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Sample records for high-resolution velocity measurements

  1. The High Resolution Measurement of P and S Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Azuma, H.

    2013-12-01

    Seismic explorations, which give seismic velocity, such as seismic refraction method and the down hole - PS logging, are generally applied to the large - scale area. Typically, at these seismic explorations, the receivers spacing ranges from 1.0m to 20.0m and resolution which means a minimal area required to determine seismic velocity is 10 to 50m depending of the receivers spacing. On the other hand, recently, seismic exploration to the smaller area has been applied with increasing frequency. For the large-scale constructions which require severe safety, such as the power station, dam, tunnels, bridges, the rock physical properties in wide area of several hundred meter square, are necessary in order to assess the safety when those are built and an earthquake comes. However, field tests which give the physical properties are almost applied to the area of around 1 m square. In this case, the issue exists whether or not the small field test area is representative of the whole rock property in the site. For this issue, seismic explorations to the small area are adopted for the purpose of the comparison between seismic velocity in the field test area and in the whole site area. It is generally recognized that the accuracy of seismic velocity decrease with decreasing seismic measurement length and number of receivers. To achieve high accuracy with the seismic exploration to the smaller area, we should adjust the spacing closer between the receivers compared to the spacing used by the existing method, and increase the number of receivers. And also, by doing this, we can increase the resolution of velocity results. At first, before the investigation, we calculated the errors of velocity caused by picking error of the arrival time from slope of a straight line using the linear least squares method, based on the Theory of Errors. This method shows that we should use the high frequency seismic wave in order to achieve the increasing the accuracy with the short seismic

  2. High resolution infrared measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, B.; Cawley, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Sample ground based cloud radiance data from a high resolution infrared sensor are shown and the sensor characteristics are presented in detail. The purpose of the Infrared Analysis Measurement and Modeling Program (IRAMMP) is to establish a deterministic radiometric data base of cloud, sea, and littoral terrain clutter to be used to advance the design and development of Infrared Search and Track (IRST) systems as well as other infrared devices. The sensor is a dual band radiometric sensor and its description, together with that of the Data Acquisition System (DAS), are given. A schematic diagram of the sensor optics is shown.

  3. High Resolution Velocity Structure in Eastern Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M; Gok, R; Zor, E; Walter, W

    2004-09-03

    We investigate the crustal and upper mantle structure of eastern Turkey where the Anatolian, Arabian and Eurasian Plates meet and form a complex tectonic structure. The Bitlis suture is a continental collision zone between the Anatolian plateau and the Arabian plate. Broadband data available through the Eastern Turkey Seismic Experiment (ETSE) provided a unique opportunity for studying the high resolution velocity structure. Zor et al. found an average 46 km thick crust in Anatolian plateau using six-layered grid search inversion of the ETSE receiver functions. Receiver functions are sensitive to the velocity contrast of interfaces and the relative travel time of converted and reverberated waves between those interfaces. The interpretation of receiver function alone with many-layered parameterization may result in an apparent depth-velocity tradeoff. In order to improve previous velocity model, we employed the joint inversion method with many layered parameterization of Julia et al. (2000) to the ETSE receiver functions. In this technique, the receiver function and surface-wave observations are combined into a single algebraic equation and each data set is weighted by an estimate of the uncertainty in the observations. We consider azimuthal changes of receiver functions and have stacked them into different groups. We calculated the receiver functions using iterative time-domain deconvolution technique and surface wave group velocity dispersion curves between 10-100 sec. We are making surface wave dispersion measurements at the ETSE stations and have incorporated them into a regional group velocity model. Preliminary results indicate a strong trend in the long period group velocity in the northeast. This indicates slow upper mantle velocities in the region consistent with Pn, Sn and receiver function results. We started with both the 1-D model that is obtained with the 12 tones dam explosion shot data recorded by ETSE network and the existing receiver function

  4. High Resolution Velocity Structure in Eastern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasyanos, M. E.; Gok, R.; Zor, E.; Walter, W. R.

    2004-12-01

    We investigate the crust and upper mantle structure of eastern Turkey where the Anatolian, Arabian and Eurasian Plates meet, forming a complex tectonic regime. The Bitlis suture is a continental collision zone between the Anatolian plateau and the Arabian plate. Broadband data available through the Eastern Turkey Seismic Experiment (ETSE) provide a unique opportunity for studying the high resolution velocity structure of the region. Zor et al. (2003) found an average 46 km thick crust in the Anatolian plateau using a six-layered grid search inversion of the ETSE receiver functions. Receiver functions are sensitive to the velocity contrast of interfaces and the relative travel time of converted and reverberated waves between those interfaces. The interpretation of receiver functions alone, however, may result in an apparent depth-velocity trade-off [Ammon et al., 1990]. In order to improve upon this velocity model, we have combined the receiver functions with surface wave data using the joint inversion method of Julia et al. (2000). In this technique, the two sets of observations are combined into a single algebraic equation and each data set is weighted by an estimate of the uncertainty in the observations. The receiver functions are calculated using an iterative time-domain deconvolution technique. We also consider azimuthal changes in the receiver functions and have stacked them into different groups accordingly. We are improving our surface wave model by making Love and Rayleigh dispersion measurements at the ETSE stations and incorporating them into a regional group velocity model for periods between 10 and 100 seconds. Preliminary results indicate a strong trend in the long period group velocities toward the northeast, indicating slow upper mantle velocities in the area consistent with Pn, Sn and receiver function results. Starting models used for the joint inversions include both a 1-D model from a 12-ton dam shot recorded by ETSE [Gurbuz et al., 2004] and

  5. Development of a High Resolution X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for Measurement of Ion-Temperature and Rotation-Velocity Profiles in Fusion Energy Research Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K W; Broennimann, Ch; Eikenberry, E F; Ince-Cushman, A; Lee, S G; Rice, J E; Scott, S

    2008-01-29

    A new imaging high resolution x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) has been developed to measure continuous profiles of ion temperature and rotation velocity in fusion plasmas. Following proof-of-principle tests on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak and the NSTX spherical tokamak, and successful testing of a new silicon, pixilated detector with 1 MHz count rate capability per pixel, an imaging XCS is being designed to measure full profiles of Ti and vφ on C-Mod. The imaging XCS design has also been adopted for ITER. Ion-temperature uncertainty and minimum measurable rotation velocity are calculated for the C-Mod spectrometer. The affects of x-ray and uclear-radiation background on the measurement uncertainties are calculated to predict performance on ITER.

  6. Development of a High Resolution X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for Measurement of Ion-Temperature and Rotation-Velocity Profiles in Fusion Energy Research Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K W; Broennimann, Ch; Eikenberry, E F; Ince-Cushman, A; Lee, S G; Rice, J E; Scott, S

    2008-02-27

    A new imaging high resolution x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) has been developed to measure continuous profiles of ion temperature and rotation velocity in fusion plasmas. Following proof-of-principle tests on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak and the NSTX spherical tokamak, and successful testing of a new silicon, pixilated detector with 1MHz count rate capability per pixel, an imaging XCS is being designed to measure full profiles of Ti and vφ on C-Mod. The imaging XCS design has also been adopted for ITER. Ion-temperature uncertainty and minimum measurable rotation velocity are calculated for the C-Mod spectrometer. The affects of x-ray and nuclear-radiation background on the measurement uncertainties are calculated to predict performance on ITER.

  7. High Resolution PDF Measurements on Ag Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, Tulio C. R.; Martin, Chris; Kycia, Stefan; Zanchet, Daniela

    2009-01-29

    The quantitative analysis of structural defects in Ag nanoparticles was addressed in this work. We performed atomic scale structural characterization by a combination of x-ray diffraction (XRD) using the Pair Distribution Function analysis (PDF) and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). The XRD measurements were performed using an innovative instrumentation setup to provide high resolution PDF patterns.

  8. A Portable, High Resolution, Surface Measurement Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihlefeld, Curtis M.; Burns, Bradley M.; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    A high resolution, portable, surface measurement device has been demonstrated to provide micron-resolution topographical plots. This device was specifically developed to allow in-situ measurements of defects on the Space Shuttle Orbiter windows, but is versatile enough to be used on a wide variety of surfaces. This paper discusses the choice of an optical sensor and then the decisions required to convert a lab bench optical measurement device into an ergonomic portable system. The necessary trade-offs between performance and portability are presented along with a description of the device developed to measure Orbiter window defects.

  9. Measurement of Rayleigh wave ellipticity and its application to the joint inversion of high-resolution S wave velocity structure beneath northeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guoliang; Chen, Haichao; Niu, Fenglin; Guo, Zhen; Yang, Yingjie; Xie, Jun

    2016-02-01

    We present a new 3-D S wave velocity model of the northeast (NE) China from the joint inversion of the Rayleigh wave ellipticity and phase velocity at 8-40 s periods. Rayleigh wave ellipticity, or Rayleigh wave Z/H (vertical to horizontal) amplitude ratio, is extracted from both earthquake (10-40 s) and ambient noise data (8-25 s) recorded by the NorthEast China Extended SeiSmic Array with 127 stations. The estimated Z/H ratios from earthquake and ambient noise data show good consistency within the overlapped periods. The observed Z/H ratio shows a good spatial correlation with surface geology and is systematically low within the basins. We jointly invert the measured Z/H ratio and phase velocity dispersion data to obtain a refined 3-D S wave velocity model beneath the NE China. At shallow depth, the 3-D model is featured by strong low-velocity anomalies that are spatially well correlated with the Songliao, Sanjiang, and Erlian basins. The low-velocity anomaly beneath the Songliao basin extends to ~ 2-3 km deep in the south and ~5-6 km in the north. At lower crustal depths, we find a significant low-velocity anomaly beneath the Great Xing'an range that extends to the upper mantle in the south. Overall, the deep structures of the 3-D model are consistent with previous models, but the shallow structures show a much better spatial correlation with tectonic terranes. The difference in sedimentary structure between the southern and northern Songliao basin is likely caused by a mantle upwelling associated with the Pacific subduction.

  10. High Resolution Spectroscopy to Support Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, D. Chris; Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2000-01-01

    The major research activities performed during the cooperative agreement enhanced our spectroscopic knowledge of molecules of atmospheric interest such as carbon dioxide, water vapor, ozone, methane, and carbon monoxide, to name a few. Measurements were made using the NASA Langley Tunable Diode Laser Spectrometer System (TDL) and several Fourier Transform Spectrometer Systems (FTS) around the globe. The results from these studies made remarkable improvements in the line positions and intensities for several molecules, particularly ozone and carbon dioxide in the 2 to 17-micrometer spectral region. Measurements of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients and the temperature dependence of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients for infrared transitions of ozone, methane, and water vapor were also performed. Results from these studies have been used for retrievals of stratospheric gas concentration profiles from data collected by several Upper Atmospheric Research satellite (UARS) infrared instruments as well as in the analysis of high resolution atmospheric spectra such as those acquired by space-based, ground-based, and various balloon-and aircraft-borne experiments. Our results made significant contributions in several updates of the HITRAN (HIgh resolution TRANsmission) spectral line parameters database. This database enjoys worldwide recognition in research involving diversified scientific fields.

  11. High Resolution Acoustoelastic Measurements of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, Mark; Guy, Samuel; Heyman, Joseph

    2006-11-01

    As materials become more complex, there is an increasing need for high resolution measurements to characterize strength and damage in the materials. Typically, the criterion for rejecting a part is based on the detection of a flaw of a specific size in a critical location. Interestingly, if a low stress field exists at the flaw site, the flaw may not grow over time. Similarly, in a part that shows no unacceptable indications, a high stress state may cause the flaw to quickly grow through the part leading to failure. In other cases, a controlled amount of stress (in a specific direction or type) is purposely added to the material to prevent flaw growth. Inspection time intervals are based knowing and controlling the stress environment to predict the flaw growth. Luna Innovations Incorporated has developed a high resolution ultrasonic instrument that can enhance the integrity of critical hardware by measuring changes in the stress state in a material. Knowledge of the stress state plus knowledge of crack sizes greatly improves structural engineers' capability of life prediction. System data will be shown for tests to stresses near holes in laboratory fabricated aircraft metal samples. Scans of the spatial distribution of stresses will be compared with finite element models of the structure.

  12. High Resolution Spectroscopy to Support Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, D. Chris; Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2000-01-01

    The major research activities performed during the cooperative agreement enhanced our spectroscopic knowledge of molecules of atmospheric interest such as carbon dioxide, water vapor, ozone, methane, and carbon monoxide, to name a few. Measurements were made using the NASA Langley Tunable Diode Laser Spectrometer System (TDL) and several Fourier Transform Spectrometer Systems (FTS) around the globe. The results from these studies made remarkable improvements in the line positions and intensities for several molecules, particularly ozone and carbon dioxide in the 2 to 17-micrometer spectral region. Measurements of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients and the temperature dependence of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients for infrared transitions of ozone, methane, and water vapor were also performed. Results from these studies have been used for retrievals of stratospheric gas concentration profiles from data collected by several Upper Atmospheric Research satellite (UARS) infrared instruments as well as in the analysis of high resolution atmospheric spectra such as those acquired by space-based, ground-based, and various balloon- and aircraft-borne experiments. Our results made significant contributions in several updates of the HITRAN (HIgh resolution TRANsmission) spectral line parameters database. This database enjoys worldwide recognition in research involving diversified scientific fields.

  13. Estimating hurricane vertical velocity from Doppler radar for high-resolution hurricane model initialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.

    2013-12-01

    A mesoscale vorticity method derives the hurricane inner-core vertical velocity from the vorticity variations in space and in time estimated from a deep layer of wind measurements obtained from Doppler radar. The vorticity method derives the hurricane inner core vertical velocity and thus, the divergent wind based on the mesoscale vorticity equation. The inner-core divergent wind inferred dynamically and rotational wind estimated from radar data form the total horizontal wind which is dynamically balanced with the derived vertical velocity. The derived high-resolution balance wind field is suitable for high resolution hurricane models initialization. The vorticity method is tested using a high-resolution non-hydrostatic hurricane model with radar data from Hurricane Danny which made landfall along the Alabama coast in 1997. Numerical experiments with a high resolution non-hydrostatic hurricane model show positive radar data impacts on track and intensity forecasts, in particular, substantial improvements on the hurricane inner core velocity field, can be obtained with the vertical velocity and thus inner-core divergent wind inferred from the mesoscale vorticity method.

  14. High Resolution Spectroscopy to Support Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2006-01-01

    The major research activities performed during the cooperative agreement enhanced our spectroscopic knowledge of molecules of atmospheric interest such as H2O (water vapor), O3 (ozone), HCN (hydrogen cyanide), CH4 (methane), NO2 (nitrogen dioxide) and CO (carbon monoxide). The data required for the analyses were obtained from two different Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTS); one of which is located at the National Solar Observatory (NSO) on Kitt Peak, Arizona and the other instrument is located at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) at Richland, Washington. The data were analyzed using a modified multispectrum nonlinear least squares fitting algorithm developed by Dr. D. Chris Benner of the College of William and Mary. The results from these studies made significant improvements in the line positons and intensities for these molecules. The measurements of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients and the temperature dependence of pressure broadening and pressure induced shift coefficients for hundreds of infrared transitions of HCN, CO3 CH4 and H2O were also performed during this period. Results from these studies have been used for retrievals of stratospheric gas concentration profiles from data collected by several Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS) infrared instruments as well as in the analysis of high resolution atmospheric spectra such as those acquired by space-based, ground-based, and various balloon- and aircraft-borne experiments. Our results made significant contributions in several updates of the HITRAN (HIgh resolution TRANsmission) spectral line parameters database. This database enjoys worldwide recognition in research involving diversified scientific fields. The research conducted during the period 2003-2006 has resulted in publications given in this paper. In addition to Journal publications, several oral and poster presentations were given at various Scientific conferences within the United States

  15. Two high resolution velocity vector analyzers for cosmic dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, S.

    1975-01-01

    Two new methods are described to measure velocities and angles of incidence of charged cosmic dust particles with precisions of about 1% and 1 deg, respectively. Both methods employ four one-dimensional position-sensitive detectors in series. The first method utilizes a charge-dividing technique while the second utilizes a time-of-flight technique for determining the position of a particle inside the instrument. The velocity vectors are measured although mechanical interaction between the particle and the instrument is completely avoided. Applications to cosmic dust composition and collection experiments are discussed. The range of radii of measurable particles is from about 0.01 to 100 microns at velocities from 1 to 80 km/sec.

  16. High-resolution velocity measurements on fully identified light nuclides produced in {sup 56}Fe+hydrogen and {sup 56}Fe+titanium systems

    SciTech Connect

    Napolitani, P.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Botvina, A.S.; Rejmund, F.; Tassan-Got, L.; Villagrasa, C.

    2004-11-01

    New experimental results on the kinematics and the residue production are obtained for the interactions of {sup 56}Fe projectiles with protons and {sup nat}Ti target nuclei, respectively, at the incident energy of 1 A GeV. The titanium-induced reaction serves as a reference case for multifragmentation. Already in the proton-induced reaction, the characteristics of the isotopic cross sections and the shapes of the velocity spectra of light residues indicate that high thermal energy is deposited in the system during the collision. In the {sup 56}Fe+p system the high excitation seems to favor the onset of fast break-up decays dominated by very asymmetric partitions of the disassembling system. This configuration leads to the simultaneous formation of one or more light fragments together with one heavy residue.

  17. High Resolution Spectroscopy to Support Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2003-01-01

    Spectroscopic parameters (such as line position, intensity, broadening and shifting coefficients and their temperature dependences, line mixing coefficients etc.) for various molecular species of atmospheric interest are determined. In order to achieve these results, infrared spectra of several molecular bands are obtained using high-resolution recording instruments such as tunable diode laser spectrometer and Fourier transform spectrometers. Using sophisticated analysis routines (Multispectrum nonlinear least squares technique) these high-resolution infrared spectra are processed to determine the various spectral line parameters that are cited above. Spectra were taken using the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at the National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak, Arizona as well as the Bruker FTS at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) at Richland, Washington. Most of the spectra are acquired not only at room temperature, but also at several different cold temperatures. This procedure is necessary to study the variation of the spectral line parameters as a function of temperature in order to simulate the Earth's and other planetary atmospheric environments. Depending upon the strength or weakness of the various bands recorded and analyzed, the length(s) of the absorption cells in which the gas samples under study are kept varied from a few centimeters up to several meters and the sample temperatures varied from approximately +30 C to -63 C. Research on several infrared bands of various molecular species and their isotopomers are undertaken. Those studies are briefly described.

  18. High-resolution shallow-seismic experiments in sand. Part 2: Velocities in shallow unconsolidated sand

    SciTech Connect

    Bachrach, R.; Dvorkin, J.; Nur, A.

    1998-07-01

    The authors conducted a shallow high-resolution seismic reflection and refraction experiment on a sandy beach. The depth of investigation was about 2 m. They interpret the data using the Hertz-Mindlin contact theory combined with Gassmann`s equation. These were used to obtain the vertical velocity profile. Then the profile was computed from seismic data using the turning-rays approximation. The normal moveout (NMO) velocity at the depth of 2 m matches the velocity profile. As a result, they developed a method to invert measured velocity from first arrivals, i.e., velocity versus distance into velocity versus depth using only one adjustable parameter. This parameter contains all the information about the internal structure and elasticity of the sand. The lowest velocity observed was about 40 m/s. It is noteworthy that the theoretical lower bound for velocity in dry sand with air is as low as 13 m/s. The authors find that modeling sand as a quartz sphere pack does not quantitatively agree with the measured data. However, the theoretical functional form proves to be useful for the inversion.

  19. High resolution spectroscopy to support atmospheric measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Mary Ann H.; Devi, V. Malathy; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Benner, D. Chris; Harvey, Gale A.

    1990-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the molecular spectra of ozone and other infrared-active atmospheric species is needed for accurate calculation of atmospheric heating and cooling rates in climate models. Remote sensing experiments on the Nimbus-7 satellites and the Spacelab-3 Space Shuttle Mission have shown that space-based measurements of infrared absorption or emission can be used to accurately determine the concentrations and distributions of stratospheric species on a global scale. The objective of this research task is to improve knowledge of the spectroscopic line parameters (positions, intensities, assignments, halfwidths, and pressure-induced shifts) of key atmospheric constituents through laboratory measurements.

  20. Efficient and reproducible high resolution spiral myocardial phase velocity mapping of the entire cardiac cycle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    systolic, early diastolic and atrial systolic peak radial velocities in the mid slice (for example) being −0.01 ± 0.36, 0.20 ± 0.56 and 0.14 ± 0.42 cm/s respectively. Reproducibility of the corresponding TTP values, when normalised to a fixed systolic and diastolic length, was also high (−13.8 ± 27.4, 1.3 ± 21.3 and 3.0 ± 10.9 ms for early systolic, early diastolic and atrial systolic respectively). Conclusions Retrospectively gated spiral PVM is an efficient and reproducible method of acquiring 3-directional, high resolution velocity data throughout the entire cardiac cycle, including atrial systole. PMID:23587250

  1. Detecting non-maxwellian electron velocity distributions at JET by high resolution Thomson scattering.

    PubMed

    Beausang, K V; Prunty, S L; Scannell, R; Beurskens, M N; Walsh, M J; de la Luna, E

    2011-03-01

    The present work is motivated by a long standing discrepancy between the electron temperature measurements of Thomson scattering (TS) and electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics for plasmas with strong auxiliary heating observed at both JET and TFTR above 6–7 keV, where in some cases the ECE electron temperature measurements can be 15%–20% higher than the TS measurements. Recent analysis based on ECE results at JET has shown evidence of distortions to the Maxwellian electron velocity distribution and a correlation with the TS and ECE discrepancies has been suggested. In this paper, a technique to determine the presence of non-Maxwellian behavior using TS diagnostics is outlined. The difficulties and limitations of modern TS system designs to determine the electron velocity distribution are also discussed. It is demonstrated that small deviations such as those suggested by previous ECE analysis could be potentially detected, depending on the spectral layout of the TS polychromators. The spectral layout of the JET high resolution Thomson scattering system is such that it could be used to determine these deviations between 1 and 6 keV, and the results presented here indicate that no evidence of non-Maxwellian behavior is observed in this range. In this paper, a modification to the current polychromator design is proposed, allowing non-Maxwellian distortions to be detected up to at least 10 keV. PMID:21585113

  2. Detecting non-Maxwellian electron velocity distributions at JET by high resolution Thomson scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Beausang, K. V.; Prunty, S. L.; Scannell, R.; Beurskens, M. N.; Walsh, M. J.; Collaboration: JET EFDA Contributors

    2011-03-15

    The present work is motivated by a long standing discrepancy between the electron temperature measurements of Thomson scattering (TS) and electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics for plasmas with strong auxiliary heating observed at both JET and TFTR above 6-7 keV, where in some cases the ECE electron temperature measurements can be 15%-20% higher than the TS measurements. Recent analysis based on ECE results at JET has shown evidence of distortions to the Maxwellian electron velocity distribution and a correlation with the TS and ECE discrepancies has been suggested. In this paper, a technique to determine the presence of non-Maxwellian behavior using TS diagnostics is outlined. The difficulties and limitations of modern TS system designs to determine the electron velocity distribution are also discussed. It is demonstrated that small deviations such as those suggested by previous ECE analysis could be potentially detected, depending on the spectral layout of the TS polychromators. The spectral layout of the JET high resolution Thomson scattering system is such that it could be used to determine these deviations between 1 and 6 keV, and the results presented here indicate that no evidence of non-Maxwellian behavior is observed in this range. In this paper, a modification to the current polychromator design is proposed, allowing non-Maxwellian distortions to be detected up to at least 10 keV.

  3. Estimation of Venus wind velocities from high-resolution infrared spectra. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. A. H.

    1978-01-01

    Zonal velocity profiles in the Venus atmosphere above the clouds were estimated from measured asymmetries of HCl and HF infrared absorption lines in high-resolution Fourier interferometer spectra of the planet. These asymmetries are caused by both pressure-induced shifts in the positions of the hydrogen-halide lines perturbed by CO2 and Doppler shifts due to atmospheric motions. Particularly in the case of the HCl 2-0 band, the effects of the two types of line shifts can be easily isolated, making it possible to estimate a profile of average Venus equatorial zonal velocity as a function of pressure in the region roughly 60 to 70 km above the surface of the planet. The mean profiles obtained show strong vertical shear in the Venus zonal winds near the cloud-top level, and both the magnitude and direction of winds at all levels in this region appear to vary greatly with longitude relative to the sub-solar point.

  4. High-Resolution Wind Measurements for Offshore Wind Energy Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, Son V.; Neumann, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    A mathematical transform, called the Rosette Transform, together with a new method, called the Dense Sampling Method, have been developed. The Rosette Transform is invented to apply to both the mean part and the fluctuating part of a targeted radar signature using the Dense Sampling Method to construct the data in a high-resolution grid at 1-km posting for wind measurements over water surfaces such as oceans or lakes.

  5. High Resolution Measurements and Electronic Structure Calculations of a Diazanaphthalene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruet, Sébastien; Goubet, Manuel; Pirali, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) have long been suspected to be the carriers of so called Unidentified Infrared Bands (UIBs). Most of the results published in the literature report rotationally unresolved spectra of pure carbon as well as heteroatom-containing PAHs species. To date for this class of molecules, the principal source of rotational informations is ruled by microwave (MW) spectroscopy while high resolution measurements reporting rotational structure of the infrared (IR) vibrational bands are very scarce. Recently, some high resolution techniques provided interesting new results to rotationally resolve the IR and far-IR bands of these large carbonated molecules of astrophysical interest. One of them is to use the bright synchrotron radiation as IR continuum source of a high resolution Fourier transform (FTIR) spectrometer. We report the very complementary analysis of the [1,6] naphthyridine (a N-bearing PAH) for which we recorded the microwave spectrum at the PhLAM laboratory (Lille) and the high resolution far-infrared spectrum on the AILES beamline at synchrotron facility SOLEIL. MW spectroscopy provided highly accurate rotational constants in the ground state to perform Ground State Combinations Differences (GSCD) allowing the analysis of the two most intense FT-FIR bands in the 50-900 wn range. Moreover, during this presentation the negative value of the inertial defect in the GS of the molecule will be discussed. A. Leger, J. L. Puget, Astron. Astrophys. 137, L5-L8 (1984) L. J. Allamandola et al. Astrophys. J. 290, L25-L28 (1985). Z. Kisiel et al. J. Mol. Spectrosc. 217, 115 (2003) S. Thorwirth et al. Astrophys. J. 662, 1309 (2007) D. McNaughton et al. J. Chem. Phys. 124, 154305 (2011). S. Albert et al. Faraday Discuss. 150, 71-99 (2011) B. E. Brumfield et al. Phys. Chem. Lett. 3, 1985-1988 (2012) O. Pirali et al. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 15, 10141 (2013).

  6. First storm-time plasma velocity estimates from high-resolution ionospheric data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta-Barua, Seebany; Bust, Gary S.; Crowley, Geoff

    2013-11-01

    This paper uses data assimilation to estimate ionospheric state during storm time at subdegree resolution. We use Ionospheric Data Assimilation Four-Dimensional (IDA4D) to resolve the three-dimensional time-varying electron density gradients of the storm-enhanced density poleward plume. By Estimating Model Parameters from Ionospheric Reverse Engineering (EMPIRE), we infer the three-dimensional plasma velocity from the densities. EMPIRE estimates of ExB drift are made by correcting the Weimer 2000 electric potential model. This is the first time electron densities derived from GPS total electron content (TEC) data are being used to estimate field-aligned and field-perpendicular drifts at such high resolution, without reference to direct drift measurements. The time-varying estimated electron densities are used to construct the ionospheric spatial decorrelation in vertical total electron content (TEC) on horizontal scales of less than 100 km. We compare slant TEC (STEC) estimates to actual STEC GPS observations, including independent unassimilated data. The IDA4D density model of the extreme ionospheric storm on 20 November 2003 shows STEC delays of up to 210 TEC units, comparable to the STEC of the GPS ground stations. Horizontal drifts from EMPIRE are predicted to be northwestward within the storm-enhanced density plume and its boundary, turning northeast at high latitudes. These estimates compare favorably to independent Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics-assimilated high-latitude ExB drift estimates. Estimated and measured Defense Meteorological Satellite Program in situ drifts differ by a factor of 2-3 and in some cases have incorrect direction. This indicates that significant density rates of change and more accurate accounting for production and loss may be needed when other processes are not dominant.

  7. High Resolution Interseismic Velocity Model of the San Andreas Fault From GPS and InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, X.; Sandwell, D. T.; Smith-Konter, B. R.

    2011-12-01

    We recover the interseismic deformation along the entire San Andreas Fault System (SAFS) at a spatial resolution of 200 meters by combining InSAR and GPS observations using a dislocation model. Previous efforts to compare 17 different GPS-derived strain rate models of the SAFS shows that GPS data alone cannot uniquely resolve the rapid velocity gradients near faults, which are critical for understanding the along-strike variations in stress accumulation rate and associated earthquake hazard. To improve the near-fault velocity resolution, we integrate new GPS observations with InSAR observations, initially from ALOS (Advanced Land Observation Satellite launched by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) ascending data (spanning 2006.5-2010), using a remove/restore approach. More than 1100 interferograms were processed with the newly developed InSAR processing software GMTSAR. The integration uses a dislocation-based velocity model to interpolate the Line-Of-Sight (LOS) velocity at the full resolution of the InSAR data in radar coordinates. The residual between the model and InSAR LOS velocity are stacked and high-pass filtered, then added back to the model. This LOS velocity map covers almost entire San Andreas Fault System (see Figure 1) from Maacama Fault to the north to the Superstition Hills Fault to the south. The average standard deviation of the LOS velocity model ranges from 2 to 4 mm/yr. Our initial results show previously unknown details in along-strike variations in surface fault creep. Moreover, the high resolution velocity field can resolve asperities in these "creeping" sections that are important for understanding moment accumulation rates and seismic hazards. We find that much of the high resolution velocity signal is related to non-tectonic processes (e.g., ground subsidence and uplift) sometimes very close to the fault zone. The near-fault deformation signal extracted from this velocity map can provide tighter constraints on fault slip rates and

  8. Wide and high resolution tension measurement using FRET in embryo.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Satoshi; Tsuboi, Takashi; Ishinabe, Nanako; Kitaguchi, Tetsuya; Michiue, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    During embryonic development, physical force plays an important role in morphogenesis and differentiation. Stretch sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) has the potential to provide non-invasive tension measurements inside living tissue. In this study, we introduced a FRET-based actinin tension sensor into Xenopus laevis embryos and demonstrated that this sensor captures variation of tension across differentiating ectoderm. The actinin tension sensor, containing mCherry and EGFP connected by spider silk protein, was validated in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells and embryos. It co-localized with actin filaments and changed FRET efficiencies in response to actin filament destruction, myosin deactivation, and osmotic perturbation. Time-lapse FRET analysis showed that the prospective neural ectoderm bears higher tension than the epidermal ectoderm during gastrulation and neurulation, and cells morphogenetic behavior correlated with the tension difference. These data confirmed that the sensor enables us to measure tension across tissues concurrently and with high resolution. PMID:27335157

  9. Wide and high resolution tension measurement using FRET in embryo

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Satoshi; Tsuboi, Takashi; Ishinabe, Nanako; Kitaguchi, Tetsuya; Michiue, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    During embryonic development, physical force plays an important role in morphogenesis and differentiation. Stretch sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) has the potential to provide non-invasive tension measurements inside living tissue. In this study, we introduced a FRET-based actinin tension sensor into Xenopus laevis embryos and demonstrated that this sensor captures variation of tension across differentiating ectoderm. The actinin tension sensor, containing mCherry and EGFP connected by spider silk protein, was validated in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells and embryos. It co-localized with actin filaments and changed FRET efficiencies in response to actin filament destruction, myosin deactivation, and osmotic perturbation. Time-lapse FRET analysis showed that the prospective neural ectoderm bears higher tension than the epidermal ectoderm during gastrulation and neurulation, and cells morphogenetic behavior correlated with the tension difference. These data confirmed that the sensor enables us to measure tension across tissues concurrently and with high resolution. PMID:27335157

  10. Measuring Large-Scale Social Networks with High Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Sekara, Vedran; Sapiezynski, Piotr; Cuttone, Andrea; Madsen, Mette My; Larsen, Jakob Eg; Lehmann, Sune

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the deployment of a large-scale study designed to measure human interactions across a variety of communication channels, with high temporal resolution and spanning multiple years—the Copenhagen Networks Study. Specifically, we collect data on face-to-face interactions, telecommunication, social networks, location, and background information (personality, demographics, health, politics) for a densely connected population of 1 000 individuals, using state-of-the-art smartphones as social sensors. Here we provide an overview of the related work and describe the motivation and research agenda driving the study. Additionally, the paper details the data-types measured, and the technical infrastructure in terms of both backend and phone software, as well as an outline of the deployment procedures. We document the participant privacy procedures and their underlying principles. The paper is concluded with early results from data analysis, illustrating the importance of multi-channel high-resolution approach to data collection. PMID:24770359

  11. High-Resolution Inverse-Based Determination of Seismic-Velocity Structure in Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akcelik, V.; Bielak, J.; Epanomeritakis, I.; Ghattas, O.

    2004-12-01

    Starting with the pioneering work of Aki, Christoffersson, and Husebye in 1976, there has been an increasing interest in developing inversion techniques for determining the three-dimensional crustal velocity structure in seismic regions. In this paper we describe a methodology that capitalizes on recent advances in optimization methods to adapt, extend, and refine powerful nonlinear Newton-Krylov adjoint-based inverse wave propagation algorithms to two- and three-dimensional velocity structure and kinematic source inversion problems. We present results of high resolution models for two-dimensional sedimentary valleys undergoing antiplane motion, and three dimensional acoustic approximations of models of the San Fernando Valley using parallel scalable inversion algorithms that overcome many of the difficulties particular to inverse heterogeneous wave propagation problems.

  12. High-resolution terahertz atmospheric water vapor continuum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slocum, David M.; Goyette, Thomas M.; Giles, Robert H.

    2014-05-01

    The terahertz frequency regime is often used as the `chemical fingerprint' region of the electromagnetic spectrum due to the large number of rotational and vibrational transitions of many molecules of interest. This region of the spectrum has particular utility for applications such as pollution monitoring and the detection of energetic chemicals using remote sensing over long path lengths through the atmosphere. Although there has been much attention to atmospheric effects over narrow frequency windows, accurate measurements across a wide spectrum are lacking. The water vapor continuum absorption is an excess absorption that is unaccounted for in resonant line spectrum simulations. Currently a semiempirical model is employed to account for this absorption, however more measurements are necessary to properly describe the continuum absorption in this region. Fourier Transform Spectroscopy measurements from previous work are enhanced with high-resolution broadband measurements in the atmospheric transmission window at 1.5THz. The transmission of broadband terahertz radiation through pure water vapor as well as air with varying relative humidity levels was recorded for multiple path lengths. The pure water vapor measurements provide accurate determination of the line broadening parameters and experimental measurements of the transition strengths of the lines in the frequency region. Also these measurements coupled with the atmospheric air measurements allow the water vapor continuum absorption to be independently identified at 1.5THz. Simulations from an atmospheric absorption model using parameters from the HITRAN database are compared with the current and previous experimental results.

  13. High-Resolution, Single-Molecule Measurements of Biomolecular Motion

    PubMed Central

    Greenleaf, William J.; Woodside, Michael T.; Block, Steven M.

    2007-01-01

    Many biologically important macromolecules undergo motions that are essential to their function. Biophysical techniques can now resolve the motions of single molecules down to the nanometer scale or even below, providing new insights into the mechanisms that drive molecular movements. This review outlines the principal approaches that have been used for high-resolution measurements of single-molecule motion, including centroid tracking, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, magnetic tweezers, atomic force microscopy, and optical traps. For each technique, the principles of operation are outlined, the capabilities and typical applications are examined, and various practical issues for implementation are considered. Extensions to these methods are also discussed, with an eye toward future application to outstanding biological problems. PMID:17328679

  14. HIGH-RESOLUTION SEISMIC VELOCITY AND ATTENUATION MODELS OF THE CAUCASUS-CASPIAN REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Mellors, R; Gok, R; Sandvol, E

    2007-07-10

    The southwest edge of Eurasia is a tectonically and structurally complex region that includes the Caspian and Black Sea basins, the Caucasus Mountains, and the high plateaus south of the Caucasus. Crustal and upper mantle velocities show great heterogeneity in this region and regional phases display variations in both amplitudes and travel time. Furthermore, due to a lack of quality data, the region has largely been unexplored in terms of the detailed lithospheric seismic structure. A unified high-resolution 3D velocity and attenuation model of the crust and upper mantle will be developed and calibrated. This model will use new data from 23 new broadband stations in the region analyzed with a comprehensive set of techniques. Velocity models of the crust and upper mantle will be developed using a joint inversion of receiver functions and surface waves. The surface wave modeling will use both event-based methods and ambient noise tomography. Regional phase (Pg, Pn, Sn, and Lg) Q model(s) will be constructed using the new data in combination with existing data sets. The results of the analysis (both attenuation and velocity modeling) will be validated using modeling of regional phases, calibration with selected events, and comparison with previous work. Preliminary analyses of receiver functions show considerable variability across the region. All results will be integrated into the KnowledgeBase.

