited by PLD at 60 mTorr O{sub 2} pressure. Electrochemical tests show that the films exhibit excellent reversibility in the range 1.0 V to 3.4 V versus lithium. Electrochemical formatting which is used to develop electrochromism in other films is not needed for the stoichiometric films. The optical transmission range is almost 70% at 550 nm for 150-nm thick films. Devices made from these films were analyzed using novel reference electrodes and by disassembly after cycling.

  16. Measurement of electromagnetic pulses generated during interactions of high power lasers with solid targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marco, M.; Krása, J.; Cikhardt, J.; Pfeifer, M.; Krouský, E.; Margarone, D.; Ahmed, H.; Borghesi, M.; Kar, S.; Giuffrida, L.; Vrana, R.; Velyhan, A.; Limpouch, J.; Korn, G.; Weber, S.; Velardi, L.; Delle Side, D.; Nassisi, V.; Ullschmied, J.

    2016-06-01

    A target irradiated with a high power laser pulse, blows off a large amount of charge and as a consequence the target itself becomes a generator of electromagnetic pulses (EMP) owing to high return current flowing to the ground through the target holder. The first measurement of the magnetic field induced by the neutralizing current reaching a value of a few kA was performed with the use of an inductive target probe at the PALS Laser Facility (Cikhardt et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85 (2014) 103507). A full description of EMP generation should contain information on the spatial distribution and temporal variation of the electromagnetic field inside and outside of the interaction chamber. For this reason, we consider the interaction chamber as a resonant cavity in which different modes of EMP oscillate for hundreds of nanoseconds, until the EMP is transmitted outside through the glass windows and EM waves are attenuated. Since the experimental determination of the electromagnetic field distribution is limited by the number of employed antennas, a mapping of the electromagnetic field has to be integrated with numerical simulations. Thus, this work reports on a detailed numerical mapping of the electromagnetic field inside the interaction chamber at the PALS Laser Facility (covering a frequency spectrum from 100 MHz to 3 GHz) using the commercial code COMSOL Multiphysics 5.2. Moreover we carried out a comparison of the EMP generated in the parallelepiped-like interaction chamber used in the Vulcan Petawatt Laser Facility at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, against that produced in the spherical interaction chamber of PALS.

  17. High-power, photofission-inducing bremsstrahlung source for intense pulsed active detection of fissile material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zier, J. C.; Mosher, D.; Allen, R. J.; Commisso, R. J.; Cooperstein, G.; Hinshelwood, D. D.; Jackson, S. L.; Murphy, D. P.; Ottinger, P. F.; Richardson, A. S.; Schumer, J. W.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Weber, B. V.

    2014-06-01

    Intense pulsed active detection (IPAD) is a promising technique for detecting fissile material to prevent the proliferation of special nuclear materials. With IPAD, fissions are induced in a brief, intense radiation burst and the resulting gamma ray or neutron signals are acquired during a short period of elevated signal-to-noise ratio. The 8 MV, 200 kA Mercury pulsed-power generator at the Naval Research Laboratory coupled to a high-power vacuum diode produces an intense 30 ns bremsstrahlung beam to study this approach. The work presented here reports on Mercury experiments designed to maximize the photofission yield in a depleted-uranium (DU) object in the bremsstrahlung far field by varying the anode-cathode (AK) diode gap spacing and by adding an inner-diameter-reducing insert in the outer conductor wall. An extensive suite of diagnostics was fielded to measure the bremsstrahlung beam and DU fission yield as functions of diode geometry. Delayed fission neutrons from the DU proved to be a valuable diagnostic for measuring bremsstrahlung photons above 5 MeV. The measurements are in broad agreement with particle-in-cell and Monte Carlo simulations of electron dynamics and radiation transport. These show that with increasing AK gap, electron losses to the insert and outer conductor wall increase and that the electron angles impacting the bremsstrahlung converter approach normal incidence. The diode conditions for maximum fission yield occur when the gap is large enough to produce electron angles close to normal, yet small enough to limit electron losses.

  18. Frequency up-conversion of a high-power microwave pulse propagating in a self-generated plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, S. P.; Ren, A.

    1992-01-01

    In the study of the propagation of a high-power microwave pulse, one of the main concerns is how to minimize the energy loss of the pulse before reaching the destination. A frequency autoconversion process that can lead to reflectionless propagation of powerful electromagnetic pulses in self-generated plasmas is studied. The theory shows that, under the proper condition, the carrier frequency omega of the pulse shifts upward during the growth of local plasma frequency omega(pe). Thus, the self-generated plasma remains underdense to the pulse. A chamber experiment to demonstrate the frequency autoconversion during the pulse propagation through the self-generated plasma is conducted. The detected frequency shift is compared with the theoretical result calculated by using the measured electron density distribution along the propagation path of the pulse. Good agreement is obtained.

  19. Deposition of ultrahard Ti-Si-N coatings by pulsed high-current reactive magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskomov, K. V.; Zakharov, A. N.; Rabotkin, S. V.; Solov'ev, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    We report on the results of investigation of properties of ultrahard Ti-Si-N coatings deposited by pulsed high-current magnetron reactive sputtering (discharge pulse voltage is 300-900 V, discharge pulse current is up to 200 A, pulse duration is 10-100 μs, and pulse repetition rate is 20-2000 Hz). It is shown that for a short sputtering pulse (25 μs) and a high discharge current (160 A), the films exhibit high hardness (66 GPa), wear resistance, better adhesion, and a lower sliding friction coefficient. The reason is an enhancement of ion bombardment of the growing coating due to higher plasma density in the substrate region (1013 cm-3) and a manifold increase in the degree of ionization of the plasma with increasing peak discharge current (mainly due to the material being sputtered).

  20. Effects of nitrogen pulsing on sputter-deposited beryllium films

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, E.J.; Price, C.W.; Pierce, E.L.; Wirtenson, G.R.

    1989-08-09

    Beryllium films have been used as a heat sink'' layer between the reflective coating of a mirror and its glass substrate to improve the mirror's radiation resistance to prompt deposition of x-rays. Under x-ray irradiation, the beryllium heat sink'' layer is subjected to tensile stresses caused by differences in thermal expansion coefficients. Test results indicated that the predominant failure mode was the film's crazing under tensile stress. The inherent columnar structure of the beryllium films deposited under normal conditions in detrimental to the tensile strength of the films and may be responsible for this type of failure. We successfully suppressed the inherent columnar growth in beryllium films by incorporating periodic N{sub 2} pulses during sputter deposition. Quantitative analyses were conducted for nitrogen and oxygen contamination in the beryllium films using standards prepared by ion implantation. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) depth profiles were obtained for oxygen and nitrogen using mass isotopes {sup 16}O and 23({sup 9}Be + {sup 14}N).

  1. Application of the Hartmann method in the investigation of the profile of wavefronts of high-power pulsed lasers

    SciTech Connect

    L`vov, L.V.; Merkulov, S.G.; Ozerov, M.A.

    1994-11-01

    The Hartmann method was used in an investigation of the wavefront profile of the infrared radiation emitted by high-power pulsed lasers. The wavefront profiles were studied for the iodine lasers used in the ISKRA-4 and ISKRA-5 facilities. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  2. High power, single mode, all-fiber source of femtosecond pulses at 1550 nm and its use in supercontinuum generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Jeffrey W.; Yablon, A. D.; Westbrook, P. S.; Feder, K. S.; Yan, M. F.

    2004-06-01

    We present a source of high power femtosecond pulses at 1550 nm with compressed pulses at the end of a single mode fiber (SMF) pigtail. The system generates 34 femtosecond pulses at a repetition rate of 46 MHz, with average powers greater than 400 mW. The pulses are generated in a passively modelocked, erbium-doped fiber laser, and amplified in a short, erbium-doped fiber amplifier. The output of the fiber amplifier consists of highly chirped picosecond pulses. These picosecond pulses are then compressed in standard single mode fiber. While the compressed pulses in the SMF pigtail do show a low pedestal that could be avoided with the use of bulk-optic compression, the desire to compress the pulses in SMF is motivated by the ability to splice the single mode fiber to a nonlinear fiber, for continuum generation applications. We demonstrate that with highly nonlinear dispersion shifted fiber (HNLF) fusion spliced directly to the amplifier output, we generate a supercontinuum spectrum that spans more than an octave, with an average power 400 mW. Such a high power, all-fiber supercontinuum source has many important applications including frequency metrology and bio-medical imaging.

  3. High power, single mode, all-fiber source of femtosecond pulses at 1550 nm and its use in supercontinuum generation.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Jeffrey; Yablon, A; Westbrook, P; Feder, K; Yan, M

    2004-06-28

    We present a source of high power femtosecond pulses at 1550 nm with compressed pulses at the end of a single mode fiber (SMF) pigtail. The system generates 34 femtosecond pulses at a repetition rate of 46 MHz, with average powers greater than 400 mW. The pulses are generated in a passively modelocked, erbium-doped fiber laser, and amplified in a short, erbium-doped fiber amplifier. The output of the fiber amplifier consists of highly chirped picosecond pulses. These picosecond pulses are then compressed in standard single mode fiber. While the compressed pulses in the SMF pigtail do show a low pedestal that could be avoided with the use of bulk-optic compression, the desire to compress the pulses in SMF is motivated by the ability to splice the single mode fiber to a nonlinear fiber, for continuum generation applications. We demonstrate that with highly nonlinear dispersion shifted fiber (HNLF) fusion spliced directly to the amplifier output, we generate a supercontinuum spectrum that spans more than an octave, with an average power 400 mW. Such a high power, all-fiber supercontinuum source has many important applications including frequency metrology and bio-medical imaging. PMID:19483820

  4. Means and method for characterizing high power, ultra short laser pulses in a real time, on line manner

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    1994-01-01

    An ultra short (<10 ps), high power laser pulse is temporally characterized by a system that uses a physical measurement of a wavefront that has been altered in a known manner. The system includes a first reflection switch to remove a portion of a pulse from a beam of pulses, then includes a second reflection switch, operating in a mode that is opposite to the first reflection switch, to slice off a portion of that removed portion. The sliced portion is then directed to a measuring device for physical measurement. The two reflection switches are arranged with respect to each other and with respect to the beam of ultra short pulses such that physical measurement of the sliced portion is related to the temporal measurement of the ultra short pulse by a geometric or trigonometric relationship. The reflection switches are operated by a control pulse that is directed to impinge on each of the reflection switches at a 90.degree. angle of incidence.

