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Sample records for high-pressure hydrogen gas

  1. LOX vaporization in high-pressure, hydrogen-rich gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Jeng, San-Mou

    1990-01-01

    LOX droplet vaporization in high-pressure hydrogen-rich gas is analyzed, with special attention to thermodynamic effects which compel the surface to heat to the critical state and to supercritical vaporization processes on heating to criticality. Subcritical vaporization is modeled using a quasi-steady diffusion-controlled gas-phase transport formulation coupled to an effective-conductivity internal-energy-transport model accounting for circulation effects. It is demonstrated how the droplet surface might heat to the critical state, for ambient pressures slightly greater than the critical pressure of oxygen, such that the bulk of propellant within the droplet remains substantially below the critical mixing temperature.

  2. Numerical simulation of high pressure release and dispersion of hydrogen into air with real gas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaksarfard, R.; Kameshki, M. R.; Paraschivoiu, M.

    2010-06-01

    Hydrogen is a renewable and clean source of energy, and it is a good replacement for the current fossil fuels. Nevertheless, hydrogen should be stored in high-pressure reservoirs to have sufficient energy. An in-house code is developed to numerically simulate the release of hydrogen from a high-pressure tank into ambient air with more accuracy. Real gas models are used to simulate the flow since high-pressure hydrogen deviates from ideal gas law. Beattie-Bridgeman and Abel Noble equations are applied as real gas equation of state. A transport equation is added to the code to calculate the concentration of the hydrogen-air mixture after release. The uniqueness of the code is to simulate hydrogen in air release with the real gas model. Initial tank pressures of up to 70 MPa are simulated.

  3. Measurement and interpretation of threshold stress intensity factors for steels in high-pressure hydrogen gas.

    SciTech Connect

    Nibur, Kevin A.

    2010-11-01

    Threshold stress intensity factors were measured in high-pressure hydrogen gas for a variety of low alloy ferritic steels using both constant crack opening displacement and rising crack opening displacement procedures. The sustained load cracking procedures are generally consistent with those in ASME Article KD-10 of Section VIII Division 3 of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which was recently published to guide design of high-pressure hydrogen vessels. Three definitions of threshold were established for the two test methods: K{sub THi}* is the maximum applied stress intensity factor for which no crack extension was observed under constant displacement; K{sub THa} is the stress intensity factor at the arrest position for a crack that extended under constant displacement; and K{sub JH} is the stress intensity factor at the onset of crack extension under rising displacement. The apparent crack initiation threshold under constant displacement, K{sub THi}*, and the crack arrest threshold, K{sub THa}, were both found to be non-conservative due to the hydrogen exposure and crack-tip deformation histories associated with typical procedures for sustained-load cracking tests under constant displacement. In contrast, K{sub JH}, which is measured under concurrent rising displacement and hydrogen gas exposure, provides a more conservative hydrogen-assisted fracture threshold that is relevant to structural components in which sub-critical crack extension is driven by internal hydrogen gas pressure.

  4. Measurement and interpretation of threshold stress intensity factors for steels in high-pressure hydrogen gas.

    SciTech Connect

    Dadfarnia, Mohsen; Nibur, Kevin A.; San Marchi, Christopher W.; Sofronis, Petros; Somerday, Brian P.; Foulk, James W., III; Hayden, Gary A.

    2010-07-01

    Threshold stress intensity factors were measured in high-pressure hydrogen gas for a variety of low alloy ferritic steels using both constant crack opening displacement and rising crack opening displacement procedures. The sustained load cracking procedures are generally consistent with those in ASME Article KD-10 of Section VIII Division 3 of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which was recently published to guide design of high-pressure hydrogen vessels. Three definitions of threshold were established for the two test methods: K{sub THi}* is the maximum applied stress intensity factor for which no crack extension was observed under constant displacement; K{sub THa} is the stress intensity factor at the arrest position for a crack that extended under constant displacement; and K{sub JH} is the stress intensity factor at the onset of crack extension under rising displacement. The apparent crack initiation threshold under constant displacement, K{sub THi}*, and the crack arrest threshold, K{sub THa}, were both found to be non-conservative due to the hydrogen exposure and crack-tip deformation histories associated with typical procedures for sustained-load cracking tests under constant displacement. In contrast, K{sub JH}, which is measured under concurrent rising displacement and hydrogen gas exposure, provides a more conservative hydrogen-assisted fracture threshold that is relevant to structural components in which sub-critical crack extension is driven by internal hydrogen gas pressure.

  5. Influence of Intense Beam in High Pressure Hydrogen Gas Filled RF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, K.; Chung, M.; Collura, M.G.; Jana, M.R.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Schwarz, T.; Tollestrup, A.; Johnson, R.P.; Franagan, G.; /Muons, Inc. /IIT

    2012-05-01

    The influence of an intense beam in a high-pressure gas filled RF cavity has been measured by using a 400 MeV proton beam in the Mucool Test Area at Fermilab. The ionization process generates dense plasma in the cavity and the resultant power loss to the plasma is determined by measuring the cavity voltage on a sampling oscilloscope. The energy loss has been observed with various peak RF field gradients (E), gas pressures (p), and beam intensities in nitrogen and hydrogen gases. Observed RF energy dissipation in single electron (dw) in N{sub 2} and H{sub 2} gases was 2 10{sup -17} and 3 10{sup -17} Joules/RF cycle at E/p = 8 V/cm/Torr, respectively. More detailed dw measurement have been done in H{sub 2} gas at three different gas pressures. There is a clear discrepancy between the observed dw and analytical one. The discrepancy may be due to the gas density effect that has already been observed in various experiments.

  6. Tensile Properties and Swelling Behavior of Sealing Rubber Materials Exposed to High-Pressure Hydrogen Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamabe, Junichiro; Nishimura, Shin

    Rubber O-rings exposed to high-pressure hydrogen gas swell, and the volume increase induced by swelling influences tensile properties of the O-rings. Samples of nonfilled (NF), carbon black-filled (CB), and silica-filled (SC) sulfur-vulcanized acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber were exposed to hydrogen at 30 °C and pressures of up to 100 MPa, and the effect of hydrogen exposure on the volume increase, hydrogen content, and tensile properties was investigated. The residual hydrogen content, measured 35 minutes after decompression, increased with increasing hydrogen pressure in the range 0.7-100 MPa for all three samples. In contrast, the volumes of NF, CB, and SC barely changed at pressures below 10 MPa, whereas they increased at pressures above 10 MPa. This nonlinear volume increase is probably related to the free volume of the rubber structure. The volume increase of the CB and SC samples was smaller than that of the NF samples, possibly because of the superior tensile properties of CB and SC. As the volumes of the NF, CB, and SC samples increased, their tensile elastic moduli decreased as a result of a decrease in crosslink density and elongation by volume increase. Although the true fracture stress of NF was barely dependent on the volume of the specimen, those of CB and SC clearly decreased as the volume increased. The decrease in the true fracture stress of CB and SC was related to the volume increase by swelling, showing that the boundary structure between the filler and the rubber matrix was changed by the volume increase.

  7. High pressure gas target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelbart, W.; Johnson, R. R.; Abeysekera, B.

    2012-12-01

    Compact, high pressure, high current gas target features all metal construction and semi-automatic window assembly change. The unique aspect of this target is the domed-shaped window. The Havar alloy window is electron beam welded to a metal ring, thus forming one, interchangeable assembly. The window assembly is sealed by knife-edges locked by a pneumatic toggle allowing a quick, in situ window change.

  8. HIGH PRESSURE GAS REGULATOR

    DOEpatents

    Ramage, R.W.

    1962-05-01

    A gas regulator operating on the piston and feedback principle is described. The device is particularly suitable for the delicate regulation of high pressure, i.e., 10,000 psi and above, gas sources, as well as being perfectly adaptable for use on gas supplies as low as 50 psi. The piston is adjustably connected to a needle valve and the movement of the piston regulates the flow of gas from the needle valve. The gas output is obtained from the needle valve. Output pressure is sampled by a piston feedback means which, in turn, regulates the movement of the main piston. When the output is other than the desired value, the feedback system initiates movement of the main piston to allow the output pressure to be corrected or to remain constant. (AEC)

  9. Hydrogen Selective Inorganic membranes for Gas Separations under High Pressure Intermediate Temperature Hydrocarbonic Envrionment

    SciTech Connect

    Rich Ciora; Paul KT Liu

    2012-06-27

    In this project, we have successfully developed a full scale commercially ready carbon molecular sieve (CMS) based membrane for applications in H{sub 2} recovery from refinery waste and other aggressive gas streams. Field tests at a refinery pilot plant and a coal gasification facility have successfully demonstrated its ability to recovery hydrogen from hydrotreating and raw syngas respectively. High purity H{sub 2} and excellent stability of the membrane permeance and selectivity were obtained in testing conducted over >500 hours at each site. The results from these field tests as well as laboratory testing conclude that the membranes can be operated at high pressures (up to 1,000 psig) and temperatures (up to 300 C) in presence of aggressive contaminants, such as sulfur and nitrogen containing species (H{sub 2}S, CO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, etc), condensable hydrocarbons, tar-like species, heavy metals, etc. with no observable effect on membrane performance. By comparison, similar operating conditions and/or environments would rapidly destroy competing membranes, such as polymeric, palladium, zeolitic, etc. Significant cost savings can be achieved through recovering H{sub 2} from refinery waste gas using this newly developed CMS membrane. Annual savings of $2 to 4MM/year (per 20,000 scfd of waste gas) can be realized by recovering the H{sub 2} for reuse (versus fuel). Projecting these values over the entire US market, potential H{sub 2} savings from refinery waste gases on the order of 750 to 1,000MM scfd and $750 to $1,000MM per year are possible. In addition to the cost savings, potential energy savings are projected to be ca. 150 to 220 tBTU/yr and CO{sub 2} gas emission reductions are projected to be ca. 5,000 to 6,500MMtons/year. The full scale membrane bundle developed as part of this project, i.e., 85 x 30 inch ceramic membrane tubes packaged into a full ceramic potting, is an important accomplishment. No comparable commercial scale product exists in the

  10. [High Pressure Gas Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quintana, Rolando

    2002-01-01

    Four high-pressure gas tanks, the basis of this study, were especially made by a private contractor and tested before being delivered to NASA Kennedy Space Center. In order to insure 100% reliability of each individual tank the staff at KSC decided to again submit the four tanks under more rigorous tests. These tests were conducted during a period from April 10 through May 8 at KSC. This application further validates the predictive safety model for accident prevention and system failure in the testing of four high-pressure gas tanks at Kennedy Space Center, called Continuous Hazard Tracking and Failure Prediction Methodology (CHTFPM). It is apparent from the variety of barriers available for a hazard control that some barriers will be more successful than others in providing protection. In order to complete the Barrier Analysis of the system, a Task Analysis and a Biomechanical Study were performed to establish the relationship between the degree of biomechanical non-conformities and the anomalies found within the system on particular joints of the body. This relationship was possible to obtain by conducting a Regression Analysis to the previously generated data. From the information derived the body segment with the lowest percentage of non-conformities was the neck flexion with 46.7%. Intense analysis of the system was conducted including Preliminary Hazard Analysis (PHA), Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA), and Barrier Analysis. These analyses resulted in the identification of occurrences of conditions, which may be becoming hazardous in the given system. These conditions, known as dendritics, may become hazards and could result in an accident, system malfunction, or unacceptable risk conditions. A total of 56 possible dendritics were identified. Work sampling was performed to observe the occurrence each dendritic. The out of control points generated from a Weighted c control chart along with a Pareto analysis indicate that the dendritics "Personnel not

  11. Small, high-pressure liquid hydrogen turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csomor, A.; Sutton, R.

    1977-01-01

    A high pressure, liquid hydrogen turbopump was designed, fabricated, and tested to a maximum speed of 9739 rad/s and a maximum pump discharge pressure of 2861 N/sq. cm. The approaches used in the analysis and design of the turbopump are described, and fabrication methods are discussed. Data obtained from gas generator tests, turbine performance calibration, and turbopump testing are presented.

  12. Method of producing a high pressure gas

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis N.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Zollinger, William T.

    2006-07-18

    A method of producing a high pressure gas is disclosed and which includes providing a container; supplying the container with a liquid such as water; increasing the pressure of the liquid within the container; supplying a reactant composition such as a chemical hydride to the liquid under pressure in the container and which chemically reacts with the liquid to produce a resulting high pressure gas such as hydrogen at a pressure of greater than about 100 pounds per square inch of pressure; and drawing the resulting high pressure gas from the container.

  13. Water-Gas-Shift Membrane Reactor for High-Pressure Hydrogen Production. A comprehensive project report (FY2010 - FY2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Klaehn, John; Peterson, Eric; Orme, Christopher; Bhandari, Dhaval; Miller, Scott; Ku, Anthony; Polishchuk, Kimberly; Narang, Kristi; Singh, Surinder; Wei, Wei; Shisler, Roger; Wickersham, Paul; McEvoy, Kevin; Alberts, William; Howson, Paul; Barton, Thomas; Sethi, Vijay

    2013-01-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL), GE Global Research (GEGR), and Western Research Institute (WRI) have successfully produced hydrogen-selective membranes for water-gas-shift (WGS) modules that enable high-pressure hydrogen product streams. Several high performance (HP) polymer membranes were investigated for their gas separation performance under simulated (mixed gas) and actual syngas conditions. To enable optimal module performance, membranes with high hydrogen (H2) selectivity, permeance, and stability under WGS conditions are required. The team determined that the VTEC PI 80-051 and VTEC PI 1388 (polyimide from Richard Blaine International, Inc.) are prime candidates for the H2 gas separations at operating temperatures (~200°C). VTEC PI 80-051 was thoroughly analyzed for its H2 separations under syngas processing conditions using more-complex membrane configurations, such as tube modules and hollow fibers. These membrane formats have demonstrated that the selected VTEC membrane is capable of providing highly selective H2/CO2 separation (α = 7-9) and H2/CO separation (α = 40-80) in humidified syngas streams. In addition, the VTEC polymer membranes are resilient within the syngas environment (WRI coal gasification) at 200°C for over 1000 hours. The information within this report conveys current developments of VTEC PI 80-051 as an effective H2 gas separations membrane for high-temperature syngas streams.

  14. High pressure hydrogen time projection chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, K.

    1983-01-01

    We describe a high pressure hydrogen gas time projection chamber which consists of two cylindrical drift regions each 45 cm in diameter and 75 cm long. Typically, at 15 atm of H/sub 2/ with 2 kV/cm drift field and 7 kV on the 35..mu.. sense wires, the drift velocity is about 0.5 cm/..mu..sec and the spatial resolution +-200..mu...

  15. The Relationship Between Crack-Tip Strain and Subcritical Cracking Thresholds for Steels in High-Pressure Hydrogen Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nibur, Kevin A.; Somerday, Brian P.; Marchi, Chris San; Foulk, James W.; Dadfarnia, Mohsen; Sofronis, Petros

    2013-01-01

    Threshold stress intensity factors were measured in high-pressure hydrogen gas for a variety of low alloy ferritic steels using both constant crack opening displacement and rising crack opening displacement procedures. Thresholds for crack extension under rising displacement, K THi, for crack extension under constant displacement, K_{{THi}}^{*} , and for crack arrest under constant displacement K THa, were identified. These values were not found to be equivalent, i.e. K THi < K THa < K_{{THi}}^{*} . The hydrogen assisted fracture mechanism was determined to be strain controlled for all of the alloys in this study, and the micromechanics of strain controlled fracture are used to explain the observed disparities between the different threshold measurements. K THa and K THi differ because the strain singularity of a stationary crack is stronger than that of a propagating crack; K THa must be larger than K THi to achieve equivalent crack tip strain at the same distance from the crack tip. Hydrogen interacts with deformation mechanisms, enhancing strain localization and consequently altering both the nucleation and growth stages of strain controlled fracture mechanisms. The timing of load application and hydrogen exposure, i.e., sequential for constant displacement tests and concurrent for rising displacement tests, leads to differences in the strain history relative to the environmental exposure history and promotes the disparity between K_{{THi}}^{*} and K THi. K THi is the only conservative measurement of fracture threshold among the methods presented here.

  16. Confinement of hydrogen at high pressure in carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Lassila, David H.; Bonner, Brian P.

    2011-12-13

    A high pressure hydrogen confinement apparatus according to one embodiment includes carbon nanotubes capped at one or both ends thereof with a hydrogen-permeable membrane to enable the high pressure confinement of hydrogen and release of the hydrogen therethrough. A hydrogen confinement apparatus according to another embodiment includes an array of multi-walled carbon nanotubes each having first and second ends, the second ends being capped with palladium (Pd) to enable the high pressure confinement of hydrogen and release of the hydrogen therethrough as a function of palladium temperature, wherein the array of carbon nanotubes is capable of storing hydrogen gas at a pressure of at least 1 GPa for greater than 24 hours. Additional apparatuses and methods are also presented.

  17. Small, high pressure liquid hydrogen turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csomor, A.; Warren, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    A high pressure, low capacity, liquid hydrogen turbopump was designed, fabricated, and tested. The design configuration of the turbopump is summarized and the results of the analytical and test efforts are presented. Approaches used to pin point the cause of poor suction performance with the original design are described and performance data are included with an axial inlet design which results in excellent suction capability.

  18. Ignition during hydrogen release from high pressure into the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleszczak, P.; Wolanski, P.

    2010-12-01

    The first investigations concerned with a problem of hydrogen jet ignition, during outflow from a high-pressure vessel were carried out nearly 40 years ago by Wolanski and Wojcicki. The research resulted from a dramatic accident in the Chorzow Chemical Plant Azoty, where the explosion of a synthesis gas made up of a mixture composed of three moles of hydrogen per mole of nitrogen, at 300°C and 30 MPa killed four people. Initial investigation had excluded potential external ignition sources and the main aim of the research was to determine the cause of ignition. Hydrogen is currently considered as a potential fuel for various vehicles such as cars, trucks, buses, etc. Crucial safety issues are of potential concern, associated with the storage of hydrogen at a very high pressure. Indeed, the evidence obtained nearly 40 years ago shows that sudden rupture of a high-pressure hydrogen storage tank or other component can result in ignition and potentially explosion. The aim of the present research is identification of the conditions under which hydrogen ignition occurs as a result of compression and heating of the air by the shock wave generated by discharge of high-pressure hydrogen. Experiments have been conducted using a facility constructed in the Combustion Laboratory of the Institute of Heat Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology. Tests under various configurations have been performed to determine critical conditions for occurrence of high-pressure hydrogen ignition. The results show that a critical pressure exists, leading to ignition, which depends mainly on the geometric configuration of the outflow system, such as tube diameter, and on the presence of obstacles.

  19. Elasticity of Hydrogen at High Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, A. F.; Decremps, F.; Gauthier, M.; Ayrinhac, S.; Antonangeli, D.; Freiman, Y. A.; Grechnev, A.; Tretyak, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    High-pressure elastic properties of hydrogen give insight into anisotropy, equation of state, thermodynamic properties, and intermolecular potentials of this material providing an important link to ultrahigh pressure behavior approaching transformation to metallic monatomic or molecular state. Here we present picosecond acoustics measurements of compressional sound velocities [1] combined with optical interferometry and Raman spectroscopy of H2 and D2 at 295 K up to 55 GPa. Using the equation of state determined previously [2], we deduced the transverse sound velocities and the Poisson's ratio up to 55 GPa. The latter shows a broad minimum near 45 GPa (c.f. Ref. [3]) providing a new experimentally proven insight into lattice dynamics of hydrogen at high pressure that can be compared to theoretical calculations of various levels [4]. [1] F. Decremps, M. Gauthier, S. Ayrinhac, L. Bove, L. Belliard, B. Perrin, M. Morand, G. Le Marchand, F. Bergame, J. Philippe, Ultrasonics, 56 (2015) 129-140. [2] P. Loubeyre, R. LeToullec, D. Hausermann, M. Hanfland, R.J. Hemley, H.K. Mao, L.W. Finger, Nature, 383 (1996) 702-704. [3] C.-s. Zha, T.S. Duffy, H.-k. Mao, R.J. Hemley, Phys. Rev. B, 48 (1993) 9246-9255. [4] Y.A. Freiman, A. Grechnev, S.M. Tretyak, A.F. Goncharov, E. Gregoryanz, Fizika Nizkikh Temperatur, 41 (2015) 571.

  20. Probing Hydrogen Diffusion under High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bove, L. E.; Klotz, S.; Strassle, T.; Saitta, M.

    2012-12-01

    volume HP press can be now warmed up to 600K and the peculiar geometry of the gasket assure an excellent signal to background ratio. This new device has been recently settled up on neutron scattering facilities (PSI, ILL), successfully showing that very high quality data can be obtained on liquid water, and more generally on hydrogenated liquids dynamics under high pressure. Some new exciting results on the diffusion mechanism in hot dense water will be presented [9]. Possible future implementation of the device to reach the 20GPa and 1000K conditions will be also discussed. References [1] C. Cavazzoni et al., Science 283, 44 (1999) ; T. Guillot, Science 286 (1999), 72 . 77. [2] Some of the most active groups in this field are the Geophysical Laboratory (USA), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (USA), CEA/DAM (France) and the Bayerisches Geoinstitut (Allemagne). [3] Klotz S et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 149602, 2006. [4] Nelmes R J Nature Phys. 2 414, 2006. [5] S. Klotz, L. Bove et al., Nature Mat. 8, 405 (2009). [6] L.E. Bove et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 106 (2011) . [7] L. E. Bove et al., Phys. Appl. Lett., in preparation (2012). [8] A. Cunsolo et al., Journal of Chem. Phys. 124, 084503 (2006). [9] L.E. Bove et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., submitted (2012) .

  1. TENSILE TESTING OF CARBON STEEL IN HIGH PRESSURE HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A; Thad Adams, T; Ps Lam, P

    2007-05-02

    An infrastructure of new and existing pipelines and systems will be required to carry and to deliver hydrogen as an alternative energy source under the hydrogen economy. Carbon and low alloy steels of moderate strength are currently used in hydrogen delivery systems as well as in the existing natural gas systems. It is critical to understand the material response of these standard pipeline materials when they are subjected to pressurized hydrogen environments. The methods and results from a testing program to quantify hydrogen effects on mechanical properties of carbon steel pipeline and pipeline weld materials are provided. Tensile properties of one type of steel (A106 Grade B) in base metal, welded and heat affected zone conditions were tested at room temperature in air and high pressure (10.34 MPa or 1500 psig) hydrogen. A general reduction in the materials ability to plastically deform was noted in this material when specimens were tested in hydrogen. Furthermore, the primary mode of fracture was changed from ductile rupture in air to cleavage with secondary tearing in hydrogen. The mechanical test results will be applied in future analyses to evaluate service life of the pipelines. The results are also envisioned to be part of the bases for construction codes and structural integrity demonstrations for hydrogen service pipeline and vessels.

  2. MECHANICAL TESTING OF CARBON STEEL IN HIGH PRESSURE HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A

    2006-05-11

    The methods and interim results from a testing program to quantify hydrogen effects on mechanical properties of carbon steel pipeline and pipeline weld materials are provided. The scope is carbon steels commonly used for natural gas pipelines in the United States that are candidates for hydrogen service in the hydrogen economy. The mechanical test results will be applied in future analyses to evaluate service life of the pipelines. The results are also envisioned to be part of the bases for construction codes and structural integrity demonstrations for hydrogen service pipeline and vessels. Tensile properties of one type of steel (A106 Grade B) in base metal, welded and heat affected zone conditions were tested at room temperature in air and high pressure (1500 psig) hydrogen. A general reduction in the materials ability to plastically deform was noted in this material when specimens were tested in 1500 psig hydrogen. Furthermore, the primary mode of fracture was changed from ductile rupture in air to cleavage with secondary tearing in hydrogen. The mechanical test program will continue with tests to quantify the fracture behavior in terms of J-R curves for these materials at air and hydrogen pressure conditions.

  3. Effects of high pressure hydrogen on metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, W. T.; Walter, R. J.

    1970-01-01

    Hydrogen environment embrittlement causes failure of hydrogen storage vessels at and below design pressures of 5000 to 6000 psi. Investigation of thirty-five alloys determines their susceptibility to such embrittlement.

  4. High Pressure Hydrogen Materials Compatibility of Piezoelectric Films

    SciTech Connect

    Alvine, Kyle J.; Shutthanandan, V.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Bonham, Charles C.; Skorski, Daniel C.; Pitman, Stan G.; Dahl, Michael E.; Henager, Charles H.

    2010-12-02

    Abstract: Hydrogen is being considered as a next-generation clean burning fuel. However, hydrogen has well known materials issues, including blistering and embrittlement in metals. Piezoelectric materials are used as actuators in hydrogen fuel technology. We present studies of materials compatibility of piezoelectric films in a high pressure hydrogen environment. Absorption of high pressure hydrogen was studied with Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA) and Rutherford Back Scattering (RBS) in lead zirconate titanate (PZT) and barium titanate (BTO) thin films. Hydrogen surface degradation in the form of blistering and Pb mixing was also observed.

  5. Sounding experiments of high pressure gas discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Biele, Joachim K.

    1998-07-10

    A high pressure discharge experiment (200 MPa, 5{center_dot}10{sup 21} molecules/cm{sup 3}, 3000 K) has been set up to study electrically induced shock waves. The apparatus consists of the combustion chamber (4.2 cm{sup 3}) to produce high pressure gas by burning solid propellant grains to fill the electrical pump chamber (2.5 cm{sup 3}) containing an insulated coaxial electrode. Electrical pump energy up to 7.8 kJ at 10 kV, which is roughly three times of the gas energy in the pump chamber, was delivered by a capacitor bank. From the current-voltage relationship the discharge develops at rapidly decreasing voltage. Pressure at the combustion chamber indicating significant underpressure as well as overpressure peaks is followed by an increase of static pressure level. These data are not yet completely understood. However, Lorentz forces are believed to generate pinching with subsequent pinch heating, resulting in fast pressure variations to be propagated as rarefaction and shock waves, respectively. Utilizing pure axisymmetric electrode initiation rather than often used exploding wire technology in the pump chamber, repeatable experiments were achieved.

  6. Hydrogen solubility in cristobalite at high pressure.

    PubMed

    Efimchenko, Vadim S; Fedotov, Vladimir K; Kuzovnikov, Mikhail A; Meletov, Konstantin P; Bulychev, Boris M

    2014-11-01

    Powder samples of cristobalite-I are loaded with hydrogen at pressures up to 90 kbar and T = 250 °C and quenched under pressure to the liquid N2 temperature. The quenched samples are examined at ambient pressure by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and thermal desorption analysis. The hydrogen content of the samples is found to increase with pressure and reach a molecular ratio of H2/SiO2 ∼ 0.10 at P = 90 kbar. At ambient pressure, the samples consist of a mixture of approximately 80% cristobalite-I phase and 20% cristobalite-II-like phase, the crystal lattices of both phases being slightly expanded due to the hydrogen uptake. According to Raman spectroscopy, the hydrogen is dissolved in these phases in the form of H2 molecules. PMID:25322160

  7. A picosecond high pressure gas switch

    SciTech Connect

    Cravey, W.R.; Poulsen, P.P.; Pincosy, P.A.

    1992-06-01

    Work is being done to develop a high pressure gas switch (HPGS) with picosecond risetimes for UWB applications. Pulse risetimes on the order of 200 picoseconds have been observed at 1 kHz prf and 1 atmosphere. Calculations show that switching closure times on the order of tens of picoseconds can be achieved at high pressures and higher electric fields. A voltage hold-off of 1 MV/cm has been measured at 10 atmospheres and several MV/cm appears possible with the HPGS. With these high electric field levels, energy storage of tens of Joules in a reasonably sized package is achievable. Initial HPGS performance has been characterized on the WASP pulse generator at LLNL. A detailed description of the switch used for initial testing is given. Switch recovery times of 1-ms have been measured at 1 atmosphere. Data on the switching uniformity, voltage hold-off recovery, and pulse repeatability, is presented. In addition, a physics switch model is described and results are compared with lab data.

  8. Ceramic high pressure gas path seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liotta, G. C.

    1987-01-01

    Stage 1 ceramic shrouds (high pressure turbine gas path seal) were developed for the GE T700 turbine helicopter engine under the Army/NASA Contract NAS3-23174. This contract successfully proved the viability and benefits of a Stage 1 ceramic shroud for production application. Stage 1 ceramic shrouds were proven by extensive component and engine testing. This Stage 1 ceramic shroud, plasma sprayed ceramic (ZrOs-BY2O3) and bond coating (NiCrAlY) onto a cast metal backing, offers significant engine performance improvement. Due to the ceramic coating, the amount of cooling air required is reduced 20% resulting in a 0.5% increase in horsepower and a 0.3% decrease in specific fuel consumption. This is accomplished with a component which is lower in cost than the current production shroud. Stage 1 ceramic shrouds will be introduced into field service in late 1987.

  9. Picosecond High Pressure Gas Switch experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cravey, W.R.; Freytag, E.K.; Goerz, D.A.; Poulsen, P.; Pincosy, P.A.

    1993-08-01

    A high Pressure Gas Switch has been developed and tested at LLNL. Risetimes on the order of 200 picoseconds have been observed at 1 kHz prf and 1 atmosphere pressures. Calculations show that switching closure times on the order of tens of picoseconds can be achieved at higher pressures and electric fields. A voltage hold-off of 1 MV/cm has been measured at 10 atmospheres and several MV/cm appears possible with the HPGS. With such high electric field levels, energy storage of tens of Joules in a reasonably sized package is achievable. Initial HPGS performance has been characterized using the WASP pulse generator at LLNL. A detailed description of the switch used for initial testing is given. Switch recovery times of 1-ms have been measured at 1 atmosphere. Data on the switching uniformity, voltage hold-off recovery, and pulse repeatability, is presented. In addition, a physics switch model is described and results are compared with experimental data. Modifications made to the WASP HV pulser in order to drive the HPGS will also be discussed. Recovery times of less than 1 ms were recorded without gas flow in the switch chambers. Low pressure synthetic air was used as the switch dielectric. Longer recovery times were required when it was necessary to over-voltage the switch.

  10. High-Pressure Studies of the Hydrogen Halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Allen Israel

    This dissertation presents an experimental study of hydrogen bonding in the solid hydrogen halides under high pressure. The high pressures were obtained with a diamond-anvil high pressure cell. Raman scattering experiments were performed on hydrogen bromide and hydrogen fluoride under pressures up to 200 kilobars. Powder x-ray diffraction experiments were performed on hydrogen bromide under pressures up to 220 kilobars. All measurements were performed at low-temperature (approximately 20 Kelvin) in the ordered orthorhombic phase III consisting of planar zig-zag chains of hydrogen bonded molecules. In the x-ray measurements on hydrogen bromide, all three orthorhombic lattice parameters were measured. The out-of-plane c-lattice parameter decreased initially much faster than the b-lattice parameter which is in the direction of the zig-zag hydrogen bonded chains. This is expected due to the weak interchain forces as opposed to the much stronger hydrogen and molecular bond forces in the chain. Surprisingly, the a and b-lattice parameters have the same pressure dependence. Raman spectra were taken of both the high frequency molecular stretching modes and the lattice modes. The stretching mode frequencies of all three hydrogen halides decrease with increasing pressure, indicative of charge transfer out of the molecular bond and into the hydrogen bond. The stretching frequency of hydrogen fluoride was observed to decrease at the greatest rate with increasing pressure. In hydrogen bromide, the two lowest frequency librational modes crossed frequencies at about 50 kilobars. After this crossing, the lower frequency mode exhibited an unusual lack of pressure dependence and an unusually large intensity. The hydrogen fluoride lattice mode frequencies all appear flat with very little pressure dependence. The ambient temperature ruby pressure scale, used for all pressure measurements in this dissertation, was calibrated at 20 Kelvin by comparison to the equation -of-state for gold

  11. Isotopic effect and amorphization of deuterated hydrogen hydrate under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, Shin-Ichi; Hirai, Hisako; Kawamura, Taro; Yamamoto, Yoshitaka; Yagi, Takehiko

    2011-04-01

    High-pressure experiments of a mixture of H2 and D2O were performed using a diamond-anvil cell in the pressure range of 0.5-77.0 GPa under room temperature. Raman measurements revealed that an exchange of the hydrogen atoms occurred between fluid hydrogen and liquid water before the formation of deuterated hydrogen hydrate, and that a high-pressure structure of hydrogen hydrate, a filled ice Ic structure, formed at the same pressure as H2-H2O system hydrate. Additionally, the Raman spectra of the vibron for the D2, HD and H2 molecules revealed that the guest hydrogen molecules were partly extracted from the filled ice Ic structure above 20 GPa. The extraction of hydrogen molecules occurred depending on the atomic weight of the guest hydrogen molecules, and the heavier molecules were selectively released from the filled ice Ic structure. This isotopic effect in the extraction of hydrogen molecules showed differences in the stability of hydrogen hydrate depending on the species of guest molecules between D2, HD, and H2. Above 65 GPa, the filled ice Ic structure of hydrogen hydrate transformed to an amorphous phase. Formation of the amorphous phase showed the high-pressure limitation of hydrogen hydrate as a crystal structure and a new mechanism for the dissociation of gas hydrates under high pressure and room temperature.

  12. Fabrication of Bulk Glassy Alloy Foams by High Pressure Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Takeshi; Inoue, Akihisa

    Porous Pd42.5Cu30Ni7.5P20 bulk glassy alloy rods with porosities of up to 70% were successfully prepared by high pressure hydrogen of 15 MPa. The melt of Pd42.5Cu30Ni7.5P20 alloy kept under high pressure hydrogen absorbs hydrogen and subsequent water quenching of the melt causes the homogeneous dispersion of hydrogen bubbles, which was resulted from the decrease of hydrogen solubility with decrease of pressure. Annealing the hydrogen bubble containing sample at a supercooled liquid state under vacuum, the bubbles are allowed to expand due to the decrease of viscosity of metallic glass matrix. Pores expansion continues until glassy matrix crystallizes or the equilibration among pressure of the pores, pressure of the atmosphere and surface tension is achieved. By utilizing these phenomena, pores up to 80 m in diameters are homogeneously distributed over the whole cross-sectional area of a fully glassy matrix. Under compressive deformation, the porous alloys with porosities exceeding 40% did not show macroscopic fracture in a wide compressive strain range up to 0.6 whereas the non-porous alloy fractures instantly after elastic limit of about 0.02. Porous bulk glassy alloys exhibit higher plateau stress, lower Young‧s modulus and higher energy absorption capacity compared with the conventional crystalline metal foams.

  13. Pressure Relief Devices for High-Pressure Gaseous Storage Systems: Applicability to Hydrogen Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kostival, A.; Rivkin, C.; Buttner, W.; Burgess, R.

    2013-11-01

    Pressure relief devices (PRDs) are viewed as essential safety measures for high-pressure gas storage and distribution systems. These devices are used to prevent the over-pressurization of gas storage vessels and distribution equipment, except in the application of certain toxic gases. PRDs play a critical role in the implementation of most high-pressure gas storage systems and anyone working with these devices should understand their function so they can be designed, installed, and maintained properly to prevent any potentially dangerous or fatal incidents. As such, the intention of this report is to introduce the reader to the function of the common types of PRDs currently used in industry. Since high-pressure hydrogen gas storage systems are being developed to support the growing hydrogen energy infrastructure, several recent failure incidents, specifically involving hydrogen, will be examined to demonstrate the results and possible mechanisms of a device failure. The applicable codes and standards, developed to minimize the risk of failure for PRDs, will also be reviewed. Finally, because PRDs are a critical component for the development of a successful hydrogen energy infrastructure, important considerations for pressure relief devices applied in a hydrogen gas environment will be explored.

  14. High pressure hydrogen stabilised by quantum nuclear motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Needs, Richard; Monserrat, Bartomeu; Pickard, Chris

    Hydrogen under extreme pressures is of fundamental interest, as it might exhibit exotic physical phenomena, and of practical interest, as it is a major component of many astrophysical objects. Structure searches have been successful at identifying promising candidates for the known phases of high pressure hydrogen. However, these searches have so far been restricted to the location of minima of the potential energy landscape. In this talk, we will describe a new structure searching method, ``saddle-point ab initio random structure searching'' (sp-AIRSS), that allows us to identify structures associated with saddle points of the potential energy landscape. Using sp-AIRSS, we find two new high-pressure hydrogen structures that exhibit a harmonic dynamical instability, but quantum and thermal anharmonic motion render them dynamically stable. These structures are formed by mixed layers of strongly and softly bound hydrogen molecules, and become thermodynamically competitive at the highest pressures reached in experiment. The experimental implications of these new structures will also be discussed. BM is supported by Robinson College, Cambridge, and the Cambridge Philosophical Society. RJN and CJP are supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) of the UK.

  15. Development of high pressure gas cells at ISIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirichek, O.; Done, R.; Goodway, C. M.; Kibble, M. G.; Evans, B.; Bowden, Z. A.

    2012-02-01

    High-pressure research is one of the fastest-growing areas of natural science, and one that attracts as diverse communities as those of physics, bio-physics, chemistry, materials science and earth science. In condensed matter physics there are a number of highly topical areas, such as quantum criticality, pressure-induced superconductivity or non-Fermi liquid behaviour, where pressure is a fundamental parameter. Reliable, safe and user-friendly high pressure gas handling systems with gas pressures up to 1GPa should make a significant impact on the range of science possible. The ISIS facility is participating in the NMI3 FP7 sample environment project supported by the European Commission which includes high pressure gas cell development. In this paper the progress in designing, manufacturing and testing a new generation of high pressure gas cells for neutron scattering experiments is discussed.

  16. Pb nanowire formation on Al/lead zirconate titanate surfaces in high-pressure hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Alvine, Kyle J.; Shutthanandan, V.; Arey, Bruce W.; Wang, Chong M.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Pitman, Stan G.

    2012-07-12

    Thin films of Al on lead zirconate titanate (PZT) annealed in high-pressure hydrogen at 100C exhibit surface Pb nanowire growth. Wire diameter is approximately 80 nm and length can exceed 100 microns. Based on microstructural analysis using electron microscopy and ion scattering, a vapor-solid scheme with hydrogen as a carrier gas was proposed as a growth mechanism. We expect that these observations may lead to controlled Pb nanowires growth through pattering of the Al film.

  17. Disruption mitigation using high pressure gas jets

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis G. Whyte

    2007-10-11

    The goal of this research is to establish credible disruption mitigation scenarios based on the technique of massive gas injection. Disruption mitigation seeks to minimize or eliminate damage to internal components that can occur due to the rapid dissipation of thermal and magnetic energy during a tokamak disruption. In particular, the focus of present research is extrapolating mitigation techniques to burning plasma experiments such as ITER, where disruption-caused damage poses a serious threat to the lifetime of internal vessel components. A majority of effort has focused on national and international collaborative research with large tokamaks: DIII-D, Alcator C-Mod, JET, and ASDEX Upgrade. The research was oriented towards empirical trials of gas-jet mitigation on several tokamaks, with the goal of developing and applying cohesive models to the data across devices. Disruption mitigation using gas jet injection has proven to be a viable candidate for avoiding or minimizing damage to internal components in burning plasma experiments like ITER. The physics understanding is progress towards a technological design for the required gas injection system in ITER.

  18. Ground state energy of solid molecular hydrogen at high pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebner, C.; Sung, C. C.

    1972-01-01

    The present status of the theoretical equation of state of solid molecular hydrogen is reviewed. Different quantum mechanical calculations by several groups lead to results which generally agree with each other but which disagree systematically with the measured pressure-volume curve at pressures larger than about 3000 atm. A new calculation of this curve is presented including the effect of the anisotropic interaction between H2 molecules within a completely quantum-mechanical formalism. The results show that inclusion of this interaction removes the discrepancy between theory and experiment at high pressures and that a quantum-mechanical treatment is necessary to realize its full effect.

  19. Processing Raman Spectra of High-Pressure Hydrogen Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Kojima, Jun

    2006-01-01

    The Raman Code automates the analysis of laser-Raman-spectroscopy data for diagnosis of combustion at high pressure. On the basis of the theory of molecular spectroscopy, the software calculates the rovibrational and pure rotational Raman spectra of H2, O2, N2, and H2O in hydrogen/air flames at given temperatures and pressures. Given a set of Raman spectral data from measurements on a given flame and results from the aforementioned calculations, the software calculates the thermodynamic temperature and number densities of the aforementioned species. The software accounts for collisional spectral-line-broadening effects at pressures up to 60 bar (6 MPa). The line-broadening effects increase with pressure and thereby complicate the analysis. The software also corrects for spectral interference ("cross-talk") among the various chemical species. In the absence of such correction, the cross-talk is a significant source of error in temperatures and number densities. This is the first known comprehensive computer code that, when used in conjunction with a spectral calibration database, can process Raman-scattering spectral data from high-pressure hydrogen/air flames to obtain temperatures accurate to within 10 K and chemical-species number densities accurate to within 2 percent.

  20. High pressure hydrocracking of vacuum gas oil to middle distillates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, C. R.; Biswas, Dipa

    1986-05-01

    Hydrocracking of heavier petroleum fractions into lighter ones is of increasing importance today to meet the huge demand, particularly for gasoline and middle distillates. Much work on hydrocracking of a gas oil range feed stock to mainly gasoline using modified zeolite catalyst-base exchanged with metals (namely Ni, Pd, Mo, etc.) has been reported. In India, however, present demand is for a maximum amount of middle distillate. The present investigation was therefore aimed to maximize the yield of middle distillate (140-270°C boiling range) by hydrocracking a vacuum gas oil (365-450°C boiling range) fraction from an Indian Refinery at high hydrogen pressure and temperature. A zeolite catalyst-base exchanged with 4.5% Ni was chosen for the reaction. A high pressure batch reactor with a rocking arrangement was used for the study. No pretreatment of the feed stock for sulphur removal applied as the total sulphur in the feed was less than 2%. The process variables studied for the maximum yield of the middle distillate were temperature 300-450°C, pressure 100-200 bar and residence period 1-3 h at the feed to catalyst ratio of 9.3 (wt/wt). The optimum conditions for the maximum yield of 36% middle distillate of the product were: temperature 400°C, pressure 34.5 bar (initially) and residence period 2 h. A carbon balance of 90-92% was found for each run.

  1. Hydrogen sulfide at high pressure: change in stoichiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, Alexander; Lobanov, Sergey; Kruglov, Ivan; Zhao, Xiao-Miao; Chen, Xiao-Jia; Oganov, Artem; Konopkova, Zuzana; Prakapenka, Vitali

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) was studied by x-ray synchrotron diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy up to 144 GPa at 180-295 K. We find that H2S compound become unstable with respect to formation of new compounds with different composition including pure S, H3S and HS2 depending on the thermodynamic P-T path. These results are supported by our quantum-mechanical variable-composition evolutionary simulations that show the stability of the above mentioned compounds at elevated pressures. The stability of H3S at high pressures, which we find a strong experimental and theoretical confirmation here, suggests that it is this material which is responsible for high-temperature superconducting properties reported previously. We thank DARPA, NSF, ISSP (Hefei, China), Government of Russian Federation, and Foreign Talents Introduction and Academic Exchange Program. Use of the Advanced Photon Source was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy Office of Science.

  2. High pressure gas quenching-technical and economical considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Midea, S.J.; Holm, T.; Segerberg, S.; Bodin, J.

    1996-12-31

    With the increasing restrictions on effluents, alternatives to oil quenching for the hardening of automotive and other large scale production components need to be considered and developed. Gas quenching is one such alternative, but up to now, has not experienced wide spread implementation. Several issues restricting introduction of this technology are the effective cooling rates that can be expected, capital costs of the quench chamber and gas recovery equipment and the processing costs involved. It has been shown that high pressure helium quenching has the capacity to replace quenching oils, even fast quenching oils, when high pressure, 20 bar and above are used. An economic model for gas quenching will be presented and applied to the case of continuous carburizing. Variables taken into account are the initial investment costs and the production costs for oil quenching and gas quenching cases. Thus, an economic comparison of cost for oil and gas quenching can be made.

  3. High pressure optical cell for synthesis and in situ Raman spectroscopy of hydrogen clathrate hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celli, Milva; Zoppi, Marco; Zaghloul, Mohamed A. S.; Ulivi, Lorenzo

    2012-11-01

    We report the design, realization, and test of a high-pressure optical cell that we have used to measure the Raman spectra of hydrogen clathrate hydrates, synthesized in situ by the application of 200-300 MPa of gas pressure on solid water. The optical apparatus is mounted on a cryogenic system so to allow measurements and sample treatment at any temperature between 300 and 20 K. A capillary pipe is connected to the inside of the cell to allow the gas flow into and out of the cell, and to regulate the internal pressure at any value from 0 to 300 MPa. In the experimental test described in this paper, the cell has been partly filled, at room temperature, with a small amount of water, then frozen at 263 K before injecting hydrogen gas, at pressure of 150 MPa, into the cell. This procedure has permitted to study hydrogen clathrate formation, by measuring Raman spectra as a function of time.

  4. Cryogenic Transport of High-Pressure-System Recharge Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K,; Ruemmele, Warren P.; Bohannon, Carl

    2010-01-01

    A method of relatively safe, compact, efficient recharging of a high-pressure room-temperature gas supply has been proposed. In this method, the gas would be liquefied at the source for transport as a cryogenic fluid at or slightly above atmospheric pressure. Upon reaching the destination, a simple heating/expansion process would be used to (1) convert the transported cryogenic fluid to the room-temperature, high-pressure gaseous form in which it is intended to be utilized and (2) transfer the resulting gas to the storage tank of the system to be recharged. In conventional practice for recharging high-pressure-gas systems, gases are transported at room temperature in high-pressure tanks. For recharging a given system to a specified pressure, a transport tank must contain the recharge gas at a much higher pressure. At the destination, the transport tank is connected to the system storage tank to be recharged, and the pressures in the transport tank and the system storage tank are allowed to equalize. One major disadvantage of the conventional approach is that the high transport pressure poses a hazard. Another disadvantage is the waste of a significant amount of recharge gas. Because the transport tank is disconnected from the system storage tank when it is at the specified system recharge pressure, the transport tank still contains a significant amount of recharge gas (typically on the order of half of the amount transported) that cannot be used. In the proposed method, the cryogenic fluid would be transported in a suitably thermally insulated tank that would be capable of withstanding the recharge pressure of the destination tank. The tank would be equipped with quick-disconnect fluid-transfer fittings and with a low-power electric heater (which would not be used during transport). In preparation for transport, a relief valve would be attached via one of the quick-disconnect fittings (see figure). During transport, the interior of the tank would be kept at a near

  5. An in situ tensile test apparatus for polymers in high pressure hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvine, K. J.; Kafentzis, T. A.; Pitman, S. G.; Johnson, K. I.; Skorski, D.; Tucker, J. C.; Roosendaal, T. J.; Dahl, M. E.

    2014-10-01

    Degradation of material properties by high-pressure hydrogen is an important factor in determining the safety and reliability of materials used in high-pressure hydrogen storage and delivery. Hydrogen damage mechanisms have a time dependence that is linked to hydrogen outgassing after exposure to the hydrogen atmosphere that makes ex situ measurements of mechanical properties problematic. Designing in situ measurement instruments for high-pressure hydrogen is challenging due to known hydrogen incompatibility with many metals and standard high-power motor materials such as Nd. Here we detail the design and operation of a solenoid based in situ tensile tester under high-pressure hydrogen environments up to 42 MPa (6000 psi). Modulus data from high-density polyethylene samples tested under high-pressure hydrogen at 35 MPa (5000 psi) are also reported as compared to baseline measurements taken in air.

  6. An In-situ Tensile Test Apparatus for Polymers in High Pressure Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Alvine, Kyle J.; Kafentzis, Tyler A.; Pitman, Stan G.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Skorski, Daniel C.; Tucker, Joseph C.; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Dahl, Michael E.

    2014-10-10

    Degradation of material properties by high-pressure hydrogen is an important factor in determining the safety and reliability of materials used in high-pressure hydrogen storage and delivery. Hydrogen damage mechanisms have a time dependence that is linked to hydrogen outgassing after exposure to the hydrogen atmosphere that makes ex-situ measurements of mechanical properties problematic. Designing in-situ measurement instruments for high-pressure hydrogen is challenging due to known hydrogen incompatibility with many metals and standard high-power motor materials like Nd. Here we detail the design and operation of a solenoid based in-situ tensile tester under high-pressure hydrogen environments up to 5,000 psi. Modulus data from high-density polyethylene (HDPE) samples tested under high-pressure hydrogen are also reported as compared to baseline measurements taken in air.

  7. An in situ tensile test apparatus for polymers in high pressure hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Alvine, K. J. Kafentzis, T. A.; Pitman, S. G.; Johnson, K. I.; Skorski, D.; Tucker, J. C.; Roosendaal, T. J.; Dahl, M. E.

    2014-10-15

    Degradation of material properties by high-pressure hydrogen is an important factor in determining the safety and reliability of materials used in high-pressure hydrogen storage and delivery. Hydrogen damage mechanisms have a time dependence that is linked to hydrogen outgassing after exposure to the hydrogen atmosphere that makes ex situ measurements of mechanical properties problematic. Designing in situ measurement instruments for high-pressure hydrogen is challenging due to known hydrogen incompatibility with many metals and standard high-power motor materials such as Nd. Here we detail the design and operation of a solenoid based in situ tensile tester under high-pressure hydrogen environments up to 42 MPa (6000 psi). Modulus data from high-density polyethylene samples tested under high-pressure hydrogen at 35 MPa (5000 psi) are also reported as compared to baseline measurements taken in air.

  8. Constitutive and damage material modeling in a high pressure hydrogen environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, D. A.; Fritzemeier, L. G.

    1991-05-01

    Numerous components in reusable space propulsion systems such as the SSME are exposed to high pressure gaseous hydrogen environments. Flow areas and passages in the fuel turbopump, fuel and oxidizer preburners, main combustion chamber, and injector assembly contain high pressure hydrogen either high in purity or as hydrogen rich steam. Accurate constitutive and damage material models applicable to high pressure hydrogen environments are therefore needed for engine design and analysis. Existing constitutive and cyclic crack initiation models were evaluated only for conditions of oxidizing environments. The main objective is to evaluate these models for applicability to high pressure hydrogen environments.

  9. Constitutive and damage material modeling in a high pressure hydrogen environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, D. A.; Fritzemeier, L. G.

    1991-01-01

    Numerous components in reusable space propulsion systems such as the SSME are exposed to high pressure gaseous hydrogen environments. Flow areas and passages in the fuel turbopump, fuel and oxidizer preburners, main combustion chamber, and injector assembly contain high pressure hydrogen either high in purity or as hydrogen rich steam. Accurate constitutive and damage material models applicable to high pressure hydrogen environments are therefore needed for engine design and analysis. Existing constitutive and cyclic crack initiation models were evaluated only for conditions of oxidizing environments. The main objective is to evaluate these models for applicability to high pressure hydrogen environments.

  10. High pressure gas spheres for neutron and photon experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupp, G.; Petrich, D.; Käppeler, F.; Kaltenbaek, J.; Leugers, B.; Reifarth, R.

    2009-09-01

    High pressure gas spheres have been designed and successfully used in several nuclear physics experiments on noble gases. The pros and cons of this solution are the simple design and the high reliability versus the fact that the density is limited to 40-60% of liquid or solid gas samples. Originally produced for neutron capture studies at keV energies, the comparably small mass of the gas spheres were an important advantage, which turned out to be of relevance for other applications as well. The construction, performance, and operation of the spheres are described and examples for their use are presented.

  11. Low Cost, High Efficiency, High Pressure Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Leavitt

    2010-03-31

    A technical and design evaluation was carried out to meet DOE hydrogen fuel targets for 2010. These targets consisted of a system gravimetric capacity of 2.0 kWh/kg, a system volumetric capacity of 1.5 kWh/L and a system cost of $4/kWh. In compressed hydrogen storage systems, the vast majority of the weight and volume is associated with the hydrogen storage tank. In order to meet gravimetric targets for compressed hydrogen tanks, 10,000 psi carbon resin composites were used to provide the high strength required as well as low weight. For the 10,000 psi tanks, carbon fiber is the largest portion of their cost. Quantum Technologies is a tier one hydrogen system supplier for automotive companies around the world. Over the course of the program Quantum focused on development of technology to allow the compressed hydrogen storage tank to meet DOE goals. At the start of the program in 2004 Quantum was supplying systems with a specific energy of 1.1-1.6 kWh/kg, a volumetric capacity of 1.3 kWh/L and a cost of $73/kWh. Based on the inequities between DOE targets and Quantum’s then current capabilities, focus was placed first on cost reduction and second on weight reduction. Both of these were to be accomplished without reduction of the fuel system’s performance or reliability. Three distinct areas were investigated; optimization of composite structures, development of “smart tanks” that could monitor health of tank thus allowing for lower design safety factor, and the development of “Cool Fuel” technology to allow higher density gas to be stored, thus allowing smaller/lower pressure tanks that would hold the required fuel supply. The second phase of the project deals with three additional distinct tasks focusing on composite structure optimization, liner optimization, and metal.

  12. DISRUPTION MITIGATION WITH HIGH-PRESSURE NOBLE GAS INJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    WHYTE, DG; JERNIGAN, TC; HUMPHREYS, DA; HYATT, AW; LASNIER, CJ; PARKS, PB; EVANS, TE; TAYLOR, PL; KELLMAN, AG; GRAY, DS; HOLLMANN, EM

    2002-10-01

    OAK A271 DISRUPTION MITIGATION WITH HIGH-PRESSURE NOBLE GAS INJECTION. High-pressure gas jets of neon and argon are used to mitigate the three principal damaging effects of tokamak disruptions: thermal loading of the divertor surfaces, vessel stress from poloidal halo currents and the buildup and loss of relativistic electrons to the wall. The gas jet penetrates as a neutral species through to the central plasma at its sonic velocity. The injected gas atoms increase up to 500 times the total electron inventory in the plasma volume, resulting in a relatively benign radiative dissipation of >95% of the plasma stored energy. The rapid cooling and the slow movement of the plasma to the wall reduce poloidal halo currents during the current decay. The thermally collapsed plasma is very cold ({approx} 1-2 eV) and the impurity charge distribution can include > 50% fraction neutral species. If a sufficient quantity of gas is injected, the neutrals inhibit runaway electrons. A physical model of radiative cooling is developed and validated against DIII-D experiments. The model shows that gas jet mitigation, including runaway suppression, extrapolates favorably to burning plasmas where disruption damage will be more severe. Initial results of real-time disruption detection triggering gas jet injection for mitigation are shown.

  13. Low-Cost High-Pressure Hydrogen Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Cropley, Cecelia C.; Norman, Timothy J.

    2008-04-02

    Electrolysis of water, particularly in conjunction with renewable energy sources, is potentially a cost-effective and environmentally friendly method of producing hydrogen at dispersed forecourt sites, such as automotive fueling stations. The primary feedstock for an electrolyzer is electricity, which could be produced by renewable sources such as wind or solar that do not produce carbon dioxide or other greenhouse gas emissions. However, state-of-the-art electrolyzer systems are not economically competitive for forecourt hydrogen production due to their high capital and operating costs, particularly the cost of the electricity used by the electrolyzer stack. In this project, Giner Electrochemical Systems, LLC (GES) developed a low cost, high efficiency proton-exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis system for hydrogen production at moderate pressure (300 to 400 psig). The electrolyzer stack operates at differential pressure, with hydrogen produced at moderate pressure while oxygen is evolved at near-atmospheric pressure, reducing the cost of the water feed and oxygen handling subsystems. The project included basic research on catalysts and membranes to improve the efficiency of the electrolysis reaction as well as development of advanced materials and component fabrication methods to reduce the capital cost of the electrolyzer stack and system. The project culminated in delivery of a prototype electrolyzer module to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for testing at the National Wind Technology Center. Electrolysis cell efficiency of 72% (based on the lower heating value of hydrogen) was demonstrated using an advanced high-strength membrane developed in this project. This membrane would enable the electrolyzer system to exceed the DOE 2012 efficiency target of 69%. GES significantly reduced the capital cost of a PEM electrolyzer stack through development of low cost components and fabrication methods, including a 60% reduction in stack parts count. Economic

  14. Thermal model development and validation for rapid filling of high pressure hydrogen tanks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Johnson, Terry A.; Bozinoski, Radoslav; Ye, Jianjun; Sartor, George; Zheng, Jinyang; Yang, Jian

    2015-06-30

    This paper describes the development of thermal models for the filling of high pressure hydrogen tanks with experimental validation. Two models are presented; the first uses a one-dimensional, transient, network flow analysis code developed at Sandia National Labs, and the second uses the commercially available CFD analysis tool Fluent. These models were developed to help assess the safety of Type IV high pressure hydrogen tanks during the filling process. The primary concern for these tanks is due to the increased susceptibility to fatigue failure of the liner caused by the fill process. Thus, a thorough understanding of temperature changes ofmore » the hydrogen gas and the heat transfer to the tank walls is essential. The effects of initial pressure, filling time, and fill procedure were investigated to quantify the temperature change and verify the accuracy of the models. In this paper we show that the predictions of mass averaged gas temperature for the one and three-dimensional models compare well with the experiment and both can be used to make predictions for final mass delivery. Furthermore, due to buoyancy and other three-dimensional effects, however, the maximum wall temperature cannot be predicted using one-dimensional tools alone which means that a three-dimensional analysis is required for a safety assessment of the system.« less

  15. Thermal model development and validation for rapid filling of high pressure hydrogen tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Terry A.; Bozinoski, Radoslav; Ye, Jianjun; Sartor, George; Zheng, Jinyang; Yang, Jian

    2015-06-30

    This paper describes the development of thermal models for the filling of high pressure hydrogen tanks with experimental validation. Two models are presented; the first uses a one-dimensional, transient, network flow analysis code developed at Sandia National Labs, and the second uses the commercially available CFD analysis tool Fluent. These models were developed to help assess the safety of Type IV high pressure hydrogen tanks during the filling process. The primary concern for these tanks is due to the increased susceptibility to fatigue failure of the liner caused by the fill process. Thus, a thorough understanding of temperature changes of the hydrogen gas and the heat transfer to the tank walls is essential. The effects of initial pressure, filling time, and fill procedure were investigated to quantify the temperature change and verify the accuracy of the models. In this paper we show that the predictions of mass averaged gas temperature for the one and three-dimensional models compare well with the experiment and both can be used to make predictions for final mass delivery. Furthermore, due to buoyancy and other three-dimensional effects, however, the maximum wall temperature cannot be predicted using one-dimensional tools alone which means that a three-dimensional analysis is required for a safety assessment of the system.

  16. Simulation of powder metal fabrication with high pressure gas atomization

    SciTech Connect

    Kuntz, D.W.; Payne, J.L.

    1994-12-31

    A computational/analytical technique has been developed which models the physics of high pressure gas atomization. The technique uses an uncoupled approach, such that the gas flowfield is initially calculated with a commercially-available Navier-Stokes code. The liquid metal droplet breakup, dynamics, and thermodynamics, are then calculated using the pre-computed flowfield by a separate computer program written by the authors. The atomization code models the primary breakup of the liquid metal stream, tracks the droplets resulting from primary breakup through the flowfield until they undergo secondary breakup, and then tracks the subdroplets until they breakup, solidify, or leave the flowfield region of interest. The statistical properties of the metal powder produced are then computed from the characteristics of these droplets. Comparisons between experimental measurements and computations indicate that the Navier-Stokes code is predicting the gas flowfield well, and that the atomization code is properly modeling the physics of the droplet dynamics and breakup.

  17. High-pressure /sup 3/He gas scintillation neutron spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Derzon, M.S.; Slaughter, D.R.; Prussin, S.G.

    1985-10-01

    A high-pressure, /sup 3/He-Xe gas scintillation spectrometer has been developed for neutron spectroscopy on D-D fusion plasmas. The spectrometer exhibits an energy resolution of (121 +- 20 keV) keV (FWHM) at 2.5 MeV and an efficiency of (1.9 +- 0.4) x 10/sup -3/ (n/cm/sup 2/)/sup -1/. The contribution to the resolution (FWHM) from counting statistics is only (22 +- 3 keV) and the remainder is due predominantly to the variation of light collection efficiency with location of neutron events within the active volume of the detector.

  18. Internal hysteresis experienced on a high pressure syn gas compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeidan, F. Y.

    1984-01-01

    A vibration instability phenomenon experienced in operating high pressure syn gas centrifugal compressors in two ammonia plants is described. The compressors were monitored by orbit and spectrum analysis for changes from baseline readings. It is found that internal hysteresis was the major destabilizing force; however, the problem was further complicated by seal lockup at the suction end of the compressor. A coupling lockup problem and a coupling fit problem, which frettage of the shaft, are also considered as contributors to the self excited vibrations.

  19. HPF HIGH PRESSURE FACILITY GAS ANALYSIS SYSTEM IN BASEMENT / HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS FACILITY IN THE E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    HPF HIGH PRESSURE FACILITY GAS ANALYSIS SYSTEM IN BASEMENT / HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS FACILITY IN THE ENGINE RESEARCH BUILDING ERB TEST CELL CE-13 / AUTOMATIC SCAN VALUE SYSTEM ON THE SECOND FLOOR OF THE INSTRUMENT RESEARCH LABORATORY IRL

  20. Structural changes and intermolecular interactions of filled ice Ic structure for hydrogen hydrate under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, S.; Hirai, H.; Kawamura, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yagi, T.

    2010-03-01

    High-pressure experiments of hydrogen hydrate were performed using a diamond anvil cell under conditions of 0.1-44.2 GPa and at room temperature. Also, high pressure Raman studies of solid hydrogen were performed in the pressure range of 0.1-43.7 GPa. X-ray diffractometry (XRD) for hydrogen hydrate revealed that a known high-pressure structure, filled ice Ic structure, of hydrogen hydrate transformed to a new high-pressure structure at approximately 35-40 GPa. A comparison of the Raman spectroscopy of a vibron for hydrogen molecules between hydrogen hydrate and solid hydrogen revealed that the extraction of hydrogen molecules from hydrogen hydrate occurred above 20 GPa. Also, the Raman spectra of a roton revealed that the rotation of hydrogen molecules in hydrogen hydrate was suppressed at around 20 GPa and that the rotation recovered under higher pressure. These results indicated that remarkable intermolecular interactions in hydrogen hydrate between neighboring hydrogen molecules and between guest hydrogen molecules and host water molecules might occur. These intermolecular interactions could produce the stability of hydrogen hydrate.

  1. Probing of the hydrogen melting line at high pressures by dynamic compression

    SciTech Connect

    Grinenko, A; Gericke, D; Glenzer, S H; Vorberger, J

    2008-06-09

    We investigate the capabilities of dynamic compression by intense heavy ion beams to yield information about the high pressure phases of hydrogen. Employing ab initio simulations and experimental data, a new wide range equation of state for hydrogen that covers solid, fluid, gas and plasma phases has been constructed for our hydrodynamic simulations. The results show that the melting line up to its maximum as well as the transition from the molecular fl fluid to the fully ionized, metallic phase can be tested with the beam parameters available at the upcoming FAIR facility at GSI-Darmstadt. Using the structural information from the ab initio simulations, we also demonstrate that x-ray scattering is capable of extracting the information about the structure and the dissociation state.