  15. High resolution rainfall measurements around a high rise building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Stijn; van de Giesen, Nick; Hut, Rolf

    2010-05-01

    A number of disdrometers (acoustic rain gauge) has been placed around a high rise building on a place where variation in spatial distribution of precipitation is expected, to show the advantage of high resolution rainfall measurements in a urban area. The standard recommendation for the placement of a rain gauge is that the gauge is positioned at a distance corresponding to two to four times the height of any nearby obstruction to obtain a measurement that is representative for the surrounding area. In an urban area it is almost impossible to find a location that suits this recommendation. Rain measurements in urban area with a high spatial resolution are desired, to obtain a better understanding of urban hydrology, but costs may be prohibitive. A low cost disdrometer has been developed to make it affordable to perform rain measurements with a very high spatial and temporal resolution. The disdrometer is tested around a high rise building on the Delft University of Technology campus. The faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science (EWI) on the campus of Delft University of Technology consists of a high rise building of 90 meters and a low rise building of 15 meters. Sensors are placed on the low rise building to measure the impact of the high rise building on the spatial distribution of precipitation. In addition to the disdrometer, two other methods are used to measure precipitation differences around the high rise building. Tipping bucket rain gauges have been placed on two elevator shaft housings on the low rise building, of which one is situated in the shadow of the high rise building. Simultaneously, runoff from the elevator shafts is measured. A comparison of the different methods will be presented.

  16. High-resolution seismic tomography of compressional wave velocity structure at Newberry Volcano, Oregon Cascade Range

    SciTech Connect

    Achauer, U.; Evans, J.R.; Stauber, D.A.

    1988-09-10

    Compressional wave velocity structure is determined for the upper crust beneath Newberry Volcano, central Oregon, using a high-resolution active-source seismic-tomography method. Newberry Volcano is a bimodal shield volcano east of the axis of the Cascade Range. It is associated both with the Cascade Range and with northwest migrating silicic volcanism in southeast Oregon. High-frequency (approx.7 Hz) crustal phases, nominally Pg and a midcrustal reflected phase, travel upward through a target volume beneath Newberry Volcano to a dense array of 120 seismographs. This arrangement is limited by station spacing to 1- to 2-km resolution in the upper 5 to 6 km of the crust beneath the volcano's summit caldera. The experiment tests the hypothesis that Cascade Range volcanoes are underlain only by small magma chambers. A small low-velocity anomaly delineated abosut 3 km below the summit caldera supports this hypothesis for Newberry Volcano and is interpreted as a possible magma chamber of a few to a few tens of km/sup 3/ in volume. A ring-shaped high-velocity anomaly nearer the surface coincides with the inner mapped ring fractures of the caldera. It also coincides with a circular gravity high, and we interpret it as largely subsolidus silicic cone sheets. The presence of this anomaly and of silicic vents along the ring fractures suggests that the fractures are a likely eruption path between the small magma chamber and the surface.

  17. The shallow velocity structure of the Carboneras fault zone from high-resolution seismic investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C.; Nippress, S.; Rietbrock, A.; Faulkner, D. R.; Rutter, E. H.; Haberland, C. A.; Teixido, T.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding and characterizing fault zone structure at depth is vital to predicting the slip behaviour of faults in the brittle crust. The CFZ is a large offset (10s of km) strike-slip fault that constitutes part of the diffuse plate boundary between Africa and Iberia. It has been largely passively exhumed from ca. 4 to 6 km depth. The friable fault zone components are excellently preserved in the region’s semi-arid climate, and consist of multiple strands of phyllosilicate-rich fault gouge ranging from 1 to 20 m in thickness. We conducted four high-resolution seismic refraction tomography lines. Two of these lines crossed the entire width of the fault zone (~1km long) while the remaining lines concentrated on individual fault strands and associated damage zones (~100m long). For each line a combination of seismic sources (accelerated drop weight, sledgehammer and 100g explosives) was used, with 2m-geophone spacing. First breaks have been picked for each of the shot gathers and inputted into a 2D travel time inversion and amplitude-modeling package (Zelt & Smith, 1992) to obtain first break tomography images down to a depth 100m for the longer lines. The fault zone is imaged as a series of low velocity zones associated with the gouge strands, with Vp=1.5-1.75 km/s a velocity reduction of 40-60% compared to the wall-rock velocities (Vp=2.8-3.2km/s). These velocities are consistent with first break tomographic observations across the Dead Sea Transform fault (Haberland et al., 2007), but lower than the velocities imaged along the Punchbowl fault zone (part of the San Andreas system). Along the longer profiles we image multiple fault strands that exhibit a variety of thicknesses (~20-80m).

  18. First high resolution P wave velocity structure beneath Tenerife Island, (Canary Islands, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Yeguas, Araceli; Ivan, Koulakov; Ibañez Jesus, M.; Valenti, Sallarès.

    2010-05-01

    3D velocity structure distribution has been imaged for first time using high resolution traveltime seismic tomography of the active volcano of Tenerife Island (Canary Islands, Spain). It is located in the Atlantic Ocean. In this island is situated the Teide stratovolcano (3718 m high) that is part of the Cañadas-Teide-Pico Viejo volcanic complex. Las Cañadas is a caldera system more than 20 kilometers wide where at least four distinct caldera processes have been identified. Evidence for many explosive eruptions in the volcanic complex has been found; the last noticeable explosive eruption (sub-plinean) occurred at Montaña Blanca around 2000 years ago. During the last 300 years, six effusive eruptions have been reported, the last of which took place at Chinyero Volcano on 18 November 1909. In January 2007, a seismic active experiment was carried out as part of the TOM-TEIDEVS project. About 6850 air gun shots were fired on the sea and recorded on a dense local seismic land network consisting of 150 independent (three component) seismic stations. The good quality of the recorded data allowed identifying P-wave arrivals up to offsets of 30-40 km obtaining more than 63000 traveltimes used in the tomographic inversion. The images have been obtained using ATOM-3D code (Koulakov, 2009). This code uses ray bending algorithms in the ray tracing for the forward modelling and in the inversion step it uses gradient methods. The velocity models show a very heterogeneous upper crust that is usual in similar volcanic environment. The tomographic images points out the no-existence of a magmatic chamber near to the surface and below Pico Teide. The ancient Las Cañadas caldera borders are clearly imaged featuring relatively high seismic velocity. Moreover, we have found a big low velocity anomaly in the northwest dorsal of the island. The last eruption took place in 1909 in this area. Furthermore, in the southeast another low velocity anomaly has been imaged. Several resolution

  19. High-resolution measurements of humidity and temperature with lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, Andreas; Wulfmeyer, Volker; Spaeth, Florian; Hammann, Eva; Muppa, Shravan Kumar; Metzendorf, Simon; Riede, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    3-dimensional thermodynamic fields of temperature and moisture including their turbulent fluctuations have been observed with the two scanning lidar systems of University of Hohenheim in three field campaigns in 2013 and 2014. In this contribution, we will introduce these two self-developed instruments and illustrate their performance with measurement examples. Finally, an outlook to envisioned future research activities with the new data sets of the instruments is given. Our temperature lidar is based on the rotational Raman technique. The scanning rotational Raman lidar (RRL) uses a seeded frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser at a wavelength of 355 nm. A two-mirror scanner with a 40-cm telescope collects the atmospheric backscatter signals. Humidity measurements are made with a scanning water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) which uses a titanium sapphire laser at 820 nm as transmitter. This laser is pumped with a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser and injection-seeded for switching between the online and offline wavelengths. The DIAL receiver consists of a scanning 80-cm telescope. The measured temperature and humidity profiles of both instruments have typical resolutions of only a few seconds and 100 m in the atmospheric boundary layer both in day- and night-time. Recent field experiments with the RRL and the DIAL of University of Hohenheim were (1) the HD(CP)2 Prototype Experiment (HOPE) in spring 2013 in western Germany - this activity is embedded in the project HD(CP)2 (High-definition clouds and precipitation for advancing climate prediction); (2) a measurement campaign in Hohenheim in autumn 2013; (3) the campaign SABLE (Surface Atmospheric Boundary Layer Exchange) in south-western Germany in summer 2014. The collected moisture and temperature data will serve as initial thermodynamic fields for forecast experiments related to the formation of clouds and precipitation. Due to their high resolution and high precision, the systems are capable of resolving

  20. High-resolution seismic velocities and shallow structure of the San Andreas fault zone at Middle Mountain, Parkfield, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catchings, R.D.; Rymer, M.J.; Goldman, M.R.; Hole, J.A.; Huggins, R.; Lippus, C.

    2002-01-01

    A 5-km-long, high-resolution seismic imaging survey across the San Andreas fault (SAF) zone and the proposed San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) drill site near Parkfield, California, shows that velocities vary both laterally and vertically. Velocities range from 4.0 km/sec) probably correspond to granitic rock of the Salinian block, which is exposed a few kilometers southwest of the SAF. The depth to the top of probable granitic rock varies laterally along the seismic profile but is about 600 m below the surface at the proposed SAFOD site. We observe a prominent, lateral low-velocity zone (LVZ) beneath and southwest of the surface trace of the SAF. The LVZ is about 1.5 km wide at 300-m depth but tapers to about 600 m wide at 750-m depth. At the maximum depth of the velocity model (750 m), the LVZ is centered approximately 400 m southwest of the surface trace of the SAF. Similar velocities and velocity gradients are observed at comparable depths on both sides of the LVZ, suggesting that the LVZ is anomalous relative to rocks on either side of it. Velocities within the LVZ are lower than those of San Andreas fault gouge, and the LVZ is also anomalous with respect to gravity, magnetic, and resistivity measurements. Because of its proximity to the surface trace of the SAF, it is tempting to suggest that the LVZ represents a zone of fractured crystalline rocks at depth. However, the LVZ instead probably represents a tectonic sliver of sedimentary rock that now rests adjacent to or encompasses the SAF. Such a sliver of sedimentary rock implies fault strands on both sides and possibly within the sliver, suggesting a zone of fault strands at least 1.5 km wide at a depth of 300 m, tapering to about 600 m wide at 750-m depth. Fluids within the sedimentary sliver are probably responsible for observed low-resistivity values.

  1. High Resolution Measurement of Auroral "Hiss" and "Roar"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, S.; Labelle, J.; Weatherwax, A.

    2004-05-01

    In December 2002, a Versatile Electromagnetic Wave Receiver (VIEW) together with a new digitization system was deployed at South Pole station. The motivation was to measure three types of auroral radio emissions: Auroral Roar, a relatively narrowband (Δ f/f <0.1) emission near 2 and 3 times the F region ionospheric electron cyclotron frequency (fce); Auroral Hiss, a whistler mode wave emission with frequencies lower than 1MHz ; and Auroral medium frequency (MF) burst, broadband impulsive radio emissions observed at ground level during the breakup phase of auroral substorms. High resolution broad band structure of those three emissions are recorded automatically at South Pole, and are crucial to our understanding the mechanism and relations of auroral radio emissions. This experiment uses a 3x3 meter square magnetic dipole antenna, located 1.7 km away from the South Pole station. A pre-amplifier is buried right below the eastern pylon of the antenna, connected by a 1.7 km long co-axial cable to a LF-HF receiver in the station. The output of the receiver is fed into the Versatile Electromagnetic Wave Receiver (VIEW) and Windows system equipped with a digitization board. Software is written to digitize the selected signals at 1 or 2 MHz. This data acquisition system was designed so that researchers at Dartmouth College can review the data from South Pole weekly and save interesting parts according to instructions sent from Dartmouth. In the year of 2003, the experiment concentrated on the auroral roar frequency band. With 3 hours window per day, it captured more than 30 auroral roar events at South Pole station. The data show detailed structure of Auroral Roar, which is comprised of multiple narrow band features drifting in frequencies in a complicated pattern. ( LaBelle et al., 1995; Shepherd et al., 1998) Starting in 2004, the experiment is concentrating on the auroral hiss frequency band. This mode promises to caputure the first detailed structure of auroral hiss

  2. High-resolution HI and CO observations of high-latitude intermediate-velocity clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röhser, T.; Kerp, J.; Ben Bekhti, N.; Winkel, B.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Intermediate-velocity clouds (IVCs) are HI halo clouds that are likely related to a Galactic fountain process. In-falling IVCs are candidates for the re-accretion of matter onto the Milky Way. Aims: We study the evolution of IVCs at the disk-halo interface, focussing on the transition from atomic to molecular IVCs. We compare an atomic IVC to a molecular IVC and characterise their structural differences in order to investigate how molecular IVCs form high above the Galactic plane. Methods: With high-resolution HI observations of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope and 12CO(1 → 0) and 13CO(1 → 0) observations with the IRAM 30 m telescope, we analyse the small-scale structures within the two clouds. By correlating HI and far-infrared (FIR) dust continuum emission from the Planck satellite, the distribution of molecular hydrogen (H2) is estimated. We conduct a detailed comparison of the HI, FIR, and CO data and study variations of the XCO conversion factor. Results: The atomic IVC does not disclose detectable CO emission. The atomic small-scale structure, as revealed by the high-resolution HI data, shows low peak HI column densities and low HI fluxes as compared to the molecular IVC. The molecular IVC exhibits a rich molecular structure and most of the CO emission is observed at the eastern edge of the cloud. There is observational evidence that the molecular IVC is in a transient and, thus, non-equilibrium phase. The average XCO factor is close to the canonical value of the Milky Way disk. Conclusions: We propose that the two IVCs represent different states in a gradual transition from atomic to molecular clouds. The molecular IVC appears to be more condensed allowing the formation of H2 and CO in shielded regions all over the cloud. Ram pressure may accumulate gas and thus facilitate the formation of H2. We show evidence that the atomic IVC will evolve also into a molecular IVC in a few Myr. The reduced datacubes are only available at the CDS via

  3. High Resolution Measurement of LF Auroral Hiss at South Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, S.; Labelle, J.

    2005-05-01

    In December 2002, a Versatile Electromagnetic Wave Receiver (VIEW) and a new digitization system were deployed at South Pole station(-74° magnetic latitude). The motivation was to measure three types of auroral radio emissions: Auroral Roar, a relatively narrowband (δf/f<0.1) emission near 2 and 3 times the F region ionospheric electron cyclotron frequency (fce); Auroral Hiss, a whistler mode wave emission with frequencies lower than 1MHz; and Auroral medium frequency (MF) burst, broadband impulsive radio emissions observed at ground level during the breakup phase of auroral substorms. High resolution broad band structure of those three emissions are recorded automatically at South Pole, and are crucial to our understanding the mechanism and relations of auroral radio emissions. This experiment uses a 3×3 meter square magnetic dipole antenna, located 1.7 km away from the South Pole station. A pre-amplifier is buried right below the eastern pylon of the antenna, connected by a 1.7 km long co-axial cable to a LF-HF receiver in the station. The output of the receiver is fed into the Versatile Electromagnetic Wave Receiver (VIEW) and Windows system equipped with a digitization board. Customed software was used to digitize the selected signals at 1-2 MHz. This data acquisition system was designed so that researchers at Dartmouth College can review the data from South Pole weekly and save interesting parts according to instructions sent from Dartmouth. In the year of 2004(from Jan through September), the experiment concentrated on the auroral hiss frequency band, covering either 0-500 kHz or 0-1000 kHz. With 3-6 hours window per day, VIEW captured more than 30 GBytes data of auroral hiss waveforms. Many experiments report wave forms of VLF auroral hiss at f < 30 kHz. We focused on waveforms of LF auroral hiss, typically at 100-300 kHz. At these frequencies, the hiss shows striking fine structure. We classified our LF hiss events into three different types: standard

  4. Laser Doppler field sensor for high resolution flow velocity imaging without camera

    SciTech Connect

    Voigt, Andreas; Bayer, Christian; Shirai, Katsuaki; Buettner, Lars; Czarske, Juergen

    2008-09-20

    In this paper we present a laser sensor for highly spatially resolved flow imaging without using a camera. The sensor is an extension of the principle of laser Doppler anemometry (LDA). Instead of a parallel fringe system, diverging and converging fringes are employed. This method facilitates the determination of the tracer particle position within the measurement volume and leads to an increased spatial and velocity resolution compared to conventional LDA. Using a total number of four fringe systems the flow is resolved in two spatial dimensions and the orthogonal velocity component. Since no camera is used, the resolution of the sensor is not influenced by pixel size effects. A spatial resolution of 4 {mu}m in the x direction and 16 {mu}m in the y direction and a relative velocity resolution of 1x10{sup -3} have been demonstrated up to now. As a first application we present the velocity measurement of an injection nozzle flow. The sensor is also highly suitable for applications in nano- and microfluidics, e.g., for the measurement of flow rates.

  5. HIGH-RESOLUTION SEISMIC VELOCITY AND ATTENUATION MODELS OF THE CAUCASUS-CASPIAN REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Mellors, R; Gok, R; Pasyanos, M; Skobeltsyn, G; Teoman, U; Godoladze, T; Sandvol, E

    2008-07-01

    The southwest edge of Eurasia is a tectonically and structurally complex region that includes the Caspian and Black Sea basins, the Caucasus Mountains, and the high plateaus south of the Caucasus. Using data from 25 broadband stations located in the region, new estimates of crustal and upper mantle thickness, velocity structure, and attenuation are being developed. Receiver functions have been determined for all stations. Depth to Moho is estimated using slant stacking of the receiver functions, forward modeling, and inversion. Moho depths along the Caspian and in the Kura Depression are in general poorly constrained using only receiver functions due to thick sedimentary basin sediments. The best fitting models suggest a low velocity upper crust with Moho depths ranging from 30 to 40 km. Crustal thicknesses increase in the Greater Caucasus with Moho depths of 40 to 50 km. Pronounced variations with azimuth of source are observed indicating 3D structural complexity and upper crustal velocities are higher than in the Kura Depression to the south. In the Lesser Caucasus, south and west of the Kura Depression, the crust is thicker (40 to 50 km) and upper crustal velocities are higher. Work is underway to refine these models with the event based surface wave dispersion and ambient noise correlation measurements from continuous data. Regional phase (Lg and Pg) attenuation models as well as blockage maps for Pn and Sn are being developed. Two methods are used to estimate Q: the two-station method to estimate inter-station Q and the reversed, two-station, two event method. The results are then inverted to create Lg and Pg Q maps. Initial results suggest substantial variations in both Pg and Lg Q in the region. A zone of higher Pg Q extends west from the Caspian between the Lesser and Greater Caucasus and a narrow area of higher Lg Q is observed.

  6. High-Resolution Correlated Fission Product Measurements of 235U (nth , f) with SPIDER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Dan; Spider Team

    2015-10-01

    The SPIDER detector (SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research) has obtained high-resolution, moderate-efficiency, correlated fission product data needed for many applications including the modeling of next generation nuclear reactors, stockpile stewardship, and the fundamental understanding of the fission process. SPIDER simultaneously measures velocity and energy of both fission products to calculate fission product yields (FPYs), neutron multiplicity (ν), and total kinetic energy (TKE). These data will be some of the first of their kind available to nuclear data evaluations. An overview of the SPIDER detector, analytical method, and preliminary results for 235U (nth , f) will be presented. LA-UR-15-20130 This work benefited from the use of the LANSCE accelerator facility and was performed under the auspices of the US Department of Energy by Los Alamos Security, LLC under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  7. HIGH RESOLUTION EMITTANCE MEASUREMENTS AT SNS FRONT END

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Zhukov, Alexander P

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac accelerates an H- beam from 2.5MeV up to 1GeV. Recently the emittance scanner in the MEBT (2.5 MeV) was upgraded. In addition to the slit - harp measurement, we now can use a slit installed on the same actuator as the harp. In combination with a faraday cup located downstream in DTL part of the linac, it represents a classical slit-slit emittance measurement device. While a slit slit scan takes much longer, it is immune to harp related problems such as wire cross talk, and thus looks promising for accurate halo measurements. Time resolution of the new device seems to be sufficient to estimate the amount of beam in the chopper gap (the scanner is downstream of the chopper), and probably to measure its emittance. This paper describes the initial measurements with the new device and some model validation data.

  8. High-Resolution Parallax Measurements of Scorpius X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, C. F.; Fomalont, E. B.; Geldzahler, B. J.

    1999-02-01

    The results of eight VLBA observations at 5 GHz, spanning 3 yr, have yielded a measured trigonometric parallax for Sco X-1 of 0.00036"+/-0.00004" hence, its distance is 2.8+/-0.3 kpc. This is the most precise parallax measured to date. Although our measured distance is 40% farther away than previous estimates based on X-ray luminosity, our Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer observations, with a measured luminosity of 2.3×1038 ergs s-1, and determined distance continue to support the hypothesis that Z-source low-mass X-ray binary systems, like Sco X-1, radiate at the Eddington luminosity at a particular point in their X-ray color-color diagram.

  9. High resolution wind measurements for offshore wind energy development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, Son Van (Inventor); Neumann, Gregory (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method, apparatus, system, article of manufacture, and computer readable storage medium provide the ability to measure wind. Data at a first resolution (i.e., low resolution data) is collected by a satellite scatterometer. Thin slices of the data are determined. A collocation of the data slices are determined at each grid cell center to obtain ensembles of collocated data slices. Each ensemble of collocated data slices is decomposed into a mean part and a fluctuating part. The data is reconstructed at a second resolution from the mean part and a residue of the fluctuating part. A wind measurement is determined from the data at the second resolution using a wind model function. A description of the wind measurement is output.

  10. Active Control of Jet Noise Using High Resolution TRPIV Part 2: Velocity-Pressure-Acoustic Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, Kerwin; Kostka, Stanislav; Berger, Zachary; Berry, Matthew; Gogineni, Sivaram; Glauser, Mark

    2011-11-01

    We investigate the pressure, velocity and acoustic field of a transonic jet. Test conditions comprise a 2 inch nozzle, analyzing two flow speeds, Mach 0.6 and 0.85, with open loop control explored for the Mach 0.6 case. We make simultaneous measurements of the near-field pressure and far-field acoustics at 40 kHz, alongside 10 kHz time resolved PIV measurements in the r-z plane. Cross correlations are performed exploring how both the near-field Fourier filtered pressure and low dimensional POD modes relate to the far-field acoustics. Of interest are those signatures witch exhibit the strongest correlation with far-field, and subsequently how these structures can be controlled. The goal is to investigate how flow-induced perturbations, via synthetic jet actuators, of the developing shear layer might bring insight into how one may alter the flow such that the far-field acoustic signature is mitigated. The TR-PIV measurements will prove to be a powerful tool in being able to track the propagation of physical structures for both the controlled and uncontrolled jet.

  11. High Resolution Spectral Measurements of Electrical Propulsion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Murat; Batishchev, Oleg; Martinez-Sanchez, Manuel

    2007-11-01

    Among various diagnostics methods in studying the EP thrusters' plasma, emission spectroscopy provides a non-invasive, fast and economical diagnostics allowing also the ability to access hard to reach locations. This study presents the spectral measurement results of SPT (BHT-200) and TAL (MHT-9) Hall Effect thrusters and mini-Helicon (mHTX@MIT) thruster plasmas. The measurements were conducted using a 750mm focal length spectrometer with a spectral resolution of up to ˜0.01 nm in the UV-VIS-NIR wavelength range, 200-1000nm. For one set of the measurements, collection optics was placed on a portable optical shelf attached to the window port of the vacuum chamber. For another set of measurements the thruster plasma radiation emission was collected using a collimating lens inside the vacuum chamber and the signal was brought out of the chamber to the spectrometer by the use of UV-rated optical fibers. Accurate spectral characterization was done for Xe and Ar plasma in a broad operational range. Additionally, emission spectroscopy was used to detect line radiation due to wall erosion products in SPT, to study the effect of thruster operational parameters on the ceramic lining erosion rate, subsequently of the thruster's lifetime.

  12. High resolution redox potential measurements: techniques, interpretation and value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorenhout, Michel; van der Geest, Harm G.

    2013-04-01

    The ongoing improvement of techniques for the in situ measurement of redox potentials has led to a large number of studies on redox variability in various environments. These studies originate from a wide array of scientific disciplines, amongst which ecology (sediment biogeochemistry), environmental chemistry (degradation studies) and archaeology (in situ preservation). To gain insight in the potential applications, this paper presents three examples of studies in which a newly developed measurement technique was used in soils and where spatial and temporal variation plays an important role. The first one is a microcosm study on the effects of biota on the dynamics of redox conditions in the toplayer of aquatic sediments, showing that the presence of microbiota has a direct influence on biogeochemical parameters. The second is the study of the redox potential in the world heritage site of Bryggen (Bergen, NO) that is under threat of oxidation. The oxidation, caused by a lowered groundwater table, causes soil degradation and unstable conditions for the monumental buildings of the Medieval site. The third study shows variability in a sandy flood plain in Bangladesh, where redox processes dictate the environmental behaviour of Arsenic. This toxic metal is present in many wells used for drinking water, but shows very local variation in dissolution dynamics. In these three studies, continuous measurements of (changes in) redox conditions revealed a strong variability in these systems and consequences for the interpretation of single point measurements or low frequency sampling campaigns are discussed. In these and many other cases, the continuous measurement of the redox potential in soil media will aid in the understanding of the system under study.

  13. High resolution DNA content measurements of mammalian sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkel, D.; Lake, S.; Gledhill, B.L.; Van Dilla, M.A.; Stephenson, D.; Watchmaker, G.

    1982-01-01

    The high condensation and flat shape of the mammalian sperm nucleus present unique difficulties to flow cytometric measurement of DNA content. Chromatin compactness makes quantitative fluorescent staining for DNA difficult and causes a high index of refraction. The refractive index makes optical measurements sensitive to sperm head orientation. We demonstrate that the optical problems can be overcome using the commercial ICP22 epiillumination flow cytometer (Ortho Instruments, Westwood, MA) or a specially built cell orientating flow cytometer (OFCM). The design and operation of the OFCM are described. Measurements of the angular dependence of fluorescence from acriflavine stained rabbit sperm show that it is capable of orienting flat sperm with a tolerance of +-7/sup 0/. Differences in the angular dependence for the similarly shaped bull and rabbit sperm allow discrimination of these cells. We show that DNA staining with 4-6 diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) or an ethidium bromide mithramycin combination allows resolution of the X and Y populations in mouse sperm. They have also been successful with sperm from the bull, ram, rabbit, and boar. Reliable results with human sperm are not obtained. The accuracy of the staining and measurement techniques are verified by the correct determination of the relative content of these two populations in sperm from normal mice and those with the Cattanach (7 to X) translocation. Among the potential uses of these techniques are measurement of DNA content errors induced in sperm due to mutagen exposure, and assessment of the fractions of X and Y sperm in semen that may have one population artifically enriched.

  14. High Resolution Viscosity Measurement by Thermal Noise Detection

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar Sandoval, Felipe; Sepúlveda, Manuel; Bellon, Ludovic; Melo, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    An interferometric method is implemented in order to accurately assess the thermal fluctuations of a micro-cantilever sensor in liquid environments. The power spectrum density (PSD) of thermal fluctuations together with Sader’s model of the cantilever allow for the indirect measurement of the liquid viscosity with good accuracy. The good quality of the deflection signal and the characteristic low noise of the instrument allow for the detection and corrections of drawbacks due to both the cantilever shape irregularities and the uncertainties on the position of the laser spot at the fluctuating end of the cantilever. Variation of viscosity below 0.03 mPa·s was detected with the alternative to achieve measurements with a volume as low as 50 μL. PMID:26540061

  15. High Resolution Viscosity Measurement by Thermal Noise Detection.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Felipe Aguilar; Sepúlveda, Manuel; Bellon, Ludovic; Melo, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    An interferometric method is implemented in order to accurately assess the thermal fluctuations of a micro-cantilever sensor in liquid environments. The power spectrum density (PSD) of thermal fluctuations together with Sader's model of the cantilever allow for the indirect measurement of the liquid viscosity with good accuracy. The good quality of the deflection signal and the characteristic low noise of the instrument allow for the detection and corrections of drawbacks due to both the cantilever shape irregularities and the uncertainties on the position of the laser spot at the fluctuating end of the cantilever. Variation of viscosity below 0:03mPa·s was detected with the alternative to achieve measurements with a volume as low as 50 µL. PMID:26540061

  16. Toroidal magnetic detector for high resolution measurement of muon momenta

    DOEpatents

    Bonanos, Peter

    1992-01-01

    A muon detector system including central and end air-core superconducting toroids and muon detectors enclosing a central calorimeter/detector. Muon detectors are positioned outside of toroids and all muon trajectory measurements are made in a nonmagnetic environment. Internal support for each magnet structure is provided by sheets, located at frequent and regularly spaced azimuthal planes, which interconnect the structural walls of the toroidal magnets. In a preferred embodiment, the shape of the toroidal magnet volume is adjusted to provide constant resolution over a wide range of rapidity.

  17. Toroidal magnetic detector for high resolution measurement of muon momenta

    DOEpatents

    Bonanos, P.

    1992-01-07

    A muon detector system including central and end air-core superconducting toroids and muon detectors enclosing a central calorimeter/detector. Muon detectors are positioned outside of toroids and all muon trajectory measurements are made in a nonmagnetic environment. Internal support for each magnet structure is provided by sheets, located at frequent and regularly spaced azimuthal planes, which interconnect the structural walls of the toroidal magnets. In a preferred embodiment, the shape of the toroidal magnet volume is adjusted to provide constant resolution over a wide range of rapidity. 4 figs.

  18. High-resolution measurements of pressure solution creep.

    PubMed

    Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Renard, Francois; Feder, Jens; Jamtveit, Bjørn; Meakin, Paul; Jøssang, Torstein

    2003-07-01

    Two dilatometers with high precision and stability have been developed for measurement of indentation by pressure solution creep. The indentation of gold wires or glass cylinders into sodium chloride has been measured with down to 10 A accuracy and 6% precision. The indentation curves show a strong history dependence and the indentation rate decreases by three orders of magnitude over 400 h. The indentation mechanism is shown to be a pressure solution creep process in which material is dissolved at the indentor-sodium chloride contacts and transported to the free surface, where it precipitates in the proximity of the indentors. The indentation rates are not controlled by precipitation rates, the density of preexisting dislocations in the material, by change in the contact widths, or by ordinary plastic deformation. Small amplitude sinusoidal variations of temperature and normal stress are shown to have a large effect on the indentation rate. Moreover, sudden increase in normal stress from the indentor on the sodium chloride is shown to initiate an increased, time-dependent indentation rate. A model for pressure solution creep with time-dependent contact sizes explains the history dependence of the indentation data presented. PMID:12935153

  19. High resolution Rayleigh wave phase velocity tomography in northern North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weilai; Wu, Jianping; Fang, Lihua

    2012-04-01

    This study presents the Rayleigh wave phase velocity tomographic results in northern North China. The data are from 190 broad-band and 10 very broad-band stations of the North China Seismic Array and 50 permanent stations nearby. All available teleseismic vertical component time-series are used to extract the phase velocity dispersion curves of the fundamental mode Rayleigh wave by interstation method. Tomographic maps are obtained at periods of 10, 15, 25 and 60 s with a grid spacing of 0.25°× 0.25°. The short-period phase velocity maps show good correlation with the geological and tectonic features. To be specific, lower velocities correspond to North China Basin and depression area whereas higher velocities are associated with Taihangshan and Yanshan uplifts. At 25 s, there are obvious low-velocity anomalies in Jizhong depression and Beijing-Tianjin-Tangshan region, indicating that ascendant low velocity channel may be formed beneath these areas and induce the velocity difference in the upper crust. The phase velocity map at 60 s reflects the upper-mantle information in the study area. High-velocity anomalies are observed at Yanshan blocks north to Zhangjiakou-Bohai seismic belt, suggesting that the materials are stable beneath these areas or the asthenosphere is at deeper location. Low-velocity anomalies are mainly south to the seismic belt, implying the asthenosphere is shallower and the materials are transformed by the open stretching rift trending NNE, resulting in many NNE-directed fault belts. These structural differences at depth may be controlled by the fault activity and strong tectonic movements.

  20. High-Resolution Velocity-Depth Functions From a BSR Field at the Yaquina Basin off Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grobys, J. W.; Huebscher, C. P.; Gajewski, D.; Bialas, J.

    2002-12-01

    In high-resolution MCS data from Yaquina Basin off Peru we observed various intricate reflection patterns related to gas and gas-hydrate. The BSR variations classify the profile into five areas: Where the BSR follows stratigraphy, it is disrupted by several faults but strong in amplitude. Reflection amplitudes from the overburden are reduced. Blanking occurs beneath the BSR. Continuing down slope where the BSR crosses stratigraphy the BSR amplitude decreases, reflections from above and beneath have regular strength. Further down slope BSR continuity dissolves into a patchy occurrence with blanking beneath. Up slope the BSR continues with reduced reflection amplitude and touches the sea floor. Towards coastline the BSR disappears completely. One of the most important tools to unravel the origin of the reflections is the high resolution velocity analysis of OBS data. On top of the MCS line a OBS/OBH profile has been shot. Sources were two 1.7 l GI-guns (Sodera) with a peak frequency of 80 - 100 Hz. Eleven OBS/OBH of the GEOMAR type recorded with a sampling rate of 1 ms. This data set allows a high resolution velocity analysis. Two different processing flows have been applied to the data. The data have undergone a Kirchhoff wave-equation datuming and adjacent coherence filtering to eliminate the one sided travel path through the water column. Both datumed and not datumed seismograms have been examined with a semblance supported interactive velocity analysis. Data have also been analyzed with high and low resolution in depth in order to find an optimum trade-off between vertical resolution and minimization of errors caused by sensitivity of the DIX' formula regarding velocity variations at thin layers. The data help to understand the reflection pattern in terms of gas-hydrate occurrence and dissociation, fluid migration and anisotropic permeability of sediments.

  1. About measuring velocity dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellhauer, M.

    A lot of our knowledge about the dynamics and total masses of pressure dominated stellar systems relies on measuring the internal velocity disper- sion of the system. We assume virial equilibrium and that we are able to measure only the bound stars of the system without any contamination. This article shows how likely it is to measure the correct velocity dispersion in reality. It will show that as long as we have small samples of velocity mea- surements the distribution of possible outcomes can be very large and as soon as we have a source of error the velocity dispersion can wrong by several standard deviations especially in large samples.

  2. Dust particle velocity measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thielman, L. O.

    1976-01-01

    A laser Doppler velocimeter was used to measure the velocity distributions for particles entering a vacuum chamber from the atmosphere through calibrated leaks. The relative number of particles per velocity interval was obtained for particulates of three size distributions and two densities passing through six different leak geometries. The velocity range 15 to 320 meters per second was investigated. Peak particle velocities were found to occur in the 15 to 150 meters per second range depending upon type of particle and leak geometry. A small fraction of the particles were found to have velocities in the 150 to 320 meters per second range.

  3. High-ResolutionVelocity Fields of Nearby Spiral Galaxies with the Southern African Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Carl; Williams, Ted; Spekkens, Kristine; Lee-Waddell, Karen; Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Sellwood, Jerry

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to test ΛCDM predictions of galaxy mass distributions, we have obtained spectrophotometric observations of several nearby spiral galaxies with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) Fabry-Pérot (FP) interferometer as part of the RSS Imaging spectroscopy Nearby Galaxy Survey. Utilizing the SALT FP's 8 arcmin field of view and 2 arcsec angular resolution, we have derived 2D velocity fields of the Hα emission line to high spatial resolution at large radii. We have modeled these velocity fields with the DiskFit software package and found them to be in good agreement with lower-resolution velocity fields of the HI 21 cm line for the same galaxies. Here we present our Hα kinematic map of the barred spiral galaxy NGC 578. At the distance to this galaxy (22 Mpc), our kinematic data has a spatial resolution of 185 pc and extends to galactocentric radii of 13 kpc. The high spatial resolution of this data allows us to resolve the inner rising part of the rotation curves, which is compromised by beam smearing in lower-resolution observations. We are using these Hα kinematic data, combined with HI 21 cm kinematics and broadband photometric observations, to place constraints on NGC 578's mass distribution.

  4. A high-resolution spectropolarimetric survey of Herbig Ae/Be stars - I. Observations and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alecian, E.; Wade, G. A.; Catala, C.; Grunhut, J. H.; Landstreet, J. D.; Bagnulo, S.; Böhm, T.; Folsom, C. P.; Marsden, S.; Waite, I.

    2013-02-01

    This is the first in a series of papers in which we describe and report the analysis of a large survey of Herbig Ae/Be stars in circular spectropolarimetry. Using the ESPaDOnS and Narval high-resolution spectropolarimeters at the Canada-France-Hawaii and Bernard Lyot Telescopes, respectively, we have acquired 132 circularly polarized spectra of 70 Herbig Ae/Be stars and Herbig candidates. The large majority of these spectra are characterized by a resolving power of about 65 000, and a spectral coverage from about 3700 Å to 1 μm. The peak signal-to-noise ratio per CCD pixel ranges from below 100 (for the faintest targets) to over 1000 (for the brightest). The observations were acquired with the primary aim of searching for magnetic fields in these objects. However, our spectra are suitable for a variety of other important measurements, including rotational properties, variability, binarity, chemical abundances, circumstellar environment conditions and structure, etc. In this paper, we describe the sample selection, the observations and their reduction, and the measurements that will comprise the basis of much of our following analysis. We describe the determination of fundamental parameters for each target. We detail the least-squares deconvolution (LSD) that we have applied to each of our spectra, including the selection, editing and tuning of the LSD line masks. We describe the fitting of the LSD Stokes I profiles using a multicomponent model that yields the rotationally broadened photospheric profile (providing the projected rotational velocity and radial velocity for each observation) as well as circumstellar emission and absorption components. Finally, we diagnose the longitudinal Zeeman effect via the measured circular polarization, and report the longitudinal magnetic field and Stokes V Zeeman signature detection probability. As an appendix, we provide a detailed review of each star observed.

  5. HIGH-RESOLUTION OBSERVATIONS AND THE PHYSICS OF HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUD A0

    SciTech Connect

    Verschuur, Gerrit L.

