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Sample records for high-temperature superconducting films

  1. Use of high-temperature superconducting films in superconducting bearings.

    SciTech Connect

    Cansiz, A.

    1999-07-14

    We have investigated the effect of high-temperature superconductor (HTS) films deposited on substrates that are placed above bulk HTSs in an attempt to reduce rotational drag in superconducting bearings composed of a permanent magnet levitated above the film/bulk HTS combination. According to the critical state model, hysteresis energy loss is inversely proportional to critical current density, J{sub c}, and because HTS films typically have much higher J{sub c} than that of bulk HTS, the film/bulk combination was expected to reduce rotational losses by at least one order of magnitude in the coefficient of fiction, which in turn is a measure of the hysteresis losses. We measured rotational losses of a superconducting bearing in a vacuum chamber and compared the losses with and without a film present. The experimental results showed that contrary to expectation, the rotational losses are increased by the film. These results are discussed in terms of flux drag through the film, as well as of the critical state model.

  2. High-temperature superconducting thin films and their application to superconducting-normal-superconducting devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mankiewich, P.M.

    1993-01-01

    The existence of the proximity effect between the high temperature superconductor YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7] (YBCO) and normal metal thin films has been demonstrated, and this effect has been exploited to produce lithographically fabricated superconducting-normal-superconducting (SNS) Josephson junctions. Improvement of the fabrication processes has led to new methods of in-situ film growth and plasma etching of YBCO, as well a YBCO-compatible processes for the deep-ultraviolet and electron-beam lithography required to fabricate submicron device structures. This proximity effect approach helps to circumvent the short coherence length ([xi] [approximately] 3 nm) characteristic of the high T[sub c] superconductors. In a clean normal metal such as gold or silver the relevant coherence length is governed by the higher Fermi velocity and longer mean free path. A Josephson device containing a normal metal weak link can be longer than an ideal all-YBCO microbridge (dimensions comparable to [xi]). Initially, SNS devices were fabricated and showed evidence for a supercurrent through the normal region. Properly spaced Shapiro steps as a function of microwave frequency were observed. This result was evidence for a proximity effect between a normal metal and YBCO. The fabrication process was not sufficiently reproducible, so new techniques were developed. In-situ film growth and fabrication is desirable to minimize contamination of and damage to the surface of the superconductor. In-situ reactive coevaporation of YBCO was demonstrated. Patterning of these in-situ films in to a structure required the development of a low-damage reactive ion etch. New lithographic techniques were developed to minimize chemical degradation of the superconductor. Deposition of gold onto heated device structures was demonstrated to produce a superior SNS device. The application of YBCO thin films to passive microwave devices and to active superconducting circuits was evaluated.

  3. High-temperature superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Ken C.

    1990-01-01

    The current status of high-temperature superconductivity (HTSC) and near-term prospects are briefly reviewed with particular reference to Lockheed's experience. Emphasis is placed on an integrated approach to systems applications of HTSC thin films, which hold the greatest near-term promise. These new materials are applied in the production of smaller, more sensitive, and more efficient electronic components to meet the ever-increasing demands for higher-performance signal acquisition and processing systems, communications systems, and computers.

  4. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shoji

    2006-12-01

    A general review on high-temperature superconductivity was made. After prehistoric view and the process of discovery were stated, the special features of high-temperature superconductors were explained from the materials side and the physical properties side. The present status on applications of high-temperature superconductors were explained on superconducting tapes, electric power cables, magnets for maglev trains, electric motors, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and single flux quantum (SFQ) devices and circuits.

  5. Use of thin films in high-temperature superconducting bearings.

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, J. R.; Cansiz, A.

    1999-09-30

    In a PM/HTS bearing, locating a thin-film HTS above a bulk HTS was expected to maintain the large levitation force provided by the bulk with a lower rotational drag provided by the very high current density of the film. For low drag to be achieved, the thin film must shield the bulk from inhomogeneous magnetic fields. Measurement of rotational drag of a PM/HTS bearing that used a combination of bulk and film HTS showed that the thin film is not effective in reducing the rotational drag. Subsequent experiments, in which an AC coil was placed above the thin-film HTS and the magnetic field on the other side of the film was measured, showed that the thin film provides good shielding when the coil axis is perpendicular to the film surface but poor shielding when the coil axis is parallel to the surface. This is consistent with the lack of reduction in rotational drag being due to a horizontal magnetic moment of the permanent magnet. The poor shielding with the coil axis parallel to the film surface is attributed to the aspect ratio of the film and the three-dimensional nature of the current flow in the film for this coil orientation.

  6. High Temperature Superconducting Thin Films and Their Application to Superconducting-Normal Devices.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankiewich, Paul M.

    The existence of the proximity effect between the high temperature superconductor YBa_2Cu _3O_7 (YBCO) and normal metal thin films has been demonstrated for the first time, and this effect has been exploited to produce lithographically fabricated superconducting-normal-superconducting (SNS) Josephson junctions. Improvement of the fabrication processes has led to new methods of in-situ film growth and plasma etching of YBCO, as well as YBCO-compatible processes for the deep -ultraviolet and electron-beam lithography required to fabricate submicron device structures. This proximity effect approach helps to circumvent the short coherence length (xi~3 nm) characteristic of the high T_ {c} superconductors. In a clean normal metal such as gold or silver the relevant coherence length is governed by the higher Fermi velocity and longer mean free path. As a result a Josephson device containing a normal metal weak link can be longer than an ideal all -YBCO microbridge (dimensions comparable to xi ). This makes fabrication possible. Initially, SNS devices were fabricated and showed evidence for a supercurrent through the normal region. Properly spaced Shapiro steps as a function of microwave frequency were also observed. This result was evidence for a proximity effect between a normal metal and YBCO. Nevertheless, due to the short coherence length and the sensitivity of the YBCO to damage, the fabrication process was not sufficiently reproducible. As a result, new techniques were developed to enable more reproducible device fabrication. In-situ film growth and fabrication is desirable to minimize contamination of and damage to the surface of the superconductor. In -situ reactive coevaporation of YBCO was demonstrated. Patterning of these in-situ films into a structure required the development of a low-damage reactive ion etch. New lithographic techniques were developed to minimize chemical degradation of the superconductor. Finally, deposition of gold onto heated device

  7. High-temperature superconductivity in potassium-coated multilayer FeSe thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Y.; Nakayama, K.; Sugawara, K.; Sato, T.; Takahashi, T.

    2015-08-01

    The recent discovery of possible high-temperature (Tc) superconductivity over 65 K in a monolayer FeSe film on SrTiO3 (refs , , , , , ) triggered a fierce debate on how superconductivity evolves from bulk to film, because bulk FeSe crystal exhibits a Tc of no higher than 10 K (ref. ). However, the difficulty in controlling the carrier density and the number of FeSe layers has hindered elucidation of this problem. Here, we demonstrate that deposition of potassium onto FeSe films markedly expands the accessible doping range towards the heavily electron-doped region. Intriguingly, we have succeeded in converting non-superconducting films with various thicknesses into superconductors with Tc as high as 48 K. We also found a marked increase in the magnitude of the superconducting gap on decreasing the FeSe film thickness, indicating that the interface plays a crucial role in realizing the high-temperature superconductivity. The results presented provide a new strategy to enhance and optimize Tc in ultrathin films of iron-based superconductors.

  8. A review of basic phenomena and techniques for sputter-deposition of high temperature superconducting films

    SciTech Connect

    Auciello, O. North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Ameen, M.S.; Kingon, A.I.; Lichtenwalner, D.J. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Krauss, A.R. )

    1990-01-01

    The processes involved in plasma and ion beam sputter-deposition of high temperature superconducting thin films are critically reviewed. Recent advances in the development of these techniques are discussed in relation to basic physical phenomena, specific to each technique, which must be understood before high quality films can be produced. Control of film composition is a major issue in sputter-deposition of multicomponent materials. Low temperature processing of films is a common goal for each technique, particularly in relation to integrating high temperature superconducting films with the current microelectronics technology. It has been understood for some time that for Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} deposition, the most intensely studied high-{Tc} compound, incorporation of sufficient oxygen into the film during deposition is necessary to produce as-deposited superconducting films at relatively substrate temperatures. Recent results have shown that with the use of suitable buffer layers, high quality Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} sputtered films can be obtained on Si substrates without the need for post-deposition anneal processing. This review is mainly focussed on issues related to sputter-deposition of Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} thin films, although representative results concerning the bismuth and thallium based compounds are included. 143 refs., 11 figs.

  9. High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 149 NIST High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database (Web, free access)   The NIST High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database (WebHTS) provides evaluated thermal, mechanical, and superconducting property data for oxides and other nonconventional superconductors.

  10. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bozovic, Ivan; Logvenov, Gennady; Gozar, Adrian Mihai

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  11. Influence of ion beam mixing on the growth of high temperature oxide superconducting thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Bordes, N.; Rollett, A.D.; Cohen, M.R.; Nastasi, M.

    1989-01-01

    The superconducting properties of high temperature superconductor thin films are dependent on the quality of the substrate used to grow these films. In order to maximize the lattice matching between the superconducting film and the substrate, we have used a YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} thin film deposited on {l angle}100{r angle} SrTiO{sub 3} as a template. The first film was prepared by coevaporation of Y, BaF{sub 2} and Cu on {l angle}100{r angle} SrTiO{sub 3}, followed by an anneal in wet'' oxygen at 850{degree}C. This film showed a sharp transition at about 90 K. A thicker layer of about 5000 A was then deposited on top of this first 2000 {angstrom} film, using the same procedure. After the post anneal at 850{degree}C, the transition took place at 80 K and no epitaxy of the second film was observed. Ion beam mixing at 400{degree}C, using 400 keV O ions was done at the interface of the two films (the second one being not annealed). After the post anneal, the film displayed an improved Tc at 90K. Moreover, epitaxy was shown to take place from the interface SrTiO{sub 3}-123 film towards the surface and was dependent of the dose. These results will be discussed from the data obtained from Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) combined with channeling experiments, x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations. 8 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. High temperature interface superconductivity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gozar, A.; Bozovic, I.

    2016-01-20

    High-Tc superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-Tc Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both ‘passive’ hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. Here, wemore » conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.« less

  13. High temperature interface superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozar, A.; Bozovic, I.

    2016-02-01

    High-Tc superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-Tc Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both 'passive' hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. We conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.

  14. High-temperature superconductivity: A conventional conundrum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Božović, Ivan

    2016-01-07

    High-temperature superconductivity in ultrathin films of iron selenide deposited on strontium titanate has been attributed to various exotic mechanisms, and new experiments indicate that it may be conventional, with broader implications.

  15. Ac susceptibility of a coated conductor with high-temperature superconducting film and covered copper stabilizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.-X.

    2014-07-01

    The ac susceptibility, χ=χ‧-jχ″, of a nearly square sample, cut from a coated conductor tape consisting of a high-temperature superconducting film and a covered copper stabilizer, is measured as a function of temperature, T, at several values of frequency, f. It is found that the χ(f) at T>Tc can be well simulated by a modeling eddy-current susceptibility of the stabilizer, and there is an extra low-T stage, where χ is not constant as expected and may be separated into two parts. The T-independent part is contributed by Meissner currents in the film with over-low |χ‧|, indicating that the film edge was damaged by cutting during tape and sample preparation. The T-dependent part is contributed by both eddy-currents and supercurrents, having a special f dependence with unknown mechanism. Both currents are interacted to each other in a complex way in the T range below and near Tc, resulting in interesting features in χ(T,f).

  16. Protection of high temperature superconducting thin-films in a semiconductor processing environment

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yizi; Fiske, R.; Sanders, S.C.; Ekin, J.W.

    1996-12-31

    Annealing studies have been carried out for high temperature superconductor YBaCuO{sub 7{minus}{delta}} in a reducing ambient, in order to identify insulator layer(s) that will effectively protect the superconducting film in the hostile environment. While a layer of magnesium oxide (MgO) sputter deposited directly on YBaCuO{sub 7{minus}{delta}} film provides some degree of protection, the authors found that a composite structure of YBCO/SrTiO{sub 3}/MgO, where the SrTiO{sub 3} was grown by laser ablation immediately following YBCO deposition (in-situ process), was much more effective. They also address the need for a buffer layer between YBCO and aluminum (Al) during annealing. Al is most commenly used for semiconductor metalization, but is known to react readily with YBCO at elevated temperatures. The authors found that the most effective buffer layers are platinum (Pt) and gold/platinum (Au/Pt).

  17. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Johnson

    2008-11-05

    Like astronomers tweaking images to gain a more detailed glimpse of distant stars, physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have found ways to sharpen images of the energy spectra in high-temperature superconductors — materials that carry electrical c

  18. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    ScienceCinema

    Peter Johnson

    2010-01-08

    Like astronomers tweaking images to gain a more detailed glimpse of distant stars, physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have found ways to sharpen images of the energy spectra in high-temperature superconductors ? materials that carry electrical c

  19. High temperature superconducting thin film microwave circuits: Fabrication, characterization, and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, K. B.; Warner, J. D.; Romanofsky, R. R.; Heinen, V. O.; Chorey, C. M.

    1990-01-01

    Epitaxial YBa2Cu3O7 films were grown on several microwave substrates. Surface resistance and penetration depth measurements were performed to determine the quality of these films. Here the properties of these films on key microwave substrates are described. The fabrication and characterization of a microwave ring resonator circuit to determine transmission line losses are presented. Lower losses than those observed in gold resonator circuits were observed at temperatures lower than critical transition temperature. Based on these results, potential applications of microwave superconducting circuits such as filters, resonators, oscillators, phase shifters, and antenna elements in space communication systems are identified.

  20. Large oscillations of the magnetoresistance in nanopatterned high-temperature superconducting films.

    PubMed

    Sochnikov, Ilya; Shaulov, Avner; Yeshurun, Yosef; Logvenov, Gennady; Bozović, Ivan

    2010-07-01

    Measurements on nanoscale structures constructed from high-temperature superconductors are expected to shed light on the origin of superconductivity in these materials. To date, loops made from these compounds have had sizes of the order of hundreds of nanometres(8-11). Here, we report the results of measurements on loops of La(1.84)Sr(0.16)CuO(4), a high-temperature superconductor that loses its resistance to electric currents when cooled below approximately 38 K, with dimensions down to tens of nanometres. We observe oscillations in the resistance of the loops as a function of the magnetic flux through the loops. The oscillations have a period of h/2e, and their amplitude is much larger than the amplitude of the resistance oscillations expected from the Little-Parks effect. Moreover, unlike Little-Parks oscillations, which are caused by periodic changes in the superconducting transition temperature, the oscillations we observe are caused by periodic changes in the interaction between thermally excited moving vortices and the oscillating persistent current induced in the loops. However, despite the enhanced amplitude of these oscillations, we have not detected oscillations with a period of h/e, as recently predicted for nanoscale loops of superconductors with d-wave symmetry, or with a period of h/4e, as predicted for superconductors that exhibit stripes. PMID:20543834

  1. Large Oscillations of the Magnetoresistance in Nanopatterned High-temperature Superconducting Films

    SciTech Connect

    Sochnikov, I.; Bozovic, I.; Shaulov, A.; Yeshurun, Y.; Logvenov, G.

    2010-07-01

    Measurements on nanoscale structures constructed from high-temperature superconductors are expected to shed light on the origin of superconductivity in these materials. To date, loops made from these compounds have had sizes of the order of hundreds of nanometeres. Here, we report the results of measurements on loops of La{sub 1.84}Sr{sub 0.16}CuO{sub 4}, a high-temperature superconductor that loses its resistance to electric currents when cooled below {approx}38 K, with dimensions down to tens of nanometres. We observe oscillations in the resistance of the loops as a function of the magnetic flux through the loops. The oscillations have a period of h/2e, and their amplitude is much larger than the amplitude of the resistance oscillations expected from the Little-Parks effect. Moreover, unlike Little-Parks oscillations, which are caused by periodic changes in the superconducting transition temperature, the oscillations we observe are caused by periodic changes in the interaction between thermally excited moving vortices and the oscillating persistent current induced in the loops. However, despite the enhanced amplitude of these oscillations, we have not detected oscillations with a period of h/e, as recently predicted for nanoscale loops of superconductors with d-wave symmetry or with a period of h/4e, as predicted for superconductors that exhibit stripes.

  2. High Temperature Superconducting Underground Cable

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, Roger, A.

    2010-02-28

    The purpose of this Project was to design, build, install and demonstrate the technical feasibility of an underground high temperature superconducting (HTS) power cable installed between two utility substations. In the first phase two HTS cables, 320 m and 30 m in length, were constructed using 1st generation BSCCO wire. The two 34.5 kV, 800 Arms, 48 MVA sections were connected together using a superconducting joint in an underground vault. In the second phase the 30 m BSCCO cable was replaced by one constructed with 2nd generation YBCO wire. 2nd generation wire is needed for commercialization because of inherent cost and performance benefits. Primary objectives of the Project were to build and operate an HTS cable system which demonstrates significant progress towards commercial progress and addresses real world utility concerns such as installation, maintenance, reliability and compatibility with the existing grid. Four key technical areas addressed were the HTS cable and terminations (where the cable connects to the grid), cryogenic refrigeration system, underground cable-to-cable joint (needed for replacement of cable sections) and cost-effective 2nd generation HTS wire. This was the world’s first installation and operation of an HTS cable underground, between two utility substations as well as the first to demonstrate a cable-to-cable joint, remote monitoring system and 2nd generation HTS.

  3. Perspectives on high temperature superconducting electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesan, T.

    1990-01-01

    The major challenges in making high temperature superconducting (HTSC) electronics viable are predominantly materials problems. Unlike their predecessors the metal oxide-based superconductors are integratable with other advanced technologies such as opto-electronics and micro-electronics. The materials problems to be addressed relate to the epitaxial growth of high quality films, highly oriented films on non-lattice matched substrates, heterostructures with atomically sharp interfaces of junctions and other novel devices, and the processing of these films with negligible deterioration of the superconducting properties. These issues are illustrated with results based on films prepared in-situ by a pulsed laser deposition process. Films with zero-transition temperatures of 90 K and critical current densities of 5 x 10(exp 6) A/sq cm at 77 K have been prepared by this technique. Ultra-thin films, less than 100 A show T(sub c) is greater than 80 K, supporting the idea of two-dimensional transport in these materials. By the use of appropriate buffer layers, films with T(sub c) of 87 K and J(sub c) of 6 x 10(exp 4) A/sq cm were fabricated on silicon substrates. Submicron structures with J(sub c) is greater than 2 x 10(exp 7) at 10 K were fabricated. Results on nonlinear switching elements, IR detectors, and microwave studies will be briefly summarized.

  4. Perspectives on high temperature superconducting electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesan, T.

    1991-01-01

    The major challenges in making high temperature superconducting (HTSC) electronics viable are predominantly materials problems. Unlike their predecessors, the metal oxide-based superconductors are integratable with other advanced technologies such as opto-electronics and micro-electronics. The materials problems to be addressed relate to the epitaxial growth of high quality films, highly oriented films on non-lattice matched substrates, heterostructures with atomically sharp interfaces of junctions and other novel devices, and the processing of these films with negligible deterioration of the superconducting properties. These issues are illustrated with results based on films prepared in-situ by a pulsed laser deposition process. Films with zero-transition temperatures of 90 K and critical current densities of 5 x 10(exp 6) A/sq cm at 77 K have been prepared by this technique. Ultra-thin films, less than 100 A show T(sub c) is greater than 80 K, supporting the idea of two-dimensional transport in these materials. By the use of appropriate buffer layers, films with T(sub c) of 87 K and J(sub c) of 6 x 10(exp 4) A/sq cm were fabricated on silicon substrates. Submicron structures with J(sub c) is greater than 2 x 10(exp 7) at 10 K were fabricated. Results on nonlinear switching elements, IR detectors, and microwave studies will be briefly summarized.

  5. High-temperature superconductivity in perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-04-01

    The technology of superconductivity and its potential applications are discussed; it is warned that U.S companies are investing less than their main foreign competitors in both low- and high-temperature superconductivity R and D. This is by far the most critical issue affecting the future U.S. competitive position in superconductivity, and in many other emerging technologies. The major areas covered include: Executive summary; High-temperature superconductivity - A progress report; Applications of superconductivity; The U.S. response to high-temperature superconductivity; High-temperature superconductivity programs in other countries; Comparison of industrial superconductivity R and D efforts in the United States and Japan - An OTA survey; Policy issues and options.

  6. The NASA high temperature superconductivity program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokoloski, Martin M.; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    1990-01-01

    It has been recognized from the onset that high temperature superconductivity held great promise for major advances across a broad range of NASA interests. The current effort is organized around four key areas: communications and data, sensors and cryogenics, propulsion and power, and space materials technology. Recently, laser ablated YBa2Cu3O(7-x) films on LaAIO produced far superior RF characteristics when compared to metallic films on the same substrate. This achievement has enabled a number of unique microwave device applications, such as low insertion loss phase shifters and high Q filters. Melt texturing and melt quenched techniques are being used to produce bulk materials with optimized magnetic properties. These yttrium enriched materials possess enhanced flux pinning characteristics and will lead to prototype cryocooler bearings. Significant progress has also occurred in bolometer and current lead technology. Studies are being conducted to evaluate the effect of high temperature superconducting materials on the performance and life of high power magneto-plasma-dynamic thrusters. Extended studies were also performed to evaluate the benefit of superconducting magnetic energy storage for LEO space station, lunar and Mars mission applications. The project direction and level of effort of the program are also described.

  7. High-Temperature Superconductivity in Single-Unit-Cell FeSe Films on Anatase TiO_{2}(001).

    PubMed

    Ding, Hao; Lv, Yan-Feng; Zhao, Kun; Wang, Wen-Lin; Wang, Lili; Song, Can-Li; Chen, Xi; Ma, Xu-Cun; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2016-08-01

    We report on the observation of high-temperature (T_{c}) superconductivity and magnetic vortices in single-unit-cell FeSe films on anatase TiO_{2}(001) substrate by using scanning tunneling microscopy. A systematic study and engineering of interfacial properties has clarified the essential roles of substrate in realizing the high-T_{c} superconductivity, probably via interface-induced electron-phonon coupling enhancement and charge transfer. By visualizing and tuning the oxygen vacancies at the interface, we find their very limited effect on the superconductivity, which excludes interfacial oxygen vacancies as the primary source for charge transfer between the substrate and FeSe films. Our findings have placed severe constraints on any microscopic model for the high-T_{c} superconductivity in FeSe-related heterostructures. PMID:27541474

  8. High-Temperature Superconductivity in Single-Unit-Cell FeSe Films on Anatase TiO2(001 )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hao; Lv, Yan-Feng; Zhao, Kun; Wang, Wen-Lin; Wang, Lili; Song, Can-Li; Chen, Xi; Ma, Xu-Cun; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2016-08-01

    We report on the observation of high-temperature (Tc) superconductivity and magnetic vortices in single-unit-cell FeSe films on anatase TiO2(001 ) substrate by using scanning tunneling microscopy. A systematic study and engineering of interfacial properties has clarified the essential roles of substrate in realizing the high-Tc superconductivity, probably via interface-induced electron-phonon coupling enhancement and charge transfer. By visualizing and tuning the oxygen vacancies at the interface, we find their very limited effect on the superconductivity, which excludes interfacial oxygen vacancies as the primary source for charge transfer between the substrate and FeSe films. Our findings have placed severe constraints on any microscopic model for the high-Tc superconductivity in FeSe-related heterostructures.

  9. Dimensionality of high temperature superconductivity in oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, C. W.

    1989-01-01

    Many models have been proposed to account for the high temperature superconductivity observed in oxide systems. Almost all of these models proposed are based on the uncoupled low dimensional carrier Cu-O layers of the oxides. Results of several experiments are presented and discussed. They suggest that the high temperature superconductivity observed cannot be strictly two- or one-dimensional, and that the environment between the Cu-O layers and the interlayer coupling play an important role in the occurrence of such high temperature superconductivity. A comment on the very short coherence length reported is also made.

  10. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.

    1997-02-04

    A fault current limiter for an electrical circuit is disclosed. The fault current limiter includes a high temperature superconductor in the electrical circuit. The high temperature superconductor is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter. 15 figs.

  11. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.

    1997-01-01

    A fault current limiter (10) for an electrical circuit (14). The fault current limiter (10) includes a high temperature superconductor (12) in the electrical circuit (14). The high temperature superconductor (12) is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter (10).

  12. High-temperature superconducting vector switch

    SciTech Connect

    Chelluri, B.; Barber, J.; Clements, N.; Johnson, D. ); Spyker, R.; Sarkar, A.K.; Kozlowoski, G. )

    1991-04-15

    The feasibility of a high-temperature superconducting switch based on the principle of the superconducting vector switch (SVS) is discussed. This switch exploits the anisotropy in electrical conductivities of the high-temperature superconductors. Underlying the SVS mechanism is the ability to turn on/off large superconducting currents confined to the CuO{sub 2} planes that characterize these materials using lower currents flowing normal to the planes. The required conditions to optimize the switch and increase the gain are presented.

  13. The high temperature superconductivity space experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, Denis C.; Nisenoff, M.

    1991-01-01

    The history and the current status of the high temperature superconductivity space experiment (HTSSE) initiated in 1988 are briefly reviewed. The goal of the HTSSE program is to demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating high temperature superconductivity (HTS) technology into space systems. The anticipated payoffs include the development of high temperature superconductor devices for space systems; preparation and space qualification of a cryogenically cooled experimental package containing HTS devices and components; and acquisition of data for future space experiments using more complex HTS devices and subsystems. The principal HTSSE systems and devices are described.

  14. Interface-enhanced electron-phonon coupling and high-temperature superconductivity in potassium-coated ultrathin FeSe films on SrTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chenjia; Liu, Chong; Zhou, Guanyu; Li, Fangsen; Ding, Hao; Li, Zhi; Zhang, Ding; Li, Zheng; Song, Canli; Ji, Shuaihua; He, Ke; Wang, Lili; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Alkali-metal (potassium) adsorption on FeSe thin films with thickness from 2 unit cells (UC) to 4 UC on SrTi O3 grown by molecular beam epitaxy is investigated with a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope. At appropriate potassium coverage (0.20-0.25 monolayer), the tunneling spectra of the films all exhibit a superconductinglike gap which is overall larger than 11 meV (five times the gap value of bulk FeSe) and decreases with increasing thickness, and two distinct features of characteristic phonon modes at ˜11 and ˜21 meV. The results reveal the critical role of the interface-enhanced electron-phonon coupling for possible high-temperature superconductivity in ultrathin FeSe films on SrTi O3 and is consistent with recent theories. Our study provides compelling evidence for the conventional pairing mechanism for this type of heterostructure superconducting system.

  15. Phase Diagram and High Temperature Superconductivity at 65K in the Single-Layer FeSe Films Revealed by ARPES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shaolong

    2013-03-01

    The discovery of the iron-based superconductors in 2008 not only provides another venue to understand the origin of high-Tc superconductivity but also a new playground to explore novel superconductors with higher superconducting transition temperature. The latest report of possible high temperature superconductivity in the single-layer FeSe films grown on SrTiO3 substrate is both surprising and interesting. In this talk, we report the electronic structure and phase diagram of the single-layer FeSe films by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Our high-resolution ARPES results show that it has a simple Fermi surface topology consisting only of electron pockets near the zone corner without indication of any Fermi surface around the zone center. In addition, our observation of large and nearly isotropic superconducting gap in this strictly two-dimensional system rules out existence of node in the superconducting gap. We also established a phase diagram in this single-layer FeSe films by an annealing procedure to tune the charge carrier concentration over a wide range. By optimizing the annealing process, we observed evidence of a record high Tc of ~ 65K in the single-layer FeSe films. The wide tunability of the system across different phases, and its high-Tc, make the single-layer FeSe film ideal not only to investigate the superconductivity physics and mechanism, but also to study novel quantum phenomena and for potential applications. Work done in collaboration with J. He, W. Zhang, L. Zhao, D. Liu, X. Liu, D. Mou, Y. Ou, Q. Wang, Z. Li, L. Wang, Y. Peng, Y. Liu, C. Chen, L. Yu, G. Liu, X. Dong, J. Zhang, C. Chen, Z. Xu, X. Chen, X. Ma, Q.-K. Xue, and X. J. Zhou in IOP, CAS, and Tsinghua Univ., Beijing

  16. Insights in High-Temperature Superconductivity from the Study of Films and Heterostructures Synthesized by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Bozovic,I.

    2009-01-09

    Using molecular beam epitaxy, we synthesize atomically smooth thin films, multilayers and superlattices of cuprate high-temperature superconductors (HTS). Such heterostructures enable novel experiments that probe the basicphysics of HTS. For example, we have established that HTS and antiferromagnetic phases separate on Ångstrom scale, while the pseudo-gap state apparently mixes with HTS over an anomalously large length scale ('Giant Proximity Effect'). Here, we briefly review our most recent experiments on such films and superlattices. The new results include an unambiguous demonstration of strong coupling of in-plane charge excitations to out-of-plane lattice vibrations and the discovery of interface HTS.

  17. A high temperature superconductivity communications flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngo, P.; Krishen, K.; Arndt, D.; Raffoul, G.; Karasack, V.; Bhasin, K.; Leonard, R.

    1992-01-01

    The proposed high temperature superconductivity (HTSC) millimeter-wave communications flight experiment from the payload bay of the Space Shuttle Orbiter to the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) in geosynchronous orbit is described. The experiment will use a Ka-band HTSC phased array antenna and front-end electronics to receive a downlink communications signal from the ACTS. The discussion covers the system configuration, a description of the ground equipment, the spacecraft receiver, link performance, thermal loading, and the superconducting antenna array.

  18. Space applications of high temperature superconductivity technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, D. J.; Aron, P. R.; Leonard, R. F.; Wintucky, E. G.

    1991-01-01

    A review is presented of the present status of high temperature superconductivity (HTS) technology and related areas of potential space application. Attention is given to areas of application that include microwave communications, cryogenic systems, remote sensing, and space propulsion and power. Consideration is given to HTS phase shifters, miniaturization of microwave filters, far-IR bolometers, and magnetic refrigeration using flux compression.

  19. Magnetic suspension using high temperature superconducting cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scurlock, R. G.

    1992-01-01

    The development of YBCO high temperature superconductors, in wire and tape forms, is rapidly approaching the point where the bulk transport current density j vs magnetic field H characteristics with liquid nitrogen cooling will enable its use in model cores. On the other hand, BSCCO high temperature superconductor in wire form has poor j-H characteristics at 77 K today, although with liquid helium or hydrogen cooling, it appears to be superior to NbTi superconductor. Since liquid nitrogen cooling is approx. 100 times cheaper than liquid helium cooling, the use of YBCO is very attractive for use in magnetic suspension. The design is discussed of a model core to accommodate lift and drag loads up to 6000 and 3000 N respectively. A comparison is made between the design performance of a liquid helium cooled NbTi (or BSCCO) superconducting core and a liquid nitrogen cooled YBCO superconducting core.

  20. Aerospace applications of high temperature superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinen, V. O.; Connolly, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    Space application of high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials may occur before most terrestrial applications because of the passive cooling possibilities in space and because of the economic feasibility of introducing an expensive new technology which has a significant system benefit in space. NASA Lewis Research Center has an ongoing program to develop space technology capitalizing on the potential benefit of HTS materials. The applications being pursued include space communications, power and propulsion systems, and magnetic bearings. In addition, NASA Lewis is pursuing materials research to improve the performance of HTS materials for space applications.

  1. High temperature superconducting digital circuits and subsystems

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, J.S.; Pance, A.; Whiteley, S.R.; Char, K.; Johansson, M.F.; Lee, L.; Hietala, V.M.; Wendt, J.R.; Hou, S.Y.; Phillips, J.

    1993-10-01

    The advances in the fabrication of high temperature superconducting devices have enabled the demonstration of high performance and useful digital circuits and subsystems. The yield and uniformity of the devices is sufficient for circuit fabrication at the medium scale integration (MSI) level with performance not seen before at 77 K. The circuits demonstrated to date include simple gates, counters, analog to digital converters, and shift registers. All of these are mid-sized building blocks for potential applications in commercial and military systems. The processes used for these circuits and blocks will be discussed along with observed performance data.

  2. Miniaturized microstrip multipole low-pass filters using high-temperature superconducting YBa2Cu3O7-x thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeha; Kang, Kwang-Yong; Han, Seok K.; Lee, Sang Yeol; Ahn, Dal

    1995-09-01

    We have designed the microstrip-type multipole (7-pole and 9-pole) lowpass filters consisting of both transmission lines and open stubs. The filters were fabricated on high temperature superconducting (HTS) YBa2Cu3O7-(delta ) (YBCO) thin films grown on MgO(100) substrates by pulsed laser deposition. For 7-pole lowpass filter, the measured insertion losses were within 0.5 dB, and up to 8 GHz the passband shows very flat with ripples of less than 0.05 dB. For 9-pole filter, we observed the insertion loss of 5.0 dB and the ripples of 0.64 dB. The skirt became steep and the off-band rejection increased large as the number of poles increases.

  3. High temperature superconductivity space experiment (HTSSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritter, J. C.; Nisenoff, M.; Price, G.; Wolf, S. A.

    1991-01-01

    An experiment dealing with high-temperature superconducting devices and components in space is discussed. A variety of devices (primarily passive microwave and millimeter-wave components) has been procured and will be integrated with a cryogenic refrigerating and data acquisition system to form the space package, which will be launched in late 1992. This space experiment is expected to demonstrate that this technology is sufficiently robust to survive the space environment and that the technology has the potential to improve the operation of space systems significantly. The devices for the initial launch have been evaluated electrically, thermally, and mechanically, and will be integrated into the final space package early in 1991. The performance of the devices is summarized, and some potential applications of this technology in space systems are outlined.

  4. Aerospace applications of high temperature superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, D. J.; Heinen, V. O.; Aron, P. R.; Lazar, J.; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    1990-01-01

    A review is presented of all the applications that are part of the NASA program to develop space technology capitalizing on the potential benefit of high temperature superconducting materials. The applications in three major areas are being pursued: sensors and cryogenic systems, space communications, and propulsion and power systems. This review places emphasis on space communications applications and the propulsion and power applications. It is concluded that the power and propulsion applications will eventually be limited by structural considerations rather than by the availability of suitable superconductors. A cursory examination of structural limitations implied by the virial theorem suggested that there is an upper limit to the size of high field magnetic systems that are feasible in space.

  5. Parameters of high-temperature superconducting transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, E. P.; Dzhafarov, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    Parameters of the high-temperature superconducting (HTSC) transformer with a core-type magnetic circuit and with coaxial and symmetrical interleaved windings made of the first-generation HTSC wire with a localized magnetic field are considered. The parameters of the most widespread core-type transformer with a coaxial HTSC winding are compared with those of a conventional transformer with a copper wire winding. Advantages of the HTSC transformers, such as reduction in the leakage inductive reactance and the HTSC winding's cross section, volume, and mass, as compared with the same parameters of conventional transformers with a copper wire winding are demonstrated. The efficiency of the HTSC transformers has proven to be determined predominantly by the core loss. In order to increase the efficiency of the HTSC transformer, it is proposed to use the amorphous electrical steel as the material of its magnetic circuit.

  6. Model for the Vaporization of Mixed Organometallic Compounds in the Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition of High Temperature Superconducting Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, Guangyao; Zhou, Gang; Schneider, Roger L.; Sarma, Bimal K.; Levy, Moises

    1993-01-01

    A model of the vaporization and mass transport of mixed organometallics from a single source for thin film metalorganic chemical vapor deposition is presented. A stoichiometric gas phase can be obtained from a mixture of the organometallics in the desired mole ratios, in spite of differences in the volatilities of the individual compounds. Proper film composition and growth rates are obtained by controlling the velocity of a carriage containing the organometallics through the heating zone of a vaporizer.

  7. JETC (Japanese Technology Evaluation Center) Panel Report on High Temperature Superconductivity in Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, Duane; Gamota, George

    1989-01-01

    The Japanese regard success in R and D in high temperature superconductivity as an important national objective. The results of a detailed evaluation of the current state of Japanese high temperature superconductivity development are provided. The analysis was performed by a panel of technical experts drawn from U.S. industry and academia, and is based on reviews of the relevant literature and visits to Japanese government, academic and industrial laboratories. Detailed appraisals are presented on the following: Basic research; superconducting materials; large scale applications; processing of superconducting materials; superconducting electronics and thin films. In all cases, comparisons are made with the corresponding state-of-the-art in the United States.

  8. High Temperature Superconducting Thick Films

    DOEpatents

    Arendt, Paul N.; Foltyn, Stephen R.; Groves, James R.; Holesinger, Terry G.; Jia, Quanxi

    2005-08-23

    An article including a substrate, a layer of an inert oxide material upon the surface of the substrate, (generally the inert oxide material layer has a smooth surface, i.e., a RMS roughness of less than about 2 nm), a layer of an amorphous oxide or oxynitride material upon the inert oxide material layer, a layer of an oriented cubic oxide material having a rock-salt-like structure upon the amorphous oxide material layer is provided together with additional layers such as at least one layer of a buffer material upon the oriented cubic oxide material layer or a HTS top-layer of YBCO directly upon the oriented cubic oxide material layer. With a HTS top-layer of YBCO upon at least one layer of a buffer material in such an article, Jc's of 1.4×106 A/cm2 have been demonstrated with projected Ic's of 210 Amperes across a sample 1 cm wide.

  9. High temperature superconducting magnetic energy storage for future NASA missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faymon, Karl A.; Rudnick, Stanley J.

    1988-01-01

    Several NASA sponsored studies based on 'conventional' liquid helium temperature level superconductivity technology have concluded that superconducting magnetic energy storage has considerable potential for space applications. The advent of high temperature superconductivity (HTSC) may provide additional benefits over conventional superconductivity technology, making magnetic energy storage even more attractive. The proposed NASA space station is a possible candidate for the application of HTSC energy storage. Alternative energy storage technologies for this and other low Earth orbit missions are compared.

  10. High-temperature superconductivity: Electron mirages in an iron salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaanen, Jan

    2014-11-01

    The detection of unusual 'mirage' energy bands in photoemission spectra of single-atom layers of iron selenide reveals the probable cause of high-temperature superconductivity in these artificial structures. See Letter p.245

  11. Cryogenic deformation of high temperature superconductive composite structures

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, Peter R.; Michels, William; Bingert, John F.

    2001-01-01

    An improvement in a process of preparing a composite high temperature oxide superconductive wire is provided and involves conducting at least one cross-sectional reduction step in the processing preparation of the wire at sub-ambient temperatures.

  12. High temperature superconductive flux gate magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Gershenson, M. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper proposes a different type of HTS superconducting magnetometer based on the non-linear magnetic behavior of bulk HTS materials. The device design is based on the generation of second harmonics which arise as a result of non-linear magnetization observed in Type-II superconductors. Even harmonics are generated from the non-linear interaction of an ac excitation signal with an external DC magnetic field which acts as a bias signal.

  13. Engineer's guide to high-temperature superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss, James D.

    The physics, properties, preparation, and applications of high-Tc superconductors are described. Chapters are devoted to the history of superconductivity, fundamental considerations, superconductor applications, the processing of high-Tc superconductors, measurement techniques, and safety problems. Also provided are a review of basic electrical and magnetic theory; a table of units and conversions; a glossary of terms and symbols; and lists of superconductor-related products, services, publications, and associations.

  14. Advanced thin-film deposition and physical properties of high-temperature and other novel superconducting materials. Annual report, 15 October 1991-31 October 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Beasley, M.R.; Geballe, T.H.; Kapitulnik, A.

    1993-06-03

    Progress under AFOSR Contract F49620-92-C-0004 for the period 15 October 1991 to 31 October 1992 is reported. Important results include studies of the grain boundaries in a-axis oriented high-Tc superconducting 123 YBCO thin films, the study of the vortex properties of high-Tc single crystals of the superconductor 2212 BSCCO and the artificially structured Mo-Ge/Ge quasi-two-dimensional superconductors. The latter provide an outstanding model system for the study of vortices in highly anisotropic superconductors, such at the high-Tc cuprates, without all the attendant difficult materials problems. Progress in the synthesis and study of the so-called infinite layer cuprate SrCuO4 and the normally conducting oxide SrRuO3 of interest as a barrier materials in high-Tc SNS devices are also reported. Finally the authors report the development of advanced approaches to rate control of the cation fluxes in the reactive coevaporation of the high-Tc superconductors.... High-Tc superconductivity, Anisotropic superconductivity, SrCuO4, SrRuO3, Mo-Ge/Ge superconducting multilayers.

  15. High-temperature-superconducting magnetic susceptibility bolometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasunas, J.; Lakew, B.; Lee, C.

    1992-01-01

    An infrared detector called the magnetic susceptibility bolometer is introduced which is based on the tmperature dependence of the diamagnetic screening of a high-Tc superconductor film near Tc. Results are reported for the response of a prototype model to modulated blackbody radiation. Possible improvements are discussed as is the potential sensitivity of an improved device.

  16. Macroscopic character of composite high temperature superconducting wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivelson, Steven; Spivak, Boris

    The ``d-wave'' symmetry of the superconducting order in the cuprate high temperature superconductors is a well established fact, and one which identifies them as ``unconventional.'' However, in macroscopic contexts - including many potential applications (i.e. superconducting ``wires'') - the material is a composite of randomly oriented superconducting grains in a metallic matrix, in which Josephson coupling between grains mediates the onset of long-range phase coherence. Here, we analyze the physics at length scales large compared to the size of such grains, and in particular the macroscopic character of the long-range order that emerges. While XY-superconducting glass order and macroscopic d-wave superconductivity may be possible, we show that under many circumstances - especially when the d-wave superconducting grains are embedded in a metallic matrix - the most likely order has global s-wave symmetry.

  17. Structural features that optimize high temperature superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, J.D.; Hinks, D.G. Chmaissem, O.; Argyriou, D.N.; Mitchell, J.F.; Dabrowski, B.

    1996-01-01

    For example, various defects can be introduced into the blocking layer to provide the optimum carrier concentration, but defects that form in or adjacent to the CuO{sub 2} layers will lower T{sub c} and eventually destroy superconductivity. After these requirements are satisfied, the highest T{sub c}`s are observed for compounds (such as the HgBa{sub 2}Ca{sub n-1}CuO{sub 2n{plus}2{plus}x} family) that have flat and square CuO{sub 2} planes and long apical Cu-O bonds. This conclusion is confirmed by the study of materials in which the flatness of the CuO{sub 2} plane can be varied in a systematic way. In more recent work, attention has focused on how the structure can be modified, for example, by chemical substitution, to improve flux pinning properties. Two strategies are being investigated: (1) Increasing the coupling of pancake vortices to form vortex-lines by shortening or ``metallizing`` the blocking layer; and (2) the formation of defects that pin flux.

  18. Aerospace Applications Of High Temperature Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, W. W.

    1988-05-01

    The existence of superconductors with TcOOK (which implies device operating temper-atures the order of Top ≍45K) opens up a variety of potential applications within the aerospace/defense industry. This is partly due to the existence of well developed cooler technologies to reach this temperature regime and partly due to the present operation of some specialized components at cryogenic temperatures. In particular, LWIR focal planes may operate at 10K with some of the signal processing electronics at an intermediate temperature of 40K. Addition of high Tc superconducting components in the latter system may be "free" in the sense of additional system complexity required. The established techniques for cooling in the 20K to 50K temperature regime are either open cycle, expendable material (stored gas with Joule-Thomson expansion, liquid cryogen or solid cryogen) or mechanical refrigerators (Stirling cycle, Brayton cycle or closed cycle Joule-Thomson). The high Tc materials may also contribute to the development of coolers through magnetically levitated bearings or providing the field for a stage of magnetic refrigeration. The discovery of materials with Tc, 90K has generated a veritable shopping list of applications. The superconductor properties which are of interest for applications are (1) zero resistance, (2) Meissner effect, (3) phase coherence and (4) existence of an energy gap. The zero resistance property is significant in the development of high field magnets requiring neglible power to maintain the field. In addition to the publicized applications to rail guns and electromagnetic launcher, we can think of space born magnets for charged particle shielding or whistler mode propagation through a plasma sheath. Conductor losses dominate attenuation and dispersion in microstrip transmission lines. While the surface impedance of a superconductor is non vanishing, significant improvements in signal transmission may be obtained. The Meissner effect may be utilized

  19. High-Temperature Capacitor Polymer Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Daniel; Zhang, Lili; Chen, Qin; Irwin, Patricia

    2014-12-01

    Film capacitor technology has been under development for over half a century to meet various applications such as direct-current link capacitors for transportation, converters/inverters for power electronics, controls for deep well drilling of oil and gas, direct energy weapons for military use, and high-frequency coupling circuitry. The biaxially oriented polypropylene film capacitor remains the state-of-the-art technology; however, it is not able to meet increasing demand for high-temperature (>125°C) applications. A number of dielectric materials capable of operating at high temperatures (>140°C) have attracted investigation, and their modifications are being pursued to achieve higher volumetric efficiency as well. This paper highlights the status of polymer dielectric film development and its feasibility for capacitor applications. High-temperature polymers such as polyetherimide (PEI), polyimide, and polyetheretherketone were the focus of our studies. PEI film was found to be the preferred choice for high-temperature film capacitor development due to its thermal stability, dielectric properties, and scalability.

  20. Damping in high-temperature superconducting levitation systems

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.

    2009-12-15

    Methods and apparatuses for improved damping in high-temperature superconducting levitation systems are disclosed. A superconducting element (e.g., a stator) generating a magnetic field and a magnet (e.g. a rotor) supported by the magnetic field are provided such that the superconducting element is supported relative to a ground state with damped motion substantially perpendicular to the support of the magnetic field on the magnet. Applying this, a cryostat housing the superconducting bearing may be coupled to the ground state with high damping but low radial stiffness, such that its resonant frequency is less than that of the superconducting bearing. The damping of the cryostat may be substantially transferred to the levitated magnetic rotor, thus, providing damping without affecting the rotational loss, as can be derived applying coupled harmonic oscillator theory in rotor dynamics. Thus, damping can be provided to a levitated object, without substantially affecting the rotational loss.

  1. A simple tuning method for high temperature superconducting microstrip filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Srikanta; Stevens, Chris; Edwards, David

    2005-07-01

    In this paper we report a simple tuning methodology of high temperature superconducting (HTS) microstrip filters. In order to establish this new tuning approach a 5 pole lumped element HTS bandpass filter, centre frequency 800 MHz, narrowband (bandwidth, 7.6 MHz), is designed and fabricated on a 2 inch (diameter) Y Ba2Cu3O6.94 thin film of thickness 700 nm and lanthanum aluminate (LaAlO3) substrate of 0.5 mm thickness. The filter was etched using conventional photolithography and a wet chemical etching process. The 5 pole lumped element filter is tested in an integrated RF-cryocooler measurement system at 65 K and also in liquid nitrogen (77 K). We demonstrate a 19.3 MHz downward shift of the centre frequency of the 5 pole filter response. This is achieved by overlaying two layers of thin dielectric tape (PTFE) (50.0 µm thickness, permittivity 3.2) over the conducting patterned part of the filter surface. A full wave electromagnetic analysis of the dielectric environment of this tuning arrangement matches the measured response closely. To improve the passband response, the filter is tuned in liquid nitrogen, placing pieces of sapphire rods over the resonators of the filter layout.

  2. Thin film thermocouples for high temperature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreider, Kenneth G.

    1989-05-01

    Thin film thermocouples have unique capabilities for measuring surface temperatures at high temperatures (above 800 K) under harsh conditions. Their low mass, approximately 2 x 10(-5) g/mm permits very rapid response and very little disturbance of heat transfer to the surface being measured. This has led to applications inside gas turbine engines and diesel engines measuring the surface temperature of first stage turbine blades and vanes and ceramic liners in diesel cylinders. The most successful high temperature (up to 1300 K) thin film thermocouples are sputter deposited from platinum and platinum-10 percent rhodium targets although results using base metal alloys, gold, and platinel will also be presented. The fabrication techniques used to form the thermocouples, approaches used to solve the high temperature insulation and adherence problems, current applications, and test results using the thin film thermocouples are reviewed. In addition a discussion will be presented on the current problems and future trends related to applications of thin film thermocouples at higher temperatures up to 1900 K.

  3. High temperature superconductive microwave technology for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, R. F.; Connolly, D. J.; Bhasin, K. B.; Warner, J. D.; Alterovitz, S. A.

    1991-01-01

    Progress being made on space application technology research on film fabrication, passive microwave circuits, and semiconductor devices for cryogenic circuits is reviewed. Achievements in YBCO and TCBCO films are addressed along with circuit evaluations of microstrip resonators, phase shifters, microstrip filters, dielectric resonator filters, and superconducting antennas.

  4. A Snapshot View of High Temperature Superconductivity 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Schuller, Ivan K.; Bansil, Arun; Basov, Dimitri N.

    2002-04-05

    This report outlines the conclusions of a workshop on High Temperature Superconductivity held April 5-8, 2002 in San Diego. The purpose of this report is to outline and highlight some outstanding and interesting issues in the field of High Temperature Superconductivity. The range of activities and new ideas that arose within the context of High Temperature Superconductors is so vast and extensive that it is impossible to summarize it in a brief document. Thus this report does not pretend to be all-inclusive and cover all areas of activity. It is a restricted snapshot and it only presents a few viewpoints. The complexity and difficulties with high temperature superconductivity is well illustrated by the Buddhist parable of the blind men trying to describe “experimentally” an elephant. These very same facts clearly illustrate that this is an extremely active field, with many unanswered questions, and with a great future potential for discoveries and progress in many (sometimes unpredictable) directions. It is very important to stress that independently of any current or future applications, this is a very important area of basic research.

  5. Spin-bag mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrieffer, J. R.; Wen, X.-G.; Zhang, S.-C.

    1988-01-01

    A new approach to the theory of high-temperature superconductivity is proposed, based on the two-dimensional antiferromagnetic spin correlations observed in these materials over distances large compared to the lattice spacing. The spin ordering produces an electronic pseudogap which is locally suppressed by the addition of a hole. This suppression forms a bag inside which the hole is self-consistently trapped. Two holes are attracted by sharing a common bag. The resulting pairing interaction leads to a superconducting energy gap which is nodeless over the Femri surface.

  6. Fabrication of Large Bulk High Temperature Superconducting Articles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koczor, Ronald (Inventor); Hiser, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method of fabricating large bulk high temperature superconducting articles which comprises the steps of selecting predetermined sizes of crystalline superconducting materials and mixing these specific sizes of particles into a homogeneous mixture which is then poured into a die. The die is placed in a press and pressurized to predetermined pressure for a predetermined time and is heat treated in the furnace at predetermined temperatures for a predetermined time. The article is left in the furnace to soak at predetermined temperatures for a predetermined period of time and is oxygenated by an oxygen source during the soaking period.

  7. Silver alloys for high-temperature superconducting wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, B. N.; Zhou, R.; Holesinger, T. G.; Hults, W. L.; Lacerda, A.; Murray, A. S.; Ray, R. D.; Buford, Cm.; Phillips, L. G.; Kebede, A.; Smith, J. L.

    1995-12-01

    The silver cladding for high-temperature superconducting wire can be modified for various applications by alloying. For example, for powder-in-tube wire, stiffer cladding improves the smoothness of the interface. For large coils, higher strength is needed at low temperatures to hold them together. Power applications require more resistance in the cladding. We have made a survey of the properties of alloys to check their feasibility for various applications. Alloys with several elements added to silver have been prepared and evaluated for hardness, electrical properties, and compatibility with high-temperature superconductors during processing.

  8. Space applications for high temperature superconductivity - Brief review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishen, Kumar

    1990-01-01

    An overview is presented of materials and devices based on high-temperature superconductivity (HTS) that could have useful space-oriented applications. Of specific interest are applications of HTS technologies to mm and microwave systems, spaceborne and planet-surface sensors, and to magnetic subsystems for robotic, rescue, and docking maneuvers. HTS technologies can be used in optoelectronics, magnetic-field detectors, antennae, transmission/delay lines, and launch/payload coils.

  9. Macroscopic character of composite high-temperature superconducting wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivelson, S. A.; Spivak, B.

    2015-11-01

    The "d -wave" symmetry of the superconducting order in the cuprate high temperature superconductors is a well established fact [J. Tsuei and J. R. Kirtley, Rev. Mod. Phys. 72, 969 (2000), 10.1103/RevModPhys.72.969 and D. J. Vanharlingen, Rev. Mod. Phys. 67, 515 (1995), 10.1103/RevModPhys.67.515], and one which identifies them as "unconventional." However, in macroscopic contexts—including many potential applications (i.e., superconducting "wires")—the material is a composite of randomly oriented superconducting grains in a metallic matrix, in which Josephson coupling between grains mediates the onset of long-range phase coherence. [See, e.g., D. C. Larbalestier et al., Nat. Mater. 13, 375 (2014), 10.1038/nmat3887, A. P. Malozemoff, MRS Bull. 36, 601 (2011), 10.1557/mrs.2011.160, and K. Heine et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 55, 2441 (1989), 10.1063/1.102295] Here we analyze the physics at length scales that are large compared to the size of such grains, and in particular the macroscopic character of the long-range order that emerges. While X Y -superconducting glass order and macroscopic d -wave superconductivity may be possible, we show that under many circumstances—especially when the d -wave superconducting grains are embedded in a metallic matrix—the most likely order has global s -wave symmetry.

  10. Experimental Investigation of High Temperature Superconducting Imaging Surface Magnetometry

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, M.A.; Matlachov, A.N.; Kraus, R.H., Jr.

    1999-06-21

    The behavior of high temperature superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) in the presence of high temperature superconducting surfaces has been investigated. When current sources are placed close to a superconducting imaging surface (SIS) an image current is produced due to the Meissner effect. When a SQUID magnetometer is placed near such a surface it will perform in a gradiometric fashion provided the SQUID and source distances to the SIS are much less than the size of the SIS. We present the first ever experimental verification of this effect for a high temperature SIS. Results are presented for two SQUID-SIS configurations, using a 100 mm diameter YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} disc as the SIS. These results indicate that when the current source and sensor coil (SQUID) are close to the SIS, the behavior is that of a first-order gradiometer. The results are compared to analytic solutions as well as the theoretical predictions of a finite element model.

  11. Optical studies of high-temperature superconducting cuprates.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Setsuko

    2016-09-01

    The optical studies of high-temperature superconducting cuprates (HTSC) are reviewed. From the doping dependence of room temperature spectra, a dramatic change of the electronic state from a Mott (charge transfer) insulator to a Fermi liquid has been revealed. Additionally, the unusual 2D nature of the electronic state has been found. The temperature dependence of the optical spectra provided a rich source of information on the pseudogap, superconducting gap, Josephson plasmon, transverse Josephson plasma mode and precursory superconductivity. Among these issues, Josephson plasmons and transverse Josephson plasma mode were experimentally discovered by optical measurements, and thus are unique to HTSC. The effect of the spin/charge stripe order is also unique to HTSC, reflecting the conducting nature of the stripe order in this system. The pair-breaking due to the stripe order seems stronger in the out-of-plane direction than in the in-plane one. PMID:27472654

  12. Optical studies of high-temperature superconducting cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, Setsuko

    2016-09-01

    The optical studies of high-temperature superconducting cuprates (HTSC) are reviewed. From the doping dependence of room temperature spectra, a dramatic change of the electronic state from a Mott (charge transfer) insulator to a Fermi liquid has been revealed. Additionally, the unusual 2D nature of the electronic state has been found. The temperature dependence of the optical spectra provided a rich source of information on the pseudogap, superconducting gap, Josephson plasmon, transverse Josephson plasma mode and precursory superconductivity. Among these issues, Josephson plasmons and transverse Josephson plasma mode were experimentally discovered by optical measurements, and thus are unique to HTSC. The effect of the spin/charge stripe order is also unique to HTSC, reflecting the conducting nature of the stripe order in this system. The pair-breaking due to the stripe order seems stronger in the out-of-plane direction than in the in-plane one.