  2. Analysis of hydrogen vehicles with cryogenic high pressure storage

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S. M.; Berry, G. D.

    1998-06-19

    Insulated pressure vessels are cryogenic-capable pressure vessels that can be fueled with liquid hydrogen (LIQ) or ambient-temperature compressed hydrogen (CH2). Insulated pressure vessels offer the advantages of liquid hydrogen tanks (low weight and volume), with reduced disadvantages (lower energy requirement for hydrogen liquefaction and reduced evaporative losses). This paper shows an evaluation of the applicability of the insulated pressure vessels for light-duty vehicles. The paper shows an evaluation of evaporative losses and insulation requirements and a description of the current experimental plans for testing insulated pressure vessels. The results show significant advantages to the use of insulated pressure vessels for light-duty vehicles.

  3. In situ gas analysis for high pressure applications using property measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, J.; Span, R.; Fieback, T.

    2013-10-01

    As the production, distribution, and storage of renewable energy based fuels usually are performed under high pressures and as there is a lack of in situ high pressure gas analysis instruments on the market, the aim of this work was to develop a method for in situ high pressure gas analysis of biogas and hydrogen containing gas mixtures. The analysis is based on in situ measurements of optical, thermo physical, and electromagnetic properties in gas mixtures with newly developed high pressure sensors. This article depicts the calculation of compositions from the measured properties, which is carried out iteratively by using highly accurate equations of state for gas mixtures. The validation of the method consisted of the generation and measurement of several mixtures, of which three are presented herein: a first mixture of 64.9 mol. % methane, 17.1 mol. % carbon dioxide, 9 mol. % helium, and 9 mol. % ethane at 323 K and 423 K in a pressure range from 2.5 MPa to 17 MPa; a second mixture of 93.0 mol. % methane, 4.0 mol. % propane, 2.0 mol. % carbon dioxide, and 1.0 mol. % nitrogen at 303 K, 313 K, and 323 K in a pressure range from 1.2 MPa to 3 MPa; and a third mixture of 64.9 mol. % methane, 30.1 mol. % carbon dioxide, and 5.0 mol. % nitrogen at 303 K, 313 K, and 323 K in a pressure range from 2.5 MPa to 4 MPa. The analysis of the tested gas mixtures showed that with measured density, velocity of sound, and relative permittivity the composition can be determined with deviations below 1.9 mol. %, in most cases even below 1 mol. %. Comparing the calculated compositions with the generated gas mixture, the deviations were in the range of the combined uncertainty of measurement and property models.

  4. High-Pressure Multi-Mbar Conductivity Experiments on Hydrogen: The Quest for Solid Metallic Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, D

    2007-02-07

    Ultra-dense hydrogen has long been the subject of intense experimental and theoretical research due to the fascinating physics which arises from this supposedly simple system. The properties of ultra-dense hydrogen also have important implications for planetary physics, since the interiors of the giant planets Jupiter and Saturn are believed to consist of cores of dense, metallic hydrogen. Finally, ultra-dense hydrogen is of direct programmatic interest, and multiple-shock compression experiments on hydrogen to the metallic state have stimulated the accelerated development of new hydrogen equation-of-state (EOS) models used for ICF and other applications. The focus of our research has often been described as the ''Holy Grail'' of high-pressure physics research: The metallization of solid hydrogen. Metallic hydrogen has long been considered to be the prototypical system for the study of insulator-to-metal (I-M) transitions. Although metallic hydrogen (Z=1) may superficially appear to be a very simple material, it is in fact an extremely challenging system for theoretical analysis due to the presence of large zero-point atomic motions and the complete absence of any core electrons. Thus, solid metallic hydrogen promises to be a fascinating material. Among its predicted properties is the possibility of being a high temperature superconductor with a critical temperature T{sub c} of the order of {approx} 100K [1]. The successful metallization of solid hydrogen would be a groundbreaking scientific discovery and open up new frontiers in science and possibly technology as well.

  5. Advanced research and technology program for advanced high pressure oxygen-hydrogen rocket propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsik, S. J.; Morea, S. F.

    1985-01-01

    A research and technology program for advanced high pressure, oxygen-hydrogen rocket propulsion technology is presently being pursued by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to establish the basic discipline technologies, develop the analytical tools, and establish the data base necessary for an orderly evolution of the staged combustion reusable rocket engine. The need for the program is based on the premise that the USA will depend on the Shuttle and its derivative versions as its principal Earth-to-orbit transportation system for the next 20 to 30 yr. The program is focused in three principal areas of enhancement: (1) life extension, (2) performance, and (3) operations and diagnosis. Within the technological disciplines the efforts include: rotordynamics, structural dynamics, fluid and gas dynamics, materials fatigue/fracture/life, turbomachinery fluid mechanics, ignition/combustion processes, manufacturing/producibility/nondestructive evaluation methods and materials development/evaluation. An overview of the Advanced High Pressure Oxygen-Hydrogen Rocket Propulsion Technology Program Structure and Working Groups objectives are presented with highlights of several significant achievements.

  6. Advanced research and technology programs for advanced high-pressure oxygen-hydrogen rocket propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsik, S. J.; Morea, S. F.

    1985-01-01

    A research and technology program for advanced high pressure, oxygen-hydrogen rocket propulsion technology is presently being pursued by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to establish the basic discipline technologies, develop the analytical tools, and establish the data base necessary for an orderly evolution of the staged combustion reusable rocket engine. The need for the program is based on the premise that the USA will depend on the Shuttle and its derivative versions as its principal Earth-to-orbit transportation system for the next 20 to 30 yr. The program is focused in three principal areas of enhancement: (1) life extension, (2) performance, and (3) operations and diagnosis. Within the technological disciplines the efforts include: rotordynamics, structural dynamics, fluid and gas dynamics, materials fatigue/fracture/life, turbomachinery fluid mechanics, ignition/combustion processes, manufacturing/producibility/nondestructive evaluation methods and materials development/evaluation. An overview of the Advanced High Pressure Oxygen-Hydrogen Rocket Propulsion Technology Program Structure and Working Groups objectives are presented with highlights of several significant achievements.

  7. Hydrogen Disorder and Elasticity of Phase D at High Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, B.; Li, L.

    2007-12-01

    One of the major goals of Earth's sciences is to develop models for the evolution of our planet. This goal is directly linked to our understanding of the dynamics within the Earth's interior. It has long been recognized that small amounts of volatiles such as hydrogen can have a disproportionately large effect on viscosity. This implies less resistance to convection and shorter overturn times. Thus knowing the abundance of hydrogen and its distribution in the mantle has important implications for the evolution of our planet. However, one of the remaining question is provide observables that may aid constraining the presence of volatiles. Phase D, MgSi2O6H2, is of particular interest since it is the only hydrogen bearing phase whose stability field extends into the lower mantle. Thus, phase D is a prime candidate for hydrogen transport into the lower mantle along subduction zones. In order to investigate the elasticity of phase D, we performed static (0 K) first-principle calculations. All calculations were performed with a plane-wave basis-set using GGA-PAW potentials. We find that long H-H bonds are energetically favorable which is likely due to H-H repulsion. The equation of state of the energetically most favorable structures are consistent with previous and experimental and theoretical studies of Phase D. Our preliminary results show that hydrogen bond symmetrization occurs in the pressure range of 40-50 GPa in agreement with previous theoretical studies. The elastic constant tensors of the relevant hydrogen distributions agree to within ~0.5% at least up 70 GPa. We also find that the largest change in elasticity with hydrogen symmetrization is an increase of C33 by ~ 10%. The induced changes of compressional and shear wave speeds are similar, ~ 1% at 40 GPa. The predicted azimuthal and polarization anisotropies of shear waves decrease by only ~ 1% with symmetrization. In contrast, the azimuthal P-wave anisotropy decreases from ~ 18% to ~ 7% with hydrogen bond

  8. High-pressure/low-temperature neutron scattering of gas inclusion compounds: progress and prospects.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yusheng; Xu, Hongwu; Daemen, Luke L; Lokshin, Konstantin; Tait, Kimberly T; Mao, Wendy L; Luo, Junhua; Currier, Robert P; Hickmott, Donald D

    2007-04-01

    Alternative energy resources such as hydrogen and methane gases are becoming increasingly important for the future economy. A major challenge for using hydrogen is to develop suitable materials to store it under a variety of conditions, which requires systematic studies of the structures, stability, and kinetics of various hydrogen-storing compounds. Neutron scattering is particularly useful for these studies. We have developed high-pressure/low-temperature gas/fluid cells in conjunction with neutron diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering instruments allowing in situ and real-time examination of gas uptake/release processes. We studied the formation of methane and hydrogen clathrates, a group of inclusion compounds consisting of frameworks of hydrogen-bonded H(2)O molecules with gas molecules trapped inside the cages. Our results reveal that clathrate can store up to four hydrogen molecules in each of its large cages with an intermolecular H(2)-H(2) distance of only 2.93 A. This distance is much shorter than that in the solid/metallic hydrogen (3.78 A), suggesting a strong densification effect of the clathrate framework on the enclosed hydrogen molecules. The framework-pressurizing effect is striking and may exist in other inclusion compounds such as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Owing to the enormous variety and flexibility of their frameworks, inclusion compounds may offer superior properties for storage of hydrogen and/or hydrogen-rich molecules, relative to other types of compounds. We have investigated the hydrogen storage properties of two MOFs, Cu(3)[Co(CN)(6)](2) and Cu(3)(BTC)(2) (BTC = benzenetricarboxylate), and our preliminary results demonstrate that the developed neutron-scattering techniques are equally well suited for studying MOFs and other inclusion compounds. PMID:17389387

  9. High-pressure/low-temperature neutron scattering of gas inclusion compounds: Progress and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yusheng; Xu, Hongwu; Daemen, Luke L.; Lokshin, Konstantin; Tait, Kimberly T.; Mao, Wendy L.; Luo, Junhua; Currier, Robert P.; Hickmott, Donald D.

    2007-01-01

    Alternative energy resources such as hydrogen and methane gases are becoming increasingly important for the future economy. A major challenge for using hydrogen is to develop suitable materials to store it under a variety of conditions, which requires systematic studies of the structures, stability, and kinetics of various hydrogen-storing compounds. Neutron scattering is particularly useful for these studies. We have developed high-pressure/low-temperature gas/fluid cells in conjunction with neutron diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering instruments allowing in situ and real-time examination of gas uptake/release processes. We studied the formation of methane and hydrogen clathrates, a group of inclusion compounds consisting of frameworks of hydrogen-bonded H2O molecules with gas molecules trapped inside the cages. Our results reveal that clathrate can store up to four hydrogen molecules in each of its large cages with an intermolecular H2–H2 distance of only 2.93 Å. This distance is much shorter than that in the solid/metallic hydrogen (3.78 Å), suggesting a strong densification effect of the clathrate framework on the enclosed hydrogen molecules. The framework-pressurizing effect is striking and may exist in other inclusion compounds such as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Owing to the enormous variety and flexibility of their frameworks, inclusion compounds may offer superior properties for storage of hydrogen and/or hydrogen-rich molecules, relative to other types of compounds. We have investigated the hydrogen storage properties of two MOFs, Cu3[Co(CN)6]2 and Cu3(BTC)2 (BTC = benzenetricarboxylate), and our preliminary results demonstrate that the developed neutron-scattering techniques are equally well suited for studying MOFs and other inclusion compounds. PMID:17389387

  10. High pressure deuterium-tritium gas target vessels for muon-catalyzed fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Caffrey, A.J.; Spaletta, H.W.; Ware, A.G.; Zabriskie, J.M.; Hardwick, D.A.; Maltrud, H.R.; Paciotti, M.A.; Los Alamos National Lab., NM )

    1989-01-01

    In experimental studies of muon-catalyzed fusion, the density of the hydrogen gas mixture is an important parameter. Catalysis of up to 150 fusions per muon has been observed in deuterium-tritium gas mixtures at liquid hydrogen density; at room temperature, such densities require a target gas pressure of the order of 1000 atmospheres (100 MPa, 15,000 psi). We report here the design considerations for hydrogen gas target vessels for muon-catalyzed fusion experiments that operate at 1000 and 10,000 atmospheres. The 1000 atmosphere high pressure target vessels are fabricated of Type A-286 stainless steel and lined with oxygen-free, high-conductivity (OFHC) copper to provide a barrier to hydrogen permeation of the stainless steel. The 10,000 atmosphere ultrahigh pressure target vessels are made from 18Ni (200 grade) maraging steel and are lined with OFHC copper, again to prevent hydrogen permeation of the steel. In addition to target design features, operating requirements, fabrication procedures, and secondary containment are discussed. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Hydrogen sulfide at high pressure: Change in stoichiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, Alexander F.; Lobanov, Sergey S.; Kruglov, Ivan; Zhao, Xiao-Miao; Chen, Xiao-Jia; Oganov, Artem R.; Konôpková, Zuzana; Prakapenka, Vitali B.

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S ) was studied by x-ray synchrotron diffraction and Raman spectroscopy up to 150 GPa at 180-295 K and by quantum-mechanical variable-composition evolutionary simulations. The experiments show that H2S becomes unstable with respect to formation of compounds with different structure and composition, including Cccm and a body-centered cubic like (R 3 m or I m -3 m ) H3S , the latter one predicted previously to show a record-high superconducting transition temperature, a Tc of 203 K. These experiments provide experimental ground for understanding of this record-high Tc. The experimental results are supported by theoretical structure searches that suggest the stability of H3S , H4S3 , H5S8 , H3S5 , and H S2 compounds that have not been reported previously at elevated pressures.

  12. Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes at High Pressures LDRD Final Report 03-ERD-047

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, W J; Cynn, H

    2004-02-16

    This goal of this project was to perform feasibility experiments and measurements of the fundamental interactions between hydrogen and single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) at high pressures. High-pressure is an adjustable experimental parameter for tuning interaction strengths, thereby elucidating and providing insights into the fundamental nature of the H{sub 2}/SWNT system. We have developed and utilized systems and methodologies to make x-ray scattering, optical spectroscopic and electrical transport measurements. These activities have been productive in demonstrating capabilities and measuring properties of SWNTs under high-pressure conditions. We have also developed strong cooperative and complementary relationships with academic research colleagues at Stanford University. Building on these results and relationships, we hope to continue and expand our research as co-investigators in a joint Harvard-LLNL-Stanford proposal to the DOE ''Grand Challenge'' for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen Storage (Solicitation No. DE-PS36-03GO93013). Hydrogen storage is an active research topic with important basic science implications and a crucial enabling technology for advanced energy systems. Measurements of the H{sub 2} storage capacity indicate that it may achieve or exceed the storage capacity level (6.5 wt-%) mandated by the DOE hydrogen plan for fielding a hydrogen-fueled vehicle. The H{sub 2}/SWNT system has been the subject of intensive study and controversy regarding this storage capacity, with various conflicting measurements ranging from 1 wt-% up to values exceeding 7 wt-%[1-5]. The mechanism and details of the hydrogen storage in SWNT systems is poorly understood and several key questions have not been definitively determined including: (1) importance of SWNT structural parameters (tube length, diameter, end termination, bundling); (2) adsorption sites, mechanism, and binding energy; and (3) optimal storage capacity and conditions. This project sought to

  13. High pressure and temperature optical flow cell for Near-Infra-Red spectroscopic analysis of gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, C. G.; Suedmeyer, J.; Oderkerk, B.; Fieback, T. M.

    2014-05-01

    A new optical flow cell with a new optical arrangement adapted for high pressures and temperatures using glass fibres to connect light source, cell, and spectrometer has been developed, as part of a larger project comprising new methods for in situ analysis of bio and hydrogen gas mixtures in high pressure and temperature applications. The analysis is based on measurements of optical, thermo-physical, and electromagnetic properties in gas mixtures with newly developed high pressure property sensors, which are mounted in a new apparatus which can generate gas mixtures with up to six components with an uncertainty of composition of as little as 0.1 mol. %. Measurements of several pure components of natural gases and biogases to a pressure of 20 MPa were performed on two isotherms, and with binary mixtures of the same pure gases at pressures to 17.5 MPa. Thereby a new method of analyzing the obtained spectra based on the partial density of methane was investigated.

  14. High pressure gas laser technology for atmospheric remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javan, A.

    1980-01-01

    The development of a fixed frequency chirp-free and highly stable intense pulsed laser made for Doppler wind velocity measurements with accurate ranging is described. Energy extraction from a high pressure CO2 laser at a tunable single mode frequency is also examined.

  15. Structural changes of filled ice Ic structure for hydrogen hydrate under high pressure.

    PubMed

    Machida, Shin-ichi; Hirai, Hisako; Kawamura, Taro; Yamamoto, Yoshitaka; Yagi, Takehiko

    2008-12-14

    High-pressure experiments of hydrogen hydrate, filled ice Ic structure, were performed using a diamond-anvil cell in the pressure range of 0.1-80.3 GPa at room temperature. In situ x-ray diffractometry (XRD) revealed that structural changes took place at approximately 35-40 and 55-60 GPa, and that the high-pressure phase of hydrogen hydrate survived up to at least 80.3 GPa. Raman spectroscopy showed that the changes in vibrational mode for the hydrogen molecules in hydrogen hydrate occurred at around 40 and 60 GPa, and these results were consistent with those of the XRD. At about 40 GPa, the intermolecular distance of host water molecules consisting the framework attained the critical distance of symmetrization of the hydrogen bond for water molecules, which suggested that symmetrization of the hydrogen bond occurred at around 40 GPa. The symmetrization might introduce some structural change in the filled ice Ic structure. In addition, the existence of the high-pressure phase above 55-60 GPa implies that a denser structure than that of filled ice Ic may exist in hydrogen hydrate. PMID:19071926

  16. Propagation of the pulsed electron beam of nanosecond duration in gas composition of high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholodnaya, G.; Sazonov, R.; Ponomarev, D.; Remnev, G.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the results of the investigation of the propagation of an electron beam in the high-pressure gas compositions (50, 300, and 760 Torr): sulfur hexafluoride and hydrogen, sulfur hexafluoride and nitrogen, sulfur hexafluoride and argon. The experiments have been performed using the TEA-500 laboratory accelerator. The main parameters of the accelerator are as follows: an accelerating voltage of 500 kV; an electron beam current of 10 kA; a pulse width at half maximum of 60 ns; a pulse energy of 200 J; a pulse repetition rate of up to 5 pulses per second, a beam diameter of 5 cm. The pulsed electron beam was injected into a 55 cm metal drift tube. The drift tube is equipped with three reverse-current shunts with simultaneous detecting of signals. The obtained results of the investigation make it possible to conclude that the picture of the processes occurring in the interaction of an electron beam in the high-pressure gas compositions is different from that observed in the propagation of the electron beam in the low-pressure gas compositions (1 Torr).

  17. High-pressure hydrogen testing of single crystal superalloys for advanced rocket engine turbopump turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, W. S.; Parr, R. A.; Johnston, M. H.; Strizak, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    A screening program to determine the effects of high pressure hydrogen on selected candidate materials for advanced single crystal turbine blade applications is examined. The alloys chosen for the investigation are CM SX-2, CM SX-4C, Rene N-4, and PWA1480. Testing is carried out in hydrogen and helium at 34 MPa and room temperature, with both notched and unnotched single crystal specimens. Results show a significant variation in susceptibility to Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) among the four alloys and a marked difference in fracture topography between hydrogen and helium environment specimens.

  18. Fracture mechanics analysis of a high-pressure hydrogen facility compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vroman, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    The investigation and analysis of a high-pressure hydrogen facility compressor is chronicled, and a life prediction based on fracture mechanics is presented. Crack growth rates in SA 105 Gr II steel are developed for the condition of sustained loading, using a hypothesis of hydrogen embrittlement associated with plastic zone reverse yielding. The resultant formula is compared with test data obtained from laboratory specimens.

  19. Influence of high pressure hydrogen on cyclic load crack growth in metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewett, R. P.; Walter, R. J.; Chandler, W. T.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of high pressure hydrogen on the crack growth rate of various nickel-base alloys was studied at ambient temperature. Considerable enhancement of the cyclic flaw growth rate was observed for Inconel 718, wrought and cast, and Waspaloy, a nickel-base alloy similar to Inconel 718. Only slight enhancement of the flaw growth rate for Alloy 903 was observed.

  20. High Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Films and Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    He, Rongrui; Day, Todd D; Sparks, Justin R; Sullivan, Nichole F; Badding, John V

    2016-07-01

    Thin films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon can be produced at MPa pressures from silane without the use of plasma at temperatures as low as 345 °C. High pressure chemical vapor deposition may open a new way to low cost deposition of amorphous silicon solar cells and other thin film structures over very large areas in very compact, simple reactors. PMID:27174318

  1. Hydrogen-bond dynamics and Fermi resonance in high-pressure methane filled ice.

    PubMed

    Klug, D D; Tse, J S; Liu, Zhenxian; Hemley, Russell J

    2006-10-21

    High-pressure, variable temperature infrared spectroscopy and first-principles calculations on the methane filled ice structure (MH-III) at high pressures are used to investigate the vibrational dynamics related to pressure induced modifications in hydrogen bonding. Infrared spectroscopy of isotopically dilute solutions of H(2)O in D(2)O is employed together with first-principles calculations to characterize proton dynamics with the pressure induced shortening of hydrogen bonds. A Fermi resonance is identified and shown to dominate the infrared spectrum in the pressure region between 10 and 30 GPa. Significant differences in the effects of the Fermi resonance observed between 10 and 300 K arise from the double-well potential energy surface of the hydrogen bond and quantum effects associated with the proton dynamics. PMID:17059274

  2. Hydrogen-bond Dynamics and Fermi Resonance in High-pressure Methane Filled Ice

    SciTech Connect

    Klug,D.; Tse, J.; Liu, Z.; Hemley, R.

    2006-01-01

    High-pressure, variable temperature infrared spectroscopy and first-principles calculations on the methane filled ice structure (MH-III) at high pressures are used to investigate the vibrational dynamics related to pressure induced modifications in hydrogen bonding. Infrared spectroscopy of isotopically dilute solutions of H{sub 2}O in D{sub 2}O is employed together with first-principles calculations to characterize proton dynamics with the pressure induced shortening of hydrogen bonds. A Fermi resonance is identified and shown to dominate the infrared spectrum in the pressure region between 10 and 30 GPa. Significant differences in the effects of the Fermi resonance observed between 10 and 300 K arise from the double-well potential energy surface of the hydrogen bond and quantum effects associated with the proton dynamics.

  3. Probing the Hydrogen Sublattice of FeHx with High-Pressure Neutron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, C. A.; Guthrie, M.; Boehler, R.; Somayazulu, M.; Fei, Y.; Molaison, J.; dos Santos, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    The combination of seismic, cosmochemical, and mineral physics observations have revealed that Earth's iron-rich core must contain some light elements, such as hydrogen, carbon, oxygen, silicon, and/or sulfur. Therefore, understanding the influence of these light elements on the structural, thermoelastic, and electronic properties of iron is important for constraining the composition of this remote layer of the Earth and, in turn, providing constraints on planetary differentiation and core formation models. The high-pressure structural and magnetic properties of iron hydride (FeHx) have previously been studied using synchrotron x-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Such experiments revealed that the double hexagonal close-packed (dhcp) structure of FeHx is stable above a pressure of ~5 GPa and up to at least 80 GPa at 300 K [1]. In addition, dhcp-FeHx is ferromagnetic at low-pressures, but undergoes a magnetic collapse around 22 GPa [2]. X-ray experiments provide valuable insight into the properties of FeHx, but such techniques are largely sensitive to the iron component because it is difficult to detect the hydrogen sublattice with x-rays. Therefore, neutron diffraction has been used to investigate metastable FeHx, which is formed by quenching the high-pressure phase to liquid nitrogen temperatures and probing the sample at ambient pressure [3]. However, such neutron experiments have been limited to formation pressures below 10 GPa, and cannot be performed at ambient temperature. Here we present the first in-situ investigation of FeHx at 300 K using high-pressure neutron diffraction experiments performed at the Spallation Neutrons and Pressure Diffractometer (SNAP) instrument at the Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In order to achieve pressures of ~50 GPa, we loaded iron samples with a hydrogen gas pressure medium into newly designed large-volume panoramic diamond-anvil cells (DACs) for neutron diffraction experiments [4; 5]. We

  4. Development of the control and ignition systems on a high pressure gas turbine combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdez, Carlos Alejandro

    The ignition and control systems of a laboratory scale high-pressure gas turbine combustor were developed in the present work. This work provides a detailed description of the design, development and testing of the remote control system developed for a High Pressure Gas Turbine Combustor (HPTC). The combustor has the capability to operate at pressures up to 1.5 MPa and temperatures up to 2400 K. It is also designed for a maximum air and fuel flow rates of 81.93 g/s and 35.77 g/s respectively. The fuel used will be CH4 for the early experiments but it is designed to operate using a mixture of H2-CO with a hydrogen fuel composition variation of up to 30 percent. The HPTC also has optical accessibility capabilities in its combustion chamber with a converging nozzle that restricts the exhaust flow. It also has three circular ports that can be used as instrumentation ports to obtain real time data from the combustion chamber. LabVIEW was used as the controlling interface for the user. A detailed outline of the LabVIEW programming is also described. LabVIEW controlled the proportional valves (ball valves), and solenoid valves; it also provided the user with data from mass flow meters as well as pressure transducers. Both proportional and solenoid valves are 1.91 cm and can withstand pressures of up to 1551 kPa. Thermal mass flow meters were used to obtain the flow in the lines with a range from 200-1000 L/min with an accuracy of 1.5 percent. Pressure transducers with a range from 0 to 2068 kPa were also positioned on the lines in order to know the line pressures. The ignition system design, development and testing is also described with its integration to the High Pressure Gas Turbine Combustor. A modified spark plug was used to provide the igniter with an ignition source. A diffusion flame was used to ignite the main line using methane as the fuel that utilizes the air in the combustion chamber as the oxidizer. Testing included a functional test of the equipment, and

  5. Hydrogen Absorption into Austenitic Stainless Steels Under High-Pressure Gaseous Hydrogen and Cathodic Charge in Aqueous Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, Masato; Cheng, Lin; Mizuno, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Yoshinori; Omura, Tomohiko; Sakai, Jun'ichi; Yokoyama, Ken'ichi; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Okuma, Ryuji

    2014-12-01

    Type 316L and Type 304 austenitic stainless steels, both deformed and non-deformed, were hydrogen charged cathodically in an aqueous solution as well as by exposure to high-pressure gaseous hydrogen in an attempt to identify suitable conditions of cathodic charge for simulating hydrogen absorption from gaseous hydrogen environments. Thermal desorption analysis (TDA) was conducted, and the amount of absorbed hydrogen and the spectrum shape were compared between the two charging methods. Simulations were performed by means of the McNabb-Foster model to analyze the spectrum shape and peak temperature, and understand the effects of deformation on the spectra. It was revealed that the spectrum shape and peak temperature were dependent directly upon the initial distribution of hydrogen within the specimen, which varied widely according to the hydrogen charge condition. Deformation also had a marked effect on the amount of absorbed hydrogen in Type 304 steel due to the strain-induced martensitic transformation.

  6. High-pressure chemistry of hydrogen in metals: in situ study of iron hydride.

    PubMed

    Badding, J V; Hemley, R J; Mao, H K

    1991-07-26

    Optical observations and x-ray diffraction measurements of the reaction between iron and hydrogen at high pressure to form iron hydride are described. The reaction is associated with a sudden pressure-induced expansion at 3.5 gigapascals of iron samples immersed in fluid hydrogen. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements carried out to 62 gigapascals demonstrate that iron hydride has a double hexagonal close-packed structure, a cell volume up to 17% larger than pure iron, and a stoichiometry close to FeH. These results greatly extend the pressure range over which the technologically important iron-hydrogen phase diagram has been characterized and have implications for problems ranging from hydrogen degradation and embrittlement of ferrous metals to the presence of hydrogen in Earth's metallic core. PMID:17746396

  7. Liquid fuel spray processes in high-pressure gas flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1986-01-01

    Atomization of single liquid jets injected downstream in high pressure and high velocity airflow was investigated to determine the effect of airstream pressure on mean drop size as measured with a scanning radiometer. For aerodynamic - wave breakup of liquid jets, the ratio of orifice diameter D sub o to measured mean drop diameter D sub m which is assumed equal to D sub 32 or Sauter mean diameter, was correlated with the product of the Weber and Reynolds numbers WeRe and the dimensionless group G1/square root of c, where G is the gravitational acceleration, 1 the mean free molecular path, and square root of C the root mean square velocity, as follows; D sub o/D sub 32 = 1.2 (WeRe) to the 0.4 (G1/square root of c) to the 0.15 for values of WeRe 1 million and an airstream pressure range of 0.10 to 2.10 MPa.

  8. Liquid fuel spray processes in high-pressure gas flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Atomization of single liquid jets injected downstream in high pressure and high velocity airflow was investigated to determine the effect of airstream pressure on mean drop size as measured with a scanning radiometer. For aerodynamic - wave breakup of liquid jets, the ratio of orifice diameter D sub o to measured mean drop diameter D sub m which is assumed equal to D sub 32 or Sauter mean diameter, was correlated with the product of the Weber and Reynolds numbers WeRe and the dimensionless group G1/square root of c, where G is the gravitational acceleration, 1 the mean free molecular path, and square root of C the root mean square velocity, as follows; D sub o/D sub 32 = 1.2 (WeRe) to the 0.4 (G1/square root of c) to the 0.15 for values of WeRe 1 million and an airstream pressure range of 0.10 to 2.10 MPa.

  9. Elastic properties of methane-propane mixed gas hydrate under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miwa, Shinya; Kanou, Masaki; Kume, Tetsuji; Sasaki, Shigeo

    2013-06-01

    Methane hydrate (MH) is widely observed in Earth's environment such as permafrost and deep sea floors. At low temperature and low pressure conditions, pure MH crystallizes a cubic structure I (sI) which consists of hydrogen-bonded two small and six medium water cages which enclathrate methane molecules as guests. However, actual MH in deep sea deposits contains not only methane molecules but also ethane and propane molecules. Therefore, the estimation of elastic properties and mechanical stability for both sI and structure II (sII) are required for the safe extraction of methane gas from the deep sea floors. The purpose of this study is to determine the elastic properties of methane-propane mixed gas hydrate (MPH) with sII by applying the high-pressure Brillouin spectroscopy to a single crystal of MPH-sII grown in a diamond anvil cell. The obtained elastic constant C11 of MPH-sII showing independent of pressure is obviously different from that of pure MH-sI. On the other hand, the C12 and C44 are similar to MH-sI. The present results suggest that a variety of gas hydrates have the individual elastic properties and stability depending on the gas hydrate structures.

  10. Unexpectedly high pressure for molecular dissociation in liquid hydrogen by electronic simulation

    PubMed Central

    Mazzola, Guglielmo; Yunoki, Seiji; Sorella, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    The study of the high pressure phase diagram of hydrogen has continued with renewed effort for about one century as it remains a fundamental challenge for experimental and theoretical techniques. Here we employ an efficient molecular dynamics based on the quantum Monte Carlo method, which can describe accurately the electronic correlation and treat a large number of hydrogen atoms, allowing a realistic and reliable prediction of thermodynamic properties. We find that the molecular liquid phase is unexpectedly stable, and the transition towards a fully atomic liquid phase occurs at much higher pressure than previously believed. The old standing problem of low-temperature atomization is, therefore, still far from experimental reach. PMID:24647280

  11. Hydrogenation under high pressure enhancing catalytic activity of Cu-Zr amorphous alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szummer, A.; Janik-Czachor, M.; Molnár, Á.; Marchuk, I.; Varga, M.; Filipek, S. M.

    2002-11-01

    High pressures of hydrogen up to 3.0 GPa and temperatures up to 373 K were used as a pretreatment to introduce structural changes in the bulk and on the surface of Cu-Zr amorphous alloys which then were examined by means of x-ray diffraction and microscopy. The hydrogenative pretreatment of high hydrogen fugacity followed by annealing at 623 K, aimed at causing desorption of hydrogen, and an eventual exposure of the samples to air at room temperature to oxidize Zr, resulted in a distinct increase of catalytic activity in the dehydrogenation of 2-propanol. A tentative mechanism to account for the enhancement of the catalytic activity induced by the above combined pretreatment is discussed.

  12. Superconducting H5S2 phase in sulfur-hydrogen system under high-pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Takahiro; Nakanishi, Akitaka; Shimizu, Katsuya; Katayama-Yoshida, Hiroshi; Oda, Tatsuki; Suzuki, Naoshi

    2016-03-01

    Recently, hydrogen sulfide was experimentally found to show the high superconducting critical temperature (Tc) under high-pressure. The superconducting Tc shows 30–70 K in pressure range of 100–170 GPa (low-Tc phase) and increases to 203 K, which sets a record for the highest Tc in all materials, for the samples annealed by heating it to room temperature at pressures above 150 GPa (high-Tc phase). Here we present a solid H5S2 phase predicted as the low-Tc phase by the application of the genetic algorithm technique for crystal structure searching and first-principles calculations to sulfur-hydrogen system under high-pressure. The H5S2 phase is thermodynamically stabilized at 110 GPa, in which asymmetric hydrogen bonds are formed between H2S and H3S molecules. Calculated Tc values show 50–70 K in pressure range of 100–150 GPa within the harmonic approximation, which can reproduce the experimentally observed low-Tc phase. These findings give a new aspect of the excellent superconductivity in compressed sulfur-hydrogen system.

  13. Superconducting H5S2 phase in sulfur-hydrogen system under high-pressure.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takahiro; Nakanishi, Akitaka; Shimizu, Katsuya; Katayama-Yoshida, Hiroshi; Oda, Tatsuki; Suzuki, Naoshi

    2016-01-01

    Recently, hydrogen sulfide was experimentally found to show the high superconducting critical temperature (Tc) under high-pressure. The superconducting Tc shows 30-70 K in pressure range of 100-170 GPa (low-Tc phase) and increases to 203 K, which sets a record for the highest Tc in all materials, for the samples annealed by heating it to room temperature at pressures above 150 GPa (high-Tc phase). Here we present a solid H5S2 phase predicted as the low-Tc phase by the application of the genetic algorithm technique for crystal structure searching and first-principles calculations to sulfur-hydrogen system under high-pressure. The H5S2 phase is thermodynamically stabilized at 110 GPa, in which asymmetric hydrogen bonds are formed between H2S and H3S molecules. Calculated Tc values show 50-70 K in pressure range of 100-150 GPa within the harmonic approximation, which can reproduce the experimentally observed low-Tc phase. These findings give a new aspect of the excellent superconductivity in compressed sulfur-hydrogen system. PMID:26983593

  14. Superconducting H5S2 phase in sulfur-hydrogen system under high-pressure

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Takahiro; Nakanishi, Akitaka; Shimizu, Katsuya; Katayama-Yoshida, Hiroshi; Oda, Tatsuki; Suzuki, Naoshi

    2016-01-01

    Recently, hydrogen sulfide was experimentally found to show the high superconducting critical temperature (Tc) under high-pressure. The superconducting Tc shows 30–70 K in pressure range of 100–170 GPa (low-Tc phase) and increases to 203 K, which sets a record for the highest Tc in all materials, for the samples annealed by heating it to room temperature at pressures above 150 GPa (high-Tc phase). Here we present a solid H5S2 phase predicted as the low-Tc phase by the application of the genetic algorithm technique for crystal structure searching and first-principles calculations to sulfur-hydrogen system under high-pressure. The H5S2 phase is thermodynamically stabilized at 110 GPa, in which asymmetric hydrogen bonds are formed between H2S and H3S molecules. Calculated Tc values show 50–70 K in pressure range of 100–150 GPa within the harmonic approximation, which can reproduce the experimentally observed low-Tc phase. These findings give a new aspect of the excellent superconductivity in compressed sulfur-hydrogen system. PMID:26983593

  15. Smart Onboard Inspection of High Pressure Gas Fuel Cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Beshears, D.L.; Starbuck, J.M.

    1999-09-27

    The use of natural gas as an alternative fuel in automotive applications is not widespread primarily because of the high cost and durability of the composite storage tanks. Tanks manufactured using carbon fiber are desirable in weight critical passenger vehicles because of the low density of carbon fiber. The high strength of carbon fiber also translates to a weight reduction because thinner wall designs are possible to withstand the internal pressure loads. However, carbon fiber composites are prone to impact damage that over the life of the storage tank may lead to an unsafe condition for the vehicle operator. A technique that potentially may be a reliable indication of developing hazardous conditions in composite fuel tanks is imbedded fiber optics. The applicability of this technique to onboard inspection is discussed and results from preliminary lab testing indicate that fiber optic sensors can reliably detect impact damage.

  16. High-pressure LOX/hydrocarbon preburners and gas generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huebner, A. W.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of the program was to conduct a small scale hardware test program to establish the technology base required for LOX/hydrocarbon preburners and gas generators. The program consisted of six major tasks; Task I reviewed and assessed the performance prediction models and defined a subscale test program. Task II designed and fabricated this subscale hardware. Task III tested and analyzed the data from this hardware. Task IV analyzed the hot fire results and formulated a preliminary design for 40K preburner assemblies. Task V took the preliminary design and detailed and fabricated three 40K size preburner assemblies, one each fuel-rich LOX/CH, and LOX/RP-1 and one oxidizer rich LOX/CH4. Task VI delivered these preburner assemblies to MSFC for subsequent evaluation.

  17. Hydrogen and helium under high pressure - A case for a classical theory of dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celebonovic, Vladan

    1989-06-01

    When subject to high pressure, H2 and He-3 are expected to undergo phase transitions, and to become metallic at a sufficiently high pressure. Using a semiclassical theory of dense matter proposed by Savic and Kasanin, calculations of phase transition and metallization pressure have been performed for these two materials. In hydrogen, metallization occurs at p(M) = (3.0 + or - 0.2) Mbar, while for helium the corresponding value is (106 + or - 1) Mbar. A phase transition occurs in helium at p(tr) = (10.0 + or - 0.4) Mbar. These values are close to the results obtainable by more rigorous methods. Possibilities of experimental verification of the calculations are briefly discussed.

  18. Flexible Electronics: High Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Films and Solar Cells (Adv. Mater. 28/2016).

    PubMed

    He, Rongrui; Day, Todd D; Sparks, Justin R; Sullivan, Nichole F; Badding, John V

    2016-07-01

    On page 5939, J. V. Badding and co-workers describe the unrolling of a flexible hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cell, deposited by high-pressure chemical vapor deposition. The high-pressure deposition process is represented by the molecules of silane infiltrating the small voids between the rolled up substrate, facilitating plasma-free deposition over a very large area. The high-pressure approach is expected to also find application for 3D nanoarchitectures. PMID:27442970

  19. Phase transitions and hydrogen bonding in deuterated calcium hydroxide: High-pressure and high-temperature neutron diffraction measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Iizuka, Riko; Komatsu, Kazuki; Kagi, Hiroyuki; Nagai, Takaya; Sano-Furukawa, Asami; Hattori, Takanori; Gotou, Hirotada; Yagi, Takehiko

    2014-10-15

    In situ neutron diffraction measurements combined with the pulsed neutron source at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) were conducted on high-pressure polymorphs of deuterated portlandite (Ca(OD){sub 2}) using a Paris–Edinburgh cell and a multi-anvil press. The atomic positions including hydrogen for the unquenchable high-pressure phase at room temperature (phase II′) were first clarified. The bent hydrogen bonds under high pressure were consistent with results from Raman spectroscopy. The structure of the high-pressure and high-temperature phase (Phase II) was concordant with that observed previously by another group for a recovered sample. The observations elucidate the phase transition mechanism among the polymorphs, which involves the sliding of CaO polyhedral layers, position modulations of Ca atoms, and recombination of Ca–O bonds accompanied by the reorientation of hydrogen to form more stable hydrogen bonds. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structures of high-pressure polymorphs of Ca(OD){sub 2}, (a) at room temperature (phase II′) and (b) at high temperature (phase II), were obtained from in situ neutron diffraction measurements. - Highlights: • We measured in situ neutron diffraction of high-pressure polymorphs of Ca(OD){sub 2}. • Hydrogen positions of the high-pressure phase are first determined. • The obtained hydrogen bonds reasonably explain Raman peaks of OH stretching modes. • A phase transition mechanism among the polymorphs is proposed.

  20. a Quantum Monte Carlo Study of the High Pressure Phases of Solid Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natoli, Vincent Dominic

    1994-01-01

    Variational and Diffusion Monte Carlo are powerful computational methods which can afford accurate estimates of the ground state properties of quantum many-body problems. We have applied these Monte Carlo methods to the high pressure phases of solid hydrogen to elucidate those parts of the phase diagram where experimental results are inconclusive or lacking. The method allows us to treat both electrons and protons as quantum particles by incorporating them in the trial wavefunction and avoids the Born-Oppenheimer and harmonic approximations. Our trial wavefunction uses single-body solutions from a mean-field calculation coupled with standard pair potential terms to achieve the most accurate results to date. Equally accurate results were realized for calculations in the disparate insulating molecular and metallic atomic regime. We performed a study of the possible ground state structures of the atomic metallic phase of hydrogen which identifies a new family of low energy atomic structures. Another study was done on the molecular phase over the range of pressures (40-180GPa) where recent experiments have observed spectral discontinuities and other interesting new phenomena. Particular attention was directed to determining the equation of state and orientational ordering. We find that molecular hydrogen adopts a lower symmetry insulating structure over a wide range of pressure. The results of the atomic and molecular studies are combined to draw conclusions about the molecular-atomic transition and other details about the high pressure phase diagram.

  1. Enhanced diffusion of molecular hydrogen in germanosilicate fibres loaded with hydrogen at high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Vasil'ev, Sergei A; Koltashev, V V; Sokolov, V O; Medvedkov, O I; Rybaltovsky, A A; Plotnichenko, V G; Dianov, Evgenii M; Rybaltovskii, A O; Klyamkin, Semen N; Malosiev, A R

    2005-03-31

    Absorption spectra and spontaneous Raman spectra of optical fibres with a germanosilicate core loaded with molecular hydrogen at a pressure of 150-170 MPa are studied; the variation of these spectra during the outdiffusion of hydrogen from the fibres is also investigated. The purely rotational transitions of molecular hydrogen in Raman spectra of optical fibres are recorded for the first time. The changes in the spectral parameters of fibre Bragg gratings loaded with hydrogen are analysed. It is observed for the first time that under such high loading pressures, the decrease in the hydrogen concentration in the fibre core after completion of hydrogen loading occurs in two clearly manifested stages, the initial stage being characterised by a more rapid outlet of hydrogen as compared to the dynamics of hydrogen outdiffusing at pressures of 10-15 MPa. Barodiffusion of molecular hydrogen in optical fibres is considered as the main mechanism explaining this effect. An increase in the solubility of molecular hydrogen in germanosilicate fibres exposed to UV radiation is observed for the first time. (optical fibres)

  2. MICROSTRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTY PERFORMANCE OF COMMERCIAL GRADE API PIPELINE STEELS IN HIGH PRESSURE GASEOUS HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect

    Stalheim, Mr. Douglas; Boggess, Todd; San Marchi, Chris; Jansto, Steven; Somerday, Dr. B; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Sofronis, Prof. Petros

    2010-01-01

    The continued growth of the world s developing countries has placed an ever increasing demand on traditional fossil fuel energy sources. This development has lead to increasing research and development of alternative energy sources. Hydrogen gas is one of the potential alternative energy sources under development. Currently the most economical method of transporting large quantities of hydrogen gas is through steel pipelines. It is well known that hydrogen embrittlement has the potential to degrade steel s mechanical properties when hydrogen migrates into the steel matrix. Consequently, the current pipeline infrastructure used in hydrogen transport is typically operated in a conservative fashion. This operational practice is not conducive to economical movement of significant volumes of hydrogen gas as an alternative to fossil fuels. The degradation of the mechanical properties of steels in hydrogen service is known to depend on the microstructure of the steel. Understanding the levels of mechanical property degradation of a given microstructure when exposed to hydrogen gas under pressure can be used to evaluate the suitability of the existing pipeline infrastructure for hydrogen service and guide alloy and microstructure design for new hydrogen pipeline infrastructure. To this end, the 2 Copyright 2010 by ASME microstructures of relevant steels and their mechanical properties in relevant gaseous hydrogen environments must be fully characterized to establish suitability for transporting hydrogen. A project to evaluate four commercially available pipeline steels alloy/microstructure performance in the presences of gaseous hydrogen has been funded by the US Department of Energy along with the private sector. The microstructures of four pipeline steels were characterized and then tensile testing was conducted in gaseous hydrogen and helium at pressures of 800, 1600 and 3000 psi. Based on measurements of reduction of area, two of the four steels that performed the best

  3. Thermodynamics of hydrogen-helium mixtures at high pressure and finite temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    A technique is reviewed for calculating thermodynamic quantities for mixtures of light elements at high pressure, in the metallic state. Ensemble averages are calculated with Monte Carlo techniques and periodic boundary conditions. Interparticle potentials are assumed to be coulombic, screened by the electrons in dielectric function theory. This method is quantitatively accurate for alloys at pressures above about 10 Mbar. An alloy of equal parts hydrogen and helium by mass appears to remain liquid and mixed for temperatures above about 3000 K, at pressures of about 15 Mbar. The additive volume law is satisfied to within about 10%, but the Gruneisen equation of state gives poor results. A calculation at 1300 K shows evidence of a hydrogen-helium phase separation.

  4. Conformation and hydrogen-bond-assisted polymerization in glycine lithium sulfate at high pressures.

    PubMed

    Mishra, A K; Murli, Chitra; Verma, Ashok K; Song, Yang; Kumar, M R Suresh; Sharma, Surinder M

    2013-07-18

    The conformation of glycine has been a subject of extensive research for the past several years. As glycine exists in zwitterionic form in liquids and solids, the experimental observations of its neutral conformation are very limited. The complexes of glycine are simple prototypes to study the conformational properties of glycine. We have investigated the high-pressure behavior of glycine lithium sulfate (GLS), a semiorganic complex of glycine using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and density functional theory (DFT)-based first principles calculations. Our Raman studies and DFT calculations suggest formation of an intramolecular hydrogen bond at higher pressures. Subsequent to a structural transformation to a new high-pressure phase at ∼9 GPa, the observed spectral changes in the Raman spectra above 14 GPa indicate possible conformational change of glycine from zwitterionic to neutral form. At pressures above 18 GPa, the characteristic features in the Raman spectra and the X-ray diffraction patterns suggest transformation to a hydrogen-bond-assisted polymeric phase with intermediate range order. PMID:23822139

  5. Plasma Studies in a High Pressure Gas Filled Radio Frequency Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freemire, Ben; Chung, Moses; Tollestrup, Alvin; Yonehara, Katsuya

    2014-10-01

    A Muon Collider offers a great deal of physics potential to the high energy physics community. In order to build such a machine with the desired luminosity, significant cooling of the muon beam is required. One proposed method for doing so is the Helical Cooling Channel, which consists of high pressure gas filled radio frequency (HPRF) cavities arranged in a helix within a strong external magnetic field. To validate this technology, an HPRF cavity was subjected to a 400 MeV proton beam at Fermilab's MuCool Test Area. Parent gases of hydrogen, deuterium, helium and nitrogen, at room temperature and densities up to 2.5E21 cm-3 were used, and doped with sulfur hexafluoride or dry air. The plasma density created by the beam approached 1E16 cm-3. Measurements of the RF energy dissipated per charged particle pair, the electron-ion recombination rate, the ion-ion recombination rate, and electron attachment time were made.

  6. Apparatus for material tests using an internal loading system in high-pressure gas at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Imade, M; Fukuyama, S; Yokogawa, K

    2008-07-01

    A new type of apparatus for material tests using an internal loading system in high-pressure gas up to 100 MPa at room temperature without conventional material testing equipment was developed. The apparatus consists of a high-pressure control system and a pressure vessel, in which a piston is installed in the cylinder of the pressure vessel. The load caused by the pressure difference between spaces separated by the piston in the vessel cylinder is applied on the specimen connected to the piston in the vessel cylinder. The actual load on the specimen is directly measured by an external load cell and the displacement of the specimen is also measured by an external extensometer. As an example of the application of the apparatus, a tensile test on SUS316 stainless steel the Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS) G4303, which is comparable to the type 316 stainless steel ASTM A276, was conducted in 90 MPa hydrogen and argon. Hydrogen showed a marked effect on the tensile property of the material. The hydrogen gas embrittlement of the material was briefly discussed. PMID:18681712

  7. Apparatus for material tests using an internal loading system in high-pressure gas at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imade, M.; Fukuyama, S.; Yokogawa, K.

    2008-07-01

    A new type of apparatus for material tests using an internal loading system in high-pressure gas up to 100MPa at room temperature without conventional material testing equipment was developed. The apparatus consists of a high-pressure control system and a pressure vessel, in which a piston is installed in the cylinder of the pressure vessel. The load caused by the pressure difference between spaces separated by the piston in the vessel cylinder is applied on the specimen connected to the piston in the vessel cylinder. The actual load on the specimen is directly measured by an external load cell and the displacement of the specimen is also measured by an external extensometer. As an example of the application of the apparatus, a tensile test on SUS316 stainless steel the Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS) G4303, which is comparable to the type 316 stainless steel ASTM A276, was conducted in 90MPa hydrogen and argon. Hydrogen showed a marked effect on the tensile property of the material. The hydrogen gas embrittlement of the material was briefly discussed.

  8. Gas-cleaning technology for high-temperature, high-pressure gas streams. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Ciliberti, D.F.; Lippert, T.E.

    1985-02-01

    This report presents the results of work accomplished in 1983 under EPRI contract RP 1336-1 on the evaluation and development of hot gas clean up technology for pressurized, fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC). Reported are results of continued testing and evaluation of the woven-ceramic bag filter concept. A theoretical model for pulse jet cleaning is described and correlated with test results. All test work has been conducted on the modified, high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) subscale test facility described. Work is also reported on the testing and evaluation of an advanced diagnostic instrument that is being developed to measure directly the deposition and removal of dust cake on the filter bag surface. 15 references, 71 figures, 12 tables.

  9. Hydrogen rich gas generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A process and apparatus is described for producing a hydrogen rich gas by introducing a liquid hydrocarbon fuel in the form of a spray into a partial oxidation region and mixing with a mixture of steam and air that is preheated by indirect heat exchange with the formed hydrogen rich gas, igniting the hydrocarbon fuel spray mixed with the preheated mixture of steam and air within the partial oxidation region to form a hydrogen rich gas.

  10. Structure and screening in molecular and metallic hydrogen at high pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, D. M.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    1981-01-01

    A variational wavefunction is used to express the (spin restricted) Hartree-Fock energy as reciprocal lattice sums for static lattice FCC monatomic hydrogen and diatomic Pa3 molecular hydrogen. In the monatomic phase the hydrogenic orbital range closely parallels the inverse Thomas-Fermi wavevector; the corresponding energy E has a minimum of -0.929 Ryd/electron at r sub s = 1.67. For the diatomic phase E(r sub s) is similar, but the constituent energies, screening, and bond length reflect a qualitative change in the nature of the solid at r sub s = 2.8. This change is interpreted in terms of a transition from protons as structural units (at high density) to weakly interacting models (at low density). Insensitivity of the total energy to a rapid fall in the bond length suggests association with the rotational transition where the rapid molecular orientations characteristic of high pressures disappear and the molecules rotate freely at low pressure.

  11. High-pressure Raman study of solid hydrogen up to 300 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaoli, Huang; Fangfei, Li; Yanping, Huang; Gang, Wu; Xin, Li; Qiang, Zhou; Bingbing, Liu; Tian, Cui

    2016-03-01

    The high-pressure behavior of solid hydrogen has been investigated by in situ Raman spectroscopy upon compression to 300 GPa at ambient temperature. The hydrogen vibron frequency begins to decrease after it initially increases with pressure up to 38 GPa. This softening behavior suggests the weakening of the intramolecular bond and the increased intermolecular interactions. Above 237 GPa, the vibron frequency softens very rapidly with pressure at a much higher rate than that of phase III, corresponding to transformation from phase III into phase IV. The phase transition sequence has been confirmed from phase I to phase III and then to phase IV at 208 and 237 GPa, respectively. Previous theoretical calculations lead to the proposal of an energetically favorable monoclinic C2/c structure for phase III and orthorhombic Pbcn structure for phase IV. Up to 304 GPa, solid hydrogen is not yet an alkali metal since the sample is still transparent. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB808200), the Program for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team in University, China (Grant No. IRT1132), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51032001, 11074090, 10979001, 51025206, 11274137, 11474127, and 11504127), the National Found for Fostering Talents of Basic Science, China (Grant No. J1103202), and the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2015M570265).

  12. High-pressure, ambient temperature hydrogen storage in metal-organic frameworks and porous carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckner, Matthew; Dailly, Anne

    2014-03-01

    We investigated hydrogen storage in micro-porous adsorbents at ambient temperature and pressures up to 320 bar. We measured three benchmark adsorbents: two metal-organic frameworks, Cu3(1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate)2 [Cu3(btc)2; HKUST-1] and Zn4O(1,3,5-benzenetribenzoate)2 [Zn4O(btb)2; MOF-177], and the activated carbon MSC-30. In this talk, we focus on adsorption enthalpy calculations using a single adsorption isotherm. We use the differential form of the Claussius-Clapeyron equation applied to the Dubinin-Astakhov adsorption model to calculate adsorption enthalpies. Calculation of the adsorption enthalpy in this way gives a temperature independent enthalpy of 5-7 kJ/mol at the lowest coverage for the three materials investigated. Additionally, we discuss the assumptions and corrections that must be made when calculating adsorption isotherms at high-pressure and adsorption enthalpies.

  13. Creep-rupture behavior of iron superalloys in high pressure hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.

    1981-01-01

    Two cast alloys (CRM-6D and XF-818) and four sheet alloys (A-26, Incoloy 800H, N-155, and 19-9DL) in the thickness range of 0.79 to 0.99 mm were evaluated for use in the Stirling engine. The creep rupture behavior of these iron base high temperature alloys is being determined in air for 10 hr to 3,00 hr, and in 20.7 MPa (3,000 psi) H2 for 10 to 300 hr at temperatures of 650 deg to 925 deg. Material procurement, preparation and air creep rupture testing are described and existing data is analyzed. Systems for the high pressure hydrogen testing are discussed. Statistical analysis of temperature-compensated rupture data for each alloy is included.

  14. Effects of High-Pressure Hydrogen Annealing (HPHA) on Reliability Characteristics of RRAM.

    PubMed

    Song, Jeonghwan; Lee, Daeseok; Woo, Jiyong; Cha, Euijun; Lee, Sangheon; Hwang, Hyunsang

    2016-05-01

    Reliability characteristics (retention and endurance) of RRAM are critical for its practical realization and need to be improved. In this work, we confirmed the trade-off between retention and endurance by using various top electrode thickness conditions. The trade-off between retention and endurance characteristics was mainly due to the different amount of oxygen in scavenging layer (Ta) and the amount of oxygen vacancy in switching layer (HfO2). The amount of the oxygen in scavenging layer (Ta) and the amount of the oxygen vacancy in switching layer (HfO2) will be increased with the increase of Ta thickness. Therefore, the thicker Ta cells have worse retention because the large amount of oxygen in scavenging layer (Ta) can diffuse back into switching layer (HfO2) and recombine with oxygen vacancies in the filament. However, it has longer endurance because the large amount of oxygen vacancy in switching layer (HfO2) can be a source of the filament. Hence, there exists a trade-off relation between retention and endurance under the various Ta thickness conditions. To improve both retention and endurance characteristics, we proposed a new method by using high-pressure hydrogen annealing (HPHA). The thin Ta cells have longer retention and worse endurance because it has small amount of both oxygen in scavenging layer (Ta) and oxygen vacancy in switching layer (HfO2). Therefore, to generate more oxygen vacancies in switching layer (HfO2) maintaining small amount of oxygen in scavenging layer (Ta), we treated the samples by HPHA before Ta deposition. Finally, we obtained both improved retention and endurance characteristics in HfO2 based RRAM devices after high-pressure hydrogen annealing treatment. PMID:27483819

  15. A high-pressure and controlled-flow gas system for catalysis research.

    PubMed

    Martis, Vladimir; Beale, Andrew M; Detollenaere, Dirk; Banerjee, Dipanjan; Moroni, Martine; Gosselin, Fabrice; Bras, Wim

    2014-03-01

    A high-pressure gas rig for in situ catalytic reactions at X-ray absorption spectroscopy beamline (BM26A) has been developed. The rig enables catalysts to be studied in a variety of cells under well controlled and industrially relevant operation conditions. A large variety of gas mixtures can be generated and pressures of up to 50 bar with dry gas and 20 bar with wet gas (steam) can be obtained. Analyses of reaction products can be performed using an on-line mass spectrometer. PMID:24562571

  16. Combined effects of high pressure and sodium hydrogen carbonate treatment on pork ham: improvement of texture and palatability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yun-Jung; Nishiumi, Tadayuki; Fujimura, Shinobu; Ogoshi, Hiro; Suzuki, Atsushi

    2013-06-01

    In this study, the combined effects of high pressure and sodium hydrogen carbonate (NaHCO3) treatment on the physical and chemical properties, and palatability of pork ham, a tough and under-utilized meat, were investigated. Assessment of meat properties with heat treatment, after exposure to NaHCO3 and high pressure treatment, revealed an increase in water content, and decreased weight reduction and rupture stress. The free amino acid content of meat samples increased with NaHCO3 and high pressure treatment. The effect of high pressure processing was especially notable at a pressure of 300 MPa. Sensory evaluation showed that meat subjected to high pressure processing after NaHCO3 treatment was tender and juicy. In addition, the sample produced minimal residue in the mouth and was characterized by a good taste.

  17. Plasma armature formation in high-pressure, high-velocity hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, R.S.; Susoeff, A.R.; Asay, J.R.; Hall, C.A.; Konrad, C.H.; Hickman, R.J.; Sauve, J.L.

    1988-03-01

    The use of a two-stage light-gas gun (2SLGG) as a preaccelerator in combination with a railgun is expected to significantly reduce barrel ablation and improve overall performance. In particular, the use of a hydrogen 2SLGG provides injection velocities of 6 to 8 km/s and a pure hydrogen environment immediately behind the projectile as it enters a railgun. To continue acceleration of the projectile, a plasma armature must be formed. We explored two methods of converting a portion of the fast-moving hydrogen gas into a plasma armature capable of supporting currents exceeding 100 kA. We report on the results of these studies. This work is part of STARFIRE, the joint Sandia National Laboratories/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory project to develop a hypervelocity railgun. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Plasma armature formation in high-pressure high-velocity hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, R.S.; Susoeff, A.R.; Asay, J.R.; Hall, C.A.; Konrad, C.H.; Hickman, R.J.; Sauve, J.L.

    1988-09-20

    The use of a two-stage light-gas gun (2SLGG) as a preaccelerator in combination with a railgun is expected to significantly reduce barrel ablation and improve overall performance. In particular, the use of a hydrogen 2SLGG provides injection velocities of 6 to 8 km/s and a pure hydrogen environment immediately behind the projectile as it enters a railgun. To continue acceleration of the projectile, a plasma armature must be formed. We explored two methods of converting a portion of the fast-moving hydrogen gas into a plasma armature capable of supporting currents exceeding 100 kA. We report on the results of these studies. This work is part of STARFIRE, the joint Sandia National Laboratories/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory project to develop a hypervelocity railgun. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Plasma armature formation in high-pressure, high-velocity hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, R.S.; Susoeff, A.R. ); Asay, J.R.; Hall, C.A.; Konrad, C.H. ); Hickman, R.J. ); Sauve, J.L. )

    1989-01-01

    The use of a two-stage light-gas gun (2SLGG) as a preaccelerator in combination with a railgun is expected to significantly reduce barrel ablation and improve overall performance. In particular, the use of a hydrogen 2SLGG provides injection velocities of 6 to 8 km/s and a pure hydrogen environment immediately behind the projectile as it enters a railgun. To continue acceleration of the projectile, a plasma armature must be formed. The authors explored two methods of converting a portion of the fast-moving hydrogen gas into a plasma armature capable of supporting currents exceeding 100 {kappa}A. They report on the results of these studies. This work is part of STARFIRE, the joint Sandia National Laboratories/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory project to develop a hypervelocity railgun.

  20. Fundamentals of high pressure adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y.P.; Zhou, L.

    2009-12-15

    High-pressure adsorption attracts research interests following the world's attention to alternative fuels, and it exerts essential effect on the study of hydrogen/methane storage and the development of novel materials addressing to the storage. However, theoretical puzzles in high-pressure adsorption hindered the progress of application studies. Therefore, the present paper addresses the major theoretical problems that challenged researchers: i.e., how to model the isotherms with maximum observed in high-pressure adsorption; what is the adsorption mechanism at high pressures; how do we determine the quantity of absolute adsorption based on experimental data. Ideology and methods to tackle these problems are elucidated, which lead to new insights into the nature of high-pressure adsorption and progress in application studies, for example, in modeling multicomponent adsorption, hydrogen storage, natural gas storage, and coalbed methane enrichment, was achieved.

  1. Growth of arc in high-pressure, pulsed glow discharge by gas density depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imada, Go; Yatsui, Kiyoshi; Masuda, Wataru

    2000-10-01

    Effects of gas density depletion on arc formation of high-pressure, pulsed glow discharge have been investigated by eliminating the other factors which may affect the discharge stability, such as shock waves, residual ions, electrode heating, and discharge products. The gas density depletion has been simulated by utilizing a subsonic gas flow between the curved electrodes combined with a convergent nozzle and a divergent diffuser. A comparison has been made on the discharge in the aerodynamically created gas density depletion with the second discharge in the double-pulse discharge within a stable gas. We have found that the large gas density depletion, Δρ/ρ0˜-3.6% corresponding to a pulse repetition rate (PRR) of ˜50 Hz, tends to cause an arc-like filament or an arc without the shocks, ions, electrode heating, and products. However, the second discharge in the double-pulse discharge becomes an arc in much smaller gas density depletion (Δρ/ρ0˜-1.2% corresponding to PRR ˜3 Hz). Therefore, the collapse of high-pressure, pulsed glow discharge is most likely caused by some factor other than the gas density depletion.

