Science.gov

Sample records for high-resolution electron spectroscopy

  1. High resolution threshold photoelectron spectroscopy by electron attachment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.; Ajello, J. M. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A system is provided for determining the stable energy levels of a species ion, of an atomic, molecular, or radical type, by application of ionizing energy of a predetermined level, such as through photoionization. The system adds a trapping gas to the gaseous species to provide a technique for detection of the energy levels. The electrons emitted from ionized species are captured by the trapping gas, only if the electrons have substantially zero kinetic energy. If the electrons have nearly zero energy, they are absorbed by the trapping gas to produce negative ions of the trapping gas that can be detected by a mass spectrometer. The applied energies (i.e. light frequencies) at which large quantities of trapping gas ions are detected, are the stable energy levels of the positive ion of the species. SF6 and CFCl3 have the narrowest acceptance bands, so that when they are used as the trapping gas, they bind electrons only when the electrons have very close to zero kinetic energy.

  2. High-resolution α and electron spectroscopy of Cf24998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, I.; Greene, J. P.; Kondev, F. G.; Zhu, S.

    2015-04-01

    α -particle spectra of 249Cf have been measured with a double-focusing magnetic spectrometer and with passivated implanted planar silicon (PIPS) detectors. The conversion-electron spectra of 249Cf have been measured with a cooled Si(Li) detector and with a room-temperature PIPS detector. Precise energies of α groups in the decay of 249Cf have been measured with respect to the known energy of 250Cf. In addition, α -electron, α -γ , and γ -γ coincidence measurements were also performed to determine the spin-parity of the previously known 643.64-keV level. From electron intensities, conversion coefficients of transitions in the daughter 245Cm have been determined. The measured L3 conversion coefficients of the 333.4- and 388.2-keV transitions are found to be in agreement with the theoretical conversion coefficients for pure E 1 multipolarity. On the other hand, the K ,L1+L2 ,M , and N conversion coefficients are approximately twice the theoretical values for pure E 1 transitions. These measurements indicate anomalous E 1 conversion coefficients for the 333.4- and 388.2-keV transitions, as has been pointed out in earlier measurements. The measured conversion coefficient of the 255.5-keV transition gives an M 1 multipolarity for this transition which establishes a spin-parity of 7/2- and the 7/2-[743 ] single-particle assignment to the 643.64-keV level.

  3. High Resolution Laboratory Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brünken, S.; Schlemmer, S.

    2016-05-01

    In this short review we will highlight some of the recent advancements in the field of high-resolution laboratory spectroscopy that meet the needs dictated by the advent of highly sensitive and broadband telescopes like ALMA and SOFIA. Among these is the development of broadband techniques for the study of complex organic molecules, like fast scanning conventional absorption spectroscopy based on multiplier chains, chirped pulse instrumentation, or the use of synchrotron facilities. Of similar importance is the extension of the accessible frequency range to THz frequencies, where many light hydrides have their ground state rotational transitions. Another key experimental challenge is the production of sufficiently high number densities of refractory and transient species in the laboratory, where discharges have proven to be efficient sources that can also be coupled to molecular jets. For ionic molecular species sensitive action spectroscopic schemes have recently been developed to overcome some of the limitations of conventional absorption spectroscopy. Throughout this review examples demonstrating the strong interplay between laboratory and observational studies will be given.

  4. High-Resolution Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy (HREELS) Using a Monochromated TEM/STEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sai, Z. R.; Bradley, J. P.; Erni, R.; Browning, N.

    2005-01-01

    A 200 keV FEI TF20 XT monochromated (scanning) transmission electron microscope funded by NASA's SRLIDAP program is undergoing installation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Instrument specifications in STEM mode are Cs =1.0 mm, Cc =1.2 mm, image resolution =0.18 nm, and in TEM mode Cs =1.3 mm, Cc =1.3 mm, information limit =0.14 nm. Key features of the instrument are a voltage-stabilized high tension (HT) supply, a monochromator, a high-resolution electron energy-loss spectrometer/energy filter, a high-resolution annular darkfield detector, and a solid-state x-ray energy-dispersive spectrometer. The high-tension tank contains additional sections for 60Hz and high frequency filtering, resulting in an operating voltage of 200 kV plus or minus 0.005V, a greater than 10-fold improvement over earlier systems. The monochromator is a single Wien filter design. The energy filter is a Gatan model 866 Tridiem-ERS high resolution GIF spec d for less than or equal to 0.15 eV energy resolution with 29 pA of current in a 2 nm diameter probe. 0.13 eV has already been achieved during early installation. The x-ray detector (EDAX/Genesis 4000) has a take-off angle of 20 degrees, an active area of 30 square millimeters, and a solid angle of 0.3 steradians. The higher solid angle is possible because the objective pole-piece allows the detector to be positioned as close as 9.47 mm from the specimen. The voltage-stabilized HT supply, monochromator and GIF enable high-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS) with energy resolution comparable to synchrotron XANES, but with approximately 100X better spatial resolution. The region between 0 and 100 eV is called the low-loss or valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy (VEELS) region where features due to collective plasma oscillations and single electron transitions of valence electrons are observed. Most of the low-loss VEELS features we are detecting are being observed for the first time in IDPs. A major focus of

  5. Oxidation of diamond films by atomic oxygen: High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shpilman, Z.; Gouzman, I.; Grossman, E.; Akhvlediani, R.; Hoffman, A.

    2007-12-01

    Diamond surface oxidation by atomic oxygen, annealing up to ˜700°C, and in situ exposure to thermally activated hydrogen were studied by high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS). After atomic oxygen (AO) exposure, HREELS revealed peaks associated with CHx groups, carbonyl, ether, and peroxide-type species and strong quenching of the diamond optical phonon and its overtones. Upon annealing of the oxidized surfaces, the diamond optical phonon overtones at 300 and 450meV emerge and carbonyl and peroxide species gradually desorb. The diamond surface was not completely regenerated after annealing to ˜700°C and in situ exposure to thermally activated hydrogen, probably due to the irreversible deterioration of the surface by AO.

  6. High resolution electron microscopy and spectroscopy of ferritin in thin window liquid cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Canhui; Qiao, Qiao; Shokuhfar, Tolou; Klie, Robert

    2014-03-01

    In-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has seen a dramatic increase in interest in recent years with the commercial development of liquid and gas stages. High-resolution TEM characterization of samples in a liquid environment remains limited by radiation damage and loss of resolution due to the thick window-layers required by the in-situ stages. We introduce thin-window static-liquid cells that enable sample imaging with atomic resolution and electron energy-loss (EEL) spectroscopy with 1.3 nm resolution. Using this approach, atomic and electronic structures of biological samples such as ferritin is studied via in-situ transmission electron microscopy experiments. Ferritin in solution is encapsulated using the static liquid cells with reduced window thickness. The integrity of the thin window liquid cell is maintained by controlling the electron dose rate. Radiation damage of samples, such as liquid water and protein, is quantitatively studied to allow precision control of radiation damage level within the liquid cells. Biochemical reactions, such as valence change of the iron in a functioning ferritin, is observed and will be quantified. Relevant biochemical activity: the release and uptake of Fe atoms through the channels of ferritin protein shell is also imaged at atomic resolution. This work is funded by Michigan Technological University. The UIC JEOL JEM-ARM200CF is supported by an MRI-R2 grant from the National Science Foundation (Grant No. DMR-0959470).

  7. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy with two-dimensional energy and momentum mapping.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuetao; Cao, Yanwei; Zhang, Shuyuan; Jia, Xun; Guo, Qinlin; Yang, Fang; Zhu, Linfan; Zhang, Jiandi; Plummer, E W; Guo, Jiandong

    2015-08-01

    High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) is a powerful technique to probe vibrational and electronic excitations at surfaces. The dispersion relation of surface excitations, i.e., energy as a function of momentum, has in the past, been obtained by measuring the energy loss at a fixed angle (momentum) and then rotating sample, monochromator, or analyzer. Here, we introduce a new strategy for HREELS, utilizing a specially designed lens system with a double-cylindrical Ibach-type monochromator combined with a commercial VG Scienta hemispherical electron energy analyzer, which can simultaneously measure the energy and momentum of the scattered electrons. The new system possesses high angular resolution (<0.1°), detecting efficiency and sampling density. The capabilities of this system are demonstrated using Bi2Sr2CaCu2O(8+δ). The time required to obtain a complete dispersion spectrum is at least one order of magnitude shorter than conventional spectrometers, with improved momentum resolution and no loss in energy resolution. PMID:26329206

  8. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy with two-dimensional energy and momentum mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xuetao; Cao, Yanwei; Zhang, Shuyuan; Jia, Xun; Guo, Qinlin; Yang, Fang; Zhu, Linfan; Zhang, Jiandi; Plummer, E. W.; Guo, Jiandong

    2015-08-15

    High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) is a powerful technique to probe vibrational and electronic excitations at surfaces. The dispersion relation of surface excitations, i.e., energy as a function of momentum, has in the past, been obtained by measuring the energy loss at a fixed angle (momentum) and then rotating sample, monochromator, or analyzer. Here, we introduce a new strategy for HREELS, utilizing a specially designed lens system with a double-cylindrical Ibach-type monochromator combined with a commercial VG Scienta hemispherical electron energy analyzer, which can simultaneously measure the energy and momentum of the scattered electrons. The new system possesses high angular resolution (<0.1°), detecting efficiency and sampling density. The capabilities of this system are demonstrated using Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+δ}. The time required to obtain a complete dispersion spectrum is at least one order of magnitude shorter than conventional spectrometers, with improved momentum resolution and no loss in energy resolution.

  9. Earle K. Plyler Prize Talk: Using High Resolution Electronic Spectroscopy to Probe Reactive Chemical Intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Terry

    2009-03-01

    Gas phase chemical reactions, such as occur in atmospheric chemistry, combustion, plasma processing, etc. are of great importance to our economy and society. These reactions are typically very complex involving up to 1000's of elementary steps with a corresponding number of reactive chemical intermediates. Spectrospic diagnostics, based upon well analyzed and well understood spectra of the intermediates, are crucial for monitoring such reactions and unraveling their mechanisms. These spectral analyses often benefit from the guidance provided by quantum chemical calculations and conversely the molecular parameters, experimentally determined from the spectra, serve as ``gold standards'' for benchmarking such calculations. Such standards are especially valuable for reactive intermediates whose electronic or geometric structure is particularly complex because of electron-spin interactions, Jahn-Teller effects or other vibronic interactions, hindered internal motions, large molecular size and weight, etc. The organic alkoxy, RO., and peroxy, RO2., (R=alkyl group) free radicals are excellent examples of such species. The talk will focus on our recent characterization of these radicals via their ``high-resolution,'' mostly rotationally resolved, electronic spectra utilizing the techniques of laser induced fluorescence, stimulated emission pumping, and cavity ringdown spectroscopy. Selected spectra, their analysis, and the molecular information resulting therefrom will be discussed.

  10. Development of an Apparatus for High-Resolution Auger Photoelectron Coincidence Spectroscopy (APECS) and Electron Ion Coincidence (EICO) Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakiuchi, Takuhiro; Hashimoto, Shogo; Fujita, Narihiko; Mase, Kazuhiko; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Okusawa, Makoto

    We have developed an electron electron ion coincidence (EEICO) apparatus for high-resolution Auger photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy (APECS) and electron ion coincidence (EICO) spectroscopy. It consists of a coaxially symmetric mirror electron energy analyzer (ASMA), a miniature double-pass cylindrical mirror electron energy analyzer (DP-CMA), a miniature time-of-flight ion mass spectrometer (TOF-MS), a magnetic shield, an xyz stage, a tilt-adjustment mechanism, and a conflat flange with an outer diameter of 203 mm. A sample surface was irradiated by synchrotron radiation, and emitted electrons were energy-analyzed and detected by the ASMA and the DP-CMA, while desorbed ions were mass-analyzed and detected by the TOF-MS. The performance of the new EEICO analyzer was evaluated by measuring Si 2p photoelectron spectra of clean Si(001)-2×1 and Si(111)-7×7, and by measuring Si-L23VV-Si-2p Auger photoelectron coincidence spectra (Si-L23VV-Si-2p APECS) of clean Si(001)-2×1.

  11. High Resolution UV Emission Spectroscopy of Molecules Excited by Electron Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, G. K.; Ajello, J. M.; Beegle, L.; Ciocca, M.; Dziczek, D.; Kanik, I.; Noren, C.; Jonin, C.; Hansen, D.

    1999-01-01

    Photodissociation via discrete line absorption into predissociating Rydberg and valence states is the dominant destruction mechanism of CO and other molecules in the interstellar medium and molecular clouds. Accurate values for the rovibronic oscillator strengths of these transitions and predissociation yields of the excited states are required for input into the photochemical models that attempt to reproduce observed abundances. We report here on our latest experimental results of the electron collisional properties of CO and N2 obtained using the 3-meter high resolution single-scattering spectroscopic facility at JPL.

  12. Experimentally characterizing the electronic structures of f-electron systems using advanced high resolution Fourier transform microwave spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, Stephen, A

    2013-02-03

    We aim to (i) provide data that directly addresses the fundamental roles of actinide valence electrons in chemical bonding, and (ii) serve to provide prototypical data for the heavy element computational chemistry community. These goals will be achieved through the first pure rotational spectroscopic measurements on prototypical systems at ultra-high resolution. These systems encompass low oxidation state uranium and thorium compounds including, but not limited to, UX and ThX, X = F, Cl, Br, I, and UY and ThY, Y = O, S, and other simple U and Th-containing compounds. Our primary experimental tools involve time-domain rotational spectroscopy achieving line widths and resolutions of a few kHz.

  13. Magnetic dynamics studied by high-resolution electron spectroscopy and time-resolved electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraman, Rajeswari

    Future information technology requires an increased magnetically encoded data density and novel electromagnetic modes of data transfer. While to date magnetic properties are observed and characterized mostly statically, the need emerges to monitor and capture their fast dynamics. In this talk, I will focus on the spin dynamics i.e. spin wave excitations and the dynamics of a new topological distribution of spins termed ``skyrmions''. Wave packets of spin waves offer the unique capability to transport a quantum bit, the spin, without the transport of charge or mass. Here, large wave-vector spin waves are of particular interest as they admit spin localization within a few nanometers. By using our recently developed electron energy loss spectrometer, we could study such spin waves in ultrathin films with an unprecedented energy resolution of 4 meV. By virtue of the finite penetration depth of low energy electrons, spin waves localized at interfaces between a substrate and a thin capping layer can be been studied yielding information about the exchange coupling between atoms at the interface. The quantization of spin waves with wave vectors perpendicular to the film gives rise to standing modes to which EELS has likewise access. Such studies when carried out as function of the film thickness again yield information on the layer dependence of the exchange coupling. Magnetic skyrmions are promising candidates as information carriers in logic or storage devices. Currently, little is known about the influence of disorder, defects, or external stimuli on the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of the skyrmion lattice. In this talk, I will describe the dynamical role of disorder in a large and flat thin film of Cu2OSeO3, exhibiting a skyrmion phase in an insulating material. We image up to 70,000 skyrmions by means of cryo-Lorentz Transmission Electron Microscopy as a function of the applied magnetic field. In the skyrmion phase, dislocations are shown to cause the

  14. 5f-electron states in uranium dioxide investigated using high-resolution neutron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoretti, G.; Blaise, A.; Caciuffo, R.; Fournier, J. M.; Hutchings, M. T.; Osborn, R.; Taylor, A. D.

    1989-07-01

    High-resolution, high-energy-transfer, inelastic neutron scattering has been used to explore the crystal-field (CF) excitations in UO2. As all the dipole-allowed transitions within the free-ion ground manifold have been identified, the observations provide a complete determination of the crystal-field potential and 5f-electron eigenstates. The fourth- and sixth-degree CF parameters are V4=-123 meV and V6=26.5 meV. In spite of the strength of the CF, the ground state is accurately given by the intermediate-coupling approximation with little modification by J-mixing effects. In the antiferromagnetic phase below TN=30.8 K, a splitting of the cubic CF levels, due to the combined effects of the molecular field and the distortion of the oxygen-ligand cage surrounding the U4+ ions, has been observed. Detailed CF calculations are presented both for the case of a double-k magnetic structure with a monoclinic distortion of the oxygen sublattice, and for a combined triple-k distortion and magnetic order. The observed splittings are shown to be more consistent with the triple-k model.

  15. High-resolution electron momentum spectroscopy of valence satellites of carbon disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chengwu; Shan, Xu; Zhang, Zhe; Wang, Enliang; Li, Zhongjun; Chen, XiangJun

    2010-09-01

    The binding energy spectrum of carbon disulphide (CS2) in the energy range of 9-23 eV has been measured by a high-resolution (e,2e) spectrometer employing asymmetric noncoplanar kinematics at an impact energy of 2500 eV plus the binding energy. Taking the advantage of the high energy resolution of 0.54 eV, four main peaks and five satellites in the outer-valence region are resolved. The assignments and pole strengths for these satellite states are achieved by comparing the experimental electron momentum profiles with the corresponding theoretical ones calculated using Hartree-Fock and density functional theory methods. The results are also compared in detail with the recent SAC-CI general-R calculations. General agreement is satisfactory, while the present experiment suggests cooperative contributions from Π2u, Σg+2 states to satellite 2 and Σg+2, Π2g states to satellite 3. Besides, relatively low pole strength for X Π2g state is obtained which contradicts all the theoretical calculations [2ph-TDA, ADC(3), SAC-CI general-R, ADC(4)] so far.

  16. Electronic excitation of furfural as probed by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira da Silva, F.; Lange, E.; Limão-Vieira, P.; Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J.; Brunger, M. J.; Neves, R. F. C.; Lopes, M. C. A.; de Oliveira, E. M.; da Costa, R. F.; Varella, M. T. do N.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; Lima, M. A. P.; Jones, D. B.

    2015-10-01

    The electronic spectroscopy of isolated furfural (2-furaldehyde) in the gas phase has been investigated using high-resolution photoabsorption spectroscopy in the 3.5-10.8 eV energy-range, with absolute cross section measurements derived. Electron energy loss spectra are also measured over a range of kinematical conditions. Those energy loss spectra are used to derive differential cross sections and in turn generalised oscillator strengths. These experiments are supported by ab initio calculations in order to assign the excited states of the neutral molecule. The good agreement between the theoretical results and the measurements allows us to provide the first quantitative assignment of the electronic state spectroscopy of furfural over an extended energy range.

  17. Electronic excitation of furfural as probed by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Ferreira da Silva, F; Lange, E; Limão-Vieira, P; Jones, N C; Hoffmann, S V; Hubin-Franskin, M-J; Delwiche, J; Brunger, M J; Neves, R F C; Lopes, M C A; de Oliveira, E M; da Costa, R F; Varella, M T do N; Bettega, M H F; Blanco, F; García, G; Lima, M A P; Jones, D B

    2015-10-14

    The electronic spectroscopy of isolated furfural (2-furaldehyde) in the gas phase has been investigated using high-resolution photoabsorption spectroscopy in the 3.5-10.8 eV energy-range, with absolute cross section measurements derived. Electron energy loss spectra are also measured over a range of kinematical conditions. Those energy loss spectra are used to derive differential cross sections and in turn generalised oscillator strengths. These experiments are supported by ab initio calculations in order to assign the excited states of the neutral molecule. The good agreement between the theoretical results and the measurements allows us to provide the first quantitative assignment of the electronic state spectroscopy of furfural over an extended energy range. PMID:26472380

  18. Electronic excitation of furfural as probed by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira da Silva, F.; Lange, E.; Limão-Vieira, P. E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au; Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J.; Brunger, M. J. E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au; and others

    2015-10-14

    The electronic spectroscopy of isolated furfural (2-furaldehyde) in the gas phase has been investigated using high-resolution photoabsorption spectroscopy in the 3.5–10.8 eV energy-range, with absolute cross section measurements derived. Electron energy loss spectra are also measured over a range of kinematical conditions. Those energy loss spectra are used to derive differential cross sections and in turn generalised oscillator strengths. These experiments are supported by ab initio calculations in order to assign the excited states of the neutral molecule. The good agreement between the theoretical results and the measurements allows us to provide the first quantitative assignment of the electronic state spectroscopy of furfural over an extended energy range.

  19. THE APPLICATION OF HIGH RESOLUTION ELECTRON ENERGY LOSS SPECTROSCOPY TO THE CHARACTERIZATION OF ADSORBED MOLECULES ON RHODIUM SINGLE CRYSTAL SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, L.H.; Somorjai, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    The scattering of low energy electrons by metal surfaces has been studied for many years now. The electron's ease of generation and detection and high surface sensitivity (low penetration depth) make it an ideal probe for surface scientists. The impinging electron can interact with the surface in basically two ways: it can either elastically reflect (or diffract) from the surface without losing energy or lose a portion of it's incident energy and inelastically scatter. In this paper we will be concerned with only one of many possible inelastic scattering processes: the loss of the electron's energy to the vibrational modes of atoms and molecules chemisorbed on the surface. This technique is known as high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (or ELS, EELS, HRELS, HREELS, etc.).

  20. Recent Developments of an Opto-Electronic THz Spectrometer for High-Resolution Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hindle, Francis; Yang, Chun; Mouret, Gael; Cuisset, Arnaud; Bocquet, Robin; Lampin, Jean-François; Blary, Karine; Peytavit, Emilien; Akalin, Tahsin; Ducournau, Guillaume

    2009-01-01

    A review is provided of sources and detectors that can be employed in the THz range before the description of an opto-electronic source of monochromatic THz radiation. The realized spectrometer has been applied to gas phase spectroscopy. Air-broadening coefficients of HCN are determined and the insensitivity of this technique to aerosols is demonstrated by the analysis of cigarette smoke. A multiple pass sample cell has been used to obtain a sensitivity improvement allowing transitions of the volatile organic compounds to be observed. A solution to the frequency metrology is presented and promises to yield accurate molecular line center measurements. PMID:22291552

  1. High-Resolution Hypernuclear Spectroscopy Electron Scattering at Jlab, Hall A

    SciTech Connect

    Franco Garibaldi

    2010-12-01

    Hypernuclear spectroscopy via electromagnetic induced reactions is a valuable and powerful way to study hypernuclei, hadronic systems with non-zero strangeness content, providing an alternative to the hadron induced reactions mainly studied so far. Electron-induced hypernuclear spectroscopy has been studied in Hall A at Jefferson Lab on three nuclei, 12C, 16O, and 9Be with unprecedented resolution and with an improved particle identification system, using a RICH detector, in order to unambiguously identify kaons, thus allowing the measurement of high-quality, almost background-free, hypernuclear spectra. Two superconducting septum magnets were added to the existing apparatus in order to permit particle detection at very forward angle providing a reasonable counting rate. These studies have provided the first quantitative information on, for instance, core-excited states in hypernuclei. In the case of oxygen, a waterfall target has been employed allowing for the simultaneous measurement of hypernuclear production on oxygen and of elementary kaon-Lambda electro-production on protons: a crucial measurement to disentangle the contribution of the elementary reaction from the measured hypernuclear production cross section, yielding direct access to the nucleus-hypernucleus transition structure. Final results for 12C and 16O as well as preliminary results on 9Be will be presented.

  2. High-resolution electronic spectroscopy of the doorway states to intramolecular charge transfer.

    PubMed

    Fleisher, Adam J; Bird, Ryan G; Zaleski, Daniel P; Pate, Brooks H; Pratt, David W

    2013-04-25

    Reported here are several of the ground, first, and second excited state structures and dipole moments of three benchmark intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) systems; 4-(1H-pyrrol-1-yl)benzonitrile (PBN), 4,4'-dimethylaminobenzonitrile (DMABN), and 4-(1-pyrrolidinyl)benzonitrile (PYRBN), isolated in the gas phase and probed by rotationally resolved spectroscopy in a molecular beam. The related molecules 1-phenylpyrrole (PP) and 4-aminobenzonitrile (ABN) also are discussed. We find that the S1 electronic state is of B symmetry in all five molecules. In PBN, a second excited state (S2) of A symmetry is found only ~400 cm(-1) above the presumed origin of the S1 state. The change in dipole moment upon excitation to the A state is measured to be Δμ ≈ 3.0 D, significantly smaller than the value predicted by theory and also smaller than that observed for the "anomalous" ICT band of PBN in solution. The B state dipole moments of DMABN and PYRBN are large, ~10.6 D, slightly larger than those attributed to "normal" LE fluorescence in solution. In addition, we find the unsaturated donor molecules (PP, PBN) to be twisted in their ground states and to become more planar upon excitation, even in the A state, whereas the saturated donor molecules (ABN, DMABN, PYRBN), initially planar, either remain planar or become more twisted in their excited states. It thus appears that the model that is appropriate for describing ICT in these systems depends on the geometry of the ground state. PMID:22913563

  3. High-Resolution {alpha} and Electron Spectroscopy of {sup 249}{sub 98}Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Greene, J. P.; Kondev, F. G.; Zhu, S.

    2015-04-13

    alpha-particle spectra of Cf-249 have been measured with a double-focusing magnetic spectrometer and with passivated implanted planar silicon (PIPS) detectors. The conversion-electron spectra of Cf-249 have been measured with a cooled Si(Li) detector and with a room-temperature PIPS detector. Precise energies of a groups in the decay of Cf-249 have been measured with respect to the known energy of Cf-250. In addition, alpha-electron, alpha-gamma, and gamma-gamma coincidence measurements were also performed to determine the spin-parity of the previously known 643.64-keV level. From electron intensities, conversion coefficients of transitions in the daughter Cm-245 have been determined. The measured L-3 conversion coefficients of the 333.4- and 388.2-keV transitions are found to be in agreement with the theoretical conversion coefficients for pure E1 multipolarity. On the other hand, the K, L-1 + L-2, M, and N conversion coefficients are approximately twice the theoretical values for pure E1 transitions. These measurements indicate anomalous E1 conversion coefficients for the 333.4- and 388.2-keV transitions, as has been pointed out in earlier measurements. The measured conversion coefficient of the 255.5-keV transition gives an M1 multipolarity for this transition which establishes a spin-parity of 7/2(-) and the 7/2(-)[743] single-particle assignment to the 643.64-keV level.

  4. Observation of New Hollow States of Li^+ in High-Resolution Electron-Spectroscopy Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, S.; Cubaynes, D.; Bizau, J.-M.; Wuilleumier, F. J.; Mosnier, J.-P.; Kennedy, E. T.

    1998-05-01

    Using the synchrotron radiation emitted by the Super-ACO storage ring in Orsay and an electron spectrometer with decelerating optics, we have observed new highly-excited (2l,3l') and (2l, 4l'') hollow states of the singly-charged lithium ion. They were observed in the second step of the autoionization decay of atomic hollow states created by photoexcitation of lithium atoms at excitation energies below the triple-ionization potential (203 eV), and after direct ionization into the continuum at photon energies above 203 eV . We have measured the energies and widths of the new states, and found that they are in excellent agreement with theoretical calculations by K. T. Chung using the saddle point approximation.

  5. Hydrogenated graphene on Ir(111): A high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy study of the vibrational spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyhl, Line; Balog, Richard; Angot, Thierry; Hornekær, Liv; Bisson, Régis

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen atom adsorption on high-quality graphene on Ir(111) [gr/Ir(111)] is investigated using high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy. The evolution of the vibrational spectrum, up to 400 meV, of gr/Ir(111) upon increasing hydrogen atom exposures is measured. The two dominant binding configurations of atomic hydrogen are identified as (1) graphanelike hydrogen clusters on the parts of the graphene more strongly interacting with the Ir(111) surface and (2) dimers bound more weakly to the freestanding parts of the graphene. The graphanelike surface structures lead to increased corrugation of the graphene sheet, yielding graphane-related phonon components. Additionally, a recent theoretical prediction of the existence of a bending character for a LO/TO graphane chair phonon mode is experimentally verified. No clear evidence was found for hydrogen bound on both sides of a high-quality graphene sheet and phonon features strongly suggest interactions between graphanelike hydrogen clusters and Ir atoms in the substrate.

  6. Neutron irradiation damage of nuclear graphite studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, R.; Jones, A. N.; McDermott, L.; Marsden, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear graphite components are produced from polycrystalline artificial graphite manufacture from a binder and filler coke with approximately 20% porosity. During the operational lifetime, nuclear graphite moderator components are subjected to fast neutron irradiation which contributes to the change of material and physical properties such as thermal expansion co-efficient, young's modulus and dimensional change. These changes are directly driven by irradiation-induced changes to the crystal structure as reflected through the bulk microstructure. It is therefore of critical importance that these irradiation changes and there implication on component property changes are fully understood. This work examines a range of irradiated graphite samples removed from the British Experimental Pile Zero (BEPO) reactor; a low temperature, low fluence, air-cooled Materials Test Reactor which operated in the UK. Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been employed to characterise the effect of increased irradiation fluence on graphite microstructure and understand low temperature irradiation damage processes. HRTEM confirms the structural damage of the crystal lattice caused by irradiation attributed to a high number of defects generation with the accumulation of dislocation interactions at nano-scale range. Irradiation-induced crystal defects, lattice parameters and crystallite size compared to virgin nuclear graphite are characterised using selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns in TEM and Raman Spectroscopy. The consolidated 'D'peak in the Raman spectra confirms the formation of in-plane point defects and reflected as disordered regions in the lattice. The reduced intensity and broadened peaks of 'G' and 'D' in the Raman and HRTEM results confirm the appearance of turbulence and disordering of the basal planes whilst maintaining their coherent layered graphite structure.

  7. High-resolution electron spectroscopy of lanthanide (Ce, Pr, and Nd) complexes of cyclooctatetraene: The role of 4f electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kumari, Sudesh; Roudjane, Mourad; Hewage, Dilrukshi; Yang Dongsheng; Liu Yang

    2013-04-28

    Cerium, praseodymium, and neodymium complexes of 1,3,5,7-cyclooctatetraene (COT) complexes were produced in a laser-vaporization metal cluster source and studied by pulsed-field ionization zero electron kinetic energy spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. The computations included the second-order Moller-Plesset perturbation theory, the coupled cluster method with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations, and the state-average complete active space self-consistent field method. The spectrum of each complex exhibits multiple band systems and is assigned to ionization of several low-energy electronic states of the neutral complex. This observation is different from previous studies of M(COT) (M = Sc, Y, La, and Gd), for which a single band system was observed. The presence of the multiple low-energy electronic states is caused by the splitting of the partially filled lanthanide 4f orbitals in the ligand field, and the number of the low-energy states increases rapidly with increasing number of the metal 4f electrons. On the other hand, the 4f electrons have a small effect on the geometries and vibrational frequencies of these lanthanide complexes.

  8. Star formation seen with high resolution spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winnewisser, G.

    1990-03-01

    More than 90 anorganic and organic molecules have been detected by high resolution spectroscopy in interstellar molecular clouds or in the envelopes of stars. The detected wavelengths of the lines - predominantly located in the millimeter- and submillimeter wavelength region - unequivocally identify the molecules and give precise knowledge of the physical and chemical conditions of molecular clouds from which the radiation emanates. The line intensities and line profiles contain information about the densities, temperatures and dynamics prevailing in molecular clouds.

  9. High-resolution spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation for surface structure determination and the study of correlated electron systems

    SciTech Connect

    Moler, E.J. Jr.

    1996-05-01

    The surface structure of three molecular adsorbate systems on transition metal surfaces, ({radical}3 x {radical}3)R30{degrees} and (1.5 x 1.5)R18{degrees} CO adsorbed on Cu(111), and c(2x2) N2/Ni(100), have been determined using Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS). The adsorption site and bond lengths are reported for the adsorbate-metal bond and the first two substrate layers. The ARPEFS diffraction pattern of the shake-up peak for c(2x2) N2/Ni(100) is also discussed. A unique method of experimentally determining the angular momentum and intrinsic/extrinsic origin of core-level satellites is presented. We show for the first time that satellite peaks not associated with chemically differentiated atomic species display an ARPEFS intensity oscillation. Specifically, we present data for the C 1s from ({radical}3x{radical}3)R30 CO/Cu(111) and p2mg(2x1)CO/Ni(110), N is from c(2x2) N2/Ni(100), and Ni 3p from clean nickel(111). The satellite peaks in all cases exhibit ARPEFS curves which indicate an angular momentum identical to the main peak and are of an intrinsic nature. A Fourier Transform Soft X-ray spectrometer (FF-SX) has been designed and is under construction for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The spectrometer is designed for ultra-high resolution theoretical resolving power E/{Delta}E{approx}-10{sup 6} in the photon energy region of 60-120 eV. This instrument is expected to provide experimental results which sensitively test models of correlated electron processes in atomic and molecular physics. The design criteria and consequent technical challenges posed by the short wavelengths of x-rays and desired resolving power are discussed. The fundamental and practical aspects of soft x-ray interferometry are also explored.

  10. Probing the electronic and vibrational structure of Au2Al2(-) and Au2Al2 using photoelectron spectroscopy and high resolution photoelectron imaging.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Gary V; Czekner, Joseph; Jian, Tian; Li, Wei-Li; Yang, Zheng; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2014-12-14

    The electronic and vibrational structures of Au2Al2(-) and Au2Al2 have been investigated using photoelectron spectroscopy (PES), high-resolution photoelectron imaging, and theoretical calculations. Photoelectron spectra taken at high photon energies with a magnetic-bottle apparatus reveal numerous detachment transitions and a large energy gap for the neutral Au2Al2. Vibrationally resolved PE spectra are obtained using high-resolution photoelectron imaging for the ground state detachment transition of Au2Al2(-) at various photon energies (670.55-843.03 nm). An accurate electron affinity of 1.4438(8) eV is obtained for the Au2Al2 neutral cluster, as well as two vibrational frequencies at 57 ± 8 and 305 ± 13 cm(-1). Hot bands transitions yield two vibrational frequencies for Au2Al2(-) at 57 ± 10 and 144 ± 12 cm(-1). The obtained vibrational and electronic structure information is compared with density functional calculations, unequivocally confirming that both Au2Al2(-) and Au2Al2 possess C2v tetrahedral structures. PMID:25494751

  11. Probing the electronic and vibrational structure of Au2Al2- and Au2Al2 using photoelectron spectroscopy and high resolution photoelectron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Gary V.; Czekner, Joseph; Jian, Tian; Li, Wei-Li; Yang, Zheng; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2014-12-01

    The electronic and vibrational structures of Au2Al2- and Au2Al2 have been investigated using photoelectron spectroscopy (PES), high-resolution photoelectron imaging, and theoretical calculations. Photoelectron spectra taken at high photon energies with a magnetic-bottle apparatus reveal numerous detachment transitions and a large energy gap for the neutral Au2Al2. Vibrationally resolved PE spectra are obtained using high-resolution photoelectron imaging for the ground state detachment transition of Au2Al2- at various photon energies (670.55-843.03 nm). An accurate electron affinity of 1.4438(8) eV is obtained for the Au2Al2 neutral cluster, as well as two vibrational frequencies at 57 ± 8 and 305 ± 13 cm-1. Hot bands transitions yield two vibrational frequencies for Au2Al2- at 57 ± 10 and 144 ± 12 cm-1. The obtained vibrational and electronic structure information is compared with density functional calculations, unequivocally confirming that both Au2Al2- and Au2Al2 possess C2v tetrahedral structures.

  12. ELECTRONICS UPGRADE OF HIGH RESOLUTION MASS SPECTROMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    Mcintosh, J; Joe Cordaro, J

    2008-03-10

    High resolution mass spectrometers are specialized systems that allow researchers to determine the exact mass of samples to four significant digits by using magnetic and electronic sector mass analyzers. Many of the systems in use today at research laboratories and universities were designed and built more than two decades ago. The manufacturers of these systems have abandoned the support for some of the mass spectrometers and parts to power and control them have become scarce or obsolete. The Savannah River National Laboratory has been involved in the upgrade of the electronics and software for these legacy machines. The Electronics Upgrade of High Resolution Mass Spectrometers consists of assembling high-end commercial instrumentation from reputable manufacturers with a minimal amount of customization to replace the electronics for the older systems. By taking advantage of advances in instrumentation, precise magnet control can be achieved using high resolution current sources and continuous feedback from a high resolution hall-effect probe. The custom equipment include a precision voltage divider/summing amplifier chassis, high voltage power supply chassis and a chassis for controlling the voltage emission for the mass spectrometer source tube. The upgrade package is versatile enough to interface with valve control, vacuum and other instrumentation. Instrument communication is via a combination of Ethernet and traditional IEEE-488 GPIB protocols. The system software upgrades include precision control, feedback and spectral waveform analysis tools.

  13. High-resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy and photoelectron-diffraction studies of the geometric structure of adsorbates on single-crystal metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenblatt, D.H.

    1982-11-01

    Two techniques which have made important contributions to the understanding of surface phenomena are high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and photoelectron diffraction (PD). EELS is capable of directly measuring the vibrational modes of clean and adsorbate covered metal surfaces. In this work, the design, construction, and performance of a new EELS spectrometer are described. These results are discussed in terms of possible structures of the O-Cu(001) system. Recommendations for improvements in this EELS spectrometer and guidelines for future spectrometers are given. PD experiments provide accurate quantitative information about the geometry of atoms and molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. The technique has advantages when used to study disordered overlayers, molecular overlayers, multiple site systems, and adsorbates which are weak electron scatterers. Four experiments were carried out which exploit these advantages.

  14. Opto-mechano-electrical tripling in ZnO nanowires probed by photocurrent spectroscopy in a high-resolution transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, C.; Golberg, D. E-mail: golberg.dmitri@nims.go.jp; Xu, Z. E-mail: golberg.dmitri@nims.go.jp; Kvashnin, D. G.; Tang, D.-M.; Xue, Y. M.; Bando, Y.; Sorokin, P. B.

    2015-08-31

    Photocurrent spectroscopy of individual free-standing ZnO nanowires inside a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) is reported. By using specially designed optical in situ TEM system capable of scanning tunneling microscopy probing paired with light illumination, opto-mechano-electrical tripling phenomenon in ZnO nanowires is demonstrated. Splitting of photocurrent spectra at around 3.3 eV under in situ TEM bending of ZnO nanowires directly corresponds to nanowire deformation and appearance of expanded and compressed nanowire sides. Theoretical simulation of a bent ZnO nanowire has an excellent agreement with the experimental data. The splitting effect could be explained by a change in the valence band structure of ZnO nanowires due to a lattice strain. The strain-induced splitting provides important clues for future flexible piezo-phototronics.

  15. High Resolution Coherent 3d Spectroscopy of Bromine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strangfeld, Benjamin R.; Wells, Thresa A.; House, Zuri R.; Chen, Peter C.

    2013-06-01

    The high resolution gas phase electronic spectrum of bromine is rather congested due to many overlapping vibrational and rotational transitions with similar transition frequencies, and also due to isotopomeric effects. Expansion into the second dimension will remove some of this congestion; however through the implementation of High Resolution Coherent 3D Spectroscopy, the density of peaks is further reduced by at least two orders of magnitude. This allows for the selective examination of a small number of spatially resolved multidimensional bands, separated by vibrational quantum number and by isotopomer, which facilitates the fitting of many rovibrational peaks in bromine. The ability to derive information about the molecular constants for the electronic states involved will be discussed.

  16. Electron transfer reactions on Cs/MoS2(0002) with chlorine, oxygen, and water: High resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ken T.; Hess, James S.; Klier, Kamil

    1999-07-01

    Supra-valence electron transfer from surface Cs-doped MoS2(0002) to electron acceptor adsorbates was investigated by high resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HRXPS) in the valence band region and above the valence band maximum (VBM). Deposition of a sub-monolayer amount of Cs onto the basal plane of MoS2 introduced a new electron density of states at ca. 1.25 eV above VBM. Angle-resolved HRXPS and theoretical analysis located this electron density in the MoS2 layer. Upon the reaction with Cl2, this Cs-induced photoelectron almost completely disappeared and the Cs 3d and Cl 2p core levels indicated the formation of a surface Cs-chloride species. The Cs-covered MoS2(0002) surface also reacted with O2 to form surface peroxides and superoxides, as evidenced by two distinct binding energies of the O 1s core level peaks. However, the reaction with water proved to be more difficult: Exposure of the Cs-covered MoS2(0002) surface to H2O at 10-5 Torr did not result in electron transfer reaction, but the Cs/MoS2(0002) surface exposed to H2O at 1 Torr showed a substantial decrease in the density of states above VBM as well as formation of a surface-hydroxide, indicated by the O 1s core level position. Theoretical calculations using a full-potential linearized augmented plane wave density functional theory (FLAPW-DFT) confirm the conclusion based on experimental intensity anisotropy of the new peak: the Cs 6s electron transfers into the MoS2 substrate, forming the Cs/MoS2 electron donor-acceptor complex with Csδ+. In addition, all phenomena observed during the adsorption of electron donor-acceptor molecules are quantitatively accounted by the theory.

  17. Computer synthesis of high resolution electron micrographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathan, R.

    1976-01-01

    Specimen damage, spherical aberration, low contrast and noisy sensors combine to prevent direct atomic viewing in a conventional electron microscope. The paper describes two methods for obtaining ultra-high resolution in biological specimens under the electron microscope. The first method assumes the physical limits of the electron objective lens and uses a series of dark field images of biological crystals to obtain direct information on the phases of the Fourier diffraction maxima; this information is used in an appropriate computer to synthesize a large aperture lens for a 1-A resolution. The second method assumes there is sufficient amplitude scatter from images recorded in focus which can be utilized with a sensitive densitometer and computer contrast stretching to yield fine structure image details. Cancer virus characterization is discussed as an illustrative example. Numerous photographs supplement the text.

  18. High Resolution Spectroscopy to Support Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2003-01-01

    Spectroscopic parameters (such as line position, intensity, broadening and shifting coefficients and their temperature dependences, line mixing coefficients etc.) for various molecular species of atmospheric interest are determined. In order to achieve these results, infrared spectra of several molecular bands are obtained using high-resolution recording instruments such as tunable diode laser spectrometer and Fourier transform spectrometers. Using sophisticated analysis routines (Multispectrum nonlinear least squares technique) these high-resolution infrared spectra are processed to determine the various spectral line parameters that are cited above. Spectra were taken using the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at the National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak, Arizona as well as the Bruker FTS at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) at Richland, Washington. Most of the spectra are acquired not only at room temperature, but also at several different cold temperatures. This procedure is necessary to study the variation of the spectral line parameters as a function of temperature in order to simulate the Earth's and other planetary atmospheric environments. Depending upon the strength or weakness of the various bands recorded and analyzed, the length(s) of the absorption cells in which the gas samples under study are kept varied from a few centimeters up to several meters and the sample temperatures varied from approximately +30 C to -63 C. Research on several infrared bands of various molecular species and their isotopomers are undertaken. Those studies are briefly described.

  19. High Resolution Spectroscopy to Support Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, D. Chris; Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2000-01-01

    The major research activities performed during the cooperative agreement enhanced our spectroscopic knowledge of molecules of atmospheric interest such as carbon dioxide, water vapor, ozone, methane, and carbon monoxide, to name a few. Measurements were made using the NASA Langley Tunable Diode Laser Spectrometer System (TDL) and several Fourier Transform Spectrometer Systems (FTS) around the globe. The results from these studies made remarkable improvements in the line positions and intensities for several molecules, particularly ozone and carbon dioxide in the 2 to 17-micrometer spectral region. Measurements of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients and the temperature dependence of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients for infrared transitions of ozone, methane, and water vapor were also performed. Results from these studies have been used for retrievals of stratospheric gas concentration profiles from data collected by several Upper Atmospheric Research satellite (UARS) infrared instruments as well as in the analysis of high resolution atmospheric spectra such as those acquired by space-based, ground-based, and various balloon- and aircraft-borne experiments. Our results made significant contributions in several updates of the HITRAN (HIgh resolution TRANsmission) spectral line parameters database. This database enjoys worldwide recognition in research involving diversified scientific fields.

  20. High Resolution Spectroscopy to Support Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, D. Chris; Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2000-01-01

    The major research activities performed during the cooperative agreement enhanced our spectroscopic knowledge of molecules of atmospheric interest such as carbon dioxide, water vapor, ozone, methane, and carbon monoxide, to name a few. Measurements were made using the NASA Langley Tunable Diode Laser Spectrometer System (TDL) and several Fourier Transform Spectrometer Systems (FTS) around the globe. The results from these studies made remarkable improvements in the line positions and intensities for several molecules, particularly ozone and carbon dioxide in the 2 to 17-micrometer spectral region. Measurements of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients and the temperature dependence of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients for infrared transitions of ozone, methane, and water vapor were also performed. Results from these studies have been used for retrievals of stratospheric gas concentration profiles from data collected by several Upper Atmospheric Research satellite (UARS) infrared instruments as well as in the analysis of high resolution atmospheric spectra such as those acquired by space-based, ground-based, and various balloon-and aircraft-borne experiments. Our results made significant contributions in several updates of the HITRAN (HIgh resolution TRANsmission) spectral line parameters database. This database enjoys worldwide recognition in research involving diversified scientific fields.

  1. High resolution electron crystallography of protein molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Glaeser, R.M. |; Downing, K.H.

    1993-06-01

    Electron diffraction data and high resolution images can now be used to obtain accurate, three-dimensional density maps of biological macromolecules. These density maps can be interpreted by building an atomic-resolution model of the structure into the experimental density. The Cowley-Moodie formalism of dynamical diffraction theory has been used to validate the use of kinematic diffraction theory, strictly the weak phase object approximation, in producing such 3-D density maps. Further improvements in the preparation of very flat specimens and in the retention of diffraction to a resolution of 0.2 nm or better could result in electron crystallography becoming as important a technique as x-ray crystallography currently is for the field of structural molecular biology.

  2. High Resolution Spectroscopy to Support Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2006-01-01

    The major research activities performed during the cooperative agreement enhanced our spectroscopic knowledge of molecules of atmospheric interest such as H2O (water vapor), O3 (ozone), HCN (hydrogen cyanide), CH4 (methane), NO2 (nitrogen dioxide) and CO (carbon monoxide). The data required for the analyses were obtained from two different Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTS); one of which is located at the National Solar Observatory (NSO) on Kitt Peak, Arizona and the other instrument is located at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) at Richland, Washington. The data were analyzed using a modified multispectrum nonlinear least squares fitting algorithm developed by Dr. D. Chris Benner of the College of William and Mary. The results from these studies made significant improvements in the line positons and intensities for these molecules. The measurements of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients and the temperature dependence of pressure broadening and pressure induced shift coefficients for hundreds of infrared transitions of HCN, CO3 CH4 and H2O were also performed during this period. Results from these studies have been used for retrievals of stratospheric gas concentration profiles from data collected by several Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS) infrared instruments as well as in the analysis of high resolution atmospheric spectra such as those acquired by space-based, ground-based, and various balloon- and aircraft-borne experiments. Our results made significant contributions in several updates of the HITRAN (HIgh resolution TRANsmission) spectral line parameters database. This database enjoys worldwide recognition in research involving diversified scientific fields. The research conducted during the period 2003-2006 has resulted in publications given in this paper. In addition to Journal publications, several oral and poster presentations were given at various Scientific conferences within the United States

  3. Probing optical band gaps at the nanoscale in NiFe₂O₄ and CoFe₂O₄ epitaxial films by high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dileep, K.; Loukya, B.; Datta, R.; Pachauri, N.; Gupta, A.

    2014-09-14

    Nanoscale optical band gap variations in epitaxial thin films of two different spinel ferrites, i.e., NiFe₂O₄ (NFO) and CoFe₂O₄ (CFO), have been investigated by spatially resolved high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy. Experimentally, both NFO and CFO show indirect/direct band gaps around 1.52 eV/2.74 and 2.3 eV, and 1.3 eV/2.31 eV, respectively, for the ideal inverse spinel configuration with considerable standard deviation in the band gap values for CFO due to various levels of deviation from the ideal inverse spinel structure. Direct probing of the regions in both the systems with tetrahedral A site cation vacancy, which is distinct from the ideal inverse spinel configuration, shows significantly smaller band gap values. The experimental results are supported by the density functional theory based modified Becke-Johnson exchange correlation potential calculated band gap values for the different cation configurations.

  4. Improved methods for high resolution electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. R.

    1987-04-01

    Existing methods of making support films for high resolution transmission electron microscopy are investigated and novel methods are developed. Existing methods of fabricating fenestrated, metal reinforced specimen supports (microgrids) are evaluated for their potential to reduce beam induced movement of monolamellar crystals of C44H90 paraffin supported on thin carbon films. Improved methods of producing hydrophobic carbon films by vacuum evaporation, and improved methods of depositing well ordered monolamellar paraffin crystals on carbon films are developed. A novel technique for vacuum evaporation of metals is described which is used to reinforce microgrids. A technique is also developed to bond thin carbon films to microgrids with a polymer bonding agent. Unique biochemical methods are described to accomplish site specific covalent modification of membrane proteins. Protocols are given which covalently convert the carboxy terminus of papain cleaved bacteriorhodopsin to a free thiol.

  5. Improved methods for high resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.R.

    1987-04-01

    Existing methods of making support films for high resolution transmission electron microscopy are investigated and novel methods are developed. Existing methods of fabricating fenestrated, metal reinforced specimen supports (microgrids) are evaluated for their potential to reduce beam induced movement of monolamellar crystals of C/sub 44/H/sub 90/ paraffin supported on thin carbon films. Improved methods of producing hydrophobic carbon films by vacuum evaporation, and improved methods of depositing well ordered monolamellar paraffin crystals on carbon films are developed. A novel technique for vacuum evaporation of metals is described which is used to reinforce microgrids. A technique is also developed to bond thin carbon films to microgrids with a polymer bonding agent. Unique biochemical methods are described to accomplish site specific covalent modification of membrane proteins. Protocols are given which covalently convert the carboxy terminus of papain cleaved bacteriorhodopsin to a free thiol. 53 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Applications of high resolution inverse Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Owyoung, A.; Esherick, P.

    1980-01-01

    The use of high-power, narrow-band lasers has significantly improved the resolving power and sensitivity of inverse Raman spectroscopy of gases. In this paper we shall describe this technique, illustrate its capabilities by showing some Q-branch spectra of heavy spherical tops, and survey some possible future applications.

  7. Techniques in molecular spectroscopy: from broad bandwidth to high resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossel, Kevin C.

    molecules such as CH5 + with highly non-classical behavior, and for tests of fundamental physics. We have developed a new technique---frequency comb velocity-modulation spectroscopy---that is the first system to enable rapid, broadband spectroscopy of molecular ions with high resolution. We have demonstrated the ability to record 150 cm-1 of spectra consisting of 45,000 points in 30 minutes and have used this system to record over 1000 cm-1 of spectra of HfF+ in the near-infrared around 800 nm. After improvements, the system can now cover more than 3250 cm-1 (700-900 nm). We have combined this with standard velocity-modulation spectroscopy to measure and analyze 19 ro-vibronic bands of HfF+. These measurements enabled precision spectroscopy of trapped HfF + for testing time-reversal symmetry. For this experiment, we perform Ramsey spectroscopy between spin states in the metastable 3Delta 1 level to look for a permanent electric dipole moment of the electron with what we believe is the narrowest line observed in a molecular system (Fourier limited with 500 ms of coherence time). The long coherence time is a major advantage of using ions, but there are also some added complexities. We discuss various aspects metastable state preparation, state detection, and spectroscopy in a rotating frame (due to the necessary rotating electric bias field) that were particular challenging. In addition, we discuss limits to the coherence time---in particular, ion-ion collisions---as well as the sensitivity of the current measurements and provide a path towards a new limit on the electric dipole moment of the electron.

  8. High Resolution Laboratory Spectroscopy: Unraveling the Secrets of Interstellar Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziurys, Lucy M.

    2008-05-01

    At present, over 140 different chemical compounds have been identified in interstellar and circumstellar gas. Such observations have offered a unique avenue by which to probe the cold, dense regions in our Galaxy and in external galaxies. Because these molecules are primarily present in colder material, they are usually studied at high spectral resolutions (1 part in 106-107) via their pure rotational transitions, which typically occur at millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. Such studies cannot be carried out, however, without the input of high resolution laboratory spectroscopy. Such measurements provide the "fingerprint” spectral pattern critical for accurate astronomical identifications. Because of the complexity of current interstellar spectra and the propensity of unidentified features, precise laboratory data are essential. Current methods employed in the laboratory for high resolution measurements include millimeter/sub-mm direct absorption, velocity modulation, and Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy (FTMW). Each of these experimental techniques has certain unique advantages, which will be discussed. Also of importance are the synthetic methods utilized to create the radicals, ions, and other transient species typically found in interstellar space. Such molecules are generated in DC and AC glow discharges, pulsed supersonic jet expansions, and using Broida-type ovens. In addition, spectral analyses can be quite complex, in particular if there are low lying excited torsional or electronic states, or if molecular inversion is present. Recent laboratory results for potential interstellar species will also be presented, in particular those for negative ions, phosphorus-bearing radicals, and organic "prebiotic” species.

  9. High-resolution flurescence spectroscopy in immunoanalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Grubor, Nenad M.

    2005-05-01

    The work presented in this dissertation combines highly sensitive and selective fluorescence line-narrowing spectroscopy (FLNS) detection with various modes of immunoanalytical techniques. It has been shown that FLNS is capable of directly probing molecules immunocomplexed with antibodies, eliminating analytical ambiguities that may arise from interferences that accompany traditional immunochemical techniques. Moreover, the utilization of highly cross-reactive antibodies for highly specific analyte determination has been demonstrated. Finally, they demonstrate the first example of the spectral resolution of diastereomeric analytes based on their interaction with a cross-reactive antibody.

  10. Evolution of titania nanotubes-supported WO{sub x} species by in situ thermo-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cortes-Jacome, M.A.; Angeles-Chavez, C.; Morales, M.; Lopez-Salinas, E.; Toledo-Antonio, J.A.

    2007-10-15

    Structural evolution of WO{sub x} species on the surface of titania nanotubes was followed by in situ thermo-Raman spectroscopy. A total of 15 wt% of W atoms were loaded on the surface of a hydroxylated titania nanotubes by impregnation with ammonium metatungstate solution and then, the sample was thermally treated in a Linkam cell at different temperatures in nitrogen flow. The band characteristic of the W=O bond was observed at 962 cm{sup -1} in the dried sample, which vanished between 300 and 700 deg. C, and reappear again after annealing at 800 deg. C, along with a broad band centered at 935 cm{sup -1}, attributed to the v{sub 1} vibration of W=O in tetrahedral coordination. At 900 and 1000 deg. C, the broad band decomposed into four bands at 923, 934, 940 and 950 cm{sup -1}, corresponding to the symmetric and asymmetric vibration of W=O bonds in Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}W{sub 2}O{sub 7} phases as determined by X-ray diffraction and High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The structure of the nanotubular support was kept at temperatures below 450 deg. C, thereafter, it transformed into anatase being stabilized at temperatures as high as 900 deg. C. At 1000 deg. C, anatase phase partially converted into rutile. After annealing at 1000 deg. C, a core-shell model material was obtained, with a shell of ca. 5 nm thickness, composed of sodium tungstate nanoclusters, and a core composed mainly of rutile TiO{sub 2} phase. - Graphical abstract: Titania nanotubes loaded with 15 wt% W atoms were characterized from room temperature (rt) to 1000 deg. C by thermo-Raman spectroscopy in N{sub 2}. At 1000 deg. C, a core-shell model material was obtained, with a shell thickness of ca. 5 nm composed by nanoclusters of sodium tungstate, and a core composed mainly of rutile TiO{sub 2} phase.

  11. High Resolution Emission Spectroscopy of the Alpha Pi-1 - Chi Sigma-1(+) Fourth Positive Band System of CO from Electron Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beegle, Luther W.; Ajello, Joseph M.; James, Geoffrey K.; Alvarez, Marcos; Dziczek, Dariusz

    2000-01-01

    We report electron-impact induced fluorescence spectra [300 mA full width at half maximum (FWHM)] of CO for 20 and 100 eV impact energies of the spectral region of 1300 to 2050 A and high resolution spectra (FWHM) of the v'=5 to v"=l and the v'=3 to v"=O bands showing that the rotational structure of the band system are modeled accurately. The excitation function of the (0,1) band (1597 A) was measured from electron impact in the energy range from threshold to 750 eV and placed on an absolute scale from modem calibration standards.

  12. Electronic state spectroscopy by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption, He(I) photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio calculations of ethyl acetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Śmialek, Malgorzata A.; Łabuda, Marta; Guthmuller, Julien; Hubin-Franskin, Marie-Jeanne; Delwiche, Jacques; Hoffmann, Søren Vrønning; Jones, Nykola C.; Mason, Nigel J.; Limão-Vieira, Paulo

    2016-06-01

    The high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption spectrum of ethyl acetate, C4H8O2, is presented over the energy range 4.5-10.7 eV (275.5-116.0 nm). Valence and Rydberg transitions and their associated vibronic series observed in the photoabsorption spectrum, have been assigned in accordance with new ab initio calculations of the vertical excitation energies and oscillator strengths. Also, the photoabsorption cross sections have been used to calculate the photolysis lifetime of this ester in the upper stratosphere (20-50 km). Calculations have also been carried out to determine the ionisation energies and fine structure of the lowest ionic state of ethyl acetate and are compared with a newly recorded photoelectron spectrum (from 9.5 to 16.7 eV). Vibrational structure is observed in the first photoelectron band of this molecule for the first time.

  13. Characterization of the (0110) {alpha}-Ti/{gamma}-TiH interface using high-resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS)

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, M.M.; Howe, J.M.

    1996-12-31

    Precipitation of {gamma}-TiH in {alpha}-Ti-H alloys involves a hcp {r_arrow} fct lattice transformation with hydrogen as an interstitial diffusing element. Results obtained from a previous TEM study have shown that the lengthening rate of {gamma}-TiH is diffusionally controlled at 25{degrees}C, and possibly interfacially controlled at temperatures of 50{degrees}C and higher. Therefore, it is essential to ascertain the presence or absence of hydrogen atoms at the interface. TEM foils from a 800 ppm wt.% Ti-H alloy were analyzed using high-resolution TEM and image simulations in order to determine the effects of hydrogen on high-resolution images of the {alpha}-Ti/{gamma}-TiH interface, and EELS was used to determine the whether the hydride structure was fully formed up to the interface.

  14. The determination of potential energy curve and dipole moment of the (5)0(+) electronic state of (85)Rb(133)Cs molecule by high resolution photoassociation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jinpeng; Zhao, Yanting; Ji, Zhonghua; Li, Zhonghao; Kim, Jin-Tae; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang

    2015-12-14

    We present the formation of ultracold (85)Rb(133)Cs molecules in the (5)0(+) electronic state by photoassociation and their detection via resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization. Up to v = 47 vibrational levels including the lowest v = 0 vibrational and lowest J = 0 levels are identified with rotationally resolved high resolution photoassociation spectra. Precise Dunham coefficients are determined for the (5)0(+) state with high accuracy, then the Rydberg-Klein-Rees potential energy curve is derived. The electric dipole moments with respect to the vibrational numbers of the (5)0(+) electronic state of (85)Rb(133)Cs molecule are also measured in the range between 1.9 and 4.8 D. These comprehensive studies on previously unobserved rovibrational levels of the (5)0(+) state are helpful to understand the molecular structure and discover suitable transition pathways for transferring ultracold atoms to deeply bound rovibrational levels of the electronic ground state. PMID:26671380

  15. The determination of potential energy curve and dipole moment of the (5)0+ electronic state of 85Rb133Cs molecule by high resolution photoassociation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jinpeng; Zhao, Yanting; Ji, Zhonghua; Li, Zhonghao; Kim, Jin-Tae; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang

    2015-12-01

    We present the formation of ultracold 85Rb133Cs molecules in the (5)0+ electronic state by photoassociation and their detection via resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization. Up to v = 47 vibrational levels including the lowest v = 0 vibrational and lowest J = 0 levels are identified with rotationally resolved high resolution photoassociation spectra. Precise Dunham coefficients are determined for the (5)0+ state with high accuracy, then the Rydberg-Klein-Rees potential energy curve is derived. The electric dipole moments with respect to the vibrational numbers of the (5)0+ electronic state of 85Rb133Cs molecule are also measured in the range between 1.9 and 4.8 D. These comprehensive studies on previously unobserved rovibrational levels of the (5)0+ state are helpful to understand the molecular structure and discover suitable transition pathways for transferring ultracold atoms to deeply bound rovibrational levels of the electronic ground state.

  16. High resolution X-ray spectroscopy using microcalorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, R. L.; Holt, S. S.; Madejski, G. M.; Moseley, S. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Szymkowiak, A. E.

    1988-01-01

    The use of microcalorimeters for high-resolution, high quantum efficiency, nondispersive X-ray spectroscopy has been demonstrated over the past few years. In this paper, the principles of X-ray calorimetry are reviewed, and the results of ongoing X-ray tests using microcalorimetry are summarized. An approach to building an X-ray calorimeter spectrometer is discussed.

  17. High-resolution tunnelling spectroscopy of a graphene quartet.

    PubMed

    Song, Young Jae; Otte, Alexander F; Kuk, Young; Hu, Yike; Torrance, David B; First, Phillip N; de Heer, Walt A; Min, Hongki; Adam, Shaffique; Stiles, Mark D; MacDonald, Allan H; Stroscio, Joseph A

    2010-09-01

    Electrons in a single sheet of graphene behave quite differently from those in traditional two-dimensional electron systems. Like massless relativistic particles, they have linear dispersion and chiral eigenstates. Furthermore, two sets of electrons centred at different points in reciprocal space ('valleys') have this dispersion, giving rise to valley degeneracy. The symmetry between valleys, together with spin symmetry, leads to a fourfold quartet degeneracy of the Landau levels, observed as peaks in the density of states produced by an applied magnetic field. Recent electron transport measurements have observed the lifting of the fourfold degeneracy in very large applied magnetic fields, separating the quartet into integer and, more recently, fractional levels. The exact nature of the broken-symmetry states that form within the Landau levels and lift these degeneracies is unclear at present and is a topic of intense theoretical debate. Here we study the detailed features of the four quantum states that make up a degenerate graphene Landau level. We use high-resolution scanning tunnelling spectroscopy at temperatures as low as 10 mK in an applied magnetic field to study the top layer of multilayer epitaxial graphene. When the Fermi level lies inside the fourfold Landau manifold, significant electron correlation effects result in an enhanced valley splitting for even filling factors, and an enhanced electron spin splitting for odd filling factors. Most unexpectedly, we observe states with Landau level filling factors of 7/2, 9/2 and 11/2, suggestive of new many-body states in graphene. PMID:20829790

  18. Electronic excitation of carbonyl sulphide (COS) by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption and electron-impact spectroscopy in the energy region from 4 to 11 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Limão-Vieira, P.; Ferreira da Silva, F.; Almeida, D.; Hoshino, M.; Tanaka, H.; Mogi, D.; Tanioka, T.; Mason, N. J.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J.

    2015-02-14

    The electronic state spectroscopy of carbonyl sulphide, COS, has been investigated using high resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy in the energy range of 4.0–10.8 eV. The spectrum reveals several new features not previously reported in the literature. Vibronic structure has been observed, notably in the low energy absorption dipole forbidden band assigned to the (4π←3π) ({sup 1}Δ←{sup 1}Σ{sup +}) transition, with a new weak transition assigned to ({sup 1}Σ{sup −}←{sup 1}Σ{sup +}) reported here for the first time. The absolute optical oscillator strengths are determined for ground state to {sup 1}Σ{sup +} and {sup 1}Π transitions. Based on our recent measurements of differential cross sections for the optically allowed ({sup 1}Σ{sup +} and {sup 1}Π) transitions of COS by electron impact, the optical oscillator strength f{sub 0} value and integral cross sections (ICSs) are derived by applying a generalized oscillator strength analysis. Subsequently, ICSs predicted by the scaling are confirmed down to 60 eV in the intermediate energy region. The measured absolute photoabsorption cross sections have been used to calculate the photolysis lifetime of carbonyl sulphide in the upper stratosphere (20–50 km)

  19. Electronic excitation of carbonyl sulphide (COS) by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption and electron-impact spectroscopy in the energy region from 4 to 11 eV.

    PubMed

    Limão-Vieira, P; Ferreira da Silva, F; Almeida, D; Hoshino, M; Tanaka, H; Mogi, D; Tanioka, T; Mason, N J; Hoffmann, S V; Hubin-Franskin, M-J; Delwiche, J

    2015-02-14

    The electronic state spectroscopy of carbonyl sulphide, COS, has been investigated using high resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy in the energy range of 4.0-10.8 eV. The spectrum reveals several new features not previously reported in the literature. Vibronic structure has been observed, notably in the low energy absorption dipole forbidden band assigned to the (4π←3π) ((1)Δ←(1)Σ(+)) transition, with a new weak transition assigned to ((1)Σ(-)←(1)Σ(+)) reported here for the first time. The absolute optical oscillator strengths are determined for ground state to (1)Σ(+) and (1)Π transitions. Based on our recent measurements of differential cross sections for the optically allowed ((1)Σ(+) and (1)Π) transitions of COS by electron impact, the optical oscillator strength f0 value and integral cross sections (ICSs) are derived by applying a generalized oscillator strength analysis. Subsequently, ICSs predicted by the scaling are confirmed down to 60 eV in the intermediate energy region. The measured absolute photoabsorption cross sections have been used to calculate the photolysis lifetime of carbonyl sulphide in the upper stratosphere (20-50 km). PMID:25681902

  20. Improvement of sensitivity in high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, H.; Nakajima, K.; Suzuki, M.; Kimura, K.; Sasakawa, K.

    2011-06-15

    The sensitivity (limit of detection) of high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (HRBS) is mainly determined by the background noise of the spectrometer. There are two major origins of the background noise in HRBS, one is the stray ions scattered from the inner wall of the vacuum chamber of the spectrometer and the other is the dark noise of the microchannel plate (MCP) detector which is commonly used as a focal plane detector of the spectrometer in HRBS. In order to reject the stray ions, several barriers are installed inside the spectrometer and a thin Mylar foil is mounted in front of the detector. The dark noise of the MCP detector is rejected by the coincidence measurement with the secondary electrons emitted from the Mylar foil upon the ion passage. After these improvements, the background noise is reduced by a factor of 200 at a maximum. The detection limit can be improved down to 10 ppm for As in Si at a measurement time of 1 h under ideal conditions.

  1. A compact, light weight, high resolution electron monochromator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goembel, L.; Doering, J. P.

    1995-06-01

    A high resolution electron monochromator that incorporates Vespel polyimide plastic in its construction is described. A great saving in bulk can be realized by mounting the electron optical elements in Vespel tubes rather than mounting them by traditional means.

  2. An Introduction to High Resolution Coherent Multidimensional Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peter C.; Wells, Thresa A.; House, Zuri R.; Strangfeld, Benjamin R.

    2013-06-01

    High resolution coherent multidimensional spectroscopy is a technique that can be used to analyze and assign peaks for molecules that have resisted spectral analysis. Molecules that yield heavily congested and seemingly patternless spectra using conventional methods can yield 2D spectra that have recognizable patterns. The off-diagonal region of the coherent 2D plot shows only cross-peaks that are related by rotational selection rules. The resulting patterns facilitate peak assignment if they are sufficiently resolved. For systems that are not well-resolved, coherent 3D spectra may be generated to further improve resolution and provide selectivity. This presentation will provide an introduction to high resolution coherent 2D and 3D spectroscopies.

  3. Single-sided sensor for high-resolution NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlo, J.; Casanova, F.; Blümich, B.

    2006-06-01

    The unavoidable spatial inhomogeneity of the static magnetic field generated by open sensors has precluded their use for high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. In fact, this application was deemed impossible because these field variations are usually orders of magnitude larger than those created by the microscopic structure of the molecules to be detected. Recently, chemical shift resolved NMR spectra were observed for the first time outside a portable single-sided magnet by implementing a method that exploits inhomogeneities in the rf field designed to reproduce variations of the static magnetic field [J. Perlo, V. Demas, F. Casanova, C.A. Meriles, J. Reimer, A. Pines, B. Blümich, High-resolution spectroscopy with a portable single-sided sensor, Science 308 (2005) 1279]. In this communication, we describe in detail the magnet system built from permanent magnets as well as the rf coil geometry used to compensate the static field variations.

  4. Direct band gap measurement of Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2} thin films using high-resolution reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Heo, Sung; Lee, Hyung-Ik; Park, Jong-Bong; Ko, Dong-Su; Chung, JaeGwan; Kim, KiHong; Kim, Seong Heon; Yun, Dong-Jin; Ham, YongNam; Park, Gyeong Su; Song, Taewon; Lee, Dongho Nam, Junggyu; Kang, Hee Jae; Choi, Pyung-Ho; Choi, Byoung-Deog

    2015-06-29

    To investigate the band gap profile of Cu(In{sub 1−x},Ga{sub x})(Se{sub 1−y}S{sub y}){sub 2} of various compositions, we measured the band gap profile directly as a function of in-depth using high-resolution reflection energy loss spectroscopy (HR-REELS), which was compared with the band gap profile calculated based on the auger depth profile. The band gap profile is a double-graded band gap as a function of in-depth. The calculated band gap obtained from the auger depth profile seems to be larger than that by HR-REELS. Calculated band gaps are to measure the average band gap of the spatially different varying compositions with respect to considering its void fraction. But, the results obtained using HR-REELS are to be affected by the low band gap (i.e., out of void) rather than large one (i.e., near void). Our findings suggest an analytical method to directly determine the band gap profile as function of in-depth.

  5. Adaptive optics high resolution spectroscopy: present status and future direction

    SciTech Connect

    Alcock, C; Angel, R; Ciarlo, D; Fugate, R O; Ge, J; Kuzmenko, P; Lloyd-Hart, M; Macintosh, B; Najita, J; Woolf, N

    1999-07-27

    High resolution spectroscopy experiments with visible adaptive optics (AO) telescopes at Starfire Optical Range and Mt. Wilson have demonstrated that spectral resolution can be routinely improved by a factor of - 10 over the seeing-limited case with no extra light losses at visible wavelengths. With large CCDs now available, a very wide wavelength range can be covered in a single exposure. In the near future, most large ground-based telescopes will be equipped with powerful A0 systems. Most of these systems are aimed primarily at diffraction-limited operation in the near IR. An exciting new opportunity will thus open up for high resolution IR spectroscopy. Immersion echelle gratings with much coarser grooves being developed by us at LLNL will play a critical role in achieving high spectral resolution with a compact and low cost IR cryogenically cooled spectrograph and simultaneous large wavelength coverage on relatively small IR detectors. We have constructed a new A0 optimized spectrograph at Steward Observatory to provide R = 200,000 in the optical, which is being commissioned at the Starfire Optical Range 3.5m telescope. We have completed the optical design of the LLNL IR Immersion Spectrograph (LISPEC) to take advantage of improved silicon etching technology. Key words: adaptive optics, spectroscopy, high resolution, immersion gratings

  6. The determination of potential energy curve and dipole moment of the (5) 0+ electronic state of 85 Rb133 Cs molecule by high resolution photoassociation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jinpeng; Zhao, Yanting; Ji, Zhonghua; Li, Zhonghao; Kim, Jin-Tae; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang

    2016-05-01

    The creation and manipulation of ultracold polar molecules have attracted intensive attentions due to their permanent electric dipole moments interacting strongly with an external electric field and with long-range dipole-dipole force, which facilitate applications such as precision measurement, quantum control of cold chemical reactions, and quantum computation. The (5) 0+ state is a good candidate to produce ultracold ground state RbCs molecule through a short-range photoassociation (PA). We present the formation of ultracold 85 Rb133 Cs molecules in the (5) 0+ electronic state by PA and their detection via resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization. Up to v = 47 vibrational levels including the lowest v = 0 and lowest J = 0 levels are identified with high resolution. Precise Dunham coefficients and the Rydberg-Klein-Rees potential energy curve of the (5) 0+ state are determined The electric dipole moments with respect to the vibrational numbers of the (5) 0+ electronic state are also measured in the range between 1.9 and 4.8 D. These comprehensive studies on previously unobserved rovibrational levels of the (5) 0+ state are helpful to understand the molecular structure and discover suitable transition pathways for transferring to the lowest rovibrational level of the ground state.

