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Sample records for high-q superconducting resonators

  1. Development of high-Q superconducting resonators for use as Kinetic Inductance detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baselmans, J.; Barends, R.; Hovenier, N.; Gao, J.; Hoevers, H.; de Korte, P.; Klapwijk, T.

    One of the largest challenges in the development of future radiation detectors for space applications is the fabrication of large detector arrays This because future missions require camera s with many pixels in combination with background limited sensitivity Within this context we have started the development of Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors MKID s The MKID is a relatively new detector concept pioneered by J Zmuidzinas and P Day et al 1 which belongs to the class of pair breaking detectors where radiation is absorbed in a superconducting film by breaking Cooper pairs into quasiparticles The operating temperature of the device is 1 10 of the transition temperature of the superconducting film Hence an Aluminum KID should be operated at 100 mK The MKID measures the change in quasiparticle and Cooper pair density by probing the complex surface impedance of the superconductor This is done by making use of an extremely high Q superconducting quarter wavelength microwave thin film resonator Every resonator each with slightly different resonance frequency can be observed simultaneously With only one wideband cryogenic amplifier 2 coaxial cables from room temperature to the cold stage and commercially available readout electronics a camera with in excess of 100 000 pixels could become a reality KIDs can address the spectrum from far infrared to X-ray depending on the antenna or absorber coupled to the microwave resonator 1 P K Day H G LeDuc B A Mazin A Vayonakis and J Zmuidzinas Nature 425 p 817-821 2003

  2. Development of high- Q superconducting resonators for use as kinetic inductance detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baselmans, J. J. A.; Yates, S. J. C.; de Korte, P.; Hoevers, H.; Barends, R.; Hovenier, J. N.; Gao, J. R.; Klapwijk, T. M.

    One of the greatest challenges in the development of future space based instruments for sub-mm astronomy is the fabrication of very sensitive and large detector arrays. Within this context we have started the development of Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKID's). The heart of each detector consists of a high- Q superconducting quarter wavelength microwave resonator. As a result it is easy to multiplex the readout by frequency division multiplexing. The predicted fundamental sensitivity limit of the MKID is due to quasiparticle creation-recombination noise, leading to a NEP˜1×10-20W/√{Hz}, low enough for any envisionable application in the sub-mm, optical and X-ray wavelength ranges. We describe experiments with these resonators, made of 150 nm Ta films with a 5 nm Nb seed layer on high purity Si substrates with a resonance frequency around 3 GHz. We measure the Q factors, responsivity, noise and noise equivalent power of several resonators. We find Q factors in excess of 1 × 10 5, high enough for the multiplexing of more than 10 4 pixels. The quasiparticle lifetime in our film is measured to be 25 μs. which gives, together with the measured phase noise, a NEP of ˜4×10-16W/√{Hz} at 1 kHz. At lower frequencies the noise increases.

  3. Molybdenum-rhenium alloy based high-Q superconducting microwave resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Vibhor Schneider, Ben H.; Bosman, Sal J.; Merkx, Evert P. J.; Steele, Gary A.

    2014-12-01

    Superconducting microwave resonators (SMRs) with high quality factors have become an important technology in a wide range of applications. Molybdenum-Rhenium (MoRe) is a disordered superconducting alloy with a noble surface chemistry and a relatively high transition temperature. These properties make it attractive for SMR applications, but characterization of MoRe SMR has not yet been reported. Here, we present the fabrication and characterization of SMR fabricated with a MoRe 60–40 alloy. At low drive powers, we observe internal quality-factors as high as 700 000. Temperature and power dependence of the internal quality-factors suggest the presence of the two level systems from the dielectric substrate dominating the internal loss at low temperatures. We further test the compatibility of these resonators with high temperature processes, such as for carbon nanotube chemical vapor deposition growth, and their performance in the magnetic field, an important characterization for hybrid systems.

  4. Tunable high-q superconducting notch filter

    DOEpatents

    Pang, C.S.; Falco, C.M.; Kampwirth, R.T.; Schuller, I.K.

    1979-11-29

    A superconducting notch filter is made of three substrates disposed in a cryogenic environment. A superconducting material is disposed on one substrate in a pattern of a circle and an annular ring connected together. The second substrate has a corresponding pattern to form a parallel plate capacitor and the second substrate has the circle and annular ring connected by a superconducting spiral that forms an inductor. The third substrate has a superconducting spiral that is placed parallel to the first superconducting spiral to form a transformer. Relative motion of the first substrate with respect to the second is effected from outside the cryogenic environment to vary the capacitance and hence the frequency of the resonant circuit formed by the superconducting devices.

  5. High Q Miniature Sapphire Acoustic Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Rabi T.; Tjoelker, R. L.

    2010-01-01

    We have demonstrated high Q measurements in a room temperature Miniature Sapphire Acoustic Resonator (MSAR). Initial measurements of bulk acoustic modes in room temperature sapphire at 39 MHz have demonstrated a Q of 8.8 x 10(exp 6). The long term goal of this work is to integrate such a high Q resonator with small, low noise quartz oscillator electronics, providing a fractional frequency stability better than 1 x 10(exp -14) @ 1s.

  6. High Q silicon carbide microdisk resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Xiyuan; Lee, Jonathan Y.; Feng, Philip X.-L.; Lin, Qiang

    2014-05-05

    We demonstrate a silicon carbide (SiC) microdisk resonator with optical Q up to 5.12 × 10{sup 4}. The high optical quality, together with the diversity of whispering-gallery modes and the tunability of external coupling, renders SiC microdisk a promising platform for integrated quantum photonics applications.

  7. Ultra-high Q even eigenmode resonance in terahertz metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Naib, Ibraheem Dignam, Marc M.; Yang, Yuping; Zhang, Weili; Singh, Ranjan

    2015-01-05

    We report the simultaneous excitation of the odd and the even eigenmode resonances in a periodic array of square split-ring resonators, with four resonators per unit cell. When the electric field is parallel to their gaps, only the two well-studied odd eigenmodes are excited. As the resonators are rotated relative to one another, we observe the emergence and excitation of an extremely sharp even eigenmode. In uncoupled split-ring resonators, this even eigenmode is typically radiative in nature with a broad resonance linewidth and low Q-factor. However, in our coupled system, for specific range of rotation angles, our simulations revealed a remarkably high quality factor (Q ∼ 100) for this eigenmode, which has sub-radiant characteristics. This type of quad-supercell metamaterial offers the advantage of enabling access to all the three distinct resonance features of the split-ring resonator, which consists of two odd eigenmodes in addition to the high-Q even eigenmode, which could be exploited for high performance multiband filters and absorbers. The high Q even eigenmode could find applications in designing label free bio-sensors and for studying the enhanced light matter interaction effects.

  8. Engineered Carbon Nanotube Materials for High-Q Nanomechanical Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Daniel S.; Hunt, Brian; Bronikowski, Mike; Epp, Larry; Hoenk, Michael; Hoppe, Dan; Kowalczyk, Bob; Wong, Eric; Xu, Jimmy; Adam, Douglas; Young, Rob

    2003-01-01

    This document represents a presentation offered by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, with assistance from researchers from Brown University and Northrop Grumman. The presentation took place in Seoul, Korea in July 2003 and attempted to demonstrate the fabrication approach regarding the development of high quality factor (high-Q) mechanical oscillators (in the forms of a tunable nanotube resonator and a nanotube array radio frequency [RF] filter) aimed at signal processing and based on carbon nanotubes. The presentation also addressed parallel efforts to develop both in-plane single nanotube resonators as well as vertical array power devices.

  9. High-Q superconducting niobium cavities for gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paula, L. A. N.; Furtado, S. R.; Aguiar, O. D.; Oliveira, N. F., Jr.; Castro, P. J.; Barroso, J. J.

    2014-10-01

    The main purpose of this work is to optimize the electric Q-factor of superconducting niobium klystron cavities to be used in parametric transducers of the Mario Schenberg gravitational wave detector. Many cavities were manufactured from niobium with relatively high tantalum impurities (1420 ppm) and they were cryogenically tested to determine their resonance frequencies, unloaded electrical quality factors (Q0) and electromagnetic couplings. These cavities were closed with a flat niobium plate with tantalum impurities below 1000 ppm and an unloaded electrical quality factors of the order of 105 have been obtained. AC conductivity of the order of 1012 S/m has been found for niobium cavities when matching experimental results with computational simulations. These values for the Q-factor would allow the detector to reach the quantum limit of sensitivity of ~ 10-22 Hz-1/2 in the near future, making it possible to search for gravitational waves around 3.2 kHz. The experimental tests were performed at the laboratories of the National Institute for Space Research (INPE) and at the Institute for Advanced Studies (IEAv - CTA).

  10. High-Q BBO whispering gallery mode resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guoping; Fürst, Josef U.; Strekalov, Dmitry V.; Grudinin, Ivan S.; Yu, Nan

    2013-02-01

    We report an investigation on optical whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators made from non z-cut beta barium borate (BBO) crystals. We first fabricated high quality (Q) factor WGM resonators made of an angle-cut BBO crystal. Q factors of 1×108 level have been demonstrated at various wavelengths including UV. They led to new upper bounds for the absorption coefficients of BBO at 1560 nm, 980 nm and 370 nm. We observed only one set of ordinarily polarized WGMs with polarization rotating along the resonator circumference. We also fabricated xy-cut BBO WGM resonators, in which the optic axis is parallel to the resonator plane. In that case, two WGM families with different polarization exist, one with constant the other with oscillatory phase velocity. This enables a novel way of broadband phase matching in WGM resonators with cyclic gain. We experimentally demonstrated efficient second harmonic generation (SHG) to a wide harmonic wavelength range from 780 nm at near infrared to 317 nm in UV. It is also the first reported direct UV SHG in a high-Q WGM resonator. This work lays a foundation for further investigations of WGM properties of non-z cut birefringent resonators and their applications in nonlinear optics.

  11. High Q diamond hemispherical resonators: fabrication and energy loss mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Jonathan J.; Bancu, Mirela G.; Bauer, Joseph M.; Cook, Eugene H.; Kumar, Parshant; Newton, Eric; Nyinjee, Tenzin; Perlin, Gayatri E.; Ricker, Joseph A.; Teynor, William A.; Weinberg, Marc S.

    2015-08-01

    We have fabricated polycrystalline diamond hemispheres by hot-filament CVD (HFCVD) in spherical cavities wet-etched into a high temperature glass substrate CTE matched to silicon. Hemispherical resonators 1.4 mm in diameter have a Q of up to 143 000 in the fundamental wineglass mode, for a ringdown time of 2.4 s. Without trimming, resonators have the two degenerate wineglass modes frequency matched as close as 2 Hz, or 0.013% of the resonant frequency (~16 kHz). Laser trimming was used to match resonant modes on hemispheres to 0.3 Hz. Experimental and FEA energy loss studies on cantilevers and hemispheres examine various energy loss mechanisms, showing that surface related losses are dominant. Diamond cantilevers with a Q of 400 000 and a ringdown time of 15.4 s were measured, showing the potential of polycrystalline diamond films for high Q resonators. These resonators show great promise for use as hemispherical resonant gyroscopes (HRGs) on a chip.

  12. Preventing Raman Lasing in High-Q WGM Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Matsko, Andrey; Strekalov, Dmitry; Maleki, Lute

    2007-01-01

    A generic design has been conceived to suppress the Raman effect in whispering- gallery-mode (WGM) optical resonators that have high values of the resonance quality factor (Q). Although it is possible to exploit the Raman effect (even striving to maximize the Raman gain to obtain Raman lasing), the present innovation is intended to satisfy a need that arises in applications in which the Raman effect inhibits the realization of the full potential of WGM resonators as frequency-selection components. Heretofore, in such applications, it has been necessary to operate high-Q WGM resonators at unattractively low power levels to prevent Raman lasing. (The Raman-lasing thresholds of WGM optical resonators are very low and are approximately proportional to Q(sup -2)). Heretofore, two ways of preventing Raman lasting at high power levels have been known, but both entail significant disadvantages: A resonator can be designed so that the optical field is spread over a relatively large mode volume to bring the power density below the threshold. For any given combination of Q and power level, there is certain mode volume wherein Raman lasing does not start. Unfortunately, a resonator that has a large mode volume also has a high spectral density, which is undesirable in a typical photonic application. A resonator can be cooled to the temperature of liquid helium, where the Raman spectrum is narrower and, therefore, the Raman gain is lower. However, liquid-helium cooling is inconvenient. The present design overcomes these disadvantages, making it possible to operate a low-spectral-density (even a single-mode) WGM resonator at a relatively high power level at room temperature, without risk of Raman lasing.

  13. A broadband reflective filter for applying dc biases to high-Q superconducting microwave cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yu; Rouxinol, Francisco; Lahaye, Matt

    2015-03-01

    The integration of dc-bias circuitry into low-loss microwave cavities is an important technical issue for topics in many fields that include research with qubit- and cavity-coupled mechanical system, circuit QED and quantum dynamics of nonlinear systems. The applied potentials or currents serve a variety of functions such as maintaining the operating state of device or establishing tunable electrostatic interactions between devices (for example, in order to couple a nanomechanical resonator to a superconducting qubit to generate and detect quantum states of a mechanical resonator). Here we report a bias-circuit design that utilizes a broadband reflective filter to connect to a high-Q superconducting coplanar waveguide (CPW) cavity. Our design allows us to apply dc-voltages to the center trace of CPW, with negligible changes in loaded quality factors of the fundamental mode. Simulations and measurements of the filter demonstrate insertion loss greater than 20 dB in the range of 3 to 10 GHz. Transmission measurements of the voltage-biased CPW show that loaded quality factors exceeding 105 can be achieved for dc-voltages as high as V = +/- 20V for the cavity operated in the single photon regime. National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR-1056423 and Grant No. DMR-1312421.

  14. High Q printed helical resonators for oscillators and filters.

    PubMed

    Everard, Jeremy K A; Broomfield, Carl D

    2007-09-01

    High Q compact printed helical resonators which operate from around 1.8 to 2 GHz are described. These consist of a multilayer printed circuit board (PCB) incorporating a printed helical transmission line. Loss in the via hole is reduced by ensuring that the standing wave current at this point is near zero. This ensures a significant increase in Q. Further increased energy storage per unit volume is achieved due to the 3-D helical nature of the resonator. Unloaded Qs of 235 and 195 have been obtained on low loss PCBs with dielectric constants of 2.2 and 10.5, respectively. Two applications for these resonators are described in this paper. The first is the design of a compact low noise oscillator where the ratio of QL/Q0, and hence insertion loss, is adjusted for low noise. The 2-GHz oscillator demonstrates a phase noise of -120 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz which is predicted exactly by the theory. The second is a three-section filter designed to offer the response required by the front end filter of a modern GSM mobile telephone. In the filter design three helical resonators are coupled together to produce a completely printed triplate bandpass filter. PMID:17941381

  15. High-Q 3D coaxial resonators for cavity QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Taekwan; Owens, John C.; Naik, Ravi; Lachapelle, Aman; Ma, Ruichao; Simon, Jonathan; Schuster, David I.

    Three-dimensional microwave resonators provide an alternative approach to transmission-line resonators used in most current circuit QED experiments. Their large mode volume greatly reduces the surface dielectric losses that limits the coherence of superconducting circuits, and the well-isolated and controlled cavity modes further suppress coupling to the environment. In this work, we focus on unibody 3D coaxial cavities which are only evanescently coupled and free from losses due to metal-metal interfaces, allowing us to reach extremely high quality-factors. We achieve quality-factor of up to 170 million using 4N6 Aluminum at superconducting temperatures, corresponding to an energy ringdown time of ~4ms. We extend our methods to other materials including Niobium, NbTi, and copper coated with Tin-Lead solder. These cavities can be further explored to study their properties under magnetic field or upon coupling to superconducting Josephson junction qubits, e.g. 3D transmon qubits. Such 3D cavity QED system can be used for quantum information applications, or quantum simulation in coupled cavity arrays.

  16. Monolithic Cylindrical Fused Silica Resonators with High Q Factors.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yao; Wang, Dongya; Wang, Yanyan; Liu, Jianping; Wu, Suyong; Qu, Tianliang; Yang, Kaiyong; Luo, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The cylindrical resonator gyroscope (CRG) is a typical Coriolis vibratory gyroscope whose performance is determined by the Q factor and frequency mismatch of the cylindrical resonator. Enhancing the Q factor is crucial for improving the rate sensitivity and noise performance of the CRG. In this paper, for the first time, a monolithic cylindrical fused silica resonator with a Q factor approaching 8 × 10⁵ (ring-down time over 1 min) is reported. The resonator is made of fused silica with low internal friction and high isotropy, with a diameter of 25 mm and a center frequency of 3974.35 Hz. The structure of the resonator is first briefly introduced, and then the experimental non-contact characterization method is presented. In addition, the post-fabrication experimental procedure of Q factor improvement, including chemical and thermal treatment, is demonstrated. The Q factor improvement by both treatments is compared and the primary loss mechanism is analyzed. To the best of our knowledge, the work presented in this paper represents the highest reported Q factor for a cylindrical resonator. The proposed monolithic cylindrical fused silica resonator may enable high performance inertial sensing with standard manufacturing process and simple post-fabrication treatment. PMID:27483263

  17. Efficient coupling into and out of high-Q resonators.

    PubMed

    Harbers, Rik; Moll, Nikolaj; Erni, Daniel; Bona, Gian-Luca; Bächtold, Werner

    2004-08-01

    The temporal-coupled-mode theory is directly applied to the design of devices that feature a resonator with a high quality factor. For the temporal-coupled-mode theory we calculate the decay rate of the resonator to determine the transmission properties of the device. The analysis using the decay rates requires little computational effort, and therefore the optimum device properties can be determined quickly. Two examples, a wavelength filter and a resonator crossing, are presented to illustrate the use of the analysis. PMID:15330480

  18. Superconducting Materials Testing with a High-Q Copper RF Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Tantawi, S.G.; Dolgashev, V.; Bowden, G.; Lewandowski, J.; Nantista, C.D.; Canabal, A.; Tajima, T.; Capmpisi, I.E.; /Oak Ridge

    2007-11-07

    Superconducting RF is of increasing importance in particle accelerators. We have developed a resonant cavity with high quality factor and an interchangeable wall for testing of superconducting materials. A compact TE01 mode launcher attached to the coupling iris selectively excites the azimuthally symmetric cavity mode, which allows a gap at the detachable wall and is free of surface electric fields that could cause field emission, multipactor, and RF breakdown. The shape of the cavity is tailored to focus magnetic field on the test sample. We describe cryogenic experiments conducted with this cavity. An initial experiment with copper benchmarked our apparatus. This was followed by tests with Nb and MgB2. In addition to characterizing the onset of superconductivity with temperature, our cavity can be resonated with a high power klystron to determine the surface magnetic field level sustainable by the material in the superconducting state. A feedback code is used to make the low level RF drive track the resonant frequency.

  19. Triple-band high Q factor Fano resonances in bilayer THz metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Chunfeng; Wu, Liang; Xu, Degang; Yao, Jianquan; Sun, Xiaohong

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we proposed a bilayer THz metamaterials, which is constructed by two sets of asymmetric split-ring resonators (ASRRs) with different sizes. Simulation results show that three high Q Fano resonances are excited in the bilayer metamaterials at 0.268, 0.418 THz, and 25 at 0.560 THz, and the Q values are 33, 42, and 25, respectively. The field distributions show that resonances at 0.268 and 0.560 THz originate from one of ASRRs, whereas the resonance at 0.418 THz originates from the other set of ASRRs. Further analysis indicates that the three high Q Fano resonances results from a combined action of the in-plane coupling and the interlayer coupling in the metamaterials: the in-plane coupling lead to resonances enhanced and the interlayer coupling lead to the eigenmode of each set of the ASRRs split into two discrete Fano resonances. This triple-band high Q factor Fano resonance metamaterials would open new degrees of freedom for designing advanced chemical and biological sensors and detectors in the terahertz regime.

  20. Efficient upconversion of subterahertz radiation in a high-Q whispering gallery resonator.

    PubMed

    Strekalov, D V; Savchenkov, A A; Matsko, A B; Yu, N

    2009-03-15

    We demonstrate efficient upconversion of subterahertz radiation into the optical domain in a high-Q whispering gallery mode resonator with quadratic optical nonlinearity. The 5x10(-3) power conversion efficiency of a cw 100 GHz signal is achieved with only 16 mW of optical pump. PMID:19282908

  1. Development of Ultra High Gradient and High Q{sub 0} Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Rongli; Clemens, William A.; Follkie, James E.; Harris, Teena M.; Kushnick, Peter W.; Machie, Danny; Martin, Robert E.; Palczewski, Ari D.; Perry, Era A.; Slack, Gary L.; Williams, R. S.; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; Hao, J. K.; Li, Y. M.; Liu, K. X.

    2013-06-01

    We report on the recent progress at Jefferson Lab in developing ultra high gradient and high Q{sub 0} superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities for future SRF based machines. A new 1300 MHz 9-cell prototype cavity is being fabricated. This cavity has an optimized shape in terms of the ratio of the peak surface field (both magnetic and electric) to the acceleration gradient, hence the name low surface field (LSF) shape. The goal of the effort is to demonstrate an acceleration gradient of 50 MV/m with Q{sub 0} of 10{sup 10} at 2 K in a 9-cell SRF cavity. Fine-grain niobium material is used. Conventional forming, machining and electron beam welding method are used for cavity fabrication. New techniques are adopted to ensure repeatable, accurate and inexpensive fabrication of components and the full assembly. The completed cavity is to be first mechanically polished to a mirror-finish, a newly acquired in-house capability at JLab, followed by the proven ILC-style processing recipe established already at JLab. In parallel, new single-cell cavities made from large-grain niobium material are made to further advance the cavity treatment and processing procedures, aiming for the demonstration of an acceleration gradient of 50 MV/m with Q{sub 0} of 2�10{sup 10} at 2K.

  2. High Q-factor resonant photoluminescence from Ge-on-insulator micro-disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xuejun; Hashimoto, Hideaki; Yoshida, Keisuke; Sawano, Kentarou; Maruizumi, Takuya

    2016-05-01

    Micro-disk resonators with high Q-factor have been experimentally demonstrated on germanium-on-insulator (GOI). GOI substrates fabricated by direct wafer bonding show better crystal quality that germanium films directly grown on Si. Sharp resonant peaks with Q-factor around 1000-4000 have been observed from micro-disks fabricated on GOI substrate by low-temperature photoluminescence measurements. The light emission properties against pump laser power and device temperature are also investigated. Our results indicating that GOI micro-disks are promising resonators for low threshold, ultra-compact Ge lasers on Si.

  3. 1/f frequency noise of 2-GHZ high-Q thin-film sapphire resonators.

    PubMed

    Ferre-Pikal, E S; Delgado Arámburo, M C; Walls, F L; Lakin, K M

    2001-03-01

    We present experimental results on intrinsic 1/f frequency modulation (FM) noise in high-overtone thin-film sapphire resonators that operate at 2 GHz. The resonators exhibit several high-Q resonant modes approximately 100 kHz apart, which repeat every 13 MHz. A loaded Q of approximately 20,000 was estimated from the phase response. The results show that the FM noise of the resonators varied between Sy (10 Hz) = -202 dB relative (rel) to 1/Hz and -210 dB rel to 1/Hz. The equivalent phase modulation (PM) noise of an oscillator using these resonators (assuming a noiseless amplifier) would range from [symbol: see text](10 Hz) = -39 to -47 dBc/Hz. PMID:11370364

  4. Conceptual design of a high-Q, 3.4-GHz thin film quartz resonator.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mihir S; Yong, Yook-Kong

    2009-05-01

    Theoretical analyses and designs of high-Q, quartz thin film resonators are presented. The resonators operate at an ultra-high frequency of 3.4 GHz for application to high-frequency timing devices such as cesium chip-scale atomic clocks. The frequency spectra for the 3.4-GHz thin film quartz resonators, which serve as design aids in selecting the resonator dimensions/configurations for simple electrodes, and ring electrode mesa designs are presented here for the first time. The thin film aluminum electrodes are found to play a major role in the resonators because the electrodes are only one third the thickness and mass of the active areas of the plate resonator. Hence, in addition to the material properties of quartz, the elastic, viscoelastic, and thermal properties of the electrodes are included in the models. The frequency-temperature behavior is obtained for the best resonator designs. To improve the frequency-temperature behavior of the resonators, new quartz cuts are proposed to compensate for the thermal stresses caused by the aluminum electrodes and the mounting supports. Frequency response analyses are performed to determine the Q-factor, motional resistance, capacitance ratio, and other figures of merit. The resonators have Q's of about 3800, resistance of about 1300 to 1400 ohms, and capacitance ratios of 1100 to 2800. PMID:19473909

  5. High-Q X-band distributed Bragg resonator utilizing an aperiodic alumina plate arrangement.

    PubMed

    Bale, Simon; Everard, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a high-Q X-band distributed Bragg resonator that uses an aperiodic arrangement of non-lambda/4 low loss alumina plates mounted in a cylindrical waveguide. An ABCD parameter waveguide model was developed to simulate and optimize the cavity. The dielectric plates and air waveguide dimensions were optimized to achieve maximum quality factor by redistributing the energy loss within the cavity. An unloaded quality factor (Q(0)) of 196,000 was demonstrated at 9.93 GHz. PMID:20040428

  6. A fast way for calculating longitudinal wakefields for high Q resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng-Yang Tan and James M Steimel

    2001-12-03

    We have come up with a way for calculating longitudinal wakefields for high Q resonances by mapping the wake functions to a two dimension vector space. Then in this space, a transformation which is basically a scale change and a rotation, allows us to calculate the new wakefield by knowing only one previous wakefield and one previous particle passage through the cavity. We will also compare this method to the brute force method which needs to know all the passages of the previous particles through the cavity.

  7. Laser-machined ultra-high-Q microrod resonators for nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del'Haye, Pascal; Diddams, Scott A.; Papp, Scott B.

    2013-06-01

    Optical whispering-gallery microresonators are useful tools in microphotonics and non-linear optics at very low threshold powers. Here, we present details about the fabrication of ultra-high-Q whispering-gallery-mode resonators made by CO2-laser lathe machining of fused-quartz rods. The resonators can be fabricated in less than 1 min and the obtained optical quality factors exceed Q = 1 × 109. Demonstrated resonator diameters are in the range between 170 μm and 8 mm (free spectral ranges between 390 GHz and 8 GHz). Using these microresonators, a variety of optical nonlinearities are observed, including Raman scattering, Brillouin scattering, and four-wave mixing.

  8. Coupling Light from a High-Q Microsphere Resonator Using a UV-induced Surface Grating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilchenko, V. S.; Starodubov, D. S.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Maleki, L.; Feinberg, J.

    2000-01-01

    High-Q microspheres with whispering-gallery modes have very narrow resonances that can be used for fiber-optic filters, ultra-compact narrow-linewidth lasers and optical/microwave oscillators. Whispering-gallery modes were previously excited in microspheres using evanescent optical fields. The necessary phase synchronism was obtained by adjusting the incident angle of input light beam (prism coupler) or adjustment of the waveguide propagation constant (fiber taper coupler). For many applications, however, bulky near-field couplers are undesirable. They compromise the symmetry and generate stray fields. Also, the control of coupling is crucial for the performance of microsphere resonators: in analogy with radio frequency circuits, the loading Q-factor should be less than the intrinsic Q-factor, Q(sub L) less than or equal to Q(sub O). Ideally one should combine a stable coupling element and a resonator into a single microsphere component.

  9. High-Q lattice mode matched structural resonances in terahertz metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ningning; Singh, Ranjan; Zhang, Weili

    2016-07-01

    The quality (Q) factor of metamaterial resonances is limited by the radiative and non-radiative losses. At terahertz frequencies, the dominant loss channel is radiative in nature since the non-radiative losses are low due to high conductivity of metals. Radiative losses could be suppressed by engineering the meta-atom structure. However, such suppression usually occurs at the fundamental resonance mode which is typically a closed mode resonance such as an inductive-capacitive resonance or a Fano resonance. Here, we report an order of magnitude enhancement in Q factor of all the structural eigenresonances of a split-ring resonator fueled by the lattice mode matching. We match the fundamental order diffractive mode to each of the odd and even eigenresonances, thus leading to a tremendous line-narrowing of all the resonances. Such precise tailoring and control of the structural resonances in a metasurface lattice could have potential applications in low-loss devices, sensing, and design of high-Q metamaterial cavities.

  10. Tunable superconducting microstrip resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamyan, A. A.; Kubatkin, S. E.; Danilov, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    We report on a simple yet versatile design for a tunable superconducting microstrip resonator. Niobium nitride is employed as the superconducting material and aluminum oxide, produced by atomic layer deposition, as the dielectric layer. We show that the high quality of the dielectric material allows to reach the internal quality factors in the order of Qi˜104 in the single photon regime. Qi rapidly increases with the number of photons in the resonator N and exceeds 105 for N ˜10 -50 . A straightforward modification of the basic microstrip design allows to pass a current bias through the strip and to control its kinetic inductance. We achieve a frequency tuning δf =62 MHz around f0=2.4 GHz for a fundamental mode and δf =164 MHz for a third harmonic. This translates into a tuning parameter Qiδf /f0=150 . The presented design can be incorporated into essentially any superconducting circuitry operating at temperatures below 2.5 K.

  11. Analysis of silicon-on-insulator slot waveguide ring resonators targeting high Q-factors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiwei; Serna, Samuel; Le Roux, Xavier; Alonso-Ramos, Carlos; Vivien, Laurent; Cassan, Eric

    2015-12-01

    Vertical slot waveguide micro-ring resonators in silicon photonics have already been demonstrated in previous works and applied to several schemes, including sensing and hybrid nonlinear optics. Their performances, first quantified by the reachable Q-factors, are still perceived to be restrained by larger intrinsic propagation losses than those suffered by simple Si wire waveguides. In this Letter, the optical loss mechanisms of slot waveguide micro-ring resonators are thoroughly investigated with a special focus on the coupler loss contribution that turns out to be the key obstacle to achieving high Q-factors. By engineering the coupler design, slotted ring resonators with a 50 μm radius are experienced with a loaded Q-factor up to 10 times improvement from Q=3,000 to Q=30,600. The intrinsic losses due to the light propagation in the bent slot ring itself are proved to be as low as 1.32±0.87  dB/cm at λ=1,550  nm. These investigations of slot ring resonators open high performance potentials for on-chip nonlinear optical processing or sensing in hybrid silicon photonics. PMID:26625052

  12. Package of a dual-tapered-fiber coupled microsphere resonator with high Q factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yongchao; Wang, Keyi; Jin, Xueying

    2015-09-01

    We package a high-quality (Q) factor optical whispering gallery mode (WGM) microsphere resonator side coupled to two tapered fibers without changing the initial coupling conditions, achieving a final Q as high as 2.7×106. The mechanical stability of the coupling system is improved by placing the tapers in contact with the microsphere. The packaged device can be easily sealed in a targeted hermetic box according to different practical applications, which provides long term maintenance of the coupling efficiency and high-Q factor. Moreover, we test the temperature dependence of the packaged device and demonstrate its capability for thermal tuning of the drop wavelength. This device has a variety of advantages, such as portability, low-cost, and ease of fabrication.