  2. Spectroscopic Studies of the Vibrational and Electronic Properties of Hydrogen at High Pressure-Temperature Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, A F; Gregoryanz, E; Hemley, R J; Mao, H K

    2003-02-04

    The behavior of hydrogen at high densities has been widely explored in recent years both experimentally and theoretically, yielding a wealth of information on the material (e.g., Ref. 1). Detailed information has been obtained from static compression experiments generally limited to low-temperature studies (<300 K) and maximum pressures of {approx}300 GPa (e.g., Refs. [2,3]). However, there are now numerous questions regarding the behavior of hydrogen at high pressures and temperatures, results that have important implications for both fundamental physics and planetary science. We report here [2] Raman scattering and visible to near-infrared absorption spectra of solid hydrogen under static pressure up to 285 GPa at 85-140 K. We obtain pressure dependences of vibron and phonon modes in agreement with previously determined to lower pressures. The results indicate the stability of the ordered molecular phase III to the highest pressure reached and provide constraints on the insulator-to-metal transition pressure. Extrapolations of the vibron and phonon frequencies suggest transformation to a monoatomic state below 495 GPa. On the other hand, considerations of the absorption edge indicate the pressure of metallization at 325-385 GPa on the basis of tentative extrapolation of the direct band gap energy. Although complicated by affects of stressed-induced diamond absorption and possible differences between the behavior of the direct and indirect gap, there appears to be an emerging consistence between various experimental and theoretical results, with a predicted transition at 325-495 GPa. We also report high P-T Raman measurements of solid and fluid hydrogen to above 1100 K and to 155 GPa [4]. These conditions, which were previously inaccessible by static compression experiments, provide new insight into the behavior of the material under extreme conditions. The data give a direct measure of the melting curve (Fig. 1) that extends previous optical investigations by up

  3. Using high-pressure gas in the front end of a muon source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, K.; Johnson, R. P.; Roberts, T. J.; Neuffer, D.; Derbenev, Y.

    2006-05-01

    High-gradient, pressurized RF cavities are investigated as a means to improve the performance of low-frequency phase-rotation schemes for neutrino factories and muon colliders. We consider placing high-gradient, low-frequency, pressured RF cavities close to the pion production target to facilitate early phase rotation and capture of the pion-muon beam. We also consider the transverse cooling effects that the high-pressure gas has on the beam.

  4. Threaded connection qualification procedures utilized for an ultra-deep, high-pressure gas well

    SciTech Connect

    Minge, J.C.; Pejac, R.D.; Asbill, W.T.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the premium connection qualification program used to qualify three different connections for the production tubular strings used in an ultra-deep, high pressure gas well. A total of eight connection types were tested during the program. Four connections failed to meet the program's acceptance criteria. Full-scale test procedures and the data acquisition system used to collect, store, reduce, and plot strain gauge data while testing are discussed.

  5. TECHNICAL BASIS AND APPLICATION OF NEW RULES ON FRACTURE CONTROL OF HIGH PRESSURE HYDROGEN VESSEL IN ASME SECTION VIII, DIVISION 3 CODE

    SciTech Connect

    Rawls, G

    2007-04-30

    As a part of an ongoing activity to develop ASME Code rules for the hydrogen infrastructure, the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Committee approved new fracture control rules for Section VIII, Division 3 vessels in 2006. These rules have been incorporated into new Article KD-10 in Division 3. The new rules require determining fatigue crack growth rate and fracture resistance properties of materials in high pressure hydrogen gas. Test methods have been specified to measure these fracture properties, which are required to be used in establishing the vessel fatigue life. An example has been given to demonstrate the application of these new rules.

  6. Ultrahigh Gas Storage both at Low and High Pressures in KOH-Activated Carbonized Porous Aromatic Frameworks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanqiang; Ben, Teng; Zhang, Bingyao; Fu, Yao; Qiu, Shilun

    2013-01-01

    The carbonized PAF-1 derivatives formed by high-temperature KOH activation showed a unique bimodal microporous structure located at 0.6 nm and 1.2 nm and high surface area. These robust micropores were confirmed by nitrogen sorption experiment and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Carbon dioxide, methane and hydrogen sorption experiments indicated that these novel porous carbon materials have significant gas sorption abilities in both low-pressure and high-pressure environments. Moreover the methane storage ability of K-PAF-1-750 is among the best at 35 bars, and its low-pressure gas adsorption abilities are also comparable to the best porous materials in the world. Combined with excellent physicochemical stability, these materials are very promising for industrial applications such as carbon dioxide capture and high-density clean energy storage. PMID:23939301

  7. Gas Hydrate Stability at Low Temperatures and High Pressures with Applications to Mars and Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marion, G. M.; Kargel, J. S.; Catling, D. C.

    2004-01-01

    Gas hydrates are implicated in the geochemical evolution of both Mars and Europa [1- 3]. Most models developed for gas hydrate chemistry are based on the statistical thermodynamic model of van der Waals and Platteeuw [4] with subsequent modifications [5-8]. None of these models are, however, state-of-the-art with respect to gas hydrate/electrolyte interactions, which is particularly important for planetary applications where solution chemistry may be very different from terrestrial seawater. The objectives of this work were to add gas (carbon dioxide and methane) hydrate chemistries into an electrolyte model parameterized for low temperatures and high pressures (the FREZCHEM model) and use the model to examine controls on gas hydrate chemistries for Mars and Europa.

  8. AXEL: High pressure xenon gas Time Projection Chamber for neutrinoless double beta decay search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Sheng

    2016-05-01

    AXEL is a high pressure xenon gas TPC detector being developed for neutrinoless double-beta decay search. We use proportional scintillation mode with a new electroluminescence light detection scheme to achieve very high energy resolution with a large detector. The detector has a capability of tracking which can be used reduce background. The project is in a R&D phase, and we report current status of our prototype chamber with 10 L and 8 bar Xe gas. We also present the results of the photon detection efficiency measurement and the linearity test of silicon photomultiplier(SiPM).

  9. Stability analysis and testing of a train of centrifugal compressors for high pressure gas injection

    SciTech Connect

    Memmott, E.A.

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes the rotor dynamic stability analysis and the PTC-10 Class 1 test of a three body centrifugal compressor train for high pressure natural gas injection services. This train had a full load full pressure string test on hydrocarbon gases to a final discharge pressure of 500 BAR (7250 PSIA). Each compressor is of the back to back configuration, and is equipped with tilting pad seals, damper bearings, and a honeycomb labyrinth at the division wall with shunt holes. The driver is a gas turbine.

  10. High-pressure photodissociation of water as a tool for hydrogen synthesis and fundamental chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Ceppatelli, Matteo; Bini, Roberto; Schettino, Vincenzo

    2009-01-01

    High-pressure methods have been demonstrated to be efficient in providing new routes for the synthesis of materials of technological interest. In several molecular compounds, the drastic pressure conditions required for spontaneous transformations have been lowered to the kilobar range by photoactivation of the reactions. At these pressures, the syntheses are accessible to large-volume applications and are of interest to bioscience, space, and environmental chemistry. Here, we show that the short-lived hydroxyl radicals, produced in the photodissociation of water molecules by near-UV radiation at room temperature and pressures of a few tenths of a gigapascal (GPa), can be successfully used to trigger chemical reactions in mixtures of water with carbon monoxide or nitrogen. The detection of molecular hydrogen among the reaction products is of particular relevance. Besides the implications in fundamental chemistry, the mild pressure and irradiation conditions, the efficiency of the process, and the nature of the reactant and product molecules suggest applications in synthesis. PMID:19581572

  11. The phase diagram of solid hydrogen at high pressure: A challenge for first principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azadi, Sam; Foulkes, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    We present comprehensive results for the high-pressure phase diagram of solid hydrogen. We focus on the energetically most favorable molecular and atomic crystal structures. To obtain the ground-state static enthalpy and phase diagram, we use semi-local and hybrid density functional theory (DFT) as well as diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) methods. The closure of the band gap with increasing pressure is investigated utilizing quasi-particle many-body calculations within the GW approximation. The dynamical phase diagram is calculated by adding proton zero-point energies (ZPE) to static enthalpies. Density functional perturbation theory is employed to calculate the proton ZPE and the infra-red and Raman spectra. Our results clearly demonstrate the failure of DFT-based methods to provide an accurate static phase diagram, especially when comparing insulating and metallic phases. Our dynamical phase diagram obtained using fully many-body DMC calculations shows that the molecular-to-atomic phase transition happens at the experimentally accessible pressure of 374 GPa. We claim that going beyond mean-field schemes to obtain derivatives of the total energy and optimize crystal structures at the many-body level is crucial. This work was supported by the UK engineering and physics science research council under Grant EP/I030190/1, and made use of computing facilities provided by HECTOR, and by the Imperial College London high performance computing centre.

  12. High-Pressure Hydrogen Sulfide from First Principles: A Strongly Anharmonic Phonon-Mediated Superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errea, Ion; Calandra, Matteo; Pickard, Chris J.; Nelson, Joseph; Needs, Richard J.; Li, Yinwei; Liu, Hanyu; Zhang, Yunwei; Ma, Yanming; Mauri, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    We use first-principles calculations to study structural, vibrational, and superconducting properties of H2S at pressures P ≥200 GPa . The inclusion of zero-point energy leads to two different possible dissociations of H2S , namely 3 H2S →2 H3S +S and 5 H2S →3 H3S +HS2 , where both H3S and HS2 are metallic. For H3S , we perform nonperturbative calculations of anharmonic effects within the self-consistent harmonic approximation and show that the harmonic approximation strongly overestimates the electron-phonon interaction (λ ≈2.64 at 200 GPa) and Tc. Anharmonicity hardens H-S bond-stretching modes and softens H-S bond-bending modes. As a result, the electron-phonon coupling is suppressed by 30% (λ ≈1.84 at 200 GPa). Moreover, while at the harmonic level Tc decreases with increasing pressure, the inclusion of anharmonicity leads to a Tc that is almost independent of pressure. High-pressure hydrogen sulfide is a strongly anharmonic superconductor.

  13. High-pressure hydrogen sulfide from first principles: a strongly anharmonic phonon-mediated superconductor.

    PubMed

    Errea, Ion; Calandra, Matteo; Pickard, Chris J; Nelson, Joseph; Needs, Richard J; Li, Yinwei; Liu, Hanyu; Zhang, Yunwei; Ma, Yanming; Mauri, Francesco

    2015-04-17

    We use first-principles calculations to study structural, vibrational, and superconducting properties of H_{2}S at pressures P≥200  GPa. The inclusion of zero-point energy leads to two different possible dissociations of H2S, namely 3H2S→2H3S+S and 5H2S→3H3S+HS2, where both H3S and HS2 are metallic. For H3S, we perform nonperturbative calculations of anharmonic effects within the self-consistent harmonic approximation and show that the harmonic approximation strongly overestimates the electron-phonon interaction (λ≈2.64 at 200 GPa) and Tc. Anharmonicity hardens H─S bond-stretching modes and softens H─S bond-bending modes. As a result, the electron-phonon coupling is suppressed by 30% (λ≈1.84 at 200 GPa). Moreover, while at the harmonic level Tc decreases with increasing pressure, the inclusion of anharmonicity leads to a Tc that is almost independent of pressure. High-pressure hydrogen sulfide is a strongly anharmonic superconductor. PMID:25933334

  14. Cyclic-load crack growth in ASME SA-105 grade II steel in high-pressure hydrogen at ambient temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, R. J.; Chandler, W. T.

    1976-01-01

    ASME SA-105 Grade II steel, which is used in high-pressure hydrogen compressor systems, is similar to steels used or considered for use in high-pressure hydrogen storage vessels and pipelines. This paper summarizes the results of a program conducted to provide cyclic-load crack growth rate (da/dN) data for a fracture mechanics analysis of a 15,000 psi hydrogen compressor facility which contains pulse quieter and after-cooler separator vessels constructed of the ASME SA-105 Grade II steel. Included in the program were tests performed to assist in establishing operating procedures that could minimize the effect of hydrogen on crack growth rates during operation.

  15. Effects of unsteady flow and real gas equations of state on high pressure ram accelerator operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundy, Christopher Michael

    2001-07-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of the conditions which enable thermally choked ram acceleration at fill pressures greater than 5 MPa is presented. A set of experimental parameters was determined which enabled projectiles to be accelerated continuously in propellants at 20 MPa for distances up to 4 m. The operating conditions which permit thermally choked operation at 20 MPa are considerably different from those at 5 MPa and below; the effects of initial velocity, propellant composition, projectile design, and obturator design on high pressure operation were investigated. During thermally choked operation at high pressure, the velocity-distance profile is overpredicted by a quasi-steady control volume approach for thrust determination. A revision to the control volume model accounting for unsteady flow effects was developed and presented here. The unsteady model indicates that the thrust coefficient-Mach number profile obtained for high pressure conditions is consistently lower than that obtained with the quasi-steady model, due to unsteady momentum transfer to the gas in the control volume surrounding the projectile, an effect considered negligible at 5 MPa and below. This analytical deviation correlates with high pressure experimental results. When the unsteady model incorporates the heat release behavior predicted for a real gas equation of state, good agreement is obtained with experimental velocity-distance data. A model for predicting sonic diffuser unstart under unsteady flow conditions is also presented; the model predictions agree well with experimental results. Both models indicate that the mass of fluid in a control volume, when on the order of the mass of the surrounding system, has a significant effect on the body forces acting on the system under unsteady flow conditions. The unsteady models quantify this effect by showing that thrust in an unsteady flow propulsion system is not directly proportional to pressure, and that supersonic

  16. Hydrogen rich gas generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, J.; Rupe, J. H.; Kushida, R. O. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A process and apparatus is described for producing a hydrogen rich gas by injecting air and hydrocarbon fuel at one end of a cylindrically shaped chamber to form a mixture and igniting the mixture to provide hot combustion gases by partial oxidation of the hydrocarbon fuel. The combustion gases move away from the ignition region to another region where water is injected to be turned into steam by the hot combustion gases. The steam which is formed mixes with the hot gases to yield a uniform hot gas whereby a steam reforming reaction with the hydrocarbon fuel takes place to produce a hydrogen rich gas.

  17. Structures and Gas Storage Performance of Metal-organic Framework Materials at High Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yang; Hu, Yue; Huang, Yining

    2013-06-01

    Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs), are crystalline nanoporous materials comprised of small metal clusters connected three-dimensionally by polyfunctional organic ligands. MOFs have been widely studied due to their high porosity, surface area and thermal stability, which make them promising candidates for gas capture and storage. In the MOF family, Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks (ZIFs) have attracted much attention because of their promising applications for CO2 storage. In contrast to the extensive studies under ambient conditions, most ZIFs have only been studied under pressure in a very limited range. It is known that pressure can provide an effective driving force to achieve structural modification which includes changes in pore size, opening and geometry, channel shape and internal surface area. Subsequently, these pressure-induced changes will affect the sorption selectivity, capacity and access to the binding sites of the porous materials. Here, we report the first in situ high-pressure investigation of several ZIFs by FTIR spectroscopy. We observed rich pressure-induced transformations upon compression in different pressure ranges. Furthermore, the reversibilities of these transformations upon decompression were also examined. Finally, the performance of CO2 storage of selected ZIFs at high pressures will be addressed. Our observation and analyses contribute to the understanding of chemical and mechanical properties of ZIFs under high-pressure conditions and provide new insight into their storage applications.

  18. High pressure hydriding of sponge-Zr in steam-hydrogen mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soo Kim, Yeon; Wang, Wei-E.; Olander, D. R.; Yagnik, S. K.

    1997-07-01

    Hydriding kinetics of thin sponge-Zr layers metallurgically bonded to a Zircaloy disk has been studied by thermogravimetry in the temperature range 350-400°C in 7 MPa hydrogen-steam mixtures. Some specimens were prefilmed with a thin oxide layer prior to exposure to the reactant gas; all were coated with a thin layer of gold to avoid premature reaction at edges. Two types of hydriding were observed in prefilmed specimens, viz., a slow hydrogen absorption process that precedes an accelerated (massive) hydriding. At 7 MPa total pressure, the critical ratio of H 2/H 2O above which massive hydriding occurs at 400°C is ˜ 200. The critical H 2/H 20 ratio is shifted to ˜2.5 × 103 at 350°C. The slow hydriding process occurs only when conditions for hydriding and oxidation are approximately equally favorable. Based on maximum weight gain, the specimen is completely converted to δ-ZrH 2 by massive hydriding in ˜5 h at a hydriding rate of ˜10 -6 mol H/cm 2 s. Incubation times of 10-20 h prior to the onset of massive hydriding increases with prefilm oxide thickness in the range of 0-10 μm. By changing to a steam-enriched gas, massive hydriding that initially started in a steam-starved condition was arrested by re-formation of a protective oxide scale.

  19. Generalization of low pressure, gas-liquid, metastable sound speed to high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bursik, J. W.; Hall, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    A theory is developed for isentropic metastable sound propagation in high pressure gas-liquid mixtures. Without simplification, it also correctly predicts the minimum speed for low pressure air-water measurements where other authors are forced to postulate isothermal propagation. This is accomplished by a mixture heat capacity ratio which automatically adjusts from its single phase values to approximately the isothermal value of unity needed for the minimum speed. Computations are made for the pure components parahydrogen and nitrogen, with emphasis on the latter. With simplifying assumptions, the theory reduces to a well known approximate formula limited to low pressure.

  20. High temperature and high pressure gas cell for quantitative spectroscopic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Caspar; Stolberg-Rohr, Thomine; Fateev, Alexander; Clausen, Sønnik

    2016-01-01

    A high temperature and high pressure gas cell (HTPGC) has been manufactured for quantitative spectroscopic measurements in the pressure range 1-200 bar and temperature range 300-1300 K. In the present work the cell was employed at up to 100 bar and 1000 K, and measured absorption coefficients of a CO2-N2 mixture at 100 bar and 1000 K are revealed for the first time, exceeding the high temperature and pressure combinations previously reported. This paper discusses the design considerations involved in the construction of the cell and presents validation measurements compared against simulated spectra, as well as published experimental data.

  1. Innovative high pressure gas MEM's based neutron detector for ICF and active SNM detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Shawn Bryan; Derzon, Mark Steven; Renzi, Ronald F.; Chandler, Gordon Andrew

    2007-12-01

    An innovative helium3 high pressure gas detection system, made possible by utilizing Sandia's expertise in Micro-electrical Mechanical fluidic systems, is proposed which appears to have many beneficial performance characteristics with regards to making these neutron measurements in the high bremsstrahlung and electrical noise environments found in High Energy Density Physics experiments and especially on the very high noise environment generated on the fast pulsed power experiments performed here at Sandia. This same system may dramatically improve active WMD and contraband detection as well when employed with ultrafast (10-50 ns) pulsed neutron sources.

  2. NETL- High-Pressure Combustion Research Facility

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-06-26

    NETL's High-Pressure Combustion Facility is a unique resource within the National Laboratories system. It provides the test capabilities needed to evaluate new combustion concepts for high-pressure, high-temperature hydrogen and natural gas turbines. These concepts will be critical for the next generation of ultra clean, ultra efficient power systems.

  3. NETL- High-Pressure Combustion Research Facility

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-08

    NETL's High-Pressure Combustion Facility is a unique resource within the National Laboratories system. It provides the test capabilities needed to evaluate new combustion concepts for high-pressure, high-temperature hydrogen and natural gas turbines. These concepts will be critical for the next generation of ultra clean, ultra efficient power systems.

  4. Influence of high pressure hydrogen environment on creep deformation of Mo-Re, Haynes 188, and NARloy-Z alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastry, S. M. L.; Yang, Charles C.; Ouyang, Shewang; Jerina, K. L.; Schwartz, D. S.

    1994-01-01

    The present study focuses on the investigation of the influence of hydrogen on the mechanical properties of three types of alloys at elevated temperatures. The reasons for the consideration of hydrogen effects are the potential use of hydrogen as a coolant in gas-cooled reactors and fuel in advanced hypersonic vehicles. The materials used in hydrogen atmosphere must not be embrittled by hydrogen at ambient temperature and should have good strength in hydrogen atmosphere at elevated temperature. The paucity of information concerning the mechanical performance in hydrogen atmosphere at elevated temperature has been a limiting factor in the selection and design of structural components for operation in hydrogen environment.

  5. Two-stage coal liquefaction without gas-phase hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Stephens, H.P.

    1986-06-05

    A process is provided for the production of a hydrogen-donor solvent useful in the liquefaction of coal, wherein the water-gas shift reaction is used to produce hydrogen while simultaneously hydrogenating a donor solvent. A process for the liquefaction of coal using said solvent is also provided. The process enables avoiding the use of a separate water-gas shift reactor as well as high pressure equipment for liquefaction. 3 tabs.

  6. Safety analysis of high pressure gasous fuel container punctures

    SciTech Connect

    Swain, M.R.

    1995-09-01

    The following report is divided into two sections. The first section describes the results of ignitability tests of high pressure hydrogen and natural gas leaks. The volume of ignitable gases formed by leaking hydrogen or natural gas were measured. Leaking high pressure hydrogen produced a cone of ignitable gases with 28{degrees} included angle. Leaking high pressure methane produced a cone of ignitable gases with 20{degrees} included angle. Ignition of hydrogen produced larger overpressures than did natural gas. The largest overpressures produced by hydrogen were the same as overpressures produced by inflating a 11 inch child`s balloon until it burst.

  7. Structural changes of filled ice Ic hydrogen hydrate under low temperatures and high pressures from 5 to 50 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Hisako; Kagawa, Shingo; Tanaka, Takehiko; Matsuoka, Takahiro; Yagi, Takehiko; Ohishi, Yasuo; Nakano, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Yoshitaka; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2012-08-01

    Low-temperature and high-pressure experiments were performed on the filled ice Ic structure of hydrogen hydrate at previously unexplored conditions of 5-50 GPa and 30-300 K using diamond anvil cells and a helium-refrigeration cryostat. In situ x-ray diffractometry revealed that the cubic filled ice Ic structure transformed to tetragonal at low temperatures and high pressures; the axis ratio of the tetragonal phase changed depending on the pressure and temperature. These results were consistent with theoretical predictions performed via first principle calculations. The tetragonal phase was determined to be stable above 20 GPa at 300 K, above 15 GPa at 200 K, and above 10 GPa at 100 K. Further changes in the lattice parameters were observed from about 45-50 GPa throughout the temperature region examined, which suggests the transformation to another high-pressure phase above 50 GPa. In our previous x-ray study that was performed up to 80 GPa at room temperature, a similar transformation was observed above 50 GPa. In this study, the observed change in the lattice parameters corresponds to the beginning of that transformation. The reasons for the transformation to the tetragonal structure are briefly discussed: the tetragonal structure might be induced due to changes in the vibrational or rotational modes of the hydrogen molecules under low temperature and high pressure.

  8. Structural changes of filled ice Ic hydrogen hydrate under low temperatures and high pressures from 5 to 50 GPa.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Hisako; Kagawa, Shingo; Tanaka, Takehiko; Matsuoka, Takahiro; Yagi, Takehiko; Ohishi, Yasuo; Nakano, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Yoshitaka; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2012-08-21

    Low-temperature and high-pressure experiments were performed on the filled ice Ic structure of hydrogen hydrate at previously unexplored conditions of 5-50 GPa and 30-300 K using diamond anvil cells and a helium-refrigeration cryostat. In situ x-ray diffractometry revealed that the cubic filled ice Ic structure transformed to tetragonal at low temperatures and high pressures; the axis ratio of the tetragonal phase changed depending on the pressure and temperature. These results were consistent with theoretical predictions performed via first principle calculations. The tetragonal phase was determined to be stable above 20 GPa at 300 K, above 15 GPa at 200 K, and above 10 GPa at 100 K. Further changes in the lattice parameters were observed from about 45-50 GPa throughout the temperature region examined, which suggests the transformation to another high-pressure phase above 50 GPa. In our previous x-ray study that was performed up to 80 GPa at room temperature, a similar transformation was observed above 50 GPa. In this study, the observed change in the lattice parameters corresponds to the beginning of that transformation. The reasons for the transformation to the tetragonal structure are briefly discussed: the tetragonal structure might be induced due to changes in the vibrational or rotational modes of the hydrogen molecules under low temperature and high pressure. PMID:22920129

  9. High pressure laser plasma studies. [energy pathways in He-Ar gas mixtures at low pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, W. E.

    1980-01-01

    The operation of a nuclear pumped laser, operating at a wavelength of 1.79 micron m on the 3d(1/2-4p(3/2) transition in argon with helium-3 as the majority gas is discussed. The energy pathways in He-Ar gas were investigated by observing the effects of varying partial pressures on the emissions of levels lying above the 4p level in argon during a pulsed afterglow. An attempt is made to determine the population mechanisms of the 3d level in pure argon by observing emission from the same transition in a high pressure plasma excited by a high energy electron beam. Both collisional radiative and dissociative recombination are discussed.

  10. Control method for high-pressure hydrogen vehicle fueling station dispensers

    DOEpatents

    Kountz, Kenneth John; Kriha, Kenneth Robert; Liss, William E.

    2006-06-13

    A method for quick filling a vehicle hydrogen storage vessel with hydrogen, the key component of which is an algorithm used to control the fill process, which interacts with the hydrogen dispensing apparatus to determine the vehicle hydrogen storage vessel capacity.

  11. An improved measurement of electron-ion recombination in high-pressure xenon gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, L.; Sorel, M.; Álvarez, V.; Borges, F. I. G.; Camargo, M.; Cárcel, S.; Cebrián, S.; Cervera, A.; Conde, C. A. N.; Dafni, T.; Díaz, J.; Esteve, R.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Ferrario, P.; Ferreira, A. L.; Freitas, E. D. C.; Gehman, V. M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; González-Díaz, D.; Gutiérrez, R. M.; Hauptman, J.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; Herrera, D. C.; Irastorza, I. G.; Labarga, L.; Laing, A.; Liubarsky, I.; Lopez-March, N.; Lorca, D.; Losada, M.; Luzón, G.; Marí, A.; Martín-Albo, J.; Martínez-Lema, G.; Martínez, A.; Miller, T.; Monrabal, F.; Monserrate, M.; Monteiro, C. M. B.; Mora, F. J.; Moutinho, L. M.; Muñoz Vidal, J.; Nebot-Guinot, M.; Nygren, D.; Oliveira, C. A. B.; Pérez, J.; Pérez Aparicio, J. L.; Querol, M.; Renner, J.; Ripoll, L.; Rodríguez, A.; Rodríguez, J.; Santos, F. P.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Shuman, D.; Simón, A.; Sofka, C.; Toledo, J. F.; Torrent, J.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Villar, J. A.; Webb, R.; White, J. T.; Yahlali, N.

    2015-03-01

    We report on results obtained with the NEXT-DEMO prototype of the NEXT-100 high-pressure xenon gas time projection chamber (TPC), filled with pure xenon gas at 10 bar pressure and exposed to an alpha decay calibration source. Compared to our previous measurements with alpha particles, an upgraded detector and improved analysis techniques have been used. We measure event-by-event correlated fluctuations between ionization and scintillation due to electron-ion recombination in the gas, with correlation coefficients between -0.80 and -0.56 depending on the drift field conditions. By combining the two signals, we obtain a 2.8% FWHM energy resolution for 5.49 MeV alpha particles and a measurement of the optical gain of the electroluminescent TPC. The improved energy resolution also allows us to measure the specific activity of the radon in the gas due to natural impurities. Finally, we measure the average ratio of excited to ionized atoms produced in the xenon gas by alpha particles to be 0.561± 0.045, translating into an average energy to produce a primary scintillation photon of Wex=(39.2± 3.2) eV.

  12. High pressure synthesis gas fermentation, January 15, 1991--April 14,1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    The components of synthesis gas can be converted into ethanol by the bacterium Clostridium ljunfdahlii, Strain PETC. This microorganism achieves complete conversion of synthesis gas and gives stoichiometric yields of ethanol with high energy efficiency. The reaction rate and bioreactor size are the controlling factors in the commercialization of this process.Synthesis gas fermentations are mass transfer limited due to the very low gas solubilities. It has been demonstrated that reaction rate is proportional to pressure at least up to 10 atm, the limit of existing experimental equipment. The equivalent retention time at 10 atm can be reduced to three minutes. It is felt that retention times of a few seconds are possible and can be demonstrated at higher pressures. With such short equivalent reaction times, the reactor volume for large scale alcohol production becomes nominal and commercial application is assured. The objective of this project is to construct and test a high pressure fermentation system for the production of ethanol from synthesis gas. This system will be fabricated and assembled and the unit used to define the effects of elevated pressure on the growth and performance of C. ljungdahlii. The limits of cell concentration and mass transport relationships will be found in immobilized cell and stirred tank reactors. Minimum retention times and reactor volumes will be found for ethanol production in these reactors.

  13. High pressure synthesis gas fermentation, January 15, 1991--April 14,1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The components of synthesis gas can be converted into ethanol by the bacterium Clostridium ljunfdahlii, Strain PETC. This microorganism achieves complete conversion of synthesis gas and gives stoichiometric yields of ethanol with high energy efficiency. The reaction rate and bioreactor size are the controlling factors in the commercialization of this process.Synthesis gas fermentations are mass transfer limited due to the very low gas solubilities. It has been demonstrated that reaction rate is proportional to pressure at least up to 10 atm, the limit of existing experimental equipment. The equivalent retention time at 10 atm can be reduced to three minutes. It is felt that retention times of a few seconds are possible and can be demonstrated at higher pressures. With such short equivalent reaction times, the reactor volume for large scale alcohol production becomes nominal and commercial application is assured. The objective of this project is to construct and test a high pressure fermentation system for the production of ethanol from synthesis gas. This system will be fabricated and assembled and the unit used to define the effects of elevated pressure on the growth and performance of C. ljungdahlii. The limits of cell concentration and mass transport relationships will be found in immobilized cell and stirred tank reactors. Minimum retention times and reactor volumes will be found for ethanol production in these reactors.

  14. Dark matter directionality revisited with a high pressure xenon gas detector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mohlabeng, Gopolang; Kong, Kyoungchul; Li, Jin; Para, Adam; Yoo, Jonghee

    2015-07-20

    An observation of the anisotropy of dark matter interactions in a direction-sensitive detector would provide decisive evidence for the discovery of galactic dark matter. Directional information would also provide a crucial input to understanding its distribution in the local Universe. Most of the existing directional dark matter detectors utilize particle tracking methods in a low-pressure gas time projection chamber. These low pressure detectors require excessively large volumes in order to be competitive in the search for physics beyond the current limit. In order to avoid these volume limitations, we consider a novel proposal, which exploits a columnar recombination effect inmore » a high-pressure gas time projection chamber. The ratio of scintillation to ionization signals observed in the detector carries the angular information of the particle interactions. In this paper, we investigate the sensitivity of a future directional detector focused on the proposed high-pressure Xenon gas time projection chamber. We study the prospect of detecting an anisotropy in the dark matter velocity distribution. We find that tens of events are needed to exclude an isotropic distribution of dark matter interactions at 95% confidence level in the most optimistic case with head-to-tail information. However, one needs at least 10-20 times more events without head-to-tail information for light dark matter below ~50 GeV. For an intermediate mass range, we find it challenging to observe an anisotropy of the dark matter distribution. Our results also show that the directional information significantly improves precision measurements of dark matter mass and the elastic scattering cross section for a heavy dark matter.« less

  15. Dark matter directionality revisited with a high pressure xenon gas detector

    SciTech Connect

    Mohlabeng, Gopolang; Kong, Kyoungchul; Li, Jin; Para, Adam; Yoo, Jonghee

    2015-07-20

    An observation of the anisotropy of dark matter interactions in a direction-sensitive detector would provide decisive evidence for the discovery of galactic dark matter. Directional information would also provide a crucial input to understanding its distribution in the local Universe. Most of the existing directional dark matter detectors utilize particle tracking methods in a low-pressure gas time projection chamber. These low pressure detectors require excessively large volumes in order to be competitive in the search for physics beyond the current limit. In order to avoid these volume limitations, we consider a novel proposal, which exploits a columnar recombination effect in a high-pressure gas time projection chamber. The ratio of scintillation to ionization signals observed in the detector carries the angular information of the particle interactions. In this paper, we investigate the sensitivity of a future directional detector focused on the proposed high-pressure Xenon gas time projection chamber. We study the prospect of detecting an anisotropy in the dark matter velocity distribution. We find that tens of events are needed to exclude an isotropic distribution of dark matter interactions at 95% confidence level in the most optimistic case with head-to-tail information. However, one needs at least 10-20 times more events without head-to-tail information for light dark matter below ~50 GeV. For an intermediate mass range, we find it challenging to observe an anisotropy of the dark matter distribution. Our results also show that the directional information significantly improves precision measurements of dark matter mass and the elastic scattering cross section for a heavy dark matter.

  16. Polymeric hydrogen diffusion barrier, high-pressure storage tank so equipped, method of fabricating a storage tank and method of preventing hydrogen diffusion

    DOEpatents

    Lessing, Paul A.

    2008-07-22

    An electrochemically active hydrogen diffusion barrier which comprises an anode layer, a cathode layer, and an intermediate electrolyte layer, which is conductive to protons and substantially impermeable to hydrogen. A catalytic metal present in or adjacent to the anode layer catalyzes an electrochemical reaction that converts any hydrogen that diffuses through the electrolyte layer to protons and electrons. The protons and electrons are transported to the cathode layer and reacted to form hydrogen. The hydrogen diffusion barrier is applied to a polymeric substrate used in a storage tank to store hydrogen under high pressure. A storage tank equipped with the electrochemically active hydrogen diffusion barrier, a method of fabricating the storage tank, and a method of preventing hydrogen from diffusing out of a storage tank are also disclosed.

  17. Polymeric hydrogen diffusion barrier, high-pressure storage tank so equipped, method of fabricating a storage tank and method of preventing hydrogen diffusion

    DOEpatents

    Lessing, Paul A.

    2004-09-07

    An electrochemically active hydrogen diffusion barrier which comprises an anode layer, a cathode layer, and an intermediate electrolyte layer, which is conductive to protons and substantially impermeable to hydrogen. A catalytic metal present in or adjacent to the anode layer catalyzes an electrochemical reaction that converts any hydrogen that diffuses through the electrolyte layer to protons and electrons. The protons and electrons are transported to the cathode layer and reacted to form hydrogen. The hydrogen diffusion barrier is applied to a polymeric substrate used in a storage tank to store hydrogen under high pressure. A storage tank equipped with the electrochemically active hydrogen diffusion barrier, a method of fabricating the storage tank, and a method of preventing hydrogen from diffusing out of a storage tank are also disclosed.

  18. Optical Fuel Injector Patternation Measurements in Advanced Liquid-Fueled, High Pressure, Gas Turbine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locke, R. J.; Hicks, Y. R.; Anderson, R. C.; Zaller, M. M.

    1998-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging and planar Mie scattering are used to examine the fuel distribution pattern (patternation) for advanced fuel injector concepts in kerosene burning, high pressure gas turbine combustors. Three fuel injector concepts for aerospace applications were investigated under a broad range of operating conditions. Fuel PLIF patternation results are contrasted with those obtained by planar Mie scattering. For one injector, further comparison is also made with data obtained through phase Doppler measurements. Differences in spray patterns for diverse conditions and fuel injector configurations are readily discernible. An examination of the data has shown that a direct determination of the fuel spray angle at realistic conditions is also possible. The results obtained in this study demonstrate the applicability and usefulness of these nonintrusive optical techniques for investigating fuel spray patternation under actual combustor conditions.

  19. Innovations in high-pressure liquid injection technique for gas chromatography: pressurized liquid injection system.

    PubMed

    Luong, Jim; Gras, Ronda; Tymko, Richard

    2003-01-01

    In gas chromatography (GC), highly volatile liquefied hydrocarbons are commonly injected using devices such as high-pressure syringes, piston valves, liquid rotary sampling valves, or vaporizing regulators. Although these techniques are adequate in some cases, there are known deficiencies. A new generation of sampling valve has been recently innovated and commercialized. Some of the highlights of the pressurized liquid injection system (PLIS) include compact size, the capability to directly couple to an injection port without the need for preinjection vaporization and transfer lines, and sample sizes ranging from 0.2 to 2.0 micro L. Although the valve has a specification of helium leak-free rating of 82.7 bar (1200 psig), the valve passes a hydrostatic pressure test of up to 414 bar (6000 psig). In the unheated version of PLIS, vaporization of solutes occur mainly because of the sheering effect of carrier gas in combination with thermal energy drawn from an injection port or a heated adaptor. This was found to be adequate for solutes with high to medium volatility of up to nC14 hydrocarbon. A higher molecular weight range of up to nC44 hydrocarbon can be achieved with the implementation of a heated version of PLIS, in which the channel of the shaft can be resistively heated at a rate of up to 400 degrees C/s. With its first introduction in May 2002, PLIS has gained acceptance amongst practitioners in GC because it addresses a key unarticulated need in sample introduction/enrichment and by specifically targeting many deficiencies encountered in contemporary high-pressure injection devices. In this paper, the design and performance of the various valve systems of PLIS, as well as industrial chromatographic applications, is presented. PMID:14629794

  20. High Pressure Gas Permeation and Liquid Diffusion Studies of Coflon and Tefzel Thermoplastics. Revision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, G. J.; Campion, R. P.

    1997-01-01

    The life of fluid-carrying flexible or umbilical pipes during service at elevated temperatures and pressures depends inter alia on their resistance to attack by the fluids present and the rate at which these fluids are absorbed by the pipe lining materials. The consequences of fluid ingress into the thermoplastic lining could mean a) a reduction in its mechanical strength, to increase chances of crack formation and growth and thus a loss of integrity, b) the occurrence of permeation right through the lining material, with pressure build- up in the outer pipe wall construction (of flexible pipes) or chemical attack (from a hostile permeant) on outer layers of reinforcements. Therefore it is important within this project to have relevant permeation data for Coflon and Tefzel thermoplastics: the former is plasticised, the latter is not. A previous report (CAPP/M.2) described experimental equipment and techniques used by MERL when measuring high pressure (up to 5000 psi) gas permeation and liquid diffusion through thermoplastic samples cut from extruded bar or pipe, and provided the basic theory involved. Norsk Hydro are also performing gas permeation tests on pipe sections, at up to 100 bars (1450 psi) pressure or so, and reporting separately. Some comparisons between data from Norsk Hydro and MERL have been made herein. The tests should be considered as complementary, as the Norsk Hydro test has the obvious benefit of using complete pipe sections, whilst MERL can test at much higher pressures, up to 1000 bar if necessary. The sophisticated analytical measuring equipment of Norsk Hydro can distinguish the individual components of mixed gases and hence the various permeation-linked coefficients whereas MERL, in using pressure increase at constant volume to determine permeation rate, is limited to obtaining single gas data, or apparent (or representative) coefficients for a mixed gas as a whole. Except for the initial fluid diffusion data for Tefzel described in CAPP

  1. High-pressure gas quenching in cold chambers for increased cooling capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Segerberg, S.; Troell, E.

    1996-12-31

    Gas quenching for the hardening of steel parts is a lower-pollution alternative to quenching in quenchants such as oil or salt. As the surfaces of the cooled parts remain clean after gas quenching, there is no need to wash them after heat treatment, which reduces the consumption of oils and detergents. The fire risk and ventilation requirements of oil quenching are eliminated. In addition, some trials have shown that gas quenching has a positive effect on distortion, representing a saving in finishing work and thus a reduction in costs. Today, gas quenching is used almost solely in vacuum furnaces. Quenching is normally performed in the same chamber as heating, which means that besides quenching the batch, the quenching system must also remove heat from the heating elements and insulation of the furnace. Previous trials performed by IVF have shown that gas quenching with helium of ball bearing and carburizing steels (and other steels) in sizes up to 25 mm at pressures up to 20 bar in a vacuum furnace can achieve quenching rates and hardnesses similar to those achieved by hot quenching oils. This quenching performance is not, however, capable of dealing with larger sizes or lower-alloy steels. At IVF`s request, ALD Vacuum Technologies GmbH has developed a cold high-pressure gas quenching chamber that is independent of the furnace. As a result, there is no need to cool insulation or heating elements. Quenching can be carried out in the chamber at pressures of up to 40 bar for helium or up to 10 bar for nitrogen. The quenching chamber has been supplied to IVF, and has been used for experimental quenching of steel test pieces and components. Temperatures have been recorded by using some Inconel 600 test probes, {phi} 12,5 x 60 mm, with thermocouples in their centers.

  2. Hydrogen-oxygen catalytic ignition and thruster investigation. Volume 2: High pressure thruster evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. J.; Heckert, B.; Burge, H. L.

    1972-01-01

    A high pressure thruster effort was conducted with the major objective of demonstrating a duct cooling concept with gaseous propellant in a thruster operating at nominally 300 psia and 1500 lbf. The analytical design methods for the duct cooling were proven in a series of tests with both ambient and reduced temperature propellants. Long duration tests as well as pulse mode tests demonstrated the feasibility of the concept. All tests were conducted with a scaling of the raised post triplet injector design previously demonstrated at 900 lbf in demonstration firings. A series of environmental conditioned firings were also conducted to determine the effects of thermal soaks, atmospheric air and high humidity. This volume presents the results of the high pressure thruster evaluations.

  3. Assessment of choke valve erosion in a high-pressure, high-temperature gas condensate well using TLA

    SciTech Connect

    Birchenough, P.M.; Cornally, D.; Dawson, S.G.B.; McCarthy, P.; Susden, S.

    1994-12-31

    Many planned new developments in the North Sea will involve the exploitation of hostile high pressure, high temperature gas condensate reserves. The extremely high pressure letdown over the wellhead choke leads to very high flow velocities, and consequent risks of erosion damage occurring to the choke internals. In a recent study, measurements of erosion have been performed during an offshore well test under flowing conditions using advanced Thin Layer Activation techniques and scaled Laboratory tests.

  4. Diffusion of hydrogen through platinum membranes at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, I.-M.; Eugster, H. P.; Berens, P.; Weare, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    The diffusion of hydrogen through platinum membranes has been measured at 450, 500, 550 and 600 C at 2000 bar pressure, using the hydrogen sensor technique. Ag + AgCl + 3M HCl was the starting solution inside the platinum tube. Hydrogen diffuses out of the platinum tube into a system containing Fe2O3 + Fe3O4 + H2O; that is, a solution with a fixed hydrogen fugacity. After quench, the drop in hydrogen fugacity inside the platinum tube was calculated from measurements of pH and chloride molality. The hydrogen fugacity is initially roughly proportional to the square root of time. Diffusion constants were calculated from these data by numerical integration.

  5. Properties of materials in high pressure hydrogen at room and elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, J. A., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental efforts in this program for this period. Mechanical property tests of wrought and cast nickel-base alloys and one wrought cobalt-base alloy were conducted in 34.5 MN/sq m (5000-psig) helium and hydrogen or hydrogen mixtures. Comparison of test results was made to determine degradation of properties due to the hydrogen environments. All testing was conducted on solid specimens exposed to external gaseous pressure. Specific mechanical properties determined and the testing methods used are summarized.

  6. Properties of materials in high pressure hydrogen at cryogenic, room, and elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, J. A., Jr.; Vanwanderham, M. C.

    1973-01-01

    Various tests were conducted to determine the mechanical properties of 12 alloys that are commonly used or proposed for use in pressurized gaseous hydrogen or hydrogen containing environments. Properties determined in the hydrogen environments were compared to properties determined in a pure helium environment at the same conditions to establish environmental degradation. The specific mechanical properties tested include: high-cycle fatigue, low-cycle fatigue, fracture mechanics, creep-rupture, and tensile.

  7. Absolute rate of the reaction of atomic hydrogen with ethylene from 198 to 320 K at high pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Michael, J. V.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    The rate constant for the H+C2H4 reaction has been measured as a function of temperature. Experiments were performed with high pressures of Ar heat bath gas at seven temperatures from 198 to 320 K with the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence (FP-RF) technique. Pressures were chosen so as to isolate the addition rate constant k1. The results are well represented by an Arrhenius expression. The results are compared with other studies and are theoretically discussed.

  8. Point defects in (Mg,Fe)O at high pressures: where does hydrogen dominate over ferric iron?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, K.; Karato, S.

    2007-12-01

    The point defects play an important role in transport processes of minerals including diffusion, electrical conduction and plastic deformation. Point defects caused by ferric iron and/or hydrogen (proton) are dominant defects in most of the iron-bearing minerals including olivine and (Mg,Fe)O. In many upper-mantle minerals such as olivine, the concentration of ferric iron is much smaller than that of hydrogen, and therefore the small amount of hydrogen changes their transport properties dramatically. However, the situation is very different for lower- mantle minerals such as (Mg,Fe)O. In this presentation, we will review the available experimental data on point defects in (Mg,Fe)O and discuss the relative importance of ferric iron and hydrogen at high pressures based on atomic models. The existing low-pressure data indicate that the maximum solubility of ferric iron in (Mg,Fe)O is on the order of 0.1 (atomic fraction in the total iron), which is much higher than that of hydrogen. However, experimental studies by Bolfan-Casanova et al (2002, 2006) indicate that the solubility of ferric iron decreases while that of hydrogen increases with pressure. This suggests that the dominant impurity to generate point defects in (Mg,Fe)O may change from ferric iron to hydrogen at high pressure. Therefore it is important to quantify the pressure dependence of the solubility of ferric iron and hydrogen. We have explored two models of ferric iron- related defects and found that the existing experimental data suggest that ferric iron may occur at two lattice sites: the tetrahedral site as interstitial atoms as well as the octahedral site. The pressure dependence of the solubility of hydrogen in (Mg,Fe)O are also estimated based on the experimental data and defect models. The cross-over of defect solubility likely occurs in the lower mantle, but the exact depth is poorly constrained because of large uncertainties in the hydrogen solubility and the mechanisms of hydrogen dissolution

  9. SSME - Materials and Methods for Addressing High-Pressure Hydrogen Embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matejczk, Daniel; Russell, Dale; Frandsen, Jon; Swanson, Greg

    2010-01-01

    From the humid, corrosion-friendly atmosphere of KSC, to the extreme heat of ascent, to the cold vacuum of space, the Space Shuttle faced one hostile environment after another. One of those harsh environments the hydrogen environment existed within the shuttle itself. Liquid hydrogen was the fuel that powered the shuttle s complex, powerful, and reusable main engine. Hydrogen provided the high specific impulse the bang per pound of fuel needed to perform the shuttle s heavy lifting duties. Hydrogen, however, was also a potential threat to the very metal of the propulsion system that used it. The diffusion of hydrogen atoms into a metal can make it more brittle and prone to cracking a process called hydrogen embrittlement. This effect can reduce the toughness of carefully selected and prepared materials. A concern that exposure to hydrogen might encourage crack growth was present from the beginning of the Space Shuttle Program, but the rationale for using hydrogen was compelling. This paper outlines the material characterization, anomaly resolution, and path to understanding of hydrogen embrittlement on superalloys through the course of the SSME program. Specific examples of nickel alloy turbine housings and single crystal turbine blades are addressed. The evolution of fracture mechanics analytical methods is also addressed.

  10. Low cycle fatigue life of two nickel-base casting alloys in a hydrogen environment. [for high-pressure oxidizer turbopump turbine nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Samples of two nickel-base casting alloys, Mar-M-246 (a Martin Company alloy) and 713LC (a low-carbon modification of the alloy 713C developed by International Nickel Company) were tested as candidate materials for the high-pressure fuel and high-pressure oxidizer turbopump turbine nozzles. The samples were subjected to tensile tests and to low cycle fatigue tests in high-pressure hydrogen to study the influence of the hydrogen environment. The Mar-M-246 material was found to have a three times higher cyclic life in hydrogen than the 713LC alloy, and was selected as the nozzle material.

  11. Stabilities of filled ice II structure of hydrogen and helium hydrates at low temperatures and high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, H.; Umeda, A.; Fujii, T.; Machida, S.; Shinozaki, A.; Kawamura, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yagi, T.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrogen hydrate is expected to be a hydrogen storage material, because it can contain relatively high hydrogen and its synthetic condition is mild comparable to industrial production. Three phases of hydrogen hydrate have been known so for. One is a clathrate hydrate sII [1], and others are filled ice II structure and filled ice Ic structure [2]. The ratio of water to hydrogen molecules for these phases are1:3, 1:6, 1:1, respectively. The clathrate sII containing only hydrogen molecules is stable only in a lower temperature region. At room temperature, above about 0.8 GPa filled ice II and above 2.5 GPa filled ice Ic are formed. The latter one survives at least up to 90 GPa [3]. However, investigations in low temperature and high pressure region have been limited. In this study, low temperature and high pressure experiments were performed by using diamond anvil cells and a helium-refrigeration cryostat in a region of 0.2 to 4.5 GPa and 130 to 300 K. X-ray diffractometry (XRD) showed a series of phase change from sII to filled ice Ic via filled ice II. For example, at 220K, sII transformed to filled ice II at approximately 0.7 GPa and further transformed to filled ice Ic structure at about 2.0 GPa. The present results experimentally confirmed the previously predicted phase boundaries. For filled ice II structure, Raman spectroscopy revealed that pressure dependency of vibration mode of guest hydrogen molecules and OH stretching mode of host water molecules changed at approximately 2.5 GPa. The XRD also showed change in axial ratio at the same pressure. These result suggested that state of filled ice II structure changed at about 2.5 GPa. Helium hydrate is known to form filled ice II structure [4], but high pressure study has not been yet fully performed. Similar experiments were carried out in a region of 0.2 to 5.0 GPa and 200 to 300 K. The results showed that the filled ice II structure did not transformed to filled ice Ic structure, but decomposed into helium

  12. High pressure operation of tubular solid oxide fuel cells and their intergration with gas turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, C.; Wepfer, W.J.

    1996-12-31

    Fossil fuels continue to be used at a rate greater than that of their natural formation, and the current byproducts from their use are believed to have a detrimental effect on the environment (e.g. global warming). There is thus a significant impetus to have cleaner, more efficient fuel consumption alternatives. Recent progress has led to renewed vigor in the development of fuel cell technology, which has been shown to be capable of producing high efficiencies with relatively benign exhaust products. The tubular solid oxide fuel cell developed by Westinghouse Electric Corporation has shown significant promise. Modeling efforts have been and are underway to optimize and better understand this fuel cell technology. Thus far, the bulk of modeling efforts has been for operation at atmospheric pressure. There is now interest in developing high-efficiency integrated gas turbine/solid oxide fuel cell systems. Such operation of fuel cells would obviously occur at higher pressures. The fuel cells have been successfully modeled under high pressure operation and further investigated as integrated components of an open loop gas turbine cycle.

  13. GFOC Project results: High Temperature / High Pressure, Hydrogen Tolerant Optical Fiber

    SciTech Connect

    E. Burov; A. Pastouret; E. Aldea; B. Overton; F. Gooijer; A. Bergonzo

    2012-02-12

    Tests results are given for exposure of multimode optical fiber to high temperatures (300 deg. C) and high partial pressure (15 bar) hydrogen. These results demonstrate that fluorine down doped optical fibers are much more hydrogen tolerant than traditional germanium doped multimode optical fibers. Also demonstrated is the similar hydrogen tolerance of carbon coated and non-carbon coated fibers. Model for reversible H2 impact in fiber versus T{sup o}C and H2 pressure is given. These results have significant impact for the longevity of use for distributed temperature sensing applications in harsh environments such as geothermal wells.

  14. Gas controlled hydrogen fermentation.

    PubMed

    Bastidas-Oyanedel, Juan-Rodrigo; Mohd-Zaki, Zuhaida; Zeng, Raymond J; Bernet, Nicolas; Pratt, Steven; Steyer, Jean-Philippe; Batstone, Damien John

    2012-04-01

    Acidogenic fermentation is an anaerobic process of double purpose, while treating organic residues it produces chemical compounds, such as hydrogen, ethanol and organic acids. Therefore, acidogenic fermentation arises as an attractive biotechnology process towards the biorefinery concept. Moreover, this process does not need sterile operating conditions and works under a wide range of pH. Changes of operating conditions produce metabolic shifts, inducing variability on acidogenic product yield. To induce those changes, experiments, based on reactor headspace N(2)-flushing (gas phase), were designed. A major result was the hydrogen yield increase from 1 to 3.25±0.4 ( [Formula: see text] ) at pH 4.5 and N(2)-flushing of 58.4 (L·d(-1)). This yield is close to the theoretical acidogenic value (4 [Formula: see text] ). The mechanisms that explain this increase on hydrogen yield shifts are related to the thermodynamics of three metabolic reactions: lactate hydrogenase, NADH hydrogenase and homoacetogenesis, which are affected by the low hydrogen partial pressures. PMID:22342590

  15. First principles simulation of a superionic phase of hydrogen fluoride (HF) at high pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, N; Fried, L E

    2006-04-10

    The authors have conducted Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen fluoride (HF) at pressures of 5-66 GPa along the 900 K isotherm. They predict a superionic phase at 33 GPa, where the fluorine atoms are fixed in a bcc lattice while the hydrogen atoms diffuse rapidly with a diffusion constant of between 2 x 10{sup -5} and 5 x 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2}/s. They find that a transformation from asymmetric to symmetric hydrogen bonding occurs in HF at 66 GPa and 900 K. With superionic HF they have discovered a model system where symmetric hydrogen bonding occurs at experimentally achievable conditions. Given previous results on superionic H{sub 2}O[1,2,3] and NH{sub 3}[1], they conclude that high P,T superionic phases of electronegative element hydrides could be common.

  16. Monitoring the convergence and the stability of high-pressure gas storage cavities by echometric techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Denzau, H.; Erhardt, S.; Wierczeyco, E.

    1988-01-01

    To demonstrate the stability of high-pressure gas storage cavities and to monitor cavity convergence, a fully computerized echometric sonar technique was developed in the early eighties. Cavity surveys made by this technique at regular intervals in accordance with requirements imposed by mining authorities are necessary to monitor the stability of cavities as well as to predict cavity life and the effect of cavity convergence on the surface. Unlike conventional methods determining overall cavity closure, the new echometric sonar method allows the calculation of convergence as a function of depth by an intercomparison of data from different surveys. The first operation in the interpretation process is a numerical comparison of the data of vertical and horizontal cross-sections of two successive surveys. This operation will identify changes in the shape of a cavity which may occur if the cavity is leached in a steep-sloped salt dome. Following a verification of the computerized interpretation of the data, the volume of fall is calculated and cross-checked against the volume of rock deposited on the bottom of the cavity.

  17. High pressure multiwire proportional and gas microstrip chambers for medical radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babichev, E. A.; Baru, S. E.; Khabakhpashev, A. G.; Kolachev, G. M.; Neustroev, V. V.; Pestov, Yu. N.; Ponomarev, O. A.; Savinov, G. M.; Shekhtman, L. I.; Martinez-Davalos, A.; Speller, R. D.; Miller, D. J.

    1995-02-01

    Application of MultiWire Proportional Chambers (MWPC) and MicroStrip Gas Chambers (MSGC) in medical radiography is discussed. These detectors are capable of detecting X-rays in counting mode with high efficiency, thus giving essential dose reduction compared to film/screen techniques. This was demonstrated on several Digital Radiographic Devices (DRD) with one-dimensional MWPC and scanning in the orthogonal direction. Effective pixel sizes of 1 mm and 0.5 mm for different devices with highly parallel readout systems has been achieved. The counting rate capability of DRDs is ˜ 500 kHz/pixel, which is enough to get high statistics of X-rays with a short exposure. Dose saving factors from 1 to 2 orders of magnitude for several common examinations were demonstrated. Further development of this approach can be made with MSGC which reproduce operation of MWPC in a much smaller scale. First tests of prototype chambers with 200 μm pitch of strips at high pressure have shown the possibility to reach a gain of ˜ 10 4 in a 6 bar Xe mixture. A proper choice of substrate material permits one to avoid charging problems at high fluxes. These features allow, one to build a counting device with 0.2 mm pixels for the detection of X-rays of 20-60 keV.

  18. Low Temperature and High Pressure Evaluation of Insulated Pressure Vessels for Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S.; Martinez-Frias, J.; Garcia-Villazana, O.

    2000-06-25

    Insulated pressure vessels are cryogenic-capable pressure vessels that can be fueled with liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) or ambient-temperature compressed hydrogen (CH{sub 2}). Insulated pressure vessels offer the advantages of liquid hydrogen tanks (low weight and volume), with reduced disadvantages (fuel flexibility, lower energy requirement for hydrogen liquefaction and reduced evaporative losses). The work described here is directed at verifying that commercially available pressure vessels can be safely used to store liquid hydrogen. The use of commercially available pressure vessels significantly reduces the cost and complexity of the insulated pressure vessel development effort. This paper describes a series of tests that have been done with aluminum-lined, fiber-wrapped vessels to evaluate the damage caused by low temperature operation. All analysis and experiments to date indicate that no significant damage has resulted. Required future tests are described that will prove that no technical barriers exist to the safe use of aluminum-fiber vessels at cryogenic temperatures.

  19. Benchmarking exchange-correlation functionals for hydrogen at high pressures using quantum Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Clay, Raymond C.; Mcminis, Jeremy; McMahon, Jeffrey M.; Pierleoni, Carlo; Ceperley, David M.; Morales, Miguel A.

    2014-05-01

    The ab initio phase diagram of dense hydrogen is very sensitive to errors in the treatment of electronic correlation. Recently, it has been shown that the choice of the density functional has a large effect on the predicted location of both the liquid-liquid phase transition and the solid insulator-to-metal transition in dense hydrogen. To identify the most accurate functional for dense hydrogen applications, we systematically benchmark some of the most commonly used functionals using quantum Monte Carlo. By considering several measures of functional accuracy, we conclude that the van der Waals and hybrid functionals significantly outperform local density approximation and Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof. We support these conclusions by analyzing the impact of functional choice on structural optimization in the molecular solid, and on the location of the liquid-liquid phase transition.

  20. Detection efficiency of a high-pressure gas scintillation proportional chamber.

    PubMed

    Fahey, F H; Zimmerman, R E; Judy, P F; Lanza, R C

    1987-01-01

    The detection efficiency of a high-pressure, gas scintillation proportional chamber (GSPC), designed for medical imaging in the 30-150 keV energy range, has been investigated through measurement and Monte Carlo simulation. Measurements were conducted on a GSPC containing 4 atm of pure xenon separated from a hexagonal array of seven ultraviolet-sensitive photomultiplier tubes by 1.27-cm-thick fused-silica windows. Experimental measurements of the photopeak efficiency, fluorescence escape efficiency, and the energy collection efficiency were obtained. Results were also obtained for different photon energies and different values of temporal resolution. The measurements were compared with the results obtained from a Monte Carlo simulation designed specifically for investigating the imaging of low-energy photons (below 150 keV) with a gas-filled detector. The simulation was used to estimate photopeak efficiency, fluorescence escape efficiency, photopeak-to-fluorescence escape peak ratio, quantum interaction efficiency, energy collection efficiency, and local energy collection efficiency. The photopeak efficiency of the GSPC relative to that of a 3-in. (7.62-cm)-thick sodium iodide crystal was measured to be 0.284 +/- 0.001 at 60 keV and 0.057 +/- 0.001 at 140 keV. Of the 60-keV photons incident upon the detector, 70% +/- 4% interacted in the detector, with 28% +/- 1% being in the photopeak, as estimated both by experimentation and through the simulation. The maximum energy collection efficiency was found to be 65% at 60 keV, with 46% being deposited within 0.2 cm of the initial photon interaction. The information gained from this study is being used to design an optimized detector for use in specialized nuclear medicine studies. PMID:3561331

  1. Low-temperature synthesis of microcrystalline 3C-SiC film by high-pressure hydrogen-plasma-enhanced chemical transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmi, Hiromasa; Hori, Takahiro; Mori, Tetsuya; Kakiuchi, Hiroaki; Yasutake, Kiyoshi

    2011-06-01

    The synthesis of microcrystalline 3C-SiC films on glass substrates at relatively low temperatures (<=600 °C) by the plasma-enhanced chemical transport method was carried out using a high-pressure pure hydrogen glow discharge. This method used the chemical erosion products of graphite and silicon in the hydrogen plasma as the deposition source. The temperature dependence of the etching rate of graphite and the generated volatile C-species were investigated by exposing sintered graphite to a pure hydrogen plasma at 100 Torr. Infrared absorption gas analysis indicated that the C-related film precursor generated from the graphite was mainly CH4. The etch rate of graphite reached a maximum at a sample temperature of 200 °C. The deposition rate of the SiC film prepared at a hydrogen pressure of 200 Torr increased monotonically from 14 to 29 nm min-1 with an increase in substrate temperature (Tsub) from 100 to 600 °C. The Si/C composition ratio in the films was independent of Tsub and all the film compositions were nearly stoichiometric. The prepared SiC films were microcrystalline 3C-SiC. Raman spectroscopy indicated that the film quality significantly depends on Tsub. The electrical conductivity of the films at room temperature was found to increase exponentially from 3 × 10-4 to 1.7 S cm-1 with Tsub.

  2. 49 CFR 192.197 - Control of the pressure of gas delivered from high-pressure distribution systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Control of the pressure of gas delivered from high-pressure distribution systems. 192.197 Section 192.197 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE...

  3. Hydrogen-oxygen auxiliary propulsion for the space shuttle. Volume 1: High pressure thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Technology for long life, high performing, gaseous hydrogen-gaseous oxygen rocket engines suitable for auxiliary propulsion was provided by a combined analytical and experimental program. Propellant injectors, fast response valves, igniters, and regeneratively and film-cooled thrust chambers were tested over a wide range of operating conditions. Data generated include performance, combustion efficiency, thermal characteristics film cooling effectiveness, dynamic response in pulsing, and cycle life limitations.

  4. Multiple diagnostics in a high-pressure hydrogen microwave plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, J.; Mullen, J. J. A. M. van der; Gamero, A.; Sola, A.

    2010-02-01

    We present an experimental study of a hydrogen plasma produced by a microwave axial injection torch, launching the plasma in a helium-filled chamber. Three different diagnostic methods have been used to obtain the electron density and temperature as follows: The Stark intersection method of Balmer spectral lines (already tested in argon and helium plasmas); the modified Boltzmann-plot showing that the plasma is far from the local thermodynamic equilibrium but ruled by the excitation-saturation balance; and a study by the disturbed bilateral relations theory. All of these diagnostic techniques show a good agreement.

  5. Structure and dynamics of hydrogen molecules in the novel clathrate hydrate by high pressure neutron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Lokshin, Konstantin A; Zhao, Yusheng; He, Duanwei; Mao, Wendy L; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Hemley, Russell J; Lobanov, Maxim V; Greenblatt, Martha

    2004-09-17

    The D2 clathrate hydrate crystal structure was determined as a function of temperature and pressure by neutron diffraction for the first time. The hydrogen occupancy in the (32+X)H2.136H(2)O, x=0-16 clathrate can be reversibly varied by changing the large (hexakaidecahedral) cage occupancy between two and four molecules, while remaining single occupancy of the small (dodecahedral) cage. Above 130-160 K, the guest D2 molecules were found in the delocalized state, rotating around the centers of the cages. Decrease of temperature results in rotation freezing followed by a complete localization below 50 K. PMID:15447276

  6. Evidence for plasma phase transition in high pressure hydrogen from ab-initio simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, M; Pierleoni, C; Schwegler, E; Ceperley, D

    2010-02-08

    We have performed a detailed study of molecular dissociation in liquid hydrogen using both Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics with Density Functional Theory and Coupled Electron-Ion Monte Carlo simulations. We observe a range of densities where (dP/d{rho}){sub T} = 0 that coincides with sharp discontinuities in the electronic conductivity, which is clear evidence of the plasma phase transition for temperatures 600K {le} T {le} 1500K. Both levels of theory exhibit the transition, although Quantum Monte Carlo predicts higher transition pressures. Based on the temperature dependence of the discontinuity in the electronic conductivity, we estimate the critical point of the transition at temperatures slightly below 2000 K. We examine the influence of proton zero point motion by using Path Integral Molecular Dynamics with Density Functional Theory; the main effect is to shift the transition to lower pressures. Furthermore, we calculate the melting curve of molecular hydrogen up to pressures of 200 GPa, finding a reentrant melting line in good agreement with previous calculations. The melting line crosses the metalization line at 700 K and 220 GPa using density functional energetics and at 550 K and 290 GPa using Quantum Monte Carlo energetics.