    2013-04-01

    The neutral hydrogen structure of high-velocity cloud A0 (at about -180 km s{sup -1}) has been mapped with a 9.'1 resolution. Gaussian decomposition of the profiles is used to separately map families of components defined by similarities in center velocities and line widths. About 70% of the H I gas is in the form of a narrow, twisted filament whose typical line widths are of the order of 24 km s{sup -1}. Many bright features with narrow line widths of the order of 6 km s{sup -1}, clouds, are located in and near the filament. A third category with properties between those of the filament and clouds appears in the data. The clouds are not always co-located with the broader line width filament emission as seen projected on the sky. Under the assumption that magnetic fields underlie the presence of the filament, a theorem is developed for its stability in terms of a toroidal magnetic field generated by the flow of gas along field lines. It is suggested that the axial magnetic field strength may be derived from the excess line width of the H I emission over and above that due to kinetic temperature by invoking the role of Alfven waves that create what is in essence a form of magnetic turbulence. At a distance of 200 pc the axial and the derived toroidal magnetic field strengths in the filament are then about 6 {mu}G while for the clouds they are about 4 {mu}G. The dependence of the derived field strength on distance is discussed.

  6. An Improved Method for the Estimation and Visualization of Velocity Fields from Gastric High-Resolution Electrical Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Paskaranandavadivel, Niranchan; O'Grady, Gregory; Du, Peng; Pullan, Andrew J; Cheng, Leo K

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution (HR) electrical mapping is an important clinical research tool for understanding normal and abnormal gastric electrophysiology. Analyzing velocities of gastric electrical activity in a reliable and accurate manner can provide additional valuable information for quantitatively and qualitatively comparing features across and within subjects, particularly during gastric dysrhythmias. In this study we compared three methods of estimating velocities from HR recordings to determine which method was the most reliable for use with gastric HR electrical mapping. The three methods were i) Simple finite difference ii) Smoothed finite difference and a iii) Polynomial based method. With synthetic data, the accuracy of the simple finite difference method resulted in velocity errors almost twice that of the smoothed finite difference and the polynomial based method, in the presence of activation time error up to 0.5s. With three synthetic cases under various noise types and levels, the smoothed finite difference resulted in average speed error of 3.2% and an average angle error of 2.0° and the polynomial based method had an average speed error of 3.3% and an average angle error of 1.7°. With experimental gastric slow wave recordings performed in pigs, the three methods estimated similar velocities (6.3-7.3 mm/s), but the smoothed finite difference method had a lower standard deviation in its velocity estimate than the simple finite difference and the polynomial based method, leading it to be the method of choice for velocity estimation in gastric slow wave propagation. An improved method for visualizing velocity fields is also presented. PMID:22207635

  7. Retrieval of Precise Radial Velocities from High Resolution Near-Infrared Spectra of M Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peter; Plavchan, Peter; Gagne, Jonathan; Furlan, Elise; Bottom, Michael; Anglada-Escudé, Guillem; White, Russel J.; Davison, Cassy; Mills, Sean; Beichman, Charles A.; Brinkworth, Carolyn; Johnson, John; Ciardi, David R.; Wallace, J. Kent; Mennesson, Bertrand; von Braun, Kaspar; Vasisht, Gautam; Prato, Lisa A.; Kane, Stephen R.; Tanner, Angelle M.; Walp, Bernie; Crawford, Sam; Lin, Sean

    2015-01-01

    We present a data analysis pipeline focused on obtaining precision radial velocities (RV) of M Dwarfs from spectra taken between 2.309 and 2.316 microns by the CSHELL spectrograph (R~46,000) at NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility with the aid of a methane isotopologue gas cell (see poster by Plavchan et al. at this meeting). The pipeline compares the observed spectra with a forward model defined by parameters that are optimized using a simplex amoeba algorithm. The stellar template is optimized simultaneously with the fit parameters in an iterative process. The pipeline accounts for temporal variations in the spectral wavelength solution, line spread function, and interference fringes due to instrumental effects. We apply our pipeline to the M Dwarfs GJ 15 A and GJ 876 and the M Giant SV Peg. For GJ 15 A, we are able to obtain 30 m/s RV precision. For the planet host GJ 876, the two most massive planets are easily retrievable from our RV curve. For SV Peg, the single night RV precision can be as low as 15 m/s, with < 5 m/s obtainable through data stacking.

  8. Inter-observer Variability in Esophageal Body Measurements with High Resolution Manometry among New Physician Users

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Erick; Rife, Christopher; Clayton, Steven; Naas, Peter; Nietert, Paul; Castell, Donald

    2012-01-01

    Goals To evaluate inter-observer variability among four new physician users on measures of esophageal body function. Background Esophageal high resolution manometry (HRM) allows observation of esophageal motility via pressure topography plots. Little is known about the inter-observer variability among physicians. Study Two resident and two fellow level physicians each interpreted 10 liquid swallows of 20 esophageal HRM studies (n=200 swallows) using the BioVIEW Analysis Suite (Sandhill Scientific, Inc.). Studies evaluated were from patients referred for evaluation of dysphagia but found to have normal esophageal manometry and complete liquid bolus transit. Physicians received an orientation session and reviewed recent literature. Each physician recorded contractile front velocity (CFV) and distal contractile integral (DCI) for each liquid swallow. STATISTICS: Inter-observer agreements for CFV and DCI were assessed by intraclass correlation (ICC) values. Linear correlations between measurements by two readers were assessed using linear regression modeling techniques. Results CFV and DCI values of up to 200 data points were analyzed. Four reader results for CFV and DCI showed strong agreement although stronger for DCI measures (ICC=0.94; 0.91 - 0.98) in comparison to CFV (ICC=0.79; 0.52 - 0.82). Further correlation was performed with two readers; readers 1 and 2 revealed excellent correlation for DCI (r=0.95, p<0.001) and good correlation for CFV (r=0.61, p<0.001). Conclusions With a thorough orientation session, good to excellent agreement for CFV and DCI measurements can be obtained from new physician users. CFV measures exhibit greater inter-observer variability possibly due to the artifact produced by intraesophageal pressurization. PMID:22647828

  9. [Measurement of OH radicals in flame with high resolution differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Liu, Wen-Qing; Kan, Rui-Feng; Si, Fu-Qi; Xu, Zhen-Yu; Hu, Ren-Zhi; Xie, Pin-Hua

    2011-10-01

    The present paper describes a new developed high resolution differential optical absorption spectroscopy instrument used for the measurement of OH radicals in flame. The instrument consists of a Xenon lamp for light source; a double pass high resolution echelle spectrometer with a resolution of 3.3 pm; a multiple-reflection cell of 20 meter base length, in which the light reflects in the cell for 176 times, so the whole path length of light can achieve 3 520 meters. The OH radicals'6 absorption lines around 308 nm were simultaneously observed in the experiment. By using high resolution DOAS technology, the OH radicals in candles, kerosene lamp, and alcohol burner flames were monitored, and their concentrations were also inverted. PMID:22250529

  10. An high resolution FDIRC for the measurement of cosmic-ray isotopic abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrocchesi, P. S.; Bagliesi, M. G.; Batkov, K.; Bigongiari, G.; Kim, M. Y.; Maestro, P.

    2011-08-01

    Measurements of the relative abundance of cosmic isotopes and of the energy dependence of their fluxes may clarify our present understanding on the confinement time of charged cosmic rays in the Galaxy. Experimental studies of these propagation clocks have been carried out by balloon and space missions at energies of a few 100 MeV/amu by means of detection techniques based on multiple d E/d x sampling, coupled with a measurement of the energy released in a thick absorber. At larger energies, the isotopic separation of light nuclei (as, for instance, 9Be/ 10Be) can be achieved by combining a precise measurement of the particle's rigidity with an high resolution determination of its velocity, via the observation of the Cherenkov effect in a radiator. In this paper, we propose the introduction - for the first time in a space experiment - of the DIRC technique (Detection of Internal Reflected Cherenkov light) for the identification of cosmic-ray isotopes. This type of detector has been successfully used in electron-positron colliders for particle identification and in particular for π-K separation. While for particles with unit charge the light yield is a limiting factor, in the case of a nucleus of charge Z the larger photostatistics (due to the Z2 dependence of Cherenkov light emission) is the key to reach an adequate angular resolution to provide a mass discrimination for isotopes of astrophysical interest. We report on the early development phase of a DIRC prototype with a focussing scheme (FDIRC) to collect the Cherenkov light onto a detector plane instrumented with a Silicon PhotoMultiplier (SiPM) array.

  11. To assess the intimal thickness, flow velocities, and luminal diameter of carotid arteries using high-resolution B-mode ultrasound doppler imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vemuru, Madhuri; Jabbar, Afzal; Chandra, Suman

    2004-04-01

    Carotid imaging is a Gold Standard test that provides useful information about the structure and functions of carotid arteries. Spectral imaging helps to evaluate the vessel and hemodynamic changes. High resolution B-mode imaging has emerged as one of the methods of choice for determining the anatomic extent of atherosclerosis and its progression and for assessing cardiovascular risks. The measurements made with Doppler correlate well with pathologic measurements. Recent prospective studies have clearly demonstrated that these measurements of carotid intimal thickness are potent predictors of Myocardial Infarction and Stroke. This method appears very attractive as it is non-invasive, extremely safe, well accepted by the patient and relatively inexpensive. It can be performed serially and has the advantage of visualizing the arterial wall in contrast to angiographic techniques which provide only an outline of the arterial lumen. Recently, there has been an interest in the clinical use of this technique in making difficult clinical decisions like deciding on preventive therapies. 30 subjects aged 21-60 years and 30 subjects aged 61-85 years of both sexes are selected after doing a baseline study to exclude Hypertension, Diabetes, Obesity and Hyperlipidemia. The carotid arteries were examined for intimal thickening, blood flow velocities and luminal diameter. With aging there is a narrowing of the carotid vessels and significant increase in intimal thickening with a consequent increase in the blood flow velocities. Inter-observer, intra-observer and instrument variations are seen and there is no significant change in the values when the distal flow pattern is considered for measurements. Aging produces major cardiovascular changes including decreased elasticity and compliance of great arteries leading to structural and functional alterations in heart and vessels. With aging there is increased intimal thickness and increased pulse wave velocity which is clearly

  12. Developing High-Resolution Inundation Estimates through a Downscaling of Brightness Temperature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, C. K.; Wood, E. F.

    2014-12-01

    There is currently a large demand for high-resolution estimates of inundation extent and flooding for applications in water management, risk assessment and hydrologic modeling. In many regions of the world it is possible to examine the extent of past inundation from visible and infrared imagery provided by sensors such as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS); however, this is not possible in regions that are densely vegetated or are under persistent cloud cover. As a result of this, there is a need for alternative methodologies that make use of other remotely sensed data sources to inform high-resolution estimates of inundation. One such data source is the AMSR-E/Aqua 37 GHz vertically and horizontally polarized brightness temperature measurements, which have been used in previous studies to estimate the extent of inundated areas and which can make observations in vegetated or cloudy regions. The objective of this work was to develop a decision tree classifier based downscaling methodology by which inundation extent can be obtained at a high resolution, based on microwave brightness temperature measurements and high resolution topographic information. Using a random forest classifier that combined the AMSR-E 37GHz brightness temperatures (~12km mean spatial resolution) and a number of high-resolution topographic indices derived from the National Elevation Dataset for the United States (30m spatial resolution), a high-resolution estimate of inundation was created. A case study of this work is presented for the severe flooding that occurred in Iowa during the summer of 2008. Training and validation data for the random forest classifier were derived from an ensemble of previously existing estimates of inundation from sources such as MODIS imagery, as well as simulated inundation extents generated from a hydrologic routing model. Results of this work suggest that the decision tree based downscaling has skill in producing high-resolution estimates

  13. Two-Phase Flow Modelling Perspectives Based on Novel High-Resolution Acoustic Measurements of Uniform Steady Sheet-Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauchat, J.; Revil-Baudard, T.; Hurther, D.

    2014-12-01

    Sheet flow is believed to be a major process for morphological evolution of natural systems. An important research effort has been dedicated to laboratory and numerical studies of sheet flow regime that have allowed to make some progress in the understanding of the underlying physical processes. Recent advances made in high resolution measurement techniques allows to give new insights into the small scale physical processes. In this contribution, a novel uniform and steady sheet flow dataset based on an Acoustic Concentration and Velocity Profiler (ACVP) is presented. Profile of colocated velocities (streamwise and wall-normal) and sediment concentration has been measured at high-resolution (3 mm ; 78 Hz for the velocities and 4.9 Hz for the concentration). The measured profiles extend over the whole water column, from the free surface down to the fixed bed and an ensemble averaging over eleven realisations of the same experimental conditions has been used to obtain mean profiles of streamwise velocity, concentration, sediment flux and turbulent shear stress. The present experiment corresponds to a Shields number of θ=0.44 and a suspension number of ws/u*=1.1 corresponding to the lower limit of the no-suspension sheet flow regime. The analysis of the mixing length profile allows to identify two layers, a dilute suspension layer dominated by turbulence and a dense moving bed layer dominated by granular interactions. Our measurements show that the Von Karman parameter is reduced by a factor of more than two and that the Schmidt number is almost constant with a mean value of σs=0.44. Frictional and collisional interactions are encountered in the bed layer. Frictional interactions dominate close to the fixed bed interface whereas collisional interactions seems to control the flow at the transition between the dense and dilute layers. The relevancy of different constitutive laws for two-phase flow models are discussed.

  14. High-resolution setup for measuring wavelength sensitivity of photoyellowing of translucent materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vaskuri, Anna Kärhä, Petri; Heikkilä, Anu

    2015-10-15

    Polystyrene and many other materials turn yellow when exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. All photodegradation mechanisms including photoyellowing are functions of the exposure wavelength, which can be described with an action spectrum. In this work, a new high-resolution transmittance measurement setup based on lasers has been developed for measuring color changes, such as the photoyellowing of translucent materials aged with a spectrograph. The measurement setup includes 14 power-stabilized laser lines between 325 nm and 933 nm wavelengths, of which one at a time is directed on to the aged sample. The power transmitted through the sample is measured with a silicon detector utilizing an integrating sphere. The sample is mounted on a high-resolution XY translation stage. Measurement at various locations aged with different wavelengths of exposure radiation gives the transmittance data required for acquiring the action spectrum. The combination of a UV spectrograph and the new high-resolution transmittance measurement setup enables a novel method for studying the UV-induced ageing of translucent materials with a spectral resolution of 3–8 nm, limited by the adjustable spectral bandwidth range of the spectrograph. These achievements form a significant improvement over earlier methods.

  15. High-resolution setup for measuring wavelength sensitivity of photoyellowing of translucent materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaskuri, Anna; Kärhä, Petri; Heikkilä, Anu; Ikonen, Erkki

    2015-10-01

    Polystyrene and many other materials turn yellow when exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. All photodegradation mechanisms including photoyellowing are functions of the exposure wavelength, which can be described with an action spectrum. In this work, a new high-resolution transmittance measurement setup based on lasers has been developed for measuring color changes, such as the photoyellowing of translucent materials aged with a spectrograph. The measurement setup includes 14 power-stabilized laser lines between 325 nm and 933 nm wavelengths, of which one at a time is directed on to the aged sample. The power transmitted through the sample is measured with a silicon detector utilizing an integrating sphere. The sample is mounted on a high-resolution XY translation stage. Measurement at various locations aged with different wavelengths of exposure radiation gives the transmittance data required for acquiring the action spectrum. The combination of a UV spectrograph and the new high-resolution transmittance measurement setup enables a novel method for studying the UV-induced ageing of translucent materials with a spectral resolution of 3-8 nm, limited by the adjustable spectral bandwidth range of the spectrograph. These achievements form a significant improvement over earlier methods.

  16. Experimental measurement of human head motion for high-resolution computed tomography system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liang; Chen, Zhiqiang; Jin, Xin; Yu, Hengyong; Wang, Ge

    2010-06-01

    Human head motion has been experimentally measured for high-resolution computed tomography (CT) design using a Canon digital camera. Our goal is to identify the minimal movements of the human head under ideal conditions without rigid fixation. In our experiments, all the 19 healthy volunteers were lying down with strict self-control. All of them were asked to be calm without pressures. Our results showed that the mean absolute value of the measured translation excursion was about 0.35 mm, which was much less than the measurements on real patients. Furthermore, the head motions in different directions were correlated. These results are useful for the design of the new instant CT system for in vivo high-resolution imaging (about 40 μm).

  17. High-resolution compact shear stress sensor for direct measurement of skin friction in fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Muchen; Kim, Chang-Jin ``Cj''

    2015-11-01

    The high-resolution measurement of skin friction in complex flows has long been of great interest but also a challenge in fluid mechanics. Compared with indirect measurement methods (e.g., laser Doppler velocimetry), direct measurement methods (e.g., floating element) do not involve any analogy and assumption but tend to suffer from instrumentation challenges, such as low sensing resolution or misalignments. Recently, silicon micromachined floating plates showed good resolution and perfect alignment but were too small for general purposes and too fragile to attach other surface samples repeatedly. In this work, we report a skin friction sensor consisting of a monolithic floating plate and a high-resolution optical encoder to measure its displacement. The key for the high resolution is in the suspension beams, which are very narrow (e.g., 0.25 mm) to sense small frictions along the flow direction but thick (e.g., 5 mm) to be robust along all other directions. This compact, low profile, and complete sensor is easy to use and allows repeated attachment and detachment of surface samples. The sheer-stress sensor has been tested in water tunnel and towing tank at different flow conditions, showing high sensing resolution for skin friction measurement. Supported by National Science Foundation (NSF) (No. 1336966) and Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) (No. HR0011-15-2-0021).

  18. Measurement of high-resolution mechanical contraction of cardiac muscle by induced eddy current.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Jae; Lee, Kang-Hwi; Kang, Seung-Jin; Kim, Kyeung-Nam; Khang, Seonah; Koo, Hye Ran; Gi, Sunok; Lee, Joo Hyeon; Lee, Jeong-Whan

    2014-01-01

    There are many types of devices which help to manage a personal health conditions such as heartbeat chest belt, pedometer and smart watch. And the most common device has the relationship with heart rate or ECG data. However, users have to attach some electrode or fasten the belt on the bare skin to measure bio-signal information. Therefore, most of people want more convenient and short-ready-time and no-need to attach electrode. In this paper, we proposed the high-resolution measuring system of mechanical activity of cardiac muscle and thereby measure heartbeat. The principle of the proposed measuring method is that the alternating current generate alternating magnetic field around coil. This primary magnetic field induces eddy current which makes magnetic field against primary coil in the nearby objects. To measure high-resolution changes of the induced secondary magnetic fields, we used digital Phase-locked loop(PLL) circuit which provides more high-resolution traces of frequency changes than the previous studies based on digital frequency counter method. As a result of our preliminary experiment, peak-peak intervals of the proposed method showed high correlation with R-R intervals of clinical ECG signals(r=0.9249). Also, from signal traces of the proposed method, we might make a conjecture that the contraction of atrium or ventricle is reflected by changing conductivity of cardiac muscle which is beating ceaselessly. PMID:25571434

  19. High resolution frequency to time domain transformations applied to the stepped carrier MRIS measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardalan, Sasan H.

    1992-01-01

    Two narrow-band radar systems are developed for high resolution target range estimation in inhomogeneous media. They are reformulations of two presently existing systems such that high resolution target range estimates may be achieved despite the use of narrow bandwidth radar pulses. A double sideband suppressed carrier radar technique originally derived in 1962, and later abandoned due to its inability to accurately measure target range in the presence of an interfering reflection, is rederived to incorporate the presence of an interfering reflection. The new derivation shows that the interfering reflection causes a period perturbation in the measured phase response. A high resolution spectral estimation technique is used to extract the period of this perturbation leading to accurate target range estimates independent of the signal-to-interference ratio. A non-linear optimal signal processing algorithm is derived for a frequency-stepped continuous wave radar system. The resolution enhancement offered by optimal signal processing of the data over the conventional Fourier Transform technique is clearly demonstrated using measured radar data. A method for modeling plane wave propagation in inhomogeneous media based on transmission line theory is derived and studied. Several simulation results including measurement of non-uniform electron plasma densities that develop near the heat tiles of a space re-entry vehicle are presented which verify the validity of the model.

  20. High-Resolution UV Holography Lens for Particle Size Distribution Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, Morris Kaufman; Capelle, Gene; Grover, Mike; Sorenson, Dan; Pazuchanics, Pete

    2010-01-01

    A high-resolution UV holography relay lens, shown in Figure 1, has been developed for measuring particle size distributions down to 0.5 μm in a 12-mm-diameter by 5-mm-thick volume. This work has been selected by an independent judging panel and editors of R&D Magazine as a recipient of a 2009 R&D 100 Award. This award recognizes the 100 most technologically significant products introduced during the past year.

  1. High resolution ion mobility measurements of peptides, proteins, and atomic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudgins, Robert Ransone

    1999-12-01

    A novel high resolution ion mobility apparatus has been constructed and applied to the study of atomic clusters and biological molecules in the gas phase. The resolving power of the high resolution apparatus is over an order of magnitude higher than has been achieved using conventional injected-ion drift tube techniques. A number of advantages of the experimental configuration, in addition to the higher resolution, are described. High resolution ion mobility measurements have been performed on atomic clusters of various composition. Several isomers for carbon cluster anions have been resolved for the first time. By comparison to computationally derived structures, detailed structural information can be extracted from the measurements. For small carbon cluster anions, ``tadpole'' isomers, where a short carbon chain is attached to a carbon ring, have been identified. Mobility measurements for (NaCl)nCl- clusters have revealed multiple isomers with the same fcc packing but different j x k x l dimensions. Metastable (NaCl)nCl- geometries isomerize on the timescale of the mobility measurements (hundreds of milliseconds). Rate constants and activation energies for the isomerization processes are extracted directly from the mobility measurements; the activation energies are found to be remarkably low. Indium and silicon cluster mobilities are found to be sensitive to the degree of electron spillout from the surface of the cluster, as revealed in differences in the anionic and cationic cluster mobilities. Mobility measurements of solvent-free biological molecules reveal important information about their intramolecular forces. Due to the gentle ion sampling in the high resolution ion mobility apparatus electrospray interface, high resolution mobilities of gas-phase proteins are found to be sensitive to the nature of the electrosprayed solution. Although calculations have shown that neutral polyalanine in vacuo is mostly helical, gas- phase polyalanine ions, AnH+, are found

  2. A sensitive, high resolution magic angle turning experiment for measuring chemical shift tensor principal values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alderman, D. W.

    1998-12-01

    A sensitive, high-resolution 'FIREMAT' two-dimensional (2D) magic-angle-turning experiment is described that measures chemical shift tensor principal values in powdered solids. The spectra display spinning-sideband patterns separated by their isotropic shifts. The new method's sensitivity and high resolution in the isotropic-shift dimension result from combining the 5pi magic-angle-turning pulse sequence, an extension of the pseudo-2D sideband-suppression data rearrangement, and the TIGER protocol for processing 2D data. TPPM decoupling is used to enhance resolution. The method requires precise synchronization of the pulses and sampling to the rotor position. It is shown that the technique obtains 35 natural-abundance 13C tensors from erythromycin in 19 hours, and high quality naturalabundance 15N tensors from eight sites in potassium penicillin V in three days on a 400MHz spectrometer.

  3. Bacteriorhodopsin as a high-resolution, high-capacity buffer for digital holographic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhart, D. H.; Koek, W. D.; Juchem, T.; Hampp, N.; Coupland, J. M.; Halliwell, N. A.

    2004-04-01

    Recent trends in optical metrology suggest that, in order for holographic measurement to become a widespread tool, it must be based on methods that do not require physical development of the hologram. While digital holography has been successfully demonstrated in recent years, unfortunately the limited information capacity of present electronic sensors, such as CCD arrays, is still many orders of magnitude away from directly competing with the high-resolution silver halide plates used in traditional holography. As a result, present digital holographic methods with current electronic sensors cannot record object sizes larger than several hundred microns at high resolution. In this paper, the authors report on the use of bacteriorhodopsin (BR) for digital holography to overcome these limitations. In particular, BR is a real-time recording medium with an information capacity (5000 line-pairs/mm) that even exceeds high resolution photographic film. As such, a centimetre-square area of BR film has the same information capacity of several hundred state-of-the-art CCD cameras. For digital holography, BR temporarily holds the hologram record so that its information content can be digitized for numeric reconstruction. In addition, this paper examines the use of BR for optical reconstruction without chemical development. When correctly managed, it is found that BR is highly effective, in terms of both quality and process time, for three-dimensional holographic measurements. Consequently, several key holographic applications, based on BR, are proposed in this paper.

  4. High resolution magnetostriction measurements in pulsed magnetic fields using fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daou, Ramzy; Weickert, Franziska; Nicklas, Michael; Steglich, Frank; Haase, Ariane; Doerr, Mathias

    2010-03-01

    We report on a new high resolution apparatus for measuring magnetostriction suitable for use at cryogenic temperatures in pulsed high magnetic fields which we have developed at the Hochfeld-Magnetlabor Dresden. Optical fiber strain gauges based on fiber Bragg gratings are used to measure the strain in small (˜1 mm) samples. We describe the implementation of a fast measurement system capable of resolving strains in the order of 10-7 with a full bandwidth of 47 kHz, and demonstrate its use on single crystal samples of GdSb and GdSi.

  5. The PRL Stabilized High-Resolution Echelle Fiber-fed Spectrograph: Instrument Description and First Radial Velocity Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Abhijit; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Roy, Arpita; Dixit, Vaibhav; Richardson, Eric Harvey; Dongre, Varun; Pathan, F. M.; Chaturvedi, Priyanka; Shah, Vishal; Ubale, Girish P.; Anandarao, B. G.

    2014-02-01

    We present spectrograph design details and initial radial velocity results from the PRL optical fiber-fed high-resolution cross-dispersed echelle spectrograph (PARAS), which has recently been commissioned at the Mount Abu 1.2 m telescope in India. Data obtained as part of the postcommissioning tests with PARAS show velocity precision better than 2 m s-1 over a period of several months on bright RV standard stars. For observations of σ Dra, we report 1.7 m s-1 precision for a period of 7 months, and for HD 9407, we report 2.1 m s-1 over a period of 2 months. PARAS is capable of single-shot spectral coverage of 3800-9500 Å at a resolution of ~67,000. The RV results were obtained between 3800 and 6900 Å using simultaneous wavelength calibration with a thorium-argon (ThAr) hollow cathode lamp. The spectrograph is maintained under stable conditions of temperature with a precision of 0.01-0.02° C (rms) at 25.55° C and is enclosed in a vacuum vessel at pressure of 0.1 ± 0.03 mbar. The blaze peak efficiency of the spectrograph between 5000 and 6500 Å, including the detector, is ~30%; it is ~25% with the fiber transmission. The total efficiency, including spectrograph, fiber transmission, focal ratio degradation (FRD), and telescope (with 81% reflectivity) is ~7% in the same wavelength region on a clear night with good seeing conditions. The stable point-spread function (PSF), environmental control, existence of a simultaneous calibration fiber, and availability of observing time make PARAS attractive for a variety of exoplanetary and stellar astrophysics projects. Future plans include testing of octagonal fibers for further scrambling of light and extensive calibration over the entire wavelength range up to 9500 Å using thorium-neon (ThNe) or uranium-neon (UNe) spectral lamps. Thus, we demonstrate how such highly stabilized instruments, even on small aperture telescopes, can contribute significantly to the ongoing radial velocity searches for low-mass planets

  6. Using High-Resolution Field Measurements to Model Dune Kinematics in a Large Elongate Meander Bend.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konsoer, K. M.; Rhoads, B. L.; Best, J.; Frias, C. E.; Abad, J. D.; Langendoen, E. J.

    2014-12-01

    Due to recent advances in hydroacoustic technology, such as the development of multibeam echo sounders, it is now possible to obtain highly accurate and detailed bathymetric data for river channels. These data provide the basis for detailed characterizations of bed form morphology ranging from individual ripples to composite dune fields. Theoretical models suggest that bed forms reach an equilibrium morphology based on hydraulic conditions during steady flow. However, at the scale of individual meander bends, bed form morphology will vary according to the local flow structure as influenced by overall bed morphology and planform curvature. Thus, the coevolution of flow structure, bed form morphology, and sediment transport should vary throughout a meander bend. This paper examines spatial variation in bed form characteristics and rates of bed form migration, and thus bed material transport, within a large, actively migrating, elongate meander loop. During a May 2013 flood event on Maier Bend, Wabash River (IL-IN, USA), repeat multibeam echo sounding surveys were conducted ~4 hours apart, providing estimates of dune celerity and volumetric rates of sediment transport at different locations around the bend. Three-dimensional velocity measurements, obtained using an acoustic Doppler current profiler, provide hydraulic data for evaluating interactions between flow structure and bed form morphology. Results show that bed form morphology is highly variable within the bend, ranging from barchans dunes on the upstream limb, 2D ripples across the point bar, and 3D composite dunes with wavelength of ~20 meters near the bend apex. Rates of dune celerity varied from 0.3 m/hr to 0.7 m/hr and were dependent on bed form geometry and local hydraulic conditions. The high-resolution data on flow and form are used to calibrate a 2D numerical model of sediment transport through the bend. Simulations using the calibrated model are used to evaluate the fluvial processes underlying

  7. First results from the Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph - Element abundances as a function of velocity in the neutral gas toward Xi Persei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Blair D.; Cardelli, Jason A.; Bruhweiler, Frederick C.; Smith, Andrew M.; Ebbets, Dennis C.

    1991-01-01

    Observations of ultraviolet interstellar absorption lines toward Xi Persei obtained with the echelle mode of the Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) aboard the HST at a resolution of 3.5 km/s are presented. The data for O I, C II, Mg II, S II, Fe II, Si II, Mn II, and Zn II are converted into representations of apparent column density per unit velocity, Na(v), over the velocity range from -30 to +40 km/s. The profiles for ions that are the dominant state of ionization in neutral clouds permit a study of the variation of element abundance with velocity caused by changes in the gas phase depletion in the different absorbing regions situated toward Xi Per. In the denser portions of the diffuse clouds, heavy element depletions are very large. However, in absorbing components near -5 and +25 km/s, the depletions are less severe, with a nearly solar gas phase abundance ratio being found for the gas in the +25 km/s component. The measurements confirm that the GHRS is well suited for diagnostic spectroscopy of interstellar gas.

  8. High-Resolution Group Quantization Phase Processing Method in Radio Frequency Measurement Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Baoqing; Feng, Dazheng; Tang, Yaohua; Geng, Xin; Zhang, Duo; Cai, Chaofeng; Wan, Maoquan; Yang, Zhigang

    2016-07-01

    Aiming at the more complex frequency translation, the longer response time and the limited measurement precision in the traditional phase processing, a high-resolution phase processing method by group quantization higher than 100 fs level is proposed in radio frequency measurement range. First, the phase quantization is used as a step value to quantize every phase difference in a group by using the fixed phase relationships between different frequencies signals. The group quantization is formed by the results of the quantized phase difference. In the light of frequency drift mainly caused by phase noise of measurement device, a regular phase shift of the group quantization is produced, which results in the phase coincidence of two comparing signals which obtain high-resolution measurement. Second, in order to achieve the best coincidences pulse, a subtle delay is initiatively used to reduce the width of the coincidences fuzzy area according to the transmission characteristics of the coincidences in the specific medium. Third, a series of feature coincidences pulses of fuzzy area can be captured by logic gate to achieve the best phase coincidences information for the improvement of the measurement precision. The method provides a novel way to precise time and frequency measurement.

  9. High-Resolution Group Quantization Phase Processing Method in Radio Frequency Measurement Range

    PubMed Central

    Du, Baoqing; Feng, Dazheng; Tang, Yaohua; Geng, Xin; Zhang, Duo; Cai, Chaofeng; Wan, Maoquan; Yang, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Aiming at the more complex frequency translation, the longer response time and the limited measurement precision in the traditional phase processing, a high-resolution phase processing method by group quantization higher than 100 fs level is proposed in radio frequency measurement range. First, the phase quantization is used as a step value to quantize every phase difference in a group by using the fixed phase relationships between different frequencies signals. The group quantization is formed by the results of the quantized phase difference. In the light of frequency drift mainly caused by phase noise of measurement device, a regular phase shift of the group quantization is produced, which results in the phase coincidence of two comparing signals which obtain high-resolution measurement. Second, in order to achieve the best coincidences pulse, a subtle delay is initiatively used to reduce the width of the coincidences fuzzy area according to the transmission characteristics of the coincidences in the specific medium. Third, a series of feature coincidences pulses of fuzzy area can be captured by logic gate to achieve the best phase coincidences information for the improvement of the measurement precision. The method provides a novel way to precise time and frequency measurement. PMID:27388587

  10. High-Resolution Group Quantization Phase Processing Method in Radio Frequency Measurement Range.

    PubMed

    Du, Baoqing; Feng, Dazheng; Tang, Yaohua; Geng, Xin; Zhang, Duo; Cai, Chaofeng; Wan, Maoquan; Yang, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Aiming at the more complex frequency translation, the longer response time and the limited measurement precision in the traditional phase processing, a high-resolution phase processing method by group quantization higher than 100 fs level is proposed in radio frequency measurement range. First, the phase quantization is used as a step value to quantize every phase difference in a group by using the fixed phase relationships between different frequencies signals. The group quantization is formed by the results of the quantized phase difference. In the light of frequency drift mainly caused by phase noise of measurement device, a regular phase shift of the group quantization is produced, which results in the phase coincidence of two comparing signals which obtain high-resolution measurement. Second, in order to achieve the best coincidences pulse, a subtle delay is initiatively used to reduce the width of the coincidences fuzzy area according to the transmission characteristics of the coincidences in the specific medium. Third, a series of feature coincidences pulses of fuzzy area can be captured by logic gate to achieve the best phase coincidences information for the improvement of the measurement precision. The method provides a novel way to precise time and frequency measurement. PMID:27388587

  11. Technical note: quantitative measures of iris color using high resolution photographs.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Melissa; Gozdzik, Agnes; Ross, Kendra; Miles, Jon; Parra, Esteban J

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of the genetic architecture of iris color is still limited. This is partly related to difficulties associated with obtaining quantitative measurements of eye color. Here we introduce a new automated method for measuring iris color using high resolution photographs. This method extracts color measurements in the CIE 1976 L*a*b* (CIELAB) color space from a 256 by 256 pixel square sampled from the 9:00 meridian of the iris. Color is defined across three dimensions: L* (the lightness coordinate), a* (the red-green coordinate), and b* (the blue-yellow coordinate). We applied this method to a sample of individuals of diverse ancestry (East Asian, European and South Asian) that was genotyped for the HERC2 rs12913832 polymorphism, which is strongly associated with blue eye color. We identified substantial variation in the CIELAB color space, not only in the European sample, but also in the East Asian and South Asian samples. As expected, rs12913832 was significantly associated with quantitative iris color measurements in subjects of European ancestry. However, this SNP was also strongly associated with iris color in the South Asian sample, although there were no participants with blue irides in this sample. The usefulness of this method is not restricted only to the study of iris pigmentation. High-resolution pictures of the iris will also make it possible to study the genetic variation involved in iris textural patterns, which show substantial heritability in human populations. PMID:22101828

  12. Combining High Resolution Measurements and Simulations of Near-Bed Sediment Transport Processes Under Large-Scale Breaking Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, J. R.; Hurther, D.; van der Zanden, J.; van der A, D. A.; Ribberink, J.; O'Donoghue, T.; Li, M.

    2015-12-01

    Physical processes involved in near-bed sediment transport under regular, breaking waves are investigated using a combined framework of high resolution measurement and numerical simulation. Experiments are carried out at full scale (0.85 m wave height, 4 s period) in the CIEM wave flume above a mobile sand bed (d10, d50, d90 = 0.15 mm, 0.25 mm, 0.37 mm). Vertical profiles of co-located, two component (u, w) velocity and particle concentration are measured in the bottom boundary layer (BBL) using a multi-frequency acoustic concentration velocity profiler (ACVP) at several locations along the beach. The intra-wave free stream velocity measurements are provided as input to three dimensional Euler-Lagrange point-particle simulations of the BBL. Using a series of feedback controllers, the simulation forcing is adjusted to match the measured orbital velocity and turbulent intensities at an elevation of z~8 cm above the bed. The simulations treat sand grains both in the bed and in suspension as Lagrangian particles that respond to hydrodynamic and inter-particle forces. Particles are coupled to the near-bed hydrodynamics through the volume filtered Navier Stokes equations, which are solved in a finite volume LES framework at near particle scale. Several wave cycles are simulated in order to make direct comparisons of the mean and turbulent statistics with the measurements and to explore the near-bed particle response to wave breaking. Statistics of the space-time dependent grain-size distribution, a natural output of the particle-based simulations, are fed back into the acoustic calibration of the ACVP, improving the instrument's response to grain size sorting induced by the near bed flow. This cross validation and calibration of measurement and simulation allows for detailed interrogation of near-bed transport processes with minimal empirical assumptions relating to bed shear, particle pickup, or surface wave breaking.

  13. A digitally configurable measurement platform using audio cards for high-resolution electronic transport studies.

    PubMed

    Gopman, D B; Bedau, D; Kent, A D

    2012-05-01

    We report on a software-defined digitally configurable measurement platform for determining electronic transport properties in nanostructures with small readout signals. By using a high-resolution audio analog-to-digital/digital-to-analog converter in a digitally compensated bridge configuration we significantly increase the measurement speed compared to established techniques and simultaneously acquire large and small signal characteristics. We characterize the performance (16 bit resolution, 100 dB dynamic range at 192 kS/s) and demonstrate the application of this measurement platform for studying the transport properties of spin-valve nanopillars, a two-terminal device that exhibits giant magnetoresistance and whose resistance can be switched between two levels by applied magnetic fields and by currents applied by the audio card. The high resolution and fast sampling capability permits rapid acquisition of deep statistics on the switching of a spin-valve nanopillar and reduces the time to acquire the basic properties of the device - a state-diagram showing the magnetic configurations as function of applied current and magnetic field - by orders of magnitude. PMID:22667635

  14. A digitally configurable measurement platform using audio cards for high-resolution electronic transport studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopman, D. B.; Bedau, D.; Kent, A. D.

