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Sample records for high-resolution dna melting

  1. High-Resolution DNA Melting Analysis in Plant Research.

    PubMed

    Simko, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    Genetic and genomic studies provide valuable insight into the inheritance, structure, organization, and function of genes. The knowledge gained from the analysis of plant genes is beneficial to all aspects of plant research, including crop improvement. New methods and tools are continually being developed to facilitate rapid and accurate mapping, sequencing, and analyzing of genes. Here, I review the recent progress in the application of high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis of DNA, a method that allows detecting polymorphism in double-stranded DNA by comparing profiles of melting curves. Use of HRM has expanded considerably in the past few years as the method was successfully applied for high-throughput genotyping, mapping genes, testing food products and seeds, and other areas of plant research. PMID:26827247

  2. Differentiating between monozygotic twins through DNA methylation-specific high-resolution melt curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Leander; Evans, Neil; Bexon, Kimberley J; van der Meer, Dieudonne J; Williams, Graham A

    2015-05-01

    Although short tandem repeat profiling is extremely powerful in identifying individuals from crime scene stains, it is unable to differentiate between monozygotic (MZ) twins. Efforts to address this include mutation analysis through whole genome sequencing and through DNA methylation studies. Methylation of DNA is affected by environmental factors; thus, as MZ twins age, their DNA methylation patterns change. This can be characterized by bisulfite treatment followed by pyrosequencing. However, this can be time-consuming and expensive; thus, it is unlikely to be widely used by investigators. If the sequences are different, then in theory the melting temperature should be different. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess whether high-resolution melt curve analysis can be used to differentiate between MZ twins. Five sets of MZ twins provided buccal swabs that underwent extraction, quantification, bisulfite treatment, polymerase chain reaction amplification and high-resolution melting curve analysis targeting two markers, Alu-E2F3 and Alu-SP. Significant differences were observed between all MZ twins targeting Alu-E2F3 and in four of five MZ twins targeting Alu-SP (P<0.05). Thus, it has been demonstrated that bisulfite treatment followed by high-resolution melting curve analysis could be used to differentiate between MZ twins. PMID:25677265

  3. High resolution melting (HRM) analysis of DNA--its role and potential in food analysis.

    PubMed

    Druml, Barbara; Cichna-Markl, Margit

    2014-09-01

    DNA based methods play an increasing role in food safety control and food adulteration detection. Recent papers show that high resolution melting (HRM) analysis is an interesting approach. It involves amplification of the target of interest in the presence of a saturation dye by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and subsequent melting of the amplicons by gradually increasing the temperature. Since the melting profile depends on the GC content, length, sequence and strand complementarity of the product, HRM analysis is highly suitable for the detection of single-base variants and small insertions or deletions. The review gives an introduction into HRM analysis, covers important aspects in the development of an HRM analysis method and describes how HRM data are analysed and interpreted. Then we discuss the potential of HRM analysis based methods in food analysis, i.e. for the identification of closely related species and cultivars and the identification of pathogenic microorganisms. PMID:24731338

  4. Mutation Scanning and Genotyping in Plants by High Resolution DNA Melting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High-resolution melting analysis after PCR allows closed-tube mutation scanning and genotyping without processing, labeled probes, real-time monitoring or allele-specific amplification. PCR is performed in the presence of the saturating dye, LCGreen® Plus, with subsequent high-resolution melting ana...

  5. Reliable Discrimination of 10 Ungulate Species Using High Resolution Melting Analysis of Faecal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ramón-Laca, Ana; Gleeson, Dianne; Yockney, Ivor; Perry, Michael; Nugent, Graham; Forsyth, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying species occupying an area is essential for many ecological and conservation studies. Faecal DNA is a potentially powerful method for identifying cryptic mammalian species. In New Zealand, 10 species of ungulate (Order: Artiodactyla) have established wild populations and are managed as pests because of their impacts on native ecosystems. However, identifying the ungulate species present within a management area based on pellet morphology is unreliable. We present a method that enables reliable identification of 10 ungulate species (red deer, sika deer, rusa deer, fallow deer, sambar deer, white-tailed deer, Himalayan tahr, Alpine chamois, feral sheep, and feral goat) from swabs of faecal pellets. A high resolution melting (HRM) assay, targeting a fragment of the 12S rRNA gene, was developed. Species-specific primers were designed and combined in a multiplex PCR resulting in fragments of different length and therefore different melting behaviour for each species. The method was developed using tissue from each of the 10 species, and was validated in blind trials. Our protocol enabled species to be determined for 94% of faecal pellet swabs collected during routine monitoring by the New Zealand Department of Conservation. Our HRM method enables high-throughput and cost-effective species identification from low DNA template samples, and could readily be adapted to discriminate other mammalian species from faecal DNA. PMID:24637802

  6. Reliable discrimination of 10 ungulate species using high resolution melting analysis of faecal DNA.

    PubMed

    Ramón-Laca, Ana; Gleeson, Dianne; Yockney, Ivor; Perry, Michael; Nugent, Graham; Forsyth, David M

    2014-01-01

    Identifying species occupying an area is essential for many ecological and conservation studies. Faecal DNA is a potentially powerful method for identifying cryptic mammalian species. In New Zealand, 10 species of ungulate (Order: Artiodactyla) have established wild populations and are managed as pests because of their impacts on native ecosystems. However, identifying the ungulate species present within a management area based on pellet morphology is unreliable. We present a method that enables reliable identification of 10 ungulate species (red deer, sika deer, rusa deer, fallow deer, sambar deer, white-tailed deer, Himalayan tahr, Alpine chamois, feral sheep, and feral goat) from swabs of faecal pellets. A high resolution melting (HRM) assay, targeting a fragment of the 12S rRNA gene, was developed. Species-specific primers were designed and combined in a multiplex PCR resulting in fragments of different length and therefore different melting behaviour for each species. The method was developed using tissue from each of the 10 species, and was validated in blind trials. Our protocol enabled species to be determined for 94% of faecal pellet swabs collected during routine monitoring by the New Zealand Department of Conservation. Our HRM method enables high-throughput and cost-effective species identification from low DNA template samples, and could readily be adapted to discriminate other mammalian species from faecal DNA. PMID:24637802

  7. Refining DNA Barcoding Coupled High Resolution Melting for Discrimination of 12 Closely Related Croton Species

    PubMed Central

    Osathanunkul, Maslin; Suwannapoom, Chatmongkon; Ounjai, Sarawut; Rora, Jantarika A.; Madesis, Panagiotis; de Boer, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    DNA barcoding coupled high resolution melting (Bar-HRM) is an emerging method for species discrimination based on DNA dissociation kinetics. The aim of this work was to evaluate the suitability of different primer sets, derived from selected DNA regions, for Bar-HRM analysis of species in Croton (Euphorbiaceae), one of the largest genera of plants with over 1,200 species. Seven primer pairs were evaluated (matK, rbcL1, rbcL2, rbcL3, rpoC, trnL and ITS1) from four plastid regions, matK, rbcL, rpoC, and trnL, and the nuclear ribosomal marker ITS1. The primer pair derived from the ITS1 region was the single most effective region for the identification of the tested species, whereas the rbcL1 primer pair gave the lowest resolution. It was observed that the ITS1 barcode was the most useful DNA barcoding region overall for species discrimination out of all of the regions and primers assessed. Our Bar-HRM results here also provide further support for the hypothesis that both sequence and base composition affect DNA duplex stability. PMID:26406615

  8. Rapid genotyping of beak and feather disease virus using high-resolution DNA melt curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Subir; Ghorashi, Seyed A; Forwood, Jade K; Raidal, Shane R

    2014-11-01

    Beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) is a significant pathogen both for wild and captive psittacine birds globally. Genotypic differentiation of BFDV isolates is crucial to establish effective control strategies for the conservation of endangered species and epidemiological investigations of disease outbreaks. The technique developed in this study is a simple, rapid and inexpensive genotyping method for BFDV using PCR and subsequent high-resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis. This was achieved using PCR amplification of the conserved Rep gene in the presence of a fluorescent DNA intercalating dye (SYTO9). HRM curve analysis of the resultant amplicon could readily differentiate between reference strain (92-SR14) and 18 other BFDV isolates used in this study. Analysis of the nucleotide sequences of the amplicon from each isolate revealed that each melt curve profile was related to a unique DNA sequence. The potential of the PCR-HRM curve analysis to differentiate inter-host genetic variation among critically endangered orange-bellied parrots, lorikeets and cockatoos was also evaluated. Phylogenetic tree topology based on partial Rep gene sequences used in this study showed that BFDV Rep gene sequence patterns were correlated with the results of HRM curve analysis. The results presented in this study indicate that this technique could be used in both clinical research and differentiation of BFDV isolates in a fraction of time without further nucleotide sequencing and provides a novel approach for the genetic screening of BFDV in clinical virology laboratories. PMID:25102431

  9. Detection of a G>C single nucleotide polymorphism within a repetitive DNA sequence by high-resolution DNA melting.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Ulrike; Hulkkonen, Johannes; Naue, Jana

    2016-09-01

    In standard forensic DNA analysis, single base mutations within short tandem repeats (STR) mostly escape detection. In this study, high-resolution DNA melting (HRM) is compared to minisequencing and Sanger sequencing as to determine the most suitable method for detection of a G to C mutation within a repetitive DNA sequence, the STR system DXS10161. It shows an ATG/ATC polymorphism surrounded by a variable number of (TATC) and (ATCT) motifs. Neutral base changes like G:C to C:G result in very low differences in the melting temperature (T m) of the PCR amplicons. By enhanced resolution of fluorescence vs. temperature in HRM, the technique showed to be suitable for detecting a G to C transversion in this repetitive DNA sequence context. Compared to minisequencing, HRM is more time- and cost-effective. Results were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. PMID:26972692

  10. Sex Determination in Highly Fragmented Human DNA by High-Resolution Melting (HRM) Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Sandoval, Brenda A.; Manzanilla, Linda R.; Montiel, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Sex identification in ancient human remains is a common problem especially if the skeletons are sub-adult, incomplete or damaged. In this paper we propose a new method to identify sex, based on real-time PCR amplification of small fragments (61 and 64 bp) of the third exon within the amelogenin gene covering a 3-bp deletion on the AMELX-allele, followed by a High Resolution Melting analysis (HRM). HRM is based on the melting curves of amplified fragments. The amelogenin gene is located on both chromosomes X and Y, showing dimorphism in length. This molecular tool is rapid, sensitive and reduces the risk of contamination from exogenous genetic material when used for ancient DNA studies. The accuracy of the new method described here has been corroborated by using control samples of known sex and by contrasting our results with those obtained with other methods. Our method has proven to be useful even in heavily degraded samples, where other previously published methods failed. Stochastic problems such as the random allele drop-out phenomenon are expected to occur in a less severe form, due to the smaller fragment size to be amplified. Thus, their negative effect could be easier to overcome by a proper experimental design. PMID:25098828

  11. Sex determination in highly fragmented human DNA by high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Sandoval, Brenda A; Manzanilla, Linda R; Montiel, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Sex identification in ancient human remains is a common problem especially if the skeletons are sub-adult, incomplete or damaged. In this paper we propose a new method to identify sex, based on real-time PCR amplification of small fragments (61 and 64 bp) of the third exon within the amelogenin gene covering a 3-bp deletion on the AMELX-allele, followed by a High Resolution Melting analysis (HRM). HRM is based on the melting curves of amplified fragments. The amelogenin gene is located on both chromosomes X and Y, showing dimorphism in length. This molecular tool is rapid, sensitive and reduces the risk of contamination from exogenous genetic material when used for ancient DNA studies. The accuracy of the new method described here has been corroborated by using control samples of known sex and by contrasting our results with those obtained with other methods. Our method has proven to be useful even in heavily degraded samples, where other previously published methods failed. Stochastic problems such as the random allele drop-out phenomenon are expected to occur in a less severe form, due to the smaller fragment size to be amplified. Thus, their negative effect could be easier to overcome by a proper experimental design. PMID:25098828

  12. DNA-based identification of Peucedanum ostruthium specimens and detection of common adulterants by high-resolution melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Schmiderer, Corinna; Ruzicka, Joana; Novak, Johannes

    2015-12-01

    Masterwort (Peucedanum ostruthium, syn. Imperatoria ostruthium, Apiaceae) is an old economic plant in Alpine countries cultivated as ornamental plant and used for spirits and in folk medicine. P. ostruthium is a species that has often been confused with related Apiaceae species or morphologically similar roots or tubers resulting in products of minor quality. Masterwort can be distinguished from other Apiaceae species by nrDNA (ITS1 and ITS2). The analysed chloroplast markers (trnK 5' intron, trnT-trnL, and psbA-trnH), however, showed no species-specific mutations. With the application of two primer pairs amplifying parts of ITS and developed for high-resolution melting curve analysis (HRM) the target species was distinguishable from the other Peucedanum and Apiaceae species of our reference set. A multiplex PCR/HRM was developed to detect adulterations with Gentiana spp., Aconitum napellus and Veratrum album. PMID:26493217

  13. Detection of plant oil DNA using high resolution melting (HRM) post PCR analysis: a tool for disclosure of olive oil adulteration.

    PubMed

    Vietina, Michelangelo; Agrimonti, Caterina; Marmiroli, Nelson

    2013-12-15

    Extra virgin olive oil is frequently subjected to adulterations with addition of oils obtained from plants other than olive. DNA analysis is a fast and economic tool to identify plant components in oils. Extraction and amplification of DNA by PCR was tested in olives, in milled seeds and in oils, to investigate its use in olive oil traceability. DNA was extracted from different oils made of hazelnut, maize, sunflower, peanut, sesame, soybean, rice and pumpkin. Comparing the DNA melting profiles in reference plant materials and in the oils, it was possible to identify any plant components in oils and mixtures of oils. Real-Time PCR (RT-PCR) platform has been added of the new methodology of high resolution melting (HRM), both were used to analyse olive oils mixed with different percentage of other oils. Results showed HRM a cost effective method for efficient detection of adulterations in olive oils. PMID:23993554

  14. High Resolution Melting Applications for Clinical Laboratory Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Erali, Maria; Voelkerding, Karl V.; Wittwer, Carl T.

    2008-01-01

    Separation of the two strands of DNA with heat (melting) is a fundamental property of DNA that is conveniently monitored with fluorescence. Conventional melting is performed after PCR on any real-time instrument to monitor product purity (dsDNA dyes) and sequence (hybridization probes). Recent advances include high-resolution instruments and saturating DNA dyes that distinguish many different species. For example, mutation scanning (identifying heterozygotes) by melting is closed-tube and has similar or superior sensitivity and specificity compared to methods that require physical separation. With high resolution melting, SNPs can be genotyped without probes and more complex regions can be typed with unlabeled hybridization probes. Highly polymorphic HLA loci can be melted to establish sequence identity for transplantation matching. Simultaneous genotyping with one or more unlabeled probes and mutation scanning of the entire amplicon can be performed at the same time in the same tube, vastly decreasing or eliminating the need for re-sequencing in genetic analysis. High-resolution PCR product melting is homogeneous, closed-tube, rapid (1–5 min), non-destructive and does not require covalently-labeled fluorescent probes. In the clinical laboratory, it is an ideal format for in-house testing, with minimal cost and time requirements for new assay development. PMID:18502416

  15. High Resolution Melting (HRM) applied to wine authenticity.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Leonor; Gomes, Sónia; Castro, Cláudia; Eiras-Dias, José Eduardo; Brazão, João; Graça, António; Fernandes, José R; Martins-Lopes, Paula

    2017-02-01

    Wine authenticity methods are in increasing demand mainly in Denomination of Origin designations. The DNA-based methodologies are a reliable means of tracking food/wine varietal composition. The main aim of this work was the study of High Resolution Melting (HRM) application as a screening method for must and wine authenticity. Three sample types (leaf, must and wine) were used to validate the three developed HRM assays (Vv1-705bp; Vv2-375bp; and Vv3-119bp). The Vv1 HRM assay was only successful when applied to leaf and must samples. The Vv2 HRM assay successfully amplified all sample types, allowing genotype discrimination based on melting temperature values. The smallest amplicon, Vv3, produced a coincident melting curve shape in all sample types (leaf and wine) with corresponding genotypes. This study presents sensitive, rapid and efficient HRM assays applied for the first time to wine samples suitable for wine authenticity purposes. PMID:27596395

  16. Differentiation of four strains of Chinese soft-shelled turtle (Pelodiscus sinensis) based on high-resolution melting analysis of single nucleotide polymorphism sites in mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H Q; Zhang, C; Xu, X J; Zhu, J J; He, Z Y; Shao, J Z

    2015-01-01

    The Chinese soft-shelled turtle (Pelodiscus sinensis) has been one of the most economically important aquatic animals in China for thousands of years, and several breeding strains have been formed. Since the morphological characteristics of some strains are similar, a rapid and accurate molecular method to differentiate between strains is required. In this study, partial sequences of mitochondrial DNA from four turtle strains, Taihu Lake Strain, Taiwan Strain, Japanese Strain, and Yellow River Strain, were amplified and sequenced based on selected strain-specific single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sites. The corresponding primers were designed and a high-resolution melting (HRM) technique was employed for genotyping these SNPs. The results indicated that a total of seven SNPs can be detected by HRM. Among these SNPs, one can be used for identifying the Taihu Lake Strain, one for the Japanese Strain, two for the Taiwan Strain, and three for the Yellow River Strain. This method is rapid and convenient, which offers technical support for strain identification and selective breeding in Chinese soft-shelled turtles. PMID:26535627

  17. High resolution optical DNA mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baday, Murat

    Many types of diseases including cancer and autism are associated with copy-number variations in the genome. Most of these variations could not be identified with existing sequencing and optical DNA mapping methods. We have developed Multi-color Super-resolution technique, with potential for high throughput and low cost, which can allow us to recognize more of these variations. Our technique has made 10--fold improvement in the resolution of optical DNA mapping. Using a 180 kb BAC clone as a model system, we resolved dense patterns from 108 fluorescent labels of two different colors representing two different sequence-motifs. Overall, a detailed DNA map with 100 bp resolution was achieved, which has the potential to reveal detailed information about genetic variance and to facilitate medical diagnosis of genetic disease.

  18. Ribo HRM--detection of inter- and intra-species polymorphisms within ribosomal DNA by high resolution melting analysis supported by application of artificial allelic standards.

    PubMed

    Masny, Aleksander; Jagiełło, Agata; Płucienniczak, Grażyna; Golab, Elzbieta

    2012-09-01

    Ribo HRM, a single-tube PCR and high resolution melting (HRM) assay for detection of polymorphisms in the large subunit ribosomal DNA expansion segment V, was developed on a Trichinella model. Four Trichinella species: T. spiralis (isolates ISS3 and ISS160), T. nativa (isolates ISS10 and ISS70), T. britovi (isolates ISS2 and ISS392) and T. pseudospiralis (isolates ISS13 and ISS1348) were genotyped. Cloned allelic variants of the expansion segment V were used as standards to prepare reference HRM curves characteristic for single sequences and mixtures of several cloned sequences imitating allelic composition detected in Trichinella isolates. Using the primer pair Tsr1 and Trich1bi, it was possible to amplify a fragment of the ESV and detect PCR products obtained from the genomic DNA of pools of larvae belonging to the four investigated species: T. pseudospiralis, T. spiralis, T. britovi and T. nativa, in a single tube Real-Time PCR reaction. Differences in the shape of the HRM curves of Trichinella isolates suggested the presence of differences between examined isolates of T. nativa, T. britovi and T. pseudospiralis species. No differences were observed between T. spiralis isolates. The presence of polymorphisms within the amplified ESV sequence fragment of T. nativa T. britovi and T. pseudospiralis was confirmed by sequencing of the cloned PCR products. Novel sequences were discovered and deposited in GenBank (GenBank IDs: JN971020-JN971027, JN120902.1, JN120903.1, JN120904.1, JN120906.1, JN120905.1). Screening the ESV region of Trichinella for polymorphism is possible using the genotyping assay Ribo HRM at the current state of its development. The Ribo HRM assay could be useful in phylogenetic studies of the Trichinella genus. PMID:22766326

  19. Detection and characterization of Leishmania (Leishmania) and Leishmania (Viannia) by SYBR green-based real-time PCR and high resolution melt analysis targeting kinetoplast minicircle DNA.

    PubMed

    Ceccarelli, Marcello; Galluzzi, Luca; Migliazzo, Antonella; Magnani, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a neglected disease with a broad clinical spectrum which includes asymptomatic infection. A thorough diagnosis, able to distinguish and quantify Leishmania parasites in a clinical sample, constitutes a key step in choosing an appropriate therapy, making an accurate prognosis and performing epidemiological studies. Several molecular techniques have been shown to be effective in the diagnosis of leishmaniasis. In particular, a number of PCR methods have been developed on various target DNA sequences including kinetoplast minicircle constant regions. The first aim of this study was to develop a SYBR green-based qPCR assay for Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum detection and quantification, using kinetoplast minicircle constant region as target. To this end, two assays were compared: the first used previously published primer pairs (qPCR1), whereas the second used a nested primer pairs generating a shorter PCR product (qPCR2). The second aim of this study was to evaluate the possibility to discriminate among subgenera Leishmania (Leishmania) and Leishmania (Viannia) using the qPCR2 assay followed by melting or High Resolution Melt (HRM) analysis. Both assays used in this study showed good sensitivity and specificity, and a good correlation with standard IFAT methods in 62 canine clinical samples. However, the qPCR2 assay allowed to discriminate between Leishmania (Leishmania) and Leishmania (Viannia) subgenera through melting or HRM analysis. In addition to developing assays, we investigated the number and genetic variability of kinetoplast minicircles in the Leishmania (L.) infantum WHO international reference strain (MHOM/TN/80/IPT1), highlighting the presence of minicircle subclasses and sequence heterogeneity. Specifically, the kinetoplast minicircle number per cell was estimated to be 26,566±1,192, while the subclass of minicircles amplifiable by qPCR2 was estimated to be 1,263±115. This heterogeneity, also observed in canine clinical samples

  20. Identification of BRCA1/2 Founder Mutations in Southern Chinese Breast Cancer Patients Using Gene Sequencing and High Resolution DNA Melting Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Ava; Ng, Enders Kai On; Wong, Chris Lei Po; Law, Fian Bic Fai; Au, Tommy; Wong, Hong Nei; Kurian, Allison W.; West, Dee W.; Ford, James M.; Ma, Edmond Siu Kwan

    2012-01-01

    Background Ethnic variations in breast cancer epidemiology and genetics have necessitated investigation of the spectra of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in different populations. Knowledge of BRCA mutations in Chinese populations is still largely unknown. We conducted a multi-center study to characterize the spectra of BRCA mutations in Chinese breast and ovarian cancer patients from Southern China. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 651 clinically high-risk breast and/or ovarian cancer patients were recruited from the Hong Kong Hereditary Breast Cancer Family Registry from 2007 to 2011. Comprehensive BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation screening was performed using bi-directional sequencing of all coding exons of BRCA1 and BRCA2. Sequencing results were confirmed by in-house developed full high resolution DNA melting (HRM) analysis. Among the 451 probands analyzed, 69 (15.3%) deleterious BRCA mutations were identified, comprising 29 in BRCA1 and 40 in BRCA2. The four recurrent BRCA1 mutations (c.470_471delCT, c.3342_3345delAGAA, c.5406+1_5406+3delGTA and c.981_982delAT) accounted for 34.5% (10/29) of all BRCA1 mutations in this cohort. The four recurrent BRCA2 mutations (c.2808_2811delACAA, c.3109C>T, c.7436_7805del370 and c.9097_9098insA) accounted for 40% (16/40) of all BRCA2 mutations. Haplotype analysis was performed to confirm 1 BRCA1 and 3 BRCA2 mutations are putative founder mutations. Rapid HRM mutation screening for a panel of the founder mutations were developed and validated. Conclusion In this study, our findings suggest that BRCA mutations account for a substantial proportion of hereditary breast/ovarian cancer in Southern Chinese population. Knowing the spectrum and frequency of the founder mutations in this population will assist in the development of a cost-effective rapid screening assay, which in turn facilitates genetic counseling and testing for the purpose of cancer risk assessment. PMID:22970155

  1. High resolution melting analysis for the differentiation of Mycobacterium species.

    PubMed

    Issa, Rahizan; Abdul, Hatijah; Hashim, Siti Hasmah; Seradja, Valentinus H; Shaili, Nurul 'Aishah; Hassan, Nurul Akma Mohd

    2014-10-01

    A quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) followed by high resolution melting (HRM) analysis was developed for the differentiation of Mycobacterium species. Rapid differentiation of Mycobacterium species is necessary for the effective diagnosis and management of tuberculosis. In this study, the 16S rRNA gene was tested as the target since this has been identified as a suitable target for the identification of mycobacteria species. During the temperature gradient and primer optimization process, the melting peak (Tm) analysis was determined at a concentration of 50 ng DNA template and 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5 µM primer. The qPCR assay for the detection of other mycobacterial species was done at the Tm and primer concentration of 62 °C and 0.4 µM, respectively. The HRM analysis generated cluster patterns that were specific and sensitive to distinguished small sequence differences of the Mycobacterium species. This study suggests that the 16S rRNA-based real-time PCR followed by HRM analysis produced unique cluster patterns for species of Mycobacterium and could differentiate the closely related mycobacteria species. PMID:25038139

  2. Hypervariable pili and flagella genes provide suitable new targets for DNA high-resolution melt-based genotyping of dairy Geobacillus spp.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Kanika; Seale, R Brent; Deeth, Hilton C; Turner, Mark S

    2014-10-01

    Although nonpathogenic in nature, spores of Geobacillus are able to attach to surfaces, germinate, and form biofilms, allowing rapid multiplication and persistence within milk powder processing plants, causing final product contamination, and eventually leading to a loss of revenue in terms of downgraded product quality. As a result, Geobacillus spp. have been found to be common contaminants of milk powder worldwide. Genotyping methods can help in gaining insight into the ecology and transmission of these thermophilic bacteria within and between dairy processing plants. The objective of this study was to use the assembled draft genomes of two Geobacillus spp. to identify and test new hypervariable genotyping targets for differentiating closely related dairy Geobacillus isolates. The two Geobacillus spp. strains obtained from high spore count powders were obtained in 2010 (isolate 7E) and in 1995 (isolate 126) and were previously shown to be of same genotype based on a variable number tandem repeat genotyping method. Significant nucleotide sequence variation was found in genes encoding pili and flagella, which were further investigated as suitable loci for a new high-resolution melt analysis (HRMA)-based genotyping method. Three genes encoding pulG (containing prepilin-type N-terminal cleavage domain), pilT (pili retraction protein), and fliW (flagellar assembly protein) were selected as targets for the new pili/flagella gene (PilFla) HRMA genotyping method. The three-gene-based PilFla-HRMA genotyping method differentiated 35 milk powder Geobacillus spp. isolates into 19 different genotype groups (D = 0.93), which compared favorably to the previous method (which used four variable number tandem repeat loci) that generated 16 different genotype groups (D = 0.90). In conclusion, through comparative genomics of two closely related dairy Geobacillus strains, we have identified new hypervariable regions that prove to be useful targets for highly discriminatory genotyping

  3. AB161. High resolution melting analysis of buccal DNA revealed a significant association between UGT1A1 c.211G>A and neonatal hyperbilirubinemia development in Malay population

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Tian Pei; Van Rostenberghe, Hans; Ismail, Rosliza; Nawawi, Noor Namirah; Abdullah, Nurul Amierah; Ramli, Noraida; Ibrahim, Nor Rosidah; Hj Abd Majid, Noorizan; Mohd Yusoff, Narazah; Nishio, Hisahide; Yusoff, Surini

    2015-01-01

    Background Severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia or neonatal jaundice (NNJ) characterised by an elevated total serum bilirubin (TSB) level may result in kernicterus or even death. Uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) is the key enzyme which conjugates bilirubin with glucuronic acid for the subsequent bilirubin excretion. Conversely, constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), encoded by nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group I, member 3 (NR1I3) gene, regulates bilirubin excretion by activating the components of the bilirubin clearance pathway. Thus, genetic variants in UGT1A1 and NR1I3 genes may modulate bilirubin excretion and lead to NNJ. This study aimed to determine the association between UGT1A1 and NR1I3 genetic variants and NNJ development in Malay population by genotyping the DNA isolated from buccal swabs. The accuracy and reliability of the genotyping results produced by buccal DNA was also compared with that of the whole blood DNA. Methods Buccal swabs were collected from 232 hyperbilirubinemia and 232 non-hyperbilirubinemia newborns admitted to and/or born in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM). Hyperbilirubinemia subjects were those with TSB levels ≥250 µmol/L within the first week after birth while non-hyperbilirubinemia subjects were newborns without significant hyperbilirubinemia. The UGT1A1 (c.211G>A) and NR1I3 [MPJ6_1I3008 (G>A), IVS8+116T>G and 540A>G] variants were genotyped by using high resolution melting (HRM) analysis. Binary logistic regression was used to assess the association between variant genotypes and risk of NNJ. Whole blood samples were also collected from 60 subjects and genotyped to compare the HRM genotyping results with that of the buccal swabs. Results When compared with wild-type genotype, both heterozygous and homozygous variant genotypes of MPJ6_1I3008 (G>A), IVS8+116T>G and 540A>G were not significantly associated with NNJ. However, the heterozygous genotype (GA) of c.211G>A was found to increase the

  4. Automated Microfluidic Platform for Serial Polymerase Chain Reaction and High-Resolution Melting Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Weidong; Bean, Brian; Corey, Scott; Coursey, Johnathan S; Hasson, Kenton C; Inoue, Hiroshi; Isano, Taisuke; Kanderian, Sami; Lane, Ben; Liang, Hongye; Murphy, Brian; Owen, Greg; Shinoda, Nobuhiko; Zeng, Shulin; Knight, Ivor T

    2016-06-01

    We report the development of an automated genetic analyzer for human sample testing based on microfluidic rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA). The integrated DNA microfluidic cartridge was used on a platform designed with a robotic pipettor system that works by sequentially picking up different test solutions from a 384-well plate, mixing them in the tips, and delivering mixed fluids to the DNA cartridge. A novel image feedback flow control system based on a Canon 5D Mark II digital camera was developed for controlling fluid movement through a complex microfluidic branching network without the use of valves. The same camera was used for measuring the high-resolution melt curve of DNA amplicons that were generated in the microfluidic chip. Owing to fast heating and cooling as well as sensitive temperature measurement in the microfluidic channels, the time frame for PCR and HRMA was dramatically reduced from hours to minutes. Preliminary testing results demonstrated that rapid serial PCR and HRMA are possible while still achieving high data quality that is suitable for human sample testing. PMID:25827436

  5. Rapid Diagnosis of Old World Leishmaniasis by High-Resolution Melting Analysis of the 7SL RNA Gene▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Nasereddin, Abedelmajeed; Jaffe, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution melt analysis PCR (HRM PCR) for diagnosis of Old World Leishmania was developed using the 7SL RNA gene. Cutaneous leishmaniasis samples were analyzed. Sensitivity and specificity of HRM PCR were significantly better (P < 0.001) than those of internal transcribed spacer 1 PCR and similar to those of kinetoplast DNA PCR. PMID:20392923

  6. Automated Classification and Cluster Visualization of Genotypes Derived from High Resolution Melt Curves

    PubMed Central

    Kanderian, Sami; Jiang, Lingxia; Knight, Ivor

    2015-01-01

    Introduction High Resolution Melting (HRM) following PCR has been used to identify DNA genotypes. Fluorescent dyes bounded to double strand DNA lose their fluorescence with increasing temperature, yielding different signatures for different genotypes. Recent software tools have been made available to aid in the distinction of different genotypes, but they are not fully automated, used only for research purposes, or require some level of interaction or confirmation from an analyst. Materials and Methods We describe a fully automated machine learning software algorithm that classifies unknown genotypes. Dynamic melt curves are transformed to multidimensional clusters of points whereby a training set is used to establish the distribution of genotype clusters. Subsequently, probabilistic and statistical methods were used to classify the genotypes of unknown DNA samples on 4 different assays (40 VKORC1, CYP2C9*2, CYP2C9*3 samples in triplicate, and 49 MTHFR c.665C>T samples in triplicate) run on the Roche LC480. Melt curves of each of the triplicates were genotyped separately. Results Automated genotyping called 100% of VKORC1, CYP2C9*3 and MTHFR c.665C>T samples correctly. 97.5% of CYP2C9*2 melt curves were genotyped correctly with the remaining 2.5% given a no call due to the inability to decipher 3 melt curves in close proximity as either homozygous mutant or wild-type with greater than 99.5% posterior probability. Conclusions We demonstrate the ability to fully automate DNA genotyping from HRM curves systematically and accurately without requiring any user interpretation or interaction with the data. Visualization of genotype clusters and quantification of the expected misclassification rate is also available to provide feedback to assay scientists and engineers as changes are made to the assay or instrument. PMID:26605797

  7. Improved protocol for rapid identification of certain spa types using high resolution melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Mayerhofer, Benjamin; Stöger, Anna; Pietzka, Ariane T; Fernandez, Haizpea Lasa; Prewein, Bernhard; Sorschag, Sieglinde; Kunert, Renate; Allerberger, Franz; Ruppitsch, Werner

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most significant pathogens associated with health care. For efficient surveillance, control and outbreak investigation, S. aureus typing is essential. A high resolution melting curve analysis was developed and evaluated for rapid identification of the most frequent spa types found in an Austrian hospital consortium covering 2,435 beds. Among 557 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates 38 different spa types were identified by sequence analysis of the hypervariable region X of the protein A gene (spa). Identification of spa types through their characteristic high resolution melting curve profiles was considerably improved by double spiking with genomic DNA from spa type t030 and spa type t003 and allowed unambiguous and fast identification of the ten most frequent spa types t001 (58%), t003 (12%), t190 (9%), t041 (5%), t022 (2%), t032 (2%), t008 (2%), t002 (1%), t5712 (1%) and t2203 (1%), representing 93% of all isolates within this hospital consortium. The performance of the assay was evaluated by testing samples with unknown spa types from the daily routine and by testing three different high resolution melting curve analysis real-time PCR instruments. The ten most frequent spa types were identified from all samples and on all instruments with 100% specificity and 100% sensitivity. Compared to classical spa typing by sequence analysis, this gene scanning assay is faster, cheaper and can be performed in a single closed tube assay format. Therefore it is an optimal screening tool to detect the most frequent endemic spa types and to exclude non-endemic spa types within a hospital. PMID:25768007

  8. Improved Protocol for Rapid Identification of Certain Spa Types Using High Resolution Melting Curve Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mayerhofer, Benjamin; Stöger, Anna; Pietzka, Ariane T.; Fernandez, Haizpea Lasa; Prewein, Bernhard; Sorschag, Sieglinde; Kunert, Renate; Allerberger, Franz; Ruppitsch, Werner

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most significant pathogens associated with health care. For efficient surveillance, control and outbreak investigation, S. aureus typing is essential. A high resolution melting curve analysis was developed and evaluated for rapid identification of the most frequent spa types found in an Austrian hospital consortium covering 2,435 beds. Among 557 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates 38 different spa types were identified by sequence analysis of the hypervariable region X of the protein A gene (spa). Identification of spa types through their characteristic high resolution melting curve profiles was considerably improved by double spiking with genomic DNA from spa type t030 and spa type t003 and allowed unambiguous and fast identification of the ten most frequent spa types t001 (58%), t003 (12%), t190 (9%), t041 (5%), t022 (2%), t032 (2%), t008 (2%), t002 (1%), t5712 (1%) and t2203 (1%), representing 93% of all isolates within this hospital consortium. The performance of the assay was evaluated by testing samples with unknown spa types from the daily routine and by testing three different high resolution melting curve analysis real-time PCR instruments. The ten most frequent spa types were identified from all samples and on all instruments with 100% specificity and 100% sensitivity. Compared to classical spa typing by sequence analysis, this gene scanning assay is faster, cheaper and can be performed in a single closed tube assay format. Therefore it is an optimal screening tool to detect the most frequent endemic spa types and to exclude non-endemic spa types within a hospital. PMID:25768007

  9. High resolution melting analysis as a new approach to discriminate gluten-containing cereals.

    PubMed

    Martín-Fernández, Begoña; Costa, Joana; de-Los-Santos-Álvarez, Noemí; López-Ruiz, Beatriz; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P; Mafra, Isabel

    2016-11-15

    With this work, it is intended to propose a novel approach based on high resolution melting (HRM) analysis to detect wheat and discriminate it from other gluten-containing cereals. The method consisted of a real-time PCR assay targeting the gene encoding for the germ agglutinin isolectin A protein (Tri a 18 allergen), using the fluorescent Evagreen dye combined with HRM analysis. The results enabled wheat differentiation from other phylogenetically related cereals, namely barley, rye and oat with high level of confidence. Additionally, a quantitative real-time PCR approach was proposed, allowing detecting and quantifying wheat down to 20mg/kg in rice flour and 20pg of wheat DNA (∼1.1 DNA copies). Its application was successfully achieved in the analysis of processed foods to verify labelling compliance, being considered as a cost-effective tool for the specific detection of cereals in gluten-free foods. PMID:27283646

  10. Protein-DNA binding in high-resolution

    PubMed Central

    Mahony, Shaun; Pugh, B. Franklin

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in experimental and computational methodologies are enabling ultra-high resolution genome-wide profiles of protein-DNA binding events. For example, the ChIP-exo protocol precisely characterizes protein-DNA crosslinking patterns by combining chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with 5′ → 3′ exonuclease digestion. Similarly, deeply sequenced chromatin accessibility assays (e.g. DNase-seq and ATACseq) enable the detection of protected footprints at protein-DNA binding sites. With these techniques and others, we have the potential to characterize the individual nucleotides that interact with transcription factors, nucleosomes, RNA polymerases, and other regulatory proteins in a particular cellular context. In this review, we explain the experimental assays and computational analysis methods that enable high-resolution profiling of protein-DNA binding events. We discuss the challenges and opportunities associated with such approaches. PMID:26038153

  11. Use of a New High Resolution Melting Method for Genotyping Pathogenic Leptospira spp.

    PubMed Central

    Naze, Florence; Desvars, Amélie; Picardeau, Mathieu; Bourhy, Pascale; Michault, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is a worldwide zoonosis that is endemic in tropical areas, such as Reunion Island. The species Leptospira interrogans is the primary agent in human infections, but other pathogenic species, such as L. kirschner and L. borgpetersenii, are also associated with human leptospirosis. Methods and Findings In this study, a melting curve analysis of the products that were amplified with the primer pairs lfb1 F/R and G1/G2 facilitated an accurate species classification of Leptospira reference strains. Next, we combined an unsupervised high resolution melting (HRM) method with a new statistical approach using primers to amplify a two variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) for typing at the subspecies level. The HRM analysis, which was performed with ScreenClust Software, enabled the identification of genotypes at the serovar level with high resolution power (Hunter-Gaston index 0.984). This method was also applied to Leptospira DNA from blood samples that were obtained from Reunion Island after 1998. We were able to identify a unique genotype that is identical to that of the L. interrogans serovars Copenhageni and Icterohaemorrhagiae, suggesting that this genotype is the major cause of leptospirosis on Reunion Island. Conclusions Our simple, rapid, and robust genotyping method enables the identification of Leptospira strains at the species and subspecies levels and supports the direct genotyping of Leptospira in biological samples without requiring cultures. PMID:26154161

  12. Advances in DNA sequencing technologies for high resolution HLA typing.

    PubMed

    Cereb, Nezih; Kim, Hwa Ran; Ryu, Jaejun; Yang, Soo Young

    2015-12-01

    This communication describes our experience in large-scale G group-level high resolution HLA typing using three different DNA sequencing platforms - ABI 3730 xl, Illumina MiSeq and PacBio RS II. Recent advances in DNA sequencing technologies, so-called next generation sequencing (NGS), have brought breakthroughs in deciphering the genetic information in all living species at a large scale and at an affordable level. The NGS DNA indexing system allows sequencing multiple genes for large number of individuals in a single run. Our laboratory has adopted and used these technologies for HLA molecular testing services. We found that each sequencing technology has its own strengths and weaknesses, and their sequencing performances complement each other. HLA genes are highly complex and genotyping them is quite challenging. Using these three sequencing platforms, we were able to meet all requirements for G group-level high resolution and high volume HLA typing. PMID:26423536

  13. Y-STR genetic screening by high-resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Deng, J Q; Liu, B Q; Wang, Y; Liu, W; Cai, J F; Long, R; Li, W H

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the widely used automated capillary electrophoresis-based short tandem repeat (STR) genotyping method for genetic screening in forensic practice is laborious, time-consuming, expensive, and technically challenging in some cases. Thus, new molecular-based strategies for conclusively identifying forensically relevant biological evidence are required. Here, we used high-resolution melting analysis (HRM) for Y-chromosome STR genotyping for forensic genetic screening. The reproducibility of the melting profile over dilution, sensitivity, discrimination power, and other factors was preliminarily studied in 10 Y-STR loci. The results showed that HRM-based approaches revealed more genotypes (compared to capillary electrophoresis), showed higher uniformity in replicate tests and diluted samples, and enabled successful detection of DNA at concentrations as low as 0.25 ng. For mixed samples, the melting curve profiles discriminated between mixed samples based on reference samples with high efficiency. The triplex Y-chromosome STR HRM assay was performed and provided a foundation for further studies such as a multiplex HRM assay. The HRM approach is a one-step application and the entire procedure can be completed within 2 h at a low cost. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that the HRM-based Y-STR assay is a useful screening tool that can be used in forensic practice. PMID:26909950

  14. First screening for Brachyspira hampsonii in Swiss pigs applying a new high resolution melting assay.

    PubMed

    Scherrer, Simone; Borgström, Anna; Frei, Daniel; Wittenbrink, Max M

    2016-09-25

    A new High Resolution Melting (HRM) assay was developed for the rapid detection of Brachyspira (B.) hampsonii. B. hampsonii occurs in different European countries, however, until today it has not been encountered in Switzerland. Four B. hampsonii reference strains were used to develop the HRM assay: B. hampsonii clade I ATCC BAA2463 and clade II ATCC BAA2464 strain, as well as two isolated strains P280/1 from the UK and the German isolate 5369-1x/12. A conserved region of the nox gene was used to design B. hampsonii-specific primers. The HRM melting curves for the four reference strains showed reproducible difference graphs with distinct differences between the four strains based on a slight variation between the four amplicon sequences. In addition, DNA from 22 B. hampsonii strains representing four genetic B. hampsonii groups was used to validate the method. Melting temperatures in the interval between 73.1 and 74°C were obtained for all B. hampsonii strains and allow differentiating B. hampsonii from other Brachyspira species. In total 897 Swiss porcine fecal Brachyspira isolates, cultured between 2009 and 2015, were analysed by the HRM protocol. B. hampsonii was not detected among these Swiss Brachyspira isolates. In conclusion, the rapid and low-cost HRM approach allows a sensitive and specific identification of B. hampsonii. PMID:27599925

  15. High-Resolution Melting Curve Analysis for Identification of Pasteurellaceae Species in Experimental Animal Facilities.

    PubMed

    Miller, Manuel; Zorn, Julia; Brielmeier, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Pasteurellaceae are among the most prevalent bacterial pathogens isolated from mice housed in experimental animal facilities. Reliable detection and differentiation of Pasteurellaceae are essential for high-quality health monitoring. In this study, we combined a real-time PCR assay amplifying a variable region in the 16S rRNA sequence with high-resolution melting curve analysis (HRM) to identify and differentiate among the commonly isolated species Pasteurella pneumotropica biotypes "Jawetz" and "Heyl", Actinobacillus muris, and Haemophilus influenzaemurium. We used a set of six reference strains for assay development, with the melting profiles of these strains clearly distinguishable due to DNA sequence variations in the amplicon. For evaluation, we used real-time PCR/HRM to test 25 unknown Pasteurellaceae isolates obtained from an external diagnostic laboratory and found the results to be consistent with those of partial 16S rRNA sequencing. The real-time PCR/HRM method provides a sensitive, rapid, and closed-tube approach for Pasteurellaceae species identification for health monitoring of laboratory mice. PMID:26556281

  16. High-Resolution Melting Curve Analysis for Identification of Pasteurellaceae Species in Experimental Animal Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Manuel; Zorn, Julia; Brielmeier, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Pasteurellaceae are among the most prevalent bacterial pathogens isolated from mice housed in experimental animal facilities. Reliable detection and differentiation of Pasteurellaceae are essential for high-quality health monitoring. In this study, we combined a real-time PCR assay amplifying a variable region in the 16S rRNA sequence with high-resolution melting curve analysis (HRM) to identify and differentiate among the commonly isolated species Pasteurella pneumotropica biotypes “Jawetz” and “Heyl”, Actinobacillus muris, and Haemophilus influenzaemurium. We used a set of six reference strains for assay development, with the melting profiles of these strains clearly distinguishable due to DNA sequence variations in the amplicon. For evaluation, we used real-time PCR/HRM to test 25 unknown Pasteurellaceae isolates obtained from an external diagnostic laboratory and found the results to be consistent with those of partial 16S rRNA sequencing. The real-time PCR/HRM method provides a sensitive, rapid, and closed-tube approach for Pasteurellaceae species identification for health monitoring of laboratory mice. PMID:26556281

  17. Rapid Detection and Identification of Human Hookworm Infections through High Resolution Melting (HRM) Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ngui, Romano; Lim, Yvonne A. L.; Chua, Kek Heng

    2012-01-01

    Background Hookworm infections are still endemic in low and middle income tropical countries with greater impact on the socioeconomic and public health of the bottom billion of the world's poorest people. In this study, a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) coupled with high resolution melting-curve (HRM) analysis was evaluated for an accurate, rapid and sensitive tool for species identification focusing on the five human hookworm species. Methods Real-time PCR coupled with HRM analysis targeting the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS-2) of nuclear ribosomal DNA as the genetic marker was used to identify and distinguish hookworm species in human samples. Unique and distinct characteristics of HRM patterns were produced for each of the five hookworm species. The melting curves were characterized by peaks of 79.24±0.05°C and 83.00±0.04°C for Necator americanus, 79.12±0.10°C for Ancylostoma duodenale, 79.40±0.10°C for Ancylostoma ceylanicum, 79.63±0.05°C for Ancylostoma caninum and 79.70±0.14°C for Ancylostoma braziliense. An evaluation of the method's sensitivity and specificity revealed that this assay was able to detect as low as 0.01 ng/µl hookworm DNA and amplification was only recorded for hookworm positive samples. Conclusion The HRM assay developed in this study is a rapid and straightforward method for the diagnosis, identification and discrimination of five human hookworms. This assay is simple compared to other probe-based genotyping methods as it does not require multiplexing, DNA sequencing or post-PCR processing. Therefore, this method offers a new alternative for rapid detection of human hookworm species. PMID:22844538

  18. [Molecular identification of hairy antler by analysis of high resolution melting].

    PubMed

    Chen, Kang; Jiang, Chao; Yuan, Yuan; Huang, Lu-qi; Jin, Yan

    2015-02-01

    High resolution melting (HRM) , an important technology for genotyping and mutation scanning, has broad prospects in the authenticity of traditional Chinese medicine. This paper selected universal CO I primers and used HRM to establish a new method for authenticity of Hairy Antler. PCR was conducted at the annealing temperature of 60 °C and 45 cycles. The range of the DNA template concentration, the primer concentration and the Mg2+ ion concentration were further optimized. The results showed that the Tm values of Cervus nippon were (81.96 ± 0.07), (84.51 ± 0.03) °C and Cervus elaphus was(82.58 ± 0.13), (85.95 ± 0.05) °C with 10-100 mg · L(-1) DNA template, 0.2 µLmol · L(-1) primer, 2.0 mmol · L(-1) Mg2+. This method can authenticate of hairy antler and is simple, fast, high-throughput, visualization. PMID:26137679

  19. Identification of Uvaria sp by barcoding coupled with high-resolution melting analysis (Bar-HRM).

    PubMed

    Osathanunkul, M; Madesis, P; Ounjai, S; Pumiputavon, K; Somboonchai, R; Lithanatudom, P; Chaowasku, T; Wipasa, J; Suwannapoom, C

    2016-01-01

    DNA barcoding, which was developed about a decade ago, relies on short, standardized regions of the genome to identify plant and animal species. This method can be used to not only identify known species but also to discover novel ones. Numerous sequences are stored in online databases worldwide. One of the ways to save cost and time (by omitting the sequencing step) in species identification is to use available barcode data to design optimized primers for further analysis, such as high-resolution melting analysis (HRM). This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of the hybrid method Bar-HRM (DNA barcoding combined with HRM) to identify species that share similar external morphological features, rather than conduct traditional taxonomic identification that require major parts (leaf, flower, fruit) of the specimens. The specimens used for testing were those, which could not be identified at the species level and could either be Uvaria longipes or Uvaria wrayias, indicated by morphological identification. Primer pairs derived from chloroplast regions (matK, psbA-trnH, rbcL, and trnL) were used in the Bar-HRM. The results obtained from psbA-trnH primers were good enough to help in identifying the specimen while the rest were not. Bar-HRM analysis was proven to be a fast and cost-effective method for plant species identification. PMID:26909907

  20. Cancer mutation screening: Comparison of high-resolution melt analysis between two platforms.

    PubMed

    Ebili, Henry O; Ilyas, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution melt analysis (HRMA) is a cheap and reliable post-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) cancer mutation screening technique, which is fast gaining clinical relevance. The HRMA capabilities of the LightScanner (Idaho Technology) have been severally studied. However, the ABI 7500 HRM has not been tested against the purpose-built HRM instrument such as the LightScanner. DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded gastric cancer, colorectal cancer, and normal tissue as well as from colorectal cancer cell lines were amplified at exons 2, 3, and 4 of KRAS, and at exons 11 and 15 of BRAF in the ABI 7500 fast real-time PCR machine and subjected to melting both on the ABI and on the LightScanner. HRMA data were analysed with the ABI HRM software v2.0.1 and the LightScanner Call-IT 2.5. We tested the ABI 7500 HRM for internal precision, accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity at mutation screening relative to the LightScanner, using crude percentage concordance, kappa statistics, and the area under the receiver operator characteristics (AUROC) curve on SPSS version 19. The results show that the ABI 7500 HRMA has a high internal precision, and excellent concordance, sensitivity, and specificity at mutation screening compared with the LightScanner. However, in contrast to the LightScanner HRM software analysis, the ABI HRM software v.2.0.1, cannot distinguish real from certain pseudovariations in PCR amplicons that are sometimes brought about by the artefacts of the melting process. In conclusion, the ABI HRM has a comparable performance level with the LightScanner, although in certain respects mentioned previously, the LightScanner has an edge over the ABI. PMID:25932046

  1. Application of high-resolution melting analysis for differentiation of spoilage yeasts.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Mine; Kesmen, Zülal; Özbekar, Esra; Çetin, Bülent; Yetim, Hasan

    2016-09-01

    A new method based on high resolution melting (HRM) analysis was developed for the differentiation and classification of the yeast species that cause food spoilage. A total 134 strains belonging to 21 different yeast species were examined to evaluate the discriminative power of HRM analysis. Two different highly variable DNA regions on the 26 rRNA gene were targeted to produce the HRM profiles of each strain. HRM-based grouping was compared and confirmed by (GTG)5 rep-PCR fingerprinting analysis. All of the yeast species belonging to the genera Pichia, Candida, Kazachstania, Kluyveromyces, Debaryomyces, Dekkera, Saccharomyces, Torulaspora, Ustilago, and Yarrowia, which were produced as species-specific HRM profiles, allowed discrimination at species and/or strain level. The HRM analysis of both target regions provided successful discrimination that correlated with rep-PCR fingerprinting analysis. Consequently, the HRM analysis has the potential for use in the rapid and accurate classification and typing of yeast species isolated from different foods to determine their sources and routes as well as to prevent contamination. PMID:27572511

  2. Development of a fast, simple profiling method for sample screening using high resolution melting (HRM) of STRs.

    PubMed

    Nicklas, Janice A; Noreault-Conti, Trisha; Buel, Eric

    2012-03-01

    A screening assay has been developed to provide preliminary individualization of crime scene samples thus eliminating expensive, time-consuming short tandem repeat (STR) profiling of nonprobative samples. High resolution melting performed in a real-time PCR instrument is used to detect the slight melting differences between the length and sequence variations of 22 forensic STRs. Three STRs (vWA, D18S51, THO1) were chosen to develop an assay which was optimized for Mg++ concentration, annealing/extension time/temperature, assay volume, and bovine serum albumin addition. The assay was tested for reproducibility, uniformity for genotype, melting profile consistency, effects of inhibitors, and mixture effects. The assay could be used to determine DNA concentration when a standard curve is run simultaneously. Calculations of costs show that the assay can save significant time and money for a crime with many samples or suspects. PMID:22150300

  3. Identification of Brucella spp. isolated from human brucellosis in Malaysia using high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis.

    PubMed

    Mohamed Zahidi, Jama'ayah; Bee Yong, Tay; Hashim, Rohaidah; Mohd Noor, Azura; Hamzah, Siti Hawa; Ahmad, Norazah

    2015-04-01

    Molecular approaches have been investigated to overcome difficulties in identification and differentiation of Brucella spp. using conventional phenotypic methods. In this study, high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis was used for rapid identification and differentiation of members of Brucella genus. A total of 41 Brucella spp. isolates from human brucellosis were subjected to HRM analysis using 4 sets of primers, which identified 40 isolates as Brucella melitensis and 1 as Brucella canis. The technique utilized low DNA concentration and was highly reproducible. The assay is shown to be a useful diagnostic tool, which can rapidly differentiate Brucella up to species level. PMID:25641125

  4. Rapid Discrimination between Anopheles gambiae s.s. and Anopheles arabiensis by High-Resolution Melt (HRM) Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zianni, Michael R.; Nikbakhtzadeh, Mahmood R.; Jackson, Bryan T.; Panescu, Jenny; Foster, Woodbridge A.

    2013-01-01

    There is a need for more cost-effective options to more accurately discriminate among members of the Anopheles gambiae complex, particularly An. gambiae and Anopheles arabiensis. These species are morphologically indistinguishable in the adult stage, have overlapping distributions, but are behaviorally and ecologically different, yet both are efficient vectors of malaria in equatorial Africa. The method described here, High-Resolution Melt (HRM) analysis, takes advantage of minute differences in DNA melting characteristics, depending on the number of incongruent single nucleotide polymorphisms in an intragenic spacer region of the X-chromosome-based ribosomal DNA. The two species in question differ by an average of 13 single-nucleotide polymorphisms giving widely divergent melting curves. A real-time PCR system, Bio-Rad CFX96, was used in combination with a dsDNA-specific dye, EvaGreen, to detect and measure the melting properties of the amplicon generated from leg-extracted DNA of selected mosquitoes. Results with seven individuals from pure colonies of known species, as well as 10 field-captured individuals unambiguously identified by DNA sequencing, demonstrated that the method provided a high level of accuracy. The method was used to identify 86 field mosquitoes through the assignment of each to the two common clusters with a high degree of certainty. Each cluster was defined by individuals from pure colonies. HRM analysis is simpler to use than most other methods and provides comparable or more accurate discrimination between the two sibling species but requires a specialized melt-analysis instrument and software. PMID:23543777

  5. High-Resolution Melting Analysis of MED12 Mutations in Uterine Leiomyomas in Chinese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua; Qian, Hua; Zhou, Ruifang; Jiang, Jun; Ye, Lihua

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Somatic mutations in mediator complex subunit 12 (MED12) have emerged as a critical genetic change in the development of uterine leiomyomas. Studies, however, have focused largely on cohorts consisting of Caucasian patients. In this study, uterine leiomyomas from Chinese patients were examined for MED12 mutations. In addition, polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA) was compared with direct sequencing as a potentially more sensitive method for the detection of MED12 mutations. Methods: Tissue samples with the pathologies of uterine leiomyoma (n=181) and other endometrial diseases (n=157) were collected from Chinese patients at the Taizhou People's Hospital and Taizhou Polytechnic College (Taizhou City, China). Genomic DNA was prepared from all samples. Both PCR-based HRMA and PCR-based direct sequencing were used to detect MED12 mutations. Results: PCR-based HRMA and direct sequencing revealed MED12 mutations in 95/181 (52.5%) and 93/181 (51.4%) uterine leiomyomas, respectively. Nearly half of these mutations (46/93) were found in a single codon, codon 131. The coincidence rate between the two methods was 98.9% (179/181) so that no statistically significant difference was evident in the application of the methodologies (χ2=0.011, p=0.916). In addition, MED12 mutations were identified in 1/157 (4.17%) case of other endometrial pathologies by both methods. Conclusions: MED12 mutations were closely associated with the development of uterine leiomyomas, as opposed to other uterine pathologies in Chinese patients, and PCR-based HRMA was found to be a reliable method for the detection of MED12 mutations. PMID:25615570

  6. Rapid real-time PCR and high resolution melt analysis in a self-filling thermoplastic chip.

    PubMed

    Sposito, A; Hoang, V; DeVoe, D L

    2016-09-21

    A microfluidic platform designed for point-of-care PCR-based nucleic acid diagnostics is described. Compared to established microfluidic PCR technologies, the system is unique in its ability to achieve exceptionally rapid PCR amplification in a low cost thermoplastic format, together with high temperature accuracy enabling effective validation of reaction product by high resolution melt analysis performed in the same chamber as PCR. In addition, the system employs capillary pumping for automated loading of sample into the reaction chamber, combined with an integrated hydrophilic valve for precise self-metering of sample volumes into the device. Using the microfluidic system to target a mutation in the G6PC gene, efficient PCR from human genomic DNA template is achieved with cycle times as low as 14 s, full amplification in 8.5 min, and final melt analysis accurately identifying the desired amplicon. PMID:27460504

  7. Development of Novel High-Resolution Melting-Based Assays for Genotyping Two Alu Insertion Polymorphisms (FXIIIB and PV92).

    PubMed

    González-Giraldo, Yeimy; Rodríguez-Dueñas, Marisol; Forero, Diego A

    2016-03-01

    Insertion/Deletion polymorphisms (InDels) are a common type of genetic variation, with a growing role in population genetics and applied genomics. There is the need for the development of novel cost-effective assays for genotyping InDels of high importance. The main objective of this study was to develop high-resolution melting-based assays for genotyping two commonly studied Alu insertion polymorphisms: FXIIIB and PV92 (rs70942849 and rs3138523). Three primers (two forward and one reverse) were designed for each marker, and high-resolution melting (HRM) analyses in a qPCR platform were performed, using EvaGreen fluorescent dye. For each one of the two Alu insertion polymorphisms, HRM analyses identified distinguishable peaks for the three genotypes, allowing a robust genotyping. Results were validated using 96 DNA samples previously genotyped and the assays worked with different DNA concentrations. In this study, we developed novel cost-effective assays, using qPCR, for genotyping two Alu insertion polymorphisms (widely used as ancestry markers). Our results highlight the feasibility of using HRM analyses for genotyping InDel polymorphisms of medical and biotechnological importance. PMID:26843017

  8. Development of a high-resolution melting method for the screening of TNFAIP3 gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yuli Christine; Chang, Ya-Sian; Chang, Chun-Chi; Liu, Ta-Chih; Ko, Ying-Chin; Lee, Chien-Chin; Chang, Shun-Jen; Chang, Jan-Gowth

    2016-05-01

    Tumor necrosis factor, α-induced protein 3 (TNFAIP3) which encodes a ubiquitin-modifying enzyme (A20), acts as a negative regulator of the NF-κB pathway, and in lymphoma and autoimmune diseases it is frequently inactivated by mutations and/or deletions. We investigated the prevalence of the inactivation of TNFAIP3 in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). DNA was extracted from 81 cases of OSCC and 50 peripheral blood samples from normal controls. A high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis was used to characterize TNFAIP3 mutations, and the results were confirmed by direct DNA sequencing. Three mutations and three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were found to be associated with OSCC; the TNFAIP3 mutation occurred in 3.7% (3/81) of the OSCC cases examined. All mutations were in exon 7 [c.1081G>A (p.E361K), c.1398C>G (p.S466R) (rs200878487) and c.1760C>T (p.P587L) (rs150056192)], and p.E361K was identified as a novel mutation. We further used SIFT and PolyPhen-2 software to assess potentially functional mutations. Two SNPs, c.296‑20_296-18delCTC (rs71670547) and c.380T>G (p.F127C) (rs2230926), were located in exon 3, and c.2140C>T (p.P714S) was located in exon 9. A novel SNP, p.P714S differed from the one reported previously (p.P714A) (rs369155845) at that site. We also identified five SNPs in 50 normal Taiwanese individuals, and two of them [c.296‑15C>T (rs377482653) and c.305A>G (p.N102S) (rs146534657)] were not found in our OSCC tissue. HRM facilitated the screening of genetic changes. In addition, our results indicate that the prevalence of the TNFAIP3 mutation is low in OSCC. PMID:26986245

  9. Detection of Indel Mutations in Drosophila by High-Resolution Melt Analysis (HRMA).

    PubMed

    Housden, Benjamin E; Perrimon, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Although CRISPR technology allows specific genome alterations to be created with relative ease, detection of these events can be problematic. For example, CRISPR-induced double-strand breaks are often repaired imprecisely to generate unpredictable short indel mutations. Detection of these events requires the use of molecular screening techniques such as endonuclease assays, restriction profiling, or high-resolution melt analysis (HRMA). Here, we provide detailed protocols for HRMA-based mutation screening in Drosophila and analysis of the resulting data using the online tool HRMAnalyzer. PMID:27587781

  10. Submarine Melting of Icebergs from Repeat High-Resolution Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enderlin, E. M.; Hamilton, G. S.; Straneo, F.; Cenedese, C.

    2014-12-01

    Icebergs calved from tidewater glaciers act as distributed freshwater sources as they transit through fjords to the surrounding ocean basins. Glacier discharge estimates provide a crude approximation of the total iceberg discharge on inter-annual timescales, but the liquid freshwater flux from icebergs in glacial fjords is largely unknown. Here we use repeat high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) to derive meltwater fluxes for 18 icebergs in Sermilik Fjord, East Greenland, during the 2011-2013 boreal summers, and for 33 comparably-sized icebergs in Ilulissat Fjord, West Greenland, during March-April 2011 and July 2012. We find that iceberg melt rates for Sermilik Fjord are in good agreement with simulated melt rates along the vertical terminus of Helheim Glacier in winter, i.e. when melting at the glacier front is not enhanced by subglacial discharge, providing an independent validation of our technique. Variations in meltwater fluxes from icebergs are primarily related to differences in the submerged area of individual icebergs, which is consistent with theory. The stratification of water masses in fjords has a noticeable effect on summertime-derived melt estimates, with lower melt rates (and meltwater fluxes) observed in the relatively cold and fresh Polar Water layer and higher melt rates in the underlying warmer and more saline Atlantic Water layer. The meltwater flux dependence on submerged area, particularly within the deeper Atlantic Water layer, suggests that changes in the characteristics of icebergs (size/shape/keel-depth) calved from a tidewater glacier will alter the magnitude and distribution of meltwater fluxes within the fjord, which may in turn influence fjord circulation and the heat content delivered to the glacier terminus.

  11. Rapid Identification of Medically Important Candida Isolates Using High Resolution Melting Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nemcova, Eva; Cernochova, Michaela; Ruzicka, Filip; Malisova, Barbora

    2015-01-01

    An increasing trend in non albicans infections and various susceptibility patterns to antifungal agents implies a requirement for the quick and reliable identification of a number of medically important Candida species. Real-time PCR followed by high resolution melting analysis (HRMA) was developed, tested on 25 reference Candida collection strains and validated on an additional 143 clinical isolates in this study. All reference strains and clinical isolates inconclusive when using phenotypic methods and/or HRMA were analysed using ITS2 sequencing. Considering reference and clinical strains together, 23 out of 27 Candida species could be clearly distinguished by HRMA, while the remaining 4 species were grouped in 2 pairs, when applying the mean Tm ± 3 SD values, the shape of the derivative melting curve (dMelt curve) and, in some cases, the normalized and temperature—shifted difference plot against C. krusei. HRMA as a simple, rapid and inexpensive tool was shown to be useful in identifying a wide spectrum of clinically important Candida species. It may complement the current clinical diagnostic approach based on commercially available biochemical kits. PMID:25689781

  12. One-step species-specific high resolution melting analysis for nosocomial bacteria detection.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yeng Pooi; Chua, Kek Heng; Thong, Kwai Lin

    2014-12-01

    Nosocomial infections are a major public health concern worldwide. Early and accurate identification of nosocomial pathogens which are often multidrug resistant is crucial for prompt treatment. Hence, an alternative real-time polymerase chain reaction coupled with high resolution melting-curve analysis (HRMA) was developed for identification of five nosocomial bacteria. This assay targets species-specific regions of each nosocomial bacteria and produced five distinct melt curves with each representing a particular bacterial species. The melting curves were characterized by peaks of 78.8 ± 0.2 °C for Acinetobacter baumannii, 82.7 ± 0.2 °C for Escherichia coli, 86.3 ± 0.3 °C for Klebsiella pneumoniae, 88.8 ± 0.2 °C for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and 74.6 ± 02 °C for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The assay was able to specifically detect the five bacterial species with an overall detection limit of 2 × 10(-2) ng/μL. In conclusion, the HRM assay developed is a simple and rapid method for identification of the selected nosocomial pathogens. PMID:25307691

  13. Differentiation of infectious bursal disease virus strains using real-time RT-PCR and high resolution melt curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Ghorashi, Seyed A; O'Rourke, Denise; Ignjatovic, Jagoda; Noormohammadi, Amir H

    2011-01-01

    Differentiation of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) strains is crucial for effective vaccination programs and epidemiological investigations. In this study, a combination of real-time RT-PCR and high resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis was developed for simultaneous detection and differentiation of IBDV strains/isolates. The hypervariable region of VP2 gene was amplified from several IBDV strains and subjected to HRM curve analysis. The method could readily differentiate between classical vaccines/isolates and variants. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the amplicons from each strain revealed that each melt curve profile was related to a unique DNA sequence. The real-time RT-PCR HRM curve analysis was also able to differentiate IBDV strains/isolates directly in bursal tissues from field submissions and from vaccinated commercial flocks. The differences between melting peaks generated from IBDV strains were significantly different (P<0.0001) demonstrating the high discriminatory power of this technique. The results presented in this study indicated that real-time RT-PCR followed by HRM curve analysis provides a rapid and robust technique for genotyping IBDV isolates/strains and can contribute to effective control of IBDV outbreaks. PMID:21111004

  14. Genotyping of classical swine fever virus using high-resolution melt analysis.

    PubMed

    Titov, Ilya; Tsybanov, Sodnom; Malogolovkin, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Discrimination between different field and vaccine strains of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is crucial for meaningful disease diagnosis and epidemiological investigation. In this study, a rapid method for differentiating vaccine strains and outbreak CSFV isolates by combined RT-PCR and high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis has been developed. The assay is based on PCR amplification of short fragments from the most variable region of CSFVgene E2, followed by HRM analysis of amplicons. Real-Time PCR/HRM for CSFV detection and differentiation analysis has sensitivity comparable to RT-qPCR and genotyping resolution comparable to E2 nucleotide sequencing. This assay in one step enables rapid and sensitive identification and genotype discrimination of CSFV in field samples, and thus will be valuable for CSF outbreak response and disease control. PMID:26300371

  15. Rigid DNA beams for high-resolution single-molecule mechanics.

    PubMed

    Pfitzner, Emanuel; Wachauf, Christian; Kilchherr, Fabian; Pelz, Benjamin; Shih, William M; Rief, Matthias; Dietz, Hendrik

    2013-07-22

    Bridging the gap: Rigid DNA linkers (blue, see picture) between microspheres (green) for high-resolution single-molecule mechanical experiments were constructed using DNA origami. The resulting DNA helical bundles greatly reduce the noise generated in studies of conformation changes using optical tweezers and were applied to study small DNA secondary structures. PMID:23794413

  16. Methods to Increase the Sensitivity of High Resolution Melting Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Genotyping in Malaria.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Rachel; Hamilton, Elizabeth J; Durfee, Katelyn; Ndiaye, Daouda; Wirth, Dyann F; Hartl, Daniel L; Volkman, Sarah K

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of eradication efforts, malaria remains a global burden. Recent renewed interest in regional elimination and global eradication has been accompanied by increased genomic information about Plasmodium parasite species responsible for malaria, including characteristics of geographical populations as well as variations associated with reduced susceptibility to anti-malarial drugs. One common genetic variation, single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), offers attractive targets for parasite genotyping. These markers are useful not only for tracking drug resistance markers but also for tracking parasite populations using markers not under drug or other selective pressures. SNP genotyping methods offer the ability to track drug resistance as well as to fingerprint individual parasites for population surveillance, particularly in response to malaria control efforts in regions nearing elimination status. While informative SNPs have been identified that are agnostic to specific genotyping technologies, high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis is particularly suited to field-based studies. Compared to standard fluorescent-probe based methods that require individual SNPs in a single labeled probe and offer at best 10% sensitivity to detect SNPs in samples that contain multiple genomes (polygenomic), HRM offers 2-5% sensitivity. Modifications to HRM, such as blocked probes and asymmetric primer concentrations as well as optimization of amplification annealing temperatures to bias PCR towards amplification of the minor allele, further increase the sensitivity of HRM. While the sensitivity improvement depends on the specific assay, we have increased detection sensitivities to less than 1% of the minor allele. In regions approaching malaria eradication, early detection of emerging or imported drug resistance is essential for prompt response. Similarly, the ability to detect polygenomic infections and differentiate imported parasite types from cryptic local reservoirs

  17. Methods to Increase the Sensitivity of High Resolution Melting Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Genotyping in Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Rachel; Hamilton, Elizabeth J.; Durfee, Katelyn; Ndiaye, Daouda; Wirth, Dyann F.; Hartl, Daniel L.; Volkman, Sarah K.