  13. Universal nonlinear scattering in ultra-high Q whispering gallery-mode resonators.

    PubMed

    Lin, Guoping; Diallo, Souleymane; Dudley, John M; Chembo, Yanne K

    2016-06-27

    Universal nonlinear scattering processes such as Brillouin, Raman, and Kerr effects are fundamental light-matter interactions of particular theoretical and experimental importance. They originate from the interaction of a laser field with an optical medium at the lattice, molecular, and electronic scale, respectively. These nonlinear effects are generally observed and analyzed separately, because they do not often occur concomitantly. In this article, we report the simultaneous excitation of these three fundamental interactions in mm-size ultra-high Q whispering gallery mode resonators under continuous wave pumping. Universal nonlinear scattering is demonstrated in barium fluoride and strontium fluoride, separately. We further propose a unified theory based on a spatiotemporal formalism for the understanding of this phenomenology. PMID:27410640

  14. Fano resonances in a multimode waveguide coupled to a high-Q silicon nitride ring resonator.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dapeng; de Dood, Michiel J A; Bauters, Jared F; Heck, Martijn J R; Bowers, John E; Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2014-03-24

    Silicon nitride (Si3N4) optical ring resonators provide exceptional opportunities for low-loss integrated optics. Here we study the transmission through a multimode waveguide coupled to a Si3N4 ring resonator. By coupling single-mode fibers to both input and output ports of the waveguide we selectively excite and probe combinations of modes in the waveguide. Strong asymmetric Fano resonances are observed and the degree of asymmetry can be tuned through the positions of the input and output fibers. The Fano resonance results from the interference between modes of the waveguide and light that couples resonantly to the ring resonator. We develop a theoretical model based on the coupled mode theory to describe the experimental results. The large extension of the optical modes out of the Si3N4 core makes this system promising for sensing applications. PMID:24664026

  15. μ-'Diving suit' for liquid-phase high-Q resonant detection.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haitao; Chen, Ying; Xu, Pengcheng; Xu, Tiegang; Bao, Yuyang; Li, Xinxin

    2016-03-01

    A resonant cantilever sensor is, for the first time, dressed in a water-proof 'diving suit' for real-time bio/chemical detection in liquid. The μ-'diving suit' technology can effectively avoid not only unsustainable resonance due to heavy liquid-damping, but also inevitable nonspecific adsorption on the cantilever body. Such a novel technology ensures long-time high-Q resonance of the cantilever in solution environment for real-time trace-concentration bio/chemical detection and analysis. After the formation of the integrated resonant micro-cantilever, a patterned photoresist and hydrophobic parylene thin-film are sequentially formed on top of the cantilever as sacrificial layer and water-proof coat, respectively. After sacrificial-layer release, an air gap is formed between the parylene coat and the cantilever to protect the resonant cantilever from heavy liquid damping effect. Only a small sensing-pool area, located at the cantilever free-end and locally coated with specific sensing-material, is exposed to the liquid analyte for gravimetric detection. The specifically adsorbed analyte mass can be real-time detected by recording the frequency-shift signal. In order to secure vibration movement of the cantilever and, simultaneously, reject liquid leakage from the sensing-pool region, a hydrophobic parylene made narrow slit structure is designed surrounding the sensing-pool. The anti-leakage effect of the narrow slit and damping limited resonance Q-factor are modelled and optimally designed. Integrated with electro-thermal resonance excitation and piezoresistive frequency readout, the cantilever is embedded in a micro-fluidic chip to form a lab-chip micro-system for liquid-phase bio/chemical detection. Experimental results show the Q-factor of 23 in water and longer than 20 hours liquid-phase continuous working time. Loaded with two kinds of sensing-materials at the sensing-pools, two types of sensing chips successfully show real-time liquid-phase detection to ppb

  16. Modifications of Superconducting Properties of Niobium Caused by Nitrogen Doping Recipes for High Q Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Vostrikov, Alexander; Checchin, Mattia; Grassellino, Anna; Kim, Young-Kee; Romanenko, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    A study is presented on the superconducting properties of niobium used for the fabrication of the SRF cavities after treating by recently discovered nitrogen doping methods. Cylindrical niobium samples have been subjected to the standard surface treatments applied to the cavities (electro-polishing, l 20°C bake) and compared with samples treated by additional nitrogen doping recipes routinely used to reach ultra-high quality factor values (>3· 1010 at 2 K, 16 MV/m). The DC magnetization curves and the complex magnetic AC susceptibility have been measured. Evidence for the lowered field of first flux penetration after nitrogen doping is found suggesting a correlation with the lowered quench fields. Superconducting critical temperatures Tc = 9.25 K are found to be in agreement with previous measurements, and no strong effect on the critical surface field (Bd) from nitrogen doping was found.

  17. Frequency-Temperature Compensation Techniques for High-Q Microwave Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartnett, John G.; Tobar, Michael E.

    Low-noise high-stability resonator oscillators based on high-Q monolithic sapphire ``Whispering Gallery'' (WG)-mode resonators have become important devices for telecommunication, radar and metrological applications. The extremely high quality factor of sapphire, of 2 x10^5 at room temperature, 5 x10^7 at liquid nitrogen temperature and 5 x10^9 at liquid helium temperature has enabled the lowest phase noise and highly frequency-stable oscillators in the microwave regime to be constructed. To create an oscillator with exceptional frequency stability, the resonator must have its frequency-temperature dependence annulled at some temperature, as well as a high quality factor. The Temperature Coefficient of Permittivity (TCP) for sapphire is quite large, at 10-100parts per million/K above 77K. This mechanism allows temperature fluctuations to transform to resonator frequency fluctuations.A number of research groups worldwide have investigated various methods of compensating the TCP of a sapphire dielectric resonator at different temperatures. The usual electromagnetic technique of annulment involves the use of paramagnetic impurities contributing an opposite temperature coefficient of the magnetic susceptibility to the TCP. This technique has only been realized successfully in liquid helium environments. Near 4K the thermal expansion and permittivity effects are small and only small quantities of the paramagnetic ions are necessary to compensate the mode frequency. Compensation is due to impurity ions that were incidentally left over from the manufacturing process.Recently, there has been an effort to dispense with the need for liquid helium and make a compact flywheel oscillator for the new generation of primary frequency standards such as the cesium fountain at the Laboratoire Primaire du Temps et des Fréquences (LPTF), France. To achieve the stability limit imposed

  18. High Q calcium titanate cylindrical dielectric resonators for magnetic resonance microimaging.

    PubMed

    Haines, K; Neuberger, T; Lanagan, M; Semouchkina, E; Webb, A G

    2009-10-01

    At high magnetic fields radiation losses, wavelength effects, self-resonance, and the high resistance of typical components all contribute to increased losses in conventional RF coil designs. High permittivity ceramic dielectric resonators create strong uniform magnetic fields in a compact structure at high frequencies and can potentially solve some of the challenges of high field coil design. In this study an NMR probe was constructed for operation at 600 MHz (14.1T) using an inductively fed CaTiO(3) (relative permittivity of 156) cylindrical hollow bore dielectric resonator. The design has an unmatched Q value greater than 2000, and the electric field is largely confined to the dielectric itself, with near zero values in the hollow bore which accommodates the sample. Experimental and simulation mapping of the RF field show good agreement, with the ceramic resonator giving a pulse width approximately 25% less than a loop gap resonator of similar inner dimensions. High resolution images, with voxel dimensions less than 50 microm(3), have been acquired from fixed zebrafish samples, showing excellent delineation of several fine structures. PMID:19656696

  19. High Q calcium titanate cylindrical dielectric resonators for magnetic resonance microimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, K.; Neuberger, T.; Lanagan, M.; Semouchkina, E.; Webb, A. G.

    2009-10-01

    At high magnetic fields radiation losses, wavelength effects, self-resonance, and the high resistance of typical components all contribute to increased losses in conventional RF coil designs. High permittivity ceramic dielectric resonators create strong uniform magnetic fields in a compact structure at high frequencies and can potentially solve some of the challenges of high field coil design. In this study an NMR probe was constructed for operation at 600 MHz (14.1 T) using an inductively fed CaTiO 3 (relative permittivity of 156) cylindrical hollow bore dielectric resonator. The design has an unmatched Q value greater than 2000, and the electric field is largely confined to the dielectric itself, with near zero values in the hollow bore which accommodates the sample. Experimental and simulation mapping of the RF field show good agreement, with the ceramic resonator giving a pulse width approximately 25% less than a loop gap resonator of similar inner dimensions. High resolution images, with voxel dimensions less than 50 μm 3, have been acquired from fixed zebrafish samples, showing excellent delineation of several fine structures.

  20. Carbon Nanofiber-Based, High-Frequency, High-Q, Miniaturized Mechanical Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama B.; Epp, Larry W.; Bagge, Leif

    2011-01-01

    High Q resonators are a critical component of stable, low-noise communication systems, radar, and precise timing applications such as atomic clocks. In electronic resonators based on Si integrated circuits, resistive losses increase as a result of the continued reduction in device dimensions, which decreases their Q values. On the other hand, due to the mechanical construct of bulk acoustic wave (BAW) and surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators, such loss mechanisms are absent, enabling higher Q-values for both BAW and SAW resonators compared to their electronic counterparts. The other advantages of mechanical resonators are their inherently higher radiation tolerance, a factor that makes them attractive for NASA s extreme environment planetary missions, for example to the Jovian environments where the radiation doses are at hostile levels. Despite these advantages, both BAW and SAW resonators suffer from low resonant frequencies and they are also physically large, which precludes their integration into miniaturized electronic systems. Because there is a need to move the resonant frequency of oscillators to the order of gigahertz, new technologies and materials are being investigated that will make performance at those frequencies attainable. By moving to nanoscale structures, in this case vertically oriented, cantilevered carbon nanotubes (CNTs), that have larger aspect ratios (length/thickness) and extremely high elastic moduli, it is possible to overcome the two disadvantages of both bulk acoustic wave (BAW) and surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators. Nano-electro-mechanical systems (NEMS) that utilize high aspect ratio nanomaterials exhibiting high elastic moduli (e.g., carbon-based nanomaterials) benefit from high Qs, operate at high frequency, and have small force constants that translate to high responsivity that results in improved sensitivity, lower power consumption, and im - proved tunablity. NEMS resonators have recently been demonstrated using topdown

  1. Meta-metallic coils and resonators: Methods for high Q-value resonant geometries.

    PubMed

    Mett, R R; Sidabras, J W; Hyde, J S

    2016-08-01

    A novel method of decreasing ohmic losses and increasing Q-value in metallic resonators at high frequencies is presented. The method overcomes the skin-depth limitation of rf current flow cross section. The method uses layers of conductive foil of thickness less than a skin depth and capacitive gaps between layers. The capacitive gaps can substantially equalize the rf current flowing in each layer, resulting in a total cross-sectional dimension for rf current flow many times larger than a skin depth. Analytic theory and finite-element simulations indicate that, for a variety of structures, the Q-value enhancement over a single thick conductor approaches the ratio of total conductor thickness to skin depth if the total number of layers is greater than one-third the square of the ratio of total conductor thickness to skin depth. The layer number requirement is due to counter-currents in each foil layer caused by the surrounding rf magnetic fields. We call structures that exhibit this type of Q-enhancement "meta-metallic." In addition, end effects due to rf magnetic fields wrapping around the ends of the foils can substantially reduce the Q-value for some classes of structures. Foil structures with Q-values that are substantially influenced by such end effects are discussed as are five classes of structures that are not. We focus particularly on 400 MHz, which is the resonant frequency of protons at 9.4 T. Simulations at 400 MHz are shown with comparison to measurements on fabricated structures. The methods and geometries described here are general for magnetic resonance and can be used at frequencies much higher than 400 MHz. PMID:27587143

  2. Surface-resistance measurements using superconducting stripline resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Hafner, Daniel; Dressel, Martin; Scheffler, Marc

    2014-01-15

    We present a method to measure the absolute surface resistance of conductive samples at a set of GHz frequencies with superconducting lead stripline resonators at temperatures 1–6 K. The stripline structure can easily be applied for bulk samples and allows direct calculation of the surface resistance without the requirement of additional calibration measurements or sample reference points. We further describe a correction method to reduce experimental background on high-Q resonance modes by exploiting TEM-properties of the external cabling. We then show applications of this method to the reference materials gold, tantalum, and tin, which include the anomalous skin effect and conventional superconductivity. Furthermore, we extract the complex optical conductivity for an all-lead stripline resonator to find a coherence peak and the superconducting gap of lead.

  3. The Physics of Superconducting Microwave Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jiansong

    Over the past decade, low temperature detectors have brought astronomers revolutionary new observational capabilities and led to many great discoveries. Although a single low temperature detector has very impressive sensitivity, a large detector array would be much more powerful and are highly demanded for the study of more difficult and fundamental problems in astronomy. However, current detector technologies, such as transition edge sensors and superconducting tunnel junction detectors, are difficult to integrate into a large array. The microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID) is a promising new detector technology invented at Caltech and JPL which provides both high sensitivity and an easy solution to the detector integration. It senses the change in the surface impedance of a superconductor as incoming photons break Cooper pairs, by using high-Q superconducting microwave resonators capacitively coupled to a common feedline. This architecture allows thousands of detectors to be easily integrated through passive frequency domain multiplexing. In this thesis, we explore the rich and interesting physics behind these superconducting microwave resonators. The first part of the thesis discusses the surface impedance of a superconductor, the kinetic inductance of a superconducting coplanar waveguide, and the circuit response of a resonator. These topics are related with the responsivity of MKIDs. The second part presents the study of the excess frequency noise that is universally observed in these resonators. The properties of the excess noise, including power, temperature, material, and geometry dependence, have been quantified. The noise source has been identified to be the two-level systems in the dielectric material on the surface of the resonator. A semi-empirical noise model has been developed to explain the power and geometry dependence of the noise, which is useful to predict the noise for a specified resonator geometry. The detailed physical noise

  4. AlN/3C-SiC composite plate enabling high-frequency and high-Q micromechanical resonators.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Ming; Chen, Yung-Yu; Felmetsger, Valery V; Senesky, Debbie G; Pisano, Albert P

    2012-05-22

    An AlN/3C-SiC composite layer enables the third-order quasi-symmetric (QS(3)) Lamb wave mode with a high quality factor (Q) characteristic and an ultra-high phase velocity up to 32395 ms(-1). A Lamb wave resonator utilizing the QS(3) mode exhibits a low motional impedance of 91 Ω and a high Q of 5510 at a series resonance frequency (f(s)) of 2.92 GHz, resulting in the highest f(s)·Q product of 1.61 × 10(13) Hz among the suspended piezoelectric thin film resonators reported to date. PMID:22495881

  5. Proof-of-principle demonstration of Nb3Sn superconducting radiofrequency cavities for high Q0 applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posen, S.; Liepe, M.; Hall, D. L.

    2015-02-01

    Many future particle accelerators require hundreds of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities operating with high duty factor. The large dynamic heat load of the cavities causes the cryogenic plant to make up a significant part of the overall cost of the facility. This contribution can be reduced by replacing standard niobium cavities with ones coated with a low-dissipation superconductor such as Nb3Sn. In this paper, we present results for single cell cavities coated with Nb3Sn at Cornell. Five coatings were carried out, showing that at 4.2 K, high Q0 out to medium fields was reproducible, resulting in an average quench field of 14 MV/m and an average 4.2 K Q0 at quench of 8 × 109. In each case, the peak surface magnetic field at quench was well above Hc1, showing that it is not a limiting field in these cavities. The coating with the best performance had a quench field of 17 MV/m, exceeding gradient requirements for state-of-the-art high duty factor SRF accelerators. It is also shown that—taking into account the thermodynamic efficiency of the cryogenic plant—the 4.2 K Q0 values obtained meet the AC power consumption requirements of state-of-the-art high duty factor accelerators, making this a proof-of-principle demonstration for Nb3Sn cavities in future applications.

  6. Quartz crystal and superconductive resonators and oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Besson, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    A general overview of piezoelectric resonators is given with emphasis on evolution of the resonator design. Superconducting cavities and crystals at low temperature and the use of resonant frequencies are also discussed.

  7. Differentially piezoresistive transduction of high-Q encapsulated SOI-MEMS resonators with sub-100 nm gaps.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng-Syun; Li, Ming-Huang; Li, Sheng-Shian

    2015-01-01

    A differentially piezoresistive (piezo-R) readout proposed for single-crystal-silicon (SCS) microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) resonators is implemented in a foundrybased resonator platform, demonstrating effective feedthrough cancellation using just simple piezoresistors from the resonator supports while maximizing their capacitively transduced driving areas. The SCS resonators are fabricated by a CMOS foundry using an SOI-MEMS technology together with a polysilicon refill process. A high electromechanical coupling coefficient is attained by the use of 50-nm transducer gap spacing. Moreover, a vacuum package of the fabricated resonators is carried out through wafer-level bonding process. In this work, the corner supporting beams of the resonator serve not only mechanical supports but also piezoresistors for detecting the motional signal, hence substantially simplifying the overall resonator design to realize the piezo-R sensing. In addition, the fabricated resonators are capable of either capacitive sensing or piezo-R detection under the same capacitive drive. To mitigate feedthrough signals from parasitics, a differential measurement configuration of the piezo-R transduction is implemented in this work, featuring more than 30-dB improvement on the feedthrough level as compared with the single-ended piezo-R counterpart and purely capacitive sensing readout. Furthermore, the high-Q design of the mechanical supports is also investigated, offering Q more than 10 000 with efficient piezo-R transduction for MEMS resonators. PMID:25585404

  8. High-Q cross-plate phononic crystal resonator for enhanced acoustic wave localization and energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Aichao; Li, Ping; Wen, Yumei; Yang, Chao; Wang, Decai; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Jiajia

    2015-05-01

    A high-Q cross-plate phononic crystal resonator (Cr-PCR) coupled with an electromechanical Helmholtz resonator (EMHR) is proposed to improve acoustic wave localization and energy harvesting. Owing to the strongly directional wave-scattering effect of the cross-plate corners, strong confinement of acoustic waves emerges. Consequently, the proposed Cr-PCR structure exhibits ∼353.5 times higher Q value and ∼6.1 times greater maximum pressure amplification than the phononic crystal resonator (Cy-PCR) (consisting of cylindrical scatterers) of the same size. Furthermore, the harvester using the proposed Cr-PCR and the EMHR has ∼22 times greater maximum output-power volume density than the previous harvester using Cy-PCR and EMHR structures.

  9. Frequency-tunable superconducting resonators via nonlinear kinetic inductance

    SciTech Connect

    Vissers, M. R.; Hubmayr, J.; Sandberg, M.; Gao, J.; Chaudhuri, S.; Bockstiegel, C.

    2015-08-10

    We have designed, fabricated, and tested a frequency-tunable high-Q superconducting resonator made from a niobium titanium nitride film. The frequency tunability is achieved by injecting a DC through a current-directing circuit into the nonlinear inductor whose kinetic inductance is current-dependent. We have demonstrated continuous tuning of the resonance frequency in a 180 MHz frequency range around 4.5 GHz while maintaining the high internal quality factor Q{sub i} > 180 000. This device may serve as a tunable filter and find applications in superconducting quantum computing and measurement. It also provides a useful tool to study the nonlinear response of a superconductor. In addition, it may be developed into techniques for measurement of the complex impedance of a superconductor at its transition temperature and for readout of transition-edge sensors.

  10. High-Q lithium niobate microdisk resonators on a chip for efficient electro-optic modulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Bo, Fang; Wan, Shuai; Li, Wuxia; Gao, Feng; Li, Junjie; Zhang, Guoquan; Xu, Jingjun

    2015-09-01

    Lithium niobate (LN) microdisk resonators on a LN-silica-LN chip were fabricated using only conventional semiconductor fabrication processes. The quality factor of the LN resonator with a 39.6-μm radius and a 0.5-μm thickness is up to 1.19 × 10(6), which doubles the record of the quality factor 4.84 × 10(5) of LN resonators produced by microfabrication methods allowing batch production. Electro-optic modulation with an effective resonance-frequency tuning rate of 3.0 GHz/V was demonstrated in the fabricated LN microdisk resonator. PMID:26368411

  11. High Q-factor distributed bragg reflector resonators with reflectors of arbitrary thickness.

    PubMed

    Le Floch, Jean-Michel; Tobar, Michael E; Cros, Dominique; Krupka, Jerzy

    2007-12-01

    The Bragg reflection technique improves the Q-factor of a resonator by reducing conductor and dielectric losses. This is achieved by designing a low-loss inner resonant region (usually free space) surrounded by an outer anti-resonant region made of distributed Bragg reflector layers. In this paper we develop a simple non-Maxwellian model and apply it to design three distinct cylindrical Bragg resonators based on the same set of single-crystal sapphire plates and rings by changing only the dimension of the cavity that supports the structure. To accomplish this, the simple model allows an arbitrary thickness for either the horizontal or the cylindrical dielectric reflectors by relaxing the condition that they must be lambda/4 thick. The model also allows for higher-order field variations in both the resonant and the anti-resonant regions. The resonators were constructed and experimental results were compared with the simple model and the rigorous method of lines analysis. For the fundamental mode, an unloaded Q-factor of 234,000 at 9.7 GHz was obtained. This is larger than that for a whispering gallery mode resonator. The resonator also exhibited a greatly reduced spurious mode density when compared to an overmoded whispering gallery mode resonator. PMID:18276575

  12. Photon trapping in a high-Q cavity by non-resonant atoms coupled with an external broadband vacuum field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basharov, A. M.

    2012-05-01

    A new effect of the decay suppression of photon mode non-resonant to the cavity atoms coupled with an external broadband vacuum field has been described. At a certain number Nacr of cavity atoms, the emission of cavity photons due to the non-resonant interaction with cavity atoms has been stopped by the Stark interaction of cavity atoms with the external broadband vacuum field. In the case of high-Q cavity this provides the effect of radiation trapping. The cavity photon has obtained an additional energy shift. These results have been obtained on the basis of a theory of localized quantum open systems developed with the help of the quantum stochastic differential equation of the generalized Langevin (non-Wiener) type.

  13. System test of an optoelectronic gyroscope based on a high Q-factor InP ring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Olio, Francesco; Indiveri, Fabrizio; Innone, Filomena; Dello Russo, Pasquale; Ciminelli, Caterina; Armenise, Mario N.

    2014-12-01

    The experimental results of the system test of an optical resonant passive gyroscope based on a high Q-factor ring resonator in InP technology are reported. The open loop configuration based on the phase modulation was preferred among the analyzed configuration options, especially because it is potentially suitable for the monolithic integration of the entire sensor on a single chip. The setup components are described with a special emphasis on a custom digital readout board based on a field-programmable gate array. The board processes the input signals according to the proportional-integral algorithm which has been implemented through an optimized firmware. For the system test, the sensor rotation has been simulated using two properly driven acousto-optic modulators. The results reported here prove the gyro functionality and are a good starting point for the full development of the sensor.

  14. Radio frequency spectral characterization and model parameters extraction of high Q optical resonators.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Zeina; Boucher, Yann G; Fernandez, Arnaud; Balac, Stéphane; Llopis, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    A microwave domain characterization approach is proposed to determine the properties of high quality factor optical resonators. This approach features a very high precision in frequency and aims to acquire a full knowledge of the complex transfer function (amplitude and phase) characterizing an optical resonator using a microwave vector network analyzer. It is able to discriminate between the different coupling regimes, from the under-coupling to the selective amplification, and it is used together with a model from which the main resonator parameters are extracted, i.e. coupling factor, intrinsic losses, phase slope, intrinsic and external quality factor. PMID:27251460

  15. Radio frequency spectral characterization and model parameters extraction of high Q optical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, Zeina; Boucher, Yann G.; Fernandez, Arnaud; Balac, Stéphane; Llopis, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    A microwave domain characterization approach is proposed to determine the properties of high quality factor optical resonators. This approach features a very high precision in frequency and aims to acquire a full knowledge of the complex transfer function (amplitude and phase) characterizing an optical resonator using a microwave vector network analyzer. It is able to discriminate between the different coupling regimes, from the under-coupling to the selective amplification, and it is used together with a model from which the main resonator parameters are extracted, i.e. coupling factor, intrinsic losses, phase slope, intrinsic and external quality factor.

  16. Radio frequency spectral characterization and model parameters extraction of high Q optical resonators

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Zeina; Boucher, Yann G.; Fernandez, Arnaud; Balac, Stéphane; Llopis, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    A microwave domain characterization approach is proposed to determine the properties of high quality factor optical resonators. This approach features a very high precision in frequency and aims to acquire a full knowledge of the complex transfer function (amplitude and phase) characterizing an optical resonator using a microwave vector network analyzer. It is able to discriminate between the different coupling regimes, from the under-coupling to the selective amplification, and it is used together with a model from which the main resonator parameters are extracted, i.e. coupling factor, intrinsic losses, phase slope, intrinsic and external quality factor. PMID:27251460

  17. Selective excitation of high-Q resonant modes in a bottle/quasi-cylindrical microresonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yongchao; Jin, Xueying; Wang, Keyi

    2016-08-01

    We fabricate a bottle/quasi-cylindrical microresonator by using a fusion splicer. This method does not require a real-time control of the translation stages and can easily fabricate a resonator with expected size and shape. Selective excitation of whispering gallery modes (WGMs) in the resonator is realized with a fiber taper coupled at various positions of the resonator along the bottle axis. Most importantly, we obtain a clean and regular spectrum with very high quality factor (Q) modes up to 3.1×107 in the quasi-cylindrical region of the resonator. Moreover, we package the coupling system into a whole device that can be moved freely. The vibration performance tests of the packaged device show that the coupling system with the taper coupled at the quasi-cylindrical region has a remarkable anti-vibration ability. The portability and robustness of the device make it attractive in practical applications.

  18. High-Q polymer resonators with spatially controlled photo-functionalization for biosensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Torsten; Mai, Martin; Grossmann, Tobias; Wienhold, Tobias; Hauser, Mario; Mappes, Timo; Kalt, Heinz

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate the applicability of polymeric whispering gallery mode resonators fabricated on silicon as biosensors. Optical measurements on the passive resonators in the visible spectral range yield Q-factors as high as 1.3×107. Local, covalent surface functionalization, is achieved by spatially controlled UV-exposure of a derivative of the photoreactive crosslinker benzophenone. Protein detection is shown using the specific binding of the biotin-streptavidin system.

  19. High-Q micromechanical resonators for mass sensing in dissipative media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tappura, Kirsi; Pekko, Panu; Seppä, Heikki

    2011-06-01

    Single crystal silicon-based micromechanical resonators are developed for mass sensing in dissipative media. The design aspects and preliminary characterization of the resonators are presented. For the suggested designs, quality factors of about 20 000 are typically measured in air at atmospheric pressure and 1000-2000 in contact with liquid. The performance is based on a wine-glass-type lateral bulk acoustic mode excited in a rectangular resonator plate. The mode essentially eliminates the radiation of acoustic energy into the sample media leaving viscous drag as the dominant fluid-based dissipation mechanism in the system. For a mass loading distributed over the central areas of the resonator a sensitivity of 27 ppm ng-1 is measured exhibiting good agreement with the results of the finite element method-based simulations. It is also shown that the mass sensitivity can be somewhat enhanced, not only by the proper distribution of the loaded mass, but also by introducing shallow barrier structures on the resonator.

  20. Extremely high Q-factor mechanical modes in quartz bulk acoustic wave resonators at millikelvin temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Goryachev, M.; Creedon, D. L.; Ivanov, E. N.; Tobar, M. E.; Galliou, S.; Bourquin, R.

    2014-12-04

    We demonstrate that Bulk Acoustic Wave (BAW) quartz resonator cooled down to millikelvin temperatures are excellent building blocks for hybrid quantum systems with extremely long coherence times. Two overtones of the longitudinal mode at frequencies of 15.6 and 65.4 MHz demonstrate a maximum f.Q product of 7.8×10{sup 16} Hz. With this result, the Q-factor in such devices near the quantum ground state can be four orders of magnitude better than previously attained in other mechanical systems. Tested quartz resonators possess the ultra low acoustic losses crucial for electromagnetic cooling to the phonon ground state.

  1. Quantum logic gates for superconducting resonator qudits

    SciTech Connect

    Strauch, Frederick W.

    2011-11-15

    We study quantum information processing using superpositions of Fock states in superconducting resonators as quantum d-level systems (qudits). A universal set of single and coupled logic gates is theoretically proposed for resonators coupled by superconducting circuits of Josephson junctions. These gates use experimentally demonstrated interactions and provide an attractive route to quantum information processing using harmonic oscillator modes.

  2. Superconducting resonator used as a beam phase detector.

    SciTech Connect

    Sharamentov, S. I.; Pardo, R. C.; Ostroumov, P. N.; Clifft, B. E.; Zinkann, G. P.; Physics

    2003-05-01

    Beam-bunch arrival time has been measured for the first time by operating superconducting cavities, normally part of the linac accelerator array, in a bunch-detecting mode. The very high Q of the superconducting cavities provides high sensitivity and allows for phase-detecting low-current beams. In detecting mode, the resonator is operated at a very low field level comparable to the field induced by the bunched beam. Because of this, the rf field in the cavity is a superposition of a 'pure' (or reference) rf and the beam-induced signal. A new method of circular phase rotation (CPR), allowing extraction of the beam phase information from the composite rf field was developed. Arrival time phase determination with CPR is better than 1{sup o} (at 48 MHz) for a beam current of 100 nA. The electronics design is described and experimental data are presented.

  3. High-Q, ultrathin-walled microbubble resonator for aerostatic pressure sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yong; Saurabh, Sunny; Ward, Jonathan M.; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2016-01-01

    Sensors based on whispering gallery resonators have minute footprints and can push achievable sensitivities and resolutions to their limits. Here, we use a microbubble resonator, with a wall thickness of 500 nm and an intrinsic Q-factor of $10^7$ in the telecommunications C-band, to investigate aerostatic pressure sensing via stress and strain of the material. The microbubble is made using two counter-propagating CO$_2$ laser beams focused onto a microcapillary. The measured sensitivity is 19 GHz/bar at 1.55 $\\mu$m. We show that this can be further improved to 38 GHz/bar when tested at the 780 nm wavelength range. In this case, the resolution for pressure sensing can reach 0.17 mbar with a Q-factor higher than $5\\times10^7$.