  7. Evidence for anisotropic dielectric properties of monoclinic hafnia using valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and ab initio time-dependent density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedj, C.; Hung, L.; Zobelli, A.; Blaise, P.; Sottile, F.; Olevano, V.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of nanocrystal orientation on the energy loss spectra of monoclinic hafnia (m-HfO2) is measured by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and valence energy loss spectroscopy (VEELS) on high quality samples. For the same momentum-transfer directions, the dielectric properties are also calculated ab initio by time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT). Experiments and simulations evidence anisotropy in the dielectric properties of m-HfO2, most notably with the direction-dependent oscillator strength of the main bulk plasmon. The anisotropic nature of m-HfO2 may contribute to the differences among VEELS spectra reported in literature. The good agreement between the complex dielectric permittivity extracted from VEELS with nanometer spatial resolution, TDDFT modeling, and past literature demonstrates that the present HRTEM-VEELS device-oriented methodology is a possible solution to the difficult nanocharacterization challenges given in the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors.

  8. Evidence for anisotropic dielectric properties of monoclinic hafnia using valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and ab initio time-dependent density-functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Guedj, C.; Hung, L.; Sottile, F.; Zobelli, A.; Blaise, P.; Olevano, V.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of nanocrystal orientation on the energy loss spectra of monoclinic hafnia (m-HfO{sub 2}) is measured by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and valence energy loss spectroscopy (VEELS) on high quality samples. For the same momentum-transfer directions, the dielectric properties are also calculated ab initio by time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT). Experiments and simulations evidence anisotropy in the dielectric properties of m-HfO{sub 2}, most notably with the direction-dependent oscillator strength of the main bulk plasmon. The anisotropic nature of m-HfO{sub 2} may contribute to the differences among VEELS spectra reported in literature. The good agreement between the complex dielectric permittivity extracted from VEELS with nanometer spatial resolution, TDDFT modeling, and past literature demonstrates that the present HRTEM-VEELS device-oriented methodology is a possible solution to the difficult nanocharacterization challenges given in the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors.

  9. Phase contrast in high resolution electron microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Rose, H.H.

    1975-09-23

    This patent relates to a device for developing a phase contrast signal for a scanning transmission electron microscope. The lens system of the microscope is operated in a condition of defocus so that predictable alternate concentric regions of high and low electron density exist in the cone of illumination. Two phase detectors are placed beneath the object inside the cone of illumination, with the first detector having the form of a zone plate, each of its rings covering alternate regions of either higher or lower electron density. The second detector is so configured that it covers the regions of electron density not covered by the first detector. Each detector measures the number of electrons incident thereon and the signal developed by the first detector is subtracted from the signal developed by the record detector to provide a phase contrast signal. (auth)

  10. High resolution coherent three dimensional spectroscopy of NO2.

    PubMed

    Wells, Thresa A; Muthike, Angelar K; Robinson, Jessica E; Chen, Peter C

    2015-06-01

    Expansion from coherent 2D spectroscopy to coherent 3D spectroscopy can provide significant advantages when studying molecules that have heavily perturbed energy levels. This paper illustrates such advantages by demonstrating how high resolution coherent 3D (HRC3D) spectroscopy can be used to study a portion of the visible spectrum of nitrogen dioxide. High resolution coherent 2D spectra usually contain rotational and vibrational patterns that are easy to analyze, but severe congestion and complexity preclude its effective use for many parts of the NO2 spectrum. HRC3D spectroscopy appears to be much more effective; multidimensional rotational and vibrational patterns produced by this new technique are easy to identify even in the presence of strong perturbations. A method for assigning peaks, which is based upon analyzing the resulting multidimensional patterns, has been developed. The higher level of multidimensionality is useful for reducing uncertainty in peak assignments, improving spectral resolution, providing simultaneous information on multiple levels and states, and predicting, verifying, and categorizing peaks. PMID:26049446

  11. Electron Gun Technologies for High Resolution Electron Microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Shin

    High-brightness electron gun technologies for high resolution electron microscopes are reviewed. High performance electron beam apparatuses today are equipped with either Schottky emission or field emission type cathodes, both of which have sharply etched tips for electric field enhancement that promotes electron emission. One of the key elements in these pointed cathodes is a proper control of the tip geometry. It substantially affects the emitter optics and performance. It is shown that the geometry is dictated by the faceting of the tip, which is in turn determined by the Equilibrium Crystal Shape (ECS). The ECS is the tip geometry that minimizes the surface free energy and dependent on the emitter operation environment. By proper choice of the tip field and temperature, one can control the degree of faceting and achieve optically desirable tip geometries.

  12. High resolution electronic spectroscopy of the A {sup 2}Σ{sup −} − X {sup 2}Π{sub 1/2} transition of PtN

    SciTech Connect

    Womack, Kaitlin; O’Brien, Leah C.; Whittemore, Sean; O’Brien, James J.; Le, Anh; Steimle, Timothy C.

    2014-08-28

    The (2,0) vibrational band of the A {sup 2}Σ{sup −} − X {sup 2}Π{sub 1/2} transition of platinum nitride, PtN, was recorded at Doppler-limited resolution using intracavity laser absorption spectroscopy (ILS) and at sub-Doppler resolution using molecular beam laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy. Isotopologue structure for {sup 194}PtN, {sup 195}PtN, and {sup 196}PtN, magnetic hyperfine splitting due to {sup 195}Pt (I = ½), and nuclear quadrupole splitting due to {sup 14}N (I = 1) were observed in the spectrum. Molecular constants for the ground and excited states are derived. The hyperfine interactions are used to illuminate the nature of the A {sup 2}Σ{sup −} excited electronic state.

  13. High resolution electron attachment to CO₂ clusters.

    PubMed

    Denifl, Stephan; Vizcaino, Violaine; Märk, Tilmann D; Illenberger, Eugen; Scheier, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Electron attachment to CO₂ clusters performed at high energy resolution (0.1 eV) is studied for the first time in the extended electron energy range from threshold (0 eV) to about 10 eV. Dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to single molecules yields O(-) as the only fragment ion arising from the well known (2)Π(u) shape resonance (ion yield centered at 4.4 eV) and a core excited resonance (at 8.2 eV). On proceeding to CO₂ clusters, non-dissociated complexes of the form (CO₂)(n)(-) including the monomer CO₂(-) are generated as well as solvated fragment ions of the form (CO₂)(n)O(-). The non-decomposed complexes appear already within a resonant feature near threshold (0 eV) and also within a broad contribution between 1 and 4 eV which is composed of two resonances observed for example for (CO₂)(4)(-) at 2.2 eV and 3.1 eV (peak maxima). While the complexes observed around 3.1 eV are generated via the (2)Π(u) resonance as precursor with subsequent intracluster relaxation, the contribution around 2.2 eV can be associated with a resonant scattering feature, recently discovered in single CO₂ in the selective excitation of the higher energy member of the well known Fermi dyad [M. Allan, Phys. Rev. Lett., 2001, 87, 0332012]. Formation of (CO₂)(n)(-) in the threshold region involves vibrational Feshbach resonances (VFRs) as previously discovered via an ultrahigh resolution (1 meV) laser photoelectron attachment method [E. Leber, S. Barsotti, I. I. Fabrikant, J. M. Weber, M.-W. Ruf and H. Hotop, Eur. Phys. J. D, 2000, 12, 125]. The complexes (CO₂)(n)O(-) clearly arise from DEA at an individual molecule within the cluster involving both the (2)Π(u) and the core excited resonance. PMID:21491691

  14. A high-resolution Fourier Transform Spectrometer for planetary spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, D. P.; Sinton, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    The employment of a high-resolution Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) is described for planetary and other astronomical spectroscopy in conjunction with the 88-inch telescope at Mauna Kea Observatory. The FTS system is designed for a broad range of uses, including double-beam laboratory spectroscopy, infrared gas chromatography, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The data system is well-suited to astronomical applications because of its great speed in acquiring and transforming data, and because of the enormous storage capability of the magnetic tape unit supplied with the system. The basic instrument is outlined 2nd some of the initial results from the first attempted use on the Mauna Kea 88-inch telescope are reported.

  15. High-Resolution Infrared Spectroscopy with Synchrotron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    McKellar, A.

    2010-01-01

    Most applications of synchrotron radiation lie in the ultraviolet and X-ray region, but it also serves as a valuable continuum source of infrared (IR) light which is much brighter (i.e. more highly directional) than that from normal thermal sources. The synchrotron brightness advantage was originally exploited for high spatial resolution spectroscopy of condensed-phase samples. But it is also valuable for high spectral resolution of gas-phase samples, particularly in the difficult far-IR (terahertz) range (1/{lambda} {approx} 10-1000 cm{sup -1}). Essentially, the synchrotron replaces the usual thermal source in a Fourier transform IR spectrometer, giving a increase of up to two (or even more) orders of magnitude in signal at very high-resolution. Following up on pioneering work in Sweden (MAX-lab) and France (LURE), a number of new facilities have recently been constructed for high-resolution gas-phase IR spectroscopy. In the present paper, this new field is reviewed. The advantages and difficulties associated with synchrotron IR spectroscopy are outlined, current and new facilities are described, and past, present, and future spectroscopic results are summarized.

  16. High resolution X-ray spectroscopy of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, Julian H.

    1990-01-01

    After a brief review of the principal problems of AGN research, selected potential high-resolution observations are discussed with a view toward assessing their scientific value and the degree of resolution they will require. Two classes of observations pertaining directly to AGNs are discussed. Fe K-alpha spectroscopy relevant to the dynamical and thermal character of the emission line zones; and measurement of resonance line absorption by highly-ionized species in BL Lac objects, which should provide information about entrainment of interstellar material by relativistic jets. A third class of potentially important observations uses AGNs as background light sources in order to directly measure the distance to clusters of galaxies.

  17. High resolution ultrasonic spectroscopy system for nondestructive evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. H.

    1991-01-01

    With increased demand for high resolution ultrasonic evaluation, computer based systems or work stations become essential. The ultrasonic spectroscopy method of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) was used to develop a high resolution ultrasonic inspection system supported by modern signal processing, pattern recognition, and neural network technologies. The basic system which was completed consists of a 386/20 MHz PC (IBM AT compatible), a pulser/receiver, a digital oscilloscope with serial and parallel communications to the computer, an immersion tank with motor control of X-Y axis movement, and the supporting software package, IUNDE, for interactive ultrasonic evaluation. Although the hardware components are commercially available, the software development is entirely original. By integrating signal processing, pattern recognition, maximum entropy spectral analysis, and artificial neural network functions into the system, many NDE tasks can be performed. The high resolution graphics capability provides visualization of complex NDE problems. The phase 3 efforts involve intensive marketing of the software package and collaborative work with industrial sectors.

  18. High Resolution Coherent Three-Dimensional Spectroscopy of Iodine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, Zuri R.; Wells, Thresa A.; Chen, Peter C.; Strangfeld, Benjamin R.

    2013-06-01

    The heavy congestion found in many one-dimensional spectra can make it difficult to study many transitions. A new coherent three-dimensional spectroscopic technique has been developed to eliminate the kind of congestion commonly seen in high resolution electronic spectra. The molecule used for this test was Iodine. A well-characterized transition (X to B) was used to determine which four wave mixing process or processes were responsible for the peaks in the resulting multidimensional spectrum. The resolution of several peaks that overlap in a coherent 2D spectrum can be accomplished by using a higher dimensional (3D) spectroscopic method. This talk will discuss strategies for finding spectroscopic constants using this high resolution coherent 3D spectroscopic method.

  19. Metallicity determination of M dwarfs. High-resolution infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindgren, Sara; Heiter, Ulrike; Seifahrt, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Context. Several new techniques to determine the metallicity of M dwarfs with better precision have been developed over the last decades. However, most of these studies were based on empirical methods. In order to enable detailed abundance analysis, standard methods established for warmer solar-like stars, i.e. model-dependent methods using fitting of synthetic spectra, still need to be used. Aims: In this work we continue the reliability confirmation and development of metallicity determinations of M dwarfs using high-resolution infrared spectra. The reliability was confirmed through analysis of M dwarfs in four binary systems with FGK dwarf companions and by comparison with previous optical studies of the FGK dwarfs. Methods: The metallicity determination was based on spectra taken in the J band (1.1-1.4 μm) with the CRIRES spectrograph. In this part of the infrared, the density of stellar molecular lines is limited, reducing the amount of blends with atomic lines enabling an accurate continuum placement. Lines of several atomic species were used to determine the stellar metallicity. Results: All binaries show excellent agreement between the derived metallicity of the M dwarf and its binary companion. Our results are also in good agreement with values found in the literature. Furthermore, we propose an alternative way to determine the effective temperature of M dwarfs of spectral types later than M2 through synthetic spectral fitting of the FeH lines in our observed spectra. Conclusions: We have confirmed that a reliable metallicity determination of M dwarfs can be achieved using high-resolution infrared spectroscopy. We also note that metallicites obtained with photometric metallicity calibrations available for M dwarfs only partly agree with the results we obtain from high-resolution spectroscopy. Based on data obtained at ESO-VLT, Paranal Observatory, Chile, Program ID 082.D-0838(A) and 084.D-1042(A).

  20. High Resolution Phonon-assisted Quasi-resonance Fluorescence Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Czarnocki, Cyprian; Kerfoot, Mark L; Casara, Joshua; Jacobs, Andrew R; Jennings, Cameron; Scheibner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    High resolution optical spectroscopy methods are demanding in terms of either technology, equipment, complexity, time or a combination of these. Here we demonstrate an optical spectroscopy method that is capable of resolving spectral features beyond that of the spin fine structure and homogeneous linewidth of single quantum dots (QDs) using a standard, easy-to-use spectrometer setup. This method incorporates both laser and photoluminescence spectroscopy, combining the advantage of laser line-width limited resolution with multi-channel photoluminescence detection. Such a scheme allows for considerable improvement of resolution over that of a common single-stage spectrometer. The method uses phonons to assist in the measurement of the photoluminescence of a single quantum dot after resonant excitation of its ground state transition. The phonon's energy difference allows one to separate and filter out the laser light exciting the quantum dot. An advantageous feature of this method is its straight forward integration into standard spectroscopy setups, which are accessible to most researchers. PMID:27405015

  1. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) of nanophase ferric oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Iron oxide minerals are the prime candidates for Fe(III) signatures in remotely sensed Martian surface spectra. Magnetic, Mossbauer, and reflectance spectroscopy have been carried out in the laboratory in order to understand the mineralogical nature of Martian analog ferric oxide minerals of submicron or nanometer size range. Out of the iron oxide minerals studied, nanometer sized ferric oxides are promising candidates for possible Martian spectral analogs. 'Nanophase ferric oxide (np-Ox)' is a generic term for ferric oxide/oxihydroxide particles having nanoscale (less than 10 nm) particle dimensions. Ferrihydrite, superparamagnetic particles of hematite, maghemite and goethite, and nanometer sized particles of inherently paramagnetic lepidocrocite are all examples of nanophase ferric oxides. np-Ox particles in general do not give X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns with well defined peaks and would often be classified as X-ray amorphous. Therefore, different np-Oxs preparations should be characterized using a more sensitive technique e.g., high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The purpose of this study is to report the particle size, morphology and crystalline order, of five np-Ox samples by HRTEM imaging and electron diffraction (ED).

  2. Probing the electronic and vibrational structure of Au{sub 2}Al{sub 2}{sup −} and Au{sub 2}Al{sub 2} using photoelectron spectroscopy and high resolution photoelectron imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Gary V.; Czekner, Joseph; Jian, Tian; Li, Wei-Li; Yang, Zheng; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2014-12-14

    The electronic and vibrational structures of Au{sub 2}Al{sub 2}{sup −} and Au{sub 2}Al{sub 2} have been investigated using photoelectron spectroscopy (PES), high-resolution photoelectron imaging, and theoretical calculations. Photoelectron spectra taken at high photon energies with a magnetic-bottle apparatus reveal numerous detachment transitions and a large energy gap for the neutral Au{sub 2}Al{sub 2}. Vibrationally resolved PE spectra are obtained using high-resolution photoelectron imaging for the ground state detachment transition of Au{sub 2}Al{sub 2}{sup −} at various photon energies (670.55−843.03 nm). An accurate electron affinity of 1.4438(8) eV is obtained for the Au{sub 2}Al{sub 2} neutral cluster, as well as two vibrational frequencies at 57 ± 8 and 305 ± 13 cm{sup −1}. Hot bands transitions yield two vibrational frequencies for Au{sub 2}Al{sub 2}{sup −} at 57 ± 10 and 144 ± 12 cm{sup −1}. The obtained vibrational and electronic structure information is compared with density functional calculations, unequivocally confirming that both Au{sub 2}Al{sub 2}{sup −} and Au{sub 2}Al{sub 2} possess C{sub 2v} tetrahedral structures.

  3. Electronic and vibronic states of the acceptor-bound-exciton complex (A0,X) in CdS. II. Determination of the fine structure of the (A0,XB) electronic states by high-resolution excitation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutowski, J.

    1985-03-01

    In a previous paper [R. Baumert, I. Broser, J. Gutowski, and A. Hoffman, Phys. Rev. B 27, 6263 (1983)] it has been shown that high-density, high-resolution excitation spectroscopy gives new information on the electronic and vibronic excited states of the acceptor-bound-exciton complex (A0,XA) with two holes from the A valence band in CdS. We now report on corresponding results for the (A0,XB) configuration which includes one hole from the second B valence band. This complex is unstable for a very fast B-->A hole conversion, and therefore gives rise to a set of excitation resonances of the I1 luminescence arising from the (A0,XA) recombination. A detailed theoretical analysis of the energetic structure of the (A0,XB) complex including the dependence on the excitation intensity and on an applied magnetic field allows the correct assignment of the excitation resonances to the (A0,XB) fine-structure levels originating from the interparticle-exchange interactions. It is shown that the magnetic field is a suitable means of distinguishing the different (A0,XB) ground-state levels. The magnetic field also creates allowed transitions which are dipole forbidden in the zero-field case. A self-contained model of the (A0,XB) complex thus can be developed, including all symmetry states and yielding adequate values for the exchange energies within the complex.

  4. Recent Results in Quantum Chemical Kinetics from High Resolution Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Quack, Martin

    2007-12-26

    We outline the approach of our group to derive intramolecular kinetic primary processes from high resolution spectroscopy. We then review recent results on intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) and on tunneling processes. Examples are the quantum dynamics of the C-H-chromophore in organic molecules, hydrogen bond dynamics in (HF){sub 2} and stereomutation dynamics in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and related chiral molecules. We finally discuss the time scales for these and further processes which range from 10 fs to more than seconds in terms of successive symmetry breakings, leading to the question of nuclear spin symmetry and parity violation as well as the question of CPT symmetry.

  5. High Resolution Absorption Spectroscopy using Externally Dispersed Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Edelstein, J; Erskine, D J

    2005-07-06

    We describe the use of Externally Dispersed Interferometry (EDI) for high-resolution absorption spectroscopy. By adding a small fixed-delay interferometer to a dispersive spectrograph, a precise fiducial grid in wavelength is created over the entire spectrograph bandwidth. The fiducial grid interacts with narrow spectral features in the input spectrum to create a moire pattern. EDI uses the moire pattern to obtain new information about the spectra that is otherwise unavailable, thereby improving spectrograph performance. We describe the theory and practice of EDI instruments and demonstrate improvements in the spectral resolution of conventional spectrographs by a factor of 2 to 6. The improvement of spectral resolution offered by EDI can benefit space instruments by reducing spectrograph size or increasing instantaneous bandwidth.

  6. High Resolution K-Band Spectroscopy of Selected M Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Tadashi

    2013-06-01

    We propose to obtain high-resolution K-band spectra of selected M dwarfs to study stellar properties such as effective temperature and metallicity. M dwarfs are under scrutiny as potential planet hosts. They have sufficiently low masses and small radii that exoplanets induce considerably larger reflex velocities and transit depths than an identical planet would around larger, more massive hosts. The low temperatures of M dwarfs imply short-period planets are in the habitable zone. However, due to the cool atmosphere, the characterization of M dwarfs at visible wavelengths has been rather difficult and the previously known stellar parameters have been rather crude. Recently a new method to use medium resolution K-band spectroscopy to determine the effective temperature and metallicity was devised. The purposes of this proposal is to examine the validity of the new method with a spectral resolution one order of magnitude higher and, if possible, to find a better method to determine the stellar properties.

  7. High resolution positron annihilation induced Auger electron spectroscopy of the CuM 2,3VV-transition and of Cu sub-monolayers on Pd and Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, J.; Hugenschmidt, C.; Schreckenbach, K.

    2010-09-01

    We present a high resolution positron annihilation induced Auger Electron Spectroscopy (PAES) of the CuM 2,3VV-transition with the unprecedented energy resolution of Δ/EE <1%. This energy resolution and the highly intense positron source NEPOMUC enabled us to resolve the double peak structure with PAES for the first time within a measurement time of only 5.5 h. In addition, sub-monolayers of Cu were deposited on Fe- and Pd-samples in order to investigate the surface selectivity of PAES in comparison with EAES. The extremely high surface selectivity of PAES due to the different positron affinity of Cu and Fe lead to the result that with only 0.96 monolayer of Cu on Fe more than 55% of the emitted Auger electrons stem from Cu, whereas with EAES the Cu Auger fraction amounted to less than 6%.

  8. The theory and practice of high resolution scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Joy, D.C. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in instrumentation have produced the first commercial examples of what can justifiably be called High Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopes. The key components of such instruments are a cold field emission gun, a small-gap immersion probe-forming lens, and a clean dry-pumped vacuum. The performance of these microscopes is characterized by several major features including a spatial resolution, in secondary electron mode on solid specimens, which can exceed 1nm on a routine basis; an incident probe current density of the order of 10{sup 6} amps/cm{sup 2}; and the ability to maintain these levels of performance over an accelerating voltage range of from 1 to 30keV. This combination of high resolution, high probe current, low contamination and flexible electron-optical conditions provides many new opportunitites for the application of the SEM to materials science, physics, and the life sciences. 27 refs., 14 figs.

  9. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy under the fume hood.

    PubMed

    Küster, Simon K; Danieli, Ernesto; Blümich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico

    2011-08-01

    This work reports the possibility to acquire high-resolution (1)H NMR spectra with a fist-sized NMR magnet directly installed under the fume hood. The small NMR sensor based on permanent magnets was used to monitor the trimerization of propionaldehyde catalyzed by indium trichloride in real time by continuously circulating the reaction mixture through the magnet bore in a closed loop with the help of a peristaltic pump. Thanks to the chemical selectivity of NMR spectroscopy the progress of the reaction can be monitored on-line by determining the concentrations of both reactant and product from the area under their respective lines in the NMR spectra as a function of time. This in situ measurement demonstrates that NMR probes can be used in chemistry laboratories, e.g. for reaction optimization, or installed at specific points of interest along industrial process lines. Therefore, it will open the door for the implementation of feedback control based on spectroscopic NMR data. PMID:21698335

  10. Optical multichannel analyzer techniques for high resolution optical spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, J.L.

    1980-06-01

    The development of optical multichannel analyzer techniques for UV/VIS spectroscopy is presented. The research focuses on the development of spectroscopic techniques for measuring high resolution spectral lineshape functions from the exciton phosphorescence in H/sub 2/-1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene. It is found that the temperature dependent frequency shifts and widths confirm a theoretical model based on an exchange theory. The exchange of low energy phonon modes which couple with excited state exciton transitions is shown to display the proper temperature dependent behavior. In addition to the techniques for using the optical multichannel analyzer (OMA) to perform low light level target integration, the use of the OMA for capturing spectral information in transient pulsed laser applications is discussed. An OMP data acquisition system developed for real-time signal processng is described. Both hardware and software interfacing considerations for control and data acquisition by a microcomputer are described. The OMA detector is described in terms of the principles behind its photoelectron detection capabilities and its design is compared with other optoelectronic devices.

  11. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of the Lunar Sodium Exosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Oliversen, R. J.; Roesler, F. L.; Lupie, O. L.

    2014-01-01

    We have applied high-resolution Fabry-Perot spectroscopy to the study of the lunar sodium exosphere for the study of exospheric effective temperature and velocity variations. Observing from the National Solar Observatory McMath-Pierce Telescope, we used a dual-etalon Fabry-Perot spectrometer with a resolving power of 180,000 to measure line widths and Doppler shifts of the sodium D2 (5889.95 Å) emission line. Our field of view was 360 km, and measurements were made in equatorial and polar regions from 500 km to 3500 km off the limb. Data were obtained from full moon to 3 days following full moon (waning phase) in March 2009. Measured Doppler line widths within 1100 km of the sunlit east and south lunar limbs for observations between 5 and 40 deg lunar phase imply effective temperatures ranging between 3260 +/- 190 and 1000 +/- 135 K. Preliminary line center analysis indicates velocity displacements between different locations off the lunar limb ranging between 100 and 600 m/s from the lunar rest velocity with a precision of +/-20 to +/-50 m/s depending on brightness. Based on the success of these exploratory observations, an extensive program has been initiated that is expected to constrain lunar atmospheric and surface-process modeling and help quantify source and escape mechanisms.

  12. Pluto's atmosphere in 2015 from high-resolution spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roe, Henry G.; Cook, Jason C.; Mace, Gregory N.; Holler, Bryan J.; Young, Leslie A.; McLane, Jacob N.; Jaffe, Daniel T.

    2015-11-01

    Pluto's thin N2/CH4 atmosphere is in vapor-pressure equilibrium with ices on its surface. The atmosphere evolves seasonally with the varying insolation pattern on Pluto's heterogenous surface, perhaps even largely freezing out to the surface during the coldest portion of Pluto's year. We use high-resolution (R≈25,000-50,000) near-infrared spectroscopy to resolve atmospheric methane absorption lines from Pluto's continuum spectra, as well as separate Pluto's atmospheric lines from the telluric spectrum. In addition to measuring the abundance and temperature of Pluto's atmospheric CH4, with broad wavelength coverage we are able to search for the inevitable products of N2/CH4 photochemistry. In 2015 we are undertaking an intensive campaign using NIRSPEC at Keck Observatory and IGRINS (Immersion Grating INfrared Spectrometer) at McDonald Observatory to coincide with the New Horizons Pluto encounter. We will report initial results from this 2015 campaign and compare the state of Pluto's atmosphere at the time of the New Horizons encounter with earlier years.

  13. Beamline 9.0.1 - a high-resolution undulator beamline for gas-phase spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bozek, J.D.; Heimann, P.A.; Mossessian, D.

    1997-04-01

    Beamline 9.0.1 at the Advanced Light Source is an undulator beamline with a Spherical Grating Monochromator (SGM) which provides very high resolution and flux over the photon energy range 20-320eV. The beamline has been used primarily by the atomic and molecular science community to conduct spectroscopy experiments using electron, ion and fluorescence photon detection. A description of the beamline and its performance will be provided in this abstract.

  14. High Resolution Measurements and Electronic Structure Calculations of a Diazanaphthalene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruet, Sébastien; Goubet, Manuel; Pirali, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) have long been suspected to be the carriers of so called Unidentified Infrared Bands (UIBs). Most of the results published in the literature report rotationally unresolved spectra of pure carbon as well as heteroatom-containing PAHs species. To date for this class of molecules, the principal source of rotational informations is ruled by microwave (MW) spectroscopy while high resolution measurements reporting rotational structure of the infrared (IR) vibrational bands are very scarce. Recently, some high resolution techniques provided interesting new results to rotationally resolve the IR and far-IR bands of these large carbonated molecules of astrophysical interest. One of them is to use the bright synchrotron radiation as IR continuum source of a high resolution Fourier transform (FTIR) spectrometer. We report the very complementary analysis of the [1,6] naphthyridine (a N-bearing PAH) for which we recorded the microwave spectrum at the PhLAM laboratory (Lille) and the high resolution far-infrared spectrum on the AILES beamline at synchrotron facility SOLEIL. MW spectroscopy provided highly accurate rotational constants in the ground state to perform Ground State Combinations Differences (GSCD) allowing the analysis of the two most intense FT-FIR bands in the 50-900 wn range. Moreover, during this presentation the negative value of the inertial defect in the GS of the molecule will be discussed. A. Leger, J. L. Puget, Astron. Astrophys. 137, L5-L8 (1984) L. J. Allamandola et al. Astrophys. J. 290, L25-L28 (1985). Z. Kisiel et al. J. Mol. Spectrosc. 217, 115 (2003) S. Thorwirth et al. Astrophys. J. 662, 1309 (2007) D. McNaughton et al. J. Chem. Phys. 124, 154305 (2011). S. Albert et al. Faraday Discuss. 150, 71-99 (2011) B. E. Brumfield et al. Phys. Chem. Lett. 3, 1985-1988 (2012) O. Pirali et al. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 15, 10141 (2013).

  15. Observation of quantum-size effects in the electronic structure of CdSe quantum dots by high resolution positron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denison, A. B.; Eijt, S. W.; van Veen, A.; Falub, C. V.; Mijnarends, P. E.; Schut, H.; Barbiellini, B.; Bansil, A.

    2003-03-01

    The electron momentum density (EMD) of CdSe quantum dots deposited as micrometer thin layers is investigated in the diameter range from 2.5 to 6 nm. For this purpose, we have carried out depth-resolved positron 2D angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) experiments at the TU-Delft intense variable-energy positron beam, together with extensive first-principles simulations of the EMD, including the case of the bulk CdSe single crystal. The EMD shows a smearing at the Jones zone boundary, which is inversely proportional to the square of the quantum dot diameter. A reduction in the Cd(4d) electron contribution is revealed and tentatively ascribed to annihilation at incomplete TOPO-covered Se-rich surfaces. We compare and contrast our results to earlier Doppler measurements [1] and recently proposed models [1,2]. [1] M. Weber, K. Lynn, B. Barbiellini, P. Sterne and A. Denison, Phys. Rev. B 66 (2002) 41305 [2] R. Saniz, B. Barbiellini and A. Denison, Phys. Rev. B 65 (2002) 245310

  16. Probing the electronic structure and Au—C chemical bonding in AuCn- and AuCnH- (n = 2, 4, and 6) using high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León, Iker; Ruipérez, Fernando; Ugalde, Jesus M.; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2016-08-01

    We report a joint photoelectron spectroscopy and theoretical study on AuC4-, AuC6-, and AuCnH- (n = 2, 4, and 6) using high-resolution photoelectron imaging and ab initio calculations. The ground state of AuC2H-, AuC4H-, and AuC6H- is found to be linear, while that of AuC4- and AuC6- is bent. All the species are found to be linear in their neutral ground states. The electron affinities (EAs) are measured to be 3.366(1) and 3.593(1) eV for AuC4 and AuC6, respectively. Both bending and stretching frequencies are resolved in the spectra of AuC4- and AuC6-. High-resolution data of AuCnH- reveal major vibrational progressions in the Au—C stretching and bending modes. AuC2H- has a ground state stretching frequency of 445(10) cm-1 and a bending frequency of 260(10) cm-1; AuC4H- has a ground state stretching frequency of 340(10) cm-1; AuC6H- has a ground state stretching frequency of 260(10) cm-1 and a bending frequency of 55(10) cm-1. The EAs are measured to be 1.475(1), 1.778(1), and 1.962(1) eV for AuC2H, AuC4H, and AuC6H, respectively. The strength of the Au—C bond decreases as the number of carbon atoms increases. The current study provides a wealth of electronic structure information about AuC4-, AuC6-, and AuCnH- (n = 2, 4, and 6) and their corresponding neutrals.

  17. Spectral restoration in high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy based on iterative semi-blind Lucy-Richardson algorithm applied to rutile surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzari, Rémi; Li, Jingfeng; Jupille, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    A new spectral restoration algorithm of reflection electron energy loss spectra is proposed. It is based on the maximum likelihood principle as implemented in the iterative Lucy-Richardson approach. Resolution is enhanced and point spread function recovered in a semi-blind way by forcing cyclically the zero loss to converge towards a Dirac peak. Synthetic phonon spectra of TiO2 are used as a test bed to discuss resolution enhancement, convergence benefit, stability towards noise, and apparatus function recovery. Attention is focused on the interplay between spectral restoration and quasi-elastic broadening due to free carriers. A resolution enhancement by a factor up to 6 on the elastic peak width can be obtained on experimental spectra of TiO2(110) and helps revealing mixed phonon/plasmon excitations.

  18. Spectral restoration in high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy based on iterative semi-blind Lucy-Richardson algorithm applied to rutile surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lazzari, Rémi Li, Jingfeng Jupille, Jacques

    2015-01-15

    A new spectral restoration algorithm of reflection electron energy loss spectra is proposed. It is based on the maximum likelihood principle as implemented in the iterative Lucy-Richardson approach. Resolution is enhanced and point spread function recovered in a semi-blind way by forcing cyclically the zero loss to converge towards a Dirac peak. Synthetic phonon spectra of TiO{sub 2} are used as a test bed to discuss resolution enhancement, convergence benefit, stability towards noise, and apparatus function recovery. Attention is focused on the interplay between spectral restoration and quasi-elastic broadening due to free carriers. A resolution enhancement by a factor up to 6 on the elastic peak width can be obtained on experimental spectra of TiO{sub 2}(110) and helps revealing mixed phonon/plasmon excitations.

  19. Johann Spectrometer for High Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Machek, Pavel; Froeba, Michael; Welter, Edmund; Caliebe, Wolfgang; Brueggmann, Ulf; Draeger, Guenter

    2007-01-19

    A newly designed vacuum Johann spectrometer with a large focusing analyzer crystal for inelastic x-ray scattering and high resolution fluorescence spectroscopy has been installed at the DORIS III storage ring. Spherically bent crystals with a maximum diameter of 125 mm, and cylindrically bent crystals are employed as dispersive optical elements. Standard radius of curvature of the crystals is 1000 mm, however, the design of the mechanical components also facilitates measurements with smaller and larger bending radii. Up to four crystals are mounted on a revolving crystal changer which enables crystal changes without breaking the vacuum. The spectrometer works at fixed Bragg angle. It is preferably designed for the measurements in non-scanning mode with a broad beam spot, and offers a large flexibility to set the sample to the optimum position inside the Rowland circle. A deep depletion CCD camera is employed as a position sensitive detector to collect the energy-analyzed photons on the circumference of the Rowland circle. The vacuum in the spectrometer tank is typically 10-6 mbar. The sample chamber is separated from the tank either by 25 {mu}m thick Kapton windows, which allows samples to be measured under ambient conditions, or by two gate valves. The spectrometer is currently installed at wiggler beamline W1 whose working range is 4-10.5 keV with typical flux at the sample of 5x1010photons/s/mm2. The capabilities of the spectrometer are illustrated by resonant inelastic experiments on 3d transition metals and rare earth compounds, and by chemical shift measurements on chromium compounds.

  20. Johann Spectrometer for High Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machek, Pavel; Welter, Edmund; Caliebe, Wolfgang; Brüggmann, Ulf; Dräger, Günter; Fröba, Michael

    2007-01-01

    A newly designed vacuum Johann spectrometer with a large focusing analyzer crystal for inelastic x-ray scattering and high resolution fluorescence spectroscopy has been installed at the DORIS III storage ring. Spherically bent crystals with a maximum diameter of 125 mm, and cylindrically bent crystals are employed as dispersive optical elements. Standard radius of curvature of the crystals is 1000 mm, however, the design of the mechanical components also facilitates measurements with smaller and larger bending radii. Up to four crystals are mounted on a revolving crystal changer which enables crystal changes without breaking the vacuum. The spectrometer works at fixed Bragg angle. It is preferably designed for the measurements in non-scanning mode with a broad beam spot, and offers a large flexibility to set the sample to the optimum position inside the Rowland circle. A deep depletion CCD camera is employed as a position sensitive detector to collect the energy-analyzed photons on the circumference of the Rowland circle. The vacuum in the spectrometer tank is typically 10-6 mbar. The sample chamber is separated from the tank either by 25 μm thick Kapton windows, which allows samples to be measured under ambient conditions, or by two gate valves. The spectrometer is currently installed at wiggler beamline W1 whose working range is 4-10.5 keV with typical flux at the sample of 5×1010photons/s/mm2. The capabilities of the spectrometer are illustrated by resonant inelastic experiments on 3d transition metals and rare earth compounds, and by chemical shift measurements on chromium compounds.

  1. Characterizing The Nearest Young Moving Groups Through High Resolution Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Kyle; Wilhelm, Ronald J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed method for characterizing the nearest young moving groups via high resolution spectroscopy. This method has three diagnostics which classify a moving group: (1) Chemical Homogeneity, (2) Kinematic Traceback, and (3) Isochrone Fitting. We have applied this technique on 10 F- and G-type stars from the AB Doradus Moving Group (ABD) and found 8 stars share similar metal abundances with an average abundance for ABD of <[M/H]> = -0.03 ± 0.06; of the two outliers, one is metal rich and the other metal poor. Seven stars follow a common traceback and share a common origin around 125 Myr. One of the outlying traceback stars diverges around 90-100 Myr, and is the same star which is metal rich. Eight stars fall along the same isochrone of 100 Myr, which is synonymous with the main sequence. We further evaluated this technique on 5 members of the newly discovered Octans-Near Moving Group (ONMG). Two of these were listed as possible members with the other three being probable members. There is a large spread in the metal abundance with <[M/H]> = -0.17 ± 0.1 and no core group of stars that define the cluster in abundance space. ONMG is also enigmatic because several age indicators (e.g. lithium abundance, surface gravities, activity) indicate a much younger cluster; however, the traceback age shows these stars were closest around 150 Myr (though this age should be taken very lightly) and 4 of the 5 stars fall on the main sequence. We therefore conclude that while these stars do share present day velocities and positions, the group is not well defined in abundance, origin, or age, and should be concidered with caution.

  2. Layer specific optical band gap measurement at nanoscale in MoS2 and ReS2 van der Waals compounds by high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dileep, K.; Sahu, R.; Sarkar, Sumanta; Peter, Sebastian C.; Datta, R.

    2016-03-01

    Layer specific direct measurement of optical band gaps of two important van der Waals compounds, MoS2 and ReS2, is performed at nanoscale by high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy. For monolayer MoS2, the twin excitons (1.8 and 1.95 eV) originating at the K point of the Brillouin zone are observed. An indirect band gap of 1.27 eV is obtained from the multilayer regions. Indirect to direct band gap crossover is observed which is consistent with the previously reported strong photoluminescence from the monolayer MoS2. For ReS2, the band gap is direct, and a value of 1.52 and 1.42 eV is obtained for the monolayer and multilayer, respectively. The energy loss function is dominated by features due to high density of states at both the valence and conduction band edges, and the difference in analyzing band gap with respect to ZnO is highlighted. Crystalline 1T ReS2 forms two dimensional chains like superstructure due to the clustering between four Re atoms. The results demonstrate the power of HREELS technique as a nanoscale optical absorption spectroscopy tool.

  3. High Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy of Cells Using Dielectrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shi-Yang; Zhang, Wei; Soffe, Rebecca; Nahavandi, Sofia; Shukla, Ravi; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar

    2014-01-01

    Ultrastructural analysis of cells can reveal valuable information about their morphological, physiological, and biochemical characteristics. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has been widely used to provide high-resolution images from the surface of biological samples. However, samples need to be dehydrated and coated with conductive materials for SEM imaging. Besides, immobilizing non-adherent cells during processing and analysis is challenging and requires complex fixation protocols. In this work, we developed a novel dielectrophoresis based microfluidic platform for interfacing non-adherent cells with high-resolution SEM at low vacuum mode. The system enables rapid immobilization and dehydration of samples without deposition of chemical residues over the cell surface. Moreover, it enables the on-chip chemical stimulation and fixation of immobilized cells with minimum dislodgement. These advantages were demonstrated for comparing the morphological changes of non-budding and budding yeast cells following Lyticase treatment. PMID:25089528

  4. High-resolution electron microscopy of advanced materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, T.E.; Kung, H.H.; Sickafus, K.E.; Gray, G.T. III; Field, R.D.; Smith, J.F.

    1997-11-01

    This final report chronicles a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The High-Resolution Electron Microscopy Facility has doubled in size and tripled in quality since the beginning of the three-year period. The facility now includes a field-emission scanning electron microscope, a 100 kV field-emission scanning transmission electron microscope (FE-STEM), a 300 kV field-emission high-resolution transmission electron microscope (FE-HRTEM), and a 300 kV analytical transmission electron microscope. A new orientation imaging microscope is being installed. X-ray energy dispersive spectrometers for chemical analysis are available on all four microscopes; parallel electron energy loss spectrometers are operational on the FE-STEM and FE-HRTEM. These systems enable evaluation of local atomic bonding, as well as chemical composition in nanometer-scale regions. The FE-HRTEM has a point-to-point resolution of 1.6 {angstrom}, but the resolution can be pushed to its information limit of 1 {angstrom} by computer reconstruction of a focal series of images. HRTEM has been used to image the atomic structure of defects such as dislocations, grain boundaries, and interfaces in a variety of materials from superconductors and ferroelectrics to structural ceramics and intermetallics.

  5. Multilayer Patterning of High Resolution Intrinsically Stretchable Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tybrandt, Klas; Stauffer, Flurin; Vörös, Janos

    2016-05-01

    Stretchable electronics can bridge the gap between hard planar electronic circuits and the curved, soft and elastic objects of nature. This has led to applications like conformal displays, electronic skin and soft neuroprosthetics. A remaining challenge, however, is to match the dimensions of the interfaced systems, as all require feature sizes well below 100 μm. Intrinsically stretchable nanocomposites are attractive in this context as the mechanical deformations occur on the nanoscale, although methods for patterning high performance materials have been lacking. Here we address these issues by reporting on a multilayer additive patterning approach for high resolution fabrication of stretchable electronic devices. The method yields highly conductive 30 μm tracks with similar performance to their macroscopic counterparts. Further, we demonstrate a three layer micropatterned stretchable electroluminescent display with pixel sizes down to 70 μm. These presented findings pave the way towards future developments of high definition displays, electronic skins and dense multielectrode arrays.

  6. High resolution photoelectron spectroscopy and femtosecond intramolecular dynamics using supersonic molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, B.

    1992-09-01

    High resolution He I[alpha] photoelectron spectroscopy of formaldehyde and ketene and their deuterated compounds, are reported. The combination of a (H2CO) double-pass high-resolution electron-energy analyzer and effective rotational cooling of the sample by supersonic expansion enable the spectroscopy of these molecular cations. The vibrational autocorrelation functions are calculated from the high-resolution photoelectron spectra, shedding light on the ultrafast intramolecular dynamics of the molecular cations. This study reveals much more vibrational structural detail in the first electronic excited state of H2CO cations. The first electronic excited state of H2CO cations may have nonplanar equilibrium geometry. Strong isotope effects on vibronic (vibrational) coupling are observed in the second electronic excited state of H2CO. Vibrational autocorrelation functions are calculated for all four observed electronic states of H2CO. The correlation function of the first electronic excited state of H2CO shows a slow decay rate on the femtosecond time scale. The ultrafast decay of the H2CO cations in the third electronic excited state implies that dissociation and intramolecular processes are the main decay pathways. The present spectra of the ground states of ketene cations have more fine structure than before. The AIEs of the first and fifth excited states are determined unambiguously more accurately. The doublet-like fine structures present in the lint excited state of ketene implies the excitation of a soft'' mode not observed before. The vibrational autocorrelation functions are calculated for 4 of the 6 observed electronic states. The dynamics of the ground states of the cations are characterized by a wave packet oscillating with small amplitude around the minimum on the upper PES. The decay dynamics of the first and the fifth excited states of ketene are characterized by ultra-fast intramolecular processes like predissociation.

  7. High resolution photoelectron spectroscopy and femtosecond intramolecular dynamics using supersonic molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, B.

    1992-09-01

    High resolution He I{alpha} photoelectron spectroscopy of formaldehyde and ketene and their deuterated compounds, are reported. The combination of a (H2CO) double-pass high-resolution electron-energy analyzer and effective rotational cooling of the sample by supersonic expansion enable the spectroscopy of these molecular cations. The vibrational autocorrelation functions are calculated from the high-resolution photoelectron spectra, shedding light on the ultrafast intramolecular dynamics of the molecular cations. This study reveals much more vibrational structural detail in the first electronic excited state of H2CO cations. The first electronic excited state of H2CO cations may have nonplanar equilibrium geometry. Strong isotope effects on vibronic (vibrational) coupling are observed in the second electronic excited state of H2CO. Vibrational autocorrelation functions are calculated for all four observed electronic states of H2CO. The correlation function of the first electronic excited state of H2CO shows a slow decay rate on the femtosecond time scale. The ultrafast decay of the H2CO cations in the third electronic excited state implies that dissociation and intramolecular processes are the main decay pathways. The present spectra of the ground states of ketene cations have more fine structure than before. The AIEs of the first and fifth excited states are determined unambiguously more accurately. The doublet-like fine structures present in the lint excited state of ketene implies the excitation of a ``soft`` mode not observed before. The vibrational autocorrelation functions are calculated for 4 of the 6 observed electronic states. The dynamics of the ground states of the cations are characterized by a wave packet oscillating with small amplitude around the minimum on the upper PES. The decay dynamics of the first and the fifth excited states of ketene are characterized by ultra-fast intramolecular processes like predissociation.

  8. A miniature high-resolution accelerometer utilizing electron tunneling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rockstad, Howard K.; Kenny, T. W.; Reynolds, J. K.; Kaiser, W. J.; Vanzandt, T. R.; Gabrielson, Thomas B.

    1992-01-01

    New methods have been developed to implement high-resolution position sensors based on electron tunneling. These methods allow miniaturization while utilizing the position sensitivity of electron tunneling to give high resolution. A single-element tunneling accelerometer giving a displacement resolution of 0.002 A/sq rt Hz at 10 Hz, corresponding to an acceleration resolution of 5 x 10 exp -8 g/sq rt Hz, is described. A new dual-element tunneling structure which overcomes the narrow bandwidth limitations of a single-element structure is described. A sensor with an operating range of 5 Hz to 10 kHz, which can have applications as an acoustic sensor, is discussed. Noise is analyzed for fundamental thermal vibration of the suspended masses and is compared to electronic noise. It is shown that miniature tunnel accelerometers can achieve resolution such that thermal noise in the suspended masses is the dominant cause of the resolution limit. With a proof mass of order 100 mg, noise analysis predicts limiting resolutions approaching 10 exp -9 g/sq rt Hz in a 300 Hz band and 10 exp -8 g/sq rt Hz at 1 kHz.

  9. High-resolution pulsed-field ionization photoelectron spectroscopy using multi-bunch synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C.W.; Evans, M.; Ng, C.Y.; Heimann, P.

    1997-04-01

    BL9.0.2.2 is the newly constructed experimental End Station 2 at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline 9.0.2 of the Advanced Light Source (ALS). It is dedicated to the high resolution photoionization study of molecules of interest to atmospheric and combustion chemistry. This End Station is equipped with a high resolution scanning monochromator, which has been demonstrated to have a world record resolution of E/{delta}E=70,000. Taking the advantage of the high resolution ALS light, the authors have improved the energy resolution in threshold photoelectron spectroscopy (TPES) to 0.8 meV. The TPES is a popular technique for photoionization experiments at all synchrotron radiation facilities due to its high energy resolution as compared to that of traditional photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). TPES achieves higher energy resolution by preferentially detecting near zero kinetic energy photoelectrons resulting from threshold photoionization. However, the spectra obtained from the TPES technique generally are complicated by the simultaneous detection of electrons with nonzero kinetic energy, which are not fully discriminated against. On the other hand, the spectra obtained from pulsed field ionization photoelectron spectroscopy (PFI-PES) are completely free of the contamination from kinetic electrons. The PFI-PE technique basically involves the detection of the photoelectrons from field ionization of the very high-n Rydberg states, a few cm{sup {minus}1} below the ionization energy (IE), by applying a delayed pulsed electric field. Within a delay of a few microseconds, all the prompt electrons formed from direct ionization will escape from the photoionization region and will not be collected. The authors have recently overcome problems with energy resolution of an electron time-of-flight technique, and incorporated the PFI-PE technique with multi-bunch VUV synchrotron radiation.

  10. High-Resolution Electronics: Spontaneous Patterning of High-Resolution Electronics via Parallel Vacuum Ultraviolet (Adv. Mater. 31/2016).

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuying; Kanehara, Masayuki; Liu, Chuan; Sakamoto, Kenji; Yasuda, Takeshi; Takeya, Jun; Minari, Takeo

    2016-08-01

    On page 6568, T. Minari and co-workers describe spontaneous patterning based on the parallel vacuum ultraviolet (PVUV) technique, enabling the homogeneous integration of complex, high-resolution electronic circuits, even on large-scale, flexible, transparent substrates. Irradiation of PVUV to the hydrophobic polymer surface precisely renders the selected surface into highly wettable regions with sharply defined boundaries, which spontaneously guides a metal nanoparticle ink into a series of circuit lines and gaps with the widths down to a resolution of 1 μm. PMID:27511534

  11. Insights into complexation of dissolved organic matter and Al(III) and nanominerals formation in soils under contrasting fertilizations using two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy techniques.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yongli; Li, Huan; Xiao, Jian; Wang, Chang; Shen, Qirong; Ran, Wei; He, Xinhua; Zhou, Quansuo; Yu, Guanghui

    2014-09-01

    Understanding the organomineral associations in soils is of great importance. Using two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS) and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques, this study compared the binding characteristics of organic ligands to Al(III) in dissolved organic matter (DOM) from soils under short-term (3-years) and long-term (22-years) fertilizations. Three fertilization treatments were examined: (i) no fertilization (Control), (ii) chemical nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (NPK), and (iii) NPK plus swine manure (NPKM). Soil spectra detected by the 2DCOS Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed that fertilization modified the binding characteristics of organic ligands to Al(III) in soil DOM at both short- and long- term location sites. The CH deformations in aliphatic groups played an important role in binding to Al(III) but with minor differences among the Control, NPK and NPKM at the short-term site. While at the long-term site both C-O stretching of polysaccharides or polysaccharide-like substances and aliphatic O-H were bound to Al(III) under the Control, whereas only aliphatic O-H, and only polysaccharides and silicates, were bound to Al(III) under NPK and NPKM, respectively. Images from HRTEM demonstrated that crystalline nanominerals, composed of Fe and O, were predominant in soil DOM under NPK, while amorphous nanominerals, predominant in Al, Si, and O, were dominant in soil DOM under Control and NPKM. In conclusion, fertilization strategies, especially under long-term, could affect the binding of organic ligands to Al(III) in soil DOM, which resulted in alterations in the turnover, reactivity, and bioavailability of soil organic matter. Our results demonstrated that the FTIR-2DCOS combined with HRTEM techniques could enhance our understanding in the binding characteristics of DOM to Al(III) and the resulted nanominerals in soils. PMID:24997950

  12. High-resolution Mn K -edge x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy study of the electronic and local structure of the three different phases in N d0.5S r0.5Mn O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafuerza, S.; García, J.; Subías, G.; Blasco, J.; Glatzel, P.

    2016-05-01

    N d0.5S r0.5Mn O3 is particularly representative of mixed-valent manganites since their three characteristic macroscopic phases (charge-ordered insulator, ferromagnetic-metallic, and paramagnetic insulator) appear at different temperatures. We here report a complete x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy (XES-XAS) study of N d0.5S r0.5Mn O3 as a function of temperature to investigate the electronic and local structure changes of the Mn atom in these three phases. Compared with the differences in the XES-XAS spectra between N d0.5S r0.5Mn O3 and the single-valent reference compounds NdMn O3 (M n3 + ) and Sr/CaMn O3 (M n4 + ), only modest changes have been obtained across the magnetoelectrical transitions. The XES spectra, including both the Mn Kα and Kβ emission lines, have mainly shown a subtle decrease in the local spin density accompanying the passage to the ferromagnetic-metallic phase. For the same phase, the small intensity variations in the pre-edge region of the high-resolution XAS spectra reflect an increase of the p -d mixing. The analysis of these XAS spectra imply a charge segregation between the two different Mn sites far from one electron, being in intermediate valences M n+3.5 ±δ /2(δ <0.2 e -) for all the phases. Our results indicate that the spin, charge, and geometrical structure of the Mn atom hardly change among the three macroscopic phases demonstrating the strong competition between the ferromagnetic conductor and the charge-ordered insulator behaviors in the manganites.

  13. High Resolution Thz and FIR Spectroscopy of SOCl_2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Drumel, M. A.; Cuisset, A.; Sadovskii, D. A.; Mouret, G.; Hindle, F.; Pirali, O.

    2013-06-01

    Thionyl chloride (SOCl_2) is an extremely powerful oxidant widely used in industrial processes and playing a role in the chemistry of the atmosphere. In addition, it has a molecular configuration similar to that of phosgene (COCl_2), and is therefore of particular interest for security and defense applications. Low resolution vibrational spectra of gas phase SOCl_2 as well as high resolution pure rotational transitions up to 25 GHz have previously been investigated. To date no high resolution data are reported at frequencies higher than 25 GHz. We have investigated the THz absorption spectrum of SOCl_2 in the spectral region 70-650 GHz using a frequency multiplier chain coupled to a 1 m long single path cell containing a pressure of about 15 μbar. At the time of the writing, about 8000 pure rotational transitions of SO^{35}Cl_2 with highest J and K_a values of 110 and 50 respectively have been assigned on the spectrum. We have also recorded the high resolution FIR spectra of SOCl_2 in the spectral range 50-700 wn using synchrotron radiation at the AILES beamline of SOLEIL facility. A White-type cell aligned with an absorption path length of 150 m has been used to record, at a resolution of 0.001 wn, two spectra at pressures of 5 and 56 μbar of SOCl_2. On these spectra all FIR modes of SOCl_2 are observed (ν_2 to ν_6) and present a resolved rotational structure. Their analysis is in progress. T. J. Johnson et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 107, 6183 (2003) D. E. Martz and R. T. Lagemann, J. Chem. Phys. 22,1193 (1954) H. S. P. Müller and M. C. L. Gerry, J. Chem. Soc. Faraday Trans. 90, 3473 (1994)

  14. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Some Very Inactive Southern Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarreal, A.; King, J. R.; Soderblom, D. R.; Henry, T. J.

    2001-12-01

    We have obtained high-resolution echelle spectra of a few dozen solar-type stars that an earlier low resolution Ca II H & K survey suggested have modest evels of chromospheric activity. We present Hα -based chromospheric activity measures, binarity information, and Li abundances of the sample. As expected, our spectra: confirm the low levels of chromospheric activity; suggest that these objects are apparently single; indicate the stars have small projected rotational velocities; and yield low photospheric abundances of Li. This work was supported by NSF grant AST-0086576 to JRK.

  15. Multilayer Patterning of High Resolution Intrinsically Stretchable Electronics.

    PubMed

    Tybrandt, Klas; Stauffer, Flurin; Vörös, Janos

    2016-01-01

    Stretchable electronics can bridge the gap between hard planar electronic circuits and the curved, soft and elastic objects of nature. This has led to applications like conformal displays, electronic skin and soft neuroprosthetics. A remaining challenge, however, is to match the dimensions of the interfaced systems, as all require feature sizes well below 100 μm. Intrinsically stretchable nanocomposites are attractive in this context as the mechanical deformations occur on the nanoscale, although methods for patterning high performance materials have been lacking. Here we address these issues by reporting on a multilayer additive patterning approach for high resolution fabrication of stretchable electronic devices. The method yields highly conductive 30 μm tracks with similar performance to their macroscopic counterparts. Further, we demonstrate a three layer micropatterned stretchable electroluminescent display with pixel sizes down to 70 μm. These presented findings pave the way towards future developments of high definition displays, electronic skins and dense multielectrode arrays. PMID:27157804

  16. Multilayer Patterning of High Resolution Intrinsically Stretchable Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Tybrandt, Klas; Stauffer, Flurin; Vörös, Janos

    2016-01-01

    Stretchable electronics can bridge the gap between hard planar electronic circuits and the curved, soft and elastic objects of nature. This has led to applications like conformal displays, electronic skin and soft neuroprosthetics. A remaining challenge, however, is to match the dimensions of the interfaced systems, as all require feature sizes well below 100 μm. Intrinsically stretchable nanocomposites are attractive in this context as the mechanical deformations occur on the nanoscale, although methods for patterning high performance materials have been lacking. Here we address these issues by reporting on a multilayer additive patterning approach for high resolution fabrication of stretchable electronic devices. The method yields highly conductive 30 μm tracks with similar performance to their macroscopic counterparts. Further, we demonstrate a three layer micropatterned stretchable electroluminescent display with pixel sizes down to 70 μm. These presented findings pave the way towards future developments of high definition displays, electronic skins and dense multielectrode arrays. PMID:27157804

  17. High-resolution electron microscopy and its applications.

    PubMed

    Li, F H

    1987-12-01

    A review of research on high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) carried out at the Institute of Physics, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, is presented. Apart from the direct observation of crystal and quasicrystal defects for some alloys, oxides, minerals, etc., and the structure determination for some minute crystals, an approximate image-contrast theory named pseudo-weak-phase object approximation (PWPOA), which shows the image contrast change with crystal thickness, is described. Within the framework of PWPOA, the image contrast of lithium ions in the crystal of R-Li2Ti3O7 has been observed. The usefulness of diffraction analysis techniques such as the direct method and Patterson method in HREM is discussed. Image deconvolution and resolution enhancement for weak-phase objects by use of the direct method are illustrated. In addition, preliminary results of image restoration for thick crystals are given. PMID:3505590

  18. Quadrature phase interferometer for high resolution force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paolino, Pierdomenico; Aguilar Sandoval, Felipe A.; Bellon, Ludovic

    2013-09-01

    In this article, we present a deflection measurement setup for Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). It is based on a quadrature phase differential interferometer: we measure the optical path difference between a laser beam reflecting above the cantilever tip and a reference beam reflecting on the static base of the sensor. A design with very low environmental susceptibility and another allowing calibrated measurements on a wide spectral range are described. Both enable a very high resolution (down to 2.5 × 10^{-15} m/sqrtHz), illustrated by thermal noise measurements on AFM cantilevers. They present an excellent long-term stability and a constant sensitivity independent of the optical phase of the interferometer. A quick review shows that our precision is equaling or out-performing the best results reported in the literature, but for a much larger deflection range, up to a few μm.

  19. High-resolution near-infrared spectroscopy of water dimer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Z. S.; Miller, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    High-resolution near-infrared spectra are reported for all of the O-H stretch vibrational bands of the water dimer. The four O-H vibrations are characterized as essentially independent proton-donor or proton-acceptor motions. In addition to the rotational and vibrational information contained in these spectra, details are obtained concerning the internal tunneling dynamics in both the ground and excited vibrational states. These results show that, for tunneling motions which involve the interchange of the proton donor and acceptor molecules, the associated frequencies decrease substantially due to vibrational excitation. The predissociation lifetimes for the various states of the dimer are determined from linewidth measurements. These results clearly show that the predissociation dynamics is strongly dependent on the tunneling states, as well as the Ka quantum number, indicating that the internal tunneling dynamics plays an important role in determining the dissociation rate in this complex.

  20. Quadrature phase interferometer for high resolution force spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Paolino, Pierdomenico; Aguilar Sandoval, Felipe A.; Bellon, Ludovic

    2013-09-15

    In this article, we present a deflection measurement setup for Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). It is based on a quadrature phase differential interferometer: we measure the optical path difference between a laser beam reflecting above the cantilever tip and a reference beam reflecting on the static base of the sensor. A design with very low environmental susceptibility and another allowing calibrated measurements on a wide spectral range are described. Both enable a very high resolution (down to 2.5×10{sup −15} m/√(Hz)), illustrated by thermal noise measurements on AFM cantilevers. They present an excellent long-term stability and a constant sensitivity independent of the optical phase of the interferometer. A quick review shows that our precision is equaling or out-performing the best results reported in the literature, but for a much larger deflection range, up to a few μm.

  1. MAGELLAN: High resolution spectroscopy at FUV and EUV wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grewing, M.; Alighieri, S. D.; Burton, W.; Coleman, C. I.; Hoekstra, R.; Jamar, C.; Labeque, A.; Laurent, C.; Vidal-Madjar, A.; Rafanelli, P.

    1982-01-01

    The aim of ESA's MAGELLAN mission is to provide high resolution spectra of celestial sources down to sixteenth magnitude over the extreme ultraviolet wavelength range (between 50 and 140 nm). This range extends from studies of interstellar matter in the disc and halo of this and other galaxies, to stellar envelopes, hot and evolved stars, clusters, intergalactic matter, nuclei of galaxies, quasars, and, finally, planets and satellites. The instrument has a nonconventional optical design using only one reflecting surface; a high groove density concave grating collects the star light, diffracts it and focuses its spectrum into a bidimensional windowless detector operated in a photon counting mode. The slitless configuration provides the spectra of all the sources (point like and extended) in the field of view of the grating. This field of view is limited by a grid collimator to reduce the diffuse background, the stray light and the probability of overlapping spectra in crowded fields.

  2. High resolution spectroscopy from low altitude satellites. [gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakano, G. H.; Imhof, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    The P 78 1 satellite to be placed in a synchronous polar orbit at an altitude of 550-660 km will carry two identical high resolution spectrometers each consisting of a single (approximately 85 cc) intrinsic germanium IGE detector. The payload also includes a pair of phoswitch scintillators, an array of CdTe detectors and several particle detectors, all of which are mounted on the wheel of the satellite. The intrinsic high purity IGE detectors receive cooling from two Stirling cycle refrigerators and facilitate the assembly of large and complex detector arrays planned for the next generation of high sensitivity instruments such as those planned for the gamma ray observatory. The major subsystems of the spectrometer are discussed as well as its capabilities.

  3. Quadrature phase interferometer for high resolution force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Paolino, Pierdomenico; Aguilar Sandoval, Felipe A; Bellon, Ludovic

    2013-09-01

    In this article, we present a deflection measurement setup for Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). It is based on a quadrature phase differential interferometer: we measure the optical path difference between a laser beam reflecting above the cantilever tip and a reference beam reflecting on the static base of the sensor. A design with very low environmental susceptibility and another allowing calibrated measurements on a wide spectral range are described. Both enable a very high resolution (down to 2.5×10(-15) m/√Hz), illustrated by thermal noise measurements on AFM cantilevers. They present an excellent long-term stability and a constant sensitivity independent of the optical phase of the interferometer. A quick review shows that our precision is equaling or out-performing the best results reported in the literature, but for a much larger deflection range, up to a few μm. PMID:24089852

  4. High-resolution spectroscopy of a giant solar filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuckein, Christoph; Denker, Carsten; Verma, Meetu

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution spectra of a giant solar quiescent filament were taken with the Echelle spectrograph at the Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT; Tenerife, Spain). A mosaic of various spectroheliograms (Hα, Hα+/-0.5 Å and Na D2) were chosen to examine the filament at different heights in the solar atmosphere. In addition, full-disk images (He i 10830 Å and Ca ii K) of the Chromspheric Telescope and full-disk magnetograms of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager were used to complement the spectra. Preliminary results are shown of this filament, which had extremely large linear dimensions (~740'') and was observed in November 2011 while it traversed the northern solar hemisphere.

  5. CARMENES science preparation. High-resolution spectroscopy of M dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, D.; Caballero, J. A.; Jeffers, S.; Alonso-Floriano, F. J.; Mundt, R.; CARMENES Consortium

    2015-05-01

    To ensure an efficient use of CARMENES observing time, and the highest chances of success, it is necessary first to select the most promising targets. To achieve this, we are observing 500 M dwarfs at high-resolution (R = 30,000-48,000), from which we determine the projected rotational velocity vsin{i} with an accuracy better than 0.5-0.2 km/s and radial-velocity stability better than 0.2-0.1 km/s. Our aim is to have at least two spectra at different epochs of the final 300 CARMENES targets. Our observations with FEROS at ESO/MPG 2.2 m La Silla, CAFE at 2.2 m Calar Alto and HRS at Hobby Eberly Telescope allow us to identify single- and double-line spectroscopic binaries and, especially, fast rotators, which should be discarded from the target list for exoplanet searches. Here we present preliminary results.

  6. [High resolution scanning electron microscopy of isolated outer hair cells].

    PubMed

    Koitschev, A; Müller, H

    1996-11-01

    Isolated hair cell preparations have gained wide acceptance as a model for studying physiological and molecular properties of the sensory cells involved in the hearing process. Ultrastructural details, such as stereocilia links, lateral membrane substructure or synaptic links are of crucial importance for normal sensory transduction. For this reason, we developed a high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM) procedure to study the surface of isolated hair cells. Cells were mechanically and/or enzymatically separated, isolated and immobilized on cover slips by alcian blue and fixed by 2% glutardialdehyde or 1% OsO4. After dehydration, preparations were critical point-dried and sputter-coated with gold-palladium (2-4 nm). Up to 5 nm resolution was achieved. Optimal fixation kept the cells in their typical cylindrical forms. Preservation of the stereocilia and the apical plates of the outer hair cells depended strongly on the fixation process. Tip- and side-links were observed only sporadically because of the aggressive preparation procedure. The lateral plasma membranes of the cell bodies showed regular granular structures of 5-7 nm diameter at maximal magnification. The granular structure of the cell membrane seemed to correspond to putative transmembrane proteins believed to generate membrane-based motility. The remnants of the nerve endings and/or supporting cells usually covered the cell base. The preservation of the cells was better when enzymatic isolation was omitted. The technique used allowed for high resolution ultrastructural examination of isolated hair cells and, when combined with immunological labeling, may permit the identification of proteins at a molecular level. PMID:9064297

  7. High resolution {gamma}-ray spectroscopy: The first 85 years

    SciTech Connect

    Deslattes, R.D.

    2000-02-01

    This opening review attempts to follow the main trends in crystal diffraction spectrometry of nuclear {gamma} rays from its 1914 beginning in Rutherford's laboratory to the ultra-high resolution instrumentation realized in the current generation of spectrometers at the Institute Laue Langeven (ILL). The authors perspective is that of an instrumentalist hoping to convey a sense of intellectual debt to a number of predecessors, each of whom realized a certain elegance in making the tools that have enabled much good science, including that to which the remainder of this workshop is dedicated. This overview follows some of the main ideas along a trajectory toward higher resolution at higher energies, thereby enabling not only the disentangling of dense spectra, but also allowing detailed study of aspects of spectral profiles sensitive to excited state lifetimes and interatomic potentials. The parallel evolution toward increasing efficiency while preserving needed resolution is also an interesting story of artful compromise that should not be neglected. Finally, it is the robustness of the measurement chain connecting {gamma}-ray wavelengths with optical wave-lengths associated with the Rydberg constant that only recently has allowed {gamma}-ray data to contribute to determine of particle masses and fundamental constants, as will be described in more detail in other papers from this workshop.

  8. High Resolution Spectroscopy of Two FK Comae Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    The FK Comae stars are a class of extremely rapidly rotating G-K giants that exhibit among the brightest UV and X-ray emission seen in late type stars. Previous IUE and optical observations have indicated that the activity (the extreme surface fluxes) in FK Comae may be qualitatively different from that in "normal" late type stars, and that the other four members of the class are far less bizarre than FK Comae itself. A definitive method for determining the structure of the outer atmospheres of these stars, and deciding whether the heating mechanism is normal chromospheric heating or accretion heating is by analysis of high resolution SWP spectra. We propose, in collaboration with S. Rucinski, to obtain 16-20 hour collaborative NASA-ESA SWP-HI spectra of FK Comae, which exhibits Hot and MgII line widths of ˜500 kms^-1, and HD 36705, which appears to be a far less bizarre member of this class. These observations would be the first high dispersion SWP spectra ever obtained of FK Comae stars.

  9. Exploring conical intersections through high resolution photofragment translational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashfold, Michael

    2007-03-01

    High resolution measurements of the kinetic energies of H atom fragments formed during UV photolysis of gas phase imidazole, [1,2] pyrrole, [3] phenol [4] and thiophenol molecules show that: (i) X-H (X = N, O, S) bond fission is an important non-radiative decay process from the ^1πσ* excited states in each of these molecules, and (ii) that the respective co-fragments (imidazolyl, pyrrolyl, phenoxyl and thiophenoxyl) are formed in very limited sub-sets of their available vibrational states. Identification of these product states yields uniquely detailed insights into the vibronic couplings involved in the photo-induced evolution from parent molecule to ultimate fragments. [1] M.N.R. Ashfold, B. Cronin, A.L. Devine, R.N. Dixon and M.G.D. Nix, Science (2006), 312, 1637. [2] A.L. Devine, B. Cronin, M.G.D. Nix and M.N.R. Ashfold, J. Chem. Phys. (in press). [3] B. Cronin, M.G.D. Nix, R.H. Qadiri and M.N.R. Ashfold, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. (2004), 6, 5031. [4] M.G.D. Nix, A.L. Devine, B. Cronin, R.N. Dixon and M.N.R. Ashfold, J. Chem. Phys. (2006), 125, 133318.

  10. High resolution photoelectron spectroscopy of clusters of Group V elements

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lai-sheng; Niu, B.; Lee, Y.T.; Shirley, D.A.

    1989-07-01

    High resolution HeI (580{angstrom}) photoelectron spectra of As{sub 2}, As{sub 4}, and P{sub 4} were obtained with a newly-built high temperature molecular beam source. Vibrational structure was resolved in the photoelectron spectra of the three cluster species. The Jahn-Teller effect is discussed for the {sup 2}E and {sup 2}T{sub 2} states of P{sub 4}{sup +} and As{sub 4}{sup +}. As a result of the Jahn-Teller effect, the {sup 2}E state splits into two bands, and the {sup 2}T{sub 2} state splits into three bands, in combination with the spin-orbit effect. It was observed that the {nu}{sub 2} normal vibrational mode was involved in the vibronic interaction of the {sup 2}E state, while both the {nu}{sub 2} and {nu}{sub 3} modes were active in the {sup 2}T{sub 2} state. 26 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. High Resolution FIR and IR Spectroscopy of Methanol Isotopologues

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, R. M.; Xu, Li-Hong; Appadoo, D. R. T.; Billinghurst, B.

    2010-02-03

    New astronomical facilities such as HIFI on the Herschel Space Observatory, the SOFIA airborne IR telescope and the ALMA sub-mm telescope array will yield spectra from interstellar and protostellar sources with vastly increased sensitivity and frequency coverage. This creates the need for major enhancements to laboratory databases for the more prominent interstellar 'weed' species in order to model and account for their lines in observed spectra in the search for new and more exotic interstellar molecular 'flowers'. With its large-amplitude internal torsional motion, methanol has particularly rich spectra throughout the FIR and IR regions and, being very widely distributed throughout the galaxy, is perhaps the most notorious interstellar weed. Thus, we have recorded new spectra for a variety of methanol isotopic species on the high-resolution FTIR spectrometer on the CLS FIR beamline. The aim is to extend quantum number coverage of the data, improve our understanding of the energy level structure, and provide the astronomical community with better databases and models of the spectral patterns with greater predictive power for a range of astrophysical conditions.