    2012-05-01

    We report on a software-defined digitally configurable measurement platform for determining electronic transport properties in nanostructures with small readout signals. By using a high-resolution audio analog-to-digital/digital-to-analog converter in a digitally compensated bridge configuration we significantly increase the measurement speed compared to established techniques and simultaneously acquire large and small signal characteristics. We characterize the performance (16 bit resolution, 100 dB dynamic range at 192 kS/s) and demonstrate the application of this measurement platform for studying the transport properties of spin-valve nanopillars, a two-terminal device that exhibits giant magnetoresistance and whose resistance can be switched between two levels by applied magnetic fields and by currents applied by the audio card. The high resolution and fast sampling capability permits rapid acquisition of deep statistics on the switching of a spin-valve nanopillar and reduces the time to acquire the basic properties of the device - a state-diagram showing the magnetic configurations as function of applied current and magnetic field - by orders of magnitude.

  15. High-resolution measurement of absolute {alpha}-decay widths in {sup 16}O

    SciTech Connect

    Wheldon, C.; Ashwood, N. I.; Barr, M.; Curtis, N.; Freer, M.; Kokalova, Tz.; Malcolm, J. D.; Spencer, S. J.; Ziman, V. A.; Faestermann, Th.; Kruecken, R.; Wirth, H.-F.; Hertenberger, R.; Lutter, R.; Bergmaier, A.

    2011-06-15

    By using a large-acceptance position-sensitive silicon detector array in coincidence with the high-resolution Munich Q3D spectrograph, unambiguous measurements have been made of the absolute {alpha}-particle decay widths from excited states in {sup 16}O* in the energy range 13.85 to 15.87 MeV. Carbon targets have been bombarded with 42-MeV {sup 6}Li beams to induce {sub 6}{sup 12}C({sub 3}{sup 6}Li, d){sub 8}{sup 16}O* reactions. The deuteron ejectiles were measured in the Q3D and the results gated by {sup 4}He+{sup 12}C breakup products detected in the silicon array, the efficiency of which was modeled using Monte Carlo simulations. By comparing total population and breakup-gated spectra, the following absolute {alpha}-decay widths have been measured with high resolution: {Gamma}{sub {alpha}}0/{Gamma}{sub tot} = 0.87{+-}0.11 (13.980 MeV), 1.04{+-}0.15 (14.302 MeV), 0.92{+-}0.10 (14.399 MeV), 0.59{+-}0.04 (14.815 MeV), 0.88{+-}0.18 (15.785 MeV), and {Gamma}{sub {alpha}}1/{Gamma}{sub tot}=1.14{+-}0.08 (14.660 MeV), 0.46{+-}0.06 (14.815 MeV).

  16. High Resolution Models of Regional Phase Attenuation and Velocity Structure of the Turkish-Iranian Plateau and Zagros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaviani, A.; Sandvol, E. A.; Bao, X.; Gok, R.; Rumpker, G.

    2014-12-01

    We present an approach for understanding the origin and nature of seismic anomalies in the continental crust of the Northern Middle East. We have constructed detailed models of crustal attenuation and velocity structure for the Northern Middle East based on the analysis of waveforms of the regional seismic phases Lg and Pg from regional earthquakes recorded at more than 550 stations in Turkish and Iranian Plateaus and the surrounding regions. The attenuation and velocity models are assumed to serve as proxies for the bulk average effective crustal P-wave and S-wave attenuation (Qa and Qb) and velocities (Vp and Vs). About 30000 reliable spectra were collected for both Lg and Pg phases and used to measure the Two-Station Method (TSM) and Reverse Two-station/event Method (RTM) Lg and Pg Q at 1 Hz (QLg0 and QPg0) and their frequency dependence factor (η). The QLg0 and QPg0 and η values measured over the individual TSM and RTM paths are then used to perform an LSQR tomographic inversion for lateral variations in Q0 and η. We observe a strong correlation between the effective Q and velocity models. Our models show lateral variations that coincide with the major tectonic boundaries in the region. The tomographic models as well as the individual TSM and RTM measurements show lower values of QLg0 and QPg0 over the Turkish-Anatolian Plateau (QLg0<150 and QPg0<200) than those observed over the Iranian Plateau (150< QLg0<300 and 150< QPg0<400). Furthermore, we obtained the Lg and Pg group velocity models (VLg and VPg) by inverting the time of the first arrival of the Lg and Pg envelopes. Our QLg0 and QPg0 models are strongly correlated with the VLg and VPg models suggesting that the source of many of the low Q and velocity anomalies is likely the same. Our Q models have implication for any hazard assessment in different regions of the northern Middle-East and can also be used for the magnitude determination of the local and regional seismic events. A combined knowledge

  17. High-resolution laboratory measurements of coronal lines in the 198-218 å region

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, Peter; Träbert, Elmar; Lepson, Jaan K.; Brickhouse, Nancy S.; Golub, Leon

    2014-06-10

    We present high-resolution laboratory measurements of the emission from various ions of C, N, O, F, Ne, S, Ar, Fe, and Ni in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength band centered around the λ211 Fe XIV channel of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. While all of the strong iron lines in this region are well known, we note many weaker lines of iron that are not yet identified. The high resolution of our measurements also allows us to resolve several lines in Fe XI, Fe XII, and Fe XIII between 200 and 205 Å, whose identities were in question based on a disagreement between different databases. The spectra of the elements other than iron are much less known, and we find a multitude of lines that are not yet in the databases. For example, the CHIANTI database clearly disagrees with the NIST data listings on several of the argon lines we observe and also it contains only about half of the observed sulfur lines.

  18. High-resolution spectroscopy used to measure inertial confinement fusion neutron spectra on Omega (invited).

    PubMed

    Forrest, C J; Radha, P B; Glebov, V Yu; Goncharov, V N; Knauer, J P; Pruyne, A; Romanofsky, M; Sangster, T C; Shoup, M J; Stoeckl, C; Casey, D T; Gatu-Johnson, M; Gardner, S

    2012-10-01

    The areal density (ρR) of cryogenic DT implosions on Omega is inferred by measuring the spectrum of neutrons that elastically scatter off the dense deuterium (D) and tritium (T) fuel. Neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) techniques are used to measure the energy spectrum with high resolution. High signal-to-background data has been recorded on cryogenic DT implosions using a well-collimated 13.4-m line of sight and an nTOF detector with an advanced liquid scintillator compound. An innovative method to analyze the elastically scattered neutron spectra was developed using well-known cross sections of the DT nuclear reactions. The estimated areal densities are consistent with alternative ρR measurements and 1-D simulations. PMID:23126921

  19. Comparison of HRDI wind measurements with radar and rocket observations. [High Resolution Doppler Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrage, M. D.; Skinner, W. R.; Marshall, A. R.; Hays, P. B.; Lieberman, R. S.; Franke, S. J.; Gell, D. A.; Ortland, D. A.; Morton, Y. T.; Schmidlin, F. J.

    1993-01-01

    Wind fields in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere are obtained with the High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) by observing the Doppler shifts of emission lines in the O2 Atmospheric band. The validity of the measured winds depends on an accurate knowledge of the positions on the detector of the observed lines in the absence of a wind-induced Doppler shift. These positions have been determined to an accuracy of approximately 5 m/s from the comparison of winds measured by HRDI with those obtained by MF radars. Excellent agreement is found between HRDI measured winds and winds observed with radars and rockets. In addition, the sensitivity of HRDI to migrating tides and other large scale waves is demonstrated.

  20. Measurement of water content in polymer electrolyte membranes using high resolution neutron imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Spernjak, Dusan; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rodney L; Davey, John; Mukherjee, Partha P; Hussey, Daniel S; Jacobson, David

    2010-01-01

    Sufficient water content within a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) is necessary for adequate ionic conductivity. Membrane hydration is therefore a fundamental requirement for fuel cell operation. The hydration state of the membrane affects the water transport within, as both the diffusion coefficient and electro-osmotic drag depend on the water content. Membrane's water uptake is conventionally measured ex situ by weighing free-swelling samples equilibrated at controlled water activity. In the present study, water profiles in Nafion{reg_sign} membranes were measured using the high-resolution neutron imaging. The state-of-the-art, 10 {micro}m resolution neutron detector is capable of resolving water distributions across N1120, N1110 and N117 membranes. It provides a means to measure the water uptake and transport properties of fuel cell membranes in situ.

  1. PROBING NEAR-SURFACE ATMOSPHERIC TURBULENCE WITH LIDAR MEASUREMENTS AND HIGH-RESOLUTION HYDRODYNAMIC MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    J. KAO; D. COOPER; ET AL

    2000-11-01

    As lidar technology is able to provide fast data collection at a resolution of meters in an atmospheric volume, it is imperative to promote a modeling counterpart of the lidar capability. This paper describes an integrated capability based on data from a scanning water vapor lidar and a high-resolution hydrodynamic model (HIGRAD) equipped with a visualization routine (VIEWER) that simulates the lidar scanning. The purpose is to better understand the spatial and temporal representativeness of the lidar measurements and, in turn, to extend their utility in studying turbulence fields in the atmospheric boundary layer. Raman lidar water vapor data collected over the Pacific warm pool and the simulations with the HIGRAD code are used for identifying the underlying physics and potential aliasing effects of spatially resolved lidar measurements. This capability also helps improve the trade-off between spatial-temporal resolution and coverage of the lidar measurements.

  2. High-resolution spectroscopy used to measure inertial confinement fusion neutron spectra on Omega (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, C. J.; Radha, P. B.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Goncharov, V. N.; Knauer, J. P.; Pruyne, A.; Romanofsky, M.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M. J. III; Stoeckl, C.; Casey, D. T.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Gardner, S.

    2012-10-15

    The areal density ({rho}R) of cryogenic DT implosions on Omega is inferred by measuring the spectrum of neutrons that elastically scatter off the dense deuterium (D) and tritium (T) fuel. Neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) techniques are used to measure the energy spectrum with high resolution. High signal-to-background data has been recorded on cryogenic DT implosions using a well-collimated 13.4-m line of sight and an nTOF detector with an advanced liquid scintillator compound. An innovative method to analyze the elastically scattered neutron spectra was developed using well-known cross sections of the DT nuclear reactions. The estimated areal densities are consistent with alternative {rho}R measurements and 1-D simulations.

  3. Birefringent dual-frequency laser Doppler velocimeter using a low-frequency lock-in amplifier technique for high-resolution measurements.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongbin; Chen, Junbao; Guo, Dongmei; Xia, Wei; Hao, Hui; Wang, Ming

    2016-06-01

    A birefringent dual-frequency laser with a half-intracavity has been used to develop a laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV). The developed LDV utilizes a new signal-processing method based on a lock-in amplifier to achieve high-resolution velocity measurements and the discrimination of positive and negative velocities. Theoretical analysis and simulation results are presented. The velocity measurement experiments by using a high-precision linear stage are performed to verify the performance of the LDV. Compared with the previous dual-frequency LDVs, the average velocity resolution of the developed LDV is improved from 0.31 mm/s to 0.028 mm/s for a target without the rotational velocity. The measurement results show that our new technique can offer a powerful instrument for metrology sciences. PMID:27411198

  4. High Resolution Measurements In U-Channel Technique And Implications For Sedimentological Purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acar, Dursun; Cagatay, Namık; Sarı, Erol; Eris, Kadir; Biltekin, Demet; Akcer, Sena; Meydan Gokdere, Feray; Makaroglu, Ozlem; Bulkan, Ozlem; Arslan, Tugce; Albut, Gulum; Yalamaz, Burak; Yakupoglu, Nurettin; Sabuncu, Asen; Fillikci, Betul; Yıldız, Guliz

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical features in-stu drilling for sediment cores and vacuum forces that affect while obtaining the sediments to the core tube are formed concave shaped deformations. Even in the half sections, concave deformation form still appears. During MCSL measurements, Laminae which forms concave shaped deformation, show interference thus, values indicate overall results for several laminae instead of single lamina. These interferenced data is not appropriate for paleoceanography studies which require extend accuracy and high frequency data set to describe geochemical and climatological effects in high resolution. U-Channel technique provides accurate location and isolated values for each lamina. In EMCOL Laboratories, U-channel provide well saturated and air-free environment for samples and, by using these technique U-channels are prepared with modificated MCSL for data acquisition. Even below millimeter scale sampling rate provides the separation of each lamina and, physical properties of every each lamina. Cover of u-channel is made by homogenous plastic in shape of rectangular prism geometry. Thus, during measurement, MSCL sensors may harm the sediment; however u-channel covers the sediment from this unwanted deformation from MSCL itself. U-channel technique can present micro scale angular changes in the laminae. Measurements that have been taken from U-channel are compared with the traditional half core measurements. Interestingly, accuracy of the positions for each lamina is much more detailed and, the resolution is progressively higher. Results from P Wave and Gamma ray density provide removed interference effects on each lamina. In this technique, it is high recommended that U-channel widens the resolution of core logging and generates more cleansed measurements in MCSL. For P- Wave Used Synthetic seismograms that modelled by MSCL data set which created from U-channel technique dictates each anomalies related with climatological and geological changes. Keywords

  5. High-resolution refractive index anisotropy measurement in optical fibers through phase retardation modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sévigny, Benoit; Busque, François; Godbout, Nicolas; Lacroix, Suzanne; Faucher, Mathieu

    2008-03-01

    We present an improved, high-resolution method for the measurement of phase retardation induced by the material birefringence of optical fibers. Such a method can be used to retrieve information about the spatial distribution of refractive index anisotropy in the fiber by comparing the accumulated phase of a polarization component oriented along the fiber transmission axis and another located in the transverse plane. The method is based on the nonlinear regression of a phase modulated signal of known modulation amplitude altered by the sample. Experimental results obtained with our method for a standard telecommunications fiber (the Corning SMF-28) as well as photosensitive fibers (Fibercore PS1250 and PS1500) are presented with a noise-limited phase resolution below 10-4 radians and a spatial resolution below 1 μm. An analysis of the limitation of such measurement methods is also presented including diffraction by the fibers.

  6. High resolution gamma ray tomography scanner for flow measurement and non-destructive testing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hampel, U.; Bieberle, A.; Hoppe, D.; Kronenberg, J.; Schleicher, E.; Suehnel, T.; Zimmermann, F.; Zippe, C.

    2007-10-15

    We report on the development of a high resolution gamma ray tomography scanner that is operated with a Cs-137 isotopic source at 662 keV gamma photon energy and achieves a spatial image resolution of 0.2 line pairs/mm at 10% modulation transfer function for noncollimated detectors. It is primarily intended for the scientific study of flow regimes and phase fraction distributions in fuel element assemblies, chemical reactors, pipelines, and hydrodynamic machines. Furthermore, it is applicable to nondestructive testing of larger radiologically dense objects. The radiation detector is based on advanced avalanche photodiode technology in conjunction with lutetium yttrium orthosilicate scintillation crystals. The detector arc comprises 320 single detector elements which are operated in pulse counting mode. For measurements at fixed vessels or plant components, we built a computed tomography scanner gantry that comprises rotational and translational stages, power supply via slip rings, and data communication to the measurement personal computer via wireless local area network.

  7. High resolution gamma ray tomography scanner for flow measurement and non-destructive testing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampel, U.; Bieberle, A.; Hoppe, D.; Kronenberg, J.; Schleicher, E.; Sühnel, T.; Zimmermann, F.; Zippe, C.

    2007-10-01

    We report on the development of a high resolution gamma ray tomography scanner that is operated with a Cs-137 isotopic source at 662keV gamma photon energy and achieves a spatial image resolution of 0.2linepairs/mm at 10% modulation transfer function for noncollimated detectors. It is primarily intended for the scientific study of flow regimes and phase fraction distributions in fuel element assemblies, chemical reactors, pipelines, and hydrodynamic machines. Furthermore, it is applicable to nondestructive testing of larger radiologically dense objects. The radiation detector is based on advanced avalanche photodiode technology in conjunction with lutetium yttrium orthosilicate scintillation crystals. The detector arc comprises 320 single detector elements which are operated in pulse counting mode. For measurements at fixed vessels or plant components, we built a computed tomography scanner gantry that comprises rotational and translational stages, power supply via slip rings, and data communication to the measurement personal computer via wireless local area network.

  8. High resolution measurements of galactic cosmic-ray neon, magnesium, and silicon isotopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Spalding, J. D.; Stone, E. C.; Vogt, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    High-resolution measurements of the abundances of individual isotopes of neon, magnesium and silicon in galactic cosmic rays are reported. The Caltech Heavy Isotope Spectrometer Telescope on board the ISEE 3 spacecraft was used to obtain measurements in the range 30 to 180 MeV/n at an rms mass resolution of 0.20 amu. Results indicate excesses of Ne-22 as well as Mg-25 and Mg-26 in galactic cosmic rays with respect to their solar system abundances. Calculations of the effects of interstellar propagation and solar modulation on cosmic-ray isotope abundances also imply an Mg-25 + Mg-26 cosmic ray source fraction significantly greater than the solar system fraction, and it is suggested that the cosmic ray source material and solar system material were synthesized under different conditions.

  9. High-resolution Rayleigh-wave velocity maps of central Europe from a dense ambient-noise data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbeke, J.; Boschi, L.; Stehly, L.; Kissling, E.; Michelini, A.

    2012-03-01

    We present a new database of surface wave group and phase-velocity dispersion curves derived from seismic ambient noise, cross-correlating continuous seismic recordings from the Swiss Network, the German Regional Seismological Network (GRSN), the Italian national broad-band network operated by the Istituto Nazionale di Geosica e Vulcanologia (INGV). To increase the aperture of the station array, additional measurements from the Mediterranean Very Broad-band Seismographic Network (MedNet), the Austrian Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG), the French, Bulgarian, Hungarian, Romanian and Greek stations obtained through Orfeus are also included. The ambient noise, we are using to assemble our database, was recorded at the above-mentioned stations between 2006 January and 2006 December. Correlating continuous signal recorded at pairs of stations, allows to extract coherent surface wave signal travelling between the two stations. Usually the ambient-noise cross-correlation technique allows to have informations at periods of 30 s or shorter. By expanding the database of noise correlations, we seek to increase the resolution of the central Europe crustal model. We invert the resulting data sets of group and phase velocities associated with 8-35 s Rayleigh waves, to determine 2-D group and phase-velocity maps of the European region. Inversions are conducted by means of a 2-D linearized tomographic inversion algorithm. The generally good agreement of our models with previous studies and good correlation of well-resolved velocity anomalies with geological features, such as sedimentary basins, crustal roots and mountain ranges, documents the effectiveness of our approach.

  10. Real-time, high-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements on shocked crystals at a synchrotron facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Y. M.; Turneaure, Stefan J.; Perkins, K.; Zimmerman, K.; Arganbright, N.; Shen, G.; Chow, P.

    2012-12-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory was used to obtain real-time, high-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements to determine the microscopic response of shock-compressed single crystals. Disk shaped samples were subjected to plane shock wave compression by impacting them with half-inch diameter, flat-faced projectiles. The projectiles were accelerated to velocities ranging between 300 and 1200 m/s using a compact powder gun designed specifically for use at a synchrotron facility. The experiments were designed to keep the sample probed volume under uniaxial strain and constant stress for a duration longer than the 153.4 ns spacing between x-ray bunches. X-rays from a single pulse (<100 ps duration) out of the periodic x-ray pulses emitted by the synchrotron were used for the diffraction measurements. A synchronization and x-ray detection technique was developed to ensure that the measured signal was obtained unambiguously from the desired x-ray pulse incident on the sample while the sample was in a constant uniaxial strain state. The synchronization and x-ray detection techniques described can be used for a variety of x-ray measurements on shock compressed solids and liquids at the APS. Detailed procedures for applying the Bragg-Brentano parafocusing approach to single crystals at the APS are presented. Analytic developments to determine the effects of crystal substructure and non-ideal geometry on the diffraction pattern position and shape are presented. Representative real-time x-ray diffraction data, indicating shock-induced microstructural changes, are presented for a shock-compressed Al(111) sample. The experimental developments presented here provided, in part, the impetus for the Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) currently under development at the APS. Both the synchronization/x-ray detection methods and the analysis equations for high-resolution single crystal x-ray diffraction can be used at the DCS.

  11. High-Resolution, Noninvasive, Two-Photon Fluorescence Measurement of Molecular Concentrations in Corneal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Liping; Huxlin, Krystel R.; Xu, Lisen; MacRae, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To perform high-resolution, noninvasive, calibrated measurements of the concentrations and diffusion profiles of fluorescent molecules in the live cornea after topical application to the ocular surface. Methods. An 800-nm femtosecond laser was used to perform two-photon fluorescence (TPF) axial scanning measurements. Calibration solutions consisting of sodium fluorescein (Na-Fl; concentration range, 0.01%–2.5%) and riboflavin (concentration range, 0.0125%–0.1%) were tested in well slides, and TPF signals were assessed. Excised feline eyeballs preserved in corneal storage medium and with either intact or removed corneal epithelia were then treated with Na-Fl, riboflavin, or fluorescein dextran (Fl-d) of different molecular weight (MW) for 30 minutes. Calibrated TPF was then used immediately to measure the concentration of these molecules across the central corneal depth. Results. The axial resolution of our TPF system was 6 μm, and a linear relationship was observed between TPF signal and low concentrations of most fluorophores. Intact corneas treated with Na-Fl or riboflavin exhibited a detectable penetration depth of only approximately 20 μm, compared with approximately 400 to 600 μm when the epithelium was removed before fluorophore application. Peak concentrations for intact corneas were half those attained with epithelial removal. Debrided corneas treated with 2,000,000 MW Fl-d showed a half-maximum penetration depth of 156.7 μm compared with 384 μm for the 3,000 MW dextran. The peak concentration of the high MW dextran was one quarter that of the lower MW dextran. Conclusions. TPF is an effective, high-resolution, noninvasive method of quantifying the diffusion and concentration of fluorescent molecules across the cornea. PMID:21228379

  12. Retrieving mesospheric winds and gravity waves using high resolution radar measurements of polar mesospheric summer echoes with MAARSY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stober, G.; Sommer, S.; Schult, C.; Chau, J. L.; Latteck, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY) located at the northern Norwegian island of Andøya (69.3 ° N, 16° E) observes polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) on a regular basis. This backscatter turned out to be an ideal tracer of atmospheric dynamics and to investigate the wind field at the mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT) at high spatial and temporal scales. MAARSY is dedicated to explore the polar mesosphere at such high resolution and employs an active phased array antenna with the capability to steer the beam on a pulse-to-pulse basis, which permits to perform systematic scanning of PMSE and to investigate the horizontal structure of the backscatter. The radar also uses a 16 channel receiver system for interferometric applications e.g. mean angle of arrival analysis or coherent radar imaging. Here we present measurements using these features of MAARSY to study the wind field at the MLT applying sophisticated wind analysis algorithms such as velocity azimuth display or volume velocity processing to derive gravity wave parameters such as horizontal wave length, phase speed and propagation direction. Further, we compare the interferometrically corrected and uncorrected wind measurements to emphasize the importance to account for likely edge effects using PMSE as tracer of the dynamics. The observations indicate huge deviations from the nominal beam pointing direction at the upper and lower edges of the PMSE altering the wind analysis.

  13. Measurement of magnetic field aligned potential differences using high resolution conjugate photoelectron energy spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, W. K.; Doering, J. P.; Potemra, T. A.; Bostrom, C. O.; Brace, L. H.; Heelis, R. A.; Hanson, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    Simultaneous high-resolution observations of a distinctive feature in the energy spectrum of conjugate photoelectrons and spacecraft potential relative to the local ionosphere have allowed the net potential difference between magnetic conjugate points at latitudes below the region of low-energy (i.e., lower than 100 eV) auroral electron precipitation to be determined. Measurements made at 300 km from Atmosphere Explorer C show that there is normally no net potential difference between hemispheres in this region, which extended up to invariant latitudes as high as 74 deg. Two types of apparently related anomalous behavior were infrequently observed at high latitudes. During these periods the incident flux of conjugate photoelectrons was either decelerated by about 3 eV or was not detected.

  14. Proton-silicon interaction potential extracted from high-resolution measurements of crystal rainbows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, S.; Nešković, N.; Ćosić, M.; Motapothula, M.; Breese, M. B. H.

    2015-10-01

    This study provides a way to produce very accurate ion-atom interaction potentials. We present the high-resolution measurements of angular distributions of protons of energies between 2.0 and 0.7 MeV channeled in a 55 nm thick (0 0 1) silicon membrane. Analysis is performed using the theory of crystal rainbows in which the Molière's interaction potential is modified to make it accurate both close to the channel axis and close to the atomic strings defining the channel. This modification is based on adjusting the shapes of the rainbow lines appearing in the transmission angle plane, with the resulting theoretical angular distributions of transmitted protons being in excellent agreement with the corresponding experimental distributions.

  15. Potassium stable isotopic compositions measured by high-resolution MC-ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, L. E.; Lloyd, N. S.; Ellam, R. M.; Simon, J. I.

    2012-12-01

    Potassium isotopic (41K/39K) compositions are notoriously difficult to measure. TIMS measurements are hindered by variable fractionation patterns throughout individual runs and too few isotopes to apply an internal spike method for instrumental mass fractionation corrections. Internal fractionation corrections via the 40K/39K ratio can provide precise values but assume identical 40K/39K ratios (e.g. 0.05‰ (1σ) in [1]); this is appropriate in some cases (e.g. identifying excess 41K) but not others (e.g., determining mass fractionation effects and metrologically traceable isotopic abundances). SIMS analyses have yielded measurements with 0.25‰ precisions (1σ) [2]. ICP-MS analyses are significantly affected by interferences from molecular species such as 38ArH+ and 40ArH+ and instrument mass bias. Single collector ICP-MS instruments in "cold plasma" mode have yielded uncertainties as low as 2‰ (1σ, e.g. [3]). Although these precisions may be acceptable for some concentration determinations, they do not resolve isotopic variation in terrestrial materials. Here we present data from a series of measurements made on the Thermo Scientific NEPTUNE Plus multi-collector ICP-MS that demonstrate the ability to make 41K/39K ratio measurements with 0.07‰ precisions (1σ). These data, collected on NIST K standards, indicate the potential for MC-ICP-MS measurements to look for K isotopic variations at the sub-permil level. The NEPTUNE Plus can sufficiently resolve 39K and 41K from the interfering 38ArH+ and 40ArH+ peaks in wet cold plasma and high-resolution mode. Measurements were made on small but flat, interference-free, plateaus (ca. 50 ppm by mass width for 41K). Although ICP-MS does not yield accurate 41K/39K values due to significant instrumental mass fractionation (ca. 6%), this bias can be sufficiently stable over the time required for several measurements so that relative 41K/39K values can be precisely determined via sample-standard bracketing. As cold plasma

  16. Potassium Stable Isotopic Compositions Measured by High-Resolution MC-ICP-MS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Leah E.; Lloyd, Nicholas S.; Ellam, Robert M.; Simon, Justin I.

    2012-01-01

    Potassium isotopic (K-41/K-39) compositions are notoriously difficult to measure. TIMS measurements are hindered by variable fractionation patterns throughout individual runs and too few isotopes to apply an internal spike method for instrumental mass fractionation corrections. Internal fractionation corrections via the K-40/K-39 ratio can provide precise values but assume identical K-40/K-39 ratios (e.g. 0.05% (1sigma) in [1]); this is appropriate in some cases (e.g. identifying excess K-41) but not others (e.g., determining mass fractionation effects and metrologically traceable isotopic abundances). SIMS analyses have yielded measurements with 0.25% precisions (1sigma) [2]. ICP-MS analyses are significantly affected by interferences from molecular species such as Ar-38H(+) and Ar-40H(+) and instrument mass bias. Single collector ICP-MS instruments in "cold plasma" mode have yielded uncertainties as low as 2% (1sigma, e.g. [3]). Although these precisions may be acceptable for some concentration determinations, they do not resolve isotopic variation in terrestrial materials. Here we present data from a series of measurements made on the Thermo Scientific NEPTUNE Plus multi-collector ICP-MS that demonstrate the ability to make K-41/K-39 ratio measurements with 0.07% precisions (1sigma). These data, collected on NIST K standards, indicate the potential for MC-ICP-MS measurements to look for K isotopic variations at the sub-permil level. The NEPTUNE Plus can sufficiently resolve 39K and 41K from the interfering 38ArH+ and 40ArH+ peaks in wet cold plasma and high-resolution mode. Measurements were made on small but flat, interference-free, plateaus (ca. 50 ppm by mass width for K-41). Although ICP-MS does not yield accurate K-41/K-39 values due to significant instrumental mass fractionation (ca. 6%), this bias can be sufficiently stable over the time required for several measurements so that relative K-41/K-39 values can be precisely determined via sample

  17. High resolution optical surface metrology with the slope measuring portable optical test system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, Alejandro V.

    New optical designs strive to achieve extreme performance, and continually increase the complexity of prescribed optical shapes, which often require wide dynamic range and high resolution. SCOTS, or the Software Configurable Optical Test System, can measure a wide range of optical surfaces with high sensitivity using surface slope. This dissertation introduces a high resolution version of SCOTS called SPOTS, or the Slope measuring Portable Optical Test System. SPOTS improves the metrology of surface features on the order of sub-millimeter to decimeter spatial scales and nanometer to micrometer level height scales. Currently there is no optical surface metrology instrument with the same utility. SCOTS uses a computer controlled display (such as an LCD monitor) and camera to measure surface slopes over the entire surface of a mirror. SPOTS differs in that an additional lens is placed near the surface under test. A small prototype system is discussed in general, providing the support for the design of future SPOTS devices. Then the SCOTS instrument transfer function is addressed, which defines the way the system filters surface heights. Lastly, the calibration and performance of larger SPOTS device is analyzed with example measurements of the 8.4-m diameter aspheric Large Synoptic Survey Telescope's (LSST) primary mirror. In general optical systems have a transfer function, which filters data. In the case of optical imaging systems the instrument transfer function (ITF) follows the modulation transfer function (MTF), which causes a reduction of contrast as a function of increasing spatial frequency due to diffraction. In SCOTS, ITF is shown to decrease the measured height of surface features as their spatial frequency increases, and thus the SCOTS and SPOTS ITF is proportional to their camera system's MTF. Theory and simulations are supported by a SCOTS measurement of a test piece with a set of lithographically written sinusoidal surface topographies. In addition, an

  18. Concentration-Discharge Patterns Revealed from High Resolution Nitrate Measurements in Agricultural Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boland, S. J.; Basu, N. B.

    2012-12-01

    Riverine export of nutrients is a major component of nutrient cycles, particularly with respect to nitrogen; ~ 25 percent of terrestrially applied nitrogen (N) is removed via riverine export. Understanding the patterns in N export during a storm event is critical for developing a conceptual model of the dominant processes and pathways of N transformation, and designing appropriate management strategies to mitigate N pollution in streams and receiving water bodies. Most studies however, are limited by the lack of high-resolution water quality data to elucidate these pathways and mechanisms. We explored concentration-discharge relationships using high-resolution (15 minute) discharge (Q) and nitrate concentration (C) data (measured using an in-situ Nitratax Sonde) at multiple nested scales (from 151.3 km2 to 8900 km2) in two watersheds in Iowa: Clear Creek Watershed and the Raccoon River watershed. Three distinct regimes of nitrate transport were revealed: (1) a linear regime in which C increases with increasing Q, (2) a saturation regime in which C remains constant against increasing Q, and (3) a dilution regime in which concentration decreases as Q increases. The tight clustering of the data along these patterns is indicative of emergent behavior in such human-dominated systems. All three regimes were apparent in the Raccoon River Watershed, while only the saturation and dilution regimes were apparent in the Clear Creek Watershed. We hypothesize that surface flow is dominant in the Clear Creek Watershed leading to a saturation/dilution regimes, while subsurface flow is dominant in the more heavily tile-drained Raccoon River Watershed, leading to the occurrence of all three regimes. A parsimonious model was developed to test the hypothesis and develop C-Q patterns as a function of the partitioning of flow through the different pathways.

  19. High-Resolution Neutron Total and Capture Cross-Section Measurements on 206Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Borella, A.; Brusegan, A.; Siegler, P.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Moxon, M.C.; Aerts, G.; Gunsing, F.

    2005-05-24

    High-resolution neutron total and capture cross-section measurements have been performed on a 99.82% enriched 206Pb metallic sample. The transmission and capture measurements were carried out at the 25- and 60-m stations, respectively, of the Time-Of-Flight facility GELINA of the IRMM in Geel (B). The small amount of material allowed us to detect 13 resonances below 80 keV in the transmission measurements and 70 were seen in the capture measurements below 150 keV. The resonance parameters for the resonances seen in transmission agree within the uncertainties of the parameters determined by Horen et al. at ORELA. The capture yield was measured up to 600 keV and the capture areas for resonances up to 150 keV were compared with published data. This comparison reveals systematic differences, which are due to the detection geometry, the different neutron sensitivity in the detection systems, the applied weighting function, and normalisation.

  20. Determination of band oscillator strengths of atmospheric molecules from high resolution vacuum ultraviolet cross section measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, W. H.

    1986-01-01

    An account is given of progress in work on (1) the determination of band oscillator strengths of the Schumann-Runge absorption bands of (16)O2 and (18)O2 from cross section measurements conducted at 79 K; (2) the determination of the absolute absorption cross section of the Schumann-Runge bands of (16)O(18)O from optical depth measurements performed on mixtures of (16)O2, (18)O2 and (16)O(18)O at 79K; and (3) the influence of Schumann-Runge linewing contributions on the determination of the Herzberg continuum absorption cross section of (16)O2 in the wavelength region 194 to 204 nm. The experimental investigations are effected at high resolution with a 6.65 m scanning spectrometer which is, by virtue of its small instrumental width (EWHM = 0.0013 nm), uniquely suitable for cross section measurements of molecular bands with discrete rotational structure. Absolute cross sections, which are independent of the instrumental function and from which band oscillator strengths are directly determined, are measured for the absorption bands that are most predissociated. Such measurements are needed for (1) accurate calculations of the stratospheric production of atomic oxygen and heavy ozone formed following the photopredissociation of (18)O(16)O by solar radiation penetrating between the absorption lines of (16)O2; (2) elucidation of the mechanism of predissociation of the upper state of the Schumann-Runge bands; and (3) determination of the true shape of the Herzberg continuum cross section.

  1. On the measurement of frequency and of its sample variance with high-resolution counters

    SciTech Connect

    Rubiola, Enrico

    2005-05-15

    A frequency counter measures the input frequency {nu} averaged over a suitable time {tau}, versus the reference clock. High resolution is achieved by interpolating the clock signal. Further increased resolution is obtained by averaging multiple frequency measurements highly overlapped. In the presence of additive white noise or white phase noise, the square uncertainty improves from {sigma}{sub {nu}}{sup 2}{proportional_to}1/{tau}{sup 2} to {sigma}{sub {nu}}{sup 2}{proportional_to}1/{tau}{sup 3}. Surprisingly, when a file of contiguous data is fed into the formula of the two-sample (Allan) variance {sigma}{sub y}{sup 2}({tau})=E{l_brace}(1/2)(y{sub k+1}-y{sub k}){sup 2}{r_brace} of the fractional frequency fluctuation y, the result is the modified Allan variance mod {sigma}{sub y}{sup 2}({tau}). But if a sufficient number of contiguous measures are averaged in order to get a longer {tau} and the data are fed into the same formula, the results is the (nonmodified) Allan variance. Of course interpretation mistakes are around the corner if the counter internal process is not well understood. The typical domain of interest is the the short-term stability measurement of oscillators.

  2. A compact and miniaturized high resolution capacitance dilatometer for measuring thermal expansion and magnetostriction

    SciTech Connect

    Kuechler, R.; Bauer, T.; Brando, M.; Steglich, F.

    2012-09-15

    We describe the design, construction, calibration, and two different applications of a miniature capacitance dilatometer. The device is suitable for thermal expansion and magnetostriction measurements from 300 K down to about 25 mK, with a resolution of 0.02 A at low temperatures. The main body of the dilatometer is fabricated from a single block of a Be-Cu alloy by electrical discharge milling. This creates an extremely compact high-resolution measuring cell. We have successfully tested and operated dilatometers of this new type with the commonly used physical property measurement system by quantum design, as well as with several other cryogenic refrigeration systems down to 25 mK and in magnetic fields up to 20 T. Here, the capacitance is measured with a commercially available capacitance bridge. Using a piezoelectric rotator from Attocube Systems, the cell can be rotated at T= 25 mK inside of an inner vacuum chamber of 40 mm diameter. The miniaturized design for the one-axis rotation setup allows a rotation of 360 Degree-Sign .

  3. High resolution ultrasonic densitometer

    SciTech Connect

    Dress, W.B.

    1983-01-01

    The velocity of torsional stress pulses in an ultrasonic waveguide of non-circular cross section is affected by the temperature and density of the surrounding medium. Measurement of the transit times of acoustic echoes from the ends of a sensor section are interpreted as level, density, and temperature of the fluid environment surrounding that section. This paper examines methods of making these measurements to obtain high resolution, temperature-corrected absolute and relative density and level determinations of the fluid. Possible applications include on-line process monitoring, a hand-held density probe for battery charge state indication, and precise inventory control for such diverse fluids as uranium salt solutions in accountability storage and gasoline in service station storage tanks.