  5. Peak power tunable mid-infrared oscillator pumped by a high power picosecond pulsed fiber amplifier with bunch output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Kaihua; Guo, Yan; Lai, Xiaomin; Fan, Shanhui

    2016-07-01

    A high power mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator (OPO) with picosecond pulse bunch output is experimentally demonstrated. The pump source was a high power master oscillation power amplifier (MOPA) picosecond pulsed fiber amplifier. The seed of the MOPA was a gain-switched distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) laser diode (LD) with picosecond pulse operation at a high repetition rate. The seed laser was amplified to 50 W by two-stage pre-amplifiers and a large mode area (LMA) Yb fiber based power-amplifier. A fiber-pigtailed acousto-optic modulator with the first order diffraction transmission was inserted into the second pre-amplifier to form a picosecond pulse bunch train and to change the peak power simultaneously. The power-amplified pulse bunches were focused to pump a wavelength-tunable OPO for emitting high power mid-infrared laser. By adjusting the OPO cavity length, the maximum average idler powers obtained at 3.1, 3.3 and 3.5 μm were 7, 6.6 and 6.4 W respectively.

  6. LN2-free Operation of the MEG Liquid Xenon Calorimeter by using a High-power Pulse Tube Cryocooler

    SciTech Connect

    Haruyama, T.; Kasami, K.; Nishiguchi, H.; Mihara, S.; Mori, T.; Otani, W.; Sawada, R.; Maruno, Y.; Nishitani, T.

    2006-04-27

    A high-power coaxial pulse tube cryocooler, originally developed in KEK and technology-transferred to Iwatani Industrial Gases Corp (IIGC), has been installed in a large liquid xenon calorimeter to evaluate liquid nitrogen-free (LN2-free) operation of the rare {mu}-particle decay experiment (MEG). Features of this pulse tube cryocooler include the cold-end heat exchanger, designed with sufficient surface area to ensure high-power cooling, and a cylindrical regenerator placed inside the pulse tube giving compact design and ease of fabrication. This production-level cryocooler provides a cooling power of {approx}200 W at 165 K, using a 6 kW Gifford-McMahon (GM)-type compressor. The paper describes the detailed configuration of the cryocooler, and the results of the continuous LN2-free operation of the large prototype liquid xenon calorimeter, which ran for more than 40 days without problems.

  7. Characterization of energetic and thermalized sputtered atoms in pulsed plasma using time-resolved tunable diode-laser induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Desecures, M.; Poucques, L. de; Easwarakhanthan, T.; Bougdira, J.

    2014-11-03

    In this work, a time-resolved tunable diode-laser (DL) induced fluorescence (TR-TDLIF) method calibrated by absorption spectroscopy has been developed in order to determine atom and flux velocity distribution functions (AVDF and FVDF) of the energetic and the thermalized atoms in pulsed plasmas. The experimental set-up includes a low-frequency (∼3 Hz) and high spectral-resolution DL (∼0.005 pm), a fast rise-time pulse generator, and a high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) system. The induced TR-TDLIF signal is recorded every 0.5 μs with a digital oscilloscope of a second-long trace. The technique is illustrated with determining the AVDF and the FVDF of a metastable state of the sputtered neutral tungsten atoms in the HiPIMS post-discharge. Gaussian functions describing the population of the four W isotopes were used to fit the measured TR-TDLIF signal. These distribution functions provide insight into transition from the energetic to thermalized regimes from the discharge onset. This technique may be extended with appropriate DLs to probe any species with rapidly changing AVDF and FVDF in pulsed and strongly oscillating plasmas.

  8. Observation of frequency up-conversion in the propagation of a high-power microwave pulse in a self-generated plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, S. P.; Zhang, Y. S.; Ren, A.

    1990-01-01

    A chamber experiment is conducted to study the propagation of a high-power microwave pulse. The results show that the pulse is experiencing frequency up-shift while ionizing the background air if the initial carrier frequency of the pulse is higher than the electron plasma frequency at the incident boundary. Such a frequency autoconversion process may lead to reflectionless propagation of a high-power microwave pulse through the atmosphere.

  9. Reliable high-power long-pulse 8XX-nm diode laser bars and arrays operating at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Li; Cao, Chuanshun; Thaler, Gerald; Nonnemacher, Dustin; Lapinski, Feliks; Ai, Irene; Caliva, Brian; Das, Suhit; Walker, Robert; Zeng, Linfei; McElhinney, Mark; Thiagarajan, Prabhu

    2011-03-01

    We report on the high-power high-temperature long-pulse performance of the 8XX-nm diode laser bars and arrays, which were recently developed at Lasertel Inc. for diode laser pumping within high-temperature (130 °C) environment without any cooling. Since certain energy in each pulse is required, the diode laser bars have to provide both high peak power and a nice pulse shape at 130 °C. Optimizing the epi-structure of the diode laser, the laser cavity and the distribution of waste heat, we demonstrate over 40-millisecond long-pulse operation of the 8XX-nm CS bars at 130 °C and 100 A. Pumping the bar with 5-Hz frequency 15-millisecond rectangular current pulses, we generate over 60 W peak power at 100 A and 130 °C. During the pulse duration, the pulse shape of the CS bars is well-maintained and the power almost linearly decays with a rate of 1.9% peak power per millisecond at 130 °C and 100 A. Regardless of the pulse shape, this laser bar can lase at very high temperature and output pulse can last for 8 ms/2ms at 170 °C/180 °C (both driven by 60 A current pulses with 5-Hz frequency, 10 millisecond pulse width), respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest operating temperature for a long-pulse 8XX-nm laser bar. Under the condition of 130 °C and 100 A, the laser bars do not show any degradation after 310,000 10-millisecond current pulse shots. The performance of stack arrays at 130 °C and 100 A are also presented. The development of reliable high-temperature diode laser bar paves the way for diode laser long-pulse pumping within a high-temperature environment without any cooling.

  10. Generation of high power pulsed terahertz radiation using a plasmonic photoconductive emitter array with logarithmic spiral antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Christopher W.; Hashemi, Mohammad R.; Jarrahi, Mona

    2014-02-24

    An array of 3 × 3 plasmonic photoconductive terahertz emitters with logarithmic spiral antennas is fabricated on a low temperature (LT) grown GaAs substrate and characterized in response to a 200 fs optical pump from a Ti:sapphire mode-locked laser at 800 nm wavelength. A microlens array is used to split and focus the optical pump beam onto the active area of each plasmonic photoconductive emitter element. Pulsed terahertz radiation with record high power levels up to 1.9 mW in the 0.1–2 THz frequency range is measured at an optical pump power of 320 mW. The record high power pulsed terahertz radiation is enabled by the use of plasmonic contact electrodes, enhancing the photoconductor quantum efficiencies, and by increasing the overall device active area, mitigating the carrier screening effect and thermal breakdown at high optical pump power levels.

  11. Crystalline garnet Bragg reflectors for high power, high temperature, and integrated applications fabricated by multi-beam pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloyan, Katherine A.; May-Smith, Timothy C.; Zervas, Michalis N.; Eason, Robert W.

    2012-08-01

    Crystalline Bragg reflectors are of interest for high power, high temperature, and integrated applications. We demonstrate the automated growth of such structures by shuttered multi-beam pulsed laser deposition. Geometries include 145 layer stacks exhibiting >99.5% reflection and π phase-shifted designs. A crystalline grating strength-apodized sample was grown by mixing plumes to obtain layers with custom refractive indices. Peak reflection wavelength was tuneable with incident position, samples withstood temperatures of ˜750 °C, and film and substrate have been shown to withstand incident pulsed laser fluences of up to ˜33 J cm-2.

  12. Alignment of a tiled-grating compressor in a high-power chirped-pulse amplification laser system.

    PubMed

    Hornung, Marco; Bödefeld, Ragnar; Siebold, Mathias; Schnepp, Matthias; Hein, Joachim; Sauerbrey, Roland; Kaluza, Malte C

    2007-10-20

    We present a novel technique to align a tiled grating in all five relevant degrees of freedom utilized in the compressor of the high-power chirped-pulse amplification laser system POLARIS at the Institute for Optics and Quantum Electronics, Jena, Germany. With this technique, alignment errors of the two gratings with respect to each other can be detected with an accuracy of 1 microrad for the rotational and 40 nm for the translational degrees of freedom. This is well sufficient to recompress 1030 nm pulses, which were stretched to 2.2 ns before amplification, to their bandwith limit of 150 fs. PMID:17952178

  13. High-power terahertz optical pulse generation with a dual-wavelength harmonically mode-locked Yb:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, W. Z.; Chang, M. T.; Su, K. W.; Huang, K. F.; Chen, Y. F.

    2013-07-01

    We report on high-power terahertz optical pulse generation with a dual-wavelength harmonically mode-locked Yb:YAG laser. A semiconductor saturable absorber mirror is developed to achieve synchronously mode-locked operation at two spectral bands centered at 1031.67 and 1049.42 nm with a pulse duration of 1.54 ps and a pulse repetition rate of 80.3 GHz. With a diamond heat spreader to improve the heat removal efficiency, the average output power can be up to 1.1 W at an absorbed pump power of 5.18 W. The autocorrelation traces reveal that the mode-locked pulse is modulated with a beat frequency of 4.92 THz and displays a modulation depth to be greater than 80%.