  12. High Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy Using Microcalorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, R. L.

    1997-01-01

    During the past 13 years high resolution X ray spectrometers have been developed that use cryogenically cooled microcalorimeters. These devices have inherently high signal-to-noise by operating at temperatures below 0.1 K and can achieve an energy resolution of < 10 eV over the 0.1-10 keV band. Existing devices use doped semiconductor thermometers and typically employ HgTe absorbers. The energy resolution depends on achieving a low heat capacity for the device. For soft X ray applications a relatively thin absorber (approximately 1 micrometer) may be used and an energy resolution of approximately 7 eV has been achieved. For applications up to approximately 10 keV an absorber thickness of approximately 10 micrometer is required and the energy resolution is typically approximately 12 eV. Improvements to the energy resolution in this energy band could be achieved if the problems of thermalizing X rays in low heat capacity superconductors can be overcome. The recent work on transition edge thermometers by Irwin et nl. looks particularly promising because of the higher sensitivity achievable from a sharp superconducting transition. The relatively low impedance of such a device permits the use of a low noise SQUID amplifier for readout. This would also significantly reduce the cryogen heat load compared with JFETs required by higher impedance semiconductor thermometers.

  13. High-Resolution Laser Spectroscopy on the Negative Osmium Ion

    SciTech Connect

    Warring, U.; Amoretti, M.; Canali, C.; Fischer, A.; Heyne, R.; Meier, J. O.; Morhard, Ch.; Kellerbauer, A.

    2009-01-30

    We have applied a combination of laser excitation and electric-field detachment to negative atomic ions for the first time, resulting in an enhancement of the excited-state detection efficiency for spectroscopy by at least 2 orders of magnitude. Applying the new method, a measurement of the bound-bound electric-dipole transition frequency in {sup 192}Os{sup -} was performed using collinear spectroscopy with a narrow-bandwidth cw laser. The transition frequency was found to be 257.831 190(35) THz [wavelength 1162.747 06(16) nm, wave number 8600.3227(12) cm{sup -1}], in agreement with the only prior measurement, but with more than 100-fold higher precision.

  14. High-Resolution Structure of the Photosynthetic Mn4Ca Catalyst from X-ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yachandra, Vittal; Yano, Junko; Kern, Jan; Pushkar, Yulia; Sauer, Kenneth; Glatzel, Pieter; Bergmann, Uwe; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2007-08-01

    The application of high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy methods to study the photosynthetic water oxidizing complex, which contains a unique hetero-nuclear catalytic Mn4Ca cluster, are described. Issues of X-ray damage especially at the metal sites in the Mn4Ca cluster are discussed. The structure of the Mn4Ca catalyst at high-resolution which has so far eluded attempts of determination by X-ray diffraction, EXAFS and other spectroscopic techniques has been addressed using polarized EXAFS techniques applied to oriented PS II membrane preparations and PS II single crystals. A review of how the resolution of traditional EXAFS techniques can be improved, using methods such as range-extended EXAFS is presented, and the changes that occur in the structure of the cluster as it advances through the catalytic cycle are described. X-ray absorption and emission techniques (XANES and K? emission) have been used earlier to determine the oxidation states of the Mn4Ca cluster, and in this report we review the use of X-ray resonant Raman spectroscopy to understand the electronic structure of the Mn4Ca cluster as it cycles through the intermediate S-states.

  15. Giant quiescent solar filament observed with high-resolution spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuckein, C.; Verma, M.; Denker, C.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: An extremely large filament was studied in various layers of the solar atmosphere. The inferred physical parameters and the morphological aspects are compared with smaller quiescent filaments. Methods: A giant quiet-Sun filament was observed with the high-resolution Echelle spectrograph at the Vacuum Tower Telescope at Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain, on 2011 November 15. A mosaic of spectra (ten maps of 100″ × 182″) was recorded simultaneously in the chromospheric absorption lines Hα and Na i D2. Physical parameters of the filament plasma were derived using cloud model (CM) inversions and line core fits. The spectra were complemented with full-disk filtergrams (He i λ10830 Å, Hα, and Ca ii K) of the Chromospheric Telescope (ChroTel) and full-disk magnetograms of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). Results: The filament had extremely large linear dimensions (~817 arcsec), which corresponds to about 658 Mm along a great circle on the solar surface. A total amount of 175119 Hα contrast profiles were inverted using the CM approach. The inferred mean line-of-sight (LOS) velocity, Doppler width, and source function were similar to previous works of smaller quiescent filaments. However, the derived optical thickness was higher. LOS velocity trends inferred from the Hα line core fits were in accord but weaker than those obtained with CM inversions. Signatures of counter-streaming flows were detected in the filament. The largest brightening conglomerates in the line core of Na i D2 coincided well with small-scale magnetic fields as seen by HMI. Mixed magnetic polarities were detected close to the ends of barbs. The computation of photospheric horizontal flows based on HMI magnetograms revealed flow kernels with a size of 5-8 Mm and velocities of 0.30-0.45 km s-1 at the ends of the filament. Conclusions: The physical properties of extremely large filaments are similar to their smaller counterparts, except for the optical thickness, which in

  16. Molecular Chirality: Enantiomer Differentiation by High-Resolution Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, Eizi

    2014-06-01

    I have demonstrated that triple resonance performed on a three-rotational-level system of a chiral molecule of C1 symmetry exhibits signals opposite in phase for different enantiomers, thereby making enantiomer differentiation possible by microwave spectroscopy This prediction was realized by Patterson et al. on 1,2-propanediol and 1,3-butanediol. We thus now add a powerful method: microwave spectroscopy to the study of chiral molecules, for which hitherto only the measurement of optical rotation has been employed. Although microwave spectroscopy is applied to molecules in the gaseous phase, it is unprecedentedly superior to the traditional method: polarimeter in resolution, accuracy, sensitivity, and so on, and I anticipate a new fascinating research area to be opened in the field of molecular chirality. More versatile and efficient systems should be invented and developed for microwave spectroscopy, in order to cope well with new applications expected for this method For C2 and Cn (n ≥ 3)chiral molecules, the three-rotational-level systems treated above for C1 molecules are no more available within one vibronic state. It should, however, be pointed out that, if we take into account an excited vibronic state in addition to the ground state, for example, we may encounter many three-level systems. Namely, either one rotational transition in the ground state is combined with two vibronic transitions, or such a rotational transition in an excited state may be connected through two vibronic transitions to a rotational level in the ground state manifold. The racemization obviously plays a crucial role in the study of molecular chirality. However, like many other terms employed in chemistry, this important process has been "defined" only in a vague way, in other words, it includes many kinds of processes, which are not well classified on a molecular basis. I shall mention an attempt to obviate these shortcomings in the definition of racemization and also to clarify the

  17. High-Resolution Waveguide THz Spectroscopy of Biological Molecules☆

    PubMed Central

    Laman, N.; Harsha, S. Sree; Grischkowsky, D.; Melinger, Joseph S.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Low-frequency vibrational modes of biological molecules consist of intramolecular modes, which are dependent on the molecule as a whole, as well as intermolecular modes, which arise from hydrogen-bonding interactions and van der Waals forces. Vibrational modes thus contain important information about conformation dynamics of biological molecules, and can also be used for identification purposes. However, conventional Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) often result in broad, overlapping features that are difficult to distinguish. The technique of waveguide THz-TDS has been recently developed, resulting in sharper features. For this technique, an ordered polycrystalline film of the molecule is formed on a metal sample plate. This plate is incorporated into a metal parallel-plate waveguide and probed via waveguide THz-TDS. The planar order of the film reduces the inhomogeneous broadening, and cooling of the samples to 77K reduces the homogenous broadening. This combination results in the line-narrowing of THz vibrational modes, in some cases to an unprecedented degree. Here, this technique has been demonstrated with seven small biological molecules, thymine, deoxycytidine, adenosine, D-glucose, tryptophan, glycine, and L-alanine. The successful demonstration of this technique shows the possibilities and promise for future studies of internal vibrational modes of large biological molecules. PMID:17933879

  18. High resolution ion Doppler spectroscopy at Prairie View Rotamak

    SciTech Connect

    Houshmandyar, Saeid; Yang Xiaokang; Magee, Richard

    2012-10-15

    A fast ion Doppler spectroscopy (IDS) diagnostic system is installed on the Prairie View Rotamak to measure ion temperature and plasma flow. The diagnostic employs a single channel photomultiplier tube and a Jarrell-Ash 50 monochromator with a diffraction grating line density of 1180 lines/mm, which allows for first order spectra of 200-600 nm. The motorized gear of the monochromator allows spectral resolution of 0.01 nm. Equal IDS measurements are observed for various impurity emission lines of which carbon lines exhibit stronger intensities. Furthermore, the diagnostics is examined in an experiment where plasma experiences sudden disruption and quick recovery. In this case, the IDS measurements show {approx}130% increase in ion temperature. Flow measurements are shown to be consistent with plasma rotation.

  19. Mobile sensor for high resolution NMR spectroscopy and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danieli, Ernesto; Mauler, Jörg; Perlo, Juan; Blümich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico

    2009-05-01

    In this work we describe the construction of a mobile NMR tomograph with a highly homogeneous magnetic field. Fast MRI techniques as well as NMR spectroscopy measurements were carried out. The magnet is based on a Halbach array built from identical permanent magnet blocks generating a magnetic field of 0.22 T. To shim the field inhomogeneities inherent to magnet arrays constructed from these materials, a shim strategy based on the use of movable magnet blocks is employed. With this approach a reduction of the line-width from ˜20 kHz to less than 0.1 kHz was achieved, that is by more than two orders of magnitude, in a volume of 21 cm 3. Implementing a RARE sequence, 3D images of different objects placed in this volume were obtained in short experimental times. Moreover, by reducing the sample size to 1 cm 3, sub ppm resolution is obtained in 1H NMR spectra.

  20. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at GANIL

    SciTech Connect

    France, G. de

    2014-11-11

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy is intensively used at GANIL to measure low lying states in exotic nuclei on the neutron-rich as well as on the neutron-deficient side of the nuclear chart. On the neutron deficient border, gamma-rays have been observed for the first time in {sup 92}Pd. The level scheme which could be established points to the role of isoscalar pairing. On the neutron rich side, the lifetime of excited states in nuclei around {sup 68}Ni have been been measured using the plunger technique. This allows us to study the evolution of collectivity in a broad range of nuclei. In 2014 GANIL will host the AGATA array for a campaign of at least 2 years. This array is based on the gamma-ray tracking technique, which allows an impressive gain in resolving power.

  1. High resolution FTIR spectroscopy of the ClO radical

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Valerie; Sander, Stanley P.; Friedl, Randy

    1988-01-01

    The chlorine monoxide radical, ClO, plays a significant role in the catalytic destruction of ozone in the Earth's stratosphere. Because of its atmospheric importance, ClO has been the subject of numerous observational attempts. In order to deduce ClO concentrations from stratospheric infrared measurements, the infrared spectroscopy of ClO must be well characterized. Approximately 830 individual lines were measured form ClO imfrared spectra with the ClO concentration between 1 x 10 to the 13th power and 6 x 10 to the 13th power molecules per cu cu. The lines were then averaged and fit to a function of m (where m = O, -J or J+1 for the Q,P and R branches respectively) to obtain the band strength, S sub v and the first Herman-Wallis coefficient, alpha. The total S sub v for the two main isotopmers was 13.11 plus or minus 1 cm(-2) atm(-1) while alpha was 0.00412 plus or minus .00062.

  2. Exploring the High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Molecules that can Affect the Quality of your Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Terry A.

    2014-06-01

    Few things affect your quality of life more than the air you breathe and the temperature of your immediate environment. Since more than 80% of the energy used in the industrialized world today is still derived from fossil fuels, these two quantities are not unrelated. Most organic molecules injected into the troposphere are degraded via oxidative processes involving free radical intermediates, and many of these intermediates are the same as the ones involved in the combustion of fossil fuels. Key oxidizing intermediates are hydroxyl, OH (day), and nitrate, NO_3 (night), and early intermediates of oxidized organic compounds include the alkoxy (RO) and peroxy (RO_2) families of radicals. Recently we have explored the spectroscopy of RO, RO_2, and NO_3 radicals both for diagnostic purposes and to characterize their molecular properties and benchmark quantum chemistry calculations. We have utilized moderate resolution cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS) to study ambient temperature radicals and high resolution CRDS and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) to study jet-cooled radicals. Peroxy radicals and NO_3 have weak tilde{A}-tilde{X} electronic transitions in the near infrared which we have studied with CRDS. Comparable LIF measurements have been made for the alkoxy species in the UV. Both vibrational and rotational resolution of the electronic spectra is observed. Data obtained from the spectral observations provide information about both the geometric and electronic structure of these radicals as well as their dynamics and also provide the capability for unambiguous diagnostics of their concentrations and reactions.

  3. Transfer-printing of single DNA molecule arrays on graphene for high resolution electron imaging and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cerf, Aline; Alava, Thomas; Barton, Robert A.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2011-01-01

    Graphene represents the ultimate substrate for high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, but the deposition of biological samples on this highly hydrophobic material has until now been a challenge. We present a reliable method for depositing ordered arrays of individual elongated DNA molecules on single-layer graphene substrates for high resolution electron beam imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis. This method is a necessary step towards the observation of single elongated DNA molecules with single base spatial resolution to directly read genetic and epigenetic information. PMID:21919532

  4. Ultra high resolution molecular beam cars spectroscopy with application to planetary atmospheric molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    The measurement of high resolution pulsed and continuous wave (CW) coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) measurements in pulsed and steady state supersonic expansions were demonstrated. Pulsed molecular beam sources were characterized, and saturation of a Raman transition and, for the first time, the Raman spectrum of a complex molecular cluster were observed. The observation of CW CARS spectra in a molecular expansion and the effects of transit time broadening is described. Supersonic expansion is established as a viable technique for high resolution Raman spectroscopy of cold molecules with resolutions of 100 MH2.

  5. a Thz Photomixing Synthesizer Based on a Fiber Frequency Comb for High Resolution Rotational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindle, Francis; Mouret, Gael; Cuisset, Arnaud; Yang, Chun; Eliet, Sophie; Bocquet, Robin

    2010-06-01

    To date the principal application for photomixing sources has been for high resolution spectroscopy of gases due to the large tuning range and spectral purity. New Developments of the Opto-Electronic THz Spectrometer have been performed in order to obtain a powerful tool for High-Resolution Spectroscopy. The combination of two extended cavity laser diodes and fast charge carrier lifetime semiconductor materials has allowed a continuous-wave THz spectrometer to be constructed based on optical heterodyning. Unlike many THz sources, this instrument gives access to all frequencies in the range 0.3 to 3.5 THz with a resolution of 1 MHz. The main spectroscopic applications of this spectrometer were dedicated to line profile analysis of rotational transitions referenced in the spectroscopic databases. One limitation of the THz spectrometer was accuracy with which the generated frequency is known. Recently, this obstacle has been circled with the construction of a photomixing spectrometer where the two pump lasers are phase locked to two modes of a repetition rate stabilized frequency doubled fiber laser frequency comb. In order to achieve a tuning range in excess to 100 MHz a third cw laser was required in the new configuration of the THz spectrometer. To assess the performances of this instrument, the frequencies of the pure rotational transitions of OCS molecules have been measured between 0,8 to 1,2 THz. A rms inferior to 100 kHz, deduced from the frequencies measured, demonstrates that the THz photomixing synthesizer is now able to be competitive with microwave and submillimeter techniques. S. Matton, F. Rohart, R. Bocquet, D. Bigourd, A. Cuisset, F. Hindle, G. Mouret, J. Mol. Spectrosc., 2006, 239: 182. C. Yang, J. Buldyreva, I. E. Gordon, F. Rohart, A. Cuisset, G. Mouret, R. Bocquet, F. Hindle, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer, 2008, 109: 2857. G. Mouret, F. Hindle, A. Cuisset, C. Yang, R. Bocquet, M. Lours, D. Rovera, Opt. Express, 2009, 17: 22031.

  6. The determination of potential energy curve and dipole moment of the (5)0{sup +} electronic state of {sup 85}Rb{sup 133}Cs molecule by high resolution photoassociation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Jinpeng; Zhao, Yanting Ji, Zhonghua; Li, Zhonghao; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang; Kim, Jin-Tae

    2015-12-14

    We present the formation of ultracold {sup 85}Rb{sup 133}Cs molecules in the (5)0{sup +} electronic state by photoassociation and their detection via resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization. Up to v = 47 vibrational levels including the lowest v = 0 vibrational and lowest J = 0 levels are identified with rotationally resolved high resolution photoassociation spectra. Precise Dunham coefficients are determined for the (5)0{sup +} state with high accuracy, then the Rydberg-Klein-Rees potential energy curve is derived. The electric dipole moments with respect to the vibrational numbers of the (5)0{sup +} electronic state of {sup 85}Rb{sup 133}Cs molecule are also measured in the range between 1.9 and 4.8 D. These comprehensive studies on previously unobserved rovibrational levels of the (5)0{sup +} state are helpful to understand the molecular structure and discover suitable transition pathways for transferring ultracold atoms to deeply bound rovibrational levels of the electronic ground state.

  7. High-Resolution Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy: Characterization of Polymorphism in Cimetidine, a Pharmaceutical Compound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacilio, Julia E.; Tokarski, John T.; Quiñones, Rosalynn; Iuliucci, Robbie J.

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy has many advantages as a tool to characterize solid-phase material that finds applications in polymer chemistry, nanotechnology, materials science, biomolecular structure determination, and others, including the pharmaceutical industry. The technology associated with achieving high resolution…

  8. Application of high-resolution laser spectroscopy to the monitoring of vapor-phase metals

    SciTech Connect

    Lipert, R.J.; Wang, Z.M.; Schuler, R.; Edelson, M.C.

    1992-10-01

    Research conducted in the Ames Laboratory Nuclear Safeguards and Security Program is reviewed. Progress in applying high-resolution laser spectroscopy to the monitoring of vapor-phase metals is described. The spectroscopic techniques employed include fluorescence excitation in an atomic beam, laser atomic absorption in a heat-pipe oven and atomic beam, Doppler-free saturated absorption in a heat-pipe oven, and Doppler-free polarization spectroscopy for the stabilization of the laser wavelength.

  9. Electron-impact-induced {ital K} plus {ital M} shell ionization in solid targets of medium-{ital Z} elements studied by means of high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ludziejewski, T.; Rymuza, P.; Sujkowski, Z.; Dousse, J.; Rheme, C.; Polasik, M.

    1996-07-01

    The {ital K}{beta}{sub 2} x-ray spectra of zirconium, niobium, molybdenum, and palladium bombarded by 150 and 300 keV electrons were measured with a high-resolution transmission curved crystal spectrometer. Multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculations were used for the decomposition of the experimental spectra into the {ital K}{beta}{sub 2}{ital M}{sup 0} (diagram) and {ital K}{beta}{sub 2}{ital M}{sup 1} (satellite) components. The probabilities of energy dependent (direct Coulomb and two-step) processes were estimated from the differences in the satellite line yields for electrons and photons. The satellite yields are found to be considerably enhanced in comparison with those for the proton-induced ionization recently measured and analyzed in the same way [T. Ludziejewski {ital et} {ital al}., Phys. Rev. A {bold 52}, 2791 (1995)]. This result indicates the importance of multielectron effects in the {ital K} plus {ital M} shell ionization by energetic projectiles. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  10. High resolution x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy - a new technique for site- and spin-selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin

    1996-12-01

    X-ray spectroscopy has long been used to elucidate electronic and structural information of molecules. One of the weaknesses of x-ray absorption is its sensitivity to all of the atoms of a particular element in a sample. Through out this thesis, a new technique for enhancing the site- and spin-selectivity of the x-ray absorption has been developed. By high resolution fluorescence detection, the chemical sensitivity of K emission spectra can be used to identify oxidation and spin states; it can also be used to facilitate site-selective X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and site-selective Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS). The spin polarization in K fluorescence could be used to generate spin selective XANES or spin-polarized EXAFS, which provides a new measure of the spin density, or the nature of magnetic neighboring atoms. Finally, dramatic line-sharpening effects by the combination of absorption and emission processes allow observation of structure that is normally unobservable. All these unique characters can enormously simplify a complex x-ray spectrum. Applications of this novel technique have generated information from various transition-metal model compounds to metalloproteins. The absorption and emission spectra by high resolution fluorescence detection are interdependent. The ligand field multiplet model has been used for the analysis of K{alpha} and K{beta} emission spectra. First demonstration on different chemical states of Fe compounds has shown the applicability of site selectivity and spin polarization. Different interatomic distances of the same element in different chemical forms have been detected using site-selective EXAFS.

  11. Dose-dependent high-resolution electron ptychography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alfonso, A. J.; Allen, L. J.; Sawada, H.; Kirkland, A. I.

    2016-02-01

    Recent reports of electron ptychography at atomic resolution have ushered in a new era of coherent diffractive imaging in the context of electron microscopy. We report and discuss electron ptychography under variable electron dose conditions, exploring the prospects of an approach which has considerable potential for imaging where low dose is needed.

  12. Very high resolution UV and X-ray spectroscopy and imagery of solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, M.; Brown, W. A.; Haisch, B. M.

    1987-01-01

    A scientific investigation of the physics of the solar atmosphere, which uses the techniques of high resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy and high resolution UV imagery, is described. The experiments were conducted during a series of three sounding rocket flights. All three flights yielded excellent images in the UV range, showing unprecedented spatial resolution. The second flight recorded the X-ray spectrum of a solar flare, and the third that of an active region. A normal incidence multi-layer mirror was used during the third flight to make the first astronomical X-ray observations using this new technique.

  13. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF DIOXINS AND FURANS BY HIGH RESOLUTION AND ELECTRON CAPTURE MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Known mixtures and unknown atmospheric sample extracts containing polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/P) were analyzed by both electron impact, high resolution, mass spectrometry (HRMS) and by electron capture, negative ion, low resolution ma...

  14. High-resolution heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy based on spatial encoding and coherence transfer in inhomogeneous fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kaiyu; Zhang, Zhiyong; Chen, Hao; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2015-11-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been proven to be a powerful technique for chemical, biological, and medical studies. Heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) and heteronuclear multiple bond correlation (HMBC) are two frequently used 2D NMR methods. In combination with spatially encoded techniques, a heteronuclear 2D NMR spectrum can be acquired in several seconds and may be applied to monitoring chemical reactions. However, it is difficult to obtain high-resolution NMR spectra in inhomogeneous fields. Inspired by the idea of tracing the difference of precession frequencies between two different spins to yield high-resolution spectra, we propose a method with correlation acquisition option and J-resolved-like acquisition option to ultrafast obtain high-resolution HSQC/HMBC spectra and heteronuclear J-resolved-like spectra in inhomogeneous fields.

  15. [Measurement of OH radicals in flame with high resolution differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Liu, Wen-Qing; Kan, Rui-Feng; Si, Fu-Qi; Xu, Zhen-Yu; Hu, Ren-Zhi; Xie, Pin-Hua

    2011-10-01

    The present paper describes a new developed high resolution differential optical absorption spectroscopy instrument used for the measurement of OH radicals in flame. The instrument consists of a Xenon lamp for light source; a double pass high resolution echelle spectrometer with a resolution of 3.3 pm; a multiple-reflection cell of 20 meter base length, in which the light reflects in the cell for 176 times, so the whole path length of light can achieve 3 520 meters. The OH radicals'6 absorption lines around 308 nm were simultaneously observed in the experiment. By using high resolution DOAS technology, the OH radicals in candles, kerosene lamp, and alcohol burner flames were monitored, and their concentrations were also inverted. PMID:22250529

  16. High-resolution inverse Raman and resonant-wave-mixing spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rahn, L.A.

    1993-12-01

    These research activities consist of high-resolution inverse Raman spectroscopy (IRS) and resonant wave-mixing spectroscopy to support the development of nonlinear-optical techniques for temperature and concentration measurements in combustion research. Objectives of this work include development of spectral models of important molecular species needed to perform coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) measurements and the investigation of new nonlinear-optical processes as potential diagnostic techniques. Some of the techniques being investigated include frequency-degenerate and nearly frequency-degenerate resonant four-wave-mixing (DFWM and NDFWM), and resonant multi-wave mixing (RMWM).

  17. High-resolution photoluminescence spectroscopy of Sn-doped ZnO single crystals

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kumar, E. Senthil; Mohammadbeigi, F.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Watkins, S. P.

    2016-01-01

    Here, Group IV donors in ZnO are poorly understood, despite evidence that they are effective n-dopants. We present high-resolution photoluminescence spectroscopy studies of unintentionally doped and Sn doped ZnO single crystals grown by the chemical vapor transport method. Doped samples showed greatly increased emission from the I10 bound exciton transition which was recently proven to be related to the incorporation of Sn impurities based on radio-isotope studies. PL linewidths are exceptionally sharp for these samples, enabling clear identification of several donor species. Temperature dependent PL measurements of the I10 line emission energy and intensity dependence reveal a behavior similar tomore » other shallow donors in ZnO. Ionized donor bound exciton and two electron satellite transitions of the I10 transition are unambiguously identified and yield a donor binding energy of 71 meV. In contrast to recent reports of Ge-related donors in ZnO, the spectroscopic binding energy for the Sn-related donor bound exciton follows a linear relationship with donor binding energy (Haynes rule), confirming the shallow nature of this defect center, which we attribute to a SnZn double donor compensated by an unknown single acceptor.« less

  18. High-resolution photoluminescence spectroscopy of Sn-doped ZnO single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, E. Senthil; Mohammadbeigi, F.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Watkins, S. P.

    2016-01-01

    Here, Group IV donors in ZnO are poorly understood, despite evidence that they are effective n-dopants. We present high-resolution photoluminescence spectroscopy studies of unintentionally doped and Sn doped ZnO single crystals grown by the chemical vapor transport method. Doped samples showed greatly increased emission from the I10 bound exciton transition which was recently proven to be related to the incorporation of Sn impurities based on radio-isotope studies. PL linewidths are exceptionally sharp for these samples, enabling clear identification of several donor species. Temperature dependent PL measurements of the I10 line emission energy and intensity dependence reveal a behavior similar to other shallow donors in ZnO. Ionized donor bound exciton and two electron satellite transitions of the I10 transition are unambiguously identified and yield a donor binding energy of 71 meV. In contrast to recent reports of Ge-related donors in ZnO, the spectroscopic binding energy for the Sn-related donor bound exciton follows a linear relationship with donor binding energy (Haynes rule), confirming the shallow nature of this defect center, which we attribute to a SnZn double donor compensated by an unknown single acceptor.

  19. Electronic Spectroscopy & Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Maroncelli, Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-06-08

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Electronic Spectroscopy and Dynamics was held at Colby College, Waterville, NH from 07/19/2009 thru 07/24/2009. The Conference was well-attended with participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. The GRC on Electronic Spectroscopy & Dynamics showcases some of the most recent experimental and theoretical developments in electronic spectroscopy that probes the structure and dynamics of isolated molecules, molecules embedded in clusters and condensed phases, and bulk materials. Electronic spectroscopy is an important tool in many fields of research, and this GRC brings together experts having diverse backgrounds in physics, chemistry, biophysics, and materials science, making the meeting an excellent opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of ideas and techniques. Topics covered in this GRC include high-resolution spectroscopy, biological molecules in the gas phase, electronic structure theory for excited states, multi-chromophore and single-molecule spectroscopies, and excited state dynamics in chemical and biological systems.

  20. High-Resolution 3D Structure Determination of Kaliotoxin by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Korukottu, Jegannath; Schneider, Robert; Vijayan, Vinesh; Lange, Adam; Pongs, Olaf; Becker, Stefan; Baldus, Marc; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2008-01-01

    High-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy can provide structural information of proteins that cannot be studied by X-ray crystallography or solution NMR spectroscopy. Here we demonstrate that it is possible to determine a protein structure by solid-state NMR to a resolution comparable to that by solution NMR. Using an iterative assignment and structure calculation protocol, a large number of distance restraints was extracted from 1H/1H mixing experiments recorded on a single uniformly labeled sample under magic angle spinning conditions. The calculated structure has a coordinate precision of 0.6 Å and 1.3 Å for the backbone and side chain heavy atoms, respectively, and deviates from the structure observed in solution. The approach is expected to be applicable to larger systems enabling the determination of high-resolution structures of amyloid or membrane proteins. PMID:18523586

  1. High resolution X-ray spectroscopy of astrophysical sources: current and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paerels, Frits

    High resolution spectroscopy of cosmic X-ray sources has become a well-established technique over the last decade, with the wide variety of investigations performed with the diffraction grating spectrometers on Chandra and XMM-Newton. I will review some of the common themes that have emerged from these studies, which comprises observations of "sources" as varied as the intergalactic medium and the atmospheres of hot neutron stars. With the microcalorimeter spectrometer array on Astro-H, we will be making two more big steps: true imaging spectroscopy, and extension of the high resolution to the Fe K band. I will outline some of the issues we will encounter, against the background of possible discoveries we may make.

  2. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hall G. E.; Goncharov, V.

    2012-05-29

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry are investigated by high resolution spectroscopic tools. Production, reaction, and energy transfer processes are investigated by transient, double resonance, polarization and saturation spectroscopies, with an emphasis on technique development and connection with theory, as well as specific molecular properties.

  3. High-resolution extreme-ultraviolet spectroscopy of potassium using anti-Stokes radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothenberg, J. E.; Young, J. F.; Harris, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    The use of a new extreme-ultraviolet radiation source based on spontaneous anti-Stokes scattering for high-resolution absorption spectroscopy of transition originating from the 3p6 shell of potassium is reported. The region from 546.6 to 536.8 A is scanned at a resolution of about 1.2 Kayser. Within this region, four previously unreported lines are observed.

  4. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, G.E.

    2011-05-31

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry are investigated by high resolution spectroscopic tools. Production, reaction, and energy transfer processes are investigated by transient, double resonance, polarization and saturation spectroscopies, with an emphasis on technique development and connection with theory, as well as specific molecular properties.

  5. Update of High Resolution (e,e'K^+) Hypernuclear Spectroscopy at Jefferson Lab's Hall A

    SciTech Connect

    Cusanno, F; Bydzovsky, P; Chang, C C; Cisbani, E; De Jager, C W; De Leo, R; Frullani, S; Garibaldi, F; Higinbotham, D W; Iodice, M; LeRose, J J; Markowitz, P; Marrone, S; Sotona, M; Urciuoli, G M

    2010-03-01

    Updated results of the experiment E94-107 hypernuclear spectroscopy in Hall A of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab), are presented. The experiment provides high resolution spectra of excitation energy for 12B_\\Lambda, 16N_\\Lambda, and 9Li_\\Lambda hypernuclei obtained by electroproduction of strangeness. A new theoretical calculation for 12B_\\Lambda, final results for 16N_\\Lambda, and discussion of the preliminary results of 9Li_\\Lambda are reported.

  6. Copper Decoration of Carbon Nanotubes and High Resolution Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Probst, Camille

    A new process of decorating carbon nanotubes with copper was developed for the fabrication of nanocomposite aluminum-nanotubes. The process consists of three stages: oxidation, activation and electroless copper plating on the nanotubes. The oxidation step was required to create chemical function on the nanotubes, essential for the activation step. Then, catalytic nanoparticles of tin-palladium were deposited on the tubes. Finally, during the electroless copper plating, copper particles with a size between 20 and 60 nm were uniformly deposited on the nanotubes surface. The reproducibility of the process was shown by using another type of carbon nanotube. The fabrication of nanocomposites aluminum-nanotubes was tested by aluminum vacuum infiltration. Although the infiltration of carbon nanotubes did not produce the expected results, an interesting electron microscopy sample was discovered during the process development: the activated carbon nanotubes. Secondly, scanning transmitted electron microscopy (STEM) imaging in SEM was analysed. The images were obtained with a new detector on the field emission scanning electron microscope (Hitachi S-4700). Various parameters were analysed with the use of two different samples: the activated carbon nanotubes (previously obtained) and gold-palladium nanodeposits. Influences of working distance, accelerating voltage or sample used on the spatial resolution of images obtained with SMART (Scanning Microscope Assessment and Resolution Testing) were analysed. An optimum working distance for the best spatial resolution related to the sample analysed was found for the imaging in STEM mode. Finally, relation between probe size and spatial resolution of backscattered electrons (BSE) images was studied. An image synthesis method was developed to generate the BSE images from backscattered electrons coefficients obtained with CASINO software. Spatial resolution of images was determined using SMART. The analysis shown that using a probe

  7. High resolution rare-earth elements analyses of natural apatite and its application in geo-sciences: Combined micro-PIXE, quantitative CL spectroscopy and electron spin resonance analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habermann, D.; Götte, T.; Meijer, J.; Stephan, A.; Richter, D. K.; Niklas, J. R.

    2000-03-01

    The rare-earth element (REE) distribution in natural apatite is analysed by micro-PIXE, cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy and spectroscopy and electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The micro-PIXE analyses of an apatite crystal from Cerro de Mercado (Mexico) and the summary of 20 analyses of six francolite (conodonts of Triassic age) samples indicate that most of the REEs are enriched in apatite and francolite comparative to average shale standard (NASC). The analyses of fossil francolite revealing the REE-distribution not to be in balance with the REE-distribution of seawater and fish bone debris. Strong inhomogenous lateral REE-distribution in fossil conodont material is shown by CL-mapping and most probably not being a vital effect. Therefore, the resulting REE-signal from fossil francolite is the sum of vital and post-mortem incorporation. The necessary charge compensation for the substitution of divalent Ca by trivalent REE being done by different kind of electron defects and defect ions.

  8. High resolution fluorescent bio-imaging with electron beam excitation.

    PubMed

    Kawata, Yoshimasa; Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru

    2014-11-01

    We have developed electron beam excitation assisted (EXA) optical microscope[1-3], and demonstrated its resolution higher than 50 nm. In the microscope, a light source in a few nanometers size is excited by focused electron beam in a luminescent film. The microscope makes it possible to observe dynamic behavior of living biological specimens in various surroundings, such as air or liquids. Scan speed of the nanometric light source is faster than that in conventional near-field scanning optical microscopes. The microscope enables to observe optical constants such as absorption, refractive index, polarization, and their dynamic behavior on a nanometric scale. The microscope opens new microscopy applications in nano-technology and nano-science.Figure 1(a) shows schematic diagram of the proposed EXA microscope. An electron beam is focused on a luminescent film. A specimen is put on the luminescent film directly. The inset in Fig. 1(a) shows magnified image of the luminescent film and the specimen. Nanometric light source is excited in the luminescent film by the focused electron beam. The nanometric light source illuminates the specimen, and the scattered or transmitted radiation is detected with a photomultiplier tube (PMT). The light source is scanned by scanning of the focused electron beam in order to construct on image. Figure 1(b) shows a luminescence image of the cells acquired with the EXA microscope, and Fig. 1(c) shows a phase contrast microscope image. Cells were observed in culture solution without any treatments, such as fixation and drying. The shape of each cell was clearly recognized and some bright spots were observed in cells. We believe that the bright spots indicated with arrows were auto-fluorescence of intracellular granules and light- grey regions were auto-fluorescence of cell membranes. It is clearly demonstrated that the EXA microscope is useful tool for observation of living biological cells in physiological conditions.jmicro;63/suppl_1/i

  9. High-resolution heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR spectroscopy in magnetic fields with unknown spatial variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Huang, Yuqing; Smith, Pieter E. S.; Wang, Kaiyu; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2014-05-01

    Heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy is an extremely powerful tool for determining the structures of organic molecules and is of particular significance in the structural analysis of proteins. In order to leverage the method’s potential for structural investigations, obtaining high-resolution NMR spectra is essential and this is generally accomplished by using very homogeneous magnetic fields. However, there are several situations where magnetic field distortions and thus line broadening is unavoidable, for example, the samples under investigation may be inherently heterogeneous, and the magnet’s homogeneity may be poor. This line broadening can hinder resonance assignment or even render it impossible. We put forth a new class of pulse sequences for obtaining high-resolution heteronuclear spectra in magnetic fields with unknown spatial variations based on distant dipolar field modulations. This strategy’s capabilities are demonstrated with the acquisition of high-resolution 2D gHSQC and gHMBC spectra. These sequences’ performances are evaluated on the basis of their sensitivities and acquisition efficiencies. Moreover, we show that by encoding and decoding NMR observables spatially, as is done in ultrafast NMR, an extra dimension containing J-coupling information can be obtained without increasing the time necessary to acquire a heteronuclear correlation spectrum. Since the new sequences relax magnetic field homogeneity constraints imposed upon high-resolution NMR, they may be applied in portable NMR sensors and studies of heterogeneous chemical and biological materials.

  10. Broadband High-Resolution Spectroscopy with Fabry-Perot Quantum Cascade Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yin; Wysocki, Gerard

    2014-06-01

    Simultaneous spectroscopic detection of large molecules with broad ro-vibrational spectra, and small molecules with well-resolved narrow spectral lines requires both broadband optical frequency coverage (>50 wn) and high resolution (<0.01 wn) to perform accurate spectral measurements. With the advent of room temperature, high power, continuous wave quantum cascade lasers (QCLs), high resolution mid-IR spectrometers for field applications became feasible. So far to address the broadband spectral coverage, external cavity (EC) QCLs with >100 wn tuning ranges have been spectroscopic sources of choice in the mid-IR; however EC-QCLs are rather complex opto-mechanical systems, which are vibration-sensitive, and construction of robust transportable systems is difficult. In this work we present a new method of performing broadband mid-IR spectroscopy using two free-running Fabry-Perot (FP) QCLs to perform multi-heterodyne down-conversion of optical signals to RF domain. The sample transmission spectrum probed by one multi-mode FP-QCL is down-converted to the RF domain through an optical multi-heterodyne process using a second FP-QCL as the local oscillator. Both a broadband multi-mode spectral measurement as well as high-resolution ( 15 MHz or 0.0005 wn) absorption spectroscopy of NH3 and N2O are demonstrated and show potential for all-solid-state FP-laser-based spectrometers for chemical sensing. Y. Wang, M. G. Soskind, W. Wang, and G. Wysocki, "High-resolution multi-heterodyne spectroscopy based on Fabry-Perot quantum cascade lasers," Appl Phys Lett 104, 0311141-0311145 (2014)

  11. High-Resolution Pfi-Zeke Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Cl_2: the Ground (X^+ ^2π{g}) and First Excited (A^+ ^2π{u}) Electronic States of Cl_2^+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollet, Sandro; Merkt, Frederic

    2012-06-01

    Recently, two studies have been devoted to the low-lying electronic states of Cl_2^+, one by PFI-ZEKE photoelectron (PE) spectroscopy of the {X}^+←{X} transition and one by laser-induced-fluorescence spectroscopy of the {A}^+→{X}^+ band system. To complement the information available on the X^+ and A^+ electronic states of Cl_2^+, we have recorded partially rotationally resolved single-photon PFI-ZEKE PE spectra of the {X}^+ ^2π{g,i}←{X} ^1Σg^+ and {A}^+ ^2π{u,i}←{X} ^1Σg^+ (i=3/2, 1/2) photoionizing transitions of Cl_2 in the wavenumber ranges 92 500-96 500 {cm}-1 and 106 750-115 500 {cm}-1. These regions correspond to transitions to low-lying vibrational levels of the X^+ state with v^+=0-5 and to transitions to vibrational levels of the X^+ state with v^+=25-45 and vibrational levels of the A^+ state with v^+≤ 7. The analysis of the rotational structure and the isotopic shifts of these spectra has enabled the derivation of an improved value of the first adiabatic ionization energy (92 647.7±0.3 {cm}-1 for 35Cl_2). In combination with measurements of ion-pair states with n≈ 1800 new values for the dissociation energies D_0 of Cl_2 and Cl_2^+ could also be derived. The potential energy function of the X^+ state of Cl_2^+ was determined in a least-squares fitting procedure. Spin-orbit splittings were derived for many vibrational levels of the X^+ and A^+ states. Combining our results with other resultsb, several low-lying vibrational levels of the upper spin-orbit component of the A^+ state could be assigned for the first time. The PFI-ZEKE PE spectra also contain a series of as yet unassigned lines and reveal numerous perturbations. J. Li, Y. Hao, J. Yang, C. Zhou, and Y. Mo}, J. Chem. Phys. 127, 104307 (2007). M. A. Gharaibeh, and D. J. Clouthier, 66th Int. Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy, Book of Abstracts, p. 169 (2011). S. Mollet, and F. Merkt, Phys. Rev. A 82, 032510 (2010). R. P. Tuckett, and S. D. Peyerimhoff, Chem. Phys. 83, 203 (1984

  12. High resolution transmission spectroscopy as a diagnostic for Jovian exoplanet atmospheres: constraints from theoretical models

    SciTech Connect

    Kempton, Eliza M.-R.; Perna, Rosalba; Heng, Kevin

    2014-11-01

    We present high resolution transmission spectra of giant planet atmospheres from a coupled three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric dynamics and transmission spectrum model that includes Doppler shifts which arise from winds and planetary motion. We model Jovian planets covering more than two orders of magnitude in incident flux, corresponding to planets with 0.9-55 day orbital periods around solar-type stars. The results of our 3D dynamical models reveal certain aspects of high resolution transmission spectra that are not present in simple one-dimensional (1D) models. We find that the hottest planets experience strong substellar to anti-stellar (SSAS) winds, resulting in transmission spectra with net blueshifts of up to 3 km s{sup –1}, whereas less irradiated planets show almost no net Doppler shifts. We find only minor differences between transmission spectra for atmospheres with temperature inversions and those without. Compared to 1D models, peak line strengths are significantly reduced for the hottest atmospheres owing to Doppler broadening from a combination of rotation (which is faster for close-in planets under the assumption of tidal locking) and atmospheric winds. Finally, high resolution transmission spectra may be useful in studying the atmospheres of exoplanets with optically thick clouds since line cores for very strong transitions should remain optically thick to very high altitude. High resolution transmission spectra are an excellent observational test for the validity of 3D atmospheric dynamics models, because they provide a direct probe of wind structures and heat circulation. Ground-based exoplanet spectroscopy is currently on the verge of being able to verify some of our modeling predictions, most notably the dependence of SSAS winds on insolation. We caution that interpretation of high resolution transmission spectra based on 1D atmospheric models may be inadequate, as 3D atmospheric motions can produce a noticeable effect on the absorption

  13. High Resolution Transmission Spectroscopy as a Diagnostic for Jovian Exoplanet Atmospheres: Constraints from Theoretical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempton, Eliza M.-R.; Perna, Rosalba; Heng, Kevin

    2014-11-01

    We present high resolution transmission spectra of giant planet atmospheres from a coupled three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric dynamics and transmission spectrum model that includes Doppler shifts which arise from winds and planetary motion. We model Jovian planets covering more than two orders of magnitude in incident flux, corresponding to planets with 0.9-55 day orbital periods around solar-type stars. The results of our 3D dynamical models reveal certain aspects of high resolution transmission spectra that are not present in simple one-dimensional (1D) models. We find that the hottest planets experience strong substellar to anti-stellar (SSAS) winds, resulting in transmission spectra with net blueshifts of up to 3 km s-1, whereas less irradiated planets show almost no net Doppler shifts. We find only minor differences between transmission spectra for atmospheres with temperature inversions and those without. Compared to 1D models, peak line strengths are significantly reduced for the hottest atmospheres owing to Doppler broadening from a combination of rotation (which is faster for close-in planets under the assumption of tidal locking) and atmospheric winds. Finally, high resolution transmission spectra may be useful in studying the atmospheres of exoplanets with optically thick clouds since line cores for very strong transitions should remain optically thick to very high altitude. High resolution transmission spectra are an excellent observational test for the validity of 3D atmospheric dynamics models, because they provide a direct probe of wind structures and heat circulation. Ground-based exoplanet spectroscopy is currently on the verge of being able to verify some of our modeling predictions, most notably the dependence of SSAS winds on insolation. We caution that interpretation of high resolution transmission spectra based on 1D atmospheric models may be inadequate, as 3D atmospheric motions can produce a noticeable effect on the absorption signatures.

  14. Fast acquisition of high-resolution 2D NMR spectroscopy in inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liangjie; Wei, Zhiliang; Zeng, Qing; Yang, Jian; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy plays an important role in chemical and biological analyses. In this study, we combine the J-coupling coherence transfer module with the echo-train acquisition technique for fast acquisition of high-resolution 2D NMR spectra in magnetic fields with unknown spatial variations. The proposed method shows satisfactory performance on a 5 mM ethyl 3-bromopropionate sample, under a 5-kHz (10 ppm at 11.7 T) B0 inhomogeneous field, as well as under varying degrees of pulse-flip-angle deviations. Moreover, a simulative ex situ NMR measurement is also conducted to show the effectiveness of the proposed pulse sequence.

  15. HERMES at Mercator, competitive high-resolution spectroscopy with a small telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raskin , G.; Van Winckel, H.

    2014-01-01

    HERMES, a fibre-fed high-resolution (R = 85 000) échelle spectrograph with good stability and excellent throughput, is the work-horse instrument of the 1.2-m Mercator telescope on La Palma. HERMES targets building up time series of high-quality data of variable stellar phenomena, mainly for asteroseismology and binary-evolution research. In this paper we present the HERMES project and discuss the instrument design, performance, and a future upgrade. We also present some results of the first four years of HERMES observations. We illustrate the value of small telescopes, equipped with efficient instrumentation, for high-resolution spectroscopy. Based on observations made with the Mercator Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma by the Flemish Community, at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.

  16. Protected Plasmonic Nanostructures for High Resolution Chemical Imaging using Tip Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butt, Rebecca; Barrios, Carlos; Malkovskiy, Andrey; Kisliuk, Alexander; Sokolov, Alexei; Foster, Mark

    2009-03-01

    Tip enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS), an emerging technique that combines optical microscopy and scanning probe microscopy, provides the sensitivity and selectivity necessary for high-resolution chemical imaging of polymer surfaces. An unprecedented 20 nm lateral resolution for the chemical imaging has been achieved. Unfortunately, the fragile plasmonic structures used to enhance the electric field are prone to mechanical, chemical, and thermal degradation. Developing robust noble metal nanostructures with stable plasmonic resonance is essential to reliable high resolution chemical imaging. Covering the metal layer with organic and inorganic ultrathin coatings is being investigated to extend the plasmonic activity of the engineered nanostructures. Addition of an ultrathin aluminum oxide (Al2O3) coating to a silver-coated scanning probe microscopy tip for TERS significantly improves plasmonic structure stability without sacrificing the initial TERS efficiency. This ultrathin coating provides wear resistance and stops chemical degradation responsible for the loss of signal enhancement.

  17. High resolution coherent three dimensional spectroscopy of NO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, Thresa A.; Muthike, Angelar K.; Robinson, Jessica E.; Chen, Peter C.

    2015-06-07

    Expansion from coherent 2D spectroscopy to coherent 3D spectroscopy can provide significant advantages when studying molecules that have heavily perturbed energy levels. This paper illustrates such advantages by demonstrating how high resolution coherent 3D (HRC3D) spectroscopy can be used to study a portion of the visible spectrum of nitrogen dioxide. High resolution coherent 2D spectra usually contain rotational and vibrational patterns that are easy to analyze, but severe congestion and complexity preclude its effective use for many parts of the NO{sub 2} spectrum. HRC3D spectroscopy appears to be much more effective; multidimensional rotational and vibrational patterns produced by this new technique are easy to identify even in the presence of strong perturbations. A method for assigning peaks, which is based upon analyzing the resulting multidimensional patterns, has been developed. The higher level of multidimensionality is useful for reducing uncertainty in peak assignments, improving spectral resolution, providing simultaneous information on multiple levels and states, and predicting, verifying, and categorizing peaks.

  18. Synchrotron-Based High Resolution Spectroscopy of N-Bearing Pahs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruet, Sébastien; Pirali, Olivier; Goubet, Manuel; Brechignac, Philippe

    2014-06-01

    For thirty years, the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been suspected to give rise to the numerous Unidentified Infrared Bands (UIBs) observed in most astrophysical objects. Pure carbon molecules as well as derivatives with nitrogen atom(s) incorporated into the carbon skeleton have been considered. These N-bearing molecules are interesting candidates for astronomical research since they possess a larger permanent dipole moment than purely carbon-based PAHs. Most of the data reported in the literature deal with rotationally unresolved data. During the last decade, high-resolution microwave spectroscopy initiated high resolution studies of this broad family of molecules. Recent advances in laboratory techniques permitted to provide interesting new results to rotationally resolve the IR/Far-IR vibrational bands of these relatively large C-bearing molecules, in particular, making use of synchrotron radiation as the IR continuum source of high resolution Fourier transform (FT) spectrometers. We will present an overview of the synchrotron-based high resolution FTIR spectroscopy of 5 aza-derivatives of naphthalene (isoquinoline, quinoline, quinoxaline, quinazoline, [1,5] naphthyridine) using a room temperature long path absorption cell at the French facility SOLEIL. In support to the rovibrational analysis of these FIR spectra, very accurate anharmonic DFT calculations were performed. A. Leger, J. L. Puget, Astron. Astrophys. 137, L5-L8 (1984) L. J. Allamandola et al. Astrophys. J. 290, L25-L28 (1985). Z. Kisiel et al. J. Mol. Spectrosc. 217, 115 (2003) S. Thorwirth et al. Astrophys. J. 662, 1309 (2007) D. McNaughton et al. J. Chem. Phys. 124, 154305 (2011). S. Albert et al. Faraday Discuss. 150, 71-99 (2011) B. E. Brumfield et al. Phys. Chem. Lett. 3, 1985-1988 (2012) O. Pirali et al. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 15, 10141 (2013) M. Goubet, O. Pirali, J. Chem. Phys., 140, 044322 (2014).

  19. High temperature and high resolution uv photoelectron spectroscopy using supersonic molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lai-Sheng; Reutt-Robey, J.E.; Niu, B.; Lee, Y.T.; Shirley, D.A.; Maryland Univ., College Park, MD . Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1989-07-01

    A high temperature molecular beam source with electron bombardment heating has been built for high resolution photoelectron spectroscopic studies of high temperature species and clusters. This source has the advantages of: producing an intense, continuous, seeded molecular beam, eliminating the interference of the heating mechanism from the photoelectron measurement. Coupling the source with our hemispherical electron energy analyzer, we can obtain very high resolution HeI{alpha} (584{angstrom}) photoelectron spectra of high temperature species. Vibrationally-resolved photoelectron spectra of PbSe, As{sub 2}, As{sub 4}, and ZnCl{sub 2} are shown to demonstrate the performance of the new source. 25 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Transient Thermometry and High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Analysis of Filamentary Resistive Switches.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jonghan; Sharma, Abhishek A; Chen, Chao-Yang; Fantini, Andrea; Jurczak, Malgorzata; Herzing, Andrew A; Bain, James A; Picard, Yoosuf N; Skowronski, Marek

    2016-08-10

    We present data on the filament size and temperature distribution in Hf0.82Al0.18Ox-based Resistive Random Access Memory (RRAM) devices obtained by transient thermometry and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The thermometry shows that the temperature of the nonvolatile conducting filament can reach temperatures as high as 1600 K at the onset of RESET at voltage of 0.8 V and power of 40 μW. The size of the filament was estimated at about 1 nm in diameter. Hot filament increases the temperature of the surrounding high resistivity oxide, causing it to conduct and carry a significant fraction of the total current. The current spreading results in slowing down the filament temperature increase at higher power. The results of thermometry have been corroborated by HRTEM analysis of the as-fabricated and switched RRAM devices. The functional HfAlOx layer in as-fabricated devices is amorphous. In devices that were switched, we detected a small crystalline region of 10-15 nm in size. The crystallization temperature of the HfAlOx was determined to be 850 K in an independent annealing experiment. The size of the crystalline region agrees with thermal modeling based on the thermometry data. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coordinated with electron energy loss spectroscopy could not detect changes in the chemical makeup of the filament. PMID:27351065

  1. High-Resolution Kaonic-Atom X-ray Spectroscopy with Transition-Edge-Sensor Microcalorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, S.; Bennett, D. A.; Doriese, W. B.; Fowler, J. W.; Irwin, K. D.; Ishimoto, S.; Sato, M.; Schmidt, D. R.; Swetz, D. S.; Tatsuno, H.; Ullom, J. N.; Yamada, S.

    2014-09-01

    We are preparing for an ultra-high resolution X-ray spectroscopy of kaonic atoms using an X-ray spectrometer based on an array of superconducting transition-edge-sensor microcalorimeters developed by NIST. The instrument has excellent energy resolutions of 2-3 eV (FWHM) at 6 keV and a large collecting area of about 20 mm. This will open new door to investigate kaon-nucleus strong interaction and provide new accurate charged-kaon mass value.

  2. High-resolution magic-angle-spinning NMR spectroscopy of intact tissue.

    PubMed

    Giskeødegård, Guro F; Cao, Maria D; Bathen, Tone F

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution magic-angle-spinning (HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy is a nondestructive technique that is used to obtain the metabolite profile of a tissue sample. This method requires minimal sample preparation. However, it is important to handle the sample with care and keep it frozen during preparation to minimize degradation. Here, we describe a typical protocol for HR-MAS analysis of intact tissue. We also include examples of typical pulse sequence programs and quantification methods that are used today. PMID:25677145

  3. Determination of Ionization Potential of Calcium by High-Resolution Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyabe, Masabumi; Geppert, Christopher; Kato, Masaaki; Oba, Masaki; Wakaida, Ikuo; Watanabe, Kazuo; Wendt, Klaus D. A.

    2006-03-01

    High-resolution resonance ionization spectroscopy has been utilized to determine a precise ionization potential of Ca. Three-step resonance excitation with single-mode extended-cavity diode lasers populates long and unperturbed Rydberg series of 4snp (1P1) and 4snf (1F3) states in the range of n=20--150. Using an extended Ritz formula for quantum defects, the series convergence limit has been determined to be 49305.9240(20) cm-1 with the accuracy improved one order of magnitude higher than previously reported ones.

  4. High-Resolution Spectroscopy with the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    ScienceCinema

    Canizares, Claude R. [MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

    2010-01-08

    The capabilities of the Chandra X-ray Observatory and XMM-Newton for high-resolution spectroscopy have brought tradition plasma diagnostic techniques to the study of cosmic plasma. Observations have probed nearly every class of astronomical object, from young proto-starts through massive O starts and black hole binaries, supernova remnants, active galactic nuclei, and the intergalactic medium. Many of these sources show remarkable rich spectra that reveal new physical information, such as emission measure distributions, elemental abundances, accretion disk and wind signatures, and time variability. This talk will present an overview of the Chandra instrumentaton and selected examples of spectral observations of astrophysical and cosmological importance.

  5. Computer simulation of high resolution transmission electron micrographs: theory and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kilaas, R.

    1985-03-01

    Computer simulation of electron micrographs is an invaluable aid in their proper interpretation and in defining optimum conditions for obtaining images experimentally. Since modern instruments are capable of atomic resolution, simulation techniques employing high precision are required. This thesis makes contributions to four specific areas of this field. First, the validity of a new method for simulating high resolution electron microscope images has been critically examined. Second, three different methods for computing scattering amplitudes in High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) have been investigated as to their ability to include upper Laue layer (ULL) interaction. Third, a new method for computing scattering amplitudes in high resolution transmission electron microscopy has been examined. Fourth, the effect of a surface layer of amorphous silicon dioxide on images of crystalline silicon has been investigated for a range of crystal thicknesses varying from zero to 2 1/2 times that of the surface layer.

  6. High resolution mass spectroscopy for the characterization of complex, fossil organic mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Winans, R.E.; Haas, G.W.; Kim, Y.L.; Hunt, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    The nature of molecules with heteroatom functionality in the Argonne Premium Coal Samples and petroleum samples is being explored using high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). Both desorption electron impact and desorption chemical ionization (DCI) are used to sample the mixtures. Structural information is obtained from tandem MS experiments using high resolution to select the ions to fragment. The first DCI HRMS spectra of complex mixtures will be shown. Quantitative aspects and the method for obtaining precise mass measurements in chemical ionization will be discussed. Molecular weight distribution determined by DCI are similar to those determined by laser desorption and field ionization mass spectrometry with very little ion intensity observed at greater than 1000 Daltons. Results will be correlated with other techniques such as NMR, XPS, and XANES.

  7. A tunable low-energy photon source for high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Harter, John W.; Monkman, Eric J.; Shai, Daniel E.; Nie Yuefeng; Uchida, Masaki; Burganov, Bulat; Chatterjee, Shouvik; King, Philip D. C.; Shen, Kyle M.

    2012-11-15

    We describe a tunable low-energy photon source consisting of a laser-driven xenon plasma lamp coupled to a Czerny-Turner monochromator. The combined tunability, brightness, and narrow spectral bandwidth make this light source useful in laboratory-based high-resolution photoemission spectroscopy experiments. The source supplies photons with energies up to {approx}7 eV, delivering under typical conditions >10{sup 12} ph/s within a 10 meV spectral bandwidth, which is comparable to helium plasma lamps and many synchrotron beamlines. We first describe the lamp and monochromator system and then characterize its output, with attention to those parameters which are of interest for photoemission experiments. Finally, we present angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy data using the light source and compare its performance to a conventional helium plasma lamp.

  8. Automatic pole-zero/zero-pole digital compensator for high-resolution spectroscopy: Design and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Geraci, A.; Pullia, A.; Ripamonti, G.

    1999-08-01

    In a high-resolution spectroscopy system the relatively long exponential decay due to the charge preamplifier is customarily canceled in an analogue fashion by means of a PZ (Pole-Zero) stage. The accurateness of such a compensation has a big impact on the energy resolution because it strongly affects the baseline-stability problems. The authors have automatically and on-line performed such a compensation in a digital way, while maintaining a spectroscopy performance and keeping at minimum both the ADC sampling frequency (thus power consumption) and its resolution (thus cost). This is done through an IIR filter, implemented within a FPGA by a DSP. The so-compensated waveform has, in excellent approximation, an all-pole shape. Starting from such a signal, the minimum-noise filters for energy and/or time measurements are then promptly synthesized and implemented for real time operation through the same DSP.

  9. Forensic examination of electrical tapes using high resolution magic angle spinning ¹H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schoenberger, Torsten; Simmross, Ulrich; Poppe, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The application of high resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) (1)H NMR spectroscopy is ideally suited for the differentiation of plastics. In addition to the actual material composition, the different types of polymer architectures and tacticity provide characteristic signals in the fingerprint of the (1)H NMR spectra. The method facilitates forensic comparison, as even small amounts of insoluble but swellable plastic particles are utilized. The performance of HR-MAS NMR can be verified against other methods that were recently addressed in various articles about forensic tape comparison. In this study samples of the 90 electrical tapes already referenced by the FBI laboratory were used. The discrimination power of HR-MAS is demonstrated by the fact that more tape groups can be distinguished by NMR spectroscopy than by using the combined evaluation of several commonly used analytical techniques. An additional advantage of this robust and quick method is the very simple sample preparation. PMID:26558760

  10. High resolution Halpha spectroscopy and R-band photometry of Swift J1357.2-0933

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casares, Jorge; Torres, Manuel A. P.; Negueruela, Ignacio; Gonzalez-Fernandez, Carlos; Corral-Santana, Jesus M.; Zurita, Cristina; Llano, Sergio Rodriguez

    2011-03-01

    We report on high resolution Halpha spectroscopy and time-resolved photometry of the optical counterpart to the X-ray transient Swift J1357.2-0933 in outburst (Krimm et al. ATEL #3138). SPECTROSCOPY: Six 30-33 min spectra were obtained on the nights of 2011 Feb 25-27 using the IDS Spectrograph on the 2.5m Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) at the Observatorio del Roque de Los Muchachos. The observations were performed with the H1800V grating and a slit width 1.6 arcsec to yield a spectral coverage of 6270-7000 Angs with a 30 km/s FWHM spectral resolution at Halpha..

  11. High-resolution laser spectroscopy with the Collinear Resonance Ionisation Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at CERN-ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocolios, T. E.; de Groote, R. P.; Billowes, J.; Bissell, M. L.; Budinčević, I.; Day Goodacre, T.; Farooq-Smith, G. J.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Flanagan, K. T.; Franchoo, S.; Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Gins, W.; Heylen, H.; Kron, T.; Li, R.; Lynch, K. M.; Marsh, B. A.; Neyens, G.; Rossel, R. E.; Rothe, S.; Smith, A. J.; Stroke, H. H.; Wendt, K. D. A.; Wilkins, S. G.; Yang, X.

    2016-06-01

    The Collinear Resonance Ionisation Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at CERN has achieved high-resolution resonance ionisation laser spectroscopy with a full width at half maximum linewidth of 20(1) MHz for 219,221 Fr, and has measured isotopes as short lived as 5 ms with 214 Fr. This development allows for greater precision in the study of hyperfine structures and isotope shifts, as well as a higher selectivity of single-isotope, even single-isomer, beams. These achievements are linked with the development of a new laser laboratory and new data-acquisition systems.

  12. Resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy of liquid water: novel instrumentation, high resolution, and the"map" approach

    SciTech Connect

    Weinhardt, L.; Fuchs, O.; Blum, M.; Bär, M.; Weigand, M.; Denlinger, J.D.; Zubavichus, Y.; Zharnikov, M.; Grunze, M.; Heske, C.; Umbach, E.

    2008-06-17

    Techniques to study the electronic structure of liquids are rare. Most recently, resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) has been shown to be an extremely versatile spectroscopy to study both occupied and unoccupied electronic states for liquids in thermodynamic equilibrium. However, XES requires high-brilliance soft x-ray synchrotron radiation and poses significant technical challenges to maintain a liquid sample in an ultra-high vacuum environment. Our group has therefore developed and constructed a novel experimental setup for the study of liquids, with the long-term goal of investigating the electronic structure of biological systems in aqueous environments. We have developed a flow-through liquid cell in which the liquid is separated from vacuum by a thin Si3N4 or SiC window and which allows a precise control of temperature. This approach has significant advantages compared to static liquids cells used in the past. Furthermore, we have designed a dedicated high-transmission, high-resolution soft x-ray spectrometer. The high transmission makes it possible to measure complete resonant XES"maps" in less than an hour, giving unprecedented detailed insight into the electronic structure of the investigated sample. Using this new equipment we have investigated the electronic structure of liquid water. Furthermore, our XES spectra and maps give information about ultra-fast dissociation on the timescale of the O 1s core hole lifetime, which is strongly affected by the initial state hydrogen bonding configuration.

  13. Continuous wave terahertz wave spectrometer based on diode laser pumping: potential applications in high resolution spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Tadao; Ragam, Srinivasa; Oyama, Yutaka

    2009-11-01

    We constructed a high resolution terahertz (THz) spectroscopic system with an automatic scanning control using a continuous wave (cw) THz wave generator based on difference frequency generation method by excitation of phonon-polariton mode in GaP. The pump and signals lasers were compact, tunable external cavity laser, and distributed feedback (DFB) lasers, respectively. The generated THz waves were tuned automatically by changing the temperature of the DFB laser using a system control. We present the water vapor transmission characteristics of the THz wave and also absorption spectrum of a white polyethylene in the frequency range of 1.97-2.45 THz. The spectroscopic measurements performed at an output power level of 2 nW, which was obtained with a 15-mm-long GaP crystal at 2 THz. The advantage of this cw THz spectrometer is wide frequency tuning range (0.7-4.42 THz) with an estimated linewidth of full width at quarter maximum <8 MHz and this system has a potential application in high resolution spectroscopy. PMID:19947715

  14. High-resolution magic-angle spinning (13)C spectroscopy of brain tissue at natural abundance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongxia; Chen, Lei; Gao, Hongchang; Zeng, Danlin; Yue, Yong; Liu, Maili; Lei, Hao; Deng, Feng; Ye, Chaohui

    2006-03-01

    High-resolution magic-angle spinning (MAS) (1)H and (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has recently been applied to study the metabolism in intact biological tissue samples. Because of the low natural abundance and the low gyromagnetic ratio of the (13)C nuclei, signal enhancement techniques such as cross-polarization (CP) and distortionless enhancement by polarization transfer (DEPT) are often employed in MAS (13)C MRS to improve the detection sensitivity. In this study, several sensitivity enhancement techniques commonly used in liquid- and solid-state NMR, including CP, DEPT and nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE), were combined with MAS to acquire high-resolution (13)C spectra on intact rat brain tissue at natural abundance, and were compared for their performances. The results showed that different signal enhancement techniques are sensitive to different classes of molecules/metabolites, depending on their molecular weights and mobility. DEPT was found to enhance the signals of low-molecular weight metabolites exclusively, while the signals of lipids, which often are associated with membranes and have relatively lower mobility, were highly sensitive to CP enhancement. PMID:16477685

  15. In situ high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy - Fundamental insights in surface reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, Christian; Steinrück, Hans-Peter

    2013-11-01

    Since the advent of third generation synchrotron light sources optimized for providing soft X-rays up to 2 keV, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been developed to be an outstanding tool to study surface properties and surface reactions at an unprecedented level. The high resolution allows identifying various surface species, and for small molecules even the vibrational fine structure can be resolved in the XP spectra. The high photon flux reduces the required measuring time per spectrum to the domain of a few seconds or even less, which enables to follow surface processes in situ. Moreover, it also provides access to very small coverages down to below 0.1% of a monolayer, enabling the investigation of minority species or processes at defect sites. The photon energy can be adjusted according to the requirement of a particular experiment, i.e., to maximize or minimize the surface sensitivity or the photoionization cross-section of the substrate or the adsorbate. For a few instruments worldwide, a next step forward was taken by combining in situ high-resolution spectrometers with supersonic molecular beams. These beams allow to control and vary the kinetic and internal energies of the incident molecules and provide a local pressure of up to ~10-5 mbar, which can be switched on and off in a controllable way, thus offering a well-defined time structure to study adsorption or reaction processes.

  16. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of four active galaxies - Probing the intercloud medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lum, Kenneth S. K.; Canizares, Claude R.; Markert, Thomas H.; Arnaud, Keith A.

    1990-01-01

    The focal plane crystal spectrometer (FPCS) on the Einstein Observatory has been used to perform a high-resolution spectroscopic search for oxygen X-ray line emission from four active galaxies: Fairall 9, Mrk 421, Mrk 501, and PKS 0548 - 322. Specifically, O VIII Ly-alpha and Ly-beta, whose unredshifted energies are 653 and 775 eV, respectively, were sought. No narrow-line emission was detected within the energy bands searched. Upper limits are calculated on the line flux from these sources of 30 eV equivalent width and use a photoionization model to place corresponding upper limits on the densities of diffuse gas surrounding the active nuclei. The upper limits on gas density range from about 0.02-50/cu cm and probe various radial distances from the central source. This is the first time high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy has been used to place constraints on the intercloud medium in active galaxies.

  17. Diamond-machined ZnSe immersion grating for NIR high-resolution spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Y; Kobayashi, N; Kuzmenko, P J; Little, S L; Yasui, C; Kondo, S; Minami, A; Motohara, K

    2008-07-25

    ZnSe immersion gratings (n {approx} 2.45) provide the possibility of high-resolution spectroscopy for the near-infrared (NIR) region. Since ZnSe has a lower internal attenuation than other NIR materials, it is most suitable for immersion grating, particularly in short NIR region (0.8-1.4 {micro}m). We are developing an extremely high-resolution spectrograph with {lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} = 100,000, WINERED, customized for the short NIR region, using ZnSe (or ZnS) immersion grating. However, it had been very difficult to make fine grooves on ZnSe substrate with a small pitch of less than 50 {micro}m because ZnSe is a soft/brittle material. We have overcome this problem and successfully machined sharp grooves with fine pitch on ZnSe substrates by nano precision fly-cutting technique at LLNL. The optical testing of the sample grating with HeNe laser shows an excellent performance: the relative efficiency more than 87.4 % at 0.633 {micro}m for a classical grating configuration. The diffraction efficiency when used as an immersion grating is estimated to be more than 65 % at 1 {micro}m. Following this progress, we are about to start machining a grating on a large ZnSe prism with an entrance aperture of 23mm x 50mm and the blaze angle of 70{sup o}.

  18. High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Observation of Colloidal Nanocrystal Growth Mechanisms using Graphene Liquid Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yuk, Jong Min; Park, Jungwon; Ercius, Peter; Kim, Kwanpyo; Hellebusch, Danny J.; Crommie, Michael F.; Lee, Jeong Yong; Zettl, A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2011-12-12

    We introduce a new type of liquid cell for in-situ electron microscopy based upon entrapment of a liquid film between layers of graphene. We employ this cell to achieve high-resolution imaging of colloidal platinum nanocrystal growth. The ability to directly image and resolve critical steps at atomic resolution provides new insights into nanocrystal coalescence and reshaping during growth.

  19. Low energy nuclear spin excitations in Ho metal investigated by high resolution neutron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chatterji, Tapan; Jalarvo, Niina

    2013-04-17

    We have investigated the low energy excitations in metallic Ho by high resolution neutron spectroscopy. We found at T = 3 K clear inelastic peaks in the energy loss and energy gain sides, along with the central elastic peak. The energy of this low energy excitation, which is 26.59 ± 0.02 μeV at T = 3 K, decreased continuously and became zero at TN ≈ 130 K. By fitting the data in the temperature range 100-127.5 K with a power law we obtained the power-law exponent β = 0.37 ± 0.02, which agrees with the expected value β = 0.367 for a three-dimensional Heisenberg model. Thus the energy of the low energy excitations can be associated with the order parameter. PMID:23507905

  20. Past, Present and Future Prospects of High Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy of Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaastra, J.

    2006-08-01

    The first high resolution X-ray spectra of clusters of galaxies have revolutionised the study of cooling flows. These excellent data have been obtained with an instrument (the RGS of XMM-Newton) that has not been optimised for spectroscopy of extended sources. I will present a few recent examples of what can be achieved further with the RGS in combination with the imaging EPIC cameras for the study of chemical enrichment of clusters. The new generation of high spectral resolution imaging TES arrays that is currently being studied for a variety of possible future X-ray observatories (such as XEUS, Constellation-X, DIOS, Estremo and NEW) offer exciting new opportunities to study the physics of clusters of galaxies. I will present examples of how these new instruments will achieve this.

  1. Alkyl-terminated Si(111) surfaces: A high-resolution, core level photoelectron spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, J.; Linford, M.R.; Wigren, C.; Cao, R.; Pianetta, P.; Chidsey, C.E.

    1999-01-01

    The bonding of alkyl monolayers to Si(111) surfaces has been studied with high-resolution core level photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). Two very different wet-chemical methods have been used to prepare the alkyl monolayers: (i) Olefin insertion into the H{endash}Si bond of the H{endash}Si(111) surface, and (ii) replacement of Cl on the Cl{endash}Si(111) surface by an alkyl group from an alkyllithium reagent. In both cases, PES has revealed a C 1s component shifted to lower binding energy and a Si 2p component shifted to higher binding energy. Both components are attributed to the presence of a C{endash}Si bond at the interface. Along with photoelectron diffraction data [Appl. Phys. Lett. {bold 71}, 1056, (1997)], these data are used to show that these two synthetic methods can be used to functionalize the Si(111) surface. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Superconducting Detector System for High-Resolution Energy-Dispersive Soft X-Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S; Niedermayr, T; Drury, O; Funk, T; Frank, M; Labov, S E; Cramer, S

    2001-02-21

    Synchrotron-based soft x-ray spectroscopy is often limited by detector performance. Grating spectrometers have the resolution, but lack the efficiency for the analysis of dilute samples. Semiconducting Si(Li) or Ge detectors are efficient, but often lack the resolution to separate weak signals from strong nearby lines in multi-element samples. Superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) operated at temperatures below 1 K can be used as high-resolution high-efficiency x-ray detectors. They combine high energy resolution around 10 eV FWHM with the broad band efficiency of energy-dispersive detectors. We have designed a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) to operate STJ detectors in x-ray fluorescence measurements at beam line 4 of the ALS. We demonstrate the capabilities of such a detector system for fluorescence analysis of dilute metal sites in proteins and inorganic model compounds.