  7. High-pressure homogeneous hydrogenation of carbon monoxide in polar and nonpolar solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Keim, W.; Berger, M.; Schlupp, J.

    1980-02-01

    Batch reactor tests were conducted on the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide in toluene or N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) catalyzed by metal carbonyl, metal acetyl acetonate, or chloroplatinic acid at 200/sup 0/-280/sup 0/C and 800-2600 bar. In NMP, the activities decreased in the order: Rh > Ru > Ir > Co, Pt > Fe > Ni > Pd, Os. In toluene, the activities decreased in the order: Co > Ru > Rh > Pt > Ir > Ni > Pd > Fe, Os. The selectivities varied with catalyst, e.g., at 230/sup 0/ and 2000 bar the main product of iridium carbonyl/NMP was methanol with 81% selectivity, of ruthenium carbonyl/toluene it was methyl formate with 40.5% selectivity, and with cobalt carbonyl/NMP, it was methyl acetate with 28.9% selectivity. Ethylene glycol was produced with cobalt carbonyl/toluene with 25.1% selectivity and with Rh(CO)/sub 2/(acac) with 44.4% selectivity. The production of ethylene glycol with CO/sub 2/(CO)/sub 8/ in toluene increased with increasing pressure, decreasing temperature, and increasing catalyst concentration, and was independent of hydrogen/carbon dioxide ratios at 0.5:1 to 2:1. The glycol separated from the toluene as a nearly catalyst-free phase. The reaction mechanisms are discussed.

  8. Cryogenic gas loading in a Mao-Bell-type diamond anvil cell for high pressure-high temperature investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekar, M.; Kumar, N. R. Sanjay; Sahu, P. Ch.; Chandra Shekar, N. V.; Subramanian, N.

    2008-07-01

    A simple system for loading argon fluid at cryogenic temperatures in a Mao-Bell-type diamond anvil cell (DAC) has been developed. It is done in a two step process in which the piston-cylinder assembly alone is submerged in the cryogenic chamber for trapping the liquefied inert gas. Liquid nitrogen is used for condensing the argon gas. This system is now being efficiently used for loading liquid argon in the DAC for high pressure-high temperature experiments. The success rate of trapping liquefied argon in the sample chamber is about 75%. The performance of the gas loading system is successfully tested by carrying out direct conversion of pyrolitic graphite to diamond under high pressure-high temperature using laser heated DAC facility.

  9. Using Modelica to investigate the dynamic behaviour of the German national standard for high pressure natural gas flow metering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Heyde, M.; Schmitz, G.; Mickan, B.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a computational model written in Modelica for the high pressure piston prover (HPPP) used as the national primary standard for high pressure natural gas flow metering in Germany. With a piston prover the gas flow rate is determined by measuring the time a piston needs to displace a certain volume of gas in a cylinder. Fluctuating piston velocity during measurement can be a significant source of uncertainty if not considered in an appropriate way. The model was built to investigate measures for the reduction of this uncertainty. Validation shows a good compliance of the piston velocity in the model with measured data for certain volume flow rates. Reduction of the piston weight, variation of the start valve switching time and integration of a flow straightener were found to reduce the piston velocity fluctuations in the model significantly. The fast and cost effective generation of those results shows the strength of the used modelling approach.

  10. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy studies of adsorbates on Pt(111): Studies of CO at high pressures and temperatures, coadsorbed with olefins and its role as a poison in ethylene hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, Kyle Yi

    2000-12-31

    High pressure high temperature CO adsorption and coadsorption with ethylene and propylene on Pt(111) was monitored in situ with infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG). At high pressures and high temperatures, CO dissociates on a Pt(111) surface to form carbon. At 400 torr CO pressure and 673K, CO modifies the Pt(111) surface through a carbonyl intermediate, and dissociates to leave carbon on the surface. SFG was used to follow the CO peak evolution from monolayer adsorption in ultra high vacuum (UHV) to 400 torr CO pressure. At this high pressure, a temperature dependence study from room temperature to 823K was carried out. Auger electron spectroscopy was used to identify carbon on the surface CO coadsorption with ethylene and CO coadsorption with propylene studies were carried out with 2-IR 1-visible SFG. With this setup, two spectral ranges covering the C-H stretch range and the CO stretch range can be monitored simultaneously. The coadsorption study with ethylene reveals that after 5L ethylene exposure on a Pt(111) surface to form ethylidyne , CO at high pressures cannot completely displace the ethylidyne from the surface. Instead, CO first adsorbs on defect sites at low pressures and then competes with ethylidyne for terrace sites at high pressures. Propylene coadsorption with CO at similar conditions shows that propylidyne undergoes conformation changes with increased CO pressure and at 1 torr, is absent from the Pt(111) surface. Experiments on CO poisoning of ethylene hydrogenation was carried by 2-IR 1-visible SFG. At 1 torr CO,10 torr ethylene and 100 torr hydrogen, CO was found to block active sites necessary for ethylene hydrogenation, Above 425K, CO desorbs from the surface to allow ethylene hydrogenation to occur. The gas phase species were monitored by gas chromatography.

  11. Ion energy distributions at the electrodes of high pressure capacitive dual-frequency hydrogen discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüngel, Edmund; Mohr, Sebastian; Schulze, Julian; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2012-10-01

    Capacitively coupled radio frequency (CCRF) discharges are widely used for surface processing applications, such as thin film solar cell manufacturing. In order to optimize the plasma surface interactions, the fluxes and energy distributions of radicals and ions at the substrate need to be controlled. In particular, the ion energy distribution function (IEDF) plays a crucial role. Previous investigations have shown that the mean ion energy can be changed in low pressure argon discharges via the Electrical Asymmetry Effect (EAE). Here, two consecutive harmonics are applied to the powered electrode. The main control parameter is the phase angle between the frequencies, which allows to adjust the symmetry of the discharge, the DC self bias, and the sheath voltages. In this work, the EAE is investigated in a parallel plate CCRF discharge operated in pure hydrogen at pressures of several hundred Pa. The axial component of the IEDF of the dominant ion species, H3^+, is measured at the grounded electrode using a plasma process monitor. The results focus on the question how the shape of the IEDF, the mean ion energy, and the total ion flux change as a function of the phase angle. Funded by the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (0325210B).

  12. Interactions between Adsorbed Hydrogenated Soy Phosphatidylcholine (HSPC) Vesicles at Physiologically High Pressures and Salt Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Ronit; Schroeder, Avi; Barenholz, Yechezkel; Klein, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Using a surface force balance, we measured normal and shear interactions as a function of surface separation between layers of hydrogenated soy phosphatidylcholine (HSPC) small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) adsorbed from dispersion at physiologically high salt concentrations (0.15 M NaNO3). Cryo-scanning electron microscopy shows that each surface is coated by a close-packed HSPC-SUV layer with an overlayer of liposomes on top. A clear attractive interaction between the liposome layers is seen upon approach and separation, followed by a steric repulsion upon further compression. The shear forces reveal low friction coefficients (μ = 0.008–0.0006) up to contact pressures of at least 6 MPa, comparable to those observed in the major joints. The spread in μ-values may be qualitatively accounted for by different local liposome structure at different contact points, suggesting that the intrinsic friction of the HSPC-SUV layers at this salt concentration is closer to the lower limit (μ = ∼0.0006). This low friction is attributed to the hydration lubrication mechanism arising from rubbing of the hydrated phosphocholine-headgroup layers exposed at the outer surface of each liposome, and provides support for the conjecture that phospholipids may play a significant role in biological lubrication. PMID:21575574

  13. Materials for high-temperature and high-pressure hydrogen peroxide bleaching equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, S.J.; Clarke, P.H.

    1999-07-01

    To determine the suitability of grade 705 zirconium (UNS R60705) as a candidate material of construction for high-temperature and pressure hydrogen peroxide (P{sub HT}) pulp-bleaching reactors, a series of electrochemical experiments were carried out in simulated P{sub HT} environments. Because the P{sub HT} process may be incorporated into a closed cycle mill or a mill that also uses chlorine-based chemicals to bleach pulp, the effect of chloride ion concentration on the corrosion of zirconium in P{sub HT} environments was studied. It was found that at the potential measured in P{sub HT} environments, zirconium was passive ({minus}100 mV vs. saturated calomel electrode [SCE]). Breakdown potentials of {approximately}500 mV{sub SCE} were measured in chloride-containing solutions. However, when the chloride ion concentration was increased >50 ppm, the repassivation potential of the zirconium was reduced significantly. Based on these results, grade 705 zirconium was determined to be suitable for a wide range of P{sub HT} process conditions.

  14. Manufacturing Cost Analysis of Novel Steel/Concrete Composite Vessel for Stationary Storage of High-Pressure Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Zhili; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Jy-An John; Ren, Fei

    2012-09-01

    A novel, low-cost, high-pressure, steel/concrete composite vessel (SCCV) technology for stationary storage of compressed gaseous hydrogen (CGH2) is currently under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) sponsored by DOE s Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Program. The SCCV technology uses commodity materials including structural steels and concretes for achieving cost, durability and safety requirements. In particular, the hydrogen embrittlement of high-strength low-alloy steels, a major safety and durability issue for current industry-standard pressure vessel technology, is mitigated through the use of a unique layered steel shell structure. This report presents the cost analysis results of the novel SCCV technology. A high-fidelity cost analysis tool is developed, based on a detailed, bottom-up approach which takes into account the material and labor costs involved in each of the vessel manufacturing steps. A thorough cost study is performed to understand the SCCV cost as a function of the key vessel design parameters, including hydrogen pressure, vessel dimensions, and load-carrying ratio. The major conclusions include: The SCCV technology can meet the technical/cost targets set forth by DOE s FCT Program for FY2015 and FY2020 for all three pressure levels (i.e., 160, 430 and 860 bar) relevant to the hydrogen production and delivery infrastructure. Further vessel cost reduction can benefit from the development of advanced vessel fabrication technologies such as the highly automated friction stir welding (FSW). The ORNL-patented multi-layer, multi-pass FSW can not only reduce the amount of labor needed for assembling and welding the layered steel vessel, but also make it possible to use even higher strength steels for further cost reductions and improvement of vessel structural integrity. It is noted the cost analysis results demonstrate the significant cost advantage attainable by the SCCV technology for different pressure levels when compared to the

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF ASME SECTION X CODE RULES FOR HIGH PRESSURE COMPOSITE HYDROGEN PRESSURE VESSELS WITH NON-LOAD SHARING LINERS

    SciTech Connect

    Rawls, G.; Newhouse, N.; Rana, M.; Shelley, B.; Gorman, M.

    2010-04-13

    The Boiler and Pressure Vessel Project Team on Hydrogen Tanks was formed in 2004 to develop Code rules to address the various needs that had been identified for the design and construction of up to 15000 psi hydrogen storage vessel. One of these needs was the development of Code rules for high pressure composite vessels with non-load sharing liners for stationary applications. In 2009, ASME approved new Appendix 8, for Section X Code which contains the rules for these vessels. These vessels are designated as Class III vessels with design pressure ranging from 20.7 MPa (3,000 ps)i to 103.4 MPa (15,000 psi) and maximum allowable outside liner diameter of 2.54 m (100 inches). The maximum design life of these vessels is limited to 20 years. Design, fabrication, and examination requirements have been specified, included Acoustic Emission testing at time of manufacture. The Code rules include the design qualification testing of prototype vessels. Qualification includes proof, expansion, burst, cyclic fatigue, creep, flaw, permeability, torque, penetration, and environmental testing.

  16. First proof of topological signature in the high pressure xenon gas TPC with electroluminescence amplification for the NEXT experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrario, P.; Laing, A.; López-March, N.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; Álvarez, V.; Azevedo, C. D. R.; Borges, F. I. G.; Cárcel, S.; Cebrián, S.; Cervera, A.; Conde, C. A. N.; Dafni, T.; Díaz, J.; Diesburg, M.; Esteve, R.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Ferreira, A. L.; Freitas, E. D. C.; Gehman, V. M.; Goldschmidt, A.; González-Díaz, D.; Gutiérrez, R. M.; Hauptman, J.; Henriques, C. A. O.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; Irastorza, I. G.; Labarga, L.; Lebrun, P.; Liubarsky, I.; Lorca, D.; Losada, M.; Luzón, G.; Marí, A.; Martín-Albo, J.; Martínez-Lema, G.; Martínez, A.; Miller, T.; Monrabal, F.; Monserrate, M.; Monteiro, C. M. B.; Mora, F. J.; Moutinho, L. M.; Muñoz Vidal, J.; Nebot-Guinot, M.; Novella, P.; Nygren, D.; Para, A.; Pérez, J.; Pérez Aparicio, J. L.; Querol, M.; Renner, J.; Ripoll, L.; Rodríguez, J.; Santos, F. P.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Serra, L.; Shuman, D.; Simón, A.; Sofka, C.; Sorel, M.; Toledo, J. F.; Torrent, J.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Villar, J. A.; Webb, R.; White, J. T.; Yahlali, N.; Yepes-Ramírez, H.

    2016-01-01

    The NEXT experiment aims to observe the neutrinoless double beta decay of 136Xe in a high-pressure xenon gas TPC using electroluminescence (EL) to amplify the signal from ionization. One of the main advantages of this technology is the possibility to reconstruct the topology of events with energies close to Q ββ . This paper presents the first demonstration that the topology provides extra handles to reject background events using data obtained with the NEXT-DEMO prototype.

  17. Application of water-insoluble polymers to orally disintegrating tablets treated by high-pressure carbon dioxide gas.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yoshitaka; Maeda, Atsushi; Kondo, Hiromu; Iwao, Yasunori; Noguchi, Shuji; Itai, Shigeru

    2016-09-10

    The phase transition of pharmaceutical excipients that can be induced by humidifying or heating is well-known to increase the hardness of orally disintegrating tablets (ODTs). However, these conditions are not applicable to drug substances that are chemically unstable against such stressors. Here, we describe a system which enhances the hardness of tablets containing water-insoluble polymers by using high-pressure carbon dioxide (CO2). On screening of 26 polymeric excipients, aminoalkyl methacrylate copolymer E (AMCE) markedly increased tablet hardness (+155N) when maintained in a high-pressure CO2 environment. ODTs containing 10% AMCE were prepared and treatment with 4.0MPa CO2 gas at 25°C for 10min increased the hardness to +30N, whose level corresponded to heating at 70°C for 720min. In addition, we confirmed the effects of CO2 pressure, temperature, treatment time, and AMCE content on the physical properties of ODTs. Optimal pressure of CO2 gas was considered to be approximately 3.5MPa for an AMCE formula, as excessive pressure delayed the disintegration of ODTs. Combination of high-pressure CO2 gas and AMCE is a prospective approach for increasing the tablet hardness for ODTs, and can be conducted without additional heat or moisture stress using a simple apparatus. PMID:27374202

  18. Selective deposition of a crystalline Si film by a chemical sputtering process in a high pressure hydrogen plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ohmi, Hiromasa Yasutake, Kiyoshi; Kakiuchi, Hiroaki

    2015-07-28

    The selective deposition of Si films was demonstrated using a chemical sputtering process induced by a high pressure hydrogen plasma at 52.6 kPa (400 Torr). In this chemical sputtering process, the initial deposition rate (R{sub d}) is dependent upon the substrate type. At the initial stage of Si film formation, R{sub d} on glass substrates increased with elapsed time and reached to a constant value. In contrast, R{sub d} on Si substrates remained constant during the deposition. The selective deposition of Si films can be achieved by adjusting the substrate temperature (T{sub sub}) and hydrogen concentration (C{sub H2}) in the process atmosphere. For any given deposition time, it was found that an optimum C{sub H2} exists for a given T{sub sub} to realize the selective deposition of a Si film, and the optimum T{sub sub} value tends to increase with decreasing C{sub H2}. According to electron diffraction patterns obtained from the samples, the selectively prepared Si films showed epitaxial-like growth, although the Si films contained many defects. It was revealed by Raman scattering spectroscopy that some of the defects in the Si films were platelet defects induced by excess hydrogen incorporated during Si film formation. Raman spectrum also suggested that Si related radicals (SiH{sub 2}, SiH, Si) with high reactivity contribute to the Si film formation. Simple model was derived as the guideline for achieving the selective growth.

  19. Evaluation of candidate Stirling engine heater tube alloys after 3500 hours exposure to high pressure doped hydrogen or helium. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Misencik, J.A.; Titran, R.H.

    1984-10-01

    Sixteen commercial tubing alloys were endurance tested at 820/sup 0/ C, 15 MPa in a diesel-fuel fired Stirling engine simulator materials test rig: iron-base N-155, A-286, Incoloy 800, 19-9DL, CG-27, W-545, 12RN72, 253MA, Sanicro 31H and Sanicro 32; nickel-base Inconel 601, Inconel 625, Inconel 718, Inconel 750 and Pyromet 901; and cobalt-base HS-188. The iron-nickel alloys CG-27 and Pyromet 901 exhibited superior oxidation/corrosion resistance to the diesel-fuel combustion products and surpassed the design criterias' 3500 h creep-rupture endurance life. Three other alloys, Inconel 625, W-545, and 12RN72, had creep-rupture failures after 2856, 2777, and 1598 h, respectively. Hydrogen permeability coefficients determined after 250 h of rig exposure show that Pyromet 901 had the lowest Phi value, 0.064x10/sup -6/ cm/sup 2//s MPa/sup 1///sup 2/. The next five hairpin tubes, CG-27, Inconel 601, Inconel 718(wd), Inconel 750, and 12RN72(cw) all had Phi values below 0.2x10/sup -6/ more than a decade lower than the design criteria. Based upon its measured high strength and low hydrogen permeation, CG-27 was selected for 3500 h endurance testing at 21 MPa gas pressure and 820/sup 0/C. Results of the high pressure, 21 MPa, CG-27 endurance test demonstrated that the 1.0 vol % C0/sub 2/ dopant is an effective deterrent to hydrogen permeation. The 21 MPa hydrogen gas pressure apparent permeability coefficient at 820/sup 0/C approached 0.1x10/sup -6/ cm/sup 2/sec MPa/sup 1///sup 2/ after 500 hr, the same as the 15 MPa test. Even at this higher gas pressure and comparable permeation rate, CG-27 passed the 3500 hr endurance test without creep-rupture failures. It is concluded that the CG-27 alloy, in the form of thin wall tubing is suitable for Stirling engine applications at 820/sup 0/C and gas pressures up to 21 MPa.

  20. Hydrogenation of Carbon Dioxide Catalyzed by Ruthenium Trimethylphosphine Complexes: A Mechanistic Investigation using High-Pressure NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Getty, April D.; Tai, Chih-Cheng; Linehan, John C.; Jessop, Philip G.; Olmstead, Marilyn M.; Rheingold, Arnold

    2009-08-26

    The previously reported complex, cis-(PMe3)4RuCl(OAc) (1) acts as a catalyst for CO2 hydrogenation into formic acid in the presence of a base and an alcohol co-catalyst. NMR spectroscopy has revealed that 1 exists in solution in equilibrium with fac-(PMe3)3RuCl(h2-OAc) (2), [(PMe3)4Ru(h2-OAc)]Cl (3a), and free PMe3. Complex 2 has been isolated and characterized by elemental analysis, NMR spectroscopy, and X-ray crystallography. 2 has been tested as a CO2 hydrogenation catalyst, however, it performed poorly under the conditions of catalysis used for 1. Complex 3a can be prepared by adding certain alcohols, such as MeOH, EtOH, or o-C6H5OH, to a solution of 1 in CDCl3. The chloride ion of 3a has been exchanged for the non-coordinating anions BPh4 or B(ArF )4 (B(ArF)4 = tetrakis(3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)borate) to produce [(PMe3)4Ru(h2-OAc)]BPh4 (3b) and [(PMe3)4Ru(h2-OAc)]B(ArF)4 (3c). Both of these complexes have been isolated and characterized by elemental analysis, NMR spectroscopy, and in the case of 3b, X-ray crystallography. Complexes 3b and 3c perform just as well as 1 for CO2 hydrogenation to formic acid in the presence of an alcohol co-catalyst; however, 3b,c perform equally well without the added alcohol. High-pressure NMR has been used to investigate the mechanism of CO2 hydrogenation via 3a,b in the presence of base. Two of the intermediates involved have been identified as cis-(PMe3)4RuH2 (5) and cis-(PMe3)4Ru(H)O2CH (6), and the role of the base includes not only trapping of the formic acid product, but also initiation of the catalysis by aiding the conversion of 3b,c to 5.

  1. Real-Time Optical Monitoring of Flow Kinetics and Gas Phase Reactions Under High-Pressure OMCVD Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, N.; McCall, S.; Bachmann, K. J.

    2001-01-01

    This contribution addresses the real-time optical characterization of gas flow and gas phase reactions as they play a crucial role for chemical vapor phase depositions utilizing elevated and high pressure chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD) conditions. The objectives of these experiments are to validate on the basis of results on real-time optical diagnostics process models simulation codes, and provide input parameter sets needed for analysis and control of chemical vapor deposition at elevated pressures. Access to microgravity is required to retain high pressure conditions of laminar flow, which is essential for successful acquisition and interpretation of the optical data. In this contribution, we describe the design and construction of the HPCVD system, which include access ports for various optical methods of real-time process monitoring and to analyze the initial stages of heteroepitaxy and steady-state growth in the different pressure ranges. To analyze the onset of turbulence, provisions are made for implementation of experimental methods for in-situ characterization of the nature of flow. This knowledge will be the basis for the design definition of experiments under microgravity, where gas flow conditions, gas phase and surface chemistry, might be analyzed by remote controlled real-time diagnostics tools, developed in this research project.

  2. Modeling high-pressure adsorption of gas mixtures on activated carbon and coal using a simplified local-density model

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, J.E.; Robinson, R.L.; Gasem, K.A.M.

    2006-11-07

    The simplified local-density (SLD) theory was investigated regarding its ability to provide accurate representations and predictions of high-pressure supercritical adsorption isotherms encountered in coalbed methane (CBM) recovery and CO{sub 2} sequestration. Attention was focused on the ability of the SLD theory to predict mixed-gas adsorption solely on the basis of information from pure gas isotherms using a modified Peng-Robinson (PR) equation of state (EOS). An extensive set of high-pressure adsorption measurements was used in this evaluation. These measurements included pure and binary mixture adsorption measurements for several gas compositions up to 14 MPa for Calgon F-400 activated carbon and three water-moistened coals. Also included were ternary measurements for the activated carbon and one coal. For the adsorption of methane, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2} on dry activated carbon, the SLD-PR can predict the component mixture adsorption within about 2.2 times the experimental uncertainty on average solely on the basis of pure-component adsorption isotherms. For the adsorption of methane, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2} on two of the three wet coals, the SLD-PR model can predict the component adsorption within the experimental uncertainties on average for all feed fractions (nominally molar compositions of 20/80, 40/60, 60/40, and 80/20) of the three binary gas mixture combinations, although predictions for some specific feed fractions are outside of their experimental uncertainties.

  3. OH-PLIF Measurements of High-Pressure, Hydrogen Augmented Premixed Flames in the SimVal Combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Strakey, P.A.; Woodruff, S.D.; Williams, T.C.; Schefer, R.W.

    2007-01-01

    Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) measurements of the hydroxyl radical in lean, premixed natural gas flames augmented with hydrogen are presented. The experiments were conducted in the SimVal combustor at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) at operating pressures from 1 to 8 atmospheres. The data, which was collected in a combustor with well controlled boundary conditions, is intended to be used for validating Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models under conditions directly relevant to land-based gas turbine engines. The images, which show significant effects of hydrogen on local flame quenching are discussed in terms of a turbulent premixed combustion regime and non-dimensional parameters such as Karlovitz number. Pressure was found to thin the OH region, but only had a secondary effect on overall flame shape compared to the effects of hydrogen addition which was found to decrease local quenching and shorten the turbulent flame brush. A method to process the individual images based on local gradients of fluorescence intensity is proposed and results are presented. Finally, the results of several Large Eddy Simulations (LES) are presented and compared to the experimental data in an effort to understand the issues related to model validation, especially for simulations that do not include OH as an intermediate species.

  4. Cryogenically formed prestressed composite fiber-metal structures for O2/N2 high pressure gas tanks.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleich, D.

    1971-01-01

    Demonstration of high-structural-performance ARDEFORM cryoformed 301 stainless-steel glass-fiber-reinforced (GFR) vessels by room temperature tests of 13 1/2-in. diam spheres. Tests verified that the structural performance of ARDEFORM spherical GFR vessels not only exceeded that of all metal construction, but also bettered previous GFR experimental results by 50%. Achievement of essentially the full strength of fiberglass in a spherical wrap pattern was again verified. Significant weight advantages for this construction are projected for O2/N2 high-pressure gas tanks for Space Shuttle environmental control/life support system missions.

  5. Human respiration at rest in rapid compression and at high pressures and gas densities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelfand, R.; Lambertsen, C. J.; Strauss, R.; Clark, J. M.; Puglia, C. D.

    1983-01-01

    The ventilation (V), end-tidal PCO2 (PACO2), and CO2 elimination rate were determined in men at rest breathing CO2-free gas over the pressure range 1-50 ATA and the gas density range 0.4-25 g/l, during slow and rapid compressions, at stable elevated ambient pressures and during slow decompressions. Progressive increase in pulmonary gas flow resistance due to elevation of ambient pressure and inspired gas density to the He-O2 equivalent of 5000 feet of seawater was found to produce a complex pattern of change in PACO2. It was found that as both ambient pressure and pulmonary gas flow resistance were progressively raised, PACO2 at first increased, went through a maximum, and then declined towards values near the 1 ATA level. It is concluded that this pattern of PACO2 change results from the interaction on ventilation of the increase in pulmonary resistance due to the elevation of gas density with the increase in respiratory drive postulated as due to generalized central nervous system excitation associated with exposure to high hydrostatic pressure. It is suggested that a similar interaction exists between increased gas flow resistance and the increase in respiratory drive related to nitrogen partial pressure and the resulting narcosis.

  6. Evaluation of candidate Stirling engine heater tube alloys after 3500 hours exposure to high pressure doped hydrogen or helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misencik, J. A.; Titran, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    The heater head tubes of current prototype automotive Stirling engines are fabricated from alloy N-155, an alloy which contains 20 percent cobalt. Because the United States imports over 90 percent of the cobalt used in this country and resource supplies could not meet the demand imposed by automotive applications of cobalt in the heater head (tubes plus cylinders and regenerator housings), it is imperative that substitute alloys free of cobalt be identified. The research described herein focused on the heater head tubes. Sixteen alloys (15 potential substitutes plus the 20 percent Co N-155 alloy) were evaluated in the form of thin wall tubing in the NASA Lewis Research Center Stirling simulator materials diesel fuel fired test rigs. Tubes filled with either hydrogen doped with 1 percent CO2 or with helium at a gas pressure of 15 MPa and a temperature of 820 C were cyclic endurance tested for times up to 3500 hr. Results showed that two iron-nickel base superalloys, CG-27 and Pyromet 901 survived the 3500 hr endurance test. The remaining alloys failed by creep-rupture at times less than 3000 hr, however, several other alloys had superior lives to N-155. Results further showed that doping the hydrogen working fluid with 1 vol % CO2 is an effective means of reducing hydrogen permeability through all the alloy tubes investigated.

  7. Composition for absorbing hydrogen from gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.; Wicks, George G.; Lee, Myung W.

    1999-01-01

    A hydrogen storage composition is provided which defines a physical sol-gel matrix having an average pore size of less than 3.5 angstroms which effectively excludes gaseous metal hydride poisons while permitting hydrogen gas to enter. The composition is useful for separating hydrogen gas from diverse gas streams which may have contaminants that would otherwise render the hydrogen absorbing material inactive.

  8. The aerodynamic effects of wheelspace coolant injection into the mainstream flow of a high pressure gas turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, Christopher Elliot

    Modern gas turbine engines operate with mainstream gas temperatures exceeding 1450°C in the high-pressure turbine stage. Unlike turbine blades, rotor disks and other internal components are not designed to withstand the extreme temperatures found in mainstream flow. In modern gas turbines, cooling air is pumped into the wheelspace cavities to prevent mainstream gas ingestion and then exits through a seal between the rotor and the nozzle guide vane (NGV) thereby mixing with the mainstream flow. The primary purpose for the wheelspace cooling air is the cooling of the turbine wheelspace. However, secondary effects arise from the mixing of the spent cooling air with the mainstream flow. The exiting cooling air is mixed with the hot mainstream flow effecting the aerodynamic and performance characteristics of the turbine stage. The physics underlying this mixing process and its effects on stage performance are not yet fully understood. The relative aerodynamic and performance effects associated with rotor - NGV gap coolant injections were investigated in the Axial Flow Turbine Research Facility (AFTRF) of the Center for Gas Turbines and Power of The Pennsylvania State University. This study quantifies the secondary effects of the coolant injection on the aerodynamic and performance character of the turbines main stream flow for root injection, radial cooling, and impingement cooling. Measurement and analysis of the cooling effects were performed in both stationary and rotational frames of reference. The AFTRF is unique in its ability to perform long duration cooling measurements in the stationary and rotating frames. The effects of wheelspace coolant mixing with the mainstream flow on total-to-total efficiency, energy transport, three dimensional velocity field, and loading coefficient were investigated. Overall, it was found that a small quantity (1%) of cooling air can have significant effects on the performance character and exit conditions of the high pressure stage

  9. KEY COMPARISON: CCM.FF-K5: a comparison of flow rates for natural gas at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dopheide, Dietrich

    2006-01-01

    The calibration of gas meters for flow rate measurements of natural gas at high pressure is of critical importance for gas importers, gas distributors and international trade, especially for Europe, as western Europe imports most of its natural gas consumption from Russia and Norway. The total gas consumption in western Europe is about 400 billion cubic metres per year. Key comparisons (KCs) have been organized among all national metrology organizations (NMIs) worldwide that maintain national standards and take care of natural gas metrology. It turned out that, for the time being, only three NMIs were ready to participate, as no other NMIs or countries maintain national standards. These three NMIs are PTB in Germany, NMi-VSL in the Netherlands and LNE in Paris. All existing facilities in the world were invited to participate, but they all refrained from participation, as they are not yet ready, e.g. CEESI, NIST, SwRI and TCC. Russia does not maintain a calibration facility so far. For more details we refer to the full report. The KCs were conducted in November/December 2004 at flow rates over a wide overlapping range of flow rate and pressure using a set of gas meters in series. The transfer package comprises of a turbine meter and an ultrasonic meter put in parallel. Flow rates between 65 m3 h-1 and 1000 m3 h-1 and pressures between 10 bar and 47 bar have been applied. The final report presents the degree of equivalence among the participants as well as the degree of equivalence to the KCRV and confirms all claimed uncertainties of the national calibration facilities of Germany, the Netherlands and France very well. In addition En values have been reported too. The last chapter of the final report shows that the so-called 'Harmonized European Natural Gas Cubic Metre' is identical with the KCRV of this KC. This ensures that the European facilities disseminate the best available realization of the gas cubic metre at high pressure, namely the KC, to their customers

  10. High-pressure ceramic air heater for indirectly fired gas turbine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahaye, P. G.; Briggs, G. F.; Vandervort, C. L.; Seger, J. L.

    The Externally-Fired Combined Cycle (EFCC) offers a method for operating high-efficiency gas and steam turbine combined cycles on coal. In the EFCC, an air heater replaces the gas turbine combustor so that the turbine can be indirectly fired. Ceramic materials are required for the heat exchange surfaces to accommodate the operating temperatures of modern gas turbines. The ceramic air heater or heat exchanger is the focus of this program, and the two primary objectives are (1) to demonstrate that a ceramic air heater can be reliably pressurized to a level of 225 psia (1.5 MPa); and (2) to show that the air heater can withstand exposure to the products of coal combustion at elevated temperatures. By replacing the gas turbine combustor with a ceramic air heater, the cycle can use coal or other ash-bearing fuels. Numerous programs have attempted to fuel high efficiency gas turbines directly with coal, often resulting in significant ash deposition upon turbine components and corrosion or erosion of turbine blades. This report will show that a ceramic air heater is significantly less susceptible to ash deposition or corrosion than a gas turbine when protected by rudimentary methods of gas-stream clean-up. A 25 x 10(sup 6) Btu/hr (7 MW) test facility is under construction in Kennebunk, Maine. It is anticipated that this proof of concept program will lead to commercialization of the EFCC by electric utility and industrial organizations. Applications are being pursued for power plants ranging from 10 to 100 megawatts.

  11. Optical Measurement and Visualization in High-Pressure, High-Temperature, Aviation Gas Turbine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Yolanda R.; Anderson, Robert C.; Locke, Randy J.

    2000-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), planar Mie scattering (PMie), and linear (1-D) spontaneous Raman scattering are applied to flame tube and sector combustors that burn Jet-A fuel at a range of inlet temperatures and pressures that simulate conditions expected in future high-performance civilian gas turbine engines. Chemiluminescence arising from C2 in the flame was also imaged. Flame spectral emissions measurements were obtained using a scanning spectrometer. Several different advanced concept fuel injectors were examined. First-ever PLIF and chemiluminescence data are presented from the 60-atm Gas turbine combustor facility.

  12. Behavior of short silica monolithic columns in high pressure gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Maniquet, Adrien; Bruyer, Nicolas; Raffin, Guy; Baco-Antoniali, Franck; Demesmay, Claire; Dugas, Vincent; Randon, Jérôme

    2016-08-19

    In order to analyze light hydrocarbons mixtures with silica monolithic columns, a conventional gas chromatograph was modified to work with carrier gas pressure as high as 60bar. To understand hydrodynamic flow and retention with short columns (less than 30cm), special attention was required due to the temperature difference between the oven area and the FID detector which contain a significant length of the column. Efficiency and selectivity using various carrier gases (helium, nitrogen and carbon dioxide) at different inlet pressure for different oven temperature were studied. Carrier gas nature was a very significant parameter: on one side, linked to adsorption mechanism for gases like nitrogen and carbon dioxide onto the stationary phase modifying retention and selectivity, on the other side in relation to the minimum theoretical plate height which was as low as 15μm (66 000 platem(-1)) using carbon dioxide as carrier gas. The chromatographic system was then used to separate methane, ethane, ethylene, acetylene, propane, cyclopropane, and butane in less than 30s. PMID:27432790

  13. High pressure gas storage capacities. Example of a solution using filament windings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phan, A.; Lamalle, J.

    1981-01-01

    The use of epoxy resin fiber glass and economic factors affecting the choice of materials for gas storage are discussed. The physical nature of the filament windings are described together with the results obtained. It is demonstrated that a substantial reduction in mass and an enhanced level of safety can be assured at a competitive cost by storing gases in this way.

  14. Feasibility demonstration of the Thermal Ignition Combustion System (TICS) for high-pressure natural-gas-injected engine

    SciTech Connect

    Kalwani, R.M.; McNulty, D.; Badgley, P.; Kamo, R.

    1989-02-01

    The objective of the program was the feasibility demonstration of the Thermal Ignition Combustion System (TICS) concept for the ignition and combustion of high-pressure injected natural gas. The TICS concept relies on the ignition of fuel by high-temperature combustion chamber walls without external ignition sources like spark plug, glow plug, or pilot diesel fuel. The program was successful in achieving ignition and combustion of natural gas in a single cylinder diesel engine with the TICS concept. An electronically controlled gas injector, designed and fabricated in the program, was used to inject natural gas at 13.8 to 20.7 MPa (2000 to 3000 psig) pressure in the TICS chamber. Cold starting of the test engine was achieved by external heating of the chamber for a few minutes. Natural gas ignition and combustion was then sustained by the high-temperature TICS chamber. The test engine was operated from idle to full load and from 600 to 1400 rpm engine-speed range.

  15. Spectrographic temperature measurement of a high power breakdown arc in a high pressure gas switch.

    PubMed

    Yeckel, Christopher; Curry, Randy

    2011-09-01

    A procedure for obtaining an approximate temperature value of conducting plasma generated during self-break closure of a RIMFIRE gas switch is described. The plasma is in the form of a breakdown arc which conducts approximately 12 kJ of energy in 1 μs. A spectrographic analysis of the trigger-section of the 6-MV RIMFIRE laser triggered gas switch used in Sandia National Laboratory's "Z-Machine" has been made. It is assumed that the breakdown plasma has sufficiently approached local thermodynamic equilibrium allowing a black-body temperature model to be applied. This model allows the plasma temperature and radiated power to be approximated. The gas dielectric used in these tests was pressurized SF(6). The electrode gap is set at 4.59 cm for each test. The electrode material is stainless steel and insulator material is poly(methyl methacrylate). A spectrum range from 220 to 550 nanometers has been observed and calibrated using two spectral irradiance lamps and three spectrograph gratings. The approximate plasma temperature is reported. PMID:21974578

  16. Spectrographic temperature measurement of a high power breakdown arc in a high pressure gas switch

    SciTech Connect

    Yeckel, Christopher; Curry, Randy

    2011-09-15

    A procedure for obtaining an approximate temperature value of conducting plasma generated during self-break closure of a RIMFIRE gas switch is described. The plasma is in the form of a breakdown arc which conducts approximately 12 kJ of energy in 1 {mu}s. A spectrographic analysis of the trigger-section of the 6-MV RIMFIRE laser triggered gas switch used in Sandia National Laboratory's ''Z-Machine'' has been made. It is assumed that the breakdown plasma has sufficiently approached local thermodynamic equilibrium allowing a black-body temperature model to be applied. This model allows the plasma temperature and radiated power to be approximated. The gas dielectric used in these tests was pressurized SF{sub 6}. The electrode gap is set at 4.59 cm for each test. The electrode material is stainless steel and insulator material is poly(methyl methacrylate). A spectrum range from 220 to 550 nanometers has been observed and calibrated using two spectral irradiance lamps and three spectrograph gratings. The approximate plasma temperature is reported.

  17. Thermodynamic measurements in a high pressure hydrogen-oxygen flame using Raman scattering from a broadband excimer laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy, Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Raman scattering is an inelastic molecular scattering process in which incident radiation is reemitted at a fixed change in frequency. Raman spectroscopy can be used to measure the number density and temperature of the irradiated species. The strength of the Raman signal is inversely proportional to the wavelength raised to the fourth power. Consequently, high signal to noise ratios are obtained by using ultraviolet (UV) excitation sources. Using UV sources for Raman Spectroscopy in flames is complicated by the fact that some of the primary constituents in hydrogen-oxygen combustion absorb and reemit light in the UV and these fluorescence processes interfere with the Raman signals. This problem has been handled in atmospheric pressure flames in some instances by using a narrowband tunable excimer laser as a source. This allows for detuning from absorption transitions and the elimination of interfering fluorescence signals at the Raman wavelengths. This approach works well in the atmospheric pressure flame; however, it has two important disadvantages. First, injection-locked narrowband tunable excimer lasers are very expensive. More importantly, however, is the fact that at the high pressures characteristic of rocket engine combustion chambers, the absorption transitions are broadened making it difficult to tune to a spectral location at which substantial absorption would not occur. The approach taken in this work is to separate the Raman signal from the fluorescence background by taking advantage of the fact that Raman signal has nonisotropic polarization characteristics while the fluorescence signals are unpolarized. Specifically, for scattering at right angles to the excitation beam path, the Raman signal is completely polarized. The Raman signal is separated from the fluorescence background by collecting both horizontally and vertically polarized signals separately. One of the polarizations has both the Raman signal and the fluorescence background while the

  18. Hydrogen gas relief valve

    DOEpatents

    Whittlesey, Curtis C.

    1985-01-01

    An improved battery stack design for an electrochemical system having at least one cell from which a gas is generated and an electrolyte in communication with the cell is described. The improved battery stack design features means for defining a substantially closed compartment for containing the battery cells and at least a portion of the electrolyte for the system, and means in association with the compartment means for selectively venting gas from the interior of the compartment means in response to the level of the electrolyte within the compartment means. The venting means includes a relief valve having a float member which is actuated in response to the level of the electrolyte within the compartment means. This float member is adapted to close the relief valve when the level of the electrolyte is above a predetermined level and open the relief valve when the level of electrolyte is below this predetermined level.

  19. Stability of Hydrogen-Bonded Supramolecular Architecture under High Pressure Conditions: Pressure-Induced Amorphization in Melamine−Boric Acid Adduct

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, K.; Duan, D; Wang, R; Lin, A; Cui, Q; Liu, B; Cui, T; Zou, B; Zhang, X; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of high pressure on the structural stability of the melamine-boric acid adduct (C3N6H6 2H3BO3, M 2B), a three-dimensional hydrogen-bonded supramolecular architecture, were studied by in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. M 2B exhibited a high compressibility and a strong anisotropic compression, which can be explained by the layerlike crystal packing. Furthermore, evolution of XRD patterns and Raman spectra indicated that the M 2B crystal undergoes a reversible pressure-induced amorphization (PIA) at 18 GPa. The mechanism for the PIA was attributed to the competition between close packing and long-range order. Ab initio calculations were also performed to account for the behavior of hydrogen bonding under high pressure.

  20. Development of a plasma sprayed ceramic gas path seal for high pressure turbine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiembob, L. T.

    1977-01-01

    The plasma sprayed graded layered yittria stabilized zirconia (ZrO2)/metal(CoCrAlY) seal system for gas turbine blade tip applications up to 1589 K (2400 F) seal temperatures was studied. Abradability, erosion, and thermal fatigue characteristics of the graded layered system were evaluated by rig tests. Satisfactory abradability and erosion resistance was demonstrated. Encouraging thermal fatigue tolerance was shown. Initial properties for the plasma sprayed materials in the graded, layered seal system was obtained, and thermal stress analyses were performed. Sprayed residual stresses were determined. Thermal stability of the sprayed layer materials was evaluated at estimated maximum operating temperatures in each layer. Anisotropic behavior in the layer thickness direction was demonstrated by all layers. Residual stresses and thermal stability effects were not included in the analyses. Analytical results correlated reasonably well with results of the thermal fatigue tests. Analytical application of the seal system to a typical gas turbine engine application predicted performance similar to rig specimen thermal fatigue performance. A model for predicting crack propagation in the sprayed ZrO2/CoCrAlY seal system was proposed, and recommendations for improving thermal fatigue resistance were made. Seal system layer thicknesses were analytically optimized to minimize thermal stresses in the abradability specimen during thermal fatigue testing. Rig tests on the optimized seal configuration demonstrated some improvement in thermal fatigue characteristics.

  1. Secondary scintillation yield in high-pressure xenon gas for neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, E. D. C.; Monteiro, C. M. B.; Ball, M.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; Lopes, J. A. M.; Lux, T.; Sánchez, F.; dos Santos, J. M. F.

    2010-02-01

    The search for neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) is an important topic in contemporary physics with many active experiments. New projects are planning to use high-pressure xenon gas as both source and detection medium. The secondary scintillation processes available in noble gases permit large amplification with negligible statistical fluctuations, offering the prospect of energy resolution approaching the Fano factor limit. This Letter reports results for xenon secondary scintillation yield, at room temperature, as a function of electric field in the gas scintillation gap for pressures ranging from 2 to 10 bar. A Large Area Avalanche Photodiode (LAAPD) collected the VUV secondary scintillation produced in the gas. X-rays directly absorbed in the LAAPD are used as a reference for determining the number of charge carriers produced by the scintillation pulse and, hence, the number of photons impinging the LAAPD. The number of photons produced per drifting electron and per kilovolt, the so-called scintillation amplification parameter, displays a small increase with pressure, ranging from 141±6 at 2 bar to 170±10 at 8 bar. In our setup, this parameter does not increase above 8 bar due to non-negligible electron attachment. The results are in good agreement with those presented in the literature in the 1 to 3 bar range. The increase of the scintillation amplification parameter with pressure for high gas densities has been also observed in former work at cryogenic temperatures.

  2. Combustion of liquid fuels in a flowing combustion gas environment at high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canada, G. S.; Faeth, G. M.

    1975-01-01

    The combustion of fuel droplets in gases which simulate combustion chamber conditions was considered both experimentally and theoretically. The fuel droplets were simulated by porous spheres and allowed to gasify in combustion gases produced by a burner. Tests were conducted for pressures of 1-40 atm, temperatures of 600-1500 K, oxygen concentrations of 0-13% (molar) and approach Reynolds numbers of 40-680. The fuels considered in the tests included methanol, ethanol, propanol-1, n-pentane, n-heptane and n-decane. Measurements were made of both the rate of gasification of the droplet and the liquid surface temperature. Measurements were compared with theory, involving various models of gas phase transport properties with a multiplicative correction for the effect of forced convection.

  3. Development of a plasma sprayed ceramic gas path seal for high pressure turbine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiembob, L. T.; Hyland, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    Development of the plasma sprayed graded, layered ZrO2/CoCrAlY seal system for gas turbine engine blade tip seal application up to 1589 K (2400 F) surface temperature was continued. Methods of improvement of the cyclic thermal shock resistance of the sprayed zirconia seal system were investigated. The most promising method, reduction of the ceramic thickness and metallic substrate stiffness were selected based upon potential and feasibility. Specimens were fabricated and experimentally evaluated to: (1) substantiate the capacity of the geometry changes to reduce operating stresses in the sprayed structure; and (2) define the abradability, erosion, thermal shock and physical property characteristic for the sprayed ceramic seal system. Thermal stress analysis was performed and correlated with thermal shock test results.

  4. Distortion Control of Transmission Components by Optimized High Pressure Gas Quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuer, Volker; Faron, Donald R.; Bolton, David; Lifshits, Mike; Loeser, K.

    2013-07-01

    The paper presents how the "Dynamic Quenching" and "Reversing gas flow" processes are successfully applied on internal ring gears and planetary gears for a 6-speed automatic transmission. The specific challenge was to reduce distortion in such a way that subsequent machining operations are entirely eliminated. As a result of extensive development in the quenching process, it was possible to meet the design metrological requirements. The internal ring gears have been in continuous production since 2006. By utilizing the special CFC fixtures and quench methodology of "Dynamic Quenching," the customer was able to achieve the design intent, while eliminating all machining operations of the ring gears following LPC/HPGQ. Subsequent testing and monitoring over a 2-year period progressively demonstrated that conformance. Therefore, quality inspection was reduced accordingly.

  5. Final results of bilateral comparison between NIST and PTB for flows of high pressure natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickan, B.; Toebben, H.; Johnson, A.; Kegel, T.

    2013-01-01

    In 2009 NIST developed a US national flow standard to provide traceability for flow meters used for custody transfer of pipeline quality natural gas. NIST disseminates the SI unit of flow by calibrating a customer flow meter against a parallel array of turbine meter working standards, which in turn are traceable to a pressure-volume-temperature-time (PVTt) primary standard. The calibration flow range extends from 0.125 actual m3/s to 9 actual m3/s with an expanded uncertainty as low as 0.22% at high flows, and increasing to almost 0.40% at the lowest flows. Details regarding the traceability chain and uncertainty analysis are documented in prior publications. The current manuscript verifies NIST's calibration uncertainty via a bilateral comparison with the German National Metrology Institute PTB. The results of the bilateral are linked to the 2006 key comparison results between three EURAMET national metrology institutes (i.e., PTB, VSL and LNE). Linkage is accomplished in spite of using a different transfer standard in the bilateral versus the key comparison. A mathematical proof is included that demonstrates that the relative difference between a laboratory's measured flow and the key comparison reference value is independent of the transfer package for most flow measurement applications. The bilateral results demonstrate that NIST's natural gas flow measurements are within their specified uncertainties and are equivalent to those of the EURAMET National Metrology Institutes. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  6. Fuel Injector Patternation Evaluation in Advanced Liquid-Fueled, High Pressure, Gas Turbine Combustors, Using Nonintrusive Optical Diagnostic Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locke, R. J.; Hicks, Y. R.; Anderson, R. C.; Zaller, M. M.

    1998-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging and planar Mie scattering are used to examine the fuel distribution pattern (patternation) for advanced fuel injector concepts in kerosene burning, high pressure gas turbine combustors. Three diverse fuel injector concepts for aerospace applications were investigated under a broad range of operating conditions. Fuel PLIF patternation results are contrasted with those obtained by planar Mie scattering. Further comparison is also made for one injector with data obtained through phase Doppler measurements. Differences in spray patterns for diverse conditions and fuel injector configurations are readily discernible. An examination of the data has shown that a direct determination of the fuel spray angle at realistic conditions is also possible. The results obtained in this study demonstrate the applicability and usefulness of these nonintrusive optical techniques for investigating fuel spray patternation under actual combustor conditions.

  7. High-Pressure Hot-Gas Self-Acting Floating Ring Shaft Seal for Liquid Rocket Turbopumps. [tapered bore seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, R. E.; Diamond, W. A.

    1980-01-01

    Design analysis, detail design, fabrication, and experimental evaluation was performed on two self acting floating ring shaft seals for a rocket engine turbopump high pressure 24132500 n/sq m (3500 psig) hot gas 533 K 9500 F) high speed 3142 rad/sec (30000 rmp) turbine. The initial design used Rayleigh step hydrodynamic lift pads to assist in centering the seal ring with minimum rubbing contact. The final design used a convergent tapered bore to provide hydrostatic centering force. The Rayleigh step design was tested for 107 starts and 4.52 hours total. The leakage was satisfactory; however, the design was not acceptable due to excessive wear caused by inadequate centering force and failure of the sealing dam caused by erosion damage. The tapered bore design was tested for 370 starts and 15.93 hours total. Satisfactory performance for the required life of 7.5 hours per seal was successfully demonstrated.

  8. Development of high pressure-high vacuum-high conductance piston valve for gas-filled radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, D. N.; Ayyappan, R.; Kamble, L. P.; Singh, J. P.; Muralikrishna, L. V.; Alex, M.; Balagi, V.; Mukhopadhyay, P. K.

    2008-05-01

    Gas-filled radiation detectors need gas filling at pressures that range from few cms of mercury to as high as 25kg/cm2 at room temperature. Before gas-filling these detectors require evacuation to a vacuum of the order of ~1 × 10-5 mbar. For these operations of evacuation and gas filling a system consisting of a vacuum pump with a high vacuum gauge, gas cylinder with a pressure gauge and a valve is used. The valve has to meet the three requirements of compatibility with high-pressure and high vacuum and high conductance. A piston valve suitable for the evacuation and gas filling of radiation detectors has been designed and fabricated to meet the above requirements. The stainless steel body (80mm×160mm overall dimensions) valve with a piston arrangement has a 1/2 inch inlet/outlet opening, neoprene/viton O-ring at piston face & diameter for sealing and a knob for opening and closing the valve. The piston movement mechanism is designed to have minimum wear of sealing O-rings. The valve has been hydrostatic pressure tested up to 75bars and has Helium leak rate of less than 9.6×10-9 m bar ltr/sec in vacuum mode and 2×10-7 mbar ltr/sec in pressure mode. As compared to a commercial diaphragm valve, which needed 3 hours to evacuate a 7 litre chamber to 2.5×10-5 mbar, the new valve achieved vacuum 7.4×10-6mbar in the same time under the same conditions.

  9. Development of a plasma sprayed ceramic gas path seal for high pressure turbine application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiembob, L. T.

    1978-01-01

    Development of the plasma sprayed graded, layered ZRO2/CoCrAlY seal system for gas turbine engine blade tip seal applications up to 1589 K (2400 F) surface temperature was continued. The effect of changing ZRO2/CoCrAlY ratios in the intermediate layers on thermal stresses was evaluated analytically with the goal of identifying the materials combinations which would minimize thermal stresses in the seal system. Three methods of inducing compressive residual stresses in the sprayed seal materials to offset tensile thermal stresses were analyzed. The most promising method, thermal prestraining, was selected based upon potential, feasibility and complexity considerations. The plasma spray equipment was modified to heat, control and monitor the substrate temperature during spraying. Specimens were fabricated and experimentally evaluated to: (1) substantiate the capability of the thermal prestrain method to develop compressive residual stresses in the sprayed structure and (2) define the effect of spraying on a heated substate on abradability, erosion and thermal shock characteristics of the seal system. Thermal stress analysis, including residual stresses and material properties variations, was performed and correlated with thermal shock test results. Seal system performance was assessed and recommendations for further development were made.

  10. Raman-free nonlinear optical effects in high pressure gas-filled hollow core PCF.

    PubMed

    Azhar, M; Wong, G K L; Chang, W; Joly, N Y; Russell, P St J

    2013-02-25

    The effective Kerr nonlinearity of hollow-core kagomé-style photonic crystal fiber (PCF) filled with argon gas increases to ~15% of that of bulk silica glass when the pressure is increased from 1 to 150 bar, while the zero dispersion wavelength shifts from 300 to 900 nm. The group velocity dispersion of the system is uniquely pressure-tunable over a wide range while avoiding Raman scattering-absent in noble gases-and having an extremely high optical damage threshold. As a result, detailed and well-controlled studies of nonlinear effects can be performed, in both normal and anomalous dispersion regimes, using only a fixed-frequency pump laser. For example, the absence of Raman scattering permits clean observation, at high powers, of the interaction between a modulational instability side-band and a soliton-created dispersive wave. Excellent agreement is obtained between numerical simulations and experimental results. The system has great potential for the realization of reconfigurable supercontinuum sources, wavelength convertors and short-pulse laser systems. PMID:23481974

  11. Viability and adaptation potential of indigenous microorganisms from natural gas field fluids in high pressure incubations with supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Frerichs, Janin; Rakoczy, Jana; Ostertag-Henning, Christian; Krüger, Martin

    2014-01-21

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is currently under debate as large-scale solution to globally reduce emissions of the greenhouse gas CO2. Depleted gas or oil reservoirs and saline aquifers are considered as suitable reservoirs providing sufficient storage capacity. We investigated the influence of high CO2 concentrations on the indigenous bacterial population in the saline formation fluids of a natural gas field. Bacterial community changes were closely examined at elevated CO2 concentrations under near in situ pressures and temperatures. Conditions in the high pressure reactor systems simulated reservoir fluids i) close to the CO2 injection point, i.e. saturated with CO2, and ii) at the outer boundaries of the CO2 dissolution gradient. During the incubations with CO2, total cell numbers remained relatively stable, but no microbial sulfate reduction activity was detected. After CO2 release and subsequent transfer of the fluids, an actively sulfate-respiring community was re-established. The predominance of spore-forming Clostridiales provided evidence for the resilience of this taxon against the bactericidal effects of supercritical (sc)CO2. To ensure the long-term safety and injectivity, the viability of fermentative and sulfate-reducing bacteria has to be considered in the selection, design, and operation of CCS sites. PMID:24320192

  12. Use of a torsional pendulum as a high-pressure gage and determination of viscosity of helium gas at high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maisel, J. E.; Webeler, R. W. H.; Grimes, H. H.

    1973-01-01

    Three torsional crystal parameters were examined for suitability in sensing pressure in gases up to 131 million newtons per square meter. The best parameters were found to be the change in crystal decrement at resonance and the change in crystal electrical resistance at resonance. The change in crystal resonant frequency did not appear to be a reliable pressure measuring parameter. Pure argon and pure helium gases were studied for use as working fluids. Helium functioned better over a wider pressure range. Calibration of the gage also provided a measure of the viscosity-density product of the gas as a function of pressure. These data, together with known extrapolated density data, permitted the determination of the viscosity of helium to 131 million N/square meter.

  13. Synthesis and morphology of iron-iron oxide core-shell nanoparticles produced by high pressure gas condensation.

    PubMed

    Xing, Lijuan; Ten Brink, Gert H; Chen, Bin; Schmidt, Franz P; Haberfehlner, Georg; Hofer, Ferdinand; Kooi, Bart J; Palasantzas, George

    2016-05-27

    Core-shell structured Fe nanoparticles (NPs) produced by high pressure magnetron sputtering gas condensation were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, electron diffraction, electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), tomographic reconstruction, and Wulff shape construction analysis. The core-shell structure, which is composed of an Fe core surrounded by a maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) and/or magnetite (Fe3O4) shell, was confirmed by fast Fourier transform (FFT) analysis combined with EELS. It was found that the particle size and shape strongly depend on the gas environment. Moreover, extensive analysis showed that NPs with a size between 10-20 nm possess a truncated cubic morphology, which is confined by the 6 {100} planes that are truncated by the 12 {110} planes at different degrees. For NPs larger than 20 nm, the rhombic dodecahedron defined by the 12 {110} planes is the predominant crystal shape, while truncated rhombic dodecahedrons, as well as non-truncated and truncated cubic NPs, were also observed. The NPs without truncation showed a characteristic inward relaxation indicating that besides thermodynamics kinetics also plays a crucial role during particle growth. PMID:27089553

  14. Synthesis and morphology of iron–iron oxide core–shell nanoparticles produced by high pressure gas condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Lijuan; ten Brink, Gert H.; Chen, Bin; Schmidt, Franz P.; Haberfehlner, Georg; Hofer, Ferdinand; Kooi, Bart J.; Palasantzas, George

    2016-05-01

    Core–shell structured Fe nanoparticles (NPs) produced by high pressure magnetron sputtering gas condensation were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, electron diffraction, electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), tomographic reconstruction, and Wulff shape construction analysis. The core–shell structure, which is composed of an Fe core surrounded by a maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) and/or magnetite (Fe3O4) shell, was confirmed by fast Fourier transform (FFT) analysis combined with EELS. It was found that the particle size and shape strongly depend on the gas environment. Moreover, extensive analysis showed that NPs with a size between 10–20 nm possess a truncated cubic morphology, which is confined by the 6 {100} planes that are truncated by the 12 {110} planes at different degrees. For NPs larger than 20 nm, the rhombic dodecahedron defined by the 12 {110} planes is the predominant crystal shape, while truncated rhombic dodecahedrons, as well as non-truncated and truncated cubic NPs, were also observed. The NPs without truncation showed a characteristic inward relaxation indicating that besides thermodynamics kinetics also plays a crucial role during particle growth.

  15. High-pressure neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hongwu

    2011-01-10

    This lecture will cover progress and prospect of applications of high-pressure neutron diffraction techniques to Earth and materials sciences. I will first introduce general high-pressure research topics and available in-situ high-pressure techniques. Then I'll talk about high-pressure neutron diffraction techniques using two types of pressure cells: fluid-driven and anvil-type cells. Lastly, I will give several case studies using these techniques, particularly, those on hydrogen-bearing materials and magnetic transitions.

  16. High-pressure microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjort, K.

    2015-03-01

    When using appropriate materials and microfabrication techniques, with the small dimensions the mechanical stability of microstructured devices allows for processes at high pressures without loss in safety. The largest area of applications has been demonstrated in green chemistry and bioprocesses, where extraction, synthesis and analyses often excel at high densities and high temperatures. This is accessible through high pressures. Capillary chemistry has been used since long but, just like in low-pressure applications, there are several potential advantages in using microfluidic platforms, e.g., planar isothermal set-ups, large local variations in geometries, dense form factors, small dead volumes and precisely positioned microstructures for control of reactions, catalysis, mixing and separation. Other potential applications are in, e.g., microhydraulics, exploration, gas driven vehicles, and high-pressure science. From a review of the state-of-art and frontiers of high pressure microfluidics, the focus will be on different solutions demonstrated for microfluidic handling at high pressures and challenges that remain.

  17. Hydrogen bond-like equatorial C-H⋯O interactions in aqueous 1,3-dioxane: A combined high-pressure infrared and Raman spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hai-Chou; Jiang, Jyh-Chiang; Chuang, Ching-Wei; Lin, Jui-San; Lai, Wen-Wei; Yang, Yu-Chuan; Lin, Sheng Hsien

    2005-07-01

    Our results demonstrate that the equatorial C-H groups of 1,3-dioxane form hydrogen-bond-like C-H⋯O interactions more readily than do the axial C-H groups. The peak frequency of the strong axial C-H stretch band of 1,3-dioxane in a dilute D 2O solution possesses an unusual non-monotonic pressure dependence, which indicates enhanced C-H⋯O hydrogen bond formation at high pressure. We performed density functional theory calculations to predict the relative energies and total interaction energies of 1,3-dioxane/(water) n clusters and found that the equatorial C-H groups are more favorable sites for hydrogen bonding than are the axial C-H groups.

  18. High pressure studies of superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, Narelle Jayne

    Superconductivity has been studied extensively since it was first discovered over 100 years ago. High pressure studies, in particular, have been vital in furthering our understanding of the superconducting state. Pressure allows researchers to enhance the properties of existing superconductors, to find new superconductors, and to test the validity of theoretical models. This thesis presents a series of high pressure measurements performed in both He-gas and diamond anvil cell systems on various superconductors and on materials in which pressure-induced superconductivity has been predicted. Under pressure the alkali metals undergo a radical departure from the nearly-free electron model. In Li this leads to a superconducting transition temperature that is among the highest of the elements. All alkali metals have been predicted to become superconducting under pressure. Pursuant to this, a search for superconductivity has been conducted in the alkali metals Na and K. In addition, the effect of increasing electron concentration on Li1-xMgx alloys has been studied. Metallic hydrogen and hydrogen-rich compounds are believed to be good candidates for high temperature superconductivity. High pressure optical studies of benzene (C6H6) have been performed to 2 Mbar to search for pressure-induced metallization. Finally, cuprate and iron-based materials are considered high-Tc superconductors. These layered compounds exhibit anisotropic behavior under pressure. Precise hydrostatic measurements of dTc/dP on HgBa2CuO 4+delta have been carried out in conjunction with uniaxial pressure experiments by another group. The results obtained provide insight into the effect of each of the lattice parameters on Tc. Finally, a series of hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic measurements on LnFePO (Ln = La, Pr, Nd) reveal startling evidence that the superconducting state in the iron-based superconductors is highly sensitive to lattice strain.

  19. New Gas Polarographic Hydrogen Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominguez, Jesus A.; Barile, Ron

    2004-01-01

    Polarography is the measurement of the current that flows in solution as a function of an applied voltage. The actual form of the observed polarographic current depends upon the manner in which the voltage is applied and on the characteristics of the working electrode. The new gas polarographic H2 sensor shows a current level increment with concentration of the gaseous H2 similar to those relating to metal ions in liquid electrolytes in well-known polarography. This phenomenon is caused by the fact that the diffusion of the gaseous H2 through a gas diffusion hole built in the sensor is a rate-determining step in the gaseous-hydrogen sensing mechanism. The diffusion hole artificially limits the diffusion of the gaseous H2 toward the electrode located at the sensor cavity. This gas polarographic H2 sensor. is actually an electrochemical-pumping cell since the gaseous H2 is in fact pumped via the electrochemical driving force generated between the electrodes. Gaseous H2 enters the diffusion hole and reaches the first electrode (anode) located in the sensor cavity to be transformed into an H+ ions or protons; H+ ions pass through the electrolyte and reach the second electrode (cathode) to be reformed to gaseous H2. Gas polarographic 02 sensors are commercially available; a gas polarographic 02 sensor was used to prove the feasibility of building a new gas polarographic H2 sensor.