  4. Neutral Pion Electroproduction in the Resonance Region at High $Q^2$

    SciTech Connect

    Villano, A N; Bosted, P E; Connell, S H; Dalton, M M; Jones, M K; Adams, G S; Afanasev, A; Ahmidouch, A; Angelescu, T; Arrington, J; Asaturyan, R; Baker, O K; Benmouna, N; Berman, B L; Breuer, H; Christy, M E; Cui, Y; Danagoulian, S; Day, D; Dodario, T; Dunne, J A; Dutta, D; El Khayari, N; Elliot, B; Ent, R; Fenker, H C; Frolov, V V; Gan, L; Gaskell, D; Gasparian, A; Grullon, S; Hafidi, K; Hinton, W; Holt, R J; Huber, G M; Hungerford, E; Joo, K; Kalantarians, N; Keppel, C E; Kinney, E R; Kubarovsky, V; Li, Y; Liang, Y; Lu, M; Lung, A; Mack, D; Malace, S; Markowitz, P; McKee, P; Meekins, D G; Mkrtchhyan, H; Napolitano, J; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Opper, A K; Pamela, P; Potterveld, D H; Reimer, Paul E; Reinhold, J; Roche, J; Rock, S E; Schulte, E; Segbefia, E; Smith, C; Smith, G R

    2009-09-01

    The process $ep \\to e^{\\prime}p^{\\prime}\\pi^0$ has been measured at $Q^2$ = 6.4 and 7.7 \\ufourmomts in Jefferson Lab's Hall C. Unpolarized differential cross sections are reported in the virtual photon-proton center of mass frame considering the process $\\gamma^{\\ast}p \\to p^{\\prime}\\pi^0$. Various details relating to the background subtractions, radiative corrections and systematic errors are discussed. The usefulness of the data with regard to the measurement of the electromagnetic properties of the well known $\\Delta(1232)$ resonance is covered in detail. Specifically considered are the electromagnetic and scalar-magnetic ratios $R_{EM}$ and $R_{SM}$ along with the magnetic transition form factor $G_M^{\\ast}$. It is found that the rapid fall off of the $\\Delta(1232)$ contribution continues into this region of momentum transfer and that other resonances

  5. Distributed bragg reflector resonators with cylindrical symmetry and extremely high Q-factors.

    PubMed

    Tobar, Michael E; le Floch, Jean-Michel; Cros, Dominique; Hartnett, John G

    2005-01-01

    A simple non-Maxwellian method is presented that allows the approximate solution of all the dimensions of a multilayered dielectric TE0qp mode cylindrical resonant cavity that constitutes a distributed Bragg reflection (DBR) resonator. The analysis considers an arbitrary number of alternating dielectric and free-space layers of cylindrical geometry enclosed by a metal cylinder. The layers may be arranged along the axial direction, the radial direction, or both. Given only the aspect ratio of the cavity, the desired frequency and the dielectric constants of the material layers, the relevant dimensions are determined from only a set of simultaneous equations, and iterative techniques are not required. The formulas were verified using rigorous method of lines (MoL) calculations and previously published experimental work. We show that the simple approximation gives dimensions close to the values of the optimum Bragg reflection condition determined by the rigorous analysis. The resulting solution is more compact with a higher Q-factor when compared to other reported cylindrical DBR structures. This is because it properly takes into account the effect of the aspect ratio on the Bragg antiresonance condition along the z-axis of the resonator. Previous analyses assumed the propagation in the z-direction was independent of the aspect ratio, and the layers of the Bragg reflector were a quarter of a wavelength thick along the z-direction. When the aspect ratio is properly taken into account, we show that the thickness of the Bragg reflectors are equivalent to the thickness of plane wave Bragg reflectors (or quarter wavelength plates). Thus it turns out that the sizes of the reflectors are related to the free-space propagation constant rather than the propagation constant in the z-direction. PMID:15742559

  6. Discovery of Bragg confined hybrid modes with high Q factor in a hollow dielectric resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    le Floch, Jean-Michel; Tobar, Michael E.; Mouneyrac, David; Cros, Dominique; Krupka, Jerzy

    2007-10-01

    The authors report on observation of Bragg confined mode in a hollow cylindrical dielectric cavity. A resonance was observed at 13.4GHz with an unloaded Q factor of order 2×105, which is more than a factor of 6 above the dielectric loss limit. Previously, such modes have only been realized from pure transverse electric modes with no azimuthal variations and only the Eϕ component. From rigorous numeric simulations, it is shown that the mode is a hybrid mode with nonzero azimuthal variations and with dominant Er and Eϕ electric field components and Hz magnetic field component.

  7. All-metal superconducting planar microwave resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsley, Matt; Pereverzev, Sergey; Dubois, Jonathon; Friedrich, Stephan; Qu, Dongxia; Libby, Steve; Lordi, Vincenzo; Carosi, Gianpaolo; Stoeffl, Wolfgang; Chapline, George; Drury, Owen; Quantum Noise in Superconducting Devices Team

    There is common agreement that noise and resonance frequency jitter in superconducting microwave planar resonators are caused by presence of two-level systems, or fluctuators, in resonator materials- in dielectric substrate, in superconducting and dielectric layers and on the boundaries and interfaces. Scaling of noise with device dimensions indicate that fluctuators are likely concentrated around boundaries; physical nature of those fluctuators remains unclear. The presence of dielectrics is not necessary for the superconducting device functionality, and one can ask question about properties of all-metal device, where dielectric substrate and oxide films on metal are absent. Resonator made from of thin conducting layer with cuts in it is usually called slot line resonator. We report on the design, fabrication and initial testing of multiple split rings slot line resonator made out of thin molybdenum plate. This work is being funded as part of a three year strategic initiative (LDRD 16-SI-004) to better understand noise in superconducting devices.

  8. Neutral pion electroproduction in the resonance region at high Q{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Villano, A. N.; Stoler, P.; Kubarovsky, V.; Adams, G. S.; Napolitano, J.; Bosted, P. E.; Jones, M. K.; Ent, R.; Fenker, H. C.; Gaskell, D.; Lung, A.; Mack, D.; Meekins, D. G.; Roche, J.; Smith, G. R.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Wood, S. A.; Connell, S. H.; Dalton, M. M.; Ahmidouch, A.

    2009-09-15

    The process ep{yields}ep{pi}{sup 0} has been measured at Q{sup 2}=6.4 and 7.7 (GeV/c{sup 2}){sup 2} in Jefferson Lab's Hall C. Unpolarized differential cross sections are reported in the virtual photon-proton center-of-mass frame considering the process {gamma}*p{yields}p{pi}{sup 0}. Various details relating to the background subtractions, radiative corrections, and systematic errors are discussed. The usefulness of the data with regard to the measurement of the electromagnetic properties of the well-known {delta}(1232) resonance is covered in detail. Specifically considered are the electromagnetic and scalar-magnetic ratios R{sub EM} and R{sub SM} along with the magnetic transition form factor G{sub M}*. It is found that the rapid falloff of the {delta}(1232) contribution continues into this region of momentum transfer and that other resonances may be making important contributions in this region.

  9. High-Q sapphire-rutile frequency-temperature compensated microwave dielectric resonators.

    PubMed

    Tobar, M E; Krupka, J; Hartnett, J G; Ivanov, E N; Woode, R A

    1998-01-01

    A sapphiro-rutile composite resonator was constructed from a cylindrical sapphire monocrystal with two thin disks of monocrystal rutile held tightly against the ends. Because rutile exhibits low loss and an opposite temperature coefficient of permittivity to sapphire, it is an ideal material for compensating the frequency-temperature dependence of a sapphire resonator. Most of the electromagnetic modes in the composite structure exhibited turning points (or compensation points) in the frequency-temperature characteristic. The temperatures of compensation for the WG quasi TM modes were measured to be below 90 K with Q-factors of the order of a few million depending on the mode. For WG quasi TE modes, the temperatures of compensation were measured to be between 100 to 160 K with Q-factors of the order of a few hundreds of thousands, depending on the mode. The second derivatives of the compensation points were measured to be of the order 0.1 ppm/K(2 ), which agreed well with the predicted values. PMID:18244235

  10. Neutral pion electroproduction in the resonance region at high Q{sup 2}.

    SciTech Connect

    Villano, A. N.; Stoler, P.; Bosted, P. E.; Connell, S. H.; Dalton, M. M.; Arrington, J.; Hafidi, K.; Holt, R. J.; Schulte, E.; Reimer, P. E.; Zheng, X.; Physics; Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst.; Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility; Univ. of the Johannesburg; Univ. of the Witwatersrand

    2009-09-01

    The process ep {yields} ep{pi}{sup 0} has been measured at Q{sup 2} = 6.4 and 7.7 (GeV/c{sup 2}){sup 2} in Jefferson Lab's Hall C. Unpolarized differential cross sections are reported in the virtual photon-proton center-of-mass frame considering the process {gamma}*p {yields} p{pi}{sup 0}. Various details relating to the background subtractions, radiative corrections, and systematic errors are discussed. The usefulness of the data with regard to the measurement of the electromagnetic properties of the well-known {Delta}(1232) resonance is covered in detail. Specifically considered are the electromagnetic and scalar-magnetic ratios R{sub EM} and R{sub SM} along with the magnetic transition form factor G*{sub M}. It is found that the rapid falloff of the {Delta}(1232) contribution continues into this region of momentum transfer and that other resonances may be making important contributions in this region.

  11. High Q-factor microring resonator wrapped by the curved waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Dong-Po; Lu, Jyun-Hong; Chen, Chii-Chang; Lee, Chien-Chieh; Lin, Chu-En; Yen, Ta-Jen

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we study the performances of ring resonators of different type by analyzing the bending loss and the condition of the critical coupling. We propose that the bending loss of microring can be reduced by wrapping a concentrically curved waveguide. The difference of propagation constant between two concentrically curved waveguides can be tuned by adjusting the bus waveguide width to optimize the critical coupling. Furthermore, we propose to enlarge the difference of the propagation constant between two concentrically curved waveguides to maintain the circulating light in the ring to obtain higher quality factor. In this study, the highest quality factor that we measured is 7 × 105. PMID:25993265

  12. Photoelastic ultrasound detection using ultra-high-Q silica optical resonators.

    PubMed

    Chistiakova, Maria V; Armani, Andrea M

    2014-11-17

    As a result of its non-invasive and non-destructive nature, ultrasound imaging has found a variety of applications in a wide range of fields, including healthcare and electronics. One accurate and sensitive approach for detecting ultrasound waves is based on optical microcavities. Previous research using polymer microring resonators demonstrated detection based on the deformation of the cavity induced by the ultrasound wave. An alternative detection approach is based on the photoelastic effect in which the ultrasound wave induces a strain in the material that is converted to a refractive index change. In the present work, photoelastic-based ultrasound detection is experimentally demonstrated using ultra high quality factor silica optical microcavities. As a result of the increase in Q and in coupled power, the noise equivalent pressure is reduced, and the device response is increased. A finite element method model that includes both the acoustics and optics components of this system is developed, and the predictive accuracy of the model is determined. PMID:25402057

  13. High-Q microsphere resonators for angular velocity sensing in gyroscopes

    SciTech Connect

    An, Panlong; Zheng, Yongqiu; Yan, Shubin Xue, Chenyang Liu, Jun; Wang, Wanjun

    2015-02-09

    A resonator gyroscope based on the Sagnac effect is proposed using a core unit that is generated by water-hydrogen flame melting. The relationship between the quality factor Q and diameter D is revealed. The Q factor of the spectral lines of the microsphere cavity coupling system, which uses tapered fibers, is found to be 10{sup 6} or more before packaging with a low refractive curable ultraviolet polymer, although it drops to approximately 10{sup 5} after packaging. In addition, a rotating test platform is built, and the transmission spectrum and discriminator curves of a microsphere cavity with Q of 3.22×10{sup 6} are measured using a semiconductor laser (linewidth less than 1 kHz) and a real-time proportional-integral circuit tracking and feedback technique. Equations fitting the relation between the voltage and angular rotation rate are obtained. According to the experimentally measured parameters, the sensitivity of the microsphere-coupled system can reach 0.095{sup ∘}/s.

  14. High-Q microsphere resonators for angular velocity sensing in gyroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Panlong; Zheng, Yongqiu; Yan, Shubin; Xue, Chenyang; Wang, Wanjun; Liu, Jun

    2015-02-01

    A resonator gyroscope based on the Sagnac effect is proposed using a core unit that is generated by water-hydrogen flame melting. The relationship between the quality factor Q and diameter D is revealed. The Q factor of the spectral lines of the microsphere cavity coupling system, which uses tapered fibers, is found to be 106 or more before packaging with a low refractive curable ultraviolet polymer, although it drops to approximately 105 after packaging. In addition, a rotating test platform is built, and the transmission spectrum and discriminator curves of a microsphere cavity with Q of 3.22 ×106 are measured using a semiconductor laser (linewidth less than 1 kHz) and a real-time proportional-integral circuit tracking and feedback technique. Equations fitting the relation between the voltage and angular rotation rate are obtained. According to the experimentally measured parameters, the sensitivity of the microsphere-coupled system can reach 0.095∘/s .

  15. Excitation of a high-Q subradiant resonance mode in mirrored single-gap asymmetric split ring resonator terahertz metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Naib, Ibraheem; Singh, Ranjan; Rockstuhl, Carsten; Lederer, Falk; Delprat, Sebastien; Rocheleau, David; Chaker, Mohamed; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki; Morandotti, Roberto

    2012-08-01

    We propose a mirrored arrangement of asymmetric single split ring resonators (ASRs) that dramatically enhances the quality factor of the inductive-capacitive resonance. In a regular non-mirrored arrangement, the surface current modes are all oriented in phase. Hence, light scattered by individual ASRs interferes constructively. In contrast, the proposed configuration sustains surface currents that are oppositely oriented for neighboring ASRs, in turn leading to the cancellation of the net dipole moment accompanied by destructive interference of the scattered fields. The proposed arrangement holds promise to suppress radiation losses in terahertz, microwave and infrared plasmonic metamaterials.

  16. Microwave mode structure of superconducting metamaterial resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haozhi; Rouxinol, Francisco; Lahaye, Matthew; Plourde, Britton

    2015-03-01

    Arrays of lumped circuit elements can be used to form metamaterial resonant structures that exhibit novel behavior compared to resonators made from conventional distributed transmission lines. By engineering the parameters and configurations of the lumped elements composing the unit cell of such a metamaterial resonator, one can generate spectra with wide stop-bands as well as pass-bands with dense microwave modes. If the metamaterials are fabricated from superconducting traces, the losses can be low enough to allow for these dense modes to be resolved and potentially coupled to quantum systems, such as superconducting qubits. We will present our low-temperature measurements of a variety of superconducting metamaterial resonators and we will compare these with numerical simulations of the microwave properties.

  17. Development of a broadband reflective T-filter for voltage biasing high-Q superconducting microwave cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Yu; Rouxinol, Francisco; LaHaye, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    We present the design of a reflective stop-band filter based on quasi-lumped elements that can be utilized to introduce large dc and low-frequency voltage biases into a low-loss superconducting coplanar waveguide (CPW) cavity. Transmission measurements of the filter are seen to be in good agreement with simulations and demonstrate insertion losses greater than 20 dB in the range of 3–10 GHz. Moreover, transmission measurements of the CPW's fundamental mode demonstrate that loaded quality factors exceeding 10{sup 5} can be achieved with this design for dc voltages as large as 20 V and for the cavity operated in the single-photon regime. This makes the design suitable for use in a number of applications including qubit-coupled mechanical systems and circuit QED.

  18. Fabrication and Characterization of Superconducting Resonators.

    PubMed

    Cataldo, Giuseppe; Barrentine, Emily M; Brown, Ari D; Moseley, Samuel H; U-Yen, Kongpop; Wollack, Edward J

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting microwave resonators are of interest for a wide range of applications, including for their use as microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) for the detection of faint astrophysical signatures, as well as for quantum computing applications and materials characterization. In this paper, procedures are presented for the fabrication and characterization of thin-film superconducting microwave resonators. The fabrication methodology allows for the realization of superconducting transmission-line resonators with features on both sides of an atomically smooth single-crystal silicon dielectric. This work describes the procedure for the installation of resonator devices into a cryogenic microwave testbed and for cool-down below the superconducting transition temperature. The set-up of the cryogenic microwave testbed allows one to do careful measurements of the complex microwave transmission of these resonator devices, enabling the extraction of the properties of the superconducting lines and dielectric substrate (e.g., internal quality factors, loss and kinetic inductance fractions), which are important for device design and performance. PMID:27284966

  19. First high power pulsed tests of a dressed 325 MHz superconducting single spoke resonator at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Madrak, R.; Branlard, J.; Chase, B.; Darve, C.; Joireman, P.; Khabiboulline, T.; Mukherjee, A.; Nicol, T.; Peoples-Evans, E.; Peterson, D.; Pischalnikov, Y.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    In the recently commissioned superconducting RF cavity test facility at Fermilab (SCTF), a 325 MHz, {beta} = 0.22 superconducting single-spoke resonator (SSR1) has been tested for the first time with its input power coupler. Previously, this cavity had been tested CW with a low power, high Q{sub ext} test coupler; first as a bare cavity in the Fermilab Vertical Test Stand and then fully dressed in the SCTF. For the tests described here, the design input coupler with Q{sub ext} {approx} 10{sup 6} was used. Pulsed power was provided by a Toshiba E3740A 2.5 MW klystron.

  20. High Temperature Superconducting RF Resonators for Resonator Stabilized Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goettee, Jeffrey David

    Electromagnetic resonators made of superconducting materials show unusually sharp resonances because resistive losses are minimized. The availability of high quality thin films of YB_2CU_3 O_{7-delta} (YBCO) with superconducting transitions at 92K has aroused interest in thin film resonators at microwave frequencies for use in filters and oscillators in communication and radar systems. I have investigated the design and radio frequency (rf) properties of superconducting resonators in microstrip geometries (in which the resonant element and a single ground plane are on opposite faces of the LaAlO_3 substrates). This monolithic approach minimizes vibration sensitivity, but exposes the resonators to interactions with the packaging structure. I used niobium (Nb) superconducting 2 GHz resonators at 4.2K to investigate the geometry dependence of the quality factor Q and the high frequency phase noise S_ {y}(f). Q's in excess of 250,000 and S_{y}(1 Hz) = -227 were achieved. Desirable geometries were then fabricated in YBCO thin films produced by coevaporation or sputtering. They typically showed Q's that are a factor of four lower than the comparable Nb resonator, but retained their usefulness to substantially higher temperatures ( ~60K). One of these YBCO resonators was successfully operated to stabilize an oscillator operating at 2 GHz with overall single-sideband phase noise }(1 Hz) = -30 dBc/Hz comparable to the best available competing technologies.

  1. Networks of nonlinear superconducting transmission line resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leib, M.; Deppe, F.; Marx, A.; Gross, R.; Hartmann, M. J.

    2012-07-01

    We investigate a network of coupled superconducting transmission line resonators, each of them made nonlinear with a capacitively shunted Josephson junction coupling to the odd flux modes of the resonator. The resulting eigenmode spectrum shows anticrossings between the plasma mode of the shunted junction and the odd resonator modes. Notably, we find that the combined device can inherit the complete nonlinearity of the junction, allowing for a description as a harmonic oscillator with a Kerr nonlinearity. Using a dc SQUID instead of a single junction, the nonlinearity can be tuned between 10 kHz and 4 MHz while maintaining resonance frequencies of a few gigahertz for realistic device parameters. An array of such nonlinear resonators can be considered a scalable superconducting quantum simulator for a Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian. The device would be capable of accessing the strongly correlated regime and be particularly well suited for investigating quantum many-body dynamics of interacting particles under the influence of drive and dissipation.

  2. Creating traveling waves from standing waves from the gyrotropic paramagnetic properties of Fe{sup 3+} ions in a high-Q whispering gallery mode sapphire resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Benmessai, Karim; Tobar, Michael Edmund; Bazin, Nicholas; Bourgeois, Pierre-Yves; Kersale, Yann; Giordano, Vincent

    2009-05-01

    We report observations of the gyrotropic change in magnetic susceptibility of the Fe{sup 3+} electron paramagnetic resonance at 12.037 GHz (between spin states |1/2> and |3/2>) in sapphire with respect to the applied magnetic field. Measurements were made by observing the response of the high-Q whispering gallery doublet in a Hemex sapphire resonator cooled to 5 K. The doublets initially existed as standing waves at zero field and were transformed to traveling waves due to the gyrotropic response.

  3. Nanoscale constrictions in superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Mark David; Naether, Uta; Ciria, Miguel; Zueco, David; Luis, Fernando; Sesé, Javier; Atkinson, James; Barco, Enrique del; Sánchez-Azqueta, Carlos; Majer, Johannes

    2014-10-20

    We report on the design, fabrication, and characterization of superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators with nanoscopic constrictions. By reducing the size of the center line down to 50 nm, the radio frequency currents are concentrated and the magnetic field in its vicinity is increased. The device characteristics are only slightly modified by the constrictions, with changes in resonance frequency lower than 1% and internal quality factors of the same order of magnitude as the original ones. These devices could enable the achievement of higher couplings to small magnetic samples or even to single molecular spins and have applications in circuit quantum electrodynamics, quantum computing, and electron paramagnetic resonance.

  4. Proof-of-principle demonstration of Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting radiofrequency cavities for high Q{sub 0} applications

    SciTech Connect

    Posen, S. Liepe, M.; Hall, D. L.

    2015-02-23

    Many future particle accelerators require hundreds of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities operating with high duty factor. The large dynamic heat load of the cavities causes the cryogenic plant to make up a significant part of the overall cost of the facility. This contribution can be reduced by replacing standard niobium cavities with ones coated with a low-dissipation superconductor such as Nb{sub 3}Sn. In this paper, we present results for single cell cavities coated with Nb{sub 3}Sn at Cornell. Five coatings were carried out, showing that at 4.2 K, high Q{sub 0} out to medium fields was reproducible, resulting in an average quench field of 14 MV/m and an average 4.2 K Q{sub 0} at quench of 8 × 10{sup 9}. In each case, the peak surface magnetic field at quench was well above H{sub c1}, showing that it is not a limiting field in these cavities. The coating with the best performance had a quench field of 17 MV/m, exceeding gradient requirements for state-of-the-art high duty factor SRF accelerators. It is also shown that—taking into account the thermodynamic efficiency of the cryogenic plant—the 4.2 K Q{sub 0} values obtained meet the AC power consumption requirements of state-of-the-art high duty factor accelerators, making this a proof-of-principle demonstration for Nb{sub 3}Sn cavities in future applications.

  5. Analysis and calibration techniques for superconducting resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cataldo, Giuseppe; Wollack, Edward J.; Barrentine, Emily M.; Brown, Ari D.; Moseley, S. Harvey; U-Yen, Kongpop

    2015-01-01

    A method is proposed and experimentally explored for in-situ calibration of complex transmission data for superconducting microwave resonators. This cryogenic calibration method accounts for the instrumental transmission response between the vector network analyzer reference plane and the device calibration plane. Once calibrated, the observed resonator response is analyzed in detail by two approaches. The first, a phenomenological model based on physically realizable rational functions, enables the extraction of multiple resonance frequencies and widths for coupled resonators without explicit specification of the circuit network. In the second, an ABCD-matrix representation for the distributed transmission line circuit is used to model the observed response from the characteristic impedance and propagation constant. When used in conjunction with electromagnetic simulations, the kinetic inductance fraction can be determined with this method with an accuracy of 2%. Datasets for superconducting microstrip and coplanar-waveguide resonator devices were investigated and a recovery within 1% of the observed complex transmission amplitude was achieved with both analysis approaches. The experimental configuration used in microwave characterization of the devices and self-consistent constraints for the electromagnetic constitutive relations for parameter extraction are also presented.

  6. Analysis and calibration techniques for superconducting resonators.

    PubMed

    Cataldo, Giuseppe; Wollack, Edward J; Barrentine, Emily M; Brown, Ari D; Moseley, S Harvey; U-Yen, Kongpop

    2015-01-01

    A method is proposed and experimentally explored for in-situ calibration of complex transmission data for superconducting microwave resonators. This cryogenic calibration method accounts for the instrumental transmission response between the vector network analyzer reference plane and the device calibration plane. Once calibrated, the observed resonator response is analyzed in detail by two approaches. The first, a phenomenological model based on physically realizable rational functions, enables the extraction of multiple resonance frequencies and widths for coupled resonators without explicit specification of the circuit network. In the second, an ABCD-matrix representation for the distributed transmission line circuit is used to model the observed response from the characteristic impedance and propagation constant. When used in conjunction with electromagnetic simulations, the kinetic inductance fraction can be determined with this method with an accuracy of 2%. Datasets for superconducting microstrip and coplanar-waveguide resonator devices were investigated and a recovery within 1% of the observed complex transmission amplitude was achieved with both analysis approaches. The experimental configuration used in microwave characterization of the devices and self-consistent constraints for the electromagnetic constitutive relations for parameter extraction are also presented. PMID:25638068

  7. Superconducting Resonators with Parasitic Electromagnetic Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornibrook, John; Mitchell, Emma; Reilly, David

    2012-02-01

    Microwave losses in niobium superconducting resonators are investigated at milli-Kelvin temperatures and with low drive power. In addition to the well-known suppression of Q-factor that arises from coupling between the resonator and two-level defects in the dielectric substrate [1-4], we report strong dependence of the loaded Q-factor and resonance line-shape on the electromagnetic environment. Methods to suppress parasitic coupling between the resonator and its environment are demonstrated.[4pt] [1] Day, P.K. et al., Nature 425, 817-821 (2003).[0pt] [2] Wallraff, A. et. al., Nature 451, 162-167 (2004).[0pt] [3] Macha, P. et. al., Appl. Phys. Lett., 96, 062503 (2010).[0pt] [4] O'Connell, A.D. et. al., Appl. Phys. Lett., 92, 112903 (2008).

  8. Compact, high-Q, zero temperature coefficient, TE011 sapphire-rutile microwave distributed Bragg reflector resonators.

    PubMed

    Tobar, M E; Cros, D; Blondy, P; Ivanov, E N

    2001-05-01

    Some novel new resonator designs based on the distributed Bragg reflector are presented. The resonators implement a TE011 resonance in a cylindrical sapphire dielectric, which is confined by the addition of rutile and sapphire dielectric reflectors at the end faces. Finite element calculations are utilized to optimize the dimensions to obtain the highest Q-factors and zero frequency-temperature coefficient for a resonator operating near 0 degree C. We show that a Q-factor of 70,000 and 65,000 can be achieved with and without the condition of zero frequency-temperature coefficients, respectively. PMID:11381707

  9. Invited Article: Dielectric material characterization techniques and designs of high-Q resonators for applications from micro to millimeter-waves frequencies applicable at room and cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Floch, Jean-Michel; Fan, Y.; Humbert, Georges; Shan, Qingxiao; Férachou, Denis; Bara-Maillet, Romain; Aubourg, Michel; Hartnett, John G.; Madrangeas, Valerie; Cros, Dominique; Blondy, Jean-Marc; Krupka, Jerzy; Tobar, Michael E.

    2014-03-01

    Dielectric resonators are key elements in many applications in micro to millimeter wave circuits, including ultra-narrow band filters and frequency-determining components for precision frequency synthesis. Distributed-layered and bulk low-loss crystalline and polycrystalline dielectric structures have become very important for building these devices. Proper design requires careful electromagnetic characterization of low-loss material properties. This includes exact simulation with precision numerical software and precise measurements of resonant modes. For example, we have developed the Whispering Gallery mode technique for microwave applications, which has now become the standard for characterizing low-loss structures. This paper will give some of the most common characterization techniques used in the micro to millimeter wave regime at room and cryogenic temperatures for designing high-Q dielectric loaded cavities.

  10. Pulsed-laser excitation of acoustic modes in open high-Q photoacoustic resonators for trace gas monitoring: results for C2H4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Christian; Winkler, Andreas; Hess, Peter; Miklós, András; Bozóki, Zoltán; Sneider, János

    1995-06-01

    The pulsed excitation of acoustic resonances was studied with a continuously monitoring photoacoustic detector system. Acoustic waves were generated in C2H4/N 2 gas mixtures by light absorption of the pulses from a transversely excited atmospheric CO2 laser. The photoacoustic part consisted of high-Q cylindrical resonators (Q factor 820 for the first radial mode in N2) and two adjoining variable acoustic filter systems. The time-resolved signal was Fourier transformed to a frequency spectrum of high resolution. For the first radial mode a Lorentzian profile was fitted to the measured data. The outside noise suppression and the signal-to-noise ratio were investigated in a normal laboratory environment in the flow-through mode. The acoustic and electric filter system combined with the

  11. Parametric resonance in tunable superconducting cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wustmann, Waltraut; Shumeiko, Vitaly

    2013-05-01

    We develop a theory of parametric resonance in tunable superconducting cavities. The nonlinearity introduced by the superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) attached to the cavity and damping due to connection of the cavity to a transmission line are taken into consideration. We study in detail the nonlinear classical dynamics of the cavity field below and above the parametric threshold for the degenerate parametric resonance, featuring regimes of multistability and parametric radiation. We investigate the phase-sensitive amplification of external signals on resonance, as well as amplification of detuned signals, and relate the amplifier performance to that of linear parametric amplifiers. We also discuss applications of the device for dispersive qubit readout. Beyond the classical response of the cavity, we investigate small quantum fluctuations around the amplified classical signals. We evaluate the noise power spectrum both for the internal field in the cavity and the output field. Other quantum-statistical properties of the noise are addressed such as squeezing spectra, second-order coherence, and two-mode entanglement.

  12. Ultra-high frequency, high Q/volume micromechanical resonators in a planar AlN phononic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi Baboly, M.; Alaie, S.; Reinke, C. M.; El-Kady, I.; Leseman, Z. C.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the first design and experimental demonstration of an ultrahigh frequency complete phononic crystal (PnC) bandgap aluminum nitride (AlN)/air structure operating in the GHz range. A complete phononic bandgap of this design is used to efficiently and simultaneously confine elastic vibrations in a resonator. The PnC structure is fabricated by etching a square array of air holes in an AlN slab. The fabricated PnC resonator resonates at 1.117 GHz, which corresponds to an out-of-plane mode. The measured bandgap and resonance frequencies are in very good agreement with the eigen-frequency and frequency-domain finite element analyses. As a result, a quality factor/volume of 7.6 × 1017/m3 for the confined resonance mode was obtained that is the largest value reported for this type of PnC resonator to date. These results are an important step forward in achieving possible applications of PnCs for RF communication and signal processing with smaller dimensions.

  13. Evaluation and optimization of quartz resonant-frequency retuned fork force sensors with high Q factors, and the associated electric circuits, for non-contact atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ooe, Hiroaki; Fujii, Mikihiro; Tomitori, Masahiko; Arai, Toyoko

    2016-02-01

    High-Q factor retuned fork (RTF) force sensors made from quartz tuning forks, and the electric circuits for the sensors, were evaluated and optimized to improve the performance of non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) performed under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. To exploit the high Q factor of the RTF sensor, the oscillation of the RTF sensor was excited at its resonant frequency, using a stray capacitance compensation circuit to cancel the excitation signal leaked through the stray capacitor of the sensor. To improve the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio in the detected signal, a small capacitor was inserted before the input of an operational (OP) amplifier placed in an UHV chamber, which reduced the output noise from the amplifier. A low-noise, wideband OP amplifier produced a superior S/N ratio, compared with a precision OP amplifier. The thermal vibrational density spectra of the RTF sensors were evaluated using the circuit. The RTF sensor with an effective spring constant value as low as 1000 N/m provided a lower minimum detection limit for force differentiation. A nc-AFM image of a Si(111)-7 × 7 surface was produced with atomic resolution using the RTF sensor in a constant frequency shift mode; tunneling current and energy dissipation images with atomic resolution were also simultaneously produced. The high-Q factor RTF sensor showed potential for the high sensitivity of energy dissipation as small as 1 meV/cycle and the high-resolution analysis of non-conservative force interactions. PMID:26931855

  14. Evaluation and optimization of quartz resonant-frequency retuned fork force sensors with high Q factors, and the associated electric circuits, for non-contact atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooe, Hiroaki; Fujii, Mikihiro; Tomitori, Masahiko; Arai, Toyoko

    2016-02-01

    High-Q factor retuned fork (RTF) force sensors made from quartz tuning forks, and the electric circuits for the sensors, were evaluated and optimized to improve the performance of non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) performed under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. To exploit the high Q factor of the RTF sensor, the oscillation of the RTF sensor was excited at its resonant frequency, using a stray capacitance compensation circuit to cancel the excitation signal leaked through the stray capacitor of the sensor. To improve the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio in the detected signal, a small capacitor was inserted before the input of an operational (OP) amplifier placed in an UHV chamber, which reduced the output noise from the amplifier. A low-noise, wideband OP amplifier produced a superior S/N ratio, compared with a precision OP amplifier. The thermal vibrational density spectra of the RTF sensors were evaluated using the circuit. The RTF sensor with an effective spring constant value as low as 1000 N/m provided a lower minimum detection limit for force differentiation. A nc-AFM image of a Si(111)-7 × 7 surface was produced with atomic resolution using the RTF sensor in a constant frequency shift mode; tunneling current and energy dissipation images with atomic resolution were also simultaneously produced. The high-Q factor RTF sensor showed potential for the high sensitivity of energy dissipation as small as 1 meV/cycle and the high-resolution analysis of non-conservative force interactions.