  3. Recent results on high resolution hypernuclear spectroscopy by electroproduction at Jefferson Lab, Hall A

    SciTech Connect

    F. Garibaldi; H. Breuer; P. Brindza; P. Bydzovski; G. Chang; E. Cisbani; S. Colilli; F. Cusanno; R. De Leo; G. De Cataldo; K. De Jager; R. Feuerbach; E. Folts; R. Fratoni; S. Frullani; F. Giuliani; M. Gricia; D. Higinbotham; M. Iodice; B. Kross; L. Lagamba; J.J.Le Rose; M. Lucentini; P. Markowitz; S. Marrone; R. Michaels; E. Nappi; Y. Qiang; B. Reitz; F. Santavenere; J. Segal; M. Sotona; G.M.Urciuoli; P. Veneroni; B.Wojtsekhowski; C. Zorn

    2005-12-01

    The first ''systematic'' study of 1 p shell hypernuclei with electromagnetic probes has started in Hall A at Jefferson Lab [?]. The aim is to perform hypernuclear high resolution spectroscopy by the electroproduction of strangeness on four 1p-shell targets: 12C, 9Be, 16O, 7Li. The first part of the experiment on 12C and 9Be has been performed in 2004, the second part (16O and 7Li) is scheduled for June 2005. To overcome the major experimental difficulties, namely the low counting rate and the challenging Particle IDentification (PID), two septum magnets and a Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) detector had to be added to the existing apparatus. After underlining the particular role the electroproduction reaction plays in hypernuclear physics we describe the challenging modifications of the Hall A apparatus. Preliminary results on 12C and 9Be are presented.

  4. High-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of sulfidation of brass at the rubber/brass interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Kenichi; Kakubo, Takashi; Shimizu, Katsunori; Amino, Naoya; Mase, Kazuhiko; Komatsu, Takayuki

    2013-01-01

    High resolution photoelectron spectroscopy is utilized to investigate the chemical composition at the rubber/brass interface to elucidate the origin of strong adhesion as well as the degradation between rubber and brass. Special attention has been given to copper sulfides formed at the interface during the vulcanization reaction at 170 °C. At least five sulfur-containing species are identified in the adhesive interlayer including crystalline CuS and amorphous CuxS (x ≃ 2). These copper sulfide species are not uniformly distributed within the layer, but there exits the concentration gradation; the concentration of CuxS is high in the region on the rubber side and is diminished in the deeper region, while vice versa for that of CuS. Degradation of the interface adhesive strength by prolonged vulcanization arises from the decrease in the CuxS/CuS ratio accompanying desulfurization of the adhesive layer.

  5. Site-selective high-resolution X-ray absorption spectroscopy and high-resolution X-ray emission spectroscopy of cobalt nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Timna-Josua; Hormes, Josef; Matoussevitch, Nina; Bönnemann, Helmut; Glatzel, Pieter

    2014-08-18

    The special (macroscopic) properties of nanoparticles are mainly due to their large surface-to-volume ratio. Thus, the separate characterization of geometric and electronic properties of surface and bulk would be favorable for a better understanding of the properties of nanoparticles. Because of the chemical sensitivity of X-ray fluorescence lines, in particular those involving higher lying electronic states, high-resolution fluorescence-detected X-ray absorption spectra (HRFD-XAS) offer these opportunities. In this study, three types of wet-chemically synthesized Co nanoparticles, ∼6 nm in diameter with varying thicknesses of a protective shell, were investigated at the ID26 beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. HRFD-XAS spectra at the Co K-edge, that is, X-ray absorption near-edge structure (HRFD-XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (HRFD-EXAFS) spectra, were recorded via detection of the Kβ1,3 fluorescence at specific energies. As these spectra are only partly site-selective due to a strong overlap of the emission lines, a numerical procedure was applied based on a least-squares fitting procedure, realized by singular value decomposition. The detailed analysis of the obtained site-selective spectra, regarding chemical composition and crystallographic phase, using measured and simulated FEFF9-based reference spectra, showed that the metallic core had mainly hexagonal close-packed structure with lattice constants matching bulk Co; the spectra for the shell could be satisfactorily fitted by a mixture of CoO and CoCO3; however, with an obvious need for at least a third compound. To obtain additional information about ligands attached to Co, valence-to-core X-ray emission spectra (VTC-XES) using the Kβ2,5 and the satellite structure Kβ″ and VTC-XANES spectra thereof were also recorded, by which the former results are confirmed. Further on, FEFF simulations indicate that a Co-N compound is a very likely candidate for the third

  6. High Resolution Spectroscopy of Naphthalene Calibrated by AN Optical Frequency Comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Akiko; Nakashima, Kazuki; Matsuba, Ayumi; Misono, Masatoshi

    2015-06-01

    In high-resolution molecular spectroscopy, the precise measure of the optical frequency is crucial to evaluate minute shifts and splittings of the energy levels. On the other hand, in such spectroscopy, thousands of spectral lines distributed over several wavenumbers have to be measured by a continuously scanning cw laser. Therefore, the continuously changing optical frequency of the scanning laser has to be determined with enough precision. To satisfy these contradictory requirements, we have been developed two types of high-resolution spectroscopic systems employing an optical frequency comb. One of the systems employs RF band-pass filters to generate equally spaced frequency markers for optical frequency calibration, and is appropriate for wide wavelength-range measurement with relatively high scanning rate.^a In the other system, the beat frequency between the optical frequency comb and the scanning laser is controlled by an acousto-optic frequency shifter. This system is suitable for more precise measurement, and enables detailed analyses of frequency characteristics of scanning laser.^b In the present study, we observe Doppler-free two-photon absorption spectra of A^1B1u (v_4 = 1) ← X^1A_g (v = 0) transition of naphthalene around 298 nm. The spectral lines are rotationally resolved and the resolution is about 100 kHz. For ^qQ transition, the rotational lines are assigned, and molecular constants in the excited state are determined. In addition, we analyze the origin of the measured linewidth and Coriolis interactions between energy levels. To determine molecular constants more precisely, we proceed to measure and analyze spectra of other transitions, such as ^sS transitions. ^a A. Nishiyama, D. Ishikawa, and M. Misono, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 30, 2107 (2013). ^b A. Nishiyama, A. Matsuba, and M. Misono, Opt. Lett. 39, 4923 (2014).

  7. High resolution simulation of beam dynamics in electron linacs for x-ray free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, J.; Ryne, R. D.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A. A.; Pogorelov, I. V.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper we report on large-scale high resolution simulations of beam dynamics in electron linacs for the next-generation x-ray free electron lasers (FELs). We describe key features of a parallel macroparticle simulation code including three-dimensional (3D) space-charge effects, short-range structure wakefields, coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) wakefields, and treatment of radio-frequency (rf) accelerating cavities using maps obtained from axial field profiles. We present a study of the microbunching instability causing severe electron beam fragmentation in the longitudinal phase space which is a critical issue for future FELs. Using parameters for a proposed FEL linac at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), we show that a large number of macroparticles (beyond 100 million) is generally needed to control the numerical macroparticle shot noise and avoid overestimating the microbunching instability. We explore the effect of the longitudinal grid on simulation results. We also study the effect of initial uncorrelated energy spread on the final uncorrelated energy spread of the beam for the FEL linac.

  8. Partial-Homogeneity-Based Two-Dimensional High-Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy under Inhomogeneous Magnetic Fields.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Wenqi; Wei, Zhiliang; Ding, Nan; Yang, Yu; Ye, Qimiao; Lin, Yulan; Chen, Zhong

    2016-05-18

    High-resolution multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy serves as an irreplaceable and versatile tool in various chemical investigations. In this study, a method based on the concept of partial homogeneity is developed to offer two-dimensional (2D) high-resolution NMR spectra under inhomogeneous fields. Oscillating gradients are exerted to encode the high-resolution information, and a field-inhomogeneity correction algorithm based on pattern recognition is designed to recover high-resolution spectra. Under fields where inhomogeneity primarily distributes along a single orientation, the proposed method will improve performances of 2D NMR spectroscopy without increasing the experimental duration or significant loss in sensitivity, and thus may open important perspectives for studies of inhomogeneous chemical systems. PMID:26891886

  9. Tunable Microcavity-Stabilized Quantum Cascade Laser for Mid-IR High-Resolution Spectroscopy and Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Borri, Simone; Siciliani de Cumis, Mario; Insero, Giacomo; Bartalini, Saverio; Cancio Pastor, Pablo; Mazzotti, Davide; Galli, Iacopo; Giusfredi, Giovanni; Santambrogio, Gabriele; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Eliyahu, Danny; Ilchenko, Vladimir; Akikusa, Naota; Matsko, Andrey; Maleki, Lute; De Natale, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The need for highly performing and stable methods for mid-IR molecular sensing and metrology pushes towards the development of more and more compact and robust systems. Among the innovative solutions aimed at answering the need for stable mid-IR references are crystalline microresonators, which have recently shown excellent capabilities for frequency stabilization and linewidth narrowing of quantum cascade lasers with compact setups. In this work, we report on the first system for mid-IR high-resolution spectroscopy based on a quantum cascade laser locked to a CaF2 microresonator. Electronic locking narrows the laser linewidth by one order of magnitude and guarantees good stability over long timescales, allowing, at the same time, an easy way for finely tuning the laser frequency over the molecular absorption line. Improvements in terms of resolution and frequency stability of the source are demonstrated by direct sub-Doppler recording of a molecular line. PMID:26901199

  10. Design and performance of a soft-x-ray interferometer for ultra-high-resolution fourier transform spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Moler, E.J.; Hussain, Z.; Duarte, R.M.; Howells, M.R.

    1997-04-01

    A Fourier Transform Soft X-ray spectrometer (FT-SX) has been designed and is under construction for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory as a branch of beamline 9.3.2. The spectrometer is a novel soft x-ray interferometer designed for ultra-high resolution (theoretical resolving power E/{delta}E{approximately}10{sup 6}) spectroscopy in the photon energy region of 60-120 eV. This instrument is expected to provide experimental results which sensitively test models of correlated electron processes in atomic and molecular physics. The design criteria and consequent technical challenges posed by the short wavelengths of x-rays and desired resolving power are discussed. The fundamental and practical aspects of soft x-ray interferometry are also explored.

  11. Tunable Microcavity-Stabilized Quantum Cascade Laser for Mid-IR High-Resolution Spectroscopy and Sensing.

    PubMed

    Borri, Simone; Siciliani de Cumis, Mario; Insero, Giacomo; Bartalini, Saverio; Cancio Pastor, Pablo; Mazzotti, Davide; Galli, Iacopo; Giusfredi, Giovanni; Santambrogio, Gabriele; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Eliyahu, Danny; Ilchenko, Vladimir; Akikusa, Naota; Matsko, Andrey; Maleki, Lute; De Natale, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The need for highly performing and stable methods for mid-IR molecular sensing and metrology pushes towards the development of more and more compact and robust systems. Among the innovative solutions aimed at answering the need for stable mid-IR references are crystalline microresonators, which have recently shown excellent capabilities for frequency stabilization and linewidth narrowing of quantum cascade lasers with compact setups. In this work, we report on the first system for mid-IR high-resolution spectroscopy based on a quantum cascade laser locked to a CaF₂ microresonator. Electronic locking narrows the laser linewidth by one order of magnitude and guarantees good stability over long timescales, allowing, at the same time, an easy way for finely tuning the laser frequency over the molecular absorption line. Improvements in terms of resolution and frequency stability of the source are demonstrated by direct sub-Doppler recording of a molecular line. PMID:26901199

  12. Spatially resolved high resolution x-ray spectroscopy for magnetically confined fusion plasmas (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Ince-Cushman, A.; Rice, J. E.; Reinke, M. L.; Podpaly, Y.; Marmar, E. S.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Scott, S.; Gu, M. F.; Eikenberry, E.; Broennimann, Ch.; Lee, S. G.

    2008-10-15

    The use of high resolution x-ray crystal spectrometers to diagnose fusion plasmas has been limited by the poor spatial localization associated with chord integrated measurements. Taking advantage of a new x-ray imaging spectrometer concept [M. Bitter et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 3660 (2004)], and improvements in x-ray detector technology [Ch. Broennimann et al., J. Synchrotron Radiat. 13, 120 (2006)], a spatially resolving high resolution x-ray spectrometer has been built and installed on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. This instrument utilizes a spherically bent quartz crystal and a set of two dimensional x-ray detectors arranged in the Johann configuration [H. H. Johann, Z. Phys. 69, 185 (1931)] to image the entire plasma cross section with a spatial resolution of about 1 cm. The spectrometer was designed to measure line emission from H-like and He-like argon in the wavelength range 3.7 and 4.0 A with a resolving power of approximately 10 000 at frame rates up to 200 Hz. Using spectral tomographic techniques [I. Condrea, Phys. Plasmas 11, 2427 (2004)] the line integrated spectra can be inverted to infer profiles of impurity emissivity, velocity, and temperature. From these quantities it is then possible to calculate impurity density and electron temperature profiles. An overview of the instrument, analysis techniques, and example profiles are presented.

  13. High-resolution atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy of native membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bippes, Christian A.; Muller, Daniel J.

    2011-08-01

    Membranes confining cells and cellular compartments are essential for life. Membrane proteins are molecular machines that equip cell membranes with highly sophisticated functionality. Examples of such functions are signaling, ion pumping, energy conversion, molecular transport, specific ligand binding, cell adhesion and protein trafficking. However, it is not well understood how most membrane proteins work and how the living cell regulates their function. We review how atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be applied for structural and functional investigations of native membrane proteins. High-resolution time-lapse AFM imaging records membrane proteins at work, their oligomeric state and their dynamic assembly. The AFM stylus resembles a multifunctional toolbox that allows the measurement of several chemical and physical parameters at the nanoscale. In the single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) mode, AFM quantifies and localizes interactions in membrane proteins that stabilize their folding and modulate their functional state. Dynamic SMFS discloses fascinating insights into the free energy landscape of membrane proteins. Single-cell force spectroscopy quantifies the interactions of live cells with their environment to single-receptor resolution. In the future, technological progress in AFM-based approaches will enable us to study the physical nature of biological interactions in more detail and decipher how cells control basic processes.

  14. Millimeter and Sub-millimeter High Resolution Spectroscopy: New Frontiers with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziurys, Lucy M.

    2016-06-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that new laboratory data will be critical for the next decade of observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). The high spatial resolution offered by ALMA will probe new regions of molecular complexity, including the inner envelopes of evolved stars, regions dominated by UV radiation, and the densest cores of molecular clouds. New molecular lines will be discovered in the wide wavelength range covered by the ALMA bands, and high resolution, gas-phase spectroscopy are needed to provide crucial “rest frequencies.” In particular, highly accurate methods that measure millimeter and sub-millimeter rotational transitions, such as direct absorption and Fourier transform mm-wave techniques, are important, especially when coupled to exotic molecular production schemes. Recent ALMA studies of SH+ and larger organic species have already demonstrated the need for laboratory measurements. New laboratory work will likely be required for circumstellar refractory molecules, radicals and ions generated near photon-dominated regions (PDRs), and large, organic-type species. This talk will give an overview of current contributions of laboratory spectroscopy to ALMA observations, summarize relevant spectroscopic techniques, and provide input into future prospects and directions.

  15. Far Infrared High Resolution Synchrotron FTIR Spectroscopy of the Low Frequency Bending Modes of Dmso

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuisset, Arnaud; Smirnova, Irina; Bocquet, Robin; Hindle, Francis; Mouret, Gael; Sadovskii, Dmitrii A.; Pirali, Olivier; Roy, Pascale

    2010-06-01

    In addition to its importance for industrial and environmental studies, the monitoring of DiMethylSulfOxyde (DMSO, (CH_3)_2SO) concentrations is of considerable interest for civil protection. The existing high resolution gas phase spectroscopic data of DMSO only concerned the pure rotational transitions in the ground state. In the Far-IR domain, the low-frequency rovibrational transitions have never previously resolved. The high brightness of the AILES beamline of the synchrotron SOLEIL and the instrumental sensitivity provided by the multipass cell allowed to measure for the first time these transitions. 1581 A-type and C-type transitions in the ν11 band have been assigned and 25 molecular constants of Watson's s-form hamiltonian developed to degree 8 have been fitted within the experimental accuracy. The use of then synchrotron radiation has opened many possibilities for new spectroscopic studies. Together with several other recent studies, our successful measurement and analysis of DMSO convincingly demonstrates the potential of the AILES beamline for high resolution FIR spectroscopy. Thus our present work is just at the beginning of unraveling the rovibrational structure of low frequency bending and torsional vibrational states of DMSO and yielding important comprehensive structural and spectroscopic information on this molecule. L. Margules, R. A. Motienko, E. A. Alekseev, J. Demaison, J. Molec. Spectrosc., 260(23),2009 V. Typke, M. Dakkouri, J. Molec. Struct., 599(177),2001 A. Cuisset, L. Nanobashvili, I. Smirnova, R. Bocquet, F. Hindle, G. Mouret, O. Pirali, P. Roy, D. Sadovskii, Chem. Phys. Lett., accepted for publication

  16. M31 GLOBULAR CLUSTER ABUNDANCES FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION, INTEGRATED-LIGHT SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Colucci, Janet E.; McWilliam, Andrew; Cohen, Judith G. E-mail: sacamero@umich.ed E-mail: andy@ociw.ed

    2009-10-10

    We report the first detailed chemical abundances for five globular clusters (GCs) in M31 from high-resolution (R approx 25,000) spectroscopy of their integrated light (IL). These GCs are the first in a larger set of clusters observed as part of an ongoing project to study the formation history of M31 and its GC population. The data presented here were obtained with the HIRES echelle spectrograph on the Keck I telescope and are analyzed using a new IL spectra analysis method that we have developed. In these clusters, we measure abundances for Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Y, and Ba, ages >=10 Gyr, and a range in [Fe/H] of -0.9 to -2.2. As is typical of Milky Way GCs, we find these M31 GCs to be enhanced in the alpha-elements Ca, Si, and Ti relative to Fe. We also find [Mg/Fe] to be low relative to other [alpha/Fe], and [Al/Fe] to be enhanced in the IL abundances. These results imply that abundances of Mg, Al (and likely O, Na) recovered from IL do display the inter- and intra-cluster abundance variations seen in individual Milky Way GC stars, and that special care should be taken in the future in interpreting low- or high-resolution IL abundances of GCs that are based on Mg-dominated absorption features. Fe-peak and the neutron-capture elements Ba and Y also follow Milky Way abundance trends. We also present high-precision velocity dispersion measurements for all five M31 GCs, as well as independent constraints on the reddening toward the clusters from our analysis.

  17. High Resolution and Low-Temperature Photoelectron Spectroscopy of an Oxygen-Linked Fullerene Dimer Dianion: C120O2-

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xue B.; Matheis, Katerina; Ioffe, Ilya N.; Goryunkov, Alexey A.; Yang, Jie; Kappes, Manfred M.; Wang, Lai S.

    2008-03-21

    C120O comprises two C60 cages linked by a furan ring and is formed by reactions of C60O and C60. We have produced doubly-charged anions of this fullerene dimer (C120O2–) and studied its electronic structure and stability using photoelectron spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. High resolution and vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectra were obtained at 70 K and at several photon energies. The second electron affinity of C120O was measured to be 1.02 ± 0.03 eV and the intramolecular Coulomb repulsion was estimated to be about 0.8 eV in C120O2– on the basis of the observed repulsive Coulomb barrier. A low-lying excited state (2B1) was also observed for C120O– at 0.09 eV above the ground state (2A1). The C120O2– dianion can be viewed as a single electron on each C60 ball very weakly coupled. Theoretical calculations showed that the singlet and triplet states of C120O2– are nearly degenerate and can both be present in the experiment. The computed electron binding energies and excitation energies, as well as Franck-Condon factors, are used to help interpret the photoelectron spectra. A C-C bond-cleaved isomer, C60-O-C602–, was also observed with a higher electron binding energy of 1.54 eV.

  18. Time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy: a preliminary study of the distribution of Cu2+ and Cu2+/Pb2+ on a Bt horizon surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, B; Vega, F A; Serra, C; Silva, L F O; Andrade, M L

    2011-11-15

    Relatively new techniques can help in determining the occurrence of mineral species and the distribution of contaminants on soil surfaces such as natural minerals and organic matter. The Bt horizon from an Endoleptic Luvisol was chosen because of its well-known sorption capability. The samples were contaminated with Cu(2+) and/or Pb(2+) and both sorption and desorption experiments were performed. The preferential distribution of the contaminant species ((63)Cu and (208)Pb) to the main soil components and their associations were studied together with the effectiveness of the surface sorption and desorption processes. The results obtained were compared with non-contaminated samples as well as with previous results obtained by different analytical techniques and advanced statistical analysis. Pb(2+) competes favorably for the sorption sites in this soil, mainly in oxides and the clay fraction. Cu(2+) and Pb(2+) were mainly associated with hematite, gibbsite, vermiculite and chlorite. This study will serve as a basis for further scientific research on the soil retention of heavy metals. New techniques such as spectroscopic imaging and transmission electron microscopy make it possible to check which soil components retain heavy metals, thereby contributing to propose effective measures for the remediation of contaminated soil. PMID:21920666

  19. Correlating high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy and gene analysis in osteoarthritic cartilage.

    PubMed

    Tufts, Lauren; Shet Vishnudas, Keerthi; Fu, Eunice; Kurhanewicz, John; Ries, Michael; Alliston, Tamara; Li, Xiaojuan

    2015-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common multifactorial and heterogeneous degenerative joint disease, and biochemical changes in cartilage matrix occur during the early stages of OA before morphological changes occur. Thus, it is desired to measure regional biochemical changes in the joint. High-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) NMR spectroscopy is a powerful method of observing cartilaginous biochemical changes ex vivo, including the concentrations of alanine and N-acetyl, which are markers of collagen and total proteoglycan content, respectively. Previous studies have observed significant changes in chondrocyte metabolism of OA cartilage via the altered gene expression profiles of ACAN, COL2A1 and MMP13, which encode aggrecan, type II collagen and matrix metalloproteinase 13 (a protein crucial in the degradation of type II collagen), respectively. Employing HRMAS, this study aimed to elucidate potential relationships between N-acetyl and/or alanine and ACAN, COL2A1 and/or MMP13 expression profiles in OA cartilage. Thirty samples from the condyles of five subjects undergoing total knee arthroplasty to treat OA were collected. HRMAS spectra were obtained at 11.7 T for each sample. RNA was subsequently extracted to determine gene expression profiles. A significant negative correlation between N-acetyl metabolite and ACAN gene expression levels was observed; this provides further evidence of N-acetyl as a biomarker of cartilage degeneration. The alanine doublet was distinguished in the spectra of 15 of the 30 specimens of this study. Alanine can only be detected with HRMAS NMR spectroscopy when the collagen framework has been degraded such that alanine is sufficiently mobile to form a distinguished peak in the spectrum. Thus, HRMAS NMR spectroscopy may provide unique localized measurements of collagenous degeneration in OA cartilage. The identification of imaging markers that could provide a link between OA pathology and chondrocyte metabolism will facilitate the

  20. What can we Expect of High-Resolution Spectroscopies on Carbohydrates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocinero, Emilio J.; Ecija, Patricia; Uriarte, Iciar; Usabiaga, Imanol; Fernández, José A.; Basterretxea, Francisco J.; Lesarri, Alberto; Davis, Benjamin G.

    2015-06-01

    Carbohydrates are one of the most multifaceted building blocks, performing numerous roles in living organisms. We present several structural investigations on carbohydrates exploiting an experimental strategy which combines microwave (MW) and laser spectroscopies in high-resolution. Laser spectroscopy offers high sensitivity coupled to mass and conformer selectivity, making it ideal for polysaccharides studies. On the other hand, microwave spectroscopy provides much higher resolution and direct access to molecular structure of monosaccharides. This combined approach provides not only accurate chemical insight on conformation, structure and molecular properties, but also benchmarking standards guiding the development of theoretical calculations. In order to illustrate the possibilities of a combined MW-laser approach we present results on the conformational landscape and structural properties of several monosaccharides and oligosaccharides including microsolvation and molecular recognition processes of carbohydrates. E.J. Cocinero, A. Lesarri, P. écija, F.J. Basterretxea, J.-U. Grabow, J.A. Fernández and F. Casta {n}o Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 51, 3119-3124, 2012. E.J. Cocinero, A. Lesarri, P. écija, Á. Cimas, B.G. Davis, F.J. Basterretxea, J.A. Fernández and F. Casta {n}o J. Am. Chem. Soc. 135, 2845-2852, 2013. E.J. Cocinero, P. Çarçabal, T.D. Vaden, J.P. Simons and B.G. Davis Nature 469, 76-80, 2011. C.S. Barry, E.J. Cocinero, P. Çarçabal, D.P. Gamblin, E.C. Stanca-Kaposta, S. M. Fernández-Alonso, S. Rudić, J.P. Simons and B.G. Davis J. Am. Chem. Soc. 135, 16895-16903, 2013.

  1. High-resolution X-ray emission spectroscopy with transition-edge sensors: present performance and future potential.

    PubMed

    Uhlig, J; Doriese, W B; Fowler, J W; Swetz, D S; Jaye, C; Fischer, D A; Reintsema, C D; Bennett, D A; Vale, L R; Mandal, U; O'Neil, G C; Miaja-Avila, L; Joe, Y I; El Nahhas, A; Fullagar, W; Gustafsson, F Parnefjord; Sundström, V; Kurunthu, D; Hilton, G C; Schmidt, D R; Ullom, J N

    2015-05-01

    X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) is a powerful element-selective tool to analyze the oxidation states of atoms in complex compounds, determine their electronic configuration, and identify unknown compounds in challenging environments. Until now the low efficiency of wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectrometer technology has limited the use of XES, especially in combination with weaker laboratory X-ray sources. More efficient energy-dispersive detectors have either insufficient energy resolution because of the statistical limits described by Fano or too low counting rates to be of practical use. This paper updates an approach to high-resolution X-ray emission spectroscopy that uses a microcalorimeter detector array of superconducting transition-edge sensors (TESs). TES arrays are discussed and compared with conventional methods, and shown under which circumstances they are superior. It is also shown that a TES array can be integrated into a table-top time-resolved X-ray source and a soft X-ray synchrotron beamline to perform emission spectroscopy with good chemical sensitivity over a very wide range of energies. PMID:25931095

  2. Electron spectrometer for gas-phase spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bozek, J.D.; Schlachter, A.S.

    1997-04-01

    An electron spectrometer for high-resolution spectroscopy of gaseous samples using synchrotron radiation has been designed and constructed. The spectrometer consists of a gas cell, cylindrical electrostatic lens, spherical-sector electron energy analyzer, position-sensitive detector and associated power supplies, electronics and vacuum pumps. Details of the spectrometer design are presented together with some representative spectra.

  3. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Mars: Recent Results and Implications for Atmospheric Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krasnopolsky, V. A.; Owen, T. C.; Maillard, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    It is believed that Earth, Venus, and Mars were formed by the same rocky and icy planetesimals, which resembled meteorites and comets in their composition, respectively. These planets are thus expected to have initially had the same chemical and isotope composition. Scaling the mass of the terrestrial ocean by the planetary mass ratio, the expected initial H2O abundance on Mars is a layer of about 1 km thick. Scaling the abundance of CO2 on Venus, the expected initial CO2 abundance on Mars is 15 bars. Evidently, significant parts of the initial H2O and CO2 abundances have been lost. Intense meteorite impact erosion and hydrodynamic escape of hydrogen (which could drag to escape more heavy species) were dominant loss processes in the first 0.8 Byr. Later, atmospheric sputtering by O+ ions resulted in the dissociation of CO2 and massive losses of O, C, and H. Formation of carbonates also reduced CO2 to its present abundance which currently exists in the atmosphere, on the polar caps, and is absorbed by regolith. Water loss is currently due to thermal escape of H and nonthermal escape of O, both formed by photodissociation of H2O. All loss processes resulted in fractionation of the H, O, and C isotopes. Therefore, the current isotope ratios in H2O and CO2 are clues to the history of volatiles on Mars. There are three tools to study H2O and CO2 isotopes in the martian atmosphere: (i) mass spectrometry from landing probes, (ii) analyses of Mars' gases trapped in the SNC meteorites which were ejected from Mars, and (iii) high-resolution spectroscopy of the H2O andCO2 bands. Method (i) is the best but is the most expensive. Mass spectrometers to be used should be designed for high-precision isotope measurements. Method (ii) makes it possible to reach an uncertainty +/- 0.1%. However, the obtained results are affected by some uncontrolled interactions: isotope fractionations of (1) trapped gases and (2) those released in pyrolysis, (3) contribution of the impactor, isotope

  4. The Astro-H Mission and High Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Richard L.; Mitsuda, K.; Awaki, H.; Fujimoto, R.; den Herder, J. W.; Ishida, M.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Kunieda, H.; Maeda, Y.; McCammon, D.; Ohashi, T.; Okajima, T.; Porter, F.; Serlemitsos, P.; Soong, Y.; Szymkowiak, A. E.; Takahashi, T.; Takei, Y.; Tashiro, M.; Tawara, Y.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Astro-H Collaboration

    2010-03-01

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Institute of Space and Aeronautical Science (JAXA/ISAS) is developing a major new high-energy astrophysics observatory. Astro-H will provide broadband, high-resolution spectroscopy and imaging over the 0.3-600 keV band using four co-aligned instruments operated simultaneously. The mission will have major US participation supported by NASA as well as contributions from Europe and Canada. For high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy, the soft x-ray spectrometer (SXS) will feature an x-ray calorimeter spectrometer and x-ray mirror. The instrument will cover the energy range 0.3-12 keV and is expected to have an energy resolution better than 5 eV (FWHM) with a collecting area of over 200 cm2 at 6 keV. The cooling system will have both cryogenic and mechanical coolers for up to five years of operation. The SXS is a joint collaboration between NASA/GSFC, ISAS/JAXA and SRON, and the NASA participation was selected as an Explorers Mission of Opportunity in June 2008. As part of this investigation, a fully supported US guest observer program was also proposed and is under review by NASA. Other instruments on Astro-H include a soft x-ray imager (SXI) consisting of a large area CCD camera with 35 arcmin field-of-view and a hard x-ray imager (HXI) that uses focusing x-ray optics combined with both double-sided silicon strip detectors and CdTe array. The 12-m focal length optical system will provide an effective area of 300 cm2 at 30 keV, and high sensitivity from 10-80 keV using multilayer x-ray mirrors with 2-4 arcmin imaging. The soft gamma detector (SGD) is a non-focusing instrument based on a new, narrow-field-of-view Compton telescope with an energy range of 10-600 keV and sensitivity at 300 keV that is more than 10 times higher than Suzaku. Astro-H is planned for launch in 2014 aboard a JAXA HII-A rocket.

  5. High-Resolution Analytical Electron Microscopy Characterization of Corrosion and Cracking at Buried Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Thomas, Larry E.

    2001-07-01

    Recent results are presented demonstrating the application of cross-sectional analytical transmission electron microscopy (ATEM) to corrosion and cracking in high-temperature water environments. Microstructural, chemical and crystallographic characterization of buried interfaces at near-atomic resolutions is shown to reveal evidence for unexpected local environments, corrosion reactions and material transformations. Information obtained by a wide variety of high-resolution imaging and analysis methods indicates the processes occurring during crack advance and provides insights into the mechanisms controlling environmental degradation.

  6. The Potential for Bayesian Compressive Sensing to Significantly Reduce Electron Dose in High Resolution STEM Images

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Andrew J.; Yang, Hao; Carin, Lawrence; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D.

    2014-02-11

    The use of high resolution imaging methods in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is limited in many cases by the sensitivity of the sample to the beam and the onset of electron beam damage (for example in the study of organic systems, in tomography and during in-situ experiments). To demonstrate that alternative strategies for image acquisition can help alleviate this beam damage issue, here we apply compressive sensing via Bayesian dictionary learning to high resolution STEM images. These experiments successively reduce the number of pixels in the image (thereby reducing the overall dose while maintaining the high resolution information) and show promising results for reconstructing images from this reduced set of randomly collected measurements. We show that this approach is valid for both atomic resolution images and nanometer resolution studies, such as those that might be used in tomography datasets, by applying the method to images of strontium titanate and zeolites. As STEM images are acquired pixel by pixel while the beam is scanned over the surface of the sample, these post acquisition manipulations of the images can, in principle, be directly implemented as a low-dose acquisition method with no change in the electron optics or alignment of the microscope itself.

  7. Quantitative neuropathology by high resolution magic angle spinning proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, L. L.; Ma, M. J.; Becerra, L.; Ptak, T.; Tracey, I.; Lackner, A.; González, R. G.

    1997-01-01

    We describe a method that directly relates tissue neuropathological analysis to medical imaging. Presently, only indirect and often tenuous relationships are made between imaging (such as MRI or x-ray computed tomography) and neuropathology. We present a biochemistry-based, quantitative neuropathological method that can help to precisely quantify information provided by in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1HMRS), an emerging medical imaging technique. This method, high resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) 1HMRS, is rapid and requires only small amounts of unprocessed samples. Unlike chemical extraction or other forms of tissue processing, this method analyzes tissue directly, thus minimizing artifacts. We demonstrate the utility of this method by assessing neuronal damage using multiple tissue samples from differently affected brain regions in a case of Pick disease, a human neurodegenerative disorder. Among different regions, we found an excellent correlation between neuronal loss shown by traditional neurohistopathology and decrease of the neuronal marker N-acetylaspartate measured by HRMAS 1HMRS. This result demonstrates for the first time, to our knowledge, a direct, quantitative link between a decrease in N-acetylaspartate and neuronal loss in a human neurodegenerative disease. As a quantitative method, HRMAS 1HMRS has potential applications in experimental and clinical neuropathologic investigations. It should also provide a rational basis for the interpretation of in vivo 1HMRS studies of human neurological disorders. PMID:9177231

  8. Determination of reference ultrasound parameters for model and hydrofluoroalkane propellants using high-resolution ultrasonic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hoe, Susan; Young, Paul M; Rogueda, Philippe; Traini, Daniela

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the reference ultrasonic velocity (v) and attenuation coefficient (alpha) for 2H, 3H-perfluoropentane (HPFP), 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFA-134a) and 1,1,1,2,3,3,3-tetrafluoroethane (HFA-227) propellants, for the future purpose of characterising pressurised metered dose inhaler (pMDI) formulations using high-resolution ultrasonic spectroscopy (HRUS). Perfluoroheptane (PFH) was used as a reference material for HPFP. With its velocity and attenuation coefficient determined at 25 degrees C, HPFP was subsequently used as a reference for HFA-134a and HFA-227. It was found that there is a linear decline in ultrasonic velocity with an increase in temperature. As with HPFP, the ultrasonic velocity of HFA-134a and HFA-227 were successfully calculated at 25 degrees C. However, the difference in density and viscosity between reference and sample prevented accurate determination of reference attenuation coefficient for the hydrofluoroalkanes. With ultrasonic velocity alone, dispersion concentration and stability monitoring for experimental pMDI formulations is possible using HRUS. However, at this point in time measurement of particle size is not feasible. PMID:18459053

  9. On the accuracy of CO line positions for high resolution IR stellar spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauval, A. J.; Farrenq, R.; Guelachvili, G.; Grevesse, N.; Farmer, C. B.; Norton, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The paper demonstrates the high accuracy of line positions derived from improved sets of Dunham coefficients for the four more abundant isotopic species of carbon monoxide - (C-12)(O-16), (C-13)(O-16), (C-12)(O-18), and (C-12)(O-17) - which are present in the sun and in cool stellar atmospheres. These new spectroscopic constants make it possible to predict very accurate positions of CO lines at any J-values, especially at very high rotational excitation (up to J around 135). Earlier proposed identifications of CO lines at large J-values are checked, and some incorrect identifications in sunspot spectra are found. The present accurate line positions are also compared with predictions from other available sets of molecular constants. It is concluded that the present improved sets of molecular constants are the most appropriate to all problems of high-resolution stellar and solar spectroscopy at any J- and v-values, particularly for synthetic spectra of cool stars.

  10. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Winds Associated with T Tauri Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iguchi, Naoto; Itoh, Yoichi

    2016-02-01

    We carried out optical high-resolution spectroscopy of T Tauri stars using the Subaru Telescope. Using archived data from the Keck Telescope and the Very Large Telescope, we detected forbidden lines of [S II] at 4069 Å, in addition to those of [O I] at 5577 Å and 6300 Å, for 13 T Tauri stars. We consider that low-velocity components of these forbidden lines emanate from the wind associated with T Tauri stars. Using two flux ratios of the three lines, we simultaneously determined the hydrogen density and temperature of the winds. The winds of T Tauri stars have a hydrogen density of 2.5 × 106 cm-3 - 2.5 × 109 cm-3 and a temperature of 10800 -18 000 K. The mass loss rates by the wind are estimated to lie in the range from 2.0 × 10-10 M⊙ yr-1 to 1.4 × 10-9 M⊙ yr-1. The mass loss rates are found to increase with increasing mass accretion rates. The ratio of the mass loss rate to the mass accretion rate is 0.001-0.1 for classical T Tauri stars and 0.1-1 for transitional disk objects.

  11. Practical high resolution detection method for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew J. Effenberger Jr; Jill R. Scott

    2012-02-01

    A Fabry-Perot etalon was coupled to a Czerny-Turner spectrometer to acquire high-resolution measurements in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The spectrometer was built using an inexpensive etalon coupled to a standard 0.5-m imaging spectrometer. The Hg emission doublet at 313.2 nm was used to evaluate instrument performance because it has a splitting of 29 pm. The 313.2 nm doublet was chosen due to the similar splitting seen in isotope splitting from uranium at 424.437 nm, which is 25 pm. The Hg doublet was easily resolved from a continuous source Hg-lamp with a 2 s acquisition. The doublet was also resolved in LIBS spectra of cinnabar (HgS) from the accumulation of 600 laser shots at rate of 10 Hz, or 1 min, under a helium atmosphere. In addition to observed spitting of the 313.2 nm Hg doublet, the FWHM of the 313.1844 nm line from the doublet is reported at varying He atmospheric pressures. The high performance, low cost, and compact footprint makes this system highly competitive with 2-m double pass Czerny-Turner spectrometers.

  12. High-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of metal compounds in neurodegenerative brain tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Collingwood, J.F.; Mikhaylova, A.; Davidson, M.R.; Batich, C.; Streit, W.J.; Eskin, T.; Terry, J.; Barrea, R.; Underhill, R.S.; Dobson, J.

    2008-06-16

    Fluorescence mapping and microfocus X-ray absorption spectroscopy are used to detect, locate and identify iron biominerals and other inorganic metal accumulations in neurodegenerative brain tissue at sub-cellular resolution (< 5 microns). Recent progress in developing the technique is reviewed. Synchrotron X-rays are used to map tissue sections for metals of interest, and XANES and XAFS are used to characterize anomalous concentrations of the metals in-situ so that they can be correlated with tissue structures and disease pathology. Iron anomalies associated with biogenic magnetite, ferritin and haemoglobin are located and identified in an avian tissue model with a pixel resolution {approx} 5 microns. Subsequent studies include brain tissue sections from transgenic Huntington's mice, and the first high-resolution mapping and identification of iron biominerals in human Alzheimer's and control autopsy brain tissue. Technical developments include use of microfocus diffraction to obtain structural information about biominerals in-situ, and depositing sample location grids by lithography for the location of anomalies by conventional microscopy. The combined techniques provide a breakthrough in the study of both intra- and extra-cellular iron compounds and related metals in tissue. The information to be gained from this approach has implications for future diagnosis and treatment of neurodegeneration, and for our understanding of the mechanisms involved.

  13. Spectral characteristics of chlorites and Mg-serpentines using high- resolution reflectance spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, T.V.V.; Clark, R.N.

    1989-01-01

    The present laboratory study using high-resolution reflectance spectroscopy (0.25-2.7 ??m) focuses on two primary phyllosilicate groups, serpentines and chlorites. The results show that it is possible to spectrally distinguish between isochemical end-members of the Mg-rich serpentine group (chrysotile, antigorite, and lizardite) and to recognize spectral variations in chlorites as a function of Fe/Mg ratio (~8-38 wt% Fe). The position and relative strength of the 1.4-??m absorption feature in the trioctahedral chlorites appear to be correlated to the total iron content and/or the Mg/Si ratio and the loss on ignition values of the sample. Spectral differences in the 2.3-??m wavelength region can be attributed to differences in lattice environments and are characteristic for specific trioctahedral chlorites. The 1.4-??m feature in the isochemical Mg-rich serpentines (total iron content ~1.5-7.0 wt%) show marked spectral differences, apparently due to structural differences. -Authors

  14. Advances in Computational High-Resolution Mechanical Spectroscopy HRMSPart I: Logarithmic Decrement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majewski, M.; Piłat, A.; Magalas, L. B.

    2012-02-01

    The comparison between different methods used to compute the logarithmic decrement in high-resolution mechanical spectroscopy (HRMS) is analyzed. The performance of parametric OMI method (Optimization in Multiple Intervals) and interpolated discrete Fourier transform (IpDFT) methods are investigated as a function of the sampling frequency used to digitize free decaying oscillations in low-frequency resonant mechanical spectrometers. It is clearly demonstrated that a new Yoshida-Magalas (YM) method is the most powerful IpDFT-based method which outperforms the standard Yoshida (Y) method and other DFT-based methods. Four IpDFT methods and the OMI method are carefully analyzed as a function of the sampling frequency. The results presented in this work clearly show that the relative error in the estimation of the logarithmic decrement depends both on the length of free decaying signal and on the sampling frequency. The effect of the sampling frequency was not yet reported in the literature. The performance of different methods used in the computations of the logarithmic decrement can be listed in the following order: (1) the OMI, (2) the Yoshida-Magalas YM, (3) the Yoshida-Magalas YMC, and finally (4) the Yoshida Y.

  15. High-resolution spectroscopy on the laser-cooling candidate La^{-}.

    PubMed

    Jordan, E; Cerchiari, G; Fritzsche, S; Kellerbauer, A

    2015-09-11

    The bound-bound transition from the 5d^{2}6s^{2} ^{3}F_{2}^{e} ground state to the 5d6s^{2}6p ^{3}D_{1}^{o} excited state in negative lanthanum has been proposed as a candidate for laser cooling, which has not yet been achieved for negative ions. Anion laser cooling holds the potential to allow the production of ultracold ensembles of any negatively charged species. We have studied the aforementioned transition in a beam of negative La ions by high-resolution laser spectroscopy. The center-of-gravity frequency was measured to be 96.592 80(10) THz. Seven of the nine expected hyperfine structure transitions were resolved. The observed peaks were unambiguously assigned to the predicted hyperfine transitions by a fit, confirmed by multiconfigurational self-consistent field calculations. From the determined hyperfine structure we conclude that La^{-} is a promising laser cooling candidate. Using this transition, only three laser beams would be required to repump all hyperfine levels of the ground state. PMID:26406825

  16. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy: the coming-of-age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaastra, J.

    2016-06-01

    Since the launch of Chandra and XMM-Newton, high-resolution X-ray spectra of cosmic sources of all kinds have become available. These spectra have resulted in major scientific breakthroughs. However, due to the techniques used, in general high-quality spectra can only be obtained for the brightest few sources of each class. Moreover, except for the most compact extended sources, like cool core clusters, grating spectra are limited to point sources. ASTRO-H makes another major step forward, in yielding for the first time high-quality spectra of extended sources, and improved spectral sensitivity in the Fe-K band. With the launch of Athena, X-ray spectroscopy will become mature. It allows us to extend the investigations from the few handful of brightest sources of each category to a large number of sources far away in space and time, or to get high time-resolution, high-spectral resolution spectra of bright time variable sources.

  17. High resolution X-ray spectroscopy of SN 1987 A: monitoring with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, R.; Haberl, F.; Aschenbach, B.; Hasinger, G.

    2010-06-01

    Context. The ongoing propagation of the supernova blast wave of SN 1987 A through its inner circumstellar ring has caused a drastic increase in X-ray luminosity in the past few years, which has allowed detailed high resolution X-ray spectroscopy to be performed with the Reflection Grating Spectrometer. Aims: We report the results of our XMM-Newton monitoring of SN 1987 A, which may be used to follow the detailed evolution of the arising supernova remnant. Methods: The fluxes and broadening of the numerous emission lines measured in the dispersed spectra provide information about the evolution of the X-ray emitting plasma and its dynamics. These were analyzed in combination with the EPIC-pn spectra, which allow a precise determination of the higher temperature plasma. We modeled individual emission lines and fitted plasma emission models. Results: For observations between 2003 and 2007 in particular, we detect significant evolution in the plasma parameters and a deceleration of the radial velocity in the lower temperature plasma regions. We detected (at 3σ-level) an iron K feature in the coadded EPIC-pn spectra. Conclusions: By comparing with Chandra grating observations in 2004, we observe a clear temporal coherence of the spectral evolution and the sudden deceleration of the expansion velocity detectable in X-ray images ~6100 days after the explosion.

  18. High-efficiency blazed transmission gratings for high-resolution soft x-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilmann, Ralf K.; Bruccoleri, Alexander R.; Schattenburg, Mark L.

    2015-09-01

    High-resolution spectroscopy of astrophysical sources is the key to gaining a quantitative understanding of the history, dynamics, and current conditions of the cosmos. A large-area (> 1,000 cm2), high resolving power (R = λ/Δλ> 3000) soft x-ray grating spectrometer (XGS) that covers the lines of C, N, O, Ne and Fe ions is the ideal tool to address a number of high-priority science questions from the 2010 Decadal Survey, such as the connection between super-massive black holes and large-scale structure via cosmic feedback, the evolution of large- scale structure, the behavior of matter at high densities, and the conditions close to black holes. While no grating missions or instruments are currently approved, an XGS aboard a potential future X-ray Surveyor could easily surpass the above performance metrics. To improve the chances for future soft x-ray grating spectroscopy missions or instruments, grating technology has to progress and advance to higher Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs). To that end we have developed Critical-Angle Transmission (CAT) gratings that combine the advantages of blazed reflection gratings (high efficiency, use of higher diffraction orders) with those of conventional transmission gratings (low mass, relaxed alignment tolerances and temperature requirements, high transparency at higher energies). A CAT grating-based spectrometer can provide performance 1-2 orders of magnitude better than current grating instruments on Chandra and Newton-XMM with minimal resource requirements. At present we have fabricated large-area freestanding CAT gratings with narrow integrated support structures from silicon-on- insulator wafers using advanced lithography and a combination of deep reactive-ion and wet etching. Our latest x-ray test results show record high absolute diffraction efficiencies in blazed orders in excess of 30% with room for improvement.

  19. High-efficiency blazed transmission gratings for high-resolution soft x-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilmann, Ralf K.; Bruccoleri, Alexander R.; Schattenburg, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution spectroscopy of astrophysical sources is the key to gaining a quantitative understanding of the history, dynamics, and current conditions of the cosmos. A large-area (> 1,000 cm2), high resolving power (R = λ/Δλ > 3,000) soft x-ray spectrometer that covers the lines of C, N, O, Ne and Fe ions is the ideal tool to address a number of high-priority sciences questions from the 2010 Decadal Survey, such as the connection between super-massive black holes and large-scale structure via cosmic feedback, the evolution of large-scale structure, the behavior of matter at high densities, and the conditions close to black holes. Numerous mission concepts that meet these requirements have been studied and proposed over the last few years, including grating instruments for the International X-ray Observatory. Nevertheless, no grating missions are currently approved. To improve the chances for future soft x-ray grating spectroscopy missions, grating technology has to progress and be advanced to higher TRLs. We have developed Critical-Angle Transmission (CAT) gratings that combine the advantages of blazed reflection gratings (high efficiency, use of higher diffraction orders) with those of conventional transmission gratings (low mass, relaxed alignment tolerances and temperature requirements, transparent at higher energies). A CAT grating-based spectrometer can provide performance 1-2 orders of magnitude better than current grating instruments on Chandra and Newton-XMM with minimal resource requirements. We have fabricated large-area free-standing CAT gratings with minimal integrated support structures from silicon-on-insulator wafers using advanced lithography and a combination of deep reactive-ion and wet etching, and will present our latest x-ray test results showing record high diffraction efficiencies in blazed orders.

  20. Cassini UVIS Solar Zenith Angle Studies of Titan Dayglow Based on N2 High Resolution Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajello, Joseph; West, Robert; Holsclaw, Greg; Royer, Emilie; Heays, Alan; Bradley, Todd; Stevens, Michael

    2014-11-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed photon emissions of Titan’s day and night limb-airglow on multiple occasions, including during an eclipse observation. On one occasion the UVIS made a Solar Zenith Angle (SZA) study of the Titan limb dayglow (2011 DOY 171) from about 70 to 95 degrees SZA. The UV intensity variation observations of the N2 photoelectron excited spectral features from the EUV (563-118.2 nm) and FUV (111.5-191.2nm) sub-systems followed a Chapman function. For other observations at night on the limb, the emission features are much weaker in intensity. Beyond 120 deg SZA, when the upper atmosphere of Titan below 1200 km is in total XUV darkness, there is an indication of weak and sporadic night side UV airglow emission excited by magnetosphere plasma collisions with ambient thermosphere gas, with similar N2 excited features as above in the daylight or twilight glow over an extended altitude range. We have analyzed the UVIS airglow spectra with models based on high resolution laboratory electron impact induced fluorescence spectra. We have measured high-resolution (FWHM = 0.2 Å) extreme-ultraviolet (EUV, 800-1350 Å) laboratory emission spectra of molecular nitrogen excited by electron impact at 20 and 100 eV. Molecular emission was observed to vibrationally-excited ground state levels as high as v''=17, from the a 1Πg , b 1Πu, and b‧ 1Σu+ excited valence states and the Rydberg series c‧n+1 1Σu+, cn 1Πu and o 1Πu for n between 3 and 9. A total of 491 emission features were observed from N2 electronic-vibrational transitions and atomic N I and N II multiplets. Their emission cross sections were measured.The blended molecular emission bands were disentangled with the aid of a model which solves the coupled-Schroedinger equation

  1. High-resolution photoelectron imaging spectroscopy of cryogenically cooled Fe4O- and Fe5O-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weichman, Marissa L.; DeVine, Jessalyn A.; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2016-08-01

    We report high-resolution photodetachment spectra of the cryogenically cooled iron monoxide clusters Fe4O- and Fe5O- obtained with slow photoelectron velocity-map imaging (cryo-SEVI). Well-resolved vibrational progressions are observed in both sets of spectra, and transitions to low-lying excited states of both species are seen. In order to identify the structural isomers, electronic states, and vibrational modes that contribute to the cryo-SEVI spectra of these clusters, experimental results are compared with density functional theory calculations and Franck-Condon simulations. The main bands observed in the SEVI spectra are assigned to the 15A2←16B2 photodetachment transition of Fe4O- and the 17A'←18A″ photodetachment transition of Fe5O-. We report electron affinities of 1.6980(3) eV for Fe4O and 1.8616(3) eV for Fe5O, although there is some uncertainty as to whether the 15A2 state is the true ground state of Fe4O. The iron atoms have a distorted tetrahedral geometry in Fe4O0/- and a distorted trigonal-bipyramidal arrangement in Fe5O0/-. For both neutral and anionic species, the oxygen atom preferably binds in a μ2-oxo configuration along the cluster edge. This finding is in contrast to prior predictions that Fe5O0/- exhibits a μ3 face-bound structure.

  2. Refinement procedure for the image alignment in high-resolution electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Houben, L; Bar Sadan, M

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution electron tomography from a tilt series of transmission electron microscopy images requires an accurate image alignment procedure in order to maximise the resolution of the tomogram. This is the case in particular for ultra-high resolution where even very small misalignments between individual images can dramatically reduce the fidelity of the resultant reconstruction. A tomographic-reconstruction based and marker-free method is proposed, which uses an iterative optimisation of the tomogram resolution. The method utilises a search algorithm that maximises the contrast in tomogram sub-volumes. Unlike conventional cross-correlation analysis it provides the required correlation over a large tilt angle separation and guarantees a consistent alignment of images for the full range of object tilt angles. An assessment based on experimental reconstructions shows that the marker-free procedure is competitive to the reference of marker-based procedures at lower resolution and yields sub-pixel accuracy even for simulated high-resolution data. PMID:21930024

  3. High Resolution Imaging Spectroscopy for Characterizing Soil Properties over Large Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, D.; Kumar, P.

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative mapping of high resolution surface soil texture (percentage sand, silt and clay), soil organic matter and chemical constituents are important for understanding infiltration, runoff and other surficial hydrologic processes at different scales. The Visible Near Infrared Analysis (VNIRA) method, which is a combination of imaging spectroscopy and laboratory chemical analysis with an underlying statistical model, has been established for the quantification of soil properties from imaging spectrometer data. In this study we characterize the feasibility of quantifying soil properties over large areas with the aim that these methods may be extended to space-borne sensors such as HyspIRI. Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI) is a space-borne NASA mission concept having 10nm contiguous bands in the VSWIR region (380nm to 2500nm) of the electromagnetic spectra. High resolution (7.6m) Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data collected by NASA immediately after the massive 2011 Mississippi River floods at the Birds Point New Madrid (BPNM) floodway, coupled with in situ samples obtained at the time of the flight, is used to generate HyspIRI like data at 60m resolution. The VNIRA method is applied in a data-mining framework for quantification of the different soil textural properties and chemical constituents. The empirical models are further used for creating quantitative maps of the soil properties for the entire BPNM floodway. These maps are compared with the fine resolution AVIRIS maps of the same area for the different legacy landscape features and spatial correlations with the underlying topography immediately disturbed by the flooding event. The scales of variation in the soil constituents captured by the fine resolution data are also compared to the scales of variation captured by coarser resolution data. This study further explores the issues of applicability, challenges (such as the sensitivity of NDVI from mixed neighborhood pixels

  4. Toward an image compression algorithm for the high-resolution electronic still camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nerheim, Rosalee

    1989-01-01

    Taking pictures with a camera that uses a digital recording medium instead of film has the advantage of recording and transmitting images without the use of a darkroom or a courier. However, high-resolution images contain an enormous amount of information and strain data-storage systems. Image compression will allow multiple images to be stored in the High-Resolution Electronic Still Camera. The camera is under development at Johnson Space Center. Fidelity of the reproduced image and compression speed are of tantamount importance. Lossless compression algorithms are fast and faithfully reproduce the image, but their compression ratios will be unacceptably low due to noise in the front end of the camera. Future efforts will include exploring methods that will reduce the noise in the image and increase the compression ratio.

  5. Exploring semiconductor quantum dots and wires by high resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Molina Rubio, Sergio I; Galindo, Pedro; Gonzalez, Luisa; Ripalda, JM; Varela del Arco, Maria; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    We review in this communication our contribution to the structural characterisation of semiconductor quantum dots and wires by high resolution electron microscopy, both in phase-contrast and Z-contrast modes. We show how these techniques contribute to predict the preferential sites of nucleation of these nanostructures, and also determine the compositional distribution in 1D and 0D nanostructures. The results presented here were produced in the framework of the European Network of Excellence entitled 'Self-Assembled semiconductor Nanostructures for new Devices in photonics and Electronics (SANDiE)'.

  6. Ge-diode detector combined with crystal-diffraction spectrometer permits high-resolution gamma ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namenson, A. I.; Smither, R. K.

    1969-01-01

    Crystal-diffraction spectrometer, combined with a lithium-drifted Ge-diode detector, performs high-resolution gamma ray spectroscopy on the complicated neutron-capture gamma ray spectra. The system is most useful in the 1-3 MeV energy range and improves the signal to background ratio.

  7. High-resolution optical spectroscopy of Os-with a view to laser cooling of atomic anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellerbauer, Alban; Fritzsche, Stephan

    2012-11-01

    Atomic anions are generally not amenable to optical spectroscopy because they are loosely bound systems and rarely have bound excited states. Until recently, there was only one known negative ion with a strong bound-bound electronic transition, the osmium anion Os-. The electric-dipole transition between the 4Fe9/2 ground and 6DoJ excited state of this ion provides unique insight into the structure of atomic anions. In addition, it may enable the preparation of ultracold ensembles of negative ions. Laser excitation of the electric-dipole transition in Os- ions could be used to laser-cool them to microkelvin temperatures. If demonstrated to be successful, the technique would allow the cooling of any species of negatively charged ions - from subatomic particles to molecular anions - to ultracold temperatures by sympathetic cooling. We have been investigating the bound-bound electric-dipole transition in Os- by high-resolution laser spectroscopy with a view to using it for the first laser cooling of negative ions. The principle of the method, its potential applications, as well as experimental results are presented.

  8. Experiments with the High Resolution Kaon Spectrometer at Jlab Hall C and the New Spectroscopy of ^12_Lambda B Hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Liguang; Chen, Chunhua; Gogami, Toshiyuki; Kawama, Daisuke; Han, Yuncheng; Yuan, Lulin; Matsumura, Akihiko; Okayasu, Yuichi; Seva, Tomislav; Rodriguez, Victor; Baturin, Pavlo; Acha Quimper, Armando; Achenbach, Carsten; Ahmidouch, Abdellah; Albayrak, Ibrahim; Androic, Darko; Asaturyan, Arshak; Asaturyan, Razmik; Ates, Ozgur; Badui, Rafael; Baker, Oliver; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Boeglin, Werner; Bono, Jason; Bosted, Peter; Brash, Edward; Carter, Philip; Carlini, Roger; Chiba, Atsushi; Christy, Michael; Cole, Leon; Dalton, Mark; Danagoulian, Samuel; Daniel, Aji; De Leo, Raffaele; Dharmawardane, Kahanawita; Doi, Daisuke; Egiyan, Kim; Elaasar, Mostafa; Ent, Rolf; Fenker, Howard; Fujii, Yu; Furic, Miroslav; Gabrielyan, Marianna; Gan, Liping; Garibaldi, Franco; Gaskell, David; Gasparian, Ashot; Gibson, Edward; Gueye, Paul; Hashimoto, Osamu; Honda, D; Horn, Tanja; Hu, Bitao; Hungerford, Ed; Jayalath, Chandana; Jones, Mark; Johnston, Kathleen; Kalantarians, Narbe; Kanda, Hiroki; Kaneta, M; Kato, F; Kato, Seigo; Kawai, Masaharu; Keppel, Cynthia; Khanal, Hari; Kohl, M; Kramer, Laird; Lan, Kejian; Li, Ya; Habarakada Liyanage, Anusha; Luo, Wei; Mack, David; Maeda, Kazushige; Malace, Simona; Margaryan, Amur; Marikyan, Gagik; Markowitz, Pete; Maruta, Tomofumi; Maruyama, Nayuta; Maxwell, Victor; Millener, David; Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Mkrtchyan, Arthur; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; Motoba, Toshio; Nagao, Sho; Nakamura, Satoshi; Narayan, Amrendra; Neville, Casey; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria; Nunez, Angel; Nuruzzaman, nfn; Nomura, Hiroshi; Nonaka, Kenichi; Ohtani, Atsushi; Oyamada, Masamichi; Perez, Naipy; Petkovic, Tomislav; Pochodzalla, J; Qiu, Xiyu; Randeniya, Kapugodage; Raue, Brian; Reinhold, Joerg; Rivera, R; Roche, Julie; Samanta, Chhanda; Sato, Yoshinori; Sawatzky, Bradley; Segbefia, Edwin; Schott, Diane; Shichijo, Ayako; Simicevic, Neven; Smith, Gregory; Song, Yushou; Sumihama, Mizuki; Tadevosyan, Vardan; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Taniya, Naotaka; Tsukada, Kyo; Tvaskis, Vladas; Veilleux, Micah; Vulcan, William; Wells, Steven; Wesselmann, Frank; Wood, Stephen; Yamamoto, Taku; Yan, Chen; Ye, Z; Yokota, Kosuke; Zhamkochyan, Simon; Zhu, Lingyan

    2014-09-01

    Since the pioneering experiment, E89-009 studying hypernuclear spectroscopy using the $(e,e^{\\prime}K^+)$ reaction was completed, two additional experiments, E01-011 and E05-115, were performed at Jefferson Lab. These later experiments used a modified experimental design, the "Tilt Method", to dramatically suppress the large electromagnetic background, and allowed for a substantial increase in luminosity. Additionally, a new kaon spectrometer, HKS (E01-011), a new electron spectrometer, HES, and a new splitting magnet were added to produce precision, high-resolution hypernuclear spectroscopy. These two experiments, E01-011 and E05-115, resulted in two new data sets, producing sub-MeV energy resolution in the spectra of ${}^{7}_{\\Lambda}\\text{He}$, ${}^{12}_{\\Lambda}\\text{B}$ and ${}^{28}_{\\Lambda} \\text{Al}$ and ${}^{7}_{\\Lambda}\\text{He}$, ${}^{10}_{\\Lambda}\\text{Be}$, ${}^{12}_{\\Lambda}\\text{B}$ and ${}^{52}_{\\Lambda}\\text{V}$. All three experiments obtained a ${}^{12}_{\\Lambda}\\text{B}$, spectrum, which is the most characteristic $p$-shell hypernucleus and is commonly used for calibration. Independent analyses of these different experiments demonstrate excellent consistency and provide the clearest level structure to date of this hypernucleus as produced by the $(e,e^{\\prime}K^+)$ reaction. This paper presents details of these experiments, and the extraction and analysis of the observed ${}^{12}_{\\Lambda}\\text{B}$ spectrum.

  9. Characterization of carbonaceous meteoritic fragments found in Antarctica by high-resolution Raman spectroscopy and SEM/EDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall Asen, Analia; Baer, Brandon; Mittelstaedt, Jake; Gerton, Jordan; Bromley, Benjamin; Kenyon, Scott

    2016-03-01

    Carbonaceous chondritic meteorites are composed mainly of chondrules (micro/millimeter-sized inclusions) surrounding by a matrix of microparticles, and are considered the most primitive surviving materials from the early Solar System. Understanding their properties and history may provide clues to the formation of planets from micron-size dust grains in the Solar nebula. Our approach is to study the structure and composition of carbonaceous chondrites with high-resolution micro-Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. These techniques enable us to capture details on a wide range of spatial scales, from micrometers to millimeters. Here we provide the first analysis of a set of meteorite fragments from Antarctica (MIL 07002 and ALH 84028), mapping elemental and molecular abundances, as well as large-scale morphological features. We present characterizations of individual chondrules and the surrounding matrix, and we consider on how our findings reflect physical processes believed to be operating during the early stages of planet formation.

  10. High-Resolution Infrared and Electron-Diffraction Studies of Trimethylenecyclopropane ([3]-Radialene)

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Corey; Holmes, Joshua; Nibler, Joseph W.; Hedberg, Kenneth; White, James D.; Hedberg, Lise; Weber, Alfons; Blake, Thomas A.

    2013-05-16

    Combined high-resolution spectroscopic, electron-diffraction, and quantum theoretical methods are particularly advantageous for small molecules of high symmetry and can yield accurate structures that reveal subtle effects of electron delocalization on molecular bonds. The smallest of the radialene compounds, trimethylenecyclopropane, [3]-radialene, has been synthesized and examined in the gas phase by these methods. The first high-resolution infrared spectra have been obtained for this molecule of D3h symmetry, leading to an accurate B0 rotational constant value of 0.1378629(8) cm-1, within 0.5% of the value obtained from electronic structure calculations (density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP/cc-pVTZ). This result is employed in an analysis of electron-diffraction data to obtain the rz bond lengths (in Å): C-H = 1.072 (17), C-C = 1.437 (4), and C=C = 1.330 (4). The analysis does not lead to an accurate value of the HCH angle; however, from comparisons of theoretical and experimental angles for similar compounds, the theoretical prediction of 117.5° is believed to be reliable to within 2°. The effect of electron delocalization in radialene is to reduce the single C-C bond length by 0.07 Å compared to that in cyclopropane.

  11. High-Resolution Imaging and Spectroscopy at High Pressure: A Novel Liquid Cell for the TEM

    PubMed Central

    Tanase, Mihaela; Winterstein, Jonathan; Sharma, Renu; Aksyuk, Vladimir; Holland, Glenn; Liddle, J. Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate quantitative core-loss electron energy-loss spectroscopy of iron oxide nanoparticles and imaging resolution of Ag nanoparticles in liquid down to 0.24 nm, in both transmission and scanning-transmission modes, in a novel, monolithic liquid cell developed for the transmission electron microscope (TEM). At typical SiN membrane thicknesses of 50 nm the liquid layer thickness has a maximum change of only 30 nm for the entire TEM viewing area of 200 μm × 200 μm. PMID:26650072

  12. Lineshape spectroscopy with a very high resolution, very high signal-to-noise crystal spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Brown, G. V.; Chen, H.; Emig, J.; Hell, N.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Allan, P.; Brown, C. R. D.; Hill, M. P.; Hoarty, D. J.; Hobbs, L. M. R.; James, S. F.

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a high-resolution x-ray spectrometer for measuring the shapes of spectral lines produced from laser-irradiated targets on the Orion laser facility. The instrument utilizes a spherically bent crystal geometry to spatially focus and spectrally analyze photons from foil or microdot targets. The high photon collection efficiency resulting from its imaging properties allows the instrument to be mounted outside the Orion chamber, where it is far less sensitive to particles, hard x-rays, or electromagnetic pulses than instruments housed close to the target chamber center in ten-inch manipulators. Moreover, Bragg angles above 50° are possible, which provide greatly improved spectral resolution compared to radially viewing, near grazing-incidence crystal spectrometers. These properties make the new instrument an ideal lineshape diagnostic for determining plasma temperature and density. We describe its calibration on the Livermore electron beam ion trap facility and present spectral data of the K-shell emission from highly charged sulfur produced by long-pulse as well as short-pulse beams on the Orion laser in the United Kingdom.

  13. Lineshape spectroscopy with a very high resolution, very high signal-to-noise crystal spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Beiersdorfer, P; Magee, E W; Brown, G V; Chen, H; Emig, J; Hell, N; Bitter, M; Hill, K W; Allan, P; Brown, C R D; Hill, M P; Hoarty, D J; Hobbs, L M R; James, S F

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a high-resolution x-ray spectrometer for measuring the shapes of spectral lines produced from laser-irradiated targets on the Orion laser facility. The instrument utilizes a spherically bent crystal geometry to spatially focus and spectrally analyze photons from foil or microdot targets. The high photon collection efficiency resulting from its imaging properties allows the instrument to be mounted outside the Orion chamber, where it is far less sensitive to particles, hard x-rays, or electromagnetic pulses than instruments housed close to the target chamber center in ten-inch manipulators. Moreover, Bragg angles above 50° are possible, which provide greatly improved spectral resolution compared to radially viewing, near grazing-incidence crystal spectrometers. These properties make the new instrument an ideal lineshape diagnostic for determining plasma temperature and density. We describe its calibration on the Livermore electron beam ion trap facility and present spectral data of the K-shell emission from highly charged sulfur produced by long-pulse as well as short-pulse beams on the Orion laser in the United Kingdom. PMID:27370448

  14. Live correlative light-electron microscopy to observe molecular dynamics in high resolution.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shouhei; Iwamoto, Masaaki; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2016-08-01

    Fluorescence microscopy (FM) is a powerful tool for observing specific molecular components in living cells, but its spatial resolution is relatively low. In contrast, electron microscopy (EM) provides high-resolution information about cellular structures, but it cannot provide temporal information in living cells. To achieve molecular selectivity in imaging at high resolution, a method combining EM imaging with live-cell fluorescence imaging, known as live correlative light-EM (CLEM), has been developed. In this method, living cells are first observed by FM, fixed in situ during the live observation and then subjected to EM observation. Various fluorescence techniques and tools can be applied for FM, resulting in the generation of various modified methods that are useful for understanding cellular structure in high resolution. Here, we review the methods of CLEM and live-cell imaging associated with CLEM (live CLEM). Such methods can greatly advance the understanding of the function of cellular structures on a molecular level, and thus are useful for medical fields as well as for basic biology. PMID:27385786

  15. Fluorescence Spectroscopy as a Rapid, High-Resolution Tool for Detecting Biomolecules in Glacial Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohde, R. A.; Price, P. B.; Bramall, N.; Bay, R.

    2007-12-01

    We have developed new instruments utilizing the intrinsic fluorescence of specific biomolecules as a sensitive, non-destructive tool for detecting microorganisms. Using a 224-nm excitation, we detect protein-bound tryptophan (an amino acid present in all cells) at a detection threshold of approximately 1 cell per laser excitation volume and a duty cycle of 100 ms per measurement. Tryptophan is easily distinguished from inorganic backgrounds due to its characteristic spectral shape and ~300 times higher intensity per unit volume than typical inorganic compounds. A different excitation was also used to detect coenzyme F420, a characteristic marker for viable methanogenic cells. At the National Ice Core Laboratory, systematic scans of a 1 meter core sections took about 15 minutes and generated ~5000 measurements per meter. The high-resolution of this work revealed strong variability of microbial content on a scale of cm within individual cores, which suggests that microbial deposition at polar sites is strongly influenced by meteorological events (e.g. storms) on subannual and interannual scales. In addition, high levels of microbes are found to correlate with anomalously high concentrations of metabolic gases (e.g. methane, nitrous oxide, and 18O/16O of O2), suggesting that many of the isolated "gas artifacts" identified in deep ice cores are the accumulated waste products of in situ metabolism. This means that fluorescence spectroscopy may be a useful tool for identifying regions where high microbial concentrations have contaminated gas records. The existing instrumentation is suitcase portable and could be easily deployed in a variety of environments. Future versions of these instruments may be practical for continuous, rapid scans of entire cores, as an on-site deployable technique for characterizing microbial abundances in ice, and for searching for as few as 1 microbe per cm3 in ice-bound planets. This work was supported by NSF grant ANT-0440609.

  16. Long-term High-Resolution Spectroscopy of γ Cas, ζ Tau, and π Aqr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjorkman, K. S.; Miroshnichenko, A. S.; Krugov, V. D.

    2000-05-01

    High-resolution spectroscopic data (λ λ 5285-6595 Angstroms) for three bright classical Be stars with unusual Hα profiles (γ Cas, ζ Tau, and π Aqr) have been obtained during the time period 1993-2000 at the Ritter Observatory of the University of Toledo. The data for γ Cas are supplemented by medium-resolution spectroscopy taken at the Terskol station of the Main Astronomical Observatory of the Ukranian Academy of Sciences. The stars show the presence of an additional variable (central) emission peak in the Hα line, which has a double-peaked profile in most stars of this type. Long-term radial velocity (RV) variations of H I, He I, Si II, and Fe II lines are detected in γ Cas and ζ Tau. The RV of the central peak of Hα in ζ Tau seem to follow the binary orbital motion (period 132.9 days) on top of the long-term variations (period 1420 days). In γ Cas this peak shows a constant trend towards negative velocities since 1993, which is opposite to the behavior of other emission lines. Short-term RV variations of the Hα emission peak with a period 84 days are found in π Aqr during its weak-disk phase (since 1996). This work has been supported in part by NASA grant NAG5-8054 to the Univ. of Toledo, and by a Cottrell Scholars Award to KSB from the Research Corporation. Support for Ritter Observatory has been provided in part by NSF grant AST-9024802, and in part by a grant from the Fund for Astrophysical Research.