  13. Insights from the study of high-temperature interface superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Pereiro, J; Bollinger, A T; Logvenov, G; Gozar, A; Panagopoulos, C; Bozović, I

    2012-10-28

    A brief overview is given of the studies of high-temperature interface superconductivity based on atomic-layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE). A number of difficult materials science and physics questions have been tackled, frequently at the expense of some technical tour de force, and sometimes even by introducing new techniques. ALL-MBE is especially suitable to address questions related to surface and interface physics. Using this technique, it has been demonstrated that high-temperature superconductivity can occur in a single copper oxide layer-the thinnest superconductor known. It has been shown that interface superconductivity in cuprates is a genuine electronic effect-it arises from charge transfer (electron depletion and accumulation) across the interface driven by the difference in chemical potentials rather than from cation diffusion and mixing. We have also understood the nature of the superconductor-insulator phase transition as a function of doping. However, a few important questions, such as the mechanism of interfacial enhancement of the critical temperature, are still outstanding. PMID:22987034

  14. High Temperature Superconducting RF Resonators for Resonator Stabilized Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goettee, Jeffrey David

    Electromagnetic resonators made of superconducting materials show unusually sharp resonances because resistive losses are minimized. The availability of high quality thin films of YB_2CU_3 O_{7-delta} (YBCO) with superconducting transitions at 92K has aroused interest in thin film resonators at microwave frequencies for use in filters and oscillators in communication and radar systems. I have investigated the design and radio frequency (rf) properties of superconducting resonators in microstrip geometries (in which the resonant element and a single ground plane are on opposite faces of the LaAlO_3 substrates). This monolithic approach minimizes vibration sensitivity, but exposes the resonators to interactions with the packaging structure. I used niobium (Nb) superconducting 2 GHz resonators at 4.2K to investigate the geometry dependence of the quality factor Q and the high frequency phase noise S_ {y}(f). Q's in excess of 250,000 and S_{y}(1 Hz) = -227 were achieved. Desirable geometries were then fabricated in YBCO thin films produced by coevaporation or sputtering. They typically showed Q's that are a factor of four lower than the comparable Nb resonator, but retained their usefulness to substantially higher temperatures ( ~60K). One of these YBCO resonators was successfully operated to stabilize an oscillator operating at 2 GHz with overall single-sideband phase noise }(1 Hz) = -30 dBc/Hz comparable to the best available competing technologies.

  15. Photoemission, low-dimensionality and high-temperature superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Margaritondo, G.

    1996-12-31

    Several experiments by different authors have established the existence of an anomalous photoemission effect in one-dimensional systems, including one-dimensional metallic crystals and other examples of one-dimensional metals. The effect consists of the suppression of the photoemission signal at energies close to the Fermi level--whereas for metals one would expect to see a Fermi edge. Increasing evidence exists, in the authors opinion, that this phenomenon is due to the decoupling of charge and spin coordinates and to a departure from the Fermi-liquid framework. If confirmed, this conclusion would be extremely relevant to high-temperature superconductivity, since it would pave the way to the use of a similar concept for non-Fermi-liquid theories of high-temperature superconductors.

  16. Conductor requirements for high-temperature superconducting utility power transformers

    SciTech Connect

    Pleva, E. F.; Mehrotra, V.; Schwenterly, S W

    2010-01-01

    High-temperature superconducting (HTS) coated conductors in utility power transformers must satisfy a set of operating requirements that are driven by two major considerations-HTS transformers must be economically competitive with conventional units, and the conductor must be robust enough to be used in a commercial manufacturing environment. The transformer design and manufacturing process will be described in order to highlight the various requirements that it imposes on the HTS conductor. Spreadsheet estimates of HTS transformer costs allow estimates of the conductor cost required for an HTS transformer to be competitive with a similarly performing conventional unit.

  17. Silver Alloys for High-Temperature Superconducting Wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. L.; Zhou, R.; Holesinger, T. C.; Hults, W. L.; Peterson, E. J.

    1996-03-01

    Pure silver is commonly used for cladding or as substrates for making bismuth- and thallium-based high-temperature superconductor wires. Pure silver's softness, lack of mechanical strength, and high-electrical conductivity cause various problems with the final conductor. We have made many alloys of silver with small amounts of additions, studied their mechanical and electrical properties, and checked compatibility with the superconducting materials. The use of silver alloys improves the usefulness of the conductors and improves or does not change the critical currents of the final conductor. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S.D.O.E.

  18. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study of High Temperature Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mounce, Andrew M.

    The high temperature superconductors HgBa2CuO 4+delta (Hg1201) and Bi2SrCa2Cu2O 8+delta (Bi2212) have been treated with 17O for both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sensitivity and various electronic properties. Subsequently, NMR experiments were performed on Hg1201 and Bi2212 to reveal the nature of the pseudogap, in the normal state, and vortex phases, in the superconducting state. NMR has been performed on 17O in an underdoped Hg1201 crystal with a superconducting transition transition temperature of 74 K to look for circulating orbital currents proposed theoretically and inferred from neutron scattering. The measurements reveal narrow spectra which preclude static local fields in the pseudogap phase at the apical site, suggesting that the moments observed with neutrons are fluctuating or the orbital current ordering is not the correct model for the neutron scattering observation. The fine detail of the NMR frequency shifts at the apical oxygen site are consistent with a dipolar field from the Cu+2 site and diamagnetism below the superconducting transition. It has been predicted that superconducting vortices should be electrically charged and that this effect is particularly enhanced for high temperature superconductors. Here it is shown that the Abrikosov vortex lattice, characteristic of the mixed state of superconductors, will become unstable at sufficiently high magnetic field if there is charge trapped on the vortex core for highly anisotropic superconductors. NMR measurements of the magnetic fields generated by vortices in Bi2212 single crystals provide evidence for an electro-statically driven vortex lattice reconstruction with the magnitude of charge on each vortex pancake of 2x10-3e, depending on doping, in line with theoretical estimates. Competition with magnetism is at the heart of high temperature superconductivity, most intensely felt near a vortex core. To investigate vortex magnetism spatially resolved NMR has been used, finding a strongly non

  19. Noise properties of high-temperature superconducting dc-SQUID gradiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, P.; Becker, C.; Steppke, A.; Foerster, T.; Wunderlich, S.; Grosse, V.; Pietzcker, R.; Schmidl, F.

    2007-09-01

    We have developed different types of superconducting magnetic field sensors based on high temperature superconducting (HTS) thin films. Here, we describe the fabrication of single layer dc-SQUID gradiometers with bicrystal Josephson junctions for operation in a flip-chip configuration to improve sensor performance. High-quality thin films are known to be essential in achieving suitable electrical properties in these superconducting devices. The influence of sample processing on sensor performance is discussed. The most important parameter for practical applications is the field gradient resolution of the investigated dc-SQUID sensors. To determine this parameter for different gradiometer layouts we measured their noise properties in unshielded as well as magnetically or electrically shielded environments.

  20. High temperature superconducting composite conductor and method for manufacturing the same

    DOEpatents

    Holesinger, Terry G.; Bingert, John F.

    2002-01-01

    A high temperature superconducting composite conductor is provided including a high temperature superconducting material surrounded by a noble metal layer, the high temperature superconducting composite conductor characterized as having a fill factor of greater than about 40. Additionally, the conductor can be further characterized as containing multiple cores of high temperature superconducting material surrounded by a noble metal layer, said multiple cores characterized as having substantially uniform geometry in the cross-sectional dimensions. Processes of forming such a high temperature superconducting composite conductor are also provided.

  1. Double-sided Tl{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10} thin films based high temperature superconducting filter operating above 100 K

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Wei; Wang, Pei; He, Ming Qiao, Ren; Du, Jia-Nan; Gao, Xiao-Xin; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Xu; Ji, Lu; Chen, Hai-Hua; Zhao, Xin-Jie

    2014-09-01

    A high temperature superconducting (HTS) filter on double-sided Tl{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10} (Tl-2223) thin films is designed in this letter. High-quality double-sided Tl-2223 thin films are prepared on 10 × 10 × 0.5 mm{sup 3} LaAlO{sub 3} (001) substrate. The critical temperatures T{sub c} of the films are 120 ± 1 K and the critical current densities J{sub c} are 3–4 MA/cm{sup 2} at 77 K for both sides. X-ray diffraction θ-2θ scans and rotational ϕ-scans prove that the films are strongly textured with the c axis perpendicular to the substrate surface. A 3-pole band-pass filter is then fabricated on the Tl-2223 thin films with 4% relative bandwidth and a center frequency of 4.0 GHz. At 77 K, 100 K, and 102 K, the insertion loss in the passband is 0.088 dB, 0.21 dB, and 0.27 dB, respectively. These performances show that the proposed HTS filter is satisfying even when the operating temperature is above 100 K, which makes it possible to work in outer space without cryogenic systems.

  2. Materials science challenges for high-temperature superconducting wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foltyn, S. R.; Civale, L.; MacManus-Driscoll, J. L.; Jia, Q. X.; Maiorov, B.; Wang, H.; Maley, M.

    2007-09-01

    Twenty years ago in a series of amazing discoveries it was found that a large family of ceramic cuprate materials exhibited superconductivity at temperatures above, and in some cases well above, that of liquid nitrogen. Imaginations were energized by the thought of applications for zero-resistance conductors cooled with an inexpensive and readily available cryogen. Early optimism, however, was soon tempered by the hard realities of these new materials: brittle ceramics are not easily formed into long flexible conductors; high current levels require near-perfect crystallinity; and - the downside of high transition temperature - performance drops rapidly in a magnetic field. Despite these formidable obstacles, thousands of kilometres of high-temperature superconducting wire have now been manufactured for demonstrations of transmission cables, motors and other electrical power components. The question is whether the advantages of superconducting wire, such as efficiency and compactness, can outweigh the disadvantage: cost. The remaining task for materials scientists is to return to the fundamentals and squeeze as much performance as possible from these wonderful and difficult materials.

  3. A Tl-based high-temperature superconducting X-band cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arendt, P. N.; Cooke, D. W.; Elliott, N. E.; Gray, E. R.; Hubbard, K. M.; Piel, H.; Swain, G. R.

    1992-08-01

    A nonplanar X-band cavity amenable to coating with high-temperature superconducting films by conventional physical vapor deposition processes has been designed, fabricated, and tested. The cavity geometry resembles a symmetric clamshell configuration. It consists of two truncated cones joined at their bases. The specific dimensions of the cavity were calculated using the SUPERFISH computer code. Cavities were constructed using a silver-based alloy, Consil 995. The separate cavity sections were coated with Tl-based high-temperature superconducting material using a two-step deposition and annealing process. The unloaded Q values for this coated clamshell cavity are 66,000 and 105,000 at 77 and 20 K, respectively.

  4. The DARPA manufacturing initiative in high temperature superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, K.R. )

    1989-01-01

    The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has a very aggressive Technology Base program in high temperature superconductivity. This program is expected to provide the basis for a specialized set of military products - passive microwave and millimeter wave devices - within the next three years. In order to get these high leverage products into military systems, a manufacturing base must be developed for HTSC components. A plan for DARPA in HTSC manufacturing is directly coupled with the ongoing DARPA materials and device oriented R and D program. In essence, this plan recommends a three phased effort: 1. Phase I (two years); Fund companies through R and D contracts for specialized HTSC components; prepare a detailed plan and develop an HTSC consortium. 2. Phase II (six years): Establish an HTSC Sematech initiative for electronic applications, including active devices. 3. Phase III (optional): Continue the HTSC Sematech with emphasis on high power applications.

  5. Shock-induced synthesis of high temperature superconducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, D.S.; Graham, R.A.; Morosin, B.; Venturini, E.L.

    1987-06-18

    It has now been determined that the unique features of the high pressure shock method, especially the shock-induced chemical synthesis technique, are fully applicable to high temperature superconducting materials. Extraordinarily high yields are achievable in accordance with this invention, e.g., generally in the range from about 20% to about 99%, often in the range from about 50% to about 90%, lower and higher yields, of course, also being possible. The method of this invention involves the application of a controlled high pressure shock compression pulse which can be produced in any conventional manner, e.g., by detonation of a high explosive material, the impact of a high speed projectile or the effect of intense pulsed radiation sources such as lasers or electron beams. Examples and a discussion are presented.

  6. Adaptive high temperature superconducting filters for interference rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Raihn, K.F.; Fenzi, N.O.; Hey-Shipton, G.L.; Saito, E.R.; Loung, P.V.; Aidnik, D.L.

    1996-07-01

    An optically switched high temperature superconducting (HTS) band-reject filter bank is presented. Fast low loss switching of high quality (Q) factor HTS filter elements enables digital selection of arbitrary pass-bands and stop-bands. Patterned pieces of GaAs and silicon are used in the manufacture of the photosensitive switches. Fiber optic cabling is used to transfer the optical energy from an LED to the switch. The fiber optic cable minimizes the thermal loading of the filter package and de-couples the switch`s power source from the RF circuit. This paper will discuss the development of a computer-controlled HTS bank of optically switchable, narrow band, high Q bandstop filters which incorporates a cryocooler to maintain the 77 K operating temperature of the HTS microwave circuit.

  7. Reluctance machines incorporating high temperature superconducting materials on the rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, A. L.; Pires, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The computer modelling of reluctance machines with rotors containing both iron and high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials, using the finite element method (FEM), is presented in this paper. The modelling permits to obtain the field and stator current distribution from where reluctance torque is evaluated. Different solutions are analyzed and experimental results on a 2 kW reluctance motor using HTS materials on the rotor and cooled by liquid nitrogen, show a significant increase in the torque values, when compared with that of a correspondent conventional machine. Pre-magnetization of these rotors by field cooling is explained and this process gives a mechanical output power undoubtedly better than that of a conventional reluctance machine.

  8. The fabrication and characterization of high temperature superconducting magnetic shields

    SciTech Connect

    Purpura, J.W.; Clem, T.R.

    1989-03-01

    Tubes fabricated of polycrystalline YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-x/ are characterized and details of the fabrication procedure are discussed. The microstructure of the tubes determined by scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffractometry is described. Resistive measurements of T/sub c/ and /Delta/T/sub c/ have been made. The tubes have also been characterized by means of SQUID magnetometry. The temperature dependence of magnetic fields trapped axially in the tubes has been measured and estimates of penetration depth are given. Moreover, measurements of transverse shielding effectiveness of the tubes have been made and are compared with theoretical predictions. Studies on flux penetration into the tubes are described. Findings from the microstructure studies are correlated with the observed superconductivity properties. The results on the high temperature materials are compared to results obtained previously on tubes made from conventional superconductors.

  9. High-temperature superconducting transformer performance, cost, and market evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Dirks, J.A.; Dagle, J.E.; DeSteese, J.G.; Huber, H.D.; Smith, S.A.; Currie, J.W.; Merrick, S.B.; Williams, T.A.

    1993-09-01

    Recent laboratory breakthroughs in high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials have stimulated both the scientific community and general public with questions regarding how these materials can be used in practical applications. While there are obvious benefits from using HTS materials (most notably the potential for reduced energy losses in the conductors), a number of issues (such as overall system energy losses, cost, and reliability) may limit applications of HTS equipment, even if the well known materials problems are solved. This study examined the future application potential of HTS materials to power transformers. This study effort was part of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Storage and Distribution (OESD) research program, Superconductivity Technology for Electric Power Systems (STEPS). The study took a systems perspective to gain insights to help guide DOE in managing research designed to realize the vision of HTS applications. Specific objectives of the study were as follows: to develop an understanding of the fundamental HTS transformer design issues that can provide guidance for developing practical devices of interest to the electric utility industry; to identify electric utility requirements for HTS transformers and to evaluate the potential for developing a commercial market; to evaluate the market potential and national benefits for HTS transformers that could be achieved by a successful HTS development program; to develop an integrated systems analysis framework, which can be used to support R&D planning by DOE, by identifying how various HTS materials characteristics impact the performance, cost, and national benefits of the HTS application.

  10. High Temperature Superconducting Reciprocating Magnetic Separator Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    James F. Maguire

    2008-06-05

    In 2001, under DOE's Superconductivity Partnership Initiative (SPI), E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co. (Dupont) was awarded a cost-share contract to build a fully functional full-scale model high temperature superconducting reciprocating magnet unit specifically designed for the koalin clay industry. After competitive bidding, American Superconductor (AMSC) was selected to provide the coil for the magnet. Dupont performed the statement of work until September 2004, when it stopped work, with the concurrence of DOE, due to lack of federal funds. DOE had paid all invoices to that point, and Dupont had provided all cost share. At this same time, Dupont determined that this program did not fit with its corporate strategies and notified DOE that it was not interesting in resuming the program when funding became available. AMSC expressed interest in assuming performance of the Agreement to Dupont and DOE, and in March 2005, this project was transferred to AMSC by DOE amendment to the original contract and Novation Agreement between AMSC and Dupont. Design drawings and some hardware components and subassemblies were transferred to AMSC. However, no funding was obligated by DOE and AMSC never performed work on the project. This report contains a summary of the work performed by Dupont up to the September 04 timeframe.

  11. High temperature superconducting current leads for fusion magnet systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J. L.; Dederer, J. T.; Singh, S. K.; Hull, J. R.

    Superconducting magnets for fusion applications typically have very high operating currents. These currents are transmitted from the room temperature power supplies to the low temperature superconducting coils by way of helium-vapor-cooled current leads. Because of the high current magnitude and the resistive characteristics associated with the normal metallic lead conductors, a substantial amount of power is dissipated in the lead. To maintain a stable operation, a high rate of helium vapor flow, generated by the boil-off of liquid helium, is required to cool the lead conductors. This helium boil-off substantially increases both the installation capacity and the operating cost of the helium refrigerator/liquefier. The boil-off of liquid helium can be significantly reduced by employing ceramic high temperature superconductors, such as Y-Ba-Cu-O, in the low temperature part of the lead conductor structure. This concept utilizes the superconducting, as well as the low thermal conductivity properties of the superconductor materials in eliminating power dissipation in part of the current lead and in inhibiting heat conduction into the liquid helium pool, resulting in reduced helium boil-off. This design concept has been conclusively demonstrated by a 2-kA current lead test model using Y-Ba-Cu-O (123) material which, although not optimized in design, has significantly reduced the rate of helium boil-off in comparison to optimized conventional leads. There appear to be no major technological barriers for scaling up this design to higher current levels for applications in fusion magnet systems or in fusion related testing activities. The theoretical basis of the current lead concept, as well as the important design and technology issues are addressed. The potential cost saving derived from employing these leads in fusion magnets is also discussed. In addition, a design concept for a 10-kA lead is presented.

  12. A 3M high temperature dielectric film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampl, Edward, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The performance characteristics of a dielectric film are summarized. Additionally, the film's environmental and chemical properties are listed: low shrinkage to 300 C; moisture insensitive; low outgassing under vacuum; excellent surface qualities--easy metallization of film; flame retardant; and low smoke generation. A series of graphs that display the performance characteristics of the film are also presented.

  13. The infinite range Heisenberg model and high temperature superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir-Kheli, Jamil

    1992-01-01

    The thesis deals with the theory of high temperature superconductivity from the standpoint of three-band Hubbard models.Chapter 1 of the thesis proposes a strongly coupled variational wavefunction that has the three-spin system of an oxygen hole and its two neighboring copper spins in a doublet and the background Cu spins in an eigenstate of the infinite range antiferromagnet. This wavefunction is expected to be a good "zeroth order" wavefunction in the superconducting regime of dopings. The three-spin polaron is stabilized by the hopping terms rather than the copper-oxygen antiferromagnetic coupling Jpd. Considering the effect of the copper-copper antiferromagnetic coupling Jdd, we show that the three-spin polaron cannot be pure Emery (Dg), but must have a non-negligible amount of doublet-u (Du) character for hopping stabilization. Finally, an estimate is made for the magnitude of the attractive coupling of oxygen holes.Chapter 2 presents an exact solution to a strongly coupled Hamiltonian for the motion of oxygen holes in a 1-D Cu-O lattice. The Hamiltonian separates into two pieces: one for the spin degrees of freedom of the copper and oxygen holes, and the other for the charge degrees of freedom of the oxygen holes. The spinon part becomes the Heisenberg antiferromagnet in 1-D that is soluble by the Bethe Ansatz. The holon piece is also soluble by a Bethe Ansatz with simple algebraic relations for the phase shifts.Finally, we show that the nearest neighbor Cu-Cu spin correlation increases linearly with doping and becomes positive at x [...] 0.70.

  14. Rotor instrumentation study for high-temperature superconducting generators

    SciTech Connect

    Schwenterly, S.W.; Wilson, C.T.

    1996-06-01

    In FY 9195, ORNL carried out work on rotor instrumentation systems in support of the General Electric (GE) Superconductivity Partnership Initiative (SPI) on Superconducting Generator Development. The objective was to develop a system for tramsitting data from sensors in the spinning rotor to a stationary data acquisition system. Previous work at ORNL had investigated an optical method of cryogenic temperature measurement using laser-induced fluorescence in certain phosphors. Later follow-up discussions with experts in the ORNL Engineering Technology Division indicated that this method could also be extended to measure strain and magnetic field. Another optical alternative using standard fiber optic transmission modules was also investigated. The equipment is very inexpensive, but needs to be adapted for operation in a high-g-force rotating environment. An optical analog of a commutator or slip ring also needs to be developed to couple the light signals from the rotor to the stationary frame. Sealed mercury-film rotary contacts are manufactured by Meridian Laboratory. Unlike conventional slipring assemblies, these offer low noise and long lifetime, with low costs per channel. Standard units may need some upgrading for 3600-rpm or high-voltage operation. A commercial electronic telemetry system offered by Wireless Data Corporation (WDC) was identified as a viable candidate, and information on this system was presented to GE. GE has since ordered two of these systems from WDC for temperature measurements in their rotating test cryostat.

  15. Exploratory research for a high temperature superconducting integrated circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Track, E. K.; Mukhanov, O.; Eckstein, J. N.; Bozovic, I.; Virshup, G. F.

    1993-09-01

    The objective of this effort was the investigation of the molecular beam epitaxy trilayer Josephson junction process under development by Varian Corporation. Under this effort, Stanford University provided fundamental materials characterization to understand and improve the surfaces and interfaces of the thin film structures. HYPRES Inc. provided an independent assessment of the junctions produced by Varian and addressed the possibilities of rapid single fluxquantum (RSFQ) circuit designs. The material system chosen for this investigation was bismuth strontium calcium copper oxide (BSSCO). The Josephson junction character of the devices was confirmed by the observation of microwave induced (Shapior) steps in the I-V curves. Contact resistance was reduced by three orders of magnitude by modulation doping the top few molecular layers of the upper superconductive electrode. The desired properties to warrant RSFQ circuit fabrication were not obtained. A material system with a higher Josephson junction critical temperature and higher critical current is necessary for circuits.

  16. High temperature superconductivity technology for advanced space power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faymon, Karl A.; Myers, Ira T.; Connolly, Denis J.

    1990-01-01

    In 1987, the Lewis Research center of the NASA and the Argonne National Laboratory of the Department of Energy joined in a cooperative program to identify and assess high payoff space and aeronautical applications of high temperature superconductivity (HTSC). The initial emphasis of this effort was limited, and those space power related applications which were considered included microwave power transmission and magnetic energy storage. The results of these initial studies were encouraging and indicated the need of further studies. A continuing collaborative program with Argonne National Laboratory has been formulated and the Lewis Research Center is presently structuring a program to further evaluate HTSC, identify applications and define the requisite technology development programs for space power systems. This paper discusses some preliminary results of the previous evaluations in the area of space power applications of HTSC which were carried out under the joint NASA-DOE program, the future NASA-Lewis proposed program, its thrusts, and its intended outputs and give general insights on the anticipated impact of HTSC for space power applications of the future.

  17. Relevance of Phonons in High-Temperature Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egami, Takeshi; Chung, Jae-Ho; Piekarz, Przemek; Arai, Masatoshi; Tajima, Setsuko; Tachiki, Masashi

    2002-03-01

    For a long time phonons have been regarded to be irrelevant to high temperature superconductivity (HTSC). However, our recent measurements of phonon dispersion in YBCO with neutron inelastic scattering at MAPS of the ISIS and of electron dressing of phonons by x-ray inelastic scattering at the APS suggest otherwise. They show that the in-plane Cu-O bond-stretching mode interacts strongly with electrons, reflecting the SC order parameter, and the electronic structure is strongly anisotropic in the Cu-O plane. The results are consistent with the formation of a short-range stripe structure and a resonant vibronic state. We conjecture that the spin-charge stripe structure brings down the electronic energy scale close to those of phonons, creating the resonant condition. A model based upon overscreening of phonons by charge and formation of the vibronic state yields a SC transition temperature over 300K. While this magnitude may not be accurate it suggests that the phonons are likely to be closely involved in the mechanism of HTSC.

  18. Trial manufacture of liquid nitrogen cooling High Temperature Superconductivity Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, H.; Nishikawa, T.; Tsuda, T.; Hondou, Y.; Akita, Y.; Takeda, T.; Okazaki, T.; Ohashi, S.; Yoshida, Y.

    2006-06-01

    We present a new high temperature superconductivity (HTS) synchronous motor using the liquid nitrogen as the refrigerant in this paper. This motor is designed to be used as the propulsion motor in ship. Because we use the liquid nitrogen as the refrigerant, it is possible to simplify the cooling equipments in the motor. And in our design, we apply the axial flux type of motor to simplify the cryostat of the HTS wires used to make the field coils. Here, the fields using the bismuth HTS wire for the HTS coils are fixed. Moreover, the cores used in the fields are separated from cryostat, and the armature applies the core-less structure. According to various the electromagnetic field analysis results, the new motor was designed and produced. The diameter of the motor is 650mm, and the width of the motor is 360mm. The motor's rated output is 8.8kW at 100rpm, while the overload output is 44kW, and the maximum efficiency is 97.7%. Also, in order to further miniaturize the motor, other magnetic field analysis have been done when the high-current-density type HTS wire was used and the permendur was used instead of magnetic steel plates. In this case, the motor's rated output is 12kW, and the overload output is 60kW.

  19. High temperature superconducting axial field magnetic coupler: realization and test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belguerras, L.; Mezani, S.; Lubin, T.; Lévêque, J.; Rezzoug, A.

    2015-09-01

    Contactless torque transmission through a large airgap is required in some industrial applications in which hermetic isolation is necessary. This torque transmission usually uses magnetic couplers, whose dimension strongly depends on the airgap flux density. The use of high temperature superconducting (HTS) coils to create a strong magnetic field may constitute a solution to reduce the size of the coupler. It is also possible to use this coupler to replace a torque tube in transmitting the torque produced by a HTS motor to its load. This paper presents the detailed construction and tests of an axial field HTS magnetic coupler. Pancake coils have been manufactured from BSCCO tape and used in one rotor of the coupler. The second rotor is mainly composed of NdFeB permanent magnets. Several tests have been carried out showing that the constructed coupler is working properly. A 3D finite element (FE) model of the studied coupler has been developed. Airgap magnetic field and torque measurements have been carried out and compared to the FE results. It has been shown that the measured and the computed quantities are in satisfactory agreement.

  20. High-temperature study of superconducting hydrogen and deuterium sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durajski, A. P.; Szczȩśniak, R.; Pietronero, L.

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen-rich compounds are extensively explored as candidates for a high-temperature superconductors. Currently, the measured critical temperature of $203$ K in hydrogen sulfide (H$_3$S) is among the highest over all-known superconductors. In present paper, using the strong-coupling Eliashberg theory of superconductivity, we compared in detail the thermodynamic properties of two samples containing different hydrogen isotopes H$_3$S and D$_3$S at $150$ GPa. Our research indicates that it is possible to reproduce the measured values of critical temperature $203$ K and $147$ K for H$_3$S and D$_3$S by using a Coulomb pseudopotential of $0.123$ and $0.131$, respectively. However, we also discuss a scenario in which the isotope effect is independent of pressure and the Coulomb pseudopotential for D$_3$S is smaller than for H$_3$S. For both scenarios, the energy gap, specific heat, thermodynamic critical field and related dimensionless ratios are calculated and compared with other conventional superconductors. We shown that the existence of the strong-coupling and retardation effects in the systems analysed result in significant differences between values obtained within the framework of the Eliashberg formalism and the prediction of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory.

  1. Transient analysis and burnout of high temperature superconducting current leads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seol, S. Y.; Hull, J. R.

    The transient behaviour of high-temperature superconductor (HTS) current leads operated between liquid helium and liquid nitrogen temperatures is analysed for burnout conditions upon transition of the HTS into the normal state. Leads composed of HTS only and of HTS sheathed by pure silver or silver alloy are investigated numerically for temperature-dependent properties and analytically for temperature-independent properties. For lower values of shape factor (current density times length), the lead can be operated indefinitely without burnout. At higher values of shape factor, the lead reaches burnout in a finite time. With high current densities, the leads heat adiabatically. For a fixed shape factor, low current densities are desired to achieve long burnout times. To achieve a low helium boil-off rate in the superconducting state without danger of burnout, there is a preferred temperature dependence for thermal conductivity, and silver alloy sheaths are preferred to pure silver sheaths. However, for a given current density, pure silver sheaths take longer to burn out.

  2. Thermal response of large area high temperature superconducting YBaCuO infrared bolometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khalil, Ali E.

    1990-01-01

    Thermal analysis of large area high temperature superconducting infrared detector operating in the equilibrium mode (bolometer) was performed. An expression for the temperature coefficient beta=1/R(dR/dT) in terms of the thermal conductance and the thermal time constant of the detector were derived. A superconducting transition edge bolometer is a thermistor consisting of a thin film superconducting YBaCuO evaporated into a suitable thermally isolated substrate. The operating temperature of the bolometer is maintained close to the midpoint of the superconducting transition region where the resistance R has a maximum dynamic range. A detector with a strip configuration was analyzed and an expression for the temperature rise (delta T) above the ambient due to a uniform illumination with a source of power density P(sub i) was calculated. An expression for the thermal responsivity of the detector was derived using the thermal diffusion analysis with appropriate boundary conditions. It was found that the thermal responsibility depends upon the spatial modulation frequency and the angular frequency of the incoming radiation. The problem of the thermal cross talk between different detector elements was addressed. In the case of monolithic HTS detector array with a row of square elements of dimensions 2a and CCD or CID readout electronics the thermal spread function was derived for different spacing between elements. This analysis can be critical for future design and applications of large area focal plane arrays as broad band optical detectors made of granular thin films HTS YBaCuO.

  3. Apparatus for continuous manufacture of high temperature superconducting wires from molten superconducting oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Hed, A.Z.

    1991-09-10

    This patent describes an apparatus for making a composite high-temperature superconducting wire, comprising a refractory core having a melting point above a melt temperature of a superconducting oxide ceramic having a critical temperature T{sub c} above 23{degrees} K and a layer of the superconducting oxide ceramic on the core. It comprises means forming a controlled-atmosphere chamber; a vessel received in the chamber and formed with an opening at a bottom thereof, the vessel receiving an annular mass of the superconducting oxide ceramic in solid form surrounding a passage traversing the mass and extending upwardly from the opening; means for forming a melt of the superconductive oxide ceramic in a small pool in the mass above the passage and at a temperature slightly above a melting point of the superconducting oxide ceramic; means for drawing the refractory core through the opening, the passage and the melt in succession and depositing the melt on the core, the pool being in contact only with the mass, the core and the atmosphere; means in the chamber above the pool for cooling the melt deposited on the core by radiation and convection.

  4. Infinite-range Heisenberg model and high-temperature superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir-Kheli, Jamil; Goddard, William A., III

    1993-11-01

    A strongly coupled variational wave function, the doublet spin-projected Néel state (DSPN), is proposed for oxygen holes in three-band models of high-temperature superconductors. This wave function has the three-spin system of the oxygen hole plus the two neighboring copper atoms coupled in a spin-1/2 doublet. The copper spins in the neighborhood of a hole are in an eigenstate of the infinite-range Heisenberg antiferromagnet (SPN state). The doublet three-spin magnetic polaron or hopping polaron (HP) is stabilized by the hopping terms tσ and tτ, rather than by the copper-oxygen antiferromagnetic coupling Jpd. Although, the HP has a large projection onto the Emery (Dg) polaron, a non-negligible amount of doublet-u (Du) character is required for optimal hopping stabilization. This is due to Jdd, the copper-copper antiferromagnetic coupling. For the copper spins near an oxygen hole, the copper-copper antiferromagnetic coupling can be considered to be almost infinite ranged, since the copper-spin-correlation length in the superconducting phase (0.06-0.25 holes per in-plane copper) is approximately equal to the mean separation of the holes (between 2 and 4 lattice spacings). The general DSPN wave function is constructed for the motion of a single quasiparticle in an antiferromagnetic background. The SPN state allows simple calculations of various couplings of the oxygen hole with the copper spins. The energy minimum is found at symmetry (π/2,π/2) and the bandwidth scales with Jdd. These results are in agreement with exact computations on a lattice. The coupling of the quasiparticles leads to an attraction of holes and its magnitude is estimated.

  5. The formation and analysis of thin film high temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Nastasi, M.; Muenchausen, R.E.; Arendt, P.N.

    1989-01-01

    Thin films of high temperature superconductors have been fabricated using a variety of physical vapor deposition techniques. Recent results of HTS thin films produced by coevaporation, sputtering and laser deposition will be briefly reviewed. In addition some examples of the utility of high energy ion backscattering for the analysis of film stoichiometry will be given. 34 refs., 6 figs.

  6. The formation and analysis of thin film high temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastasi, Michael; Muenchausen, Ross E.; Arendt, Paul N.

    Thin films of high temperature superconductors have been fabricated using a variety of physical vapor deposition techniques. Recent results of HTS thin films produced by coevaporation, sputtering and laser deposition will be briefly reviewed. In addition some examples of the utility of high energy ion backscattering for the analysis of film stoichiometry will be given.

  7. Thermal response of large area high temperature superconducting YBaCuO infrared bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khalil, Ali E.

    1991-01-01

    Thermal analysis of large area high temperature superconducting infrared detector operating in the equilibrium mode (bolometer) was performed. An expression for the temperature coefficient beta = 1/R(dR/dT) in terms of the thermal conductance and the thermal time constant of the detector were derived. A superconducting transition edge bolometer is a thermistor consisting of a thin film superconducting YBaCuO evaporated into a suitable thermally isolated substrate. The operating temperature of the bolometer is maintained close to the midpoint of the superconducting transition region where the resistance R has a maximum dynamic range. A detector with a strip configuration was analyzed and an expression for the temperature rise (delta T) above the ambient due to a uniform illumination with a source of power density was calculated. An expression for the thermal responsibility depends upon the spatial modulation frequency and the angular frequency of the incoming radiation. The problem of the thermal cross talk between different detector elements was addressed. In the case of monolithic HTS detector array with a row of square elements of dimensions 2a and CCD or CID readout electronics the thermal spread function was derived for different spacing between elements.

  8. High-temperature superconductivity in iron pnictides and chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Qimiao; Yu, Rong; Abrahams, Elihu

    2016-04-01

    Superconductivity develops in metals upon the formation of a coherent macroscopic quantum state of electron pairs. Iron pnictides and chalcogenides are materials that have high superconducting transition temperatures. In this Review, we describe the advances in the field that have led to higher superconducting transition temperatures in iron-based superconductors and the wide range of materials that are used to form these superconductors. We summarize the essential aspects of the normal state and the mechanism for superconductivity. We emphasize the degree of electron–electron correlations and their manifestation in properties of the normal state. We examine the nature of magnetism, analyse its role in driving the electronic nematicity and discuss quantum criticality at the border of magnetism in the phase diagram. Finally, we review the amplitude and structure of the superconducting pairing, and survey the potential material settings for optimizing superconductivity.

  9. Damping and support in high-temperature superconducting levitation systems

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.; McIver, Carl R.; Mittleider, John A.

    2009-12-15

    Methods and apparatuses to provide improved auxiliary damping for superconducting bearings in superconducting levitation systems are disclosed. In a superconducting bearing, a cryostat housing the superconductors is connected to a ground state with a combination of a damping strip of material, a set of linkage arms to provide vertical support, and spring washers to provide stiffness. Alternately, the superconducting bearing may be supported by a cryostat connected to a ground state by posts constructed from a mesh of fibers, with the damping and stiffness controlled by the fiber composition, size, and mesh geometry.

  10. High temperature polymer dielectric film insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    PFPI polymers were invented in the late 1970's. Assessment of emerging requirements has dictated that 300 C performance is the goal for next generation wire insulation. TRW PFPI as superior 300 C polymer candidates is presented. Included is a comparison of promising PFPI film properties with Kapton. Also included are the promising bulk polymer or coating properties.

  11. Can doping graphite trigger room temperature superconductivity? Evidence for granular high-temperature superconductivity in water-treated graphite powder.

    PubMed

    Scheike, T; Böhlmann, W; Esquinazi, P; Barzola-Quiquia, J; Ballestar, A; Setzer, A

    2012-11-14

    Granular superconductivity in powders of small graphite grains (several tens of micrometers) is demonstrated after treatment with pure water. The temperature, magnetic field and time dependence of the magnetic moment of the treated graphite powder provides evidence for the existence of superconducting vortices with some similarities to high-temperature granular superconducting oxides but even at temperatures above 300 K. Room temperature superconductivity in doped graphite or at its interfaces appears to be possible. PMID:22949348

  12. The spin bag mechanism of high temperature superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrieffer, J. R.; Wen, X.-G.; Zhang, S.-C.

    1989-01-01

    In oxide superconductors the local suppression of antiferromagnetic correlations in the vicinity of a hole lowers the energy of the system. This quasi two-dimensional bag of weakened spin order follows the hole in its motion. In addition, holes prefer to share a bag, leading to a strong pairing attraction and a high Tc superconductivity. There are many experimental consequences of this mechanism for both the superconducting and normal phases.

  13. Engineering nanocolumnar defect configurations for optimized vortex pinning in high temperature superconducting nanocomposite wires.

    PubMed

    Wee, Sung Hun; Zuev, Yuri L; Cantoni, Claudia; Goyal, Amit

    2013-01-01

    We report microstructural design via control of BaZrO3 (BZO) defect density in high temperature superconducting (HTS) wires based on epitaxial YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) films to achieve the highest critical current density, Jc, at different fields, H. We find the occurrence of Jc(H) cross-over between the films with 1-4 vol% BZO, indicating that optimal BZO doping is strongly field-dependent. The matching fields, Bφ, estimated by the number density of BZO nanocolumns are matched to the field ranges for which 1-4 vol% BZO-doped films exhibit the highest Jc(H). With incorporation of BZO defects with the controlled density, we fabricate 4-μm-thick single layer, YBCO + BZO nanocomposite film having the critical current (Ic) of ~1000 A cm(-1) at 77 K, self-field and the record minimum Ic, Ic(min), of 455 A cm(-1) at 65 K and 3 T for all field angles. This Ic(min) is the largest value ever reported from HTS films fabricated on metallic templates. PMID:23939231

  14. Engineering nanocolumnar defect configurations for optimized vortex pinning in high temperature superconducting nanocomposite wires

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Sung Hun; Zuev, Yuri L.; Cantoni, Claudia; Goyal, Amit

    2013-01-01

    We report microstructural design via control of BaZrO3 (BZO) defect density in high temperature superconducting (HTS) wires based on epitaxial YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) films to achieve the highest critical current density, Jc, at different fields, H. We find the occurrence of Jc(H) cross-over between the films with 1–4 vol% BZO, indicating that optimal BZO doping is strongly field-dependent. The matching fields, Bφ, estimated by the number density of BZO nanocolumns are matched to the field ranges for which 1–4 vol% BZO-doped films exhibit the highest Jc(H). With incorporation of BZO defects with the controlled density, we fabricate 4-μm-thick single layer, YBCO + BZO nanocomposite film having the critical current (Ic) of ~1000 A cm−1 at 77 K, self-field and the record minimum Ic, Ic(min), of 455 A cm−1 at 65 K and 3 T for all field angles. This Ic(min) is the largest value ever reported from HTS films fabricated on metallic templates. PMID:23939231

  15. Preisach-type modeling of high-temperature superconducting hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ElBidweihy, Hatem

    2016-05-01

    Even though Isaak Mayergoyz described it as: "much more accurate for the description of superconducting hysteresis than for the description of hysteresis of magnetic materials", Preisach modeling of superconducting hysteresis is not a popular investigative tool. This might be due to the complexity of identifying the Preisach distribution function or due to lack of convincing physical reasoning behind pure phenomenological versions. In this paper, a two-component Preisach-type model is presented which is computationally-efficient and physically-sound. The change in the slope of the minor hysteresis loops is incorporated in the model and is attributed to reversible fluxoid motion. The model presented is clearly capable of simulating various shapes of superconducting hysteresis loops and could be easily coupled with finite element method (FEM) numerical software.

  16. Compact design of high-temperature superconducting duplexer and triplexer for satellite communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu; He, Ming; Ji, Lu; Zhao, Xinjie; Fang, Lan; Yan, Shaolin

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a compact C-band high-temperature superconducting (HTS) input module duplexer, which can be scaled to a triplexer. The duplexer includes a common node as the input port, which is an extensible and effective structure for integrating a HTS multiplexer on a single superconducting film. The input node is realized by an open-loop microstrip line, which resonates at the frequency in the guard band between the two channels. In addition two four-pole bandpass filters consisting of rectangular spiral line resonators are used as output channels of the device. The duplexer is designed at 3995 MHz with a bandwidth of 226 MHz. The frequency ranges of the two channels are 3882-3942 MHz and 4048-4108 MHz, respectively. It is fabricated using double-sided Y Ba2Cu3O7 (YBCO) thin films on a piece of 30× 10 mm 2 MgO substrate. The experimental results show that the insertion loss is less than 0.1 dB for both channel filters and the isolation between the two channels is higher than 40 dB. Good agreement has been achieved between simulations and measurements to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. Moreover, the triplexer is also designed and measured and the scalability is verified by simulation and experiments.

  17. Hidden Fermionic Excitation Boosting High-Temperature Superconductivity in Cuprates.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Shiro; Civelli, Marcello; Imada, Masatoshi

    2016-02-01

    The dynamics of a microscopic cuprate model, namely, the two-dimensional Hubbard model, is studied with a cluster extension of the dynamical mean-field theory. We find a nontrivial structure of the frequency-dependent self-energies, which describes an unprecedented interplay between the pseudogap and superconductivity. We show that these properties are well described by quasiparticles hybridizing with (hidden) fermionic excitations, emergent from the strong electronic correlations. The hidden fermion enhances superconductivity via a mechanism distinct from a conventional boson-mediated pairing, and originates the normal-state pseudogap. Though the hidden fermion is elusive in experiments, it can solve many experimental puzzles. PMID:26894730

  18. Hidden Fermionic Excitation Boosting High-Temperature Superconductivity in Cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Shiro; Civelli, Marcello; Imada, Masatoshi

    2016-02-01

    The dynamics of a microscopic cuprate model, namely, the two-dimensional Hubbard model, is studied with a cluster extension of the dynamical mean-field theory. We find a nontrivial structure of the frequency-dependent self-energies, which describes an unprecedented interplay between the pseudogap and superconductivity. We show that these properties are well described by quasiparticles hybridizing with (hidden) fermionic excitations, emergent from the strong electronic correlations. The hidden fermion enhances superconductivity via a mechanism distinct from a conventional boson-mediated pairing, and originates the normal-state pseudogap. Though the hidden fermion is elusive in experiments, it can solve many experimental puzzles.

  19. High-temperature Superconductivity in compressed Solid Silane

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huadi; Jin, Xilian; Lv, Yunzhou; Zhuang, Quan; Liu, Yunxian; Lv, Qianqian; Bao, Kuo; Li, Da; Liu, Bingbing; Cui, Tian

    2015-01-01

    Crystal structures of silane have been extensively investigated using ab initio evolutionary simulation methods at high pressures. Two metallic structures with P21/c and C2/m symmetries are found stable above 383 GPa. The superconductivities of metallic phases are fully explored under BCS theory, including the reported C2/c one. Perturbative linear-response calculations for C2/m silane at 610 GPa reveal a high superconducting critical temperature that beyond the order of 102 K. PMID:25746861

  20. Compensation techniques for high-temperature superconducting quantum interference device gradiometers operating in unshielded environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgmann, J.; David, P.; Krause, H. J.; Otto, R.; Braginski, A. I.

    1997-08-01

    We have tested two methods of compensating environmental disturbances applicable to high-temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) systems operating in magnetically unshielded environments. For testing, we used first- and second-order axial electronic gradiometer setups with rf SQUID magnetometers operating at 77 K and base lines between 7 and 8 cm. The magnetometers were single-layer washer rf SQUIDs with bulk or thin-film magnetic flux concentrators in flip-chip geometry. The tested methods resulted in disturbance compensation levels comparable to those attained using electronically formed gradiometers. The white noise of the compensated magnetometers resulted in 13.5 fT/cm √Hz for first-order and 22 fT/cm2 √Hz for second-order compensation down to a few Hz. Common mode rejection was balanced to better than 10 000 for homogeneous fields and better than 200 for gradient fields with second-order compensation.

  1. High temperature superconductivity research in selected laboratories in West Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebenberg, Donald H.; Clark, Alan

    1988-07-01

    The superconductivity work at eight West German laboratories is reviewed. The laboratories are (or located at): the University of Giessen; the Technical University at Darmstadt; Hoechst AG; Siemens AG; KFA Julich; KFK, Karlsruhe; the Walter Meissner Institute, Garching; and the Max Planck Institute, Stuttgart.

  2. 630 kVA high temperature superconducting transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zueger, H.

    This document describes the 630 KVA HTS transformer project made by ABB jointly with EDF and ASC. The project started April 1994 and its goal was to manufacture a real scale superconducting distribution transformer and to operate it during one year in the grid of Geneva's utility (SIG). The conclusion highlights the future perspective of HTS transformers.

  3. Engineering Nanocolumnar Defect Configurations for Optimized Vortex Pinning in High Temperature Superconducting Nanocomposite Wires

    SciTech Connect

    Wee, Sung Hun; Zuev, Yuri L; Cantoni, Claudia; Goyal, Amit; Ahuja, Raj; Abiade, J.

    2013-01-01

    High temperature superconducting (HTS), coated conductor wires based on nanocomposite films containing self-assembled, insulating BaZrO3 (BZO) nanocolumnar defects have previously been reported to exhibit enhanced vortex pinning. Here, we report on microstructural design via control of BZO nanocolumns density in YBa2Cu3O7- (YBCO)+BZO nancomposite films to achieve the highest critical current density, Jc(H, ,T). X-ray diffraction and microstructural examination shows increasing number density of epitaxial BZO nanocolumns in the highly cube-textured YBCO matrix with increasing nominal BZO additions. Transport property measurement reveals that an increase in BZO content upto 4 vol% is required to sustain the highest pinning and Jc performance as the magnetic field increases. By growing thicker, single-layer nanocomposite films (~4 m) with controlled density of BZO columnar defects, the critical current (Ic) of ~1000 A/cm at 77 K, self-field and the minimum Ic of 455 A/cm at 65 K and 3 T for all magnetic field orientations were obtained. This is the highest Ic reported to date for films on metallic templates which are the basis for the 2nd generation, coated conductor-based HTS wires.

  4. The processing of high temperature ceramic superconducting devices, volume 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, James H., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    BEI has completed the preliminary evaluation on the planar coil and conductor requirements for the brushless DC motor. Results indicate that current density is adequate. However, there is not enough cross section of the conductor using the thin film approach. Preliminary design was based on two planar coils attached on each side of a central chill plate filled with liquid nitrogen. Evaluation was further performed on the output anticipated in thick film substrates 100 times thicker than the 1 micron thin film. Estimates with thick film substrates yielded .168 watts output which is still inefficient for DC brushless motor design. Thick film designs appear to be the correct approach to achieve a high conductor cross section, enabling sufficient power levels to drive the actuator or motor.

  5. Recent Developments in High-Temperature Shape Memory Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motemani, Y.; Buenconsejo, P. J. S.; Ludwig, A.

    2015-11-01

    High-temperature shape memory alloy (HTSMA) thin films are candidates for development of microactuators with operating temperatures exceeding 100 °C. This article reviews recent advances and developments in the field of HTSMA thin films during the past decade, with focus on the systems Ti-Ni-X (X = Hf, Zr, Pd, Pt and Au), Ti-Ta, and Au-Cu-Al. These actuator films offer a wide range of transformation temperatures, thermal hysteresis, and recoverable strains suitable for high-temperature applications. Promising alloy compositions in the systems Ti-Ni-Hf, Ti-Ni-Pd, Ti-Ni-Au, and Au-Cu-Al are highlighted for further upscaling and development. The remaining challenges as well as prospects for development of HTSMA thin films are also discussed.

  6. A novel excitonic mechanism for high temperature superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Tesanovic, Z.; Bishop, A.R.; Martin, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    We propose a novel mechanism for superconductivity, based on intra and interband Cu/longleftrightarrow/O charge transfer excitations in oxide superconductors. The dynamic polarizability of the environment surrounding CuO/sup 2/ planes plays an important role in enhancing T/sub c/. The ''sandwich'' structure in which CuO/sub 2/ planes are separated by a highly polarizable medium is ideally suited for this mechanism. Our proposal is consistent with a variety of available data, and suggests several new experimental directions. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  7. The phenomenology of high-temperature superconductive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, K. E.

    2002-01-01

    High-temperature superconductors offer considerable promise for high current applications. Some of the relevant issues, such as materials, grain boundaries and dissipation, will be introduced and both the fundamental and practical aspects will be addressed. For example, the first generation powder-in-tube wires based on the bismuth cuprate have restricted high field performance at liquid nitrogen temperature due to the weak inter-bilayer coupling of magnetic vortices. The second generation coated conductor uses YBa2Cu3O7 to overcome this, but it requires a high degree of biaxial texturing in order to provide notable performance in high fields in liquid nitrogen. .

  8. Narrowband high temperature superconducting receiver for low frequency radio waves

    DOEpatents

    Reagor, David W.

    2001-01-01

    An underground communicating device has a low-noise SQUID using high temperature superconductor components connected to detect a modulated external magnetic flux for outputting a voltage signal spectrum that is related to the varying magnetic flux. A narrow bandwidth filter may be used to select a portion of the voltage signal spectrum that is relatively free of power line noise to output a relatively low noise output signal when operating in a portion of the electromagnetic spectra where such power line noise exists. A demodulator outputs a communication signal, which may be an FM signal, indicative of a modulation on the modulated external magnetic flux.

  9. A Transverse Flux High-Temperature Superconducting Generator Topology for Large Direct Drive Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keysan, Ozan; Mueller, Markus A.

    The cost and mass of an offshore wind turbine power-train can be reduced by using high-temperature superconducting generators, but for a successful commercial design the superconducting generator should be as reliable as its alternatives. In this paper, we present a novel transverse flux superconducting generator topology which is suitable for low-speed, high-torque applications. The generator is designed with a stationary superconducting field winding and a variable reluctance claw pole motor for simplified mechanical structure and maximum reliability. 3D FEA simulation results of a 70 kW prototype is presented.

  10. Importance of structural instability to high-temperature superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bussmann-Holder, A. University of Bayreuth, D-8550 Bayreuth, Federal Republic of Germany ); Migliori, A.; Fisk, Z.; Sarrao, J.L.; Leisure, R.G. ); Cheong, S. )

    1991-07-22

    The orthorhombic-tetragonal structural phase transition of La{sub 2{minus}{ital x}}Sr{sub {ital x}}CuO{sub 4} is quantitatively analyzed as a function of composition {ital x} within an anharmonic electron-phonon interaction model. The correct temperature dependence of the soft mode and the elastic constant {ital c}{sub 66} is obtained. The double-well potential in the electron-phonon interaction is derived self-consistently and found to vary strongly with {ital x}. In the vicinity of the superconducting transition temperature {ital T}{sub {ital c}} electron--two-phonon interactions dominate the harmonic ones which may explain the high {ital T}{sub {ital c}}'s observed.

  11. High Temperature Superconducting Bearings for Lunar Telescope Mounts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, Mark; BuiMa, Ki; Cooley, Rodger; Mackey, Daniel; Meng, Ruling; Chu, Ching Wu; Chu, Wei Kan; Chen, Peter C.; Wilson, Thomas

    1995-01-01

    A telescope to be installed on the lunar surface in the near future must work in a cold and dusty vacuum environment for long periods without on site human maintenance. To track stars, the drive mechanism must be capable of exceedingly fine steps and repeatability. Further, the use of lightweight telescopes for obvious economic benefits burdens the requirement for stable support and rotation. Conventional contact bearings and gear drives have numerous failure modes under such a restrictive and harsh environment. However, hybrid superconducting magnetic bearings (HSMB) fit in naturally. These bearings are stable, light, passive, and essentially frictionless, allowing high precision electronic positioning control. By passive levitation, the HSMB does not wear out and requires neither maintenance nor power. A prototype illustrating the feasibility of this application is presented.

  12. Spacecraft design project: High temperature superconducting infrared imaging satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The High Temperature Superconductor Infrared Imaging Satellite (HTSCIRIS) is designed to perform the space based infrared imaging and surveillance mission. The design of the satellite follows the black box approach. The payload is a stand alone unit, with the spacecraft bus designed to meet the requirements of the payload as listed in the statement of work. Specifications influencing the design of the spacecraft bus were originated by the Naval Research Lab. A description of the following systems is included: spacecraft configuration, orbital dynamics, radio frequency communication subsystem, electrical power system, propulsion, attitude control system, thermal control, and structural design. The issues of testing and cost analysis are also addressed. This design project was part of the course Advanced Spacecraft Design taught at the Naval Postgraduate School.

  13. High Temperature Superconducting Terahertz Emitters with Various Mesa Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delfanazari, Kaveh; Tsujimoto, M.; Kashiwagi, T.; Asai, H.; Kitamura, T.; Yamamoto, T.; Sawamura, M.; Ishida, K.; Watanabe, C.; Sekimoto, S.; Minami, H.; Tachiki, M.; Hattori, T.; Klemm, R. A.; Kadowaki, K.

    2013-03-01

    In 2007, the first observation of the coherent terahertz (THz) electromagnetic (EM) waves from a mesa structures of intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJs) in high temperature superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi-2212) is reported. The ac-Josephson effect as well as the cavity resonance conditions is considered as the principle mechanism of the THz radiation. In order to understand the cavity effect in THz radiation from IJJ mesas more clearly, we studied mesas with various geometries; various kinds of triangles, and pentagonal mesas with various sizes and thicknesses. The focused ion beam (FIB) milling technique is used in all mesa fabrications. In this talk, we discuss our recent progress in THz emission observation in pentagonal mesas. This work has been supported in part by CREST-JST (Japan Science and Technology Agency), WPI-MANA project (NIMS).

  14. Development of Thin Film Ceramic Thermocouples for High Temperature Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Farmer, Serene C.; Sayir, Ali; Blaha, Charles A.; Gonzalez, Jose M.

    2004-01-01

    The maximum use temperature of noble metal thin film thermocouples of 1100 C (2000 F) may not be adequate for use on components in the increasingly harsh conditions of advanced aircraft and next generation launch technology. Ceramic-based thermocouples are known for their high stability and robustness at temperatures exceeding 1500 C, but are typically found in the form of rods or probes. NASA Glenn Research Center is investigating the feasibility of ceramics as thin film thermocouples for extremely high temperature applications to take advantage of the stability and robustness of ceramics and the non-intrusiveness of thin films. This paper will discuss the current state of development in this effort.

