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Sample records for high-resolution gamma-ray detector

  1. CeBr3 as a Room-Temperature, High-Resolution Gamma-Ray Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Guss, Michael Reed, Ding Yuan, Alexis Reed, and Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay

    2009-09-01

    Cerium bromide (CeBr3) has become a material of interest in the race for high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at room temperature. This investigation quantified the potential of CeBr3 as a room temperature, high-resolution gamma-ray detector. The performance of CeBr3 crystals was compared to other scintillation crystals of similar dimensions and detection environments. Comparison of self-activity of CeBr3 to cerium-doped lanthanum tribromide (LaBr3:Ce) was performed. Energy resolution and relative intrinsic efficiency were measured and are presented.

  2. The transient gamma-ray spectrometer: A new high resolution detector for gamma-ray burst spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Seifert, H.; Baker, R.; Cline, T.L.; Gehrels, N.; Jermakian, J.; Nolan, T.; Ramaty, R.; Sheppard, D.A.; Smith, G.; Stilwell, D.E.; Teegarden, B.J.; Trombka, J.; Owens, A.; Cork, C.P.; Landis, D.A.; Luke, P.N.; Madden, N.W.; Malone, D.; Pehl, R.H.; Yaver, H.; Hurley, K.; Mathias, S.; Post, A.H. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The Transient Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (TGRS) to be flown aboard the WIND spacecraft is primarily designed to perform high resolution spectroscopy of transient gamma-ray events, such as cosmic [gamma]-ray bursts and solar flares, over the energy range 20 keV to 10 MeV with an expected spectroscopic resolution of E/[delta]E = 500. The detector itself consists of a 215 cm[sup 3] high purity n-type Ge crystal kept at cryogenic temperatures by a passive radiative cooler. The geometric field of view defined by the cooler is 170[degrees]. To avoid continuous triggers caused by soft solar events, a thin Be/Cu sun-shield around the sides of the cooler has been provided. A passive Mo/Pb occulter, which modulates signals from within [+-]5[degrees] of the ecliptic plane at the spacecraft spin frequency, is used to identify and study solar flares, as well as emission from the galactic plane and center. Thus, in addition to transient event measurements, the instrument will allow the search for possible diffuse background lines and monitor the 511 keV positron annihilation radiation from the galactic center. In order to handle the typically large burst count rates which can be in excess of 100 kHz, burst data are stored directly in an on-board 2.75 Mbit burst memory with an absolute timing accuracy of [+-]1.5 ms after ground processing. This capacity is sufficient to store the entire spectral data set of all but the largest bursts. The experiment is scheduled to be launched on a Delta II launch vehicle from Cape Canaveral in the fall of 1993.

  3. Ge-diode detector combined with crystal-diffraction spectrometer permits high-resolution gamma ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namenson, A. I.; Smither, R. K.

    1969-01-01

    Crystal-diffraction spectrometer, combined with a lithium-drifted Ge-diode detector, performs high-resolution gamma ray spectroscopy on the complicated neutron-capture gamma ray spectra. The system is most useful in the 1-3 MeV energy range and improves the signal to background ratio.

  4. High-resolution imaging gamma-ray spectroscopy with externally segmented germanium detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callas, J. L.; Mahoney, W. A.; Varnell, L. S.; Wheaton, W. A.

    1993-01-01

    Externally segmented germanium detectors promise a breakthrough in gamma-ray imaging capabilities while retaining the superb energy resolution of germanium spectrometers. An angular resolution of 0.2 deg becomes practical by combining position-sensitive germanium detectors having a segment thickness of a few millimeters with a one-dimensional coded aperture located about a meter from the detectors. Correspondingly higher angular resolutions are possible with larger separations between the detectors and the coded aperture. Two-dimensional images can be obtained by rotating the instrument. Although the basic concept is similar to optical or X-ray coded-aperture imaging techniques, several complicating effects arise because of the penetrating nature of gamma rays. The complications include partial transmission through the coded aperture elements, Compton scattering in the germanium detectors, and high background count rates. Extensive electron-photon Monte Carlo modeling of a realistic detector/coded-aperture/collimator system has been performed. Results show that these complicating effects can be characterized and accounted for with no significant loss in instrument sensitivity.

  5. New room temperature high resolution solid-state detector (CdZnTe) for hard x rays and gamma rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Amyelizabeth C.; Desai, Upendra D.

    1993-01-01

    The new CdZnTe high 'Z' material represents a significant improvement in detectors for high energy photons. With the thicknesses available, photons up to 100 keV can be efficiently detected. This material has a wide band gap of 1.5 - 2.2 eV which allows it to operate at room temperature while providing high spectral resolution. Results of resolution evaluations are presented. This detector can be used for high resolution spectral measurements of photons in x-ray and gamma-ray astronomy, offering a significant reduction in the weight, power, and volume of the detector system compared to more conventional detector types such as scintillation counters. In addition, the detector will have the simplicity and reliability of solid-state construction. The CdZnTe detector, as a new development, has not yet been evaluated in space. The Get Away Special program can provide this opportunity.

  6. A 3D CZT high resolution detector for x- and gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvvetli, I.; Budtz-Jørgensen, C.; Zappettini, A.; Zambelli, N.; Benassi, G.; Kalemci, E.; Caroli, E.; Stephen, J. B.; Auricchio, N.

    2014-07-01

    At DTU Space we have developed a high resolution three dimensional (3D) position sensitive CZT detector for high energy astronomy. The design of the 3D CZT detector is based on the CZT Drift Strip detector principle. The position determination perpendicular to the anode strips is performed using a novel interpolating technique based on the drift strip signals. The position determination in the detector depth direction, is made using the DOI technique based the detector cathode and anode signals. The position determination along the anode strips is made with the help of 10 cathode strips orthogonal to the anode strips. The position resolutions are at low energies dominated by the electronic noise and improve therefore with increased signal to noise ratio as the energy increases. The achievable position resolution at higher energies will however be dominated by the extended spatial distribution of the photon produced ionization charge. The main sources of noise contribution of the drift signals are the leakage current between the strips and the strip capacitance. For the leakage current, we used a metallization process that reduces the leakage current by means of a high resistive thin layer between the drift strip electrodes and CZT detector material. This method was applied to all the proto type detectors and was a very effective method to reduce the surface leakage current between the strips. The proto type detector was recently investigated at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble which provided a fine 50 × 50 μm2 collimated X-ray beam covering an energy band up to 600 keV. The Beam positions are resolved very well with a ~ 0.2 mm position resolution (FWHM ) at 400 keV in all directions.

  7. Gamma ray detector shield

    DOEpatents

    Ohlinger, R.D.; Humphrey, H.W.

    1985-08-26

    A gamma ray detector shield comprised of a rigid, lead, cylindrical-shaped vessel having upper and lower portions with an pneumatically driven, sliding top assembly. Disposed inside the lead shield is a gamma ray scintillation crystal detector. Access to the gamma detector is through the sliding top assembly.

  8. Mercuric iodine room temperature gamma-ray detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patt, Bradley E.; Markakis, Jeffrey M.; Gerrish, Vernon M.; Haymes, Robert C.; Trombka, Jacob I.

    1990-01-01

    high resolution mercuric iodide room temperature gamma-ray detectors have excellent potential as an essential component of space instruments to be used for high energy astrophysics. Mercuric iodide detectors are being developed both as photodetectors used in combination with scintillation crystals to detect gamma-rays, and as direct gamma-ray detectors. These detectors are highly radiation damage resistant. The list of applications includes gamma-ray burst detection, gamma-ray line astronomy, solar flare studies, and elemental analysis.

  9. High resolution spectroscopy from low altitude satellites. [gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakano, G. H.; Imhof, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    The P 78 1 satellite to be placed in a synchronous polar orbit at an altitude of 550-660 km will carry two identical high resolution spectrometers each consisting of a single (approximately 85 cc) intrinsic germanium IGE detector. The payload also includes a pair of phoswitch scintillators, an array of CdTe detectors and several particle detectors, all of which are mounted on the wheel of the satellite. The intrinsic high purity IGE detectors receive cooling from two Stirling cycle refrigerators and facilitate the assembly of large and complex detector arrays planned for the next generation of high sensitivity instruments such as those planned for the gamma ray observatory. The major subsystems of the spectrometer are discussed as well as its capabilities.

  10. Directional detector of gamma rays

    DOEpatents

    Cox, Samson A.; Levert, Francis E.

    1979-01-01

    A directional detector of gamma rays comprises a strip of an electrical cuctor of high atomic number backed with a strip of a second electrical conductor of low atomic number. These elements are enclosed within an electrical conductor that establishes an electrical ground, maintains a vacuum enclosure and screens out low-energy gamma rays. The detector exhibits a directional sensitivity marked by an increased output in the favored direction by a factor of ten over the output in the unfavored direction.

  11. Gamma ray detector modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capote, M. Albert (Inventor); Lenos, Howard A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A radiation detector assembly has a semiconductor detector array substrate of CdZnTe or CdTe, having a plurality of detector cell pads on a first surface thereof, the pads having a contact metallization and a solder barrier metallization. An interposer card has planar dimensions no larger than planar dimensions of the semiconductor detector array substrate, a plurality of interconnect pads on a first surface thereof, at least one readout semiconductor chip and at least one connector on a second surface thereof, each having planar dimensions no larger than the planar dimensions of the interposer card. Solder columns extend from contacts on the interposer first surface to the plurality of pads on the semiconductor detector array substrate first surface, the solder columns having at least one solder having a melting point or liquidus less than 120 degrees C. An encapsulant is disposed between the interposer circuit card first surface and the semiconductor detector array substrate first surface, encapsulating the solder columns, the encapsulant curing at a temperature no greater than 120 degrees C.

  12. PANGU: A high resolution gamma-ray space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xin; Su, Meng; Bravar, Alessandro; Chang, Jin; Fan, Yizhong; Pohl, Martin; Walter, Roland

    2014-07-01

    We describe the instrument concept of a high angular resolution telescope dedicated to the sub-GeV (from >=10 MeV to >=1 GeV) gamma-ray photon detection. This mission, named PANGU (PAir-productioN Gamma-ray Unit), has been suggested as a candidate for the joint small mission between the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Chinese Academy of Science (CAS). A wide range of topics of both astronomy and fundamental physics can be attacked with PANGU, covering Galactic and extragalactic cosmic-ray physics, extreme physics of a variety of extended (e.g. supernova remnants, galaxies, galaxy clusters) and compact (e.g. black holes, pulsars, gamma-ray bursts) objects, solar and terrestrial gamma-ray phenomena, and searching for dark matter decay and/or annihilation signature etc. The unprecedented point spread function can be achieved with a pair-production telescope with a large number of thin active tracking layers to precisely reconstruct the pair-produced electron and positron tracks. Scintillating fibers or thin silicon micro-strip detectors are suitable technology for such a tracker. The energy measurement is achieved by measuring the momentum of the electrons and positrons through a magnetic field. The innovated spectrometer approach provides superior photon pointing resolution, and is particular suitable in the sub-GeV range. The level of tracking precision makes it possible to measure the polarization of gamma rays, which would open up a new frontier in gamma-ray astronomy. The frequent full-sky survey at sub-GeV with PANGU's large field of view and significantly improved point spread function would provide crucial information to GeV-TeV astrophysics for current/future missions including Fermi, DAMPE, HERD, and CTA, and other multi-wavelength telescopes.

  13. High resolution {gamma}-ray spectroscopy: The first 85 years

    SciTech Connect

    Deslattes, R.D.

    2000-02-01

    This opening review attempts to follow the main trends in crystal diffraction spectrometry of nuclear {gamma} rays from its 1914 beginning in Rutherford's laboratory to the ultra-high resolution instrumentation realized in the current generation of spectrometers at the Institute Laue Langeven (ILL). The authors perspective is that of an instrumentalist hoping to convey a sense of intellectual debt to a number of predecessors, each of whom realized a certain elegance in making the tools that have enabled much good science, including that to which the remainder of this workshop is dedicated. This overview follows some of the main ideas along a trajectory toward higher resolution at higher energies, thereby enabling not only the disentangling of dense spectra, but also allowing detailed study of aspects of spectral profiles sensitive to excited state lifetimes and interatomic potentials. The parallel evolution toward increasing efficiency while preserving needed resolution is also an interesting story of artful compromise that should not be neglected. Finally, it is the robustness of the measurement chain connecting {gamma}-ray wavelengths with optical wave-lengths associated with the Rydberg constant that only recently has allowed {gamma}-ray data to contribute to determine of particle masses and fundamental constants, as will be described in more detail in other papers from this workshop.

  14. Design of a Multi-Channel Ultra-High Resolution Superconducting Gamma-Ray Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S; Terracol, S F; Miyazaki, T; Drury, O B; Ali, Z A; Cunningham, M F; Niedermayr, T R; Barbee Jr., T W; Batteux, J D; Labov, S E

    2004-11-29

    Superconducting Gamma-ray microcalorimeters operated at temperatures around {approx}0.1 K offer an order of magnitude improvement in energy resolution over conventional high-purity Germanium spectrometers. The calorimeters consist of a {approx}1 mm{sup 3} superconducting or insulating absorber and a sensitive thermistor, which are weakly coupled to a cold bath. Gamma-ray capture increases the absorber temperature in proportion to the Gamma-ray energy, this is measured by the thermistor, and both subsequently cool back down to the base temperature through the weak link. We are developing ultra-high-resolution Gamma-ray spectrometers based on Sn absorbers and superconducting Mo/Cu multilayer thermistors for nuclear non-proliferation applications. They have achieved an energy resolution between 60 and 90 eV for Gamma-rays up to 100 keV. We also build two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators for user-friendly detector operation at 0.1 K. We present recent results on the performance of single pixel Gamma-ray spectrometers, and discuss the design of a large detector array for increased sensitivity.

  15. PANGU: A High Resolution Gamma-Ray Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Meng

    2014-08-01

    We propose a high angular resolution telescope dedicated to the sub-GeV gamma-ray astronomy as a candidate for the CAS-ESA joint small mission. This mission, called PANGU (PAir-productioN Gamma-ray Unit), will open up a unique window of electromagnetic spectrum that has never been explored with great precision. A wide range of topics of both astronomy and fundamental physics can be attacked with a telescope that has an angular resolution about one order of magnitude better than the currently operating Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) in the sub-GeV range, covering galactic and extragalactic cosmic-ray physics, extreme physics of a variety of extended (e.g. supernova remnants, galaxies, galaxy clusters) and compact (e.g. black holes, pulsars, gamma-ray bursts) objects, solar and terrestrial gamma-ray phenomena, and searching for Dark Matter (DM) decay and/or annihilation signature etc. The unprecedented resolution can be achieved with a pair-production telescope that, instead of the high-Z converter commonly used, relies on a large number of thin active tracking layers to increase the photon conversion probability, and to precisely reconstruct the pair-produced electron and positron tracks. Scintillating fibers or thin silicon micro-strip detectors are suitable technology for such a tracker. The energy measurement is achieved by measuring the momentum of the electrons and positrons through a magnetic field. The innovated spectrometer approach provides superior photon conversion identification and photon pointing resolution, and is particular suitable in the sub-GeV range, where the opening angle between the electron and positron is relatively large. The level of tracking precision makes it possible to measure the polarization of gamma rays, which would open up a new frontier in gamma-ray astronomy. The sub-GeV full sky survey by PANGU would provides crucial link with GeV to TeV maps from current/future missions including Fermi, DAMPE, HERD, and CTA.

  16. Compact high-resolution gamma-ray computed tomography system for multiphase flow studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bieberle, A.; Nehring, H.; Berger, R.; Arlit, M.; Haerting, H.-U.; Schubert, M.; Hampel, U.

    2013-03-15

    In this paper, a compact high-resolution gamma-ray Computed Tomography (CompaCT) measurement system for multiphase flow studies and tomographic imaging of technical objects is presented. Its compact and robust design makes it particularly suitable for studies on industrial facilities and outdoor applications. Special care has been given to thermal ruggedness, shock resistance, and radiation protection. Main components of the system are a collimated {sup 137}Cs isotopic source, a thermally stabilised modular high-resolution gamma-ray detector arc with 112 scintillation detector elements, and a transportable rotary unit. The CompaCT allows full CT scans of objects with a diameter of up to 130 mm and can be operated with any tilting angle from 0 Degree-Sign (horizontal) to 90 Degree-Sign (vertical).

  17. Compact high-resolution gamma-ray computed tomography system for multiphase flow studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieberle, A.; Nehring, H.; Berger, R.; Arlit, M.; Härting, H.-U.; Schubert, M.; Hampel, U.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, a compact high-resolution gamma-ray Computed Tomography (CompaCT) measurement system for multiphase flow studies and tomographic imaging of technical objects is presented. Its compact and robust design makes it particularly suitable for studies on industrial facilities and outdoor applications. Special care has been given to thermal ruggedness, shock resistance, and radiation protection. Main components of the system are a collimated 137Cs isotopic source, a thermally stabilised modular high-resolution gamma-ray detector arc with 112 scintillation detector elements, and a transportable rotary unit. The CompaCT allows full CT scans of objects with a diameter of up to 130 mm and can be operated with any tilting angle from 0° (horizontal) to 90° (vertical).

  18. Compact high-resolution gamma-ray computed tomography system for multiphase flow studies.

    PubMed

    Bieberle, A; Nehring, H; Berger, R; Arlit, M; Härting, H-U; Schubert, M; Hampel, U

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, a compact high-resolution gamma-ray Computed Tomography (CompaCT) measurement system for multiphase flow studies and tomographic imaging of technical objects is presented. Its compact and robust design makes it particularly suitable for studies on industrial facilities and outdoor applications. Special care has been given to thermal ruggedness, shock resistance, and radiation protection. Main components of the system are a collimated (137)Cs isotopic source, a thermally stabilised modular high-resolution gamma-ray detector arc with 112 scintillation detector elements, and a transportable rotary unit. The CompaCT allows full CT scans of objects with a diameter of up to 130 mm and can be operated with any tilting angle from 0° (horizontal) to 90° (vertical). PMID:23556806

  19. High resolution X- and gamma-ray spectroscopy of cosmic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.

    1983-01-01

    A high resolution X-ray spectrometer and large area phoswich detector were designed and co-aligned in a common elevation mounting in order to measure solar and cosmic X-ray and gamma ray emission in the 13 to 600 KeV energy range from a balloon. The instrument is described and results obtained for the Crab Nebula, the supernova remnant Cas A, and the Sun are discussed and analyzed.

  20. High resolution x-ray and gamma ray imaging using diffraction lenses with mechanically bent crystals

    DOEpatents

    Smither, Robert K.

    2008-12-23

    A method for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation is provided. High quality mechanically bent diffracting crystals of 0.1 mm radial width are used for focusing the radiation and directing the radiation to an array of detectors which is used for analyzing their addition to collect data as to the location of the source of radiation. A computer is used for converting the data to an image. The invention also provides for the use of a multi-component high resolution detector array and for narrow source and detector apertures.

  1. High resolution gamma ray tomography scanner for flow measurement and non-destructive testing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hampel, U.; Bieberle, A.; Hoppe, D.; Kronenberg, J.; Schleicher, E.; Suehnel, T.; Zimmermann, F.; Zippe, C.

    2007-10-15

    We report on the development of a high resolution gamma ray tomography scanner that is operated with a Cs-137 isotopic source at 662 keV gamma photon energy and achieves a spatial image resolution of 0.2 line pairs/mm at 10% modulation transfer function for noncollimated detectors. It is primarily intended for the scientific study of flow regimes and phase fraction distributions in fuel element assemblies, chemical reactors, pipelines, and hydrodynamic machines. Furthermore, it is applicable to nondestructive testing of larger radiologically dense objects. The radiation detector is based on advanced avalanche photodiode technology in conjunction with lutetium yttrium orthosilicate scintillation crystals. The detector arc comprises 320 single detector elements which are operated in pulse counting mode. For measurements at fixed vessels or plant components, we built a computed tomography scanner gantry that comprises rotational and translational stages, power supply via slip rings, and data communication to the measurement personal computer via wireless local area network.

  2. High resolution gamma ray tomography scanner for flow measurement and non-destructive testing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampel, U.; Bieberle, A.; Hoppe, D.; Kronenberg, J.; Schleicher, E.; Sühnel, T.; Zimmermann, F.; Zippe, C.

    2007-10-01

    We report on the development of a high resolution gamma ray tomography scanner that is operated with a Cs-137 isotopic source at 662keV gamma photon energy and achieves a spatial image resolution of 0.2linepairs/mm at 10% modulation transfer function for noncollimated detectors. It is primarily intended for the scientific study of flow regimes and phase fraction distributions in fuel element assemblies, chemical reactors, pipelines, and hydrodynamic machines. Furthermore, it is applicable to nondestructive testing of larger radiologically dense objects. The radiation detector is based on advanced avalanche photodiode technology in conjunction with lutetium yttrium orthosilicate scintillation crystals. The detector arc comprises 320 single detector elements which are operated in pulse counting mode. For measurements at fixed vessels or plant components, we built a computed tomography scanner gantry that comprises rotational and translational stages, power supply via slip rings, and data communication to the measurement personal computer via wireless local area network.

  3. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at GANIL

    SciTech Connect

    France, G. de

    2014-11-11

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy is intensively used at GANIL to measure low lying states in exotic nuclei on the neutron-rich as well as on the neutron-deficient side of the nuclear chart. On the neutron deficient border, gamma-rays have been observed for the first time in {sup 92}Pd. The level scheme which could be established points to the role of isoscalar pairing. On the neutron rich side, the lifetime of excited states in nuclei around {sup 68}Ni have been been measured using the plunger technique. This allows us to study the evolution of collectivity in a broad range of nuclei. In 2014 GANIL will host the AGATA array for a campaign of at least 2 years. This array is based on the gamma-ray tracking technique, which allows an impressive gain in resolving power.

  4. High-resolution ionization detector and array of such detectors

    DOEpatents

    McGregor, Douglas S.; Rojeski, Ronald A.

    2001-01-16

    A high-resolution ionization detector and an array of such detectors are described which utilize a reference pattern of conductive or semiconductive material to form interaction, pervious and measurement regions in an ionization substrate of, for example, CdZnTe material. The ionization detector is a room temperature semiconductor radiation detector. Various geometries of such a detector and an array of such detectors produce room temperature operated gamma ray spectrometers with relatively high resolution. For example, a 1 cm.sup.3 detector is capable of measuring .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays with room temperature energy resolution approaching 2% at FWHM. Two major types of such detectors include a parallel strip semiconductor Frisch grid detector and the geometrically weighted trapezoid prism semiconductor Frisch grid detector. The geometrically weighted detector records room temperature (24.degree. C.) energy resolutions of 2.68% FWHM for .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays and 2.45% FWHM for .sup.60 Co 1.332 MeV gamma rays. The detectors perform well without any electronic pulse rejection, correction or compensation techniques. The devices operate at room temperature with simple commercially available NIM bin electronics and do not require special preamplifiers or cooling stages for good spectroscopic results.

  5. Development of liquid xenon detectors for gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aprile, Elena; Suzuki, Masayo

    1989-01-01

    The application of liquid xenon in high-resolution detectors for gamma-ray astronomy is being investigated. Initial results from a pulse-shape analysis of ionization signals in a liquid-xenon gridded chamber indicate that it is possible to achieve the necessary liquid purity for the transport of free electrons with simple techniques. The energy resolution has been measured as a function of applied electric field, using electrons and gamma-rays from a 207Bi source. At a field of 12 kV/cm the noise-substracted energy resolution of the dominant 569-keV gamma-ray line is 34 keV FWHM (full width at half maximum). This value is mostly determined by recombination of electron-ion pairs on delta-electron tracks.

  6. a Quantitative Method for Analyzing Radioactive Nuclides in Infinite Composite Materials Using High-Resolution Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, John Henry, Jr.

    1982-03-01

    A theory is formulated in which the concentration of a radionuclide uniformly distributed throughout an infinite medium is related to the photopeak count rate of a signature gamma ray acquired by a detector within the medium. The mass fraction of the i('th) radionuclide in the medium is given by f(,i) = W(,i)(psi)(,i) (E)/(lamda)(,i)I(,I)(E)K(E); where (psi)(,i)(E) and I(,i)(E) are the observed photopeak count rate and absolute intensity for a gamma-ray emission of energy E. (lamda)(,i) and W(,i) are the decay constant and isotopic mass, respectively. It is shown that the function K(E) is a source volume integration over(' )(epsilon)(E,R)B(E,R)exp( -(SIGMA)(mu)(E)r(R))/(VBAR)R(VBAR)('2) which depends on gamma-ray energy only. Values of the narrow-beam attenuation coefficient (mu) are known for many materials. However, several laboratory experiments are performed in order to obtain data from which to empirically determine the detector response function (epsilon)(E,R)(' )and the gamma-ray build -up-factor(' )B(E,R). Special experimental instrumentation for analyzing radionuclides in infinite composite materials using high -resolution gamma-ray spectrometry is introduced. A probe is constructed which contains a coaxial high-purity germanium crystal to detect the gamma rays, a cryostat to cool the crystal and electronic circuitry to process the signal from the detector. Laboratory models of natural formations are prepared using high-grade radioactive samples diluted with silicon dioxide to obtain the desired concentrations. Each model is sampled to obtain X-ray fluorescence, delayed neutron and fluorimetric analysis from independent laboratories to compare with results using the method presented in this work.

  7. High Resolution Gamma Ray Analysis of Medical Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chillery, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Compton-suppressed high-purity Germanium detectors at the University of Massachusetts Lowell have been used to study medical radioisotopes produced at Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP), in particular isotopes such as Pt-191 used for cancer therapy in patients. The ability to precisely analyze the concentrations of such radio-isotopes is essential for both production facilities such as Brookhaven and consumer hospitals across the U.S. Without accurate knowledge of the quantities and strengths of these isotopes, it is possible for doctors to administer incorrect dosages to patients, thus leading to undesired results. Samples have been produced at Brookhaven and shipped to UML, and the advanced electronics and data acquisition capabilities at UML have been used to extract peak areas in the gamma decay spectra. Levels of Pt isotopes in diluted samples have been quantified, and reaction cross-sections deduced from the irradiation parameters. These provide both cross checks with published work, as well as a rigorous quantitative framework with high quality state-of-the-art detection apparatus in use in the experimental nuclear physics community.

  8. High resolution gamma-ray spectrometry of culverts containing transuranic waste at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Sigg, R.

    1990-01-01

    A number of concrete culverts used to retrievably store drummed, dry, radioactive waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS), were suspected of containing ambiguous quantities of transuranic (TRU) nuclides. These culverts were assayed in place for Pu-239 content using thermal and fast neutron counting techniques. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy on 17 culverts, having neutron emission rates several times higher than expected, showed characteristic gamma-ray signatures of neutron emitters other than Pu-239 (e.g., Pu-238, Pu/Be, or Am/Be neutron sources). This study confirmed the Pu-239 content of the culverts with anomalous neutron rates and established limits on the Pu-239 mass in each of the 17 suspect culverts by in-field, non-intrusive gamma-ray measurements.

  9. High resolution gamma-ray spectrometry of culverts containing transuranic waste at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Sigg, R.

    1990-12-31

    A number of concrete culverts used to retrievably store drummed, dry, radioactive waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS), were suspected of containing ambiguous quantities of transuranic (TRU) nuclides. These culverts were assayed in place for Pu-239 content using thermal and fast neutron counting techniques. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy on 17 culverts, having neutron emission rates several times higher than expected, showed characteristic gamma-ray signatures of neutron emitters other than Pu-239 (e.g., Pu-238, Pu/Be, or Am/Be neutron sources). This study confirmed the Pu-239 content of the culverts with anomalous neutron rates and established limits on the Pu-239 mass in each of the 17 suspect culverts by in-field, non-intrusive gamma-ray measurements.

  10. High Resolution Gamma Ray Tomography and its Application to the Measurement of Phase Fractions in Chemical Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampel, Uwe; Bieberle, Andre; Schleicher, Eckhard; Hessel, Günther; Zippe, Cornelius; Friedrich, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-06-01

    We applied gamma ray tomography to the problem of phase fraction measurement in chemical reactors. Therefore, we used a new tomography device that is operated with a Cs-137 source and a high resolution gamma ray detector. One application example is the reconstruction of the fluid distribution and the measurement of radial gas fraction profiles in a laboratory scale stirred vessel. The tomograph was used to obtain radiographic projections of the averaged gamma ray attenuation for different stirrer speeds along the height of the vessel. With tomographic reconstruction techniques we calculated the angularly averaged radial distribution of the attenuation coefficient for as many as 150 single cross-sectional planes and synthesised from this data set the axial and radial fluid distribution pattern. Further, we exemplarily reconstructed the radial gas fraction distributions induced by the stirrer in the area of the stirrer blades. In a second application the gamma ray measurement system was used to visualise gas inclusions in a water cleaning column that is used to remove hazardous heavy metal species from water.

  11. Development of a high resolution liquid xenon imaging chamber for gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aprile, Elena

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to develop the technology of liquid xenon (LXe) detectors for spectroscopy and imaging of gamma rays from astrophysical sources emitting in the low to medium energy regime. In particular, the technical challenges and the physical processes relevant to the realization of the LXe detector operated as a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) were addressed and studied. Experimental results were obtained on the following topics: (1) long distance drift of free electrons in LXe (purity); (2) scintillation light yield for electrons and alphas in LXe (triggering); and (3) ionization yield for electrons and gamma rays in LXe (energy resolution). The major results from the investigations are summarized.

  12. Development of Superconducting High-Resolution Gamma-Ray Spectrometers for Nuclear Safeguards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, Jonathan Glen

    Superconducting high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometers based on molybdenum/ copper transition edge sensors (TES) with tin absorbers have been developed for nuclear safeguard applications. This dissertation focuses on plutonium analysis, specifically the direct measurement of the 242Pu gamma-ray signature at 44.915 keV. As existing nondestructive analysis methods cannot directly measure this or any other 242Pu signature, the feasibility of making such a measurement using a TES based system is presented. Analysis from of Monte Carlo simulations and analytical noise models shows that the direct detection of this gamma-ray line of is possible and can be quantified in the presence of a 240Pu gamma-ray line with a line separation of 324 eV, even if the emission from the 240Pu is several orders of magnitude stronger. Spectroscopic measurements conducted in a liquid cryogen system offered an energy resolution of 180 eV, adequate for the measurement of 242Pu; however, TES operation in a liquid-cryogen-free pulse tube refrigerator degraded sensor performance such that this measurement was no longer possible. The numerical noise model indicates that the energy resolution of this device is adequate to demonstrate a direct measurement of 242Pu if the noise pickup from the mechanical cooler can be suppressed. This work shows that the precise measurement of low-intensity gamma-ray signatures, such as the 44.915 keV gamma ray from 242Pu, will require arrays of low-noise TES sensors and that such a system would offer invaluable information in the analysis of plutonium bearing materials.

  13. Recent developments in semiconductor gamma-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Luke, Paul N.; Amman, Mark; Tindall, Craig; Lee, Julie S.

    2003-10-28

    The successful development of lithium-drifted Ge detectors in the 1960's marked the beginning of the significant use of semiconductor crystals for direct detection and spectroscopy of gamma rays. In the 1970's, high-purity Ge became available, which enabled the production of complex detectors and multi-detector systems. In the following decades, the technology of semiconductor gamma-ray detectors continued to advance, with significant developments not only in Ge detectors but also in Si detectors and room-temperature compound-semiconductor detectors. In recent years, our group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has developed a variety of gamma ray detectors based on these semiconductor materials. Examples include Ge strip detectors, lithium-drifted Si strip detectors, and coplanar-grid CdZnTe detectors. These advances provide new capabilities in the measurement of gamma rays, such as the ability to perform imaging and the realization of highly compact spectroscopy systems.

  14. A high-resolution gamma-ray and hard X-ray spectrometer for solar flare observations in Max 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.; Curtis, D. W.; Harvey, P.; Hurley, K.; Primbsch, J. H.; Smith, D. M.; Pelling, R. M.; Duttweiler, F.

    1988-01-01

    A long duration balloon flight instrument for Max 1991 designed to study the acceleration of greater than 10 MeV ions and greater than 15 keV electrons in solar flares through high resolution spectroscopy of the gamma ray lines and hard X-ray and gamma ray continuum is described. The instrument, HIREGS, consists of an array of high-purity, n-type coaxial germanium detectors (HPGe) cooled to less than 90 K and surrounded by a bismuth germanate (BGO) anticoincidence shield. It will cover the energy range 15 keV to 20 MeV with keV spectral resolution, sufficient for accurate measurement of all parameters of the expected gamma ray lines with the exception of the neutron capture deuterium line. Electrical segmentation of the HPGe detector into a thin front segment and a thick rear segment, together with pulse-shape discrimination, provides optimal dynamic range and signal-to-background characteristics for flare measurements. Neutrons and gamma rays up to approximately 0.1 to 1 GeV can be detected and identified with the combination of the HPGe detectors and rear BGO shield. The HIREGS is planned for long duration balloon flights (LDBF) for solar flare studies during Max 1991. The two exploratory LDBFs carried out at mid-latitudes in 1987 to 1988 are described, and the LDBFs in Antarctica, which could in principle provide 24 hour/day solar coverage and very long flight durations (20 to 30 days) because of minimal ballast requirements are discussed.

  15. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy applied to bulk sample analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kosanke, K.L.; Koch, C.D.; Wilson, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    A high resolution Ge(Li) gamma-ray spectrometer has been installed and made operational for use in routine bulk sample analysis by the Bendix Field Engineering Corporation (BFEC) geochemical analysis department. The Ge(Li) spectrometer provides bulk sample analyses for potassium, uranium, and thorium that are superior to those obtained by the BFEC sodium iodide spectrometer. The near term analysis scheme permits a direct assay for uranium that corrects for bulk sample self-absorption effects and is independent of the uranium/radium disequilibrium condition of the sample. A more complete analysis scheme has been developed that fully utilizes the gamma-ray data provided by the Ge(Li) spectrometer and that more properly accounts for the sample self-absorption effect. This new analysis scheme should be implemented on the BFEC Ge(Li) spectrometer at the earliest date.

  16. Measuring high-energy {gamma} rays with Ge detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lipoglavsek, M.; Likar, A.; Vencelj, M.; Vidmar, T.; Bark, R. A.; Gueorguieva, E.; Komati, F.; Lawrie, J. J.; Maliage, S. M.; Mullins, S. M.; Murray, S. H. T.; Ramashidzha, T. M.

    2006-04-26

    Gamma rays with energies up to 21 MeV were measured with Ge detectors. Such {gamma} rays were produced in the 208Pb(p,{gamma})209Bi reaction. The position of the 2g9/2 single proton orbit in 209Bi has been determined indicating the size of the Z=126 shell gap.

  17. SONGS - A high resolution imaging gamma-ray spectrometer for the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakano, G. H.; Chase, L. F.; Kilner, J. R.; Sandie, W. G.; Fishman, G. J.; Paciesas, W. S.

    1989-01-01

    The overall design and the instrumental features of the Space-Station Observer for Nuclear Gamma-ray Spectroscopy (SONGS) instrument are described. SONGS comprises an array of 19 two-segment n-type Ge detectors, which have the capability of determining the interaction site in either the upper or the lower segment or in both segments. The detectors provide high energy resolution of 1 keV at 100 keV and of 2 keV at 1 MeV. The close-packed Ge sensor array provides a natural sensitivity for the measurement of gamma ray polarization in the 100 keV to 1 MeV energy range, making it possible to obtain information on the structure of the magnetosphere of neutron stars and of the accretion disk of black holes.

  18. A directional low energy gamma-ray detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morfill, G.; Pieper, G. F.

    1973-01-01

    The sensitivity of a directional gamma ray detector, which relies on blocking a source to determine its direction and energy spectrum, is calculated and compared to the more conventional well shaped shielded detectors. It is shown that such an anticollimator detection system provides a basis for measuring the celestial diffuse gamma ray background, gamma ray sources and bursts with good energy, angular, and time resolution, and that additionally the system is 20 to 50 times as sensitive as conventional detectors when compared on a per unit mass basis.

  19. A directional low energy gamma-ray detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morfill, G.; Pieper, G. F.

    1973-01-01

    The sensitivity of a directional gamma ray detector, which relies on blocking a source to determine its direction and energy spectrum, is calculated and compared to the more conventional well-shaped shielded detectors. It is shown that such an anticollimator detection system provides a basis for measuring the celestial diffuse gamma ray background, gamma ray sources and bursts with good energy, angular, and time resolution, and that additionally the system is 20 to 50 times as sensitive as conventional detectors when compared on a per unit mass basis.

  20. Dawn's Gamma Ray and Neutron Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prettyman, Thomas H.; Feldman, William C.; McSween, Harry Y.; Dingler, Robert D.; Enemark, Donald C.; Patrick, Douglas E.; Storms, Steven A.; Hendricks, John S.; Morgenthaler, Jeffery P.; Pitman, Karly M.; Reedy, Robert C.

    2011-12-01

    The NASA Dawn Mission will determine the surface composition of 4 Vesta and 1 Ceres, providing constraints on their formation and thermal evolution. The payload includes a Gamma Ray and Neutron Detector (GRaND), which will map the surface elemental composition at regional spatial scales. Target elements include the constituents of silicate and oxide minerals, ices, and the products of volcanic exhalation and aqueous alteration. At Vesta, GRaND will map the mixing ratio of end-members of the howardite, diogenite, and eucrite (HED) meteorites, determine relative proportions of plagioclase and mafic minerals, and search for compositions not well sampled by the meteorite collection. The large south polar impact basin may provide an opportunity to determine the composition of Vesta’s mantle and lower crust. At Ceres, GRaND will provide chemical information needed to test different models of Ceres’ origin and thermal and aqueous evolution. GRaND is also sensitive to hydrogen layering and can determine the equivalent H2O/OH content of near-surface hydrous minerals as well as the depth and water abundance of an ice table, which may provide information about the state of water in the interior of Ceres. Here, we document the design and performance of GRaND with sufficient detail to interpret flight data archived in the Planetary Data System, including two new sensor designs: an array of CdZnTe semiconductors for gamma ray spectroscopy, and a loaded-plastic phosphor sandwich for neutron spectroscopy. An overview of operations and a description of data acquired from launch up to Vesta approach is provided, including annealing of the CdZnTe sensors to remove radiation damage accrued during cruise. The instrument is calibrated using data acquired on the ground and in flight during a close flyby of Mars. Results of Mars flyby show that GRaND has ample sensitivity to meet science objectives at Vesta and Ceres. Strategies for data analysis are described and prospective results

  1. High-pressure xenon detectors for gamma-ray spectrometry

    PubMed

    Dmitrenko; Gratchev; Ulin; Uteshev; Viasik

    2000-03-01

    The main results of long-term research on compressed xenon detector properties conducted at the laboratory of cosmic physics of MEPhI are given along with a description of the latest gamma-ray spectrometers based on this work. It is shown that using xenon as working substance, it is possible to create a gamma-ray spectrometer with high energy resolution. The construction and the main physical, technical and operation performances of xenon gamma-ray spectrometers based on ionization chambers of various configurations are described. For a gamma-ray spectrometer with a cylindrical ionization chamber and shielding grid, an energy resolution of about 14 keV (10 keV intrinsic resolution) for gamma-ray line of 662 keV is obtained. The characteristics of these detectors allow one to apply them in various fields of science and engineering, moreover, their good spectrometric properties provide the opportunity to use them for metrology measurements. PMID:10724434

  2. Development and performance of a gamma-ray imaging detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gálvez, J. L.; Hernanz, M.; Álvarez, J. M.; La Torre, M.; Álvarez, L.; Karelin, D.; Lozano, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Ullán, M.; Cabruja, E.; Martínez, R.; Chmeissani, M.; Puigdengoles, C.

    2012-09-01

    In the last few years we have been working on feasibility studies of future instruments in the gamma-ray range, from several keV up to a few MeV. The innovative concept of focusing gamma-ray telescopes in this energy range, should allow reaching unprecedented sensitivities and angular resolution, thanks to the decoupling of collecting area and detector volume. High sensitivities are essential to perform detailed studies of cosmic explosions and cosmic accelerators, e.g., Supernovae, Classical Novae, Supernova Remnants (SNRs), Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), Pulsars, Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). In order to achieve the needed performance, a gamma-ray imaging detector with mm spatial resolution and large enough efficiency is required. In order to fulfill the combined requirement of high detection efficiency with good spatial and energy resolution, an initial prototype of a gamma-ray imaging detector based on CdTe pixel detectors is being developed. It consists of a stack of several layers of CdTe detectors with increasing thickness, in order to enhance the gamma-ray absorption in the Compton regime. A CdTe module detector lies in a 11 x 11 pixel detector with a pixel pitch of 1mm attached to the readout chip. Each pixel is bump bonded to a fan-out board made of alumina (Al2O3) substrate and routed to the corresponding input channel of the readout ASIC to measure pixel position and pulse height for each incident gamma-ray photon. We will report the main features of the gamma-ray imaging detector performance such as the energy resolution for a set of radiation sources at different operating temperatures.

  3. Mount makes liquid nitrogen-cooled gamma ray detector portable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fessler, T. E.

    1966-01-01

    Liquid nitrogen-cooled gamma ray detector system is made portable by attaching the detector to a fixture which provides a good thermal conductive path between the detector and the liquid nitrogen in a dewar flask and a low heat leak path between the detector and the external environment.

  4. X-ray and gamma ray astronomy detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decher, Rudolf; Ramsey, Brian D.; Austin, Robert

    1994-01-01

    X-ray and gamma ray astronomy was made possible by the advent of space flight. Discovery and early observations of celestial x-rays and gamma rays, dating back almost 40 years, were first done with high altitude rockets, followed by Earth-orbiting satellites> once it became possible to carry detectors above the Earth's atmosphere, a new view of the universe in the high-energy part of the electromagnetic spectrum evolved. Many of the detector concepts used for x-ray and gamma ray astronomy were derived from radiation measuring instruments used in atomic physics, nuclear physics, and other fields. However, these instruments, when used in x-ray and gamma ray astronomy, have to meet unique and demanding requirements related to their operation in space and the need to detect and measure extremely weak radiation fluxes from celestial x-ray and gamma ray sources. Their design for x-ray and gamma ray astronomy has, therefore, become a rather specialized and rapidly advancing field in which improved sensitivity, higher energy and spatial resolution, wider spectral coverage, and enhanced imaging capabilities are all sought. This text is intended as an introduction to x-ray and gamma ray astronomy instruments. It provides an overview of detector design and technology and is aimed at scientists, engineers, and technical personnel and managers associated with this field. The discussion is limited to basic principles and design concepts and provides examples of applications in past, present, and future space flight missions.

  5. X-ray and gamma ray astronomy detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decher, Rudolf; Ramsey, Brian D.; Austin, Robert

    X-ray and gamma ray astronomy was made possible by the advent of space flight. Discovery and early observations of celestial x-rays and gamma rays, dating back almost 40 years, were first done with high altitude rockets, followed by Earth-orbiting satellites> once it became possible to carry detectors above the Earth's atmosphere, a new view of the universe in the high-energy part of the electromagnetic spectrum evolved. Many of the detector concepts used for x-ray and gamma ray astronomy were derived from radiation measuring instruments used in atomic physics, nuclear physics, and other fields. However, these instruments, when used in x-ray and gamma ray astronomy, have to meet unique and demanding requirements related to their operation in space and the need to detect and measure extremely weak radiation fluxes from celestial x-ray and gamma ray sources. Their design for x-ray and gamma ray astronomy has, therefore, become a rather specialized and rapidly advancing field in which improved sensitivity, higher energy and spatial resolution, wider spectral coverage, and enhanced imaging capabilities are all sought. This text is intended as an introduction to x-ray and gamma ray astronomy instruments. It provides an overview of detector design and technology and is aimed at scientists, engineers, and technical personnel and managers associated with this field. The discussion is limited to basic principles and design concepts and provides examples of applications in past, present, and future space flight missions.

  6. Neutron capture gamma-ray data and calculations for HPGe detector-based applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNabb, Dennis P.; Firestone, Richard B.

    2004-10-01

    Recently an IAEA Coordinated Research Project published an evaluation of thermal neutron capture gamma-ray cross sections, measured to 1-5% uncertainty, for over 80 elements [1] and produced the Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation File (EGAF) [2] containing nearly 35,000 primary and secondary gamma-rays is available from the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. We have begun an effort to model the quasi-continuum gamma-ray cascade following neutron capture using the approach outlined by Becvar et al. [3] while constraining the calculation to reproduce the measured cross sections deexciting low-lying levels. Our goal is to provide complete neutron capture gamma ray data in ENDF formatted files to use as accurate event generators for high-resolution HPGe detector based applications. The results will be benchmarked to experimental spectroscopic data and compared with existing gamma-decay widths and level densities. [1] Database of Prompt Gamma Rays from Slow Neutron Capture for Elemental Analysis, IAEA-TECDOC-DRAFT (December, 2003); http://www-nds.iaea.org/pgaa/tecdoc.pdf. [2] Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation File maintained by the International Atomic Energy Agency; http://www-nds.iaea.org/pgaa/. [3] F. Becvar, Nucl Instr. Meth. A417, 434 (1998).

  7. High resolution X- and gamma-ray spectroscopy of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    A balloon-borne X- and gamma-ray instrument was developed, fabricated, and flown. This instrument has the highest energy resolution of any instrument flown to date for measurements of solar and cosmic X-ray and gamma-ray emission in the 13 to 600 keV energy range. The purpose of the solar measurements was to study electron acceleration and solar flare energy release processes. The cosmic observations were to search for cyclotron line features from neutron stars and for low energy gamma-ray lines from nucleosynthesis. The instrument consists of four 4 cm diameter, 1.3 cm thick, planar intrinsic germanium detectors cooled by liquid nitrogen and surrounded by CsI and NaI anti-coincidence scintillation crystals. A graded z collimator limited the field of view to 3 deg x 6 deg and a gondola pointing system provided 0.3 deg pointing accuracy. A total of four flights were made with this instrument. Additional funding was obtained from NSF for the last three flights, which had primarily solar objectives. A detailed instrument description is given. The main scientific results and the data analysis are discussed. Current work and indications for future work are summarized. A bibliography of publications resulting from this work is given.

  8. Assay for uranium and determination of disequilibrium by means of in situ high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanner, Allan B.; Moxham, Robert M.; Senftle, F.E.

    1977-01-01

    Two sealed sondes, using germanium gamma-ray detectors cooled by melting propane, have been field tested to depths of 79 m in water-filled boreholes at the Pawnee Uranium Mine in Bee Co., Texas. When, used as total-count devices, the sondes are comparable in logging speed and counting rate with conventional scintillation detectors for locating zones of high radioactivity. When used with a multichannel analyzer, the sondes are detectors with such high resolution that individual lines from the complex spectra of the uranium and thorium series can be distinguished. Gamma rays from each group of the uranium series can be measured in ore zones permitting determination of the state of equilibrium at each measurement point. Series of 10-minute spectra taken at 0.3- to 0.5-m intervals in several holes showed zones where maxima from the uranium group and from the 222Rn group were displaced relative to each other. Apparent excesses of 230Th at some locations suggest that uranium-group concentrations at those locations were severalfold greater some tens of kiloyears, ago. At the current state of development a 10-minute count yields a sensitivity of about 80 ppm U308. Data reduction could in practice be accomplished in about 5 minutes. The result is practically unaffected by disequilibrium or radon contamination. In comparison with core assay, high-resolution spectrometry samples a larger volume; avoids problems due to incomplete core recovery, loss of friable material to drilling fluids, and errors in depth and marking; and permits use of less expensive drilling methods. Because gamma rays from the radionuclides are accumulated simultaneously, it also avoids the problems inherent in trying to correlate logs made in separate runs with different equipment. Continuous-motion delayed-gamma activation by a 163-?g 252Cf neutron source attached to the sonde yielded poor sensitivity. A better neutron-activation method, in which the sonde is moved in steps so as to place the detector

  9. In situ calibration of a high-resolution gamma-ray borehole sonde for assaying uranium-bearing sandstone deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day, J.H., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A method is presented for assaying radioactive sandstone deposits in situ by using a high-resolution borehole gamma-ray spectrometer. Gamma-ray photopeaks from the same spectrum acquired to analyze a sample are used to characterize gamma-ray attenuation properties, from which a calibration function is determined. Assay results are independent of differences between properties of field samples and those of laboratory or test-hole standards generally used to calibrate a borehole sonde. This assaying technique is also independent of the state of radioactive disequilibrium that usually exists in nature among members of the natural-decay chains. ?? 1985.

  10. Compact, high-resolution, gamma ray imaging for scintimammography and other medical diagostic applications

    DOEpatents

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Wojcik, Randolph F.; Steinbach, Daniela

    1999-01-01

    A high resolution gamma ray imaging device includes an aluminum housing, a lead screen collimator at an opened end of the housing, a crystal scintillator array mounted behind the lead screen collimator, a foam layer between the lead screen collimator and the crystal scintillator array, a photomultiplier window coupled to the crystal with optical coupling grease, a photomultiplier having a dynode chain body and a base voltage divider with anodes, anode wire amplifiers each connected to four anodes and a multi pin connector having pin connections to each anode wire amplifier. In one embodiment the crystal scintillator array includes a yttrium aluminum perovskite (YAP) crystal array. In an alternate embodiment, the crystal scintillator array includes a gadolinium oxyorthosilicate (GSO) crystal array.

  11. Air shower detectors in gamma-ray astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Sinnis, Gus

    2008-01-01

    Extensive air shower (EAS) arrays directly detect the particles in an EAS that reach the observation altitude. This detection technique effectively makes air shower arrays synoptic telescopes -- they are capable of simultaneously and continuously viewing the entire overhead sky. Typical air shower detectors have an effective field-of-view of 2 sr and operate nearly 100% of the time. These two characteristics make them ideal instruments for studying the highest energy gamma rays, extended sources and transient phenomena. Until recently air shower arrays have had insufficient sensitivity to detect gamma-ray sources. Over the past decade, the situation has changed markedly. Milagro, in the US, and the Tibet AS{gamma} array in Tibet, have detected very-high-energy gamma-ray emission from the Crab Nebula and the active galaxy Markarian 421 (both previously known sources). Milagro has discovered TeV diffuse emission from the Milky Way, three unidentified sources of TeV gamma rays, and several candidate sources of TeV gamma rays. Given these successes and the suite of existing and planned instruments in the GeV and TeV regime (AGILE, GLAST, HESS, VERITAS, CTA, AGIS and IceCube) there are strong reasons for pursuing a next generation of EAS detectors. In conjunction with these other instruments the next generation of EAS instruments could answer long-standing problems in astrophysics.

  12. Gamma ray spectroscopy in astrophysics: Future role of scintillation detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurfess, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    The future role of conventional scintillation detector telescopes for line gamma-ray astronomy is discussed. Although the energy resolution of the germanium detectors now being used by several groups is clearly desirable, the larger effective areas and higher efficiencies available with scintillation detectors is advantageous for many observations. This is particularly true for those observations of astrophysical phenomena where significant line broadening is expected.

  13. High resolution phoswich gamma-ray imager utilizing monolithic MPPC arrays with submillimeter pixelized crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, T.; Kataoka, J.; Nakamori, T.; Kishimoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Sato, K.; Ishikawa, Y.; Yamamura, K.; Kawabata, N.; Ikeda, H.; Kamada, K.

    2013-05-01

    We report the development of a high spatial resolution tweezers-type coincidence gamma-ray camera for medical imaging. This application consists of large-area monolithic Multi-Pixel Photon Counters (MPPCs) and submillimeter pixelized scintillator matrices. The MPPC array has 4 × 4 channels with a three-side buttable, very compact package. For typical operational gain of 7.5 × 105 at + 20 °C, gain fluctuation over the entire MPPC device is only ± 5.6%, and dark count rates (as measured at the 1 p.e. level) amount to <= 400 kcps per channel. We selected Ce-doped (Lu,Y)2(SiO4)O (Ce:LYSO) and a brand-new scintillator, Ce-doped Gd3Al2Ga3O12 (Ce:GAGG) due to their high light yield and density. To improve the spatial resolution, these scintillators were fabricated into 15 × 15 matrices of 0.5 × 0.5 mm2 pixels. The Ce:LYSO and Ce:GAGG scintillator matrices were assembled into phosphor sandwich (phoswich) detectors, and then coupled to the MPPC array along with an acrylic light guide measuring 1 mm thick, and with summing operational amplifiers that compile the signals into four position-encoded analog outputs being used for signal readout. Spatial resolution of 1.1 mm was achieved with the coincidence imaging system using a 22Na point source. These results suggest that the gamma-ray imagers offer excellent potential for applications in high spatial medical imaging.

  14. Anomalous Thermal Behavior in Microcalorimeter Gamma-Ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Horansky, Robert D.; Beall, James A.; Irwin, Kent D.; Ullom, Joel N.

    2009-12-16

    Improving the resolution of gamma-ray detectors is important for many fields, including determinations of the Lamb shift in atoms with high atomic numbers, nuclear treaty verification, and environmental monitoring. High-purity germanium detectors are currently the tool of choice for precision gamma-ray spectroscopy. The resolution of these detectors is limited to about 500 eV full-width-at-half-maximum at 100 keV by Fano statistics. In comparison, low-temperature microcalorimeters can provide over an order of magnitude improvement in photon resolution. For instance, a gamma-ray microcalorimeter has achieved 25 eV FWHM resolution at 103 keV. These calorimeters consist of two components, a bulk absorber to stop incident gamma rays and a thermometer made from a thin film electrically biased in the superconducting-to-normal phase transition, called a Transition Edge Sensor, or TES. The standard absorber is bulk, superconducting tin. While tin has historically been the best performing absorber, pulse decays in Sn devices are much slower than predicted. We have begun a systematic study of absorber behavior in order to assess and improve response times. This study leverages two capabilities: the ability to microfabricate highly uniform arrays of gamma-ray detectors and the ability to read out many detectors in a single cool-down using SQUID multiplexer circuits. Here, we present two experiments to identify the source of thermal time constants. The first involves varying properties of the Sn absorber including purity, vendor, and crystal grain size. The second examines the role of the other elements in the microcalorimeter assembly.

  15. Inter-pulse high-resolution gamma-ray spectra using a 14 MeV pulsed neutron generator

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, L.G.; Trombka, J.I.; Jensen, D.H.; Stephenson, W.A.; Hoover, R.A.; Mikesell, J.L.; Tanner, A.B.; Senftle, F.E.

    1984-01-01

    A neutron generator pulsed at 100 s-1 was suspended in an artificial borehole containing a 7.7 metric ton mixture of sand, aragonite, magnetite, sulfur, and salt. Two Ge(HP) gamma-ray detectors were used: one in a borehole sonde, and one at the outside wall of the sample tank opposite the neutron generator target. Gamma-ray spectra were collected by the outside detector during each of 10 discrete time windows during the 10 ms period following the onset of gamma-ray build-up after each neutron burst. The sample was measured first when dry and then when saturated with water. In the dry sample, gamma rays due to inelastic neutron scattering, neutron capture, and decay were counted during the first (150 ??s) time window. Subsequently only capture and decay gamma rays were observed. In the wet sample, only neutron capture and decay gamma rays were observed. Neutron capture gamma rays dominated the spectrum during the period from 150 to 400 ??s after the neutron burst in both samples, but decreased with time much more rapidly in the wet sample. A signal-to-noise-ratio (S/N) analysis indicates that optimum conditions for neutron capture analysis occurred in the 350-800 ??s window. A poor S/N in the first 100-150 ??s is due to a large background continuum during the first time interval. Time gating can be used to enhance gamma-ray spectra, depending on the nuclides in the target material and the reactions needed to produce them, and should improve the sensitivity of in situ well logging. ?? 1984.

  16. A high resolution gamma-ray spectrometer based on superconducting microcalorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, D. A.; Horansky, R. D.; Schmidt, D. R.; Doriese, W. B.; Fowler, J. W.; Kotsubo, V.; Mates, J. A. B.; Hoover, A. S.; Winkler, R.; Rabin, M. W.; Alpert, B. K.; Beall, J. A.; Fitzgerald, C. P.; Hilton, G. C.; Irwin, K. D.; O'Neil, G. C.; Reintsema, C. D.; Schima, F. J.; Swetz, D. S.; Vale, L. R.; and others

    2012-09-15

    Improvements in superconductor device fabrication, detector hybridization techniques, and superconducting quantum interference device readout have made square-centimeter-sized arrays of gamma-ray microcalorimeters, based on transition-edge sensors (TESs), possible. At these collecting areas, gamma microcalorimeters can utilize their unprecedented energy resolution to perform spectroscopy in a number of applications that are limited by closely-spaced spectral peaks, for example, the nondestructive analysis of nuclear materials. We have built a 256 pixel spectrometer with an average full-width-at-half-maximum energy resolution of 53 eV at 97 keV, a useable dynamic range above 400 keV, and a collecting area of 5 cm{sup 2}. We have demonstrated multiplexed readout of the full 256 pixel array with 236 of the pixels (91%) giving spectroscopic data. This is the largest multiplexed array of TES microcalorimeters to date. This paper will review the spectrometer, highlighting the instrument design, detector fabrication, readout, operation of the instrument, and data processing. Further, we describe the characterization and performance of the newest 256 pixel array.

  17. Frequency-Domain Multiplexed Readout for Superconducting Gamma-Ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Dreyer, Jonathan G.; Arnold, Kam; Lanting, Trevor M.; Dobbs, Matt A.; Friedrich, Stephan; Lee, Adrian T.; Spieler, Helmuth G.

    2006-08-30

    We are developing a frequency-multiplexed readout for arrays of high-resolution Gamma detectors based on superconducting transition edge sensors (TESs). Each sensor is part of an LCR resonant circuit and is biased at an identifying carrier frequency. Several carrier signals are added and amplified with a single SQUID preamplifier at 4 K. Gamma absorption modulates the amplitude of the carrier, and demodulation at room temperature retrieves the initial temperature evolution of the sensor. This multiplexing system has originally been developed to read out large arrays of bolometers for cosmic microwave background studies. To accommodate the faster Gamma-ray signals, its demodulator bandwidth is being extended to 20 kHz to allow reading out up to eight TESs with a detector bandwidth of 10 kHz. Here we characterize the system noise performance and show how this multiplexing scheme can be adapted to read out arrays of superconducting Gamma-ray detectors.

  18. Advanced Ge detectors for gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnell, Larry S.

    1991-01-01

    Externally segmented coaxial detectors are fabricated for high efficiency in detecting gamma rays from cosmic sources with good sensitivities. The external background is reduced by enclosing the Ge detector array inside a thick active shield. The outer electrode of the coaxial detectors is subdivided into five segments, and internal beta activity is rejected by operating the segmented detector in a multisegment mode. The multisegment mode requires that events be detected in two or more segments before they are recorded. The full-energy-peak (FEP) efficiency of the unit is tested as a function of the incident gamma-ray energy and of the discriminator threshold of the segments. Measurements of beta-rejection and FEP efficiency are compared with Monte Carlo calculations, and good agreement is noted.

  19. Validation of high-resolution gamma-ray computed tomography for quantitative gas holdup measurements in centrifugal pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieberle, André; Schäfer, Thomas; Neumann, Martin; Hampel, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    In this article, the capability of high-resolution gamma-ray computed tomography (HireCT) for quantitative gas-liquid phase distribution measurements in commercially available industrial pumps is experimentally investigated. The object of interest thereby operates under two-phase flow conditions. HireCT System comprises a collimated 137Cs isotopic source, a radiation detector arc with a multi-channel signal processing unit, and a rotary unit enabling CT scans of objects with diameters of up to 700 mm. The accuracy of gas holdup measurements was validated on a sophisticated modular test mockup replicating defined gas-liquid distributions, which are expected in impeller chambers of industrial centrifugal pumps under two-phase operation. Stationary as well as rotation-synchronized CT scanning techniques have been analyzed, which are both used to obtain sharply resolved gas phase distributions in rotating structures as well as non-rotating zones. A measuring accuracy of better than 1% absolute for variously distributed static gas holdups in the rotating frame has been verified with the modular test mockup using HireCT.

  20. Gamma Ray Interactions in Planar Germanium Strip Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, E. G.; Lakshmi, S.; Chowdhury, P.; Deo, A. Y.; Guess, C. J.; Hota, S.; Lister, C. J.

    2011-10-01

    The position resolution of the interaction point of a gamma ray within the volume of a planar germanium crystal is under investigation. A 16x16 planar double-sided strip detector of high-purity germanium, measuring 92×92×20 mm, with 16 horizontal strips on one face and 16 vertical strips on the other, is used. Comparing the strongest strip signal from each side of the detector allows for a X-Y pixelation of the gamma ray interaction in the crystal. Energy and efficiency calibrations are performed with standard 152Eu and 133Ba sources placed at fixed distances from the detector face. The measured efficiency of each pixel is compared to calculated geometric efficiencies. Next steps involve the analysis of two-pixel events which pick out Compton scatters within the planar crystal. Results and status report will be presented. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  1. Continuum Background in Space-Borne Gamma-Ray Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Larry G.; Trombka, Jacob I; Starr, Richard; Boyton, William V.; Bailey, S.

    1997-01-01

    The background measured with space-borne gamma-ray spectrometers (GRS) in the 100 keV-10 MeV energy region consists of both discrete lines and continuum. The discrete lines originate in the decay of radioactive species. The continuum originates from a number of different processes and can be an important factor in the detection, for example, of weak gamma-ray lines from a planetary surface. Measurements of the gamma-ray background have been made during the cruise portion of a number of planetary missions. The three missions described here are the Apollo 15 and 16 missions each of which carried a 7 cm x 7 cm NaI scintillation detector, the Mars Observer (MO) mission which used a 5.5 cm X 5.5 cm high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector, and the Near Earth Rendezvous Asteroid (NEAR) mission that has a 2.54 cm x 7.6 cm NaI detector. A comparison of the intensity and spectral shape of these background spectra can be useful to help understand how these backgrounds vary with spacecraft size, detector position, and detector size. The use of shields to reduce the background components on these three missions is a test of the effectiveness of different shield designs.

  2. CdZnTe technology for gamma ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahle, Carl; Shi, Jack; Shu, Peter; Barthelmy, Scott; Parsons, Ann; Snodgrass, Steve

    1998-01-01

    CdZnTe detector technology has been developed at NASA Goddard for imaging and spectroscopy applications in hard x-ray and gamma ray astronomy. A CdZnTe strip detector array with capabilities for arc second imaging and spectroscopy has been built as a prototype for a space flight gamma ray burst instrument. CdZnTe detectors also have applications for medical imaging, environmental protection, transportation safety, nuclear safeguards and safety, nuclear non-proliferation, and national security. This can be accomplished from space and also from portable detectors on earth. One of the great advantages of CdZnTe is that the detectors can be operated at room temperature which eliminates the need for cryogenic cooling. CdZnTe detectors have good energy resolution (3.6 keV at 60 keV) and excellent spatial resolution (<100 microns). NASA Goddard has developed the fabrication technology to make a variery of planar, strip, and pixel detectors and integrated these detectors to high density electronics. We have built a 2×2 and a large area (60 cm2, 36 detectors) 6×6 strip detector array. This paper will summarize the CdZnTe detector fabrication and packaging technology developed at Goddard.

  3. Isotopic composition analysis and age dating of uranium samples by high resolution gamma ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, A. I.; Pantelica, A.; Sima, O.; Fugaru, V.

    2016-09-01

    Non-destructive methods were applied to determine the isotopic composition and the time elapsed since last chemical purification of nine uranium samples. The applied methods are based on measuring gamma and X radiations of uranium samples by high resolution low energy gamma spectrometric system with planar high purity germanium detector and low background gamma spectrometric system with coaxial high purity germanium detector. The "Multigroup γ-ray Analysis Method for Uranium" (MGAU) code was used for the precise determination of samples' isotopic composition. The age of the samples was determined from the isotopic ratio 214Bi/234U. This ratio was calculated from the analyzed spectra of each uranium sample, using relative detection efficiency. Special attention is paid to the coincidence summing corrections that have to be taken into account when performing this type of analysis. In addition, an alternative approach for the age determination using full energy peak efficiencies obtained by Monte Carlo simulations with the GESPECOR code is described.

  4. A position-sensitive germanium detector for gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnell, L. S.; Ling, J. C.; Mahoney, W. A.; Jacobson, A. S.; Pehl, R. H.; Goulding, F. S.; Landis, D. A.; Luke, P. N.; Madden, N. W.

    1984-01-01

    The critical problem in high-resolution cosmic gamma-ray spectroscopy in the energy range from 0.02 to 10 MeV is the limited spectral sensitivity of the detectors used. This results from the small effective area of the detectors and the high background noise due to induced radioactivity and scattering in the detectors' high-energy particle environment. The effective area can be increased by increasing the number of detectors, but this becomes prohibitive because of the size and expense of the resulting instrument. We have taken a new approach: a segmented large-volume germanium gamma-ray detector which can effectively discriminate against internal background yet maintain the high spectral resolution and efficiency of conventional coaxial Ge detectors. To verify this concept, a planar detector divided into two segments has been fabricated and laboratory measurements agree well with Monte Carlo calculations. A large coaxial detector which will be divided into five segments is being built using the techniques developed for the planar detector. Monte Carlo calculations show that the sensitivity (minimum detectable flux) of the segmented coaxial detector is a factor of 2-3 better than conventional detectors because of the reduction in the internal background.

  5. Combination neutron-gamma ray detector

    DOEpatents

    Stuart, Travis P.; Tipton, Wilbur J.

    1976-10-26

    A radiation detection system capable of detecting neutron and gamma events and distinguishing therebetween. The system includes a detector for a photomultiplier which utilizes a combination of two phosphor materials, the first of which is in the form of small glass beads which scintillate primarily in response to neutrons and the second of which is a plastic matrix which scintillates in response to gammas. A combination of pulse shape and pulse height discrimination techniques is utilized to provide an essentially complete separation of the neutron and gamma events.

  6. A low-energy gamma-ray imaging detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, L. I.; Trombka, J. I.; Seltzer, S. M.

    1979-01-01

    We describe a hard-X-ray/soft-gamma-ray imaging detector, incorporating a microchannel-plate (MCP) electron multiplier for possible use in future telescopes. In contrast to previous attempts using MCP's this approach promises to achieve high quantum detection efficiencies in addition to high spatial and temporal resolution. Preliminary results indicate not only the capability of simultaneous imaging and single-photon counting, but also coarse energy resolution.

  7. High photopeak efficiency gamma-ray detector for upcoming Laue Lens missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. J.; Dean, A. J.; Bird, A. J.