  17. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Stratospheric Ethane Following the Jupiter Impact of 2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fast, Kelly; Kostiuk, Theodor; Livengood, Timothy A.; Hewagama, Tilak; Amen, John

    2010-01-01

    We report on high-resolution infrared spectroscopy of ethane (C2H6) performed at the latitude of an impact site on Jupiter discovered on 19 July 2009 by A. Wesley from a location in Murrumbateman, Australia. The observations used the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Heterodyne Instrument for Planetary Wind and Composition (HIPWAC) at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. HIPWAC is a mid-infrared (9-12 microns) heterodyne spectrometer operating at the highest limit of spectral resolving power (lambda\\Delta\\lambda > l06), providing information on atmospheric constituent abundance and temperature through fully resolved tine shapes. Ethane is a stable trace product of methane photochemistry that is nearly uniformly mixed in Jupiter's stratosphere, providing an effective probe of that altitude region. Ethane emission line profiles near 11,74 microns in the Ug band were measured in Jupiter's stratosphere at 25 MHz (11.00083/cm) resolution. A sequence of spectra of ethane acquired over a range of longitude at the impact latitude (56S planetocentric) probes constituent abundance and temperature profile, both on and off the impact region. Near the site of the impact, ethane emission increased above levels measured well outside the impact region. Radiative transfer analysis indicates increased ethane mole fraction (30% greater). Variation in the measured continuum level and line intensities within 75deg of the impact longitude indicate the presence of an opacity source (haze) at altitudes near and above the tropopause and as high as the 10-mbar level near the impact site. The indication of possible haze opacity up to the 10-mbar level in the atmosphere is consistent with measurements made by HIPWAC's predecessor as part of the IRTF Shoemaker Levy-9 campaign in 1994.

  18. Imaging and high-resolution spectroscopy of the Planetary Nebula NGC 3242

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Muñoz, Marco Antonio; Wendolyn Blanco Cárdenas, Mónica; Vázquez, Roberto; Zavala, Saúl A.; Guillén, Pedro F.; Ayala, Sandra A.

    2015-08-01

    We present a high-resolution imaging and high-dispersion spectroscopy study of the complex morphological and kinematical structure of the planetary nebula NGC 3242. We analyze narrowband Hα, [O III] and [N II] images, addressing important morphological features: in the [O III] image we found one knot oriented to PA=-4°, in the [N II] image, three knots oriented at PA1=155°, PA2=+157°, and PA3=-45.5°, and in the Hα image, two bubbles in the internal region, one of them oriented toward SE and the other toward NW. Additionally we used the unsharp-masking technique and found faint structures in the halo that have not been studied before. These structures are presented in two pairs of arcs, one pair oriented toward PA=-35° and the other toward PA=140°. NGC 3242 is a morphologically rich PN with bubbles, asymmetrical outflows, and some knots in a double-shell nebular structure. Ground-based long-slit echelle spectra were obtained crossing NGC 3242 at twelve different positions to precisely determine kinematical features in the structure of the nebula. We obtain a systemic velocity of VLSR=-6.6 km/s. We have used the software SHAPE (Steffen et al. 2011, IEEE Trans. Vis. Comput. Graphics, 17, 454), to reconstruct a 3D model of NGC 3242 which fits all our observational data. Preliminary results (deprojected velocities and kinematical ages) of all these structures will be presented.This project has been supported by grant PAPIIT-DGAPA-UNAM IN107914. MWB is in grateful receipt of a DGAPA-UNAM postdoctoral scholarship. MAG acknowledges CONACYT for his graduate scholarship.

  19. IGRINS Near-IR High-resolution Spectroscopy of Multiple Jets around LkHα 234

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Heeyoung; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Yuk, In-Soo; Park, Byeong-Gon; Park, Chan; Chun, Moo-Young; Pak, Soojong; Kim, Kang-Min; Sok Oh, Jae; Jeong, Ueejeong; Yu, Young Sam; Lee, Jae-Joon; Kim, Hwihyun; Hwang, Narae; Kaplan, Kyle; Pavel, Michael; Mace, Gregory; Lee, Hye-In; Nguyen Le, Huynh Anh; Lee, Sungho; Jaffe, Daniel T.

    2016-02-01

    We present the results of high-resolution near-IR spectroscopy toward the multiple outflows around the Herbig Be star LkHα 234 using the Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrograph. Previous studies indicate that the region around LkHα 234 is complex, with several embedded young stellar objects and the outflows associated with them. In simultaneous H- and K-band spectra from HH 167, we detected 5 [Fe ii] and 14 H2 emission lines. We revealed a new [Fe ii] jet driven by radio continuum source VLA 3B. Position-velocity diagrams of the H2 1-0 S(1) λ2.122 μm line show multiple velocity peaks. The kinematics may be explained by a geometrical bow shock model. We detected a component of H2 emission at the systemic velocity (VLSR = -10.2 km s-1) along the whole slit in all slit positions, which may arise from the ambient photodissociation region. Low-velocity gas dominates the molecular hydrogen emission from knots A and B in HH 167, which is close to the systemic velocity; [Fe ii] emission lines are detected farther from the systemic velocity, at VLSR = -100--130 km s-1. We infer that the H2 emission arises from shocked gas entrained by a high-velocity outflow. Population diagrams of H2 lines imply that the gas is thermalized at a temperature of 2500-3000 K and the emission results from shock excitation. This paper includes data taken at The McDonald Observatory of The University of Texas at Austin.

  20. High Resolution Far Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy of the NH_2 Radical.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Drumel, M. A.; Pirali, O.; Balcon, D.; Vervloet, M.

    2011-06-01

    First identified toward Sgr B2, the NH_2 radical has recently been detected in the interstellar medium by the HIFI instrument on board of Herschel. Despite the fact that this radical has not been detected in brown dwarfs and exoplanets yet, it is already included in physical and chemical models of those environments (temperature higher than 2000 K expected in several objects). Its detection in those objects will depend on the existence of a reliable high temperature and high resolution spectroscopic database on the NH_2 radical.The absorption spectrum of NH_2 has been recorded between 15 and 700 Cm-1 at the highest resolution available using the Bruker IFS125HR Fourier transform interferometer connected to the far infrared AILES beamline at SOLEIL (R=0.001 Cm-1). The radical was produced by an electrical discharge (DC) through a continuous flow of NH_3 and He using the White-type discharge cell developped on the beamline (optical path: 24m). Thanks to the brilliance of the synchrotron radiation, more than 700 pure rotational transitions of NH_2 have been identified with high N values (NMax=25) in its fundamental and first excited vibrational modes. By comparison to the previous FT spectroscopic study on that radical in the FIR spectral range, asymmetric splitting as well as fine and hyperfine structure have been resolved for several transitions. E. F. Van Dishoeck, D. J. Jansen, P. Schilke, T. G. Phillips The Astrophysical Journal 416, L83-L86 (1993) C. M. Persson, J. H. Black, J. Cernicharo et al. Astronomy and Astrophysics 521, L45 (2010) K. Lodders and B. Fegley, Jr Icarus 155, 393-424 (2002) I. Morino and K. Kawaguchi Journal of Molecular Spectroscopy 182, 428-438 (1997)

  1. Structure of Se-rich As-Se glasses by high-resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Golovchak, R.; Kovalskiy, A.; Miller, A. C.; Jain, H.; Shpotyuk, O.

    2007-09-15

    To establish the validity of various proposed structural models, we have investigated the structure of the binary As{sub x}Se{sub 100-x} chalcogenide glass family (x{<=}40) by high-resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. From the composition dependence of the valence band, the contributions to the density of states from the 4p lone pair electrons of Se and the 4p bonding states and 4s electrons of Se and As are identified in the top part of the band. The analysis of Se 3d and As 3d core-level spectra supports the so-called chain crossing model for the atomic structure of Se-rich As{sub x}Se{sub 100-x} bulk glasses. The results also indicate small deviations ({approx}3-8%) from this model, especially for glass compositions with short Se chains (25

  2. High Resolution Spectroscopy of 12B Hypernuclei by the (e,e'K) Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    M. Sarsour

    2002-05-01

    Jefferson Laboratory experiment E89-009 used the reaction (e,e' K+ ) to produce 12/{Lambda}B hypernuclei from a carbon target. The scattered electrons were tagged at 0 degrees to take advantage of the increased virtual photon flux at forward angles, and the electroproduced kaons were also detected at small angles, {approx}3 degrees, to minimize the momentum transfer. To do this, a splitter magnet was used to bend the scattered electrons into an Enge split-pole spectrometer and the kaons into a short orbit spectrometer. In addition to increasing the production rate, tagging the scattered electrons at 0 degrees minimizes the optical aberrations on the focal plane of the Enge split-pole spectrometer. In this experiment, the spectroscopy of the 12/{Lambda}B hypernuclei was studied and excellent energy resolution was achieved, {approx} 918 keV. The differential cross section of the ground state doublet was also calculated.

  3. Crack tip shielding observed with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Adhika, Damar Rastri; Tanaka, Masaki; Daio, Takeshi; Higashida, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    The dislocation shielding field at a crack tip was experimentally proven at the atomic scale by measuring the local strain in front of the crack tip using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and geometric phase analysis (GPA). Single crystalline (110) silicon wafers were employed. Cracks were introduced using a Vickers indenter at room temperature. The crack tip region was observed using HRTEM followed by strain measurements using GPA. The measured strain field at the crack tip was compressive owing to dislocation shielding, which is in good agreement with the strain field calculated from elastic theory. PMID:26115957

  4. Magnetic lens apparatus for a low-voltage high-resolution electron microscope

    DOEpatents

    Crewe, Albert V.

    1996-01-01

    A lens apparatus in which a beam of charged particles of low accelerating voltage is brought to a focus by a magnetic field, the lens being situated behind the target position. The lens comprises an electrically-conducting coil arranged around the axis of the beam and a magnetic pole piece extending along the axis of the beam at least within the space surrounded by the coil. The lens apparatus comprises the sole focusing lens for high-resolution imaging in a low-voltage scanning electron microscope.

  5. High resolution electron microscopy of GaAs capped GaSb nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Molina Rubio, Sergio I; Beltran, AM; Ben, Teresa; Galindo, P.L.; Taboada, Alfonso G; Chisholm, Matthew F

    2012-01-01

    We show in this work that GaAs capping of 2 ML of GaSb grown by molecular beam epitaxy results in the formation of very small (with heights of about 1 nm) GaAsxSb1 x nanostructures surrounded by a GaAs rich layer. This conclusion is obtained by analyzing the morphology of the GaAsxSb1 x nanostructures by high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy in Z-contrast mode. This result shows that a significant fraction of the Sb atoms must segregate along the growth direction during the GaAs capping process.

  6. Soot Nanostructure: Using Fringe Analysis Software on High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy of Carbon Soot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, James D.

    2004-01-01

    Using high resolution transmission electron images of carbon nanotubes and carbon particles, we are able to use image analysis program to determine several carbon fringe properties, including length, separation, curvature and orientation. Results are shown in the form of histograms for each of those quantities. The combination of those measurements can give a better indication of the graphic structure within nanotubes and particles of carbon and can distinguish carbons based upon fringe properties. Carbon with longer, straighter and closer spaced fringes are considered graphite, while amorphous carbon contain shorter, less structured fringes.

  7. Quantitative high resolution electron microscopy of III-V compounds: A fuzzy logic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillebrand, R.; Hofmeister, H.; Werner, P.; Gösele, U.

    1995-09-01

    In the study of interdiffusion phenomena in layered structures of III-V compounds by high resolution electron microscopy, contrast features in the micrographs can be correlated with the variation of the chemical composition of the crystals. For quantitative interpretation of the micrographs a fuzzy logic approach is adapted to extract chemical information. The linguistic variable ``similarity of images'' is derived from the standard deviation (SD) of their difference patterns, which proved to be an appropriate measure. The approach developed is used to analyze simulated contrast tableaus of GaAs/P (As/P variation) and experimental micrographs of Al/GaAs (Al/Ga variation).

  8. High-resolution infrared detector and its electronic unit for space application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, M.; Montmessin, F.; Korablev, O.; Trokhimovsky, A.; Poiet, G.; Bel, J.-B.

    2015-05-01

    High-resolution infrared detector is used extensively for military and civilian purposes. Military applications include target acquisition, surveillance, night vision, and tracking. Civilian applications include, among others, scientific observations. For our space systems, we want to use the products developed by SOFRADIR Company. Thus, we have developed a space electronic unit that is used to control the high-resolution SCORPIO-MW infrared detector, which has a format of 640×512 pixels with 15μm×15μm pixel pitch. The detector within microelectronics based on infrared mid-wave (MW) complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS) uses a micro-cooler in order to keep its temperature around 100 K. The standard wavelength range (3 to 5μm) is adapted to the 2.2 to 4.3μm wavelength range thanks to adaptation of the optical interface of the detector and with an antireflection coating. With our electronic system, we can acquire 3 images per second. To increase the signal to noise ratio, we have the opportunity to make a summation of 15 frames per image. Through this article, we will describe the space electronic system that we have developed in order to achieve space observations (e.g. Atmospheric Chemistry Suite package for ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter).

  9. High-resolution photodetachment spectroscopy from the lowest threshold of O{sup -}

    SciTech Connect

    Joiner, Anne; Mohr, Robert H.; Yukich, J. N.

    2011-03-15

    We conducted photodetachment spectroscopy near the lowest detachment threshold from O{sup -} in a 1-T field with sufficient resolution to observe a magnetic field structure similar to that observed in experiments conducted at the threshold of the electron affinity. These observations included not only cyclotron structure but also, to a smaller degree, individual Zeeman thresholds. The experiment was conducted in a Penning ion trap and with a single-mode, tunable, amplified diode laser. Finally, analysis of our results yielded a measurement of the lowest threshold energy.

  10. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Long-Range Molecular States of 85Rb_2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carollo, Ryan; Eyler, Edward E.; Bruneau, Yoann; Gould, Phillip; Stwalley, W. C.

    2015-06-01

    We present analysis of low-n long-range molecular Rydberg states in 85Rb_2, based on high-resolution spectra. The weakly bound states are accessed by bound-bound transitions from high-v levels of the a ^3 σ _u^+ state, which are prepared by photoassociation of laser-cooled atoms. Single-photon transitions to target states near the 5s + 7p asymptote are excited by a frequency-doubled pulse-amplified CW laser with a narrow linewidth, under 200 MHz. The long-range portion of the bonding potential is dominated by the elastic scattering interaction of the Rydberg electron of a perturbed 7p atom and a nearby ground-state atom, in much the same manner as trilobite states. We use time of flight to selectively measure molecular ions, which are formed via autoionization. This technique gives a two orders-of-magnitude improvement in linewidth over our previous work, reported in Ref. [1]. We also present calculations of a proposed scheme for STIRAP transfer from the current v''=35 level of the a ^3 σ _u^+ state to the v''=39 level. The long-range states accessible to us are defined in large part by the Franck-Condon factors, which are dominated by the outer lobe of the wavefunction. Thus, choosing a v'' sets R, and determines the Franck-Condon window. The proposed v'' = 39 level has a classical outer turning point at ˜ 72 a_0, and will provide access to higher-n states with longer-range wells. This work is supported by the NSF and AFOSR. [1] M. A. Bellos et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 053001 (2013)

  11. Computer Simulation of High Resolution Transmission Electron Micrographs: Theory and Analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilaas, Roar

    Computer simulation of electron micrographs is an invaluable aid in their proper interpretation and in defining optimum conditions for obtaining images experimentally. Since modern instruments are capable of atomic resolution, simulation techniques employing high precision are required. This thesis makes contributions to four specific areas of this field. First, the validity of a new method for simulating high resolution electron microscope images has been critically examined. This method, which has been termed the real space method (RSP) since the entire calculation is performed without any Fourier transforms, offers a considerable reduction in computing time over the conventional multislice approach when identical sampling conditions are employed. However, for the same level of accuracy the real space method requires more sampling points and more computing time than the conventional multislice method. These characteristics are illustrated with calculated results using both methods to identify practical limitations. Second, three different methods for computing scattering amplitudes in High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) have been investigated as to their ability to include upper Laue layer (ULL) interaction. The conventional first order multislice method using fast Fourier transform (FFT) and the second order multislice (SOM) method are shown to yield calculated intensities of first order Laue reflections with the use of slice thicknesses smaller than the crystal periodicity along the incident electron beam direction. It is argued that the calculated intensities of ULL reflections approach the correct values in the limiting case of vanishing slice thickness and electron wavelength. The third method, the improved phasegrating method (IPG) does also in principle include ULL effects, but is severely limited as to choice of slice thickness and sampling interval. A practical way to use slice thicknesses less than the crystal periodicity along the

  12. High-resolution spin-polarized scanning electron microscopy (spin SEM).

    PubMed

    Kohashi, Teruo; Konoto, Makoto; Koike, Kazuyuki

    2010-01-01

    We have developed spin-polarized scanning electron microscopy (spin SEM) with a 5-nm resolution. The secondary electron optics is very important, as it needs to transfer a sufficient number of secondary electrons to the spin polarimeter, due to the low efficiency of the polarimeter. The optics was designed using a three-dimensional (3D) simulation program of the secondary electron trajectories, and it achieves highly efficient collection and transport of the secondary electrons even though the distance between the sample and the objective lens exit of the electron gun remains short. Moreover, the designed optics enables us to obtain clear SEM images in the spin SEM measurement and to precisely adjust the probe beam shape. These functions lead to images with high spatial resolution and sufficient signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios. This optics has been installed in an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) spin SEM chamber with a Schottky-type electron gun for the probe electron beam. We observed recorded bits on a perpendicular magnetic recording medium and visualized small irregularities in the bit shapes around the track edges and bit boundaries. The high resolution of 5 nm was demonstrated by observing the smallest domain composed by a single grain in the recording medium. PMID:19840986

  13. The Wesleyan Hobby-Eberly High-Resolution Exoplanetary Atmospheric Transmission Spectroscopy Survey: Latest Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Adam G.; Redfield, S.; Cochran, W. D.; Endl, M.; Koesterke, L.; Barman, T. S.

    2013-01-01

    The Wesleyan Hobby-Eberly High-Resolution Exoplanetary Atmospheric Transmission Spectroscopy Survey (W[HE]2ATS2) has used the 9.2m Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) at McDonald Observatory to make observations of the transmission spectra of hot Jupiter atmospheres at high spectral resolution ( 60,000). This program has made the first ground-based detection of neutral sodium in an exoplanetary atmosphere (Redfield et al. 2008) and the first detection of exoplanetary Hα (Jensen et al. 2012). A primary goal of exoplanet characterization science is to press toward smaller, Earth-like atmospheres. Though such Earth-like atmospheres are largely beyond the reach of current instrumentation, the W[HE]2ATS2 program has obtained data on a hot Neptune-class planet and a highly irradiated hot Jupiter. The purpose of studying a hot Neptune is to explore a planet with a lower surface gravity and possibly a different atmospheric molecular weight and scale height. The goal of observing the irradiated hot Jupiter is to explore the effects of star-planet interactions on exoplanetary atmospheres. Though such a planet is not a precise analogy to Super-Earths or Earth-like planets, there is a great deal of interest in planets around relatively active M dwarf stars, where the habitable zone is much closer to the star and the star-planet interaction may have a great effect on the planet’s atmosphere. Here we present our initial results for our newest data, where we search for resonance absorption lines of alkali metals such as sodium and potassium, and nonthermally excited material such as n=2 hydrogen detected through Hα absorption. We also discuss directions for future work with the HET and the W[HE]2ATS2 program. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation through an Astronomy and Astrophysics Research Grant (AST-0903573). The Hobby-Eberly Telescope is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig

  14. High-resolution spectroscopy for Cepheids distance determination. IV. Time series of Hα line profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardetto, N.; Groh, J. H.; Kraus, S.; Millour, F.; Gillet, D.

    2008-10-01

    Context: In recent years, infrared interferometry has revealed the presence of faint dusty circumstellar envelopes (CSE) around Cepheids. However the size, shape, chemical nature, and the interaction of the CSE with the star itself are still under investigation. The presence of a CSE might have an effect on the angular diameter estimates used in the interferometric Baade-Wesselink and surface-brightness methods of determining the distance of Cepheids. Aims: By studying Hα profiles as a function of the period, we investigate the permanent mass loss and the CSE around Cepheids. Our high spectral- and time-resolution data, combined with a very good S/N, will be useful in constraining future hydrodynamical models of Cepheids atmosphere and their close environment. Methods: We present HARPS (High Accuracy Radial velocity Planetary Search project developed by the European Southern Observatory.) high-resolution spectroscopy (R = 120 000) of eight galactic Cepheids: R Tra, S Cru, Y Sgr, β Dor, zeta Gem, RZ Vel, ell Car, and RS Pup, providing a good period sampling (P = 3.39 d to P = 41.52 d). The Hα line profiles are described for all stars using a 2D (wavelength versus pulsation phase) representation. For each star, an average spectral line profile is derived, together with its first moment (γ-velocity) and its asymmetry (γ-asymmetry). Results: Short-period Cepheids show Hα line profiles following the pulsating envelope of the star, while long-period Cepheids show very complex line profiles and, in particular, large asymmetries. We find a new relationship between the period of Cepheids and their γ-velocities and -asymmetries. These results may be related to the dynamical structure of the atmosphere and to a permanent mass loss of Cepheids. In particular, we confirm for ell Car a dominant absorption component whose velocity is constant and nearly of zero km s-1 in the stellar rest frame. This component is attributed to the presence of circumstellar envelope

  15. Investigation of Exploding Wire Plasmas Using High Resolution Point Projection X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Patrick

    2011-10-01

    We have determined the properties of plasma around and between two exploding wires using high-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Plasma densities and temperatures ranging from 1020 cm-3 and a few eV to 1017 cm-3 and 30 eV have been measured in experiments at Cornell University with two 25 μm aluminum (Al) wires spaced 1 mm apart driven by ~ 100 kA peak current pulses with 50 - 100 ns rise time. The wire plasma was backlit by the 1 . 4 - 1 . 6 keV continuum radiation produced by a Mo wire X-pinch. The spectrometer employed two spherically bent quartz crystals to record the absorption and backlighter spectra simultaneously. The transition between the dense Al wire core and the coronal plasma is seen as a transition from cold K-edge absorption to Mg-, Na- and finally Ne-like absorption at the boundary. In the plasma that accumulates between the wires, ionization states up to Be-Like Al have been seen. The spectrometer geometry and ~ 2 μm X-pinch source size provide 0 . 3 eV spectral resolution and 20 μm spatial resolution, enabling us to see 1 --> 2 satellite transitions as separate lines as well as O-, F- and N-like 1 --> 3 transitions that have not been seen before. A step wedge was used to calibrate the transmission, enabling density to be measured within 50 % and temperature to be measured within 25 % . A genetic algorithm was developed to fit synthetic spectra calculated using the collisional-radiative code SCRAM to the experimental spectra. In order to obtain agreement it was necessary to assume 3 plasma regions with variable thicknesses, thereby allowing the inferred plasma conditions to vary along the absorption path. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin company, for the National Nuclear Security Administration under DE-AC04-94AL85000 This research was carried out at Cornell University sponsored by the NNSA Stewardship Science Academic Alliances program under DOE agreement DE-FC03-02NA00057.

  16. Random vs realistic amorphous carbon models for high resolution microscopy and electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Ricolleau, C. Alloyeau, D.; Le Bouar, Y.; Amara, H.; Landon-Cardinal, O.

    2013-12-07

    Amorphous carbon and amorphous materials in general are of particular importance for high resolution electron microscopy, either for bulk materials, generally covered with an amorphous layer when prepared by ion milling techniques, or for nanoscale objects deposited on amorphous substrates. In order to quantify the information of the high resolution images at the atomic scale, a structural modeling of the sample is necessary prior to the calculation of the electron wave function propagation. It is thus essential to be able to reproduce the carbon structure as close as possible to the real one. The approach we propose here is to simulate a realistic carbon from an energetic model based on the tight-binding approximation in order to reproduce the important structural properties of amorphous carbon. At first, we compare this carbon with the carbon obtained by randomly generating the carbon atom positions. In both cases, we discuss the limit thickness of the phase object approximation. In a second step, we show the influence of both carbons models on (i) the contrast of Cu, Ag, and Au single atoms deposited on carbon and (ii) the determination of the long-range order parameter in CoPt bimetallic nanoalloys.

  17. Application of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy to the study of aragonite crystallography and diagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Haywick, D.W. . Geology Dept.); Ness, S.E. . Instrumentation Centre)

    1993-03-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) is a valuable technique by which to study the ultrastructure of various organic and inorganic compounds. Some biogeological minerals, including skeletal aragonite, have proven to be relatively unstable under an electron beam. Nevertheless, these compounds can be examined by HRTEM provided that minimal exposure techniques are employed. The authors have successfully applied HRTEM to examine diagenetically altered Plio-Pleistocene aragonitic faunas from New Zealand. To date, they have obtained high-resolution images of lattice-fringes with a spacing of 3.7 [angstrom] using a defocused, low-intensity electron beam. At least two of the samples imaged revealed clusters of lattice planes which together, form an interlocking mosaic of variably oriented micro-domains between 5 and 100 nm across. These micro-domains suggest that at least some of the aragonite is heterogeneous at a nm-scale; however, the individual micro-domains, when averaged together, generate single crystal electron diffraction patterns typical of well-ordered aragonite. The origin of the micro-domains is presently unclear. They may be an artifact of diagenetic alteration of an ultrastructurally homogeneous crystal. It is more likely, however, that the micro-domains were produced during aragonite precipitation. If this scenario is correct, it could have major implications for carbonate diagenesis, particularly if micro-domains prove to be ubiquitous within biogenic carbonate minerals. Inter-domains boundaries would be zones of comparative weakness and may provide nucleation points for diagenetic alteration. The intent now is to apply HRTEM in conjunction with other analytical techniques (e.g. x-ray diffraction, electron microprobe, stable isotope geochemistry) to characterize crystallographic changes during progressive diagenesis of aragonite, especially the aragonite-calcite transformation.

  18. Triosmium clusters on a support: determination of structure by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and high-resolution microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mehraeen, Shareghe; Kulkarni, Apoorva; Chi, Miaofang; Reed, Bryan W; Okamoto, Norihiko L; Browning, Nigel D; Gates, Bruce C

    2011-01-17

    The structures of small, robust metal clusters on a solid support were determined by a combination of spectroscopic and microscopic methods: extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), and aberration-corrected STEM. The samples were synthesized from [Os(3) (CO)(12) ] on MgO powder to provide supported clusters intended to be triosmium. The results demonstrate that the supported clusters are robust in the absence of oxidants. Conventional high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) STEM images demonstrate a high degree of uniformity of the clusters, with root-mean-square (rms) radii of 2.03±0.06 Å. The EXAFS OsOs coordination number of 2.1±0.4 confirms the presence of triosmium clusters on average and correspondingly determines an average rms cluster radius of 2.02±0.04 Å. The high-resolution STEM images show the individual Os atoms in the clusters, confirming the triangular structures of their frames and determining OsOs distances of 2.80±0.14 Å, matching the EXAFS value of 2.89±0.06 Å. IR and EXAFS spectra demonstrate the presence of CO ligands on the clusters. This set of techniques is recommended as optimal for detailed and reliable structural characterization of supported clusters. PMID:21226118

  19. Triosmium Clusters on a Support: Determination of Structure by X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy and High-Resolution Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shareghe, Mehraeen; Chi, Miaofang; Browning, Nigel D.

    2011-01-01

    The structures of small, robust metal clusters on a solid support were determined by a combination of spectroscopic and microscopic methods: extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), and aberration-corrected STEM. The samples were synthesized from [Os{sub 3}(CO){sub 12}] on MgO powder to provide supported clusters intended to be triosmium. The results demonstrate that the supported clusters are robust in the absence of oxidants. Conventional high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) STEM images demonstrate a high degree of uniformity of the clusters, with root-mean-square (rms) radii of 2.03 {+-} 0.06 {angstrom}. The EXAFS OsOs coordination number of 2.1 {+-} 0.4 confirms the presence of triosmium clusters on average and correspondingly determines an average rms cluster radius of 2.02 {+-} 0.04 {angstrom}. The high-resolution STEM images show the individual Os atoms in the clusters, confirming the triangular structures of their frames and determining OsOs distances of 2.80 {+-} 0.14 {angstrom}, matching the EXAFS value of 2.89 {+-} 0.06 {angstrom}. IR and EXAFS spectra demonstrate the presence of CO ligands on the clusters. This set of techniques is recommended as optimal for detailed and reliable structural characterization of supported clusters.

  20. High resolution cathodoluminescence spectroscopy of carbonate cementation in Khurmala Formation (Paleocene-L. Eocene) from Iraqi Kurdistan Region, Northern Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omer, Muhamed F.; Omer, Dilshad; Zebari, Bahroz Gh.

    2014-12-01

    A combination of high resolution cathodoluminsecnce-spectroscopy (HRS-CL) with spatial electron microprobe analysis and optical microscopy is used to determine paragenesis and history of cementation in the limestones and dolostones of Khurmala Formation which is exposed in many parts of Northern Iraq. Khurmala Formation was subjected to different diagenetic processes such as micritization, compaction, dissolution, neomorphism, pyritization and cementation that occurred during marine to shallow burial stages and culminated during intermediate to deep burial later stages. Five dolomite textures are recognized and classified according to crystal size distribution and crystal-boundary shape. Dolomitization is closely associated with the development of secondary porosity that pre-and postdates dissolution and corrosion; meanwhile such porosity was not noticed in the associated limestones. Microprobe analysis revealed three types of cement, calcite, dolomite and ankerite which range in their luminescence from dull to bright. Cathodoluminescence study indicated four main texture generations. These are (1) unzoned microdolomite of planar and subhedral shape, with syntaxial rim cement of echinoderm that show dull to red luminescence, (2) equant calcite cements filling interparticle pores which shows dull luminescence and weak zonal growth, (3.1) homogenous intrinsic blue stoichiometric calcite with dull luminescence and without activators, (3.2) coarse blocky calcite cement with strong oscillatory zoning and bright orange luminescence which postdates other calcite cements, (4) ankerite cement with red to orange, non-luminescence growth zonation which is the last formed cement.

  1. High Resolution Stark Spectroscopy of Model Donor-Acceptor Aminobenzonitriles in the Gas Phase.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleisher, Adam J.; Clements, Casey L.; Bird, Ryan G.; Pratt, David W.; Alvarez-Valtierra, Leonardo

    2011-06-01

    Electronic communication between donor-acceptor systems is prevalent in many chemical processes. Unfortunately, an accurate description of the changes in molecular geometry responsible for intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) is difficult to ascertain. Reported here are the S0, LA, and LB electronic state structures and dipole moments of two model ICT systems, 4-(1H-pyrrol-l-yl)benzonitrile (PBN) and 4-(1-pyrrolidinyl)benzonitrile (PDBN), as measured by rotationally resolved electronic spectroscopy. As was observed for phenylpyrrole, the unsaturted rings of PBN become collectively more planar following excitation with UV light, in support of the planar ICT model. However, in PDBN the twist/inversion angle between rings is nearly zero in both the ground and excited electronic states. The unperturbed dipole moments measured here, taken in conjunction with available solvatochromism data, provide an estimate for the polarization, dispersion, and charge transfer contributions to solvent-mediated excited state stabilization. J.A. Thomas, J.W. Young, A.J. Fleisher, L. Álvarez-Valtierra, and D.W. Pratt, J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 1, 2017 (2010).

  2. Nanoscale deformation analysis with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and digital image correlation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Xueju; Pan, Zhipeng; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Jiangwei; Liu, Yang; Mao, Scott X.; Zhu, Ting; Xia, Shuman

    2015-09-10

    We present an application of the digital image correlation (DIC) method to high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images for nanoscale deformation analysis. The combination of DIC and HRTEM offers both the ultrahigh spatial resolution and high displacement detection sensitivity that are not possible with other microscope-based DIC techniques. We demonstrate the accuracy and utility of the HRTEM-DIC technique through displacement and strain analysis on amorphous silicon. Two types of error sources resulting from the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image noise and electromagnetic-lens distortions are quantitatively investigated via rigid-body translation experiments. The local and global DIC approaches are applied for themore » analysis of diffusion- and reaction-induced deformation fields in electrochemically lithiated amorphous silicon. As a result, the DIC technique coupled with HRTEM provides a new avenue for the deformation analysis of materials at the nanometer length scales.« less

  3. Nanoscale deformation analysis with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and digital image correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xueju; Pan, Zhipeng; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Jiangwei; Liu, Yang; Mao, Scott X.; Zhu, Ting; Xia, Shuman

    2015-09-10

    We present an application of the digital image correlation (DIC) method to high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images for nanoscale deformation analysis. The combination of DIC and HRTEM offers both the ultrahigh spatial resolution and high displacement detection sensitivity that are not possible with other microscope-based DIC techniques. We demonstrate the accuracy and utility of the HRTEM-DIC technique through displacement and strain analysis on amorphous silicon. Two types of error sources resulting from the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image noise and electromagnetic-lens distortions are quantitatively investigated via rigid-body translation experiments. The local and global DIC approaches are applied for the analysis of diffusion- and reaction-induced deformation fields in electrochemically lithiated amorphous silicon. As a result, the DIC technique coupled with HRTEM provides a new avenue for the deformation analysis of materials at the nanometer length scales.

  4. Ultrastable gold substrates: Properties of a support for high-resolution electron cryomicroscopy of biological specimens

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Christopher J.; Passmore, Lori A.

    2016-01-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) allows structure determination of a wide range of biological molecules and specimens. All-gold supports improve cryo-EM images by reducing radiation-induced motion and image blurring. Here we compare the mechanical and electrical properties of all-gold supports to amorphous carbon foils. Gold supports are more conductive, and have suspended foils that are not compressed by differential contraction when cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures. These measurements show how the choice of support material and geometry can reduce specimen movement by more than an order of magnitude during low-dose imaging. We provide methods for fabrication of all-gold supports and preparation of vitrified specimens. We also analyse illumination geometry for optimal collection of high resolution, low-dose data. Together, the support structures and methods herein can improve the resolution and quality of images from any electron cryomicroscope. PMID:26592474

  5. Investigating Protostellar Carbon Reservoirs with High-Resolution Spectroscopy Toward Massive Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. L.; Blake, G. A.; Boogert, A. C. A.; Pontoppidan, K. M.; Lockwood, A. C.

    2014-09-01

    High-resolution CO spectra toward massive YSOs reveal less dispersion in [12C16O]/[13C16O] gas compared to low-mass YSOs, while these ratios may be similarly affected by CO ice. Our new data suggest that CO2 may not originate from a CO reservoir.

  6. High-Resolution Vibration-Rotation Spectroscopy of CO[subscript 2]: Understanding the Boltzmann Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Karen J.

    2007-01-01

    In this undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory experiment, students acquire a high-resolution infrared absorption spectrum of carbon dioxide and use their data to show that the rotational-vibrational state populations follow a Boltzmann distribution. Data are acquired with a mid-infrared laser source and infrared detector. Appropriate…

  7. Sensitivity enhancement in high resolution stimulated Raman spectroscopy of gases with hollow-core photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Doménech, José Luis; Cueto, Maite

    2013-10-15

    We show the first experimental evidence of the sensitivity enhancement that can be achieved in high resolution stimulated Raman spectroscopy of gases using hollow-core photonic crystal fibers (HCPCFs). Using low power cw lasers and a HCPCF containing the gas, we have observed more than four orders of magnitude enhancement of sensitivity when compared with the cw single focus regime, and a similar sensitivity to that achieved in the more sensitive quasi-cw setups with multipass cells. PMID:24321926

  8. Coordination defects in bismuth-modified arsenic selenide glasses: High-resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Golovchak, Roman; Shpotyuk, Oleh

    2008-05-01

    The possibility of coordination defects formation in Bi-modified chalcogenide glasses is examined by high-resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results provide evidence for the formation of positively charged fourfold coordinated defects on As and Bi sites in glasses with low Bi concentration. At high Bi concentration, mixed As{sub 2}Se{sub 3}-Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} nanocrystallites are formed in the investigated Se-rich As-Se glasses.

  9. A digitally configurable measurement platform using audio cards for high-resolution electronic transport studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopman, D. B.; Bedau, D.; Kent, A. D.

    2012-05-01

    We report on a software-defined digitally configurable measurement platform for determining electronic transport properties in nanostructures with small readout signals. By using a high-resolution audio analog-to-digital/digital-to-analog converter in a digitally compensated bridge configuration we significantly increase the measurement speed compared to established techniques and simultaneously acquire large and small signal characteristics. We characterize the performance (16 bit resolution, 100 dB dynamic range at 192 kS/s) and demonstrate the application of this measurement platform for studying the transport properties of spin-valve nanopillars, a two-terminal device that exhibits giant magnetoresistance and whose resistance can be switched between two levels by applied magnetic fields and by currents applied by the audio card. The high resolution and fast sampling capability permits rapid acquisition of deep statistics on the switching of a spin-valve nanopillar and reduces the time to acquire the basic properties of the device - a state-diagram showing the magnetic configurations as function of applied current and magnetic field - by orders of magnitude.

  10. High Resolution Electron Microscopy Of Dislocation Ribbons In A CMSX-4 Superalloy single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Vorontsov, V. A.; Kovarik, Libor; Mills, M. J.; Rae, Catherine

    2012-07-01

    High-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (HR STEM) has been used to study the structure of dislocations in single crystal superalloy samples that have been subjected to conditions that favour the primary creep regime. The study has revealed the detailed structure of extended a 2 h112i dislocations as they shear the 0 precipitates during creep. These dislocations dissociate in a manner that is consistent with the PFMD predictions made and also suggests the importance of the reordering process during their movement. The shearing done by the ah112i dislocationswas also found to distort the/ 0 interface, changing its appearance from linear to a 'saw tooth' pattern. Another important observation was the segregation of alloying element with high atomic mass to the stacking faults to reduce their energies during shear. Numerous a 2 h110i dissociated dislocations were also observed in the channels of the superalloy. The high resolution provided by the STEM imaging enables one to study the high energy faults that are usually di*cult to observe in conventional weak-beam TEM, such as CISF and CESF-1 in the 0 andthe ISF in the, and to make estimates of their energies. Key

  11. A digitally configurable measurement platform using audio cards for high-resolution electronic transport studies.

    PubMed

    Gopman, D B; Bedau, D; Kent, A D

    2012-05-01

    We report on a software-defined digitally configurable measurement platform for determining electronic transport properties in nanostructures with small readout signals. By using a high-resolution audio analog-to-digital/digital-to-analog converter in a digitally compensated bridge configuration we significantly increase the measurement speed compared to established techniques and simultaneously acquire large and small signal characteristics. We characterize the performance (16 bit resolution, 100 dB dynamic range at 192 kS/s) and demonstrate the application of this measurement platform for studying the transport properties of spin-valve nanopillars, a two-terminal device that exhibits giant magnetoresistance and whose resistance can be switched between two levels by applied magnetic fields and by currents applied by the audio card. The high resolution and fast sampling capability permits rapid acquisition of deep statistics on the switching of a spin-valve nanopillar and reduces the time to acquire the basic properties of the device - a state-diagram showing the magnetic configurations as function of applied current and magnetic field - by orders of magnitude. PMID:22667635

  12. High-intensity xenon plasma discharge lamp for bulk-sensitive high-resolution photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Souma, S.; Sato, T.; Takahashi, T.; Baltzer, P.

    2007-12-15

    We have developed a highly brilliant xenon (Xe) discharge lamp operated by microwave-induced electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) for ultrahigh-resolution bulk-sensitive photoemission spectroscopy (PES). We observed at least eight strong radiation lines from neutral or singly ionized Xe atoms in the energy region of 8.4-10.7 eV. The photon flux of the strongest Xe I resonance line at 8.437 eV is comparable to that of the He I{alpha} line (21.218 eV) from the He-ECR discharge lamp. Stable operation for more than 300 h is achieved by efficient air-cooling of a ceramic tube in the resonance cavity. The high bulk sensitivity and high-energy resolution of PES using the Xe lines are demonstrated for some typical materials.

  13. The high-resolution microchannel plate detector for FUV spectroscopy in the BepiColombo mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Go; Ezawa, Fukuhiro; Yoshioka, Kazuo; Yoshikawa, Ichiro; Chassefiere, Eric; Maria, Jean-Luc

    Mariner-10 UV measurements and telescopic spectroscopy from the Earth identified six elements (Ca, Na, K, H, He, and O) in the Mercury's exosphere. Other species are expected, e.g. H2 , OH, and some noble gasses (Ar, Ne, and Xe). All species representative of the surface composition, directly produced by impact vaporization driven by micrometeoroids, physical sputtering, photo-stimulated desorption, and thermal desorption from the regolith, should also be present. To determine the composition of the Mercury's exosphere, the PHEBUS (Probing of Hermean Exosphere By Ultraviolet Spectroscopy) instrument on Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) will measure the emission lines of the exosphere. PHEBUS is a dual FUV-EUV spectrometer working in the wavelength range from 55 to 315 nm. We are now developing the compact detector system sensitive to FUV airglow emissions of the Mercury. The FUV detector is required to have high spatial resolution (80 µm) so that the wavelength resolution of the PHEBUS instrument should be 2 nm at the FUV range. The FUV detector consists of a Cs2 Te photocathode, microchannel plates (MCPs), and a resistive anode encoder (RAE). In a position-sensitive system with an RAE, the spatial resolution is determined by the signal-to-noise ratios at the anode terminals. Therefore, a high and stable electron gain of MCPs allows the position determination of each photoelectron event with high spatial resolution. We studied a method for achieving a high and stable electron gain. We fabricated a test model of the FUV detector incorporating a clamped pair of MCPs (V-stack) followed by a gap and a clamped triplet of MCPs (Z-stack) in cascade. We have investigated the effect of the negative potential applied across the inter-stack (V-Z) gap on the PHD and the spatial resolution by means of calculation and experiments. The calculation with a simple ballistic model showed that the negative inter-stack potential reduced the size of the electron cloud by 70%. The result

  14. Detecting non-maxwellian electron velocity distributions at JET by high resolution Thomson scattering.

    PubMed

    Beausang, K V; Prunty, S L; Scannell, R; Beurskens, M N; Walsh, M J; de la Luna, E

    2011-03-01

    The present work is motivated by a long standing discrepancy between the electron temperature measurements of Thomson scattering (TS) and electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics for plasmas with strong auxiliary heating observed at both JET and TFTR above 6–7 keV, where in some cases the ECE electron temperature measurements can be 15%–20% higher than the TS measurements. Recent analysis based on ECE results at JET has shown evidence of distortions to the Maxwellian electron velocity distribution and a correlation with the TS and ECE discrepancies has been suggested. In this paper, a technique to determine the presence of non-Maxwellian behavior using TS diagnostics is outlined. The difficulties and limitations of modern TS system designs to determine the electron velocity distribution are also discussed. It is demonstrated that small deviations such as those suggested by previous ECE analysis could be potentially detected, depending on the spectral layout of the TS polychromators. The spectral layout of the JET high resolution Thomson scattering system is such that it could be used to determine these deviations between 1 and 6 keV, and the results presented here indicate that no evidence of non-Maxwellian behavior is observed in this range. In this paper, a modification to the current polychromator design is proposed, allowing non-Maxwellian distortions to be detected up to at least 10 keV. PMID:21585113

  15. Detecting non-Maxwellian electron velocity distributions at JET by high resolution Thomson scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Beausang, K. V.; Prunty, S. L.; Scannell, R.; Beurskens, M. N.; Walsh, M. J.; Collaboration: JET EFDA Contributors

    2011-03-15

    The present work is motivated by a long standing discrepancy between the electron temperature measurements of Thomson scattering (TS) and electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics for plasmas with strong auxiliary heating observed at both JET and TFTR above 6-7 keV, where in some cases the ECE electron temperature measurements can be 15%-20% higher than the TS measurements. Recent analysis based on ECE results at JET has shown evidence of distortions to the Maxwellian electron velocity distribution and a correlation with the TS and ECE discrepancies has been suggested. In this paper, a technique to determine the presence of non-Maxwellian behavior using TS diagnostics is outlined. The difficulties and limitations of modern TS system designs to determine the electron velocity distribution are also discussed. It is demonstrated that small deviations such as those suggested by previous ECE analysis could be potentially detected, depending on the spectral layout of the TS polychromators. The spectral layout of the JET high resolution Thomson scattering system is such that it could be used to determine these deviations between 1 and 6 keV, and the results presented here indicate that no evidence of non-Maxwellian behavior is observed in this range. In this paper, a modification to the current polychromator design is proposed, allowing non-Maxwellian distortions to be detected up to at least 10 keV.

  16. High resolution transmission electron microscopic in-situ observations of plastic deformation of compressed nanocrystalline gold

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Guoyong; Lian, Jianshe; Jiang, Qing; Sun, Sheng; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2014-09-14

    Nanocrystalline (nc) metals possess extremely high strength, while their capability to deform plastically has been debated for decades. Low ductility has hitherto been considered an intrinsic behavior for most nc metals, due to the lack of five independent slip systems actively operating during deformation in each nanograin. Here we report in situ high resolution transmission electron microscopic (HRTEM) observations of deformation process of nc gold under compression, showing the excellent ductility of individual and aggregate nanograins. Compression causes permanent change in the profile of individual nanograins, which is mediated by dislocation slip and grain rotation. The high rate of grain boundary sliding and large extent of widely exited grain rotation may meet the boundary compatibility requirements during plastic deformation. The in situ HRTEM observations suggest that nc gold is not intrinsically brittle under compressive loading.

  17. Very high resolution soft x-ray spectrometer for an electron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J.R.; Foerster, E.; Mahiri, J. |; Widmann, K.

    1997-01-01

    A very high resolution vacuum flat-crystal spectrometer was constructed for analyzing soft x rays emitted by an electron beam ion trap. The spectrometer was designed to operate at large Bragg angles ({theta}{le}85{degree}) in order to maximize the spectral dispersion and thus the resolving power. Using a quartz (100) crystal at a Bragg angle of 82{degree}, a measurement of the 2p{sub 1/2}, 2p{sub 3/2}{r_arrow}1s{sub 1/2} transitions in hydrogenic Mg{sup 11+} situated near 8.42 {Angstrom} was made. The nominal resolving power of the instrument was better than 30000 allowing us to infer the ion temperature (246{plus_minus}20 eV) from the observed line widths. A comparison with an existing flat-crystal spectrometer demonstrates the great improvement in resolving power achieved. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. High-resolution electron microscopy in spin pumping NiFe/Pt interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ley Domínguez, D. Sáenz-Hernández, R. J.; Faudoa Arzate, A.; Arteaga Duran, A. I.; Ornelas Gutiérrez, C. E.; Solís Canto, O.; Botello-Zubiate, M. E.; Rivera-Gómez, F. J.; Matutes-Aquino, J. A.; Azevedo, A.; Silva, G. L. da; Rezende, S. M.

    2015-05-07

    In order to understand the effect of the interface on the spin pumping and magnetic proximity effects, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) were used to analyze Py/Pt bilayer and Pt/Py/Pt trilayer systems. The samples were deposited by dc magnetron sputtering at room temperature on Si (001) substrates. The Py layer thickness was fixed at 12 nm in all the samples and the Pt thickness was varied in a range of 0–23 nm. A diffusion zone of approximately 8 nm was found in the Py/Pt interfaces and confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis. The FMR measurements show an increase in the linewidth and a shift in the ferromagnetic resonance field, which reach saturation.

  19. Nano features of Al/Au ultrasonic bond interface observed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Hongjun; Li Mingyu Kim, Jong-Myung; Kim, Dae-Won; Wang Chunqing

    2008-10-15

    Nano-scale interfacial details of ultrasonic AlSi1 wire wedge bonding to a Au/Ni/Cu pad were investigated using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The intermetallic phase Au{sub 8}Al{sub 3} formed locally due to diffusion and reaction activated by ultrasound at the Al/Au bond interface. Multilayer sub-interfaces roughly parallel to the wire/pad interface were observed among this phase, and interdiffusional features near the Au pad resembled interference patterns, alternately dark and bright bars. Solid-state diffusion theory cannot be used to explain why such a thick compound formed within milliseconds at room temperature. The major formation of metallurgical bonds was attributed to ultrasonic cyclic vibration.

  20. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy with an electrostatic Zach phase plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hettler, S.; Dries, M.; Zeelen, J.; Oster, M.; Schröder, R. R.; Gerthsen, D.

    2016-05-01

    A new method to control lattice-fringe contrast in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images by the implementation of a physical phase plate (PP) is proposed. PPs are commonly used in analogy to Zernike PPs in light microscopy to enhance the phase contrast of weak-phase objects with nm-sized features, which often occur in life science applications. Such objects otherwise require strong defocusing, which leads to a degradation of the instrumental resolution and impedes intuitive image interpretation. The successful application of an electrostatic Zach PP in HRTEM is demonstrated by the investigation of single crystalline Si and Ge samples. The influence of the Zach PP on the image formation process is assessed by analyzing the amplitudes of (111) reflections in power spectra which show a cosine-type dependence on the induced phase shift under certain conditions as predicted by theory.

  1. Time-resolved high-resolution electron microscopy of structural stability in MgO clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kizuka, T.; Tanaka, N.

    1996-12-31

    Structure and stability of atomic clusters have been studied by time-resolved high-resolution electron microscopy (TRHREM). Typical examples are observations of structural fluctuation in gold (Au) clusters supported on silicon oxide films, graphtized carbon films and magnesium oxide (MgO) films. All the observations have been performed on the clusters consisted of single metal element. Structural stability of ceramics clusters, such as metal-oxide, metal-nitride and metal-carbide clusters, has not been observed by TRHREM although the clusters show anomalous structural and functional properties concerning to solid state physics and materials science. In the present study, the behavior of ceramic, magnesium oxide (MgO) clusters is for the first time observed by TRHREM at 1/60 s time resolution and at atomic resolution down to 0.2 nm.

  2. High resolution transmission electron microscopy of two stony meteorites - Murchison and Kenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackinnon, I. D. R.; Buseck, P. R.

    1979-01-01

    Matrix material from the Murchison C2(M) carbonaceous chondrite and less than micrometer-size pyroxene inclusions in an olivine from the Kenna ureilite have been characterized using high resolution transmission electron microscopy. A diversity of textures and mineral associations, including serpentine-type and brucite-type mixed-layering, occur in the Murchison matrix. Such mixed layer structures are new types of layer silicate. Their presence in the matrix may prove to be genetically significant. The Kenna inclusions, formed at the olivine grain margins, are of two types: (1) a disordered orthopyroxene-clinopyroxene which may have inverted from protopyroxene and (2) a pigeonite with narrow anti-phase domains (80 A to 250 A) and boundaries parallel to (100).

  3. High-resolution electron microscopy in spin pumping NiFe/Pt interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ley Domínguez, D.; Sáenz-Hernández, R. J.; Faudoa Arzate, A.; Arteaga Duran, A. I.; Ornelas Gutiérrez, C. E.; Solís Canto, O.; Botello-Zubiate, M. E.; Rivera-Gómez, F. J.; Azevedo, A.; da Silva, G. L.; Rezende, S. M.; Matutes-Aquino, J. A.

    2015-05-01

    In order to understand the effect of the interface on the spin pumping and magnetic proximity effects, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) were used to analyze Py/Pt bilayer and Pt/Py/Pt trilayer systems. The samples were deposited by dc magnetron sputtering at room temperature on Si (001) substrates. The Py layer thickness was fixed at 12 nm in all the samples and the Pt thickness was varied in a range of 0-23 nm. A diffusion zone of approximately 8 nm was found in the Py/Pt interfaces and confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis. The FMR measurements show an increase in the linewidth and a shift in the ferromagnetic resonance field, which reach saturation.

  4. High-resolution Infrared Spectroscopy of Starspots on RS CVn Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neal, D.; Neff, J. E.; Saar, S. H.

    1997-12-01

    We present results from a study of magnetically active stars using the PHOENIX infrared spectrograph at KPNO. We constrain starspot coverages on RS CVn stars using high-resolution observations of two temperature-sensitive OH lines near 1.563mu m (6397 cm(-1) ). The use of these features holds two advantages over the TiO bands that we have used previously: the OH lines are visible in spots up to ~ 4500 K; and spots are much brighter, relative to the unspotted photosphere, in the infrared than in the visible. These properties also make these OH lines excellent candidates for the first Doppler imaging study to use high-resolution observations of infrared spectral features. Using the OH lines, we also search for previously unknown secondary stars in ``single-lined'' RS CVn binary systems, including II Pegasi (HD 224085).

  5. High-resolution multiple quantum MAS NMR spectroscopy of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Gang; Rovnyank, David; Sun, Boqin; Griffin, Robert G.

    1996-02-01

    We demonstrate the utility of a two-pulse sequence in obtaining high-resolution solid state NMR spectra of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei with magic-angle-spinning (MAS). The experiment, which utilizes multiple/single-quantum correlation, was first described in a different form by Frydman and Harwood [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 117 (1995) 5367] and yields high-resolution isotropic NMR spectra where shifts are determined by the sum of resonance offset (chemical shift) and second-order quadrupolar effects. The two-pulse sequence described here is shown to provide a higher and more uniform excitation of multiple-quantum coherence than the three-pulse sequence used previously.

  6. Differential high-resolution stimulated CW Raman spectroscopy of hydrogen in a hollow-core fiber.

    PubMed

    Westergaard, Philip G; Lassen, Mikael; Petersen, Jan C

    2015-06-15

    We demonstrate sensitive high-resolution stimulated Raman measurements of hydrogen using a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF). The Raman transition is pumped by a narrow linewidth (< 50 kHz) 1064 nm continuous-wave (CW) fiber laser. The probe light is produced by a homebuilt CW optical parametric oscillator (OPO), tunable from around 800 nm to 1300 nm (linewidth ∼ 5 MHz). These narrow linewidth lasers allow for an excellent spectral resolution of approximately 10(-4) cm(-1). The setup employs a differential measurement technique for noise rejection in the probe beam, which also eliminates background signals from the fiber. With the high sensitivity obtained, Raman signals were observed with only a few mW of optical power in both the pump and probe beams. This demonstration allows for high resolution Raman identification of molecules and quantification of Raman signal strengths. PMID:26193604

  7. High resolution X- and gamma-ray spectroscopy of cosmic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.

    1983-01-01

    A high resolution X-ray spectrometer and large area phoswich detector were designed and co-aligned in a common elevation mounting in order to measure solar and cosmic X-ray and gamma ray emission in the 13 to 600 KeV energy range from a balloon. The instrument is described and results obtained for the Crab Nebula, the supernova remnant Cas A, and the Sun are discussed and analyzed.

  8. Installation of electric field electron beam blanker in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashida, Misa; Kimura, Yoshihide; Taniguchi, Yoshifumi; Otsuka, Masayuki; Takai, Yoshizo

    2006-11-15

    We have newly installed an electric field electron beam blanker in a transmission electron microscopy, which chops an electron beam very quickly without the effect of hysteresis. The electric field, which is generated by the electron beam blanker, deflects the electron beam, and the electron beam is intercepted by an aperture. The response time of the beam blanker is 50 {mu}s. Therefore, a very short pulsed electron beam enables a charge-coupled device camera to directly expose an electron beam spot or diffraction pattern. Moreover, we measured the response of a deflector coil, which is usually used as an electron beam blanker, using our electron beam blanker. Our beam blanker will become a key component in a computer-assisted minimal dose system, which enables us to reduce the electron dose of the sample.

  9. New High Resolution Spectroscopy Studies of Methyl Nitrite CH_3ONO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sironneau, V.; Chelin, P.; Tchana, F. Kwabia; Kleiner, I.; Orphal, J.; Pirali, O.; Guillemin, J.-C.; Margules, L.; Motiyenko, R.; Cooke, S.; Youngblood, W. J.; Agnew, A.; Dewberry, C. T.

    2010-06-01

    Methyl nitrite CH3ONO is an important species in atmospheric chemistry involved in photochemical oxidation of volatile organic compounds. The cis conformer (more stable by about 298 cm-1) has a high internal rotation potential barrier for the methyl group (731 cm-1) whereas for the trans conformer the barrier to internal rotation is extremely low (10 cm-1), leading to large internal rotation splittings. Only one high resolution infrared study was performed prior to this study. For the first time, high-resolution spectrum of CH3ONO was recorded in the far infrared region (30-500 cm-1) using the synchrotron SOLEIL far-infrared beamline (AILES) and a Fourier transform (FT) spectrometer. Some 987 lines were assigned for the cis isomer up to J=65 and combined with 66 previously recorded microwave lines. In addition, high-resolution spectrum of the ν9 band of the cis isomer around 627.9 cm-1 was also recorded using the FT spectrometer at LISA. New microwave data is currently recorded to improve the knowledge of both the cis and trans ground state parameters. P. N. Gosh, A. Bauder and Hs. H. Gunthard, Chem. Phys. 53, 39-60 (1980) P. H. Turner, M. J. Corkill, and A. P. Cox, J. Chem. Phys. 83, 1473-1482 1979) L. M. Goss, C. D. Mortensen and T. A. Blake, J. Mol. Spectrosc., 225, 182-188 (2004)

  10. Analysis of high quality monatomic chromium films used in biological high resolution scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Apkarian, R P

    1994-01-01

    During the recent employment of field emission (FE) in-lens scanning electron microscopes (SEMs), refractory metal deposition technology has co-evolved to provide enhanced contrast of 1-10 nm hydrocarbon based biological structures imaged at high magnifications (> 200,000 times). Pioneer development employing the Penning sputter system in a high vacuum chamber proved that imaging of chromium (Cr) coated biological specimens contained enriched secondary electron (SE)-(I) contrasts. Single nanometer size fibrillar and particulate ectodomains within the context of complex biological membranes were accurately imaged without significant enlargement using the high resolution SE-I mode (HRSEM). This paper reports the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) testing of ultrathin (0.5-2.0 nm) Cr films deposited by planar magnetron sputter coating (PMSC). Essential parameters necessary to reproduce quality sputtered films of refractory metals used in HRSEM studies were described for the vacuum system and target operation conditions (current, voltage, and target distance). HRSEM imaging of biological specimens is presented to assess contrast attained from ultrathin fine grain Cr films deposited by PMSC. High magnification images were recorded to illustrate high quality contrasts attainable by HRSEM at low (1-5 kV) and high (10-30 kV) voltages. Dispersed molecules on formvar coated grids were sputter coated with a 1 nm thick Cr film before employing scanning transmission (STEM)/SEM modes of the FESEM to establish non-decorative image accuracy in the transmitted electron mode. PMID:7701300

  11. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy of frozen-hydrated cells.

    PubMed

    Walther, P; Chen, Y; Pech, L L; Pawley, J B

    1992-11-01

    Cryo-fixed yeast Paramecia and sea urchin embryos were investigated with an in-lens type field-emission SEM using a cold stage. The goal was to further develop and investigate the processing of frozen samples for the low-temperature scanning electron microscope (LTSEM). Uncoated frozen-hydrated samples were imaged with the low-voltage backscattered electron signal (BSE). Resolution and contrast were sufficient to visualize cross-fractured membranes, nuclear pores and small vesicles in the cytoplasm. It is assumed that the resolution of this approach is limited by the extraction depth of the BSE which depends upon the accelerating voltage of the primary beam (V0). In this study, the lowest possible V0 was 2.6 kV because below this value the sensitivity of the BSE detector is insufficient. It is concluded that the resolution of the uncoated specimen could be improved if equipment were available for high-resolution BSE imaging at 0.5-2 kV. Higher resolution was obtained with platinum cryo-coated samples, on which intramembranous particles were easily imaged. These images even show the ring-like appearance of the hexagonally arranged intramembranous particles known from high-resolution replica studies. On fully hydrated samples at high magnification, the observation time for a particular area is limited by mass loss caused by electron irradiation. Other potential sources of artefacts are the deposition of water vapour contamination and shrinkage caused by the sublimation of ice. Imaging of partially dehydrated (partially freeze-dried) samples, e.g. high-pressure frozen Paramecium and sea urchin embryos, will probably become the main application in cell biology. In spite of possible shrinkage problems, this approach has a number of advantages compared with any other electron microscopy preparation method: no chemical fixation is necessary, eliminating this source of artefacts; due to partial removal of the water additional structures in the cytoplasm can be investigated

  12. Electron-beam-enhanced oxidation processes in II-VI compound semiconductors observed by high-resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Thangaraj, N.; Wessels, B.W.

    1990-02-01

    Enhanced oxidation of ZnS and ZnSe semiconductor surfaces has been observed in situ during electron irradiation in a high-resolution electron microscope. The phase present at the surface region has been identified as ZnO by optical diffractogram and selected area electron diffraction techniques. For ZnS oxidation, both hexagonal ZnO having a random orientation and cubic ZnO in perfect epitaxial relationship with the bulk ZnS were observed. Enhanced oxidation of ZnSe to ZnO has also been observed under electron beam irradiation. However, only the hexagonal form was observed. The oxidation rates for both ZnS and ZnSe depended on electron flux but was independent of orientation. A model in which the oxidation process is limited by diffusion through the oxide film is proposed. By electron irradiation the diffusion rate is enhanced presumably by a nonthermal process.

  13. Electron-impact spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trajmar, S.

    1990-01-01

    The methods of electron impact spectroscopy and cross section measurements are discussed and compared to optical spectroscopy. A brief summary of the status of this field and the available data is given.

  14. Magnetic lens apparatus for use in high-resolution scanning electron microscopes and lithographic processes

    DOEpatents

    Crewe, Albert V.

    2000-01-01

    Disclosed are lens apparatus in which a beam of charged particlesis brought to a focus by means of a magnetic field, the lens being situated behind the target position. In illustrative embodiments, a lens apparatus is employed in a scanning electron microscopeas the sole lens for high-resolution focusing of an electron beam, and in particular, an electron beam having an accelerating voltage of from about 10 to about 30,000 V. In one embodiment, the lens apparatus comprises an electrically-conducting coil arranged around the axis of the beam and a magnetic pole piece extending along the axis of the beam at least within the space surrounded by the coil. In other embodiments, the lens apparatus comprises a magnetic dipole or virtual magnetic monopole fabricated from a variety of materials, including permanent magnets, superconducting coils, and magnetizable spheres and needles contained within an energy-conducting coil. Multiple-array lens apparatus are also disclosed for simultaneous and/or consecutive imaging of multiple images on single or multiple specimens. The invention further provides apparatus, methods, and devices useful in focusing charged particle beams for lithographic processes.

  15. Coherent Vibrational Dynamics and High-Resolution Nonlinear Spectroscopy: A Comparison with the Air/DMSO Liquid Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Lu, Zhou; Wang, Hongfei

    2013-12-27

    In this report we present a comparative study on the C-H stretching vibrations at air/DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide) interface with both the free-induction decay (FID) coherent vibrational dynamics and sub-wavenumber high resolution sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy measurements. In principle the frequency-domain and time-domain spectroscopic measurements should generate identical information for a given molecular system. However, when the molecular systems are with several coupled or overlapping vibrational modes, to obtain detailed spectroscopic and coherent dynamics information is not as straightforward and rather difficult from either the time-domain or the frequency domain measurements. For the case of air/DMSO interface that is with moderately complex vibrational spectra, we show that the frequency-domain measurement with sub-wavenumber high-resolution SFGVS is probably more advantageous than the time-domain measurement in obtaining quantitative understanding of the structure and coherent dynamics of the molecular interface.

  16. Use of a Continuous Wave Laser and Pockels Cell for Sensitive High-Resolution Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Groote, R. P.; Budinčević, I.; Billowes, J.; Bissell, M. L.; Cocolios, T. E.; Farooq-Smith, G. J.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Flanagan, K. T.; Franchoo, S.; Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Heylen, H.; Li, R.; Lynch, K. M.; Marsh, B. A.; Neyens, G.; Rossel, R. E.; Rothe, S.; Stroke, H. H.; Wendt, K. D. A.; Wilkins, S. G.; Yang, X.

    2015-09-01

    New technical developments have led to a 2 orders of magnitude improvement of the resolution of the collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at ISOLDE, CERN, without sacrificing the high efficiency of the CRIS technique. Experimental linewidths of 20(1) MHz were obtained on radioactive beams of francium, allowing us for the first time to determine the electric quadrupole moment of the short lived [t1 /2=22.0 (5 ) ms ] 219Fr Qs=-1.21 (2 ) eb , which would not have been possible without the advantages offered by the new method. This method relies on a continuous-wave laser and an external Pockels cell to produce narrow-band light pulses, required to reach the high resolution in two-step resonance ionization. Exotic nuclei produced at rates of a few hundred ions/s can now be studied with high resolution, allowing detailed studies of the anchor points for nuclear theories.

  17. Use of a Continuous Wave Laser and Pockels Cell for Sensitive High-Resolution Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    de Groote, R P; Budinčević, I; Billowes, J; Bissell, M L; Cocolios, T E; Farooq-Smith, G J; Fedosseev, V N; Flanagan, K T; Franchoo, S; Garcia Ruiz, R F; Heylen, H; Li, R; Lynch, K M; Marsh, B A; Neyens, G; Rossel, R E; Rothe, S; Stroke, H H; Wendt, K D A; Wilkins, S G; Yang, X

    2015-09-25

    New technical developments have led to a 2 orders of magnitude improvement of the resolution of the collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at ISOLDE, CERN, without sacrificing the high efficiency of the CRIS technique. Experimental linewidths of 20(1) MHz were obtained on radioactive beams of francium, allowing us for the first time to determine the electric quadrupole moment of the short lived [t_{1/2}=22.0(5) ms] ^{219}Fr Q_{s}=-1.21(2) eb, which would not have been possible without the advantages offered by the new method. This method relies on a continuous-wave laser and an external Pockels cell to produce narrow-band light pulses, required to reach the high resolution in two-step resonance ionization. Exotic nuclei produced at rates of a few hundred ions/s can now be studied with high resolution, allowing detailed studies of the anchor points for nuclear theories. PMID:26451548

  18. The design and construction of a high-resolution velocity-map imaging apparatus for photoelectron spectroscopy studies of size-selected clusters

    SciTech Connect

    León, Iker; Yang, Zheng; Liu, Hong-Tao; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2014-08-15

    A new velocity-map imaging apparatus equipped with a laser-vaporization supersonic cluster source and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer is described for high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy studies of size-selected cluster anions. Vibrationally cold anion clusters are produced using a laser-vaporization supersonic cluster source, size-selected by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and then focused co-linearly into the interaction zone of the high-resolution velocity-map imaging (VMI) system. The multilens VMI system is optimized via systematic simulations and can reach a resolution of 1.2 cm{sup −1} (FWHM) for near threshold electrons while maintaining photoelectron kinetic energy resolutions (ΔKE/KE) of ∼0.53% for higher energy electrons. The new VMI lens has superior focusing power over a large energy range, yielding highly circular images with distortions no larger than 1.0025 between the long and short radii. The detailed design, simulation, construction, testing, and performance of the high-resolution VMI apparatus are presented.

  19. Elemental analysis of organic species with electron ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Aiken, Allison C; DeCarlo, Peter F; Jimenez, Jose L

    2007-11-01

    We present a new elemental analysis (EA) technique for organic species (CHNO) that allows fast on-line analysis (10 s) and reduces the required sample size to approximately 1 ng, approximately 6 orders of magnitude less than standard techniques. The composition of the analyzed samples is approximated by the average elemental composition of the ions from high-resolution electron ionization (EI) mass spectra. EA of organic species can be performed on organic/inorganic mixtures. Elemental ratios for the total organic mass, such as oxygen/carbon (O/C), hydrogen/carbon (H/C), and nitrogen/carbon (N/C), in addition to the organic mass to organic carbon ratio (OM/OC), can be determined. As deviations between the molecular and the ionic composition can appear due to chemical influences on the ion fragmentation processes, the method was evaluated and calibrated using spectra from 20 compounds from the NIST database and from 35 laboratory standards sampled with the high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). The analysis of AMS (NIST) spectra indicates that quantification of O/C is possible with an error (average absolute value of the relative error) of 30% (17%) for individual species. Precision is much better than accuracy at +/-5% in the absence of air for AMS data. AMS OM/OC has an average error of 5%. Additional calibration is recommended for types of species very different from those analyzed here. EA was applied to organic mixtures and ambient aerosols (sampled at 20 s from aircraft). The technique is also applicable to other EI-HRMS measurements such as direct injection MS. PMID:17914892

  20. High-resolution spectroscopy of the blue compact dwarf galaxy Haro 15 - II. Chemodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hägele, Guillermo F.; Firpo, Verónica; Bosch, Guillermo; Díaz, Ángeles I.; Morrell, Nidia

    2012-06-01

    We present a detailed study of the physical properties of the nebular material in four star-forming knots of the blue compact dwarf galaxy Haro 15. Using long-slit and echelle spectroscopy obtained at Las Campanas Observatory, we study the physical conditions (electron density and temperatures), ionic and total chemical abundances of several atoms, reddening and ionization structure, for the global flux and for the different kinematical components. The latter was derived by comparing the oxygen and sulphur ionic ratios to their corresponding observed emission-line ratios (the η and η' plots) in different regions of the galaxy. Applying the direct method or empirical relationships for abundance determination, we perform a comparative analysis between these regions. The similarities found in the ionization structure of the different kinematical components imply that the effective temperatures of the ionizing radiation fields are very similar in spite of some small differences in the ionization state of the different elements. Therefore, the different gaseous kinematical components identified in each star-forming knot are probably ionized by the same star cluster. However, the difference in the ionizing structure of the two knots with knot A showing a lower effective temperature than knot B suggests a different evolutionary stage for them consistent with the presence of an older and more evolved stellar population in the first.

  1. HIGH-RESOLUTION XMM-NEWTON SPECTROSCOPY OF THE COOLING FLOW CLUSTER A3112

    SciTech Connect

    Bulbul, G. Esra; Smith, Randall K.; Foster, Adam; Cottam, Jean; Loewenstein, Michael; Mushotzky, Richard; Shafer, Richard

    2012-03-01

    We examine high signal-to-noise XMM-Newton European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) and Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) observations to determine the physical characteristics of the gas in the cool core and outskirts of the nearby rich cluster A3112. The XMM-Newton Extended Source Analysis Software data reduction and background modeling methods were used to analyze the XMM-Newton EPIC data. From the EPIC data, we find that the iron and silicon abundance gradients show significant increase toward the center of the cluster while the oxygen abundance profile is centrally peaked but has a shallower distribution than that of iron. The X-ray mass modeling is based on the temperature and deprojected density distributions of the intracluster medium determined from EPIC observations. The total mass of A3112 obeys the M-T scaling relations found using XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of massive clusters at r{sub 500}. The gas mass fraction f{sub gas} = 0.149{sup +0.036}{sub -0.032} at r{sub 500} is consistent with the seven-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe results. The comparisons of line fluxes and flux limits on the Fe XVII and Fe XVIII lines obtained from high-resolution RGS spectra indicate that there is no spectral evidence for cooler gas associated with the cluster with temperature below 1.0 keV in the central <38'' ({approx}52 kpc) region of A3112. High-resolution RGS spectra also yield an upper limit to the turbulent motions in the compact core of A3112 (206 km s{sup -1}). We find that the contribution of turbulence to total energy is less than 6%. This upper limit is consistent with the energy contribution measured in recent high-resolution simulations of relaxed galaxy clusters.