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of eradication efforts, malaria remains a global burden. Recent renewed interest in regional elimination and global eradication has been accompanied by increased genomic information about Plasmodium parasite species responsible for malaria, including characteristics of geographical populations as well as variations associated with reduced susceptibility to anti-malarial drugs. One common genetic variation, single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), offers attractive targets for parasite genotyping. These markers are useful not only for tracking drug resistance markers but also for tracking parasite populations using markers not under drug or other selective pressures. SNP genotyping methods offer the ability to track drug resistance as well as to fingerprint individual parasites for population surveillance, particularly in response to malaria control efforts in regions nearing elimination status. While informative SNPs have been identified that are agnostic to specific genotyping technologies, high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis is particularly suited to field-based studies. Compared to standard fluorescent-probe based methods that require individual SNPs in a single labeled probe and offer at best 10% sensitivity to detect SNPs in samples that contain multiple genomes (polygenomic), HRM offers 2-5% sensitivity. Modifications to HRM, such as blocked probes and asymmetric primer concentrations as well as optimization of amplification annealing temperatures to bias PCR towards amplification of the minor allele, further increase the sensitivity of HRM. While the sensitivity improvement depends on the specific assay, we have increased detection sensitivities to less than 1% of the minor allele. In regions approaching malaria eradication, early detection of emerging or imported drug resistance is essential for prompt response. Similarly, the ability to detect polygenomic infections and differentiate imported parasite types from cryptic local reservoirs

  18. High Resolution Melting Analysis Targeting hsp70 as a Fast and Efficient Method for the Discrimination of Leishmania Species

    PubMed Central

    Zampieri, Ricardo Andrade; Laranjeira-Silva, Maria Fernanda; Muxel, Sandra Marcia; Stocco de Lima, Ana Carolina; Shaw, Jeffrey Jon; Floeter-Winter, Lucile Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background Protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania cause a large spectrum of clinical manifestations known as Leishmaniases. These diseases are increasingly important public health problems in many countries both within and outside endemic regions. Thus, an accurate differential diagnosis is extremely relevant for understanding epidemiological profiles and for the administration of the best therapeutic protocol. Methods/Principal Findings Exploring the High Resolution Melting (HRM) dissociation profiles of two amplicons using real time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) targeting heat-shock protein 70 coding gene (hsp70) revealed differences that allowed the discrimination of genomic DNA samples of eight Leishmania species found in the Americas, including Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum chagasi, L. (L.) amazonensis, L. (L.) mexicana, L. (Viannia) lainsoni, L. (V.) braziliensis, L. (V.) guyanensis, L. (V.) naiffi and L. (V.) shawi, and three species found in Eurasia and Africa, including L. (L.) tropica, L. (L.) donovani and L. (L.) major. In addition, we tested DNA samples obtained from standard promastigote culture, naturally infected phlebotomines, experimentally infected mice and clinical human samples to validate the proposed protocol. Conclusions/Significance HRM analysis of hsp70 amplicons is a fast and robust strategy that allowed for the detection and discrimination of all Leishmania species responsible for the Leishmaniases in Brazil and Eurasia/Africa with high sensitivity and accuracy. This method could detect less than one parasite per reaction, even in the presence of host DNA. PMID:26928050

  19. Exploring crystallization kinetics in natural rhyolitic melts using high resolution CT imagery of spherulites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clow, T. W.; Befus, K. S.; Gardner, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Little of our understanding of crystallization kinetics has been directly derived from studies of natural samples. We examine crystallization of rhyolitic melts by quantifying spherulite sizes and number densities in obsidian collected from Yellowstone caldera using high-resolution x-ray computed tomography (CT) imagery. Spherulites are spherical to ellipsoidal masses of intergrown alkali feldspar and quartz in a radiating, fibrous structure. They are thought to form in response to relatively rapid crystallization of melt in response to large amounts of undercooling. Recent research using compositional gradients that form outside of spherulites has suggested that they nucleate at 700 to 500 ˚C and their growth slows exponentially until it eventually ceases at ~400 ˚C. By quantifying spherulite textures, and using those temperature constraints, we derive new kinetic information regarding crystallization in natural rhyolitic systems. We find that spherulites range from 0.2 to 12.3 mm in diameter, and are 0.004 to 49.5 mm3 in volume. Such values generate number densities of 70 to 185 spherulites cm-3. Histograms of size display positively skewed distributions indicating small spherulites are far more abundant than larger ones. Those distributions imply nucleation rates change as a function of temperature. At higher temperatures where the melt is undercooled by 400-500 ˚C, nucleation is rare and growth is favored. With decreasing temperature, nucleation rates increase rapidly until cold enough temperatures are reached that diffusion limits crystallization and causes it to cease (undercoolings of ~650 ˚C). Assuming a cooling rate for the host obsidian of 10-5 ˚C s-1, then overall spherulite nucleation rates are 0.01 to 0.03 spherulites cm-3 hour-1.

  20. Rapid detection of fungal pathogens in bronchoalveolar lavage samples using panfungal PCR combined with high resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Bezdicek, Matej; Lengerova, Martina; Ricna, Dita; Weinbergerova, Barbora; Kocmanova, Iva; Volfova, Pavlina; Drgona, Lubos; Poczova, Miroslava; Mayer, Jiri; Racil, Zdenek

    2016-10-01

    Despite advances in the treatment of invasive fungal diseases (IFD), mortality rates remain high. Moreover, due to the expanding spectrum of causative agents, fast and accurate pathogen identification is necessary. We designed a panfungal polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which targets the highly variable ITS2 region of rDNA genes and uses high resolution melting analysis (HRM) for subsequent species identification. The sensitivity and specificity of this method was tested on a broad spectrum of the most clinically important fungal pathogens including Aspergillus spp., Candida spp. and mucormycetes. Despite the fact that fluid from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) is one of the most frequently tested materials there is a lack of literature sources aimed at panfungal PCR as an IFD diagnostic tool from BAL samples. The applicability of this method in routine practice was evaluated on 104 BAL samples from immunocompromised patients. Due to high ITS region variability, we obtained divergent melting peaks for different fungal species. Thirteen out of 18 patients with proven or probable IFD were positive. Therefore, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of our method were 67%, 100%, 100%, and 94%, respectively. In our assay, fungal pathogens identification is based on HRM, therefore omitting the expensive and time consuming sequencing step. With the high specificity, positive and negative predictive values, short time needed to obtain a result, and low price, the presented assay is intended to be used as a quick screening method for patients at risk of IFD. PMID:27161789

  1. Differentiation of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli Using Multiplex-PCR and High Resolution Melt Curve Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Banowary, Banya; Dang, Van Tuan; Sarker, Subir; Connolly, Joanne H.; Chenu, Jeremy; Groves, Peter; Ayton, Michelle; Raidal, Shane; Devi, Aruna; Vanniasinkam, Thiru; Ghorashi, Seyed A.

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter spp. are important causes of bacterial gastroenteritis in humans in developed countries. Among Campylobacter spp. Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) and C. coli are the most common causes of human infection. In this study, a multiplex PCR (mPCR) and high resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis were optimized for simultaneous detection and differentiation of C. jejuni and C. coli isolates. A segment of the hippuricase gene (hipO) of C. jejuni and putative aspartokinase (asp) gene of C. coli were amplified from 26 Campylobacter isolates and amplicons were subjected to HRM curve analysis. The mPCR-HRM was able to differentiate between C. jejuni and C. coli species. All DNA amplicons generated by mPCR were sequenced. Analysis of the nucleotide sequences from each isolate revealed that the HRM curves were correlated with the nucleotide sequences of the amplicons. Minor variation in melting point temperatures of C. coli or C. jejuni isolates was also observed and enabled some intraspecies differentiation between C. coli and/or C. jejuni isolates. The potential of PCR-HRM curve analysis for the detection and speciation of Campylobacter in additional human clinical specimens and chicken swab samples was also confirmed. The sensitivity and specificity of the test were found to be 100% and 92%, respectively. The results indicated that mPCR followed by HRM curve analysis provides a rapid (8 hours) technique for differentiation between C. jejuni and C. coli isolates. PMID:26394042

  2. High Resolution Melting Analysis for Rapid Mutation Screening in Gyrase and Topoisomerase IV Genes in Quinolone-Resistant Salmonella enterica

    PubMed Central

    Thong, Kwai Lin

    2014-01-01

    The increased Salmonella resistance to quinolones and fluoroquinolones is a public health concern in the Southeast Asian region. The objective of this study is to develop a high resolution melt curve (HRM) assay to rapidly screen for mutations in quinolone-resistant determining region (QRDR) of gyrase and topoisomerase IV genes. DNA sequencing was performed on 62 Salmonella strains to identify mutations in the QRDR of gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes. Mutations were detected in QRDR of gyrA (n = 52; S83F, S83Y, S83I, D87G, D87Y, and D87N) and parE (n = 1; M438I). Salmonella strains with mutations within QRDR of gyrA are generally more resistant to nalidixic acid (MIC 16 > 256 μg/mL). Mutations were uncommon within the QRDR of gyrB, parC, and parE genes. In the HRM assay, mutants can be distinguished from the wild-type strains based on the transition of melt curves, which is more prominent when the profiles are displayed in difference plot. In conclusion, HRM analysis allows for rapid screening for mutations at the QRDRs of gyrase and topoisomerase IV genes in Salmonella. This assay markedly reduced the sequencing effort involved in mutational studies of quinolone-resistance genes. PMID:25371903

  3. High resolution melting analysis for rapid mutation screening in gyrase and Topoisomerase IV genes in quinolone-resistant Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Ngoi, Soo Tein; Thong, Kwai Lin

    2014-01-01

    The increased Salmonella resistance to quinolones and fluoroquinolones is a public health concern in the Southeast Asian region. The objective of this study is to develop a high resolution melt curve (HRM) assay to rapidly screen for mutations in quinolone-resistant determining region (QRDR) of gyrase and topoisomerase IV genes. DNA sequencing was performed on 62 Salmonella strains to identify mutations in the QRDR of gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes. Mutations were detected in QRDR of gyrA (n = 52; S83F, S83Y, S83I, D87G, D87Y, and D87N) and parE (n = 1; M438I). Salmonella strains with mutations within QRDR of gyrA are generally more resistant to nalidixic acid (MIC 16 > 256 μg/mL). Mutations were uncommon within the QRDR of gyrB, parC, and parE genes. In the HRM assay, mutants can be distinguished from the wild-type strains based on the transition of melt curves, which is more prominent when the profiles are displayed in difference plot. In conclusion, HRM analysis allows for rapid screening for mutations at the QRDRs of gyrase and topoisomerase IV genes in Salmonella. This assay markedly reduced the sequencing effort involved in mutational studies of quinolone-resistance genes. PMID:25371903

  4. High resolution DNA content measurements of mammalian sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkel, D.; Lake, S.; Gledhill, B.L.; Van Dilla, M.A.; Stephenson, D.; Watchmaker, G.

    1982-01-01

    The high condensation and flat shape of the mammalian sperm nucleus present unique difficulties to flow cytometric measurement of DNA content. Chromatin compactness makes quantitative fluorescent staining for DNA difficult and causes a high index of refraction. The refractive index makes optical measurements sensitive to sperm head orientation. We demonstrate that the optical problems can be overcome using the commercial ICP22 epiillumination flow cytometer (Ortho Instruments, Westwood, MA) or a specially built cell orientating flow cytometer (OFCM). The design and operation of the OFCM are described. Measurements of the angular dependence of fluorescence from acriflavine stained rabbit sperm show that it is capable of orienting flat sperm with a tolerance of +-7/sup 0/. Differences in the angular dependence for the similarly shaped bull and rabbit sperm allow discrimination of these cells. We show that DNA staining with 4-6 diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) or an ethidium bromide mithramycin combination allows resolution of the X and Y populations in mouse sperm. They have also been successful with sperm from the bull, ram, rabbit, and boar. Reliable results with human sperm are not obtained. The accuracy of the staining and measurement techniques are verified by the correct determination of the relative content of these two populations in sperm from normal mice and those with the Cattanach (7 to X) translocation. Among the potential uses of these techniques are measurement of DNA content errors induced in sperm due to mutagen exposure, and assessment of the fractions of X and Y sperm in semen that may have one population artifically enriched.

  5. Rapid and inexpensive species differentiation using a multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction high-resolution melt assay.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Kelly M; Perez, Anjelica C U; Sweetin, Katherine C

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a method for developing real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) high-resolution melt (HRM) assays to identify multiple species present in a mixture simultaneously using LCGreen Plus and melt temperatures. Highly specific PCR primers are designed to yield amplicons with different melt temperatures for simple routine species identification compared with differentiating melt curve kinetics traces or difference plots. This method is robust and automatable, and it leads to savings in time and reagent costs, is easily modified to probe any species of interest, eliminates the need for post-PCR gel or capillary electrophoresis in routine assays, and requires no expensive dye-labeled primers. PMID:26836486

  6. Development of High Resolution Melting Analysis for the Diagnosis of Human Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Kek Heng; Lim, Siew Chee; Ng, Ching Ching; Lee, Ping Chin; Lim, Yvonne Ai Lian; Lau, Tze Pheng; Chai, Hwa Chia

    2015-01-01

    Molecular detection has overcome limitations of microscopic examination by providing greater sensitivity and specificity in Plasmodium species detection. The objective of the present study was to develop a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction coupled with high-resolution melting (qRT-PCR-HRM) assay for rapid, accurate and simultaneous detection of all five human Plasmodium spp. A pair of primers targeted the 18S SSU rRNA gene of the Plasmodium spp. was designed for qRT-PCR-HRM assay development. Analytical sensitivity and specificity of the assay were evaluated. Samples collected from 229 malaria suspected patients recruited from Sabah, Malaysia were screened using the assay and results were compared with data obtained using PlasmoNexTM, a hexaplex PCR system. The qRT-PCR-HRM assay was able to detect and discriminate the five Plasmodium spp. with lowest detection limits of 1–100 copy numbers without nonspecific amplifications. The detection of Plasmodium spp. in clinical samples using this assay also achieved 100% concordance with that obtained using PlasmoNexTM. This indicated that the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of this assay in Plasmodium spp. detection is comparable with those of PlasmoNexTM. The qRT-PCR-HRM assay is simple, produces results in two hours and enables high-throughput screening. Thus, it is an alternative method for rapid and accurate malaria diagnosis. PMID:26507008

  7. High resolution melting: improvements in the genetic diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a Portuguese cohort

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a complex myocardial disorder with a recognized genetic heterogeneity. The elevated number of genes and mutations involved in HCM limits a gene-based diagnosis that should be considered of most importance for basic research and clinical medicine. Methodology In this report, we evaluated High Resolution Melting (HRM) robustness, regarding HCM genetic testing, by means of analyzing 28 HCM-associated genes, including the most frequent 4 HCM-associated sarcomere genes, as well as 24 genes with lower reported HCM-phenotype association. We analyzed 80 Portuguese individuals with clinical phenotype of HCM allowing simultaneously a better characterization of this disease in the Portuguese population. Results HRM technology allowed us to identify 60 mutated alleles in 72 HCM patients: 49 missense mutations, 3 nonsense mutations, one 1-bp deletion, one 5-bp deletion, one in frame 3-bp deletion, one insertion/deletion, 3 splice mutations, one 5'UTR mutation in MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2, TNNI3, CSRP3, MYH6 and MYL2 genes. Significantly 22 are novel gene mutations. Conclusions HRM was proven to be a technique with high sensitivity and a low false positive ratio allowing a rapid, innovative and low cost genotyping of HCM. In a short return, HRM as a gene scanning technique could be a cost-effective gene-based diagnosis for an accurate HCM genetic diagnosis and hopefully providing new insights into genotype/phenotype correlations. PMID:22429680

  8. High Resolution Melting Analysis for JAK2 Exon 14 and Exon 12 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Rapado, Inmaculada; Grande, Silvia; Albizua, Enriqueta; Ayala, Rosa; Hernández, José-Angel; Gallardo, Miguel; Gilsanz, Florinda; Martinez-Lopez, Joaquin

    2009-01-01

    JAK2 mutations are important criteria for the diagnosis of Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms. We aimed to assess JAK2 exon 14 and exon 12 mutations by high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis, which allows variation screening. The exon 14 analysis included 163 patients with polycythemia vera, secondary erythrocytoses, essential thrombocythemia, or secondary thrombocytoses, and 126 healthy subjects. The study of exon 12 included 40 JAK2 V617F-negative patients (nine of which had polycythemia vera, and 31 with splanchnic vein thrombosis) and 30 healthy subjects. HRM analyses of JAK2 exons 14 and 12 gave analytical sensitivities near 1% and both intra- and interday coefficients of variation of less than 1%. For HRM analysis of JAK2 exon 14 in polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia, clinical sensitivities were 93.5% and 67.9%, clinical specificities were 98.8% and 97.0%, positive predictive values were 93.5% and 79.2%, and negative predictive values were 98.8% and 94.6, respectively. Correlations were observed between the results from HRM and three commonly used analytical methods. The JAK2 exon 12 HRM results agreed completely with those from sequencing analysis, and the three mutations in exon 12 were detected by both methods. Hence, HRM analysis of exons 14 and 12 in JAK2 shows better diagnostic values than three other routinely used methods against which it was compared. In addition, HRM analysis has the advantage of detecting unknown mutations. PMID:19225136

  9. High-resolution melting system to perform multilocus sequence typing of Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Lévesque, Simon; Michaud, Sophie; Arbeit, Robert D; Frost, Eric H

    2011-01-01

    Multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) has emerged as the state-of-the-art method for resolving bacterial population genetics but it is expensive and time consuming. We evaluated the potential of high resolution melting (HRM) to identify known MLST alleles of Campylobacter jejuni at reduced cost and time. Each MLST locus was amplified in two or three sub fragments, which were analyzed by HRM. The approach was investigated using 47 C. jejuni isolates, previously characterized by classical MLST, representing isolates from diverse environmental, animal and clinical sources and including the six most prevalent sequence types (ST) and the most frequent alleles. HRM was then applied to a validation set of 84 additional C. jejuni isolates from chickens; 92% of the alleles were resolved in 35 hours of laboratory time and the cost of reagents per isolate was $20 compared with $100 for sequence-based typing. HRM has the potential to complement sequence-based methods for resolving SNPs and to facilitate a wide range of genotyping studies. PMID:21297862

  10. Development of High Resolution Melting Analysis for the Diagnosis of Human Malaria.

    PubMed

    Chua, Kek Heng; Lim, Siew Chee; Ng, Ching Ching; Lee, Ping Chin; Lim, Yvonne Ai Lian; Lau, Tze Pheng; Chai, Hwa Chia

    2015-01-01

    Molecular detection has overcome limitations of microscopic examination by providing greater sensitivity and specificity in Plasmodium species detection. The objective of the present study was to develop a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction coupled with high-resolution melting (qRT-PCR-HRM) assay for rapid, accurate and simultaneous detection of all five human Plasmodium spp. A pair of primers targeted the 18S SSU rRNA gene of the Plasmodium spp. was designed for qRT-PCR-HRM assay development. Analytical sensitivity and specificity of the assay were evaluated. Samples collected from 229 malaria suspected patients recruited from Sabah, Malaysia were screened using the assay and results were compared with data obtained using PlasmoNex(TM), a hexaplex PCR system. The qRT-PCR-HRM assay was able to detect and discriminate the five Plasmodium spp. with lowest detection limits of 1-100 copy numbers without nonspecific amplifications. The detection of Plasmodium spp. in clinical samples using this assay also achieved 100% concordance with that obtained using PlasmoNex(TM). This indicated that the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of this assay in Plasmodium spp. detection is comparable with those of PlasmoNex(TM). The qRT-PCR-HRM assay is simple, produces results in two hours and enables high-throughput screening. Thus, it is an alternative method for rapid and accurate malaria diagnosis. PMID:26507008

  11. High resolution melting curve analysis as a new tool for rapid identification of canine parvovirus type 2 strains.

    PubMed

    Bingga, Gali; Liu, Zhicheng; Zhang, Jianfeng; Zhu, Yujun; Lin, Lifeng; Ding, Shuangyang; Guo, Pengju

    2014-01-01

    A high resolution melting (HRM) curve method was developed to identify canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) strains by nested PCR. Two sets of primers, CPV-426F/426R and CPV-87R/87F, were designed that amplified a 52 bp and 53 bp product from the viral VP2 capsid gene. The region amplified by CPV-426F/426R included the A4062G and T4064A mutations in CPV-2a, CPV-2b and CPV-2c. The region amplified by CPV-87F/87R included the A3045T mutation in the vaccine strains of CPV-2 and CPV-2a, CPV-2b and CPV-2c. Faecal samples were obtained from 30 dogs that were CPV antigen-positive. The DNA was isolated from the faecal samples and PCR-amplified using the two sets of primers, and genotyped by HRM curve analysis. The PCR-HRM assay was able to distinguish single nucleotide polymorphisms between CPV-2a, CPV-2b and CPV-2c using CPV-426F/426R. CPV-2a was distinguished from CPV-2b and CPV-2c by differences in the melting temperature. CPV-2b and CPV-2c could be distinguished based on the shape of the melting curve after generating heteroduplexes using a CPV-2b reference sample. The vaccine strains of CPV-2 were identified using CPV-87F/87R. Conventional methods for genotyping CPV strains are labor intensive, expensive or time consuming; the present PCR-based HRM assay might be an attractive alternative. PMID:25159576

  12. High-resolution melt analysis for species identification of coagulase-negative staphylococci derived from bovine milk.

    PubMed

    Ajitkumar, Praseeda; Barkema, Herman W; Zadoks, Ruth N; Morck, Douglas W; van der Meer, Frank J U M; De Buck, Jeroen

    2013-03-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are the most frequently isolated pathogens isolated from bovine milk. In this study, we report a rapid assay for species identification of CNS using high-resolution melt analysis (HRMA) of 16S rDNA sequences. Real-time polymerase chain reaction amplification of 16S rRNA gene fragment, spanning the variable region V1 and V2, was performed with a resulting amplicon of 215 bp. A library of distinct melt curves of reference strains of 13 common CNS species was created using HRMA. Sequencing of 16S rRNA and rpoB genes, and, when needed, tuf gene, of 100 CNS isolates obtained from Canadian Bovine Mastitis Research Network was done to determine their species identity, allowing for subsequent evaluation of the performance of HRMA for field isolates of bovine CNS. A combination of HRMA and sequencing revealed that Staphylococcus chromogenes, S. xylosus, S. simulans, and S. sciuri had multiple genotypes, complicating their resolution by HRMA. As the 3 genotypes of S. chromogenes had distinct melt curves, the 3 distinct genotypes were employed as reference strains in a blinded trial of 156 CNS isolates to identify S. chromogenes. HRMA correctly identified all S. chromogenes isolates which were later confirmed by sequencing. Staphylococcus chromogenes (68%) was most frequently found among the CNS isolates, followed by S. haemolyticus (10%) and S. xylosus (6%). The present study revealed that HRMA of 16S rRNA gene (V1-V2) could be used as a rapid, efficient, low-cost, and minimally cumbersome technique for S. chromogenes identification, the most common CNS derived from bovine milk. PMID:23273337

  13. High Resolution Melting Analysis: A Rapid Screening and Typing Tool for Common β-Thalassemia Mutation in Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Min; Jiao, Ji-Wei; Zhan, Xiu-Hui; Zhan, Xiao-Fen; Pan, Mei-Chen; Wang, Jun-Li; Wang, Chun-Fang; Zhong, Tian-Yu; Zhang, Qin; Yu, Xia; Wu, Jiao-Ren; Yang, Hui-Tian; Lin, Fen; Tong, Xin; Yang, Hui; Zha, Guang-Cai; Wang, Qian; Zheng, Lei; Wen, Ying-Fang; Yang, Li-Ye

    2014-01-01

    β-thalassemia is a common inherited disorder worldwide including southern China, and at least 45 distinct β-thalassemia mutations have been identified in China. High-resolution melting (HRM) assay was recently introduced as a rapid, inexpensive and effective method for genotyping. However, there was no systemic study on the diagnostic capability of HRM to identify β-thalassemia. Here, we used an improved HRM method to screen and type 12 common β-thalassemia mutations in Chinese, and the rapidity and reliability of this method was investigated. The whole PCR and HRM procedure could be completed in 40 min. The heterozygous mutations and 4 kinds of homozygous mutations could be readily differentiated from the melting curve except c.-78A>G heterozygote and c.-79A>G heterozygote. The diagnostic reliability of this HRM assay was evaluated on 756 pre-typed genomic DNA samples and 50 cases of blood spots on filter paper, which were collected from seven high prevalent provinces in southern China. If c.-78A>G heterozygote and c.-79A>G heterozygote were classified into the same group (c.-78&79 A>G heterozygote), the HRM method was in complete concordance with the reference method (reverse dot blot/DNA-sequencing). In a conclusion, the HRM method appears to be an accurate and sensitive method for the rapid screening and identification of β-thalassemia mutations. In the future, we suggest this technology to be used in neonatal blood spot screening program. It could enlarge the coverage of β-thalassemia screening program in China. At the same time, its value should be confirmed in prospectively clinical and epidemiological studies. PMID:25089872

  14. A PCR–High-Resolution Melt Assay for Rapid Differentiation of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Binks, Michael J.; Beissbarth, Jemima; Hare, Kim M.; Kirkham, Lea-Ann S.; Smith-Vaughan, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a PCR–high-resolution melt (PCR-HRM) assay to discriminate nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) colonies from Haemophilus haemolyticus. This method is rapid and robust, with 96% sensitivity and 92% specificity compared to the hpd#3 assay. PCR-HRM is ideal for high-throughput screening for NTHi surveillance and clinical trials. PMID:24478508

  15. Quantitative high-resolution melting PCR analysis for monitoring of fermentation microbiota in sourdough.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaoxi B; Gänzle, Michael G

    2014-09-01

    Current methods of monitoring the microbial ecology of food fermentation system are generally labor intensive and/or time consuming. This study developed two methods based on high-resolution melting curves (HRM) to monitor sourdough microbiota during fermentation and to investigate the effect of cereal substrate on microbial ecology. A strain cocktail of Lactobacillus fermentum FUA3165, Lactobacillus plantarum FUA3309, Lactobacillus paracasei FUA3166 and Lactobacillus reuteri FUA3168 was used to ferment red (Town and PAN8609) and white (commercial and Segaolane) sorghum sourdough, and wheat sourdough. The microbial composition of sourdoughs was determined by plate count and HRM-qPCR to differentiate at the species level. The resistance of each species to sorghum phenolic extract was measured. There was no difference in microbial composition among the four sorghum sourdoughs, with L. fermentum FUA3165 in all sourdoughs. The competiveness of the strains in sorghum sourdoughs corresponded to their resistance to sorghum phenolic extract. In a second experiment, five L. reuteri strains, the human-lineage strains FUA3400 and 3401 isolated from wheat sourdough, the rodent-lineage strain FUA5448 isolated from rye sourdough and the sorghum isolates FUA3168 and 3324, were used to ferment wheat, rye and sorghum sourdoughs. The microbial composition of sourdoughs was determined by plate counts and HRM-qPCR to different L. reuteri strains representing different host-adapted lineages. No difference among different substrates was observed; indicating cereal type had no selective effect on sourdough microbial ecology. In conclusion, HRM-qPCR assays were established as rapid and highly specific tool for monitoring of sourdough microbiota. The ability to distinguish highly similar microbes in samples containing only few genotypes makes HRM-qPCR suitable for quality control in other food fermentation systems. The presence of phenolic compounds in sorghum sourdough favored organisms

  16. Evaluation of High Resolution Melting for MTHFR C677T Genotyping in Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Shuying; Zhang, Kun; Wang, Hui; Dong, Rui; Yang, Xiaomeng; Liu, Yi; Ma, Yanhui

    2016-01-01

    Background High resolution melting (HRM) is a simple, flexible and low-cost mutation screening technique. The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene encoding a critical enzyme, potentially affects susceptibility to some congenital defects like congenital heart disease (CHD). We evaluate the performance of HRM for genotyping of the MTHFR gene C677T locus in CHD cases and healthy controls of Chinese Han population. Methods A total of 315 blood samples from 147 CHD patients (male72, female 75) and 168 healthy controls (male 92, female 76) were enrolled in the study. HRM was utilized to genotype MTHFR C677T locus of all the samples. The results were compared to that of PCR-RFLP and Sanger sequencing. The association of the MTHFR C677T genotypes and the risk of CHD was analyzed using odds ratio with their 95% confidence interval (CIs) from unconditional logistic regression. Results All the samples were successfully genotyped by HRM within 1 hour and 30 minutes while at least 6 hours were needed for PCR-RFLP and sequencing. The genotypes of MTHFR C677T CC, CT, and TT were 9.52%, 49.66%, and 40.82% in CHD group but 29.17%, 50% and 20.83% in control group, which were identical using both methods of HRM and PCR-RFLP, demonstrating the sensitivity and specificity of HRM were all 100%. Conclusion MTHFR C677T is a potential risk factor for CHD in our local residents of Shandong province in China. HRM is a fast, sensitive, specific and reliable method for clinical application of genotyping. PMID:26990189

  17. Rapid detection of HLA-B*51 by real-time polymerase chain reaction and high-resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Imperiali, C; Alía-Ramos, P; Padró-Miquel, A

    2015-08-01

    HLA-B*51, a class I human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecule, is the strongest known genetic risk factor for Behçet disease. However, there are only few articles reporting methods to determine the presence or absence of HLA-B51. For this reason, we designed and developed an easy, fast, and inexpensive real-time high-resolution melting (HRM) assay to detect HLA-B*51. We genotyped 61 samples by our HRM assay and by conventional polymerase chain reaction, and no discrepancies were found between results. Besides, a subgroup of 25 samples was also genotyped in a different laboratory, and another subgroup of 16 samples was obtained from the International Histocompatibility Working Group DNA Bank, and a full concordance of results was observed with those obtained by HRM. Regarding the identifying system evaluated, we obtained 100% of specificity, sensibility, and repeatability, and 0% of false positive and false negative rates. Therefore, this HRM analysis is easily applicable to the rapid detection of HLA-B*51, exhibits a high speed, and requires a very low budget. PMID:26176813

  18. Combined Use of Molecular Markers and High-Resolution Melting (HRM) to Assess Chromosome Dosage in Potato Hybrids.

    PubMed

    Villano, Clizia; Miraglia, Valeria; Iorizzo, Massimo; Aversano, Riccardo; Carputo, Domenico

    2016-03-01

    In plants, the most widely used cytological techniques to assess parental genome contributions are based on in situ hybridization (FISH and GISH), but they are time-consuming and need specific expertise and equipment. Recent advances in genomics and molecular biology have made PCR-based markers a straightforward, affordable technique for chromosome typing. Here, we describe the development of a molecular assay that uses single-copy conserved ortholog set II (COSII)-based single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and the high-resolution melting (HRM) technique to assess the chromosome dosage of interspecific hybrids between a Solanum phureja-S. tuberosum diploid (2n = 2x = 24) hybrid and its wild relative S. commersonii. Screening and analysis of 45 COSII marker sequences allowed S. commersonii-specific SNPs to be identified for all 12 chromosomes. Combining the HRM technique with the establishment of synthetic DNA hybrids, SNP markers were successfully used to predict the expected parental chromosome ratio of 5 interspecific triploid hybrids. These results demonstrate the ability of this strategy to distinguish diverged genomes from each other, and to estimate chromosome dosage. The method could potentially be applied to any species as a tool to assess paternal to maternal ratios in the framework of a breeding program or following transformation techniques. PMID:26663623

  19. A novel method for the rapid and prospective identification of Beijing Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains by high-resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Alonso, M; Navarro, Y; Barletta, F; Martínez Lirola, M; Gotuzzo, E; Bouza, E; García de Viedma, D

    2011-03-01

    Genotypic analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) has enabled the definition of several lineages. The Beijing family, which is considered highly virulent and transmissible, has been associated with resistance in certain settings and involved in severe outbreaks, making it one of the most closely-monitored lineages. Therefore, rapid prospective identification of Beijing MTB strains could be relevant. In the present study, we evaluate a real-time PCR followed by high-resolution melting (HRM) based on the identification of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the Rv2629 gene which defines Beijing lineage (A191C for Beijing genotype and A191A for non-Beijing genotype). This combined methodology efficiently differentiated Beijing and non-Beijing strains in 100% of the isolates from a collection of reference strains without requiring specific DNA probes. Additionally, HRM was able to assign a Beijing/non-Beijing genotype in 90.9% of the respiratory specimens assayed. Its applicability was tested on a Peruvian sample of circulating MTB strains, in which it identified 10.7% as belonging to the Beijing genotype; this proportion reached 20% in the North Lima area. HRM analysis of the A191C SNP is a rapid, reliable, and sensitive method for the efficient prospective survey of high-risk Beijing MTB strains, even in developing settings where MTB culture is often not available. PMID:20384709

  20. Detection of Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma haematobium by Real-Time PCR with High Resolution Melting Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sady, Hany; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M.; Ngui, Romano; Atroosh, Wahib M.; Al-Delaimy, Ahmed K.; Nasr, Nabil A.; Dawaki, Salwa; Abdulsalam, Awatif M.; Ithoi, Init; Lim, Yvonne A. L.; Chua, Kek Heng; Surin, Johari

    2015-01-01

    The present study describes a real-time PCR approach with high resolution melting-curve (HRM) assay developed for the detection and differentiation of Schistosoma mansoni and S. haematobium in fecal and urine samples collected from rural Yemen. The samples were screened by microscopy and PCR for the Schistosoma species infection. A pair of degenerate primers were designed targeting partial regions in the cytochrome oxidase subunit I (cox1) gene of S. mansoni and S. haematobium using real-time PCR-HRM assay. The overall prevalence of schistosomiasis was 31.8%; 23.8% of the participants were infected with S. haematobium and 9.3% were infected with S. mansoni. With regards to the intensity of infections, 22.1% and 77.9% of S. haematobium infections were of heavy and light intensities, respectively. Likewise, 8.1%, 40.5% and 51.4% of S. mansoni infections were of heavy, moderate and light intensities, respectively. The melting points were distinctive for S. mansoni and S. haematobium, categorized by peaks of 76.49 ± 0.25 °C and 75.43 ± 0.26 °C, respectively. HRM analysis showed high detection capability through the amplification of Schistosoma DNA with as low as 0.0001 ng/µL. Significant negative correlations were reported between the real-time PCR-HRM cycle threshold (Ct) values and microscopic egg counts for both S. mansoni in stool and S. haematobium in urine (p < 0.01). In conclusion, this closed-tube HRM protocol provides a potentially powerful screening molecular tool for the detection of S. mansoni and S. haematobium. It is a simple, rapid, accurate, and cost-effective method. Hence, this method is a good alternative approach to probe-based PCR assays. PMID:26193254

  1. Genotyping single-nucleotide polymorphisms of human genes involved in organophosphate detoxification by high-resolution melting.

    PubMed

    Kurdyukov, Ivan; Rodionov, Gennady; Radilov, Andrey; Babakov, Vladimir

    2014-08-01

    Paraoxonase-1 (PON1) and butyrylcholinesterase (BCHE) are natural bioscavengers of organophosphate acetylcholinesterase inhibitors in the human body, which can determine individual sensitivity to organophosphate toxicity. Interindividual differences in activity of PON1 (catalytic bioscavenger) and substrate specificity are strongly associated with the substitution of two amino acids: Leu/Met (L/M) at position 55 (rs854560) and Gln/Arg (Q/R) at position 192 (rs662). In the case of BCHE (stoichiometric bioscavenger) substitution, Ala/Thr (A/T) at position 539 produces the so-called "K-variant" of the enzyme (rs1803274). Threonine allele is often co-inherited with an atypical BCHE allele (rs1799807). The atypical variant of BCHE displays a lower affinity for cholinesterase inhibitors. Genotyping rs662 and rs1803274 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) by high-resolution melting (HRM) is facilitated by the nucleotide substitution A>G (G>A), which resulted in a changed number of hydrogen bonds in the PCR product and, consequently, shifted T m. In the case of rs854560, genotyping is complicated by the nucleotide substitution T>A, which has no significant effect on the T m of the PCR product. An addition of a small quantity of LL homozygote DNA into the reaction mixture before PCR discriminates the three genotypes by the melt curves due to different amounts of heteroduplexes formed in the LM and MM samples. HRM analysis can be applied for genotyping human rs854560, rs662, and rs1803274 SNPs. PMID:24705954

  2. Detection of Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma haematobium by Real-Time PCR with High Resolution Melting Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sady, Hany; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M; Ngui, Romano; Atroosh, Wahib M; Al-Delaimy, Ahmed K; Nasr, Nabil A; Dawaki, Salwa; Abdulsalam, Awatif M; Ithoi, Init; Lim, Yvonne A L; Chua, Kek Heng; Surin, Johari

    2015-01-01

    The present study describes a real-time PCR approach with high resolution melting-curve (HRM) assay developed for the detection and differentiation of Schistosoma mansoni and S. haematobium in fecal and urine samples collected from rural Yemen. The samples were screened by microscopy and PCR for the Schistosoma species infection. A pair of degenerate primers were designed targeting partial regions in the cytochrome oxidase subunit I (cox1) gene of S. mansoni and S. haematobium using real-time PCR-HRM assay. The overall prevalence of schistosomiasis was 31.8%; 23.8% of the participants were infected with S. haematobium and 9.3% were infected with S. mansoni. With regards to the intensity of infections, 22.1% and 77.9% of S. haematobium infections were of heavy and light intensities, respectively. Likewise, 8.1%, 40.5% and 51.4% of S. mansoni infections were of heavy, moderate and light intensities, respectively. The melting points were distinctive for S. mansoni and S. haematobium, categorized by peaks of 76.49 ± 0.25 °C and 75.43 ± 0.26 °C, respectively. HRM analysis showed high detection capability through the amplification of Schistosoma DNA with as low as 0.0001 ng/µL. Significant negative correlations were reported between the real-time PCR-HRM cycle threshold (Ct) values and microscopic egg counts for both S. mansoni in stool and S. haematobium in urine (p < 0.01). In conclusion, this closed-tube HRM protocol provides a potentially powerful screening molecular tool for the detection of S. mansoni and S. haematobium. It is a simple, rapid, accurate, and cost-effective method. Hence, this method is a good alternative approach to probe-based PCR assays. PMID:26193254

  3. Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay with High-Resolution Melting Analysis for Characterization of Antimicrobial Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Donà, Valentina; Kasraian, Sara; Lupo, Agnese; Guilarte, Yuvia N; Hauser, Christoph; Furrer, Hansjakob; Unemo, Magnus; Low, Nicola; Endimiani, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Resistance to antibiotics used against Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections is a major public health concern. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) testing relies on time-consuming culture-based methods. Development of rapid molecular tests for detection of AMR determinants could provide valuable tools for surveillance and epidemiological studies and for informing individual case management. We developed a fast (<1.5-h) SYBR green-based real-time PCR method with high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis. One triplex and three duplex reactions included two sequences for N. gonorrhoeae identification and seven determinants of resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESCs), azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, and spectinomycin. The method was validated by testing 39 previously fully characterized N. gonorrhoeae strains, 19 commensal Neisseria species strains, and an additional panel of 193 gonococcal isolates. Results were compared with results of culture-based AMR determination. The assay correctly identified N. gonorrhoeae and the presence or absence of the seven AMR determinants. There was some cross-reactivity with nongonococcal Neisseria species, and the detection limit was 10(3) to 10(4) genomic DNA (gDNA) copies/reaction. Overall, the platform accurately detected resistance to ciprofloxacin (sensitivity and specificity, 100%), ceftriaxone (sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 90%), cefixime (sensitivity, 92%; specificity, 94%), azithromycin (sensitivity and specificity, 100%), and spectinomycin (sensitivity and specificity, 100%). In conclusion, our methodology accurately detects mutations that generate resistance to antibiotics used to treat gonorrhea. Low assay sensitivity prevents direct diagnostic testing of clinical specimens, but this method can be used to screen collections of gonococcal isolates for AMR more quickly than current culture-based AMR testing. PMID:27225407

  4. Identifying the last bloodmeal of questing sheep tick nymphs (Ixodes ricinus L.) using high resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Collini, Margherita; Albonico, Francesca; Hauffe, Heidi C; Mortarino, Michele

    2015-06-15

    The sheep tick, Ixodes ricinus L., is an important hematophagous vector of zoonotic disease of both veterinary and public health importance in Europe. Risk models for tick-borne diseases can be improved by identifying the main hosts of this species in any given area. However, this generalist tick stays on a host for only a few days a year over its life cycle, making the study of its feeding ecology difficult. In contrast, ticks can easily be collected from vegetation when they are questing. Molecular methods have proved to be a reliable alternative to field observation, but most current methods have low sensitivity and/or low identification success (i.e. hosts are only identified to taxonomic levels higher than species). In this study we use Real-time PCR coupled with High Resolution Melting Analysis (HRMA) to identify the source of the last bloodmeal in questing tick nymphs. Twenty of the most important tick hosts were grouped taxonomically and six group-specific primer sets, targeting short mitochondrial DNA regions, were designed de novo. Firstly, we show that these primers successfully amplify target host DNA (from host tissue or engorged ticks), and that HRMA can be used to reliably identify hosts to species (or genera in the case of Sorex and Apodemus). Secondly, the new protocol was tested on field-collected questing nymphs. Bloodmeal source was identified in 65.4% of 52 individuals. In 83.3% of these, the host was identified to species or genera using HRMA alone. Moreover, the primer sets designed here can unequivocally identify mixed bloodmeals. The combination of sensitivity and identification success together with the closed-tube and single step approach that minimizes contamination, make Real-time HRMA a good alternative to current methods for bloodmeal identification. PMID:25941127

  5. Rigidity of melting DNA.

    PubMed

    Pal, Tanmoy; Bhattacharjee, Somendra M

    2016-05-01

    The temperature dependence of DNA flexibility is studied in the presence of stretching and unzipping forces. Two classes of models are considered. In one case the origin of elasticity is entropic due to the polymeric correlations, and in the other the double-stranded DNA is taken to have an intrinsic rigidity for bending. In both cases single strands are completely flexible. The change in the elastic constant for the flexible case due to thermally generated bubbles is obtained exactly. For the case of intrinsic rigidity, the elastic constant is found to be proportional to the square root of the bubble number fluctuation. PMID:27300825

  6. Rigidity of melting DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Tanmoy; Bhattacharjee, Somendra M.

    2016-05-01

    The temperature dependence of DNA flexibility is studied in the presence of stretching and unzipping forces. Two classes of models are considered. In one case the origin of elasticity is entropic due to the polymeric correlations, and in the other the double-stranded DNA is taken to have an intrinsic rigidity for bending. In both cases single strands are completely flexible. The change in the elastic constant for the flexible case due to thermally generated bubbles is obtained exactly. For the case of intrinsic rigidity, the elastic constant is found to be proportional to the square root of the bubble number fluctuation.

  7. Comparison of a High-Resolution Melting Assay to Next-Generation Sequencing for Analysis of HIV Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Cousins, Matthew M.; Ou, San-San; Wawer, Maria J.; Munshaw, Supriya; Swan, David; Magaret, Craig A.; Mullis, Caroline E.; Serwadda, David; Porcella, Stephen F.; Gray, Ronald H.; Quinn, Thomas C.; Donnell, Deborah; Eshleman, Susan H.

    2012-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has recently been used for analysis of HIV diversity, but this method is labor-intensive, costly, and requires complex protocols for data analysis. We compared diversity measures obtained using NGS data to those obtained using a diversity assay based on high-resolution melting (HRM) of DNA duplexes. The HRM diversity assay provides a single numeric score that reflects the level of diversity in the region analyzed. HIV gag and env from individuals in Rakai, Uganda, were analyzed in a previous study using NGS (n = 220 samples from 110 individuals). Three sequence-based diversity measures were calculated from the NGS sequence data (percent diversity, percent complexity, and Shannon entropy). The amplicon pools used for NGS were analyzed with the HRM diversity assay. HRM scores were significantly associated with sequence-based measures of HIV diversity for both gag and env (P < 0.001 for all measures). The level of diversity measured by the HRM diversity assay and NGS increased over time in both regions analyzed (P < 0.001 for all measures except for percent complexity in gag), and similar amounts of diversification were observed with both methods (P < 0.001 for all measures except for percent complexity in gag). Diversity measures obtained using the HRM diversity assay were significantly associated with those from NGS, and similar increases in diversity over time were detected by both methods. The HRM diversity assay is faster and less expensive than NGS, facilitating rapid analysis of large studies of HIV diversity and evolution. PMID:22785188

  8. High resolution melting analysis of the NR1I3 genetic variants: Is there an association with neonatal hyperbilirubinemia?

    PubMed

    Cheung, Tian Pei; Van Rostenberghe, Hans; Ismail, Rosliza; Nawawi, Noor Namirah; Abdullah, Nurul Amierah; Ramli, Noraida; Ibrahim, Nor Rosidah; Hj Abd Majid, Noorizan; Mohd Yusoff, Narazah; Nishio, Hisahide; Yusoff, Surini

    2015-12-01

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) encoded by the nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group I, member 3 (NR1I3) gene regulates the elimination of bilirubin through activating the components of the bilirubin clearance pathway. Hence, NR1I3 genetic variants may affect bilirubin metabolism and result in neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. Thus far, research which investigates the association between NR1I3 variants and neonatal hyperbilirubinemia has not been undertaken in any population. The present study aimed to evaluate the influence of MPJ6_1I3008 (rs10157822), IVS8+116T>G (rs4073054) and 540A>G (rs2307424) on neonatal hyperbilirubinemia development in the Malay population. Buccal swabs were collected from 232 hyperbilirubinemia and 277 control term newborns with gestational age ≥37weeks and birth weight ≥2500g. The NR1I3 variants were genotyped by using high resolution melting (HRM) assays and verified by DNA sequencing. Gender, mode of delivery and birth weight did not differ between hyperbilirubinemia and control groups. The genotypic and allelic frequencies of MPJ6_1I3008, IVS8+116T>G and 540A>G were not significantly different between the groups. However, stratification by gender revealed a significant inverse association between homozygous variant genotype of MPJ6_1I3008 and risk of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in the females (OR, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.20-0.95; p=0.034). This study demonstrates that the homozygous variant genotype of MPJ6_1I3008 was associated with a significant reduced risk of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in the females. PMID:26188155

  9. Hybrid analysis (barcode-high resolution melting) for authentication of Thai herbal products, Andrographis paniculata (Burm.f.) Wall.ex Nees

    PubMed Central

    Osathanunkul, Maslin; Suwannapoom, Chatmongkon; Khamyong, Nuttaluck; Pintakum, Danupol; Lamphun, Santisuk Na; Triwitayakorn, Kanokporn; Osathanunkul, Kitisak; Madesis, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Background: Andrographis paniculata Nees is a medicinal plant with multiple pharmacological properties. It has been used over many centuries as a household remedy. A. paniculata products sold on the markets are in processed forms so it is difficult to authenticate. Therefore buying the herbal products poses a high-risk of acquiring counterfeited, substituted and/or adulterated products. Due to these issues, a reliable method to authenticate products is needed. Materials and Methods: High resolution melting analysis coupled with DNA barcoding (Bar-HRM) was applied to detect adulteration in commercial herbal products. The rbcL barcode was selected to use in primers design for HRM analysis to produce standard melting profile of A. paniculata species. DNA of the tested commercial products was isolated and their melting profiles were then generated and compared with the standard A. paniculata. Results: The melting profiles of the rbcL amplicons of the three closely related herbal species (A. paniculata, Acanthus ebracteatus and Rhinacanthus nasutus) are clearly separated so that they can be distinguished by the developed method. The method was then used to authenticate commercial herbal products. HRM curves of all 10 samples tested are similar to A. paniculata which indicated that all tested products were contained the correct species as labeled. Conclusion: The method described in this study has been proved to be useful in aiding identification and/or authenticating A. paniculata. This Bar-HRM analysis has allowed us easily to determine the A. paniculata species in herbal products on the markets even they are in processed forms. SUMMARY We propose the use of DNA barcoding combined with High Resolution Melting analysis for authenticating of Andrographis paniculata products.The developed method can be used regardless of the type of the DNA template (fresh or dried tissue, leaf, and stem).rbcL region was chosen for the analysis and work well with our samplesWe can easily

  10. A new identification method for five species of oysters in genus Crassostrea from China based on high-resolution melting analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiafeng; Xu, Fei; Li, Li; Zhang, Guofan

    2014-03-01

    The high phenotypic plasticity in the shell of oysters presents a challenge during taxonomic and phylogenetic studies of these economically important bivalves. However, because DNA can exhibit marked differences among morphologically similar species, DNA barcoding offers a potential means for oyster identification. We analyzed the complete sequences of the cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) of five common Crassostrea species in China (including Hong Kong oyster C. hongkongensis, Jinjiang oyster C. ariakensis, Portuguese oyster C. angulata, Kumamoto oyster C. sikamea, and Pacific oyster C. gigas) and screened for distinct fragments. Using these distinct fragments on a high-resolution melting analysis platform, we developed an identification method that does not rely on species-specific PCR or fragment length polymorphism and is efficient, reliable, and easy to visualize. Using a single pair of primers (Oyster-COI-1), we were able to successfully distinguish among the five oyster species. This new method provides a simple and powerful tool for the identification of oyster species.

  11. High-resolution melting analysis (HRM) for differentiation of four major Taeniidae species in dogs Taenia hydatigena, Taenia multiceps, Taenia ovis, and Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto.

    PubMed

    Dehghani, Mansoureh; Mohammadi, Mohammad Ali; Rostami, Sima; Shamsaddini, Saeedeh; Mirbadie, Seyed Reza; Harandi, Majid Fasihi

    2016-07-01

    Tapeworms of the genus Taenia include several species of important parasites with considerable medical and veterinary significance. Accurate identification of these species in dogs is the prerequisite of any prevention and control program. Here, we have applied an efficient method for differentiating four major Taeniid species in dogs, i.e., Taenia hydatigena, T. multiceps, T. ovis, and Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto. High-resolution melting (HRM) analysis is simpler, less expensive, and faster technique than conventional DNA-based assays and enables us to detect PCR amplicons in a closed system. Metacestode samples were collected from local abattoirs from sheep. All the isolates had already been identified by PCR-sequencing, and their sequence data were deposited in the GenBank. Real-time PCR coupled with HRM analysis targeting mitochondrial cox1 and ITS1 genes was used to differentiate taeniid species. Distinct melting curves were obtained from ITS1 region enabling accurate differentiation of three Taenia species and E. granulosus in dogs. The HRM curves of Taenia species and E .granulosus were clearly separated at Tm of 85 to 87 °C. In addition, double-pick melting curves were produced in mixed infections. Cox1 melting curves were not decisive enough to distinguish four taeniids. In this work, the efficiency of HRM analysis to differentiate four major taeniid species in dogs has been demonstrated using ITS1 gene. PMID:27008188

  12. Rapid and efficient differentiation of Yersinia species using high-resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Souza, Roberto A; Frazão, Miliane R; Almeida, Alzira M P; Falcão, Juliana P

    2015-08-01

    The primary goal of clinical microbiology is the accurate identification of the causative agent of the disease. Here, we describe a method for differentiation between Yersinia species using PCR-HRMA. The results revealed species-specific melting profiles. The herein developed assay can be used as an effective method to differentiate Yersinia species. PMID:25980404

  13. High-resolution atomic force microscopy of duplex and triplex DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinov, Dmitry; Dwir, Benjamin; Kapon, Eli; Borovok, Natalia; Molotsky, Tatiana; Kotlyar, Alexander

    2007-06-01

    Double-stranded poly(dG)-poly(dC) and triple-stranded poly(dG)-poly(dG)-poly(dC) DNA were deposited on the modified surface of highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) and visualized using atomic force microscopy with high-resolution (radius of ~1 nm) tips. The high resolution attained by this technique enabled us to detect single-stranded regions in double-stranded poly(dG)-poly(dC) and double-stranded and single-stranded regions in poly(dG)-poly(dG)-poly(dC) triplexes, as well as to resolve the helical pitch of the triplex molecules. We could also follow the reaction of G-strand extension in poly(dG)-poly(dC) by the Klenow exo- fragment of DNA polymerase I. This approach to molecular visualization could serve as a useful tool for the investigation of irregular structures in canonical DNA and other biopolymers, as well as studies of the molecular mechanisms of DNA replication and transcription.

  14. Identification case of evidence in timber tracing of Pinus radiate, using high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis.

    PubMed

    Solano, Jaime; Anabalón, Leonardo; Encina, Francisco

    2016-03-01

    Fast, accurate detection of plant species and their hybrids using molecular tools will facilitate assessment and monitoring of timber tracing evidence. In this study the origin of unknown pine samples is determined for a case of timber theft in the region of Araucania southern Chile. We evaluate the utility of the trnL marker region for species identification applied to pine wood based on High Resolution Melting. This efficient tracing methods can be incorporated into forestry applications such as certification of origin. The object of this work was genotype identification using high-resolution melting (HRM) and trnL approaches for Pinus radiata (Don) in timber tracing evidence. Our results indicate that trnL is a very sensitive marker for delimiting species and HRM analysis was used successfully for genotyping Pinus samples for timber tracing purposes. Genotyping samples by HRM analysis with the trnL1 approach allowed us to differentiate two wood samples from the Pinaceae family: Pinus radiata (Don) and Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco. The same approach with Pinus trnL wood was not able to discriminate between samples of Pinus radiata, indicating that the samples were genetically indistinguishable, possibly because they have the same genotype at this locus. Timber tracing with HRM analysis is expected to contribute to future forest certification schemes, control of illegal trading, and molecular traceability of Pinus spp. PMID:26626827

  15. High resolution laser micro sintering / melting using q-switched and high brilliant laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exner, H.; Streek, A.

    2015-03-01

    Since the discovery of selective laser sintering/melting, numerous modifications have been made to upgrade or customize this technology for industrial purposes. Laser micro sintering (LMS) is one of those modifications: Powders with particles in the range of a few micrometers are used to obtain products with highly resolved structures. Pulses of a q-switched laser had been considered necessary in order to generate sinter layers from the micrometer scaled metal powders. LMS has been applied with powders from metals as well as from ceramic and cermet feedstock's to generate micro parts. Recent technological progress and the application of high brilliant continuous laser radiation have now allowed an efficient laser sintering/melting of micrometer scaled metal powders. Thereby it is remarkable that thin sinter layers are generated using high continuous laser power. The principles of the process, the state of the art in LMS concerning its advantages and limitations and furthermore the latest results of the recent development of this technology will be presented. Laser Micro Sintering / Laser Micro Melting (LMM) offer a vision for a new dimension of additive fabrication of miniature and precise parts also with application potential in all engineering fields.

  16. The utility of high-resolution melting analysis of SNP nucleated PCR amplicons--an MLST based Staphylococcus aureus typing scheme.

    PubMed

    Lilliebridge, Rachael A; Tong, Steven Y C; Giffard, Philip M; Holt, Deborah C

    2011-01-01

    High resolution melting (HRM) analysis is gaining prominence as a method for discriminating DNA sequence variants. Its advantage is that it is performed in a real-time PCR device, and the PCR amplification and HRM analysis are closed tube, and effectively single step. We have developed an HRM-based method for Staphylococcus aureus genotyping. Eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were derived from the S. aureus multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) database on the basis of maximized Simpson's Index of Diversity. Only G↔A, G↔T, C↔A, C↔T SNPs were considered for inclusion, to facilitate allele discrimination by HRM. In silico experiments revealed that DNA fragments incorporating the SNPs give much higher resolving power than randomly selected fragments. It was shown that the predicted optimum fragment size for HRM analysis was 200 bp, and that other SNPs within the fragments contribute to the resolving power. Six DNA fragments ranging from 83 bp to 219 bp, incorporating the resolution optimized SNPs were designed. HRM analysis of these fragments using 94 diverse S. aureus isolates of known sequence type or clonal complex (CC) revealed that sequence variants are resolved largely in accordance with G+C content. A combination of experimental results and in silico prediction indicates that HRM analysis resolves S. aureus into 268 "melt types" (MelTs), and provides a Simpson's Index of Diversity of 0.978 with respect to MLST. There is a high concordance between HRM analysis and the MLST defined CCs. We have generated a Microsoft Excel key which facilitates data interpretation and translation between MelT and MLST data. The potential of this approach for genotyping other bacterial pathogens was investigated using a computerized approach to estimate the densities of SNPs with unlinked allelic states. The MLST databases for all species tested contained abundant unlinked SNPs, thus suggesting that high resolving power is not dependent upon large numbers of SNPs

  17. Co-evolution of tidewater glacier calving front morphology and submarine melt rates in a high resolution ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, D. A.; Nienow, P. W.; Goldberg, D. N.; Cowton, T. R.; Sole, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid dynamic changes at the margins of the Greenland Ice Sheet, synchronous with ocean warming, have raised concern that tidewater glaciers can respond rapidly and sensitively to ocean forcing. One way in which ocean forcing would manifest is through the melting of the submerged parts of tidewater glacier calving fronts, with the spatial distribution of submarine melt a control on their morphology. Calving front morphology has thus far received little attention and yet has the potential to significantly impact calving rates and therefore tidewater glacier dynamics. Here we present a model which allows us to study the evolution of calving front morphology in two dimensions. We outline a new routine for calculating submarine melt rates from ocean models at calving fronts of arbitrary geometry, and for adjusting this geometry according to the calculated melt rates. This routine is applied to a high resolution (~1m) non-hydrostatic ocean model (MITgcm) with a glacier boundary (calving front) which evolves in time according to the simulated submarine melt rates. The model shows, consistent with recent observations, that submarine melting leads to undercutting of tidewater glacier calving fronts. We examine how undercut magnitude, undercut depth and potential steady states respond to variation in subglacial discharge, ice velocity, and fjord depth, temperature and stratification. In addition to this analysis we use a diagnostic full-Stokes flow-line ice model to examine how these geometries affect ice internal stress and potential for calving. In undertaking this work we aim to elucidate a process which - supposing tidewater glaciers are sensitive to ocean forcing - must provide a fundamental link between the ocean and the ice.

  18. Detection of Sequence Polymorphism in Rubus Occidentalis L. Monomorphic Microsatellite Markers by High Resolution Melting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microsatellite, or simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, are valuable as co-dominant genetic markers with a variety of applications such as DNA fingerprinting, linkage mapping, and population structure analysis. Development of microsatellite primers through the identification of appropriate repeate...

  19. Probing the atomic structure of basaltic melts generated by partial melting of upper mantle peridotite (KLB-1): Insights from high-resolution solid-state NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S. Y.; Lee, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    Probing the structural disorder in multi-component silicate glasses and melts with varying composition is essential to reveal the change of macroscopic properties in natural silicate melts. While a number of NMR studies for the structure of multi-component silicate glasses and melts including basaltic and andesitic glasses have been reported (e.g., Park and Lee, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 2012, 80, 125; Park and Lee, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 2014, 26, 42), many challenges still remain. The composition of multi-component basaltic melts vary with temperature, pressure, and melt fraction (Kushiro, Annu. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci., 2001, 71, 107). Especially, the eutectic point (the composition of first melt) of nepheline-forsterite-quartz (the simplest model of basaltic melts) moves with pressure from silica-saturated to highly undersaturated and alkaline melts. The composition of basaltic melts generated by partial melting of upper mantle peridotite (KLB-1, the xenolith from Kilbourne Hole) also vary with pressure. In this study we report experimental results for the effects of composition on the atomic structure of Na2O-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 (NMAS) glasses in nepheline (NaAlSiO4)-forsterite (Mg2SiO4)-quartz (SiO2) eutectic composition and basaltic glasses generated by partial melting of upper mantle peridotite (KLB-1) using high-resolution multi-nuclear solid-state NMR. The Al-27 3QMAS (triple quantum magic angle spinning) NMR spectra of NMAS glasses in nepheline-forsterite-quartz eutectic composition show only [4]Al. The Al-27 3QMAS NMR spectra of KLB-1 basaltic glasses show mostly [4]Al and a non-negligible fraction of [5]Al. The fraction of [5]Al, the degree of configurational disorder, increases from 0 at XMgO [MgO/(MgO+Al2O3)]=0.55 to ~3% at XMgO=0.79 in KLB-1 basaltic glasses while only [4]Al are observed in nepheline-forsterite-quartz eutectic composition. The current experimental results provide that the fraction of [5]Al abruptly increases by the effect of

  20. Second generation sequencing allows for mtDNA mixture deconvolution and high resolution detection of heteroplasmy

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Mitchell M.; McQuillan, Megan R.; O’Hanlon, Katherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Aim To use parallel array pyrosequencing to deconvolute mixtures of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence and provide high resolution analysis of mtDNA heteroplasmy. Methods The hypervariable segment 1 (HV1) of the mtDNA control region was analyzed from 30 individuals using the 454 GS Junior instrument. Mock mixtures were used to evaluate the system’s ability to deconvolute mixtures and to reliably detect heteroplasmy, including heteroplasmic differences between 5 family members of the same maternal lineage. Amplicon sequencing was performed on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products generated with primers that included multiplex identifiers (MID) and adaptors for pyrosequencing. Data analysis was performed using NextGENe® software. The analysis of an autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) locus (D18S51) and a Y-STR locus (DYS389 I/II) was performed simultaneously with a portion of HV1 to illustrate that multiplexing can encompass different markers of forensic interest. Results Mixtures, including heteroplasmic variants, can be detected routinely down to a component ratio of 1:250 (20 minor variant copies with a coverage rate of 5000 sequences) and can be readily detected down to 1:1000 (0.1%) with expanded coverage. Amplicon sequences from D18S51, DYS389 I/II, and the second half of HV1 were successfully partitioned and analyzed. Conclusions The ability to routinely deconvolute mtDNA mixtures down to a level of 1:250 allows for high resolution analysis of mtDNA heteroplasmy, and for differentiation of individuals from the same maternal lineage. The pyrosequencing approach results in poor resolution of homopolymeric sequences, and PCR/sequencing artifacts require a filtering mechanism similar to that for STR stutter and spectral bleed through. In addition, chimeric sequences from jumping PCR must be addressed to make the method operational. PMID:21674826

  1. High resolution melting detects sequence polymorphism in rubus occidentalis L. monomorphic microsatellite markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microsatellite, or simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, are valuable as co-dominant genetic markers with a variety of applications such as DNA fingerprinting, linkage mapping, and population structure analysis. However, primer pairs designed from the regions that flank SSRs often generate fragment...

  2. Viscosity of Carbonate-Silicate Melts Using Ultra-High Resolution Falling Sphere Viscometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummer, D. R.; Kavner, A.; Manning, C. E.; Park, C.; Kono, Y.; Kenney-Benson, C.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonatites are carbon-rich magmas that participate in the deep-Earth carbon cycle, and may be precursors to many types of terrestrial magmatism. [1] Viscosity is a crucial parameter in determining migration rates and behavior of melts from the upper mantle to Earth's surface, but very little is known about the viscosity of carbonate-silicate liquids at conditions relevant to Earth's interior. To examine the viscosity of carbonate-silicate liquids as a function of composition, we performed in situ falling sphere viscosity experiments using a high speed X-ray camera and Paris-Edinburgh press at the HPCAT beamline (Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory). Mixtures from the CaCO3-CaSiO3 (calcite-wollastonite) binary system were used to simulate mantle silicate carbonatites. Samples were loaded using the experimental setup of Yamada et al [2], held at 3 GPa, and heated until the sample was fully molten (between 1350-1650 oC). The high speed camera recorded the falling rate of a platinum sphere placed near the top of the sample chamber, enabling the calculation of terminal velocity and hence viscosity. Results indicate that pure CaCO3 at upper mantle conditions has a very low viscosity of ~0.006 Pa-s, only a little higher than that of water. This viscosity is 2-6 times lower than that of potassium carbonates at similar pressures (2.5-4.0 GPa) but at somewhat lower temperatures (800-1200 oC). [3] Our measured viscosity as a function of increasing silicate content increases along a log-linear trend, reaching 0.256 Pa-s for CaSiO3 liquid. This heavy dependence of viscosity on composition has implications for melt migration processes at different depths, suggesting either viscosity-driven or porosity-driven migration depending on both extent of melting and carbonate content. [1] Dasgupta, R. et al. (2013) Nature 493, 211-215. [2] Yamada, A. et al. (2011) Rev. Sci. Instr. 82, 015103. [3] Dobson, D. et al. (1996) Earth Plan. Sci. Lett. 143, 207-215.

  3. Allele-specific extension allows base-pair neutral homozygotes to be discriminated by high-resolution melting of small amplicons.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yanning; Yuan, Yanpeng; Lin, Qingling; Chan, Piu

    2010-11-01

    Not all single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) can be determined using high-resolution melting (HRM) of small amplicons, especially class 3 and 4 SNPs. This is due mainly to the small shift in the melting temperature (Tm) between two types of homozygote. Choosing rs1869458 (a class 4 SNP) as a sample, we developed a modified small amplicon HRM assay. An allele-specific extension (ASE) primer, which ended at an SNP site and matched only one of the alleles, was added to the reaction as well as additional thermal steps for ASE. Following asymmetric polymerase chain reaction and melting curve analysis, heterozygotes were easily identified. Two types of homozygote were also distinguishable, indicating that extension primers 11 to 13 bases in length worked efficiently in an allele-specific way. Modification of the limiting amplification primer with locked nucleic acid increased the Tm difference between extension and amplification peaks and facilitated subsequent genotyping. In addition, 194 human genomic DNA samples were genotyped with the developed assay and by direct sequencing, with the different methods providing identical genotyping results. In conclusion, ASE-HRM is a simple, inexpensive, closed-tube genotyping method that can be used to examine all types of SNP. PMID:20599636

  4. Duplex High-Resolution Melting Assay for the Simultaneous Genotyping of IL28B rs12979860 and PNPLA3 rs738409 Polymorphisms in Chronic Hepatitis C Patients

    PubMed Central

    Enache, Elena L.; Sin, Anca; Bancu, Ligia; Ramière, Christophe; Diaz, Olivier; André, Patrice; Enache, Liviu S.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is a major burden for public health worldwide. Although newer direct-acting antivirals show good efficacy, their cost precludes their wide adoption in resource-limited regions. Thus, strategies are being developed to help identify patients with high susceptibility to response to classic PEG-interferon + ribavirin therapy. IL28B polymorphism rs12979860 C/T is an important predictor for an efficient response to interferon-based therapy. A genetic variant in adiponutrin (PNPLA3) gene, rs738409 C/G, is associated with steatosis, severity, and progression of liver fibrosis in CHC patients, and predicts treatment outcome in difficult-to-cure HCV-infected patients with advanced fibrosis. We developed a rapid and inexpensive assay based on duplex high-resolution melting (HRM) for the simultaneous genotyping of these two polymorphisms. The assay validation was performed on synthetic DNA templates and 132 clinical samples from CHC patients. When compared with allele-specific PCR and sequencing, our assay showed 100% (95% CI: 0.9724–1) accuracy, with 100% sensitivity and specificity. Our assay was robust against concentration and quality of DNA samples, melting curve normalization intervals, HRM analysis algorithm, and sequence variations near the targeted SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphism). This duplex assay should provide useful information for patient-oriented management and clinical decision-making in CHC. PMID:26389885

  5. Development of a high-resolution melting analysis assay for rapid and high-throughput identification of clinically important dermatophyte species.

    PubMed

    Didehdar, M; Khansarinejad, B; Amirrajab, N; Shokohi, T

    2016-07-01

    Accurate identification of dermatophyte species is important both for epidemiological studies and for implementing antifungal treatment strategies. Although nucleic acid amplification-based assays have several advantages over conventional mycological methods, a major disadvantage is their high cost. The aim of this study was to develop a rapid and accurate real-time PCR-based high-resolution melting (HRM) assay for differentiation of the most common dermatophyte species. The oligonucleotide primers were designed to amplify highly conserved regions of the dermatophyte ribosomal DNA. Analysis of a panel containing potentially interfering fungi demonstrated no cross reactivity with the assay. To evaluate the performance characteristics of the method, a total of 250 clinical isolates were tested in comparison with the long-established PCR-RFLP method and the results were reassessed using DNA sequencing, as the reference standard method. The assay is able to type dermatophytes using normalised melting peak, difference plot analysis or electrophoresis on agarose gel methods. The results showed that, in comparison to PCR-RFLP, the developed HRM assay was able to differentiate at least 10 common dermatophytes species with a higher speed, throughput and accuracy. These results indicate that the HRM assay will be a useful sensitive, high throughput and cost-effective method for differentiating the most common dermatophyte species. PMID:26991756

  6. Duplex High-Resolution Melting Assay for the Simultaneous Genotyping of IL28B rs12979860 and PNPLA3 rs738409 Polymorphisms in Chronic Hepatitis C Patients.

    PubMed

    Enache, Elena L; Sin, Anca; Bancu, Ligia; Ramière, Christophe; Diaz, Olivier; André, Patrice; Enache, Liviu S

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is a major burden for public health worldwide. Although newer direct-acting antivirals show good efficacy, their cost precludes their wide adoption in resource-limited regions. Thus, strategies are being developed to help identify patients with high susceptibility to response to classic PEG-interferon + ribavirin therapy. IL28B polymorphism rs12979860 C/T is an important predictor for an efficient response to interferon-based therapy. A genetic variant in adiponutrin (PNPLA3) gene, rs738409 C/G, is associated with steatosis, severity, and progression of liver fibrosis in CHC patients, and predicts treatment outcome in difficult-to-cure HCV-infected patients with advanced fibrosis. We developed a rapid and inexpensive assay based on duplex high-resolution melting (HRM) for the simultaneous genotyping of these two polymorphisms. The assay validation was performed on synthetic DNA templates and 132 clinical samples from CHC patients. When compared with allele-specific PCR and sequencing, our assay showed 100% (95% CI: 0.9724-1) accuracy, with 100% sensitivity and specificity. Our assay was robust against concentration and quality of DNA samples, melting curve normalization intervals, HRM analysis algorithm, and sequence variations near the targeted SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphism). This duplex assay should provide useful information for patient-oriented management and clinical decision-making in CHC. PMID:26389885

  7. A method to distinguish morphologically similar Peromyscus species using extracellular RNA and high-resolution melt analysis.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Veronica A; Clarke, Benjamin L; Crossland, Janet P; Bemis, Lynne T

    2016-09-01

    A method applying high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis to PCR products copied and amplified from extracellular RNA (exRNA) has been developed to distinguish two morphologically similar Peromyscus species: Peromyscus leucopus and Peromyscus maniculatus. P. leucopus is considered the primary reservoir host of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent for Lyme disease in North America. In northern Minnesota the habitat ranges of P. leucopus overlaps with that of P. maniculatus. Serum samples from live mice of both species were collected from cheek bleeds, total extracellular RNA (exRNA) was extracted, copied using reverse transcription and amplified by PCR followed by HRM analysis. A circulating ribosomal RNA (rRNA) was identified which differed at seven nucleotides between the two species and a method of HRM analysis was developed allowing rapid species confirmation. In the future, this HRM based method may be adapted for additional species. PMID:27349513

  8. Taxonomic Identification of Mediterranean Pines and Their Hybrids Based on the High Resolution Melting (HRM) and trnL Approaches: From Cytoplasmic Inheritance to Timber Tracing

    PubMed Central

    Ganopoulos, Ioannis; Aravanopoulos, Filippos; Madesis, Panagiotis; Pasentsis, Konstantinos; Bosmali, Irene; Ouzounis, Christos; Tsaftaris, Athanasios

    2013-01-01

    Fast and accurate detection of plant species and their hybrids using molecular tools will facilitate the assessment and monitoring of local biodiversity in an era of climate and environmental change. Herein, we evaluate the utility of the plastid trnL marker for species identification applied to Mediterranean pines (Pinus spp.). Our results indicate that trnL is a very sensitive marker for delimiting species biodiversity. Furthermore, High Resolution Melting (HRM) analysis was exploited as a molecular fingerprint for fast and accurate discrimination of Pinus spp. DNA sequence variants. The trnL approach and the HRM analyses were extended to wood samples of two species (Pinus nigra and Pinus sylvestris) with excellent results, congruent to those obtained using leaf tissue. Both analyses demonstrate that hybrids from the P. brutia (maternal parent) × P. halepensis (paternal parent) cross, exhibit the P. halepensis profile, confirming paternal plastid inheritance in Group Halepensis pines. Our study indicates that a single one-step reaction method and DNA marker are sufficient for the identification of Mediterranean pines, their hybrids and the origin of pine wood. Furthermore, our results underline the potential for certain DNA regions to be used as novel biological information markers combined with existing morphological characters and suggest a relatively reliable and open taxonomic system that can link DNA variation to phenotype-based species or hybrid assignment status and direct taxa identification from recalcitrant tissues such as wood samples. PMID:23577179

  9. Taxonomic identification of mediterranean pines and their hybrids based on the high resolution melting (HRM) and trnL approaches: from cytoplasmic inheritance to timber tracing.