    2006-06-01

    We present the design for a new detector configuration, specifically tailored to suit the needs of prospective Laue Lens Gamma-ray astronomy missions in the 10keV to 1MeV energy range. A Laue Lens uses transmission diffraction through crystal planes to focus the incoming gamma-rays. Diffraction is highly energy dependant and in order to recreate high resolution images, very accurate measurements of the total energy of the incident photon are necessary, as well as good spatial resolution. The aim is to absorb all the Compton scattered products of the incoming photons. The design uses a cavity geometry with the main germanium pixilated imaging detector embedded position sensitive cavity. The germanium is then enclosed in a veto to reduce background and to clean the imaging of unwanted non-photopeak events. This allows the majority of backscattered photons to be captured producing a detector with a photopeak efficiency of ~90% at 511keV and millimetric spatial resolution. The detector system has the added advantage that it functions extremely efficiently as a gamma-ray polarimeter.

  8. DMSP satellites as gamma-ray burst detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Terrell, J.; Lee, P.; Klebesadel, R.W.; Griffee, J.W.

    1993-12-31

    Gamma-ray burst detectors are aboard three US Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft, in orbit at 800 km altitude, with corresponding fields of view to 117{degree} from the zenith. A large number of bursts have been detected by DMSP, usually confirming and supplementing data from GRO and other spacecraft. The location of a gamma-ray burst source detected by several DMSP spacecraft is considerably restricted by knowledge of the several fields of view. Often non-detection of a strong burst by one or more DMSP spacecraft is even more informative in narrowing the possible area of the burst. The DMSP data in conjunction with observations by other spacecraft can lead to reasonable positional information when more accurate positions are not available from GRO or other data.

  9. Hybrid Array of Gamma Ray Detectors (HAGRiD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Karl; Grzywacz, R.; Jones, K. L.; Munoz, S.; Baugher, T.; Cizewski, J. A.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Pain, S. D.

    2015-10-01

    Transfer reactions and beta-decay studies are powerful tools to study nuclear structure and to provide insight into astrophysically important reactions that may be difficult to measure directly. Both types of studies are enhanced immensely by measuring a particle-gamma coincidence. For transfer reactions, gamma-ray measurements improve the resolution, aid in channel selection and lifetime measurements. To achieve these coincidences the Hybrid Array of Gamma Ray Detectors (HAGRiD) is being designed and constructed. This array would be coupled with the Oak Ridge Rutgers Barrel Array (ORRUBA) of silicon detectors, the Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE) and beta detection scintillators. Detector systems providing a particle-gamma coincidence have previously compromised the charged-particle angular resolution due to compact geometries used to increase the gamma efficiency. HAGRiD will be coupled with ORRUBA such that resolution is not sacrificed, requiring the new array to provide improved resolution and efficiency over NaI and increased portability and flexibility over germanium detectors; therefore, we have chosen to use LaBr3(Ce) crystals. We demonstrate the advantages of a coupled detector system and discuss the current status of the project.

  10. Requirements on high resolution detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, A.

    1997-02-01

    For a number of microtomography applications X-ray detectors with a spatial resolution of 1 {mu}m are required. This high spatial resolution will influence and degrade other parameters of secondary importance like detective quantum efficiency (DQE), dynamic range, linearity and frame rate. This note summarizes the most important arguments, for and against those detector systems which could be considered. This article discusses the mutual dependencies between the various figures which characterize a detector, and tries to give some ideas on how to proceed in order to improve present technology.

  11. Gamma-Ray Background Variability in Mobile Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aucott, Timothy John

    Gamma-ray background radiation significantly reduces detection sensitivity when searching for radioactive sources in the field, such as in wide-area searches for homeland security applications. Mobile detector systems in particular must contend with a variable background that is not necessarily known or even measurable a priori. This work will present measurements of the spatial and temporal variability of the background, with the goal of merging gamma-ray detection, spectroscopy, and imaging with contextual information--a "nuclear street view" of the ubiquitous background radiation. The gamma-ray background originates from a variety of sources, both natural and anthropogenic. The dominant sources in the field are the primordial isotopes potassium-40, uranium-238, and thorium-232, as well as their decay daughters. In addition to the natural background, many artificially-created isotopes are used for industrial or medical purposes, and contamination from fission products can be found in many environments. Regardless of origin, these backgrounds will reduce detection sensitivity by adding both statistical as well as systematic uncertainty. In particular, large detector arrays will be limited by the systematic uncertainty in the background and will suffer from a high rate of false alarms. The goal of this work is to provide a comprehensive characterization of the gamma-ray background and its variability in order to improve detection sensitivity and evaluate the performance of mobile detectors in the field. Large quantities of data are measured in order to study their performance at very low false alarm rates. Two different approaches, spectroscopy and imaging, are compared in a controlled study in the presence of this measured background. Furthermore, there is additional information that can be gained by correlating the gamma-ray data with contextual data streams (such as cameras and global positioning systems) in order to reduce the variability in the background

  12. High resolution scintillation detector with semiconductor readout

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Craig S.; Hoffman, Edward J.

    2000-01-01

    A novel high resolution scintillation detector array for use in radiation imaging such as high resolution Positron Emission Tomography (PET) which comprises one or more parallelepiped crystals with at least one long surface of each crystal being in intimate contact with a semiconductor photodetector such that photons generated within each crystal by gamma radiation passing therethrough is detected by the photodetector paired therewith.

  13. High resolution gamma-ray astronomy - Observations and predictions of line shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharya, Dipen; Gehrels, Neil

    1991-01-01

    The shapes of gamma-ray lines carry unique information about the physical processes and conditions in astrophysical sites. Galactic center and SN 1987A lines have been observationally resolved allowing their shapes to be studied. There are also significant new theoretical results concerning line shapes from Type I supernovae, supernova remnants and the interstellar medium. New work is presented on a simple treatment of line profiles for rotating disks and spherical shells.

  14. A high resolution gamma-ray and hard X-ray spectrometer (HIREGS) for long duration balloon flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelling, M.; Feffer, P. T.; Hurley, K.; Kane, S. R.; Lin, R. P.; Mcbride, S.; Primbsch, J. H.; Smith, D. M.; Youseffi, K.; Zimmer, G.

    1992-01-01

    The elements of a high resolution gamma-ray spectrometer, developed for observations of solar flares, are described. Emphasis is given to those aspects of the system that relate to its operation on a long duration balloon platform. The performance of the system observed in its first flight, launched from McMurdo Station, Antarctica on 10 January, 1992, is discussed. Background characteristics of the antarctic balloon environment are compared with those observed in conventional mid-latitude balloon flights and the general advantages of long duration ballooning are discussed.

  15. Comparison of activation effects in {gamma}-ray detector materials

    SciTech Connect

    Truscott, P.R.; Evans, H.E.; Dyer, C.S.; Peerless, C.L.; Flatman, J.C.; Cosby, M.; Knight, P.; Moss, C.E.

    1996-06-01

    Activation induced by cosmic and trapped radiation in {gamma}-ray detector materials represents a significant source of background for space-based detector systems. Selection of detector materials should therefore include consideration of this background source. Results are presented from measurements of induced radioactivity in different scintillators activated either as a result of irradiation by mono-energetic protons at accelerator facilities, or flight on board the Space Shuttle. Radiation transport computer codes are used to help compare the effects observed from the scintillators, by identifying and quantifying the influence on the background spectra from more than one hundred of the radionuclides produced by spallation. For the space experiment data, the simulation results also permit determination of the contributions to detector activation from the different sources of radiation in the Shuttle cabin.

  16. Signal Variance in Gamma Ray Detectors - A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Corrales, Louis R.; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2006-09-06

    Signal variance in gamma ray detector materials is reviewed with an emphasis on intrinsic variance. Phenomenological models of electron cascades are examined and the Fano factor (F) is discussed in detail. In semiconductors F is much smaller than unity and charge carrier production is nearly proportional to energy. Based on a fit to a number of semiconductors and insulators, a new relationship between the average energy for electron-hole pair production and band-gap energy is proposed. In scintillators, the resolution is governed mainly by photoelectron statistics and proportionality of light yield with respect to energy.

  17. The ionosphere as a gamma ray burst detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgruder, Charles H., III

    1992-01-01

    Unlike all man made detectors, which are only sensitive to relative narrow regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, the ionosphere is practically a perfect detector for high energy radiation because it absorbs all radiation from the far-ultraviolet to the higher energy gamma-rays. Therefore, it may be possible to employ the terrestrial atmosphere as a detector of high energy celestial photons. As early as the 1940's solar flares were detected by the disturbance they caused to the ionosphere. The VLF (3 - 30 kHz) approach for detecting ionospheric disturbances is based on the following physical circumstance: celestial high energy radiation ionizes the atoms of the earth's ionosphere leading to the production of free electrons. These free electrons influence the propagation of electromagnetic waves. By studying the phase and amplitude changes of VLF radio wave propagating in the earth-ionosphere waveguide, it was hoped to ascertain the electron density in these regions and draw conclusions about the celestial radiation which caused them. To detect gamma-ray bursts, two conditions for the optimal detection are: (1) large zenith angle; and (2) alignment of burst and propagation path.

  18. High resolution spectroscopy of two gamma-ray bursts in November 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teegarden, B. J.; Cline, T. L.

    1979-01-01

    The first results from the ISSEE-3 radiatively colled germanium gamma ray burst spectrometer are presented. Spectra and time histories from two events on the 1978 November 4 and 1978 November 19 are given. A significant difference in the continuum spectra for the two events was observed. Evidence is presented for two spectral features in the features in the November 19 events, a broad one at approximately 420 key KeV and a narrower one at 740 KeV with a suggestion of an accompanying high energy tail.

  19. High-resolution spectroscopy of two gamma-ray bursts in 1978 November

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teegarden, B. J.; Cline, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    The first results from the ISEE 3 radiatively cooled germanium gamma-ray burst spectrometer are presented. Spectra and time histories from two events on 1978 November 4 and 19 are given. A significant difference in the continuum spectra for the two events was observed. Evidence is presented for two spectral features in the November 19 event, a broad one at about 420 keV and a narrower one at about 740 keV with a suggestion of an accompanying high-energy tail.

  20. Environmental Radioactivity: Gamma Ray Spectroscopy with Germanium detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Gargi; Beausang, Cornelius; Hughes, Richard; Tarlow, Thomas; Gell, Kristen; University of Richmond Physics Team

    2013-10-01

    A CF-1000BRL series portable Air Particle Sampler with filter paper as filter media was placed in one indoor and one outdoor location at 100 LPM flow rate on six dates under alternating rainy and warm weather conditions over the course of sixteen days in May 2013. The machine running times spanned between 6 to 69 hours. Each filter paper was then put in a germanium gamma ray detector, and the counts ranged from 93000 to 250000 seconds. The spectra obtained were analyzed by the CANBERRA Genie 2000 software, corrected using a background spectrum, and calibrated using a 20.27 kBq activity multi-nuclide source. We graphed the corrected counts (from detector analysis time)/second (from air sampler running time)/liter (from the air sampler's flow rate) of sharp, significantly big peaks corresponding to a nuclide in every sample against the sample number along with error bars. The graphs were then used to compare the samples and they showed a similar trend. The slight differences were usually due to the different running times of the air sampler. The graphs of about 22 nuclides were analyzed. We also tried to recognize the nuclei to which several gamma rays belonged that were displayed but not recognized by the Genie 2000 software.

  1. High resolution inelastic gamma-ray measurements with a white neutron source from 1 to 200 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.O.; Laymon, C.M.; Wender, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of prompt gamma rays following neutron-induced reactions have recently been made at the spallation neutron source at the WNR target area of LAMPF using germanium detectors. These experiments provide extensive excitation function data for inelastic neutron scattering as well as for other reactions such as (n,{alpha}), (n,n{alpha}), (n,p), (n,np), (n,nnp) and (n,xn) for 1 {le} {times} {le} 11. The continuous energy coverage available from 1 MeV to over 200 MeV is ideal for excitation function measurements and greatly extends the energy range for such data. The results of these measurements will provide a database for interpretation of gamma-ray spectra from the planned Mars Observer mission, aid in radiation transport calculations, allow verification of nuclear reaction models, and improve the evaluated neutron reaction data base.

  2. Zinc oxide nanowire gamma ray detector with high spatiotemporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, Daniel C.; Nolen, J. Ryan; Cook, Andrew; Mu, Richard R.; Haglund, Richard F.

    2016-03-01

    Conventional scintillation detectors are typically single crystals of heavy-metal oxides or halides doped with rare-earth ions that record the recombination of electron-hole pairs by photon emission in the visible to ultraviolet. However, the light yields are typically low enough to require photomultiplier detection with the attendant instrumental complications. Here we report initial studies of gamma ray detection by zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires, grown by vapor-solid deposition. The nanowires grow along the c-axis in a wurtzite structure; they are typically 80 nm in diameter and have lengths of 1- 2 μm. The nanowires are single crystals of high quality, with a photoluminescence (PL) yield from band-edge exciton emission in the ultraviolet that is typically one hundred times larger than the PL yield from defect centers in the visible. Nanowire ensembles were irradiated by 662 keV gamma rays from a Cs-137 source for periods of up to ten hours; gamma rays in this energy range interact by Compton scattering, which in ZnO creates F+ centers that relax to form singly-charged positive oxygen vacancies. Following irradiation, we fit the PL spectra of the visible emission with a sum of Gaussians at the energies of the known defects. We find highly efficient PL from the irradiated area, with a figure of merit approaching 106 photons/s/MeV of deposited energy. Over a period of days, the singly charged O+ vacancies relax to the more stable doubly charged O++ vacancies. However, the overall defect PL returns to pre-irradiation values after about a week, as the vacancies diffuse to the surface of these very thin nanowires, indicating that a self-healing process restores the nanowires to their original state.

  3. Isotopically enriched germanium detectors for astrophysical gamma-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    1990-01-01

    A study is presented of the instrumental background in astrophysical gamma-ray spectrometers using isotopically enriched germanium detectors. Calculations show that the beta-decay background, which is the largest component between approximately 0.1 and 1.0 MeV in balloonborne and satellite spectrometers, is dominated by the activation of Ge-74. This component can be reduced by an order of magnitude using detectors enriched to more than 80 percent in (Ge-70). The predicted reduction in the total background for current balloonborne instruments is more than a factor of 1.7 between 0.2 and 1.0 MeV. For future satellite instruments, the reduction in this energy range is by more than a factor of 5.

  4. Gamma rays and cosmic rays at Venus: The Pioneer Venus gamma ray detector and considerations for future measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.; Lawrence, David J.

    2015-05-01

    We draw attention to, and present a summary archive of the data from, the Pioneer Venus Orbiter Gamma-ray Burst Detector (OGBD), an instrument not originally conceived with Venus science in mind. We consider the possibility of gamma-ray flashes generated by lightning and model the propagation of gamma rays in the Venusian atmosphere, finding that if gamma rays originate at the upper range of reported cloud top altitudes (75 km altitude), they may be attenuated by factors of only a few, whereas from 60 km altitude they are attenuated by over two orders of magnitude. The present archive is too heavily averaged to reliably detect such a source (and we appeal to investigators who may have retained a higher-resolution archive), but the data do provide a useful and unique record of the cosmic ray flux at Venus 1978-1993. We consider other applications of future orbital gamma ray data, such as atmospheric occultations and the detection of volcanic materials injected high in the atmosphere.

  5. Development of a High Resolution Liquid Xenon Imaging Telescope for Medium Energy Gamma Ray Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aprile, Elena

    1992-01-01

    In the third year of the research project, we have (1) tested a 3.5 liter prototype of the Liquid Xenon Time Projection Chamber, (2) used a prototype having a 4.4 cm drift gap to study the charge and energy resolution response of the 3.5 liter chamber, (3) obtained an energy resolution as good as that previously measured by us using chambers with drift gaps of the order of millimeters, (4) observed the induction signals produced by MeV gamma rays, (4) used the 20 hybrid charge sensitive preamplifiers for a nondestructive readout of the electron image on the induction wires, (5) performed extensive Monte Carlo simulations to obtain results on efficiency, background rejection capability, and source flux sensitivity, and (6) developed a reconstruction algorithm for events with multiple interaction points.

  6. A balloon-borne high-resolution spectrometer for observations of gamma-ray emission from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crannell, C. J.; Starr, R.; Stottlemyre, A. R.; Trombka, J. I.

    1984-01-01

    The design, development, and balloon-flight verification of a payload for observations of gamma-ray emission from solar flares are reported. The payload incorporates a high-purity germanium semiconductor detector, standard NIM and CAMAC electronics modules, a thermally stabilized pressure housing, and regulated battery power supplies. The flight system is supported on the ground with interactive data-handling equipment comprised of similar electronics hardware. The modularity and flexibility of the payload, together with the resolution and stability obtained throughout a 30-hour flight, make it readily adaptable for high-sensitivity, long-duration balloon fight applications.

  7. Peak fitting and identification software library for high resolution gamma-ray spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uher, Josef; Roach, Greg; Tickner, James

    2010-07-01

    A new gamma-ray spectral analysis software package is under development in our laboratory. It can be operated as a stand-alone program or called as a software library from Java, C, C++ and MATLAB TM environments. It provides an advanced graphical user interface for data acquisition, spectral analysis and radioisotope identification. The code uses a peak-fitting function that includes peak asymmetry, Compton continuum and flexible background terms. Peak fitting function parameters can be calibrated as functions of energy. Each parameter can be constrained to improve fitting of overlapping peaks. All of these features can be adjusted by the user. To assist with peak identification, the code can automatically measure half-lives of single or multiple overlapping peaks from a time series of spectra. It implements library-based peak identification, with options for restricting the search based on radioisotope half-lives and reaction types. The software also improves the reliability of isotope identification by utilizing Monte-Carlo simulation results.

  8. High-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy with a microwave-multiplexed transition-edge sensor array

    SciTech Connect

    Noroozian, Omid; Mates, John A. B.; Bennett, Douglas A.; Brevik, Justus A.; Fowler, Joseph W.; Gao, Jiansong; Hilton, Gene C.; Horansky, Robert D.; Irwin, Kent D.; Schmidt, Daniel R.; Vale, Leila R.; Ullom, Joel N.; Kang, Zhao

    2013-11-11

    We demonstrate very high resolution photon spectroscopy with a microwave-multiplexed two-pixel transition-edge sensor (TES) array. We measured a {sup 153}Gd photon source and achieved an energy resolution of 63 eV full-width-at-half-maximum at 97 keV and an equivalent readout system noise of 86 pA/√(Hz) at the TES. The readout circuit consists of superconducting microwave resonators coupled to radio-frequency superconducting-quantum-interference-devices and transduces changes in input current to changes in phase of a microwave signal. We use flux-ramp modulation to linearize the response and evade low-frequency noise. This demonstration establishes one path for the readout of cryogenic X-ray and gamma-ray sensor arrays with more than 10{sup 3} elements and spectral resolving powers R=λ/Δλ>10{sup 3}.

  9. Gamma ray measurement of earth formation properties using a position sensitive scintillation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Sonne, D.S.

    1986-10-21

    This patent describes a system for measuring properties of earth formations in the vicinity of a well borehole at different radial distances from the borehole, comprising: a fluid tight hollow body member sized and adapted for passage through a well borehole and housing therein; a source of gamma rays and means for directing gamma rays from the source outwardly from the body member into earth formations in the vicinity of the borehole; and a position sensitive scintillation detector for detecting gamma rays scattered back into the body member from the earth formation in the vicinity of the borehole and means for collimating the scattered gamma rays onto the detector.

  10. Gamma-ray observations of supernova SN1987A by the balloonborne gamma-ray advanced detector

    SciTech Connect

    Coldwell, R.L.; Rester, A.C. ); Eichhorn, G. ); Starr, R.; Trombka, J.I. ); Lasche, G.P. )

    1988-01-01

    On 8 January 1988, gamma-ray advanced detector (GRAD) supernova observer was launched on a 3.3 x 10{sup 5} cubic meter helium balloon from Williams Field. The instrument maintained a float altitude of 36 kilometers as it drifted eastward along the 78{degrees}S parallel until it was brought down 320 kilometers east of Vostak Station on 10 January and recovered on 13 January. High-energy resolution gamma-ray spectra of the supernova SN1987A were taken; it is hoped that these spectra will provide evidence of explosive nucleosynthesis of the heavy elements in the supernova. Results. The earliest results of the analysis, showed evidence of gamma rays from the radioactive decay of the isotope cobalt-56, the longer-lived daughter of short-lived nickel-56, which was expected to be produced in great abundance in the supernova explosion, but the cobalt-56 line appearing most clearly in the supernova spectrum-the 1,238-kiloelectronvolt gamma-ray--was apparently split into two doppler-shifted and broadened components. This astonishing result appeared to suggest that the mantle of the supernova had expanded asymmetrically with a velocity in excess of 3,000 kilometers per second.

  11. High-resolution Schottky CdTe diode for hard X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, T.; Paul, B.; Hirose, K.; Matsumoto, C.; Ohno, R.; Ozaki, T.; Mori, K.; Tomita, Y.

    1999-10-01

    We report a significant improvement of the spectral properties of cadmium telluride (CdTe) detectors, fabricated in the form of a Schottky CdTe diode. With the use of high quality CdTe wafer, we formed a Schottky junction by evaporating indium on the Te-face and operated the detector as a diode. This allows us to apply much higher bias voltage than was possible with the previous CdTe detectors. A /2 mm/×2 mm detector of thickness 0.5 mm, when operated at a temperature of /5°C, shows leakage current of only 0.2 and 0.4 nA for an operating voltage of 400 and 800 V, respectively. We found that, at a high-electric field of several kV cm-1, the Schottky CdTe diode has very good energy resolution and stability, suitable for astronomical applications. The broad low-energy tail, often observed in CdTe detectors due to the low mobility and short lifetime of holes, was significantly reduced by the application of a higher bias voltage which improves the charge collection efficiency. We achieved very good FWHM energy resolution of /1.1% and /0.8% at energies 122 and 511 keV, respectively, without any rise time discrimination or pulse height correction electronics. For the detection of hard X-rays and gamma-rays above 100 keV, we have improved the detection efficiency by stacking a number of thin CdTe diodes. Using individual readout electronics for each layer, we obtained high detection efficiency without sacrificing the energy resolution. In this paper, we report the performance of the new CdTe diode and discuss its proposed applications in future hard X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy missions.

  12. Large scale telescopes for high resolution X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy. [using widely separated satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.; Lin, R. P.

    1978-01-01

    This paper shows that angular-resolution, energy-range, and structural constraints on image-modulated X-ray telescopes are not fundamental and that the limits on angular resolution can be overcome by constructing such telescopes on a very large spatial scale. It is proposed that widely separated satellites be used for the modulating mask and detector array. Implementation of this concept is discussed in terms of a simple system consisting of a pinhole camera (i.e., a hole in an opaque mask on one subsatellite and a detector array on another). Advantages and problems of such systems are briefly discussed, and a solar X-ray telescope intended for deployment from a Shuttle orbiter is described. It is noted that such large-scale telescopes can be constructed to image gamma rays and even energetic neutrons as well.

  13. High-Resolution PET Detector. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karp, Joel

    2014-03-26

    The objective of this project was to develop an understanding of the limits of performance for a high resolution PET detector using an approach based on continuous scintillation crystals rather than pixelated crystals. The overall goal was to design a high-resolution detector, which requires both high spatial resolution and high sensitivity for 511 keV gammas. Continuous scintillation detectors (Anger cameras) have been used extensively for both single-photon and PET scanners, however, these instruments were based on NaI(Tl) scintillators using relatively large, individual photo-multipliers. In this project we investigated the potential of this type of detector technology to achieve higher spatial resolution through the use of improved scintillator materials and photo-sensors, and modification of the detector surface to optimize the light response function.We achieved an average spatial resolution of 3-mm for a 25-mm thick, LYSO continuous detector using a maximum likelihood position algorithm and shallow slots cut into the entrance surface.

  14. Physics-based generation of gamma-ray response functions for CDZNTE detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Prettyman, T.H.; Mercer, D.J.; Cooper, C.; Russo, P.A.; Rawool-Sullivan, M.; Close, D.A.; Luke, P.N.; Amman, M.; Soldner, S.

    1997-09-01

    A physics-based approach to gamma-ray response-function generation is presented in which the response of CdZnTe detectors is modeled from first principles. Computer modeling is used to generate response functions needed for spectrum analysis for general detector configurations (e.g., electrode design, detector materials and geometry, and operating conditions). With computer modeling, requirements for calibration and characterization are significantly reduced. Elements of the physics-based model, including gamma-ray transport, charge drift-diffusion, and circuit response, are presented. Calculated and experimental gamma-ray spectra are compared for a coplanar-grid CdZnTe detector.

  15. Shaped scintillation detector systems for measurements of gamma ray flux anisotropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trombka, J. I.; Vette, J. I.; Stecker, F. W.; Eller, E. L.; Wildes, W. T.

    1973-01-01

    The detection efficiencies of cylindrical detectors for various gamma ray photon angular distributions were studied in the energy range from .10 Mev to 15 Mev. These studies indicate that simple detector systems on small satellites can be used to measure flux anisotropy of cosmic gamma rays and the angular distribution of albedo gamma rays produced in planetary atmospheres. The results indicate that flat cylindrical detectors are most suitable for measuring flux anisotropy because of their angular response function. A general method for calculating detection efficiencies for such detectors is presented.

  16. System to quantify gamma-ray radial energy deposition in semiconductor detectors

    DOEpatents

    Kammeraad, Judith E.; Blair, Jerome J.

    2001-01-01

    A system for measuring gamma-ray radial energy deposition is provided for use in conjunction with a semiconductor detector. The detector comprises two electrodes and a detector material, and defines a plurality of zones within the detecting material in parallel with the two electrodes. The detector produces a charge signal E(t) when a gamma-ray interacts with the detector. Digitizing means are provided for converting the charge signal E(t) into a digitized signal. A computational means receives the digitized signal and calculates in which of the plurality of zones the gamma-ray deposited energy when interacting with the detector. The computational means produces an output indicating the amount of energy deposited by the gamma-ray in each of the plurality of zones.

  17. Gamma-ray pulse height spectrum analysis on systems with multiple Ge detectors using spectrum summing

    SciTech Connect

    Killian, E.W.

    1997-11-01

    A technique has been developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to sum high resolution gamma-ray pulse spectra from systems with multiple Ge detectors. Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company operates a multi-detector spectrometer configuration at the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant facility which is used to characterize the radionuclide contents in waste drums destined for shipment to Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. This summing technique was developed to increase the sensitivity of the system, reduce the count times required to properly quantify the radio-nuclides and provide a more consistent methodology for combining data collected from multiple detectors. In spectrometer systems with multiple detectors looking at non homogeneous waste forms it is often difficult to combine individual spectrum analysis results from each detector to obtain a meaningful result for the total waste container. This is particularly true when the counting statistics in each individual spectrum are poor. The spectrum summing technique adds the spectra collected by each detector into a single spectrum which has better counting statistics than each individual spectrum. A normal spectral analysis program can then be used to analyze the sum spectrum to obtain radio-nuclide values which have smaller errors and do not have to be further manipulated to obtain results for the total waste container. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Gamma Ray Detector Using Gallium Arsenide to Develop an Electrode Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, G.F.

    1999-03-26

    The emphasis of the DOE-funded detector project at the University of Michigan has been on the improvement of the performance of room-temperature gamma ray spectrometers. We have concentrated on the material known as CZT, a blend of cadmium and zinc tellurides, as the material of primary interest.

  19. Development of gamma-ray detector for lunar and planetary landing mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitani, Takefumi; Inoue, Yousuke; Kobayashi, Shingo; Iijima, Yuichi; Takashima, Takeshi

    For a study of the origin and eveolution of a planet, its chemical composition holds an important information. The abundances of certain elements with different condensation temperature and with various types of geochemical behavior can provide valuable information for its history. Gamma-ray lines from the planet are generally used to determine the chemical composition of a planet without atmosphere. These gamma-ray lines are produded by the decay of nat-ural radionuclides or nuclear-reactions between planetary material and galactic cosmic rays. Abundance of elements is determined by measuring the intensity of gamma-ray lines specific to each element. From a orbital remote-sensing observation, global distribution of elements is acquired but its spatial resolution is limited, sim 10s km, because of difficulty of collimation of gamma-rays. Therefore in-situ gamma-ray observation is necessary to measure the elemental abundances in meter-scale topography. To survey the gamma-ray flux, a gamma-ray detec-tor aboard a rover on a planet is desired. Because of its limited electrical power and weight resources, we are developing small gamma-ray detector using a Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) semiconductor. CdTe has been regarded as a promising semiconductor material for gamma-ray detector because of such features as room temperature operation and large band-gap energy. The high atomic number of the materials gives a high absorption efficiency. On the surface of the moon, CdTe must be used in high temperature condition without any cooling system. Since CdTe spectral performance above room temperature is not established, we have examined the detector property in detail up to 40 degrees Celsius. Based on the results, we design total observation system and estimate the sensitivity of specific elements. Here we present the development status of gamma-ray detector system and the sensitivty estimate for the lunar observation.

  20. Neutron induced background in the COMPTEL detector on the Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, D. J.; Aarts, H.; Bennett, K.; Busetta, M.; Byrd, R.; Collmar, W.; Connors, A.; Diehl, R.; Eymann, G.; Foster, C.

    1992-01-01

    Interactions of neutrons in a prototype of the Compton imaging telescope (COMPTEL) gamma ray detector for the Gamma Ray Observatory were studied to determine COMPTEL's sensitivity as a neutron telescope and to estimate the gamma ray background resulting from neutron interactions. The IUCF provided a pulsed neutron beam at five different energies between 18 and 120 MeV. These measurements showed that the gamma ray background from neutron interactions is greater than previously expected. It was thought that most such events would be due to interactions in the upper detector modules of COMPTEL and could be distinguished by pulse shape discrimination. Rather, the bulk of the gamma ray background appears to be due to interactions in passive material, primarily aluminum, surrounding the D1 modules. In a considerable fraction of these interactions, two or more gamma rays are produced simultaneously, with one interacting in the D1 module and the other interacting in the module of the lower (D2) detector. If the neutron interacts near the D1 module, the D1 D2 time of flight cannot distinguish such an event from a true gamma ray event. In order to assess the significance of this background, the flux of neutrons in orbit has been estimated based on observed events with neutron pulse shape signature in D1. The strength of this neutron induced background is estimated. This is compared with the rate expected from the isotropic cosmic gamma ray flux.

  1. Gamma-ray detector guidance of breast cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi, Ananth

    2009-12-01

    . One method to provide intraoperative seed localization is through the use of a gamma-camera system. Monte Carlo simulations were conducted of a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) gamma-camera system and a realistic model of a breast with 3 layers of seeds distributed according to the pre-implant treatment plan of a typical patient. The simulations showed that a gamma-camera was able to localize the seeds with a maximum error of 2.0 mm within 20 seconds. An experimental prototype was designed and constructed to validate these promising Monte Carlo results. Using a 64 pixel linear array CZT detector fitted with a custom built brass collimator, images were acquired of a physical phantom similar to the model used in the Monte Carlo simulations. The experimental prototype was able to reliably detect the seeds within 30 seconds with a median error in localization of 1 mm. The results from this thesis suggest that gamma-ray detecting technology may be able to provide significant improvements in guidance of breast cancer therapies and, thus, potentially improved therapeutic outcomes.

  2. Performance of a 6 mm thick CdTe detector for 166 keV gamma rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, B. T. A.; Goetz, T.; Hazlett, T.; Forkert, L.

    1988-11-01

    In order to extend the utility of CdTe detectors to higher gamma ray energies, yet avoid increasing the charge collection problems of thick detectors, a 6 mm thick detector configuration has been developed consisting of three crystals 2 mm thick and of 16 mm diameter. The active volume is over 1.0 cm 3. The performance of this detector has been evaluated for gamma rays of 166 keV energy by measuring the pulse height spectra and determining the intrinsic peak and total efficiencies over a range of bias voltages and amplifier time constants. A maximum peak and total efficiency of 41% and 80% were obtained with 200 V bias and 2 μs amplifier time constant, although under these conditions the noise width was almost 40 keV FWHM. A Monte Carlo model was used to simulate the gamma ray and electron interaction in this 6 mm detector. Charge collection, including trapping effects, was incorporated into the model. The model pulse height spectra could be approximately matched to the measured data using hole and electron effective mobility values of 60 and 600 cm 2/V s, and hole and electron mean trapping times of 25 and 15 μs. Our findings indicate that detectors such as this will not be useful for high resolution spectroscopic applications, but the high gamma ray stopping power will be of interest for applications where the noise width is acceptable. Results from the modelling imply that in this detector shallow trapping sites (reducing the effective mobility) are more important than deep trapping sites in contributing to incomplete charge collection.

  3. POSITION SENSITIVE GERMANIUM DETECTORS FOR GAMMA-RAY IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gamma-ray imaging with position-sensitive germanium detectors offers the advantages of excellent energy resolution, high detection efficiency, and potentially good sptial resolution. The development of the amorphous-semiconductor electrical contact technology for germanium detec...

  4. X-ray and gamma ray detector readout system

    DOEpatents

    Tumer, Tumay O; Clajus, Martin; Visser, Gerard

    2010-10-19

    A readout electronics scheme is under development for high resolution, compact PET (positron emission tomography) imagers based on LSO (lutetium ortho-oxysilicate, Lu.sub.2SiO.sub.5) scintillator and avalanche photodiode (APD) arrays. The key is to obtain sufficient timing and energy resolution at a low power level, less than about 30 mW per channel, including all required functions. To this end, a simple leading edge level crossing discriminator is used, in combination with a transimpedance preamplifier. The APD used has a gain of order 1,000, and an output noise current of several pA/ Hz, allowing bipolar technology to be used instead of CMOS, for increased speed and power efficiency. A prototype of the preamplifier and discriminator has been constructed, achieving timing resolution of 1.5 ns FWHM, 2.7 ns full width at one tenth maximum, relative to an LSO/PMT detector, and an energy resolution of 13.6% FWHM at 511 keV, while operating at a power level of 22 mW per channel. Work is in progress towards integration of this preamplifier and discriminator with appropriate coincidence logic and amplitude measurement circuits in an ASIC suitable for a high resolution compact PET instrument. The detector system and/or ASIC can also be used for many other applications for medical to industrial imaging.

  5. A transportable source of gamma rays with discrete energies and wide range for calibration and on-site testing of gamma-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granja, Carlos; Slavicek, Tomas; Kroupa, Martin; Owens, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Janout, Zdenek; Kralik, Miloslav; Solc, Jaroslav; Valach, Ondrej

    2015-01-01

    We describe a compact and transportable wide energy range, gamma-ray station for the calibration of gamma-ray sensitive devices. The station was specifically designed for the on-site testing and calibration of gamma-ray sensitive spacecraft payloads, intended for space flight on the BepiColombo and SoIar Orbiter missions of the European Space Agency. The source is intended to serve as a calibrated reference for post test center qualification of integrated payload instruments and for preflight evaluation of scientific radiation sensors. Discrete gamma rays in the energy range 100 keV-9 MeV are produced in the station with reasonable intensity using a radionuclide neutron source and 100 l of distilled water with 22 kg salt dissolved. The gamma-rays generated contain many discrete lines conveniently evenly distributed over the entire energy range. The neutron and gamma-ray fields have been simulated by Monte Carlo calculations. Results of the numerical calculations are given in the form of neutron and gamma-ray spectra as well as dose equivalent rate. The dose rate was also determined directly by dedicated dosemetric measurements. The gamma-ray field produced in the station was characterized using a conventional HPGe detector. The application of the station is demonstrated by measurements taken with a flight-qualified LaBr3:Ce scintillation detector. Gamma-ray spectra acquired by both detectors are presented. The minimum measuring times for calibration of the flight-version detector, was between 2 and 10 min (up to 6.2 MeV) and 20-30 min (up to 8 MeV), when the detector was placed at a distance 2-5 m from the station.

  6. Fiber optic thermal/fast neutron and gamma ray scintillation detector

    DOEpatents

    Neal, John S.; Mihalczo, John T.

    2006-11-28

    A detector system that combines a .sup.6Li loaded glass fiber scintillation thermal neutron detector with a fast scintillation detector in a single layered structure. Detection of thermal and fast neutrons and ionizing electromagnetic radiation is achieved in the unified detector structure. The fast scintillator replaces the polyethelene moderator layer adjacent the .sup.6Li loaded glass fiber panel of the neutron detector and acts as the moderator for the glass fibers. Fast neutrons, x-rays and gamma rays are detected in the fast scintillator. Thermal neutrons, x-rays and gamma rays are detected in the glass fiber scintillator.

  7. Advanced Gamma-ray Detectors: Science with GRETINA/GRETA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Heather

    2014-09-01

    In 2007 the NSAC Rare Isotope Beam Task force introduced 17 ``benchmark experimental programs'' to provide a measure of facility performance capabilities for rare-isotope research and to characterize the physics that can be pursued at FRIB. A majority of these topics, and hence the FRIB program and current RIBF programs, will rely on high-resolution, high-efficiency in-flight γ-ray detection. Toward that end, GRETA is proposed to be a high-resolution, high-efficiency 4 π γ-ray spectrometer, consisting of highly segmented germanium detectors grouped in quad-crystal modules. Using pulse shape analysis, the array will be capable of reconstructing the individual interaction points of incident γ-rays. When combined with tracking algorithms, this provides a large increase in sensitivity and resolving power over existing arrays. GRETA, with 30 quad-crystal modules, will allow maximization of the physics opportunities at FRIB, and will play a central role in the science program both with fast-fragmentation and reaccelerated beams. The technology of GRETA, and the capabilities in terms of science have already been demonstrated through the performance of the 1 π spectrometer, GRETINA. Consisting of 7 quad-crystal modules, GRETINA has proven its capabilities in fast-beam experiments at NSCL, a campaign which saw 24 successful experiments which would not have been possible with previous detector technologies. The capabilities of the array in the energy regime of reaccelerated beams is being put to a similar test in the physics campaign currently underway at ANL. The performance and physics accomplishments to date of GRETINA, and a description and path forward to GRETA, the full 4 π tracking array will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on the role of GRETA or a similar device at facilities like FRIB and RIBF, in terms of experimental capabilities and physics reach. In 2007 the NSAC Rare Isotope Beam Task force introduced 17 ``benchmark experimental programs'' to

  8. Digital discrimination of neutrons and gamma-rays in organic scintillation detectors using moment analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xufei; Zhang, Xing; Yuan, Xi; Chen, Jinxiang; Li, Xiangqing; Zhang, Guohui; Fan, Tieshuan; Yuan, Guoliang; Yang, Jinwei; Yang, Qingwei

    2012-09-01

    Digital discrimination of neutron and gamma-ray events in an organic scintillator has been investigated by moment analysis. Signals induced by an americium-beryllium (Am/Be) isotropic neutron source in a stilbene crystal detector have been sampled with a flash analogue-to-digital converter (ADC) of 1 GSamples/s sampling rate and 10-bit vertical resolution. Neutrons and gamma-rays have been successfully discriminated with a threshold corresponding to gamma-ray energy about 217 keV. Moment analysis has also been verified against the results assessed by a time-of-flight (TOF) measurement. It is shown that the classification of neutrons and gamma-rays afforded by moment analysis is consistent with that achieved by digital TOF measurement. This method has been applied to analyze the data acquired from the stilbene crystal detector in mixed radiation field of the HL-2A tokamak deuterium plasma discharges and the results are described.

  9. Digital discrimination of neutrons and gamma-rays in organic scintillation detectors using moment analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Xufei; Zhang Xing; Yuan Xi; Chen Jinxiang; Li Xiangqing; Zhang Guohui; Fan Tieshuan; Yuan Guoliang; Yang Jinwei; Yang Qingwei

    2012-09-15

    Digital discrimination of neutron and gamma-ray events in an organic scintillator has been investigated by moment analysis. Signals induced by an americium-beryllium (Am/Be) isotropic neutron source in a stilbene crystal detector have been sampled with a flash analogue-to-digital converter (ADC) of 1 GSamples/s sampling rate and 10-bit vertical resolution. Neutrons and gamma-rays have been successfully discriminated with a threshold corresponding to gamma-ray energy about 217 keV. Moment analysis has also been verified against the results assessed by a time-of-flight (TOF) measurement. It is shown that the classification of neutrons and gamma-rays afforded by moment analysis is consistent with that achieved by digital TOF measurement. This method has been applied to analyze the data acquired from the stilbene crystal detector in mixed radiation field of the HL-2A tokamak deuterium plasma discharges and the results are described.

  10. Digital discrimination of neutrons and gamma-rays in organic scintillation detectors using moment analysis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xufei; Zhang, Xing; Yuan, Xi; Chen, Jinxiang; Li, Xiangqing; Zhang, Guohui; Fan, Tieshuan; Yuan, Guoliang; Yang, Jinwei; Yang, Qingwei

    2012-09-01

    Digital discrimination of neutron and gamma-ray events in an organic scintillator has been investigated by moment analysis. Signals induced by an americium-beryllium (Am/Be) isotropic neutron source in a stilbene crystal detector have been sampled with a flash analogue-to-digital converter (ADC) of 1 GSamples/s sampling rate and 10-bit vertical resolution. Neutrons and gamma-rays have been successfully discriminated with a threshold corresponding to gamma-ray energy about 217 keV. Moment analysis has also been verified against the results assessed by a time-of-flight (TOF) measurement. It is shown that the classification of neutrons and gamma-rays afforded by moment analysis is consistent with that achieved by digital TOF measurement. This method has been applied to analyze the data acquired from the stilbene crystal detector in mixed radiation field of the HL-2A tokamak deuterium plasma discharges and the results are described. PMID:23020376

  11. Gamma ray measurement of earth formation properties using a position sensitive scintillation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Sonne, D.S.; Beard, W.J.

    1987-01-20

    This patent describes a system for measuring properties of earth formations in the vicinity of a well borehole at different radial distances from the borehole, comprising: a fluid tight hollow body member sized and adapted for passage through a well borehole and housing therein; a source of gamma rays and means for directing gamma rays from the source outwardly from the body member into earth formations in the vicinity of the borehole; and a position sensitive scintillation detector for detecting gamma rays scattered back into the body member from the earth formation in the vicinity of the borehole, means for collimating the scattered gamma rays onto the detector. The detector comprises scintillation crystal means having discrete longitudinally spaced active regions or bins and is longitudinally spaced from the gamma ray source. It has a longitudinal length L and two opposite ends and photomultiplier tubes optically coupled to the opposite ends for providing output voltage signals having voltage amplitudes A and B representative of the intensity of scintillation events occurring in the crystal and impinging at the opposite ends thereof. A means separates the bins for selectively attenuating light passing therebetween, and a means combines the output voltage signals A and B according to a predetermined relationship to derive the discrete bin along the length L of each of the scintillation events in the crystal, thereby providing measurements of the gamma ray scattering properties of the earth formations at different radial distances from the borehole.

  12. Array-compatible transition-edge sensor microcalorimeter {gamma}-ray detector with 42 eV energy resolution at 103 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Zink, B. L.; Ullom, J. N.; Beall, J. A.; Irwin, K. D.; Doriese, W. B.; Duncan, W. D.; Ferreira, L.; Hilton, G. C.; Horansky, R. D.; Reintsema, C. D.; Vale, L. R.

    2006-09-18

    The authors describe a microcalorimeter {gamma}-ray detector with measured energy resolution of 42 eV full width at half maximum for 103 keV photons. This detector consists of a thermally isolated superconducting transition-edge thermometer and a superconducting bulk tin photon absorber. The absorber is attached with a technique compatible with producing arrays of high-resolution {gamma}-ray detectors. The results of a detailed characterization of the detector, which includes measurements of the complex impedance, detector noise, and time-domain pulse response, suggest that a deeper understanding and optimization of the thermal transport between the absorber and thermometer could significantly improve the energy resolution of future detectors.

  13. Recent developments in the search for new semiconductor gamma-ray detector materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, J. C.; Olschner, F.; Shah, K. S.; Squillante, M. R.

    1992-12-01

    The requirements of a semiconductor material intended to operate in a gamma-ray detector at room temperatures are discussed, and the status of the search for alternative materials is reviewed. The important material characteristics of a semiconductor gamma-ray detector material are high average atomic number, material's uniformity, resistivity, and electron and holes transport properties. Materials under investigation include GaAs, InP, TlBr, and PbI2. Theoretically, it is considered to be feasible to built a large volume semiconductor gamma-ray detector capable of good energy resolution at room temperature. But it is very unlikely that a semiconductor detector with germanium-like performance will be available in the next five years.

  14. Gamma-ray superconducting detector based on Abrikosov vortices: Principle of operation

    SciTech Connect

    Lisitskiy, M. P.

    2009-11-15

    The high atomic number of some superconducting elements such as niobium (Z=41) and tantalum (Z=73) and a high material thickness (e.g., t=300 mum) are emphasized as essential properties for development of a gamma-ray solid state detector with high intrinsic detection efficiency in the energy range up to 100 keV. To exploit these properties, a new detection principle based on the interaction of a single gamma-ray photon with Abrikosov vortex is proposed. The interaction of gamma-ray photon with a superconductor is discussed in terms of the photoelectric absorption and a hot-spot formation, the last acts as a short-time pinning center on an Abrikosov vortex and activates its motion, namely, a jump or damped vibration. Both types of vortex motion lead to variation (either static or dynamic) in the magnetic field on the absorber surface. The high sensitivity of the Josephson tunneling to weak magnetic field can be exploited for revealing the magnetic field variation and to make the readout of the detector. Main intrinsic properties of a gamma-ray detector based on Abrikosov vortices are evaluated, including the possibility to measure the energy deposited in the detector. A single Josephson tunnel junction configuration or a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) configuration is proposed and discussed as possible realization of working gamma-ray detector both in the counter operation mode and in the radiation spectroscopy operation mode.

  15. THREE-DIMENSIONAL POSITION SENSING AND FIELD SHAPING IN ORTHOGONAL-STRIP GERMANIUM GAMMA-RAY DETECTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have fabricated a prototype orthogonal-strip germanium detector for gamma-ray imaging studies. With this detector we demonstrate that a gamma-ray interaction event in the detector can be located in three dimensions. In particular we determine the interaction depth from the dif...

  16. Maximum-Likelihood Methods for Processing Signals From Gamma-Ray Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Harrison H.; Hunter, William C. J.; Miller, Brian William; Moore, Stephen K.; Chen, Yichun; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2009-01-01

    In any gamma-ray detector, each event produces electrical signals on one or more circuit elements. From these signals, we may wish to determine the presence of an interaction; whether multiple interactions occurred; the spatial coordinates in two or three dimensions of at least the primary interaction; or the total energy deposited in that interaction. We may also want to compute listmode probabilities for tomographic reconstruction. Maximum-likelihood methods provide a rigorous and in some senses optimal approach to extracting this information, and the associated Fisher information matrix provides a way of quantifying and optimizing the information conveyed by the detector. This paper will review the principles of likelihood methods as applied to gamma-ray detectors and illustrate their power with recent results from the Center for Gamma-ray Imaging. PMID:20107527

  17. Germanium-Based Detectors for Gamma-Ray Imaging andSpectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Amman, Mark; Luke, Paul N.; Boggs, Steven E.

    2006-10-13

    Germanium-based detectors are the standard technology usedfor gamma-ray spectroscopy when high efficiency and excellent energyresolution are desired. By dividing the electrical contacts on thesedetectors into segments, the locations of the gamma-ray interactionevents within the detectors can be determined as well as the depositedenergies. This enables simultaneous gamma-ray imaging and spectroscopyand leads to applications in the areas of astronomy, nuclear physics,environmental remediation, nuclear nonproliferation, and homelandsecurity. Producing the fine-pitched electrode segmentation oftenrequired for imaging has been problematic in the past. To address thisissue, we have developed an amorphous-semiconductor contact technology.Using this technology, fully passivated detectors with closely spacedcontacts can be produced using a simple fabrication process. The currentstate of the amorphous-semiconductor contact technology and thechallenges that remain will be given in this paper.

  18. Early warning for VHE gamma-ray flares with the ARGO-YBJ detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ARGO-YBJ Collaboration; Bartoli, B.; Bernardini, P.; Bi, X. J.; Bleve, C.; Bolognino, I.; Branchini, P.; Budano, A.; Calabrese Melcarne, A. K.; Camarri, P.; Cao, Z.; Cappa, A.; Cardarelli, R.; Catalanotti, S.; Cattaneo, C.; Celio, P.; Chen, S. Z.; Chen, T. L.; Chen, Y.; Creti, P.; Cui, S. W.; Dai, B. Z.; D'Alí Staiti, G.; Danzengluobu; Dattoli, M.; de Mitri, I.; D'Ettorre Piazzoli, B.; di Girolamo, T.; Ding, X. H.; di Sciascio, G.; Feng, C. F.; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Zhenyong; Galeazzi, F.; Galeotti, P.; Giroletti, E.; Gou, Q. B.; Guo, Y. Q.; He, H. H.; Hu, Haibing; Hu, Hongbo; Huang, Q.; Iacovacci, M.; Iuppa, R.; James, I.; Jia, H. Y.; Labaciren; Li, H. J.; Li, J. Y.; Li, X. X.; Liguori, G.; Liu, C.; Liu, C. Q.; Liu, J.; Liu, M. Y.; Lu, H.; Ma, X. H.; Mancarella, G.; Mari, S. M.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Mastroianni, S.; Montini, P.; Ning, C. C.; Pagliaro, A.; Panareo, M.; Panico, B.; Perrone, L.; Pistilli, P.; Qu, X. B.; Rossi, E.; Ruggieri, F.; Salvini, P.; Santonico, R.; Shen, P. R.; Sheng, X. D.; Shi, F.; Stanescu, C.; Surdo, A.; Tan, Y. H.; Vallania, P.; Vernetto, S.; Vigorito, C.; Wang, B.; Wang, H.; Wu, C. Y.; Wu, H. R.; Xu, B.; Xue, L.; Yan, Y. X.; Yang, Q. Y.; Yang, X. C.; Yao, Z. G.; Yuan, A. F.; Zha, M.; Zhang, H. M.; Zhang, Jilong; Zhang, Jianli; Zhang, L.; Zhang, P.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhaxiciren; Zhaxisangzhu; Zhou, X. X.; Zhu, F. R.; Zhu, Q. Q.; Zizzi, G.

    2011-12-01

    Detecting and monitoring emissions from flaring gamma-ray sources in the very-high-energy (VHE, > 100 GeV) band is a very important topic in gamma-ray astronomy. The ARGO-YBJ detector is characterized by a high duty cycle and a wide field of view. Therefore, it is particularly capable of detecting flares from extragalactic objects. Based on fast reconstruction and analysis, real-time monitoring of 33 selected VHE extragalactic sources is implemented. Flares exceeding a specific threshold are reported timely, hence enabling the follow-up observation of these objects using more sensitive detectors, such as Cherenkov telescopes.

  19. COMBINED GAMMA-RAY AND NEUTRON DETECTOR FOR MEASURING THE CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF AIRLESS PLANETARY BODIES.

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, David J. ,; Barraclough, B. L.; Feldman, W. C.; Prettyman, T. H.; Wiens, R. C.

    2001-01-01

    Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) constant1,y itnpinge all planetary bodies and produce characteristic gamma-ray lines and leakage neutrons as reaction products. Together with gamma-ray lines produced by radioactive decay, these nuclear emissions provide a powerful technique for remotely measuring the chemical composition of airless planetary surfaces. While lunar gamma-ray spectroscopy was first demonstrated with Apollo Gamma-Ray measurements, the full value of combined gamma-ray and neutron spectroscopy was shown for the first time with the Lunar Prospector Gamma-Ray (LP-GRS) and Neutron Spectrometers (LP-NS). Any new planetary mission will likely have the requirement that instrument mass and power be kept to a minimum. To satisfy such requirements, we have been designing a GR/NS instrument which combines all the functionality of the LP-GRS and LP-NS for a fraction of the mass and power. Specifically, our design uses a BGO scintillator crystal to measure gamma-rays from 0.5-10 MeV. A borated plastic scintillator and a lithium gliiss scintillator are used to separately measure thermal, epithermal, and fast neutrons as well as serve as an anticoincidence shield for the BGO. All three scintillators are packaged together in a compact phoswich design. Modifications to this design could include a CdZnTe gamma-ray detector for enhanced energy resolution at low energies (0.5-3 MeV). While care needs to be taken to ensure that an adequate count rate is achieved for specific mission designs, previous mission successes demonstrate that a cornbined GR/NS provides essential information about planetary surfaces.

  20. Space Detectors for Gamma Rays (100 MeV-100 GeV): from Egret to Fermi LAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The design of spaceborne high-energy (E is greater than 100 MeV) gamma-ray detectors depends on two principal factors: (1) the basic physics of detecting and measuring the properties of the gamma rays; and (2) the constraints of operating such a detector in space for an extended period. Improvements in technology have enabled major advances in detector performance, as illustrated by two successful instruments, EGRET on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory and LAT on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope.

  1. GAMMA RAY IMAGING FOR ENVIRONMENTAL REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research is a three year development program to apply high resolution gamma-ray imaging technologies to environmental remediation of radioactive hazards. High resolution, position-sensitive germanium detectors are being developed at the Naval Research Laboratory for space app...

  2. On the Angular Resolution of the AGILE Gamma-Ray Imaging Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatini, S.; Donnarumma, I.; Tavani, M.; Trois, A.; Bulgarelli, A.; Argan, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Chen, A.; Del Monte, E.; Fioretti, V.; Gianotti, F.; Giuliani, A.; Longo, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Morselli, A.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Caraveo, P.

    2015-08-01

    We present a study of the angular resolution of the AGILE gamma-ray imaging detector (GRID) that has been operational in space since 2007 April. The AGILE instrument is made of an array of 12 planes that are each equipped with a tungsten converter and silicon microstrip detectors, and is sensitive in the energy range 50 MeV-10 GeV. Among the space instruments devoted to gamma-ray astrophysics, AGILE uniquely exploit an analog readout system with dedicated electronics coupled with silicon detectors. We show the results of Monte Carlo simulations carried out to reproduce the gamma-ray detection by the GRID and we compare them to in-flight data. We use the Crab (pulsar + Nebula) system for discussion of real data performance, since its {E}-2 energy spectrum is representative of the majority of gamma-ray sources. For Crab-like spectrum sources, the GRID angular resolution (FWHM of ˜ 4^\\circ at 100 MeV; ˜ 0\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 8 at 1 GeV; ˜ 0\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 9 integrating the full energy band from 100 MeV to tens of GeV) is stable across a large field of view, characterized by a flat response up to 30^\\circ off-axis. A comparison of the angular resolution obtained by the two operational gamma-ray instruments, AGILE/GRID and Fermi/LAT (Large Area Telescope), is interesting in view of future gamma-ray missions, which are currently under study. The two instruments exploit different detector configurations that affect the angular resolution: the former is optimized in the readout and track reconstruction, especially in the low-energy band, the latter is optimized in terms of converter thickness and power consumption. We show that despite these differences, the angular resolution of both instruments is very similar, between 100 MeV and a few GeV.

  3. Design and performance of soft gamma-ray detector for NeXT mission

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, H.; Kamae, T.; Madejski, G.; Takahashi, T.; Nakazawa, K.; Watanabe, S.; Mitani, T.; Tanaka, T.; Fukazawa, Y.; Kataoka, J.; Ikagawa, T.; Kokubun, M.; Makishima, K.; Terada, Y.; Nomachi, M.; Tashiro, M.; /Saitama U.

    2005-05-04

    The Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD) on board NeXT (Japanese future high energy astrophysics mission) is a Compton telescope with narrow field of view, which utilizes Compton kinematics to enhance its background rejection capabilities. It is realized as a hybrid semiconductor gamma-ray detector which consists of silicon and Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) detectors. It can detect photons in an energy band 0.05-1 MeV at a background level of 5 x 10{sup -7} counts/s/cm{sup 2}/keV; the silicon layers are required to improve the performance at a lower energy band (<0.3 MeV). Excellent energy resolution is the key feature of the SGD to achieve both high angular resolution and good background rejection capability. Its ability to measure gamma-ray polarization opens up a new window to study gamma-ray emission in the universe. We will present the development of key technologies to realize the SGD; high quality CdTe, low noise front-end VLSI and bump bonding technology. Energy resolutions of 1.7 keV (FWHM) for CdTe pixel detectors and 1.1 keV for silicon strip detectors have been measured. We also present the validation of Monte Carlo simulation used to evaluate the performance of the SGD.

  4. Design and Performance of Soft Gamma-ray Detector for NeXT Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, H.; Kamae, T.; Madejski, G.; Takahashi, T.; Nakazawa, K.; Watanabe, S.; Mitani, T.; Tanaka, T.; Fukazawa, Y.; Kataoka, J.; Ikagawa, T.; Kokubun, M.; Makishima, K.; Terada, Y.; Nomachi, M.; Tashiro, M.

    The Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD) on board NeXT (Japanese future high energy astrophysics mission) is a Compton telescope with narrow field of view, which utilizes Compton kinematics to enhance its background rejection capabilities. It is realized as a hybrid semiconductor gamma-ray detector which consists of silicon and Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) detectors. It can detect photons in an energy band 0.05-1 MeV at a background level of 5×10-7 counts/s/cm2/keV; the silicon layers are required to improve the performance at a lower energy band (<0.3 MeV). Excellent energy resolution is the key feature of the SGD to achieve both high angular resolution and good background rejection capability. Its ability to measure gamma-ray polarization opens up a new window to study gamma-ray emission in the universe. We will present the development of key technologies to realize the SGD; high quality CdTe, low noise front-end VLSI and bump bonding technology. Energy resolutions of 1.7 keV (FWHM) for CdTe pixel detectors and 1.1 keV for silicon strip detectors have been measured. We also present the validation of Monte Carlo simulation used to evaluate the performance of the SGD.

  5. Gamma-Ray Detectors: From Homeland Security to the Cosmos (443rd Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey

    2008-12-03

    Many radiation detectors are first developed for homeland security or industrial applications. Scientists, however, are continuously realizing new roles that these detectors can play in high-energy physics and astrophysics experiments. On Wednesday, December 3, join presenter Aleksey Bolotnikov, a physicist in the Nonproliferation and National Security Department (NNSD) and a co-inventor of the cadmium-zinc-telluride Frisch-ring (CdZnTe) detector, for the 443rd Brookhaven Lecture, entitled Gamma-Ray Detectors: From Homeland Security to the Cosmos. In his lecture, Bolotnikov will highlight two primary radiation-detector technologies: CdZnTe detectors and fluid-Xeon (Xe) detectors.

  6. Gamma ray generator

    DOEpatents

    Firestone, Richard B; Reijonen, Jani

    2014-05-27

    An embodiment of a gamma ray generator includes a neutron generator and a moderator. The moderator is coupled to the neutron generator. The moderator includes a neutron capture material. In operation, the neutron generator produces neutrons and the neutron capture material captures at least some of the neutrons to produces gamma rays. An application of the gamma ray generator is as a source of gamma rays for calibration of gamma ray detectors.

  7. Gamma-ray burst and spectroscopy instrumentation development at the Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teegarden, B. J.

    1986-01-01

    This paper summarizes the activities that are specifically related to the development of instrumentation for gamma-ray astronomy. Three programs are described: (1) the Gamma-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (GRIS), a balloon-borne array of seven germanium detectors for high-resolution spectrographic studies of persistent gamma-ray sources; (2) the Transient Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (TGRS), a single radiatively-cooled germanium detector for the spectrographic study of gamma-ray bursts, and (3) the Rapidly Moving Telescope (RMT), a ground-based optical telescope for the detection and study of short-lived optical transients, particularly those that occur in coincidence with gamma-ray bursts.

  8. Simulation of gamma-ray spectra for a variety of user-specified detector designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rester, A. C., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The gamma-ray spectrum simulation program BSIMUL was designed to allow the operator to follow the path of a gamma-ray through a detector, shield and collimator whose dimensions are entered by the operator. It can also be used to simulate spectra that would be generated by a detector. Several improvements have been made to the program within the last few months. The detector, shield and collimator dimensions can now be entered through an interactive menu whose options are discussed below. In addition, spectra containing more than one gamma-ray energy can now be generated with the menu - for isotopes listed in the program. Adding isotopes to the main routine is also quite easy. Subroutines have been added to enable the operator to specify the material and dimensions of a collimator. This report details the progress made in simulating gamma-ray spectra for a variety of user-specified detector designs. In addition, a short discussion of work done in the related areas of pulse shape analysis and the spectral analysis is included. The pulse shape analysis and spectral analysis work is being performed pursuant to the requirements of contract F-94-C-0006, for the Advanced Research Projects Agency and the U.S. Air Force.

  9. Simulation of the Interactions Between Gamma-Rays and Detectors Using BSIMUL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haywood, S. E.; Rester, A. C., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Progress made during 1995 on the Monte-Carlo gamma-ray spectrum simulation program BSIMUL is discussed. Several features have been added, including the ability to model shield that are tapered cylinders. Several simulations were made on the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous detector.

  10. CDZNTE ROOM-TEMPERATURE SEMICONDUCTOR GAMMA-RAY DETECTOR FOR NATIONAL-SECURITY APPLICATIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    CAMARDA,G.S.; BOLOTNIKOV, A.E.; CUI, Y.; HOSSAIN, A.; KOHMAN, K.T.; JAMES, R.B.

    2007-05-04

    One important mission of the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration is to develop reliable gamma-ray detectors to meet the widespread needs of users for effective techniques to detect and identify special nuclear- and radioactive-materials. Accordingly, the Nonproliferation and National Security Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory was tasked to evaluate existing technology and to develop improved room-temperature detectors based on semiconductors, such as CdZnTe (CZT). Our research covers two important areas: Improving the quality of CZT material, and exploring new CZT-based gamma-ray detectors. In this paper, we report on our recent findings from the material characterization and tests of actual CZT devices fabricated in our laboratory and from materials/detectors supplied by different commercial vendors. In particular, we emphasize the critical role of secondary phases in the current CZT material and issues in fabricating the CZT detectors, both of which affect their performance.

  11. Monte Carlo simulation of induced radioactive background in gamma-ray detector materials

    SciTech Connect

    Truscott, P.R.; Evans, H.E.; Dyer, C.S.; Cosby, M.; Knight, P.R.; Moss, C.E.

    1998-06-01

    Induced activation in detector materials constitutes a major source of background for space-borne {gamma}-ray instruments. Future detector systems will utilize a variety of background reduction techniques and novel detector materials to maximize signal-to-noise and resolution of the measurements taken, and assessment of the merits of different designs will require detailed attention to a wide range of physical processes. The Integrated Radiation Transport Suite (IRTS) has been applied to simulate the effects of spacecraft shielding against Van Allen and galactic cosmic-ray protons, the production of secondary hadrons, and induced radioactivity in and the response of {gamma}-ray detector materials. This paper discusses the physics requirements for these simulations, and the degree of success of the models through comparisons with experimental data obtained from Space Shuttle flights and proton-beam irradiation of detector materials.

  12. Characterization of Single-Sided Charge-Sharing CZT Strip Detectors for Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donmez, Burcin; Macri, John R.; Ryan, James M.; Legere, Jason S.; McConnell, Mark L.; Widholm, Mark; Narita, Tomohiko; Hamel, Louis-Andre

    2006-01-01

    We report progress in the study of thick single-sided charge-sharing cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) strip detector modules designed to perform spectroscopy and 3-D imaging of gamma-rays. We report laboratory measurements including spectroscopy, efficiency and 3-D imaging capability of prototype detectors (15 15 7.5 cu mm) with 11x11 unit cells. We also report on Monte Carlo simulations (GEANT4 v7.1) to investigate the effect of multihits on detector performance in both spectroscopy and imaging. We compare simulation results with data obtained from laboratory measurements and discuss the implications for future strip detector designs. Keywords: CZT, strip detectors, gamma-ray

  13. Detectors of Cosmic Rays, Gamma Rays, and Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Altamirano, A.; Navarra, G.

    2009-04-30

    We summarize the main features, properties and performances of the typical detectors in use in Cosmic Ray Physics. A brief historical and general introduction will focus on the main classes and requirements of such detectors.

  14. Polarimetry with the Soft Gamma-ray Detector onboard ASTRO-H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Tsunefumi

    2012-07-01

    X-ray and gamma-ray polarimetry is a powerful probe to investigate emission mechanisms and geometries of astrophysical sources. It provides vital information on ordered magnetic field and accretion disk around compact objects. The Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD) onboard ASTRO-H satellite, scheduled for launch in 2014, is a highly-sensitive spectrometer in the 40-600 keV energy band. Since the SGD employs a Si/CdTe Compton camera surrounded by a thick BGO active shield, it is also sensitive to polarization in the 50-200 keV energy range. We have been developing the SGD through extensive tests in laboratory, detailed Monte-Carlo simulation and verification tests at synchrotron facilities (e.g., Takeda et al. 2010; Tajima et al. 2010). In this contribution, we will present the SGD instrumentation, prototype testing and expected performance as a gamma-ray polarimeter.

  15. High performance detectors for upgraded gamma ray diagnostics for JET DT campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zychor, I.; Boltruczyk, G.; Burakowska, A.; Craciunescu, T.; Fernandes, A.; Figueiredo, J.; Giacomelli, L.; Gorini, G.; Gierlik, M.; Gosk, M.; Grodzicka, M.; Iwanowska-Hanke, J.; Kaveney, G.; Kiptily, V.; Korolczuk, S.; Kwiatkowski, R.; Mianowski, S.; Moszynski, M.; Murari, A.; Nocente, M.; Pereira, R. C.; Perseo, V.; Rigamonti, D.; Rzadkiewicz, J.; Sibczynski, P.; Santos, B.; Soare, S.; Syntfeld-Kazuch, A.; Swiderski, L.; Szawlowski, M.; Szczesniak, T.; Szewinski, J.; Szydlowski, A.; Tardocchi, M.; Urban, A.; Zoita, V. L.; contributors, JET

    2016-06-01

    In forthcoming deuterium-tritium (DT) experiments on JET a significant population of alpha-particles will be produced. For operating alpha-particle diagnostics at high DT neutron fluxes, specific improvements have to be made. Proposed new detectors for gamma-ray measurements will be based on CeBr3 and LaBr3:Ce scintillators. They are characterized by a good energy resolution, a relatively high detection efficiency for a few MeV gamma-rays and a fast response time. An overview of scintillator parameters is presented. A description of the properties of photodetectors is given to indicate optimal setups. Results of measurements, using gamma-ray sources with energies up to a few MeV, are discussed with relation to the DT campaign requirements.