  2. High resolution spectroscopy of the new FU Orionis object BBW 76

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisloeffel, J.; Hessman, F. V.; Mundt, R.

    1990-06-01

    High-resolution spectra of the new FU Orionis object BBW 76 are presented. Although the photometric outburst of this FU Orionis object could not be observed, its spectral characteristics clearly identify it as belonging to this class. BBW 76 shows Balmer line profiles typical for FU Orionis stars. Its absorption line spectrum and, in particular, the line widths are strikingly similar to that of FU Ori. Other similarities to FU Ori are the presence of an arclike nebula, and the FIR luminosities and color temperatures.

  3. High-resolution spectroscopy with the multi-anode microchannel array detector systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.; Joseph, C. L.; Wolf, S. C.

    1982-01-01

    The results of a series of high-resolution spectroscopic observations undertaken with a linear (1 x 1024)-pixel visible-light Multi-Anode Microchannel Array (MAMA) detector on the Coudespectrograph of the 2.2-meter telescope at the Mauna Kea Observatory and on the vacuum spectrograph of the McMath Solar telescope at the Kitt Peak National Observatory are described. In addition, the two-dimensional MAMA detector systems with (16 x 1024)-pixel, (24 x 1024)-pixel, and (256 x 1024)-pixel formats which are now being readied for use in a series of ground-based, balloon, and sounding-rocket observing programs are briefly described.

  4. High resolution, low h{nu} photoelectron spectroscopy with the use of a microwave excited rare gas lamp and ionic crystal filters

    SciTech Connect

    Suga, S.; Sekiyama, A.; Funabashi, G.; Yamaguchi, J.; Kimura, M.; Tsujibayashi, M.; Uyama, T.; Sugiyama, H.; Tomida, Y.; Kuwahara, G.; Kitayama, S.; Fukushima, K.; Kimura, K.; Yokoi, T.; Murakami, K.; Fujiwara, H.; Saitoh, Y.; Plucinski, L.; Schneider, C. M.

    2010-10-15

    The need for not only bulk sensitive but also extremely high resolution photoelectron spectroscopy for studying detailed electronic structures of strongly correlated electron systems is growing rapidly. Moreover, easy access to such a capability in one's own laboratory is desirable. Demonstrated here is the performance of a microwave excited rare gas (Xe, Kr, and Ar) lamp combined with ionic crystal filters (sapphire, CaF{sub 2}, and LiF), which can supply three strong lines near the photon energy of hnyu h{nu}=8.4, 10.0, and 11.6 eV, with the h{nu} resolution of better than 600 {mu}eV for photoelectron spectroscopy. Its performance is demonstrated on some materials by means of both angle-integrated and angle-resolved measurements.

  5. Development of spatially resolved high resolution x-ray spectroscopy for fusion and light-source research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J.; Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Pablant, N. A.; Efthimion, P.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, H.; Widmann, K.; Sanchez del Rio, M.

    2014-09-01

    One dimensional spatially resolved high resolution x-ray spectroscopy with spherically bent crystals and 2D pixelated detectors is an established technique on magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) experiments world wide for Doppler measurements of spatial profiles of plasma ion temperature and flow velocity. This technique is being further developed for diagnosis of High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) plasmas at laser-plasma facilities and synchrotron/x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) facilities. Useful spatial resolution (micron scale) of such small-scale plasma sources requires magnification, because of the finite pixel size of x-ray CCD detectors (13.5 μm). A von-Hamos like spectrometer using spherical crystals is capable of magnification, as well as uniform sagittal focusing across the full x-ray spectrum, and is being tested in laboratory experiments using a tungsten-target microfocus (5-10 μm) x-ray tube and 13-μm pixel x-ray CCD. A spatial resolution better than 10 μm has been demonstrated. Good spectral resolution is indicated by small differences (0.02 - 0.1 eV) of measured line widths with best available published natural line widths. Progress and status of HEDP measurements and the physics basis for these diagnostics are presented. A new type of x-ray crystal spectrometer with a convex spherically bent crystal is also reported. The status of testing of a 2D imaging microscope using matched pairs of spherical crystals with x rays will also be presented. The use of computational x-ray optics codes in development of these instrumental concepts is addressed.

  6. Synthesis, High-Resolution Infrared Spectroscopy, and Vibrational Structure of Cubane, C8H8.

    PubMed

    Boudon, V; Lamy, M; Dugue-Boyé, F; Pirali, O; Gruet, S; D'Accolti, L; Fusco, C; Annese, C; Alikhani, M E

    2016-06-30

    Carbon-cage molecules have generated a considerable interest from both experimental and theoretical points of view. We recently performed a high-resolution study of adamantane (C10H16), the smallest hydrocarbon cage belonging to the diamandoid family ( Pirali , O. ; et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2012 , 136 , 024310 ). There exist another family of hydrocarbon cages with additional interesting chemical properties: the so-called platonic hydrocarbons that comprise dodecahedrane (C20H20) and cubane (C8H8). Both possess C-C bond angles that deviate from the tetrahedral angle (109.8°) of the sp(3) hybridized form of carbon. This generates a considerable strain in the molecule. We report a new wide-range high-resolution study of the infrared spectrum of cubane. The sample was synthesized in Bari upon decarboxylation of 1,4-cubanedicarboxylic acid thanks to the improved synthesis of literature. Several spectra have been recorded at the AILES beamline of the SOLEIL synchrotron facility. They cover the 600-3200 cm(-1) region. Besides the three infrared-active fundamentals (ν10, ν11, and ν12), we could record many combination bands, all of them displaying a well-resolved octahedral rotational structure. We present here a preliminary analysis of some of the recorded bands, performed thanks the SPVIEW and XTDS software, based on the tensorial formalism developed in the Dijon group. A comparison with ab initio calculations, allowing to identify some combination bands, is also presented. PMID:27267150

  7. ALMA-backed NIR high resolution integral field spectroscopy of the NUGA galaxy NGC 1433

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smajić, Semir; Moser, Lydia; Eckart, Andreas; Valencia-S., Mónica; Combes, Françoise; Horrobin, Matthew; García-Burillo, Santiago; García-Marín, Macarena; Fischer, Sebastian; Zuther, Jens

    2014-07-01

    Aims: We present the results of near-infrared (NIR) H- and K-band European Southern Observatory SINFONI integral field spectroscopy (IFS) of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1433. We investigate the central 500 pc of this nearby galaxy, concentrating on excitation conditions, morphology, and stellar content. NGC 1433 was selected from our extended NUGA(-south) sample, which was additionally observed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). NGC 1433 is a ringed, spiral galaxy with a main stellar bar in roughly east-west direction (PA 94°) and a secondary bar in the nuclear region (PA 31°). Several dusty filaments are detected in the nuclear region with the Hubble Space Telescope. ALMA detects molecular CO emission coinciding with these filaments. The active galactic nucleus is not strong and the galaxy is also classified as a low-ionization emission-line region (LINER). Methods: The NIR is less affected by dust extinction than optical light and is sensitive to the mass-dominating stellar populations. SINFONI integral field spectroscopy combines NIR imaging and spectroscopy, allowing us to analyse several emission and absorption lines to investigate the stellar populations and ionization mechanisms over the 10″ × 10″ field of view (FOV). Results: We present emission and absorption line measurements in the central kpc of NGC 1433. We detect a narrow Balmer line and several H2 lines. We find that the stellar continuum peaks in the optical and NIR in the same position, indicating that there is no covering of the center by a nuclear dust lane. A strong velocity gradient is detected in all emission lines at that position. The position angle of this gradient is at 155° whereas the galactic rotation is at a position angle of 201°. Our measures of the molecular hydrogen lines, hydrogen recombination lines, and [Fe ii] indicate that the excitation at the nucleus is caused by thermal excitation, i.e., shocks that can be associated with active galactic

  8. The first observation of titanate nanotubes by spherical aberration corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, L.; Tanemura, S.; Jiang, T.; Tanemura, M.; Yoshida, K.; Tanaka, N.; Xu, G.

    2009-07-01

    Multi-wall titanate nanotubes (MW-TNNTs) with high aspect ratio, large surface area and good uniformity were produced by alkaline hydrothermal treatment of grounded TiO 2 aerogels and further by applying freeze-drying. Not only the crystal phase and diameter, but also morphology of the starting materials impact on the aspect ratio and transformation efficiency of the obtained nanotubes. Other parameters, such as pH value during neutralization process and drying method for the final products, are important to control length and dispersion of MW-TNNTs. By spherical aberration corrected high-resolution transmission-electron-microscopy (Cs-corrected HRTEM) with lateral space resolution of 0.14 nm at 200 kV accelerating voltage and electron energy loss spectrum (EELS), the detailed structural analysis of MW-TNNTs reveals that (1) diameters of inner and outer tubes are about 4-7 nm and 10 nm, respectively, (2) numbers of layers are different from part to part along the longitudinal tube axis, (3) the walls of the tubes have interlayer spacing of 0.70-0.80 nm and the lateral fringes which are vertical to the walls have spacing of 0.32 nm, (4) each layer of MW-TNNT is the nanosheet composed by the arrayed TiO 6 octahedrons, and respective octahedron being slightly strained, and (5) no chirality of MW-TNNT tubular structure is observed.

  9. High-resolution far ultraviolet spectrum of electron-excited SO(sub 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palle, P. V.; Ajello, J.; Bhardwaj, A.

    2004-01-01

    The high resolution UV capabilities (lamda/delta lambda = 10(sup 5)) of the Hubble Space Telscope (HST) equipped with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) reflects a need for high resolution laboratory UV spectral data base for comparison with observation.

  10. Changes in plant defense chemistry (pyrrolizidine alkaloids) revealed through high-resolution spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Sabrina; Macel, Mirka; Schlerf, Martin; Moghaddam, Fatemeh Eghbali; Mulder, Patrick P. J.; Skidmore, Andrew K.; van der Putten, Wim H.

    2013-06-01

    Plant toxic biochemicals play an important role in defense against natural enemies and often are toxic to humans and livestock. Hyperspectral reflectance is an established method for primary chemical detection and could be further used to determine plant toxicity in the field. In order to make a first step for pyrrolizidine alkaloids detection (toxic defense compound against mammals and many insects) we studied how such spectral data can estimate plant defense chemistry under controlled conditions. In a greenhouse, we grew three related plant species that defend against generalist herbivores through pyrrolizidine alkaloids: Jacobaea vulgaris, Jacobaea erucifolia and Senecio inaequidens, and analyzed the relation between spectral measurements and chemical concentrations using multivariate statistics. Nutrient addition enhanced tertiary-amine pyrrolizidine alkaloids contents of J. vulgaris and J. erucifolia and decreased N-oxide contents in S. inaequidens and J. vulgaris. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids could be predicted with a moderate accuracy. Pyrrolizidine alkaloid forms tertiary-amines and epoxides were predicted with 63% and 56% of the variation explained, respectively. The most relevant spectral regions selected for prediction were associated with electron transitions and Csbnd H, Osbnd H, and Nsbnd H bonds in the 1530 and 2100 nm regions. Given the relatively low concentration in pyrrolizidine alkaloids concentration (in the order of mg g-1) and resultant predictions, it is promising that pyrrolizidine alkaloids interact with incident light. Further studies should be considered to determine if such a non-destructive method may predict changes in PA concentration in relation to plant natural enemies. Spectroscopy may be used to study plant defenses in intact plant tissues, and may provide managers of toxic plants, food industry and multitrophic-interaction researchers with faster and larger monitoring possibilities.

  11. [High resolution electron microscopy of the crystalline structure in remineralized enamel].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, N

    1989-09-01

    The present work was designed to elucidate crystallographic changes in enamel that had been demineralized in a 0.01 M acetate buffer (pH 4.0) for 2 days at 50 degrees C and then remineralized in a solution containing 1 mM Ca, 0.6 mM P, and 0.05 mM F for 1 or 2 weeks at 37 degrees C. The demineralized and remineralized enamel samples were observed by means of high-resolution electron microscopy, electron-probe analysis, and small area X-ray or electron diffraction. Before remineralization, demineralized enamel had been composed of sparsely arranged apatite crystals with either a central perforation or lateral surface defects or both. Measurements of crystalline (001) planes indicated that crystals in demineralized enamel were significantly larger than those in intact enamel, thus suggesting that crystal growth had taken place during demineralization. Small, newly formed, hexagonal crystals occurred in remineralized enamel. In some cases, precipitation of such small crystals together with localized enamel-crystal regrowth restored central perforations and lateral defects. A number of the small, newly formed crystals and preexisting enamel crystals aggregated to form a group with a roughly hexagonal outline. After the growth and fusion of these grouping crystals, a large, regular-hexagonal crystal formed. Such various kinds of lattice defects as edge dislocation, small-angle grain boundary, and lattice displacement were frequently detected in fusing crystal boundaries. Prolonging remineralization duration seemed to reinforce these lattice defects. Electron-probe and X-ray diffraction studies led to the assumption that the large hexagonal crystals were fluoroapatite. These results indicate that remineralization of demineralized enamel proceeds through several stages, including formation and growth of new crystals and regrowth of preexisting enamel crystals. PMID:2641199

  12. High-resolution subtyping of Staphylococcus aureus strains by means of Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Johler, Sophia; Stephan, Roger; Althaus, Denise; Ehling-Schulz, Monika; Grunert, Tom

    2016-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes a variety of serious illnesses in humans and animals. Subtyping of S. aureus isolates plays a crucial role in epidemiological investigations. Metabolic fingerprinting by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is commonly used to identify microbes at species as well as subspecies level. In this study, we aimed to assess the suitability of FTIR spectroscopy as a tool for S. aureus subtyping. To this end, we compared the subtyping performance of FTIR spectroscopy to other subtyping methods such as pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and spa typing in a blinded experimental setup and investigated the ability of FTIR spectroscopy for identifying S. aureus clonal complexes (CC). A total of 70 S. aureus strains from human, animal, and food sources were selected, for which clonal complexes and a unique virulence and resistance gene pattern had been determined by DNA microarray analysis. FTIR spectral analysis resulted in high discriminatory power similar as obtained by spa typing and PFGE. High directional concordance was found between FTIR spectroscopy based subtypes and capsular polysaccharide expression detected by FTIR spectroscopy and the cap specific locus, reflecting strain specific expression of capsular polysaccharides and/or other surface glycopolymers, such as wall teichoic acid, peptidoglycane, and lipoteichoic acid. Supervised chemometrics showed only limited possibilities for differentiation of S. aureus CC by FTIR spectroscopy with the exception of CC45 and CC705. In conclusion, FTIR spectroscopy represents a valuable tool for S. aureus subtyping, which complements current molecular and proteomic strain typing. PMID:27021524

  13. High-Resolution Infrared Spectroscopy of Cubane, C_8H_8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudon, Vincent; Pirali, Olivier; Gruet, Sébastien; D'accolti, Lucia; Fusco, Caterina; Annese, Cosimo

    2014-06-01

    Carbon-cage molecules have generated a considerable interest from both experimental and theoretical point of views. We recently performed a high-resolution study of adamantane (C10H16), the smallest hydrocarbon cage belonging to the diamandoid family. There exist another family of hydrocarbon cages with additional interesting chemical properties: the so-called Platonic hydrocarbons that comprise dodecahedrane (C20H20) and cubane (C_8H_8). Both possess C-C bond angles that deviate from the tetrahedral angle (109.8°) of the sp^3 hybridized form of carbon. This generates a considerable strain in the molecule. Cubane itself has the highest density of all hydrocarbons (1.29 g/cm^3). This makes it able to store larges amounts of energy, although the molecule is fully stable. Up to now, only one high-resolution study of cubane has been performed on a few bands [2]. We report here a new wide-range high-resolution study of the infrared spectrum of cubane. The sample was synthesized in Bari upon decarboxylation of 1,4-cubanedicarboxylic acid thanks to the improved synthesis of literature [3]; its {}1H and 13C NMR, FTIR, and mass spectrometry agreed with reported data [4]. Several spectra have been recorded at the AILES beamline of the SOLEIL French synchrotron facility. They cover the 800 to 3100 cm-1 region. Besides the three infrared-active fundamentals (ν10, ν11 and ν12), we could record many combination bands, all of them displaying a well-resolved octahedral rotational structure. We present here a preliminary analysis of some of the recorded bands, performed thanks the SPVIEW and XTDS software, based on the tensrorial formalism developed in the Dijon group [5]. [1] O. Pirali, V. Boudon, J. Oomens, M. Vervloet, J. Chem. Phys., 136, 024310 (2012). [2] A. S. Pine, A. G. Maki, A. G. Robiette, B. J. Krohn, J. K. G. Watson, Th. Urbanek, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 106, 891-897 (1984). [3] P. E. Eaton, N. Nordari, J. Tsanaktsidis, P. S. Upadhyaya, Synthesis, 1, 501, (1995). [4] E

  14. High resolution infrared spectroscopy: Some new approaches and applications to planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumma, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    The principles of spectral line formation and of techniques for retrieval of atmospheric temperature and constituent profiles are discussed. Applications to the atmospheres of Earth, Mars, Venus, and Jupiter are illustrated by results obtained with Fourier transform and infrared heterodyne spectrometers at resolving powers (lambda/delta hyperon lambda of approximately 10,000 and approximately 10 to the seventh power), respectively, showing the high complementarity of spectroscopy at these two widely different resolving powers. The principles of heterodyne spectroscopy are presented and its applications to atmospheric probing and to laboratory spectroscopy are discussed. Direct absorption spectroscopy with tuneable semiconductor lasers is discussed in terms of precision frequency-and line strength-measurements, showing substantial advances in laboratory infrared spectroscopy.

  15. High-resolution photoassociation spectroscopy of the 6Li2 A(11Σu+) state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunton, Will; Semczuk, Mariusz; Dattani, Nikesh S.; Madison, Kirk W.

    2013-12-01

    We present spectroscopic measurements of seven vibrational levels v=29-35 of the A(11Σu+) excited state of Li2 molecules by the photoassociation of a degenerate Fermi gas of 6Li atoms. The absolute uncertainty of our measurements is ±0.00002 cm-1 (±600 kHz) and we use these new data to further refine an analytic potential for this state. This work provides high accuracy photoassociation resonance locations essential for the eventual high-resolution mapping of the X(11Σg+) state enabling further improvements to the s-wave scattering length determination of Li and enabling the eventual creation of ultracold ground-state 6Li2 molecules.

  16. High-resolution spectroscopy and mode identification in non-radially pulsating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, K. R.; Wright, D. J.; Zima, W.; Cottrell, P. L.; De Cat, P.

    2008-12-01

    We have obtained high-resolution spectroscopic data of a sample of non-radially pulsating stars with the HERCULES spectrograph on the 1.0-m telescope at the Mt John University Observatory in New Zealand. We have developed and used a new technique which cross- correlates stellar spectra with scaled delta function templates to obtain high signal-to-noise representative spectral line profiles for further analysis. Using these profiles, and employing the Fourier Parameter Fit method, we have been able to place constraints on the degree, ℓ, and azimuthal order, m, of the non-radial pulsation modes in one β Cephei star, V2052 Oph and two γ Doradus stars, QW Pup and HD 139095.

  17. High-resolution spectroscopy used to measure inertial confinement fusion neutron spectra on Omega (invited).

    PubMed

    Forrest, C J; Radha, P B; Glebov, V Yu; Goncharov, V N; Knauer, J P; Pruyne, A; Romanofsky, M; Sangster, T C; Shoup, M J; Stoeckl, C; Casey, D T; Gatu-Johnson, M; Gardner, S

    2012-10-01

    The areal density (ρR) of cryogenic DT implosions on Omega is inferred by measuring the spectrum of neutrons that elastically scatter off the dense deuterium (D) and tritium (T) fuel. Neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) techniques are used to measure the energy spectrum with high resolution. High signal-to-background data has been recorded on cryogenic DT implosions using a well-collimated 13.4-m line of sight and an nTOF detector with an advanced liquid scintillator compound. An innovative method to analyze the elastically scattered neutron spectra was developed using well-known cross sections of the DT nuclear reactions. The estimated areal densities are consistent with alternative ρR measurements and 1-D simulations. PMID:23126921

  18. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy of encapsulated proteins dissolved in low-viscosity fluids.

    PubMed

    Nucci, Nathaniel V; Valentine, Kathleen G; Wand, A Joshua

    2014-04-01

    High-resolution multi-dimensional solution NMR is unique as a biophysical and biochemical tool in its ability to examine both the structure and dynamics of macromolecules at atomic resolution. Conventional solution NMR approaches, however, are largely limited to examinations of relatively small (<25kDa) molecules, mostly due to the spectroscopic consequences of slow rotational diffusion. Encapsulation of macromolecules within the protective nanoscale aqueous interior of reverse micelles dissolved in low viscosity fluids has been developed as a means through which the 'slow tumbling problem' can be overcome. This approach has been successfully applied to diverse proteins and nucleic acids ranging up to 100kDa, considerably widening the range of biological macromolecules to which conventional solution NMR methodologies may be applied. Recent advances in methodology have significantly broadened the utility of this approach in structural biology and molecular biophysics. PMID:24656086

  19. High resolution FTIR spectroscopy of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane: ν6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Christopher D.; Robertson, Evan G.; Evans, Corey J.; McNaughton, Don

    2003-03-01

    High resolution FTIR spectra of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoromethane (R134a) were recorded using both an enclosive flow cell and a supersonic jet expansion. The temperature in the collisionally cooled enclosive flow was approximately 150 K, whilst in the jet a rotational temperature of 65 K was achieved. A rovibrational analysis was performed for ν6, an a/b hybrid band at 1104.5 cm-1. Least squares fits were used to derive effective rotational and centrifugal distortion constants for ν6 using a total of 799 assigned transitions with quantum numbers up to Ka=21 and J=32. A second fit is presented considering the Coriolis interactions with two dark state combination bands perturbing the rotational structure of the fundamental, fitting a total of 1118 lines and with quantum numbers up to Ka=21 and J=42.

  20. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy applied to bulk sample analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kosanke, K.L.; Koch, C.D.; Wilson, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    A high resolution Ge(Li) gamma-ray spectrometer has been installed and made operational for use in routine bulk sample analysis by the Bendix Field Engineering Corporation (BFEC) geochemical analysis department. The Ge(Li) spectrometer provides bulk sample analyses for potassium, uranium, and thorium that are superior to those obtained by the BFEC sodium iodide spectrometer. The near term analysis scheme permits a direct assay for uranium that corrects for bulk sample self-absorption effects and is independent of the uranium/radium disequilibrium condition of the sample. A more complete analysis scheme has been developed that fully utilizes the gamma-ray data provided by the Ge(Li) spectrometer and that more properly accounts for the sample self-absorption effect. This new analysis scheme should be implemented on the BFEC Ge(Li) spectrometer at the earliest date.

  1. High-resolution spectroscopy of jet-cooled CH{sub 5}{sup +}: Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, C.; Dong, F.; Nesbitt, D. J.

    2015-01-22

    Protonated methane (CH{sub 5}{sup +}) is thought to be a highly abundant molecular ion in interstellar medium, as well as a potentially bright μwave- mm wave emitter that could serve as a tracer for methane. This paper describes progress and first successful efforts to obtain a high resolution, supersonically cooled spectrum of CH{sub 5}{sup +} in the 2900-3100 cm{sup −1} region, formed in a slit supersonic discharge at low jet temperatures and with sub-Doppler resolution. Short term precision in frequency measurement (< 5 MHz on an hour time scale) is obtained from a thermally controlled optical transfer cavity servoloop locked onto a frequency stabilized HeNe laser. Long term precision (< 20 MHz day-to-day) due to pressure, temperature and humidity dependent index of refraction effects in the optical transfer cavity is also present and discussed.

  2. High Resolution Near-IR Spectroscopy of Protostars With Large Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Tom; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    It is now possible to measure absorption spectra of Class I protostars using D greater than or = 8m telescopes equipped with sensitive cryogenic IR spectrographs. Our latest high-resolution (R approx. 20,000) Keck data reveal that Class I protostars are indeed low-mass stars with dwarf-like features. However, they differ from T Tauri stars in that Class I protostars have much higher IR veilings (tau(sub k) greater than or = 1 - 3+) and they are rotating quickly, v sin i greater than 20 km/s. Interestingly, the vast majority of protostellar absorption spectra show stellar - not disk - absorption features. A preliminary H-R diagram suggests that protostellar photospheres may have different physical structures than T Tauri stars, perhaps due to their higher accretion rates.

  3. High-Resolution Threshold Photoionization and Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Propene and 2-BUTYNE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaud, Julie M.; Vasilatou, Konstantina; Merkt, Frédéric

    2009-06-01

    The high-resolution photoionization and pulsed-field ionization zero-kinetic energy (PFI-ZEKE) photoelectron spectra of propene and 2-butyne and their perdeuterated isotopologues have been recorded in the vicinity of the first adiabatic ionization energy following single-photon excitation from the neutral ground state using a narrowband vacuum ultraviolet laser system. The spectral resolution of better than 0.1 cm^{-1} achieved in these spectra has enabled us to partially resolve the rotational structure of the photoelectron spectra and to obtain information on the internal rotation/torsional vibration of the methyl groups in the cationic ground state. The intensity distributions observed in the photoelectron spectra will be discussed in terms of rovibronic photoionization selection rules and Franck-Condon factors for transitions between the neutral and ionized molecules.

  4. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy of biological tissues usingprojected Magic Angle Spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Rachel W.; Jachmann, Rebecca C.; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Nielsen, Ulla Gro; Pines, Alexander

    2005-01-27

    High-resolution NMR spectra of materials subject toanisotropic broadening are usually obtained by rotating the sample aboutthe magic angle, which is 54.7 degrees to the static magnetic field. Inprojected Magic Angle Spinning (p-MAS), the sample is spun about twoangles, neither of which is the magic angle. This provides a method ofobtaining isotropic spectra while spinning at shallow angles. The p-MASexperiment may be used in situations where spinning the sample at themagic angle is not possible due to geometric or other constraints,allowing the choice of spinning angle to be determined by factors such asthe shape of the sample, rather than by the spin physics. The applicationof this technique to bovine tissue samples is demonstrated as a proof ofprinciple for future biological or medical applications.

  5. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy of encapsulated proteins dissolved in low-viscosity fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nucci, Nathaniel V.; Valentine, Kathleen G.; Wand, A. Joshua

    2014-04-01

    High-resolution multi-dimensional solution NMR is unique as a biophysical and biochemical tool in its ability to examine both the structure and dynamics of macromolecules at atomic resolution. Conventional solution NMR approaches, however, are largely limited to examinations of relatively small (<25 kDa) molecules, mostly due to the spectroscopic consequences of slow rotational diffusion. Encapsulation of macromolecules within the protective nanoscale aqueous interior of reverse micelles dissolved in low viscosity fluids has been developed as a means through which the ‘slow tumbling problem' can be overcome. This approach has been successfully applied to diverse proteins and nucleic acids ranging up to 100 kDa, considerably widening the range of biological macromolecules to which conventional solution NMR methodologies may be applied. Recent advances in methodology have significantly broadened the utility of this approach in structural biology and molecular biophysics.

  6. High-resolution spectroscopy used to measure inertial confinement fusion neutron spectra on Omega (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, C. J.; Radha, P. B.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Goncharov, V. N.; Knauer, J. P.; Pruyne, A.; Romanofsky, M.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M. J. III; Stoeckl, C.; Casey, D. T.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Gardner, S.

    2012-10-15

    The areal density ({rho}R) of cryogenic DT implosions on Omega is inferred by measuring the spectrum of neutrons that elastically scatter off the dense deuterium (D) and tritium (T) fuel. Neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) techniques are used to measure the energy spectrum with high resolution. High signal-to-background data has been recorded on cryogenic DT implosions using a well-collimated 13.4-m line of sight and an nTOF detector with an advanced liquid scintillator compound. An innovative method to analyze the elastically scattered neutron spectra was developed using well-known cross sections of the DT nuclear reactions. The estimated areal densities are consistent with alternative {rho}R measurements and 1-D simulations.

  7. High-resolution photoassociation spectroscopy of ultracold ytterbium atoms by using the intercombination transition.

    PubMed

    Tojo, Satoshi; Kitagawa, Masaaki; Enomoto, Katsunari; Kato, Yutaka; Takasu, Yosuke; Kumakura, Mitsutaka; Takahashi, Yoshiro

    2006-04-21

    We observed high-resolution photoassociation spectra of laser-cooled ytterbium (Yb) atoms in the spin-forbidden 1S0 - 3P1 intercombination line. The rovibrational levels in the 0u+ state were measured for red detunings of the photoassociation laser ranging from 2.9 MHz to 1.97 GHz with respect to the atomic resonance. The rotational splitting of the vibrational levels near the dissociation limit were fully resolved due to the sub-MHz linewidth of the spectra in contrast to previous measurements using the spin-allowed singlet transition. In addition, from a comparison between the spectra of 174Yb and those of 176Yb, a d-wave shape resonance for 174Yb is strongly suggested. PMID:16712155

  8. CARMENES at PPVI. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of M Dwarfs with FEROS, CAFE and HRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Floriano, F. J.; Montes, D.; Jeffers, S.; Caballero, J. A.; Zechmeister, M.; Mundt, R.; Reiners, A.; Amado, P. J.; Casal, E.; Cortés-Contreras, M.; Modroño, Z.; Ribas, I.; Rodríguez-López, C.; Quirrenbach, A.

    2013-07-01

    To ensure an efficient use of CARMENES observing time, and the highest chances of success, it is necessary first to select the most promising targets. To achieve this, we are observing ~500 M dwarfs at high-resolution (R = 30,000-48,000), from which we determine the projected rotational velocity vsini with an accuracy better than 0.5-0.2 km/s and radial-velocity stability better than 0.2-0.1 km/s. Our aim is to have at least two spectra at different epochs of the final 300 CARMENES targets. Our observations with FEROS at ESO/MPG 2.2m La Silla , CAFE at 2.2m Calar Alto and HRS at Hobby Eberly Telescope allow us to identify single- and double-line spectroscopic binaries and, especially, fast rotators, which should be discarded from the target list for exoplanet searches. Here we present preliminary results.

  9. An atomic beam of 6Li — 7Li for high resolution spectroscopy from matrix isolation sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, A. N.; Sacramento, R. L.; Silva, B. A.; Uhlmann, F. O.; Wolff, W.; Cesar, C. L.

    2016-07-01

    We propose the Matrix Isolation Sublimation (MlSu) technique for generating cold lithium atoms for the measurement of the 6Li - 7Li isotope shift in D1 and D2 transitions. The technique is capable of generating cold 6Li and 7Li beams at 4 K with forward velocity of 125 m/s. Using this beam we offer a distinguished source of lithium atoms for transitions measurements, adding a new possibility to make high resolution spectroscopy towards improving the experimental checks of the theory.

  10. High-resolution Inductively Coupled Plasma--Atomic Emission Spectroscopy applied to problems in Nuclear Waste Management

    SciTech Connect

    Edelson, M.C.; Winge, R.K.; Eckels, D.E. ); Douglas, J.G. )

    1990-01-01

    High-resolution Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) is a variant of the more conventional ICP-AES that is widely used for environmental monitoring. The relevance of high-resolution capabilities of three such analytical problems are discussed herein. (1) Pu in very complex, radioactive matrices can be determined with good accuracy without the need for prior chemical separations. Isotopically resolved spectra from actinides in fuel dissolver solutions can be obtained after a simple ion-exchange step. (2) High-resolution methods permit the simultaneous determination of fission products and actinides in simulated high-level nuclear waste solutions. Such measurements can be useful for both safeguards and waste processing. (3) The ICP-AES technique, with a photodiode array detector, can be used to determine the composition of nuclear waste glasses. Such measurements can assist the glass producer as well as providing predictors of nuclear waste form performance in a repository. 16 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. High Resolution X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy: Distribution of Matter in and around Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Norbert; MIT/CAT Team

    2015-10-01

    The chemical evolution of the Universe embraces aspects that reachdeep into modern astrophysics and cosmology. We want to know how present and past matter is affected by various levels and types of nucleo-synthesis and stellar evolution. Three major categories were be identified: 1. The study of pre-mordial star formation including periods of super-massive black hole formation, 2. The embedded evolution of the intergalactic medium IGM, 3. The status and evolution of stars and the interstellar medium ISM in galaxies. Today a fourth category relates to our understanding of dark matter in relationwith these three categories. The X-ray band is particularly sensitive to K- and L-shell absorption and scattering from high abundant elements like C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S,Ar, Ca, Fe, and Ni. Like the Lyman alpha forest in the optical band, absorbers in the IGM produce an X-ray line forest along the line of sight in the X-rayspectrum of a background quasar. Similary bright X-ray sources within galaxies and the Milky Way produce a continuum, which is being absorbed by elements invarious phases of the ISM. High resolution X-ray absorption surveys are possible with technologies ready for flight within decade. == high efficiency X-ray optics with optical performance 3== high resolution X-ray gratings with R 3000 for E 1.5 keV== X-ray micro-calorimeters with R 2000 for E 1.5 keV. The vision for the next decade needs to lead to means and strategies which allows us to perform such absorption surveys as effectively as surveys are now or in very near future quite common in astronomy pursued in other wave length bands such as optical, IR, and sub-mm.

  12. Static FBG strain sensor with high resolution and large dynamic range by dual-comb spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kuse, Naoya; Ozawa, Akira; Kobayashi, Yohei

    2013-05-01

    We demonstrate a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) strain sensor with optical frequency combs. To precisely characterize the optical response of the FBG when strain is applied, dual-comb spectroscopy is used. Highly sensitive dual-comb spectroscopy of the FBG enabled strain measurements with a resolution of 34 nε. The optical spectral bandwidth of the measurement exceeds 1 THz. Compared with conventional FBG strain sensor using a continuous-wave laser that requires rather slow frequency scanning with a limited range, the dynamic range and multiplexing capability are significantly improved by using broadband dual-comb spectroscopy. PMID:23669971

  13. Soot Structure and Reactivity Analysis by Raman Microspectroscopy, Temperature-Programmed Oxidation, and High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knauer, Markus; Schuster, Manfred E.; Su, Dangsheng; Schlögl, Robert; Niessner, Reinhard; Ivleva, Natalia P.

    2009-11-01

    Raman microspectroscopy (RM), temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were combined to get comprehensive information on the relationship between structure and reactivity of soot in samples of spark discharge (GfG), heavy duty engine diesel (EURO VI and IV) soot, and graphite powder upon oxidation by oxygen at increasing temperatures. GfG soot and graphite powder represent the higher and lower reactivity limits. Raman microspectroscopic analysis was conducted by determination of spectral parameters using a five band fitting procedure (G, D1-D4) as well as by evaluation of the dispersive character of the D mode. The analysis of spectral parameters shows a higher degree of disorder and a higher amount of molecular carbon for untreated GfG soot samples than for samples of untreated EURO VI and EURO IV soot. The structural analysis based on the dispersive character of the D mode revealed substantial differences in ordering descending from graphite powder, EURO IV, VI to GfG soot. HRTEM images and EELS analysis of EURO IV and VI samples indicated a different morphology and a higher structural order as compared to GfG soot in full agreement with the Raman analysis. These findings are also confirmed by the reactivity of soot during oxidation (TPO), where GfG soot was found to be the most reactive and EURO IV and VI soot samples exhibited a moderate reactivity.

  14. High resolution Raman spectroscopy of complexes and clusters in molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, P.M.

    1991-01-01

    The DOE-sponsored project in this laboratory has two facets. The first is the development of methods of nonlinear Raman spectroscopy for application in studies of sparse samples. The second is the application of such methods to structural and dynamical studies of species in supersonic molecular beams. The progress we have made in both of these areas is described in this paper. The report is divided into five remaining sections. The first pertains to theoretical and experimental developments in Fourier transform stimulated emission spectroscopy and Fourier transform hole-burning spectroscopy. The second deals with progress in the development of ionization-detected stimulated Raman spectroscopies (IDSRS). The third describes results from the application of IDSRS methods to studies of jet-cooled benzene clusters. The fourth describes IDSRS results from studies of hydrogen-bonded complexes containing phenols. The fifth relates to studies of carbazole-(Ar){sub n} clusters.

  15. Quantitative high-resolution on-line NMR spectroscopy in reaction and process monitoring.

    PubMed

    Maiwald, Michael; Fischer, Holger H; Kim, Young-Kyu; Albert, Klaus; Hasse, Hans

    2004-02-01

    On-line nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (on-line NMR) is a powerful technique for reaction and process monitoring. Different set-ups for direct coupling of reaction and separation equipment with on-line NMR spectroscopy are described. NMR spectroscopy can be used to obtain both qualitative and quantitative information from complex reacting multicomponent mixtures for equilibrium or reaction kinetic studies. Commercial NMR probes can be used at pressures up to 35 MPa and temperatures up to 400 K. Applications are presented for studies of equilibria and kinetics of complex formaldehyde-containing mixtures as well as homogeneously and heterogeneously catalyzed esterification kinetics. Direct coupling of a thin-film evaporator is described as an example for the benefits of on-line NMR spectroscopy in process monitoring. PMID:14729025

  16. High resolution Raman spectroscopy of complexes and clusters in molecular beams. Performance report

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, P.M.

    1991-12-31

    The DOE-sponsored project in this laboratory has two facets. The first is the development of methods of nonlinear Raman spectroscopy for application in studies of sparse samples. The second is the application of such methods to structural and dynamical studies of species in supersonic molecular beams. The progress we have made in both of these areas is described in this paper. The report is divided into five remaining sections. The first pertains to theoretical and experimental developments in Fourier transform stimulated emission spectroscopy and Fourier transform hole-burning spectroscopy. The second deals with progress in the development of ionization-detected stimulated Raman spectroscopies (IDSRS). The third describes results from the application of IDSRS methods to studies of jet-cooled benzene clusters. The fourth describes IDSRS results from studies of hydrogen-bonded complexes containing phenols. The fifth relates to studies of carbazole-(Ar){sub n} clusters.

  17. High-resolution electron microscopy study of mesoporous dichalcogenides and their hydrogen storage properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Lan; Li, Jing; Gu, Dong; Shi, Yifeng; Che, Renchao; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2011-02-01

    In this work, we report a detailed investigation on the surface topology of ordered mesoporous WS2 nanoarrays nanocast from the silica SBA-15 template. Using a high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM) technique, we acquire distinguishably clear images of the WS2 surface. A large number of small nanorods are found to be evenly distributed among the nanowire arrays, supporting their ordered mesostructures. Based on these observations, tunnel-like connecting pores are proposed to have a similar distribution in the mother mesoporous silica SBA-15 template. Interestingly, we observe the atomic crystal lattices of the layered WS2 on the HRSEM image. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that atomic crystal lattices have been directly observed using a SEM technique. In addition, both materials show good adsorption-desorption capabilities with hydrogen, and the maximum amount of hydrogen that can be taken up is 0.34 wt% for mesoporous WS2 and 0.52 wt% for mesoporous MoS2 at a pressure of 10 bar, indicating that both are potential hydrogen storage materials.

  18. High resolution transmission electron microscopy of melamine-formaldehyde aerogels and silica aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Ruben, G.C. . Dept. of Biological Sciences)

    1991-09-01

    The goal of the high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was to image the structure of two tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) and two melamine-formaldehyde (MF) aerogels at the single polymer chain level{sup 1,2}. With this level of structural resolution we hoped to interrelate each aerogel's structure with its physical properties and its method of synthesis. Conventional single-step base catalysed TMOS aerogels show strings of spheroidal particles linked together with minimal necking. The spheroidal particles range from 86--132 {Angstrom} and average 113{plus minus}10 {Angstrom} in diameter{sup 2}. In contrast the TMOS aerogels reported on here were made by a two step method. After extended silica chains are grown in solution under acidic conditions with a substoichiometric amount of water, the reaction is stopped and the methanol hydrolysed from TMOS is removed. Then base catalysis and additional water are added to cause gel formation is a nonalcoholic solvent. The MF aerogels were prepared for HRTEM by fracturing them on a stereo microscope stage with razor knife so that fractured pieces with smooth flat surfaces could be selected for platinum-carbon replication. The two silica (TMOS) aerogels were both transparent and difficult to see. These aerogels were fractured on a stereo microscope stage with tweezers. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Direct imaging of CdTe(001) surface reconstructions by high-resolution electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ping; Smith, David J.

    1991-08-01

    Novel reconstructions of the CdTe(001) surface have been directly observed using high-resolution electron microscopy in the profile-imaging geometry. The CdTe(001) surface, obtained by in situ annealing under ultrahigh vacuum conditions, is found to have a (2 × 1) structure at temperatures of less than about 200° C, but it transforms reversibly into a (3 × 1) structure at temperatures above 200 °C. Structural models for the reconstructions have been proposed and confirmed by extensive computer simulations. The (2 × 1) reconstruction, stabilized by Cd atoms, consists of a {1}/{2} monolayer of Cd vacancies and a large inward relaxation of the remaining surface Cd atoms, similar to the (2 × 1) reconstruction previously proposed for the GaAs(001) surface. The (3 × 1) reconstruction, stabilized by Te atoms, involves formation of surface dimers and the presence of vacancies. In both reconstructions, atomic displacements are observed that extend a few layers into the bulk and serve to reduce the strain energy.

  20. In-Situ High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigation of Overheating of Cu Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chunlin; Hu, Ziyu; Li, Yanfen; Liu, Limin; Mori, Hirotaro; Wang, Zhangchang

    2016-01-01

    Synthesizing and functionalizing metal nanoparticles supported on substrates is currently the subject of intensive study owing to their outstanding catalytic performances for heterogeneous catalysis. Revealing the fundamental effect of the substrates on metal nanoparticles represents a key step in clarifying mechanisms of stability and catalytic properties of these heterogeneous systems. However, direct identification of these effects still poses a significant challenge due to the complicacy of interactions between substrates and nanoparticles and also for the technical difficulty, restraining our understanding of these heterogeneous systems. Here, we combine in situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy with molecular dynamics simulations to investigate Cu nanoparticles supported on graphite and Cu2O substrates, and demonstrate that melting behavior and thermal stability of Cu nanoparticles can be markedly influenced by substrates. The graphite-supported Cu nanoparticles do not melt during annealing at 1073 K until they vanish completely, i.e. only the sublimation occurs, while the Cu2O-supported Cu nanoparticles suffer melting during annealing at 973 K. Such selective superheating of the Cu nanoparticles can be attributed to the adsorption of a thin carbon layer on the surface of the Cu nanoparticles, which helps guide further stability enhancement of functional nanoparticles for realistic applications. PMID:26785839

  1. Microstructure of massively transformed {gamma}-TiAl phase studied by high-resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, E.; Kumagai, T.; Kajiwara, S.; Nakamura, M.

    1997-12-31

    A microstructure of the massively transformed {gamma}-TiAl ({gamma}{sub m}) phase in a Ti-48at.%Al alloy, which was heat treated in the high-temperature {alpha}-Ti (disordered hcp) single phase field (1,683 K), followed by ice water quenching, has been examined using high-resolution electron microscopy. The characteristic features of the microstructure originated from the {alpha}{yields}{gamma} massive transformation have been clarified in detail, which are as follows. (1) Extremely thin hcp plates (about 0.8--2nm in thickness), which are considered to be a retained {alpha} phase, are found to exist in the {gamma}{sub m} phase. (2) Twin boundaries are found to be not flat interfaces, that is, twin interfaces are not on the exact (111) mirror plane. This situation is attributed to the existence of a number of partial dislocations at the twin boundaries. (3) Antiphase relationship between the regions either side of the thin rotated domain wall is confirmed. The validity of this situation is explained by assuming that the thin rotated domain wall has been grown from a simple antiphase domain boundary. On the basis of these facts, mechanism of the {alpha}{yields}{gamma} massive transformation has been discussed.

  2. A high-resolution coherent transition radiation diagnostic for laser-produced electron transport studies (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Storm, M.; Begishev, I. A.; Brown, R. J.; Mileham, C.; Myatt, J. F.; Nilson, P. M.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Zuegel, J. D.; Guo, C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2008-10-15

    High-resolution images of the rear-surface optical emission from high-intensity (I{approx}10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) laser illuminated metal foils have been recorded using coherent transition radiation (CTR). CTR is generated as relativistic electrons, generated in high-intensity laser-plasma interactions, exit the target's rear surface and move into vacuum. A transition radiation diagnostic (TRD) records time-integrated images in a 24 nm bandwidth window around {lambda}=529 nm. The optical transmission at {lambda}=1053 nm, the laser wavelength, is 15 orders of magnitude lower than the transmission at the wavelength of interest, {lambda}=527 nm. The detector is a scientific grade charge-coupled device (CCD) camera that operates with a signal-to-noise ratio of 10{sup 3} and has a dynamic range of 10{sup 4}. The TRD has demonstrated a spatial resolution of 1.4 {mu}m over a 1 mm field of view, limited only by the CCD pixel size.

  3. High-resolution electron microscopy study of synthetic carbonate and aluminum containing apatites.

    PubMed

    Layani, J D; Cuisinier, F J; Steuer, P; Cohen, H; Voegel, J C; Mayer, I

    2000-05-01

    Aluminum (Al)-containing calcium-deficient carbonated hydroxyapatites were produced by a precipitation method from aqueous solution with carbonate (0-6.1%) and aluminum (0.1-0.5%) concentrations close to those found in biological materials. Two series of apatites were prepared: one at pH 7.0 and another at pH 9. 0. High-resolution electron microscopy has shown that many of them possess structural defects such as screw dislocations, grain boundaries, and central defects. Samples with high carbonate content and high water and high Al(3+) content had a high amount of structural defects. Accordingly, a sample (7Al1) with a relatively high carbonate content (6.1%) and a sample (7Al6) without carbonate but with a relatively high water (2.0 mol) and Al(3+) content (0. 39%) presented the highest amount of structural defects, 54% and 47%, respectively. A sample (7Al13) with a low level of crystalline water (1 mol) and low carbonate (2.5%) showed a small amount of defects. The presence of water associated with Al(3+) induced a high number of crystals having a central defect with a great similarity to the so-called water layer of octacalcium phosphate (OCP). Observed images of all these crystals have shown good correspondence with the computer-simulated image based on the crystal structure of hydroxyapatite, indicating that the addition of Al(3+) and carbonate does not perturb the apatitic structure. PMID:10679685

  4. High resolution transmission electron microscopy study of diamond films grown from fullerene precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, J.S.; Gruen, D.M.; Krauss, A.R.

    1995-07-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) has been used to investigate the microstructure of diamond films grown by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition using fullerene precursors. HRTEM observations of as-grown films revealed an array of larger crystals (>200 nm) within a polycrystalline matrix of much smaller crystallites (<20 nm). The randomly oriented small crystallites were nearly free of structural imperfections such as stacking faults or twins, while the larger ones had preferred <110> orientations with respect to the Si (100) substrate and showed evidence of structural defects on the periphery of the crystals. The most common defects were V-shaped {Sigma}9 twin boundaries, which are generally believed to serve as re-entrant sites for diamond nucleation and growth. The observation of growth steps on both (111) and (110) surfaces seems to support a reaction model in which fragments of C{sub 60}, including C{sub 2}, are considered the growth species. In particular, the nanocrystallinity of the films is most likely due to a high carbon cluster density from C{sub 60} fragmentation at or near the diamond surface, which can serve as nucleation sites for the growth of new crystallites.

  5. In-Situ High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigation of Overheating of Cu Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chunlin; Hu, Ziyu; Li, Yanfen; Liu, Limin; Mori, Hirotaro; Wang, Zhangchang

    2016-01-01

    Synthesizing and functionalizing metal nanoparticles supported on substrates is currently the subject of intensive study owing to their outstanding catalytic performances for heterogeneous catalysis. Revealing the fundamental effect of the substrates on metal nanoparticles represents a key step in clarifying mechanisms of stability and catalytic properties of these heterogeneous systems. However, direct identification of these effects still poses a significant challenge due to the complicacy of interactions between substrates and nanoparticles and also for the technical difficulty, restraining our understanding of these heterogeneous systems. Here, we combine in situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy with molecular dynamics simulations to investigate Cu nanoparticles supported on graphite and Cu2O substrates, and demonstrate that melting behavior and thermal stability of Cu nanoparticles can be markedly influenced by substrates. The graphite-supported Cu nanoparticles do not melt during annealing at 1073 K until they vanish completely, i.e. only the sublimation occurs, while the Cu2O-supported Cu nanoparticles suffer melting during annealing at 973 K. Such selective superheating of the Cu nanoparticles can be attributed to the adsorption of a thin carbon layer on the surface of the Cu nanoparticles, which helps guide further stability enhancement of functional nanoparticles for realistic applications.

  6. High Resolution Spectroscopy in the Non-thermal Infrared: Use of an Existing Coude System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basri, Gibor; Marcy, Geoffrey W.

    1993-05-01

    We describe a recent effort to use a NICMOS 3 chip as the detector on the 160" coude spectrograph camera at Lick Observatory. This new instrument (IRCS) has a useful spectral range of 1-2mu with spectral coverage in one exposure of about 25 Angstroms, and resolutions up to 75000. We have successfully obtained astronomical observations with essentially no modification of the (uncooled) spectrograph, using an existing grating blazed at 1.22mu , and a dewar without optics (but containing a filter) easily mounted at the position of the old photographic plates. The throughput of the system is very high. Its sensitivity is primarily limited by the background from the warm spectrograph. Using filters with 0.1mu bandwidth, the expected background is negligible below 1.5mu , but limits exposures to one minute near 2mu . With an optimized dewar, one can remain photon (rather than background) limited down to 10th magnitude even at 2mu . Our current system (using a test dewar and engineering grade chip) has been tested at 1.6mu . We have operated with and without an image slicer. We show spectra and discuss the current successes and problems. Our first application is to study the Zeeman--sensitive line at 1.56mu at high resolution. We expect to be able to achieve S/N of 200:1 in 10 minutes on 6th magnitude stars now, and eventually 100:1 in one hour on 10th magnitude stars using the 3-m telescope. This opens the possibility of measuring magnetic fields for large numbers of RS CVN and dM(e) stars (in addition to many G,K dwarfs), and even perhaps a few pre-main sequence stars. There is a lot of potential for science in the 1-2mu range at high resolution, which cannot be done as easily with any other type of instrument. This includes: (1) molecular lines in giants and winds, (2) lines from the ISM for abundances and kinematics, (3) detailed atmospheric analysis of embedded stars (and disks?).

  7. High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Calibration of Critical Dimension (CD) Reference Materials

    SciTech Connect

    ALLEN, RICHARD A.; CRESSWELL, MICHAEL W.; EVERIST, SARAH C.; GHOSHTAGORE, RATHINDRA N.; HEADLEY, THOMAS J.; LINHOLM, LOREN W.

    1999-09-21

    NIST and Sandia have developed a procedure for producing and calibrating critical dimension (CD), or linewidth, reference materials. These reference materials will be used to calibrate metrology instruments used in semiconductor manufacturing. The artifacts, with widths down to 100 nm, are produced in monocrystalline silicon with all feature edges aligned to specific crystal planes. A two-part calibration of these linewidths is used: the primary calibration, with accuracy to within a few lattice plane thicknesses, is accomplished by counting the lattice planes across the sample as-imaged through use of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The secondary calibration is the high-precision electrical CD technique. NIST and Sandia are developing critical dimension (CD), or linewidth, reference materials for use by the semiconductor industry. To meet the current requirements of this rapidly changing industry, the widths of the reference features must be at or below the widths of the finest features in production and/or development. Further, these features must produce consistent results no matter which metrology tool (e.g., scanning electron microscope, scanned probe microscope, electrical metrology) is used to make the measurement. This leads to a requirement for the samples to have planar surfaces, known sidewall angles, and uniform material composition. None of the production techniques in use in semiconductor manufacturing can produce features with all these characteristics. In addition, requirements specified in the National Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors indicate that the width of the feature must be accurately calibrated to approximately 1-2 nm, a value well beyond the current capabilities of the instruments used for semiconductor metrology.

  8. On-chip near-infrared spectroscopy of CO2 using high resolution plasmonic filter array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Xinyuan; Li, Erwen; Squire, Kenneth; Wang, Alan X.

    2016-05-01

    We report an ultra-compact, cost-effective on-chip near-infrared spectroscopy system for CO2 sensing using narrow-band optical filter array based on plasmonic gratings with a waveguide layer. By varying the periodicity of the gratings, the transmission spectra of the filters can be continuously tuned to cover the 2.0 μm sensing window with high spectral resolution around 10 nm. Our experimental results show that the on-chip spectroscopy system can resolve the two symmetric vibrational bands of CO2 at 2.0 μm wavelength, which proves its potential to replace the expensive commercial IR spectroscopy system for on-site gas sensing.

  9. New results in high-resolution X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žitnik, Matjaž; Kavčič, Matjaž; Bučar, Klemen; Mihelič, Andrej; Bohinc, Rok

    2014-04-01

    We present some recent results dealing with resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) on atomic targets in the 3-5 keV enegy region. In this so-called tender spectral region, the K-shell fluorescence branching ratios become reasonably large, but a full vacuum enclosure is still preferable to avoid detection efficiency loss due to the sizeable arms of high resolution crystal spectrometers. By squeezing energy resolution in the fluorescence decay channel, one may improve the spectral resolution of photoabsorption, enable separation of multielectron excitation and relaxation channels, and completely eliminate the need to scan across the selected energy range of the photon probe in order to acquire the photoabsorption spectrum. On the other hand, the spectra may be untrivially modified by effects such as interference of absorption-emission paths or structured relaxation modes, and a more elaborated modelling is needed to understand the emitted signal. We illustrate these aspects by presenting four cases: the reconstruction of Ar KM and Ar KL absorption edges from a series of highly resolved emission spectra recorded at different probe energies, the reconstruction of the Xe L3 edge from a single X-ray emission spectrum, and the analysis of the radiative Ar K-MM Auger decay preceeded by the resonant or nonresonant photon absorption.

  10. High-Resolution IR Absorption Spectroscopy of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: The Realm of Anharmonicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maltseva, Elena; Petrignani, Annemieke; Candian, Alessandra; Mackie, Cameron J.; Huang, Xinchuan; Lee, Timothy J.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Oomens, Jos; Buma, Wybren Jan

    2016-01-01

    We report on an experimental and theoretical investigation of the importance of anharmonicity in the 3 micrometers CH stretching region of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules. We present mass-resolved, high-resolution spectra of the gas-phase cold ((is) approximately 4K) linear PAH molecules naphthalene, anthracene, and tetracene. The measured IR spectra show a surprisingly high number of strong vibrational bands. For naphthalene, the observed bands are well separated and limited by the rotational contour, revealing the band symmetries. Comparisons are made to the harmonic and anharmonic approaches of the widely used Gaussian software. We also present calculated spectra of these acenes using the computational program SPECTRO, providing anharmonic predictions enhanced with a Fermi-resonance treatment that utilizes intensity redistribution. We demonstrate that the anharmonicity of the investigated acenes is strong, dominated by Fermi resonances between the fundamental and double combination modes, with triple combination bands as possible candidates to resolve remaining discrepancies. The anharmonic spectra as calculated with SPECTRO lead to predictions of the main modes that fall within 0.5% of the experimental frequencies. The implications for the Aromatic Infrared Bands, specifically the 3-m band are discussed.

  11. Applications of High Resolution Laser: Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Environmental and Biological Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Madhavi Z.; Labbe, Nicole; Wagner, Rebekah J.

    This chapter details the application of LIBS in a number of environmental areas of research such as carbon sequestration and climate change. LIBS has also been shown to be useful in other high resolution environmental applications for example, elemental mapping and detection of metals in plant materials. LIBS has also been used in phytoremediation applications. Other biological research involves a detailed understanding of wood chemistry response to precipitation variations and also to forest fires. A cross-section of Mountain pine (pinceae Pinus pungen Lamb.) was scanned using a translational stage to determine the differences in the chemical features both before and after a fire event. Consequently, by monitoring the elemental composition pattern of a tree and by looking for abrupt changes, one can reconstruct the disturbance history of a tree and a forest. Lastly we have shown that multivariate analysis of the LIBS data is necessary to standardize the analysis and correlate to other standard laboratory techniques. LIBS along with multivariate statistical analysis makes it a very powerful technology that can be transferred from laboratory to field applications with ease.

  12. High-resolution rovibrational spectroscopy of carbon monoxide isotopologues isolated in solid parahydrogen.

    PubMed

    Fajardo, Mario E

    2013-12-19

    We report high-resolution infrared absorption spectra of six different CO isotopologues isolated in cryogenic parahydrogen (pH2) solids. These data provide a stringent test for theories of nearly free molecular rotors in crystalline solids, such as crystal field theory, rotation-translation coupling theory, and the pseudorotating cage model. A gas-phase molecule rotates about its center-of-mass (C.M.); a trapped molecule instead rotates about its "center of interaction" (C.I.) with the trapping cage, which may differ from the C.M. for heteronuclear diatomics like CO. Isotopic manipulation of CO allows the systematic variation of the C.M. relative to the C.I. We report remarkably good straight line correlation plots between the observed matrix effects and C.M. locations. Extrapolation of these lines to the limit of vanishing matrix effects yields an "experimental prediction" of the C.I. in excellent (fortuitous?) agreement with the C.I. calculated using a linear pH2-CO-pH2 toy model. PMID:24102285

  13. Applications of High Resolution Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Environmental and Biological Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Madhavi Z; Labbe, Nicole; Wagner, Rebekah J.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter details the application of LIBS in a number of environmental areas of research such as carbon sequestration and climate change. LIBS has also been shown to be useful in other high resolution environmental applications for example, elemental mapping and detection of metals in plant materials. LIBS has also been used in phytoremediation applications. Other biological research involves a detailed understanding of wood chemistry response to precipitation variations and also to forest fires. A cross-section of Mountain pine (pinceae Pinus pungen Lamb.) was scanned using a translational stage to determine the differences in the chemical features both before and after a fire event. Consequently, by monitoring the elemental composition pattern of a tree and by looking for abrupt changes, one can reconstruct the disturbance history of a tree and a forest. Lastly we have shown that multivariate analysis of the LIBS data is necessary to standardize the analysis and correlate to other standard laboratory techniques. LIBS along with multivariate statistical analysis makes it a very powerful technology that can be transferred from laboratory to field applications with ease.

  14. ISIS: An Interactive Spectral Interpretation System for High Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houck, J. C.; Denicola, L. A.

    The Interactive Spectral Interpretation System (ISIS) is designed to facilitate the interpretation and analysis of high resolution X-ray spectra like those obtained using the grating spectrographs on Chandra and XMM and the microcalorimeter on Astro-E. It is being developed as an interactive tool for studying the physics of X-ray spectrum formation, supporting measurement and identification of spectral features, and interaction with a database of atomic structure parameters and plasma emission models. The current version uses the atomic data and collisional ionization equilibrium models in the Astrophysical Plasma Emission Database (APED) of Brickhouse et.al., and also provides access to earlier plasma emission models including Raymond-Smith and MEKAL. Although the current version focuses on collisional ionization equilibrium plasmas, the system is designed to allow use of other databases to provide better support for studies of non-equilibrium and photoionized plasmas. To maximize portability between Unix operating systems, ISIS is being written entirely in ANSI C using free-software components (CFITSIO, PGPLOT and S-Lang).

  15. HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPY OF FEIGE 24 IN THE EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalski, M. P.; Wood, K. S.; Yentis, D. J.; Berendse, F. B.; Cruddace, R. G.; Barstow, M. A.; Lapington, J. S.; Fritz, G. G.; Barbee, T. W. Jr E-mail: kent.wood@nrl.navy.mil E-mail: raymond.cruddace@nrl.navy.mil E-mail: jsl12@star.le.ac.uk E-mail: barbee2@llnl.gov

    2011-04-01

    We report the first high-resolution (R = 4000) spectroscopic observation of the binary DA white dwarf Feige 24 in the extreme-ultraviolet band 220-250 A. A stellar atmosphere model assuming a homogeneous element distribution yields a best fit to the data that excludes a significant abundance of photospheric helium. The upper limit on the photospheric helium abundance is 2.5 x 10{sup -6} (90% confidence), equivalent to a lower limit of 1.2 x 10{sup -13} M{sub sun} on the overlying layer of hydrogen. An ionized interstellar He component (3.9 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}) is clearly present along the line of sight, which implies an He ionization fraction of 0.72, considerably higher than is typical of the local interstellar medium. However, some of this material may be associated with circumstellar gas, which has been detected by analysis of the C IV absorption line doublet in a Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph spectrum.

  16. Spectroscopy of 9B via high-resolution ejectile-tagged recoil break-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheldon, C.; Kokalova, Tz.; Freer, M.; Walshe, J.; Hertenberger, R.; Wirth, H.-F.; Ashwood, N. I.; Barr, M.; Curtis, N.; Faestermann, Th.; Lutter, R.; Malcolm, J. D.; Marín-Lámbarri, D. J.

    2015-02-01

    An experiment has been carried out using the 9Be(3He ,t )B9* reaction at a beam energy of 33 MeV. A large acceptance silicon-strip array was used to detect the B9* break-up in coincidence with the triton ejectiles in the high-resolution Munich-Q3D spectrograph. The excitation energy regime <3 MeV has been explored and the spectrum resulting from proton decaying states, isolated and characterized. Additional resonance strength is observed at 1.86 MeV ±70 keV(stat) ±35 keV(syst), in agreement with two other recent measurements at higher energies and different angles. The consequences for the "missing" ½+ first excited state are discussed. Additionally, the branching ratios for the 2.36 MeV 5/2 - state have been measured as Γα 0/Γ =0.98 ±0.12 and Γp 0/Γ =0.016 ±0.008 , in close agreement with earlier work.

  17. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of C3 around 3 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieg, J.; Lutter, V.; Endres, C. P.; Keppeler, I. H.; Jensen, P.; Harding, M. E.; Vazquez, J.; Schlemmer, S.; Giesen, T. F.; Thorwirth, S.

    2013-03-01

    We report on the detection of the (1001)-(0000) vibrational band of gas-phase C3 and the two of its mono 13C substituted isotopologs in the infrared region around 3200 cm-1. Additionally, the associated hot band (1111)-(0110) has been assigned for the parent isotopolog. Spectra have been recorded using a supersonic jet spectrometer with a laser ablation source in combination with a continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator as radiation source. High-level quantum-chemical ab initio calculations have been performed and used to assist the assignment. A combined fit for the vibrational states of C3 found in this study has been done together with previously reported high-resolution data to increase the accuracy of the molecular parameters, especially for the ground state. The vibrational energies are 3260.126, 3205.593, and 3224.751 cm-1 for the (1001) state of C3, 12C13C12C, and 13C12C12C, respectively. The (1111) state of C3 has been found to be at 3330.509 cm-1.

  18. High Resolution FTIR Spectroscopy of DCCCl: Anharmonic Resonances in the nu(1) and nu(2) Bands.

    PubMed

    Wang, DongBing; Imajo, Takashi; Tanaka, Keiichi; Tanaka, Takehiko; Bürger, Hans

    2001-05-01

    High-resolution infrared spectra of the nu(1) and nu(2) bands of DCCCl were observed using Bruker IFS 120HR Fourier transform spectrometers at resolutions of 0.0044 and 0.0035 cm(-1), respectively. For the DCC(35)Cl isotopomer, the nu(1) as well as the nu(2) band was found to be heavily perturbed. Detailed analyses revealed that the nu(1) state is in resonance with the l=0 substate of the nu(3)+4nu(4) state and that the nu(2) state is in resonance with the l=0 substate of the nu(3)+4nu(5) state. The rotational constants played a key role in identifying the perturbing states. In contrast, for the DCC(37)Cl isotopomer, the rotational structures of the nu(1) and nu(2) states are almost regular but slightly perturbed by interactions with the nu(3)+4nu(4) and nu(3)+4nu(5) states, respectively. The constants of resonances as well as the molecular constants for the nu(1), nu(2), nu(3)+4nu(4) and nu(3)+4nu(5) states were determined. Copyright 2001 Academic Press. PMID:11336523

  19. High Resolution FTIR Spectroscopy of DCCCl: Anharmonic Resonances in the ν 1 and ν 2 Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, DongBing; Imajo, Takashi; Tanaka, Keiichi; Tanaka, Takehiko; Bürger, Hans

    2001-05-01

    High-resolution infrared spectra of the ν1 and ν2 bands of DCCCl were observed using Bruker IFS 120HR Fourier transform spectrometers at resolutions of 0.0044 and 0.0035 cm-1, respectively. For the DCC35Cl isotopomer, the ν1 as well as the ν2 band was found to be heavily perturbed. Detailed analyses revealed that the ν1 state is in resonance with the l=0 substate of the ν3+4ν4 state and that the ν2 state is in resonance with the l=0 substate of the ν3+4ν5 state. The rotational constants played a key role in identifying the perturbing states. In contrast, for the DCC37Cl isotopomer, the rotational structures of the ν1 and ν2 states are almost regular but slightly perturbed by interactions with the ν3+4ν4 and ν3+4ν5 states, respectively. The constants of resonances as well as the molecular constants for the ν1, ν2, ν3+4ν4 and ν3+4ν5 states were determined.

  20. HIGH-RESOLUTION INFRARED IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPY OF THE Z CANIS MAJORIS SYSTEM DURING QUIESCENCE AND OUTBURST

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkley, Sasha; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Crepp, Justin R.; Oppenheimer, Ben R.; Zimmerman, Neil; Brenner, Douglas; Rice, Emily L.; Pueyo, Laurent; Vasisht, Gautam; Roberts, Jennifer E.; Roberts, Lewis C. Jr.; Burruss, Rick; Wallace, J. Kent; Cady, Eric; Zhai, Chengxing; Kraus, Adam L.; Ireland, Michael J.; Beichman, Charles; Dekany, Richard; Parry, Ian R.; and others

    2013-01-20

    We present adaptive optics photometry and spectra in the JHKL bands along with high spectral resolution K-band spectroscopy for each component of the Z Canis Majoris system. Our high angular resolution photometry of this very young ({approx}<1 Myr) binary, comprised of an FU Ori object and a Herbig Ae/Be star, was gathered shortly after the 2008 outburst while our high-resolution spectroscopy was gathered during a quiescent phase. Our photometry conclusively determines that the outburst was due solely to the embedded Herbig Ae/Be member, supporting results from earlier works, and that the optically visible FU Ori component decreased slightly ({approx}30%) in luminosity during the same period, consistent with previous works on the variability of FU Ori type systems. Further, our high-resolution K-band spectra definitively demonstrate that the 2.294 {mu}m CO absorption feature seen in composite spectra of the system is due solely to the FU Ori component, while a prominent CO emission feature at the same wavelength, long suspected to be associated with the innermost regions of a circumstellar accretion disk, can be assigned to the Herbig Ae/Be member. These findings clarify previous analyses of the origin of the CO emission in this complex system.

  1. Mid-infrared high-resolution absorption spectroscopy by use of a semimonolithic entangled-cavity optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Desormeaux, A; Lefebvre, M; Rosencher, E; Huignard, J P

    2004-12-15

    By recording low-pressure absorption lines of N2O around 3.9 microm, we fully qualify a pulsed entangled-cavity doubly resonant optical parametric oscillator as a power tool for high-resolution spectroscopy. This compact source runs at a high repetition rate (>10 kHz) with a low threshold of oscillation (<8 microJ), is mode-hop-free tunable over 5 cm(-1), and displays single-frequency Fourier-transformed-limited operation (linewidth <0.005 cm(-1)). A high potential for nonlinear spectroscopy is also expected given the high peak power (70 W) and the good quality (M2 < 2) of the output beam. PMID:15645813

  2. High-resolution VUV spectroscopy: New results from the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Schlachter, F.; Bozek, J.

    1996-06-01

    Third-generation synchrotron light sources are providing photon beams of unprecedented brightness for researchers in atomic and molecular physics. Beamline 9.0.1, an undulator beamline at the Advanced Light Source (ALS), produces a beam in the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) region of the spectrum with exceptional flux and spectral resolution. Exciting new results from experiments in atomic and molecular VUV spectroscopy of doubly excited autoionizing states of helium, hollow lithium, and photoelectron spectroscopy of small molecules using Beamline 9.0.1 at the ALS are reported.

  3. High-resolution terahertz spectroscopy with a single tunable frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Skryl, A S; Pavelyev, D G; Tretyakov, M Y; Bakunov, M I

    2014-12-29

    We report an improvement of three orders of magnitude in the spectral resolution of a recently proposed single-comb terahertz spectroscopy [Opt. Lett.39, 5669 (2014)]. The improvement is achieved by using a femtosecond optical pulse train with a tunable repetition rate. Terahertz comb with tunable spectral line spacing generated by the train is detected via nonlinear mixing with a harmonic of a CW signal from a microwave frequency synthesizer. By applying this technique to the low-pressure gas spectroscopy, we achieved a 100 kHz spectral resolution in measuring separate absorption lines of the rotational manifold of fluoroform (CF3H). PMID:25607192

  4. USING HIGH-RESOLUTION SOLUTION-STATE NMR SPECTROSCOPY TO INVESTIGATE PMDI REACTIONS WITH WOOD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solution-state NMR spectroscopy provides a powerful tool for understanding the formation of chemical bonds between wood components and adhesives. Finely ground cell wall (CW) material fully dissolves in a solvent system containing dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO-d6) and N-methyl¬imidazole (NMI-d6), keeping ...

  5. High resolution spectroscopy of six SOCl2 isotopologues from the microwave to the far-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Drumel, M. A.; Roucou, A.; Brown, G. G.; Thorwirth, S.; Pirali, O.; Mouret, G.; Hindle, F.; McCarthy, M. C.; Cuisset, A.

    2016-02-01

    Despite its potential role as an atmospheric pollutant, thionyl chloride, SOCl2, remains poorly characterized in the gas phase. In this study, the pure rotational and ro-vibrational spectra of six isotopologues of this molecule, all detected in natural abundance, have been extensively studied from the cm-wave band to the far-infrared region by means of three complementary techniques: chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy, sub-millimeter-wave spectroscopy using frequency multiplier chain, and synchrotron-based far-infrared spectroscopy. Owing to the complex line pattern which results from two nuclei with non-zero spins, new, high-level quantum-chemical calculations of the hyperfine structure played a crucial role in the spectroscopic analysis. From the combined experimental and theoretical work, an accurate semi-experimental equilibrium structure (reSE) of SOCl2 has been derived. With the present data, spectroscopy-based methods can now be applied with confidence to detect and monitor this species, either by remote sensing or in situ.

  6. High resolution infrared ``vision'' of dynamic electron processes in semiconductor devices (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyutenko, V. K.