  15. Research & Developments for Millimeter-Wave Dielectric Forsterite with Low Dielectric Constant, High Q, and Zero Temperature Coefficient of Resonant Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunooka, Tsutomu; Ando, Minato; Suzuki, Sadahiko; Yasufuku, Yoshitoyo; Ohsato, Hitoshi

    2013-09-01

    Forsterite Mg2SiO4 is a candidate for millimeter-wave dielectrics because of its high Q and low dielectric constant ɛr. Commercial forsterite has been improved with a high Q of 240,000 GHz using high-purity and fine raw materials, and the temperature coefficient of resonant frequency (TCf) can also be adjusted to near-zero ppm/°C by adding 24 wt % rutile compared with that in a previous study. In this study, the TCf, TCɛ, and ɛr of forsterite ceramics with rutile added are studied for the tuning conditions. Zero ppm/°C TCf of the forsterite with 30 and 25 wt % rutile added was achieved at 1200 °C for 2.5 and 2.25 h, respectively. The ɛr values of the near-zero TCf forsterite with 30 and 25 wt % rutile added are 11.3 and 10.2, respectively.

  16. Encapsulated high frequency (235 kHz), high-Q (100 k) disk resonator gyroscope with electrostatic parametric pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, C. H.; Nitzan, S.; Ng, E. J.; Hong, V. A.; Yang, Y.; Kimbrell, T.; Horsley, D. A.; Kenny, T. W.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we explore the effects of electrostatic parametric amplification on a high quality factor (Q > 100 000) encapsulated disk resonator gyroscope (DRG), fabricated in <100> silicon. The DRG was operated in the n = 2 degenerate wineglass mode at 235 kHz, and electrostatically tuned so that the frequency split between the two degenerate modes was less than 100 mHz. A parametric pump at twice the resonant frequency is applied to the sense axis of the DRG, resulting in a maximum scale factor of 156.6 μV/(°/s), an 8.8× improvement over the non-amplified performance. When operated with a parametric gain of 5.4, a minimum angle random walk of 0.034°/√h and bias instability of 1.15°/h are achieved, representing an improvement by a factor of 4.3× and 1.5×, respectively.

  17. Simulation of coupled bunch mode growth driven by a high-Q resonator: A transient response approach

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, S.; Bogacz, S.A.

    1989-03-01

    In this article the use of a longitudinal phase-space tracking code, ESME, to simulate the growth of a coupled-bunch instability in the Fermilab Booster is examined. A description of the calculation of the resonant response is given, and results are presented for the growth of the coupled bunch instability in a ring in which all of the rf buckets are equally populated and in one in which several consecutive buckets are empty. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Diamond nanoelectromechanical resonators: Dissipation and superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imboden, Matthias

    Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) have become a viable commercial technology and are becoming more and more prevalent in research applications. Through miniaturization, the mechanical response to external sources becomes ever more sensitive. This transduction, coupled to an electrical readout circuit, results in unprecedented sensitivity. This thesis examines dissipation in diamond NEMS resonators in the MHz to GHz range. NCD (Nano-crystalline diamond) has extraordinary properties that make it an intriguing material to study. To begin with, the mechanical hardness allows for a boost in resonance frequency, but beyond that, boron-doped diamond also shows extraordinary electrical behavior. Although scaling benefits speed and sensitivity, dissipation increases dramatically with miniaturization, negating some of the gains in sensitivity. The dissipative mechanisms at play in the MHz range are identified at high temperatures. It is found that extrinsic dissipation mechanisms, mainly circuit and clamping losses, can limit the quality factor (inverse of the dissipation). Furthermore, due to the high surface-to-volume ratio of NEMS, surface defects become significant at the nano-scale. For the first time, quantum dissipation due to assisted phonon tunneling of two level systems is observed in diamond NEMS resonators at millikelvin temperatures. Through scaling, it is shown that the low temperature behavior is universal for a broad range of MHz resonators, including silicon and gallium arsenide, as well as graphene and carbon-nanotubes. Beyond the mechanical response, the superconducting properties of highly boron-doped diamond (BDD) are studied. It is found that the critical temperature of 3.3 K for the thin-film is maintained at the nano-scale. The high critical field, on the order of 3 T for thin-films, is strongly suppressed, already at the micro-scale. The zero resistance state is compromised with fields as low as 0.1 T for submicron wide constrictions. It is known

  19. Nonlinearly Coupled Superconducting Lumped Element Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collodo, Michele C.; Potočnik, Anton; Rubio Abadal, Antonio; Mondal, Mintu; Oppliger, Markus; Wallraff, Andreas

    We study SQUID-mediated tunable coupling between two superconducting on-chip resonators in the microwave frequency range. In this circuit QED implementation, we employ lumped-element type resonators, which consist of Nb thin film structured into interdigitated finger shunt capacitors and meander inductors. A SQUID, functioning as flux dependent and intrinsically nonlinear inductor, is placed as a coupling element together with an interdigitated capacitor between the two resonators (cf. A. Baust et al., Phys Rev. B 91 014515 (2015)). We perform a spectroscopic measurement in a dilution refrigerator and find the linear photon hopping rate between the resonators to be widely tunable as well as suppressible for an appropriate choice of parameters, which is made possible due to the interplay of inductively and capacitively mediated coupling. Vanishing linear coupling promotes nonlinear effects ranging from onsite- to cross-Kerr interaction. A dominating cross-Kerr interaction related to this configuration is notable, as it induces a unique quantum state. In the course of analog quantum simulations, such elementary building blocks can serve as a precursor for more complex geometries and thus pave the way to a number of novel quantum phases of light

  20. Single-crystal sapphire resonator at millikelvin temperatures: Observation of thermal bistability in high- Q factor whispering gallery modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creedon, Daniel L.; Tobar, Michael E.; Le Floch, Jean-Michel; Reshitnyk, Yarema; Duty, Timothy

    2010-09-01

    Resonance modes in single crystal sapphire (α-Al2O3) exhibit extremely high electrical and mechanical Q factors ( ≈109 at 4 K), which are important characteristics for electromechanical experiments at the quantum limit. We report the cool down of a bulk sapphire sample below superfluid liquid-helium temperature (1.6 K) to as low as 25 mK. The electromagnetic properties were characterized at microwave frequencies, and we report the observation of electromagnetically induced thermal bistability in whispering gallery modes due to the material T3 dependence on thermal conductivity and the ultralow dielectric loss tangent. We identify “magic temperatures” between 80 and 2100 mK, the lowest ever measured, at which the onset of bistability is suppressed and the frequency-temperature dependence is annulled. These phenomena at low temperatures make sapphire suitable for quantum metrology and ultrastable clock applications, including the possible realization of the quantum-limited sapphire clock.

  1. Single-crystal sapphire resonator at millikelvin temperatures: Observation of thermal bistability in high-Q factor whispering gallery modes

    SciTech Connect

    Creedon, Daniel L.; Tobar, Michael E.; Le Floch, Jean-Michel; Reshitnyk, Yarema; Duty, Timothy

    2010-09-01

    Resonance modes in single crystal sapphire ({alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) exhibit extremely high electrical and mechanical Q factors ({approx_equal}10{sup 9} at 4 K), which are important characteristics for electromechanical experiments at the quantum limit. We report the cool down of a bulk sapphire sample below superfluid liquid-helium temperature (1.6 K) to as low as 25 mK. The electromagnetic properties were characterized at microwave frequencies, and we report the observation of electromagnetically induced thermal bistability in whispering gallery modes due to the material T{sup 3} dependence on thermal conductivity and the ultralow dielectric loss tangent. We identify ''magic temperatures'' between 80 and 2100 mK, the lowest ever measured, at which the onset of bistability is suppressed and the frequency-temperature dependence is annulled. These phenomena at low temperatures make sapphire suitable for quantum metrology and ultrastable clock applications, including the possible realization of the quantum-limited sapphire clock.

  2. Frequency Comb Generation in Superconducting Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappas, David; Erickson, Robert; Vissers, Michael; Ku, Hsiang-Sheng

    2015-03-01

    We have generated frequency combs spanning 0.5 to 20 GHz in superconducting λ = 2 resonators at T =3 K. Thin films of niobium-titanium nitride enabled this development due to their low loss, high nonlinearity, low frequency dispersion, and high critical temperature. The combs nucleate as sidebands around multiples of the pump frequency. Selection rules for the allowed frequency emission are calculated using perturbation theory, and the measured spectrum is shown to agree with the theory. Sideband spacing is measured to be accurate to 1 part in 108 The sidebands coalesce into a continuous comb structure observed to cover at least several frequency octaves. Generation of combs in this frequency range allows for unprecedented analysis of this non-linear phenomena in the time domain. We acknowledge DARPA and the NIST Quantum Information program.

  3. A High-Q Resonant Pressure Microsensor with Through-Glass Electrical Interconnections Based on Wafer-Level MEMS Vacuum Packaging

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zhenyu; Chen, Deyong; Wang, Junbo; Li, Yinan; Chen, Jian

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a high-Q resonant pressure microsensor with through-glass electrical interconnections based on wafer-level MEMS vacuum packaging. An approach to maintaining high-vacuum conditions by integrating the MEMS fabrication process with getter material preparation is presented in this paper. In this device, the pressure under measurement causes a deflection of a pressure-sensitive silicon square diaphragm, which is further translated to stress build up in “H” type doubly-clamped micro resonant beams, leading to a resonance frequency shift. The device geometries were optimized using FEM simulation and a 4-inch SOI wafer was used for device fabrication, which required only three photolithographic steps. In the device fabrication, a non-evaporable metal thin film as the getter material was sputtered on a Pyrex 7740 glass wafer, which was then anodically bonded to the patterned SOI wafer for vacuum packaging. Through-glass via holes predefined in the glass wafer functioned as the electrical interconnections between the patterned SOI wafer and the surrounding electrical components. Experimental results recorded that the Q-factor of the resonant beam was beyond 22,000, with a differential sensitivity of 89.86 Hz/kPa, a device resolution of 10 Pa and a nonlinearity of 0.02% F.S with the pressure varying from 50 kPa to 100 kPa. In addition, the temperature drift coefficient was less than −0.01% F.S/°C in the range of −40 °C to 70 °C, the long-term stability error was quantified as 0.01% F.S over a 5-month period and the accuracy of the microsensor was better than 0.01% F.S. PMID:25521385

  4. Superconducting resonators with trapped vortices under direct injection of quasiparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nsanzineza, Ibrahim; Patel, Umesh; Dodge, K. R.; McDermott, R. F.; Plourde, B. L. T.

    Nonequilibrium quasiparticles and trapped magnetic flux vortices can significantly impact the performance of superconducting microwave resonant circuits and qubits at millikelvin temperatures. Quasiparticles result in excess loss, reducing resonator quality factors and qubit lifetimes. Vortices trapped near regions of large microwave currents also contribute excess loss. However, vortices located in current-free areas in the resonator or in the ground plane of a device can actually trap quasiparticles and lead to a reduction in the quasiparticle loss. We will describe experiments involving the controlled trapping of vortices in superconducting resonators with direct injection of quasiparticles using Normal metal-Insulator-Superconductor (NIS)-tunnel junctions.

  5. YBCO superconducting ring resonators at millimeter-wave frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chorey, Christopher M.; Kong, Keon-Shik; Bhasin, Kul B.; Warner, J. D.; Itoh, Tatsuo

    1991-01-01

    Microstrip ring resonators operating at 35 GHz were fabricated from laser ablated YBCO films deposited on lanthanum aluminate substrates. They were measured over a range of temperatures and their performances compared to identical resonators made of evaporated gold. Below 60 Kelvin the superconducting strip performed better than the gold, reaching an unloaded Q approximately 1.5 times that of gold at 25 K. A shift in the resonant frequency follows the form predicted by the London equations. The Phenomenological Loss Equivalence Method is applied to the ring resonator and the theoretically calculated Q values are compared to the experimental results.

  6. Resonance at the Rabi frequency in a superconducting flux qubit

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, Ya. S.; Il'ichev, E.; Oelsner, G.; Shevchenko, S. N.

    2014-10-15

    We analyze a system composed of a superconducting flux qubit coupled to a transmission-line resonator driven by two signals with frequencies close to the resonator's harmonics. The first strong signal is used for exciting the system to a high energetic state while a second weak signal is applied for probing effective eigenstates of the system. In the framework of doubly dressed states we showed the possibility of amplification and attenuation of the probe signal by direct transitions at the Rabi frequency. We present a brief review of theoretical and experimental works where a direct resonance at Rabi frequency have been investigated in superconducting flux qubits. The interaction of the qubit with photons of two harmonics has prospects to be used as a quantum amplifier (microwave laser) or an attenuator.

  7. Detecting elementary excitations of a quantum simulator with superconducting resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Lianghui; You, J. Q.; Tian, Lin

    2014-03-01

    Analog quantum simulators can emulate various many-body systems and can be used to study novel quantum correlations in such systems. One essential question in quantum simulation is how to detect the properties of the simulated many-body system, such as ground state property and spectrum of elementary excitations. Here we present a circuit QED approach for detecting the excitation spectrum of a quantum simulator by measuring the correlation spectrum of a superconducting resonator. For illustration, we apply this approach to a simulator for the transverse field Ising model coupling to a coplanar waveguide resonator. The simulator can be implemented with an array of superconducting flux qubits. We show that the resonance peaks in the correlation spectrum reveal exactly the frequencies of the excitations. The project was supported by NSF-0956064 and NSF-0916303.

  8. Unconventional superconducting quantum interference in a suspended graphene resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Monica; Nurgaliev, Daniyar; Akhmerov, Anton; Yacoby, Amir

    2014-03-01

    In a coherent electron cavity, quantum interference of electron waves replaces classical diffusion as a key feature of electronic transport. Here we report novel behavior that emerges by coupling superconducting reservoirs to a Fabry-Perot resonator in bilayer graphene. In this device, a pair of superconducting electrodes is coupled to a suspended graphene membrane and defines a ballistic cavity between the two graphene-electrode interfaces. Tuning the Fermi wavelength in the cavity with a gate electrode moves the system on and off resonance, thus inducing an oscillatory critical current whose period satisfies the Fabry-Perot interference conditions. By varying the magnetic flux through the junction, we explore the rich interplay between superconducting quantum interference and resonant cavity states and demonstrate a non-trivial correspondence between the supercurrent and normal state resistance. To describe our findings, we use a numerical model based on the tight-binding approach and Landauer-Buttiker scattering formalism. These results constitute a departure from the conventional Josephson effect in graphene and motivate exploration of new effects at the intersection of superconductivity and optics-like phenomena.

  9. Two-resonator circuit quantum electrodynamics: A superconducting quantum switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariantoni, Matteo; Deppe, Frank; Marx, A.; Gross, R.; Wilhelm, F. K.; Solano, E.

    2008-09-01

    We introduce a systematic formalism for two-resonator circuit QED, where two on-chip microwave resonators are simultaneously coupled to one superconducting qubit. Within this framework, we demonstrate that the qubit can function as a quantum switch between the two resonators, which are assumed to be originally independent. In this three-circuit network, the qubit mediates a geometric second-order circuit interaction between the otherwise decoupled resonators. In the dispersive regime, it also gives rise to a dynamic second-order perturbative interaction. The geometric and dynamic coupling strengths can be tuned to be equal, thus permitting to switch on and off the interaction between the two resonators via a qubit population inversion or a shifting of the qubit operation point. We also show that our quantum switch represents a flexible architecture for the manipulation and generation of nonclassical microwave field states as well as the creation of controlled multipartite entanglement in circuit QED. In addition, we clarify the role played by the geometric interaction, which constitutes a fundamental property characteristic of superconducting quantum circuits without a counterpart in quantum-optical systems. We develop a detailed theory of the geometric second-order coupling by means of circuit transformations for superconducting charge and flux qubits. Furthermore, we show the robustness of the quantum switch operation with respect to decoherence mechanisms. Finally, we propose a realistic design for a two-resonator circuit QED setup based on a flux qubit and estimate all the related parameters. In this manner, we show that this setup can be used to implement a superconducting quantum switch with available technology.

  10. Characterization of Fabrication Defects in Superconducting Epitaxial Aluminum Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siwak, Nathan; He, Lei; Hackley, Justin; Richardson, Christopher

    2015-03-01

    A continuing challenge in superconducting quantum computing is the creation of low-loss superconducting aluminum resonators. Significant processing difficulties lie in the removal of residues resulting from conventional Cl-based plasma etching without damaging the aluminum patterns. Correlations of resist residues and corrosion pit defect densities with cleaning process variations are completed using charge contrast-enhanced imaging in a scanning electron microscope. These quantified defects provide insight into the effectiveness of specific device processing steps in reducing these artifacts which can introduce additional loss mechanisms and limit potentially high performance devices. Currently at Northrop Grumman Corp.

  11. An analysis method for transmission measurements of superconducting resonators with applications to quantum-regime dielectric-loss measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Chunqing; Otto, Martin; Lupascu, Adrian

    2013-08-01

    Superconducting resonators provide a convenient way to measure loss tangents of various dielectrics at low temperature. For the purpose of examining the microscopic loss mechanisms in dielectrics, precise measurements of the internal quality factor at different values of energy stored in the resonators are required. Here, we present a consistent method to analyze a LC superconducting resonator coupled to a transmission line. We first derive an approximate expression for the transmission S-parameter S21(ω), with ω the excitation frequency, based on a complete circuit model. In the weak coupling limit, we show that the internal quality factor is reliably determined by fitting the approximate form of S21(ω). Since the voltage V of the capacitor of the LC circuit is required to determine the energy stored in the resonator, we next calculate the relation between V and the forward propagating wave voltage Vin+, with the latter being the parameter controlled in experiments. Due to the dependence of the quality factor on voltage, V is not simply proportional to Vin+. We find a self-consistent way to determine the relation between V and Vin+, which employs only the fitting parameters for S21(ω) and a linear scaling factor. We then examine the resonator transmission in the cases of port reflection and impedance mismatch. We find that resonator transmission asymmetry is primarily due to the reflection from discontinuity in transmission lines. We show that our analysis method to extract the internal quality factor is robust in the non-ideal cases above. Finally, we show that the analysis method used for the LC resonator can be generalized to arbitrary weakly coupled lumped and distributed resonators. The generalization uses a systematic approximation on the response function based on the pole and zero which are closest to the resonance frequency. This Closest Pole and Zero Method is a valuable tool for analyzing physical measurements of high-Q resonators.

  12. Quantum logical gates with four-level superconducting quantum interference devices coupled to a superconducting resonator

    SciTech Connect

    He Xiaoling; Luo Junyan; Yang Chuiping; Li Sheng; Han Siyuan

    2010-08-15

    We propose a way for realizing a two-qubit controlled phase gate with superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) coupled to a superconducting resonator. In this proposal, the two lowest levels of each SQUID serve as the logical states and two intermediate levels of each SQUID are used for the gate realization. We show that neither adjustment of SQUID level spacings during the gate operation nor uniformity in SQUID parameters is required by this proposal. In addition, this proposal does not require the adiabatic passage or a second-order detuning and thus the gate is much faster.

  13. Observation of superconductivity in hydrogen sulfide from nuclear resonant scattering.

    PubMed

    Troyan, Ivan; Gavriliuk, Alexander; Rüffer, Rudolf; Chumakov, Alexander; Mironovich, Anna; Lyubutin, Igor; Perekalin, Dmitry; Drozdov, Alexander P; Eremets, Mikhail I

    2016-03-18

    High-temperature superconductivity remains a focus of experimental and theoretical research. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been reported to be superconducting at high pressures and with a high transition temperature. We report on the direct observation of the expulsion of the magnetic field in H2S compressed to 153 gigapascals. A thin (119)Sn film placed inside the H2S sample was used as a sensor of the magnetic field. The magnetic field on the (119)Sn sensor was monitored by nuclear resonance scattering of synchrotron radiation. Our results demonstrate that an external static magnetic field of about 0.7 tesla is expelled from the volume of (119)Sn foil as a result of the shielding by the H2S sample at temperatures between 4.7 K and approximately 140 K, revealing a superconducting state of H2S. PMID:26989248

  14. A bulk niobium superconducting quarter wave resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I. ); Chiaveri, E. ); Elkonin, B.V. ); Facco, A.; Sokolowski, J.S. . Lab. Nazionale di Legnaro)

    1990-01-01

    A bath-cooled all-niobium 160 MHz quarter wave resonator prototype was constructed and tested. The objective of this research has been the development of a high performance accelerating element with {beta}{sub opt} {approx equal} 0.11 for the ALPI linac at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro. The design of this resonator was based upon a previous 150 MHz model, with minor changes due to the different frequency and to modified welding procedure. An accelerating field of 5 MV/m was achieved at a power dissipation of 10 W and the low power Q was 2.4 {times} 10{sup 8}. The resonator could dissipate 70 W of power without thermal breakdown. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Superconducting Microwave Resonator Arrays for Submillimeter/Far-Infrared Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noroozian, Omid

    Superconducting microwave resonators have the potential to revolutionize submillimeter and far-infrared astronomy, and with it our understanding of the universe. The field of low-temperature detector technology has reached a point where extremely sensitive devices like transition-edge sensors are now capable of detecting radiation limited by the background noise of the universe. However, the size of these detector arrays are limited to only a few thousand pixels. This is because of the cost and complexity of fabricating large-scale arrays of these detectors that can reach up to 10 lithographic levels on chip, and the complicated SQUID-based multiplexing circuitry and wiring for readout of each detector. In order to make substantial progress, next-generation ground-based telescopes such as CCAT or future space telescopes require focal planes with large-scale detector arrays of 104--10 6 pixels. Arrays using microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKID) are a potential solution. These arrays can be easily made with a single layer of superconducting metal film deposited on a silicon substrate and pattered using conventional optical lithography. Furthermore, MKIDs are inherently multiplexable in the frequency domain, allowing ˜ 10 3 detectors to be read out using a single coaxial transmission line and cryogenic amplifier, drastically reducing cost and complexity. An MKID uses the change in the microwave surface impedance of a superconducting thin-film microresonator to detect photons. Absorption of photons in the superconductor breaks Cooper pairs into quasiparticles, changing the complex surface impedance, which results in a perturbation of resonator frequency and quality factor. For excitation and readout, the resonator is weakly coupled to a transmission line. The complex amplitude of a microwave probe signal tuned on-resonance and transmitted on the feedline past the resonator is perturbed as photons are absorbed in the superconductor. The perturbation can be

  16. Long-term operating experience for the ATLAS superconducting resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, R.; Zinkann, G.

    1999-12-21

    Portions of the ATLAS accelerator have been operating now for over 21 years. The facility has accumulated several million resonator-hours of operation at this point and has demonstrated the long-term reliability of RF superconductivity. The overall operating performance of the ATLAS facility has established a level of beam quality, flexibility, and reliability not previously achieved with heavy-ion accelerator facilities. The actual operating experience and maintenance history of ATLAS are presented for ATLAS resonators and associated electronics systems. Solutions to problems that appeared in early operation as well as current problems needing further development are discussed.

  17. Superconducting microstrip resonator for pulsed ESR of thin films.

    PubMed

    Benningshof, O W B; Mohebbi, H R; Taminiau, I A J; Miao, G X; Cory, D G

    2013-05-01

    This article describes a superconducting microstrip resonator operating at 9.5 GHz (X-band) that is specially designed for pulsed ESR on thin films. A novel configuration consisting of an array of half-wave length microstrip transmission lines generates a uniform magnetic field over a 2-D region of 100×1000 μm(2) with field homogeneity better than 5×10(-2). Using the device, we demonstrate strong coupling of the resonator to an electron spin ensemble and pulsed ESR on Si:P. PMID:23454577

  18. Observation of the fundamental Nyquist noise limit in an ultra-high Q-factor cryogenic bulk acoustic wave cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Goryachev, Maxim Ivanov, Eugene N.; Tobar, Michael E.; Kann, Frank van; Galliou, Serge

    2014-10-13

    Thermal Nyquist noise fluctuations of high-Q bulk acoustic wave cavities have been observed at cryogenic temperatures with a DC superconducting quantum interference device amplifier. High Q modes with bandwidths of few tens of milliHz produce thermal fluctuations with a signal-to-noise ratio of up to 23 dB. The estimated effective temperature from the Nyquist noise is in good agreement with the physical temperature of the device, confirming the validity of the equivalent circuit model and the non-existence of any excess resonator self-noise. The measurements also confirm that the quality factor remains extremely high (Q > 10{sup 8} at low order overtones) for very weak (thermal) system motion at low temperatures, when compared to values measured with relatively strong external excitation. This result represents an enabling step towards operating such a high-Q acoustic device at the standard quantum limit.

  19. Local comb generation in nonlinear TiN superconducting resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappas, David; Vissers, Michael R.; Erickson, Robert; Sandberg, Martin; Gao, Jiansong

    2014-03-01

    Low loss superconducting nonlinear resonators are extensively used for qubit readout as well as photon detectors. These devices are typically capacitively coupled to a launch line. When driven at high power, a shift in resonant frequency is observed due to the kinetic inductance of the TiN superconductor. At higher power, the resonant frequency mixes with the drive tone to produce a series of peaks that are observed to be equally spaced at the detuning frequency, i.e. a ``local comb.'' The full circuit analysis of this system is derived. The renormalized resonant frequency is obtained and the local comb is derived from a first order successive approximation. Work suppported by DARPA, ARO, and NIST.

  20. Superconducting Magnets for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feenan, Peter

    2000-03-01

    MRI is now a well established diagnostic technique in medicine. The richness of information provided by magnetic resonance gives rise to a variety of techniques which in turn leads to a variety of magnet designs. Magnet designers must consider suitable superconduting materials for the magnet, but need also to consider the overall fomat of the magnet to maximise patient comfort, access for clinicians and convenience of use - in some examples magnets are destined for use within the operating theatre and special considerations are required for this. Magnet types include; (1) low-field general purpose imagers, (2) extremity imaging, (3) open magnets with exellent all-round access often employing iron or permanent magnetic materials, (4) high-field magnets, and (5) very high-field (7 Tesla and more) magnets for spectroscopy and functional imaging research. Examples of these magnet varieties will be shown and some of the design challenges discussed.

  1. Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Yung K.

    Many potential high-temperature superconductivity (HTS) military applications have been demonstrated by low-temperature superconductivity systems; they encompass high efficiency electric drives for naval vessels, airborne electric generators, energy storage systems for directed-energy weapons, electromechanical launchers, magnetic and electromagnetic shields, and cavity resonators for microwave and mm-wave generation. Further HST applications in militarily relevant fields include EM sensors, IR focal plane arrays, SQUIDs, magnetic gradiometers, high-power sonar sources, and superconducting antennas and inertial navigation systems. The development of SQUID sensors will furnish novel magnetic anomaly detection methods for ASW.

  2. High-Q Hybrid Plasmon-Photon Modes in a Bottle Resonator Realized with a Silver-Coated Glass Fiber with a Varying Diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rottler, Andreas; Harland, Malte; Bröll, Markus; Klingbeil, Matthias; Ehlermann, Jens; Mendach, Stefan

    2013-12-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that hybrid plasmon-photon modes exist in a silver-coated glass bottle resonator. The bottle resonator is realized in a glass fiber with a smoothly varying diameter, which is subsequently coated with a rhodamine 800-dye doped acryl-glass layer and a 30 nm thick silver layer. We show by means of photoluminescence experiments supported by electromagnetic simulations that the rhodamine 800 photoluminescence excites hybrid plasmon-photon modes in such a bottle resonator, which provide a plasmon-type field enhancement at the outer silver surface and exhibit quality factors as high as 1000.

  3. High-Q hybrid plasmon-photon modes in a bottle resonator realized with a silver-coated glass fiber with a varying diameter.

    PubMed

    Rottler, Andreas; Harland, Malte; Bröll, Markus; Klingbeil, Matthias; Ehlermann, Jens; Mendach, Stefan

    2013-12-20

    We experimentally demonstrate that hybrid plasmon-photon modes exist in a silver-coated glass bottle resonator. The bottle resonator is realized in a glass fiber with a smoothly varying diameter, which is subsequently coated with a rhodamine 800-dye doped acryl-glass layer and a 30 nm thick silver layer. We show by means of photoluminescence experiments supported by electromagnetic simulations that the rhodamine 800 photoluminescence excites hybrid plasmon-photon modes in such a bottle resonator, which provide a plasmon-type field enhancement at the outer silver surface and exhibit quality factors as high as 1000. PMID:24483745

  4. Dynamically tuned high-Q AC-dipole implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Oddo, P.; Bai, M.; Dawson, W.C.; Meng, W.; Mernick, K.; Pai, C.; Roser, T.; Russo, T.

    2010-05-02

    AC-dipole magnets are typically implemented as a parallel LC resonant circuit. To maximize efficiency, it's beneficial to operate at a high Q. This, however, limits the magnet to a narrow frequency range. Current designs therefore operate at a low Q to provide a wider bandwidth at the cost of efficiency. Dynamically tuning a high Q resonant circuit tries to maintain a high efficiency while providing a wide frequency range. The results of ongoing efforts at BNL to implement dynamically tuned high-Q AC dipoles will be presented.

  5. Loss mechanisms in superconducting thin film microwave resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, Jan; Deppe, Frank; Haeberlein, Max; Wulschner, Friedrich; Zollitsch, Christoph W.; Meier, Sebastian; Fischer, Michael; Eder, Peter; Xie, Edwar; Fedorov, Kirill G.; Menzel, Edwin P.; Marx, Achim; Gross, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    We present a systematic analysis of the internal losses of superconducting coplanar waveguide microwave resonators based on niobium thin films on silicon substrates. In particular, we investigate losses introduced by Nb/Al interfaces in the center conductor, which is important for experiments where Al based Josephson junctions are integrated into Nb based circuits. We find that these interfaces can be a strong source for two-level state (TLS) losses, when the interfaces are not positioned at current nodes of the resonator. In addition to TLS losses, for resonators including Al, quasiparticle losses become relevant above 200 mK. Finally, we investigate how losses generated by eddy currents in conductive material on the backside of the substrate can be minimized by using thick enough substrates or metals with high conductivity on the substrate backside.