  14. Effect of bias voltage on the microstructure and hardness of Ti-Si-N films deposited by using high-power impulse magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, JiCheng; Zou, ChangWei; Wang, QiMin; Zeng, Kun; Feng, SiCheng

    2016-01-01

    The huge potential of High-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) to improve the properties of deposited coatings has been verified. In this study, Ti-Si-N coatings were deposited on Si (111), glass and cemented carbide substrates by using HIPIMS. The influences of the peak voltage, duty cycle and total gas pressure on the transient peak current of the Ti90Si10 target was investigated in detailed. The (200) diffraction intensity decreased with increasing bias voltage from -50 V to -400 V. The hardness of the Ti-Si-N coatings deposited at various bias voltages and the internal stress at different bias voltages were studied. The results indicate that HIPIMS technology can considerably improve the mechanical capacity of the Ti-Si-N coatings, possibly due to the combined protection of the increased adhesive force with the substrate and the relatively high hardness, which are caused by densification and dislocation strengthening effects.

  15. Influence of nitrogen-related defects on optical and electrical behaviour in HfO2-xNx deposited by high-power impulse magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdoch, B. J.; Ganesan, R.; McKenzie, D. R.; Bilek, M. M. M.; McCulloch, D. G.; Partridge, J. G.

    2015-09-01

    HfO2-xNx films have been deposited by high-power impulse magnetron sputtering in an Ar-O2-N2 atmosphere with a series of nitrogen partial pressures. X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed the optimum deposition conditions required to passivate O vacancies in the HfO2-xNx films by nitrogen. Low-mobility interstitial species prevent crystallisation of nitrogen-incorporated films. These effects combine to remove leakage paths resulting in superior breakdown strengths compared to films deposited without nitrogen. The bandgap was maintained at ˜5.9 eV in the films in which nitrogen passivated the oxygen vacancies. This is essential to provide sufficient band offsets for HfO2-xNx films to be used an effective gate dielectric.

  16. High power laser pulses with voltage controlled durations of 400 - 1000 ps.

    PubMed

    Harth, F; Ulm, T; Lührmann, M; Knappe, R; Klehr, A; Hoffmann, Th; Erbert, G; L'huillier, J A

    2012-03-26

    We report on the generation and amplification of pulses with pulse widths of 400 - 1000 ps at 1064 nm. For pulse generation an ultra-fast semiconductor modulator is used that modulates a cw-beam of a DFB diode laser. The pulse lengths could be adjusted by the use of a voltage control. The pulses were amplified in a solid state Nd:YVO₄ regenerative amplifier to an average power of up to 47.7 W at 100 - 816 kHz. PMID:22453379

  17. Pump-seed synchronization for MHz repetition rate, high-power optical parametric chirped pulse amplification.

    PubMed

    Fattahi, Hanieh; Teisset, Catherine Yuriko; Pronin, Oleg; Sugita, Atsushi; Graf, Roswitha; Pervak, Vladimir; Gu, Xun; Metzger, Thomas; Major, Zsuzsanna; Krausz, Ferenc; Apolonski, Alexander

    2012-04-23

    We report on an active synchronization between two independent mode-locked lasers using a combined electronic-optical feedback. With this scheme, seed pulses at MHz repetition rate were amplified in a non-collinear optical parametric chirped pulse amplifier (OPCPA). The amplifier was seeded with stretched 1.5 nJ pulses from a femtosecond Ti:Sapphire oscillator, while pumped with the 1 ps, 2.9 µJ frequency-doubled output of an Yb:YAG thin-disk oscillator. The residual timing jitter between the two oscillators was suppressed to 120 fs (RMS), allowing for an efficient and broadband amplification at 11.5 MHz to a pulse energy of 700 nJ and an average power of 8 W. First compression experiment with 240 nJ amplified pulse energy resulted in a pulse duration of ~10 fs. PMID:22535076

  18. High-power widely tunable sub-20 fs Gaussian laser pulses for ultrafast nonlinear spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Bernd; Steinmann, Andy; Giessen, Harald

    2011-11-21

    We demonstrate the generation of widely tunable sub-20 fs Gaussian-shaped laser pulses using a grating-based 4-f pulse shaper and a liquid crystal spatial light modulator. Our pump source is an Yb:KGW solitary mode-locked oscillator at 44 MHz repetition rate which is coupled into a large mode area microstructured fiber to generate a broad spectrum from below 900 nm to above 1150 nm. These pulses are precompressed by a prism sequence and subsequently sent into the pulse shaper. We use the multiphoton intrapulse interference phase scan (MIIPS) for phase shaping and iterative amplitude optimization to achieve Gaussian-like tunable sub-20 fs pulses with output powers of up to 142 mW as well as nontunable pulses with 310 mW output power as short as 11.5 fs. PMID:22109462

  19. High-power pulsed thulium fiber oscillator modulated by stimulated Brillouin scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yulong Xu, Jianqiu

    2014-01-06

    A pulsed ∼2-μm thulium-doped fiber laser passively modulated by distributed stimulated Brillouin scattering achieves 10.2 W average power and >100 kHz repetition rate with a very simple all-fiber configuration. The maximum pulse energy and peak power surpass 100 μJ and 6 kW, respectively. Another distinct property is that the pulse width is clamped around 17 ns at all power levels. All the average-power, pulse energy, and peak power show the highest values from passively modulated fiber lasers in all wavelength regions.

  20. High-power soliton fiber laser based on pulse width control with chirped fiber Bragg gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Fermann, M.E.; Sugden, K.; Bennion, I.

    1995-01-15

    Chirped fiber Bragg gratings control the pulse width and energy in Kerr mode-locked erbium fiber soliton lasers. We create high-energy pulses by providing large amounts of excessive negative dispersion, which increases the pulse width while keeping the nonlinearity of the cavity constant. With a chirped fiber grating of 3.4-ps{sup 2} dispersion, 3-ps pulses with an energy content higher than 1 nJ are generated at a repetition rate of 27 MHz. By controlling the polarization state in the cavity, we obtain a tuning range from 1.550 to 1.562 {mu}m.

  1. Dynamics of high power and long pulse laser propagation and its control in underdense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsutsumi, M.; Fuchs, J.; Antici, P.; Audebert, P.; Bourgeois, N.; Grech, M.; Kodama, R.; Lin, T.; Marqués, J. R.; Riazuelo, G.; Romagnani, L.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2006-10-01

    The study of intense laser pulse propagation through long underdense plasmas is of crucial importance for inertial confinement fusion (ICF). We have performed a systematic study of long pulse beams (τL=400ps,I=10^10˜10^12Wcm-2) propagating through the underdense plasmas (ne=10^19˜10^20cm-3), by controlling two filaments created from the pulses with variable delay and intensity ratio. These experiments have been performed at the LULI laser facility. The results show that the earlier pulse affects the propagation characteristics of the later pulse. The 2D time-resolved sampling camera provides the ability to examine the possibility of enhanced propagation, collimation, and guiding of a trailing pulse induced by an earlier pulse. These facts are of interest for ICF and other applications. In particular, this study opens perspectives, through shaping the pulses temporally, for the control of propagation of long pulses in the low density plasmas that are present within ICF hohlraums.

  2. The Development of the Electrically Controlled High Power RF Switch and Its Application to Active RF Pulse Compression Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jiquan

    2008-12-01

    In the past decades, there has been increasing interest in pulsed high power RF sources for building high-gradient high-energy particle accelerators. Passive RF pulse compression systems have been used in many applications to match the available RF sources to the loads requiring higher RF power but a shorter pulse. Theoretically, an active RF pulse compression system has the advantage of higher efficiency and compactness over the passive system. However, the key component for such a system an element capable of switching hundreds of megawatts of RF power in a short time compared to the compressed pulse width is still an open problem. In this dissertation, we present a switch module composed of an active window based on the bulk effects in semiconductor, a circular waveguide three-port network and a movable short plane, with the capability to adjust the S-parameters before and after switching. The RF properties of the switch module were analyzed. We give the scaling laws of the multiple-element switch systems, which allow the expansion of the system to a higher power level. We present a novel overmoded design for the circular waveguide three-port network and the associated circular-to-rectangular mode-converter. We also detail the design and synthesis process of this novel mode-converter. We demonstrate an electrically controlled ultra-fast high power X-band RF active window built with PIN diodes on high resistivity silicon. The window is capable of handling multi-megawatt RF power and can switch in 2-300ns with a 1000A current driver. A low power active pulse compression experiment was carried out with the switch module and a 375ns resonant delay line, obtaining 8 times compression gain with a compression ratio of 20.

  3. Forward voltage short-pulse technique for measuring high power laser array junction temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meadows, Byron L. (Inventor); Amzajerdian, Frazin (Inventor); Barnes, Bruce W. (Inventor); Baker, Nathaniel R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of measuring the temperature of the P-N junction within the light-emitting region of a quasi-continuous-wave or pulsed semiconductor laser diode device. A series of relatively short and low current monitor pulses are applied to the laser diode in the period between the main drive current pulses necessary to cause the semiconductor to lase. At the sufficiently low current level of the monitor pulses, the laser diode device does not lase and behaves similar to an electronic diode. The voltage across the laser diode resulting from each of these low current monitor pulses is measured with a high degree of precision. The junction temperature is then determined from the measured junction voltage using their known linear relationship.

  4. High repetition rate multi-channel source of high-power rf-modulated pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmaskulov, M. R.; Pedos, M. S.; Rukin, S. N.; Sharypov, K. A.; Shpak, V. G.; Shunailov, S. A.; Yalandin, M. I.; Romanchenko, I. V.; Rostov, V. V.