  20. Low-temperature embrittlement of Ti-6Al-4V and Inconel-718 by high pressure hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, W. T.; Walter, R. J.

    1970-01-01

    Notched specimens of titanium alloy and Inconel-718 exhibit little reduction of notch strength at certain low temperatures under 2000 lb/sq in. hydrogen, unnotched specimens are not embrittled at these temperatures. The degree of Inconel-718 embrittlement is lower than earlier observations under 1000 lb/sq in. hydrogen.

  1. A High-Pressure Gas-Scintillation-Proportional Counter for the Focus of a Hard-X-Ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, R. A.; Ramsey, B. D.; Tse, C. L.

    1999-01-01

    We are developing a high-pressure Gas Scintillation Proportional Counter (GSPC) for the focus of a balloon-borne hard-x-ray telescope. The device has a total active diameter of 50 mm, of which the central 20 mm only is used, and is filled with xenon + 4% helium at a total pressure of 10 6 Pa giving a quantum efficiency of greater than 85% up to 60 keV. The detector entrance is sealed with a beryllium window, 3-mm thick, which provides useful transmission down to 6 keV, way below the atmospheric cut-off at balloon float altitudes. Scintillation light exits the detector via a UV transmitting window in its base and is registered by a Hamamatsu position-sensitive crossed-grid-readout photomultiplier tube. Initial testing is underway, quantifying light yield and energy resolution. Following that, the spatial resolution and absolute efficiency will be calibrated. Simulations show that a spatial resolution of better than 0.5 mm FWHM should be achievable up to 60 keV, and this is well matched to the angular resolution and plate scale of the mirror system. The energy resolution will be around 5% at 22 keV. Full details of the instrument design and its performance will be presented. A first flight is scheduled for the Fall of 99, on a stratospheric balloon to be launched from Fort Sumner, New Mexico.

  2. First proof of topological signature in the high pressure xenon gas TPC with electroluminescence amplification for the NEXT experiment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ferrario, P.

    2016-01-19

    The NEXT experiment aims to observe the neutrinoless double beta decay of xenon in a high-pressure 136Xe gas TPC using electroluminescence (EL) to amplify the signal from ionization. One of the main advantages of this technology is the possibility to reconstruct the topology of events with energies close to Qββ. This paper presents the first demonstration that the topology provides extra handles to reject background events using data obtained with the NEXT-DEMO prototype. Single electrons resulting from the interactions of 22Na 1275 keV gammas and electron-positron pairs produced by conversions of gammas from the 228Th decay chain were used tomore » represent the background and the signal in a double beta decay. Furthermore, these data were used to develop algorithms for the reconstruction of tracks and the identification of the energy deposited at the end-points, providing an extra background rejection factor of 24.3 ± 1.4 (stat.)%, while maintaining an efficiency of 66.7 ± 1% for signal events.« less

  3. Device removes hydrogen gas from enclosed spaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, W. N.

    1966-01-01

    Hydrogen-oxidant galvanic cell removes small amounts of hydrogen gas continually released from equipment, such as vented silver-zinc batteries, in enclosed compartments where air venting is not feasible. These cells are used in satellite compartments.

  4. Hydrogen bond effects on compressional behavior of isotypic minerals: high-pressure polymorphism of cristobalite-like Be(OH)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Hannah; Barkley, Madison C.; Downs, Robert T.; Miletich, Ronald; Dera, Przemyslaw

    2016-05-01

    Three isotypic crystals, SiO2 (α-cristobalite), ɛ-Zn(OH)2 (wülfingite), and Be(OH)2 (β-behoite), with topologically identical frameworks of corner-connected tetrahedra, undergo displacive compression-driven phase transitions at similar pressures (1.5-2.0 GPa), but each transition is characterized by a different mechanism resulting in different structural modifications. In this study, we report the crystal structure of the high-pressure γ-phase of beryllium hydroxide and compare it with the high-pressure structures of the other two minerals. In Be(OH)2, the transition from the ambient β-behoite phase with the orthorhombic space group P212121 and ambient unit cell parameters a = 4.5403(4) Å, b = 4.6253(5) Å, c = 7.0599(7) Å, to the high-pressure orthorhombic γ-polymorph with space group Fdd2 and unit cell parameters (at 5.3(1) GPa) a = 5.738(2) Å, b = 6.260(3) Å, c = 7.200(4) Å takes place between 1.7 and 3.6 GPa. This transition is essentially second order, is accompanied by a negligible volume discontinuity, and exhibits both displacive and reversible character. The mechanism of the phase transition results in a change to the hydrogen bond connectivities and rotation of the BeO4 tetrahedra.

  5. High-Pressure Raman and Calorimetry Studies of Vanadium(III) Alkyl Hydrides for Kubas-Type Hydrogen Storage.

    PubMed

    Morris, Leah; Trudeau, Michel L; Reed, Daniel; Book, David; Antonelli, David M

    2016-03-16

    Reversible hydrogen storage under ambient conditions has been identified as a major bottleneck in enabling a future hydrogen economy. Herein, we report an amorphous vanadium(III) alkyl hydride gel that binds hydrogen through the Kubas interaction. The material possesses a gravimetric adsorption capacity of 5.42 wt % H2 at 120 bar and 298 K reversibly at saturation with no loss of capacity after ten cycles. This corresponds to a volumetric capacity of 75.4 kgH2  m(-3) . Raman experiments at 100 bar confirm that Kubas binding is involved in the adsorption mechanism. The material possesses an enthalpy of H2 adsorption of +0.52 kJ mol(-1) H2 , as measured directly by calorimetry, and this is practical for use in a vehicles without a complex heat management system. PMID:26762590

  6. Thermodynamics of a solar mixture of molecular hydrogen and helium at high pressure. [for Jupiter atmospheric model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slattery, W. L.; Hubbard, W. B.

    1976-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of a model molecular hydrogen and helium mixture are calculated in the strongly interacting region of 0.005 to 0.3 per cu cm for a range of temperatures that are of interest for the envelopes of the Jovian planets. Computed adiabats fit the gravity data and boundary conditions from model atmospheres of Jupiter.

  7. Solution of the subsynchronous whirl problem in the high-pressure hydrogen turbomachinery of the Space Shuttle Main Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ek, M. C.

    1978-01-01

    Subsynchronous whirl of the high-pressure fuel turbopump limited operation of the Space Shuttle Main Engine for some months in early 1976. The means by which this problem was successfully attacked is of particular interest to the rotor-dynamics community, not only because this machinery was the highest power-to-weight ratio known (77,000 hp...760 pounds), but because of the multiple forcing functions involved and the means, both analytical and experimental, which were utilized in separating variables, pointing toward successful solutions, and evaluating results. The general means of identifying fundamental characteristics, analyzing data, and conducting computer investigations are delineated. The results of analysis and testing are discussed. Since whirl inception occurs at a shaft speed greater than twice the first system critical, this was increased by stiffening the shaft and bearing supports; the system damping and system stiffness was additionally increased by proper interstage seal design to the extent that the instability threshold is now beyond the operating range.

  8. A new technique for pumping hydrogen gas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; Hardcastle, K.

    1970-01-01

    A system for pumping hydrogen gas without isotopic fractionation has been developed. The pump contains uranium metal, which when heated to about 80??C reacts with hydrogen to form UH3. The UH3 is heated to above 500??C to decompose the hydride and regenerate the hydrogen. ?? 1970.

  9. Hydrogen gas sensor and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    McKee, John M.

    1991-01-01

    A sensor for measuring the pressure of hydrogen gas in a nuclear reactor, and method of manufacturing the same. The sensor comprises an elongated tube of hydrogen permeable material which is connected to a pressure transducer through a feedthrough tube which passes through a wall at the boundary of the region in which hydrogen is present. The tube is pressurized and flushed with hydrogen gas at an elevated temperature during the manufacture of the sensor in order to remove all gasses other than hydrogen from the device.

  10. Lattice stability and high-pressure melting mechanism of dense hydrogen up to 1.5 TPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Hua Y.; Hoffmann, R.; Wu, Q.

    2015-09-01

    Lattice stability and metastability, as well as melting, are important features of the physics and chemistry of dense hydrogen. Using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD), the classical superheating limit and melting line of metallic hydrogen are investigated up to 1.5 TPa. The computations show that the classical superheating degree is about 100 K, and the classical melting curve becomes flat at a level of 350 K when beyond 500 GPa. This information allows us to estimate the well depth and the potential barriers that must be overcome when the crystal melts. Inclusion of nuclear quantum effects (NQE) using path integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) predicts that both superheating limit and melting temperature are lowered to below room temperature, but the latter never reaches absolute zero. Detailed analysis indicates that the melting is thermally activated, rather than driven by pure zero-point motion (ZPM). This argument was further supported by extensive PIMD simulations, demonstrating the stability of Fddd structure against liquefaction at low temperatures.

  11. Superconductivity at 52 K in hydrogen-substituted LaFeAsO1-xHx under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, H.; Soeda, H.; Nukii, M.; Kawashima, C.; Nakanishi, T.; Iimura, S.; Muraba, Y.; Matsuishi, S.; Hosono, H.

    2015-01-01

    The 1111-type iron-based superconductor LnFeAsO1-xFx (Ln stands for lanthanide) is the first material with a Tc above 50 K, other than cuprate superconductors. Electron doping into LaFeAsO by H, rather than F, revealed a double-dome-shaped Tc-x diagram, with a first dome (SC1, 0.05hydrogen-doping range in LaFeAsO1-xHx under pressures of up to 19 GPa. Tc rises to 52 K at 6 GPa for the Tc-valley composition between the two Tc domes. This is the first instance of the Tc exceeding 50 K in La-1111-type iron-based superconductors. On the other hand, the Tc of SmFeAsO1-xHx decreased continually, keeping its single-dome structure up to 15 GPa. The present findings strongly suggest that the main reason for realization of the Tc >50 K observed in RE-1111 compounds (RE: Pr, Sm, and Gd) at ambient pressure is the merging of SC1 and SC2.

  12. Conversion of glycerol to hydrogen rich gas.

    PubMed

    Tran, Nguyen H; Kannangara, G S Kamali

    2013-12-21

    Presently there is a glut of glycerol as the by-product of biofuel production and it will grow as production increases. The conundrum is how we can consume this material and convert it into a more useful product. One potential route is to reform glycerol to hydrogen rich gas including synthesis gas (CO + H2) and hydrogen. However, there is recent literature on various reforming techniques which may have a bearing on the efficiency of such a process. Hence in this review reforming of glycerol at room temperature (normally photo-catalytic), catalysis at moderate and high temperature and a non-catalytic pyrolysis process are presented. The high temperature processes allow the generation of synthesis gas with the hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratios being suitable for synthesis of dimethyl ether, methanol and for the Fischer-Tropsch process using established catalysts. Efficient conversion of synthesis gas to hydrogen involves additional catalysts that assist the water gas shift reaction, or involves in situ capture of carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Reforming at reduced temperatures including photo-reforming offers the opportunity of producing synthesis gas or hydrogen using single catalysts. Together, these processes will assist in overcoming the worldwide glut of glycerol, increasing the competitiveness of the biofuel production and reducing our dependency on the fossil based, hydrogen rich gas. PMID:24043264

  13. Hydrogen generation for fuel-cell power systems by high-pressure catalytic methanol-steam reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Peppley, B.A.; Amphlett, J.C.; Kearns, L.M.; Mann, R.F.; Roberge, P.R.

    1997-12-31

    Results of kinetic studies of methanol-steam reforming on a commercial low-temperature shift catalyst, BASF K3-110, are reported. A comprehensive Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic model of methanol-steam reforming on Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was used to simulate a methanol-steam reformer operating at pressures up to 45 bar. At constant temperature and steam-to-methanol ratio, increasing the pressure results in an increase in the initial rate of the reaction and a corresponding improvement in reformer performance. This is partially offset as the equilibrium conversion decreases with increasing pressure. The rate of reaction is highest at low conversion. The result is that there is a large heat demand near the entrance of the catalyst bed which causes a strong endothermic effect and a corresponding temperature minimum. In the worst case, this temperature minimum can be below the dewpoint temperature of the operating fluid causing a loss in reformer performance due to condensation in the pores of the catalyst. The situation is exacerbated by the potential for thermal damage to other regions of the catalyst bed if the heating temperature is increased to overcome the endothermic effect. Catalyst deactivation at elevated pressures was also studied in an 80 hour experiment at 260 C. Increasing the operating pressure did not accelerate the rate of deactivation for the typical gas compositions encountered during normal reformer operation. No catalyst fouling was observed for experimental pressures as high as 40 bar at steam-to-methanol ratios greater than unity even though the tendency for carbon formation increases with pressure. Catalyst selectivity improved at lower conversion due to kinetic effects. The equilibrium CO concentration, however, does not vary significantly with pressure because of the stoichiometry of the water-gas shift reaction.

  14. A novel method for high-pressure annealing experiments in a water-rich environment: hydrogen solubility and speciation in natural, gem-quality diopside

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromiley, G. D.; Keppler, H.; Bromiley, F. A.; Jacobsen, S. D.

    2003-04-01

    Previous experimental invesitgations on the incorporation of structurally-bound hydrogen in nominally anhydrous minerals have either involved synthesis experiments or annealing of natural samples under hydrothermal conditions. For investigation of hydrogen incorporation using FTIR, large, good quality crystals are required. Because of experimental difficulties, synthesis experiments are limited to the investigation of end-member systems. Annealing experiments may be used to investigate chemically more complex systems. However, in previous investigations problems have arisen due to reaction of samples with chemical buffers and fluids at elevated pressures and temperatures, and run times have been limited to less than 48 hours, raising questions regarding attainment of equilbrium. In the present study, a novel method for conducting long duration (100 s of hours) annealing experiments to investigate hydrogen incorporation in samples at high-pressure has been developed. The method relies on the use of a semi-permeable platinum membrane, which protects the sample during the experiment. Samples, cut into 1×2×3 mm blocks, are surrounded by a thin platinum jacket, which is "shrink-wrapped" around the samples. The samples are then loaded into larger Pt10%Rh capsules with a buffer mixture of the same composition as the Cr-diopside, a large amount of excess water, excess silica and a Ni-NiO buffer to control oxygen fugacity. At elevated pressures and temperatures, hydrogen can diffuse freely through the platinum membrane, but the samples are protected from reaction with the surrounding buffer material and fluid. Capsules are loaded into a specially designed low-friction NaCl cells for use in piston-cylinder apparatus. Samples are recovered completely intact and crack-free. Several experiments have been performed at 1.5 GPa, with increasing run duration, to demonstrate the attainment of equilibrium hydrogen contents in the sample. Experiments have been performed at pressures

  15. Apparatus and methods of reheating gas turbine cooling steam and high pressure steam turbine exhaust in a combined cycle power generating system

    DOEpatents

    Tomlinson, Leroy Omar; Smith, Raub Warfield

    2002-01-01

    In a combined cycle system having a multi-pressure heat recovery steam generator, a gas turbine and steam turbine, steam for cooling gas turbine components is supplied from the intermediate pressure section of the heat recovery steam generator supplemented by a portion of the steam exhausting from the HP section of the steam turbine, steam from the gas turbine cooling cycle and the exhaust from the HP section of the steam turbine are combined for flow through a reheat section of the HRSG. The reheated steam is supplied to the IP section inlet of the steam turbine. Thus, where gas turbine cooling steam temperature is lower than optimum, a net improvement in performance is achieved by flowing the cooling steam exhausting from the gas turbine and the exhaust steam from the high pressure section of the steam turbine in series through the reheater of the HRSG for applying steam at optimum temperature to the IP section of the steam turbine.

  16. Taxis Toward Hydrogen Gas by Methanococcus maripaludis

    PubMed Central

    Brileya, Kristen A.; Connolly, James M.; Downey, Carey; Gerlach, Robin; Fields, Matthew W.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of taxis (directed swimming) in the Archaea is currently expanding through identification of novel receptors, effectors, and proteins involved in signal transduction to the flagellar motor. Although the ability for biological cells to sense and swim toward hydrogen gas has been hypothesized for many years, this capacity has yet to be observed and demonstrated. Here we show that the average swimming velocity increases in the direction of a source of hydrogen gas for the methanogen, Methanococcus maripaludis using a capillary assay with anoxic gas-phase control and time-lapse microscopy. The results indicate that a methanogen couples motility to hydrogen concentration sensing and is the first direct observation of hydrogenotaxis in any domain of life. Hydrogenotaxis represents a strategy that would impart a competitive advantage to motile microorganisms that compete for hydrogen gas and would impact the C, S and N cycles. PMID:24189441

  17. Integrated Mirco-Machined Hydrogen Gas Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Frank DiMeoJr. Ing--shin Chen

    2005-12-15

    The widespread use of hydrogen as both an industrial process gas and an energy storage medium requires fast, selective detection of hydrogen gas. This report discusses the development of a new type of solid-state hydrogen gas sensor that couples novel metal hydride thin films with a MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical System) structure known as a micro-hotplate. In this project, Micro-hotplate structures were overcoated with engineered multilayers that serve as the active hydrogen-sensing layer. The change in electrical resistance of these layers when exposed to hydrogen gas was the measured sensor output. This project focused on achieving the following objectives: (1) Demonstrating the capabilities of micro-machined H2 sensors; (2) Developing an understanding of their performance; (3) Critically evaluating the utility and viability of this technology for life safety and process monitoring applications. In order to efficiently achieve these objectives, the following four tasks were identified: (1) Sensor Design and Fabrication; (2) Short Term Response Testing; (3) Long Term Behavior Investigation; (4) Systems Development. Key findings in the project include: The demonstration of sub-second response times to hydrogen; measured sensitivity to hydrogen concentrations below 200 ppm; a dramatic improvement in the sensor fabrication process and increased understanding of the processing properties and performance relationships of the devices; the development of improved sensing multilayers; and the discovery of a novel strain based hydrogen detection mechanism. The results of this program suggest that this hydrogen sensor technology has exceptional potential to meet the stringent demands of life safety applications as hydrogen utilization and infrastructure becomes more prevalent.

  18. 49 CFR 192.197 - Control of the pressure of gas delivered from high-pressure distribution systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Control of the pressure of gas delivered from high... STANDARDS Design of Pipeline Components § 192.197 Control of the pressure of gas delivered from high... connected and properly adjusted gas utilization equipment. (6) A self-contained service regulator with...

  19. 49 CFR 192.197 - Control of the pressure of gas delivered from high-pressure distribution systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Control of the pressure of gas delivered from high... STANDARDS Design of Pipeline Components § 192.197 Control of the pressure of gas delivered from high... connected and properly adjusted gas utilization equipment. (6) A self-contained service regulator with...

  20. High-pressure creep tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Lamoureux, J.; Hales, C.

    1986-01-01

    The automotive Stirling engine, presently being developed by the U.S. Department of Energy and NASA, uses high-pressure hydrogen as a working fluid; its long-term effects on the properties of alloys are relatively unknown. Hence, creep-rupture testing of wrought and cast high-temperature alloys in high-pressure hydrogen is an essential part of the research supporting the development of the Stirling cycle engine. Attention is given to the design, development, and operation of a 20 MPa hydrogen high-temperature multispecimen creep-rupture possessing high sensitivity. This pressure vessel allows for the simultaneous yet independent testing of six specimens. The results from one alloy, XF-818, are presented to illustrate how reported results are derived from the raw test data.

  1. High-pressure Gas Activation for Amorphous Indium-Gallium-Zinc-Oxide Thin-Film Transistors at 100 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Won-Gi; Tak, Young Jun; Du Ahn, Byung; Jung, Tae Soo; Chung, Kwun-Bum; Kim, Hyun Jae

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the use of high-pressure gases as an activation energy source for amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin film transistors (TFTs). High-pressure annealing (HPA) in nitrogen (N2) and oxygen (O2) gases was applied to activate a-IGZO TFTs at 100 °C at pressures in the range from 0.5 to 4 MPa. Activation of the a-IGZO TFTs during HPA is attributed to the effect of the high-pressure environment, so that the activation energy is supplied from the kinetic energy of the gas molecules. We reduced the activation temperature from 300 °C to 100 °C via the use of HPA. The electrical characteristics of a-IGZO TFTs annealed in O2 at 2 MPa were superior to those annealed in N2 at 4 MPa, despite the lower pressure. For O2 HPA under 2 MPa at 100 °C, the field effect mobility and the threshold voltage shift under positive bias stress were improved by 9.00 to 10.58 cm2/V.s and 3.89 to 2.64 V, respectively. This is attributed to not only the effects of the pressurizing effect but also the metal-oxide construction effect which assists to facilitate the formation of channel layer and reduces oxygen vacancies, served as electron trap sites.

  2. High Pressure Electrolyzer System Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokopius, Kevin; Coloza, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    This report documents the continuing efforts to evaluate the operational state of a high pressure PEM based electrolyzer located at the NASA Glenn Research Center. This electrolyzer is a prototype system built by General Electric and refurbished by Hamilton Standard (now named Hamilton Sunstrand). It is capable of producing hydrogen and oxygen at an output pressure of 3000 psi. The electrolyzer has been in storage for a number of years. Evaluation and testing was performed to determine the state of the electrolyzer and provide an estimate of the cost for refurbishment. Pressure testing was performed using nitrogen gas through the oxygen ports to ascertain the status of the internal membranes and seals. It was determined that the integrity of the electrolyzer stack was good as there were no appreciable leaks in the membranes or seals within the stack. In addition to the integrity testing, an itemized list and part cost estimate was produced for the components of the electrolyzer system. An evaluation of the system s present state and an estimate of the cost to bring it back to operational status was also produced.

  3. Urea and deuterium mixtures at high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, M. Husband, R. J.; Frantzana, A. D.; Loveday, J. S.; Bull, C. L.; Klotz, S.

    2015-03-28

    Urea, like many network forming compounds, has long been known to form inclusion (guest-host) compounds. Unlike other network formers like water, urea is not known to form such inclusion compounds with simple molecules like hydrogen. Such compounds if they existed would be of interest both for the fundamental insight they provide into molecular bonding and as potential gas storage systems. Urea has been proposed as a potential hydrogen storage material [T. A. Strobel et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 478, 97 (2009)]. Here, we report the results of high-pressure neutron diffraction studies of urea and D{sub 2} mixtures that indicate no inclusion compound forms up to 3.7 GPa.

  4. Solubilities of methane, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and a natural gas mixture in aqueous sodium bicarbonate solutions under high pressure and elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, J.; Zheng, D.Q.; Guo, T.M.

    1997-01-01

    The solubility of natural gas mixtures in formation water (brine) plays an important role in estimating the natural gas reserve, the formation/dissociation conditions of methane hydrates in situ, and the interfacial tension of the hydrocarbon-formation water system. However, solubility data at high pressure and elevated temperature conditions for aqueous electrolyte systems are rare. Recently, in the reservoirs found at the South China Sea areas, the main salt species in the formation water is sodium bicarbonate, and the solubility data of gases in aqueous sodium bicarbonate solutions under reservoir conditions have not previously been reported. An apparatus for measuring the solubility of gases in aqueous electrolyte solutions under high pressure and elevated temperature conditions is described. The solubility of methane, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and a natural gas mixture in aqueous sodium bicarbonate solutions were measured up to 58 MPa and 403 K. The modified Patel-Teja equation of state proposed by Zuo and Guo (1991) for aqueous electrolyte systems was applied to correlate the measured solubility data, and satisfactory results were obtained.

  5. Hydrogen-rich gas generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, J.; Cerini, D. J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A process and apparatus are described for producing hydrogen-rich product gases. A spray of liquid hydrocarbon is mixed with a stream of air in a startup procedure and the mixture is ignited for partial oxidation. The stream of air is then heated by the resulting combustion to reach a temperature such that a signal is produced. The signal triggers a two way valve which directs liquid hydrocarbon from a spraying mechanism to a vaporizing mechanism with which a vaporized hydrocarbon is formed. The vaporized hydrocarbon is subsequently mixed with the heated air in the combustion chamber where partial oxidation takes place and hydrogen-rich product gases are produced.

  6. Numerical simulation of the LEC-growth of GaAs crystals with account of high-pressure gas convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fainberg, J.; Leister, H.-J.; Müller, G.

    1997-10-01

    The influence of the inert gas pressure on the growth of 4 GaAs crystals by the liquid encapsulated Czochralski method (LEC) process is studied for a range of the Ar gas pressure up to 10 bar by using our finite-volume computer code STHAMAS. Up to the pressure of 0.6 bar we are considering laminar convection. For the pressure range from 5 to 10 bar we are using the buoyancy extended standard k-ε turbulence model with wall functions to simulate the gas flow. The numerical results show that the Argon gas pressure has a strong influence on the consumption of heater power in qualitative agreement with our experimental results. The convex curvature of the growth interface and the maximum thermal stress (von Mises criterion) are found to increase with increasing gas pressure both in the laminar and turbulent evaluations.

  7. A high-pressure polarized 3He gas target for nuclear-physics experiments using a polarized photon beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Q.; Laskaris, G.; Chen, W.; Gao, H.; Zheng, W.; Zong, X.; Averett, T.; Cates, G. D.; Tobias, W. A.

    2010-04-01

    Following the first experiment on three-body photodisintegration of polarized 3He utilizing circularly polarized photons from High-Intensity Gamma Source (HI γ S) at Duke Free Electron Laser Laboratory (DFELL), a new high-pressure polarized 3He target cell made of pyrex glass coated with a thin layer of sol-gel doped with aluminum nitrate nonahydrate has been built in order to reduce the photon beam-induced background. The target is based on the technique of spin exchange optical pumping of hybrid rubidium and potassium and the highest polarization achieved is ˜ 62% determined from both NMR-AFP and EPR polarimetries. The phenomenological parameter that reflects the additional unknown spin relaxation processes, X , is estimated to be ˜ 0.10 and the performance of the target is in good agreement with theoretical predictions. We also present beam test results from this new target cell and the comparison with the GE180 3He target cell used previously at HI γ S. This is the first time that the sol-gel coating technique has been used in a polarized 3He target for nuclear-physics experiments.

  8. Non-Intrusive Laser-Induced Imaging for Speciation and Patternation in High Pressure Gas Turbine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locke, Randy J.; Zaller, Michelle M.; Hicks, Yolanda R.; Anderson, Robert C.

    1999-01-01

    The next generation of was turbine combustors for aerospace applications will be required to meet increasingly stringent constraints on fuel efficiency, noise abatement, and emissions. The power plants being designed to meet these constraints will operate at extreme conditions of temperature and pressure, thereby generating unique challenges to the previously employed diagnostic methodologies. Current efforts at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) utilize optically accessible, high pressure flametubes and sector combustor rigs to probe, via advanced nonintrusive laser techniques, the complex flowfields encountered in advanced combustor designs. The fuel-air mixing process is of particular concern for lowering NO(x) emissions generated in lean, premixed engine concepts. Using planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) we have obtained real-time, detailed imaging of the fuel spray distribution for a number of fuel injector over a wide range of operational conditions that closely match those expected in the proposed propulsion systems. Using a novel combination of planar imaging, of fuel fluorescence and computational analysis that allows an examination of the flowfield from any perspective, we have produced spatially and temporally resolved fuel-air distribution maps. These maps provide detailed insight into the fuel injection at actual conditions never before possible, thereby greatly enhancing the evaluation of fuel injector performance and combustion phenomena.

  9. Photoexcitation of lasers and chemical reactions for NASA missions: A theoretical study. [optical pumping in high pressure gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javan, A.; Guerra, M.

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of obtaining CW laser oscillation by optical pumping in the infrared at an elevated gas pressure is reviewed. A specific example utilizing a mixture of CO and NO gases is included. The gas pressures considered are in excess of several atmospheres. Laser frequency tuning over a broad region becomes possible at such elevated gas pressures due to collisional broadening of the amplifying transitions. The prior-rate and surprisal analysis are applied to obtain detailed VV and VT rates for CO and NO molecules and the transfer rates in a CO-NO gas mixture. The analysis is capable of giving temperature dependence of the rate constants. Computer estimates of the rates are presented for vibrational levels up to v = 50. The results show that in the high-lying vibrational states the VV transfer rates with Delta nu = 2 become appreciable.

  10. Regasification of liquefied natural gas and hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonkonog, V. G.; Tukmakov, A. L.; Muchitova, K. M.; Agalakov, U. A.; Serazetdinov, F. Sh; Gromov, B. C.

    2016-06-01

    Liquefied natural gas and hydrogen gasification process is suggested, in which vapor phase is generated by the decrease of internal energy of the liquid. Methane and hydrogen gasification processes have been numerically modeled. Flow rates of the methane and hydrogen through choke channel were defined. A satisfactory match between the modeled and experimental data for liquid nitrogen has been acquired. Technical suitability of the suggested process is proved. Based on the initial parameters of the cryogenic fluid, the amount of vapor phase is 5-20% of the flow rate.

  11. Cooling conditions and heat transfer in oil and high-pressure gas quenching of steel components - an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Segerberg, S.; Bodin, J.

    1996-12-31

    Recent developments in gas quenching technology prove to be a promising approach to overcome the disadvantage of liquid quenching. The results of gas quenching depend highly on the part geometry, batch design and the interrelation of the parameters like gas type, pressure or gas flow characteristic. Today, gas quenching is cost intensive and restricted to a few applications in small batch production due to the limitations according to the cooling capacity, material, part geometry and batch design. The large advantage with gas quenching is that it is environmentally friendly; no oil smoke, no detergent, no waste water and no fire risk. In this paper comparisons have been made about the cooling characteristics between oils and gases and also how different parameters affect both quenchants. Different ways to correlate quenching curves and hardening results have been shown and explained. Calculation and use of the heat transfer coefficient can not be done in the same way for oil. With the new knowledge it is possible to use data from test probes and be able to predict temperature-time curves for actual component.

  12. Process for extractive-stripping of lean hydrocarbon gas streams at high pressure with a preferential physical solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Bunting, T.N.

    1987-09-22

    This patent describes a process for selectively extracting hydrocarbons from a hydrocarbon gas feed stream with a preferential physical solvent which provides selective capability for extremely high recoveries according to any selected degree of a selected hydrocarbon component and heavier hydrocarbons within the group consisting of ethane, propane, butane, and pentane without the need simultaneously to recover hydrocarbons lighter than the selected hydrocarbon component from the hydrocarbon gas feed stream. The recoveries are: (a) ethane in amounts within the range of 2-100%, (b) propane in amounts within the range of 2-100%, (c) butane in amounts within the range of 2-100%, or (d) pentanes and higher molecular weight hydrocarbons in amounts ranging up to 100% by the following steps: (a) selectively extracting and stripping the hydrocarbon gas feed stream with the physical solvent to produce a residue hydrocarbon gas stream of pipeline specifications and a rich solvent stream containing ethane and heavier hydrocarbon components, (b) distilling the rich solvent to produce: (1) the selected hydrocarbon component and heavier hydrocarbons as overhead product. The improvement comprises the selective enrichment of the hydrocarbon gas feed stream with recycle of a selected portion of the overhead product to the extracting and stripping step, whereby the extremely high recoveries according to the any selected degree are feasible without the excessive solvent flow rates or the high reboiler temperatures.

  13. Gamma-ray astronomy using a high pressure gas scintillation drift chamber with a waveshifting fiber readout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkerson, J.; Edberg, T. K.; Parsons, A.; Sadoulet, B.; Weiss, S.; Smith, G.

    1992-01-01

    We describe a balloon-borne hard X-ray telescope called SIGHT (Scintillation Imaging Gas-filled Hard X-ray Telescope). SIGHT is a high sensitivity, good energy resolution instrument that images in the 30 to 300 keV region. We discuss the development of a large area, 20 atmosphere, position sensitive xenon gas scintillation drift chamber which is the gamma-ray detector at the heart of the telescope package. Results of the development of the novel waveshifting fiber readout for this chamber are presented.

  14. Thermodynamic properties of a high pressure subcritical UF6/He gas volume (irradiated by an external source)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterritt, D. E.; Lalos, G. T.; Schneider, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    A computer simulation study concerning a compressed fissioning UF6 gas is presented. The compression is to be achieved by a ballistic piston compressor. Data on UF6 obtained with this compressor were incorporated in the simulation study. As a neutron source to create the fission events in the compressed gas, a fast burst reactor was considered. The conclusion is that it takes a neutron flux in excess of 10 to the 15th power n/sec sq cm to produce measurable increases in pressure and temperature, while a flux in excess of 10 to 19th power n/sq cm sec would probably damage the compressor.

  15. Electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Rakestraw, David J.

    2000-01-01

    A compact high pressure hydraulic pump having no moving mechanical parts for converting electric potential to hydraulic force. The electrokinetic pump, which can generate hydraulic pressures greater than 2500 psi, can be employed to compress a fluid, either liquid or gas, and manipulate fluid flow. The pump is particularly useful for capillary-base systems. By combining the electrokinetic pump with a housing having chambers separated by a flexible member, fluid flow, including high pressure fluids, is controlled by the application of an electric potential, that can vary with time.

  16. High-pressure systems for gas-phase free continuous incubation of enriched marine microbial communities performing anaerobic oxidation of methane.

    PubMed

    Deusner, Christian; Meyer, Volker; Ferdelman, Timothy G

    2010-02-15

    Novel high-pressure biotechnical systems that were developed and applied for the study of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) are described. The systems, referred to as high-pressure continuous incubation system (HP-CI system) and high-pressure manifold-incubation system (HP-MI system), allow for batch, fed-batch, and continuous gas-phase free incubation at high concentrations of dissolved methane and were designed to meet specific demands for studying environmental regulation and kinetics as well as for enriching microbial biomass in long-term incubation. Anoxic medium is saturated with methane in the first technical stage, and the saturated medium is supplied for biomass incubation in the second stage. Methane can be provided in continuous operation up to 20 MPa and the incubation systems can be operated during constant supply of gas-enriched medium at a hydrostatic pressure up to 45 MPa. To validate the suitability of the high-pressure systems, we present data from continuous and fed-batch incubation of highly active samples prepared from microbial mats from the Black Sea collected at a water depth of 213 m. In continuous operation in the HP-CI system initial methane-dependent sulfide production was enhanced 10- to 15-fold after increasing the methane partial pressure from near ambient pressure of 0.2 to 10.0 MPa at a hydrostatic pressure of 16.0 MPa in the incubation stage. With a hydraulic retention time of 14 h a stable effluent sulfide concentration was reached within less than 3 days and a continuing increase of the volumetric AOM rate from 1.2 to 1.7 mmol L(-1) day(-1) was observed over 14 days. In fed-batch incubation the AOM rate increased from 1.5 to 2.7 and 3.6 mmol L(-1) day(-1) when the concentration of aqueous methane was stepwise increased from 5 to 15 mmol L(-1) and 45 mmol L(-1). A methane partial pressure of 6 MPa and a hydrostatic pressure of 12 MPa in manifold fed-batch incubation in the HP-MI system yielded a sixfold increase in the

  17. Tunable high pressure lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. V.

    1976-01-01

    Atmospheric transmission of high energy CO2 lasers is considerably improved by high pressure operation which, due to pressure broadening, permits tuning the laser lines off atmospheric absorption lines. Pronounced improvement is shown for horizontal transmission at altitudes above several kilometers and for vertical transmission through the entire atmosphere. Applications of tunable high pressure CO2 lasers to energy transmission and to remote sensing are discussed along with initial efforts in tuning high pressure CO2 lasers.

  18. 49 CFR 192.197 - Control of the pressure of gas delivered from high-pressure distribution systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... unsafe overpressuring of the customer's appliances if the service regulator fails. (c) If the maximum... following methods must be used to regulate and limit, to the maximum safe value, the pressure of gas... regulator to 60 p.s.i. (414 kPa) gage or less in case the upstream regulator fails to function...

  19. 49 CFR 192.197 - Control of the pressure of gas delivered from high-pressure distribution systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .... This device may be either a relief valve or an automatic shutoff that shuts, if the pressure on the... relief valve vented to the outside atmosphere, with the relief valve set to open so that the pressure of gas going to the customer does not exceed a maximum safe value. The relief valve may either be...

  20. The high-efficient regenerative cycle of a gas turbine unit with recirculation of combustion products at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodus, V. V.

    2010-02-01

    The circuit of a stationary gas turbine unit is proposed using which it is possible to obtain the thermodynamic advantages of a regenerative cycle with a small compression ratio as a result of setting up a partially closed loop (with a small compression ratio) and high absolute values of pressure at the inlet to and outlet from the circulation loop compressor.

  1. High pressure neon arc lamp

    DOEpatents

    Sze, Robert C.; Bigio, Irving J.

    2003-07-15

    A high pressure neon arc lamp and method of using the same for photodynamic therapies is provided. The high pressure neon arc lamp includes a housing that encloses a quantity of neon gas pressurized to about 500 Torr to about 22,000 Torr. At each end of the housing the lamp is connected by electrodes and wires to a pulse generator. The pulse generator generates an initial pulse voltage to breakdown the impedance of the neon gas. Then the pulse generator delivers a current through the neon gas to create an electrical arc that emits light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. A method for activating a photosensitizer is provided. Initially, a photosensitizer is administered to a patient and allowed time to be absorbed into target cells. Then the high pressure neon arc lamp is used to illuminate the target cells with red light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. The red light activates the photosensitizers to start a chain reaction that may involve oxygen free radicals to destroy the target cells. In this manner, a high pressure neon arc lamp that is inexpensive and efficiently generates red light useful in photodynamic therapy is provided.

  2. High-pressure Gas Activation for Amorphous Indium-Gallium-Zinc-Oxide Thin-Film Transistors at 100 °C.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won-Gi; Tak, Young Jun; Du Ahn, Byung; Jung, Tae Soo; Chung, Kwun-Bum; Kim, Hyun Jae

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the use of high-pressure gases as an activation energy source for amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin film transistors (TFTs). High-pressure annealing (HPA) in nitrogen (N2) and oxygen (O2) gases was applied to activate a-IGZO TFTs at 100 °C at pressures in the range from 0.5 to 4 MPa. Activation of the a-IGZO TFTs during HPA is attributed to the effect of the high-pressure environment, so that the activation energy is supplied from the kinetic energy of the gas molecules. We reduced the activation temperature from 300 °C to 100 °C via the use of HPA. The electrical characteristics of a-IGZO TFTs annealed in O2 at 2 MPa were superior to those annealed in N2 at 4 MPa, despite the lower pressure. For O2 HPA under 2 MPa at 100 °C, the field effect mobility and the threshold voltage shift under positive bias stress were improved by 9.00 to 10.58 cm(2)/V.s and 3.89 to 2.64 V, respectively. This is attributed to not only the effects of the pressurizing effect but also the metal-oxide construction effect which assists to facilitate the formation of channel layer and reduces oxygen vacancies, served as electron trap sites. PMID:26972476

  3. High-pressure Gas Activation for Amorphous Indium-Gallium-Zinc-Oxide Thin-Film Transistors at 100 °C

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won-Gi; Tak, Young Jun; Du Ahn, Byung; Jung, Tae Soo; Chung, Kwun-Bum; Kim, Hyun Jae

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the use of high-pressure gases as an activation energy source for amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin film transistors (TFTs). High-pressure annealing (HPA) in nitrogen (N2) and oxygen (O2) gases was applied to activate a-IGZO TFTs at 100 °C at pressures in the range from 0.5 to 4 MPa. Activation of the a-IGZO TFTs during HPA is attributed to the effect of the high-pressure environment, so that the activation energy is supplied from the kinetic energy of the gas molecules. We reduced the activation temperature from 300 °C to 100 °C via the use of HPA. The electrical characteristics of a-IGZO TFTs annealed in O2 at 2 MPa were superior to those annealed in N2 at 4 MPa, despite the lower pressure. For O2 HPA under 2 MPa at 100 °C, the field effect mobility and the threshold voltage shift under positive bias stress were improved by 9.00 to 10.58 cm2/V.s and 3.89 to 2.64 V, respectively. This is attributed to not only the effects of the pressurizing effect but also the metal-oxide construction effect which assists to facilitate the formation of channel layer and reduces oxygen vacancies, served as electron trap sites. PMID:26972476

  4. Process for CO.sub.2 capture using zeolites from high pressure and moderate temperature gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.; Stevens, Robert W.

    2012-03-06

    A method for separating CO.sub.2 from a gas stream comprised of CO.sub.2 and other gaseous constituents using a zeolite sorbent in a swing-adsorption process, producing a high temperature CO.sub.2 stream at a higher CO.sub.2 pressure than the input gas stream. The method utilizes CO.sub.2 desorption in a CO.sub.2 atmosphere and effectively integrates heat transfers for optimizes overall efficiency. H.sub.2O adsorption does not preclude effective operation of the sorbent. The cycle may be incorporated in an IGCC for efficient pre-combustion CO.sub.2 capture. A particular application operates on shifted syngas at a temperature exceeding 200.degree. C. and produces a dry CO.sub.2 stream at low temperature and high CO.sub.2 pressure, greatly reducing any compression energy requirements which may be subsequently required.

  5. Measurement of electrical avalanches and optical radiation near solid insulators in high pressure (up to 0. 3 MPa) nitrogen gas

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, S.M. ); Sudarshan, T.S. )

    1991-03-01

    Electron and ion avalanches have been recorded near a variety of insulators (plexiglas, teflon, high-density polyethylene, low-density polyethylene, polypropylene, delrin, polyvinyl chloride, and nylon) in nitrogen gas at pressures of 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 MPa. With the exception of nylon, suppression of avalanches has been observed in the presence of insulators. In addition to electron and ion avalanches, simultaneous measurement of optical radiation associated with an electron avalanche was successfully carried out. Qualitative explanations have been provided for the suppression of avalanches near most insulators and an anomalous growth of avalanches near nylon insulators. Photoemission from nylon surfaces appears to be responsible for the enhanced growth of avalanches near nylon insulators. More precise measurements of optical radiation are needed to better understand the electron-photon interactions near a solid insulator in a gaseous dielectric medium.

  6. Characterization of Nuclear Recoils in High Pressure Xenon Gas: Towards a Simultaneous Search for WIMP Dark Matter and Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Renner, J.; Gehman, V. M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Oliveira, C. A.B.; Nygren, D.

    2015-03-24

    Xenon has recently been the medium of choice in several large scale detectors searching for WIMP dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay. Though present-day large scale experiments use liquid xenon, the gas phase offers advantages favorable to both types of searches such as improved intrinsic energy resolution and fewer fluctuations in the partition of deposited energy between scintillation and ionization channels. We recently constructed a high pressure xenon gas TPC as a prototype for the NEXT (Neutrino Experiment with a Xenon TPC) neutrinoless double beta decay experiment and have demonstrated the feasibility of 0.5% FWHM energy resolution at themore » 136Xe double beta Q-value with 3-D tracking capabilities. We now present results from this prototype on the simultaneous observation of scintillation and ionization produced by nuclear recoils at approximately 14 bar pressure. The recoils were produced by neutrons of approximately 2-6 MeV emitted from a radioisotope plutonium-beryllium source, and primary scintillation (S1) and electroluminescent photons produced by ionization (S2) were observed. We discuss the potential of gaseous xenon to distinguish between electron and nuclear recoils through the ratio of these two signals S2/S1. From these results combined with the possibility of using columnar recombination to sense nuclear recoil directionality at high pressures we envision a dual-purpose, ton-scale gaseous xenon detector capable of a combined search for WIMP dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay. This work has been performed within the context of the NEXT collaboration.« less

  7. Characterization of Nuclear Recoils in High Pressure Xenon Gas: Towards a Simultaneous Search for WIMP Dark Matter and Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, J.; Gehman, V. M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Oliveira, C. A. B.; Nygren, D.

    Xenon has recently been the medium of choice in several large scale detectors searching for WIMP dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay. Though present-day large scale experiments use liquid xenon, the gas phase o_ers advantages favorable to both types of searches such as improved intrinsic energy resolution and fewer fluctuations in the partition of deposited energy between scintillation and ionization channels. We recently constructed a high pressure xenon gas TPC as a prototype for the NEXT (Neutrino Experiment with a Xenon TPC) neutrinoless double beta decay experiment and have demonstrated the feasibility of 0.5% FWHM energy resolution at the 136Xe double beta Q-value with 3-D tracking capabilities. We now present results from this prototype on the simultaneous observation of scintillation and ionization produced by nuclear recoils at approximately 14 bar pressure. The recoils were produced by neutrons of approximately 2-6 MeV emitted from a radioisotope plutonium-beryllium source, and primary scintillation (S1) and electroluminescent photons produced by ionization (S2) were observed. We discuss the potential of gaseous xenon to distinguish between electron and nuclear recoils through the ratio of these two signals S2/S1. From these results combined with the possibility of using columnar recombination to sense nuclear recoil directionality at high pressures we envision a dual-purpose, ton-scale gaseous xenon detector capable of a combined search for WIMP dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay. This work has been performed within the context of the NEXT collaboration.

  8. Characterization of Nuclear Recoils in High Pressure Xenon Gas: Towards a Simultaneous Search for WIMP Dark Matter and Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Renner, J.; Gehman, V. M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Oliveira, C. A.B.; Nygren, D.

    2015-03-24

    Xenon has recently been the medium of choice in several large scale detectors searching for WIMP dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay. Though present-day large scale experiments use liquid xenon, the gas phase offers advantages favorable to both types of searches such as improved intrinsic energy resolution and fewer fluctuations in the partition of deposited energy between scintillation and ionization channels. We recently constructed a high pressure xenon gas TPC as a prototype for the NEXT (Neutrino Experiment with a Xenon TPC) neutrinoless double beta decay experiment and have demonstrated the feasibility of 0.5% FWHM energy resolution at the 136Xe double beta Q-value with 3-D tracking capabilities. We now present results from this prototype on the simultaneous observation of scintillation and ionization produced by nuclear recoils at approximately 14 bar pressure. The recoils were produced by neutrons of approximately 2-6 MeV emitted from a radioisotope plutonium-beryllium source, and primary scintillation (S1) and electroluminescent photons produced by ionization (S2) were observed. We discuss the potential of gaseous xenon to distinguish between electron and nuclear recoils through the ratio of these two signals S2/S1. From these results combined with the possibility of using columnar recombination to sense nuclear recoil directionality at high pressures we envision a dual-purpose, ton-scale gaseous xenon detector capable of a combined search for WIMP dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay. This work has been performed within the context of the NEXT collaboration.

  9. High-pressure cryogenic valves for the Vulcain rocket motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garceau, P.; Meyer, F.

    The high-pressure valve developed to control the flow of liquid oxygen or hydrogen into the gas generator of the ESA Vulcain rocket motor is described. The spherical ball-seal design employed provides high reliability over a service lifetime of 5000 on-off actuations at temperatures 20-350 K and pressures up to 200 bar. Leakage is limited to a few cu cm/sec of hydrogen at 20 K. The steps in the development process, from the definition of the valve specifications to the fabrication and testing phase are reviewed, and the final design is shown in drawings, diagrams, and photographs.

  10. Mechanochemistry of lithium nitride under hydrogen gas.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Zhang, J; Wang, S; Jiang, L; Latroche, M; Du, J; Cuevas, F

    2015-09-14

    Hydrogen uptake during the mechanochemistry of lithium nitride under 9 MPa hydrogen pressure has been analyzed by means of in situ solid-gas absorption and ex situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. In situ hydrogenation curves show two H-sorption steps leading to an overall hydrogen uptake of 9.8 wt% H after 3 hours of milling. The milled end-products consist of nanocrystalline (∼10 nm) LiNH2 and LiH phases. The first reaction step comprises the transformation of the polymorph α-Li3N (S.G. P6/mmm) into the β-Li3N (S.G. P63/mmc) metastable phase and the reaction of the latter with hydrogen to form lithium imide: β-Li3N + H2→ Li2NH + LiH. Reaction kinetics of the first step is zero-order. Its rate-limiting control is assigned to the collision frequency between milling balls and Li3N powder. In the second absorption step, lithium imide converts to lithium amide following the reaction scheme Li2NH + H2→ LiNH2 + LiH. Reaction kinetics is here limited by one-dimensional nucleation and the growth mechanism, which, in light of structural data, is assigned to the occurrence of lithium vacancies in the imide compound. This study provides new insights into the reaction paths and chemical kinetics of light hydrogen storage materials during their mechanochemical synthesis. PMID:26234206

  11. Automated Hydrogen Gas Leak Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Gencorp Aerojet Automated Hydrogen Gas Leak Detection System was developed through the cooperation of industry, academia, and the Government. Although the original purpose of the system was to detect leaks in the main engine of the space shuttle while on the launch pad, it also has significant commercial potential in applications for which there are no existing commercial systems. With high sensitivity, the system can detect hydrogen leaks at low concentrations in inert environments. The sensors are integrated with hardware and software to form a complete system. Several of these systems have already been purchased for use on the Ford Motor Company assembly line for natural gas vehicles. This system to detect trace hydrogen gas leaks from pressurized systems consists of a microprocessor-based control unit that operates a network of sensors. The sensors can be deployed around pipes, connectors, flanges, and tanks of pressurized systems where leaks may occur. The control unit monitors the sensors and provides the operator with a visual representation of the magnitude and locations of the leak as a function of time. The system can be customized to fit the user's needs; for example, it can monitor and display the condition of the flanges and fittings associated with the tank of a natural gas vehicle.

  12. Development of 230-kV high-pressure, gas-filled, pipe-type cable system: Model test program phase

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, D.A. )

    1990-09-01

    The objective of this project was the development of a 230 kV high-pressure gas-filled (HPGF) pipe-type cable employing paper or laminate of paper-polypropylene-paper (PPP) insulation pressurized with N{sub 2} gas or a blend of 15% SF{sub 6}/85% N{sub 2} gas. Heretofore, HPGF pipe-type cables have been restricted to 138 kV ratings due to technical difficulties in achieving higher voltage ratings. In view of the high cost of manufacturing and testing a large number of full size cables, cable models with 2 mm (80 mils) and 2.5 mm (100 mils) wall thicknesses of insulation enclosed in a test fixture capable of withstanding a test pressure of 2070 kPa (300 psig) and high electrical stresses were employed for dissipation factor versus voltage measurements and for ac and impulse breakdown tests at rated and emergency operating temperatures. In addition, a 36 cm (14 in) full wall cable model enclosed in a pressure vessel was utilized for transient pressure response tests. The results of this investigation attest tot he technical feasibility of the design and manufacture of a 230 kV HPGF pipe-type cable employing paper or PPP insulation pressurized with 100% N{sub 2} gas or a blend of 15% SF{sub 6}/85% N{sub 2} gas for operation under normal and 100 hour emergency conditions at conductor temperatures of 85{degree} and 105{degree}C, respectively. The manufacture of a full size PPP insulated cable pressurized with a blend of 15% SF{sub 6}/85% N{sub 2} gas employing pre-impregnated PPP insulating tapes and an annular conductor based on the design stresses defined in this report is recommended for laboratory evaluation and extended life tests. 11 refs., 45 figs., 11 tabs.

  13. Development of UV Optical Measurements of Nitric Oxide and Hydroxyl Radical at the Exit of High Pressure Gas Turbine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liscinsky, D. S.; Knight, B. A.; Shirley, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    Measurements of nitric oxide (NO) and hydroxyl radical (OR) have been made in a laboratory flat flame at pressures up to 30 atm using line-of-sight resonant absorption. Data are reported at equivalence ratios of 0.98 and 1.3 and pressures of 1, 5, 10, 20 and 30 atm. The performance of the in-situ LTV absorption technique with assessed at these elevated pressures by comparing the measured absorption with those predicted by detailed theoretical spectroscopic models for NO and OH. Previous to this experiment the resonant models had not been verified at pressures greater than two atmospheres. Agreement within 25% was found between the measurements and predictions with only slight modification of the existing models for both NO and OH to account for line center shifting and pressure broadening. Continuum interference of hot oxygen (O2) on the NO absorption spectra was not significant in the interpretation of the data. The optical methods used in this study are distinct from laser-based diagnostics such as laser induced fluorescence and, hence, have the potential to provide independent verification of the laser-based measurements. The methodology is also of sufficient simplicity to be hardened into a portable optical measurement system that can be deployed in gas turbine engine test cells. A miniature fiber optic couple portable instrument is described.

  14. Improved operation of a microwave pulse compressor with a laser-triggered high-pressure gas plasma switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlapakovski, A.; Gorev, S.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2016-08-01

    The influence of laser beam parameters on the output pulses of a resonant microwave compressor with a laser-triggered plasma switch was investigated. The S-band compressor, consisting of a rectangular waveguide-based cavity and H-plane waveguide tee with a shorted side arm, was filled with pressurized dry air and pumped by 1.8-μs-long microwave pulses of up to 450 kW power. A Nd:YAG laser was used to ignite the gas discharge in the tee side arm for output pulse extraction. The laser beam (at 213 nm or 532 nm) was directed along the RF electric field lines. It was found that the compressor operated most effectively when the laser beam was focused at the center of the switch waveguide cross-section. In this case, the power extraction efficiency reached ˜47% at an output power of ˜14 MW, while when the laser beam was not focused the maximal extraction efficiency was only ˜20% at ˜6 MW output power. Focusing the laser beam resulted also in a dramatic decrease (down to <1 ns) in the delay of the output pulses' appearance with respect to the time of the beam's entrance into the switch, and the jitter of the output pulses' appearance was minimized. In addition, the quality of the output pulses' waveform was significantly improved.

  15. Three-Dimensional Measurements of Fuel Distribution in High-Pressure, High- Temperature, Next-Generation Aviation Gas Turbine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Yolanda R.; Locke, Randy J.; Anderson, Robert C.; Zaller, Michelle M.

    1998-01-01

    In our world-class, optically accessible combustion facility at the NASA Lewis Research Center, we have developed the unique capability of making three-dimensional fuel distribution measurements of aviation gas turbine fuel injectors at actual operating conditions. These measurements are made in situ at the actual operating temperatures and pressures using the JP-grade fuels of candidate next-generation advanced aircraft engines for the High Speed Research (HSR) and Advanced Subsonics Technology (AST) programs. The inlet temperature and pressure ranges used thus far are 300 to 1100 F and 80 to 250 psia. With these data, we can obtain the injector spray angles, the fuel mass distributions of liquid and vapor, the degree of fuel vaporization, and the degree to which fuel has been consumed. The data have been used to diagnose the performance of injectors designed both in-house and by major U.S. engine manufacturers and to design new fuel injectors with overall engine performance goals of increased efficiency and reduced environmental impact. Mie scattering is used to visualize the liquid fuel, and laser-induced fluorescence is used to visualize both liquid and fuel vapor.

  16. Time-dependent gas phase kinetics in a hydrogen diluted silane plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Nunomura, S.; Kondo, M.; Yoshida, I.

    2009-02-16

    The gas phase kinetics in a high-pressure hydrogen diluted silane plasma has been studied at time scales of 10{sup -2}-6x10{sup 2} s. The time-resolved gas phase composition shows the following kinetics at different time scales: silane decomposition and polysilane generation in < or approx. 2x10{sup -1} s, nanoparticle formation and plasma density reduction in 10{sup -1}-10{sup 0} s, polysilane accumulation in 10{sup 0}-10{sup 2} s, and silane depletion and electrode heating in > or approx. 10{sup 1} s. Disilane radicals are implied to be the dominant film precursors in addition to silyl radicals.

  17. Time-dependent gas phase kinetics in a hydrogen diluted silane plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunomura, S.; Yoshida, I.; Kondo, M.

    2009-02-01

    The gas phase kinetics in a high-pressure hydrogen diluted silane plasma has been studied at time scales of 10-2-6×102 s. The time-resolved gas phase composition shows the following kinetics at different time scales: silane decomposition and polysilane generation in ≲2×10-1 s, nanoparticle formation and plasma density reduction in 10-1-100 s, polysilane accumulation in 100-102 s, and silane depletion and electrode heating in ≳101 s. Disilane radicals are implied to be the dominant film precursors in addition to silyl radicals.

  18. Mechanical Properties of Super Duplex Stainless Steel 2507 after Gas Phase Thermal Precharging with Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San Marchi, C.; Somerday, B. P.; Zelinski, J.; Tang, X.; Schiroky, G. H.

    2007-11-01

    Thermal precharging of super duplex stainless steel 2507 with 125 wppm hydrogen significantly reduced tensile ductility and fracture toughness. Strain-hardened 2507 exhibited more severe ductility loss compared to the annealed microstructure. The reduction of area (RA) was between 80 and 85 pct for both microstructures in the noncharged condition, while reductions of area were 25 and 46 pct for the strain-hardened and annealed microstructures, respectively, after hydrogen precharging. Similar to the effect of internal hydrogen on tensile ductility, fracture toughness of strain-hardened 2507 was lowered from nearly 300 MPa m1/2 in the noncharged condition to less than 60 MPa m1/2 in the hydrogen-precharged condition. While precharging 2507 with hydrogen results in a considerable reduction in ductility and toughness, the absolute values are similar to high-strength austenitic steels that have been tested under the same conditions, and which are generally considered acceptable for high-pressure hydrogen gas systems. The fracture mode in hydrogen-precharged 2507 involved cleavage cracking of the ferrite phase and ductile fracture along oblique planes in the austenite phase, compared to 100 pct microvoid coalescence in the absence of hydrogen. Predictions from a strain-based micromechanical fracture toughness model were in good agreement with the measured fracture toughness of hydrogen-precharged 2507, implying a governing role of austenite for resistance to hydrogen-assisted fracture.

  19. Shock-wave proton acceleration from a hydrogen gas jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Nathan; Pogorelsky, Igor; Polyanskiy, Mikhail; Babzien, Marcus; Tresca, Olivier; Maharjan, Chakra; Shkolnikov, Peter; Yakimenko, Vitaly

    2013-04-01

    Typical laser acceleration experiments probe the interaction of intense linearly-polarized solid state laser pulses with dense metal targets. This interaction generates strong electric fields via Transverse Normal Sheath Acceleration and can accelerate protons to high peak energies but with a large thermal spectrum. Recently, the advancement of high pressure amplified CO2 laser technology has allowed for the creation of intense (10^16 Wcm^2) pulses at λ˜10 μm. These pulses may interact with reproducible, high rep. rate gas jet targets and still produce plasmas of critical density (nc˜10^19 cm-3), leading to the transference of laser energy via radiation pressure. This acceleration mode has the advantage of producing narrow energy spectra while scaling well with pulse intensity. We observe the interaction of an intense CO2 laser pulse with an overdense hydrogen gas jet. Using two pulse optical probing in conjunction with interferometry, we are able to obtain density profiles of the plasma. Proton energy spectra are obtained using a magnetic spectrometer and scintillating screen.

  20. Sensoring hydrogen gas concentration using electrolyte made of proton

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, Yoshikatsu; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Koyanaka, Hideki

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen gas promises to be a major clean fuel in the near future. Thus, sensors that can measure the concentrations of hydrogen gas over a wide dynamic range (e.g., 1 99.9%) are in demand for the production, storage, and utilization of hydrogen gas. However, it is difficult to directly measure hydrogen gas concentrations greater than 10% using conventional sensor [1 11]. We report a simple sensor using an electrolyte made of proton conductive manganese dioxide that enables in situmeasurements of hydrogen gas concentration over a wide range of 0.1 99.9% at room temperature.

  1. Empirical Method to Estimate Hydrogen Embrittlement of Metals as a Function of Hydrogen Gas Pressure at Constant Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2010-01-01

    High pressure Hydrogen (H) gas has been known to have a deleterious effect on the mechanical properties of certain metals, particularly, the notched tensile strength, fracture toughness and ductility. The ratio of these properties in Hydrogen as compared to Helium or Air is called the Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) Index, which is a useful method to classify the severity of H embrittlement and to aid in the material screening and selection for safety usage H gas environment. A comprehensive world-wide database compilation, in the past 50 years, has shown that the HEE index is mostly collected at two conveniently high H pressure points of 5 ksi and 10 ksi near room temperature. Since H embrittlement is directly related to pressure, the lack of HEE index at other pressure points has posed a technical problem for the designers to select appropriate materials at a specific H pressure for various applications in aerospace, alternate and renewable energy sectors for an emerging hydrogen economy. Based on the Power-Law mathematical relationship, an empirical method to accurately predict the HEE index, as a function of H pressure at constant temperature, is presented with a brief review on Sievert's law for gas-metal absorption.

  2. High-pressure well design

    SciTech Connect

    Krus, H.; Prieur, J.M. )

    1991-12-01

    Shell U.K. E and P (Shell Expro), operator in the U.K. North Sea on behalf of Shell and Esso, plans to drill 20 high-pressure oil and gas wells during the next 2 years. This paper reports that the well design is based on new standards developed after the U.K. Dept. of Energy restriction on high-pressure drilling in the autumn of 1988. Studies were carried out to optimize casing design and drilling performance on these wells. Several casing schemes, including a slim-hole option, were analyzed. The material specifications for casing and drillpipe were reviewed to ensure that they met the loads imposed during drilling, well- control, and well-testing operations. The requirement for sour-service material was weighted against possible H{sub 2}S adsorption by the mud film. As a result, a new drillstring and two high-pressure casing schemes have been specified. The high-pressure casing scheme used depends on the maximum expected surface pressure.

  3. CARS study of linewidths of the Q-branch of hydrogen molecules at high temperatures in a pulsed high-pressure H{sub 2}-O{sub 2} combustion chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Vereschagin, Konstantin A; Vereschagin, Alexey K; Smirnov, Valery V; Stelmakh, O M; Fabelinskii, V I; Clauss, W; Klimenko, D N; Oschwald, M

    2005-03-31

    The results of measurements of individual line widths of the Q-branch of a hydrogen molecule and the corresponding coefficients of broadening caused by collisions with water molecules at T = 2700 K in a repetitively pulsed high-pressure (50-200 atm) hydrogen-oxygen combustion chamber are presented. CARS spectra of individual Q{sub 1}-Q{sub 7} hydrogen lines, pressure pulses, and the broadband CARS spectra of the entire Q-branch of hydrogen are recorded simultaneously during a single laser pulse. The shape of line profiles was analysed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The temperature in the volume being probed was determined from the 'broadband' CARS spectra. The entire body of the experimental results gives information on the spectral linewidths, temperature and pressure in the combustion chamber during CARS probing. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  4. Adsorption Device Based on a Langatate Crystal Microbalance for High Temperature High Pressure Gas Adsorption in Zeolite H-ZSM-5.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wenjin; Baracchini, Giulia; Klumpp, Michael; Schwieger, Wilhelm; Dittmeyer, Roland

    2016-01-01

    We present a high-temperature and high-pressure gas adsorption measurement device based on a high-frequency oscillating microbalance (5 MHz langatate crystal microbalance, LCM) and its use for gas adsorption measurements in zeolite H-ZSM-5. Prior to the adsorption measurements, zeolite H-ZSM-5 crystals were synthesized on the gold electrode in the center of the LCM, without covering the connection points of the gold electrodes to the oscillator, by the steam-assisted crystallization (SAC) method, so that the zeolite crystals remain attached to the oscillating microbalance while keeping good electroconductivity of the LCM during the adsorption measurements. Compared to a conventional quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) which is limited to temperatures below 80 °C, the LCM can realize the adsorption measurements in principle at temperatures as high as 200-300 °C (i.e., at or close to the reaction temperature of the target application of one-stage DME synthesis from the synthesis gas), owing to the absence of crystalline-phase transitions up to its melting point (1,470 °C). The system was applied to investigate the adsorption of CO2, H2O, methanol and dimethyl ether (DME), each in the gas phase, on zeolite H-ZSM-5 in the temperature and pressure range of 50-150 °C and 0-18 bar, respectively. The results showed that the adsorption isotherms of these gases in H-ZSM-5 can be well fitted by Langmuir-type adsorption isotherms. Furthermore, the determined adsorption parameters, i.e., adsorption capacities, adsorption enthalpies, and adsorption entropies, compare well to literature data. In this work, the results for CO2 are shown as an example. PMID:27585356

  5. Electokinetic high pressure hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Rakestraw, David J.

    2000-01-01

    A compact high pressure hydraulic system having no moving parts for converting electric potential to hydraulic force and for manipulating fluids. Electro-osmotic flow is used to provide a valve and means to compress a fluid or gas in a capillary-based system. By electro-osmotically moving an electrolyte between a first position opening communication between a fluid inlet and outlet and a second position closing communication between the fluid inlet and outlet the system can be configured as a valve. The system can also be used to generate forces as large as 2500 psi that can be used to compress a fluid, either a liquid or a gas.