  6. Coupling a Transmon Qubit to a Superconducting Metamaterial Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haozhi; Hutchings, M.; Indrajeet, Sager; Rouxinol, Francisco; Lahaye, Matthew; Plourde, B. L. T.; Taketani, Bruno G.; Wilhelm, Frank K.

    Arrays of lumped circuit elements can be used to form metamaterial resonant structures that exhibit significantly different mode structures compared to resonators made from conventional distributed transmission lines. In particular, it is possible to produce a high density of modes in the microwave regime where a superconducting qubit can be operated and coupled to the various modes. We will present our low-temperature measurements of such a superconducting metamaterial resonator coupled to a tunable transmon qubit. By tuning the magnetic flux biasing the qubit, we observe vacuum Rabi splittings in the modes that the qubit transition passes through. We will also discuss our measurements of an interaction between neighboring modes of the metamaterial system that is mediated by the qubit. Because of the dispersive coupling of the qubit to the various modes of the system, driving a microwave tone near one mode of the system can have a significant influence on the transmission through another mode, with a strong dependence on the bias point of the qubit. We will compare these measurements with a theoretical model of the system.

  7. Superposition of Inductive and Capacitive Coupling in Superconducting LC Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladchenko, Sergiy; Khalil, Moe; Lobb, C. J.; Wellstood, F. C.; Osborn, Kevin D.

    2011-06-01

    We present an experimental investigation of lumped-element superconducting LC resonators designed to provide different types of coupling to a transmission line. We have designed four resonator geometries including dipole and quadrupole configured inductors connected in parallel with low loss SiNx dielectric parallel-plate capacitors. The design of the resonator allows a small change in the symmetry of the inductor or grounding of the capacitor to allow LC resonators with: 1) inductive coupling, 2) capacitive coupling, 3) both types of coupling, or 4) greatly reduced coupling. We measured all four designs at a temperature of 30mK at different values of power. We compare the extracted data from the four resonator types and find that both capacitive and inductive coupling can be included and that when left off, only a minor change in the circuit design is necessary. We also find a variation in the measured loss tangent of less than a few percent, which is a test of the systematic precision of the measurement technique.

  8. Evanescent straight tapered-fiber coupling of ultra-high Q optomechanical micro-resonators in a low-vibration helium-4 exchange-gas cryostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivière, R.; Arcizet, O.; Schliesser, A.; Kippenberg, T. J.

    2013-04-01

    We developed an apparatus to couple a 50-μm diameter whispering-gallery silica microtoroidal resonator in a helium-4 cryostat using a straight optical tapered-fiber at 1550 nm wavelength. On a top-loading probe specifically adapted for increased mechanical stability, we use a specifically-developed "cryotaper" to optically probe the cavity, allowing thus to record the calibrated mechanical spectrum of the optomechanical system at low temperatures. We then demonstrate excellent thermalization of a 63-MHz mechanical mode of a toroidal resonator down to the cryostat's base temperature of 1.65 K, thereby proving the viability of the cryogenic refrigeration via heat conduction through static low-pressure exchange gas. In the context of optomechanics, we therefore provide a versatile and powerful tool with state-of-the-art performances in optical coupling efficiency, mechanical stability, and cryogenic cooling.

  9. First high gradient test results of a dressed 325 MHz superconducting single spoke resonator at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, R.C.; Khabiboulline, T.; Madrak, R.; Nicol, T.; Ristori, L.; Soyars, W.; Wagner, R.; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    A new superconducting RF cavity test facility has been commissioned at Fermilab in conjunction with first tests of a 325 MHz, {beta} = 0.22 superconducting single-spoke cavity dressed with a helium jacket and prototype tuner. The facility is described and results of full gradient, CW cavity tests with a high Q{sub ext} drive coupler are reported. Sensitivities to Q disease and externally applied magnetic fields were investigated. Results are compared to bare cavity results obtained prior to hydrogen degassing and welding into the helium jacket.

  10. Multi-frequency modes in superconducting resonators: Bridging frequency gaps in off-resonant couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Christian Kraglund; Mølmer, Klaus

    2015-03-01

    A SQUID inserted in a superconducting waveguide resonator imposes current and voltage boundary conditions that makes it suitable as a tuning element for the resonator modes. If such a SQUID element is subject to a periodically varying magnetic flux, the resonator modes acquire frequency side bands. We calculate the multi-frequency eigenmodes and these can couple resonantly to physical systems with different transition frequencies and this makes the resonator an efficient quantum bus for state transfer and coherent quantum operations in hybrid quantum systems. As an example of the application, we determine their coupling to transmon qubits with different frequencies and we present a bi-chromatic scheme for entanglement and gate operations. In this calculation, we obtain a maximally entangled state with a fidelity F = 95 % . Our proposal is competitive with the achievements of other entanglement-gates with superconducting devices and it may offer some advantages: (i) There is no need for additional control lines and dephasing associated with the conventional frequency tuning of qubits. (ii) When our qubits are idle, they are far detuned with respect to each other and to the resonator, and hence they are immune to cross talk and Purcell-enhanced decay.

  11. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study of High Temperature Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mounce, Andrew M.

    The high temperature superconductors HgBa2CuO 4+delta (Hg1201) and Bi2SrCa2Cu2O 8+delta (Bi2212) have been treated with 17O for both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sensitivity and various electronic properties. Subsequently, NMR experiments were performed on Hg1201 and Bi2212 to reveal the nature of the pseudogap, in the normal state, and vortex phases, in the superconducting state. NMR has been performed on 17O in an underdoped Hg1201 crystal with a superconducting transition transition temperature of 74 K to look for circulating orbital currents proposed theoretically and inferred from neutron scattering. The measurements reveal narrow spectra which preclude static local fields in the pseudogap phase at the apical site, suggesting that the moments observed with neutrons are fluctuating or the orbital current ordering is not the correct model for the neutron scattering observation. The fine detail of the NMR frequency shifts at the apical oxygen site are consistent with a dipolar field from the Cu+2 site and diamagnetism below the superconducting transition. It has been predicted that superconducting vortices should be electrically charged and that this effect is particularly enhanced for high temperature superconductors. Here it is shown that the Abrikosov vortex lattice, characteristic of the mixed state of superconductors, will become unstable at sufficiently high magnetic field if there is charge trapped on the vortex core for highly anisotropic superconductors. NMR measurements of the magnetic fields generated by vortices in Bi2212 single crystals provide evidence for an electro-statically driven vortex lattice reconstruction with the magnitude of charge on each vortex pancake of 2x10-3e, depending on doping, in line with theoretical estimates. Competition with magnetism is at the heart of high temperature superconductivity, most intensely felt near a vortex core. To investigate vortex magnetism spatially resolved NMR has been used, finding a strongly non

  12. A new microwave resonator readout scheme for superconducting qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Michael B.

    Quantum computation is a relatively new field of research, which uses the properties of quantum mechanical systems for information processing. While most proposals for constructing such a quantum computer involve using microscopic degrees of freedom such as those of trapped ions or nuclear spins, this thesis concentrates on using the collective electromagnetic response of a macroscopic electrical circuit to construct the fundamental building block of a quantum computer---a qubit. These macroscopic systems are inherently more difficult to protect from decoherence compared to the microscopic qubit systems because of strong environmental coupling through, for example, the measurement leads. However, superconducting quantum circuits should be easier to scale to large multi qubit systems since they involve simple electrical elements, such as inductors and capacitors for coupling qubits. Furthermore, they can be produced using the highly developed fabrication techniques of integrated circuits. One of the outstanding issues in superconducting qubit circuits is to read out the qubit state without introducing excessive noise. Such a readout scheme requires speed, sensitivity and should minimally disturb the qubit state. To meet these requirements we have developed a new type of dispersive bifurcating amplifier, called the cavity bifurcation amplifier (CBA), which consists of a Josephson junction imbedded in a microwave on-chip resonator. The optimum resonator design is based on a simple coplanar waveguide (CPW), imposing a pre-determined frequency and whose other RF characteristics like the quality factor are easily controlled and optimized. The CBA is sensitive to the susceptibility of the superconducting qubit with respect to an external control parameter (e.g., flux) and hence during both qubit manipulation and readout sequences, the qubit can be biased on a so-called "sweet spot", where it is immune to first order fluctuations in this parameter. This readout has no on

  13. Superconducting radio-frequency resonator in magnetic fields up to 6 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, M. S.; Stallkamp, N.; Quint, W.; Wiesel, M.; Vogel, M.; Martin, A.; Birkl, G.

    2016-07-01

    We have measured the characteristics of a superconducting radio-frequency resonator in an external magnetic field. The magnetic field strength has been varied with 10 mT resolution between zero and 6 T. The resonance frequency and the quality factor of the resonator have been found to change significantly as a function of the magnetic field strength. Both parameters show a hysteresis effect which is more pronounced for the resonance frequency. Quantitative knowledge of such behaviour is particularly important when experiments require specific values of resonance frequency and quality factor or when the magnetic field is changed while the resonator is in the superconducting state.

  14. Quasiparticle spin resonance and coherence in superconducting aluminium

    PubMed Central

    Quay, C. H. L.; Weideneder, M.; Chiffaudel, Y.; Strunk, C.; Aprili, M.

    2015-01-01

    Conventional superconductors were long thought to be spin inert; however, there is now increasing interest in both (the manipulation of) the internal spin structure of the ground-state condensate, as well as recently observed long-lived, spin-polarized excitations (quasiparticles). We demonstrate spin resonance in the quasiparticle population of a mesoscopic superconductor (aluminium) using novel on-chip microwave detection techniques. The spin decoherence time obtained (∼100 ps), and its dependence on the sample thickness are consistent with Elliott–Yafet spin–orbit scattering as the main decoherence mechanism. The striking divergence between the spin coherence time and the previously measured spin imbalance relaxation time (∼10 ns) suggests that the latter is limited instead by inelastic processes. This work stakes out new ground for the nascent field of spin-based electronics with superconductors or superconducting spintronics. PMID:26497744

  15. Quasiparticle spin resonance and coherence in superconducting aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quay, C. H. L.; Weideneder, M.; Chiffaudel, Y.; Strunk, C.; Aprili, M.

    2015-10-01

    Conventional superconductors were long thought to be spin inert; however, there is now increasing interest in both (the manipulation of) the internal spin structure of the ground-state condensate, as well as recently observed long-lived, spin-polarized excitations (quasiparticles). We demonstrate spin resonance in the quasiparticle population of a mesoscopic superconductor (aluminium) using novel on-chip microwave detection techniques. The spin decoherence time obtained (~100 ps), and its dependence on the sample thickness are consistent with Elliott-Yafet spin-orbit scattering as the main decoherence mechanism. The striking divergence between the spin coherence time and the previously measured spin imbalance relaxation time (~10 ns) suggests that the latter is limited instead by inelastic processes. This work stakes out new ground for the nascent field of spin-based electronics with superconductors or superconducting spintronics.

  16. Characterizing and reducing microfabrication-induced loss in superconducting devices, Part I: Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunsworth, Andrew; Megrant, A.; Chen, Z.; Quintana, C.; Burkett, B.; Kelly, J.; Barends, R.; Fowler, A.; Jeffrey, E.; White, T.; Sank, D.; Mutus, J.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Y.; Chiaro, B.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Roushan, P.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; Martinis, J. M.

    Planar and 3D superconducting qubits have previously been shown to be limited by microfabrication induced loss. Using finite element simulations, we have identified a major source of this decoherence in superconducting qubits. Furthermore, we experimentally verified this dominant loss channel using a novel resonator based approach, which we call 'Hydra' resonators. We fully characterized and then substantially reduced this loss channel using these Hydra resonators. I will report on these measurements and their implications on improving the coherence of superconducting qubits. This work is supported by Google inc.

  17. Nonlinearities and Parametric Amplification of Superconducting Coplanar Waveguide Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haviland, David; Tholén, Erik; Ergul, Adem

    2008-03-01

    We have experimentally studied the nonlinear properties of superconducting coplanar stripline resonators fabricated from Al and Nb films with small transverse dimensions (gap size 1μm). Magnetic field penetration into the superconductor causes a current-dependant kinetic inductance, which gives an ideal Kerr nonlinearity. When the nonlinear oscillator is pumped very near its dynamic instability, it can be used to realize parametric amplification. We have achieved a gain of +22.4dB in a 5.8 GHz resonator cooled to 450 mK [E. Thol'en et. al. Appl. Phys. Lett. 90, 253509 (2007)]. Parametric deamplification or squeezing of a signal has also been verified with squeezing of 30 dB. The later effect is interesting because it can be used to generate squeezed vacuum states of the electromagnetic field. We have modeled the data using a theory developed by Yurke and Buks [J. Lightwave Technol. 24, 5054 (2006)]. Excellent fit of the model to the measured data can be achieved over a wide range of pump power, and the strength of the nonlinear terms can be obtained with high accuracy.

  18. Microtesla magnetic resonance imaging with a superconducting quantum interference device

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, Robert; Lee, SeungKyun; ten Haken, Bennie; Trabesinger, Andreas H.; Pines, Alexander; Clarke, John

    2004-03-15

    We have constructed a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner based on a dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) configured as a second-derivative gradiometer. The magnetic field sensitivity of the detector is independent of frequency; it is therefore possible to obtain high-resolution images by prepolarizing the nuclear spins in a field of 300 mT and detecting the signal at 132 fYT, corresponding to a proton Larmor frequency of 5.6 kHz. The reduction in the measurement field by a factor of 10,000 compared with conventional scanners eliminates inhomogeneous broadening of the nuclear magnetic resonance lines, even in fields with relatively poor homogeneity. The narrow linewidths result in enhanced signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution for a fixed strength of the magnetic field gradients used to encode the image. We present two-dimensional images of phantoms and pepper slices, obtained in typical magnetic field gradients of 100 fYT/m, with a spatial resolution of about 1mm. We further demonstrate a slice-selected image of an intact pepper. By varying the time delay between removal of the polarizing field and initiation of the spin echo sequence we acquire T1-weighted contrast images of water phantoms, some of which are doped with a paramagnetic salt; here, T1 is the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time. The techniques presented here could readily be adapted to existing multichannel SQUID systems used for magnetic source imaging of brain signals. Further potential applications include low-cost systems for tumor screening and imaging peripheral regions of the body.

  19. Storage and on-demand release of microwaves using superconducting resonators with tunable coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Pierre, Mathieu Svensson, Ida-Maria; Raman Sathyamoorthy, Sankar; Johansson, Göran; Delsing, Per

    2014-06-09

    We present a system which allows to tune the coupling between a superconducting resonator and a transmission line. This storage resonator is addressed through a second, coupling resonator, which is frequency-tunable and controlled by a magnetic flux applied to a superconducting quantum interference device. We experimentally demonstrate that the lifetime of the storage resonator can be tuned by more than three orders of magnitude. A field can be stored for 18 μs when the coupling resonator is tuned off resonance and it can be released in 14 ns when the coupling resonator is tuned on resonance. The device allows capture, storage, and on-demand release of microwaves at a tunable rate.

  20. Instrument for in-situ orientation of superconducting thin-film resonators used for electron-spin resonance experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mowry, Andrew; Kubasek, James; Friedman, Jonathan R.; Chen, Yiming

    2015-01-15

    When used in electron-spin resonance measurements, superconducting thin-film resonators must be precisely oriented relative to the external magnetic field in order to prevent the trapping of magnetic flux and the associated degradation of resonator performance. We present a compact design solution for this problem that allows in-situ control of the orientation of the resonator at cryogenic temperatures. Tests of the apparatus show that when proper alignment is achieved, there is almost no hysteresis in the field dependence of the resonant frequency.

  1. Optical-Fiber-Illuminated Response of a Superconducting Microwave Resonator Below 1 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Kristen; Hertzberg, J. B.; Dutta, S. K.; Hoffman, J. E.; Grover, J. A.; Lee, J.; Solano, P.; Budoyo, R. P.; Ballard, C.; Anderson, J. R.; Lobb, C. J.; Rolston, S. L.; Wellstood, F. C.

    As a step towards building a hybrid quantum system that couples superconducting elements to neutral atoms trapped on a tapered optical nanofiber, we have studied how the presence of the fiber dielectric and light scattered from a fiber affect the response of a translatable thin-film lumped-element superconducting Al microwave resonator that is cooled to 15 mK. The resonator has a resonance frequency of about 6 GHz, a quality factor Q 2 x 105, and is mounted inside a 3D Al superconducting cavity. An optical fiber is tapered to a 60 um diameter and passes through two small holes in the 3D cavity such that it sits near the resonator. The 3D cavity is mounted on an x-z piezo-translation stage that allows us to change the relative position of the thin-film resonator and fiber. When the resonator is brought closer to the fiber, the resonance frequency decreases slightly due to the presence of the fiber dielectric. When 200 uW of 780 nm light is sent through the fiber, about 100 pW/mm is Rayleigh-scattered from the fiber. This causes a position-dependent illumination of the resonator, affecting its resonance frequency and Q. We compare our results to a model of the resonator response that includes the generation, diffusion, and recombination of quasiparticles in the resonator and find that the frequency response allows us to track the position of the fiber to within 10 um.

  2. Mode coupling in superconducting parallel plate resonator in a cavity with outer conductive enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, F.; Klein, M.V.; Kruse, J.; Feng, M.

    1996-06-01

    The authors have carefully studied the mode coupling effect from analysis of the measured microwave scattering parameters of superconducting films using a parallel-plate-resonator technique. Due to its high resolution and simplicity, this technique has been widely employed to identify the quality of high-{Tc} superconducting films by measuring the resonance bandwidth, from which the microwave surface resistance is directly derived. To minimize the radiation loss, the resonator is usually housed in a conductive cavity. Using this method, they observe that a number of strong ``cavity`` modes due to the test enclosure fall around the lowest TM mode of the superconducting resonator and that a strong interaction between these two types of resonant modes occurs when their eigenfrequencies are close, causing a significant distortion or a strong antiresonance for the resonator mode. To describe this effect, a coupled harmonic-oscillator model is proposed. They suggest that the interaction arises from a phase interference or a linear coupling among the individual oscillators. The model fits very well the observed Fano-type asymmetric or antiresonant features, and thus can be used to extract the intrinsic Q of the superconducting resonator.

  3. Coherences of transmon qubits embedded in superconducting whispering gallery mode resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minev, Z. K.; Serniak, K.; Pop, Ioan; Leghtas, Z.; Sliwa, K.; Frunzio, L.; Schoelkopf, R.; Devoret, Michel

    2015-03-01

    We describe the design and measurement of a planar uperconducting two-resonator one-qubit device. The two resonators are realized in a hardware-efficient way by the differential modes of a superconducting whispering gallery mode resonator [APL 103, 142604]. This device forms an integrated basis for a quantum memory [New J. Phys. 16, 045014 2014]. Work supported by: IARPA, ARO, and ONR.

  4. Mechanical resonance characteristics of a high-{Tc} superconducting levitation system

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiura, Toshihiko; Fujimori, Hideki

    1996-05-01

    This research deals with dynamic response of a permanent magnet freely levitated above an excited high-{Tc} superconductor. Evaluation of dynamic characteristics is required in mechanical design of high-{Tc} superconducting levitation systems. Their dynamics is coupled with Type-II superconducting phenomena. By a numerical approach based on some macroscopic models they evaluate mechanical resonance characteristics of a superconducting levitation system. Numerical results show some nonlinear properties and effect of the flux flow in Type-II superconductor, which are observed in experiments or predicted by analyses.

  5. Tuning of a superconducting microwave resonator at 77 K using an integrated micromachined silicon vertical actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prest, M. J.; Wang, Y.; Huang, F.; Lancaster, M. J.

    2010-09-01

    A silicon micromachined actuator is used to tune a high temperature superconducting microwave resonator. The superconducting resonator is only 1.24 mm × 0.66 mm and demonstrates a Q of up to 1078 at 6.3 GHz and at 77 K. A tuning range of 12% is demonstrated with a maximum applied voltage of 40 V. The frequency of the resonator is controlled by the proximity of a silicon tuning probe. The room temperature resistivity of the silicon is measured to be 20 Ω cm; this value drops as the device is cooled, but remains the limiting factor in the quality factor of the device. This proof of principle experiment demonstrates the application of silicon micromachining for tuning of superconducting microwave circuits, which is achieved despite the difficulties presented by differing material properties and thermal constraints when cooling to 77 K.

  6. Analysis of high quality superconducting resonators: consequences for TLS properties in amorphous oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, J.; Faoro, L.; Lindström, T.

    2016-04-01

    1/f noise caused by microscopic two-level systems (TLS) is known to be very detrimental to the performance of superconducting quantum devices but the nature of these TLS is still poorly understood. Recent experiments with superconducting resonators indicates that interaction between TLS in the oxide at the film-substrate interface is not negligible. Here we present data on the loss and 1/f frequency noise from two different Nb resonators with and without Pt capping and discuss what conclusions can be drawn regarding the properties of TLS in amorphous oxides. We also estimate the concentration and dipole moment of the TLS.

  7. Measurement of dielectric loss tangent at cryogenic temperature using superconducting film resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yufang; Wang, Zhenqing

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate that the superconducting film resonator can be used to accurately and quantitatively measure the microwave dielectric loss tangent of a variety of materials. Compared to traditional dielectric resonator loaded metal cavity method, it has advantage of small sample size (~2-3 orders of magnitude smaller than the old method), and much higher sensitivity to measure small loss tangent values as small as 10-5 at around 7 GHz band at cryogenic temperatures. This method can be utilized widely in study of mechanism of microwave loss at cryogenic temperature range, which is extremely important in superconducting microwave application areas, such as novel super quantum computers.

  8. Position-Dependent Optical Response of a Superconducting Resonator at 15 mK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, K. D.; Hertzberg, J. B.; Hoffman, J. E.; Grover, J. A.; Lee, J.; Solano, P.; Budoyo, R. P.; Ballard, C.; Anderson, J. R.; Lobb, C. J.; Orozco, L. A.; Rolston, S. L.; Wellstood, F. C.

    2015-03-01

    We have studied the optical and dielectric response of a translatable thin-film lumped-element superconducting Al microwave resonator cooled to 15 mK. The resonator has a resonance frequency of 6.14 GHz, a quality factor Q of 2.59 x 105and is mounted inside a superconducting aluminum 3D cavity. A tapered optical fiber enters and exits the 3D cavity through two small holes in opposite sides of the cavity, placed so that the fiber can pass close to the resonator. The 3D cavity is mounted on an x-z piezo-translation stage that allows us to change the relative position of the lumped-element resonator and fiber. When the resonator is brought near to the fiber, we observe a shift in resonance frequency due to the presence of the fiber dielectric. When light is sent through the fiber, Rayleigh scattering causes a position-dependent illumination of the resonator, generating quasiparticles and thereby affecting its resonance frequency and Q. Our model of the resonator response includes the generation, diffusion, and recombination of quasiparticles in the resonator and shows that the frequency response allows us to track the position of the fiber in situ. Work supported by NSF through the Physics Frontier Center at the Joint Quantum Institute, Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Maryland.

  9. Sequentially evaporated thin film YBa2Cu3O(7-x) superconducting microwave ring resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohrer, Norman J.; To, Hing Y.; Valco, George J.; Bhasin, Kul B.; Chorey, Chris; Warner, Joseph D.

    1990-01-01

    There is great interest in the application of thin film high temperature superconductors in high frequency electronic circuits. A ring resonator provides a good test vehicle for assessing the microwave losses in the superconductor and for comparing films made by different techniques. Ring resonators made of YBa2Cu3O(7-x) have been investigated on LaAlO3 substrates. The superconducting thin films were deposited by sequential electron beam evaporation of Cu, Y, and BaF2 with a post anneal. Patterning of the superconducting film was done using negative photolithography. A ring resonator was also fabricated from a thin gold film as a control. Both resonators had a gold ground plane on the backside of the substrate. The ring resonators' reflection coefficients were measured as a function of frequency from 33 to 37 GHz at temperatures ranging from 20 K to 68 K. The resonator exhibited two resonances which were at 34.5 and 35.7 GHz at 68 K. The resonant frequencies increased with decreasing temperature. The magnitude of the reflection coefficients was in the calculation of the unloaded Q-values. The performance of the evaporated and gold resonator are compared with the performance of a laser ablated YBa2Cu3O(7-x) resonator. The causes of the double resonance are discussed.

  10. Superconducting resonator used as a phase and energy detector for linac setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, Nikolai R.

    2016-07-01

    Booster linacs for tandem accelerators and positive ion superconducting injectors have matured into standard features of many accelerator laboratories. Both types of linac are formed as an array of independently-phased resonators operating at room temperature or in a superconducting state. Each accelerating resonator needs to be individually set in phase and amplitude for optimum acceleration efficiency. The modularity of the linac allows the velocity profile along the structure to be tailored to accommodate a wide range charge to mass ratio. The linac setup procedure, described in this paper, utilizes a superconducting resonator operating in a beam bunch phase detection mode. The main objective was to derive the full set of phase distributions for quick and efficient tuning of the entire accelerator. The phase detector was operated in overcoupling mode in order to minimize de-tuning effects of microphonic background. A mathematical expression was derived to set a limit on resonator maximum accelerating field during the crossover search to enable extracting unambiguous beam phase data. A set of equations was obtained to calculate the values of beam phase advance and energy gain produced by accelerating resonators. An extensive range of linac setting up configurations was conducted to validate experimental procedures and analytical models. The main application of a superconducting phase detector is for fast tuning for beams of ultralow intensities, in particular in the straight section of linac facilities.

  11. Progress toward high-Q perfect absorption: A Fano antilaser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Sunkyu; Piao, Xianji; Hong, Jiho; Park, Namkyoo

    2015-07-01

    Here we propose a route to the high-Q perfect absorption of light by introducing the concept of a Fano antilaser. Based on the drastic spectral variation of the optical phase in a Fano-resonant system, a spectral singularity for scatter-free perfect absorption can be achieved with an order of magnitude smaller material loss. By applying temporal coupled mode theory to a Fano-resonant waveguide platform, we reveal that the required material loss and following absorption Q factor are ultimately determined by the degree of Fano spectral asymmetry. The feasibility of the Fano antilaser is confirmed using a photonic crystal platform, to demonstrate spatiospectrally selective heating. Our results utilizing the phase-dependent control of device bandwidths derive a counterintuitive realization of high-Q perfect conversion of light into internal energy, and thus pave the way for a new regime of absorption-based devices, including switches, sensors, thermal imaging, and optothermal emitters.

  12. TLS-like temperature and power dependence for loss in superconducting coplanar resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladchenko, S.; Stoutimore, M. J. A.; Khalil, M.; Osborn, K.

    2013-03-01

    Loss in 2D superconducting coplanar resonators and qubits is often limited by two-level systems thought to be on the metal and substrate surfaces. While these TLSs are thought to be similar to those found in amorphous dielectrics, their nature is generally different. In most experiments, loss in coplanar resonators shows power and temperature dependence which disagrees with TLS theory. Here we will show new data from high-quality Al on sapphire coplanar resonators which is in qualitative agreement with TLS theory, and discuss the quantitative differences to TLS theory. The data on surface TLS behavior will be compared to resonator measurements of ALD-grown thin films.

  13. Performance and modeling of superconducting ring resonators at millimeter-wave frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, K. B.; Chorey, C. M.; Warner, J. D.; Romanofsky, R. R.; Heinen, V. O.; Kong, K. S.; Lee, H. Y.; Itoh, T.

    1990-01-01

    Microstrip ring resonators operating at 35 GHz were fabricated from laser ablated YBCO thin films deposited on lanthanum aluminate substrates. They were measured over a range of temperatures and their performance compared to identical resonators made of evaporated gold. Below 60 Kelvin the superconducting strip performed better than the gold, reaching an unloaded Q approximately 1.5 times that of gold at 25 K. A shift in the resonant frequency follows the form predicted by the London equations. The Phenomenological Loss Equivalence Method is applied to the ring resonator and the theoretically calculated Q values are compared to the experimental results.

  14. Etch Effects on Surface loss in High Quality Aluminum on Silicon Superconducting Coplanar Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunsworth, Andrew; Megrant, Anthony; Barends, Rami; Chen, Yu; Hoi, Iochun; Jeffrey, Evan; Mutus, Josh; Roushan, Pedram; Campbell, Brooks; Chen, Zijun; Chiaro, Ben; Kelly, Julian; Neill, Charles; O'Malley, Peter; Quintana, Chris; Sank, Daniel; Vainsencher, Amit; Wenner, Jim; White, Ted; Cleland, Andrew; Martinis, John; Martinis Group Team

    2014-03-01

    Superconducting coplanar resonators are a powerful tool for studying capacitive loss from two level states (TLS's) in superconducting qubits. We have found evidence that standard processing of aluminum on sapphire superconducting devices leaves behind ~2 nm organic residues which can contribute to loss at the Q >106 level that we are presently working with. Removing these residues is possible on a silicon substrate as it allows various sidewall etchings and profilings via chemical and physical etches. I will present recent Q factor measurements of aluminum on silicon resonators that were defined through a variety of etching conditions. This research was funded by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA), through the Army Research Office grant JMAR-05.

  15. Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Langone, J.

    1989-01-01

    This book explains the theoretical background of superconductivity. Includes discussion of electricity, material fabrication, maglev trains, the superconducting supercollider, and Japanese-US competition. The authors reports the latest discoveries.

  16. Traveling-wave pulse on a superconductive active transmission line using resonant tunneling diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klofaï, Yerima; Essimbi, B. Z.; Jäger, D.

    2013-10-01

    Analytic study and computer experiment investigations on a superconductive active transmission line using resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) are discussed. It is shown, based on nonlinear wave propagation effects, that the line supports pulse propagation appearing as pairs of kink-antikink profiles. This behavior is due to compensation between the effects of amplification and dissipation along the network.

  17. Design and investigations of the superconducting magnet system for the multipurpose superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Tinschert, K.; Lang, R.; Maeder, J.; Rossbach, J.; Spaedtke, P.; Komorowski, P.; Meyer-Reumers, M.; Krischel, D.; Fischer, B.; Ciavola, G.; Gammino, S.; Celona, L.

    2012-02-15

    The production of intense beams of heavy ions with electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRIS) is an important request at many accelerators. According to the ECR condition and considering semi-empirical scaling laws, it is essential to increase the microwave frequency together with the magnetic flux density of the ECRIS magnet system. A useful frequency of 28 GHz, therefore, requires magnetic flux densities above 2.2 T implying the use of superconducting magnets. A cooperation of European institutions initiated a project to build a multipurpose superconducting ECRIS (MS-ECRIS) in order to achieve an increase of the performances in the order of a factor of ten. After a first design of the superconducting magnet system for the MS-ECRIS, the respective cold testing of the built magnet system reveals a lack of mechanical performance due to the strong interaction of the magnetic field of the three solenoids with the sextupole field and the magnetization of the magnetic iron collar. Comprehensive structural analysis, magnetic field calculations, and calculations of the force pattern confirm thereafter these strong interactions, especially of the iron collar with the solenoidal fields. The investigations on the structural analysis as well as suggestions for a possible mechanical design solution are given.

  18. Microwave dynamics of high aspect ratio superconducting nanowires studied using self-resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santavicca, Daniel F.; Adams, Jesse K.; Grant, Lierd E.; McCaughan, Adam N.; Berggren, Karl K.