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents the results of testing a high voltage pulse generator based on parallel gyromagnetic nonlinear transmission lines filled with saturable ferrite. The generator is capable of producing almost identical stable rf-modulated nanosecond high voltage pulses in each of the two, or four, parallel output channels. The output voltage amplitude in each channel can reach -285 or -180 kV, respectively, with a rf modulation depth of up to 60%. Drive pulses were produced as the packets of duration 1-5 s at a pulse repetition frequency of 800 Hz using a driver equipped with all-solid-state switches. Splitting the driver pulse provided electric field strengths in the channels which were below the breakdown field strength of the transmission lines. As a result, the use of nonlinear transmission lines of reduced diameter made it possible to increase the center frequency of the excited rf oscillations to ˜2 GHz.

  5. High-power Waveguide Dampers for the Short-Pulse X-Ray Project at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Waldschmidt, G J; Liu, J; Middendorf, M E; Nassiri, A; Smith, T L; Wu, G; Henry, J; Mammosser, J D; Rimmer, R A; Wiseman, M

    2012-07-01

    High-power waveguide dampers have been designed and prototyped for the Short-Pulse X-ray (SPX) cavities at the Advanced Photon Source. The cavities will operate at 2.815 GHz and utilize the TM110 dipole mode. As a result, higher-order (HOM) and lower-order mode (LOM) in-vacuum dampers have been designed to satisfy the demanding broadband damping requirements in the APS storage ring. The SPX single-cell cavity consists of two WR284 waveguides for damping the HOMs and one WR284 waveguide for primarily damping the LOM where up to 2kW will be dissipated in the damping material. The damper designs and high-power experimental results will be discussed in this paper.

  6. Means and method for characterizing high power, ultra short laser pulses in a real time, on line manner

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1994-03-08

    An ultra short (<10 ps), high power laser pulse is temporally characterized by a system that uses a physical measurement of a wavefront that has been altered in a known manner. The system includes a first reflection switch to remove a portion of a pulse from a beam of pulses, then includes a second reflection switch, operating in a mode that is opposite to the first reflection switch, to slice off a portion of that removed portion. The sliced portion is then directed to a measuring device for physical measurement. The two reflection switches are arranged with respect to each other and with respect to the beam of ultra short pulses such that physical measurement of the sliced portion is related to the temporal measurement of the ultra short pulse by a geometric or trigonometric relationship. The reflection switches are operated by a control pulse that is directed to impinge on each of the reflection switches at a 90[degree] angle of incidence. 8 figures.

  7. Effect of sputtering pressure on crystalline quality and residual stress of AlN films deposited at 823 K on nitrided sapphire substrates by pulsed DC reactive sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsuka, Makoto; Takeuchi, Hiroto; Fukuyama, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) is a promising material for use in applications such as deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) and surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices. In the present study, the effect of sputtering pressure on the surface morphology, crystalline quality, and residual stress of AlN films deposited at 823 K on nitrided a-plane sapphire substrates, which have high-crystalline-quality c-plane AlN thin layers, by pulsed DC reactive sputtering was investigated. The c-axis-oriented AlN films were homoepitaxially grown on nitrided sapphire substrates at sputtering pressures of 0.4–1.5 Pa. Surface damage of the AlN sputtered films increased with increasing sputtering pressure because of arcing (abnormal electrical discharge) during sputtering. The sputtering pressure affected the crystalline quality and residual stress of AlN sputtered films because of a change in the number and energy of Ar+ ions and Al sputtered atoms. The crystalline quality of AlN films was improved by deposition with lower sputtering pressure.

  8. High-power noise-like pulse generation using a 1.56-µm all-fiber laser system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Shian; Hwang, Sheng-Kwang; Liu, Jia-Ming

    2015-07-13

    We demonstrated an all-fiber, high-power noise-like pulse laser system at the 1.56-µm wavelength. A low-power noise-like pulse train generated by a ring oscillator was amplified using a two-stage amplifier, where the performance of the second-stage amplifier determined the final output power level. The optical intensity in the second-stage amplifier was managed well to avoid not only the excessive spectral broadening induced by nonlinearities but also any damage to the device. On the other hand, the power conversion efficiency of the amplifier was optimized through proper control of its pump wavelength. The pump wavelength determines the pump absorption and therefore the power conversion efficiency of the gain fiber. Through this approach, the average power of the noise-like pulse train was amplified considerably to an output of 13.1 W, resulting in a power conversion efficiency of 36.1% and a pulse energy of 0.85 µJ. To the best of our knowledge, these amplified pulses have the highest average power and pulse energy for noise-like pulses in the 1.56-µm wavelength region. As a result, the net gain in the cascaded amplifier reached 30 dB. With peak and pedestal widths of 168 fs and 61.3 ps, respectively, for the amplified pulses, the pedestal-to-peak intensity ratio of the autocorrelation trace remains at the value of 0.5 required for truly noise-like pulses. PMID:26191882

  9. Breaking symmetry in propagation of radially and azimuthally polarized high power laser pulses in underdense plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Naveen; Zhidkov, Alexei; Nakanii, Nobuhiko; Masuda, Shinichi; Hosokai, Tomonao; Kodama, Ryosuke

    2016-03-01

    Propagation of relativistically intense azimuthally or radially polarized laser pulses (RPP) is demonstrated, via 3D particle-in-cell simulations, to be unstable in uniform underdense plasma. Strong breaking of the pulse symmetry occurs for RPP with power exceeding the critical one for self-focusing in transversely uniform plasma with an increment, Γ, close to the well-known Rayleigh-Taylor-like instability depending on the acceleration, α, and the modulated density gradient length, L, as Γ≈(α/L) 1 /2 . In deeper plasma channels, the instability vanishes. Electron self-injection in the pulse wake and resulting acceleration is explored.

  10. Spatiotemporal evolution of high power laser pulses in relativistic magnetized inhomogeneous plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bokaei, B.; Niknam, A. R. Imani, E.

    2015-09-15

    In this work, the spatiotemporal evolution of Gaussian laser pulse propagated through a plasma is investigated in the presence of an external axial magnetic field. The coupled equations of self-focusing and self-compression are obtained via paraxial approximation by taking into account the relativistic nonlinearity. The effect of axial magnetic field on simultaneously relativistic self-focusing and self-compression of the laser pulse is studied for homogeneous and inhomogeneous plasmas. The results show that the simultaneous use of both axial magnetic field and density ramp-up leads to generate pulses with the smallest spot size and shortest compression length.

  11. On the Theory of High-Power Ultrashort Pulse Propagation in Raman-Active Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belenov, E. M.; Isakov, V. A.; Kanavin, A. P.; Smetanin, I. V.

    1996-01-01

    The propagation of an intense femtosecond pulse in a Raman-active medium is analyzed. An analytic solution which describes in explicit form the evolution of the light pulse is derived. The field of an intense light wave undergoes a substantial transformation as the wave propagates through the medium. The nature of this transformation can change over time scales comparable to the period of the optical oscillations. As a result, the pulse of sufficiently high energy divides into stretched and compressed domains where the field decreases and increases respectively.

  12. An ultra short pulse reconstruction software applied to the GEMINI high power laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galletti, Mario; Galimberti, Marco; Hooker, Chris; Chekhlov, Oleg; Tang, Yunxin; Bisesto, Fabrizio Giuseppe; Curcio, Alessandro; Anania, Maria Pia; Giulietti, Danilo

    2016-09-01

    The GRENOUILLE traces of Gemini pulses (15 J, 30 fs, PW, shot per 20 s) were acquired in the Gemini Target Area PetaWatt at the Central Laser Facility (CLF), Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). A comparison between the characterizations of the laser pulse parameters made using two different types of algorithms: Video Frog and GRenouille/FrOG (GROG), was made. The temporal and spectral parameters came out to be in great agreement for the two kinds of algorithms. In this experimental campaign it has been showed how GROG, the developed algorithm, works as well as VideoFrog algorithm with the PetaWatt pulse class.

  13. High-power mode-locked hybrid pulse source using two-section laser diodes.

    PubMed

    Morton, P A; Mizrahi, V; Tanbun-Ek, T; Logan, R A; Lemaire, P; Erdogan, T; Sciortino, P F; Sergent, A M; Wecht, K W

    1994-05-15

    We describe a mode-locked hybrid pulse source with a two-section laser diode to obtain short mode-locked pulses (23 ps) with an average power of 7.8 mW, a high peak power of 137 mW, and a repetition rate of 2.51 GHz. The hybrid laser incorporates a two-section laser and an optical fiber cavity with an integrated Bragg reflector. The Bragg reflector controls the operating wavelength to subnanometer precision and also confines the bandwidth of the pulses so as to keep the time-bandwidth product below 1. PMID:19844425

  14. Long pulse acceleration of MeV class high power density negative H- ion beam for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, N.; Kojima, A.; Kashiwagi, M.; Tobari, H.; Hiratsuka, J.; Watanabe, K.; Dairaku, M.; Yamanaka, H.; Hanada, M.

    2015-04-01

    R&D of high power density negative ion beam acceleration has been carried out at MeV test facility in JAEA to realize ITER neutral beam accelerator. The main target is H- ion beam acceleration up to 1 MeV with 200 A/m2 for 60 s whose pulse length is the present facility limit. For long pulse acceleration at high power density, new extraction grid (EXG) has been developed with high cooling capability, which electron suppression magnet is placed under cooling channel similar to ITER. In addition, aperture size of electron suppression grid (ESG) is enlarged from 14 mm to 16 mm to reduce direct interception on the ESG and emission of secondary electron which leads to high heat load on the upstream acceleration grid. By enlarging ESG aperture, beam current increased 10 % at high current beam and total acceleration grid heat load reduced from 13 % to 10 % of input power at long pulse beam. In addition, heat load by back stream positive ion into the EXG is measured for the first time and is estimated as 0.3 % of beam power, while heat load by back stream ion into the source chamber is estimated as 3.5 ~ 4.0 % of beam power. Beam acceleration up to 60 s which is the facility limit, has achieved at 683 keV, 100 A/m2 of negative ion beam, whose energy density increases two orders of magnitude since 2011.