    PubMed

    Ganopoulos, Ioannis; Aravanopoulos, Filippos; Madesis, Panagiotis; Pasentsis, Konstantinos; Bosmali, Irene; Ouzounis, Christos; Tsaftaris, Athanasios

    2013-01-01

    Fast and accurate detection of plant species and their hybrids using molecular tools will facilitate the assessment and monitoring of local biodiversity in an era of climate and environmental change. Herein, we evaluate the utility of the plastid trnL marker for species identification applied to Mediterranean pines (Pinus spp.). Our results indicate that trnL is a very sensitive marker for delimiting species biodiversity. Furthermore, High Resolution Melting (HRM) analysis was exploited as a molecular fingerprint for fast and accurate discrimination of Pinus spp. DNA sequence variants. The trnL approach and the HRM analyses were extended to wood samples of two species (Pinus nigra and Pinus sylvestris) with excellent results, congruent to those obtained using leaf tissue. Both analyses demonstrate that hybrids from the P. brutia (maternal parent) × P. halepensis (paternal parent) cross, exhibit the P. halepensis profile, confirming paternal plastid inheritance in Group Halepensis pines. Our study indicates that a single one-step reaction method and DNA marker are sufficient for the identification of Mediterranean pines, their hybrids and the origin of pine wood. Furthermore, our results underline the potential for certain DNA regions to be used as novel biological information markers combined with existing morphological characters and suggest a relatively reliable and open taxonomic system that can link DNA variation to phenotype-based species or hybrid assignment status and direct taxa identification from recalcitrant tissues such as wood samples. PMID:23577179

  10. Impact of Mutation Type and Amplicon Characteristics on Genetic Diversity Measures Generated Using a High-Resolution Melting Diversity Assay

    PubMed Central

    Cousins, Matthew M.; Donnell, Deborah; Eshleman, Susan H.

    2013-01-01

    We adapted high-resolution melting (HRM) technology to measure genetic diversity without sequencing. Diversity is measured as a single numeric HRM score. Herein, we determined the impact of mutation types and amplicon characteristics on HRM diversity scores. Plasmids were generated with single-base changes, insertions, and deletions. Different primer sets were used to vary the position of mutations within amplicons. Plasmids and plasmid mixtures were analyzed to determine the impact of mutation type, position, and concentration on HRM scores. The impact of amplicon length and G/C content on HRM scores was also evaluated. Different mutation types affected HRM scores to varying degrees (1-bp deletion < 1-bp change < 3-bp insertion < 9-bp insertion). The impact of mutations on HRM scores was influenced by amplicon length and the position of the mutation within the amplicon. Mutations were detected at concentrations of 5% to 95%, with the greatest impact at 50%. The G/C content altered melting temperature values of amplicons but had no impact on HRM scores. These data are relevant to the design of assays that measure genetic diversity using HRM technology. PMID:23178437

  11. A high-resolution melting (HRM) assay for the differentiation between Israeli field and Neethling vaccine lumpy skin disease viruses.

    PubMed

    Menasherow, Sophia; Erster, Oran; Rubinstein-Giuni, Marisol; Kovtunenko, Anita; Eyngor, Evgeny; Gelman, Boris; Khinich, Evgeny; Stram, Yehuda

    2016-06-01

    Lumpy skin disease (LSD) is a constant threat to the Middle East including the State of Israel. During vaccination programs it is essential for veterinary services and farmers to be able to distinguish between animals affected by the cattle-borne virulent viruses and vaccinated animals, subsequently affected by the vaccine strain. This study describes an improved high resolution-melting (HRM) test that exploits a 27 base pair (bp) fragment of the LSDV126 extracellular enveloped virion (EEV) gene that is present in field viruses but is absent from the Neethling vaccine strain. This difference leads to ∼0.5 °C melting point change in the HRM assay, when testing the quantitative PCR (qPCR) products generated from the virulent field viruses compared to the attenuated vaccine. By exploiting this difference, it could be shown using the newly developed HRM assay that virus isolated from vaccinated cattle that developed disease symptoms behave similarly to vaccine virus control, indicating that the vaccine virus can induce disease symptoms. This assay is not only in full agreement with the previously published PCR gradient and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) tests but it is faster with, fewer steps, cheaper and dependable. PMID:26902159

  12. A novel gap-PCR with high resolution melting analysis for the detection of α-thalassaemia Southeast Asian and Filipino β0-thalassaemia deletion

    PubMed Central

    Leng Kho, Siew; Heng Chua, Kek; George, Elizabeth; Tan, Jin Ai Mary Anne

    2015-01-01

    Homozygosity for the α-thalassaemia Southeast Asian (α-SEA) and Filipino β0-thalassaemia (β-FIL) deletions can cause serious complications leading to foetal death or life-long blood transfusions. A rapid and accurate molecular detection assay is essential in populations where the deletions are common. In this study, gap-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with high resolution melting (HRM) analysis was developed to detect both the large deletions. Melting curves at 86.9 ± 0.1 °C were generated by normal individuals without the α-SEA deletion, 84.7 ± 0.1 °C by homozygous α-SEA deletion individuals and two melting curves at 84.7 ± 0.1 °C and 86.9 ± 0.1 °C by α-SEA deletion carriers. Normal individuals without the β-FIL deletion produce amplicons with a melting temperature (Tm) at 74.6 ± 0.1 °C, homozygous β-FIL individuals produce amplicons with Tm at 73.6 ± 0.1 °C and heterozygous β-FIL individuals generate two amplicons with Tm at 73.6 ± 0.1 °C and 74.6 ± 0.1 °C. Evaluation using blinded tests on 220 DNA samples showed 100% sensitivity and specificity. The developed assays are sensitive and specific for rapid molecular and prenatal diagnosis for the α-SEA and β-FIL deletions. PMID:26365497

  13. A novel gap-PCR with high resolution melting analysis for the detection of α-thalassaemia Southeast Asian and Filipino β°-thalassaemia deletion.

    PubMed

    Kho, Siew Leng; Chua, Kek Heng; George, Elizabeth; Tan, Jin Ai Mary Anne

    2015-01-01

    Homozygosity for the α-thalassaemia Southeast Asian (α-SEA) and Filipino β°-thalassaemia (β-FIL) deletions can cause serious complications leading to foetal death or life-long blood transfusions. A rapid and accurate molecular detection assay is essential in populations where the deletions are common. In this study, gap-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with high resolution melting (HRM) analysis was developed to detect both the large deletions. Melting curves at 86.9 ± 0.1 °C were generated by normal individuals without the α-SEA deletion, 84.7 ± 0.1 °C by homozygous α-SEA deletion individuals and two melting curves at 84.7 ± 0.1 °C and 86.9 ± 0.1 °C by α-SEA deletion carriers. Normal individuals without the β-FIL deletion produce amplicons with a melting temperature (Tm) at 74.6 ± 0.1 °C, homozygous β-FIL individuals produce amplicons with Tm at 73.6 ± 0.1 °C and heterozygous β-FIL individuals generate two amplicons with Tm at 73.6 ± 0.1 °C and 74.6 ± 0.1 °C. Evaluation using blinded tests on 220 DNA samples showed 100% sensitivity and specificity. The developed assays are sensitive and specific for rapid molecular and prenatal diagnosis for the α-SEA and β-FIL deletions. PMID:26365497

  14. High-resolution DNA-binding specificity analysis of yeast transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Cong; Byers, Kelsey J.R.P.; McCord, Rachel Patton; Shi, Zhenwei; Berger, Michael F.; Newburger, Daniel E.; Saulrieta, Katrina; Smith, Zachary; Shah, Mita V.; Radhakrishnan, Mathangi; Philippakis, Anthony A.; Hu, Yanhui; De Masi, Federico; Pacek, Marcin; Rolfs, Andreas; Murthy, Tal; LaBaer, Joshua; Bulyk, Martha L.

    2009-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) regulate the expression of genes through sequence-specific interactions with DNA-binding sites. However, despite recent progress in identifying in vivo TF binding sites by microarray readout of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-chip), nearly half of all known yeast TFs are of unknown DNA-binding specificities, and many additional predicted TFs remain uncharacterized. To address these gaps in our knowledge of yeast TFs and their cis regulatory sequences, we have determined high-resolution binding profiles for 89 known and predicted yeast TFs, over more than 2.3 million gapped and ungapped 8-bp sequences (“k-mers”). We report 50 new or significantly different direct DNA-binding site motifs for yeast DNA-binding proteins and motifs for eight proteins for which only a consensus sequence was previously known; in total, this corresponds to over a 50% increase in the number of yeast DNA-binding proteins with experimentally determined DNA-binding specificities. Among other novel regulators, we discovered proteins that bind the PAC (Polymerase A and C) motif (GATGAG) and regulate ribosomal RNA (rRNA) transcription and processing, core cellular processes that are constituent to ribosome biogenesis. In contrast to earlier data types, these comprehensive k-mer binding data permit us to consider the regulatory potential of genomic sequence at the individual word level. These k-mer data allowed us to reannotate in vivo TF binding targets as direct or indirect and to examine TFs' potential effects on gene expression in ∼1700 environmental and cellular conditions. These approaches could be adapted to identify TFs and cis regulatory elements in higher eukaryotes. PMID:19158363

  15. Development of a High-Resolution Melting Approach for Scanning Beta Globin Gene Point Mutations in the Greek and Other Mediterranean Populations.

    PubMed

    Chassanidis, Christos; Boutou, Effrossyni; Voskaridou, Ersi; Balassopoulou, Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    Beta-thalassaemia is one of the most common autosomal recessive disorders worldwide. The disease's high incidence, which is observed in the broader Mediterranean area has led to the establishment of molecular diagnostics' assays to prevent affected births. Therefore, the development of a reliable, cost-effective and rapid scanning method for β globin gene point mutations, easily adapted to a routine laboratory, is absolutely essential. Here, we describe, for the first time, the development of a High-Resolution Melting Analysis (HRMA) approach, suitable for scanning the particularly heterogeneous beta globin gene mutations present in the Greek population, and thus adaptable to the Mediterranean and other areas where these mutations have been identified. Within this context, β globin gene regions containing mutations frequently identified in the Greek population were divided in ten overlapping amplicons. Our reactions' setup allowed for the simultaneous amplification of multiple primer sets and partial multiplexing, thereby resulting in significant reduction of the experimental time. DNA samples from β-thalassaemia patients/carriers with defined genotypes were tested. Distinct genotypes displayed distinguishable melting curves, enabling accurate detection of mutations. The described HRMA can be adapted to a high-throughput level. It represents a rapid, simple, cost-effective, reliable, highly feasible and sensitive method for β-thalassaemia gene scanning. PMID:27351925

  16. Development of a High-Resolution Melting Approach for Scanning Beta Globin Gene Point Mutations in the Greek and Other Mediterranean Populations

    PubMed Central

    Chassanidis, Christos; Boutou, Effrossyni; Voskaridou, Ersi; Balassopoulou, Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    Beta-thalassaemia is one of the most common autosomal recessive disorders worldwide. The disease’s high incidence, which is observed in the broader Mediterranean area has led to the establishment of molecular diagnostics’ assays to prevent affected births. Therefore, the development of a reliable, cost-effective and rapid scanning method for β globin gene point mutations, easily adapted to a routine laboratory, is absolutely essential. Here, we describe, for the first time, the development of a High-Resolution Melting Analysis (HRMA) approach, suitable for scanning the particularly heterogeneous beta globin gene mutations present in the Greek population, and thus adaptable to the Mediterranean and other areas where these mutations have been identified. Within this context, β globin gene regions containing mutations frequently identified in the Greek population were divided in ten overlapping amplicons. Our reactions’ setup allowed for the simultaneous amplification of multiple primer sets and partial multiplexing, thereby resulting in significant reduction of the experimental time. DNA samples from β-thalassaemia patients/carriers with defined genotypes were tested. Distinct genotypes displayed distinguishable melting curves, enabling accurate detection of mutations. The described HRMA can be adapted to a high-throughput level. It represents a rapid, simple, cost-effective, reliable, highly feasible and sensitive method for β-thalassaemia gene scanning. PMID:27351925

  17. Targeted enrichment and high-resolution digital profiling of mitochondrial DNA deletions in human brain.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Sean D; Ericson, Nolan G; Burton, Joshua N; Prolla, Tomas A; Silber, John R; Shendure, Jay; Bielas, Jason H

    2014-02-01

    Due largely to the inability to accurately quantify and characterize de novo deletion events, the mechanisms underpinning the pathogenic expansion of mtDNA deletions in aging and neuromuscular disorders remain poorly understood. Here, we outline and validate a new tool termed 'Digital Deletion Detection' (3D) that allows for high-resolution analysis of rare deletions occurring at frequencies as low as 1 × 10(-8) . 3D is a three-step process that includes targeted enrichment for deletion-bearing molecules, single-molecule partitioning of genomes into thousands of droplets for direct quantification via droplet digital PCR, and breakpoint characterization using massively parallel sequencing. Using 3D, we interrogated over 8 billion mitochondrial genomes to analyze the age-related dynamics of mtDNA deletions in human brain tissue. We demonstrate that the total deletion load increases with age, while the total number and diversity of unique deletions remain constant. Our data provide support for the hypothesis that expansion of pre-existing mutations is the primary factor contributing to age-related accumulation of mtDNA deletions. PMID:23911137

  18. Rapid Identification of Echinococcus granulosus and E. canadensis Using High-Resolution Melting (HRM) Analysis by Focusing on a Single Nucleotide Polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Safa, Ahmad Hosseini; Harandi, Majid Fasihi; Tajaddini, Mohammadhasan; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Mohtashami-Pour, Mehdi; Pestehchian, Nader

    2016-07-22

    High-resolution melting (HRM) is a reliable and sensitive scanning method to detect variation in DNA sequences. We used this method to better understand the epidemiology and transmission of Echinococcus granulosus. We tested the use of HRM to discriminate the genotypes of E. granulosus and E. canadensis. One hundred forty-one hydatid cysts were collected from slaughtered animals in different parts of Isfahan-Iran in 2013. After DNA extraction, the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene was amplified using PCR coupled with the HRM curve. The result of HRM analysis using partial the sequences of cox1 gene revealed that 93, 35, and 2 isolates were identified as G1, G3, and G6 genotypes, respectively. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was found in locus 9867 of the cox1 gene. This is a critical locus for the differentiation between the G6 and G7 genotypes. In the phylogenic tree, the sample with a SNP was located between the G6 and G7 genotypes, which suggest that this isolate has a G6/G7 genotype. The HRM analysis developed in the present study provides a powerful technique for molecular and epidemiological studies on echinococcosis in humans and animals. PMID:26567833

  19. Mutation scanning in a single and a stacked genetically modified (GM) event by real-time PCR and high resolution melting (HRM) analysis.

    PubMed

    Ben Ali, Sina-Elisabeth; Madi, Zita Erika; Hochegger, Rupert; Quist, David; Prewein, Bernhard; Haslberger, Alexander G; Brandes, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Genetic mutations must be avoided during the production and use of seeds. In the European Union (EU), Directive 2001/18/EC requires any DNA construct introduced via transformation to be stable. Establishing genetic stability is critical for the approval of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). In this study, genetic stability of two GMOs was examined using high resolution melting (HRM) analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) employing Scorpion primers for amplification. The genetic variability of the transgenic insert and that of the flanking regions in a single oilseed rape variety (GT73) and a stacked maize (MON88017×MON810) was studied. The GT73 and the 5' region of MON810 showed no instabilities in the examined regions. However; two out of 100 analyzed samples carried a heterozygous point mutation in the 3' region of MON810 in the stacked variety. These results were verified by direct sequencing of the amplified PCR products as well as by sequencing of cloned PCR fragments. The occurrence of the mutation suggests that the 5' region is more suitable than the 3' region for the quantification of MON810. The identification of the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in a stacked event is in contrast to the results of earlier studies of the same MON810 region in a single event where no DNA polymorphism was found. PMID:25365178

  20. Mutation Scanning in a Single and a Stacked Genetically Modified (GM) Event by Real-Time PCR and High Resolution Melting (HRM) Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ben Ali, Sina-Elisabeth; Madi, Zita Erika; Hochegger, Rupert; Quist, David; Prewein, Bernhard; Haslberger, Alexander G.; Brandes, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Genetic mutations must be avoided during the production and use of seeds. In the European Union (EU), Directive 2001/18/EC requires any DNA construct introduced via transformation to be stable. Establishing genetic stability is critical for the approval of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). In this study, genetic stability of two GMOs was examined using high resolution melting (HRM) analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) employing Scorpion primers for amplification. The genetic variability of the transgenic insert and that of the flanking regions in a single oilseed rape variety (GT73) and a stacked maize (MON88017 × MON810) was studied. The GT73 and the 5' region of MON810 showed no instabilities in the examined regions. However; two out of 100 analyzed samples carried a heterozygous point mutation in the 3' region of MON810 in the stacked variety. These results were verified by direct sequencing of the amplified PCR products as well as by sequencing of cloned PCR fragments. The occurrence of the mutation suggests that the 5' region is more suitable than the 3' region for the quantification of MON810. The identification of the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in a stacked event is in contrast to the results of earlier studies of the same MON810 region in a single event where no DNA polymorphism was found. PMID:25365178

  1. High-resolution melting curve analysis for genotyping of common SNP in MTHFR gene using fixed-cell suspension.

    PubMed

    Sinthuwiwat, Thivaratana; Poowasanpetch, Phanasit; Wongngamrungroj, Angsana; Promso, Somying; Auewarakul, Chirayu; Mooney, Sean; Tocharoentanaphol, Chintana

    2008-01-01

    Genetic variation in MTHFR might explain the interindividual differences in both therapeutic and toxic responses to the treatment of cancer and rheumatoid arthritis with methotrexate, and can be involved in the sensitivity of developing diseases like cancer and congenital anomalies. We investigated the common sequence variation, C677T, in the MTHFR gene in fixed-cell specimens archived after chromosomal analysis using a novel gene scanning method based on post PCR analysis of high-resolution melting curves (HRM). These fixed specimens were stored after routine chromosomal analysis for 1 year at -20 degrees C in a 3:1 methanol:acetic acid solution. The method revealed a distinct pattern between homozygous and heterozygous alleles. Sensitivity and specificity of the HRM based method were comparable to that obtained by a hybridization probe. While the success rate for genotyping of a common SNP in MTHFR was similar to the hybridization probe approach, the HRM based method was more cost-effective and had a shorter turnaround time. PMID:18725286

  2. Probe-free and sensitive detection of diarrhea-causing pathogens using RT-PCR combined high resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Bo; Mo, Qiu-Hua; Wang, Qi; Wu, Bi-Mei; Feng, Zi-Li; Lin, Ji-Can; Yang, Ze

    2016-09-01

    Rapid and sensitive diagnostic methods are needed to help physicians make faster and better treatment decision for patients suffered from diarrhea. In the present study, a probe-free and sensitive RT-PCR combined high resolution melting analysis (HRMA) assay was established successfully for the detection of four major diarrhea-causing pathogens. The lower limit of detection of the assay were 10(0), 10(2), 10(0) and 10(3) copies/reaction for rotaviruses group A, astroviruses serotype 1, noroviruses genogroup II, and sapoviruses genegroup I, respectively, which were 1000-fold, 10-fold, 1000-fold and 10-fold more sensitive than conventional RT-PCR assay developed in parallel and comparable to or higher than commercially available real-time RT-PCR assay. Blinded sample evaluation showed that the assay was 100% concordant to both conventional RT-PCR and commercial real-time RT-PCR, indicating high reliability of the new assay. Therefore, the assay could provide a valuable platform for the probe-free and sensitive diagnosis of these pathogens. PMID:27461241

  3. Identification of Molecular Markers Associated with Verticillium Wilt Resistance in Alfalfa (Medicago Sativa L.) Using High-Resolution Melting

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tiejun; Yu, Long-Xi; McCord, Per; Miller, David; Bhamidimarri, Suresh; Johnson, David; Monteros, Maria J.; Ho, Julie; Reisen, Peter; Samac, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    Verticillium wilt, caused by the soilborne fungus, Verticillium alfalfae, is one of the most serious diseases of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) worldwide. To identify loci associated with resistance to Verticillium wilt, a bulk segregant analysis was conducted in susceptible or resistant pools constructed from 13 synthetic alfalfa populations, followed by association mapping in two F1 populations consisted of 352 individuals. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers were used for genotyping. Phenotyping was done by manual inoculation of the pathogen to replicated cloned plants of each individual and disease severity was scored using a standard scale. Marker-trait association was analyzed by TASSEL. Seventeen SNP markers significantly associated with Verticillium wilt resistance were identified and they were located on chromosomes 1, 2, 4, 7 and 8. SNP markers identified on chromosomes 2, 4 and 7 co-locate with regions of Verticillium wilt resistance loci reported in M. truncatula. Additional markers identified on chromosomes 1 and 8 located the regions where no Verticillium resistance locus has been reported. This study highlights the value of SNP genotyping by high resolution melting to identify the disease resistance loci in tetraploid alfalfa. With further validation, the markers identified in this study could be used for improving resistance to Verticillium wilt in alfalfa breeding programs. PMID:25536106

  4. Molecular simultaneous detection of Cherry necrotic rusty mottle virus and Cherry green ring mottle virus by real-time RT-PCR and high resolution melting analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, real-time RT-PCR assays were combined with high resolution melting (HRM) analysis for the simultaneous detection of Cherry necrotic rusty mottle virus (CNRMV) and Cherry green ring mottle virus (CGRMV) infection in sweet cherry trees. Detection of CNRMV and CGRMV was performed using a...

  5. Transfer-printing of single DNA molecule arrays on graphene for high resolution electron imaging and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cerf, Aline; Alava, Thomas; Barton, Robert A.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2011-01-01

    Graphene represents the ultimate substrate for high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, but the deposition of biological samples on this highly hydrophobic material has until now been a challenge. We present a reliable method for depositing ordered arrays of individual elongated DNA molecules on single-layer graphene substrates for high resolution electron beam imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis. This method is a necessary step towards the observation of single elongated DNA molecules with single base spatial resolution to directly read genetic and epigenetic information. PMID:21919532

  6. High-Resolution Melting Analysis as a Powerful Tool to Discriminate and Genotype Pseudomonas savastanoi Pathovars and Strains

    PubMed Central

    Gori, Andrea; Cerboneschi, Matteo; Tegli, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas savastanoi is a serious pathogen of Olive, Oleander, Ash, and several other Oleaceae. Its epiphytic or endophytic presence in asymptomatic plants is crucial for the spread of Olive and Oleander knot disease, as already ascertained for P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi (Psv) on Olive and for pv. nerii (Psn) on Oleander, while no information is available for pv. fraxini (Psf) on Ash. Nothing is known yet about the distribution on the different host plants and the real host range of these pathovars in nature, although cross-infections were observed following artificial inoculations. A multiplex Real-Time PCR assay was recently developed to simultaneously and quantitatively discriminate in vitro and in planta these P. savastanoi pathovars, for routine culture confirmation and for epidemiological and diagnostical studies. Here an innovative High-Resolution Melting Analysis (HRMA)-based assay was set up to unequivocally discriminate Psv, Psn and Psf, according to several single nucleotide polymorphisms found in their Type Three Secretion System clusters. The genetic distances among 56 P. savastanoi strains belonging to these pathovars were also evaluated, confirming and refining data previously obtained by fAFLP. To our knowledge, this is the first time that HRMA is applied to a bacterial plant pathogen, and one of the few multiplex HRMA-based assays developed so far. This protocol provides a rapid, sensitive, specific tool to differentiate and detect Psv, Psn and Psf strains, also in vivo and against other related bacteria, with lower costs than conventional multiplex Real-Time PCR. Its application is particularly suitable for sanitary certification programs for P. savastanoi, aimed at avoiding the spreading of this phytopathogen through asymptomatic plants. PMID:22295075

  7. Screening of the BRCA1 gene in Brazilian patients with breast and/or ovarian cancer via high-resolution melting reaction analysis.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Eneida Santos; Soares, Bárbara Luisa; Lemos, Sara; Rosa, Reginaldo Cruz Alves; Rodrigues, Angélica Nogueira; Barbosa, Leandro Augusto; de Oliveira Lopes, Débora; dos Santos, Luciana Lara

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the profile of BRCA1 mutations among cancer-affected Brazilian women from the Midwest region of Minas Gerais state with clearly defined risk factors for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndrome. In this Brazilian region, the first Center for Hereditary Cancer Control began operation in 2011, and 90% of patients receive assistance from the public health service. Eighteen patients at high risk for HBOC were subjected to molecular analysis. Primers were designed for 22 coding exons of the gene; DNA was extracted; and real-time PCR followed by high-resolution melting reaction was performed. The amplicons were sequenced to confirm the identified profiles. Only exon 11 was directly sequenced due its length. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) was performed for those patients in whom no pathogenic mutations were found. Among the 14 alterations identified in this study, the c.5263_5264insC pathogenic mutation was present in two patients (11.1%). Four alterations showed no clinical relevance; one exhibited inconclusive clinical relevance according to the examined databases; and eight alterations presented a divergent classification between the databases. No deletions or duplications were found using the MLPA technique. The HRM methodology was highly sensitive in identifying variants in the BRCA1 gene and can dramatically reduce the amount of sequencing required to identify germline mutations in BRCA genes, enabling cheaper tests and increasing their availability to Brazilian women assisted by the public health service. PMID:26666763

  8. Detection of NPM1 exon 12 mutations and FLT3 – internal tandem duplications by high resolution melting analysis in normal karyotype acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Angela YC; Westerman, David A; Carney, Dennis A; Seymour, John F; Juneja, Surender; Dobrovic, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Background Molecular characterisation of normal karyotype acute myeloid leukemia (NK-AML) allows prognostic stratification and potentially can alter treatment choices and pathways. Approximately 45–60% of patients with NK-AML carry NPM1 gene mutations and are associated with a favourable clinical outcome when FLT3-internal tandem duplications (ITD) are absent. High resolution melting (HRM) is a novel screening method that enables rapid identification of mutation positive DNA samples. Results We developed HRM assays to detect NPM1 mutations and FLT3-ITD and tested diagnostic samples from 44 NK-AML patients. Eight were NPM1 mutation positive only, 4 were both NPM1 mutation and FLT3-ITD positive and 4 were FLT3-ITD positive only. A novel point mutation Y572C (c.1715A>G) in exon 14 of FLT3 was also detected. In the group with de novo NK-AML, 40% (12/29) were NPM1 mutation positive whereas NPM1 mutations were observed in 20% (3/15) of secondary NK-AML cases. Sequencing was performed and demonstrated 100% concordance with the HRM results. Conclusion HRM is a rapid and efficient method of screening NK-AML samples for both novel and known NPM1 and FLT3 mutations. NPM1 mutations can be observed in both primary and secondary NK-AML cases. PMID:18664261

  9. High regularity of Z-DNA revealed by ultra high-resolution crystal structure at 0.55;#8201;Å

    SciTech Connect

    Brzezinski, Krzysztof; Brzuszkiewicz, Anna; Dauter, Miroslawa; Kubicki, Maciej; Jaskolski, Mariusz; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2011-12-02

    The crystal structure of a Z-DNA hexamer duplex d(CGCGCG){sub 2} determined at ultra high resolution of 0.55 {angstrom} and refined without restraints, displays a high degree of regularity and rigidity in its stereochemistry, in contrast to the more flexible B-DNA duplexes. The estimations of standard uncertainties of all individually refined parameters, obtained by full-matrix least-squares optimization, are comparable with values that are typical for small-molecule crystallography. The Z-DNA model generated with ultra high-resolution diffraction data can be used to revise the stereochemical restraints applied in lower resolution refinements. Detailed comparisons of the stereochemical library values with the present accurate Z-DNA parameters, shows in general a good agreement, but also reveals significant discrepancies in the description of guanine-sugar valence angles and in the geometry of the phosphate groups.

  10. Counterintuitive DNA Sequence Dependence in Supercoiling-Induced DNA Melting

    PubMed Central

    Vlijm, Rifka; v.d. Torre, Jaco; Dekker, Cees

    2015-01-01

    The metabolism of DNA in cells relies on the balance between hybridized double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and local de-hybridized regions of ssDNA that provide access to binding proteins. Traditional melting experiments, in which short pieces of dsDNA are heated up until the point of melting into ssDNA, have determined that AT-rich sequences have a lower binding energy than GC-rich sequences. In cells, however, the double-stranded backbone of DNA is destabilized by negative supercoiling, and not by temperature. To investigate what the effect of GC content is on DNA melting induced by negative supercoiling, we studied DNA molecules with a GC content ranging from 38% to 77%, using single-molecule magnetic tweezer measurements in which the length of a single DNA molecule is measured as a function of applied stretching force and supercoiling density. At low force (<0.5pN), supercoiling results into twisting of the dsDNA backbone and loop formation (plectonemes), without inducing any DNA melting. This process was not influenced by the DNA sequence. When negative supercoiling is introduced at increasing force, local melting of DNA is introduced. We measured for the different DNA molecules a characteristic force Fchar, at which negative supercoiling induces local melting of the dsDNA. Surprisingly, GC-rich sequences melt at lower forces than AT-rich sequences: Fchar = 0.56pN for 77% GC but 0.73pN for 38% GC. An explanation for this counterintuitive effect is provided by the realization that supercoiling densities of a few percent only induce melting of a few percent of the base pairs. As a consequence, denaturation bubbles occur in local AT-rich regions and the sequence-dependent effect arises from an increased DNA bending/torsional energy associated with the plectonemes. This new insight indicates that an increased GC-content adjacent to AT-rich DNA regions will enhance local opening of the double-stranded DNA helix. PMID:26513573

  11. Genotyping of the C742T mutation of the FGFR3 gene causing type 1 thanatophoric dysplasia by high-resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying-Na; Li, Ru; Li, Dong-Zhi

    2011-01-01

    Type 1 thanatophoric dysplasia (TD) is typically a lethal dwarfism. It is not always possible to distinguish fetuses with TD from other skeletal dysplasia in utero by ultrasonography. A definite diagnosis should be established by molecular genetic analysis to find out the abnormal mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR 3) gene. Among the known mutations of this gene, the C742T (R248C) mutation is the most common one associated with type 1 TD. Exon 7 of the FGFR3 gene was analyzed in 10 prenatal samples with type 1 TD, as well as in 30 control individuals for the presence of the c.742 C > T variant using melting curve analysis with a high-resolution melting instrument. The high-resolution melting curve analysis successfully genotyped this mutation in all 10 samples with type 1 TD without the need of further assays. The technique had a sensitivity and specificity of 100%. This study suggest that high-resolution melting analysis is a simple, rapid, and sensitive one tube assay for genotyping the FGFR3 gene. PMID:20569165

  12. Sensitive Detection and Serovar Differentiation of Typhoidal and Nontyphoidal Salmonella enterica Species Using 16S rRNA Gene PCR Coupled with High-Resolution Melt Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Masek, Billie J.; Hardick, Justin; Won, Helen; Yang, Samuel; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Rothman, Richard E.; Gaydos, Charlotte A.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica species infections are a significant public health problem causing high morbidity rates worldwide and high mortality rates in the developing world. These infections are not always rapidly diagnosed as a cause of bloodstream infections because of the limitations of blood culture, which greatly affects clinical care as a result of treatment delays. A molecular diagnostic assay that could rapidly detect and identify S. enterica species infections as a cause of sepsis is needed. Nine typhoidal and nontyphoidal S. enterica serovars were used to establish the limit of detection (LOD) of a previously published 16S rRNA gene PCR (16S PCR) in mock whole blood specimens. In addition, 16 typhoidal and nontyphoidal S. enterica serovars were used to evaluate the serovar differentiation capability of 16S PCR coupled with high-resolution melt analysis. The overall LOD of 16S PCR for the nine typhoidal and nontyphoidal S. enterica serovars analyzed was <10 colony-forming units per milliliter (CFU/mL) in mock whole blood specimens, with the lowest and highest LOD at <1 CFU/mL and 9 CFU/mL, respectively. By high-resolution melt analysis, the typhoidal and nontyphoidal S. enterica serovar groups analyzed each generated a unique grouping code, allowing for serovar-level identification. 16S PCR coupled with high-resolution melt analysis could be a useful molecular diagnostic that could enhance the current diagnostic, treatment, and surveillance methods of S. enterica bloodstream infections. PMID:24365382

  13. High-resolution melting analysis of the spa locus reveals significant diversity within sequence type 93 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from northern Australia.

    PubMed

    Tong, S Y C; Lilliebridge, R A; Holt, D C; McDonald, M I; Currie, B J; Giffard, P M

    2009-12-01

    High-resolution melting analysis is an inherently robust, easy and inexpensive approach to the examination of genomic regions containing single-nucleotide polymorphisms and hypervariable loci. Staphylococcus aureus sequence type (ST) 93 is a singleton, Panton-Valentine leukocidin-positive clone unique to Australia. A high-resolution melting-based method for the identification of ST93 was developed, and a similar approach was used to reveal diversity within the spa locus of this lineage. Statistical and graphical methods that account for instrumental and operator-dependent variation in high-resolution melting curves were developed, to allow greater confidence and reproducibility in deciding whether another curve is truly different from the baseline curve of an amplicon with known sequence. The data support a very early acquisition, or multiple independent acquisitions, of SCCmec by ST93 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), and the coexistence of MSSA and methicillin-resistant S. aureus versions of the same lineage within northern Australia. PMID:19392885

  14. Identification and Evaluation of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Allotetraploid Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) Based on Amplicon Sequencing Combined with High Resolution Melting (HRM) Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yanbin; Pandey, Manish K.; Liu, Ying; Chen, Xiaoping; Liu, Hong; Varshney, Rajeev K.; Liang, Xuanqiang; Huang, Shangzhi

    2015-01-01

    The cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is an allotetraploid (AABB) species derived from the A-genome (Arachis duranensis) and B-genome (Arachis ipaensis) progenitors. Presence of two versions of a DNA sequence based on the two progenitor genomes poses a serious technical and analytical problem during single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker identification and analysis. In this context, we have analyzed 200 amplicons derived from expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and genome survey sequences (GSS) to identify SNPs in a panel of genotypes consisting of 12 cultivated peanut varieties and two diploid progenitors representing the ancestral genomes. A total of 18 EST-SNPs and 44 genomic-SNPs were identified in 12 peanut varieties by aligning the sequence of A. hypogaea with diploid progenitors. The average frequency of sequence polymorphism was higher for genomic-SNPs than the EST-SNPs with one genomic-SNP every 1011 bp as compared to one EST-SNP every 2557 bp. In order to estimate the potential and further applicability of these identified SNPs, 96 peanut varieties were genotyped using high resolution melting (HRM) method. Polymorphism information content (PIC) values for EST-SNPs ranged between 0.021 and 0.413 with a mean of 0.172 in the set of peanut varieties, while genomic-SNPs ranged between 0.080 and 0.478 with a mean of 0.249. Total 33 SNPs were used for polymorphism detection among the parents and 10 selected lines from mapping population Y13Zh (Zhenzhuhei × Yueyou13). Of the total 33 SNPs, nine SNPs showed polymorphism in the mapping population Y13Zh, and seven SNPs were successfully mapped into five linkage groups. Our results showed that SNPs can be identified in allotetraploid peanut with high accuracy through amplicon sequencing and HRM assay. The identified SNPs were very informative and can be used for different genetic and breeding applications in peanut. PMID:26697032

  15. Evaluation of the Capacity of PCR and High-Resolution Melt Curve Analysis for Identification of Mixed Infection with Mycoplasma gallisepticum Strains.

    PubMed

    Ghorashi, Seyed A; Kanci, Anna; Noormohammadi, Amir H

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenicity and presentation of Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) infection may differ from one strain to another and this may have implications on control measures. Infection of individual birds with more than one MG strain has been reported. A PCR followed by high resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis has been developed in our laboratory and routinely used for detection and differentiation of MG strains. However the potential of this test for identification of MG strains in a mixed specimen has not been evaluated. In the present study, the capability of PCR-HRM curve analysis technique, targeting vlhA and pvpA genes was assessed for identification of individual MG strains in a mixed population. Different DNA ratios of two MG strains from 1 to 10(-4) ng were tested with some generated conventional and normalized curves distinct from those of individual strains alone. Using genotype confidence percentages (GCP) generated from HRM curve analysis, it was found that vlhA PCR-HRM was more consistent than pvpA PCR-HRM for the detection of MG ts-11 vaccine strain mixed with any of the MG strains 6/85, F, S6 or a field isolate. The potential of vlhA PCR-HRM to detect mixed MG strains in a specimen was found to be primarily dependent on quantity and proportion of the target DNAs in the mixture. This is the first study examining the capacity of PCR-HRM technique for identification of individual MG strains in a mixed strain population. PMID:25970590

  16. Evaluation of the Capacity of PCR and High-Resolution Melt Curve Analysis for Identification of Mixed Infection with Mycoplasma gallisepticum Strains

    PubMed Central

    Ghorashi, Seyed A.; Kanci, Anna; Noormohammadi, Amir H.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenicity and presentation of Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) infection may differ from one strain to another and this may have implications on control measures. Infection of individual birds with more than one MG strain has been reported. A PCR followed by high resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis has been developed in our laboratory and routinely used for detection and differentiation of MG strains. However the potential of this test for identification of MG strains in a mixed specimen has not been evaluated. In the present study, the capability of PCR-HRM curve analysis technique, targeting vlhA and pvpA genes was assessed for identification of individual MG strains in a mixed population. Different DNA ratios of two MG strains from 1 to 10-4 ng were tested with some generated conventional and normalized curves distinct from those of individual strains alone. Using genotype confidence percentages (GCP) generated from HRM curve analysis, it was found that vlhA PCR-HRM was more consistent than pvpA PCR-HRM for the detection of MG ts-11 vaccine strain mixed with any of the MG strains 6/85, F, S6 or a field isolate. The potential of vlhA PCR-HRM to detect mixed MG strains in a specimen was found to be primarily dependent on quantity and proportion of the target DNAs in the mixture. This is the first study examining the capacity of PCR-HRM technique for identification of individual MG strains in a mixed strain population. PMID:25970590

  17. Identification and Evaluation of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Allotetraploid Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) Based on Amplicon Sequencing Combined with High Resolution Melting (HRM) Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yanbin; Pandey, Manish K; Liu, Ying; Chen, Xiaoping; Liu, Hong; Varshney, Rajeev K; Liang, Xuanqiang; Huang, Shangzhi

    2015-01-01

    The cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is an allotetraploid (AABB) species derived from the A-genome (Arachis duranensis) and B-genome (Arachis ipaensis) progenitors. Presence of two versions of a DNA sequence based on the two progenitor genomes poses a serious technical and analytical problem during single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker identification and analysis. In this context, we have analyzed 200 amplicons derived from expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and genome survey sequences (GSS) to identify SNPs in a panel of genotypes consisting of 12 cultivated peanut varieties and two diploid progenitors representing the ancestral genomes. A total of 18 EST-SNPs and 44 genomic-SNPs were identified in 12 peanut varieties by aligning the sequence of A. hypogaea with diploid progenitors. The average frequency of sequence polymorphism was higher for genomic-SNPs than the EST-SNPs with one genomic-SNP every 1011 bp as compared to one EST-SNP every 2557 bp. In order to estimate the potential and further applicability of these identified SNPs, 96 peanut varieties were genotyped using high resolution melting (HRM) method. Polymorphism information content (PIC) values for EST-SNPs ranged between 0.021 and 0.413 with a mean of 0.172 in the set of peanut varieties, while genomic-SNPs ranged between 0.080 and 0.478 with a mean of 0.249. Total 33 SNPs were used for polymorphism detection among the parents and 10 selected lines from mapping population Y13Zh (Zhenzhuhei × Yueyou13). Of the total 33 SNPs, nine SNPs showed polymorphism in the mapping population Y13Zh, and seven SNPs were successfully mapped into five linkage groups. Our results showed that SNPs can be identified in allotetraploid peanut with high accuracy through amplicon sequencing and HRM assay. The identified SNPs were very informative and can be used for different genetic and breeding applications in peanut. PMID:26697032

  18. Real-Time PCR and High-Resolution Melt Analysis for Rapid Detection of Mycobacterium leprae Drug Resistance Mutations and Strain Types

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Matsuoka, Masanori; Kai, Masanori; Thapa, Pratibha; Khadge, Saraswoti; Hagge, Deanna A.; Brennan, Patrick J.

    2012-01-01

    Drug resistance surveillance and strain typing of Mycobacterium leprae are necessary to investigate ongoing transmission of leprosy in regions of endemicity. To enable wider implementation of these molecular analyses, novel real-time PCR–high-resolution melt (RT-PCR-HRM) assays without allele-specific primers or probes and post-PCR sample handling were developed. For the detection of mutations within drug resistance-determining regions (DRDRs) of folP1, rpoB, and gyrA, targets for dapsone, rifampin, and fluoroquinolones, real-time PCR-HRM assays were developed. Wild-type and drug-resistant mouse footpad-derived strains that included three folP1, two rpoB, and one gyrA mutation types in a reference panel were tested. RT-PCR-HRM correctly distinguished the wild type from the mutant strains. In addition, RT-PCR-HRM analyses aided in recognizing samples with mixed or minor alleles and also a mislabeled sample. When tested in 121 sequence-characterized clinical strains, HRM identified all the folP1 mutants representing two mutation types, including one not within the reference panel. The false positives (<5%) could be attributed to low DNA concentration or PCR inhibition. A second set of RT-PCR-HRM assays for identification of three previously reported single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that have been used for strain typing were developed and validated in 22 reference and 25 clinical strains. Real-time PCR-HRM is a sensitive, simple, rapid, and high-throughput tool for routine screening known DRDR mutants in new and relapsed cases, SNP typing, and detection of minor mutant alleles in the wild-type background at lower costs than current methods and with the potential for quality control in leprosy investigations. PMID:22170923

  19. A Rapid Multiplex Real-Time PCR High-Resolution Melt Curve Assay for the Simultaneous Detection of Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus in Food.

    PubMed

    Forghani, Fereidoun; Wei, Shuai; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2016-05-01

    Three important foodborne pathogens, Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus, are of great concern for food safety. They may also coexist in food matrices and, in the case of B. cereus and S. aureus, the resulting illnesses can resemble each other owing to similar symptoms. Therefore, their simultaneous detection may have advantages in terms of cost savings and rapidity. Given this context, a rapid multiplex real-time PCR high-resolution melt curve assay for the simultaneous detection of these three pathogens in food was developed. The assay successfully detected B. cereus (gyrB), L. monocytogenes (hly), and S. aureus (nuc) in a single reaction, and the average melting temperatures were 76.23, 80.19, and 74.01°C, respectively. The application of SYTO9 dye and a slow melt curve analysis ramp rate (0.1°C/s) enabled the production of sharp, high-resolution melt curve peaks that were easily distinguishable from each other. The detection limit in food (milk, rice, and lettuce) was 3.7 × 10(3) CFU/g without an enrichment step and 3.7 × 10(1) CFU/g following the 10-h enrichment. Hence, the assay developed here is specific and sensitive, providing an efficient tool for implementation in food for the simultaneous detection of B. cereus, L. monocytogenes, and S. aureus . PMID:27296430

  20. High resolution methylome map of rat indicates role of intragenic DNA methylation in identification of coding region.

    PubMed

    Sati, Satish; Tanwar, Vinay Singh; Kumar, K Anand; Patowary, Ashok; Jain, Vaibhav; Ghosh, Sourav; Ahmad, Shadab; Singh, Meghna; Reddy, S Umakar; Chandak, Giriraj Ratan; Raghunath, Manchala; Sivasubbu, Sridhar; Chakraborty, Kausik; Scaria, Vinod; Sengupta, Shantanu

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation is crucial for gene regulation and maintenance of genomic stability. Rat has been a key model system in understanding mammalian systemic physiology, however detailed rat methylome remains uncharacterized till date. Here, we present the first high resolution methylome of rat liver generated using Methylated DNA immunoprecipitation and high throughput sequencing (MeDIP-Seq) approach. We observed that within the DNA/RNA repeat elements, simple repeats harbor the highest degree of methylation. Promoter hypomethylation and exon hypermethylation were common features in both RefSeq genes and expressed genes (as evaluated by proteomic approach). We also found that although CpG islands were generally hypomethylated, about 6% of them were methylated and a large proportion (37%) of methylated islands fell within the exons. Notably, we obeserved significant differences in methylation of terminal exons (UTRs); methylation being more pronounced in coding/partially coding exons compared to the non-coding exons. Further, events like alternate exon splicing (cassette exon) and intron retentions were marked by DNA methylation and these regions are retained in the final transcript. Thus, we suggest that DNA methylation could play a crucial role in marking coding regions thereby regulating alternative splicing. Apart from generating the first high resolution methylome map of rat liver tissue, the present study provides several critical insights into methylome organization and extends our understanding of interplay between epigenome, gene expression and genome stability. PMID:22355382

  1. Ultra-high resolution HLA genotyping and allele discovery by highly multiplexed cDNA amplicon pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background High-resolution HLA genotyping is a critical diagnostic and research assay. Current methods rarely achieve unambiguous high-resolution typing without making population-specific frequency inferences due to a lack of locus coverage and difficulty in exon-phase matching. Achieving high-resolution typing is also becoming more challenging with traditional methods as the database of known HLA alleles increases. Results We designed a cDNA amplicon-based pyrosequencing method to capture 94% of the HLA class I open-reading-frame with only two amplicons per sample, and an analogous method for class II HLA genes, with a primary focus on sequencing the DRB loci. We present a novel Galaxy server-based analysis workflow for determining genotype. During assay validation, we performed two GS Junior sequencing runs to determine the accuracy of the HLA class I amplicons and DRB amplicon at different levels of multiplexing. When 116 amplicons were multiplexed, we unambiguously resolved 99%of class I alleles to four- or six-digit resolution, as well as 100% unambiguous DRB calls. The second experiment, with 271 multiplexed amplicons, missed some alleles, but generated high-resolution, concordant typing for 93% of class I alleles, and 96% for DRB1 alleles. In a third, preliminary experiment we attempted to sequence novel amplicons for other class II loci with mixed success. Conclusions The presented assay is higher-throughput and higher-resolution than existing HLA genotyping methods, and suitable for allele discovery or large cohort sampling. The validated class I and DRB primers successfully generated unambiguously high-resolution genotypes, while further work is needed to validate additional class II genotyping amplicons. PMID:22866951

  2. High-Resolution Imaging of Plasmid DNA in Liquids in Dynamic Mode Atomic Force Microscopy Using a Carbon Nanofiber Tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazawa, Masashi; Ito, Shuichi; Yagi, Akira; Sakai, Nobuaki; Uekusa, Yoshitugu; Ohta, Ryo; Inaba, Kazuhisa; Hayashi, Akari; Hayashi, Yasuhiko; Tanemura, Masaki

    2011-08-01

    To understand the motion of DNA and DNA complexes, the real-time visualization of living DNA in liquids is quite important. Here, we report the high-resolution imaging of plasmid DNA in water using a rapid-scan atomic force microscopy (AFM) system equipped with a carbon nanofiber (CNF) probe. To achieve a rapid high-resolution scan, small SiN cantilevers with dimensions of 2 (width) × 0.1 (thickness) × 9 µm (length) and a bent end (tip view structure) were employed as base cantilevers onto which single CNFs were grown. The resonant frequencies of the cantilever were 1.5 MHz in air and 500 kHz in water, and the spring constant was calculated to be 0.1 N/m. Single CNFs, typically 88 nm in length, were formed on an array of the cantilevers in a batch process by the ion-irradiation method. An AFM image of a plasmid DNA taken in water at 0.2 fps (5 s/image) using a batch-fabricated CNF-tipped cantilever clearly showed the helix turns of the double strand DNA. The average helical pitch measured 3.4 nm (σ: 0.5 nm), which was in good agreement with that determined by the X-ray diffraction method, 3.4 nm. Thus, it is presumed that the combined use of the rapid-scan AFM system with the ion-induced CNF probe is promising for the dynamic analysis of biomolecules.

  3. High resolution melt-curve analysis to fine map a locus controlling the paternal sorting of mitochondria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mitochondria are required for normal growth and development and play an important role in programmed cell death and aging. The mitochondrial DNA is maternally transmitted in the vast majority of eukaryotes. One exception is cucumber (Cucumis sativus), whose mitochondrial DNA is paternally transmit...

  4. Inferring coarse-grain histone-DNA interaction potentials from high-resolution structures of the nucleosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Sam; Everaers, Ralf

    2015-02-01

    The histone-DNA interaction in the nucleosome is a fundamental mechanism of genomic compaction and regulation, which remains largely unknown despite increasing structural knowledge of the complex. In this paper, we propose a framework for the extraction of a nanoscale histone-DNA force-field from a collection of high-resolution structures, which may be adapted to a larger class of protein-DNA complexes. We applied the procedure to a large crystallographic database extended by snapshots from molecular dynamics simulations. The comparison of the structural models first shows that, at histone-DNA contact sites, the DNA base-pairs are shifted outwards locally, consistent with locally repulsive forces exerted by the histones. The second step shows that the various force profiles of the structures under analysis derive locally from a unique, sequence-independent, quadratic repulsive force-field, while the sequence preferences are entirely due to internal DNA mechanics. We have thus obtained the first knowledge-derived nanoscale interaction potential for histone-DNA in the nucleosome. The conformations obtained by relaxation of nucleosomal DNA with high-affinity sequences in this potential accurately reproduce the experimental values of binding preferences. Finally we address the more generic binding mechanisms relevant to the 80% genomic sequences incorporated in nucleosomes, by computing the conformation of nucleosomal DNA with sequence-averaged properties. This conformation differs from those found in crystals, and the analysis suggests that repulsive histone forces are related to local stretch tension in nucleosomal DNA, mostly between adjacent contact points. This tension could play a role in the stability of the complex.

  5. Strong thermodynamic coupling between sub-ice-shelf melting and sea ice in a high-resolution global sea-ice-ocean isopycnal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergienko, O. V.

    2015-12-01

    Sub-ice-shelf melting(freezing) of the Antarctic ice shelves acts as a source(sink) of freshwater, therefore, affects ocean water properties and circulation. In its turn, sub-ice-shelf melting/freezing is controlled by the ocean water properties that reach the sub-ice-shelf cavities. The properties of these water masses are determined by heat and fresh-water exchange with sea ice and atmosphere. Simulations of a high-resolution (1/8 deg) global sea-ice-ocean isopycnal model capable to resolve the ocean circulation in sub-ice-shelf cavities of Antarctic ice shelves and account for the thermodynamic interaction of the circulation with ice shelves show that melting/freezing rates have a strong seasonal cycle with highest melting rates observed in the Austral Fall. On the continental shelf, subsurface ocean temperatures (100-300 m) have a similar seasonal cycle which is lagged with respect to the surface. Shelf temperatures peak in the summertime, followed by rapid cooling towards the freezing point as seasonal ice cover increases. The lagged warming in the subsurface is attributable to reduced heat loss to the atmosphere in the presence of seasonal sea ice. This suggests that the seasonal cycle in melt rates is controlled by the phasing of subsurface temperatures on the continental shelf, which is in turn dominated by sea ice. The outflowing fresh, cold and light meltwater formed in sub-ice-shelf cavities remains in the mixed layer and promotes formation of sea ice and its longer persistence into the Austral Summer. These processes suggest the presence of strong mutual feedbacks between sub-ice-shelf melting and sea ice formation around Antarctic ice shelves.

  6. Transcription-Factor-Mediated DNA Looping Probed by High-Resolution, Single-Molecule Imaging in Live E. coli Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hensel, Zach; Xiao, Jie

    2013-01-01

    DNA looping mediated by transcription factors plays critical roles in prokaryotic gene regulation. The “genetic switch” of bacteriophage λ determines whether a prophage stays incorporated in the E. coli chromosome or enters the lytic cycle of phage propagation and cell lysis. Past studies have shown that long-range DNA interactions between the operator sequences OR and OL (separated by 2.3 kb), mediated by the λ repressor CI (accession number P03034), play key roles in regulating the λ switch. In vitro, it was demonstrated that DNA segments harboring the operator sequences formed loops in the presence of CI, but CI-mediated DNA looping has not been directly visualized in vivo, hindering a deep understanding of the corresponding dynamics in realistic cellular environments. We report a high-resolution, single-molecule imaging method to probe CI-mediated DNA looping in live E. coli cells. We labeled two DNA loci with differently colored fluorescent fusion proteins and tracked their separations in real time with ∼40 nm accuracy, enabling the first direct analysis of transcription-factor-mediated DNA looping in live cells. Combining looping measurements with measurements of CI expression levels in different operator mutants, we show quantitatively that DNA looping activates transcription and enhances repression. Further, we estimated the upper bound of the rate of conformational change from the unlooped to the looped state, and discuss how chromosome compaction may impact looping kinetics. Our results provide insights into transcription-factor-mediated DNA looping in a variety of operator and CI mutant backgrounds in vivo, and our methodology can be applied to a broad range of questions regarding chromosome conformations in prokaryotes and higher organisms. PMID:23853547

  7. Extended chromatin and DNA fibers from active plant nuclei for high-resolution FISH.

    PubMed

    Lavania, U C; Yamamoto, M; Mukai, Y

    2003-10-01

    The conventional protocol for isolation of cell wall free nuclei for release of DNA fibers for plants involves mechanical removal of the cell wall and separation of debris by sieve filtration. The mechanical grinding pressure applied during the process leaves only the more tolerant G(1) nuclei intact, and all other states of active nuclei that may be present in the target tissues (e.g., leaf) are simply crushed/disrupted during the isolation process. Here we describe an alternative enzymatic protocol for isolation of nuclei from root tip tissue. Cell wall free nuclei at a given stage of cell cycle, free of any cell debris, could be realized in suspension that are fit for preparation of extended fibers suitable for fiber FISH applications. The protocol utilizes selective harvest of active nuclei from root tip tissue in liquid suspension under the influence of cell wall-degrading enzymes, and provides opportunities to target cell cycle-specific nuclei from interphase through division phase for the release of extended DNA fibers. Availability of cell cycle-specific fibers may have added value in transcriptional analysis, DNA:RNA hybridization, visualization of DNA replication and replication forks, and improved FISH efficiency. PMID:14500692

  8. Amundsen Sea sector ice shelf thickness, melt rates, and inland response from annual high-resolution DEM mosaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shean, D. E.; Joughin, I. R.; Smith, B. E.; Alexandrov, O.; Moratto, Z.; Porter, C. C.; Morin, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Significant grounding line retreat, acceleration, and thinning have occurred along the Amundsen Sea sector of West Antarctica in recent decades. These changes are driven primarily by ice-ocean interaction beneath ice shelves, but existing observations of the spatial distribution, timing, and magnitude of ice shelf melt are limited. Using the NASA Ames Stereo Pipeline, we generated digital elevation models (DEMs) with ~2 m posting from all ~450 available WorldView-1/2 along-track stereopairs for the Amundsen Sea sector. A novel iterative closest point algorithm was used to coregister DEMs to filtered Operation IceBridge ATM/LVIS data and ICESat-1 GLAS data, offering optimal sub-meter horizontal/vertical accuracy. The corrected DEMs were used to produce annual mosaics for the entire ~500x700 km region with focused, sub-annual products for ice shelves and grounding zones. These mosaics provide spatially-continuous measurements of ice shelf topography with unprecedented detail. Using these data, we derive estimates of ice shelf thickness for regions in hydrostatic equilibrium and map networks of sub-shelf melt channels for the Pine Island (PIG), Thwaites, Crosson, and Dotson ice shelves. We also document the break-up of the Thwaites ice shelf and PIG rift evolution leading up to the 2013 calving event. Eulerian difference maps document 2010-2014 thinning over fast-flowing ice streams and adjacent grounded ice. These data reveal the greatest thinning rates over the Smith Glacier ice plain and slopes beyond the margins of the fast-flowing PIG trunk. Difference maps also highlight the filling of at least two subglacial lakes ~30 km upstream of the PIG grounding line in 2011. Lagrangian difference maps reveal the spatial distribution of ice shelf thinning, which can primarily be attributed to basal melt. Preliminary results show focused ice shelf thinning within troughs and large basal channels, especially along the western margin of the Dotson ice shelf. These new data

  9. Correlation between DNA ploidy, metaphase high-resolution comparative genomic hybridization results and clinical outcome of synovial sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although synovial sarcoma is the 3rd most commonly occurring mesenchymal tumor in young adults, usually with a highly aggressive clinical course; remarkable differences can be seen regarding the clinical outcome. According to comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) data published in the literature, the simple and complex karyotypes show a correlation between the prognosis and clinical outcome. In addition, the connection between DNA ploidy and clinical course is controversial. The aim of this study was using a fine-tuning interpretation of our DNA ploidy results and to compare these with metaphase high-resolution CGH (HR-CGH) results. Methods DNA ploidy was determined on Feulgen-stained smears in 56 synovial sarcoma cases by image cytometry; follow up was available in 46 cases (average: 78 months). In 9 cases HR-CGH analysis was also available. Results 10 cases were found DNA-aneuploid, 46 were DNA-diploid by image cytometry. With fine-tuning of the diploid cases according to the 5c exceeding events (single cell aneuploidy), 33 cases were so called "simple-diploid" (without 5c exceeding events) and 13 cases were "complex-diploid"; containing 5c exceeding events (any number). Aneuploid tumors contained large numbers of genetic alterations with the sum gain of at least 2 chromosomes (A-, B- or C-group) detected by HR-CGH. In the "simple-diploid" cases no or few genetic alterations could be detected, whereas the "complex-diploid" samples numerous aberrations (equal or more than 3) could be found. Conclusions Our results show a correlation between the DNA-ploidy, a fine-tuned DNA-ploidy and the HR-CGH results. Furthermore, we found significant correlation between the different ploidy groups and the clinical outcome (p < 0.05). PMID:22053830

  10. Rapid detection and identification of Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, B. pahangi, and Dirofilaria immitis in mosquito vectors and blood samples by high resolution melting real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Intapan, Pewpan M; Tantrawatpan, Chairat; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Chungpivat, Sudchit; Taweethavonsawat, Piyanan; Kaewkong, Worasak; Sanpool, Oranuch; Janwan, Penchom; Choochote, Wej; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2013-12-01

    A simple, rapid, and high-throughput method for detection and identification of Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, Brugia pahangi, and Dirofilaria immitis in mosquito vectors and blood samples was developed using a real-time PCR combined with high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis. Amplicons of the 4 filarial species were generated from 5S rRNA and spliced leader sequences by the real-time PCR and their melting temperatures were determined by the HRM method. Melting of amplicons from W. bancrofti, B. malayi, D. immitis, and B. pahangi peaked at 81.5±0.2℃, 79.0±0.3℃, 76.8±0.1℃, and 79.9±0.1℃, respectively. This assay is relatively cheap since it does not require synthesis of hybridization probes. Its sensitivity and specificity were 100%. It is a rapid and technically simple approach, and an important tool for population surveys as well as molecular xenomonitoring of parasites in vectors. PMID:24516268

  11. Rapid Detection and Identification of Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, B. pahangi, and Dirofilaria immitis in Mosquito Vectors and Blood Samples by High Resolution Melting Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Intapan, Pewpan M.; Tantrawatpan, Chairat; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Chungpivat, Sudchit; Taweethavonsawat, Piyanan; Kaewkong, Worasak; Sanpool, Oranuch; Janwan, Penchom; Choochote, Wej

    2013-01-01

    A simple, rapid, and high-throughput method for detection and identification of Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, Brugia pahangi, and Dirofilaria immitis in mosquito vectors and blood samples was developed using a real-time PCR combined with high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis. Amplicons of the 4 filarial species were generated from 5S rRNA and spliced leader sequences by the real-time PCR and their melting temperatures were determined by the HRM method. Melting of amplicons from W. bancrofti, B. malayi, D. immitis, and B. pahangi peaked at 81.5±0.2℃, 79.0±0.3℃, 76.8±0.1℃, and 79.9±0.1℃, respectively. This assay is relatively cheap since it does not require synthesis of hybridization probes. Its sensitivity and specificity were 100%. It is a rapid and technically simple approach, and an important tool for population surveys as well as molecular xenomonitoring of parasites in vectors. PMID:24516268

  12. High-Resolution Specificity from DNA Sequencing Highlights Alternative Modes of Lac Repressor Binding

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Zheng; Stormo, Gary D.

    2014-01-01

    Knowing the specificity of transcription factors is critical to understanding regulatory networks in cells. The lac repressor–operator system has been studied for many years, but not with high-throughput methods capable of determining specificity comprehensively. Details of its binding interaction and its selection of an asymmetric binding site have been controversial. We employed a new method to accurately determine relative binding affinities to thousands of sequences simultaneously, requiring only sequencing of bound and unbound fractions. An analysis of 2560 different DNA sequence variants, including both base changes and variations in operator length, provides a detailed view of lac repressor sequence specificity. We find that the protein can bind with nearly equal affinities to operators of three different lengths, but the sequence preference changes depending on the length, demonstrating alternative modes of interaction between the protein and DNA. The wild-type operator has an odd length, causing the two monomers to bind in alternative modes, making the asymmetric operator the preferred binding site. We tested two other members of the LacI/GalR protein family and find that neither can bind with high affinity to sites with alternative lengths or shows evidence of alternative binding modes. A further comparison with known and predicted motifs suggests that the lac repressor may be unique in this ability and that this may contribute to its selection. PMID:25209146

  13. High-resolution specificity from DNA sequencing highlights alternative modes of Lac repressor binding.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Zheng; Stormo, Gary D

    2014-11-01

    Knowing the specificity of transcription factors is critical to understanding regulatory networks in cells. The lac repressor-operator system has been studied for many years, but not with high-throughput methods capable of determining specificity comprehensively. Details of its binding interaction and its selection of an asymmetric binding site have been controversial. We employed a new method to accurately determine relative binding affinities to thousands of sequences simultaneously, requiring only sequencing of bound and unbound fractions. An analysis of 2560 different DNA sequence variants, including both base changes and variations in operator length, provides a detailed view of lac repressor sequence specificity. We find that the protein can bind with nearly equal affinities to operators of three different lengths, but the sequence preference changes depending on the length, demonstrating alternative modes of interaction between the protein and DNA. The wild-type operator has an odd length, causing the two monomers to bind in alternative modes, making the asymmetric operator the preferred binding site. We tested two other members of the LacI/GalR protein family and find that neither can bind with high affinity to sites with alternative lengths or shows evidence of alternative binding modes. A further comparison with known and predicted motifs suggests that the lac repressor may be unique in this ability and that this may contribute to its selection. PMID:25209146

  14. Method for site-specific detection of m6A nucleoside presence in RNA based on high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis.

    PubMed

    Golovina, Anna Y; Dzama, Margarita M; Petriukov, Kirill S; Zatsepin, Timofei S; Sergiev, Petr V; Bogdanov, Alexey A; Dontsova, Olga A

    2014-02-01

    Chemical landscape of natural RNA species is decorated with the large number of modified nucleosides. Some of those could easily be detected by reverse transcription, while others permit only high-performance liquid chromatography or mass-spectrometry detection. Presence of m(6)A nucleoside at a particular position of long RNA molecule is challenging to observe. Here we report an easy and high-throughput method for detection of m(6)A nucleosides in RNA based on high-resolution melting analysis. The method relies on the previous knowledge of the modified nucleoside position at a particular place of RNA and allows rapid screening for conditions or genes necessary for formation of that modification. PMID:24265225

  15. Rapid Detection and Statistical Differentiation of KPC Gene Variants in Gram-Negative Pathogens by Use of High-Resolution Melting and ScreenClust Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Amanda L.

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, the production of the Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC) is an important mechanism of carbapenem resistance in Gram-negative pathogens. Infections with KPC-producing organisms are associated with increased morbidity and mortality; therefore, the rapid detection of KPC-producing pathogens is critical in patient care and infection control. We developed a real-time PCR assay complemented with traditional high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis, as well as statistically based genotyping, using the Rotor-Gene ScreenClust HRM software to both detect the presence of blaKPC and differentiate between KPC-2-like and KPC-3-like alleles. A total of 166 clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii with various β-lactamase susceptibility patterns were tested in the validation of this assay; 66 of these organisms were known to produce the KPC β-lactamase. The real-time PCR assay was able to detect the presence of blaKPC in all 66 of these clinical isolates (100% sensitivity and specificity). HRM analysis demonstrated that 26 had KPC-2-like melting peak temperatures, while 40 had KPC-3-like melting peak temperatures. Sequencing of 21 amplified products confirmed the melting peak results, with 9 isolates carrying blaKPC-2 and 12 isolates carrying blaKPC-3. This PCR/HRM assay can identify KPC-producing Gram-negative pathogens in as little as 3 h after isolation of pure colonies and does not require post-PCR sample manipulation for HRM analysis, and ScreenClust analysis easily distinguishes blaKPC-2-like and blaKPC-3-like alleles. Therefore, this assay is a rapid method to identify the presence of blaKPC enzymes in Gram-negative pathogens that can be easily integrated into busy clinical microbiology laboratories. PMID:23077125

  16. Detection of Short-Range DNA Interactions in Mammalian Cells Using High-Resolution Circular Chromosome Conformation Capture Coupled to Deep Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Millau, Jean-François; Gaudreau, Luc

    2015-01-01

    DNA interactions shape the genome to physically and functionally connect regulatory elements to their target genes. Studying these interactions is crucial to understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate gene expression. In this chapter, we present a protocol for high-resolution circular chromosome conformation capture coupled to deep sequencing. This methodology allows to investigate short-range DNA interactions (<100 kbp) and to obtain high-resolution DNA interaction maps of loci. It is a powerful tool to explore how regulatory elements and genes are connected together. PMID:26404155

  17. Rapid and Reliable Detection of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) Gene Mutations in Han Chinese Using High-Resolution Melting Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jing-bin; Xu, Hong-ping; Xiong, Can; Ren, Zhao-rui; Tian, Guo-li; Zeng, Fanyi; Huang, Shu-zhen

    2010-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, an X-linked inherited disease, is one of the most common enzymopathies and affects over 400 million people worldwide. In China at least 21 distinct point mutations have been identified so far. In this study high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis was used to screen for G6PD mutations in 260 unrelated Han Chinese individuals, and the rapidity and reliability of this method was investigated. The mutants were readily differentiated by using HRM analysis, which produced distinct melting curves for each tested mutation. Interestingly, G1388A and G1376T, the two most common variants accounting for 50% to 60% of G6PD deficiency mutations in the Chinese population, could be differentiated in a single reaction. Further, two G6PD mutations not previously reported in the Chinese population were identified in this study. One of these mutations, designated “G6PD Jiangxi G1340T,” involved a G1340T substitution in exon 11, predicting a Gly447Val change in the protein. The other mutation involved a C406T substitution in exon 5. The frequencies of the common polymorphism site C1311T/IVS (intervening sequence) XI t93c between patients with G6PD and healthy volunteers were not significantly different. Thus, HRM analysis will be a useful alternative for screening G6PD mutations. PMID:20203002

  18. Rapid and reliable detection of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) gene mutations in Han Chinese using high-resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing-bin; Xu, Hong-ping; Xiong, Can; Ren, Zhao-rui; Tian, Guo-li; Zeng, Fanyi; Huang, Shu-zhen

    2010-05-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, an X-linked inherited disease, is one of the most common enzymopathies and affects over 400 million people worldwide. In China at least 21 distinct point mutations have been identified so far. In this study high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis was used to screen for G6PD mutations in 260 unrelated Han Chinese individuals, and the rapidity and reliability of this method was investigated. The mutants were readily differentiated by using HRM analysis, which produced distinct melting curves for each tested mutation. Interestingly, G1388A and G1376T, the two most common variants accounting for 50% to 60% of G6PD deficiency mutations in the Chinese population, could be differentiated in a single reaction. Further, two G6PD mutations not previously reported in the Chinese population were identified in this study. One of these mutations, designated "G6PD Jiangxi G1340T," involved a G1340T substitution in exon 11, predicting a Gly447Val change in the protein. The other mutation involved a C406T substitution in exon 5. The frequencies of the common polymorphism site C1311T/IVS (intervening sequence) XI t93c between patients with G6PD and healthy volunteers were not significantly different. Thus, HRM analysis will be a useful alternative for screening G6PD mutations. PMID:20203002

  19. Precise Detection of IDH1/2 and BRAF Hotspot Mutations in Clinical Glioma Tissues by a Differential Calculus Analysis of High-Resolution Melting Data

    PubMed Central

    Hatae, Ryusuke; Yoshimoto, Koji; Kuga, Daisuke; Akagi, Yojiro; Murata, Hideki; Suzuki, Satoshi O.; Mizoguchi, Masahiro; Iihara, Koji

    2016-01-01

    High resolution melting (HRM) is a simple and rapid method for screening mutations. It offers various advantages for clinical diagnostic applications. Conventional HRM analysis often yields equivocal results, especially for surgically obtained tissues. We attempted to improve HRM analyses for more effective applications to clinical diagnostics. HRM analyses were performed for IDH1R132 and IDH2R172 mutations in 192 clinical glioma samples in duplicate and these results were compared with sequencing results. BRAFV600E mutations were analyzed in 52 additional brain tumor samples. The melting profiles were used for differential calculus analyses. Negative second derivative plots revealed additional peaks derived from heteroduplexes in PCR products that contained mutations; this enabled unequivocal visual discrimination of the mutations. We further developed a numerical expression, the HRM-mutation index (MI), to quantify the heteroduplex-derived peak of the mutational curves. Using this expression, all IDH1 mutation statuses matched those ascertained by sequencing, with the exception of three samples. These discordant results were all derived from the misinterpretation of sequencing data. The effectiveness of our approach was further validated by analyses of IDH2R172 and BRAFV600E mutations. The present analytical method enabled an unequivocal and objective HRM analysis and is suitable for reliable mutation scanning in surgically obtained glioma tissues. This approach could facilitate molecular diagnostics in clinical environments. PMID:27529619

  20. Precise Detection of IDH1/2 and BRAF Hotspot Mutations in Clinical Glioma Tissues by a Differential Calculus Analysis of High-Resolution Melting Data.

    PubMed

    Hatae, Ryusuke; Hata, Nobuhiro; Yoshimoto, Koji; Kuga, Daisuke; Akagi, Yojiro; Murata, Hideki; Suzuki, Satoshi O; Mizoguchi, Masahiro; Iihara, Koji

    2016-01-01

    High resolution melting (HRM) is a simple and rapid method for screening mutations. It offers various advantages for clinical diagnostic applications. Conventional HRM analysis often yields equivocal results, especially for surgically obtained tissues. We attempted to improve HRM analyses for more effective applications to clinical diagnostics. HRM analyses were performed for IDH1R132 and IDH2R172 mutations in 192 clinical glioma samples in duplicate and these results were compared with sequencing results. BRAFV600E mutations were analyzed in 52 additional brain tumor samples. The melting profiles were used for differential calculus analyses. Negative second derivative plots revealed additional peaks derived from heteroduplexes in PCR products that contained mutations; this enabled unequivocal visual discrimination of the mutations. We further developed a numerical expression, the HRM-mutation index (MI), to quantify the heteroduplex-derived peak of the mutational curves. Using this expression, all IDH1 mutation statuses matched those ascertained by sequencing, with the exception of three samples. These discordant results were all derived from the misinterpretation of sequencing data. The effectiveness of our approach was further validated by analyses of IDH2R172 and BRAFV600E mutations. The present analytical method enabled an unequivocal and objective HRM analysis and is suitable for reliable mutation scanning in surgically obtained glioma tissues. This approach could facilitate molecular diagnostics in clinical environments. PMID:27529619

  1. Identification and Differentiation of Monilinia Species Causing Brown Rot of Pome and Stone Fruit using High-Resolution Melting (HRM) Analysis.