  15. Contribution of ion beam analysis methods to the development of 2nd generation high temperature superconducting (HTS) wires

    SciTech Connect

    Usov, Igor O; Arendt, Paul N; Stan, Liliana; Holesinger, Terry G; Foltyn, Steven R; Depaula, Raymond F

    2009-01-01

    One of the crucial steps in the second generation high temperature superconducting wire program was development of the buffer layer architecture. The architecture designed at the Superconductivity Technology Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory consists of several oxide layers wherein each layer plays a specific role, namely: nucleation layer, diffusion barrier, biaxially textured template, and an intermediate layer with a good match to the lattice parameter of superconducting Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} (YBCO) compound. This report demonstrates how a wide range of ion beam analysis techniques (SIMS, RBS, channeling, PIXE, PIGE, NRA, ERD) was employed for analysis of each buffer layer and the YBCO films. These results assisted in understanding of a variety of physical processes occurring during the buffet layer fabrication and helped to optimize the buffer layer architecture as a whole.

  16. Properties of thin films for high temperature flow sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albin, Sacharia

    1991-01-01

    Requirements of material parameters of high temperature flow sensors are identified. Refractory metal silicides offer high temperature sensitivity and high frequency response and are stable up to 1000 C. Intrinsic semiconductors of high band gap are also considered as sensor elements. SiC and diamond are identified. Combined with substrates of low thermal and electrical conductivity, such as quartz or Al2O3, these materials meet several requirements of high sensitivity and frequency response. Film deposition and patterning techniques suitable for these materials are identified.

  17. The 20 GHz circularly polarized, high temperature superconducting microstrip antenna array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, Jarrett D.; Williams, Jeffery T.; Long, Stuart A.; Wolfe, John C.

    1994-01-01

    The primary goal was to design and characterize a four-element, 20 GHz, circularly polarized microstrip patch antenna fabricated from YBa2Cu3O(x) superconductor. The purpose is to support a high temperature superconductivity flight communications experiment between the space shuttle orbiter and the ACTS satellite. This study is intended to provide information into the design, construction, and feasibility of a circularly polarized superconducting 20 GHz downlink or cross-link antenna. We have demonstrated that significant gain improvements can be realized by using superconducting materials for large corporate fed array antennas. In addition, we have shown that when constructed from superconducting materials, the efficiency, and therefore the gain, of microstrip patches increases if the substrate is not so thick that the dominant loss mechanism for the patch is radiation into the surface waves of the conductor-backed substrate. We have considered two design configurations for a superconducting 20 GHz four-element circularly polarized microstrip antenna array. The first is the Huang array that uses properly oriented and phased linearly polarized microstrip patch elements to realize a circularly polarized pattern. The second is a gap-coupled array of circularly polarized elements. In this study we determined that although the Huang array operates well on low dielectric constant substrates, its performance becomes extremely sensitive to mismatches, interelement coupling, and design imperfections for substrates with high dielectric constants. For the gap-coupled microstrip array, we were able to fabricate and test circularly polarized elements and four-element arrays on LaAlO3 using sputtered copper films. These antennas were found to perform well, with relatively good circular polarization. In addition, we realized a four-element YBa2Cu3O(x) array of the same design and measured its pattern and gain relative to a room temperature copper array. The patterns were

  18. An overview of recent developments in high-temperature superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Falicov, L.M.

    1987-10-01

    The BCS theory, in all probability, will explain the properties of new superconducting oxide materials. However, a detailed account of why they have such an unusually high transition temperature will require much more work. The key to the answer to the theoretical questions may be found in the fact that all these materials are ceramics, i.e., bad conductors in their normal phase. In fact, they are ''almost insulators'', with strange and varied magnetic properties. And although the lattice polarization will certainly play a role (as shown by the isotope effect), the detailed motion of the electrons and the short-range Coulomb repulsion may give the unusual characteristics which result in high transition temperatures. From the point of view of practical applications and their implications in our everyday life, much can be speculated: transmission lines without any power losses, levitated trains, super-super-computers, new and not-yet-invented devices. But all these innovations will require the solution of complicated (and expensive to solve) materials problems (brittle, hard to handle ceramics; unstable phases; low critical currents) as well as a cool-headed economic analysis which this author is unable to provide. 13 refs.

  19. Two-stage heat treatment of high temperature superconducting coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyshev, E. N.; Mikheenko, P. N.

    1991-12-01

    The properties of YBa2Cu3O(x) coatings, 30-40 microns thick, plasma-sprayed on quartz, Pyroceram, stainless steel, and ceramic dielectric substrates were investigated experimentally using X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and resistance measurements. It is found that the properties of the films depend to a large degree on the spraying conditions, the dispersity and grain size distribution of the starting powder, and substrate temperature during spraying. Coatings sprayed under optimal conditions have a critical current density of 300-400 A/sq cm at the liquid nitrogen temperature and effectively shield magnetic fields of several oersteds.

  20. Thin Film Ceramic Strain Sensor Development for High Temperature Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Gonzalez, Jose M.; Laster, Kimala L.

    2008-01-01

    The need for sensors to operate in harsh environments is illustrated by the need for measurements in the turbine engine hot section. The degradation and damage that develops over time in hot section components can lead to catastrophic failure. At present, the degradation processes that occur in the harsh hot section environment are poorly characterized, which hinders development of more durable components, and since it is so difficult to model turbine blade temperatures, strains, etc, actual measurements are needed. The need to consider ceramic sensing elements is brought about by the temperature limits of metal thin film sensors in harsh environments. The effort at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) to develop high temperature thin film ceramic static strain gauges for application in turbine engines is described, first in the fan and compressor modules, and then in the hot section. The near-term goal of this research effort was to identify candidate thin film ceramic sensor materials and provide a list of possible thin film ceramic sensor materials and corresponding properties to test for viability. A thorough literature search was conducted for ceramics that have the potential for application as high temperature thin film strain gauges chemically and physically compatible with the NASA GRCs microfabrication procedures and substrate materials. Test results are given for tantalum, titanium and zirconium-based nitride and oxynitride ceramic films.

  1. Effect of ‘microwave window’ on the performance of high temperature superconducting antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, M. H.; Cao, B. S.; Huang, H. S.; Zhang, X. X.; Liu, T.; Liu, T. J.; Tu, G. B.; Jin, S. L.; Zhou, Y. L.; He, M.; Cui, D. F.

    We studied the effect of ‘microwave window’ on the performance of a high temperature superconducting antenna that was installed in a metal dewar with a low temperature superconducting magnet inside. Although the window was in the antenna's near and Fresnel zones, the signal attenuation induced by the ‘microwave window’ can be reduced to less than 1 dB in the far field. The configuration of the ‘microwave window’ is also presented.

  2. Microwave properties of high transition temperature superconducting thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, W. L.

    1991-01-01

    Extensive studies of the interaction of microwaves with YBa2Cu3O(7-delta), Bi-based, and Tl-based superconducting thin films deposited in several microwave substrates were performed. The data were obtained by measuring the microwave power transmitted through the film in the normal and the superconducting state and by resonant cavity techniques. The main motives were to qualify and understand the physical parameters such as the magnetic penetration depth, the complex conductivity, and the surface impedance, of high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials at microwave frequencies. Based on these parameters, the suitability of these HTS thin films is discussed for microwave applications.

  3. Active superconducting devices formed of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Martens, Jon S.; Beyer, James B.; Nordman, James E.; Hohenwarter, Gert K. G.

    1991-05-28

    Active superconducting devices are formed of thin films of superconductor which include a main conduction channel which has an active weak link region. The weak link region is composed of an array of links of thin film superconductor spaced from one another by voids and selected in size and thickness such that magnetic flux can propagate across the weak link region when it is superconducting. Magnetic flux applied to the weak link region will propagate across the array of links causing localized loss of superconductivity in the links and changing the effective resistance across the links. The magnetic flux can be applied from a control line formed of a superconducting film deposited coplanar with the main conduction channel and weak link region on a substrate. The devices can be formed of any type to superconductor but are particularly well suited to the high temperature superconductors since the devices can be entirely formed from coplanar films with no overlying regions. The devices can be utilized for a variety of electrical components, including switching circuits, amplifiers, oscillators and modulators, and are well suited to microwave frequency applications.

  4. Characterization of polybenzimidazole (PBI) film at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammoud, Ahmad N.; Suthar, J. L.

    1992-01-01

    Polybenzimidazole, a linear thermoplastic polymer with excellent thermal stability and strength retention over a wide range of temperatures, was evaluated for its potential use as the main dielectric in high temperature capacitors. The film was characterized in terms of its dielectric properties in a frequency range of 50 Hz to 100 kilo-Hz. These properties, which include the dielectric constant and dielectric loss, were also obtained in a temperature range from 20 C to 300 C with an electrical stress of 60 Hz, 50 V/mil present. The alternating and direct current breakdown voltages of silicone oil impregnated films as a function of temperature were also determined. The results obtained indicate that while the film remained relatively stable up to 200 C, it exhibited an increase in its dielectric properties as the temperature was raised to 300 C. It was also found that conditioning of the film by heat treatment at 60 C for six hours tended to improve its dielectric and breakdown properties. The results are discussed and conclusions made concerning the suitability of the film as a high temperature capacitor dielectric.

  5. Performance evaluation of high-temperature superconducting current leads for micro-SMES systems

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, R.C.; Cha, Y.S.; Hull, J.R.; Buckles, W.E.; Weber, B.R.; Yang, S.T.

    1995-08-01

    As part of the US Department of Energy`s Superconductivity Technology Program, Argonne National Laboratory and Superconductivity, Inc., are developing high-temperature superconductor (HTS) current leads for application to micro-superconducting magnetic energy storage systems. Two 1500-A HTS leads have been designed and constructed. The performance of the current lead assemblies is being evaluated in a zero-magnetic-field test program that includes assembly procedures, tooling, and quality assurance; thermal and electrical performance; and flow and mechanical characteristics. Results of evaluations performed to data are presented.

  6. Recovery time of high temperature superconducting tapes exposed in liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Jie; Zeng, Weina; Yao, Zhihao; Zhao, Anfeng; Hu, Daoyu; Hong, Zhiyong

    2016-08-01

    The recovery time is a crucial parameter to high temperature superconducting tapes, especially in power applications. The cooperation between the reclosing device and the superconducting facilities mostly relies on the recovery time of the superconducting tapes. In this paper, a novel method is presented to measure the recovery time of several different superconducting samples. In this method criterion used to judge whether the sample has recovered is the liquid nitrogen temperature, instead of the critical temperature. An interesting phenomenon is observed during the testing of superconducting samples exposed in the liquid nitrogen. Theoretical explanations of this phenomenon are presented from the aspect of heat transfer. Optimization strategy of recovery characteristics based on this phenomenon is also briefly discussed.

  7. High-frequency applications of high-temperature superconductor thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, N.

    2002-10-01

    High-temperature superconducting thin films offer unique properties which can be utilized for a variety of high-frequency device applications in many areas related to the strongly progressing market of information technology. One important property is an exceptionally low level of microwave absorption at temperatures attainable with low power cryocoolers. This unique property has initiated the development of various novel type of microwave devices and commercialized subsystems with special emphasis on application in advanced microwave communication systems. The second important achievement related to efforts in oxide thin and multilayer technology was the reproducible fabrication of low-noise Josephson junctions in high-temperature superconducting thin films. As a consequence of this achievement, several novel nonlinear high-frequency devices, most of them exploiting the unique features of the ac Josephson effect, have been developed and found to exhibit challenging properties to be utilized in basic metrology and Terahertz technology. On the longer timescale, the achievements in integrated high-temperature superconductor circuit technology may offer a strong potential for the development of digital devices with possible clock frequencies in the range of 100 GHz.

  8. Phase Diagram and High-Temperature Superconductivity of Compressed Selenium Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shoutao; Wang, Yanchao; Zhang, Jurong; Liu, Hanyu; Zhong, Xin; Song, Hai-Feng; Yang, Guochun; Zhang, Lijun; Ma, Yanming

    2015-01-01

    Recent discovery of high-temperature superconductivity (Tc = 190 K) in sulfur hydrides at megabar pressures breaks the traditional belief on the Tc limit of 40 K for conventional superconductors, and opens up the doors in searching new high-temperature superconductors in compounds made up of light elements. Selenium is a sister and isoelectronic element of sulfur, with a larger atomic core and a weaker electronegativity. Whether selenium hydrides share similar high-temperature superconductivity remains elusive, but it is a subject of considerable interest. First-principles swarm structure predictions are performed in an effort to seek for energetically stable and metallic selenium hydrides at high pressures. We find the phase diagram of selenium hydrides is rather different from its sulfur analogy, which is indicated by the emergence of new phases and the change of relative stabilities. Three stable and metallic species with stoichiometries of HSe2, HSe and H3Se are identified above ~120 GPa and they all exhibit superconductive behaviors, of which the hydrogen-rich HSe and H3Se phases show high Tc in the range of 40-110 K. Our simulations established the high-temperature superconductive nature of selenium hydrides and provided useful route for experimental verification. PMID:26490223

  9. Phase Diagram and High-Temperature Superconductivity of Compressed Selenium Hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shoutao; Wang, Yanchao; Zhang, Jurong; Liu, Hanyu; Zhong, Xin; Song, Hai-Feng; Yang, Guochun; Zhang, Lijun; Ma, Yanming

    2015-10-01

    Recent discovery of high-temperature superconductivity (Tc = 190 K) in sulfur hydrides at megabar pressures breaks the traditional belief on the Tc limit of 40 K for conventional superconductors, and opens up the doors in searching new high-temperature superconductors in compounds made up of light elements. Selenium is a sister and isoelectronic element of sulfur, with a larger atomic core and a weaker electronegativity. Whether selenium hydrides share similar high-temperature superconductivity remains elusive, but it is a subject of considerable interest. First-principles swarm structure predictions are performed in an effort to seek for energetically stable and metallic selenium hydrides at high pressures. We find the phase diagram of selenium hydrides is rather different from its sulfur analogy, which is indicated by the emergence of new phases and the change of relative stabilities. Three stable and metallic species with stoichiometries of HSe2, HSe and H3Se are identified above ~120 GPa and they all exhibit superconductive behaviors, of which the hydrogen-rich HSe and H3Se phases show high Tc in the range of 40-110 K. Our simulations established the high-temperature superconductive nature of selenium hydrides and provided useful route for experimental verification.

  10. Phase Diagram and High-Temperature Superconductivity of Compressed Selenium Hydrides

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shoutao; Wang, Yanchao; Zhang, Jurong; Liu, Hanyu; Zhong, Xin; Song, Hai-Feng; Yang, Guochun; Zhang, Lijun; Ma, Yanming

    2015-01-01

    Recent discovery of high-temperature superconductivity (Tc = 190 K) in sulfur hydrides at megabar pressures breaks the traditional belief on the Tc limit of 40 K for conventional superconductors, and opens up the doors in searching new high-temperature superconductors in compounds made up of light elements. Selenium is a sister and isoelectronic element of sulfur, with a larger atomic core and a weaker electronegativity. Whether selenium hydrides share similar high-temperature superconductivity remains elusive, but it is a subject of considerable interest. First-principles swarm structure predictions are performed in an effort to seek for energetically stable and metallic selenium hydrides at high pressures. We find the phase diagram of selenium hydrides is rather different from its sulfur analogy, which is indicated by the emergence of new phases and the change of relative stabilities. Three stable and metallic species with stoichiometries of HSe2, HSe and H3Se are identified above ~120 GPa and they all exhibit superconductive behaviors, of which the hydrogen-rich HSe and H3Se phases show high Tc in the range of 40–110 K. Our simulations established the high-temperature superconductive nature of selenium hydrides and provided useful route for experimental verification. PMID:26490223

  11. High temperature superconducting microwave switch. Interim report, April 1995-June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Neel, M.M.

    1996-12-01

    This report presents the design, construction, and testing of a high temperature superconducting microwave switch. The circuit is implemented in microstrip transmission line geometry and utilizes voltage and or current to create the switching action. Results of RF power limiting are also presented.

  12. Deposition of YBCO films by high temperature spray pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, T. C.; Abell, J. S.; Button, T. W.; Chakalov, R. A.; Chakalova, R. I.; Cai, C.; Haessler, W.; Eickemeyer, J.; de Boer, B.

    2002-08-01

    The fabrication of YBCO coated conductors on flexible textured metallic substrates requires the deposition of biaxially textured buffer layers and superconducting films. In this study we have prepared YBCO thin films on single crystal SrTiO 3 substrates and cube textured Ni substrates by spray pyrolysis. The Ni substrates have been pre-buffered with CeO 2/YSZ/CeO 2, layers deposited by pulsed laser deposition. Spray pyrolysis of nitrate solutions has been performed directly on heated substrates at temperatures between 800 and 900 °C without need for a subsequent annealing step. YBCO films deposited on both types of substrate are biaxially textured. Full width half maximum values determined from φ-scans are 8° and 20° for films on SrTiO 3 and buffered Ni substrates respectively. A transport Jc value of 1.2×10 5 A/cm 2 at 77 K and zero field has been achieved on SrTiO 3 ( T c onset=91 K, ΔTc=6 K). χ ac susceptibility measurements of films on buffered Ni substrates show Tc onsets of 88 K with ΔTc=18 K.

  13. Chemical preparation of powders and films for high temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunker, B. C.; Voigt, J. A.; Lamppa, D. L.; Doughty, D. H.; Venturini, E. L.; Kwak, J. F.; Ginley, D. S.; Headley, T. J.; Harrington, M. S.; Eatough, M. O.

    A precipitation process has been developed to prepare precursor powders which can be calcined and sintered to form high critical temperature superconductors such as YBa(sub 2)Cu(sub 3)O(sub 7-x). Precursor powders are prepared using a continuous precipitation system in which a solution containing highly soluble salts of the desired metal cations is rapidly and completely mixed with a solution containing precipitating anions such as hydroxide and carbonate ions. The resulting amorphous powder can be calcined to form submicron particles of desired superconducting phases which are useful in preparing inks for the ink-jet printing of superconducting interconnects. The powders can be redissolved in organic solvents to form solutions which can be used in spin or dip coating substrates with thin superconducting films. Finally, the powders have been used to prepare bulk ceramics which exhibit the highest reported critical currents of any chem-prep ceramics. Bulk samples prepared from chloride doped precursors exhibit large, oriented grains and extensive flux pinning.

  14. Ultrafast Dynamics Evidence of High Temperature Superconductivity in Single Unit Cell FeSe on SrTiO_{3}.

    PubMed

    Tian, Y C; Zhang, W H; Li, F S; Wu, Y L; Wu, Q; Sun, F; Zhou, G Y; Wang, Lili; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qi-Kun; Zhao, Jimin

    2016-03-11

    We report the time-resolved excited state ultrafast dynamics of single unit cell (1 UC) thick FeSe films on SrTiO_{3} (STO), with FeTe capping layers. By measuring the photoexcited quasiparticles' density and lifetime, we unambiguously identify a superconducting (SC) phase transition, with a transition temperature T_{c} of 68 (-5/+2)  K and a SC gap of Δ(0)=20.2±1.5  meV. The obtained electron-phonon coupling strength λ is as large as 0.48, demonstrating the likely crucial role of electron-phonon coupling in the high temperature superconductivity of the 1 UC FeSe on STO systems. We further find a 0.05 THz coherent acoustic phonon branch in the capping layer, which provides an additional decay channel to the gluing bosons. PMID:27015504

  15. Ultrafast Dynamics Evidence of High Temperature Superconductivity in Single Unit Cell FeSe on SrTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y. C.; Zhang, W. H.; Li, F. S.; Wu, Y. L.; Wu, Q.; Sun, F.; Zhou, G. Y.; Wang, Lili; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qi-Kun; Zhao, Jimin

    2016-03-01

    We report the time-resolved excited state ultrafast dynamics of single unit cell (1 UC) thick FeSe films on SrTiO3 (STO), with FeTe capping layers. By measuring the photoexcited quasiparticles' density and lifetime, we unambiguously identify a superconducting (SC) phase transition, with a transition temperature Tc of 68 (-5 /+2 ) K and a SC gap of Δ (0 )=20.2 ±1.5 meV . The obtained electron-phonon coupling strength λ is as large as 0.48, demonstrating the likely crucial role of electron-phonon coupling in the high temperature superconductivity of the 1 UC FeSe on STO systems. We further find a 0.05 THz coherent acoustic phonon branch in the capping layer, which provides an additional decay channel to the gluing bosons.

  16. High-Temperature, Thin-Film Ceramic Thermocouples Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayir, Ali; Blaha, Charles A.; Gonzalez, Jose M.

    2005-01-01

    To enable long-duration, more distant human and robotic missions for the Vision for Space Exploration, as well as safer, lighter, quieter, and more fuel efficient vehicles for aeronautics and space transportation, NASA is developing instrumentation and material technologies. The high-temperature capabilities of thin-film ceramic thermocouples are being explored at the NASA Glenn Research Center by the Sensors and Electronics Branch and the Ceramics Branch in partnership with Case Western Reserve University (CWRU). Glenn s Sensors and Electronics Branch is developing thin-film sensors for surface measurement of strain, temperature, heat flux, and surface flow in propulsion system research. Glenn s Ceramics Branch, in conjunction with CWRU, is developing structural and functional ceramic technology for aeropropulsion and space propulsion.

  17. No mixing of superconductivity and antiferromagnetism in a high-temperature superconductor.

    PubMed

    Bozovic, I; Logvenov, G; Verhoeven, M A J; Caputo, P; Goldobin, E; Geballe, T H

    2003-04-24

    There is still no universally accepted theory of high-temperature superconductivity. Most models assume that doping creates 'holes' in the valence band of an insulating, antiferromagnetic 'parent' compound, and that antiferromagnetism and high-temperature superconductivity are intimately related. If their respective energies are nearly equal, strong antiferromagnetic fluctuations (temporally and spatially restricted antiferromagnetic domains) would be expected in the superconductive phase, and superconducting fluctuations would be expected in the antiferromagnetic phase; the two states should 'mix' over an extended length scale. Here we report that one-unit-cell-thick antiferromagnetic La2CuO4 barrier layers remain highly insulating and completely block a supercurrent; the characteristic decay length is 1 A, indicating that the two phases do not mix. We likewise found that isolated one-unit-cell-thick layers of La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 remain superconducting. The latter further implies that, on doping, new electronic states are created near the middle of the bandgap. These two findings are in conflict with most proposed models, with a few notable exceptions that include postulated spin-charge separation. PMID:12712200

  18. Thermodynamics of the interplay between magnetism and high-temperature superconductivity

    PubMed Central

    Kivelson, Steven A.; Aeppli, G.; Emery, Victor J.

    2001-01-01

    Copper–oxide-based high-temperature superconductors have complex phase diagrams with multiple ordered phases. It even appears that the highest superconducting transition temperatures for certain cuprates are found in samples that display simultaneous onset of magnetism and superconductivity. We show here how the thermodynamics of fluid mixtures—a touchstone for chemistry as well as hard and soft condensed matter physics—accounts for this startling observation, as well as many other properties of the cuprates in the vicinity of the instability toward “striped” magnetism. PMID:11593001

  19. From quantum matter to high-temperature superconductivity in copper oxides.

    PubMed

    Keimer, B; Kivelson, S A; Norman, M R; Uchida, S; Zaanen, J

    2015-02-12

    The discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in the copper oxides in 1986 triggered a huge amount of innovative scientific inquiry. In the almost three decades since, much has been learned about the novel forms of quantum matter that are exhibited in these strongly correlated electron systems. A qualitative understanding of the nature of the superconducting state itself has been achieved. However, unresolved issues include the astonishing complexity of the phase diagram, the unprecedented prominence of various forms of collective fluctuations, and the simplicity and insensitivity to material details of the 'normal' state at elevated temperatures. PMID:25673411

  20. Performance of a four-element Ka-band high-temperature superconducting microstrip antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, M. A.; Bhasin, K. B.; Gilbert, C.; Metzler, S.; Koepf, G.; Claspy, P. C.

    1992-01-01

    Superconducting four-element microstrip array antennas operating at 30 GHz have been designed and fabricated on a lanthanum aluminate (LaAlO3) substrates. The experimental performance of these thin film Y-Ba-Cu-O superconducting antennas is compared with that of identical antenna patterned with evaporated gold. Efficiency measurements of these antennas show an improvement of 2 dB at 70 K and as much as 3.5 dB at 40 K in the superconducting antenna over the gold antenna.

  1. Doping dependence of spin excitations and its correlations with high-temperature superconductivity in iron pnictides

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Zhang, Chenglin; Lu, Xingye; Tan, Guotai; Luo, Huiqian; Song, Yu; Wang, Miaoyin; Zhang, Xiaotian; Goremychkin, E.A.; Perring, T.G.; Maier, T.A.; Yin, Zhiping; Haule, Kristjan; Kotliar, Gabriel; Dai, Pengcheng

    2013-01-01

    High-temperature superconductivity in iron pnictides occurs when electrons and holes are doped into their antiferromagnetic parent compounds. Since spin excitations may be responsible for electron pairing and superconductivity, it is important to determine their electron/hole-doping evolution and connection with superconductivity. Here we use inelastic neutron scattering to show that while electron doping to the antiferromagnetic BaFe2As2 parent compound modifies the low-energy spin excitations and their correlation with superconductivity (<50 meV) without affecting the high-energy spin excitations (>100 meV), hole-doping suppresses the high-energy spin excitations and shifts the magnetic spectral weight to low-energies. In addition, our absolute spin susceptibility measurements for the optimally hole-doped iron pnictide reveal that the change in magnetic exchange energy below and above Tc can account for the superconducting condensation energy. These results suggest that high-Tc superconductivity in iron pnictides is associated with both the presence of high-energy spin excitations and a coupling between low-energy spin excitations and itinerant electrons. PMID:24301219

  2. High-temperature superconductivity in a single copper-oxygen plane.

    PubMed

    Logvenov, G; Gozar, A; Bozovic, I

    2009-10-30

    The question of how thin cuprate layers can be while still retaining high-temperature superconductivity (HTS) has been challenging to address, in part because experimental studies require the synthesis of near-perfect ultrathin HTS layers and ways to profile the superconducting properties such as the critical temperature and the superfluid density across interfaces with atomic resolution. We used atomic-layer molecular beam epitaxy to synthesize bilayers of a cuprate metal (La(1.65)Sr(0.45)CuO4) and a cuprate insulator (La2CuO4) in which each layer is just three unit cells thick. We selectively doped layers with isovalent Zn atoms, which suppress superconductivity and act as markers, to show that this interface HTS occurs within a single CuO2 plane. This approach may also be useful in fabricating HTS devices. PMID:19900926

  3. High-Temperature Superconductivity in a Single Copper-Oxygen Plane

    SciTech Connect

    Logvenov, G.; Gozar, A.; Bozovic, I.

    2009-10-30

    The question of how thin cuprate layers can be while still retaining high-temperature superconductivity (HTS) has been challenging to address, in part because experimental studies require the synthesis of near-perfect ultrathin HTS layers and ways to profile the superconducting properties such as the critical temperature and the superfluid density across interfaces with atomic resolution. We used atomic-layer molecular beam epitaxy to synthesize bilayers of a cuprate metal (La{sub 1.65}Sr{sub 0.45}CuO{sub 4}) and a cuprate insulator (La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}) in which each layer is just three unit cells thick. We selectively doped layers with isovalent Zn atoms, which suppress superconductivity and act as markers, to show that this interface HTS occurs within a single CuO{sub 2} plane. This approach may also be useful in fabricating HTS devices.

  4. Microwave properties of HTS (high temperature superconductor) films

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, D.W.; Arendt, P.N.; Gray, E.R.; Muenchausen, R.E.; Bennett, B.L.; Foltyn, S.R.; Estler, R.C.; Wu, X.D.; Reeves, G.A.; Elliott, N.E.; Brown, D.R. ); Portis, A.M. ); Taber, R.C. . Labs.); Mogro-Campero, A. . Corporate Research and Development Ce

    1990-01-01

    High-frequency applications of high-temperature superconductors generally fall into two categories: devices that require low values of surface resistance R{sub s} in ambient surface magnetic fields H{sub rf}, and devices that require low R{sub s} in modest fields. Moreover, many applications can be realized with small-surface-area films whereas others require larger areas-radiofrequency (rf) cavities, for example. Regardless of the application, the potential of HTS films is predicated on satisfying one or both of the above-stated requirements. We have measured the surface resistance of small-area (1 cm{sup 2}) and large-area (6.5 cm{sup 2}) YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} (YBCO) films that have been laser ablated onto LaA{ell}O{sub 3} substrates, large-area (5.1 cm{sup 2}) YBCO films that have been e-beam deposited onto LaA{ell}O{sub 3}, and large-area (11.4 cm{sup 2}) T{ell}-based films that have been magnetron sputtered onto metallic substrates. The best R{sub s} values are obtained from the 1-cm{sup 2} laser-ablated films; they are 40 {mu}{Omega} and 340 {mu}{Omega} at 4 K and 77 K, respectively ({omega}/2{pi} = 10 GHz). Comparable values for Cu are 6 and 13 m{Omega}, respectively. Large-area T{ell}-based films yield typical R{sub s} values of 4 m{Omega} and 14 m{Omega} at 4 K and 77 K, respectively ({omega}/2{pi} = 18 GHz). The dependence of R{sub s} on H{sub rf} for these films indicates that surface fields as large as 55 Oe can be achieved with R{sub s} increasing only by a factor of 10. This field dependence is associated with c-axis texturing.

  5. Evaluation of high temperature superconductive thermal bridges for space borne cryogenic detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Elaine P.

    1996-01-01

    Infrared sensor satellites are used to monitor the conditions in the earth's upper atmosphere. In these systems, the electronic links connecting the cryogenically cooled infrared detectors to the significantly warmer amplification electronics act as thermal bridges and, consequently, the mission lifetimes of the satellites are limited due to cryogenic evaporation. High-temperature superconductor (HTS) materials have been proposed by researchers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley's Research Center (NASA-LaRC) as an alternative to the currently used manganin wires for electrical connection. The potential for using HTS films as thermal bridges has provided the motivation for the design and the analysis of a spaceflight experiment to evaluate the performance of this superconductive technology in the space environment. The initial efforts were focused on the preliminary design of the experimental system which allows for the quantitative comparison of superconductive leads with manganin leads, and on the thermal conduction modeling of the proposed system. Most of the HTS materials were indicated to be potential replacements for the manganin wires. In the continuation of this multi-year research, the objectives of this study were to evaluate the sources of heat transfer on the thermal bridges that have been neglected in the preliminary conductive model and then to develop a methodology for the estimation of the thermal conductivities of the HTS thermal bridges in space. The Joule heating created by the electrical current through the manganin wires was incorporated as a volumetric heat source into the manganin conductive model. The radiative heat source on the HTS thermal bridges was determined by performing a separate radiant interchange analysis within a high-T(sub c) superconductor housing area. Both heat sources indicated no significant contribution on the cryogenic heat load, which validates the results obtained in the preliminary conduction

  6. Method and apparatus for measuring gravitational acceleration utilizing a high temperature superconducting bearing

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.

    2000-01-01

    Gravitational acceleration is measured in all spatial dimensions with improved sensitivity by utilizing a high temperature superconducting (HTS) gravimeter. The HTS gravimeter is comprised of a permanent magnet suspended in a spaced relationship from a high temperature superconductor, and a cantilever having a mass at its free end is connected to the permanent magnet at its fixed end. The permanent magnet and superconductor combine to form a bearing platform with extremely low frictional losses, and the rotational displacement of the mass is measured to determine gravitational acceleration. Employing a high temperature superconductor component has the significant advantage of having an operating temperature at or below 77K, whereby cooling may be accomplished with liquid nitrogen.

  7. Method and Apparatus for measuring Gravitational Acceleration Utilizing a high Temperature Superconducting Bearing

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, John R.

    1998-11-06

    Gravitational acceleration is measured in all spatial dimensions with improved sensitivity by utilizing a high temperature superconducting (HTS) gravimeter. The HTS gravimeter is comprised of a permanent magnet suspended in a spaced relationship from a high temperature superconductor, and a cantilever having a mass at its free end is connected to the permanent magnet at its fixed end. The permanent magnet and superconductor combine to form a bearing platform with extremely low frictional losses, and the rotational displacement of the mass is measured to determine gravitational acceleration. Employing a high temperature superconductor component has the significant advantage of having an operative temperature at or below 77K, whereby cooling maybe accomplished with liquid nitrogen.

  8. High temperature superconductivity in sulfur hydride under ultrahigh pressure: A complex superconducting phase beyond conventional BCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussmann-Holder, Annette; Köhler, Jürgen; Whangbo, M.-H.; Bianconi, Antonio; Simon, Arndt

    2016-05-01

    The recent report of superconductivity under high pressure at the record transition temperature of Tc =203 K in pressurized H2S has been identified as conventional in view of the observation of an isotope effect upon deuteration. Here it is demonstrated that conventional theories of superconductivity in the sense of BCS or Eliashberg formalisms cannot account for the pressure dependence of the isotope coefficient. The only way out of the dilemma is a multi-band approach of superconductivity where already small interband coupling suffices to achieve the high values of Tc together with the anomalous pressure dependent isotope coefficient. In addition, it is shown that anharmonicity of the hydrogen bonds vanishes under pressure whereas anharmonic phonon modes related to sulfur are still active.

  9. DC characterization and 3D modelling of a triangular, epoxy-impregnated high temperature superconducting coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, D.; Ainslie, M. D.; Rush, J. P.; Durrell, J. H.; Zou, J.; Raine, M. J.; Hampshire, D. P.

    2015-06-01

    The direct current (dc) characterization of high temperature superconducting (HTS) coils is important for applications, such as electric machines, superconducting magnetic energy storage and transformers. In this paper, the dc characterization of a triangular-shaped, epoxy-impregnated HTS coil wound with YBCO coated conductor intended for use in an axial-flux HTS motor is presented. Voltage was measured at several points along the coil to provide detailed information of its dc characteristics. The coil is modelled based on the H -formulation using a new three-dimensional (3D) technique that utilizes the real superconducting layer thickness, and this model allows simulation of the actual geometrical layout of the HTS coil structure. Detailed information on the critical current density’s dependence on the magnitude and orientation of the magnetic flux density, Jc(B,θ), determined from experimental measurement of a short sample of the coated conductor comprising the coil is included directly in the numerical model by a two-variable direct interpolation to avoid developing complicated equations for data fitting and greatly improve the computational speed. Issues related to meshing the finite elements of the real thickness 3D model are also discussed in detail. Based on a comparison of the measurement and simulation results, it is found that non-uniformity along the length exists in the coil, which implies imperfect superconducting properties in the coated conductor, and hence, coil. By evaluating the current-voltage (I-V) curves using the experimental data, and after taking into account a more practical n value and critical current for the non-uniform region, the modelling results show good agreement with the experimental results, validating this model as an appropriate tool to estimate the dc I-V relationship of a superconducting coil. This work provides a further step towards effective and efficient 3D modelling of superconducting devices for large

  10. Performance evaluation of high-temperature superconducting current leads for micro-SMES systems

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, R.C.; Cha, Y.S.; Hull, J.R.; Buckles, W.E.; Weber, B.R.; Yang, S.T.

    1995-02-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Superconductivity Technology Program, Argonne National Laboratory and Superconductivity, Inc., are developing high-temperature superconductor (HTS) current leads for application to micro-SMES systems. Two 1500-A HTS leads have been designed and constructed. A component performance evaluation program was conducted to confirm performance predictions and/or to qualify the design features for construction. The evaluations included HTS characteristics, demountable electrical connections, and heat intercept effectiveness. The performance of current lead assemblies is being evaluated in a zero-magnetic-field test program that included assembly procedures, tooling, and quality assurance; thermal and electrical performance; and flow and mechanical characteristics. The leads were installed in a liquid helium test cryostat and connected at their cold ends by a current jumper. The leads were heat intercepted with a cryocooler.

  11. A universal scaling behavior in magnetic resonance peak in high temperature superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seung Joon; Salk, Sung-Ho Suck

    2015-08-01

    Eminent inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements of high temperature cuprates currently lacking theoretical interpretations are the observed temperature dependence of magnetic resonance peak and linear scaling relation between the resonance peak energy, Eres and the superconducting transition temperature, Tc. Using our slave-boson approach of the t-J Hamiltonian (Phys. Rev. 64, 052501 (2001)) for this study, we show that starting from the pseudogap temperature T∗, the magnetic resonance peak increases with decreasing temperature, revealing its inflection point at Tc and that spin pairing correlations are responsible for d-wave superconductivity. We find that there exists a universal linear scaling behavior of Eres/Tc = const., irrespective of the Heisenberg exchange coupling.

  12. High-temperature superconductivity for avionic electronic warfare and radar systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, P.A.

    1994-12-31

    The electronic warfare (EW) and radar communities expect to be major beneficiaries of the performance advantages high-temperature superconductivity (HTS) has to offer over conventional technology. Near term upgrades to system hardware can be envisioned using extremely small, high Q, microwave filters and resonators; compact, wideband, low loss, microwave delay and transmission lines; as well as, wideband, low loss, monolithic microwave integrated circuit phase shifters. The most dramatic impact will be in the far term, using HTS to develop new, real time threat identification and response strategy receiver/processing systems designed to utilize the unique high frequency properties of microwave and ultimately digital HTS. To make superconductivity practical for operational systems, however, technological obstacles need to be overcome. Compact cryogenically cooled subsystems with exceptional performance able to withstand rugged operational environments for long periods of time need to be developed.

  13. Ultra-Low Heat-Leak, High-Temperature Superconducting Current Leads for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rey, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has a need for current leads used in an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) for space applications. These leads must comply with stringent requirements such as a heat leak of approximately 100 W or less while conducting up to 10 A of electric current, from more than 90 K down to 10 K. Additionally, a length constraint of < 300 mm length and < 50 mm diameter is to be maintained. The need for these current leads was addressed by developing a superconducting hybrid lead. This hybrid lead comprises two different high-temperature superconducting (HTS) conductors bonded together at a thermally and electrically determined optimum point along the length of the current lead. By taking advantage of material properties of each conductor type, employing advanced fabrication techniques, and taking advantage of novel insulation materials, the company was able to develop and fabricate the lightweight, low heat-leak leads currently to NASA's specs.

  14. Improving homogeneity of the magnetic field by a high-temperature superconducting shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikov, E.; Agapov, N.; Drobin, V.; Smirnov, A.; Trubnikov, G.; Dorofeev, G.; Malinowski, H.

    2014-05-01

    The shielding opportunity of the magnetic field perpendicular component by the high-temperature superconducting tape (HTS) is shown experimentally for the first time. The tapes are laid closely to each other with a shift of pieces from layer to layer equal to a half of the tape width at the experimental set-up. This multilayer cylindrical structure inserted into the solenoid is similar to the unclosed shield from a uniform piece of the superconducting foil with the corresponding current-carrying capacity. It has been found that the maximum shielding field is proportional to the number of layers and a half of the full magnetization field of one tape for the regular multilayer structure of the HTS segments. The obtained results are necessary to construct systems with the high magnetic field homogeneity, in particular, for the electron cooling system of charged particle beams at the new accelerator complex which is being developed at JINR in Dubna, Russia.

  15. High temperature superconducting current lead test facility with heat pipe intercepts

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenfeld, P.E.; Prenger, C.; Roth, E.W.; Stewart, J.A.

    1998-12-31

    A high temperature superconducting (HTS) current lead test facility using heat pipe thermal intercepts is under development at the Superconducting Technology Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The facility can be configured for tests at currents up to 1,000 A. Mechanical cryocoolers provide refrigeration to the leads. Electrical isolation is maintained by intercepting thermal energy from the leads through cryogenic heat pipes. HST lead warm end temperature is variable from 65 K to over 90 K by controlling heat pipe evaporator temperature. Cold end temperature is variable up to 30 K. Performance predictions in terms of heat pipe evaporator temperature as a function of lead current are presented for the initial facility configuration, which supports testing up to 200 A. Measurements are to include temperature and voltage gradient in the conventional and HTS lead sections, temperature and heat transfer rate in the heat pipes. as well as optimum and off-optimum performance of the conventional lead sections.

  16. Possible light-induced superconductivity in K3C60 at high temperature.

    PubMed

    Mitrano, M; Cantaluppi, A; Nicoletti, D; Kaiser, S; Perucchi, A; Lupi, S; Di Pietro, P; Pontiroli, D; Riccò, M; Clark, S R; Jaksch, D; Cavalleri, A

    2016-02-25

    The non-equilibrium control of emergent phenomena in solids is an important research frontier, encompassing effects such as the optical enhancement of superconductivity. Nonlinear excitation of certain phonons in bilayer copper oxides was recently shown to induce superconducting-like optical properties at temperatures far greater than the superconducting transition temperature, Tc (refs 4-6). This effect was accompanied by the disruption of competing charge-density-wave correlations, which explained some but not all of the experimental results. Here we report a similar phenomenon in a very different compound, K3C60. By exciting metallic K3C60 with mid-infrared optical pulses, we induce a large increase in carrier mobility, accompanied by the opening of a gap in the optical conductivity. These same signatures are observed at equilibrium when cooling metallic K3C60 below Tc (20 kelvin). Although optical techniques alone cannot unequivocally identify non-equilibrium high-temperature superconductivity, we propose this as a possible explanation of our results. PMID:26855424

  17. Real-time measurement of the emergence of superconducting order in a high-temperature superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madan, I.; Kusar, P.; Baranov, V. V.; Lu-Dac, M.; Kabanov, V. V.; Mertelj, T.; Mihailovic, D.

    2016-06-01

    Systems which rapidly evolve through symmetry-breaking transitions on timescales comparable to the fluctuation timescale of the single-particle excitations may behave very differently than under controlled near-ergodic conditions. A real-time investigation with high temporal resolution may reveal insights into the ordering through the transition that are not available in static experiments. We present an investigation of the system trajectory through a normal-to-superconductor transition in a prototype high-temperature superconducting cuprate in which such a situation occurs. Using a multiple pulse femtosecond spectroscopy technique we measure the system trajectory and time evolution of the single-particle excitations through the transition in La1.9Sr0.1CuO4 and compare the data to a simulation based on the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau theory, using the laser excitation fluence as an adjustable parameter controlling the quench conditions in both experiment and theory. The comparison reveals the presence of significant superconducting fluctuations which precede the transition on short timescales. By including superconducting fluctuations as a seed for the growth of the superconducting order we can obtain a satisfactory agreement of the theory with the experiment. Remarkably, the pseudogap excitations apparently play no role in this process.

  18. Application of high-temperature superconducting wires to magnetostrictive transducers for underwater sonar

    SciTech Connect

    Voccio, J.P.; Joshi, C.H.; Lindberg, J.F.

    1994-07-01

    Recently discovered cryogenic magnetostrictive materials show maximum strains greater than any room temperature materials. These cryogenic magnetostrictors can be combined with high-temperature superconducting (HTS) coils to create a sonar transducer with high efficiency and high acoustic power density. A prototype low-frequency (< 1,000 Hz) magnetostrictive transducer is described. This transducer uses a terbium-dysprosium (TbDy) magnetostrictor rod with HTS coils cooled to 50--80 K using a single-stage cryocooler. The device is designed for operation at water depths of 100 m and is believed to be the first fully integrated prototype demonstration of HTS.

  19. Evaluation of high temperature superconductive thermal bridges for space-borne cryogenic infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Elaine P.

    1993-01-01

    The focus of this research is on the reduction of the refrigeration requirements for infrared sensors operating in space through the use of high temperature superconductive (HTS) materials as electronic leads between the cooled sensors and the relatively warmer data acquisition components. Specifically, this initial study was directed towards the design of an experiment to quantify the thermal performance of these materials in the space environment. First, an intensive review of relevant literature was undertaken, and then, design requirements were formulated. From this background information, a preliminary experimental design was developed. Additional studies will involve a thermal analysis of the experiment and further modifications of the experimental design.

  20. Vertical Vibration Characteristics of a High-Temperature Superconducting Maglev Vehicle System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jing; Li, Ke Cai; Zhao, Li Feng; Ma, Jia Qing; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Yong

    2013-06-01

    The vertical vibration characteristics of a high-temperature superconducting maglev vehicle system are investigated experimentally. The displacement variations of the maglev vehicle system are measured with different external excitation frequency, in the case of a certain levitation gap. When the external vibration frequency is low, the amplitude variations of the response curve are small. With the increase of the vibration frequency, chaos status can be found. The resonance frequencies with difference levitation gap are also investigated, while the external excitation frequency range is 0-100 Hz. Along with the different levitation gap, resonance frequency is also different. There almost is a linear relationship between the levitation gap and the resonance frequency.

  1. Progress in Nanoengineered Microstructures for Tunable High-Current, High-Temperature Superconducting Wires

    SciTech Connect

    Holesinger, T. G.; Civale, L.; Maiorov, B.; Feldmann, D. M.; Coulter, Yates; Miller, D. J.; Maroni, Victor A.; Chen, Zhijun; Larbalestier, D. C.; Feenstra, Roeland; Li, Xiaoping; Huang, Y.; Kodenkandath, Thomas; Zhang, W.; Rupich, Marty; Malozemoff, Alex

    2008-01-01

    High critical current densities (J{sub c}) in thick films of the Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (YBCO, {Tc}{approx}92 K) superconductor directly depend upon the types of nanoscale defects and their densities within the films. A major challenge for developing a viable wire technology is to introduce nanoscale defect structures into the YBCO grains of the thick film suitable for flux pinning and the tailoring of the superconducting properties to specific, application-dependent, temperature and magnetic field conditions. Concurrently, the YBCO film needs to be integrated into a macroscopically defect-free conductor in which the grain-to-grain connectivity maintains levels of inter-grain J{sub c} that are comparable to the intra-grain J{sub c}. That is, high critical current (I{sub c}) YBCO coated conductors must contain engineered in homogeneities on the nanoscale, while being homogeneous on the macroscale. An analysis is presented of the advances in high-performance YBCO coated-conductors using chemical solution deposition (CSD) based on metal trifluoroacetates and the subsequent processing to nano-engineer the microstructure for tunable superconducting wires. Multi-scale structural, chemical, and electrical investigations of the CSD film processes, thick film development, key microstructural features, and wire properties are presented. Prospects for further development of much higher I{sub c} wires for large-scale, commercial application are discussed within the context of these recent advances.

  2. Interface induced high temperature superconductivity in single unit-cell FeSe on SrTiO3(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guanyu; Zhang, Ding; Liu, Chong; Tang, Chenjia; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Li, Zheng; Song, Canli; Ji, Shuaihua; He, Ke; Wang, Lili; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2016-05-01

    We report high temperature superconductivity in one unit-cell (1-UC) FeSe films grown on SrTiO3 (STO)(110) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. By in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy measurement, we observe a superconducting gap as large as 17 meV on the 1-UC FeSe films. Transport measurements on 1-UC FeSe/STO(110) capped with FeTe layers reveal superconductivity with an onset transition temperature (TC) of 31.6 K and an upper critical magnetic field of 30.2 T. We also find that TC can be further increased by external electric field although the effect is weaker than that on STO(001) substrate.

  3. High temperature superconductivity in sulfur and selenium hydrides at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Livas, José A.; Sanna, Antonio; Gross, E. K. U.

    2016-03-01

    Due to its low atomic mass, hydrogen is the most promising element to search for high-temperature phononic superconductors. However, metallic phases of hydrogen are only expected at extreme pressures (400 GPa or higher). The measurement of the record superconducting critical temperature of 203 K in a hydrogen-sulfur compound at 160 GPa of pressure [A.P. Drozdov, M.I. Eremets, I.A. Troyan, arXiv:1412.0460 [cond-mat.supr-con] (2014); A.P. Drozdov, M.I. Eremets, I.A. Troyan, V. Ksenofontov, S.I. Shylin, Nature 525, 73 (2015)], shows that metallization of hydrogen can be reached at significantly lower pressure by inserting it in the matrix of other elements. In this work we investigate the phase diagram and the superconducting properties of the H-S systems by means of minima hopping method for structure prediction and density functional theory for superconductors. We also show that Se-H has a similar phase diagram as its sulfur counterpart as well as high superconducting critical temperature. We predict H3Se to exceed 120 K superconductivity at 100 GPa. We show that both H3Se and H3S, due to the critical temperature and peculiar electronic structure, present rather unusual superconducting properties. Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2016-70020-0

  4. A Cryogenic Magnetostrictive Actuator Using a Persistent High Temperature Superconducting Magnet. Part 1; Concept and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horner, Garnett; Bromberg, Leslie; Teter, J. P.

    2000-01-01

    Cryogenic magnetostrictive materials, such as rare earth zinc crystals, offer high strains and high forces with minimally applied magnetic fields, making the material ideally suited for deformable optics applications. For cryogenic temperature applications the use of superconducting magnets offer the possibility of a persistent mode of operation, i.e., the magnetostrictive material will maintain a strain field without power. High temperature superconductors (HTS) are attractive options if the temperature of operation is higher than 10 degrees Kelvin (K) and below 77 K. However, HTS wires have constraints that limit the minimum radius of winding, and even if good wires can be produced, the technology for joining superconducting wires does not exist. In this paper, the design and capabilities of a rare earth zinc magnetostrictive actuator using bulk HTS is described. Bulk superconductors can be fabricated in the sizes required with excellent superconducting properties. Equivalent permanent magnets, made with this inexpensive material, are persistent, do not require a persistent switch as in HTS wires, and can be made very small. These devices are charged using a technique which is similar to the one used for charging permanent magnets, e.g., by driving them into saturation. A small normal conducting coil can be used for charging or discharging. Because of the magnetic field capability of the superconductor material, a very small amount of superconducting magnet material is needed to actuate the rare earth zinc. In this paper, several designs of actuators using YBCO and BSCCO 2212 superconducting materials are presented. Designs that include magnetic shielding to prevent interaction between adjacent actuators will also be described. Preliminary experimental results and comparison with theory for BSCCO 2212 with a magnetostrictive element will be discussed.

  5. Soldered joints—an essential component of demountable high temperature superconducting fusion magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Yeekin; Surrey, Elizabeth; Hampshire, Damian

    2016-07-01

    Demountable superconducting magnet coils would offer significant benefits to commercial nuclear fusion power plants. Whether large pressed joints or large soldered joints provide the solution for demountable fusion magnets, a critical component or building block for both will be the many, smaller-scale joints that enable the supercurrent to leave the superconducting layer, cross the superconducting tape and pass into the solder that lies between the tape and the conductor that eventually provides one of the demountable surfaces. This paper considers the electrical and thermal properties of this essential component part of demountable high temperature superconducting (HTS) joints by considering the fabrication and properties of jointed HTSs consisting of a thin layer of solder (In52Sn48 or Pb38Sn62) sandwiched between two rare-earth-Ba2Cu3O7 (REBCO) second generation HTS coated conductors (CCs). The HTS joints are analysed using numerical modelling, critical current and resistivity measurements on the joints from 300 to 4.2 K in applied magnetic fields up to 12 T, as well as scanning electron microscopy studies. Our results show that the copper/silver layers significantly reduce the heating in the joints to less than a few hundred mK. When the REBCO alone is superconducting, the joint resistivity (R J) predominantly has two sources, the solder layer and an interfacial resistivity at the REBCO/silver interface (∼25 nΩ cm2) in the as-supplied CCs which together have a very weak magnetoresistance in fields up to 12 T. We achieved excellent reproducibility in the R J of the In52Sn48 soldered joints of better than 10% at temperatures below T c of the REBCO layer which can be compared to variations of more than two orders of magnitude in the literature. We also show that demountable joints in fusion energy magnets are viable and need only add a few percent to the total cryogenic cost for a fusion tokamak.

  6. A novel high temperature superconducting magnetic flux pump for MRI magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zhiming; Yan, Guo; Wu, Chunli; Ding, Shufang; Chen, Chuan

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents a kind of minitype magnetic flux pump made of high temperature superconductor. This kind of novel high temperature superconducting (HTS) flux pump has not any mechanical revolving parts or thermal switches. The excitation current of copper coils in magnetic pole system is controlled by a singlechip. The structure design and operational principle have been described. The operating performance of the new model magnetic flux pump has been preliminarily tested. The experiments show that the maximum pumping current is approximately 200 A for Bi2223 flux pump and 80 A for MgB 2 flux pump operating at 20 K. By comparison, it is discovered that the operating temperature range is wider, the ripple is smaller and the pumping frequency is higher in Bi2223 flux pump than those in MgB 2 flux pump. These results indicate that the newly developed Bi2223 magnetic flux pump may efficiently compensate the magnetic field decay in HTS magnet and make the magnet operate in persistent current mode, this point is significant to the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) magnets. This new flux pump is under construction presently. It is expected that the Bi2223 flux pump would be applied to the superconducting MRI magnets by further optimizing structure and improving working process.

  7. Design analysis of a solid nitrogen cooled ''permanent'' high-temperature superconducting magnet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haid, Benjamin J.; Lee, Haigun; Iwasa, Yukikazu; Oh, Sang-Soo; Kwon, Young-Kil; Ryu, Kang-Sik

    2002-10-01

    Potential performance advantages of a solid nitrogen cooled "permanent" high-temperature superconducting (SN2/HTS) magnet system over a liquid helium cooled low-temperature superconducting (LHe/LTS) system are explored. The SN2/HTS system design includes a second solid heat capacitor that cools a radiation shield. Recooling of the heat capacitors is performed with a demountable cryocooler. The SN2/HTS system offers both enhanced stability and improved portability over a LHe/LTS system. Design codes are constructed to compare the SN2/HTS system design with a LHe/LTS design for a general permanent superconducting magnet system employing a room temperature bore. The codes predict the system volume and mass that should be expected for a given set of design requirements, i.e. field strength and bore size, and a given set of conductor properties. The results indicate that present HTS conductor critical current and index are not yet sufficient for producing SN2/HTS systems of a size that is comparable with that expected for a LHe/LTS system; however, the conductor properties of Bi2223/Ag have been consistently improving, and new HTS conductors are expected to be developed in the near future. The codes are used to determine the minimum Bi2223/Ag conductor performance required for a SN2/HTS system to be competitive with a LHe/LTS system.

  8. The creation of high-temperature superconducting cables of megawatt range in Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Sytnikov, V. E. Bemert, S. E.; Krivetsky, I. V.; Romashov, M. A.; Popov, D. A.; Fedotov, E. V.; Komandenko, O. V.

    2015-12-15

    Urgent problems of the power industry in the 21st century require the creation of smart energy systems, providing a high effectiveness of generation, transmission, and consumption of electric power. Simultaneously, the requirements for controllability of power systems and ecological and resource-saving characteristics at all stages of production and distribution of electric power are increased. One of the decision methods of many problems of the power industry is the development of new high-efficiency electrical equipment for smart power systems based on superconducting technologies to ensure a qualitatively new level of functioning of the electric power industry. The intensive research and development of new types of electrical devices based on superconductors are being carried out in many industrialized advanced countries. Interest in such developments has especially increased in recent years owing to the discovery of so-called high-temperature superconductors (HTS) that do not require complicated and expensive cooling devices. Such devices can operate at cooling by inexpensive and easily accessible liquid nitrogen. Taking into account the obvious advantages of superconducting cable lines for the transmission of large power flows through an electrical network, as compared with conventional cables, the Federal Grid Company of Unified Energy System (JSC FGC UES) initiated a research and development program including the creation of superconducting HTS AC and DC cable lines. Two cable lines for the transmitted power of 50 MVA/MW at 20 kV were manufactured and tested within the framework of the program.

  9. The creation of high-temperature superconducting cables of megawatt range in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sytnikov, V. E.; Bemert, S. E.; Krivetsky, I. V.; Romashov, M. A.; Popov, D. A.; Fedotov, E. V.; Komandenko, O. V.