  4. High-resolution atmospheric water vapor measurements with a scanning differential absorption lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Späth, F.; Behrendt, A.; Muppa, S. K.; Metzendorf, S.; Riede, A.; Wulfmeyer, V.

    2014-11-01

    The scanning differential absorption lidar (DIAL) of the University of Hohenheim (UHOH) is presented. The UHOH DIAL is equipped with an injection-seeded frequency-stabilized high-power Ti:sapphire laser operated at 818 nm with a repetition rate of 250 Hz. A scanning transceiver unit with a 80 cm primary mirror receives the atmospheric backscatter signals. The system is capable of water vapor measurements with temporal resolutions of a few seconds and a range resolution between 30 and 300 m at daytime. It allows to investigate surface-vegetation-atmosphere exchange processes with high resolution. In this paper, we present the design of the instrument and illustrate its performance with recent water vapor measurements taken in Stuttgart-Hohenheim and in the frame of the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE). HOPE was located near research center Jülich, in western Germany, in spring 2013 as part of the project "High Definition of Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction" (HD(CP)2). Scanning measurements reveal the 3-dimensional structures of the water vapor field. The influence of uncertainties within the calculation of the absorption cross-section at wavelengths around 818 nm for the WV retrieval is discussed. Radiosonde intercomparisons show a very small bias between the instruments of only (-0.04 ± 0.11) g m-3 or (-1.0 ± 2.3) % in the height range of 0.5 to 3 km.

  5. Multiple apolipoprotein kinetics measured in human HDL by high-resolution/accurate mass parallel reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sasha A; Andraski, Allison B; Pieper, Brett; Goh, Wilson; Mendivil, Carlos O; Sacks, Frank M; Aikawa, Masanori

    2016-04-01

    Endogenous labeling with stable isotopes is used to study the metabolism of proteins in vivo. However, traditional detection methods such as GC/MS cannot measure tracer enrichment in multiple proteins simultaneously, and multiple reaction monitoring MS cannot measure precisely the low tracer enrichment in slowly turning-over proteins as in HDL. We exploited the versatility of the high-resolution/accurate mass (HR/AM) quadrupole Orbitrap for proteomic analysis of five HDL sizes. We identified 58 proteins in HDL that were shared among three humans and that were organized into five subproteomes according to HDL size. For seven of these proteins, apoA-I, apoA-II, apoA-IV, apoC-III, apoD, apoE, and apoM, we performed parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) to measure trideuterated leucine tracer enrichment between 0.03 to 1.0% in vivo, as required to study their metabolism. The results were suitable for multicompartmental modeling in all except apoD. These apolipoproteins in each HDL size mainly originated directly from the source compartment, presumably the liver and intestine. Flux of apolipoproteins from smaller to larger HDL or the reverse contributed only slightly to apolipoprotein metabolism. These novel findings on HDL apolipoprotein metabolism demonstrate the analytical breadth and scope of the HR/AM-PRM technology to perform metabolic research. PMID:26862155

  6. High resolution measurement of light in terrestrial ecosystems using photodegrading dyes.

    PubMed

    Roales, Javier; Durán, Jorge; Bechtold, Heather A; Groffman, Peter M; Rosi-Marshall, Emma J

    2013-01-01

    Incoming solar radiation is the main determinant of terrestrial ecosystem processes, such as primary production, litter decomposition, or soil mineralization rates. Light in terrestrial ecosystems is spatially and temporally heterogeneous due to the interaction among sunlight angle, cloud cover and tree-canopy structure. To integrate this variability and to know light distribution over time and space, a high number of measurements are needed, but tools to do this are usually expensive and limited. An easy-to-use and inexpensive method that can be used to measure light over time and space is needed. We used two photodegrading fluorescent organic dyes, rhodamine WT (RWT) and fluorescein, for the quantification of light. We measured dye photodegradation as the decrease in fluorescence across an irradiance gradient from full sunlight to deep shade. Then, we correlated it to accumulated light measured with PAR quantum sensors and obtained a model for this behavior. Rhodamine WT and fluorescein photodegradation followed an exponential decay curve with respect to accumulated light. Rhodamine WT degraded slower than fluorescein and remained unaltered after exposure to temperature changes. Under controlled conditions, fluorescence of both dyes decreased when temperatures increased, but returned to its initial values after cooling to the pre-heating temperature, indicating no degradation. RWT and fluorescein can be used to measure light under a varying range of light conditions in terrestrial ecosystems. This method is particularly useful to integrate solar radiation over time and to measure light simultaneously at different locations, and might be a better alternative to the expensive and time consuming traditional light measurement methods. The accuracy, low price and ease of this method make it a powerful tool for intensive sampling of large areas and for developing high resolution maps of light in an ecosystem. PMID:24069440

  7. The design and construction of a high-resolution velocity-map imaging apparatus for photoelectron spectroscopy studies of size-selected clusters

    SciTech Connect

    León, Iker; Yang, Zheng; Liu, Hong-Tao; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2014-08-15

    A new velocity-map imaging apparatus equipped with a laser-vaporization supersonic cluster source and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer is described for high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy studies of size-selected cluster anions. Vibrationally cold anion clusters are produced using a laser-vaporization supersonic cluster source, size-selected by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and then focused co-linearly into the interaction zone of the high-resolution velocity-map imaging (VMI) system. The multilens VMI system is optimized via systematic simulations and can reach a resolution of 1.2 cm{sup −1} (FWHM) for near threshold electrons while maintaining photoelectron kinetic energy resolutions (ΔKE/KE) of ∼0.53% for higher energy electrons. The new VMI lens has superior focusing power over a large energy range, yielding highly circular images with distortions no larger than 1.0025 between the long and short radii. The detailed design, simulation, construction, testing, and performance of the high-resolution VMI apparatus are presented.

  8. A High Resolution Fourier-Transform Spectrometer for the Measurement of Atmospheric Column Abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cageao, R.; Sander, S.; Blavier, J.; Jiang, Y.; Nemtchinov, V.

    2000-01-01

    A compact, high resolution Fourier-transform spectrometer for atmospheric near ultraviolet spectroscopy has been installed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Table Mountain Facility (34.4N, 117.7 W, elevation 2290m).

  9. High-Resolution Measurements of the K-Shell Spectral Lines of Hydrogenlike and Heliumlike Xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Windman, K.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G.V.; Crespo, J.R.; Osterheld, A.L.; Reed, K.J.; Scofield, J.H.; Utter, S.B.

    1999-09-13

    With the implementation of a transmission-type curved crystal spectrometer at the Livermore high-energy electron beam ion trap (SuperEBIT) the window on sub-eV level measurements of the ground-state quantum electrodynamics and the two-electron quantum electrodynamics of high-Z ions has been opened. High-resolution spectroscopic measurements of the K{alpha} spectra of hydrogenlike Xe{sup 53+} and heliumlike Xe{sup 52+} are presented. The electron-impact excitation cross sections have been determined relative to the radiative recombination cross sections. The electron-impact energy was 112 keV which is about 3.7 times the excitation threshold for the n = 2 {yields} 1 transitions. Although the relative uncertainties of the measured electron-impact excitation cross sections range from about 20% to 50%, significant disagreement between the measured and calculated cross section values has been found for one of the heliumlike xenon lines. Overall, the comparison between experiment and theory shows that already for xenon (Z=54) the Breit interaction plays a significant part in the collisional excitation process. The measured cross sections for the hydrogenlike transitions are in good agreement with theoretical predictions. Additionally, the Xe{sup 53+} Ly-{alpha}{sub 1} transition energy has been measured utilizing the K{alpha} emission of neutral cesium and barium for calibration. Surprisingly, the experimental result, (31279.2 {+-} 1.5) eV, disagrees with the widely accepted theoretically predicted value of (31283.77 {+-} 0.09) eV. However, this disagreement does not (yet) call for any correction in respect to the theoretical values for the transition energies of the hydrogenlike isoelectronic sequence. It rather emphasizes the need for a reevaluation of the commonly used x-ray wavelengths table for atomic inner-shell transitions, in particular, for the cesium K{alpha} lines.

  10. Simultaneous high-resolution measurement of mitochondrial respiration and hydrogen peroxide production.

    PubMed

    Krumschnabel, Gerhard; Fontana-Ayoub, Mona; Sumbalova, Zuzana; Heidler, Juliana; Gauper, Kathrin; Fasching, Mario; Gnaiger, Erich

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiration is associated with the formation of reactive oxygen species, primarily in the form of superoxide (O2 (•-)) and particularly hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Since H2O2 plays important roles in physiology and pathology, measurement of hydrogen peroxide has received considerable attention over many years. Here we describe how the well-established Amplex Red assay can be used to detect H2O2 production in combination with the simultaneous assessment of mitochondrial bioenergetics by high-resolution respirometry. Fundamental instrumental and methodological parameters were optimized for analysis of the effects of various substrate, uncoupler, and inhibitor titrations (SUIT) on respiration versus H2O2 production. The sensitivity of the H2O2 assay was strongly influenced by compounds contained in different mitochondrial respiration media, which also exerted significant effects on chemical background fluorescence changes. Near linearity of the fluorescence signal was restricted to narrow ranges of accumulating resorufin concentrations independent of the nature of mitochondrial respiration media. Finally, we show an application example using isolated mouse brain mitochondria as an experimental model for the simultaneous measurement of mitochondrial respiration and H2O2 production in SUIT protocols. PMID:25631019

  11. Graphene Nanopore Support System for Simultaneous High-Resolution AFM Imaging and Conductance Measurements

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Accurately defining the nanoporous structure and sensing the ionic flow across nanoscale pores in thin films and membranes has a wide range of applications, including characterization of biological ion channels and receptors, DNA sequencing, molecule separation by nanoparticle films, sensing by block co-polymers films, and catalysis through metal–organic frameworks. Ionic conductance through nanopores is often regulated by their 3D structures, a relationship that can be accurately determined only by their simultaneous measurements. However, defining their structure–function relationships directly by any existing techniques is still not possible. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can image the structures of these pores at high resolution in an aqueous environment, and electrophysiological techniques can measure ion flow through individual nanoscale pores. Combining these techniques is limited by the lack of nanoscale interfaces. We have designed a graphene-based single-nanopore support (∼5 nm thick with ∼20 nm pore diameter) and have integrated AFM imaging and ionic conductance recording using our newly designed double-chamber recording system to study an overlaid thin film. The functionality of this integrated system is demonstrated by electrical recording (<10 pS conductance) of suspended lipid bilayers spanning a nanopore and simultaneous AFM imaging of the bilayer. PMID:24581087

  12. High-resolution Vertical Profiling of Ocean Velocity and Water Properties Under Hurricane Frances in September 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, T. B.; D'Asarp, E. A.; Girton, J. B.; Price, J. F.; Webb, D. C.

    2006-12-01

    In ONR's CBLAST Hurricane research program observations were made of the upper ocean's response to Hurricane Frances. Three EM-APEX floats (velocity sensing versions of Webb Research APEX floats) and two Lagrangian floats were deployed north of Hispaniola from a C-130 aircraft ahead of Hurricane Frances in September 2004. The EM-APEX floats measured T, S and V over the upper 500 m starting about a day before the storm's arrival. The Lagrangian floats measured temperature and salinity while following the three- dimensional boundary layer turbulence in the upper 40 m. One EM-APEX float was directly under the track of the storm's eye, another EM-APEX and two Lagrangian floats went in about 50 km to the right of the track (where the surface winds are strongest) and the third float was about 100 km to the right. The EM-APEX floats profiled for 10 hours from the surface to 200 m, then continued profiling between 35 and 200 m with excursions to 500 m every half inertial period. After 5 days, the EM-APEX floats surfaced and transmitted the accumulated processed observations, then the floats profiled to 500 m every half inertial period until recovered early in October aided by GPS and Iridium. The float array sampled in unprecedented detail the upper-ocean turbulence, momentum, and salt and heat changes in response to the hurricane. The buildup of surface gravity waves in advance of the storm was also observed in the velocity profiles, with significant wave heights of up to 11 m. Rapid acceleration of inertial currents in the surface mixing layer (SML) to over 1 m/s stimulated vertical mixing by shear instability at the SML base, as indicated by low Richardson numbers and SML deepening from about 40 m to 120 m under the strongest wind forcing. Surface cooling of about 2.5 C was primarily due to the SML deepening and entrainment of colder water, with a small contribution from surface heat flux. Intense inertial pumping was observed under the eye, with vertical excursions of

  13. Field comparison of the point velocity probe with other groundwater velocity measurement methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labaky, W.; Devlin, J. F.; Gillham, R. W.

    2009-04-01

    Field testing of a new tool for measuring groundwater velocities at the centimeter scale, the point velocity probe (PVP), was undertaken at Canadian Forces Base, Borden, Ontario, Canada. The measurements were performed in a sheet pile-bounded alleyway in which bulk flow rate and direction could be controlled. PVP velocities were compared with those estimated from bulk flow, a Geoflo® instrument, borehole dilution, colloidal borescope measurements, and a forced gradient tracer test. In addition, the velocity profiles were compared with vertical variations in hydraulic conductivity (K) measured by permeameter testing of core samples and in situ high-resolution slug tests. There was qualitative agreement between the trends in velocity and K among all the various methods. The PVP and Geoflo® meter tests returned average velocity magnitudes of 30.2 ± 7.7 to 34.7 ± 13.1 cm/d (depending on prior knowledge of flow direction in PVP tests) and 36.5 ± 10.6, respectively, which were near the estimated bulk velocity (20 cm/d). The other direct velocity measurement techniques yielded velocity estimates 5 to 12 times the bulk velocity. Best results with the PVP instrument were obtained by jetting the instrument into place, though this method may have introduced a slight positive bias to the measured velocities. The individual estimates of point velocity direction varied, but the average of the point velocity directions agreed quite well with the expected bulk flow direction. It was concluded that the PVP method is a viable technique for use in the field, where high-resolution velocity data are required.

  14. Patterning pallet arrays for cell selection based on high-resolution measurements of fluorescent biosensors.

    PubMed

    Shadpour, Hamed; Zawistowski, Jon S; Herman, Annadele; Hahn, Klaus; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2011-06-24

    Pallet arrays enable cells to be separated while they remain adherent to a surface and provide a much greater range of cell selection criteria relative to that of current technologies. However there remains a need to further broaden cell selection criteria to include dynamic intracellular signaling events. To demonstrate the feasibility of measuring cellular protein behavior on the arrays using high resolution microscopy, the surfaces of individual pallets were modified to minimize the impact of scattered light at the pallet edges. The surfaces of the three-dimensional pallets on an array were patterned with a coating such as fibronectin using a customized stamping tool. Micropatterns of varying shape and size were printed in designated regions on the pallets in single or multiple steps to demonstrate the reliability and precision of patterning molecules on the pallet surface. Use of a fibronectin matrix stamped at the center of each pallet permitted the localization of H1299 and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells to the pallet centers and away from the edges. Compared to pallet arrays with fibronectin coating the entire top surface, arrays with a central fibronectin pattern increased the percentage of cells localized to the pallet center by 3-4-fold. Localization of cells to the pallet center also enabled the physical separation of cells from optical artifacts created by the rough pallet side walls. To demonstrate the measurement of dynamic intracellular signaling on the arrays, fluorescence measurements of high spatial resolution were performed using a RhoA GTPase biosensor. This biosensor utilized fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) to measure localized RhoA activity in cellular ruffles at the cell periphery. These results demonstrated the ability to perform spatially resolved measurements of fluorescence-based sensors on the pallet arrays. Thus, the patterned pallet arrays

  15. High resolution as a key feature to perform accurate ELISPOT measurements using Zeiss KS ELISPOT readers.

    PubMed

    Malkusch, Wolf

    2005-01-01

    The enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay was originally developed for the detection of individual antibody secreting B-cells. Since then, the method has been improved, and ELISPOT is used for the determination of the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interferon (IFN)-gamma, or various interleukins (IL)-4, IL-5. ELISPOT measurements are performed in 96-well plates with nitrocellulose membranes either visually or by means of image analysis. Image analysis offers various procedures to overcome variable background intensity problems and separate true from false spots. ELISPOT readers offer a complete solution for precise and automatic evaluation of ELISPOT assays. Number, size, and intensity of each single spot can be determined, printed, or saved for further statistical evaluation. Cytokine spots are always round, but because of floating edges with the background, they have a nonsmooth borderline. Resolution is a key feature for a precise detection of ELISPOT. In standard applications shape and edge steepness are essential parameters in addition to size and color for an accurate spot recognition. These parameters need a minimum spot diameter of 6 pixels. Collecting one single image per well with a standard color camera with 750 x 560 pixels will result in a resolution much too low to get all of the spots in a specimen. IFN-gamma spots may have only 25 microm diameters, and TNF-alpha spots just 15 microm. A 750 x 560 pixel image of a 6-mm well has a pixel size of 12 microm, resulting in only 1 or 2 pixel for a spot. Using a precise microscope optic in combination with a high resolution (1300 x 1030 pixel) integrating digital color camera, and at least 2 x 2 images per well will result in a pixel size of 2.5 microm and, as a minimum, 6 pixel diameter per spot. New approaches try to detect two cytokines per cell at the same time (i.e., IFN-gamma and IL-5). Standard staining procedures produce brownish spots (horseradish peroxidase) and blue spots

  16. Velocity analysis of simultaneous-source data using high-resolution semblance—coping with the strong noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Shuwei; Wang, Shoudong; Chen, Yangkang; Qu, Shan; Zu, Shaohuan

    2016-02-01

    Direct imaging of simultaneous-source (or blended) data, without the need of deblending, requires a precise subsurface velocity model. In this paper, we focus on the velocity analysis of simultaneous-source data using the normal moveout-based velocity picking approach.We demonstrate that it is possible to obtain a precise velocity model directly from the blended data in the common-midpoint domain. The similarity-weighted semblance can help us obtain much better velocity spectrum with higher resolution and higher reliability compared with the traditional semblance. The similarity-weighted semblance enforces an inherent noise attenuation solely in the semblance calculation stage, thus it is not sensitive to the intense interference. We use both simulated synthetic and field data examples to demonstrate the performance of the similarity-weighted semblance in obtaining reliable subsurface velocity model for direct migration of simultaneous-source data. The migrated image of blended field data using prestack Kirchhoff time migration approach based on the picked velocity from the similarity-weighted semblance is very close to the migrated image of unblended data.

  17. Biaxial Mechanical Testing of Posterior Sclera using High-Resolution Ultrasound Speckle Tracking for Strain Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Perez, Benjamin; Tang, Junhua; Morris, Hugh J.; Palko, Joel R.; Pan, Xueliang; Hart, Richard T.; Liu, Jun

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize the mechanical responses of the sclera, the white outer coat of the eye, under equal-biaxial loading with unrestricted shear. An ultrasound speckle tracking technique was used to measure tissue deformation through sample thickness, expanding the capabilities of surface strain techniques. Eight porcine scleral samples were tested within 72 hours postmortem. High resolution ultrasound scans of scleral cross-sections along the two loading axes were acquired at 25 consecutive biaxial load levels. An additional repeat of the biaxial loading cycle was performed to measure a third normal strain emulating a strain gauge rosette for calculating the in-plane shear. The repeatability of the strain measurements during identical biaxial ramps was evaluated. A correlation-based ultrasound speckle tracking algorithm was used to compute the displacement field and determine the distributive strains in the sample cross-sections. A Fung type constitutive model including a shear term was used to determine the material constants of each individual specimen by fitting the model parameters to the experimental stress-strain data. A non-linear stress-strain response was observed in all samples. The meridian direction had significantly larger strains than the circumferential direction during equal-biaxial loadings (P’s<0.05). The stiffness along the two directions were also significantly different (P=0.02) but highly correlated (R2=0.8). These results showed that the mechanical properties of the porcine sclera were nonlinear and anisotropic under biaxial loading. This work has also demonstrated the feasibility of using ultrasound speckle tracking for strain measurements during mechanical testing. PMID:24438767

  18. High resolution measurement of neutron inelastic scattering cross-sections for 23Na

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouki, C.; Archier, P.; Borcea, C.; De Saint Jean, C.; Drohé, J. C.; Kopecky, S.; Moens, A.; Nankov, N.; Negret, A.; Noguère, G.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Stanoiu, M.

    2012-04-01

    The neutron inelastic scattering cross-section of 23Na has been measured in response to the relevant request of the OECD-NEA High Priority Request List, which requires a target uncertainty of 4% in the energy range up to 1.35 MeV for the development of sodium-cooled fast reactors. The measurement was performed at the GELINA facility with the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS), featuring eight high purity germanium detectors. The setup is installed at a 200 m flight path from the neutron source and provides high resolution measurements using the (n,n'γ)-technique. The sample was an 80 mm diameter metallic sodium disk prepared at IRMM. Transitions up to the seventh excited state were observed and the differential gamma cross-sections at 110° and 150° were measured, showing mostly isotropic gamma emission. From these the gamma production, level and inelastic cross-sections were determined for neutron energies up to 3838.9 keV. The results agree well with the existing data and the evaluated nuclear data libraries in the low energies, and provide new experimental points in the little studied region above 2 MeV. Following a detailed review of the methodology used for the gamma efficiency calibrations and flux normalization of GAINS data, an estimated total uncertainty of 2.2% was achieved for the inelastic cross-section integrals over the energy ranges 0.498-1.35 MeV and 1.35-2.23 MeV, meeting the required targets.

  19. High-resolution surface connectivity measurements and runoff dynamics in five urban watersheds in Knoxville, TN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epps, T.

    2015-12-01

    Impervious surfaces and stormwater drainage networks transmit rainfall quickly to urban stream systems with greater frequency, volume, energy, and pollutant loadings than in predevelopment conditions. This has a well-established negative impact on stream ecology, channel morphology, and water quality. Green infrastructure retrofits for urban drainage systems promote more natural hydrologic pathways by disconnecting concentrated flows. However, they are expensive due to high land costs and physical constraints. If a systematic strategy for siting green infrastructure is sought to restore natural flows throughout an urban catchment, greater knowledge of the drainage patterns and areas contributing frequent surface runoff is necessary. Five diverse urban watersheds in Knoxville, TN, were assessed using high-resolution topography, land cover, and artificial drainage network data to identify how surface connectivity differs among watersheds and contributes to altered flow regimes. Rainfall-runoff patterns were determined from continuous rainfall and streamflow monitoring over the previous ten years. Fine-scale flowpath connectivity of impervious surfaces was measured by both a binary approach and by a method incorporating runoff potential by saturation excess. The effect of the spatial distribution of connected surfaces was investigated by incorporating several distance-weighting schema along established urban drainage flowpaths. Statistical relationships between runoff generation and connectivity were measured to determine the ability of these different measures of connectivity to predict runoff thresholds, frequency, volumes, and peak flows. Initial results suggest that rapid assessment of connected surficial flowpaths can be used to identify known green infrastructure assets and highly connected impervious areas and that the differences in connectivity measured between watersheds reflects differing runoff patterns observed in monitored data.

  20. Hydrographical long term measurements and high resolution transects in tidal estuaries of the Southern North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badewien, Thomas H.; Schulz, Anne-Christin; Holinde, Lars; Zielinski, Oliver

    2013-04-01

    The tidal flats of the Wadden Sea and connected estuaries such as the Ems-Dollart are highly dynamic and diverse ecosystems and are of high economic value to the neighbouring regions. The Institute for Chemistry and Biology of the Marine Environment (ICBM) at the University of Oldenburg has expertise in observing and analysing environmental data from such complex systems. A research platform located at a tidal inlet between the East Frisian Islands Spiekeroog and Langeoog has collected hydrographical, meteorological and biogeochemical time series data for more than ten years. Currently, the bilateral Dutch-German research project "Future-Ems" deals with the highly dynamic exchange processes of the river Ems and its estuary (Dollart). Here, we present hydrographical long-term data sets obtained from the research platform as well as short-term high-resolution measurements from the same location and the river Ems. We focus on exchange and mixing processes as well as water mass transport through the respective tidal channels.

  1. Spatial variability of the Black Sea surface temperature from high resolution modeling and satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizyuk, Artem; Senderov, Maxim; Korotaev, Gennady

    2016-04-01

    Large number of numerical ocean models were implemented for the Black Sea basin during last two decades. They reproduce rather similar structure of synoptical variability of the circulation. Since 00-s numerical studies of the mesoscale structure are carried out using high performance computing (HPC). With the growing capacity of computing resources it is now possible to reconstruct the Black Sea currents with spatial resolution of several hundreds meters. However, how realistic these results can be? In the proposed study an attempt is made to understand which spatial scales are reproduced by ocean model in the Black Sea. Simulations are made using parallel version of NEMO (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean). A two regional configurations with spatial resolutions 5 km and 2.5 km are described. Comparison of the SST from simulations with two spatial resolutions shows rather qualitative difference of the spatial structures. Results of high resolution simulation are compared also with satellite observations and observation-based products from Copernicus using spatial correlation and spectral analysis. Spatial scales of correlations functions for simulated and observed SST are rather close and differs much from satellite SST reanalysis. Evolution of spectral density for modelled SST and reanalysis showed agreed time periods of small scales intensification. Using of the spectral analysis for satellite measurements is complicated due to gaps. The research leading to this results has received funding from Russian Science Foundation (project № 15-17-20020)

  2. Measurement of ciliary beat frequency using ultra-high resolution optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jason J.; Jing, Joseph C.; Su, Erica; Badger, Christopher; Coughlan, Carolyn A.; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2016-02-01

    Ciliated epithelial cells populate up to 80% of the surface area of the human airway and are responsible for mucociliary transport, which is the key protective mechanism that provides the first line of defense in the respiratory tract. Cilia beat in a rhythmic pattern and may be easily affected by allergens, pollutants, and pathogens, altering ciliary beat frequency (CBF) subsequently. Diseases including cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and primary ciliary dyskinesia may also decrease CBF. CBF is therefore a critical component of respiratory health. The current clinical method of measuring CBF is phase-contrast microscopy, which involves a tissue biopsy obtained via brushing of the nasal cavity. While this method is minimally invasive, the tissue sample must be oriented to display its profile view, making the visualization of a single layer of cilia challenging. In addition, the conventional method requires subjective analysis of CBF, e.g., manually counting by visual inspection. On the contrary, optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been used to study the retina in ophthalmology as well as vasculature in cardiology, and offers higher resolution than conventional computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Based on this technology, our lab specifically developed an ultra-high resolution OCT system to image the microstructure of the ciliated epithelial cells. Doppler analysis was also performed to determine CBF. Lastly, we also developed a program that utilizes fast Fourier transform to determine CBF under phase-contrast microscopy, providing a more objective method compared to the current method.

  3. A modularized infrared light matrix system with high resolution for measuring animal behaviors.

    PubMed

    Young, M S; Li, Y C; Lin, M T

    1993-03-01

    The current study provides a new modularized infrared light matrix system (about $200 cost) which is designed to measure the horizontal gross or fine movements, vertical motion, clockwise or anticlockwise turnings, freezing time, and total distance traveled in rats. The system records the sequences of animal's activity in a computer-aided system with a resolution of 0.2 s in time or 1.6 cm in space, and permanently stores all the resulting data in file. The behavioral apparatus was tested for its sensitivity and usability by amphetamine-injected rats. It was found that intraperitoneal administration of amphetamine (1.25-2.50 mg/kg), but not normal saline, produced a dose-related increase in either the horizontal gross or fine movements, vertical motion, clockwise or anticlockwise turnings, or total distance traveled. However, amphetamine injections produced a dose-related decrease in freezing time. Apparently, most of the amphetamine-induced responses obtained by other detecting apparatus can be reproduced easily by the present apparatus. The current detection system possesses the following advantages: a) high resolution, b) high expansion potential, and c) precise and simplified algorithms for behavioral parameter analysis. PMID:8451322

  4. High-Resolution X-Ray and Light Beam Induced Current (LBIC) Measurements of Multcrystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle; Budai, John D; Bennett, Charlee J C; Tischler, Jonathan Zachary; Duty, Chad E; Yelundur, V.; Rohatgi, A.

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution, spatially-resolved x-ray Laue patterns and high-resolution light beam induced current (LBIC) measurements are combined to study two multicrystalline solar cells made from the Heat Exchanger Method (HEM) and the Sting Ribbon Growth technique. The LBIC measurements were made at 4 different wavelengths (488, 633, 780, and 980 nm), resulting in penetration depths ranging from <1 {mu}m to >100 {mu}m. There is a strong correlation between the x-ray and LBIC measurements, showing that some twins and grain boundaries are effective in the reduction of local quantum efficiency, while others are benign.

  5. High-resolution Measurement Of Magnetic Anomalies With An Unmanned Airship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petzke, M.; Hofmeister, P.; Auster, H.; Hoerdt, A.; Glassmeier, K.

    2011-12-01

    High-resolution magnetic mapping of areas is a suitable way to determine location, geometry and physical parameters of disturbing objects that cause magnetic anomalies. Areas are often difficult to walk and handheld measurements can become costly. It can also be dangerous to enter areas where ordnance is suspected. In these cases it may be advantageous to use an aircraft to perform the measurement. We use a 6.5 m long unmanned airship. Compared to helicopters or gyrocopters, an advantage is that the damage in case of hazards is almost negligible. We made considerable efforts to construct a system that is easy to control without intense training under moderate wind conditions (up to 2 m/s wind speed). The airship has a mass of 10 kg and is powered by four electric motors with a maximum total power of 4.8 kW. Two of the rotors are used to control the altitude of the ship; the other two can be used to control direction and speed. The required energy is provided by four 4S1P Lithium-Polymer battery packs. Batteries are designed to provide a maximum of 125 A at 14.8 V. They have a capacity of 0.3 kWh and can be recharged in 20 minutes. The airship carries a differential GPS receiver that measures the position of the airship at 100 Hz with a precision of 10 cm. The distance to the ground is measured with ultrasonic sensors. A fluxgate magnetometer measures the magnetic field with an accuracy of 1 nT, also at 100 Hz. The flight path does not follow a rigid measuring grid but is a random walk, with roughly constant altitude to achieve a mean sensor position of 2 m above the ground. Thus, near-surface disturbing bodies are well resolved if their distance from each other is greater than 4 m. First measurements demonstrate the feasibility of the system. Future applications will be mid-scale measurements which are too large or too cumbersome for handheld measurements, and too small to justify the use of a manned helicopter.

  6. Differential membrane-based nanocalorimeter for high-resolution measurements of low-temperature specific heat.

    PubMed

    Tagliati, S; Krasnov, V M; Rydh, A

    2012-05-01

    A differential, membrane-based nanocalorimeter for general specific heat studies of very small samples, ranging from 0.5 mg to sub-μg in mass, is described. The calorimeter operates over the temperature range from above room temperature down to 0.5 K. It consists of a pair of cells, each of which is a stack of heaters and thermometer in the center of a silicon nitride membrane, in total giving a background heat capacity less than 100 nJ/K at 300 K, decreasing to 10 pJ/K at 1 K. The device has several distinctive features: (i) The resistive thermometer, made of a Ge(1 - x)Au(x) alloy, displays a high dimensionless sensitivity ∣dlnR∕dlnT∣ ≳ 1 over the entire temperature range. (ii) The sample is placed in direct contact with the thermometer, which is allowed to self-heat. The thermometer can thus be operated at high dc current to increase the resolution. (iii) Data are acquired with a set of eight synchronized lock-in amplifiers measuring dc, 1st and 2nd harmonic signals of heaters and thermometer. This gives high resolution and allows continuous output adjustments without additional noise. (iv) Absolute accuracy is achieved via a variable-frequency-fixed-phase technique in which the measurement frequency is automatically adjusted during the measurements to account for the temperature variation of the sample heat capacity and the device thermal conductance. The performance of the calorimeter is illustrated by studying the heat capacity of a small Au sample and the specific heat of a 2.6 μg piece of superconducting Pb in various magnetic fields. PMID:22667657

  7. High resolution 3D P wave velocity structure beneath Tenerife Island (Canary Islands, Spain) based on tomographic inversion of active-source data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GarcíA-Yeguas, Araceli; Koulakov, Ivan; IbáñEz, Jesús M.; Rietbrock, A.

    2012-09-01

    We present a high resolution 3 dimensional (3D) P wave velocity model for Tenerife Island, Canaries, covering the top of Teide volcano (3,718 m a.s.l.) down to around 8 km below sea level (b.s.l). The tomographic inversion is based on a large data set of travel times obtained from a 3D active seismic experiment using offshore shots (air guns) recorded at more than 100 onshore seismic stations. The obtained seismic velocity structure is strongly heterogeneous with significant (up to 40%) lateral variations. The main volcanic structure of the Las Cañadas-Teide-Pico Viejo Complex (CTPVC) is characterized by a high P wave velocity body, similar to many other stratovolcanoes. The presence of different high P wave velocity regions inside the CTPVC may be related to the geological and volcanological evolution of the system. The presence of high P wave velocities at the center of the island is interpreted as evidence for a single central volcanic source for the formation of Tenerife. Furthermore, reduced P wave velocities are found in a small confined region in CTPVC and are more likely related to hydrothermal alteration, as indicated by the existence of fumaroles, than to the presence of a magma chamber beneath the system. In the external regions, surrounding CTPVC a few lower P wave velocity regions can be interpreted as fractured zones, hydrothermal alterations, porous materials and thick volcaniclastic deposits.

  8. Small scale high resolution LiDAR measurements of a subglacial conduit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankoff, K. D.; Gulley, J.

    2012-04-01

    We present direct measurements of surface roughness in a sub-glacial conduit system underneath the Rieperbreen Glacier, Svalbard, Norway. Data was collected with a low-cost (129 USD) Microsoft Kinect video game device used as a LIDAR sensor. Surface roughness is a primary control on water flow in rivers, channels, and cave conduit systems and understanding the effects of surface roughness on water flow has been problematic due to lack of direct measurements of roughness in natural systems. We use the ice scallop dimensions to derive flow velocity and explore implications of the changing roughness parameters as the cave grows and shrinks.

  9. High-resolution Sonographic Measurements of Lower Extremity Bursae in Chinese Healthy Young Men

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yong-Yan; Wu, Chi-Qiu; Liu, Wei-Xing; Zhang, Lei; Li, Chun-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lower extremity bursae are very vulnerable to injury during strenuous physical exercises. Understanding the imaging characteristics of normal bursae is essential for early diagnosis of morphological abnormalities. Therefore, we evaluated the normal range of lower extremity bursae in healthy young men using high-resolution ultrasound (HR-US) imaging. Methods: Bursae in the lower extremities were examined by HR-US in 290 Chinese healthy young men with a median age of 18 years (range, 18–23 years). The bilateral suprapatellar bursa (SPB), deep infrapatellar bursa (DIPB), popliteal bursa (PB), and retrocalcaneal bursa (RCB) were imaged and measured for analysis. Results: The HR-US identification rates of the SPB, DIPB, PB, and RCB were 89.0% (517/580), 55.0% (319/580), 29.4% (171/580), and 49.5% (287/580), respectively. With the assumption that the bursae were normal in 95% of the study participants, the length and width values at the maximal cross-section of the SPB, DIPB, PB, and RCB were ≤18.00 and 6.09 mm, 8.10 and 2.11 mm, 7.67 and 3.93 mm, and 7.82 and 2.04 mm, respectively. Conclusions: Using HR-US imaging, we were able to analyze lower extremity bursae with high detection rates in healthy young men. The normal ranges of lower extremity bursa dimensions in healthy young men measured by HR-US in this study could be used as reference values for evaluation of bursa abnormalities in the lower extremity. PMID:26831233

  10. High Resolution Transmission Grating Spectrometer for Edge Toroidal Rotation Measurements of Tokamak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, A; May, M; Beiersdorfer, P; Magee, E; Lawrence, M; Terry, J; Rice, J

    2004-04-29

    We present a high throughput (f/3) visible (3500 - 7000 Angstrom) Doppler spectrometer for toroidal rotation velocity measurements of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak plasma. The spectrometer has a temporal response of 1 ms and a rotation velocity sensitivity of {approx}10{sup 5} cm/s. This diagnostic will have a tangential view and map out the plasma rotation at several locations along the outer half of the minor radius (r/a > 0.5). The plasma rotation will be determined from the Doppler shifted wavelengths of D{sub alpha} and magnetic and electric dipole transitions of highly ionized impurities in the plasma. The fast time resolution and high spectral resolving power are possible due to a 6' diameter circular transmission grating that is capable of {lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} {approx} 15500 at 5769 Angstrom in conjunction with a 50 {micro}m slit.

  11. Particle Velocity Measuring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for determining the velocity of individual food particles within a liquid/solid food mixture that is cooked by an aseptic cooking method whereby the food mixture is heated as it flows through a flowline. At least one upstream and at least one downstream microwave transducer are provided to determine the minimum possible travel time of the fastest food particle through the flowline. In one embodiment, the upstream detector is not required. In another embodiment, a plurality of small dipole antenna markers are secured to a plurality of food particles to provide a plurality of signals as the markers pass the upstream and downstream transducers. The dipole antenna markers may also include a non-linear element to reradiate a harmonic frequency of a transmitter frequency. Upstream and downstream transducers include dipole antennas that are matched to the impedance of the food slurry and a signal transmission cable by various impedance matching means including unbalanced feed to the antennas.

  12. Ambient Aerosol in Southeast Asia: High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer Measurements Over Oil Palm (Elaeis guineensis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, G.; Dimarco, C.; Misztal, P.; Nemitz, E.; Farmer, D.; Kimmel, J.; Jimenez, J.