  16. Novel deployment of elpasolites as a dual neutron / gamma- ray directional detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guckes, Amber

    At a time when upholding national security has never been more important, there exists a need for the advancement of radiation detection technologies. Neutron and photon detectors are essential to fulfilling mission areas including detection and localization of missing, stolen or smuggled radiological or nuclear materials, quantification of the effects of a radiological or nuclear event, and supporting nonproliferation efforts. The aim of this study was to evaluate a new radiation detector based on the scintillation elpasolite compound Cs2LiYCl6:Ce (CLYC) for simultaneous measurements of neutron and photon flux and the localization of radiation sources. Previous studies performed on the CLYC scintillator indicate its potential for thermal neutron and gamma-ray measurements. This study is dedicated to the novel application of the CLYC as a dual neutron / photon detector and as part of a directional detection system. Both computational modeling and an experimental study were carried out within this research project. As part of the computational study, the response of a CLYC scintillator detector to gamma rays induced by thermal neutron interaction with Cl and 7Li nuclei was investigated using the MCNP6 code. In addition, arrays of three and four CLYC detectors were modeled in order to evaluate the directional detection of both a thermal neutron source and a gamma-ray source. It was shown that little or no quality of source direction determination would be lost when three detectors were used in the array compared to four detectors. In the experimental study, the photon spectroscopy capabilities of the CLYC detectors were evaluated. A gamma-ray energy resolution of 4.9% was measured for the 662-keV peak of 137Cs and 3.6% for the 1.33-MeV peak of 60Co. Using a thermal neutron source, the pulse shape discrimination analysis was successfully performed for the CLYC detector signal waveforms. Thermal neutrons and gamma rays were separated with an exceptional figure of merit

  17. Development of CDZNTE Detectors for Low-Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.

    1999-01-01

    Under this grant the UC Berkeley PI, K. Hurley, joined a Goddard-led effort to develop large area, multi-pixel Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CdZnTe, or CZT) detectors for gamma-ray astronomy. His task was to advise the project of new developments in the area of cosmic gamma-ray bursts, in order to focus the detector development effort on the construction of an instrument which could be deployed on a spacecraft to localize and measure the energy spectra of bursts with good angular and energy resolution, respectively. UC Berkeley had no hardware role in this proposal. The result of this effort was the production, at Goddard, of five CZT prototype modules. A proposal was written for SWIFT, a MIDEX mission to study cosmic gamma-ray bursts. One experiment aboard SWIFT is the Burst Arcminute Telescope (BAT), which consists of a 5200 sq cm hard X-ray detector and a coded mask. The detector comprises 256 CZT modules, each containing 128 4 x 4 x 2 mm CZT detectors. Each detector is read out using an ASIC. The angular resolution achieved with this mask/array combination is 22 arcminutes, and a strong gamma-ray burst can be localized to an accuracy of 4 arcminutes in under 10 seconds. The energy resolution is typically 5 keV FWHM at 60 keV, and the energy range is 10 - 150 keV. The BAT views 2 steradians, and its sensitivity is such that the instrument can detect 350 gamma-ray burst/year, localizing 320 of them to better than 4 arcminute accuracy. The BAT concept therefore met the science goals for gamma-ray bursts. The UCB effort in the SWIFT proposal included the scientific objectives for gamma-ray bursts, and the assembly of a team of optical and radio observers who would use the BAT data to perform rapid multi-wavelength searches for the counterparts to bursts. This proposal was submitted to NASA and peer-reviewed. In January 1999 it was one of five such proposals selected for a Phase A study. This study was completed in June, and SWIFT was formally presented to NASA in

  18. Computational assessment of the impact of gamma-ray detector material properties on spectroscopic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, David V.; Baciak, James E.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Hensley, Walter K.; Miller, Erin A.; Wittman, Richard S.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2011-09-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is performing a computational assessment of the impact of several important gamma-ray detector material properties (e.g. energy resolution and intrinsic detection efficiency) on the scenario-specific spectroscopic performance of these materials. The research approach combines 3D radiation transport calculations, detector response modeling, and spectroscopic analysis of simulated energy deposition spectra to map the functional dependence of detection performance on the underlying material properties. This assessment is intended to help guide formulation of performance goals for new detector materials within the context of materials discovery programs, with an emphasis on applications in the threat reduction, nonproliferation, and safeguards/ verification user communities. The research results will also provide guidance to the gamma-ray sensor design community in estimating relative spectroscopic performance merits of candidate materials for novel or notional detectors.

  19. Characterization of Cd0.9Zn0.1Te based virtual Frisch grid detectors for high energy gamma ray detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, R. M.; Chaudhuri, S. K.; Zavalla, K. J.; Mandal, K. C.

    2013-02-01

    Detector grade CZT single crystals have been grown from zone refined Cd, Zn, and Te (∼7 N) precursor materials using a tellurium solvent method. Infrared transmission imaging has shown an average tellurium inclusion size of ∼8 μm in the as-grown crystal. Radiation detectors were fabricated in planar and virtual Frisch grid geometry and characterized for their spectroscopic performance. Charge transport properties revealed a high drift mobility of∼1200 cm2/V s and a mobility-lifetime product of ∼2.8×10-3 cm2/V. A detector with planar configuration (dimensions 6.9×6.9×4.8 mm3) showed an energy resolution of 4.7% for 59.5 keV gamma rays. The detector in a Frisch grid configuration (dimensions 4.2×6.2×6.5 mm3) exhibited an energy resolution of 1.4% for 662 keV gamma rays. Digital spectroscopic measurements were carried out using a high-resolution digitizer card. A biparametric correlation scheme was employed to study the effect of charge loss on energy resolution of the planar detector. Based on this correlation scheme, a digital correction method was applied and improved pulse-height spectrum was obtained for 662 keV gamma rays using the planar detector with spectral features comparable to those of the virtual Frisch grid detector.

  20. Development of gas micro-structure detectors for gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, S. D.; Belolipetskiy, S. V.; Bertsch, D. L.; Catelli, J. R.; Crawford, H.; Daniels, W. M.; Deines-Jones, P.; Esposito, J. A.; Fenker, H.; Gossan, B.; Hartman, R. C.; Hutchins, J. B.; Krizmanic, J. F.; Lindenstruth, V.; Martin, M. D.; Mitchell, J. W.; Pitts, W. K.; Simrall, J. H.; Sreekumar, P.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Thompson, D. J.; Visser, G.; Walsh, K. M.

    1997-05-01

    Large area gas micro-structure detectors are being developed for the next generation high-energy gamma-ray telescope as part of NASA's SR&T program to support new technologies. These low-cost detectors are produced by laser micromachining of metalized polyimide films layered on carbon fiber composite substrates. This integrated detector and support design reduces the detector complexity and associated assembly costs. Accomplishments to date include testing of a 32 channel ASIC for the front-end electronics and integration of functional hardware into prototype detectors for tests of the FPGA readout system and event display software.

  1. Gamma-ray Full Spectrum Analysis for Environmental Radioactivity by HPGe Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Meeyoung; Lee, Kyeong Beom; Kim, Kyeong Ja; Lee, Min-Kie; Han, Ju-Bong

    2014-12-01

    Odyssey, one of the NASA¡¯s Mars exploration program and SELENE (Kaguya), a Japanese lunar orbiting spacecraft have a payload of Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) for analyzing radioactive chemical elements of the atmosphere and the surface. In these days, gamma-ray spectroscopy with a High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector has been widely used for the activity measurements of natural radionuclides contained in the soil of the Earth. The energy spectra obtained by the HPGe detectors have been generally analyzed by means of the Window Analysis (WA) method. In this method, activity concentrations are determined by using the net counts of energy window around individual peaks. Meanwhile, an alternative method, the so-called Full Spectrum Analysis (FSA) method uses count numbers not only from full-absorption peaks but from the contributions of Compton scattering due to gamma-rays. Consequently, while it takes a substantial time to obtain a statistically significant result in the WA method, the FSA method requires a much shorter time to reach the same level of the statistical significance. This study shows the validation results of FSA method. We have compared the concentration of radioactivity of 40K, 232Th and 238U in the soil measured by the WA method and the FSA method, respectively. The gamma-ray spectrum of reference materials (RGU and RGTh, KCl) and soil samples were measured by the 120% HPGe detector with cosmic muon veto detector. According to the comparison result of activity concentrations between the FSA and the WA, we could conclude that FSA method is validated against the WA method. This study implies that the FSA method can be used in a harsh measurement environment, such as the gamma-ray measurement in the Moon, in which the level of statistical significance is usually required in a much shorter data acquisition time than the WA method.

  2. A novel detector assembly for detecting thermal neutrons, fast neutrons and gamma rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cester, D.; Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S.; Nebbia, G.; Pino, F.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Stevanato, L.; Bonesso, I.; Turato, F.

    2016-09-01

    A new composite detector has been developed by combining two different commercial scintillators. The device has the capability to detect gamma rays as well as thermal and fast neutrons; the signal discrimination between the three types is performed on-line by means of waveform digitizers and PSD algorithms. This work describes the assembled detector and its discrimination performance to be employed in the applied field.

  3. Study of gamma ray response of R404A superheated droplet detector using a two-state model.

    PubMed

    Mondal, P K; Chatterjee, B K

    2013-07-01

    The superheated droplet detector (SDD) is known to be gamma ray insensitive below a threshold temperature which made them excellent candidates for neutron detection in the presence of gamma rays. Above the threshold temperature, the gamma ray detection efficiency increases with increase in temperature. In this work the gamma ray threshold temperature has been studied for SDD using R404A as the active liquid and is compared to the theoretical prediction. The temperature variation of gamma ray detection efficiency and interstate transition kinetics has also been studied using a two-state model. The experiments are performed at the ambient pressure of 1 atm and in the temperature range of 17-32 °C using a 662 keV (1)(37)Cs gamma ray source. PMID:23528644

  4. Design and Performance of the Soft Gamma-ray Detector for the NeXT mission

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, Hiroyasu; Kamae, T.; Madejski, G.; Mitani, T.; Nakazawa, K.; Tanaka, T.; Takahashi, T.; Watanabe, S.; Fukazawa, Y.; Ikagawa, T.; Kataoka, J.; Kokubun, M.; Makishima, K.; Terada, Y.; Nomachi, M.; Tashiro, M.; /SLAC /Sagamihara, Inst. Space Astron. Sci. /Tokyo U. /Hiroshima U. /Tokyo Inst. Tech. /Wako, RIKEN /Osaka U. /Saitama U.

    2006-04-19

    The Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD) on board the NeXT (Japanese future high energy astrophysics mission) is a Compton telescope with narrow field of view (FOV), which utilizes Compton kinematics to enhance its background rejection capabilities. It is realized as a hybrid semiconductor gamma-ray detector which consists of silicon and CdTe (cadmium telluride) detectors. It can detect photons in a wide energy band (0.05-1 MeV) at a background level of 5 x 10{sup -7} counts/s/cm{sup 2}/keV; the silicon layers are required to improve the performance at a lower energy band (<0.3 MeV). Excellent energy resolution is the key feature of the SGD, allowing it to achieve both high angular resolution and good background rejection capability. An additional capability of the SGD, its ability to measure gamma-ray polarization, opens up a new window to study properties of astronomical objects. We will present the development of key technologies to realize the SGD: high quality CdTe, low noise front-end ASIC and bump bonding technology. Energy resolutions of 1.7 keV (FWHM) for CdTe pixel detectors and 1.1 keV for Si strip detectors have been measured. We also present the validation of Monte Carlo simulation used to evaluate the performance of the SGD.

  5. Xenon gamma-ray detector for ecological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, Alexander S.; Ulin, Sergey E.; Chernysheva, Irina V.; Dmitrenko, Valery V.; Grachev, Victor M.; Petrenko, Denis V.; Shustov, Alexander E.; Uteshev, Ziyaetdin M.; Vlasik, Konstantin F.

    2015-01-01

    A description of the xenon detector (XD) for ecological applications is presented. The detector provides high energy resolution and is able to operate under extreme environmental conditions (wide temperature range and unfavorable acoustic action). Resistance to acoustic noise as well as improvement in energy resolution has been achieved by means of real-time digital pulse processing. Another important XD feature is the ionization chamber's thin wall with composite housing, which significantly decreases the mass of the device and expands its energy range, especially at low energies.

  6. 3D positioning germanium detectors for gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coburn, Wayne; Amrose, Susan; Boggs, Steven E.; Lin, Robert P.; Amman, Mark S.; Burks, Morgan T.; Hull, Ethan L.; Luke, Paul N.; Madden, Norman W.

    2003-01-01

    We have developed germanium detector technologies for use in the Nuclear Compton Telescope (NCT) - a balloon-borne soft γ-ray (0.2-10 MeV) telescope to study astrophysical sources of nuclear line emission and polarization. The heart of NCT is an array of twelve large volume cross strip germanium detectors, designed to provide 3-D positions for each photon interaction with ~1mm resolution while maintaining the high spectral resolution of germanium. Here we discuss the detailed performance of our prototype 19x19 strip detector, including laboratory tests, calibrations, and numerical simulations. In addition to the x and y positions provided by the orthogonal strips, the interaction depth (z-position) in the detector is measured using the relative timing of the anode and cathode charge collection signals. We describe laboratory calibrations of the depth discrimination using collimated sources with different characteristic energies, and compare the measurements to detailed Monte Carlo simulations and charge collection routines tracing electron-hole pairs from the interaction site to the electrodes. We have also investigated the effects of charge sharing and loss between electrodes, and present these in comparison to charge collection simulations. Detailed analysis of strip-to-strip uniformity in both efficiency and spectral resolution are also presented.

  7. Gamma-ray pulse height spectrum analysis on systems with multiple Ge detectors using a spectrum summing

    SciTech Connect

    Killian, E.W.

    1997-05-01

    A technique has been developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to sum high resolution gamma-ray pulse spectra from systems with multiple Ge detectors. Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company operates a multi-detector spectrometer configuration at the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant facility which is used to characterize the radio nuclide contents in waste drums destined for shipment to Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. This summing technique was developed to increase the sensitivity of the system, reduce the count times required to properly quantify the radionuclides and provide a more consistent methodology for combining data collected from multiple detectors. In spectrometer systems with multiple detectors looking at non homogenous waste forms it is often difficult to combine individual spectrum analysis results from each detector to obtain a meaningful result for the total waste container. This is particularly true when the counting statistics in each individual spectrum are poor. The spectrum summing technique adds the spectra collected by each detector into a single spectrum which has better counting statistics than each individual spectrum. A normal spectral analysis program can then be used to analyze the sum spectrum to obtain radio nuclide values which have smaller errors and do not have to be further manipulated to obtain results for the total waste container.

  8. Gamma-ray peak shapes from cadmium zinc telluride detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Namboodiri, M.N.; Lavietes, A.D.; McQuaid, J.H.

    1996-09-01

    We report the results of a study of the peak shapes in the gamma spectra measured using several 5 x 5 x 5 mm{sup 3} cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors. A simple parameterization involving a Gaussian and an exponential low energy tail describes the peak shapes sell. We present the variation of the parameters with gamma energy. This type of information is very useful in the analysis of complex gamma spectra consisting of many peaks.

  9. High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1992-05-26

    A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n-type, intrinsic, p-type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography. 18 figs.

  10. High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Kaplan, Selig N.; Perez-Mendez, Victor

    1992-01-01

    A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n type, intrinsic, p type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography.

  11. Charged Particle Induced Radiation damage of Germanium Detectors in Space: Two Mars Observer Gamma-Ray Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruekner, J.; Koenen, M.; Evans, L. G.; Starr, R.; Bailey, S. H.; Boynton W. V.

    1997-01-01

    The Mars Observer Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (MO GRS) was designed to measure gamma-rays emitted by the Martian surface. This gamma-ray emission is induced by energetic cosmic-ray particles penetrating the Martian surface and producing many secondary particles and gamma rays. The MO GRS consisted of an high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector with a passive cooler. Since radiation damage due to permanent bombardment of energetic cosmic ray particles (with energies up to several GeV) was expected for the MO GRS HPGe crystal, studies on radiation damage effects of HPGe crystals were carried on earth. One of the HPGe crystals (paradoxically called FLIGHT) was similar to the MO GRS crystal. Both detectors, MO GRS and FLIGHT, contained closed-end coaxial n-type HPGe crystals and had the same geometrical dimensions (5.6 x 5.6 cm). Many other parameters, such as HV and operation temperature, differed in space and on earth, which made it somewhat difficult to directly compare the performance of both detector systems. But among other detectors, detector FLIGHT provided many useful data to better understand radiation damage effects.

  12. Stabilization of prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) spectra from NaI detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metwally, W. A.; Gardner, R. P.

    2004-06-01

    NaI detectors are still used frequently in industrial Prompt Gamma-Ray Neutron Activation Analysis applications such as in bulk material analysis. They have the advantages of being efficient for high-energy gamma rays, being relatively rugged, and being able to be used without cooling. When using NaI detectors, and consequently photomultiplier tubes, the quality of the data can drastically deteriorate through gain and zero shifts that result in spectral smearing due to temperature and/or counting rate changes. A new offline approach is presented to stabilize the NaI spectral drift. The approach is not sensitive to the cause of the drift and takes into account the NaI and ADC non-linearities. Peak resolution is improved substantially when this approach is used in the presence of spectral drift.

  13. The Tunka detector complex: from cosmic-ray to gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budnev, N.; Astapov, I.; Barbashina, N.; Bogdanov, A.; Bogorodskii, D.; Boreyko, V.; Büker, M.; Brückner, M.; Chiavassa, A.; Chvalaev, O.; Gress, O.; Gress, T.; Dyachok, A.; Epimakhov, S.; Gafatov, A.; Gorbunov, N.; Grebenyuk, V.; Grinuk, A.; Haungs, A.; Hiller, R.; Horns, D.; Huege, T.; Ivanova, A.; Kalinin, A.; Karpov, N.; Kalmykov, N.; Kazarina, Y.; Kindin, V.; Kirichkov, N.; Kiryuhin, S.; Kleifges, M.; Kokoulin, R.; Komponiest, K.; Konstantinov, A.; Konstantinov, E.; Korobchenko, A.; Korosteleva, E.; Kostunin, D.; Kozhin, V.; Krömer, O.; Kunnas, M.; Kuzmichev, L.; Lenok, V.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lubsandorzhiev, N.; Mirgazov, R.; Mirzoyan, R.; Monkhoev, R.; Nachtigall, R.; Pakhorukov, A.; Panasyuk, M.; Pankov, L.; Petrukhin, A.; Platonov, V.; Poleschuk, V.; Popova, E.; Porelli, A.; Prosin, V.; Ptuskin, V.; Rubtsov, G.; Rühle, C.; Samoliga, V.; Satunin, P.; Savinov, V.; Saunkin, A.; Schröder, F.; Semeney, Yu; Shaibonov (junior, B.; Silaev, A.; Silaev (junior, A.; Skurikhin, A.; Slucka, V.; Spiering, C.; Sveshnikova, L.; Tabolenko, V.; Tkachenko, A.; Tkachev, L.; Tluczykont, M.; Voronin, D.; Wischnewski, R.; Zagorodnikov, A.; Zurbanov, V.; Yashin, I.

    2015-08-01

    TAIGA stands for “Tunka Advanced Instrument for cosmic ray physics and Gamma Astronomy” and is a project to build a complex, hybrid detector system for ground-based gamma- ray astronomy from a few TeV to several PeV, and for cosmic-ray studies from 100 TeV to 1 EeV. TAIGA will search for ”PeVatrons” (ultra-high energy gamma-ray sources) and measure the composition and spectrum of cosmic rays in the knee region (100 TeV - 10 PeV) with good energy resolution and high statistics. TAIGA will include Tunka-HiSCORE (an array of wide-angle air Cherenkov stations), an array of Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes, an array of particle detectors, both on the surface and underground, and the TUNKA-133 air Cherenkov array.

  14. Upgrade of LXe gamma-ray detector in MEG experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Daisuke

    2014-08-01

    We are searching for the μ → e + γ in the MEG experiment. In order to improve the search sensitivity down to about 5 × 10-14, which is one order higher than the sensitivity goal of the current stage of the experiment. We are planning a major upgrade of the experiment including the upgrade of the liquid xenon (LXe) γ-ray detector. The main item of the upgrade of the xenon detector is a replacement of the current PMTs located on the γ-ray incident face with smaller photosensors such as MPPC. The energy and position resolutions are expected to be significantly improved, especially for the event where γ-ray converts at a shallow point in the LXe. Because the MPPC operational in liquid xenon is not yet commercially available, we are developing special MPPC in collaboration with Hamamatsu Photonics. The detection efficiency for LXe scintillation light is measured with prototype sensors and found to be already at the level necessary for the upgrade of the experiment.

  15. Calibration of particle detectors for secondary cosmic rays using gamma-ray beams from thunderclouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, A.; Chilingaryan, S.; Hovsepyan, G.

    2015-09-01

    After observation of hundreds of Thunderstorm Ground Enhancements (TGEs) we measure energy spectra of particles originated in clouds and directed towards Earth. We use these "beams" for calibration of cosmic ray detectors located beneath the clouds at an altitude of 3200 m at Mount Aragats in Armenia. The calibrations of particle detectors with fluxes of TGE gamma rays are in good agreement with simulation results and allow estimation of the energy thresholds and efficiencies of numerous particle detectors used for studying galactic and solar cosmic rays.

  16. Nuclear Material Accountability Applications of a Continuous Energy and Direction Gamma Ray Detector

    SciTech Connect

    David Gerts; Robert Bean; Marc Paff

    2010-07-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory has recently developed a detector system based on the principle of a Wilson cloud chamber that gives the original energy and direction to a gamma ray source. This detector has the properties that the energy resolution is continuous and the direction to the source can be resolved to desired fidelity. Furthermore, the detector has low power requirements, is durable, operates in widely varying environments, and is relatively cheap to produce. This detector is expected, however, to require significant time to perform measurements. To mitigate the significant time for measurements, the detector is expected to scale to very large sizes with a linear increase in cost. For example, the proof of principle detector is approximately 30,000 cm3. This work describes the technical results that lead to these assertions. Finally, the applications of this detector are described in the context of nuclear material accountability.

  17. Multipurpose Radiation Resistant Semiconductor Detectors for Alpha, Neutron & Low Energy Gamma Ray Measurements at High Temperatures in High-Intensity Gamma Ray

    SciTech Connect

    Ruddy, Frank H.

    2005-06-01

    Work scheduled under year two of DOE Grant DE-FG02-04ER63734 is on schedule and all year-two milestones have or will be met. Results to date demonstrate that unprecedented silicon carbide (SiC) energy resolution has been obtained, and that SiC detectors may achieve energy resolution that exceeds that obtainable with the best silicon alpha spectrometers. Fast-neutron energy spectrometry measurements indicate that recoil-ion energy spectrometry should be possible with SiC detectors. Furthermore, SiC detectors have been demonstrated to perform well even after gamma-ray exposures of 1.E09 Rad. This result and the previously demonstrated capability of SiC detectors to operate in elevated-temperature environments are very promising for potential DOE EMSP applications. A new class of multipurpose, radiation-resistant semiconductor detectors that can be used in elevated-temperature and high-radiation environments is being developed under this grant. These detectors, based on silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor are designed to have larger active volumes than previously available SiC detectors, and are being tested for their response to alpha particles, X-rays and low energy gamma rays, and fast neutrons. Specifically, SiC radiation detectors with larger areas and 100-micrometer thick active regions have been designed and manufactured according to detector-design specifications. Detectors based on a Schottky diode design were specified in order to minimize the effects of the detector entrance window on alpha particle measurements. During manufacture of the Schottky diodes, the manufacturer also provided a set of large-volume SiC p-i-n diodes for testing Extensive alpha particle measurements have been carried out to test and quantify the response of the SiC Schottky diodes. Exposures to 148-Gd, 213-Po, 217-At, 221-Fr, 225-Ac, 237-Np, 238-Pu, 240-Pu, and 242-Pu sources were used to obtain detailed alpha response data in the alpha energy range from 3182.787 keV to 8375.9 ke

  18. MeV Gamma Ray Detection Algorithms for Stacked Silicon Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMurray, Robert E. Jr.; Hubbard, G. Scott; Wercinski, Paul F.; Keller, Robert G.

    1993-01-01

    By making use of the signature of a gamma ray event as it appears in N = 5 to 20 lithium-drifted silicon detectors and applying smart selection algorithms, gamma rays in the energy range of 1 to 8 MeV can be detected with good efficiency and selectivity. Examples of the types of algorithms used for different energy regions include the simple sum mode, the sum-coincidence mode used in segmented detectors, unique variations on sum-coincidence for an N-dimensional vector event, and a new and extremely useful mode for double escape peak spectroscopy at pair-production energies. The latter algorithm yields a spectrum similar to that of the pair spectrometer, but without the need of the dual external segments for double escape coincidence, and without the large loss in efficiency of double escape events. Background events due to Compton scattering are largely suppressed. Monte Carlo calculations were used to model the gamma ray interactions in the silicon, in order to enable testing of a wide array of different algorithms on the event N-vectors for a large-N stack.

  19. Mercuric iodide room-temperature array detectors for gamma-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Patt, B.

    1994-11-15

    Significant progress has been made recently in the development of mercuric iodide detector arrays for gamma-ray imaging, making real the possibility of constructing high-performance small, light-weight, portable gamma-ray imaging systems. New techniques have been applied in detector fabrication and then low noise electronics which have produced pixel arrays with high-energy resolution, high spatial resolution, high gamma stopping efficiency. Measurements of the energy resolution capability have been made on a 19-element protypical array. Pixel energy resolutions of 2.98% fwhm and 3.88% fwhm were obtained at 59 keV (241-Am) and 140-keV (99m-Tc), respectively. The pixel spectra for a 14-element section of the data is shown together with the composition of the overlapped individual pixel spectra. These techniques are now being applied to fabricate much larger arrays with thousands of pixels. Extension of these principles to imaging scenarios involving gamma-ray energies up to several hundred keV is also possible. This would enable imaging of the 208 keV and 375-414 keV 239-Pu and 240-Pu structures, as well as the 186 keV line of 235-U.

  20. Soft gamma-ray detector for the ASTRO-H Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Shin; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Blandford, Roger; Enoto, Teruaki; Kataoka, Jun; Kawaharada, Madoka; Kokubun, Motohide; Laurent, Philippe; Lebrun, François; Limousin, Olivier; Madejski, Greg; Makishima, Kazuo; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Nakamori, Takeshi; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Mori, Kunishiro; Odaka, Hirokazu; Ohno, Masanori; Ohta, Masayuki; Sato, Goro; Sato, Rie; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tashiro, Makoto; Terada, Yukikatsu; Uchiyama, Hideki; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Yamada, Shinya; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Yuasa, Takayuki

    2012-09-01

    ASTRO-H is the next generation JAXA X-ray satellite, intended to carry instruments with broad energy coverage and exquisite energy resolution. The Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD) is one of ASTRO-H instruments and will feature wide energy band (60-600 keV) at a background level 10 times better than the current instruments on orbit. The SGD is complimentary to ASTRO-H’s Hard X-ray Imager covering the energy range of 5-80 keV. The SGD achieves low background by combining a Compton camera scheme with a narrow field-of-view active shield where Compton kinematics is utilized to reject backgrounds. The Compton camera in the SGD is realized as a hybrid semiconductor detector system which consists of silicon and CdTe (cadmium telluride) sensors. Good energy resolution is afforded by semiconductor sensors, and it results in good background rejection capability due to better constraints on Compton kinematics. Utilization of Compton kinematics also makes the SGD sensitive to the gamma-ray polarization, opening up a new window to study properties of gamma-ray emission processes. In this paper, we will present the detailed design of the SGD and the results of the final prototype developments and evaluations. Moreover, we will also present expected performance based on the measurements with prototypes.

  1. Soft gamma-ray detector for the ASTRO-H Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, Hiroyasu; Blandford, Roger; Enoto, Teruaki; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Gilmore, Kirk; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Kataoka, Jun; Kawaharada, Madoka; Kokubun, Motohide; Laurent, Philippe; Lebrun, Francois; Limousin, Olivier; Madejski, Greg; Makishima, Kazuo; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Ohno, Masanori; Ohta, Masayuki; Sato, Goro; Sato, Rie; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tashiro, Makoto; Terada, Yukikatsu; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Watanabe, Shin; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yonetoku, Daisuke

    2010-07-01

    ASTRO-H is the next generation JAXA X-ray satellite, intended to carry instruments with broad energy coverage and exquisite energy resolution. The Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD) is one of ASTRO-H instruments and will feature wide energy band (40-600 keV) at a background level 10 times better than the current instruments on orbit. SGD is complimentary to ASTRO-H's Hard X-ray Imager covering the energy range of 5-80 keV. The SGD achieves low background by combining a Compton camera scheme with a narrow field-of-view active shield where Compton kinematics is utilized to reject backgrounds. The Compton camera in the SGD is realized as a hybrid semiconductor detector system which consists of silicon and CdTe (cadmium telluride) sensors. Good energy resolution is afforded by semiconductor sensors, and it results in good background rejection capability due to better constraints on Compton kinematics. Utilization of Compton kinematics also makes the SGD sensitive to the gamma-ray polarization, opening up a new window to study properties of gamma-ray emission processes. The ASTRO-H mission is approved by ISAS/JAXA to proceed to a detailed design phase with an expected launch in 2014. In this paper, we present science drivers and concept of the SGD instrument followed by detailed description of the instrument and expected performance.

  2. Performance optimization for hard X-ray/soft gamma-ray detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, Fiona A.; Kahn, Steven M.; Hailey, Charles J.; Ziock, Klaus P.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the optimization of the performance of imaging scintillation detectors used in the hard X-ray/soft gamma-ray (20-300) keV region of the spectrum. In these devices, absorption of an incident gamma-ray within an alkali halide crystal induces a scintillation light distribution which is centroided by an imaging photomultiplier tube mounted to the crystal. The ultimate imaging resolution is strongly affected by the detailed propagation of the scintillation light within the crystal and at the interface between the crystal and the phototube face plate. A number of refined techniques for preparing the scintillation crystals so as to optimize the imaging resolution have been investigated. The results indicate very good agreement with relatively simple models of the light propagation. It is shown that it is possible to achieve resolution consistent with the most optimistic models.

  3. BATSE gamma-ray burst line search. 1: Search for narrow lines in spectroscopy detector data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, David M.; Teegarden, Bonnard J.; Schaefer, Bradley E.; Cline, Thomas L.; Band, David L.; Ford, Lyle A.; Matteson, James L.; Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Briggs, Michael S.

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of data from the Spectroscopy Detectors (SDs) of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) has found no convincing line features in the spectra of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in almost 3 years of operation, in contrast to expectations based on results from other experiments. In this Letter we discuss the visual search for narrow lines in the SD data. The search has examined 192 bursts, of which approximately 18 were intense enough that lines similar to those seen by instruments on the Ginga satellite would have been visible between approximately 20 and approximately 100 keV. A simplified calculation shows that the BATSE and Ginga results are consistent at the 13% level.

  4. Shower disc sampling and the angular resolution of gamma-ray shower detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, A.; Lloyd-Evans, J.

    1985-01-01

    As part of the design study for the new UHE gamma ray detector being constsructed at Haverah Park, a series of experiments using scintillators operated side-by-side in 10 to the 15th power eV air showers are undertaken. Investigation of the rms sampling fluctuations in the shower disc arrival time yields an upper limit to the intrinsic sampling uncertainty, sigma sub rms = (1.1 + or - 0.1)ns, implying an angular resolution capability 1 deg for an inter-detector spacing of approximately 25 m.

  5. The Synergy of Gamma-Ray Burst Detectors In The Glast Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, David L.

    2008-01-01

    Simultaneous observations by the large number of gamma-ray burst detectors operating in the GLAST era will provide the spectra, lightcurves and locations necessary for studying burst physics and testing the putative relations between intrinsic burst properties. The detectors' energy band and the accumulation timescale of their trigger system affect their sensitivity to hard vs. soft and long vs. short bursts. Coordination of the Swift and GLAST observing plans consistent with Swift's other science objectives could increase the rate of GLAST bursts with redshifts.

  6. Development of a Broad High-Energy Gamma-Ray Telescope using Silicon Strip Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michelson, Peter F.

    1998-01-01

    The research effort has led to the development and demonstration of technology to enable the design and construction of a next-generation high-energy gamma-ray telescope that operates in the pair-production regime (E greater than 10 MeV). In particular, the technology approach developed is based on silicon-strip detector technology. A complete instrument concept based on this technology for the pair-conversion tracker and the use of CsI(T1) crystals for the calorimeter is now the baseline instrument concept for the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) mission. GLAST is NASA's proposed high-energy gamma-ray mission designed to operate in the energy range from 10 MeV to approximately 300 GeV. GLAST, with nearly 100 times the sensitivity of EGRET, operates through pair conversion of gamma-rays and measurement of the direction and energy of the resulting e (+) - e (-) shower. The baseline design, developed with support from NASA includes a charged particle anticoincidence shield, a tracker/converter made of thin sheets of high-Z material interspersed with Si strip detectors, a CsI calorimeter and a programmable data trigger and acquisition system. The telescope is assembled as an array of modules or towers. Each tower contains elements of the tracker, calorimeter, and anticoincidence system. As originally proposed, the telescope design had 49 modules. In the more optimized design that emerged at the end of the grant period the individual modules are larger and the total number in the GLAST array is 25. Also the calorimeter design was advanced substantially to the point that it has a self-contained imaging capability, albeit much cruder than the tracker.

  7. Multipurpose Radiation Resistant Semiconductor Detectors for Alpha, Neutron & Low Energy Gamma Ray Measurements at High Temperatures in High-Intensity Gamma Ray

    SciTech Connect

    Ruddy, Frank H.

    2005-06-01

    Work scheduled under year two of DOE Grant DE-FG02-04ER63734 is on schedule and all year-two milestones have or will be met. Results to date demonstrate that unprecedented silicon carbide (SiC) energy resolution has been obtained, and that SiC detectors may achieve energy resolution that exceeds that obtainable with the best silicon alpha spectrometers. Fast-neutron energy spectrometry measurements indicate that recoil-ion energy spectrometry should be possible with SiC detectors. Furthermore, SiC detectors have been demonstrated to perform well even after gamma-ray exposures of 1.E09 Rad. This result and the previously demonstrated capability of SiC detectors to operate in elevated-temperature environments are very promising for potential DOE EMSP applications. A new class of multipurpose, radiation-resistant semiconductor detectors that can be used in elevated-temperature and high-radiation environments is being developed under this grant. These detectors, based on silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor are designed to have larger active volumes than previously available SiC detectors, and are being tested for their response to alpha particles, X-rays and low energy gamma rays, and fast neutrons.

  8. High resolution collimator system for X-ray detector

    DOEpatents

    Eberhard, Jeffrey W.; Cain, Dallas E.

    1987-01-01

    High resolution in an X-ray computerized tomography (CT) inspection system is achieved by using a collimator/detector combination to limit the beam width of the X-ray beam incident on a detector element to the desired resolution width. In a detector such as a high pressure Xenon detector array, a narrow tapered collimator is provided above a wide detector element. The collimator slits have any desired width, as small as a few mils at the top, the slit width is easily controlled, and they are fabricated on standard machines. The slit length determines the slice thickness of the CT image.

  9. Recent progress of MPPC-based scintillation detectors in high precision X-ray and gamma-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, J.; Kishimoto, A.; Fujita, T.; Nishiyama, T.; Kurei, Y.; Tsujikawa, T.; Oshima, T.; Taya, T.; Iwamoto, Y.; Ogata, H.; Okochi, H.; Ohsuka, S.; Ikeda, H.; Yamamoto, S.

    2015-06-01

    The multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC) is a promising light sensor for various applications, not only in physics experiments but also in nuclear medicine, industry, and even high-energy astrophysics. In this paper, we present the current status and most recent progress of the MPPC-based scintillation detectors, such as (1) a high-precision X-ray and gamma-ray spectral image sensor, (2) next-generation PET detectors with MRI, TOF, and DOI measurement capabilities, and (3) a compact gamma camera for environmental radiation surveys. We first present a new method of fabricating a Ce:GAGG scintillator plate (1 or 2 mm thick) with ultra-fine resolution (0.2 mm/pixel), cut using a dicing saw to create 50 μm wide micro-grooves. When the plate is optically coupled with a large-area MPPC array, excellent spatial resolution of 0.48 mm (FWHM) and energy resolution of 14% (FWHM) are obtained for 122 keV gamma rays. Hence, the detector can act as a convenient "multi-color" imaging device that can potentially be used for future SPECT and photon-counting CT. We then show a prototype system for a high-resolution MPPC-based PET scanner that can realize ≃1 mm (FWHM) spatial resolution, even under a strong magnetic field of 4.7 T. We develop a front-end ASIC intended for future TOF-PET scanner with a 16-channel readout that achieves a coincidence time resolution of 489 ps (FWHM). A novel design for a module with DOI-measurement capability for gamma rays is also presented by measuring the pulse height ratio of double-sided MPPCs coupled at both ends of scintillation crystal block. Finally, we present the concept of a two-plane Compton camera consisting of Ce:GAGG scintillator arrays coupled with thin MPPC arrays. As a result of the thin and compact features of the MPPC device, the camera not only achieves a small size (14×14×15 cm3) and light weight (1.9 kg) but also excellent sensitivity, compared to the conventional PMT-based pinhole camera used in Fukushima. Finally, we briefly

  10. The effect of elemental and hydrocarbon impurities on mercuric iodide gamma ray detector performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Eilene S.; Buffleben, George; Soria, Ed; James, Ralph; Schieber, Michael; Natarajan, Raj; Gerrish, Vern

    Mercuric iodide is a room temperature semiconductor material that is used for gamma ray and x-ray radiation detection. Mercuric iodide is synthesized from mercuric chloride and potassium iodide and is then purified by a series of melts and sublimation steps and by zone refining. The mercuric iodide is grown into crystals and platelets and then fabricated into detectors. Elemental contamination may be a determining factor in the performance of these detectors. These contaminates may be present in the starting material or may be introduced during, or be unaffected by, the purification, growth or fabrication steps. Methods have been developed for the analysis of trace levels of elemental contamination. Inductively Coupled Plasma/Mass Spectroscopy (ICP/MS), Inductively Coupled Plasma/Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP/OES) and Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectroscopy (GC/MS) are used to determine sub ppm levels of many trace elemental impurities. Trace levels of many elemental impurities in the raw mercuric iodide are significantly reduced during the purification and zone refining processes. Though the levels of impurities are reduced, poor performing mercuric iodide detectors have contamination levels remaining or reintroduced which are higher for Ag, Al, Ca, Cu, Mg, Mn, Na, Pb and Zn than detectors with good gamma ray response. This paper will discuss the analytical methodology, the effects of purification on impurity levels, and the correlation between detector performance and impurity levels.

  11. Low-Energy Study of Gamma-Ray Bursts Using Two BATSE Spectroscopy Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pangia, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are energetic, short-duration emissions of gamma-rays from astronomical sources typically well beyond our galaxy. The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) that was onboard NASA's Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) had detected an unprecedented 2704 GRBs during CGRO's nine-year mission. BATSE consisted of eight detector assemblies located at the corners of CGRO to give full sky coverage. Each assembly consisted of two detectors, a Large Area Detector (LAD) and a Spectroscopy Detector (SD). In determining the detail features of GRBs, the degree to which they possess a low-energy component (approx. 10 keV) is of interest. Preece has developed a method to study the low-energy characteristics and concluded that 14% of the 86 bright GRBs they studied had a definite low-energy component, referred to as a low-energy excess. Their study, and the present study as well, needed to use SD data, because it extends down to the low-energy range when operating in a high-gain mode. For their study, low-energy data was used from just one SD. To better quantify the low-energy behavior, this study will consider bursts for which two SDs satisfy the same criteria as used by Preece. The procedure developed by Preece to study the low-energy aspects of GRBs with BATSE data is to fit the data to a representative spectral function. In particular, two components are used, one corresponding to the low-energy component, and another representing the main part of the spectrum. The low-energy function used is the optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung (OTTB) model.

  12. High-resolution x-ray characterization of mosaic crystals for hard x-and gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Claudio; Buffagni, Elisa; Marchini, Laura; Zappettini, Andrea

    2011-09-01

    We have analyzed GaAs, Cu, CdTe, and CdZnTe crystals as possible optical elements for hard x-ray lenses for x-ray astronomy. We used high resolution x-ray diffraction at 8keV in Bragg geometry and Laue transmission diffraction at synchrotron at energies up to 500 keV. A good agreement was found between the mosaicity evaluated in Bragg diffraction geometry with x-ray penetration of the order of few tens micrometers and in Laue transmission geometry at synchrotron. All the analyzed crystals showed mosaicity values in a range between a few to 150 arcseconds and suitable for the application. Nevertheless -CdTe and CdZnTe crystals exhibit non-uniformity due to the presence of low angle grain boundaries; -Cu crystals exhibit mosaicity of the order of several arcminutes; they indeed suffer by a severe cutting damage that had to be removed with a very deep etching. The FWHM was also rapidly decreasing with the x-ray energy showing that the mosaic spread is not the only origin of peak broadening; -GaAs crystals grown by Czochralski method show mosaicity up to 30 arcseconds and good diffraction efficiency up to energies of 500 keV. The use of thermal treatments as a possible method to increase the mosaic spread is also evaluated.

  13. Gadolinium-doped water cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma-ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Dazeley, Steven A; Svoboda, Robert C; Bernstein, Adam; Bowden, Nathaniel

    2013-02-12

    A water Cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system using water doped with a Gadolinium (Gd)-based compound as the Cerenkov radiator. An optically opaque enclosure is provided surrounding a detection chamber filled with the Cerenkov radiator, and photomultipliers are optically connected to the detect Cerenkov radiation generated by the Cerenkov radiator from incident high energy gamma rays or gamma rays induced by neutron capture on the Gd of incident neutrons from a fission source. The PMT signals are then used to determine time correlations indicative of neutron multiplicity events characteristic of a fission source.

  14. A Monte Carlo simulation to study a design of a gamma-ray detector for neutron resonance densitometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, H.; Harada, H.; Koizumi, M.; Kitatani, F.; Takamine, J.; Kureta, M.; Iimura, H.

    2013-11-01

    Neutron resonance densitometry (NRD) has been proposed to quantify nuclear materials in melted fuel (MF) that will be removed from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. The problem is complex due to the expected presence of strong neutron absorbing impurities such as 10B and high radiation field that is mainly caused by 137Cs. To identify the impurities under the high radiation field, NRD is based on a combination of neutron resonance transmission analysis (NRTA) and neutron resonance capture analysis (NRCA). We investigated with Geant4 the performance of a gamma-ray detector for NRCA in NRD. The gamma-ray detector has a well shape, consisting of cylindrical and tube type LaBr3 scintillators. We show how it measures 478 keV gamma rays derived from 10B(n, αγ) reaction in MF under a high 137Cs-radiation environment. It was found that the gamma-ray detector was able to well suppress the Compton edge of 662-keV gamma rays of 137Cs and had a high peak-to-Compton continuum ratio, by using the tube type scintillator as a back-catcher detector. Then, we demonstrate that with this ability, detection of 478-keV gamma rays from 10B is accomplished in realistic measuring time.

  15. Focal Plane Detectors for the Advanced Gamma-Ray Imaging System (AGIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Otte, A. N.; Williams, D. A.; Byrum, K.; Drake, G.; Horan, D.; Smith, A.; Wagner, R. G.; Falcone, A.; Funk, S.; Tajima, H.; Mukherjee, R.

    2008-12-24

    The Advanced Gamma-Ray Imaging System (AGIS) is a concept for the next generation observatory in ground-based very high energy gamma-ray astronomy. Design goals are ten times better sensitivity, higher angular resolution, and a lower energy threshold than existing Cherenkov telescopes. Simulations show that a substantial improvement in angular resolution may be achieved if the pixel diameter is reduced to the order of 0.05 deg, i.e. two to three times smaller than the pixel diameter of current Cherenkov telescope cameras. At these dimensions, photon detectors with smaller physical dimensions can be attractive alternatives to the classical photomultiplier tube (PMT). Furthermore, the operation of an experiment with the size of AGIS requires photon detectors that are among other things more reliable, more durable, and possibly higher efficiency photon detectors. Alternative photon detectors we are considering for AGIS include both silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) and multi-anode photomultipliers (MAPMTs). Here we present results from laboratory testing of MAPMTs and SiPMs along with results from the first incorporation of these devices into cameras on test bed Cherenkov telescopes.

  16. Gamma ray astrophysics to the year 2000. Report of the NASA Gamma Ray Program Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Important developments in gamma-ray astrophysics up to energies of 100 GeV during the last decade are reviewed. Also, the report seeks to define the major current scientific goals of the field and proposes a vigorous program to pursue them, extending to the year 2000. The goals of gamma-ray astronomy include the study of gamma rays which provide the most direct means of studying many important problems in high energy astrophysics including explosive nucleosynthesis, accelerated particle interactions and sources, and high-energy processes around compact objects. The current research program in gamma-ray astronomy in the U.S. including the space program, balloon program and foreign programs in gamma-ray astronomy is described. The high priority recommendations for future study include an Explorer-class high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy mission and a Get Away Special cannister (GAS-can) or Scout class multiwavelength experiment for the study of gamma-ray bursts. Continuing programs include an extended Gamma Ray Observatory mission, continuation of the vigorous program of balloon observations of the nearby Supernova 1987A, augmentation of the balloon program to provide for new instruments and rapid scientific results, and continuation of support for theoretical research. Long term recommendations include new space missions using advanced detectors to better study gamma-ray sources, the development of these detectors, continued study for the assembly of large detectors in space, collaboration with the gamma-ray astronomy missions initiated by other countries, and consideration of the Space Station attached payloads for gamma-ray experiments.

  17. High Resolution X-ray Characterization Of Mosaic Crystals For Hard X- And Gamma-ray Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchini, L.; Ferrari, C.; Buffagni, E.; Zappettini, A.

    2011-09-01

    For hard X-ray astronomy in the 70-1000 keV energy range Laue lenses have been proposed where the focusing elements are made of single mosaic crystals, in order to increase the diffraction efficiency with respect to perfect crystals. Suitable crystals to be used for such application should have a sufficient density to increase the diffraction efficiency and a mosaicity ranging between 30 arcsec and 1-2 arcmin, depending on the lens focusing distance and resolution. In the past germanium and copper crystals, often employed as monochromators for neutrons, have been considered. In this work we propose several crystalline materials of different degree of crystal perfection such as GaAs, Cu, CdTe, and CdZnTe as possible mosaic crystals for hard X-ray astronomy. They were analyzed by high resolution X-ray diffraction at 8 keV and by diffraction at energies up to 700 keV at synchrotron. It was found that: CdTe and CdZnTe crystals exhibit low angle grain boundaries preventing the formation of a single diffracted X-ray beam; Cu crystals exhibit mosaicity of the order of several arcmin, however a deep etching is needed to remove the cutting damage; GaAs crystals grown by LEC method show mosaicity between 15 and 30 arcsec and good diffraction efficiency up to energies of 700 keV. Annealing and surface damage were considered as possible methods to increase the GaAs crystal mosaicity.

  18. Pulse shape discrimination for background rejection in germanium gamma-ray detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feffer, P. T.; Smith, D. M.; Campbell, R. D.; Primbsch, J. H.; Lin, R. P.

    1989-01-01

    A pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) technique is developed to reject the beta-decay background resulting from activation of Ge gamma-ray detectors by cosmic-ray secondaries. These beta decays are a major source of background at 0.2-2 MeV energies in well shielded Ge detector systems. The technique exploits the difference between the detected current pulse shapes of single- and multiple-site energy depositions within the detector: beta decays are primarily single-site events, while photons at these energies typically Compton scatter before being photoelectrically absorbed to produce multiple-site events. Depending upon the amount of background due to sources other than beta decay, PSD can more than double the detector sensitivity.

  19. Development of x-ray and gamma-ray CZT detectors for homeland security applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kuen; Martin, J. W.; Garson, A. B., III; Beilicke, M.; Guo, Q.; Li, Q.; de Geronimo, G.; Groza, M.; Burger, A.; Krawczynski, H.

    2010-04-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) continues to progress in quality and cost as a material for the detection of hard X-ray and gamma-ray photons with excellent spatial and energy resolutions. We are developing large-volume (0.5×3.9×3.9 cm3) cross-strip CZT detectors with the objective to combine the excellent performance achieved so far only with pixelated CZT detectors with a reduced number of readout channels. In this contribution, we discuss the spectroscopic performance of large volume CZT detectors from the company Orbotech when contacted as pixelated detectors. Subsequently, we present results obtained when the same substrates where contacted with cross-strip contacts. Finally, we use the results from a simulation study to discuss the optimization of the design of the strip contacts and the readout electronics.

  20. Pixellated thallium bromide detectors for gamma-ray spectroscopy and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onodera, T.; Hitomi, K.; Shoji, T.; Hiratate, Y.

    2004-06-01

    Recently, pixellated semiconductor detectors exhibit high-energy resolution, which have been studied actively and fabricated from CdTe, CZT and HgI 2. Thallium bromide (TlBr) is a compound semiconductor characterized with its high atomic numbers (Tl=81, Br=35) and high density (7.56 g/cm 3). Thus, TlBr exhibits higher photon stopping power than other semiconductor materials used for radiation detector fabrication such as CdTe, CZT and HgI 2. The wide band gap of TlBr (2.68 eV) permits the detectors low-noise operation at around room temperature. Our studies made an effort to fabricate pixellated TlBr detectors had sufficient detection efficiency and good charge collection efficiency. In this study, pixellated TlBr detectors were fabricated from the crystals purified by the multipass zone-refining method and grown by the horizontal traveling molten zone (TMZ) method. The TlBr detector has a continuous cathode over one crystal surface and 3×3 pixellated anodes (0.57×0.57 mm 2 each) surrounded by a guard ring on the opposite surface. The electrodes were realized by vacuum evaporation of palladium through a shadow mask. Typical thickness of the detector was 2 mm. Spectrometric performance of the TlBr detectors was tested by irradiating them with 241Am (59.5 keV), 57Co (122 keV) and 137Cs (662 keV) gamma-ray sources at temperature of -20°C. Energy resolutions (FWHM) were measured to be 4.0, 6.0 and 9.7 keV for 59.5, 122 and 662 keV gamma-rays, respectively.

  1. A silicon photomultiplier readout for time of flight neutron spectroscopy with {gamma}-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Pietropaolo, A.; Gorini, G.; Festa, G.; Andreani, C.; De Pascale, M. P.; Reali, E.; Grazzi, F.; Schooneveld, E. M.

    2009-09-15

    The silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) is a recently developed photosensor used in particle physics, e.g., for detection of minimum ionizing particles and/or Cherenkov radiation. Its performance is comparable to that of photomultiplier tubes, but with advantages in terms of reduced volume and magnetic field insensitivity. In the present study, the performance of a gamma ray detector made of an yttrium aluminum perovskite scintillation crystal and a SiPM-based readout is assessed for use in time of flight neutron spectroscopy. Measurements performed at the ISIS pulsed neutron source demonstrate the feasibility of {gamma}-detection based on the new device.

  2. Digital and Analog Electronics for an autonomous, deep-sea, Gamma Ray Burst Neutrino prototype detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manolopoulos, K.; Belias, A.; Markou, C.; Rapidis, P.; Kappos, E.

    2016-04-01

    GRBNeT is a Gamma Ray Burst Neutrino Telescope made of autonomously operated arrays of deep-sea light detectors, anchored to the sea-bed without any cabled connection to the shore. This paper presents the digital and analog electronics that we have designed and developed for the GRBNeT prototype. We describe the requirements for these electronics and present their design and functionality. We present low-power analog electronics for the PMTs utilized in the GRBNeT prototype and the FPGA based digital system for data selection and storage. We conclude with preliminary performance measurements of the electronics systems for the GRBNeT prototype.

  3. Optimal bandgap variants of Cd 1- xZn xTe for high-resolution X-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toney, J. E.; Schlesinger, T. E.; James, R. B.

    1999-06-01

    We show that the trade-off between noise and charge generation statistics in Cd 1- xZn xTe leads to an optimal band gap of approximately 2.0 eV at room temperature. This implies a ZnTe fraction of approximately 0.7-0.8. We show that for X-rays and relatively low energy gamma-rays Cd 0.2Zn 0.8Te theoretically offers a significant potential improvement in energy resolution over Cd 0.9Zn 0.1Te even if compensation of shallow levels is less complete and carrier lifetimes are an order of magnitude lower for the higher x variant. We also show that these calculations are consistent with observed detector performance reported by many workers over a large period of time.

  4. Lifetime effects for high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at relativistic energies and their implications for the RISING spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doornenbal, P.; Reiter, P.; Grawe, H.; Saito, T.; Al-Khatib, A.; Banu, A.; Beck, T.; Becker, F.; Bednarczyk, P.; Benzoni, G.; Bracco, A.; Bürger, A.; Caceres, L.; Camera, F.; Chmel, S.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Geissel, H.; Gerl, J.; Górska, M.; Grebosz, J.; Hübel, H.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Kmiecik, M.; Kojouharov, I.; Kurz, N.; Lozeva, R.; Maj, A.; Mandal, S.; Meczynski, W.; Million, B.; Podolyák, Zs.; Richard, A.; Saito, N.; Schaffner, H.; Seidlitz, M.; Striepling, T.; Walker, J.; Warr, N.; Weick, H.; Wieland, O.; Winkler, M.; Wollersheim, H. J.

    2010-02-01

    The lineshapes and peak position of Doppler corrected γ-ray spectra from in-beam experiments at relativistic energies are investigated with respect to the intrinsic energy resolution of the employed detectors, the particles' velocities, and the photons' emission angle uncertainties at the moment of γ-ray emission. The uncertainties in velocity and photon emission angle are dependent on the lifetime of the excited state. The impact of these two observables on the lineshape and energy resolution are studied for the RISING γ-spectrometer by means of simulations and experimental results from a two-step fragmentation experiment at ≈200 MeV/u. Potential use of the distinct lineshape for lifetime determination is demonstrated for measured γ-ray transitions.

  5. Laue optics for nuclear astrophysics: New detector requirements for focused gamma-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrière, N.; von Ballmoos, P.; Abrosimov, N. V.; Bastie, P.; Camus, T.; Courtois, P.; Jentschel, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Natalucci, L.; Roudil, G.; Rousselle, J.; Wunderer, C. B.; Kurlov, V. N.

    2009-10-01

    Nuclear astrophysics presents an extraordinary scientific potential for the study of the most powerful sources and the most violent events in the Universe. But in order to take full advantage of this potential, telescopes should be at least an order of magnitude more sensitive than present technologies. Today, Laue lenses have demonstrated their capability of focusing gamma-rays in the 100 keV-1 MeV domain, enabling the possibility of building a new generation of instruments for which sensitive area is decoupled from collecting area. Thus we have now the opportunity of dramatically increase the signal/background ratio and hence improve significantly the sensitivity. With a lens, the best detector is no longer the largest possible within a mission envelope. The point spread function of a Laue lens measures a few centimeters in diameter, but the field of view is limited by the detector size. Requirements for a focal plane instrument are presented in the context of the Gamma-Ray Imager mission (proposed to European Space Agency, ESA in the framework of the first Cosmic Vision AO): a 15-20 cm a side finely pixellated detector capable of Compton events reconstruction seems to be optimal, giving polarization and background rejection capabilities and 30 arcsec of angular resolution within a field of view of 5 arc min.

  6. Radiation background in a LaBr3(Ce) gamma-ray scintillation detector.

    PubMed

    Rosson, Robert; Lahr, Jeffrey; Kahn, Bernd

    2011-12-01

    Gamma-ray spectral analyses with a 5-cm × 5-cm LaBr3(Ce) detector and a NaI(Tl) detector of the same size show that the LaBr3(Ce) has much better gamma-ray peak resolution and full-energy peak counting efficiency but worse detection sensitivity. The LaBr3(Ce) detector has relatively high intrinsic radiation background due to the naturally occurring La radioisotope in lanthanum. Although this La background is entirely below the energy of 1,500 keV, additional background is in the energy region between 1,500 keV and 2,750 keV. The manufacturer attributes this radiation to alpha particles emitted by the five short-lived progeny of an Ac impurity. Comparative values for peak resolution, full-energy peak counting efficiency, and detection sensitivity are reported for Am, Co, and Cs. Results of counting Cs sources at two activity levels demonstrate the impact of background on detection sensitivity. PMID:22048488

  7. Spectroscopic CZT detectors development for x- and gamma-ray imaging instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quadrini, Egidio M.; Uslenghi, Michela; Alderighi, Monica; Casini, Fabio; D'Angelo, Sergio; Fiorini, Mauro; La Palombara, Nicola; Mancini, Marcello; Monti, Serena; Bazzano, Angela; Di Cosimo, Sergio; Frutti, Massimo; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Ubertini, Pietro; Guadalupi, Giuseppe M.; Sassi, Matteo; Negri, Barbara

    2007-09-01

    In the context of R&D studies financed by the Italian Space Agency (ASI), a feasibility study to evaluate the Italian Industry interest in medium-large scale production of enhanced CZT detectors has been performed by an Italian Consortium. The R&D investment aims at providing in-house source of high quality solid state spectrometers for Space Astrophysics applications. As a possible spin-off industrial applications to Gamma-ray devices for non-destructive inspections in medical, commercial and security fields have been considered by ASI. The short term programme mainly consists of developing proprietary procedures for 2-3" CZT crystals growth, including bonding and contact philosophy, and a newly designed low-power electronics readout chain. The prototype design and breadboarding is based on a fast signal AD conversion with the target in order to perform a new run for an already existing low-power (<0.7 mW/pixel) ASIC. The prototype also provides digital photon energy reconstruction with particular care for multiple events and polarimetry evaluations. Scientific requirement evaluations for Space Astrophysics Satellite applications have been carried out in parallel, targeted to contribute to the ESA Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 Announcement of Opportunity. Detailed accommodation studies are undergoing, as part of this programme, to size a "Large area arcsecond angular resolution Imager" for the Gamma Ray Imager satellite (Knödlseder et al., this conference).and a new Gamma-ray Wide Field Camera for the "EDGE" proposal (Piro et al., this conference). Finally, an extended market study for cost analysis evaluation in view of the foreseen massive detector production has been performed.

  8. The Synergy of Gamma-Ray Burst Detectors in the GLAST Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, David

    2008-01-01

    Simultaneous observations by the large number of gamma-ray burst detectors that will operate in the GLAST era will provide the spectra, lightcurves and locations necessary for studying burst physics and testing the putative relations between intrinsic burst properties. I review the burst detection sensitivities, spectral bands, and localization capabilities of the GLAST (GBM and LAT), Swift (BAT), INTEGRAL (ISGRI), Suzaku (wAM), AGILE (Super-AGILE) and wind (Konus) detectors; the detectors' energy band and the accumulation timescale of their trigger system affect their sensitivity to hard vs. soft and long vs. short bursts. In addition, I estimate the rate of simultaneous burst observations. In particular, coordination of the Swift observing plan consistent with Swift's other science objectives could increase the rate of GLAST bursts with redshifts

  9. Cryogenic detector development at LLNL: ultraviolet x-ray, gamma-ray and biomolecule spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Labov, S.E.; Frank, M.; le Grand, J.B.

    1997-08-12

    We are developing low-temperature detectors for optical, ultraviolet, X-ray, and gamma-ray spectroscopy, and for biomolecular mass spectrometry. We present development work on these detectors and materials analysis and biomolecular mass spectrometry. We have measured thin-film Nb/Al/Al2O3/AlNb superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) X-ray detectors in the 0.2 to 1 keV band with a range of different junction sizes and aluminum film thicknesses. In one case, we have achieved the statistical limit to the energy resolution of 13 eV FWHM at 227 eV with an output count rate of 20,600 cts/s.

  10. Deconvolution of gamma-ray spectra obtained with NAI(Tl) detector in a water tank.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M Sohelur; Cho, Gyuseong; Kang, Bo-Sun

    2009-07-01

    Maximum-likelihood fitting by the expectation maximization deconvolution method is presented to analyse gamma-ray spectra recorded using an NaI(Tl) detector for a water monitoring system. The applicability of the method was tested by deconvolving measured spectra taken using an industry standard 3'' x 3'' cylindrical NaI(Tl) detector in a model water tank with several calibration sources. The results show significant removal of the Compton continuum counts and efficient transfer of the counts into the corresponding photo-peaks. The peak-to-total count ratio and the number of counts in the photo-peaks in the deconvolved spectra increased approximately 4.67 and 5.29 times, respectively, compared with those of measured spectra taken using an NaI(Tl) scintillation detector in the case of (137)Cs. PMID:19502359

  11. Advantages and limitations of cadmium selenide room temperature gamma ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, M.

    1989-11-01

    State-of-the-art technology of spectrometer grade CdSe gamma ray detectors is presented in this paper. It is shown that high resistivity CdSe single crystals can be reproducibly grown by the temperature gradient solution zoning technique. Zone refining of Se used for crystal growth is found to reduce efficiently the concentration of Cu trace impurities, which are mainly responsible for the electron trapping. The charge carrier transport parameters are studied in detail, and the perspective of further improvement of the energy resolution of CdSe detectors are discussed. A comparison with the performance of CdTe and HgI2 nuclear radiation detectors is also given.

  12. Study of Thick CZT Detectors for X-ray and Gamma-ray Astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Li Q.; De Geronimo G.; Beilicke, M.; Lee, K.; Garson III, A.; Guo, Q.; Martin, J.; Yin, Y.; Dowkontt, P.; Jung, I.; Krawczynski, H.

    2011-02-12

    CdZnTe (CZT) is a wide bandgap II-VI semiconductor developed for the spectroscopic detection of X-rays and {gamma}-rays at room temperature. The Swift Burst Alert Telescope is using an 5240 cm{sup 2} array of 2 mm thick CZT detectors for the detection of 15-150 keV X-rays from Gamma-ray Bursts. We report on the systematic tests of thicker (0.5 cm) CZT detectors with volumes between 2 cm{sup 3} and 4 cm{sup 3} which are potential detector choices for a number of future X-ray telescopes that operate in the 10 keV to a few MeV energy range. The detectors contacted in our laboratory achieve Full Width Half Maximum energy resolutions of 2.7 keV (4.5%) at 59 keV, 3 keV (2.5%) at 122 keV and 4 keV (0.6%) at 662 keV. The 59 keV and 122 keV energy resolutions are among the world-best results for 0.5 cm thick CZT detectors. We use the data set to study trends of how the energy resolution depends on the detector thickness and on the pixel pitch. Unfortunately, we do not find clear trends, indicating that even for the extremely good energy resolutions reported here, the achievable energy resolutions are largely determined by the properties of individual crystals. Somewhat surprisingly, we achieve the reported results without applying a correction of the anode signals for the depth of the interaction. Measuring the interaction depths thus does not seem to be a pre-requisite for achieving sub-1% energy resolutions at 662 keV.

  13. Evaluation of natural radioactivity content in high-volume surface water samples along the northern coast of Oman Sea using portable high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zare, Mohammad Reza; Kamali, Mahdi; Omidi, Zohre; Khorambagheri, Mahdi; Mortazavi, Mohammad Seddigh; Ebrahimi, Mahmood; Akbarzadeh, Gholamali

    2015-06-01

    Portable high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry was carried out to determine the natural radioactivity levels in high volume surface water samples of the northern coast of Oman Sea, covering the coastal strip from Hormoz strait to Goatr seaport, for the first time. The water samples from 36 coastal and near shore locations were collected for analysis. Analyses on the samples collected were carried out to determine (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K contents. The concentration of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in surface water samples ranged between 2.19 and 2.82 Bq/L, 1.66-2.17 Bq/L and 132.6-148.87 Bq/L, respectively. The activity profile of radionuclides shows low activity across the study area. The study also examined some radiation hazard indices. The external hazard index was found to be less than 1, indicating a low dose. The results of measurements will serve as background reference level for Oman Sea coastlines. PMID:25847859

  14. Theoretical performance analysis for CMOS based high resolution detectors.

    PubMed

    Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R; Rudin, Stephen

    2013-03-01

    High resolution imaging capabilities are essential for accurately guiding successful endovascular interventional procedures. Present x-ray imaging detectors are not always adequate due to their inherent limitations. The newly-developed high-resolution micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF-CCD) detector has demonstrated excellent clinical image quality; however, further improvement in performance and physical design may be possible using CMOS sensors. We have thus calculated the theoretical performance of two proposed CMOS detectors which may be used as a successor to the MAF. The proposed detectors have a 300 μm thick HL-type CsI phosphor, a 50 μm-pixel CMOS sensor with and without a variable gain light image intensifier (LII), and are designated MAF-CMOS-LII and MAF-CMOS, respectively. For the performance evaluation, linear cascade modeling was used. The detector imaging chains were divided into individual stages characterized by one of the basic processes (quantum gain, binomial selection, stochastic and deterministic blurring, additive noise). Ranges of readout noise and exposure were used to calculate the detectors' MTF and DQE. The MAF-CMOS showed slightly better MTF than the MAF-CMOS-LII, but the MAF-CMOS-LII showed far better DQE, especially for lower exposures. The proposed detectors can have improved MTF and DQE compared with the present high resolution MAF detector. The performance of the MAF-CMOS is excellent for the angiography exposure range; however it is limited at fluoroscopic levels due to additive instrumentation noise. The MAF-CMOS-LII, having the advantage of the variable LII gain, can overcome the noise limitation and hence may perform exceptionally for the full range of required exposures; however, it is more complex and hence more expensive. PMID:24353390

  15. The detector response matrices of the burst and transient source experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Paciesas, William S.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Koshut, Tom M.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegan, Charles A.; Wilson, Robert B.; Horack, John M.; Lestrade, John Patrick

    1995-01-01

    The detector response matrices for the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) are described, including their creation and operation in data analysis. These response matrices are a detailed abstract representation of the gamma-ray detectors' operating characteristics that are needed for data analysis. They are constructed from an extensive set of calibration data coupled with a complex geometry electromagnetic cascade Monte Carlo simulation code. The calibration tests and simulation algorithm optimization are described. The characteristics of the BATSE detectors in the spacecraft environment are also described.

  16. Performance of the large-area detectors for the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciesas, W. S.; Pendleton, G. N.; Lestrade, J. P.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.; Wilson, R. B.; Parnell, T. A.; Austin, R. W.; Berry, F. A., Jr.; Horack, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    BATSE, one of four experiments on the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO), is expected to provide the most sensitive observations of gamma-ray bursts yet obtained, as well as to provide long-term monitoring of hard X-ray and low-energy gamma-ray emission from bright pulsating sources, transients, and solar flares. Eight uncollimated modules, positioned at the corners of the spacecraft to provide an unobstructed view of the sky, detect sources by various techniques based on time variability. Use of detectors with anisotropic response allows location of gamma-ray bursts to be determined to an accuracy of about 1 deg using BATSE data alone. The completed BATSE underwent intensive testing and calibration prior to its delivery in October 1988.

  17. BiI3 single crystal for room-temperature gamma ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, T.; Iwasaki, T.; Kurosawa, S.; Yoshikawa, A.; Den, T.