    2016-06-01

    We study the microwave impedance of extremely high aspect ratio (length/width ≈ 5000) superconducting niobium nitride nanowires. The nanowires are fabricated in a compact meander geometry that is in series with the center conductor of a 50 Ω coplanar waveguide transmission line. The transmission coefficient of the sample is measured up to 20 GHz. At high frequency, a peak in the transmission coefficient is seen. Numerical simulations show that this is a half-wave resonance along the length of the nanowire, where the nanowire acts as a high impedance, slow wave transmission line. This resonance sets the upper frequency limit for these nanowires as inductive elements. Fitting simulations to the measured resonance enables a precise determination of the nanowire's complex sheet impedance at the resonance frequency. The real part is a measure of dissipation, while the imaginary part is dominated by kinetic inductance. We characterize the dependence of the sheet resistance and sheet inductance on both temperature and current and compare the results to recent theoretical predictions for disordered superconductors. These results can aid in the understanding of high frequency devices based on superconducting nanowires. They may also lead to the development of novel superconducting devices such as ultra-compact resonators and slow-wave structures.

  19. A universal scaling behavior in magnetic resonance peak in high temperature superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seung Joon; Salk, Sung-Ho Suck

    2015-08-01

    Eminent inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements of high temperature cuprates currently lacking theoretical interpretations are the observed temperature dependence of magnetic resonance peak and linear scaling relation between the resonance peak energy, Eres and the superconducting transition temperature, Tc. Using our slave-boson approach of the t-J Hamiltonian (Phys. Rev. 64, 052501 (2001)) for this study, we show that starting from the pseudogap temperature T∗, the magnetic resonance peak increases with decreasing temperature, revealing its inflection point at Tc and that spin pairing correlations are responsible for d-wave superconductivity. We find that there exists a universal linear scaling behavior of Eres/Tc = const., irrespective of the Heisenberg exchange coupling.

  20. Superconductive quantum interference magnetometer with high sensitivity achieved by an induced resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Vettoliere, A.; Granata, C.

    2014-08-15

    A fully integrated low noise superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) in a magnetometer configuration is presented. An intrinsic high voltage responsivity as high as 500 μV/Φ{sub 0} has been obtained by introducing a resonance in the voltage – magnetic flux characteristic. This resonance is induced by an integrated superconducting coil surrounding the pick-up coil and connected to one end of the SQUID output. The SQUID magnetometer exhibits a spectral density of magnetic field noise as low as 3 fT/Hz{sup 1/2}. In order to verify the suitability of the magnetometer, measurements of bandwidth and slew rate have been performed and compared with those of the same device without the resonance and with additional positive feedback. Due to their good characteristics such devices can be employed in a large number of applications including biomagnetism.

  1. In situ broadband cryogenic calibration for two-port superconducting microwave resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Jen-Hao; Anlage, Steven M.

    2013-03-15

    We introduce an improved microwave calibration method for use in a cryogenic environment, based on a traditional three-standard calibration, the Thru-Reflect-Line (TRL) calibration. The modified calibration method takes advantage of additional information from multiple measurements of an ensemble of realizations of a superconducting resonator, as a new pseudo-Open standard, to correct errors in the TRL calibration. We also demonstrate an experimental realization of this in situ broadband cryogenic calibration system utilizing cryogenic switches. All calibration measurements are done in the same thermal cycle as the measurement of the resonator (requiring only an additional 20 min), thus avoiding 4 additional thermal cycles for traditional TRL calibration (which would require an additional 12 days). The experimental measurements on a wave-chaotic microwave billiard verify that the new method significantly improves the measured scattering matrix of a high-quality-factor superconducting resonator.

  2. Space applications of superconductivity - Resonators for high stability oscillators and other applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, S. R.

    1980-01-01

    The potential applications of superconductivity in space are examined. It is shown that superconducting oscillators have achieved better frequency stability that any other device for averaging times of 10 s to 1000 s. Such a high stability results from the use of solid niobium resonators having Q factors greater that 10 to the 10th. Oscillators of this type have direct applications as clocks and spectrally pure sources. In addition, they may also be used for accurate measurements of many physical quantities and to perform a variety of experiments on fundamental constants, relativity, and gravity waves.

  3. An Analysis Method for Superconducting Resonator Parameter Extraction with Complex Baseline Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    A new semi-empirical model is proposed for extracting the quality (Q) factors of arrays of superconducting microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs). The determination of the total internal and coupling Q factors enables the computation of the loss in the superconducting transmission lines. The method used allows the simultaneous analysis of multiple interacting discrete resonators with the presence of a complex spectral baseline arising from reflections in the system. The baseline removal allows an unbiased estimate of the device response as measured in a cryogenic instrumentation setting.

  4. Two Dimensional Intermodulation Distortion Scanning of Superconducting Filter Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischak, Michael; Remillard, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    Nonlinear superconducting conductivity produces distortion that has usually been measured globally across the entire sample. In order to fully understand the origin of non linearity, local methods must be used to examine specific points in the sample. The nonlinear Ohm's law, V =IZ(I) includes the current dependence in the impedance. The method in this work raster scans a magnetic loop probe across a sample. In order to address limited resolution, we reduced the size of the magnetic loop probe. Using the electromagnetic field solver, sonnet, two dimensional current simulations of superconducting microwave filters composed of Tl2Ba2CaCu2O8 or of YBa2Cu3O7 reveal microwave current which is bunched up at the corners and sides of the sample. Two dimensional images of third order intermodulation distortion made with the magnetic probe at the same corners and edges reveal elevated distortion in the same places. Using the magnetic probe, third order intermodulation was seen to come from the same corners and edges where the current is bunched. This research was funded by the National Science Foundation under grant number DMR-1206149.

  5. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2014-09-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems.

  6. An analysis method for asymmetric resonator transmission applied to superconducting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, M. S.; Stoutimore, M. J. A.; Wellstood, F. C.; Osborn, K. D.

    2012-03-01

    We examine the transmission through nonideal microwave resonant circuits. The general analytical resonance line shape is derived for both inductive and capacitive coupling with mismatched input and output transmission impedances, and it is found that, for certain non-ideal conditions, the line shape is asymmetric. We describe an analysis method for extracting an accurate internal quality factor (Qi), the diameter correction method (DCM), and compare it to the conventional method used for millikelvin resonator measurements, the φ rotation method (φRM). We analytically find that the φRM deterministically overestimates Qi when the asymmetry of the resonance line shape is high, and that this error is eliminated with the DCM. A consistent discrepancy between the two methods is observed when they are used to analyze both simulations from a numerical linear solver and data from asymmetric coplanar superconducting thin-film resonators.

  7. High-Kinetic-Inductance Superconducting Nanowire Resonators for Circuit QED in a Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samkharadze, N.; Bruno, A.; Scarlino, P.; Zheng, G.; DiVincenzo, D. P.; DiCarlo, L.; Vandersypen, L. M. K.

    2016-04-01

    We present superconducting microwave-frequency resonators based on NbTiN nanowires. The small cross section of the nanowires minimizes vortex generation, making the resonators resilient to magnetic fields. Measured intrinsic quality factors exceed 2 ×105 in a 6-T in-plane magnetic field and 3 ×104 in a 350-mT perpendicular magnetic field. Because of their high characteristic impedance, these resonators are expected to develop zero-point voltage fluctuations one order of magnitude larger than in standard coplanar waveguide resonators. These properties make the nanowire resonators well suited for circuit QED experiments needing strong coupling to quantum systems with small electric dipole moments and requiring a magnetic field, such as electrons in single and double quantum dots.

  8. Space applications of superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, D. B.; Vorreiter, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    Some potential applications of superconductivity in space are summarized, e.g., the use of high field magnets for cosmic ray analysis or energy storage and generation, space applications of digital superconducting devices, such as the Josephson switch and, in the future, a superconducting computer. Other superconducting instrumentation which could be used in space includes: low frequency superconducting sensors, microwave and infrared detectors, instruments for gravitational studies, and high-Q cavities for use as stabilizing elements in clocks and oscillators.

  9. Precise Frequency Measurements Using a Superconducting Cavity Stabilized Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strayer, D. M.; Yeh, N.-C.; Jiang, W.; Anderson, V. L.; Asplund, N.

    1999-01-01

    Many physics experiments call on improved resolution to better define the experimental results, thus improving tests of theories. Modern microwave technology combined with high-Q resonators can achieve frequency readout and control with resolutions up to a part in 10(exp 18). When the physical quantity in question in the experiment can be converted to a frequency or a change in frequency, a high-stability microwave oscillator can be applied to obtain state-of-the-art precision. In this work we describe the overall physical concepts and the required experimental procedures for optimizing a high-resolution frequency measurement system that employs a high-Q superconducting microwave cavity and a low-noise frequency synthesizer. The basic approach is to resolve the resonant frequencies of a high-Q (Q > 10(exp 10)) cavity to extremely high precision (one part in 10(exp 17)- 10(exp 18)). Techniques for locking the synthesizer frequency to a resonant frequency of the superconducting cavity to form an ultra-stable oscillator are described. We have recently set up an ultra-high-vacuum high-temperature annealing system to process superconducting niobium cavities, and have been able to consistently achieve Q > 10(exp 9). We have integrated high-Q superconducting cavities with a low-noise microwave synthesizer in a phase-locked-loop to verify the frequency stability of the system. Effects that disturb the cavity resonant frequency (such as the temperature fluctuations and mechanical vibrations) and methods to mitigate those effects are also considered. Applicability of these techniques to experiments will be discussed, and our latest experimental progress in achieving high-resolution frequency measurements using the superconducting-cavity-stabilized-oscillator will be presented.

  10. New Method for Determining the Quality Factor and Resonance Frequency of Superconducting Micro-Resonators from Sonnet Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisbey, D. S.; Martin, A.; Reinisch, A.; Gao, J.

    2014-08-01

    Lithographed superconducting microwave resonators (micro-resonators) are useful in a number of important applications, including microwave kinetic inductance detectors (Day et al., Nature 425:817, 2003), as memory elements in quantum information circuits, and as readouts of qubits and nanomechanical resonators. One of the major tasks in designing these devices is to find the resonance frequency (f) and quality factor (Q) for these microwave circuits using EM simulation software such as Sonnet. The traditional method iteratively runs simulations over successively smaller frequency ranges. In this way the simulated transmission S data is zoomed in on to yield a well-sampled resonance curve of a circuit. Designing microwave resonators in this manner is often time consuming since it requires many simulation runs. In this work, we show a new—and much faster—method for determining f and Q by adding an internal (virtual) port in the Sonnet model and examining the input impedance through the added port. Accurate f and Q values can be retrieved from a single simulation with a wide frequency sweep. This method works on many types of resonance circuits and dramatically reduces the simulation time.

  11. Quantum fractional resonances in superconducting circuits with an embedded Josephson junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisenko, M. V.; Munyayev, V. O.; Satanin, A. M.

    2016-02-01

    We present a quantum electrodynamic treatment of the generation of fractional resonances in a planar waveguide with an embedded superconducting Josephson oscillator. We analyze the dynamics of the Josephson oscillator coupled with the electromagnetic pulse which is propagating along the waveguide. The calculations are carried out entirely in the Heisenberg picture. It is shown that the quantum Josephson oscillator excited by coherent pulse field at the pump frequency, can realize frequency down-conversion and emitting sub-harmonic multiples of the fundamental (fractional harmonics). The influence of dissipation on the phenomenon of resonance capture is discussed.

  12. Fabrication of transmon qubits embedded in superconducting whispering gallery mode resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serniak, K.; Minev, Z. K.; Pop, I. M.; Frunzio, L.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Devoret, M. H.

    2015-03-01

    Superconducting whispering gallery mode resonators (WGMRs) can confine up to 98% of two high quality modes in lossless vacuum [APL 103, 142604]. We have fabricated new WGMR-based devices using standard lithography techniques and in which transmon qubits were integrated. The advantages of this transmon-resonator configuration are i) the possibility to perform a targeted study of thin-film quality factor across different methods and steps of fabrication and ii) precise control of the Hamiltonian parameters. Work supported by: IARPA, ARO, and ONR.

  13. Enhanced electromechanical coupling of a nanomechanical resonator to coupled superconducting cavities

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng-Bo; Li, Hong-Rong; Li, Fu-Li

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the electromechanical coupling between a nanomechanical resonator and two parametrically coupled superconducting coplanar waveguide cavities that are driven by a two-mode squeezed microwave source. We show that, with the selective coupling of the resonator to the cavity Bogoliubov modes, the radiation-pressure type coupling can be greatly enhanced by several orders of magnitude, enabling the single photon strong coupling to be reached. This allows the investigation of a number of interesting phenomena such as photon blockade effects and the generation of nonclassical quantum states with electromechanical systems. PMID:26753744

  14. High quality superconducting resonators for QND Measurements of Qubits and Sensitive Photon Detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Lianfu

    2014-03-01

    We proposed an approach to implement the QND measurements of qubits by probing the intensity and phase transmissions of driven signals through a dispersively-coupled cavity. With such a technique we foud that the states of the qubits can be high-effectively reconstructed tomographically and Bell's-, Mermin's- and Svetlichny's inequalities for confirming the existences of quantum nonlocal correlations can be tested numerically. We designed and fabricated the half-wavelength- and quarter-wavelength superconducting transmission line resonators with various coupling configurations by sputtering and photolithographic techniques. The measured quality factors of these resonators are 104 and 106, respectively, at low-temperature (20mK). We have experimentally demonstrated that the fabricated resonators could be served as the desired sensitive detectors of single photons. Applications of these resonators for experimental solid state quantum information processing are possible.

  15. Note: Electronic damping of microphonics in superconducting resonators of a continuous wave linac

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Gopal; Sahu, Bhuban Kumar; Agarwal, Vivek; Kumar, Girish

    2014-02-15

    The paper presents an implementation technique to damp the microphonics in superconducting resonators utilizing the coupling between the electromagnetic and the mechanical modes of a resonator. In the technique used the resonant frequency variations are fed back to modulate the field amplitude through a suitable transfer function. Of the two transfer functions used in the experiments, one emulates a derivative action and is placed in a negative feedback configuration. The other transfer function is essentially a parallel combination of second order low pass filters and is used in a positive feedback configuration. Experiments with the Quarter Wave resonators of IUAC, New Delhi linac demonstrate that the damping of some of the modes increases significantly with the introduction of this feedback leading to a reduction in power required for field stabilization and quieter operation of the RF control system.

  16. Coupling of a locally implanted rare-earth ion ensemble to a superconducting micro-resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Wisby, I. Tzalenchuk, A. Ya.; Graaf, S. E. de; Adamyan, A.; Kubatkin, S. E.; Gwilliam, R.; Meeson, P. J.; Lindström, T.

    2014-09-08

    We demonstrate the coupling of rare-earth ions locally implanted in a substrate (Gd{sup 3+} in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) to a superconducting NbN lumped-element micro-resonator. The hybrid device is fabricated by a controlled ion implantation of rare-earth ions in well-defined micron-sized areas, aligned to lithographically defined micro-resonators. The technique does not degrade the internal quality factor of the resonators which remain above 10{sup 5}. Using microwave absorption spectroscopy, we observe electron-spin resonances in good agreement with numerical modelling and extract corresponding coupling rates of the order of 1 MHz and spin linewidths of 50–65 MHz.

  17. Direct Observation of a Superconducting Spin Resonance in the Heavy Fermion Antiferromagnetic Superconductor UNi2 Al3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagman, Jerod; Gaudet, Jonathan; Broholm, Collin; Rodriguez, Jose; Winn, Barry; Graves-Brook, Melissa; Garrett, Jim; Gaulin, Bruce

    2015-03-01

    We present neutron scattering data identifying a superconducting spin resonance in the heavy fermion, antiferromagnetic superconductor UNi2 Al3 . This resolves a longstanding issue in the comparison of UNi2 Al3 to its isostructural sister UPd2 Al3 . Theses material both undergo antiferromagnetic phase transitions at relatively high temperatures, TN = 4.6 K and 14.5 K respectively, before respectively superconducting below 1.2 and 2 K(B. D. Gaulin, et al, PRB 66, 174520 (2002)). However, previous reports suggest that only the magnetic fluctuations in UPd2 Al3 display sensitivity to superconductivity via a superconducting spin resonance - the build up in the superconducting ground state of excess scattered intensity at a well defined resonance energy centered on a magnetic wave-vector. We resolve this disparity by clearly identifying a superconducting spin resonance in UNi2 Al3 at the incommensurate wavevector Q = (1/2 +/- 0.11 0 1/2). This re-establishes the relationship between these sister compounds and further evidences the intimate correlation of magnetism and superconductivity. NSERC, National Science Foundation, Scientific User Facilities Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. DOE.

  18. Ultra-thin superconducting film coated silicon nitride nanowire resonators for low-temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, Abhilash; Zhelev, Nikolay; de Alba, Roberto; Parpia, Jeevak

    We demonstrate fabrication of high stress silicon nitride nanowire resonators with a thickness and width of less than 50 nm intended to be used as probes for the study of superfluid 3He. The resonators are fabricated as doubly-clamped wires/beams using a combination of electron-beam lithography and wet/dry etching techniques. We demonstrate the ability to suspend (over a trench of depth ~8 µm) wires with a cross section as small as 30 nm, covered with a 20 nm superconducting film, and having lengths up to 50 µm. Room temperature resonance measurements were carried out by driving the devices using a piezo stage and detecting the motion using an optical interferometer. The results show that metalizing nano-mechanical resonators not only affects their resonant frequencies but significantly reduce their quality factor (Q). The devices are parametrically pumped by modulating the system at twice its fundamental resonant frequency, which results in observed amplification of the signal. The wires show self-oscillation with increasing modulation strength. The fabricated nanowire resonators are intended to be immersed in the superfluid 3He. By tracking the resonant frequency and the Q of the various modes of the wire versus temperature, we aim to probe the superfluid gap structure.

  19. Error analysis for intrinsic quality factor measurement in superconducting radio frequency resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnychuk, O.; Grassellino, A.; Romanenko, A.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we discuss error analysis for intrinsic quality factor (Q0) and accelerating gradient (Eacc) measurements in superconducting radio frequency (SRF) resonators. The analysis is applicable for cavity performance tests that are routinely performed at SRF facilities worldwide. We review the sources of uncertainties along with the assumptions on their correlations and present uncertainty calculations with a more complete procedure for treatment of correlations than in previous publications [T. Powers, in Proceedings of the 12th Workshop on RF Superconductivity, SuP02 (Elsevier, 2005), pp. 24-27]. Applying this approach to cavity data collected at Vertical Test Stand facility at Fermilab, we estimated total uncertainty for both Q0 and Eacc to be at the level of approximately 4% for input coupler coupling parameter β1 in the [0.5, 2.5] range. Above 2.5 (below 0.5) Q0 uncertainty increases (decreases) with β1 whereas Eacc uncertainty, in contrast with results in Powers [in Proceedings of the 12th Workshop on RF Superconductivity, SuP02 (Elsevier, 2005), pp. 24-27], is independent of β1. Overall, our estimated Q0 uncertainty is approximately half as large as that in Powers [in Proceedings of the 12th Workshop on RF Superconductivity, SuP02 (Elsevier, 2005), pp. 24-27].

  20. Exact Tuning of High-Q Optical Microresonators by Use of UV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchankov, Anaotliy; Maleki, Lute; Iltchenko, Vladimir; Handley, Timothy

    2006-01-01

    In one of several alternative approaches to the design and fabrication of a "whispering-gallery" optical microresonator of high resonance quality (high Q), the index of refraction of the resonator material and, hence, the resonance frequencies. In this approach, a microresonator structure is prepared by forming it from an ultraviolet-sensitive material. Then the structure is subjected to controlled exposure to UV light while its resonance frequencies are monitored.

  1. Quench-Induced Degradation of the Quality Factor in Superconducting Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Checchin, M.; Martinello, M.; Romanenko, A.; Grassellino, A.; Sergatskov, D. A.; Posen, S.; Melnychuk, O.; Zasadzinski, J. F.

    2016-04-01

    Quench of superconducting radio-frequency cavities frequently leads to the lowered quality factor Q0 , which had been attributed to the additional trapped magnetic flux. Here we demonstrate that the origin of this magnetic flux is purely extrinsic to the cavity by showing no extra dissipation (unchanged Q0) after quenching in zero magnetic field, which allows us to rule out intrinsic mechanisms of flux trapping such as generation of thermal currents or trapping of the rf field. We also show the clear relation of dissipation introduced by quenching to the orientation of the applied magnetic field and the possibility to fully recover the quality factor by requenching in the compensated field. We discover that for larger values of the ambient field, the Q -factor degradation may become irreversible by this technique, likely due to the outward flux migration beyond the normal zone opening during quench. Our findings are of special practical importance for accelerators based on low- and medium-β accelerating structures residing close to focusing magnets, as well as for all high-Q cavity-based accelerators.

  2. Low loss superconducting titanium nitride coplanar waveguide resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Vissers, M. R.; Gao, J.; Wisbey, D. S.; Hite, D. A.; Pappas, D. P.; Tsuei, C. C.; Corcoles, A. D.; Steffen, M.

    2010-12-06

    Thin films of TiN were sputter-deposited onto Si and sapphire wafers with and without SiN buffer layers. The films were fabricated into rf coplanar waveguide resonators, and internal quality factor measurements were taken at millikelvin temperatures in both the many photon and single photon limits, i.e., high and low electric field regimes, respectively. At high field, we found the highest internal quality factors ({approx}10{sup 7}) were measured for TiN with predominantly a (200)-TiN orientation. The (200)-TiN is favored for growth at high temperature on either bare Si or SiN buffer layers. However, growth on bare sapphire or Si(100) at low temperature resulted in primarily a (111)-TiN orientation. Ellipsometry and Auger measurements indicate that the (200)-TiN growth on the bare Si substrates is correlated with the formation of a thin, {approx_equal}2 nm, layer of SiN during the predeposition procedure. On these surfaces we found a significant increase of Q{sub i} for both high and low electric field regimes.

  3. Protection layers on a superconducting microwave resonator toward a hybrid quantum system

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jongmin; Park, Dong Hun

    2015-10-07

    We propose a protection scheme of a superconducting microwave resonator to realize a hybrid quantum system, where cold neutral atoms are coupled with a single microwave photon through magnetic dipole interaction at an interface inductor. The evanescent field atom trap, such as a waveguide/nanofiber atom trap, brings both surface-scattered photons and absorption-induced broadband blackbody radiation which result in quasiparticles and a low quality factor at the resonator. A proposed multiband protection layer consists of pairs of two dielectric layers and a thin nanogrid conductive dielectric layer above the interface inductor. We show numerical simulations of quality factors and reflection/absorption spectra, indicating that the proposed multilayer structure can protect a lumped-element microwave resonator from optical photons and blackbody radiation while maintaining a reasonably high quality factor.

  4. Results of RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with 28 GHz.

    PubMed

    Higurashi, Y; Ohnishi, J; Nakagawa, T; Haba, H; Tamura, M; Aihara, T; Fujimaki, M; Komiyama, M; Uchiyama, A; Kamigaito, O

    2012-02-01

    We measured the beam intensity of highly charged heavy ions and x-ray heat load for RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with 28 GHz microwaves under the various conditions. The beam intensity of Xe(20+) became maximum at B(min) ∼ 0.65 T, which was ∼65% of the magnetic field strength of electron cyclotron resonance (B(ECR)) for 28 GHz microwaves. We observed that the heat load of x-ray increased with decreasing gas pressure and field gradient at resonance zone. It seems that the beam intensity of highly charged heavy ions with 28 GHz is higher than that with 18 GHz at same RF power. PMID:22380155

  5. Roadmap for the design of a superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source for Spiral2

    SciTech Connect

    Thuillier, T.; Angot, J.; Lamy, T.; Peaucelle, C.

    2012-02-15

    A review of today achieved A/Q = 3 heavy ions beams is proposed. The daily operation A/Q = 3 ion beam intensities expected at Spiral2 are at the limit or above best record 3rd generation electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) intensities. The necessity to build a new fully superconducting to fulfill these requirements is outlined. A discussion on the volume of the future source is proposed and the minimum value of 12 liters is derived. An analysis of the x-ray absorption superconducting ECRIS is presented based on VENUS experimental data and geometry. This study underlines the necessity to include a complete x-ray study at the time of source conception. The specifications foreseen for the new ECRIS are presented, followed with the roadmap for the design.

  6. Spatial modulation of unitary impurity-induced resonances in superconducting CeCoIn5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ge; Liu, Bin; Yang, Yi-Feng; Feng, Shiping

    2016-06-01

    Motivated by recent experimental progress in high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) techniques, we investigate the local quasiparticle density of states around a unitary impurity in the heavy-fermion superconductor CeCoIn5. Based on the T-matrix approach we obtain a sharp nearly zero-energy resonance state in the strong impurity potential scattering localized around the impurity and find qualitative differences in the spatial pattern of the tunneling conductance modulated by the nodal structure of the superconducting gap. These unique features may be used as a probe of the superconducting gap symmetry and, in combination with further STM measurements, may help to confirm the {d_{{x^2} - {y^2}}} pairing in CeCoIn5 at ambient pressure.

  7. On-Chip All-Optical Passive 3.55 Gbit/s NRZ-to-PRZ Format Conversion Using a High-Q Silicon-Based Microring Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Yao; Chen, Shao-Wu; Ren, Guang-Hui

    2010-10-01

    We report the experimental result of all-optical passive 3.55 Gbit/s non-return-to-zero (NRZ) to pseudo-return-to-zero (PRZ) format conversion using a high-quality-factor (Q-factor) silicon-based microring resonator notch filter on chip. The silicon-based microring resonator has 23800 Q-factor and 22 dB extinction ratio (ER), and the PRZ signals has about 108ps width and 4.98 dB ER.

  8. Robustness of superconducting quantum modes against direct quasiparticle injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, U.; Nsanzineza, I.; Vavilov, M. G.; Plourde, B. L. T.; McDermott, R.

    Classical Josephson digital logic based on Single Flux Quantum (SFQ) pulses offers a path to high-fidelity coherent control of large-scale superconducting quantum machines. However, an SFQ pulse driver generates nonequilibrium quasiparticles that contribute to qubit relaxation, and steps must be taken to protect the qubit from this decoherence channel. Here we describe experiments to characterize the robustness of high-Q superconducting linear resonators and qubits against direct quasiparticle injection. We use NIS junctions and SFQ elements to controllably inject quasiparticles into the groundplane of superconducting resonator and qubit chips, and we characterize the quasiparticle contribution to dissipation. We examine the effectiveness of groundplane cuts, normal metal quasiparticle traps, and spatially-varying superconducting gaps at protecting the quantum modes against quasiparticle loss. Finally, we discuss strategies for the integration of multiqubit circuits with on-chip SFQ control elements.

  9. Superconductivity:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacchetti, N.

    In this paper a short historical account of the discovery of superconductivity and of its gradual development is given. The physical interpretation of its various aspects took about forty years (from 1911 to 1957) to reach a successful description of this phenomenon in terms of a microscopic theory At the very end it seemed that more or less everything could be reasonably interpreted even if modifications and refinements of the original theory were necessary. In 1986 the situation changed abruptly when a cautious but revolutionary paper appeared showing that superconductivity was found in certain ceramic oxides at temperatures above those up to then known. A rush of frantic experimental activity started world-wide and in less than one year it was shown that superconductivity is a much more widespread phenomenon than deemed before and can be found at temperatures well above the liquid air boiling point. The complexity and the number of the substances (mainly ceramic oxides) involved call for a sort of modern alchemy if compounds with the best superconducting properties are to be manufactured. We don't use the word alchemy in a deprecatory sense but just to emphasise that till now nobody can say why these compounds are what they are: superconductors.

  10. Cantilever anemometer based on a superconducting micro-resonator: Application to superfluid turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Salort, J.; Monfardini, A.; Roche, P.-E.

    2012-12-15

    We present a new type of cryogenic local velocity probe that operates in liquid helium (1 K < T < 4.2 K) and achieves a spatial resolution of Almost-Equal-To 0.1 mm. The operating principle is based on the deflection of a micro-machined silicon cantilever which reflects the local fluid velocity. Deflection is probed using a superconducting niobium micro-resonator sputtered on the sensor and used as a strain gauge. We present the working principle and the design of the probe, as well as calibration measurements and velocity spectra obtained in a turbulent helium flow above and below the superfluid transition.

  11. Coherently coupling distinct spin ensembles through a high-Tc superconducting resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghirri, A.; Bonizzoni, C.; Troiani, F.; Buccheri, N.; Beverina, L.; Cassinese, A.; Affronte, M.

    2016-06-01

    The problem of coupling multiple spin ensembles through cavity photons is revisited by using (3,5-dichloro-4-pyridyl)bis(2,4,6-trichlorophenyl)methyl (PyBTM) organic radicals and a high-Tc superconducting coplanar resonator. An exceptionally strong coupling is obtained and up to three spin ensembles are simultaneously coupled. The ensembles are made physically distinguishable by chemically varying the g factor and by exploiting the inhomogeneities of the applied magnetic field. The coherent mixing of the spin and field modes is demonstrated by the observed multiple anticrossing, along with the simulations performed within the input-output formalism, and quantified by suitable entropic measures.

  12. Production of a highly charged uranium ion beam with RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Higurashi, Y.; Ohnishi, J.; Nakagawa, T.; Haba, H.; Fujimaki, M.; Komiyama, M.; Kamigaito, O.; Tamura, M.; Aihara, T.; Uchiyama, A.

    2012-02-15

    A highly charged uranium (U) ion beam is produced from the RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source using 18 and 28 GHz microwaves. The sputtering method is used to produce this U ion beam. The beam intensity is strongly dependent on the rod position and sputtering voltage. We observe that the emittance of U{sup 35+} for 28 GHz microwaves is almost the same as that for 18 GHz microwaves. It seems that the beam intensity of U ions produced using 28 GHz microwaves is higher than that produced using 18 GHz microwaves at the same Radio Frequency (RF) power.

  13. Development of an 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at RCNP.

    PubMed

    Yorita, Tetsuhiko; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Kibayashi, Mitsuru; Morinobu, Shunpei; Okamura, Hiroyuki; Tamii, Atsushi

    2008-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source has recently been developed and installed in order to extend the variety and the intensity of ions at the RCNP coupled cyclotron facility. Production of several ions such as O, N, Ar, Kr, etc., is now under development and some of them have already been used for user experiments. For example, highly charged heavy ion beams like (86)Kr(21+,23+) and intense (16)O(5+,6+) and (15)N(6+) ion beams have been provided for experiments. The metal ion from volatile compounds method for boron ions has been developed as well. PMID:18315101

  14. Raman and fluorescence characteristics of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering from doped superconducting cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H. Y.; Jia, C. J.; Chen, Z. Y.; Wohlfeld, K.; Moritz, B.; Devereaux, T. P.; Wu, W. B.; Okamoto, J.; Lee, W. S.; Hashimoto, M.; He, Y.; Shen, Z. X.; Yoshida, Y.; Eisaki, H.; Mou, C. Y.; Chen, C. T.; Huang, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of spin excitations are essential for an understanding of spin-mediated pairing for superconductivity; and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) provides a considerable opportunity to probe high-energy spin excitations. However, whether RIXS correctly measures the collective spin excitations of doped superconducting cuprates remains under debate. Here we demonstrate distinct Raman- and fluorescence-like RIXS excitations of Bi1.5Pb0.6Sr1.54CaCu2O8+δ. Combining photon-energy and momentum dependent RIXS measurements with theoretical calculations using exact diagonalization provides conclusive evidence that the Raman-like RIXS excitations correspond to collective spin excitations, which are magnons in the undoped Mott insulators and evolve into paramagnons in doped superconducting compounds. In contrast, the fluorescence-like shifts are due primarily to the continuum of particle-hole excitations in the charge channel. Our results show that under the proper experimental conditions RIXS indeed can be used to probe paramagnons in doped high-Tc cuprate superconductors.