  6. Vacancy-induced initial decomposition of condensed phase NTO via bimolecular hydrogen transfer mechanisms at high pressure: a DFT-D study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhichao; Wu, Qiong; Zhu, Weihua; Xiao, Heming

    2015-04-28

    Density functional theory with dispersion-correction (DFT-D) was employed to study the effects of vacancy and pressure on the structure and initial decomposition of crystalline 5-nitro-2,4-dihydro-3H-1,2,4-triazol-3-one (β-NTO), a high-energy insensitive explosive. A comparative analysis of the chemical behaviors of NTO in the ideal bulk crystal and vacancy-containing crystals under applied hydrostatic compression was considered. Our calculated formation energy, vacancy interaction energy, electron density difference, and frontier orbitals reveal that the stability of NTO can be effectively manipulated by changing the molecular environment. Bimolecular hydrogen transfer is suggested to be a potential initial chemical reaction in the vacancy-containing NTO solid at 50 GPa, which is prior to the C-NO2 bond dissociation as its initiation decomposition in the gas phase. The vacancy defects introduced into the ideal bulk NTO crystal can produce a localized site, where the initiation decomposition is preferentially accelerated and then promotes further decompositions. Our results may shed some light on the influence of the molecular environments on the initial pathways in molecular explosives. PMID:25804616

  7. U-GAS process for production of hydrogen from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Dihu, R.J.; Patel, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    Today, hydrogen is produced mainly from natural gas and petroleum fractions. Tomorrow, because reserves of natural gas and oil are declining while demand continues to increase, they cannot be considered available for long-term, large-scale production of hydrogen. Hydrogen obtained from coal is expected to be the lowest cost, large-scale source of hydrogen in the future. The U-GAS coal gasification process and its potential application to the manufacture of hydrogen is discussed. Pilot plant results, the current status of the process, and economic projections for the cost of hydrogen manufactured are presented.

  8. Advanced IGCC/Hydrogen Gas Turbine Development

    SciTech Connect

    York, William; Hughes, Michael; Berry, Jonathan; Russell, Tamara; Lau, Y. C.; Liu, Shan; Arnett, Michael; Peck, Arthur; Tralshawala, Nilesh; Weber, Joseph; Benjamin, Marc; Iduate, Michelle; Kittleson, Jacob; Garcia-Crespo, Andres; Delvaux, John; Casanova, Fernando; Lacy, Ben; Brzek, Brian; Wolfe, Chris; Palafox, Pepe; Ding, Ben; Badding, Bruce; McDuffie, Dwayne; Zemsky, Christine

    2015-07-30

    The objective of this program was to develop the technologies required for a fuel flexible (coal derived hydrogen or syngas) gas turbine for IGCC that met DOE turbine performance goals. The overall DOE Advanced Power System goal was to conduct the research and development (R&D) necessary to produce coal-based IGCC power systems with high efficiency, near-zero emissions, and competitive capital cost. To meet this goal, the DOE Fossil Energy Turbine Program had as an interim objective of 2 to 3 percentage points improvement in combined cycle (CC) efficiency. The final goal is 3 to 5 percentage points improvement in CC efficiency above the state of the art for CC turbines in IGCC applications at the time the program started. The efficiency goals were for NOx emissions of less than 2 ppm NOx (@15 % O2). As a result of the technologies developed under this program, the DOE goals were exceeded with a projected 8 point efficiency improvement. In addition, a new combustion technology was conceived of and developed to overcome the challenges of burning hydrogen and achieving the DOE’s NOx goal. This report also covers the developments under the ARRA-funded portion of the program that include gas turbine technology advancements for improvement in the efficiency, emissions, and cost performance of gas turbines for industrial applications with carbon capture and sequestration. Example applications could be cement plants, chemical plants, refineries, steel and aluminum plants, manufacturing facilities, etc. The DOE’s goal for more than 5 percentage point improvement in efficiency was met with cycle analyses performed for representative IGCC Steel Mill and IGCC Refinery applications. Technologies were developed in this program under the following areas: combustion, larger latter stage buckets, CMC and EBC, advanced materials and coatings, advanced configurations to reduce cooling, sealing and rotor purge flows, turbine aerodynamics, advanced sensors, advancements in first

  9. Compact solid source of hydrogen gas

    DOEpatents

    Kravitz, Stanley H.; Hecht, Andrew M.; Sylwester, Alan P.; Bell, Nelson S.

    2004-06-08

    A compact solid source of hydrogen gas, where the gas is generated by contacting water with micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in the presence of a catalyst, such as cobalt or ruthenium. The micro-disperse particles can have a substantially uniform diameter of 1-10 microns, and preferably about 3-5 microns. Ruthenium or cobalt catalytic nanoparticles can be incorporated in the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride, which allows a rapid and complete reaction to occur without the problems associated with caking and scaling of the surface by the reactant product sodium metaborate. A closed loop water management system can be used to recycle wastewater from a PEM fuel cell to supply water for reacting with the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in a compact hydrogen gas generator. Capillary forces can wick water from a water reservoir into a packed bed of micro-disperse fuel particles, eliminating the need for using an active pump.

  10. Hydrogen-Enhanced Natural Gas Vehicle Program

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, Dan; Collier, Kirk

    2009-01-22

    The project objective is to demonstrate the viability of HCNG fuel (30 to 50% hydrogen by volume and the remainder natural gas) to reduce emissions from light-duty on-road vehicles with no loss in performance or efficiency. The City of Las Vegas has an interest in alternative fuels and already has an existing hydrogen refueling station. Collier Technologies Inc (CT) supplied the latest design retrofit kits capable of converting nine compressed natural gas (CNG) fueled, light-duty vehicles powered by the Ford 5.4L Triton engine. CT installed the kits on the first two vehicles in Las Vegas, trained personnel at the City of Las Vegas (the City) to perform the additional seven retrofits, and developed materials for allowing other entities to perform these retrofits as well. These vehicles were used in normal service by the City while driver impressions, reliability, fuel efficiency and emissions were documented for a minimum of one year after conversion. This project has shown the efficacy of operating vehicles originally designed to operate on compressed natural gas with HCNG fuel incorporating large quantities of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). There were no safety issues experienced with these vehicles. The only maintenance issue in the project was some rough idling due to problems with the EGR valve and piping parts. Once the rough idling was corrected no further maintenance issues with these vehicles were experienced. Fuel economy data showed no significant changes after conversion even with the added power provided by the superchargers that were part of the conversions. Driver feedback for the conversions was very favorable. The additional power provided by the HCNG vehicles was greatly appreciated, especially in traffic. The drivability of the HCNG vehicles was considered to be superior by the drivers. Most of the converted vehicles showed zero oxides of nitrogen throughout the life of the project using the State of Nevada emissions station.

  11. Gas distribution equipment in hydrogen service - Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasionowski, W. J.; Huang, H. D.

    1980-01-01

    The hydrogen permeability of three different types of commercially available natural gas polyethylene pipes was determined. Ring tensile tests were conducted on permeability-exposed and as-received samples. Hydrogen-methane leakage experiments were also performed. The results show no selective leakage of hydrogen via Poiseuille, turbulent, or orifice flow (through leaks) on the distribution of blends of hydrogen and methane. The data collected show that the polyethylene pipe is 4 to 6 times more permeable to hydrogen than to methane.

  12. High pressure furnace

    DOEpatents

    Morris, D.E.

    1993-09-14

    A high temperature high pressure furnace has a hybrid partially externally heated construction. A metallic vessel fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum)). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 or 2 inch, 32 mm or 50 mm bar stock and has a length of about 22 inches, 56 cm. This bar stock has an aperture formed therein to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the vessel is provided with a small blind aperture into which a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the vessel is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior. 19 figures.

  13. High pressure furnace

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Donald E.

    1993-01-01

    A high temperature high pressure furnace has a hybrid partially externally heated construction. A metallic vessel fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 or 2 inch, 32 mm or 50 mm bar stock and has a length of about 22 inches, 56 cm. This bar stock has an aperture formed therein to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the vessel is provided with a small blind aperture into which a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the vessel is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior.

  14. High pressure oxygen furnace

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Donald E.

    1992-01-01

    A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior.

  15. High pressure oxygen furnace

    DOEpatents

    Morris, D.E.

    1992-07-14

    A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized, the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior. 5 figs.

  16. Proposal for high pressure RF cavity test in the MTA

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, K.; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    In order to demonstrate the feasibility of high pressure hydrogen gas filled RF (HPRF) cavities for muon ionization cooling, an HPRF cavity must be tested with a high intensity charged beam. When an HPRF cavity is irradiated with an intense beam each incident particle generates about 1000 electrons and ions per cubic centimeter in a high pressure cavity via ionization. These ionization electrons are influenced by the RF field and the RF quality factor goes down. This Q factor reduction will be a problem with a multi bunch beam, e.g., a muon beam for a muon collider consists of a 12 to 20 bunch train beam with 5 ns timing gap. Thus, the RF field must recover in few nano seconds. We propose to use a 400 MeV proton beam in the MTA and measure a beam loading effect in the HPRF cavity and study the recovery mechanism of the RF field.

  17. Microstructual investigation of mixed rar earth iron boron processed vis melt-spinning and high-pressure gas-atomization for isotrophic bonded permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Buelow, Nicholas Lee

    2005-08-01

    A solid solution of three rare earths (RE) in the RE{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B structure have been combined to create the novel mixed rare earth iron boron (MRE{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B) alloy family. MRE{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B exhibits reduced temperature dependent magnetic properties; remanence and coercivity. The desired form of MRE{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B is a powder that can be blended with a polymer binder and compression or injection molded to form an isotropic polymer bonded permanent magnet (PBM). Commercially, Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B is the alloy of choice for PBMs. Powders of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B are made via melt-spinning as can be MRE{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B which allows for direct comparisons. MRE{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B made using melt-spinning at high wheel speeds is overquenched and must be annealed to an optimal hard magnetic state. Due to the rare earth content in the MRE{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B powders, they must be protected from the environment in which they operate. This protection is accomplished by using a modified fluidized bed process to grow a protective fluoride coating nominally 15nm thick, to reduce air oxidation. MRE{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B has demonstrated reduced temperature dependent magnetic properties in ribbon and PBM form. The real challenge has been modifying alloy designs that were successfully melt-spun to be compatible with high-pressure gas-atomization (HPGA). The cooling rates in HPGA are lower than melt-spinning, as the powders are quenched via convective cooling, compared to melt-spinning, which quenches initially by conductive cooling. Early alloy designs, in gas atomized and melt-spun form, did not have similar phase compositions or microstructures. Alloy additions, such as the addition of zirconium as a nucleation catalyst, were successful in creating similar phases and microstructures in the HPGA powders and melt-spun ribbon of the same MRE{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B composition.

  18. HIGH PRESSURE DIES

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, W.B.

    1960-05-31

    A press was invented for subjecting specimens of bismuth, urania, yttria, or thoria to high pressures and temperatures. The press comprises die parts enclosing a space in which is placed an electric heater thermally insulated from the die parts so as not to damage them by heat. The die parts comprise two opposed inner frustoconical parts and an outer part having a double frustoconical recess receiving the inner parts. The die space decreases in size as the inner die parts move toward one another against the outer part and the inner parts, though very hard, do not fracture because of the mode of support provided by the outer part.

  19. Hydrogen gas storage in fluorinated ultramicroporous tunnel crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, Keisuke; Katagiri, Toshimasa

    2012-07-01

    We report hydrogen storage at an ordinary pressure due to a bottle-neck effect of an ultramicroporous crystal. Stored hydrogen was kept at an ordinary pressure below -110 °C. The amounts of stored hydrogen gas linearly correlated with the initial pressures. These phenomena suggested the ultramicroporous tunnels worked as a molecular gas cylinder.We report hydrogen storage at an ordinary pressure due to a bottle-neck effect of an ultramicroporous crystal. Stored hydrogen was kept at an ordinary pressure below -110 °C. The amounts of stored hydrogen gas linearly correlated with the initial pressures. These phenomena suggested the ultramicroporous tunnels worked as a molecular gas cylinder. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. CCDC 246922. For ESI and crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30940h

  20. Evaluation of hydrogen as a cryogenic wind tunnel test gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haut, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    The nondimensional ratios used to describe various flow situations in hydrogen were determined and compared with the corresponding ideal diatomic gas ratios. The results were used to examine different inviscid flow configurations. The relatively high value of the characteristic rotational temperature causes the behavior of hydrogen, under cryogenic conditions, to deviate substantially from the behavior of an ideal diatomic gas in the compressible flow regime. Therefore, if an idea diatomic gas is to be modeled, cryogenic hydrogen is unacceptable as a wind tunnel test gas in a compressible flow situation.

  1. On the room-temperature phase diagram of high pressure hydrogen: an ab initio molecular dynamics perspective and a diffusion Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ji; Ren, Xinguo; Li, Xin-Zheng; Alfè, Dario; Wang, Enge

    2014-07-14

    The finite-temperature phase diagram of hydrogen in the region of phase IV and its neighborhood was studied using the ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) and the ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics (PIMD). The electronic structures were analyzed using the density-functional theory (DFT), the random-phase approximation, and the diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) methods. Taking the state-of-the-art DMC results as benchmark, comparisons of the energy differences between structures generated from the MD and PIMD simulations, with molecular and dissociated hydrogens, respectively, in the weak molecular layers of phase IV, indicate that standard functionals in DFT tend to underestimate the dissociation barrier of the weak molecular layers in this mixed phase. Because of this underestimation, inclusion of the quantum nuclear effects (QNEs) in PIMD using electronic structures generated with these functionals leads to artificially dissociated hydrogen layers in phase IV and an error compensation between the neglect of QNEs and the deficiencies of these functionals in standard ab initio MD simulations exists. This analysis partly rationalizes why earlier ab initio MD simulations complement so well the experimental observations. The temperature and pressure dependencies for the stability of phase IV were also studied in the end and compared with earlier results. PMID:25028021

  2. On the room-temperature phase diagram of high pressure hydrogen: An ab initio molecular dynamics perspective and a diffusion Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ji; Ren, Xinguo; Li, Xin-Zheng; Alfè, Dario; Wang, Enge

    2014-07-14

    The finite-temperature phase diagram of hydrogen in the region of phase IV and its neighborhood was studied using the ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) and the ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics (PIMD). The electronic structures were analyzed using the density-functional theory (DFT), the random-phase approximation, and the diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) methods. Taking the state-of-the-art DMC results as benchmark, comparisons of the energy differences between structures generated from the MD and PIMD simulations, with molecular and dissociated hydrogens, respectively, in the weak molecular layers of phase IV, indicate that standard functionals in DFT tend to underestimate the dissociation barrier of the weak molecular layers in this mixed phase. Because of this underestimation, inclusion of the quantum nuclear effects (QNEs) in PIMD using electronic structures generated with these functionals leads to artificially dissociated hydrogen layers in phase IV and an error compensation between the neglect of QNEs and the deficiencies of these functionals in standard ab initio MD simulations exists. This analysis partly rationalizes why earlier ab initio MD simulations complement so well the experimental observations. The temperature and pressure dependencies for the stability of phase IV were also studied in the end and compared with earlier results.

  3. Pressure Dome for High-Pressure Electrolyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Timothy; Schmitt, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    A high-strength, low-weight pressure vessel dome was designed specifically to house a high-pressure [2,000 psi (approx. = 13.8 MPa)] electrolyzer. In operation, the dome is filled with an inert gas pressurized to roughly 100 psi (approx. = 690 kPa) above the high, balanced pressure product oxygen and hydrogen gas streams. The inert gas acts to reduce the clamping load on electrolyzer stack tie bolts since the dome pressure acting axially inward helps offset the outward axial forces from the stack gas pressure. Likewise, radial and circumferential stresses on electrolyzer frames are minimized. Because the dome is operated at a higher pressure than the electrolyzer product gas, any external electrolyzer leak prevents oxygen or hydrogen from leaking into the dome. Instead the affected stack gas stream pressure rises detectably, thereby enabling a system shutdown. All electrical and fluid connections to the stack are made inside the pressure dome and require special plumbing and electrical dome interfaces for this to be accomplished. Further benefits of the dome are that it can act as a containment shield in the unlikely event of a catastrophic failure. Studies indicate that, for a given active area (and hence, cell ID), frame outside diameter must become ever larger to support stresses at higher operating pressures. This can lead to a large footprint and increased costs associated with thicker and/or larger diameter end-plates, tie-rods, and the frames themselves. One solution is to employ rings that fit snugly around the frame. This complicates stack assembly and is sometimes difficult to achieve in practice, as its success is strongly dependent on frame and ring tolerances, gas pressure, and operating temperature. A pressure dome permits an otherwise low-pressure stack to operate at higher pressures without growing the electrolyzer hardware. The pressure dome consists of two machined segments. An O-ring is placed in an O-ring groove in the flange of the bottom

  4. High pressure nitriding

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, M.; Hoffmann, F.T.; Mayr, P.; Minarski, P.

    1995-12-31

    The aim of the presented research project is the development of a new high pressure nitriding process, which avoids disadvantages of conventional nitriding processes and allows for new applications. Up to now, a nitriding furnace has been constructed and several investigations have been made in order to characterize the influence of pressure on the nitriding process. In this paper, connections between pressure in the range of 2 to 12 atm and the corresponding nitride layer formation for the steel grades AISI 1045, H11 and a nitriding steel are discussed. Results of the nitride layer formation are presented. For all steel grades, a growth of nitride layers with increasing pressure was obtained. Steels with passive layers, as the warm working steel H11, showed a better nitriding behavior at elevated pressure.

  5. High pressure mechanical seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babel, Henry W. (Inventor); Anderson, Raymond H. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A relatively impervious mechanical seal is formed between the outer surface of a tube and the inside surface of a mechanical fitting of a high pressure fluid or hydraulic system by applying a very thin soft metal layer onto the outer surface of the hard metal tube and/or inner surface of the hard metal fitting. The thickness of such thin metal layer is independent of the size of the tube and/or fittings. Many metals and alloys of those metals exhibit the requisite softness, including silver, gold, tin, platinum, indium, rhodium and cadmium. Suitably, the coating is about 0.0025 millimeters (0.10 mils) in thickness. After compression, the tube and fitting combination exhibits very low leak rates on the order or 10.sup.-8 cubic centimeters per second or less as measured using the Helium leak test.

  6. High pressure mechanical seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babel, Henry W. (Inventor); Fuson, Phillip L. (Inventor); Chickles, Colin D. (Inventor); Jones, Cherie A. (Inventor); Anderson, Raymond H. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A relatively impervious mechanical seal is formed between the outer surface of a tube and the inside surface of a mechanical fitting of a high pressure fluid or hydraulic system by applying a very thin soft metal layer onto the outer surface of the hard metal tube and/or inner surface of the hard metal fitting, prior to swaging the fitting onto the tube. The thickness of such thin metal layer is independent of the size of the tube and/or fittings. Many metals and alloys of those metals exhibit the requisite softness, including silver, gold, nickel, tin, platinum, indium, rhodium and cadmium. Suitably, the coating is about 0.0025 millimeters (0.10 mils) in thickness. After swaging, the tube and fitting combination exhibits very low leak rates on the order or 10.sup.-8 cubic centimeters per second or less as meaured using the Helium leak test.

  7. Chromium at High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, Rafael

    2012-02-01

    Chromium has long served as the archetype of spin density wave magnetism. Recently, Jaramillo and collaborators have shown that Cr also serves as an archetype of magnetic quantum criticality. Using a combination of x-ray diffraction and electrical transport measurements at high pressures and cryogenic temperatures in a diamond anvil cell, they have demonstrated that the N'eel transition (TN) can be continuously suppressed to zero, with no sign of a concurrent structural transition. The order parameter undergoes a broad regime of exponential suppression, consistent with the weak coupling paradigm, before deviating from a BCS-like ground state within a narrow but accessible quantum critical regime. The quantum criticality is characterized by mean field scaling of TN and non mean field scaling of the transport coefficients, which points to a fluctuation-induced reconstruction of the critical Fermi surface. A comparison between pressure and chemical doping as means to suppress TN sheds light on different routes to the quantum critical point and the relevance of Fermi surface nesting and disorder at this quantum phase transition. The work by Jaramillo et al. is broadly relevant to the study of magnetic quantum criticality in a physically pure and theoretically tractable system that balances elements of weak and strong coupling. [4pt] [1] R. Jaramillo, Y. Feng, J. Wang & T. F. Rosenbaum. Signatures of quantum criticality in pure Cr at high pressure. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 107, 13631 (2010). [0pt] [2] R. Jaramillo, Y. Feng, J. C. Lang, Z. Islam, G. Srajer, P. B. Littlewood, D. B. McWhan & T. F. Rosenbaum. Breakdown of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer ground state at a quantum phase transition. Nature 459, 405 (2009).

  8. Herman Feshbach Prize in Theoretical Nuclear Physics Xiangdong Ji, University of Maryland PandaX-III: high-pressure gas TPC for Xe136 neutrinoless double beta decay at CJPL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xiangdong; PandaX-III Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The PandaX-III in China's Jinping Underground Lab is a new neutrinoless double beta decay experiment using Xe136 high-pressure gas TPC. The first phase of the experiment uses a 4 m3 gas detector with symmetric Micromegas charge readout planes. The gas TPC allows full reconstruction of the event topology, capable of distinguishing the two electron events from gamma background with high confidence level. The energy resolution can reach about 3% FWHM at the beta decay Q-value. The detector construction and the experimental lab is currently under active development. In this talk, the current status and future plan are reported.

  9. On-Board Hydrogen Gas Production System For Stirling Engines

    DOEpatents

    Johansson, Lennart N.

    2004-06-29

    A hydrogen production system for use in connection with Stirling engines. The production system generates hydrogen working gas and periodically supplies it to the Stirling engine as its working fluid in instances where loss of such working fluid occurs through usage through operation of the associated Stirling engine. The hydrogen gas may be generated by various techniques including electrolysis and stored by various means including the use of a metal hydride absorbing material. By controlling the temperature of the absorbing material, the stored hydrogen gas may be provided to the Stirling engine as needed. A hydrogen production system for use in connection with Stirling engines. The production system generates hydrogen working gas and periodically supplies it to the Stirling engine as its working fluid in instances where loss of such working fluid occurs through usage through operation of the associated Stirling engine. The hydrogen gas may be generated by various techniques including electrolysis and stored by various means including the use of a metal hydride absorbing material. By controlling the temperature of the absorbing material, the stored hydrogen gas may be provided to the Stirling engine as needed.

  10. Development Of A Centrifugal Hydrogen Pipeline Gas Compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Di Bella, Francis A.

    2015-04-16

    Concepts NREC (CN) has completed a Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored project to analyze, design, and fabricate a pipeline capacity hydrogen compressor. The pipeline compressor is a critical component in the DOE strategy to provide sufficient quantities of hydrogen to support the expected shift in transportation fuels from liquid and natural gas to hydrogen. The hydrogen would be generated by renewable energy (solar, wind, and perhaps even tidal or ocean), and would be electrolyzed from water. The hydrogen would then be transported to the population centers in the U.S., where fuel-cell vehicles are expected to become popular and necessary to relieve dependency on fossil fuels. The specifications for the required pipeline hydrogen compressor indicates a need for a small package that is efficient, less costly, and more reliable than what is available in the form of a multi-cylinder, reciprocating (positive displacement) compressor for compressing hydrogen in the gas industry.

  11. Hydrogen Gas Production from Nuclear Power Plant in Relation to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technologies Nowadays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusibani, Elin; Kamil, Insan; Suud, Zaki

    2010-06-01

    Recently, world has been confused by issues of energy resourcing, including fossil fuel use, global warming, and sustainable energy generation. Hydrogen may become the choice for future fuel of combustion engine. Hydrogen is an environmentally clean source of energy to end-users, particularly in transportation applications because without release of pollutants at the point of end use. Hydrogen may be produced from water using the process of electrolysis. One of the GEN-IV reactors nuclear projects (HTGRs, HTR, VHTR) is also can produce hydrogen from the process. In the present study, hydrogen gas production from nuclear power plant is reviewed in relation to commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technologies nowadays.

  12. Hydrogen Gas Production from Nuclear Power Plant in Relation to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technologies Nowadays

    SciTech Connect

    Yusibani, Elin; Kamil, Insan; Suud, Zaki

    2010-06-22

    Recently, world has been confused by issues of energy resourcing, including fossil fuel use, global warming, and sustainable energy generation. Hydrogen may become the choice for future fuel of combustion engine. Hydrogen is an environmentally clean source of energy to end-users, particularly in transportation applications because without release of pollutants at the point of end use. Hydrogen may be produced from water using the process of electrolysis. One of the GEN-IV reactors nuclear projects (HTGRs, HTR, VHTR) is also can produce hydrogen from the process. In the present study, hydrogen gas production from nuclear power plant is reviewed in relation to commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technologies nowadays.

  13. Electric Field in a Plasma Channel in a High-Pressure Nanosecond Discharge in Hydrogen: A Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatom, S.; Tskhai, S.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2013-12-01

    Experimental results of a study of the electric field in a plasma channel produced during nanosecond discharge at a H2 gas pressure of (2-3)×105 Pa by the coherent anti-Stokes scattering method are reported. The discharge was ignited by applying a voltage pulse with an amplitude of ˜100 kV and a duration of ˜5 ns to a blade cathode placed at a distance of 10 and 20 mm from the anode. It was shown that this type of gas discharge is characterized by the presence of an electric field in the plasma channel with root-mean-square intensities of up to 30 kV/cm. Using polarization measurements, it was found that the direction of the electric field is along the cathode-anode axis.

  14. Measurement component technology. Volume 1: Cryogenic pressure measurement technology, high pressure flange seals, hydrogen embrittlement of pressure transducer material, close coupled versus remote transducer installation and temperature compensation of pressure transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayakawa, K. K.; Udell, D. R.; Iwata, M. M.; Lytle, C. F.; Chrisco, R. M.; Greenough, C. S.; Walling, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    The results are presented of an investigation into the availability and performance capability of measurement components in the area of cryogenic temperature, pressure, flow and liquid detection components and high temperature strain gages. In addition, technical subjects allied to the components were researched and discussed. These selected areas of investigation were: (1) high pressure flange seals, (2) hydrogen embrittlement of pressure transducer diaphragms, (3) The effects of close-coupled versus remote transducer installation on pressure measurement, (4) temperature transducer configuration effects on measurements, and (5) techniques in temperature compensation of strain gage pressure transducers. The purpose of the program was to investigate the latest design and application techniques in measurement component technology and to document this information along with recommendations for upgrading measurement component designs for future S-2 derivative applications. Recommendations are provided for upgrading existing state-of-the-art in component design, where required, to satisfy performance requirements of S-2 derivative vehicles.

  15. Hydrogen production and delivery analysis in US markets : cost, energy and greenhouse gas emissions.

    SciTech Connect

    Mintz, M.; Gillette, J.; Elgowainy, A.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen production cost conclusions are: (1) Steam Methane Reforming (SMR) is the least-cost production option at current natural gas prices and for initial hydrogen vehicle penetration rates, at high production rates, SMR may not be the least-cost option; (2) Unlike coal and nuclear technologies, the cost of natural gas feedstock is the largest contributor to SMR production cost; (3) Coal- and nuclear-based hydrogen production have significant penalties at small production rates (and benefits at large rates); (4) Nuclear production of hydrogen is likely to have large economies of scale, but because fixed O&M costs are uncertain, the magnitude of these effects may be understated; and (5) Given H2A default assumptions for fuel prices, process efficiencies and labor costs, nuclear-based hydrogen is likely to be more expensive to produce than coal-based hydrogen. Carbon taxes and caps can narrow the gap. Hydrogen delivery cost conclusions are: (1) For smaller urban markets, compressed gas delivery appears most economic, although cost inputs for high-pressure gas trucks are uncertain; (2) For larger urban markets, pipeline delivery is least costly; (3) Distance from hydrogen production plant to city gate may change relative costs (all results shown assume 100 km); (4) Pipeline costs may be reduced with system 'rationalization', primarily reductions in service pipeline mileage; and (5) Liquefier and pipeline capital costs are a hurdle, particularly at small market sizes. Some energy and greenhouse gas Observations: (1) Energy use (per kg of H2) declines slightly with increasing production or delivery rate for most components (unless energy efficiency varies appreciably with scale, e.g., liquefaction); (2) Energy use is a strong function of production technology and delivery mode; (3) GHG emissions reflect the energy efficiency and carbon content of each component in a production-delivery pathway; (4) Coal and natural gas production pathways have high energy consumption

  16. High pressure capillary connector

    DOEpatents

    Renzi, Ronald F.

    2005-08-09

    A high pressure connector capable of operating at pressures of 40,000 psi or higher is provided. This connector can be employed to position a first fluid-bearing conduit that has a proximal end and a distal end to a second fluid-bearing conduit thereby providing fluid communication between the first and second fluid-bearing conduits. The connector includes (a) an internal fitting assembly having a body cavity with (i) a lower segment that defines a lower segment aperture and (ii) an interiorly threaded upper segment, (b) a first member having a first member aperture that traverses its length wherein the first member aperture is configured to accommodate the first fluid-bearing conduit and wherein the first member is positioned in the lower segment of the internal fitting assembly, and (c) a second member having a second member aperture that traverses its length wherein the second member is positioned in the upper segment of the fitting assembly and wherein a lower surface of the second member is in contact with an upper surface of the first member to assert a compressive force onto the first member and wherein the first member aperture and the second member aperture are coaxial.

  17. Adsorption process to recover hydrogen from feed gas mixtures having low hydrogen concentration

    DOEpatents

    Golden, Timothy Christopher; Weist, Jr., Edward Landis; Hufton, Jeffrey Raymond; Novosat, Paul Anthony

    2010-04-13

    A process for selectively separating hydrogen from at least one more strongly adsorbable component in a plurality of adsorption beds to produce a hydrogen-rich product gas from a low hydrogen concentration feed with a high recovery rate. Each of the plurality of adsorption beds subjected to a repetitive cycle. The process comprises an adsorption step for producing the hydrogen-rich product from a feed gas mixture comprising 5% to 50% hydrogen, at least two pressure equalization by void space gas withdrawal steps, a provide purge step resulting in a first pressure decrease, a blowdown step resulting in a second pressure decrease, a purge step, at least two pressure equalization by void space gas introduction steps, and a repressurization step. The second pressure decrease is at least 2 times greater than the first pressure decrease.

  18. Creep-rupture behavior of 6 candidate stirling engine iron-base superalloys in high pressure hydrogen. Volume 1: Air creep-rupture behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.

    1982-01-01

    Four wrought alloys (A-286, IN 800H, N-155, and 19-9DL) and two cast alloys (CRM-6D and XF-818) were tested to determine their creep-rupture behavior. The wrought alloys were used in the form of sheets of 0.89 mm (0.035 in.) average thickness. The cast alloy specimens were investment cast and machined to 6.35 mm (0.250 in.) gage diameter. All specimens were tested to rupture in air at different times up to 3000 h over the temperature range of 650 C to 925 C (1200 F to 1700 F). Rupture life, minimum creep rate, and time to 1% creep strain were statistically analyzed as a function of stress at different temperatures. Temperature-compensated analysis was also performed to obtain the activation energies for rupture life, time to 1% creep strain, and the minimum creep rate. Microstructural and fracture analyses were also performed. Based on statistical analyses, estimates were made for stress levels at different temperatures to obtain 3500 h rupture life and time to 1% creep strain. Test results are to be compared with similar data being obtained for these alloys under 15 MPa (2175 psi) hydrogen.

  19. Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, R.W.; Bell, C.M.; Chow, P.; Louie, J.; Mohr, J.M.; Peinemann, K.V.; Pinnau, I.; Wijmans, J.G.; Gottschlich, D.E.; Roberts, D.L.

    1990-10-01

    The production of hydrogen from synthesis gas made by gasification of coal is expensive. The separation of hydrogen from synthesis gas is a major cost element in the total process. In this report we describe the results of a program aimed at the development of membranes and membrane modules for the separation and purification of hydrogen from synthesis gas. The performance properties of the developed membranes were used in an economic evaluation of membrane gas separation systems in the coal gasification process. Membranes tested were polyetherimide and a polyamide copolymer. The work began with an examination of the chemical separations required to produce hydrogen from synthesis gas, identification of three specific separations where membranes might be applicable. A range of membrane fabrication techniques and module configurations were investigated to optimize the separation properties of the membrane materials. Parametric data obtained were used to develop the economic comparison of processes incorporating membranes with a base-case system without membranes. The computer calculations for the economic analysis were designed and executed. Finally, we briefly investigated alternative methods of performing the three separations in the production of hydrogen from synthesis gas. The three potential opportunities for membranes in the production of hydrogen from synthesis gas are: (1) separation of hydrogen from nitrogen as the final separation in a air-blown or oxygen-enriched air-blown gasification process, (2) separation of hydrogen from carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide to reduce or eliminate the conventional ethanolamine acid gas removal unit, and (3) separation of hydrogen and/or carbon dioxide form carbon monoxide prior to the shift reactor to influence the shift reaction. 28 refs., 54 figs., 40 tabs.

  20. Quantitative determination of hydrogen in solids by gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Addach, H; Berçot, P; Wery, M; Rezrazi, M

    2004-11-19

    Processes such as electroplating or acid cleaning are notorious causes of post-processing failure through hydrogen embrittlement. So, the determination of amounts of hydrogen in metals is of great importance. An analysis method for investigation of H content in solids has been established based on hot extraction and gas chromatography system. Hot extraction in inert gas enables complete and/or partial removal of the hydrogen from the samples. A gas chromatography system is used to determine quantitatively the amount of thermally desorbed hydrogen. An investigation of the baking operating conditions is made of the hydrogen desorption rate of zinc-plated steel parts. Then, an analysis of the polarisation conditions upon chromium electroplating is given. PMID:15584242

  1. Hydrogen fracture toughness tester completion

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Michael J.

    2015-09-30

    The Hydrogen Fracture Toughness Tester (HFTT) is a mechanical testing machine designed for conducting fracture mechanics tests on materials in high-pressure hydrogen gas. The tester is needed for evaluating the effects of hydrogen on the cracking properties of tritium reservoir materials. It consists of an Instron Model 8862 Electromechanical Test Frame; an Autoclave Engineering Pressure Vessel, an Electric Potential Drop Crack Length Measurement System, associated computer control and data acquisition systems, and a high-pressure hydrogen gas manifold and handling system.

  2. Gaseous fueled vehicles: A role for natural gas and hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Blazek, C.F.; Jasionowski, W.J.

    1991-01-01

    The commercialization of gaseous hydrogen fueled vehicles requires both the development of hydrogen fueled vehicles and the establishment of a hydrogen fueling infrastructure. These requirements create a classic chicken and egg scenario in that manufacturers will not build and consumers will not buy vehicles without an adequate refueling infrastructure and potential refueling station operators will not invest the needed capital without an adequate market to serve. One solution to this dilemma is to create a bridging strategy whereby hydrogen is introduced gradually via another carrier. The only contending alternative fuel that can act as a bridge to hydrogen fueled vehicles is natural gas. To explore this possibility, IGT is conducting emission tests on its dedicated natural gas vehicle (NGV) test platform to determine what, if any, effects small quantities of hydrogen have on emissions and performance. Furthermore, IGT is actively developing an adsorbent based low-pressure natural gas storage system for NGV applications. This system has also shown promise as a storage media for hydrogen. A discussion of our research results in this area will be presented. Finally, a review of IGT's testing facility will be presented to indicate our capabilities in conducted natural gas/hydrogen vehicle (NGHV) research. 3 refs., 10 figs.

  3. Para-Hydrogen-Enhanced Gas-Phase Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Louis-S.; Kovtunov, Kirill V.; Burt, Scott R.; Anwar,M. Sabieh; Koptyug, Igor V.; Sagdeev, Renad Z.; Pines, Alexander

    2007-02-23

    Herein, we demonstrate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) inthe gas phase using para-hydrogen (p-H2)-induced polarization. A reactantmixture of H2 enriched in the paraspin state and propylene gas is flowedthrough a reactor cell containing a heterogenized catalyst, Wilkinson'scatalyst immobilized on modified silica gel. The hydrogenation product,propane gas, is transferred to the NMR magnet and is spin-polarized as aresult of the ALTADENA (adiabatic longitudinal transport and dissociationengenders net alignment) effect. A polarization enhancement factor of 300relative to thermally polarized gas was observed in 1D1H NMR spectra.Enhancement was also evident in the magnetic resonance images. This isthe first demonstration of imaging a hyperpolarized gaseous productformed in a hydrogenation reaction catalyzed by a supported catalyst.This result may lead to several important applications, includingflow-through porous materials, gas-phase reaction kinetics and adsorptionstudies, and MRI in low fields, all using catalyst-free polarizedfluids.

  4. Catalytic hydrogenation of polyaromatic compounds using coke-oven gas instead of pure hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Braekman-Danheux, C.E.; Fontana, A.H.; Laurent, Ph.M.; Lolivier, Ph.

    1995-12-31

    In order to improve the economy of the conversion process of polyaromatic molecules to their hydroaromatics analogs, catalytic hydrogenation of phenanthrene has been carried out under pressure of different simulated coke-oven gases instead of pure hydrogen. The influence of reaction time, temperature and pressure on the hydrogenation yields and on the nature of the obtained products has been studied. Comparisons have been made with reaction with pure hydrogen in the same conditions. The influence of the different components of a real coke-oven gas has also been pointed out. The results indicate that coke-oven gas can be used if the goal is not to obtain perhydroaromatics compounds for a thermal cracking, but to give partly hydrogenated compounds to be used as hydrogen donor solvent in a coal liquefaction process. The results have been applied to coal-tar highly aromatic fractions.

  5. Proton delocalization under extreme conditions of high pressure and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, Alexander F.; Crowhurst, Jonathan

    2008-10-02

    Knowledge of the behaviour of light hydrogen-containing molecules under extreme conditions of high pressure and temperature is crucial to a comprehensive understanding of the fundamental physics and chemistry that is relevant under such conditions. It is also vital for interpreting the results of planetary observations, in particular those of the gas giants, and also for various materials science applications. On a fundamental level, increasing pressure causes the redistribution of the electronic density, which results in a modification of the interatomic potentials followed by a consequent qualitative change in the character of the associated bonding. Ultimately, at sufficiently high pressure, one may anticipate a transformation to a homogeneously bonded material possessing unusual physical properties (e.g. a quantum fluid). As temperature increases so does the concentration of ionised species leading ultimately to a plasma. Considerable improvements have recently been made in both the corresponding experimental and theoretical investigations. Here we review recent results for hydrogen and water that reveal unexpected routes of transformation to nonmolecular materials. We stress the importance of quantum effects, which remain significant even at high temperatures.

  6. Process for hydrogen isotope concentration between liquid water and hydrogen gas

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, William H.

    1976-09-21

    A process for hydrogen isotope exchange and concentration between liquid water and hydrogen gas, wherein liquid water and hydrogen gas are contacted, in an exchange section, with one another and with at least one catalyst body comprising at least one metal selected from Group VIII of the Periodic Table and preferably a support therefor, the catalyst body has a liquid-water-repellent, gas permeable polymer or organic resin coating, preferably a fluorinated olefin polymer or silicone coating, so that the isotope concentration takes place by two simultaneously occurring steps, namely, ##EQU1## WHILE THE HYDROGEN GAS FED TO THE EXCHANGE SECTION IS DERIVED IN A REACTOR VESSEL FROM LIQUID WATER THAT HAS PASSED THROUGH THE EXCHANGE SECTION.

  7. Infrared spectroscopic and modeling studies of H2/CH4 microwave plasma gas phase from low to high pressure and power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rond, C.; Hamann, S.; Wartel, M.; Lombardi, G.; Gicquel, A.; Röpcke, J.

    2014-09-01

    InfraRed Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy technique has been implemented in a H2/CH4 Micro-Wave (MW frequency f = 2.45 GHz) plasma reactor dedicated to diamond deposition under high pressure and high power conditions. Parametric studies such as a function of MW power, pressure, and admixtures of methane have been carried out on a wide range of experimental conditions: the pressure up to 270 mbar and the MW power up to 4 kW. These conditions allow high purity Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond deposition at high growth rates. Line integrated absorption measurements have been performed in order to monitor hydrocarbon species, i.e., CH3, CH4, C2H2, C2H4, and C2H6. The densities of the stable detected species were found to vary in the range of 1012-1017 molecules cm-3, while the methyl radical CH3 (precursor of diamond growth under these conditions) measured into the plasma bulk was found up to 1014 molecules cm-3. The experimental densities have been compared to those provided by 1D-radial thermochemical model for low power and low pressure conditions (up to 100 mbar/2 kW). These densities have been axially integrated. Experimental measurements under high pressure and power conditions confirm a strong increase of the degree of dissociation of the precursor, CH4, associated to an increase of the C2H2 density, the most abundant reaction product in the plasma.

  8. Hydrogen mitigation Gas Characterization System: System design description

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, T.C.

    1998-07-17

    The Gas Characterization System (GCS) design is described for flammable gas monitoring. Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) is known to experience periodic tank level increases and decreases during which hydrogen gas is released. It is believed that the generated gases accumulate in the solids-containing layer near the bottom of the tank. Solids and gases are also present in the crust and may be present in the interstitial liquid layer. The accumulation of gases creates a buoyancy that eventually overcomes the density and bonding strength of the bottom layer. When this happens, the gas from the bottom layer is released upward through the liquid layer to the vapor space above the tank crust. Previous monitoring of the vapor space gases during such an event indicates hydrogen release concentrations greater than the lower flammability limit (LFL) of hydrogen in a partial nitrous oxide atmosphere. Tanks 241-AN-105, 241-AW-101, and 241-SY-103 have been identified as having the potential to behave similar to SY-101. These waste tanks have been placed on the flammable gas watch list (FGWL). All waste tanks on the FGWL will have a standard hydrogen monitoring system (SHMS) installed to measure hydrogen. In the event that hydrogen levels exceed 0.75% by volume, additional characterization will be required. The purpose of this additional vapor space characterization is to determine the actual lower flammability limit of these tanks, accurately measure low baseline gas release concentrations, and to determine potential hazards associated with larger Gas Release Events (GREs). The instruments to be installed in the GCS for vapor monitoring will allow accurate analysis of samples from the tank vapor space. It will be possible to detect a wide range of hydrogen from parts per million to percent by volume, as well as other gas species suspected to be generated in waste tanks.

  9. Hydrogen Gas Sensors Based on Semiconductor Oxide Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Haoshuang; Wang, Zhao; Hu, Yongming

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the hydrogen gas sensing properties of semiconductor oxide (SMO) nanostructures have been widely investigated. In this article, we provide a comprehensive review of the research progress in the last five years concerning hydrogen gas sensors based on SMO thin film and one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures. The hydrogen sensing mechanism of SMO nanostructures and some critical issues are discussed. Doping, noble metal-decoration, heterojunctions and size reduction have been investigated and proved to be effective methods for improving the sensing performance of SMO thin films and 1D nanostructures. The effect on the hydrogen response of SMO thin films and 1D nanostructures of grain boundary and crystal orientation, as well as the sensor architecture, including electrode size and nanojunctions have also been studied. Finally, we also discuss some challenges for the future applications of SMO nanostructured hydrogen sensors. PMID:22778599

  10. Automated gas burette system for evolved hydrogen measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Feng; Rassat, Scot D.; Helderandt, David J.; Caldwell, Dustin D.; Aardahl, Christopher L.; Autrey, Tom; Linehan, John C.; Rappe, Kenneth G.

    2008-08-15

    This paper reports a simple and efficient gas burette system that allows automated determination of evolved gas volume in real time using only temperature and pressure measurements. The system is reliable and has been used successfully to study the hydrogen release kinetics of ammonia borane thermolysis. The system is especially suitable for bench scale studies involving small batches and potentially rapid reaction kinetics.

  11. Fuel droplet burning rates at high pressures.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canada, G. S.; Faeth, G. M.

    1973-01-01

    Combustion of methanol, ethanol, propanol-1, n-pentane, n-heptane, and n-decane was observed in air under natural convection conditions, at pressures up to 100 atm. The droplets were simulated by porous spheres, with diameters in the range from 0.63 to 1.90 cm. The pressure levels of the tests were high enough so that near-critical combustion was observed for methanol and ethanol. Due to the high pressures, the phase-equilibrium models of the analysis included both the conventional low-pressure approach as well as high-pressure versions, allowing for real gas effects and the solubility of combustion-product gases in the liquid phase. The burning-rate predictions of the various theories were similar, and in fair agreement with the data. The high-pressure theory gave the best prediction for the liquid-surface temperatures of ethanol and propanol-1 at high pressure. The experiments indicated the approach of critical burning conditions for methanol and ethanol at pressures on the order of 80 to 100 atm, which was in good agreement with the predictions of both the low- and high-pressure analysis.

  12. Hydrogen gas getters: Susceptibility to poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Mroz, E.J.; Dye, R.C.; Duke, J.R.; Weinrach, J.

    1998-12-31

    About 40% ({approximately}9,000) of the {approximately}23,000 transuranic (TRU) waste drums at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are presently unshippable because conservative calculations suggest that the hydrogen concentration may exceed the lower explosive limit for hydrogen. This situation extends across nearly all DOE sites holding and generating TRU waste. The incorporation of a hydrogen getter such as DEB into the waste drums (or the TRUPACT II shipping containers) could substantially mitigate the explosion risk. The result would be to increase the number of drums that qualify for transportation to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) without having to resort to expensive re-packaging or waste treatment technologies. However, before this approach can be implemented, key technical questions must be answered. Foremost among these is the question of whether the presence of other chemical vapors and gases in the drum might poison the catalytic reaction between hydrogen and DEB. This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to obtain fundamental information on the chemical mechanism of the catalytic reaction of hydrogen with one commonly used hydrogen getter, DEB. Experiments with these materials showed that the method of exposure affects the nature of the reaction products. The results of this work contributed to the development of a mechanistic model of the reaction.

  13. Method for making hydrogen rich gas from hydrocarbon fuel

    DOEpatents

    Krumpelt, M.; Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Doshi, R.

    1999-07-27

    A method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel in which the hydrocarbon fuel contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion at a temperature not less than about 400 C for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich gas while maintaining CO content less than about 5 volume percent. There is also disclosed a method of forming partially oxidized hydrocarbons from ethanes in which ethane gas contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form an oxide. 4 figs.

  14. Method for making hydrogen rich gas from hydrocarbon fuel

    DOEpatents

    Krumpelt, Michael; Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Doshi, Rajiv

    1999-01-01

    A method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel in which the hydrocarbon fuel contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion at a temperature not less than about 400.degree. C. for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich gas while maintaining CO content less than about 5 volume percent. There is also disclosed a method of forming partially oxidized hydrocarbons from ethanes in which ethane gas contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form an oxide.

  15. Methanation of gas streams containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Frost, Albert C.

    1983-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams having a relatively high concentration of hydrogen are pretreated so as to remove the hydrogen in a recoverable form for use in the second step of a cyclic, essentially two-step process for the production of methane. The thus-treated streams are then passed over a catalyst to deposit a surface layer of active surface carbon thereon essentially without the formation of inactive coke. This active carbon is reacted with said hydrogen removed from the feed gas stream to form methane. The utilization of the CO in the feed gas stream is appreciably increased, enhancing the overall process for the production of relatively pure, low-cost methane from CO-containing waste gas streams.

  16. Electrokinetically pumped high pressure sprays

    DOEpatents

    Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Paul, Phillip H.; Schoeniger, Luke

    2005-11-01

    An electrokinetic pump capable of producing high pressure is combined with a nozzle having a submicron orifice to provide a high pressure spray device. Because of its small size, the device can be contained within medical devices such as an endoscope for delivering biological materials such as DNA, chemo therapeutic agents, or vaccines to tissues and cells.

  17. Electrokinetically pumped high pressure sprays

    DOEpatents

    Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Paul, Phillip H.; Schoeniger, Luke

    2002-01-01

    An electrokinetic pump capable of producing high pressure is combined with a nozzle having a submicron orifice to provide a high pressure spray device. Because of its small size, the device can be contained within medical devices such as an endoscope for delivering biological materials such as DNA, chemo therapeutic agents, or vaccines to tissues and cells.

  18. Hydrogen Resource Assessment: Hydrogen Potential from Coal, Natural Gas, Nuclear, and Hydro Power

    SciTech Connect

    Milbrandt, A.; Mann, M.

    2009-02-01

    This paper estimates the quantity of hydrogen that could be produced from coal, natural gas, nuclear, and hydro power by county in the United States. The study estimates that more than 72 million tonnes of hydrogen can be produced from coal, natural gas, nuclear, and hydro power per year in the country (considering only 30% of their total annual production). The United States consumed about 396 million tonnes of gasoline in 2007; therefore, the report suggests the amount of hydrogen from these sources could displace about 80% of this consumption.

  19. Infrared spectroscopic and modeling studies of H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} microwave plasma gas phase from low to high pressure and power

    SciTech Connect

    Rond, C. Lombardi, G.; Gicquel, A.; Hamann, S.; Röpcke, J.; Wartel, M.

    2014-09-07

    InfraRed Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy technique has been implemented in a H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} Micro-Wave (MW frequency f = 2.45 GHz) plasma reactor dedicated to diamond deposition under high pressure and high power conditions. Parametric studies such as a function of MW power, pressure, and admixtures of methane have been carried out on a wide range of experimental conditions: the pressure up to 270 mbar and the MW power up to 4 kW. These conditions allow high purity Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond deposition at high growth rates. Line integrated absorption measurements have been performed in order to monitor hydrocarbon species, i.e., CH{sub 3}, CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}. The densities of the stable detected species were found to vary in the range of 10{sup 12}–10{sup 17} molecules cm{sup −3}, while the methyl radical CH{sub 3} (precursor of diamond growth under these conditions) measured into the plasma bulk was found up to 10{sup 14} molecules cm{sup −3}. The experimental densities have been compared to those provided by 1D-radial thermochemical model for low power and low pressure conditions (up to 100 mbar/2 kW). These densities have been axially integrated. Experimental measurements under high pressure and power conditions confirm a strong increase of the degree of dissociation of the precursor, CH{sub 4}, associated to an increase of the C{sub 2}H{sub 2} density, the most abundant reaction product in the plasma.

  20. Hydrogen Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Another spinoff from spacecraft fuel cell technology is the portable hydrogen generator shown. Developed by General Electric Company, it is an aid to safer operation of systems that use hydrogen-for example, gas chromatographs, used in laboratory analysis of gases. or flame ionization detectors used as $ollution monitors. The generator eliminates the need for high-pressure hydrogen storage bottles, which can be a safety hazard, in laboratories, hospitals and industrial plants. The unit supplies high-purity hydrogen by means of an electrochemical process which separates the hydrogen and oxygen in distilled water. The oxygen is vented away and the hydrogen gas is stored within the unit for use as needed. GE's Aircraft Equipment Division is producing about 1,000 of the generators annually.

  1. Molecular processes in astrophysics: Calculations of hydrogen + hydrogen gas excitation, de-excitation, and cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Matthew Thomas

    The implications of H+H2 cooling in astrophysics is important to several applications. One of the most significant and pure applications is its role in cooling in the early universe. Other applications would include molecular dynamics in nebulae and their collapse into stars and astrophysical shocks. Shortly after the big bang, the universe was a hot primordial gas of photons, electrons, and nuclei among other ingredients. By far the most dominant nuclei in the early universe was hydrogen. In fact, in the early universe the matter density was 90 percent hydrogen and only 10 percent helium with small amounts of lithium and deuterium. In order for structure to form in the universe, this primordial gas must form atoms and cool. One of the significant cooling mechanisms is the collision of neutral atomic hydrogen with a neutral diatomic hydrogen molecule. This work performs calculations to determine collisional cooling rates of hydrogen using two potential surfaces.

  2. Production of hydrogen by thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Muradov, N.Z.

    1995-09-01

    It is universally accepted that in the next few decades hydrogen production will continue to rely on fossil fuels (primarily, natural gas). On the other hand, the conventional methods of hydrogen production from natural gas (for example, steam reforming) are complex multi-step processes. These processes also result in the emission of large quantities of CO{sub 2} into the atmosphere that produce adverse ecological effects. One alternative is the one-step thermocatalytic cracking (TCC) (or decomposition) of natural gas into hydrogen and carbon. Preliminary analysis indicates that the cost of hydrogen produced by thermal decomposition of natural gas is somewhat lower than the conventional processes after by-product carbon credit is taken. In the short term, this process can be used for on-site production of hydrogen-methane mixtures in gas-filling stations and for CO{sub x}-free production of hydrogen for fuel cell driven prime movers. The experimental data on the thermocatalytic cracking of methane over various catalysts and supports in a wide range of temperatures (500-900{degrees}C) are presented in this paper. Two types of reactors were designed and built at FSEC: continuous flow and pulse fix bed catalytic reactors. The temperature dependence of the hydrogen production yield using oxide type catalysts was studied. Alumina-supported Ni- and Fe-catalysts demonstrated relatively high efficiency in the methane cracking reaction at moderate temperatures (600-800{degrees}C). Kinetic curves of hydrogen production over metal and metal oxide catalysts at different temperatures are presented in the paper. Fe-catalyst demonstrated good stability (for several hours), whereas alumina-supported Pt-catalyst rapidly lost its catalytic activity.

  3. Magnetic and Superconducting Materials at High Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Struzhkin, Viktor V.

    2015-03-24

    The work concentrates on few important tasks in enabling techniques for search of superconducting compressed hydrogen compounds and pure hydrogen, investigation of mechanisms of high-Tc superconductivity, and exploring new superconducting materials. Along that route we performed several challenging tasks, including discovery of new forms of polyhydrides of alkali metal Na at very high pressures. These experiments help us to establish the experimental environment that will provide important information on the high-pressure properties of hydrogen-rich compounds. Our recent progress in RIXS measurements opens a whole field of strongly correlated 3d materials. We have developed a systematic approach to measure major electronic parameters, like Hubbard energy U, and charge transfer energy Δ, as function of pressure. This technique will enable also RIXS studies of magnetic excitations in iridates and other 5d materials at the L edge, which attract a lot of interest recently. We have developed new magnetic sensing technique based on optically detected magnetic resonance from NV centers in diamond. The technique can be applied to study superconductivity in high-TC materials, to search for magnetic transitions in strongly correlated and itinerant magnetic materials under pressure. Summary of Project Activities; development of high-pressure experimentation platform for exploration of new potential superconductors, metal polyhydrides (including newly discovered alkali metal polyhydrides), and already known superconductors at the limit of static high-pressure techniques; investigation of special classes of superconducting compounds (high-Tc superconductors, new superconducting materials), that may provide new fundamental knowledge and may prove important for application as high-temperature/high-critical parameter superconductors; investigation of the pressure dependence of superconductivity and magnetic/phase transformations in 3d transition metal compounds, including

  4. Numerical modeling of gas mixing and bio-chemical transformations during underground hydrogen storage within the project H2STORE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagemann, B.; Feldmann, F.; Panfilov, M.; Ganzer, L.

    2015-12-01

    The change from fossil to renewable energy sources is demanding an increasing amount of storage capacities for electrical energy. A promising technological solution is the storage of hydrogen in the subsurface. Hydrogen can be produced by electrolysis using excessive electrical energy and subsequently converted back into electricity by fuel cells or engine generators. The development of this technology starts with adding small amounts of hydrogen to the high pressure natural gas grid and continues with the creation of pure underground hydrogen storages. The feasibility of hydrogen storage in depleted gas reservoirs is investigated in the lighthouse project H2STORE financed by the German Ministry for Education and Research. The joint research project has project members from the University of Jena, the Clausthal University of Technology, the GFZ Potsdam and the French National Center for Scientic Research in Nancy. The six sub projects are based on laboratory experiments, numerical simulations and analytical work which cover the investigation of mineralogical, geochemical, physio-chemical, sedimentological, microbiological and gas mixing processes in reservoir and cap rocks. The focus in this presentation is on the numerical modeling of underground hydrogen storage. A mathematical model was developed which describes the involved coupled hydrodynamic and microbiological effects. Thereby, the bio-chemical reaction rates depend on the kinetics of microbial growth which is induced by the injection of hydrogen. The model has been numerically implemented on the basis of the open source code DuMuX. A field case study based on a real German gas reservoir was performed to investigate the mixing of hydrogen with residual gases and to discover the consequences of bio-chemical reactions.

  5. Improved Hydrogen Gas Getters for TRU Waste -- Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Stone; Michael Benson; Christopher Orme; Thomas Luther; Eric Peterson

    2005-09-01

    Alpha radiolysis of hydrogenous waste and packaging materials generates hydrogen gas in radioactive storage containers. For that reason, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission limits the flammable gas (hydrogen) concentration in the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) containers to 5 vol% of hydrogen in air, which is the lower explosion limit. Consequently, a method is needed to prevent the build up of hydrogen to 5 vol% during the storage and transport of the TRUPACT-II containers (up to 60 days). One promising option is the use of hydrogen getters. These materials scavenge hydrogen from the gas phase and irreversibly bind it in the solid phase. One proven getter is a material called 1,4-bis (phenylethynyl) benzene, or DEB, characterized by the presence of carbon-carbon triple bonds. Carbon may, in the presence of suitable precious metal catalysts such as palladium, irreversibly react with and bind hydrogen. In the presence of oxygen, the precious metal may also eliminate hydrogen by catalyzing the formation of water. This reaction is called catalytic recombination. DEB has the needed binding rate and capacity for hydrogen that potentially could be generated in the TRUPACT II. Phases 1 and 2 of this project showed that uncoated DEB performed satisfactorily in lab scale tests. Based upon these results, Phase 3, the final project phase, included larger scale testing. Test vessels were scaled to replicate the ratio between void space in the inner containment vessel of a TRUPACT-II container and a payload of seven 55-gallon drums. The tests were run with an atmosphere of air for 63.9 days at ambient temperature (15-27°C) and a scaled hydrogen generation rate of 2.60E-07 moles per second (0.35 cc/min). A second type of getter known as VEI, a proprietary polymer hydrogen getter characterized by carbon-carbon double bonds, was also tested in Phase 3. Hydrogen was successfully “gettered” by both getter systems. Hydrogen concentrations remained below 5 vol% (in

  6. Calculating Mass Diffusion in High-Pressure Binary Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth

    2004-01-01

    A comprehensive mathematical model of mass diffusion has been developed for binary fluids at high pressures, including critical and supercritical pressures. Heretofore, diverse expressions, valid for limited parameter ranges, have been used to correlate high-pressure binary mass-diffusion-coefficient data. This model will likely be especially useful in the computational simulation and analysis of combustion phenomena in diesel engines, gas turbines, and liquid rocket engines, wherein mass diffusion at high pressure plays a major role.

  7. Gas Permeable Chemochromic Compositions for Hydrogen Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokerman, Gary (Inventor); Mohajeri, Nahid (Inventor); Muradov, Nazim (Inventor); Tabatabaie-Raissi, Ali (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A (H2) sensor composition includes a gas permeable matrix material intermixed and encapsulating at least one chemochromic pigment. The chemochromic pigment produces a detectable change in color of the overall sensor composition in the presence of H2 gas. The matrix material provides high H2 permeability, which permits fast permeation of H2 gas. In one embodiment, the chemochromic pigment comprises PdO/TiO2. The sensor can be embodied as a two layer structure with the gas permeable matrix material intermixed with the chemochromic pigment in one layer and a second layer which provides a support or overcoat layer.

  8. Development of Simulation System for Hot Gas Filtration by Ceramic Candle Filters on High Temperature and/or High Pressure Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.J.; Lim, J.H.; Kim, S.D.; Choi, H.K.; Park, H,S.; Park, Y.O.

    2002-09-19

    Hot gas filtration from industrial processes offers various advantages in terms of improvement of process efficiencies, heat recovery and protection of plant installation. Especially hot gas filtration is an essential technology for pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC).

  9. Bubbles Quantified In vivo by Ultrasound Relates to Amount of Gas Detected Post-mortem in Rabbits Decompressed from High Pressure.

    PubMed

    Bernaldo de Quirós, Yara; Møllerløkken, Andreas; Havnes, Marianne B; Brubakk, Alf O; González-Díaz, Oscar; Fernández, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The pathophysiological mechanism of decompression sickness is not fully understood but there is evidence that it can be caused by intravascular and autochthonous bubbles. Doppler ultrasound at a given circulatory location is used to detect and quantify the presence of intravascular gas bubbles as an indicator of decompression stress. In this manuscript we studied the relationship between presence and quantity of gas bubbles by echosonography of the pulmonary artery of anesthetized, air-breathing New Zealand White rabbits that were compressed and decompressed. Mortality rate, presence, quantity, and distribution of gas bubbles elsewhere in the body was examined postmortem. We found a strong positive relationship between high ultrasound bubble grades in the pulmonary artery, sudden death, and high amount of intra and extra vascular gas bubbles widespread throughout the entire organism. In contrast, animals with lower bubble grades survived for 1 h after decompression until sacrificed, and showed no gas bubbles during dissection. PMID:27493634

  10. Bubbles Quantified In vivo by Ultrasound Relates to Amount of Gas Detected Post-mortem in Rabbits Decompressed from High Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Bernaldo de Quirós, Yara; Møllerløkken, Andreas; Havnes, Marianne B.; Brubakk, Alf O.; González-Díaz, Oscar; Fernández, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The pathophysiological mechanism of decompression sickness is not fully understood but there is evidence that it can be caused by intravascular and autochthonous bubbles. Doppler ultrasound at a given circulatory location is used to detect and quantify the presence of intravascular gas bubbles as an indicator of decompression stress. In this manuscript we studied the relationship between presence and quantity of gas bubbles by echosonography of the pulmonary artery of anesthetized, air-breathing New Zealand White rabbits that were compressed and decompressed. Mortality rate, presence, quantity, and distribution of gas bubbles elsewhere in the body was examined postmortem. We found a strong positive relationship between high ultrasound bubble grades in the pulmonary artery, sudden death, and high amount of intra and extra vascular gas bubbles widespread throughout the entire organism. In contrast, animals with lower bubble grades survived for 1 h after decompression until sacrificed, and showed no gas bubbles during dissection. PMID:27493634

  11. Refrigerated hydrogen gas jet for the Fermilab antiproton accumulator

    SciTech Connect

    Allspach, D.H.; Kendziora, C.L.; Marinelli, M.