    2016-01-01

    BiI3 single crystals were grown by the physical vapor transport method. The repeated sublimation of the starting material reduced impurities in the BiI3 single crystal to sub-ppm levels. The detector was fabricated by depositing Au electrodes on both surfaces of the 100-μm-thick BiI3 single crystal platelet. The resistivity of the BiI3 single crystal was increased by post-annealing in an iodine atmosphere (ρ=1.6×1011 Ω cm). Pulse height spectroscopy measurements showed clear peaks in the energy spectrum of alpha particles or gamma rays. It was estimated that the mobility-lifetime product was μeτe=3.4-8.5×10-6 cm2/V and the electron-hole pair creation energy was 5.8 eV. Our results show that BiI3 single crystals are promising candidates for detectors used in radiographic imaging or gamma ray spectroscopy.

  18. Search for gravitational waves associated with the gamma ray burst GRB030329 using the LIGO detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, B.; Anderson, S.B.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Asiri, F.; Barish, B.C.; Barnes, M.; Barton, M.A.; Bhawal, B.; Billingsley, G.; Black, E.; Blackburn, K.; Bogue, L.; Bork, R.; Busby, D.; Cardenas, L.; Chandler, A.; Chapsky, J.; Charlton, P.; Coyne, D.

    2005-08-15

    We have performed a search for bursts of gravitational waves associated with the very bright gamma ray burst GRB030329, using the two detectors at the LIGO Hanford Observatory. Our search covered the most sensitive frequency range of the LIGO detectors (approximately 80--2048 Hz), and we specifically targeted signals shorter than {approx_equal}150 ms. Our search algorithm looks for excess correlated power between the two interferometers and thus makes minimal assumptions about the gravitational waveform. We observed no candidates with gravitational-wave signal strength larger than a predetermined threshold. We report frequency-dependent upper limits on the strength of the gravitational waves associated with GRB030329. Near the most sensitive frequency region, around {approx_equal}250 Hz, our root-sum-square (RSS) gravitational-wave strain sensitivity for optimally polarized bursts was better than h{sub RSS}{approx_equal}6x10{sup -21} Hz{sup -1/2}. Our result is comparable to the best published results searching for association between gravitational waves and gamma ray bursts.

  19. Search for gravitational waves associated with the gamma ray burst GRB030329 using the LIGO detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Ageev, A.; Allen, B.; Amin, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Ashley, M.; Asiri, F.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Balasubramanian, R.; Ballmer, S.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, C.; Barker, D.; Barnes, M.; Barr, B.; Barton, M. A.; Bayer, K.; Beausoleil, R.; Belczynski, K.; Bennett, R.; Berukoff, S. J.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhawal, B.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Black, E.; Blackburn, K.; Blackburn, L.; Bland, B.; Bochner, B.; Bogue, L.; Bork, R.; Bose, S.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Brown, D. A.; Bullington, A.; Bunkowski, A.; Buonanno, A.; Burgess, R.; Busby, D.; Butler, W. E.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J. K.; Cantley, C. A.; Cardenas, L.; Carter, K.; Casey, M. M.; Castiglione, J.; Chandler, A.; Chapsky, J.; Charlton, P.; Chatterji, S.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chickarmane, V.; Chin, D.; Christensen, N.; Churches, D.; Cokelaer, T.; Colacino, C.; Coldwell, R.; Coles, M.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T.; Coyne, D.; Creighton, J. D.; Creighton, T. D.; Crooks, D. R.; Csatorday, P.; Cusack, B. J.; Cutler, C.; D'Ambrosio, E.; Danzmann, K.; Daw, E.; Debra, D.; Delker, T.; Dergachev, V.; Desalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Credico, A. Di; Diaz, M.; Ding, H.; Drever, R. W.; Dupuis, R. J.; Edlund, J. A.; Ehrens, P.; Elliffe, E. J.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Fairhurst, S.; Fallnich, C.; Farnham, D.; Fejer, M. M.; Findley, T.; Fine, M.; Finn, L. S.; Franzen, K. Y.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fyffe, M.; Ganezer, K. S.; Garofoli, J.; Giaime, J. A.; Gillespie, A.; Goda, K.; González, G.; Goßler, S.; Grandclément, P.; Grant, A.; Gray, C.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grimmett, D.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guenther, M.; Gustafson, E.; Gustafson, R.; Hamilton, W. O.; Hammond, M.; Hanson, J.; Hardham, C.; Harms, J.; Harry, G.; Hartunian, A.; Heefner, J.; Hefetz, Y.; Heinzel, G.; Heng, I. S.; Hennessy, M.; Hepler, N.; Heptonstall, A.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hindman, N.; Hoang, P.; Hough, J.; Hrynevych, M.; Hua, W.; Ito, M.; Itoh, Y.; Ivanov, A.; Jennrich, O.; Johnson, B.; Johnson, W. W.; Johnston, W. R.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, L.; Jungwirth, D.; Kalogera, V.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kells, W.; Kern, J.; Khan, A.; Killbourn, S.; Killow, C. J.; Kim, C.; King, C.; King, P.; Klimenko, S.; Koranda, S.; Kötter, K.; Kovalik, J.; Kozak, D.; Krishnan, B.; Landry, M.; Langdale, J.; Lantz, B.; Lawrence, R.; Lazzarini, A.; Lei, M.; Leonor, I.; Libbrecht, K.; Libson, A.; Lindquist, P.; Liu, S.; Logan, J.; Lormand, M.; Lubiński, M.; Lück, H.; Lyons, T. T.; Machenschalk, B.; Macinnis, M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majid, W.; Malec, M.; Mann, F.; Marin, A.; Márka, S.; Maros, E.; Mason, J.; Mason, K.; Matherny, O.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McHugh, M.; McNabb, J. W.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messaritaki, E.; Messenger, C.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Miyoki, S.; Mohanty, S.; Moreno, G.; Mossavi, K.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Murray, P.; Myers, J.; Nagano, S.; Nash, T.; Nayak, R.; Newton, G.; Nocera, F.; Noel, J. S.; Nutzman, P.; Olson, T.; O'Reilly, B.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottewill, A.; Ouimette, D.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pan, Y.; Papa, M. A.; Parameshwaraiah, V.; Parameswariah, C.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Pitkin, M.; Plissi, M.; Prix, R.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F.; Radkins, H.; Rahkola, R.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rao, S. R.; Rawlins, K.; Ray-Majumder, S.; Re, V.; Redding, D.; Regehr, M. W.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reilly, K. T.; Reithmaier, K.; Reitze, D. H.; Richman, S.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Rivera, B.; Rizzi, A.; Robertson, D. I.; Robertson, N. A.; Robison, L.; Roddy, S.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romie, J.; Rong, H.; Rose, D.; Rotthoff, E.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Russell, P.; Ryan, K.; Salzman, I.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, G. H.; Sannibale, V.; Sathyaprakash, B.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Sazonov, A.; Schilling, R.; Schlaufman, K.; Schmidt, V.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, S. M.; Seader, S. E.; Searle, A. C.; Sears, B.; Seel, S.; Seifert, F.; Sengupta, A. S.; Shapiro, C. A.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shu, Q. Z.; Sibley, A.; Siemens, X.; Sievers, L.; Sigg, D.; Sintes, A. M.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M.; Smith, M. R.; Sneddon, P. H.; Spero, R.; Stapfer, G.; Steussy, D.; Strain, K. A.; Strom, D.; Stuver, A.; Summerscales, T.; Sumner, M. C.; Sutton, P. J.; Sylvestre, J.; Takamori, A.; Tanner, D. B.; Tariq, H.; Taylor, I.; Taylor, R.; Taylor, R.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Tibbits, M.; Tilav, S.; Tinto, M.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Torres, C.; Torrie, C.; Traylor, G.; Tyler, W.; Ugolini, D.; Ungarelli, C.; Vallisneri, M.; van Putten, M.; Vass, S.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.

    2005-08-01

    We have performed a search for bursts of gravitational waves associated with the very bright gamma ray burst GRB030329, using the two detectors at the LIGO Hanford Observatory. Our search covered the most sensitive frequency range of the LIGO detectors (approximately 80 -2048 Hz), and we specifically targeted signals shorter than ≃150 ms. Our search algorithm looks for excess correlated power between the two interferometers and thus makes minimal assumptions about the gravitational waveform. We observed no candidates with gravitational-wave signal strength larger than a predetermined threshold. We report frequency-dependent upper limits on the strength of the gravitational waves associated with GRB030329. Near the most sensitive frequency region, around ≃250 Hz, our root-sum-square (RSS) gravitational-wave strain sensitivity for optimally polarized bursts was better than hRSS≃6×10-21 Hz-1/2. Our result is comparable to the best published results searching for association between gravitational waves and gamma ray bursts.

  20. Scintillator gamma-ray detectors with silicon photomultiplier readouts for high-energy astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloser, Peter F.; Legere, Jason; Bancroft, Christopher; McConnell, Mark L.; Ryan, James M.; Schwadron, Nathan

    2013-09-01

    Space-based gamma-ray detectors for high-energy astronomy face strict constraints of mass, volume, and power, and must endure harsh operating environments. Scintillator materials have a long history of successful operation under these conditions, and new materials offer greatly improved performance in terms of efficiency, time response, and energy resolution. The use of scintillators in space remains constrained, however, by the mass, volume, and fragility of the associated light readout device, typically a vacuum photomultiplier tube (PMT). Recently developed silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) offer gains and efficiencies similar to those of PMTs, but with greatly reduced mass and volume, high ruggedness, and no high-voltage requirements. We have therefore been investigating the use of SiPM readouts for scintillator gamma-ray detectors, with an emphasis on their suitability for space- and balloonbased instruments for high-energy astronomy. We present our most recent results, including spectroscopy measurements for lanthanum bromide scintillators with SiPM readouts, and pulse-shape discrimination using organic scintillators with SiPM readouts. We also describe potential applications of SiPM readouts to specific highenergy astronomy instrument concepts.

  1. ``Super'' Gas Cherenkov Detector for Gamma Ray Measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Hans W.; Kim, Y. H.; McEvoy, A. M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Lopez, F. E.; Griego, J. R.; Fatherley, V. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Batha, S. H.; Stoeffl, W.; Church, J. A.; Carpenter, A.; Rubery, M. S.; Horsfield, C. J.; Gales, S.; Leatherland, A.; Hilsabeck, T.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Malone, R. M.; Shmayda, W. T.

    2015-11-01

    New requirements to improve reaction history and ablator areal density measurements at the NIF necessitate improvements in sensitivity, temporal and spectral response relative to the existing Gamma Reaction History diagnostic (GRH-6m) located 6 meters from target chamber center (TCC). A new DIM-based ``Super'' Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD) will ultimately provide ~ 200x more sensitivity to DT fusion gamma rays, reduce the effective temporal resolution from ~ 100 to ~ 10 ps and lower the energy threshold from 2.9 to 1.8 MeV, relative to GRH-6m. The first phase is to insert the existing coaxial GCD-3 detector into a reentrant well on the NIF chamber which will put it within 4 meters of TCC. This diagnostic platform will allow assessment of the x-ray radiation background environment within the well which will be fed into the shielding design for the follow-on ``Super'' GCD. It will also enable use of a pulse-dilation PMT which has the potential to improve the effective measurement bandwidth by ~ 10x relative to current PMT technology. GCD-3 has been thoroughly tested at the OMEGA Laser Facility and characterized at the High Intensity Gamma Ray Source (HIgS).

  2. Gamma large area silicon telescope: Applying SI strip detector technology to the detection of gamma rays in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwood, W. B.; Bloom, E. D.; Godfrey, G. L.; Hertz, P. L.; Lin, Ying-Chi; Nolan, P. L.; Snyder, A. E.; Taylor, R. E.; Wood, K. S.; Michelson, P. F.

    1992-12-01

    The recent discoveries and excitement generated by EGRET (Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope) (presently operating on CGRO (Compton Gamma Ray Observatory)) has prompted an investigation into modern technologies ultimately leading to the next generation space based gamma ray telescope. The goal is to design a detector that would increase the data acquisition rate by almost two orders of magnitude beyond EGRET, while at the same time improving on the angular resolution, the energy measurement of reconstructed gamma rays and the triggering capability of the instrument. The proposed GLAST (Gamma Ray Large Area Silicon Telescope) instrument is based on silicon particle detectors that offer the advantages of no consumables, no gas volume, robust (versus fragile), long lived, and self triggering. The GLAST detector is roughly modeled after EGRET in that a tracking module precedes a calorimeter. The GLAST tracker has planes of cross strip (x, y) 300 micrometer match silicon detectors coupled to a thin radiator to measure the coordinates of converted electron-positron pairs. An angular resolution of 0.1 deg at high energy is possible (the low energy angular resolution 100 MeV would be about 2 deg, limited by multiple scattering). The increased depth of the GLAST calorimeter over EGRET's extends the energy range to about 300 GeV.

  3. Pulse-height defect due to electron interaction in dead layers of Ge/Li/ gamma-ray detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, R. N.; Strauss, M. G.

    1969-01-01

    Study shows the pulse-height degradation of gamma ray spectra in germanium/lithium detectors to be due to electron interaction in the dead layers that exist in all semiconductor detectors. A pulse shape discrimination technique identifies and eliminates these defective pulses.

  4. Gamma-ray Flares from Mrk421 in 2008 Observed with the ARGO-YBJ Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aielli, G.; Bacci, C.; Bartoli, B.; Bernardini, P.; Bi, X. J.; Bleve, C.; Branchini, P.; Budano, A.; Bussino, S.; Calabrese Melcarne, A. K.; Camarri, P.; Cao, Z.; Cappa, A.; Cardarelli, R.; Catalanotti, S.; Cattaneo, C.; Celio, P.; Chen, S. Z.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, N.; Creti, P.; Cui, S. W.; Dai, B. Z.; D'Alí Staiti, G.; Danzengluobu; Dattoli, M.; De Mitri, I.; D'Ettorre Piazzoli, B.; De Vincenzi, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Ding, X. H.; Di Sciascio, G.; Feng, C. F.; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Zhenyong; Galeazzi, F.; Galeotti, P.; Gargana, R.; Gou, Q. B.; Guo, Y. Q.; He, H. H.; Hu, Haibing; Hu, Hongbo; Huang, Q.; Iacovacci, M.; Iuppa, R.; James, I.; Jia, H. Y.; Labaciren; Li, H. J.; Li, J. Y.; Li, X. X.; Liberti, B.; Liguori, G.; Liu, C.; Liu, C. Q.; Liu, M. Y.; Liu, J.; Lu, H.; Ma, X. H.; Mancarella, G.; Mari, S. M.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Mastroianni, S.; Meng, X. R.; Montini, P.; Ning, C. C.; Pagliaro, A.; Panareo, M.; Perrone, L.; Pistilli, P.; Qu, X. B.; Rossi, E.; Ruggieri, F.; Saggese, L.; Salvini, P.; Santonico, R.; Shen, P. R.; Sheng, X. D.; Shi, F.; Stanescu, C.; Surdo, A.; Tan, Y. H.; Vallania, P.; Vernetto, S.; Vigorito, C.; Wang, B.; Wang, H.; Wu, C. Y.; Wu, H. R.; Xu, B.; Xue, L.; Yan, Y. X.; Yang, Q. Y.; Yang, X. C.; Yuan, A. F.; Zha, M.; Zhang, H. M.; Zhang, Jilong; Zhang, Jianli; Zhang, L.; Zhang, P.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhaxisangzhu; Zhou, X. X.; Zhu, F. R.; Zhu, Q. Q.; Zizzi, G.; ARGO-YBJ Collaboration

    2010-05-01

    In 2008, the blazar Markarian 421 entered a very active phase and was one of the brightest sources in the sky at TeV energies, showing frequent flaring episodes. Using the data of ARGO-YBJ, a full coverage air shower detector located at Yangbajing (4300 m a.s.l., Tibet), we monitored the source at gamma-ray energies E>0.3 TeV during the whole year. The observed flux was variable, with the strongest flares in March and June, in correlation with X-ray enhanced activity. While during specific episodes the TeV flux could be several times larger than the Crab Nebula one, the average emission from day 41 to 180 was almost twice the Crab level, with an integral flux of (3.6 ± 0.6) × 10-11 photons cm-2 s-1 for energies E>1 TeV, and decreased afterward. This Letter concentrates on the flares that occurred in the first half of June. This period has been deeply studied from optical to 100 MeV gamma rays, and partially up to TeV energies, since the moonlight hampered the Cherenkov telescope observations during the most intense part of the emission. Our data complete these observations, with the detection of a signal with a statistical significance of 3.8 standard deviations on June 11-13, corresponding to a gamma-ray flux about 6 times larger than the Crab one above 1 TeV. The reconstructed differential spectrum, corrected for the intergalactic absorption, can be represented by a power law with an index α = -2.1+0.7 -0.5 extending up to several TeV. The spectrum slope is fully consistent with previous observations reporting a correlation between the flux and the spectral index, suggesting that this property is maintained in different epochs and characterizes the source emission processes.

  5. LaBr3(Ce) gamma-ray detector for neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, M.; Shmanin, E.; Galavanov, A.; Shustov, A.; Ulin, S.; Vlasik, K.; Dmitrenko, V.; Novikov, A.; Orlov, A.; Petrenko, D.; Shmurak, S.; Uteshev, Z.

    2016-02-01

    Results of developing of a gamma-ray detector based on LaBr3(Ce) scintillation crystal for neutron capture therapy are presented. An energy resolution of the detector measured by photomultiplier tube Hamamatsu R6233-100 is showed. It was 2.93% for gamma line 662 keV from a source 137Cs. For radiative capture gamma line of isotope 10B (478 keV) and annihilation line (511 keV) the values were 3.33 and 3.24% respectively. Data analysis of gamma spectra for an estimation of energy resolution threshold required for visual identification gamma lines 478 and 511 keV was made.

  6. P-I-N CdTe gamma-ray detectors by liquid phase epitaxy (LPE)

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, S.H.; Niizawa, G.T.; Pasko, J.G.; Bostrup, G.L.; Ryan, F.J.; Khoshnevisan, M.; Westmark, C.I.; Fuller, C.

    1984-01-01

    A new device concept of CdTe gamma ray detectors has been demonstrated by using p+(HgCdTe)-n(CdTe)-n+(HgCdTe) diode structures. Both p+ and n/sup +/-type Hg/sub 0.25/Cd/sub 0.75/Te epilayers were grown by the liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) technique on semi-insulating CdTe sensor elements. The LPE-grown P-I-N structure offers potential advantages for p-n junction formation and ohmic contact over standard ion-implanted diodes or Schottky barrier devices. Detectors with active areas of 2 mm/sup 2/ were fabricated. Resolutions of 10 keV were obtained for the 122 keV gamma peak of Co/sup 57/ at room temperature.

  7. P-I-N CdTe gamma ray detectors by liquid phase epitaxy (LPE)

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, S.H.; Bostrup, G.L.; Fuller, C.; Khoshnevisan, M.; Niizawa, G.T.; Pasko, J.G.; Ryan, F.J.; Westmark, C.I.

    1985-02-01

    A new device concept for CdTe gamma ray detectors has been demonstrated using p/sup +/(HgCdTe)-n(CdTe)-n/sup +/ (HgCdTe) diode structures. Both p/sup +/ and n/sup +/ Hg /SUB 0.25/ Cd /SUB 0.75/ Te epilayers were grown by the liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) technique on semi-insulating CdTe sensor elements. The LPE grown P-I-N structure offers potential advantages for p-n junction and ohmic contact formation over standard ion implanted diodes or Schottky barrier devices. Detectors with active areas of 2 mm/sup 2/ were fabricated. Resolutions of 10 KeV were obtained for the 122 KeV gamma peak of Co/sup 57/ at room temperature.

  8. HAND-HELD GAMMA-RAY SPECTROMETER BASED ON HIGH-EFFICIENCY FRISCH-RING CdZnTe DETECTORS.

    SciTech Connect

    CUI,Y.

    2007-05-01

    Frisch-ring CdZnTe detectors have demonstrated good energy resolution, el% FWHM at 662 keV, and good efficiency for detecting gamma rays. This technique facilitates the application of CdZnTe materials for high efficiency gamma-ray detection. A hand-held gamma-ray spectrometer based on Frisch-ring detectors is being designed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It employs an 8x8 CdZnTe detector array to achieve a high volume of 19.2 cm3, so that detection efficiency is significantly improved. By using the front-end ASICs developed at BNL, this spectrometer has a small profile and high energy resolution. The spectrometer includes signal processing circuit, digitization and storage circuit, high-voltage module, and USB interface. In this paper, we introduce the details of the system structure and report our test results with it.

  9. Multipurpose Radiation Resistant Semiconductor Detectors for Alpha, Neutron & Low Energy Gamma Ray Measurements at High Temperatures in High-Intensity Gamma Ray

    SciTech Connect

    Ruddy, Frank H.

    2005-06-01

    Work scheduled under year two of DOE Grant DE-FG02-04ER63734 is on schedule and all year-two milestones have or will be met. Results to date demonstrate that unprecedented silicon carbide (SiC) energy resolution has been obtained, and that SiC detectors may achieve energy resolution that exceeds that obtainable with the best silicon alpha spectrometers. Fast-neutron energy spectrometry measurements indicate that recoil-ion energy spectrometry should be possible with SiC detectors. Furthermore, SiC detectors have been demonstrated to perform well even after gamma-ray exposures of 1.E09 Rad. This result and the previously demonstrated capability of SiC detectors to operate in elevated-temperature environments are very promising for potential DOE EMSP applications. A new class of multipurpose, radiation-resistant semiconductor detectors that can be used in elevated-temperature and high-radiation environments is being developed under this grant. These detectors, based on silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor are designed to have larger active volumes than previously available SiC detectors, and are being tested for their response to alpha particles, X-rays and low energy gamma rays, and fast neutrons. Specifically, SiC radiation detectors with larger areas and 100-micrometer thick active regions have been designed and manufactured according to detector-design specifications. Detectors based on a Schottky diode design were specified in order to minimize the effects of the detector entrance window on alpha particle measurements. During manufacture of the Schottky diodes, the manufacturer also provided a set of large-volume SiC p-i-n diodes for testing Extensive alpha particle measurements have been carried out to test and quantify the response of the SiC Schottky diodes. Exposures to 148-Gd, 213-Po, 217-At, 221-Fr, 225-Ac, 237-Np, 238-Pu, 240-Pu, and 242-Pu sources were used to obtain detailed alpha response data in the alpha energy range from 3182.787 keV to 8375.9 ke

  10. Portable electro-mechanically cooled high-resolution germanium detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, K. W.; Ruhter, W. D.

    1995-05-01

    We have integrated a small, highly-reliable, electro-mechanical cryo-cooler with a high-resolution germanium detector for portable/field applications. The system weighs 6.8 kg and requires 40 watts of power to operate once the detector is cooled to its operating temperature. The detector is a 500 mm(exp 2) by 20-mm thick low-energy configuration that gives a full-width at half maximum (FWHM) energy resolution of 523 eV at 122 keV, when cooled with liquid nitrogen. The energy resolution of the detector, when cooled with the electro-mechanical cooler, is 570 eV at 122 keV. We have field tested this system in measurements of plutonium and uranium for isotopic and enrichment information using the MGA and MGAU analysis programs without any noticeable effects on the results.

  11. Broad Band Polarimetry with the Soft Gamma-ray Detector on board Hitomi (ASTRO-H)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Tsunefumi

    2016-07-01

    X-ray and gamma-ray polarization can arise from synchrotron emission in ordered magnetic fields, photon propagation in extremely strong magnetic fields and anisotropic Compton scattering. Polarization measurement provides vital information (often inaccessible even with the current best imaging instruments) on magnetic field and accretion disk around astrophysical objects, hence is a powerful probe to investigate emission mechanism and geometries of the sources. The Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD) on board Hitomi (ASTRO-H) satellite is a highly-sensitive spectrometer in the 40-600 keV energy band. Since the SGD is a Si/CdTe Compton camera surrounded by a thick BGO shield, it also works as a very sensitive polarimeter in wide energy range. We have verified the SGD polarization measurement capability through extensive beam tests at a synchrotron facility SPring-8 in 2008 (Takeda et al. 2010) and 2015 (Katsuta et al. in preparation). In addition, we have examined possible sciences provided by the SGD polarimetry based on the expected performance (Coppi et al. 2014). In this contribution, we will present the SGD instrumentation, the latest beam test results and expected sciences provided by the polarization measurements. The results based on the initial observations will also be reported.

  12. [A multi-phase flow detector system based on gamma-ray].

    PubMed

    Ma, Min; Wang, Hua-xiang; Hao, Kui-hong

    2010-07-01

    In the present paper, a gamma-ray based on-line detection system was designed for multi-phase flow measurement, where the complicated fluid property of multi-phase flow can be studied by using the principle of ray transmission. The system is made up of three parts, i. e., the sensing unit, the signal conditioning & processing unit and the computer imaging unit. The sensing unit consists of five 241 Am sources with principal energy of 59.5 keV and five sets of CdZnTe semiconductor detectors by using the Geant 4 simulating software toolkits. The sources and detectors are mounted equally at the cross section of pipeline to detect different phase medium simultaneously. This function of the system guarantees the real-time performance of the on-line detecting. In order to improve the accuracy of the probe, a low noise probe circuit was designed, including a low noise charge-sensitive preamplifier, a low noise amplifier, filter circuit and an eliminated zero-poles circuit. Some of the emitted gamma-ray photons from the radiation sources are detected by the sensing element, where the photo energy is transferred into electrical energy by using CdZnTe semiconductor detectors. The output of the sensing element is sent to the signal conditioning & processing unit, which is amplified and filtered to be a level-discriminated signal. Finally, the output of the signal conditioning & processing unit is sent to the computer imaging unit, in which the 2D images are reconstructed by using a certain reconstruction algorithm. Under the normal temperature, the system performs the test of energy spectrum and then it has better energy resolution about 4.38% for 241 Am 59.5 keV. The result reveals that our system has higher probe accuracy. Using experimental data, the images are reconstructed with Filter back projection (FBP) reconstruction algorithm. Images of high quality are achieved. PMID:20828018

  13. Recent Developments: The Gamma Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar Flares (GRIPS) Imaging and Detector systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Nicole; Shih, A. Y.; Hurford, G. J.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Bain, H.; Zoglauer, A.; Lin, R. P.; Boggs, S. E.

    2013-07-01

    In two of the best-observed flares of the last cycle, the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) satellite found the centroids of ion and relativistic electron emission to have a significant displacement. This result is surprising; co-spatially accelerated ions and electrons are thought to be transported along the same field lines, implying they would enter the chromosphere together and have similar emission locations. The Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar Flares (GRIPS) balloon instrument will investigate particle transport in solar flares by providing enhanced imaging, spectroscopy and polarimetry of gamma/HXR flare emission (20keV - 10MeV). GRIPS’ key technological improvements over the solar state of the art in HXR/gamma ray energies (RHESSI) include three-dimensional position-sensitive germanium detectors (3D-GeDs) and a single-grid modulating collimator, the multi-pitch rotating modulator (MPRM). The 3D-GeDs allow GRIPS to Compton track energy deposition within the crystal. This capability (1) enables the MPRM design by acting as a second modulation grid, (2) provides significant background rejection and (3) makes solar polarization measurements possible. The MPRM imager provides quasi-continuous resolution from 12.5 - 162 arcsecs with 2x the throughput of a dual grid collimator system like RHESSI. This spatial resolution can resolve the separate footpoints of many flare sizes. In comparison, RHESSI images with a minimum of 35 arcsecs for gamma-rays, making these footpoints resolvable in only the largest flares. Here, we present the intial calibration of GRIPS’ 3D-GED detectors using laboratory radioactive sources. We evaluate charge sharing between adjacent strips, the detection of coincidences and preliminary depth measurements. The detectors have been shown to have a linear response and resolve line emission. The MPRM modulation grid is constructed and we present initial results from calibration. GRIPS is scheduled for a

  14. Charged-particle induced radiation damage of a HPGe gamma-ray detector during spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, L. G.; Starr, R.; Brückner, J.; Boynton, W. V.; Bailey, S. H.; Trombka, J. I.

    1999-02-01

    The Mars Observer spacecraft was launched on September 26, 1992 with a planned arrival at Mars after an 11-month cruise. Among the scientific instruments carried on the spacecraft was a Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) experiment to measure the composition of Mars. The GRS used a passively cooled high-purity germanium detector for measurements in the 0.2-10MeV region. The sensor was a closed-end co-axial detector, 5.5cm diameter by 5.5cm long, and had an efficiency along its axis of 28% at 1332keV relative to a standard NaI(Tl) detector. The sensor was surrounded by a thin (0.5cm) plastic charged-particle shield. This was the first planetary mission to use a cooled Ge detector. It was expected that the long duration in space of three years would cause an increase in the energy resolution of the detector due to radiation damage and could affect the expected science return of the GRS. Shortly before arrival, on August 21, 1993, contact was lost with the spacecraft following the pressurization of the propellent tank for the orbital-insertion rocket motor. During much of the cruise to Mars, the GRS was actively collecting background data. The instrument provided over 1200h of data collection during periods of both quiescent sun and solar flares. From the charged particle interactions in the shield, the total number of cosmic ray hits on the detector could be determined. The average cosmic ray flux at the MO GRS was about 2.5cm-2s-1. The estimated fluence of charged particles during cruise was about 108 particles cm-2 with 31% of these occurring during a single solar proton event of approximately 10 days duration. During cruise, the detector energy resolution determined from a background gamma-ray at 1312keV degraded from 2.4keV full-width at half-maximum shortly after launch to 6.4keV 11 months later. This result agrees well with measurements from ground-based accelerator irradiations (at 1.5GeV) on a similar size detector.

  15. Setup and operation of gamma-ray measurement systems to maximize detector lifetime and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penn, David G.; Grodsinsky, Carlos M.

    1999-10-01

    The details for optimizing gamma-ray measurement system for specific applications are not always well understood. The setup and operation of a system plays an important role in performance aspects such as maximizing detector lifetime, stability and minimizing the signal to noise ratio. In addition to system setup and operation, the effects of scintillation detector design and accompanying electronics (PMT) are discussed with respect to both gross counting and spectroscopy measurements in order to obtain reliable results. Data has been taken with various sodium iodide scintillation detectors to study system stability during transient such as power cycling and count rate fluctuations. These fluctuations may introduce substantial measurement uncertainty, and if not accounted for will propagate into an analyses. The above transients can also affect the detector lifetime, and if the system conditions are monitored properly, they can be used as a predictive tool for determining the useful life of a detector. Data is also presented to examine counting statistics in an overlapping spectrum as a function of spectral resolution and count rate. The objective is to determine the optimum counting time for the spectrum to reach a statistically stable shape. The data is reduced by examining the standard deviation of fitted Gaussian curves at ten second intervals. The result is a contour plat showing the time needed to reach stability, which increase with spectral resolution and decrease with a rising count rate.

  16. Imaging microwell detectors for x-ray and gamma-ray applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, J. Kevin; Deines-Jones, Phil; Hunter, Stanley D.; Jahoda, Keith; Huang, J.; Jackson, Thomas N.; Klauk, H.; Qian, W.

    2000-12-01

    Gas proportional counter arrays based on the micro-well are an example of a new generation of detectors that exploit narrow anode-cathode gaps, rather than fine anodes, to create gas gain. These are inherently imaging pixel detectors that can be made very large for reasonable costs. Because of their intrinsic gain and room-temperature operation, they can be instrumented at very low power per unit area, making them valuable for a variety of space-flight applications where large-area X-ray imaging or particle tracking is required. We discuss micro-well detectors as focal plane imager for Lobster-ISS, a proposed soft X-ray all-sky monitor, and as electron trackers for the Next Generation High-Energy Gamma Ray mission. We have developed a fabrication technique using a masked UV laser that allows us both to machine micro-wells in polymer substrates and to pattern metal electrodes. We have used this technique to fabricate detectors which image X-rays by simultaneously reading out orthogonal anode and cathode strips. We present imaging results from these detectors, as well as gain and energy resolution measurements that agree well with results from other groups.

  17. Designing a new type of neutron detector for neutron and gamma-ray discrimination via GEANT4.

    PubMed

    Shan, Qing; Chu, Shengnan; Ling, Yongsheng; Cai, Pingkun; Jia, Wenbao

    2016-04-01

    Design of a new type of neutron detector, consisting of a fast neutron converter, plastic scintillator, and Cherenkov detector, to discriminate 14-MeV fast neutrons and gamma rays in a pulsed n-γ mixed field and monitor their neutron fluxes is reported in this study. Both neutrons and gamma rays can produce fluorescence in the scintillator when they are incident on the detector. However, only the secondary charged particles of the gamma rays can produce Cherenkov light in the Cherenkov detector. The neutron and gamma-ray fluxes can be calculated by measuring the fluorescence and Cherenkov light. The GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit is used to simulate the whole process occurring in the detector, whose optimum parameters are known. Analysis of the simulation results leads to a calculation method of neutron flux. This method is verified by calculating the neutron fluxes using pulsed n-γ mixed fields with different n/γ ratios, and the results show that the relative errors of all calculations are <5%. PMID:26844541

  18. The High Altitude Water Cherenlov (HAWC) Gamma ray Detector Response to Atmospheric Electric Field Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, A.

    2015-12-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is located at 4100 m a.s.l. in Mexico. HAWC's primary purpose is the study of both: galactic and extra-galactic sources of high energy gamma rays. HAWC consists of 300 large water Cherenkov detectors (WCD), each instrumented with 4 photo-multipliers (PMTs). The HAWC scaler system records the rates of individual PMTs giving the opportunity of study relatively low energy transients as solar energetic particles, the solar modulation of galactic cosmic rays and possible variations of the cosmic ray rate due to atmospheric electric field changes. In this work, we present the observations of scaler rate enhancements associated with thunderstorm activity observed at the HAWC site.In particular, we present preliminary results of the analysis of the time coincidence of the electric field changes and the scaler enhancements.

  19. Development of marijuana and tobacco detectors using potassium-40 gamma-ray emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, John A.; Lindquist, Roy P.

    1994-10-01

    Measurements were made at the Otay Mesa, CA, border crossing between November 30 and December 4, 1992, to demonstrate proof of concept and the practicality of using potassium 40 (K40) gamma emissions to detect the presence of marijuana in vehicles. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory personnel, with the assistance of the EPA, set up three large volume gamma ray detectors with lead brick shielding and collimation under a stationary trailer and pickup truck. Measurements were performed for various positions and quantities of marijuana. Also, small quantities of marijuana, cigarettes, and other materials were subjected to gamma counting measurements under controlled geometry conditions to determine their K40 concentration. Larger quantities of heroin and cocaine were subjected to undefined geometry gamma counts for significant K40 gamma emissions.

  20. Extended performance gas Cherenkov detector for gamma-ray detection in high-energy density experiments.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, H W; Kim, Y H; Young, C S; Fatherley, V E; Lopez, F E; Oertel, J A; Malone, R M; Rubery, M S; Horsfield, C J; Stoeffl, W; Zylstra, A B; Shmayda, W T; Batha, S H

    2014-11-01

    A new Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD) with low-energy threshold and high sensitivity, currently known as Super GCD (or GCD-3 at OMEGA), is being developed for use at the OMEGA Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Super GCD is designed to be pressurized to ≤400 psi (absolute) and uses all metal seals to allow the use of fluorinated gases inside the target chamber. This will allow the gamma energy threshold to be run as low at 1.8 MeV with 400 psi (absolute) of C2F6, opening up a new portion of the gamma ray spectrum. Super GCD operating at 20 cm from TCC will be ∼400 × more efficient at detecting DT fusion gammas at 16.7 MeV than the Gamma Reaction History diagnostic at NIF (GRH-6m) when operated at their minimum thresholds. PMID:25430303

  1. Extended performance gas Cherenkov detector for gamma-ray detection in high-energy density experimentsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y. H.; Young, C. S.; Fatherley, V. E.; Lopez, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Malone, R. M.; Rubery, M. S.; Horsfield, C. J.; Stoeffl, W.; Zylstra, A. B.; Shmayda, W. T.; Batha, S. H.

    2014-11-01

    A new Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD) with low-energy threshold and high sensitivity, currently known as Super GCD (or GCD-3 at OMEGA), is being developed for use at the OMEGA Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Super GCD is designed to be pressurized to ≤400 psi (absolute) and uses all metal seals to allow the use of fluorinated gases inside the target chamber. This will allow the gamma energy threshold to be run as low at 1.8 MeV with 400 psi (absolute) of C2F6, opening up a new portion of the gamma ray spectrum. Super GCD operating at 20 cm from TCC will be ˜400 × more efficient at detecting DT fusion gammas at 16.7 MeV than the Gamma Reaction History diagnostic at NIF (GRH-6m) when operated at their minimum thresholds.

  2. Constraints on Vesta's elemental composition: Fast neutron measurements by Dawn's gamma ray and neutron detector

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, David J; Peplowski, Patrick N; Prettyman, Thomas H; Feldman, William C; Bazell, David; Mittlefehldt, David W; Reedy, Robert C; Yamashita, Naoyuki

    2013-01-01

    Surface composition information from Vesta is reported using fast neutron data collected by the gamma ray and neutron detector on the Dawn spacecraft. After correcting for variations due to hydrogen, fast neutrons show a compositional dynamic range and spatial variability that is consistent with variations in average atomic mass from howardite, eucrite, and diogenite (HED) meteorites. These data provide additional compositional evidence that Vesta is the parent body to HED meteorites. A subset of fast neutron data having lower statistical precision show spatial variations that are consistent with a 400 ppm variability in hydrogen concentrations across Vesta and supports the idea that Vesta's hydrogen is due to long-term delivery of carbonaceous chondrite material. PMID:26074718

  3. Development of marijuana and tobacco detectors using potassium-40 gamma ray emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, J.; Lindquist, R.P.

    1994-06-01

    Measurements were made at the Otay Mesa, Ca. border crossing between November 30 and December 4, 1992 to demonstrate proof of concept and the practicality of using potassium 40 (K40) gamma emissions to detect the presence of marijuana in vehicles. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) personnel, with the assistance of the EPA, set up three large volume gamma ray detectors with lead brick shielding and collimation under a stationary trailer and pickup truck. Measurements were performed for various positions and quantities of marijuana. Also, small quantities of marijuana, cigarettes, and other materials were subjected to gamma counting measurements under controlled geometry conditions to determine their K40 concentration. Larger quantities of heroin and cocaine were subjected to undefined geometry gamma counts for significant K40 gamma emissions.

  4. Extended performance gas Cherenkov detector for gamma-ray detection in high-energy density experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, H. W. Kim, Y. H.; Young, C. S.; Fatherley, V. E.; Lopez, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Batha, S. H.; Malone, R. M.; Rubery, M. S.; Horsfield, C. J.; Stoeffl, W.; Zylstra, A. B.; Shmayda, W. T.

    2014-11-15

    A new Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD) with low-energy threshold and high sensitivity, currently known as Super GCD (or GCD-3 at OMEGA), is being developed for use at the OMEGA Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Super GCD is designed to be pressurized to ≤400 psi (absolute) and uses all metal seals to allow the use of fluorinated gases inside the target chamber. This will allow the gamma energy threshold to be run as low at 1.8 MeV with 400 psi (absolute) of C{sub 2}F{sub 6}, opening up a new portion of the gamma ray spectrum. Super GCD operating at 20 cm from TCC will be ∼400 × more efficient at detecting DT fusion gammas at 16.7 MeV than the Gamma Reaction History diagnostic at NIF (GRH-6m) when operated at their minimum thresholds.

  5. Application of CdZnTe Gamma-Ray Detector for Imaging Corrosion under Insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, J.; Yahya, R.

    2007-05-01

    Corrosion under insulation (CUI) on the external wall of steel pipes is a common problem in many types of industrial plants. This is mainly due to the presence of moisture or water in the insulation materials. This type of corrosion can cause failures in areas that are not normally of a primary concern to an inspection program. The failures are often the result of localised corrosion and not general wasting over a large area. These failures can tee catastrophic in nature or at least have an adverse economic effect in terms of downtime and repairs. There are a number of techniques used today for CUI investigations. The main ones are profile radiography, pulse eddy current, ultrasonic spot readings and insulation removal. A new system now available is portable Pipe-CUI-Profiler. The nucleonic system is based on dual-beam gamma-ray absorption technique using Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe) semiconductor detectors. The Pipe-CUI-Profiler is designed to inspect pipes of internal diameter 50, 65, 80, 90, 100, 125 and 150 mm. Pipeline of these sizes with aluminium or thin steel sheathing, containing fibreglass or calcium silicate insulation to thickness of 25, 40 and 50 mm can be inspected. The system has proven to be a safe, fast and effective method of inspecting pipe in industrial plant operations. This paper describes the application of gamma-ray techniques and CdZnTe semiconductor detectors in the development of Pipe-CUI-Profiler for non-destructive imaging of corrosion under insulation of steel pipes. Some results of actual pipe testing in large-scale industrial plant will be presented.

  6. Application of CdZnTe Gamma-Ray Detector for Imaging Corrosion under Insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, J.; Yahya, R.

    2007-05-09

    Corrosion under insulation (CUI) on the external wall of steel pipes is a common problem in many types of industrial plants. This is mainly due to the presence of moisture or water in the insulation materials. This type of corrosion can cause failures in areas that are not normally of a primary concern to an inspection program. The failures are often the result of localised corrosion and not general wasting over a large area. These failures can tee catastrophic in nature or at least have an adverse economic effect in terms of downtime and repairs. There are a number of techniques used today for CUI investigations. The main ones are profile radiography, pulse eddy current, ultrasonic spot readings and insulation removal. A new system now available is portable Pipe-CUI-Profiler. The nucleonic system is based on dual-beam gamma-ray absorption technique using Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe) semiconductor detectors. The Pipe-CUI-Profiler is designed to inspect pipes of internal diameter 50, 65, 80, 90, 100, 125 and 150 mm. Pipeline of these sizes with aluminium or thin steel sheathing, containing fibreglass or calcium silicate insulation to thickness of 25, 40 and 50 mm can be inspected. The system has proven to be a safe, fast and effective method of inspecting pipe in industrial plant operations. This paper describes the application of gamma-ray techniques and CdZnTe semiconductor detectors in the development of Pipe-CUI-Profiler for non-destructive imaging of corrosion under insulation of steel pipes. Some results of actual pipe testing in large-scale industrial plant will be presented.

  7. SU-C-201-03: Coded Aperture Gamma-Ray Imaging Using Pixelated Semiconductor Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, S; Kaye, W; Jaworski, J; He, Z

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Improved localization of gamma-ray emissions from radiotracers is essential to the progress of nuclear medicine. Polaris is a portable, room-temperature operated gamma-ray imaging spectrometer composed of two 3×3 arrays of thick CdZnTe (CZT) detectors, which detect gammas between 30keV and 3MeV with energy resolution of <1% FWHM at 662keV. Compton imaging is used to map out source distributions in 4-pi space; however, is only effective above 300keV where Compton scatter is dominant. This work extends imaging to photoelectric energies (<300keV) using coded aperture imaging (CAI), which is essential for localization of Tc-99m (140keV). Methods: CAI, similar to the pinhole camera, relies on an attenuating mask, with open/closed elements, placed between the source and position-sensitive detectors. Partial attenuation of the source results in a “shadow” or count distribution that closely matches a portion of the mask pattern. Ideally, each source direction corresponds to a unique count distribution. Using backprojection reconstruction, the source direction is determined within the field of view. The knowledge of 3D position of interaction results in improved image quality. Results: Using a single array of detectors, a coded aperture mask, and multiple Co-57 (122keV) point sources, image reconstruction is performed in real-time, on an event-by-event basis, resulting in images with an angular resolution of ∼6 degrees. Although material nonuniformities contribute to image degradation, the superposition of images from individual detectors results in improved SNR. CAI was integrated with Compton imaging for a seamless transition between energy regimes. Conclusion: For the first time, CAI has been applied to thick, 3D position sensitive CZT detectors. Real-time, combined CAI and Compton imaging is performed using two 3×3 detector arrays, resulting in a source distribution in space. This system has been commercialized by H3D, Inc. and is being acquired for

  8. Development of Gamma-Ray Compton Imager Using Room-Temperature 3-D Position Sensitive Semiconductor Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong He; David Whe; Glenn Knoll

    2003-05-14

    During the three years of this project, two 3-dimensional position sensitive CdZnTe spectrometers were upgraded in collaboration with Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. A prototype Compton-scattering gamma-ray imager was assembled using the two upgraded CdZnTe detectors. The performance of both gamma-ray spectrometers were individually tested. The angular resolution and detection sensitivity of the imaging system were measured using both a point and a line-shaped 137 Cs radiation source. The measurement results are consistent with that obtained from Monte-Carlo simulations performed during the early phase of the project.

  9. Comparison of the Gamma-Ray Burst Sensitivity of Different Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, David L.

    2003-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst detectors are sensitive at different energies, complicating the comparison of the burst populations that they detect. The instrument teams often report their detector sensitivities in their instruments' energy band. I propose that sensitivities be reported its the threshold peak photon flux FT over the 1-1000 keV energy band for a specific spectral shape. The primary spectral parameter is E(sub p), the energy of the maximum E(sup 2)N(sub E) proportional to upsilon f(sub upsilon). Thus F(sub T) vs. E(sub p). E(sub p) is a useful description of a detector's sensitivity. I find that Swift will be marginally more sensitive than BATSE for E(sub p) greater than 100 keV, but significantly more sensitive for E(sub p) less than 100 keV. Because of its small field-of-view and low energy sensitivity, the FREGATE on HETE-2 is surprisingly sensitive. Both the WFC on BeppoSAX and the WXM on HETE-2 are/were sensitive for low E(sub p). As expected, the GBM on GLAST will be less sensitive than BATSE, while EXIST will be significantly more sensitive than Swift. The BeppoSAX GRBM was less sensitive that the WFC, particularly at low E(sub p).

  10. Measurement and Modeling of Blocking Contacts for Cadmium Telluride Gamma Ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, Patrick R.

    2010-01-07

    Gamma ray detectors are important in national security applications, medicine, and astronomy. Semiconductor materials with high density and atomic number, such as Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), offer a small device footprint, but their performance is limited by noise at room temperature; however, improved device design can decrease detector noise by reducing leakage current. This thesis characterizes and models two unique Schottky devices: one with an argon ion sputter etch before Schottky contact deposition and one without. Analysis of current versus voltage characteristics shows that thermionic emission alone does not describe these devices. This analysis points to reverse bias generation current or leakage through an inhomogeneous barrier. Modeling the devices in reverse bias with thermionic field emission and a leaky Schottky barrier yields good agreement with measurements. Also numerical modeling with a finite-element physics-based simulator suggests that reverse bias current is a combination of thermionic emission and generation. This thesis proposes further experiments to determine the correct model for reverse bias conduction. Understanding conduction mechanisms in these devices will help develop more reproducible contacts, reduce leakage current, and ultimately improve detector performance.

  11. Limits on neutrino emission from gamma-ray bursts with the 40 string IceCube detector.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, R; Abdou, Y; Abu-Zayyad, T; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Bay, R; Bazo Alba, J L; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Becker, J K; Becker, K-H; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Braun, J; Brown, A M; Buitink, S; Carson, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clem, J; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Colnard, C; Cowen, D F; D'Agostino, M V; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; Demirörs, L; Depaepe, O; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dierckxsens, M; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Ehrlich, R; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegård, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Foerster, M M; Fox, B D; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Geisler, M; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J A; Grant, D; Griesel, T; Gross, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hanson, K; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Herquet, P; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Hubert, D; Huelsnitz, W; Hülss, J-P; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Johansson, H; Joseph, J M; Kampert, K-H; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kelley, J L; Kemming, N; Kenny, P; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Klein, S R; Köhne, J-H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Kowarik, T; Krasberg, M; Krings, T; Kroll, G; Kuehn, K; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Lafebre, S; Laihem, K; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lehmann, R; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Majumdar, P; Marotta, A; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Movit, S M; Nahnhauer, R; Nam, J W; Naumann, U; Niessen, P; Nygren, D R; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Ono, M; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Pérez de los Heros, C; Petrovic, J; Piegsa, A; Pieloth, D; Porrata, R; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Prikockis, M; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Rizzo, A; Rodrigues, J P; Roth, P; Rothmaier, F; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Rutledge, D; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Sander, H-G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Schmidt, T; Schoenwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schultes, A; Schulz, O; Schunck, M; Seckel, D; Semburg, B; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Silvestri, A; Slipak, A; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stephens, G; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stoyanov, S; Strahler, E A; Straszheim, T; Sullivan, G W; Swillens, Q; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Tarasova, O; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Tosi, D; Turčan, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Voigt, B; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Weaver, C; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, X W; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P

    2011-04-01

    IceCube has become the first neutrino telescope with a sensitivity below the TeV neutrino flux predicted from gamma-ray bursts if gamma-ray bursts are responsible for the observed cosmic-ray flux above 10(18)  eV. Two separate analyses using the half-complete IceCube detector, one a dedicated search for neutrinos from pγ interactions in the prompt phase of the gamma-ray burst fireball and the other a generic search for any neutrino emission from these sources over a wide range of energies and emission times, produced no evidence for neutrino emission, excluding prevailing models at 90% confidence. PMID:21561178

  12. Room temperature X- and gamma-ray detectors using thallium bromide crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitomi, K.; Muroi, O.; Shoji, T.; Suehiro, T.; Hiratate, Y.

    1999-10-01

    Thallium bromide (TlBr) is a compound semiconductor with wide band gap (2.68eV) and high X- and γ-ray stopping power. The TlBr crystals were grown by the horizontal travelling molten zone (TMZ) method using purified material. Two types of room temperature X- and γ-ray detectors were fabricated from the TlBr crystals: TlBr detectors with high detection efficiency for positron annihilation γ-ray (511keV) detection and TlBr detectors with high-energy resolution for low-energy X-ray detection. The detector of the former type demonstrated energy resolution of 56keV FWHM (11%) for 511keV γ-rays. Energy resolution of 1.81keV FWHM for 5.9keV was obtained from the detector of the latter type. In order to analyze noise characteristics of the detector-preamplifier assembly, the equivalent noise charge (ENC) was measured as a function of the amplifier shaping time for the high-resolution detector. This analysis shows that parallel white noise and /1/f noise were dominant noise sources in the detector system. Current-voltage characteristics of the TlBr detector with a small Peltier cooler were also measured. Significant reduction of the detector leakage current was observed for the cooled detectors.

  13. CdZnTe detector for hard x-ray and low energy gamma-ray focusing telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natalucci, L.; Alvarez, J. M.; Barriere, N.; Caroli, E.; Curado da Silva, R. M.; Del Sordo, S.; Di Cosimo, S.; Frutti, M.; Hernanz, M.; Lozano, M.; Quadrini, E.; Pellegrini, G.; Stephen, J. B.; Ubertini, P.; Uslenghi, M. C.; Zoglauer, A.

    2008-07-01

    The science drivers for a new generation soft gamma-ray mission are naturally focused on the detailed study of the acceleration mechanisms in a variety of cosmic sources. Through the development of high energy optics in the energy energy range 0.05-1 MeV it will be possible to achieve a sensitivity about two orders of magnitude better than the currently operating gamma-ray telescopes. This will open a window for deep studies of many classes of sources: from Galactic X-ray binaries to magnetars, from supernova remnants to Galaxy clusters, from AGNs (Seyfert, blazars, QSO) to the determination of the origin of the hard X-/gamma-ray cosmic background, from the study of antimatter to that of the dark matter. In order to achieve the needed performance, a detector with mm spatial resolution and very high peak efficiency is needed. The instrumental characteristics of this device could eventually allow to detect polarization in a number of objects including pulsars, GRBs and bright AGNs. In this work we focus on the characteristics of the focal plane detector, based on CZT or CdTe semiconductor sensors arranged in multiple planes and viewed by a side detector to enhance gamma-ray absorption in the Compton regime. We report the preliminary results of an optimization study based on simulations and laboratory tests, as prosecution of the former design studies of the GRI mission which constitute the heritage of this activity.

  14. Integrated Operation of the GАММА-400 Gamma-Ray Telescope Scintillation Detector Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runtso, Mikhail

    In this paper the question of integrated operation of scintillation detector systems AC (anticoincidence system) and SDC (scintillation detector system of calorimeter) in the GАММА-400 gamma-ray telescope is discussed. The main problem is the presence of so-called «backsplash current» (BSC) of particles from massive telescope calorimeter when detecting of very high-energy gamma-rays is provided. BSC is a low energy particle flux, moving up from the calorimeter and producing triggering of the AC detector, imitating detection of a charged particle. It is offered to record all events accompanied by BSC that should not result in to overload of the gamma-ray telescope in frequency of triggering. As an indicator to the number of BSC particles in the AC detector we offer the value of energy release in the C3 scintillation detector placing between two parts of the calorimeter (KK1 and KK2). Using mathematical simulation, the threshold on energy release in the C3 detector equal to 280 GeV was determined, at which the losses of gamma-quanta number in events with BSC do not exceed 10%. When detecting protons there are also events with BSC, which will be accompanied by exceeding of the indicated threshold of energy release in the С3 detector for proton energies above 30 GeV. However, counting rate for such protons will not exceed 200 Hz, that is reasonable for the GAMMA-400 data acquisition system.

  15. Conversion factor and uncertainty estimation for quantification of towed gamma-ray detector measurements in Tohoku coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, S.; Thornton, B.; Kamada, S.; Hirao, Y.; Ura, T.; Odano, N.

    2016-05-01

    Factors to convert the count rate of a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector to the concentration of radioactive cesium in marine sediments are estimated for a towed gamma-ray detector system. The response of the detector against a unit concentration of radioactive cesium is calculated by Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation considering the vertical profile of radioactive material measured in core samples. The conversion factors are acquired by integrating the contribution of each layer and are normalized by the concentration in the surface sediment layer. At the same time, the uncertainty of the conversion factors are formulated and estimated. The combined standard uncertainty of the radioactive cesium concentration by the towed gamma-ray detector is around 25 percent. The values of uncertainty, often referred to as relative root mean squat errors in other works, between sediment core sampling measurements and towed detector measurements were 16 percent in the investigation made near the Abukuma River mouth and 5.2 percent in Sendai Bay, respectively. Most of the uncertainty is due to interpolation of the conversion factors between core samples and uncertainty of the detector's burial depth. The results of the towed measurements agree well with laboratory analysed sediment samples. Also, the concentrations of radioactive cesium at the intersection of each survey line are consistent. The consistency with sampling results and between different lines' transects demonstrate the availability and reproducibility of towed gamma-ray detector system.

  16. Current response of a TlBr detector to {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-ray radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gazizov, I. M.; Zaletin, V. M.; Kukushkin, V. M.; Khrunov, V. S.

    2011-05-15

    The current response of a TlBr detector to {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-ray radiation has been studied in the dose-rate range 0.033-3.84 Gy/min and within the voltage range 1-300 V; the detectors are based on pure and doped TlBr crystals grown from the melt by the Bridgman-Stockbarger method. The mass fraction of Pb or Ca introduced into the TlBr crystals was 1-10 ppm for Pb and 150 ppm for Ca. The current response of nominally undoped TlBr samples was nearly linear over two decades of studied dose rates. Deep hole levels associated with cationic vacancies V{sub c}{sup -} determine the dependence of the current response on the voltage in the high electric fields. The parameters of the carriers' transport {mu}{tau} are determined. The TlBr crystals grown in vacuum and in the bromine vapor exhibit a large mobility-lifetime product of 4.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} and 6.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2}V{sup -1}, respectively. The value of {mu}{tau} is in the range (4-9) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2}V{sup -1} for crystals doped with a divalent cation.

  17. A quality survey on different shielding configurations of gamma ray detector used with a portable PGNAA system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayat, E.; Afarideh, H.; Davani, F. Abbasi; Ghal-Eh, N.

    2016-03-01

    The appropriate gamma-ray detector shielding configuration is critical for a precise prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) measurement. The shielding material has to prevent the radiation damage to the detector crystal and it must produce less activation gamma rays, whether prompt or delayed, which may interfere the gamma ray spectrum of the sample. In this research, using common shielding materials, a number of combinations have been studies to form a 50 cm long shield for portable PGNAA system against both fast and slow neutrons as well as gamma rays emitted by 20Ci Am-Be source. The measurement results show that in contrast with conventional shadow cone in which the shielding material starts with 20 cm heavy metals such as iron and ends with 30 cm polymer materials, in portable PGNAA systems, the shielding material gives better results if it starts with about 40 cm borated polymer material and ends with an appropriate thickness (7 cm to 10 cm) of heavy metal such as tungsten.

  18. Hand-Held Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Based on High-Efficiency Frisch-Ring Cdznte Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Y.; Bolotnikov, A; Camarda, G; Hossain, A; James, R; DeGeronimo, G; Fried, J; O'Connor, P; Kargar, A; et. al.

    2008-01-01

    Frisch-ring CdZnTe detectors have demonstrated both good energy resolution, <1% FWHM at 662 keV, and good efficiency in detecting gamma rays, highlighting the strong potential of CdZnTe materials for such applications. We are designing a hand-held gamma-ray spectrometer based on Frisch-ring detectors at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It employs an 8 times 8 CdZnTe detector array to achieve a high volume of 19.2 cm3, so greatly improving detection efficiency. By using the front-end application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) developed at BNL, this spectrometer has a small profile and high energy-resolution. It includes a signal processing circuit, digitization and storage circuits, a high-voltage module, and a universal serial bus (USB) interface. In this paper, we detail the system's structure and report the results of our tests with it.

  19. A high resolution liquid xenon imaging telescope for 0.3-10 MeV gamma-ray astrophysics: Construction and initial balloon flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aprile, Elena

    1994-01-01

    An instrument is described which will provide a direct image of gamma-ray line or continuum sources in the energy range 300 keV to 10 MeV. The use of this instrument to study the celestial distribution of the (exp 26)Al isotope by observing the 1.809 MeV deexcitation gamma-ray line is illustrated. The source location accuracy is 2' or better. The imaging telescope is a liquid xenon time projection chamber coupled with a coded aperture mask (LXe-CAT). This instrument will confirm and extend the COMPTEL observations from the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) with an improved capability for identifying the actual Galactic source or sources of (exp 26)Al, which are currently not known with certainty. sources currently under consideration include red giants on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB), novae, Type 1b or Type 2 supernovae, Wolf-Rayet stars and cosmic-rays interacting in molecular clouds. The instrument could also identify a local source of the celestial 1.809 MeV gamma-ray line, such as a recent nearby supernova.

  20. CdTe and CdZnTe gamma ray detectors for medical and industrial imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisen, Y.; Shor, A.; Mardor, I.

    1999-06-01

    CdTe and CdZnTe X-ray and gamma ray detectors in the form of single elements or as segmented monolithic detectors have been shown to be useful in medical and industrial imaging systems. These detectors possess inherently better energy resolution than scintillators coupled to either photodiodes or photomultipliers, and together with application specific integrated circuits they lead to compact imaging systems of enhanced spatial resolution and better contrast resolution. Photopeak efficiencies of these detectors is greatly affected by a relatively low hole mobility-lifetime product. Utilizing these detectors as highly efficient good spectrometers, demands use of techniques to improve their charge collection properties, i.e., correct for variations in charge losses at different depths of interaction in the detector. The corrections for the large hole trapping are made either by applying electronic techniques or by fabricating detector or electrical contacts configurations which differ from the commonly used planar detectors. The following review paper is divided into three parts: The first part discusses detector contact configurations for enhancing photopeak efficiencies and the single carrier collection approach which leads to improved energy resolutions and photopeak efficiencies at high gamma ray energies. The second part demonstrates excellent spectroscopic results using thick CdZnTe segmented monolithic pad and strip detectors showing energy resolutions less than 2% FWHM at 356 keV gamma rays. The third part discusses advantages and disadvantages of CdTe and CdZnTe detectors in imaging systems and describes new developments for medical diagnostics imaging systems.

  1. Advanced radiation detector development: Advanced semiconductor detector development: Development of a oom-temperature, gamma ray detector using gallium arsenide to develop an electrode detector

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, G.F.

    1995-11-01

    The advanced detector development project at the University of Michigan has completed the first full year of its current funding. Our general goals are the development of radiation detectors and spectrometers that are capable of portable room temperature operation. Over the past 12 months, we have worked primarily in the development of semiconductor spectrometers with {open_quotes}single carrier{close_quotes} response that offer the promise of room temperature operation and good energy resolution in gamma ray spectroscopy. We have also begun a small scale effort at investigating the properties of a small non-spectroscopic detector system with directional characteristics that will allow identification of the approximate direction in which gamma rays are incident. These activities have made use of the extensive clean room facilities at the University of Michigan for semiconductor device fabrication, and also the radiation measurement capabilities provided in our laboratory in the Phoenix Building on the North Campus. In addition to our laboratory based activities, Professor Knoll has also been a participant in several Department of Energy review activities held in the Forrestal Building and at the Germantown site. The most recent of these has been service on a DOE review panel chaired by Dr. Hap Lamonds that is reviewing the detector development programs supported through the Office of Arms Control and International Security.

  2. Performance characterization of a new high resolution PET scintillation detector

    PubMed Central

    Foudray, A M K; Olcott, P D

    2013-01-01

    Performance of a new high resolution PET detection concept is presented. In this new concept, annihilation radiation enters the scintillator detectors edge-on. Each detector module comprises two 8 × 8 LYSO scintillator arrays of 0.91 × 0.91 × 1 mm3 crystals coupled to two position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs) mounted on a flex circuit. Appropriate crystal segmentation allows the recording of all three spatial coordinates of the interaction(s) simultaneously with submillimeter resolution. We report an average energy resolution of 14.6 ± 1.7% for 511 keV photons at FWHM. Coincident time resolution was determined to be 2.98 ± 0.13 ns FWHM on average. The coincidence point spread function (PSF) has an average FWHM of 0.837 ± 0.049 mm (using a 500 μm spherical source) and is uniform across the arrays. Both PSF and coincident time resolution degrade when Compton interactions are included in the data. Different blurring factors were evaluated theoretically, resulting in a calculated PSF of 0.793 mm, in good agreement with the measured value. PMID:20844332

  3. PANGU: a sub-GeV gamma-ray detector proposed for the joint CAS-ESA misson call

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Meng

    2015-08-01

    The ESA Directorate of Science and Robotic Exploration (ESA-SRE) and the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have agreed to jointly pursue a scientific space mission, to be implemented by the ESA Science Programme and the Chinese National Space Science Centre (NSSC) under the CAS. In this talk, I will briefly describe a proposed space mission for the low energy gamma-ray observations. The highly successful Fermi mission has proved the great potential of studying astrophysics, cosmology and fundamental physics in high energy gamma rays. One area of improvement is in the 10 MeV to 1 GeV region, where the PSF of Fermi is limited by the presence of the Tungsten converters. Another area is the polarization measurement. It is also crucial to have a gamma-ray all sky survey mission running in parallel with HERD and CTA. PANGU (PAir-productioN Gamma-ray Unit) is a mission candidate proposed to the ESA-CAS joint mission. To achieve a PSF of ~1° at 100 MeV, PANGU proposes to use a fully active tracker use thin silicon strip detectors. Our proposal has been presented at the first dedicated workshop of the ESA-CAS joint mission, and was selected for oral presentation as the only high energy mission for the second workshop. PANUG mission involves ~100 scientists from both China and Europe.

  4. Observations of a gamma-ray burst and other sources with a large-area, balloon-borne detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. B.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    Observations of a weak cosmic gamma ray burst of integrated intensity 2 x 10 to the -6th erg/sq cm, two solar flare events, and pulsed emission profiles of A0535+26 and NP0532 are reported for several energy intervals in the energy range from 45 to 520 keV. The measurements were made with a NaI(Tl) detector array flown on a balloon to 4 g/sq cm residual atmosphere from Palestine, Texas, on October 6-8, 1980, for 28 hours. The detector is a prototype of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) to be flown on the Gamma-Ray Observatory (GRO).

  5. Low energy gamma ray observations with the MPI-Compton telescope. [balloon-borne detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graml, F.; Penningsfeld, F. P.; Schoenfelder, V.

    1978-01-01

    Although the evaluation of data from the first balloon-flight of a large area Compton telescope is incomplete, two preliminary results are discussed. From the measured background spectrum at float altitude, the sensitivity of the telescope for the detection of cosmic gamma ray lines is estimated. The energy spectra is determined for an enhanced gamma ray flux observed from the direction of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151. A schematic drawing of the telescope is presented and discussed.

  6. CdTe and CdZnTe materials for room-temperature X-ray and gamma ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisen, Y.; Shor, A.

    1998-02-01

    Among the semiconductor materials of a wide band gap, CdTe and CdZnTe have attracted most attention as room-temperature X-ray and gamma-ray detectors. Suitable CdTe materials for nuclear detectors and, in particular, for spectrometers, have been developed over the past few decades and are mainly grown via the traveling heater method (THM). However, the manufacture of large homogeneous ingots at relatively low cost has not reached yet a proven stage. Cd 1- xZn xTe (CZT) materials, mainly grown via the high-pressure Bridgman (HPB) technique, possess several advantages over CdTe and appear to better approach the practicality of providing large volume X-ray and gamma-ray detectors at moderate costs. Continuing effort is still underway to improve the characteristics of both CdTe and CZT materials in order to achieve reproducible detectors for either low- and high-energy gamma rays. This review paper is divided into three parts: The first part describes different structural designs of detectors to improve their spectroscopic characteristics. These include hemispherical detectors, coplanar strip-electrode detectors and monolithic, two-dimensional segmented electrode arrays with pad sizes smaller than their thickness. This part will also describe various electronic methods to compensate for the poor charge collection of holes. The second part compares the characteristics of planar CdTe and CZT nuclear detectors containing metal contacts. Characteristics include: charge collection efficiencies for both electrons and holes indicated by the mobility-lifetime product, energy resolutions, leakage currents and robustness in field use. The third part is devoted to field uses of these detectors. Those include: X-ray fluorescent spectrometers, large volume spectrometers and a new generation nuclear gamma camera for medical diagnostics based on room-temperature solid-state spectrometers.

  7. Development of a detector based on Silicon Drift Detectors for gamma-ray spectroscopy and imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busca, P.; Butt, A. D.; Fiorini, C.; Marone, A.; Occhipinti, M.; Peloso, R.; Quaglia, R.; Bombelli, L.; Giacomini, G.; Piemonte, C.; Camera, F.; Giaz, A.; Million, B.; Nelms, N.; Shortt, B.

    2014-05-01

    This work deals with the development of a new gamma detector based on Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) to readout large LaBr3:Ce scintillators for gamma-ray spectroscopy and imaging applications. The research is supported by the European Space Agency through the Technology Research Programme (TRP) and by Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) within the Gamma project. The SDDs, produced at Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK) semiconductor laboratories, are designed as monolithic arrays of 3 × 3 units, each one of an active area of 8 mm × 8 mm (overall area of 26 mm × 26 mm). The readout electronics and the architecture of the camera are briefly described and then first experimental results coupling the SDD array with a 1'' × 1'' LaBr3:Ce scintillator are reported. An energy resolution of 3% FWHM at 662 keV has been measured at -20°C, better than coupling the same scintillator with a photomultiplier tube. The same scintillator is also used to evaluate position sensitivity with a 1 mm collimated Cs-137 source. The main difficulty in determining the position of the gamma-ray interaction in the crystal is associated to the high thickness/diameter ratio of the crystal (1:1) and the use of reflectors on all lateral and top sides the crystal. This last choice enhances energy resolution but makes imaging capability more challenging because light is spread over all photodetectors. Preliminary results show that the camera is able to detect shifts in the measured signals, when the source is moved with steps of 5 mm. A modified version of the centroid method is finally implemented to evaluate the imaging capability of the system.