    2008-12-01

    The emission of organic compounds in the troposphere is important factor in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). A very large proportion of organic material emitted globally is estimated to arise from biogenic sources, with almost half coming from tropical and sub-tropical forests. Preliminary analyses of leave cuvette emission studies suggest that oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) is a significantly larger source of isoprene than tropical forest. Much larger sources of isoprene over oil palm allied with a larger anthropogenic component of local emissions contrast greatly with the remote tropical forest environment and therefore the character of SOA formed may differ significantly. These issues, allied with the high price of palm oil on international markets leading to increased use of land for oil palm production, could give rise to rapidly changing chemical and aerosol regimes in the tropics. It is therefore important to understand the current emissions and composition of organic aerosol over all important land-uses in the tropical environment. This in turn will lead to a greater understanding of the present, and to an improvement in predictive capacity for the future system. To help address these issues, a high resolution time of flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed in the Sabahmas (PPB OIL) oil palm plantation near Lahad Datu, in Eastern Sabah, as part of the field component of the Aerosol Coupling in the Earth System (ACES) project, part of the UK NERC APPRAISE program. This project was allied closely with measurements made of similar chemical species and aerosol components at a forest site in the Danum Valley as part of the UK Oxidant and Particle Photochemical Processes above a Southeast Asian tropical rainforest (OP3) project. Measurements of submicron non- refractory aerosol composition are presented along with some preliminary analysis of chemically resolved aerosol fluxes made with a new eddy covariance system, based on the

  13. Mid-latitude cirrus investigations at high-resolution through ground-based lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dionisi, Davide; Keckhut, Philippe; Hauchecorne, Alain; Gaudo, Thierry; Courcoux, Yann; Porteneuve, Jacques; Hoareau, Christophe; Congeduti, Fernando; Liberti, Gianluigi

    2013-04-01

    Although cirrus vertical distributions determine their local cooling or warming effects, one of the main missing information in Global Climate Models (GCMs) is the characterization of their vertical location and stratification. Lidar technique, in contrast, can detect cirrus with high spatial and temporal resolution, providing accurate information on their vertical distribution. In this work, the recent and on going studies about the the characterization of mid-latitude cirrus through lidar systems located at the Observatory of Haute Provence (OHP, 43.9 ° N, 5.7 ° E) in France and at Rome Tor Vergata (RTV, 41.8 ° N, 12.6 ° E) in Italy are presented. Cirrus have been firstly studied in terms of quasi-stationary periods regarding statistical variability. A clustering approach has been then adopted to derive cirrus classification (and climatology) over the period 1996-2007 for OHP lidar measurements and over 2007-2010 for RTV dataset. Three independent cirrus classes have been identified: I thin middle tropospheric cirrus, II thick upper tropospheric cirrus, III thin tropopause cirrus. The temporal variability of the optical properties of these classes has been then analyzed at lidar raw temporal sampling (180 sec). While advection dominates, at the first order, variability on timescale of minutes can be related to space fluctuations of cloud properties on typical scale of few kilometers. Lognormal distributions of the optical depth have been used to model variability of the cirrus optical depth as observed by lidars. Finally, the implementation of the OHP lidar system in terms of two analogic channels that collect the Rayleigh-Mie orthogonal and parallel component signals through an high-resolution acquisition chain (vertical and temporal sampling of 37.5 m and 1 sec, respectively) has been employed to investigate the high frequency cirrus variability in a recent campaign held at the OHP. The preliminary results of this campaign are also showed

  14. Work-function measurement by high-resolution scanning Kelvin nanoprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheran, Larisa-Emilia; Johnstone, Sherri; Sadeghi, Saman; Thompson, Michael

    2007-03-01

    Nanoscience promises to transform today's world in the same way that integrated semiconductor devices transformed the world of electronics and computation. In the post-genomic era, the greatest challenge is to make connections between the structures and functions of biomolecules at the nanometre-scale level in order to underpin the understanding of larger scale systems in the fields of human biology and physiology. To achieve this, instruments with new capabilities need to be researched and developed, with particular emphasis on new levels of sensitivity, precision and resolution for biomolecular analysis. This paper describes an instrument able to analyse structures that range from tenths of a nanometre (proteins, DNA) to micron-scale structures (living cells), which can be investigated non-destructively in their normal state and subsequently in chemical- or biochemical-modified conditions. The high-resolution scanning Kelvin nanoprobe (SKN) measures the work-function changes at molecular level, instigated by local charge reconfiguration due to translational motion of mobile charges, dipolar relaxation of bound charges, interfacial polarization and structural and conformational modifications. In addition to detecting surface electrical properties, the instrument offers, in parallel, the surface topographic image, with nanometre resolution. The instrument can also be used to investigate subtle work function/topography variations which occur in, for example, corrosion, contamination, adsorption and desorption of molecules, crystallographic studies, mechanical stress studies, surface photovoltaic studies, material science, biocompatibility studies, microelectronic characterization in semiconductor technology, oxide and thin films, surface processing and treatments, surfaces and interfaces characterization. This paper presents the design and development of the instrument, the basic principles of the method and the challenges involved to achieve nanometric resolution

  15. High Resolution Turbulence Measurement Using Large-Scale Single Beam Two View Holographic PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, J.; Malkiel, E.; Katz, J.

    2002-11-01

    This presentation describes recent advances in the development of a holographic PIV (HPIV) system for measuring the 3D velocity distribution in a finite volume. To overcome the depth of focus problem of HPIV, we opt to record two perpendicular views of the same volume (Zhang et. al 1997, Exp. Fluid, 23). The associated complexity is solved by inserting a mirror in the flow facility. The perpendicular incident and reflected beams illuminate the same volume in two orthogonal directions, and the two views are recorded onto a single hologram. Matching the two images of the same particle enables us to determine the 3D position of a particle to within 7um. The 3D velocity field is computed by matching the two orthogonal projections of the same interrogation volume spatially filtered to remove traces of faraway particles. An uncertainty of 2.5% in the 3D velocity can be achieved. The directional ambiguity is overcome by recording hologram with two reference beams at different angles. Recent experiments attained very high spatial resolution over a substantial depth. About 200 particles/mm^3 can be resolved over a depth of 600mm. Using 180x180x180 um interrogation volume with 50% overlap, 500x500x500 vectors can be generated from the volume of 50x50x50 mm^3. Experiments in progress, which are performed in a spinning grid facility, focus on the structure of isotropic turbulence at high Re.

  16. Use of speckled speckles in high-resolution measurement of random bioflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulyanov, Sergey S.

    1999-09-01

    The statement of the problem concerning the formation of speckled biospeckles with a small number of scatterers has been reviewed briefly in this paper. Formulas relating to diffraction of focused Gaussian beam from narrow random flow to bioliquid have been discussed. Flow has been considered as a set of moving random screens. Statistical properties of doubly scattered speckles have been investigated. The correlation function of intensity fluctuations of statistically inhomogeneous speckled speckles has been studied with regard to bioflow measurement. Dependencies of statistical characteristics of small-N cascade speckles on the number of scattering screens have been discussed. It has been shown that the value of Doppler bandwidth in the scattered light essentially depends on the spatial velocity distribution in the flow. Mechanism of formation of output signal of speckle-microscope for measurements of blood and lymph flow in narrow vessels has been also considered. Output characteristics of measuring system have been studied. Dependence of spectral moments of output signal of speckle-microscope on the velocity of bioflow and its scattering characteristics has been analyzed.

  17. Static and Dynamic Reservoir Characterization Using High Resolution P-Wave Velocity Data in Delhi Field, la

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, S.; Davis, T.

    2012-12-01

    Static and dynamic reservoir characterization was done on high resolution P-wave seismic data in Delhi Field, LA to study the complex stratigraphy of the Holt-Bryant sands and to delineate the CO2 flow path. The field is undergoing CO2 injection for enhanced oil recovery. The seismic data was bandwidth extended by Geotrace to decrease the tuning thickness effect. Once the authenticity of the added frequencies in the data was determined, the interpretation helped map thin Tuscaloosa and Paluxy sands. Cross-equalization was done on the baseline and monitor surveys to remove the non-repeatable noise in the data. Acoustic impedance (AI) inversion was done on the baseline and monitor surveys to map the changes in AI with CO2 injection in the field. Figure 1 shows the AI percentage change at Base Paluxy. The analysis helped identify areas that were not being swept by CO2. Figure 2 shows the CO2 flow paths in Tuscaloosa formation. The percentage change of AI with CO2 injection and pressure increase corresponded with the fluid substitution modeling results. Time-lapse interpretation helped in delineating the channels, high permeability zones and the bypassed zones in the reservoir.; Figure 1: P-impedance percentage difference map with a 2 ms window centered at the base of Paluxy with the production data from June 2010 overlain; the black dashed line is the oil-water contact; notice the negative impedance change below the OWC. The lighter yellow color shows area where Paluxy is not being swept completely. ; Figure 2: P-impedance percentage difference map at TUSC 7 top; the white triangles are TUSC 7 injectors and the white circles are TUSC 7 producers; the black polygons show the flow paths of CO2.

  18. MODTRAN3: An update and recent validations against airborne high resolution interferometer measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Gail P.; Wang, Jinxue; Chetwynd, James H.

    1995-01-01

    accuracy of the code is very important because any errors in the radiative transfer calculation will directly translate into errors in the derived surface reflectance. In this paper, the new solar irradiance calculated by Kurucz, which is adopted in MODTRAN3, will be presented. Recent validations of MODTRAN3 with airborne high resolution interferometer measurements over ocean will be discussed. Good agreeement between model calculations and measurements was achieved.

  19. SERAPIS project - 3D imaging of the Campi Flegrei caldera (southern Italy) : high resolution P-wave velocity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judenherc, S.; Zollo, A.; Auger, E.; Boschi, L.; Satriano, C.; Serapis Working Group

    2003-04-01

    In September 2001, the SERAPIS project was carried out as an extended active seismic survey in the gulfs of Naples and Pozzuoli. A dense array of 60 three-component on-land stations and 72 sea bottom seismographs (OBS) have been deployed to record more than 5000 air gun shots at a spacing of about 125~m. As a preliminary analysis, the first P-arrival times of a the small offset data in the central part of the region has been inverted using the codes of H.M. Benz. The linearized iterative inversion of 38000 arrival times provided a >80% variance reduction with a node spacing of 250m. At the first order, our model shows a 2-layer structure : low velocity volcanic sediments (2.5-3.5km/s) lying on an inclined high velocity limestone platform (>6km/s). The caldera itself is very well identified, the rim is characterized by a 500-1000m upward shift of the velocity isolines. The whole dataset is expected to provide a wider image with the same resolution (250m). It includes the detailed shape of the refractor beneath the caldera as well as its irregularities out of the bay which have been observered in the seismic sections.

  20. High-Resolution Fourier-Transform Ultraviolet-Visible Spectrometer for the Measurement of Atmospheric Trace Species: Application to OH.

    PubMed

    Cageao, R P; Blavier, J F; McGuire, J P; Jiang, Y; Nemtchinov, V; Mills, F P; Sander, S P

    2001-04-20

    A compact, high-resolution Fourier-transform spectrometer for atmospheric near-ultraviolet spectroscopy has been installed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Table Mountain Facility (34.4 degrees N, 117.7 degrees W, elevation 2290 m). This instrument is designed with an unapodized resolving power near 500,000 at 300 nm to provide high-resolution spectra from 290 to 675 nm for the quantification of column abundances of trace atmospheric species. The measurement technique used is spectral analysis of molecular absorptions of solar radiation. The instrument, accompanying systems designs, and results of the atmospheric hydroxyl column observations are described. PMID:18357206

  1. Flow velocimetry for weakly conducting electrolytes based on high resolution Lorentz force measurement.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resagk, Christian; Ebert, Reschad; Vasilyan, Suren; Wiederhold, Andreas

    2013-11-01

    We demonstrate that a flow velocity measurement can be transformed into a non-invasive force measurement by metering the drag force acting on a system of magnets around a flow channel. This method is called Lorentz force velocimetry and has been developed in the last years in our institute. It is a feasible principle for materials with large conductivity like liquid metals. To evolve this method for weakly conducting fluids like salt water or molten glass the drag force measurement is the challenging bottleneck. Here forces of 10-8 and less of the weight force of the magnet system have to be resolved. In this paper different force measurement techniques get tested and compared. For the current setup the magnet system is attached to a state of the art electromagnetic force compensation balance. Different ways of getting the correct force signal out of the two measurement setups will be presented and discussed. For generalization of the measurement principle the Lorentz force is determined for different fluid profiles. In addition to that we have developed new systematic noise reduction methods to increase the resolution of the force measurement techniques by a factor of ten or larger which we will present here.

  2. Measurement of multidimensional ion velocity distributions by optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koslover, R.; McWilliams, R.

    1986-10-01

    The development of a new diagnostic capable of measuring plasma ion distributions as a function of all three velocity-space coordinates is reported. The diagnostic makes use of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and computer-assisted image reconstruction techniques. LIF yields high-resolution, nonperturbing measurements of one-dimensional distributions that are integrated in two directions through three-dimensional velocity space. Computer tomography allows for the unambiguous determinations of the complete ion velocity distribution. In addition to a description of the diagnostic, examples of recovered distributions obtained from experiments are given, and the effects of the major steps in the data processing are discussed.

  3. A high resolution 3D velocity model beneath the Tokyo Metropolitan area by MeSO-net

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, S.; Sakai, S.; Honda, R.; Kimura, H.; Hirata, N.

    2015-12-01

    Beneath the Tokyo metropolitan area, the Philippine Sea Plate (PSP) subducts and causes devastating mega-thrust earthquakes, such as the 1703 Genroku earthquake (M8.0) and the 1923 Kanto earthquake (M7.9). An M7 or greater (M7+) earthquake in this area at present has high potential to produce devastating serious loss of life and property with even greater global economic repercussions. The Central Disaster Management Council of Japan estimates that an M7+ earthquake will cause 23,000 fatalities and 95 trillion yen (about 1 trillion US$) economic loss. We have launched the Special Project for Reducing Vulnerability for Urban Mega Earthquake Disasters in collaboration with scientists, engineers, and social-scientists in nationwide institutions since 2012. We analyze data from the dense seismic array called Metropolitan Seismic Observation network (MeSO-net), which has 296 seismic stations with spacing of 5 km (Sakai and Hirata, 2009; Kasahara et al., 2009). We applied the double-difference tomography method (Zhang and Thurber, 2003) and estimated the velocity structure and the upper boundary of PSP (Nakagawa et al., 2010). The 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake (M9.0) has activated seismicity also in Kanto region, providing better coverage of ray paths for tomographic analysis. We obtain much higher resolution velocity models from whole dataset observed by MeSO-net between 2008 and 2015. A detailed image of tomograms shows that PSP contacts Pacific plate at a depth of 50 km beneath northern Tokyo bay. A variation of velocity along the oceanic crust suggests dehydration reaction to produce seismicity in a slab, which may related to the M7+ earthquake. Acknowledgement: This study was supported by the Special Project for Reducing Vulnerability for Urban Mega Earthquake Disasters of MEXT, Japan and the Earthquake Research Institute cooperative research program.

  4. Collision cross section measurements for biomolecules within a high-resolution FT-ICR cell: theory.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dan; Xin, Yi; Li, Dayu; Xu, Wei

    2015-04-14

    In this study, an energetic hard-sphere ion-neutral collision model was proposed to bridge-link ion collision cross section (CCS) with the image current collected from a high-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) cell. By investigating the nonlinear effects induced by high-order electric fields and image charge forces, the energetic hard-sphere collision model was validated through experiments. Suitable application regions for the energetic hard-sphere collision model, as well as for the conventional Langevin and hard-sphere collision models, were also discussed. The energetic hard-sphere collision model was applied in the extraction of ion CCSs from high-resolution FT-ICR mass spectra. Discussions in the present study also apply to FT-Orbitraps and FT-quadrupole ion traps. PMID:25754983

  5. Flow Velocimetry for Weakly Conducting Electrolytes Based on High Resolution Lorentzforce Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, R.; Vasilyan, S.; Wiederhold, A.

    We demonstrate that a flow velocity measurement can be transformed into a non-invasive force measurement by metering the dragforce acting on a system of magnets that is arranged around a flow channel. This method is called Lorentzforce velocimetry and has been developed in the last years in our institute. It is a highly feasible principle for materials with large conductivity like liquid metals. To evolve this method for weakly conducting fluids like salt water or molten glass the dragforce measurement is the challenging bottleneck. Here forces of 10-8 and less of the weightforce of the magnet system have to be resolved in the rather noisy environment of the flow channel. In this paper different force measurement techniques get tested and compared. In the first setup the drag-force is acting on the magnets that are hanging as a pendulum with 0.5 m long wires on a mounting. Here the displacement in the range of a few μm can be detected with a laser interferometer and another optical positioning sensor. For the second setup the magnet system is attached to a state of the art electromagnetic force compensation balance. The balance is used in an unusual orientation: It is turned by 90 degrees to measure the horizontally acting Lorentzforce. Different ways of getting the correct force signal out of the two measurement setups will be presented and discussed. For generalization of the measurement principle the Lorentzforce is determined for different fluid profiles. In addition to that we have developed new systematic noise reduction methods to increase the resolution of both force measurement techniques by a factor of ten or larger which we will present here.

  6. High resolution minor and trace element measurements for mussel shells using LA-ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, N.; Paradis, G.; Martin, P. A.; Pfister, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    The successively deposited calcium carbonate layers in mollusk shells could offer high resolution archives of the environmental conditions the mollusk has experienced during its life. Previous studies have shown that the elemental composition of mollusk shells is related to environmental parameters. Understanding the high resolution environmental conditions recorded in the mollusk shells requires a reliable high resolution analytical method of the trace and minor element composition in the shells. In this study, we investigated three methods using different instrumental configurations to generate high resolution records/time series of a suite of minor/ trace elements in mussel shells (Mytilus californianus) using laser ablation sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and compared their advantages and disadvantages. The three methods include running the ablated sample with dry plasma, running the ablated sample with diluted nitric acid blank solution and running the ablated sample with spiked solution. We concluded that running the ablated material with the spiked solution could yield the most reproducible signal and accurate data for Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca, Ba/Ca, La/Ca, Ce/Ca and Nd/Ca. To better understand the features of the laser ablation analytical method, we did a series of tests, such as scanning at different speeds, different directions, and applying different sampling strategies and explored the possible complications that could be encountered in using the laser ablation analytical method. In addition, we compared the results from the micromilled samples analyzed by the solution based method to the those obtained from the laser ablation method. Our results demonstrate that applying the slow ablation speed and simultaneously introducing the spiked solution (i.e. along with the ablated sample in the He carrier gas) could yield high resolution and reproducible time series of element/Ca ratios throughout the life span of the mussel. An

  7. Measurement of surface velocity fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, J. A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A new technique for measuring surface velocity fields is briefly described. It determines the surface velocity vector as a function of location and time by the analysis of thermal fluctuations of the surface profile in a small domain around the point of interest. The apparatus now being constructed will be used in a series of experiments involving flow fields established by temperature gradients imposed along a surface.

  8. Measurement method for roll angular displacement with a high resolution by using diffraction gratings and a heterodyne interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Shanzhi; Wang, Zhao; Gao, Jianmin; Guo, Junjie

    2014-04-15

    The roll angle measurement is difficult to be achieved directly using a typical commercial interferometer due to its low sensitivity in axial direction, where the axial direction is orthogonal to the plane of the roll angular displacement. A roll angle measurement method combined diffraction gratings with a laser heterodyne interferometer is discussed in this paper. The diffraction grating placed in the plane of a roll angular displacement and the interferometer arranged in the plane's orthogonal direction, constitute the measurement pattern for the roll angle with high resolution. The roll angular displacement, considered as the linear, can be tested precisely when the corresponding angle is very small. Using the proposed method, the angle roll measurement obtains the high resolution of 0.002{sup ″}. Experiment has proved its feasibility and practicability.

  9. Rotation and winds of exoplanet HD 189733 b measured with high-resolution transmission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brogi, Matteo

    2015-12-01

    At the dawn of exoplanet science, the first discoveries revealed the existence of giant planets orbiting very close to their parent stars, called hot Jupiters. Early theories suggested that these planets should be tidally locked, although their spin rotation has never been measured directly. On top of rotation, hot Jupiters can show equatorial super-rotation via eastward jet streams and/or high-altitude winds flowing from the day- to the night-side hemisphere. All these patterns broaden and distort the planet spectral lines to an extent that is detectable with measurements at high spectral resolution.High-dispersion observations have recently excelled in robustly detecting molecules in the atmospheres of transiting and non-transiting hot Jupiters, and in measuring their relative abundances. Here the method is applied to the transmission spectrum of HD 189733 b, a Jupiter-size planet orbiting a K1-2V star in 2.2 days, observed around 2.3μm with CRIRES at the ESO Very Large Telescope. At a spectral resolution of R~100,000, the combined absorption of carbon monoxide and water vapor is detected in the planet spectrum at a confidence level of 7σ. The signal is obtained by cross correlating with theoretical spectra and it is maximized for a planet rotational velocity of 3.5+1.1-2.6 km/s. This corresponds to a planet rotational period of 1.7+4.9-0.4 days, consistent with the known orbital period of 2.2 days and therefore with tidal locking. Although planet rotations faster than 1.1 days can be ruled out at high confidence (3σ), sub-synchronous rotational velocities (Vrot < 2.7 km/s) or no-rotation are only marginally excluded (1.2σ). Finally, no significant day-to-night side winds are detected. When compared to the recent detection of sodium Doppler shifted by -8 km/s, this likely implies a strong wind shear between the atmospheric levels probed by these high-dispersion observations and the outermost atmospheric layers where the core of the sodium lines are formed.

  10. High-resolution real-time 3D shape measurement on a portable device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpinsky, Nikolaus; Hoke, Morgan; Chen, Vincent; Zhang, Song

    2013-09-01

    Recent advances in technology have enabled the acquisition of high-resolution 3D models in real-time though the use of structured light scanning techniques. While these advances are impressive, they require large amounts of computing power, thus being limited to using large desktop computers with high end CPUs and sometimes GPUs. This is undesirable in making high-resolution real-time 3D scanners ubiquitous in our mobile lives. To address this issue, this work describes and demonstrates a real-time 3D scanning system that is realized on a mobile device, namely a laptop computer, which can achieve speeds of 20fps 3D at a resolution of 640x480 per frame. By utilizing a graphics processing unit (GPU) as a multipurpose parallel processor, along with a parallel phase shifting technique, we are able to realize the entire 3D processing pipeline in parallel. To mitigate high speed camera transfer problems, which typically require a dedicated frame grabber, we make use of USB 3.0 along with direct memory access (DMA) to transfer camera images to the GPU. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the technique, we experiment with the scanner on both static geometry of a statue and dynamic geometry of a deforming material sample in front of the system.

  11. The relation between gas density and velocity power spectra in galaxy clusters: High-resolution hydrodynamic simulations and the role of conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspari, M.; Churazov, E.; Nagai, D.; Lau, E. T.; Zhuravleva, I.

    2014-09-01

    Exploring the power spectrum of fluctuations and velocities in the intracluster medium (ICM) can help us to probe the gas physics of galaxy clusters. Using high-resolution 3D plasma simulations, we study the statistics of the velocity field and its intimate relation with the ICM thermodynamic perturbations. The normalization of the ICM spectrum (related to density, entropy, or pressure fluctuations) is linearly tied to the level of large-scale motions, which excite both gravity and sound waves due to stratification. For a low 3D Mach number M ~ 0.25, gravity waves mainly drive entropy perturbations, which are traced by preferentially tangential turbulence. For M> 0.5, sound waves start to significantly contribute and pass the leading role to compressive pressure fluctuations, which are associated with isotropic (or slightly radial) turbulence. Density and temperature fluctuations are then characterized by the dominant process: isobaric (low M), adiabatic (high M), or isothermal (strong conduction). Most clusters reside in the intermediate regime, showing a mixture of gravity and sound waves, hence drifting toward isotropic velocities. Remarkably, regardless of the regime, the variance of density perturbations is comparable to the 1D Mach number, M1D ~ δρ/ρ. This linear relation allows us to easily convert between gas motions and ICM perturbations (δρ/ρ< 1), which can be exploited by the available Chandra, XMM data and by the forthcoming Astro-H mission. At intermediate and small scales (10-100 kpc), the turbulent velocities develop a tight Kolmogorov cascade. The thermodynamic perturbations (which can be generally described by log-normal distributions) act as effective tracers of the velocity field, in broad agreement with the Kolmogorov-Obukhov-Corrsin advection theory. The cluster radial gradients and compressive features induce a flattening in the cascade of the perturbations. Thermal conduction, on the other hand, acts to damp the thermodynamic

  12. High-resolution near-surface velocity model building using full-waveform inversion—a case study from southwest Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, A.; Malinowski, M.; Malehmir, A.

    2014-06-01

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI) is an iterative optimization technique that provides high-resolution models of subsurface properties. Frequency-domain, acoustic FWI was applied to seismic data acquired over a known quick-clay landslide scar in southwest Sweden. We inverted data from three 2-D seismic profiles, 261-572 m long, two of them shot with small charges of dynamite and one with a sledgehammer. To our best knowledge this is the first published application of FWI to sledgehammer data. Both sources provided data suitable for waveform inversion, the sledgehammer data containing even wider frequency spectrum. Inversion was performed for frequency groups between 27.5 and 43.1 Hz for the explosive data and 27.5-51.0 Hz for the sledgehammer. The lowest inverted frequency was limited by the resonance frequency of the standard 28-Hz geophones used in the survey. High-velocity granitic bedrock in the area is undulated and very shallow (15-100 m below the surface), and exhibits a large P-wave velocity contrast to the overlying normally consolidated sediments. In order to mitigate the non-linearity of the inverse problem we designed a multiscale layer-stripping inversion strategy. Obtained P-wave velocity models allowed to delineate the top of the bedrock and revealed distinct layers within the overlying sediments of clays and coarse-grained materials. Models were verified in an extensive set of validating procedures and used for pre-stack depth migration, which confirmed their robustness.

  13. The application of line imaging velocimetry to provide high resolution spatially resolved velocity data in plate impact experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philpott, M. K.; George, A.; Whiteman, G.; De'Ath, J.; Millett, J. C. F.

    2015-12-01

    A single streak camera line imaging velocimeter has been applied to Armco® iron plate impact experiments to study material response at the grain scale. The grain size and phase distribution were determined with electron back scatter diffraction. The optical system resolution and fringe size were optimised to suit the grain size distribution. Comparisons of the performance and merits of several analysis algorithms including the ‘Fourier transform’, ‘fringe tracking’, ‘quadrature’ and the ‘continuous wavelet transform’ have been made by application to synthetic data. Point heterodyne velocimetry measurements made at the same location on the target surface have been compared with the line imaging velocimetry data for confirmation.

  14. Instantaneous high-resolution multiple-frequency measurement system based on frequency-to-time mapping technique.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuan A; Chan, Erwin H W; Minasian, Robert A

    2014-04-15

    A new microwave photonic instantaneous frequency measurement system that can simultaneously measure multiple-frequency signals while achieving very high resolution and wide frequency measurement range is presented. It is based on the frequency-to-time mapping technique implemented using a frequency shifting recirculating delay line loop and a narrowband optical filter realized by the in-fiber stimulated Brillouin scattering effect. Experimental results demonstrate the realization of a multiple-frequency measurement capability over a frequency range of 0.1-20 GHz that can be extended to 90 GHz, and with a measurement resolution of 250 MHz. PMID:24979008

  15. Extended-range grazing-incidence spectrometer for high-resolution extreme ultraviolet measurements on an electron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Brown, G. V.; Träbert, E.; Widmann, K.; Hell, N.

    2014-11-15

    A high-resolution grazing-incidence grating spectrometer has been implemented on the Livermore electron beam ion traps for performing very high-resolution measurements in the soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet region spanning from below 10 Å to above 300 Å. The instrument operates without an entrance slit and focuses the light emitted by highly charged ions located in the roughly 50 μm wide electron beam onto a cryogenically cooled back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector. The measured line widths are below 0.025 Å above 100 Å, and the resolving power appears to be limited by the source size and Doppler broadening of the trapped ions. Comparisons with spectra obtained with existing grating spectrometers show an order of magnitude improvement in spectral resolution.

  16. Measuring eddy heat, constituent, and momentum fluxes with high-resolution Na and Fe Doppler lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Chester S.; Liu, Alan Z.

    2014-09-01

    Vertical transport by turbulent mixing plays a fundamental role in establishing the thermal and constituent structure of the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). Because of observational challenges, eddy heat, constituent, and momentum fluxes, and the associated coefficients for thermal (kH), constituent (kzz), and momentum (kM), diffusion have not been well characterized in the MLT. We show that properly configured Na and Fe Doppler lidars, with sufficient resolution to observe the turbulence-induced wind, temperature, and density fluctuations, can make direct measurements of eddy fluxes throughout the mesopause region. When the horizontal (zθL with z = altitude and θL = full width at half maximum laser divergence), vertical (Δz), and temporal (Δt) resolutions of the lidar satisfy the condition LC≃ (3zθL) 2+ (0.6u>¯Δt) 2+ (1.5Δz) 2 ≤ 270 m (125 m), where u>¯ is the mean horizontal wind velocity, the observations include more than 80% (90%) of the energy in the turbulence fluctuations, and the observed fluxes and derived diffusivities will be highly representative of the actual values. For existing Na and Fe Doppler lidars, which have modest power-aperture products of about 1 W m2, long averaging times (5-20 h) are required to obtain statistically significant estimates of the eddy fluxes, kzz, kH, and kM profiles, and the turbulent Prandtl number (Pr = kM/kH) between about 85 and 100 km. These systems are capable of measuring the weekly or monthly mean flux and diffusivity profiles. Systems with power-aperture products of 5-100 W m2 or larger could be used to study the eddy fluxes generated by the dissipation and breaking of individual gravity waves to altitudes as high as the turbopause (~110 km).

  17. Deep-sea, high-resolution, hydrography and current measurements using an autonomous underwater vehicle: The overflow from the Strait of Sicily

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stansfield, Kate; Smeed, David A.; Gasparini, Gian Pietro; McPhail, Stephen; Millard, Nick; Stevenson, Peter; Webb, Andy; Vetrano, Anna; Rabe, Benjamin

    AUTOSUB-2, an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by the Southampton Oceanography Centre, was used for high resolution hydrographic surveys in the Sicily Strait. A combination of “seasoar” type profiling and terrain following missions were undertaken and velocity and hydrographic measurements taken from AUTOSUB-2 were compared with concurrent shipboard hydrographic and velocity profiles. Even though shipboard stations were separated by just 5 to 8 km along the mission path, data from the AUV showed small scale variability that was missed by the shipboard sampling. In this paper we present the example of an intense jet, with maximum speed greater than 0.50 m s-1, less than 4 km wide.

  18. Spectroscopic Properties of Neodymium-Doped Yttrium Orthovanadate Single Crystals with High-Resolution Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yoichi; Taira, Takunori

    2002-10-01

    The absorption and fluorescence spectra of the neodymium-doped yttrium orthovanadate (Nd:YVO4) single crystal were investigated carefully. For the 808.8-nm absorption cross section, the published values varied between 18.4 and 25.6 × 10-20 cm2 for π-polarization. The authors evaluated this spectroscopic parameter with high resolution at 0.5 nm, and discovered 48.4 cm-1 at 808.8 nm even for the absorption of 1 at.% Nd3+-ion-doped YVO4 single crystal. This value is 1.3 times larger than the well-known value, and confirms that Nd:YVO4 is very suitable for microchip lasers, and that certain laser characteristics of Nd:YVO4 of previous works should be re-evaluated.

  19. Study of M1 and E1 excitations by high-resolution proton inelastic scattering measurement at forward angles

    SciTech Connect

    Tamii, A.; Adachi, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Kaneda, T.; Matsubara, H.; Okamura, H.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Tameshige, Y.; Yosoi, M.; Carter, J.; Dozono, M.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Itoh, M.; Kawabata, T.; Nakanishi, K.; Sasamoto, Y.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von

    2007-06-13

    Experimental technique for measuring proton inelastic scattering with high-resolution at 295 MeV and at forward angles including zero degrees is described. The method is useful for extracting spin part of the M1 strength via nuclear excitation as well as E1 strength via Coulomb excitation. An excitation energy resolution of 20 keV, good scattering angle resolution, and low background condition have been achieved. The experimental technique was applied for several sd and pf shell nuclei.

  20. High-Resolution UV Relay Lens for Particle Size Distribution Measurements Using Holography

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, Robert M.; Capelle, Gene A.; Frogget, Brent C.; Grover, Mike; Kaufman, Morris I.; Pazuchanics, Peter; Sorenson, Danny S.; Stevens, Gerald D.; Tibbits, Aric; Turley, William D.

    2008-08-29

    Shock waves passing through a metal sample can produce ejecta particulates at a metal-vacuum interface. Holography records particle size distributions by using a high-power, short-pulse laser to freeze particle motion. The sizes of the ejecta particles are recorded using an in-line Fraunhofer holography technique. Because the holographic plate would be destroyed in an energetic environment, a high-resolution lens has been designed to relay the interference fringes to a safe environment. Particle sizes within a 12-mm-diameter, 5-mm-thick volume are recorded onto holographic film. To achieve resolution down to 0.5 μm, ultraviolet laser (UV) light is needed. The design and assembly of a nine-element lens that achieves >2000 lp/mm resolution and operates at f/0.89 will be described. To set up this lens system, a doublet lens is temporarily attached that enables operation with 532-nm laser light and 1100 lp/mm resolution. Thus, the setup and alignment are performed with green light, but the dynamic recording is done with UV light. During setup, the 532-nm beam provides enough focus shift to accommodate the placement of a resolution target outside the ejecta volume; this resolution target does not interfere with the calibrated wires and pegs surrounding the ejecta volume. A television microscope archives images of resolution patterns that prove that the calibration wires, interference filter, holographic plate, and relay lenses are in their correct positions. Part of this lens is under vacuum, at the point where the laser illumination passes through a focus. Alignment and tolerancing of this high-resolution lens will be presented, and resolution variation through the 5-mm depth of field will be discussed.

  1. High-Resolution UV Relay Lens for Particle Size Distribution Measurements Using Holography

    SciTech Connect

    Robert M. Malone, Brent C. Frogget, Morris I. Kaufman, Aric Tibbits, Gene A. Capelle, Mike Grover, Gerald D. Stevens, William D. Turley

    2008-03-01

    Shock waves passing through a metal sample can produce ejecta particulates at a metal-vacuum interface. Holography records particle size distributions by using a highpower, short-pulse laser to freeze particle motion. The sizes of the ejecta particles are recorded using an in-line Fraunhofer holography technique. Because the holographic plate would be destroyed in this energetic environment, a high-resolution lens has been designed to relay the interference fringes to a safe environment. Particle sizes within a 12-mm-diameter, 5-mm-thick volume are recorded on holographic film. To achieve resolution down to 0.5 microns, ultraviolet (UV) light (in this case supplied by a tripled Nd:YAG laser) is needed. The design and assembly of a nine-element lens that achieves >2000 lp/mm resolution and operates at f/0.85 will be described. To set up this lens system, a doublet lens is temporarily attached that enables operation with 532-nm (green) light and 1100 lp/mm resolution. Thus, the setup and alignment is performed with green light, but the dynamic recording is done with UV light. During setup, the 532-nm beam provides enough focus shift to accommodate the placement of a resolution pattern outside the ejecta volume; this resolution pattern does not interfere with the calibrated wires and pegs surrounding the ejecta volume. A television microscope archives images of resolution patterns that prove that the calibration wires, interference filter, holographic plate, and relay lenses are in their correct positions. Part of this lens is under vacuum, at the point where the laser illumination passes through a focus. Alignment and tolerancing of this high-resolution lens will be presented, and resolution variation through the 5-mm depth of field will be discussed.

  2. Instrument remotely measures wind velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, J. S.; Mccleese, D. J.; Seaman, C. H.; Shumate, M. S.

    1980-01-01

    Doppler-shift spectrometer makes remote satellite measurements of atmospheric wind velocity and temperature at specified altitudes. As in correlation spectrometer, spectrum of gas in reference cell and spectrum of same gas in atmosphere are correlated both in emission and absorption.

  3. Measurements of Laser Imprinting Using 2-D Velocity Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehly, T. R.; Fiksel, G.; Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. N.; Sangster, T. C.; Celliers, P. M.

    2014-10-01

    Evaluating laser imprinting and its effect on target performance is critical to direct-drive inertial confinement fusion research. Using high-resolution velocity interferometry, we measure modulations in the velocity of shock waves produced by the 351-nm beams on OMEGA. These modulations result from nonuniformities in the drive laser beams. We use these measurements to evaluate the effect on imprinting of multibeam irradiation and metal layers on both plastic and cryogenic deuterium targets driven with 100-ps pulses. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  4. A high-resolution analyser for the measurement of ammonium in oligotrophic seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abi Kaed Bey, Samer K.; Connelly, Douglas P.; Legiret, François-Eric; Harris, Andy J. K.; Mowlem, Matthew C.