    PubMed

    Papavasileiou, Antonios; Madesis, Panagiotis B; Karaoglanidis, George S

    2016-09-01

    Brown rot is a devastating disease of stone fruit caused by Monilinia spp. Among these species, Monilinia fructicola is a quarantine pathogen in Europe but has recently been detected in several European countries. Identification of brown rot agents relies on morphological differences or use of molecular methods requiring fungal isolation. The current study was initiated to develop and validate a high-resolution melting (HRM) method for the identification of the Monilinia spp. and for the detection of M. fructicola among other brown rot pathogens. Based on the sequence of the cytb intron from M. laxa, M. fructicola, M. fructigena, M. mumecola, M. linhartiana, and M. yunnanensis isolates originating from several countries, a pair of universal primers for species identification and a pair of primers specific to M. fructicola were designed. The specificity of the primers was verified to ensure against cross-reaction with other fungal species. The melting curve analysis using the universal primers generated six different HRM curve profiles, each one specific for each species. Τhe HRM analysis primers specific to M. fructicola amplified a 120-bp region with a distinct melt profile corresponding to the presence of M. fructicola, regardless of the presence of other species. HRM analysis can be a useful tool for rapid identification and differentiation of the six Monilinia spp. using a single primer pair. This novel assay has the potential for simultaneous identification and differentiation of the closely related Monilinia spp. as well as for the differentiation of M. fructicola from other common pathogens or saprophytes that may occur on the diseased fruit. PMID:27247082

  2. Mapping the phase diagram of DNA force-induced melting in the presence of DNA intercalators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladescu, Ioana; McCauley, Micah; Nunez, Megan; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark

    2006-03-01

    The interactions between single DNA molecules and different non-covalent binding agents - the classical intercalator ethidium and compounds from the family of ruthenium complexes - are investigated using an optical tweezers instrument and their effects on the structure and mechanical stability of DNA molecules are quantitatively analyzed using a model of force-induced melting. When a single DNA molecule is stretched beyond its normal contour length, a melting phase transition is observed. Drug binding increases the dsDNA contour length, decreases the DNA elongation upon melting, and increases the DNA melting force. At concentrations of intercalator above critical, no force induced melting of dsDNA is possible. The DNA stretching curves map out a phase diagram for DNA melting in the presence of intercalator, and define its critical point in the force-extension-drug concentration space. Our results allow for the complete thermodynamic characterization of the interaction of these intercalators with DNA.

  3. Direct Observation of Iron-Induced Conformational Changes of Mitochondrial DNA by High-Resolution Field-Emission in-Lens Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaffee, Marcus; Walter, Patrick; Richter, Christoph; Muller, Martin

    1996-05-01

    When respiring rat liver mitochondria are incubated in the presence of Fe(III) gluconate, their DNA (mtDNA) relaxes from the supercoiled to the open circular form dependent on the iron dose. Anaerobiosis or antioxidants fail to completely inhibit the unwinding. High-resolution field-emission in-lens scanning electron microscopy imaging, in concert with backscattered electron detection, pinpoints nanometer-range iron colloids bound to mtDNA isolated from iron-exposed mitochondria. High-resolution field-emission in-lens scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron detection imaging permits simultaneous detailed visual analysis of DNA topology, iron dose-dependent mtDNA unwinding, and assessment of iron colloid formation on mtDNA strands.

  4. Unraveling Host-Vector-Arbovirus Interactions by Two-Gene High Resolution Melting Mosquito Bloodmeal Analysis in a Kenyan Wildlife-Livestock Interface

    PubMed Central

    Omondi, David; Masiga, Daniel K.; Ajamma, Yvonne Ukamaka; Fielding, Burtram C.; Njoroge, Laban; Villinger, Jandouwe

    2015-01-01

    The blood-feeding patterns of mosquitoes are directly linked to the spread of pathogens that they transmit. Efficient identification of arthropod vector bloodmeal hosts can identify the diversity of vertebrate species potentially involved in disease transmission cycles. While molecular bloodmeal analyses rely on sequencing of cytochrome b (cyt b) or cytochrome oxidase 1 gene PCR products, recently developed bloodmeal host identification based on high resolution melting (HRM) analyses of cyt b PCR products is more cost-effective. To resolve the diverse vertebrate hosts that mosquitoes may potentially feed on in sub-Saharan Africa, we utilized HRM profiles of both cyt b and 16S ribosomal RNA genes. Among 445 blood-fed Aedeomyia, Aedes, Anopheles, Culex, Mansonia, and Mimomyia mosquitoes from Kenya’s Lake Victoria and Lake Baringo regions where many mosquito-transmitted pathogens are endemic, we identified 33 bloodmeal hosts including humans, eight domestic animal species, six peridomestic animal species and 18 wildlife species. This resolution of vertebrate host species was only possible by comparing profiles of both cyt b and 16S markers, as melting profiles of some pairs of species were similar for either marker but not both. We identified mixed bloodmeals in a Culex pipiens from Mbita that had fed on a goat and a human and in two Mansonia africana mosquitoes from Baringo that each had fed on a rodent (Arvicanthis niloticus) in addition to a human or baboon. We further detected Sindbis and Bunyamwera viruses in blood-fed mosquito homogenates by Vero cell culture and RT-PCR in Culex, Aedeomyia, Anopheles and Mansonia mosquitoes from Baringo that had fed on humans and livestock. The observed mosquito feeding on both arbovirus amplifying hosts (including sheep and goats) and possible arbovirus reservoirs (birds, porcupine, baboons, rodents) informs arbovirus disease epidemiology and vector control strategies. PMID:26230507

  5. Wide genetic variations at 18S ribosomal RNA locus of Cyclospora cayetanensis isolated from Egyptian patients using high resolution melting curve.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Eman M; El-Moamly, Amal A; Mahmoud, Moushira A; Ateek, Nayera S

    2016-07-01

    A variable clinical picture of cyclosporiasis including gastrointestinal tract (GIT) symptomatic or asymptomatic beside extraintestinal consequences suggests a possibility of heterogenicity of Cyclospora cayetanensis. The present work aimed to explore the possibility of genetic variation of C. cayetanensis using high-resolution melting (HRM) curve of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified 18S rRNA genes. DNAs extracted from the stool samples of 70 cyclosporiasis patients were amplified and scanned by PCR/HRM curve. The results showed that there are four different genotypic profiles of C. cayetanensis with presence of mixed ones. Although Tm of all profiles was within the same range, they were discerned by plotting of the temperature-shifted florescence difference between normalized melting curves (dF/dT). Genotypic profile I was found alone in 40 % of patients and mixed with genotypic profile II and/or III in 25.7 % of patients, followed by genotypic profile II in 14.3 % then genotypic profile III and IV (10 % each). A significant relation was found between genotypic profiles and GIT symptomatic status as profile I and profile II were mostly detected in patients with acute GIT symptoms without or with chronic illness, respectively, while profile IV cases only were GIT asymptomatic. Statistical significance relations between genotypic profiles and age, gender, residence and oocyst shape index were determined. In conclusion, PCR/HRM proved a wide variation on C. cayetanensis genes that could be reflected on its pathogenic effects and explaining the variability of the clinical manifestations presented by cyclosporiasis patients. PMID:27041342

  6. High-resolution melting analysis of the single nucleotide polymorphism hot-spot region in the rpoB gene as an indicator of reduced susceptibility to rifaximin in Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Pecavar, Verena; Blaschitz, Marion; Hufnagl, Peter; Zeinzinger, Josef; Fiedler, Anita; Allerberger, Franz; Maass, Matthias; Indra, Alexander

    2012-06-01

    Clostridium difficile, a Gram-positive, spore-forming, anaerobic bacterium, is the main causative agent of hospital-acquired diarrhoea worldwide. In addition to metronidazole and vancomycin, rifaximin, a rifamycin derivative, is a promising antibiotic for the treatment of recurring C. difficile infections (CDI). However, exposure of C. difficile to this antibiotic has led to the development of rifaximin-resistance due to point mutations in the β-subunit of the RNA polymerase (rpoB) gene. In the present study, 348 C. difficile strains with known PCR-ribotypes were investigated for respective single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the proposed rpoB hot-spot region by using high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis. This method allows the detection of SNPs by comparing the altered melting behaviour of dsDNA with that of wild-type DNA. Discrimination between wild-type and mutant strains was enhanced by creating heteroduplexes by mixing sample DNA with wild-type DNA, leading to characteristic melting curve shapes from samples containing SNPs in the respective rpoB section. In the present study, we were able to identify 16 different rpoB sequence-types (ST) by sequencing analysis of a 325 bp fragment. The 16 PCR STs displayed a total of 24 different SNPs. Fifteen of these 24 SNPs were located within the proposed 151 bp SNP hot-spot region, resulting in 11 different HRM curve profiles (CP). Eleven SNPs (seven of which were within the proposed hot-spot region) led to amino acid substitutions associated with reduced susceptibility to rifaximin and 13 SNPs (eight of which were within the hot-spot region) were synonymous. This investigation clearly demonstrates that HRM analysis of the proposed SNP hot-spot region in the rpoB gene of C. difficile is a fast and cost-effective method for the identification of C. difficile samples with reduced susceptibility to rifaximin and even allows simultaneous SNP subtyping of the respective C. difficile isolates. PMID:22361457

  7. Rapid Detection and Identification of Mucormycetes in Bronchoalveolar Lavage Samples from Immunocompromised Patients with Pulmonary Infiltrates by Use of High-Resolution Melt Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Racil, Zdenek; Hrncirova, Kristyna; Kocmanova, Iva; Volfova, Pavlina; Ricna, Dita; Bejdak, Petr; Moulis, Mojmir; Pavlovsky, Zdenek; Weinbergerova, Barbora; Toskova, Martina; Mayer, Jiri

    2014-01-01

    Rapid differential diagnostics of pulmonary infiltrates suspected of invasive fungal disease in an immunocompromised host and early initiation of effective antifungal therapy are crucial for patient outcomes. There are no serological tests available to detect mucormycetes; therefore, PCR-based methods are highly suitable. We validated our previously published PCR followed by high-resolution melt analysis (PCR/HRMA) to detect Rhizopus spp., Rhizomucor pusillus, Lichtheimia corymbifera, and Mucor spp. in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples from immunocompromised patients who were at risk of invasive fungal disease. All PCR/HRMA-positive samples were retested using novel real-time quantitative PCR (RQ PCR) assays specific to the species identified. In total, between January 2009 and December 2012 we analyzed 99 BAL samples from 86 patients with pulmonary abnormalities using PCR/HRMA. Ninety (91%) BAL samples were negative, and 9 (9%) samples were positive. The sensitivity and specificity of PCR/HRMA were 100% and 93%, respectively. By combining the positive results of PCR/HRMA with positive RQ PCR results, the specificity was raised to 98%. PCR/HRMA, due to its high negative predictive value (99%), represents a fast and reliable tool for routine BAL sample screening for the differential diagnosis of pulmonary infiltrates in immunocompromised patients for the four most clinically important mucormycetes. PMID:24850354

  8. Rapid detection and identification of mucormycetes in bronchoalveolar lavage samples from immunocompromised patients with pulmonary infiltrates by use of high-resolution melt analysis.

    PubMed

    Lengerova, Martina; Racil, Zdenek; Hrncirova, Kristyna; Kocmanova, Iva; Volfova, Pavlina; Ricna, Dita; Bejdak, Petr; Moulis, Mojmir; Pavlovsky, Zdenek; Weinbergerova, Barbora; Toskova, Martina; Mayer, Jiri

    2014-08-01

    Rapid differential diagnostics of pulmonary infiltrates suspected of invasive fungal disease in an immunocompromised host and early initiation of effective antifungal therapy are crucial for patient outcomes. There are no serological tests available to detect mucormycetes; therefore, PCR-based methods are highly suitable. We validated our previously published PCR followed by high-resolution melt analysis (PCR/HRMA) to detect Rhizopus spp., Rhizomucor pusillus, Lichtheimia corymbifera, and Mucor spp. in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples from immunocompromised patients who were at risk of invasive fungal disease. All PCR/HRMA-positive samples were retested using novel real-time quantitative PCR (RQ PCR) assays specific to the species identified. In total, between January 2009 and December 2012 we analyzed 99 BAL samples from 86 patients with pulmonary abnormalities using PCR/HRMA. Ninety (91%) BAL samples were negative, and 9 (9%) samples were positive. The sensitivity and specificity of PCR/HRMA were 100% and 93%, respectively. By combining the positive results of PCR/HRMA with positive RQ PCR results, the specificity was raised to 98%. PCR/HRMA, due to its high negative predictive value (99%), represents a fast and reliable tool for routine BAL sample screening for the differential diagnosis of pulmonary infiltrates in immunocompromised patients for the four most clinically important mucormycetes. PMID:24850354

  9. Characterization of Genetic Diversity of Bacillus anthracis in France by Using High-Resolution Melting Assays and Multilocus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Derzelle, S.; Laroche, S.; Le Flèche, P.; Hauck, Y.; Thierry, S.; Vergnaud, G.; Madani, N.

    2011-01-01

    Using high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis, we developed a cost-effective method to genotype a set of 13 phylogenetically informative single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the genome of Bacillus anthracis. SNP discrimination assays were performed in monoplex or duplex and applied to 100 B. anthracis isolates collected in France from 1953 to 2009 and a few reference strains. HRM provided a reliable and cheap alternative to subtype B. anthracis into one of the 12 major sublineages or subgroups. All strains could be correctly positioned on the canonical SNP (canSNP) phylogenetic tree, except the divergent Pasteur vaccine strain ATCC 4229. We detected the cooccurrence of three canSNP subgroups in France. The dominant B.Br.CNEVA sublineage was found to be prevalent in the Alps, the Pyrenees, the Auvergne region, and the Saône-et-Loire department. Strains affiliated with the A.Br.008/009 subgroup were observed throughout most of the country. The minor A.Br.001/002 subgroup was restricted to northeastern France. Multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis using 24 markers further resolved French strains into 60 unique profiles and identified some regional patterns. Diversity found within the A.Br.008/009 and B.Br.CNEVA subgroups suggests that these represent old, ecologically established clades in France. Phylogenetic relationships with strains from other parts of the world are discussed. PMID:21998431

  10. Integrated Microfluidic Card with TaqMan Probes and High-Resolution Melt Analysis To Detect Tuberculosis Drug Resistance Mutations across 10 Genes

    PubMed Central

    Pholwat, Suporn; Liu, Jie; Stroup, Suzanne; Gratz, Jean; Banu, Sayera; Rahman, S. M. Mazidur; Ferdous, Sara Sabrina; Foongladda, Suporn; Boonlert, Duangjai; Ogarkov, Oleg; Zhdanova, Svetlana; Kibiki, Gibson; Heysell, Scott

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genotypic methods for drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are desirable to speed the diagnosis and proper therapy of tuberculosis (TB). However, the numbers of genes and polymorphisms implicated in resistance have proliferated, challenging diagnostic design. We developed a microfluidic TaqMan array card (TAC) that utilizes both sequence-specific probes and high-resolution melt analysis (HRM), providing two layers of detection of mutations. Twenty-seven primer pairs and 40 probes were designed to interrogate 3,200 base pairs of critical regions of the inhA, katG, rpoB, embB, rpsL, rrs, eis, gyrA, gyrB, and pncA genes. The method was evaluated on 230 clinical M. tuberculosis isolates from around the world, and it yielded 96.1% accuracy (2,431/2,530) in comparison to that of Sanger sequencing and 87% accuracy in comparison to that of the slow culture-based susceptibility testing. This TAC-HRM method integrates assays for 10 genes to yield fast, comprehensive, and accurate drug susceptibility results for the 9 major antibiotics used to treat TB and could be deployed to improve treatment outcomes. PMID:25714709

  11. rpoB gene high-resolution melt curve analysis: a rapid approach for diagnosis and screening of drug resistance in tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Kusum; Modi, Manish; Kaur, Harsimran; Sharma, Aman; Ray, Pallab; Varma, Subhash

    2015-10-01

    Timely and rapid diagnosis of multidrug resistance in tuberculous meningitis (TBM) is a challenge both for a microbiologist and neurologist. The present study was conducted to evaluate role of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using rpoB, IS6110, and MPB64 as targets in diagnosis of TBM in 110 patients and subsequent high-resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis of rpoB gene amplicons for screening of drug resistance. The sensitivity of smear, culture, and real-time PCR was 1.8%, 10.9%, and 83.63%, respectively. All 120 control patients showed negative results. With HRM rpoB analysis, rifampicin resistance was detected in 3 out of 110 cases of TBM (3.33%). Subsequently, results of HRM analysis were confirmed by rpoB gene sequencing, and mutations were observed at 516 (2 patients) and 531 (1 patient) codons, respectively. rpoB HRM analysis can be a promising tool for rapid diagnosis and screening of drug resistance in TBM patients in 90minutes. PMID:26254140

  12. Use of a High Resolution Melting (HRM) Assay to Compare Gag, Pol, and Env Diversity in Adults with Different Stages of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cousins, Matthew M.; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Beauchamp, Geetha; Brookmeyer, Ronald; Towler, William I.; Hudelson, Sarah E.; Khaki, Leila; Koblin, Beryl; Chesney, Margaret; Moore, Richard D.; Kelen, Gabor D.; Coates, Thomas; Celum, Connie; Buchbinder, Susan P.; Seage, George R.; Quinn, Thomas C.; Donnell, Deborah; Eshleman, Susan H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Cross-sectional assessment of HIV incidence relies on laboratory methods to discriminate between recent and non-recent HIV infection. Because HIV diversifies over time in infected individuals, HIV diversity may serve as a biomarker for assessing HIV incidence. We used a high resolution melting (HRM) diversity assay to compare HIV diversity in adults with different stages of HIV infection. This assay provides a single numeric HRM score that reflects the level of genetic diversity of HIV in a sample from an infected individual. Methods HIV diversity was measured in 203 adults: 20 with acute HIV infection (RNA positive, antibody negative), 116 with recent HIV infection (tested a median of 189 days after a previous negative HIV test, range 14–540 days), and 67 with non-recent HIV infection (HIV infected >2 years). HRM scores were generated for two regions in gag, one region in pol, and three regions in env. Results Median HRM scores were higher in non-recent infection than in recent infection for all six regions tested. In multivariate models, higher HRM scores in three of the six regions were independently associated with non-recent HIV infection. Conclusions The HRM diversity assay provides a simple, scalable method for measuring HIV diversity. HRM scores, which reflect the genetic diversity in a viral population, may be useful biomarkers for evaluation of HIV incidence, particularly if multiple regions of the HIV genome are examined. PMID:22073290

  13. Probing the microscopic flexibility of DNA from melting temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Gerald; Essex, Jonathan W.; Neylon, Cameron

    2009-10-01

    The microscopic flexibility of DNA is a key ingredient for understanding its interaction with proteins and drugs but is still poorly understood and technically challenging to measure. Several experimental methods probe very long DNA samples, but these miss local flexibility details. Others mechanically disturb or modify short molecules and therefore do not obtain flexibility properties of unperturbed and pristine DNA. Here, we show that it is possible to extract very detailed flexibility information about unmodified DNA from melting temperatures with statistical physics models. We were able to retrieve, from published melting temperatures, several established flexibility properties such as the presence of highly flexible TATA regions of genomic DNA and support recent findings that DNA is very flexible at short length scales. New information about the nanoscale Na+ concentration dependence of DNA flexibility was determined and we show the key role of ApT and TpA steps when it comes to ion-dependent flexibility and melting temperatures.

  14. DETECTION OF DNA DAMAGE USING MELTING ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and simple fluorescence screening assay for UV radiation-, chemical-, and enzyme-induced DNA damage is reported. This assay is based on a melting/annealing analysis technique and has been used with both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from E. coli). DN...

  15. Sub-7-second genotyping of single-nucleotide polymorphism by high-resolution melting curve analysis on a thermal digital microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tianlan; Jia, Yanwei; Dong, Cheng; Gao, Jie; Mak, Pui-In; Martins, Rui P

    2016-02-21

    We developed a thermal digital microfluidic (T-DMF) device enabling ultrafast DNA melting curve analysis (MCA). Within 7 seconds, the T-DMF device succeeded in differentiating a melting point difference down to 1.6 °C with a variation of 0.3 °C in a tiny droplet sample (1.2 μL), which was 300 times faster and with 20 times less sample spending than the standard MCA (35 minutes, 25 μL) run in a commercial qPCR machine. Such a performance makes it possible for a rapid discrimination of single-nucleotide mutation relevant to prompt clinical decision-making. Also, aided by electronic intelligent control, the T-DMF device facilitates sample handling and pipelining in an automatic serial manner. An optimized oval-shaped thermal electrode is introduced to achieve high thermal uniformity. A device-sealing technique averts sample contamination and permits uninterrupted chemical/biological reactions. Simple fabrication using a single chromium layer fulfills both the thermal and typical transport electrode requirements. Capable of thermally modulating DNA samples with ultrafast MCA, this T-DMF device has the potential for a wide variety of life science analyses, especially for disease diagnosis and prognosis. PMID:26781669

  16. THE MELTING MECHANISM OF DNA TETHERED TO A SURFACE

    PubMed Central

    QAMHIEH, KHAWLA; WONG, KA-YIU; LYNCH, GILLIAN C.; PETTITT, B. MONTGOMERY

    2009-01-01

    The details of melting of DNA immobilized on a chip or nanoparticle determines the sensitivity and operating characteristics of many analytical and synthetic biotechnological devices. Yet, little is known about the differences in how the DNA melting occurs between a homogeneous solution and that on a chip. We used molecular dynamics simulations to explore possible pathways for DNA melting on a chip. Simulation conditions were chosen to ensure that melting occurred in a submicrosecond timescale. The temperature was set to 400 K and the NaCl concentration was set to 0.1 M. We found less symmetry than in the solution case where for oligomeric double-stranded nucleic acids both ends melted with roughly equal probability. On a prepared silica surface we found melting is dominated by fraying from the end away from the surface. Strand separation was hindered by nonspecific surface adsorption at this temperature. At elevated temperatures the melted DNA was attracted to even uncharged organically coated surfaces demonstrating surface fouling. While hybridization is not the simple reverse of melting, this simulation has implications for the kinetics of hybridization. PMID:19802357

  17. Towards a Pathogenic Escherichia coli Detection Platform Using Multiplex SYBR®Green Real-Time PCR Methods and High Resolution Melting Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kagkli, Dafni-Maria; Folloni, Silvia; Barbau-Piednoir, Elodie; Van den Eede, Guy; Van den Bulcke, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a group of bacteria which has raised a lot of safety concerns in recent years. Five major intestinal pathogenic groups have been recognized amongst which the verocytotoxin or shiga-toxin (stx1 and/or stx2) producing E. coli (VTEC or STEC respectively) have received a lot of attention recently. Indeed, due to the high number of outbreaks related to VTEC strains, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has requested the monitoring of the “top-five” serogroups (O26, O103, O111, O145 and O157) most often encountered in food borne diseases and addressed the need for validated VTEC detection methods. Here we report the development of a set of intercalating dye Real-time PCR methods capable of rapidly detecting the presence of the toxin genes together with intimin (eae) in the case of VTEC, or aggregative protein (aggR), in the case of the O104:H4 strain responsible for the outbreak in Germany in 2011. All reactions were optimized to perform at the same annealing temperature permitting the multiplex application in order to minimize the need of material and to allow for high-throughput analysis. In addition, High Resolution Melting (HRM) analysis allowing the discrimination among strains possessing similar virulence traits was established. The development, application to food samples and the flexibility in use of the methods are thoroughly discussed. Together, these Real-time PCR methods facilitate the detection of VTEC in a new highly efficient way and could represent the basis for developing a simple pathogenic E. coli platform. PMID:22761753

  18. Rapid detection of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis by use of real-time PCR and high-resolution melt analysis.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Melissa V; Cowart, Kelley C; Campbell, Patricia J; Morlock, Glenn P; Sikes, David; Winchell, Jonas M; Posey, James E

    2010-11-01

    The current study describes the development of a unique real-time PCR assay for the detection of mutations conferring drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The rifampicin resistance determinant region (RRDR) of rpoB and specific regions of katG and the inhA promoter were targeted for the detection of rifampin (RIF) and isoniazid (INH) resistance, respectively. Additionally, this assay was multiplexed to discriminate Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) strains from nontuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM) strains by targeting the IS6110 insertion element. High-resolution melting (HRM) analysis following real-time PCR was used to identify M. tuberculosis strains containing mutations at the targeted loci, and locked nucleic acid (LNA) probes were used to enhance the detection of strains containing specific single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) transversion mutations. This method was used to screen 252 M. tuberculosis clinical isolates, including 154 RIF-resistant strains and 174 INH-resistant strains based on the agar proportion method of drug susceptibility testing (DST). Of the 154 RIF-resistant strains, 148 were also resistant to INH and therefore classified as multidrug resistant (MDR). The assay demonstrated sensitivity and specificity of 91% and 98%, respectively, for the detection of RIF resistance and 87% and 100% for the detection of INH resistance. Overall, this assay showed a sensitivity of 85% and a specificity of 98% for the detection of MDR strains. This method provides a rapid, robust, and inexpensive way to detect the dominant mutations known to confer MDR in M. tuberculosis strains and offers several advantages over current molecular and culture-based techniques. PMID:20810777

  19. Quantitation of CDH1 promoter methylation in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues of breast cancer patients using differential high resolution melting analysis

    PubMed Central

    Naghitorabi, Mojgan; Mohammadi-Asl, Javad; Sadeghi, Hamid Mir Mohammad; Rabbani, Mohammad; Jafarian-Dehkordi, Abbas; Javanmard, Shaghayegh Haghjooy

    2016-01-01

    Background: E-cadherin (CDH1) plays an important role in cell–cell adhesion of epithelial tissues. Loss of E-cadherin expression can lead to loss of tissue integrity, metastasis, and cancer progression. Also loss of E-cadherin expression might be related to aberrant promoter methylation of the CDH1 gene. Many studies have been performed on CDH1 promoter methylation, especially in breast cancer. Although most of the studies have used qualitative methods for methylation analysis, this study is designed to quantitatively investigate CDH1 promoter methylation in breast cancer and its correlation with patients’ clinicopathological features. Materials and Methods: Using differential high resolution melting analysis (D-HRMA), the methylation level of the CDH1 gene promoter was quantified in 98 breast cancer formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues and also 10 fresh frozen normal breast tissues. Results: All samples were detected to be methylated at the CDH1 promoter region. About 74.5% of the breast cancer samples were hypermethylated with an average methylation level of around 60%, while 25.5% of the patients were methylated with the mean methylation level of about 33%, and 90% of the normal samples had a mean methylation level of about 18%. Statistical analyses represented a significant correlation between CDH1 promoter methylation and cancer progression hallmarks, such as, clinical stage, nodal involvement, tumor size, and histological grade. Conclusion: In summary, quantitation of CDH1 promoter methylation can serve as a diagnostic and prognostic tool in breast cancer. Also D-HRMA can be used as a fast and reliable method for quantitation of promoter methylation. PMID:27308263

  20. Association between the p73 gene G4C14-to-A4T14 single nucleotide polymorphism and risk of cervical cancer by high resolution melting and PCR with confronting two-pair primers in a Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    GUO, HAIYAN; YANG, SHAODI; XU, LIJIAN; LI, DING; TANG, JIANXIN; WANG, SHUANGSHAUNG; WEI, BENJIE; LIU, ZHENGCHUN

    2016-01-01

    As a member of the p53 gene family, the p73 gene can affect an individual's susceptibility to cancer through a p53-like manner. DNA sequence variation in the p73 gene has been reported to be associated with cancer risk. The present study aimed to identify whether the p73 gene G4C14-to-A4T14 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is associated with risk of cervical cancer in a Chinese population. The p73 G4C14-to-A4T14 polymorphism was genotyped in 175 cervical cancer and 189 healthy control peripheral blood DNA samples using high resolution melting, polymerase chain reaction with confronting two-pair primers and direct DNA sequencing. The results demonstrated that carriers of the AT/AT genotype were associated with a significantly increased risk of cervical cancer (P=0.042; χ2=4.122; odds ratio = 2.241; 95% confidence interval = 1.013–4.956) compared with the GC/GC genotype carriers. In addition, there was a significant association between p73 genotypes and tumor size in patients with cervical cancer (P=0.014; χ2=8.607). However, no association was identified between p73 genotypes and tumor stage, histological type or lymph node metastasis in patients with cervical cancer. These results suggest that the p73 G4C14-to-A4T14 SNP may function as a marker of genetic susceptibility to cervical cancer in the Chinese population. PMID:27347206

  1. Enthalpies of DNA melting in the presence of osmolytes.

    PubMed

    Spink, Charles H; Garbett, Nichola; Chaires, Jonathan B

    2007-03-01

    The melting of DNA in the presence of osmolytes has been studied with the intention of obtaining information about how base pair stability is affected by changes in solution conditions. In previous investigations, the melting enthalpies were assumed to be constant as osmolalities change, but no systematic evaluation of whether this condition is true has been offered. This paper presents calorimetric data on the melting of two synthetic DNA samples in the presence of a number of common osmolytes. Poly(dAdT)*poly(dTdA) and poly(dGdC)*poly(dCdG) melting have been examined by differential scanning calorimetry in solutions containing ethylene glycol, glycerol, sucrose, urea, betaine, PEG 200 and PEG 1450 at increasing osmolalities. The results show small, but significant changes in the enthalpy of melting of the two polynucleotides that are different, depending on the structure of the cosolvent. The polyols, ethylene glycol, glycerol, PEG 200 and also urea all show decreases in melting enthalpy, while betaine and sucrose display increases with increasing concentration of cosolvent. The large stabilizing PEG 1450 shows no change within the experimental errors. Using concepts relating to preferential interactions of the cosolvents with the DNA base pairs, it is possible to interpret some of the observed changes in the thermodynamic properties of melting. The results indicate that there is strong entropy-enthalpy compensation upon melting base pairs, but entropy increases dominate to cause the decreases in stability with increased cosolvent concentration. Excess hydration parameters are evaluated and their magnitudes discussed in terms of changes in cosolvent interactions with the DNA base pairs. PMID:16920250

  2. Estimation of the diversity between DNA calorimetric profiles, differential melting curves and corresponding melting temperatures.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chun-Ling; Fridman, Alexander S; Grigoryan, Inessa E; Galyuk, Elena N; Murashko, Oleg N; Hu, Chin-Kun; Lando, Dmitri Y

    2016-11-01

    The Poland-Fixman-Freire formalism was adapted for modeling of calorimetric DNA melting profiles, and applied to plasmid pBR 322 and long random sequences. We studied the influence of the difference (HGC -HAT ) between the helix-coil transition enthalpies of AT and GC base pairs on the calorimetric melting profile and on normalized calorimetric melting profile. A strong alteration of DNA calorimetrical profile with HGC -HAT was demonstrated. In contrast, there is a relatively slight change in the normalized profiles and in corresponding ordinary (optical) normalized differential melting curves (DMCs). For fixed HGC -HAT , the average relative deviation (S) between DMC and normalized calorimetric profile, and the difference between their melting temperatures (Tcal -Tm ) are weakly dependent on peculiarities of the multipeak fine structure of DMCs. At the same time, both the deviation S and difference (Tcal -Tm ) enlarge with the temperature melting range of the helix-coil transition. It is shown that the local deviation between DMC and normalized calorimetric profile increases in regions of narrow peaks distant from the melting temperature. PMID:27422497

  3. High-resolution genomic assays provide insight into the division of labor between TLS and HDR in mammalian replication of damaged DNA.

    PubMed

    Livneh, Zvi; Cohen, Isadora S; Paz-Elizur, Tamar; Davidovsky, Dana; Carmi, Dalit; Swain, Umakanta; Mirlas-Neisberg, Nataly

    2016-08-01

    The multitude of DNA lesions that continuously form in DNA cannot all be detected and removed prior to replication. Thus, encounters of the replication fork with DNA damage become inevitable. Such encounters inhibit fork progression, leading to replication fork arrest or to replication re-priming downstream of the damage site. Either of these events will result in the formation of gap-lesion structures, in which a damaged base is located in a single stranded stretch of DNA, that is vulnerable to subsequent nicking. The double strand break that would ensue if ssDNA becomes nicked constitutes escalation of the damage from nucleotide(s)-specific to chromosomal scale. Cells employ two universal DNA damage tolerance (DDT) strategies to resolve these situations, by converting the gap-lesion structures into dsDNA without repairing the damage. The first is translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), in which a specialized low-fidelity DNA polymerase inserts a nucleotide opposite the damaged one. TLS is inherently mutagenic, due to the miscoding nature of most damaged nucleotides. The second strategy is homology-dependent repair (HDR), which relies on the presence of an identical intact sister chromatid. The molecular mechanisms that regulate the division of labor between these pathways are poorly understood. This review focuses on the balance between TLS and HDR in mammalian cells, discussing recent findings that were made possible thanks to newly developed high resolution genomic assays, and highlighting the role of the DNA lesion's properties in DDT pathway choice. PMID:27262613

  4. High resolution analysis of the timing of replication of specific DNA sequences during S phase of mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    D'Andrea, A D; Tantravahi, U; Lalande, M; Perle, M A; Latt, S A

    1983-01-01

    A new method, utilizing selective photodegradation of 5-bromo-deoxyuridine (BUdR)-substituted DNA and flow cytometry, has been developed for analyzing the timing of replication of specific DNA sequences. Chemically synchronized Chinese hamster ovary cells were given a pulse of the deoxythymidine analogue, BUdR, at different times during S phase, and flow sorted according to DNA content, before DNA isolation. Newly-replicated, unifilarly BUdR-substituted DNA was selectively degraded by treatment with 33258 Hoechst plus near UV light followed by S1 nuclease digestion; the resistant DNA was analyzed for its content of 18s and 28s rDNA or dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) sequences via Southern blot analysis. Both the rDNA and DHFR sequences were found to replicate almost entirely during the first quarter of S phase. The approach described should have general utility for analyzing replication kinetics of specific DNA sequences in mammalian cells. Images PMID:6192392

  5. Development of a Novel Real-Time PCR Assay with High-Resolution Melt Analysis To Detect and Differentiate OXA-48-Like β-Lactamases in Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae

    PubMed Central

    Hemarajata, Peera; Yang, Shangxin; Hindler, Janet A.

    2015-01-01

    The rapid global spread of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) poses an urgent threat to public health. More than 250 class D β-lactamases (OXAs) have been described in recent years, with variations in hydrolytic activity for β-lactams. The plasmid-borne OXA-48 β-lactamase and its variants are identified only sporadically in the United States but are common in Europe. Recognition of these OXA-48-like carbapenemases is vital in order to control their dissemination. We developed a real-time PCR assay based on high-resolution melt analysis, using blaOXA-48-like-specific primers coupled with an unlabeled 3′-phosphorylated oligonucleotide probe (LunaProbe) homologous to OXA-48-like carbapenemase genes. The assay was validated using genomic DNA from 48 clinical isolates carrying a variety of carbapenemase genes, including blaKPC, blaSME, blaIMP, blaNDM-1, blaVIM, blaOXA-48, blaOXA-162, blaOXA-181, blaOXA-204, blaOXA-244, blaOXA-245, and blaOXA-232. Our assay identified the presence of blaOXA-48-like β-lactamase genes and clearly distinguished between blaOXA-48 and its variants in control strains, including between blaOXA-181 and blaOXA-232, which differ by only a single base pair in the assay target region. This approach has potential for use in epidemiological investigations and continuous surveillance to help control the spread of CRE strains producing OXA-48-like enzymes. PMID:26124164

  6. Comparison of high resolution melting analysis, pyrosequencing, next generation sequencing and immunohistochemistry to conventional Sanger sequencing for the detection of p.V600E and non-p.V600E BRAF mutations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The approval of vemurafenib in the US 2011 and in Europe 2012 improved the therapy of not resectable or metastatic melanoma. Patients carrying a substitution of valine to glutamic acid at codon 600 (p.V600E) or a substitution of valine to leucine (p.V600K) in BRAF show complete or partial response. Therefore, the precise identification of the underlying somatic mutations is essential. Herein, we evaluate the sensitivity, specificity and feasibility of six different methods for the detection of BRAF mutations. Methods Samples harboring p.V600E mutations as well as rare mutations in BRAF exon 15 were compared to wildtype samples. DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues by manual micro-dissection and automated extraction. BRAF mutational analysis was carried out by high resolution melting (HRM) analysis, pyrosequencing, allele specific PCR, next generation sequencing (NGS) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). All mutations were independently reassessed by Sanger sequencing. Due to the limited tumor tissue available different numbers of samples were analyzed with each method (82, 72, 60, 72, 49 and 82 respectively). Results There was no difference in sensitivity between the HRM analysis and Sanger sequencing (98%). All mutations down to 6.6% allele frequency could be detected with 100% specificity. In contrast, pyrosequencing detected 100% of the mutations down to 5% allele frequency but exhibited only 90% specificity. The allele specific PCR failed to detect 16.3% of the mutations eligible for therapy with vemurafenib. NGS could analyze 100% of the cases with 100% specificity but exhibited 97.5% sensitivity. IHC showed once cross-reactivity with p.V600R but was a good amendment to HRM. Conclusion Therefore, at present, a combination of HRM and IHC is recommended to increase sensitivity and specificity for routine diagnostic to fulfill the European requirements concerning vemurafenib therapy of melanoma patients. PMID:24410877

  7. Assessment of high resolution melt analysis feasibility for evaluation of beta-globin gene mutations as a reproducible, cost-efficient and fast alternative to the present conventional method

    PubMed Central

    Ramezanzadeh, Mahboubeh; Salehi, Mansour; Salehi, Rasoul

    2016-01-01

    Background: Beta-thalassemia is the most prevalent monogenic disease throughout the world. It was the first genetic disorder nominated for nation-wide prevention programs involving population screening for heterozygotes and prenatal diagnosis (PND) in Iran. Due to the high prevalence of beta-thalassemia, the shift from conventional mutation detection methods to more recently developed techniques based on novel innovative technologies are essential. We aimed to develop a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based protocol using high resolution melting (HRM) analysis for diagnosis of common beta-thalassemia mutations. Materials and Methods: Forty DNA samples extracted from peripheral blood of suspected beta-thalassemia carriers participated in this study were subjected to amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS). We then used 20 of these samples for HRM optimization. When 100% sensitivity and specificity was obtained with HRM procedure, we applied the technique for mutation detection on another remaining 20 samples as thalassemia cases with unknown mutations (detected mutations with ARMS-PCR kept confidential). Finally, the HRM procedure applied on 2 chorionic villous sample (CVS) biopsied from 12 weeks gestational age pregnant women for routine PND analysis. Results: In the first step of study, Fr 8/9 (+G), IVSI-1 (G > A), IVSI-5 (G > C), IVSI-110 (G > A), and CD44 (−C) mutations were diagnosed in samples under study using ARMS-PCR technique. Finally, the HRM procedure applied on 20 unknown samples and 2 CVS The results of HRM were in complete concordance with ARMS and confirmed by sequencing. Conclusions: The advantages of HRM analysis over conventional methods is high throughput, rapid, accurate, cost-effective, and reproducible. PMID:27169102

  8. High-resolution hydrodynamic chromatographic separation of large DNA using narrow, bare open capillaries: a rapid and economical alternative technology to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis?

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Veerappan, Vijaykumar; Pu, Qiaosheng; Cheng, Chang; Wang, Xiayan; Lu, Liping; Allen, Randy D; Guo, Guangsheng

    2014-01-01

    A high-resolution, rapid, and economical hydrodynamic chromatographic (HDC) method for large DNA separations in free solution was developed using narrow (5 μm diameter), bare open capillaries. Size-based separation was achieved in a chromatographic format with larger DNA molecules being eluting faster than smaller ones. Lambda DNA Mono Cut Mix was baseline-separated with the percentage resolutions generally less than 9.0% for all DNA fragments (1.5 to 48.5 kbp) tested in this work. High efficiencies were achieved for large DNA from this chromatographic technique, and the number of theoretical plates reached 3.6 × 10(5) plates for the longest (48.5 kbp) and 3.7 × 10(5) plates for the shortest (1.5 kbp) fragments. HDC parameters and performances were also discussed. The method was further applied for fractionating large DNA fragments from real-world samples (SacII digested Arabidopsis plant bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) DNA and PmeI digested Rice BAC DNA) to demonstrate its feasibility for BAC DNA finger printing. Rapid separation of PmeI digested Rice BAC DNA covering from 0.44 to 119.041 kbp was achieved in less than 26 min. All DNA fragments of these samples were baseline separated in narrow bare open capillaries, while the smallest fragment (0.44 kbp) was missing in pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) separation mode. It is demonstrated that narrow bare open capillary chromatography can realize a rapid separation for a wide size range of DNA mixtures that contain both small and large DNA fragments in a single run. PMID:24274685

  9. High-Resolution Mapping of Changes in Histone-DNA Contacts of Nucleosomes Remodeled by ISW2

    PubMed Central

    Kassabov, Stefan R.; Henry, Nathalia M.; Zofall, Martin; Tsukiyama, Toshio; Bartholomew, Blaine

    2002-01-01

    The imitation switch (ISWI) complex from yeast containing the Isw2 and Itc1 proteins was shown to preferentially slide mononucleosomes with as little as 23 bp of linker DNA from the end to the center of DNA. The contacts of unique residues in the histone fold regions of H4, H2B, and H2A with DNA were determined with base pair resolution before and after chromatin remodeling by a site-specific photochemical cross-linking approach. The path of DNA and the conformation of the histone octamer in the nucleosome remodeled or slid by ISW2 were not altered, because after adjustment for the new translational position, the DNA contacts at specific sites in the histone octamer had not been changed. Maintenance of the canonical nucleosome structure after sliding was also demonstrated by DNA photoaffinity labeling of histone proteins at specific sites within the DNA template. In addition, nucleosomal DNA does not become more accessible during ISW2 remodeling, as assayed by restriction endonuclease cutting. ISW2 was also shown to have the novel capability of counteracting transcriptional activators by sliding nucleosomes through Gal4-VP16 bound initially to linker DNA and displacing the activator from DNA. PMID:12370299

  10. A DNA Melting Exercise for a Large Laboratory Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Lauren A.; Junker, Matthew; Stark, Myranda; Greenleaf, Dustin

    2015-01-01

    A simple and economical experimental setup is described that enables multiple individuals or groups within a laboratory class to measure the thermal melting of double stranded DNA simultaneously. The setup utilizes a basic spectrophotometer capable of measuring absorbance at 260 nm, UV plastic cuvettes, and a stirring hot plate. Students measure…

  11. High-Resolution Mapping of Epigenetic Modifications of the Rice Genome Uncovers Interplay between DNA Methylation, Histone Methylation, and Gene Expression[W

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xueyong; Wang, Xiangfeng; He, Kun; Ma, Yeqin; Su, Ning; He, Hang; Stolc, Viktor; Tongprasit, Waraporn; Jin, Weiwei; Jiang, Jiming; Terzaghi, William; Li, Songgang; Deng, Xing Wang

    2008-01-01

    We present high-resolution maps of DNA methylation and H3K4 di- and trimethylation of two entire chromosomes and two fully sequenced centromeres in rice (Oryza sativa) shoots and cultured cells. This analysis reveals combinatorial interactions between these epigenetic modifications and chromatin structure and gene expression. Cytologically densely stained heterochromatin had less H3K4me2 and H3K4me3 and more methylated DNA than the less densely stained euchromatin, whereas centromeres had a unique epigenetic composition. Most transposable elements had highly methylated DNA but no H3K4 methylation, whereas more than half of protein-coding genes had both methylated DNA and di- and/or trimethylated H3K4. Methylation of DNA but not H3K4 was correlated with suppressed transcription. By contrast, when both DNA and H3K4 were methylated, transcription was only slightly reduced. Transcriptional activity was positively correlated with the ratio of H3K4me3/H3K4me2: genes with predominantly H3K4me3 were actively transcribed, whereas genes with predominantly H3K4me2 were transcribed at moderate levels. More protein-coding genes contained all three modifications, and more transposons contained DNA methylation in shoots than cultured cells. Differential epigenetic modifications correlated to tissue-specific expression between shoots and cultured cells. Collectively, this study provides insights into the rice epigenomes and their effect on gene expression and plant development. PMID:18263775

  12. DNA melting and genotoxicity induced by silver nanoparticles and graphene.

    PubMed

    Ivask, Angela; Voelcker, Nicolas H; Seabrook, Shane A; Hor, Maryam; Kirby, Jason K; Fenech, Michael; Davis, Thomas P; Ke, Pu Chun

    2015-05-18

    We have revealed a connection between DNA-nanoparticle (NP) binding and in vitro DNA damage induced by citrate- and branched polyethylenimine-coated silver nanoparticles (c-AgNPs and b-AgNPs) as well as graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets. All three types of nanostructures triggered an early onset of DNA melting, where the extent of the melting point shift depends upon both the type and concentration of the NPs. Specifically, at a DNA/NP weight ratio of 1.1/1, the melting temperature of lambda DNA dropped from 94 °C down to 76 °C, 60 °C, and room temperature for GO, c-AgNPs and b-AgNPs, respectively. Consistently, dynamic light scattering revealed that the largest changes in DNA hydrodynamic size were also associated with the binding of b-AgNPs. Upon introduction to cells, b-AgNPs also exhibited the highest cytotoxicity, at the half-maximal inhibitory (IC50) concentrations of 3.2, 2.9, and 5.2 mg/L for B and T-lymphocyte cell lines and primary lymphocytes, compared to the values of 13.4, 12.2, and 12.5 mg/L for c-AgNPs and 331, 251, and 120 mg/L for GO nanosheets, respectively. At cytotoxic concentrations, all NPs elicited elevated genotoxicities via the increased number of micronuclei in the lymphocyte cells. However, b-AgNPs also induced micronuclei at subtoxic concentrations starting from 0.1 mg/L, likely due to their stronger cellular adhesion and internalization, as well as their subsequent interference with normal DNA synthesis or chromosome segregation during the cell cycle. This study facilitates our understanding of the effects of NP chemical composition, surface charge, and morphology on DNA stability and genotoxicity, with implications ranging from nanotoxicology to nanobiotechnology and nanomedicine. PMID:25781053

  13. Validation of High Resolution Melting Analysis (HRM) of the Amplified ITS2 Region for the Detection and Identification of Yeasts from Clinical Samples: Comparison with Culture and MALDI-TOF Based Identification

    PubMed Central

    Duyvejonck, Hans; Cools, Piet; Decruyenaere, Johan; Roelens, Kristien; Noens, Lucien; Vermeulen, Stefan; Claeys, Geert; Decat, Ellen; Van Mechelen, Els; Vaneechoutte, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Aim Candida species are known as opportunistic pathogens, and a possible cause of invasive infections. Because of their species-specific antimycotic resistance patterns, reliable techniques for their detection, quantification and identification are needed. We validated a DNA amplification method for direct detection of Candida spp. from clinical samples, namely the ITS2-High Resolution Melting Analysis (direct method), by comparing it with a culture and MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry based method (indirect method) to establish the presence of Candida species in three different types of clinical samples. Materials and Methods A total of 347 clinical samples, i.e. throat swabs, rectal swabs and vaginal swabs, were collected from the gynaecology/obstetrics, intensive care and haematology wards at the Ghent University Hospital, Belgium. For the direct method, ITS2-HRM was preceded by NucliSENS easyMAG DNA extraction, directly on the clinical samples. For the indirect method, clinical samples were cultured on Candida ID and individual colonies were identified by MALDI-TOF. Results For 83.9% of the samples there was complete concordance between both techniques, i.e. the same Candida species were detected in 31.1% of the samples or no Candida species were detected in 52.8% of the samples. In 16.1% of the clinical samples, discrepant results were obtained, of which only 6.01% were considered as major discrepancies. Discrepancies occurred mostly when overall numbers of Candida cells in the samples were low and/or when multiple species were present in the sample. Discussion Most of the discrepancies could be decided in the advantage of the direct method. This is due to samples in which no yeast could be cultured whereas low amounts could be detected by the direct method and to samples in which high quantities of Candida robusta according to ITS2-HRM were missed by culture on Candida ID agar. It remains to be decided whether the diagnostic advantages of the direct method

  14. Human paternal and maternal demographic histories: insights from high-resolution Y chromosome and mtDNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Comparisons of maternally-inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and paternally-inherited non-recombining Y chromosome (NRY) variation have provided important insights into the impact of sex-biased processes (such as migration, residence pattern, and so on) on human genetic variation. However, such comparisons have been limited by the different molecular methods typically used to assay mtDNA and NRY variation (for example, sequencing hypervariable segments of the control region for mtDNA vs. genotyping SNPs and/or STR loci for the NRY). Here, we report a simple capture array method to enrich Illumina sequencing libraries for approximately 500 kb of NRY sequence, which we use to generate NRY sequences from 623 males from 51 populations in the CEPH Human Genome Diversity Panel (HGDP). We also obtained complete mtDNA genome sequences from the same individuals, allowing us to compare maternal and paternal histories free of any ascertainment bias. Results We identified 2,228 SNPs in the NRY sequences and 2,163 SNPs in the mtDNA sequences. Our results confirm the controversial assertion that genetic differences between human populations on a global scale are bigger for the NRY than for mtDNA, although the differences are not as large as previously suggested. More importantly, we find substantial regional variation in patterns of mtDNA versus NRY variation. Model-based simulations indicate very small ancestral effective population sizes (<100) for the out-of-Africa migration as well as for many human populations. We also find that the ratio of female effective population size to male effective population size (Nf/Nm) has been greater than one throughout the history of modern humans, and has recently increased due to faster growth in Nf than Nm. Conclusions The NRY and mtDNA sequences provide new insights into the paternal and maternal histories of human populations, and the methods we introduce here should be widely applicable for further such studies. PMID

  15. Comprehensive High-Resolution Mass Spectrometric Analysis of DNA Phosphate Adducts Formed by the Tobacco-Specific Lung Carcinogen 4-(Methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK, 1) is a potent lung carcinogen in laboratory animals and is believed to play a key role in the development of lung cancer in smokers. Metabolic activation of NNK leads to the formation of pyridyloxobutyl DNA adducts, a critical step in its mechanism of carcinogenesis. In addition to DNA nucleobase adducts, DNA phosphate adducts can be formed by pyridyloxobutylation of the oxygen atoms of the internucleotidic phosphodiester linkages. We report the use of a liquid chromatography–nanoelectrospray ionization–high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry technique to characterize 30 novel pyridyloxobutyl DNA phosphate adducts in calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) treated with 4-(acetoxymethylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNKOAc, 2), a regiochemically activated form of NNK. A 15N3-labeled internal standard was synthesized for one of the most abundant phosphate adducts, dCp[4-oxo-4-(3-pyridyl)butyl]dC (CpopC), and this standard was used to quantify CpopC and to estimate the levels of other adducts in the NNKOAc-treated CT-DNA. Formation of DNA phosphate adducts by NNK in vivo was further investigated in rats treated with NNK acutely (0.1 mmol/kg once daily for 4 days by subcutaneous injection) and chronically (5 ppm in drinking water for 10, 30, 50, and 70 weeks). This study provides the first comprehensive structural identification and quantitation of a panel of DNA phosphate adducts of a structurally complex carcinogen and chemical support for future mechanistic studies of tobacco carcinogenesis in humans. PMID:26398225

  16. Mapping DNA Quantity into Electrophoretic Mobility through Quantum Dot Nanotethers for High Resolution Genetic and Epigenetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Liu, Kelvin J.; Wang, Tian-Li; Shih, Ie-Ming; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2011-01-01

    Newly discovered nanoparticle properties have driven the development of novel applications and uses. We report a new observation where the electrophoretic mobility of a quantum dot-DNA nanoassembly can be precisely modulated by the degree of surface DNA conjugation. By using streptavidin-coated quantum dots (QD) as nanotethers to gather biotin-labeled DNA into electrophoretic nanoassemblies, the QD surface charge is modulated and transformed into electrophoretic mobility shifts using standard agarose gel electrophoresis. Typical fluorescent assays quantify based on relative intensity. However, this phenomenon uses a novel approach that accurately maps DNA quantity into shifts in relative band position. This property was applied in a quantum dot enabled nanoassay called Quantum Dot Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay (QEMSA) that enables accurate quantification of DNA targets down to 1.1-fold (9%) changes in quantity, beyond what is achievable in qPCR. In addition to these experimental findings, an analytical model is presented to explain this behavior. Finally, QEMSA was applied to both genetic and epigenetic analysis of cancer. First, it was used to analyze copy number variation (CNV) of the RSF1/HBXAP gene where conventional approaches for CNV analysis based on comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), microarrays, and qPCR are unable to reliably differentiate less than 2-fold changes in copy number. Then, QEMSA was used for DNA methylation analysis of the p16/CDK2A tumor suppressor gene where its ability to detect subtle changes in methylation was shown to be superior to that of qPCR. PMID:22136600

  17. A conformational transition in the structure of a 2'-thiomethyl-modified DNA visualized at high resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Pallan, Pradeep S.; Prakash, Thazha P.; Li, Feng; Eoff, Robert L.; Manoharan, Muthiah; Egli, Martin

    2009-06-17

    Crystal structures of A-form and B-form DNA duplexes containing 2'-S-methyl-uridines reveal that the modified residues adopt a RNA-like C3'-endo pucker, illustrating that the replacement of electronegative oxygen at the 2'-carbon of RNA by sulfur does not appear to fundamentally alter the conformational preference of the sugar in the oligonucleotide context and sterics trump stereoelectronics.

  18. Oxygen-aromatic contacts in intra-strand base pairs: analysis of high-resolution DNA crystal structures and quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Jain, Alok; Krishna Deepak, R N V; Sankararamakrishnan, Ramasubbu

    2014-07-01

    Three-dimensional structures of biomolecules are stabilized by a large number of non-covalent interactions and some of them such as van der Waals, electrostatic and hydrogen bond interactions are well characterized. Delocalized π-electron clouds of aromatic residues are known to be involved in cation-π, CH-π, OH-π and π-π interactions. In proteins, many examples have been found in which the backbone carbonyl oxygen of one residue makes close contact with the aromatic center of aromatic residues. Quantum chemical calculations suggest that such contacts may provide stability to the protein secondary structures. In this study, we have systematically analyzed the experimentally determined high-resolution DNA crystal structures and identified 91 examples in which the aromatic center of one base is in close contact (<3.5Ǻ) with the oxygen atom of preceding (Group-I) or succeeding base (Group-II). Examples from Group-I are overwhelmingly observed and cytosine or thymine is the preferred base contributing oxygen atom in Group-I base pairs. A similar analysis of high-resolution RNA structures surprisingly did not yield many examples of oxygen-aromatic contact of similar type between bases. Ab initio quantum chemical calculations on compounds based on DNA crystal structures and model compounds show that interactions between the bases in base pairs with oxygen-aromatic contacts are energetically favorable. Decomposition of interaction energies indicates that dispersion forces are the major cause for energetically stable interaction in these base pairs. We speculate that oxygen-aromatic contacts in intra-strand base pairs in a DNA structure may have biological significance. PMID:24816369

  19. Quantification of the DNA content of structurally abnormal X chromosomes and X chromosome aneuploidy using high resolution bivariate flow karyotyping.

    PubMed

    Trask, B; van den Engh, G; Nussbaum, R; Schwartz, C; Gray, J

    1990-01-01

    Quantification of the Hoechst and chromomycin A3 fluorescence intensities of mitotic human chromosomes isolated from karyotypically normal and abnormal cells was performed with a dual beam flow cytometer. The resultant flow karyotypes contain information about the relative DNA content and base composition of chromosomes and their relative frequencies in the mitotic cell sample. The relative copy number of X and Y chromosomes was determined for 38 normal males and females and 6 cell lines with X or Y chromosome aneuploidy. Flow karyotype diagnoses corresponded with conventional cytogenetic results in all cases. We show that chromosome DNA content can be derived from peak position in Hoechst vs. chromomycin flow karyotypes. These values are linearly related to propidium iodide staining intensity as measured with flow cytometry and to the binding of gallocyanin chrome alum to phosphate groups as measured with slide-based scanning photometry. Cell lines with deleted or dicentric X chromosomes ranging in length from 0.53 to 1.95 times normal were analyzed by using flow cytometry. The measured difference in DNA content between a normal X and each of the structurally abnormal chromosomes was linearly correlated to the difference predicted from cytogenetics and/or probe analyses. Deletions of 3-5 Mb, which were at and below the detection limits of conventional cytogenetics, could be quantified by flow karyotyping in individuals with X-linked diseases such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy, choroideremia, and ocular albinism/ichthyosis. The results show that the use of flow karyotyping to quantify the size of restricted regions of the genome can complement conventional cytogenetics and other physical mapping techniques in the study of genetic disorders. PMID:2106419

  20. Very high resolution single pass HLA genotyping using amplicon sequencing on the 454 next generation DNA sequencers: Comparison with Sanger sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, F; Höglund, B; Fernandez-Vina, M; Tyan, D; Rastrou, M; Williams, T; Moonsamy, P; Goodridge, D; Anderson, M; Erlich, H A; Holcomb, C L

    2015-12-01

    Compared to Sanger sequencing, next-generation sequencing offers advantages for high resolution HLA genotyping including increased throughput, lower cost, and reduced genotype ambiguity. Here we describe an enhancement of the Roche 454 GS GType HLA genotyping assay to provide very high resolution (VHR) typing, by the addition of 8 primer pairs to the original 14, to genotype 11 HLA loci. These additional amplicons help resolve common and well-documented alleles and exclude commonly found null alleles in genotype ambiguity strings. Simplification of workflow to reduce the initial preparation effort using early pooling of amplicons or the Fluidigm Access Array™ is also described. Performance of the VHR assay was evaluated on 28 well characterized cell lines using Conexio Assign MPS software which uses genomic, rather than cDNA, reference sequence. Concordance was 98.4%; 1.6% had no genotype assignment. Of concordant calls, 53% were unambiguous. To further assess the assay, 59 clinical samples were genotyped and results compared to unambiguous allele assignments obtained by prior sequence-based typing supplemented with SSO and/or SSP. Concordance was 98.7% with 58.2% as unambiguous calls; 1.3% could not be assigned. Our results show that the amplicon-based VHR assay is robust and can replace current Sanger methodology. Together with software enhancements, it has the potential to provide even higher resolution HLA typing. PMID:26037172

  1. Salt concentration effects on equilibrium melting curves from DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, J; Fiche, J-B; Buhot, A; Calemczuk, R; Livache, T

    2010-09-22

    DNA microarrays find applications in an increasing number of domains where more quantitative results are required. DNA being a charged polymer, the repulsive interactions between the surface of the microarray and the targets in solution are increasing upon hybridization. Such electrostatic penalty is generally reduced by increasing the salt concentration. In this article, we present equilibrium-melting curves obtained from dedicated physicochemical experiments on DNA microarrays in order to get a better understanding of the electrostatic penalty incurred during the hybridization reaction at the surface. Various salt concentrations have been considered and deviations from the commonly used Langmuir adsorption model are experimentally quantified for the first time in agreement with theoretical predictions. PMID:20858434

  2. Real-time RT-PCR high-resolution melting curve analysis and multiplex RT-PCR to detect and differentiate grapevine leafroll-associated virus 3 variant groups I, II, III and VI

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 3 (GLRaV-3) is the main contributing agent of leafroll disease worldwide. Four of the six GLRaV-3 variant groups known have been found in South Africa, but their individual contribution to leafroll disease is unknown. In order to study the pathogenesis of leafroll disease, a sensitive and accurate diagnostic assay is required that can detect different variant groups of GLRaV-3. Methods In this study, a one-step real-time RT-PCR, followed by high-resolution melting (HRM) curve analysis for the simultaneous detection and identification of GLRaV-3 variants of groups I, II, III and VI, was developed. A melting point confidence interval for each variant group was calculated to include at least 90% of all melting points observed. A multiplex RT-PCR protocol was developed to these four variant groups in order to assess the efficacy of the real-time RT-PCR HRM assay. Results A universal primer set for GLRaV-3 targeting the heat shock protein 70 homologue (Hsp70h) gene of GLRaV-3 was designed that is able to detect GLRaV-3 variant groups I, II, III and VI and differentiate between them with high-resolution melting curve analysis. The real-time RT-PCR HRM and the multiplex RT-PCR were optimized using 121 GLRaV-3 positive samples. Due to a considerable variation in melting profile observed within each GLRaV-3 group, a confidence interval of above 90% was calculated for each variant group, based on the range and distribution of melting points. The intervals of groups I and II could not be distinguished and a 95% joint confidence interval was calculated for simultaneous detection of group I and II variants. An additional primer pair targeting GLRaV-3 ORF1a was developed that can be used in a subsequent real-time RT-PCR HRM to differentiate between variants of groups I and II. Additionally, the multiplex RT-PCR successfully validated 94.64% of the infections detected with the real-time RT-PCR HRM. Conclusion The real-time RT-PCR HRM

  3. Calculating Freshwater Input from Iceberg Melt in Greenlandic Fjords by Combining In Situ Observations of Iceberg Movement with High Resolution Satellite Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulak, D. J.; Sutherland, D.; Stearns, L. A.; Hamilton, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding fjord circulation in Greenland's outlet glacial fjords is crucial to explaining recent temporal and spatial variability in glacier dynamics, as well as freshwater transport on the continental shelf. The fjords are commonly assumed to exhibit a plume driven circulation that draws in warmer and saltier Atlantic-origin water toward the glacier at depth. Freshwater input at glacier termini directly drives this circulation and significantly influences water column stratification, which indirectly feeds back on the plume driven circulation. Previous work has focused on freshwater inputs from surface runoff and submarine melting, but the contribution from iceberg melt, a potentially important freshwater source, has not been quantified. Here, we develop a new technique combining in situ observations of movement from iceberg-mounted GPS units with multispectral satellite imagery from Landsat 8. The combination of datasets allows us to examine the details of iceberg movement and quantify mean residence times in a given fjord. We then use common melt rate parameterizations to estimate freshwater input for a given iceberg, utilizing novel satellite-derived iceberg distributions to scale up to a fjord-wide freshwater contribution. We apply this technique to Rink Isbræ and Kangerlussuup Sermia in west Greenland, and Helheim Glacier in southeast Greenland. The analysis can be rapidly expanded to look at other systems as well as seasonal and interannual changes in how icebergs affect the circulation and stratification of Greenland's outlet glacial fjords. Ultimately, this work will lead to a more complete understanding of the wide range of factors that control the observed regional variability in Greenland's glaciers.

  4. Quantitative determination of DNA adducts using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/high-resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Siethoff, C; Feldmann, I; Jakubowski, N; Linscheid, M

    1999-04-01

    The quantitative determination of nucleotides from DNA modified by styrene oxide is described using a combination of inductively coupled plasma high-resolution mass spectrometry (ICP-HRMS) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), both interfaced to reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). LC/ICP-MS (resolution > 1500 to discriminate against 15N16O+ and 14N16OH+) was employed to determine quantitatively the content of modified nucleotides in standard solutions based on the signal of phosphorus; phosphoric acid served as an internal standard. By means of the standard addition technique the sensitivity of the LC/ESI-MS approach was subsequently determined. Since a comparison of UV, ICP and ESI-MS data suggested that in ESI-MS the ionization efficiency of the adducts is identical within the error limits, quantitative determination of all adducts is possible. For LC/ESI-MS with single ion monitoring, the detection limit for styrene oxide adducts of nucleotides was determined to be 20 pg absolute or 14 modified in 10(8) unmodified nucleotides in a 5 micrograms DNA sample, which comes close to the best methods available for the detection of chemical modifications in DNA. PMID:10226366

  5. The trans-Saharan slave trade - clues from interpolation analyses and high-resolution characterization of mitochondrial DNA lineages

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A proportion of 1/4 to 1/2 of North African female pool is made of typical sub-Saharan lineages, in higher frequencies as geographic proximity to sub-Saharan Africa increases. The Sahara was a strong geographical barrier against gene flow, at least since 5,000 years ago, when desertification affected a larger region, but the Arab trans-Saharan slave trade could have facilitate enormously this migration of lineages. Till now, the genetic consequences of these forced trans-Saharan movements of people have not been ascertained. Results The distribution of the main L haplogroups in North Africa clearly reflects the known trans-Saharan slave routes: West is dominated by L1b, L2b, L2c, L2d, L3b and L3d; the Center by L3e and some L3f and L3w; the East by L0a, L3h, L3i, L3x and, in common with the Center, L3f and L3w; while, L2a is almost everywhere. Ages for the haplogroups observed in both sides of the Saharan desert testify the recent origin (holocenic) of these haplogroups in sub-Saharan Africa, claiming a recent introduction in North Africa, further strengthened by the no detection of local expansions. Conclusions The interpolation analyses and complete sequencing of present mtDNA sub-Saharan lineages observed in North Africa support the genetic impact of recent trans-Saharan migrations, namely the slave trade initiated by the Arab conquest of North Africa in the seventh century. Sub-Saharan people did not leave traces in the North African maternal gene pool for the time of its settlement, some 40,000 years ago. PMID:20459715

  6. Vitis vinifera L. Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism Detection with High-Resolution Melting Analysis Based on the UDP-Glucose:Flavonoid 3-O-Glucosyltransferase Gene.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Leonor; Martins-Lopes, Paula

    2015-10-21

    Vitis vinifera L. is a species with a large number of varieties, which differ in terms of anthocyanin content. The genes involved in the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway have a direct effect in the anthocyanin profile of each variety, being potentially interesting for varietal identification. The current study aimed at the design of an assay suitable for the discrimination of the largest number of grapevine varieties. Two genes of the anthocyanin pathway, chalcone isomerase (CHI) and UDP-glucose:flavonoid 3-O-glucosyltransferase (UFGT), were sequenced in 22 grapevine varieties. The CHI gene presented 5 SNPs within the sequence. A total of 58 SNPs and 1 INDEL were found among the UFGT gene, allowing the discrimination of 18 different genotypes within the 22 grapevine varieties. A HRM assay designed for UFGT, containing 704 bp, produced differentiated melting curves for each of the 18 haplotypes. The developed HRM assay is efficient in grapevine varietal discrimination. PMID:26422991

  7. Entropy-driven denaturation and bubble nucleation in DNA melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singha Roy, Subhamoy; Bandyopadhyay, Pratul

    2015-02-01

    The conformational properties of a DNA molecule when mapped onto a Heisenberg spin system denaturation transition can be formulated in terms of quantum phase transition induced by a quench where the temperature effect is incorporated in the quench time. Here torsion takes on the role of the external field. The denaturation transition occurs when the entanglement entropy of the spin system vanishes. As the critical region corresponds to a two-limit behaviour the entanglement entropy gradually decreases with the gradual increase in the fraction of open base pairs and when the entropy vanishes the two strands are separated. The sequence heterogeneity interplays with the entropy effects and we have the onset of denaturation bubbles. We have studied the melting profiles for different sequence-specific DNA molecules and the results are found to be in excellent agreement with experiment.

  8. The effect of local melting of DNA on DNA loop formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jiyoun; Kim, Harold

    Statistical mechanics of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) is well described by the wormlike chain model (WLC) which assumes a harmonic bending potential. Such smooth bending potential may no longer be valid for large bending angles to form small loops (<100 bp). Instead, DNA may rely on rare structural transitions such as local melting (opening) of base pairs to lower the energetic cost. In theory, open base pairs called bubbles can increase the looping probability of short DNA molecules by a few orders of magnitude, but a robust experimental validation of this theoretical prediction is lacking. Here, we investigated the correlation between local melting probability and looping dynamics of dsDNA using single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). We designed two groups of short DNA molecules with low and high melting probabilities around their center and measured their looping and unlooping rates in equilibrium. Our data allow rigorous tests of meltable wormlike chain (MWLC) models at short length scales for setting ranges of acceptable free energy cost of bubble formation and flexibility values of a bubble.

  9. High-resolution echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathan, R.

    1979-01-01

    High resolution computer aided ultrasound system provides two-and three-dimensional images of beating heart from many angles. System provides means for determining whether small blood vessels around the heart are blocked or if heart wall is moving normally without interference of dead and noncontracting muscle tissue.

  10. High-resolution headlamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gut, Carsten; Cristea, Iulia; Neumann, Cornelius

    2016-04-01

    The following article shall describe how human vision by night can be influenced. At first, front lighting systems that are already available on the market will be described, followed by their analysis with respect to the positive effects on traffic safety. Furthermore, how traffic safety by night can be increased since the introduction of high resolution headlamps shall be discussed.

  11. High resolution melting analysis (HRM) as a new tool for the identification of species belonging to the Lactobacillus casei group and comparison with species-specific PCRs and multiplex PCR.

    PubMed

    Iacumin, Lucilla; Ginaldi, Federica; Manzano, Marisa; Anastasi, Veronica; Reale, Anna; Zotta, Teresa; Rossi, Franca; Coppola, Raffaele; Comi, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    The correct identification and characterisation of bacteria is essential for several reasons: the classification of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) has changed significantly over the years, and it is important to distinguish and define them correctly, according to the current nomenclature, avoiding problems in the interpretation of literature, as well as mislabelling when probiotic are used in food products. In this study, species-specific PCR and HRM (high-resolution melting) analysis were developed to identify strains belonging to the Lactobacillus casei group and to classify them into L. casei, Lactobacillus paracasei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus. HRM analysis confirmed to be a potent, simple, fast and economic tool for microbial identification. In particular, 201 strains, collected from International collections and attributed to the L. casei group, were examined using these techniques and the results were compared with consolidated molecular methods, already published. Seven of the tested strains don't belong to the L. casei group. Among the remaining 194 strains, 6 showed inconsistent results, leaving identification undetermined. All the applied techniques were congruent for the identification of the vast majority of the tested strains (188). Notably, for 46 of the strains, the identification differed from the previous attribution. PMID:25475306

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Outbreak Linked to Mineral Water Bottles in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: Fast Typing by Use of High-Resolution Melting Analysis of a Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Locus▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Naze, F.; Jouen, E.; Randriamahazo, R. T.; Simac, C.; Laurent, P.; Blériot, A.; Chiroleu, F.; Gagnevin, L.; Pruvost, O.; Michault, A.

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes nosocomial infections in intensive care units. Determining a system of typing that is discriminatory is essential for epidemiological surveillance of P. aeruginosa. We developed a method for the typing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, namely, multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) typing with high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA). The technology was used to genotype a collection of 43 environmental and clinical strains isolated during an outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) that we report. Nineteen strains isolated in other departments or outside the hospital were also tested. The genetic diversity of this collection was determined using VNTR-HRMA, with amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis as a reference. Twenty-five and 28 genotypes were identified, respectively, and both techniques produced congruent data. VNTR-HRMA established clonal relationships between the strains of P. aeruginosa isolated during the outbreak in the NICU and proved, for the first time, the role of mineral water as the inoculum source. VNTR typing with one primer pair in association with HRMA is highly reproducible and discriminative, easily portable among laboratories, fast, and inexpensive, and it demonstrated excellent typeability in this study. VNTR-HRMA represents a promising tool for the molecular surveillance of P. aeruginosa and perhaps for molecular epidemiologic analysis of other hospital infections. PMID:20573865

  13. MECP2 mutations in Czech patients with Rett syndrome and Rett-like phenotypes: novel mutations, genotype-phenotype correlations and validation of high-resolution melting analysis for mutation scanning.