  8. Development and calibration of fine collimators for the ASTRO-H Soft Gamma-ray Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, T.; Kimura, D.; Fukazawa, Y.; Furui, S.; Goto, K.; Hayashi, T.; Kawabata, K. S.; Kawano, T.; Kitamura, Y.; Shirakawa, H.; Tanabe, T.; Makishima, K.; Nakajima, K.; Nakazawa, K.; Fukuyama, T.; Ichinohe, Y.; Ishimura, K.; Ohta, M.; Sato, T.; Takahashi, T.; Uchida, Y.; Watanabe, S.; Ishibashi, K.; Sakanobe, K.; Matsumoto, H.; Miyazawa, T.; Mori, H.; Sakai, M.; Tajima, H.

    2014-07-01

    The Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD) is a Si/CdTe Compton telescope surrounded by a thick BGO active shield and is scheduled to be onboard the ASTRO-H satellite when it is launched in 2015. The SGD covers the energy range from 40 to 600 keV with high sensitivity, which allows us to study nonthermal phenomena in the universe. The SGD uses a Compton camera with the narrow field-of-view (FOV) concept to reduce the non-Xray background (NXB) and improve the sensitivity. Since the SGD is essentially a nonimaging instrument, it also has to cope with the cosmic X-ray background (CXB) within the FOV. The SGD adopts passive shields called "fine collimators" (FCs) to restrict the FOV to <= 0.6° for low-energy photons (<= 100 keV), which reduces contamination from CXB to less than what is expected due to NXB. Although the FC concept was already adopted by the Hard X-ray Detector onboard Suzaku, FCs for the SGD are about four times larger in size and are technically more difficult to operate. We developed FCs for the SGD and confirmed that the prototypes function as required by subjecting them to an X-ray test and environmental tests, such as vibration tests. We also developed an autocollimator system, which uses visible light to determine the transmittance and the optical axis, and calibrated it against data from the X-ray test. The acceptance tests of flight models started in December 2013: five out of six FCs were deemed acceptable, and one more unit is currently being produced. The activation properties were studied based on a proton-beam test and the results were used to estimate the in-orbit NXB.

  9. The gamma-ray spectrum of Centaurus A: A high-resolution observation between 70 keV and 8 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.; Cline, T. L.; Teegarden, B. J.; Paciesas, W. S.; Tueller, J.; Durouchoux, P.; Hameury, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    The NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Low Energy Gamma ray Spectrometer (LEGS) observed the nearby active nucleus galaxy Centaurus A (NGC 5128) during a balloon flight on 1981 November 19. There is no evidence of a break in the spectrum or of any line features. The 1.6 MeV limit is a factor of 8 lower than the 1974 line flux, indicating that, if the 1974 feature was real, and, if it was narrow, then the line intensity decreased significantly between 1974 and 1981. The lack of observed annihilation radiation from Cen A, combined with the temporal variations that are seen in the X-ray and gamma-ray intensities, constrain the size of the emission region to be between 10 to the 13th power and 5 x 10 to the 17th power cm.

  10. The gamma-ray spectrum of Centaurus A - A high-resolution observation between 70 keV and 8 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.; Cline, T. L.; Teegarden, B. J.; Paciesas, W. S.; Tueller, J.; Durouchoux, PH.; Hameury, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    The NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Low Energy Energy Gamma ray Spectrometer (LEGS) observed the nearby active nucleus galaxy Centaurus A (NGC 5128) during a balloon flight on 1981 November 19. There is no evidence of a break in the spectrum or of any line features. The 1.6 MeV limit is a factor of 8 lower than the 1974 line flux, indicating that, if the 1974 feature was real, and, if it was narrow, then the line intensity decreased significantly between 1974 and 1981. The lack of observed annihilation radiation from Cen A, combined with the temporal variations that are seen in the X-ray and gamma-ray intensities, constrain the size of the emission region to be between 10 to the 13th power and 5 x 10 to the 17th power cm. Previously announced in STAR as N83-35990

  11. Development of the multi-purpose gamma-ray detection system consisting of a double-sided silicon strip detector and a 25-segmented germanium detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H.; Kim, N. Y.; Lee, C. S.; Jang, Z. H.

    2005-07-01

    We developed a position-sensitive gamma-ray detection system consisting of a double-sided silicon strip detector (DSSD) and a 25-segmented germanium detector (25-SEGD). Two major applications of the system are gamma-ray imaging (Compton camera) and linear polarization measurement for gamma rays emitted from oriented nuclei. Customized electronics were developed in order to handle multi-channel signals of both the DSSD and the 25-SEGD. Images for a 133Ba-based compound source in a square shape with areal dimensions of 1.5 × 1.5 mm2 are presented. Comparison between experimental images and a Monte Carlo simulation yielded the overall imaging resolution within 1 cm for the present system.

  12. WE-D-BRF-03: Proton Beam Range Verification with a Single Prompt Gamma-Ray Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Verburg, J; Testa, M; Cascio, E; Bortfeld, T; Lu, H; Seco, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To present an experimental study of a novel range verification method for scanned and scattered proton beams. Methods: A detection system consisting of an actively shielded lanthanum(III)bromide scintillator and a one-sided lead collimator was used to measure prompt gamma-rays emitted during the delivery of proton beams to a water phantom and an anthropomorphic head phantom. The residual proton range at the collimator position was determined by comparing gamma-ray intensities while the proton energy was modulated to the distal end of the target. We used a clinical field to deliver a 50 cGy dose to a 12 cm diameter target in the water phantom and to a 175 cc tumor-shaped target in the head phantom. The detector signals were acquired with a custom data acquisition system enabling energy and time-of-flight discrimination of prompt gamma-rays. Results: Range deviations were detected with a statistical accuracy of ± 0.2 mm and ± 1.4 mm at 90% confidence level, respectively for the water and head phantom. We obtained a time resolution of 1 ns FWHM and an energy resolution < 2% FWHM for the main gamma lines from proton-induced nuclear reactions with carbon and oxygen. This allowed for an accurate separation of the prompt gamma-rays from neutron-induced background. Conclusion: Proton range deviations can be detected with millimeter accuracy using a single prompt gamma-ray measurement point acquired during the delivery of a few proton energy layers to the distal part of the target. The method is also feasible in the presence of background radiation from passively scattered proton beam delivery.

  13. SYNTH - Gamma Ray Spectrum Synthesizer

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2009-05-18

    SYNTH was designed to synthesize the results of typical gamma-ray spectroscopy experiments. The code allows a user to specify the physical characteristics of a gamma-ray source, the quantity of radionuclides emitting gamma radiation, the source-to-detector distance and the presence and type of any intervening absorbers, the size and type of the gamma-ray detector, and the electronic set-up used to gather the data.

  14. Gamma-ray detection efficiency of the microchannel plate installed as an ion detector in the low energy particle instrument onboard the GEOTAIL satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Y. T.; Yoshikawa, I.; Yoshioka, K.; Terasawa, T.; Saito, Y.; Mukai, T.

    2007-03-15

    A microchannel plate (MCP) assembly has been used as an ion detector in the low energy particle (LEP) instrument onboard the magnetospheric satellite GEOTAIL. Recently the MCP assembly has detected gamma rays emitted from an astronomical object and has been shown to provide unique information of gamma rays if they are intense enough. However, the detection efficiency for gamma rays was not measured before launch, and therefore we could not analyze the LEP data quantitatively. In this article, we report the gamma-ray detection efficiency of the MCP assembly. The measured efficiencies are 1.29%{+-}0.71% and 0.21%{+-}0.14% for normal incidence 60 and 662 keV gamma rays, respectively. The incident angle dependence is also presented. Our calibration is crucial to study high energy astrophysical phenomena by using the LEP.

  15. Some gamma-ray shielding measurements made at altitudes greater than 115000 feet using large Ge(Li) detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, G. T.; Cumby, R. P.; Gibbons, J. H.; Macklin, R. L.; Parker, H. W.

    1972-01-01

    A series of balloon-flight experiments at altitudes greater than 115,000 feet were conducted to gain information relative to the use of composite shields (passive and/or active) for shielding large-volume, lithium-drifted, germanium (Ge(Li)) detectors used in gamma-ray spectrometers. Data showing the pulse-height spectra of the environmental gamma radiation as measured at 5.3 and 3.8 gms sq cm residual atmosphere with an unshielded diode detector are also presented.

  16. Fiber optic thermal/fast neutron and gamma ray scintillation detector

    DOEpatents

    Neal, John S.; Mihalczo, John T

    2007-10-30

    A system for detecting fissile and fissionable material originating external to the system includes: a .sup.6Li loaded glass fiber scintillator for detecting thermal neutrons, x-rays and gamma rays; a fast scintillator for detecting fast neutrons, x-rays and gamma rays, the fast scintillator conjoined with the glass fiber scintillator such that the fast scintillator moderates fast neutrons prior to their detection as thermal neutrons by the glass fiber scintillator; and a coincidence detection system for processing the time distributions of arriving signals from the scintillators.

  17. Gamma-ray multiplicity measurement of the spontaneous fission decay of 252Cf in a segmented HPGe/BGO detector array

    SciTech Connect

    Bleuel, D L; Bernstein, L A; Burke, J T; Gibelin, J; Heffner, M D; Mintz, J; Norman, E B; Phair, L; Scielzo, N D; Sheets, S A; Snyderman, N J; Stoyer, M A; Wiedeking, M

    2008-04-23

    Coincident {gamma} rays from a {sup 252}Cf source were measured using an array of six segmented high-purity germanium (HPGe) Clover detectors each enclosed by 16 bismuth-germanate (BGO) detectors. The detectors were arranged in a cubic pattern around a 1 {micro}Ci {sup 252}Cf source to cover a large solid angle for {gamma}-ray measurement with a reasonable reconstruction of the multiplicity. Neutron multiplicity was determined in certain cases by identifying the prompt {gamma} rays from individual fission fragment pairs. Multiplicity distributions from previous experiments and theoretical models were convolved with the response function of the array and compared to the present results. These results suggest a {gamma}-ray multiplicity spectrum broader than previous measurements and models, and provide no evidence of correlation with neutron multiplicity.

  18. Gamma Large Area Silicon Telescope (GLAST): Applying silicon strip detector technology to the detection of gamma rays in space

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, W.B.; The GLAST Collaboration

    1993-06-01

    The recent discoveries and excitement generated by space satellite experiment EGRET (presently operating on Compton Gamma Ray Observatory -- CGRO) have prompted an investigation into modern detector technologies for the next generation space based gamma ray telescopes. The GLAST proposal is based on silicon strip detectors as the {open_quotes}technology of choice{close_quotes} for space application: no consumables, no gas volume, robust (versus fragile), long lived, and self triggerable. The GLAST detector basically has two components: a tracking module preceding a calorimeter. The tracking module has planes of crossed strip (x,y) 300 {mu}m pitch silicon detectors coupled to a thin radiator to measure the coordinates of converted electron-positron pairs. The gap between the layers ({approximately}5 cm) provides a lever arm for track fitting resulting in an angular resolution of <0.1{degree} at high energy. The status of this R & D effort is discussed including details on triggering the instrument, the organization of the detector electronics and readout, and work on computer simulations to model this instrument.

  19. Direct Detection of Pu-242 with a Metallic Magnetic Calorimeter Gamma-Ray Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, C.; Pies, C.; Kempf, S.; Hengstler, D.; Fleischmann, A.; Gastaldo, L.; Enss, C.; Friedrich, S.

    2016-07-01

    Cryogenic high-resolution γ -ray detectors can improve the accuracy of non-destructive assay (NDA) of nuclear materials in cases where conventional high-purity germanium detectors are limited by line overlap or by the Compton background. We have improved the performance of gamma detectors based on metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs) by separating the 0.5 × 2 × 0.25 mm3 Au absorber from the Au:Er sensor with sixteen 30-\\upmu m-diameter Au posts. This ensures that the entire γ -ray energy thermalizes in the absorber before heating the Au:Er sensor, and improves the energy resolution at 35 mK to as low as 90 eV FWHM at 60 keV. This energy resolution enables the direct detection of γ -rays from Pu-242, an isotope that cannot be measured by traditional NDA and whose concentration is therefore inferred through correlations with other Pu isotopes. The Pu-242 concentration of 11.11 ± 0.42 % measured by NDA with MMCs agrees with mass spectrometry results and exceeds the accuracy of correlation measurements.

  20. Performance of A Compact Multi-crystal High-purity Germanium Detector Array for Measuring Coincident Gamma-ray Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, Chris; Daigle, Stephen; Buckner, Matt; Erikson, Luke E.; Runkle, Robert C.; Stave, Sean C.; Champagne, Art; Cooper, Andrew; Downen, Lori; Glasgow, Brian D.; Kelly, Keegan; Sallaska, Anne

    2015-02-18

    The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) detector is a 14-crystal array of high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors housed in a single cryostat. The array was used to measure the astrophysical S-factor for the 14N(p,γ)15O* reaction for several transition energies at an effective center of mass energy of 163 keV. Owing to the segmented nature of the MARS detector, the effect of gamma-ray summing was greatly reduced in comparison to past experiments which utilized large, single-crystal detectors. The new S-factor values agree within the uncertainties with the past measurements. Details of the analysis and detector performance will be presented.

  1. Performance of a compact multi-crystal high-purity germanium detector array for measuring coincident gamma-ray emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Chris; Daigle, Stephen; Buckner, Matt; Erikson, Luke E.; Runkle, Robert C.; Stave, Sean C.; Champagne, Arthur E.; Cooper, Andrew; Downen, Lori; Glasgow, Brian D.; Kelly, Keegan; Sallaska, Anne

    2015-05-01

    The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) detector is a 14-crystal array of high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors housed in a single cryostat. The array was used to measure the astrophysical S-factor for the 14N(p,γ)15O* reaction for several transition energies at an effective center-of-mass energy of 163 keV. Owing to the granular nature of the MARS detector, the effect of gamma-ray summing was greatly reduced in comparison to past experiments which utilized large, single-crystal detectors. The new S-factor values agree within their uncertainties with the past measurements. Details of the analysis and detector performance are presented.

  2. Instruments and detectors for the registration of gamma-ray transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedrenne, G.; Zenchenko, V. M.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Niel, M.; Hurley, K.; Chambon, G.; Estulin, I. V.

    Descriptions are given of the Sneg-2MP and Sneg-2MZ instruments designed to detect gamma-ray transients. The basic physical characteristics and modes of operation of these instruments are discussed, and their application on the Vela 5 and 6 satellites as well as on Venera and Prognoz spacecraft is considered.

  3. Computed radiography as a gamma ray detector--dose response and applications.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, D S; McLeod, R W

    2004-08-21

    Computed radiography (CR) can be used for imaging the spatial distribution of photon emissions from radionuclides. Its wide dynamic range and good response to medium energy gamma rays reduces the need for long exposure times. Measurements of small doses can be performed without having to pre-sensitize the computed radiography plates via an x-ray exposure, as required with screen-film systems. Cassette-based Agfa MD30 and Kodak GP25 CR plates were used in applications involving the detection of gamma ray emissions from technetium-99m and iodine-131. Cassette entrance doses as small as 1 microGy (140 keV gamma rays) produce noisy images, but the images are suitable for applications such as the detection of breaks in radiation protection barriers. A consequence of the gamma ray sensitivity of CR plates is the possibility that some nuclear medicine patients may fog their x-rays if the x-ray is taken soon after their radiopharmaceutical injection. The investigation showed that such fogging is likely to be diffuse. PMID:15446787

  4. Silicon Photomultiplier-Based Multi-Channel Gamma Ray Detector Using the Dynamic Time-Over-Threshold Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Shimazoe, K.; Takahashi, H.

    2016-02-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), which are a relatively new type of photon detector, have received more attention in the fields of nuclear medicine and high-energy physics because of their compactness and high gain up to 106. In this work, a SiPM-based multi-channel gamma ray detector with individual read out based on the dynamic time-over-threshold (dToT) method is implemented and demonstrated as an elemental material for large-area gamma ray imager applications. The detector consists of 64 channels of KETEK SiPM PM6660 (6 × 6 mm2 containing 10,000 micro-cells of 60 × 60 μm2) coupled to an 8 × 8 array of high-energy resolution Gd3(Al,Ga)5O12(Ce) (HR-GAGG) crystals (10 × 10 × 10 mm3) segmented by a 1 mm thick BaSO4 reflector. To produce a digital pulse containing linear energy information, the dToT-based read-out circuit consists of a CR-RC shaping amplifier (2.2 μs) and comparator with a feedback component. By modelling the pulse of the SiPM, the light output, and the CR-RC shaping amplifier, the integral-non-linearity (INL) was numerically calculated in terms of the delay time and the time constant of dynamic threshold movement. The experimental results of the averaged INL and energy resolution were 5.8±1.6% and the full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) of 7.4±0.9% at 662 keV, respectively. The 64-channel single-mode detector module was successfully implemented, demonstrating potential for its use as an elemental material for large-area gamma ray imaging applications.

  5. A High Resolution Liquid Xenon Imaging Telescope for 0.3-10 MeV Gamma Ray Astrophysics: Construction and Initial Balloon Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aprile, Elena

    1993-01-01

    The results achieved with a 3.5 liter liquid xenon time projection chamber (LXe-TPC) prototype during the first year include: the efficiency of detecting the primary scintillation light for event triggering has been measured to be higher than 85%; the charge response has been measured to be stable to within 0.1% for a period of time of about 30 hours; the electron lifetime has been measured to be in excess of 1.3 ms; the energy resolution has been measured to be consistent with previous results obtained with small volume chambers; X-Y gamma ray imaging has been demonstrated with a nondestructive orthogonal wires readout; Monte Carlo simulation results on detection efficiency, expected background count rate at balloon altitude, background reduction algorithms, telescope response to point-like and diffuse sources, and polarization sensitivity calculations; and work on a 10 liter LXe-TPC prototype and gas purification/recovery system.

  6. DPIX, an assembly of 6400 CdTe detectors for gamma-ray bursts detection with ECLAIRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remoué, N.; Barret, D.; Mandrou, P.; Lacombe, K.; Pons, R.; Amoros, C.; Landé, J.; Rambaud, D.; Dezalay, J. P.; Narbonne, J.; Soulié, Y.; Marty, W.; Ramon, P.; Rouaix, G.; Houret, B.; Limousin, O.; Gevin, O.; Lugiez, F.; Penquer, A.

    2008-07-01

    The French instrument ECLAIRs, to be part of the French and Chinese SVOM mission for the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), will detect bursts between 4 and 250 keV. Its detector plane is an assembly of 200 elementary detection modules (XRDPIX) equipped with 32 Schottky CdTe detectors, produced by ACRORAD in Japan. The innovative concept of XRDPIX will enable a 4 keV low-energy threshold to be achieved. After introducing the SVOM payload, the ECLAIRs instrument and its detector plane, this paper presents the results of the performance evaluation of a first set of 500 detectors, and briefly describes the tests foreseen for the first XRDPIX prototypes.

  7. Design and performance of a modularized NaI/Tl/ detector /The Crystal Ball prototype/. [for gamma rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Y.; Partridge, R. A.; Peck, C. W.; Kollman, W.; Richardson, M.; Strauch, K.; Aschman, D.; Coyne, D. G.; Beron, B. L.; Carrington, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    A prototype NaI(Tl) detector (the Cluster of 54) of spherical geometry subtending a solid angle of 7.5% of 4pi at its center, has recently been assembled and tested. This detector consists of 54 close-packed but optically isolated NaI(Tl) modules and the associated electronic circuitry. The Cluster of 54 is the predecessor of an almost complete spherical detector, the Crystal Ball, which will cover 94% of 4pi. The latter detector is now under construction and is especially designed for the study of gamma-rays produced in electron-positron collisions at colliding beam facilities. This article outlines the mechanical, optical, and electronic assembly of the prototype system.

  8. Two CdZnTe Detector-Equipped Gamma-ray Spectrometers for Attribute Measurements on Irradiated Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwell, John Kelvin; Winston, Philip Lon; Marts, Donna Jeanne; Moore-McAteer, Lisa Dawn; Taylor, Steven Cheney

    2003-04-01

    Some United States Department of Energy-owned spent fuel elements from foreign research reactors (FRRs) are presently being shipped from the reactor location to the US for storage at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Two cadmium zinc telluride detector-based gamma-ray spectrometers have been developed to confirm the irradiation status of these fuels. One spectrometer is configured to operate underwater in the spent fuel pool of the shipping location, while the other is configured to interrogate elements on receipt in the dry transfer cell at the INEEL’s Interim Fuel Storage Facility (IFSF). Both units have been operationally tested at the INEEL.

  9. Construction of the GAMCIT gamma-ray burst detector (G-056)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coward, Michael H.; Grunsfeld, John M.; Mccall, Benjamin J.; Ratner, Albert

    1995-01-01

    The GAMCIT (Gamma-ray Astrophysics Mission, California Institute of Technology) payload is a Get-Away-Special payload designed to search for high-energy gamma-ray bursts and any associated optical transients. This paper presents details on the development and construction of the GAMCIT payload. In addition, this paper will reflect upon the unique challenges involved in bringing the payload close to completion, as the project has been designed, constructed, and managed entirely by undergraduate members of the Caltech SEDS (Students for the Exploration and Development of Space). Our experience will definitely be valuable to other student groups interested in undertaking a challenge such as a Get-Away-Special payload.

  10. A combined neutron and gamma-ray multiplicity counter based on liquid scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enqvist, Andreas; Flaska, Marek; Dolan, Jennifer L.; Chichester, David L.; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2011-10-01

    Multiplicity counters for neutron assay have been extensively used in materials control and accountability for nonproliferation and nuclear safeguards. Typically, neutron coincidence counters are utilized in these fields. In this work, we present a measurement system that makes use not only of neutron (n) multiplicity counting but also of gamma-ray ( γ) multiplicity counting and the combined higher-order multiples containing both neutrons and gamma rays. The benefit of this approach is in using both particle types available from the sample, leading to a reduction in measurement times compared with single-particle measurements. We present measurement results of n, γ, nn, nγ, γγ, nnn, nnγ, nγγ and γγγ multiples emitted by Mixed-Oxide (MOX) samples measured at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The MOX measurement is compared to initial validation of the detection system done using a 252Cf source. The dual radiation measuring system proposed here uses extra measurables to improve the statistics when compared to a neutron-only system and allows for extended analysis and interpretation of sample parameters. New challenges such as the effect of very high intrinsic gamma-ray sources in the case of MOX samples are discussed. Successful measurements of multiple rates can be performed also when using high-Z shielding.

  11. Ground-based detectors in very-high-energy gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Naurois, Mathieu; Mazin, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Following the discovery of the cosmic rays by Victor Hess in 1912, more than 70 years and numerous technological developments were needed before an unambiguous detection of the first very-high-energy gamma-ray source in 1989 was made. Since this discovery, the field on very-high-energy gamma-ray astronomy experienced a true revolution: a second, then a third generation of instruments were built, observing the atmospheric cascades from the ground, either through the atmospheric Cherenkov light they comprise, or via the direct detection of the charged particles they carry. Present arrays, 100 times more sensitive than the pioneering experiments, have detected a large number of astrophysical sources of various types, thus opening a new window on the non-thermal Universe. New, even more sensitive instruments are currently being built; these will allow us to explore further this fascinating domain. In this article we describe the detection techniques, the history of the field and the prospects for the future of ground-based very-high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. xml:lang="fr"

  12. Laboratory background of an escape-suppressed Clover gamma-ray detector overground, shallow underground, and deep underground

    SciTech Connect

    Szuecs, T.

    2010-03-01

    This study presents the laboratory background measurement of a Clover-type composite gamma-detector equipped with a BGO escape-suppression shield. Recently, such a detector had been used in an in-beam gamma-spectroscopy measurement of the {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O reaction deep underground. Here the laboratory gamma-ray background of that detector is studied in three different environments: overground, in a shallow underground laboratory and deep underground. In addition, the effect of the escape-suppression shield on the cosmic-ray induced background has been studied in all three cases. The measurements have been performed at LUNA site in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory, Assergi, Italy (deep underground), at the Felsenkeller Laboratory, Dresden, Germany (shallow underground) and ATOMKI, Debrecen, Hungary (Earth's surface).

  13. Application of high resolution NMR, ESR, and gamma-ray scintillation spectroscopy to the study of ligand binding in proteins. [Torpedo californica

    SciTech Connect

    Lancione, G.V.

    1982-01-01

    Electron spin resonance spectroscopy has been employed to study the nature of the ligand binding site of alpha-1-antitrypsin. Spectra of spin-labeled alpha-1-antitrypsin were recorded at pH's ranging from 2.4 to 12.5. This data demonstrates the tight binding of the spin-label to the protease, and the sensitivity of the bound spin-label to informational changes in the protease inhibitor. A molecular dipstick approach has also been applied to this system and has yielded information on the geometry of the cleft accommodating the spin-label. /sup 160/Terbium(III) exchange experiments have been performed on the acetylcholine receptor protein isolated from Torpedo californica, employing a specially designed flow dialysis apparatus constructed in the laboratory. The apparatus is designed to allow continuous monitoring of /sup 160/Tb(III) gamma-ray emission from the protein compartment of the flow dialysis cell. Nicotinic ligand-induced displacement of /sup 160/Tb(III) from the nicotinic binding site of the receptor was monitored as a funtion of (1) the concentration of nicotinic ligand in the washout buffer, and (2) the nature of the nicotinic ligand in the buffer. Measured /sup 160/Tb(III) exchange half-lives indicate (1) a direct relationship between /sup 160/Tb(III) displacement and nicotinic ligand concentration in the wash-out buffer, and (2) an enhanced /sup 160/Tb(III) displacement for nicotinic agents possessing quaternary ammonium functions.

  14. Application of nondestructive gamma-ray and neutron techniques for the safeguarding of irradiated fuel materials

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.R.; Halbig, J.K.; Lee, D.M.; Beach, S.E.; Bement, T.R.; Dermendjiev, E.; Hatcher, C.R.; Kaieda, K.; Medina, E.G.

    1980-05-01

    Nondestructive gamma-ray and neutron techniques were used to characterize the irradiation exposures of irradiated fuel assemblies. Techniques for the rapid measurement of the axial-activity profiles of fuel assemblies have been developed using ion chambers and Be(..gamma..,n) detectors. Detailed measurements using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry and passive neutron techniques were correlated with operator-declared values of cooling times and burnup.

  15. Recipes for high resolution time-of-flight detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Anz, S.J. |; Felter, T.E.; Hess, B.V.; Daley, R.S.; Roberts, M.L.; Williams, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    The authors discuss the dynamics, construction, implementation and benefits of a time-of-flight (TOF) detector with count rates an order of magnitude higher and resolution three to four times better than that obtainable with a surface barrier detector. The propose use of design criteria for a time-of-flight detector is outlined, and the determination of a TOF detector`s total relative timing error and how this value determines the mass resolution are illustrated using a graphical analysis. They present simulation and experimental examples employing light ions and discuss advantages and pitfalls of medium-energy heavy ion TOF spectrometry.

  16. The new large-area wide-angle ground-based cosmic-ray and gamma-ray detector SCORE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tluczykont, Martin; Hampf, Daniel; Horns, Dieter; Kneiske, Tanja; Rowell, Gavin

    We propose to explore the so-far poorly measured cosmic-ray and gamma-ray sky (accelerator sky) in the energy range from 10 TeV to 1 EeV with the new large-area (10 square-km) wide-angle (1 sr) air Cherenkov detector SCORE (Study for a Cosmic ORigin Explorer). The SCORE detector concept is based on non-imaging Cherenkov light-front sampling with sensitive large-area (order of square-m) detector modules, distributed over an array covering a total area of at least 10 square-kilometers. The lateral intensity and arrival-time distribu-tions will be sampled with high sensitivity up to large distances from the shower core. An extension of the SCORE detector to HiSCORE (Hundred Square-km Cosmic ORigin Explorer) is planned. With SCORE (and HiSCORE) fundamental physics questions can be addressed, including the origin of charged Galactic cosmic rays, diffuse gamma-ray emission from the Galactic plane and the local super-cluster, attenuation by Galactic interstellar radiaton fields and the cosmic microwave background and studies of possible effects on this attenuation by photon/axion conversion, hidden-sector photon oscillations or violation of Lorentz invariance. Further motivations are spectral and chemical composition measurements of charged cosmic rays from 100 TeV to 1 EeV and independent measurements of the proton-proton inelastic cross-section overlapping with and exceeding LHC energies. First simulations show that already SCORE has the potential to be competitive with existing and planned experiments above 10 TeV and outperforming above 100 TeV. The physics moti-vations, the detector concept / performance expectations and the status of our project will be presented.

  17. High-Resolution Detector For X-Ray Diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Withrow, William K.; Pusey, Marc L.; Yost, Vaughn H.

    1988-01-01

    Proposed x-ray-sensitive imaging detector offers superior spatial resolution, counting-rate capacity, and dynamic range. Instrument based on laser-stimulated luminescence and reusable x-ray-sensitive film. Detector scans x-ray film line by line. Extracts latent image in film and simultaneously erases film for reuse. Used primarily for protein crystallography. Principle adapted to imaging detectors for electron microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy and general use in astronomy, engineering, and medicine.

  18. Toroidal magnetic detector for high resolution measurement of muon momenta

    DOEpatents

    Bonanos, Peter

    1992-01-01

    A muon detector system including central and end air-core superconducting toroids and muon detectors enclosing a central calorimeter/detector. Muon detectors are positioned outside of toroids and all muon trajectory measurements are made in a nonmagnetic environment. Internal support for each magnet structure is provided by sheets, located at frequent and regularly spaced azimuthal planes, which interconnect the structural walls of the toroidal magnets. In a preferred embodiment, the shape of the toroidal magnet volume is adjusted to provide constant resolution over a wide range of rapidity.

  19. Toroidal magnetic detector for high resolution measurement of muon momenta

    DOEpatents

    Bonanos, P.

    1992-01-07

    A muon detector system including central and end air-core superconducting toroids and muon detectors enclosing a central calorimeter/detector. Muon detectors are positioned outside of toroids and all muon trajectory measurements are made in a nonmagnetic environment. Internal support for each magnet structure is provided by sheets, located at frequent and regularly spaced azimuthal planes, which interconnect the structural walls of the toroidal magnets. In a preferred embodiment, the shape of the toroidal magnet volume is adjusted to provide constant resolution over a wide range of rapidity. 4 figs.

  20. High resolution Cherenkov detectors for cosmic ray isotope experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acharya, B. S.; Balasubrahmanyan, V. K.; Esposito, J. A.; Lloyd-Evans, J.; Ormes, J. F.; Streitmatter, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Cerenkov detectors are used to measure the velocity of particles in configurations designed to study the isotopic composition of galactic cosmic rays. The geometrical properties of the detector are outlined. Monte-Carlo simulations of photon propagation in a diffusive detector were undertaken. The scattering properties of diffusively reflecting white paint and of surface treatments for the radiator material were measured. It is found that the absorption of light in the radiator is an important light loss mechanism. The simulations are used to find optimal mapping techniques and data reduction strategies. The application of these techniques are discussed with respect to the large area isotopic composition experiment (ALICE) Cerenkov detector.

  1. Comparison of two position sensitive gamma-ray detectors based on continuous YAP and pixellated NaI(TI) for nuclear medical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jie; Ma, Hong-Guang; Ma, Wen-Yan; Zeng, Hui; Wang, Zhao-Min; Xu, Zi-Zhong

    2008-11-01

    Dedicated position sensitive gamma-ray detectors based on position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs) coupled to scintillation crystals, have been used for the construction of compact gamma-ray imaging systems, suitable for nuclear medical imaging applications such as small animal imaging and single organ imaging and scintimammography. In this work, the performance of two gamma-ray detectors: a continuous YAP scintillation crystal coupled to a Hamamastu R2486 PSPMT and a pixellated NaI(TI) scintillation array crystal coupled to the same PSPMT, is compared. The results show that the gamma-ray detector based on a pixellated NaI(TI) scintillation array crystal is a promising candidate for nuclear medical imaging applications, since their performance in terms of position linearity, spatial resolution and effective field of view (FOV) is superior than that of the gamma-ray detector based on a continuous YAP scintillation crystal. However, a better photodetector (Hamamatau H8500 Flat Panel PMT, for example) coupled to the continuous crystal is also likely a good selection for nuclear medicine imaging applications. Supported by National Nature Science Foundation of China (10275063)

  2. Gamma-ray irradiation effects on InAs/GaSb-based nBn IR detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, Vincent M.; Morath, Christian P.; Swift, Seth M.; Myers, Stephen; Gautam, Nutan; Krishna, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    IR detectors operated in a space environment are subjected to a variety of radiation effects while required to have very low noise performance. When properly passivated, conventional mercury cadmium telluride (MCT)-based infrared detectors have been shown to perform well in space environments. However, the inherent manufacturing difficulties associated with the growth of MCT has resulted in a research thrust into alternative detector technologies, specifically type-II Strained Layer Superlattice (SLS) infrared detectors. Theory predicts that SLS-based detector technologies have the potential of offering several advantages over MCT detectors including lower dark currents and higher operating temperatures. Experimentally, however, it has been found that both p-on-n and n-on-p SLS detectors have larger dark current densities than MCT-based detectors. An emerging detector architecture, complementary to SLS-technology and hence forth referred to here as nBn, mitigates this issue via a uni-polar barrier design which effectively blocks majority carrier conduction thereby reducing dark current to more acceptable levels. Little work has been done to characterize nBn IR detectors tolerance to radiation effects. Here, the effects of gamma-ray radiation on an nBn SLS detector are considered. The nBn IR detector under test was grown by solid source molecular beam epitaxy and is composed of an InAs/GaSb SLS absorber (n) and contact (n) and an AlxGa1-xSb barrier (B). The radiation effects on the detector are characterized by dark current density measurements as a function of bias, device perimeter-to-area ratio and total ionizing dose (TID).

  3. High resolution 64-element pyroelectric linear array IR detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, Andrew A.; Cooke, Martin E.

    1987-01-01

    A 64-element pyroelectric linear array detector has been developed. Included within the detector is a corresponding array of source followers together with a multiplexer and amplifier. High responsivity and high detectivity have been achieved, together with a low level of microphony.

  4. Novel ZnO:Al contacts to CdZnTe for X- and gamma-ray detectors

    PubMed Central

    Roy, U. N.; Mundle, R. M.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Gul, R.; Hossain, A.; Yang, G.; Pradhan, A. K.; James, R. B.

    2016-01-01

    CdZnTe (CZT) has made a significant impact as a material for room-temperature nuclear-radiation detectors due to its potential impact in applications related to nonproliferation, homeland security, medical imaging, and gamma-ray telescopes. In all such applications, common metals, such as gold, platinum and indium, have been used as electrodes for fabricating the detectors. Because of the large mismatch in the thermal-expansion coefficient between the metal contacts and CZT, the contacts can undergo stress and mechanical degradation, which is the main cause for device instability over the long term. Here, we report for the first time on our use of Al-doped ZnO as the preferred electrode for such detectors. The material was selected because of its better contact properties compared to those of the metals commonly used today. Comparisons were conducted for the detector properties using different contacts, and improvements in the performances of ZnO:Al-coated detectors are described in this paper. These studies show that Al:ZnO contacts to CZT radiation detectors offer the potential of becoming a transformative replacement for the common metallic contacts due to the dramatic improvements in the performance of detectors and improved long-term stability. PMID:27216387

  5. Novel ZnO:Al contacts to CdZnTe for X- and gamma-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, U. N.; Mundle, R. M.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Gul, R.; Hossain, A.; Yang, G.; Pradhan, A. K.; James, R. B.

    2016-05-01

    CdZnTe (CZT) has made a significant impact as a material for room-temperature nuclear-radiation detectors due to its potential impact in applications related to nonproliferation, homeland security, medical imaging, and gamma-ray telescopes. In all such applications, common metals, such as gold, platinum and indium, have been used as electrodes for fabricating the detectors. Because of the large mismatch in the thermal-expansion coefficient between the metal contacts and CZT, the contacts can undergo stress and mechanical degradation, which is the main cause for device instability over the long term. Here, we report for the first time on our use of Al-doped ZnO as the preferred electrode for such detectors. The material was selected because of its better contact properties compared to those of the metals commonly used today. Comparisons were conducted for the detector properties using different contacts, and improvements in the performances of ZnO:Al-coated detectors are described in this paper. These studies show that Al:ZnO contacts to CZT radiation detectors offer the potential of becoming a transformative replacement for the common metallic contacts due to the dramatic improvements in the performance of detectors and improved long-term stability.

  6. Novel ZnO:Al contacts to CdZnTe for X- and gamma-ray detectors.

    PubMed

    Roy, U N; Mundle, R M; Camarda, G S; Cui, Y; Gul, R; Hossain, A; Yang, G; Pradhan, A K; James, R B

    2016-01-01

    CdZnTe (CZT) has made a significant impact as a material for room-temperature nuclear-radiation detectors due to its potential impact in applications related to nonproliferation, homeland security, medical imaging, and gamma-ray telescopes. In all such applications, common metals, such as gold, platinum and indium, have been used as electrodes for fabricating the detectors. Because of the large mismatch in the thermal-expansion coefficient between the metal contacts and CZT, the contacts can undergo stress and mechanical degradation, which is the main cause for device instability over the long term. Here, we report for the first time on our use of Al-doped ZnO as the preferred electrode for such detectors. The material was selected because of its better contact properties compared to those of the metals commonly used today. Comparisons were conducted for the detector properties using different contacts, and improvements in the performances of ZnO:Al-coated detectors are described in this paper. These studies show that Al:ZnO contacts to CZT radiation detectors offer the potential of becoming a transformative replacement for the common metallic contacts due to the dramatic improvements in the performance of detectors and improved long-term stability. PMID:27216387

  7. OPTIMIZATION OF VIRTUAL FRISCH-GRID CdZnTe DETECTOR DESIGNS FOR IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPY OF GAMMA RAYS.

    SciTech Connect

    BOLOTNIKOV,A.E.; ABDUL-JABBAR, N.M.; BABALOLA, S.; CAMARDA, G.S.; CUI, Y.; HOSSAIN, A.; JACKSON, E.; JACKSON, H.; JAMES, J.R.; LURYI, A.L.; JAMES, R.B.

    2007-08-21

    In the past, various virtual Frisch-grid designs have been proposed for cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) and other compound semiconductor detectors. These include three-terminal, semi-spherical, CAPture, Frisch-ring, capacitive Frisch-grid and pixel devices (along with their modifications). Among them, the Frisch-grid design employing a non-contacting ring extended over the entire side surfaces of parallelepiped-shaped CZT crystals is the most promising. The defect-free parallelepiped-shaped crystals with typical dimensions of 5x5{approx}12 mm3 are easy to produce and can be arranged into large arrays used for imaging and gamma-ray spectroscopy. In this paper, we report on further advances of the virtual Frisch-grid detector design for the parallelepiped-shaped CZT crystals. Both the experimental testing and modeling results are described.

  8. A simulation of a CdTe gamma ray detector based on collection efficiency profiles as determined by lateral IBIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vittone, E.; Fizzotti, F.; Lo Giudice, A.; Polesello, P.; Manfredotti, C.

    1999-06-01

    Collection efficiency profiles as determined by the ion beam-induced charge (IBIC) technique have been considered to evaluate the spectroscopic performance of a cadmium telluride (CdTe) nuclear radiation detector. The dependence of such profiles on the applied bias voltage and the shaping time are presented and discussed on the basis of a theoretical model, which is also used to evaluate the electron/hole collection lengths profiles. Experimental collection efficiency profiles were used as input data of the "ISIDE" Monte Carlo programme to simulate the CdTe response to gamma rays produced by 57Co. A systematic investigation of such spectra obtained under different detection conditions shows the effects of non constant collection efficiency profiles and ballistic deficit on the energy resolution of the detector.

  9. Optimization of virtual Frisch-grid CdZnTe detector designs for imaging and spectroscopy of gamma rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotnikov, A. E.; Abdul-Jabbar, N. M.; Babalola, S.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Jackson, E.; Jackson, H.; James, J. R.; Luryi, A. L.; James, R. B.

    2007-09-01

    In the past, various virtual Frisch-grid designs have been proposed for cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) and other compound semiconductor detectors. These include three-terminal, semi-spherical, CAPture, Frisch-ring, capacitive Frisch-grid and pixel devices (along with their modifications). Among them, the Frisch-grid design employing a non-contacting ring extended over the entire side surfaces of parallelepiped-shaped CZT crystals is the most promising. The defect-free parallelepiped-shaped crystals with typical dimensions of 5x5x12 mm3 are easy to produce and can be arranged into large arrays used for imaging and gamma-ray spectroscopy. In this paper, we report on further advances of the virtual Frisch-grid detector design for the parallelepiped-shaped CZT crystals. Both the experimental testing and modelling results are described.

  10. HIGH-RESOLUTION X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF THE PULSAR WIND NEBULA ASSOCIATED WITH THE GAMMA-RAY SOURCE HESS J1640-465

    SciTech Connect

    Lemiere, A.; Slane, P.; Murray, S.; Gaensler, B. M.

    2009-12-01

    We present a Chandra X-ray observation of the very high energy gamma-ray source HESS J1640 - 465. We identify a point source surrounded by a diffuse emission that fills the extended object previously detected by XMM-Newton at the centroid of the HESS source, within the shell of the radio supernova remnant (SNR) G338.3 - 0.0. The morphology of the diffuse emission strongly resembles that of a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) and extends asymmetrically to the southwest of a point source presented as a potential pulsar. The spectrum of the putative pulsar and compact nebula are well characterized by an absorbed power-law model which, for a reasonable N{sub H} value of 14 x 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}, exhibit an index of 1.1 and 2.5 respectively, typical of Vela-like PWNe. We demonstrate that, given the H I absorption features observed along the line of sight, the SNR and the H II surrounding region are probably connected and lie between 8 kpc and 13 kpc. The resulting age of the system is between 10 and 30 kyr. For a 10 kpc distance (also consistent with the X-ray absorption) the 2-10 keV X-ray luminosities of the putative pulsar and nebula are L{sub PSR} approx 1.3 x 10{sup 33} d {sup 2}{sub 10kpc} erg s{sup -1} and L{sub PWN} approx 3.9 x 10{sup 33} d {sup 2}{sub 10} erg s{sup -1} (d {sub 10} = d/10 kpc). Both the flux ratio of L {sub PWN}/L{sub PSR} approx 3.4 and the total luminosity of this system predict a pulsar spin-down power around E-dotapprox4 x 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}. We finally consider several reasons for the asymmetries observed in the PWN morphology and discuss the potential association with the HESS source in terms of a time-dependent one-zone leptonic model.

  11. Beam Test of a Prototype Phoswich Detector Assembly forthe PoGOLite Astronomical Soft Gamma-ray Polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Kanai, Y.; Ueno, M.; Kataoka, J.; Arimoto, M.; Kawai, N.; Yamamoto, K.; Mizuno, T.; Fukazawa, Y.; Kiss, M.; Ylinen, T.; Bettolo, C.Marini; Carlson, P.; P.Chen d, B.Craig d, T.Kamae d, G.Madejski d, J.S.T.Ng; Rogers, R.; Tajima, H.; Thurston, T.S.; Saito, Y.; Takahashi, T. Gunji, S.; Bjornsson, C-I.; Larsson, S.; /Stockholm U. /Ecole Polytechnique /KEK, Tsukuba

    2007-01-17

    We report about the beam test on a prototype of the balloon-based astronomical soft gamma-ray polarimeter, PoGOLite (Polarized Gamma-ray Observer--Light Version) conducted at KEK Photon Factory, a synchrotron radiation facility in Japan. The synchrotron beam was set at 30, 50, and 70 keV and its polarization was monitored by a calibrated polarimeter. The goal of the experiment was to validate the flight design of the polarimeter. PoGOLite is designed to measure polarization by detecting a Compton scattering and the subsequent photo-absorption in an array of 217 well-type phoswich detector cells (PDCs). The test setup included a first flight model PDC and a front-end electronics to select and reconstruct valid Compton scattering events. The experiment has verified that the flight PDC can detect recoil electrons and select valid Compton scattering events down to 30 keV from background. The measure azimuthal modulations (34.4 %, 35.8 % and 37.2 % at 30, 50, and 70 keV, respectively) agreed within 10% (relative) with the predictions by Geant4 implemented with dependence on the initial and final photon polarizations.

  12. The dynamic time-over-threshold method for multi-channel APD based gamma-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orita, T.; Shimazoe, K.; Takahashi, H.

    2015-03-01

    t- Recent advances in manufacturing technology have enabled the use of multi-channel pixelated detectors in gamma-ray imaging applications. When obtaining gamma-ray measurements, it is important to obtain pulse height information in order to avoid unnecessary events such as scattering. However, as the number of channels increases, more electronics are needed to process each channel's signal, and the corresponding increases in circuit size and power consumption can result in practical problems. The time-over-threshold (ToT) method, which has recently become popular in the medical field, is a signal processing technique that can effectively avoid such problems. However, ToT suffers from poor linearity and its dynamic range is limited. We therefore propose a new ToT technique called the dynamic time-over-threshold (dToT) method [4]. A new signal processing system using dToT and CR-RC shaping demonstrated much better linearity than that of a conventional ToT. Using a test circuit with a new Gd3Al2Ga3O12 (GAGG) scintillator and an avalanche photodiode, the pulse height spectra of 137Cs and 22Na sources were measured with high linearity. Based on these results, we designed a new application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for this multi-channel dToT system, measured the spectra of a 22Na source, and investigated the linearity of the system.

  13. A High Resolution Monolithic Crystal, DOI, MR Compatible, PET Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Robert S Miyaoka

    2012-03-06

    The principle objective of this proposal is to develop a positron emission tomography (PET) detector with depth-of-interaction (DOI) positioning capability that will achieve state of the art spatial resolution and sensitivity performance for small animal PET imaging. When arranged in a ring or box detector geometry, the proposed detector module will support <1 mm3 image resolution and >15% absolute detection efficiency. The detector will also be compatible with operation in a MR scanner to support simultaneous multi-modality imaging. The detector design will utilize a thick, monolithic crystal scintillator readout by a two-dimensional array of silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) devices using a novel sensor on the entrance surface (SES) design. Our hypothesis is that our single-ended readout SES design will provide an effective DOI positioning performance equivalent to more expensive dual-ended readout techniques and at a significantly lower cost. Our monolithic crystal design will also lead to a significantly lower cost system. It is our goal to design a detector with state of the art performance but at a price point that is affordable so the technology can be disseminated to many laboratories. A second hypothesis is that using SiPM arrays, the detector will be able to operate in a MR scanner without any degradation in performance to support simultaneous PET/MR imaging. Having a co-registered MR image will assist in radiotracer localization and may also be used for partial volume corrections to improve radiotracer uptake quantitation. The far reaching goal of this research is to develop technology for medical research that will lead to improvements in human health care.

  14. A High-resolution TOF Detector _ A Possible Way to Compete with a RICH Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Va'vra, J; Ertley, C.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Ratcliff, B.; Schwiening, J.; /SLAC

    2008-07-25

    Using two identical 64-pixel Burle/Photonis MCP-PMTs to provide start and stop signals, they have achieved a timing resolution of {sigma}{sub Single{_}detector} {approx} 7.2 ps for N{sub pe} {approx} 50 photoelectrons (N{sub pe}) with a laser diode providing a 1 mm spot on the MCP window. The limiting resolution achieved was {sigma}{sub Single{_}detector} {approx} 5.0 ps for N{sub pe} {approx} 180, for which they estimate the MCP-PMT contribution of {sigma}{sub MCP-PMT} {approx} 4.5 ps. The electronics contribution is estimated as {sigma}{sub Electrons} = 3.42 ps. These results suggest that an ultra-high resolution TOF detector may become a reality at future experiments one day.

  15. High resolution decoding of Multi-Anode Microchannel Array detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasle, David B.; Morgan, Jeffrey S.

    1991-01-01

    The Multi-Anode Microchannel Array (MAMA) is a photon counting detector which utilizes a photocathode for photon to electron conversion, a microchannel plate (MCP) for signal amplification and a proximity focused anode array for position sensitivity. The detector electronics decode the position of an event through coincidence discrimination. The decoding algorithm which associates a given event with the appropriate pixel is determined by the geometry of the array. A new algorithm incorporated into a CMOS Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) decoder which improves the pixel spatial resolution is described. The new algorithm does not degrade the detector throughput and does not require any modifications to the detector tube. The standard MAMA detector has a pixel size of 25 x 25 square microns, but with the new decoder circuit the pixel size is reduced to 12.5 x 12.5 square microns. We have built the first set of decode electronics utilizing the new ASIC chips and report here on the first imaging tests of this system.

  16. Development of high resolution imaging detectors for x ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, S. S.; Schwartz, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    This final report summarizes our past activities and discusses the work performed over the period of 1 April 1990 through 1 April 1991 on x-ray optics, soft x-ray (0.1 - 10 KeV) imaging detectors, and hard x-ray (10 - 300 KeV) imaging detectors. If microchannel plates (MCPs) can be used to focus x-rays with a high efficiency and good angular resolution, they will revolutionize the field of x-ray optics. An x-ray image of a point source through an array of square MCP pores compared favorably with our ray tracing model for the MCP. Initial analysis of this image demonstrates the feasibility of MCPs for soft x-rays. Our work continues with optimizing the performance of our soft x-ray MCP imaging detectors. This work involves readout technology that should provide improved MCP readout devices (thin film crossed grid, curved, and resistive sheets), defect removal in MCPs, and photocathode optimization. In the area of hard x-ray detector development we have developed two different techniques for producing a CsI photocathode thickness of 10 to 100 microns, such that it is thick enough to absorb the high energy x-rays and still allow the photoelectrons to escape to the top MCP of a modified soft x-ray imaging detector. The methods involve vacuum depositing a thick film of CsI on a strong back, and producing a converter device that takes the place of the photocathode.

  17. Digital Signal Processors for Cryogenic High-Resolution X-Ray Detector Readout

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S; Drury, O; Bechstein, S; Henning, W; Momayezi, M

    2003-01-01

    The authors are developing fast digital signal processors (DSPs) to read out superconducting high-resolution X-ray detectors with on-line pulse processing. For superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detector read-out, the DSPs offer on-line filtering, rise time discrimination and pile-up rejection. Compared to analog pulse processing, DSP readout somewhat degrades the detector resolution, but improves the spectral purity of the detector response. They discuss DSP performance with the 9-channel STJ array for synchrotron-based high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy.

  18. High resolution, low energy avalanche photodiode X-ray detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, R.; Vanderpuye, K.; Entine, G.; Squillante, M. R.

    1991-01-01

    Silicon avalanche photodiodes have been fabricated, and their performance as X-ray detectors has been measured. Photon sensitivity and energy resolution were measured as a function of size and operating parameters. Noise thresholds as low as 212 eV were obtained at room temperature, and backscatter X-ray fluorescence data were obtained for aluminum and other light elements. It is concluded that the results with the X-ray detector are extremely encouraging, and the performance is challenging the best available proportional counters. While not at the performance level of either cryogenic silicon or HgI2, these device operate at room temperature and can be reproduced in large numbers and with much larger areas than typically achieved with HgI2. In addition, they are rugged and appear to be indefinitely stable.

  19. Monte-Carlo simulation of a compact gamma-ray detector using wavelength-shifting fibers coupled to a YAP scintillation crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jie; Ma, Hong-Guang; Ma, Wen-Yan; Zeng, Hui; Wang, Zhao-Min; Xu, Zi-Zong

    2008-05-01

    The production and transportation of fluorescent light produced in wavelength-shifting fibers (WSFs) coupled to YAP scintillation crystal is simulated using the GEANT4 codes. An advantage of the wavelength-shifting fiber readout technique over a direct readout with a position-sensitive photo-sensor is the reduced requirement for position sensitive photomultiplier tube photocathode area. With this gamma-ray detector, the gamma camera is small and flexible and has larger effective field of view and low cost. Simulation results show that a) a mean 12 of photons per 59.5 keV gamma ray interaction is produced in the WSF located nearest to the incident gamma ray, and a spatial resolution of 3.6 mm FWHM is obtained, b) a mean 27 of photons per 140 keV gamma ray interaction is produced and a spatial resolution of 3.1 mm FWHM is obtained. Results demonstrate the feasibility of this concept of a compact gamma-ray detector based on wavelength-shifting fibers readout. However, since the very low photoelectron levels, it is very important to use a photon counting device with good single photo-electron response to readout the WSFs. Supported by National Nature Science Foundation of China (10275063)

  20. Portable compton gamma-ray detection system

    DOEpatents

    Rowland, Mark S.; Oldaker, Mark E.

    2008-03-04

    A Compton scattered gamma-ray detector system. The system comprises a gamma-ray spectrometer and an annular array of individual scintillators. The scintillators are positioned so that they are arrayed around the gamma-ray spectrometer. The annular array of individual scintillators includes a first scintillator. A radiation shield is positioned around the first scintillator. A multi-channel analyzer is operatively connected to the gamma-ray spectrometer and the annular array of individual scintillators.

  1. Software tool for xenon gamma-ray spectrometer control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernysheva, I. V.; Novikov, A. S.; Shustov, A. E.; Dmitrenko, V. V.; Pyae Nyein, Sone; Petrenko, D.; Ulin, S. E.; Uteshev, Z. M.; Vlasik, K. F.

    2016-02-01

    Software tool "Acquisition and processing of gamma-ray spectra" for xenon gamma-ray spectrometers control was developed. It supports the multi-windows interface. Software tool has the possibilities for acquisition of gamma-ray spectra from xenon gamma-ray detector via USB or RS-485 interfaces, directly or via TCP-IP protocol, energy calibration of gamma-ray spectra, saving gamma-ray spectra on a disk.

  2. Hard-X and gamma-ray imaging detector for astrophysics based on pixelated CdTe semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gálvez, J.-L.; Hernanz, M.; Álvarez, L.; Artigues, B.; Ullán, M.; Lozano, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Cabruja, E.; Martínez, R.; Chmeissani, M.; Puigdengoles, C.

    2016-01-01

    Stellar explosions are astrophysical phenomena of great importance and interest. Instruments with high sensitivities are essential to perform detailed studies of cosmic explosions and cosmic accelerators. In order to achieve the needed performance, a hard-X and gamma-ray imaging detector with mm spatial resolution and large enough efficiency is required. We present a detector module which consists of a single CdTe crystal of 12.5 × 12.5mm 2 and 2mm thick with a planar cathode and with the anode segmented in an 11x11 pixel array with a pixel pitch of 1 mm attached to the readout chip. Two possible detector module configurations are considered: the so-called Planar Transverse Field (PTF) and the Parallel Planar Field (PPF). The combination of several modules in PTF or PPF configuration will achieve the desired performance of the imaging detector. The sum energy resolution of all pixels of the CdTe module measured at 122 keV and 356 keV is 3.8% and 2% respectively, in the following operating conditions: PPF irradiation, bias voltage -500 V and temperature -10̂ C.

  3. Research in particle and gamma-ray astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. C.; Davis, L., Jr.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Prince, T. A.

    1988-01-01

    This research program is directed toward the investigation of the astrophysical aspects of cosmic rays and gamma rays and of the radiation and electromagnetic field environment of the Earth and other planets. The emphasis was on precice measurements with high resolution in charge, mass and energy. These investigations were carried out by means of energetic particle and photon detector systems flown on spacecraft and balloons.

  4. Development activities of a CdTe/CdZnTe pixel detector for gamma-ray spectrometry with imaging and polarimetry capability in astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gálvez, J. L.; Hernanz, M.; Álvarez, J. M.; Álvarez, L.; La Torre, M.; Caroli, E.; Lozano, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Ullán, M.; Cabruja, E.; Martínez, R.; Chmeissani, M.; Puigdengoles, C.

    2013-05-01

    In the last few years we have been working on feasibility studies of future instruments in the gamma-ray range, from several keV up to a few MeV, in collaboration with other research institutes. High sensitivities are essential to perform detailed studies of cosmic explosions and cosmic accelerators, e.g., Supernovae, Classical Novae, Supernova Remnants (SNRs), Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), Pulsars, Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN).Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) and Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe) are very attractive materials for gamma-ray detection, since they have already demonstrated their great performance onboard current space missions, such as IBIS/INTEGRAL and BAT/SWIFT, and future projects like ASIM onboard the ISS. However, the energy coverage of these instruments is limited up to a few hundred keV, and there has not been yet a dedicated instrument for polarimetry.Our research and development activities aim to study a gamma-ray imaging spectrometer in the MeV range based on CdTe detectors, suited either for the focal plane of a focusing mission or as a calorimeter for a Compton camera. In addition, our undergoing detector design is proposed as the baseline for the payload of a balloon-borne experiment dedicated to hard X- and soft gamma-ray polarimetry, currently under study and called CμSP (CZT μ-Spectrometer Polarimeter). Other research institutes such as INAF-IASF, DTU Space, LIP, INEM/CNR, CEA, are involved in this proposal. We will report on the main features of the prototype we are developing at the Institute of Space Sciences, a gamma-ray detector with imaging and polarimetry capabilities in order to fulfil the combined requirement of high detection efficiency with good spatial and energy resolution driven by the science.

  5. Simulation of gamma-ray spectra for a variety of user-specified detector designs. Semiannual technical report, 1 March-31 August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Rester, A.C. Jr.

    1994-12-01

    The gamma-ray spectrum simulation program BSIMUL was designed to allow the operator to follow the path of a gamma-ray through a detector, shield and collimator whose dimensions are entered by the operator. It can also be used to simulate spectra that would be generated by a detector. Several improvements have been made to the program within the last few months. The detector, shield and collimator dimensions can now be entered through an interactive menu whose options are discussed below. In addition, spectra containing more than one gamma-ray energy can now be generated with the menu - for isotopes listed in the program. Adding isotopes to the main routine is also quite easy. Subroutines have been added to enable the operator to specify the material and dimensions of a collimator. This report details the progress made in simulating gamma-ray spectra for a variety of user-specified detector designs. In addition, a short discussion of work done in the related areas of pulse shape analysis and the spectral analysis is included. The pulse shape analysis and spectral analysis work is being performed pursuant to the requirements of contract F-94-C-0006, for the Advanced Research Projects Agency and the U.S. Air Force.

  6. Gamma rays from Centaurus A

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Nayantara

    2008-06-15

    Centaurus A, the cosmic ray accelerator a few Mpc away from us, is possibly one of the nearest sources of extremely high energy cosmic rays. We investigate whether the gamma ray data currently available from Centaurus A in the GeV-TeV energy band can be explained with only proton-proton interactions. We show that for a single power law proton spectrum, mechanisms of {gamma}-ray production other than proton-proton interactions are needed inside this radio-galaxy to explain the gamma ray flux observed by EGRET, upper limits from HESS/CANGAROO-III and the correlated extremely energetic cosmic ray events observed by the Pierre Auger experiment. In future, with better {gamma}-ray data, and simultaneous observation with {gamma}-ray and cosmic ray detectors, it will be possible to carry out such studies on different sources in more detail.

  7. Size Effect on Nuclear Gamma-Ray Energy Spectra Acquired by Different Sized CeBr3, LaBr3:Ce, and NaI:Tl Gamma-Ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, Paul; Reed, Michael; Yuan, Ding; Beller, Denis; Cutler, Matthew; Contreras, Chris; Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Wilde, Scott UNLV

    2014-03-01

    Gamma-ray energy spectra were acquired for different sizes of cerium tribromide (CeBr3), cerium-doped lanthanum tribromide (LaBr3:Ce), and thallium-doped sodium iodide (NaI:Tl) detectors. A comparison was conducted of the energy resolution and detection efficiency of these scintillator detectors for different sizes of detectors. The results of this study are consistent with the observation that for each size detector, LaBr3:Ce offers better resolution than either a CeBr3 or NaI:Tl detector of the same size. In addition, CeBr3 and LaBr3:Ce detectors could resolve some closely spaced peaks in the spectra of several radioisotopes that NaI:Tl could not. As the detector size increased, all three detector materials exhibited higher efficiency, albeit with slightly reduced resolution. Significantly, the very low intrinsic activity of CeBr3 is also demonstrated in this study, which, when combined with energy resolution characteristics for a range of detector sizes, could lead to an improved ability to detect special nuclear materials compared to the other detectors.

  8. Advanced radiation detector development: Advanced semiconductor detector development: Development of a room-temperature, gamma ray detector using gallium arsenide to develop an electrode detector. Annual progress report, September 30, 1994--September 29, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, G.F.

    1995-11-01

    The advanced detector development project at the University of Michigan has completed the first full year of its current funding. The general goals are the development of radiation detectors and spectrometers that are capable of portable room temperature operation. Over the past 12 months, the authors have worked primarily in the development of semiconductor spectrometers with ``single carrier`` response that offer the promise of room temperature operation and good energy resolution in gamma ray spectroscopy. They have also begun a small scale effort at investigating the properties of a small non-spectroscopic detector system with directional characteristics that will allow identification of the approximate direction in which gamma rays are incident. These activities have made use of the extensive clean room facilities at the University of Michigan for semiconductor device fabrication, and also the radiation measurement capabilities provided in the laboratory in the Phoenix Building on the North Campus.

  9. Gamma Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    The project has progressed successfully during this period of performance. The highlights of the Gamma Ray Astronomy teams efforts are: (1) Support daily BATSE data operations, including receipt, archival and dissemination of data, quick-look science analysis, rapid gamma-ray burst and transient monitoring and response efforts, instrument state-of-health monitoring, and instrument commanding and configuration; (2) On-going scientific analysis, including production and maintenance of gamma-ray burst, pulsed source and occultation source catalogs, gamma-ray burst spectroscopy, studies of the properties of pulsars and black holes, and long-term monitoring of hard x-ray sources; (3) Maintenance and continuous improvement of BATSE instrument response and calibration data bases; (4) Investigation of the use of solid state detectors for eventual application and instrument to perform all sky monitoring of X-Ray and Gamma sources with high sensitivity; and (5) Support of BATSE outreach activities, including seminars, colloquia and World Wide Web pages. The highlights of this efforts can be summarized in the publications and presentation list.

  10. Interconnect and bonding techniques for pixelated X-ray and gamma-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, A.; Veale, M. C.; Duarte, D. D.; Bell, S. J.; Wilson, M. D.; Lipp, J. D.; Seller, P.

    2015-02-01

    In the last decade, the Detector Development Group at the Technology Department of the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), U.K., established a variety of fabrication and bonding techniques to build pixelated X-ray and γ-ray detector systems such as the spectroscopic X-ray imaging detector HEXITEC [1]. The fabrication and bonding of such devices comprises a range of processes including material surface preparation, photolithography, stencil printing, flip-chip and wire bonding of detectors to application-specific integrated circuits (ASIC). This paper presents interconnect and bonding techniques used in the fabrication chain for pixelated detectors assembled at STFC. For this purpose, detector dies (~ 20× 20 mm2) of high quality, single crystal semiconductors, such as cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) are cut to the required thickness (up to 5mm). The die surfaces are lapped and polished to a mirror-finish and then individually processed by electroless gold deposition combined with photolithography to form 74× 74 arrays of 200 μ m × 200 μ m pixels with 250 μ m pitch. Owing to a lack of availability of CZT wafers, lithography is commonly carried out on individual detector dies which represents a significant technical challenge as the edge of the pixel array and the surrounding guard band lies close to the physical edge of the crystal. Further, such detector dies are flip-chip bonded to readout ASIC using low-temperature curing silver-loaded epoxy so that the stress between the bonded detector die and the ASIC is minimized. In addition, this reduces crystalline modifications of the detector die that occur at temperature greater than 150\\r{ }C and have adverse effects on the detector performance. To allow smaller pitch detectors to be bonded, STFC has also developed a compression cold-weld indium bump bonding technique utilising bumps formed by a photolithographic lift-off technique.

  11. Performance of high resolution decoding with Multi-Anode Microchannel Array detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasle, David B.; Horch, Elliott P.

    1993-01-01

    The Multi-Anode Microchannel Array (MAMA) is a microchannel plate based photon counting detector with applications in ground-based and space-based astronomy. The detector electronics decode the position of each photon event, and the decoding algorithm that associates a given event with the appropriate pixel is determined by the geometry of the anode array. The standard MAMA detector has a spatial resolution set by the anode array of 25 microns, but the MCP pore resolution exceeds this. The performance of a new algorithm that halves the pixel spacing and improves the pixel spatial resolution is described. The new algorithm does not degrade the pulse-pair resolution of the detector and does not require any modifications to the detector tube. Measurements of the detector's response demonstrate that high resolution decoding yields a 60 percent enhancement in spatial resolution. Measurements of the performance of the high resolution algorithm with a 14 micron MAMA detector are also described. The parameters that control high resolution performance are discussed. Results of the application of high resolution decoding to speckle interferometry are presented.