    2003-01-01

    Infrared cameras have been traditionally used in semiconductor industry for noncontact measurements of printed circuit boards (PCBs) local overheating. While an effective way to prevent defective PCB application in a "find-problems-before-your-customer-do" manner, this conventional static (25-50 frames/s) and small spatial resolution (>100 μm) approach is incapable, in principle, of explaining the physical reason for the PCB failure. What follows in this report is the demonstration of an IR camera based new approach in high-resolution dynamic study of electron processes responsible for single device performance. More specifically, time resolved two-dimensional visualization of current carrier drift and diffusion processes across the device base that happen in microsecond scale is of prime concern in the work. Thus, contrary to the conventional visualization-through-heating measurements, objective is mapping of electron processes in a device base through negative and positive luminescence (provoked by band-to-band electron transitions) and nonequilibrium thermal emission (provoked by intraband electron transitions) studies inside the region in which current flows. Therefore, the parameters of interest are not only a device thermal mass and thermal conductance, but also free carrier lifetime, surface recombination velocity, diffusion length, and contact properties. The micro-mapping system developed consists of reflective type IR microscope coaxially attached to calibrated scanning IR thermal imaging cameras (3-5 and 8-12 μm spectral ranges, HgCdTe cooled photodetectors, scene spatial resolution of some 20 μm, minimum time resolved interval of 10 μs, and temperature resolution of about 0.5 °C at 30 °C). Data acquisition and image processing (emissivity equalization, noise reduction by image averaging, and external triggering) are computer controlled. Parallel video channel equipped with a CCD camera permits easy positioning and focusing of <1×1 mm2 object

  7. Understanding AGB evolution in Galactic bulge stars from high-resolution infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uttenthaler, S.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Wood, P. R.; Lebzelter, T.; Aringer, B.; Schultheis, M.; Ryde, N.

    2015-08-01

    An analysis of high-resolution near-infrared spectra of a sample of 45 asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars towards the Galactic bulge is presented. The sample consists of two subsamples, a larger one in the inner and intermediate bulge, and a smaller one in the outer bulge. The data are analysed with the help of hydrostatic model atmospheres and spectral synthesis. We derive the radial velocity of all stars, and the atmospheric chemical mix ([Fe/H], C/O, 12C/13C, Al, Si, Ti, and Y) where possible. Our ability to model the spectra is mainly limited by the (in)completeness of atomic and molecular line lists, at least for temperatures down to Teff ≈ 3100 K. We find that the subsample in the inner and intermediate bulge is quite homogeneous, with a slightly subsolar mean metallicity and only few stars with supersolar metallicity, in agreement with previous studies of non-variable M-type giants in the bulge. All sample stars are oxygen-rich, C/O < 1.0. The C/O and carbon isotopic ratios suggest that third dredge-up (3DUP) is absent among the sample stars, except for two stars in the outer bulge that are known to contain technetium. These stars are also more metal-poor than the stars in the intermediate or inner bulge. Current stellar masses are determined from linear pulsation models. The masses, metallicities and 3DUP behaviour are compared to AGB evolutionary models. We conclude that these models are partly in conflict with our observations. Furthermore, we conclude that the stars in the inner and intermediate bulge belong to a more metal-rich population that follows bar-like kinematics, whereas the stars in the outer bulge belong to the metal-poor, spheroidal bulge population.

  8. HIGH-RESOLUTION FOURIER TRANSFORM SPECTROSCOPY OF LANTHANUM IN Ar DISCHARGE IN THE NEAR-INFRARED

    SciTech Connect

    Güzelçimen, F.; Başar, Gö.; Tamanis, M.; Kruzins, A.; Ferber, R.; Windholz, L.; Kröger, S. E-mail: sophie.kroeger@htw-berlin.de

    2013-10-01

    A high-resolution spectrum of lanthanum has been recorded by a Fourier Transform spectrometer in the wavelength range from 833 nm to 1666 nm (6000 cm{sup –1} to 12,000 cm{sup –1}) using as light source a hollow cathode lamp operated with argon as the discharge carrier gas. In total, 2386 spectral lines were detected in this region, of which 555 lines could be classified as La I transitions and 10 lines as La II transitions. All La II transitions and 534 of these La I transitions were classified for the first time, and 6 of the La II transitions and 433 of the classified La I transitions appear to be new lines, which could not be found in the literature. The corresponding energy level data of classified lines are given. Additionally, 430 lines are assigned as Ar I lines and 394 as Ar II lines, of which 179 and 77, respectively, were classified for the first time. All 77 classified Ar II transitions as well as 159 of the classified Ar I transitions are new lines. Furthermore, the wavenumbers of 997 unclassified spectral lines were determined, 235 of which could be assigned as La lines, because of their hyperfine pattern. The remaining 762 lines may be either unclassified Ar lines or unresolved and unclassified La lines with only one symmetrical peak with an FWHM in the same order of magnitude as the Ar lines. The accuracy of the wavenumber for the classified lines with signal-to-noise-ratio higher than four is better than 0.006 cm{sup –1} which corresponds to an accuracy of 0.0004 nm at 830 nm and 0.0017 nm at 1660 nm, respectively.

  9. Jupiter’s tropospheric composition and cloud structure from high-resolution ground-based spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, Rohini Sara; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Irwin, Patrick G. J.

    2015-11-01

    The CRIRES instrument on the Very Large Telescope was used to make high-resolution (R=100,000) observations of Jupiter in the 4.5-5.2 μm spectral range. At these wavelengths, Jupiter’s atmosphere is optically thin and the spectra are sensitive to the 4-8 bar region. This enabled us to spectrally resolve the line shapes of four minor species in Jupiter’s troposphere: CH3D, GeH4, AsH3 and PH3. The slit was aligned north-south along Jupiter’s central meridian, allowing us to search for latitudinal variability in these line shapes. The spectra were analysed using the NEMESIS radiative transfer code and retrieval algorithm.The CH3D line shape is narrower in the cool zones than in the warm belts. CH3D is chemically stable and does not condense in Jupiter’s atmosphere, so this difference cannot be due to variations in the CH3D abundance. Instead, it can be modelled as variations in the opacity of a deep cloud located at around 4 bar. This deep cloud is opaque in the zones and transparent in the belts.We also observe variability in the GeH4 line shape, with stronger absorption features in the belts than in the zones. As a disequilibrium species, GeH4 is expected to vary with latitude, but we found that the variations in the line shape could be entirely explained by the variations in the cloud structure.In contrast, there is clear evidence for spatial variability in the remaining two molecular species, AsH3 and PH3. Their absorption features are weak near the equator and significantly stronger at high latitudes. A full latitudinal retrieval leads to a broadly symmetric profile for both species, with a minimum at the equator and an enhancement towards the poles.

  10. High Resolution Emission Spectroscopy of the Vibration-Rotation Bands of Hbo and Hbs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Ram, R. S.; Hargreaves, R. J.; Bernath, P. F.; Li, H.

    2012-06-01

    The vibration-rotation spectra of HBO and HBS have been investigated at high resolution using a Fourier transform spectrometer. The HBO molecules were produced in a high temperature furnace from the reaction of H2O vapor with boron by heating a mixture of crystalline boron and boron oxide (B2O3) at a temperature ˜1350°C. The spectra were recorded in the 1100-2200 cm-1 and 1700-4000 cm-1 wavenumber regions covering the ν3 and ν1 fundamentals, respectively. In total 24 vibrational bands involving 30 vibrational levels of H11BO and 12 bands involving 18 levels of H10BO have been rotationally analyzed. After combining the existing microwave and infrared measurements, the absolute term values have been determined for a number of vibrationally-excited states of H11BO and H10BO. The HBS molecules were formed by the reaction of CS2 and water vapor with crystalline boron at a temperature ˜1300°C. The spectra were recorded in the 850-1500 cm-1 and 1750-4000 cm-1 wavenumber regions covering the ν3 and ν1 frequency regions. In total 29 vibrational bands involving 33 vibrationally-excited levels of H11BS and 9 bands involving 12 vibrational levels of H10BS have been analyzed. The fitted spectroscopic parameters agree very well with the results of our {ab initio} calculations. {L}-resonance interactions observed between the 0200 (Σ) and 0220 (Δ) levels of HBO and HBS were analyzed using a 2×2 matrix to yield deperturbed constants.

  11. HIGH-RESOLUTION, DIFFERENTIAL, NEAR-INFRARED TRANSMISSION SPECTROSCOPY OF GJ 1214b

    SciTech Connect

    Crossfield, I. J. M.; Hansen, Brad M. S.; Barman, Travis

    2011-08-01

    The nearby star GJ 1214 hosts a planet intermediate in radius and mass between Earth and Neptune, resulting in some uncertainty as to its nature. We have observed this planet, GJ 1214b, during transit with the high-resolution, near-infrared NIRSPEC spectrograph on the Keck II telescope, in order to characterize the planet's atmosphere. By cross-correlating the spectral changes through transit with a suite of theoretical atmosphere models, we search for variations associated with absorption in the planet atmosphere. Our observations are sufficient to rule out tested model atmospheres with wavelength-dependent transit depth variations {approx}> 5 x 10{sup -4} over the wavelength range 2.1-2.4 {mu}m. Our sensitivity is limited by variable slit loss and telluric transmission effects. We find no positive signatures but successfully rule out a number of plausible atmospheric models, including the default assumption of a gaseous, H-dominated atmosphere in chemical equilibrium. Such an atmosphere can be made consistent if the absorption due to methane is reduced. Clouds can also render such an atmosphere consistent with our observations, but only if they lie higher in the atmosphere than indicated by recent optical and infrared measurements. When taken in concert with other observational constraints, our results support a model in which the atmosphere of GJ 1214b contains significant H and He, but where CH{sub 4} is depleted. If this depletion is the result of photochemical processes, it may also produce a haze that suppresses spectral features in the optical.

  12. SUBARU HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPY OF STAR G IN THE TYCHO SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Kerzendorf, Wolfgang E.; Schmidt, Brian P.; Yong, David; Asplund, M.; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Podsiadlowski, Ph.; Frebel, Anna; Fesen, Robert A. E-mail: brian@mso.anu.edu.au E-mail: nomoto@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: anna@astro.as.utexas.edu

    2009-08-20

    It is widely believed that Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) originate in binary systems where a white dwarf accretes material from a companion star until its mass approaches the Chandrasekhar mass and carbon is ignited in the white dwarf's core. This scenario predicts that the donor star should survive the supernova (SNe) explosion, providing an opportunity to understand the progenitors of SNe Ia. In this paper, we argue that rotation is a generic signature expected of most nongiant donor stars that is easily measurable. Ruiz-Lapuente et al. examined stars in the center of the remnant of SN 1572 (Tycho SN) and showed evidence that a subgiant star (Star G by their naming convention) near the remnant's center was the system's donor star. We present high-resolution (R {approx_equal} 40, 000) spectra taken with the High Dispersion Spectrograph on Subaru of this candidate donor star and measure the star's radial velocity as 79 {+-} 2 km s{sup -1} with respect to the local standard of rest and put an upper limit on the star's rotation of 7.5 km s{sup -1}. In addition, by comparing images that were taken in 1970 and 2004, we measure the proper motion of Star G to be {mu} {sub l} = -1.6 {+-} 2.1 mas yr{sup -1} and {mu} {sub b} = -2.7 {+-} 1.6 mas yr{sup -1}. We demonstrate that all of the measured properties of Star G presented in this paper are consistent with those of a star in the direction of Tycho SN that is not associated with the SN event. However, we discuss an unlikely, but still viable scenario for Star G to be the donor star, and suggest further observations that might be able to confirm or refute it.

  13. High-resolution infrared spectroscopy and ab initio studies of the cyclopropane-carbon dioxide interaction.

    PubMed

    Su, Zheng; Tam, Wai Shun; Xu, Yunjie

    2006-01-14

    A jet-cooled high-resolution infrared spectrum of the cyclopropane-carbon dioxide complex was detected for the first time, using a rapid scan infrared spectrometer with an astigmatic multipass sample cell. The spectrum was recorded in the vicinity of the CO2 asymmetric stretching band (nu3) and exhibits a b-dipole selection rule. Altogether, over 200 lines were observed, assigned, and fitted to Watson's S-reduction Hamiltonian. Rotational and quartic distortion constants were obtained. The band origin was located at 2347.6263(2) cm(-1), redshifted by 1.5230(2) cm(-1) from the corresponding frequency of the CO2 monomer. The experimentally determined structure shows that CO2 lies next to a C-C bond edge and is perpendicular to the C3 ring, indicating that the interaction is characterized by the bonding between the carbon atom of CO2 and the pseudo-pi system of cyclopropane. The intermolecular distance between the carbon atom of CO2 and the center of mass of cyclopropane was determined to be 3.667(2) A. Complete ab initio geometry optimizations and harmonic frequency calculations were carried out at the level of second-order Moller-Plesset perturbation theory with four different basis sets: cc-pVDZ, 6-311++G(d,p), aug-cc-pVDZ, and aug-cc-pVTZ. The lowest-energy structure identified with the three larger basis sets is in accord with the experimental finding. In addition, a transition state was identified and the tunneling barrier height was computed. PMID:16422587

  14. Mapping the Local Interstellar Medium Using High-Resolution UV Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamut, Craig; Redfield, S.; Linsky, J.

    2013-01-01

    Observations using the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph aboard the Hubble Space Telescope have provided high-resolution near ultraviolet spectra showing MgII, FeII and MnII absorption in the local interstellar medium (LISM). The sample includes sight lines towards over 30 stars within 100 parsecs and across a wide range of spectral types. Observations span the entire sky, probing previously unobserved regions of the LISM. The heavy ions studied in this survey produce narrow absorption features that make possible the identification of multiple interstellar components. Our simultaneous fits of the MgII, FeII, and MnII doublets reveal anywhere from one to six individual absorption components in a particular sight line, where the number of absorbers roughly correlates with the length of the sight line. The simultaneous fitting procedure reduces the systematic errors involved in continuum placement and number of absorbers. Already, sight lines show evidence of previously unidentified clouds within the Local Bubble. These measurements will be added to a growing data set of 81 near UV sight lines. The increase in the number of sight lines will test and improve a three dimensional kinematic model of the local interstellar medium. With an improved understanding of the LISM's kinematical structure, it will be possible to distinguish blended components within the absorption features of lighter ions. Specifically, the MAST Archive contains FUV observations of interstellar absorption by low mass ions (DI, CII, NI, OI) along the the same sight lines. The combination of these data will constrain properties of the LISM such as temperature, turbulence, ionization, abundances and depletions. We acknowledge support for this project through NASA HST Grant GO-11568 awarded by the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., for NASA, under contract NAS 5-26555, and a student research fellowship from the

  15. High-resolution optical spectroscopy using multimode interference in a compact tapered fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Noel H.; Meng, Fan; Schröder, Tim; Shiue, Ren-Jye; Chen, Edward H.; Englund, Dirk

    2015-07-01

    Optical spectroscopy is a fundamental tool in numerous areas of science and technology. Much effort has focused on miniaturizing spectrometers, but thus far at the cost of spectral resolution and broad operating range. Here we describe a compact spectrometer that achieves both high spectral resolution and broad bandwidth. The device relies on imaging multimode interference from leaky modes along a multimode tapered optical fibre, resulting in spectrally distinguishable spatial patterns over a wide range of wavelengths from 500 to 1,600 nm. This tapered fibre multimode interference spectrometer achieves a spectral resolution down to 40 pm in the visible spectrum and 10 pm in the near-infrared spectrum (corresponding to resolving powers of 104-105). Multimode interference spectroscopy is suitable in a variety of device geometries, including planar waveguides in a broad range of transparent materials.

  16. Rapid probe of the nicotine spectra by high-resolution rotational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Grabow, Jens-Uwe; Mata, S; Alonso, José L; Peña, I; Blanco, S; López, Juan C; Cabezas, C

    2011-12-21

    Nicotine has been investigated in the gas phase and two conformational forms were characterized through their rotational spectra. Two spectroscopic techniques have been used to obtain the spectra: a new design of broadband Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) spectroscopy with an in-phase/quadrature-phase-modulation passage-acquired-coherence technique (IMPACT) and narrowband FTMW spectroscopy with coaxially oriented beam-resonator arrangement (COBRA). The rotational, centrifugal distortion and hyperfine quadrupole coupling constants of two conformers of nicotine have been determined and found to be in N-methyl trans configurations with the pyridine and pyrrolidine rings perpendicular to one another. The quadrupole hyperfine structure originated by two (14)N nuclei has been completely resolved for both conformers and used for their unambiguous identification. PMID:22020263

  17. The subgiant branch of ω Centauri seen through high-resolution spectroscopy. I. The first stellar generation in ω Cen?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancino, E.; Mucciarelli, A.; Sbordone, L.; Bellazzini, M.; Pasquini, L.; Monaco, L.; Ferraro, F. R.

    2011-03-01

    We analysed high-resolution UVES spectra of six stars belonging to the subgiant branch of ω Centauri, and derived abundance ratios of 19 chemical elements (namely Al, Ba, C, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, La, Mg, Mn, N, Na, Ni, Sc, Si, Sr, Ti, and Y). A comparison with previous abundance determinations for red giants provided remarkable agreement and allowed us to identify the sub-populations to which our targets belong. We found that three targets belong to a low-metallicity population at [Fe/H] ≃ -2.0 dex, [α/Fe] ≃ +0.4 dex and [s/Fe] ≃ 0 dex. Stars with similar characteristics were found in small amounts by past surveys of red giants. We discuss the possibility that they belong to a separate sub-population that we name VMP (very metal-poor, at most 5% of the total cluster population), which - in the self-enrichment hypothesis - is the best-candidate first stellar generation in ω Cen. Two of the remaining targets belong to the dominant metal-poor population (MP) at [Fe/H] ≃ -1.7 dex, and the last one to the metal-intermediate (MInt) one at [Fe/H] ≃ -1.2 dex. The existence of the newly defined VMP population could help to understand some puzzling results based on low-resolution spectroscopy for age differences determinations, because the metallicity resolution of these studies was probably not enough to detect the VMP population. The VMP could also correspond to some of the additional substructures of the subgiant-branch region found in the latest HST photometry. After trying to correlate chemical abundances with substructures in the subgiant branch of ω Cen, we found that the age difference between the VMP and MP populations should be small (0 ± 2 Gyr), while the difference between the MP and MInt populations could be slightly larger (2 ± 2 Gyr). Based on data collected at the ESO VLT in Chile, with UVES and FLAMES under programs 68.D-0332(A) and 079.D-0021. Also based on literature data from the ESO WFI, under programs 62.L-0354 and 63.L-0439, and on data

  18. Microstructure development in latex coatings: High-resolution cryo-scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Haiyan

    2005-07-01

    High-resolution cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (Cryo-SEM) was used to investigate microstructure development in drying latex coatings: from a colloidal stable suspension into a coherent strong film by drying. Useful sample preparation artifacts during the freeze-fracture, i.e., pullouts were documented and analyzed. Pullouts indicate both physical properties of latex particles and the drying stages in latex coatings. The mechanism of pullout formation was studied both theoretically and experimentally. Latex coatings must possess satisfactory freeze-thaw stability to avoid problems during transportation and storage in cold winter. The behavior of latex particles during freeze-thaw cycles was visualized by Cryo-SEM. The images indicated that high concentration of polymerizable surfactant in a latex suspension improved its freeze-thaw stability. In film formation, skinning was captured from edge in and top down in coatings of 80nm diameter styrene-butadiene latex particles with exceptional low Tg (-65°C). Effects on skinning of drying conditions and the way the latex was initially stabilized against flocculation were investigated. A skinned pocket was unexpectedly found in the coating. The cause of such a skin around the air bubble was explained by both simple models calculating the dissolution time and force analysis on the particles. The film formation processes in conventional and low volatile organic compound (VOC) latex coatings were compared by time-sectioning Cryo-SEM. Some low-VOC latex coatings were found to dry as fast as conventional ones without deteriorating final good film properties.

  19. High-resolution cryo-electron microscopy on macromolecular complexes and cell organelles.

    PubMed

    Hoenger, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy techniques and computational 3-D reconstruction of macromolecular assemblies are tightly linked tools in modern structural biology. This symbiosis has produced vast amounts of detailed information on the structure and function of biological macromolecules. Typically, one of two fundamentally different strategies is used depending on the specimens and their environment. A: 3-D reconstruction based on repetitive and structurally identical unit cells that allow for averaging, and B: tomographic 3-D reconstructions where tilt-series between approximately ± 60 and ± 70° at small angular increments are collected from highly complex and flexible structures that are beyond averaging procedures, at least during the first round of 3-D reconstruction. Strategies of group A are averaging-based procedures and collect large number of 2-D projections at different angles that are computationally aligned, averaged together, and back-projected in 3-D space to reach a most complete 3-D dataset with high resolution, today often down to atomic detail. Evidently, success relies on structurally repetitive particles and an aligning procedure that unambiguously determines the angular relationship of all 2-D projections with respect to each other. The alignment procedure of small particles may rely on their packing into a regular array such as a 2-D crystal, an icosahedral (viral) particle, or a helical assembly. Critically important for cryo-methods, each particle will only be exposed once to the electron beam, making these procedures optimal for highest-resolution studies where beam-induced damage is a significant concern. In contrast, tomographic 3-D reconstruction procedures (group B) do not rely on averaging, but collect an entire dataset from the very same structure of interest. Data acquisition requires collecting a large series of tilted projections at angular increments of 1-2° or less and a tilt range of ± 60° or more. Accordingly, tomographic data

  20. Estimating photosynthesis with high resolution field spectroscopy in a Mediterranean grassland under different nutrient availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Priego, O.; Guan, J.; Fava, F.; Rossini, M.; Wutzler, T.; Moreno, G.; Carrara, A.; Kolle, O.; Schrumpf, M.; Reichstein, M.; Migliavacca, M.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have shown how human induced N:P imbalances are affecting essential processes (e.g. photosynthesis, plant growth rate) that lead to important changes in ecosystem structure and function. In this regard, the accuracy of the approaches based on remotely-sensed data for monitoring and modeling gross primary production (GPP) relies on the ability of vegetation indices (VIs) to track the dynamics of vegetation physiological and biophysical properties/variables. Promising results have been recently obtained when Chlorophyll-sensitive VIs and Chlorophyll fluorescence are combined with structural indices in the framework of the Monteith's light use efficiency (LUE) model. However, further ground-based experiments are required to validate LUE model performances, and their capability to be generalized under different nutrient availability conditions. In this study, the overall objective was to investigate the sensitivity of VIs to track short- and long-term GPP variations in a Mediterranean grassland under different N and P fertilization treatments. Spectral VIs were acquired manually using high resolution spectrometers (HR4000, OceanOptics, USA) along a phenological cycle. The VIs examined included photochemical reflectance index (PRI), MERIS terrestrial-chlorophyll index (MTCI) and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). Solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence calculated at the oxygen absorption band O2-A (F760) using spectral fitting methods was also used. Simultaneously, measurements of GPP and environmental variables were conducted using a transient-state canopy chamber. Overall, GPP, F760 and VIs showed a clear seasonal time-trend in all treatments, which was driven by the phenological development of the grassland. Results showed significant differences (p<0.05) in midday GPP values between N and without N addition plots, in particular at the peak of the growing season during the flowering stage and at the end of the season during senescence. While

  1. High Resolution Spectroscopy Using a Tunable Thz Synthesizer Based on Photomixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuisset, Arnaud; Hindle, Francis; Mouret, Gael; Eliet, Sophie; Guinet, Mickael; Bocquet, Robin

    2011-06-01

    Optical heterodyning, also know as photomixing is an attractive solution as a single device able to cover the entire frequency range from 300 GHz to 3 THz. As the THz frequency is extracted from the difference frequency of two lasers, the accuracy with which the generated frequency is known is directly determined by the frequency accuracy of the lasers. In order to fully characterize the spectral fingerprint of a given molecule an accuracy approximately one order of magnitude finer than the Doppler linewidth is required, around 100 kHz for smaller polar compounds. To generate accurate cw-THz the frequency spacing of the modes of a Frequency Comb (FC) has been employed to constrain the emission frequency of a photomixing source.footnote{G. Mouret, F. Hindle, A. Cuisset, C. Yang, R. Bocquet, M. Lours, D. Rovera, Opt. Express, 2009, 17: 22031.} Two phase locked loops are implemented coherently locking the two cw-lasers (CW1 and CW2) to different modes of the FC. Although this solution allows accurate generation of narrowband THz the continuous tuning of the frequency presents some obstacles. To overcome these difficulties a system architecture with a third cw-laser (CW3) phase locked to CW2 has been implemented. The beatnote between CW2 and CW3 is free from the FC modes therefore the PLL frequency can be freely scanned over its entire operating range, in our case around 200 MHz. The most of polar compounds may be studied at high resolution in the THz domain with this synthesizer. Three different examples of THz analysis with atmospherical and astrophysical interests will be presented: The ground and vibrationnally excited states of H_2CO revisited in the 0.5-2 THz frequency region The rotational dependences of the broadening coefficients of CH_3Cl studied at high J and K values The molecular discrimination of a complex mixture containing methanol and ethanol. F. Hindle, A. Cuisset, G. Mouret, R. Bocquet Comptes Rendus Physique, 2008, 9: 262-275.

  2. High-resolution patterning of graphene by screen printing with a silicon stencil for highly flexible printed electronics.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Woo Jin; Secor, Ethan B; Hersam, Mark C; Frisbie, C Daniel; Francis, Lorraine F

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution screen printing of pristine graphene is introduced for the rapid fabrication of conductive lines on flexible substrates. Well-defined silicon stencils and viscosity-controlled inks facilitate the preparation of high-quality graphene patterns as narrow as 40 μm. This strategy provides an efficient method to produce highly flexible graphene electrodes for printed electronics. PMID:25377870

  3. The Application of High-Resolution Electron Microscopy to Problems in Solid State Chemistry: The Exploits of a Peeping TEM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyring, LeRoy

    1980-01-01

    Describes methods for using the high-resolution electron microscope in conjunction with other tools to reveal the identity and environment of atoms. Problems discussed include the ultimate structure of real crystalline solids including defect structure and the mechanisms of chemical reactions. (CS)

  4. Goals for the application of high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy to the diagnosis of stellar coronal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    Examples are provided of how high-resolution X-ray spectra may be used to determine the temperature and emission measure distributions, electron densities, steady and transient flow velocities, and location of active regions in stellar coronas. For each type of measurement, the minimum spectral resolution required to resolve the most useful spectral features is estimated. In general, high sensitivity is required to obtain sufficient signal-to-noise to exploit the high spectral resolution. Although difficult, each measurement should be achievable with the instrumentation proposed for AXAF.

  5. Goals for the application of high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy to the diagnosis of stellar coronal plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    1990-01-01

    Examples are provided of how high-resolution X-ray spectra may be used to determine the temperature and emission measure distributions, electron densities, steady and transient flow velocities, and location of active regions in stellar coronas. For each type of measurement, the minimum spectral resolution required to resolve the most useful spectral features is estimated. In general, high sensitivity is required to obtain sufficient signal-to-noise to exploit the high spectral resolution. Although difficult, each measurement should be achievable with the instrumentation proposed for AXAF.

  6. High-resolution spectroscopy of V854 Cen in decline - absorption and emission lines of C2 molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameswara Rao, N.; Lambert, David L.

    2000-04-01

    High-resolution optical spectra of the R Coronae Borealis (RCB) star V854 Centauri in the early stages of a decline show, in addition to the features reported for other RCBs in decline, narrow absorption lines from the C2 Phillips system. The low rotational temperature, Trot=1150K, of the C2 ground electronic state suggests the cold gas is associated with the developing shroud of carbon dust. These absorption lines were not seen at a fainter magnitude on the rise from minimum light, nor at maximum light. This is the first detection of cold gas around an RCB star.

  7. Discrimination of Basal Cell Carcinoma from Normal Skin Tissue Using High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mun, Je-Ho; Lee, Heonho; Yoon, Dahye; Kim, Byung-Soo; Kim, Moon-Bum; Kim, Shukmann

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HR-MAS NMR) spectroscopy is a useful tool for investigating the metabolism of various cancers. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common skin cancer. However, to our knowledge, data on metabolic profiling of BCC have not been reported in the literature. The objective of the present study was to investigate the metabolic profiling of cutaneous BCC using HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy. HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy was used to analyze the metabolite profile and metabolite intensity of histopathologically confirmed BCC tissues and normal skin tissue (NST) samples. The metabolic intensity normalized to the total spectral intensities in BCC and NST was compared, and multivariate analysis was performed with orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). P values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Univariate analysis revealed 9 metabolites that showed statistically significant difference between BCC and NST. In multivariate analysis, the OPLS-DA models built with the HR-MAS NMR metabolic profiles revealed a clear separation of BCC from NST. The receiver operating characteristic curve generated from the results revealed an excellent discrimination of BCC from NST with an area under the curve (AUC) value of 0.961. The present study demonstrated that the metabolite profile and metabolite intensity differ between BCC and NST, and that HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy can be a valuable tool in the diagnosis of BCC. PMID:26934749

  8. Activators of photoluminescence in calcite: evidence from high-resolution, laser-excited luminescence spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pedone, V.A.; Cercone, K.R.; Burruss, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    Laser-excited luminescence spectroscopy of a red-algal, biogenic calcite and a synthetic Mn-calcite can make the distinction between organic and trace-element activators of photoluminescence. Organic-activated photoluminescence in biogenic calcite is characterized by significant peak shifts and increasing intensity with shorter-wavelength excitation and by significant decreases in intensity after heating to ??? 400??C. In contrast, Mn-activated photoluminescence shows no peak shift, greatest intensity under green excitation and limited changes after heating. Examination of samples with a high-sensitivity spectrometer using several wavelengths of exciting light is necessary for identification of photoluminescence activators. ?? 1990.

  9. High-resolution pulse-counting array detectors for imaging and spectroscopy at ultraviolet wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. Gethyn; Bybee, Richard L.

    1986-01-01

    The performance characteristics of multianode microchannel array (MAMA) detector systems which have formats as large as 256 x 1024 pixels and which have application to imaging and spectroscopy at UV wavelengths are evaluated. Sealed and open-structure MAMA detector tubes with opaque CsI photocathodes can determine the arrival time of the detected photon to an accuracy of 100 ns or better. Very large format MAMA detectors with CsI and Cs2Te photocathodes and active areas of 52 x 52 mm (2048 x 2048 pixels) will be used as the UV solar blind detectors for the NASA STIS.

  10. High-precision three-dimensional field mapping of a high resolution magnetic spectrometer for hypernuclear spectroscopy at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Yuu; Hashimoto, Osamu; Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Nakamura, Satoshi N.; Ohtani, Atsushi; Okayasu, Yuichi; Oyamada, Masamichi; Yamamoto, Yosuke; Kato, Seigo; Matsui, Jumei; Sako, Katsuhisa; Brindza, Paul

    2015-09-01

    The High Resolution Kaon Spectrometer (HKS), which consists of two quadrupole magnets and one dipole magnet, was designed and constructed for high-resolution spectroscopy of hypernuclei using the (e,e'K+) reaction in Hall C, Jefferson Lab (JLab). It was used to analyze momenta of around 1.2 GeV/c K^+ s with a resolution of 2 ×10^-4 (FWHM). To achieve the target resolution, a full three-dimensional magnetic field measurement of each magnet was successfully performed, and a full three-dimensional magnetic field map of the HKS magnets was reconstructed. Using the measured field map, the initial reconstruction function was generated. The target resolution would be achieved via careful tuning of the reconstruction function of HKS with the p(e,e'K+)Lambda,Sigma^0 and C-12 (e,e'K+)12_Lambda B_g.s. reactions. After tuning of the initial reconstruction function generated from the measured map, the estimated HKS momentum resolution was 2.2×10^-4 (FWHM).

  11. High resolution broad-band spectroscopy in the NIR using the Triplespec externally dispersed interferometer at the Hale telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erskine, David J.; Edelstein, J.; Sirk, M.; Wishnow, E.; Ishikawa, Y.; McDonald, E.; Shourt, W. V.

    2014-07-01

    High resolution broad-band spectroscopy at near-infrared wavelengths has been performed using externally dis- persed interferometry (EDI) at the Hale telescope at Mt. Palomar. The EDI technique uses a field-widened Michelson interferometer in series with a dispersive spectrograph, and is able to recover a spectrum with a resolution 4 to 10 times higher than the existing grating spectrograph. This method increases the resolution well beyond the classical limits enforced by the slit width and the detector pixel Nyquist limit and, in principle, decreases the effect of pupil variation on the instrument line-shape function. The EDI technique permits arbi- trarily higher resolution measurements using the higher throughput, lower weight, size, and expense of a lower resolution spectrograph. Observations of many stars were performed with the TEDI interferometer mounted within the central hole of the 200 inch primary mirror. Light from the interferometer was then dispersed by the TripleSpec near-infrared echelle spectrograph. Continuous spectra between 950 and 2450 nm with a resolution as high as ~27,000 were recovered from data taken with TripleSpec at a native resolution of ˜2,700. Aspects of data analysis for interferometric spectral reconstruction are described. This technique has applications in im- proving measurements of high-resolution stellar template spectra, critical for precision Doppler velocimetry using conventional spectroscopic methods. A new interferometer to be applied for this purpose at visible wavelengths is under construction.

  12. Structural analysis of IPC zeolites and related materials using positron annihilation spectroscopy and high-resolution argon adsorption.

    PubMed

    Jagiello, J; Sterling, M; Eliášová, P; Opanasenko, M; Zukal, A; Morris, R E; Navaro, M; Mayoral, A; Crivelli, P; Warringham, R; Mitchell, S; Pérez-Ramírez, J; Čejka, J

    2016-06-01

    The advanced investigation of pore networks in isoreticular zeolites and mesoporous materials related to the IPC family was performed using high-resolution argon adsorption experiments coupled with the development of a state-of-the-art non-local density functional theory approach. The optimization of a kernel for model sorption isotherms for materials possessing the same layer structure, differing only in the interlayer connectivity (e.g. oxygen bridges, single- or double-four-ring building units, mesoscale pillars etc.) revealed remarkable differences in their porous systems. Using high-resolution adsorption data, the bimodal pore size distribution consistent with crystallographic data for IPC-6, IPC-7 and UTL samples is shown for the first time. A dynamic assessment by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) provided complementary insights, simply distinguishing the enhanced accessibility of the pore network in samples incorporating mesoscale pillars and revealing the presence of a certain fraction of micropores undetected by gas sorption. Nonetheless, subtle differences in the pore size could not be discriminated based on the widely-applied Tao-Eldrup model. The combination of both methods can be useful for the advanced characterization of microporous, mesoporous and hierarchical materials. PMID:27210107

  13. Method And Apparatus For High Resolution Ex-Situ Nmr Spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Meriles, Carlos A.; Heise, Henrike; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Moule, Adam

    2004-01-06

    A method and apparatus for ex-situ nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for use on samples outside the physical limits of the magnets in inhomogeneous static and radio-frequency fields. Chemical shift spectra can be resolved with the method using sequences of correlated, composite z-rotation pulses in the presence of spatially matched static and radio frequency field gradients producing nutation echoes. The amplitude of the echoes is modulated by the chemical shift interaction and an inhomogeneity free FID may be recovered by stroboscopically sampling the maxima of the echoes. In an alternative embodiment, full-passage adiabatic pulses are consecutively applied. One embodiment of the apparatus generates a static magnetic field that has a variable saddle point.

  14. High resolution core level spectroscopy of hydrogen-terminated (1 0 0) diamond.

    PubMed

    Schenk, A K; Rietwyk, K J; Tadich, A; Stacey, A; Ley, L; Pakes, C I

    2016-08-01

    Synchrotron-based photoelectron spectroscopy experiments are presented that address a long standing inconsistency in the treatment of the C1s core level of hydrogen terminated (1 0 0) diamond. Through a comparison of surface and bulk sensitive measurements we show that there is a surface related core level component to lower binding energy of the bulk diamond component; this component has a chemical shift of [Formula: see text] eV which has been attributed to carbon atoms which are part of the hydrogen termination. Additionally, our results indicate that the asymmetry of the hydrogen terminated (1 0 0) diamond C1s core level is an intrinsic aspect of the bulk diamond peak which we have attributed to sub-surface carbon layers. PMID:27299369

  15. Natural abundance high-resolution solid state 2 H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, Abil E.; Harris, Kenneth D. M.; Apperley, David C.

    1994-08-01

    We report for the first time an approach for natural abundance solid state 2 H NMR spectroscopy involving magic angle sample spinning (MAS), high-power 1 H decoupling (HPPD) and 1 H- 2 H cross polarization (CP). Taking tetrakis(trimethylsilyl)silane (TTMSS), adamantane, 1-chloroadamantane, hexamethylbenzene (HMB), 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-propanediol (DMPD) and 2-hydroxymethyl-2-methyl-1,3-propanediol (HMPD) as examples, it has been shown that the combination of HPPD and MAS can be applied readily to study rotator phase solids, allowing isotropic peaks arising from chemically inequivalent 2 H nuclei to be resolved. For natural abundance samples of TTMSS and chloroadamantane, it has been shown that 2 H CP/HPPD/MAS NMR experiments, involving polarization transfer from 1 H to 2 H, may provide considerable sensitivity enhancement in comparison with single pulse experiments.

  16. Natural abundance high-resolution solid state 2 H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, Abil E.; Harris, Kenneth D. M.; Apperley, David C.

    1994-08-01

    We report for the first time an approach for natural abundance solid state 2H NMR spectroscopy involving magic angle sample spinning (MAS), high-power 1H decoupling (HPPD) and 1H- 2H cross polarization (CP). Taking tetrakis(trimethylsilyl)silane (TTMSS), adamantane, 1-chloroadamantane, hexamethylbenzene (HMB), 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-propanediol (DMPD) and 2-hydroxymethyl-2-methyl-1,3-propanediol (HMPD) as examples, it has been shown that the combination of HPPD and MAS can be applied readily to study rotator phase solids, allowing isotropic peaks arising from chemically inequivalent 2H nuclei to be resolved. For natural abundance samples of TTMSS and chloroadamantane, it has been shown that 2H CP/HPPD/MAS NMR experiments, involving polarization transfer from 1H to 2H, may provide considerable sensitivity enhancement in comparison with single pulse experiments.

  17. Multiresonant Spectroscopy and the High-Resolution Threshold Photoionization of Combustion Free Radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Edward R. Grant

    2005-09-07

    This report describes the results of a program of research on the thermochemistry, spectroscopy and intramolecular relaxation dynamics of the combustion intermediate, HCO. We prepare this radical from acetaldehyde as a photo-precursor in a differentially pumped laser-ionization source quadrupole mass spectrometer. Using a multiresonant spectroscopic technique established in our laboratory, we select individual rotational states and overcome Franck-Condon barriers associated with neutral-to-cation geometry changes to promote transitions to individual autoionizing series and state-resolved ionization thresholds. Systematic analysis of rotational structure and associated lineshapes provide experimental insight on autoionization dynamics as input for theoretical modeling. Extrapolation of series, combined with direct threshold-photoelectron detection, yield precise ionization potentials that constitute an important contribution to the thermochemical base of information on HCO.

  18. High-resolution detectors for imaging and spectroscopy at ultraviolet and soft X-ray wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.; Morgan, J. S.; Slater, D. C.

    1988-01-01

    The Multi-Anode Microchannel Arrays (MAMAs) are a family of pulse-counting imaging array detectors designed specifically for astrophysical investigations in space. The MAMAs have a number of unique performance characteristics which make them particularly suitable for imaging and spectroscopy at ultraviolet and soft X-ray wavelengths. First, they employ 'solar blind' photocathodes eliminating the 'red leak' problem associated with solid state arrays such as the CCDs. Second, they operate with zero readout noise, yielding photon-statistics limited signals. Third, they utilize a random readout technique and can determine both the location of a detected photon and also its arrival time to an accuracy of the order of 100 ns. This paper gives an overview of the construction, mode of operation, and performance characteristics of the MAMA detectors and describes the current status of the development program.

  19. High resolution core level spectroscopy of hydrogen-terminated (1 0 0) diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, A. K.; Rietwyk, K. J.; Tadich, A.; Stacey, A.; Ley, L.; Pakes, C. I.

    2016-08-01

    Synchrotron-based photoelectron spectroscopy experiments are presented that address a long standing inconsistency in the treatment of the C1s core level of hydrogen terminated (1 0 0) diamond. Through a comparison of surface and bulk sensitive measurements we show that there is a surface related core level component to lower binding energy of the bulk diamond component; this component has a chemical shift of -0.16+/- 0.05 eV which has been attributed to carbon atoms which are part of the hydrogen termination. Additionally, our results indicate that the asymmetry of the hydrogen terminated (1 0 0) diamond C1s core level is an intrinsic aspect of the bulk diamond peak which we have attributed to sub-surface carbon layers.

  20. High-resolution (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy pattern recognition of fish oil capsules.

    PubMed

    Aursand, Marit; Standal, Inger B; Axelson, David E

    2007-01-10

    13C NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy, in conjunction with multivariate analysis of commercial fish oil-related health food products, have been used to provide discrimination concerning the nature, composition, refinement, and/or adulteration or authentication of the products. Supervised (probabilistic neural networks, PNN) and unsupervised (principal component analysis, PCA; Kohonen neural networks; generative topographic mapping, GTM) pattern recognition techniques were used to visualize and classify samples. Simple PCA score plots demonstrated excellent, but not totally unambiguous, class distinctions, whereas Kohonen and GTM visualization provided better results. Quantitative class predictions with accuracies >95% were achieved with PNN analysis. Trout, salmon, and cod oils were completely and correctly classified. Samples reported to be salmon oils and cod liver oils did not cluster with true salmon and cod liver oil samples, indicating mislabeling or adulteration. PMID:17199311

  1. High-resolution Surface Analysis by Microarea Auger Spectroscopy: Computerization and Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browning, R.

    1986-01-01

    A custom scanning Auger electron microscope (SAM) capable of introducing a 3-5 keV electron beam of several nA into a 30 nm diameter sample area was fitted with a sample introduction system and was fully computerized to be used for materials science research. The method of multispectral Auger imaging was devised and implemented. The instrument was applied to various problems in materials science, including the study of the fiber/matrix interface in a SiC reinforced titanium alloy, the study of SiC whiskers in Al alloy 2124 (in cooperation with NASA-Langley), the study of NiCrAl superalloys (in collaboration with NASA-Lewis), the study of zircalloy specimens (in collaboration with Stanford University), and the microstructure of sintered SiC specimens (in collaboration with NASA-Lewis). The report contains a number of manuscripts submitted for publication on these subjects.

  2. Microcalorimeters for High Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silver, E.; Flowers, Bobby J. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The proposal has three major objectives. The first focuses on advanced neutron-transmutation-doped (NTD)-based microcalorimeter development. Our goal is to develop an array of microcalorimeters with sub- 5 eV energy resolution that can operate with pile-up-free throughput of at least 100 Hz per pixel. The second objective is to establish our microcalorimeter as an essential x-ray diagnostic for laboratory astrophysics studies. We propose to develop a dedicated microcalorimeter spectrometer for the EBIT (electron beam ion trap). This instrument will incorporate the latest detector and cryogenic technology that we have available. The third objective is to investigate innovative ideas related to possible flight opportunities. These include compact, long lived cryo-systems, ultra-low temperature cold stages, low mass and low power electronics, and novel assemblies of thin windows with high x-ray transmission.

  3. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of K-shell Praseodymium with a High-Energy Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, D B; Brown, G V; Clementson, J T; Chen, H; Chen, M H; Beiersdorfer, P; Boyce, K R; Kilbourne, C A; Porter, F S; Kelley, R L

    2007-06-05

    We present a measurement of the K-shell spectrum of He-like through Be-like praseodymium ions trapped in the Livermore SuperEBIT electron beam ion trap using a bismuth absorber pixel on the XRS/EBIT microcalorimeter. This measurement is the first of its kind where the n=2 to n=1 transitions of the various charge states are spectroscopically resolved. The measured transition energies are compared with theoretical calculations from several atomic codes.

  4. High-resolution emission spectroscopy of random lasing in GaN films pumped by UV-pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cachoncinlle, C.; Millon, E.; Petit, A.

    2016-06-01

    We report on room temperature photoluminescence on GaN films grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). A NdYAG pulsed-laser at 266 nm illuminates the films. Two components, at 363 nm and 370 nm, are identified in the near band edge structure on the spectra. A laser threshold of 700±150 kW cm-2 is evidenced and corresponds to random lasing in the GaN film. A drastic narrowing of the spectral bandwidth from 5.2 to 1.8 nm is observed at 370 nm. High-resolution spectroscopy measurements show laser mode widths thinner than 50 pm leading to a high quality factor Q=7750. Low-resolution measurements show redshift from 370.0 to 373.1 nm for one component and from 363.1 nm to 363.9 nm for the other. Interpretation of this redshift is discussed.

  5. High resolution Fourier transform spectroscopy and crystal-field analysis in Tm,Ho:BaY2F8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraldi, A.; Capelletti, R.; Mazzera, M.; Riolo, P.; Amoretti, G.; Magnani, N.; Sani, E.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.

    2005-01-01

    A Tm3+- Ho3+ -codoped single crystal of monoclinic BaY2F8 has been characterized by means of high resolution FTIR spectroscopy in the wave number range 2000-24000 cm-1 and in the temperature range 9-300 K. The energy level schemes of the two lanthanide ions as determined by the optical absorption spectra is presented, analyzed, and fitted within a single ion Hamiltonian model. The very small energy separation (about 0.6-1.6 cm-1) measured between the first and second sublevels of the ground state manifolds for both the ions is in line with the theoretical predictions. The impurity-phonon coupling is put into evidence by the thermally induced line shift and broadening, and by the detection of vibronic replicas of a few lines.

  6. Variation of Surface Charge along the Surface of Wool Fibers Assessed by High-Resolution Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Bonnie; Chow, James; Abbott, Albert G.; Ellison, Michael S.; Kennedy, Marian S.; Dean, Delphine

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we have mapped the surface charge of wool fibers using chemically specific high-resolution force spectroscopy in order to better understand the dispersion of amino acids in relation to fiber morphology. The inter-surface forces between standard atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe tips (tip radius ~ 50 nm) functionalized with COOH and NH3 terminated alkanethiol self assembling monolayers and the wool surface were used to estimate the surface charge per unit area using linear Poisson-Boltzmann-based electrostatic double layer theory. The positional measurement of nano-scale surface charge showed a correlation between the surface charge and fiber morphology, indicated that basic amino acids are located near the scale edges. PMID:21866220

  7. Development of high-resolution real-time sub-ppb ethane spectroscopy and some pilot studies in life science.

    PubMed

    Skeldon, Kenneth D; Gibson, Graham M; Wyse, Cathy A; McMillan, Lesley C; Monk, Steve D; Longbottom, Chris; Padgett, Miles J

    2005-08-01

    We describe a high-resolution real-time spectroscopy system targeted to ethane gas with sensitivity > or = 70 ppt and response time from > or = 0.7 s. The measurement technique is based on a mid-IR lead-salt laser passing through a Herriott cell through which a gas sample flows. We compare wavelength scanning and locked configurations and discuss their relative merits. The technology has been motivated by clinical breath testing applications, ethane being widely regarded as the most important breath biomarker for cell damage via free-radical-mediated oxidative attack. We discuss preliminary human and animal studies in which ultrasensitive real-time ethane detection offers new diagnostic and monitoring potential. PMID:16075884

  8. High-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy with a microwave-multiplexed transition-edge sensor array

    SciTech Connect

    Noroozian, Omid; Mates, John A. B.; Bennett, Douglas A.; Brevik, Justus A.; Fowler, Joseph W.; Gao, Jiansong; Hilton, Gene C.; Horansky, Robert D.; Irwin, Kent D.; Schmidt, Daniel R.; Vale, Leila R.; Ullom, Joel N.; Kang, Zhao

    2013-11-11

    We demonstrate very high resolution photon spectroscopy with a microwave-multiplexed two-pixel transition-edge sensor (TES) array. We measured a {sup 153}Gd photon source and achieved an energy resolution of 63 eV full-width-at-half-maximum at 97 keV and an equivalent readout system noise of 86 pA/√(Hz) at the TES. The readout circuit consists of superconducting microwave resonators coupled to radio-frequency superconducting-quantum-interference-devices and transduces changes in input current to changes in phase of a microwave signal. We use flux-ramp modulation to linearize the response and evade low-frequency noise. This demonstration establishes one path for the readout of cryogenic X-ray and gamma-ray sensor arrays with more than 10{sup 3} elements and spectral resolving powers R=λ/Δλ>10{sup 3}.

  9. High-resolution three-dimensional compositional imaging by double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavo, C.; Menichetti, L.; Grifoni, E.; Legnaioli, S.; Lorenzetti, G.; Poggialini, F.; Pagnotta, S.; Palleschi, V.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we present a new instrument specifically realized for high-resolution three-dimensional compositional analysis and mapping of materials. The instrument is based on the coupling of a Double-Pulse Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) instrument with an optical microscope. The compositional mapping of the samples is obtained by scanning the laser beam across the surface of the sample, while the in depth analysis is performed by sending multiple laser pulses on the same point. Depths of analysis of several tens of microns can be obtained. The instrument presented has definite advantages with respect to Laser Ablation-ICP Mass Spectrometry in many applications related to material analysis, biomedicine and environmental diagnostics. An application to the diagnostics of industrial ceramics is presented, demonstrating the feasibility of Double-Pulse LIBS Imaging and its advantages with respect to conventional single-pulse LIBS imaging.

  10. High-Resolution Rotational Spectroscopy Study of the Smallest Sugar Dimer: Interplay of Hydrogen Bonds in the Glycolaldehyde Dimer.

    PubMed

    Zinn, Sabrina; Medcraft, Chris; Betz, Thomas; Schnell, Melanie

    2016-05-10

    Molecular recognition of carbohydrates plays an important role in nature. The aggregation of the smallest sugar, glycolaldehyde, was studied in a conformer-selective manner using high-resolution rotational spectroscopy. Two different dimer structures were observed. The most stable conformer reveals C2 -symmetry by forming two intermolecular hydrogen bonds, giving up the strong intramolecular hydrogen bonds of the monomers and thus showing high hydrogen bond selectivity. By analyzing the spectra of the (13) C and (18) O isotopologues of the dimer in natural abundance, we could precisely determine the heavy backbone structure of the dimer. Comparison to the monomer structure and the complex with water provides insight into intermolecular interactions. Despite hydrogen bonding being the dominant interaction, precise predictions from quantum-chemical calculations highly rely on the consideration of dispersion. PMID:27060475

  11. 256-pixel microcalorimeter array for high-resolution γ-ray spectroscopy of mixed-actinide materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Rabin, M. W.; Bennett, D. A.; Doriese, W. B.; Fowler, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J.; Horansky, R. D.; Reintsema, C. D.; Schmidt, D. R.; Vale, L. R.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-01-01

    The application of cryogenic microcalorimeter detectors to γ-ray spectroscopy allows for measurements with unprecedented energy resolution. These detectors are ideally suited for γ-ray spectroscopy applications for which the measurement quality is limited by the spectral overlap of many closely spaced transitions using conventional detector technologies. The non-destructive analysis of mixed-isotope Pu materials is one such application where the precision can be potentially improved utilizing microcalorimeter detectors compared to current state-of-the-art high-purity Ge detectors (HPGe). The LANL-NIST γ-ray spectrometer, a 256-pixel microcalorimeter array based on transition-edge sensors (TESs), was recently commissioned and used to collect data on a variety of Pu isotopic standards to characterize the instrument performance. These measurements represent the first time the simultaneous readout of all 256 pixels for measurements of mixed-isotope Pu materials has been achieved. The LANL-NIST γ-ray spectrometer has demonstrated an average pixel resolution of 55 eV full-width-at-half-maximum at 100 keV, nearly an order of magnitude better than HPGe detectors. Some challenges of the analysis of many-channel ultra-high resolution data and the techniques used to produce quality spectra for isotopic analysis will be presented. The LANL-NIST γ-ray spectrometer has also demonstrated stable operation and obtained high resolution measurements at total array event rates beyond 1 kHz. For a total event rate of 1.25 kHz, approximately 5.6 cps/pixel, a 72.2 eV average FWHM for the 103 keV photopeak of 153Gd was achieved.

  12. Superconducting tunnel junction x-ray detectors for high resolution spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Labov, S., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    We are developing low-tcmpaature detectors for optical, ultraviolet, X-ray, and gamma-ray spectroscopy, and for biomolecular mass spectrometry. We present here a some of our recent work in developing these detectors and some of the first results in applying these detectors to X-ray fluorescence analysis. We have measured thin-film Nb/Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al/Nb superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) X-ray detectors in the 0 2 to 1 keV band with a range of different junction sizes and aluminum film thicknesses. In one case, we have achieved the statistical limit to the energy resolution in this band. We have measured the performance of these STJ detectors as a function of count rate. and demonstrated a resolution of 13 eV FWHM at 271 eV with an output count rate of 20,600 cts/s Using X rays from SSRL to study compos- ite materials, we have demonstrated that we can resolve the L lines of transition metals from the nearby K lines of light elements We describe the first use of a low-temperature X-ray detector to measure X-ray fluoresccncc from the dilute metal component in a protein.

  13. High-resolution imaging and spectroscopy of interfacial water at single bond limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ying

    Hydrogen bond is one of the most important weak interactions in nature and plays an essential role in a broad spectrum of physics, chemistry, biology, energy and material sciences. The conventional methods for studying hydrogen-bonding interaction are all based on spectroscopic or diffraction techniques. However, those techniques have poor spatial resolution and only measure the average properties of many hydrogen bonds, which are susceptible to the structural inhomogeneity and local environments, especially when interfacial systems are concerned. The spatial variation and inter-bond coupling of the hydrogen bonds leads to significant spectral broadening, which prohibits the accurate understanding of the experimental data. In this talk, I will present our recent progress on the development of new-generation scanning probe microscopy/spectroscopy (SPM/S) with unprecedentedly high sensitivity and resolution, for addressing weak inter- and intra-molecular interactions, such as hydrogen bonds and van der Waals force. Based on a qPlus sensor, we have succeeded to push the real-space study of a prototypical hydrogen-bonded system, i.e. water, down to single bond limit. Combined with state-of-the-arts quantum simulations, we have discovered exotic nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) in interfacial water and revealed the quantum nature of the hydrogen bond from a completely new perspective

  14. The high-resolution absorption spectroscopy branch on the VUV beamline DESIRS at SOLEIL.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Nelson; Joyeux, Denis; Roudjane, Mourad; Gil, Jean François; Pilette, Bertrand; Archer, Lucy; Ito, Kenji; Nahon, Laurent

    2016-07-01

    A VUV absorption spectroscopy facility designed for ultra-high spectral resolution is in operation as a dedicated branch on the DESIRS beamline at Synchrotron SOLEIL. This branch includes a unique VUV Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) and a dedicated versatile gas sample chamber. The FTS instrument can cover a large UV-VUV spectral range from 4 to 30 eV, with an ultimate line width of 0.08 cm(-1) on a large spectral window, ΔE/E = 7%, over which all spectral features can be acquired in a multiplex way. The performance can be considered to be a middle ground between broadband moderate-resolution spectrometers based on gratings and ultra-high-spectral-resolution VUV tunable-laser-based techniques over very narrow spectral windows. The various available gaseous-sample-handling setups, which function over a wide range of pressures and temperatures, and the acquisition methodology are described. A selection of experimental results illustrates the performance and limitations of the FTS-based facility. PMID:27359137

  15. Determination of rank and kerogen type by high resolution NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, W.W.; Collen, J.D. ); Newman, R.H. )

    1990-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a nondestructive technique for measuring the chemical and structural properties of organic matter. Although used in organic geochemistry for the past 14 years, the technique has continually undergone refinement. Initially, only the aromatic and aliphatic signal areas of the carbon NMR spectrum could be measured. Carboxylic groups as well as oxygen-substituted groups on aromatic and aliphatic carbon can now be qualitatively measured. The authors have examined coal and shale samples of various ranks from the Williston and San Juan basins, USA, and the Taranaki and Great South basins, New Zealand. Kerogen type can be distinguished on a plot of aromaticity versus the methylene to methyl ratio. For type III kerogens, vitrinite reflectance correlates very well with the percent of oxygen substitution on aromatic carbon and aromaticity. These parameters are excellent indicators of rank because they reflect the decrease in oxygen content and the increase in aromatic carbon as organic matter matures. Although the initial cost of NMR equipment is high, the vast amount of chemical information on kerogen that may be obtained from a small sample and very little laboratory preparation make it a valuable tool for petroleum geochemistry.

  16. High Resolution Photoacoustic Spectroscopy of the Oxygen A-Band to Support the OCO Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cich, M. J.; Lunny, E. M.; Bui, T. Q.; Drouin, B. J.; Okumura, M.; Stroscio, G. D.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory missions require spectroscopic parameterization of the Oxygen A-Band absorption (757-775 nm) with unprecedented detail to meet the objective of delivering space-based column CO2 measurements with an accuracy of better than 1 ppm. This requires spectroscopic parameters with accuracies at the 0.1% level. To achieve this it is necessary for line shape models to include deviations from the Voigt line shape, including the collisional effects of Dicke narrowing, speed-dependence, line mixing (LM), and collision-induced absorption (CIA). To measure these effects to high accuracy, new innovative lab measurements are required. LM and CIA in particular are difficult to measure using standard spectroscopic techniques because, while present at atmospheric temperatures, these effects are difficult to quantify. At pressures of several atmospheres these effects contribute several percent to the A-Band absorption. While the O2 A-band is too weak for direct absorption measurements via a diode laser, a very sensitive photoacoustic spectroscopy technique is being used to study the pressure- dependence of the spectral line shape up to pressures of 5 atm. This spectrometer has a high S/N of about 10,000 and an advantageous zero baseline. In addition, temperature effects on the line shape are studied using a newly developed temperature control scheme. The latest results are reported.

  17. Next generation techniques in the high resolution spectroscopy of biologically relevant molecules.

    PubMed

    Neill, Justin L; Douglass, Kevin O; Pate, Brooks H; Pratt, David W

    2011-04-28

    Recent advances in the technology of test and measurement equipment driven by the computer and telecommunications industries have made possible the development of a new broadband, Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer that operates on principles similar to FTNMR. This technique uses a high sample-rate arbitrary waveform generator to construct a phase-locked chirped microwave pulse that gives a linear frequency sweep over a wide frequency range in 1 μs. The chirped pulse efficiently polarizes the molecular sample at all frequencies lying within this band. The subsequent free induction decay of this polarization is measured with a high-speed digitizer and then fast Fourier-transformed to yield a broadband, frequency-resolved rotational spectrum, spanning up to 11.5 GHz and containing lines that are as narrow as 100 kHz. This new technique is called chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave (CP-FTMW) spectroscopy. The technique offers the potential to determine the structural and dynamical properties of very large molecules solely from fully resolved pure rotational spectra. FTMW double resonance techniques employing a low-resolution UV laser facilitate an easy assignment of overlapping spectra produced by different conformers in the sample. Of particular interest are the energy landscapes of conformationally flexible molecules of biological importance, including studies of their interaction with solvent and/or other weakly bound molecules. An example is provided from the authors' work on p-methoxyphenethylamine, a neurotransmitter, and its complexes with water. PMID:21394332

  18. High resolution applications of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for environmental and forensic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Madhavi Z.; Labbé, Nicole; André, Nicolas; Harris, Ronny; Ebinger, Michael; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Vass, Arpad A.

    2007-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used in the elemental analysis for a variety of environmental samples and as a proof of concept for a host of forensic applications. In the first application, LIBS was used for the rapid detection of carbon from a number of different soil types. In this application, a major breakthrough was achieved by using a multivariate analytical approach that has brought us closer towards a "universal calibration curve". In a second application, it has been demonstrated that LIBS in combination with multivariate analysis can be employed to analyze the chemical composition of annual tree growth rings and correlate them to external parameters such as changes in climate, forest fires, and disturbances involving human activity. The objectives of using this technology in fire scar determinations are: 1) To determine the characteristic spectra of wood exposed to forest fires and 2) To examine the viability of this technique for detecting fire occurrences in stems that did not develop fire scars. These examples demonstrate that LIBS-based techniques are inherently well suited for diverse environmental applications. LIBS was also applied to a variety of proof of concept forensic applications such as the analysis of cremains (human cremation remains) and elemental composition analysis of prosthetic implants.

  19. High Resolution Applications of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Environmental and Forensic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Madhavi Z; Labbe, Nicole; Andre, Nicolas O; Harris, Ronny D; Ebinger, Michael H; Wullschleger, Stan D; Vass, Arpad Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used in the elemental analysis for a variety of environmental samples and as a proof of concept for a host of forensic applications. In the first application, LIBS was used for the rapid detection of carbon from a number of different soil types. In this application, a major breakthrough was achieved by using a multivariate analytical approach that has brought us closer towards a "universal calibration curve". In a second application, it has been demonstrated that LIBS in combination with multivariate analysis can be employed to analyze the chemical composition of annual tree growth rings and correlate them to external parameters such as changes in climate, forest fires, and disturbances involving human activity. The objectives of using this technology in fire scar determinations are: 1) To determine the characteristic spectra of wood exposed to forest fires and 2) To examine the viability of this technique for detecting fire occurrences in stems that did not develop fire scars. These examples demonstrate that LIBS-based techniques are inherently well suited for diverse environmental applications. LIBS was also applied to a variety of proof of concept forensic applications such as the analysis of cremains (human cremation remains) and elemental composition analysis of prosthetic implants.

  20. High-Resolution Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy used in Homeland Security and Forensic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Madhavi Z; Wullschleger, Stan D; Vass, Arpad Alexander; Martin, Rodger Carl; Grissino-Mayer, Henri

    2006-01-01

    The technique of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to detect elements for a variety of homeland security applications such as nuclear materials identification and inventory,and forensic applications has been demonstrated. For nuclear materials applications, we detected and profiled metals in coatings that were used to encapsulate nuclear fuel. Multivariate analysis has been successfully employed in the quantification of elements present in treated wood and engineered wood composites. These examples demonstrate that LIBS-based techniques are inherently well suited for diverse environmental applications related to homeland security. Three key advantages are evident: (1) small samples (mg) are sufficient; (2) samples can be analyzed by LIBS very rapidly, and (3) biological materials such as human and animal bones and wood can be analyzed with minimal sample preparation. For forensic applications they have used LIBS to determine differences in animal and human bones. They have also applied this technique in the determination of counterfeit and non-counterfeit currency. They recently applied LIBS in helping to solve a murder case.

  1. New Atomic Data for Doubly Ionized Iron Group Atoms by High Resolution UV Fourier Transform Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Peter L.; Pickering, Juliet C.; Thorne, A. P.

    2002-01-01

    Currently available laboratory spectroscopic data of doubly ionized iron-group element were obtained about 50 years ago using spectrographs of modest dispersion, photographic plates, and eye estimates of intensities. The accuracy of the older wavelength data is about 10 mAngstroms at best, whereas wavelengths are now needed to an accuracy of 1 part in 10(exp 6) to 10(exp 7) (0.2 to 2 mAngstroms at 2000 Angstroms). The Fourier transform (FT) spectroscopy group at Imperial College, London, and collaborators at the Harvard College Observatory have used a unique VUV FT spectrometer in a program focussed on improving knowledge of spectra of many neutral and singly and doubly ionized, astrophysically important, iron group elements. Spectra of Fe II and Fe III have been recorded at UV and VUV wavelengths with signal-to-noise ratios of several hundred for the stronger lines. Wavelengths and energy levels for Fe III are an order of magnitude more accurate than previous work; analysis is close to completion. f-values for Fe II have been published.

  2. Phase identification of microfeatures using EPMA methods, especially high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy

    PubMed

    Love; Scott

    2001-02-01

    Methods of electron-probe microanalysis (EPMA), with some input from scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM/TEM), are applied for the identification of micro-scale constituents in a solid matrix. The subject of the study is a magnesium alloy composite, which contains silicon carbide-based fibres made by a liquid metal infiltration process. Backscattered electron imaging of the composite in the SEM showed that during composite manufacture, fibres were chemically attacked by the metal, many of the fibres exhibiting three distinct grey levels, indicative of different reaction zones, and others appearing uniformly black. EPMA measurements showed that each region contained approximately 12wt.% oxygen and that penetration of the fibre by magnesium was accompanied by a reduction in the concentration of silicon and carbon. From studying the position and shape of specific X-ray lines it was shown that magnesium penetration involved a chemical reaction with silicon oxycarbide, established in earlier EPMA studies as one of the fibre constituents. Also, in the outermost region, aluminium in the alloy reacted with free carbon in the fibre to form aluminium carbide and with magnesium to produce a Mg-Al intermetallic. The composition of black fibres was quite different from the grey ones, with negligible silicon and only a small amount of aluminium. Oxygen levels in black fibres were consistent with complete oxidation, indicating these fibres were subjected, locally, to severe oxidising conditions during composite manufacture. In the metal matrix itself, particles of a mixed magnesium/aluminium oxide, silicon carbide and magnesium silicide were observed, the latter two phases forming as silicon and carbon were ejected from fibres. PMID:10936455

  3. X-ray High-resolution Spectroscopy for Laser-produced Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbato, F.; Scarpellini, D.; Malizia, A.; Gaudio, P.; Richetta, M.; Antonelli, L.

    The study of the emission spectrum gives information about the material generating the spectrum itself and the condition in which this is generated. The wavelength spectra lines are linked to the specific element and plasma conditions (electron temperature, density), while their shape is influenced by several physical effects like Stark and Doppler ones. In this work we study the X-ray emission spectra of a copper laser-produced plasma by using a spherical bent crystal spectrometer to measure the electron temperature. The facility used is the laser TVLPS, at the Tor Vergata University in Rome. It consists of a Nd:Glass source (in first harmonic - 1064 nm) whose pulse parameters are: 8 J in energy, time duration of 15 ns and a focal spot diameter of 200 μm. The adopted spectrometer is based on a spherical bent crystal of muscovite. The device combines the focusing property of a spherical mirror with the Bragg's law. This allows to obtain a great power resolution but a limited range of analysis. In our case the resolution is on average 80 eV. As it is well-known, the position of the detector on the Rowland's circle is linked to the specific spectral range which has been studied. To select the area to be investigated, we acquired spectra by means of a flat spectrometer. The selected area is centered on 8.88 Å. To calibrate the spectrum we wrote a ray-tracing MATLAB code, which calculates the detector alignment parameters and calibration curve. We used the method of line ratio to measure the electron temperature. This is possible because we assumed the plasma to be in LTE condition. The temperature value was obtained comparing the experimental one, given by the line ratio, with the theoretical one, preceded by FLYCHK simulations.

  4. Coupling parameters of many-body interactions for the Al(100) surface state: A high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, J.; Shimada, K.; Hayashi, H.; Iwasawa, H.; Aiura, Y.; Namatame, H.; Taniguchi, M.

    2011-10-01

    We examined the dimensionless coupling parameters of many-body interactions for a free-electron-like surface-derived state in Al(100) by means of high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. A kink structure was found to exist in the energy-band dispersion near the Fermi level (EF), which was attributed to the electron-phonon interaction. At 50 K, the coupling parameters of the electron-phonon and electron-electron interactions were estimated as λep=0.67±0.05 and λee˜0.003, respectively, indicating that the effective mass enhancement was mainly derived from the electron-phonon interaction. The temperature dependence of the kink structure, as measured by λep(T), was consistent with a theoretical calculation based on the Eliashberg function. A quasiparticle peak with a width of 15-20 meV was found near EF, which was explained well by the simulated spectral function incorporating the self-energy evaluated in this study. We found that the electrons at the surface were strongly scattered by the defects at the surface and that the linewidth was significantly broadened (Γ0=0.238±0.006 eV).

  5. High Resolution Time-resolved UCLES Spectroscopy of AE Aqr: I. The Secondary Star Revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echevarria, J.; Diego, F.; Mills, D.; Connon Smith, R.

    2006-06-01

    High-dispersion time-resolved spectroscopy of the cataclysmic variable AE Aqr has been obtained. The emission lines have a complex structure that make difficult to measure the motion of the white dwarf. The cross correlation for the absorption lines shows a clear asymmetric profile as expected from a heated side of the red star. The spectral type for the secondary star varies from K2 to K5; there are clear indications that the temperature varies as a function of star longitude. The radial velocity analysis yield Kab = 165.2 ± 0.6 Km s-1 for the cross-correlated secondary star. The rotational velocity of the red star has been measured as a function of orbital period. It shows ellipsoidal variations with a period half the orbital period. The rotational velocities vary within the range Vrot sin i = 105 ± 3 Km s-1 and Vrot sin i = 130 ± 3 Km s-1. The former can be used to constrain the white dwarf semi-amplitude value to yield Kem = 139 ± 4 Km s-1 consistent with derived values from published radial velocity measurements. From a variation in the absorption line strength of 30%, we constrain the inclination angle to i = 58° ± 3. The estimated masses of the binary are: Mw = 1.07 ± 0.07 M? and Mr = 0.90 ± 0.05 M?. If this is correct we should expect a spectral type of G5 if the secondary star is a main sequence star. We suggest that the discrepancy is explained if the star has a radius 40% greater than a main sequence star for a mass of 0.90 M?.

  6. MULTI-EPOCH OBSERVATIONS OF HD 69830: HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPY AND LIMITS TO VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Beichman, C. A.; Tanner, A. M.; Bryden, G.; Akeson, R. L.; Ciardi, D. R.; Lisse, C. M.; Boden, A. F.; Dodson-Robinson, S. E.; Salyk, C.; Wyatt, M. C.

    2011-12-10

    The main-sequence solar-type star HD 69830 has an unusually large amount of dusty debris orbiting close to three planets found via the radial velocity technique. In order to explore the dynamical interaction between the dust and planets, we have performed multi-epoch photometry and spectroscopy of the system over several orbits of the outer dust. We find no evidence for changes in either the dust amount or its composition, with upper limits of 5%-7% (1{sigma} per spectral element) on the variability of the dust spectrum over 1 year, 3.3% (1{sigma}) on the broadband disk emission over 4 years, and 33% (1{sigma}) on the broadband disk emission over 24 years. Detailed modeling of the spectrum of the emitting dust indicates that the dust is located outside of the orbits of the three planets and has a composition similar to main-belt, C-type asteroids in our solar system. Additionally, we find no evidence for a wide variety of gas species associated with the dust. Our new higher signal-to-noise spectra do not confirm our previously claimed detection of H{sub 2}O ice leading to a firm conclusion that the debris can be associated with the break-up of one or more C-type asteroids formed in the dry, inner regions of the protoplanetary disk of the HD 69830 system. The modeling of the spectral energy distribution and high spatial resolution observations in the mid-infrared are consistent with a {approx}1 AU location for the emitting material.

  7. Spectroscopy and high-resolution imaging of the gravitational lens SDSS J1206+4332

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnello, Adriano; Sonnenfeld, Alessandro; Suyu, Sherry H.; Treu, Tommaso; Fassnacht, Christopher D.; Mason, Charlotte; Bradač, Maruša; Auger, Matthew W.

    2016-06-01

    We present spectroscopy and laser guide star adaptive optics (LGSAO) images of the doubly imaged lensed quasar SDSS J1206+4332. We revise the deflector redshift proposed previously to zd = 0.745, and measure for the first time its velocity dispersion σ = (290 ± 30) km s-1. The LGSAO data show the lensed quasar host galaxy stretching over the astroid caustic thus forming an extra pair of merging images, which was previously thought to be an unrelated galaxy in seeing limited data. Owing to the peculiar geometry, the lens acts as a natural coronagraph on the broad-line region of the quasar so that only narrow C III]emission is found in the fold arc. We use the data to reconstruct the source structure and deflector potential, including nearby perturbers. We reconstruct the point-spread function (PSF) from the quasar images themselves, since no additional point source is present in the field of view. From gravitational lensing and stellar dynamics, we find the slope of the total mass density profile to be γ' = -log ρ/log r = 1.93 ± 0.09. We discuss the potential of SDSS J1206+4332 for measuring a time-delay distance (and thus H0 and other cosmological parameters), or as a standard ruler, in combination with the time-delay published by the COSMOGRAIL collaboration. We conclude that this system is very promising for cosmography. However, in order to achieve competitive precision and accuracy, an independent characterization of the PSF is needed. Spatially resolved kinematics of the deflector would reduce the uncertainties further. Both are within the reach of current observational facilities.