    1995-07-01

    A hydrogen gas jet has been built for use at Fermilab for the study of charmonium spectroscopy in proton-antiproton annihilations. The hydrogen gas jet is part of an upgrade to a previous experiment which ran in the Fermilab 1990-1991 fixed target program utilizing a jet cooled to 80 K with liquid nitrogen. The jet delivers a defined stream of hydrogen gas which travels through a series of vacuum chambers and then intersects the circulating antiproton beam. The goal of the upgrade is to provide a hydrogen gas stream at least twice as dense as used for the earlier experiment to increase the interaction rate and allow an improved study of rare processes. This is achieved by cooling the stream to below 30 K using a Gifford-McMahon refrigerator. The jet apparatus is designed to allow motion in the plane perpendicular to the gas stream as well as angular positioning at the jet nozzle to provide a means of optimizing the interaction rate. Two skimmers located in the vacuum chambers are used to define the gas stream dimensions. The jet target vacuum chambers require constant pumping with turbomolecular pumps. The vacuum space around the jet is designed to have a large system pumping speed so that the chamber pressure can be maintained below an absolute pressure of 1 Pa. The jet will operate in the next fixed target run at Fermilab. Details of the design and test results are discussed.

  12. Recovery of purified helium or hydrogen from gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Merriman, J.R.; Pashley, J.H.; Stephenson, M.J.; Dunthorn, D.I.

    1974-01-15

    A process is described for the removal of helium or hydrogen from gaseous mixtures also containing contaminants. The gaseous mixture is contacted with a liquid fluorocarbon in an absorption zone maintained at superatomspheric pressure to preferentially absorb the contaminants in the fluorocarbon. Unabsorbed gas enriched in hydrogen or helium is withdrawn from the absorption zone as product. Liquid fluorocarbon enriched in contaminants is withdrawn separately from the absorption zone. (10 claims)

  13. Ruthenium catalyzed hydrogenation of aldehyde with synthesis gas.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kohei; Nozaki, Kyoko

    2014-11-21

    The hydrogenation of aldehyde utilizing synthesis gas as a dihydrogen source was examined with various ruthenium catalysts, among which Ru-cyclopentadienone complexes (Shvo-type catalysts) exhibited higher activity than others. DFT calculations proved that the exchange of coordinated carbon monoxide by dihydrogen is relatively preferable in Shvo-type catalysts compared to others, which is a pre-equilibrium for the generation of the hydrogenation-active species. PMID:25372182

  14. Flashback Detection Sensor for Hydrogen Augmented Natural Gas Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, J.D.; Chorpening, B.T.; Sidwell, T.; Strakey, P.A.; Huckaby, E.D.; Benson, K.J.

    2007-05-01

    The use of hydrogen augmented fuel is being investigated by various researchers as a method to extend the lean operating limit, and potentially reduce thermal NOx formation in natural gas fired lean premixed (LPM) combustion systems. The resulting increase in flame speed during hydrogen augmentation, however, increases the propensity for flashback in LPM systems. Real-time in-situ monitoring of flashback is important for the development of control strategies for use of hydrogen augmented fuel in state-of-the-art combustion systems, and for the development of advanced hydrogen combustion systems. The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and Woodward Industrial Controls are developing a combustion control and diagnostics sensor (CCADS), which has already been demonstrated as a useful sensor for in-situ monitoring of natural gas combustion, including detection of important combustion events such as flashback and lean blowoff. Since CCADS is a flame ionization sensor technique, the low ion concentration produced in pure hydrogen combustion raises concerns of whether CCADS can be used to monitor flashback in hydrogen augmented combustion. This paper discusses CCADS tests conducted at 0.2-0.6 MPa (2-6 atm), demonstrating flashback detection with fuel compositions up to 80% hydrogen (by volume) mixed with natural gas. NETL’s Simulation Validation (SimVal) combustor offers full optical access to pressurized combustion during these tests. The CCADS data and high-speed video show the reaction zone moves upstream into the nozzle as the hydrogen fuel concentration increases, as is expected with the increased flame speed of the mixture. The CCADS data and video also demonstrate the opportunity for using CCADS to provide the necessary in-situ monitor to control flashback and lean blowoff in hydrogen augmented combustion applications.

  15. Blending Hydrogen into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks. A Review of Key Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Melaina, M. W.; Antonia, O.; Penev, M.

    2013-03-01

    This study assesses the potential to deliver hydrogen through the existing natural gas pipeline network as a hydrogen and natural gas mixture to defray the cost of building dedicated hydrogen pipelines. Blending hydrogen into the existing natural gas pipeline network has also been proposed as a means of increasing the output of renewable energy systems such as large wind farms.

  16. Hydrogen Gas as a Fuel in Direct Injection Diesel Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanasekaran, Chinnathambi; Mohankumar, Gabriael

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen is expected to be one of the most important fuels in the near future for solving the problem caused by the greenhouse gases, for protecting environment and saving conventional fuels. In this study, a dual fuel engine of hydrogen and diesel was investigated. Hydrogen was conceded through the intake port, and simultaneously air and diesel was pervaded into the cylinder. Using electronic gas injector and electronic control unit, the injection timing and duration varied. In this investigation, a single cylinder, KIRLOSKAR AV1, DI Diesel engine was used. Hydrogen injection timing was fixed at TDC and injection duration was timed for 30°, 60°, and 90° crank angles. The injection timing of diesel was fixed at 23° BTDC. When hydrogen is mixed with inlet air, emanation of HC, CO and CO2 decreased without any emission (exhaustion) of smoke while increasing the brake thermal efficiency.

  17. Combustion gas properties. Part 3: Hydrogen gas fuel and dry air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wear, J. D.; Jones, R. E.; Mcbride, B. J.; Beyerle, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    A series of computations has been made to produce the equilibrium temperature and gas composition for hydrogen gas fuel and dry air. The computed tables and figures provide combustion gas property data for pressures from 0.5 to 50 atmospheres and equivalence ratios from 0 to 2.0. Only sample tables and figures are provided in this report.

  18. Automated gas burette system for evolved hydrogen measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Feng; Rassat, Scot D.; Heldebrant, David J.; Caldwell, Dustin D.; Aardahl, Christopher L.; Autrey, Thomas; Linehan, John C.; Rappe, Kenneth G.

    2008-08-01

    The US Department of Energy has issued a Grand Challenge in Hydrogen Storage for Fuel Cell powered vehicles. New breakthroughs in materials and approaches are needed to facilitate the transition from an energy economy based upon fossil fuels to an energy economy based upon hydrogen. Consequently there is a need for readily accessible instrumentation to evaluate and quantify the potential of condensed phase hydrogen storage materials. Both the total system storage capacity (90 gm H2/kg system and 81 gm of H2/liter system) and rate of hydrogen gas desorption (2 gm H2/sec/100KW) are critical parameters specified by the experts in the automobile and energy industries that can be obtained with volumetric methods . In bench scale studies for material screening, gas burette systems have been routinely used to determine hydrogen gas release kinetics of sodium borohydride 1-14 and ammonia borane systems 15-23. Simple gas burettes with manual measurements at intervals are easy to set up but are not adequate to study fast kinetics or to carry out high throughput testing. Automated gas burettes of various designs have been reported in the literature 23-30. Piston-cylinder type burette systems can measure gas volume changes at constant pressure if they are equipped with a linear actuator that is driven by a pressure controller. The response time of the actuator motors does impose a limit on the rate of volume change allowed. Due to the response time limit and the complexity of such systems, gas burettes with constant pressure device have not found wide spread use in hydrogen storage studies 29,31. Some designs of automated gas burettes relied on measurements of the electrical resistance of the burette liquid to determine gas volume 23,27. In these systems, it is necessary to use special working fluids such as mercury or certain electrolyte solutions, requiring careful considerations of possible interactions among reaction compounds, electrode materials, and the burette fluid

  19. Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-02-01

    To make the coal-to-hydrogen route economically attractive, improvements are being sought in each step of the process: coal gasification, water-carbon monoxide shift reaction, and hydrogen separation. This report addresses the use of membranes in the hydrogen separation step. The separation of hydrogen from synthesis gas is a major cost element in the manufacture of hydrogen from coal. Separation by membranes is an attractive, new, and still largely unexplored approach to the problem. Membrane processes are inherently simple and efficient and often have lower capital and operating costs than conventional processes. In this report current ad future trends in hydrogen production and use are first summarized. Methods of producing hydrogen from coal are then discussed, with particular emphasis on the Texaco entrained flow gasifier and on current methods of separating hydrogen from this gas stream. The potential for membrane separations in the process is then examined. In particular, the use of membranes for H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}/CO, and H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separations is discussed. 43 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Advanced Diagnostics for High Pressure Spray Combustion.

    SciTech Connect

    Skeen, Scott A.; Manin, Julien Luc; Pickett, Lyle M.

    2014-06-01

    The development of accurate predictive engine simulations requires experimental data to both inform and validate the models, but very limited information is presently available about the chemical structure of high pressure spray flames under engine- relevant conditions. Probing such flames for chemical information using non- intrusive optical methods or intrusive sampling techniques, however, is challenging because of the physical and optical harshness of the environment. This work details two new diagnostics that have been developed and deployed to obtain quantitative species concentrations and soot volume fractions from a high-pressure combusting spray. A high-speed, high-pressure sampling system was developed to extract gaseous species (including soot precursor species) from within the flame for offline analysis by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A high-speed multi-wavelength optical extinction diagnostic was also developed to quantify transient and quasi-steady soot processes. High-pressure sampling and offline characterization of gas-phase species formed following the pre-burn event was accomplished as well as characterization of gas-phase species present in the lift-off region of a high-pressure n-dodecane spray flame. For the initial samples discussed in this work several species were identified, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH); however, quantitative mole fractions were not determined. Nevertheless, the diagnostic developed here does have this capability. Quantitative, time-resolved measurements of soot extinction were also accomplished and the novel use of multiple incident wavelengths proved valuable toward characterizing changes in soot optical properties within different regions of the spray flame.

  1. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2014-11-25

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  2. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOEpatents

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  3. Efficient High-Pressure State Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, Kenneth G.; Miller, Richard S.; Bellan, Josette

    1997-01-01

    A method is presented for a relatively accurate, noniterative, computationally efficient calculation of high-pressure fluid-mixture equations of state, especially targeted to gas turbines and rocket engines. Pressures above I bar and temperatures above 100 K are addressed The method is based on curve fitting an effective reference state relative to departure functions formed using the Peng-Robinson cubic state equation Fit parameters for H2, O2, N2, propane, methane, n-heptane, and methanol are given.

  4. High pressure/high temperature thermogravimetric apparatus. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Calo, J.M.; Suuberg, E.M.

    1999-12-01

    The purpose of this instrumentation grant was to acquire a state-of-the-art, high pressure, high temperature thermogravimetric apparatus (HP/HT TGA) system for the study of the interactions between gases and carbonaceous solids for the purpose of solving problems related to coal utilization and applications of carbon materials. The instrument that we identified for this purpose was manufactured by DMT (Deutsche Montan Technologies)--Institute of Cokemaking and Coal Chemistry of Essen, Germany. Particular features of note include: Two reactors: a standard TGA reactor, capable of 1100 C at 100 bar; and a high temperature (HT) reactor, capable of operation at 1600 C and 100 bar; A steam generator capable of generating steam to 100 bar; Flow controllers and gas mixing system for up to three reaction gases, plus a separate circuit for steam, and another for purge gas; and An automated software system for data acquisition and control. The HP/TP DMT-TGA apparatus was purchased in 1996 and installed and commissioned during the summer of 1996. The apparatus was located in Room 128 of the Prince Engineering Building at Brown University. A hydrogen alarm and vent system were added for safety considerations. The system has been interfaced to an Ametek quadruple mass spectrometer (MA 100), pumped by a Varian V250 turbomolecular pump, as provided for in the original proposed. With this capability, a number of gas phase species of interest can be monitored in a near-simultaneous fashion. The MS can be used in a few different modes. During high pressure, steady-state gasification experiments, it is used to sample, measure, and monitor the reactant/product gases. It can also be used to monitor gas phase species during nonisothermal temperature programmed reaction (TPR) or temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments.

  5. Blending Hydrogen into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks: A Review of Key Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Melaina, M. W.; Antonia, O.; Penev, M.

    2013-03-01

    The United States has 11 distinct natural gas pipeline corridors: five originate in the Southwest, four deliver natural gas from Canada, and two extend from the Rocky Mountain region. This study assesses the potential to deliver hydrogen through the existing natural gas pipeline network as a hydrogen and natural gas mixture to defray the cost of building dedicated hydrogen pipelines.

  6. Hydrogen-air energy storage gas-turbine system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schastlivtsev, A. I.; Nazarova, O. V.

    2016-02-01

    A hydrogen-air energy storage gas-turbine unit is considered that can be used in both nuclear and centralized power industries. However, it is the most promising when used for power-generating plants based on renewable energy sources (RES). The basic feature of the energy storage system in question is combination of storing the energy in compressed air and hydrogen and oxygen produced by the water electrolysis. Such a process makes the energy storage more flexible, in particular, when applied to RES-based power-generating plants whose generation of power may considerably vary during the course of a day, and also reduces the specific cost of the system by decreasing the required volume of the reservoir. This will allow construction of such systems in any areas independent of the local topography in contrast to the compressed-air energy storage gas-turbine plants, which require large-sized underground reservoirs. It should be noted that, during the energy recovery, the air that arrives from the reservoir is heated by combustion of hydrogen in oxygen, which results in the gas-turbine exhaust gases practically free of substances hazardous to the health and the environment. The results of analysis of a hydrogen-air energy storage gas-turbine system are presented. Its layout and the principle of its operation are described and the basic parameters are computed. The units of the system are analyzed and their costs are assessed; the recovery factor is estimated at more than 60%. According to the obtained results, almost all main components of the hydrogen-air energy storage gas-turbine system are well known at present; therefore, no considerable R&D costs are required. A new component of the system is the H2-O2 combustion chamber; a difficulty in manufacturing it is the necessity of ensuring the combustion of hydrogen in oxygen as complete as possible and preventing formation of nitric oxides.

  7. Detection of hydrogen chloride gas in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.

    1978-01-01

    Launch vehicle effluent (LVE) monitoring is part of NASA's overall tropospheric and stratospheric environmental program. Following nine techniques are evaluated and developed in report: bubbler method, pH measurements, indicator tubes, microcoulometers, modified condensation nuclei counter, dual-isotope absorption, gas-filter correlation, chemiluminescent nitric oxide detection, chemiluminescent luminol-oxidation detection.

  8. Polymerization of formic acid under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, A.F.; Manaa, M.R.; Zaug, J.M.; Gee, R.H.; Fried, L.E.; Montgomery, W.B.

    2010-07-19

    We report Raman, infrared, and x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, along with ab initio calculations on formic acid (FA) under pressure up to 50 GPa. We find an infinite chain Pna2{sub 1} structure to be a high-pressure phase at room temperature. Our data indicate the symmetrization and a partially covalent character of the intrachain hydrogen bonds above approximately 20 GPa. Raman spectra and XRD patterns indicate a loss of long-range order at pressures above 40 GPa, with a large hysteresis upon decompression. We attribute this behavior to a three-dimensional polymerization of FA.

  9. Development of a hydrogen gas sensor using microfabrication technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chung-Chiun; Wu, Qinghai; Stuczynski, Matthew; Madzsar, George C.

    1992-01-01

    Microfabrication and micromachining technologies are used to produce a hydrogen gas sensor based on a palladium-silver film. The sensor uses a heater that is fabricated by diffusing p-type borones into the substrate, forming a resistance heater. A diode for temperature measurement is produced using p-type boron and n-type phosphor diffused into the substrate. A thickness of the palladium-silver film is approximately 300 arcsec. The hydrogen gas sensor employs the proven palladium-silver diode structure and is surrounded by a phosphor doped resistance heater which can be heated up to a temperature of 250 C. Experimental results show that the sensor is capable of operating over a wide range of hydrogen concentration levels between 0-95 percent without any hysteresis effects.

  10. Dynamic gas bearing turbine technology in hydrogen plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlig, Klaus; Bischoff, Stefan

    2012-06-01

    Dynamic Gas Bearing Turbines - although applied for helium refrigerators and liquefiers for decades - experienced limitations for hydrogen applications due to restrictions in axial bearing capacity. With a new design concept for gas bearing turbines developed in 2004, axial bearing capacity was significantly improved enabling the transfer of this technology to hydrogen liquefiers. Prior to roll-out of the technology to industrial plants, the turbine bearing technology passed numerous tests in R&D test benches and subsequently proved industrial scale demonstration at Linde Gas' hydrogen liquefier in Leuna, Germany. Since its installation, this turbine has gathered more than 16,000 successful operating hours and has outperformed its oil bearing brother in terms of performance, maintainability as well as reliability. The present paper is based on Linde Kryotechnik AG's paper published in the proceedings of the CEC 2009 concerning the application of Dynamic Gas Bearing Turbines in hydrogen applications. In contrast to the former paper, this publication focuses on the steps towards final market launch and more specifically on the financial benefits of this turbine technology, both in terms of capital investment as well as operating expenses.

  11. Summary of gas release events detected by hydrogen monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    MCCAIN, D.J.

    1999-05-18

    This paper summarizes the results of monitoring tank headspace for flammable gas release events. In over 40 tank years of monitoring the largest detected release in a single-shell tank is 2.4 cubic meters of Hydrogen. In the double-shell tanks the largest release is 19.3 cubic meters except in SY-101 pre mixer pump installation condition.

  12. Hydrogen and Oxygen Gas Monitoring System Design and Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee C. Cadwallader; Kevin G. DeWall; J. Stephen Herring

    2007-06-01

    This paper describes pertinent design practices of selecting types of monitors, monitor unit placement, setpoint selection, and maintenance considerations for gas monitors. While hydrogen gas monitors and enriched oxygen atmosphere monitors as they would be needed for hydrogen production experiments are the primary focus of this paper, monitors for carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide are also discussed. The experiences of designing, installing, and calibrating gas monitors for a laboratory where experiments in support of the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) are described along with codes, standards, and regulations for these monitors. Information from the literature about best operating practices is also presented. The NHI program has two types of activities. The first, near-term activity is laboratory and pilot-plant experimentation with different processes in the kilogram per day scale to select the most promising types of processes for future applications of hydrogen production. Prudent design calls for indoor gas monitors to sense any hydrogen leaks within these laboratory rooms. The second, longer-term activity is the prototype, or large-scale plants to produce tons of hydrogen per day. These large, outdoor production plants will require area (or “fencepost”) monitoring of hydrogen gas leaks. Some processes will have oxygen production with hydrogen production, and any oxygen releases are also safety concerns since oxygen gas is the strongest oxidizer. Monitoring of these gases is important for personnel safety of both indoor and outdoor experiments. There is some guidance available about proper placement of monitors. The fixed point, stationary monitor can only function if the intruding gas contacts the monitor. Therefore, monitor placement is vital to proper monitoring of the room or area. Factors in sensor location selection include: indoor or outdoor site, the location and nature of potential vapor/gas sources, chemical and physical data of the

  13. Fully Premixed Low Emission, High Pressure Multi-Fuel Burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A low-emissions high-pressure multi-fuel burner includes a fuel inlet, for receiving a fuel, an oxidizer inlet, for receiving an oxidizer gas, an injector plate, having a plurality of nozzles that are aligned with premix face of the injector plate, the plurality of nozzles in communication with the fuel and oxidizer inlets and each nozzle providing flow for one of the fuel and the oxidizer gas and an impingement-cooled face, parallel to the premix face of the injector plate and forming a micro-premix chamber between the impingement-cooled face and the in injector face. The fuel and the oxidizer gas are mixed in the micro-premix chamber through impingement-enhanced mixing of flows of the fuel and the oxidizer gas. The burner can be used for low-emissions fuel-lean fully-premixed, or fuel-rich fully-premixed hydrogen-air combustion, or for combustion with other gases such as methane or other hydrocarbons, or even liquid fuels.

  14. Silicon Carbide-Based Hydrogen and Hydrocarbon Gas Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Chen, Liang-Yu; Knight, D.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.R

    1995-01-01

    Hydrogen and hydrocarbon detection in aeronautical applications is important for reasons of safety and emissions control. The use of silicon carbide as a semiconductor in a metal-semiconductor or metal-insulator-semiconductor structure opens opportunities to measure hydrogen and hydrocarbons in high temperature environments beyond the capabilities of silicon-based devices. The purpose of this paper is to explore the response and stability of Pd-SiC Schottky diodes as gas sensors in the temperature range from 100 to 400 C. The effect of heat treating on the diode properties as measured at 100 C is explored. Subsequent operation at 400 C demonstrates the diodes' sensitivity to hydrogen and hydrocarbons. It is concluded that the Pd-SiC Schottky diode has potential as a hydrogen and hydrocarbon sensor over a wide range of temperatures but further studies are necessary to determine the diodes' long term stability.

  15. High-Pressure Fluorescence Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Maeno, Akihiro; Akasaka, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The combination of fluorescence and pressure perturbation is a widely used technique to study the effect of pressure on a protein system to obtain thermodynamic, structural and kinetic information on proteins. However, we often encounter the situation where the available pressure range up to 400 MPa of most commercial high-pressure fluorescence spectrometers is insufficient for studying highly pressure-stable proteins like inhibitors and allergenic proteins. To overcome the difficulty, we have recently developed a new high-pressure fluorescence system that allows fluorescence measurements up to 700 MPa. Here we describe the basic design of the apparatus and its application to study structural and thermodynamic properties of a couple of highly stable allergenic proteins, hen lysozyme and ovomucoid, using Tryptophan and Tyrosine/Tyrosinate fluorescence, respectively. Finally, we discuss the utility and the limitation of Trp and Tyr fluorescence. We discuss pitfalls of fluorescence technique and importance of simultaneous use of other high-pressure spectroscopy, particularly high-pressure NMR spectroscopy. PMID:26174405

  16. Detail view of unit 43 with high pressure stage compressor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of unit 43 with high pressure stage compressor in left foreground. - Burnsville Natural Gas Pumping Station, Saratoga Avenue between Little Kanawha River & C&O Railroad line, Burnsville, Braxton County, WV

  17. DETAIL VIEW OF UNIT #3 WITH HIGH PRESSURE STAGE COMPRESSOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF UNIT #3 WITH HIGH PRESSURE STAGE COMPRESSOR IN LEFT FOREGROUND. - Burnsville Natural Gas Pumping Station, Saratoga Avenue between Little Kanawha River & C&O Railroad line, Burnsville, Braxton County, WV

  18. Detail view of valve mechanisms and goverenor on high pressure ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of valve mechanisms and goverenor on high pressure stage engine of unit 43. - Burnsville Natural Gas Pumping Station, Saratoga Avenue between Little Kanawha River & C&O Railroad line, Burnsville, Braxton County, WV

  19. Hydrogen pellet acceleration with a two-stage system consisting of a gas gun and a fuseless electromagnetic railgun

    SciTech Connect

    Honig, J.; Kim, K.; Wedge, S.W.

    1986-05-01

    Hydrogen pellets are successfully accelerated for the first time using a two-stage system consisting of a pneumatic gun and an electromagnetic railgun. The pneumatic gun preaccelerator forms cylindrical hydrogen ice pellets (1.6-mm diam x 2.15-mm long) and accelerates them with high-pressure helium gas to velocities in excess of 500 m/s. The booster accelerator, which is a fuseless, circular-bore electromagnetic railgun, derives its propulsive force from a plasma arc armature. The plasma arc armature is formed by electrically breaking down the propellant gas which follows the pellet from the gas gun into the railgun. The diagnostics are for the monitoring of the main capacitor bank and rail currents, for the pellet detection and velocity measurements at the breech and muzzle ends of the railgun, for the recording of the plasma-arc-armature movement inside the railgun bore, and for the photographing of the hydrogen pellet exiting the railgun. Using the system, which is a 60-cm long proof-of-principle machine for refueling magnetic fusion devices, hyrogen pellet velocities exceeding 1 km/s have been achieved for pellets exiting the gas gun at velocities of approx.500 m/s.

  20. Hydrogenation Reactions during Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Polymer Samples Using Hydrogen Carrier Gas.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Atsushi; Watanabe, Chuichi; Freeman, Robert R; Teramae, Norio; Ohtani, Hajime

    2016-05-17

    Pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of polymer samples is studied focusing on the effect of hydrogen (H2) carrier gas on chromatographic and spectral data. The pyrograms and the related mass spectra of high density polyethylene (HDPE), low density polyethylene, and polystyrene (PS) serve to illustrate the differences between the species formed in H2 and the helium environment. Differences in the pyrograms and the spectra are generally thought to be a result of the hydrogenation reaction of the pyrolyzates. From the peak intensity changes in the pyrograms of HDPE and PS, hydrogenation of unsaturated pyrolyzates is concluded to occur when the pyrolysis is done in H2. Moreover, additional hydrogenation of the pyrolyzates occurs in the electron ionization source of a MS detector when H2 is used as a carrier gas. Finally, the applicability of mass spectral libraries to characterize pyrograms obtained in H2 is illustrated using 24 polymers. The effect of the hydrogenation reaction on the library search results is found to be negligible for most polymer samples with polar and nonpolar monomer units. PMID:27125864

  1. High pressure liquid level monitor

    DOEpatents

    Bean, Vern E.; Long, Frederick G.

    1984-01-01

    A liquid level monitor for tracking the level of a coal slurry in a high-pressure vessel including a toroidal-shaped float with magnetically permeable bands thereon disposed within the vessel, two pairs of magnetic field generators and detectors disposed outside the vessel adjacent the top and bottom thereof and magnetically coupled to the magnetically permeable bands on the float, and signal processing circuitry for combining signals from the top and bottom detectors for generating a monotonically increasing analog control signal which is a function of liquid level. The control signal may be utilized to operate high-pressure control valves associated with processes in which the high-pressure vessel is used.

  2. Electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Rakestraw, David J.; Arnold, Don W.; Hencken, Kenneth R.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Neyer, David W.

    2003-06-03

    An electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic pump for manipulating fluids in capillary-based system. The pump uses electro-osmotic flow to provide a high pressure hydraulic system, having no moving mechanical parts, for pumping and/or compressing fluids, for providing valve means and means for opening and closing valves, for controlling fluid flow rate, and manipulating fluid flow generally and in capillary-based systems (microsystems), in particular. The compact nature of the inventive high pressure hydraulic pump provides the ability to construct a micro-scale or capillary-based HPLC system that fulfills the desire for small sample quantity, low solvent consumption, improved efficiency, the ability to run samples in parallel, and field portability. Control of pressure and solvent flow rate is achieved by controlling the voltage applied to an electrokinetic pump.

  3. Electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Rakestraw, David J.; Arnold, Don W.; Hencken, Kenneth R.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Neyer, David W.

    2001-01-01

    An electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic pump for manipulating fluids in capillary-based systems. The pump uses electro-osmotic flow to provide a high pressure hydraulic system, having no moving mechanical parts, for pumping and/or compressing fluids, for providing valve means and means for opening and closing valves, for controlling fluid flow rate, and manipulating fluid flow generally and in capillary-based systems (Microsystems), in particular. The compact nature of the inventive high pressure hydraulic pump provides the ability to construct a micro-scale or capillary-based HPLC system that fulfills the desire for small sample quantity, low solvent consumption, improved efficiency, the ability to run samples in parallel, and field portability. Control of pressure and solvent flow rate is achieved by controlling the voltage applied to an electrokinetic pump.

  4. Windage Power Loss in Gas Foil Bearings and the Rotor-Stator Clearance of High Speed Generators Operating in High Pressure Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) and Closed Supercritical Cycle (CSC) engines are prime candidates to convert heat from a reactor into electric power for robotic space exploration and habitation. These engine concepts incorporate a permanent magnet starter/generator mounted on the engine shaft along with the requisite turbomachinery. Successful completion of the long-duration missions currently anticipated for these engines will require designs that adequately address all losses within the machine. The preliminary thermal management concept for these engine types is to use the cycle working fluid to provide the required cooling. In addition to providing cooling, the working fluid will also serve as the bearing lubricant. Additional requirements, due to the unique application of these microturbines, are zero contamination of the working fluid and entirely maintenance-free operation for many years. Losses in the gas foil bearings and within the rotor-stator gap of the generator become increasingly important as both rotational speed and mean operating pressure are increased. This paper presents the results of an experimental study, which obtained direct torque measurements on gas foil bearings and generator rotor-stator gaps. Test conditions for these measurements included rotational speeds up to 42,000 revolutions per minute, pressures up to 45 atmospheres, and test gases of nitrogen, helium, and carbon dioxide. These conditions provided a maximum test Taylor number of nearly one million. The results show an exponential rise in power loss as mean operating density is increased for both the gas foil bearing and generator windage. These typical "secondary" losses can become larger than the total system output power if conventional design paradigms are followed. A nondimensional analysis is presented to extend the experimental results into the CSC range for the generator windage.

  5. Production of hydrogen by thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Muradov, N.

    1996-10-01

    The conventional methods of hydrogen production from natural gas (for example, steam reforming and partial oxidation) are complex, multi-step processes that produce large quantities of CO{sub 2}. The main goal of this project is to develop a technologically simple process for hydrogen production from natural gas (NG) and other hydrocarbon fuels via single-step decomposition of hydrocarbons. This approach eliminates or significantly reduces CO{sub 2} emission. Carbon is a valuable by-product of this process, whereas conventional methods of hydrogen production from NG produce no useful by-products. This approach is based on the use of special catalysts that reduce the maximum temperature of the process from 1400-1500{degrees}C (thermal non-catalytic decomposition of methane) to 500-900{degrees}C. Transition metal based catalysts and various forms of carbon are among the candidate catalysts for the process. This approach can advantageously be used for the development of compact NG reformers for on-site production of hydrogen-methane blends at refueling stations and, also, for the production of hydrogen-rich gas for fuel cell applications. The author extended the search for active methane decomposition catalysts to various modifications of Ni-, Fe-, Mo- and Co-based catalysts. Variation in the operational parameters makes it possible to produce H{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} blends with a wide range of hydrogen concentrations that vary from 15 to 98% by volume. The author found that Ni-based catalysts are more effective at temperatures below 750{degrees}C, whereas Fe-based catalysts are effective at temperatures above 800{degrees}C for the production of hydrogen with purity of 95% v. or higher. The catalytic pyrolysis of liquid hydrocarbons (pentane, gasoline) over Fe-based catalyst was conducted. The author observed the production of a hydrogen-rich gas (hydrogen concentration up to 97% by volume) at a rate of approximately 1L/min.mL of hydrocarbon fuel.

  6. Solid-phase microextraction may catalize hydrogenation when using hydrogen as carrier in gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Fiorini, D; Boarelli, M C

    2016-07-01

    When hydrogen is used as carrier gas, carbon-carbon double bonds may be hydrogenated in the hot gas chromatograph (GC) injector if introduced by solid-phase microextraction (SPME). SPME fibers coated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)/carboxen/divinylbenzene (DVB), PDMS/carboxen, polyacrylate, PDMS/DVB and PDMS on fused silica, stableflex or metal alloy core have been tested with fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) from olive oil. Using coatings containing DVB, hydrogenation took place with high conversion rates (82.0-92.9%) independently of the core material. With all fibers having a metal core, hydrogenation was observed to a certain extent (27.4-85.3%). PDMS, PDMS/carboxen and polyacrylate coated fibers with a fused silica or stableflex core resulted in negligible hydrogenation (0.2-2.5%). The occurrence of hydrogenation was confirmed also with other substances containing carbon-carbon double bonds (n-alkenes, alkenoic acids, mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acid methyl and ethyl esters). PMID:27236484

  7. Synthesis of sodium polyhydrides at high pressures

    PubMed Central

    Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Kim, Duck Young; Stavrou, Elissaios; Muramatsu, Takaki; Mao, Ho-kwang; Pickard, Chris J.; Needs, Richard J.; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2016-01-01

    The only known compound of sodium and hydrogen is archetypal ionic NaH. Application of high pressure is known to promote states with higher atomic coordination, but extensive searches for polyhydrides with unusual stoichiometry have had only limited success in spite of several theoretical predictions. Here we report the first observation of the formation of polyhydrides of Na (NaH3 and NaH7) above 40 GPa and 2,000 K. We combine synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell and theoretical random structure searching, which both agree on the stable structures and compositions. Our results support the formation of multicenter bonding in a material with unusual stoichiometry. These results are applicable to the design of new energetic solids and high-temperature superconductors based on hydrogen-rich materials. PMID:27464650

  8. Synthesis of sodium polyhydrides at high pressures.

    PubMed

    Struzhkin, Viktor V; Kim, Duck Young; Stavrou, Elissaios; Muramatsu, Takaki; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Pickard, Chris J; Needs, Richard J; Prakapenka, Vitali B; Goncharov, Alexander F

    2016-01-01

    The only known compound of sodium and hydrogen is archetypal ionic NaH. Application of high pressure is known to promote states with higher atomic coordination, but extensive searches for polyhydrides with unusual stoichiometry have had only limited success in spite of several theoretical predictions. Here we report the first observation of the formation of polyhydrides of Na (NaH3 and NaH7) above 40 GPa and 2,000 K. We combine synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell and theoretical random structure searching, which both agree on the stable structures and compositions. Our results support the formation of multicenter bonding in a material with unusual stoichiometry. These results are applicable to the design of new energetic solids and high-temperature superconductors based on hydrogen-rich materials. PMID:27464650

  9. Synthesis of sodium polyhydrides at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Kim, Duck Young; Stavrou, Elissaios; Muramatsu, Takaki; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Pickard, Chris J.; Needs, Richard J.; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2016-07-01

    The only known compound of sodium and hydrogen is archetypal ionic NaH. Application of high pressure is known to promote states with higher atomic coordination, but extensive searches for polyhydrides with unusual stoichiometry have had only limited success in spite of several theoretical predictions. Here we report the first observation of the formation of polyhydrides of Na (NaH3 and NaH7) above 40 GPa and 2,000 K. We combine synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell and theoretical random structure searching, which both agree on the stable structures and compositions. Our results support the formation of multicenter bonding in a material with unusual stoichiometry. These results are applicable to the design of new energetic solids and high-temperature superconductors based on hydrogen-rich materials.

  10. Synthesis of sodium polyhydrides at high pressures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Kim, Duck Young; Stavrou, Elissaios; Muramatsu, Takaki; Mao, Ho-kwang; Pickard, Chris J.; Needs, Richard J.; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2016-07-28

    Archetypal ionic NaH is the only known compound of sodium and hydrogen. Application of high pressure is known to promote states with higher atomic coordination, but extensive searches for polyhydrides with unusual stoichiometry have had only limited success in spite of several theoretical predictions. Here we report the first observation of the formation of polyhydrides of Na (NaH3 and NaH7) above 40 GPa and 2,000 K. Moreover, we combine synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell and theoretical random structure searching, which both agree on the stable structures and compositions. Our results support the formationmore » of multicenter bonding in a material with unusual stoichiometry. These results are applicable to the design of new energetic solids and high-temperature superconductors based on hydrogen-rich materials.« less

  11. Biomass & Natural Gas Based Hydrogen Fuel For Gas Turbine (Power Generation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Significant progress has been made by major power generation equipment manufacturers in the development of market applications for hydrogen fuel use in gas turbines in recent years. Development of a new application using gas turbines for significant reduction of power plant CO2 e...

  12. Development of a new type of high pressure calorimetric cell, mechanically agitated and equipped with a dynamic pressure control system: Application to the characterization of gas hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Plantier, F. Missima, D.; Torré, J.-P.; Marlin, L.

    2013-12-15

    A novel prototype of calorimetric cell has been developed allowing experiments under pressure with an in situ agitation system and a dynamic control of the pressure inside the cell. The use of such a system opens a wide range of potential practical applications for determining properties of complex fluids in both pressurized and agitated conditions. The technical details of this prototype and its calibration procedure are described, and an application devoted to the determination of phase equilibrium and phase change enthalpy of gas hydrates is presented. Our results, obtained with a good precision and reproducibility, were found in fairly good agreement with those found in literature, illustrate the various interests to use this novel apparatus.

  13. Hydrogen storage on high-surface-area carbon monoliths for Adsorb hydrogen Gas Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soo, Yuchoong; Pfeifer, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Carbon briquetting can increase hydrogen volumetric storage capacity by reducing the useless void volume resulting in a better packing density. It is a robust and efficient space-filling form for an adsorbed hydrogen gas vehicle storage tank. To optimize hydrogen storage capacity, we studied three fabrication process parameters: carbon-to-binder ratio, compaction temperature, and pyrolysis atmosphere. We found that carbon-to-binder ratio and pyrolysis atmosphere have influences on gravimetric excess adsorption. Compaction temperature has large influences on gravimetric and volumetric storage capacity. We have been able to optimize these parameters for high hydrogen storage. All monolith uptakes (up to 260 bar) were measured by a custom-built, volumetric, reservoir-type instrument.

  14. Hydrogen and Hydrogen/Natural Gas Station and Vehicle Operations - 2006 Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Francfort; Donald Karner; Roberta Brayer

    2006-09-01

    This report is a summary of the operations and testing of internal combustion engine vehicles that were fueled with 100% hydrogen and various blends of hydrogen and compressed natural gas (HCNG). It summarizes the operations of the Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which produces, compresses, and dispenses hydrogen fuel. Other testing activities, such as the destructive testing of a CNG storage cylinder that was used for HCNG storage, are also discussed. This report highlights some of the latest technology developments in the use of 100% hydrogen fuels in internal combustion engine vehicles. Reports are referenced and WWW locations noted as a guide for the reader that desires more detailed information. These activities are conducted by Arizona Public Service, Electric Transportation Applications, the Idaho National Laboratory, and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity.

  15. Solidification structure of C{sub 2.08}Cr{sub 25.43}Si{sub 1.19}Mn{sub 0.43}Fe{sub 70.87} powders fabricated by high pressure gas atomization

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Yongxiang; Yang Min; Song Changjiang; Han, Qingyou; Zhai Qijie

    2010-01-15

    Powders of hypoeutectic high chromium white cast iron (C{sub 2.08}Cr{sub 25.43}Si{sub 1.19}Mn{sub 0.43}Fe{sub 70.87}) were produced by high pressure gas atomization. The microstructure of the powders was characterized using light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results showed that the as-atomized powders were mainly composed of austenite and M{sub 7}C{sub 3} (M = Fe, Cr) type carbide, and became ferrite and carbide after annealing. With the decrease of the powder diameter, the number of austenite grains, primary dendrite length and second dendrite arm spacing were decreased. The relationship between cooling rate and microstructure was also determined.

  16. Hydrogen gas embrittlement and the disc pressure test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachelet, E. J.; Troiano, A. R.

    1973-01-01

    A disc pressure test has been used to study the influenced of a hydrogen gas environment on the mechanical properties of three high strength superalloys, Inconel 718, L-605 and A-286, in static and dynamic conditions. The influence of the hydrogen pressure, loading rate, temperature, mechanical and thermal fatigue has investigated. The permeation characteristics of Inconel 718 have been determined in collaboration with the French AEC. The results complemented by a fractographic study are consistent either with a stress-sorption or with an internal embrittlement type of mechanism.

  17. High-pressure water facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA Test Operations Group employees, from left, Todd Pearson, Tim Delcuze and Rodney Wilkinson maintain a water pump in Stennis Space Center's high-pressure water facility. The three were part of a group of employees who rode out Hurricane Katrina at the facility and helped protect NASA's rocket engine test complex.

  18. Instruction manual for UTEP weld gas hydrogen detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclure, John; Pang, Tonghui

    1992-01-01

    The instrument described in this manual was developed at the University of Texas at El Paso under contract from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Marshall Space Flight Center. The instrument has been used to detect hydrogen in the shielding gas of Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) welds at concentrations of less than 100 ppm. The instrument makes measurements in real time during the welding operation and provides the operator with an easily readable graphic display of the present level of hydrogen in the arc as well as the level of hydrogen over the past approximately five minutes. In this way the welder can not only tell if the present level of hydrogen is excessive, but can see what changes in weld parameters have done to the level of hydrogen. The welder can set the level of hydrogen that is considered critical and the instrument display will indicate when that level has been exceeded. All detection is from the torch side. All needed equipment is supplied by the developer except for an IBM PC compatible computer which must be supplied by the user. Source code is supplied in this manual so that the user can modify the control program as desired.

  19. Disposal pathway for tritiated reactive metals and tritiated hydrogen gas

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniazzi, A. B.; Morton, C. S.

    2008-07-15

    Kinectrics and its predecessor company Ontario Hydro Research Div. (a division of Ontario Hydro) had a fully operational tritium laboratory on site since the early 1980's. During those years numerous projects and experiments were undertaken using hydrogen and tritium for the most part. Metals with an affinity for hydrogen are commonly employed as scavengers of hydrogenic gases from process streams or as hydrogen storage mediums. The two most common of these metals used were depleted uranium and a zirconium-iron alloy (SAES St198). The break-up of Ontario Hydro through deregulation activities resulted in the building of a new, smaller, tritium laboratory and the decommissioning of the original tritium laboratory. Decommissioning activities resulted in the need to safely dispose of these reactive metals. Disposal of these metals is not straight forward. For safe, long term, disposal it has been decided to oxidize the metals in a controlled fashion. The oxidized beds, containing the metals, will be sent to a radioactive waste site for long term storage. Options for disposal of tritiated hydrogen gas are presented and discussed. This paper provides a disposal pathway for tritiated reactive metals and hydrogen thereby closing the loop in tritium handling. (authors)

  20. Process for removal of hydrogen sulfide from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Hansford, R.C.; Hass, R.H.

    1981-01-06

    A process for the removal of H/sub 2/S from a feed gas, and the production of sulfur therefrom, is effected by oxidation with oxygen and/or SO/sub 2/ at temperatures between 250* and 450* F. The oxidation is conducted in the presence of an extremely stable oxidation catalyst comprising an oxide and/or sulfide of vanadium supported on a non-alkaline porous refractory oxide. Sulfur deposition and consequent catalyst deactivation are prevented by maintaining the partial pressure of free sulfur in the oxidation reactor below that necessary for condensation. H/sub 2/, CO, and light hydrocarbons present in the feed gas are not oxidized. Typical uses of the process include the removal of H/sub 2/S and the production of sulfur from sour natural gases or gases obtained from the gasification of coal. Feed gases which contain SO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S in mole ratios greater than 5, or which contain other gaseous sulfur compounds such as CO, CS/sub 2/, SO/sub 3/ and mercaptans, can be desulfurized by hydrogenating all of such sulfur components to H/sub 2/S and subsequently removing the H/sub 2/S from the hydrogenated feed gas by the oxidation process of the invention. This hydrogenation-oxidation combination is especially contemplated for the desulfurization of claus tail gases and stack gas effluents.

  1. Process for removal of hydrogen sulfide from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Hansford, R.C.; Hass, R.H.

    1982-01-19

    A process for the removal of H2S from a feed gas, and the production of sulfur therefrom, is effected by oxidation with oxygen and/or SO2 at temperatures between 250 and 450/sup 0/F. The oxidation is conducted in the presence of an extremely stable oxidation catalyst comprising an oxide and/or sulfide of vanadium supported on a non-alkaline porous refractory oxide. Sulfur deposition and consequent catalyst deactivation are prevented by maintaining the partial pressure of free sulfur in the oxidation reactor below that necessary for condensation. H2, CO, and light hydrocarbons present in the feed gas are not oxidized. Typical uses of the process include the removal of H2S and the production of sulfur from sour natural gases or gases obtained from the gasification of coal. Feed gases which contain SO2 and H2S in mole ratios greater than 5, or which contain other gaseous sulfur compounds such as CO CS2, SO3 and mercaptans, can be desulfurized by hydrogenating all of such sulfur components to H2S and subsequently removing the H2S from the hydrogenated feed gas by the oxidation process of the invention. This hydrogenation-oxidation combination is especially contemplated for the desulfurization of claus tail gases and stack gas effluents.

  2. Culturable prokaryotic diversity of deep, gas hydrate sediments: first use of a continuous high-pressure, anaerobic, enrichment and isolation system for subseafloor sediments (DeepIsoBUG)

    PubMed Central

    Parkes, R John; Sellek, Gerard; Webster, Gordon; Martin, Derek; Anders, Erik; Weightman, Andrew J; Sass, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Deep subseafloor sediments may contain depressurization-sensitive, anaerobic, piezophilic prokaryotes. To test this we developed the DeepIsoBUG system, which when coupled with the HYACINTH pressure-retaining drilling and core storage system and the PRESS core cutting and processing system, enables deep sediments to be handled without depressurization (up to 25 MPa) and anaerobic prokaryotic enrichments and isolation to be conducted up to 100 MPa. Here, we describe the system and its first use with subsurface gas hydrate sediments from the Indian Continental Shelf, Cascadia Margin and Gulf of Mexico. Generally, highest cell concentrations in enrichments occurred close to in situ pressures (14 MPa) in a variety of media, although growth continued up to at least 80 MPa. Predominant sequences in enrichments were Carnobacterium, Clostridium, Marinilactibacillus and Pseudomonas, plus Acetobacterium and Bacteroidetes in Indian samples, largely independent of media and pressures. Related 16S rRNA gene sequences for all of these Bacteria have been detected in deep, subsurface environments, although isolated strains were piezotolerant, being able to grow at atmospheric pressure. Only the Clostridium and Acetobacterium were obligate anaerobes. No Archaea were enriched. It may be that these sediment samples were not deep enough (total depth 1126–1527 m) to obtain obligate piezophiles. PMID:19694787

  3. Culturable prokaryotic diversity of deep, gas hydrate sediments: first use of a continuous high-pressure, anaerobic, enrichment and isolation system for subseafloor sediments (DeepIsoBUG).

    PubMed

    Parkes, R John; Sellek, Gerard; Webster, Gordon; Martin, Derek; Anders, Erik; Weightman, Andrew J; Sass, Henrik

    2009-12-01

    Deep subseafloor sediments may contain depressurization-sensitive, anaerobic, piezophilic prokaryotes. To test this we developed the DeepIsoBUG system, which when coupled with the HYACINTH pressure-retaining drilling and core storage system and the PRESS core cutting and processing system, enables deep sediments to be handled without depressurization (up to 25 MPa) and anaerobic prokaryotic enrichments and isolation to be conducted up to 100 MPa. Here, we describe the system and its first use with subsurface gas hydrate sediments from the Indian Continental Shelf, Cascadia Margin and Gulf of Mexico. Generally, highest cell concentrations in enrichments occurred close to in situ pressures (14 MPa) in a variety of media, although growth continued up to at least 80 MPa. Predominant sequences in enrichments were Carnobacterium, Clostridium, Marinilactibacillus and Pseudomonas, plus Acetobacterium and Bacteroidetes in Indian samples, largely independent of media and pressures. Related 16S rRNA gene sequences for all of these Bacteria have been detected in deep, subsurface environments, although isolated strains were piezotolerant, being able to grow at atmospheric pressure. Only the Clostridium and Acetobacterium were obligate anaerobes. No Archaea were enriched. It may be that these sediment samples were not deep enough (total depth 1126-1527 m) to obtain obligate piezophiles. PMID:19694787

  4. Introduction to High-Pressure Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dera, Przemyslaw

    To a common person pressure is just one of the parameters that describe a thermodynamic state. We all hear about it in everyday weather forecasts, and most of us do not associate it with anything particularly unique. Probably the most intuitive idea of the effect of high-pressure comes from movies, where submarine sinking to the bottom of the ocean is gradually crushed by the surrounding water, until its hull implodes. Why, then hundreds of scientists throughout the world spent their lifelong careers studying high-pressure phenomena? Despite all the developments in experimental technologies and instrumentation, modern scientist has very few tools that allow him or her to "grab" two atoms and bring them, in a very controllable way, closer together. Being able to achieve this task means the ability to directly probe interatomic interaction potentials and can cause transformations as dramatic as turning of a common gas into solid metal. Before the reader delves into more advanced topics described later in this book, this introductory chapter aims to explain several elementary, but extremely important concepts in high-pressure science. We will start with a brief discussion of laboratory devices used to produce pressure, address the issue of hydrostaticity, elastic and plastic compression, and will conclude with a short discussion of unique effects of anisotropic stress.

  5. Structure and stability of hydrous minerals at high pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, T. S.; Fei, Y.; Meade, C.; Hemley, R. J.; Mao, H. K.

    1994-01-01

    The presence of even small amounts of hydrogen in the Earth's deep interior may have profound effects on mantle melting, rheology, and electrical conductivity. The recent discovery of a large class of high-pressure H-bearing silicates further underscores the potentially important role for hydrous minerals in the Earth's mantle. Hydrogen may also be a significant component of the Earth's core, as has been recently documented by studies of iron hydride at high pressure. In this study, we explore the role of H in crystal structures at high pressure through detailed Raman spectroscopic and x ray diffraction studies of hydrous minerals compressed in diamond anvil cells. Brucite, Mg(OH)2, has a simple structure and serves as an analogue for the more complex hydrous silicates. Over the past five years, this material has been studied at high pressure using shock-compression, powder x ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and neutron diffraction. In addition, we have recently carried out single-crystal synchrotron x-ray diffraction on Mg(OH)2 and Raman spectroscopy on Mg(OD)2 at elevated pressure. From all these studies, an interesting picture of the crystal chemical behavior of this material at high pressure is beginning to emerge. Some of the primary conclusions are as follows: First, hydrogen bonding is enhanced by the application of pressure. Second, layered minerals which are elastically anisotropic at low pressure may not be so at high pressure. Furthermore, the brucite data place constraints on the effect of hydrogen on seismic velocities and density at very high pressure. Third, the stability of hydrous minerals may be enhanced at high P by subtle structural rearrangements that are difficult to detect using traditional probes and require detailed spectroscopic analyses. Finally, brucite appears to be unique in that it undergoes pressure-induced disordering that is confined solely to the H-containing layers of the structure.

  6. Laser Raman sensor for measurement of trace-hydrogen gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler-Golden, Steven M.; Goldstein, Neil; Bien, Fritz; Matthew, Michael W.; Gersh, Michael E.; Cheng, Wai K.; Adams, Frederick W.

    1992-01-01

    A new optical hydrogen sensor based on spontaneous Raman scattering of laser light has been designed and constructed for rugged field use. It provides good sensitivity, rapid response, and the inherent Raman characteristics of linearity and background gas independence of the signal. Efficient light collection and discrimination by using fast optics and a bandpass interference filter compensate for the inefficiency of the Raman-scattering process. A multipass optical cavity with a Herriott-type configuration provides intense illumination from an air-cooled CW gas laser. The observed performance is in good agreement with the theoretical signal and noise level predictions.

  7. Hydrogen Gas Production by an Ectothiorhodospira vacuolata Strain.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, L J; Irgens, R L

    1991-02-01

    A hydrogen gas (H(2))-producing strain of Ectothiorhodospira vacuolata isolated from Soap Lake, Washington, possessed nitrogenase activity. Increasing evolution of H(2) with decreasing ammonium chloride concentrations provided evidence that nitrogenase was the catalyst in gas production. Cells were grown in a mineral medium plus 0.2% acetate with sodium sulfide as an electron donor. Factors increasing H(2) production included addition of reduced carbon compounds such as propionate and succinate, increased reducing power by increasing sodium sulfide concentrations, and increased energy charge (ATP) by increasing light intensity. PMID:16348423

  8. Hydrogen and Oxygen Gas Production in the UT TRIGA Reflector

    SciTech Connect

    D. S. O'Kelly

    2000-11-12

    In December 1999, The University of Texas at Austin (UT) reported an unusual condition associated with the annular graphite reflector surrounding the Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory (NETL) TRIGA reactor. The aluminum container encapsulating the graphite showed signs of bulging or swelling. Further, during an investigation of this occurrence, bubbles were detected coming from a weld in the aluminum. The gas composition was approximately 2:1 hydrogen to oxygen. After safety review and equipment fabrication, the reflector was successfully vented and flooded. The ratio of the gases produced is unusual, and the gas production mechanism has not yet been explained.

  9. High-pressure coal fuel processor development

    SciTech Connect

    Greenhalgh, M.L.

    1992-11-01

    The objective of Subtask 1.1 Engine Feasibility was to conduct research needed to establish the technical feasibility of ignition and stable combustion of directly injected, 3,000 psi, low-Btu gas with glow plug ignition assist at diesel engine compression ratios. This objective was accomplished by designing, fabricating, testing and analyzing the combustion performance of synthesized low-Btu coal gas in a single-cylinder test engine combustion rig located at the Caterpillar Technical Center engine lab in Mossville, Illinois. The objective of Subtask 1.2 Fuel Processor Feasibility was to conduct research needed to establish the technical feasibility of air-blown, fixed-bed, high-pressure coal fuel processing at up to 3,000 psi operating pressure, incorporating in-bed sulfur and particulate capture. This objective was accomplished by designing, fabricating, testing and analyzing the performance of bench-scale processors located at Coal Technology Corporation (subcontractor) facilities in Bristol, Virginia. These two subtasks were carried out at widely separated locations and will be discussed in separate sections of this report. They were, however, independent in that the composition of the synthetic coal gas used to fuel the combustion rig was adjusted to reflect the range of exit gas compositions being produced on the fuel processor rig. Two major conclusions resulted from this task. First, direct injected, ignition assisted Diesel cycle engine combustion systems can be suitably modified to efficiently utilize these low-Btu gas fuels. Second, high pressure gasification of selected run-of-the-mine coals in batch-loaded fuel processors is feasible. These two findings, taken together, significantly reduce the perceived technical risks associated with the further development of the proposed coal gas fueled Diesel cycle power plant concept.

  10. Warm Pressurant Gas Effects on the Liquid Hydrogen Bubble Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartwig, Jason W.; McQuillen, John B.; Chato, David J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results for the liquid hydrogen bubble point tests using warm pressurant gases conducted at the Cryogenic Components Cell 7 facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The purpose of the test series was to determine the effect of elevating the temperature of the pressurant gas on the performance of a liquid acquisition device. Three fine mesh screen samples (325 x 2300, 450 x 2750, 510 x 3600) were tested in liquid hydrogen using cold and warm noncondensible (gaseous helium) and condensable (gaseous hydrogen) pressurization schemes. Gases were conditioned from 0 to 90 K above the liquid temperature. Results clearly indicate a degradation in bubble point pressure using warm gas, with a greater reduction in performance using condensable over noncondensible pressurization. Degradation in the bubble point pressure is inversely proportional to screen porosity, as the coarsest mesh demonstrated the highest degradation. Results here have implication on both pressurization and LAD system design for all future cryogenic propulsion systems. A detailed review of historical heated gas tests is also presented for comparison to current results.

  11. EUV tools: hydrogen gas purification and recovery strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landoni, Cristian; Succi, Marco; Applegarth, Chuck; Riddle Vogt, Sarah

    2015-03-01

    The technological challenges that have been overcome to make extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUV) a reality have been enormous1. This vacuum driven technology poses significant purity challenges for the gases employed for purging and cleaning the scanner EUV chamber and source. Hydrogen, nitrogen, argon and ultra-high purity compressed dry air (UHPCDA) are the most common gases utilized at the scanner and source level. Purity requirements are tighter than for previous technology node tools. In addition, specifically for hydrogen, EUV tool users are facing not only gas purity challenges but also the need for safe disposal of the hydrogen at the tool outlet. Recovery, reuse or recycling strategies could mitigate the disposal process and reduce the overall tool cost of operation. This paper will review the types of purification technologies that are currently available to generate high purity hydrogen suitable for EUV applications. Advantages and disadvantages of each purification technology will be presented. Guidelines on how to select the most appropriate technology for each application and experimental conditions will be presented. A discussion of the most common approaches utilized at the facility level to operate EUV tools along with possible hydrogen recovery strategies will also be reported.

  12. High pressure rinsing system comparison

    SciTech Connect

    D. Sertore; M. Fusetti; P. Michelato; Carlo Pagani; Toshiyasu Higo; Jin-Seok Hong; K. Saito; G. Ciovati; T. Rothgeb

    2007-06-01

    High pressure rinsing (HPR) is a key process for the surface preparation of high field superconducting cavities. A portable apparatus for the water jet characterization, based on the transferred momentum between the water jet and a load cell, has been used in different laboratories. This apparatus allows to collected quantitative parameters that characterize the HPR water jet. In this paper, we present a quantitative comparison of the different water jet produced by various nozzles routinely used in different laboratories for the HPR process

  13. Cryogenic High Pressure Sensor Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  14. Beam-induced Electron Loading Effects in High Pressure Cavities for a Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, M.; Tollestrup, A.; Jansson, A.; Yonehara, K.; Insepov, Z.; /Argonne

    2010-05-01

    Ionization cooling is a critical building block for the realization of a muon collider. To suppress breakdown in the presence of the external magnetic field, an idea of using an RF cavity filled with high pressure hydrogen gas is being considered for the cooling channel design. One possible problem expected in the high pressure RF cavity is, however, the dissipation of significant RF power through the beam-induced electrons accumulated inside the cavity. To characterize this detrimental loading effect, we develop a simplified model that relates the electron density evolution and the observed pickup voltage signal in the cavity, with consideration of several key molecular processes such as the formation of the polyatomic molecules, recombination and attachment. This model is expected to be compared with the actual beam test of the cavity in the MuCool Test Area (MTA) of Fermilab.

  15. Electronic phenomena at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Drickamer, H.G.

    1981-01-01

    High pressure research is undertaken either to investigate intrinsically high pressure phenomena or in order to get a better understanding of the effect of the chemical environment on properties or processes at one atmosphere. Studies of electronic properties which fall in each area are presented. Many molecules and complexes can assume in the excited state different molecular arrangements and intermolecular forces depending on the medium. Their luminescence emission is then very different in a rigid or a fluid medium. With pressure one can vary the viscosity of the medium by a factor of 10/sup 7/ and thus control the distribution and rate of crossing between the excited state conformations. In rare earth chelates the efficiency of 4f-4f emission of the rare earth is controlled by the feeding from the singlet and triplet levels of the organic ligand. These ligand levels can be strongly shifted by pressure. A study of the effect of pressure on the emission efficiency permits one to understand the effect of ligand chemistry at one atmosphere. At high pressure electronic states can be sufficiently perturbed to provide new ground states. In EDA complexes these new ground states exhibit unusual chemical reactivity and new products.

  16. Green synthesis of highly reduced graphene oxide by compressed hydrogen gas towards energy storage devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng Chao; Yu, Hong; Yan, Qingyu; Hng, Huey Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we present a new strategy for the mass production of high-quality reduced graphene oxide (RGO) with a surface area of 354 m2 g-1 using high pressure hydrogen as a reducing agent under hydrothermal conditions. The high pressure used is solely generated from the packing of the gas cylinder itself and a pressure meter could simply fulfil the role of monitoring pressure. The reduction process is green without chemical wastes produced. Comparing to other reported methods, the significant advancements of our strategy lie not only in the high-quality RGO with high C/O ratio, conductivity and surface area, but also in the most environment-friendliness and cost-effectiveness, which make the large scale fabrication feasible. Moreover, clean noble metal nanocrystals such as Pt could be easily in situ deposited onto the surface of RGO nanosheets when noble metal salts are introduced into the system. In particular, the prepared RGO and Pt/RGO show exceptional electrochemical performances in supercapacitors and lithium oxygen batteries because of their clean electrochemical surface, good conductivity and large surface area. Our results reveal that the obtained RGO have a specific capacitance of 884.4 F g-1 at a current density of 0.5 A g-1, and the Pt/RGO electrode can deliver discharge-charge capacities of 1000 mAh g-1 for 40 cycles with a high round-trip efficiencies of 74.9% at 50 mA g-1 when used as Li-O2 battery electrodes.

  17. Revisions to the hydrogen gas generation computer model

    SciTech Connect

    Jerrell, J.W.

    1992-08-31

    Waste Management Technology has requested SRTC to maintain and extend a previously developed computer model, TRUGAS, which calculates hydrogen gas concentrations within the transuranic (TRU) waste drums. TRUGAS was written by Frank G. Smith using the BASIC language and is described in the report A Computer Model of gas Generation and Transport within TRU Waste Drums (DP- 1754). The computer model has been partially validated by yielding results similar to experimental data collected at SRL and LANL over a wide range of conditions. The model was created to provide the capability of predicting conditions that could potentially lead to the formation of flammable gas concentrations within drums, and to assess proposed drum venting methods. The model has served as a tool in determining how gas concentrations are affected by parameters such as filter vent sizes, waste composition, gas generation values, the number and types of enclosures, water instrusion into the drum, and curie loading. The success of the TRUGAS model has prompted an interest in the program`s maintenance and enhancement. Experimental data continues to be collected at various sites on such parameters as permeability values, packaging arrangements, filter designs, and waste contents. Information provided by this data is used to improve the accuracy of the model`s predictions. Also, several modifications to the model have been made to enlarge the scope of problems which can be analyzed. For instance, the model has been used to calculate hydrogen concentrations inside steel cabinets containing retired glove boxes (WSRC-RP-89-762). The revised TRUGAS computer model, H2GAS, is described in this report. This report summarizes all modifications made to the TRUGAS computer model and provides documentation useful for making future updates to H2GAS.

  18. Revisions to the hydrogen gas generation computer model

    SciTech Connect

    Jerrell, J.W.

    1992-08-31

    Waste Management Technology has requested SRTC to maintain and extend a previously developed computer model, TRUGAS, which calculates hydrogen gas concentrations within the transuranic (TRU) waste drums. TRUGAS was written by Frank G. Smith using the BASIC language and is described in the report A Computer Model of gas Generation and Transport within TRU Waste Drums (DP- 1754). The computer model has been partially validated by yielding results similar to experimental data collected at SRL and LANL over a wide range of conditions. The model was created to provide the capability of predicting conditions that could potentially lead to the formation of flammable gas concentrations within drums, and to assess proposed drum venting methods. The model has served as a tool in determining how gas concentrations are affected by parameters such as filter vent sizes, waste composition, gas generation values, the number and types of enclosures, water instrusion into the drum, and curie loading. The success of the TRUGAS model has prompted an interest in the program's maintenance and enhancement. Experimental data continues to be collected at various sites on such parameters as permeability values, packaging arrangements, filter designs, and waste contents. Information provided by this data is used to improve the accuracy of the model's predictions. Also, several modifications to the model have been made to enlarge the scope of problems which can be analyzed. For instance, the model has been used to calculate hydrogen concentrations inside steel cabinets containing retired glove boxes (WSRC-RP-89-762). The revised TRUGAS computer model, H2GAS, is described in this report. This report summarizes all modifications made to the TRUGAS computer model and provides documentation useful for making future updates to H2GAS.