  12. Conceptual design of stacked-layer detectors to increase the sensitivity of Fast Neutron Gamma-ray Radiography (FNGR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jea Hyung; Kim, Kwang Hyun; Chung, Young Hyun

    2012-04-01

    This study is focused on the structure and other possible factors related to scintillators used in the Fast Neutron and Gamma-ray Radiography (FNGR) system to increase its sensitivity. The CsI(Tl) crystal scintillator (Co-60 gamma-ray detection) and the BC430 plastic scintillator (14 MeV fast neutron detection) were analyzed with the Monte Carlo simulation (MCNPX and DETEC97 codes). Each scintillator was investigated with regard to the optimum thickness (1 cm × 1 cm), reconfiguration of detector modules (a stacked-layer structure), the optimum surface treatment, and the spectral matching with customized PIN-type photodiodes. As a result, the optimum thickness of the CsI(Tl) was found to be 4.5 cm; the optimum value was 5.5 cm for the BC430. When the detector modules were stacked in a sandwich structure rather than the existing single detector structure, the light photon transmission to the surface of the photodiode was enhanced by 40% and 58% for CsI(Tl) and BC430, respectively. In the matter of scintillator surface treatment, both scintillators were simulated with unpolished and polished condition before coating. The polished condition of the scintillator surfaces showed a higher performance, more than doubling that of the unpolished condition surfaces. Then, the performance improvement of the scintillator with the paint coating was compared to the scintillator with the metal coating conditions. For CsI(Tl), the metal coating showed a 10 % higher performance than that of the paint coating, and the metal coating of BC430 showed a 6% higher performance than that of the paint coating. As a result of spectral matching between the scintillators and the customized PIN-photodiodes, PS100-6b of Silicon AG, SD445-14-21-305 of API, and FSD1010-CAL of THOLABS were compared. The spectral matching factor of PS100-6b was 0.39 with CsI(Tl) and was 0.42 with BC430; the spectral matching factors of the other samples were relatively lower (SD445-14-21-305 with CsI(Tl): 0.29; SD445

  13. Calibration Analyses and Efficiency Studies for the Anti Coincidence Detector on the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Kachulis, Chris; /Yale U. /SLAC

    2011-06-22

    The Anti Coincidence Detector (ACD) on the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope provides charged particle rejection for the Large Area Telescope (LAT). We use two calibrations used by the ACD to conduct three studies on the performance of the ACD. We examine the trending of the calibrations to search for damage and find a timescale over which the calibrations can be considered reliable. We also calculated the number of photoelectrons counted by a PMT on the ACD from a normal proton. Third, we calculated the veto efficiencies of the ACD for two different veto settings. The trends of the calibrations exhibited no signs of damage, and indicated timescales of reliability for the calibrations of one to two years. The number of photoelectrons calculated ranged from 5 to 25. Large errors in the effect of the energy spectrum of the charged particles caused these values to have very large errors of around 60 percent. Finally, the veto efficiencies were found to be very high at both veto values, both for charged particles and for the lower energy backsplash spectrum. The Anti Coincidence Detector (ACD) on the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope is a detector system built around the silicon strip tracker on the Large Area Telescope (LAT). The purpose of the ACD is to provide charged particle rejection for the LAT. To do this, the ACD must be calibrated correctly in flight, and must be able to efficiently veto charged particle events while minimizing false vetoes due to 'backsplash' from photons in the calorimeter. There are eleven calibrations used by the ACD. In this paper, we discuss the use of two of these calibrations to preform three studies on the performance of the ACD. The first study examines trending of the calibrations to check for possible hardware degradation. The second study uses the calibrations to explore the efficiency of an on-board hardware veto. The third study uses the calibrations to calculate the number of photoelectrons seen by each PMT when a minimum ionizing

  14. Segmented Ge detectors and mechanical coolers for future gamma-ray astronomy instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnell, Larry S.

    1990-01-01

    The effectiveness of a segmented Ge detector in rejecting background events due to the beta decay of internal radioactivity is demonstrated by a laboratory experiment in which radioactivity was produced in the detector by neutron irradiation. A Cf-252 source of neutrons was used to produce, by neutron capture on Ge-74 in the detector itself, Ge-75, which decays by beta emission with a maximum energy of 1188 keV. Simultaneous spectra are taken of the activity in the detector under two conditions: a free spectrum in which all events in the detector are accumulated, and a gated spectrum in which events are accumulated only if they deposit energy in two or more segments. A comparison of the spectra shows that over 85 percent of the beta events are rejected, which is in good agreement with predictions.

  15. Development of CZT detectors for x-ray and gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kuen; Martin, J. W.; Garson, A., III; Guo, Q.; Matteson, J.; Groza, M.; Beilicke, M.; Burger, A.; de Geronimo, G.; Krawczynski, H.

    2011-09-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) is the detector material of choice for the detection of X-rays in the 10 keV-1MeV energy band with excellent spatial and energy resolutions and without cryogenic cooling. In this contribution, we report on recent results of the CZT detector development program and several astrophysical experiments which make use of CZT detectors. In the first part of the paper, we discuss the performance of pixel and cross-strip CZT detectors read out with an ASIC developed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Our pixel detectors achieve some of the best energy resolutions reported in the literature. Cross-strip detectors are found to give an inferior performance and we investigate the reason for this performance difference. We also present results from a precision measurement of the effect of a steering grid on multi-pixel events obtained with a 200 micrometer collimator. In the second part of the paper, we describe the design and performance of the hard X-ray polarimeter X-Calibur. The polarimeter uses a 14 cm long scintillator scatterer, surrounded by an assembly of 32 2-5 mm thick CZT detectors. We discuss the sensitivity of the polarimeter to measure the linear polarization of 10 keV-80 keV X-rays on short and long balloon flights and results from testing the polarimeter in the laboratory.

  16. A Multiyear Light Curve of Scorpius X-1 Based on Compton Gamma Ray Observatory BATSE Spectroscopy Detector Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, B. J.; Harrison, T. E.; Mason, P. A.; Templeton, M.; Heikkila, C. W.; Buckley, T.; Galvan, E.; Silva, A.; Harmon, B. A.

    1998-06-01

    A multiyear light curve of the low mass X-ray binary, Scorpius X-1, is constructed based on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) Spectroscopy Detector (SD) data in the nominal energy range of 10-20 keV. A detailed discussion is given of the reduction process of the BATSE/SD data. Corrections to the SD measurements are made for off-axis pointings, spectral and bandpass changes, and differences in the eight SD sensitivities. The resulting 4.4 yr Sco X-1 SD light curve is characterized in terms of the timescales over which various types of emission changes occur. This light curve is then compared with Sco X-1 light curves obtained by Ariel 5, the BATSE Large Area Detectors (LADs), and the RXTE all-sky monitor (ASM). Coincident temporal coverage by the BATSE/SD and RXTE/ASM allows a direct comparison of the behavior of Sco X-1 over a range of high energies to be made. These ASM light curves are then used to discuss model constraints on the Sco X-1 system.

  17. A Search for gravitational waves associated with the gamma ray burst GRB030329 using the LIGO detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Ageev, A.; Allen, B.; Amin, R.; Anderson, S.B.; Anderson, W.G.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Ashley, M.; Asiri, F.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Balasubramanian, R.; Ballmer, S.; Barish, B.C.; Barker, C.; Barker, D.; Barnes, M.; /Potsdam, Max Planck Inst. /Hannover, Max Planck Inst. Grav. /Australian Natl. U., Canberra /Caltech /Cal State, Dominguez Hills /Caltech /Cardiff U. /Carleton Coll. /Fermilab /Hobart - William Smith Coll. /IUCAA, Pune /LIGO Lab., Caltech /MIT, MKI /LIGO Hanford Observ. /LIGO Livingston Obs. /Louisiana State U. /Louisiana Tech. U. /Loyola U., New Orleans /Munich, Max Planck Inst. Quantenopt. /Moscow State U. /NASA, Goddard

    2005-01-01

    We have performed a search for bursts of gravitational waves associated with the very bright Gamma Ray Burst GRB030329, using the two detectors at the LIGO Hanford Observatory. Our search covered the most sensitive frequency range of the LIGO detectors (approximately 80-2048 Hz), and we specifically targeted signals shorter than {approx_equal}150 ms. Our search algorithm looks for excess correlated power between the two interferometers and thus makes minimal assumptions about the gravitational waveform. We observed no candidates with gravitational wave signal strength larger than a pre-determined threshold. We report frequency dependent upper limits on the strength of the gravitational waves associated with GRB030329. Near the most sensitive frequency region, around {approx_equal}250 Hz, our root-sum-square (RSS) gravitational wave strain sensitivity for optimally polarized bursts was better than h{sub RSS} {approx_equal} 6 x 10{sup -21} Hz{sup -1/2}. Our result is comparable to the best published results searching for association between gravitational waves and GRBs.

  18. Superconducting tunnel junction x-ray detectors for high resolution spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Labov, S., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    We are developing low-tcmpaature detectors for optical, ultraviolet, X-ray, and gamma-ray spectroscopy, and for biomolecular mass spectrometry. We present here a some of our recent work in developing these detectors and some of the first results in applying these detectors to X-ray fluorescence analysis. We have measured thin-film Nb/Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al/Nb superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) X-ray detectors in the 0 2 to 1 keV band with a range of different junction sizes and aluminum film thicknesses. In one case, we have achieved the statistical limit to the energy resolution in this band. We have measured the performance of these STJ detectors as a function of count rate. and demonstrated a resolution of 13 eV FWHM at 271 eV with an output count rate of 20,600 cts/s Using X rays from SSRL to study compos- ite materials, we have demonstrated that we can resolve the L lines of transition metals from the nearby K lines of light elements We describe the first use of a low-temperature X-ray detector to measure X-ray fluoresccncc from the dilute metal component in a protein.

  19. Cryogenic, high-resolution x-ray detector with high count rate capability

    DOEpatents

    Frank, Matthias; Mears, Carl A.; Labov, Simon E.; Hiller, Larry J.; Barfknecht, Andrew T.

    2003-03-04

    A cryogenic, high-resolution X-ray detector with high count rate capability has been invented. The new X-ray detector is based on superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), and operates without thermal stabilization at or below 500 mK. The X-ray detector exhibits good resolution (.about.5-20 eV FWHM) for soft X-rays in the keV region, and is capable of counting at count rates of more than 20,000 counts per second (cps). Simple, FET-based charge amplifiers, current amplifiers, or conventional spectroscopy shaping amplifiers can provide the electronic readout of this X-ray detector.

  20. Design studies of two possible detector blocks for high resolution positron emission tomography of the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksson, L.; Bohm, C.; Kesselberg, M.; Holte, S.; Bergstrom, M.; Litton, J.

    1987-02-01

    Two possible detector designs for high resolution positron camera systems have been investigated. The goal is to achieve an instrument that can measure the whole brain with a spatial resolution of 5 mm FWHM in all directions. For both detectors BGO crystals are used, with the dimension 4.5 x 9.5 x 25 mm. One detector scheme utilizes the Anger principle for crystal identification with 16 crystals mounted on two dual PMT:s via a 3 mm light guide. The other detector scheme utilizes position sensitive PMT:s. The figures of merit for these two configurations are discussed in terms of high count rate capabilities and identification reliability.

  1. Searches for neutrinos from gamma ray bursts with the AMANDA-II and IceCube detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strahler, Erik Albert

    2009-11-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most energetic phenomenon in the universe, releasing isotropic equivalent energies of [Special characters omitted.] ergs over short time scales. While it is possible to wholly explain the keV-GeV observed photons by purely electromagnetic processes, it is natural to consider the implications of concurrent hadronic (proton) acceleration in these sources. Such processes make GRBs one of the leading candidates for the sources of the ultra high-energy cosmic rays as well as sources of associated high energy (TeV-PeV) neutrinos. We have performed searches for such neutrinos from 85 northern sky GRBs with the AMANDA-II neutrino detector. No signal is observed and upper limits are set on the emission from these sources. Additionally, we have performed a search for 41 northern sky GRBs using the 22-string configuration of the IceCube neutrino telescope, employing an unbinned maximum- likelihood method and individual modeling of the predicted emission from each burst. This search is consistent with the background-only hypothesis and we set upper limits on the emission.

  2. High-Resolution Compton-Suppressed CZT Detector for Fission Products Identification

    SciTech Connect

    R. Aryaeinejd; J. K. Hartwell; Wade W. Scates

    2004-10-01

    Room temperature semiconductor CdZnTe (CZT) detectors are currently limited to total detector volumes of 1-2 cm3, which is dictated by the poor charge transport characteristics. Because of this size limitation one of the problems in accurately determining isotope identification is the enormous background from the Compton scattering events. Eliminating this background will not only increase the sensitivity and accuracy of measurements but also help us to resolve peaks buried under the background and peaks in close vicinity of others. We are currently developing a fission products detection system based on the Compton-suppressed CZT detector. In this application, the detection system is required to operate in high radiation fields. Therefore, a small 10x10x5 mm3 CZT detector is placed inside the center of a well-shielded 3" in diameter by 3" long Nal detector. So far we have been able to successfully reduce the Compton background by a factor of 5.4 for a 137Cs spectrum. This reduction of background will definitely enhance the quality of the gamma-ray spectrum in the information-rich energy range below 1 MeV, which consequently increases the detection sensitivity. In this work, we will discuss the performance of this detection system as well as its applications.

  3. SNM Movement Detection/Radiation Sensors and Advanced Materials Portfolio Review, CdMnTe (CMT) Gamma Ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov,A.

    2009-06-02

    The project goals are: (1) Develop CMT radiation detectors - Demonstrate feasibility (Phase 1 is complete) and Improve material properties and device performance; (2) This project will lead to novel radiation detectors - high detection efficiency, high energy-resolution, ambient-temperature operation, and low production cost; and (3) Such detectors are needed in areas of nonproliferation and national security for detection of SNM. Research highlights are: (1) We achieved our Phase-I goal - Demonstration of CMT detector performance approaching that of CZT detectors; (2) Demonstrated that In-doped CMT is much closer to its anticipated performance as radiation detectors than other alternative materials, TlBr and HgI{sub 2} - Large crystal volumes, 10{sup 10}{Omega}{center_dot}cm, 3 x 10{sup -3}cm{sup 2}/V, and stable response; and (3) Conducted material and device characterization experiments - Detectors: I-V, {mu}{sub e}, ({mu}{tau}){sub e}, internal E fields, energy spectra, and high-resolution x-ray response mapping data and Materials - DLTS, TCT, PL, EPDs, XRD, PCD and IR transmission.

  4. Gamma ray measurements with photoconductive detectors using a dense plasma focus

    SciTech Connect

    May, M. J. Brown, G. V.; Halvorson, C.; Schmidt, A.; Bower, D.; Tran, B.; Lewis, P.; Hagen, C.

    2014-11-15

    Photons in the MeV range emitted from the dense plasma focus (DPF) at the NSTec North Las Vegas Facility have been measured with both neutron-damaged GaAs and natural diamond photoconductive detectors (PCDs). The DPF creates or “pinches” plasmas of various gases (e.g., H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, Ne, Ar., etc.) that have enough energy to create MeV photons from either bremsstrahlung and/or (n,n{sup ′}) reactions if D{sub 2} gas is used. The high bandwidth of the PCDs enabled the first ever measurement of the fast micro-pinches present in DPF plasmas. Comparisons between a slower more conventional scintillator/photomultiplier tube based nuclear physics detectors were made to validate the response of the PCDs to fast intense MeV photon signals. Significant discrepancies in the diamond PCD responses were evident.

  5. Gamma ray measurements with photoconductive detectors using a dense plasma focus.

    PubMed

    May, M J; Brown, G V; Halvorson, C; Schmidt, A; Bower, D; Tran, B; Lewis, P; Hagen, C

    2014-11-01

    Photons in the MeV range emitted from the dense plasma focus (DPF) at the NSTec North Las Vegas Facility have been measured with both neutron-damaged GaAs and natural diamond photoconductive detectors (PCDs). The DPF creates or "pinches" plasmas of various gases (e.g., H2, D2, Ne, Ar., etc.) that have enough energy to create MeV photons from either bremsstrahlung and/or (n,n(')) reactions if D2 gas is used. The high bandwidth of the PCDs enabled the first ever measurement of the fast micro-pinches present in DPF plasmas. Comparisons between a slower more conventional scintillator/photomultiplier tube based nuclear physics detectors were made to validate the response of the PCDs to fast intense MeV photon signals. Significant discrepancies in the diamond PCD responses were evident. PMID:25430296

  6. Gamma-ray detector employing scintillators coupled to semiconductor drift photodetectors

    DOEpatents

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Patt, Bradley E.

    2003-01-01

    Radiation detectors according to one embodiment of the invention are implemented using scintillators combined with a semiconductor drift photodetectors wherein the components are specifically constructed in terms of their geometry, dimensions, and arrangement so that the scintillator decay time and drift time in the photodetector pairs are matched in order to achieve a greater signal-to-noise ratio. The detectors may include electronics for amplification of electrical signals produced by the silicon drift photodetector, the amplification having a shaping time optimized with respect to the decay time of the scintillator and time spread of the signal in the silicon drift photodetector to substantially maximize the ratio of the signal to the electronic noise.

  7. Multi-Line Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Performance of a Si(Li) Detector Stack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, G. Scott; McMurray, Robert E., Jr.; Keller, Robert G.; Wercinski, Paul F.; Walton, J. T.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental data is presented which for the first time displays multi-line spectrometer performance of a Si(Li) detector stack at elevated temperature. The stack consists of four elements, each with a 2 cm diameter active area. Ba-133 and Ag-110m spectra are obtained using various techniques to enhance the peak-to-background ratio. Spectral data are shown as a function of temperature (94 K less than or = T less than or = 230 K) using optimized peak shaping.

  8. Material properties limiting the performance of CZT gamma-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov,A.E.; Babalola, S.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Egarievwe, S. U.; Hossain, A.; Yang, G.; James, R. B.

    2009-03-16

    CdZnTe (CZT) nuclear radiation detectors are advanced sensors that utilize innovative technologies developed for wide band-gap semiconductor industry and microelectronics. They open opportunities for new types of room-temperature operating, field deployable instruments that provide accurate identification of potential radiological threats and timely awareness for both the civilian and military communities. Room-temperature radiation detectors are an emerging technology that relies on the use of high-quality CZT crystals whose availability is currently limited by material non-uniformities and the presence of extended defects. To address these issues, which are most critical to CZT sensor developments, we developed X-ray mapping and IR transmission microscopy systems to characterize both CZT crystals and devices. Since a customized system is required for such X-ray measurements, we use synchrotron radiation beams available at BNL's National Synchrotron Light Source. A highly-collimated and high-intensity X-ray beam supports measurements of areas as small as 10 x 10 {micro}m{sup 2}, and allowed us to see fluctuations in collected charge over the entire area of the detector in a reasonable time. The IR microscopy system allows for 3D visualization of Te inclusions and other extended defects. In this paper, we describe the experimental techniques used in our measurements and typical results obtained from CZT samples produced by different suppliers.

  9. High Resolution PET with 250 micrometer LSO Detectors and Adaptive Zoom

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, Simon R.; Qi, Jinyi

    2012-01-08

    There have been impressive improvements in the performance of small-animal positron emission tomography (PET) systems since their first development in the mid 1990s, both in terms of spatial resolution and sensitivity, which have directly contributed to the increasing adoption of this technology for a wide range of biomedical applications. Nonetheless, current systems still are largely dominated by the size of the scintillator elements used in the detector. Our research predicts that developing scintillator arrays with an element size of 250 {micro}m or smaller will lead to an image resolution of 500 {micro}m when using 18F- or 64Cu-labeled radiotracers, giving a factor of 4-8 improvement in volumetric resolution over the highest resolution research systems currently in existence. This proposal had two main objectives: (i) To develop and evaluate much higher resolution and efficiency scintillator arrays that can be used in the future as the basis for detectors in a small-animal PET scanner where the spatial resolution is dominated by decay and interaction physics rather than detector size. (ii) To optimize one such high resolution, high sensitivity detector and adaptively integrate it into the existing microPET II small animal PET scanner as a 'zoom-in' detector that provides higher spatial resolution and sensitivity in a limited region close to the detector face. The knowledge gained from this project will provide valuable information for building future PET systems with a complete ring of very high-resolution detector arrays and also lay the foundations for utilizing high-resolution detectors in combination with existing PET systems for localized high-resolution imaging.

  10. Realization of a small-size high resolution linear neutron scintillation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Engels, R.; Reinartz, R.; Reinhart, P.; Schelten, J.; Jansen, E.; Schaefer, W.

    1998-06-01

    The spectrum of position sensitive neutron scintillation detectors, which have been developed and designed in the institute during the last decade, comprises several high resolution linear detectors. The design of the small size high resolution detector is based on a modified Anger technology using a linear array of 24 HAMAMATSU type R1770 rectangular photomultipliers and a 1 mm {sup 6}Li glass scintillator. The sensitive detector area is 200 x 20 mm{sup 2} and the spatial resolution is 1.2 mm. The neutron sensitivity at 1{angstrom} is about 65% and the residual gamma sensitivity is less than 10{sup {minus}4} and the maximum count rate is about 100 kHz. The detector is linked to a highly flexible PC-based data acquisition system with 12 bit position and 16 bit time resolution. The stand alone detector and data acquisition system is aimed preferably at pulsed sources performing high resolution angle-dispersive time-of-flight experiments.

  11. Multi-Line Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Performance of a Si(Li) Detector Stack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, G. Scott; McMurray, Robert E., Jr.; Keller, Robert G.; Wercinski, Paul F.; Walton, J. T.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental data is presented which for the first time displays multi-line spectrometer performance of a Si(Li) detector stack at elevated temperature. The stack consists of four elements, each with a 2 cm diameter active area. Ba-133 and Ag-110m spectra are obtained using various techniques to enhance the peak-to-background ratio. Spectral data are shown as a function of temperature (94 K less than or equal to T less than or equal to 230 K) using optimized peak shaping.

  12. Gamma Ray Measurements at OMEGA with the Newest Gas Cherenkov Detector “GCD-3”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEvoy, A. M.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y.; Zylstra, A. B.; Young, C. S.; Fatherley, V. E.; Lopez, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Sedillo, T. J.; Archuleta, T. N.; Aragonez, R. J.; Malone, R. M.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M.; Gales, S.; Leatherland, A.; Stoeffl, W.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Shmayda, W. T.; Batha, S. H.

    2016-05-01

    Initial results from the newest Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD-3) are reported demonstrating improved performance over previous GCD iterations. Increased shielding and lengthening of the Cherenkov photon optical path have resulted in a diminished precursor signal with increased temporal separation between the precursor and the primary DT Cherenkov signal. Design changes resulted in a measured GCD-3 sensitivity comparable to GCD-1 at identical 100 psia CO2 operation. All metal gasket seals and pressure vessel certification to 400 psia operation allow for a GCD-3 lower Cherenkov threshold of 1.8 MeV using the fluorinated gas C2F6 as compared to the 6.3 MeV lower limit of GCD-1 and GCD-2. Calibration data will be used to benchmark GEANT4 and ACCEPT detector models. The GCD-3 acts as a prototype for the Super GCD being fielded at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) as part of the National Diagnostics Plan and will be installed at NIF in early 2016.

  13. Gamma-ray Measurements with LaBr3: Ce Detectors -thinking Outside the Box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberstedt, A.; Billnert, R.; Oberstedt, S.

    Recently developed cerium-doped lanthanum bromide (LaBr3: Ce) scintillation detectors have shown to possess promising properties with respect to the detection of γ-rays compared to previously known materials. In this work however, we demonstrate how these detectors may be used to obtain information not only about γ-rays, but also about neutrons, i.e. thinking"inside" and"outside" the box, respectively. For this purpose γ-rays were detected in coincidence with fission fragments and both their energy and their time-of-flight relative to the instant of a fission event is recorded. By evaluating the time-of-flight distributions of γ-rays, identified as decays of excited states after population by inelastically scattered neutrons inside the scintillation crystal as well as other surrounding materials, we show that it is possible to acquire knowledge from and about the spectrum of incident neutrons. We give three examples for conceivable applications, used to determine geometrical profiles, cross sections and neutron spectra, respectively.

  14. Gamma ray measurements at OMEGA with the newest gas Cherenkov Detector “GCD-3”

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McEvoy, A. M.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y.; Zylstra, A. B.; Young, C. S.; Fatherley, V. E.; Lopez, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Sedillo, T. J.; Archuleta, T. N.; et al

    2016-05-01

    Initial results from the newest Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD-3) are reported demonstrating improved performance over previous GCD iterations. Increased shielding and lengthening of the Cherenkov photon optical path have resulted in a diminished precursor signal with increased temporal separation between the precursor and the primary DT Cherenkov signal. Design changes resulted in a measured GCD-3 sensitivity comparable to GCD-1 at identical 100 psia CO2 operation. All metal gasket seals and pressure vessel certification to 400 psia operation allow for a GCD-3 lower Cherenkov threshold of 1.8 MeV using the fluorinated gas C2F6 as compared to the 6.3 MeV lower limitmore » of GCD-1 and GCD-2. Calibration data will be used to benchmark GEANT4 and ACCEPT detector models. Lastly, the GCD-3 acts as a prototype for the Super GCD being fielded at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) as part of the National Diagnostics Plan and will be installed at NIF in early 2016.« less

  15. The Effect of Gamma-ray Detector Energy Resolution on the Ability to Identify Radioactive Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, K E; Gosnell, T B; Knapp, D A

    2009-03-05

    This report describes the results of an initial study on radiation detector spectral resolution, along with the underlying methodology used. The study was done as part of an ongoing effort in Detection Modeling and Operational Analysis (DMOA) for the DNDO System Architecture Directorate. The study objective was to assess the impact of energy resolution on radionuclide identification capability, measured by the ability to reliably discriminate between spectra associated with 'threats' (defined as fissile materials) and radioactive 'non-threats' that might be present in the normal stream of commerce. Although numerous factors must be considered in deciding which detector technology is appropriate for a specific application, spectral resolution is a critical one for homeland security applications in which a broad range of non-threat sources are present and very low false-alarm rates are required. In this study, we have proposed a metric for quantifying discrimination capability, and have shown how this metric depends on resolution. In future work we will consider other important factors, such as efficiency and volume, and the relative frequency of spectra known to be discrimination challenges in practical applications.

  16. A 16N gamma-ray facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Ethan L.; Pehl, Richard H.; Stanley, Michelle R.; Foster, Charles C.; Komisarcik, Kevin; East, Gary W.; Vanderwerp, John D.; Friesel, Dennis L.

    1997-02-01

    A practical 16N gamma-ray source is created in a medium-energy cyclotron environment. A 16N source emits 6129 and 7115 keV gamma rays. The viability of this several μCi source for detector calibration and studying detector physics is established.

  17. Circuit for high resolution decoding of multi-anode microchannel array detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasle, David B. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A circuit for high resolution decoding of multi-anode microchannel array detectors consisting of input registers accepting transient inputs from the anode array; anode encoding logic circuits connected to the input registers; midpoint pipeline registers connected to the anode encoding logic circuits; and pixel decoding logic circuits connected to the midpoint pipeline registers is described. A high resolution algorithm circuit operates in parallel with the pixel decoding logic circuit and computes a high resolution least significant bit to enhance the multianode microchannel array detector's spatial resolution by halving the pixel size and doubling the number of pixels in each axis of the anode array. A multiplexer is connected to the pixel decoding logic circuit and allows a user selectable pixel address output according to the actual multi-anode microchannel array detector anode array size. An output register concatenates the high resolution least significant bit onto the standard ten bit pixel address location to provide an eleven bit pixel address, and also stores the full eleven bit pixel address. A timing and control state machine is connected to the input registers, the anode encoding logic circuits, and the output register for managing the overall operation of the circuit.

  18. Solid-state gamma-ray dosimeter which measures radiation in terms of absorption in a material different from the detector material

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenberg, S.

    1988-02-04

    A solid-state gamma-ray dosimeter is described, which measures radiation in terms of absorption in a material different from the detector material. A solid-state detector, and amplifier, an analog-to-digital interface, and a microprocessor are combined in circuit to correct for differences between absorption of radiation in detector material and absorption in other materials, especially tissue. A suitable cladding may surround the detector. A method of generating dose-translation data for calibrating the microprocessor is also disclosed. The solid-state detector is attached to a multichannel analyzer circuit and subject to known doses of various monochromatic gamma rays. Output pulses from the detector are amplified and introduced into the multichannel analyzer. The spectrum produced is used to determine an average channel number (or pulse height) for a given dose of monochromatic radiation. The given dose is in units specific to material different from the detector material. The partial dose represented by a single detector pulse at that energy is computed. Partial doses for other energies are likewise computed.

  19. Hard X-ray and gamma-ray detector for ASTRO-H based on Si and CdTe imaging sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hxi/Sgd Team; Kokubun, M.; Watanabe, S.; Nakazawa, K.; Tajima, H.; Fukazawa, Y.; Takahashi, T.; Kataoka, J.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Madejski, G. M.; Makishima, K.; Mizuno, T.; Ohno, M.; Sato, R.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Tashiro, M.; Terada, Y.; Yamaoka, K.; HXI/SGD Team

    2010-11-01

    We have been developing a hard X-ray imager and soft gamma-ray detector as on board instruments of the ASTRO-H mission. The Hard X-ray Imager (HXI) is one of the three focal plane detectors of ASTRO-H, which is aimed to realize the focusing imaging of hard X-ray photons in combination with hard X-ray telescopes. By use of the hybrid structure composed of double-sided silicon strip detectors and a cadmium telluride strip detector, it fully covers the energy range up to 80 keV with a high quantum efficiency. High spatial resolutions of 250μm pitch and energy resolutions of 1-2 keV (FWMH) are at the same time achieved with low noise front-end ASICs. The Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD) is a novel and unique detector which is characterized by semiconductor Compton cameras surrounded by narrow field-of-view active shields, and covers a higher energy range (30-600 keV) than that of HXI. It consists of four Compton Cameras constructed with many layers of Silicon and CdTe pad detectors. With its multi-layer structure and Compton reconstruction capability, in addition to the BGO active shields read by Avalanche photo-diodes, this detector will achieve an extremely high background rejection efficiency in the orbit. We report the current status of hardware development including the design requirement, expected performance, and technical readinesses of key technologies.

  20. Superconducting Detector System for High-Resolution Energy-Dispersive Soft X-Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S; Niedermayr, T; Drury, O; Funk, T; Frank, M; Labov, S E; Cramer, S

    2001-02-21

    Synchrotron-based soft x-ray spectroscopy is often limited by detector performance. Grating spectrometers have the resolution, but lack the efficiency for the analysis of dilute samples. Semiconducting Si(Li) or Ge detectors are efficient, but often lack the resolution to separate weak signals from strong nearby lines in multi-element samples. Superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) operated at temperatures below 1 K can be used as high-resolution high-efficiency x-ray detectors. They combine high energy resolution around 10 eV FWHM with the broad band efficiency of energy-dispersive detectors. We have designed a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) to operate STJ detectors in x-ray fluorescence measurements at beam line 4 of the ALS. We demonstrate the capabilities of such a detector system for fluorescence analysis of dilute metal sites in proteins and inorganic model compounds.

  1. Reproducibility and calibration of MMC-based high-resolution gamma detectors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bates, C. R.; Pies, C.; Kempf, S.; Hengstler, D.; Fleischmann, A.; Gastaldo, L.; Enss, C.; Friedrich, S.

    2016-07-15

    Here, we describe a prototype γ-ray detector based on a metallic magnetic calorimeter with an energy resolution of 46 eV at 60 keV and a reproducible response function that follows a simple second-order polynomial. The simple detector calibration allows adding high-resolution spectra from different pixels and different cool-downs without loss in energy resolution to determine γ-ray centroids with high accuracy. As an example of an application in nuclear safeguards enabled by such a γ-ray detector, we discuss the non-destructive assay of 242Pu in a mixed-isotope Pu sample.

  2. Reproducibility and calibration of MMC-based high-resolution gamma detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, C. R.; Pies, C.; Kempf, S.; Hengstler, D.; Fleischmann, A.; Gastaldo, L.; Enss, C.; Friedrich, S.

    2016-07-01

    We describe a prototype γ-ray detector based on a metallic magnetic calorimeter with an energy resolution of 46 eV at 60 keV and a reproducible response function that follows a simple second-order polynomial. The simple detector calibration allows adding high-resolution spectra from different pixels and different cool-downs without loss in energy resolution to determine γ-ray centroids with high accuracy. As an example of an application in nuclear safeguards enabled by such a γ-ray detector, we discuss the non-destructive assay of 242Pu in a mixed-isotope Pu sample.

  3. TRAGALDABAS: A new high resolution detector for the regular study of cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Pol, H.; Blanco, A.; Blanco, J. J.; Collazo, J.; Fonte, P.; Garzón, J. A.; Gómez, A.; Kornakov, G.; Kurtukian, T.; Lopes, L.; Morales, M.; Morozova, A.; Pais, M. A.; Palka, M.; Pérez Muñuzuri, V.; Rey, P.; Ribeiro, P.; Seco, M.; Taboada, J.

    2015-08-01

    Research on cosmic rays is of big interest either for getting a better understanding about their origin and properties or because they offer very valuable information about the galactic, the solar and the Earth's environment. In order to improve our knowledge of all those fields, a high resolution cosmic ray tracking detector, TRAGALDABAS, is being commissioned at the Faculty of Physics of the Univ. of Santiago de Compostela (Spain). In this article we make overview of the main performances of the detector and we present some very preliminary results showing that the detector is taking good data, and that we are gathering a valuable sample of events, ready to be analyzed.

  4. Real time method and computer system for identifying radioactive materials from HPGe gamma-ray spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Rowland, Mark S.; Howard, Douglas E.; Wong, James L.; Jessup, James L.; Bianchini, Greg M.; Miller, Wayne O.

    2007-10-23

    A real-time method and computer system for identifying radioactive materials which collects gamma count rates from a HPGe gamma-radiation detector to produce a high-resolution gamma-ray energy spectrum. A library of nuclear material definitions ("library definitions") is provided, with each uniquely associated with a nuclide or isotope material and each comprising at least one logic condition associated with a spectral parameter of a gamma-ray energy spectrum. The method determines whether the spectral parameters of said high-resolution gamma-ray energy spectrum satisfy all the logic conditions of any one of the library definitions, and subsequently uniquely identifies the material type as that nuclide or isotope material associated with the satisfied library definition. The method is iteratively repeated to update the spectrum and identification in real time.

  5. AlSb photonic detectors for gamma-ray spectroscopy. Progress report, October 1994--August 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Becla, P.; Witt, A.F.

    1995-12-31

    Aluminum antimony (AlSb) is an indirect band gap semiconductor with Eg of about 1.62 eV at 300 K and about 1.75 eV at 77 K. This material, is extremely difficult to obtain in single crystal form because of the very high reactivity of aluminum with oxygen, and the high volatility of antimony. Moreover, molten AlSb reacts with nearly all crucible materials available. Since Welker`s first attempts in 1952, only very few different experimental approaches have been used to grow single crystals of AlSb, e.g. by Bridgman, Czochralski and MBE. All experimental results, however, indicate that many of the properties of AlSb, e.g. carrier concentration, electron-hole mobility and carrier life-time, differ significantly from the theoretically predicted values. The main objective of this research period has been to develop a method leading to improved crystallographic and electronic quality of AlSb crystals, making them more suitable for device applications. The research program was aimed along the following two directions: (1) study the growth of AlSb via Bridgman, Czochralski and THM techniques; (2) comprehensive characterization of grown material, related to the use of compounds for high energy gamma detectors. Variables in the growth study were growth temperature, equilibrium pressure, growth rate, doping, crucible material, seeding and encapsulation. The characterization study included crystallographic quality (grain size, etch pits, precipitates, inclusions), electronic quality (conductivity type, carrier concentration and mobility), optical properties (spectral absorption, photoconductivity, persistent absorption) and others (SIMS, EPR).

  6. High-resolution detectors for medical applications and synchrotron radiation research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babichev, E. A.; Baru, S. E.; Grigoriev, D. N.; Groshev, V. R.; Leonov, V. V.; Papushev, P. A.; Porosev, V. V.; Savinov, G. A.; Shayakhmetov, V. R.; Shekhtman, L. I.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Ukraintsev, Yu. G.; Yurchenko, Yu. B.

    2011-02-01

    In the present report, we summarize our experience in the development of high-resolution position sensitive gas detectors for medicine and synchrotron radiation experiments at Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics for the last years. We have designed several versions of Multistrip Ionisation Chambers with a channel pitch varying from 0.4 down to 0.1 mm. The high quantum efficiency (>65%) of these detectors allow its application in high quality diagnostic imaging. The detector with 0.1 mm strip pitch and 20 atm pressure of Xe demonstrates the best possible DQE and spatial resolution for gaseous detectors in a wide range of X-ray energies. Additionally, the initial results of feasibility study of the detector for beam position monitoring for Heavy Ion Therapy System are presented too.

  7. Instrumentation for gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertsch, David L.; Fichtel, Carl E.; Trombka, Jacob I.

    1988-01-01

    The current status of gamma-ray-telescope technology for ground, airborne, and space observations is surveyed and illustrated with drawings, diagrams, and graphs and tables of typical data. For the low- and medium-energy ranges, consideration is given to detectors and detector cooling systems, background-rejection methods, radiation damage, large-area detectors, gamma-ray imaging, data analysis, and the Compton-interaction region. Also discussed are the gamma-ray interaction process at high energies; multilevel automated spark-chamber gamma-ray telescopes; the Soviet Gamma-1 telescope; the EGRET instrument for the NASA Gamma-Ray Observatory; and Cerenkov, air-shower, and particle-detector instruments for the TeV and PeV ranges. Significant improvements in resolution and sensitivity are predicted for the near future.

  8. Instrumentation for gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertsch, David L.; Fichtel, Carl E.; Trombka, Jacob I.

    1988-03-01

    The current status of gamma-ray-telescope technology for ground, airborne, and space observations is surveyed and illustrated with drawings, diagrams, and graphs and tables of typical data. For the low- and medium-energy ranges, consideration is given to detectors and detector cooling systems, background-rejection methods, radiation damage, large-area detectors, gamma-ray imaging, data analysis, and the Compton-interaction region. Also discussed are the gamma-ray interaction process at high energies; multilevel automated spark-chamber gamma-ray telescopes; the Soviet Gamma-1 telescope; the EGRET instrument for the NASA Gamma-Ray Observatory; and Cerenkov, air-shower, and particle-detector instruments for the TeV and PeV ranges. Significant improvements in resolution and sensitivity are predicted for the near future.

  9. Search for Gamma Rays above 100 TeV from the Crab Nebula with the Tibet Air Shower Array and the 100 m2 muon Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amenomori, M.; Bi, X. J.; Chen, D.; Chen, T. L.; Chen, W. Y.; Cui, S. W.; Danzengluobu; Ding, L. K.; Feng, C. F.; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Z. Y.; Gou, Q. B.; Guo, Y. Q.; He, H. H.; He, Z. T.; Hibino, K.; Hotta, N.; Hu, Haibing; Hu, H. B.; Huang, J.; Jia, H. Y.; Jiang, L.; Kajino, F.; Kasahara, K.; Katayose, Y.; Kato, C.; Kawata, K.; Kozai, M.; Labaciren; Le, G. M.; Li, A. F.; Li, H. J.; Li, W. J.; Liu, C.; Liu, J. S.; Liu, M. Y.; Lu, H.; Meng, X. R.; Miyazaki, T.; Mizutani, K.; Munakata, K.; Nakajima, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Nanjo, H.; Nishizawa, M.; Niwa, T.; Ohnishi, M.; Ohta, I.; Ozawa, S.; Qian, X. L.; Qu, X. B.; Saito, T.; Saito, T. Y.; Sakata, M.; Sako, T. K.; Shao, J.; Shibata, M.; Shiomi, A.; Shirai, T.; Sugimoto, H.; Takita, M.; Tan, Y. H.; Tateyama, N.; Torii, S.; Tsuchiya, H.; Udo, S.; Wang, H.; Wu, H. R.; Xue, L.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yamauchi, K.; Yang, Z.; Yasue, S.; Yuan, A. F.; Yuda, T.; Zhai, L. M.; Zhang, H. M.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Ying; Zhaxisangzhu; Zhou, X. X.; Tibet ASγ Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    A 100 m2 muon detector (MD) was successfully constructed under the existing Tibet air shower (AS) array in the late fall of 2007. The sensitivity of the Tibet AS array to cosmic gamma rays can be improved by selecting muon-poor events with the MD. Our MC simulation of the MD response reasonably agrees with the experimental data in terms of the charge distribution for one-muon events and the background rejection power. Using the data collected by the Tibet AS array and the 100 m2 MD taken from 2008 March to 2010 February, we search for continuous gamma-ray emission from the Crab Nebula above ∼100 TeV. No significant excess is found, and the most stringent upper limit is obtained above 140 TeV.

  10. Search for 100 TeV gamma rays from the Crab Nebula with the Tibet Air Shower Array and the 100 m2 muon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sako, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    The 100 m ^{2} muon detector (MD) was constructed under the Tibet air shower (AS) array in the late autumn of 2007. By selecting muon-poor events with the MD, the sensitivity of the Tibet AS array to cosmic gamma rays can be improved. Our MC simulation of the MD response is in reasonable agreement with the experimental data, with regard to the charge distribution for one-muon events and the background rejection power. Using the data taken from 2008 March to 2010 February by the Tibet AS array and the 100 m ^{2} MD, we search for continuous 100 TeV gamma-ray emission from the Crab Nebula. No significant excess is detected, and the world's best upper limit is obtained above 140 TeV.

  11. Cumulative analysis of the association between the data of the gravitational wave detectors NAUTILUS and EXPLORER and the gamma ray bursts detected by BATSE and BeppoSAX

    SciTech Connect

    Astone, P.; Babusci, D.; Fafone, V.; Giordano, G.; Marini, A.; Modestino, G.; Quintieri, L.; Ronga, F.; Sperandio, L.; Bassan, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Modena, I.; Moleti, A.; Carelli, P.; Coccia, E.; Cosmelli, C.; Pallottino, G.V.; D'Antonio, S.; Frontera, F.; Guidorzi, C.

    2005-02-15

    The statistical association between the output of the Gravitational Wave (GW) detectors EXPLORER and NAUTILUS and a list of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) detected by the satellite experiments BATSE and BeppoSAX has been analyzed using cumulative algorithms. GW detector data collected between 1991 and 1999 have been searched for an energy excess in a 10 s interval around the GRB flux peak times. The cumulative analysis of the data relative to a large number of GRBs (387) allows to push the upper bound for the corresponding GW burst amplitude down to h=2.5x10{sup -19}.

  12. A Lower-Cost High-Resolution LYSO Detector Development for Positron Emission Mammography (PEM).

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Rocio A; Zhang, Yuxuan; Liu, Shitao; Li, Hongdi; Baghaei, Hossain; An, Shaohui; Wang, Chao; Jan, Meei-Ling; Wong, Wai-Hoi

    2009-10-01

    In photomultiplier-quadrant-sharing (PQS) geometry for positron emission tomography applications, each PMT is shared by four blocks and each detector block is optically coupled to four round PMTs. Although this design reduces the cost of high-resolution PET systems, when the camera consists of detector panels that are made up of square blocks, half of the PMT's sensitive window remains unused at the detector panel edge. Our goal was to develop a LYSO detector panel which minimizes the unused portion of the PMTs for a low-cost, high-resolution, and high-sensitivity positron emission mammography (PEM) camera. We modified the PQS design by using elongated blocks at panel edges and square blocks in the inner area. For elongated blocks, symmetric and asymmetrical reflector patterns were developed and PQS and PMT-half-sharing (PHS) arrangements were implemented in order to obtain a suitable decoding. The packing fraction was 96.3% for asymmetric block and 95.5% for symmetric block. Both of the blocks have excellent decoding capability with all crystals clearly identified, 156 for asymmetric and 144 for symmetric and peak-to-valley ratio of 3.0 and 2.3 respectively. The average energy resolution was 14.2% for the asymmetric block and 13.1% for the symmetric block. Using a modified PQS geometry and asymmetric block design, we reduced the unused PMT region at detector panel edges, thereby increased the field-of-view and the overall detection sensitivity and minimized the undetected breast region near the chest wall. This detector design and using regular round PMT allowed building a lower-cost, high-resolution and high-sensitivity PEM camera. PMID:20485510

  13. Limitations of anti-scatter grids when used with high resolution image detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, V.; Jain, A.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2014-03-01

    Anti-scatter grids are used in fluoroscopic systems to improve image quality by absorbing scattered radiation. A stationary Smit Rontgen X-ray grid (line density: 70 lines/cm, grid ratio: 13:1) was used with a flat panel detector (FPD) of pixel size 194 micron and a high-resolution CMOS detector, the Dexela 1207 with pixel size of 75 microns. To investigate the effectiveness of the grid, a simulated artery block was placed in a modified uniform frontal head phantom and imaged with both the FPD and the Dexela for an approximately 15 x 15 cm field of view (FOV). The contrast improved for both detectors with the grid. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) does not increase as much in the case of the Dexela as it improves in the case of the FPD. Since the total noise in a single frame increases substantially for the Dexela compared to the FPD when the grid is used, the CNR is degraded. The increase in the quantum noise per frame would be similar for both detectors when the grid is used due to the attenuation of radiation, but the fixed pattern noise caused by the grid was substantially higher for the Dexela compared to the FPD and hence caused a severe reduction of CNR. Without further corrective methods this grid should not be used with high-resolution fluoroscopic detectors because the CNR does not improve significantly and the visibility of low contrast details may be reduced. Either an anti-scatter grid of different design or an additional image processing step when using a similar grid would be required to deal with the problem of scatter for high resolution detectors and the structured noise of the grid pattern.

  14. Limitations of anti-scatter grids when used with high resolution image detectors.

    PubMed

    Singh, V; Jain, A; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2014-03-19

    Anti-scatter grids are used in fluoroscopic systems to improve image quality by absorbing scattered radiation. A stationary Smit Rontgen X-ray grid (line density: 70 lines/cm, grid ratio: 13:1) was used with a flat panel detector (FPD) of pixel size 194 micron and a high-resolution CMOS detector, the Dexela 1207 with pixel size of 75 microns. To investigate the effectiveness of the grid, a simulated artery block was placed in a modified uniform frontal head phantom and imaged with both the FPD and the Dexela for an approximately 15 × 15 cm field of view (FOV). The contrast improved for both detectors with the grid. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) does not increase as much in the case of the Dexela as it improves in the case of the FPD. Since the total noise in a single frame increases substantially for the Dexela compared to the FPD when the grid is used, the CNR is degraded. The increase in the quantum noise per frame would be similar for both detectors when the grid is used due to the attenuation of radiation, but the fixed pattern noise caused by the grid was substantially higher for the Dexela compared to the FPD and hence caused a severe reduction of CNR. Without further corrective methods this grid should not be used with high-resolution fluoroscopic detectors because the CNR does not improve significantly and the visibility of low contrast details may be reduced. Either an anti-scatter grid of different design or an additional image processing step when using a similar grid would be required to deal with the problem of scatter for high resolution detectors and the structured noise of the grid pattern. PMID:25309101

  15. High-resolution spectroscopy with the multi-anode microchannel array detector systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.; Joseph, C. L.; Wolf, S. C.

    1982-01-01

    The results of a series of high-resolution spectroscopic observations undertaken with a linear (1 x 1024)-pixel visible-light Multi-Anode Microchannel Array (MAMA) detector on the Coudespectrograph of the 2.2-meter telescope at the Mauna Kea Observatory and on the vacuum spectrograph of the McMath Solar telescope at the Kitt Peak National Observatory are described. In addition, the two-dimensional MAMA detector systems with (16 x 1024)-pixel, (24 x 1024)-pixel, and (256 x 1024)-pixel formats which are now being readied for use in a series of ground-based, balloon, and sounding-rocket observing programs are briefly described.

  16. Gamma-ray spectral analysis algorithm library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-05-06

    The routines of the Gauss Algorithms library are used to implement special purpose products that need to analyze gamma-ray spectra from Ge semiconductor detectors as a part of their function. These routines provide the ability to calibrate energy, calibrate peakwidth, search for peaks, search for regions, and fit the spectral data in a given region to locate gamma rays.

  17. Gamma-ray Spectral Analysis Algorithm Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1997-09-25

    The routines of the Gauss Algorithm library are used to implement special purpose products that need to analyze gamma-ray spectra from GE semiconductor detectors as a part of their function. These routines provide the ability to calibrate energy, calibrate peakwidth, search for peaks, search for regions, and fit the spectral data in a given region to locate gamma rays.

  18. Gamma ray lines from dark matter annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Giudice, G.F.

    1989-08-01

    If direct annihilation of dark matter particles into a pair of photons occurs in the galactic halo, a narrow {gamma}-ray line can be discovered at future {gamma}-ray detectors sensitive to the GeV region. The signals predicted by different dark matter candidates are analyzed. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Effects of chemo-mechanical polishing on CdZnTe X-ray and gamma-ray detectors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Egarievwe, Stephen E.; Hossain, Anwar; Okwechime, Ifechukwude O.; Gul, Rubi; James, Ralph B.

    2015-06-23

    Here, mechanically polishing cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) wafers for x-ray and gamma-ray detectors often is inadequate in removing surface defects caused by cutting them from the ingots. Fabrication-induced defects, such as surface roughness, dangling bonds, and nonstoichiometric surfaces, often are reduced through polishing and etching the surface. In our earlier studies of mechanical polishing with alumina powder, etching with hydrogen bromide in hydrogen peroxide solution, and chemomechanical polishing with bromine–methanol–ethylene glycol solution, we found that the chemomechanical polishing process produced the least surface leakage current. In this research, we focused on using two chemicals to chemomechanically polish CdZnTe wafers aftermore » mechanical polishing, viz. bromine–methanol–ethylene glycol (BME) solution, and hydrogen bromide (HBr) in a hydrogen peroxide and ethylene–glycol solution. We used x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), current–voltage (I–V) measurements, and Am-241 spectral response measurements to characterize and compare the effects of each solution. The results show that the HBr-based solution produced lower leakage current than the BME solution. Results from using the same chemomechanical polishing solution on two samples confirmed that the surface treatment affects the measured bulk current (a combination of bulk and surface currents). XPS results indicate that the tellurium oxide to tellurium peak ratios for the mechanical polishing process were reduced significantly by chemomechanical polishing using the BME solution (78.9% for Te 3d5/2O2 and 76.7% for Te 3d3/2O2) compared with the HBr-based solution (27.6% for Te 3d5/2O2 and 35.8% for Te 3d3/2O2). Spectral response measurements showed that the 59.5-keV peak of Am-241 remained under the same channel number for all three CdZnTe samples. While the BME-based solution gave a better performance of 7.15% full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) compared with 7.59% FWHM

  20. Effects of chemo-mechanical polishing on CdZnTe X-ray and gamma-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Egarievwe, Stephen E.; Hossain, Anwar; Okwechime, Ifechukwude O.; Gul, Rubi; James, Ralph B.

    2015-06-23

    Here, mechanically polishing cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) wafers for x-ray and gamma-ray detectors often is inadequate in removing surface defects caused by cutting them from the ingots. Fabrication-induced defects, such as surface roughness, dangling bonds, and nonstoichiometric surfaces, often are reduced through polishing and etching the surface. In our earlier studies of mechanical polishing with alumina powder, etching with hydrogen bromide in hydrogen peroxide solution, and chemomechanical polishing with bromine–methanol–ethylene glycol solution, we found that the chemomechanical polishing process produced the least surface leakage current. In this research, we focused on using two chemicals to chemomechanically polish CdZnTe wafers after mechanical polishing, viz. bromine–methanol–ethylene glycol (BME) solution, and hydrogen bromide (HBr) in a hydrogen peroxide and ethylene–glycol solution. We used x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), current–voltage (I–V) measurements, and Am-241 spectral response measurements to characterize and compare the effects of each solution. The results show that the HBr-based solution produced lower leakage current than the BME solution. Results from using the same chemomechanical polishing solution on two samples confirmed that the surface treatment affects the measured bulk current (a combination of bulk and surface currents). XPS results indicate that the tellurium oxide to tellurium peak ratios for the mechanical polishing process were reduced significantly by chemomechanical polishing using the BME solution (78.9% for Te 3d5/2O2 and 76.7% for Te 3d3/2O2) compared with the HBr-based solution (27.6% for Te 3d5/2O2 and 35.8% for Te 3d3/2O2). Spectral response measurements showed that the 59.5-keV peak of Am-241 remained under the same channel number for all three CdZnTe samples. While the BME-based solution gave a better

  1. High-resolution infrared detector and its electronic unit for space application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, M.; Montmessin, F.; Korablev, O.; Trokhimovsky, A.; Poiet, G.; Bel, J.-B.

    2015-05-01

    High-resolution infrared detector is used extensively for military and civilian purposes. Military applications include target acquisition, surveillance, night vision, and tracking. Civilian applications include, among others, scientific observations. For our space systems, we want to use the products developed by SOFRADIR Company. Thus, we have developed a space electronic unit that is used to control the high-resolution SCORPIO-MW infrared detector, which has a format of 640×512 pixels with 15μm×15μm pixel pitch. The detector within microelectronics based on infrared mid-wave (MW) complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS) uses a micro-cooler in order to keep its temperature around 100 K. The standard wavelength range (3 to 5μm) is adapted to the 2.2 to 4.3μm wavelength range thanks to adaptation of the optical interface of the detector and with an antireflection coating. With our electronic system, we can acquire 3 images per second. To increase the signal to noise ratio, we have the opportunity to make a summation of 15 frames per image. Through this article, we will describe the space electronic system that we have developed in order to achieve space observations (e.g. Atmospheric Chemistry Suite package for ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter).

  2. Monte Carlo based method for conversion of in-situ gamma ray spectra obtained with a portable Ge detector to an incident photon flux energy distribution.

    PubMed

    Clouvas, A; Xanthos, S; Antonopoulos-Domis, M; Silva, J

    1998-02-01

    A Monte Carlo based method for the conversion of an in-situ gamma-ray spectrum obtained with a portable Ge detector to photon flux energy distribution is proposed. The spectrum is first stripped of the partial absorption and cosmic-ray events leaving only the events corresponding to the full absorption of a gamma ray. Applying to the resulting spectrum the full absorption efficiency curve of the detector determined by calibrated point sources and Monte Carlo simulations, the photon flux energy distribution is deduced. The events corresponding to partial absorption in the detector are determined by Monte Carlo simulations for different incident photon energies and angles using the CERN's GEANT library. Using the detector's characteristics given by the manufacturer as input it is impossible to reproduce experimental spectra obtained with point sources. A transition zone of increasing charge collection efficiency has to be introduced in the simulation geometry, after the inactive Ge layer, in order to obtain good agreement between the simulated and experimental spectra. The functional form of the charge collection efficiency is deduced from a diffusion model. PMID:9450590

  3. EMCCD-Based High Resolution Dynamic X-Ray Detector for Neurovascular Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, P.; Vasan, S.N. Swetadri; Jain, A.; Panse, A.; Titus, A.H.; Cartwright, A. N.; Bednarek, D. R; Rudin, S.

    2012-01-01

    We have designed and developed from the discrete component level a high resolution dynamic detector for neurovascular interventions. The heart of the detector is a 1024 × 1024 pixel electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) with a pixel size of 13 × 13 μm2, bonded to a fiber optic plate (FOP), and optically coupled to a 350 μm micro-columnar CsI(TI) scintillator via a 3.3:1 fiber optic taper (FOT). The detector provides x-ray images of 9 cycles/mm resolution at 15 frames/sec and real time live video at 30 frames/sec with binning at a lower resolution, both independent of gain applied to EMCCD, as needed for region-of-interest (ROI) image guidance during neurovascular interventions. PMID:22256144

  4. Performance improvements of wavelength-shifting-fiber neutron detectors using high-resolution positioning algorithms.

    PubMed

    Wang, C L

    2016-05-01

    Three high-resolution positioning methods based on the FluoroBancroft linear-algebraic method [S. B. Andersson, Opt. Express 16, 18714 (2008)] are proposed for wavelength-shifting fiber (WLSF) neutron detectors. Using a Gaussian or exponential-decay light-response function, the non-linear relation of photon-number profiles vs. x-pixels was linearized and neutron positions were determined. After taking the super-Poissonian photon noise into account, the proposed algorithms give an average of 0.03-0.08 pixel position error much smaller than that (0.29 pixel) from a traditional maximum photon algorithm (MPA). The new algorithms result in better detector uniformity, less position misassignment (ghosting), better spatial resolution, and an equivalent or better instrument resolution in powder diffraction than the MPA. These improvements will facilitate broader applications of WLSF detectors at time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction beamlines, including single-crystal diffraction and texture analysis. PMID:27250410

  5. High resolution, two-dimensional imaging, microchannel plate detector for use on a sounding rocket experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, Brett C.; Cotton, Daniel M.; Siegmund, Oswald H.; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Harris, Walter; Clarke, John

    1991-01-01

    We discuss a high resolution microchannel plate (MCP) imaging detector to be used in measurements of Doppler-shifted hydrogen Lyman-alpha line emission from Jupiter and the interplanetary medium. The detector is housed in a vacuum-tight stainless steel cylinder (to provide shielding from magnetic fields) with a MgF2 window. Operating at nominal voltage, the four plate configuration provides a gain of 1.2 x 10 exp 7 electrons per incident photon. The wedge-and-strip anode has two-dimensional imaging capabilities, with a resolution of 40 microns FWHM over a one centimeter diameter area. The detector has a high quantum efficiency while retaining a low background rate. A KBr photocathode is used to enhance the quantum efficiency of the bare MCPs to a value of 35 percent at Lyman-alpha.

  6. Performance of high-resolution position-sensitive detectors developed for storage-ring decay experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Suzaki, F.; Izumikawa, T.; Miyazawa, S.; Morimoto, K.; Suzuki, T.; Tokanai, F.; Furuki, H.; Ichihashi, N.; Ichikawa, C.; Kitagawa, A.; Kuboki, T.; Momota, S.; Nagae, D.; Nagashima, M.; Nakamura, Y.; Nishikiori, R.; Niwa, T.; Ohtsubo, T.; Ozawa, A.; Sato, K.; Sato, S.; Suzuki, S.

    2013-12-01

    As next generation spectroscopic tools, heavy-ion cooler storage rings will be a unique application of highly charged RI beam experiments. Decay spectroscopy of highly charged rare isotopes provides us important information relevant to the stellar conditions, such as for the s- and r-process nucleosynthesis. In-ring decay products of highly charged RI will be momentum-analyzed and reach a position-sensitive detector set-up located outside of the storage orbit. To realize such in-ring decay experiments, we have developed and tested two types of high-resolution position-sensitive detectors: silicon strips and scintillating fibers. The beam test experiments resulted in excellent position resolutions for both detectors, which will be available for future storage-ring experiments.

  7. Neutron-induced gamma-ray spectroscopy: simulations for chemical mapping of planetary surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Brueckner, J.; Waenke, H.; Reedy, R.C.

    1986-01-01

    Cosmic rays interact with the surface of a planetary body and produce a cascade of secondary particles, such as neutrons. Neutron-induced scattering and capture reactions play an important role in the production of discrete gamma-ray lines that can be measured by a gamma-ray spectrometer on board of an orbiting spacecraft. These data can be used to determine the concentration of many elements in the surface of a planetary body, which provides clues to its bulk composition and in turn to its origin and evolution. To investigate the gamma rays made by neutron interactions, thin targets were irradiated with neutrons having energies from 14 MeV to 0.025 eV. By means of foil activation technique the ratio of epithermal to thermal neutrons was determined to be similar to that in the Moon. Gamma rays emitted by the targets and the surrounding material were detected by a high-resolution germanium detector in the energy range of 0.1 to 8 MeV. Most of the gamma-ray lines that are expected to be used for planetary gamma-ray spectroscopy were found in the recorded spectra and the principal lines in these spectra are presented. 58 refs., 7 figs., 9 tabs.

  8. Focal spot deblurring for high resolution direct conversion x-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Rana, R.; Russ, M.; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2016-03-01

    Small pixel high resolution direct x-ray detectors have the advantage of higher spatial sampling and decreased blurring characteristic. The limiting factors for such systems becomes the degradation due to the focal spot size. One solution is a smaller focal spot; however, this can limit the output of the x-ray tube. Here a software solution of deconvolving with an estimated focal spot blur is presented. To simulate images from a direct detector affected with focal-spot blur, first a set of high-resolution stent images (FRED from Microvention, Inc., Tustin, CA) were acquired using a 75μm pixel size Dexela-Perkin-Elmer detector and frame averaged to reduce quantum noise. Then the averaged image was blurred with a known Gaussian blur. To add noise to the blurred image a flat-field image was multiplied with the blurred image. Both the ideal and the noisy-blurred images were then deconvolved with the known Gaussian function using either threshold-based inverse filtering or Weiner deconvolution. The blur in the ideal image was removed and the details were recovered successfully. However, the inverse filtering deconvolution process is extremely susceptible to noise. The Weiner deconvolution process was able to recover more of the details of the stent from the noisy-blurred image, but for noisier images, stent details are still lost in the recovery process.

  9. A pulse shape discriminator and an online system for the balloon-borne hard X-ray/gamma-ray detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, T.; Kamae, T.; Tanaka, M.; Gunji, S.; Miyazuki, S.; Tamura, T.; Sekimoto, Y.; Yamaoka, N.; Nishimura, J.; Yajima, N.

    Attention is given to a new kind of phoswich counters (the well-type phoswich counter) that will be capable of detecting very low flux hard X-rays/gamma-rays (40-1000 keV) from astronomical objects. A specially designed pulse-shape discriminator (PSD) selects hard X-rays/gamma-rays that has deposited energy only in the detection part. Sixty-four such counters are assembled into an array where each phoswich element acts as an active shield to the neighboring elements too. The ADCs, the TDCs, the hit-pattern latches, and the precision clock are read out by a VME-based online system, stored on an 8-mm video tape, and transmitted to the ground station. The design and performance of the pulse shape discriminator and the online system are described.

  10. Defect Measurements of CdZnTe Detectors Using I-DLTS, TCT, I-V and Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gul,R.

    2008-08-11

    In this work we measured the crystal defect levels and tested the performance of CdZnTe detectors by diverse methodologies, viz., Current Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (I-DLTS), Transient Current Technique (TCT), Current and Capacitance versus Voltage measurements (I-V and C-V), and gamma-ray spectroscopy. Two important characteristics of I-DLTS technique for advancing this research are (1) it is applicable for high-resistivity materials (>10{sup 6} {Omega}-cm), and, (2) the minimum temperature for measurements can be as low as 10 K. Such low-temperature capability is excellent for obtaining measurements at shallow levels. We acquired CdZnTe crystals grown by different techniques from two different vendors and characterized them for point defects and their response to photons. I-DLTS studies encompassed measuring the parameters of the defects, such as the energy levels in the band gap, the carrier capture cross-sections and their densities. The current induced by the laser-generated carriers and the charge collected (or number of electrons collected) were obtained using TCT that also provides the transport properties, such as the carrier life time and mobility of the detectors under study. The detector's electrical characteristics were explored, and its performance tested using I-V, C-V and gamma-ray spectroscopy.

  11. Performance of a Low Noise Front-end ASIC for Si/CdTe Detectors in Compton Gamma-ray Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, H

    2004-03-29

    Compton telescopes based on semiconductor technologies are being developed to explore the gamma-ray universe in an energy band 0.1-20 MeV, which is not well covered by the present or near-future gamma-ray telescopes. The key feature of such Compton telescopes is the high energy resolution that is crucial for high angular resolution and high background rejection capability. The energy resolution around 1 keV is required to approach physical limit of the angular resolution due to Doppler broadening. We have developed a low noise front-end ASIC (Application-Specific Integrated Circuit), VA32TA, to realize this goal for the readout of Double-sided Silicon Strip Detector (DSSD) and Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) pixel detector which are essential elements of the semiconductor Compton telescope. We report on the design and test results of the VA32TA. We have reached an energy resolution of 1.3 keV (FWHM) for 60 keV and 122 keV at 0 C with a DSSD and 1.7 keV (FWHM) with a CdTe detector.

  12. HPGe detectors long time behaviour in high-resolution γ spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajo-Bohus, L.; Rosso, D.; Sajo Castelli, A. M.; Napoli, D. R.; Fioretto, E.; Menegazzo, R.; Barros, H.; Ur, C. A.; Palacios, D.; Liendo, J.

    2011-08-01

    A large set of data on long term performance of n-type HPGe detectors used in GASP, EUROBALL and CLARA γ spectrometers, as well as environmental measurements have been collected over two decades. In this paper a detailed statistical analysis of this data is given and detector long term behaviour is provided to the scientific community. We include failure, failure mode, repair frequency, repair outcome and its influence in the energy efficiency and energy resolution. A remarkable result is that the life span distribution is exponential. A detector's failure is a memory-less process, where a previous failure does not influence the upcoming one. Repaired spectrometers result in high reliability with deep implications in the management of large scale high-resolution gamma spectrometry related projects. Findings show that on average, detectors initial counting efficiency is slightly lower (∼2%) than that reported by the manufacturers and the repair process (including annealing) does not affect significantly the energy efficiency, even after a long period of use. Repaired detector energy resolution statistics show that the probability, that a repaired detector will be at least as good as it was originally, is more than 3/4.

  13. Low cost, high resolution x-ray detector system for digital radiography and computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.R.; Erker, J.W.

    1993-12-31

    The authors have designed and evaluated a novel design of line array x-ray detector for use with digital radiography (DR) and computed tomography (CT) systems. The Radiographic Line Scan (RLS) detector is less than half the cost of discrete multi-channel line array detectors, yet provides the potential for resolution to less than 25 {micro}m at energies of 420 kV. The RLS detector consists of a scintillator fiber-optically coupled to a thermo-electrically cooled line array CCD. Gadolinium oxysulfide screen material has been used as the scintillator, in thicknesses up to 250 {micro}m. Scintillating glass, which is formed into a fiber optic bundle, has also been used in thicknesses up to 2 mm. The large 2.5 mm by 25 {micro}m CCD cells provide high dynamic range while preserving high resolution; the 2.5 mm dimension is oriented in the x-ray absorption direction while the 25 {micro}m dimension is oriented in the resolution direction. Servo controlled thermo-electric cooling of the CCD to a fixed temperature provides reduction of dark current and stabilization of the output. Greater dynamic range is achieved by reducing the dark current, while output stabilization reduces the need for frequent calibration of the detector. Measured performance characteristics are presented along with DR and CT images produced using the RLS detector.

  14. Workflow for the use of a high-resolution image detector in endovascular interventional procedures

    PubMed Central

    Rana, R.; Loughran, B.; Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Pope, L.; Ionita, C. N.; Siddiqui, A.; Lin, N.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2014-01-01

    Endovascular image-guided intervention (EIGI) has become the primary interventional therapy for the most widespread vascular diseases. These procedures involve the insertion of a catheter into the femoral artery, which is then threaded under fluoroscopic guidance to the site of the pathology to be treated. Flat Panel Detectors (FPDs) are normally used for EIGIs; however, once the catheter is guided to the pathological site, high-resolution imaging capabilities can be used for accurately guiding a successful endovascular treatment. The Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) detector provides needed high-resolution, high-sensitivity, and real-time imaging capabilities. An experimental MAF enabled with a Control, Acquisition, Processing, Image Display and Storage (CAPIDS) system was installed and aligned on a detector changer attached to the C-arm of a clinical angiographic unit. The CAPIDS system was developed and implemented using LabVIEW software and provides a user-friendly interface that enables control of several clinical radiographic imaging modes of the MAF including: fluoroscopy, roadmap, radiography, and digital-subtraction-angiography (DSA). Using the automatic controls, the MAF detector can be moved to the deployed position, in front of a standard FPD, whenever higher resolution is needed during angiographic or interventional vascular imaging procedures. To minimize any possible negative impact to image guidance with the two detector systems, it is essential to have a well-designed workflow that enables smooth deployment of the MAF at critical stages of clinical procedures. For the ultimate success of this new imaging capability, a clear understanding of the workflow design is essential. This presentation provides a detailed description and demonstration of such a workflow design. PMID:25302003

  15. Workflow for the use of a high-resolution image detector in endovascular interventional procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, R.; Loughran, B.; Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Pope, L.; Ionita, C. N.; Siddiqui, A.; Lin, N.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2014-03-01

    Endovascular image-guided intervention (EIGI) has become the primary interventional therapy for the most widespread vascular diseases. These procedures involve the insertion of a catheter into the femoral artery, which is then threaded under fluoroscopic guidance to the site of the pathology to be treated. Flat Panel Detectors (FPDs) are normally used for EIGIs; however, once the catheter is guided to the pathological site, high-resolution imaging capabilities can be used for accurately guiding a successful endovascular treatment. The Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) detector provides needed high-resolution, high-sensitivity, and real-time imaging capabilities. An experimental MAF enabled with a Control, Acquisition, Processing, Image Display and Storage (CAPIDS) system was installed and aligned on a detector changer attached to the C-arm of a clinical angiographic unit. The CAPIDS system was developed and implemented using LabVIEW software and provides a user-friendly interface that enables control of several clinical radiographic imaging modes of the MAF including: fluoroscopy, roadmap, radiography, and digital-subtraction-angiography (DSA). Using the automatic controls, the MAF detector can be moved to the deployed position, in front of a standard FPD, whenever higher resolution is needed during angiographic or interventional vascular imaging procedures. To minimize any possible negative impact to image guidance with the two detector systems, it is essential to have a well-designed workflow that enables smooth deployment of the MAF at critical stages of clinical procedures. For the ultimate success of this new imaging capability, a clear understanding of the workflow design is essential. This presentation provides a detailed description and demonstration of such a workflow design.