  8. Extracting the Redox Orbitals in Li Battery Materials with High-Resolution X-Ray Compton Scattering Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, K.; Barbiellini, B.; Orikasa, Y.; Go, N.; Sakurai, H.; Kaprzyk, S.; Itou, M.; Yamamoto, K.; Uchimoto, Y.; Wang, Yung Jui; Hafiz, H.; Bansil, A.; Sakurai, Y.

    2015-02-01

    We present an incisive spectroscopic technique for directly probing redox orbitals based on bulk electron momentum density measurements via high-resolution x-ray Compton scattering. Application of our method to spinel LixMn2O4 , a lithium ion battery cathode material, is discussed. The orbital involved in the lithium insertion and extraction process is shown to mainly be the oxygen 2 p orbital. Moreover, the manganese 3 d states are shown to experience spatial delocalization involving 0.16 ±0.05 electrons per Mn site during the battery operation. Our analysis provides a clear understanding of the fundamental redox process involved in the working of a lithium ion battery.

  9. Extracting the Redox Orbitals in Li Battery Materials with High-Resolution X-Ray Compton Scattering Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbiellini, B.; Suzuki, K.; Orikasa, Y.; Go, N.; Sakurai, H.; Kaprzyk, S.; Itou, M.; Yamamoto, K.; Uchimoto, Y.; Wang, Yung Jui; Hafiz, H.; Bansil, A.; Sakurai, Y.

    2015-03-01

    We present an incisive spectroscopic technique for directly probing redox orbitals based on bulk electron momentum density measurements via high-resolution X-ray Compton scattering. Application of our method to spinel LixMn2O4 (a lithium ion battery cathode material) is discussed. The orbital involved in lithium insertion and extraction process is mainly the oxygen 2p orbital. Moreover, the manganese 3d states are shown to experience spatial delocalization involving 0.16 electrons per Mn site during the battery operation. Our analysis provides a clear understanding of the fundamental redox process involved in the working of the lithium ion battery. Work supported in part by the US DOE.

  10. A sensitive detection method for high resolution spectroscopy of trapped antihydrogen, hydrogen and other trapped species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz Cesar, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    A method for detection of the weak 1s-2s laser excitation of a few trapped antihydrogen atoms is described. It involves the typical antihydrogen trapping environment that combines a magnetic trap for the atoms as well as a Penning trap for its constituent particles. By photoionization of the excited state the photoion can be kept in a weak Penning trap and at a suitable time be ejected towards a charged particle detector such as a microchannel plate or a channel electron multiplier. Since it does not rely on annihilation, the method is also suitable for trapped hydrogen and may find application with other species when a weak transition to a metastable state is intended and only a few trapped atoms or molecules are available.

  11. High Resolution Rotational Spectroscopy of Zeeman & Hyperfine Effects in PbF & YbF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawhorter, Richard; Baum, Alex; Murphy, Benjamin; Sears, Trevor; Shafer-Ray, N. E.; Alphei, Lukas; Grabow, Jens-Uwe

    2012-06-01

    Motivated by the ongoing search for the CP-violating electron electric dipole moment (e-EDM), rotational spectra of the radicals^ 207Pb^19F and ^208Pb^19F were measured using a supersonic jet Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. Zeeman splitting was examined for 10 ^207PbF and 9 ^208PbF J = .5ex1 -.1em/ -.15em.25ex2 and J = ^3/2 transitions using Helmholtz coils and magnetic fields up to ˜4 Gauss. Transitions were observed with 0.5 kHz accuracy and 6 kHz pair resolution over a range of 2 -- 26.5 GHz. The observation of these field dependent spectra allowed for the determination of the two body fixed g-factors, G and G, of the electronic wave function. This is an important step in a possible future e-EDM experiment using either the ^207PbF or ^208PbF molecule, and our results compare reasonably well with recently calculated values. Observing the nuclear quadrupole hyperfine structure can also help characterize the critical electric field at the heavy atom nucleus in unstable but long-lived ^205PbF as well as ^173YbF. Energy level predictions based on our detailed studies of the 4 stable PbF isotopologues as well as previous optical and microwave spectra of YbF will facilitate upcoming experimental studies and may also uncover nearby states of opposite parity which could also greatly benefit the eEDM search.

  12. High-Resolution Infrared Imaging and Spectroscopy of the Pistol Nebula: Evidence for Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figer, Donald F.; Morris, Mark; Geballe, T. R.; Rich, R. Michael; Serabyn, Eugene; McLean, Ian S.; Puetter, R. C.; Yahil, Amos

    1999-11-01

    We present new infrared images, obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Near-Infrared Camera and Multiobject Spectrometer (NICMOS), and Brα (4.05 μm) spectroscopy, obtained using CGS4 on UKIRT, of the Pistol Star and its associated nebula. We find strong evidence to support the hypothesis that the Pistol Nebula was ejected from the Pistol Star. The Paα (1.87 μm) NICMOS image shows that the nebula completely surrounds the Pistol Star, although the line intensity is much stronger on its northern and western edges. The Brα CGS4 spectra show the classical ringlike signature of quasi-spherical expansion. The blueshifted emission (Vmax~-60 km s-1) is much weaker than the redshifted emission (Vmax~+10 km s-1), where the velocities are with respect to the velocity of the Pistol Star; further, the redshifted emission spans a very narrow range of velocities, i.e., it appears ``flattened'' in the position-velocity diagram. These data suggest that the nebula was ejected from the star several thousand years ago, with a velocity between the current terminal velocity of the stellar wind (95 km s-1) and the present expansion velocity of gas in the outer shell of the nebula (60 km s-1). The Paα image reveals several emission-line stars in the region, including two newly identified emission-line stars north of the Pistol Star, both of which are likely to be the hottest known stars in the Galactic center with spectral types earlier than WC8 and Teff>50,000 K). The presence of these stars, the morphology of the Paα emission, and the velocity field in the gas suggest that the side of the nebula farthest from us is approaching, and being ionized by, the hot stars of the Quintuplet and that the highest velocity redshifted gas has been decelerated by winds from the Quintuplet stars. We also discuss the possibility that the nebular gas might be magnetically confined by the ambient magnetic field delineated by the nearby nonthermal filaments. Based on observations with the

  13. High-resolution imaging gamma-ray spectroscopy with externally segmented germanium detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callas, J. L.; Mahoney, W. A.; Varnell, L. S.; Wheaton, W. A.

    1993-01-01

    Externally segmented germanium detectors promise a breakthrough in gamma-ray imaging capabilities while retaining the superb energy resolution of germanium spectrometers. An angular resolution of 0.2 deg becomes practical by combining position-sensitive germanium detectors having a segment thickness of a few millimeters with a one-dimensional coded aperture located about a meter from the detectors. Correspondingly higher angular resolutions are possible with larger separations between the detectors and the coded aperture. Two-dimensional images can be obtained by rotating the instrument. Although the basic concept is similar to optical or X-ray coded-aperture imaging techniques, several complicating effects arise because of the penetrating nature of gamma rays. The complications include partial transmission through the coded aperture elements, Compton scattering in the germanium detectors, and high background count rates. Extensive electron-photon Monte Carlo modeling of a realistic detector/coded-aperture/collimator system has been performed. Results show that these complicating effects can be characterized and accounted for with no significant loss in instrument sensitivity.

  14. High resolution X- and gamma-ray spectroscopy of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    A balloon-borne X- and gamma-ray instrument was developed, fabricated, and flown. This instrument has the highest energy resolution of any instrument flown to date for measurements of solar and cosmic X-ray and gamma-ray emission in the 13 to 600 keV energy range. The purpose of the solar measurements was to study electron acceleration and solar flare energy release processes. The cosmic observations were to search for cyclotron line features from neutron stars and for low energy gamma-ray lines from nucleosynthesis. The instrument consists of four 4 cm diameter, 1.3 cm thick, planar intrinsic germanium detectors cooled by liquid nitrogen and surrounded by CsI and NaI anti-coincidence scintillation crystals. A graded z collimator limited the field of view to 3 deg x 6 deg and a gondola pointing system provided 0.3 deg pointing accuracy. A total of four flights were made with this instrument. Additional funding was obtained from NSF for the last three flights, which had primarily solar objectives. A detailed instrument description is given. The main scientific results and the data analysis are discussed. Current work and indications for future work are summarized. A bibliography of publications resulting from this work is given.

  15. Ultrasensitive high resolution laser spectroscopy and its application to optical frequency standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jun

    1997-09-01

    Advanced laser stabilization techniques now enable one to lock laser frequencies onto line centers of natural atomic/molecular resonances with unprecedented precision and accuracy. In this dissertation we discuss our effort in utilizing these techniques to establish visible optical frequency standards. By summarizing our earlier results on frequency measurements of the 87Rb D2 line at 780 nm 127I2 hyperfine transitions at 532 nm, we show the advantage of using a higher quality reference line, usually characterized by its narrower linewidth, higher attainable signal-to-noise ratio and lower sensitivity toward external perturbations. We then present a novel approach of cavity-enhanced frequency modulation spectroscopy for ultra-sensitive detections. The powerful utility of this new technique in the field of frequency standards is demonstrated by probing saturated molecular overtone transitions in the visible and near infrared. Weakly-absorbing gases such as C2H2 and C2HD are placed inside an external high-finesse resonator to enhance their detection sensitivities. A frequency modulation technique is employed to achieve a shot noise limited signal-to- noise ratio. The rf modulation frequency is chosen to match the cavity's free spectral range in order to avoid the cavity-induced conversion of laser frequency noise into amplitude noise. The molecular saturated dispersion signal is directly recovered after demodulation of the cavity transmitted light. A record high integrated absorption sensitivity of 5× 10-13/ (1× 10-14/cm) (at 1 second averaging time) has been obtained. Systematic studies on this new technique are presented on topics of detection sensitivity, signal line shape, signal size and slope, and pressure dependent linewidth broadening and linecenter shift. A Nd:YAG laser is stabilized on the P(5) transition in the (ν2+3/ ν3) overtone band of C2HD at 1.064 μm. Its absolute frequency is established. The excellent signal- to-noise ratio produces a frequency

  16. High-Resolution Laser Spectroscopy of the S1 ← S0 Transition of Cl-NAPHTHALENES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasahara, Shunji; Yamamoto, Ryo

    2015-06-01

    High-resolution fluorescence excitation spectra of the S1 ← S0 electronic transition have been observed for 1-Cl naphthalene (1-ClN) and 2-Cl naphthalene (2-ClN). Sub-Doppler excitation spectra were measured by crossing a single-mode UV laser beam perpendicular to a collimated molecular beam. The absolute wavenumber was calibrated with accuracy 0.0002 cm-1 by measurement of the Doppler-free saturation spectrum of iodine molecule and fringe pattern of the stabilized etalon. For 2-ClN, the rotationally resolved high-resolution spectra were obtained for the 0^0_0 and 0^0_0+1042 cm-1 bands, and these molecular constants were determined in high accuracy. The obtained molecular constants of the 0^0_0 band are good agreement with the ones reported by Plusquellic et. al. For the 0^0_0+1042 cm-1 band, the local energy shifts were found. On the other hand, for 1-ClN, the rotational lines were not fully resolved because the fluorescence lifetime is shorter than the one of 2-ClN. Then we determined the molecular constants of 1-ClN from the comparison the observed spectrum with calculated one. D. F. Plusquellic, S. R. Davis, and F. Jahanmir, J. Chem. Phys., 115, 225 (2001).

  17. Detecting ring systems around exoplanets using high resolution spectroscopy: the case of 51 Pegasi b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, N. C.; Martins, J. H. C.; Boué, G.; Correia, A. C. M.; Oshagh, M.; Figueira, P.; Santerne, A.; Sousa, S. G.; Melo, C.; Montalto, M.; Boisse, I.; Ehrenreich, D.; Lovis, C.; Pepe, F.; Udry, S.; Garcia Munoz, A.

    2015-11-01

    Aims: In this paper we explore the possibility that the recently detected reflected light signal of 51 Peg b could be caused by a ring system around the planet. Methods: We use a simple model to compare the observed signal with the expected signal from a short-period giant planet with rings. We also use simple dynamical arguments to understand the possible geometry of such a system. Results: We provide evidence that, to a good approximation, the observations are compatible with the signal expected from a ringed planet, assuming that the rings are non-coplanar with the orbital plane. However, based on dynamical arguments, we also show that this configuration is unlikely. In the case of coplanar rings we then demonstrate that the incident flux on the ring surface is about 2% the value received by the planet, a value that renders the ring explanation unlikely. Conclusions: The results suggest that the signal observed cannot in principle be explained by a planet+ring system. We discuss, however, the possibility of using reflected light spectra to detect and characterize the presence of rings around short-period planets. Finally, we show that ring systems could have already been detected by photometric transit campaigns, but their signal could have been easily misinterpreted by the expected light curve of an eclipsing binary. Based on observations collected at ESO facilities under program 091.C-0271 (with the HARPS spectrograph at the ESO 3.6-m telescope, La Silla-Paranal Observatory).Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy with the EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, F S; Adams, J S; Beiersdorfer, P; Brown, G V; Clementson, J; Frankel, M; Kahn, S M; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A

    2009-10-01

    The EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer (ECS) is a production-class 36 pixel x-ray calorimeter spectrometer that has been continuously operating at the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for almost 2 years. The ECS was designed to be a long-lifetime, turn-key spectrometer that couples high performance with ease of operation and minimal operator intervention. To this end, a variant of the Suzaku/XRS spaceflight detector system has been coupled to a low-maintenance cryogenic system consisting of a long-lifetime liquid He cryostat, and a closed cycle, {sup 3}He pre-cooled adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator. The ECS operates for almost 3 weeks between cryogenic servicing and the ADR operates at 0.05 K for more than 60 hours between automatic recycles under software control. Half of the ECS semiconductor detector array is populated with mid-band pixels that have a resolution of 4.5 eV FWHM, a bandpass from 0.05-12 keV, and a quantum efficiency of 95% at 6 keV. The other half of the array has thick HgTe absorbers that have a bandpass from 0.3 to over 100 keV, an energy resolution of 33 eV FWHM, and a quantum efficiency of 32% at 60 keV. In addition, the ECS uses a real-time, autonomous, data collection and analysis system developed for the Suzaku/XRS instrument and implemented in off-the-shelf hardware for the ECS. Here we will discuss the performance of the ECS instrument and its implementation as a turnkey cryogenic detector system.

  19. High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy with the EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, F. Scott; Adams, Joseph S.; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Brown, Gregory V.; Clementson, Joel; Frankel, Miriam; Kahn, Steven M.; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.

    2009-12-01

    The EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer (ECS) is a production-class 36 pixel x-ray calorimeter spectrometer that has been continuously operating at the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for almost 2 years. The ECS was designed to be a long-lifetime, turn-key spectrometer that couples high performance with ease of operation and minimal operator intervention. To this end, a variant of the Suzaku/XRS spaceflight detector system has been coupled to a low-maintenance cryogenic system consisting of a long-lifetime liquid He cryostat, and a closed cycle, 3He pre-cooled adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator. The ECS operates for almost 3 weeks between cryogenic servicing and the ADR operates at 0.05 K for more than 60 hours between automatic recycles under software control. Half of the ECS semiconductor detector array is populated with mid-band pixels that have a resolution of 4.5 eV FWHM, a bandpass from 0.05-12 keV, and a quantum efficiency of 95% at 6 keV. The other half of the array has thick HgTe absorbers that have a bandpass from 0.3 to over 100 keV, an energy resolution of 33 eV FWHM, and a quantum efficiency of 32% at 60 keV. In addition, the ECS uses a real-time, autonomous, data collection and analysis system developed for the Suzaku/XRS instrument and implemented in off-the-shelf hardware for the ECS. Here we will discuss the performance of the ECS instrument and its implementation as a turnkey cryogenic detector system.

  20. New generation NMR bioreactor coupled with high-resolution NMR spectroscopy leads to novel discoveries in Moorella thermoacetica metabolic profiles.

    PubMed

    Xue, Junfeng; Isern, Nancy G; Ewing, R James; Liyu, Andrei V; Sears, Jesse A; Knapp, Harlan; Iversen, Jens; Sisk, Daniel R; Ahring, Birgitte K; Majors, Paul D

    2014-10-01

    An in situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) bioreactor was developed and employed to monitor microbial metabolism under batch growth conditions in real time. We selected Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 49707 as a test case. M. thermoacetica (formerly Clostridium thermoaceticum) is a strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, acetogenic, gram-positive bacterium with potential for industrial production of chemicals. The metabolic profiles of M. thermoacetica were characterized during growth in batch mode on xylose (a component of lignocellulosic biomass) using the new generation NMR bioreactor in combination with high-resolution NMR (HR-NMR) spectroscopy. In situ NMR measurements were performed using water-suppressed H-1 NMR spectroscopy at 500 MHz, and aliquots of the bioreactor contents were taken for 600-MHz HR-NMR spectroscopy at specific intervals to confirm metabolite identifications and expand metabolite coverage. M. thermoacetica demonstrated the metabolic potential to produce formate, ethanol, and methanol from xylose, in addition to its known capability of producing acetic acid. Real-time monitoring of bioreactor conditions showed a temporary pH decrease, with a concomitant increase in formic acid during exponential growth. Fermentation experiments performed outside of the magnet showed that the strong magnetic field employed for NMR detection did not significantly affect cell metabolism. Use of the in situ NMR bioreactor facilitated monitoring of the fermentation process, enabling identification of intermediate and endpoint metabolites and their correlation with pH and biomass produced during culture growth. Real-time monitoring of culture metabolism using the NMR bioreactor in combination with HR-NMR spectroscopy will allow optimization of the metabolism of microorganisms producing valuable bioproducts. PMID:24946863

  1. New generation NMR bioreactor coupled with high-resolution NMR spectroscopy leads to novel discoveries in Moorella thermoaceticum metabolic profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Junfeng; Isern, Nancy G.; Ewing, R James; Liyu, Andrey V.; Sears, Jesse A.; Knapp, Harlan; Iversen, Jens; Sisk, Daniel R.; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Majors, Paul D.

    2014-06-20

    An in-situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) bioreactor was developed and employed to monitor microbial metabolism under batch-growth conditions in real time. We selected Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 49707 as a test case. M. thermoacetica (formerly Clostridium thermoaceticum) is a strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, acetogenic, gram-positive bacterium with potential for industrial production of chemicals. The metabolic profiles of M. thermoacetica were characterized during growth in batch mode on xylose (a component of lignocellulosic biomass) using the new generation NMR bioreactor in combination with high-resolution, high sensitivity NMR (HR-NMR) spectroscopy. In-situ NMR measurements were performed using water-suppressed H-1 NMR spectroscopy at an NMR frequency of 500 MHz, and aliquots of the bioreactor contents were taken for 600 MHz HR-NMR spectroscopy at specific intervals to confirm metabolite identifications and expand metabolite coverage. M. thermoacetica demonstrated the metabolic potential to produce formate, ethanol and methanol from xylose, in addition to its known capability of producing acetic acid. Real-time monitoring of bioreactor conditions showed a temporary pH decrease, with a concomitant increase in formic acid during exponential growth. Fermentation experiments performed outside of the magnet showed that the strong magnetic field employed for NMR detection did not significantly affect cell metabolism. Use of the in-situ NMR bioreactor facilitated monitoring of the fermentation process in real time, enabling identification of intermediate and end-point metabolites and their correlation with pH and biomass produced during culture growth. Real-time monitoring of culture metabolism using the NMR bioreactor in combination with the HR-NMR spectroscopy will allow optimization of the metabolism of microorganisms producing valuable bioproducts.

  2. Application of high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy: Vibrational resolved C 1s and O 1s spectra of CO adsorbed on Ni(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Foehlisch, A.; Nilsson, A.; Martensson, N.

    1997-04-01

    There are various effects which determine the line shape of a core-level electron spectrum. These are due to the finite life-time of the core hole, inelastic scattering of the outgoing photoelectron, electronic shake-up and shake-off processes and vibrational excitations. For free atoms and molecules the different contributions to the observed line shapes can often be well separated. For solids, surfaces and adsorbates the line shapes are in general much broader and it has in the past been assumed that no separation of the various contributions can be made. In the present report the authors will show that this is indeed not the case. Surprisingly, the vibrational fine structure of CO adsorbed on Ni(100) can be resolved in the C 1s and O 1s electron spectra. This was achieved by the combination of highly monochromatized soft X-rays from B18.0 with a high resolution Scienta 200 mm photoelectron spectrometer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with tunable excitation energy yields as a core level spectroscopy atomic and site-specific information. The presented measurements allow for a determination of internuclear distances and potential energy curves in corehole ionized adsorbed molecules. The authors analysis of the c(2x2) phase CO/Ni(100) on {open_quotes}top{close_quotes} yielded a vibrational splitting of 217 +/- 2 meV for C 1s ionization. For O 1s ionization a splitting of 173 +/- 8 meV was found.

  3. Structural model of homogeneous As–S glasses derived from Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution XPS

    SciTech Connect

    Golovchak, R.; Shpotyuk, O.; Mccloy, J. S.; Riley, B. J.; Windisch, C. F.; Sundaram, S. K.; Kovalskiy, A.; Jain, H.

    2010-11-28

    The structure of homogeneous bulk As x S100- x (25 ≤ x ≤ 42) glasses, prepared by the conventional rocking–melting–quenching method, was investigated using high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy. It is shown that the main building blocks of their glass networks are regular AsS3/2 pyramids and sulfur chains. In the S-rich domain, the existence of quasi-tetrahedral (QT) S = As(S1/2)3 units is deduced from XPS data, but with a concentration not exceeding ~3–5% of total atomic sites. Therefore, QT units do not appear as primary building blocks of the glass backbone in these materials, and an optimally-constrained network may not be an appropriate description for glasses when x < 40. Finally, it is shown that, in contrast to Se-based glasses, the ‘chain-crossing’ model is only partially applicable to sulfide glasses.

  4. The SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline. III. Comparison with High-Resolution Spectroscopy of SDSS/SEGUE Field Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Allende Prieto, C.; Sivarani, T.; Beers, T.C.; Lee, Y.S.; Koesterke, L.; Shetrone, M.; Sneden, C.; Lambert, D.L.; Wilhelm, R.; Rockosi, C.M.; Lai, D.

    2007-10-01

    The authors report high-resolution spectroscopy of 125 field stars previously observed as part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and its program for Galactic studies, the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE). These spectra are used to measure radial velocities and to derive atmospheric parameters, which they compare with those reported by the SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline (SSPP). The SSPP obtains estimates of these quantities based on SDSS ugriz photometry and low-resolution (R {approx} 2000) spectroscopy. For F- and G-type stars observed with high signal-to-noise ratios (S/N), they empirically determine the typical random uncertainties in the radial velocities, effective temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities delivered by the SSPP to be 2.4 km s{sup -1}, 130 K (2.2%), 0.21 dex, and 0.11 dex, respectively, with systematic uncertainties of a similar magnitude in the effective temperatures and metallicities. They estimate random errors for lower S/N spectra based on numerical simulations.

  5. Extended-range grazing-incidence spectrometer for high-resolution extreme ultraviolet measurements on an electron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Brown, G. V.; Träbert, E.; Widmann, K.; Hell, N.

    2014-11-15

    A high-resolution grazing-incidence grating spectrometer has been implemented on the Livermore electron beam ion traps for performing very high-resolution measurements in the soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet region spanning from below 10 Å to above 300 Å. The instrument operates without an entrance slit and focuses the light emitted by highly charged ions located in the roughly 50 μm wide electron beam onto a cryogenically cooled back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector. The measured line widths are below 0.025 Å above 100 Å, and the resolving power appears to be limited by the source size and Doppler broadening of the trapped ions. Comparisons with spectra obtained with existing grating spectrometers show an order of magnitude improvement in spectral resolution.

  6. HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPY OF EXTREMELY METAL-POOR STARS FROM SDSS/SEGUE. I. ATMOSPHERIC PARAMETERS AND CHEMICAL COMPOSITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Wako; Suda, Takuma; Beers, Timothy C.; Lee, Young Sun; Honda, Satoshi; Ito, Hiroko; Takada-Hidai, Masahide; Frebel, Anna; Fujimoto, Masayuki Y.; Carollo, Daniela; Sivarani, Thirupathi E-mail: takuma.suda@nao.ac.jp E-mail: lee@pa.msu.edu E-mail: hidai@apus.rh.u-tokai.ac.jp E-mail: fujimoto@astro1.sci.hokudai.ac.jp E-mail: sivarani@iiap.res.in

    2013-01-01

    Chemical compositions are determined based on high-resolution spectroscopy for 137 candidate extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and its first stellar extension, the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE). High-resolution spectra with moderate signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios were obtained with the High Dispersion Spectrograph of the Subaru Telescope. Most of the sample (approximately 80%) are main-sequence turnoff stars, including dwarfs and subgiants. Four cool main-sequence stars, the most metal-deficient such stars known, are included in the remaining sample. Good agreement is found between effective temperatures estimated by the SEGUE stellar parameter pipeline, based on the SDSS/SEGUE medium-resolution spectra, and those estimated from the broadband (V - K){sub 0} and (g - r){sub 0} colors. Our abundance measurements reveal that 70 stars in our sample have [Fe/H] < -3, adding a significant number of EMP stars to the currently known sample. Our analyses determine the abundances of eight elements (C, Na, Mg, Ca, Ti, Cr, Sr, and Ba) in addition to Fe. The fraction of carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars ([C/Fe] > +0.7) among the 25 giants in our sample is as high as 36%, while only a lower limit on the fraction (9%) is estimated for turnoff stars. This paper is the first of a series of papers based on these observational results. The following papers in this series will discuss the higher-resolution and higher-S/N observations of a subset of this sample, the metallicity distribution function, binarity, and correlations between the chemical composition and kinematics of extremely metal-poor stars.

  7. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Metal-rich Giants in ω Centauri: First Indication of Type Ia Supernova Enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancino, E.; Pasquini, L.; Hill, V.; Ferraro, F. R.; Bellazzini, M.

    2002-04-01

    We have obtained high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra for six red giants in ω Centauri: three belong to the recently discovered metal-rich red giant branch (RGB-a as defined by Pancino et al.) and three to the metal-intermediate population (RGB-MInt). Accurate iron, copper, and α-element (Ca and Si) abundances have been derived and discussed. In particular, we have obtained the first direct abundance determination based on high-resolution spectroscopy for the RGB-a population, <[Fe/H]>=-0.60+/-0.15. Although this value is lower than previous estimates based on calcium triplet measurements, we confirm that this population is the most metal-rich in ω Cen. In addition, we have found a significant difference in the α-element enhancement of the two populations. The three RGB-MInt stars have the expected overabundance, typical of halo and globular cluster stars: <[α/Fe]>=0.29+/-0.01. The three RGB-a stars show, instead, a significantly lower α-enhancement: <[α/Fe]>=0.10+/-0.04. We have also detected an increasing trend of [Cu/Fe] with metallicity, similar to the one observed for field stars by Sneden et al. The observational facts presented in this Letter, if confirmed by larger samples of giants, are the first indication that supernovae Type Ia ejecta have contaminated the medium from which the metal-rich RGB-a stars have formed. The implications for current scenarios on the formation and evolution of ω Cen are briefly discussed. Based on Ultraviolet-Visual Echelle Spectrograph observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile, within the observing program 165.L-0263. Also based on Wide-Field Imager observations collected at La Silla, Chile, within the observing programs 62.L-0354 and 64.L-0439.

  8. Globular Cluster Abundances from High-resolution, Integrated-light Spectroscopy. III. The Large Magellanic Cloud: Fe and Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A.; Cameron, Scott A.; McWilliam, Andrew

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we refine our method for the abundance analysis of high-resolution spectroscopy of the integrated light of unresolved globular clusters (GCs). This method was previously demonstrated for the analysis of old (>10 Gyr) Milky Way (MW) GCs. Here, we extend the technique to young clusters using a training set of nine GCs in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Depending on the signal-to-noise ratio of the data, we use 20-100 Fe lines per cluster to successfully constrain the ages of old clusters to within a ~5 Gyr range, the ages of ~2 Gyr clusters to a 1-2 Gyr range, and the ages of the youngest clusters (0.05-1 Gyr) to a ~200 Myr range. We also demonstrate that we can measure [Fe/H] in clusters with any age less than 12 Gyr with similar or only slightly larger uncertainties (0.1-0.25 dex) than those obtained for old MW GCs (0.1 dex) the slightly larger uncertainties are due to the rapid evolution in stellar populations at these ages. In this paper, we present only Fe abundances and ages. In the next paper in this series, we present our complete analysis of ~20 elements for which we are able to measure abundances. For several of the clusters in this sample, there are no high-resolution abundances in the literature from individual member stars; our results are the first detailed chemical abundances available. The spectra used in this paper were obtained at Las Campanas with the echelle on the du Pont Telescope and with the MIKE spectrograph on the Magellan Clay Telescope. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  9. GLOBULAR CLUSTER ABUNDANCES FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION, INTEGRATED-LIGHT SPECTROSCOPY. III. THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD: Fe AND AGES

    SciTech Connect

    Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A.; McWilliam, Andrew E-mail: rab@ucolick.org E-mail: andy@ociw.edu

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we refine our method for the abundance analysis of high-resolution spectroscopy of the integrated light of unresolved globular clusters (GCs). This method was previously demonstrated for the analysis of old (>10 Gyr) Milky Way (MW) GCs. Here, we extend the technique to young clusters using a training set of nine GCs in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Depending on the signal-to-noise ratio of the data, we use 20-100 Fe lines per cluster to successfully constrain the ages of old clusters to within a {approx}5 Gyr range, the ages of {approx}2 Gyr clusters to a 1-2 Gyr range, and the ages of the youngest clusters (0.05-1 Gyr) to a {approx}200 Myr range. We also demonstrate that we can measure [Fe/H] in clusters with any age less than 12 Gyr with similar or only slightly larger uncertainties (0.1-0.25 dex) than those obtained for old MW GCs (0.1 dex); the slightly larger uncertainties are due to the rapid evolution in stellar populations at these ages. In this paper, we present only Fe abundances and ages. In the next paper in this series, we present our complete analysis of {approx}20 elements for which we are able to measure abundances. For several of the clusters in this sample, there are no high-resolution abundances in the literature from individual member stars; our results are the first detailed chemical abundances available. The spectra used in this paper were obtained at Las Campanas with the echelle on the du Pont Telescope and with the MIKE spectrograph on the Magellan Clay Telescope.

  10. New frontiers of high-resolution spectroscopy: Probing the atmospheres of brown dwarfs and reflected light from exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkby, Jayne; Alonso, Roi; Brogi, Matteo; Charbonneau, David; Fortney, Jonathan; Hoyer, Sergio; Johnson, John Asher; de Kok, Remco; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Montet, Ben; Snellen, Ignas

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution spectroscopy (R>25,000) is a robust and powerful tool in the near-infrared characterization of exoplanet atmospheres. It has unambiguously revealed the presence of carbon monoxide and water in several hot Jupiters, measured the rotation rate of beta Pic b, and suggested the presence of fast day-to-night winds in one atmosphere. The method is applicable to transiting, non-transiting, and directly-imaged planets. It works by resolving broad molecular bands in the planetary spectrum into a dense, unique forest of individual lines and tracing them directly by their Doppler shift, while the star and tellurics remain essentially stationary. I will focus on two ongoing efforts to expand this technique. First, I will present new results on 51 Peg b revealing its infrared atmospheric compositional properties, then I will discuss an ongoing optical HARPS-N/TNG campaign (due mid October 2015) to obtain a detailed albedo spectrum of 51 Peg b at 387-691 nm in bins of 50nm. This spectrum would provide strong constraints on the previously claimed high albedo and potentially cloudy nature of this planet. Second, I will discuss preliminary results from Keck/NIRSPAO observations (due late September 2015) of LHS 6343 C, a 1000 K transiting brown dwarf with an M-dwarf host star. The high-resolution method converts this system into an eclipsing, double-lined spectroscopic binary, thus allowing dynamical mass and radius estimates of the components, free from astrophysical assumptions. Alongside probing the atmospheric composition of the brown dwarf, these data would provide the first model-independent study of the bulk properties of an old brown dwarf, with masses accurate to <5%, placing a crucial constraint on brown dwarf evolution models.

  11. 15N/14N Ratio Determination in the ISM with Herschel with High Resolution Spectroscopy of Nitrogen Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulès, L.; Bailleux, S.; Wlodarczak, G.; Pirali, O.; Martin-Drumel, M.-A.; Roy, P.; Roueff, E.; Gerin, M.

    2011-06-01

    The very high resolution of the HIFI instrument (134 kHz-1MHz) on board of Herschel needs very accurate laboratory measurements to detect unambiguously the signature of stable and unstable molecular species. Concerning the pure rotation spectra of new species, and particularly of open shell molecules, the first prediction could be far away and up to few hundred MHz. The 15N/14N ratio is not well measured in the ISM. However, the 15N/14N in the isotopomers is a potential tracer of the formation processes and the possible link with cometary molecules. Recent measurements include the detection of 15NH_2D N15NH+ and 15NH_3. The NH and NH_2 species are the simplest nitrogen radicals and are intermediate products in the NH_3 synthesis. They have been easily detected by Herschel and it therefore is interesting to now search for 15NH and 15NH_2. No spectrocopic data have been reported for these two radicals up to now. We present here the studies with high resolution spectroscopy in the THz range. The high sensitivity and the wide range of Synchrotron (0.6-6 THz) was essential to improve the prediction of the spectra of these two species in order to measure them in Lille (0.6-1 THz) with both a higher accuracy and resolution. The combined studies now give the most accurate predictions. ISM searches on these radicals are in progress in the HERSCHEL spectra. This work is supported by the Programme National de Physico-Chimie du Milieu Interstellaire (PCMI-CNRS) M. Gerin, N. Marcellino, N. Biver, et al., Astron. & Astrophys. 498 (2009) 9. L. Bizzochi, P. Caselli, and L. Dore, Astron. & Astrophys. 510 (2010) L5. D. C. Lis, A. Wooten, M. Gerin and E. Roueff, Astrophys. J. 710 (2010) L49.

  12. Virtually distortion-free imaging system for large field, high resolution lithography using electrons, ions or other particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Hawryluk, A.M.; Ceglio, N.M.

    1993-01-12

    Virtually distortion free large field high resolution imaging is performed using an imaging system which contains large field distortion or field curvature. A reticle is imaged in one direction through the optical system to form an encoded mask. The encoded mask is then imaged back through the imaging system onto a wafer positioned at the reticle position. Particle beams, including electrons, ions and neutral particles, may be used as well as electromagnetic radiation.

  13. Virtually distortion-free imaging system for large field, high resolution lithography using electrons, ions or other particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Hawryluk, Andrew M.; Ceglio, Natale M.

    1993-01-01

    Virtually distortion free large field high resolution imaging is performed using an imaging system which contains large field distortion or field curvature. A reticle is imaged in one direction through the optical system to form an encoded mask. The encoded mask is then imaged back through the imaging system onto a wafer positioned at the reticle position. Particle beams, including electrons, ions and neutral particles, may be used as well as electromagnetic radiation.

  14. Virtually distortion-free imaging system for large field, high resolution lithography using electrons, ions or other particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, A.M.; Ceglio, N.M.

    1991-04-10

    Virtually distortion free large field high resolution imaging is performed using an imaging system which contains large field distortion or field curvature. A reticle is imaged in one direction through the optical system to form an encoded mask. The encoded mask is then imaged back through the imaging system onto a wafer positioned at the reticle position. Particle beams, including electrons, ions and neutral particles, may be used as well as electromagnetic radiation.

  15. Properties of the Open Cluster Tombaugh 1 from High-resolution Spectroscopy and uvbyCaHβ Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sales Silva, João V.; Carraro, Giovanni; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J.; Moni Bidin, Christian; Costa, Edgardo; Twarog, Bruce A.

    2016-01-01

    Open clusters can be the key to deepening our knowledge on various issues involving the structure and evolution of the Galactic disk and details of stellar evolution because a cluster's properties are applicable to all its members. However, the number of open clusters with detailed analysis from high-resolution spectroscopy or precision photometry imposes severe limitations on studies of these objects. To expand the number of open clusters with well-defined chemical abundances and fundamental parameters, we investigate the poorly studied, anticenter open cluster Tombaugh 1. Using precision uvbyCaHβ photometry and high-resolution spectroscopy, we derive the cluster's reddening, obtain photometric metallicity estimates, and, for the first time, present a detailed abundance analysis of 10 potential cluster stars (nine clump stars and one Cepheid). Using the radial position from the cluster center and multiple color indices, we have isolated a sample of unevolved, probable single-star members of Tombaugh 1. From 51 stars, the cluster reddening is found to be E(b-y) = 0.221 ± 0.006 or E(B-V) = 0.303 ± 0.008, where the errors refer to the internal standard errors of the mean. The weighted photometric metallicity from m1 and hk is [Fe/H] = -0.10 ± 0.02, while a match to the Victoria-Regina Strömgren isochrones leads to an age of 0.95 ± 0.10 Gyr and an apparent modulus of (m-M) = 13.10 ± 0.10. Radial velocities identify six giants as probable cluster members, and the elemental abundances of Fe, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Ni, Y, Ba, Ce, and Nd have been derived for both the cluster and the field stars. Tombaugh 1 appears to be a typical inner thin disk, intermediate-age open cluster of slightly subsolar metallicity, located just beyond the solar circle, with solar elemental abundance ratios except for the heavy s-process elements, which are a factor of two above solar. Its metallicity is consistent with a steep metallicity gradient in the galactocentric region

  16. Contrast transfer and resolution limits for sub-angstrom high-resolution transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lentzen, Markus

    2008-02-01

    The optimum imaging of an object structure at the sub-angstrom length scale requires precise adjustment of the lens aberrations of a high-resolution instrument up to the fifth order. A least-squares optimization of defocus aberration C1, third-order spherical aberration C3, and fifth-order spherical aberration C5 yields two sets of aberration coefficients for strong phase contrast up to the information limit: one for variable C1 and C3, at fixed C5, another for variable C1, C3, and C5. An additional correction to the defocus aberration, dependent on object thickness, is described, which becomes important for the use of image simulation programs in predicting optimum high-resolution contrast from thin objects at the sub-angstrom scale. For instruments with a sub-angstrom information limit the ultimate structure resolution, the power to resolve adjacent atom columns in a crystalline object, depends on both the instrumental pointspread and an object pointspread due to finite width of the atomic column potentials. A simulation study on a simple double-column model yields a range for structure resolutions, dependent on the atomic scattering power, from 0.070 nm down to 0.059 nm, for a hypothetical 300-kV instrument with an information limit of 0.050 nm. PMID:18096097

  17. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khanna, S. K.; Lambe, J.

    1983-01-01

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy is a useful technique for the study of vibrational modes of molecules adsorbed on the surface of oxide layers in a metal-insulator-metal tunnel junction. The technique involves studying the effects of adsorbed molecules on the tunneling spectrum of such junctions. The data give useful information about the structure, bonding, and orientation of adsorbed molecules. One of the major advantages of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy is its sensitivity. It is capable of detecting on the order of 10 to the 10th molecules (a fraction of a monolayer) on a 1 sq mm junction. It has been successfully used in studies of catalysis, biology, trace impurity detection, and electronic excitations. Because of its high sensitivity, this technique shows great promise in the area of solid-state electronic chemical sensing.

  18. Sample preparation of biological macromolecular assemblies for the determination of high-resolution structures by cryo-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Stark, Holger; Chari, Ashwin

    2016-02-01

    Single particle cryo-EM has recently developed into a powerful tool to determine the 3D structure of macromolecular complexes at near-atomic resolution, which allows structural biologists to build atomic models of proteins. All technical aspects of cryo-EM technology have been considerably improved over the last two decades, including electron microscopic hardware, image processing software and the ever growing speed of computers. This leads to a more widespread use of the technique, and it can be anticipated that further automation of electron microscopes and image processing tools will soon fully shift the focus away from the technological aspects, onto biological questions that can be answered. In single particle cryo-EM, no crystals of a macromolecule are required. In contrast to X-ray crystallography, this significantly facilitates structure determination by cryo-EM. Nevertheless, a relatively high level of biochemical control is still essential to obtain high-resolution structures by cryo-EM, and it can be anticipated that the success of the cryo-EM technology goes hand in hand with further developments of sample purification and preparation techniques. This will allow routine high-resolution structure determination of the many macromolecular complexes of the cell that until now represent evasive targets for X-ray crystallographers. Here we discuss the various biochemical tools that are currently available and the existing sample purification and preparation techniques for cryo-EM grid preparation that are needed to obtain high-resolution images for structure determination. PMID:26671943

  19. Comparative analysis of dioxins and furans in ambient air by high-resolution and electron-capture mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Koester, C.J.; Harless, R.L.; Hites, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    Known mixtures and unknown atmospheric sample extracts containing polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/F) were analyzed by both electron impact, high resolution, mass spectrometry (HRMS) and by electron capture, negative ion, low resolution mass spectrometry (ECNI). PCDD/F concentrations measured by the two methods were comparable, typically agreeing with + or - 33%. The major difference between the two techniques is that HRMS easily detects 2,3,7,8- tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin but ECNI does not. Results suggest that ECNI can be a sensitive low cost alternative to HRMS for the determination of PCDD/F concentrations.

  20. High-resolution line-shape spectroscopy during a laser pulse based on Dual-Broad-Band-CARS interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Vereschagin, Konstantin A; Vereschagin, Alexey K; Smirnov, Valery V; Stelmakh, O M; Fabelinskii, V I; Clauss, W; Klimenko, D N; Oschwald, M E-mail: Al_Vereshchagin@mail.r E-mail: stelmakh@kapella.gpi.r

    2006-07-31

    A high-resolution spectroscopic method is developed for recording Raman spectra of molecular transitions in transient objects during a laser pulse with a resolution of {approx}0.1 cm{sup -1}. The method is based on CARS spectroscopy using a Fabry-Perot interferometer for spectral analysis of the CARS signal and detecting a circular interferometric pattern on a two-dimensional multichannel photodetector. It is shown that the use of the Dual-Broad-Band-CARS configuration to obtain the CARS process provides the efficient averaging of the spectral-amplitude noise of the CARS signal generated by a laser pulse and, in combination with the angular integration of the two-dimensional interference pattern, considerably improves the quality of interferograms. The method was tested upon diagnostics of the transient oxygen-hydrogen flame where information on the shapes of spectral lines of the Q-branch of hydrogen molecules required for measuring temperature was simultaneously obtained and used. (special issue devoted to the 90th anniversary of a.m. prokhorov)

  1. Evaluation of Cancer Metabolomics Using ex vivo High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning (HRMAS) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS)

    PubMed Central

    Fuss, Taylor L.; Cheng, Leo L.

    2016-01-01

    According to World Health Organization (WHO) estimates, cancer is responsible for more deaths than all coronary heart disease or stroke worldwide, serving as a major public health threat around the world. High resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has demonstrated its usefulness in the identification of cancer metabolic markers with the potential to improve diagnosis and prognosis for the oncology clinic, due partially to its ability to preserve tissue architecture for subsequent histological and molecular pathology analysis. Capable of the quantification of individual metabolites, ratios of metabolites, and entire metabolomic profiles, HRMAS MRS is one of the major techniques now used in cancer metabolomic research. This article reviews and discusses literature reports of HRMAS MRS studies of cancer metabolomics published between 2010 and 2015 according to anatomical origins, including brain, breast, prostate, lung, gastrointestinal, and neuroendocrine cancers. These studies focused on improving diagnosis and understanding patient prognostication, monitoring treatment effects, as well as correlating with the use of in vivo MRS in cancer clinics. PMID:27011205

  2. Vibrational spectral signatures of crystalline cellulose using high resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Libing; Lu, Zhou; Velarde, Luis; Fu, Li; Pu, Yunqiao; Ding, Shi-You; Ragauskas, Arthur; Wang, Hong-Fei; Yang, Bin

    2015-03-03

    Both the C–H and O–H region spectra of crystalline cellulose were studied using the sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS) for the first time. The resolution of HR-BB-SFG-VS is about 10-times better than conventional scanning SFG-VS and has the capability of measuring the intrinsic spectral lineshape and revealing many more spectral details. With HR-BB-SFG-VS, we found that in cellulose samples from different sources, including Avicel and cellulose crystals isolated from algae Valonia (Iα) and tunicates (Iβ), the spectral signatures in the O–H region were unique for the two allomorphs, i.e. Iα and Iβ, while the spectral signatures in the C–H regions varied in all samples examined. Even though the origin of the different spectral signatures of the crystalline cellulose in the O–H and C–H vibrational frequency regions are yet to be correlated to the structure of cellulose, these results lead to new spectroscopic methods and opportunities to classify and to understand the basic crystalline structures, as well as variations in polymorphism of the crystalline cellulose.

  3. Vibrational spectral signatures of crystalline cellulose using high resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Libing; Lu, Zhou; Velarde, Luis; Fu, Li; Pu, Yunqiao; Ding, Shi-You; Ragauskas, Arthur; Wang, Hong-Fei; Yang, Bin

    2015-03-03

    Both the C–H and O–H region spectra of crystalline cellulose were studied using the sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS) for the first time. The resolution of HR-BB-SFG-VS is about 10-times better than conventional scanning SFG-VS and has the capability of measuring the intrinsic spectral lineshape and revealing many more spectral details. With HR-BB-SFG-VS, we found that in cellulose samples from different sources, including Avicel and cellulose crystals isolated from algae Valonia (Iα) and tunicates (Iβ), the spectral signatures in the O–H region were unique for the two allomorphs, i.e. Iα and Iβ, while the spectral signaturesmore » in the C–H regions varied in all samples examined. Even though the origin of the different spectral signatures of the crystalline cellulose in the O–H and C–H vibrational frequency regions are yet to be correlated to the structure of cellulose, these results lead to new spectroscopic methods and opportunities to classify and to understand the basic crystalline structures, as well as variations in polymorphism of the crystalline cellulose.« less

  4. HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPY OF EXTREMELY METAL-POOR STARS IN THE LEAST EVOLVED GALAXIES: LEO IV

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Joshua D.; McWilliam, Andrew; Thompson, Ian B.; Frebel, Anna; Kirby, Evan N. E-mail: andy@ociw.ed E-mail: afrebel@cfa.harvard.ed

    2010-06-10

    We present high-resolution Magellan/MIKE spectroscopy of the brightest star in the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Leo IV. We measure an iron abundance of [Fe/H] = -3.2, adding to the rapidly growing sample of extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars being identified in Milky Way satellite galaxies. The star is enhanced in the {alpha} elements Mg, Ca, and Ti by {approx}0.3 dex, very similar to the typical Milky Way halo abundance pattern. All of the light and iron-peak elements follow the trends established by EMP halo stars, but the neutron-capture elements Ba and Sr are significantly underabundant. These results are quite similar to those found for stars in the ultra-faint dwarfs Ursa Major II, Coma Berenices, Booetes I, and Hercules, suggesting that the chemical evolution of the lowest-luminosity galaxies may be universal. The abundance pattern we observe is consistent with predictions for nucleosynthesis from a Population III supernova explosion. The extremely low metallicity of this star also supports the idea that a significant fraction ({approx}>10%) of the stars in the faintest dwarfs have metallicities below [Fe/H] = -3.0.

  5. Formation, characterization, and stability of methaneselenolate monolayers on Au(111): an electrochemical high-resolution photoemission spectroscopy and DFT study.

    PubMed

    Cometto, F P; Calderón, C A; Morán, M; Ruano, G; Ascolani, H; Zampieri, G; Paredes-Olivera, P; Patrito, E M

    2014-04-01

    We investigated the mechanism of formation and stability of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of methaneselenolate on Au(111) prepared by the immersion method in ethanolic solutions of dimethyl diselenide (DMDSe). The adsorbed species were characterized by electrochemical measurements and high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy (HR-XPS). The importance of the headgroup on formation mechanism and the stability of the SAMs was addressed by comparatively studying methaneselenolate (MSe) and methanethiolate (MT) monolayers. Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations were performed to identify the elementary reaction steps in the mechanisms of formation and decomposition of the monolayers. Reductive desorption and HR-XPS measurements indicated that a MSe monolayer is formed at short immersion times by the cleavage of the Se-Se bond of DMDSe. However, the monolayer decomposes at long immersion times at room temperature, as evidenced by the appearance of atomic Se on the surface. The decomposition is more pronounced for MSe than for MT monolayers. The MSe monolayer stability can be greatly improved by two modifications in the preparation method: immersion at low temperatures (-20 °C) and the addition of a reducing agent to the forming solution. PMID:24645647

  6. Baseline restoration and pile-up correction based on bipolar cusp-like shaping for high-resolution radiation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafaee, Mahdi; Moussavi-Zarandi, Ali

    2016-04-01

    The baseline may shift in many radiation measurement systems. The shift is time variant and depends on the events. Also, with high count rates, pulses may overlap in random time intervals. These phenomena can affect the peak values of the pulses. Piled-up events are traditionally rejected, but this reduces the detection efficiency considerably. In other approaches, the corrupted events are reconstructed, and information about the single pulses is extracted. The peaks carry much of the basic information, so many shaping methods have been proposed so far. For pile-up mitigation, a narrow unipolar shaping is enough, but a baseline shift is eliminated by using bipolar shaping. However, the latter decreases the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), which is critical for high-resolution spectroscopy. In this paper, we propose bipolar cusp-like shaping as a tradeoff between mitigating the baseline shift and pulse pile-up. A novel recursive algorithm, implementable on digital pulse processors (DPPs), is introduced and is then evaluated. Finally, the superior noise-reduction capability is studied by using Monte Carlo simulations, a real piled-up pulse stream shaped by using the algorithm, and the results show its advantages.

  7. Vibrational Spectral Signatures of Crystalline Cellulose Using High Resolution Broadband Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Libing; Lu, Zhou; Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Fu, Li; Pu, Yunqiao; Ding, Shi-You; Ragauskas, Art J.; Wang, Hongfei; Yang, Bin

    2015-03-03

    Here we reported the first sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS) study on both the C-H and O-H region spectra of crystalline cellulose. HR-BB-SFG-VS has about 10 times better resolution than the conventional scanning SFG-VS and is known to be able to measure the intrinsic spectral lineshape and to resolve much more spectral details. With HR-BB-SFG-VS, we found that in cellulose from different sources, including Avicel and cellulose crystals isolated from algae Valonia (Iα) and tunicates (Iβ), the spectral signatures in the OH regions were unique for different allomorphs, i.e. Iα and Iβ, while the spectral signatures in the C-H regions varied in all samples examined. Even though the origin of the different behaviors of the crystalline cellulose in the O-H and C-H vibrational frequency regions is yet to be correlated to the structure of cellulose, these results provided new spectroscopic methods and opportunities to classify and understand the basic crystalline structure, as well as variations, in polymorphism of the crystalline cellulose structure.

  8. High resolution infrared spectroscopy from space: A preliminary report on the results of the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) experiment on Spacelab 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Crofton B.; Raper, Odell F.

    1987-01-01

    The ATMOS (Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy) experiment has the broad purpose of investigating the physical structure, chemistry, and dynamics of the upper atmosphere through the study of the distributions of the neutral minor and trace constituents and their seasonal and long-term variations. The technique used is high-resolution infrared absorption spectroscopy using the Sun as the radiation source, observing the changes in the transmission of the atmosphere as the line-of-sight from the Sun to the spacecraft penetrates the atmosphere close to the Earth's limb at sunrise and sunset. During these periods, interferograms are generated at the rate of one each second which yield, when transformed, high resolution spectra covering the 2.2 to 16 micron region of the infrared. Twenty such occultations were recorded during the Spacelab 3 flight, which have produced concentration profiles for a large number of minor and trace upper atmospheric species in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. Several of these species have not previously been observed in spectroscopic data. The data reduction and analysis procedures used following the flight are discussed; a number of examples of the spectra obtained are shown, and a bar graph of the species detected thus far in the analysis is given which shows the altitude ranges for which concentration profiles were retrieved.

  9. Strain measurement at the nanoscale: Comparison between convergent beam electron diffraction, nano-beam electron diffraction, high resolution imaging and dark field electron holography.

    PubMed

    Béché, A; Rouvière, J L; Barnes, J P; Cooper, D

    2013-08-01

    Convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED), nano-beam electron diffraction (NBED or NBD), high resolution imaging (HRTEM and HRSTEM) and dark field electron holography (DFEH or HoloDark) are five TEM based techniques able to quantitatively measure strain at the nanometer scale. In order to demonstrate the advantages and disadvantages of each technique, two samples composed of epitaxial silicon-germanium layers embedded in a silicon matrix have been investigated. The five techniques are then compared in terms of strain precision and accuracy, spatial resolution, field of view, mapping abilities and ease of performance and analysis. PMID:23673283

  10. Live-cell high resolution magic angle spinning magnetic resonance spectroscopy for in vivo analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Righi, Valeria; Constantinou, Caterina; Kesarwani, Meenu; Rahme, Laurence G; Tzika, Aria A

    2013-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is a pathogenic gram-negative bacterium that is widespread in nature, inhabiting soil, water, plants and animals. PA is a prevalent cause of deleterious human infections, particularly in patients whose host defense mechanisms have been compromised. Metabolomics is an important tool used to study host-pathogen interactions and to identify novel therapeutic targets and corresponding compounds. The aim of the present study was to report the metabolic profile of live PA bacteria using in vivo high-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), in combination with 1- and 2-dimensional HRMAS NMR. This methodology provides a new and powerful technique to rapidly interrogate the metabolome of intact bacterial cells and has several advantages over traditional techniques that identify metabolome components from disrupted cells. Furthermore, application of multidimensional HRMAS NMR, in combination with the novel technique total through-Bond correlation Spectroscopy (TOBSY), is a promising approach that may be used to obtain in vivo metabolomics information from intact live bacterial cells and can mediate such analyses in a short period of time. Moreover, HRMAS (1)H NMR enables the investigation of the associations between metabolites and cell processes. In the present study, we detected and quantified several informative metabolic molecules in live PA cells, including N-acetyl, betaine, citrulline, alanine and glycine, which are important in peptidoglycan synthesis. The results provided a complete metabolic profile of PA for future studies of PA clinical isolates and mutants. In addition, this in vivo NMR biomedical approach might have clinical utility and should prove useful in gene function validation, the study of pathogenetic mechanisms, the classification of microbial strains into functional/clinical groups, the testing of anti-bacterial agents and the determination of metabolic profiles of bacterial

  11. Characterization of metabolites in infiltrating gliomas using ex vivo ¹H high-resolution magic angle spinning spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Elkhaled, Adam; Jalbert, Llewellyn; Constantin, Alexandra; Yoshihara, Hikari A I; Phillips, Joanna J; Molinaro, Annette M; Chang, Susan M; Nelson, Sarah J

    2014-05-01

    Gliomas are routinely graded according to histopathological criteria established by the World Health Organization. Although this classification can be used to understand some of the variance in the clinical outcome of patients, there is still substantial heterogeneity within and between lesions of the same grade. This study evaluated image-guided tissue samples acquired from a large cohort of patients presenting with either new or recurrent gliomas of grades II-IV using ex vivo proton high-resolution magic angle spinning spectroscopy. The quantification of metabolite levels revealed several discrete profiles associated with primary glioma subtypes, as well as secondary subtypes that had undergone transformation to a higher grade at the time of recurrence. Statistical modeling further demonstrated that these metabolomic profiles could be differentially classified with respect to pathological grading and inter-grade conversions. Importantly, the myo-inositol to total choline index allowed for a separation of recurrent low-grade gliomas on different pathological trajectories, the heightened ratio of phosphocholine to glycerophosphocholine uniformly characterized several forms of glioblastoma multiforme, and the onco-metabolite D-2-hydroxyglutarate was shown to help distinguish secondary from primary grade IV glioma, as well as grade II and III from grade IV glioma. These data provide evidence that metabolite levels are of interest in the assessment of both intra-grade and intra-lesional malignancy. Such information could be used to enhance the diagnostic specificity of in vivo spectroscopy and to aid in the selection of the most appropriate therapy for individual patients. PMID:24596146

  12. AEGIS: An Astrophysics Experiment for Grating and Imaging Spectroscopy---a Soft X-ray, High-resolution Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huenemoerder, David; Bautz, M. W.; Davis, J. E.; Heilmann, R. K.; Houck, J. C.; Marshall, H. L.; Neilsen, J.; Nicastro, F.; Nowak, M. A.; Schattenburg, M. L.; Schulz, N. S.; Smith, R. K.; Wolk, S.; AEGIS Team

    2012-01-01

    AEGIS is a concept for a high-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopic observatory developed in response to NASA's request for definitions of the next X-ray astronomy mission. At a small fraction of the cost of the once-planned International X-ray Observatory (IXO), AEGIS has capabilities that surpass IXO grating spectrometer requirements, and which are far superior to those of existing soft X-ray spectrometers. AEGIS incorporates innovative technology in X-ray optics, diffraction gratings and detectors. The mirror uses high area-to-mass ratio segmented glass architecture developed for IXO, but with smaller aperture and larger graze angles optimized for high-throughput grating spectroscopy with low mass and cost. The unique Critical Angle Transmission gratings combine low mass and relaxed figure and alignment tolerances of Chandra transmission gratings but with high diffraction efficiency and resolving power of blazed reflection gratings. With more than an order of magnitude better performance over Chandra and XMM grating spectrometers, AEGIS can obtain high quality spectra of bright AGN in a few hours rather than 10 days. Such high resolving power allows detailed kinematic studies of galactic outflows, hot gas in galactic haloes, and stellar accretion flows. Absorption line spectroscopy will be used to study large scale structure, cosmic feedback, and growth of black holes in thousands of sources to great distances. AEGIS will enable powerful multi-wavelength investigations, for example with Hubble/COS in the UV to characterize the intergalactic medium. AEGIS will be the first observatory with sufficient resolution below 1 keV to resolve thermally-broadened lines in hot ( 10 MK) plasmas. Here we describe key science investigations enable by Aegis, its scientific payload and mission plan. Acknowledgements: Support was provided in part by: NASA SAO contract SV3-73016 to MIT for the Chandra X-ray Center and Science Instruments; NASA grant NNX08AI62G; and the MKI

  13. R-matrix calculations of triplet gerade states of molecular hydrogen and their use for high-resolution spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oueslati, H.; Argoubi, F.; Bezzaouia, S.; Telmini, M.; Jungen, Ch.

    2014-03-01

    A variational R-matrix approach combined with multichannel quantum defect theory is used for a computational study of triplet gerade states of H2. Electron-ion reaction (quantum defect) matrices are calculated as functions of internuclear distance and energy for the bound and continuum ranges including singly and doubly excited configurations built on the 1σg (X+2Σg+) and 1σu (A+2Σu+) core states of the H2+ ion. It is shown how these matrices can be reduced to effective quantum defect functions adapted to the analysis of high-resolution spectra in the bound range. These R-matrix effective quantum defects are finally adjusted to the available experimental data [Sprecher et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 117, 9462 (2013), 10.1021/jp311793t], producing agreement with experiment to within 0.5 cm-1, nearly as good as obtained by Sprecher et al. In addition, the R-matrix calculations predict the evolution of the quantum defects for higher energies, in a range extending far into the electronic continuum.

  14. HIGH-RESOLUTION OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY OF DY Cen: DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR BANDS IN A PROTO-FULLERENE CIRCUMSTELLAR ENVIRONMENT?

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Hernandez, D. A.; Lambert, David L. E-mail: nkrao@iiap.res.in

    2012-11-01

    We search high-resolution and high-quality VLT/UVES optical spectra of the hot R Coronae Borealis star DY Cen for electronic transitions of the C{sub 60} molecule and diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). We report the non-detection of the strongest C{sub 60} electronic transitions (e.g., those at {approx}3760, 3980, and 4024 A). The absence of C{sub 60} absorption bands may support recent laboratory results, which show that the {approx}7.0, 8.5, 17.4, and 18.8 {mu}m emission features seen in DY Cen-and other similar objects with polycyclic-aromatic-hydrocarbon-like dominated IR spectra-are attributable to proto-fullerenes or fullerene precursors rather than to C{sub 60}. DIBs toward DY Cen are normal for its reddening; the only exception is the DIB at 6284 A (possibly also the 7223 A DIB) which is found to be unusually strong. We also report the detection of a new broad (FWHM {approx} 2 A) and unidentified feature centered at {approx}4000 A. We suggest that this new band may be related to the circumstellar proto-fullerenes seen at infrared wavelengths.

  15. Characterization of an Yb:LuVO 4 single crystal using X-ray topography, high-resolution X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paszkowicz, W.; Romanowski, P.; Bąk-Misiuk, J.; Wierzchowski, W.; Wieteska, K.; Graeff, W.; Iwanowski, R. J.; Heinonen, M. H.; Ermakova, O.; Dąbkowska, H.

    2011-10-01

    Knowledge on the defect and electronic structure allows for improved modeling of material properties. A short literature review has shown that the information on defect structure of rare earth orthovanadate single crystals is limited. In this paper, defect and electronic structure of a needle-shaped Yb:LuVO 4 single crystal grown by the slow cooling method have been studied by means of X-ray diffraction topography employing white synchrotron beam, high-resolution diffraction (HRD) and photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. Topographic investigations show that the crystal is composed of two blocks disoriented by about 1.5° and separated by a narrow deformed region. Some contrasts observed within the crystal volume may be attributed to glide bands and sector boundaries. The contrasts appearing in the vicinity of the surface may be interpreted as due to the presence of small inclusions. The HRD study indicates, in particular, that among point defects, the vacancy type defects dominate and that the density of other defects is small in comparison. The XPS measurements enabled, despite highly insulating properties of the studied crystal, an analysis of its bulk electronic structure, including the main core-levels (O 1 s, V 2 p, Lu 4 f) as well as the valence band range.

  16. High resolution absorption spectroscopy of the ν1=2-6 acetylenic overtone bands of propyne: Spectroscopy and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campargue, A.; Biennier, L.; Garnache, A.; Kachanov, A.; Romanini, D.; Herman, M.

    1999-11-01

    The rotationally resolved nν1 (n=2-6) overtone transitions of the CH acetylenic stretching of propyne (CH3-C≡C-H) have been recorded by using Fourier transform spectroscopy (n=2), various intracavity laser absorption spectrometers (n=3, 4, and 6) and cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) (n=5). The 2ν1, 3ν1, and 6ν1 bands exhibit a well-resolved and mostly unperturbed J-rotational structure, whose analysis is reported. The 5ν1 band recorded by pulsed CRDS shows an unresolved rotational envelope. In the region of 12 700 cm-1, an anharmonic interaction is confirmed between 4ν1 and 3ν1+ν3+ν5. The band at a higher wave number in this dyad exhibits a partly resolved K-structure, whose analysis is reported. The mixing coefficient of the two interacting states is determined consistently using different procedures. The 1/35 anharmonic resonance evidenced in the 4ν1 manifold induces weaker intensity borrowing from the 2ν1 and 3ν1 levels to the ν1+ν3+ν5 and 2ν1+ν3+ν5 level, respectively, which have been predicted and identified. Several hot bands around the 2ν1, 3ν1, and 3ν1+ν3+ν5 bands arising from the ν9=1 and ν10=1 and 2 bending levels are identified and rotationally analyzed, also leading to determine x1,9 [-20.3(3) cm-1], x1,10 [-1.7975(75) cm-1], and x3,10 [-6.56 cm-1]. The J-clumps of the P and R branches in the 6ν1 band at 18 499 cm-1 show a Lorentzian homogeneous profile mostly J-independent with an average full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 0.17 cm-1, attributed to arising from the intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution towards the bath of vibrational states. A detailed comparative examination of the fine structure in all investigated nν1 (n=2 to 7) overtone bands and the similar behavior of the cold and hot bands arising from ν10=1 definitively suggests that a highly specific low-order anharmonic coupling, still unidentified, dominates the hierarchy of interaction mechanisms connecting the nν1 levels to the background

  17. Precision Spectroscopy in Cold Molecules: the First Rotational Intervals of He_2^+ by High-Resolution Spectroscopy and Rydberg-Series Extrapolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Paul; Semeria, Luca; Scheidegger, Simon; Merkt, Frederic

    2015-06-01

    Having only three electrons, He_2^+ represents a system for which highly accurate ab initio calculations are possible. The latest calculation of rovibrational energies in He_2^+ do not include relativistic or QED corrections but claim an accuracy of about 120 MHz The available experimental data on He_2^+, though accurate to 300 MHz, are not precise enough to rigorously test these calculations or reveal the magnitude of the relativistic and QED corrections. We have performed high-resolution Rydberg spectroscopy of metastable He_2 molecules and employed multichannel-quantum-defect-theory extrapolation techniques to determine the rotational energy-level structure in the He_2^+ ion. To this end we have produced samples of helium molecules in the a ^3σ_u^+ state in supersonic beams with velocities tunable down to 100 m/s by combining a cryogenic supersonic-beam source with a multistage Zeeman decelerator. The metastable He_2 molecules are excited to np Rydberg states using the frequency doubled output of a pulse-amplified ring dye laser. Although the bandwidth of the laser systems is too large to observe the reduction of the Doppler width resulting from deceleration, the deceleration greatly simplifies the spectral assignments because of its spin-rotational state selectivity. Our approach enabled us to determine the rotational structure of He_2^+ with unprecedented accuracy, to determine the size of the relativistic and QED corrections by comparison with the results of Ref.~a and to precisely measure the rotational structure of the metastable state for comparison with the results of Focsa~et al. W.-C. Tung, M. Pavanello, L. Adamowicz, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 104309 (2012). D. Sprecher, J. Liu, T. Krähenmann, M. Schäfer, and F. Merkt, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 064304 (2014). M. Motsch, P. Jansen, J. A. Agner, H. Schmutz, and F. Merkt, Phys. Rev. A 89, 043420 (2014). C. Focsa, P. F. Bernath, and R. Colin, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 191, 209 (1998).

  18. Imaging interactions of metal oxide nanoparticles with macrophage cells by ultra-high resolution scanning electron microscopy techniques†

    PubMed Central

    Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Starr, Clarise R.; Armstrong, Linda S.; Ponce, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Use of engineered metal oxide nanoparticles in a plethora of biological applications and custom products has warned about some possible dose-dependent cytotoxic effects. Macrophages are key components of the innate immune system used to study possible toxic effects and internalization of different nanoparticulate materials. In this work, ultra-high resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) was used to offer new insights into the dynamical processes of interaction of nanomaterials with macrophage cells dosed with different concentrations of metal oxide nanoparticles (CeO2, TiO2 and ZnO). The versatility of FE-SEM has allowed obtaining a detailed characterization of processes of adsorption and endocytosis of nanoparticles, by using advanced analytical and imaging techniques on complete unstained uncoated cells, including secondary electron imaging, high-sensitive backscattered electron imaging, X-ray microanalysis and stereoimaging. Low voltage BF/DF-STEM confirmed nanoparticle adsorption and internalization into endosomes of CeO2 and TiO2, whereas ZnO develop apoptosis after 24 h of interaction caused by dissolution and invasion of cell nucleus. Ultra-high resolution scanning electron microscopy techniques provided new insights into interactions of inorganic nanoparticles with macrophage cells with high spatial resolution. PMID:23023106

  19. 6 x 6-cm fully depleted pn-junction CCD for high-resolution spectroscopy in the 0.1- to 15-keV photon energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Zanthier, Christoph; Holl, Peter; Kemmer, Josef; Lechner, Peter; Maier, B.; Soltau, Heike; Stoetter, R.; Braeuninger, Heinrich W.; Dennerl, Konrad; Haberl, Frank; Hartmann, R.; Hartner, Gisela D.; Hippmann, H.; Kastelic, E.; Kink, W.; Krause, N.; Meidinger, Norbert; Metzner, G.; Pfeffermann, Elmar; Popp, M.; Reppin, Claus; Stoetter, Diana; Strueder, Lothar; Truemper, Joachim; Weber, U.; Carathanassis, D.; Engelhard, S.; Gebhart, Th.; Hauff, D.; Lutz, G.; Richter, R. H.; Seitz, H.; Solc, P.; Bihler, Edgar; Boettcher, H.; Kendziorra, Eckhard; Kraemer, J.; Pflueger, Bernhard; Staubert, Ruediger

    1998-04-01

    The concept and performance of the fully depleted pn- junction CCD system, developed for the European XMM- and the German ABRIXAS-satellite missions for soft x-ray imaging and spectroscopy in the 0.1 keV to 15 keV photon range, is presented. The 58 mm X 60 mm large pn-CCD array uses pn- junctions for registers and for the backside instead of MOS registers. This concept naturally allows to fully deplete the detector volume to make it an efficient detector to photons with energies up to 15 keV. For high detection efficiency in the soft x-ray region down to 100 eV, an ultrathin pn-CCD backside deadlayer has been realized. Each pn-CCD-channel is equipped with an on-chip JFET amplifier which, in combination with the CAMEX-amplifier and multiplexing chip, facilitates parallel readout with a pixel read rate of 3 MHz and an electronic noise floor of ENC < e-. With the complete parallel readout, very fast pn-CCD readout modi can be implemented in the system which allow for high resolution photon spectroscopy of even the brightest x-ray sources in the sky.

  20. High-Cadence and High-Resolution Halpha Imaging Spectroscopy of a Circular Flare's Remote Ribbon with IBIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Na; Tritschler, A.; Jing, J.; Chen, X.; Liu, C.; Reardon, K. P.; Denker, C.; Xu, Y.; Wang, H.

    2013-07-01

    We present an unprecedented high-resolution halpha imaging spectroscopic observation of a C4.1 flare taken with IBIS on 2011 October 22. The flare consists of a main circular ribbon that occurred in a parasitic magnetic configuration and a remote ribbon that was observed by the IBIS. Such a circular-ribbon flare with a remote brightening is predicted in 3D fan-spine reconnection but so far has been rarely reported. During the flare impulsive phase, we define "core" and "halo" structures in the observed ribbon. Examining the halpha emission spectra averaged in the flare core and halo areas, we find that only those from the flare cores show typical nonthermal electron beam heating characteristics. These characteristics include: broad and centrally reversed emission spectra, excess emission in the red wing with regard to the blue wing (i.e., red asymmetry), and redshifted bisectors of the emission spectra. We also observe rather quick timescales for the heating (30 s) and cooling (14--33 s) in the flare core locations. Therefore, we suggest that the flare cores revealed by IBIS track the sites of electron beam precipitation with exceptional spatial and temporal resolution. The flare cores show two-stage motion (a parallel motion along the ribbon followed by an expansion motion perpendicular to the ribbon) during the two impulsive phases of the flare. Some cores jump quickly (30 km/s) between discrete magnetic elements implying reconnection involving different flux tubes. We observe a very high temporal correlation (>0.9) between the integrated halpha and HXR emission during the flare impulsive phase. A short time delay (4.6 s) is also found in the halpha emission spikes relative to HXR bursts. The ionization timescale of the cool chromosphere and the extra time taken for the electrons to travel to the remote ribbon site may contribute to this delay.