    2015-12-01

    Urgent problems of the power industry in the 21st century require the creation of smart energy systems, providing a high effectiveness of generation, transmission, and consumption of electric power. Simultaneously, the requirements for controllability of power systems and ecological and resource-saving characteristics at all stages of production and distribution of electric power are increased. One of the decision methods of many problems of the power industry is the development of new high-efficiency electrical equipment for smart power systems based on superconducting technologies to ensure a qualitatively new level of functioning of the electric power industry. The intensive research and development of new types of electrical devices based on superconductors are being carried out in many industrialized advanced countries. Interest in such developments has especially increased in recent years owing to the discovery of so-called high-temperature superconductors (HTS) that do not require complicated and expensive cooling devices. Such devices can operate at cooling by inexpensive and easily accessible liquid nitrogen. Taking into account the obvious advantages of superconducting cable lines for the transmission of large power flows through an electrical network, as compared with conventional cables, the Federal Grid Company of Unified Energy System (JSC FGC UES) initiated a research and development program including the creation of superconducting HTS AC and DC cable lines. Two cable lines for the transmitted power of 50 MVA/MW at 20 kV were manufactured and tested within the framework of the program.

  10. TOPICAL REVIEW: The physics behind high-temperature superconducting cuprates: the 'plain vanilla' version of RVB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, P. W.; Lee, P. A.; Randeria, M.; Rice, T. M.; Trivedi, N.; Zhang, F. C.

    2004-06-01

    One of the first theoretical proposals for understanding high-temperature superconductivity in the cuprates was Anderson's RVB theory using a Gutzwiller projected BCS wavefunction as an approximate ground state. Recent work by Paramekanti et al has shown that this variational approach gives a semi-quantitative understanding of the doping dependences of a variety of experimental observables in the superconducting state of the cuprates. In this paper we revisit these issues using the 'renormalized mean field theory' of Zhang et al based on the Gutzwiller approximation in which the kinetic and superexchange energies are renormalized by different doping-dependent factors gt and gS respectively. We point out a number of consequences of this early mean field theory for experimental measurements which were not available when it was first explored, and observe that it is able to explain the existence of the pseudogap, properties of nodal quasiparticles and approximate spin-charge separation, the latter leading to large renormalizations of the Drude weight and superfluid density. We use the Lee-Wen theory of the phase transition as caused by thermal excitation of nodal quasiparticles, and also obtain a number of further experimental confirmations. Finally, we remark that superexchange, and not phonons, is responsible for d-wave superconductivity in the cuprates.

  11. High-temperature superconducting superconductor/normal metal/superconducting devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foote, M. C.; Hunt, B. D.; Bajuk, L. J.

    1991-01-01

    We describe the fabrication and characterization of superconductor/normal metal/superconductor (SNS) devices made with the high-temperature superconductor (HTS) YBa2Cu3O(7-x). Structures of YBa2Cu3O(7-x)/Au/Nb on c-axis-oriented YBa2Cu3O(7-x) were made in both sandwich and edge geometries in order to sample the HTS material both along and perpendicular to the conducting a-b planes. These devices display fairly ideal Josephson properties at 4.2 K. In addition, devices consisting of YBa2Cu3O(7-x)/YBa2Cu3O(y)/YBa2Cu3O(7-x), with a 'normal metal' layer of reduced transition temperature YBa2Cu3O(7-x) were fabricated and show a great deal of promise for applications near 77 K. Current-voltage characteristics like those of the Resistively-Shunted Junction model are observed, with strong response to 10 GHz radiation above 60 K.

  12. Superconducting UBe 13 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quateman, J. H.; Tedrow, P. M.

    1985-12-01

    Of the known heavy fermion superconductors only UBe 13 can have a low resistivity ratio and still go superconducting. In addition, it is a line compound with a melting temperature of nearly twice that of the constituents. These facts make UBe 13 a promising choice for fabrication in thin film form. We have successfully made 2000 Å UBe 13 films by coevaporation of uranium and beryllium on 700°C substrates which were then heated in situ to 1100°C. These films were polycrystalline as shown by X-ray diffraction and have Tc's of 0.85 K, that of the bulk. The resistivity rise at approximately 2 K and the strong negative magnetoresistance were also of the same magnitude as that of the bulk, as were both the perpendicular and parallel critical fields. Thin films of UBe 13 will make more accessible tunneling and proximity effect experiments which can help elucidate the nature of the superconductivity of this compound.

  13. Cryogenics Vision Workshop for High-Temperature Superconducting Electric Power Systems Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Energetics, Inc.

    2000-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's Superconductivity Program for Electric Systems sponsored the Cryogenics Vision Workshop, which was held on July 27, 1999 in Washington, D.C. This workshop was held in conjunction with the Program's Annual Peer Review meeting. Of the 175 people attending the peer review meeting, 31 were selected in advance to participate in the Cryogenics Vision Workshops discussions. The participants represented cryogenic equipment manufactures, industrial gas manufacturers and distributors, component suppliers, electric power equipment manufacturers (Superconductivity Partnership Initiative participants), electric utilities, federal agencies, national laboratories, and consulting firms. Critical factors were discussed that need to be considered in describing the successful future commercialization of cryogenic systems. Such systems will enable the widespread deployment of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) electric power equipment. Potential research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) activities and partnership opportunities for advancing suitable cryogenic systems were also discussed. The workshop agenda can be found in the following section of this report. Facilitated sessions were held to discuss the following specific focus topics: identifying Critical Factors that need to be included in a Cryogenics Vision for HTS Electric Power Systems (From the HTS equipment end-user perspective) identifying R and D Needs and Partnership Roles (From the cryogenic industry perspective) The findings of the facilitated Cryogenics Vision Workshop were then presented in a plenary session of the Annual Peer Review Meeting. Approximately 120 attendees participated in the afternoon plenary session. This large group heard summary reports from the workshop session leaders and then held a wrap-up session to discuss the findings, cross-cutting themes, and next steps. These summary reports are presented in this document. The ideas and suggestions raised during

  14. High-temperature adhesives for bonding polyimide film. [bonding Kapton film for solar sails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; Slemp, W. S.; St.clair, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    Experimental polyimide resins were developed and evaluated as potential high temperature adhesives for bonding Kapton polyimide film. Lap shear strengths of Kapton/Kapton bonds were obtained as a function of test temperature, adherend thickness, and long term aging at 575 K (575 F) in vacuum. Glass transition temperatures of the polyimide/"Kapton" bondlines were monitored by thermomechanical analysis.

  15. High-temperature superconductivity in two-band materials with interband pairing

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, E. A. Dubovik, V. M.

    2015-07-15

    The Eliashberg theory generalized using peculiar properties of two-band electron–phonon (EP) systems is employed for studying T{sub c} in two-band materials (in particular, pnictides). In view of probably strong EP coupling, we take into account pairing within the entire width of the electron band, not only in a narrow layer at the Fermi surface. It is found that the effect of pairing of electrons belonging to different bands is a decisive factor for manifestation of the effect of high T{sub c} in these materials. It is shown that in materials analogous to pnictides, high T{sub c} values are reproduced by the two-band spectral function of electron–phonon interaction. The existence of one more family of two-band high-temperature materials with a superconducting transition temperature T{sub c} comparable to that in cuprates is predicted.

  16. Studies on the levitation height decay of the high temperature superconducting Maglev vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Z. G.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, J.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, S. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, L.

    2007-10-01

    The levitation height decay was found in the high temperature superconducting (HTS) Maglev test vehicle system during man-loading running. Experimental results show that the no-load levitating system would drift to a new equilibrium position by the external loaded history, but the new equilibrium position will almost not drift by the second-round same loaded history. A new method is proposed to improve the stability of the HTS Maglev vehicle, that is, a pre-load was applied to the HTS Maglev vehicle before running. The impulse responses are performed on the HTS Maglev vehicle before the pre-load and after the pre-load. The results show that the pre-load method is considerably effective to improve the stiffness and damping coefficient of the HTS Maglev vehicle. Moreover, it helps to suppress the levitation height decay and enhance the stability of the HTS Maglev vehicle in practical operation.

  17. Triple-band high-temperature superconducting microstrip filter based on multimode split ring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hai-Wen; Wang, Yan; Fan, Yi-Chao; Guan, Xue-Hui; He, Yusheng

    2013-09-01

    A compact triple-band high-temperature superconducting (HTS) YBa2Cu3Oy microstrip bandpass filter using multimode split ring resonator (SRR) is presented in this letter. Also, its properties and equivalent circuit models are investigated by even- and odd-mode analysis. Moreover, design method of the proposed triple-band HTS filter for the applications of global positioning system at 1.57 GHz, worldwide interoperability for microwave access at 3.5 GHz, and wireless local area networks at 5.8 GHz is discussed. The centre frequencies and the bandwidths of the three passbands can be allocated properly choosing the dimension parameters of the multimode SRR. In addition, four transmission zeros are produced to improve the selectivity of this filter.

  18. Performance improvement of a high-temperature superconducting coil by separating and grading the coil edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiguri, Shinichi; Funamoto, Taisuke

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we establish a model to analyze the transport current performance of a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) coil, considering the dependencies of critical current and n-value of an HTS tape on magnetic field and magnetic field angles. This analysis shows that relatively large electric fields appear at the coil’s edges, preventing improvement in the transport current performance of the coil. To solve this problem, in this paper, we propose a graded coil in which several coil edges of different heights are separated and graded. Analysis of its performance shows that the coil’s critical current increases, thus confirming that there exists an optimum coil cross section at which the stored energy and central magnetic field improve 2.1 times and 45%, respectively, compared with a typical rectangular coil that employs the same total length of the HTS tape. It is recommended that these results of the coil should be applied to SMES.

  19. Biomolecular ion detection using high-temperature superconducting MgB2 strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zen, N.; Shibata, H.; Mawatari, Y.; Koike, M.; Ohkubo, M.

    2015-06-01

    Superconducting strip ion detectors (SSIDs) are promising for realization of ideal ion detection with 100% efficiency and nanosecond-scale time response in time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We have detected single biomolecular ions in the keV range using a 10-nm-thick and 250-nm-wide strip of a high temperature superconductor, magnesium diboride (MgB2), at temperatures of up to 13 K. The output pulse shape is explained remarkably well using circuit simulations and time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau simulations coupled with a heat diffusion equation. The simulations show that the hot spot model is applicable to the proposed MgB2-SSIDs and the normal region expansion is completed within 16 ps, which corresponds to a maximum length of 1010 nm.

  20. Towards material-specific simulations of high-temperature superconducting cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulthess, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    Simulations of high-temperature superconducting (HTSC) cuprates have typically fallen into two categories: (1) studies of generic models such as the two-dimensional (2D) Hubbard model, that are believed to capture the essential physics necessary to describe the superconducting state, and, (2) first principles electronic structure calculations that are based on the local density approximation (LDA) to density functional theory (DFT) and lead to materials specific models. With advent of massibely parallel vector supercomputers, such as the Cray X1E at ORNL, and cluster algorithms such as the Dynamical Cluster Approximation (DCA), it is now possible to systematically solve the 2D Hubbard model with Quantum Monte Carol (QMC) simulations and to establish that the model indeed describes d-wave superconductivity [1]. Furthermore, studies of a multi-band model with input parameters generated from LDA calculations demonstrate that the existence of a superconducting transition is very sensitive to the underlying band structure [2]. Application of the LDA to transition metal oxides is, however, hampered by spurious self-interactions that particularly affects localized orbitals. Here we apply the self-interaction corrected local spin-density method (SIC-LSD) to describe the electronic structure of the cuprates. It was recently applied with success to generate input parameters for simple models of Mn doped III-V semiconductors [3] and is known to properly describe the antiferromagnetic insulating ground state of the parent compounds of the HTSC cuprates. We will discus the models for HTSC cuprates derived from the SIC-LSD study and how the differences to the well-known LDA results impact the QMC-DCA simulations of the magnetic and superconducting properties. [1] T. A. Maier, M. Jarrell, T. C. Schulthess, P. R. C. Kent, and J. B. White, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 237001 (2005). [2] P. Kent, A. Macridin, M. Jarrell, T. Schulthess, O. Andersen, T. Dasgupta, and O. Jepsen, Bulletin of

  1. Depairing current density through a low-angle grain boundary in a superconducting film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Feng; Zhang, Zhaoxia; Zeng, Jun; Gou, Xiaofan

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the effect of a grain boundary (GB) on the depairing current density of a high-temperature superconducting film is investigated. The modified effective free energy is proposed by considering the interaction of the superconducting condensate with the deformation of the superconductor due to the dislocations which constitute a grain boundary. After the elastic strain field of the dislocation is obtained, we analyzed the depress effect of the GB on the depairing current density of a superconducting film. The results are qualitatively agreement with the classic exponential relationship with the misorientation angles of the critical current density of high-temperature superconductors.

  2. The Fabrication Technique and Property Analysis of Racetrack-Type High Temperature Superconducting Magnet for High Power Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, S. F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, D. Y.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhao, B.; Zhang, Y. Y.; Li, L.; Li, Y. N.; Chen, P. M.

    2013-03-01

    The superconducting motor is now the focus of the research on the application of high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials. In this manuscript, we mainly introduce the recent progress on the fabrication technique and property research of the superconducting motor magnet in Luoyang Ship Material Research Institute (LSMRI) in China, including the materials, the winding and impregnation technique, and property measurement of magnet. Several techniques and devices were developed to manufacture the magnet, including the technique of insulation and thermal conduction, the device for winding the racetrack-type magnet, etc. At last, the superconducting magnet used for the MW class motor were successfully developed, which is the largest superconducting motor magnet in china at present. The critical current of the superconducting magnet exceeds the design value (90 A at 30 K).

  3. Impurities: A smoking gun for the physical origin of high temperature superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, D.

    1994-12-31

    Philippe Monthoux and the author have recently carried out detailed strong coupling (Eliashberg) calculations for YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} of the influence of impurities on the normal state quasiparticle self-energy and resistivity, and the superconducting transition temperature, T{sub c}. They find, in agreement with experiment, that although both Ni and Zn impurities primarily substitute for planar Cu(2) atoms, their influence on T{sub c} is markedly different. That difference arises from the experimental fact that Zn, when substituted for Cu(2), alters the local magnetic order, and hence the local spin fluctuation spectrum, while Ni does not. This difference is the equivalent of the isotope effect for conventional superconductors: it is a smoking gun for the physical origin of high temperature superconductivity and provides strong evidence for the spin-fluctuation mechanism, and the d{sub x{sup 2}{minus}y{sup 2}} pairing state to which it gives rise.

  4. Superconducting thin films on potassium tantalate substrates

    DOEpatents

    Feenstra, Roeland; Boatner, Lynn A.

    1992-01-01

    A superconductive system for the lossless transmission of electrical current comprising a thin film of superconducting material Y.sub.1 Ba.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-x epitaxially deposited upon a KTaO.sub.3 substrate. The KTaO.sub.3 is an improved substrate over those of the prior art since the it exhibits small lattice constant mismatch and does not chemically react with the superconducting film.

  5. The high temperature superconductivity in cuprates: physics of the pseudogap region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cea, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    We discuss the physics of the high temperature superconductivity in hole doped copper oxide ceramics in the pseudogap region. Starting from an effective reduced Hamiltonian relevant to the dynamics of holes injected into the copper oxide layers proposed in a previous paper, we determine the superconductive condensate wavefunction. We show that the low-lying elementary condensate excitations are analogous to the rotons in superfluid 4He. We argue that the rotons-like excitations account for the specific heat anomaly at the critical temperature. We discuss and compare with experimental observations the London penetration length, the Abrikosov vortices, the upper and lower critical magnetic fields, and the critical current density. We give arguments to explain the origin of the Fermi arcs and Fermi pockets. We investigate the nodal gap in the cuprate superconductors and discuss both the doping and temperature dependence of the nodal gap. We suggest that the nodal gap is responsible for the doping dependence of the so-called nodal Fermi velocity detected in angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy studies. We discuss the thermodynamics of the nodal quasielectron liquid and their role in the low temperature specific heat. We propose that the ubiquitous presence of charge density wave in hole doped cuprate superconductors in the pseudogap region originates from instabilities of the nodal quasielectrons driven by the interaction with the planar CuO2 lattice. We investigate the doping dependence of the charge density wave gap and the competition between charge order and superconductivity. We discuss the effects of external magnetic fields on the charge density wave gap and elucidate the interplay between charge density wave and Abrikosov vortices. Finally, we examine the physics underlying quantum oscillations in the pseudogap region.

  6. Ultra-High Performance, High-Temperature Superconducting Wires via Cost-effective, Scalable, Co-evaporation Process

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dr. Hosup; Oh, Sang-Soo; Ha, HS; Youm, D; Moon, SH; Kim, JH; Heo, YU; Dou, SX; Wee, Sung Hun; Goyal, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Long-length, high-temperature superconducting (HTS) wires capable of carrying high critical current, Ic, are required for a wide range of applications. Here, we report extremely high performance HTS wires based on 5 m thick SmBa2Cu3O7- (SmBCO) single layer films on textured metallic templates. SmBCO layer wires over 20 meters long were deposited by a cost-effective, scalable co-evaporation process using a batch-type drum in a dual chamber. All deposition parameters influencing the composition, phase, and texture of the films were optimized via a unique combinatorial method that is broadly applicable for co-evaporation of other promising complex materials containing several cations. Thick SmBCO layers deposited under optimized conditions exhibit excellent cube-on-cube epitaxy. Such excellent structural epitaxy over the entire thickness results in exceptionally high Ic performance, with average Ic over 1000 A/cm for the entire 22 meter long wire and maximum Ic over 1,500 A/cm for a short 12 cm long tape. The Ic values reported in this work are the highest values ever reported from any lengths of cuprate-based HTS wire or conductor.

  7. Ultra-High Performance, High-Temperature Superconducting Wires via Cost-effective, Scalable, Co-evaporation Process

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ho-Sup; Oh, Sang-Soo; Ha, Hong-Soo; Youm, Dojun; Moon, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Jung Ho; Dou, Shi Xue; Heo, Yoon-Uk; Wee, Sung-Hun; Goyal, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Long-length, high-temperature superconducting (HTS) wires capable of carrying high critical current, Ic, are required for a wide range of applications. Here, we report extremely high performance HTS wires based on 5 μm thick SmBa2Cu3O7 − δ (SmBCO) single layer films on textured metallic templates. SmBCO layer wires over 20 meters long were deposited by a cost-effective, scalable co-evaporation process using a batch-type drum in a dual chamber. All deposition parameters influencing the composition, phase, and texture of the films were optimized via a unique combinatorial method that is broadly applicable for co-evaporation of other promising complex materials containing several cations. Thick SmBCO layers deposited under optimized conditions exhibit excellent cube-on-cube epitaxy. Such excellent structural epitaxy over the entire thickness results in exceptionally high Ic performance, with average Ic over 1,000 A/cm-width for the entire 22 meter long wire and maximum Ic over 1,500 A/cm-width for a short 12 cm long tape. The Ic values reported in this work are the highest values ever reported from any lengths of cuprate-based HTS wire or conductor. PMID:24752189

  8. Fabricating Thin-Film High-Temperature Thermoset Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickerson, G. E.; Long, E. R. J.; Kitts, R., G.

    1982-01-01

    To prepare an epoxy thin film, quantity of uncured epoxy to be cast placed in vacuum oven and heated to melting temperature. Vacuum of about 30 mm Hg is applied to deaerate epoxy charge. Pressure is cycled with each foaming until all air and excess volatiles are revoved. thermoset (cross-linked) resin is cast between thin, flexible, releasing substrate films. Films less than 0.025 mm in thickness are made routinely with this facility.

  9. Pulsed Laser Deposition of High Temperature Protonic Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Fred W.; Berger, M. H.; Sayir, Ali

    2006-01-01

    Pulsed laser deposition has been used to fabricate nanostructured BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O3- sigma) films. Protonic conduction of fabricated BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O(3-sigma) films was compared to sintered BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O(3-sigma). Sintered samples and laser targets were prepared by sintering BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O(3-sigma) powders derived by solid state synthesis. Films 1 to 8 micron thick were deposited by KrF excimer laser on porous Al2O3 substrates. Thin films were fabricated at deposition temperatures of 700 to 950 C at O2 pressures up to 200 mTorr using laser pulse energies of 0.45 - 0.95 J. Fabricated films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy and electrical impedance spectroscopy. Single phase BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O(3-sigma) films with a columnar growth morphology are observed with preferred crystal growth along the [100] or [001] direction. Results indicate [100] growth dependence upon laser pulse energy. Electrical conductivity of bulk samples produced by solid state sintering and thin film samples were measured over a temperature range of 100 C to 900 C. Electrical conduction behavior was dependent upon film deposition temperature. Maximum conductivity occurs at deposition temperature of 900 oC; the electrical conductivity exceeds the sintered specimen. All other deposited films exhibit a lower electrical conductivity than the sintered specimen. Activation energy for electrical conduction showed dependence upon deposition temperature, it varied

  10. Thermodynamic Critical Field and Superconducting Fluctuation of Vortices for High Temperature Cuprate Superconductor: La-214

    SciTech Connect

    Yung Moo Huh

    2001-05-01

    Thermodynamics has been studied systematically for the high temperature cuprate superconductor La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4-{delta}}, La-214, in the entire superconductive region from strongly underdoped to strongly overdoped regimes. Magnetization studies with H{parallel}c have been made in order to investigate the changes in free energy of the system as the number of carriers is reduced. Above the superconducting transition temperature, the normal-state magnetization exhibits a two-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnetic behavior. Below T{sub c}, magnetization data are thermodynamically reversible over large portions of the H-T plane, so the free energy is well defined in these regions. As the Sr concentration is varied over the wide range from 0.060 (strongly underdoped) to 0.234 (strongly overdoped), the free energy change goes through a maximum at the optimum doped in a manner similar to the T{sub c0} vs. x curve. The density of states, N(0), remains nearly constant in the overdoped and optimum doped regimes, taking a broad maximum around x = 0.188, and then drops abruptly towards zero in the underdoped regime. The La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} (La-214) system displays the fluctuating vortex behavior with the characteristic of either 2D or 3D fluctuations as indicated by clearly identifiable crossing points T* close to T{sub c}. The dimensional character of the fluctuations depends on both applied magnetic fields and the density of charge carriers. The dimensional crossover from 2D to 3D occurs in the strongly underdoped regime when the c-axis coherence distance {zeta}{sub c} becomes comparable to the spacing between adjacent CuO{sub 2} layers s at sufficiently high magnetic fields near H{sub c2}.

  11. Quantitative determination of pairing interactions for high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates.

    PubMed

    Bok, Jin Mo; Bae, Jong Ju; Choi, Han-Yong; Varma, Chandra M; Zhang, Wentao; He, Junfeng; Zhang, Yuxiao; Yu, Li; Zhou, X J

    2016-03-01

    A profound problem in modern condensed matter physics is discovering and understanding the nature of fluctuations and their coupling to fermions in cuprates, which lead to high-temperature superconductivity and the invariably associated strange metal state. We report the quantitative determination of normal and pairing self-energies, made possible by laser-based angle-resolved photoemission measurements of unprecedented accuracy and stability. Through a precise inversion procedure, both the effective interactions in the attractive d-wave symmetry and the repulsive part in the full symmetry are determined. The latter is nearly angle-independent. Near T c, both interactions are nearly independent of frequency and have almost the same magnitude over the complete energy range of up to about 0.4 eV, except for a low-energy feature at around 50 meV that is present only in the repulsive part, which has less than 10% of the total spectral weight. Well below T c, they both change similarly, with superconductivity-induced features at low energies. Besides finding the pairing self-energy and the attractive interactions for the first time, these results expose the central paradox of the problem of high T c: how the same frequency-independent fluctuations can dominantly scatter at angles ±π/2 in the attractive channel to give d-wave pairing and lead to angle-independent repulsive scattering. The experimental results are compared with available theoretical calculations based on antiferromagnetic fluctuations, the Hubbard model, and quantum-critical fluctuations of the loop-current order. PMID:26973872

  12. Quantitative determination of pairing interactions for high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates

    PubMed Central

    Bok, Jin Mo; Bae, Jong Ju; Choi, Han-Yong; Varma, Chandra M.; Zhang, Wentao; He, Junfeng; Zhang, Yuxiao; Yu, Li; Zhou, X. J.

    2016-01-01

    A profound problem in modern condensed matter physics is discovering and understanding the nature of fluctuations and their coupling to fermions in cuprates, which lead to high-temperature superconductivity and the invariably associated strange metal state. We report the quantitative determination of normal and pairing self-energies, made possible by laser-based angle-resolved photoemission measurements of unprecedented accuracy and stability. Through a precise inversion procedure, both the effective interactions in the attractive d-wave symmetry and the repulsive part in the full symmetry are determined. The latter is nearly angle-independent. Near Tc, both interactions are nearly independent of frequency and have almost the same magnitude over the complete energy range of up to about 0.4 eV, except for a low-energy feature at around 50 meV that is present only in the repulsive part, which has less than 10% of the total spectral weight. Well below Tc, they both change similarly, with superconductivity-induced features at low energies. Besides finding the pairing self-energy and the attractive interactions for the first time, these results expose the central paradox of the problem of high Tc: how the same frequency-independent fluctuations can dominantly scatter at angles ±π/2 in the attractive channel to give d-wave pairing and lead to angle-independent repulsive scattering. The experimental results are compared with available theoretical calculations based on antiferromagnetic fluctuations, the Hubbard model, and quantum-critical fluctuations of the loop-current order. PMID:26973872

  13. Thermodynamic Critical Field and Superconducting Fluctuation of Vortices for High Temperature Cuprate Superconductor: La-214

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas K. Finnemore

    2001-06-25

    Thermodynamics has been studied systematically for the high temperature cuprate superconductor La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4-{delta}}, La-214, in the entire superconductive region from strongly underdoped to strongly overdoped regimes. Magnetization studies with H {parallel} c have been made in order to investigate the changes in free energy of the system as the number of carriers is reduced. Above the superconducting transition temperature, the normal-state magnetization exhibits a two-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnetic behavior. Below T{sub c}, magnetization data are thermodynamically reversible over large portions of the H-T plane, so the free energy is well defined in these regions. As the Sr concentration is varied over the wide range from 0.060 (strongly underdoped) to 0.234 (strongly overdoped), the free energy change goes through a maximum at the optimum doped in a manner similar to the T{sub c0} vs. x curve. The density of states, N(0), remains nearly constant in the overdoped and optimum doped regimes, taking a broad maximum around x = 0.188, and then drops abruptly towards zero in the underdoped regime. The La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} (La-214) system displays the fluctuating vortex behavior with the characteristic of either 2D or 3D fluctuations as indicated by clearly identifiable crossing points T* close to T{sub c}. The dimensional character of the fluctuations depends on both applied magnetic fields and the density of charge carriers. The dimensional crossover from 2D to 3D occurs in the strongly underdoped regime when the c-axis coherence distance {xi}{sub c} becomes comparable to the spacing between adjacent CuO{sub 2} layers s at sufficiently high magnetic field near H{sub c2}.

  14. Strong-coupling theory of high-temperature superconductivity and colossal magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, A. S.

    2005-08-01

    We argue that the extension of the BCS theory to the strong-coupling regime describes the high-temperature superconductivity of cuprates and the colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) of ferromagnetic oxides if the phonon dressing of carriers and strong attractive correlations are taken into account. The attraction between carriers, which is prerequisite to high-temperature superconductivity, is caused by an almost unretarted electron-phonon interaction sufficient to overcome the direct Coulomb repulsion in the strong-coupling limit, where electrons become polarons and bipolarons (real-space electron or hole pairs dressed by phonons). The long-range Froehlich electron-phonon interaction has been identified as the most essential in cuprates providing "superlight" lattice polarons and bipolarons. A number of key observations have been predicted and/or explained with polarons and bipolarons including unusual isotope effects, normal state (pseudo)gaps, upper critical fields, etc. Here some kinetic, magnetic, and more recent thermomagnetic normal state measurements are interpreted in the framework of the strong-coupling theory, including the Nernst effect and normal state diamagnetism. Remarkably, a similar strong-coupling approach offers a simple explanation of CMR in ferromagnetic oxides, while the conventional double-exchange (DEX) model, proposed half a century ago and generalised more recently to include the electronphonon interaction, is in conflict with a number of modern experiments. Among these experiments are site-selective spectroscopies, which have shown that oxygen p-holes are current carriers rather than d-electrons in ferromagnetic manganites (and in cuprates) ruling out DEX mechanism of CMR. Also some samples of ferromagnetic manganites manifest an insulating-like optical conductivity at all temperatures contradicting the DEX notion that their ferromagnetic phase is metallic. On the other hand, the pairing of oxygen holes into heavy bipolarons in the

  15. YBCO High-Temperature Superconducting Filters on M-Plane Sapphire Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabataitis, J. C.; Mueller, C. H.; Miranda, F. A.; Warner, J.; Bhasin, K. B.

    1996-01-01

    Since the discovery of High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) in 1986, microwave circuits have been demonstrated using HTS films on various substrates. These HTS-based circuits have proven to operate with less power loss than their metallic film counterparts at 77 K. This translates into smaller and lighter microwave circuits for space communication systems such as multiplexer filter banks. High quality HTS films have conventionally been deposited on lanthanum aluminate (LaAlO3) substrates. However, LaAlO3 has a relative dielectric constant (epsilon(sub r)) of 24. With a epsilon(sub r) approx. 9.4-11.6, sapphire (Al2O3) would be a preferable substrate for the fabrication of HTS-based components since the lower dielectric constant would permit wider microstrip lines to be used in filter design, since the lower dielectric constant would permit wider microstrip lines to be used for a given characteristic impedance (Z(sub 0)), thus lowering the insertion losses and increasing the power handling capabilities of the devices. We report on the fabrication and characterization of YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) (YBCO) on M-plane sapphire bandpass filters at 4.0 GHz. For a YBCO 'hairpin' filter, a minimum insertion loss of 0.5 dB was measured at 77 K as compared with 1.4 dB for its gold counterpart. In an 'edge-coupled' configuration, the insertion loss went down from 0.9 dB for the gold film to 0.8 dB for the YBCO film at the same temperature.

  16. Development of high-efficiency Stirling cryocoolers for high temperature superconducting motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, K.; Yumoto, K.; Hiratsuka, Y.

    2015-12-01

    For wide spread high-temperature superconductor (HTS) devices, a cryocooler having COP of >0.1, with a compact size, light weight, high efficiency and high reliability is required. For practical use of superconductive devices, Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI) developed a high-efficiency Stirling type pulse tube cryocooler (STPC). The STPC had high reliability and low vibration. However, its efficiency was not enough to meet the demands of an HTS motor. To further improve the efficiency, we reconsidered the expander of cryocooler and developed a Stirling cryocooler (STC). Two prototype units of a compact, high-efficiency split Stirling cryocooler were designed, built and tested. With the second prototype unit, a cooling capacity of 151 W at 70 K and a minimum temperature of 33 K have been achieved with a compressor input power of 2.15 kW. Accordingly, COP of about 0.07 has been achieved. The detailed design of the prototype units and the experimental results will be reported in this paper.

  17. Comparative Assessment of Direct Drive High Temperature Superconducting Generators in Multi-Megawatt Class Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Maples, B.; Hand, M.; Musial, W.

    2010-10-01

    This paper summarizes the work completed under the CRADA between NREL and American Superconductor (AMSC). The CRADA combined NREL and AMSC resources to benchmark high temperature superconducting direct drive (HTSDD) generator technology by integrating the technologies into a conceptual wind turbine design, and comparing the design to geared drive and permanent magnet direct drive (PMDD) wind turbine configurations. Analysis was accomplished by upgrading the NREL Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model to represent geared and PMDD turbines at machine ratings up to 10 MW and then comparing cost and mass figures of AMSC's HTSDD wind turbine designs to theoretical geared and PMDD turbine designs at 3.1, 6, and 10 MW sizes. Based on the cost and performance data supplied by AMSC, HTSDD technology has good potential to compete successfully as an alternative technology to PMDD and geared technology turbines in the multi megawatt classes. In addition, data suggests the economics of HTSDD turbines improve with increasing size, although several uncertainties remain for all machines in the 6 to 10 MW class.

  18. A novel approach to quench detection for high temperature superconducting coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, W. J.; Fang, X. Y.; Fang, J.; Wei, B.; Hou, J. Z.; Liu, L. F.; Lu, K. K.; Li, Shuo

    2015-11-01

    A novel approach to quench detection for high temperature superconducting (HTS) coils is proposed, which is mainly based on phase angle between voltage and current of two coils to detect the quench resistance voltage. The approach is analyzed theoretically, verified experimentally and analytically by MATLAB Simulink and LabVIEW. An analog quench circuit is built on Simulink and a quench alarm system program is written in LabVIEW. Experiment of quench detection is further conducted. The sinusoidal AC currents ranging from 19.9 A to 96 A are transported to the HTS coils, whose critical current is 90 A at 77 K. The results of analog simulation and experiment are analyzed and they show good consistency. It is shown that with the increase of current, the phase undergoes apparent growth, and it is up to 60° and 15° when the current reaches critical value experimentally and analytically, respectively. It is concluded that the approach proposed in this paper can meet the need of precision and quench resistance voltage can be detected in time.

  19. Study of second generation, high-temperature superconducting coils: Determination of critical current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Kim, Jae-Ho; Pamidi, Sastry; Chudy, Michal; Yuan, Weijia; Coombs, T. A.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the modeling of second generation (2 G) high-temperature superconducting (HTS) pancake coils using finite element method. The axial symmetric model can be used to calculate current and magnetic field distribution inside the coil. The anisotropic characteristics of 2 G tapes are included in the model by direct interpolation. The model is validated by comparing to experimental results. We use the model to study critical currents of 2 G coils and find that 100 μV/m is too high a criterion to determine long-term operating current of the coils, because the innermost turns of a coil will, due to the effect of local magnetic field, reach their critical current much earlier than outer turns. Our modeling shows that an average voltage criterion of 20 μV/m over the coil corresponds to the point at which the innermost turns' electric field exceeds 100 μV/m. So 20 μV/m is suggested to be the critical current criterion of the HTS coil. The influence of background field on the coil critical current is also studied in the paper.

  20. Dynamic response characteristics of the high-temperature superconducting maglev system under lateral eccentric distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Zheng, Jun; Si, Shuaishuai; Qian, Nan; Li, Haitao; Li, Jipeng; Deng, Zigang

    2016-07-01

    Off-centre operation of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) maglev systems caused by inevitable conditions such as the misregistration of vehicle, crosswind and curve negotiation, may change the distribution of the trapped flux in the HTS bulks and the magnetic interaction between HTS bulks and the PMG. It impacts on the performance of HTS maglev, and more seriously makes the maglev vehicle overturned. Therefore, understanding the performance of the HTS maglev in off-center operation is very important. In this paper, the dynamic response characteristics of a cryostat with twenty-four onboard YBaCuO superconductor bulks were experimentally investigated at different eccentric distances under loads before the initial FC process. Parameters such as vibration accelerations, displacement, natural frequency and dynamic stiffness were acquired and analyzed via the B&K vibration analyzer and laser displacement sensors. Results suggest that the natural frequency and dynamic stiffness of the maglev vehicle would be obviously reduced with the eccentric distance, posing negative effects on the stability of HTS maglev.

  1. van Hove Singularities and Spectral Smearing in High Temperature Superconducting H3S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Yundi; Pickett, Warren E.

    The superconducting phase of hydrogen sulfide at Tc=200 K observed by Drozdov and collaborators at pressures around 200 GPa is simple bcc Im 3 m H3S reopens questions about what is achievable in high Tc. The various ''extremes'' that are involved - pressure, implying extreme reduction of volume, extremely high H phonon energy scale around 1400K, extremely high temperature for a superconductor - necessitate a close look at new issues raised by these characteristics in relation to high Tc. We have applied first principles methods to analyze the H3S electronic structure, particularly the van Hove singularities (vHs) and the effect of sulfur. Focusing on the two closely spaced vHs near the Fermi level that give rise to the impressively sharp peak in the density of states, the implications of strong coupling Migdal-Eliashberg theory are assessed. The electron spectral density smearing due to virtual phonon emission and absorption, as done in earlier days for A15 superconductors, must be included explicitly to obtain accurate theoretical predictions and a correct understanding. Means for increasing Tc in H3S-like materials will be mentioned. NSF DMR Grant 1207622.

  2. Quench Detection and Protection for High Temperature Superconducting Transformers by Using the Active Power Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanato, N.; Kobayashi, Y.

    AC high temperature superconducting (HTS) coils have been developed for transformers, motors and so on. Quench detection and protection system are essential for safety operations of the AC HTS facilities. The balance voltage method is universally used for the quench detection and protection, however especially for AC operations, the method has risks in terms of high voltage sparks. Because the method needs a voltage tap soldered to a midpoint of the coil winding and the AC HTS facilities generally operate at high voltages and therefore high voltage sparks may occur at the midpoint with no insulation. We have proposed the active power method for the quench detection and protection. The method requires no voltage tap on the midpoint of the coil winding and therefore it has in-built effectiveness for the AC HTS facilities. In this paper, we show that the method can detect the quench in an HTS transformer and moreover our proposed quench protection circuits which consist of thyristors are simple and useful for the AC HTS facilities.

  3. Performance Calculation of High Temperature Superconducting Hysteresis Motor Using Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konar, G.; Chakraborty, N.; Das, J.

    Hysteresis motors being capable of producing a steady torque at low speeds and providing good starting properties at loaded condition became popular among different fractional horse power electrical motors. High temperature superconducting materials being intrinsically hysteretic are suitable for this type of motor. In the present work, performance study of a 2-pole, 50 Hz HTS hysteresis motor with conventional stator and HTS rotor has been carried out numerically using finite element method. The simulation results confirm the ability of the segmented HTS rotor with glued circular sectors to trap the magnetic field as high as possible compared to the ferromagnetic rotor. Also the magnetization loops in the HTS hysteresis motor are obtained and the corresponding torque and AC losses are calculated. The motor torque thus obtained is linearly proportional to the current which is the common feature of any hysteresis motor. Calculations of torques, current densities etc are done using MATLAB program developed in-house and validated using COMSOL Multiphysics software. The simulation result shows reasonable agreement with the published results.

  4. Development of practical high temperature superconducting wire for electric power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hawsey, R.A.; Sokolowski, R.S.; Haldar, P.; Motowidlo, L.R.

    1994-09-01

    The technology of high temperature superconductivity has gone from beyond mere scientific curiosity into the manufacturing environment. Single lengths of multifilamentary wire are now produced that are over 200 meters long and that carry over 13 amperes at 77 K. Short-sample critical current densities approach 5 {times} 10{sup 4} A/cm{sup 2} at 77 K. Conductor requirements such as high critical current density in a magnetic field, strain-tolerant sheathing materials, and other engineering properties are addressed. A new process for fabricating round BSCCO-2212 wire has produced wires with critical current densities as high as 165,000 A/cm{sup 2} at 4.2 K and 53,000 A/cm{sup 2} at 40 K. This process eliminates the costly, multiple pressing and rolling steps that are commonly used to develop texture in the wires. New multifilamentary wires with strengthened sheathing materials have shown improved yield strengths up to a factor of five better than those made with pure silver. Many electric power devices require the wire to be formed into coils for production of strong magnetic fields. Requirements for coils and magnets for electric power applications are described.

  5. Progress in development of high temperature superconducting wire for electric power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hawsey, R.A.; Sokolowski, R.S.; Haldar, P.; Motowidlo, L.R.

    1994-12-31

    The technology of high temperature superconductivity has gone beyond mere scientific curiosity and into the manufacturing environment. Single lengths of multifilamentary wire are now produced that are over 200 meters long and that carry over 13 amperes at 77 K. Short-sample critical current densities approach 5 x 10{sup 4} A/cm{sup 2} at 77 K. Conductor requirements such as high critical current density in a magnetic field, strain-tolerant sheathing materials, and other engineering properties are addressed. A new process for fabricating round BSCCO-2212 wire has produced wires with critical current densities as high as 165,000 A/cm{sup 2} at 4.2 K and 53,000 A/cm{sup 2} at 40 K. This process eliminates the costly, multiple pressing and rolling steps that are commonly used to develop texture in the wires. New multifilamentary wires with strengthened sheathing materials have shown improved yield strengths up to a factor of five better than those made with pure silver. Many electric power devices require the wire to be formed into coils for production of strong magnetic fields. Requirements for coils and magnets for electric power applications are described.

  6. AC loss in high-temperature superconducting conductors, cables and windings for power devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oomen, M. P.; Rieger, J.; Hussennether, V.; Leghissa, M.

    2004-05-01

    High-temperature superconducting (HTS) transformers and reactor coils promise decreased weight and volume and higher efficiency. A critical design parameter for such devices is the AC loss in the conductor. The state of the art for AC-loss reduction in HTS power devices is described, starting from the loss in the single HTS tape. Improved tape manufacturing techniques have led to a significant decrease in the magnetization loss. Transport-current loss is decreased by choosing the right operating current and temperature. The role of tape dimensions, filament twist and resistive matrix is discussed and a comparison is made between state-of-the-art BSCCO and YBCO tapes. In transformer and reactor coils the AC loss in the tape is influenced by adjacent tapes in the coil, fields from other coils, overcurrents and higher harmonics. These factors are accounted for by a new AC-loss prediction model. Field components perpendicular to the tape are minimized by optimizing the coil design and by flux guidance pieces. High-current windings are made of Roebel conductors with transposed tapes. The model iteratively finds the temperature distribution in the winding and predicts the onset of thermal instability. We have fabricated and tested several AC windings and used them to validate the model. Now we can confidently use the model as an engineering tool for designing HTS windings and for determining the necessary tape properties.

  7. Calculating AC Losses in High-temperature Superconducting Cables Comprising Coated Conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noji, Hideki; Kawano, Shouta; Akaki, Yoji; Hamada, Tsugio

    In this study, we present a new calculation model of AC loss in a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) cable comprising coated conductors. AC loss is calculated by an electric circuit (EC) model. A previous EC model had three circuit elements: resistance as a function of the layer current, inductances related to the circumferential and axial fields. The new EC model has only inductances, and resistance is eliminated. In both models, AC loss of the coated conductor in each layer of an HTS cable is calculated on the basis of the Norris equation for a thin strip. The differences between measurement and calculations using the previous and new models are 12% and 14%, respectively, when transporting 1 kArms, which indicates that the new model is applicable for the calculation of AC loss in an HTS cable. These results indicate that layer current is dependent on inductances and not on resistance. The elimination of resistance simplifies AC loss calculation because it does not require repeated calculations for the convergence of the layer current. The calculation time was 1/20th of that of the previous model. In the new model, the Norris equation can be replaced with the calculation result obtained by the two-dimensional finite element method to obtain more accurate AC loss.

  8. Possible high-temperature superconductivity in hole-doped MgB2C2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, A. K.; Modak, P.; Gaitonde, D. M.; Rao, R. S.; Godwal, B. K.; Gupta, L. C.

    2003-09-01

    We report first-principles full potential linearised augmented plane wave calculations of the electronic band structure of the compound MgB2C2 and its hole-doped derivatives Mg0.5Li0.5B2C2, Mg0.5Na0.5B2C2, Mg0.9Na0.1B2C2 and Mg0.5K0.5B2C2. The parent compound MgB2C2 is a band insulator, which on hole doping, is predicted to turn metallic with a large density of states at the Fermi energy. Its band dispersion shows a flat band feature close to the Fermi energy, reminiscent of MgB2. Based on our estimates of changes in the density of states at the Fermi level, we predict that hole-doped MgB2C2 is a potential candidate for high-temperature superconductivity.

  9. Development of practical high temperature superconducting wire for electric power application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawsey, Robert A.; Sokolowski, Robert S.; Haldar, Pradeep; Motowidlo, Leszek R.

    1995-01-01

    The technology of high temperature superconductivity has gone from beyond mere scientific curiousity into the manufacturing environment. Single lengths of multifilamentary wire are now produced that are over 200 meters long and that carry over 13 amperes at 77 K. Short-sample critical current densities approach 5 x 104 A/sq cm at 77 K. Conductor requirements such as high critical current density in a magnetic field, strain-tolerant sheathing materials, and other engineering properties are addressed. A new process for fabricating round BSCCO-2212 wire has produced wires with critical current densities as high as 165,000 A/sq cm at 4.2 K and 53,000 A/sq cm at 40 K. This process eliminates the costly, multiple pressing and rolling steps that are commonly used to develop texture in the wires. New multifilamentary wires with strengthened sheathing materials have shown improved yield strengths up to a factor of five better than those made with pure silver. Many electric power devices require the wire to be formed into coils for production of strong magnetic fields. Requirements for coils and magnets for electric power applications are described.

  10. Operating experience with the southwire 30-meter high-temperature superconducting power cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stovall, J. P.; Lue, J. W.; Demko, J. A.; Fisher, P. W.; Gouge, M. J.; Hawsey, R. A.; Armstrong, J. W.; Hughey, R. L.; Lindsay, D. T.; Roden, M. L.; Sinha, U. K.; Tolbert, J. C.

    2002-05-01

    Southwire Company is operating a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) cable system at its corporate headquarters. The 30-m long, 3-phase cable system is powering three Southwire manufacturing plants and is rated at 12.4-kV, 1250-A, 60-Hz. Cooling is provided by a pressurized liquid nitrogen system operating at 70-80 K. The cables were energized on January 5, 2000 for on-line testing and operation and in April 2000 were placed into extended service. As of June 1, 2001, the HTS cables have provided 100% of the customer load for 8000 hours. The cryogenic system has been in continuous operation since November 1999. The HTS cable system has not been the cause of any power outages to the average 20 MW industrial load served by the cable. The cable has been exposed to short-circuit currents caused by load-side faults without damage. Based upon field measurements described herein, the cable critical current-a key performance parameter-remains the same and has not been affected by the hours of real-world operation, further proving the viability of this promising technology.

  11. Van Hove singularities and spectral smearing in high-temperature superconducting H3S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Yundi; Pickett, Warren E.

    2016-03-01

    The superconducting phase of hydrogen sulfide at Tc=200 K observed by Drozdov and collaborators at pressures around 200 GPa is simple bcc I m 3 ¯m H3S from a combination of theoretical and experimental confirmation. The various "extremes" that are involved—high pressure implying extreme reduction of volume, extremely high H phonon energy scale around 1400 K, extremely high temperature for a superconductor—necessitates a close look at new issues raised by these characteristics in relation to high Tc itself. First principles methods are applied to analyze the H3S electronic structure, beginning with the effect of sulfur and then focusing on the origin and implications of the two van Hove singularities (vHs) providing an impressive peak in the density of states near the Fermi energy. Implications arising from strong coupling Migdal-Eliashberg theory are studied. It becomes evident that electron spectral density smearing due to virtual phonon emission and absorption must be accounted for in a correct understanding of this unusual material and to obtain accurate theoretical predictions. Means for increasing Tc in H3S -like materials are noted.

  12. High Temperature Superconducting Magnets with Active Control for Attraction Levitation Transport Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry; Jenkins, Richard G.; Goodall, Roger M.; Macleod, Colin; ElAbbar, Abdallah A.; Campbell, Archie M.

    1996-01-01

    A research program, involving 3 British universities, directed at quantifying the controllability of High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) magnets for use in attraction levitation transport systems will be described. The work includes measurement of loss mechanisms for iron cored HTS magnets which need to produce a flux density of approx. 1 tesla in the airgap between the magnet poles and a ferromagnetic rail. This flux density needs to be maintained and this is done by introducing small variations of the magnet current using a feedback loop, at frequencies up to 10 Hz to compensate for load changes, track variation etc. The test magnet assemblies constructed so far will be described and the studies and modelling of designs for a practical levitation demonstrator (using commercially obtained HTS tape) will be discussed with particular emphasis on how the field distribution and its components, e.g., the component vector normal to the broad face of the tape, can radically affect design philosophy compared to the classical electrical engineering approach. Although specifically aimed at levitation transport the controllability data obtained have implications for a much wider range of applications.

  13. Fermi-surface reconstruction and the origin of high-temperature superconductivity.

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, M. R.; Materials Science Division

    2010-01-01

    lattice into a d{sup 9} configuration, with one localized hole in the 3d shell per copper site. Given the localized nature of this state, it was questioned whether a momentum-space picture was an appropriate description of the physics of the cuprates. In fact, this question relates to a long-standing debate in the physics community: Since the parent state is also an antiferromagnet, one can, in principle, map the Mott insulator to a band insulator with magnetic order. In this 'Slater' picture, Mott physics is less relevant than the magnetism itself. It is therefore unclear which of the two, magnetism or Mott physics, is more fundamentally tied to superconductivity in the cuprates. After twenty years of effort, definitive quantum oscillations that could be used to map the Fermi surface were finally observed in a high-temperature cuprate superconductor in 2007. This and subsequent studies reveal a profound rearrangement of the Fermi surface in underdoped cuprates. The cause of the reconstruction, and its implication for the origin of high-temperature superconductivity, is a subject of active debate.

  14. Development of superconducting thin films with a critical temperature greater than 110 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ianno, Ned

    1991-12-01

    CSA provided superconducting thin films consisting of Tl2Ca1Ba2Cu2O(x) on LaAlO3. Films were generated using the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method. The company achieved a zero resistance temperature of 115 K and a critical current density of 1,000,000 A/sq cm at 77 K. Relationships between the deposition process, the as-deposited film, annealing conditions, and the annealed film were investigated. Twenty thallium-based high temperature superconducting films on microwave compatible substrates were delivered under provisions of this contract.

  15. Method and apparatus for connecting high voltage leads to a high temperature super-conducting transformer

    DOEpatents

    Golner, Thomas M.; Mehta, Shirish P.

    2005-07-26

    A method and apparatus for connecting high voltage leads to a super-conducting transformer is provided that includes a first super-conducting coil set, a second super-conducting coil set, and a third super-conducting coil set. The first, second and third super-conducting coil sets are connected via an insulated interconnect system that includes insulated conductors and insulated connectors that are utilized to connect the first, second, and third super-conducting coil sets to the high voltage leads.

  16. High-Temperature, Thin-Film Strain Gages Improved

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Conventional resistance strain gage technology uses "bonded" strain gages. These foil or wire gages are bonded onto the surface of the test article with glue, ceramic cements, or flame-sprayed ceramics. These bonding agents can, in some instances, limit both the degree of strain transmission from the test structure to the gage and the maximum working temperature of the gage. Also, the bulky, bonded gage normally disrupts aerodynamic gas flow on the surface of the test structure because of its intrusive character. To respond to the urgent needs in aeronautic and aerospace research where stress and temperature gradients are high, aerodynamic effects need to be minimized, and higher operational temperatures are required, the NASA Lewis Research Center developed a thin film strain gage. This gage, a vacuum-deposited thin film formed directly on the surface of a test structure, operates at much higher temperatures than commercially available gages do and with minimal disruption of the aerodynamic flow. The gage uses an alloy, palladium-13 wt % chromium (hereafter, PdCr), which was developed by United Technologies Research Center under a NASA contract. PdCr is structurally stable and oxidation resistant up to at least 1100 C (2000 F); its temperature-induced resistance change is linear, repeatable, and not sensitive to the rates of heating and cooling. An early strain gage, which was made of 25-micrometer-diameter PdCr wire and demonstrated to be useable to 800 C, won an R&D 100 award in 1991. By further improving the purity of the material and by developing gage fabrication techniques that use sputter-deposition, photolithography patterning, and chemical etching, we have made an 8- to 10-m PdCr thin-film strain gage that can measure dynamic and static strain to at least 1100 C. For static strain measurements, a 5-m-thick Pt element serves as a temperature compensator to further minimize the temperature effect of the gage. These thin-film gages provide the advantage of

  17. High temperature Hall measurement setup for thin film characterization.

    PubMed

    Adnane, L; Gokirmak, A; Silva, H

    2016-07-01

    Hall measurement using the van der Pauw technique is a common characterization approach that does not require patterning of contacts. Measurements of the Hall voltage and electrical resistivity lead to the product of carrier mobility and carrier concentration (Hall coefficient) which can be decoupled through transport models. Based on the van der Paw method, we have developed an automated setup for Hall measurements from room temperature to ∼500 °C of semiconducting thin films of a wide resistivity range. The resistivity of the film and Hall coefficient is obtained from multiple current-voltage (I-V) measurements performed using a semiconductor parameter analyzer under applied constant "up," zero, and "down" magnetic field generated with two neodymium permanent magnets. The use of slopes obtained from multiple I-Vs for the three magnetic field conditions offer improved accuracy. Samples are preferred in square shape geometry and can range from 2 mm to 25 mm side length. Example measurements of single-crystal silicon with known doping concentration show the accuracy and reliability of the measurement. PMID:27475605

  18. High temperature Hall measurement setup for thin film characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adnane, L.; Gokirmak, A.; Silva, H.

    2016-07-01

    Hall measurement using the van der Pauw technique is a common characterization approach that does not require patterning of contacts. Measurements of the Hall voltage and electrical resistivity lead to the product of carrier mobility and carrier concentration (Hall coefficient) which can be decoupled through transport models. Based on the van der Paw method, we have developed an automated setup for Hall measurements from room temperature to ˜500 °C of semiconducting thin films of a wide resistivity range. The resistivity of the film and Hall coefficient is obtained from multiple current-voltage (I-V) measurements performed using a semiconductor parameter analyzer under applied constant "up," zero, and "down" magnetic field generated with two neodymium permanent magnets. The use of slopes obtained from multiple I-Vs for the three magnetic field conditions offer improved accuracy. Samples are preferred in square shape geometry and can range from 2 mm to 25 mm side length. Example measurements of single-crystal silicon with known doping concentration show the accuracy and reliability of the measurement.

  19. Development of a high temperature thin film static strain gage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulse, Charles O.; Bailey, Richard S.; Grant, Howard P.; Przybyszewski, John S.

    1987-10-01

    The objective is to develop a new thin film resistance strain gage system which will be suitable for use inside gas turbine engines on blades or vanes at temperatures up to 1250 K. These gages are to be capable of making strain measurements to plus or minus 2000 microstrain with total errors of no more than plus or minus 10 percent during a 50 hour period. In addition to survival and stability in this hostile environment, attaining a low temperature coefficient of resistance, of the order of 20 ppm/K or less, is an important goal. This requirement arises from the presently unavoidable uncertainties in the measurement of exact temperatures inside gas turbine engines for use in making corrections for apparent strain.

  20. A simple method for characterizing the RF properties of high-temperature superconductive materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, K.; Pandey, R. K.; Skrehot, M. K.; Li, M.

    1989-01-01

    A simple method using a resonant strip in a rectangular waveguide has been devised for superconductive material characterization. The method has the advantages of simplicity; and it requires only a small piece of the superconductive material. The resonant frequency of the superconductive strip can be predicted theoretically.

  1. Magnetic and levitation characteristics of bulk high-temperature superconducting magnets above a permanent magnet guideway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Zheng, Botian; He, Dabo; Sun, Ruixue; Deng, Zigang; Xu, Xun; Dou, Shixue

    2016-09-01

    Due to the large levitation force or the large guidance force of bulk high-temperature superconducting magnets (BHTSMs) above a permanent magnet guideway (PMG), it is reasonable to employ pre-magnetized BHTSMs to replace applied-magnetic-field-cooled superconductors in a maglev system. There are two combination modes between the BHTSM and the PMG, distinguished by the different directions of the magnetization. One is the S-S pole mode, and the other is the S-N pole mode combined with a unimodal PMG segment. A multi-point magnetic field measurement platform was employed to acquire the magnetic field signals of the BHTSM surface in real time during the pre-magnetization process and the re-magnetization process. Subsequently, three experimental aspects of levitation, including the vertical movement due to the levitation force, the lateral movement due to the guidance force, and the force relaxation with time, were explored above the PMG segment. Moreover, finite element modeling by COMSOL Multiphysics has been performed to simulate the different induced currents and the potentially different temperature rises with different modes inside the BHTSM. It was found that the S-S pole mode produced higher induced current density and a higher temperature rise inside the BHTSM, which might escalate its lateral instability above the PMG. The S-N pole mode exhibits the opposite characteristics. In general, this work is instructive for understanding and connecting the magnetic flux, the inner current density, the levitation behavior, and the temperature rise of BHTSMs employed in a maglev system.