  16. Comparison of high-resolution wax-embedded and pneumatically coupled borehole seismic detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, T.E.; Parra, J.O. )

    1993-01-01

    High quality seismic measurements at frequencies up to about 2,000 Hz are needed if projected resolution limits on the order of 1m in spatial dimension are to be realized in reservoir structure delineation, cross-well sonic logging, and shallow reverse VSP applications. While sources and detectors are critical to this goal, the authors have investigated detector requirements in an objective way to demonstrate a successful design philosophy capable of achieving unprecedented wide-band frequency response and data quality in three-component shallow-borehole sensors. Two prototype detectors were developed: a nearly ideal responding wax-embedded reference'' detector and a pneumatically coupled detector exhibiting closely comparable performance. Their approach uses a three-axis accelerometer sensor assembly installed in a borehole drilled through the weathered surface to a depth at which the ground is competent enough to support practical kilohertz wave propagation. The wax-coupled detector is planted using a meltable wax embedment to achieve a rigid, stress-free, conformal coupling at the bottom of the hole. Experimental test results show this wax-embedded detector to have excellent broadband three-component response at frequencies up to 2,500 Hz; a range heretofore unexplored for seismic applications. The pneumatically coupled detector, although limited by modal resonance distortion effects in the highest range of frequencies, demonstrated useful three-component response at frequencies up to 1,500 Hz. Tests of the two coupling techniques under identical conditions illustrate their high-quality responses and their differences. Field tests of the prototype pneumatically coupled detector in shallow reverse vertical seismic profiling (VSP) measurements demonstrate the practical effectiveness of the basic high-resolution probe design concepts.

  17. Region-of-interest cone beam computed tomography (ROI CBCT) with a high resolution CMOS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, A.; Takemoto, H.; Silver, M. D.; Nagesh, S. V. S.; Ionita, C. N.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2015-03-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) systems with rotational gantries that have standard flat panel detectors (FPD) are widely used for the 3D rendering of vascular structures using Feldkamp cone beam reconstruction algorithms. One of the inherent limitations of these systems is limited resolution (<3 lp/mm). There are systems available with higher resolution but their small FOV limits them to small animal imaging only. In this work, we report on region-of-interest (ROI) CBCT with a high resolution CMOS detector (75 μm pixels, 600 μm HR-CsI) mounted with motorized detector changer on a commercial FPD-based C-arm angiography gantry (194 μm pixels, 600 μm HL-CsI). A cylindrical CT phantom and neuro stents were imaged with both detectors. For each detector a total of 209 images were acquired in a rotational protocol. The technique parameters chosen for the FPD by the imaging system were used for the CMOS detector. The anti-scatter grid was removed and the incident scatter was kept the same for both detectors with identical collimator settings. The FPD images were reconstructed for the 10 cm x10 cm FOV and the CMOS images were reconstructed for a 3.84 cm x 3.84 cm FOV. Although the reconstructed images from the CMOS detector demonstrated comparable contrast to the FPD images, the reconstructed 3D images of the neuro stent clearly showed that the CMOS detector improved delineation of smaller objects such as the stent struts (~70 μm) compared to the FPD. Further development and the potential for substantial clinical impact are suggested.

  18. Very High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weekes, Trevor C.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses topics related to high-energy, gamma-ray astronomy (including cosmic radiation, gamma-ray detectors, high-energy gamma-ray sources, and others). Also considers motivation for the development of this field, the principal results to date, and future prospects. (JN)

  19. Statistical LOR estimation for a high-resolution dMiCE PET detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champley, Kyle M.; Lewellen, Thomas K.; Mac Donald, Lawrence R.; Miyaoka, Robert S.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2009-10-01

    We develop a statistical line of response (LOR) estimator of the three-dimensional interaction positions of a pair of annihilation photons in a PET detector module with depth of interaction capability. The three-dimensional points of interaction of a coincidence pair of photons within the detector module are estimated by calculation of an expectation of the points of interaction conditioned on the signals measured by the photosensors. This conditional expectation is computed from estimates of the probability density function of the light collection process and a model of the kinetics of photon interactions in the detector module. Our algorithm is capable of handling coincidences where each annihilation photon interacts any number of times within the detector module before being completely absorbed or escaping. In the case of multiple interactions, our algorithm estimates the position of the first interaction for each of the coincidence photons. This LOR estimation algorithm is developed for a high-resolution PET detector capable of providing depth-of-interaction information. Depth of interaction is measured by tailoring the light shared between two adjacent detector elements. These light-sharing crystal pairs are referred to as dMiCE and are being developed in our lab. Each detector element in the prototype system has a 2 × 2 mm2 cross section and is directly coupled to a micro-pixel avalanche photodiode (MAPD). In this set-up, the distribution of the ratio of light shared between two adjacent detector elements can be expressed as a function of the depth of interaction. Monte Carlo experiments are performed using our LOR estimation algorithm and compared with Anger logic. We show that our LOR estimation algorithm provides a significant improvement over Anger logic under a variety of parameters.

  20. The development of high resolution coordinate detectors for the DEUTERON facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, V. N.; Shekhtman, L. I.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Maltsev, T. V.; Nikolenko, D. N.; Rachek, I. A.

    2014-09-01

    The DEUTERON internal target facility at the VEPP-3 storage ring at BINP is intended for the experiments on interaction of electrons and positrons with proton and deuteron. These experiments require high resolution tracking detectors which can provide the energy and angles of scattered electron. The prototype detector with a sensitive area of 160 × 40 mm2 was built and proved to be operational. It consists of three cascades of gaseous electron multiplier (GEM), the readout structure and detector electronics. Readout structure has 640 strips which are uniformly distributed in two layers skewed by 30 degrees. Electronics of the detector includes APC128 ASICs, Altera Cyclone III FPGA, 100 MBit ethernet. In the APC128 ASIC each channel has a separate analog pipeline consisting of 32 cells which are cyclically switched by a global clock synchronized to the bunch crossing rate ( ~ 4 MHz). For the needs of DEUTERON facility the expected resolution of less than 100 μm and thickness of ~ 0.15% of radiation length are considered to be quite satisfactory. The latest results obtained at the test beam facility at the VEPP-4M collider show that detector is fully operational with maximum detection efficiency reached 98%.

  1. Properties of single crystal para-terphenyl as medium for high resolution TOF detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gerone, M.; Biasotti, M.; Ceriale, V.; Corsini, D.; Gatti, F.; Orlando, A.; Pizzigoni, G.

    2016-07-01

    In the last years organic scintillators have been largely investigated in order to achieve high light yield together with good time response. Pure organic compound with high quality crystalline structure can achieve both this goals. Among a large type of organic compound, para-terphenyl (C18H14) have proven to have practical applications as detector medium for particle physics. In this work, the characterization of different sizes high quality mono-crystal p-terphenyl samples is presented. The optical and scintillation properties (emission spectrum, light yield, attenuation length, and decay time) are investigated. Coupling a Silicon PhotoMultiplier-based readout system to the crystal, a small prototype for a high resolution TOF detector was built; the preliminary results, obtained on a 20×30×3 mm3 sample, with dual-side read-out (Hamamatsu S10931-050P SiPMs) and irradiated with 90Sr source, show a time resolution of 35 ps.

  2. High-resolution X-ray imaging by polycapillary optics and lithium fluoride detectors combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampai, D.; Dabagov, S. B.; Della Ventura, G.; Bellatreccia, F.; Magi, M.; Bonfigli, F.; Montereali, R. M.

    2011-12-01

    Novel results on high-resolution X-ray imaging by a table-top laboratory system based on lithium fluoride (LiF) imaging radiation detectors and a X-ray tube combined with polycapillary optics are reported for the first time. In this paper, imaging experiments of reference objects, as well as thick geological samples, show some of the potentialities of this approach for the development of a compact laboratory X-ray microscopy apparatus. The high spatial resolution and dynamic range of versatile LiF imaging detectors, based on optical reading of photoluminescence from X-ray-induced color centers in LiF crystals and films, allow us to use very simple contact imaging techniques. Promising applications can be foreseen in the fields of bio-medical imaging diagnostics, characterization of X-ray sources and optical elements, material science and photonics.

  3. Design of a high-resolution small-animal SPECT-CT system sharing a CdTe semiconductor detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Young-Jin; Lee, Seung-Wan; Cho, Hyo-Min; Choi, Yu-Na; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2012-07-01

    A single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system with a co-registered X-y computed tomography (CT) system allows the convergence of functional information and morphologic information. The localization of radiopharmaceuticals on a SPECT can be enhanced by combining the SPECT with an anatomical modality, such as X-ray CT. Gamma-ray imaging for nuclear medicine devices and X-ray imaging systems for diagnostics has recently been developed based on semiconductor detectors, and semiconductor detector materials such as cadmium telluride (CdTe) or cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) are available for both X-ray and gamma-ray systems for small-animal imaging. CdTe or CZT detectors provide strong absorption and high detection efficiency of high energy X-ray and gamma-ray photons because of their large atomic numbers. In this study, a pinhole collimator SPECT system sharing a cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector with a CT was designed. The GEANT4 application for tomographic emission (GATE) v.6.1 was used for the simulation. The pinhole collimator was designed to obtain a high spatial resolution of the SPECT system. The acquisition time for each projection was 40 seconds, and 60 projections were obtained for tomographic image acquisition. The reconstruction was performed using ordered subset expectation maximization (OS-EM) algorithms. The sensitivity and the spatial resolution were measured on the GATE simulation to evaluate the system characteristics. The spatial resolution of the system calculated from the FWHM of Gaussian fitted PSF curve was 0.69 mm, and the sensitivity of the system was measured to be 0.354 cps/kBq by using a Tc-99m point source of 1 MBq for 800 seconds. A phantom study was performed to verify the design of the dual imaging modality system. The system will be built as designed, and it can be applied as a pre-clinical imaging system.

  4. Bayesian reconstruction of photon interaction sequences for high-resolution PET detectors

    PubMed Central

    Pratx, Guillem

    2013-01-01

    Realizing the full potential of high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) systems involves accurately positioning events in which the annihilation photon deposits all its energy across multiple detector elements. Reconstructing the complete sequence of interactions of each photon provides a reliable way to select the earliest interaction because it ensures that all the interactions are consistent with one another. Bayesian estimation forms a natural framework to maximize the consistency of the sequence with the measurements while taking into account the physics of γ-ray transport. An inherently statistical method, it accounts for the uncertainty in the measured energy and position of each interaction. An algorithm based on maximum a posteriori (MAP) was evaluated for computer simulations. For a high-resolution PET system based on cadmium zinc telluride detectors, 93.8% of the recorded coincidences involved at least one photon multiple-interactions event (PMIE). The MAP estimate of the first interaction was accurate for 85.2% of the single photons. This represents a two-fold reduction in the number of mispositioned events compared to minimum pair distance, a simpler yet efficient positioning method. The point-spread function of the system presented lower tails and higher peak value when MAP was used. This translated into improved image quality, which we quantified by studying contrast and spatial resolution gains. PMID:19652293

  5. Low-noise small-size microring ultrasonic detectors for high-resolution photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sung-Liang; Ling, Tao; Guo, L. Jay

    2011-01-01

    Small size polymer microring resonators have been exploited for photoacoustic (PA) imaging. To demonstrate the advantages of the wide acceptance angle of ultrasound detection of small size microrings, photoacoustic tomography (PAT), and delay-and-sum beamforming PA imaging was conducted. In PAT, we compared the imaging quality using different sizes of detectors with similar noise-equivalent pressures and the same wideband response: 500 μm hydrophone and 100, 60, and 40 μm microrings. The results show significantly improved imaging contrast and high resolution over the whole imaging region using smaller size detectors. The uniform high resolution in PAT imaging using 40 μm microrings indicates the potential to resolve microvasculature over a large imaging region. The improved lateral resolution of two-dimensional and three-dimensional delay-and-sum beamforming PA imaging using a synthetic array demonstrate another advantageous application of small microrings. The small microrings can also be applied to other ultrasound-related imaging applications. PMID:21639569

  6. Molecular imaging: High-resolution detectors for early diagnosis and therapy monitoring of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garibaldi, F.; Cisbani, E.; Colilli, S.; Cusanno, F.; Fratoni, R.; Giuliani, F.; Gricia, M.; Lucentini, M.; Fratoni, R.; Lo Meo, S.; Magliozzi, M. L.; Santanvenere, F.; Cinti, M. N.; Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Simonetti, G.; Schillaci, O.; Del Vecchio, S.; Salvatore, M.; Majewski, S.; Lanza, R. C.; De Vincentis, G.; Scopinaro, F.

    2006-12-01

    Dedicated high-resolution detectors are required for detection of small cancerous breast tumours by molecular imaging with radionuclides. Absorptive collimation is normally applied in imaging single photon emitters, but it results in a strong reduction in detection efficiency. Systems based on electronic collimation are complex and expensive. For these reasons simulations and measurements have been performed to design optimised dedicated high-resolution mini gamma camera. Critical parameters are contrast and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Intrinsic performance (spatial resolution, pixel identification, and response linearity and uniformity) were first optimised. Pixellated scintillator arrays (NaI(Tl)) of different pixel size were coupled to arrays of PSPMTs with different anode pad dimensions (6×6 mm 2 and 3×3 mm 2). Detectors having a field of view (FOV) of 100×100 mm 2 and 150×200 mm 2 were designed and built. The electronic system allows read out of all the anode pad signals. The collimation technique was then considered and limits of coded aperture option were studied. Preliminary results are presented.

  7. Photofraction of a 5 cm x 2 cm BGO scintillator. [bismuth germanate crystal for use in cosmic gamma ray detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunphy, P. P.; Forrest, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The photofraction of a 5.1 cm x 2.0 cm bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillator was measured over a gamma-ray energy range of 0.2 to 6.1 MeV. Several methods, used to minimize the effect of room scattering on the measurement, are discussed. These include a gamma-gamma coincidence technique, a beta-gamma coincidence technique, and the use of sources calibrated with a standard 7.6 cm x 7.6 cm sodium iodide scintillator.

  8. Gamma-ray astrophysics with AGILE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavani, M.

    2003-09-01

    Gamma-ray astrophysics above 30 MeV will soon be revitalized by a new generation of high-energy detectors in space. We discuss here the AGILE Mission that will be dedicated to gamma-ray astrophysics above 30 MeV during the period 2005-2006. The main characteristics of AGILE are: (1) excellent imaging and monitoring capabilities both in the γ-ray (30 MeV - 30 GeV) and hard X-ray (10-40 keV) energy ranges (reaching an arcminute source positioning), (2) very good timing (improving by three orders of magnitude the instrumental deadtime for γ-ray detection compared to previous instruments), and (3) excellent imaging and triggering capability for Gamma-Ray Bursts. The AGILE scientific program will emphasize a quick response to gamma-ray transients and multiwavelength studies of gamma-ray sources.

  9. Monte Carlo simulation study of in-orbit background for the soft gamma-ray detector on-board ASTRO-H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, T.; Hiragi, K.; Fukazawa, Y.; Umeki, Y.; Odaka, H.; Watanabe, S.; Kokubun, M.; Takahashi, T.; Nakajima, K.; Nakazawa, K.; Makishima, K.; Nakahira, S.; Terada, Y.; Tajima, H.

    2010-07-01

    The Soft Gamma-ray Detector onboard the ASTRO-H satellite, scheduled for launch in 2014, is a Si/CdTe Compton telescope surrounded by a thick BGO active shield. The SGD covers the energy range from 40 to 600 keV and studies non-thermal phenomena in the universe with high sensitivity. For the success of the SGD mission, careful examination of the expected performance, particularly the instrumental background in orbit, and optimization of the detector configuration are essential. We are developing a Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulation framework on the ANL++ platform, employing the MGGPOD software suite to predict the radioactivation in orbit. A detailed validation of the simulator through the comparison with literature and the beam test data is summarized. Our system will be integrated into the ASTRO-H simulation framework.

  10. Kinetics of the current response in TlBr detectors under a high dose rate of {gamma}-ray irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gazizov, I. M.; Zaletin, V. M.; Kukushkin, V. M.; Kuznetsov, M. S.; Lisitsky, I. S.

    2012-03-15

    The kinetics of the photocurrent response in doped and undoped TlBr samples subjected to irradiation with {gamma}-ray photons from a {sup 137}Cs source with the dose rate 0.033 to 3.84 Gy/min are studied. The crystals were grown by the directional crystallization of the melt method using the Bridgman-Stockbarger technique. The Pb impurity mass fraction introduced into the doped TlBr crystals was 1-10 ppm and amounted to 150 ppm for the Ca impurity. The crystals were grown in a vacuum, in bromine vapors, in a hydrogen atmosphere, and in air. Decay of the photocurrent is observed for extrinsic semiconductor crystals doped with bivalent cations (irrespective of the growth atmosphere), and also for crystals grown in hydrogen and crystals grown in an excess of thallium. The time constant of photocurrent decay {tau} amounted to 30-1400 s and was proportional to resistivity. It is shown that the current response can be related to photolysis in the TlBr crystals during irradiation with {gamma}-ray photons. The energy of hole traps responsible for a slow increase in the photo-current has been estimated and found to be equal to 0.6-0.85 eV.

  11. Gamma ray transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, Thomas L.

    1987-01-01

    The discovery of cosmic gamma ray bursts was made with systems designed at Los Alamos Laboratory for the detection of nuclear explosions beyond the atmosphere. HELIOS-2 was the first gamma ray burst instrument launched; its initial results in 1976, seemed to deepen the mystery around gamma ray transients. Interplanetary spacecraft data were reviewed in terms of explaining the behavior and source of the transients.

  12. Methods and results of a search for gravitational waves associated with gamma-ray bursts using the GEO 600, LIGO, and Virgo detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D.; Andersen, M.; Anderson, R. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J. S.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Augustus, H.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Bergmann, G.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brückner, F.; Buchman, S.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burman, R.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cain, J.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Castaldi, G.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Celerier, C.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J. A.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C.; Colombini, M.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Croce, R. P.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, C.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Dickson, J.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dolique, V.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Endrőczi, G.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Feroz, F.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S.; Garufi, F.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C. J.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Ha, J.; Hall, E. D.; Hamilton, W.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Haris, K.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Hopkins, P.; Horrom, T.; Hoske, D.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y.; Huerta, E.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; Jang, H.; Jaranowski, P.; Ji, Y.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karlen, J.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Keiser, G. M.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, C.; Kim, K.; Kim, N. G.; Kim, N.; Kim, S.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Koehlenbeck, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Koranda, S.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, D. Nanda; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Larson, S.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, P. J.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Le Roux, A.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B.; Lewis, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Libbrecht, K.; Libson, A.; Lin, A. C.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lockett, V.; Lodhia, D.; Loew, K.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lopez, E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M. J.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Ma, Y.; Macdonald, E. P.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R.; Mageswaran, M.; Maglione, C.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Manca, G. M.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mangini, N. M.; Mansell, G.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martinelli, L.; Martynov, D.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; May, G.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McLin, K.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meidam, J.; Meinders, M.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, M. S.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Minenkov, Y.; Mingarelli, C. M. F.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morgado, N.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nagy, M. F.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, I.; Neri, M.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A. H.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Omar, S.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, R.; O'Reilly, B.; Ortega, W.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Padilla, C.; Pai, A.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pan, H.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Paoletti, F.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patel, P.; Pedraza, M.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Pichot, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poeld, J.; Poggiani, R.; Poteomkin, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajalakshmi, G.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramet, C.; Ramirez, K.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Recchia, S.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Reula, O.; Rhoades, E.; Ricci, F.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Roddy, S. B.; Rogstad, S.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sankar, S.; Sannibale, V.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Saracco, E.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Scheuer, J.; Schilling, R.; Schilman, M.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Singh, R.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Souradeep, T.; Staley, A.; Stebbins, J.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Stephens, B. C.; Steplewski, S.; Stevenson, S.; Stone, R.; Stops, D.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tao, J.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, R.; Tellez, G.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trias, M.; Tse, M.; Tshilumba, D.; Tuennermann, H.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Heijningen, J.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vincent-Finley, R.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wiesner, K.; Wilkinson, C.; Williams, K.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Williams, T. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Wolovick, N.; Worden, J.; Wu, Y.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, H.; Yoshida, S.; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L.; Zhao, C.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we report on a search for short-duration gravitational wave bursts in the frequency range 64 Hz-1792 Hz associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), using data from GEO 600 and one of the LIGO or Virgo detectors. We introduce the method of a linear search grid to analyze GRB events with large sky localization uncertainties, for example the localizations provided by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Coherent searches for gravitational waves (GWs) can be computationally intensive when the GRB sky position is not well localized, due to the corrections required for the difference in arrival time between detectors. Using a linear search grid we are able to reduce the computational cost of the analysis by a factor of O(10) for GBM events. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our analysis pipeline can improve upon the sky localization of GRBs detected by the GBM, if a high-frequency GW signal is observed in coincidence. We use the method of the linear grid in a search for GWs associated with 129 GRBs observed satellite-based gamma-ray experiments between 2006 and 2011. The GRBs in our sample had not been previously analyzed for GW counterparts. A fraction of our GRB events are analyzed using data from GEO 600 while the detector was using squeezed-light states to improve its sensitivity; this is the first search for GWs using data from a squeezed-light interferometric observatory. We find no evidence for GW signals, either with any individual GRB in this sample or with the population as a whole. For each GRB we place lower bounds on the distance to the progenitor, under an assumption of a fixed GW emission energy of 10-2M⊙c2, with a median exclusion distance of 0.8 Mpc for emission at 500 Hz and 0.3 Mpc at 1 kHz. The reduced computational cost associated with a linear search grid will enable rapid searches for GWs associated with Fermi GBM events once the advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors begin operation.

  13. Methods and Results of a Search for Gravitational Waves Associated with Gamma-Ray Bursts Using the GEO 600, LIGO, and Virgo Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Blackburn, Lindy L.; Camp, Jordan B.; Gehrels, N.; Graff, P. B.; Slutsky, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we report on a search for short-duration gravitational wave bursts in the frequency range 64 Hz-1792 Hz associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), using data from GEO600 and one of the LIGO or Virgo detectors. We introduce the method of a linear search grid to analyze GRB events with large sky localization uncertainties such as the localizations provided by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Coherent searches for gravitational waves (GWs) can be computationally intensive when the GRB sky position is not well-localized, due to the corrections required for the difference in arrival time between detectors. Using a linear search grid we are able to reduce the computational cost of the analysis by a factor of O(10) for GBM events. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our analysis pipeline can improve upon the sky localization of GRBs detected by the GBM, if a high-frequency GW signal is observed in coincidence. We use the linear search grid method in a search for GWs associated with 129 GRBs observed satellite-based gamma-ray experiments between 2006 and 2011. The GRBs in our sample had not been previously analyzed for GW counterparts. A fraction of our GRB events are analyzed using data from GEO600 while the detector was using squeezed-light states to improve its sensitivity; this is the first search for GWs using data from a squeezed-light interferometric observatory. We find no evidence for GW signals, either with any individual GRB in this sample or with the population as a whole. For each GRB we place lower bounds on the distance to the progenitor, assuming a fixed GW emission energy of 10(exp -2)Stellar Mass sq c, with a median exclusion distance of 0.8 Mpc for emission at 500 Hz and 0.3 Mpc at 1 kHz. The reduced computational cost associated with a linear search grid will enable rapid searches for GWs associated with Fermi GBM events in the Advanced detector era.

  14. Lutetium oxyorthosilicate block detector readout by avalanche photodiode arrays for high resolution animal PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichler, B. J.; Swann, B. K.; Rochelle, J.; Nutt, R. E.; Cherry, S. R.; Siegel, S. B.

    2004-09-01

    Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) have proven to be useful as light detectors for high resolution positron emission tomography (PET). Their compactness makes these devices excellent candidates for replacing bulky photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) in PET systems where space limitations are an issue. The readout of densely packed, 10 × 10 lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) block detectors (crystal size 2.0 × 2.0 × 12 mm3) with custom-built monolithic 3 × 3 APD arrays was investigated. The APDs had a 5 × 5 mm2 active surface and were arranged on a 6.25 mm pitch. The dead space on the edges of the array was 1.25 mm. The APDs were operated at a bias voltage of approximately 380 V for a gain of 100 and a dark current of 10 nA per APD. The standard deviation in gain between the APDs in the array ranged from 1.8 to 6.5% as the gain was varied from 50 to 108. A fast, low-noise, multi-channel charge sensitive preamplifier application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) was developed for the APD readout. The amplifier had a rise time of 8 ns, a noise floor of 515 e- rms and a 9 e- pF-1 noise slope. An acquired flood image showed that all 100 crystals from the block detector could be resolved. Timing measurements with single-channel LSO-APD detectors, as well as with the array, against a plastic scintillator and PMT assembly showed a time resolution of 1.2 ns and 2.5 ns, respectively. The energy resolution measured with a single 4.0 × 4.0 × 10 mm3 LSO crystal, wrapped in four-layer polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tape and coupled with optical grease on a single APD of the array, yielded 15% (full width at half maximum, FWHM) at 511 keV. Stability tests over 9 months of operation showed that the APD arrays do not degrade appreciably. These results demonstrate the ability to decode densely packed LSO scintillation blocks with compact APD arrays. The good timing and energy resolution makes these detectors suitable for high resolution PET.

  15. Evaluation of a compact, high-resolution SPECT detector based on digital silicon photomultipliers.

    PubMed

    Bouckaert, Carmen; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Van Holen, Roel

    2014-12-01

    MicroSPECT is one of the main functional imaging techniques used in the preclinical setting. Even though high-resolution images can be obtained with currently available systems, their sensitivity is often quite low due to the use of multi-pinhole collimation. This results in long acquisition times and hampers dynamic imaging. However, it has already been shown that this limited sensitivity can be overcome using high-resolution detectors. In this article, we therefore investigated the use of a digital photon counter (DPC) in combination with a 2 mm thick monolithic LYSO crystal for SPECT imaging. These light sensors contain arrays of avalanche photodiodes whose signals are directly digitised. The DPCs have the advantage that they are very compact, have a high intrinsic resolution, are MR compatible and allow disabling cells with a high dark count rate. In order to investigate the influence of the temperature dependent dark count rate on the detector performance, we compared it at 3 °C and 18 °C. At 3 °C, we observed an energy resolution of 28.8% and an intrinsic spatial resolution of 0.48 mm. Furthermore, the count rate at 10% loss is 60 kcps. Next, we looked at the event loss at 18 °C caused by the higher dark count rate and found a 5% loss compared to the 3 °C measurements. At this higher temperature the energy resolution becomes 29.2% and the intrinsic spatial resolution decreases to 0.52 mm. Due to the 5% count loss, the count rate at 10% loss increases to 63 kcps. A small degradation of the detector performance is thus observed at 18 °C.These results show the usefulness of this detector for SPECT imaging together with its excellent intrinsic spatial resolution. A drawback of the detector is its low, spatially varying energy resolution. Even though the detection efficiency and intrinsic spatial resolution are better at 3 °C, results are still acceptable at 18 °C. PMID:25401505

  16. Evaluation of a compact, high-resolution SPECT detector based on digital silicon photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouckaert, Carmen; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Van Holen, Roel

    2014-12-01

    MicroSPECT is one of the main functional imaging techniques used in the preclinical setting. Even though high-resolution images can be obtained with currently available systems, their sensitivity is often quite low due to the use of multi-pinhole collimation. This results in long acquisition times and hampers dynamic imaging. However, it has already been shown that this limited sensitivity can be overcome using high-resolution detectors. In this article, we therefore investigated the use of a digital photon counter (DPC) in combination with a 2 mm thick monolithic LYSO crystal for SPECT imaging. These light sensors contain arrays of avalanche photodiodes whose signals are directly digitised. The DPCs have the advantage that they are very compact, have a high intrinsic resolution, are MR compatible and allow disabling cells with a high dark count rate. In order to investigate the influence of the temperature dependent dark count rate on the detector performance, we compared it at 3 °C and 18 °C. At 3 °C, we observed an energy resolution of 28.8% and an intrinsic spatial resolution of 0.48 mm. Furthermore, the count rate at 10% loss is 60 kcps. Next, we looked at the event loss at 18 °C caused by the higher dark count rate and found a 5% loss compared to the 3 °C measurements. At this higher temperature the energy resolution becomes 29.2% and the intrinsic spatial resolution decreases to 0.52 mm. Due to the 5% count loss, the count rate at 10% loss increases to 63 kcps. A small degradation of the detector performance is thus observed at 18 °C. These results show the usefulness of this detector for SPECT imaging together with its excellent intrinsic spatial resolution. A drawback of the detector is its low, spatially varying energy resolution. Even though the detection efficiency and intrinsic spatial resolution are better at 3 °C, results are still acceptable at 18 °C.

  17. A full range detector for the HIRRBS high resolution RBS magnetic spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Skala, Wayne G.; Haberl, Arthur W.; Bakhru, Hassaram; Lanford, William

    2013-04-19

    The UAlbany HIRRBS (High Resolution RBS) system has been updated for better use in rapid analysis. The focal plane detector now covers the full range from U down to O using a linear stepper motor to translate the 1-cm detector across the 30-cm range. Input is implemented with zero-back-angle operation in all cases. The chamber has been modified to allow for quick swapping of sample holders, including a channeling goniometer. A fixed standard surface-barrier detector allows for normal RBS simultaneously with use of the magnetic spectrometer. The user can select a region on the standard spectrum or can select an element edge or an energy point for collection of the expanded spectrum portion. The best resolution currently obtained is about 2-to-3 keV, probably representing the energy width of the incoming beam. Calibration is maintained automatically for any spectrum portion and any beam energy from 1.0 to 3.5 MeV. Element resolving power, sensitivity and depth resolution are shown using several examples. Examples also show the value of simultaneous conventional RBS.

  18. A full range detector for the HIRRBS high resolution RBS magnetic spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skala, Wayne G.; Haberl, Arthur W.; Bakhru, Hassaram; Lanford, William

    2013-04-01

    The UAlbany HIRRBS (High Resolution RBS) system has been updated for better use in rapid analysis. The focal plane detector now covers the full range from U down to O using a linear stepper motor to translate the 1-cm detector across the 30-cm range. Input is implemented with zero-back-angle operation in all cases. The chamber has been modified to allow for quick swapping of sample holders, including a channeling goniometer. A fixed standard surface-barrier detector allows for normal RBS simultaneously with use of the magnetic spectrometer. The user can select a region on the standard spectrum or can select an element edge or an energy point for collection of the expanded spectrum portion. The best resolution currently obtained is about 2-to-3 keV, probably representing the energy width of the incoming beam. Calibration is maintained automatically for any spectrum portion and any beam energy from 1.0 to 3.5 MeV. Element resolving power, sensitivity and depth resolution are shown using several examples. Examples also show the value of simultaneous conventional RBS.

  19. Optimized light sharing for high-resolution TOF PET detector based on digital silicon photomultipliers.

    PubMed

    Marcinkowski, R; España, S; Van Holen, R; Vandenberghe, S

    2014-12-01

    The majority of current whole-body PET scanners are based on pixelated scintillator arrays with a transverse pixel size of 4 mm. However, recent studies have shown that decreasing the pixel size to 2 mm can significantly improve image spatial resolution. In this study, the performance of Digital Photon Counter (DPC) from Philips Digital Photon Counting (PDPC) was evaluated to determine their potential for high-resolution whole-body time of flight (TOF) PET scanners. Two detector configurations were evaluated. First, the DPC3200-44-22 DPC array was coupled to a LYSO block of 15 × 15 2 × 2 × 22 mm(3) pixels through a 1 mm thick light guide. Due to light sharing among the dies neighbour logic of the DPC was used. In a second setup the same DPC was coupled directly to a scalable 4 × 4 LYSO matrix of 1.9 × 1.9 × 22 mm(3) crystals with a dedicated reflector arrangement allowing for controlled light sharing patterns inside the matrix. With the first approach an average energy resolution of 14.5% and an average CRT of 376 ps were achieved. For the second configuration an average energy resolution of 11% and an average CRT of 295 ps were achieved. Our studies show that the DPC is a suitable photosensor for a high-resolution TOF-PET detector. The dedicated reflector arrangement allows one to achieve better performances than the light guide approach. The count loss, caused by dark counts, is overcome by fitting the matrix size to the size of DPC single die. PMID:25365502

  20. Optimized light sharing for high-resolution TOF PET detector based on digital silicon photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcinkowski, R.; España, S.; Van Holen, R.; Vandenberghe, S.

    2014-12-01

    The majority of current whole-body PET scanners are based on pixelated scintillator arrays with a transverse pixel size of 4 mm. However, recent studies have shown that decreasing the pixel size to 2 mm can significantly improve image spatial resolution. In this study, the performance of Digital Photon Counter (DPC) from Philips Digital Photon Counting (PDPC) was evaluated to determine their potential for high-resolution whole-body time of flight (TOF) PET scanners. Two detector configurations were evaluated. First, the DPC3200-44-22 DPC array was coupled to a LYSO block of 15  ×  15 2  ×  2 × 22 mm3 pixels through a 1 mm thick light guide. Due to light sharing among the dies neighbour logic of the DPC was used. In a second setup the same DPC was coupled directly to a scalable 4  ×  4 LYSO matrix of 1.9  ×  1.9  ×  22 mm3 crystals with a dedicated reflector arrangement allowing for controlled light sharing patterns inside the matrix. With the first approach an average energy resolution of 14.5% and an average CRT of 376 ps were achieved. For the second configuration an average energy resolution of 11% and an average CRT of 295 ps were achieved. Our studies show that the DPC is a suitable photosensor for a high-resolution TOF-PET detector. The dedicated reflector arrangement allows one to achieve better performances than the light guide approach. The count loss, caused by dark counts, is overcome by fitting the matrix size to the size of DPC single die.

  1. High resolution gamma detector for small-animal positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Tao

    In this study, the performance of continuous miniature crystal element (cMiCE) detectors with LYSO crystals of different thickness were investigated. Potential designs of a cMiCE small animal positron emission tomography scanner were also evaluated by an analytical simulation approach. The cMiCE detector was proposed as a high sensitivity, low cost alternative to the prevailing discrete crystal detectors. A statistics based positioning (SBP) algorithm was developed to solve the scintillation position estimation problem and proved to be successful on a cMiCE detector with a 4 mm thick crystal. By assuming a Gaussian distribution, the distributions of the photomultiplier signals could be characterized by mean and variance, which are functions of scintillation position. After calibrating the detector on a grid of locations, a 2D table of the mean and variance can be built. The SBP algorithm searches the tables to find the location that maximizes the likelihood between the mean and variance of known positions and the incoming scintillation event. In this work, the performance of the SBP algorithm on cMiCE detectors with thicker crystals (6 and 8 mm) was studied. The stopping power of a cMiCE detector is 40% and 49% for 6 and 8 mm thick crystals respectively. The intrinsic spatial resolution is 1.2 mm and 1.4 mm FWHM for the center and corner sections of a 6 mm thick crystal detector, and 1.3 mm and 1.6 mm for center and corner of an 8 mm thick crystal detector. These results demonstrate that the cMiCE detector is a promising candidate for high resolution, high sensitivity PET applications. A maximum-likelihood (ML) clustering method was developed to empirically separate the experimental data set into two to four subgroups according to the depth-of-interaction of the detected photons. This method enabled us to build 2-DOI lookup tables (LUT) (mean and variance lookup tables for front group and back group). Using the 2-DOI SBP LUTs, the scintillation position and DOI

  2. Plutonium Isotopic Gamma-Ray Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-01-08

    The MGA8 (Multiple Group Analysis) program determines the relative abundances of plutonium and other actinide isotopes in different materials. The program analyzes spectra taken of such samples using a 4096-channel germanium (Ge) gamma-ray spectrometer. The code can be run in a one or two detector mode. The first spectrum, which is required and must be taken at a gain of 0.075 Kev/channel with a high resolution planar detector, contains the 0-300 Kev energy region. Themore » second spectrum, which is optional, must be taken at a gain of 0.25 Kev/channel; it becomes important when analyzing high burnup samples (concentration of Pu241 greater than one percent). Isotopic analysis precisions of one percent or better can be obtained, and no calibrations are required. The system also measures the abundances of U235, U238, Np237, and Am241. A special calibration option is available to perform a one-time peak-shape characterization when first using a new detector system.« less

  3. Gamma-ray Output Spectra from 239Pu Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, John

    2015-05-01

    Gamma-ray multiplicities, individual gamma-ray energy spectra, and total gamma energy spectra following neutron-induced fission of 239Pu were measured using the DANCE detector at Los Alamos. Corrections for detector response were made using a forward-modeling technique based on propagating sets of gamma rays generated from a paramaterized model through a GEANT model of the DANCE array and adjusting the parameters for best fit to the measured spectra. The results for the gamma-ray spectrum and multiplicity are in general agreement with previous results, but the measured total gamma-ray energy is about 10% higher. A dependence of the gamma-ray spectrum on the gamma-ray multplicity was also observed. Global model calculations of the multiplicity and gamma energy distributions are in good agreement with the data, but predict a slightly softer total-energy distribution.

  4. Gamma-ray astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W. (Editor); Trombka, J. I. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    Conference papers on gamma ray astrophysics are summarized. Data cover the energy region from about 0.3 MeV to a few hundred GeV and theoretical models of production mechanisms that give rise to both galactic and extragalactic gamma rays.

  5. Gamma-Ray Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2011-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has revolutionized the study of pulsar physics with the detection of over 80 gamma-ray pulsars. Several new populations have been discovered, including 24 radio quiet pulsars found through gamma-ray pulsations alone and about 20 millisecond gamma-ray pulsars. The gamma-ray pulsations from millisecond pulsars were discovered by both folding at periods of known radio millisecond pulsars or by detecting them as gamma-ray sources that are followed up by radio pulsar searches. The second method has resulted in a phenomenally successful synergy, with -35 new radio MSPs (to date) having been discovered at Fermi unidentified source locations and the gamma-ray pulsations having then been detected in a number of these using the radio timing solutions. The higher sensitivity and larger energy range of the Fermi Large Area Telescope has produced detailed energy-dependent light curves and phase-resolved spectroscopy on brighter pulsars, that have ruled out polar cap models as the major source of the emission in favor of outer magnetosphere accelerators. The large number of gamma-ray pulsars now allows for the first time meaningful population and sub-population studies that are revealing surprising properties of these fascinating sources.

  6. A novel high resolution, high sensitivity SPECT detector for molecular imaging of cardiovascular diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusanno, F.; Argentieri, A.; Baiocchi, M.; Colilli, S.; Cisbani, E.; De Vincentis, G.; Fratoni, R.; Garibaldi, F.; Giuliani, F.; Gricia, M.; Lucentini, M.; Magliozzi, M. L.; Majewski, S.; Marano, G.; Musico, P.; Musumeci, M.; Santavenere, F.; Torrioli, S.; Tsui, B. M. W.; Vitelli, L.; Wang, Y.

    2010-05-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause of death in western countries. Understanding the rupture of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques and monitoring the effect of innovative therapies of heart failure is of fundamental importance. A flexible, high resolution, high sensitivity detector system for molecular imaging with radionuclides on small animal models has been designed for this aim. A prototype has been built using tungsten pinhole and LaBr3(Ce) scintillator coupled to Hamamatsu Flat Panel PMTs. Compact individual-channel readout has been designed, built and tested. Measurements with phantoms as well as pilot studies on mice have been performed, the results show that the myocardial perfusion in mice can be determined with sufficient precision. The detector will be improved replacing the Hamamatsu Flat Panel with Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) to allow integration of the system with MRI scanners. Application of LaBr3(Ce) scintillator coupled to photosensor with high photon detection efficiency and excellent energy resolution will allow dual-label imaging to monitor simultaneously the cardiac perfusion and the molecular targets under investigation during the heart therapy.

  7. A high resolution animal PET scanner using compact PS-PMT detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, M.; Okada, H.; Shimizu, K.; Omura, T.

    1996-12-31

    A new high resolution PET scanner dedicated to animal studies has been designed, built and tested. The system utilizes 240 block detectors, each of which consists of a new compact position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PS-PMT) and an 8 x 4 BGO array. A total number of 7,680 crystals (480 per ring) are positioned to form a 508 mm diameter of 16 detector rings with 7.2 mm pitch and 114 mm axial field of view (FOV). The system is designed to perform activation studies using a monkey in a sitting position. The data can be acquired in either 2D or 3D mode, where the slice collimators are retracted in 3D mode. The transaxial resolution is 2.6 mm FWHM at the center of the FOV, and the average axial resolution on the axis of the ring is 3.3 mm FWHM in the direct slice and 3.2 mm FWHM in the cross slice. The scatter fraction, sensitivity and count rate performance were evaluated for a 10 cm diameter cylindrical phantom. The total system sensitivity is 2.3 kcps/kBq/ml in 2D mode and 22.8 kcps/kBq/ml in 3D mode. The noise equivalent count rate with 3D mode is equivalent to that with 2D mode at five times higher radioactivity level. The applicable imaging capabilities of the scanner was demonstrated by animal studies with a monkey.

  8. MOLE: A new high-energy gamma-ray diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, M. J.; Chang, B.

    1992-01-01

    Continued interest in high-energy gamma rays associated with fusion reactions has motivated an ongoing search for simple, effective measurement techniques. Past experiments have measured 16.7-MeV gamma rays with Compton-magnetic spectrometers. Some measurements have been performed with threshold Cherenkov detectors with enhanced sensitivity to high-energy (gamma) rays. The Compton spectrometers work quite well, but they require extensive calibrations and tend to be expensive and cumbersome. The threshold Cherenkov detectors are simpler to calibrate and physically compact, but have poor spectral definition and are vulnerable to background signals. This report describes a new type of (gamma)-ray detector, the MOLE, that may retain the simplicity of a threshold Cherenkov detector while still having sufficient energy discrimination to be effective for measuring high-energy (gamma)-rays in the presence of lower-energy (gamma)-ray fluxes.

  9. Research in cosmic and gamma ray astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. C.; Davis, L., Jr.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Prince, T. A.

    1989-01-01

    Research activities in cosmic rays, gamma rays, and astrophysical plasmas are covered. The activities are divided into sections and described, followed by a bibliography. The astrophysical aspects of cosmic rays, gamma rays, and of the radiation and electromagnetic field environment of the Earth and other planets are investigated. These investigations are performed by means of energetic particle and photon detector systems flown on spacecraft and balloons.

  10. The gamma-ray telescope Gamma-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akimov, V. V.; Nesterov, V. E.; Rodin, V. G.; Kalinkin, L. F.; Balibanov, V. M.; Prilutsky, O. F.; Leikov, N. G.; Bielaoussov, A. S.; Dobrian, L. B.; Poluektov, V. P.

    1985-01-01

    French and Soviet specialists have designed and built the gamma-ray telescope GAMMA-1 to detect cosmic gamma rays above 50 MeV. The sensitive area of the detector is 1400 sq cm, energy resolution is 30% at 300 MeV, and angular resolution 1.2 deg at 300 MeV (and less than 20' arc when a coded aperture mask is used). Results on calibration of the qualification model and Monte-Carlo calculations are presented.

  11. Light Transmission Fluctuations from Extended Air Showers Produced by Cosmic-Rays and Gamma-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Stuart

    Cosmic-ray and gamma-ray experiments that use the atmosphere as a calorimeter, such as the High Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) and the Telescope Array (TA), require understanding the transmission of the light from the air shower of particles produced by the cosmic-ray or gamma-ray striking the atmosphere. To better understand the scattering and transmission of light to the detectors, HiRes measures light from different calibrated sources. We compare scattered light from laser shots a few kilometers away from the two HiRes detectors with direct light from stable portable light sources placed a few meters in front of the phototubes. We use two HiRes detectors to study and isolate contributions to fluctuations of the measured light. These contributions include fluctuations in the source intensity, the night sky background, scattering and transmission of the laser beam, the phototubes and electronics, and photostatistics. N o rth Mirror Fields of View

  12. Study of stent deployment mechanics using a high-resolution x-ray imaging detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weiyuan; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    To treat or prevent some of the 795,000 annual strokes in the U.S., self-expanding endo-vascular stents deployed under fluoroscopic image guidance are often used. Neuro-interventionalists need to know the deployment behavior of each stent in order to place them in the correct position. Using the Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) which has about 3 times higher resolution than commercially available flat panel detectors (FPD) we studied the deployment mechanics of two of the most important commercially available nitinol stents: the Pipeline embolization device (EV3), and the Enterprise stent (Codman). The Pipeline stent's length extends to about 3 times that of its deployed length when it is contained inside a catheter. From the high-resolution images with the MAF we found that upon the sudden release of the distal end of the Pipeline from a helical wire cap, the stent expands radially but retracts to about 30% (larger than for patient deployments) of its length. When released from the catheter proximally, it retracts additionally about 50% contributing to large uncertainty in the final deployed location. In contrast, the MAF images clearly show that the Enterprise stent self expands with minimal length retraction during deployment from its catheter and can be retrieved and repositioned until the proximal markers are released from clasping structures on its guide-wire thus enabling more accurate placement at the center of an aneurysm or stenosis. The high-resolution imaging demonstrated in this study should help neurointerventionalists understand and control endovascular stent deployment mechanisms and hence perform more precise treatments.

  13. Scatter reduction for high resolution image detectors with a region of interest attenuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Compton scatter is the main interaction of x-rays with objects undergoing radiographic and fluoroscopic imaging procedures. Such scatter is responsible for reducing image signal to noise ratio which can negatively impact object detection especially for low contrast objects. To reduce scatter, possible methods are smaller fields-of-view, larger air gaps and the use of an anti-scatter grid. Smaller fields of view may not be acceptable and scanned-beam radiography is not practical for real-time imaging. Air gaps can increase geometric unsharpness and thus degrade image resolution. Deployment of an anti-scatter grid is not well suited for high resolution imagers due to the unavailability of high line density grids needed to prevent grid-line artifacts. However, region of interest (ROI) imaging can be used not only for dose reduction but also for scatter reduction in the ROI. The ROI region receives unattenuated x-rays while the peripheral region receives x-rays reduced in intensity by an ROI attenuator. The scatter within the ROI part of the image originates from both the unattenuated ROI and the attenuated peripheral region. The scatter contribution from the periphery is reduced in intensity because of the reduced primary x-rays in that region and the scatter fraction in the ROI is thus reduced. In this study, the scatter fraction for various kVp's, air-gaps and field sizes was measured for a uniform head equivalent phantom. The scatter fraction in the ROI was calculated using a derived scatter fraction formula, which was validated with experimental measurements. It is shown that use of a ROI attenuator can be an effective way to reduce both scatter and patient dose while maintaining the superior image quality of high resolution detectors.

  14. Determination of the gamma-ray spectrum in a strong neutron/gamma-ray mixed field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan-Hao; Lin, Yi-Chun; Nievaart, Sander; Chou, Wen-Tsae; Liu, Hong-Ming; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2011-10-01

    The knowledge of gamma-ray spectrum highly affects the accuracy of the correspondingly derived gamma-ray dose and the correctness of calculated neutron dose in the neutron/gamma-ray mixed field dosimetry when using the paired ionization chambers technique. It is of our interest to develop a method to determine the gamma-ray spectrum in a strong neutron/gamma-ray mixed field. The current type detector, Mg(Ar) ionization chamber with 6 different thick caps incorporated with the unfolding technique, was used to determine the gamma-ray spectrum in the THOR epithermal neutron beam, which contains intense neutrons and gamma rays. The applied caps had nominal thicknesses from 1 to 6 mm. Detector response functions of the applied Mg(Ar) chamber with different caps were calculated using MCNP5 with a validated chamber model. The spectrum unfolding process was performed using the well-known SAND-II algorithm. The unfolded result was found much softer than the originally calculated spectrum at the design stage. A large portion of low energy continuum was shown in the adjusted spectrum. This work gave us a much deeper insight into the THOR epithermal neutron beam and also showed a way to determine the gamma-ray spectrum.

  15. Gamma-Ray Burst Physics with GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Omodei, N.; /INFN, Pisa

    2006-10-06

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is an international space mission that will study the cosmos in the energy range 10 keV-300 GeV, the upper end of which is one of the last poorly observed region of the celestial electromagnetic spectrum. The ancestor of the GLAST/LAT was the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) detector, which flew onboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). The amount of information and the step forward that the high energy astrophysics made thanks to its 9 years of observations are impressive. Nevertheless, EGRET uncovered the tip of the iceberg, raising many questions, and it is in the light of EGRET's results that the great potential of the next generation gamma-ray telescope can be appreciated. GLAST will have an imaging gamma-ray telescope, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) vastly more capable than instruments own previously, as well as a secondary instrument, the GLAST Bursts Monitor, or GBM, to augment the study of gamma-ray bursts. Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) science is one of the most exciting challenges for the GLAST mission, exploring the high energy emission of one of the most intense phenomena in the sky, shading light on various problems: from the acceleration of particles to the emission processes, to more exotic physics like Quantum Gravity effect. In this paper we report the work done so far in the simulation development as well as the study of the LAT sensitivity to GRB.

  16. Future prospects for gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C.

    1981-01-01

    As gamma-ray astronomy moves from the discovery to the exploratory phase, the promise of gamma-ray astrophysics noted by theorists in the late 1940s and 1950s is beginning to be realized. In the future, satellites should carry instruments that will have over an order of magnitude greater sensitivity than those flown thus far, and, for at least some portions of the gamma-ray energy range, these detectors will also have substantially improved energy and angular resolution. The information to be obtained from these experiments should greatly enhance our knowledge of several astrophysical phenomena including the very energetic and nuclear processes associated with compact objects, astrophysical nucleosynthesis, solar particle acceleration, the chemical composition of the planets and other bodies of the solar system, the structure of our galaxy, the origin and dynamic pressure effects of the cosmic rays, high energy particles and energetic processes in other galaxies especially active ones, and the degree of matter-antimatter symmetry of the universe. The gamma-ray results of the forthcoming programs such as Gamma-I, the Gamma Ray Observatory, the gamma-ray burst network, Solar Polar, and very high energy gamma-ray telescopes on the ground will almost certainly provide justification for more sophisticated telescopes. These advanced instruments might be placed on the Space Platform currently under study by N.A.S.A.

  17. Gamma-ray Astronomy and GLAST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2007-01-01

    The high energy gamma-ray (30 MeV to 100 GeV) sky has been relatively poorly studied. Most of our current knowledge comes from observations made by the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) detector on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), which revealed that the GeV gamma-ray sky is rich and vibrant. Studies of astrophysical objects at GeV energies are interesting for several reasons: The high energy gamma-rays are often produced by a different physical process than the better studied X-ray and optical emission, thus providing a unique information for understanding these sources. Production of such high-energy photons requires that charged particles are accelerated to equally high energies, or much greater. Thus gamma-ray astronomy is the study of extreme environments, with natural and fundamental connections to cosmic-ray and neutrino astrophysics. The launch of GLAST in 2008 will herald a watershed in our understanding of the high energy gamma-ray sky, providing dramatic improvements in sensitivity, angular resolution and energy range. GLAST will open a new avenue to study our Universe as well as to answer scientific questions EGRET observations have raised. In this talk, I will describe the GLAST instruments and capabilities and highlight some of the science we expect to address.

  18. Experimental and Calculation Study of Absolute Efficiency of {gamma}-Ray Detection with the Coaxial HPGe-Detector GC 5019 at E{gamma}=0.24-18.565 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Generalov, L.N.; Lebedev, B.L.; Livke, A.V.; Modenov, A.B.; Chirkin, V.A.

    2005-05-24

    In the range E{gamma}=0.24-18.565 MeV investigations were carried out of the absolute efficiency of {gamma}-ray detection with the HPGe-detector GC 5019 (CANBERRA). The investigations were performed in connection with measurements of proton radiation capture reaction cross sections on the lightest nuclei.

  19. Gamma ray spectrometer for Lunar Scout 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, C. E.; Burt, W. W.; Edwards, B. C.; Martin, R. A.; Nakano, George H.; Reedy, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    We review the current status of the Los Alamos program to develop a high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer for the Lunar Scout-II mission, which is the second of two Space Exploration Initiative robotic precursor missions to study the Moon. This instrument will measure gamma rays in the energy range of approximately 0.1 - 10 MeV to determine the composition of the lunar surface. The instrument is a high-purity germanium crystal surrounded by an CsI anticoincidence shield and cooled by a split Stirling cycle cryocooler. It will provide the abundance of many elements over the entire lunar surface.

  20. Spectral evolution of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, D.; Matteson, J.; Ford, L.; Schaefer, B.; Teegarden, B.; Cline, T.; Paciesas, W.; Pendleton, G.; Fishman, G.; Meegan, C.

    1992-01-01

    BATSE's Spectral Detectors provide a series of high resolution spectra over the duration of a gamma-ray burst; fits to these spectra show the evolution of the continuum as the burst progresses. The burst continuum can usually be fit by the spectral form AE sup alpha exp(-E/kT) from around 25 keV to more than 3 MeV, with varying trends in the value and evolution of the spectral parameters. As a result of limited statistics for E greater than 1 - 2 MeV in the individual spectra, a high energy power law is not required. Only long duration strong bursts can be studied by fitting a series of spectra, and therefore our conclusions concern only this class of burst. The bursts we analyzed tend to be characterized by a hard-to-soft trend both for individual intensity spikes and for the burst as a whole: the hardness leads the count rate in spectra which resolve the temporal variations, while the hardness of successive spikes decreases. We also summarize the performance of the Spectral Detectors and the development of analysis tools to date.

  1. The Gamma-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (GRIS): A new balloon-borne experiment for gamma-ray line astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teegarden, B. J.; Cline, T. L.; Gehrels, N.; Porreca, G.; Tueller, J.; Leventhal, M.; Huters, A. F.; Maccallum, C. J.; Stang, P. D.

    1985-01-01

    High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy is a relatively new field that holds great promise for further understanding of high energy astrophysical processes. When the high resolution gamma-ray spectrometer (GRSE) was removed from the GRO payload, a balloon program was initiated to permit continued development and improvement of instrumentation in this field, as well as continued scientific observations. The Gamma-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (GRIS) is one of the experiments selected as part of this program. The instrument contains a number of new and innovative features that are expected to produce a significant improvement in source location accuracy and sensitivity over previous balloon and satellite experiments.

  2. A three-dimensional imaging detector based on nano-scale silver-related defects in X- and gamma-ray-irradiated glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurobori, Toshio; Yanagida, Yuka; Chen, Yao Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Ag-activated phosphate glass, which is the most commonly known radiophotoluminescent (RPL) material, has the capability to operate not only dosimeters but also two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) dose imaging detectors in the same host. This passive detector is based on radiation-induced, optically active nano-scale defects. In this work, the transient-state optical properties of the blue and orange RPL were investigated using a time-resolved spectrum technique for 137Cs and 60Co gamma-ray-irradiated Ag-activated phosphate glass. Specifically, the blue RPL intensity with a decay time of 5 ns as a function of the depth at the vicinity of the surface was systematically examined to clarify an accurate dose distribution within the glass. Moreover, a feasibility study into the use of an RPL Ag-activated phosphate glass detector for fluorescent nuclear track imaging was demonstrated using a confocal fluorescence image microscope for the first time.

  3. Floating-zone growth of CdMnTe crystals and their characterization as room-temperature semiconductor gamma-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T. S.; Wang, F. Y.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Roy, U.; Lee, K.; Yang, G.; James, R.; Gu, G. D.

    2014-03-01

    CdMnTe (CMT) is a promising candidate for room-temperature semiconductor gamma-ray detectors. In the past, several groups have grown detector-grade CMT material by using a low-pressure Bridgman method. The performance of the test devices fabricated from CMT crystals was found to be slightly lower to that achieved with CdZnTe detectors. For example, the best electron mu-tau product reported for CMT was about 5 times lower compared to that achieved for the best commercial CZT material. Also, the crystal quality of the CMT crystals was reduced due to strong twinning, presence of subgrain boundaries and, in some cases, Te inclusions. Here, we report on our attempt to grow CMT crystals by using a modified floating-zone growth technique, which has not been used previously to grow CMT crystals. There are several advantages of this technique over the traditional Bridgman methods: a higher purity of as-grown crystals, better doping control, more stable growth conditions with uniform compositional distribution, and a better control of the seeding and morphology of the growing crystal. We present the new growth technique and results from CMT crystal characterization and device testing. The work is supported by office NA22, DOE.

  4. An optimised detector for in-situ high-resolution NMR in microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finch, Graeme; Yilmaz, Ali; Utz, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Integration of high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with microfluidic lab-on-a-chip devices is challenging due to limited sensitivity and line broadening caused by magnetic susceptibility inhomogeneities. We present a novel double-stripline NMR probe head that accommodates planar microfluidic devices, and obtains the NMR spectrum from a rectangular sample chamber on the chip with a volume of 2 μ l. Finite element analysis was used to jointly optimise the detector and sample volume geometry for sensitivity and RF homogeneity. A prototype of the optimised design has been built, and its properties have been characterised experimentally. The performance in terms of sensitivity and RF homogeneity closely agrees with the numerical predictions. The system reaches a mass limit of detection of 1.57 nmol √{ s } , comparing very favourably with other micro-NMR systems. The spectral resolution of this chip/probe system is better than 1.75 Hz at a magnetic field of 7 T, with excellent line shape.

  5. A slanting light-guide analog decoding high resolution detector for positron emission tomography camera

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, W.H.; Jing, M.; Bendriem, B.; Hartz, R.; Mullani, N.; Gould, K.L.; Michel, C.

    1987-02-01

    Current high resolution PET cameras require the scintillation crystals to be much narrower than the smallest available photomultipliers. In addition, the large number of photomultiplier channels constitutes the major component cost in the camera. Recent new designs use the Anger camera type of analog decoding method to obtain higher resolution and lower cost by using the relatively large photomultipliers. An alternative approach to improve the resolution and cost factors has been proposed, with a system of slanting light-guides between the scintillators and the photomultipliers. In the Anger camera schemes, the scintillation light is distributed to several neighboring photomultipliers which then determine the scintillation location. In the slanting light-guide design, the scintillation is metered and channeled to only two photomultipliers for the decision making. This paper presents the feasibility and performance achievable with the slanting light-guide detectors. With a crystal/photomultiplier ratio of 6/1, the intrinsic resolution was found to be 4.0 mm using the first non-optimized prototype light-guides on BGO crystals. The axial resolution will be about 5-6 mm.

  6. Gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciesas, William S.

    1991-01-01

    Miscellaneous tasks related to the development of the Bursts and Transient Source Experiment on the Gamma Ray Observatory and to analysis of archival data from balloon flight experiments were performed. The results are summarized and relevant references are included.

  7. Gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    Cosmic gamma rays, the physical processes responsible for their production and the astrophysical sites from which they were seen are reported. The bulk of the observed gamma ray emission is in the photon energy range from about 0.1 MeV to 1 GeV, where observations are carried out above the atmosphere. There are also, however, gamma ray observations at higher energies obtained by detecting the Cerenkov light produced by the high energy photons in the atmosphere. Gamma ray emission was observed from sources as close as the Sun and the Moon and as distant as the quasar 3C273, as well as from various other galactic and extragalactic sites. The radiation processes also range from the well understood, e.g. energetic particle interactions with matter, to the still incompletely researched, such as radiation transfer in optically thick electron positron plasmas in intense neutron star magnetic fields.

  8. Gamma ray line astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.

    1984-01-01

    The interpretations and implications of the astrophysical observations of gamma-ray lines are reviewed. At the Galactic Center e(+)-e(-) pairs from a compact object produce an annihilation line that shows no redshift, indicating an annihilation site far removed from this object. In the jets of SS433, gamma-ray lines are produced by inelastic excitations, probably in dust grains, although line emission from fusion reactions has also been considered. Observations of diffuse galactic line emission reveal recently synthesized radioactive aluminum in the interstellar medium. In gamma-ray bursts, redshifted pair annihilation lines are consistent with a neutron star origin for the bursts. In solar flares, gamma-ray line emission reveals the prompt acceleration of protons and nuclei, in close association with the flare energy release mechanism.

  9. Gamma Ray Pulsars: Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David J.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    High-energy gamma rays are a valuable tool for studying particle acceleration and radiation in the magnetospheres of energetic pulsars. The six or more pulsars seen by CGRO/EGRET show that: the light curves usually have double-peak structures (suggesting a broad cone of emission); gamma rays are frequently the dominant component of the radiated power; and all the spectra show evidence of a high-energy turnover. Unless a new pulsed component appears at higher energies, progress in gamma-ray pulsar studies will be greatest in the 1-20 GeV range. Ground-based telescopes whose energy ranges extend downward toward 10 GeV should make important measurements of the spectral cutoffs. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), now in planning for a launch in 2005, will provide a major advance in sensitivity, energy range, and sky coverage.

  10. Development of a segmented n-type germanium detector, and its application to astronomical gamma-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.; Cline, T. L.; Teegarden, B. J.; Tueller, J.; Leventhal, M.; Maccallum, C. J.; Ryge, P.

    1983-01-01

    Extensive calculations and simulations have shown that the instrumental background in a coaxial germanium photon detector flown at balloon altitudes or in space, can be substantially reduced by segmenting the outer contact. The contact is divided into horizontal strips around the side of the detector, giving it many characteristics similar to that of a stack of planar detectors. By choosing different segment coincidence requirements in different energy ranges, one can obtain a factor of approx. 2 increase in sensitivity to spectral lines between 40 keV and 1 MeV, compared with an unsegmented detector. The reverse electrode configuration (using n-type germanium), with the p contact outside, is preferred for this application due to its thin dead layer and resistance to radiation damage in space. A small two segment n type detector is being developed to serve as a prototype for larger multisegment devices. Results of this development effort and of detector tests are presented.

  11. Gamma ray camera

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, C.D.; Wang, S.

    1980-09-09

    An anger gamma ray camera is improved by the substitution of a gamma ray sensitive, proximity type image intensifier tube for the scintillator screen in the anger camera, the image intensifier tube having a negatively charged flat scintillator screen and a flat photocathode layer and a grounded, flat output phosphor display screen all of the same dimension (Unity image magnification) and all within a grounded metallic tube envelope and having a metallic, inwardly concaved input window between the scintillator screen and the collimator.

  12. Investigation of (235)U, (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K, (137)Cs, and heavy metal concentrations in Anzali international wetland using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry and atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zare, Mohammad Reza; Kamali, Mahdi; Fallahi Kapourchali, Maryam; Bagheri, Hashem; Khoram Bagheri, Mahdi; Abedini, Ali; Pakzad, Hamid Reza

    2016-02-01

    Measurements of natural radioactivity levels and heavy metals in sediment and soil samples of the Anzali international wetland were carried out by two HPGe-gamma ray spectrometry and atomic absorption spectroscopy techniques. The concentrations of (235)U, (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K, and (137)Cs in sediment samples ranged between 1.05 ± 0.51-5.81 ± 0.61, 18.06 ± 0.63-33.36 ± .0.34, 17.57 ± 0.38-45.84 ± 6.23, 371.88 ± 6.36-652.28 ± 11.60, and 0.43 ± 0.06-63.35 ± 0.94 Bq/kg, while in the soil samples they vary between 2.36-5.97, 22.71-38.37, 29.27-42.89, 472.66-533, and 1.05-9.60 Bq/kg for (235)U, (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K, and (137)Cs, respectively. Present results are compared with the available literature data and also with the world average values. The radium equivalent activity was well below the defined limit of 370 Bq/kg. The external hazard indices were found to be less than 1, indicating a low dose. Heavy metal concentrations were found to decrease in order as Fe > Mn > Sr > Zn > Cu > Cr > Ni > Pb > Co > Cd. These measurements will serve as background reference levels for the Anzali wetland. PMID:26490904

  13. Gamma ray optics

    SciTech Connect

    Jentschel, M.; Guenther, M. M.; Habs, D.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-07-09

    Via refractive or diffractive scattering one can shape {gamma} ray beams in terms of beam divergence, spot size and monochromaticity. These concepts might be particular important in combination with future highly brilliant gamma ray sources and might push the sensibility of planned experiments by several orders of magnitude. We will demonstrate the experimental feasibility of gamma ray monochromatization on a ppm level and the creation of a gamma ray beam with nanoradian divergence. The results are obtained using the inpile target position of the High Flux Reactor of the ILL Grenoble and the crystal spectrometer GAMS. Since the refractive index is believed to vanish to zero with 1/E{sup 2}, the concept of refractive optics has never been considered for gamma rays. The combination of refractive optics with monochromator crystals is proposed to be a promising design. Using the crystal spectrometer GAMS, we have measured for the first time the refractive index at energies in the energy range of 180 - 2000 keV. The results indicate a deviation from simple 1/E{sup 2} extrapolation of X-ray results towards higher energies. A first interpretation of these new results will be presented. We will discuss the consequences of these results on the construction of refractive optics such as lenses or refracting prisms for gamma rays and their combination with single crystal monochromators.

  14. Prospects for gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The Solar Maximum Mission and the Gamma Ray Experiment aboard the SMM spacecraft are discussed. Mission plans for interplanetary probes are also discussed. The Gamma Ray observatory and its role in future gamma ray astronomy is highlighted. It is concluded that gamma ray astronomy will be of major importance in the development of astronomical models and in the development of comsological theory.

  15. The gamma-ray observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    An overview is given of the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) mission. Detection of gamma rays and gamma ray sources, operations using the Space Shuttle, and instruments aboard the GRO, including the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), the Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE), the Imaging Compton Telescope (COMPTEL), and the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) are among the topics surveyed.

  16. Effect of the concentration of uncompensated impurities on the properties of CdTe-based X- and {gamma}-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kosyachenko, L. A. Sklyarchuk, V. M.; Melnychuk, S. V.; Maslyanchuk, O. L.; Grushko, E. V.; Sklyarchuk, O. V.