  15. Long pulse acceleration of MeV class high power density negative H{sup −} ion beam for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Umeda, N. Kojima, A.; Kashiwagi, M.; Tobari, H.; Hiratsuka, J.; Watanabe, K.; Dairaku, M.; Yamanaka, H.; Hanada, M.

    2015-04-08

    R and D of high power density negative ion beam acceleration has been carried out at MeV test facility in JAEA to realize ITER neutral beam accelerator. The main target is H{sup −} ion beam acceleration up to 1 MeV with 200 A/m{sup 2} for 60 s whose pulse length is the present facility limit. For long pulse acceleration at high power density, new extraction grid (EXG) has been developed with high cooling capability, which electron suppression magnet is placed under cooling channel similar to ITER. In addition, aperture size of electron suppression grid (ESG) is enlarged from 14 mm to 16 mm to reduce direct interception on the ESG and emission of secondary electron which leads to high heat load on the upstream acceleration grid. By enlarging ESG aperture, beam current increased 10 % at high current beam and total acceleration grid heat load reduced from 13 % to 10 % of input power at long pulse beam. In addition, heat load by back stream positive ion into the EXG is measured for the first time and is estimated as 0.3 % of beam power, while heat load by back stream ion into the source chamber is estimated as 3.5 ~ 4.0 % of beam power. Beam acceleration up to 60 s which is the facility limit, has achieved at 683 keV, 100 A/m{sup 2} of negative ion beam, whose energy density increases two orders of magnitude since 2011.

  16. Reliability of High Power Laser Diode Arrays Operating in Long Pulse Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Lockard, George E.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Baker, Nathaniel R.

    2006-01-01

    Reliability and lifetime of quasi-CW laser diode arrays are greatly influenced by their thermal characteristics. This paper examines the thermal properties of laser diode arrays operating in long pulse duration regime.

  17. A broadly tunable autocorrelator for ultra-short, ultra-high power infrared optical pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Szarmes, E.B.; Madey, J.M.J.

    1995-12-31

    We describe the design of a crossed-beam, optical autocorrelator that uses an uncoated, birefringent beamsplitter to split a linearly polarized incident pulse into two orthogonally polarized pulses, and a Type II, SHG crystal to generate the intensity autocorrelation function. The uncoated beamsplitter accommodates extremely broad tunability while precluding any temporal distortion of ultrashort optical pulses at the dielectric interface, and the specific design provides efficient operation between 1 {mu}m and 4 {mu}m. Furthermore, the use of Type II SHG completely eliminates any single-beam doubling, so the autocorrelator can be operated at very shallow crossed-beam angles without generating a background pedestal. The autocorrelator has been constructed and installed in the Mark III laboratory at Duke University as a broadband diagnostic for ongoing compression experiments on the chirped-pulse FEL.

  18. Suppression of beam induced pulse shortening modes in high power RF generator TW output structures

    SciTech Connect

    Haimson, J.; Mecklenburg, B.

    1992-12-31

    Several different style 11.4 GHz relativistic klystrons, operating with beam pulse widths of 50 ns and using large aperture, tapered phase-velocity TW structures,` have recently demonstrated output RF power levels in the range of 100 to 300 MW without breakdown or pulse shortening. To extend this performance into the long pulse regime (1 {mu}s) or to demonstrate a threefold increase in output power by using higher currents, the existing TW circuit designs must be modified (a) to reduce the cavity maximum surface E-fields by a factor of 2 to 3, and (b) to elevate the current threshold values of the beam induced higher order modes (HOM) to ensure avoidance of RF pulse shortening and associated instabilities. A technique for substantially elevating this threshold current is described, and microwave data and photographs are presented showing the degree of HOM damping achieved in a recently constructed 11.4 GHz TW structure.

  19. High-power vacuum-tube modulator with pulse-width control

    SciTech Connect

    Manoilo, V.S.; Chebotarev, V.V.; Kulik, N.V.; Lishenko, B.A.; Shevchuk, B.A.; Tereshin, V.I.; Voznyi, V.I.

    1984-03-01

    The authors describe a modulator for shaping square pulses of up to 35 kV and 30 A. The device may be powered from the line or from a storage battery. It will produce 2 pulses of widths from 50 microseconds to 50 milliseconds with rise times of about 10 microseconds. A protections circuit allows voltage to be taken from the load in the presence of breakdown for about 20 microseconds.

  20. Multi-nanosecond high power pulse generation at 7.8GHz with a dielectric-loaded power extractor.

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, M..; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Liu, W.; Power, J. G.; Gao, F.; Jing, C.; Wong, T.; Yusof, Z.; High Energy Physics; Illinois Inst. of Tech.; Euclid Techlabs LLC; IEEE

    2009-06-01

    Power extraction from charged particle beams is a prospective way to develop future high power radio frequency (RF) sources. We have designed and tested a 7.8 GHz power extractor based on a dielectric-loaded waveguide. Building upon earlier work on single electron bunch tests, 10 ns and 22 ns megawatt-level RF pulses have been generated with trains consisting of 16 electron bunches each, by using a laser splitting-recombination scheme. In addition, 44 MW of peak power has been generated with a train consisting 4 electron bunches. Behaviors of higher-order-modes are also explored.

  1. High power burst-mode optical parametric amplifier with arbitrary pulse selection.

    PubMed

    Pergament, M; Kellert, M; Kruse, K; Wang, J; Palmer, G; Wissmann, L; Wegner, U; Lederer, M J

    2014-09-01

    We present results from a unique burst-mode femtosecond non-collinear optical parametric amplifier (NOPA) under development for the optical - x-ray pump-probe experiments at the European X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Facility. The NOPA operates at a burst rate of 10 Hz, a duty cycle of 2.5% and an intra-burst repetition rate of up to 4.5 MHz, producing high fidelity 15 fs pulses at a center wavelength of 810 nm. Using dispersive amplification filtering of the super-continuum seed pulses allows for selectable pulse duration up to 75 fs, combined with a tuning range in excess of 100 nm whilst remaining nearly transform limited. At an intra-burst rate of 188 kHz the single pulse energy from two sequential NOPA stages reached 180 µJ, corresponding to an average power of 34W during the burst. Acousto- and electro-optic switching techniques enable the generation of transient free bursts of required length and the selection of arbitrary pulse sequences inside the burst. PMID:25321596

  2. Initial operation of high power ICRF system for long pulse in EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, C. M.; Zhao, Y. P.; Zhang, X. J.; Wan, B. N.; Gong, X. Z.; Mao, Y. Z.; Yuan, S.; Chen, G.

    2015-12-01

    The ICRF heating system on EAST upgraded by active cooling aims for long pulse operation. In this paper, the main technical features of the ICRF system are described. One of a major challenges for long pulse operation is RF-edge interactions induced impurity production and heat loading. In EAST, ICRF antenna protections and Faraday screen bars damaged due to LH electron beam are found. Preliminary results for the analysis of the interaction between LHCD and ICRF antenna are discussed. Increase of metal impurities in the plasma during RF pulse and in a larger core radiation are also shown. These RF-edge interactions at EAST and some preliminary results for the optimizing RF performance will be presented.

  3. Initial operation of high power ICRF system for long pulse in EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, C. M. Zhao, Y. P.; Zhang, X. J.; Wan, B. N.; Gong, X. Z.; Mao, Y. Z.; Yuan, S.; Chen, G.

    2015-12-10

    The ICRF heating system on EAST upgraded by active cooling aims for long pulse operation. In this paper, the main technical features of the ICRF system are described. One of a major challenges for long pulse operation is RF-edge interactions induced impurity production and heat loading. In EAST, ICRF antenna protections and Faraday screen bars damaged due to LH electron beam are found. Preliminary results for the analysis of the interaction between LHCD and ICRF antenna are discussed. Increase of metal impurities in the plasma during RF pulse and in a larger core radiation are also shown. These RF-edge interactions at EAST and some preliminary results for the optimizing RF performance will be presented.

  4. Technology and engineering aspects of high power pulsed single longitudinal mode dye lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, V. S.; Mukherjee, Jaya; Gantayet, L. M.

    2015-09-01

    Tunable single mode pulsed dye lasers are capable of generating optical radiations in the visible range having very small bandwidths (transform limited), high average power (a few kW) at a high pulse repetition rate (a few tens of kHz), small beam divergence and relatively higher efficiencies. These dye lasers are generally utilized laser dyes dissolved in solvents such as water, heavy water, ethanol, methanol, etc. to provide a rapidly flowing gain medium. The dye laser is a versatile tool, which can lase either in the continuous wave (CW) or in the pulsed mode with pulse duration as small as a few tens of femtoseconds. In this review, we have examined the several cavity designs, various types of gain mediums and numerous types of dye cell geometries for obtaining the single longitudinal mode pulsed dye laser. Different types of cavity configuration, such as very short cavity, short cavity with frequency selective element and relatively longer cavity with multiple frequency selective elements were reviewed. These single mode lasers have been pumped by all kinds of pumping sources such as flash lamps, Excimer, Nitrogen, Ruby, Nd:YAG, Copper Bromide and Copper Vapor Lasers. The single mode dye lasers are either pumped transversely or longitudinally to the resonator axis. The pulse repletion rate of these pump lasers were ranging from a few Hz to a few tens of kHz. Physics technology and engineering aspects of tuning mechanism, mode hop free scanning and dye cell designs are also presented in this review. Tuning of a single mode dye laser with a resolution of a few MHz per step is a technologically challenging task, which is discussed here.