  2. Dynamic compaction of high-temperature superconducting YBa2Cu3O(x) powders by laser-driven shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darquey, P.; Kieffer, J. C.; Gauthier, J.; Pepin, H.; Chaker, M.; Champagne, B.; Villeneuve, D.; Baldis, H.

    1991-10-01

    Laser-driven shocks are successfully used to density high-temperature superconducting YBa2Cu3O7 ceramic powders. Pressures of 10 GPa on a nanosecond time scale were generated by producing a confined plasma with a high-intensity laser pulse. Significant consolidation is generated up to 300 microns below the irradiated surface. Magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate that the pinning of the intergranular vortices is strongly affected by the shock propagation. Recovery of superconductivity in compacted material is obtained with a postshock oxygen annealing.

  3. Superconductive niobium films coating carbon nanotube fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvato, M.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I.; Cirillo, M.; Behabtu, N.; Young, C. C.; Pasquali, M.; Vecchione, A.; Fittipaldi, R.; Corato, V.

    2014-11-01

    Superconducting niobium (Nb) has been successfully obtained by sputter deposition on carbon nanotube fibers. The transport properties of the niobium coating the fibers are compared to those of niobium thin films deposited on oxidized Si substrates during the same deposition run. For niobium films with thicknesses above 300 nm, the niobium coating the fibers and the thin films show similar normal state and superconducting properties with critical current density, measured at T = 4.2 K, of the order of 105 A cm-2. Thinner niobium layers coating the fibers also show the onset of the superconducting transition in the resistivity versus temperature dependence, but zero resistance is not observed down to T = 1 K. We evidence by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and current-voltage measurements that the granular structure of the samples is the main reason for the lack of true global superconductivity for thicknesses below 300 nm.

  4. Advanced high temperature superconductor film-based process using RABiTS

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, A.; Hawsey, R.A.; Hack, J.; Moon, D.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation (Contractor), Managing contractor for Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Midwest Superconductivity, Inc. (MSI) and Westinghouse Science and Electric Company (WEC) was to develop the basis for a commercial process for the manufacturing of superconducting tape based on the RABiTS technology developed at ORNL. The chosen method for deposition of YBCO films on RABiTS was Metal Organic chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD).

  5. Analyses, algorithms, and computations for models of high-temperature superconductivity. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Q.

    1997-06-01

    Under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy, the authors have achieved significant progress in the modeling, analysis, and computation of superconducting phenomena. The work so far has focused on mezoscale models as typified by the celebrated Ginzburg-Landau equations; these models are intermediate between the microscopic models (that can be used to understand the basic structure of superconductors and of the atomic and sub-atomic behavior of these materials) and the macroscale, or homogenized, models (that can be of use for the design of devices). The models they have considered include a time dependent Ginzburg-Landau model, a variable thickness thin film model, models for high values of the Ginzburg-landau parameter, models that account for normal inclusions and fluctuations and Josephson effects, and the anisotropic ginzburg-Landau and Lawrence-Doniach models for layered superconductors, including those with high critical temperatures. In each case, they have developed or refined the models, derived rigorous mathematical results that enhance the state of understanding of the models and their solutions, and developed, analyzed, and implemented finite element algorithms for the approximate solution of the model equations.

  6. Analyses, algorithms, and computations for models of high-temperature superconductivity. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Gunzburger, M.D.; Peterson, J.S.

    1998-04-01

    Under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy, the authors have achieved significant progress in the modeling, analysis, and computation of superconducting phenomena. Their work has focused on mezoscale models as typified by the celebrated ginzburg-Landau equations; these models are intermediate between the microscopic models (that can be used to understand the basic structure of superconductors and of the atomic and sub-atomic behavior of these materials) and the macroscale, or homogenized, models (that can be of use for the design of devices). The models the authors have considered include a time dependent Ginzburg-Landau model, a variable thickness thin film model, models for high values of the Ginzburg-Landau parameter, models that account for normal inclusions and fluctuations and Josephson effects, and the anisotropic Ginzburg-Landau and Lawrence-Doniach models for layered superconductors, including those with high critical temperatures. In each case, they have developed or refined the models, derived rigorous mathematical results that enhance the state of understanding of the models and their solutions, and developed, analyzed, and implemented finite element algorithms for the approximate solution of the model equations.

  7. Preparation of superconducting Y-Ba-Cu-O films by a reactive plasma evaporation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terashima, Kazuo; Eguchi, Keisuke; Yoshida, Toyonobu; Akashi, Kazuo

    1988-04-01

    Y-Ba-Cu-O superconducting films were prepared by a reactive plasma evaporation method, in which mixed powders were coevaporated in a thermal RF Ar + O2 plasma, and the ternary-composition controlled high-temperature metallic vapors were codeposited onto a substrate. The deposition rate was much more than 10 micron/min, which is several orders of magnitude higher than those reported for other methods. The structure of the prepared films was identified as an orthorhombic oxygen-deficient perovskite phase, and some films showed the preferred orientation of (001). The as-deposited film without postannealing showed a superconducting transition temperature Tcm (midpoint) of 94 K.

  8. Photoemission results and understanding of high-temperature superconducting oxides: Non-issues, real issues, limitations and opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Margaritondo, G.

    1994-12-31

    The authors argue that the photoelectric effect in high-temperature superconductors is not only a source of extremely valuable information, but one of the most important and interesting open problems in today`s physics. Even without a complete picture of this phenomenon, very important conclusions can be obtained from an empirical analysis of photoemission data, notably on the parity (see Onellion`s article in this volume) and on the link between superconductivity and Anderson locations But a complete theoretical framework is urgently needed. Its development can contribute to the conceptual revolution that might be necessary to understand high-temperature superconductivity, as the Drude-Fermi-Landau revolution was necessary to understand metallic conductivity.

  9. A visualization instrument to investigate the mechanical-electro properties of high temperature superconducting tapes under multi-fields.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Xingyi; Liu, Cong; Zhang, Wentao; Zhou, Jun; Zhou, YouHe

    2016-07-01

    We construct a visible instrument to study the mechanical-electro behaviors of high temperature superconducting tape as a function of magnetic field, strain, and temperature. This apparatus is directly cooled by a commercial Gifford-McMahon cryocooler. The minimum temperature of sample can be 8.75 K. A proportion integration differentiation temperature control is used, which is capable of producing continuous variation of specimen temperature from 8.75 K to 300 K with an optional temperature sweep rate. We use an external loading device to stretch the superconducting tape quasi-statically with the maximum tension strain of 20%. A superconducting magnet manufactured by the NbTi strand is applied to provide magnetic field up to 5 T with a homogeneous range of 110 mm. The maximum fluctuation of the magnetic field is less than 1%. We design a kind of superconducting lead composed of YBa2Cu3O7-x coated conductor and beryllium copper alloy (BeCu) to transfer DC to the superconducting sample with the maximum value of 600 A. Most notably, this apparatus allows in situ observation of the electromagnetic property of superconducting tape using the classical magnetic-optical imaging. PMID:27475594

  10. A visualization instrument to investigate the mechanical-electro properties of high temperature superconducting tapes under multi-fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Xingyi; Liu, Cong; Zhang, Wentao; Zhou, Jun; Zhou, YouHe

    2016-07-01

    We construct a visible instrument to study the mechanical-electro behaviors of high temperature superconducting tape as a function of magnetic field, strain, and temperature. This apparatus is directly cooled by a commercial Gifford-McMahon cryocooler. The minimum temperature of sample can be 8.75 K. A proportion integration differentiation temperature control is used, which is capable of producing continuous variation of specimen temperature from 8.75 K to 300 K with an optional temperature sweep rate. We use an external loading device to stretch the superconducting tape quasi-statically with the maximum tension strain of 20%. A superconducting magnet manufactured by the NbTi strand is applied to provide magnetic field up to 5 T with a homogeneous range of 110 mm. The maximum fluctuation of the magnetic field is less than 1%. We design a kind of superconducting lead composed of YBa2Cu3O7-x coated conductor and beryllium copper alloy (BeCu) to transfer DC to the superconducting sample with the maximum value of 600 A. Most notably, this apparatus allows in situ observation of the electromagnetic property of superconducting tape using the classical magnetic-optical imaging.

  11. Study of the effects of fuel vortex film cooling on high temperature coating durability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A report on the effects of fuel vortex film cooling on high temperature coating durability is presented. The program evaluated candidate high temperature oxidation resistant reaction control system engine thrust chamber material. As a result of the evaluation, the current and future programs may be optimized from the materials standpoint. Engine firing data for the evaluation of one material system is generated. The subjects considered are: (1) screening of materials, (2) thrust chamber fabrication, (3) engine testing, and (4) analysis of the data.

  12. Local structural studies of oriented high-temperature superconducting cuprates by polarized XAFS spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haskel, Daniel

    1998-07-01

    Doping (Sr,Ba) in Lasb{2-x}(Sr,Ba)sb{x}CuOsb4 induces high Tsb{c} superconductivity in addition to profound changes in structural, magnetic and normal state electronic properties. The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the structural characteristics accompanying this doping by performing orientation dependent x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements on magnetically aligned powders. This type of measurements allowed obtaining critical information at the La/(Sr,Ba) site previously unavailable, as detailed below. The measurements show that hole carriers introduced with Sr are polaronic in nature as evident from the two site configuration found for the O(2) apical neighboring Sr and the lack of temperature dependence in the O(2) distribution, which indicates that the hole states associated with each site are not discrete but rather broader than ksb{B}T up to T = 300K. There is a good theoretical argument suggesting each O(2) site is associated with holes being doped into O(1) 2psb{x,y}-Cu 3dsb{xsp2-ysp2} in-plane and O(2) 2psb{z}-Cu 3dsb{3zsp2-rsp2} out-of-plane electronic bands resulting in two different Jahn-Teller distortions of the CuOsb6 octahedra neighboring Sr, where the doped holes are peaked. Based on this argument, the predominance of out-of-plane character for the doped holes, as evidenced from the concentration dependence of the relative population of O(2) sites, would imply that theories of high Tsb{c} relying only on in-plane character of the doped holes are not complete in describing the properties of these cuprates. Our measurements showed that all structural phase transitions in Lasb{2-x}(Sr,Ba)sb{x}CuOsb4 have a significant order-disorder component, as opposed to the purely displacive models found in crystallographic studies. The CuOsb6 octahedra are locally tilted in the high-doping, high-temperature phases but fail to order over long range resulting in the average structures of the crystallographic studies. A critical parameter in

  13. Techniques for Connecting Superconducting Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mester, John; Gwo, Dz-Hung

    2006-01-01

    Several improved techniques for connecting superconducting thin films on substrates have been developed. The techniques afford some versatility for tailoring the electronic and mechanical characteristics of junctions between superconductors in experimental electronic devices. The techniques are particularly useful for making superconducting or alternatively normally conductive junctions (e.g., Josephson junctions) between patterned superconducting thin films in order to exploit electron quantum-tunneling effects. The techniques are applicable to both low-Tc and high-Tc superconductors (where Tc represents the superconducting- transition temperature of a given material), offering different advantages for each. Most low-Tc superconductors are metallic, and heretofore, connections among them have been made by spot welding. Most high-Tc superconductors are nonmetallic and cannot be spot welded. These techniques offer alternatives to spot welding of most low-Tc superconductors and additional solutions to problems of connecting most high-Tc superconductors.

  14. Interface-induced high-temperature superconductivity in FeSe/TiO2(001) heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hao

    2015-03-01

    The recently discovered high transition temperature (Tc) superconductivity at the interface of single unit-cell (UC) FeSe films on SrTiO3(001) has generated considerable excitement, which may eventually lead to the discovery of a new family of high-Tc superconductors at many different interfaces. In this talk, we will present our recent work on a new interfacial system with high-Tc superconductivity, 1 UC FeSe films on anatase TiO2(001). By using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) techniques, we have successfully prepared high-quality 1 UC FeSe films on anatase TiO2(001) formed on SrTiO3. In situ scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) reveals large superconducting gap (Δ) ranging from 17 meV to 22 meV, which is nearly one order of magnitude larger than Δ = 2.2 meV of bulk FeSe with Tc = 9.4 K, indicating the signature of high-Tc superconductivity. The superconductivity of this heterostructure system is further verified by imaging vortex lattice under external magnetic field. By examining the distinct properties of anatase TiO2 from SrTiO3, as well as their influences on superconductivity, we will also discuss about the possible pairing mechanism of this system. Together with our previous work of 1 UC FeSe/SrTiO3, this work demonstrates that interface engineering is a powerful way to fabricate new high-Tc superconductors and investigate the mechanism of high-Tc superconductivity.

  15. Design and construction of a high temperature superconducting power cable cryostat for use in railway system applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, M.; Muralidhar, M.; Suzuki, K.; Fukumoto, Y.; Ishihara, A.; Akasaka, T.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2013-10-01

    The primary objective of the current effort was to design and test a cryostat using a prototype five-meter long high temperature Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3Oy (Bi-2223) superconducting dc power cable for railway systems. To satisfy the safety regulations of the Govt of Japan a mill sheet covered by super-insulation was used inside the walls of the cryostat. The thicknesses of various walls in the cryostat were obtained from a numerical analysis. A non-destructive inspection was utilized to find leaks under vacuum or pressure. The cryostat target temperature range was around 50 K, which is well below liquid nitrogen temperature, the operating temperature of the superconducting cable. The qualification testing was carried out from 77 down to 66 K. When using only the inner sheet wire, the maximum current at 77.3 K was 10 kA. The critical current (Ic) value increased with decreasing temperature and reached 11.79 kA at 73.7 K. This is the largest dc current reported in a Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3Oy or YBa2Cu3Oy (Y-123) superconducting prototype cable so far. These results verify that the developed DC superconducting cable is reliable and fulfils all the requirements necessary for successful use in various power applications including railway systems. The key issues for the design of a reliable cryogenic system for superconducting power cables for railway systems are discussed.

  16. Evaluation of high temperature dielectric films for high voltage power electronic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suthar, J. L.; Laghari, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    Three high temperature films, polyimide, Teflon perfluoroalkoxy and poly-P-xylene, were evaluated for possible use in high voltage power electronic applications, such as in high energy density capacitors, cables and microelectronic circuits. The dielectric properties, including permittivity and dielectric loss, were obtained in the frequency range of 50 Hz to 100 kHz at temperatures up to 200 C. The dielectric strengths at 60 Hz were determined as a function of temperature to 250 C. Confocal laser microscopy was performed to diagnose for voids and microimperfections within the film structure. The results obtained indicate that all films evaluated are capable of maintaining their high voltage properties, with minimal degradation, at temperatures up to 200 C. However, above 200 C, they lose some of their electrical properties. These films may therefore become viable candidates for high voltage power electronic applications at high temperatures.

  17. Experimental observation of high-temperature superconductivity in HxS at P ~150 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremets, M.

    2015-03-01

    We found that sulfur hydride transforms at P ~90 GPa to metal and superconductor with Tc increasing with pressure to 150 K at ~ 200 GPa. Moreover we found superconductivity with Tc ~ 190 K in a H2S sample pressurized to P > 150 GPa at T > 220 K. This superconductivity likely associates with the dissociation of H2S, and formation of SHn (n > 2) hydrides. We proved occurrence of superconductivity by the drop of the resistivity at least 50 times lower than the copper resistivity, the decrease of Tc with magnetic field, and the strong isotope shift of Tc in D2S which evidences a major role of phonons in the superconductivity.

  18. Measurements and calculations of transport AC loss in second generation high temperature superconducting pancake coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Weijia; Coombs, T. A.; Kim, Jae-Ho; Han Kim, Chul; Kvitkovic, Jozef; Pamidi, Sastry

    2011-12-01

    Theoretical and experimental AC loss data on a superconducting pancake coil wound using second generation (2 G) conductors are presented. An anisotropic critical state model is used to calculate critical current and the AC losses of a superconducting pancake coil. In the coil there are two regions, the critical state region and the subcritical region. The model assumes that in the subcritical region the flux lines are parallel to the tape wide face. AC losses of the superconducting pancake coil are calculated using this model. Both calorimetric and electrical techniques were used to measure AC losses in the coil. The calorimetric method is based on measuring the boil-off rate of liquid nitrogen. The electric method used a compensation circuit to eliminate the inductive component to measure the loss voltage of the coil. The experimental results are consistent with the theoretical calculations thus validating the anisotropic critical state model for loss estimations in the superconducting pancake coil.

  19. Thin Film Sensors for Minimally-Intrusive Measurements in Harsh High Temperature Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, Jih-Fen; Will, Herbert A.; Martin, Lisa C.

    1998-01-01

    Advanced thin film sensors are being developed to provide accurate surface temperature, heat flux and strain measurements for components used in hostile propulsion environments. These sensors are sputter deposited and microfabricated directly onto the test articles with no additional bonding agent. The thickness of the sensors is only a few micrometers which creates minimal disturbance of the gas flow over the test surface. Thus thin film sensors have the advantage over conventional wire- based sensors by providing minimally intrusive measurement and having a faster response. These thin film sensors are being developed for characterization of advanced materials and structures in hostile, high-temperature environments, and for validation of design codes. This paper presents the advances of three high temperature thin film sensor technologies developed at NASA Lewis Research Center: thermocouples, heat-flux gages and strain gages. The fabrication techniques of these thin film sensors which include physical vapor deposition, photolithography patterning and lead Wire attachment are described. Sensors demonstrations on a variety of engine materials, including superalloys, ceramics and advanced ceramic matrix composites, in several hostile, high-temperature test environments are presented. The advantages and limitations of thin film sensor technology are also discussed.

  20. Superconducting NbTiN thin films for superconducting radio frequency accelerator cavity applications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Burton, Matthew C.; Beebe, Melissa R.; Yang, Kaida; Lukaszew, Rosa A.; Valente-Feliciano, Anne -Marie; Reece, Charles

    2016-02-12

    Current superconducting radio frequency technology, used in various particle accelerator facilities across the world, is reliant upon bulk niobium superconducting cavities. Due to technological advancements in the processing of bulk Nb cavities, the facilities have reached accelerating fields very close to a material-dependent limit, which is close to 50 MV/m for bulk Nb. One possible solution to improve upon this fundamental limitation was proposed a few years ago by Gurevich [Appl. Phys. Lett. 88, 012511 (2006)], consisting of the deposition of alternating thin layers of superconducting and insulating materials on the interior surface of the cavities. The use of type-IImore » superconductors with Tc > TcNb and Hc > HcNb, (e.g., Nb3Sn, NbN, or NbTiN) could potentially greatly reduce the surface resistance (Rs) and enhance the accelerating field, if the onset of vortex penetration is increased above HcNb, thus enabling higher field gradients. Although Nb3Sn may prove superior, it is not clear that it can be grown as a suitable thin film for the proposed multilayer approach, since very high temperature is typically required for its growth, hindering achieving smooth interfaces and/or surfaces. On the other hand, since NbTiN has a smaller lower critical field (Hc1) and higher critical temperature (Tc) than Nb and increased conductivity compared to NbN, it is a promising candidate material for this new scheme. Here, the authors present experimental results correlating filmmicrostructure with superconducting properties on NbTiN thin film coupon samples while also comparing filmsgrown with targets of different stoichiometry. In conclusion, it is worth mentioning that the authors have achieved thin films with bulk-like lattice parameter and transition temperature while also achieving Hc1 values larger than bulk for films thinner than their London penetration depths.« less

  1. An experimental investigation of high temperature superconducting microstrip antennas at K- and Ka-band frequencies. Ph.D. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, Mark A.

    1993-01-01

    The recent discovery of high temperature superconductors (HTS) has generated a substantial amount of interest in microstrip antenna applications. However, the high permittivity of substrates compatible with HTS results in narrow bandwidths and high patch edge impedances of such antennas. To investigate the performance of superconducting microstrip antennas, three antenna architectures at K and Ka-band frequencies are examined. Superconducting microstrip antennas that are directly coupled, gap coupled, and electromagnetically coupled to a microstrip transmission line were designed and fabricated on lanthanum aluminate substrates using YBa2Cu3O7 superconducting thin films. For each architecture, a single patch antenna and a four element array were fabricated. Measurements from these antennas, including input impedance, bandwidth, patterns, efficiency, and gain are presented. The measured results show usable antennas can be constructed using any of the architectures. All architectures show excellent gain characteristics, with less than 2 dB of total loss in the four element arrays. Although the direct and gap coupled antennas are the simplest antennas to design and fabricate, they suffer from narrow bandwidths. The electromagnetically coupled antenna, on the other hand, allows the flexibility of using a low permittivity substrate for the patch radiator, while using HTS for the feed network, thus increasing the bandwidth while effectively utilizing the low loss properties of HTS. Each antenna investigated in this research is the first of its kind reported.

  2. High-temperature interface superconductivity between metallic and insulating copper oxides.

    PubMed

    Gozar, A; Logvenov, G; Kourkoutis, L Fitting; Bollinger, A T; Giannuzzi, L A; Muller, D A; Bozovic, I

    2008-10-01

    The realization of high-transition-temperature (high-T(c)) superconductivity confined to nanometre-sized interfaces has been a long-standing goal because of potential applications and the opportunity to study quantum phenomena in reduced dimensions. This has been, however, a challenging target: in conventional metals, the high electron density restricts interface effects (such as carrier depletion or accumulation) to a region much narrower than the coherence length, which is the scale necessary for superconductivity to occur. By contrast, in copper oxides the carrier density is low whereas T(c) is high and the coherence length very short, which provides an opportunity-but at a price: the interface must be atomically perfect. Here we report superconductivity in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La(2)CuO(4)) and a metal (La(1.55)Sr(0.45)CuO(4)), neither of which is superconducting in isolation. In these bilayers, T(c) is either approximately 15 K or approximately 30 K, depending on the layering sequence. This highly robust phenomenon is confined within 2-3 nm of the interface. If such a bilayer is exposed to ozone, T(c) exceeds 50 K, and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from an interface layer about 1-2 unit cells thick. Enhancement of T(c) in bilayer systems was observed previously but the essential role of the interface was not recognized at the time. PMID:18843365

  3. Magnetic levitation using high temperature superconducting pancake coils as composite bulk cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, A.; Hopkins, S. C.; Baskys, A.; Kalitka, V.; Molodyk, A.; Glowacki, B. A.

    2015-11-01

    Stacks of superconducting tape can be used as composite bulk superconductors for both trapped field magnets and for magnetic levitation. Little previous work has been done on quantifying the levitation force behavior between stacks of tape and permanent magnets. This paper reports the axial levitation force properties of superconducting tape wound into pancake coils to act as a composite bulk cylinder, showing that similar stable forces to those expected from a uniform bulk cylinder are possible. Force creep was also measured and simulated for the system. The geometry tested is a possible candidate for a rotary superconducting bearing. Detailed finite element modeling in COMSOL Multiphysics was also performed including a full critical state model for induced currents, with temperature and field dependent properties and 3D levitation force models. This work represents one of the most complete levitation force modeling frameworks yet reported using the H-formulation and helps explain why the coil-like stacks of tape are able to sustain levitation forces. The flexibility of geometry and consistency of superconducting properties offered by stacks of tapes, make them attractive for superconducting levitation applications.

  4. Crystallization and high temperature functional properties in CoFeB films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ke; Huang, Ya; Xu, Zhan; Hu, Yiyang; Dong, Shuo

    2016-05-01

    CoFeB alloy films have been attracting much research interest for the applications in magnetoelectronic devices. In this study, crystallization and high temperature functional properties in the sputtered CoFeB alloy films were investigated. The as-deposited alloy films were amorphous and a nanocrystalline structure was formed after annealing, confirmed by X-ray measurements. Large variation in saturation magnetization with temperature was observed in thermomagnetic measurements, reflecting the interplay between crystallization and temperature dependent magnetization in the ferromagnetic alloy film. Pronounced changes in electrical resistivity and optical reflectance with temperature were observed in the alloy film, in accompany with the structural change. The activation barrier for crystallization was determined to be 1.32 eV from the electrical measurements, showing a good thermal stability of the alloy film.

  5. Processing study of high temperature superconducting Y-Ba-Cu-O ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Safari, A.; Wachtman, J.B. Jr.; Ward, C.; Parkhe, V.; Jisrawi, N.; McLean, W.L. )

    1987-07-01

    Processing of the YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} superconducting phase by employing different precursor powder preparation techniques (ball milling, attrition milling) and samples formed by different sintering conditions are discussed. The superconducting phase has been identified by powder x-ray diffraction. The effect of different powder processing and pressing conditions on the structure, density, resistivity and a.c. magnetic susceptibility were studied. Though there is no variation in T{sub c} for all the samples, attrition milled samples show a much lower resistance and less temperature dependence compared to ball milled samples above the superconducting transition temperature up to room temperature. Ball milled samples were loosely packed with more voids compared to attrition milled samples which are more densely packed with a needle-like structure.

  6. Present Status and Future Perspective of Bismuth-Based High-Temperature Superconducting Wires Realizing Application Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Ken-ichi; Kobayashi, Shin-ichi; Nakashima, Takayoshi

    2012-01-01

    Among a series of high-temperature superconducting materials that have been discovered to date, (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10-x is the best candidate for superconducting wires that are long with commercial productivity, and critical current performance. In particular, the controlled overpressure (CT-OP) sintering technique gave us a 100% density of (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10-x portion, which leads to robustness, increase in critical current, and mechanical tolerance. Many application prototypes are already verified and are being evaluated worldwide. Current leads for large magnets and magnetic billet heaters are already commercial products. Commercial applications for power cables, motors for ship propulsion and electric vehicles, and many kinds of magnets are promising in the near future.

  7. SSTAC/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP). Volume 8: Aerothermodynamics Automation and Robotics (A/R) systems sensors, high-temperature superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs of briefings presented at the SSTAC/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP) on aerothermodynamics, automation and robotics systems, sensors, and high-temperature superconductivity are included. Topics covered include: aerothermodynamics; aerobraking; aeroassist flight experiment; entry technology for probes and penetrators; automation and robotics; artificial intelligence; NASA telerobotics program; planetary rover program; science sensor technology; direct detector; submillimeter sensors; laser sensors; passive microwave sensing; active microwave sensing; sensor electronics; sensor optics; coolers and cryogenics; and high temperature superconductivity.

  8. Neutron scattering experiments on high-temperature superconducting materials: Foreign trip report, September 13, 1988--October 4, 1988

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mook, H. A.

    1988-10-01

    The trip to the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) was made to perform neutron scattering experiments on the new high temperature superconducting materials. Part of this work could have been accomplished at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at ORNL had it been operational; other parts utilized the special instrumentation at the ILL available at no other place. Experiments performed were the following: high energy magnetic excitations in pure and Ba-doped La2CuO4, magnetic excitations and structural phase transitions in the Bi2Ba2Cu1O6 superconductor, search for the fluxoid lattice in the high temperature materials, and magnetic spin structures in ErBa2Cu3O7 and GdBa2Cu3O6.5. Measurements were also made on supermirrors important for polarizing and neutron guide applications.

  9. Preparation and Analysis of Platinum Thin Films for High Temperature Sensor Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Laster, Kimala L. H.

    2005-01-01

    A study has been made of platinum thin films for application as high temperature resistive sensors. To support NASA Glenn Research Center s high temperature thin film sensor effort, a magnetron sputtering system was installed recently in the GRC Microsystems Fabrication Clean Room Facility. Several samples of platinum films were prepared using various system parameters to establish run conditions. These films were characterized with the intended application of being used as resistive sensing elements, either for temperature or strain measurement. The resistances of several patterned sensors were monitored to document the effect of changes in parameters of deposition and annealing. The parameters were optimized for uniformity and intrinsic strain. The evaporation of platinum via oxidation during annealing over 900 C was documented, and a model for the process developed. The film adhesion was explored on films annealed to 1000 C with various bondcoats on fused quartz and alumina. From this compiled data, a list of optimal parameters and characteristics determined for patterned platinum thin films is given.

  10. Characterization of Thick and Thin Film SiCN for Pressure Sensing at High Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Leo, Alfin; Andronenko, Sergey; Stiharu, Ion; Bhat, Rama B.

    2010-01-01

    Pressure measurement in high temperature environments is important in many applications to provide valuable information for performance studies. Information on pressure patterns is highly desirable for improving performance, condition monitoring and accurate prediction of the remaining life of systems that operate in extremely high temperature environments, such as gas turbine engines. A number of technologies have been recently investigated, however these technologies target specific applications and they are limited by the maximum operating temperature. Thick and thin films of SiCN can withstand high temperatures. SiCN is a polymer-derived ceramic with liquid phase polymer as its starting material. This provides the advantage that it can be molded to any shape. CERASET™ also yields itself for photolithography, with the addition of photo initiator 2, 2-Dimethoxy-2-phenyl-acetophenone (DMPA), thereby enabling photolithographical patterning of the pre-ceramic polymer using UV lithography. SiCN fabrication includes thermosetting, crosslinking and pyrolysis. The technology is still under investigation for stability and improved performance. This work presents the preparation of SiCN films to be used as the body of a sensor for pressure measurements in high temperature environments. The sensor employs the phenomenon of drag effect. The pressure sensor consists of a slender sensitive element and a thick blocking element. The dimensions and thickness of the films depend on the intended application of the sensors. Fabrication methods of SiCN ceramics both as thin (about 40–60 μm) and thick (about 2–3 mm) films for high temperature applications are discussed. In addition, the influence of thermosetting and annealing processes on mechanical properties is investigated. PMID:22205871

  11. Characterization of thick and thin film SiCN for pressure sensing at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Leo, Alfin; Andronenko, Sergey; Stiharu, Ion; Bhat, Rama B

    2010-01-01

    Pressure measurement in high temperature environments is important in many applications to provide valuable information for performance studies. Information on pressure patterns is highly desirable for improving performance, condition monitoring and accurate prediction of the remaining life of systems that operate in extremely high temperature environments, such as gas turbine engines. A number of technologies have been recently investigated, however these technologies target specific applications and they are limited by the maximum operating temperature. Thick and thin films of SiCN can withstand high temperatures. SiCN is a polymer-derived ceramic with liquid phase polymer as its starting material. This provides the advantage that it can be molded to any shape. CERASET™ also yields itself for photolithography, with the addition of photo initiator 2, 2-Dimethoxy-2-phenyl-acetophenone (DMPA), thereby enabling photolithographical patterning of the pre-ceramic polymer using UV lithography. SiCN fabrication includes thermosetting, crosslinking and pyrolysis. The technology is still under investigation for stability and improved performance. This work presents the preparation of SiCN films to be used as the body of a sensor for pressure measurements in high temperature environments. The sensor employs the phenomenon of drag effect. The pressure sensor consists of a slender sensitive element and a thick blocking element. The dimensions and thickness of the films depend on the intended application of the sensors. Fabrication methods of SiCN ceramics both as thin (about 40-60 μm) and thick (about 2-3 mm) films for high temperature applications are discussed. In addition, the influence of thermosetting and annealing processes on mechanical properties is investigated. PMID:22205871

  12. Amorphous molybdenum silicon superconducting thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Bosworth, D. Sahonta, S.-L.; Barber, Z. H.; Hadfield, R. H.

    2015-08-15

    Amorphous superconductors have become attractive candidate materials for superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors due to their ease of growth, homogeneity and competitive superconducting properties. To date the majority of devices have been fabricated using W{sub x}Si{sub 1−x}, though other amorphous superconductors such as molybdenum silicide (Mo{sub x}Si{sub 1−x}) offer increased transition temperature. This study focuses on the properties of MoSi thin films grown by magnetron sputtering. We examine how the composition and growth conditions affect film properties. For 100 nm film thickness, we report that the superconducting transition temperature (Tc) reaches a maximum of 7.6 K at a composition of Mo{sub 83}Si{sub 17}. The transition temperature and amorphous character can be improved by cooling of the substrate during growth which inhibits formation of a crystalline phase. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy studies confirm the absence of long range order. We observe that for a range of 6 common substrates (silicon, thermally oxidized silicon, R- and C-plane sapphire, x-plane lithium niobate and quartz), there is no variation in superconducting transition temperature, making MoSi an excellent candidate material for SNSPDs.

  13. Electrodynamic stabilization conditions for high-temperature superconducting composites with different types of current-voltage characteristic nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkharov, A. M.; Lavrov, N. A.; Romanovskii, V. R.

    2014-06-01

    The current instability is studied in high-temperature superconducting current-carrying elements with I- V characteristics described by power or exponential equations. Stability analysis of the macroscopic states is carried out in terms of a stationary zero-dimensional model. In linear temperature approximation criteria are derived that allow one to find the maximum allowable values of the induced current, induced electric field intensity, and overheating of the superconductor. A condition is formulated for the complete thermal stabilization of the superconducting composite with regard to the nonlinearity of its I- V characteristic. It is shown that both subcritical and supercritical stable states may arise. In the latter case, the current and electric field intensity are higher than the preset critical parameters of the superconductor. Conditions for these states depending on the properties of the matrix, superconductor's critical current, fill factor, and nonlinearity of the I- V characteristic are discussed. The obtained results considerably augment the class of allowable states for high-temperature superconductors: it is demonstrated that there exist stable resistive conditions from which superconductors cannot pass to the normal state even if the parameters of these conditions are supercritical.

  14. High-temperature superconductivity from fine-tuning of Fermi-surface singularities in iron oxypnictides

    PubMed Central

    Charnukha, A.; Evtushinsky, D. V.; Matt, C. E.; Xu, N.; Shi, M.; Büchner, B.; Zhigadlo, N. D.; Batlogg, B.; Borisenko, S. V.

    2015-01-01

    In the family of the iron-based superconductors, the REFeAsO-type compounds (with RE being a rare-earth metal) exhibit the highest bulk superconducting transition temperatures (Tc) up to 55 K and thus hold the key to the elusive pairing mechanism. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the intrinsic electronic structure of SmFe0.92Co0.08AsO (Tc = 18 K) is highly nontrivial and consists of multiple band-edge singularities in close proximity to the Fermi level. However, it remains unclear whether these singularities are generic to the REFeAsO-type materials and if so, whether their exact topology is responsible for the aforementioned record Tc. In this work, we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to investigate the inherent electronic structure of the NdFeAsO0.6F0.4 compound with a twice higher Tc = 38 K. We find a similarly singular Fermi surface and further demonstrate that the dramatic enhancement of superconductivity in this compound correlates closely with the fine-tuning of one of the band-edge singularities to within a fraction of the superconducting energy gap Δ below the Fermi level. Our results provide compelling evidence that the band-structure singularities near the Fermi level in the iron-based superconductors must be explicitly accounted for in any attempt to understand the mechanism of superconducting pairing in these materials. PMID:26678565

  15. Electrodeposited Ag-Stabilization Layer for High Temperature Superconducting Coated Conductors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, R. N.; Mann, J.; Qiao, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Selvamanickam, V.

    2010-11-01

    We developed a non-aqueous based electrodepostion process of Ag-stabilization layer on YBCO superconductor tapes. The non-aqueous electroplating solution is non-reactive to the HTS layer thus does not detoriate the critical current capability of the superconductor layer when plated directly on the HTS tape. The superconducting current capabilities of these tapes were measured by non-contact magnetic measurements.

  16. Basic concepts, status, opportunities, and challenges of electrical machines utilizing high-temperature superconducting (HTS) windings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frauenhofer, J.; Grundmann, J.; Klaus, G.; Nick, W.

    2008-02-01

    An overview of the different approaches towards achieving a marketable application of a superconducting electrical machine, either as synchronous motor or generator, will be given. This field ranges from relatively small industrial drives to utility generators with large power ratings, from the low speed and high torque of wind power generators and ship propulsion motors, to high speed generators attached to turbines. Essentially HTS machine technology offers several advantages such as compactness (weight and volume reduction), increased efficiency, and other operational benefits. The machine features have to be optimized with regard to the specific application, and different concepts were developed by internationally competing teams, with Siemens being one of them. The achieved status in these fields will be summarized, pointing to the specific technical challenges to overcome. For this purpose we have not only to consider the technology of manufacturing the HTS rotor winding itself, but also to check requirements and availability of supporting technologies. This ranges from new challenges posed to the non-superconducting ("conventional") components of such innovative HTS machines, manufacturing superconducting material in the coming transition from 1st to 2nd generation HTS tape, cryogenic technology including material behavior, to new and challenging tasks in simulating and predicting the performance of such machines by computational tools. The question of market opportunities for this technology obviously is a function of all these aspects; however, a strong tendency for the near future is seen in the area of high-torque ship propulsion.

  17. High-temperature superconductivity from fine-tuning of Fermi-surface singularities in iron oxypnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnukha, Aliaksei

    2015-03-01

    In the family of iron-based superconductors, 1111-type materials exhibit superconductivity with the highest transition temperature Tc=55K. Early theoretical predictions of their electronic structure revealed multiple large circular sheets of the Fermi surface. Here we use ARPES to show that two prototypical compounds of the 1111 type are at odds with this description. Their low-energy band structure is formed by the edges of several bands, which are pulled to the Fermi level from the depths of the theoretically predicted band structure by strong electronic interactions. We further demonstrate that although their low-energy electronic looks remarkably similar, the Tc differs by a factor of 2. Upon closer examination we uncover that one of the bands in the higher-Tc compound sinks to 2.3meV below the Fermi level and thus does not produce a Fermi surface. And yet we find that it hosts a superconducting energy gap 10x larger than the same band in the lower-Tc sister compound. Our results show that the Fermi-surface singularities in the iron-oxypnictides dramatically affect their low-energy electronic properties, including superconductivity, and must therefore be explicitly taken into account in any attempt to understand the pairing mechanism.

  18. Preparation of superconducting Tl-Ca-Ba-Cu thin films by chemical deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, W.L.; Eddy, M.M.; James, T.W.; Hammond, R.B.; Gruner, G.

    1989-07-10

    The scientific revolution in superconductivity has been driven by the discovery of many metal oxides that exhibit this unique property at unusually high temperatures. At the time of submission of this article, the material showing the highest transition temperature is Tl2Ca2Ba2Cu3O10 (2223) which is superconducting below 122 K. For many potential applications of high Tc superconductors uniform thin films are required. There are a number of methods that might be employed for the preparation of such a film. These include electron beam (e-beam) coevaporation and sequential evaporation, sputtering, ion beam deposition, molecular beam epitaxy, laser ablation, spray, and spin-on techniques, all of which have been used to prepare thin and thick films of YBa{sub 2}CuO{sub 7}. Sequential e-beam, sputtering, and laser ablation have been shown to make superconducting films in the Tl-Ca-Ba-Cu oxide system.

  19. High Temperature Annealing Studies on the Piezoelectric Properties of Thin Aluminum Nitride Films

    SciTech Connect

    R. Farrell; V. R. Pagan; A. Kabulski; Sridhar Kuchibhatl; J. Harman; K. R. Kasarla; L. E. Rodak; P. Famouri; J. Peter Hensel; D. Korakakis

    2008-05-01

    A Rapid Thermal Annealing (RTA) system was used to anneal sputtered and MOVPE grown Aluminum Nitride (AlN) thin films at temperatures up to 1000°C in ambient and controlled environments. According to Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (EDAX), the films annealed in an ambient environment rapidly oxidize after five minutes at 1000°C. Below 1000°C the films oxidized linearly as a function of annealing temperature which is consistent with what has been reported in literature [1]. Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV) was used to measure the piezoelectric coefficient, d33, of these films. Films annealed in an ambient environment had a weak piezoelectric response indicating that oxidation on the surface of the film reduces the value of d33. A high temperature furnace has been built that is capable of taking in-situ measurements of the piezoelectric response of AlN films. In-situ d33 measurements are recorded up to 300°C for both sputtered and MOVPE-grown AlN thin films. The measured piezoelectric response appears to increase with temperature up to 300°C possibly due to stress in the film.

  20. High Temperature Annealing Studies on the Piezoelectric Properties of Thin Aluminum Nitride Films

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, R.; Pagan, V.R.; Kabulski, A.; Kuchibhatla, S.; Harman, J.; Kasarla, K.R.; Rodak, L.E.; Hensel, J.P.; Famouri, P.; Korakakis, D.

    2008-01-01

    A Rapid Thermal Annealing (RTA) system was used to anneal sputtered and MOVPE-grown Aluminum Nitride (AlN) thin films at temperatures up to 1000°C in ambient and controlled environments. According to Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (EDAX), the films annealed in an ambient environment rapidly oxidize after five minutes at 1000°C. Below 1000°C the films oxidized linearly as a function of annealing temperature which is consistent with what has been reported in literature [1]. Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV) was used to measure the piezoelectric coefficient, d33, of these films. Films annealed in an ambient environment had a weak piezoelectric response indicating that oxidation on the surface of the film reduces the value of d33. A high temperature furnace has been built that is capable of taking in-situ measurements of the piezoelectric response of AlN films. In-situ d33 measurements are recorded up to 300°C for both sputtered and MOVPE-grown AlN thin films. The measured piezoelectric response appears to increase with temperature up to 300°C possibly due to stress in the film.

  1. Effects of interlayer coupling on the magnetic and transport properties of superconducting multilayers and high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, K.E.; Hettinger, J.D.; Kim, D.H.

    1994-06-01

    The effect of interlayer coupling on the transport properties and dissipation in a magnetic field is reviewed for superconducting multilayers including highly-anisotropic high-temperature superconductors (HTS). For the applied field parallel to the superconducting layers the absence of any Lorentz-force dependence of the dissipation leads to an explanation other than flux motion. This is consistent with a Josephson junction dissipation which dominates flux motion of the insulating regions between layers. However, in is seen to cross over from phase slips at Josephson junctions to depinning of vortices from the external field at high fields and temperatures. For fields perpendicular to the superconducting layers the much greater resistive broadening in HTS is due to dissipation by thermally-activated flux motion, consistent with a lack of intrinsic pinning. We show experimental evidence that the associated flux motion occurs as a result of a crossover from three dimensional (3D) vortex lines to 2D independent pancake-like vortices, residing in the Cu-O layers. This 3D to 2D crossover occurs after k{sub B}T exceeds the Josephson coupling energy.

  2. Cytochrome c thin film with high temperature of coefficient for infrared detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Chung Hao; Su, Guo-Dung J.

    2011-10-01

    The cytochrome c (protein) thin film on the oxide surface has been reported high temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR). The protein thin film resistance acts as exponential grow under the constant voltage bias. The experimental results showed that the TCR exceeded 20% 1/K, which is 5times higher than popular vanadium oxide (VOx). We also found the protein thin film can be attached on to the SU8 photoresist surface by changing the SU8 surface more hydrophilic and simple spinning coat technique. The cytochrome c thin film on SU8 also showed the high TCR. With easy fabrication methods and lower thermal conductivity of SU8 and protein, we believe that it is possible to fabricate new generation microbolometer based on cytochrome c protein and SU-8 photoresist.

  3. Advances in Thin Film Thermocouple Durability Under High Temperature and Pressure Testing Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Lisa C.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Taylor, Keith F.

    1999-01-01

    Thin film thermocouples for measuring material surface temperature have been previously demonstrated on several material systems and in various hostile test environments. A well-developed thin film fabrication procedure utilizing shadow masking for patterning the sensors elements had produced thin films with sufficient durability for applications in high temperature and pressure environments that exist in air-breathing and hydrogen-fueled burner rig and engine test facilities. However, while shadow masking had been a reliable method for specimens with flat and gently curved surfaces, it had not been consistently reliable for use on test components with sharp contours. This work reports on the feasibility of utilizing photolithography processing for patterning thin film thermocouples. Because this patterning process required changes in the thin film deposition process from that developed for shadow masking, the effect of these changes on thin film adherence during burner rig testing was evaluated. In addition to the results of changing the patterning method, the effects on thin film adherence of other processes used in the thin film fabrication procedure is also presented.

  4. Multivibrator transistor switch module using a high-temperature superconducting core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, T.; Shibata, T.; Makino, M.; Mohri, K.

    1991-11-01

    A transistor switching module based on the Royer oscillator-type magnetic multivibrator is presented in which a high-temperature superconductor thin disk core, with four coils tightly set around it, is connected with two switching transistors. This Royer-type module has superior properties such as pulse-triggered switching; moreover, oscillation of this circuit starts within a half cycle, while parametric oscillation switching modules need several cycles to turn on. The module has a total switching time of less than 0.4 microsec, which is about 1 percent that of the Royer circuit using an amorphous core.

  5. Fields and forces in flywheel energy storage with high-temperature superconducting bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, L.R.

    1997-03-01

    The development of low-loss bearings employing high-temperature superconductors has brought closer the advent of practical flywheel energy storage systems. These systems require magnetic fields and forces for levitation, stabilization, and energy transfer. This paper describes the status of experiments on flywheel energy storage at Argonne National Laboratory and computations in support of that project, in particular computations for the permanent-magnet rotor of the motor-generator that transfers energy to and from the flywheel, for other energy-transfer systems under consideration, and for the levitation and stability subsystems.

  6. Fields and forces in flywheel energy storage with high-temperature superconducting bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, L.R.

    1996-05-01

    The development of low-loss bearings employing high-temperature superconductors has brought closer the advent of practical flywheel energy storage systems. These systems require magnetic fields and forces for levitation, stabilization, and energy transfer. This paper describes the status of experiments on flywheel energy storage at Argonne National Laboratory and computations in support of that project, in particular computations for the permanent-magnet rotor of the motor-generator that transfers energy to and from the flywheel, for other energy-transfer systems under consideration, and for the levitation and stabilization subsystem.

  7. Space-deployed, thin-walled enclosure for a cryogenically-cooled high temperature superconducting coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Allison K.

    The interaction of magnetic fields generated by large superconducting coils has multiple applications in space, including actuation of spacecraft or spacecraft components, wireless power transfer, and shielding of spacecraft from radiation and high energy particles. These applications require coils with major diameters as large as 20 meters and a thermal management system to maintain the superconducting material of the coil below its critical temperature. Since a rigid thermal management system, such as a heat pipe, is unsuitable for compact stowage inside a 5 meter payload fairing, a thin-walled thermal enclosure is proposed. A 1.85 meter diameter test article consisting of a bladder layer for containing chilled nitrogen vapor, a restraint layer, and multilayer insulation was tested in a custom toroidal vacuum chamber. The material properties found during laboratory testing are used to predict the performance of the test article in low Earth orbit. Deployment motion of the same test article was measured using a motion capture system and the results are used to predict the deployment in space. A 20 meter major diameter and coil current of 6.7 MA is selected as a point design case. This design point represents a single coil in a high energy particle shielding system. Sizing of the thermal and structural components of the enclosure is completed. The thermal and deployment performance is predicted.

  8. Superconducting thin films on potassium tantalate substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Feenstra, R.; Boatner, L.A.

    1992-05-05

    This patent describes a composition for the lossless transmission of electrical current, it comprises: a superconducting thin film epitaxially deposited on a oriented surface of a single crystal KTa{sub 1{minus}z}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate, where z is 0 to 1, wherein the superconducting thin film is selected from the group consisting of YBa{sub 2{minus}}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}, Y{sub 2}Ba{sub 4}Cu{sub 8}O{sub 20}, a compound wherein a trivalent rare earth element replaces yttrium in compound YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}, and a compound wherein scandium replaces yttrium in the compound YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}.

  9. Research On Bi-Based High-Temperature Superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Curtis; Doane, George B., III; Golben, John

    1993-01-01

    Brief report describes effects of melt sintering on Bi-based high-temperature superconductor system, as well as use of vibrating-sample magnetometer to determine hysteresis curves at 77 K for partially melt-sintered samples. Also discussed is production of high-temperature superconducting thin films by laser ablation: such films potentially useful in detection of signals of very low power.

  10. Grain boundary studies of high temperature superconducting materials using electron backscatter Kikuchi diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, A.; Specht, E.D.; Wang, Z.L.; Kroeger, D.M.

    1996-12-31

    Grain Orientation and gain boundary misorientation distributions in high critical current density, high temperature superconductors were determined using electron backscatter Kikuchi diffraction. It is found that depending on the type of superconductor and the processing method used to fabricate it, there exist different scales of biaxial texture from no biaxial texture, local biaxial texture, to complete biaxial texture. Experimentally obtained grain boundary misorientation distributions (GBMDs) were found to be skewed significantly to low angles in comparison to what is expected on the basis of macroscopic texture alone, suggesting that minimization of energy may be a driving force during the processing of high critical current density materials. In addition, a higher than expected fraction of coincident-site lattice boundaries is observed. Examination of maps of grain boundary misorientations in spatially correlated gains, i.e. the grain boundary mesotexture, suggests the presence percolative paths of high critical current density. A combination of orientation measurements, theoretical modeling of GBMDs and modeling of percolative current flow through an assemblage of gain boundaries is performed to gain an insight into the important microstructural features dictating the transport properties of high temperature superconductors. It is found that maximization of low energy, in particular, low angle boundaries is essential for higher critical currents. The combination of experimental and analytical techniques employed are applicable to other materials where physical properties are dominated by interganular characteristics.

  11. Assessment of High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) electric motors for rotorcraft propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doernbach, Jay

    1990-01-01

    The successful development of high temperature superconductors (HTS) could have a major impact on future aeronautical propulsion and aeronautical flight vehicle systems. Applications of high temperature superconductors have been envisioned for several classes of aeronautical systems, including subsonic and supersonic transports, hypersonic aircraft, V/STOL aircraft, rotorcraft and solar powered aircraft. The potential of HTS electric motors and generators for providing primary shaft power for rotorcraft propulsion is examined. Three different sized production helicopters were investigated; namely, the Bell Jet Ranger, the Sikorsky Black Hawk and the Sikorsky Super Stallion. These rotorcraft have nominal horsepower ratings of 500, 3600, and 13400 respectively. Preliminary results indicated that an all-electric HTS drive system produces an improvement in rotorcraft Takeoff Gross Weight (TOGW) for those rotorcraft with power ratings above 2000 horsepower. The predicted TOGW improvements are up to 9 percent for the medium-sized Sikorsky Black Hawk and up to 20 percent for the large-sized Sikorsky Super Stallion. The small-sized Bell Jet Ranger, however, experienced a penalty in TOGW with the all-electric HTS drive system.

  12. Serial and parallel power equipment with high-temperature superconducting elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bencze, Laszlo; Goebl, Nandor; Palotas, Bela; Vajda, Istvan

    1995-01-01

    One of the prospective, practical applications of high-temperature superconductors is the fault-current limitation in electrical energy networks. The development and testing of experimental HTSC serial current limiters have been reported in the literature. A Hungarian electric power company has proposed the development of a parallel equipment for arc suppressing both in the industrial and customers' networks. On the basis of the company's proposal the authors have outlined the scheme of a compound circuit that can be applied both for current limitation and arc suppressing. In this paper the design principles and methods of the shunt equipment are presented. These principles involve the electrical, mechanical and cryogenic aspects with the special view on the electrical and mechanical connection between the HTSC material and the current lead. Preliminary experiments and tests have been carried out to demonstrate the validity of the design principles developed. The results of the experiments and of the technological investigations are presented.

  13. No-insulation multi-width winding technique for high temperature superconducting magnet

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Seungyong; Kim, Youngjae; Keun Park, Dong; Kim, Kwangmin; Voccio, John P.; Bascuñán, Juan; Iwasa, Yukikazu

    2013-01-01

    We present a No-Insulation (NI) Multi-Width (MW) winding technique for an HTS (high temperature superconductor) magnet consisting of double-pancake (DP) coils. The NI enables an HTS magnet self-protecting and the MW minimizes the detrimental anisotropy in current-carrying capacity of HTS tape by assigning tapes of multiple widths to DP coils within a stack, widest tape to the top and bottom sections and the narrowest in the midplane section. This paper presents fabrication and test results of an NI-MW HTS magnet and demonstrates the unique features of the NI-MW technique: self-protecting and enhanced field performance, unattainable with the conventional technique. PMID:24255549

  14. Some problems in the competition of high-temperature superconductivity research during the late 1980s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bing

    2014-03-01

    After A. Müller and J.G. Bednorz found that Oxide Ba-La-Cu-O could have Tc for 30K in 1986, a special competition in High Temperature superconductors research began in the world, especially among American, Japanese and Chinese scientists in late 1980's. By investigating that competition in history, some interesting problems were found. There are strategy used by scientists in different country which differ from normal science period; Question about the peer review and competition in that special period; ``Matthew's Effect'' in that competition; some question about the disclosure of the secret information and competition; and, finally what methodology was used by Chinese scientists. All that problems are not only historically, but also have some sociological and philosophical meaning. Based on historical re-investigation, all those problems were discussed in the paper.

  15. In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscope High Temperature Behavior in Nanocrystalline Platinum Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Davil; Leon, Alexander; Kumar, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present a micro electro-mechanical systems (MEMS)-based in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) experimental setup for high-temperature uniaxial tensile behavior of nanocrystalline thin films. This setup utilizes self-heating (Ohmic) to raise the temperature of thin films while applying uniaxial tensile loading using electro-thermal actuators. Self-heating is achieved by passing a high-density direct current through the specimen. We carried out a qualitative uniaxial tensile experiment on a 75-nm platinum thin film at 360 K. Temperature is estimated using COMSOL modeling. In this qualitative experiment, we observed initial grain growth followed by formation of edge serrations. We propose that grain boundary sliding coupled with grain growth is the underlying mechanism responsible for the observed behavior.

  16. Rhombohedral AlPt films formed by self-propagating, high temperature synthesis.

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, David Price; Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Kotula, Paul Gabriel

    2005-11-01

    High-purity AlPt thin films prepared by self-propagating, high temperature combustion synthesis show evidence for a new rhombohedral phase. Sputter deposited Al/Pt multilayers of various designs are reacted at different rates in air and in vacuum, and each form a new trigonal/hexagonal aluminide phase with unit cell parameters a = 15.571(8) {angstrom}, c = 5.304(1) {angstrom}, space group R-3 (148), and Z, the number of formula units within a unit cell, = 39. The lattice is isostructural to that of the AlPd R-3 lattice as reported by Matkovic and Schubert (Matkovic, 1977). Reacted films have a random in-plane crystallographic texture, a modest out-of-plane (001) texture, and equiaxed grains with dimensions on the order of film thickness.

  17. High Temperature Superconducting Degaussing-Cooling Two Hts Coils with One Cryocooler for the Littoral Combat Ship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, B. K.; Golda, E. M.; Kephart, J. T.

    2008-03-01

    The concept of creating a high temperature superconducting degaussing system has previously been studied by the Navy and shown to provide significant weight savings over conventional copper based degaussing systems. Modeling efforts have shown that in a HTS Degaussing System (HTSDG) for the Littoral Combat Ship, the dominant costs are cryocoolers. In an effort to minimize the number of cryocoolers, a two coil demonstrator cooled by one cryocooler has been constructed at NSWCCD Philadelphia. The demonstration consists of two 22 m long sections of flexible cryostat that are electrically isolated but connected in series through two junction boxes for serial gas flow. Within each cryostat section, 12 turns of HTS represent a vertical and horizontal degaussing coil. Use of Helium as the working fluid reduces safety impacts and allows higher current density in the HTS conductor due to lower temperature operation. Design, testing results, and lessons learned from the installation and operation of this cable are presented in this paper.

  18. Alternating current loss of second-generation high-temperature superconducting coils with magnetic and non-magnetic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Kvitkovic, J.; Kim, Jae-Ho.; Kim, C. H.; Pamidi, S. V.; Coombs, T. A.