    2012-03-15

    Measurements of the {sup 55}Fe-isotope emission spectra and the photosensitivity of CdTe detectors with a Schottky diode, and also the temperature dependence of the resistivity of a CdTe crystal ((2-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} {Omega}cm at 300 K) have been used to determine the concentration of uncompensated donors (1-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}. Similar measurements performed for Cd{sub 0.9}Zn{sub 0.1}Te crystals with the resistivity (3-5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} {Omega} cm at 300 K have shown that the concentration of uncompensated donors in this case is lower by approximately four orders of magnitude. The results of calculations show that, due to such a significant decrease in the concentration of uncompensated donors, the efficiency of X- and {gamma}-ray radiation detection in the photon energy range 59 to 662 keV can decrease by one-three orders of magnitude (depending on the photon energy and the lifetime of charge carriers in the space-charge region). The results obtained account for the apparent poor detecting properties of the Cd{sub 0.9}Zn{sub 0.1}Te detectors.

  17. Gamma-ray Output Spectra from 239 Pu Fission

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ullmann, John

    2015-05-25

    Gamma-ray multiplicities, individual gamma-ray energy spectra, and total gamma energy spectra following neutron-induced fission of 239Pu were measured using the DANCE detector at Los Alamos. Corrections for detector response were made using a forward-modeling technique based on propagating sets of gamma rays generated from a paramaterized model through a GEANT model of the DANCE array and adjusting the parameters for best fit to the measured spectra. The results for the gamma-ray spectrum and multiplicity are in general agreement with previous results, but the measured total gamma-ray energy is about 10% higher. A dependence of the gamma-ray spectrum on the gamma-raymore » multplicity was also observed. Global model calculations of the multiplicity and gamma energy distributions are in good agreement with the data, but predict a slightly softer total-energy distribution.« less

  18. Uncertainties in gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lépy, M. C.; Pearce, A.; Sima, O.

    2015-06-01

    High resolution gamma-ray spectrometry is a well-established metrological technique that can be applied to a large number of photon-emitting radionuclides, activity levels and sample shapes and compositions. Three kinds of quantitative information can be derived using this technique: detection efficiency calibration, radionuclide activity and photon emission intensities. In contrast to other radionuclide measurement techniques gamma-ray spectrometry provides unambiguous identification of gamma-ray emitting radionuclides in addition to activity values. This extra information comes at a cost of increased complexity and inherently higher uncertainties when compared with other secondary techniques. The relative combined standard uncertainty associated with any result obtained by gamma-ray spectrometry depends not only on the uncertainties of the main input parameters but also on different correction factors. To reduce the uncertainties, the experimental conditions must be optimized in terms of the signal processing electronics and the physical parameters of the measured sample should be accurately characterized. Measurement results and detailed examination of the associated uncertainties are presented with a specific focus on the efficiency calibration, peak area determination and correction factors. It must be noted that some of the input values used in quantitative analysis calculation can be correlated, which should be taken into account in fitting procedures or calculation of the uncertainties associated with quantitative results. It is shown that relative combined standard uncertainties are rarely lower than 1% in gamma-ray spectrometry measurements.

  19. The development of a segmented N-type germanium detector, and its application to astronomical gamma-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.; Cline, T. L.; Teegarden, B. J.; Tueller, J.; Leventhal, M.; Maccallum, C. J.; Hewka, P. V.; Ryge, P.

    1984-01-01

    Extensive calculations and simulations have shown that the instrumental background in a coaxial germanium photon detector flown at balloon altitudes or in space, can be substantially reduced by segmenting the outer contact. The contact is divided into horizontal strips around the side of the detector, giving it many characteristics similar to that of a stack of planar detectors. By choosing different segment coincidence requirements in different energy ranges, one can obtain a factor of approx. 2 increase in sensitivity to spectral lines between 40 keV and 1 MeV, compared with an unsegmented detector. The reverse electrode configuration (using n-type germanium), with the p contact outside, is preferred for this application due to its thin dead layer and resistance to radiation damage in space. A small two segment n type detector is being developed to serve as a prototype for larger multisegment devices. Results of this development effort and of detector tests are presented. Previously announced in STAR as N84-13039

  20. Design of a High Resolution, Monolithic Crystal, PET/MRI Detector with DOI Positioning Capability.

    PubMed

    Miyaoka, Robert S; Li, Xiaoli; Lockhart, Cate; Lewellen, Tom K

    2008-10-01

    We report on a high resolution, monolithic crystal PET detector design concept that provides depth of interaction (DOI) positioning within the crystal and is compatible for operation in a MRI scanner to support multimodal anatomic and functional imaging. Our design utilizes a novel sensor on the entrance surface (SES) approach combined with a maximum likelihood positioning algorithm. The sensor will be a two-dimensional array of micro-pixel avalanche photodiodes (MAPD). MAPDs are a new type of solid-state photodetector with Geiger mode operation that can provide signal gain similar to a photomltipiler tube (PMT). In addition, they can be operated in high magnetic fields to support PET/MR imaging. Utilizing a multi-step simulation process, we determined the intrinsic spatial resolution characteristics for a variety of detector configurations. The crystal was always modeled as a 48.8 mm by 48.8 mm by 15 mm monolithic slab of a lutetium-based scintillator. The SES design was evaluated via simulation for three different two-dimensional MAPD array sizes: 8×8 with 5.8×5.8 mm(2) pads; 12×12 with 3.8×3.8 mm(2) pads; and 16×16 with 2.8×2.8 mm(2) pads. To reduce the number of signal channels row-column summing readout was explored for the 12×12 and 16×16 channel array devices. The intrinsic spatial resolution for the 8×8 MAPD array is 0.88 mm FWHM in X and Y, and 1.83 mm FWHM in Z (i.e., DOI). Comparing the results versus using a conventional design with the photosensors on the backside of the crystal, an average improvement of ~24% in X and Y and 20% in Z is achieved. The X, Y intrinsic spatial resolution improved to 0.66 mm and 0.65 mm FWHM for the 12×12 and 16×16 MAPDs using row-column readout. Using the 12×12 and 16×16 arrays also led to a slight improvement in the DOI positioning accuracy. PMID:20607144

  1. Studying the High Energy Gamma Ray Sky with Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamae, T.; Ohsugi, T.; Thompson, D. J.; Watanabe, K.

    1998-01-01

    Building on the success of the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will make a major step in the study of such subjects as blazars, gamma Ray bursts, the search for dark matter, supernova remnants, pulsars, diffuse radiation, and unidentified high energy sources. The instrument will be built on new and mature detector technologies such as silicon strip detectors, low-power low-noise LSI, and a multilevel data acquisition system. GLAST is in the research and development phase, and one full tower (of 25 total) is now being built in collaborating institutes. The prototype tower will be tested thoroughly at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in the fall of 1999.

  2. Gamma-ray limits on neutrino lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queiroz, Farinaldo S.; Yaguna, Carlos E.; Weniger, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    Monochromatic neutrinos from dark matter annihilations (χχ→ νbar nu) are always produced in association with a gamma-ray spectrum generated by electroweak bremsstrahlung. Consequently, these neutrino lines can be searched for not only with neutrino detectors but also indirectly with gamma-ray telescopes. Here, we derive limits on the dark matter annihilation cross section into neutrinos based on recent Fermi-LAT and HESS data. We find that, for dark matter masses above 200 GeV, gamma-ray data actually set the most stringent constraints on neutrino lines from dark matter annihilation and, therefore, an upper bound on the dark matter total annihilation cross section. In addition, we point out that gamma-ray telescopes, unlike neutrino detectors, have the potential to distinguish the flavor of the final state neutrino. Our results indicate that we have already entered into a new era where gamma-ray telescopes are more sensitive than neutrino detectors to neutrino lines from dark matter annihilation.

  3. Characterization of CdTe and CdZnTe detectors for gamma-ray imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verger, L.; Boitel, M.; Gentet, M. C.; Hamelin, R.; Mestais, C.; Mongellaz, F.; Rustique, J.; Sanchez, G.

    2001-02-01

    CEA-LETI in association with Bicron and Crismatec has been developing solid-state gamma camera technology based on CZT. The project included gamma camera head systems development including front-end electronics with an integrated circuit (ASIC), material growth, and detector fabrication and characterization. One feature of the work is the use of linear correlation between the amplitude and the fast rise time of the signal - which corresponds to the electron transit time in the detector, a development that was reported previously and which allows more than 80% of the 122 keV γ-photons incident on HPBM material to be recovered in a ±6.5% 2D window. In the current work, we summarize other methods to improve CZT detector performance and compare them with the Bi-Parametric Spectrum (BPS) method. The BPS method can also be applied as a diagnositic. BPS curve shapes are shown to vary with electric field, and with electron transport properties, and the correction algorithims are seen to be robust over a range of values. In addition, the technique is found to improve detectors from a variety of sources including some with special electrode geometries. In all cases, the BPS method improves efficiency (>75%) without degrading energy resolution (± 6.5% 2D window) even for a monolithic detector. The method does not overcome bulk inhomogeneity nor noise which comes from low resistivity.

  4. Neutron-induced gamma-ray production

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.O.; Drake, D.M.; Haight, R.C.; Laymon, C.M.; Wender, S.A.; Young, P.G. ); Drosg, M.; Pavlik, A.; Vonach, H. . Inst. fuer Radiumforschung und Kernphysik); Larson, D.C. )

    1990-01-01

    High resolution Ge detectors coupled with the WNR high-intensity, high-energy, pulsed neutron source at LAMPF recently have been used to measure a variety of reactions including (n,xn) for 1 {le} x {le} 11, (n,n{alpha}), (n,np), etc. The reactions are identified by the known gamma-ray energies of prompt transitions between the low lying states in the final nuclei. With our spallation neutron source cross section data are obtained at all neutron energies from a few MeV to over 200 MeV. Applications of the data range from assisting the interpretation of the planned Mars Observer mission to map the elemental composition of the martian surface, to providing data for nuclear model verification and understanding reaction mechanisms. For example, a study of the Pb(n,xn) reactions for 2 {le} x {le} 11 populating the first excited states of the even Pb isotopes is underway. These data will be used to test preequilibrium and other reaction models. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  5. MGA++ Analysis of Low Quantity Samples of U and Pu on an Extended-rage Gamma-ray Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T; Russ, G P; Williams, R W

    2007-06-04

    The IAEA has expressed a need for improved determination of gamma emitting nuclides in environmental samples collected during inspections of nuclear facilities and to use the MGA++ to determine U and Pu concentrations and isotopic compositions when those elements are present in relatively high concentrations. We are addressing the IAEA needs by evaluating the applicability of extended-range germanium detectors (ERG). In this paper we used 1g U isotopic standards and 100ug Pu liquid standards (1) to determine the performance of MGA++ on this special detector and (2) to estimate the amount of U and Pu necessary in the sample for determination of the isotopics via MGA++ within reasonable accuracy for a week of counting time using this ERG detector.

  6. Gamma ray camera

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    1997-01-21

    A gamma ray camera is disclosed for detecting rays emanating from a radiation source such as an isotope. The gamma ray camera includes a sensor array formed of a visible light crystal for converting incident gamma rays to a plurality of corresponding visible light photons, and a photosensor array responsive to the visible light photons in order to form an electronic image of the radiation therefrom. The photosensor array is adapted to record an integrated amount of charge proportional to the incident gamma rays closest to it, and includes a transparent metallic layer, photodiode consisting of a p-i-n structure formed on one side of the transparent metallic layer, and comprising an upper p-type layer, an intermediate layer and a lower n-type layer. In the preferred mode, the scintillator crystal is composed essentially of a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal preferably doped with a predetermined amount impurity, and the p-type upper intermediate layers and said n-type layer are essentially composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The gamma ray camera further includes a collimator interposed between the radiation source and the sensor array, and a readout circuit formed on one side of the photosensor array. 6 figs.

  7. Gamma ray camera

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, Victor

    1997-01-01

    A gamma ray camera for detecting rays emanating from a radiation source such as an isotope. The gamma ray camera includes a sensor array formed of a visible light crystal for converting incident gamma rays to a plurality of corresponding visible light photons, and a photosensor array responsive to the visible light photons in order to form an electronic image of the radiation therefrom. The photosensor array is adapted to record an integrated amount of charge proportional to the incident gamma rays closest to it, and includes a transparent metallic layer, photodiode consisting of a p-i-n structure formed on one side of the transparent metallic layer, and comprising an upper p-type layer, an intermediate layer and a lower n-type layer. In the preferred mode, the scintillator crystal is composed essentially of a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal preferably doped with a predetermined amount impurity, and the p-type upper intermediate layers and said n-type layer are essentially composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The gamma ray camera further includes a collimator interposed between the radiation source and the sensor array, and a readout circuit formed on one side of the photosensor array.

  8. Performance of CdTe gamma-ray detectors fabricated in a new M π n design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niraula, M.; Mochizuki, D.; Aoki, T.; Tomita, Y.; Hatanaka, Y.

    2000-06-01

    CdTe radiation detectors have been fabricated in a new M-π-n structure that provides very effective blocking for the leakage current and, as a result, excellent spectral responses are achieved. An iodine-doped n-CdTe layer was grown on the Te-faces of the (1 1 1)-oriented high-resistivity (˜10 9 Ω cm) ρ-type CdTe wafers at the low substrate temperature of 150°C. An aluminum electrode was evaporated on the n-CdTe side, while a gold electrode was evaporated on the other side. Low leakage current around 60 pA/mm 2 was typically attained for a 0.5 mm thick detector at room-temperature (25°C) for an applied reverse bias of 250 V. Improved charge collection efficiency and spectral responses for different radioisotopes in the energy range of a few tens of keV to several hundreds of keV were obtained due to the application of very large electric fields on the detectors. The performance of the detectors thus fabricated is presented.

  9. A thermostable high pressure xenon gamma-ray detector for monitoring concentration of KCl during fertilizer manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrenko, V. V.; Dvornyak, A. G.; Gratchev, V. M.; Kondakova, O. N.; Krivova, K. V.; Papchenko, A. Yu; Sokolov, D. V.; Ulin, S. E.; Uteshev, Z. M.; Vlasik, K. F.

    1999-02-01

    The abundance of 40K isotope in natural K is about 10 -4. Therefore, measurements of the intensity of the 1.46 MeV gamma line from 40K allows to estimate the concentration of KCl in various mixtures and solutions. However, during the technological procedure it is necessary to carry out the measurements at a relatively high temperature, typically at about 120°C, where traditional detectors cannot be used. A high pressure xenon gamma-detector has been developed for these kinds of measurements. The detector is a cylindrical ionization chamber with a sensitive volume of 5 l. The pressure of xenon gas inside the chamber is 40 atm. A special charge sensitive amplifier capable to operate at high temperatures up to 200°C was designed for these measurements. The detector test under real industrial conditions at "Silvinit" - a company located in the North East of European part of Russia - proved that the concentration of KCl can be measured directly during the manufacturing process with an accuracy better than 1% in the temperature between 15°C and 120°C.

  10. Hard x-ray and gamma-ray imaging and spectroscopy using scintillators coupled to silicon drift detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechner, P.; Eckhard, R.; Fiorini, C.; Gola, A.; Longoni, A.; Niculae, A.; Peloso, R.; Soltau, H.; Strüder, L.

    2008-07-01

    Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) are used as low-capacitance photon detectors for the optical light emitted by scintillators. The scintillator crystal is directly coupled to the SDD entrance window. The entrance window's transmittance can be optimized for the scintillator characteristic by deposition of a wavelength-selective anti-reflective coating. Compared to conventional photomultiplier tubes the SDD readout offers improved energy resolution and avoids the practical problems of incompatibility with magnetic fields, instrument volume and requirement of high voltage. A compact imaging spectrometer for hard X-rays and γ-rays has been developed by coupling a large area (29 × 26 mm2) monolithic SDD array with 77 hexagonal cells to a single non-structured CsI-scintillator of equal size. The scintillation light generated by the absorption of an energetic photon is seen by a number of detector cells and the position of the photon interaction is reconstructed by the centroid method. The measured spatial resolution of the system (<= 500 μm) is considerably smaller than the SDD cell size (3.2 mm) and in the order required at the focal plane of high energy missions. The energy information is obtained by summing the detector cell signals. Compared to direct converting pixelated detectors, e.g. CdTe with equal position resolution the scintillator-SDD combination requires a considerably lower number of readout channels. In addition it has the advantages of comprehensive material experience, existing technologies, proven long term stability, and practically unlimited availability of high quality material.

  11. Radiation measurement above the lunar surface by Kaguya gamma-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasebe, Nobuyuki; Nagaoka, Hiroshi; Kusano, Hiroki; Hareyama, Matoko; Ideguchi, Yusuke; Shimizu, Sota; Shibamura, Eido

    The lunar surface is filled with various ionizing radiations such as high energy galactic particles, albedo particles and secondary radiations of neutrons, gamma rays and other elementary particles. A high-resolution Kaguya Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (KGRS) was carried on the Japan’s lunar explorer SELENE (Kaguya), the largest lunar orbiter since the Apollo missions. The KGRS instrument employed, for the first time in lunar exploration, a high-purity Ge crystal to increase the identification capability of elemental gamma-ray lines. The Ge detector is surrounded by BGO and plastic counters as for anticoincidence shields. The KGRS measured gamma rays in the energy range from 200 keV to 13 MeV with high precision to determine the chemical composition of the lunar surface. It provided data on the abundance of major elements over the entire lunar surface. In addition to the gamma-ray observation by the KGRS, it successfully measured the global distribution of fast neutrons. In the energy spectra of gamma-rays observed by the KGRS, several saw-tooth- peaks of Ge are included, which are formed by the collision interaction of lunar fast neutrons with Ge atoms in the Ge crystal. With these saw-tooth-peaks analysis, global distribution of neutrons emitted from the lunara surface was successfully created, which was compared with the previous results obtained by Lunar Prospector neutron maps. Another anticoincidence counter, the plastic counter with 5 mm thickness, was used to veto radiation events mostly generated by charged particles. A single photomultiplier serves to count scintillation light from the plastic scintillation counter. The global map of counting rates observed by the plastic counter was also created, implying that the radiation counting rate implies the geological distribution, in spite that the plastic counter mostly measures high energy charged particles and energetic neutrons. These results are presented and discussed.

  12. Gamma-Ray Library and Uncertainty Analysis: Passively Emitted Gamma Rays Used in Safeguards Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, W

    2009-09-18

    Non-destructive gamma-ray analysis is a fundamental part of nuclear safeguards, including nuclear energy safeguards technology. Developing safeguards capabilities for nuclear energy will certainly benefit from the advanced use of gamma-ray spectroscopy as well as the ability to model various reactor scenarios. There is currently a wide variety of nuclear data that could be used in computer modeling and gamma-ray spectroscopy analysis. The data can be discrepant (with varying uncertainties), and it may difficult for a modeler or software developer to determine the best nuclear data set for a particular situation. To use gamma-ray spectroscopy to determine the relative isotopic composition of nuclear materials, the gamma-ray energies and the branching ratios or intensities of the gamma-rays emitted from the nuclides in the material must be well known. A variety of computer simulation codes will be used during the development of the nuclear energy safeguards, and, to compare the results of various codes, it will be essential to have all the {gamma}-ray libraries agree. Assessing our nuclear data needs allows us to create a prioritized list of desired measurements, and provides uncertainties for energies and especially for branching intensities. Of interest are actinides, fission products, and activation products, and most particularly mixtures of all of these radioactive isotopes, including mixtures of actinides and other products. Recent work includes the development of new detectors with increased energy resolution, and studies of gamma-rays and their lines used in simulation codes. Because new detectors are being developed, there is an increased need for well known nuclear data for radioactive isotopes of some elements. Safeguards technology should take advantage of all types of gamma-ray detectors, including new super cooled detectors, germanium detectors and cadmium zinc telluride detectors. Mixed isotopes, particularly mixed actinides found in nuclear reactor

  13. Technology Needs for Gamma Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Gamma ray astronomy is currently in an exciting period of multiple missions and a wealth of data. Results from INTEGRAL, Fermi, AGILE, Suzaku and Swift are making large contributions to our knowledge of high energy processes in the universe. The advances are due to new detector and imaging technologies. The steps to date have been from scintillators to solid state detectors for sensors and from light buckets to coded aperture masks and pair telescopes for imagers. A key direction for the future is toward focusing telescopes pushing into the hard X-ray regime and Compton telescopes and pair telescopes with fine spatial resolution for medium and high energy gamma rays. These technologies will provide finer imaging of gamma-ray sources. Importantly, they will also enable large steps forward in sensitivity by reducing background.

  14. Hydrologic data collected in the vicinity of the proposed gamma-ray and neutrino detector site, Hot Spring County, Arkansas, 1988-89

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitzpatrick, D.J.; Westerfield, P.W.

    1990-01-01

    An abandoned barite mine in Hot Spring County, Arkansas, has been selected as the location for a proposed gamma-ray and neutrino detector site. As part of the hydrologic evaluation of the site, the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Arkansas Geological Commission collected hydrologic data at selected locations in the vicinity of the abandoned barite mine. Data collected as part of the project included water quality, pond-evaluation, and precipitation data within the abandoned barite mine and flow and water quality data at selected sites in the vicinity of the mine. Water quality samples from within the abandoned mine were collected at three locations in the pond at selected depths. These data included field measurements of specific conductance, pH, water temperature, dissolved oxygen, major ions, and trace metals. Major ion and trace-metal samples were collected at six stream sites, one lake site, and two wastewater pond sites. Pond elevation and precipitation data from within the abandoned barite mine were measured during the period between July 1, 1988 and June 30, 1989. Twevle discharge measurements during the period between June 21, 1988, and June 26, 1989, were collected at six sites in the vicinity of the abandoned barite mine. (USGS)

  15. Effect of Te inclusions on internal electric field of CdMnTe gamma-ray detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babalola, Oluseyi Stephen; Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; Egarievwe, Stephen U.; Hossain, Anwar M.; Burger, Arnold; James, Ralph B.

    2009-08-01

    We studied two separate as-grown CdMnTe crystals by Infrared (IR) microscopy and Pockels effect imaging, and then developed an algorithm to analyze and visualize the electric field within the crystals' bulk. In one of the two crystals the size and distribution of inclusions within the bulk promised to be more favorable in terms of efficiency as a detector crystal. However, the Te inclusions were arranged in characteristic 'planes'. Pockels imaging revealed an accumulation of charges in the region of these planes. We demonstrated that the planes induced stress within the bulk of the crystal that accumulated charges, thereby causing non-uniformity of the internal electric field and degrading the detector's performance.

  16. Gamma-ray bursts.

    PubMed

    Gehrels, Neil; Mészáros, Péter

    2012-08-24

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day, typically last for tens of seconds, and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this Review, we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglow. PMID:22923573

  17. Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Meszaros, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma-rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day ,last typically lOs of seconds and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this review we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglows.

  18. Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Mészáros, Péter

    2012-08-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day, typically last for tens of seconds, and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this Review, we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglow.

  19. Improved event positioning in a gamma ray detector using an iterative position-weighted centre-of-gravity algorithm.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen-Yi; Goertzen, Andrew L

    2013-07-21

    An iterative position-weighted centre-of-gravity algorithm was developed and tested for positioning events in a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM)-based scintillation detector for positron emission tomography. The algorithm used a Gaussian-based weighting function centred at the current estimate of the event location. The algorithm was applied to the signals from a 4 × 4 array of SiPM detectors that used individual channel readout and a LYSO:Ce scintillator array. Three scintillator array configurations were tested: single layer with 3.17 mm crystal pitch, matched to the SiPM size; single layer with 1.5 mm crystal pitch; and dual layer with 1.67 mm crystal pitch and a ½ crystal offset in the X and Y directions between the two layers. The flood histograms generated by this algorithm were shown to be superior to those generated by the standard centre of gravity. The width of the Gaussian weighting function of the algorithm was optimized for different scintillator array setups. The optimal width of the Gaussian curve was found to depend on the amount of light spread. The algorithm required less than 20 iterations to calculate the position of an event. The rapid convergence of this algorithm will readily allow for implementation on a front-end detector processing field programmable gate array for use in improved real-time event positioning and identification. PMID:23798644

  20. Al-doped ZnO contact to CdZnTe for x- and gamma-ray detector applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, U. N.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Gul, R.; Hossain, A.; Yang, G.; Mundle, R. M.; Pradhan, A. K.; James, R. B.

    2016-06-01

    The poor adhesion of common metals to CdZnTe (CZT)/CdTe surfaces has been a long-standing challenge for radiation detector applications. In this present work, we explored the use of an alternative electrode, viz., Al-doped ZnO (AZO) as a replacement to common metallic contacts. ZnO offers several advantages over the latter, such as having a higher hardness, a close match of the coefficients of thermal expansion for CZT and ZnO, and better adhesion to the surface of CZT due to the contact layer being an oxide. The AZO/CZT contact was investigated via high spatial-resolution X-ray response mapping for a planar detector at the micron level. The durability of the device was investigated by acquiring I-V measurements over an 18-month period, and good long-term stability was observed. We have demonstrated that the AZO/CZT/AZO virtual-Frisch-grid device performs fairly well, with comparable or better characteristics than that for the same detector fabricated with gold contacts.

  1. Development of a Telescope for Medium-Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Stanley D.

    2010-01-01

    Since the launch of AGILE and FERMI, the scientific progress in high-energy (E(sub gamma) greater than approximately 200 MeV) gamma-ray science has been, and will continue to be dramatic. Both of these telescopes cover a broad energy range from approximately 20 MeV to greater than 10 GeV. However, neither instrument is optimized for observations below approximately 200 MeV where many astrophysical objects exhibit unique, transitory behavior, such as spectral breaks, bursts, and flares. Hence, while significant progress from current observations is expected, there will nonetheless remain a significant sensitivity gap in the medium-energy (approximately 0.1-200 MeV) regime; the lower end of this range remains largely unexplored whereas the upper end will allow comparison with FERMI data. Tapping into this unexplored regime requires significant improvements in sensitivity. A major emphasis of modern detector development, with the goal of providing significant improvements in sensitivity in the medium-energy regime, focuses on high-resolution electron tracking. The Three-Dimensional Track Imager (3-DTI) technology being developed at GSFC provides high resolution tracking of the electron-positron pair from gamma-ray interactions from 5 to 200 MeV. The 3-DTI consists of a time projection chamber (TPC) and 2-D cross-strip microwell detector (MWD). The low-density and homogeneous design of the 3-DTI, offers unprecedented sensitivity by providing angular resolution near the kinematic limit. Electron tracking also enables measurement of gamma-ray polarization, a new tool to study astrophysical phenomenon. We describe the design, fabrication, and performance of a 30x30x30 cubic centimeters 3-DTI detector prototype of a medium-energy gamma-ray telescope.

  2. Development of a Telescope for Medium-Energy Gamma-ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunter, Stan

    2012-01-01

    Since the launch of AGILE and FERMI, the scientific progress in high-energy (Eg greater than approximately 200 MeV) gamma-ray science has been, and will continue to be dramatic. Both of these telescopes cover a broad energy range from approximately 20 MeV to greater than 10 GeV. However, neither instrument is optimized for observations below approximately 200 MeV where many astrophysical objects exhibit unique, transitory behavior, such as spectral breaks, bursts, and flares. Hence, while significant progress from current observations is expected, there will nonetheless remain a significant sensitivity gap in the medium-energy (approximately 0.1-200 MeV) regime; the lower end of this range remains largely unexplored whereas the upper end will allow comparison with FERMI data. Tapping into this unexplored regime requires significant improvements in sensitivity. A major emphasis of modern detector development, with the goal of providing significant improvements in sensitivity in the medium-energy regime, focuses on high-resolution electron tracking. The Three-Dimensional Track Imager (3-DTI) technology being developed at GSFC provides high resolution tracking of the electron-positron pair from gamma-ray interactions from 5 to 200 MeV. The 3-DTI consists of a time projection chamber (TPC) and 2-D cross-strip microwell detector (MWD). The low-density and homogeneous design of the 3-DTI, offers unprecedented sensitivity by providing angular resolution near the kinematic limit. Electron tracking also enables measurement of gamma-ray polarization, a new tool to study astrophysical phenomenon. We describe the design, fabrication, and performance of a 30x30x30 cm3 3-DTI detector prototype of a medium-energy gamma-ray telescope.

  3. Inelastic cross sections from gamma-ray measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Ronald Owen

    2010-12-06

    Measurements of gamma rays following neutron induced reactions have been studied with the Germanium Array for Neutron-induced Excitations (GEANIE) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) for many years. Gamma-ray excitation functions and coincidence studies provide insight into nuclear reaction mechanisms as well as expanding our knowledge of energy levels and gamma-rays. Samples studied with Ge detectors at LANSCE range from Be to Pu. Fe, Cr and Ti have been considered for use as reference cross sections. An overview of the measurements and efforts to create a reliable neutron-induced gamma-ray reference cross section will be presented.

  4. A search for GeV-TeV emission from Gamma-ray Bursts using the Milagro detector

    SciTech Connect

    Saz Parkinson, P. M.

    2009-04-08

    The Milagro detector surveyed the sky continuously in the Very High Energy regime from January 2000 through March 2008. During that time, over 130 GRBs were detected and well localized by satellites within its 2 sr field of view. We have used Milagro data to search for >1 GeV emission from these bursts. Milagro is a water Cerenkov detector designed primarily for observations in the 0.1-100 TeV energy range. In the standard mode of operation, Milagro data is used to reconstruct the direction of an incoming high energy particle by analyzing the timing information of a large number of photomultiplier tubes that are triggered in coincidence by the air shower generated when such a particle interacts with the Earth's atmosphere. Milagro data, however, can also be analyzed in 'scaler mode', where the rates of individual photomultiplier tubes can be used to detect emission above 1 GeV (albeit with no directional information). Here we present results from both techniques for all known GRBs detected by BATSE, BeppoSax, HETE-2, INTEGRAL, Swift, and the IPN, within the field of view of Milagro in its 8 years of operation.

  5. The comprehensive evaluation of the structural and functional properties of the gas- statically treated Au-CdZnTe-Au structures for X- and gamma-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasieka, Iu.; Strelchuk, V.; Boyko, M.; Rybka, A.; Kutniy, V.; Nakonechnyj, D.

    2015-08-01

    The influence of the gas-static processing on the optical, structural and electrophysical properties of Au-CdZnTe-Au structures, used in X- and gamma-ray detectors, was investigated. The processing, which is described in detail in the experimental part, was done in a laboratory-scale setup "GAUS-4/2000-35" with the following process parameters: pressure=0.32±0.02 GPa, temperature ~170 °C, time=2 h. The influence of the mentioned processing on the photoluminescence, the Raman scattering, the electric resistance, the I-V characteristics and the spectrometric parameters of the Au-CdZnTe-Au structures was determined. The physical mechanisms, through which the gas-static processing induces changes in the structural and functional properties, were analyzed. It was observed that the gas-static processing (with the above-mentioned process parameters) of the Au-CdZnTe-Au structures leads to a significant increase of the electric resistance of the structures; it also leads to the increase of the intensity of the photoelectric absorption peak when the respective detector is registering X- and gamma-radiation with energy near 32.19 keV. The Raman and photoluminescence data indicates the formation of the surface oxides TeOx and the compensation of Cd vacancies by Au atoms. The assumption that, under the discussed processing, two different rival processes modify the Au-CdZnTe junction due to the influence of the increased temperature ~170 °C and pressure ~0.3 GPa, was suggested. The first process is the formation of TeO2 oxide (which increases the electric resistance) on the contact; the second process is the destruction of the surface films of the oxides and the absorbed gases. Most likely, the first process is dominant, which was evidenced by the Raman and photoluminescence measurements.

  6. Search for GeV gamma-ray bursts with the ARGO-YBJ detector: summary of eight years of observations

    SciTech Connect

    Bartoli, B.; Catalanotti, S.; Piazzoli, B. D'Ettorre; Di Girolamo, T.; Bernardini, P.; D'Amone, A.; De Mitri, I.; Bi, X. J.; Cao, Z.; Chen, S. Z.; Branchini, P.; Budano, A.; Camarri, P.; Cardarelli, R.; Sciascio, G. Di; Chen, T. L.; Danzengluobu; Creti, P.; Cui, S. W.; Dai, B. Z. E-mail: Piero.Vallania@to.infn.it; Collaboration: ARGO-YBJ Collaboration; and others

    2014-10-10

    The search for gamma-ray burst (GRB) emission in the energy range of 1-100 GeV in coincidence with the satellite detection has been carried out using the Astrophysical Radiation with Ground-based Observatory at YangBaJing (ARGO-YBJ) experiment. The high-altitude location (4300 m a.s.l.), the large active surface (∼6700 m{sup 2} of Resistive Plate Chambers), the wide field of view (∼2 sr, limited only by the atmospheric absorption), and the high duty cycle (>86%) make the ARGO-YBJ experiment particularly suitable to detect short and unexpected events like GRBs. With the scaler mode technique, i.e., counting all the particles hitting the detector with no measurement of the primary energy and arrival direction, the minimum threshold of ∼1 GeV can be reached, overlapping the direct measurements carried out by satellites. During the experiment lifetime from 2004 December 17 to 2013 February 7, a total of 206 GRBs occurring within the ARGO-YBJ field of view (zenith angle θ ≤ 45°) have been analyzed. This is the largest sample of GRBs investigated with a ground-based detector. Two light curve models have been assumed and since in both cases no significant excess has been found, the corresponding fluence upper limits in the 1-100 GeV energy region have been derived, with values as low as 10{sup –5} erg cm{sup –2}. The analysis of a subset of 24 GRBs with known redshift has been used to constrain the fluence extrapolation to the GeV region together with possible cutoffs under different assumptions on the spectrum.

  7. Celestial gamma ray study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michelson, Peter F.

    1995-01-01

    This report documents the research activities performed by Stanford University investigators as part of the data reduction effort and overall support of the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Observatory. This report is arranged chronologically, with each subsection detailing activities during roughly a one year period of time, beginning in June 1991.

  8. Gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciesas, William S.

    1991-01-01

    Miscellaneous tasks related to the development of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment on the Gamma Ray Observatory and to collection, analysis, and interpretation of data from the MSFC Very Low Frequency transient monitoring program were performed. The results are summarized and relevant references are included.

  9. Gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciesas, William S.

    1992-01-01

    Miscellaneous tasks related to mission operations and data analysis for the Burst and Transient Source Experiment on the Gamma Ray Observatory, to collection, analysis, and interpretation of data from the Marshall Space Flight Center Very Low Frequency transient monitoring program, and to compilation and analysis of induced radioactivity data were performed. The results are summarized and relevant references are included.

  10. Effect of Te Inclusions on Internal Electric Field of CdMnTe Gamma-Ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Babalola, O.S.; Bolotnikov, A.; Egarievwe, S.; Hossain, A.; Burger, A.; James, R.

    2009-08-02

    We studied two separate as-grown CdMnTe crystals by Infrared (IR) microscopy and Pockels effect imaging, and then developed an algorithm to analyze and visualize the electric field within the crystals’ bulk. In one of the two crystals the size and distribution of inclusions within the bulk promised to be more favorable in terms of efficiency as a detector crystal. However, the Te inclusions were arranged in characteristic ‘planes’. Pockels imaging revealed an accumulation of charges in the region of these planes. We demonstrated that the planes induced stress within the bulk of the crystal that accumulated charges, thereby causing non-uniformity of the internal electric field and degrading the detector’s performance.

  11. Apparatuses and methods for detecting, identifying and quantitating radioactive nuclei and methods of distinguishing neutron stimulation of a radiation particle detector from gamma-ray stimulation of a detector

    DOEpatents

    Cole, Jerald D.; Drigert, Mark W.; Reber, Edward L.; Aryaeinejad, Rahmat

    2001-01-01

    In one aspect, the invention encompasses a method of detecting radioactive decay, comprising: a) providing a sample comprising a radioactive material, the radioactive material generating decay particles; b)providing a plurality of detectors proximate the sample, the detectors comprising a first set and a second set, the first set of the detectors comprising liquid state detectors utilizing liquid scintillation material coupled with photo tubes to generate a first electrical signal in response to decay particles stimulating the liquid scintillation material, the second set of the detectors comprising solid state detectors utilizing a crystalline solid to generate a second electrical signal in response to decay particles stimulating the crystalline solid; c) stimulating at least one of the detectors to generate at least one of the first and second electrical signals, the at least one of the first and second electrical signals being indicative of radioactive decay in the sample. In another aspect, the invention encompasses an apparatus for identifying and quantitating radioactive nuclei of a sample comprising radioactive material that decays to generate neutrons and high-energy .gamma.-rays.

  12. New shield for gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brar, S. S.; Gustafson, P. F.; Nelson, D. M.

    1969-01-01

    Gamma-ray shield that can be evacuated, refilled with a clean gas, and pressurized for exclusion of airborne radioactive contaminants effectively lowers background noise. Under working conditions, repeated evacuation and filling procedures have not adversely affected the sensitivity and resolution of the crystal detector.

  13. Characterization of a high-resolution hybrid DOI detector for a dedicated breast PET/CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Godinez, Felipe; Chaudhari, Abhijit J; Yang, Yongfeng; Farrell, Richard; Badawi, Ramsey D

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study is to design and test a new high-resolution hybrid depth of interaction (DOI) detector for a dedicated breast PET/CT scanner. Two detectors have been designed and built. The completed detectors are based on a 14 × 14 array of 1.5 × 1.5 × 20 mm(3) unpolished lutetium orthosilicate scintillation crystals, with each element coated in a 50 μm layer of reflective material. The detector is read out from both ends using a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT) and a large active area (20 × 20 mm(2)) avalanche photodiode (APD) to enable acquisition of DOI information. Nuclear instrumentation modules were used to characterize the detectors' performances in terms of timing, intrinsic spatial resolution (ISR) and energy resolution, as well as DOI resolution with a dual-ended readout configuration. Measurements with the APD were performed at a temperature of 10 °C. All crystals were identified at all depths, even though the signal amplitude from the PSPMT decreases with depth away from it. We measured a timing resolution of 2.4 ns, and an average energy resolution of 19%. The mean ISR was measured to be 1.2 mm for crystals in the central row of the array for detectors in the face-to-face position. Two off-center positions were measured corresponding to 26° and 51° oblique photon incidence, and the mean ISR at these positions was 1.5 and 1.7 mm, respectively. The average DOI resolution across all crystals and depths was measured to be 2.9 mm (including the beam width of 0.6 mm). This detector design shows good promise as a high-resolution detector for a dedicated breast PET/CT scanner. PMID:22581109

  14. TeV gamma-ray survey of the northern sky using the ARGO-YBJ detector

    SciTech Connect

    Bartoli, B.; Catalanotti, S.; Bernardini, P.; D'Amone, A.; De Mitri, I.; Bi, X. J.; Cao, Z.; Chen, S. Z.; Chen, Y.; Bolognino, I.; Branchini, P.; Budano, A.; Calabrese Melcarne, A. K.; Cardarelli, R.; Chen, T. L.; Danzengluobu; Creti, P.; Cui, S. W.; Dai, B. Z.; Collaboration: ARGO-YBJ Collaboration; and others

    2013-12-10

    The Astrophysical Radiation with Ground-based Observatory at Yang Ba Jing (ARGO-YBJ) detector is an extensive air shower array that has been used to monitor the northern γ-ray sky at energies above 0.3 TeV from 2007 November to 2013 January. In this paper, we present the results of a sky survey in the declination band from –10° to 70°, using data recorded over the past five years. With an integrated sensitivity ranging from 0.24 to ∼1 Crab units depending on the declination, six sources have been detected with a statistical significance greater than five standard deviations. Several excesses are also reported as potential γ-ray emitters. The features of each source are presented and discussed. Additionally, 95% confidence level upper limits of the flux from the investigated sky region are shown. Specific upper limits for 663 GeV γ-ray active galactic nuclei inside the ARGO-YBJ field of view are reported. The effect of the absorption of γ-rays due to the interaction with extragalactic background light is estimated.

  15. Optical telescope BIRT in ORIGIN for gamma ray burst observing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Content, Robert; Sharples, Ray; Page, Mathew J.; Cole, Richard; Walton, David M.; Winter, Berend; Pedersen, Kristian; Hjorth, Jens; Andersen, Michael; Hornstrup, Allan; den Herder, Jan-Willem A.; Piro, Luigi

    2012-09-01

    The ORIGIN concept is a space mission with a gamma ray, an X-ray and an optical telescope to observe the gamma ray bursts at large Z to determine the composition and density of the intergalactic matter in the line of sight. It was an answer to the ESA M3 call for proposal. The optical telescope is a 0.7-m F/1 with a very small instrument box containing 3 instruments: a slitless spectrograph with a resolution of 20, a multi-imager giving images of a field in 4 bands simultaneously, and a cross-dispersed Échelle spectrograph giving a resolution of 1000. The wavelength range is 0.5 μm to 1.7 μm. All instruments fit together in a box of 80 mm x 80 mm x 200 mm. The low resolution spectrograph uses a very compact design including a special triplet. It contains only spherical surfaces except for one tilted cylindrical surface to disperse the light. To reduce the need for a high precision pointing, an Advanced Image Slicer was added in front of the high resolution spectrograph. This spectrograph uses a simple design with only one mirror for the collimator and another for the camera. The Imager contains dichroics to separate the bandwidths and glass thicknesses to compensate the differences in path length. All 3 instruments use the same 2k x 2k detector simultaneously so that telescope pointing and tip-tilt control of a fold mirror permit to place the gamma ray burst on the desired instrument without any other mechanism.

  16. Development of a high-resolution room-temperature compressed-xenon cylindrical ionization-chamber gamma radiation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepper, Gary C.; Losee, Jon R.; Palmer, Robert L.

    1998-07-01

    Highly compressed and purified xenon is emerging as an important detection medium for high resolution, room temperature gamma radiation spectroscopy. Detectors based on compressed xenon offer a unique combination of thermal stability, high energy resolution and large volume. Furthermore, fluid based detectors are not susceptible to radiation damage, and can be constructed in a variety of geometries. However, some important factors have delayed the development of practical xenon detectors for widespread use. These factors include the relatively high operational pressures and voltages and the need to maintain extremely high xenon purity. We have recently developed a 0.7 liter gridded ionization chamber xenon gamma radiation detector in a cylindrical geometry. The detector operates at room temperature and provides an intrinsic energy resolution of 1.8% at 662 keV which is five times greater than scintillation based spectrometers. The detector design and performance variables are discussed in comparison to a previous detector constructed in a planar geometry. Our results indicate that practical xenon detectors can now be developed for a wide variety of applications.

  17. Gamma ray astronomy in perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A brief overview of the development of gamma ray astronomy is presented. Gamma ray telescopes and other optical measuring instruments are highlighted. Emphasis is placed on findings that were unobtainable before gamma ray astronomy. Information on evolution of the solar system, the relationship of the solar system to the galaxy, and the composition of interstellar matter is discussed.

  18. Gamma rays from pulsar wind shock acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    1990-01-01

    A shock forming in the wind of relativistic electron-positron pairs from a pulsar, as a result of confinement by surrounding material, could convert part of the pulsar spin-down luminosity to high energy particles through first order Fermi acceleration. High energy protons could be produced by this mechanism both in supernova remnants and in binary systems containing pulsars. The pion-decay gamma-rays resulting from interaction of accelerated protons with surrounding target material in such sources might be observable above 70 MeV with EGRET (Energetic Gamma-Ray Experimental Telescope) and above 100 GeV with ground-based detectors. Acceleration of protons and expected gamma-ray fluxes from SN1987A, Cyg X-3 type sources and binary pulsars are discussed.

  19. ADP study of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Don Q.; Wang, John C. L.; Heuter, Geoffry J.; Graziani, Carlo; Loredo, Tom; Freeman, Peter

    This grant supported study of cyclotron scattering lines in the spectra of gamma-ray bursts through analysis of Ginga and HEAO-1 archival data, and modeling of the results in terms of radiation transfer calculations of cyclotron scattering in a strong magnetic field. A Monte Carlo radiation transfer code with which we are able to calculate the expected properties of cyclotron scattering lines in the spectra of gamma-ray bursts was developed. The extensive software necessary in order to carry out fits of these model spectra to gamma-ray burst spectral data, including folding of the model spectra through the detector response functions was also developed. Fits to Ginga satellite data on burst GB880205 were completed and fits to Ginga satellite data on burst GB870303 are being carried out. These fits have allowed us to test our software, as well as to garner new scientific results. This work has demonstrated that cyclotron resonant scattering successfully accounts for the locations, strengths, and widths of the observed line features in GB870303 and GB880205. The success of the model provides compelling evidence that these gamma-ray bursts come from strongly magnetic neutron stars and are galactic in origin, resolving longstanding controversies about the nature and distance of the burst sources. These results were reported in two papers which are in press in the proceedings of the Taos Workshop on Gamma-Ray Bursts, and in a paper submitted for publication.

  20. ADP study of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, Don Q.; Wang, John C. L.; Heuter, Geoffry J.; Graziani, Carlo; Loredo, Tom; Freeman, Peter

    1991-01-01

    This grant supported study of cyclotron scattering lines in the spectra of gamma-ray bursts through analysis of Ginga and HEAO-1 archival data, and modeling of the results in terms of radiation transfer calculations of cyclotron scattering in a strong magnetic field. A Monte Carlo radiation transfer code with which we are able to calculate the expected properties of cyclotron scattering lines in the spectra of gamma-ray bursts was developed. The extensive software necessary in order to carry out fits of these model spectra to gamma-ray burst spectral data, including folding of the model spectra through the detector response functions was also developed. Fits to Ginga satellite data on burst GB880205 were completed and fits to Ginga satellite data on burst GB870303 are being carried out. These fits have allowed us to test our software, as well as to garner new scientific results. This work has demonstrated that cyclotron resonant scattering successfully accounts for the locations, strengths, and widths of the observed line features in GB870303 and GB880205. The success of the model provides compelling evidence that these gamma-ray bursts come from strongly magnetic neutron stars and are galactic in origin, resolving longstanding controversies about the nature and distance of the burst sources. These results were reported in two papers which are in press in the proceedings of the Taos Workshop on Gamma-Ray Bursts, and in a paper submitted for publication.

  1. SU-E-I-40: New Method for Measurement of Task-Specific, High-Resolution Detector System Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Loughran, B; Singh, V; Jain, A; Bednarek, D; Rudin, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Although generalized linear system analytic metrics such as GMTF and GDQE can evaluate performance of the whole imaging system including detector, scatter and focal-spot, a simplified task-specific measured metric may help to better compare detector systems. Methods: Low quantum-noise images of a neuro-vascular stent with a modified ANSI head phantom were obtained from the average of many exposures taken with the high-resolution Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) and with a Flat Panel Detector (FPD). The square of the Fourier Transform of each averaged image, equivalent to the measured product of the system GMTF and the object function in spatial-frequency space, was then divided by the normalized noise power spectra (NNPS) for each respective system to obtain a task-specific generalized signal-to-noise ratio. A generalized measured relative object detectability (GM-ROD) was obtained by taking the ratio of the integral of the resulting expressions for each detector system to give an overall metric that enables a realistic systems comparison for the given detection task. Results: The GM-ROD provides comparison of relative performance of detector systems from actual measurements of the object function as imaged by those detector systems. This metric includes noise correlations and spatial frequencies relevant to the specific object. Additionally, the integration bounds for the GM-ROD can be selected to emphasis the higher frequency band of each detector if high-resolution image details are to be evaluated. Examples of this new metric are discussed with a comparison of the MAF to the FPD for neuro-vascular interventional imaging. Conclusion: The GM-ROD is a new direct-measured task-specific metric that can provide clinically relevant comparison of the relative performance of imaging systems. Supported by NIH Grant: 2R01EB002873 and an equipment grant from Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation.

  2. CdZnTe gamma ray spectrometer for orbital gamma ray spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Prettyman, T. H.; Feldman, W. C.; Fuller, K. R.; Storms, S. A.; Soldner, S. A.; Lawrence, David J. ,; Browne, M. C.; Moss, C. E.

    2001-01-01

    We present the design and analysis of a new gamma ray spectrometer for planetary science that uses an array of CdZnTe detectors to achieve the detection efficiency needed for orbital measurements. The use of CdZnTe will provide significantly improved pulse height resolution relative to scintillation-based detectors, with commensurate improvement in the accuracy of elemental abundances determined by gamma ray and neutron spectroscopy. The spectrometer can be flown either on the instrument deck of the spacecraft or on a boom. For deck-mounted systems, a BGO anticoincidence shield is included in the design to suppress the response of the CdZnTe detector to gamma rays that originate in the spacecraft. The BGO shield also serves as a backup spectrometer, providing heritage from earlier planetary science missions and reducing the risk associated with the implementation of new technology.

  3. A compact high resolution flat panel PET detector based on the new 4-side buttable MPPC for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Wen, Jie; Ravindranath, Bosky; O`Sullivan, Andrew W.; Catherall, David; Li, Ke; Wei, Shouyi; Komarov, Sergey; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2015-09-01

    Compact high-resolution panel detectors using virtual pinhole (VP) PET geometry can be inserted into existing clinical or pre-clinical PET systems to improve regional spatial resolution and sensitivity. Here we describe a compact panel PET detector built using the new Though Silicon Via (TSV) multi-pixel photon counters (MPPC) detector. This insert provides high spatial resolution and good timing performance for multiple bio-medical applications. Because the TSV MPPC design eliminates wire bonding and has a package dimension which is very close to the MPPC's active area, it is 4-side buttable. The custom designed MPPC array (based on Hamamatsu S12641-PA-50(x)) used in the prototype is composed of 4×4 TSV-MPPC cells with a 4.46 mm pitch in both directions. The detector module has 16×16 lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystal array, with each crystal measuring 0.92×0.92×3 mm3 with 1.0 mm pitch. The outer diameter of the detector block is 16.8×16.8 mm2. Thirty-two such blocks will be arranged in a 4×8 array with 1 mm gaps to form a panel detector with detection area around 7 cm×14 cm in the full-size detector. The flood histogram acquired with 68Ge source showed excellent crystal separation capability with all 256 crystals clearly resolved. The detector module's mean, standard deviation, minimum (best) and maximum (worst) energy resolution were 10.19%, ±0.68%, 8.36% and 13.45% FWHM, respectively. The measured coincidence time resolution between the block detector and a fast reference detector (around 200 ps single photon timing resolution) was 0.95 ns. When tested with Siemens Cardinal electronics the performance of the detector blocks remain consistent. These results demonstrate that the TSV-MPPC is a promising photon sensor for use in a flat panel PET insert composed of many high resolution compact detector modules.

  4. High-resolution pulse-counting array detectors for imaging and spectroscopy at ultraviolet wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. Gethyn; Bybee, Richard L.

    1986-01-01

    The performance characteristics of multianode microchannel array (MAMA) detector systems which have formats as large as 256 x 1024 pixels and which have application to imaging and spectroscopy at UV wavelengths are evaluated. Sealed and open-structure MAMA detector tubes with opaque CsI photocathodes can determine the arrival time of the detected photon to an accuracy of 100 ns or better. Very large format MAMA detectors with CsI and Cs2Te photocathodes and active areas of 52 x 52 mm (2048 x 2048 pixels) will be used as the UV solar blind detectors for the NASA STIS.

  5. Thickness scalability of large volume cadmium zinc telluride high resolution radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awadalla, S. A.; Chen, H.; Mackenzie, J.; Lu, P.; Iniewski, K.; Marthandam, P.; Redden, R.; Bindley, G.; He, Z.; Zhang, F.

    2009-06-01

    This work focuses on the thickness scalability of traveling heater method (THM) grown CdZnTe crystals to produce large volume detectors with optimized spectroscopic performance. To meet this challenge, we have tuned both our THM growth process, to grow 75 mm diameter ingots, and our postgrowth annealing process. We have increased the thickness of our sliced wafers from 6 to 12 and 18 mm allowing the production of 10 and 15 mm thick detectors. As the detectors' thickness is scaled up, the energy resolution of both types, as pseudo-Frisch grid and pixelated monolithic detectors showed no degradation indicating improved materials uniformity and transport properties.

  6. Large-volume high-resolution cadmium zinc telluride radiation detectors: recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Awadalla, S. A.; Iniewski, K.; Lu, P. H.; Harris, F.; Mackenzie, J.; Hasanen, T.; Chen, W.; Redden, R.; Bindley, G.; Kuvvetli, Irfan; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Luke, P.; Amman, M.; Lee, J. S.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; James, R. B.

    2007-09-01

    The excellent room temperature spectral performance of cadmium zinc telluride detectors grown via the Traveling Heater Method (THM) makes this approach suitable for the mass deployment of radiation detectors for applications in homeland security and medical imaging. This paper reports our progress in fabricating thicker and larger area detectors from THM grown CZT. We discuss the performance of such 20x20x10 mm 3, and 10x10x10 mm 3 monolithic pixellated detectors and virtual Frisch-Grid 4x4x12 mm3 devices, and describe the various physical properties of the materials.

  7. Gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciesas, William S.

    1994-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) is one of four instruments on the Compton observatory which was launched by the space shuttle Atlantis on April 5, 1991. As of mid-March, 1994, BATSE detected more than 925 cosmic gamma-ray bursts and more than 725 solar flares. Pulsed gamma rays have been detected from at least 16 sources and emission from at least 28 sources (including most of the pulsed sources) has been detected by the earth occultation technique. UAH participation in BATSE is extensive but can be divided into two main areas, operations and data analysis. The daily BATSE operations tasks represent a substantial level of effort and involve a large team composed of MSFC personnel as well as contractors such as UAH. The scientific data reduction and analysis of BATSE data is also a substantial level of effort in which UAH personnel have made significant contributions.

  8. Topics in gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    Observations of gamma rays from solar flares, gamma ray bursts, the Galactic center, galactic nucleosynthesis, SS433, and Cygnus X-3, and their effects on astrophysical problems are discussed. It is observed that gamma ray spectra from solar flares are applicable to the study of particle acceleration and confinement and the determination of chemical abundances in the solar atmosphere. The gamma ray lines from the compact galactic object SS433 are utilized to examine the acceleration of jets, and analysis of the gamma ray lines of Cygnus X-3 reveal that particles can be accelerated in compact sources to ultrahigh energies.

  9. Topics in gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaty, R.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    Observations of gamma rays from solar flares, gamma ray bursts, the Galactic center, galactic nucleosynthesis, SS433, and Cygnus X-3, and their effects on astrophysical problems are discussed. It is observed that gamma ray spectra from solar flares are applicable to the study of particle acceleration and confinement and the determination of chemical abundances in the solar atmosphere. The gamma ray lines from the compact galactic object SS433 are utilized to examine the acceleration of jets, and analysis of the gamma ray lines of Cygnus X-3 reveal that particles can be accelerated in compact sources to ultrahigh energies.

  10. 235U, 238U, 232Th, 40K and 137Cs activity concentrations in marine sediments along the northern coast of Oman Sea using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zare, Mohammad Reza; Mostajaboddavati, Mojtaba; Kamali, Mahdi; Abdi, Mohammad Reza; Mortazavi, Mohammad Seddigh

    2012-09-01

    The natural radioactivity levels in sediment samples of the northern coast of Oman Sea, covering the coastal strip from Hormoz canyon to Goatr seaport, as the first time has been determined. The results of measurements will serve as background reference level for Oman Sea coastlines. Sediments from 36 coastal and near shore locations were collected for analysis. Analysis on the collected samples were carried out to determine (235)U, (238)U, (232)Th, (40)K and (137)Cs using two high purity germanium detectors with 38.5% and 55% relative efficiencies. The concentration of (235)U, (238)U, (232)Th, (40)K and (137)Cs in sediment samples ranged between 1.01 and 2.87 Bq/kg, 11.83 and 22.68 Bq/kg, 10.7 and 25.02 Bq/kg, 222.89 and 535.07 Bq/kg and 0.14 and 2.8 Bq/kg, respectively. The radium equivalent activity was well below the defined limit of 370 Bq/kg. The external hazard indices were found to be less than 1, indicating a low dose. PMID:22717321

  11. Gamma ray collimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casanova, Edgar J. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A gamma ray collimator including a housing having first and second sections is disclosed. The first section encloses a first section of depleted uranium which is disposed for receiving and supporting a radiation emitting component such as cobalt 60. The second section encloses a depleted uranium member which is provided with a conical cut out focusing portion disposed in communication with the radiation emitting element for focusing the emitted radiation to the target.

  12. Gamma ray collimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casanova, Edgar J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A gamma ray collimator including a housing having first and second sections. The first section encloses a first section of depleted uranium which is disposed for receiving and supporting a radiation emitting component such as cobalt 60. The second section encloses a depleted uranium member which is provided with a conical cut-out focusing portion disposed in communication with the radiation emitting element for focusing the emitted radiation to the target.

  13. Physical characterization of a high-resolution CCD detector for mammography.

    PubMed

    Elbakri, I A; Tesic, M M; Xiong, Quanren

    2007-04-21

    The physical characteristics of charge-coupled device (CCD) mammography detector with 16-bit dynamic range and 27 microm detector element size were investigated. The detector, with an active area of 1 cm x 20 cm is suitable for slot-scanning systems. We evaluated the detector resolution by measuring the modulation transfer function (MTF) using a tilted edge. We also measured the noise power spectra (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) using tungsten spectra filtered with 3 mm Al. We carried out measurements in two modes of operation: the frame mode where the detector is stationary and the scan mode where the detector operates in a slot-scanning configuration. The specific beam qualities and exposure ranges employed were 30 kVp, HVL 1.4 mm Al, 1.24 microC kg(-1) to 12.44 microC kg(-1), and 40 kVp, HVL 2.1 mm Al and 3.26 microC kg(-1) to 16.64 microC kg(-1). The product of the normalized noise power spectrum and exposure was also computed to evaluate the quantum limited characteristic of the detector. The detector MTF was 12% at 15 lp mm(-1). The product of the noise power spectra and exposure was independent of exposure level, indicating a quantum limited detector. The DQE in the scan and frame modes near zero frequency was 40% and 60%, respectively. Our results show that the slot-scanning configuration was less efficient than the performance capabilities of the detector. This detector is comparable to other digital mammography sensors evaluated in the literature. PMID:17404462

  14. Computer simulation study of multiple germanium gamma-ray sensor arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakano, G. H.; Francis, W. E.; Imhof, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    Design studies of large high resolution gamma-ray spectrometer systems employing multiple sensors are greatly facilitated by the use of computer simulation techniques. A study has been made by interfacing a detector geometry code with the EGS-3 version of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Monte-Carlo Code which has been modified to run on our VAX computer. The detector responses have been simulated for input photons with energies between 0.1 and 10 MeV. Examples are given to illustrate the performance of complex sensor arrays with different configurations of the anticoincidence system. Of particular interest is a design composed of an array of 7 detector elements each consisting of a thin planar Ge (1 cm thick) detector mounted in front of and in tandem with a large coaxial Ge detector.

  15. High resolution, multiple-energy linear sweep detector for x-ray imaging

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, Victor; Goodman, Claude A.

    1996-01-01

    Apparatus for generating plural electrical signals in a single scan in response to incident X-rays received from an object. Each electrical signal represents an image of the object at a different range of energies of the incident X-rays. The apparatus comprises a first X-ray detector, a second X-ray detector stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector, and an X-ray absorber stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector. The X-ray absorber provides an energy-dependent absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the first X-ray detector, but provides no absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the second X-ray detector. The first X-ray detector includes a linear array of first pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a first range of energies. The first X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a first electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the first pixels. The second X-ray detector includes a linear array of second pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a second range of energies, broader than the first range of energies. The second X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a second electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the second pixels.

  16. High resolution, multiple-energy linear sweep detector for x-ray imaging

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Goodman, C.A.

    1996-08-20

    Apparatus is disclosed for generating plural electrical signals in a single scan in response to incident X-rays received from an object. Each electrical signal represents an image of the object at a different range of energies of the incident X-rays. The apparatus comprises a first X-ray detector, a second X-ray detector stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector, and an X-ray absorber stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector. The X-ray absorber provides an energy-dependent absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the first X-ray detector, but provides no absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the second X-ray detector. The first X-ray detector includes a linear array of first pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a first range of energies. The first X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a first electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the first pixels. The second X-ray detector includes a linear array of second pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a second range of energies, broader than the first range of energies. The second X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a second electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the second pixels. 12 figs.

  17. Experimental and theoretical performance analysis for a CMOS-based high resolution image detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Increasing complexity of endovascular interventional procedures requires superior x-ray imaging quality. Present stateof- the-art x-ray imaging detectors may not be adequate due to their inherent noise and resolution limitations. With recent developments, CMOS based detectors are presenting an option to fulfill the need for better image quality. For this work, a new CMOS detector has been analyzed experimentally and theoretically in terms of sensitivity, MTF and DQE. The detector (Dexela Model 1207, Perkin-Elmer Co., London, UK) features 14-bit image acquisition, a CsI phosphor, 75 μm pixels and an active area of 12 cm x 7 cm with over 30 fps frame rate. This detector has two modes of operations with two different full-well capacities: high and low sensitivity. The sensitivity and instrumentation noise equivalent exposure (INEE) were calculated for both modes. The detector modulation-transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectra (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were measured using an RQA5 spectrum. For the theoretical performance evaluation, a linear cascade model with an added aliasing stage was used. The detector showed excellent linearity in both modes. The sensitivity and the INEE of the detector were found to be 31.55 DN/μR and 0.55 μR in high sensitivity mode, while they were 9.87 DN/μR and 2.77 μR in low sensitivity mode. The theoretical and experimental values for the MTF and DQE showed close agreement with good DQE even at fluoroscopic exposure levels. In summary, the Dexela detector's imaging performance in terms of sensitivity, linear system metrics, and INEE demonstrates that it can overcome the noise and resolution limitations of present state-of-the-art x-ray detectors.

  18. High resolution dual detector volume-of-interest cone beam breast CT––Demonstration with a bench top system

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Youtao; Yi, Ying; Zhong, Yuncheng; Lai, Chao-Jen; Liu, Xinming; You, Zhicheng; Ge, Shuaiping; Wang, Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, we used a small field high resolution detector in conjunction with a full field flat panel detector to implement and investigate the dual detector volume-of-interest (VOI) cone beam breast computed tomography (CBCT) technique on a bench-top system. The potential of using this technique to image small calcifications without increasing the overall dose to the breast was demonstrated. Significant reduction of scatter components in the high resolution projection image data of the VOI was also shown. Methods: With the regular flat panel based CBCT technique, exposures were made at 80 kVp to generate an air kerma of 6 mGys at the isocenter. With the dual detector VOI CBCT technique, a high resolution small field CMOS detector was used to scan a cylindrical VOI (2.5 cm in diameter and height, 4.5 cm off-center) with collimated x-rays at four times of regular exposure level. A flat panel detector was used for full field scan with low x-ray exposures at half of the regular exposure level. The low exposure full field image data were used to fill in the truncated space in the VOI scan data and generate a complete projection image set. The Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) filtered backprojection algorithm was used to reconstruct high resolution images for the VOI. Two scanning techniques, one breast centered and the other VOI centered, were implemented and investigated. Paraffin cylinders with embedded thin aluminum (Al) wires were imaged and used in conjunction with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dose measurements to demonstrate the ability of this technique to image small calcifications without increasing the mean glandular dose (MGD). Results: Using exposures that produce an air kerma of 6 mGys at the isocenter, the regular CBCT technique was able to resolve the cross-sections of Al wires as thin as 254 μm in diameter in the phantom. For the specific VOI studied, by increasing the exposure level by a factor of 4 for the VOI scan and reducing the

  19. High resolution dual detector volume-of-interest cone beam breast CT - Demonstration with a bench top system

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Youtao; Yi Ying; Zhong Yuncheng; Lai Chaojen; Liu Xinming; You Zhicheng; Ge Shuaiping; Wang Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C.

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: In this study, we used a small field high resolution detector in conjunction with a full field flat panel detector to implement and investigate the dual detector volume-of-interest (VOI) cone beam breast computed tomography (CBCT) technique on a bench-top system. The potential of using this technique to image small calcifications without increasing the overall dose to the breast was demonstrated. Significant reduction of scatter components in the high resolution projection image data of the VOI was also shown. Methods: With the regular flat panel based CBCT technique, exposures were made at 80 kVp to generate an air kerma of 6 mGys at the isocenter. With the dual detector VOI CBCT technique, a high resolution small field CMOS detector was used to scan a cylindrical VOI (2.5 cm in diameter and height, 4.5 cm off-center) with collimated x-rays at four times of regular exposure level. A flat panel detector was used for full field scan with low x-ray exposures at half of the regular exposure level. The low exposure full field image data were used to fill in the truncated space in the VOI scan data and generate a complete projection image set. The Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) filtered backprojection algorithm was used to reconstruct high resolution images for the VOI. Two scanning techniques, one breast centered and the other VOI centered, were implemented and investigated. Paraffin cylinders with embedded thin aluminum (Al) wires were imaged and used in conjunction with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dose measurements to demonstrate the ability of this technique to image small calcifications without increasing the mean glandular dose (MGD). Results: Using exposures that produce an air kerma of 6 mGys at the isocenter, the regular CBCT technique was able to resolve the cross-sections of Al wires as thin as 254 {mu}m in diameter in the phantom. For the specific VOI studied, by increasing the exposure level by a factor of 4 for the VOI scan and reducing

  20. Semiconductor arrays with multiplexer readout for gamma-ray imaging: results for a 48 × 48 Ge array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, H. B.; Augustine, F. L.; Barrett, H. H.; Dereniak, E. L.; Matherson, K. L.; Meyers, T. J.; Perry, D. L.; Venzon, J. E.; Woolfenden, J. M.; Young, E. T.

    1994-12-01

    We are developing a new kind of gamma-ray imaging device that has sub-millimeter spatial resolution and excellent energy resolution. The device is composed of a slab of semiconductor detector partitioned into an array of detector cells by photolithography and connected to a monolithic circuit chip called a multiplexer (MUX) for readout. Our application is for an ultra-high-resolution SPECT system for functional brain imaging using an injected radiotracer. We report here on results obtained with a Hughes 48 × 48 Ge PIN-photodiode array with MUX readout, originally developed as an infrared focal-plane-array imaging sensor. The device functions as an array of individual gamma-ray detectors with minimal interpixel crosstalk. Linearity of energy response is excellent up to at least 140 keV. The array exhibits excellent energy resolution, ˜ 2 keV at ≤ 140 keV or 1.5% FWHM at 140 keV. The energy resolution is dominated by MUX readout noise and so should improve with MUX optimization for gamma-ray detection. The spatial resolution of the 48 × 48 Ge array is essentially the same as the pixel spacing, 125 μm. The quantum efficiency is limited by the thin Ge detector (0.25 mm), but this approach is readily applicable to thicker Ge detectors and room-temperature semiconductor detectors such as CdTe, HgI 2 and CdZnTe.