  5. High-power pulse repetitive HF(DF) laser with a solid-state pump generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikanov, S. D.; Domazhirov, A. P.; Zaretskiy, N. A.; Kazantsev, S. Yu; Kononov, I. G.; Kromin, A. A.; Podlesnykh, S. V.; Sivachev, A. A.; Firsov, K. N.; Kharitonov, S. V.; Tsykin, V. S.; Shchurov, V. V.; Yutkin, I. M.

    2015-11-01

    Operation of a repetitively pulsed electric-discharge HF(DF) laser with an all-solid-state pump generator based on FID switches is demonstrated. The energy stored in the pump generator capacitors was 880 J at an open-circuit voltage of 240 kV and a discharge pulse repetition rate of 25 Hz. The specific energy extractions were 3.8 and 3.4 J L-1 for the HF and DF lasers, respectively. The possibilities of improving the output laser characteristics are discussed.

  6. Low-jitter high-power thyristor array pulse driver and generator

    DOEpatents

    Hanks, Roy L.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for generating low-jitter, high-voltage and high-current pulses for driving low impedance loads such as detonator fuses uses a MOSFET driver which, when triggered, discharges a high-voltage pre-charged capacitor into the primary of a toroidal current-multiplying transformer with multiple isolated secondary windings. The secondary outputs are suitable for driving an array of thyristors that discharge a precharged high-voltage capacitor and thus generating the required high-voltage and high-current pulse.

  7. High-power pulsed-current-mode operation of an overdriven tapered amplifier.

    PubMed

    Takase, Ken; Stockton, John K; Kasevich, Mark A

    2007-09-01

    We experimentally investigate the performance of a commercial tapered amplifier diode operating in a pulsed-current mode with a peak current that is significantly higher than the specified maximum continuous current. For a tapered amplifier rated at 500 mW of continuous power, we demonstrate 2.6 W of peak optical output power with 15 mW of injection light for 200 micros, 7 A current pulses. Different failure mechanisms for the tapered amplifier, including thermal and optical damage, are identified under these conditions. PMID:17767324

  8. Low-temperature growth of low friction wear-resistant amorphous carbon nitride thin films by mid-frequency, high power impulse, and direct current magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Bakoglidis, Konstantinos D. Schmidt, Susann; Garbrecht, Magnus; Ivanov, Ivan G.; Jensen, Jens; Greczynski, Grzegorz; Hultman, Lars

    2015-09-15

    The potential of different magnetron sputtering techniques for the synthesis of low friction and wear resistant amorphous carbon nitride (a-CN{sub x}) thin films onto temperature-sensitive AISI52100 bearing steel, but also Si(001) substrates was studied. Hence, a substrate temperature of 150 °C was chosen for the film synthesis. The a-CN{sub x} films were deposited using mid-frequency magnetron sputtering (MFMS) with an MF bias voltage, high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) with a synchronized HiPIMS bias voltage, and direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) with a DC bias voltage. The films were deposited using a N{sub 2}/Ar flow ratio of 0.16 at the total pressure of 400 mPa. The negative bias voltage, V{sub s}, was varied from 20 to 120 V in each of the three deposition modes. The microstructure of the films was characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction, while the film morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. All films possessed an amorphous microstructure, while the film morphology changed with the bias voltage. Layers grown applying the lowest substrate bias of 20 V exhibited pronounced intercolumnar porosity, independent of the sputter technique. Voids closed and dense films are formed at V{sub s} ≥ 60 V, V{sub s} ≥ 100 V, and V{sub s} = 120 V for MFMS, DCMS, and HiPIMS, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the nitrogen-to-carbon ratio, N/C, of the films ranged between 0.2 and 0.24. Elastic recoil detection analysis showed that Ar content varied between 0 and 0.8 at. % and increased as a function of V{sub s} for all deposition techniques. All films exhibited compressive residual stress, σ, which depends on the growth method; HiPIMS produces the least stressed films with values ranging between −0.4 and −1.2 GPa for all V{sub s}, while CN{sub x} films deposited by MFMS showed residual stresses up to −4.2

  9. Numerical simulations of output pulse extraction from a high-power microwave compressor with a plasma switch

    SciTech Connect

    Shlapakovski, Anatoli; Beilin, Leonid; Bliokh, Yuri; Donskoy, Moshe; Krasik, Yakov E.; Hadas, Yoav; Schamiloglu, Edl

    2014-05-07

    Numerical simulations of the process of electromagnetic energy release from a high-power microwave pulse compressor comprising a gas-filled cavity and interference switch were carried out. A microwave plasma discharge in a rectangular waveguide H-plane tee was modeled with the use of the fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell code MAGIC. The gas ionization, plasma evolution, and interaction with RF fields accumulated within the compressor were simulated using different approaches provided by the MAGIC code: particle-in-cell approach accounting for electron-neutral collisions, gas conductivity model based on the concept of mobility, and hybrid modeling. The dependences of the microwave output pulse peak power and waveform on parameters that can be controlled in experiments, such as an external ionization rate, RF field amplitude, and background gas pressure, were investigated.

  10. A method towards simulating the total luminous flux of a monochromatic high power LED operated in a pulsed manner.

    PubMed

    Moolman, M C; Koek, W D; Urbach, H P

    2009-09-28

    High power light-emitting diodes (HPLEDs) are frequently being operated in a pulsed manner. The research presented here focuses on the optical, electrical and thermal behaviour of a HPLED under pulse width modulation (PWM), and has the following twofold aim. Firstly, investigating the temperature dependence of the HPLED's efficiency, where it was found that the exact method of operation and the definition of calculation is crucial when making claims. Secondly, we propose a method to simulate the absolute emitted luminous flux of a current driven HPLED under PWM. This is done by making use of experimentally determined characteristic parameters of the HPLED. This has as advantage that no further physical measurements are needed to investigate the HPLEDs behavior under numerous different PWM circumstances. PMID:19907530

  11. Improved long-term electrical stability of pulsed high-power diodes using dense carbon fiber velvet cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Jie; Shu Ting; Wang Hui

    2012-07-15

    The influence of fibrous velvet cathodes on the electrical stability of a planar high-power diode powered by a {approx}230 kV, {approx}110 ns pulse has been investigated. The current density was on the order of {approx}123 A/cm{sup 2}. A combination of time-resolved electrical and optical diagnostics has been employed to study the basic phenomenology of the temporal and spatial evolution of the diode plasmas. Additionally, an impedance model was used to extract information about this plasma from voltage and current profiles. The results from the two diagnostics were compared. By comparison with commercial polymer velvet cathode, the dense carbon fiber velvet cathode showed superior long-term electrical stability as judged by the change in cathode turn-on field, ignition delays, diode impedance, and surface plasma characteristics during the voltage flattop, a promising result for applications where reliable operation at high power is required. Finally, it was shown that the interaction of the electron beam with the stainless steel anode did not lead to the formation of anode plasma. These results may be of interest to the high power microwave systems with cold cathodes.

  12. Reducing, by pulse width modulation, the curing temperature of a prototype high-power LED light curing unit.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ta-Ko; Hung, Chun-Cheng; Tsai, Chi-Cheng

    2006-06-01

    Third-generation LEDs have high irradiance and efficiency, but the associated temperature rise is potentially hazardous to the pulp of teeth. We evaluated, during composite polymerization, the irradiance and temperature rise of a prototype high-power LED light curing unit (LCU) with optimal pulse width modulation (PWM), and then compared the results with four off-the-shelf high-power LCUs. A cavity was prepared in a tooth, and a composite resin layer was applied and cured. For each LCU, the irradiance and temperature changes at the pulp-dentin junction were measured. Microhardness (Vickers hardness) of cured composite samples was measured for each LCU. Our prototype had a final temperature of 36.4 +/- 1.3 degrees C and irradiance of 1,182 +/- 1 mW/cm2. The unit with the highest temperature had a temperature of 48.7 +/- 1.2 degrees C and an irradiance of 1,194 +/- 1 mW/cm2. Based on the results of the present study, it was shown that PWM technology reduced the curing temperature while retaining the polymerization effectiveness of a high-power LED LCU. PMID:16916235

  13. An Investigation into the Effect of High-Power Pulse IR Radiation on the Properties of Surfaces of CdxHg1-хTe Heteroepitaxial Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boltar', K. O.; Burlakov, I. D.; Voitsekhovskii, А. V.; Sizov, А. L.; Sredin, V. G.; Talipov, N. Kh.; Shul'ga, S. А.

    2013-12-01

    The results of investigations into radiation modification of surfaces of Cd x Hg1- x Te (CMT) heteroepitaxial layers grown by molecular-beam and liquid-phase epitaxy (MBE- and LPE CMT HEL) affected by high-power pulse short-wavelength IR radiation are discussed. It is found that the surfaces of MBE CMT HEL and LPE CMT are enhanced by mercury as a result of high-power pulse short-wavelength IR radiation.

  14. Advanced concepts for high-power, short-pulse CO2 laser development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Daniel F.; Hasson, Victor; von Bergmann, Hubertus; Chen, Yu-hsin; Schmitt-Sody, A.; Penano, Joseph R.

    2016-06-01

    Ultra-short pulse lasers are dominated by solid-state technology, which typically operates in the near-infrared. Efforts to extend this technology to longer wavelengths are meeting with some success, but the trend remains that longer wavelengths correlate with greatly reduced power. The carbon dioxide (CO2) laser is capable of delivering high energy, 10 micron wavelength pulses, but the gain structure makes operating in the ultra-short pulse regime difficult. The Naval Research Laboratory and Air Force Research Laboratory are developing a novel CO2 laser designed to deliver ~1 Joule, ~1 picosecond pulses, from a compact gain volume (~2x2x80 cm). The design is based on injection seeding an unstable resonator, in order to achieve high energy extraction efficiency, and to take advantage of power broadening. The unstable resonator is seeded by a solid state front end, pumped by a custom built titanium sapphire laser matched to the CO2 laser bandwidth. In order to access a broader range of mid infrared wavelengths using CO2 lasers, one must consider nonlinear frequency multiplication, which is non-trivial due to the bandwidth of the 10 micron radiation.