    PubMed

    Zahorakova, Daniela; Lelkova, Petra; Gregor, Vladimir; Magner, Martin; Zeman, Jiri; Martasek, Pavel

    2016-07-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by developmental regression with loss of motor, communication and social skills, onset of stereotypic hand movements and often seizures. RTT is primarily caused by de novo mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 gene (MECP2). We established a high-resolution melting (HRM) technique for mutation scanning of the MECP2 gene and performed analyses in Czech patients with RTT, autism spectrum conditions and intellectual disability with Rett-like features. In the cases with confirmed MECP2 mutations, we determined X-chromosome inactivation (XCI), examined the relationships between genotype and clinical severity and evaluated the modifying influence of XCI. Our results demonstrate that HRM analysis is a reliable method for the detection of point mutations, small deletions and duplications in the MECP2 gene. We identified 29 pathogenic mutations in 75 girls, including four novel mutations: c.155_1189del1035;909_932inv;insC, c.573delC, c.857_858dupAA and c.1163_1200del38. Skewed XCI (ratio >75%) was found in 19.3% of the girls, but no gross divergence in clinical severity was observed. Our findings confirm a high mutation frequency in classic RTT (92%) and a correlation between the MECP2 mutation type and clinical severity. We also demonstrate limitations of XCI in explaining all of the phenotypic differences in RTT. PMID:26984561

  14. Detection of EGFR mutation in supernatant, cell pellets of pleural effusion and tumor tissues from non-small cell lung cancer patients by high resolution melting analysis and sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jie; Gu, Ye; Du, Rui; Deng, Min; Lu, Yaodan; Ding, Yanqing

    2014-01-01

    To determine epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and compare the detection efficiency between different sample resources, both high resolution melting (HRM) analysis and direct sequencing method were used to analyze 36 pleural effusion samples and 22 matched biopsy tumor tissues collected from NSCLC patients. For each pleural effusion sample, the supernatant and the cell pellets were examined separately. Among all the 36 cases of pleural effusion samples, 18 mutations of EGFR were found in cell-free supernatant while 13 mutations were found in the cell pellets as detected by HRM analysis. In the 22 matched samples, 13 cases of EGFR mutations were identified in paraffin-embedded biopsy tissue samples, 12 cases in the cell-free supernatant and 9 cases in the cell pellets of pleural effusion. EGFR mutations in 15 cases out of the total 36 pleural effusion samples detected by direct sequencing were also identified by HRM analysis, giving 100% efficiency for HRM method. The results established the important role of HRM as a reliable and efficient method to determine EGFR mutation status and indicated the feasibility of using pleural effusion in replacement of biopsy tissues in particular clinical cases. Furthermore, the cell-free supernatant of pleural effusion might be a better resource for mutation detection than cell pellets. PMID:25674250

  15. Comparative melting and healing of B-DNA and Z-DNA by an infrared laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Viet Hoang; Pan, Feng; Sagui, Celeste; Roland, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    We explore the use of a fast laser melting simulation approach combined with atomistic molecular dynamics simulations in order to determine the melting and healing responses of B-DNA and Z-DNA dodecamers with the same d(5'-CGCGCGCGCGCG-3')2 sequence. The frequency of the laser pulse is specifically tuned to disrupt Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds, thus inducing melting of the DNA duplexes. Subsequently, the structures relax and partially refold, depending on the field strength. In addition to the inherent interest of the nonequilibrium melting process, we propose that fast melting by an infrared laser pulse could be used as a technique for a fast comparison of relative stabilities of same-sequence oligonucleotides with different secondary structures with full atomistic detail of the structures and solvent. This could be particularly useful for nonstandard secondary structures involving non-canonical base pairs, mismatches, etc.

  16. High resolution data acquisition

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, Glenn W.; Fuller, Kenneth R.

    1993-01-01

    A high resolution event interval timing system measures short time intervals such as occur in high energy physics or laser ranging. Timing is provided from a clock (38) pulse train (37) and analog circuitry (44) for generating a triangular wave (46) synchronously with the pulse train (37). The triangular wave (46) has an amplitude and slope functionally related to the time elapsed during each clock pulse in the train. A converter (18, 32) forms a first digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the start of the event interval and a second digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the end of the event interval. A counter (26) counts the clock pulse train (37) during the interval to form a gross event interval time. A computer (52) then combines the gross event interval time and the first and second digital values to output a high resolution value for the event interval.

  17. High resolution data acquisition

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, G.W.; Fuller, K.R.

    1993-04-06

    A high resolution event interval timing system measures short time intervals such as occur in high energy physics or laser ranging. Timing is provided from a clock, pulse train, and analog circuitry for generating a triangular wave synchronously with the pulse train (as seen in diagram on patent). The triangular wave has an amplitude and slope functionally related to the time elapsed during each clock pulse in the train. A converter forms a first digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the start of the event interval and a second digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the end of the event interval. A counter counts the clock pulse train during the interval to form a gross event interval time. A computer then combines the gross event interval time and the first and second digital values to output a high resolution value for the event interval.

  18. Ultra high resolution tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, W.S.

    1994-11-15

    Recent work and results on ultra high resolution three dimensional imaging with soft x-rays will be presented. This work is aimed at determining microscopic three dimensional structure of biological and material specimens. Three dimensional reconstructed images of a microscopic test object will be presented; the reconstruction has a resolution on the order of 1000 A in all three dimensions. Preliminary work with biological samples will also be shown, and the experimental and numerical methods used will be discussed.

  19. High-Resolution Autoradiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Towe, George C; Gomberg, Henry J; Freemen, J W

    1955-01-01

    This investigation was made to adapt wet-process autoradiography to metallurgical samples to obtain high resolution of segregated radioactive elements in microstructures. Results are confined to development of the technique, which was perfected to a resolution of less than 10 microns. The radioactive samples included carbon-14 carburized iron and steel, nickel-63 electroplated samples, a powder product containing nickel-63, and tungsten-185 in N-155 alloy.

  20. High-resolution analysis of 16q22.1 in breast carcinoma using DNA amplifiable probes (multiplex amplifiable probe hybridization technique) and immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Rakha, Emad A; Armour, John A L; Pinder, Sarah E; Paish, Claire E; Ellis, Ian O

    2005-05-01

    Loss of the chromosomal material at 16q22.1 is one of the most frequent genetic aberrations found in both lobular and low-grade nonlobular invasive carcinoma of the breast, indicating the presence of a tumour suppressor gene (TSG) at this region in these tumours. However, the TSG (s) at the 16q22.1 in the more frequent nonlobular carcinomas is still unknown. Multiplex Amplifiable Probe Hybridisation (MAPH) is a simple, accurate and a high-resolution technique that provides an alternative approach to DNA copy-number measurement. The aim of our study was to examine the most likely candidate genes at 16q22.1 using MAPH assay combined with protein expression analysis by immunohistochemistry. We identified deletion at 16q22.1 that involves some or all of these genes. We also noticed that the smallest region of deletion at 16q22.1 could be delineated to a 3 Mb region centromeric to the P-cadherin gene. Apart from the correlation between E-cadherin protein expression and its gene copy number, no correlation was detected between the expression of E2F-4, CTCF, TRF2 or P-cadherin with their gene's copy number. In the malignant tissues, no significant loss or decrease of protein expression of any gene other than E-cadherin was seen in association with any specific tumour type. No expression of VE-cadherin or Ksp-cadherin was detected in the normal and/or malignant tissues of the breast in these cases. However, there was a correlation between increased nuclear expression of E2F-4 and tumours with higher histological grade (p = 0.04) and positive lymph node disease (p = 0.02), suggesting that it may have an oncogenic rather than a tumour suppressor role. The malignant breast tissues also showed abnormal cytoplasmic cellular localisation of CTCF, compared to its expression in the normal parenchymal cells. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that MAPH is a potential technique for assessment of genomic imbalances in malignant tissues. Although our results support E-cadherin as the

  1. The energetics of tightly bent DNA: a composite elastica model including local melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Arthur; Levine, Alex

    2012-02-01

    Melting transitions are well-known to be affected by the application of mechanical stress. Motivated by the experiments of Zocchi and collaborators (Qu and Zocchi 2011, EPL 94 18003), we explore the effect of the application of mechanical stress on DNA melting in a particular composite of a stiff double stranded piece of DNA (dsDNA), shorter than its own persistence length, whose ends are linked by a flexible single stranded piece of DNA (ssDNA). The flexible ssDNA acts as a Gaussian polymer coil bending the stiff dsDNA through an elastic force that is controllable by the length of the ssDNA chain. In this talk we present theoretical predictions for two experimentally accessible features: the degree of local dsDNA melting and the local elastic energy of the dsDNA/ssDNA construct both as a function of the length of the attached ssDNA. We also address the effect of introducing a nick (broken covalent bond) in the dsDNA backbone on these results and discuss the implications of such data on the relative importance of backbone elasticity versus base stacking and base pairing interactions in determining the elasticity of dsDNA. This work also addresses open questions in the nonlinear elasticity of DNA in tightly bent curves.

  2. High-resolution solid-state NMR study of the effect of composition on network connectivity and structural disorder in multi-component glasses in the diopside and jadeite join: Implications for structure of andesitic melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sun Young; Lee, Sung Keun

    2014-12-01

    The structural evolution of andesitic melts with varying compositions remains one of the unsolved questions in high-temperature geochemistry and petrology. In this article, we report the structural details of model andesitic glasses [CaO-MgO-Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2 (CMNAS)] in the diopside (CaMgSi2O6) and jadeite (NaAlSi2O6) join using high-resolution, multi-nuclear, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The 27Al NMR spectra of CMNAS glasses confirm that [4]Al is dominant. While a minor fraction of [5]Al is observed, its presence is only prevalent in the glasses with higher Ca-Mg content. Topological disorder in the glass network also tends to increase with Ca-Mg content as evidenced by the increase in the quadrupolar coupling constant (Cq) of [4]Al for glasses with increasing diopside contents (XDiopside). Despite the complex nature of the glasses studied here (with five oxide components), the 17O 3QMAS NMR spectra resolve diverse bridging oxygens (BOs) and non-bridging oxygens (NBOs), from which the degree of Al avoidance among framework cations (Si and Al) and preferential proximity among non-network cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, and Na+) and each oxygen site can be estimated: presence of Al-O-Al in jadeite glass implies a violation of the Al-avoidance rule in the glasses and the decrease in the fraction of NBOs with increasing XDiopside is consistent with a decrease in their viscosity. Analysis of the peak position of {Ca, Mg}-mixed NBOs, along with the absence of Na-NBO peak, and the peak shape of Si-O-Al reveals preferential partitioning of Ca2+ and Mg2 into NBOs and the proximity of Na+ to BOs. The fraction of highly coordinated Al has been linked to thermodynamic and transport properties of the melts. Considering all the experimental Al coordination environments available in the literature, together with the current experimental studies, we attempt to establish the relationship between the fractions of highly coordinated Al and composition, particularly average

  3. Detection of BRAF Mutations Using a Fully Automated Platform and Comparison with High Resolution Melting, Real-Time Allele Specific Amplification, Immunohistochemistry and Next Generation Sequencing Assays, for Patients with Metastatic Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Harlé, Alexandre; Salleron, Julia; Franczak, Claire; Dubois, Cindy; Filhine-Tressarieu, Pierre; Leroux, Agnès; Merlin, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-01

    Background Metastatic melanoma is a severe disease with one of the highest mortality rate in skin diseases. Overall survival has significantly improved with immunotherapy and targeted therapies. Kinase inhibitors targeting BRAF V600 showed promising results. BRAF genotyping is mandatory for the prescription of anti-BRAF therapies. Methods Fifty-nine formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded melanoma samples were assessed using High-Resolution-Melting (HRM) PCR, Real-time allele-specific amplification (RT-ASA) PCR, Next generation sequencing (NGS), immunohistochemistry (IHC) and the fully-automated molecular diagnostics platform IdyllaTM. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were calculated using NGS as the reference standard to compare the different assays. Results BRAF mutations were found in 28(47.5%), 29(49.2%), 31(52.5%), 29(49.2%) and 27(45.8%) samples with HRM, RT-ASA, NGS, IdyllaTM and IHC respectively. Twenty-six (81.2%) samples were found bearing a c.1799T>A (p.Val600Glu) mutation, three (9.4%) with a c.1798_1799delinsAA (p.Val600Lys) mutation and one with c.1789_1790delinsTC (p.Leu597Ser) mutation. Two samples were found bearing complex mutations. Conclusions HRM appears the less sensitive assay for the detection of BRAF V600 mutations. The RT-ASA, IdyllaTM and IHC assays are suitable for routine molecular diagnostics aiming at the prescription of anti-BRAF therapies. IdyllaTM assay is fully-automated and requires less than 2 minutes for samples preparation and is the fastest of the tested assays. PMID:27111917

  4. High-Resolution Melting Is a Sensitive, Cost-Effective, Time-Saving Technique for BRAF V600E Detection in Thyroid FNAB Washing Liquid: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Marco; Monzani, Maria Laura; Brigante, Giulia; Cioni, Katia; Madeo, Bruno; Santi, Daniele; Maiorana, Antonino; Bettelli, Stefania; Moriondo, Valeria; Pignatti, Elisa; Bonacini, Lara; Carani, Cesare; Rochira, Vincenzo; Simoni, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Objective The diagnostic accuracy of thyroid fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) can be improved by the combination of cytological and molecular analysis. In this study, washing liquids of FNAB (wFNAB) were tested for the BRAF V600E mutation, using the sensitive and cost-effective technique called high-resolution melting (HRM). The aim was to demonstrate the feasibility of BRAF analysis in wFNAB and its diagnostic utility, combined with cytology. Design Prospective cohort study. Methods 481 patients, corresponding to 648 FNAB samples, were subjected to both cytological (on cells smeared onto a glass slide) and molecular analysis (on fluids obtained washing the FNAB needle with 1 ml of saline) of the same aspiration. BRAF V600E analysis was performed by HRM after methodological validation for application to wFNAB (technique sensitivity: 5.4%). Results The cytological results of the FNAB were: 136 (21%) nondiagnostic (THY1); 415 (64%) benign (THY2); 80 (12.4%) indeterminate (THY3); 9 (1.4%) suspicious for malignancy (THY4); 8 (1.2%) diagnostic of malignancy (THY5). The BRAF V600E mutation was found in 5 THY2, 2 THY3, 6 THY4 and 6 THY5 samples. Papillary carcinoma diagnosis was histologically confirmed in all BRAF+ thyroidectomized patients. BRAF combined with cytology improved the diagnostic value compared to cytology alone in a subgroup of 74 operated patients. Conclusions HRM was demonstrated to be a feasible method for BRAF analysis in wFNAB. Thanks to its sensitivity and cost-effectiveness, it might be routinely used on a large scale in clinical practice. In perspective, standby wFNAB samples could be analyzed a posteriori in case of indeterminate cytology and/or suspicious findings on ultrasound. PMID:26279992

  5. High-resolution melting-curve analysis of obg gene to differentiate the temperature-sensitive Mycoplasma synoviae vaccine strain MS-H from non-temperature-sensitive strains.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Muhammad A; Markham, Philip F; Marenda, Marc S; Agnew-Crumpton, Rebecca; Noormohammadi, Amir H

    2014-01-01

    Temperature-sensitive (ts+) vaccine strain MS-H is the only live attenuated M. synoviae vaccine commercially available for use in poultry. With increasing use of this vaccine to control M. synoviae infections, differentiation of MS-H from field M. synoviae strains and from rarely occurring non-temperature-sensitive (ts-) MS-H revertants has become important, especially in countries where local strains are indistinguishable from MS-H by sequence analysis of variable lipoprotein haemagglutinin (vlhA) gene. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the obg of MS-H have been found to associate with ts phenotype. In this study, four PCRs followed by high-resolution melting (HRM)-curve analysis of the regions encompassing these SNPs were developed and evaluated for their potential to differentiate MS-H from 36 M. synoviae strains/isolates. The nested-obg PCR-HRM differentiated ts+ MS-H vaccine not only from field M. synoviae strains/isolates but also from ts- MS-H revertants. The mean genotype confidence percentages, 96.9±3.4 and 8.8±11.2 for ts+ and ts- strains, respectively, demonstrated high differentiating power of the nested-obg PCR-HRM. Using a combination of nested-obg and obg-F3R3 PCR-HRM, 97% of the isolates/strains were typed according to their ts phenotype with all MS-H isolates typed as MS-H. A set of respiratory swabs from MS-H vaccinated specific pathogen free chickens and M. synoviae infected commercial chicken flocks were tested using obg PCR-HRM system and results were consistent with those of vlhA genotyping. The PCR-HRM system developed in this study, proved to be a rapid and reliable tool using pure M. synoviae cultures as well as direct clinical specimens. PMID:24643035

  6. Comparison of multiple genes and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic space region for their capacity in high resolution melt curve analysis to differentiate Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine strain ts-11 from field strains.

    PubMed

    Ghorashi, Seyed A; Bradbury, Janet M; Ferguson-Noel, Naola M; Noormohammadi, Amir H

    2013-12-27

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is an important avian pathogen causing significant economic losses in the global poultry industry. In an attempt to compare and evaluate existing genotyping methods for differentiation of MG strains/isolates, high resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis was applied to 5 different PCR methods targeting vlhA, pvpA, gapA, mgc2 genes and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic space region (IGSR). To assess the discriminatory power of PCR-HRM of examined genes and IGSR, MG strains ts-11, F, 6/85 and S6, and, initially, 8 field isolates were tested. All MG strains/isolates were differentiated using PCR-HRM curve analysis and genotype confidence percentage (GCP) values of vlhA and pvpA genes, while only 0, 3 and 4 out of 12 MG strains/isolates were differentiated using gapA, mgc2 genes and IGSR, respectively. The HRM curve analysis of vlhA and pvpA genes was found to be highly correlated with the genetic diversity of the targeted genes confirmed by sequence analysis of amplicons generated from MG strains. The potential of the vlhA and pvpA genes was also demonstrated for genotyping of 12 additional MG strains from Europe and the USA. Results from this study provide a direct comparison between genes previously used in sequencing-based genotyping methods for MG strain identification and highlight the usefulness of vlhA and pvpA HRM curve analyses as rapid and reliable tools specially for diagnosis and differentiation of MG strains used here. PMID:24238667

  7. High resolution infrared measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, B.; Cawley, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Sample ground based cloud radiance data from a high resolution infrared sensor are shown and the sensor characteristics are presented in detail. The purpose of the Infrared Analysis Measurement and Modeling Program (IRAMMP) is to establish a deterministic radiometric data base of cloud, sea, and littoral terrain clutter to be used to advance the design and development of Infrared Search and Track (IRST) systems as well as other infrared devices. The sensor is a dual band radiometric sensor and its description, together with that of the Data Acquisition System (DAS), are given. A schematic diagram of the sensor optics is shown.

  8. How nanochannel confinement affects the DNA melting transition within the Poland-Scheraga model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter-Schad, Michaela; Werner, Erik; Tegenfeldt, Jonas O.; Mehlig, Bernhard; Ambjörnsson, Tobias

    2015-09-01

    When double-stranded DNA molecules are heated, or exposed to denaturing agents, the two strands are separated. The statistical physics of this process has a long history and is commonly described in terms of the Poland-Scheraga (PS) model. Crucial to this model is the configurational entropy for a melted region (compared to the entropy of an intact region of the same size), quantified by the loop factor. In this study, we investigate how confinement affects the DNA melting transition, by using the loop factor for an ideal Gaussian chain. By subsequent numerical solutions of the PS model, we demonstrate that the melting temperature depends on the persistence lengths of single-stranded and double-stranded DNA. For realistic values of the persistence lengths, the melting temperature is predicted to decrease with decreasing channel diameter. We also demonstrate that confinement broadens the melting transition. These general findings hold for the three scenarios investigated: 1. homo-DNA, i.e., identical basepairs along the DNA molecule, 2. random sequence DNA, and 3. "real" DNA, here T4 phage DNA. We show that cases 2 and 3 in general give rise to broader transitions than case 1. Case 3 exhibits a similar phase transition as case 2 provided the random sequence DNA has the same ratio of AT to GC basepairs (A - adenine, T - thymine, G - guanine, C - cytosine). A simple analytical estimate for the shift in melting temperature is provided as a function of nanochannel diameter. For homo-DNA, we also present an analytical prediction of the melting probability as a function of temperature.

  9. High resolution Doppler lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abreu, Vincent J.; Hays, Paul B.; Barnes, John E.

    1989-01-01

    A high resolution lidar system was implemented to measure winds in the lower atmosphere. The wind speed along the line of sight was determined by measuring the Doppler shift of the aerosol backscattered laser signal. The system in its present configuration is stable, and behaves as indicated by theoretical simulations. This system was built to demonstrate the capabilities of the detector system as a prototype for a spaceborne lidar. The detector system investigated consisted of a plane Fabry-Perot etalon, and a 12-ring anode detector. This system is generically similar to the Fabry-Perot interferometer developed for passive wind measurements on board the Dynamics Explorer satellite. That this detector system performs well in a lidar configuration was demonstrated.

  10. Very high resolution radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aronson, A. I.

    1974-01-01

    A primary sensor used in environmental and earth-resource observation, the Very High Resolution Radiometer (VHRR) was designed for use on the ITOS D series spacecraft. The VHRR provides a 0.47 mile resolution made possible with a mercury-cadmium-telluride detector cooled to approximately 105 K by a passive radiator cooler. The components of this system are described. The optical subsystem of the VHRR consists of a scanning mirror, a Dall-Kirkham telescope, a dichroic beam splitter, relay lenses, spectral filters, and an IR detector. Signal electronics amplify and condition the signals from the infrared and visible light detector. Sync generator electronics provides the necessary time signals. Scan-drive electronics is used for commutation of the motor winding, velocity, and phase control. A table lists the performance parameters of the VHRR.

  11. High resolution ultrasonic densitometer

    SciTech Connect

    Dress, W.B.

    1983-01-01

    The velocity of torsional stress pulses in an ultrasonic waveguide of non-circular cross section is affected by the temperature and density of the surrounding medium. Measurement of the transit times of acoustic echoes from the ends of a sensor section are interpreted as level, density, and temperature of the fluid environment surrounding that section. This paper examines methods of making these measurements to obtain high resolution, temperature-corrected absolute and relative density and level determinations of the fluid. Possible applications include on-line process monitoring, a hand-held density probe for battery charge state indication, and precise inventory control for such diverse fluids as uranium salt solutions in accountability storage and gasoline in service station storage tanks.

  12. Criterion for DNA melting in the mean-field modified self-consistent phonon theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y.; Prohofsky, E. W.

    1991-04-01

    We have examined the validity of the first-order-perturbation method in calculating eigenfunctions and the criterion for helix melting of mean-field polymers in the modified self-consistent phonon approach (MSPA) theory. It is found that the instability in the self-consistent solution is due to the breakdown of the first-order perturbation. The instability as a criterion for helix melting is therefore techniquely inappropriate. However, the breakdown of the perturbation is due to facts that are directly related to the onset of softening. Previously predicted melting temperatures for various sequence DNA polymers may still represent good estimates to the actual melting temperatures. An alternative criterion is required to define the melting temperature of the polymer DNA double helix in the MSPA theory.

  13. Use of DNA melting simulation software for in silico diagnostic assay design: targeting regions with complex melting curves and confirmation by real-time PCR using intercalating dyes

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, John P; Saint, Christopher P; Monis, Paul T

    2007-01-01

    Background DNA melting curve analysis using double-stranded DNA-specific dyes such as SYTO9 produce complex and reproducible melting profiles, resulting in the detection of multiple melting peaks from a single amplicon and allowing the discrimination of different species. We compare the melting curves of several Naegleria and Cryptosporidium amplicons generated in vitro with in silico DNA melting simulations using the programs POLAND and MELTSIM., then test the utility of these programs for assay design using a genetic marker for toxin production in cyanobacteria. Results The SYTO9 melting curve profiles of three species of Naegleria and two species of Cryptosporidium were similar to POLAND and MELTSIM melting simulations, excepting some differences in the relative peak heights and the absolute melting temperatures of these peaks. MELTSIM and POLAND were used to screen sequences from a putative toxin gene in two different species of cyanobacteria and identify regions exhibiting diagnostic melting profiles. For one of these diagnostic regions the POLAND and MELTSIM melting simulations were observed to be different, with POLAND more accurately predicting the melting curve generated in vitro. Upon further investigation of this region with MELTSIM, inconsistencies between the melting simulation for forward and reverse complement sequences were observed. The assay was used to accurately type twenty seven cyanobacterial DNA extracts in vitro. Conclusion Whilst neither POLAND nor MELTSIM simulation programs were capable of exactly predicting DNA dissociation in the presence of an intercalating dye, the programs were successfully used as tools to identify regions where melting curve differences could be exploited for diagnostic melting curve assay design. Refinements in the simulation parameters would be required to account for the effect of the intercalating dye and salt concentrations used in real-time PCR. The agreement between the melting curve simulations for

  14. High Resolution Laboratory Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brünken, S.; Schlemmer, S.

    2016-05-01

    In this short review we will highlight some of the recent advancements in the field of high-resolution laboratory spectroscopy that meet the needs dictated by the advent of highly sensitive and broadband telescopes like ALMA and SOFIA. Among these is the development of broadband techniques for the study of complex organic molecules, like fast scanning conventional absorption spectroscopy based on multiplier chains, chirped pulse instrumentation, or the use of synchrotron facilities. Of similar importance is the extension of the accessible frequency range to THz frequencies, where many light hydrides have their ground state rotational transitions. Another key experimental challenge is the production of sufficiently high number densities of refractory and transient species in the laboratory, where discharges have proven to be efficient sources that can also be coupled to molecular jets. For ionic molecular species sensitive action spectroscopic schemes have recently been developed to overcome some of the limitations of conventional absorption spectroscopy. Throughout this review examples demonstrating the strong interplay between laboratory and observational studies will be given.

  15. High Resolution Doppler Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Paul B.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of the High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI) on UARS spacecraft during the period 4/l/96 - 3/31/99. During this period, HRDI operation, data processing, and data analysis continued, and there was a high level of vitality in the HRDI project. The HRDI has been collecting data from the stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower thermosphere since instrument activation on October 1, 1991. The HRDI team has stressed three areas since operations commenced: 1) operation of the instrument in a manner which maximizes the quality and versatility of the collected data; 2) algorithm development and validation to produce a high-quality data product; and 3) scientific studies, primarily of the dynamics of the middle atmosphere. There has been no significant degradation in the HRDI instrument since operations began nearly 8 years ago. HRDI operations are fairly routine, although we have continued to look for ways to improve the quality of the scientific product, either by improving existing modes, or by designing new ones. The HRDI instrument has been programmed to collect data for new scientific studies, such as measurements of fluorescence from plants, measuring cloud top heights, and lower atmosphere H2O.

  16. Revealing the competition between peeled ssDNA, melting bubbles, and S-DNA during DNA overstretching by single-molecule calorimetry

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinghua; Chen, Hu; Le, Shimin; Rouzina, Ioulia; Doyle, Patrick S.; Yan, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) unconstrained by torsion undergoes an overstretching transition at about 65 pN, elongating the DNA to about 1.7-fold. Three possible structural transitions have been debated for the nature of DNA overstretching: (i) “peeling” apart of dsDNA to produce a peeled ssDNA strand under tension while the other strand coils, (ii) “inside-strand separation” of dsDNA to two parallel ssDNA strands that share tension (melting bubbles), and (iii) “B-to-S” transition to a novel dsDNA, termed S-DNA. Here we overstretched an end-opened DNA (with one open end to allow peeling) and an end-closed (i.e., both ends of the linear DNA are covalently closed to prohibit peeling) and torsion-unconstrained DNA. We report that all three structural transitions exist depending on experimental conditions. For the end-opened DNA, the peeling transition and the B-to-S transition were observed; for the end-closed DNA, the inside-strand separation and the B-to-S transition were observed. The peeling transition and the inside-strand separation are hysteretic and have an entropy change of approximately 17 cal/(K⋅mol), whereas the B-to-S transition is nonhysteretic and has an entropy change of approximately −2 cal/(K⋅mol). The force-extension curves of peeled ssDNA, melting bubbles, and S-DNA were characterized by experiments. Our results provide experimental evidence for the formation of DNA melting bubbles driven by high tension and prove the existence of nonmelted S-DNA. Our findings afford a full understanding of three possible force-driven structural transitions of torsion-unconstrained DNA and the resulting three overstretched DNA structures. PMID:23431154

  17. Single molecule detection of PARP1 and PARP2 interaction with DNA strand breaks and their poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation using high-resolution AFM imaging.

    PubMed

    Sukhanova, Maria V; Abrakhi, Sanae; Joshi, Vandana; Pastre, David; Kutuzov, Mikhail M; Anarbaev, Rashid O; Curmi, Patrick A; Hamon, Loic; Lavrik, Olga I

    2016-04-01

    PARP1 and PARP2 are implicated in the synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) after detection of DNA damage. The specificity of PARP1 and PARP2 interaction with long DNA fragments containing single- and/or double-strand breaks (SSBs and DSBs) have been studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging in combination with biochemical approaches. Our data show that PARP1 localizes mainly on DNA breaks and exhibits a slight preference for nicks over DSBs, although the protein has a moderately high affinity for undamaged DNA. In contrast to PARP1, PARP2 is mainly detected at a single DNA nick site, exhibiting a low level of binding to undamaged DNA and DSBs. The enhancement of binding affinity of PARP2 for DNA containing a single nick was also observed using fluorescence titration. AFM studies reveal that activation of both PARPs leads to the synthesis of highly branched PAR whose size depends strongly on the presence of SSBs and DSBs for PARP1 and of SSBs for PARP2. The initial affinity between the PARP1, PARP2 and the DNA damaged site appears to influence both the size of the PAR synthesized and the time of residence of PARylated PARP1 and PARP2 on DNA damages. PMID:26673720

  18. Single molecule detection of PARP1 and PARP2 interaction with DNA strand breaks and their poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation using high-resolution AFM imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sukhanova, Maria V.; Abrakhi, Sanae; Joshi, Vandana; Pastre, David; Kutuzov, Mikhail M.; Anarbaev, Rashid O.; Curmi, Patrick A.; Hamon, Loic; Lavrik, Olga I.

    2016-01-01

    PARP1 and PARP2 are implicated in the synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) after detection of DNA damage. The specificity of PARP1 and PARP2 interaction with long DNA fragments containing single- and/or double-strand breaks (SSBs and DSBs) have been studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging in combination with biochemical approaches. Our data show that PARP1 localizes mainly on DNA breaks and exhibits a slight preference for nicks over DSBs, although the protein has a moderately high affinity for undamaged DNA. In contrast to PARP1, PARP2 is mainly detected at a single DNA nick site, exhibiting a low level of binding to undamaged DNA and DSBs. The enhancement of binding affinity of PARP2 for DNA containing a single nick was also observed using fluorescence titration. AFM studies reveal that activation of both PARPs leads to the synthesis of highly branched PAR whose size depends strongly on the presence of SSBs and DSBs for PARP1 and of SSBs for PARP2. The initial affinity between the PARP1, PARP2 and the DNA damaged site appears to influence both the size of the PAR synthesized and the time of residence of PARylated PARP1 and PARP2 on DNA damages. PMID:26673720

  19. High Resolution Formaldehyde Photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernest, C. T.; Bauer, D.; Hynes, A. J.

    2010-12-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is the most abundant and most important organic carbonyl compound in the atmosphere. The sources of formaldehyde are the oxidation of methane, isoprene, acetone, and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs); fossil fuel combustion; and biomass burning. The dominant loss mechanism for formaldehyde is photolysis which occurs via two pathways: (R1) HCHO + hv → HCO + H (R2) HCHO + hv → H2 + CO The first pathway (R1) is referred to as the radical channel, while the second pathway (R2) is referred to as the molecular channel. The products of both pathways play a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. The CO that is produced in the molecular channel undergoes further oxidation to produce CO2. Under atmospheric conditions, the H atom and formyl radical that are produced in the radical channel undergo rapid reactions with O2 to produce the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) via (R3) and (R4). (R3) HCO + O2 → HO2 + CO (R4) H + O2 → HO2 Thus, for every photon absorbed, the photolysis of formaldehyde can contribute one CO2 molecule to the global greenhouse budget or two HO2 radicals to the tropospheric HOx (OH + HO2) cycle. The HO2 radicals produced during formaldehyde photolysis have also been implicated in the formation of photochemical smog. The HO2 radicals act as radical chain carriers and convert NO to NO2, which ultimately results in the catalytic production of O3. Constraining the yield of HO2 produced via HCHO photolysis is essential for improving tropospheric chemistry models. In this study, both the absorption cross section and the quantum yield of the radical channel (R1) were measured at high resolution over the tropospherically relevant wavelength range 304-330 nm. For the cross section measurements a narrow linewidth Nd:YAG pumped dye laser was used with a multi-pass cell. Partial pressures of HCHO were kept below 0.3 torr. Simultaneous measurement of OH LIF in a flame allowed absolute calibration of the wavelength scale. Pressure

  20. The melting phenomenon in random-walk model of DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Hayrapetyan, G. N.; Mamasakhlisov, E. Sh.; Papoyan, Vl. V.; Poghosyan, S. S.

    2012-10-15

    The melting phenomenon in a double-stranded homopolypeptide is considered. The relative distance between the corresponding monomers of two polymer chains is modeled by the two-dimensional random walk on the square lattice. Returns of the random walk to the origin describe the formation of hydrogen bonds between complementary units. To take into account the two competing interactions of monomers inside the chains, we obtain a completely denatured state at finite temperature T{sub c}.

  1. Melting behavior and different bound states in three-stranded DNA models.

    PubMed

    Maji, Jaya; Bhattacharjee, Somendra M; Seno, Flavio; Trovato, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Thermal denaturation of DNA is often studied with coarse-grained models in which native sequential base pairing is mimicked by the existence of attractive interactions only between monomers at the same position along strands (Poland and Scheraga models). Within this framework, the existence of a three-stranded DNA bound state in conditions where a duplex DNA would be in the denaturated state was recently predicted from a study of three directed polymer models on simplified hierarchical lattices (d>2) and in 1+1 dimensions. Such a phenomenon which is similar to the Efimov effect in nuclear physics was named Efimov-DNA. In this paper we study the melting of the three-stranded DNA on a Sierpinski gasket of dimensions d<2 by assigning extra weight factors to fork openings and closings, to induce a two-strand DNA melting. In such a context we can find again the existence of the Efimov-DNA-like state but quite surprisingly we discover also the presence of a different phase, to be called a mixed state, where the strands are pair-wise bound but without three chain contacts. Whereas the Efimov DNA turns out to be a crossover near melting, the mixed phase is a thermodynamic phase. PMID:24580186

  2. High resolution time interval meter

    DOEpatents

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09

    Method and apparatus are provided for measuring the time interval between two events to a higher resolution than reliability available from conventional circuits and component. An internal clock pulse is provided at a frequency compatible with conventional component operating frequencies for reliable operation. Lumped constant delay circuits are provided for generating outputs at delay intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution. An initiation START pulse is input to generate first high resolution data. A termination STOP pulse is input to generate second high resolution data. Internal counters count at the low frequency internal clock pulse rate between the START and STOP pulses. The first and second high resolution data are logically combined to directly provide high resolution data to one counter and correct the count in the low resolution counter to obtain a high resolution time interval measurement.

  3. The Pathway of Oligomeric DNA Melting Investigated by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ka-Yiu; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2008-01-01

    Details of the reaction coordinate for DNA melting are fundamental to much of biology and biotechnology. Recently, it has been shown experimentally that there are at least three states involved. To clarify the reaction mechanism of the melting transition of DNA, we perform 100-ns molecular dynamics simulations of a homo-oligomeric, 12-basepair DNA duplex, d(A12)·d(T12), with explicit salt water at 400 K. Analysis of the trajectory reveals the various biochemically important processes that occur on different timescales. Peeling (including fraying from the ends), searching for Watson-Crick complements, and dissociation are recognizable processes. However, we find that basepair searching for Watson-Crick complements along a strand is not mechanistically tied to or directly accessible from the dissociation steps of strand melting. A three-step melting mechanism is proposed where the untwisting of the duplex is determined to be the major component of the reaction coordinate at the barrier. Though the observations are limited to the characteristics of the system being studied, they provide important insight into the mechanism of melting of other more biologically relevant forms of DNA, which will certainly differ in details from those here. PMID:18952784

  4. Isolation and characterization of transcribed sequences from a chromosome 16 hn-cDNA library and the physical mapping of genes and transcribed sequences using a high-resolution somatic cell panel of human chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Whitmore, S.A.; Apostolou, S.; Lane, S.; Nancarrow, J.K.; Phillips, H.A.; Richards, R.I.; Sutherland, G.R.; Callen, D.F. )

    1994-03-15

    A hn-cDNA (heteronuclear complementary DNA) library was constructed from a mouse/human somatic cell hybrid, CY18, which contains chromosome 16 as the only human chromosome. Hexamer primers constructed from consensus 5[prime]intron splice sequences were used to generate cDNA from the immature unspliced mRNA. The resulting cDNA library was screened with a total human DNA probe to identify potential human clones. Rescreening was necessary, and use of a mouse-derived clone with homology to 7SL RNA proved successful in eliminating the majority of mouse clones. Thirteen clones had open reading frames, and of those, five showed homology to human sequences in Gen-Bank. Two clones had homology to random partially sequenced cDNAs, one clone was likely to be a GRP78 pseudogene, one clone mapped the PHKG2 gene to 16p11.2-16p12.1, and one clone had homology to human S-13 ribosomal protein. All clones except the latter were mapped to a high-resolution somatic cell panel. Although isolation of human chromosome 16 genes from this library was successful, it was apparent that cDNA synthesis was initiated at sites other than intron splice sites, presumably by mispairing of the hexamers. 31 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. A high-resolution structure of the DNA-binding domain of AhrC, the arginine repressor/activator protein from Bacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    Garnett, James A.; Baumberg, Simon; Stockley, Peter G.; Phillips, Simon E. V.

    2007-11-01

    The structure of the winged helix–turn–helix DNA-binding domain of AhrC has been determined at 1.0 Å resolution. The largely hydrophobic β-wing shows high B factors and may mediate the dimer interface in operator complexes. In Bacillus subtilis the concentration of l-arginine is controlled by the transcriptional regulator AhrC, which interacts with 18 bp DNA operator sites called ARG boxes in the promoters of arginine biosynthetic and catabolic operons. AhrC is a 100 kDa homohexamer, with each subunit having two domains. The C-terminal domains form the core, mediating intersubunit interactions and binding of the co-repressor l-arginine, whilst the N-terminal domains contain a winged helix–turn–helix DNA-binding motif and are arranged around the periphery. The N-terminal domain of AhrC has been expressed, purified and characterized and it has been shown that the fragment still binds DNA operators as a recombinant monomer. The DNA-binding domain has also been crystallized and the crystal structure refined to 1.0 Å resolution is presented.

  6. DNA melting properties of the dityrosine cross-linked dimer of Ribonuclease A.

    PubMed

    Dinda, Amit Kumar; Chattaraj, Saparya; Ghosh, Sudeshna; Tripathy, Debi Ranjan; Dasgupta, Swagata

    2016-09-01

    Several DNA binding proteins exist in dimeric form when bound with DNA to be able to exhibit various biological processes such as DNA repair, DNA replication and gene expression. Various dimeric forms of Ribonuclease A (RNase A) and other members of the ribonuclease A superfamily are endowed with a multitude of biological activities such as antitumor and antiviral activity. In the present study, we have compared the DNA binding properties between the RNase A monomer and the dityrosine (DT) cross-linked RNase A dimer, and checked the inhibitory effect of DNA on the ribonucleolytic activity of the dimeric protein. An agarose gel based assay shows that like the monomer, the dimer also binds with DNA. The number of nucleotides bound per monomer unit of the dimer is higher than the number of nucleotides that bind with the each monomer. From fluorescence measurements, the association constant (Ka) values for complexation of the monomer and the dimer with ct-DNA are (4.95±0.45)×10(4)M(-1) and (1.29±0.05)×10(6)M(-1) respectively. Binding constant (Kb) values for the binding of the monomer and the dimer with ct-DNA were determined using UV-vis spectroscopy and were found to be (4.96±1.67)×10(4)M(-1) and (4.32±0.31)×10(5)M(-1) respectively. Circular dichroism studies shows that the dimer possesses significant effect on DNA conformation. The melting profile for the ct-DNA-dimer indicated that the melting temperature (Tm) for the ct-DNA-dimer complex is lower compared to the ct-DNA-monomer complex. The ribonucleolytic activity of the dimer, like the monomer, diminishes upon binding with DNA. PMID:27475778

  7. [High resolution analysis of replication foci by conventional fluorescent microscopy. I. A study of complexity and DNA content of the foci].

    PubMed

    Chagin, V O; Rozanov, Iu M; Solov'eva, L V; Tomilin, N V

    2004-01-01

    Newly replicated DNA segments (RDS) have been shown to form discrete foci in the mammalian nucleus. Comparison of the number of such foci in formaldehyde-fixed cell nucleus with estimated number of simultaneously active replication forks (RF) suggests that each replication focus contains a cluster of about 10 to 20 closely associated RF. That implied the cluster of synchronously activated replicons as the primary unit of mammalian DNA replication. It still remains unclear whether such clustering of RF does mean adjacency of the replicons in a genomic location (structural clustering, model 1), or it arises from transient clustering of the replicons from different DNA domains at the functioning replication machinery (functional clustering, model 2). In this study we used conventional fluorescence microscopy of the hypotonically treated nuclei preparations to investigate replication foci at the optical resolution limit. Human K562 cells were labeled with 5'-iododeoxyuridine for different time periods. We synchronized the cell culture with hydroxyurea to be able to measure an average increase in DNA content during labeling period using DNA cytometry. Under these conditions, RDS appear as multiple small foci (mini-foci, MF). Further studies revealed that most of such mini-foci of replication represent optical diffraction spots, which are standard in size and different in brightness. The number of the "spots" and variation of their brightness mostly depend on the extent of hypotonic treatment. Flow cytometry control of the synchronized cells peak movement allowed us to measure mean DNA content of the MF. In case of most effective hypotonic treatment, a MF contains about 40 Kbp of labeled DNA, and the general number of the MF approaches the number of replicons that are simultaneously active in a given moment of S-phase. Influence of the effect of hypotonic treatment on overall number of observed MF suggests that replication foci in early and mid S-phase cells do not

  8. First- or second-order transition in the melting of repeat sequence DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y Z; Prohofsky, E W

    1994-01-01

    Both theoretical analysis and observation of the continuity of the melted fraction of base pairs indicate that the melting transition in DNA is second order. Analysis of the salt dependence of the transition by polyelectrolyte limiting laws, however, has first-order dynamics imbedded in the analysis. This paper proposes that the observation taken to be a latent heat of melting in the limiting law analysis could instead be a specific heat anomaly associated with a second-order transition. The limiting laws can be reconstructed based on a second-order transition with a specific heat anomaly. The T2M dependence of this excess heat is also consistent with its being a specific heat anomaly of a system displaying classical critical behavior. Classical critical behavior indicates that theoretical mean field approaches such as MSPA should be particularly appropriate to helix melting studies. PMID:8130338

  9. Hydrogen-bond breaking by O/sub 2/ and N/sub 2/. II. Melting curves of DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Mathers, T.L.; Schoeffler, G.; McGlynn, S.P.

    1982-01-01

    Evidence for hydrogen bond breaking (HBB) by O/sub 2/ and N/sub 2/ in the denaturation or melting of DNA is presented. It was found that air and oxygen significantly reduce the temperature of the DNA melting process. The possible relationship of this HBB ability of oxygen and nitrogen to phenomena observed in vivo are discussed. (ACR)

  10. Unearthing the ecology of soil microorganisms using a high resolution DNA-SIP approach to explore cellulose and xylose metabolism in soil

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pepe-Ranney, Charles; Campbell, Ashley N.; Koechli, Chantal N.; Berthrong, Sean; Buckley, Daniel H.

    2016-05-12

    We explored microbial contributions to decomposition using a sophisticated approach to DNA Stable Isotope Probing (SIP). Our experiment evaluated the dynamics and ecological characteristics of functionally defined microbial groups that metabolize labile and structural C in soils. We added to soil a complex amendment representing plant derived organic matter substituted with either 13C-xylose or 13C-cellulose to represent labile and structural C pools derived from abundant components of plant biomass. We found evidence for 13C-incorporation into DNA from 13C-xylose and 13C-cellulose in 49 and 63 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), respectively. The types of microorganisms that assimilated 13C in the 13C-xylose treatmentmore » changed over time being predominantly Firrnicutes at day 1 followed by Bacteroidetes at day 3 and then Actinobacteria at day 7. These 13C-labeling dynamics suggest labile C traveled through different trophic levels. In contrast, microorganisms generally metabolized cellulose-C after 14 days and did not change to the same extent in phylogenetic composition over time. Furthermore, microorganisms that metabolized cellulose-C belonged to poorly characterized but cosmopolitan soil lineages including Verrucomicrobia, Chlorotlexi, and Planctomycetes.« less

  11. Unearthing the Ecology of Soil Microorganisms Using a High Resolution DNA-SIP Approach to Explore Cellulose and Xylose Metabolism in Soil.

    PubMed

    Pepe-Ranney, Charles; Campbell, Ashley N; Koechli, Chantal N; Berthrong, Sean; Buckley, Daniel H

    2016-01-01

    We explored microbial contributions to decomposition using a sophisticated approach to DNA Stable Isotope Probing (SIP). Our experiment evaluated the dynamics and ecological characteristics of functionally defined microbial groups that metabolize labile and structural C in soils. We added to soil a complex amendment representing plant derived organic matter substituted with either (13)C-xylose or (13)C-cellulose to represent labile and structural C pools derived from abundant components of plant biomass. We found evidence for (13)C-incorporation into DNA from (13)C-xylose and (13)C-cellulose in 49 and 63 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), respectively. The types of microorganisms that assimilated (13)C in the (13)C-xylose treatment changed over time being predominantly Firmicutes at day 1 followed by Bacteroidetes at day 3 and then Actinobacteria at day 7. These (13)C-labeling dynamics suggest labile C traveled through different trophic levels. In contrast, microorganisms generally metabolized cellulose-C after 14 days and did not change to the same extent in phylogenetic composition over time. Microorganisms that metabolized cellulose-C belonged to poorly characterized but cosmopolitan soil lineages including Verrucomicrobia, Chloroflexi, and Planctomycetes. PMID:27242725

  12. Unearthing the Ecology of Soil Microorganisms Using a High Resolution DNA-SIP Approach to Explore Cellulose and Xylose Metabolism in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Pepe-Ranney, Charles; Campbell, Ashley N.; Koechli, Chantal N.; Berthrong, Sean; Buckley, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    We explored microbial contributions to decomposition using a sophisticated approach to DNA Stable Isotope Probing (SIP). Our experiment evaluated the dynamics and ecological characteristics of functionally defined microbial groups that metabolize labile and structural C in soils. We added to soil a complex amendment representing plant derived organic matter substituted with either 13C-xylose or 13C-cellulose to represent labile and structural C pools derived from abundant components of plant biomass. We found evidence for 13C-incorporation into DNA from 13C-xylose and 13C-cellulose in 49 and 63 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), respectively. The types of microorganisms that assimilated 13C in the 13C-xylose treatment changed over time being predominantly Firmicutes at day 1 followed by Bacteroidetes at day 3 and then Actinobacteria at day 7. These 13C-labeling dynamics suggest labile C traveled through different trophic levels. In contrast, microorganisms generally metabolized cellulose-C after 14 days and did not change to the same extent in phylogenetic composition over time. Microorganisms that metabolized cellulose-C belonged to poorly characterized but cosmopolitan soil lineages including Verrucomicrobia, Chloroflexi, and Planctomycetes. PMID:27242725

  13. Re-entrant melting as a design principle for DNA-coated colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angioletti-Uberti, Stefano; Mognetti, Bortolo M.; Frenkel, Daan

    2012-06-01

    Colloids functionalized with DNA hold great promise as building blocks for complex self-assembling structures. However, the practical use of DNA-coated colloids (DNACCs) has been limited by the narrowness of the temperature window where the target structures are both thermodynamically stable and kinetically accessible. Here we propose a strategy to design DNACCs, whereby the colloidal suspensions crystallize on cooling and then melt on further cooling. In a phase diagram with such a re-entrant melting, kinetic trapping of the system in non-target structures should be strongly suppressed. We present model calculations and simulations that show that real DNA sequences exist that should bestow this unusual phase behaviour on suitably functionalized colloidal suspensions. We present our results for binary systems, but the concepts that we develop apply to multicomponent systems and should therefore open the way towards the design of truly complex self-assembling colloidal structures.

  14. “Ultra-high resolution optical trap with single fluorophore sensitivity”

    PubMed Central

    Comstock, Matthew J; Ha, Taekjip; Chemla, Yann R

    2013-01-01

    We present a single-molecule instrument that combines a timeshared ultra-high resolution dual optical trap interlaced with a confocal fluorescence microscope. In a demonstration experiment, individual single-fluorophore labeled DNA oligonucleotides were observed to bind and unbind to complementary DNA suspended between two trapped beads. Simultaneous with the single-fluorophore detection, coincident angstrom-scale changes in tether extension could be clearly observed. Fluorescence readout allowed us to determine the duplex melting rate as a function of force. The new instrument will enable the simultaneous measurement of angstrom-scale mechanical motion of individual DNA-binding proteins (e.g., single base pair stepping of DNA translocases) along with the detection of fluorescently labeled protein properties (e.g., internal configuration). PMID:21336286

  15. High-resolution anion-exchange and partition thin-layer chromatography for complex mixtures of 32P-postlabeled DNA adducts.

    PubMed

    Spencer-Beach, G G; Beach, A C; Gupta, R C

    1996-03-01

    32P-Postlabeling has emerged as a major tool for detecting DNA adducts resulting from exposure to complex carcinogen mixtures. An integral component of this assay is multi-directional PEI-cellulose TLC in which lipophilic 32P-adducts are resolved in high-salt, high-urea solvents following removal of the bulk of non-adduct radioactivity. This TLC system is very effective for adducts formed following exposure to individual carcinogens; however, adducts resulting from exposure to complex mixtures (e.g. cigarette smoke) generally appear in the form of the so-called diagonal radioactive zones. By using mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon- and aromatic amine-DNA adducts as well as adducts in mouse skin treated with cigarette smoke condensate, we have demonstrated that a combination of 0.3-0.4 M NH4OH and isopropanol-4 M NH4OH (1-1.4:1) solvents can provide more sharply defined adduct spots than the commonly used urea solvents. The non-urea solvents also result in excellent resolution of many adducts which otherwise may remain buried in diagonal radioactive zones when using the urea solvents. In addition, the signal-to-noise ratio is increased 2- to 5-fold over the urea solvents enabling detection of discrete adducts at < or = 3 adducts per 10(10) nucleotides. These partition TLC solvents also involve fewer manipulations (e.g. no water washes to remove salt and urea), and are likely to be more informative with regards to the type of individual adducts detected in the biomonitoring of humans than has hitherto been possible. PMID:8704930

  16. BRCA1 Gene Mutation Screening for the Hereditary Breast and/or Ovarian Cancer Syndrome in Breast Cancer Cases: a First High Resolution DNA Melting Analysis in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Mundhofir, Farmaditya Ep; Wulandari, Catharina Endah; Prajoko, Yan Wisnu; Winarni, Tri Indah

    2016-01-01

    Specific patterns of the hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndrome are related to mutations in the BRCA1 gene. One hundred unrelated breast cancer patients were interviewed to obtain clinical symptoms and signs, pedigree and familial history of HBOC syndrome related cancer. Subsequently, data were calculated using the Breast and Ovarian Analysis of Disease Incidence and Carrier Estimation Algorithm (BOADICEA) risk prediction model. Patients with high score of BOADICEA were offered genetic testing. Eleven patients with high score of BOADICEA, 2 patients with low score of BOADICEA, 2 patient's family members and 15 controls underwent BRCA1 genetic testing. Mutation screening using PCR-HRM was carried out in 22 exons (41 amplicons) of BRCA1 gene. Sanger sequencing was subjected in all samples with aberrant graph. This study identified 10 variants in the BRCA1 gene, consisting of 6 missense mutations (c.1480C>A, c.2612C>T, c.2566T>C, c.3113A>G, c.3548 A>G, c.4837 A>G), 3 synonymous mutations (c.2082 C> T, c.2311 T> C and c.4308T>C) and one intronic mutation (c.134+35 G>T). All variants tend to be polymorphisms and unclassified variants. However, no known pathogenic mutations were found. PMID:27039803

  17. High Resolution DNA Stable Isotope Probing Reveals that Root Exudate Addition to Soil Changes the Identity of the Microbes that Degrade Cellulose but not the Rate of Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, A.; Pepe-Ranney, C. P.; Nguyen, A. V. T.; Buckley, D. H.

    2015-12-01

    Plant roots release compounds, such as root exudates, which can alter soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition and have large impacts on soil carbon (C) retention. The changes in SOM turnover resulting from the addition of organic and/or inorganic substrates are termed 'priming effects'. In this study we examine the effects of root exudates on the priming of cellulose added as particulate organic matter. We amended soil microcosms with 13C-cellulose in the presence or absence of artificial root exudate additions and incubated over time for 45 days. Soils receiving the root exudate (RE) were given either one large dose or multiple, small doses of RE. In each treatment we tracked operational taxonomic units (OTUs) assimilating 13C from cellulose (herein, known as a 'responder') over time using DNA stable isotope probing coupled with next generation sequencing. In all treatments the same amount of cellulose-13C was respired indicating the addition of RE did not result in the priming of cellulose decomposition. However, cellulose responders were different depending on treatment and time of sampling (days 14, 28 and 45). We identified a total of 10,361 OTUs, of which there were 369 cellulose responders in the cellulose only treatment, 273 in the repeated, small dose RE treatment, and 358 in the RE single, large dose treatment. Most of the cellulose responders found in all treatments belonged to phyla Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, and Chloroflexi. The response time of phyla varies; for instance, more OTUs in Bacteroidetes were observed on day 14 and diminish with each subsequent sampling time. On the other hand, OTUs in Verrucomicrobia increased in response over time. Our study shows no priming effect resulting from the addition of root exudates, although the identity of the microbial mediators of cellulose decomposition varies in each treatment.

  18. On-chip magnetic bead-based DNA melting curve analysis using a magnetoresistive sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzi, Giovanni; Østerberg, Frederik W.; Henriksen, Anders D.; Dufva, Martin; Hansen, Mikkel F.

    2015-04-01

    We present real-time measurements of DNA melting curves in a chip-based system that detects the amount of surface-bound magnetic beads using magnetoresistive magnetic field sensors. The sensors detect the difference between the amount of beads bound to the top and bottom sensor branches of the differential sensor geometry. The sensor surfaces are functionalized with wild type (WT) and mutant type (MT) capture probes, differing by a single base insertion (a single nucleotide polymorphism, SNP). Complementary biotinylated targets in suspension couple streptavidin magnetic beads to the sensor surface. The beads are magnetized by the field arising from the bias current passed through the sensors. We demonstrate the first on-chip measurements of the melting of DNA hybrids upon a ramping of the temperature. This overcomes the limitation of using a single washing condition at constant temperature. Moreover, we demonstrate that a single sensor bridge can be used to genotype a SNP.

  19. Advanced very high resolution radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The advanced very high resolution radiometer development program is considered. The program covered the design, construction, and test of a breadboard model, engineering model, protoflight model, mechanical structural model, and a life test model. Special bench test and calibration equipment was also developed for use on the program.

  20. High resolution digital delay timer

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Albert D.

    1988-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay (20) provides a first output signal (24) at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits (26, 28) latch the high resolution data (24) to form a first synchronizing data set (60). A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters (142, 146, 154) and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses (32, 34) count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an interval which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD (184) corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD (74) to generate a second set of synchronizing data (76) which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data (60) for presentation to logic circuits (64). The logic circuits (64) further delay the internal output signal (72) to obtain a proper phase relationship of an output signal (80) with the internal pulses (32, 34). The final delayed output signal (80) thereafter enables the output pulse generator (82) to produce the desired output pulse (84) at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse (10, 12).

  1. Improvement of the fidelity of molecular DNA computations: control of DNA duplex melting using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolenko, T. A.; Burikov, S. A.; Laptinskiy, K. A.; Sarmanova, O. E.

    2016-02-01

    In this study it is demonstrated that use of laser Raman spectroscopy for monitoring biochemical reactions provides the detection and control of the processes of renaturation and denaturation of DNA strands, the determination of state of strands, and also the control of possible mutations in DNA molecules. The obtained results are very promising to improve the fidelity of DNA computations, i.e. to provide the greater convergence of the estimated and exact values.

  2. The use of real-time polymerase chain reaction with high resolution melting (real-time PCR-HRM) analysis for the detection and discrimination of nematodes Bursaphelenchus xylophilus and Bursaphelenchus mucronatus.

    PubMed

    Filipiak, Anna; Hasiów-Jaroszewska, Beata

    2016-04-01

    The real-time PCR-HRM analysis was developed for the detection and discrimination of the quarantine nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus and Bursaphelenchus mucronatus. A set of primers was designed to target the ITS region of rDNA. The results have demonstrated that this analysis is a valuable tool for differentiation of these both species. PMID:26880540

  3. High-Resolution Shadowing of Transfer RNA

    PubMed Central

    Abermann, Reinhard J.; Yoshikami, Doju

    1972-01-01

    High-resolution shadowing with metals that melt at high temperatures was used to study macromolecules. Molecules of transfer RNA shadowed with tantalum-tungsten are readily visualized in an electron microscope. Mounting procedures for tRNA were perfected that reproducibly gave uniform distributions of both monomeric and dimeric tRNA particles, and allowed a statistical assessment of their gross shapes and sizes. Monomeric tRNA yielded a fairly homogeneous population of rod-shaped particles, with axial dimensions of about 40 × 85 Å. Dimers of yeast alanine tRNA held together by hydrogen bonds and dimers constructed by covalent linkage of the amino-acid acceptor (3′-) termini of monomers both gave slightly more heterogeneous populations of particles. Yet, their structures were also basically rod shaped, with their lengths ranging to about twice that of the monomer; this result indicates an end-to-end arrangement of the monomeric units within both dimers. These results suggest that the amino-acid acceptor terminus and the anticodon region are at the ends of the rod-shaped, dehydrated tRNA monomer visible by electron microscopy, consistent with the generally accepted view of tRNA structure in solution suggested by other workers using other methods. This study demonstrates that high-resolution shadowing with tantalum-tungsten provides a means to examine the three-dimensional structures of relatively small biological macromolecules. Images PMID:4504373

  4. DNA duplex length and salt concentration dependence of enthalpy-entropy compensation parameters for DNA melting.

    PubMed

    Starikov, E B; Nordén, Bengt

    2009-08-20

    Systematical differential calorimetry experiments on DNA oligomers with different lengths and placed in water solutions with various added salt concentrations may, in principle, unravel important information about the structure and dynamics of the DNA and their water-counterion surrounding. With this in mind, to reinterpret the most recent results of calorimetric experiments on DNA oligomers of such a kind, the recent enthalpy-entropy compensation theory has been used. It is demonstrated that the application of the latter could enable direct estimation of thermodynamic parameters of the microphase transitions connected to the changes in DNA dynamical regimes versus the length of the biopolymers and the ionic strengths of their water solutions, and this calls for much more systematical experimental and theoretical studies in this field. PMID:19719257

  5. Partly melted DNA conformations obtained with a probability peak finding method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tøstesen, Eivind

    2005-06-01

    Peaks in the probabilities of loops or bubbles, helical segments, and unzipping ends in melting DNA are found in this article using a peak finding method that maps the hierarchical structure of certain energy landscapes. The peaks indicate the alternative conformations that coexist in equilibrium and the range of their fluctuations. This yields a representation of the conformational ensemble at a given temperature, which is illustrated in a single diagram called a stitch profile. This article describes the methodology and discusses stitch profiles vs the ordinary probability profiles using the phage lambda genome as an example.

  6. High Resolution Scanning Reflectarray Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R. (Inventor); Miranda, Felix A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a High Resolution Scanning Reflectarray Antenna (HRSRA) for the purpose of tracking ground terminals and space craft communication applications. The present invention provides an alternative to using gimbaled parabolic dish antennas and direct radiating phased arrays. When compared to a gimbaled parabolic dish, the HRSRA offers the advantages of vibration free steering without incurring appreciable cost or prime power penalties. In addition, it offers full beam steering at a fraction of the cost of direct radiating arrays and is more efficient.

  7. High-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dozier, Jeff; Goetz, Alexander F. H.

    1990-01-01

    Earth resources observed in greater detail. High-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer, undergoing development for use in NASA's Earth Observing System, measures reflectance of Earth's surface in visible and near-infrared wavelengths. From an orbit around Earth, instrument scans surface of Earth in 200 wavelength bands simultaneously. Produces images enabling identification of minerals in rocks and soils, important algal pigments in oceans and inland waters, changes in spectra associated with biochemistry of plant canopies, compositions of atmospheric aerosols, sizes of grains in snow, and contamination of snow by impurities that absorb visible light.

  8. Single-molecule visualization of RecQ helicase reveals DNA melting, nucleation, and assembly are required for processive DNA unwinding

    PubMed Central

    Rad, Behzad; Forget, Anthony L.; Baskin, Ronald J.; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    DNA helicases are motor proteins that unwind double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) to reveal single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) needed for many biological processes. The RecQ helicase is involved in repairing damage caused by DNA breaks and stalled replication forks via homologous recombination. Here, the helicase activity of RecQ was visualized on single molecules of DNA using a fluorescent sensor that directly detects ssDNA. By monitoring the formation and progression of individual unwinding forks, we observed that both the frequency of initiation and the rate of unwinding are highly dependent on RecQ concentration. We establish that unwinding forks can initiate internally by melting dsDNA and can proceed in both directions at up to 40–60 bp/s. The findings suggest that initiation requires a RecQ dimer, and that continued processive unwinding of several kilobases involves multiple monomers at the DNA unwinding fork. We propose a distinctive model wherein RecQ melts dsDNA internally to initiate unwinding and subsequently assembles at the fork into a distribution of multimeric species, each encompassing a broad distribution of rates, to unwind DNA. These studies define the species that promote resection of DNA, proofreading of homologous pairing, and migration of Holliday junctions, and they suggest that various functional forms of RecQ can be assembled that unwind at rates tailored to the diverse biological functions of RecQ helicase. PMID:26540728

  9. Single-molecule visualization of RecQ helicase reveals DNA melting, nucleation, and assembly are required for processive DNA unwinding.

    PubMed

    Rad, Behzad; Forget, Anthony L; Baskin, Ronald J; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C

    2015-12-15

    DNA helicases are motor proteins that unwind double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) to reveal single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) needed for many biological processes. The RecQ helicase is involved in repairing damage caused by DNA breaks and stalled replication forks via homologous recombination. Here, the helicase activity of RecQ was visualized on single molecules of DNA using a fluorescent sensor that directly detects ssDNA. By monitoring the formation and progression of individual unwinding forks, we observed that both the frequency of initiation and the rate of unwinding are highly dependent on RecQ concentration. We establish that unwinding forks can initiate internally by melting dsDNA and can proceed in both directions at up to 40-60 bp/s. The findings suggest that initiation requires a RecQ dimer, and that continued processive unwinding of several kilobases involves multiple monomers at the DNA unwinding fork. We propose a distinctive model wherein RecQ melts dsDNA internally to initiate unwinding and subsequently assembles at the fork into a distribution of multimeric species, each encompassing a broad distribution of rates, to unwind DNA. These studies define the species that promote resection of DNA, proofreading of homologous pairing, and migration of Holliday junctions, and they suggest that various functional forms of RecQ can be assembled that unwind at rates tailored to the diverse biological functions of RecQ helicase. PMID:26540728

  10. The High Resolution Hurricane Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripoli, G. J.

    2009-09-01

    It has been suggested that an answer to the hurricane intensity forecast problem is to use very high cloud-resolving resolution in operational forecast models. In consideration of this hypothesis, the United States National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration commissioned a major study to take place over the past 1.5 years whereby the hypothesis would be tested with 6 different hurricane models featuring different dynamics cores and different physics. These models included the GFDL hurricane, Navy COAMPS, the WRF-ARW, WRF-AHW, WRF-NMM, and the UW-NMS. The experiment design was to choose and optimal mix of historic hurricanes where good observations of intensity at land fall existed and run 5 day model forecasts with 3 different resolutions of about 9-12 km (low resolution), 3-4 km (medium resolution) and 1-1.5 km (high resolution) and document how much the forecast improved in each case. The project focused on 10 storms over 2-12, 1-5 day forecast periods, for a total of 67 simulations. Not all groups completed all 67 simulations, but there were sufficient results to reach a stunning conclusion. The results of these tests suggested that little or no improvement in intensity prediction was achieved with high resolution.

  11. Electrical detection of the temperature induced melting transition of a DNA hairpin covalently attached to gold interdigitated microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Brewood, Greg P.; Rangineni, Yaswanth; Fish, Daniel J.; Bhandiwad, Ashwini S.; Evans, David R.; Solanki, Raj; Benight, Albert S.

    2008-01-01

    The temperature induced melting transition of a self-complementary DNA strand covalently attached at the 5′ end to the surface of a gold interdigitated microelectrode (GIME) was monitored in a novel, label-free, manner. The structural state of the hairpin was assessed by measuring four different electronic properties of the GIME (capacitance, impedance, dissipation factor and phase angle) as a function of temperature from 25°C to 80°C. Consistent changes in all four electronic properties of the GIME were observed over this temperature range, and attributed to the transition of the attached single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) from an intramolecular, folded hairpin structure to a melted ssDNA. The melting curve of the self-complementary single strand was also measured in solution using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and UV absorbance spectroscopy. Temperature dependent electronic measurements on the surface and absorbance versus temperature values measured in solution experiments were analyzed assuming a two-state process. The model analysis provided estimates of the thermodynamic transition parameters of the hairpin on the surface. Two-state analyses of optical melting data and DSC measurements provided evaluations of the thermodynamic transition parameters of the hairpin in solution. Comparison of surface and solution measurements provided quantitative evaluation of the effect of the surface on the thermodynamics of the melting transition of the DNA hairpin. PMID:18628294

  12. Enhanced High Resolution RBS System

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, Thomas J.; Hass, James A.; Klody, George M.

    2011-06-01

    Improvements in full spectrum resolution with the second NEC high resolution RBS system are summarized. Results for 50 A ring TiN/HfO films on Si yielding energy resolution on the order of 1 keV are also presented. Detector enhancements include improved pulse processing electronics, upgraded shielding for the MCP/RAE detector, and reduced noise generated from pumping. Energy resolution measurements on spectra front edge coupled with calculations using 0.4mStr solid angle show that beam energy spread at 400 KeV from the Pelletron registered accelerator is less than 100 eV. To improve user throughput, magnet control has been added to the automatic data collection. Depth profiles derived from experimental data are discussed. For the thin films profiled, depth resolutions were on the Angstrom level with the non-linear energy/channel conversions ranging from 100 to 200 eV.

  13. Enhanced High Resolution RBS System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Thomas J.; Hass, James A.; Klody, George M.

    2011-06-01

    Improvements in full spectrum resolution with the second NEC high resolution RBS system are summarized. Results for 50 Å TiN/HfO films on Si yielding energy resolution on the order of 1 keV are also presented. Detector enhancements include improved pulse processing electronics, upgraded shielding for the MCP/RAE detector, and reduced noise generated from pumping. Energy resolution measurements on spectra front edge coupled with calculations using 0.4mStr solid angle show that beam energy spread at 400 KeV from the Pelletron® accelerator is less than 100 eV. To improve user throughput, magnet control has been added to the automatic data collection. Depth profiles derived from experimental data are discussed. For the thin films profiled, depth resolutions were on the Angstrom level with the non-linear energy/channel conversions ranging from 100 to 200 eV.

  14. High Resolution Thermometry for EXACT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, J. S.; Nash, A. E.; Larson, M.; Mulders, N.

    2000-01-01

    High Resolution Thermometers (HRTs) based on SQUID detection of the magnetization of a paramagnetic salt or a metal alloy has been commonly used for sub-nano Kelvin temperature resolution in low temperature physics experiments. The main applications to date have been for temperature ranges near the lambda point of He-4 (2.177 K). These thermometers made use of materials such as Cu(NH4)2Br4 *2H2O, GdCl3, or PdFe. None of these materials are suitable for EXACT, which will explore the region of the He-3/He-4 tricritical point at 0.87 K. The experiment requirements and properties of several candidate paramagnetic materials will be presented, as well as preliminary test results.

  15. High Resolution Neutral Atom Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucay, Igal; Castillo-Garza, Rodrigo; Stratis, Georgios; Raizen, Mark

    2015-03-01

    We are developing a high resolution neutral atom microscope based on metastable atom electron spectroscopy (MAES). When a metastable atom of a noble gas is near a solid, a surface electron will tunnel to an empty energy level of the metastable atom, thereby ejecting the excited electron from the atom. The emitted electrons carry information regarding the local topography and electronic, magnetic, and chemical structures of most hard materials. Furthermore, using a chromatic aberration corrected magnetic hexapole lens we expect to attain a spatial resolution below 10 nm. We will use this microscope to investigate how local phenomena can give rise to macroscopic effects in materials that cannot be probed using a scanning tunneling microscope, namely insulating transition metal oxides.

  16. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  17. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  18. HRSC: High resolution stereo camera

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neukum, G.; Jaumann, R.; Basilevsky, A.T.; Dumke, A.; Van Gasselt, S.; Giese, B.; Hauber, E.; Head, J. W., III; Heipke, C.; Hoekzema, N.; Hoffmann, H.; Greeley, R.; Gwinner, K.; Kirk, R.; Markiewicz, W.; McCord, T.B.; Michael, G.; Muller, Jan-Peter; Murray, J.B.; Oberst, J.; Pinet, P.; Pischel, R.; Roatsch, T.; Scholten, F.; Willner, K.

    2009-01-01

    The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on Mars Express has delivered a wealth of image data, amounting to over 2.5 TB from the start of the mapping phase in January 2004 to September 2008. In that time, more than a third of Mars was covered at a resolution of 10-20 m/pixel in stereo and colour. After five years in orbit, HRSC is still in excellent shape, and it could continue to operate for many more years. HRSC has proven its ability to close the gap between the low-resolution Viking image data and the high-resolution Mars Orbiter Camera images, leading to a global picture of the geological evolution of Mars that is now much clearer than ever before. Derived highest-resolution terrain model data have closed major gaps and provided an unprecedented insight into the shape of the surface, which is paramount not only for surface analysis and geological interpretation, but also for combination with and analysis of data from other instruments, as well as in planning for future missions. This chapter presents the scientific output from data analysis and highlevel data processing, complemented by a summary of how the experiment is conducted by the HRSC team members working in geoscience, atmospheric science, photogrammetry and spectrophotometry. Many of these contributions have been or will be published in peer-reviewed journals and special issues. They form a cross-section of the scientific output, either by summarising the new geoscientific picture of Mars provided by HRSC or by detailing some of the topics of data analysis concerning photogrammetry, cartography and spectral data analysis.

  19. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefitted greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  20. High resolution time interval counter

    DOEpatents

    Condreva, Kenneth J.

    1994-01-01

    A high resolution counter circuit measures the time interval between the occurrence of an initial and a subsequent electrical pulse to two nanoseconds resolution using an eight megahertz clock. The circuit includes a main counter for receiving electrical pulses and generating a binary word--a measure of the number of eight megahertz clock pulses occurring between the signals. A pair of first and second pulse stretchers receive the signal and generate a pair of output signals whose widths are approximately sixty-four times the time between the receipt of the signals by the respective pulse stretchers and the receipt by the respective pulse stretchers of a second subsequent clock pulse. Output signals are thereafter supplied to a pair of start and stop counters operable to generate a pair of binary output words representative of the measure of the width of the pulses to a resolution of two nanoseconds. Errors associated with the pulse stretchers are corrected by providing calibration data to both stretcher circuits, and recording start and stop counter values. Stretched initial and subsequent signals are combined with autocalibration data and supplied to an arithmetic logic unit to determine the time interval in nanoseconds between the pair of electrical pulses being measured.