    2012-09-01

    It is widely believed that the second-generation high-temperature superconducting (2G HTS) tapes with magnetic substrates suffer higher transport loss compared to those with non-magnetic substrates. To test this, we prepared two identical coils with magnetic and non-magnetic substrates, respectively. The experimental result was rather surprising that they generated roughly the same amount of transport loss. We used finite element method to understand this result. It is found that, unlike in the single tape where the magnetic field-dependent critical current characteristic can be neglected and the effect of magnetic substrate dominates, the magnetic field-dependent critical current characteristic of 2G tape plays as an equally important role as magnetic substrate in terms of HTS coils.

  19. Ripple current loss measurement with DC bias condition for high temperature superconducting power cable using calorimetry method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D. W.; Kim, J. G.; Kim, A. R.; Park, M.; Yu, I. K.; Sim, K. D.; Kim, S. H.; Lee, S. J.; Cho, J. W.; Won, Y. J.

    2010-11-01

    The authors calculated the loss of the High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) model cable using Norris ellipse formula, and measured the loss of the model cable experimentally. Two kinds of measuring method are used. One is the electrical method, and the other is the calorimetric method. The electrical method can be used only in AC condition. But the calorimetric method can be used in both AC and DC bias conditions. In order to propose an effective measuring approach for Ripple Dependent Loss (RDL) under DC bias condition using the calorimetric method, Bismuth Strontium Calcium Copper Oxide (BSCCO) wires were used for the HTS model cable, and the SUS tapes were used as a heating tape to make the same pattern of the temperature profiles as in the electrical method without the transport current. The temperature-loss relations were obtained by the electrical method, and then applied to the calorimetric method by which the RDL under DC bias condition was well estimated.

  20. Study on the effect of transition curve to the dynamic characteristics of high-temperature superconducting maglev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Nan; Zheng, Botian; Gou, Yanfeng; Chen, Ping; Zheng, Jun; Deng, Zigang

    2015-12-01

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) maglev technology is becoming more and more mature, and many key technologies have been deeply studied. However, the transition curve plays a key role in HTS maglev system, and related studies have not been carried out. In this paper series of simulations were conducted to test the lateral and vertical vibration of HTS maglev when passing through curves. Two magnetic guideways, of which one has transition curves but the other does not, are designed to test the vibration characteristics of a mini HTS maglev model running though curves. Results show that after adding transition curves between straight line and circular curve the vibration of HTS maglev model in lateral and vertical directions are all weakened in different degrees. It proves that adding transition curve into HTS maglev system is favorable and necessary.

  1. Phenomenological study of the normal state angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy line shapes of high temperature superconducting cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, Kazue; Dilip, Rohit; Gweon, G.-H.

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the normal state properties of high temperature (high-Tc) superconducting cuprates remains a central mystery in the high-Tc problem. Standing out among those mysterious properties are the anomalous angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) line shapes. The extremely correlated Fermi liquid (ECFL) theory recently introduced by Shastry has renewed interest in quantitatively understanding ARPES line shapes. In this talk, we combine certain phenomenological considerations with the ECFL framework in order to describe the ARPES data. Our phenomenological models have the property of preserving the universal property of the original ECFL theory, while introducing phenomenological changes in a non-universal property. Our models describe, with unprecedented fidelity, the key aspects of the dichotomy between momentum distribution curves (MDCs) and energy distribution curves (EDCs) of high-Tc ARPES data. Therefore, our study goes well beyond the prevailing studies that discuss only MDCs and EDCs.

  2. Hydrogen termination of CVD diamond films by high-temperature annealing at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Seshan, V; Ullien, D; Castellanos-Gomez, A; Sachdeva, S; Murthy, D H K; Savenije, T J; Ahmad, H A; Nunney, T S; Janssens, S D; Haenen, K; Nesládek, M; van der Zant, H S J; Sudhölter, E J R; de Smet, L C P M

    2013-06-21

    A high-temperature procedure to hydrogenate diamond films using molecular hydrogen at atmospheric pressure was explored. Undoped and doped chemical vapour deposited (CVD) polycrystalline diamond films were treated according to our annealing method using a H2 gas flow down to ~50 ml∕min (STP) at ~850 °C. The films were extensively evaluated by surface wettability, electron affinity, elemental composition, photoconductivity, and redox studies. In addition, electrografting experiments were performed. The surface characteristics as well as the optoelectronic and redox properties of the annealed films were found to be very similar to hydrogen plasma-treated films. Moreover, the presented method is compatible with atmospheric pressure and provides a low-cost solution to hydrogenate CVD diamond, which makes it interesting for industrial applications. The plausible mechanism for the hydrogen termination of CVD diamond films is based on the formation of surface carbon dangling bonds and carbon-carbon unsaturated bonds at the applied tempera-ture, which react with molecular hydrogen to produce a hydrogen-terminated surface. PMID:23802976

  3. Hydrogen termination of CVD diamond films by high-temperature annealing at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshan, V.; Ullien, D.; Castellanos-Gomez, A.; Sachdeva, S.; Murthy, D. H. K.; Savenije, T. J.; Ahmad, H. A.; Nunney, T. S.; Janssens, S. D.; Haenen, K.; Nesládek, M.; van der Zant, H. S. J.; Sudhölter, E. J. R.; de Smet, L. C. P. M.

    2013-06-01

    A high-temperature procedure to hydrogenate diamond films using molecular hydrogen at atmospheric pressure was explored. Undoped and doped chemical vapour deposited (CVD) polycrystalline diamond films were treated according to our annealing method using a H2 gas flow down to ˜50 ml/min (STP) at ˜850 °C. The films were extensively evaluated by surface wettability, electron affinity, elemental composition, photoconductivity, and redox studies. In addition, electrografting experiments were performed. The surface characteristics as well as the optoelectronic and redox properties of the annealed films were found to be very similar to hydrogen plasma-treated films. Moreover, the presented method is compatible with atmospheric pressure and provides a low-cost solution to hydrogenate CVD diamond, which makes it interesting for industrial applications. The plausible mechanism for the hydrogen termination of CVD diamond films is based on the formation of surface carbon dangling bonds and carbon-carbon unsaturated bonds at the applied tempera-ture, which react with molecular hydrogen to produce a hydrogen-terminated surface.

  4. Nanostructures of Boron, Carbon and Magnesium Diboride for High Temperature Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Pfefferle, Lisa; Fang, Fang; Iyyamperumal, Eswarmoorthi; Keskar, Gayatri

    2013-12-23

    Direct fabrication of MgxBy nanostructures is achieved by employing metal (Ni,Mg) incorporated MCM-41 in the Hybrid Physical-Chemical Vapor Deposition (HPCVD) reaction. Different reaction conditions are tested to optimize the fabrication process. TEM analysis shows the fabrication of MgxBy nanostructures starting at the reaction temperature of 600oC, with the yield of the nanostructures increasing with increasing reaction temperature. The as-synthesized MgxBy nanostructures have the diameters in the range of 3-5nm, which do not increase with the reaction temperature consistent with templated synthesis. EELS analysis of the template removed nanostructures confirms the existence of B and Mg with possible contamination of Si and O. NEXAFS and Raman spectroscopy analysis suggested a concentric layer-by-layer MgxBy nanowire/nanotube growth model for our as-synthesized nanostructures. Ni k-edge XAS indicates that the formation of MgNi alloy particles is important for the Vapor-Liquid-Solid (VLS) growth of MgxBy nanostructures with fine diameters, and the presence of Mg vapor not just Mg in the catalyst is crucial for the formation of Ni-Mg clusters. Physical templating by the MCM-41 pores was shown to confine the diameter of the nanostructures. DC magnetization measurements indicate possible superconductive behaviors in the as-synthesized samples.

  5. Growth, structure, and high temperature stability of zirconium diboride thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, David M.; Frankel, David J.; Lad, Robert J.

    2015-05-15

    Morphologically stable, electrically conductive thin films are required for emerging harsh environment sensors that can operate at temperatures above 1000 °C. Zirconium diboride (ZrB{sub 2}) is an ultrahigh temperature ceramic with a melting temperature greater than 3200 °C and in bulk form has an electrical conductivity of ∼10{sup 7 }S/m. Thin films of varying Zr:B ratio have been deposited on sapphire substrates by electron beam coevaporation from elemental sources. An appropriate ratio of the elemental fluxes was determined to produce nearly stoichiometric ZrB{sub 2} thin films. Films deposited at ambient substrate temperatures are amorphous as measured by x-ray diffraction, while films grown at 600 °C show textured ZrB{sub 2} nanocrystallites in an amorphous matrix, regardless of composition. When annealed in ultrahigh vacuum at 800 and 1000 °C for 1 h, nanocrystalline films show further grain growth with a 〈101{sup ¯}0〉 ZrB{sub 2} preferred orientation normal to the substrate, while the low nucleation rate in the amorphous films inhibits the formation of any substantial grains. Film conductivity ranges between 0.13 and 6.3 × 10{sup 5 }S/m, increasing with zirconium content and crystallite grain size. Besides grain growth, no micron-scale structural or morphological changes were observed with annealing, suggesting that ZrB{sub 2} films can act as stable electrodes in high temperature environments.

  6. Material-parameter Dependence of Superconductivity in High-temperature Cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, Takashi; Miyazaki, Mitake; Yamaji, Kunihiko

    We show that there is an interesting correlation between material parameters and critical temperature Tc in cuprate high temperature superconductors. Our analysis is based on the d-p model, that is, the three-band Hubbard model including d and p orbitals explicitly. This model contains many parameters; the transfer integrals tdp and tpp, the energy levels ɛp and ɛd, and the Coulomb interaction parameters Ud and Up. Our main results are the following: (a) Tc increases as ɛp-ɛd is increased for Up = 0, (2) Tc is lowered with increase of Up when ɛp-ɛd > 0, (3) Tc is increased with increase of Up when ɛp-ɛd < 0, (4) Tc has a minimum at near ɛp-ɛd = 0 as a function of ɛp-ɛd when Ud and Up are comparable, (5) Ud induces dx2-y2 pairing while Up induces dxy pairing, (6) Tc has a peak as a function of tpp. The results imply that Tc will increase if we can suppress Up. The role of Up is consistent with the experimental tendency that Tc increases as the relative ratio of the hole density at oxygen site to that at copper site is increased, which means that when Up increases, the number of p holes is decreased and Tc is also decreased.

  7. Development of a 13C-optimized 1.5-mm high temperature superconducting NMR probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, Vijaykumar; Hooker, Jerris W.; Withers, Richard S.; Nast, Robert E.; Brey, William W.; Edison, Arthur S.

    2013-10-01

    We report a 1.5-mm NMR probe based on high temperature superconductors operating at 14.1 T optimized for 13C detection. The probe has a total sample volume of about 35 microliters (μL) with an active volume of 20 μL and provides exceptional mass sensitivity for 13C detection. The probe also has excellent 1H sensitivity and employs a 2H lock; 15N irradiation capability can be added in the future. The coils are cooled to about 20 K using a standard Agilent cryogenic refrigeration system, and the sample temperature is regulated near room temperature. The coil design considerations are discussed in detail. This probe is ideal for directly detected 13C NMR experiments for natural products chemistry and metabolomics applications, for which 35 μL is an optimal sample volume. The outstanding 13C sensitivity of this probe allowed us to directly determine the 13C connectivity on 1.1 mg of natural abundance histidine using an INADEQUATE experiment. We demonstrated the utility of this probe for 13C-based metabolomics using a synthetic mixture of common natural abundance metabolites whose concentrations ranged from 1 to 5 mM (40-200 nmol).

  8. High-Temperature Superconductive Cabling Investigated for Space Solar Power Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, Roy C.; Juhasz, Albert J.

    2000-01-01

    NASA has been directed by Congress to take a fresh look at the Space Solar Power (SSP) concept that was studied by the Department of Energy and NASA about 20 years ago. To summarize, the concept involves (1) collecting solar energy and converting it to electrical energy via photovoltaic arrays on satellites in Earth orbit, (2) conducting the electricity to the microwave transmitting portion of the satellite, and (3) transmitting the power via microwave transmitters (or possibly via lasers) to ground power station antennas located on the surface of the Earth. One Sun Tower SSP satellite concept is illustrated here. This figure shows many photovoltaic arrays attached to a "backbone" that conducts electricity down to a wireless transmitter, which is pointed toward the Earth. Other variations on this concept use multiple backbones to reduce the overall length of the satellite structure. In addition, non-Sun-Tower concepts are being considered. The objective of the work reported here was to determine the benefits to the SSP concept of using high-temperature superconductors (HTS) to conduct the electricity from the photovoltaic arrays to the wireless power transmitters. Possible benefits are, for example, reduced mass, improved efficiency, and improved reliability. Dr. James Powell of Plus Ultra Technologies, Inc., of Stony Brook, New York, is conducting the study, and it is being managed by the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field via a task-order contract through Scientific Applications International Corp. (SAIC).

  9. Development of a 13C-Optimized 1.5-mm High Temperature Superconducting NMR Probe

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Vijaykumar; Hooker, Jerris W.; Withers, Richard S.; Nast, Robert E.; Brey, William W.; Edison, Arthur S.

    2013-01-01

    We report a 1.5-mm NMR probe based on high temperature superconductors operating at 14.1 T optimized for 13C detection. The probe has a total sample volume of about 35 microliters (μL) with an active volume of 20 μL and provides exceptional mass sensitivity for 13C detection. The probe also has excellent 1H sensitivity and employs a 2H channel lock; 15N irradiation capability can be added in the future. The coils are cooled to about 20 K using a standard Agilent cryogenic refrigeration system, and the sample temperature is regulated near room temperature. The coil design considerations are discussed in detail. This probe is ideal for directly detected 13C NMR experiments for natural products chemistry and metabolomics applications, for which 35 μL is an optimal sample volume. The outstanding 13C sensitivity of this probe allowed us to directly determine the 13C connectivity on 1.1 mg of natural abundance histidine using an INADEQUATE experiment. We demonstrated the utility of this probe for 13C-based metabolomics using a synthetic mixture of common natural abundance metabolites whose concentrations ranged from 1 to 5 mM (40 to 200 nmol). PMID:23969086

  10. The Progress on Low-Cost, High-Quality, High-Temperature Superconducting Tapes Deposited by the Combustion Chemical Vapor Deposition Process

    SciTech Connect

    Shoup, S.S.; White, M.K.; Krebs, S.L.; Darnell, N.; King, A.C.; Mattox, D.S.; Campbell, I.H.; Marken, K.R.; Hong, S.; Czabaj, B.; Paranthaman, M.; Christen, H.M.; Zhai, H.-Y. Specht, E.

    2008-06-24

    The innovative Combustion Chemical Vapor Deposition (CCVD) process is a non-vacuum technique that is being investigated to enable next generation products in several application areas including high-temperature superconductors (HTS). In combination with the Rolling Assisted Biaxially Textured Substrate (RABiTS) technology, the CCVD process has significant promise to provide low-cost, high-quality lengths of YBCO coated conductor. Over 100 meter lengths of both Ni and Ni-W (3 at. Wt.%) substrates with a surface roughness of 12-18 nm were produced. The CCVD technology has been used to deposit both buffer layer coatings as well as YBCO superconducting layers. Buffer layer architecture of strontium titanate (SrTiO{sub 3}) and ceria (CeO{sub 2}) have been deposited by CCVD on textured nickel substrates and optimized to appropriate thicknesses and microstructures to provide templates for growing PLD YBCO with a J{sub c} of 1.1 MA/cm{sup 2} at 77 K and self-field. The CCVD buffer layers have been scaled to meter plus lengths with good epitaxial uniformity along the length. A short sample cut from one of the lengths enabled high critical current density PLD YBCO. Films of CCVD YBCO superconductors have been grown on single crystal substrates with critical current densities over 1 MA/cm{sup 2}. In addition, superconducting YBCO films with an I{sub c} of 60 A/cm-width (J{sub c} = 1.5 MA/cm{sup 2}) were grown on ORNL RABiTS (CeO{sub 2}/YSZ/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ni/Ni-3W) using CCVD process.

  11. High Temperature - Thin Film Strain Gages Based on Alloys of Indium Tin Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Otto J.; Cooke, James D.; Bienkiewicz, Joseph M.

    1998-01-01

    A stable, high temperature strain gage based on reactively sputtered indium tin oxide (ITO) was demonstrated at temperatures up to 1050 C. These strain sensors exhibited relatively large, negative gage factors at room temperature and their piezoresistive response was both linear and reproducible when strained up to 700 micro-in/in. When cycled between compression and tension, these sensors also showed very little hysteresis, indicating excellent mechanical stability. Thin film strain gages based on selected ITO alloys withstood more than 50,000 strain cycles of +/- 500 micro-in/in during 180 hours of testing in air at 1000 C, with minimal drift at temperature. Drift rates as low as 0.0009%/hr at 1000 C were observed for ITO films that were annealed in nitrogen at 700 C prior to strain testing. These results compare favorably with state of the art 10 micro-m thick PdCr films deposited by NASA, where drift rates of 0.047%/hr at 1050 C were observed. Nitrogen annealing not only produced the lowest drift rates to date, but also produce the largest dynamic gage factors (G = 23.5). These wide bandgap, semiconductor strain sensors also exhibited moderately low temperature coefficients of resistance (TCR) at temperatures up to 1100 C, when tested in a nitrogen ambient. A TCR of +230 ppm/C over the temperature range 200 C < T < 500 C and a TCR of -469 ppm/C over the temperature range 600 C < T < 1100 C was observed for the films tested in nitrogen. However, the resistivity behavior changed considerably when the same films were tested in oxygen ambients. A TCR of -1560 ppm/C was obtained over the temperature range of 200 C < T < 1100 C. When similar films were protected with an overcoat or when ITO films were prepared with higher oxygen contents in the plasma, two distinct TCR's were observed. At T < 800 C, a linear TCR of -210 ppm/C was observed and at T > 800 C, a linear TCR of -2170 DDm/C was observed. The combination of a moderately low TCR and a relatively large gage

  12. Weak localization effect in superconducting thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Jihn; Chang, K. J.

    1997-03-01

    It was claimed(1. R. C. Dynes et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 57), 2195 (1986). that the Eliashberg theory breaks down for two-dimensional superconductivity in weakly disordered systems. From tunneling measurements on Pb films, both the electron-phonon interaction λ and the Coulomb pseudopotential μ^* were suggested to decrease by disordering. In this problem, it was previously noted that the Dyson expansion of Green's function in the presence of impurities is inappropriate.(2. Y.-J. Kim and A. W. Overhauser, Phys. Rev. B47), 8025 (1993). Alternatively, employing time-reversed scattered-state pairs, we note that the phonon-mediated coupling parameter λ is decreased by weak localization. With solving both the BCS and Eliashberg gap equations, we find good agreements between our calculations and existing experimental data. We also discuss the weak localization effect on superconductivity in one- and three-dimensional systems.

  13. Role of weakly bound oxygen in the exoemission and superconductivity of YBa2Cu3O(7-x) high-temperature superconductor ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krylova, I. V.; Makarov, A. V.

    1991-12-01

    Experiments were carried out on a high-temperature superconductor ceramic, YBa2Cu3o(6.86), to determine the effect of various forms of sorbed oxygen on superconductivity and formation of the surface localization levels of electrons that determine exoemission. Results of the high-temperature mass spectrometry of thermal oxygen desoprtion, thermally stimulated exoemission in the temperature range 293-700 K, and exoemission parameters in the low-temperature regions (293-77 K) are compared.

  14. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and High-Temperature Superconductivity in YTTRIUM(1-X)PRASEODYMIUM(X)BARIUM Cuprate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Arneil Payongayong

    dependence of the correlation length and spin susceptibility. Magnetic correlations have been found to increase with higher Pr doping, consistent with a decrease of mobile hole concentration. The intimate relation between spin fluctuations and hole-carrier density in these materials offers the suggestion that magnetism may be important in high temperature superconductivity.

  15. High temperature thermocouple and heat flux gauge using a unique thin film-hardware hot juncture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, C. H.; Holanda, R.; Hippensteele, S. A.; Andracchio, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    A special thin film-hardware material thermocouple (TC) and heat flux gauge concept for a reasonably high temperature and high flux flat plate heat transfer experiment was fabricated and tested to gauge temperatures of 911 K. This concept was developed for minimal disturbance of boundary layer temperature and flow over the plates and minimal disturbance of heat flux through the plates. Comparison of special heat flux gauge Stanton number output at steady-state conditions with benchmark literature data was good and agreement was within a calculated uncertainty of the measurement system. Also, good agreement of special TC and standard TC outputs was obtained and the results are encouraging. Oxidation of thin film thermoelements was a primary failure mode after about 5 of operation.

  16. Design, fabrication, and characterization of double-sided high-temperature superconducting RF filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahba, Shapur

    2000-10-01

    This dissertation reports the design, fabrication, and characterization of double-sided high-Tc superconducting (HTS) resonator-based RF filter. This filter operates in HF range (3-30 MHz) of electromagnetic spectrum, demonstrating the center frequency of about 18 MHz, and the 3-dB bandwidth of 5%. The main feature of the proposed device is the double- sided structure that not only reduces the size of a HF filter, but also provides a much higher quality factor, Q, and extremely low insertion loss between the input and output of the filter. Such ideal characteristics have become possible because of the inherently low surface impedance of the superconductors, and the strong magnetic coupling between the input/output ports of the filter. The latter is accomplished because of the unique device configuration, which provides the maximum magnetic flux shared between the different elements of the filter. The heart of the new device is the multi-turn HTS spiral resonator structure. Three of such resonators are utilized to form a three-pole filter. The resonant frequencies of these resonators are chosen to be the same in order to provide the maximum coupling and transfer of energy between them. Also due to such coupling, the energy transfer between the input and output of the filter is maximized, indicating a very low insertion loss. In addition to the resonators, two single-turn coils are employed as the input and output structures. Each loop is concentric with one of the resonators to share the maximum magnetic flux, which in turn translates to stronger magnetic coupling between the different filter elements. A variety of device configurations have been designed, fabricated, and characterized. The three-pole frequency responses for different filter configurations, including a single-input/three-output channelizer structure, have been analyzed, and the results will be provided in this work. One of the structures for a single-input/single- output three-pole filter

  17. Doping Evolution of Electronic Structure and Superconductivity in FeSe/SrTiO3 Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Bing; Hu, Yong; Liu, Defa; Huang, Jianwei; Liang, Aiji; Xu, Yu; Zhao, Lin; He, Shaolong; Wang, Lili; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qikun; Chen, Chuangtian; Xu, Zuyan; Zhou, Xingjiang

    The latest discovery of high temperature superconductivity in FeSe/SrTiO3 film has attracted extensive attention. Our previous ARPES studies on the single-layer and double-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 films showed that, it is possible to transform single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 films from N-phase to S phase by vacuum annealing and get superconductivity with a high Tc over 65K. We also showed that it is hard to get double-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 films doped and it remains in the semiconducting/insulating state under an extensive annealing condition. In this talk, we will present our new ARPES results on the FeSe/SrTiO3 films with different layers (1UC, 2UC, 3UC and 20UC), especially for the 3UC-FeSe films. We use another method, potassium deposition, to increase the carrier concentration. As the result, we observed N phase to S phase transformation in FeSe/SrTiO3 films with different layers. This systematic study will provide insight in understanding the evolution of electronic structure and superconductivity from the single-layer FeSe film, to multiple-layer FeSe film and eventually to the bulk FeSe superconductor.

  18. High Energy Density and High Temperature Multilayer Capacitor Films for Electric Vehicle Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treufeld, Imre; Song, Michelle; Zhu, Lei; Baer, Eric; Snyder, Joe; Langhe, Deepak

    2015-03-01

    Multilayer films (MLFs) with high energy density and high temperature capability (>120 °C) have been developed at Case Western Reserve University. Such films offer a potential solution for electric car DC-link capacitors, where high ripple currents and high temperature tolerance are required. The current state-of-the-art capacitors used in electric cars for converting DC to AC use biaxially oriented polypropylene (BOPP), which can only operate at temperatures up to 85 °C requiring an external cooling system. The polycarbonate (PC)/poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) MLFs have a higher permittivity compared to that of BOPP (2.3), leading to higher energy density. They have good mechanical stability and reasonably low dielectric losses at 120 °C. Nonetheless, our preliminary dielectric measurements show that the MLFs exhibit appreciable dielectric losses (20%) at 120 °C, which would, despite all the other advantages, make them not suitable for practical applications. Our preliminary data showed that dielectric losses of the MLFs at 120 °C up to 400 MV/m and 1000 Hz originate mostly from impurity ionic conduction. This work is supported by the NSF PFI/BIC Program (IIP-1237708).

  19. A deployable high temperature superconducting coil (DHTSC) - A novel concept for producing magnetic shields against both solar flare and Galactic radiation during manned interplanetary missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cocks, F. Hadley

    1991-01-01

    The discovery of materials which are superconducting above 100 K makes possible the use of superconducting coils deployed beyong the hull of an interplanetary spacecraft to produce a magnetic shield capable of giving protection not only against solar flare radiation, but also even against Galactic radiation. Such deployed coils can be of very large size and can thus achieve the great magnetic moments required using only relatively low currents. Deployable high-temperature-superconducting coil magnetic shields appear to offer very substantial reductions in mass and energy compared to other concepts and could readily provide the radiation protection needed for a Mars mission or space colonies.

  20. Substrates suitable for deposition of superconducting thin films

    DOEpatents

    Feenstra, Roeland; Boatner, Lynn A.

    1993-01-01

    A superconducting system for the lossless transmission of electrical current comprising a thin film of superconducting material Y.sub.1 Ba.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-x epitaxially deposited upon a KTaO.sub.3 substrate. The KTaO.sub.3 is an improved substrate over those of the prior art since the it exhibits small lattice constant mismatch and does not chemically react with the superconducting film.

  1. Analytical approximations for thermophysical properties of supercritical nitrogen (SCN) to be used in futuristic high temperature superconducting (HTS) cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dondapati, Raja Sekhar; Ravula, Jeswanth; Thadela, S.; Usurumarti, Preeti Rao

    2015-12-01

    Future power transmission applications demand higher efficiency due to the limited resources of energy. In order to meet such demand, a novel method of transmission is being developed using High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) cables. However, these HTS cables need to be cooled below the critical temperature of superconductors used in constructing the cable to retain the superconductivity. With the advent of new superconductors whose critical temperatures having reached up to 134 K (Hg based), a need arises to find a suitable coolant which can accommodate the heating loads on the superconductors. The present work proposes, Supercritical Nitrogen (SCN) to be a feasible coolant to achieve the required cooling. Further, the feasibility of proposed coolant to be used in futuristic HTS cables is investigated by studying the thermophysical properties such as density, viscosity, specific heat and thermal conductivity with respect to temperature (TC + 10 K) and pressure (PC + 10 bar). In addition, few temperature dependent analytical functions are developed for thermophysical properties of SCN which are useful in predicting thermohydraulic performance (pressure drop, pumping power and cooling capacity) using numerical or computational techniques. Also, the developed analytical functions are used to calculate the pumping power and the temperature difference between inlet and outlet of HTS cable. These results are compared with those of liquid nitrogen (LN2) and found that the circulating pumping power required to pump SCN is significantly smaller than that to pump LN2. Further, it is found that the temperature difference between the inlet and outlet is smaller as compared to that when LN2 is used, SCN can be preferred to cool long length Hg based HTS cables.

  2. Design and preliminary results from a high temperature superconducting SQUID milliscope used for non-destructive evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, M.A.; Atencio, L.; Flynn, E.R.; Kraus, R.H. Jr.; Matlashov, A.

    1998-12-31

    The authors present the design and preliminary results from a SQUID milliscope. The device was designed for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) as part of the Enhanced Surveillance Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory and uses a high temperature superconducting (HTS) SQUID sensor to map magnetic fields induced in the sample. Eddy currents are induced in the conducting sample by a wire coil designed to produce minimal magnetic field at the SQUID when no sample is present. The features of interest are characterized by anomalies in the induced magnetic field. The goal of the instrument is sensitivity to small features generally buried under several intervening layers ({approximately}1--10 mm) of conducting and/or non-conducting materials and robustness of design (i.e., the ability to operate in a noisy, unshielded environment). The device has primarily focused on specific NDE problems such as the ability to detect buried seams in conducting materials and quantify the width of these seams. The authors present the design of the instrument, and some data to demonstrate its capabilities.

  3. Dynamic response characteristics of high temperature superconducting maglev systems: Comparison between Halbach-type and normal permanent magnet guideways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Zheng, J.; Che, T.; Zheng, B. T.; Si, S. S.; Deng, Z. G.

    2015-12-01

    The permanent magnet guideway (PMG) is very important for the performance of the high temperature superconducting (HTS) system in terms of electromagnetic force and operational stability. The dynamic response characteristics of a HTS maglev model levitating on two types of PMG, which are the normal PMG with iron flux concentration and Halbach-type PMG, were investigated by experiments. The dynamic signals for different field-cooling heights (FCHs) and loading/unloading processes were acquired and analyzed by a vibration analyzer and laser displacement sensors. The resonant frequency, stiffness and levitation height of the model were discussed. It was found that the maglev model on the Halbach-type PMG has higher resonant frequency and higher vertical stiffness compared with the normal PMG. However, the low lateral stiffness of the model on the Halbach-type PMG indicates poor lateral stability. Besides, the Halbach-type PMG has better loading capacity than the normal PMG. These results are helpful to design a suitable PMG for the HTS system in practical applications.

  4. Locating of normal transitions in a Bi2223 high temperature superconducting coil by non-contact voltage measurement method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanato, N.; Nishiyama, K.

    2015-12-01

    Locating of normal transitions in high temperature superconducting (HTS) coils is important for protection and safety design of HTS apparatus. A general method to locate the normal transitions is to measure resistive voltages along HTS windings by many voltage taps directly soldered to the HTS coils. However, electrical insulation characteristics of the HTS coils are deteriorated because it is necessary to remove electrical insulations of the HTS wires for the soldering. It is a serious problem especially for AC HTS coils to which high voltages are applied. Therefore the authors have presented a non-contact voltage measurement method that can detect the resistive voltages without removing the insulations by voltage dividing capacitors. So far the authors have verified the principle of the non-contact method. In this paper, a method to locate the normal transitions in a Bi2223 HTS coil based on the non-contact method is proposed. The proposed method can not only detect the normal transitions but also locate their positions. It is experimentally confirmed that the proposed method is useful for locating the normal transitions.

  5. Design and development of high-temperature superconducting magnet system with joint-winding for the helical fusion reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagi, N.; Ito, S.; Terazaki, Y.; Seino, Y.; Hamaguchi, S.; Tamura, H.; Miyazawa, J.; Mito, T.; Hashizume, H.; Sagara, A.

    2015-05-01

    An innovative winding method is developed by connecting high-temperature superconducting (HTS) conductors to enable efficient construction of a magnet system for the helical fusion reactor FFHR-d1. A large-current capacity HTS conductor, referred to as STARS, is being developed by the incorporation of several innovative ideas, such as the simple stacking of state-of-the-art yttrium barium copper oxide tapes embedded in a copper jacket, surrounded by electrical insulation inside a conductor, and an outer stainless-steel jacket cooled by helium gas. A prototype conductor sample was fabricated and reached a current of 100 kA at a bias magnetic field of 5.3 T with the temperature at 20 K. At 4.2 K, the maximum current reached was 120 kA, and a current of 100 kA was successfully sustained for 1 h. A low-resistance bridge-type mechanical lap joint was developed and a joint resistance of 2 nΩ was experimentally confirmed for the conductor sample.

  6. A Temperature-Stable Cryo-System for High-Temperature Superconducting MR In-Vivo Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lin, In-Tsang; Yang, Hong-Chang; Chen, Jyh-Horng

    2013-01-01

    To perform a rat experiment using a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) surface resonator, a cryostat is essential to maintain the rat's temperature. In this work, a compact temperature-stable HTS cryo-system, keeping animal rectal temperature at 37.4°C for more than 3 hours, was successfully developed. With this HTS cryo-system, a 40-mm-diameter Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox (Bi-2223) surface resonator at 77 K was demonstrated in a 3-Tesla MRI system. The proton resonant frequency (PRF) method was employed to monitor the rat's temperature. Moreover, the capacity of MR thermometry in the HTS experiments was evaluated by correlating with data from independent fiber-optic sensor temperature measurements. The PRF thermal coefficient was derived as 0.03 rad/°C and the temperature-monitoring architecture can be implemented to upgrade the quality and safety in HTS experiments. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the HTS surface resonator at 77 K was higher than that of a professionally made copper surface resonator at 300 K, which has the same geometry, by a 3.79-fold SNR gain. Furthermore, the temperature-stable HTS cryo-system we developed can obtain stable SNR gain in every scan. A temperature-stable HTS cryo-system with an external air-blowing circulation system is demonstrated. PMID:23637936

  7. Electrode loading effect and high temperature performance of ZnO thin film ultrasonic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X. S.; Zhang, J.; Hou, R.; Zhao, C.; Kirk, K. J.; Hutson, D.; Hu, P. A.; Peng, S. M.; Zu, X. T.; Fu, Y. Q.

    2014-10-01

    Nanocrystalline ZnO films of 5.8 μm thick were sputter-deposited on ferritic carbon steel plates (25 × 25 × 3 mm3) and characterized for use as ultrasonic transducers at both room temperature and high temperatures. Electrode loading effects have been studied using two types of electrodes, i.e., sputtered Cr/Au (5/50 nm) and silver paste, with electrode diameters 0.7-2.5 mm. Longitudinal and transverse waves were obtained in pulse-echo tests using both types of electrodes. With a silver paste top electrode, a dominant longitudinal mode was obtained, but with a thin Cr/Au film as the top electrode, shear waves were more dominant. Pulse-echo tests of the ZnO transducers were also performed at elevated temperatures up to 450 °C using a carbon paste electrodes. The sputtered ZnO films maintained a stable crystalline structure and orientation at the elevated temperatures, and ZnO devices on ferritic carbon steel could be used successfully up to 400 °C. However, when the temperature was increased further, rapid surface oxidation of the ferritic carbon steel caused the failure of the transducer.

  8. P2IMS depth profile analysis of high temperature boron oxynitride dielectric films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badi, N.; Vijayaraghavan, S.; Benqaoula, A.; Tempez, A.; Tauziède, C.; Chapon, P.

    2014-02-01

    Existing silicon oxynitride (SiON) dielectric can only provide a very near term solution for the metal oxide semiconductor technology. The emerging high-k dielectric materials have a limited thermal stability and are prone to electrical behavior degradation which is associated with unwanted chemical reactions with silicon (Si). We investigated here applicability of amorphous boron oxynitride (BON) thin films as an emerging dielectric for high temperature capacitors. BON samples of thickness varying from 200 nm down to 10 nm were deposited in a high vacuum reactor using ion source assisted physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique. Plasma profiling ion mass spectrometry (P2IMS) was utilized to specifically determine the interface quality and best capacitor performance as a function of growth temperatures of a graded sample with alternate layers of deposited titanium (Ti) and BON layers on Si. P2IMS depth profiling of these layers were also performed to evaluate the stability of the dielectric layers and their efficacy against B dopant diffusion simulating processes occurring in activated polySi-based devices. For this purpose, BON layers were deposited on boron-isotope 10 (B10) implanted Si substrates and subsequently annealed at high temperatures up to 1050 °C for about 10 s. Results comparing inter-diffusion of B10 intensities at the interfaces of BON-Si and SiON-Si samples suggest suitability of BON as barrier layers against boron diffusion at high temperature. Stable Ti/BON/Ti capacitor behavior was achieved at optimum growth temperature of 600 °C of the BON dielectric layer. Capacitance change with frequency (10 kHz to 2 MHz) and temperature up to 400 °C is about 1% and 10%, respectively.

  9. High temperature nitrogen oxides sensing enabled by indium oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, Srinivasan

    Generation of power using fossil fuel combustion invariably results in formation of undesirable gas species (NOx, SOx, CO, CO2, etc.) at high-temperatures which are harmful to the environment. Thus, there is a continual need to develop sensitive, responsive, stable, selective, robust and low-cost sensor systems and sensor materials for combustion monitoring. This work investigates the viability of microfabricated NO x sensors based on sputtered indium oxide (In2O3) utilizing microhotplate structures. The material becomes resistive when exposed to oxidizing gases like NOx, with its conductivity dependent upon the temperature, partial pressure of the test gas and morphological structure. We believe this device would help increase efficiency and decrease emissions through improved combustion process control, leading to a comparably economic and responsive sensor. In this work, more than 600 sensors were fabricated and tested, including RF and pulsed-DC sputtered films. About 50 unique sensor conditions were characterized and related to the gas sensor response. The sensor conditions included deposition parameters (power, pressure, time, etc.) and postdeposition processes (anneals, promoter layers, etc.). In2O3 thin films were RF sputter deposited on microhotplate structures with different thickness (40 to 300 nm) in pure Ar. Additionally, a combination of reactive and RF sputtering of In2O3 material was-deposited in Ar and O2 (10% and 25%) mixture. In2O3 films without promoter layers and with gold or TiOx promoter layers (~ 3 nm) were investigated for NOx sensing. Selectivity, stability and repeatability of indium oxide (In2O3) thin film sensor to detect NOx (25 ppm) in presence of other exhaust gas pollutants including H2, NH3 and CO2 at high operating temperatures (greater than 350 °C) was investigated in N2 carrier gas. In2O 3 films (150nm thick) deposited in Ar and O2 (25% O 2) presented the highest response (S ~ 50) to 25 ppm NOx at 500 °C when compared to films

  10. High-temperature decomposition of solid solutions of beta-tantalum with copper in films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuleushev, Yu. Zh.; Volodin, V. N.; Zhakanbaev, E. A.

    2014-05-01

    Using high-temperature X-ray diffractometry and electron microprobe analysis decomposition of alloys of beta-tantalum with copper produced by codeposition of sputtered ultradisperse particles of tantalum and copper has been established. At a temperature of 900°C, the precipitation of copper from the solid solution into an individual phase starts, and its diffusion onto the film surface with the formation of globular particles and simultaneous transition of the matrix β-modification into α-tantalum. The suggested mechanism of decomposition of solid solutions includes the following stages: the precipitation of copper into an individual phase, its diffusion onto the surface because of lattice pressure and the concentration gradient inside and outside the tantalum matrix, the coalescence of nanosized formations into drops at the coating surface, and the subsequent evaporation of copper from them in a vacuum.

  11. Effect of surface condition on the formation of solid lubricating films at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanyaloglu, Bengi; Graham, E. E.

    1992-01-01

    Solid films were produced on active metal or ceramic surfaces using lubricants (such as tricresyl phosphate) delivered as a vapor at high temperatures, and the lubricity of these deposits under different dynamic wear conditions was investigated. A method is described for chemically activating ceramic surfaces resulting in a surface that could promote the formation of lubricating polymeric derivative of TCP. Experiments were carried out to evaluate the wear characteristics of unlubricated cast iron and of Sialon ceramic at 25 and 280 C, and lubricated with a vapor of TCP at 280 C. It is shown that continuous vapor phase lubrication of chemically treated Sialon reduced its coefficient of friction from 0.7 to less than 0.1.

  12. SiC Nanowire Film Photodetectors: A Promising Candidate Toward High Temperature Photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Chong, Haining; Yang, Huijun; Yang, Weiyou; Zheng, Jinju; Shang, Minghui; Yang, Zuobao; Wei, Guodong; Gao, Fengmei

    2016-04-01

    In this study, UV photodetectors (PDs) based on SiC nanowire films have been successfully prepared by a simple and low-cost drip-coating method followed by sintering at 500 °C. The corresponding electrical characterizations clearly demonstrate that the SiC nanowire based PD devices can be regarded as a promising candidate for UV PDs. The PDs can exhibit the excellent performances of fast, high sensitivity, linearity, and stable response, which can thus achieve on-line monitoring of weak UV light. Furthermore, the SiC nanowire-based PDs enable us to fabricate detectors working under high temperature as high as 150 °C. The high photosensitivity and rapid photoresponse for the PDs can be attributed to the superior single crystalline quality of SiC nanowires and the ohmic contact between the electrodes and nanowires. PMID:27451712

  13. High temperature superconductor materials and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doane, George B., III.; Banks, Curtis; Golben, John

    1990-01-01

    Research on processing methods leading to a significant enhancement in the critical current densities (Jc) and the critical temperature (Tc) of high temperature superconducting in thin bulk and thin film forms. The fabrication of important devices for NASA unique applications (sensors) is investigated.

  14. Thermal Cycling Behavior of Zinc Antimonide Thin Films for High Temperature Thermoelectric Power Generation Applications.

    PubMed

    Shim, Hyung Cheoul; Woo, Chang-Su; Han, Seungwoo

    2015-08-19

    The zinc antimonide compound ZnxSby is one of the most efficient thermoelectric materials known at high temperatures due to its exceptional low thermal conductivity. For this reason, it continues to be the focus of active research, especially regarding its glass-like atomic structure. However, before practical use in actual surroundings, such as near a vehicle manifold, it is imperative to analyze the thermal reliability of these materials. Herein, we present the thermal cycling behavior of ZnxSby thin films in nitrogen (N2) purged or ambient atmosphere. ZnxSby thin films were prepared by cosputtering and reached a power factor of 1.39 mW m(-1) K(-2) at 321 °C. We found maximum power factor values gradually decreased in N2 atmosphere due to increasing resistivity with repeated cycling, whereas the specimen in air kept its performance. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy observations revealed that fluidity of Zn atoms leads to nanoprecipitates, porous morphologies, and even growth of a coating layer or fiber structures on the surface of ZnxSby after repetitive heating and cooling cycles. With this in mind, our results indicate that proper encapsulation of the ZnxSby surface would reduce these unwanted side reactions and the resulting degradation of thermoelectric performance. PMID:26226167

  15. Synthesis and characterization of novel piezoelectric nitrile copolyimide films for high temperature sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maceiras, A.; Martins, P.; San Sebastián, M.; Lasheras, A.; Silva, M.; Laza, J. M.; Vilas, J. L.; Gutierrez, J.; Lanceros-Mendez, S.; Barandiarán, J. M.; León, L. M.

    2014-10-01

    A series of amorphous polyimides and copolyimides that contained nitrile were obtained by a two-step procedure. The first step consisted of a polycondensation reaction of 4,4’-oxydiphtalic anhydride (ODPA) with one or two aromatic diamines, namely 1,3-Bis-2-cyano-3-(3-aminophenoxy)phenoxybenzene (diamine 2CN) and 1,3-Bis(3-aminophenoxy)benzene (diamine 0CN). In the second step, a thermal cyclodehydration converted each poly(amic acid) or copoly(amic acid) into their corresponding polyimide films. The piezoelectric response was improved after corona poling of the films. A maximum d33 modulus value of 16 pC N-1 was obtained for the polymide with two cyano groups (poly 2CN). The polarization also showed time and thermal stability up to 160 °C. Additionally, the thermal stability of the amorphous polyimides, (β-CN)APB/ODPA, was studied by determining the glass transition temperature (T g ) and thermal decomposition through differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TG), respectively. The high piezoelectric response (1-16 pC N-1), T g (160-180 °C) and degradation temperature (315-450 °C) make such polyamides excellent candidates for use as high temperature sensors.

  16. Superconductivity in epitaxial thin films of NaxCoO2•yD2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krockenberger, Y.; Fritsch, I.; Christiani, G.; Habermeier, H.-U.; Yu, Li; Bernhard, C.; Keimer, B.; Alff, L.

    2006-04-01

    The observation of superconductivity in the layered transition metal oxide NaxCoO2•yH2O [K. Takada et al., Nature (London) 422, 53 (2003)] has caused a tremendous upsurge of scientific interest due to its similarities and its differences to the copper based high-temperature superconductors. Two years after the discovery, we report the fabrication of single-phase superconducting epitaxial thin films of Na0.3CoO2•1.3D2O grown by pulsed laser deposition technique. This opens additional roads for experimental research exploring the superconducting state and the phase diagram of this unconventional material.

  17. PREFACE: Superconductivity in ultrathin films and nanoscale systems Superconductivity in ultrathin films and nanoscale systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, Antonio; Bose, Sangita; Garcia-Garcia, Antonio Miguel

    2012-12-01

    The recent technological developments in the synthesis and characterization of high-quality nanostructures and developments in the theoretical techniques needed to model these materials, have motivated this focus section of Superconductor Science and Technology. Another motivation is the compelling evidence that all new superconducting materials, such as iron pnictides and chalcogenides, diborides (doped MgB2) and fullerides (alkali-doped C60 compounds), are heterostrucures at the atomic limit, such as the cuprates made of stacks of nanoscale superconducting layers intercalated by different atomic layers with nanoscale periodicity. Recently a great amount of interest has been shown in the role of lattice nano-architecture in controlling the fine details of Fermi surface topology. The experimental and theoretical study of superconductivity in the nanoscale started in the early 1960s, shortly after the discovery of the BCS theory. Thereafter there has been rapid progress both in experiments and the theoretical understanding of nanoscale superconductors. Experimentally, thin films, granular films, nanowires, nanotubes and single nanoparticles have all been explored. New quantum effects appear in the nanoscale related to multi-component condensates. Advances in the understanding of shape resonances or Fano resonances close to 2.5 Lifshitz transitions near a band edge in nanowires, 2D films and superlattices [1, 2] of these nanosized modules, provide the possibility of manipulating new quantum electronic states. Parity effects and shell effects in single, isolated nanoparticles have been reported by several groups. Theoretically, newer techniques based on solving Richardson's equation (an exact theory incorporating finite size effects to the BCS theory) numerically by path integral methods or solving the entire Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation in these limits have been attempted, which has improved our understanding of the mechanism of superconductivity in these confined

  18. Characterization of a high-temperature superconducting conductor on round core cables in magnetic fields up to 20 T

    SciTech Connect

    van der Laan, D. C.; Noyes, P. D.; Miller, G. E.; Weijers, H. W.; Willering, G. P.

    2013-02-13

    The next generation of high-ï¬eld magnets that will operate at magnetic ï¬elds substantially above 20 T, or at temperatures substantially above 4.2 K, requires high-temperature superconductors (HTS). Conductor on round core (CORC) cables, in which RE-Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (RE = rare earth) (REBCO) coated conductors are wound in a helical fashion on a flexible core, are a practical and versatile HTS cable option for low-inductance, high-field magnets. We performed the first tests of CORC magnet cables in liquid helium in magnetic fields of up to 20 T. A record critical current I{sub c} of 5021 A was measured at 4.2 K and 19 T. In a cable with an outer diameter of 7.5 mm, this value corresponds to an engineering current density J{sub e} of 114 A mm{sup -2} , the highest J{sub e} ever reported for a superconducting cable at such high magnetic fields. Additionally, the first magnet wound from an HTS cable was constructed from a 6 m-long CORC cable. The 12-turn, double-layer magnet had an inner diameter of 9 cm and was tested in a magnetic field of 20 T, at which it had an I{sub c} of 1966 A. The cables were quenched repetitively without degradation during the measurements, demonstrating the feasibility of HTS CORC cables for use in high-field magnet applications.

  19. PREFACE: Superconductivity in ultrathin films and nanoscale systems Superconductivity in ultrathin films and nanoscale systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, Antonio; Bose, Sangita; Garcia-Garcia, Antonio Miguel

    2012-12-01

    The recent technological developments in the synthesis and characterization of high-quality nanostructures and developments in the theoretical techniques needed to model these materials, have motivated this focus section of Superconductor Science and Technology. Another motivation is the compelling evidence that all new superconducting materials, such as iron pnictides and chalcogenides, diborides (doped MgB2) and fullerides (alkali-doped C60 compounds), are heterostrucures at the atomic limit, such as the cuprates made of stacks of nanoscale superconducting layers intercalated by different atomic layers with nanoscale periodicity. Recently a great amount of interest has been shown in the role of lattice nano-architecture in controlling the fine details of Fermi surface topology. The experimental and theoretical study of superconductivity in the nanoscale started in the early 1960s, shortly after the discovery of the BCS theory. Thereafter there has been rapid progress both in experiments and the theoretical understanding of nanoscale superconductors. Experimentally, thin films, granular films, nanowires, nanotubes and single nanoparticles have all been explored. New quantum effects appear in the nanoscale related to multi-component condensates. Advances in the understanding of shape resonances or Fano resonances close to 2.5 Lifshitz transitions near a band edge in nanowires, 2D films and superlattices [1, 2] of these nanosized modules, provide the possibility of manipulating new quantum electronic states. Parity effects and shell effects in single, isolated nanoparticles have been reported by several groups. Theoretically, newer techniques based on solving Richardson's equation (an exact theory incorporating finite size effects to the BCS theory) numerically by path integral methods or solving the entire Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation in these limits have been attempted, which has improved our understanding of the mechanism of superconductivity in these confined

  20. Co-sputtered MoRe thin films for carbon nanotube growth-compatible superconducting coplanar resonators.

    PubMed

    Götz, K J G; Blien, S; Stiller, P L; Vavra, O; Mayer, T; Huber, T; Meier, T N G; Kronseder, M; Strunk, Ch; Hüttel, A K

    2016-04-01

    Molybdenum rhenium alloy thin films can exhibit superconductivity up to critical temperatures of T(c)=15K. At the same time, the films are highly stable in the high-temperature methane/hydrogen atmosphere typically required to grow single wall carbon nanotubes. We characterize molybdenum rhenium alloy films deposited via simultaneous sputtering from two sources, with respect to their composition as function of sputter parameters and their electronic dc as well as GHz properties at low temperature. Specific emphasis is placed on the effect of the carbon nanotube growth conditions on the film. Superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators are defined lithographically; we demonstrate that the resonators remain functional when undergoing nanotube growth conditions, and characterize their properties as function of temperature. This paves the way for ultra-clean nanotube devices grown in situ onto superconducting coplanar waveguide circuit elements. PMID:26901846

  1. Co-sputtered MoRe thin films for carbon nanotube growth-compatible superconducting coplanar resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götz, K. J. G.; Blien, S.; Stiller, P. L.; Vavra, O.; Mayer, T.; Huber, T.; Meier, T. N. G.; Kronseder, M.; Strunk, Ch; Hüttel, A. K.

    2016-04-01

    Molybdenum rhenium alloy thin films can exhibit superconductivity up to critical temperatures of {T}{{c}}=15 {{K}}. At the same time, the films are highly stable in the high-temperature methane/hydrogen atmosphere typically required to grow single wall carbon nanotubes. We characterize molybdenum rhenium alloy films deposited via simultaneous sputtering from two sources, with respect to their composition as function of sputter parameters and their electronic dc as well as GHz properties at low temperature. Specific emphasis is placed on the effect of the carbon nanotube growth conditions on the film. Superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators are defined lithographically; we demonstrate that the resonators remain functional when undergoing nanotube growth conditions, and characterize their properties as function of temperature. This paves the way for ultra-clean nanotube devices grown in situ onto superconducting coplanar waveguide circuit elements.

  2. Common electronic origin of superconductivity in (Li,Fe)OHFeSe bulk superconductor and single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 films

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lin; Liang, Aiji; Yuan, Dongna; Hu, Yong; Liu, Defa; Huang, Jianwei; He, Shaolong; Shen, Bing; Xu, Yu; Liu, Xu; Yu, Li; Liu, Guodong; Zhou, Huaxue; Huang, Yulong; Dong, Xiaoli; Zhou, Fang; Liu, Kai; Lu, Zhongyi; Zhao, Zhongxian; Chen, Chuangtian; Xu, Zuyan; Zhou, X. J.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity in the iron-based superconductors remains an outstanding issue in condensed matter physics. The electronic structure plays an essential role in dictating superconductivity. Recent revelation of distinct electronic structure and high-temperature superconductivity in the single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 films provides key information on the role of Fermi surface topology and interface in inducing or enhancing superconductivity. Here we report high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission measurements on the electronic structure and superconducting gap of an FeSe-based superconductor, (Li0.84Fe0.16)OHFe0.98Se, with a Tc at 41 K. We find that this single-phase bulk superconductor shows remarkably similar electronic behaviours to that of the superconducting single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 films in terms of Fermi surface topology, band structure and the gap symmetry. These observations provide new insights in understanding high-temperature superconductivity in the single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 films and the mechanism of superconductivity in the bulk iron-based superconductors. PMID:26853801

  3. Common electronic origin of superconductivity in (Li,Fe)OHFeSe bulk superconductor and single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 films.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lin; Liang, Aiji; Yuan, Dongna; Hu, Yong; Liu, Defa; Huang, Jianwei; He, Shaolong; Shen, Bing; Xu, Yu; Liu, Xu; Yu, Li; Liu, Guodong; Zhou, Huaxue; Huang, Yulong; Dong, Xiaoli; Zhou, Fang; Liu, Kai; Lu, Zhongyi; Zhao, Zhongxian; Chen, Chuangtian; Xu, Zuyan; Zhou, X J

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity in the iron-based superconductors remains an outstanding issue in condensed matter physics. The electronic structure plays an essential role in dictating superconductivity. Recent revelation of distinct electronic structure and high-temperature superconductivity in the single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 films provides key information on the role of Fermi surface topology and interface in inducing or enhancing superconductivity. Here we report high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission measurements on the electronic structure and superconducting gap of an FeSe-based superconductor, (Li0.84Fe0.16)OHFe0.98Se, with a Tc at 41 K. We find that this single-phase bulk superconductor shows remarkably similar electronic behaviours to that of the superconducting single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 films in terms of Fermi surface topology, band structure and the gap symmetry. These observations provide new insights in understanding high-temperature superconductivity in the single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 films and the mechanism of superconductivity in the bulk iron-based superconductors. PMID:26853801

  4. Effects of high-temperature thermal annealing on the electronic properties of In-Ga-Zn oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qin; Song, Zhong Xiao; Ma, Fei E-mail: liyhemail@gmail.com; Li, Yan Huai E-mail: liyhemail@gmail.com; Xu, Ke Wei

    2015-03-15

    Indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) thin films were deposited by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering at room-temperature. Then, thermal annealing was conducted to improve the structural ordering. X-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that the as-deposited IGZO thin films were amorphous and crystallization occurred at 800 and 950 °C. As a result of crystallization at high temperature, the carrier concentration and the Hall mobility of IGZO thin films were sharply increased, which could be ascribed to the increased oxygen vacancies and improved structural ordering of the thin films.

  5. Neutron scattering studies of spin-phonon hybridization and superconducting spin gaps in the high temperature superconductor La2-x(Sr;Ba)xCuO4

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wagman, J. J.; Carlo, Jeremy P.; Gaudet, J.; Van Gastel, G. J.; Abernathy, Douglas L.; Stone, Matthew B.; Granroth, Garrett E.; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Savici, Andrei T.; Kim, Young -June; et al

    2016-03-14

    We present time-of-flight neutron-scattering measurements on single crystals of La2-xBaxCuO4 (LBCO) with 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.095 and La2-xSrxCuO4 (LSCO) with x = 0.08 and 0.11. This range of dopings spans much of the phase diagram relevant to high temperature cuprate superconductivity, ranging from insulating, three dimensional commensurate long range antiferromagnetic order for x ≤ 0.02 to two dimensional (2D) incommensurate antiferromagnetism co-existing with superconductivity for x ≥ 0.05. Previous work on lightly doped LBCO with x = 0.035 showed a clear resonant enhancement of the inelastic scattering coincident with the low energy crossings of the highly dispersive spin excitationsmore » and quasi-2D optic phonons. The present work extends these measurements across the phase diagram and shows this enhancement to be a common feature to this family of layered quantum magnets. Furthermore we show that the low temperature, low energy magnetic spectral weight is substantially larger for samples with non-superconducting ground states relative to any of the samples with superconducting ground states. Lastly spin gaps, suppression of low energy magnetic spectral weight, are observed in both superconducting LBCO and LSCO samples, consistent with previous observations for superconducting LSCO« less

  6. Neutral wetting brush layers for block copolymer thin films using homopolymer blends processed at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceresoli, M.; Palermo, M.; Ferrarese Lupi, F.; Seguini, G.; Perego, M.; Zuccheri, G.; Phadatare, S. D.; Antonioli, D.; Gianotti, V.; Sparnacci, K.; Laus, M.