  15. Generating high-power short terahertz electromagnetic pulses with a multifoil radiator.

    PubMed

    Vinokurov, Nikolay A; Jeong, Young Uk

    2013-02-01

    We describe a multifoil cone radiator capable of generating high-field short terahertz pulses using short electron bunches. Round flat conducting foil plates with successively decreasing radii are stacked, forming a truncated cone with the z axis. The gaps between the foil plates are equal and filled with some dielectric (or vacuum). A short relativistic electron bunch propagates along the z axis. At sufficiently high particle energy, the energy losses and multiple scattering do not change the bunch shape significantly. When passing by each gap between the foil plates, the electron bunch emits some energy into the gap. Then, the radiation pulses propagate radially outward. For transverse electromagnetic waves with a longitudinal (along the z axis) electric field and an azimuthal magnetic field, there is no dispersion in these radial lines; therefore, the radiation pulses conserve their shapes (time dependence). At the outer surface of the cone, we have synchronous circular radiators. Their radiation field forms a conical wave. Ultrashort terahertz pulses with gigawatt-level peak power can be generated with this device. PMID:23432259

  16. High power visible light emitting diodes as pulsed excitation sources for biomedical photoacoustics

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Thomas J.; Beard, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    The use of visible light emitting diodes (LEDs) as an alternative to Q-switched lasers conventionally used as photoacoustic excitation sources has been explored. In common with laser diodes, LEDs offer the advantages of compact size, low cost and high efficiency. However, laser diodes suitable for pulsed photoacoustic generation are typically available only at wavelengths greater than 750nm. By contrast, LEDs are readily available at visible wavelengths below 650nm where haemoglobin absorption is significantly higher, offering the prospect of increased SNR for superficial vascular imaging applications. To demonstrate feasibility, a range of low cost commercially available LEDs operating in the 420-620nm spectral range were used to generate photoacoustic signals in physiologically realistic vascular phantoms. Overdriving with 200ns pulses and operating at a low duty cycle enabled pulse energies up to 10µJ to be obtained with a 620nm LED. By operating at a high pulse repetition frequency (PRF) in order to rapidly signal average over many acquisitions, this pulse energy was sufficient to generate detectable signals in a blood filled tube immersed in an Intralipid suspension (µs’ = 1mm−1) at a depth of 15mm using widefield illumination. In addition, a compact four-wavelength LED (460nm, 530nm, 590nm, 620nm) in conjunction with a coded excitation scheme was used to illustrate rapid multiwavelength signal acquisition for spectroscopic applications. This study demonstrates that LEDs could find application as inexpensive and compact multiwavelength photoacoustic excitation sources for imaging superficial vascular anatomy. Published by The Optical Society under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License. Further distribution of this work must maintain attribution to the author(s) and the published article’s title, journal citation, and DOI. PMID:27446652

  17. High power visible light emitting diodes as pulsed excitation sources for biomedical photoacoustics.

    PubMed

    Allen, Thomas J; Beard, Paul C

    2016-04-01

    The use of visible light emitting diodes (LEDs) as an alternative to Q-switched lasers conventionally used as photoacoustic excitation sources has been explored. In common with laser diodes, LEDs offer the advantages of compact size, low cost and high efficiency. However, laser diodes suitable for pulsed photoacoustic generation are typically available only at wavelengths greater than 750nm. By contrast, LEDs are readily available at visible wavelengths below 650nm where haemoglobin absorption is significantly higher, offering the prospect of increased SNR for superficial vascular imaging applications. To demonstrate feasibility, a range of low cost commercially available LEDs operating in the 420-620nm spectral range were used to generate photoacoustic signals in physiologically realistic vascular phantoms. Overdriving with 200ns pulses and operating at a low duty cycle enabled pulse energies up to 10µJ to be obtained with a 620nm LED. By operating at a high pulse repetition frequency (PRF) in order to rapidly signal average over many acquisitions, this pulse energy was sufficient to generate detectable signals in a blood filled tube immersed in an Intralipid suspension (µs' = 1mm(-1)) at a depth of 15mm using widefield illumination. In addition, a compact four-wavelength LED (460nm, 530nm, 590nm, 620nm) in conjunction with a coded excitation scheme was used to illustrate rapid multiwavelength signal acquisition for spectroscopic applications. This study demonstrates that LEDs could find application as inexpensive and compact multiwavelength photoacoustic excitation sources for imaging superficial vascular anatomy. Published by The Optical Society under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License. Further distribution of this work must maintain attribution to the author(s) and the published article's title, journal citation, and DOI. PMID:27446652

  18. Large-scale geophysical and geological-prospecting earth-crust investigation using high-power electromagnetic pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikhov, E. P.; Panchenko, V. P.

    2005-12-01

    The paper presents the concept and physical/technical prerequisites for the use of multi-megawatt electromagnetic pulses created, for instance, by autonomous MHD facilities of short-term operation (3--12 seconds), in fundamental and applied in-depth geophysical and geological research. Location of geological sites and research regions; circuits and parameters of emitting and detecting devices; unique pulse MHD facilities of 10--100 MWe capacity using solid (powder) fuel, created in Russia; conditions and methods of conducting large-scale experiments and trial methodical works, performed in the last 30 years by a cooperative group of Russian institute in various regions of Russia, Kyrghizia and Tajikistan, are described. Results of the following large-scale experiments and methodical works are presented: Oil and gas deposits' searching (Caspian depression, East Siberia); Study of electric conduction of sediments near and on the sea shelf (Kola peninsula); Electrical prospecting of ore deposits at depths of up to 10 km (Kola peninsula); Study of geo-electrical composition (section) of the earth-crust and upper mantle at the Ural (up to 40 km), and in the Baltic (up to 150 km); Forecasting of earthquakes using the effective electric resistance of earth-crust blocks up to 20 km deep (Tajikistan, Kirghizia); Seismic earth-crust "unloading", and changing the time-dependent distribution of the seismic activity under high-power electromagnetic impact; Impact on the ionosphere and spreading of ultra-low-frequency electromagnetic waves emitted by a high-power source. The possibilities and prospects of research dedicated to developing the technologies for electrical prospecting, sorting and outlining hydrocarbon deposits on the shelf, as well as to monitoring and studying the processes occurring in the earth-crust under artificial high-power electromagnetic impact in seismic regions, are discussed.

  19. Combining a molecular modelling approach with direct current and high power impulse magnetron sputtering to develop new TiO2 thin films for antifouling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillot, Jérôme; Lecoq, Elodie; Duday, David; Puhakka, Eini; Riihimäki, Markus; Keiski, Riitta; Chemin, Jean-Baptiste; Choquet, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    The accumulation of crystallization deposits at the surface of heat exchangers results in the increase of the heat transfer resistance and a drastic loss of efficiency. Coating surfaces with a thin film can limit the scale-surface adhesion force and thus the fouling process. This study compares the efficiency of TiO2 layers exhibiting various crystalline planes and microstructures to reduce the kinetic of fouling. Molecular modelling with density functional theory is first carried out to determine the energy of CaCO3 deposition on anatase (1 0 1), (0 0 4), and (2 0 0) surfaces as well as on a rutile (1 0 1) one. TiO2 thin films (thickness < 1 μm) are then synthesized by direct current and high power impulse magnetron sputtering (dcMS and HiPIMS respectively) in order to tune their crystallinity and microstructure. Lastly, the induction time to grow CaCO3 crystals at the surface of such materials is determined. Comparing the modelling and fouling results allows to draw general trends on the potential anti-scaling properties of TiO2 crystallized under various forms. Until now, such a comparison combining a theoretical approach with experimental fouling tests has never been reported in the literature.

  20. Influence of ionisation zone motion in high power impulse magnetron sputtering on angular ion flux and NbO x film growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, Robert; Clavero, César; Kolbeck, Jonathan; Anders, André

    2016-02-01

    The ion energies and fluxes in the high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasma from a Nb target were analysed angularly resolved along the tangential direction of the racetrack. A reactive oxygen-containing atmosphere was used as such discharge conditions are typically employed for the synthesis of thin films. Asymmetries in the flux distribution of the recorded ions as well as their energies and charge states were noticed when varying the angle between mass-energy analyser and target surface. More positively charged ions with higher count rates in the medium energy range of their distributions were detected in +\\mathbf{E}× \\mathbf{B} than in -\\mathbf{E}× \\mathbf{B} direction, thus confirming the notion that ionisation zones (also known as spokes or plasma bunches) are associated with moving potential humps. The motion of the recorded negatively charged high-energy oxygen ions was unaffected. Nb{{\\text{O}}x} thin films at different angles and positions were synthesised and analysed as to their structure and properties in order to correlate the observed plasma properties to the film growth conditions. The chemical composition and the film thickness varied with changing deposition angle, where the latter, similar to the ion fluxes, was higher in +\\mathbf{E}× \\mathbf{B} than in -\\mathbf{E}× \\mathbf{B} direction.

  1. Development of negative ion extractor in the high-power and long-pulse negative ion source for fusion application.

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, M; Umeda, N; Tobari, H; Kojima, A; Yoshida, M; Taniguchi, M; Dairaku, M; Maejima, T; Yamanaka, H; Watanabe, K; Inoue, T; Hanada, M

    2014-02-01

    High power and long-pulse negative ion extractor, which is composed of the plasma grid (PG) and the extraction grid (EXG), is newly developed toward the neutral beam injector for heating and current drive of future fusion machines such as ITER, JT-60 Super Advanced and DEMO reactor. The PG is designed to enhance surface production of negative ions efficiently by applying the chamfered aperture. The efficiency of the negative ion production for the discharge power increased by a factor of 1.3 against that of the conventional PG. The EXG is also designed with the thermal analysis to upgrade the cooling capability for the long pulse operation of >1000 s required in ITER. Though the magnetic field for electron suppression is reduced to 0.75 of that in the conventional EXG due to this upgrade, it was experimentally confirmed that the extracted electron current can be suppressed to the allowable level for the long pulse operation. These results show that newly developed extractor has the high potential for the long pulse extraction of the negative ions. PMID:24593597

  2. High-power sub-two-cycle mid-infrared pulses at 100 MHz repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pupeza, I.; Sánchez, D.; Zhang, J.; Lilienfein, N.; Seidel, M.; Karpowicz, N.; Paasch-Colberg, T.; Znakovskaya, I.; Pescher, M.; Schweinberger, W.; Pervak, V.; Fill, E.; Pronin, O.; Wei, Z.; Krausz, F.; Apolonski, A.; Biegert, J.