    2011-10-01

    In this work, we describe a high-resolution fluorometric shipboard analyser and an improved method to determine NH{4/+} in oligotrophic seawater. The limit of detection is <5 nM, calculated with 95% confidence level using the weighted regression line applied to the standard addition method using real samples prepared with low nutrient seawater from the Atlantic. The results are summarised and cross-compared with spiked artificial seawater (ASW) and spiked Milli-Q water samples. The analyser has a precision of ±1-4% with a high performance over a wide range from 5 nM to 25 μM. The methodology of NH{4/+} analysis is based on the fluorescent product formed between o-pthaldialdehyde and NH{4/+} in the presence of sulfite. Due to the high resolution of the developed system, we were able to study in depth the sensitivity of the method to salinity, amines, amino acids and potential interferences from particles/algae. The method was found to be sensitive to salinity variations, reducing the signal by up to 85% at 5 nM; this effect decreased at higher concentrations of ammonium. It was noted that the interference from amines at low concentrations was negligible; however, at either high amino acid or high amine concentrations, the signal was depressed. To test for the effect of particles on the system, the system was tested with samples containing phytoplankton ( Dunaliella primolecta) cells at different concentrations prepared with ASW to simulate the effect of a phytoplankton bloom. This experiment assessed the potential impact of both particles and other potential fluorescence interferences from cells and/or ammonium leaching from cells. This experiment showed that a phytoplankton bloom could potentially have an impact of up to 12% on the signal of interest. Thus, we propose that this method is suitable for oligotrophic environments rather than coastal and eutrophic environments. The reagent was found to be stable for 17 days and standards of 1 μM were stable for 6

  5. Radioactivity of a Rock Profile from Rio do Rasto Formation Measured by High Resolution Gamma Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastos, Rodrigo O.; Appoloni, Carlos R.; Pinese, José P. P.

    2011-08-01

    Natural occurring radionuclides are present in different concentrations in sedimentary rocks. Generally, their distribution correlates reasonably with their geo-physicochemical behavior during sediment deposition and rock consolidation. This fact permits to study some geological characteristics of the rocks by analyzing the radionuclide distribution in the rocks, as it might reflect the origin of the sediments, the depositional environment, and more recent events such as weathering and erosion. In this work, rocks from an exposed profile of the Rio do Rasto Formation were collected and analyzed in laboratory by high resolution gamma spectrometry for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K determination. It was employed a standard gamma ray spectrometry electronic chain, with a 66% relative efficiency HPGe detector. The efficiency calibration, as well as its validation, was accomplished with eight International Atomic Energy Agency certified samples. The outcrop exposes layers of sandstone and siltstone and, secondarily, claystone, with varying colors (gray, red and green). The rocks were collected along this profile, each of them was dried in the open air during 48 hours, grounded, sieved through 4 mm mesh and sealed in cylindrical recipients. The 226Ra, 232Th and 40K activity concentrations are presented, their distribution and the possible relations among activities are analyzed. The general pattern of radionuclides distribution respects well the hypotheses on geo-physicochemical behavior of radioactive elements.

  6. High resolution measures of polarization and color of selected lunar areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, L. A.; Hall, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    High resolution observations of intensity, color (UBV) and polarization were obtained with scanning techniques for a number of lunar areas of special interest, including boundaries of some of the brightest and darkest lunar regions, certain Apollo landing sites and prominent craters. Two dimensional raster scans of colors were obtained for Alphonsus, Aristarchus, and Herodotus. The degree of polarization for any given phase angle appears to be roughly indicative of age. The darker younger mare surface are more highly polarized than the lighter and older mare surfaces, which appear to be more contaminated by lighter material from the highlands or by ray material thrown out from fresh craters. All mare surfaces are more highly polarized than the still older and lighter terra regions surrounding the maria. The very oldest craters are either dark-floored and show polarization characteristics similar to those of the mare surfaces, or if located in the highlands, they are less and less distinguishable from the highland background with greater age, and show the general highland polarization characteristics.

  7. High-resolution isotope measurements resolve rapid ecohydrological dynamics at the soil-plant interface.

    PubMed

    Volkmann, Till H M; Haberer, Kristine; Gessler, Arthur; Weiler, Markus

    2016-05-01

    Plants rely primarily on rainfall infiltrating their root zones - a supply that is inherently variable, and fluctuations are predicted to increase on most of the Earth's surface. Yet, interrelationships between water availability and plant use on short timescales are difficult to quantify and remain poorly understood. To overcome previous methodological limitations, we coupled high-resolution in situ observations of stable isotopes in soil and transpiration water. We applied the approach along with Bayesian mixing modeling to track the fate of (2) H-labeled rain pulses following drought through soil and plants of deciduous tree ecosystems. We resolve how rainwater infiltrates the root zones in a nonequilibrium process and show that tree species differ in their ability to quickly acquire the newly available source. Sessile oak (Quercus petraea) adjusted root uptake to vertical water availability patterns under drought, but readjustment toward the rewetted topsoil was delayed. By contrast, European beech (Fagus sylvatica) readily utilized water from all soil depths independent of water depletion, enabling faster uptake of rainwater. Our results demonstrate that species-specific plasticity and responses to water supply fluctuations on short timescales can now be identified and must be considered to predict vegetation functional dynamics and water cycling under current and future climatic conditions. PMID:26864434

  8. Variability of the North Atlantic Current: high resolution model data versus in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breckenfelder, Tilia; Rhein, Monika; Roessler, Achim; Behrens, Erik; Böning, Claus; Biastoch, Arne; Mertens, Christian

    2015-04-01

    The North Atlantic Current (NAC) provides an important heat source for the relatively warm winters in Western Europe by bringing warm and salty tropical/subtropical water into the subpolar gyre of the North Atlantic. The NAC is the northward extension of the Gulfstream and its warm and salty water form the warm upper branch of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). The NAC crosses the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) via the Charlie-Gibbs, Faraday and Maxwell Fracture Zones between 47° and 53°N. Along that section an array of four inverted echo sounders with bottom pressure sensors (PIES) are deployed since 2006 and combined with altimetry to quantify the NAC transport and its variability. The observed transport time series is compared to the high resolution output of the VIKING20 model, a 1/20° North Atlantic model which is embedded in a global model of 1/4° resolution (ORCA25) via a two-way nesting. We compare the horizontal and vertical flow fields, the mean transport and the variability as well as the water mass characteristics.

  9. Using high-resolution phosphorus data to investigate mitigation measures in headwater river catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. M.; Jordan, P.; Arnscheidt, J.

    2015-01-01

    This study reports the use of high-resolution water quality monitoring to assess the influence of changes in land use management on total phosphorus (TP) transfers in two 5 km2 agricultural sub-catchments. Specifically, the work investigates the issue of agricultural soil P management and subsequent diffuse transfers at high river flows over a 5-year timescale. The work also investigates the phenomenon of low flow P pollution from septic tank systems (STSs) and mitigation efforts - a key concern for catchment management. Results showed an inconsistent response to soil P management over 5 years with one catchment showing a convergence to optimum P concentrations and the other an overall increase. Both catchments indicated an overall increase in P concentration in defined high flow ranges. Low flow P concentration showed little change or higher P concentrations in defined low flow ranges despite replacement of defective systems and this is possibly due to a number of confounding reasons including increased housing densities due to new-builds. The work indicates fractured responses to catchment management advice and mitigation and that the short to medium term may be an insufficient time to expect the full implementation of policies (here defined as convergence to optimum soil P concentration and mitigation of STSs) and also to gauge their effectiveness.

  10. Using high-resolution phosphorus data to investigate mitigation measures in headwater river catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. M.; Jordan, P.; Arnscheidt, J.

    2014-09-01

    This study reports the use of high resolution water quality monitoring to assess the influence of changes in landuse management on total phosphorus (TP) transfers in two 5 km2 agricultural sub-catchments. Specifically, the work investigates the "wicked problem" of agricultural soil P management and subsequent diffuse transfers at high river flows over a five year timescale. The work also investigates the phenomenon of low flow P pollution from septic tank systems (STS) and mitigation efforts - here termed the "filthy issue" of rural catchment management. Results showed an inconsistent response to soil P management over five years with one catchment showing a convergence to optimum P concentrations and the other an overall increase. Both catchments indicated an overall increase in P concentration in defined high flow ranges. Low flow P concentration showed little change or higher P concentrations in defined low flow ranges despite replacement of defective systems and this is possibly due to a number of confounding reasons including increased housing densities due to new-builds. The work indicates fractured responses to catchment management advice and mitigation and that the short to medium term may be an insufficient time to expect the full implementation of policies (here defined as convergence to optimum soil P concentration and mitigation of STS) and also to gauge their effectiveness.

  11. The apogee red-clump catalog: Precise distances, velocities, and high-resolution elemental abundances over a large area of the Milky Way's disk

    SciTech Connect

    Bovy, Jo; Nidever, David L.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Girardi, Léo; Rodrigues, Thaíse S.; Zasowski, Gail; Chojnowski, S. Drew; Majewski, Steven R.; Holtzman, Jon; Hayden, Michael R.; Epstein, Courtney; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Andrews, Brett; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Stello, Dennis; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Basu, Sarbani; Beers, Timothy C.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; and others

    2014-08-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey III's Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) is a high-resolution near-infrared spectroscopic survey covering all of the major components of the Galaxy, including the dust-obscured regions of the inner Milky Way disk and bulge. Here we present a sample of 10,341 likely red-clump stars (RC) from the first two years of APOGEE operations, selected based on their position in color-metallicity-surface-gravity-effective-temperature space using a new method calibrated using stellar evolution models and high-quality asteroseismology data. The narrowness of the RC locus in color-metallicity-luminosity space allows us to assign distances to the stars with an accuracy of 5%-10%. The sample extends to typical distances of about 3 kpc from the Sun, with some stars out to 8 kpc, and spans a volume of approximately 100 kpc{sup 3} over 5 kpc ≲ R ≲ 14 kpc, |Z| ≲ 2 kpc, and –15° ≲ Galactocentric azimuth ≲ 30°. The APOGEE red-clump (APOGEE-RC) catalog contains photometry from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, reddening estimates, distances, line-of-sight velocities, stellar parameters and elemental abundances determined from the high-resolution APOGEE spectra, and matches to major proper motion catalogs. We determine the survey selection function for this data set and discuss how the RC selection samples the underlying stellar populations. We use this sample to limit any azimuthal variations in the median metallicity within the ≈45° azimuthal region covered by the current sample to be ≤0.02 dex, which is more than an order of magnitude smaller than the radial metallicity gradient. This result constrains coherent non-axisymmetric flows within a few kiloparsecs from the Sun.

  12. New turbidity current model based on high-resolution monitoring of the longest flow ever measured

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azpiroz, Maria; Cartigny, Matthieu; Talling, Peter; Parsons, Daniel; Simmons, Steve; Clare, Michael; Sumner, Esther; Pope, Ed

    2016-04-01

    Turbidity currents transport large amounts of sediment from shallow waters towards deep ocean basins. Little is known about these flows, despite their potential hazard for damaging expensive and strategically important seafloor infrastructure. So far turbidity currents have been profiled in only 6 deep ocean locations worldwide. Our current knowledge of these flows is therefore mainly based on scaled-down experimental and computationally-limited numerical modelling. Here we present results from the monitoring of a one-week long turbidity current in the Congo Canyon that had a discharge close to that of the Mississippi River. Measurements taken every 5 seconds give the most detailed image yet of a turbidity current deep-water over an unprecedented duration. Our analysis reveals a different flow structure than that presented in previous models. Classical models display a thick front of the flow followed by a thinner and faster flow, which gives way to a short and quasi-steady body. Instead, we observe a thin frontal cell that outruns a thicker (~80 m), long and slower quasi-steady flow. In contrast to the previous model, where the thinner faster flow feeds sediment into the head, the Congo Canyon turbidity current shows a frontal cell that feeds sediment into, and at the same time outruns, the succeeding quasi-steady flow. As a result of the faster moving frontal cell, the flow should continuously stretch and grow in length while propagating down the system. Within the quasi-steady body, the flow switches between what appears to be two stable flow modes. One mode exhibits a fast and thin velocity profile whose maximum is a low distance from the seabed and resembles Froude-supercritical flow conditions, while the other mode is similar to Froude-subcritical flow conditions as the flow is thicker and slower. These first observations provide new insights into the behaviour of deep water long duration flows that differ from traditional models and provide an exciting

  13. Measurement of retinal blood velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winchester, Leonard W., Jr.; Chou, Nee-Yin

    2006-02-01

    A fundus camera was modified to illuminate the retina of a rabbit model with low power laser light in order to obtain laser speckle images. A fast-exposure charge-coupled device (CCD) camera was used to capture laser speckle images of the retina. Image acquisition was synchronized with the arterial pulses of the rabbit to ensure that all images are obtained at the same point in the cardiac cycle. The rabbits were sedated and a speculum was inserted to prevent the eyelid from closing. Both albino (New Zealand; pigmented (Dutch belted) rabbits were used in the study. The rabbit retina is almost avascular. The measurements are obtained for choroidal tissue as well as retinal tissue. Because the retina is in a region of high metabolism, blood velocity is strongly affected by blood oxygen saturation. Measurements of blood velocity obtained over a wide range of O II saturations (58%-100%) showed that blood velocity increases with decreasing O II saturation. For most experiments, the left eye of the rabbit was used for laser measurements whereas the right eye served as a control. No observable difference between pre- and post-experimented eye was noted. Histological examinations of retinal tissue subjected to repeated laser measurements showed no indication of tissue damage.

  14. Evaluation of High-Resolution Ocean Surface Vector Winds Measured by QuikSCAT Scatterometer in Coastal Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Wenqing; Liu, W. Timothy; Stiles, Bryan W.

    2004-01-01

    The SeaWinds scatterometer onboard QuikSCAT covers approximately 90% of the global ocean under clear and cloudy condition in 24 h, and the standard data product has 25-km spatial resolution. Such spatial resolution is not sufficient to resolve small-scale processes, especially in coastal oceans. Based on range-compressed normalized backscatter and a modified wind retrieval algorithm, a coastal wind dataset at 12.5-km resolution was produced. Even with larger error, the high-resolution winds, in medium to high strength, would still be useful over coastal ocean. Using measurements from moored buoys from the National Buoy Data Center, the high-resolution QuikSCAT wind data are found to have similar accuracy as standard data in the open ocean. The accuracy of both high- and standard-resolution winds, particularly in wind directions, is found to degrade near shore. The increase in error is likely caused by the inadequacy of the geophysical model function/ambiguity removal scheme in addressing coastal conditions and light winds situations. The modified algorithm helps to bring the directional accuracy of the high-resolution winds to the accuracy of the standard-resolution winds in near-shore regions, particularly in the nadir and far zones across the satellite track.

  15. Test of high-resolution 3D P-wave velocity model of Poland by back-azimuthal sections of teleseismic receiver function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilde-Piorko, Monika; Polkowski, Marcin; Grad, Marek

    2015-04-01

    Geological and seismic structure under area of Poland is well studied by over one hundred thousand boreholes, over thirty deep seismic refraction and wide angle reflection profiles and by vertical seismic profiling, magnetic, gravity, magnetotelluric and thermal methods. Compilation of these studies allowed to create a high-resolution 3D P-wave velocity model down to 60 km depth in the area of Poland (Polkowski et al. 2014). Model also provides details about the geometry of main layers of sediments (Tertiary and Quaternary, Cretaceous, Jurassic, Triassic, Permian, old Paleozoic), consolidated/crystalline crust (upper, middle and lower) and uppermost mantle. This model gives an unique opportunity for calculation synthetic receiver function and compering it with observed receiver function calculated for permanent and temporary seismic stations. Modified ray-tracing method (Langston, 1977) can be used directly to calculate the response of the structure with dipping interfaces to the incoming plane wave with fixed slowness and back-azimuth. So, 3D P-wave velocity model has been interpolated to 2.5D P-wave velocity model beneath each seismic station and back-azimuthal sections of components of receiver function have been calculated. Vp/Vs ratio is assumed to be 1.8, 1.67, 1.73, 1.77 and 1.8 in the sediments, upper/middle/lower consolidated/crystalline crust and uppermost mantle, respectively. Densities were calculated with combined formulas of Berteussen (1977) and Gardner et al. (1974). Additionally, to test a visibility of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary phases at receiver function sections models have been extended to 250 km depth based on P4-mantle model (Wilde-Piórko et al., 2010). National Science Centre Poland provided financial support for this work by NCN grant DEC-2011/02/A/ST10/00284 and by NCN grant UMO-2011/01/B/ST10/06653.

  16. High-resolution measurements of the K-MM radiative Auger effect in medium-mass atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herren, Ch.; Dousse, J.-Cl.

    1996-02-01

    High-resolution measurements of the Kβ1,3 low-energy satellites of 42Mo, 44Ru, 46Pd, 48Cd, and 50Sn were performed. The photoinduced x-ray spectra were measured with a transmission-type bent-crystal spectrometer. Particular groups of K-MM radiative Auger effect (RAE) transitions could be identified. The intensity ratios I(K-MM RAE) / I(Kβ13) were extracted. They are compared to relativistic Hartree-Fock theoretical predictions of Scofield. The experimental energies of the RAE edges are compared to calculated Auger transition energies. The present experiment provides experimental RAE results for solid elements with Z>=42.

  17. Surface structure of imidazolium-based ionic liquids: Quantitative comparison between simulations and high-resolution RBS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kaoru; Nakanishi, Shunto; Lísal, Martin; Kimura, Kenji

    2016-03-01

    Elemental depth profiles of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([CnMIM][TFSI], n = 4, 6, 8) are measured using high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (HRBS). The profiles are compared with the results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Both MD simulations and HRBS measurements show that the depth profiles deviate from the uniform stoichiometric composition in the surface region, showing preferential orientations of ions at the surface. The MD simulations qualitatively reproduce the observed HRBS profiles but the agreement is not satisfactory. The observed discrepancy is ascribed to the capillary waves. By taking account of the surface roughness induced by the capillary waves, the agreement becomes almost perfect.

  18. Measurement of low radioactivity background in a high voltage cable by high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Vacri, M. L. di; Nisi, S.; Balata, M.

    2013-08-08

    The measurement of naturally occurring low level radioactivity background in a high voltage (HV) cable by high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR ICP MS) is presented in this work. The measurements were performed at the Chemistry Service of the Gran Sasso National Laboratory. The contributions to the radioactive background coming from the different components of the heterogeneous material were separated. Based on the mass fraction of the cable, the whole contamination was calculated. The HR ICP MS results were cross-checked by gamma ray spectroscopy analysis that was performed at the low background facility STELLA (Sub Terranean Low Level Assay) of the LNGS underground lab using HPGe detectors.

  19. Determination of Spectroscopic Properties of Atmospheric Molecules from High Resolution Vacuum Ultraviolet Cross Section and Wavelength Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, W. H.; Yoshino, K.

    1997-01-01

    An account is given of progress during the period 8/l/96-7/31/97 on work on (a) cross section measurements of O2 S-R using a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at the Photon Factory in Japan; (b) the determination of the predissociation linewidths of the Schumann-Runge bands (S-R) of 02; (c) cross section measurements of 02 Herzberg bands using a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at Imperial College; and (d) cross section measurements of H2O in the wavelength region 120-188 nm. The experimental investigations are effected at high resolution with a 6.65 m scanning spectrometer and with the Fourier transform spectrometer. Below 175 nm, synchrotron radiation is most suitable for cross section measurements in combination with spectrometers at the Photon Factory Japan. Cross section measurements of the Doppler limited bands depend on using the very high resolution, available with the Fourier transform spectrometer, (0.025/cm resolution). All of these spectroscopic measurements are needed for accurate calculations of the production of atomic oxygen, the penetration of solar radiation into the Earth's atmosphere, and photochemistry of minor molecules.

  20. Evaluating high resolution GRACE solutions against in situ measurements in the Three-Gorge Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Linage, C.; Bettadpur, S.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2012-12-01

    Wang et al (2011) showed that, when compared to in situ data, the total volume change associated with the impoundment of the Three-Gorge Reservoir between April 2002 and May 2010 could be retrieved with a 3-km3 (14%) error by the GRACE-CSR Release 04 solutions at 3.5° (max. harmonic degree 51) resolution after correlated errors were removed. However, the retrieved total volume change suffered from low spatial resolution and incorrect spatial localization. A larger volume increase was found in GRACE compared to in situ data during the last impoundment which was attributable to seepage into the underlying aquifer. In this study, we analyze the new CSR-Release 05 monthly solutions for 2004-2010. We also generate high resolution (1°, max. degree 180) mean solutions computed before and after the first and last impoundments for both Release 04 and Release 05. Correlated errors are removed using the decorrelation filter suggested by Swenson and Wahr (2006). We find a better agreement with RL05 (r2=0.66, MAD=4.30 km3) than with RL04 monthly solutions (r2=0.50, MAD=4.95 km3), and find even larger volume increase during the last impoundment (5-8 km3 difference vs 4-6 km3), strengthening our initial hypothesis of groundwater recharge. We find that 1° resolution mean solutions need to be truncated at max. degree 80 (2.5°) to reduce the impact of noise. A better spatial concentration is then obtained although the total volume change is now underestimated compared to in situ data. Finally, the damping effect of the decorrelation filter is investigated by forward modeling of total volume change using the 3" SRTM DEM. As an alternative, we apply the spatio-spectral localization technique based on Slepian functions (Simons 2006) to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. The contribution of regional hydrology is also considered via global hydrological model predictions.

  1. Structure and interactions of fluid phospholipid bilayers measured by high-resolution X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrache, Horia Iosif

    The topic of this work is the biologically relevant fluid phase of phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers. A first goal is the determination of the average bilayer structure using low-angle X-ray scattering from multilamellar lipid vesicles (MLVs). The MLVs are smectic liquid crystals, for which interbilayer correlations decay algebraically. Consequently, the smectic Bragg peaks have power low tails, with the exponent related to the bilayer fluctuations. The analysis of such peaks requires good instrumental resolution and a sophisticated (and equally good) scattering theory. The high resolution is achieved at the F3 station at CHESS. The scattering theory is an improved version of the modified Caillé theory being developed in our laboratory. Data fitting gives the three pieces of information carried by the scattering peaks: position, amplitude, and power-law exponent. The position and the amplitude (form factor) are used to determine the bilayer structure. The power-law exponent is converted into mean square fluctuations in the interbilayer water spacing. This opens a new window on interbilayer interactions which is the second goal of this work. The fundamental issue of interbilayer interactions is addressed both experimentally and theoretically. We obtain the interbilayer water spacing fluctuation σ, as well as the traditional osmotic pressure P, both as functions of the lamellar repeat spacing D and the aqueous separation a. We show theoretically how to obtain the functional form of the fluctuational free energy from the a data, which is then determined to within a factor that depends upon the bending modulus, Kc. The resulting functional form determined from experimental data has an exponential decay rather than the power law decay that applies for hard confinement in the large a regime, thereby showing that a theory of soft confinement is necessary. The existing theory of soft confinement predicts an exponential decay, but with a smaller decay length λfl than we

  2. Two-photon high-resolution measurement of partial pressure of oxygen in cerebral vasculature and tissue.

    PubMed

    Sakadzić, Sava; Roussakis, Emmanuel; Yaseen, Mohammad A; Mandeville, Emiri T; Srinivasan, Vivek J; Arai, Ken; Ruvinskaya, Svetlana; Devor, Anna; Lo, Eng H; Vinogradov, Sergei A; Boas, David A

    2010-09-01

    Measurements of oxygen partial pressure (pO(2)) with high temporal and spatial resolution in three dimensions is crucial for understanding oxygen delivery and consumption in normal and diseased brain. Among existing pO(2) measurement methods, phosphorescence quenching is optimally suited for the task. However, previous attempts to couple phosphorescence with two-photon laser scanning microscopy have faced substantial difficulties because of extremely low two-photon absorption cross-sections of conventional phosphorescent probes. Here we report to our knowledge the first practical in vivo two-photon high-resolution pO(2) measurements in small rodents' cortical microvasculature and tissue, made possible by combining an optimized imaging system with a two-photon-enhanced phosphorescent nanoprobe. The method features a measurement depth of up to 250 microm, sub-second temporal resolution and requires low probe concentration. The properties of the probe allowed for direct high-resolution measurement of cortical extravascular (tissue) pO(2), opening many possibilities for functional metabolic brain studies. PMID:20693997

  3. Two-photon high-resolution measurement of partial pressure of oxygen in cerebral vasculature and tissue

    PubMed Central

    Sakadžić, Sava; Roussakis, Emmanuel; Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Mandeville, Emiri T.; Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Arai, Ken; Ruvinskaya, Svetlana; Devor, Anna; Lo, Eng H.; Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Boas, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to measure oxygen partial pressure (pO2) with high temporal and spatial resolution in three dimensions is crucial for understanding oxygen delivery and consumption in normal and diseased brain. Among existing pO2 measurement methods, phosphorescence quenching is optimally suited for the task. However, previous attempts to couple phosphorescence with two-photon laser scanning microscopy have faced substantial difficulties because of extremely low two-photon absorption cross-sections of conventional phosphorescent probes. Here, we report the first practical in vivo two-photon high-resolution pO2 measurements in small rodents’ cortical microvasculature and tissue, made possible by combining an optimized imaging system with a two-photon-enhanced phosphorescent nanoprobe. The method features a measurement depth of up to 250 µm, sub-second temporal resolution and requires low probe concentration. Most importantly, the properties of the probe allowed for the first direct high-resolution measurement of cortical extravascular (tissue) pO2, opening numerous possibilities for functional metabolic brain studies. PMID:20693997

  4. Application of high-resolution spectral absorbance measurements to determine dissolved organic carbon concentration in remote areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avagyan, Armine; Runkle, Benjamin R. K.; Kutzbach, Lars

    2014-09-01

    Accurate quantification of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in surface and soil pore waters is crucial for understanding changes in water resources under the influence of climate and land use changes. Sampling and laboratory analysis of DOC content at a sufficient temporal frequency are especially difficult to achieve for natural DOC sources like the extensive boreal and arctic mire landscapes due to their remoteness. Therefore, the goals of this paper are (1) to investigate the performance of a portable, high-resolution ultraviolet-visible light spectroscopic method for determining the DOC content of surface and soil pore water samples from a boreal mire complex and (2) to compare the spectroscopic method with other DOC measurement techniques, e.g., the wet heated persulfate oxidation method and a laboratory, expulsion-based spectrophotometric method and (3) to assess different multivariate models that relate absorbance measurements with DOC contents. The study indicates that high-resolution spectroscopic measurements provide a simple, robust and non-destructive method for measuring DOC content. These measurements are of short duration (<1 min) and the sample analysis is portable, rendering this method particularly advantageous for in situ investigations at remote field locations. The study also demonstrates that if absorbances at specific wavelengths are used as proxies for DOC concentration, it is recommended to create site-specific calibration models that include more than one wavelength to achieve the optimal accuracy of the proxy-based DOC quantification.

  5. High Resolution Surface Backscatter Measurements with the SeaWinds Scatterometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, M. W.; Wu, C.; Long, D. G.

    1998-01-01

    A technique employed to extract higher resolution backscatter measurements from the SeaWinds pencil-beam scatterometer system is described. The unique methodology necessary to achieve very high radiometric accuracy for such measurements is discussed.

  6. Improved determination of seafloor absolute magnetization from uneven, near-seafloor magnetic measurements and high-resolution bathymetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szitkar, F.; Dyment, J.; Choi, Y.; Fouquet, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Vector magnetometers installed on deep-sea submersibles offer a unique opportunity to achieve high resolution magnetic investigations at the scale of hundred to thousand meters. Once corrected for the vehicle induced and remanent magnetization, the measurements mostly reflect variations of the topography and the submersible path - i.e. the distance between the sources and the observation points. The interesting parameter, however, is the seafloor magnetization that can be interpreted in terms of geological processes. Here we present methods to compute absolute magnetization of the seafloor by taking advantage of the uneven track of the submersible. In these methods, synthetic anomalies are computed for a unit magnetization assuming the geometry of the experiment, i.e. the source and the submersible path. The absolute magnetization is determined by a comparison between the observed anomalies and the synthetic ones along sliding windows. The coherency between the two signals gives an estimation of the quality of the determination, and the phase provides information on the magnetic polarity, and therefore the age of volcanic features. Such a method has been developed by Honsho et al. (JGR, 2009) using deep-sea submersible data only, i.e. magnetic anomaly, depth and altitude of the submersible. The synthetic anomalies are computed using 2D forward modeling, i.e. assuming the structures to be infinite in the direction perpendicular to the submersible path. The method has been applied with success to linear profiles crossing elongated structures such as mid-ocean ridges, but may fail for structures departing from the 2D assumption. The adaptation of improving multibeam systems to autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) has opened the way to the collection of very high resolution bathymetric data (around 2m between each measurement). This development has triggered a new strategy to explore the seafloor using manned submersibles: an AUV is operated during night time to

  7. A high-resolution 3D seismic velocity model of the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule, Chile earthquake rupture zone using land & OBS networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, S. P.; Rietbrock, A.; Ryder, I. M.; Miller, M.; Lee, C.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of seismic properties along a subduction megathrust can shed light on the composition and structure of rocks along the fault. By comparing seismic velocity structure with models of interseismic locking, co-seismic slip and afterslip, we can begin to understand how physical properties may affect fault dynamics throughout the subduction seismic cycle. The Maule earthquake, which hit the coast of central Chile in 2010, is the 6th largest earthquake ever recorded, rupturing a 500 x 80 km area of the Chilean megathrust. Published models demonstrate a complex bilateral rupture, with most co-seismic slip occurring to the north of the mainshock epicentre, although significant slip likely stopped short of the trench and the continental Moho. Here, we show a new high-resolution 3D velocity model (vp and vp/vs ratio) of the central Chilean margin Our velocity model is based on manually picked P- and S-wave arrival times from 670 aftershocks recorded by the International Maule Aftershock Deployment (IMAD) network. Seismic properties of the marine forearc are poorly understood in subduction zones, but by incorporating picks from two ocean-bottom seismometer (OBS) networks, we can resolve the velocity structure of the megathrust as far as the trench. In total, the catalogue used for the tomographic inversion yields a total of ~50,000 high quality P- and S-wave picks. We analyse the quality of our model by analysis of the resolution matrix and by testing characteristic models. The 3D velocity model shows the main structures associated within a subduction forearc: the marine forearc basin (vp < 6.0 km/s), continental mantle (vp > 7.5 km/s), and subducting oceanic crust (vp ~ 7.7 km/s). The plate interface is well defined by relocated aftershock seismicity. P-wave velocities along the megathrust range from 6.5 km/s beneath the marine forearc to 7.7 km/s at the intersection of the megathrust with the continental Moho. We infer several high vp anomalies within the South

  8. New Measurements of Doubly Ionized Iron Group Spectra by High Resolution Fourier Transform and Grating Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smillie, D. G.; Pickering, J. C.; Blackwell-Whitehead, R. J.; Smith, Peter L.; Nave, G.

    2006-01-01

    We report new measurements of doubly ionized iron group element spectra, important in the analysis of B-type (hot) stars whose spectra they dominate. These measurements include Co III and Cr III taken with the Imperial College VUV Fourier transform (FT) spectrometer and measurements of Co III taken with the normal incidence vacuum spectrograph at NIST, below 135 nm. We report new Fe III grating spectra measurements to complement our FT spectra. Work towards transition wavelengths, energy levels and branching ratios (which, combined with lifetimes, produce oscillator strengths) for these ions is underway.

  9. Determination of spectroscopic properties of atmospheric molecules from high resolution vacuum ultraviolet cross section and wavelength measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, W. H.; Yoshino, K.; Freeman, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Progress is given on work on: cross section measurements in the transmission window regions of the Schumann-Runge bands of oxygen; the determinations of predissociation linewidths; the theoretical calculation of band oscillator strengths of the Schumann-Runge absorption bands of O-16O-18; the determination of molecular spectroscopic constants; and the combined Herzberg continuum cross sections. The experimental investigations relevant to the cross section measurements, predissociation linewidths, and molecular spectroscopic constants are effected at high resolution with a 6.65 m scanning spectrometer which is, by virtue of its small instrumental width (FWHM = 0.0013 nm), suitable for cross section measurements of molecular bands with discrete rotational structure. Such measurements are needed for accurate calculations of the stratospheric production of atomic oxygen and heavy ozone formed following the photo-predissociation of O-16O-18 by solar radiation penetrating between the absorption lines of O-16(sub 2).

  10. Remote sounding of stratospheric temperatures using high resolution radiance measurements from the IRIS-D. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallery, W. O.

    1974-01-01

    Remote sounding of stratospheric temperatures up to 3.2 millibars is attempted using high resolution (unapodized) radiance measurements in the 15 micron CO2 band from the Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer on Nimbus 4. Inversions are performed using the Chahine relaxation technique. Radiance data and simultaneous in situ temperature profiles are obtained from the Rocket/Nimbus Sounder Comparison. Numerical tests with synthetic radiance data show that the uncertainty in the retrieved temperatures due to random instrument noise is about 1.1 K when averaged over layers about 10 km thick. However, comparison of the measured radiances with the radiances calculated from the in situ profiles show the calculated radiances to be systematically higher than the measured radiances. The evidence indicates that systematic errors exist in both the radiance and the in situ measurements.

  11. High resolution time interval meter

    DOEpatents

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09

    Method and apparatus are provided for measuring the time interval between two events to a higher resolution than reliability available from conventional circuits and component. An internal clock pulse is provided at a frequency compatible with conventional component operating frequencies for reliable operation. Lumped constant delay circuits are provided for generating outputs at delay intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution. An initiation START pulse is input to generate first high resolution data. A termination STOP pulse is input to generate second high resolution data. Internal counters count at the low frequency internal clock pulse rate between the START and STOP pulses. The first and second high resolution data are logically combined to directly provide high resolution data to one counter and correct the count in the low resolution counter to obtain a high resolution time interval measurement.

  12. Hydrokinetic canal measurements: inflow velocity, wake flow velocity, and turbulence

    DOE Data Explorer

    Gunawan, Budi

    2014-06-11

    The dataset consist of acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) velocity measurements in the wake of a 3-meter diameter vertical-axis hydrokinetic turbine deployed in Roza Canal, Yakima, WA, USA. A normalized hub-centerline wake velocity profile and two cross-section velocity contours, 10 meters and 20 meters downstream of the turbine, are presented. Mean velocities and turbulence data, measured using acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) at 50 meters upstream of the turbine, are also presented. Canal dimensions and hydraulic properties, and turbine-related information are also included.

  13. Dynamic frequency-domain interferometer for absolute distance measurements with high resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Jidong; Liu, Shenggang; Ma, Heli; Tao, Tianjiong; Wang, Xiang; Liu, Cangli; Tan, Hua

    2014-11-15

    A unique dynamic frequency-domain interferometer for absolute distance measurement has been developed recently. This paper presents the working principle of the new interferometric system, which uses a photonic crystal fiber to transmit the wide-spectrum light beams and a high-speed streak camera or frame camera to record the interference stripes. Preliminary measurements of harmonic vibrations of a speaker, driven by a radio, and the changes in the tip clearance of a rotating gear wheel show that this new type of interferometer has the ability to perform absolute distance measurements both with high time- and distance-resolution.

  14. High-Resolution Measurements of Photoionization of Ions Using Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar, A.; Covington, A.M.; Emmons, E.D.; Gharaibeh, M.F.; Phaneuf, R.A.; Alvarez, I.; Cisneros, C.; Hinojosa, G.; Dominguez, I.; Ackerman, G.; Bozek, J.D.; Canton, S.; Rude, B.; Sant'Anna, M.M.; Schlachter, A. S.; Folkmann, F.

    2003-08-26

    Measurement of absolute cross sections for photoionization of ions has become feasible by merging a well-collimated ion beam with a monochromatic beam of synchrotron radiation. An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source permits such measurements to be extended to multiply charged ions, and makes possible systematic studies along isoelectronic sequences. The evolution of atomic spectra along such sequences is commonly studied theoretically, but the predictive ability of the theoretical methods remains largely untested. Absolute cross-section measurements are presented for the first three ionic members of the isoelectronic sequence of nitrogen (O+, F2+ and Ne3+)

  15. Ice Fog and Light Snow Measurements Using a High-Resolution Camera System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Thomas; Gultepe, Ismail

    2016-07-01

    Ice fog, diamond dust, and light snow usually form over extremely cold weather conditions, and they affect both visibility and Earth's radiative energy budget. Prediction of these hydrometeors using models is difficult because of limited knowledge of the microphysical properties at the small size ranges due to measurement issues. These phenomena need to be better represented in forecast and climate models; therefore, in addition to remote sensing accurate measurements using ground-based instrumentation are required. An imaging instrument, aimed at measuring ice fog and light snow particles, has been built and is presented here. The ice crystal imaging (ICI) probe samples ice particles into a vertical, tapered inlet with an inlet flow rate of 11 L min-1. A laser beam across the vertical air flow containing the ice crystals allows for their detection by a photodetector collecting the scattered light. Detected particles are then imaged with high optical resolution. An illuminating LED flash and image capturing are triggered by the photodetector. In this work, ICI measurements collected during the fog remote sensing and modeling (FRAM) project, which took place during Winter of 2010-2011 in Yellowknife, NWT, Canada, are summarized and challenges related to measuring small ice particles are described. The majority of ice particles during the 2-month-long campaign had sizes between 300 and 800 μm. During ice fog events the size distribution measured had a lower mode diameter of 300 μm compared to the overall campaign average with mode at 500 μm.

  16. The Kinect as a low cost high resolution small scale LiDAR for water surface and shallow subsurface measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankoff, K. D.; Russo, T. A.

    2012-04-01

    The Microsoft Kinect, a video game input device designed for the Xbox system, can be used by earth scientists as a low cost high resolution LiDAR sensor. The device can see through at least 1 m of clear still water, or image the surface of opaque water. When observing through water the measurement is distorted by the refraction at the air/water interface. We present initial results of a calibration for sub-aqueous measurements, and describe a method for measuring sub-aqueous features and water height. When waves exist on the surface the signal is further convoluted and both the waves and subsurface are captured in the signal. We discuss signal deconvolution and techniques for capturing the relative and/or absolute values of surface waves and subsurface features.

  17. Determination of Spectroscopic Properties of Atmospheric Molecules from High Resolution Vacuum Ultraviolet Cross Section and Wavelength Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, W. H.; Yoshino, K.