  1. High resolution time interval counter

    DOEpatents

    Condreva, K.J.

    1994-07-26

    A high resolution counter circuit measures the time interval between the occurrence of an initial and a subsequent electrical pulse to two nanoseconds resolution using an eight megahertz clock. The circuit includes a main counter for receiving electrical pulses and generating a binary word--a measure of the number of eight megahertz clock pulses occurring between the signals. A pair of first and second pulse stretchers receive the signal and generate a pair of output signals whose widths are approximately sixty-four times the time between the receipt of the signals by the respective pulse stretchers and the receipt by the respective pulse stretchers of a second subsequent clock pulse. Output signals are thereafter supplied to a pair of start and stop counters operable to generate a pair of binary output words representative of the measure of the width of the pulses to a resolution of two nanoseconds. Errors associated with the pulse stretchers are corrected by providing calibration data to both stretcher circuits, and recording start and stop counter values. Stretched initial and subsequent signals are combined with autocalibration data and supplied to an arithmetic logic unit to determine the time interval in nanoseconds between the pair of electrical pulses being measured. 3 figs.

  2. High resolution optoelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudin, Jim; Dinyari, Rostam; Huie, Phil; Butterwick, Alex; Peumans, Peter; Palanker, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight in patients with retinal degeneration by delivering pulsed electric currents to retinal neurons via an array of microelectrodes. Most implants use inductive or optical transmission of information and power to an intraocular receiver, with decoded signals subsequently distributed to retinal electrodes through an intraocular cable. Surgical complexity could be minimized by an "integrated" prosthesis, in which both power and data are delivered directly to the stimulating array without any discrete components or cables. We present here an integrated retinal prosthesis system based on a photodiode array implant. Video frames are processed and imaged onto the retinal implant by a video goggle projection system operating at near-infrared wavelengths (~ 900 nm). Photodiodes convert light into pulsed electric current, with charge injection maximized by specially optimized series photodiode circuits. Prostheses of three different pixel densities (16 pix/mm2, 64 pix/mm2, and 256 pix/mm2) have been designed, simulated, and prototyped. Retinal tissue response to subretinal implants made of various materials has been investigated in RCS rats. The resulting prosthesis can provide sufficient charge injection for high resolution retinal stimulation without the need for implantation of any bulky discrete elements such as coils or tethers. In addition, since every pixel functions independently, pixel arrays may be placed separately in the subretinal space, providing visual stimulation to a larger field of view.

  3. High resolution auditory perception system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Iftekhar; Ghatol, Ashok

    2005-04-01

    Blindness is a sensory disability which is difficult to treat but can to some extent be helped by artificial aids. The paper describes the design aspects of a high resolution auditory perception system, which is designed on the principle of air sonar with binaural perception. This system is a vision substitution aid for enabling blind persons. The blind person wears ultrasonic eyeglasses which has ultrasonic sensor array embedded on it. The system has been designed to operate in multiresolution modes. The ultrasonic sound from the transmitter array is reflected back by the objects, falling in the beam of the array and is received. The received signal is converted to a sound signal, which is presented stereophonically for auditory perception. A detailed study has been done as the background work required for the system implementation; the appropriate range analysis procedure, analysis of space-time signals, the acoustic sensors study, amplification methods and study of the removal of noise using filters. Finally the system implementation including both the hardware and the software part of it has been described. Experimental results on actual blind subjects and inferences obtained during the study have also been included.

  4. High-Resolution Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Alan G.; Hendrickson, Christopher L.

    2008-07-01

    Over the past decade, mass spectrometry has been revolutionized by access to instruments of increasingly high mass-resolving power. For small molecules up to ˜400 Da (e.g., drugs, metabolites, and various natural organic mixtures ranging from foods to petroleum), it is possible to determine elemental compositions (CcHhNnOoSsPp…) of thousands of chemical components simultaneously from accurate mass measurements (the same can be done up to 1000 Da if additional information is included). At higher mass, it becomes possible to identify proteins (including posttranslational modifications) from proteolytic peptides, as well as lipids, glycoconjugates, and other biological components. At even higher mass (˜100,000 Da or higher), it is possible to characterize posttranslational modifications of intact proteins and to map the binding surfaces of large biomolecule complexes. Here we review the principles and techniques of the highest-resolution analytical mass spectrometers (time-of-flight and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance and orbitrap mass analyzers) and describe some representative high-resolution applications.

  5. High-resolution slug testing.

    PubMed

    Zemansky, G M; McElwee, C D

    2005-01-01

    The hydraulic conductivity (K) variation has important ramifications for ground water flow and the transport of contaminants in ground water. The delineation of the nature of that variation can be critical to complete characterization of a site and the planning of effective and efficient remedial measures. Site-specific features (such as high-conductivity zones) need to be quantified. Our alluvial field site in the Kansas River valley exhibits spatial variability, very high conductivities, and nonlinear behavior for slug tests in the sand and gravel aquifer. High-resolution, multilevel slug tests have been performed in a number of wells that are fully screened. A general nonlinear model based on the Navier-Stokes equation, nonlinear frictional loss, non-Darcian flow, acceleration effects, radius changes in the wellbore, and a Hvorslev model for the aquifer has been used to analyze the data, employing an automated processing system that runs within the Excel spreadsheet program. It is concluded that slug tests can provide the necessary data to identify the nature of both horizontal and vertical K variation in an aquifer and that improved delineation or higher resolution of K structure is possible with shorter test intervals. The gradation into zones of higher conductivity is sharper than seen previously, and the maximum conductivity observed is greater than previously measured. However, data from this project indicate that well development, the presence of fines, and the antecedent history of the well are important interrelated factors in regard to slug-test response and can prevent obtaining consistent results in some cases. PMID:15819943

  6. Global high resolution climate reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert-Frisius, Martina; Feser, Frauke; Zahn, Matthias; von Storch, Hans; Rast, Sebastian

    2014-05-01

    Long-term reanalysis products represent an important data source for numerous climate studies. However, their coarse spatial resolution for data sets spanning the last more than 50 years and well known inhomogeneities in space and time make it difficult to derive changes in meteorological variables over time. We therefore use spectral nudging technique to down-scale the global reanalysis data to a finer resolution with a general global circulation model. With this technique the new calculated higher resolved global model fields are attracted to the large-scale state of the coarse resolution reanalysis. Besides the conservation of large-scale atmospheric information and the resulting finer topography, a surplus in contents of information in meteorological phenomena of small spatial extensions is expected. Following this strategy a simulation with the global high-resolution atmospheric model ECHAM6 (T255L95), developed by MPI-M Hamburg, will be started by spectrally nudging NCEP1 reanalysis for the time period from 1948 until 2013. Selected wavelengths of more than 1000 km of vorticity, divergence, temperature and the logarithm of the surface pressure will be imposed onto the simulated GCM counterparts at levels above 750 hPa. SST and sea ice distribution are taken from the NCEP1 data set. These simulations enable the investigation of long-term changes in meteorological phenomena; the focus is put here on intense storms. Various horizontal wavelength selections and associated vertical profiles in the strength of nudging were tested. The temporarily best configuration resulted in large time correlations for 2m-temperature and 10m wind speed at several selected locations in Germany in comparison to observations. Correlations were highest for extra-tropical regions, while over the western part of the Pacific and Indian Ocean relative low time correlations were found. In a continuing study meteorological quantities at different levels and the influences of the nudging

  7. Practising high-resolution anoscopy.

    PubMed

    Palefsky, Joel M

    2012-12-01

    The incidence of anal cancer is increasing in the general population among both men and women. The incidence is particularly high among men who have sex with men and HIV-infected men and women. Anal cancer is similar to cervical cancer and is associated with human papillomavirus (HPV). Anal cancer is potentially preventable through primary prevention with HPV vaccination or secondary prevention. Secondary prevention is modelled after cervical cancer, where cytology is used as a screening tool to identify women who need colposcopy. Colposcopy includes magnification of the cervix, which, along with acetic acid and Lugol's solution, is used to visualise and biopsy potentially precancerous lesions, enabling treatment before progression to cervical cancer. Anal cancer is likely preceded by high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN), and a colposcope with acetic acid and Lugol's solution may similarly be used to visualise HGAIN to permit biopsy and treatment in an effort to prevent anal cancer. To distinguish it from cervical colposcopy, this technique is called high-resolution anoscopy (HRA). Many of the features that distinguish low-grade AIN from HGAIN are similar to those of the cervix, but HRA poses several additional challenges compared with cervical colposcopy. These include uneven topography; obscuring of lesions due to haemorrhoids, folds, stool or mucus; or lesions being located at the base of folds and anal glands. Consequently, a long learning curve is typically required before becoming fully competent in this technique. The technique of HRA, its uses and challenges in prevention of anal cancer are described in this article. PMID:23380236

  8. High-Resolution Intravital Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Andresen, Volker; Pollok, Karolin; Rinnenthal, Jan-Leo; Oehme, Laura; Günther, Robert; Spiecker, Heinrich; Radbruch, Helena; Gerhard, Jenny; Sporbert, Anje; Cseresnyes, Zoltan; Hauser, Anja E.; Niesner, Raluca

    2012-01-01

    Cellular communication constitutes a fundamental mechanism of life, for instance by permitting transfer of information through synapses in the nervous system and by leading to activation of cells during the course of immune responses. Monitoring cell-cell interactions within living adult organisms is crucial in order to draw conclusions on their behavior with respect to the fate of cells, tissues and organs. Until now, there is no technology available that enables dynamic imaging deep within the tissue of living adult organisms at sub-cellular resolution, i.e. detection at the level of few protein molecules. Here we present a novel approach called multi-beam striped-illumination which applies for the first time the principle and advantages of structured-illumination, spatial modulation of the excitation pattern, to laser-scanning-microscopy. We use this approach in two-photon-microscopy - the most adequate optical deep-tissue imaging-technique. As compared to standard two-photon-microscopy, it achieves significant contrast enhancement and up to 3-fold improved axial resolution (optical sectioning) while photobleaching, photodamage and acquisition speed are similar. Its imaging depth is comparable to multifocal two-photon-microscopy and only slightly less than in standard single-beam two-photon-microscopy. Precisely, our studies within mouse lymph nodes demonstrated 216% improved axial and 23% improved lateral resolutions at a depth of 80 µm below the surface. Thus, we are for the first time able to visualize the dynamic interactions between B cells and immune complex deposits on follicular dendritic cells within germinal centers (GCs) of live mice. These interactions play a decisive role in the process of clonal selection, leading to affinity maturation of the humoral immune response. This novel high-resolution intravital microscopy method has a huge potential for numerous applications in neurosciences, immunology, cancer research and developmental biology

  9. Conformational state of DNA in chromatin subunits. Circular dichroism, melting, and ethidium bromide binding analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, J J; Chan, D C; Piette, L H

    1976-01-01

    This study compares some physical properties of DNA in native chromatin and mono-, di-, trinucleosomes obtained after mild micrococcal nuclease digestion. Melting curves and derivatives are shown to be very similar from one sample to another although a shift from 79 to 82 degrees C is observed between the mainly monophasic peak of multimers and chromatin. Careful analysis of the positive band of the circular dichroism spectra shows the appearance of a shoulder at 275nm, the intensity of which increases from the mono- to the di- and trinucleosome. This shoulder is maximum for native chromatin. At the same time binding isotherms of ethidium - bromide are characterized by two highly fluorescent binding sites for all the samples but the product KN of the apparent binding constant of the higher affinity binding sites by the apparent number of those sites increases from the mono- to the di- and trinucleosome. There again the valus is maximum for native chromatin. Such results strongly suggest that the native state of chromatin requires something more than the indefinite repeat of an elementary subunit. Images PMID:1005108

  10. High Resolution PDF Measurements on Ag Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, Tulio C. R.; Martin, Chris; Kycia, Stefan; Zanchet, Daniela

    2009-01-29

    The quantitative analysis of structural defects in Ag nanoparticles was addressed in this work. We performed atomic scale structural characterization by a combination of x-ray diffraction (XRD) using the Pair Distribution Function analysis (PDF) and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). The XRD measurements were performed using an innovative instrumentation setup to provide high resolution PDF patterns.

  11. High resolution scintillation detector with semiconductor readout

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Craig S.; Hoffman, Edward J.

    2000-01-01

    A novel high resolution scintillation detector array for use in radiation imaging such as high resolution Positron Emission Tomography (PET) which comprises one or more parallelepiped crystals with at least one long surface of each crystal being in intimate contact with a semiconductor photodetector such that photons generated within each crystal by gamma radiation passing therethrough is detected by the photodetector paired therewith.

  12. Transient kinetics measured with force steps discriminate between double-stranded DNA elongation and melting and define the reaction energetics.

    PubMed

    Bongini, Lorenzo; Melli, Luca; Lombardi, Vincenzo; Bianco, Pasquale

    2014-03-01

    Under a tension of ∼65 pN, double-stranded DNA undergoes an overstretching transition from its basic (B-form) conformation to a 1.7 times longer conformation whose nature is only recently starting to be understood. Here we provide a structural and thermodynamic characterization of the transition by recording the length transient following force steps imposed on the λ-phage DNA with different melting degrees and temperatures (10-25°C). The shortening transient following a 20-35 pN force drop from the overstretching force shows a sequence of fast shortenings of double-stranded extended (S-form) segments and pauses owing to reannealing of melted segments. The lengthening transients following a 2-35 pN stretch to the overstretching force show the kinetics of a two-state reaction and indicate that the whole 70% extension is a B-S transition that precedes and is independent of melting. The temperature dependence of the lengthening transient shows that the entropic contribution to the B-S transition is one-third of the entropy change of thermal melting, reinforcing the evidence for a double-stranded S-form that maintains a significant fraction of the interstrand bonds. The cooperativity of the unitary elongation (22 bp) is independent of temperature, suggesting that structural factors, such as the nucleic acid sequence, control the transition. PMID:24353317

  13. A High Resolution Microprobe Study of EETA79001 Lithology C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, Christian M.; Cohen, B. A.; Donovan, J. J.; Vicenzi, E. P.

    2010-01-01

    Antarctic meteorite EETA79001 has received substantial attention for possibly containing a component of Martian soil in its impact glass (Lithology C) [1]. The composition of Martian soil can illuminate near-surface processes such as impact gardening [2] and hydrothermal and volcanic activity [3,4]. Impact melts in meteorites represent our most direct samples of Martian regolith. We present the initial findings from a high-resolution electron microprobe study of Lithology C from Martian meteorite EETA79001. As this study develops we aim to extract details of a potential soil composition and to examine Martian surface processes using elemental ratios and correlations.

  14. NOAA's Use of High-Resolution Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hund, Erik

    2007-01-01

    NOAA's use of high-resolution imagery consists of: a) Shoreline mapping and nautical chart revision; b) Coastal land cover mapping; c) Benthic habitat mapping; d) Disaster response; and e) Imagery collection and support for coastal programs.

  15. High-Resolution Plots of Trigonometric Functions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stick, Marvin E.; Stick, Michael J.

    1985-01-01

    Provides computer programs (for Apple microcomputers) for drawing (in high resolution graphics) a three-leaved rose, concentric circles, circumscribed and inscribed astroids. Sample output and discussions of the mathematics involved in the programs are included. (JN)

  16. Localised sequence regions possessing high melting temperatures prevent the amplification of a DNA mimic in competitive PCR.

    PubMed

    McDowell, D G; Burns, N A; Parkes, H C

    1998-07-15

    The polymerase chain reaction is an immensely powerful technique for identification and detection purposes. Increasingly, competitive PCR is being used as the basis for quantification. However, sequence length, melting temperature and primary sequence have all been shown to influence the efficiency of amplification in PCR systems and may therefore compromise the required equivalent co-amplification of target and mimic in competitive PCR. The work discussed here not only illustrates the need to balance length and melting temperature when designing a competitive PCR assay, but also emphasises the importance of careful examination of sequences for GC-rich domains and other sequences giving rise to stable secondary structures which could reduce the efficiency of amplification by serving as pause or termination sites. We present data confirming that under particular circumstances such localised sequence, high melting temperature regions can act as permanent termination sites, and offer an explanation for the severity of this effect which results in prevention of amplification of a DNA mimic in competitive PCR. It is also demonstrated that when Taq DNA polymerase is used in the presence of betaine or a proof reading enzyme, the effect may be reduced or eliminated. PMID:9649616

  17. Progress on LAMOST High Resolution Spectrograph Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, KaI

    2015-08-01

    To explore more science case, LAMOST doesn't only has strong power on celestial spectral survey but also reserves an access to high resolution spectrograph with a few optional fibers. This commissioned spectrograph gets high resolution of R=30,000 - 60,000 at a broad visible band from 370nm to 760nm. With the consideration about site seeing variation in future, single science fiber covers wider field on sky of 4.5arcsec instead of the present 3.3arcsec. An oversize Echelle R4 grating and a pre-slit image slicer are adopted to relieve the spectrograph resolution pressure. High resolution observation will parallel to the low resolution spectral survey at a small cost of losing a few fibers (10 - 20) on telescope focal plane. These science fibers will locate at the different sky areas for more approciate choice. The presentation will give the detailed design introduction and the current project status.

  18. The Yersinia enterocolitica pYV Virulence Plasmid Contains Multiple Intrinsic DNA Bends Which Melt at 37°C

    PubMed Central

    Rohde, John R.; Luan, Xing-she; Rohde, Harold; Fox, James M.; Minnich, S. A.

    1999-01-01

    Temperature has a pleiotropic effect on Yersinia enterocolitica gene expression. Temperature-dependent phenotypes include the switching between two type III protein secretion systems, flagellum biosynthesis (≤30°C) and virulence plasmid-encoded Yop secretion (37°C). The mechanism by which temperature exerts this change in genetic programming is unclear; however, altered gene expression by temperature-dependent changes in DNA topology has been implicated. Here, we present evidence that the Y. enterocolitica virulence plasmid, pYV, undergoes a conformational transition between 30 and 37°C. Using a simplified two-dimensional, single-gel assay, we show that pYV contains multiple regions of intrinsic curvature, including virF, the positive activator of virulence genes. These bends are detectable at 30°C but melt at 37°C, the temperature at which the cells undergo phenotypic switching. We also show that pACYC184, a plasmid used as a reporter of temperature-induced changes in DNA supercoiling, has a single region of intrinsic bending detected by our assay. Topoisomers of pACYC184, with and without this bend, isolated from Y. enterocolitica were resolved by using chloroquine gels. The single bend has a dramatic influence on temperature-dependent DNA supercoiling. These data suggest that the Y. enterocolitica pYV plasmid may undergo a conformational change at the host temperature due to melting of DNA bends followed by compensatory adjustments in superhelical density. Hence, changes in DNA topology may be the temperature-sensing mechanism for virulence gene expression in Y. enterocolitica and other enteric pathogens. PMID:10400576

  19. ELECTRONICS UPGRADE OF HIGH RESOLUTION MASS SPECTROMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    Mcintosh, J; Joe Cordaro, J

    2008-03-10

    High resolution mass spectrometers are specialized systems that allow researchers to determine the exact mass of samples to four significant digits by using magnetic and electronic sector mass analyzers. Many of the systems in use today at research laboratories and universities were designed and built more than two decades ago. The manufacturers of these systems have abandoned the support for some of the mass spectrometers and parts to power and control them have become scarce or obsolete. The Savannah River National Laboratory has been involved in the upgrade of the electronics and software for these legacy machines. The Electronics Upgrade of High Resolution Mass Spectrometers consists of assembling high-end commercial instrumentation from reputable manufacturers with a minimal amount of customization to replace the electronics for the older systems. By taking advantage of advances in instrumentation, precise magnet control can be achieved using high resolution current sources and continuous feedback from a high resolution hall-effect probe. The custom equipment include a precision voltage divider/summing amplifier chassis, high voltage power supply chassis and a chassis for controlling the voltage emission for the mass spectrometer source tube. The upgrade package is versatile enough to interface with valve control, vacuum and other instrumentation. Instrument communication is via a combination of Ethernet and traditional IEEE-488 GPIB protocols. The system software upgrades include precision control, feedback and spectral waveform analysis tools.

  20. A High-Resolution Stopwatch for Cents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gingl, Z.; Kopasz, K.

    2011-01-01

    A very low-cost, easy-to-make stopwatch is presented to support various experiments in mechanics. The high-resolution stopwatch is based on two photodetectors connected directly to the microphone input of a sound card. Dedicated free open-source software has been developed and made available to download. The efficiency is demonstrated by a free…

  1. The rolling-circle melting-pot model for porcine circovirus DNA replication

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A stem-loop structure, formed by a pair of inverted repeats during DNA replication, is a conserved feature at the origin of DNA replication (Ori) among plant and animal viruses, bacteriophages and plasmids that replicate their genomes via the rolling-circle replication (RCR) mechanism. Porcine circo...

  2. High-resolution display system for mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskowitz, Michael J.; Huang, H. K.; Wang, Jun; Allen, Jeffrey; Sickles, Edward A.; Giles, Anthony

    1995-04-01

    A high resolution mammographic display station is implemented for clinical diagnosis and for a digital teaching file. The display consists of a specially designed, high resolution mammographic station which contains a connection to a 50 micron (variable spot size) laser film digitizer, two 2 K X 2.5 K display monitors, an image processor, a host computer, and a disk array for high speed image transfer to the display monitors. After digitization on a separate host computer, the files are immediately transferred to the display station and post- processed for viewing. The algorithm for post-processing of the digitized image applies a non- linear LUT to mimic the original film characteristics while taking into account the luminosity of the display monitors in an attempt to produce the highest digital image quality possible. Image processing functions for enhancing calcification and soft tissue are also available to assist the human observer in classification of objects within the image. Windowing and level controls are seamlessly integrated for each monitor, as well as magnification capabilities. For an image display at its full resolution (e.g., digitized at 100 microns), the magnification is accomplished with a roaming window utilizing simple 2X pixel replication. This has been found to be acceptable in preliminary tests with clinicians. Measurements of features on the 2 k displays are possible, as well. The display format accurately simulates mammographic viewing arrangements with automatic side-by-side historical, current, left and right craniocaudal, mediolateral, etc., view comparisons. This high resolution mammographic display is found to be essential for fast and accurate display of high resolution digitized mammograms. A digital mammographic teaching file has been designed and tested using this display architecture. The teaching file presents the case questions on the host display monitor, and the related images for each question are presented on the high

  3. High-resolution microbiota flow cytometry reveals dynamic colitis-associated changes in fecal bacterial composition.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Jakob; Hübschmann, Thomas; Schattenberg, Florian; Schumann, Joachim; Durek, Pawel; Riedel, René; Friedrich, Marie; Glauben, Rainer; Siegmund, Britta; Radbruch, Andreas; Müller, Susann; Chang, Hyun-Dong

    2016-05-01

    Using high-resolution flow cytometry of bacterial shape (forward scatter) and DNA content (DAPI staining), we detected dramatic differences in the fecal microbiota composition during murine colitis that were validated using 16S rDNA sequencing. This innovative method provides a fast and inexpensive tool to interrogate the microbiota on the single-cell level. PMID:26909672

  4. High resolution 3D nonlinear integrated inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Wang, Xuben; Li, Zhirong; Li, Qiong; Li, Zhengwen

    2009-06-01

    The high resolution 3D nonlinear integrated inversion method is based on nonlinear theory. Under layer control, the log data from several wells (or all wells) in the study area and seismic trace data adjacent to the wells are input to a network with multiple inputs and outputs and are integratedly trained to obtain an adaptive weight function of the entire study area. Integrated nonlinear mapping relationships are built and updated by the lateral and vertical geologic variations of the reservoirs. Therefore, the inversion process and its inversion results can be constrained and controlled and a stable seismic inversion section with high resolution with velocity inversion, impedance inversion, and density inversion sections, can be gained. Good geologic effects have been obtained in model computation tests and real data processing, which verified that this method has high precision, good practicality, and can be used for quantitative reservoir analysis.

  5. High-resolution Visible Spectra of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Chae Kyung; Kim, S.

    2006-09-01

    We have obtained high-resolution (R 30,000) spectra of Titan between 4,000 and 10,000 A on Feb. 23, 2005 (UT) using an optical echelle spectrograph (BOES) on the 1.8-m telescope at Bohyunsan Observatory, Korea. The raw Titan spectra contain telluric and solar absorption/emission lines. We used Kitt Peak solar atlases to remove the solar lines effectively. We also constructed synthetic spectra for the atmosphere of Titan including haze layers and utilizing laboratory spectra of CH4 available in literature. Preliminary results on the identifications of weak CH4 lines and on the derived opacities of the haze layers will be presented. Since the observations were carried out near the activities of Cassini observations of Titan, these high-resolution visible spectra are complementary to Cassini/VIMS imagery.

  6. Petrous apex mucocele: high resolution CT.

    PubMed

    Memis, A; Memis, A; Alper, H; Calli, C; Ozer, H; Ozdamar, N

    1994-11-01

    Mucocele of the petrous apex is very rare, only three cases having been reported. Since this area is inaccessible to direct examination, imaging, preferably high resolution computed tomography (HR CT) is essential. We report a case showing an eroding, non enhancing mass with sharp, lobulated contours, within the petrous apex. The presence of a large air cell on the opposite side suggested a mucocele. PMID:7862284

  7. High resolution schemes for hyperbolic conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harten, A.

    1983-01-01

    A class of new explicit second order accurate finite difference schemes for the computation of weak solutions of hyperbolic conservation laws is presented. These highly nonlinear schemes are obtained by applying a nonoscillatory first order accurate scheme to an appropriately modified flux function. The so-derived second order accurate schemes achieve high resolution while preserving the robustness of the original nonoscillatory first order accurate scheme. Numerical experiments are presented to demonstrate the performance of these new schemes.

  8. Star formation seen with high resolution spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winnewisser, G.

    1990-03-01

    More than 90 anorganic and organic molecules have been detected by high resolution spectroscopy in interstellar molecular clouds or in the envelopes of stars. The detected wavelengths of the lines - predominantly located in the millimeter- and submillimeter wavelength region - unequivocally identify the molecules and give precise knowledge of the physical and chemical conditions of molecular clouds from which the radiation emanates. The line intensities and line profiles contain information about the densities, temperatures and dynamics prevailing in molecular clouds.

  9. High resolution imaging of boron carbide microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Mackinnon, I.D.R.; Aselage, T.; Van Deusen, S.B.

    1985-08-01

    Two samples of boron carbide have been examined using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). A hot-pressed B/sub 13/C/sub 2/ sample shows a high density of variable width twins normal to (10*1). Subtle shifts or offsets of lattice fringes along the twin plane and normal to approx.(10*5) were also observed. A B/sub 4/C powder showed little evidence of stacking disorder in crystalline regions.

  10. High resolution imaging of boron carbide microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    MacKinnon, I.D.R.; Aselage, T.; Van Deusen, S.B.

    1986-04-15

    Two samples of boron carbide have been examined using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). A hot-pressed B/sub 13/C/sub 2/ sample shows a high density of variable width twins normal to (10*1). Subtle shifts or offsets of lattice fringes along the twin plane and normal to approx.(10*5) were also observed. A B/sub 4/C powder showed little evidence of stacking disorder in crystalline regions.

  11. High-Resolution X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ODell, Stephen L.; Brissenden, Roger J.; Davis, William; Elsner, Ronald F.; Elvis, Martin; Freeman, Mark; Gaetz, Terry; Gorenstein, Paul; Gubarev, Mikhail V.

    2010-01-01

    Fundamental needs for future x-ray telescopes: a) Sharp images => excellent angular resolution. b) High throughput => large aperture areas. Generation-X optics technical challenges: a) High resolution => precision mirrors & alignment. b) Large apertures => lots of lightweight mirrors. Innovation needed for technical readiness: a) 4 top-level error terms contribute to image size. b) There are approaches to controlling those errors. Innovation needed for manufacturing readiness. Programmatic issues are comparably challenging.

  12. Conversational high resolution mass spectrographic data reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romiez, M. P.

    1973-01-01

    A FORTRAN 4 program is described which reduces the data obtained from a high resolution mass spectrograph. The program (1) calculates an accurate mass for each line on the photoplate, and (2) assigns elemental compositions to each accurate mass. The program is intended for use in a time-shared computing environment and makes use of the conversational aspects of time-sharing operating systems.

  13. High-Resolution US of Rheumatologic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Taljanovic, Mihra S; Melville, David M; Gimber, Lana H; Scalcione, Luke R; Miller, Margaret D; Kwoh, C Kent; Klauser, Andrea S

    2015-01-01

    For the past 15 years, high-resolution ultrasonography (US) is being routinely and increasingly used for initial evaluation and treatment follow-up of rheumatologic diseases. This imaging technique is performed by using high-frequency linear transducers and has proved to be a powerful diagnostic tool in evaluation of articular erosions, simple and complex joint and bursal effusions, tendon sheath effusions, and synovitis, with results comparable to those of magnetic resonance imaging, excluding detection of bone marrow edema. Crystal deposition diseases including gouty arthropathy and calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease (CPPD) have characteristic appearances at US, enabling differentiation between these two diseases and from inflammatory arthropathies. Enthesopathy, which frequently accompanies psoriatic and reactive arthritis, also has a characteristic appearance at high-resolution US, distinguishing these two entities from other inflammatory and metabolic arthropathies. The presence of Doppler signal in examined joints, bursae, and tendon sheaths indicates active synovitis. Microbubble echo contrast agents augment detection of tissue vascularity and may act in the future as a drug delivery vehicle. Frequently, joint, tendon sheath, and bursal fluid aspirations and therapeutic injections are performed under US guidance. The authors describe the high-resolution US technique including gray-scale, color or power Doppler, and contrast agent-enhanced US that is used in evaluation of rheumatologic diseases of the wrist and hand and the ankle and foot in their routine clinical practice. This article demonstrates imaging findings of normal joints, rheumatoid arthritis, gouty arthritis, CPPD, psoriatic and reactive arthritis, and osteoarthritis. PMID:26562235

  14. High-Resolution Traction Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Plotnikov, Sergey V.; Sabass, Benedikt; Schwarz, Ulrich S.; Waterman, Clare M.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular forces generated by the actomyosin cytoskeleton and transmitted to the extracellular matrix (ECM) through discrete, integrin-based protein assemblies, that is, focal adhesions, are critical to developmental morphogenesis and tissue homeostasis, as well as disease progression in cancer. However, quantitative mapping of these forces has been difficult since there has been no experimental technique to visualize nanonewton forces at submicrometer spatial resolution. Here, we provide detailed protocols for measuring cellular forces exerted on two-dimensional elastic substrates with a high-resolution traction force microscopy (TFM) method. We describe fabrication of polyacrylamide substrates labeled with multiple colors of fiducial markers, functionalization of the substrates with ECM proteins, setting up the experiment, and imaging procedures. In addition, we provide the theoretical background of traction reconstruction and experimental considerations important to design a high-resolution TFM experiment. We describe the implementation of a new algorithm for processing of images of fiducial markers that are taken below the surface of the substrate, which significantly improves data quality. We demonstrate the application of the algorithm and explain how to choose a regularization parameter for suppression of the measurement error. A brief discussion of different ways to visualize and analyze the results serves to illustrate possible uses of high-resolution TFM in biomedical research. PMID:24974038

  15. High-resolution mapping of bifurcations in nonlinear biochemical circuits.

    PubMed

    Genot, A J; Baccouche, A; Sieskind, R; Aubert-Kato, N; Bredeche, N; Bartolo, J F; Taly, V; Fujii, T; Rondelez, Y

    2016-08-01

    Analog molecular circuits can exploit the nonlinear nature of biochemical reaction networks to compute low-precision outputs with fewer resources than digital circuits. This analog computation is similar to that employed by gene-regulation networks. Although digital systems have a tractable link between structure and function, the nonlinear and continuous nature of analog circuits yields an intricate functional landscape, which makes their design counter-intuitive, their characterization laborious and their analysis delicate. Here, using droplet-based microfluidics, we map with high resolution and dimensionality the bifurcation diagrams of two synthetic, out-of-equilibrium and nonlinear programs: a bistable DNA switch and a predator-prey DNA oscillator. The diagrams delineate where function is optimal, dynamics bifurcates and models fail. Inverse problem solving on these large-scale data sets indicates interference from enzymatic coupling. Additionally, data mining exposes the presence of rare, stochastically bursting oscillators near deterministic bifurcations. PMID:27442281

  16. High-resolution mapping of bifurcations in nonlinear biochemical circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genot, A. J.; Baccouche, A.; Sieskind, R.; Aubert-Kato, N.; Bredeche, N.; Bartolo, J. F.; Taly, V.; Fujii, T.; Rondelez, Y.

    2016-08-01

    Analog molecular circuits can exploit the nonlinear nature of biochemical reaction networks to compute low-precision outputs with fewer resources than digital circuits. This analog computation is similar to that employed by gene-regulation networks. Although digital systems have a tractable link between structure and function, the nonlinear and continuous nature of analog circuits yields an intricate functional landscape, which makes their design counter-intuitive, their characterization laborious and their analysis delicate. Here, using droplet-based microfluidics, we map with high resolution and dimensionality the bifurcation diagrams of two synthetic, out-of-equilibrium and nonlinear programs: a bistable DNA switch and a predator–prey DNA oscillator. The diagrams delineate where function is optimal, dynamics bifurcates and models fail. Inverse problem solving on these large-scale data sets indicates interference from enzymatic coupling. Additionally, data mining exposes the presence of rare, stochastically bursting oscillators near deterministic bifurcations.

  17. Observation of HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein induced TAR DNA melting at the single molecule level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosa, Gonzalo; Harbron, Elizabeth; O'Connor, Donald; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Barbara, Paul

    2003-03-01

    Reverse transcription of the HIV-1 RNA genome involves several nucleic acid rearrangement steps, and the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) plays a key role in this process. NC is a nucleic acid chaperone protein, which facilitates the formation of the most stable nucleic acid structures. Single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (SM-FRET) measurements enable us to observe the NC-induced conformational fluctuations of a transactivation response region (TAR) DNA hairpin, which is part of the initial product of reverse transcription known as minus-strand strong-stop DNA. SM-FRET studies show that the majority of conformational fluctuations of the fluorescently-labeled TAR DNA hairpin in the presence of NC occur in <100 ms. A single molecule explores a wide range of confomations unpon NC binding, with fluctuations encompassing as many as 40 bases in both arms of the hairpin. No conformational fluctuations are observed with the dye-labeled TAR DNA hairpin in the absence of NC or when a labeled TAR DNA hairpin variant lacking bulges and internal loops is analyzed in the presence of NC. This study represents the first real-time observation of NC-mediated nucleic acid conformational fluctuations, revealing new insights into NC's nucleic acid chaperone activity.

  18. Ligand induced stabilization of the melting temperature of the HSV-1 single-strand DNA binding protein using the thermal shift assay.

    PubMed

    Rupesh, Kanchi Ravi; Smith, Aaron; Boehmer, Paul E

    2014-11-01

    We have adapted the thermal shift assay to measure the ligand binding properties of the herpes simplex virus-1 single-strand DNA binding protein, ICP8. By measuring SYPRO Orange fluorescence in microtiter plates using a fluorescence-enabled thermal cycler, we have quantified the effects of oligonucleotide ligands on the melting temperature of ICP8. We found that single-stranded oligomers raise the melting temperature of ICP8 in a length- and concentration-dependent manner, ranging from 1°C for (dT)5 to a maximum of 9°C with oligomers ⩾10 nucleotides, with an apparent Kd of <1μM for (dT)20. Specifically, the results indicate that ICP8 is capable of interacting with oligomers as short as 5 nucleotides. Moreover, the observed increases in melting temperature of up to 9°C, indicates that single-strand DNA binding significantly stabilizes the structure of ICP8. This assay may be applied to investigate the ligand binding proteins of other single-strand DNA binding proteins and used as a high-throughput screen to identify compounds with therapeutic potential that inhibit single-strand DNA binding. As proof of concept, the single-strand DNA binding agent ciprofloxacin reduces the ligand induced stabilization of the melting temperature of ICP8 in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:25449284

  19. Ligand induced stabilization of the melting temperature of the HSV-1 single-strand DNA binding protein using the thermal shift assay

    PubMed Central

    Rupesh, Kanchi Ravi; Smith, Aaron; Boehmer, Paul E.

    2014-01-01

    We have adapted the thermal shift assay to measure the ligand binding properties of the herpes simplex virus-1 single-strand DNA binding protein, ICP8. By measuring SYPRO Orange fluorescence in microtiter plates using a fluorescence-enabled thermal cycler, we have quantified the effects of oligonucleotide ligands on the melting temperature of ICP8. We found that single-stranded oligomers raise the melting temperature of ICP8 in a length- and concentration-dependent manner, ranging from 1 °C for (dT)5 to a maximum of 9 °C with oligomers ≥10 nucleotides, with an apparent Kd of <1 µM for (dT)20. Specifically, the results indicate that ICP8 is capable of interacting with oligomers as short as 5 nucleotides. Moreover, the observed increases in melting temperature of up to 9 °C, indicates that single-strand DNA binding significantly stabilizes the structure of ICP8. This assay may be applied to investigate the ligand binding proteins of other single-strand DNA binding proteins and used as a high-throughput screen to identify compounds with therapeutic potential that inhibit single-strand DNA binding. As proof of concept, the single-strand DNA binding agent ciprofloxacin reduces the ligand induced stabilization of the melting temperature of ICP8 in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:25449284

  20. A high-resolution record of Greenland mass balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Malcolm; Leeson, Amber; Shepherd, Andrew; Briggs, Kate; Armitage, Thomas W. K.; Hogg, Anna; Kuipers Munneke, Peter; Broeke, Michiel; Noël, Brice; Berg, Willem Jan; Ligtenberg, Stefan; Horwath, Martin; Groh, Andreas; Muir, Alan; Gilbert, Lin

    2016-07-01

    We map recent Greenland Ice Sheet elevation change at high spatial (5 km) and temporal (monthly) resolution using CryoSat-2 altimetry. After correcting for the impact of changing snowpack properties associated with unprecedented surface melting in 2012, we find good agreement (3 cm/yr bias) with airborne measurements. With the aid of regional climate and firn modeling, we compute high spatial and temporal resolution records of Greenland mass evolution, which correlate (R = 0.96) with monthly satellite gravimetry and reveal glacier dynamic imbalance. During 2011-2014, Greenland mass loss averaged 269 ± 51 Gt/yr. Atmospherically driven losses were widespread, with surface melt variability driving large fluctuations in the annual mass deficit. Terminus regions of five dynamically thinning glaciers, which constitute less than 1% of Greenland's area, contributed more than 12% of the net ice loss. This high-resolution record demonstrates that mass deficits extending over small spatial and temporal scales have made a relatively large contribution to recent ice sheet imbalance.

  1. High resolution SAR applications and instrument design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dionisio, C.; Torre, A.

    1993-01-01

    The Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) has viewed, in the last two years, a huge increment of interest from many preset and potential users. The good spatial resolution associated to the all weather capability lead to considering SAR not only a scientific instrument but a tool for verifying and controlling the daily human relationships with the Earth Environment. New missions were identified for SAR as spatial resolution became lower than three meters: disasters, pollution, ships traffic, volcanic eruptions, earthquake effect are only a few of the possible objects which can be effectively detected, controlled and monitored by SAR mounted on satellites. High resolution radar design constraints and dimensioning are discussed.

  2. High resolution extremity CT for biomechanics modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, A.E.; Brand, H.; Hollerbach, K.; Logan, C.M.; Martz, H.E.

    1995-09-23

    With the advent of ever more powerful computing and finite element analysis (FEA) capabilities, the bone and joint geometry detail available from either commercial surface definitions or from medical CT scans is inadequate. For dynamic FEA modeling of joints, precise articular contours are necessary to get appropriate contact definition. In this project, a fresh cadaver extremity was suspended in parafin in a lucite cylinder and then scanned with an industrial CT system to generate a high resolution data set for use in biomechanics modeling.

  3. High Resolution Sapphire Bragg Backscattering Monochromator

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, P. van der; Wille, H.-C.; Shvyd'ko, Yu. V.

    2007-01-19

    We present a temperature stabilised high resolution sapphire backscattering monochromator. The device consists of a sapphire crystal inside a cold nitrogen gas cooled, temperature stabilised chamber with a passively temperature stabilised screen. The achieved temperature stability of {+-}2mK allows for an energy resolution of {delta}E/E {<=} 10-7 at energies in the range of 30-70 keV. The device was developed for nuclear resonant scattering above 30 keV, where appropriate solutions did not exist until now.

  4. A High Resolution Scale-of-four

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Fitch, V.

    1949-08-25

    A high resolution scale-of-four has been developed to be used in conjunction with the nuclear particle detection devices in applications where the counting rate is unusually high. Specifically, it is intended to precede the commercially available medium resolution scaling circuits and so decrease the resolving time of the counting system. The circuit will function reliably on continuously recurring pulses separated by less than 0.1 microseconds. It will resolve two pulses (occurring at a moderate repetition rate) which are spaced at 0.04 microseconds. A five-volt input signal is sufficient to actuate the device.

  5. High-Resolution Manometry in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Pandolfino, John E.

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution manometry (HRM) is the primary method used to evaluate esophageal motor function. Displayed and interpreted by esophageal pressure topography (EPT), HRM/ EPT provides a detailed assessment of esophageal function that is useful in the evaluation of patients with nonobstructive dysphagia and before foregut surgery. Esophageal motility diagnoses are determined systematically by applying objective metrics of esophageal sphincter and peristaltic function to the Chicago Classification of esophageal motility disorders. This article discusses HRM study, EPT interpretation, and the translation of EPT findings into clinical practice. Examples are provided to illustrate several clinical challenges. PMID:27118931

  6. High resolution interferometry of cool stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    A description is given of results obtained in a program of infrared high resolution spectroscopy of cool stars. The nature of infrared stellar spectra is considered along with questions regarding astrophysics and stellar infrared spectroscopy. An abundance analysis for alpha Ori (Betelgeuse) is conducted. The C-12/C-13 abundance ratio is examined and attention is given to the O-16/O-18 and O-16/O-17 abundance ratios. M stars and SiO vibration-rotation bands are discussed and questions regarding the characteristics of the molecular hydrogen quadrupole vibration-rotation lines are explored.

  7. A Portable, High Resolution, Surface Measurement Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihlefeld, Curtis M.; Burns, Bradley M.; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    A high resolution, portable, surface measurement device has been demonstrated to provide micron-resolution topographical plots. This device was specifically developed to allow in-situ measurements of defects on the Space Shuttle Orbiter windows, but is versatile enough to be used on a wide variety of surfaces. This paper discusses the choice of an optical sensor and then the decisions required to convert a lab bench optical measurement device into an ergonomic portable system. The necessary trade-offs between performance and portability are presented along with a description of the device developed to measure Orbiter window defects.

  8. High-resolution color photographic reproductions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, John J.

    1997-04-01

    This paper will describe a fine-art reproduction process that: captures painting information with high-resolution color photographs; scans the information into a 300 megabyte digital file; performs a 3D color calibration in a dedicated hardware color-transform circuit; makes a master positive color transparency and makes a reproduction on polaroid color print film. The master transparency can be used to expose a large number of images. This combines the efficiency of instant photography with the color fidelity of digital color transforms.

  9. High-resolution scanning hall probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Clifford; Luan, Lan; Hendrik Bluhm, J.; Moler, Kathryn; Guikema, Janice; Zeldov, Eli; Shtrikman, Hadas

    2006-03-01

    Scanning hall sensors can be used to directly image magnetic fields at surfaces. They offer high resolution, high sensitivity, operability over a broad temperature range, and linearity. We have fabricated hall sensors on GaAs / Al0.35Ga0.65As and GaAs / Al0.3Ga0.7As heterostructures containing 2D electron gases 40, 39 and 140nm beneath the surface. The sensitive areas of our probes range from microns to 85nm on a side. We report on the field sensitivities of probes of various sizes and their spatial resolution in a scanning configuration.

  10. Common high-resolution MMW scene generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saylor, Annie V.; McPherson, Dwight A.; Satterfield, H. DeWayne; Sholes, William J.; Mobley, Scott B.

    2001-08-01

    The development of a modularized millimeter wave (MMW) target and background high resolution scene generator is reported. The scene generator's underlying algorithms are applicable to both digital and real-time hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) simulations. The scene generator will be configurable for a variety of MMW and multi-mode sensors employing state of the art signal processing techniques. At present, digital simulations for MMW and multi-mode sensor development and testing are custom-designed by the seeker vendor and are verified, validated, and operated by both the vendor and government in simulation-based acquisition. A typical competition may involve several vendors, each requiring high resolution target and background models for proper exercise of seeker algorithms. There is a need and desire by both the government and sensor vendors to eliminate costly re-design and re-development of digital simulations. Additional efficiencies are realized by assuring commonality between digital and HWIL simulation MMW scene generators, eliminating duplication of verification and validation efforts.

  11. High Resolution Acoustoelastic Measurements of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, Mark; Guy, Samuel; Heyman, Joseph

    2006-11-01

    As materials become more complex, there is an increasing need for high resolution measurements to characterize strength and damage in the materials. Typically, the criterion for rejecting a part is based on the detection of a flaw of a specific size in a critical location. Interestingly, if a low stress field exists at the flaw site, the flaw may not grow over time. Similarly, in a part that shows no unacceptable indications, a high stress state may cause the flaw to quickly grow through the part leading to failure. In other cases, a controlled amount of stress (in a specific direction or type) is purposely added to the material to prevent flaw growth. Inspection time intervals are based knowing and controlling the stress environment to predict the flaw growth. Luna Innovations Incorporated has developed a high resolution ultrasonic instrument that can enhance the integrity of critical hardware by measuring changes in the stress state in a material. Knowledge of the stress state plus knowledge of crack sizes greatly improves structural engineers' capability of life prediction. System data will be shown for tests to stresses near holes in laboratory fabricated aircraft metal samples. Scans of the spatial distribution of stresses will be compared with finite element models of the structure.

  12. Limiting liability via high resolution image processing

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwade, L.E.; Overlin, T.K.

    1996-12-31

    The utilization of high resolution image processing allows forensic analysts and visualization scientists to assist detectives by enhancing field photographs, and by providing the tools and training to increase the quality and usability of field photos. Through the use of digitized photographs and computerized enhancement software, field evidence can be obtained and processed as `evidence ready`, even in poor lighting and shadowed conditions or darkened rooms. These images, which are most often unusable when taken with standard camera equipment, can be shot in the worst of photographic condition and be processed as usable evidence. Visualization scientists have taken the use of digital photographic image processing and moved the process of crime scene photos into the technology age. The use of high resolution technology will assist law enforcement in making better use of crime scene photography and positive identification of prints. Valuable court room and investigation time can be saved and better served by this accurate, performance based process. Inconclusive evidence does not lead to convictions. Enhancement of the photographic capability helps solve one major problem with crime scene photos, that if taken with standard equipment and without the benefit of enhancement software would be inconclusive, thus allowing guilty parties to be set free due to lack of evidence.

  13. High resolution guided wave pipe inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velichko, Alexander; Wilcox, Paul D.

    2009-03-01

    Commercial guided wave inspection systems provide rapid screening of pipes, but limited sizing capability for small defects. However, accurate detection and sizing of small defects is essential for assessing the integrity of inaccessible pipe regions where guided waves provide the only possible inspection mechanism. In this paper an array-based approach is presented that allows guided waves to be focused on both transmission and reception to produce a high resolution image of a length of pipe. In the image, it is shown that a signal to coherent noise ratio of over 40 dB with respect to the reflected signal from a free end of pipe can be obtained, even taking into account typical levels of experimental uncertainty in terms of transducer positioning, wave velocity etc. The combination of an image with high resolution and a 40 dB dynamic range enables the detection of very small defects. It also allows the in-plane shape of defects over a certain size to be observed directly. Simulations are used to estimate the detection and sizing capability of the system for crack-like defects. Results are presented from a prototype system that uses EMATs to fully focus pipe guided wave modes on both transmission and reception in a 12 inch diameter stainless steel pipe. The 40 dB signal to coherent noise ratio is obtained experimentally and a 2 mm diameter (0.08 wavelengths) half-thickness hole is shown to be detectable.

  14. High Resolution Spectroscopy to Support Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2003-01-01

    Spectroscopic parameters (such as line position, intensity, broadening and shifting coefficients and their temperature dependences, line mixing coefficients etc.) for various molecular species of atmospheric interest are determined. In order to achieve these results, infrared spectra of several molecular bands are obtained using high-resolution recording instruments such as tunable diode laser spectrometer and Fourier transform spectrometers. Using sophisticated analysis routines (Multispectrum nonlinear least squares technique) these high-resolution infrared spectra are processed to determine the various spectral line parameters that are cited above. Spectra were taken using the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at the National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak, Arizona as well as the Bruker FTS at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) at Richland, Washington. Most of the spectra are acquired not only at room temperature, but also at several different cold temperatures. This procedure is necessary to study the variation of the spectral line parameters as a function of temperature in order to simulate the Earth's and other planetary atmospheric environments. Depending upon the strength or weakness of the various bands recorded and analyzed, the length(s) of the absorption cells in which the gas samples under study are kept varied from a few centimeters up to several meters and the sample temperatures varied from approximately +30 C to -63 C. Research on several infrared bands of various molecular species and their isotopomers are undertaken. Those studies are briefly described.

  15. High Resolution Spectroscopy to Support Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, D. Chris; Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2000-01-01

    The major research activities performed during the cooperative agreement enhanced our spectroscopic knowledge of molecules of atmospheric interest such as carbon dioxide, water vapor, ozone, methane, and carbon monoxide, to name a few. Measurements were made using the NASA Langley Tunable Diode Laser Spectrometer System (TDL) and several Fourier Transform Spectrometer Systems (FTS) around the globe. The results from these studies made remarkable improvements in the line positions and intensities for several molecules, particularly ozone and carbon dioxide in the 2 to 17-micrometer spectral region. Measurements of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients and the temperature dependence of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients for infrared transitions of ozone, methane, and water vapor were also performed. Results from these studies have been used for retrievals of stratospheric gas concentration profiles from data collected by several Upper Atmospheric Research satellite (UARS) infrared instruments as well as in the analysis of high resolution atmospheric spectra such as those acquired by space-based, ground-based, and various balloon- and aircraft-borne experiments. Our results made significant contributions in several updates of the HITRAN (HIgh resolution TRANsmission) spectral line parameters database. This database enjoys worldwide recognition in research involving diversified scientific fields.

  16. High-Resolution PET Detector. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karp, Joel

    2014-03-26

    The objective of this project was to develop an understanding of the limits of performance for a high resolution PET detector using an approach based on continuous scintillation crystals rather than pixelated crystals. The overall goal was to design a high-resolution detector, which requires both high spatial resolution and high sensitivity for 511 keV gammas. Continuous scintillation detectors (Anger cameras) have been used extensively for both single-photon and PET scanners, however, these instruments were based on NaI(Tl) scintillators using relatively large, individual photo-multipliers. In this project we investigated the potential of this type of detector technology to achieve higher spatial resolution through the use of improved scintillator materials and photo-sensors, and modification of the detector surface to optimize the light response function.We achieved an average spatial resolution of 3-mm for a 25-mm thick, LYSO continuous detector using a maximum likelihood position algorithm and shallow slots cut into the entrance surface.

  17. High Resolution Spectroscopy to Support Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, D. Chris; Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2000-01-01

    The major research activities performed during the cooperative agreement enhanced our spectroscopic knowledge of molecules of atmospheric interest such as carbon dioxide, water vapor, ozone, methane, and carbon monoxide, to name a few. Measurements were made using the NASA Langley Tunable Diode Laser Spectrometer System (TDL) and several Fourier Transform Spectrometer Systems (FTS) around the globe. The results from these studies made remarkable improvements in the line positions and intensities for several molecules, particularly ozone and carbon dioxide in the 2 to 17-micrometer spectral region. Measurements of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients and the temperature dependence of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients for infrared transitions of ozone, methane, and water vapor were also performed. Results from these studies have been used for retrievals of stratospheric gas concentration profiles from data collected by several Upper Atmospheric Research satellite (UARS) infrared instruments as well as in the analysis of high resolution atmospheric spectra such as those acquired by space-based, ground-based, and various balloon-and aircraft-borne experiments. Our results made significant contributions in several updates of the HITRAN (HIgh resolution TRANsmission) spectral line parameters database. This database enjoys worldwide recognition in research involving diversified scientific fields.

  18. High Resolution Camera for Mapping Titan Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, Bianca

    2011-01-01

    Titan, Saturn's largest moon, has a dense atmosphere and is the only object besides Earth to have stable liquids at its surface. The Cassini/Huygens mission has revealed the extraordinary breadth of geological processes shaping its surface. Further study requires high resolution imaging of the surface, which is restrained by light absorption by methane and scattering from aerosols. The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft has demonstrated that Titan's surface can be observed within several windows in the near infrared, allowing us to process several regions in order to create a geological map and to determine the morphology. Specular reflections monitored on the lakes of the North Pole show little scattering at 5 microns, which, combined with the present study of Titan's northern pole area, refutes the paradigm that only radar can achieve high resolution mapping of the surface. The present data allowed us to monitor the evolution of lakes, to identify additional lakes at the Northern Pole, to examine Titan's hypothesis of non-synchronous rotation and to analyze the albedo of the North Pole surface. Future missions to Titan could carry a camera with 5 micron detectors and a carbon fiber radiator for weight reduction.

  19. High-Resolution Scintimammography: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rachel F. Brem; Joelle M. Schoonjans; Douglas A. Kieper; Stan Majewski; Steven Goodman; Cahid Civelek

    2002-07-01

    This study evaluated a novel high-resolution breast-specific gamma camera (HRBGC) for the detection of suggestive breast lesions. Methods: Fifty patients (with 58 breast lesions) for whom a scintimammogram was clinically indicated were prospectively evaluated with a general-purpose gamma camera and a novel HRBGC prototype. The results of conventional and high-resolution nuclear studies were prospectively classified as negative (normal or benign) or positive (suggestive or malignant) by 2 radiologists who were unaware of the mammographic and histologic results. All of the included lesions were confirmed by pathology. Results: There were 30 benign and 28 malignant lesions. The sensitivity for detection of breast cancer was 64.3% (18/28) with the conventional camera and 78.6% (22/28) with the HRBGC. The specificity with both systems was 93.3% (28/30). For the 18 nonpalpable lesions, sensitivity was 55.5% (10/18) and 72.2% (13/18) with the general-purpose camera and the HRBGC, respectively. For lesions 1 cm, 7 of 15 were detected with the general-purpose camera and 10 of 15 with the HRBGC. Four lesions (median size, 8.5 mm) were detected only with the HRBGC and were missed by the conventional camera. Conclusion: Evaluation of indeterminate breast lesions with an HRBGC results in improved sensitivity for the detection of cancer, with greater improvement shown for nonpalpable and 1-cm lesions.

  20. Clementine High Resolution Camera Mosaicking Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This report constitutes the final report for NASA Contract NASW-5054. This project processed Clementine I high resolution images of the Moon, mosaicked these images together, and created a 22-disk set of compact disk read-only memory (CD-ROM) volumes. The mosaics were produced through semi-automated registration and calibration of the high resolution (HiRes) camera's data against the geometrically and photometrically controlled Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/Vis) Basemap Mosaic produced by the US Geological Survey (USGS). The HiRes mosaics were compiled from non-uniformity corrected, 750 nanometer ("D") filter high resolution nadir-looking observations. The images were spatially warped using the sinusoidal equal-area projection at a scale of 20 m/pixel for sub-polar mosaics (below 80 deg. latitude) and using the stereographic projection at a scale of 30 m/pixel for polar mosaics. Only images with emission angles less than approximately 50 were used. Images from non-mapping cross-track slews, which tended to have large SPICE errors, were generally omitted. The locations of the resulting image population were found to be offset from the UV/Vis basemap by up to 13 km (0.4 deg.). Geometric control was taken from the 100 m/pixel global and 150 m/pixel polar USGS Clementine Basemap Mosaics compiled from the 750 nm Ultraviolet/Visible Clementine imaging system. Radiometric calibration was achieved by removing the image nonuniformity dominated by the HiRes system's light intensifier. Also provided are offset and scale factors, achieved by a fit of the HiRes data to the corresponding photometrically calibrated UV/Vis basemap, that approximately transform the 8-bit HiRes data to photometric units. The sub-polar mosaics are divided into tiles that cover approximately 1.75 deg. of latitude and span the longitude range of the mosaicked frames. Images from a given orbit are map projected using the orbit's nominal central latitude. Polar mosaics are tiled into squares 2250 pixels on a

  1. High Resolution Powder Diffraction and Structure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, D. E.

    1999-04-23

    It is clear that high-resolution synchrotrons X-ray powder diffraction is a very powerful and convenient tool for material characterization and structure determination. Most investigations to date have been carried out under ambient conditions and have focused on structure solution and refinement. The application of high-resolution techniques to increasingly complex structures will certainly represent an important part of future studies, and it has been seen how ab initio solution of structures with perhaps 100 atoms in the asymmetric unit is within the realms of possibility. However, the ease with which temperature-dependence measurements can be made combined with improvements in the technology of position-sensitive detectors will undoubtedly stimulate precise in situ structural studies of phase transitions and related phenomena. One challenge in this area will be to develop high-resolution techniques for ultra-high pressure investigations in diamond anvil cells. This will require highly focused beams and very precise collimation in front of the cell down to dimensions of 50 {micro}m or less. Anomalous scattering offers many interesting possibilities as well. As a means of enhancing scattering contrast it has applications not only to the determination of cation distribution in mixed systems such as the superconducting oxides discussed in Section 9.5.3, but also to the location of specific cations in partially occupied sites, such as the extra-framework positions in zeolites, for example. Another possible application is to provide phasing information for ab initio structure solution. Finally, the precise determination of f as a function of energy through an absorption edge can provide useful information about cation oxidation states, particularly in conjunction with XANES data. In contrast to many experiments at a synchrotron facility, powder diffraction is a relatively simple and user-friendly technique, and most of the procedures and software for data analysis

  2. A melting pot of multicontinental mtDNA lineages in admixed Venezuelans.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Ignacio-Veiga, Ana; Alvarez-Iglesias, Vanesa; Pastoriza-Mourelle, Ana; Ruíz, Yarimar; Pineda, Lennie; Carracedo, Angel; Salas, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The arrival of Europeans in Colonial and post-Colonial times coupled with the forced introduction of sub-Saharan Africans have dramatically changed the genetic background of Venezuela. The main aim of the present study was to evaluate, through the study of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation, the extent of admixture and the characterization of the most likely continental ancestral sources of present-day urban Venezuelans. We analyzed two admixed populations that have experienced different demographic histories, namely, Caracas (n = 131) and Pueblo Llano (n = 219). The native American component of admixed Venezuelans accounted for 80% (46% haplogroup [hg] A2, 7% hg B2, 21% hg C1, and 6% hg D1) of all mtDNAs; while the sub-Saharan and European contributions made up ∼10% each, indicating that Trans-Atlantic immigrants have only partially erased the native American nature of Venezuelans. A Bayesian-based model allowed the different contributions of European countries to admixed Venezuelans to be disentangled (Spain: ∼38.4%, Portugal: ∼35.5%, Italy: ∼27.0%), in good agreement with the documented history. Seventeen entire mtDNA genomes were sequenced, which allowed five new native American branches to be discovered. B2j and B2k, are supported by two different haplotypes and control region data, and their coalescence ages are 3.9 k.y. (95% C.I. 0-7.8) and 2.6 k.y. (95% C.I. 0.1-5.2), respectively. The other clades were exclusively observed in Pueblo Llano and they show the fingerprint of strong recent genetic drift coupled with severe historical consanguinity episodes that might explain the high prevalence of certain Mendelian and complex multi-factorial diseases in this region. PMID:22120584

  3. High resolution electron crystallography of protein molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Glaeser, R.M. |; Downing, K.H.

    1993-06-01

    Electron diffraction data and high resolution images can now be used to obtain accurate, three-dimensional density maps of biological macromolecules. These density maps can be interpreted by building an atomic-resolution model of the structure into the experimental density. The Cowley-Moodie formalism of dynamical diffraction theory has been used to validate the use of kinematic diffraction theory, strictly the weak phase object approximation, in producing such 3-D density maps. Further improvements in the preparation of very flat specimens and in the retention of diffraction to a resolution of 0.2 nm or better could result in electron crystallography becoming as important a technique as x-ray crystallography currently is for the field of structural molecular biology.

  4. Computer synthesis of high resolution electron micrographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathan, R.

    1976-01-01

    Specimen damage, spherical aberration, low contrast and noisy sensors combine to prevent direct atomic viewing in a conventional electron microscope. The paper describes two methods for obtaining ultra-high resolution in biological specimens under the electron microscope. The first method assumes the physical limits of the electron objective lens and uses a series of dark field images of biological crystals to obtain direct information on the phases of the Fourier diffraction maxima; this information is used in an appropriate computer to synthesize a large aperture lens for a 1-A resolution. The second method assumes there is sufficient amplitude scatter from images recorded in focus which can be utilized with a sensitive densitometer and computer contrast stretching to yield fine structure image details. Cancer virus characterization is discussed as an illustrative example. Numerous photographs supplement the text.

  5. High Resolution, High Frame Rate Video Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Papers and working group summaries presented at the High Resolution, High Frame Rate Video (HHV) Workshop are compiled. HHV system is intended for future use on the Space Shuttle and Space Station Freedom. The Workshop was held for the dual purpose of: (1) allowing potential scientific users to assess the utility of the proposed system for monitoring microgravity science experiments; and (2) letting technical experts from industry recommend improvements to the proposed near-term HHV system. The following topics are covered: (1) State of the art in the video system performance; (2) Development plan for the HHV system; (3) Advanced technology for image gathering, coding, and processing; (4) Data compression applied to HHV; (5) Data transmission networks; and (6) Results of the users' requirements survey conducted by NASA.

  6. A simple, high efficiency, high resolution spectropolarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barden, Samuel C.

    2012-09-01

    A simple concept is described that uses volume phase holographic gratings as polarizing dispersers for a high efficiency, high resolution spectropolarimeter. Although the idea has previously been mentioned in the literature as possible, such a concept has not been explored in detail. Performance analysis is presented for a VPHG spectropolarimeter concept that could be utilized for both solar and night-time astronomy. Instrumental peak efficiency can approach 100% with spectral dispersions permitting R~200,000 spectral resolution with diffraction limited telescopes. The instrument has 3-channels: two dispersed image planes with orthogonal polarization and an undispersed image plane. The concept has a range of versatility where it could be configured (with appropriate half-wave plates) for slit-fed spectroscopy or without slits for snapshot/hyperspectral/tomographic spectroscopic imaging. Multiplex gratings could also be used for the simultaneous recording of two separate spectral bands or multiple instruments could be daisy chained with beam splitters for further spectral coverage.

  7. High-resolution spectrometer for atmospheric studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Carlo, Piero; Barone, Massimiliano; D'Altorio, Alfonso; Dari-Salisburgo, Cesare; Pietropaolo, Ermanno

    2009-08-01

    A high-resolution spectrometer (0.0014 nm at 313 nm) has been developed at the University of L'Aquila (Italy) for atmospheric spectroscopic studies. The layout, optics and software for the instrument control are described. Measurements of the mercury low-pressure lamp lines from 200 to 600 nm show the high performances of the spectrometer. Laboratory measurements of OH and NO2 spectrums demonstrate that the system could be used for cross-section measurements and to detect these species in the atmosphere. The first atmospheric application of the system was the observation of direct solar and sky spectrums that shows a filling-in of the sky lines due to rotational Raman scattering. The measurements have been done with clear and cloudy sky and in both there was a strong dependence of the filling-in from the solar zenith angle whereas no dependence from the wavelengths was evident at low solar zenith angles (less than 85°).

  8. Characterization of a high resolution transmission grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desauté, P.; Merdji, H.; Greiner, V.; Missalla, T.; Chenais-Popovics, C.; Troussel, P.

    2000-01-01

    Three 5000 lines/mm gold transmission gratings have been tested with the radiation from the Super-ACO synchrotron in the range 250 eV< E<850 eV. Typical results for the spectral dependence of the grating efficiency at different diffraction orders are presented. This grating theoretically built to have no second order exhibits second order as high as 15-20% of first order. The very thin 5000 L/mm gratings are supported by a larger grid which perturbs the recorded data by separating each order in three peaks. Fraunhofer diffraction of the support grid has been modelled and can explain this effect. The high resolution gratings were used to measure the harmonics of the beamline monochromator grating (550 L/mm) and to measure the emission and absorption of laser-produced plasmas in the XUV range.

  9. Improved methods for high resolution electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. R.

    1987-04-01

    Existing methods of making support films for high resolution transmission electron microscopy are investigated and novel methods are developed. Existing methods of fabricating fenestrated, metal reinforced specimen supports (microgrids) are evaluated for their potential to reduce beam induced movement of monolamellar crystals of C44H90 paraffin supported on thin carbon films. Improved methods of producing hydrophobic carbon films by vacuum evaporation, and improved methods of depositing well ordered monolamellar paraffin crystals on carbon films are developed. A novel technique for vacuum evaporation of metals is described which is used to reinforce microgrids. A technique is also developed to bond thin carbon films to microgrids with a polymer bonding agent. Unique biochemical methods are described to accomplish site specific covalent modification of membrane proteins. Protocols are given which covalently convert the carboxy terminus of papain cleaved bacteriorhodopsin to a free thiol.

  10. High resolution solar X-ray studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Two high resolution solar X-ray payloads and their launches on Aerobee rockets with pointing system are described. The payloads included 5 to 25A X-ray spectrometers, multiaperture X-ray cameras, and command box attitude control inflight by means of a television image radioed to ground. Spatial resolution ranged from five arc minutes to ten arc seconds and spectral resolution ranged from 500 to 3000. Several laboratory tasks were completed in order to achieve the desired resolution. These included (1) development of techniques to align grid collimators, (2) studies of the spectrometric properties of crystals, (3) measurements of the absorption coefficients of various materials used in X-ray spectrometers, (4) evaluation of the performance of multiaperture cameras, and (5) development of facilities.

  11. Ultra-high resolution computed tomography imaging

    DOEpatents

    Paulus, Michael J.; Sari-Sarraf, Hamed; Tobin, Jr., Kenneth William; Gleason, Shaun S.; Thomas, Jr., Clarence E.

    2002-01-01

    A method for ultra-high resolution computed tomography imaging, comprising the steps of: focusing a high energy particle beam, for example x-rays or gamma-rays, onto a target object; acquiring a 2-dimensional projection data set representative of the target object; generating a corrected projection data set by applying a deconvolution algorithm, having an experimentally determined a transfer function, to the 2-dimensional data set; storing the corrected projection data set; incrementally rotating the target object through an angle of approximately 180.degree., and after each the incremental rotation, repeating the radiating, acquiring, generating and storing steps; and, after the rotating step, applying a cone-beam algorithm, for example a modified tomographic reconstruction algorithm, to the corrected projection data sets to generate a 3-dimensional image. The size of the spot focus of the beam is reduced to not greater than approximately 1 micron, and even to not greater than approximately 0.5 microns.

  12. High-resolution adaptive spiking sonar.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Fernando J; Kuc, Roman

    2009-05-01

    A new sonar system based on the conventional 6500 ranging module is presented that generates a sequence of spikes whose temporal density is related to the strength of the received echo. This system notably improves the resolution of a previous system by shortening the discharge cycle of the integrator included in the module. The operation is controlled by a PIC18F452 device, which can adapt the duration of the discharge to changing features of the echo, providing the system with a novel adaptive behavior. The performance of the new sensor is characterized and compared with that of the previous system by performing rotational scans of simple objects with different reflecting strengths. Some applications are suggested that exploit the high resolution and adaptability of this sensor. PMID:19473919

  13. High resolution analysis of satellite gradiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, O. L.

    1989-01-01

    Satellite gravity gradiometry is a technique now under development which, by the middle of the next decade, may be used for the high resolution charting from space of the gravity field of the earth and, afterwards, of other planets. Some data analysis schemes are reviewed for getting detailed gravity maps from gradiometry on both a global and a local basis. It also presents estimates of the likely accuracies of such maps, in terms of normalized spherical harmonics expansions, both using gradiometry alone and in combination with data from a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver carried on the same spacecraft. It compares these accuracies with those of current and future maps obtained from other data (conventional tracking, satellite-satellite tracking, etc.), and also with the spectra of various signals of geophysical interest.

  14. High-Resolution Broadband Spectral Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, D J; Edelstein, J

    2002-08-09

    We demonstrate solar spectra from a novel interferometric method for compact broadband high-resolution spectroscopy. The spectral interferometer (SI) is a hybrid instrument that uses a spectrometer to externally disperse the output of a fixed-delay interferometer. It also has been called an externally dispersed interferometer (EDI). The interferometer can be used with linear spectrometers for imaging spectroscopy or with echelle spectrometers for very broad-band coverage. EDI's heterodyning technique enhances the spectrometer's response to high spectral-density features, increasing the effective resolution by factors of several while retaining its bandwidth. The method is extremely robust to instrumental insults such as focal spot size or displacement. The EDI uses no moving parts, such as purely interferometric FTS spectrometers, and can cover a much wider simultaneous bandpass than other internally dispersed interferometers (e.g. HHS or SHS).

  15. Limits of simulation based high resolution EBSD.

    PubMed

    Alkorta, Jon

    2013-08-01

    High resolution electron backscattered diffraction (HREBSD) is a novel technique for a relative determination of both orientation and stress state in crystals through digital image correlation techniques. Recent works have tried to use simulated EBSD patterns as reference patterns to achieve the absolute orientation and stress state of crystals. However, a precise calibration of the pattern centre location is needed to avoid the occurrence of phantom stresses. A careful analysis of the projective transformation involved in the formation of EBSD patterns has permitted to understand these phantom stresses. This geometrical analysis has been confirmed by numerical simulations. The results indicate that certain combinations of crystal strain states and sample locations (pattern centre locations) lead to virtually identical EBSD patterns. This ambiguity makes the problem of solving the absolute stress state of a crystal unfeasible in a single-detector configuration. PMID:23676453

  16. Constructing a WISE High Resolution Galaxy Atlas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, T. H.; Masci, F.; Tsai, C. W.; Petty, S.; Cluver, M.; Assef, Roberto J.; Benford, D.; Blain, A.; Bridge, C.; Donoso, E.; Eisenhardt, P.; Fowler, J.; Koribalski, B.; Lake, S.; Neill, James D.; Seibert, M.; Stanford, S.; Wright, E.

    2012-01-01

    After eight months of continuous observations, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mapped the entire sky at 3.4 micron, 4.6 micron, 12 micron, and 22 micron. We have begun a dedicated WISE High Resolution Galaxy Atlas project to fully characterize large, nearby galaxies and produce a legacy image atlas and source catalog. Here we summarize the deconvolution techniques used to significantly improve the spatial resolution of WISE imaging, specifically designed to study the internal anatomy of nearby galaxies. As a case study, we present results for the galaxy NGC 1566, comparing the WISE enhanced-resolution image processing to that of Spitzer, Galaxy Evolution Explorer, and ground-based imaging. This is the first paper in a two-part series; results for a larger sample of nearby galaxies are presented in the second paper.

  17. High-resolution scanning hall probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, C. W.; Guikema, J. W.; Zeldov, E.

    2005-03-01

    Scanning hall sensors can be used to directly image magnetic fields at surfaces. They offer high resolution, high sensitivity, operability from cryogenic to room temperature, and linearity. We have fabricated hall sensors on GaAs / Al0.35Ga0.65As and GaAs / Al0.3Ga0.7As heterostructures, one containing a 2D electron gas 40 nanometers below the surface and another 140nm below the surface, as well as an In0.5Al0.5As / GaSb / AlSb / InAs heterostructure containing a 2DEG 21nm below the surface. The sensitive areas of our probes range from microns to 60nm on a side. We report on the field sensitivities of the probes and their spatial resolution in a scanning configuration.