    2015-11-01

    Powerful coherent light with a spectrum spanning the mid-infrared (MIR) spectral range is crucial for a number of applications in natural as well as life sciences, but so far has only been available from large-scale synchrotron sources. Here we present a compact apparatus that generates pulses with a sub-two-cycle duration and with an average power of 0.1 W and a spectral coverage of 6.8-16.4 μm (at -30 dB). The demonstrated source combines, for the first time in this spectral region, a high power, a high repetition rate and phase coherence. The MIR pulses emerge via difference-frequency generation (DFG) driven by the nonlinearly compressed pulses of a Kerr-lens mode-locked ytterbium-doped yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Yb:YAG) thin-disc oscillator. The resultant 100 MHz MIR pulse train is hundreds to thousands of times more powerful than state-of-the-art frequency combs that emit in this range, and offers a high dynamic range for spectroscopy in the molecular fingerprint region and an ideal prerequisite for hyperspectral imaging as well as for the time-domain coherent control of vibrational dynamics.

  3. High-power, highly stable KrF laser with a 4-kHz pulse repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, V. M.; El'tsov, A. V.; Khristoforov, O. B.

    2015-08-01

    An electric-discharge KrF laser (248 nm) with an average output power of 300 W is developed and studied. A number of new design features are related to the use of a laser chamber based on an Al2O3 ceramic tube. A high power and pulse repetition rate are achieved by using a volume discharge with lateral preionisation by the UV radiation of a creeping discharge in the form of a homogeneous plasma sheet on the surface of a plane sapphire plate. Various generators for pumping the laser are studied. The maximum laser efficiency is 3.1%, the maximum laser energy is 160 mJ pulse-1, and the pulse duration at half maximum is 7.5 ns. In the case of long-term operation at a pulse repetition rate of 4 kHz and an output power of 300 W, high stability of laser output energy (σ <= 0.7%) is achieved using an all-solid-state pump system.

  4. Development of negative ion extractor in the high-power and long-pulse negative ion source for fusion application

    SciTech Connect

    Kashiwagi, M. Umeda, N.; Tobari, H.; Kojima, A.; Yoshida, M.; Taniguchi, M.; Dairaku, M.; Maejima, T.; Yamanaka, H.; Watanabe, K.; Inoue, T.; Hanada, M.

    2014-02-15

    High power and long-pulse negative ion extractor, which is composed of the plasma grid (PG) and the extraction grid (EXG), is newly developed toward the neutral beam injector for heating and current drive of future fusion machines such as ITER, JT-60 Super Advanced and DEMO reactor. The PG is designed to enhance surface production of negative ions efficiently by applying the chamfered aperture. The efficiency of the negative ion production for the discharge power increased by a factor of 1.3 against that of the conventional PG. The EXG is also designed with the thermal analysis to upgrade the cooling capability for the long pulse operation of >1000 s required in ITER. Though the magnetic field for electron suppression is reduced to 0.75 of that in the conventional EXG due to this upgrade, it was experimentally confirmed that the extracted electron current can be suppressed to the allowable level for the long pulse operation. These results show that newly developed extractor has the high potential for the long pulse extraction of the negative ions.

  5. Pulsed DC magnetron sputtered piezoelectric thin film aluminum nitride - Technology and piezoelectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeckel, C.; Kaufmann, C.; Hahn, R.; Schulze, R.; Billep, D.; Gessner, T.

    2014-07-01

    Pulsed DC magnetron sputtered aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films are prepared on several seed layers and at different sputtering conditions. The piezoelectric c-axis (002) orientation of the AlN is analyzed with X-ray diffraction method. The transverse piezoelectric coefficient d31 is determined with a Laser-Doppler-Vibrometer at cantilevers and membranes by analytical calculations and finite element method. Additionally, thin film AlN on bulk silicon is used to characterize the longitudinal piezoelectric charge coefficient d33.

  6. Pulsed DC magnetron sputtered piezoelectric thin film aluminum nitride – Technology and piezoelectric properties

    SciTech Connect

    Stoeckel, C. Kaufmann, C.; Hahn, R.; Schulze, R.; Billep, D.; Gessner, T.

    2014-07-21

    Pulsed DC magnetron sputtered aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films are prepared on several seed layers and at different sputtering conditions. The piezoelectric c-axis (002) orientation of the AlN is analyzed with X-ray diffraction method. The transverse piezoelectric coefficient d{sub 31} is determined with a Laser-Doppler-Vibrometer at cantilevers and membranes by analytical calculations and finite element method. Additionally, thin film AlN on bulk silicon is used to characterize the longitudinal piezoelectric charge coefficient d{sub 33}.

  7. Evolution of a finite pulse of radiation in a high-power free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Ting, A.; Hafizi, B.; Sprangle, P.; Tang, C.M. . Plasma Physics Div.)

    1991-12-01

    The development of an optical pulse of finite axial extent is studied by means of an axisymmetric time-dependent particle simulation code for different rates of tapering of the wiggler field. The results provided in this paper illustrate a number of the physical phenomena underlying the free-electron laser mechanism. These include: suppression of the sideband instability; the role of gain focusing versus that of refractive guiding; efficiency enhancement; and pulse slippage. It is found that a significant reduction in the sideband modulation of the optical field can be achieved with a faster tapering of the wiggler parameters. Increasing the tapering rate also reduces refractive guiding, causing the optical wavefronts to become more convex, thus spreading the optical field into a larger cross section. The corresponding enhancement of the peak output power is associated with an increased lateral extent of the optical field rather than an increase in the field amplitude.

  8. High-power, high-repetition-rate femtosecond pulses tunable in the visible.

    PubMed

    Ellingson, R J; Tang, C L

    1993-03-15

    We demonstrate a Ti:sapphire-pumped intracavity-doubled optical parametric oscillator (OPO) that generates a total of up to 240 mW of sub-100-fs pulses tunable in the visible. The OPO consists of a 1.5-mm-thick KTiPO(4) (KTP) crystal configured in a ring cavity that is synchronously pumped by a self-mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser operating at an 81-MHz repetition rate and 2.1-W average power, producing 115-fs pulses at lambda = 790 nm. Intracavity doubling of the OPO is accomplished by inserting a 47-microm-thick beta-BaB(2)O(4) crystal into an additional focus in the OPO cavity. We demonstrate continuous tuning of the second-harmonic output from 580 to 657 nm. The potential tuning range of this intracavity-doubled KTP OPO is approximately 500 to 800 nm. PMID:19802161

  9. Industrial grade fiber-coupled laser systems delivering ultrashort high-power pulses for micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pricking, Sebastian; Welp, Petra; Overbuschmann, Johannes; Nutsch, Sebastian; Gebs, Raphael; Fleischhaker, Robert; Kleinbauer, Jochen; Wolf, Martin; Budnicki, Aleksander; Sutter, Dirk H.; Killi, Alexander; Mielke, Michael

    2016-03-01

    We report on an industrial fiber-delivered laser system producing ultra-short pulses in the range of a few picoseconds down to a few hundred femtoseconds with high average power suitable for high-precision micromachining. The delivery fiber is a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber with a Kagomé shaped lattice and a hypocycloid core wall enabling the guiding of laser radiation over several meters with exceptionally low losses and preservation of high beam quality (M2<1.3). The mode-matching and coupling optics are integrated into the laser head providing a compact footprint without the need for external boxes. The laser head is carefully designed regarding its thermo-mechanical properties to allow a highly reliable coupling stability. The exchangeable delivery fiber is packaged using Trumpf's well established LLK-D connectors which offer a very high mechanical precision, the possibility to add water cooling, as well as full featured safety functions. The fiber is hermetically sealed and protected by a robust but flexible shield providing bend protection and break detection. We show the linear and nonlinear optical properties of the transported laser radiation and discuss its feasibility for pulse compression. Measurements are supported by simulation of pulse propagation by solving the nonlinear Schrödinger equation implementing the split-step Fourier method. In addition, mode properties are measured and confirmed by finite element method simulations. The presented industrial laser system offers the known advantages of ultra-short pulses combined with the flexibility of fiber delivery yielding a versatile tool perfectly suitable for all kinds of industrial micromachining applications.

  10. High Power Laser Cutting of Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastic Polymers with cw- and Pulsed Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, F.; Wolf, N.; Petring, D.

    Glass fiber and carbon fiber reinforced polymers with thermoplastic matrix enable high volume production with short cycle times. Cutting and trimming operations in these production chains require the use of high average laser power for an efficient cutting speed, but employment of high laser power runs the risk to induce a wide heat affected zone (HAZ). This paper deals with investigations with cw and ns-pulsed CO2-laser radiation in the kilowatt range in single-pass and multiple-pass processes. Using multi-pass processing at high processing speeds of 100 m/min and above a reduced heat affected zone in the range of 100 μm to 200 μm could be achieved by the ns-pulsed radiation. With cw radiation at the same average power of 1 kW however, the HAZ was 300-400 μm. Also employing ns-pulses in the kW-range average power leads to heat accumulation in the material. Small HAZ were obtained with sufficient break times between subsequent passes.