    2015-10-01

    Binary homopolymer blends of two hydroxyl-terminated polystyrene (PS-OH) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA-OH) homopolymers (Mn ˜ 16000 g mol-1) were grafted on SiO2 substrates by high-temperature (T > 150 °C), short-time (t < 600 s) thermal treatments. The resulting brush layer was tested to screen preferential interactions of the SiO2 substrate with the different symmetric and asymmetric PS-b-PMMA block copolymers deposited on top of the grafted molecules. By properly adjusting the blend composition and the processing parameters, an efficient surface neutralization path was identified, enabling the formation, in the block copolymer film, of homogeneous textures of lamellae or cylinders perpendicularly oriented with respect to the substrate. A critical interplay between the phase segregation of the homopolymer blends and their grafting process on the SiO2 was observed. In fact, the polar SiO2 is preferential for the PMMA-rich phase that forms a homogeneous layer on the substrate, while the PS-rich phase is located at the polymer-air interface. During the thermal treatment, phase segregation and grafting proceed simultaneously. Complete wetting of the PS rich phase on the PMMA rich phase leads to the formation of a PS/PMMA bilayer. In this case, the progressive diffusion of PS chains toward the polymer-SiO2 interface during the thermal treatment allows tuning of the brush layer composition.

  7. Resistive evaporation of superconducting Y-Ba-Cu-O thin films from a single source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azoulay, Jacob; Goldschmidt, Dan

    1989-06-01

    A new evaporation method of high-temperature superconducting films, the resistive evaporation from a single source, is reported here for the first time. The source material, inserted into a tungsten boat in a conventional vacuum system, consisted of a pulverized mixture of Cu, YF3, and BaF2. The handling of the source material required only grinding and mixing of the raw materials. Its deposition onto SrTiO3 substrates yielding superconducting films with properties very similar to those obtained in a layer-by-layer resistive evaporation of these materials. In particular, a resistive transition onset at 75 K and zero resistance at ˜40 K, and critical currents of 2000 A/cm2 at ≊10 K have been measured. The broad transition may be attributed to a copper concentration gradient, as measured by Auger depth profiling, or to a residual fluorine-rich phase.

  8. Process for preparing superconducting film having substantially uniform phase development

    DOEpatents

    Bharacharya, Raghuthan; Parilla, Philip A.; Blaugher, Richard D.

    1995-01-01

    A process for preparing a superconducting film, such as a thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide superconducting film, having substantially uniform phase development. The process comprises providing an electrodeposition bath having one or more soluble salts of one or more respective potentially superconducting metals in respective amounts adequate to yield a superconducting film upon subsequent appropriate treatment. Should all of the metals required for producing a superconducting film not be made available in the bath, such metals can be a part of the ambient during a subsequent annealing process. A soluble silver salt in an amount between about 0.1% and about 4.0% by weight of the provided other salts is also provided to the bath, and the bath is electrically energized to thereby form a plated film. The film is annealed in ambient conditions suitable to cause formation of a superconductor film. Doping with silver reduces the temperature at which the liquid phase appears during the annealing step, initiates a liquid phase throughout the entire volume of deposited material, and influences the nucleation and growth of the deposited material.

  9. Process for preparing superconducting film having substantially uniform phase development

    DOEpatents

    Bharacharya, R.; Parilla, P.A.; Blaugher, R.D.

    1995-12-19

    A process is disclosed for preparing a superconducting film, such as a thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide superconducting film, having substantially uniform phase development. The process comprises providing an electrodeposition bath having one or more soluble salts of one or more respective potentially superconducting metals in respective amounts adequate to yield a superconducting film upon subsequent appropriate treatment. Should all of the metals required for producing a superconducting film not be made available in the bath, such metals can be a part of the ambient during a subsequent annealing process. A soluble silver salt in an amount between about 0.1% and about 4.0% by weight of the provided other salts is also provided to the bath, and the bath is electrically energized to thereby form a plated film. The film is annealed in ambient conditions suitable to cause formation of a superconductor film. Doping with silver reduces the temperature at which the liquid phase appears during the annealing step, initiates a liquid phase throughout the entire volume of deposited material, and influences the nucleation and growth of the deposited material. 3 figs.

  10. High-temperature superconductivity in space-charge regions of lanthanum cuprate induced by two-dimensional doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiutti, F.; Logvenov, G.; Gregori, G.; Cristiani, G.; Wang, Y.; Sigle, W.; van Aken, P. A.; Maier, J.

    2015-10-01

    The exploitation of interface effects turned out to be a powerful tool for generating exciting material properties. Such properties include magnetism, electronic and ionic transport and even superconductivity. Here, instead of using conventional homogeneous doping to enhance the hole concentration in lanthanum cuprate and achieve superconductivity, we replace single LaO planes with SrO dopant planes using atomic-layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (two-dimensional doping). Electron spectroscopy and microscopy, conductivity measurements and zinc tomography reveal such negatively charged interfaces to induce layer-dependent superconductivity (Tc up to 35 K) in the space-charge zone at the side of the planes facing the substrate, where the strontium (Sr) profile is abrupt. Owing to the growth conditions, the other side exhibits instead a Sr redistribution resulting in superconductivity due to conventional doping. The present study represents a successful example of two-dimensional doping of superconducting oxide systems and demonstrates its power in this field.

  11. High-Tc Superconducting Thin- and Thick-Film-Based Coated Conductors for Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cantoni, Claudia; Goyal, Amit

    2010-01-01

    Although the first epitaxial films of YBCO with high Tc were grown nearly 20 years ago, the understanding and control of the nanostructures responsible for the dissipation-free electrical current transport in high temperature superconductors (HTS) is quite recent. In the last six to seven years, major advances have occurred in the fundamental investigation of low angle grain boundaries, flux-pinning phenomena, growth mode, and atomic-level defect structures of HTS epitaxial films. As a consequence, it has been possible to map and even engineer to some extent the performance of HTS coatings in large regions of the operating H, T, J phase space. With such progress, the future of high temperature superconducting wires looks increasingly promising despite the tremendous challenges offered by these brittle and anisotropic materials. Nevertheless, further performance improvements are necessary for the superconducting technology to become cost-competitive against copper wires and ultimately succeed in revolutionizing the transmission of electricity. This can be achieved by further diminishing the gap between theoretical and experimental values of the critical current density Jc, and/or increasing the thickness of the superconductive layer as much as possible without degrading performance. In addition, further progress in controlling extrinsic and/or intrinsic nano-sized defects within the films is necessary to significantly reduce the anisotropic response of HTS and obtain a nearly constant dependence of the critical current on the magnetic field orientation, which is considered crucial for power applications. This chapter is a review of the challenges still present in the area of superconducting film processing for HTS wires and the approaches currently employed to address them.

  12. Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Yung K.

    Many potential high-temperature superconductivity (HTS) military applications have been demonstrated by low-temperature superconductivity systems; they encompass high efficiency electric drives for naval vessels, airborne electric generators, energy storage systems for directed-energy weapons, electromechanical launchers, magnetic and electromagnetic shields, and cavity resonators for microwave and mm-wave generation. Further HST applications in militarily relevant fields include EM sensors, IR focal plane arrays, SQUIDs, magnetic gradiometers, high-power sonar sources, and superconducting antennas and inertial navigation systems. The development of SQUID sensors will furnish novel magnetic anomaly detection methods for ASW.

  13. Physical and Material Properties of Yttrium Barium Copper Oxide High Critical Temperature Superconducting Thin Films.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qiyuan

    1990-01-01

    A simple method of using layered structures and rapid thermal annealing to produce Y_1 Ba_2 Cu_3 O_{7-x} (YBCO) superconducting thin films is presented. Material properties of the films depend strongly on the processing conditions, the film stoichiometry, and the substrates. The films with critical temperature (T_{ rm c}) higher than liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K) have been made on various substrates including magnesium oxide, sapphire, and silicon. The best film was obtained on a MgO substrate with T_{rm c} of 84 K. Silicon diffusion and reaction with oxygen during a high temperature anneal degrade the superconductivity of the film on a Si substrate. Using a buffer layer of gold, the Si-YBCO interaction is greatly reduced. Typical resistivity of the film shows a linear temperature dependence which may be attributed to an electron -phonon interaction. Anisotropic resistance behavior has been observed due to the layered structures. Different metal contacts to the YBCO films have been used to study the chemical and electrical properties of metal-YBCO film interfaces. Gold has been found nonreactive to YBCO film, thus, it has the lowest contact resistivity. Near the T_{rm c}, the contact resistivity of a Au-YBCO contact approaches zero. This may be due to the proximity effect. Other metals such as Pt, Pd, Sn and Ti, react with the YBCO film and form thin oxide layers at the interfaces. The oxide layer acts as an insulating barrier which forbids the proximity effect and causes a large contact resistivity. The structural and electrical properties of the Si-YBCO intermixed film have been studied for different thicknesses of the silicon layers. A novel patterning technique of using Si-YBCO intermixing has been developed for fabricating the YBCO superconducting device structures. A superconductor sample has a critical current value I _{rm c}. Below the I _{rm c} the material is superconducting, and above I_{rm c} the sample has a finite resistance. Based on this effect

  14. Study of high-temperature oxidation of ultrathin fe films on Pt(100) by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahm, T.-U.

    2016-05-01

    High-temperature oxidation of iron thin films deposited on Pt(100) surfaces was studied by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Upon an oxygen exposure of 300 Langmuir onto a 7.5- monolayer (ML) Fe film at 830 K, about 2 monolayers of the Fe film were oxidized as Fe3O4 while the remaining Fe atoms diffused into the substrate. For 1.25-, 2.5-, and 3.75-monolayer Fe films, only about a monolayer of the Fe film was oxidized as FeO, regardless of the number of Fe atoms. The oxide layers on the 7.5-monolayer Fe film were observed to be stable upon post-annealing at 1030 K.

  15. Neutron scattering studies of spin-phonon hybridization and superconducting spin gaps in the high-temperature superconductor La2-x(Sr,Ba)xCuO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagman, J. J.; Carlo, J. P.; Gaudet, J.; Van Gastel, G.; Abernathy, D. L.; Stone, M. B.; Granroth, G. E.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Savici, A. T.; Kim, Y. J.; Zhang, H.; Ellis, D.; Zhao, Y.; Clark, L.; Kallin, A. B.; Mazurek, E.; Dabkowska, H. A.; Gaulin, B. D.

    2016-03-01

    We present time-of-flight neutron scattering measurements on single crystals of La2-xBaxCuO4 (LBCO) with 0 ≤x ≤0.095 and La2-xSrxCuO4 (LSCO) with x =0.08 and 0.11. This range of dopings spans much of the phase diagram relevant to high-temperature cuprate superconductivity, ranging from insulating, three-dimensional commensurate long-range antiferromagnetic order, for x ≤0.02 , to two-dimensional (2D) incommensurate antiferromagnetism coexisting with superconductivity for x ≥0.05 . Previous work on lightly doped LBCO with x =0.035 showed a clear enhancement of the inelastic scattering coincident with the low-energy crossings of the highly dispersive spin excitations and quasi-2D optic phonons. The present work extends these measurements across the phase diagram and shows this enhancement to be a common feature to this family of layered quantum magnets. Furthermore, we show that the low-temperature, low-energy magnetic spectral weight is substantially larger for samples with nonsuperconducting ground states relative to any of the samples with superconducting ground states. Spin gaps, suppression of low-energy magnetic spectral weight as a function of decreasing temperature, are observed in both superconducting LBCO and LSCO samples, consistent with previous observations for superconducting LSCO.

  16. Tribological properties at 25 C of seven polyimide films bonded to 440 C high-temperature stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    The tribological properties of seven polyimide films applied to 440 C high temperature stainless steel substrates were studied at 25 C with a pin-on-disk type of friction and were apparatus. The polyimides fell into two groups according to friction and wear properties. Group I polyimides had slightly lower friction but much higher wear than group II polyimides. The wear mechanism was predominately adhesion, but the wear particles were larger for group I polyimides. For most of the polyimides the transfer films consisted of clumps of compacted wear particles. One polyimide composition produced a very thin transfer film that sheared plastically in the contact area.

  17. Jet Propulsion Laboratory/NASA Lewis Research Center space qualified hybrid high temperature superconducting/semiconducting 7.4 GHz low-noise downconverter for NRL HTSSE-II program

    SciTech Connect

    Javadi, H.H.S.; Bowen, J.G.; Rascoe, D.L.; Romanofsky, R.R.; Bhasin, K.B.; Chorey, C.M.

    1996-07-01

    A deep space satellite downconverter receiver was proposed by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) for the Naval Research Laboratory`s (NRL) high temperature superconductivity space experiment, phase-II (HTSSE-II) program. Space qualified low-noise cryogenic downconverter receivers utilizing thin-film high temperature superconducting (HTS) passive circuitry and semiconductor active devices were developed and delivered to NRL. The downconverter consists of an HTS preselect filter, a cryogenic low-noise amplifier, a cryogenic mixer, and a cryogenic oscillator with an HTS resonator. HTS components were inserted as the front-end filter and the local oscillator resonator for their superior 77 K performance over the conventional components. The semiconducting low noise amplifier also benefited from cooling to 77 K. The mixer was designed specifically for cryogenic applications and provided low conversion loss and low power consumption. In addition to an engineering model, two space qualified units (qualification, flight) were built and delivered to NRL. Manufacturing, integration and test of the space qualified downconverters adhered to the requirements of JPL class-D space instruments and partially to MIL-STD-883D specifications. The qualification unit has {approximately}50 K system noise temperature which is a factor of three better than a conventional downconverter at room temperature.

  18. Superconductive thin film makes convenient liquid helium level sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, H. H.

    1968-01-01

    Sensor consisting of superconductive film mounted on a dipstick measures the level of liquid helium in a Dewar flask. The sensor is made by depositing a thin film of niobium metal to a thickness of 2000 angstroms on a quartz substrate, which is then mounted on a graduated dipstick.

  19. Method of enhancing the upper critical field (HC sub 2 ) in high temperature superconducting ceramic copper oxide perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, C.Z.

    1992-03-03

    This patent describes a method of increasing the current carrying capacity and enhancing the upper critical (H{sub c2}) in a Type II superconducting material. It comprises providing a sample of a Type II superconducting material; exposing the sample to gamma radiation ranging in dosage level from about ten million rads to about one hundred million rads at a dose rate of about three million rads per hour.

  20. Segregation of antiferromagnetism and high-temperature superconductivity in Ca1-xLaxFe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Shanta R.; Drye, T.; Goh, S. K.; Klintberg, L. E.; Silver, J. M.; Grosche, F. M.; Sutherland, M.; Munsie, T. J. S.; Luke, G. M.; Pratt, D. K.; Lynn, J. W.; Paglione, J.

    2014-04-01

    We report the effect of applied pressures on magnetic and superconducting order in single crystals of the aliovalent La-doped iron pnictide material Ca1-xLaxFe2As2. Using electrical transport, elastic neutron scattering, and resonant tunnel diode oscillator measurements on samples under both quasihydrostatic and hydrostatic pressure conditions, we report a series of phase diagrams spanning the range of substitution concentrations for both antiferromagnetic and superconducting ground states that include pressure-tuning through the antiferromagnetic (AFM) superconducting critical point. Our results indicate that the observed superconducting phase with a maximum transition temperature of Tc=47 K is intrinsic to these materials, appearing only upon suppression of magnetic order by pressure-tuning through the AFM critical point. Thus, the superconducting phase appears to exist exclusively in juxtaposition to the antiferromagnetic phase in a manner similar to the oxygen- and fluorine-based iron-pnictide superconductors with the highest transition temperatures reported to date. Unlike the lower-Tc systems, in which superconductivity and magnetism usually coexist, the tendency for the highest-Tc systems to show noncoexistence provides an important insight into the distinct transition temperature limits in different members of the iron-based superconductor family.

  1. First-principles prediction of MgB2-like NaBC: A more promising high-temperature superconducting material than LiBC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Rende; Huang, Guiqin; Yang, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Crystal structure, lattice dynamics, and superconducting properties for sodium borocarbides NaB1+xC1-x are investigated with first-principles calculations. Based on crystal structure analysis by particle swarm optimization methodology, NaBC is predicted to crystallize in the layered P63 / mmc crystal structure as LiBC. However, it is different from LiBC, in that Na atoms are effectively ionized, with no longitudinal covalence exist between Na and B-C layers, just as in the case of MgB2. Therefore, Na1-xBC is more similar to MgB2 than Li1-xBC as a potential high-temperature superconductor. Further more, we suggest that the slight hole doping of NaBC through partial substitution of C by B atoms can also produce cause superconductivity. The phonon spectra for NaBC and NaB1.1C0.9 are obtained within the virtual-crystal approximation treatment. There is a remarkable softening of the in-plane B-C bond-stretching modes for NaB1.1C0.9 in certain regions of the Brillouin zone, while other phonon bands show no obvious softening behavior. This conspicuous softening of the in-plane B-C bond-stretching modes indicates a strong electron-phonon coupling for them. The obtained total electron-phonon coupling strength λ for NaB1.1C0.9 is 0.73, and superconducting transition temperature TC is predicted to be 35 K (μ* = 0.1). This indicates that NaB1+xC1-x is potentially high-temperature superconducting and hole doping of NaBC could produce high-temperature superconductivity. In addition, we conjecture that, to design a MgB2-like high TC superconducting material, the longitudinal covalent bonds between the metal cations and graphite-like layers need be excluded.

  2. Dissipation in thin superconducting current biased films due to vortex motion

    SciTech Connect

    Bulaevskii, Lev N

    2009-01-01

    Recently, the problem of dissipation in thin superconducting films with thickness d on the order of the coherence length {zeta}, and width {omega} much narrower than the Pearl length, {Lambda} >> {omega} >> {zeta}, was discussed as the main cause for the behavior of I-V characteristics observed in thin high-temperature superconducting films. In thin and narrow films or strips with width w >> {zeta} the barrier for phase slips by creation of temporary normal regions across the entire film width is too big, thus phase slips become highly improbable. Instead, we consider a vortex crossing the strip from one edge to the other, perpendicular to the bias current, as the dominant mechanism for generalized phase slips resulting in detectable voltage pulses. We derive the rate of vortex crossings using the general theory of transition rates between metastable states. In mean field theory, the saddle point solution of the rate equation gives the vortex position inside the strip, where the kinetic energy of supercurrents is maximum. However, the free energy barrier derived in such an approach is strongly renormalized by superconducting fluctuations and this effect was not accounted for previously. They drastically reduce the rate of vortex crossings and, consequently, dissipation. We present results for the amplitude and duration of voltage pulses induced by vortex motion and their consequences on I-V characteristics, when heating due to vortex crossings is negligible. We found ohmic behavior at low bias currents, power law behavior at intermediate currents and exponential I-V characteristics at currents close to the critical one. The impact of vortex motion in superconducting strips on the observation of so-called dark counts (voltage pulses) in superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors is discussed.

  3. Passivation of high temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Richard P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The surface of high temperature superconductors such as YBa2Cu3O(7-x) are passivated by reacting the native Y, Ba and Cu metal ions with an anion such as sulfate or oxalate to form a surface film that is impervious to water and has a solubility in water of no more than 10(exp -3) M. The passivating treatment is preferably conducted by immersing the surface in dilute aqueous acid solution since more soluble species dissolve into the solution. The treatment does not degrade the superconducting properties of the bulk material.

  4. Optical and electrical properties of thin superconducting films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Covington, Billy C.; Jing, Feng Chen

    1990-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopic techniques can provide a vital probe of the superconducting energy gap which is one of the most fundamental physical properties of superconductors. Currently, the central questions regarding the optical properties of superconductors are how the energy gap can be measured by infrared techniques and at which frequency the gap exists. An effective infrared spectroscopic method to investigate the superconducting energy gap, Eg, was developed by using the Bomem DA 3.01 Fourier Transformation Spectrophotometer. The reflectivity of a superconducting thin film of YBaCuO deposited on SrTiO3 was measured. A shoulder was observed in the superconducting state reflectance R(sub S) at 480/cm. This gives a value of Eg/kT(sub c) = 7.83, where k is the Boltzmann constant and T(sub c) is the superconducting transition temperature, from which, it is suggested that YBaCuO is a very strong coupling superconductor.

  5. High-temperature superconductivity in space-charge regions of lanthanum cuprate induced by two-dimensional doping

    PubMed Central

    Baiutti, F.; Logvenov, G.; Gregori, G.; Cristiani, G.; Wang, Y.; Sigle, W.; van Aken, P. A.; Maier, J.

    2015-01-01

    The exploitation of interface effects turned out to be a powerful tool for generating exciting material properties. Such properties include magnetism, electronic and ionic transport and even superconductivity. Here, instead of using conventional homogeneous doping to enhance the hole concentration in lanthanum cuprate and achieve superconductivity, we replace single LaO planes with SrO dopant planes using atomic-layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (two-dimensional doping). Electron spectroscopy and microscopy, conductivity measurements and zinc tomography reveal such negatively charged interfaces to induce layer-dependent superconductivity (Tc up to 35 K) in the space-charge zone at the side of the planes facing the substrate, where the strontium (Sr) profile is abrupt. Owing to the growth conditions, the other side exhibits instead a Sr redistribution resulting in superconductivity due to conventional doping. The present study represents a successful example of two-dimensional doping of superconducting oxide systems and demonstrates its power in this field. PMID:26481902

  6. Gate-controlled superconducting proximity effect in ultrathin graphite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Moriki, T.; Tanaka, S.; Kanda, A.; Goto, H.; Miyazaki, H.; Odaka, S.; Ootuka, Y.; Tsukagoshi, K.; Aoyagi, Y.

    2008-03-01

    We experimentally investigated electrical transport in thin graphite films about 10 nm thick connected to superconducting leads. Proximity-induced superconductivity was observed and the critical supercurrent strongly depends on the gate voltage. From the maximum-to-minimum ratios of the critical supercurrent and the normal state resistance, we conclude that the major part of the supercurrent flows in a few graphene layers close to the gate electrode.

  7. Study of critical current density in superconducting magnesium diboride films grown by ex situ annealing of CVD boron films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, Mina

    MgB2 films have been processed by different techniques, the most successful of which include the hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD) as well as the ex situ high temperature annealing of boron films in Mg vapor. The advantage of the ex situ method is that it allows the coating of MgB2 on large and complex surfaces, such as superconducting radio frequency (RF) cavities. However, it has always been realized that HPCVD films can carry higher J c than the ex situ annealed films. In this research, we succeeded in fabricating high quality MgB2 films by the ex situ annealing technique that produced a Jc value as high as 1.8 x 106 A/cm 2 for 1 mum thick film at 20 K and self-field. This high Jc value is, however, considerably reduced at higher thicknesses similar to that observed in YBCO coated conductors. In order to understand the mechanisms responsible for J c decrease with increasing film thickness, we studied the Jc behavior as a function of thickness in MgB2 films fabricated by ex situ annealing at 840°C of boron films, grown by chemical vapor deposition, in Mg vapor. The film thickness ranged between 300 nm and 10 mum. The values of Jc for these films ranged from 1.2 x 107 A/cm2 for 300 nm to 1.9 x 105 A/cm2 for 10 mum film thickness at 20 K and self-field. In addition, the results show that critical current (Ic) reaches a maximum value of 728 A/cm width at ˜1 mum thick MgB2 film at 20 K and self-field. These results of Jc and Ic behaviors with higher thickness are interpreted in terms of impurity diffusion during annealing and microstructural degradation for thicker films.

  8. Diffusion tensor imaging using a high-temperature superconducting resonator in a 3 T magnetic resonance imaging for a spontaneous rat brain tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, In-Tsang; Yang, Hong-Chang; Chen, Jyh-Horng

    2013-02-01

    This study investigates the peri-tumor signal abnormalities of a spontaneous brain tumor in a rat by using a 4 cm high-temperature superconducting (HTS) surface resonator. Fractional anisotropy (FA) values derived from diffusion tensor imaging reflect the interstitial characteristic of the peri-lesional tissues of brain tumors. Low FA indicates interstitial tumor infiltration and tissue injury, while high FA indicates better tissue integrity. Better delineation of tissue contents obtained by the HTS surface resonator at 77 K may facilitate therapeutic strategy and improve clinical outcomes.

  9. Reversible superconductivity in electrochromic indium-tin oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, Ali E.; Xiong, Ka; Cho, Kyeongjae; Salamon, M. B.

    2012-12-01

    Transparent conductive indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films, electrochemically intercalated with sodium or other cations, show tunable superconducting transitions with a maximum Tc at 5 K. The transition temperature and the density of states, D(EF) (extracted from the measured Pauli susceptibility χp) exhibit the same dome shaped behavior as a function of electron density. Optimally intercalated samples have an upper critical field ≈ 4 T and Δ/kBTc ≈ 2.0. Accompanying the development of superconductivity, the films show a reversible electrochromic change from transparent to colored and are partially transparent (orange) at the peak of the superconducting dome. This reversible intercalation of alkali and alkali earth ions into thin ITO films opens diverse opportunities for tunable, optically transparent superconductors.

  10. Superconductivity of very thin films: The superconductor-insulator transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yen-Hsiang; Nelson, J.; Goldman, A. M.

    2015-07-01

    The study of thin superconducting films has been an important component of the science of superconductivity for more than six decades. It played a major role in the development of currently accepted views of the macroscopic and microscopic nature of the superconducting state. In recent years the focus of research in the field has shifted to the study of ultrathin films and surface and interface layers. This has permitted the exploration of one of the important topics of condensed matter physics, the superconductor-insulator transition. This review will discuss this phenomenon as realized in the study of metallic films, cuprates, and metallic interfaces. These are in effect model systems for behaviors that may be found in more complex systems of contemporary interest.

  11. High-temperature stability of thermoelectric Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 4}O{sub 9} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Brinks, P.; Rijnders, G.; Huijben, M.; Van Nong, N.; Pryds, N.

    2015-04-06

    An enhanced thermal stability in thermoelectric Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 4}O{sub 9} thin films up to 550 °C in an oxygen rich environment was demonstrated by high-temperature electrical and X-ray diffraction measurements. In contrast to generally performed heating in helium gas, it is shown that an oxygen/helium mixture provides sufficient thermal contact, while preventing the previously disregarded formation of oxygen vacancies. Combining thermal cycling with electrical measurements proves to be a powerful tool to study the real intrinsic thermoelectric behaviour of oxide thin films at elevated temperatures.

  12. Thickness dependence of superconducting properties in magnesium diboride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beringer, Douglas; Clavero, Cesar; Tan, Teng; Xi, Xiaoxing; Lukaszew, Rosa

    2013-03-01

    Thin film MgB2 is a promising material currently researched for improvements in superconducting radio frequency (SRF) technology and applications. At present, bulk niobium SRF accelerating cavities suffer from a fundamental upper limit in maximally sustained accelerating gradients; however, a scheme involving multi-layered superstructures consisting of superconducting-insulating-superconducting (SIS) layers has been proposed to overcome this fundamental material limit of 50 MV/m. The SIS multi-layer paradigm is reliant upon implementing a thin shielding material with a suitably high Hc1 which may prevent early field penetration in a bulk material layer and consequently delay the high field breakdown. It has been predicted that for thin superconducting films -- thickness less than the London penetration depth (~ 140 nm in the case of MgB2) -- the lower critical field Hc1 will be enhanced with decreasing thickness. Thus, MgB2, with a high bulk Hc1 value is a prime candidate for such SIS structures. Here we present our study on the structure, surface morphology and superconducting properties on a series of MgB2 thin films and correlate the effects of film thickness and surface morphology on Hc1. This work was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-SC0004410 and DE-AC05-06OR23177) and Defense Threat Reduction Agency (HDTRA1-10-1-0072).

  13. Preparation, structure and superconductivity of high T(c) compounds: Research of high temperature superconductors in Hungary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirschner, I.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper the main directions, methods and results of the investigation of high-T(c) superconductors in Hungary are briefly summarized. The fundamental idea of this research is to study the effect of starting conditions on the microstructure of samples and the influence of the latter one on their superconducting parameters. The investigation concerning technical development is also mentioned.

  14. Signature of Cooper pairs in the non-superconducting phases of amorphous superconducting tantalum films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yize Stephanie

    2015-02-01

    We have studied the magnetic field or disorder induced insulating and metallic phases in amorphous Ta superconducting thin films. The evolution of the nonlinear transport in the insulating phase exhibits a non-monotonic behavior as the magnetic field is increased. We suggest that this observation could be evidence of the presence of localized Cooper pairs in the insulating phase. As the metallic phase intervenes the superconducting and insulating states in Ta films, this result further reveals that Cooper pairs also exist in the metallic ground state.

  15. Analysis of superconducting FeSe thin films deposited by a sputtering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, R.; Zaitsev, A. G.; Fuchs, D.; Fromknecht, R.

    2013-05-01

    Superconducting FeSe thin films have been deposited onto (001)-oriented single-crystalline MgO substrates by conventional radio-frequency magnetron co-sputtering of a FeSe target and a pure Se target. The composition of the films is within the homogeneity range of the tetragonal β phase close to stoichiometry. Films with a minimum residual resistivity and a maximum superconducting transition temperature can be prepared within a narrow substrate temperature range from 480 to 510 °C. In contrast to the equilibrium phase diagram the β phase surprisingly exists in thin films deposited at substrate temperatures as high as 680 °C. The polycrystalline tetragonal films grow with a preferred c-axis texture and a tiny admixture of misaligned grains. The temperature-dependent resistivity reveals a low-temperature linear part and a high-temperature part with a pronounced negative curvature. The origin of the non-Fermi liquid behaviour and the underlying electron scattering mechanisms are still unknown so far.

  16. Sequentially evaporated thin film YBa2Cu3O(7-x) superconducting microwave ring resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohrer, Norman J.; To, Hing Y.; Valco, George J.; Bhasin, Kul B.; Chorey, Chris; Warner, Joseph D.

    1990-01-01

    There is great interest in the application of thin film high temperature superconductors in high frequency electronic circuits. A ring resonator provides a good test vehicle for assessing the microwave losses in the superconductor and for comparing films made by different techniques. Ring resonators made of YBa2Cu3O(7-x) have been investigated on LaAlO3 substrates. The superconducting thin films were deposited by sequential electron beam evaporation of Cu, Y, and BaF2 with a post anneal. Patterning of the superconducting film was done using negative photolithography. A ring resonator was also fabricated from a thin gold film as a control. Both resonators had a gold ground plane on the backside of the substrate. The ring resonators' reflection coefficients were measured as a function of frequency from 33 to 37 GHz at temperatures ranging from 20 K to 68 K. The resonator exhibited two resonances which were at 34.5 and 35.7 GHz at 68 K. The resonant frequencies increased with decreasing temperature. The magnitude of the reflection coefficients was in the calculation of the unloaded Q-values. The performance of the evaporated and gold resonator are compared with the performance of a laser ablated YBa2Cu3O(7-x) resonator. The causes of the double resonance are discussed.

  17. Microwave study of superconducting Sn films above and below percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beutel, Manfred H.; Ebensperger, Nikolaj G.; Thiemann, Markus; Untereiner, Gabriele; Fritz, Vincent; Javaheri, Mojtaba; Nägele, Jonathan; Rösslhuber, Roland; Dressel, Martin; Scheffler, Marc

    2016-08-01

    The electronic properties of superconducting Sn films ({T}{{c}}≈ 3.8 {{K}}) change significantly when reducing the film thickness down to a few {nm}, in particular close to the percolation threshold. The low-energy electrodynamics of such Sn samples can be probed via microwave spectroscopy, e.g. with superconducting stripline resonators. Here we study Sn thin films, deposited via thermal evaporation—ranging in thickness between 38 and 842 {nm}—which encompasses the percolation transition. We use superconducting Pb stripline resonators to probe the microwave response of these Sn films in a frequency range between 4 and 20 {GHz} at temperatures from 7.2 down to 1.5 {{K}}. The measured quality factor of the resonators decreases with rising temperature due to enhanced losses. As a function of the sample thickness we observe three regimes with significantly different properties: samples below percolation, i.e. ensembles of disconnected superconducting islands, exhibit dielectric properties with negligible losses, demonstrating that macroscopic current paths are required for appreciable dynamical conductivity of Sn at GHz frequencies. Thick Sn films, as the other limit, lead to low-loss resonances both above and below T c of Sn, as expected for bulk conductors. But in an intermediate thickness regime, just above percolation and with labyrinth-like morphology of the Sn, we observe a quite different behavior: the superconducting state has a microwave response similar to the thicker, completely covering films with low microwave losses; but the metallic state of these Sn films is so lossy that resonator operation is suppressed completely.

  18. Signs of high-temperature superconductivity in frustrated manganites La1 - y Sm y MnO3 + δ ( y = 0.85, 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukhanko, F. N.; Bukhanko, A. F.

    2016-03-01

    The characteristics signs of the coexistence of nanoscale superconductivity and fluctuating antiferromagnetic state of the spin-liquid type have been revealed for the first time in frustrated manganites La1‒ y Sm y MnO3 + δ (δ ~ 0.1, y = 0.85, 1.0) in the form of macroscopic quantization of magnetic properties in weak magnetic fields. A sharp decrease and oscillations of close-in-magnitude critical temperatures of transitions to fluctuating antiferromagnetic ( T A) and superconducting ( T c0) states with an increase in the external magnetic field strength have been found. Quantum oscillations of the magnetization and magnetic susceptibility near the critical temperatures of fluctuating antiferromagnetic phase transitions of the A- and CE-types have been discovered and investigated in detail. It has been shown that the studied samples exhibit properties of a multicomponent composite in which at temperatures T < 60 K in weak magnetic fields, there coexist fluctuating charge and antiferromagnetic correlations of the A- and CE-types with properties of the spin-liquid state and a small fraction of the superconducting phase in the form of individual and Josephsontunnel- junction-coupled superconducting loops with low critical currents. It has been assumed that, in samples with samarium concentrations y ≥ 0.8 at temperatures below 60 K, there is a new inhomogeneous state of doped manganites of the magneto-electronic liquid crystal type with strong quantum fluctuations of the magnetic and electronic order parameters, which are similar to electronic liquid crystals in lightly doped high-temperature superconducting cuprates.

  19. A Cryogenic Magnetostrictive Actuator using a Persistent High Temperature Superconducting Magnet, Part 1: Concept and Design. Part 1; Concept and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horner, Garnett C.; Bromberg, Leslie; Teter, J. P.

    2001-01-01

    Cryogenic magnetostrictive materials, such as rare earth zinc crystals, offer high strains and high forces with minimally applied magnetic fields, making the material ideally suited for deformable optics applications. For cryogenic temperature applications, such as Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST), the use of superconducting magnets offer the possibility of a persistent mode of operation, i.e., the magnetostrictive material will maintain a strain field without power. High temperature superconductors (HTS) are attractive options if the temperature of operation is higher than 10 degrees Kelvin (K) and below 77 K. However, HTS wires have constraints that limit the minimum radius of winding, and even if good wires can be produced, the technology for joining superconducting wires does not exist. In this paper, the design and capabilities of a rare earth zinc magnetostrictive actuator using bulk HTS is described. Bulk superconductors can be fabricated in the sizes required with excellent superconducting properties. Equivalent permanent magnets, made with this inexpensive material, are persistent, do not require a persistent switch as in HTS wires, and can be made very small. These devices are charged using a technique which is similar to the one used for charging permanent magnets, e.g., by driving them into saturation. A small normal conducting coil can be used for charging or discharging. Very fast charging and discharging of HTS tubes, as short as 100 microseconds, has been demonstrated. Because of the magnetic field capability of the superconductor material, a very small amount of superconducting magnet material is needed to actuate the rare earth zinc. In this paper, several designs of actuators using YBCO and BSCCO 2212 superconducting materials are presented. Designs that include magnetic shielding to prevent interaction between adjacent actuators will also be described. Preliminary experimental results and comparison with theory for BSSCO 2212 with a

  20. A single-sided linear synchronous motor with a high temperature superconducting coil as the excitation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, F.; Li, J.; Zheng, S. J.; Liu, L.; Ma, G. T.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, S. Y.; Liu, Wei

    2010-10-01

    Thrust measurements were performed on a coil made of a YBa2Cu3O7 - δ coated conductor acting as the excitation system of a single-sided linear synchronous motor. The superconducting coil was a single pancake in the shape of a racetrack with 100 turns, the width and effective lengths were 42 mm and 84 mm, respectively. The stator was made of conventional copper wire. At 77 K and a gap of 10 mm, with an operating direct current of IDC = 30 A for the superconducting coil and alternating current of IAC = 9 A for the stator coils, a thrust of 24 N was achieved. With addition of an iron core, thrust was increased by 49%. With addition of an iron back-plate, thrust was increased by 70%.

  1. Optimization of the Processing Parameters of High Temperature Superconducting Glass-Ceramics: Center Director's Discretionary Fund Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, E. C.; Kaukler, W. F.

    1993-01-01

    A number of promising glass forming compositions of high Tc superconducting Ba-Sr-Ca-Cu-O (BSCCO) materials were evaluated for their glass-ceramic crystallization ability. The BSCCO ceramics belonging to the class of superconductors in the Ba-Sr-Ca-Cu-O system were the focus of this study. By first forming the superconducting material as a glass, subsequent devitrification into the crystalline (glass-ceramic) superconductor can be performed by thermal processing of the glass preform body. Glass formability and phase formation were determined by a variety of methods in another related study. This study focused on the nucleation and crystallization of the materials. Thermal analysis during rapid cooling aids in the evaluation of nucleation and crystallization behavior. Melt viscosity is used to predict glass formation ability.

  2. High temperature coefficient of resistance molybdenum oxide and nickel oxide thin films for microbolometer applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yao O.; John, David Saint; Podraza, Nikolas J.; Jackson, Thomas N.; Horn, Mark W.

    2015-03-01

    Molybdenum oxide (MoOx) and nickel oxide (NiOx) thin films were deposited by reactive biased target ion beam deposition. MoOx thin film resistivity varied from 3 to 2000 Ω.cm with a temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) from -1.7% to -3.2%/K, and NiOx thin film resistivity varied from 1 to 300 Ω.cm with a TCR from -2.2% to -3.3%/K, both easily controlled by varying the oxygen partial pressure. Biased target ion beam deposited high TCR MoOx and NiOx thin films are polycrystalline semiconductors and have good stability in air. Compared with commonly used vanadium oxide thin films, MoOx or NiOx thin films offer improved process control for resistive temperature sensors.

  3. Dome-shaped magnetic order competing with high-temperature superconductivity at high pressures in FeSe

    PubMed Central

    Sun, J. P.; Matsuura, K.; Ye, G. Z.; Mizukami, Y.; Shimozawa, M.; Matsubayashi, K.; Yamashita, M.; Watashige, T.; Kasahara, S.; Matsuda, Y.; Yan, J. -Q.; Sales, B. C.; Uwatoko, Y.; Cheng, J. -G.; Shibauchi, T.

    2016-01-01

    The coexistence and competition between superconductivity and electronic orders, such as spin or charge density waves, have been a central issue in high transition-temperature (Tc) superconductors. Unlike other iron-based superconductors, FeSe exhibits nematic ordering without magnetism whose relationship with its superconductivity remains unclear. Moreover, a pressure-induced fourfold increase of Tc has been reported, which poses a profound mystery. Here we report high-pressure magnetotransport measurements in FeSe up to ∼15 GPa, which uncover the dome shape of magnetic phase superseding the nematic order. Above ∼6 GPa the sudden enhancement of superconductivity (Tc≤38.3 K) accompanies a suppression of magnetic order, demonstrating their competing nature with very similar energy scales. Above the magnetic dome, we find anomalous transport properties suggesting a possible pseudogap formation, whereas linear-in-temperature resistivity is observed in the normal states of the high-Tc phase above 6 GPa. The obtained phase diagram highlights unique features of FeSe among iron-based superconductors, but bears some resemblance to that of high-Tc cuprates. PMID:27431724

  4. Dome-shaped magnetic order competing with high-temperature superconductivity at high pressures in FeSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J. P.; Matsuura, K.; Ye, G. Z.; Mizukami, Y.; Shimozawa, M.; Matsubayashi, K.; Yamashita, M.; Watashige, T.; Kasahara, S.; Matsuda, Y.; Yan, J.-Q.; Sales, B. C.; Uwatoko, Y.; Cheng, J.-G.; Shibauchi, T.

    2016-07-01

    The coexistence and competition between superconductivity and electronic orders, such as spin or charge density waves, have been a central issue in high transition-temperature (Tc) superconductors. Unlike other iron-based superconductors, FeSe exhibits nematic ordering without magnetism whose relationship with its superconductivity remains unclear. Moreover, a pressure-induced fourfold increase of Tc has been reported, which poses a profound mystery. Here we report high-pressure magnetotransport measurements in FeSe up to ~15 GPa, which uncover the dome shape of magnetic phase superseding the nematic order. Above ~6 GPa the sudden enhancement of superconductivity (Tc<=38.3 K) accompanies a suppression of magnetic order, demonstrating their competing nature with very similar energy scales. Above the magnetic dome, we find anomalous transport properties suggesting a possible pseudogap formation, whereas linear-in-temperature resistivity is observed in the normal states of the high-Tc phase above 6 GPa. The obtained phase diagram highlights unique features of FeSe among iron-based superconductors, but bears some resemblance to that of high-Tc cuprates.

  5. Dome-shaped magnetic order competing with high-temperature superconductivity at high pressures in FeSe.

    PubMed

    Sun, J P; Matsuura, K; Ye, G Z; Mizukami, Y; Shimozawa, M; Matsubayashi, K; Yamashita, M; Watashige, T; Kasahara, S; Matsuda, Y; Yan, J-Q; Sales, B C; Uwatoko, Y; Cheng, J-G; Shibauchi, T

    2016-01-01

    The coexistence and competition between superconductivity and electronic orders, such as spin or charge density waves, have been a central issue in high transition-temperature (Tc) superconductors. Unlike other iron-based superconductors, FeSe exhibits nematic ordering without magnetism whose relationship with its superconductivity remains unclear. Moreover, a pressure-induced fourfold increase of Tc has been reported, which poses a profound mystery. Here we report high-pressure magnetotransport measurements in FeSe up to ∼15 GPa, which uncover the dome shape of magnetic phase superseding the nematic order. Above ∼6 GPa the sudden enhancement of superconductivity (Tc≤38.3 K) accompanies a suppression of magnetic order, demonstrating their competing nature with very similar energy scales. Above the magnetic dome, we find anomalous transport properties suggesting a possible pseudogap formation, whereas linear-in-temperature resistivity is observed in the normal states of the high-Tc phase above 6 GPa. The obtained phase diagram highlights unique features of FeSe among iron-based superconductors, but bears some resemblance to that of high-Tc cuprates. PMID:27431724

  6. High-Temperature Characterization of Silicon Dioxide Films with Wafer Curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigl, S.; Heinz, W.; Kahn, M.; Schoenherr, H.; Cordill, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Amorphous silicon dioxide films used as dielectric layers in microelectronic devices are deposited using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Because of the presence of hydrogen and nitrogen species in the precursor gases, incorporation of such species in the films can lead to crack formation during subsequent annealing processes up to 1000°C. In this study, the role of film chemistry on the thermo-mechanical behavior of silicon dioxide films is studied with in situ film stress measurements using wafer curvature to maximum temperatures of 1000°C. This is a significant advance because normal wafer curvature can only reach maximum temperatures of around 500°C. The increased temperature range allows for the stress evolution and film chemistry to be examined for the relevant processing conditions. It was found that at temperatures higher than 550°C, hydrogen bond cleavage led to a large stress increase and film chemistry change due to new bonding arrangements between nitrogen and silicon as well as subsequent film densification causing cracking of films. These changes could only be identified with wafer curvature measurements up to 1000°C.

  7. High temperature passive film on the surface of Co-Cr-Mo alloy and its tribological properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Feifei; Dong, Guangneng; Dong, Lishe

    2014-09-01

    For the artificial hip joints, passive film formed on the Co-Cr-Mo alloy acted as a highly protective barrier in the body fluid. But its stability, composition and structure always influenced the protection. In this work, passive film was obtained by high temperature treatment. The effect of passivation environment on the properties of the passive film was investigated. The film's surface roughness, micro-hardness and structure were analyzed. In order to study the tribological behavior of the passive film, pin-on-disk tribotest was carried out under bovine serum albumin (BSA) and saline solution. Results indicated the sample passivated in vacuum had friction coefficient of 0.18 under BSA solution and 0.53 under saline solution; the sample passivated in air had friction coefficient of 0.14 under BSA solution and 0.56 under saline solution. In addition, the reference sample without passivation was tested under the same condition. It showed friction of 0.22 under BSA solution and 0.45 under solution. The lubricating mechanism was attributed to BSA tribo-film absorption on the surface and high hardness passive film.

  8. Enhanced localized superconductivity in Sr2RuO4 thin film by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, J.; Massarotti, D.; Vickers, M. E.; Kursumovic, A.; Di Bernardo, A.; Robinson, J. W. A.; Tafuri, F.; MacManus-Driscoll, J. L.; Blamire, M. G.

    2016-09-01

    Superconducting c-axis-oriented Sr2RuO4 thin film has been fabricated using pulsed laser deposition. Although the superconductivity is localized, the onset critical temperature is enhanced over the bulk value. X-ray microstructural analysis of Sr2RuO4 superconducting and non-superconducting thin films suggests the existence of the localized stacking faults and an overall c-axis lattice expansion which may account for the locally enhanced superconductivity.

  9. Thickness dependence of superconductivity and superconductor-insulator transition in ultrathin FeSe films on SrTiO3(001) substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qingyan; Zhang, Wenhao; Zhang, Zuocheng; Sun, Yi; Xing, Ying; Wang, Yayu; Wang, Lili; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qi-Kun; Wang, Jian

    2015-12-01

    Interface-enhanced high-temperature superconductivity in a one-unit-cell (UC) FeSe film on SrTiO3(001) (STO) substrate has recently attracted much attention in condensed matter physics and material science. Here, using ex situ transport measurements, we report on the superconductivity in FeSe ultrathin films with different thicknesses on STO substrate. We find that the onset superconducting transition temperature (T c) decreases with increasing film thickness of FeSe, which is opposite to the behavior usually observed in traditional superconductor films. By systematic post-annealing of 5 UC FeSe films, we observe an insulator-superconductor transition, which is accompanied by a sign change of the dominant charge carriers from holes to electrons at low temperatures according to the corresponding Hall measurement.

  10. Theory of exotic superconductivity and normal states of heavy electron and high temperature superconductivity materials. Progress report, February 15, 1994--February 14, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, D.L.

    1995-02-01

    This is a progress report for the DOE project covering the period 2/15/94 to 2/14/95. The PI had a fruitful sabbatical during this period, and had some important new results, particularly in the area of new phenomenology for heavy fermion superconductivity. Significant new research accomplishments are in the area of odd-in-time-reversal pairing states/staggered superconductivity, the two-channel Kondo lattice, and a general model for Ce impurities which admits one-, two-, and three-channel Kondo effects. Papers submitted touch on these areas: staggered superconductivity - a new phenomenology for UPt{sub 3}; theory of the two-channel Kondo lattice in infinite dimensions; general model of a Ce{sup 3+} impurity. Other work was done in the areas: Knight shift in heavy fermion alloys and compounds; symmetry analysis of singular pairing correlations for the two-channel Kondo impurity model.

  11. Diamond magnetometry of Meissner currents in a superconducting film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfasi, Nir; Masis, Sergei; Shtempluck, Oleg; Kochetok, Valleri; Buks, Eyal

    2016-07-01

    We study magnetic field penetration into a thin film made of a superconducting niobium. Imaging of magnetic field is performed by optically detecting magnetic resonances of negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy defects inside a single crystal diamond, which is attached to the niobium film under study. The experimental results are compared with theoretical predictions based on the critical state model, and good agreement is obtained.

  12. Controllable injector for local flux entry into superconducting films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmo, D.; Colauto, F.; de Andrade, A. M. H.; Oliveira, A. A. M.; Ortiz, W. A.; Johansen, T. H.

    2016-09-01

    A superconducting flux injector (SFI) has been designed to allow for controlled injections of magnetic flux into a superconducting film from a predefined location along the edge. The SFI is activated by an external current pulse, here chosen to be 200 ms long, and it is demonstrated on films of Nb that the amount of injected flux is controlled by the pulse height. Examples of injections at two different temperatures where the flux enters by stimulated flux-flow and by triggered thermomagnetic avalanches are presented. The boundary between the two types of injection is determined and discussed. The SFI opens up for active use of phenomena which up to now have been considered hazardous for a safe operation of superconducting devices.

  13. Superconducting thin film cavities and base electrode planarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Christopher Doyle

    1997-11-01

    This study concerns two separate projects. The first deals with a new technique to improve superconducting tunnel junction fabrication technology through the use of planarized base electrodes. Planarization, resulting in smooth film surfaces, is realized by coating a conventional niobium base electrode with a multilayer of niobium and aluminum. Very low leakage tunnel junctions were made using this method. The second project involves electromagnetic coupling to a superconducting thin film cavity. A novel device, potentially useful as an x-ray detector, has been fabricated and characterized. The theory of operation of this closed superconducting cavity, or "Fiske Cavity", is presented along with experimental results. Current - voltage measurements reveal current steps at selected voltages that are predicted theoretically and indicate electromagnetic coupling in this system. This form of coupling motivates new devices with arrays of phase locked junctions that interact through an underlying resonant waveguide and with no external microwave source.

  14. High-temperature anodized WO3 nanoplatelet films for photosensitive devices.

    PubMed

    Sadek, Abu Z; Zheng, Haidong; Breedon, Michael; Bansal, Vipul; Bhargava, Suresh K; Latham, Kay; Zhu, Jianmin; Yu, Leshu; Hu, Zheng; Spizzirri, Paul G; Wlodarski, Wojtek; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2009-08-18

    Anodization at elevated temperatures in nitric acid has been used for the production of highly porous and thick tungsten trioxide nanostructured films for photosensitive device applications. The anodization process resulted in platelet crystals with thicknesses of 20-60 nm and lengths of 100-1000 nm. Maximum thicknesses of approximately 2.4 microm were obtained after 4 h of anodization at 20 V. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the as-prepared anodized samples contain predominantly hydrated tungstite phases depending on voltage, while films annealed at 400 degrees C for 4 h are predominantly orthorhombic WO3 phase. Photocurrent measurements revealed that the current density of the 2.4 microm nanostructured anodized film was 6 times larger than the nonanodized films. Dye-sensitized solar cells developed using these films produced 0.33 V and 0.65 mA/cm2 in open- and short-circuit conditions. PMID:19627158

  15. Preparation, transport properties and patterning of superconducting YBCO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataria, N. D.; May, D.; Wolf, H.; Schneider, R.; Niemeyer, J.

    1991-09-01

    The preparation of YBCO thin films by coevaporation and magnetron sputtering is reported. The coevaporated films were fabricated on SrTiO 3 substrates by the codeposition of Y, BaF 2 and Cu at elevated substrate temperature and an ex situ annealing process. Zero resistance T c was as high as 88 K and the critical current density was j c(77K)≈10 5 A/cm 2. The superconducting sputtered films were fabricated in situ using an inverted cylindrical target on Y-stabilized ZrO 2 substrates with T c near 85 K and j c (77K)≈10 6 A/cm 2. The films were structured by a conventional photolithographic technique and chemical etching. The temperature dependence of the resistance R(T) and critical current I c(T) were measured for bridges with different line widths w. Line widths down to 3 μm were patterned on sputtered films by EDTA without any degradation of the superconducting properties, whereas due to the intrinsic surface roughness of the coevaporated films, degradation in the superconducting properties was observed for w < 10μm.

  16. Size effects in superconducting thin films coupled to a substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Bermúdez, Aurelio; García-García, Antonio M.

    2014-02-01

    Recent experimental advances in surface science have made it possible to track the evolution of superconductivity in films as the thickness enters the nanoscale region where it is expected that the substrate plays an important role. Here, we put forward a mean-field, analytically tractable, model that describes size effects in ultrathin films coupled to the substrate. We restrict our study to one-band, crystalline, weakly coupled superconductors with no impurities. The thin-film substrate/vacuum interfaces are described by a simple asymmetric potential well and a finite quasiparticle lifetime. Boundary conditions are chosen to comply with the charge neutrality condition. This model provides a fair description of experimental results in ultrathin lead films: on average, the superconducting gap decreases with thickness and it is always below the bulk value. Clear oscillations, remnants of the shape resonances, are still observed for intermediate thicknesses. For materials with a weaker electron-phonon coupling and negligible disorder, a modest enhancement of superconductivity seems to be feasible. The relaxation of the charge neutrality condition, which is in principle justified in complex oxide heterostructures and other materials, would lead to a much stronger enhancement of superconductivity by size effects.

  17. Different variation behaviors of resistivity for high-temperature-grown and low-temperature-grown p-GaN films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Yang; De-Gang, Zhao; De-Sheng, Jiang; Ping, Chen; Zong-Shun, Liu; Jian-Jun, Zhu; Ling-Cong, Le; Xiao-Jing, Li; Xiao-Guang, He; Li-Qun, Zhang; Hui, Yang

    2016-02-01

    Two series of p-GaN films grown at different temperatures are obtained by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). And the different variation behaviors of resistivity with growth condition for high- temperature(HT)-grown and low-temperature(LT)-grown p-GaN films are investigated. It is found that the resistivity of HT-grown p-GaN film is nearly unchanged when the NH3 flow rate or reactor pressure increases. However, it decreases largely for LT-grown p-GaN film. These different variations may be attributed to the fact that carbon impurities are easy to incorporate into p-GaN film when the growth temperature is low. It results in a relatively high carbon concentration in LT-grown p-GaN film compared with HT-grown one. Therefore, carbon concentration is more sensitive to the growth condition in these samples, ultimately, leading to the different variation behaviors of resistivity for HT- and LT-grown ones. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61474110, 61377020, 61376089, 61223005, and 61176126), the National Natural Science Fund for Distinguished Young Scholars, China (Grant No. 60925017), the One Hundred Person Project of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the Basic Research Project of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. BK20130362).

  18. High-temperature oxidation resistant (Cr, Al)N films synthesized using pulsed bias arc ion plating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Lin, Guoqiang; Lu, Guoying; Dong, Chuang; Kim, Kwang Ho

    2008-09-01

    (Cr, Al)N films were deposited by pulsed bias arc ion plating on HSS and 316L stainless steel substrates. With pulsed substrate bias ranging from -100 V to -500 V, the effect of pulsed bias on film composition, phase structure, deposition rate and mechanical properties was investigated by EDX, XRD, SEM, nanoindentation and scratch measurements. The high-temperature (up to 900 °C) oxidation resistance of the films was also evaluated. The results show that Al contents and deposition rates decrease with increasing pulsed bias and the ratio of (Cr + Al)/N is almost constant at 0.95. The as-deposited (Cr, Al)N films crystallize in the pseudo-binary (Cr, Al)N and Al phases. The film hardness increases with increasing bias and reaches the maximum 21.5 GPa at -500 V. The films deposited at -500 V exhibit a high adhesion force, about 70 N, and more interestingly good oxidation resistance when annealed in air at 900 °C for 10 h.

  19. Method of preparing high-temperature-stable thin-film resistors

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Leonard S.

    1983-01-01

    A chemical vapor deposition method for manufacturing tungsten-silicide thin-film resistors of predetermined bulk resistivity and temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR). Gaseous compounds of tungsten and silicon are decomposed on a hot substrate to deposit a thin-film of tungsten-silicide. The TCR of the film is determined by the crystallinity of the grain structure, which is controlled by the temperature of deposition and the tungsten to silicon ratio. The bulk resistivity is determined by the tungsten to silicon ratio. Manipulation of the fabrication parameters allows for sensitive control of the properties of the resistor.