  18. Improved methods for high resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.R.

    1987-04-01

    Existing methods of making support films for high resolution transmission electron microscopy are investigated and novel methods are developed. Existing methods of fabricating fenestrated, metal reinforced specimen supports (microgrids) are evaluated for their potential to reduce beam induced movement of monolamellar crystals of C/sub 44/H/sub 90/ paraffin supported on thin carbon films. Improved methods of producing hydrophobic carbon films by vacuum evaporation, and improved methods of depositing well ordered monolamellar paraffin crystals on carbon films are developed. A novel technique for vacuum evaporation of metals is described which is used to reinforce microgrids. A technique is also developed to bond thin carbon films to microgrids with a polymer bonding agent. Unique biochemical methods are described to accomplish site specific covalent modification of membrane proteins. Protocols are given which covalently convert the carboxy terminus of papain cleaved bacteriorhodopsin to a free thiol. 53 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Information extraction from high resolution satellite images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Haiping; Luo, Jiancheng; Shen, Zhanfeng; Xia, Liegang

    2014-11-01

    Information extracted from high resolution satellite images, such as roads, buildings, water and vegetation, has a wide range of applications in disaster assessment and environmental monitoring. At present, object oriented supervised learning is usually used in the objects identification from the high spatial resolution satellite images. In classical ways, we have to label some regions of interests from every image to be classified at first, which is labor intensive. In this paper, we build a feature base for information extraction in order to reduce the labeling efforts. The features stored are regulated and labeled. The labeled samples for a new coming image can be selected from the feature base. And the experiments are taken on GF-1 and ZY-3 images. The results show the feasibility of the feature base for image interpretation.

  20. Pyramidal fractal dimension for high resolution images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayrhofer-Reinhartshuber, Michael; Ahammer, Helmut

    2016-07-01

    Fractal analysis (FA) should be able to yield reliable and fast results for high-resolution digital images to be applicable in fields that require immediate outcomes. Triggered by an efficient implementation of FA for binary images, we present three new approaches for fractal dimension (D) estimation of images that utilize image pyramids, namely, the pyramid triangular prism, the pyramid gradient, and the pyramid differences method (PTPM, PGM, PDM). We evaluated the performance of the three new and five standard techniques when applied to images with sizes up to 8192 × 8192 pixels. By using artificial fractal images created by three different generator models as ground truth, we determined the scale ranges with minimum deviations between estimation and theory. All pyramidal methods (PM) resulted in reasonable D values for images of all generator models. Especially, for images with sizes ≥1024 ×1024 pixels, the PMs are superior to the investigated standard approaches in terms of accuracy and computation time. A measure for the possibility to differentiate images with different intrinsic D values did show not only that the PMs are well suited for all investigated image sizes, and preferable to standard methods especially for larger images, but also that results of standard D estimation techniques are strongly influenced by the image size. Fastest results were obtained with the PDM and PGM, followed by the PTPM. In terms of absolute D values best performing standard methods were magnitudes slower than the PMs. Concluding, the new PMs yield high quality results in short computation times and are therefore eligible methods for fast FA of high-resolution images.

  1. High resolution multimodal clinical ophthalmic imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Mujat, Mircea; Ferguson, R. Daniel; Patel, Ankit H.; Iftimia, Nicusor; Lue, Niyom; Hammer, Daniel X.

    2010-01-01

    We developed a multimodal adaptive optics (AO) retinal imager which is the first to combine high performance AO-corrected scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) and swept source Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (SSOCT) imaging modes in a single compact clinical prototype platform. Such systems are becoming ever more essential to vision research and are expected to prove their clinical value for diagnosis of retinal diseases, including glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy (DR), age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and retinitis pigmentosa. The SSOCT channel operates at a wavelength of 1 µm for increased penetration and visualization of the choriocapillaris and choroid, sites of major disease activity for DR and wet AMD. This AO system is designed for use in clinical populations; a dual deformable mirror (DM) configuration allows simultaneous low- and high-order aberration correction over a large range of refractions and ocular media quality. The system also includes a wide field (33 deg.) line scanning ophthalmoscope (LSO) for initial screening, target identification, and global orientation, an integrated retinal tracker (RT) to stabilize the SLO, OCT, and LSO imaging fields in the presence of lateral eye motion, and a high-resolution LCD-based fixation target for presentation of visual cues. The system was tested in human subjects without retinal disease for performance optimization and validation. We were able to resolve and quantify cone photoreceptors across the macula to within ~0.5 deg (~100-150 µm) of the fovea, image and delineate ten retinal layers, and penetrate to resolve features deep into the choroid. The prototype presented here is the first of a new class of powerful flexible imaging platforms that will provide clinicians and researchers with high-resolution, high performance adaptive optics imaging to help guide therapies, develop new drugs, and improve patient outcomes. PMID:20589021

  2. High-resolution simulation of field emission

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B. ); Becker, R. ); Brodie, I.; Rosengreen, A.; Spindt, C.A. )

    1990-03-01

    High-resolution simulations of field emission electron sources have been made using the electron optics program EGN2. Electron emission distributions are made using the Fowler-Nordheim equation. Mesh resolution in the range of 1-5 {angstrom} is required to adequately model surface details that can result in emission currents in the range found experimentally. A typical problem starts with mechanical details with dimensions of about 1{mu}. To achieve high resolution a new boundary is defined by the tip, a nearby equipotential line, and a pair of field lines. The field lines (one of which is normally the axis of symmetry) define Neumann boundaries. This new boundary is then used by the boundary preprocessor POLYGON to create an enlarged version of the problem, typically by a factor of ten. This process can be repeated until adequate resolution is obtained to simulate surface details, such as microprotusion, that could sufficiently enhance the surface electric fields and cause field emission. When simulating experimental conditions under which emission of several microamperes per tip were observed, it was found that both a locally reduced work function and a surface protrusion were needed to duplicate the experimental results. If only a local region of reduced work function is used, the area involved and the extent of the reduction both need to be very large to reproduce the emission. If only a surface protrusion is used, it is possible to get the observed emission current with a reasonable protrusion of length a few times radius, but then the resulting beam spreads over a very large solid angle due to the strong local radial electric fields. 8 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  3. High Resolution Spectroscopy to Support Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2006-01-01

    The major research activities performed during the cooperative agreement enhanced our spectroscopic knowledge of molecules of atmospheric interest such as H2O (water vapor), O3 (ozone), HCN (hydrogen cyanide), CH4 (methane), NO2 (nitrogen dioxide) and CO (carbon monoxide). The data required for the analyses were obtained from two different Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTS); one of which is located at the National Solar Observatory (NSO) on Kitt Peak, Arizona and the other instrument is located at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) at Richland, Washington. The data were analyzed using a modified multispectrum nonlinear least squares fitting algorithm developed by Dr. D. Chris Benner of the College of William and Mary. The results from these studies made significant improvements in the line positons and intensities for these molecules. The measurements of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients and the temperature dependence of pressure broadening and pressure induced shift coefficients for hundreds of infrared transitions of HCN, CO3 CH4 and H2O were also performed during this period. Results from these studies have been used for retrievals of stratospheric gas concentration profiles from data collected by several Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS) infrared instruments as well as in the analysis of high resolution atmospheric spectra such as those acquired by space-based, ground-based, and various balloon- and aircraft-borne experiments. Our results made significant contributions in several updates of the HITRAN (HIgh resolution TRANsmission) spectral line parameters database. This database enjoys worldwide recognition in research involving diversified scientific fields. The research conducted during the period 2003-2006 has resulted in publications given in this paper. In addition to Journal publications, several oral and poster presentations were given at various Scientific conferences within the United States

  4. Pyramidal fractal dimension for high resolution images.

    PubMed

    Mayrhofer-Reinhartshuber, Michael; Ahammer, Helmut

    2016-07-01

    Fractal analysis (FA) should be able to yield reliable and fast results for high-resolution digital images to be applicable in fields that require immediate outcomes. Triggered by an efficient implementation of FA for binary images, we present three new approaches for fractal dimension (D) estimation of images that utilize image pyramids, namely, the pyramid triangular prism, the pyramid gradient, and the pyramid differences method (PTPM, PGM, PDM). We evaluated the performance of the three new and five standard techniques when applied to images with sizes up to 8192 × 8192 pixels. By using artificial fractal images created by three different generator models as ground truth, we determined the scale ranges with minimum deviations between estimation and theory. All pyramidal methods (PM) resulted in reasonable D values for images of all generator models. Especially, for images with sizes ≥1024×1024 pixels, the PMs are superior to the investigated standard approaches in terms of accuracy and computation time. A measure for the possibility to differentiate images with different intrinsic D values did show not only that the PMs are well suited for all investigated image sizes, and preferable to standard methods especially for larger images, but also that results of standard D estimation techniques are strongly influenced by the image size. Fastest results were obtained with the PDM and PGM, followed by the PTPM. In terms of absolute D values best performing standard methods were magnitudes slower than the PMs. Concluding, the new PMs yield high quality results in short computation times and are therefore eligible methods for fast FA of high-resolution images. PMID:27475069

  5. Ecological applications of high resolution spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, William T.

    1989-01-01

    Future directions of NASA's space program plans include a significant effort at studying the Earth as a system of interrelated ecosystems. As part of NASA's Earth Observing System (Eos) Program a series of space platforms will be launched and operated to study the Earth with a variety of active and passive instruments. Several of the Eos instruments will be capable of imaging the planet's surface reflectance on a large number of very narrow portions of the solar spectrum. After the development of appropriate algorithms, this reflectance information will be used to determine key parameters about the structure and function of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and the pattern and processes of those systems across large areas of the globe. Algorithm development applicable to terrestrial systems will permit the inference of ecological processes from high resolution spectrometry data, similar to that to be forthcoming from the Eos mission. The first summer was spent working with tropical soils and relating their reflectance characteristics to particle size, iron content, and color. This summer the emphasis is on vegetation and work was begun with the Forest Ecosystems Dynamics Project in the Earth Resources Branch where both optical and radar characteristics of a mixed conifer/hardwood forest in Maine are being studied for use in a ecological modeling effort. A major series of aircraft overflights will take place throughout the summer. Laboratory and field spectrometers are used to measure the spectral reflectance of a hierarchy of vegetation from individual leaves to whole canopies for eventual modeling of their nutrient content using reflectance data. Key leaf/canopy parameters are being approximated including chlorophyll, nitrogen, phosphorus, water content, and leaf specific weight using high resolution spectrometry alone. Measurements are made of carbon exchange across the landscape for input to a spatial modeling effort to gauge production within the forest. A

  6. High Resolution Continuous Flow Analysis System for Polar Ice Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallmayr, Remi; Azuma, Kumiko; Yamada, Hironobu; Kjær, Helle Astrid; Vallelonga, Paul; Azuma, Nobuhiko; Takata, Morimasa

    2014-05-01

    35.636 kyr b2k 7), respectively. The results show the conductivity measured upstream and downstream of the debubbler. We will calculate the depth resolution of our system and compare it with earlier studies. 1) Bigler at al, "Optimization of High-Resolution Continuous Flow Analysis For Transient Climate Signals in Ice Cores". Environ. Sci. Technol. 2011, 45, 4483-4489 2) Kaufmann et al, "An Improved Continuous Flow Analysis System for High Resolution Field Measurements on Ice Cores". Environmental Environ. Sci. Technol. 2008, 42, 8044-8050 3) Gkinis, V., T. J. Popp, S. J. Johnsen and T, Blunier, 2010: A continuous stream flash evaporator for the calibration of an IR cavity ring down spectrometer for the isotopic analysis of water. Isotopes in Environmental and Health Studies, 46(4), 463-475. 4) McConnell et al, "Continuous ice-core chemical analyses using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Environ. Sci. Technol. 2002, 36, 7-11 5) Rhodes et al, "Continuous methane measurements from a late Holocene Greenland ice core : Atmospheric and in-situ signals" Earth and Planetary Science Letters. 2013, 368, 9-19 6) Breton et al, "Quantifying Signal Dispersion in a Hybrid Ice Core Melting System". Environ. Sci. Technol. 2012, 46, 11922-11928 7) Rasmussen et al, " A first chronology for the NEEM ice core". Climate of the Past. 2013, 9, 2967--3013

  7. Crusta: Visualizing High-resolution Global Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardin, T. S.; Kreylos, O.; Bowles, C. J.; Cowgill, E.; Hamann, B.; Kellogg, L. H.

    2009-12-01

    Virtual globes have become indispensable tools for visualizing, understanding and presenting data from Earth and other planetary bodies. The scientific community has invested much effort into exploiting existing globes to their fullest potential by refining and adapting their capabilities to better satisfy specific needs. For example, Google Earth provides users with the ability to view hillshade images derived from airborne LiDAR data such as the 2007 Northern California GeoEarthScope data. However, because most available globes were not designed with the specific needs of geoscientists in mind, shortcomings are becoming increasingly evident in geoscience applications such as terrain visualization. In particular, earth scientists struggle to visualize digital elevation models with both high spatial resolution (0.5 - 1 square meters per sample) and large extent (>2000 square kilometers), such as those obtained with airborne LiDAR. To address the specific earth science need of real-time terrain visualization of LiDAR data, we are developing Crusta as part of a close collaboration involving earth and computer scientists. Crusta is a new virtual globe that differs from widely used globes by both providing accurate global data representation and the ability to easily visualize custom topographic and image data. As a result, Crusta enables real-time, interactive visualization of high resolution digital elevation data spanning thousands of square kilometers, such as the complete 2007 Northern California GeoEarthScope airborne LiDAR data set. To implement an accurate data representation and avoid distortion of the display at the poles, where other projections have singularities, Crusta represents the globe as a thirty-sided polyhedron. Each side of this polyhedron can be subdivided to an arbitrarily fine grid on the surface of the globe, which allows Crusta to accommodate input data of arbitrary resolution ranging from global (e.g., Blue Marble) to local (e.g., a tripod

  8. Efficient Compression of High Resolution Climate Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, J.; Schuchardt, K. L.

    2011-12-01

    resolution climate data can be massive. Those data can consume a huge amount of disk space for storage, incur significant overhead for outputting data during simulation, introduce high latency for visualization and analysis, and may even make interactive visualization and analysis impossible given the limit of the data that a conventional cluster can handle. These problems can be alleviated by with effective and efficient data compression techniques. Even though HDF5 format supports compression, previous work has mainly focused on employ traditional general purpose compression schemes such as dictionary coder and block sorting based compression scheme. Those compression schemes mainly focus on encoding repeated byte sequences efficiently and are not well suitable for compressing climate data consist mainly of distinguished float point numbers. We plan to select and customize our compression schemes according to the characteristics of high-resolution climate data. One observation on high resolution climate data is that as the resolution become higher, values of various climate variables such as temperature and pressure, become closer in nearby cells. This provides excellent opportunities for predication-based compression schemes. We have performed a preliminary estimation of compression ratios of a very simple minded predication-based compression ratio in which we compute the difference between current float point number with previous float point number and then encoding the exponent and significance part of the float point number with entropy-based compression scheme. Our results show that we can achieve higher compression ratios between 2 and 3 in lossless compression, which is significantly higher than traditional compression algorithms. We have also developed lossy compression with our techniques. We can achive orders of magnitude data reduction while ensure error bounds. Moreover, our compression scheme is much more efficient and introduces much less overhead

  9. Superconducting High Resolution Fast-Neutron Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Hau, I D

    2006-05-25

    Superconducting high resolution fast-neutron calorimetric spectrometers based on {sup 6}LiF and TiB{sub 2} absorbers have been developed. These novel cryogenic spectrometers measure the temperature rise produced in exothermal (n, {alpha}) reactions with fast neutrons in {sup 6}Li and {sup 10}B-loaded materials with heat capacity C operating at temperatures T close to 0.1 K. Temperature variations on the order of 0.5 mK are measured with a Mo/Cu thin film multilayer operated in the transition region between its superconducting and its normal state. The advantage of calorimetry for high resolution spectroscopy is due to the small phonon excitation energies k{sub B}T on the order of {mu}eV that serve as signal carriers, resulting in an energy resolution {Delta}E {approx} (k{sub B}T{sup 2}C){sup 1/2}, which can be well below 10 keV. An energy resolution of 5.5 keV has been obtained with a Mo/Cu superconducting sensor and a TiB{sub 2} absorber using thermal neutrons from a {sup 252}Cf neutron source. This resolution is sufficient to observe the effect of recoil nuclei broadening in neutron spectra, which has been related to the lifetime of the first excited state in {sup 7}Li. Fast-neutron spectra obtained with a {sup 6}Li-enriched LiF absorber show an energy resolution of 16 keV FWHM, and a response in agreement with the {sup 6}Li(n, {alpha}){sup 3}H reaction cross section and Monte Carlo simulations for energies up to several MeV. The energy resolution of order of a few keV makes this novel instrument applicable to fast-neutron transmission spectroscopy based on the unique elemental signature provided by the neutron absorption and scattering resonances. The optimization of the energy resolution based on analytical and numerical models of the detector response is discussed in the context of these applications.

  10. High resolution spectrograph for the Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, J. C.; Boggess, A.; Heap, S. R.; Maran, S. P.; Smith, A. M.; Beaver, E. A.; Bottema, M.; Hutchings, J. B.; Jura, M. A.; Linsky, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    The high resolution spectrograph (HRS) for ultraviolet astronomy with the Space Telescope will provide a spectral resolution of approximately 120,000 over a nominal wavelength range of 110-320 nm, together with a spatial resolution of about 0.25 arc seconds. The two detectors will consist of 512-element Digicons with cesium telluride and cesium iodide photocathodes, respectively. Photoelectrons in transit between the photocathodes and the diodes within the Digicons can be deflected in two axes with 12-bit resolution. This feature facilitates a design that emphasizes reliability since (once a hermetic seal is opened in orbit), only two moving parts, a grating carrousel and a shutter, are required for regular operation of the HRS. The instrument will be controlled by a computer in the spacecraft. The scientific objectives of the HRS investigation relate to interstellar matter in our own and nearby galaxies, physical processes of stellar mass loss and mass transfer, chemical abundances, bright quasars and Seyfert galaxy nuclei, and solar system phenomena.

  11. High Resolution BPM for Linear Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, C.; Chel, S.; Luong, M.; Napoly, O.; Novo, J.; Roudier, D.; Baboi, N.; Noelle, D.; Mildner, N.; Zapfe, K.; Rouvière, N.

    2006-11-01

    A high resolution Beam Position Monitor (BPM) is necessary for the beam-based alignment systems of high energy and low emittance electron linacs. Such a monitor is developed in the framework of the European CARE/SRF programme, in a close collaboration between DESY and CEA/DSM/DAPNIA. This monitor is a radiofrequency re-entrant cavity, which can be used either at room or cryogenic temperature, in an environment where dust particle contamination has to be avoided, such as superconducting cavities in a cryomodule. A first prototype of a re-entrant BPM has already delivered measurements at 2K. inside the first cryomodule (ACC1) on the TESLA Test Facility 2 (TTF2). The performances of this BPM are analyzed both experimentally and theoretically, and the limitations of this existing system clearly identified. A new cavity and new electronics have been designed in order to improve the position resolution down to 1 μm and the damping time down to 10 ns.

  12. High-resolution microwave images of saturn.

    PubMed

    Grossman, A W; Muhleman, D O; Berge, G L

    1989-09-15

    An analysis of high-resolution microwave images of Saturn and Saturn's individual rings is presented. Radio interferometric observations of Saturn taken at the Very Large Array in New Mexico at wavelengths of 2 and 6 centimeters reveal interesting new features in both the atmosphere and rings. The resulting maps show an increase in brightness temperature of about 3 K from equator to pole at both wavelengths, while the 6-centimeter map shows a bright band at northern mid-latitudes. The data are consistent with a radiative transfer model of the atmosphere that constrains the well-mixed, fully saturated, NH(3) mixing ratio to be 1.2 x 10(-4) in a region just below the NH(3) clouds, while the observed bright band indicates a 25 percent relative decrease of NH(3) in northern mid-latitudes. Brightness temperatures for the classical rings are presented. Ring brightness shows a variation with azimuth and is linearly polarized at an average value of about 5 percent. The variations in ring polarization suggest that at least 20 percent of the ring brightness is the result of a single scattering process. PMID:17747882

  13. High-resolution x-ray telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Brissenden, Roger J.; Davis, William N.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Elvis, Martin S.; Freeman, Mark D.; Gaetz, Terrance; Gorenstein, Paul; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Jerius, Diab; Juda, Michael; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; Murray, Stephen S.; Petre, Robert; Podgorski, William; Ramsey, Brian D.; Reid, Paul B.; Saha, Timo; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Weisskopf, Martin C.; Wilke, Rudeger H. T.; Wolk, Scott; Zhang, William W.

    2010-08-01

    High-energy astrophysics is a relatively young scientific field, made possible by space-borne telescopes. During the half-century history of x-ray astronomy, the sensitivity of focusing x-ray telescopes-through finer angular resolution and increased effective area-has improved by a factor of a 100 million. This technological advance has enabled numerous exciting discoveries and increasingly detailed study of the high-energy universe-including accreting (stellarmass and super-massive) black holes, accreting and isolated neutron stars, pulsar-wind nebulae, shocked plasma in supernova remnants, and hot thermal plasma in clusters of galaxies. As the largest structures in the universe, galaxy clusters constitute a unique laboratory for measuring the gravitational effects of dark matter and of dark energy. Here, we review the history of high-resolution x-ray telescopes and highlight some of the scientific results enabled by these telescopes. Next, we describe the planned next-generation x-ray-astronomy facility-the International X-ray Observatory (IXO). We conclude with an overview of a concept for the next next-generation facility-Generation X. The scientific objectives of such a mission will require very large areas (about 10000 m2) of highly-nested lightweight grazing-incidence mirrors with exceptional (about 0.1-arcsecond) angular resolution. Achieving this angular resolution with lightweight mirrors will likely require on-orbit adjustment of alignment and figure.

  14. Future trends in high-resolution lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawes, R. A.

    2000-02-01

    A perennial question is "what is the future of high-resolution lithography, a key technology that drives the semiconductor industry"? The dominant technology over the last 30 years has been optical lithography, which by lowering wavelengths to 193 nm (ArF) and 157 nm (F 2) and by using optical "tricks" such as phase shift masks, off-axis illumination and phase filters, should be capable of 100 nm CMOS technology. So where does this leave the competition? The 100-nm lithography used to be the domain of electron beam lithography but only in research laboratories. Significant efforts are being made to increase throughput by electron projection (scattering with angular limitation projection electron beam lithography or SCALPEL). X-ray lithography remains a demonstrated R&D tool waiting to be commercially exploited but the initial expenditure to do so is very high. Ion beam lithography and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) ( λ<12 nm) have also received attention in recent years. This paper will concentrate on some of the key issues and speculate on how and when an alternative to optical lithography will be embraced by industry.

  15. High resolution quantum metrology via quantum interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajoy, Ashok; Liu, Yixiang; Saha, Kasturi; Marseglia, Luca; Jaskula, Jean-Christophe; Cappellaro, Paola

    2016-05-01

    Nitrogen Vacancy (NV) centers in diamond are a promising platform for quantum metrology - in particular for nanoscale magnetic resonance imaging to determine high resolution structures of single molecules placed outside the diamond. The conventional technique for sensing of external nuclear spins involves monitoring the effects of the target nuclear spins on the NV center coherence under dynamical decoupling (the CPMG/XY8 pulse sequence). However, the nuclear spin affects the NV coherence only at precise free evolution times - and finite timing resolution set by hardware often severely limits the sensitivity and resolution of the method. In this work, we overcome this timing resolution barrier by developing a technique to supersample the metrology signal by effectively implementing a quantum interpolation of the spin system dynamics. This method will enable spin sensing at high magnetic fields and high repetition rate, allowing significant improvements in sensitivity and spectral resolution. We experimentally demonstrate a resolution boost by over a factor of 100 for spin sensing and AC magnetometry. The method is shown to be robust, versatile to sensing normal and spurious signal harmonics, and ultimately limited in resolution only by the number of pulses that can be applied.

  16. Holographic high-resolution endoscopic image recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjelkhagen, Hans I.

    1991-03-01

    Endoscopic holography or endoholography combines the features of endoscopy and holography. The purpose of endoholographic imaging is to provide the physician with a unique means of extending diagnosis by providing a life-like record of tissue. Endoholographic recording will provide means for microscopic examination of tissue and in some cases may obviate the need to excise specimens for biopsy. In this method holograms which have the unique properties of three-dimensionality large focal depth and high resolution are made with a newly designed endoscope. The endoscope uses a single-mode optical fiber for illumination and single-beam reflection holograms are recorded in close contact with the tissue at the distal end of the endoscope. The holograms are viewed under a microscope. By using the proper combinations of dyes for staining specific tissue types with various wavelengths of laser illumination increased contrast on the cellular level can be obtained. Using dyes such as rose bengal in combination with the 514. 5 nm line of an argon ion laser and trypan blue or methylene blue with the 647. 1 nm line of a krypton ion laser holograms of the stained colon of a dog showed the architecture of the colon''s columnar epithelial cells. It is hoped through chronological study using this method in-vivo an increased understanding of the etiology and pathology of diseases such as Crohn''s diseases colitis proctitis and several different forms of cancer will help

  17. High-resolution imaging using endoscopic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjelkhagen, Hans I.

    1990-08-01

    Endoscopic holography or endoholography combines the features of endoscopy and holography. The purpose of endoholographic imaging is to provide the physician with a unique means of extending diagnosis by providing a life-like record of tissue. Endoholographic recording will provide means for microscopic examination of tissue and in some cases may obviate the need to excise specimens for biopsy. In this method holograms which have the unique properties of three-dimensionality large focal depth and high resolution are made with a newly designed endoscope. The endoscope uses a single-mode optical fiber for illumination and single-beam reflection holograms are recorded in close contact with the tissue at the distal end of the endoscope. The holograms are viewed under a microscope. By using the proper combinations of dyes for staining specific tissue types with various wavelengths of laser illumination increased contrast on the cellular level can be obtained. Using dyes such as rose bengal in combination with the 514. 5 nm line of an argon ion laser and trypan blue or methylene blue with the 647. 1 nm line of a krypton ion laser holograms of the stained colon of a dog showed the architecture of the colon''s columnar epithelial cells. It is hoped through chronological study using this method in-vivo an increased understanding of the etiology and pathology of diseases such as Crohn''s diseases colitis proctitis and several different forms of cancer will help to their control. 1.

  18. High resolution Fourier interferometer-spectrophotopolarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fymat, A. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A high-resolution Fourier interferometer-spectrophotopolarimeter is provided using a single linear polarizer-analyzer the transmission axis azimuth of which is positioned successively in the three orientations of 0 deg, 45 deg, and 90 deg, in front of a detector; four flat mirrors, three of which are switchable to either of two positions to direct an incoming beam from an interferometer to the polarizer-analyzer around a sample cell transmitted through a medium in a cell and reflected by medium in the cell; and four fixed focussing lenses, all located in a sample chamber attached at the exit side of the interferometer. This arrangement can provide the distribution of energy and complete polarization state across the spectrum of the reference light entering from the interferometer; the same light after a fixed-angle reflection from the sample cell containing a medium to be analyzed; and the same light after direct transmission through the same sample cell, with the spectral resolution provided by the interferometer.

  19. High-Resolution Optical Tweezers for Single-Molecule Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinming; Ma, Lu; Zhang, Yongli

    2013-01-01

    Forces hold everything together and determine its structure and dynamics. In particular, tiny forces of 1-100 piconewtons govern the structures and dynamics of biomacromolecules. These forces enable folding, assembly, conformational fluctuations, or directional movements of biomacromolecules over sub-nanometer to micron distances. Optical tweezers have become a revolutionary tool to probe the forces, structures, and dynamics associated with biomacromolecules at a single-molecule level with unprecedented resolution. In this review, we introduce the basic principles of optical tweezers and their latest applications in studies of protein folding and molecular motors. We describe the folding dynamics of two strong coiled coil proteins, the GCN4-derived protein pIL and the SNARE complex. Both complexes show multiple folding intermediates and pathways. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes translocate DNA to remodel chromatin structures. The detailed DNA translocation properties of such molecular motors have recently been characterized by optical tweezers, which are reviewed here. Finally, several future developments and applications of optical tweezers are discussed. These past and future applications demonstrate the unique advantages of high-resolution optical tweezers in quantitatively characterizing complex multi-scale dynamics of biomacromolecules. PMID:24058311

  20. Potential High Resolution Dosimeters For MRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bräuer-Krisch, E.; Rosenfeld, A.; Lerch, M.; Petasecca, M.; Akselrod, M.; Sykora, J.; Bartz, J.; Ptaszkiewicz, M.; Olko, P.; Berg, A.; Wieland, M.; Doran, S.; Brochard, T.; Kamlowski, A.; Cellere, G.; Paccagnella, A.; Siegbahn, E. A.; Prezado, Y.; Martinez-Rovira, I.; Bravin, A.; Dusseau, L.; Berkvens, P.

    2010-07-01

    Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) uses highly collimated, quasi-parallel arrays of X-ray microbeams of 50-600 keV, produced by 2nd and 3rd generation synchrotron sources, such as the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in the U.S., and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in France, respectively. High dose rates are necessary to deliver therapeutic doses in microscopic volumes, to avoid spreading of the microbeams by cardiosynchronous movement of the tissues. A small beam divergence and a filtered white beam spectrum in the energy range between 30 and 250 keV results in the advantage of steep dose gradients with a sharper penumbra than that produced in conventional radiotherapy. MRT research over the past 20 years has allowed a vast number of results from preclinical trials on different animal models, including mice, rats, piglets and rabbits. Microbeams in the range between 10 and 100 micron width show an unprecedented sparing of normal radiosensitive tissues as well as preferential damage to malignant tumor tissues. Typically, MRT uses arrays of narrow (˜25-100 micron-wide) microplanar beams separated by wider (100-400 microns centre-to-centre, c-t-c) microplanar spaces. We note that thicker microbeams of 0.1-0.68 mm used by investigators at the NSLS are still called microbeams, although some invesigators in the community prefer to call them minibeams. This report, however, limits it discussion to 25-100 μm microbeams. Peak entrance doses of several hundreds of Gy are surprisingly well tolerated by normal tissues. High resolution dosimetry has been developed over the last two decades, but typical dose ranges are adapted to dose delivery in conventional Radiation Therapy (RT). Spatial resolution in the sub-millimetric range has been achieved, which is currently required for quality assurance measurements in Gamma-knife RT. Most typical commercially available detectors are not suitable for MRT applications at a dose rate of 16000 Gy/s, micron

  1. Large Scale, High Resolution, Mantle Dynamics Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geenen, T.; Berg, A. V.; Spakman, W.

    2007-12-01

    To model the geodynamic evolution of plate convergence, subduction and collision and to allow for a connection to various types of observational data, geophysical, geodetical and geological, we developed a 4D (space-time) numerical mantle convection code. The model is based on a spherical 3D Eulerian fem model, with quadratic elements, on top of which we constructed a 3D Lagrangian particle in cell(PIC) method. We use the PIC method to transport material properties and to incorporate a viscoelastic rheology. Since capturing small scale processes associated with localization phenomena require a high resolution, we spend a considerable effort on implementing solvers suitable to solve for models with over 100 million degrees of freedom. We implemented Additive Schwartz type ILU based methods in combination with a Krylov solver, GMRES. However we found that for problems with over 500 thousend degrees of freedom the convergence of the solver degraded severely. This observation is known from the literature [Saad, 2003] and results from the local character of the ILU preconditioner resulting in a poor approximation of the inverse of A for large A. The size of A for which ILU is no longer usable depends on the condition of A and on the amount of fill in allowed for the ILU preconditioner. We found that for our problems with over 5×105 degrees of freedom convergence became to slow to solve the system within an acceptable amount of walltime, one minute, even when allowing for considerable amount of fill in. We also implemented MUMPS and found good scaling results for problems up to 107 degrees of freedom for up to 32 CPU¡¯s. For problems with over 100 million degrees of freedom we implemented Algebraic Multigrid type methods (AMG) from the ML library [Sala, 2006]. Since multigrid methods are most effective for single parameter problems, we rebuild our model to use the SIMPLE method in the Stokes solver [Patankar, 1980]. We present scaling results from these solvers for 3D

  2. Wavefront metrology for high resolution optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakawa, Ryan H.

    Next generation extreme ultraviolet (EUV) optical systems are moving to higher resolution optics to accommodate smaller length scales targeted by the semiconductor industry. As the numerical apertures (NA) of the optics become larger, it becomes increasingly difficult to characterize aberrations due to experimental challenges associated with high-resolution spatial filters and geometrical effects caused by large incident angles of the test wavefront. This dissertation focuses on two methods of wavefront metrology for high resolution optical systems. The first method, lateral shearing interferometry (LSI), is a self-referencing interferometry where the test wavefront is incident on a low spatial frequency grating, and the resulting interference between the diffracted orders is used to reconstruct the wavefront aberrations. LSI has many advantages over other interferometric tests such as phase-shifting point diffraction interferometry (PS/PDI) due to its experimental simplicity, stability, relaxed coherence requirements, and its ability to scale to high numerical apertures. While LSI has historically been a qualitative test, this dissertation presents a novel quantitative investigation of the LSI interferogram. The analysis reveals the existence of systematic aberrations due to the nonlinear angular response from the diffraction grating that compromises the accuracy of LSI at medium to high NAs. In the medium NA regime (0.15 < NA < 0.35), a holographic model is presented that derives the systematic aberrations in closed form, which demonstrates an astigmatism term that scales as the square of the grating defocus. In the high NA regime (0.35 < NA), a geometrical model is introduced that describes the aberrations as a system of transcendental equations that can be solved numerically. The characterization and removal of these systematic errors is a necessary step that unlocks LSI as a viable candidate for high NA EUV optical testing. The second method is a novel image

  3. Potential High Resolution Dosimeters For MRT

    SciTech Connect

    Braeuer-Krisch, E.; Brochard, T.; Prezado, Y.; Bravin, A.; Berkvens, P.; Rosenfeld, A.; Lerch, M.; Petasecca, M.; Akselrod, M.; Sykora, J.; Bartz, J.; Ptaszkiewicz, M.; Olko, P.; Berg, A.; Wieland, M.; Doran, S.; Kamlowski, A.; Cellere, G.

    2010-07-23

    Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) uses highly collimated, quasi-parallel arrays of X-ray microbeams of 50-600 keV, produced by 2nd and 3rd generation synchrotron sources, such as the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in the U.S., and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in France, respectively. High dose rates are necessary to deliver therapeutic doses in microscopic volumes, to avoid spreading of the microbeams by cardiosynchronous movement of the tissues. A small beam divergence and a filtered white beam spectrum in the energy range between 30 and 250 keV results in the advantage of steep dose gradients with a sharper penumbra than that produced in conventional radiotherapy. MRT research over the past 20 years has allowed a vast number of results from preclinical trials on different animal models, including mice, rats, piglets and rabbits. Microbeams in the range between 10 and 100 micron width show an unprecedented sparing of normal radiosensitive tissues as well as preferential damage to malignant tumor tissues. Typically, MRT uses arrays of narrow ({approx}25-100 micron-wide) microplanar beams separated by wider (100-400 microns centre-to-centre, c-t-c) microplanar spaces. We note that thicker microbeams of 0.1-0.68 mm used by investigators at the NSLS are still called microbeams, although some invesigators in the community prefer to call them minibeams. This report, however, limits it discussion to 25-100 {mu}m microbeams. Peak entrance doses of several hundreds of Gy are surprisingly well tolerated by normal tissues. High resolution dosimetry has been developed over the last two decades, but typical dose ranges are adapted to dose delivery in conventional Radiation Therapy (RT). Spatial resolution in the sub-millimetric range has been achieved, which is currently required for quality assurance measurements in Gamma-knife RT. Most typical commercially available detectors are not suitable for MRT applications at a dose rate of 16000 Gy

  4. High-Resolution Radar Imagery of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, John K.; Nolan, M. C.

    2009-09-01

    We present high-resolution radar images of Mars obtained during the 2005 and 2007 oppositions. The images were constructed from long-code delay-Doppler observations made with the Arecibo S-band (13-cm) radar. The average image resolution of 3 km represented a better than order-of-magnitude improvement over pre-upgrade Arecibo imagery of the planet. Images of depolarized reflectivity (an indicator primarily of wavelength-scale surface roughness) show the same bright volcanic flow features seen in earlier imagery, but with much finer detail. A new image of the Elysium region shows fine detail in the radar-bright channels of Athabasca Vallis, Marte Vallis, and Grjota Vallis. The new images of Tharsis and Olympus Mons also show a complex array of radar-bright and radar-dark features. Southern Amazonis exhibits some of the most complex and puzzling radar-bright structure on the planet. Another curiosity is the Chryse/Xanthe/Channels region, where we find some radar-bright features in or adjacent to fluvial chaos structures. Chryse/Xanthe is also the only region of Mars showing radar-bright craters (which are rare on Mars but common on the Moon and Mercury). We also obtained the first delay-Doppler image showing the enhanced backscatter from the residual south polar ice cap. In addition to the depolarized imagery, we were able to make the first delay-Doppler images of the circular polarization ratio (an important diagnostic for surface roughness texture). We find that vast areas of the radar-bright volcanic regions have polarization ratios close to unity. Such high ratios are rare for terrestrial lava flows and only seen for extremely blocky surfaces giving high levels of multiple scattering.

  5. Decadal prediction with a high resolution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monerie, Paul-Arthur; Valcke, Sophie; Terray, Laurent; Moine, Marie-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The ability of a high resolution coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (with a horizontal resolution of the quarter degree in the ocean and of about 50 km in the atmosphere) to predict the annual means of temperature, precipitation, sea-ice volume and extent is assessed. Reasonable skill in predicting sea surface temperatures and surface air temperature is obtained, especially over the North Atlantic, the tropical Atlantic and the Indian Ocean. The skill in predicting precipitations is weaker and not significant. The Sea Ice Extent and volume are also reasonably predicted in winter (March) and summer (September). It is however argued that the skill is mainly due to the atmosphere feeding in well-mixed GHGs. The mid-90's subpolar gyre warming is assessed. The model simulates a warming of the North Atlantic Ocean, associated with an increase of the meridional heat transport, a strengthening of the North Atlantic current and a deepening of the mixed layer over the Labrador Sea. The atmosphere plays a role in the warming through a modulation of the North Atlantic Oscillation and a shrinking of the subpolar gyre. At the 3-8 years lead-time, a negative anomaly of pressure, located south of the subpolar gyre is associated with the wind speed decrease over the subpolar gyre. It prevents oceanic heat-loss and favors the northward move, from the subtropical to the subpolar gyre, of anomalously warm and salty water, leading to its warming. We finally argued that the subpolar gyre warming is triggered by the ocean dynamic but the atmosphere can contributes to its sustaining. This work is realised in the framework of the EU FP7 SPECS Project.

  6. Toward high-resolution optoelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, Daniel; Huie, Philip; Vankov, Alexander; Asher, Alon; Baccus, Steven

    2005-04-01

    It has been already demonstrated that electrical stimulation of retina can produce visual percepts in blind patients suffering from macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. Current retinal implants provide very low resolution (just a few electrodes), while several thousand pixels are required for functional restoration of sight. We present a design of the optoelectronic retinal prosthetic system that can activate a retinal stimulating array with pixel density up to 2,500 pix/mm2 (geometrically corresponding to a visual acuity of 20/80), and allows for natural eye scanning rather than scanning with a head-mounted camera. The system operates similarly to "virtual reality" imaging devices used in military and medical applications. An image from a video camera is projected by a goggle-mounted infrared LED-LCD display onto the retina, activating an array of powered photodiodes in the retinal implant. Such a system provides a broad field of vision by allowing for natural eye scanning. The goggles are transparent to visible light, thus allowing for simultaneous utilization of remaining natural vision along with prosthetic stimulation. Optical control of the implant allows for simple adjustment of image processing algorithms and for learning. A major prerequisite for high resolution stimulation is the proximity of neural cells to the stimulation sites. This can be achieved with sub-retinal implants constructed in a manner that directs migration of retinal cells to target areas. Two basic implant geometries are described: perforated membranes and protruding electrode arrays. Possibility of the tactile neural stimulation is also examined.

  7. High Resolution Global View of Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Io, the most volcanic body in the solar system is seen in the highest resolution obtained to date by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The smallest features that can be discerned are 2.5 kilometers in size. There are rugged mountains several kilometers high, layered materials forming plateaus, and many irregular depressions called volcanic calderas. Several of the dark, flow-like features correspond to hot spots, and may be active lava flows. There are no landforms resembling impact craters, as the volcanism covers the surface with new deposits much more rapidly than the flux of comets and asteroids can create large impact craters. The picture is centered on the side of Io that always faces away from Jupiter; north is to the top.

    Color images acquired on September 7, 1996 have been merged with higher resolution images acquired on November 6, 1996 by the Solid State Imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The color is composed of data taken, at a range of 487,000 kilometers, in the near-infrared, green, and violet filters and has been enhanced to emphasize the extraordinary variations in color and brightness that characterize Io's face. The high resolution images were obtained at ranges which varied from 245,719 kilometers to 403,100 kilometers.

    Launched in October 1989, Galileo entered orbit around Jupiter on December 7, 1995. The spacecraft's mission is to conduct detailed studies of the giant planet, its largest moons and the Jovian magnetic environment. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  8. The NASA High Resolution Microwave Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarter, J. C.; Gulkis, S.

    1993-05-01

    The NASA High Resolution Microwave Survey (HRMS) began a decade of planned observations to search for signals of extraterrestrial intelligent origin with inaugural ceremonies at two sites on October 12, 1992. At Goldstone, California the Sky Survey began executing precisely controlled scanning patterns on the celestial sphere using a new beam waveguide 34m antenna operating at a frequency near 8500 MHz (X-band). At Arecibo, Puerto Rico the Targeted Search began tracking GL615.1A, one of 24 solar-type stars selected for these inaugural observations, using the NAIC 300m radio telescope operating in a band of frequencies centered at 1406 MHz. Since the initiation of the search, the Sky Survey has completed X-band observations of several dozen sky-frames measuring 30(deg) times 1.5(deg) . In addition, observations of selected areas of the galactic plane have been observed in several frequency bands (1400 MHz and 1600 MHz) using a 26m antenna located near the 34m antenna. The Targeted Search has completed the first 200 hours of observations at Arecibo covering some 300 MHz of bandwidth. This paper summarizes the results of the observations to date, including a synopsis of the interference observed at the Goldstone and Arecibo sites, and a discussion of techniques that will be used to improve future observations. The HRMS program is managed by the Ames Research Center in collaboration with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The results presented in this paper represent the efforts of a team of scientists and engineers at these two institutions as well as the SETI Institute, Silicon Engines Inc., John C. Reykjalin Inc., Sverdrup Technology, Sterling Federal Systems, Cornell University, the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, the American Astronomical Society, Arecibo Observatory, UC Santa Cruz, the University of Washington, UC Berkeley, California Institute of Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Innovative Systems, and the Space Telescope Science Institute.

  9. High-resolution phylogenetic microbial community profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, Esther; Coleman-Derr, Devin; Bowman, Brett; Schwientek, Patrick; Clum, Alicia; Copeland, Alex; Ciobanu, Doina; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Gies, Esther; Hallam, Steve; Tringe, Susannah; Woyke, Tanja

    2014-03-17

    The representation of bacterial and archaeal genome sequences is strongly biased towards cultivated organisms, which belong to merely four phylogenetic groups. Functional information and inter-phylum level relationships are still largely underexplored for candidate phyla, which are often referred to as microbial dark matter. Furthermore, a large portion of the 16S rRNA gene records in the GenBank database are labeled as environmental samples and unclassified, which is in part due to low read accuracy, potential chimeric sequences produced during PCR amplifications and the low resolution of short amplicons. In order to improve the phylogenetic classification of novel species and advance our knowledge of the ecosystem function of uncultivated microorganisms, high-throughput full length 16S rRNA gene sequencing methodologies with reduced biases are needed. We evaluated the performance of PacBio single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing in high-resolution phylogenetic microbial community profiling. For this purpose, we compared PacBio and Illumina metagenomic shotgun and 16S rRNA gene sequencing of a mock community as well as of an environmental sample from Sakinaw Lake, British Columbia. Sakinaw Lake is known to contain a large age of microbial species from candidate phyla. Sequencing results show that community structure based on PacBio shotgun and 16S rRNA gene sequences is highly similar in both the mock and the environmental communities. Resolution power and community representation accuracy from SMRT sequencing data appeared to be independent of GC content of microbial genomes and was higher when compared to Illumina-based metagenome shotgun and 16S rRNA gene (iTag) sequences, e.g. full-length sequencing resolved all 23 OTUs in the mock community, while iTags did not resolve closely related species. SMRT sequencing hence offers various potential benefits when characterizing uncharted microbial communities.

  10. High Resolution Velocity Structure in Eastern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasyanos, M. E.; Gok, R.; Zor, E.; Walter, W. R.

    2004-12-01

    We investigate the crust and upper mantle structure of eastern Turkey where the Anatolian, Arabian and Eurasian Plates meet, forming a complex tectonic regime. The Bitlis suture is a continental collision zone between the Anatolian plateau and the Arabian plate. Broadband data available through the Eastern Turkey Seismic Experiment (ETSE) provide a unique opportunity for studying the high resolution velocity structure of the region. Zor et al. (2003) found an average 46 km thick crust in the Anatolian plateau using a six-layered grid search inversion of the ETSE receiver functions. Receiver functions are sensitive to the velocity contrast of interfaces and the relative travel time of converted and reverberated waves between those interfaces. The interpretation of receiver functions alone, however, may result in an apparent depth-velocity trade-off [Ammon et al., 1990]. In order to improve upon this velocity model, we have combined the receiver functions with surface wave data using the joint inversion method of Julia et al. (2000). In this technique, the two sets of observations are combined into a single algebraic equation and each data set is weighted by an estimate of the uncertainty in the observations. The receiver functions are calculated using an iterative time-domain deconvolution technique. We also consider azimuthal changes in the receiver functions and have stacked them into different groups accordingly. We are improving our surface wave model by making Love and Rayleigh dispersion measurements at the ETSE stations and incorporating them into a regional group velocity model for periods between 10 and 100 seconds. Preliminary results indicate a strong trend in the long period group velocities toward the northeast, indicating slow upper mantle velocities in the area consistent with Pn, Sn and receiver function results. Starting models used for the joint inversions include both a 1-D model from a 12-ton dam shot recorded by ETSE [Gurbuz et al., 2004] and

  11. High Resolution Velocity Structure in Eastern Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M; Gok, R; Zor, E; Walter, W

    2004-09-03

    We investigate the crustal and upper mantle structure of eastern Turkey where the Anatolian, Arabian and Eurasian Plates meet and form a complex tectonic structure. The Bitlis suture is a continental collision zone between the Anatolian plateau and the Arabian plate. Broadband data available through the Eastern Turkey Seismic Experiment (ETSE) provided a unique opportunity for studying the high resolution velocity structure. Zor et al. found an average 46 km thick crust in Anatolian plateau using six-layered grid search inversion of the ETSE receiver functions. Receiver functions are sensitive to the velocity contrast of interfaces and the relative travel time of converted and reverberated waves between those interfaces. The interpretation of receiver function alone with many-layered parameterization may result in an apparent depth-velocity tradeoff. In order to improve previous velocity model, we employed the joint inversion method with many layered parameterization of Julia et al. (2000) to the ETSE receiver functions. In this technique, the receiver function and surface-wave observations are combined into a single algebraic equation and each data set is weighted by an estimate of the uncertainty in the observations. We consider azimuthal changes of receiver functions and have stacked them into different groups. We calculated the receiver functions using iterative time-domain deconvolution technique and surface wave group velocity dispersion curves between 10-100 sec. We are making surface wave dispersion measurements at the ETSE stations and have incorporated them into a regional group velocity model. Preliminary results indicate a strong trend in the long period group velocity in the northeast. This indicates slow upper mantle velocities in the region consistent with Pn, Sn and receiver function results. We started with both the 1-D model that is obtained with the 12 tones dam explosion shot data recorded by ETSE network and the existing receiver function

  12. High Resolution Airborne Shallow Water Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbacher, F.; Pfennigbauer, M.; Aufleger, M.; Ullrich, A.

    2012-07-01

    In order to meet the requirements of the European Water Framework Directive (EU-WFD), authorities face the problem of repeatedly performing area-wide surveying of all kinds of inland waters. Especially for mid-sized or small rivers this is a considerable challenge imposing insurmountable logistical efforts and costs. It is therefore investigated if large-scale surveying of a river system on an operational basis is feasible by employing airborne hydrographic laser scanning. In cooperation with the Bavarian Water Authority (WWA Weilheim) a pilot project was initiated by the Unit of Hydraulic Engineering at the University of Innsbruck and RIEGL Laser Measurement Systems exploiting the possibilities of a new LIDAR measurement system with high spatial resolution and high measurement rate to capture about 70 km of riverbed and foreland for the river Loisach in Bavaria/Germany and the estuary and parts of the shoreline (about 40km in length) of lake Ammersee. The entire area surveyed was referenced to classic terrestrial cross-section surveys with the aim to derive products for the monitoring and managing needs of the inland water bodies forced by the EU-WFD. The survey was performed in July 2011 by helicopter and airplane and took 3 days in total. In addition, high resolution areal images were taken to provide an optical reference, offering a wide range of possibilities on further research, monitoring, and managing responsibilities. The operating altitude was about 500 m to maintain eye-safety, even for the aided eye, the airspeed was about 55 kts for the helicopter and 75 kts for the aircraft. The helicopter was used in the alpine regions while the fixed wing aircraft was used in the plains and the urban area, using appropriate scan rates to receive evenly distributed point clouds. The resulting point density ranged from 10 to 25 points per square meter. By carefully selecting days with optimum water quality, satisfactory penetration down to the river bed was achieved

  13. The HFIP High Resolution Hurricane Forecast Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nance, L. B.; Bernardet, L.; Bao, S.; Brown, B.; Carson, L.; Fowler, T.; Halley Gotway, J.; Harrop, C.; Szoke, E.; Tollerud, E. I.; Wolff, J.; Yuan, H.

    2010-12-01

    Tropical cyclones are a serious concern for the nation, causing significant risk to life, property and economic vitality. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Weather Service has a mission of issuing tropical cyclone forecasts and warnings, aimed at protecting life and property and enhancing the national economy. In the last 10 years, the errors in hurricane track forecasts have been reduced by about 50% through improved model guidance, enhanced observations, and forecaster expertise. However, little progress has been made during this period toward reducing forecasted intensity errors. To address this shortcoming, NOAA established the Hurricane Forecast Improvement Project (HFIP) in 2007. HFIP is a 10-year plan to improve one to five day tropical cyclone forecasts, with a focus on rapid intensity change. Recent research suggests that prediction models with grid spacing less than 1 km in the inner core of the hurricane may provide a substantial improvement in intensity forecasts. The 2008-09 staging of the High Resolution Hurricane (HRH) Test focused on quantifying the impact of increased horizontal resolution in numerical models on hurricane intensity forecasts. The primary goal of this test was an evaluation of the effect of increasing horizontal resolution within a given model across a variety of storms with different intensity, location and structure. The test focused on 69 retrospectives cases from the 2005 and 2007 hurricane seasons. Six modeling groups participated in the HRH test utilizing a variety of models, including three configurations of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, the operational GFDL model, the Navy’s tropical cyclone model, and a model developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UWM). The Development Testbed Center (DTC) was tasked with providing objective verification statistics for a variety of metrics. This presentation provides an overview of the HRH Test and a summary of the standard

  14. Genome-Wide High-Resolution aCGH Analysis of Gestational Choriocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Poaty, Henriette; Coullin, Philippe; Peko, Jean Félix; Dessen, Philippe; Diatta, Ange Lucien; Valent, Alexander; Leguern, Eric; Prévot, Sophie; Gombé-Mbalawa, Charles; Candelier, Jean-Jacques; Picard, Jean-Yves; Bernheim, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Eleven samples of DNA from choriocarcinomas were studied by high resolution CGH-array 244 K. They were studied after histopathological confirmation of the diagnosis, of the androgenic etiology and after a microsatellite marker analysis confirming the absence of contamination of tumor DNA from maternal DNA. Three cell lines, BeWo, JAR, JEG were also studied by this high resolution pangenomic technique. According to aCGH analysis, the de novo choriocarcinomas exhibited simple chromosomal rearrangements or normal profiles. The cell lines showed various and complex chromosomal aberrations. 23 Minimal Critical Regions were defined that allowed us to list the genes that were potentially implicated. Among them, unusually high numbers of microRNA clusters and imprinted genes were observed. PMID:22253721

  15. High resolution atomic force microscopy of double-stranded RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ares, Pablo; Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Herrero-Galán, Elías; Valpuesta, José M.; Gil, Adriana; Gomez-Herrero, Julio; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    Double-stranded (ds) RNA mediates the suppression of specific gene expression, it is the genetic material of a number of viruses, and a key activator of the innate immune response against viral infections. The ever increasing list of roles played by dsRNA in the cell and its potential biotechnological applications over the last decade has raised an interest for the characterization of its mechanical properties and structure, and that includes approaches using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and other single-molecule techniques. Recent reports have resolved the structure of dsDNA with AFM at unprecedented resolution. However, an equivalent study with dsRNA is still lacking. Here, we have visualized the double helix of dsRNA under near-physiological conditions and at sufficient resolution to resolve the A-form sub-helical pitch periodicity. We have employed different high-sensitive force-detection methods and obtained images with similar spatial resolution. Therefore, we show here that the limiting factors for high-resolution AFM imaging of soft materials in liquid medium are, rather than the imaging mode, the force between the tip and the sample and the sharpness of the tip apex.Double-stranded (ds) RNA mediates the suppression of specific gene expression, it is the genetic material of a number of viruses, and a key activator of the innate immune response against viral infections. The ever increasing list of roles played by dsRNA in the cell and its potential biotechnological applications over the last decade has raised an interest for the characterization of its mechanical properties and structure, and that includes approaches using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and other single-molecule techniques. Recent reports have resolved the structure of dsDNA with AFM at unprecedented resolution. However, an equivalent study with dsRNA is still lacking. Here, we have visualized the double helix of dsRNA under near-physiological conditions and at sufficient resolution to

  16. A high resolution solar atlas for fluorescence calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hearn, M. F.; Ohlmacher, J. T.; Schleicher, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    The characteristics required of a solar atlas to be used for studying the fluorescence process in comets are examined. Several sources of low resolution data were combined to provide an absolutely calibrated spectrum from 2250 A to 7000A. Three different sources of high resolution data were also used to cover this same spectral range. The low resolution data were then used to put each high resolution spectrum on an absolute scale. The three high resolution spectra were then combined in their overlap regions to produce a single, absolutely calibrated high resolution spectrum over the entire spectral range.

  17. High Resolution Simulation in the Eastern Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, J.; Sa, L.; Nogueira, D.; Gandu, A.

    2006-05-01

    produced by the BRAMS model shows that the numerical simulation reproduced both LLJs of November 13 and 14 at, 06 UTC. However, their magnitude was about 2 and 3 m/s lower and their height was higher than what was observed. In order to verify the origin of the LLJ, the variability of the wind at the jet level, during the numerical simulation in grid 1, was analyzed. In the afternoon, it was observed the increase in wind speed at the Atlantic Coast associated to sea breeze circulation. Nonetheless, at 00 UTC, this maximum speed center penetrated the continent and reached the region of Caxiuanã. Indeed, this circulation was under a canalization effect due to the rivers distribution. On November 13, the sea breeze formed again. However, the circulation on this day was relatively weak. The numerical simulations with this high resolution model indicated the occurrence of low level jets. Nevertheless, it did not reproduce in detail some of the observed characteristics of the flow. An important aspect revealed by the simulations with BRAMS was the origin of the jets, which is associated to a phenomenon of canalization of the flow above zones where there are some of the great rivers in the Northeast of Para.

  18. ALMA Debuts High-Resolution Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-07-01

    through space as it orbits the Sun. The resolution of these images — enough to study the shape and even some surface features of the asteroid! — are unprecedented for this wavelength. HL Tau is a young star surrounded by a protoplanetary disk. ALMA's detailed observations of this region revealed remarkable structure within the disk: a series of light and dark concentric rings indicative of planets caught in the act of forming. Studying this system will help us understand how multi-planet solar systems like our own form and evolve. The star-forming galaxy SDP.81 — located so far away that the light we see was emitted when the Universe was only 15% of its current age — is gravitationally-lensed into a cosmic arc, due to the convenient placement of a nearby foreground galaxy. The combination of the lucky alignment and ALMA's high resolution grant us a spectacularly detailed view of this distant galaxy, allowing us to study its actual shape and the motion within it. The observations from ALMA's first test of its long baseline demonstrate that ALMA is capable of doing the transformational science it promised. As we gear up for the next cycle of observations, it's clear that exciting times are ahead! Citation: ALMA ship et al. 2015 ApJ 808 L1, L2, L3 and L4. Focus on the ALMA Long Baseline Campaign

  19. Real-time PCR/DNA melting curve-based assay to identify individual strongylid larvae recovered from ovine faecal cultures.

    PubMed

    Knight, Jacqueline S; Bisset, Stewart A

    2015-12-15

    A closed-tube real-time PCR (RT PCR) method was developed to identify individual strongylid nematode larvae recovered from ovine faecal cultures. The method builds on an earlier conventional PCR assay established by our group and similarly targets species-specific sequence motifs in the ITS-2 region of ribosomal DNA. The new procedure combines RT PCR with DNA melting curve analyses to identify species-specific amplicons, thus avoiding the need to undertake gel electrophoresis. As with the earlier method, it involves two sets of species-specific reactions. The first targets Haemonchus contortus, Teladorsagia circumcincta, Trichostrongylus colubriformis, Nematodirus spathiger and Oesophagostomum venulosum while the second targets Trichostrongylus axei, Trichostrongylus vitrinis, Cooperia curticei and Chabertia ovina. With two exceptions, all the DNA primers employed in the new assay were among those described and tested in developing the earlier assay. The exceptions are the forward "generic" primer, which was re-designed to generate smaller amplicon sizes more suitable for melting curve analyses, and the T. axei-specific primer, which was modified to achieve a higher amplicon melt temperature to enable larvae of this species to be more readily differentiated from those of C. curticei. The melt temperature range for amplicons representing each of the species targeted was determined using lysates derived from both microscopically identified adult male worms (2-12/species), as well as 30 larvae of each of the species which were derived from at least 6 different geographical locations throughout New Zealand. The new assay potentially provides a simpler, faster method to identify individual ovine strongylid larvae for downstream applications than was provided by the earlier conventional PCR assay. PMID:26526096

  20. The implementation of sea ice model on a regional high-resolution scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Siva; Zakharov, Igor; Bobby, Pradeep; McGuire, Peter

    2015-09-01

    The availability of high-resolution atmospheric/ocean forecast models, satellite data and access to high-performance computing clusters have provided capability to build high-resolution models for regional ice condition simulation. The paper describes the implementation of the Los Alamos sea ice model (CICE) on a regional scale at high resolution. The advantage of the model is its ability to include oceanographic parameters (e.g., currents) to provide accurate results. The sea ice simulation was performed over Baffin Bay and the Labrador Sea to retrieve important parameters such as ice concentration, thickness, ridging, and drift. Two different forcing models, one with low resolution and another with a high resolution, were used for the estimation of sensitivity of model results. Sea ice behavior over 7 years was simulated to analyze ice formation, melting, and conditions in the region. Validation was based on comparing model results with remote sensing data. The simulated ice concentration correlated well with Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) and Ocean and Sea Ice Satellite Application Facility (OSI-SAF) data. Visual comparison of ice thickness trends estimated from the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity satellite (SMOS) agreed with the simulation for year 2010-2011.

  1. High resolution atomic force microscopy of double-stranded RNA.

    PubMed

    Ares, Pablo; Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Herrero-Galán, Elías; Valpuesta, José M; Gil, Adriana; Gomez-Herrero, Julio; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    Double-stranded (ds) RNA mediates the suppression of specific gene expression, it is the genetic material of a number of viruses, and a key activator of the innate immune response against viral infections. The ever increasing list of roles played by dsRNA in the cell and its potential biotechnological applications over the last decade has raised an interest for the characterization of its mechanical properties and structure, and that includes approaches using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and other single-molecule techniques. Recent reports have resolved the structure of dsDNA with AFM at unprecedented resolution. However, an equivalent study with dsRNA is still lacking. Here, we have visualized the double helix of dsRNA under near-physiological conditions and at sufficient resolution to resolve the A-form sub-helical pitch periodicity. We have employed different high-sensitive force-detection methods and obtained images with similar spatial resolution. Therefore, we show here that the limiting factors for high-resolution AFM imaging of soft materials in liquid medium are, rather than the imaging mode, the force between the tip and the sample and the sharpness of the tip apex. PMID:26876486

  2. High resolution bragg focusing optics for synchrotron monochromators and analyzers

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, G.S.; Beno, M.A.; Gofron, K.J.

    1997-07-01

    A number of different applications for high resolution Bragg Focusing Optics are reviewed. Applications include Sagittal Focusing, Energy Dispersive optics for x-ray absorption and diffraction, a curved analyzer-multichannel detector method for efficient acquisition of powder and small angle scattering data, the use of Backscattering Analyzers for very high resolution inelastic scattering, and curved crystals for high energy applications.

  3. Development of a Melting Curve-Based Allele-Specific PCR of Apolipoprotein E (APOE) Genotyping Method for Genomic DNA, Guthrie Blood Spot, and Whole Blood.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms of apolipoprotein E (APOE) are associated with various health conditions and diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, etc. Hence, genotyping of APOE has broad applications in biomedical research and clinical settings, particularly in the era of precision medicine. The study aimed to develop a convenient and accurate method with flexible throughput to genotype the APOE polymorphisms. A melting curve-based allele-specific PCR method was developed to genotype two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of APOE, i.e. rs429358 at codon 112 and rs7412 at codon 158. These two SNPs determine the genotype of APOE2, E3, and E4. PCR-based Sanger sequencing was used as the reference method for APOE genotyping. A 100% concordance rate was obtained in 300 subjects between the melting curve-based allele-specific PCR method and the Sanger sequencing method. This method was applied to a genetic association analysis of APOE and schizophrenia consisting of 711 patients with schizophrenia and 665 control subjects from Taiwan. However, no significant differences in the allele and genotype frequencies were detected between these two groups. Further experiments showed that DNA dissolved from blood collected on Guthrie filter paper and total blood cell lysate without DNA extraction can be used in the melting curve-based allele-specific PCR method. Thus, we suggest that this is a fast, accurate and robust APOE genotyping method with a flexible throughput and suitable for DNA template from different preparations. This convenient method shall meet the different needs of various research and clinical laboratories. PMID:27078154

  4. Development of a Melting Curve-Based Allele-Specific PCR of Apolipoprotein E (APOE) Genotyping Method for Genomic DNA, Guthrie Blood Spot, and Whole Blood

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms of apolipoprotein E (APOE) are associated with various health conditions and diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, etc. Hence, genotyping of APOE has broad applications in biomedical research and clinical settings, particularly in the era of precision medicine. The study aimed to develop a convenient and accurate method with flexible throughput to genotype the APOE polymorphisms. A melting curve-based allele-specific PCR method was developed to genotype two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of APOE, i.e. rs429358 at codon 112 and rs7412 at codon 158. These two SNPs determine the genotype of APOE2, E3, and E4. PCR-based Sanger sequencing was used as the reference method for APOE genotyping. A 100% concordance rate was obtained in 300 subjects between the melting curve-based allele-specific PCR method and the Sanger sequencing method. This method was applied to a genetic association analysis of APOE and schizophrenia consisting of 711 patients with schizophrenia and 665 control subjects from Taiwan. However, no significant differences in the allele and genotype frequencies were detected between these two groups. Further experiments showed that DNA dissolved from blood collected on Guthrie filter paper and total blood cell lysate without DNA extraction can be used in the melting curve-based allele-specific PCR method. Thus, we suggest that this is a fast, accurate and robust APOE genotyping method with a flexible throughput and suitable for DNA template from different preparations. This convenient method shall meet the different needs of various research and clinical laboratories. PMID:27078154

  5. High resolution airborne geophysics at hazardous waste disposal sites

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, L.P.; Nyquist, J.E.; Doll, W.E.; Chong Foo, M.; Gamey, T.J.

    1995-06-01

    In 1994, a high resolution helicopter geophysical survey was conducted over portions of the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee. The 1800 line kilometer survey included multi-frequency electromagnetic and magnetic sensors. The areas covered by the high resolution portion of the survey were selected on the basis of their importance to the environmental restoration effort and on data obtained from the reconnaissance phase of the airborne survey in which electromagnetic, magnetic, and radiometric data were collected over the entire Oak Ridge Reservation in 1992--1993. The high resolution phase had lower sensor heights, more and higher EM frequencies, and tighter line spacings than did the reconnaissance survey. When flying over exceptionally clear areas, the high resolution bird came within a few meters of the ground surface. Unfortunately, even sparse trees and power or phone lines could prevent the bird from being towed safely at low altitude, and over such areas it was more usual for it to be flown at about the same altitude as the bird in the reconnaissance survey, about 30m. Even so, the magnetometers used in the high resolution phase were 20m closer to the ground than in the reconnaissance phase because they were mounted on the tail of the bird rather than on the tow cable above the bird. The EM frequencies used in the high resolution survey ranged from 7400Hz to 67000Hz. Only the horizontal coplanar loop configuration was used in the high resolution flyovers.

  6. Genotyping of velvet antlers for identification of country of origin using mitochondrial DNA and fluorescence melting curve analysis with locked nucleic acid probes.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jeong Jin; Kim, Youngjoo; Hong, Ji Young; Kim, Gi Won; Hwang, Seung Yong

    2016-07-01

    Velvet antlers are used medicinally in Asia and possess various therapeutic effects. Prices are set according to the country of origin, which is unidentifiable to the naked eye, and therefore counterfeiting is prevalent. Additionally, antlers of the Canadian elk, which can generate chronic wasting disease, are prevalently smuggled and distributed in the market. Thus, a method for identifying the country of origin of velvet antlers was developed, using polymorphisms in mitochondrial DNA, fluorescence melting curve analysis and analysis of locked nucleic acids (LNA). This combined method is capable of identifying five genotypes of velvet antlers in a single experiment using two probes. It also has advantages in multiplexing, simplicity and efficiency in genotyping, when compared to real-time PCR or microarrays. The developed method can be used to improve identification rates in the velvet antler market and, by extension, research based on polymorphisms in DNA sequences. PMID:26094991

  7. Methodology of high-resolution photography for mural condition database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, R.; Suzuki, T.; Shibata, M.; Taniguchi, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Digital documentation is one of the most useful techniques to record the condition of cultural heritage. Recently, high-resolution images become increasingly useful because it is possible to show general views of mural paintings and also detailed mural conditions in a single image. As mural paintings are damaged by environmental stresses, it is necessary to record the details of painting condition on high-resolution base maps. Unfortunately, the cost of high-resolution photography and the difficulty of operating its instruments and software have commonly been an impediment for researchers and conservators. However, the recent development of graphic software makes its operation simpler and less expensive. In this paper, we suggest a new approach to make digital heritage inventories without special instruments, based on our recent our research project in Üzümlü church in Cappadocia, Turkey. This method enables us to achieve a high-resolution image database with low costs, short time, and limited human resources.

  8. A compact, light weight, high resolution electron monochromator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goembel, L.; Doering, J. P.

    1995-06-01

    A high resolution electron monochromator that incorporates Vespel polyimide plastic in its construction is described. A great saving in bulk can be realized by mounting the electron optical elements in Vespel tubes rather than mounting them by traditional means.

  9. High Resolution CryoFESEM of Microbial Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlandsen, Stanley; Lei, Ming; Martin-Lacave, Ines; Dunny, Gary; Wells, Carol

    2003-08-01

    The outer surfaces of three microorganisms, Giardia lamblia, Enterococcus faecalis, and Proteus mirabilis, were investigated by cryo-immobilization followed by sublimation of extracellular ice and cryocoating with either Pt alone or Pt plus carbon. Cryocoated samples were examined at [minus sign]125°C in either an in-lens field emission SEM or a below-the-lens field emission SEM. Cryocoating with Pt alone was sufficient for low magnification observation, but attempts to do high-resolution imaging resulted in radiolysis and cracking of the specimen surface. Double coating with Pt and carbon, in combination with high resolution backscatter electron detectors, enabled high-resolution imaging of the glycocalyx of bacteria, revealing a sponge-like network over the surface. High resolution examination of bacterial flagella also revealed a periodic substructure. Common artifacts included radiolysis leading to “cracking” of the surface, and insufficient deposition of Pt resulting in the absence of detectable surface topography.

  10. Update on High-Resolution Geodetically Controlled LROC Polar Mosaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archinal, B.; Lee, E.; Weller, L.; Richie, J.; Edmundson, K.; Laura, J.; Robinson, M.; Speyerer, E.; Boyd, A.; Bowman-Cisneros, E.; Wagner, R.; Nefian, A.

    2015-10-01

    We describe progress on high-resolution (1 m/pixel) geodetically controlled LROC mosaics of the lunar poles, which can be used for locating illumination resources (for solar power or cold traps) or landing site and surface operations planning.

  11. High resolution difference schemes for compressible gas dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, P.; Colella, P.

    1980-07-30

    The advantages and disadvantages of four new high-resolution difference schemes, namely the von Neumann-Richtmyer, Godunovs, MUSCL and Glimms, for mathematically representing physical conditions in compressible gas flows are compared. (LCL)

  12. AVHRR/1-FM Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The advanced very high resolution radiometer is discussed. The program covers design, construction, and test of a breadboard model, engineering model, protoflight model, mechanical/structural model, and a life test model. Special bench test and calibration equipment was developed for use on the program. The flight model program objectives were to fabricate, assemble and test four of the advanced very high resolution radiometers along with a bench cooler and collimator.

  13. NASA/American Cancer Society High-Resolution Flow Cytometry Project-I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. A.; Krishan, A.; Robinson, D. M.; Sams, C.; Costa, F.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The NASA/American Cancer Society (ACS) flow cytometer can simultaneously analyze the electronic nuclear volume (ENV) and DNA content of cells. This study describes the schematics, resolution, reproducibility, and sensitivity of biological standards analyzed on this unit. METHODS: Calibrated beads and biological standards (lymphocytes, trout erythrocytes [TRBC], calf thymocytes, and tumor cells) were analyzed for ENV versus DNA content. Parallel data (forward scatter versus DNA) from a conventional flow cytometer were obtained. RESULTS: ENV linearity studies yielded an R value of 0.999. TRBC had a coefficient of variation (CV) of 1.18 +/- 0.13. DNA indexes as low as 1.02 were detectable. DNA content of lymphocytes from 42 females was 1.9% greater than that for 60 males, with a noninstrumental variability in total DNA content of 0.5%. The ENV/DNA ratio was constant in 15 normal human tissue samples, but differed in the four animal species tested. The ENV/DNA ratio for a hypodiploid breast carcinoma was 2.3 times greater than that for normal breast tissue. CONCLUSIONS: The high-resolution ENV versus DNA analyses are highly reliable, sensitive, and can be used for the detection of near-diploid tumor cells that are difficult to identify with conventional cytometers. ENV/DNA ratio may be a useful parameter for detection of aneuploid populations.