  15. Resonating Valence Bonds and Mean-Field d-Wave Superconductivity in Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Black-Schaffer, Annica M.

    2010-04-27

    We investigate the possibility of inducing superconductivity in a graphite layer by electronic correlation effects. We use a phenomenological microscopic Hamiltonian which includes nearest neighbor hopping and an interaction term which explicitly favors nearest neighbor spin-singlets through the well-known resonance valence bond (RVB) character of planar organic molecules. Treating this Hamiltonian in mean-field theory, allowing for bond-dependent variation of the RVB order parameter, we show that both s- and d-wave superconducting states are possible. The d-wave solution belongs to a two-dimensional representation and breaks time reversal symmetry. At zero doping there exists a quantum critical point at the dimensionless coupling J/t = 1.91 and the s- and d-wave solutions are degenerate for low temperatures. At finite doping the d-wave solution has a significantly higher T{sub c} than the s-wave solution. By using density functional theory we show that the doping induced from sulfur absorption on a graphite layer is enough to cause an electronically driven d-wave superconductivity at graphite-sulfur interfaces. We also discuss applying our results to the case of the intercalated graphites as well as the validity of a mean-field approach.

  16. Raman and fluorescence characteristics of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering from doped superconducting cuprates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Huang, H. Y.; Jia, C. J.; Chen, Z. Y.; Wohlfeld, K.; Moritz, B.; Devereaux, T. P.; Wu, W. B.; Okamoto, J.; Lee, W. S.; Hashimoto, M.; et al

    2016-01-22

    Measurements of spin excitations are essential for an understanding of spin-mediated pairing for superconductivity; and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) provides a considerable opportunity to probe high-energy spin excitations. However, whether RIXS correctly measures the collective spin excitations of doped superconducting cuprates remains under debate. Here we demonstrate distinct Raman- and fluorescence-like RIXS excitations of Bi1.5Pb0.6Sr1.54CaCu2O8+δ. Combining photon-energy and momentum dependent RIXS measurements with theoretical calculations using exact diagonalization provides conclusive evidence that the Raman-like RIXS excitations correspond to collective spin excitations, which are magnons in the undoped Mott insulators and evolve into paramagnons in doped superconducting compounds. In contrast,more » the fluorescence-like shifts are due primarily to the continuum of particle-hole excitations in the charge channel. Our results show that under the proper experimental conditions RIXS indeed can be used to probe paramagnons in doped high-Tc cuprate superconductors.« less

  17. Raman and fluorescence characteristics of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering from doped superconducting cuprates

    PubMed Central

    Huang, H. Y.; Jia, C. J.; Chen, Z. Y.; Wohlfeld, K.; Moritz, B.; Devereaux, T. P.; Wu, W. B.; Okamoto, J.; Lee, W. S.; Hashimoto, M.; He, Y.; Shen, Z. X.; Yoshida, Y.; Eisaki, H.; Mou, C. Y.; Chen, C. T.; Huang, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of spin excitations are essential for an understanding of spin-mediated pairing for superconductivity; and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) provides a considerable opportunity to probe high-energy spin excitations. However, whether RIXS correctly measures the collective spin excitations of doped superconducting cuprates remains under debate. Here we demonstrate distinct Raman- and fluorescence-like RIXS excitations of Bi1.5Pb0.6Sr1.54CaCu2O8+δ. Combining photon-energy and momentum dependent RIXS measurements with theoretical calculations using exact diagonalization provides conclusive evidence that the Raman-like RIXS excitations correspond to collective spin excitations, which are magnons in the undoped Mott insulators and evolve into paramagnons in doped superconducting compounds. In contrast, the fluorescence-like shifts are due primarily to the continuum of particle-hole excitations in the charge channel. Our results show that under the proper experimental conditions RIXS indeed can be used to probe paramagnons in doped high-Tc cuprate superconductors. PMID:26794437

  18. Progress of superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion sources at Institute of Modern Physics (IMP)

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, L. Feng, Y. C.; Zhang, W. H.; Zhang, X. Z.; Cao, Y.; Wu, W.; Yang, T. J.; Zhao, B.; Zhao, H. W.; Ma, L. Z.; Xia, J. W.; Lu, W.; Zhao, Y. Y.; Xie, D.

    2014-02-15

    Superconducting ECR ion sources can produce intense highly charged ion beams for the application in heavy ion accelerators. Superconducting Electron Resonance ion source with Advanced Design (SECRAL) is one of the few fully superconducting ECR ion sources that has been successfully built and put into routine operation for years. With enormous efforts and R and D work, promising results have been achieved with the ion source. Heated by the microwave power from a 7 kW/24 GHz gyrotron microwave generator, very intense highly charged gaseous ion beams have been produced, such as 455 eμA Xe{sup 27+}, 236 eμA Xe{sup 30+}, and 64 eμA Xe{sup 35+}. Since heavy metallic ion beams are being more and more attractive and important for many accelerator projects globally, intensive studies have been made to produce highly charged heavy metal ion beams, such as those from bismuth and uranium. Recently, 420 eμA Bi{sup 30+} and 202 eμA U{sup 33+} have been produced with SECRAL source. This paper will present the latest results with SECRAL, and the operation status will be discussed as well. An introduction of recently started SECRAL II project will also be given in the presentation.

  19. Progress of superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion sources at Institute of Modern Physics (IMP).

    PubMed

    Sun, L; Lu, W; Feng, Y C; Zhang, W H; Zhang, X Z; Cao, Y; Zhao, Y Y; Wu, W; Yang, T J; Zhao, B; Zhao, H W; Ma, L Z; Xia, J W; Xie, D

    2014-02-01

    Superconducting ECR ion sources can produce intense highly charged ion beams for the application in heavy ion accelerators. Superconducting Electron Resonance ion source with Advanced Design (SECRAL) is one of the few fully superconducting ECR ion sources that has been successfully built and put into routine operation for years. With enormous efforts and R&D work, promising results have been achieved with the ion source. Heated by the microwave power from a 7 kW/24 GHz gyrotron microwave generator, very intense highly charged gaseous ion beams have been produced, such as 455 eμA Xe(27+), 236 eμA Xe(30+), and 64 eμA Xe(35+). Since heavy metallic ion beams are being more and more attractive and important for many accelerator projects globally, intensive studies have been made to produce highly charged heavy metal ion beams, such as those from bismuth and uranium. Recently, 420 eμA Bi(30+) and 202 eμA U(33+) have been produced with SECRAL source. This paper will present the latest results with SECRAL, and the operation status will be discussed as well. An introduction of recently started SECRAL II project will also be given in the presentation. PMID:24593521

  20. Raman and fluorescence characteristics of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering from doped superconducting cuprates.

    PubMed

    Huang, H Y; Jia, C J; Chen, Z Y; Wohlfeld, K; Moritz, B; Devereaux, T P; Wu, W B; Okamoto, J; Lee, W S; Hashimoto, M; He, Y; Shen, Z X; Yoshida, Y; Eisaki, H; Mou, C Y; Chen, C T; Huang, D J

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of spin excitations are essential for an understanding of spin-mediated pairing for superconductivity; and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) provides a considerable opportunity to probe high-energy spin excitations. However, whether RIXS correctly measures the collective spin excitations of doped superconducting cuprates remains under debate. Here we demonstrate distinct Raman- and fluorescence-like RIXS excitations of Bi1.5Pb0.6Sr1.54CaCu2O(8+δ). Combining photon-energy and momentum dependent RIXS measurements with theoretical calculations using exact diagonalization provides conclusive evidence that the Raman-like RIXS excitations correspond to collective spin excitations, which are magnons in the undoped Mott insulators and evolve into paramagnons in doped superconducting compounds. In contrast, the fluorescence-like shifts are due primarily to the continuum of particle-hole excitations in the charge channel. Our results show that under the proper experimental conditions RIXS indeed can be used to probe paramagnons in doped high-Tc cuprate superconductors. PMID:26794437

  1. First results of 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source for KBSI accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jin Yong; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Kim, Seong Jun; Ok, Jung-Woo; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Shin, Chang Seouk; Hong, Jonggi; Bahng, Jungbae; Won, Mi-Sook

    2016-02-01

    The 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source has been developed to produce a high current heavy ion for the linear accelerator at KBSI (Korea Basic Science Institute). The objective of this study is to generate fast neutrons with a proton target via a p(Li,n)Be reaction. The design and fabrication of the essential components of the ECR ion source, which include a superconducting magnet with a liquid helium re-condensed cryostat and a 10 kW high-power microwave, were completed. The waveguide components were connected with a plasma chamber including a gas supply system. The plasma chamber was inserted into the warm bore of the superconducting magnet. A high voltage system was also installed for the ion beam extraction. After the installation of the ECR ion source, we reported the results for ECR plasma ignition at ECRIS 2014 in Russia. Following plasma ignition, we successfully extracted multi-charged ions and obtained the first results in terms of ion beam spectra from various species. This was verified by a beam diagnostic system for a low energy beam transport system. In this article, we present the first results and report on the current status of the KBSI accelerator project.

  2. First results of 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source for KBSI accelerator.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Yong; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Kim, Seong Jun; Ok, Jung-Woo; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Shin, Chang Seouk; Hong, Jonggi; Bahng, Jungbae; Won, Mi-Sook

    2016-02-01

    The 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source has been developed to produce a high current heavy ion for the linear accelerator at KBSI (Korea Basic Science Institute). The objective of this study is to generate fast neutrons with a proton target via a p(Li,n)Be reaction. The design and fabrication of the essential components of the ECR ion source, which include a superconducting magnet with a liquid helium re-condensed cryostat and a 10 kW high-power microwave, were completed. The waveguide components were connected with a plasma chamber including a gas supply system. The plasma chamber was inserted into the warm bore of the superconducting magnet. A high voltage system was also installed for the ion beam extraction. After the installation of the ECR ion source, we reported the results for ECR plasma ignition at ECRIS 2014 in Russia. Following plasma ignition, we successfully extracted multi-charged ions and obtained the first results in terms of ion beam spectra from various species. This was verified by a beam diagnostic system for a low energy beam transport system. In this article, we present the first results and report on the current status of the KBSI accelerator project. PMID:26931935

  3. A near-field scanning microwave microscope based on a superconducting resonator for low power measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, S. E.; Danilov, A. V.; Adamyan, A.; Kubatkin, S. E.

    2013-02-01

    We report on the design and performance of a cryogenic (300 mK) near-field scanning microwave microscope. It uses a microwave resonator as the near-field sensor, operating at a frequency of 6 GHz and microwave probing amplitudes down to 100 {μ V}, approaching low enough photon population (N ˜ 1000) of the resonator such that coherent quantum manipulation becomes feasible. The resonator is made out of a miniaturized distributed fractal superconducting circuit that is integrated with the probing tip, micromachined to be compact enough such that it can be mounted directly on a quartz tuning-fork, and used for parallel operation as an atomic force microscope (AFM). The resonator is magnetically coupled to a transmission line for readout, and to achieve enhanced sensitivity we employ a Pound-Drever-Hall measurement scheme to lock to the resonance frequency. We achieve a well localized near-field around the tip such that the microwave resolution is comparable to the AFM resolution, and a capacitive sensitivity down to 6.4 × 10-20 F/sqrt{Hz}, limited by mechanical noise. We believe that the results presented here are a significant step towards probing quantum systems at the nanoscale using near-field scanning microwave microscopy.

  4. A near-field scanning microwave microscope based on a superconducting resonator for low power measurements.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, S E; Danilov, A V; Adamyan, A; Kubatkin, S E

    2013-02-01

    We report on the design and performance of a cryogenic (300 mK) near-field scanning microwave microscope. It uses a microwave resonator as the near-field sensor, operating at a frequency of 6 GHz and microwave probing amplitudes down to 100 μV, approaching low enough photon population (N ∼ 1000) of the resonator such that coherent quantum manipulation becomes feasible. The resonator is made out of a miniaturized distributed fractal superconducting circuit that is integrated with the probing tip, micromachined to be compact enough such that it can be mounted directly on a quartz tuning-fork, and used for parallel operation as an atomic force microscope (AFM). The resonator is magnetically coupled to a transmission line for readout, and to achieve enhanced sensitivity we employ a Pound-Drever-Hall measurement scheme to lock to the resonance frequency. We achieve a well localized near-field around the tip such that the microwave resolution is comparable to the AFM resolution, and a capacitive sensitivity down to 6.4 × 10(-20) F/Hz, limited by mechanical noise. We believe that the results presented here are a significant step towards probing quantum systems at the nanoscale using near-field scanning microwave microscopy. PMID:23464217

  5. Tunable TiN or NbTiN resonators and couplers using nonlinear kinetic inductance for superconducting qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vissers, Michael; Gao, Jiansong; Bockstiegel, Clint; Sandberg, Martin; Pappas, David

    2014-03-01

    Nitride superconductors such as TiN and NbTiN have a nonlinear kinetic inductance when driven at high current. Using this current-tunable reactance, we have designed superconducting devices that are tunable with a DC current without using Josephson junctions. We show that when the DC current is directly coupled to a lumped element resonator, the resonant frequency can be tuned by >4% without inducing loss. In other circuits, we can use a DC current to independently tune the coupling of a long microwave transmission line to a standard superconducting resonator from zero to maximum coupling. In addition to characterizing the non-linear current response of these materials, these tunable devices could be used as a tunable coupler in transmon qubits, by adjusting the strength of the cavity's Purcell effect to the qubit as needed. They also have potential to be used as tunable filters or parametric amplifiers in superconducting circuits.

  6. A study of two-level system defects in dielectric films using superconducting resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Moe Shwan

    In this dissertation I describe measurements of dielectric loss at microwave frequencies due to two level systems (TLS) using superconducting resonators. Most measurements were performed in a dilution refrigerator at temperatures between 30 and 200 mK and all resonators discussed were fabricated with thin-film superconducting aluminum. I derive the transmission through a non-ideal (mismatched) resonant circuit and find that in general the resonance line-shape is asymmetric. I describe an analysis method for extracting the internal quality factor (Q i), the diameter correction method (DCM), and compare it to a commonly used phenomenological method, the phi rotation method (phiRM). I analytically find that the phiRM deterministically overestimates Qi when the asymmetry of the resonance line-shape is high. Four coplanar resonator geometries were studied, with frequencies spanning 5-7 GHz. They were all superconducting aluminum fabricated on sapphire and silicon substrates. These include a quasi-lumped element resonator, a coplanar strip transmission line resonator, and two hybrid designs that contain both a coplanar strip and a quasi-lumped element. Measured Qi's were as high as 2 x 105 for single photon excitations and there was no systematic variation in loss between quasi-lumped and coplanar strip resonance modes. I also measured the microwave loss tangent of several atomic layer deposition (ALD) grown dielectrics and obtained secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) measurements of the same films. I found that hydrogen defect concentrations were correlated with low temperature microwave loss. In amorphous films that showed excess hydrogen defects on the surface, two independent TLS distributions were required to fit the loss tangent, one for the surface and one for the bulk. In crystalline dielectrics where hydrogen contamination was uniform throughout the bulk, a single bulk TLS distribution was sufficient. Finally, I measured the TLS loss in 250 nm thick HD

  7. Large Dispersive Shift of Cavity Resonance Induced by a Superconducting Flux Qubit in the Straddling Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inomata, Kunihiro; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Billangeon, Pierre-M.; Lin, Zhirong; Nakamura, Yasunobu; Tsai, Jaw-Shen; Koshino, Kazuki

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate enhancement of the dispersive frequency shift in a coplanar waveguide resonator induced by a capacitively coupled superconducting flux qubit in the straddling regime. The magnitude of the observed shift, 80 MHz for the qubit-resonator detuning of 5 GHz, is quantitatively explained by the generalized Rabi model which takes into account the contribution of the qubit higher energy levels. By applying the enhanced dispersive shift to the qubit readout, we achieved 90 % contrast of the Rabi oscillations which is mainly limited by the energy relaxation of the qubit. We also discuss the qubit readout using a Josephson parametric amplifier. This work was supported by the MEXT Kakenhi ``Quantum Cybernetics'', the JSPS through its FIRST Program, and the NICT Commissioned Research.

  8. Quantum state transfer and controlled-phase gate on one-dimensional superconducting resonators assisted by a quantum bus.

    PubMed

    Hua, Ming; Tao, Ming-Jie; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2016-01-01

    We propose a quantum processor for the scalable quantum computation on microwave photons in distant one-dimensional superconducting resonators. It is composed of a common resonator R acting as a quantum bus and some distant resonators rj coupled to the bus in different positions assisted by superconducting quantum interferometer devices (SQUID), different from previous processors. R is coupled to one transmon qutrit, and the coupling strengths between rj and R can be fully tuned by the external flux through the SQUID. To show the processor can be used to achieve universal quantum computation effectively, we present a scheme to complete the high-fidelity quantum state transfer between two distant microwave-photon resonators and another one for the high-fidelity controlled-phase gate on them. By using the technique for catching and releasing the microwave photons from resonators, our processor may play an important role in quantum communication as well. PMID:26907366

  9. Quantum state transfer and controlled-phase gate on one-dimensional superconducting resonators assisted by a quantum bus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Ming; Tao, Ming-Jie; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2016-02-01

    We propose a quantum processor for the scalable quantum computation on microwave photons in distant one-dimensional superconducting resonators. It is composed of a common resonator R acting as a quantum bus and some distant resonators rj coupled to the bus in different positions assisted by superconducting quantum interferometer devices (SQUID), different from previous processors. R is coupled to one transmon qutrit, and the coupling strengths between rj and R can be fully tuned by the external flux through the SQUID. To show the processor can be used to achieve universal quantum computation effectively, we present a scheme to complete the high-fidelity quantum state transfer between two distant microwave-photon resonators and another one for the high-fidelity controlled-phase gate on them. By using the technique for catching and releasing the microwave photons from resonators, our processor may play an important role in quantum communication as well.

  10. Quantum state transfer and controlled-phase gate on one-dimensional superconducting resonators assisted by a quantum bus

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Ming; Tao, Ming-Jie; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2016-01-01

    We propose a quantum processor for the scalable quantum computation on microwave photons in distant one-dimensional superconducting resonators. It is composed of a common resonator R acting as a quantum bus and some distant resonators rj coupled to the bus in different positions assisted by superconducting quantum interferometer devices (SQUID), different from previous processors. R is coupled to one transmon qutrit, and the coupling strengths between rj and R can be fully tuned by the external flux through the SQUID. To show the processor can be used to achieve universal quantum computation effectively, we present a scheme to complete the high-fidelity quantum state transfer between two distant microwave-photon resonators and another one for the high-fidelity controlled-phase gate on them. By using the technique for catching and releasing the microwave photons from resonators, our processor may play an important role in quantum communication as well. PMID:26907366

  11. Beam steering in superconducting quarter-wave resonators: An analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facco, Alberto; Zvyagintsev, Vladimir

    2011-07-01

    Beam steering in superconducting quarter-wave resonators (QWRs), which is mainly caused by magnetic fields, has been pointed out in 2001 in an early work [A. Facco and V. Zviagintsev, in Proceedings of the Particle Accelerator Conference, Chicago, IL, 2001 (IEEE, New York, 2001), p. 1095], where an analytical formula describing it was proposed and the influence of cavity geometry was discussed. Since then, the importance of this effect was recognized and effective correction techniques have been found [P. N. Ostroumov and K. W. Shepard, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 4, 110101 (2001)PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.4.110101]. This phenomenon was further studied in the following years, mainly with numerical methods. In this paper we intend to go back to the original approach and, using well established approximations, derive a simple analytical expression for QWR steering which includes correction methods and reproduces the data starting from a few calculable geometrical constants which characterize every cavity. This expression, of the type of the Panofski equation, can be a useful tool in the design of superconducting quarter-wave resonators and in the definition of their limits of application with different beams.

  12. Probing dynamics of a spin ensemble of P1 centers in diamond using a superconducting resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lange, Gijs; Ranjan, Vishal; Schutjens, Ron; Debelhoir, Thibault; Groen, Joost; Szombati, Daniel; Thoen, David; Klapwijk, Teun; Hanson, Ronald; Dicarlo, Leonardo

    2013-03-01

    Solid-state spin ensembles are promising candidates for realizing a quantum memory for superconducting circuits. Understanding the dynamics of such ensembles is a necessary step towards achieving this goal. Here, we investigate the dynamics of an ensemble of nitrogen impurities (P1 centers) in diamond using magnetic-field controlled coupling to the first two modes of a superconducting (NbTiN) coplanar waveguide resonator. Three hyperfine-split spin sub-ensembles are clearly resolved in the 0.25-1.2 K temperature range, with a collective coupling strength extrapolating to 23 MHz at full polarization. The coupling to multiple modes allows us to distinguish the contributions of dipolar broadening and magnetic field inhomogeneity to the spin linewidth. We find the spin polarization recovery rate to be temperature independent below 1 K and conclude that spin out-diffusion across the resonator mode volume provides the mechanism for spin relaxation of the ensemble. Furthermore, by pumping spins in one sub-ensemble and probing the spins in the other sub-ensembles, we observe fast steady-state cross-relaxation (compared to spin repolarization) across the hyperfine transitions. These observations have important implications for using the three sub-ensembles as independent quantum memories. Research supported by NWO, FOM, and EU Project SOLID

  13. Tracking errors of a logical qubit comprised of superpositions of cat states in a superconducting resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrenko, A.; Ofek, N.; Heeres, R.; Reinhold, P.; Liu, Y.; Leghtas, Z.; Vlastakis, B.; Frunzio, L.; Jiang, Liang; Mirrahimi, M.; Devoret, M. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    QEC schemes involve redundantly encoding a qubit into a larger space of states that has symmetry properties that allow one to measure error syndromes. Traditional approaches involve encodings that employ large numbers of physical qubits, enhancing decay rates significantly and requiring considerable hardware overhead to realize. A hardware-efficient proposal, which we term the cat code, sheds much of this complexity by encoding a qubit in superpositions of cat states in a superconducting resonator, which has one dominant error syndrome: single photon loss. As these cat states are eigenstates of photon number parity, the loss of a photon changes the parity without corrupting the encoded information. In a superconducting cQED architecture, we demonstrate that we track these errors in real-time with repeated single shot parity measurements and map their occurrence onto applications of a unitary rotation of an arbitrary encoded state in the logical space. Our results illustrate the utility of long-lived resonators in the context of a full QEC system by highlighting the advantages of employing the cat code to suppress decoherence.

  14. Superconducting qubit as a quantum transformer routing entanglement between a microscopic quantum memory and a macroscopic resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, Alexander; Saito, Shiro; Semba, Kouichi; Munro, William J.; Nemoto, Kae

    2011-09-01

    We demonstrate experimentally the creation and measurement of an entangled state between a microscopic two-level system (TLS), formed by a defect in an oxide layer, and a macroscopic superconducting resonator, where their indirect interaction is mediated by an artificial atom, a superconducting persistent current qubit (PCQB). Under appropriate conditions, we found the coherence time of the TLS, the resonator, and the entangled state of these two are significantly longer than the Ramsey dephasing time of PCQB itself. This demonstrates that a PCQB can be used as a quantum transformer to address high coherence microscopic quantum memories by connecting them to macroscopic quantum buses.

  15. X-shaped and Y-shaped Andreev resonance profiles in a superconducting quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Mi, Shuo; Pikulin, D. I.; Marciani, M.; Beenakker, C. W. J.

    2014-12-15

    The quasi-bound states of a superconducting quantum dot that is weakly coupled to a normal metal appear as resonances in the Andreev reflection probability, measured via the differential conductance. We study the evolution of these Andreev resonances when an external parameter (such as the magnetic field or gate voltage) is varied, using a random-matrix model for the N × N scattering matrix. We contrast the two ensembles with broken time-reversal symmetry, in the presence or absence of spin-rotation symmetry (class C or D). The poles of the scattering matrix in the complex plane, encoding the center and width of the resonance, are repelled from the imaginary axis in class C. In class D, in contrast, a number ∝ √N of the poles has zero real part. The corresponding Andreev resonances are pinned to the middle of the gap and produce a zero-bias conductance peak that does not split over a range of parameter values (Y-shaped profile), unlike the usual conductance peaks that merge and then immediately split (X-shaped profile)

  16. High Q BPS Monopole Bags are Urchins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evslin, Jarah; Gudnason, Sven Bjarke

    2014-01-01

    It has been known for 30 years that 't Hooft-Polyakov monopoles of charge Q greater than one cannot be spherically symmetric. Five years ago, Bolognesi conjectured that, at some point in their moduli space, BPS monopoles can become approximately spherically symmetric in the high Q limit. In this paper, we determine the sense in which this conjecture is correct. We consider an SU(2) gauge theory with an adjoint scalar field, and numerically find configurations with Q units of magnetic charge and a mass which is roughly linear in Q, for example, in the case Q = 81 we present a configuration whose energy exceeds the BPS bound by about 54%. These approximate solutions are constructed by gluing together Q cones, each of which contains a single unit of magnetic charge. In each cone, the energy is largest in the core, and so a constant energy density surface contains Q peaks and thus resembles a sea urchin.

  17. Adiabatic formation of high-Q modes by suppression of chaotic diffusion in deformed microdiscs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Jeong-Bo; Eberspächer, Alexander; Wiersig, Jan

    2013-11-01

    Resonant modes with high-Q factors in a two-dimensional deformed microdisc cavity are analyzed by using a dynamical and semiclassical approach. The analysis focuses particularly on the ultra-small cavity regime, where the scale of a resonant free-space wavelength is comparable with that of the microdisc size. Although the deformed microcavity has strongly chaotic internal ray dynamics, modes with high-Q factors in this regime show unexpectedly regular distributions in configuration space and adiabatic features in phase space. By tracing the evolution process of such high-Q modes through the deformation from a circular cavity, it is uncovered that the high-Q modes are formed adiabatically on cantori. Due to the openness of microcavities, such adiabatic formation of high-Q modes around cantori is enabled, in spite of strong chaos in ray dynamics. Since the cantori are in close contact with short periodic orbits, their influence on the modes, such as localization patterns in phase space, can be also clarified. In order to quantitatively analyze the spectral range where high-Q modes appear, the phase space section of the deformed microcavity is partitioned by partial barriers of short periodic orbits, and the semiclassical quantization scheme is applied to the partitioned areas and their action fluxes. The derived spectral ranges for the high-Q modes show a good agreement with a numerically observed spectrum. In the course of semiclassical quantization, it is shown that the chaotic diffusion in the system that we investigate can be resolved by the scale of a quarter effective Planck's constant, and the topological structure of the manifolds in phase space allows for this resolution higher than a Planck constant scale. By analyzing flux Farey trees, the role of short periodic orbits in chaotic diffusion and their connection to cantori are verified.

  18. New development of advanced superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source SECRAL (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, H. W.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, X. Z.; Guo, X. H.; Zhao, H. Y.; Feng, Y. C.; Li, J. Y.; Ma, H. Y.; Ma, B. H.; Wang, H.; Li, X. X.; Xie, D. Z.; Lu, W.; Cao, Y.; Shang, Y.

    2010-02-15

    Superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with advance design in Lanzhou (SECRAL) is an 18-28 GHz fully superconducting electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source dedicated for highly charged heavy ion beam production. SECRAL, with an innovative superconducting magnet structure of solenoid-inside-sextupole and at lower frequency and lower rf power operation, may open a new way for developing compact and reliable high performance superconducting ECR ion source. One of the recent highlights achieved at SECRAL is that some new record beam currents for very high charge states were produced by 18 GHz or 18+14.5 GHz double frequency heating, such as 1 e {mu}A of {sup 129}Xe{sup 43+}, 22 e {mu}A of {sup 209}Bi{sup 41+}, and 1.5 e {mu}A of {sup 209}Bi{sup 50+}. To further enhance the performance of SECRAL, a 24 GHz/7 kW gyrotron microwave generator was installed and SECRAL was tested at 24 GHz. Some promising and exciting results at 24 GHz with new record highly charged ion beam intensities were produced, such as 455 e {mu}A of {sup 129}Xe{sup 27+} and 152 e {mu}A of {sup 129}Xe{sup 30+}, although the commissioning time was limited within 3-4 weeks and rf power only 3-4 kW. Bremsstrahlung measurements at 24 GHz show that x-ray is much stronger with higher rf frequency, higher rf power. and higher minimum mirror magnetic field (minimum B). Preliminary emittance measurements indicate that SECRAL emittance at 24 GHz is slightly higher that at 18 GHz. SECRAL has been put into routine operation at 18 GHz for heavy ion research facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL) accelerator complex since May 2007. The total operation beam time from SECRAL for HIRFL accelerator has been more than 2000 h, and {sup 129}Xe{sup 27+}, {sup 78}Kr{sup 19+}, {sup 209}Bi{sup 31+}, and {sup 58}Ni{sup 19+} beams were delivered. All of these new developments, the latest results, and long-term operation for the accelerator have again demonstrated that SECRAL is one of the best in the performance of

  19. New development of advanced superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source SECRAL (invited).

    PubMed

    Zhao, H W; Sun, L T; Lu, W; Zhang, X Z; Guo, X H; Cao, Y; Zhao, H Y; Feng, Y C; Li, J Y; Ma, H Y; Shang, Y; Ma, B H; Wang, H; Li, X X; Xie, D Z

    2010-02-01

    Superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with advance design in Lanzhou (SECRAL) is an 18-28 GHz fully superconducting electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source dedicated for highly charged heavy ion beam production. SECRAL, with an innovative superconducting magnet structure of solenoid-inside-sextupole and at lower frequency and lower rf power operation, may open a new way for developing compact and reliable high performance superconducting ECR ion source. One of the recent highlights achieved at SECRAL is that some new record beam currents for very high charge states were produced by 18 GHz or 18+14.5 GHz double frequency heating, such as 1 e microA of (129)Xe(43+), 22 e microA of (209)Bi(41+), and 1.5 e microA of (209)Bi(50+). To further enhance the performance of SECRAL, a 24 GHz/7 kW gyrotron microwave generator was installed and SECRAL was tested at 24 GHz. Some promising and exciting results at 24 GHz with new record highly charged ion beam intensities were produced, such as 455 e microA of (129)Xe(27+) and 152 e microA of (129)Xe(30+), although the commissioning time was limited within 3-4 weeks and rf power only 3-4 kW. Bremsstrahlung measurements at 24 GHz show that x-ray is much stronger with higher rf frequency, higher rf power. and higher minimum mirror magnetic field (minimum B). Preliminary emittance measurements indicate that SECRAL emittance at 24 GHz is slightly higher that at 18 GHz. SECRAL has been put into routine operation at 18 GHz for heavy ion research facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL) accelerator complex since May 2007. The total operation beam time from SECRAL for HIRFL accelerator has been more than 2000 h, and (129)Xe(27+), (78)Kr(19+), (209)Bi(31+), and (58)Ni(19+) beams were delivered. All of these new developments, the latest results, and long-term operation for the accelerator have again demonstrated that SECRAL is one of the best in the performance of ECR ion source for highly charged heavy ion beam production

  20. Superconducting magnet performance for 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source developed at the Korea Basic Science Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jin Yong; Choi, Seyong; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Ok, Jung-Woo; Shin, Chang Seouk; Won, Mi-Sook; Kim, Byoung Chul; Ahn, Jung Keun

    2014-02-15

    A superconducting magnet for use in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source was developed at the Korea Basic Science Institute. The superconducting magnet is comprised of three solenoids and a hexapole magnet. According to the design value, the solenoid magnets can generate a mirror field, resulting in axial magnetic fields of 3.6 T at the injection area and 2.2 T at the extraction region. A radial field strength of 2.1 T can also be achieved by hexapole magnet on the plasma chamber wall. NbTi superconducting wire was used in the winding process following appropriate techniques for magnet structure. The final assembly of the each magnet involved it being vertically inserted into the cryostat to cool down the temperature using liquid helium. The performance of each solenoid and hexapole magnet was separately verified experimentally. The construction of the superconducting coil, the entire magnet assembly for performance testing and experimental results are reported herein.