  19. Integrated Micro-Machined Hydrogen Gas Sensor. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Frank DiMeo, Jr.

    2000-10-02

    This report details our recent progress in developing novel MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) based hydrogen gas sensors. These sensors couple novel thin films as the active layer on a device structure known as a Micro-HotPlate. This coupling has resulted in a gas sensor that has several unique advantages in terms of speed, sensitivity, stability and amenability to large scale manufacture. This Phase-I research effort was focused on achieving the following three objectives: (1) Investigation of sensor fabrication parameters and their effects on sensor performance. (2) Hydrogen response testing of these sensors in wet/dry and oxygen-containing/oxygen-deficient atmospheres. (3) Investigation of the long-term stability of these thin film materials and identification of limiting factors. We have made substantial progress toward achieving each of these objectives, and highlights of our phase I results include the demonstration of signal responses with and without oxygen present, as well as in air with a high level of humidity. We have measured response times of <0.5 s to 1% H{sub 2} in air, and shown the ability to detect concentrations of <200 ppm. These results are extremely encouraging and suggest that this technology has substantial potential for meeting the needs of a hydrogen based economy. These achievements demonstrate the feasibility of using micro-hotplates structures in conjunction with palladium+coated metal-hydride films for sensing hydrogen in many of the environments required by a hydrogen based energy economy. Based on these findings, they propose to continue and expand the development of this technology in Phase II.

  20. Hydrogen gettering the overpressure gas from highly radioactive liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, D.L.; McCoy, J.C.; Schicker, J.R.

    1996-04-01

    Remediation of current inventories of high-activity radioactive liquid waste (HALW) requires transportation of Type-B quantities of radioactive material, possibly up to several hundred liters. However, the only currently certified packaging is limited to quantities of 50 ml (0.01 gal) quantities of Type-B radioactive liquid. Efforts are under way to recertify the existing packaging to allow the shipment of up to 4 L (1.1 gal) of Type-B quantities of HALW, but significantly larger packaging could be needed in the future. Scoping studies and preliminary designs have identified the feasibility of retrofitting an insert into existing casks, allowing the transport of up to 380 L (100 gal) of HALW. However, the insert design and ultimate certification strategy depend heavily on the gas-generating attributes of the HALW. A non-vented containment vessel filled with HALW, in the absence of any gas-mitigation technologies, poses a deflagration threat and, therefore, gas generation, specifically hydrogen generation, must be reliably controlled during all phases of transportation. Two techniques are available to mitigate hydrogen accumulation: recombiners and getters. Getters have an advantage over recombiners in that oxides are not required to react with the hydrogen. A test plan was developed to evaluate three forms of getter material in the presence of both simulated HALW and the gases that are produced by the HALW. These tests demonstrated that getters can react with hydrogen in the presence of simulated waste and in the presence of several other gases generated by the HALW, such as nitrogen, ammonia, nitrous oxide, and carbon monoxide. Although the use of such a gettering system has been shown to be technically feasible, only a preliminary design for its use has been completed. No further development is planned until the requirement for bulk transport of Type-B quantities of HALW is more thoroughly defined.

  1. [The influence of high pressure on the 3-indoleacetic-acid-induced curvature of Avena coleoptiles in the Went-test].

    PubMed

    Chrometzka, P

    1967-12-01

    1. High atmospheric pressure causes an increase of the 3-indoleacetic-acid-induced curvature of Avena coleoptiles in the Went-test, regardless of whether the applied gas is nitrogen, hydrogen, oxygen, or air. 2. The highest increase was caused by high pressure of oxygen, the lowest by lack of oxygen. 3. The high pressure effect was also observed with coleoptiles which were treated 20 hours prior to the test and which were then kept under normal pressure. 4. High pressure of oxygen for a long period (20 hours) had a poisonous effect on the coleoptiles. They ceased to grow. Preliminary studies have shown that the respiration is enhanced if the coleoptiles have been kept under high pressure. PMID:24554325

  2. ELECTROCHEMICAL SEPARATION AND CONCENTRATION OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE FROM GAS MIXTURES

    DOEpatents

    Winnick, Jack; Sather, Norman F.; Huang, Hann S.

    1984-10-30

    A method of removing sulfur oxides of H.sub.2 S from high temperature gas mixtures (150.degree.-1000.degree. C.) is the subject of the present invention. An electrochemical cell is employed. The cell is provided with inert electrodes and an electrolyte which will provide anions compatible with the sulfur containing anions formed at the anode. The electrolyte is also selected to provide inert stable cations at the temperatures encountered. The gas mixture is passed by the cathode where the sulfur gases are converted to SO.sub.4 -- or, in the case of H.sub.2 S, to S--. The anions migrate to the anode where they are converted to a stable gaseous form at much greater concentration levels (>10X). Current flow may be effected by utilizing an external source of electrical energy or by passing a reducing gas such as hydrogen past the anode.

  3. Electrochemical separation and concentration of hydrogen sulfide from gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Winnick, Jack; Sather, Norman F.; Huang, Hann S.

    1984-10-30

    A method of removing sulfur oxides of H.sub.2 S from high temperature gas mixtures (150.degree.-1000.degree. C.) is the subject of the present invention. An electrochemical cell is employed. The cell is provided with inert electrodes and an electrolyte which will provide anions compatible with the sulfur containing anions formed at the anode. The electrolyte is also selected to provide inert stable cations at the temperatures encountered. The gas mixture is passed by the cathode where the sulfur gases are converted to SO.sub.4 -- or, in the case of H.sub.2 S, to S--. The anions migrate to the anode where they are converted to a stable gaseous form at much greater concentration levels (>10X). Current flow may be effected by utilizing an external source of electrical energy or by passing a reducing gas such as hydrogen past the anode.

  4. STARFIRE: Hypervelocity railgun development for high-pressure research

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, R.S.; Susoeff, A.R.; Asay, J.R.; Balk, J.K.; Hall, C.A.; Konrad, C.H.; McDonald, J.M.; Schuler, K.W.; Wellman, G.W.; Hickman, R.J.

    1988-09-20

    STARFIRE, a program based at Sandia National Laboratories, has as its goal the development of a hypervelocity railgun for use as a high-pressure research tool. The program has included efforts to identify and solve the problems that have inhibited reliable attainment of velocities greater than the 8 to 9 km/s attainable with two-stage light-gas guns (2SLGG). Issues studied include: (1) plasma arc formation and stabilization, (2) restrike inhibition, (3) viscous drag, (4) ratio of preload to operating stresses, (5) barrel joint design, and (6) barrel precision requirements. The system uses a 2SLGG as an injector to minimize barrel ablation and armature contamination. Hydrogen is used as the injection gas and will also serve to reduce the probability of forming secondary arcs. A VISAR optical Doppler system is used to continuously and precisely measure the projectile velocity from a standing start in the 2SLGG barrel, through several joints, the HELEOS (Hypervelocity Experimental Launcher for Equation of State) railgun barrel, and post-launch. The STARFIRE program is focused on the combined use of precision diagnostics and new experimental techniques. Results of tests are presented. 24 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  5. WATER-GAS SHIFT WITH INTEGRATED HYDROGEN SEPARATION

    SciTech Connect

    Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos; Jerry Meldon; Xiaomei Qi

    2001-12-01

    Optimization of the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction system for hydrogen production for fuel cells is of particular interest to the energy industry. To this end, it is desirable to couple the WGS reaction to hydrogen separation using a semi-permeable membrane, with both processes carried out at high temperature to improve reaction kinetics. Reduced equilibrium conversion of the WGS reaction at high temperatures is overcome by product H{sub 2} removal via the membrane. This project involves fundamental research and development of novel cerium oxide-based catalysts for the water-gas-shift reaction and the integration of these catalysts with Pd-alloy H{sub 2}-separation membranes supplying high purity hydrogen for fuel cell use. Conditions matching the requirements of coal gasifier-exit gas streams will be examined in the project. In the first year of the project, we prepared a series of nanostructured Cu- and Fe-containing ceria catalysts by a special gelation/precipitation technique followed by air calcination at 650 C. Each sample was characterized by ICP for elemental composition analysis, BET-N2 desorption for surface area measurement, and by temperature-programmed reduction in H{sub 2} to evaluate catalyst reducibility. Screening WGS tests with catalyst powders were conducted in a flow microreactor at temperatures in the range of 200-550 C. On the basis of both activity and stability of catalysts in simulated coal gas, and in CO{sub 2}-rich gases, a Cu-CeO{sub 2} catalyst formulation was selected for further study in this project. Details from the catalyst development and testing work are given in this report. Also in this report, we present H{sub 2} permeation data collected with unsupported flat membranes of pure Pd and Pd-alloys over a wide temperature window.

  6. Polymerization of Formic Acid under High Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, A F; Manaa, M R; Zaug, J M; Fried, L E; Montgomery, W B

    2004-08-23

    We report combined Raman, infrared (IR) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, along with ab initio calculations on formic acid under pressure up to 50 GPa. Contrary to the report of Allan and Clark (PRL 82, 3464 (1999)), we find an infinite chain low-temperature Pna2{sub 1} structure consisting of trans molecules to be a high-pressure phase at room temperature. Our data indicate the symmetrization and a partially covalent character of the intra-chain hydrogen bonds above approximately 20 GPa. Raman spectra and XRD patterns indicate a loss of the long-range order at pressures above 40 GPa with a large hysteresis at decompression. We attribute this behavior to a three-dimensional polymerization of formic acid.

  7. Improved high pressure turbine shroud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bessen, I. I.; Rigney, D. V.; Schwab, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    A new high pressure turbine shroud material has been developed from the consolidation of prealloyed powders of Ni, Cr, Al and Y. The new material, a filler for cast turbine shroud body segments, is called Genaseal. The development followed the identification of oxidation resistance as the primary cause of prior shroud deterioration, since conversion to oxides reduces erosion resistance and increases spalling under thermal cycled engine conditions. The NICrAlY composition was selected in preference to NIAL and FeCRALY alloys, and was formulated to a prescribed density range that offers suitable erosion resistance, thermal conductivity and elastic modulus for improved behavior as a shroud.

  8. Nano Materials Under High Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Karmakar, S.; Garg, Nandini; Sharma, Surinder M.

    2010-12-01

    Materials comprising of units or particles of the size of a few nano-meters have significantly different high pressure behavior than their bulk counterparts. This is abundantly elucidated in our studies on transition metals encapsulated in carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes filled with Argon also show that it affects the behavior of tubes as well as argon. Studies on nano-crystalline Si displays an interesting crystalline-amorphous reversible transition, unique of its kind in elemental solids. We also demonstrate that in some cases of nanocrystalline samples, a phase perceived to be an intermediate-transient may be actually realized.

  9. Vibratory high pressure coal feeder having a helical ramp

    DOEpatents

    Farber, Gerald

    1978-01-01

    Apparatus and method for feeding powdered coal from a helical ramp into a high pressure, heated, reactor tube containing hydrogen for hydrogenating the coal and/or for producing useful products from coal. To this end, the helical ramp is vibrated to feed the coal cleanly at an accurately controlled rate in a simple reliable and trouble-free manner that eliminates complicated and expensive screw feeders, and/or complicated and expensive seals, bearings and fully rotating parts.

  10. Advanced High Pressure O2/H2 Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morea, S. F. (Editor); Wu, S. T. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    Activities in the development of advanced high pressure oxygen-hydrogen stage combustion rocket engines are reported. Particular emphasis is given to the Space Shuttle main engine. The areas of engine technology discussed include fracture and fatigue in engine components, manufacturing and producibility engineering, materials, bearing technology, structure dynamics, fluid dynamics, and instrumentation technology.

  11. Silica membranes for hydrogen separation from coal gas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gavalas, G.R.

    1996-01-01

    This project is a continuation of a previous DOE-UCR project (DE-FG22- 89PC89765) dealing with the preparation of silica membranes highly permselective to hydrogen at elevated temperatures, suitable for hydrogen separation from coal gas. The membranes prepared in the previous project had very high selectivity but relatively low permeance. Therefore, the general objectives of this project were to improve the permeance of these membranes and to obtain fundamental information about membrane structure and properties. The specific objectives were: (1) to explore new silylation reagents and reaction conditions with the purpose of reducing the thickness and increasing the permeance of silica membranes prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), (2) to characterize the membrane structure, (3) to delineate mechanism and kinetics of deposition, (4) to measure the permeability of silica layers at different extents of deposition, and (5) to mathematically model the relationship between structure and deposition kinetics.

  12. Method of generating hydrogen gas from sodium borohydride

    DOEpatents

    Kravitz, Stanley H.; Hecht, Andrew M.; Sylwester, Alan P.; Bell, Nelson S.

    2007-12-11

    A compact solid source of hydrogen gas, where the gas is generated by contacting water with micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in the presence of a catalyst, such as cobalt or ruthenium. The micro-disperse particles can have a substantially uniform diameter of 1-10 microns, and preferably about 3-5 microns. Ruthenium or cobalt catalytic nanoparticles can be incorporated in the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride, which allows a rapid and complete reaction to occur without the problems associated with caking and scaling of the surface by the reactant product sodium metaborate. A closed loop water management system can be used to recycle wastewater from a PEM fuel cell to supply water for reacting with the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in a compact hydrogen gas generator. Capillary forces can wick water from a water reservoir into a packed bed of micro-disperse fuel particles, eliminating the need for using an active pump.

  13. High pressure xenon ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Markey, John K.

    1989-01-01

    A method is provided for detecting ionization comprising allowing particles that cause ionization to contact high pressure xenon maintained at or near its critical point and measuring the amount of ionization. An apparatus is provided for detecting ionization, the apparatus comprising a vessel containing a ionizable medium, the vessel having an inlet to allow high pressure ionizable medium to enter the vessel, a means to permit particles that cause ionization of the medium to enter the vessel, an anode, a cathode, a grid and a plurality of annular field shaping rings, the field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another, the anode, cathode, grid and field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another in order to form an electric field between the cathode and the anode, the electric field originating at the anode and terminating at the cathode, the grid being disposed between the cathode and the anode, the field shaping rings being disposed between the cathode and the grid, the improvement comprising the medium being xenon and the vessel being maintained at a pressure of 50 to 70 atmospheres and a temperature of 0.degree. to 30.degree. C.

  14. High pressure xenon ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Markey, J.K.

    1989-11-14

    A method is provided for detecting ionization comprising allowing particles that cause ionization to contact high pressure xenon maintained at or near its critical point and measuring the amount of ionization. An apparatus is provided for detecting ionization, the apparatus comprising a vessel containing a ionizable medium, the vessel having an inlet to allow high pressure ionizable medium to enter the vessel, a means to permit particles that cause ionization of the medium to enter the vessel, an anode, a cathode, a grid and a plurality of annular field shaping rings, the field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another, the anode, cathode, grid and field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another in order to form an electric field between the cathode and the anode, the electric field originating at the anode and terminating at the cathode, the grid being disposed between the cathode and the anode, the field shaping rings being disposed between the cathode and the grid, the improvement comprising the medium being xenon and the vessel being maintained at a pressure of 50 to 70 atmospheres and a temperature of 0 to 30 C. 2 figs.

  15. Detection of hydrogen dissolved in acrylonitrile butadiene rubber by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Shin; Fujiwara, Hirotada

    2012-01-01

    Rubber materials, which are used for hydrogen gas seal, can dissolve hydrogen during exposure in high-pressure hydrogen gas. Dissolved hydrogen molecules were detected by solid state 1H NMR of the unfilled vulcanized acrylonitrile butadiene rubber. Two signals were observed at 4.5 ppm and 4.8 ppm, which were assignable to dissolved hydrogen, in the 1H NMR spectrum of NBR after being exposed 100 MPa hydrogen gas for 24 h at room temperature. These signals were shifted from that of gaseous hydrogen molecules. Assignment of the signals was confirmed by quantitative estimation of dissolved hydrogen and peak area of the signals.

  16. Selective permeation of hydrogen gas using cellulose nanofibril film.

    PubMed

    Fukuzumi, Hayaka; Fujisawa, Shuji; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Isogai, Akira

    2013-05-13

    Biobased membranes that can selectively permeate hydrogen gas have been developed from aqueous dispersions of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-oxidized cellulose nanofibrils (TOCN) prepared from wood cellulose: TOCN-coated plastic films and self-standing TOCN films. Compared with TOCNs with sodium, lithium, potassium, and cesium carboxylate groups, TOCN with free carboxyl groups (TOCN-COOH) had much high and selective H2 gas permeation performance. Because permeabilities of H2, N2, O2, and CO2 gases through the membranes primarily depended on their kinetic diameters, the gas permeation behavior of the various TOCNs can be explained in terms of a diffusion mechanism. Thus, the selective H2 gas permeability for TOCN-COOH was probably due to a larger average size in free volume holes present between nanofibrils in the layer and film than those of other TOCNs with metal carboxylate groups. The obtained results indicate that TOCN-COOH membranes are applicable as biobased H2 gas separation membranes in fuel cell electric power generation systems. PMID:23594396

  17. EVALUATION OF CERAMIC FILTERS FOR HIGH-TEMPERATURE/HIGH-PRESSURE FINE PARTICULATE CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    High temperature gas turbines used to generate electric power require gas streams virtually free of particulate matter. Gas streams from high temperature, high pressure coal processes, such as low Btu gasification and pressurized fluidized bed combustion, require considerable par...

  18. Energy degradation of fast electrons in hydrogen gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Yueming; Mccray, Richard

    1991-01-01

    An equation is derived for calculating the energy distribution of fast electrons in a partially ionized gas and a method is provided to solve for the electron degradation spectrum and the energy deposition in different forms (ionization, excitation, or heating). As an example, the energy degradation of fast electrons in a gas of pure hydrogen is calculated, considering excitations to the lowest 10 atomic levels. The Bethe approximation and the continuous slowing-down approximation are discussed and it is concluded that these approximations are accurate to the order of 20 percent for electrons with initial energy of greater than about keV. The method and results can be used to determine heating, excitations, and ionizations by high-energy photoelectrons or cosmic-ray particles in various astrophysical circumstances, such as the interstellar medium, supernova envelopes, and QSO emission-line clouds.

  19. Steam Oxidation at High Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Carney, Casey

    2013-07-19

    A first high pressure test was completed: 293 hr at 267 bar and 670{degrees}C; A parallel 1 bar test was done for comparison; Mass gains were higher for all alloys at 267 bar than at 1 bar; Longer term exposures, over a range of temperatures and pressures, are planned to provide information as to the commercial implications of pressure effects; The planned tests are at a higher combination of temperatures and pressures than in the existing literature. A comparison was made with longer-term literature data: The short term exposures are largely consistent with the longer-term corrosion literature; Ferritic steels--no consistent pressure effect; Austenitic steels--fine grain alloys less able to maintain protective chromia scale as pressure increases; Ni-base alloys--more mass gains above 105 bar than below. Not based on many data points.

  20. Ultra-High-Pressure Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Martin; Redmer, Ronald; Mattsson, Thomas R.

    2008-03-01

    We present the first all-electron QMD simulations of water in the ultra-high-pressure regime up to conditions typical for the deep interior of Jupiter and Saturn. We calculate the equation of state and the Hugoniot curve and study the structural properties via pair correlation functions and self-diffusion coefficients. In the ultra-dense superionic phase, we find a continuous transition in the protonic structure. Water at conditions of Jupiter's core (i.e. 20000 K, 50 Mbar, 11 g/cm^3) forms a fluid dense plasma. Supported by the DFG within SFB 652. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  1. HIGH PRESSURE COAL COMBUSTON KINETICS PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Stefano Orsino

    2005-03-30

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) initiative to improve the efficiency of coal-fired power plants and reduce the pollution generated by these facilities, DOE has funded the High-Pressure Coal Combustion Kinetics (HPCCK) Projects. A series of laboratory experiments were conducted on selected pulverized coals at elevated pressures with the specific goals to provide new data for pressurized coal combustion that will help extend to high pressure and validate models for burnout, pollutant formation, and generate samples of solid combustion products for analyses to fill crucial gaps in knowledge of char morphology and fly ash formation. Two series of high-pressure coal combustion experiments were performed using SRI's pressurized radiant coal flow reactor. The first series of tests characterized the near burner flame zone (NBFZ). Three coals were tested, two high volatile bituminous (Pittsburgh No.8 and Illinois No.6), and one sub-bituminous (Powder River Basin), at pressures of 1, 2, and 3 MPa (10, 20, and 30 atm). The second series of experiments, which covered high-pressure burnout (HPBO) conditions, utilized a range of substantially longer combustion residence times to produce char burnout levels from 50% to 100%. The same three coals were tested at 1, 2, and 3 MPa, as well as at 0.2 MPa. Tests were also conducted on Pittsburgh No.8 coal in CO2 entrainment gas at 0.2, 1, and 2 MPa to begin establishing a database of experiments relevant to carbon sequestration techniques. The HPBO test series included use of an impactor-type particle sampler to measure the particle size distribution of fly ash produced under complete burnout conditions. The collected data have been interpreted with the help of CFD and detailed kinetics simulation to extend and validate devolatilization, char combustion and pollutant model at elevated pressure. A global NOX production sub-model has been proposed. The submodel reproduces the performance of the detailed chemical reaction

  2. Plasma reforming and partial oxidation of hydrocarbon fuel vapor to produce synthesis gas and/or hydrogen gas

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Detering, Brent A.

    2003-08-19

    Methods and systems for treating vapors from fuels such as gasoline or diesel fuel in an internal combustion engine, to form hydrogen gas or synthesis gas, which can then be burned in the engine to produce more power. Fuel vapor, or a mixture of fuel vapor and exhaust gas and/or air, is contacted with a plasma, to promote reforming reactions between the fuel vapor and exhaust gas to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, partial oxidation reactions between the fuel vapor and air to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, or direct hydrogen and carbon particle production from the fuel vapor. The plasma can be a thermal plasma or a non-thermal plasma. The plasma can be produced in a plasma generating device which can be preheated by contact with at least a portion of the hot exhaust gas stream, thereby decreasing the power requirements of the plasma generating device.

  3. Plasma Reforming And Partial Oxidation Of Hydrocarbon Fuel Vapor To Produce Synthesis Gas And/Or Hydrogen Gas

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Detering, Brent A.

    2004-10-19

    Methods and systems are disclosed for treating vapors from fuels such as gasoline or diesel fuel in an internal combustion engine, to form hydrogen gas or synthesis gas, which can then be burned in the engine to produce more power. Fuel vapor, or a mixture of fuel vapor and exhaust gas and/or air, is contacted with a plasma, to promote reforming reactions between the fuel vapor and exhaust gas to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, partial oxidation reactions between the fuel vapor and air to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, or direct hydrogen and carbon particle production from the fuel vapor. The plasma can be a thermal plasma or a non-thermal plasma. The plasma can be produced in a plasma generating device which can be preheated by contact with at least a portion of the hot exhaust gas stream, thereby decreasing the power requirements of the plasma generating device.

  4. Gettering of hydrogen and methane from a helium gas mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Cárdenas, Rosa Elia; Stewart, Kenneth D.; Cowgill, Donald F.

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the authors developed an approach for accurately quantifying the helium content in a gas mixture also containing hydrogen and methane using commercially available getters. The authors performed a systematic study to examine how both H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} can be removed simultaneously from the mixture using two SAES St 172{sup ®} getters operating at different temperatures. The remaining He within the gas mixture can then be measured directly using a capacitance manometer. The optimum combination involved operating one getter at 650 °C to decompose the methane, and the second at 110 °C to remove the hydrogen. This approach eliminated the need to reactivate the getters between measurements, thereby enabling multiple measurements to be made within a short time interval, with accuracy better than 1%. The authors anticipate that such an approach will be particularly useful for quantifying the He-3 in mixtures that include tritium, tritiated methane, and helium-3. The presence of tritiated methane, generated by tritium activity, often complicates such measurements.

  5. Gettering of Hydrogen and Methane from a Helium Gas Mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Cardenas, Rosa E.; Stewart, Kenneth D.; Cowgill, Donald F.

    2014-10-21

    In our study, the authors developed an approach for accurately quantifying the helium content in a gas mixture also containing hydrogen and methane using commercially available getters. The authors performed a systematic study to examine how both H2 and CH4 can be removed simultaneously from the mixture using two SAES St 172® getters operating at different temperatures. The remaining He within the gas mixture can then be measured directly using a capacitance manometer. Moreover, the optimum combination involved operating one getter at 650°C to decompose the methane, and the second at 110°C to remove the hydrogen. Finally, this approach eliminated the need to reactivate the getters between measurements, thereby enabling multiple measurements to be made within a short time interval, with accuracy better than 1%. The authors anticipate that such an approach will be particularly useful for quantifying the He-3 in mixtures that include tritium, tritiated methane, and helium-3. The presence of tritiated methane, generated by tritium activity, often complicates such measurements.

  6. Gettering of Hydrogen and Methane from a Helium Gas Mixture

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cardenas, Rosa E.; Stewart, Kenneth D.; Cowgill, Donald F.

    2014-10-21

    In our study, the authors developed an approach for accurately quantifying the helium content in a gas mixture also containing hydrogen and methane using commercially available getters. The authors performed a systematic study to examine how both H2 and CH4 can be removed simultaneously from the mixture using two SAES St 172® getters operating at different temperatures. The remaining He within the gas mixture can then be measured directly using a capacitance manometer. Moreover, the optimum combination involved operating one getter at 650°C to decompose the methane, and the second at 110°C to remove the hydrogen. Finally, this approach eliminatedmore » the need to reactivate the getters between measurements, thereby enabling multiple measurements to be made within a short time interval, with accuracy better than 1%. The authors anticipate that such an approach will be particularly useful for quantifying the He-3 in mixtures that include tritium, tritiated methane, and helium-3. The presence of tritiated methane, generated by tritium activity, often complicates such measurements.« less

  7. Gas phase hydrogen permeation in alpha titanium and carbon steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. L.; Shah, K. K.; Reeves, B. H.; Gadgeel, V. L.

    1980-01-01

    Commercially pure titanium and heats of Armco ingot iron and steels containing from 0.008-1.23 w/oC were annealed or normalized and machined into hollow cylinders. Coefficients of diffusion for alpha-Ti and alpha-Fe were determined by the lag-time technique. Steady state permeation experiments yield first power pressure dependence for alpha-Ti and Sievert's law square root dependence for Armco iron and carbon steels. As in the case of diffusion, permeation data confirm that alpha-titanium is subject to at least partial phase boundary reaction control while the steels are purely diffusion controlled. The permeation rate in steels also decreases as the carbon content increases. As a consequence of Sievert's law, the computed hydrogen solubility decreases as the carbon content increases. This decreases in explained in terms of hydrogen trapping at carbide interfaces. Oxidizing and nitriding the surfaces of alpha-titanium membranes result in a decrease in the permeation rate for such treatment on the gas inlet surfaces but resulted in a slight increase in the rate for such treatment on the gas outlet surfaces. This is explained in terms of a discontinuous TiH2 layer.

  8. Determination of the relative resistance to ignition of selected turbopump materials in high-pressure, high-temperature, oxygen environments, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Benz, Frank J.

    1986-01-01

    Advances in the design of the liquid oxygen, liquid hydrogen engines for the Space Transportation System call for the use of warm, high-pressure oxygen as the driving gas in the liquid oxygen turbopump. The NASA Lewis Research Center requested the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) to design a test program to determine the relative resistance to ignition of nine selected turbopump materials: Hastelloy X, Inconel 600, Invar 36, Monel K-500, nickel 200, silicon carbide, stainless steel 316, and zirconium copper. The materials were subjected to particle impact and to frictional heating in high-pressure oxygen.

  9. Star Formation as a Function of Neutral Hydrogen Gas Density in Local Group Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Erika K.; Madore, Barry F.; Freedman, Wendy L.

    2016-06-01

    We present a study of the efficiency and timescales of star formation as a function of local neutral hydrogen gas density in four Local Group galaxies: M33, NGC 6822, the LMC, and the SMC. In this work, we conceptualize the process of star formation as a cycle of two major phases – (1) a gas dynamics phase in which neutral hydrogen gas coalesces into clouds, and (2) a stellar phase in which stars have formed and interrupt further gas coalescence during their active lifetimes. By examining the spatial distribution and number densities of stars on maps of neutral hydrogen, we estimate the timescale of the gas coalescence phase relative to the timescale of the stellar phase and infer an efficiency of star formation as a function of neutral hydrogen gas density. From these timescales and efficiencies, we will calculate star formation rates as a function of neutral hydrogen gas density in these galaxies.

  10. Gas phase selective hydrogenation over oxide supported Ni-Au.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-Lizana, Fernando; Keane, Mark A

    2015-11-14

    The chemoselective continuous gas phase (T = 573 K; P = 1 atm) hydrogenation of nitroarenes (p-chloronitrobenzene (p-CNB) and m-dinitrobenzene (m-DNB)) has been investigated over a series of oxide (Al2O3 and TiO2) supported Au and Ni-Au (1 : 10 mol ratio; 0.1-1 mol% Au) catalysts. Monometallic supported Au with mean particle size 3-9 nm promoted exclusive formation of p-chloroaniline (p-CAN) and m-nitroaniline (m-NAN). Selective hydrogenation rate was higher over smaller Au particles and can be attributed to increased surface hydrogen (from TPD measurements) at higher metal dispersion. (S)TEM analysis has confirmed an equivalent metal particle size for the supported bimetallics at the same Au loading where TPR indicates Ni-Au interaction and EDX surface mapping established Ni in close proximity to Au on isolated nanoparticles with a composition (Au/Ni) close to the bulk value (= 10). Increased spillover hydrogen due to the incorporation of Ni in the bimetallics resulted in elevated -NO2 group reduction rate. Full selectivity to p-CAN was maintained over all the bimetallic catalysts. Conversion of m-DNB over the lower loaded Ni-Au/Al2O3 generated m-NAN as sole product. An increase in Ni content (0.01 → 0.1 mol%) or a switch from Al2O3 to TiO2 as support resulted in full -NO2 reduction (to m-phenylenediamine). Our results demonstrate the viability of Ni-promotion of Au in the continuous production of functionalised anilines. PMID:25752655

  11. Overview of Two Hydrogen Energy Storage Studies: Wind Hydrogen in California and Blending in Natural Gas Pipelines (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Melaina, M. W.

    2013-05-01

    This presentation provides an overview of two NREL energy storage studies: Wind Hydrogen in California: Case Study and Blending Hydrogen Into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks: A Review of Key Issues. The presentation summarizes key issues, major model input assumptions, and results.

  12. Electrical Transport Experiments at High Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, S

    2009-02-11

    High-pressure electrical measurements have a long history of use in the study of materials under ultra-high pressures. In recent years, electrical transport experiments have played a key role in the study of many interesting high pressure phenomena including pressure-induced superconductivity, insulator-to-metal transitions, and quantum critical behavior. High-pressure electrical transport experiments also play an important function in geophysics and the study of the Earth's interior. Besides electrical conductivity measurements, electrical transport experiments also encompass techniques for the study of the optoelectronic and thermoelectric properties of materials under high pressures. In addition, electrical transport techniques, i.e., the ability to extend electrically conductive wires from outside instrumentation into the high pressure sample chamber have been utilized to perform other types of experiments as well, such as high-pressure magnetic susceptibility and de Haas-van Alphen Fermi surface experiments. Finally, electrical transport techniques have also been utilized for delivering significant amounts of electrical power to high pressure samples, for the purpose of performing high-pressure and -temperature experiments. Thus, not only do high-pressure electrical transport experiments provide much interesting and valuable data on the physical properties of materials extreme compression, but the underlying high-pressure electrical transport techniques can be used in a number of ways to develop additional diagnostic techniques and to advance high pressure capabilities.

  13. The analysis of high pressure experimental data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlosser, Herbert; Ferrante, John

    1991-01-01

    This letter is concerned with the analysis of high pressure experimental data. It is demonstrated that ln H plots based on the Vinet et al. (1988) universal equation of state are a simple sensitive means for identifying anomalous P-V data in high pressure experiments and for detecting structural and phase transitions in solids subjected to high pressure.

  14. Small, high-pressure liquid oxygen turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csomor, A.; Sutton, R.

    1977-01-01

    A small, high-pressure, liquid oxygen turbopump was designed, fabricated, and tested. The pump was of a single-stage, centrifugal type; power to the pump was supplied by a single-stage, partial emission, axial-impulse turbine. Design conditions included an operating speed of 70,000 rpm, pump discharge pressure of 2977 N/sq cm (4318 psia), and a pump flowrate of 16.4 kg/s (36.21 lb/sec). The turbine was propelled by LO2/LH2 combustion products at 1041 K (1874 R) inlet temperature, and at a design pressure ratio of 1.424. The approaches used in the detail analysis and design of the turbopump are described, and fabrication methods are discussed. Data obtained from gas generator tests, turbine performance calibration, and turbopump testing are presented.

  15. High-pressure stabilization of argon fluorides.

    PubMed

    Kurzydłowski, Dominik; Zaleski-Ejgierd, Patryk

    2016-01-28

    On account of the rapid development of noble gas chemistry in the past half-century both xenon and krypton compounds can now be isolated in macroscopic quantities. The same does not hold true for the next lighter group 18 element, argon, which forms only isolated molecules stable solely in low temperature matrices or supersonic jet streams. Here we present theoretical investigations into a new high-pressure reaction pathway, which enables synthesis of argon fluorides in bulk and at room temperature. Our hybrid DFT calculations (employing the HSE06 functional) indicate that above 60 GPa ArF2-containing molecular crystals can be obtained by a reaction between argon and molecular fluorine. PMID:26742478

  16. High-Pressure Gaseous Burner (HPGB) Facility Completed for Quantitative Laser Diagnostics Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet

    2002-01-01

    A gas-fueled high-pressure combustion facility with optical access, which was developed over the last 2 years, has just been completed. The High Pressure Gaseous Burner (HPGB) rig at the NASA Glenn Research Center can operate at sustained pressures up to 60 atm with a variety of gaseous fuels and liquid jet fuel. The facility is unique as it is the only continuous-flow, hydrogen-capable, 60-atm rig in the world with optical access. It will provide researchers with new insights into flame conditions that simulate the environment inside the ultra-high-pressure-ratio combustion chambers of tomorrow's advanced aircraft engines. The facility provides optical access to the flame zone, enabling the calibration of nonintrusive optical diagnostics to measure chemical species and temperature. The data from the HPGB rig enables the validation of numerical codes that simulate gas turbine combustors, such as the National Combustor Code (NCC). The validation of such numerical codes is often best achieved with nonintrusive optical diagnostic techniques that meet these goals: information-rich (multispecies) and quantitative while providing good spatial and time resolution. Achieving these goals is a challenge for most nonintrusive optical diagnostic techniques. Raman scattering is a technique that meets these challenges. Raman scattering occurs when intense laser light interacts with molecules to radiate light at a shifted wavelength (known as the Raman shift). This shift in wavelength is unique to each chemical species and provides a "fingerprint" of the different species present. The facility will first be used to gather a comprehensive data base of laser Raman spectra at high pressures. These calibration data will then be used to quantify future laser Raman measurements of chemical species concentration and temperature in this facility and other facilities that use Raman scattering.

  17. Selective hydrogen gas sensor using CuFe2O4 nanoparticle based thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haija, Mohammad Abu; Ayesh, Ahmad I.; Ahmed, Sadiqa; Katsiotis, Marios S.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen gas sensors based on CuFe2O4 nanoparticle thin films are presented in this work. Each gas sensor was prepared by depositing CuFe2O4 thin film on a glass substrate by dc sputtering inside a high vacuum chamber. Argon inert gas was used to sputter the material from a composite sputtering target. Interdigitated metal electrodes were deposited on top of the thin films by thermal evaporation and shadow masking. The produced sensors were tested against hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide, and ethylene gases where they were found to be selective for hydrogen. The sensitivity of the produced sensors was maximum for hydrogen gas at 50 °C. In addition, the produced sensors exhibit linear response signal for hydrogen gas with concentrations up to 5%. Those sensors have potential to be used for industrial applications because of their low power requirement, functionality at low temperatures, and low production cost.

  18. Protective Effects of Hydrogen Gas on Experimental Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hao-xin; Han, Bing; Hou, Li-Min; An, Ting-Ting; Jia, Guang; Cheng, Zhuo-Xin; Ma, Yong; Zhou, Yi-Nan; Kong, Rui; Wang, Shuang-Jia; Wang, Yong-Wei; Sun, Xue-Jun; Pan, Shang-Ha; Sun, Bei

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an inflammatory disease mediated by damage to acinar cells and pancreatic inflammation. In patients with AP, subsequent systemic inflammatory responses and multiple organs dysfunction commonly occur. Interactions between cytokines and oxidative stress greatly contribute to the amplification of uncontrolled inflammatory responses. Molecular hydrogen (H2) is a potent free radical scavenger that not only ameliorates oxidative stress but also lowers cytokine levels. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effects of H2 gas on AP both in vitro and in vivo. For the in vitro assessment, AR42J cells were treated with cerulein and then incubated in H2-rich or normal medium for 24 h, and for the in vivo experiment, AP was induced through a retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the pancreatobiliary duct (0.1 mL/100 g body weight). Wistar rats were treated with inhaled air or 2% H2 gas and sacrificed 12 h following the induction of pancreatitis. Specimens were collected and processed to measure the amylase and lipase activity levels; the myeloperoxidase activity and production levels; the cytokine mRNA expression levels; the 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, malondialdehyde, and glutathione levels; and the cell survival rate. Histological examinations and immunohistochemical analyses were then conducted. The results revealed significant reductions in inflammation and oxidative stress both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the beneficial effects of H2 gas were associated with reductions in AR42J cell and pancreatic tissue damage. In conclusion, our results suggest that H2 gas is capable of ameliorating damage to the pancreas and AR42J cells and that H2 exerts protective effects both in vitro and in vivo on subjects with AP. Thus, the results obtained indicate that this gas may represent a novel therapy agent in the management of AP. PMID:27115738

  19. WATER-GAS SHIFT WITH INTEGRATED HYDROGEN SEPARATION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos; Xiaomei Qi; Scott Kronewitter

    2004-02-01

    This project involved fundamental research and development of novel cerium oxide-based catalysts for the water-gas-shift reaction and the integration of these catalysts with Pd-alloy H{sub 2} -separation membranes supplying high purity hydrogen for fuel cell use. Conditions matching the requirements of coal gasifier-exit gas streams were examined in the project. Cu-cerium oxide was identified as the most promising high-temperature water-gas shift catalyst for integration with H{sub 2}-selective membranes. Formulations containing iron oxide were found to deactivate in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Cu-containing ceria catalysts, on the other hand, showed high stability in CO{sub 2}-rich gases. This type gas will be present over much of the catalyst, as the membrane removes the hydrogen produced from the shift reaction. The high-temperature shift catalyst composition was optimized by proper selection of dopant type and amount in ceria. The formulation 10at%Cu-Ce(30at%La)O{sub x} showed the best performance, and was selected for further kinetic studies. WGS reaction rates were measured in a simulated coal-gas mixture. The apparent activation energy, measured over aged catalysts, was equal to 70.2 kJ/mol. Reaction orders in CO, H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} were found to be 0.8, 0.2, -0.3, and -0.3, respectively. This shows that H{sub 2}O has very little effect on the reaction rate, and that both CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} weakly inhibit the reaction. Good stability of catalyst performance was found in 40-hr long tests. A flat (38 cm{sup 2}) Pd-Cu alloy membrane reactor was used with the catalyst washcoated on oxidized aluminum screens close coupled with the membrane. To achieve higher loadings, catalyst granules were layered on the membrane itself to test the combined HTS activity/ H{sub 2} -separation efficiency of the composite. Simulated coal gas mixtures were used and the effect of membrane on the conversion of CO over the catalyst was evidenced at high space

  20. Si substrates texturing and vapor-solid-solid Si nanowhiskers growth using pure hydrogen as source gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordmark, H.; Nagayoshi, H.; Matsumoto, N.; Nishimura, S.; Terashima, K.; Marioara, C. D.; Walmsley, J. C.; Holmestad, R.; Ulyashin, A.

    2009-02-01

    Scanning and transmission electron microscopies have been used to study silicon substrate texturing and whisker growth on Si substrates using pure hydrogen source gas in a tungsten hot filament reactor. Substrate texturing, in the nanometer to micrometer range of mono- and as-cut multicrystalline silicon, was observed after deposition of WSi2 particles that acted as a mask for subsequent hydrogen radical etching. Simultaneous Si whisker growth was observed for long residence time of the source gas and low H2 flow rate with high pressure. The whiskers formed via vapor-solid-solid growth, in which the deposited WSi2 particles acted as catalysts for a subsequent metal-induced layer exchange process well below the eutectic temperature. In this process, SiHx species, formed by substrate etching by the H radicals, diffuse through the metal particles. This leads to growth of crystalline Si whiskers via metal-induced solid-phase crystallization. Transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, and x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy were used to study the WSi2 particles and the structure of the Si substrates in detail. It has been established that the whiskers are partly crystalline and partly amorphous, consisting of pure Si with WSi2 particles on their tips as well as sometimes being incorporated into their structure.

  1. Si substrates texturing and vapor-solid-solid Si nanowhiskers growth using pure hydrogen as source gas

    SciTech Connect

    Nordmark, H.; Holmestad, R.; Nagayoshi, H.; Matsumoto, N.; Nishimura, S.; Terashima, K.; Marioara, C. D.; Walmsley, J. C.; Ulyashin, A.

    2009-02-15

    Scanning and transmission electron microscopies have been used to study silicon substrate texturing and whisker growth on Si substrates using pure hydrogen source gas in a tungsten hot filament reactor. Substrate texturing, in the nanometer to micrometer range of mono- and as-cut multicrystalline silicon, was observed after deposition of WSi{sub 2} particles that acted as a mask for subsequent hydrogen radical etching. Simultaneous Si whisker growth was observed for long residence time of the source gas and low H{sub 2} flow rate with high pressure. The whiskers formed via vapor-solid-solid growth, in which the deposited WSi{sub 2} particles acted as catalysts for a subsequent metal-induced layer exchange process well below the eutectic temperature. In this process, SiH{sub x} species, formed by substrate etching by the H radicals, diffuse through the metal particles. This leads to growth of crystalline Si whiskers via metal-induced solid-phase crystallization. Transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, and x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy were used to study the WSi{sub 2} particles and the structure of the Si substrates in detail. It has been established that the whiskers are partly crystalline and partly amorphous, consisting of pure Si with WSi{sub 2} particles on their tips as well as sometimes being incorporated into their structure.

  2. Energy storage using high pressure electrolysis and methods for reconversion. [in automobile fuel synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies on high pressure electrolysis producing hydrogen and oxygen for energy storage and reconversion are reported. Moderate temperature, high pressure hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells with nickel electrodes are investigated for effects of pressure, temperature, and membrane porosity. Test results from an aphodid burner turbine generator combination obtained 40 percent kilowatt hours out of the fuel cell divided by kilowatt hours into the electrolyzer. It is concluded that high pressure hydrogenation of organic materials can be used to synthesize hydrozenes and methanes for making synthetic vehicular fuels.

  3. Applications and development of high pressure PEM systems

    SciTech Connect

    Leonida, A; Militsky, F; Myers, B; Weisberg, A H

    1999-06-01

    Many portable fuel cell applications require high pressure hydrogen, oxygen, or both. High pressure PEM systems that were originally designed and developed primarily for aerospace applications are being redesigned for use in portable applications. Historically, applications can be broken into weight sensitive and weight insensitive cell stack designs. Variants of the weight sensitive designs have been considered to refill oxygen bottles for space suits, to provide oxygen for space shuttle, to provide oxygen and/or reboost propellants to the space station, and to recharge oxygen bottles for commercial aviation. A long operating history has been generated for weight insensitive designs that serve as oxygen generators for submarines. Exciting future vehicle concepts and portable applications are enabled by carefully designing lightweight stacks which do not require additional pressure containment. These include high altitude long endurance solar rechargeable aircraft and airships, water refuelable spacecraft, and a variety of field portable systems. High pressure electrolyzers can refill compressed hydrogen storage tanks for fuel cell powered vehicles or portable fuel cells. Hamilton Standard has demonstrated many high pressure PEM water electrolyzer designs for a variety of applications. Electrolyzers with operational pressures up to 3000 psi (20.7 MPa) are currently used for US Navy submarine oxygen generators. An aerospace version has been demonstrated in the Integrated Propulsion Test Article (IPTA) program. Electrolyzers with operational pressures up to 6000 psi (41.4 MPa) have also been demonstrated in the High Pressure Oxygen Recharge System (HPORS). Onboard oxygen generator systems (OBOGS) that generate up to 2000 psi (13.8 MPa) oxygen and refill breathable oxygen tanks for commercial aviation have been designed and successfully demonstrated. Other hardware applications that require high pressure PEM devices are related to these proven applications.

  4. Microsensor measurements of hydrogen gas dynamics in cyanobacterial microbial mats

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Michael; Revsbech, Niels P.; Kühl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We used a novel amperometric microsensor for measuring hydrogen gas production and consumption at high spatio-temporal resolution in cyanobacterial biofilms and mats dominated by non-heterocystous filamentous cyanobacteria (Microcoleus chtonoplastes and Oscillatoria sp.). The new microsensor is based on the use of an organic electrolyte and a stable internal reference system and can be equipped with a chemical sulfide trap in the measuring tip; it exhibits very stable and sulfide-insensitive measuring signals and a high sensitivity (1.5–5 pA per μmol L-1 H2). Hydrogen gas measurements were done in combination with microsensor measurements of scalar irradiance, O2, pH, and H2S and showed a pronounced H2 accumulation (of up to 8–10% H2 saturation) within the upper mm of cyanobacterial mats after onset of darkness and O2 depletion. The peak concentration of H2 increased with the irradiance level prior to darkening. After an initial build-up over the first 1–2 h in darkness, H2 was depleted over several hours due to efflux to the overlaying water, and due to biogeochemical processes in the uppermost oxic layers and the anoxic layers of the mats. Depletion could be prevented by addition of molybdate pointing to sulfate reduction as a major sink for H2. Immediately after onset of illumination, a short burst of presumably photo-produced H2 due to direct biophotolysis was observed in the illuminated but anoxic mat layers. As soon as O2 from photosynthesis started to accumulate, the H2 was consumed rapidly and production ceased. Our data give detailed insights into the microscale distribution and dynamics of H2 in cyanobacterial biofilms and mats, and further support that cyanobacterial H2 production can play a significant role in fueling anaerobic processes like e.g., sulfate reduction or anoxygenic photosynthesis in microbial mats. PMID:26257714

  5. Detail view of unit 43 with high pressure stage compressor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of unit 43 with high pressure stage compressor in left foreground and low pressure stage compressor in right background. - Burnsville Natural Gas Pumping Station, Saratoga Avenue between Little Kanawha River & C&O Railroad line, Burnsville, Braxton County, WV

  6. Argon recovery from hydrogen depleted ammonia plant purge gas using a HARP Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamurthy, R.; Lerner, S.L.; Maclean, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    A number of ammonia plants employ membranes or cryogenic hydrogen recovery units to separate hydrogen contained in the purge gas for recycle to the ammonia synthesis loop. The resulting hydrogen depleted purge gas, which is usually used for fuel, is an attractive source of argon. This paper presents the novel features of a process which employs a combination of pressure swing adsorption (PSA) and cryogenic technology to separate the argon from this hydrogen depleted purge gas stream. This new proprietary Hybrid Argon Recovery Progress (HARP) plant is an effective alternative to a conventional all-cryogenic plant.

  7. Development Program of IS Process Pilot Test Plant for Hydrogen Production With High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Iwatsuki; Atsuhiko Terada; Hiroyuki Noguchi; Yoshiyuki Imai; Masanori Ijichi; Akihiro Kanagawa; Hiroyuki Ota; Shinji Kubo; Kaoru Onuki; Ryutaro Hino

    2006-07-01

    hydrogen production was demonstrated with the hydrogen production rate of about 30 NL/hr for one week using a bench-scale test apparatus made of glass. Based on the test results and know-how obtained through the bench-scale tests, a pilot test plant that can produce hydrogen of about 30 Nm{sup 3}/hr is being designed. The test plant will be fabricated with industrial materials such as glass coated steel, SiC ceramics etc, and operated under high pressure condition up to 2 MPa. The test plant will consist of a IS process plant and a helium gas (He) circulation facility (He loop). The He loop can simulate HTTR operation conditions, which consists of a 400 kW-electric heater for He hating, a He circulator and a steam generator working as a He cooler. In parallel to the design study, key components of the IS process such as the sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) and the sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}) decomposers working under-high temperature corrosive environments have been designed and test-fabricated to confirm their fabricability. Also, other R and D's are under way such as corrosion, processing of HIx solutions. This paper describes present status of these activities. (authors)

  8. High-pressure Raman study of methane hydrate "filled ice"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, T.; Ohno, Y.; Sasaki, S.; Kume, T.; Shimizu, H.

    2010-03-01

    High-pressure Raman scattering measurements for the high-pressure phase III of methane hydrate (MH-III, filled ice structure) have been performed at pressures up to 25 GPa and at 296 K. We have observed the O-H stretching Raman signal in the MH-III phase by growing the MH-III crystals over several days at 1.9 GPa. The O-H stretching vibrational peak in the MH-III phase shows negative pressure dependence indicative of hydrogen bond and disappears above 14 GPa. The symmetrization pressure of hydrogen bond in the MH-III phase is estimated to be about 45 GPa from the pressure dependence of the O-H stretching Raman frequency, which is consistent with the previous theoretical prediction.

  9. Hydrodesulphurization of Light Gas Oil using hydrogen from the Water Gas Shift Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alghamdi, Abdulaziz

    2009-12-01

    The production of clean fuel faces the challenges of high production cost and complying with stricter environmental regulations. In this research, the ability of using a novel technology of upgrading heavy oil to treat Light Gas Oil (LGO) will be investigated. The target of this project is to produce cleaner transportation fuel with much lower cost of production. Recently, a novel process for upgrading of heavy oil has been developed at University of Waterloo. It is combining the two essential processes in bitumen upgrading; emulsion breaking and hydroprocessing into one process. The water in the emulsion is used to generate in situ hydrogen from the Water Gas Shift Reaction (WGSR). This hydrogen can be used for the hydrogenation and hydrotreating reaction which includes sulfur removal instead of the expensive molecular hydrogen. This process can be carried out for the upgrading of the bitumen emulsion which would improve its quality. In this study, the hydrodesulphurization (HDS) of LGO was conducted using in situ hydrogen produced via the Water Gas Shift Reaction (WGSR). The main objective of this experimental study is to evaluate the possibility of producing clean LGO over dispersed molybdenum sulphide catalyst and to evaluate the effect of different promoters and syn-gas on the activity of the dispersed Mo catalyst. Experiments were carried out in a 300 ml Autoclave batch reactor under 600 psi (initially) at 391°C for 1 to 3 hours and different amounts of water. After the hydrotreating reaction, the gas samples were collected and the conversion of carbon monoxide to hydrogen via WGSR was determined using a refinery gas analyzer. The sulphur content in liquid sample was analyzed via X-Ray Fluorescence. Experimental results showed that using more water will enhance WGSR but at the same time inhibits the HDS reaction. It was also shown that the amount of sulfur removed depends on the reaction time. The plan is to investigate the effect of synthesis gas (syngas

  10. High-pressure inactivation of dried microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Espinasse, V; Perrier-Cornet, J-M; Marecat, A; Gervais, P

    2008-01-01

    Dried microorganisms are particularly resistant to high hydrostatic pressure effects. In this study, the survival of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was studied under pressure applied in different ways. Original processes and devices were purposely developed in our laboratory for long-term pressurization. Dried and wet yeast powders were submitted to high-pressure treatments (100-150 MPa for 24-144 h at 25 degrees C) through liquid media or inert gas. These powders were also pressurized after being vacuum-packed. In the case of wet yeasts, the pressurization procedure had little influence on the inactivation rate. In this case, inactivations were mainly due to hydrostatic pressure effects. Conversely, in the case of dried yeasts, inactivation was highly dependent on the treatment scheme. No mortality was observed when dried cells were pressurized in a non-aqueous liquid medium, but when nitrogen gas was used as the pressure-transmitting fluid, the inactivation rate was found to be between 1.5 and 2 log for the same pressure level and holding time. Several hypotheses were formulated to explain this phenomenon: the thermal effects induced by the pressure variations, the drying resulting from the gas pressure release and the sorption and desorption of the gas in cells. The highest inactivation rates were obtained with vacuum-packed dried yeasts. In this case, cell death occurred during the pressurization step and was induced by shear forces. Our results show that the mechanisms at the origin of cell death under pressure are strongly dependent on the nature of the pressure-transmitting medium and the hydration of microorganisms. PMID:17573691

  11. Dissociation of methane under high pressure.

    PubMed

    Gao, Guoying; Oganov, Artem R; Ma, Yanming; Wang, Hui; Li, Peifang; Li, Yinwei; Iitaka, Toshiaki; Zou, Guangtian

    2010-10-14

    Methane is an extremely important energy source with a great abundance in nature and plays a significant role in planetary physics, being one of the major constituents of giant planets Uranus and Neptune. The stable crystal forms of methane under extreme conditions are of great fundamental interest. Using the ab initio evolutionary algorithm for crystal structure prediction, we found three novel insulating molecular structures with P2(1)2(1)2(1), Pnma, and Cmcm space groups. Remarkably, under high pressure, methane becomes unstable and dissociates into ethane (C(2)H(6)) at 95 GPa, butane (C(4)H(10)) at 158 GPa, and further, carbon (diamond) and hydrogen above 287 GPa at zero temperature. We have computed the pressure-temperature phase diagram, which sheds light into the seemingly conflicting observations of the unusually low formation pressure of diamond at high temperature and the failure of experimental observation of dissociation at room temperature. Our results support the idea of diamond formation in the interiors of giant planets such as Neptune. PMID:20950018

  12. Stable xenon nitride at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Feng; Wang, Yanchao; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Yunwei; Ma, Yanming

    2015-09-01

    Nitrides in many ways are fascinating since they often appear as superconductors, high-energy density, and hard materials. Though there exist a large variety of nitrides, noble gas nitrides are missing in nature. Pursuit of noble gas nitrides has therefore become the subject of topical interests, but remains as a great challenge since molecular nitrogen (N2, a major form of nitrogen) and noble gases are both inert systems and do not interact at normal conditions. We show through a first-principles swarm-structure search that high pressure enables a direct interaction of N2 and xenon (Xe) above 146 GPa. The resultant Xe nitride has a peculiar stoichiometry of XeN6, possessing a high-energy density of approximately 2.4 kJg -1, rivaling that of the modern explosives. Structurally, XeN6 is intriguing with the appearance of chaired N6 hexagons and unusually high 12-coordination of Xe bonded with N. Our work opens up the possibility of achieving Xe nitride with superior high-energy density whose formation is long sought as impossible.

  13. Study of Hydrogen Recovery Systems for Gas Vented While Refueling Liquid-Hydrogen Fueled Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, C. R.

    1979-01-01

    Methods of capturing and reliquefying the cold hydrogen vapor produced during the fueling of aircraft designed to utilize liquid hydrogen fuel were investigated. An assessment of the most practical, economic, and energy efficient of the hydrogen recovery methods is provided.

  14. Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas. Task 1, Literature survey

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-02-01

    To make the coal-to-hydrogen route economically attractive, improvements are being sought in each step of the process: coal gasification, water-carbon monoxide shift reaction, and hydrogen separation. This report addresses the use of membranes in the hydrogen separation step. The separation of hydrogen from synthesis gas is a major cost element in the manufacture of hydrogen from coal. Separation by membranes is an attractive, new, and still largely unexplored approach to the problem. Membrane processes are inherently simple and efficient and often have lower capital and operating costs than conventional processes. In this report current ad future trends in hydrogen production and use are first summarized. Methods of producing hydrogen from coal are then discussed, with particular emphasis on the Texaco entrained flow gasifier and on current methods of separating hydrogen from this gas stream. The potential for membrane separations in the process is then examined. In particular, the use of membranes for H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}/CO, and H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separations is discussed. 43 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Measurements of laminar burning velocities for natural gas-hydrogen-air mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zuohua; Zhang, Yong; Zeng, Ke; Liu, Bing; Wang, Qian; Jiang, Deming

    2006-07-15

    Laminar flame characteristics of natural gas-hydrogen-air flames were studied in a constant-volume bomb at normal temperature and pressure. Laminar burning velocities and Markstein lengths were obtained at various ratios of hydrogen to natural gas (volume fraction from 0 to 100%) and equivalence ratios (f from 0.6 to 1.4). The influence of stretch rate on flame was also analyzed. The results show that, for lean mixture combustion, the flame radius increases with time but the increasing rate decreases with flame expansion for natural gas and for mixtures with low hydrogen fractions, while at high hydrogen fractions, there exists a linear correlation between flame radius and time. For rich mixture combustion, the flame radius shows a slowly increasing rate at early stages of flame propagation and a quickly increasing rate at late stages of flame propagation for natural gas and for mixtures with low hydrogen fractions, and there also exists a linear correlation between flame radius and time for mixtures with high hydrogen fractions. Combustion at stoichiometric mixture demonstrates the linear relationship between flame radius and time for natural gas-air, hydrogen-air, and natural gas-hydrogen-air flames. Laminar burning velocities increase exponentially with the increase of hydrogen fraction in mixtures, while the Markstein length decreases and flame instability increases with the increase of hydrogen fractions in mixture. For a fixed hydrogen fraction, the Markstein number shows an increase and flame stability increases with the increase of equivalence ratios. Based on the experimental data, a formula for calculating the laminar burning velocities of natural gas-hydrogen-air flames is proposed. (author)

  16. High-Pressure Lightweight Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard; McKechnie, Timothy; Shchetkovskiy, Anatoliy; Smirnov, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Returning samples of Martian soil and rock to Earth is of great interest to scientists. There were numerous studies to evaluate Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission architectures, technology needs, development plans, and requirements. The largest propulsion risk element of the MSR mission is the Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV). Along with the baseline solid-propellant vehicle, liquid propellants have been considered. Similar requirements apply to other lander ascent engines and reaction control systems. The performance of current state-ofthe- art liquid propellant engines can be significantly improved by increasing both combustion temperature and pressure. Pump-fed propulsion is suggested for a single-stage bipropellant MAV. Achieving a 90-percent stage propellant fraction is thought to be possible on a 100-kg scale, including sufficient thrust for lifting off Mars. To increase the performance of storable bipropellant rocket engines, a high-pressure, lightweight combustion chamber was designed. Iridium liner electrodeposition was investigated on complex-shaped thrust chamber mandrels. Dense, uniform iridium liners were produced on chamber and cylindrical mandrels. Carbon/carbon composite (C/C) structures were braided over iridium-lined mandrels and densified by chemical vapor infiltration. Niobium deposition was evaluated for forming a metallic attachment flange on the carbon/ carbon structure. The new thrust chamber was designed to exceed state-of-the-art performance, and was manufactured with an 83-percent weight savings. High-performance C/Cs possess a unique set of properties that make them desirable materials for high-temperature structures used in rocket propulsion components, hypersonic vehicles, and aircraft brakes. In particular, more attention is focused on 3D braided C/Cs due to their mesh-work structure. Research on the properties of C/Cs has shown that the strength of composites is strongly affected by the fiber-matrix interfacial bonding, and that weakening

  17. Hydrogen gas sensor based on palladium and yttrium alloy ultrathin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Liu; You-ping, Chen; Han, Song; Gang, Zhang

    2012-12-01

    Compared with the other hydrogen sensors, optical fiber hydrogen sensors based on thin films exhibits inherent safety, small volume, immunity to electromagnetic interference, and distributed remote sensing capability, but slower response characteristics. To improve response and recovery rate of the sensors, a novel reflection-type optical fiber hydrogen gas sensor with a 10 nm palladium and yttrium alloy thin film is fabricated. The alloy thin film shows a good hydrogen sensing property for hydrogen-containing atmosphere and a complete restorability for dry air at room temperature. The variation in response value of the sensor linearly increases with increased natural logarithm of hydrogen concentration (ln[H2]). The shortest response time and recovery response time to 4% hydrogen are 6 and 8 s, respectively. The hydrogen sensors based on Pd0.91Y0.09 alloy ultrathin film have potential applications in hydrogen detection and measurement.

  18. Criterion for Identifying Vortices in High-Pressure Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Okong'o, Nora

    2007-01-01

    A study of four previously published computational criteria for identifying vortices in high-pressure flows has led to the selection of one of them as the best. This development can be expected to contribute to understanding of high-pressure flows, which occur in diverse settings, including diesel, gas turbine, and rocket engines and the atmospheres of Jupiter and other large gaseous planets. Information on the atmospheres of gaseous planets consists mainly of visual and thermal images of the flows over the planets. Also, validation of recently proposed computational models of high-pressure flows entails comparison with measurements, which are mainly of visual nature. Heretofore, the interpretation of images of high-pressure flows to identify vortices has been based on experience with low-pressure flows. However, high-pressure flows have features distinct from those of low-pressure flows, particularly in regions of high pressure gradient magnitude caused by dynamic turbulent effects and by thermodynamic mixing of chemical species. Therefore, interpretations based on low-pressure behavior may lead to misidentification of vortices and other flow structures in high-pressure flows. The study reported here was performed in recognition of the need for one or more quantitative criteria for identifying coherent flow structures - especially vortices - from previously generated flow-field data, to complement or supersede the determination of flow structures by visual inspection of instantaneous fields or flow animations. The focus in the study was on correlating visible images of flow features with various quantities computed from flow-field data.

  19. Underground storage systems for high-pressure air and gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beam, B. H.; Giovannetti, A.

    1975-01-01

    This paper is a discussion of the safety and cost of underground high-pressure air and gas storage systems based on recent experience with a high-pressure air system installed at Moffett Field, California. The system described used threaded and coupled oil well casings installed vertically to a depth of 1200 ft. Maximum pressure was 3000 psi and capacity was 500,000 lb of air. A failure mode analysis is presented, and it is shown that underground storage offers advantages in avoiding catastrophic consequences from pressure vessel failure. Certain problems such as corrosion, fatigue, and electrolysis are discussed in terms of the economic life of such vessels. A cost analysis shows that where favorable drilling conditions exist, the cost of underground high-pressure storage is approximately one-quarter that of equivalent aboveground storage.

  20. Formation of ordered gas-solid structures via solidification in metal-hydrogen systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shapovalov, V.I. |

    1998-12-31

    This work contains theoretical discussions concerning the large amount of previously published experimental data related to gas eutectic transformations in metal-hydrogen systems. Theories of pore nucleation and growth in these gas-solid materials will be presented and related to observed morphologies and structures. This work is intended to be helpful to theorists that work with metal-hydrogen systems, and experimentalists engaged in manufacturing technology development of these ordered gas-solid structures.