    1999-01-01

    We have studied the spectroscopy and the cross sections of the simple molecules of atmospheric interest such as oxygen, nitric oxide, carbon dioxide, and water. We have made cross section measurements on an absolute base without the effects from the limited instrumental resolution. We have used the following different instruments- the grating spectrometer (6.65-m at CfA, 3-m at Photon Factory), VUV Fourier transform spectrometer at Imperial College, and then moved the same one to the Photon Factory. Selection of the instruments depend on the appearance of molecular bands, and their wavelength region. For example, the cross section measurements of Doppler limited bands can been done with the Fourier transform spectrometer at the very high resolution (0.025/ cm resolution). All of these spectroscopic measurements are needed for accurate calculations of the production of atomic oxygen penetration of solar radiation into the Earth's atmosphere, and photochemistry of minor molecules.

  18. Interpretation of data obtained with a high-resolution height-measuring corneal topographer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jongsma, Franciscus H. M.; Stultiens, Bertho A. T.; Hendrikse, Fred

    1995-02-01

    Basically, other information becomes available when, instead of local slope, local height is measured. In contradistinction to the data obtained from Placido based systems, ambiguity can be avoided in the height data obtained from oblique projected grids on a diffusely reflecting surface, e.g., with an adapted set-up, discrimination between convex and concave surfaces is possible. We made a corneal topographer based on sodium-fluorescein installation in the precorneal tearfilm for obtaining a diffusely radiating surface. The local information available using a height measuring system, however, sometimes deviates from global information a.o. due to tearfilm breakup. This breakup may be controlled by applying artificial tear products. These products however, may influence the tearfilm thickness. With in vitro measurements we also obtained information about the thickness of a natural tearfilm that turned out to be at least several tens of micrometers s rather than 7 to 10 micrometers as is given in physiological handbooks. In this paper also a microslit-projection and observation method for direct tearlayer thickness measurements is described. The aim of this research is to investigate the maximum obtainable accuracy of measurements done in vivo and to optimize the sodium-fluorescein installation with respect to absorption of the excitation light and the fluorescent yield with minimum distortion of the natural corneal tearlayer.

  19. High resolution measurements of the Am241(n,2n) reaction cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sage, C.; Semkova, V.; Bouland, O.; Dessagne, P.; Fernandez, A.; Gunsing, F.; Nästren, C.; Noguère, G.; Ottmar, H.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Romain, P.; Rudolf, G.; Somers, J.; Wastin, F.

    2010-06-01

    Measurements of the Am241(n,2n) reaction cross section have been performed at the Joint Research Centre (JRC) Geel in the frame of a collaboration between the European Commission (EC) JRC and French laboratories from CNRS and the Commissariat à L’Energie Atomique (CEA) Cadarache. Raw material coming from the Atalante facility of CEA Marcoule has been transformed by JRC Karlsruhe into suitable Am241O2 samples embedded in Al2O3 matrices specifically designed for these measurements. The irradiations were carried out at the 7-MV Van de Graaff accelerator. The Am241(n,2n) reaction cross section was determined relative to the Al27(n,α)Na24 standard cross section. The measurements were performed in four sessions, using quasi-mono-energetic neutrons with energies ranging from 8 to 21 MeV produced via the H2(d,n)He3 and the H3(d,n)He4 reactions. The induced activity was measured by standard γ-ray spectrometry using a high-purity germanium detector. Below 15 MeV, the present results are in agreement with data obtained earlier. Above 15 MeV, these measurements allowed the experimental investigation of the Am241(n,2n) reaction cross section for the first time. The present data are in good agreement with predictions obtained with the talys code that uses an optical and fission model developed at CEA.

  20. NMDB: real-time database for high resolution neutron monitor measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigies, Christian

    The worldwide network of standardized neutron monitors is, after 50 years, still the stateof-the-art instrumentation to measure variations of the primary cosmic rays in the energy range 500 MeV-60 GeV. These measurements are an ideal complement to space based cosmic ray measurements. Unlike data from satellite experiments, neutron monitor data has never been available in high time resolution from many neutron monitor stations in real-time. The data is often available only from the individual station's website, in varying formats, and not in real-time. To overcome this deficit, the European Commission is supporting the Neutron Monitor database (NMDB) since January 2008 as an e-Infrastructures project in the Seventh Framework Programme in the Capacities section. Neutron Monitor stations that do not yet have 1-minute resolution will be supported by software and the development of an affordable standard registration system to submit the measurements to the database via internet in realtime. This resolves the problem of different data formats and for the first time allows use of realtime cosmic ray measurements for space weather applications. Besides creating a database and developing applications that use this data, a part of the project is dedicated to create a public outreach website to inform about cosmic rays and possible effects on humans, technological systems, and the environment.

  1. High frequency, high resolution in situ measurement of Dissolved Organic Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, I. H.; Hemond, H.

    2013-12-01

    Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) is an important part of the carbon cycle in aquatic ecosystems and plays a fundamental role in numerous biogeochemical processes. Fast and accurate quantification of its concentration is necessary for several applications. For instance, determination of benthic fluxes of DOC via the eddy correlation (EC) method requires a sensor capable of precisely measuring DOC concentrations at a small point location, at a speed of several Hz. Such a sensor would enable the development of EC as a minimally invasive, in situ alternative to existing methods of DOC flux estimation, which currently include benthic chambers and sediment core incubations. A proof of concept instrument has been created capable of detecting naturally occurring levels of DOC at high speed via fluorescence measurements. Designed with the EC application in mind, the system utilizes optical fibers to transmit excitation and emission light, enabling in situ measurements at high spatial resolution. Emitted fluorescence light is passed through a tunable monochromator before reaching a photomultiplier tube; light level, and therefore solute concentration, is determined by photon counting. Preliminary results indicated that 100 Hz measurements of a 10 ppm humic acid solution were precise within 5%. The use of a tunable monochromator not only allows flexibility in detection wavelength, but also enables scans of the emission spectrum. The instrument thus is a dual-function device capable of both characterizing the chemistry of the water (e.g. characterizing the DOC present, or identifying additional compounds), and measuring fluorescence at selected wavelengths for EC and other applications.

  2. Deflection Measurements of a Thermally Simulated Nuclear Core Using a High-Resolution CCD-Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanojev, B. J.; Houts, M.

    2004-01-01

    Space fission systems under consideration for near-term missions all use compact. fast-spectrum reactor cores. Reactor dimensional change with increasing temperature, which affects neutron leakage. is the dominant source of reactivity feedback in these systems. Accurately measuring core dimensional changes during realistic non-nuclear testing is therefore necessary in predicting the system nuclear equivalent behavior. This paper discusses one key technique being evaluated for measuring such changes. The proposed technique is to use a Charged Couple Device (CCD) sensor to obtain deformation readings of electrically heated prototypic reactor core geometry. This paper introduces a technique by which a single high spatial resolution CCD camera is used to measure core deformation in Real-Time (RT). Initial system checkout results are presented along with a discussion on how additional cameras could be used to achieve a three- dimensional deformation profile of the core during test.

  3. Ice fog and light snow measurements using a high resolution camera system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Thomas; Gultepe, Ismail

    2016-04-01

    In this presentation, measurements collected by the ice crystal imaging (ICI) probe employed during FRAM (Fog Remote Sensing and Modeling) project for the Winter of 2010-2011 in Yellowknife, NWT, Canada are analysed to study small ice crystal impact on aviation operations. Ice fog, diamond dust, and light snow form during cold weather conditions and they affect aviation operations through visibility and deposition over the surfaces. In addition, these events influence the local heat budget through radiative cooling. Prediction of these hydrometeors using models is difficult because of limited knowledge of the microphysical properties at the small size ranges. These phenomena need to be better represented in forecast and climate models and this can only be done using accurate measurements from ground-based instrumentation. Imaging of ice particles' properties can complement other in-situ measurements being collected routinely. The newly developed ICI probe, aimed at measuring ice fog and light snow particles, is presented here. The ICI probe samples ice particles through a vertical inlet, where a laser beam and photodetector detect ice crystals contained in the flow. The detected particles are then imaged with high optical resolution between 10 to 1000 micron size range. An illuminating LED flash and image capturing for measurements are triggered by the photodetector. The results suggested that the majority of ice particles during the two-month long campaign were small with sizes between 300 μm and 800 μm. During ice fog events, the size distribution measured had a lower mode diameter of 300 μm compared to the overall campaign average with mode at 500 μm. In this presentation, challenges and issues related to small ice crystals are described and their importance for aviation operations and climate change are discussed.

  4. Real-time high-resolution measurement of collagen alignment in dynamically loaded soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    York, Timothy; Kahan, Lindsey; Lake, Spencer P.; Gruev, Viktor

    2014-06-01

    A technique for creating maps of the direction and strength of fiber alignment in collagenous soft tissues is presented. The method uses a division of focal plane polarimeter to measure circularly polarized light transmitted through the tissue. The architecture of the sensor allows measurement of the retardance and fiber alignment at the full frame rate of the sensor without any moving optics. The technique compares favorably to the standard method of using a rotating polarizer. How the new technique enables real-time capture of the full angular spread of fiber alignment and retardance under various cyclic loading conditions is illustrated.

  5. High resolution kilometric range optical telemetry in air by radio frequency phase measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillory, Joffray; Šmíd, Radek; García-Márquez, Jorge; Truong, Daniel; Alexandre, Christophe; Wallerand, Jean-Pierre

    2016-07-01

    We have developed an optical Absolute Distance Meter (ADM) based on the measurement of the phase accumulated by a Radio Frequency wave during its propagation in the air by a laser beam. In this article, the ADM principle will be described and the main results will be presented. In particular, we will emphasize how the choice of an appropriate photodetector can significantly improve the telemeter performances by minimizing the amplitude to phase conversion. Our prototype, tested in the field, has proven its efficiency with a resolution better than 15 μm for a measurement time of 10 ms and distances up to 1.2 km.

  6. High resolution kilometric range optical telemetry in air by radio frequency phase measurement.

    PubMed

    Guillory, Joffray; Šmíd, Radek; García-Márquez, Jorge; Truong, Daniel; Alexandre, Christophe; Wallerand, Jean-Pierre

    2016-07-01

    We have developed an optical Absolute Distance Meter (ADM) based on the measurement of the phase accumulated by a Radio Frequency wave during its propagation in the air by a laser beam. In this article, the ADM principle will be described and the main results will be presented. In particular, we will emphasize how the choice of an appropriate photodetector can significantly improve the telemeter performances by minimizing the amplitude to phase conversion. Our prototype, tested in the field, has proven its efficiency with a resolution better than 15 μm for a measurement time of 10 ms and distances up to 1.2 km. PMID:27475593

  7. Prediction of sugarcane sucrose content with high resolution, hyperspectral leaf reflectance measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments were conducted to determine if leaf reflectance measurements could be used to predict theoretically recoverable sugar (TRS) levels in sugarcane prior to harvest. Leaf and stalk samples were collected from multi-variety first-ratoon (FR) sugarcane maturity studies in 2005 at three sample ...

  8. Prediction of sugarcane sucrose content with high resolution, hyperspectral leaf reflectance measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Remote sensing for crop maturity parameters may offer sugarcane producers a method to develop harvest schedules that maximize sucrose production. Several tests were conducted to determine if leaf reflectance measurements could be used to predict theoretically recoverable sugar (TRS) levels (crop mat...

  9. A Novel, High Resolution, Non-Contact Channel Temperature Measurement Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Q.; Stark, B.; Kayali, S.

    1998-01-01

    An in-situ optical technique based on infrared emission spectroscopy has been developed for non-contact measurement of the temperature of a hot spot in the gate channel of a GaAs metal/semiconductor field effect transistor (MESFET).

  10. [High resolution measurement of concentrations and fluxes of heavy metals in pore waters by DGT].

    PubMed

    Fan, Ying-hong; Lin, Chun-ye; He, Meng-chang; Zhou, Yu-xiang; Yang, Zhi-feng

    2007-12-01

    Three sediment cores were collected from the Daliao River system in May 2006. The physico-chemical characteristics and heavy metal contents of sediment cores were analyzed. The vertical profiles of metals in pore water were measured by diffusive gradient in thin films (DGT) and centrifugal methods separately. The sequence of the concentrations of Cd, Co, Cr and Cu in sediment is Cr > Cu > Co > Cd. The concentrations measured by DGT were lower than that measured by centrifugal method. The average ratios of DGT measured concentrations (cDGT) to the concentrations measured by centrifugal method of Cd, Co, Cr and Cu were 0.389, 0.328, 0.863 and 0.403, respectively. This suggested that the release rates of these metals from solid phase to solution followed the sequence of Cr > Cu > Cd > Co. The fluxes of Cd, Co Cr and Cu were 1.12 x 10(-7) - 3.28 x 10(-7) nmol/(cm2 x s), 2.48 x 10(-7) - 10.40 x 10(-7) nmol/(cm2 x s), 8.80 x 10(-6) - 12.65 x 10(-6) nmol/(cm2 x s) and 6.14 x 10(-6) - 13.93 x 10(-6) nmol/(cm2 x s), respectively. The result showed that the release of Cd and Cu was mainly influenced by organic matter (OM), while Fe oxides, Mn oxides and OM were major factors controlling the transfer of Cr. The redox potential may be the major factor influencing the release of Co element. PMID:18290432

  11. Wavelength calibration of spectra measured by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment by use of a high-resolution reference spectrum.

    PubMed

    van Geffen, Jos H G M; van Oss, Roeland F

    2003-05-20

    Earthshine spectra measured by the nadir-viewing Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) spectrometer aboard the second European Remote Sensing (ERS-2) Satellite in the range of 240-790 nm are widely used for the retrieval of concentrations and vertical profiles of atmospheric trace gases. For the near-real-time delivery of ozone columns and profiles at the Royal Netherlands Meterological Institute, a tailor-made wavelength calibration method was developed. The method use a high-resolution (0.01-nm) solar spectrum as the reference spectrum and applies both a shift and a squeeze to the wavelengths in selected windows to find the optimal wavelength grid per window. This method provides a calibration accuracy of 0.002 nm below and 0.001 nm above 290 nm. The new wavelength calibration method can be used on any wavelength window, for example, to improve the calibration of spectra from the GOME Data Processor. A software package, GomeCal, which performs this recalibration, along with an improved polarization and radiometric correction, has been made and has been released via the World Wide Web. The method can be used for any high-resolution (ir)radiance spectrometer, such as the satellite instruments SCIAMACHY (Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Cartography), Ozone Monitoring Instrument, and GOME-2. PMID:12777012

  12. Integrated reflectivity measurements of hydrogen phthalate crystals for high-resolution soft x-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zastrau, U.; Förster, E.

    2014-09-01

    The integrated x-ray reflectivity of Potassium Hydrogen Phthalate (KAP) and Rubidium Hydrogen Phthalate (RAP) crystals is studied at a photon energy of (1740±14) eV using a double-crystal setup. The absolute measured reflectivities are in < 5% agreement with the values predicted by the dynamic diffraction theory for perfect crystals when absorption is included. Within 4% experimental error margins, specimen that were exposed to ambient conditions over many years show identical reflectivity as specimen that were cleaved just before the measurement. No differences are observed between cleaving off a 10 μm surface layer and splitting the entire crystal bulk of 2 mm thickness. We conclude that at 1.7 keV photon energy the penetration depth of ~ 1 μm is large compared to a potentially deteriorated surface layer of a few 10 nm.

  13. Characterization of fracture permeability with high-resolution vertical flow measurements during borehole pumping.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, Frederick L.; Hess, A.E.; Cheng, C.H.; Hardin, E.

    1987-01-01

    The distribution of fracture permeability in granitic rocks was investigated by measuring the distribution of vertical flow in boreholes during periods of steady pumping. Pumping tests were conducted at two sites chosen to provide examples of moderately fractured rocks near Mirror Lake, New Hampshire and intensely fractured rocks near Oracle, Arizona. A sensitive heat-pulse flowmeter was used for accurate measurements of vertical flow as low as 0.2 liter per minute. Results indicate zones of fracture permeability in crystalline rocks are composed of irregular conduits that cannot be approximated by planar fractures of uniform aperture, and that the orientation of permeability zones may be unrelated to the orientation of individual fractures within those zones.-Authors

  14. High-resolution, real-time simultaneous 3D surface geometry and temperature measurement.

    PubMed

    An, Yatong; Zhang, Song

    2016-06-27

    This paper presents a method to simultaneously measure three-dimensional (3D) surface geometry and temperature in real time. Specifically, we developed 1) a holistic approach to calibrate both a structured light system and a thermal camera under exactly the same world coordinate system even though these two sensors do not share the same wavelength; and 2) a computational framework to determine the sub-pixel corresponding temperature for each 3D point as well as discard those occluded points. Since the thermal 2D imaging and 3D visible imaging systems do not share the same spectrum of light, they can perform sensing simultaneously in real time: we developed a hardware system that can achieve real-time 3D geometry and temperature measurement at 26 Hz with 768 × 960 points per frame. PMID:27410608

  15. A high-resolution magnetic tweezer for single-molecule measurements

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kipom; Saleh, Omar A.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic tweezers (MT) are single-molecule manipulation instruments that utilize a magnetic field to apply force to a biomolecule-tethered magnetic bead while using optical bead tracking to measure the biomolecule’s extension. While relatively simple to set up, prior MT implementations have lacked the resolution necessary to observe sub-nanometer biomolecular configuration changes. Here, we demonstrate a reflection-interference technique for bead tracking, and show that it has much better resolution than traditional diffraction-based systems. We enhance the resolution by fabricating optical coatings on all reflecting surfaces that optimize the intensity and contrast of the interference image, and we implement feedback control of the focal position to remove drift. To test the system, we measure the length change of a DNA hairpin as it undergoes a folding/unfolding transition. PMID:19729511

  16. High resolution photofission measurements and intermediate structure in /sup 232/Th

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.

    1986-01-01

    The photofission cross section of /sup 232/Th was measured in the energy range 5.8-12 MeV with an average photon energy resolution of 600 eV. The gamma rays, variable in energy, were obtained from narrow (p,..gamma..) resonances in various nuclei. Intermediate structure was observed at subbarrier excitation energies. The average spacing of photofission resonances provided the first relatively direct determination of the energy of the second minimum of the fission barrier, relative to the ground state. The measured fission probability and various properties of the intermediate structure were found to agree with calculated values based on a double bumped fission barrier. The features of this barrier, a rather high first hump and a deep secondary well, are quite different from the predictions of current theoretical barrier calculations.

  17. High-resolution micromechanical measurement in real time of forces exerted by living cells

    PubMed Central

    Swierczewski, Robert; Hedley, John; Redfern, Chris P. F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to compare uniaxial traction forces exerted by different cell types using a novel sensor design and to test the dependence of measured forces on cytoskeletal integrity. The sensor design detects forces generated between 2 contact points by cells spanning a gap. The magnitude of these forces varied according to cell type and were dependent on cytoskeletal integrity. The response time for drug-induced cytoskeletal disruption also varied between cell types: dermal fibroblasts exerted the greatest forces and had the slowest drug response times; EBV-transformed epithelial cells also had slow cytoskeletal depolymerisation times but exerted the lowest forces overall. Conversely, lung epithelial tumor cells exerted low forces but had the fastest depolymerisation drug response. These results provide proof of principle for a new design of force-measurement sensor based on optical interferometry, an approach that can be used to study cytoskeletal dynamics in real time. PMID:26645140

  18. A high resolution capacitive sensing system for the measurement of water content in crude oil.

    PubMed

    Zubair, Muhammad; Tang, Tong Boon

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a non-intrusive system to measure ultra-low water content in crude oil. The system is based on a capacitance to phase angle conversion method. Water content is measured with a capacitance sensor comprising two semi-cylindrical electrodes mounted on the outer side of a glass tube. The presence of water induces a capacitance change that in turn converts into a phase angle, with respect to a main oscillator. A differential sensing technique is adopted not only to ensure high immunity against temperature variation and background noise, but also to eliminate phase jitter and amplitude variation of the main oscillator that could destabilize the output. The complete capacitive sensing system was implemented in hardware and experiment results using crude oil samples demonstrated that a resolution of ± 50 ppm of water content in crude oil was achieved by the proposed design. PMID:24967606

  19. Measuring Curved Crystal Performance for a High Resolution, Imaging X-ray Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Haugh and Richard Stewart

    2010-06-07

    This paper describes the design, crystal selection, and crystal testing for a vertical Johann spectrometer operating in the 13 keV range to measure ion Doppler broadening in inertial confinement plasmas. The spectrometer is designed to use thin, curved, mica crystals to achieve a resolving power of E/ΔE>2000. A number of natural mica crystals were screened for flatness and X-ray diffraction width to find samples of sufficient perfection for use in the instrument. Procedures to select and mount high quality mica samples are discussed. A diode-type X-ray source coupled to a dual goniometer arrangement was used to measure the crystal reflectivity curve. A procedure was developed for evaluating the goniometer performance using a set of diffraction grade Si crystals. This goniometer system was invaluable for identifying the best original crystals for further use and developing the techniques to select satisfactory curved crystals for the spectrometer.

  20. Implementation of Ultrasonic Sensing for High Resolution Measurement of Binary Gas Mixture Fractions

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Richard; Battistin, Michele; Berry, Stephane; Bitadze, Alexander; Bonneau, Pierre; Bousson, Nicolas; Boyd, George; Bozza, Gennaro; Crespo-Lopez, Olivier; Riva, Enrico Da; Degeorge, Cyril; Deterre, Cecile; DiGirolamo, Beniamino; Doubek, Martin; Favre, Gilles; Godlewski, Jan; Hallewell, Gregory; Hasib, Ahmed; Katunin, Sergey; Langevin, Nicolas; Lombard, Didier; Mathieu, Michel; McMahon, Stephen; Nagai, Koichi; Pearson, Benjamin; Robinson, David; Rossi, Cecilia; Rozanov, Alexandre; Strauss, Michael; Vitek, Michal; Vacek, Vaclav; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2014-01-01

    We describe an ultrasonic instrument for continuous real-time analysis of the fractional mixture of a binary gas system. The instrument is particularly well suited to measurement of leaks of a high molecular weight gas into a system that is nominally composed of a single gas. Sensitivity < 5 × 10−5 is demonstrated to leaks of octaflouropropane (C3F8) coolant into nitrogen during a long duration (18 month) continuous study. The sensitivity of the described measurement system is shown to depend on the difference in molecular masses of the two gases in the mixture. The impact of temperature and pressure variances on the accuracy of the measurement is analysed. Practical considerations for the implementation and deployment of long term, in situ ultrasonic leak detection systems are also described. Although development of the described systems was motivated by the requirements of an evaporative fluorocarbon cooling system, the instrument is applicable to the detection of leaks of many other gases and to processes requiring continuous knowledge of particular binary gas mixture fractions. PMID:24961217

  1. Implementation of ultrasonic sensing for high resolution measurement of binary gas mixture fractions.

    PubMed

    Bates, Richard; Battistin, Michele; Berry, Stephane; Bitadze, Alexander; Bonneau, Pierre; Bousson, Nicolas; Boyd, George; Bozza, Gennaro; Crespo-Lopez, Olivier; Da Riva, Enrico; Degeorge, Cyril; Deterre, Cecile; DiGirolamo, Beniamino; Doubek, Martin; Favre, Gilles; Godlewski, Jan; Hallewell, Gregory; Hasib, Ahmed; Katunin, Sergey; Langevin, Nicolas; Lombard, Didier; Mathieu, Michel; McMahon, Stephen; Nagai, Koichi; Pearson, Benjamin; Robinson, David; Rossi, Cecilia; Rozanov, Alexandre; Strauss, Michael; Vitek, Michal; Vacek, Vaclav; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2014-01-01

    We describe an ultrasonic instrument for continuous real-time analysis of the fractional mixture of a binary gas system. The instrument is particularly well suited to measurement of leaks of a high molecular weight gas into a system that is nominally composed of a single gas. Sensitivity < 5 × 10(-5) is demonstrated to leaks of octaflouropropane (C3F8) coolant into nitrogen during a long duration (18 month) continuous study. The sensitivity of the described measurement system is shown to depend on the difference in molecular masses of the two gases in the mixture. The impact of temperature and pressure variances on the accuracy of the measurement is analysed. Practical considerations for the implementation and deployment of long term, in situ ultrasonic leak detection systems are also described. Although development of the described systems was motivated by the requirements of an evaporative fluorocarbon cooling system, the instrument is applicable to the detection of leaks of many other gases and to processes requiring continuous knowledge of particular binary gas mixture fractions. PMID:24961217

  2. High Resolution Muscle Measurements Provide Insights into Equinus Contractures in Patients with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Mathewson, Margie A.; Ward, Samuel R.; Chambers, Henry G.; Lieber, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Muscle contractures that occur after upper motor neuron lesion are often surgically released or lengthened. However, surgical manipulation of muscle length changes a muscle’s sarcomere length (Ls), which can affect force production. To predict effects of surgery, both macro- (fascicle length (Lf)) and micro- (Ls) level structural measurements are needed. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to quantify both Ls and Lf in patients with cerebral palsy (CP) as well as typically developing (TD) children. Soleus ultrasound images were obtained from children with CP and TD children. Lf was determined and, with the joint in the same position, CP biopsies were obtained, formalin fixed and Ls measured by laser diffraction. Since soleus Ls values were not measurable in TD children, TD Ls values were obtained using three independent methods. While average Lf did not differ between groups (CP=3.6±1.2 cm, TD=3.5±0.9 cm; p>0.6), Ls was dramatically longer in children with CP (4.07±0.45 μm vs. TD=2.17±0.24 μm; p<0.0001). While Lf values were similar between children with CP and TD children, this was due to highly stretched sarcomeres within the soleus muscle. Surgical manipulation of muscle-tendon unit length will thus alter muscle sarcomere length and change force generating capacity of the muscle. PMID:25242618

  3. A high-resolution measurement device for detecting the positioning accuracy of the optical fiber positioner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yonggang; Xu, Jianlei; Jin, Yi; Zhai, Chao

    2012-09-01

    The optical fiber positioner with double revolving mechanism is driven by two stepping motors. One stepping motor drives center revolving mechanism and the other drives decentered slewing mechanism. Photogrammetry is currently used to detect the positioning accuracy of the optical fiber positioner, but it cannot achieve high precision because of the small size of the fiber’s diameter. So, a new measurement device, which mainly contained optical microscope, CCD camera and two-dimensional precision mobile platform, was established in this paper. One end of the optical fiber (the other end was lighted by integrating sphere light source) was imaged on the CCD sensor in a magnified way through the optical microscope, and the image was processed to build the position feedback mechanism in real time. Then the two-dimensional mobile platform was controlled by PID control method to track the optical fiber, and the fiber was always kept to locate in center of the CCD image in order to eliminate the aberrations of the optical microscope lens. Finally, the position changes of the moving fiber could be obtained by the coordinates of the two-dimensional precision mobile platform. The experimental results demonstrate that the resolution of this measurement device is 0.1μm and the accuracy of repeat positioning is 1.5μm. The measurement device could satisfy the testing requirement.

  4. High-resolution measurements of surface topography with airborne laser altimetry and the global positioning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvin, James B.; Bufton, Jack L.; Cavanaugh, John F.; Krabill, William B.; Clem, Thomas D.; Frederick, Earl B.; Ward, John L.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, an airborne lidar system that measures laser pulse time-of-flight and the distortion of the pulse waveform upon reflection from earth surface terrain features was developed and is now operational. This instrument is combined with Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers and a two-axis gyroscope for accurate recovery of aircraft position and pointing attitude. The laser altimeter system is mounted on a high-altitude aircraft platform and operated in a repetitively-pulsed mode for measurements of surface elevation profiles at nadir. The laser transmitter makes use of recently developed short-pulse diode-pumped solid-state laser technology in Q-switched Nd:YAG operating at its fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. A reflector telescope and silicon avalanche photodiode are the basis of the optical receiver. A high-speed time-interval unit and a separate high-bandwidth waveform digitizer under microcomputer control are used to process the backscattered pulses for measurements of terrain. Other aspects of the lidar system are briefly discussed.

  5. SU-E-I-40: New Method for Measurement of Task-Specific, High-Resolution Detector System Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Loughran, B; Singh, V; Jain, A; Bednarek, D; Rudin, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Although generalized linear system analytic metrics such as GMTF and GDQE can evaluate performance of the whole imaging system including detector, scatter and focal-spot, a simplified task-specific measured metric may help to better compare detector systems. Methods: Low quantum-noise images of a neuro-vascular stent with a modified ANSI head phantom were obtained from the average of many exposures taken with the high-resolution Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) and with a Flat Panel Detector (FPD). The square of the Fourier Transform of each averaged image, equivalent to the measured product of the system GMTF and the object function in spatial-frequency space, was then divided by the normalized noise power spectra (NNPS) for each respective system to obtain a task-specific generalized signal-to-noise ratio. A generalized measured relative object detectability (GM-ROD) was obtained by taking the ratio of the integral of the resulting expressions for each detector system to give an overall metric that enables a realistic systems comparison for the given detection task. Results: The GM-ROD provides comparison of relative performance of detector systems from actual measurements of the object function as imaged by those detector systems. This metric includes noise correlations and spatial frequencies relevant to the specific object. Additionally, the integration bounds for the GM-ROD can be selected to emphasis the higher frequency band of each detector if high-resolution image details are to be evaluated. Examples of this new metric are discussed with a comparison of the MAF to the FPD for neuro-vascular interventional imaging. Conclusion: The GM-ROD is a new direct-measured task-specific metric that can provide clinically relevant comparison of the relative performance of imaging systems. Supported by NIH Grant: 2R01EB002873 and an equipment grant from Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation.

  6. High resolution deformation measurements at active volcanoes: a new remote sensing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hort, M. K.; Scharff, L.; Gerst, A.; Meier, K.; Falk, S.; Peters, G.; Ripepe, M.

    2013-12-01

    It is known from observations at different volcanoes using ULP seismic observations that the volcanic edifice deforms slightly prior to an eruption. It can be expected that immediately prior to an eruption the largest deformation should occur in the vicinity of the vent. However, placing instruments at the vent is impossible as they will be destroyed during an eruption. Here we present new, high temporal resolution (up to 300Hz) deformation measurement that utilizes the phase information of a frequency modulated Doppler radar system. We decompose the Doppler signal into two parts, one part which allows us to measure speeds significantly above 0.5m/s (i.e. the movement of volcanic ash and clasts). The other part utilizes the slow phase changes of the signal reflected from non-moving objects, i.e. the volcanic edifice. This signal is used to measure very slow and longer term deformations, which are the main subject of this study. The method has been tested measuring the displacement of high rise buildings during strong winds. It can be shown that displacements down to 50 μm can be resolved without a problem. We apply this method to different data sets collected at Stromboli volcano, Italy, as well as Santiaguito volcano, Guatemala. At Stromboli we observed the NE crater once in 2008 and once in 2011. During both campaigns we observe on average a displacement between 1 and 5mm before different eruptions. This displacement can be interpreted as a widening of the conduit prior to an eruption. In a couple of cases even an oscillatory movement is observed with frequencies of about 0.5Hz. Finite element modeling of the rise of a pressurized slug indicates that deformations at the crater rim on the order of a 1mm or less are certainly reasonable. In the case of Santiaguito volcano prior to an eruption we observe a pre eruptive displacement 5-15mm and after the end of an eruption a displacement of up to 1m before the next eruption occurs. This can be interpreted as in

  7. Modular lidar systems for high-resolution 4-dimensional measurements of water vapor, temperature, and aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, Andreas; Wagner, Gerd; Petrova, Anna; Shiler, Max; Pal, Sandip; Schaberl, Thorsten; Wulfmeyer, Volker

    2005-01-01

    Three lidar systems are currently in development at University of Hohenheim. A water vapor lidar based on the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technology working near 815 or 935 nm, a temperature and aerosol lidar employing the rotational Raman technique at 355 nm, and an aerosol lidar working with eye-safe laser radiation near 1.5 μm. The transmitters of these three systems are based on an injection-seeded, diode laser pumped Nd:YAG laser with an average power of 100 W at 1064 nm and a repetition rate of 250 Hz. This laser emits a nearly Gaussian-shaped beam which permits frequency-doubling and tripling with high efficiencies. The frequency-doubled 532-nm radiation is employed for pumping a Ti:Sapphire ring-resonator which will be used for DIAL water vapor measurements. In a second branch, a Cr4+:YAG crystal is pumped with the 1064-nm radiation to reach 1400 to 1500 nm for eye-safe monitoring of aerosol particles and clouds. The 532 and 1064 nm radiation are also used for backscatter lidar observations. Frequency tripling gives 355-nm radiation for measurements of temperature with the rotational Raman technique and particle extinction and particle backscattering coefficients in the UV. High transmitter power and effective use of the received signals will allow scanning operation of these three lidar systems. The lidar transmitters and detectors are designed as modules which can be combined for simultaneous measurements with one scanning telescope unit in a ground-based mobile container. Alternatively, they can be connected to different Nd:YAG pump lasers and to telescope units on separate platforms.

  8. High-Resolution ac Measurements of the Hall Effect in Organic Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Yi, H. T.; Podzorov, V.

    2016-03-01

    We describe a high resolving power technique for Hall-effect measurements, efficient in determining Hall mobility and carrier density in organic field-effect transistors and other low-mobility systems. We utilize a small low-frequency ac magnetic field (Brms<0.25 T ) and a phase-sensitive (lock-in) detection of Hall voltage, with the necessary corrections for Faraday induction. This method significantly enhances the signal-to-noise ratio and eliminates the necessity of using high magnetic fields in Hall-effect studies. With the help of this method, we are able to obtain the Hall mobility and carrier density in organic transistors with a mobility as low as μ ˜0.3 cm2 V-1 s-1 by using a compact desktop apparatus and low magnetic fields. We find a good agreement between Hall-effect and electric-field-effect measurements, indicating that, contrary to the common belief, certain organic semiconductors with mobilities below 1 cm2 V-1 s-1 can still exhibit a fully developed, band-semiconductor-like Hall effect, with the Hall mobility and carrier density matching those obtained in longitudinal transistor measurements. This suggests that, even when μ <1 cm2 V-1 s-1 , charges in organic semiconductors can still behave as delocalized coherent carriers. This technique paves the way to ubiquitous Hall-effect studies in a wide range of low-mobility materials and devices, where it is typically very difficult to resolve the Hall effect even in very high dc magnetic fields.

  9. High-resolution methane emission estimates using surface measurements and the InTEM inversion system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, Sarah; Manning, Alistair; Robinson, Andrew; Riddick, Stuart; Forster, Grant; Oram, Dave; O'Doherty, Simon; Harris, Neil

    2015-04-01

    High quality GHG emission estimates will be required to successfully tackle climate change. There is a growing need for comparisons between emission estimates produced using bottom-up and top-down techniques at high spatial resolution. Here, a top-down inversion approach combining multi-year atmospheric measurements and an inversion model, InTEM, was used to estimate methane emissions for a region in the South East of the UK (~100 x 150 km). We present results covering a 2-year period (July 2012 - July 2014) in which atmospheric methane concentrations were recorded at 1 - 2 minute time-steps at four locations within the region of interest. Precise measurements were obtained using gas chromatography with flame ionisation detection (GC-FID) for all sites except one, which used a PICARRO Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer (CRDS). These observations, along with the UK Met Office's Lagrangian particle dispersion model, NAME, were used within InTEM to produce the methane emission fields. We present results from both Bayesian and non-prior based inversion analysis at varying spatial resolutions, for annual, seasonal and monthly time frames. These results are compared with the UK National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (NAEI) which is compiled using bottom-up methods and available at 1x1 km resolution. A thorough assessment of uncertainty is incorporated into this technique which is represented in the results. This project is part of the UK GAUGE campaign which aims to produce robust estimates of the UK GHG budget using new and existing measurement networks (e.g. the UK DECC GHG network) and modelling activities at a range of scales.

  10. Mid-Infrared OPO for High Resolution Measurements of Trace Gases in the Mars Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Anthony W.; Numata,Kenji; Riris, haris; Abshire, James B.; Allan, Graham; Sun, Xiaoli; Krainak, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    The Martian atmosphere is composed primarily (>95%) of CO2 and N2 gas, with CO, O2, CH4, and inert gases such as argon comprising most of the remainder. It is surprisingly dynamic with various processes driving changes in the distribution of CO2, dust, haze, clouds and water vapor on global scales in the meteorology of Mars atmosphere [I]. The trace gases and isotopic ratios in the atmosphere offer important but subtle clues as to the origins of the planet's atmosphere, hydrology, geology, and potential for biology. In the search for life on Mars, an important process is the ability of bacteria to metabolize inorganic substrates (H2, CO2 and rock) to derive energy and produce methane as a by-product of anaerobic metabolism. Trace gases have been measured in the Mars atmosphere from Earth, Mars orbit, and from the Mars surface. The concentration of water vapor and various carbon-based trace gases are observed in variable concentrations. Within the past decade multiple groups have reported detection of CH4, with concentrations in the 10's of ppb, using spectroscopic observations from Earth [2]. Passive spectrometers in the mid-infrared (MIR) are restricted to the sunlit side of the planet, generally in the mid latitudes, and have limited spectral and spatial resolution. To accurately map the global distribution and to locate areas of possibly higher concentrations of these gases such as plumes or vents requires an instrument with high sensitivity and fine spatial resolution that also has global coverage and can measure during both day and night. Our development goal is a new MIR lidar capable of measuring, on global scales, with sensitivity, resolution and precision needed to characterize the trace gases and isotopic ratios of the Martian atmosphere. An optical parametric oscillator operating in the MIR is well suited for this instrument. The sufficient wavelength tuning range of the OPO can extend the measurements to other organic molecules, CO2, atmospheric water