  14. A method for generating high resolution satellite image time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Tao

    2014-10-01

    There is an increasing demand for satellite remote sensing data with both high spatial and temporal resolution in many applications. But it still is a challenge to simultaneously improve spatial resolution and temporal frequency due to the technical limits of current satellite observation systems. To this end, much R&D efforts have been ongoing for years and lead to some successes roughly in two aspects, one includes super resolution, pan-sharpen etc. methods which can effectively enhance the spatial resolution and generate good visual effects, but hardly preserve spectral signatures and result in inadequate analytical value, on the other hand, time interpolation is a straight forward method to increase temporal frequency, however it increase little informative contents in fact. In this paper we presented a novel method to simulate high resolution time series data by combing low resolution time series data and a very small number of high resolution data only. Our method starts with a pair of high and low resolution data set, and then a spatial registration is done by introducing LDA model to map high and low resolution pixels correspondingly. Afterwards, temporal change information is captured through a comparison of low resolution time series data, and then projected onto the high resolution data plane and assigned to each high resolution pixel according to the predefined temporal change patterns of each type of ground objects. Finally the simulated high resolution data is generated. A preliminary experiment shows that our method can simulate a high resolution data with a reasonable accuracy. The contribution of our method is to enable timely monitoring of temporal changes through analysis of time sequence of low resolution images only, and usage of costly high resolution data can be reduces as much as possible, and it presents a highly effective way to build up an economically operational monitoring solution for agriculture, forest, land use investigation

  15. Cloud-Based Tools to Support High-Resolution Modeling (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, N.; Nelson, J.; Swain, N.; Christensen, S.

    2013-12-01

    The majority of watershed models developed to support decision-making by water management agencies are simple, lumped-parameter models. Maturity in research codes and advances in the computational power from multi-core processors on desktop machines, commercial cloud-computing resources, and supercomputers with thousands of cores have created new opportunities for employing more accurate, high-resolution distributed models for routine use in decision support. The barriers for using such models on a more routine basis include massive amounts of spatial data that must be processed for each new scenario and lack of efficient visualization tools. In this presentation we will review a current NSF-funded project called CI-WATER that is intended to overcome many of these roadblocks associated with high-resolution modeling. We are developing a suite of tools that will make it possible to deploy customized web-based apps for running custom scenarios for high-resolution models with minimal effort. These tools are based on a software stack that includes 52 North, MapServer, PostGIS, HT Condor, CKAN, and Python. This open source stack provides a simple scripting environment for quickly configuring new custom applications for running high-resolution models as geoprocessing workflows. The HT Condor component facilitates simple access to local distributed computers or commercial cloud resources when necessary for stochastic simulations. The CKAN framework provides a powerful suite of tools for hosting such workflows in a web-based environment that includes visualization tools and storage of model simulations in a database to archival, querying, and sharing of model results. Prototype applications including land use change, snow melt, and burned area analysis will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1135482

  16. Preparation and high-resolution microscopy of gold cluster labeled nucleic acid conjugates and nanodevices

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Richard D.; Hainfeld, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Nanogold and undecagold are covalently linked gold cluster labels which enable the identification and localization of biological components with molecular precision and resolution. They can be prepared with different reactivities, which means they can be conjugated to a wide variety of molecules, including nucleic acids, at specific, unique sites. The location of these sites can be synthetically programmed in order to preserve the binding affinity of the conjugate and impart novel characteristics and useful functionality. Methods for the conjugation of undecagold and Nanogold to DNA and RNA are discussed, and applications of labeled conjugates to the high-resolution microscopic identification of binding sites and characterization of biological macromolecular assemblies are described. In addition to providing insights into their molecular structure and function, high-resolution microscopic methods also show how Nanogold and undecagold conjugates can be synthetically assembled, or self-assemble, into supramolecular materials to which the gold cluster labels impart useful functionality. PMID:20869258

  17. High Resolution Local Structure-Constrained Image Upsampling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yang; Wang, Ronggang; Wang, Wenmin; Gao, Wen

    2015-11-01

    With the development of ultra-high-resolution display devices, the visual perception of fine texture details is becoming more and more important. A method of high-quality image upsampling with a low cost is greatly needed. In this paper, we propose a fast and efficient image upsampling method that makes use of high-resolution local structure constraints. The average local difference is used to divide a bicubic-interpolated image into a sharp edge area and a texture area, and these two areas are reconstructed separately with specific constraints. For reconstruction of the sharp edge area, a high-resolution gradient map is estimated as an extra constraint for the recovery of sharp and natural edges; for the reconstruction of the texture area, a high-resolution local texture structure map is estimated as an extra constraint to recover fine texture details. These two reconstructed areas are then combined to obtain the final high-resolution image. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed method recovered finer pixel-level texture details and obtained top-level objective performance with a low time cost compared with state-of-the-art methods. PMID:26186777

  18. Design and implementation of spaceborne high resolution infrared touch screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tai-guo; Li, Wen-xin; Dong, Yi-peng; Ma, Wen; Xia, Jia-gao

    2015-10-01

    For the consideration of the special application environment of the electronic products used in aerospace and to further more improve the human-computer interaction of the manned aerospace area. The research is based on the design and implementation way of the high resolution spaceborne infrared touch screen on the basis of FPGA and DSP frame structure. Beside the introduction of the whole structure for the high resolution spaceborne infrared touch screen system, this essay also gives the detail information about design of hardware for the high resolution spaceborne infrared touch screen system, FPGA design, GUI design and DSP algorithm design based on Lagrange interpolation. What is more, the easy makes a comprehensive research of the reliability design for the high resolution spaceborne infrared touch screen for the special purpose of it. Besides, the system test is done after installation of spaceborne infrared touch screen. The test result shows that the system is simple and reliable enough, which has a stable running environment and high resolution, which certainly can meet the special requirement of the manned aerospace instrument products.

  19. The Human Genomic Melting Map

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Tøstesen, Eivind; Sundet, Jostein K; Jenssen, Tor-Kristian; Bock, Christoph; Jerstad, Geir Ivar; Thilly, William G; Hovig, Eivind

    2007-01-01

    In a living cell, the antiparallel double-stranded helix of DNA is a dynamically changing structure. The structure relates to interactions between and within the DNA strands, and the array of other macromolecules that constitutes functional chromatin. It is only through its changing conformations that DNA can organize and structure a large number of cellular functions. In particular, DNA must locally uncoil, or melt, and become single-stranded for DNA replication, repair, recombination, and transcription to occur. It has previously been shown that this melting occurs cooperatively, whereby several base pairs act in concert to generate melting bubbles, and in this way constitute a domain that behaves as a unit with respect to local DNA single-strandedness. We have applied a melting map calculation to the complete human genome, which provides information about the propensities of forming local bubbles determined from the whole sequence, and present a first report on its basic features, the extent of cooperativity, and correlations to various physical and biological features of the human genome. Globally, the melting map covaries very strongly with GC content. Most importantly, however, cooperativity of DNA denaturation causes this correlation to be weaker at resolutions fewer than 500 bps. This is also the resolution level at which most structural and biological processes occur, signifying the importance of the informational content inherent in the genomic melting map. The human DNA melting map may be further explored at http://meltmap.uio.no. PMID:17511513

  20. High-Resolution Glacial Discharge Records From Deep-Water Tidal Rhythmites in an Alaskan Fjord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackolski, C. L.; Cowan, E. A.; Jaeger, J. M.; Powell, R. D.

    2006-12-01

    In this study we have compiled and analyzed two high-resolution records of deep-water tidal rhythmites derived from glacial discharges. The rhythmites contain an average of 1 cm of sediment thickness per week during the melt-season. Two sediment cores over 17-m-long were collected from Muir Inlet, Glacier Bay National Park, Southeast Alaska, aboard the R/V Maurice Ewing in 2004 (EW0408). One core (core 60JC) was collected just north of the mouth of Wachusett Inlet. The other (core 62JC) was collected 3.8 km due north of 60JC in a separate basin more proximal to Muir and McBride Glaciers. In Glacier Bay, glacial retreat since the Little Ice Age Maximum is well constrained by historical mapping of glacial temini, and local climate records exist as well. The next step after establishing glacial discharge records is to test hypotheses relating glacial discharge to temperature and rainfall. The cores were subsampled with ODP-style u-channels and scanned for magnetic susceptibility and bulk density. X-radiographs of u-channels were collected to observe small-scale (42 microns/pixel) density differences between silt and mud laminae. Spring-neap tidal packages, representing 2-week periods during summer, are visible because of closely-spaced bounding silt laminae. Seasonality is marked by winter gravelly mud (diamicton) beds and/or spring plankton blooms. Spring-neap packages and seasonal markers were considered jointly in order to construct two mostly continuous records of spring-neap packages and melt- season deposits in each core. Secondarily, melt-season duration, which we define as the number of spring- neap packages occurring in a melt-season, was determined. We found that core 60JC extends back 83 years. 75 of those years were identified as having complete, contiguous melt-season deposits that are, on average, 17 cm thick and contain 8.3 spring-neap packages. Core 62JC extends back 62 years. 57 of those years were identified as having complete, contiguous melt

  1. High resolution single particle refinement in EMAN2.1.

    PubMed

    Bell, James M; Chen, Muyuan; Baldwin, Philip R; Ludtke, Steven J

    2016-05-01

    EMAN2.1 is a complete image processing suite for quantitative analysis of grayscale images, with a primary focus on transmission electron microscopy, with complete workflows for performing high resolution single particle reconstruction, 2-D and 3-D heterogeneity analysis, random conical tilt reconstruction and subtomogram averaging, among other tasks. In this manuscript we provide the first detailed description of the high resolution single particle analysis pipeline and the philosophy behind its approach to the reconstruction problem. High resolution refinement is a fully automated process, and involves an advanced set of heuristics to select optimal algorithms for each specific refinement task. A gold standard FSC is produced automatically as part of refinement, providing a robust resolution estimate for the final map, and this is used to optimally filter the final CTF phase and amplitude corrected structure. Additional methods are in-place to reduce model bias during refinement, and to permit cross-validation using other computational methods. PMID:26931650

  2. Single sensor processing to obtain high resolution color component signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenn, William E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method for generating color video signals representative of color images of a scene includes the following steps: focusing light from the scene on an electronic image sensor via a filter having a tri-color filter pattern; producing, from outputs of the sensor, first and second relatively low resolution luminance signals; producing, from outputs of the sensor, a relatively high resolution luminance signal; producing, from a ratio of the relatively high resolution luminance signal to the first relatively low resolution luminance signal, a high band luminance component signal; producing, from outputs of the sensor, relatively low resolution color component signals; and combining each of the relatively low resolution color component signals with the high band luminance component signal to obtain relatively high resolution color component signals.

  3. A high-resolution vehicle emission inventory for China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, B.; Zhang, Q.; He, K.; Huo, H.; Yao, Z.; Wang, X.

    2012-12-01

    Developing high resolution emission inventory is an essential task for air quality modeling and management. However, current vehicle emission inventories in China are usually developed at provincial level and then allocated to grids based on various spatial surrogates, which is difficult to get high spatial resolution. In this work, we developed a new approach to construct a high-resolution vehicle emission inventory for China. First, vehicle population at county level were estimated by using the relationship between per-capita GDP and vehicle ownership. Then the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model were used to drive the International Vehicle Emission (IVE) model to get monthly emission factors for each county. Finally, vehicle emissions by county were allocated to grids with 5-km horizon resolution by using high-resolution road network data. This work provides a better understanding of spatial representation of vehicle emissions in China and can benefit both air quality modeling and management with improved spatial accuracy.

  4. High-resolution signal synthesis for time-frequency distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, G.S.; Williams, W.J.

    1993-03-01

    Bilinear time-frequency distributions (TFDs) offer improved resolution over linear nine-frequency representations (TFRs), but many TFDs are costly to evaluate and are not associated with signal synthesis algorithms. Recently, the spectrogram (SP) decomposition and weighted reversal correlator decomposition have been used to define low-cost, high-resolution TFDs. In this paper, we show that the vector-valued ``square-root`` of a TFD (VVTFR) provides a representational underpinning for the TFD. By synthesizing signals from modified VVTFRs, we define high-resolution signal synthesis algorithms associated with TFDs. The signal analysis and synthesis packages can be implemented as weighted sums of SP/short-time Fourier Transform signal analysis and synthesis packages, which are widely available, allowing the interested non-specialist easy access to high-resolution methods.

  5. High-resolution signal synthesis for time-frequency distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, G.S. ); Williams, W.J. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science)

    1993-01-01

    Bilinear time-frequency distributions (TFDs) offer improved resolution over linear nine-frequency representations (TFRs), but many TFDs are costly to evaluate and are not associated with signal synthesis algorithms. Recently, the spectrogram (SP) decomposition and weighted reversal correlator decomposition have been used to define low-cost, high-resolution TFDs. In this paper, we show that the vector-valued square-root'' of a TFD (VVTFR) provides a representational underpinning for the TFD. By synthesizing signals from modified VVTFRs, we define high-resolution signal synthesis algorithms associated with TFDs. The signal analysis and synthesis packages can be implemented as weighted sums of SP/short-time Fourier Transform signal analysis and synthesis packages, which are widely available, allowing the interested non-specialist easy access to high-resolution methods.

  6. New vacuum solar telescope and observations with high resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhong; Xu, Jun; Gu, Bo-Zhong; Wang, Sen; You, Jian-Qi; Shen, Long-Xiang; Lu, Ru-Wei; Jin, Zhen-Yu; Chen, Lin-Fei; Lou, Ke; Li, Zhi; Liu, Guang-Qian; Xu, Zhi; Rao, Chang-Hui; Hu, Qi-Qian; Li, Ru-Feng; Fu, Hao-Wen; Wang, Feng; Bao, Men-Xian; Wu, Ming-Chan; Zhang, Bo-Rong

    2014-06-01

    The New Vacuum Solar Telescope (NVST) is a one meter vacuum solar telescope that aims to observe fine structures on the Sun. The main goals of NVST are high resolution imaging and spectral observations, including measurements of the solar magnetic field. NVST is the primary ground-based facility used by the Chinese solar research community in this solar cycle. It is located by Fuxian Lake in southwest China, where the seeing is good enough to perform high resolution observations. We first introduce the general conditions at the Fuxian Solar Observatory and the primary science cases of NVST. Then, the basic structures of this telescope and instruments are described in detail. Finally, some typical high resolution data of the solar photosphere and chromosphere are also shown.

  7. High-resolution Urban Image Classification Using Extended Features

    SciTech Connect

    Vatsavai, Raju

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution image classification poses several challenges because the typical object size is much larger than the pixel resolution. Any given pixel (spectral features at that location) by itself is not a good indicator of the object it belongs to without looking at the broader spatial footprint. Therefore most modern machine learning approaches that are based on per-pixel spectral features are not very effective in high- resolution urban image classification. One way to overcome this problem is to extract features that exploit spatial contextual information. In this study, we evaluated several features in- cluding edge density, texture, and morphology. Several machine learning schemes were tested on the features extracted from a very high-resolution remote sensing image and results were presented.

  8. HIRES: the high resolution spectrograph for the E-ELT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerbi, F. M.; Bouchy, F.; Fynbo, J.; Maiolino, R.; Piskunov, N.; Rebolo Lopez, R.; Santos, N.; Strassmeier, K.; Udry, S.; Vanzi, L.; Riva, M.; Basden, A.; Boisse, I.; Bonfils, X.; Buscher, D.; Cabral, A.; Dimarcantonio, P.; Di Varano, I.; Henry, D.; Monteiro, M.; Morris, T.; Murray, G.; Oliva, Ernesto; Parry, I.; Pepe, F.; Quirrenbach, A.; Rasilla, J. L.; Rees, P.; Stempels, E.; Valenziano, L.; Wells, M.; Wildi, F.; Origlia, L.; Allende Prieto, C.; Chiavassa, A.; Cristiani, S.; Figueira, P.; Gustafsson, B.; Hatzes, A.; Haehnelt, M.; Heng, K.; Israelian, G.; Kochukhov, O.; Lovis, C.; Marconi, A.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Noterdaeme, P.; Petitjean, P.; Puzia, T.; Queloz, D.; Reiners, A.; Zoccali, M.

    2014-08-01

    The current instrumentation plan for the E-ELT foresees a High Resolution Spectrograph conventionally indicated as HIRES. Shaped on the study of extra-solar planet atmospheres, Pop-III stars and fundamental physical constants, HIRES is intended to embed observing modes at high-resolution (up to R=150000) and large spectral range (from the blue limit to the K band) useful for a large suite of science cases that can exclusively be tackled by the E-ELT. We present in this paper the solution for HIRES envisaged by the "HIRES initiative", the international collaboration established in 2013 to pursue a HIRES on E-ELT.

  9. Microbeam X-Ray Standing Wave and High Resolution Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Kazimirov, A.; Bilderback, D.H.; Huang, R.; Sirenko, A.

    2004-05-12

    Post-focusing collimating optics are introduced as a tool to condition X-ray microbeams for the use in high-resolution X-ray diffraction and scattering techniques. As an example, a one-bounce imaging capillary and miniature Si(004) channel-cut crystal were used to produce a microbeam with 10 {mu}m size and an ultimate angular resolution of 2.5 arc sec. This beam was used to measure the strain in semiconductor microstructures by using X-ray high resolution diffraction and standing wave techniques to {delta}d/d < 5x10-4.

  10. High resolution BPMS with integrated gain correction system

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, M.; Briegel, C.; Eddy, N.; Fellenz, B.; Gianfelice, E.; Prieto, P.; Rechenmacher, R.; Voy, D.; Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2009-08-01

    High resolution beam position monitors (BPM) are an essential tool to achieve and reproduce a low vertical beam emittance at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) damping ring. The ATF damping ring (DR) BPMs are currently upgraded with new high resolution read-out electronics. Based on analog and digital down-conversion techniques, the upgrade includes an automatic gain calibration system to correct for slow drift effects and ensure high reproducible beam position readings. The concept and its technical realization, as well as preliminary results of beam studies are presented.

  11. Modified Noise Power Ratio testing of high resolution digitizers

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, T.S.

    1994-05-01

    A broadband, full signal range, side-by-side (tandem) test method for estimating the internal noise performance of high resolution digitizers is described and illustrated. The technique involves a re-definition of the traditional Noise Power Ratio (NPR) test, a change that not only makes this test applicable to higher resolution systems than was previously practical, but also enhances its value and flexibility. Since coherence analysis is the basis of this new definition, and since the application of coherence procedures to high resolution data poses several problems, this report discusses these problems and their resolution.

  12. Theoretical Problems in High Resolution Solar Physics, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athay, G. (Editor); Spicer, D. S. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The Science Working Group for the High Resolution Solar Observatory (HRSO) laid plans beginning in 1984 for a series of workshops designed to stimulate a broadbased input from the scientific community to the HRSO mission. These workshops have the dual objectives of encouraging an early start on the difficult theoretical problems in radiative transfer, magnetohydrodynamics, and plasma physics that will be posed by the HRSO data, and maintaining current discussions of results in high resolution solar studies. This workshop was the second in the series. The workshop format presented invited review papers during the formal sessions and contributed poster papers for discussions during open periods. Both are presented.

  13. PCR amplification of SNP loci from crude DNA for large-scale genotyping of oomycetes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian; Lyon, Rebecca; Zhou, Yuxin; Lamour, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    Similar to other eukaryotes, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers are abundant in many oomycete plant pathogen genomes. High resolution DNA melting analysis (HR-DMA) is a cost-effective method for SNP genotyping, but like many SNP marker technologies, is limited by the amount and quality of template DNA. We describe PCR preamplification of Phytophthora and Peronospora SNP loci from crude DNA extracted from a small amount of mycelium and/or infected plant tissue to produce sufficient template to genotype at least 10 000 SNPs. The approach is fast, inexpensive, requires minimal biological material and should be useful for many organisms in a variety of contexts. PMID:24871597

  14. ATS-6 - The Geosynchronous Very High Resolution Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shenk, W. E.; Stephanides, C. C.; Sonnek, G. E.; Howell, L. D.

    1975-01-01

    The Geosynchronous Very High Resolution Radiometer (GVHRR), flown on the three-axis stabilized geosynchronous satellite, Applications Technology Satellite-6 (ATS-6), collected meteorological data for two months during the summer of 1974. Several hundred images were successfully taken. Data collection terminated when the instrument chopper motor failed. The instrument, its supporting ground equipment, and the data collected in orbit are described.

  15. Reproducible high-resolution multispectral image acquisition in dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duliu, Alexandru; Gardiazabal, José; Lasser, Tobias; Navab, Nassir

    2015-07-01

    Multispectral image acquisitions are increasingly popular in dermatology, due to their improved spectral resolution which enables better tissue discrimination. Most applications however focus on restricted regions of interest, imaging only small lesions. In this work we present and discuss an imaging framework for high-resolution multispectral imaging on large regions of interest.

  16. Evacuee Compliance Behavior Analysis using High Resolution Demographic Information

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei; Han, Lee; Liu, Cheng; Tuttle, Mark A; Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine whether evacuee compliance behavior with route assignments from different resolutions of demographic data would impact the evacuation performance. Most existing evacuation strategies assume that travelers will follow evacuation instructions, while in reality a certain percent of evacuees do not comply with prescribed instructions. In this paper, a comparison study of evacuation assignment based on Traffic Analysis Zones (TAZ) and high resolution LandScan USA Population Cells (LPC) were conducted for the detailed road network representing Alexandria, Virginia. A revised platform for evacuation modeling built on high resolution demographic data and activity-based microscopic traffic simulation is proposed. The results indicate that evacuee compliance behavior affects evacuation efficiency with traditional TAZ assignment, but it does not significantly compromise the efficiency with high resolution LPC assignment. The TAZ assignment also underestimates the real travel time during evacuation, especially for high compliance simulations. This suggests that conventional evacuation studies based on TAZ assignment might not be effective at providing efficient guidance to evacuees. From the high resolution data perspective, traveler compliance behavior is an important factor but it does not impact the system performance significantly. The highlight of evacuee compliance behavior analysis should be emphasized on individual evacuee level route/shelter assignments, rather than the whole system performance.

  17. High resolution data base for use with MAP

    SciTech Connect

    Tapley, W.C.; Harris, D.B.

    1987-05-05

    A high resolution cartographic data base of thw World is available from the CIA. We obtained this data, extracted portions of the data, and produced cartographic files of varying resolutions. The resulting data files are of the proper format for use with MAP (2), our in-house cartographic plotting program.

  18. Ultrastable reference pulser for high-resolution spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, R.; Lenkszus, F. R.; Sifter, L. L.; Strauss, M. G.

    1970-01-01

    Solid-state double-pulse generator for a high resolution semiconductor detector meets specific requirements for resolution /0.05 percent/, amplitude range /0.1-13 MeV/, and repetition rate /0.1-1000 pulses per second/. A tag pulse is generated in coincidence with each reference pulse.

  19. High-resolution TFT-LCD for spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, JaeWon; Kim, Yong-Hae; Byun, Chun-Won; Pi, Jae-Eun; Oh, Himchan; Kim, GiHeon; Lee, Myung-Lae; Chu, Hye-Yong; Hwang, Chi-Sun

    2014-06-01

    SLM with very fine pixel pitch is needed for the holographic display system. Among various kinds of SLMs, commercially available high resolution LCoS has been widely used as a spatial light modulator. But the size of commercially available LCoS SLM is limited because the manufacturing technology of LCoS is based on the semiconductor process developed on small size Si wafer. Recently very high resolution flat panel display panel (~500ppi) was developed as a "retina display". Until now, the pixel pitch of flat panel display is several times larger than the pixel pitch of LCoS. But considering the possibility of shrink down the pixel pitch with advanced lithographic tools, the application of flat panel display will make it possible to build a SLM with high spatial bandwidth product. We simulated High resolution TFT-LCD panel on glass substrate using oxide semiconductor TFT with pixel pitch of 20um. And we considered phase modulation behavior of LC(ECB) mode. The TFT-LCD panel is reflective type with 4-metal structure with organic planarization layers. The technical challenge for high resolution large area SLM will be discussed with very fine pixel.

  20. High-Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Solids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maciel, Gary E.

    1984-01-01

    Examines recent developments in techniques for obtaining high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra on solid samples, discussing the kinds of applications for which these techniques are well suited. Also discusses the characteristics of NMR of solids and generating magnetization for NMR in solids. (JN)

  1. Application of Classification Models to Pharyngeal High-Resolution Manometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mielens, Jason D.; Hoffman, Matthew R.; Ciucci, Michelle R.; McCulloch, Timothy M.; Jiang, Jack J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The authors present 3 methods of performing pattern recognition on spatiotemporal plots produced by pharyngeal high-resolution manometry (HRM). Method: Classification models, including the artificial neural networks (ANNs) multilayer perceptron (MLP) and learning vector quantization (LVQ), as well as support vector machines (SVM), were…

  2. High resolution bone mineral densitometry with a gamma camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, A.; Evans, H.; Jhingran, S.; Johnson, P.

    1983-01-01

    A technique by which the regional distribution of bone mineral can be determined in bone samples from small animals is described. The technique employs an Anger camera interfaced to a medical computer. High resolution imaging is possible by producing magnified images of the bone samples. Regional densitometry of femurs from oophorectomised and bone mineral loss.

  3. Vehicle Detection and Classification from High Resolution Satellite Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, L.; Sasikumar, M.

    2014-11-01

    In the past decades satellite imagery has been used successfully for weather forecasting, geographical and geological applications. Low resolution satellite images are sufficient for these sorts of applications. But the technological developments in the field of satellite imaging provide high resolution sensors which expands its field of application. Thus the High Resolution Satellite Imagery (HRSI) proved to be a suitable alternative to aerial photogrammetric data to provide a new data source for object detection. Since the traffic rates in developing countries are enormously increasing, vehicle detection from satellite data will be a better choice for automating such systems. In this work, a novel technique for vehicle detection from the images obtained from high resolution sensors is proposed. Though we are using high resolution images, vehicles are seen only as tiny spots, difficult to distinguish from the background. But we are able to obtain a detection rate not less than 0.9. Thereafter we classify the detected vehicles into cars and trucks and find the count of them.

  4. Using High Resolution SPOT 5 Multispectral Imagery for Crop Identification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High resolution satellite imagery offers new opportunities for crop monitoring and assessment. A SPOT 5 image with four spectral bands (green, red, near-infrared, and mid-infrared) and 10-m pixel size covering intensively cropped areas in south Texas was evaluated for crop identification. Two images...

  5. Mapping riparian and wetland weeds with high resolution satellite imagery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aquatic and wetland weeds are a serious management problem in many freshwater ecosystems of the world. This paper presents an overview on the application of using high resolution QuickBird multi-spectral satellite imagery for detecting weeds in waterways and wetlands in Texas. Unsupervised image a...

  6. High Resolution Wavenumber Standards for the Infrared. (IUPAC Recommendations 1995)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guelachvili, G.; Birk, M.; Borde, C. J.; Brault, J. W.; Brown, L. R.; Carli, B.; Cole, A. R. H.; Evenson, K. M.; Fayt, A.; Hausamann, D.; Johns, J. W. C.; Kauppinen, J.; Kou, Q.; Maki, A. G.; Rao, K. N.; Toth, R. A.; Urban, W.; Valentin, A.; Verges, J.; Wagner, G.; Wappelhorst, M. H.; Wells, J. S.; Winnewisser, B. P.; Winnewisser, M.

    1995-01-01

    The calibration of high resolution infrared spectra is generally more precise than accurate. This is the case even when they are recorded with Fourier transform interferometers. This presentation aims at improving the accuracy of wavenumber measurements in the infrared by recommending a selection of spectral lines as wavenumber standards for absolute calibration.

  7. High-Resolution Fluorometer for Mapping Microscale Phytoplankton Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Doubell, Mark J.; Seuront, Laurent; Seymour, Justin R.; Patten, Nicole L.; Mitchell, James G.

    2006-01-01

    A new high-resolution, in situ profiling fluorometer maps fluorescence distributions with a spatial resolution of 0.5 to 1.5 mm to a depth of 70 m in the open ocean. We report centimeter-scale patterns for phytoplankton distributions associated with gradients exhibiting 10- to 30-fold changes in fluorescence in contrasting marine ecosystems. PMID:16751572

  8. High-resolution fluorometer for mapping microscale phytoplankton distributions.

    PubMed

    Doubell, Mark J; Seuront, Laurent; Seymour, Justin R; Patten, Nicole L; Mitchell, James G

    2006-06-01

    A new high-resolution, in situ profiling fluorometer maps fluorescence distributions with a spatial resolution of 0.5 to 1.5 mm to a depth of 70 m in the open ocean. We report centimeter-scale patterns for phytoplankton distributions associated with gradients exhibiting 10- to 30-fold changes in fluorescence in contrasting marine ecosystems. PMID:16751572

  9. Workshop on high-resolution, large-acceptance spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Zeidman, B.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of the Workshop on High-Resolution, Large-Acceptance Spectrometers was to provide a means for exchange of information among those actively engaged in the design and construction of these new spectrometers. Thirty-seven papers were prepared for the data base.

  10. Homology Groups of High-Resolution Temporal Rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Félix; Vásquez Aguilar, Raciel; Carsteanu, Alin-Andrei

    2016-04-01

    This study applies topological data analysis, by generating homology groups to uncover patterns in the data of high-resolution temporal rainfall intensities from Iowa City (IIHR, U of Iowa). The state-space representation of the data is being investigated for an appropiate embedding dimension, in order to subsequently study topological properties of resulting manifold.

  11. Evaluating high resolution SPOT 5 satellite imagery for crop identification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High resolution satellite imagery offers new opportunities for crop monitoring and assessment. A SPOT 5 image with four spectral bands (green, red, near-infrared, and mid-infrared) and 10-m pixel size covering intensively cropped areas in south Texas was evaluated for crop identification. Two images...

  12. A DVD Spectroscope: A Simple, High-Resolution Classroom Spectroscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakabayashi, Fumitaka; Hamada, Kiyohito

    2006-01-01

    Digital versatile disks (DVDs) have successfully made up an inexpensive but high-resolution spectroscope suitable for classroom experiments that can easily be made with common material and gives clear and fine spectra of various light sources and colored material. The observed spectra can be photographed with a digital camera, and such images can…

  13. HIGH RESOLUTION RESISTIVITY LEAK DETECTION DATA PROCESSING & EVALUATION MEHTODS & REQUIREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    SCHOFIELD JS

    2007-10-04

    This document has two purposes: {sm_bullet} Describe how data generated by High Resolution REsistivity (HRR) leak detection (LD) systems deployed during single-shell tank (SST) waste retrieval operations are processed and evaluated. {sm_bullet} Provide the basic review requirements for HRR data when Hrr is deployed as a leak detection method during SST waste retrievals.

  14. High resolution X-ray spectroscopy using microcalorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, R. L.; Holt, S. S.; Madejski, G. M.; Moseley, S. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Szymkowiak, A. E.

    1988-01-01

    The use of microcalorimeters for high-resolution, high quantum efficiency, nondispersive X-ray spectroscopy has been demonstrated over the past few years. In this paper, the principles of X-ray calorimetry are reviewed, and the results of ongoing X-ray tests using microcalorimetry are summarized. An approach to building an X-ray calorimeter spectrometer is discussed.

  15. Dual camera system for acquisition of high resolution images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papon, Jeremie A.; Broussard, Randy P.; Ives, Robert W.

    2007-02-01

    Video surveillance is ubiquitous in modern society, but surveillance cameras are severely limited in utility by their low resolution. With this in mind, we have developed a system that can autonomously take high resolution still frame images of moving objects. In order to do this, we combine a low resolution video camera and a high resolution still frame camera mounted on a pan/tilt mount. In order to determine what should be photographed (objects of interest), we employ a hierarchical method which first separates foreground from background using a temporal-based median filtering technique. We then use a feed-forward neural network classifier on the foreground regions to determine whether the regions contain the objects of interest. This is done over several frames, and a motion vector is deduced for the object. The pan/tilt mount then focuses the high resolution camera on the next predicted location of the object, and an image is acquired. All components are controlled through a single MATLAB graphical user interface (GUI). The final system we present will be able to detect multiple moving objects simultaneously, track them, and acquire high resolution images of them. Results will demonstrate performance tracking and imaging varying numbers of objects moving at different speeds.

  16. Plant respirometer enables high resolution of oxygen consumption rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, D. L.

    1966-01-01

    Plant respirometer permits high resolution of relatively small changes in the rate of oxygen consumed by plant organisms undergoing oxidative metabolism in a nonphotosynthetic state. The two stage supply and monitoring system operates by a differential pressure transducer and provides a calibrated output by digital or analog signals.

  17. High Resolution Mass Spectra Analysis with a Programmable Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdsworth, David K.

    1980-01-01

    Highlighted are characteristics of programs written for a pocket-sized programmable calculator to analyze mass spectra data (such as displaying high resolution masses for formulas, predicting whether formulas are stable molecules or molecular ions, determining formulas by isotopic abundance measurement) in a laboratory or classroom. (CS)

  18. Persistence Diagrams of High-Resolution Temporal Rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández Méndez, F.; Carsteanu, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    This study applies Topological Data Analysis (TDA), by generating persistence diagrams to uncover patterns in the data of high-resolution temporal rainfall intensities from Iowa City (IIHR, U of Iowa). Persistence diagrams are a way to identify essential cycles in state-space representations of the data.

  19. In-Situ High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigation of Overheating of Cu Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chunlin; Hu, Ziyu; Li, Yanfen; Liu, Limin; Mori, Hirotaro; Wang, Zhangchang

    2016-01-01

    Synthesizing and functionalizing metal nanoparticles supported on substrates is currently the subject of intensive study owing to their outstanding catalytic performances for heterogeneous catalysis. Revealing the fundamental effect of the substrates on metal nanoparticles represents a key step in clarifying mechanisms of stability and catalytic properties of these heterogeneous systems. However, direct identification of these effects still poses a significant challenge due to the complicacy of interactions between substrates and nanoparticles and also for the technical difficulty, restraining our understanding of these heterogeneous systems. Here, we combine in situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy with molecular dynamics simulations to investigate Cu nanoparticles supported on graphite and Cu2O substrates, and demonstrate that melting behavior and thermal stability of Cu nanoparticles can be markedly influenced by substrates. The graphite-supported Cu nanoparticles do not melt during annealing at 1073 K until they vanish completely, i.e. only the sublimation occurs, while the Cu2O-supported Cu nanoparticles suffer melting during annealing at 973 K. Such selective superheating of the Cu nanoparticles can be attributed to the adsorption of a thin carbon layer on the surface of the Cu nanoparticles, which helps guide further stability enhancement of functional nanoparticles for realistic applications. PMID:26785839

  20. In-Situ High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigation of Overheating of Cu Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chunlin; Hu, Ziyu; Li, Yanfen; Liu, Limin; Mori, Hirotaro; Wang, Zhangchang

    2016-01-01

    Synthesizing and functionalizing metal nanoparticles supported on substrates is currently the subject of intensive study owing to their outstanding catalytic performances for heterogeneous catalysis. Revealing the fundamental effect of the substrates on metal nanoparticles represents a key step in clarifying mechanisms of stability and catalytic properties of these heterogeneous systems. However, direct identification of these effects still poses a significant challenge due to the complicacy of interactions between substrates and nanoparticles and also for the technical difficulty, restraining our understanding of these heterogeneous systems. Here, we combine in situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy with molecular dynamics simulations to investigate Cu nanoparticles supported on graphite and Cu2O substrates, and demonstrate that melting behavior and thermal stability of Cu nanoparticles can be markedly influenced by substrates. The graphite-supported Cu nanoparticles do not melt during annealing at 1073 K until they vanish completely, i.e. only the sublimation occurs, while the Cu2O-supported Cu nanoparticles suffer melting during annealing at 973 K. Such selective superheating of the Cu nanoparticles can be attributed to the adsorption of a thin carbon layer on the surface of the Cu nanoparticles, which helps guide further stability enhancement of functional nanoparticles for realistic applications.

  1. Guidelines for high-resolution genotyping of Chlamydia trachomatis using multilocus sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Christerson, Linus; Herrmann, Björn

    2012-01-01

    Chlamydia is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide and can cause ectopic pregnancies and infertility. It is therefore important to have adequate genotyping tools for investigating the spread of Chlamydia trachomatis among the population. Here, we describe a high-resolution multilocus sequence typing (MLST) system able to differentiate closely related clinical strains, which makes it ideal for short-term epidemiology and outbreak investigations. It is based on five highly variable but stable target regions which are PCR amplified and DNA sequenced. PMID:22782811

  2. High Resolution Rapid Revisits Insar Monitoring of Surface Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhroy, V.; Li, J.; Charbonneau, F.

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring surface deformation on strategic energy and transportation corridors requires high resolution spatial and temporal InSAR images for mitigation and safety purposes. High resolution air photos, lidar and other satellite images are very useful in areas where the landslides can be fatal. Recently, radar interferometry (InSAR) techniques using more rapid revisit images from several radar satellites are increasingly being used in active deformation monitoring. The Canadian RADARSAT Constellation (RCM) is a three-satellite mission that will provide rapid revisits of four days interferometric (InSAR) capabilities that will be very useful for complex deformation monitoring. For instance, the monitoring of surface deformation due to permafrost activity, complex rock slide motion and steam assisted oil extraction will benefit from this new rapid revisit capability. This paper provide examples of how the high resolution (1-3 m) rapid revisit InSAR capabilities will improve our monitoring of surface deformation and provide insights in understanding triggering mechanisms. We analysed over a hundred high resolution InSAR images over a two year period on three geologically different sites with various configurations of topography, geomorphology, and geology conditions. We show from our analysis that the more frequent InSAR acquisitions are providing more information in understanding the rates of movement and failure process of permafrost triggered retrogressive thaw flows; the complex motion of an asymmetrical wedge failure of an active rock slide and the identification of over pressure zones related to oil extraction using steam injection. Keywords: High resolution, InSAR, rapid revisits, triggering mechanisms, oil extraction.

  3. High-resolution DEM Effects on Geophysical Flow Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, M. R.; Bursik, M. I.; Stefanescu, R. E. R.; Patra, A. K.

    2014-12-01

    Geophysical mass flow models are numerical models that approximate pyroclastic flow events and can be used to assess the volcanic hazards certain areas may face. One such model, TITAN2D, approximates granular-flow physics based on a depth-averaged analytical model using inputs of basal and internal friction, material volume at a coordinate point, and a GIS in the form of a digital elevation model (DEM). The volume of modeled material propagates over the DEM in a way that is governed by the slope and curvature of the DEM surface and the basal and internal friction angles. Results from TITAN2D are highly dependent upon the inputs to the model. Here we focus on a single input: the DEM, which can vary in resolution. High resolution DEMs are advantageous in that they contain more surface details than lower-resolution models, presumably allowing modeled flows to propagate in a way more true to the real surface. However, very high resolution DEMs can create undesirable artifacts in the slope and curvature that corrupt flow calculations. With high-resolution DEMs becoming more widely available and preferable for use, determining the point at which high resolution data is less advantageous compared to lower resolution data becomes important. We find that in cases of high resolution, integer-valued DEMs, very high-resolution is detrimental to good model outputs when moderate-to-low (<10-15°) slope angles are involved. At these slope angles, multiple adjacent DEM cell elevation values are equal due to the need for the DEM to approximate the low slope with a limited set of integer values for elevation. The first derivative of the elevation surface thus becomes zero. In these cases, flow propagation is inhibited by these spurious zero-slope conditions. Here we present evidence for this "terracing effect" from 1) a mathematically defined simulated elevation model, to demonstrate the terracing effects of integer valued data, and 2) a real-world DEM where terracing must be

  4. High-resolution climate simulation of the last glacial maximum

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson III, David J

    2008-01-01

    The climate of the last glacial maximum (LGM) is simulated with a high-resolution atmospheric general circulation model, the NCAR CCM3 at spectral truncation of T170, corresponding to a grid cell size of roughly 75 km. The purpose of the study is to assess whether there are significant benefits from the higher resolution simulation compared to the lower resolution simulation associated with the role of topography. The LGM simulations were forced with modified CLIMAP sea ice distribution and sea surface temperatures (SST) reduced by 1 C, ice sheet topography, reduced CO{sub 2}, and 21,000 BP orbital parameters. The high-resolution model captures modern climate reasonably well, in particular the distribution of heavy precipitation in the tropical Pacific. For the ice age case, surface temperature simulated by the high-resolution model agrees better with those of proxy estimates than does the low-resolution model. Despite the fact that tropical SSTs were only 2.1 C less than the control run, there are many lowland tropical land areas 4-6 C colder than present. Comparison of T170 model results with the best constrained proxy temperature estimates (noble gas concentrations in groundwater) now yield no significant differences between model and observations. There are also significant upland temperature changes in the best resolved tropical mountain belt (the Andes). We provisionally attribute this result in part as resulting from decreased lateral mixing between ocean and land in a model with more model grid cells. A longstanding model-data discrepancy therefore appears to be resolved without invoking any unusual model physics. The response of the Asian summer monsoon can also be more clearly linked to local geography in the high-resolution model than in the low-resolution model; this distinction should enable more confident validation of climate proxy data with the high-resolution model. Elsewhere, an inferred salinity increase in the subtropical North Atlantic may have

  5. High resolution selective multilayer laser processing by nanosecond laser ablation of metal nanoparticle films

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Seung H.; Pan Heng; Hwang, David J.; Chung, Jaewon; Ryu, Sangil; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2007-11-01

    Ablation of gold nanoparticle films on polymer was explored using a nanosecond pulsed laser, with the goal to achieve feature size reduction and functionality not amenable with inkjet printing. The ablation threshold fluence for the unsintered nanoparticle deposit was at least ten times lower than the reported threshold for the bulk film. This could be explained by the combined effects of melting temperature depression, lower conductive heat transfer loss, strong absorption of the incident laser beam, and the relatively weak bonding between nanoparticles. The ablation physics were verified by the nanoparticle sintering characterization, ablation threshold measurement, time resolved ablation plume shadowgraphs, analysis of ablation ejecta, and the measurement and calculation of optical properties. High resolution and clean feature fabrication with small energy and selective multilayer processing are demonstrated.

  6. High Resolution Observations of Drop Size Distribution for GPM Ground Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatlin, Patrick N.; Petersen, W. A.; Carey, L. D.; Wingo, M. T.; Tokay, A.; Bringi, V. N.; Thurai, M.; Wolff, D. B.; Phillips, D. W.

    2012-01-01

    During the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E), NASA's GPM GV Disdrometer and Radar Observations of Precipitation (DROP) Facility deployed an array of disdrometers and rain gauges in northern Oklahoma to sample, with high resolution, the drop size distribution for use in development of precipitation retrieval algorithms for the GPM core satellites. The DROP Facility instruments deployed during MC3E consisted of 16 autonomous Parsivel units, 5 two-dimensional video disdrometers (2dvds), a vertically pointing K band radar, and 32 tipping bucket rain gauges. There were several rainfall events during MC3E in which rain drops exceeding 6 mm in diameter were recorded. The disdrometer array revealed large rain drops with diameters exceeding 6 mm and 8 mm during two separate stratiform and convective rainfall events, respectively. The NPOL radar, which was scanning in high resolution RHI mode (every 40 sec) over the disdrometer array during the stratiform event, indicated a 1 km thick bright band with a differential reflectivity column of 2-3 dB extending below the melting layer to the surface where the large drops were recorded by the 2dvds. These large drops are important for GPM since they can have a great impact upon satellite precipitation retrieval, especially near the ground and below heavy convective rainfall cores where satellites have had problems depicting the rainfall.

  7. Sequence dependent structure and thermodynamics of DNA oligonucleotides and polynucleotides: uv melting and NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) studies

    SciTech Connect

    Aboul-ela, F.M.

    1987-12-01

    Thermodynamic parameters for double strand formation have been measured for the twenty-five DNA double helices made by mixing deoxyoligonucleotides of the sequence dCA/sub 3/XA/sub 3/G with the complement dCT/sub 3/YT/sub 3/G. Each of the bases A, C, G, T, and I (I = hypoxanthine) have been substituted at the positions labeled X and Y. The results are analyzed in terms of nearest neighbors. At higher temperatures the sequences containing a G)centerreverse arrowdot)C base pair become more stable than those containing only A)centerreverse arrowdot)T. All molecules containing mismatcher are destabilized with respect to those with only Watson-Crick pairing, but there is a wide range of destabilization. Large neighboring base effects upon stability were observed. For example, when (X, Y) = (I, A), the duplex is eightfold more stable than when (X, Y) = (A, I). Independent of sequence effects the order of stabilities is: I)centerreverse arrowdot)C )succ) I)centerreverse arrowdot) A)succ) I)centerreverse arrowdot)T approx. I)centerreverse arrowdot)G. All of these results are discussed within the context of models for sequence dependent DNA secondary structure, replication fidelity and mechanisms of mismatch repair, and implications for probe design. The duplex deoxyoligonucleotide d(GGATGGGAG))centerreverse arrowdot)d(CTCCCATCC) is a portion of the gene recognition sequence of the protein transcription factor IIIA. The crystal structure of this oligonucleotide was shown to be A-form The present study employs Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, optical, chemical and enzymatic techniques to investigate the solution structure of this DNA 9-mer. (157 refs., 19 figs., 10 tabs.

  8. Ring artifact correction for high-resolution micro CT.

    PubMed

    Kyriakou, Yiannis; Prell, Daniel; Kalender, Willi A

    2009-09-01

    In high-resolution micro CT using flat detectors (FD), imperfect or defect detector elements may cause concentric-ring artifacts due to their continuous over- or underestimation of attenuation values, which often disturb image quality. We here present a dedicated image-based ring artifact correction method for high-resolution micro CT, based on median filtering of the reconstructed image and working on a transformed version of the reconstructed images in polar coordinates. This post-processing method reduced ring artifacts in the reconstructed images and improved image quality for phantom and in in vivo scans. Noise and artifacts were reduced both in transversal and in multi-planar reformations along the longitudinal axis. PMID:19661571

  9. High Resolution Coherent 3d Spectroscopy of Bromine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strangfeld, Benjamin R.; Wells, Thresa A.; House, Zuri R.; Chen, Peter C.

    2013-06-01

    The high resolution gas phase electronic spectrum of bromine is rather congested due to many overlapping vibrational and rotational transitions with similar transition frequencies, and also due to isotopomeric effects. Expansion into the second dimension will remove some of this congestion; however through the implementation of High Resolution Coherent 3D Spectroscopy, the density of peaks is further reduced by at least two orders of magnitude. This allows for the selective examination of a small number of spatially resolved multidimensional bands, separated by vibrational quantum number and by isotopomer, which facilitates the fitting of many rovibrational peaks in bromine. The ability to derive information about the molecular constants for the electronic states involved will be discussed.

  10. High Resolution Coherent Three-Dimensional Spectroscopy of Iodine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, Zuri R.; Wells, Thresa A.; Chen, Peter C.; Strangfeld, Benjamin R.

    2013-06-01

    The heavy congestion found in many one-dimensional spectra can make it difficult to study many transitions. A new coherent three-dimensional spectroscopic technique has been developed to eliminate the kind of congestion commonly seen in high resolution electronic spectra. The molecule used for this test was Iodine. A well-characterized transition (X to B) was used to determine which four wave mixing process or processes were responsible for the peaks in the resulting multidimensional spectrum. The resolution of several peaks that overlap in a coherent 2D spectrum can be accomplished by using a higher dimensional (3D) spectroscopic method. This talk will discuss strategies for finding spectroscopic constants using this high resolution coherent 3D spectroscopic method.

  11. Strategies for Interpreting High Resolution Coherent Multidimensional Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Thresa A.; House, Zuri R.; Chen, Peter C.; Strangfeld, Benjamin R.

    2013-06-01

    The electronic spectra of certain molecules can be very complex and consist of a high density of peaks. The high density of peaks results in severe spectral congestion, making conventional data analysis techniques extremely difficult to use. One solution to this problem is to use high resolution coherent 2D spectroscopy (HRC2DS), which can improve resolution and sort peaks into recognizable clusters. This technique requires new data analysis techniques to accurately assign peaks. Even though HRC2DS can improve spectral resolution, some regions of the spectra may still remain congested. The ability to solve this problem using even higher dimensional techniques (e.g., high resolution coherent 3D spectroscopy) with 3D pattern recognition and data analysis techniques will be discussed.

  12. An Introduction to High Resolution Coherent Multidimensional Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peter C.; Wells, Thresa A.; House, Zuri R.; Strangfeld, Benjamin R.

    2013-06-01

    High resolution coherent multidimensional spectroscopy is a technique that can be used to analyze and assign peaks for molecules that have resisted spectral analysis. Molecules that yield heavily congested and seemingly patternless spectra using conventional methods can yield 2D spectra that have recognizable patterns. The off-diagonal region of the coherent 2D plot shows only cross-peaks that are related by rotational selection rules. The resulting patterns facilitate peak assignment if they are sufficiently resolved. For systems that are not well-resolved, coherent 3D spectra may be generated to further improve resolution and provide selectivity. This presentation will provide an introduction to high resolution coherent 2D and 3D spectroscopies.

  13. Fabricating High-Resolution X-Ray Collimators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, Michael; Atkinson, James E.; Fraser, Iain; Klinger, Jill

    2008-01-01

    A process and method for fabricating multi-grid, high-resolution rotating modulation collimators for arcsecond and sub-arcsecond x-ray and gamma-ray imaging involves photochemical machining and precision stack lamination. The special fixturing and etching techniques that have been developed are used for the fabrication of multiple high-resolution grids on a single array substrate. This technology has application in solar and astrophysics and in a number of medical imaging applications including mammography, computed tomography (CT), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and gamma cameras used in nuclear medicine. This collimator improvement can also be used in non-destructive testing, hydrodynamic weapons testing, and microbeam radiation therapy.

  14. Analysis of Complex Steel Microstructures by High-Resolution EBSD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isasti, Nerea; Jorge-Badiola, Denis; Alkorta, Jon; Uranga, Pello

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution electron backscattered diffraction (HR-EBSD) is a powerful tool to describe microstructures at the sub-micrometric scale that achieves a higher degree of angular accuracy compared with conventional EBSD. However, such an EBSD technique is time-consuming and requires data-intensive computing to save and postprocess the results obtained after each scan. In the current work, a simple strategy to transform conventional results into high-resolution results is put forward in an averaging statistical layout. This makes it possible to measure the misorientations more precisely and, subsequently, the geometrically necessary dislocations by lowering the typical noise generated from Hough transformation-based conventional EBSD. Different steel microstructures are analyzed in light of this strategy. The calculated dislocation densities for those microstructures are used as input values for evaluating the initial dislocation density contribution to the yield strength in a newly developed mechanical model.

  15. High-resolution imaging of cellular processes in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Maddox, Amy S; Maddox, Paul S

    2012-01-01

    Differential interference contrast (DIC) imaging of Caenorhabditis elegans embryogenesis led to a Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine (Sulston et al., 1983) as did the first use of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in a transgenic C. elegans (Chalfie et al., 1994). Given that C. elegans is free living, does not require exceptional environmental control, and is optically clear, live imaging is a powerful tool in for this model system. Combining genetics with high-resolution imaging has continued to make important contributions to many fields. In this chapter, we discuss how certain aspects of high-resolution microscopy are implemented. This is not an exhaustive review of microscopy; it is meant to be a helpful guide and point of reference for some basic concepts in imaging. While these concepts are largely true for all biological imaging, they are chosen as particularly important for C. elegans. PMID:22226519

  16. Temperature-dependent high resolution absorption cross sections of propane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beale, Christopher A.; Hargreaves, Robert J.; Bernath, Peter F.

    2016-10-01

    High resolution (0.005 cm-1) absorption cross sections have been measured for pure propane (C3H8). These cross sections cover the 2550-3500 cm-1 region at five temperatures (from 296 to 700 K) and were measured using a Fourier transform spectrometer and a quartz cell heated by a tube furnace. Calibrations were made by comparison to the integrated cross sections of propane from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. These are the first high resolution absorption cross sections of propane for the 3 μm region at elevated temperatures. The cross sections provided may be used to monitor propane in combustion environments and in astronomical sources such as the auroral regions of Jupiter, brown dwarfs and exoplanets.

  17. High resolution nitrogen dioxide observations: retrieval, evaluation, and interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamsal, L. N.; Janz, S. J.; Krotkov, N. A.; Pickering, K. E.; Kowalewski, M. G.; Loughner, C.; Spurr, R. J. D.; Crawford, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    The Airborne Compact Atmospheric Mapper (ACAM) deployed during the DISCOVER-AQ Maryland field campaign made hyperspectral remote sensing measurements in the 304-910 nm range allowing observations of several tropospheric pollutants including nitrogen dioxide (NO2) at an unprecedented spatial resolution of 1.5x0.75 km2. We apply the DOAS method, include high resolution information for surface reflectivity and vertical distributions of NO2 and aerosols, and account for temporal variation in atmospheric NO2 to retrieve lower tropospheric NO2 column. We compare NO2 from ACAM with observations from in-situ aircraft, ground-based PANDORA, and space-based OMI, and NO2 simulation from air quality models. The high resolution ACAM measurements offer not only new insights into our understanding of atmospheric composition and chemistry through observation of sub-sampling variability in typical satellite and model resolutions, but also opportunities for algorithm improvements for upcoming geostationary air quality missions.

  18. High resolution reservoir geological modelling using outcrop information

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Changmin; Lin Kexiang; Liu Huaibo

    1997-08-01

    This is China`s first case study of high resolution reservoir geological modelling using outcrop information. The key of the modelling process is to build a prototype model and using the model as a geological knowledge bank. Outcrop information used in geological modelling including seven aspects: (1) Determining the reservoir framework pattern by sedimentary depositional system and facies analysis; (2) Horizontal correlation based on the lower and higher stand duration of the paleo-lake level; (3) Determining the model`s direction based on the paleocurrent statistics; (4) Estimating the sandbody communication by photomosaic and profiles; (6) Estimating reservoir properties distribution within sandbody by lithofacies analysis; and (7) Building the reservoir model in sandbody scale by architectural element analysis and 3-D sampling. A high resolution reservoir geological model of Youshashan oil field has been built by using this method.

  19. Airborne laser scanning for high-resolution mapping of Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csatho, Bea; Schenk, Toni; Krabill, William; Wilson, Terry; Lyons, William; McKenzie, Garry; Hallam, Cheryl; Manizade, Serdar; Paulsen, Timothy

    In order to evaluate the potential of airborne laser scanning for topographic mapping in Antarctica and to establish calibration/validation sites for NASA's Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) altimeter mission, NASA, the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) joined forces to collect high-resolution airborne laser scanning data.In a two-week campaign during the 2001-2002 austral summer, NASA's Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) system was used to collect data over several sites in the McMurdo Sound area of Antarctica (Figure 1a). From the recorded signals, NASA computed laser points and The Ohio State University (OSU) completed the elaborate computation/verification of high-resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) in 2003. This article reports about the DEM generation and some exemplary results from scientists using the geomorphologic information from the DEMs during the 2003-2004 field season.

  20. High-resolution ultrasound imaging of cutaneous lesions

    PubMed Central

    Mandava, Anitha; Ravuri, Prabhakar Rao; Konathan, Rajyalaxmi

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution variable frequency ultrasound imaging is increasingly being used in the noninvasive evaluation of various cutaneous diseases. It plays a complimentary role to physical examination in the assessment of cutaneous lesions. It is the only imaging modality useful in the evaluation of superficial cutaneous lesions that are too small to be evaluated on computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and is helpful in reducing invasive procedures like biopsies and fine needle aspirations. In this article, we seek to describe the relevance and basic principles of cutaneous ultrasound, imaging findings of normal skin, current applications of high-resolution ultrasound in the diagnosis and management of various dermatological conditions, along with the features of some commonly encountered lesions. PMID:24347861

  1. Spaceborne laser instruments for high-resolution mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Anthony W.; Krainak, Michael A.; Harding, David J.; Abshire, James B.; Sun, Xiaoli; Valett, Susan; Cavanaugh, John; Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis

    2010-02-01

    We discuss past, present and future spaceborne laser instruments for high-resolution mapping of Earth and planetary surfaces. Previous spaceborne-laser-altimeters projected and imaged a single laser spot for surface-height measurements. In contrast, the recent Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) instrument on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) uses a non-scanning multi-beam system for surface topography mapping. The multi-beam instrument facilitates surface slope measurement and reduces the time-to-completion for global high-resolution topographic mapping. We discuss our first-year progress on a three-year swath-mapping laser-altimetry Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) funded by the NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO). Our IIP is a technology development program supporting the LIdar Surface Topography (LIST) space-flight mission that is a third-tier mission as recommended by the National Research Council (NRC) for NASA's Earth Science programs.

  2. Development of a high resolution and high dispersion Thomson parabola

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, D.; Hörlein, R.; Kiefer, D.; Letzring, S.; Gautier, D. C.; Schramm, U.; Hübsch, C.; Öhm, R.; Albright, B. J.; Fernandez, J. C.; Habs, D.; Hegelich, B. M.

    2011-01-01

    Here, we report on the development of a novel high resolution and high dispersion Thomson parabola for simultaneously resolving protons and low-Z ions of more than 100 MeV/nucleon necessary to explore novel laser ion acceleration schemes. High electric and magnetic fields enable energy resolutions of ΔE/E < 5% at 100 MeV/nucleon and impede premature merging of different ion species at low energies on the detector plane. First results from laser driven ion acceleration experiments performed at the Trident Laser Facility demonstrate high resolution and superior species and charge state separation of this novel Thomson parabola for ion energies of more than 30 MeV/nucleon.

  3. Development of a high resolution and high dispersion Thomson parabola.

    PubMed

    Jung, D; Hörlein, R; Kiefer, D; Letzring, S; Gautier, D C; Schramm, U; Hübsch, C; Öhm, R; Albright, B J; Fernandez, J C; Habs, D; Hegelich, B M

    2011-01-01

    Here, we report on the development of a novel high resolution and high dispersion Thomson parabola for simultaneously resolving protons and low-Z ions of more than 100 MeV/nucleon necessary to explore novel laser ion acceleration schemes. High electric and magnetic fields enable energy resolutions of ΔE∕E < 5% at 100 MeV/nucleon and impede premature merging of different ion species at low energies on the detector plane. First results from laser driven ion acceleration experiments performed at the Trident Laser Facility demonstrate high resolution and superior species and charge state separation of this novel Thomson parabola for ion energies of more than 30 MeV/nucleon. PMID:21280824

  4. High resolution computed tomography of advanced composite and ceramic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yancey, R. N.; Klima, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    Advanced composite and ceramic materials are being developed for use in many new defense and commercial applications. In order to achieve the desired mechanical properties of these materials, the structural elements must be carefully analyzed and engineered. A study was conducted to evaluate the use of high resolution computed tomography (CT) as a macrostructural analysis tool for advanced composite and ceramic materials. Several samples were scanned using a laboratory high resolution CT scanner. Samples were also destructively analyzed at the locations of the scans and the nondestructive and destructive results were compared. The study provides useful information outlining the strengths and limitations of this technique and the prospects for further research in this area.

  5. Scalable, flexible and high resolution patterning of CVD graphene.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Mario; Hsieh, Ya-Ping; Hsu, Allen L; Kong, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The unique properties of graphene make it a promising material for interconnects in flexible and transparent electronics. To increase the commercial impact of graphene in those applications, a scalable and economical method for producing graphene patterns is required. The direct synthesis of graphene from an area-selectively passivated catalyst substrate can generate patterned graphene of high quality. We here present a solution-based method for producing patterned passivation layers. Various deposition methods such as ink-jet deposition and microcontact printing were explored, that can satisfy application demands for low cost, high resolution and scalable production of patterned graphene. The demonstrated high quality and nanometer precision of grown graphene establishes the potential of this synthesis approach for future commercial applications of graphene. Finally, the ability to transfer high resolution graphene patterns onto complex three-dimensional surfaces affords the vision of graphene-based interconnects in novel electronics. PMID:24189709

  6. High-resolution dot-matrix hologram generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarkov, Boban; Grujić, Dušan; Pantelić, Dejan

    2012-05-01

    Holography is a technique that enables us to permanently record three-dimensional (3D) colour pictures. Owing to their sub-micron structure, holograms are remarkable safety devices that are very difficult to counterfeit. Dot-matrix technology, which is one of the commonly used methods, is a substantial obstacle to all types of fraudulent activities. This kind of hologram is mainly used for the purpose of protection against forgery of cheques, cards, passports, etc. Such a high-resolution technique also enables the engineering of 2D and 3D structures, potentially leading to the construction of metamaterials. In this paper, we describe high-resolution holographic structures obtained by dot-matrix devices of novel construction.

  7. Turbine component casting core with high resolution region

    DOEpatents

    Kamel, Ahmed; Merrill, Gary B.

    2014-08-26

    A hollow turbine engine component with complex internal features can include a first region and a second, high resolution region. The first region can be defined by a first ceramic core piece formed by any conventional process, such as by injection molding or transfer molding. The second region can be defined by a second ceramic core piece formed separately by a method effective to produce high resolution features, such as tomo lithographic molding. The first core piece and the second core piece can be joined by interlocking engagement that once subjected to an intermediate thermal heat treatment process thermally deform to form a three dimensional interlocking joint between the first and second core pieces by allowing thermal creep to irreversibly interlock the first and second core pieces together such that the joint becomes physically locked together providing joint stability through thermal processing.

  8. Effective Area of the AXAF High Resolution Camera (HRC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaude, Daniel; Pease, Deron; Donnelly, Hank; Juda, Mike; Jones, Christine; Murray, Steve; Zombeck, Martin; Kraft, Ralph; Kenter, Almus; Meehan, Gary; Meehan, Gary; Swartz, Doug; Elsner, Ron

    1998-01-01

    The AXAF High-Resolution Camera (HRC) was calibrated at NASA MSFC's X-Ray Calibration Facility (XRCF) during 1997 March and April. We have undertaken an analysis of the HRC effective area using all data presently available from the XRCF. We discuss our spectral fitting of the beam-normalization detectors (BNDs), our method of removing higher order contamination lines present in the spectra, and corrections for beam non-uniformities. We apply a model of photon absorption depth in order to fit a smooth curve to the quantum efficiency of the detector. This is then combined with the most recent model of the AXAF High-Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA) to determine the ensemble effective area versus energy for the HRC. We also address future goals and concerns.

  9. High-resolution adaptive optics test bed for vision science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilks, Scott C.; Thompson, Charles A.; Olivier, Scot S.; Bauman, Brian J.; Flath, Laurence M.; Silva, Dennis A.; Sawvel, Robert M.; Barnes, Thomas B.; Werner, John S.

    2002-02-01

    We discuss the design and implementation of a low-cost, high-resolution adaptive optics test-bed for vision research. It is well known that high-order aberrations in the human eye reduce optical resolution and limit visual acuity. However, the effects of aberration-free eyesight on vision are only now beginning to be studied using adaptive optics to sense and correct the aberrations in the eye. We are developing a high-resolution adaptive optics system for this purpose using a Hamamatsu Parallel Aligned Nematic Liquid Crystal Spatial Light Modulator. Phase-wrapping is used to extend the effective stroke of the device, and the wavefront sensing and wavefront correction are done at different wavelengths. Issues associated with these techniques will be discussed.

  10. High resolution map of light pollution over Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netzel, Henryka; Netzel, Paweł

    2016-09-01

    In 1976 Berry introduced a simple mathematical equation to calculate artificial night sky brightness at zenith. In the original model cities, considered as points with given population, are only sources of light emission. In contrary to Berry's model, we assumed that all terrain surface can be a source of light. Emission of light depends on percent of built up area in a given cell. We based on Berry's model. Using field measurements and high-resolution data we obtained the map of night sky brightness over Poland in 100-m resolution. High resolution input data, combined with a very simple model, makes it possible to obtain detailed structures of the night sky brightness without complicating the calculations.

  11. High-resolution dynamical modelling of the Antarctic stratospheric vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, P. H.

    1988-01-01

    Progress is reported on the high-resolution three-dimensional numerical simulation of flows characteristic of the Antarctic wintertime stratosphere. The numerical model is a modified version of the Reading University sigma-coordinate used previously for tropospheric studies. Physical parameterizations are kept to a minimum in order to concentrate as much computing power as possible on simulating details of the dynamical processes. The major question addressed is whether the features observed in recent high-resolution two-dimensional simulations - namely: (1) the formation of a sharp edge to the vortex (seen in the potential vorticity field), (2) the survival of the polar vortex in a material entity, and (3) the formation of small-scale eddies rough the break-up of tongues of high potential vorticity drawn out from the polar vortex - are realized in three-dimensional simulations.

  12. High-resolution studies of atmospheric IR emission spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murcray, F. J.; Murcray, F. H.; Goldman, A.; Blatherwick, R. D.; Murcray, D. G.

    1991-01-01

    Atmospheric emission spectra obtained with two different spectrometer systems are presented. The first system (the BOMEM Michelson interferometer) is designed for emission work. Spectra were obtained under adverse conditions in the Antarctic, and are still of good absolute accuracy. The second system (a modified Bruker Instruments IFS120 very high spectral resolution interferometer) demonstrates the sensitivity that can be achieved even at higher spectral resolution. This system shows that mid-IR atmospheric emission spectra can be obtained with a good SNR in a reasonable length of time at a relatively high resolution. A properly designed high resolution system should achieve high accuracy, sensitivity, and resolution, thereby permitting measurements of many atmospheric constituents when solar spectra cannot be obtained.

  13. Dynamical downscaling inter-comparison for high resolution climate reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, J.; Rocha, A.; Castanheira, J. M.; Carvalho, A. C.

    2012-04-01

    In the scope of the project: "High-resolution Rainfall EroSivity analysis and fORecasTing - RESORT", an evaluation of various methods of dynamic downscaling is presented. The methods evaluated range from the classic method of nesting a regional model results in a global model, in this case the ECMWF reanalysis, to more recently proposed methods, which consist in using Newtonian relaxation methods in order to nudge the results of the regional model to the reanalysis. The method with better results involves using a system of variational data assimilation to incorporate observational data with results from the regional model. The climatology of a simulation of 5 years using this method is tested against observations on mainland Portugal and the ocean in the area of the Portuguese Continental Shelf, which shows that the method developed is suitable for the reconstruction of high resolution climate over continental Portugal.

  14. Sparse Recovery Analysis of High-Resolution Climate Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archibald, R.

    2013-12-01

    The field of compressed sensing is vast and currently very active, with new results, methods, and algorithms appearing almost daily. The first notions of compressed sensing began with Prony's method, which was designed by the French mathematician Gaspard Riche de Prony to extract signal information from a limited number of measurements. Since then, sparsity has been used empirically in a variety of applications, including geology and geophysics, spectroscopy, signal processing, radio astronomy, and medical ultrasound. High-resolution climate studies performed on large scale high performance computing have been producing large amounts of data that can benefit from unique mathematical methods for analysis. This work demonstrates how sparse recovery and L1 regularization can be used effectively on large datasets from high-resolution climate studies.

  15. High Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy of Cells Using Dielectrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shi-Yang; Zhang, Wei; Soffe, Rebecca; Nahavandi, Sofia; Shukla, Ravi; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar

    2014-01-01

    Ultrastructural analysis of cells can reveal valuable information about their morphological, physiological, and biochemical characteristics. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has been widely used to provide high-resolution images from the surface of biological samples. However, samples need to be dehydrated and coated with conductive materials for SEM imaging. Besides, immobilizing non-adherent cells during processing and analysis is challenging and requires complex fixation protocols. In this work, we developed a novel dielectrophoresis based microfluidic platform for interfacing non-adherent cells with high-resolution SEM at low vacuum mode. The system enables rapid immobilization and dehydration of samples without deposition of chemical residues over the cell surface. Moreover, it enables the on-chip chemical stimulation and fixation of immobilized cells with minimum dislodgement. These advantages were demonstrated for comparing the morphological changes of non-budding and budding yeast cells following Lyticase treatment. PMID:25089528

  16. High-resolution streaming video integrated with UGS systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrer, Matthew

    2010-04-01

    Imagery has proven to be a valuable complement to Unattended Ground Sensor (UGS) systems. It provides ultimate verification of the nature of detected targets. However, due to the power, bandwidth, and technological limitations inherent to UGS, sacrifices have been made to the imagery portion of such systems. The result is that these systems produce lower resolution images in small quantities. Currently, a high resolution, wireless imaging system is being developed to bring megapixel, streaming video to remote locations to operate in concert with UGS. This paper will provide an overview of how using Wifi radios, new image based Digital Signal Processors (DSP) running advanced target detection algorithms, and high resolution cameras gives the user an opportunity to take high-powered video imagers to areas where power conservation is a necessity.

  17. Single-sided sensor for high-resolution NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlo, J.; Casanova, F.; Blümich, B.

    2006-06-01

    The unavoidable spatial inhomogeneity of the static magnetic field generated by open sensors has precluded their use for high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. In fact, this application was deemed impossible because these field variations are usually orders of magnitude larger than those created by the microscopic structure of the molecules to be detected. Recently, chemical shift resolved NMR spectra were observed for the first time outside a portable single-sided magnet by implementing a method that exploits inhomogeneities in the rf field designed to reproduce variations of the static magnetic field [J. Perlo, V. Demas, F. Casanova, C.A. Meriles, J. Reimer, A. Pines, B. Blümich, High-resolution spectroscopy with a portable single-sided sensor, Science 308 (2005) 1279]. In this communication, we describe in detail the magnet system built from permanent magnets as well as the rf coil geometry used to compensate the static field variations.

  18. The theory and practice of high resolution scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Joy, D.C. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in instrumentation have produced the first commercial examples of what can justifiably be called High Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopes. The key components of such instruments are a cold field emission gun, a small-gap immersion probe-forming lens, and a clean dry-pumped vacuum. The performance of these microscopes is characterized by several major features including a spatial resolution, in secondary electron mode on solid specimens, which can exceed 1nm on a routine basis; an incident probe current density of the order of 10{sup 6} amps/cm{sup 2}; and the ability to maintain these levels of performance over an accelerating voltage range of from 1 to 30keV. This combination of high resolution, high probe current, low contamination and flexible electron-optical conditions provides many new opportunitites for the application of the SEM to materials science, physics, and the life sciences. 27 refs., 14 figs.

  19. A high resolution cavity BPM for the CLIC Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chritin, N.; Schmickler, H.; Soby, L.; Lunin, A.; Solyak, N.; Wendt, M.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    In frame of the development of a high resolution BPM system for the CLIC Main Linac we present the design of a cavity BPM prototype. It consists of a waveguide loaded dipole mode resonator and a monopole mode reference cavity, both operating at 15 GHz, to be compatible with the bunch frequencies at the CLIC Test Facility. Requirements, design concept, numerical analysis, and practical considerations are discussed.

  20. The Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph: Instrument, goals, and science results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, J. C.; Heap, S. R.; Beaver, E. A.; Boggess, A.; Carpenter, K. G.; Ebbets, D. C.; Hutchings, J. B.; Jura, M.; Leckrone, D. S.; Linsky, J. L.; Maran, S. P.; Savage, B. D.; Smith, A. M.; Trafton, L. M.; Walter, F. M.; Weymann, R. J.; Ake, T. B.; Bruhweiler, F.; Cardelli, J. A.; Lindler, D. J.; Malumuth, E.; Randall, C. E.; Robinson, R.; Shore, S. N.; Wahlgren, G.

    1994-08-01

    The Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS), currently in Earth orbit on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), operates in the wavelength range 1150-3200 A with spectral resolutions (lambda/delta lambda) of approximately 2 x 103, 2 x 104, and 1 x 103. The instrument and its development from inception, its current status, the approach to operations, representative results in the major areas of the scientific goals, and prospects for the future are described.