  1. Co-sputtered MoRe thin films for carbon nanotube growth-compatible superconducting coplanar resonators.

    PubMed

    Götz, K J G; Blien, S; Stiller, P L; Vavra, O; Mayer, T; Huber, T; Meier, T N G; Kronseder, M; Strunk, Ch; Hüttel, A K

    2016-04-01

    Molybdenum rhenium alloy thin films can exhibit superconductivity up to critical temperatures of T(c)=15K. At the same time, the films are highly stable in the high-temperature methane/hydrogen atmosphere typically required to grow single wall carbon nanotubes. We characterize molybdenum rhenium alloy films deposited via simultaneous sputtering from two sources, with respect to their composition as function of sputter parameters and their electronic dc as well as GHz properties at low temperature. Specific emphasis is placed on the effect of the carbon nanotube growth conditions on the film. Superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators are defined lithographically; we demonstrate that the resonators remain functional when undergoing nanotube growth conditions, and characterize their properties as function of temperature. This paves the way for ultra-clean nanotube devices grown in situ onto superconducting coplanar waveguide circuit elements. PMID:26901846

  2. Co-sputtered MoRe thin films for carbon nanotube growth-compatible superconducting coplanar resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götz, K. J. G.; Blien, S.; Stiller, P. L.; Vavra, O.; Mayer, T.; Huber, T.; Meier, T. N. G.; Kronseder, M.; Strunk, Ch; Hüttel, A. K.

    2016-04-01

    Molybdenum rhenium alloy thin films can exhibit superconductivity up to critical temperatures of {T}{{c}}=15 {{K}}. At the same time, the films are highly stable in the high-temperature methane/hydrogen atmosphere typically required to grow single wall carbon nanotubes. We characterize molybdenum rhenium alloy films deposited via simultaneous sputtering from two sources, with respect to their composition as function of sputter parameters and their electronic dc as well as GHz properties at low temperature. Specific emphasis is placed on the effect of the carbon nanotube growth conditions on the film. Superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators are defined lithographically; we demonstrate that the resonators remain functional when undergoing nanotube growth conditions, and characterize their properties as function of temperature. This paves the way for ultra-clean nanotube devices grown in situ onto superconducting coplanar waveguide circuit elements.

  3. Physics and material science of ultra-high quality factor superconducting resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Vostrikov, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    The nitrogen doping into niobium superconducting radio frequency cavity walls aiming to improve the fundamental mode quality factor is the subject of the research in the given work. Quantitative nitrogen diffusion into niobium model calculating the concentration profile was developed. The model estimations were confirmed with secondary ion mass spectrometry technique measurements. The model made controlled nitrogen doping recipe optimization possible. As a result the robust reproducible recipe for SRF cavity walls treatment with nitrogen doping was developed. The cavities produced with optimized recipe met LCLS–II requirements on quality factor of 2.7 ∙ 1010 at acceleration field of 16 MV/m. The microscopic effects of nitrogen doping on superconducting niobium properties were studied with low energy muon spin rotation technique and magnetometer measurements. No significant effect of nitrogen on the following features was found: electron mean free path, magnetic field penetration depth, and upper and surface critical magnetic fields. It was detected that for nitrogen doped niobium samples magnetic flux starts to penetrate inside the superconductor at lower external magnetic field value compared to the low temperature baked niobium ones. This explains lower quench field of SRF cavities treated with nitrogen. Quality factor improvement of fundamental mode forced to analyze the high order mode (HOM) impact on the particle beam dynamics. Both resonant and cumulative effects caused by monopole and dipole HOMs respectively are found to be negligible within the requirements for LCLS–II.

  4. Physics and material science of ultra-high quality factor superconducting resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vostrikov, Alexander

    The nitrogen doping into niobium superconducting radio frequency cavity walls aiming to improve the fundamental mode quality factor is the subject of the research in the given work. Quantitative nitrogen diffusion into niobium model calculating the concentration profile was developed. The model estimations were confirmed with secondary ion mass spectrometry technique measurements. The model made controlled nitrogen doping recipe optimization possible. As a result the robust reproducible recipe for SRF cavity walls treatment with nitrogen doping was developed. The cavities produced with optimized recipe met LCLS--II requirements on quality factor of 2. · 10 10 at acceleration field of 16~MV/m. The microscopic effects of nitrogen doping on superconducting niobium properties were studied with low energy muon spin rotation technique and magnetometer measurements. No significant effect of nitrogen on the following features was found: electron mean free path, magnetic field penetration depth, and upper and surface critical magnetic fields. It was detected that for nitrogen doped niobium samples magnetic flux starts to penetrate inside the superconductor at lower external magnetic field value compared to the low temperature baked niobium ones. This explains lower quench field of SRF cavities treated with nitrogen. Quality factor improvement of fundamental mode forced to analyze the high order mode (HOM) impact on the particle beam dynamics. Both resonant and cumulative effects caused by monopole and dipole HOMs respectively are found to be negligible within the requirements for LCLS--II.

  5. Decrease of the surface resistance in superconducting niobium resonator cavities by the microwave field

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, G. Dhakal, P.; Gurevich, A.

    2014-03-03

    Measurements of the quality factor, Q, of Nb superconducting microwave resonators often show that Q increases by ≃10%–30% with increasing radio-frequency (rf) field, H, up to ∼15–20 mT. Recent high temperature heat treatments can amplify this rf field-induced increase of Q up to ≃50%–100% and extend it to much higher fields ≃100 mT, but the mechanisms of the enhancement of Q(H) remain unclear. Here, we suggest a method to reveal these mechanisms by measuring temperature dependencies of Q at different rf field amplitudes. We show that the increase of Q(H) does not come from a field dependent quasi-particles activation energy or residual resistance, but rather results from the smearing of the density of state by the rf field.

  6. Anisotropy of Superconducting MgB2 as Seen in Electron Spin Resonance and Magnetization Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, F.; Jánossy, A.; Fehér, T.; Murányi, F.; Garaj, S.; Forró, L.; Petrovic, C.; Bud'Ko, S. L.; Lapertot, G.; Kogan, V. G.; Canfield, P. C.

    2001-07-01

    We observed the conduction electron spin resonance (CESR) in fine powders of MgB2 both in the superconducting and normal states. The Pauli susceptibility is χs = 2.0×10-5 emu/mole in the temperature range of 450 to 600 K. The spin relaxation rate has an anomalous temperature dependence. The CESR measured below Tc at several frequencies suggests that MgB2 is a strongly anisotropic superconductor with the upper critical field, Hc2, ranging between 2 and 16 T. The high-field reversible magnetization data of a randomly oriented powder sample are well described assuming that MgB2 is an anisotropic superconductor with Habc2/Hcc2~6-9.

  7. Microwave nonlinearity and photoresponse of superconducting resonators with columnar defect micro-channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remillard, S. K.; Kirkendall, D.; Ghigo, G.; Gerbaldo, R.; Gozzelino, L.; Laviano, F.; Yang, Z.; Mendelsohn, N. A.; Ghamsari, B. G.; Friedman, B.; Jung, P.; Anlage, S. M.

    2014-09-01

    Micro-channels of nanosized columnar tracks were planted by heavy-ion irradiation into superconducting microwave microstrip resonators that were patterned from YBa2Cu3O7 - x thin films on LaAlO3 substrates. Three different ion fluences were used, producing different column densities, with each fluence having a successively greater impact on the microwave nonlinearity of the device, as compared to a control sample. Photoresponse (PR) images made with a 638 nm rastered laser beam revealed that the channel is a location of enhanced PR and a hot spot for the generation of intermodulation distortion. The microwave PR technique was also advanced in this work by investigating the role of coupling strength on the distribution of PR between inductive and resistive components.

  8. Superconducting quantum interference device microsusceptometer balanced over a wide bandwidth for nuclear magnetic resonance applications

    SciTech Connect

    Vinante, A. Falferi, P.; Mezzena, R.

    2014-10-15

    Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) microsusceptometers have been widely used to study magnetic properties of materials at microscale. As intrinsically balanced devices, they could also be exploited for direct SQUID-detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from micron sized samples, or for SQUID readout of mechanically detected NMR from submicron sized samples. Here, we demonstrate a double balancing technique that enables achievement of very low residual imbalance of a SQUID microsusceptometer over a wide bandwidth. In particular, we can generate ac magnetic fields within the SQUID loop as large as 1 mT, for frequencies ranging from dc up to a few MHz. As an application, we demonstrate direct detection of NMR from {sup 1}H spins in a glycerol droplet placed directly on top of the 20 μm SQUID loops.

  9. High- Tc superconducting rf receiver coils for magnetic resonance imaging of small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosik, J.; Nesteruk, K.; Xie, L.-M.; Strikovski, M.; Wang, F.; Miller, J. H.; Bilgen, M.; Narayana, P. A.

    We report on an HTS rf receiver surface probe designed for 2-Tesla MRI imaging of spinal cord injuries in small animals. The 2-T probe is used in lieu of an implanted copper coil being currently used in research on spinal cord injuries. The HTS probe was designed with a virtual ground plane, thus reducing the coil-to-ground losses and making its unloaded quality factor and resonant frequency less sensitive to body proximity. Each coil was fabricated using patterned double-sided YBa 2Cu 3O x (YBCO) films deposited either on sapphire or LaAlO 3 substrates. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was analyzed numerically using complete solutions to Maxwell's equations and the reciprocity principle for a rectangular coil next to a finite lossy dielectric cylinder. A comparison of images obtained with superconducting and cooled copper probes is shown.

  10. Decrease of the surface resistance in superconducting niobium resonator cavities by the microwave field

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Gurevich, Alexander V.

    2014-03-03

    Measurements of the quality factor, Q, of Nb superconducting microwave resonators often show that Q increases by {approx_equal} 10%–30% with increasing radio-frequency (rf) field, H, up to {approx} 15-20 mT. Recent high temperature heat treatments can amplify this rf field-induced increase of Q up to {approx_equal} 50%–100% and extend it to much higher fields, but the mechanisms of the enhancement of Q(H) remain unclear. Here, we suggest a method to reveal these mechanisms by measuring temperature dependencies of Q at different rf field amplitudes. We show that the increase of Q(H) does not come from a field dependent quasi-particles activation energy or residual resistance, but rather results from the smearing of the density of state by the rf field.

  11. Triple-band high-temperature superconducting microstrip filter based on multimode split ring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hai-Wen; Wang, Yan; Fan, Yi-Chao; Guan, Xue-Hui; He, Yusheng

    2013-09-01

    A compact triple-band high-temperature superconducting (HTS) YBa2Cu3Oy microstrip bandpass filter using multimode split ring resonator (SRR) is presented in this letter. Also, its properties and equivalent circuit models are investigated by even- and odd-mode analysis. Moreover, design method of the proposed triple-band HTS filter for the applications of global positioning system at 1.57 GHz, worldwide interoperability for microwave access at 3.5 GHz, and wireless local area networks at 5.8 GHz is discussed. The centre frequencies and the bandwidths of the three passbands can be allocated properly choosing the dimension parameters of the multimode SRR. In addition, four transmission zeros are produced to improve the selectivity of this filter.

  12. Fabrication of high-Q lithium niobate microresonators using femtosecond laser micromachining.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jintian; Xu, Yingxin; Fang, Zhiwei; Wang, Min; Song, Jiangxin; Wang, Nengwen; Qiao, Lingling; Fang, Wei; Cheng, Ya

    2015-01-01

    We report on fabrication of high-Q lithium niobate (LN) whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) microresonators suspended on silica pedestals by femtosecond laser direct writing followed by focused ion beam (FIB) milling. The micrometer-scale (diameter ~82 μm) LN resonator possesses a Q factor of ~2.5 × 10(5) around 1550 nm wavelength. The combination of femtosecond laser direct writing with FIB enables high-efficiency, high-precision nanofabrication of high-Q crystalline microresonators. PMID:25627294

  13. Fabrication of high-Q lithium niobate microresonators using femtosecond laser micromachining

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jintian; Xu, Yingxin; Fang, Zhiwei; Wang, Min; Song, Jiangxin; Wang, Nengwen; Qiao, Lingling; Fang, Wei; Cheng, Ya

    2015-01-01

    We report on fabrication of high-Q lithium niobate (LN) whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) microresonators suspended on silica pedestals by femtosecond laser direct writing followed by focused ion beam (FIB) milling. The micrometer-scale (diameter ~82 μm) LN resonator possesses a Q factor of ~2.5 × 105 around 1550 nm wavelength. The combination of femtosecond laser direct writing with FIB enables high-efficiency, high-precision nanofabrication of high-Q crystalline microresonators. PMID:25627294

  14. High Q factor bonding using natural resin for reduced thermal noise of test masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schediwy, S. W.; Gras, S.; Ju, L.; Blair, D. G.

    2005-02-01

    We show that a low acoustic loss resin enables composite mechanical structures to be bonded with minimal Q degradation. The resin is excreted from the Australian native grass tree Xanthorrhoea. This resin has traditionally been used as an adhesive by the Australian Aborigines. It is shown that the Q factor of the resin is greater than 300 for the 5180Hz resonance, which allows a high Q factor niobium resonator to be constructed with bonded mirrors while maintaining a Q of ˜106.

  15. Nb3Sn superconducting magnets for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Ferracin, P.; Caspi, S.; Felice, H.; Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C. M.; Prestemon, S.; Sabbi, G. L.; Todd, D. S.

    2009-05-04

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources are an essential component of heavy-ion accelerators. Over the past few decades advances in magnet technology and an improved understanding of the ECR ion source plasma physics have led to remarkable performance improvements of ECR ion sources. Currently third generation high field superconducting ECR ion sources operating at frequencies around 28 GHz are the state of the art ion injectors and several devices are either under commissioning or under design around the world. At the same time, the demand for increased intensities of highly charged heavy ions continues to grow, which makes the development of even higher performance ECR ion sources a necessity. To extend ECR ion sources to frequencies well above 28 GHz, new magnet technology will be needed in order to operate at higher field and force levels. The superconducting magnet program at LBNL has been developing high field superconducting magnets for particle accelerators based on Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting technology for several years. At the moment, Nb{sub 3}Sn is the only practical conductor capable of operating at the 15 T field level in the relevant configurations. Recent design studies have been focused on the possibility of using Nb{sub 3}Sn in the next generation of ECR ion sources. In the past, LBNL has worked on the VENUS ECR, a 28 GHz source with solenoids and a sextupole made with NbTi operating at fields of 6-7 T. VENUS has now been operating since 2004. We present in this paper the design of a Nb{sub 3}Sn ECR ion source optimized to operate at an rf frequency of 56 GHz with conductor peak fields of 13-15 T. Because of the brittleness and strain sensitivity of Nb{sub 3}Sn- , particular care is required in the design of the magnet support structure, which must be capable of providing support to the coils without overstressing the conductor. In this paper, we present the main features of the support structure, featuring an external aluminum shell

  16. Nb3Sn superconducting magnets for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources.

    PubMed

    Ferracin, P; Caspi, S; Felice, H; Leitner, D; Lyneis, C M; Prestemon, S; Sabbi, G L; Todd, D S

    2010-02-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources are an essential component of heavy-ion accelerators. Over the past few decades advances in magnet technology and an improved understanding of the ECR ion source plasma physics have led to remarkable performance improvements of ECR ion sources. Currently third generation high field superconducting ECR ion sources operating at frequencies around 28 GHz are the state of the art ion injectors and several devices are either under commissioning or under design around the world. At the same time, the demand for increased intensities of highly charged heavy ions continues to grow, which makes the development of even higher performance ECR ion sources a necessity. To extend ECR ion sources to frequencies well above 28 GHz, new magnet technology will be needed in order to operate at higher field and force levels. The superconducting magnet program at LBNL has been developing high field superconducting magnets for particle accelerators based on Nb(3)Sn superconducting technology for several years. At the moment, Nb(3)Sn is the only practical conductor capable of operating at the 15 T field level in the relevant configurations. Recent design studies have been focused on the possibility of using Nb(3)Sn in the next generation of ECR ion sources. In the past, LBNL has worked on the VENUS ECR, a 28 GHz source with solenoids and a sextupole made with NbTi operating at fields of 6-7 T. VENUS has now been operating since 2004. We present in this paper the design of a Nb(3)Sn ECR ion source optimized to operate at an rf frequency of 56 GHz with conductor peak fields of 13-15 T. Because of the brittleness and strain sensitivity of Nb(3)Sn, particular care is required in the design of the magnet support structure, which must be capable of providing support to the coils without overstressing the conductor. In this paper, we present the main features of the support structure, featuring an external aluminum shell pretensioned with water

  17. The Electrodynamics of Gradient Fields in Superconductive Magnetic Resonance Imaging Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morich, Michael Andrew

    The eddy current problem associated with magnetic field gradients in superconductive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) applications is well-known throughout the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) scientific and engineering community. The electromagnetic interaction of gradient field coils with surrounding cold (4.2 K to 80 K) and warm (300 K) metal structures from which the superconducting magnet systems are fabricated, nonetheless, has largely remained unstudied from a theoretical standpoint. There is a great need for a fundamental understanding of this interaction, which, it is fair to say, is a major determinant of imaging system performance due to its impact on gradient pulse fidelity. The work presented in this dissertation addresses this need and advances our knowledge and understanding of the gradient coil and cold shield interaction problem. It goes beyond the gross approximations of superconducting shell and skin-effect models used in present self-shielded and unshielded gradient coil design schemes. In essence, we take into account the fact that a typical gradient pulse spectrum spans DC to several kHz and, hence, skin-effect arguments are invalid. The work is largely theoretical in nature and provides solutions to canonical and more generalized problems involving axial (azimuthal separation constant m = 0) and distributed transverse (m = +/-1) gradient field coils which interact with cylindrical metallic shells of finite conductivity, various thicknesses and of infinite length. The electromagnetic boundary-value problems are developed and are then solved in the spectral domain, exclusive of the radial variable. The solutions are obtained directly in the spectral domain for three cases: (i) m = 0 and a single shell of infinite thickness, (ii) m = 0 and a single shell of finite thickness, and (iii) m = +/-1 and a single shell of infinite thickness. A normalized matrix solution is then developed for the general N-shell problem and is

  18. On-chip filter bank spectroscopy at 600-700 GHz using NbTiN superconducting resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, A.; Sfiligoj, C.; Yates, S. J. C.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Thoen, D. J.; Javadzadeh, S. M. H.; van der Werf, P. P.; Baryshev, A. M.; Klapwijk, T. M.

    2013-07-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the principle of an on-chip submillimeter wave filter bank spectrometer, using superconducting microresonators as narrow band-separation filters. The filters are made of NbTiN/SiNx/NbTiN microstrip line resonators, which have a resonance frequency in the range of 614-685 GHz, two orders of magnitude higher in frequency than what is currently studied for use in circuit quantum electrodynamics and photodetectors. The frequency resolution of the filters decreases from 350 to 140 with increasing frequency, most likely limited by dissipation of the resonators.

  19. TiN superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators with single-photon quality factors of 1.5 million

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calusine, Greg; Rosenberg, Danna; Hover, David; Das, Rabindra; Melville, Alexander; Miloshi, Xhovalin; Woods, Wayne; Yoder, Jonilyn; Oliver, William

    The investigation of loss mechanisms in superconducting coplanar waveguide (CPW) resonator provides an efficient means to elucidate relevant loss mechanisms affecting superconducting qubit circuits. As compared to superconducting qubits, the reduced complexity of CPW fabrication coupled with the straightforward characterization of CPW properties facilitates the deconvolution of the impact of individual fabrication steps on the CPW performance. We assess this impact by characterizing the statistically significant differences in internal quality factors (Qi) at the single-photon level resulting from different fabrication processes in aluminum and titanium nitride (TiN) superconducting thin film CPW resonators on silicon. We demonstrate repeatable Qi's at the single-photon level of approximately 1.5x10 in TiN CPW resonators with 90 percent of devices showing Qi's above 1x106 and single Qi's as high as 3.8x106. This work is sponsored in part by the Laboratory for Physical Science, IARPA, and the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering under Air Force Contract FA8721-05-0002. Opinions, interpretations, conclusions, and recommendations are those of the authors and are not necessarily endorsed by the United States Government.

  20. Emittance study of a 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the Rare Isotope Science Project superconducting linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Park, Bum-Sik; Hong, In-Seok; Jang, Ji-Ho; Jin, Hyunchang; Choi, Sukjin; Kim, Yonghwan

    2016-02-01

    A 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source is being developed for use as an injector for the superconducting linear accelerator of the Rare Isotope Science Project. Beam extraction from the ECR ion source has been simulated using the KOBRA3-INP software. The simulation software can calculate charged particle trajectories in three dimensional complex magnetic field structures, which in this case are formed by the arrangement of five superconducting magnets. In this study, the beam emittance is simulated to understand the effects of plasma potential, mass-to-charge ratio, and spatial distribution. The results of these simulations and their comparison to experimental results are presented in this paper. PMID:26931953

  1. Emittance study of a 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the Rare Isotope Science Project superconducting linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Bum-Sik; Hong, In-Seok; Jang, Ji-Ho; Jin, Hyunchang; Choi, Sukjin; Kim, Yonghwan

    2016-02-01

    A 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source is being developed for use as an injector for the superconducting linear accelerator of the Rare Isotope Science Project. Beam extraction from the ECR ion source has been simulated using the KOBRA3-INP software. The simulation software can calculate charged particle trajectories in three dimensional complex magnetic field structures, which in this case are formed by the arrangement of five superconducting magnets. In this study, the beam emittance is simulated to understand the effects of plasma potential, mass-to-charge ratio, and spatial distribution. The results of these simulations and their comparison to experimental results are presented in this paper.

  2. Realization of universal quantum cloning with superconducting quantum-interference device qubits in a cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian; Yu, Ya-Fei; Zhang, Zhi-Ming; Liu, Song-Hao

    2008-03-01

    We propose a scheme to realize a 1→2 universal quantum cloning machine with superconducting quantum interference device qubits, embedded in a high- Q cavity. The controlled-NOT operations are derived to present our scheme, and the two-photon Raman resonance processes are used to increase the operation rate. Compared with previous works, our scheme has advantages in the experimental realization and further utilization.

  3. Superconducting qubit as a probe of squeezing in a nonlinear resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boissonneault, Maxime; Doherty, A. C.; Ong, F. R.; Bertet, P.; Vion, D.; Esteve, D.; Blais, A.

    2014-02-01

    In addition to their central role in quantum information processing, qubits have proven to be useful tools in a range of other applications such as enhanced quantum sensing and as spectrometers of quantum noise. Here we show that a superconducting qubit strongly coupled to a nonlinear resonator can act as a probe of quantum fluctuations of the intraresonator field. Building on previous work [M. Boissoneault et al., Phys. Rev. A 85, 022305 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevA.85.022305], we derive an effective master equation for the qubit which takes into account squeezing of the resonator field. We show how sidebands in the qubit excitation spectrum that are predicted by this model can reveal information about the squeezing factor r. The main results of this paper have already been successfully compared to experimental data [F. R. Ong et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 047001 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.047001], and we present here the details of the derivations.

  4. Electronic Model for CoO2 Layer Based Systems: Chiral Resonating Valence Bond Metal and Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskaran, G.

    2003-08-01

    Takada et al. have reported superconductivity in layered NaxCoO2yH2O (Tc≈5 K). We model a reference neutral CoO2 layer as an orbitally nondegenerate spin-1/2 antiferromagnetic Mott insulator on a triangular lattice and NaxCoO2yH2O as electron doped Mott insulators described by a t-J model. It is suggested that at optimal doping chiral spin fluctuations enhanced by the dopant dynamics lead to a gapful d-wave superconducting state. A chiral resonating valence bond (RVB) metal, a parity and time (PT) reversal violating state with condensed RVB gauge fields, with a possible weak ferromagnetism, and low temperature p-wave superconductivity are also suggested at higher dopings.

  5. Nematicity and in-plane anisotropy of superconductivity in β -FeSe detected by 77Se nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, S.-H.; Efremov, D. V.; Ok, J. M.; Kim, J. S.; van den Brink, Jeroen; Büchner, B.

    2016-05-01

    The recent study of 77Se nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in a β -FeSe single crystal proposed that ferro-orbital order breaks the 90∘ C4 rotational symmetry, driving nematic ordering. Here, we report an NMR study of the impact of small strains generated by gluing on nematic state and spin fluctuations. We observe that the local strains strongly affect the nematic transition, considerably enhancing its onset temperature. On the contrary, no effect on low-energy spin fluctuations was found. Furthermore we investigate the interplay of the nematic phase and superconductivity. Our study demonstrates that the twinned nematic domains respond unequivalently to superconductivity, evidencing the twofold C2 symmetry of superconductivity in this material. The obtained results are well understood in terms of the proposed ferro-orbital order.

  6. Tunnel-diode resonator and nuclear magnetic resonance studies of low-dimensional magnetic and superconducting systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yeninas, Steven Lee

    2013-01-01

    This thesis emphasizes two frequency-domain techniques which uniquely employ radio frequency (RF) excitations to investigate the static and dynamic properties of novel magnetic and superconducting materials.

  7. Direct current superconducting quantum interference device spectrometer for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance and nuclear quadrupole resonance at frequencies up to 5 MHz

    SciTech Connect

    TonThat, D.M.; Clarke, J. |

    1996-08-01

    A spectrometer based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) has been developed for the direct detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) or nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) at frequencies up to 5 MHz. The sample is coupled to the input coil of the niobium-based SQUID via a nonresonant superconducting circuit. The flux locked loop involves the direct offset integration technique with additional positive feedback in which the output of the SQUID is coupled directly to a low-noise preamplifier. Precession of the nuclear quadrupole spins is induced by a magnetic field pulse with the feedback circuit disabled; subsequently, flux locked operation is restored and the SQUID amplifies the signal produced by the nuclear free induction signal. The spectrometer has been used to detect {sup 27}Al NQR signals in ruby (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}[Cr{sup 3+}]) at 359 and 714 kHz. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Status report of the 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source VENUS (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C.M.; Loew, T.; Todd, D.S.; Virostek, S.; Tarvainen, O.

    2006-03-15

    The superconducting versatile electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source for nuclear science (VENUS) is a next generation superconducting ECR ion source designed to produce high-current, high-charge-state ions for the 88-Inch Cyclotron at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. VENUS also serves as the prototype ion source for the rare isotope accelerator (RIA) front end, where the goal is to produce intense beams of medium-charge-state ions. Example beams for the RIA accelerator are 15 p {mu}A of Kr{sup 17+}(260 e {mu}A), 12 p {mu}A of Xe{sup 20+} (240 e {mu}A of Xe{sup 20+}), and 8 p {mu}A of U{sup 28+}(230 e {mu}A). To achieve these high currents, VENUS has been optimized for operation at 28 GHz, reaching maximal confinement fields of 4 and 3 T axially and over 2.2 T on the plasma chamber wall radially. After a commissioning phase at 18 GHz, the source started the 28 GHz operation in the summer of 2004. During that ongoing 28 GHz commissioning process, record ion-beam intensities have been extracted. For instance, measured extracted currents for the low to medium charge states were 270 e {mu}A of Xe{sup 27+} and 245 e {mu}A of Bi{sup 29+}, while for the higher charge states 15 e {mu}A of Xe{sup 34+}, 15 e {mu}A of Bi{sup 41+}, and 0.5 e {mu}A of Bi{sup 50+} could be produced. Results from the ongoing 28 GHz commissioning as well as results using double-frequency heating with 18 and 28 GHz for oxygen and xenon are presented. The effect of the minimum B field on the ion source performance has been systematically measured for 18 and 28 GHz. In both cases the performance peaked at a minimum B field of about 80% of the resonance field. In addition, a strong dependence of the x-ray flux and energy on the minimum B field value was found.

  9. Status report of the 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source VENUS (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C. M.; Loew, T.; Todd, D. S.; Virostek, S.; Tarvainen, O.

    2006-03-01

    The superconducting versatile electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source for nuclear science (VENUS) is a next generation superconducting ECR ion source designed to produce high-current, high-charge-state ions for the 88-Inch Cyclotron at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. VENUS also serves as the prototype ion source for the rare isotope accelerator (RIA) front end, where the goal is to produce intense beams of medium-charge-state ions. Example beams for the RIA accelerator are 15 p μA of Kr17+(260 e μA), 12 p μA of Xe20+ (240 e μA of Xe20+), and 8 p μA of U28+(230 e μA). To achieve these high currents, VENUS has been optimized for operation at 28 GHz, reaching maximal confinement fields of 4 and 3 T axially and over 2.2 T on the plasma chamber wall radially. After a commissioning phase at 18 GHz, the source started the 28 GHz operation in the summer of 2004. During that ongoing 28 GHz commissioning process, record ion-beam intensities have been extracted. For instance, measured extracted currents for the low to medium charge states were 270 e μA of Xe27+ and 245 e μA of Bi29+, while for the higher charge states 15 e μA of Xe34+, 15 e μA of Bi41+, and 0.5 e μA of Bi50+ could be produced. Results from the ongoing 28 GHz commissioning as well as results using double-frequency heating with 18 and 28 GHz for oxygen and xenon are presented. The effect of the minimum B field on the ion source performance has been systematically measured for 18 and 28 GHz. In both cases the performance peaked at a minimum B field of about 80% of the resonance field. In addition, a strong dependence of the x-ray flux and energy on the minimum B field value was found.

  10. Diffusion tensor imaging using a high-temperature superconducting resonator in a 3 T magnetic resonance imaging for a spontaneous rat brain tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, In-Tsang; Yang, Hong-Chang; Chen, Jyh-Horng

    2013-02-01

    This study investigates the peri-tumor signal abnormalities of a spontaneous brain tumor in a rat by using a 4 cm high-temperature superconducting (HTS) surface resonator. Fractional anisotropy (FA) values derived from diffusion tensor imaging reflect the interstitial characteristic of the peri-lesional tissues of brain tumors. Low FA indicates interstitial tumor infiltration and tissue injury, while high FA indicates better tissue integrity. Better delineation of tissue contents obtained by the HTS surface resonator at 77 K may facilitate therapeutic strategy and improve clinical outcomes.