  20. Method of preparing high-temperature-stable thin-film resistors

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, L.S.

    1980-11-12

    A chemical vapor deposition method for manufacturing tungsten-silicide thin-film resistors of predetermined bulk resistivity and temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) is disclosed. Gaseous compounds of tungsten and silicon are decomposed on a hot substrate to deposit a thin-film of tungsten-silicide. The TCR of the film is determined by the crystallinity of the grain structure, which is controlled by the temperature of deposition and the tungsten to silicon ratio. The bulk resistivity is determined by the tungsten to silicon ratio. Manipulation of the fabrication parameters allows for sensitive control of the properties of the resistor.

  1. Solid state thin film battery having a high temperature lithium alloy anode

    DOEpatents

    Hobson, David O.

    1998-01-01

    An improved rechargeable thin-film lithium battery involves the provision of a higher melting temperature lithium anode. Lithium is alloyed with a suitable solute element to elevate the melting point of the anode to withstand moderately elevated temperatures.

  2. Life Studies of Metal Films on Beta-Alumina at High Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R.; Kisor, A.; Fiebig, B.; Cortez, R.; Ryan, M.; Shields, V.; Homer, M.

    2000-01-01

    Applications of metallic films on sodium beta-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) ceramic in technology for the alkali metal thermal to electric converter (AMTEC) include both electrode and metallization functions.

  3. Niobium Thin Film Characterization for Thin Film Technology Used in Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Yishu; Valente-Feliciano, Anne-Marie

    2015-10-01

    Superconducting RadioFrequency (SRF) penetrates about 40-100 nm of the top surface, making thin film technology possible in producing superconducting cavities. Thin film is based on the deposition of a thin Nb layer on top of a good thermal conducting material such as Al or Cu. Thin film allows for better control of the surface and has negligible response to the Earth's magnetic field, eliminating the need for magnetic shielding of the cavities. Thin film superconductivity depends heavily on coating process conditions, involving controllable parameters such as crystal plane orientation, coating temperature, and ion energy. MgO and Al2O3 substrates are used because they offer very smooth surfaces, ideal for studying film growth. Atomic Force Microscopy is used to characterize surface's morphology. It is evident that a lower nucleation energy and a long coating time increases the film quality in the r-plane sapphire crystal orientation. The quality of the film increases with thickness. Nb films coated on r-plane, grow along the (001) plane and yield a much higher RRR compared to the films grown on a- and c-planes. This information allows for further improvement on the research process for thin film technology used in superconducting cavities for the particle accelerators. National Science Foundation, Department of Energy, Jefferson Lab, Old Dominion University.

  4. From Kondo behavior to high temperature superconductivity in Sr(Ni1-xFex)2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakeham, Nicholas; Ni, Ni; Bauer, Eric; Thompson, Joe; Ronning, Filip

    SrFe2As2 has an antiferromagnetic groundstate at ambient pressure that can be suppressed by chemical doping or pressure to produce unconventional superconductivity. SrNi2As2 is a non-magnetic conventional superconductor with Tc of 0.6 K. It has been shown that in Sr(Ni1-xFex)2As2 there is a dome of superconductivity between x = 0 . 95 and x = 0 . 9 . However, little is known about this doping series for small x values. We will present the study of the thermodynamic and transport properties of the doping series of Sr(Ni(1-x)Fex)2As2 for x <= 0 . 6 . In the dilute Fe limit (x <= 0 . 01) we find strong evidence for single-ion Kondo behaviour. As the concentration of Fe is increased, Fe-Fe interaction effects become significant and the Kondo scale increases. For 0 . 2 <= x <= 0 . 6 magnetic susceptibility measurements show the presence of a spin glass transition. The presence of Kondo behaviour in Sr(Ni(1-x)Fex)2As2 indicates the formation of local moments interacting with conduction electrons. Therefore, we will address the relevance of this result to the discussion of the itineracy of the magnetism in SrFe2As2, as well as the observed enhancement of the effective mass seen in many pnictide compounds.

  5. Long-term stability at high temperatures for birefringence in PAZO/PAH layer-by-layer films.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Quirina; Ribeiro, Paulo A; Oliveira, Osvaldo N; Raposo, Maria

    2012-03-01

    Optical memories with long-term stability at high temperatures have long been pursued in azopolymers with photoinduced birefringence. In this study, we show that the residual birefringence in layer-by-layer (LbL) films made with poly[1-[4-(3-carboxy-4 hydroxyphenylazo)benzene sulfonamido]-1,2-ethanediyl, sodium salt] (PAZO) alternated with poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) can be tuned by varying the extent of electrostatic interactions with film fabrication at different pHs for PAH. The dynamics of both writing and relaxation processes could be explained with a two-stage mechanism involving the orientation of the chromophores per se and the chain movement. Upon calculating the activation energies for these processes, we demonstrate semiquantitatively that reduced electrostatic interactions in films prepared at higher pH, for which PAH is less charged, are responsible for the longer stability at high temperatures. This is attributed to orientation of PAZO chromophores via cooperative aggregation, where the presence of counterions hindered relaxation. PMID:22335565

  6. Low temperature phase formation of Tl-based superconducting thin films in reduced oxygen atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. Y.; Foong, F.; Liou, S. H.; Ho, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    Tl-Ba-Cu-Cu-O superconducting thin films were prepared by magnetron sputtering with postannealing in a reduced oxygen atmosphere. Single-phase Tl2Ba2Ca2Cu3O(x) can form on the MgO substrate at 800 C under P(O2) about 0.1 atm. However the phase formation temperature can be affected by the starting composition of the film. Tl1Ba2Ca2Cu3O(x) phase can be formed by simply lowering the Tl2O pressure. The thermal stability of Tl1Ba2Ca2Cu3O(x) phase was studied by resistivity measurements at high temperatures.

  7. Phase transformation of oxide film in zirconium alloy in high temperature hydrogenated water

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Taeho; Kim, Jongjin; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Yoo, Seung Chang; Kim, Seung Hyun; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2015-07-23

    The effect of the variation of the dissolved hydrogen concentration on the oxide phase transformation under high-temperature hydrogenated water conditions was investigated using in situ Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectrum in 50 cm(3)/kg of dissolved hydrogen concentration indicated the formation of monoclinic and tetragonal zirconium oxide at the water-substrate interface. As the dissolved hydrogen concentration decreased to 30 cm(3)/kg, the Raman peaks corresponding to the zirconium oxide phase changed, indicating an oxide phase transformation. And, the results of SEM and TEM analyses were compared with those of in situ analyses obtained for the oxide structure formed on the zirconium alloy.

  8. Convective Heat Transfer with and without Film Cooling in High Temperature, Fuel Rich and Lean Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, Nathan J.

    Modern turbine engines require high turbine inlet temperatures and pressures to maximize thermal efficiency. Increasing the turbine inlet temperature drives higher heat loads on the turbine surfaces. In addition, increasing pressure ratio increases the turbine coolant temperature such that the ability to remove heat decreases. As a result, highly effective external film cooling is required to reduce the heat transfer to turbine surfaces. Testing of film cooling on engine hardware at engine temperatures and pressures can be exceedingly difficult and expensive. Thus, modern studies of film cooling are often performed at near ambient conditions. However, these studies are missing an important aspect in their characterization of film cooling effectiveness. Namely, they do not model effect of thermal property variations that occur within the boundary and film cooling layers at engine conditions. Also, turbine surfaces can experience significant radiative heat transfer that is not trivial to estimate analytically. The present research first computationally examines the effect of large temperature variations on a turbulent boundary layer. Subsequently, a method to model the effect of large temperature variations within a turbulent boundary layer in an environment coupled with significant radiative heat transfer is proposed and experimentally validated. Next, a method to scale turbine cooling from ambient to engine conditions via non-dimensional matching is developed computationally and the experimentally validated at combustion temperatures. Increasing engine efficiency and thrust to weight ratio demands have driven increased combustor fuel-air ratios. Increased fuel-air ratios increase the possibility of unburned fuel species entering the turbine. Alternatively, advanced ultra-compact combustor designs have been proposed to decrease combustor length, increase thrust, or generate power for directed energy weapons. However, the ultra-compact combustor design requires a

  9. Ultrafast IR detector response in high Tc superconducting thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindgren, Mikael; Ahlberg, Henrik; Danerud, Martin; Larsson, Anders; Eng, Sverre T.

    1991-01-01

    The response from a high Tc superconducting multielement optical detector made of a laser deposited Y-Ba-Cu-O thin film has been evaluated. Several microscopic and spectroscopic techniques were used to establish the presence of the correct phase of the thin film. Optical pulses from a laser diode at 830 nm and from a Q-switched CO2-laser at 10.6 microns were used. The detector responded to 50 ps (FWHM) pulses. A comparison between dR/dT of the film and the response amplitude as a function of temperature indicated a bolometric response.

  10. Room-Temperature Deposition of NbN Superconducting Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, S.; Lamb, J. L.; Thakoor, A. P.; Khanna, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    Films with high superconducting transition temperatures deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering. Since deposition process does not involve significantly high substrate temperatures, employed to deposit counter electrode in superconductor/insulator/superconductor junction without causing any thermal or mechanical degradation of underlying delicate tunneling barrier. Substrates for room-temperature deposition of NbN polymeric or coated with photoresist, making films accessible to conventional lithographic patterning techniques. Further refinements in deposition technique yield films with smaller transition widths, Tc of which might approach predicted value of 18 K.

  11. Oscillatory regimes of the thermomagnetic instability in superconducting films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestgârden, J. I.; Galperin, Y. M.; Johansen, T. H.

    2016-05-01

    The stability of superconducting films with respect to oscillatory precursor modes for thermomagnetic avalanches is investigated theoretically. The results for the onset threshold show that previous treatments of nonoscillatory modes have predicted much higher thresholds. Thus, in film superconductors, oscillatory modes are far more likely to cause thermomagnetic breakdown. This explains the experimental fact that flux avalanches in film superconductors can occur even at very small ramping rates of the applied magnetic field. Closed expressions for the threshold magnetic field and temperature, as well oscillation frequency, are derived for different regimes of the oscillatory thermomagnetic instability.

  12. Low emissivity high-temperature tantalum thin film coatings for silicon devices

    SciTech Connect

    Rinnerbauer, Veronika; Senkevich, Jay J.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljacic, Marin; Celanovic, Ivan; Harl, Robert R.; Rogers, Bridget R.

    2013-01-01

    The authors study the use of thin ( ~230 nm ) tantalum (Ta) layers on silicon (Si) as a low emissivity (high reflectivity) coating for high-temperature Si devices. Such coatings are critical to reduce parasitic radiation loss, which is one of the dominant loss mechanisms at high temperatures (above 700 °C ). The key factors to achieve such a coating are low emissivity in the near infrared and superior thermal stability at high operating temperatures. The authors investigated the emissivity of Ta coatings deposited on Si with respect to deposition parameters, and annealing conditions, and temperature. The authors found that after annealing at temperatures ≥900 °C the emissivity in the near infrared ( 1–3 μm ) was reduced by a factor of 2 as compared to bare Si. In addition, the authors measured thermal emission at temperatures from 700 to 1000 °C , which is stable up to a heater temperature equal to the annealing temperature. Furthermore, Auger electron spectroscopy profiles of the coatings before and after annealing were taken to evaluate thermal stability. A thin (about 70 nm) Ta₂O₅ layer was found to act as an efficient diffusion barrier between the Si substrate and the Ta layer to prevent Si diffusion.

  13. Lithographic patterning of superconducting YBCO films

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, S.K.; Pathak, L.C.; Ray, S.K.; Kal, S.; Bhattacharya, D.; Lahiri, S.K.; Chopra, K.L.

    1992-10-01

    Microbridges of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} thin films have been fabricated by conventional photolithography and wet chemical etching using EDTA, and by lift-off lithography technique. The variation of etch rate with etch time, etchant temperature, and post-deposition sintering temperature has been studied. It has been shown that both techniques are useful for film patterning. However, an additional sintering step is necessary for the chemically etched sample to regain the original film properties. An order of increase in critical current density is observed for the patterned film. 10 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Oxygen diffusion at high temperatures within the SnO2/Sst interlayer in sputtered thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carretero, E.; Alonso, R.; Marco, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    SnO2 and Stainless Steel 316 (Sst) films are useful materials for the production of interferential decorative coatings because they provide a high sputtering rate and low cost respectively. Multilayers of SnO2 and Stainless Steel 316 were deposited using DC pulsed magnetron sputtering, and oxygen diffusion processes were studied in the interface. Studies were made at selected temperatures between 450 °C and 650 °C for different exposure times: 0, 15, 30, 60 and 120 min. TOF-SIMS depth profiles determined the oxygen penetration in Sst films and evidenced the formation of a chromium oxide film. This method is noted for its simplicity for a full study at different temperatures and exposure times with few TOF-SIMS measurements. Oxidation kinetics can be described by two different contributions: a fast oxide film formation and parabolic growth. Results are useful for predicting the thickness of the chromium oxide film and the degradation of the coating at high temperatures.

  15. Nanofriction of neon films on superconducting lead.

    PubMed

    Pierno, M; Bruschi, L; Fois, G; Mistura, G; Boragno, C; de Mongeot, F Buatier; Valbusa, U

    2010-07-01

    With a quartz crystal microbalance technique we have studied the nanofriction of neon monolayers deposited on a lead surface at a temperature around 7 K. Unlike heavier adsorbates, Ne is found to systematically slide at such low temperatures without any evidence of pinning. The crossing of the Pb superconducting-metal transition is not accompanied by any change in dissipation, suggesting that the electronic contribution to friction is negligible for this system. PMID:20867468

  16. Study - Radiation Shielding Effectiveness of the Prototyped High Temperature Superconductivity (HTS) 'Artificial' Magnetosphere for Deep Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denkins, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    The high temperature superconductor (HTS) is being used to develop the magnets for the Variable Specific Impulse Magneto-plasma Rocket (VASIMR ) propulsion system and may provide lightweight magnetic radiation shielding to protect spacecraft crews from radiation caused by GCR and SPEs on missions to Mars. A study is being planned to assess the radiation shielding effectiveness of the artificial magnetosphere produced by the HTS magnet. VASIMR is an advanced technology propulsion engine which is being touted as enabling one way transit to Mars in 90 days or less. This is extremely important to NASA. This technology would enable a significant reduction in the number of days in transit to and from Mars and significantly reduce the astronauts exposure to a major threat - high energy particles from solar storms and GCR during long term deep space missions. This paper summarizes the plans for the study and the subsequent testing of the VASIMR technology onboard the ISS slated for 2013.

  17. Electrical transport in the superconducting and normal states in Y2Ba5Cu7Ox high-temperature superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazaheri, M.; Jamasb, S.

    2016-05-01

    The resistivity of a recently reported Y2Ba5Cu7Ox (Y257) polycrystalline, high-temperature superconductor has been characterized over temperature in the presence of magnetic field intensities in the 0-15 kOe range. The magnetoresistive behavior of Y257 has been analyzed to determine the functional dependence of the pinning energy, U, associated with the resistive transition. Within the temperature range of 0.60 < T /Tc < 0.95 the Y257 resistivity data are consistent with the thermally activated flux creep model with the pinning energy following the temperature and magnetic field according to (1 - T /Tc) 2H-1. The pinning energy in this temperature range was determined to be in the 0.0125-0.8151 eV range. Furthermore, application of the Mott variable range hopping model to account for the normal-state behavior of resistivity in Y257 is critically assessed.

  18. Thermal diffusivity measurements of sub-micron organic dye thin films using a high temperature superconductor bolometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savoy, Steven M.; Wells, Cyndi A.; McDevitt, John T.; Rhodes, Timothy A.

    1998-12-01

    The thermal diffusivity of a thin organic dye layer deposited atop thin films of the high temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-δ is measured using a pulsed laser flash method. Here, the underlying superconductor acts as a highly sensitive temperature transducer after appropriate conversion of the transient voltage response from 7 ns optical pulses. Film surface temperature decays for several thicknesses of the dye layers were evaluated; these decays exhibited a linear dependence of the time at half temperature maximum versus thickness squared. Three dimensional finite difference modeling was used to study and extract the thermal diffusivity values of the thin organic layers as well as to investigate the transient temperature distributions within the dye and superconductor areas.

  19. Diamondlike carbon films as protective coatings for superconducting YBa2Cu3O7 films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganapathi, L.; Giles, S.; Rao, Rama

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the use of diamondlike carbon (DLC) films for protecting superconducting YBCO films against degradation from exposure to moisture and acid. YBCO thin films on single crystal LaAlO3 and MgO substrates were deposited by laser ablation followed by DLC encapsulation. DLC films were deposited at pressures ranging from high vacuum to 0.1 Torr He. Substrate temperature was varied from 20 to 100 C during the deposition of DLC. The process compatibility of laser ablation was found convenient to sequentially deposit YBCO and DLC films from high purity stoichiometric targets. Epitaxial YBCO films on (100)LaAlO3 and (100)MgO substrates showed identical superconducting transitions before and after encapsulation by a DLC layer. The encapsulated films showed no degradation due to acid treatment or aging over a period of 45 days.

  20. X-ray diffraction characterization of thin superconductive films

    SciTech Connect

    Kozaczek, K.J.; Watkins, T.R.; Book, G.W.; Carter, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    The physical and mechanical properties of thin films are often different from the properties of bulk material and are dictated by the film/substrate orientation relationship, crystal anisotropy and crystalgraphic texture of the film. X-ray diffraction texture analysis provides information about preferential film growth and can be used for optimization of deposition parameters and prediction of properties of thin films. An x-ray back reflection technique using the Braga-Brentano geometry with experimental corrections for absorption and defocusing was used to study thin ceramic films deposited by combustion chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). The film/substrate orientation relationships of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} (YBCO) superconducting thin films deposited via CCVD on single crystal MgO and polycrystalline silver substrates were studied. The as-deposited films on single crystal (100) MgO substrates showed strong preferential growth with the basal plane parallel to the substrate surface (c-axis up growth). Texture analysis showed two in-plane alignment orientations of the film with respect to the substrate, with YBCO [100] and [110] aligned with the [100] MgO substrate. YBCO films deposited on cold-rolled polycrystalline silver displayed c-axis up growth indicating that the orientation of the polycrystalline substrate (brass type texture) did not induce detectable in-plane preferential growth of the YBCO.

  1. Emergence of a High-Temperature Superconductivity in Hydrogen Cycled pd Compounds as AN Evidence for Superstoihiometric H/d Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipson, Andrei; Castano, Carlos; Miley, George; Lipson, Andrei; Lyakhov, Boris; Mitin, Alexander

    2006-02-01

    Transport and magnetic properties of hydrogen cycled PdHx and Pd/PdO:Hx (x ~ (4/6) × 10-4) nano-composite consisting of a Pd matrix with hydrogen trapped inside dislocation cores have been studied. The results suggest emergence of a high-temperature superconductivity state of a condensed hydrogen phase confined inside deep dislocation cores in the Pd matrix. The possible role of hydrogen/deuterium filled dislocation nano-tubes is discussed. These dislocation cores could be considered as active centers of LENR triggering due to (i) short D-D separation distance (~Bohr radius); (ii) high-local D-loading in the Pd and the corresponding effective lattice compression; (iii) a large optic phonon energy resulting in a most effective lattice-nuclei energy transfer.

  2. Overcoats for the Improved Performance of PdCr High Temperature Thin Film Strain Gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Otto J.; Dyer, S. E.; Cooke, James D.

    1998-01-01

    Overcoat protection schemes for thin film devices have typically focused on inhibiting the growth of native oxides formed on the sensor surface, rather than on improving the passivating nature of these native oxides. Here, thin sputtered Cr overcoats and heat treatments in varying oxygen partial pressures enhanced the passivating nature of native Cr203 films formed on PdCr thin film strain gages. Results of strain tests using sensors protected using this approach are presented and the implications are discussed. PdCr gages with sputtered Cr overcoats withstood 12,000 dynamic strain cycles of 1100 micro-epsilon during 100 hours of testing at a temperature of 1000 C in air. Gage factors of 1.3 with drift rates as low as 0.1 Omega/hr were achieved for devices having a nominal resistance of approximately 100 Omega's. TCR's ranging from +550 ppm/C to +798 ppm/C were realized depending on the overcoat and thermal history. Possible mechanisms for an anomaly in the electrical characteristics of these films at 800 C and improvements in stability due to the use of overcoats are presented.

  3. Solid-film lubricant is effective at high temperatures in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1966-01-01

    Calcium fluoride with a suitable inorganic binder forms a stable solid-film lubricant when fused to the surface to be lubricated. It is effective in environments at elevated temperatures and gas pressures ranging from atmospheric to high vacuum. It is not stable in reducing atmospheres.

  4. Solid state thin film battery having a high temperature lithium alloy anode

    DOEpatents

    Hobson, D.O.

    1998-01-06

    An improved rechargeable thin-film lithium battery involves the provision of a higher melting temperature lithium anode. Lithium is alloyed with a suitable solute element to elevate the melting point of the anode to withstand moderately elevated temperatures. 2 figs.

  5. High-temperature superconducting radiofrequency probe for magnetic resonance imaging applications operated below ambient pressure in a simple liquid-nitrogen cryostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Simon; Ginefri, Jean-Christophe; Poirier-Quinot, Marie; Darrasse, Luc

    2013-05-01

    The present work investigates the joined effects of temperature and static magnetic field on the electrical properties of a 64 MHz planar high-temperature superconducting (HTS) coil, in order to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) applications with a moderate decrease of the HTS coil temperature (THTS). Temperature control is provided with accuracy better than 0.1 K from 80 to 66 K by regulating the pressure of the liquid nitrogen bath of a dedicated cryostat. The actual temperature of the HTS coil is obtained using a straightforward wireless method that eliminates the risks of coupling electromagnetic interference to the HTS coil and of disturbing the static magnetic field by DC currents near the region of interest. The resonance frequency ( f0) and the quality factor (Q) of the HTS coil are measured as a function of temperature in the 0-4.7 T field range with parallel and orthogonal orientations relative to the coil plane. The intrinsic HTS coil sensitivity and the detuning effect are then analyzed from the Q and f0 data. In the presence of the static magnetic field, the initial value of f0 in Earth's field could be entirely recovered by decreasing THTS, except for the orthogonal orientation above 1 T. The improvement of Q by lowering THTS was substantial. From 80 to 66 K, Q was multiplied by a factor of 6 at 1.5 T in orthogonal orientation. In parallel orientation, the maximum measured improvement of Q from 80 K to 66 K was a factor of 2. From 80 to 66 K, the improvement of the RF sensitivity relative to the initial value at the Earth's field and ambient pressure was up to 4.4 dB in parallel orientation. It was even more important in orthogonal orientation and continued to increase, up to 8.4 dB, at the maximum explored field of 1.5 T. Assuming that the noise contributions from the RF receiver are negligible, the SNR improvement using enhanced HTS coil cooling in NMR experiments was extracted from Q measurements either

  6. High Temperature Superconductivity in Praseodymium Doped (0%, 2%, 4%) in Melt-Textured Y(1-x)Pr(x)Ba2Cu3O(7-delta) Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Claudell

    1995-01-01

    A study of the magnetic and structural properties of the alloy Y(1-x)Pr(x)Ba2Cu3O(7-delta) of 0%, 2%, and 4% doping of praseodymium is presented. The resulting oxides of the alloy series are a high-temperature superconductor Y-Ba-Cu-O, which has an orthorhombic superconducting crystal-lattice. Magnetic relaxation studies have been performed on the Y-Pr-Ba-CuO bulk samples for field orientation parallel to the c-axis, using a vibrating sample magnetometer. Relaxation was measured at several temperatures to obtain the irreversible magnetization curves used for the Bean model. Magnetization current densities were derived from the relaxation data. Field and temperature dependence of the logarithmic flux-creep relaxation was measured in critical state. The data indicates that the effective activation energy U(eff) increases with increasing T between 77 K and 86 K. Also, the data shows that U(eff)(T) and superconducting transition temperature, Tc, decreased as the lattice parameters increased with increasing Pr ion concentration, x, for the corresponding Y(1-x)Pr(x)Ba(x)Cu3O(7-delta) oxides. One contribution to Tc decrease in this sampling is suspected to be due to the larger ionic radius of the Pr(3+) ion. The upper critical field (H(sub c2)) was measured in the presence of magnetic field parallel to the c axis. A linear temperature dependence with H(sub c2) was obtained.

  7. Enhanced p-type conduction of B-doped nanocrystalline diamond films by high temperature annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, S. S.; Hu, X. J.

    2013-07-14

    We report the enhanced p-type conduction with Hall mobility of 53.3 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1} in B-doped nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films by 1000 Degree-Sign C annealing. High resolution transmission electronic microscopy, uv, and visible Raman spectroscopy measurements show that a part of amorphous carbon grain boundaries (GBs) transforms to diamond phase, which increases the opportunity of boron atoms located at the GBs to enter into the nano-diamond grains. This phase transition doping is confirmed by the secondary ion mass spectrum depth profile results that the concentration of B atoms in nano-diamond grains increases after 1000 Degree-Sign C annealing. It is also observed that 1000 Degree-Sign C annealing improves the lattice perfection, reduces the internal stress, decreases the amount of trans-polyacetylene, and increases the number or size of aromatic rings in the sp{sup 2}-bonded carbon cluster in B-doped NCD films. These give the contributions to improve the electrical properties of 1000 Degree-Sign C annealed B-doped NCD films.

  8. A study on the electrical insulation properties of solid nitrogen for cooling of the high temperature superconducting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J. H.; Choi, J. W.; Lee, H.; Song, J. B.; Kim, H. J.; Seong, K. C.; Kim, S. H.

    2009-10-01

    Recently, for improvement of the magnetic field of high temperature superconductor (HTS) apparatus, many studies on operating in the temperature range of 20-65 K with liquid helium or the thermal conducting method using cryocooler are actively reviewed. Also, the cooling method of using solid nitrogen as cryogen is currently being suggested. Since nitrogen has a very large specific heat in solid state, it is expected that it can enable long-time operation without a continuous supply of cooling energy. However, there is still insufficient data on the characteristics of solid nitrogen such as thermodynamic properties and liquid-solid phase transition. Especially, there was almost no study done on the electrical insulation properties of solid nitrogen so far. In this study, solid nitrogen to find the electrical characteristics was made by using cryocooler and cryostat, and investigated the flashover discharge and breakdown. The results of this study will be useful as a basic data for electrical insulation design of the HTS system such as SMES using solid nitrogen as cryogen.

  9. In-situ deposition of YBCO high-Tc superconducting thin films by MOCVD and PE-MOCVD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, J.; Noh, D. W.; Chern, C.; Li, Y. Q.; Norris, P. E.; Kear, B.; Gallois, B.

    1991-01-01

    Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) offers the advantages of a high degree of compositional control, adaptability for large scale production, and the potential for low temperature fabrication. The capability of operating at high oxygen partial pressure is particularly suitable for in situ formation of high temperature superconducting (HTSC) films. Yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) thin films having a sharp zero-resistance transition with T(sub c) greater than 90 K and J(sub c) of approximately 10(exp 4) A on YSZ have been prepared, in situ, at a substrate temperature of about 800 C. Moreover, the ability to form oxide films at low temperature is very desirable for device applications of HTSC materials. Such a process would permit the deposition of high quality HTSC films with a smooth surface on a variety of substrates. Highly c-axis oriented, dense, scratch resistant, superconducting YBCO thin films with mirror-like surfaces have been prepared, in situ, at a reduced substrate temperature as low as 570 C by a remote microwave-plasma enhanced metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (PE-MOCVD) process. Nitrous oxide was used as a reactant gas to generate active oxidizing species. This process, for the first time, allows the formation of YBCO thin films with the orthorhombic superconducting phase in the as-deposited state. The as-deposited films grown by PE-MOCVD show attainment of zero resistance at 72 K with a transition width of about 5 K. MOCVD was carried out in a commercial production scale reactor with the capability of uniform deposition over 100 sq cm per growth run. Preliminary results indicate that PE-MOCVD is a very attractive thin film deposition process for superconducting device technology.

  10. In Situ deposition of YBCO high-T(sub c) superconducting thin films by MOCVD and PE-MOCVD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, J.; Noh, D. W.; Chern, C.; Li, Y. Q.; Norris, P.; Gallois, B.; Kear, B.

    1990-01-01

    Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) offers the advantages of a high degree of compositional control, adaptability for large scale production, and the potential for low temperature fabrication. The capability of operating at high oxygen partial pressure is particularly suitable for in situ formation of high temperature superconducting (HTSC) films. Yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) thin films having a sharp zero-resistance transition with T( sub c) greater than 90 K and Jc approx. 10 to the 4th power A on YSZ have been prepared, in situ, at a substrate temperature of about 800 C. Moreover, the ability to form oxide films at low temperature is very desirable for device applications of HTSC materials. Such a process would permit the deposition of high quality HTSC films with a smooth surface on a variety of substrates. Highly c-axis oriented, dense, scratch resistant, superconducting YBCO thin films with mirror-like surfaces have been prepared, in situ, at a reduced substrate temperature as low as 570 C by a remote microwave-plasma enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (PE-MOCVD) process. Nitrous oxide was used as a reactant gas to generate active oxidizing species. This process, for the first time, allows the formation of YBCO thin films with the orthorhombic superconducting phase in the as-deposited state. The as-deposited films grown by PE-MOCVD show attainment of zero resistance at 72 K with a transition width of about 5 K. MOCVD was carried out in a commercial production scale reactor with the capability of uniform deposition over 100 sq cm per growth run. Preliminary results indicate that PE-MOCVD is a very attractive thin film deposition process for superconducting device technology.

  11. Nanocomposite thin films for high temperature optical gas sensing of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Ohodnicki, Jr., Paul R.; Brown, Thomas D.

    2013-04-02

    The disclosure relates to a plasmon resonance-based method for H.sub.2 sensing in a gas stream at temperatures greater than about 500.degree. C. utilizing a hydrogen sensing material. The hydrogen sensing material is comprised of gold nanoparticles having an average nanoparticle diameter of less than about 100 nanometers dispersed in an inert matrix having a bandgap greater than or equal to 5 eV, and an oxygen ion conductivity less than approximately 10.sup.-7 S/cm at a temperature of 700.degree. C. Exemplary inert matrix materials include SiO.sub.2, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, and Si.sub.3N.sub.4 as well as modifications to modify the effective refractive indices through combinations and/or doping of such materials. At high temperatures, blue shift of the plasmon resonance optical absorption peak indicates the presence of H.sub.2. The method disclosed offers significant advantage over active and reducible matrix materials typically utilized, such as yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) or TiO.sub.2.

  12. Review of high-temperature superconductivity and the effect of chemical modifications on Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 and Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T.E.; McGinnis, W.C.; Boss, R.D.

    1991-08-01

    Perform chemical modifications to existing materials that may enhance their superconducting properties and provide insight into the mechanisms responsible for high-temperature superconductivity. This report presented a review of high-temperature superconductivity. An overview of superconductivity from its original discovery to the present is also given. Synthesized two sets of samples. One set was based on the structure Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 and the other on Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10. In both cases, the copper was partially replaced with elements from the first transition row of elements. The replacement was at the level of 5 mol.-% of the transition element for copper. The transition elements used were vanadium (V), manganese (Mn), titanium (Ti), nickel (Ni), zinc (Zn), cobalt (Co), and iron (Fe) and determined the effect of the substitutions on the crystal structure.

  13. Solid state microelectronics tolerant to radiation and high temperature. [JFET thick film hybrids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, B. L.; Palmer, D. W.

    1981-01-01

    The 300 C electronics technology based on JFET thick film hybrids was tested up to 10 to the 9th power rad gamma (Si) and 10 to the 15th power neutrons/sq cm. Circuits and individual components from this technology all survived this total dose although some devices required 1 hour of annealing at 200 or 300 C to regain functionality. This technology used with real time annealing should function to levels greater than 10 to the 10th power rad gamma and 10 to the 16th power n/sq cm.

  14. Simulation of space radiation effects on polyimide film materials for high temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogdall, L. B.; Cannaday, S. S.

    1977-01-01

    Space environment effects on candidate materials for the solar sail film are determined. Polymers, including metallized polyimides that might be suitable solar radiation receivers, were exposed to combined proton and solar electromagnetic radiation. Each test sample was weighted, to simulate the tension on the polymer when it is stretched into near-planar shape while receiving solar radiation. Exposure rates up to 16 times that expected in Earth orbit were employed, to simulate near-sun solar sailing conditions. Sample appearance, elongation, and shrinkage were monitored, noted, and documented in situ. Thermosetting polyimides showed less degradation or visual change in appearance than thermoplastics.

  15. Weakly superconducting, thin-film structures as radiation detectors.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirschman, R. K.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements were taken with weakly superconducting quantum structures of the Notarys-Mercereau type, representing a thin superconductor film with a short region that is weakened in the sense that its transition temperature is lower than in the remaining portion of the film. The structure acts as a superconducting relaxation oscillator in which the supercurrent increases with time until the critical current of the weakened section is attained, at which moment the supercurrent decays and the cycle repeats. Under applied radiation, a series of constant-voltage steps appears in the current-voltage curve, and the size of the steps varies periodically with the amplitude of applied radiation. Measurements of the response characteristics were made in the frequency range of 10 to 450 MHz.

  16. Measurement of thermal properties of thin films up to high temperatures--pulsed photothermal radiometry system and Si-B-C-N films.

    PubMed

    Martan, J; Čapek, J; Chalhoub, E Amin

    2010-12-01

    A new arrangement of two-detector pulsed photothermal radiometry measurement system has been developed enabling temperature dependence measurement of thermal properties of thin films up to high temperatures. Only a few methods are available in this temperature range for thin films' thermal properties investigation, but there is a need for their knowledge in the fields of high-temperature electronics and high-speed machining. The present system enables simultaneous determination of the thin film effusivity, thermal conductivity, and volumetric specific heat in the temperature range from room temperature to 600 °C. The samples are placed in a vacuum chamber. The temperatures in the system were verified by an independent measurement and the system was tested on known bulk samples. Advantages and shortcomings of the method when used at higher temperatures and in the vacuum are described and discussed. Furthermore, Si-B-C-N thin films were studied. These amorphous ceramic materials possess an interesting set of mechanical and thermal properties. In particular, the films of the investigated chemical composition exhibit an excellent thermal stability at temperatures of up to 1700 °C. In the studied temperature range, from 20 to 600 °C, the thermal conductivity increased with increasing temperature from 1.72 to 1.89 W m(-1) K(-1) and volumetric specific heat increased from 2.65 to 3.76 × 10(6) J  m(-3) K(-1). PMID:21198042

  17. Measurement of thermal properties of thin films up to high temperatures-Pulsed photothermal radiometry system and Si-B-C-N films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martan, J.; Čapek, J.; Chalhoub, E. Amin

    2010-12-01

    A new arrangement of two-detector pulsed photothermal radiometry measurement system has been developed enabling temperature dependence measurement of thermal properties of thin films up to high temperatures. Only a few methods are available in this temperature range for thin films' thermal properties investigation, but there is a need for their knowledge in the fields of high-temperature electronics and high-speed machining. The present system enables simultaneous determination of the thin film effusivity, thermal conductivity, and volumetric specific heat in the temperature range from room temperature to 600 °C. The samples are placed in a vacuum chamber. The temperatures in the system were verified by an independent measurement and the system was tested on known bulk samples. Advantages and shortcomings of the method when used at higher temperatures and in the vacuum are described and discussed. Furthermore, Si-B-C-N thin films were studied. These amorphous ceramic materials possess an interesting set of mechanical and thermal properties. In particular, the films of the investigated chemical composition exhibit an excellent thermal stability at temperatures of up to 1700 °C. In the studied temperature range, from 20 to 600 °C, the thermal conductivity increased with increasing temperature from 1.72 to 1.89 W m-1 K-1 and volumetric specific heat increased from 2.65 to 3.76 × 106 J m-3 K-1.

  18. High-temperature antiferromagnetism in molecular semiconductor thin films and nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Serri, Michele; Wu, Wei; Fleet, Luke R; Harrison, Nicholas M; Hirjibehedin, Cyrus F; Kay, Christopher W M; Fisher, Andrew J; Aeppli, Gabriel; Heutz, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    The viability of dilute magnetic semiconductors in applications is linked to the strength of the magnetic couplings, and room temperature operation is still elusive in standard inorganic systems. Molecular semiconductors are emerging as an alternative due to their long spin-relaxation times and ease of processing, but, with the notable exception of vanadium-tetracyanoethylene, magnetic transition temperatures remain well below the boiling point of liquid nitrogen. Here we show that thin films and powders of the molecular semiconductor cobalt phthalocyanine exhibit strong antiferromagnetic coupling, with an exchange energy reaching 100 K. This interaction is up to two orders of magnitude larger than in related phthalocyanines and can be obtained on flexible plastic substrates, under conditions compatible with routine organic electronic device fabrication. Ab initio calculations show that coupling is achieved via superexchange between the singly occupied a1g () orbitals. By reaching the key milestone of magnetic coupling above 77 K, these results establish quantum spin chains as a potentially useable feature of molecular films. PMID:24445992

  19. High-temperature antiferromagnetism in molecular semiconductor thin films and nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Serri, Michele; Wu, Wei; Fleet, Luke R.; Harrison, Nicholas M.; Hirjibehedin, Cyrus F.; Kay, Christopher W.M.; Fisher, Andrew J.; Aeppli, Gabriel; Heutz, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    The viability of dilute magnetic semiconductors in applications is linked to the strength of the magnetic couplings, and room temperature operation is still elusive in standard inorganic systems. Molecular semiconductors are emerging as an alternative due to their long spin-relaxation times and ease of processing, but, with the notable exception of vanadium-tetracyanoethylene, magnetic transition temperatures remain well below the boiling point of liquid nitrogen. Here we show that thin films and powders of the molecular semiconductor cobalt phthalocyanine exhibit strong antiferromagnetic coupling, with an exchange energy reaching 100 K. This interaction is up to two orders of magnitude larger than in related phthalocyanines and can be obtained on flexible plastic substrates, under conditions compatible with routine organic electronic device fabrication. Ab initio calculations show that coupling is achieved via superexchange between the singly occupied a1g () orbitals. By reaching the key milestone of magnetic coupling above 77 K, these results establish quantum spin chains as a potentially useable feature of molecular films. PMID:24445992

  20. Superconductivity above 100 K in single-layer FeSe films on doped SrTiO3.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jian-Feng; Liu, Zhi-Long; Liu, Canhua; Gao, Chun-Lei; Qian, Dong; Xue, Qi-Kun; Liu, Ying; Jia, Jin-Feng

    2015-03-01

    Recent experiments on FeSe films grown on SrTiO3 (STO) suggest that interface effects can be used as a means to reach superconducting critical temperatures (Tc) of up to 80 K (ref. ). This is nearly ten times the Tc of bulk FeSe and higher than the record value of 56 K for known bulk Fe-based superconductors. Together with recent studies of superconductivity at oxide heterostructure interfaces, these results rekindle the long-standing idea that electron pairing at interfaces between two different materials can be tailored to achieve high-temperature superconductivity. Subsequent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements of the FeSe/STO system revealed an electronic structure distinct from bulk FeSe (refs , ), with an energy gap vanishing at around 65 K. However, ex situ electrical transport measurements have so far detected zero resistance-the key experimental signature of superconductivity-only below 30 K. Here, we report the observation of superconductivity with Tc above 100 K in the FeSe/STO system by means of in situ four-point probe electrical transport measurements. This finding confirms FeSe/STO as an ideal material for studying high-Tc superconductivity. PMID:25419814

  1. Method of producing high T(subc) superconducting NBN films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Sarita (Inventor); Lamb, James L. (Inventor); Thakoor, Anilkumar P. (Inventor); Khanna, Satish K. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    Thin films of niobium nitride with high superconducting temperature (T sub c) of 15.7 K are deposited on substrates held at room temperature (approx 90 C) by heat sink throughout the sputtering process. Films deposited at P sub Ar 12.9 + or - 0.2 mTorr exhibit higher T sub c with increasing P sub N2,I with the highest T sub c achieved at P sub n2,I= 3.7 + or - 0.2 mTorr and total sputtering pressure P sub tot = 16.6 + or - 0.4. Further increase of N2 injection starts decreasing T sub c.

  2. On excess conductivity of wide superconducting films with phase slippage

    SciTech Connect

    Kulikovsky, A.; Erganokov, Kh.; Bielska-Lewandowska, H.

    1997-02-01

    Properties of wide superconducting tin films in the resistive current state with phase slippage have been studied experimentally. The authors have observed a region of excess conductivity on the current-voltage characteristics of the samples. Experimental results were discussed in view of the theory establishing the relationship between an interference term of the total current and excess current in weak superconductors. They derived the equation to evaluate the inelastic scattering time of superconductor {tau}{sub E} using the excess current of wide films with phase slippage. Their {tau}{sub E} values are in a good agreement with those obtained by other methods.

  3. Probing transport mechanisms of BaFe2As2 superconducting films and grain boundary junctions by noise spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Barone, C.; Romeo, F.; Pagano, S.; Adamo, M.; Nappi, C.; Sarnelli, E.; Kurth, F.; Iida, K.

    2014-01-01

    An important step forward for the understanding of high-temperature superconductivity has been the discovery of iron-based superconductors. Among these compounds, iron pnictides could be used for high-field magnet applications, resulting more advantageous over conventional superconductors, due to a high upper critical field as well as its low anisotropy at low temperatures. However, the principal obstacle in fabricating high quality superconducting wires and tapes is given by grain boundaries. In order to study these effects, the dc transport and voltage-noise properties of Co-doped BaFe2As2 superconducting films with artificial grain boundary junctions have been investigated. A specific procedure allows the separation of the film noise from that of the junction. While the former shows a standard 1/f behaviour, the latter is characterized by an unconventional temperature-dependent multi-Lorentzian voltage-spectral density. Moreover, below the film superconducting critical temperature, a peculiar noise spectrum is found for the grain boundary junction. Possible theoretical interpretation of these phenomena is proposed. PMID:25145385

  4. Upward shift of the vortex solid phase in high-temperature-superconducting wires through high density nanoparticle addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Masashi; Maiorov, Boris; Balakirev, Fedor F.; Kato, Takeharu; Sato, Michio; Takagi, Yuji; Izumi, Teruo; Civale, Leonardo

    2016-02-01

    We show a simple and effective way to improve the vortex irreversibility line up to very high magnetic fields (60T) by increasing the density of second phase BaZrO3 nanoparticles. (Y0.77,Gd0.23)Ba2Cu3Oy films were grown on metal substrates with different concentration of BaZrO3 nanoparticles by the metal organic deposition method. We find that upon increase of the BaZrO3 concentration, the nanoparticle size remains constant but the twin-boundary density increases. Up to the highest nanoparticle concentration (n ~ 1.3 × 1022/m3), the irreversibility field (Hirr) continues to increase with no sign of saturation up to 60 T, although the vortices vastly outnumber pinning centers. We find extremely high Hirr, namely Hirr = 30 T (H||45°) and 24 T (H||c) at 65 K and 58 T (H||45°) and 45 T (H||c) at 50K. The difference in pinning landscape shifts the vortex solid-liquid transition upwards, increasing the vortex region useful for power applications, while keeping the upper critical field, critical temperature and electronic mass anisotropy unchanged.

  5. Upward shift of the vortex solid phase in high-temperature-superconducting wires through high density nanoparticle addition.

    PubMed

    Miura, Masashi; Maiorov, Boris; Balakirev, Fedor F; Kato, Takeharu; Sato, Michio; Takagi, Yuji; Izumi, Teruo; Civale, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    We show a simple and effective way to improve the vortex irreversibility line up to very high magnetic fields (60T) by increasing the density of second phase BaZrO3 nanoparticles. (Y0.77,Gd0.23)Ba2Cu3Oy films were grown on metal substrates with different concentration of BaZrO3 nanoparticles by the metal organic deposition method. We find that upon increase of the BaZrO3 concentration, the nanoparticle size remains constant but the twin-boundary density increases. Up to the highest nanoparticle concentration (n ~ 1.3 × 10(22)/m(3)), the irreversibility field (Hirr) continues to increase with no sign of saturation up to 60 T, although the vortices vastly outnumber pinning centers. We find extremely high Hirr, namely Hirr = 30 T (H||45°) and 24 T (H||c) at 65 K and 58 T (H||45°) and 45 T (H||c) at 50K. The difference in pinning landscape shifts the vortex solid-liquid transition upwards, increasing the vortex region useful for power applications, while keeping the upper critical field, critical temperature and electronic mass anisotropy unchanged. PMID:26853703

  6. Upward shift of the vortex solid phase in high-temperature-superconducting wires through high density nanoparticle addition

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Masashi; Maiorov, Boris; Balakirev, Fedor F.; Kato, Takeharu; Sato, Michio; Takagi, Yuji; Izumi, Teruo; Civale, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    We show a simple and effective way to improve the vortex irreversibility line up to very high magnetic fields (60T) by increasing the density of second phase BaZrO3 nanoparticles. (Y0.77,Gd0.23)Ba2Cu3Oy films were grown on metal substrates with different concentration of BaZrO3 nanoparticles by the metal organic deposition method. We find that upon increase of the BaZrO3 concentration, the nanoparticle size remains constant but the twin-boundary density increases. Up to the highest nanoparticle concentration (n ~ 1.3 × 1022/m3), the irreversibility field (Hirr) continues to increase with no sign of saturation up to 60 T, although the vortices vastly outnumber pinning centers. We find extremely high Hirr, namely Hirr = 30 T (H||45°) and 24 T (H||c) at 65 K and 58 T (H||45°) and 45 T (H||c) at 50K. The difference in pinning landscape shifts the vortex solid-liquid transition upwards, increasing the vortex region useful for power applications, while keeping the upper critical field, critical temperature and electronic mass anisotropy unchanged. PMID:26853703

  7. Upward shift of the vortex solid phase in high-temperature-superconducting wires through high density nanoparticle addition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Miura, Masashi; Maiorov, Boris; Balakirev, Fedor F.; Kato, Takeharu; Sato, Michio; Takagi, Yuji; Izumi, Teruo; Civale, Leonardo

    2016-02-08

    Here, we show a simple and effective way to improve the vortex irreversibility line up to very high magnetic fields (60T) by increasing the density of second phase BaZrO3 nanoparticles. (Y0.77,Gd0.23)Ba2Cu3Oy films were grown on metal substrates with different concentration of BaZrO3 nanoparticles by the metal organic deposition method. We find that upon increase of the BaZrO3 concentration, the nanoparticle size remains constant but the twin-boundary density increases. Up to the highest nanoparticle concentration (n ~ 1.3 × 1022/m3), the irreversibility field (Hirr) continues to increase with no sign of saturation up to 60 T, although the vortices vastly outnumbermore » pinning centers. We find extremely high Hirr, namely Hirr = 30 T (H||45°) and 24 T (H||c) at 65 K and 58 T (H||45°) and 45 T (H||c) at 50K. The difference in pinning landscape shifts the vortex solid-liquid transition upwards, increasing the vortex region useful for power applications, while keeping the upper critical field, critical temperature and electronic mass anisotropy unchanged.« less

  8. MoO3 Cathodes for High-Temperature Lithium Thin-Film Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, William; Whitacre, Jay

    2007-01-01

    MoO3 has shown promise as a cathode material that can extend the upper limit of operating temperature of rechargeable lithium thin-film electrochemical cells. Cells of this type are undergoing development for use as energy sources in cellular telephones, wireless medical sensors, and other, similarly sized portable electronic products. The LiCoO2 and LiMn2O4 cathodes heretofore used in these cells exhibit outstanding cycle lives (of the order of hundreds of thousands of cycles) at room temperature, but operation at higher temperatures reduces their cycle lives substantially: for example, at a temperature of 150 C, cells containing LiCoO2 cathodes lose half their capacities in 100 charge/discharge cycles. The superiority of MoO3 as a cathode material was demonstrated in experiments on lithium thin-film cells fabricated on glass slides. Each cell included a layer of Ti (for adhesion to the glass slide), a patterned layer of Pt that served as a cathode current collector, a cathode layer of MoO3, a solid electrolyte layer of Li3.3 PO3.8 N0.22 ("LiPON"), and an anode layer of Li. All the layers were deposited by magnetron sputtering except for the Li layer, which was deposited by thermal evaporation. These cells, along with similar ones containing LiCoO2 cathodes, were subjected to several tests, including measurements of specific capacity in charge/discharge cycling at a temperature of 150 C. The results of these measurements, plotted in the figure, showed that whereas specific capacity of the cells containing LiCoO2 cathodes faded to about half its initial value after only 100 cycles, the specific capacity of the cells containing the MoO3 cathodes faded only slightly during the first few hundred cycles and thereafter not only recovered to its initial value but continued to increase up to at least 5,500 cycles.

  9. The high temperature photoluminescence and optical absorption of undoped ZnO single crystals and thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Margueron, Samuel; Clarke, David R.

    2014-11-21

    The photoluminescence of undoped ZnO single crystals up to 1350 °C and the optical absorption of stress-relaxed, epitaxial ZnO thin films up to 1100 °C are reported. The photoluminescence intensity and power dependence with illumination flux are related to the crystal growth methods and stabilize after high temperature annealing. The observation of excitonic recombination at very high temperatures requires high illumination flux. It is found that the zero phonon line model reproduces the shift and the band gap narrowing as well as the free excitonic transition up to the cross-over with a defect level at 2.83 eV that occurs at 800 °C. A phenomenological model of the excitonic recombination band shape, taking account exciton-phonon losses and defect levels provides an excellent fit up to 2.2–2.4 eV (1100 °C). At these cross-over temperatures, an energy transfer is observed between the free exciton transition and defect transitions. However, at temperature above 1100 °C, the decrease of the band gap and the increase of thermal radiation, as well as the restrictions of our experimental set-up and particularly the illumination flux of the exciting laser, limit the analysis of the photoluminescence spectra measurements.

  10. Suppressed gross erosion of high-temperature lithium films under high-flux deuterium bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrams, Tyler; Jaworski, M. A.; Kaita, R.; Capece, A. M.; Nichols, J. H.; Stotler, D. P.; Roszell, J. P.; de Temmerman, G.; van den Berg, M. A.; van der Meiden, H. J.; Morgan, T. W.

    2014-10-01

    Liquid lithium is an attractive plasma facing component (PFC) for a fusion reactor because it improves confinement and protects the underlying substrate from high heat fluxes. However some previous studies have implied the maximum Li temperature permitted on such devices may be unacceptably low. Recently thin (<1 μm) and thick (~500 μm) Li films on TZM molybdenum substrates were studied in the Magnum-PSI linear plasma device with ion fluxes >1024 m-2 s1 and Li surface temperatures <= 800 °C. Measured Li erosion yields under neon plasma bombardment were similar to previous studies on low-flux devices, but erosion under deuterium bombardment was significantly suppressed. This motivated development of a mixed-material Li-D surface model incorporating D diffusion in Li, preferential sputtering, and LiD chemistry. This model is coupled to the adatom-evaporation equation for thermally-enhanced sputtering and the Langmuir law evaporation equation to obtain realistic predictions of temperature-dependent erosion rates. This model is found to predict the correct functional dependence of the mixed-material Li-D erosion rate vs. temperature in these discharges. Further investigations via molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and surface science experiments will also be presented. This work supported by US DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  11. A facile approach to derive binder protective film on high voltage spinel cathode materials against high temperature degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Wei-Yu; Jin, Yi-Chun; Duh, Jenq-Gong; Lu, Cheng-Zhang; Liao, Shih-Chieh

    2015-11-01

    The electrochemical performance of spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode combined with different binders at elevated temperature is firstly investigated. The water soluble binder, such as sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and sodium alginate (SA), is compared with the polyvinylidene difluoride (PVdF) binder used in non-aqueous process. The aqueous process can meet the need of Li-ion battery industry due to environmental-friendly and cost effectiveness by replacing toxic organic solvent, such as N-methyl-pyrrolidone (NMP). In this study, a significantly improved high temperature cycling performance is successfully obtained as compared to the traditional PVdF binder. The aqueous binder can serve as a protective film which inhibits the serious Ni and Mn dissolution especially at elevated temperature. Our result demonstrates a facile approach to solve the problem of capacity fading for high voltage spinel cathodes.

  12. Novel Superoxygenated Phases in Superconducting Cuprate Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Zhang, H.; Gauquelin, N.; Botton, G. A.; McMahon, C.; Hawthorn, D. G.; Wei, J. Y. T.

    The superconducting critical temperature (Tc) of hole-doped cuprates tends to increase with their lattice complexity, which is generally correlated with higher states of oxidation. For YBa2Cu3O7 - δ (YBCO-123), it is known that solid-state reaction in high-pressure oxygen can induce the formation of more complex and oxidized phases such as Y2Ba4Cu7O15 - δ (YBCO-247) and Y2Ba4Cu8O16 (YBCO-248). In this work, we apply this superoxygenation concept of material synthesis to nanoscale thin films which, owing to their large surface-to-volume ratio, are more thermodynamically reactive than bulk samples. Epitaxial thin films of YBCO-123 were grown by pulsed laser deposition on (La , Sr) (Al , Ta) O3 substrates, and post-annealed in up to 500 atm of oxygen at 800C. Our post-annealed films show robust superconducting transitions with Tc ranging from 80 to 93K. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy were used to probe the lattice structure and oxygen stoichiometry. Our measurements show clear evidence of conversion to YBCO-247 and YBCO-248 in the superoxygenated films, as well as YBCO-125, a novel YBCO phase that has three CuO chains per unit cell and potentially higher Tc. Work supported by NSERC, CFI/OIT, and CIFAR.

  13. Superconducting Properties of Ion-Implanted Gold - Thin Films.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jisrawi, Najeh Mohamed

    The superconducting properties of thin Au _{x}rm Si_{1-x} films prepared by ion beam implantation and ion beam mixing are studied. The films are prepared by evaporation of single Au layers on Si substrates and mixing them with Si, Ar, or Xe, or by Xe beam mixing of alternate multilayers of Au and Si sputtered on rm Al_2 O_3 substrates. The superconducting transition temperature and upper critical fields are determined by measuring the temperature and magnetic field dependence of resistivity. Temperatures as low as 20mK and magnetic fields as high as 8 T were used. Superconductivity in these films is discussed in connection with metastable metallic phases that are reportedly produced in the Au -Si system by high quenching rate preparation techniques like quenching from the vapor or the melt or ion implantation. Preliminary structural studies provide evidence for the existence of these phases and near-edge X-ray absorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements indicate a metallic type of bonding from which compound formation is inferred. The quality of the films is strongly dependent on the conditions of implantation. The maximum superconducting transition temperature attained is about 1.2 K. The upper critical fields have a maximum of 6T. An unusual double transition in the field dependence of resistivity is observed at low temperatures. The effect is very pronounced at compositions near x = 0.5 where the maximum T_{c} occurs. A model is presented to explain this result which invokes the properties of the metastable metallic phases and assumes the formation of more than two such phases in the same sample as the implantation dose increases. The Si-Au interface plays an important role in understanding the model and in interpreting the results of this thesis in general. The origin of superconductivity in the Au -Si system is discussed by relating the experimental results to the various mechanisms suggested in the literature. The implications of the study of

  14. Metallic alloy targets for high Tc superconducting film deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manini, P.; Nigro, A.; Romano, P.; Vaglio, R.

    1989-02-01

    Many experiments are nowadays conducting worldwide on superconducting films based on the recently developed high Tc superconductor materials (YBCO, BISCO, etc). There are different ways to produce these films, among which sputtering and evaporation are most popular. Normally, use is made of oxides, pure metals or compounds as material sources. In the present paper we describe the fabrication process and the physico-chemical characteristics of various metallic alloy components for both sputtering and evaporation processes which show various advantages in terms of stability, easiness of use, purity, flexibility in composition and shape and allow good process control. Deposition techniques and experimental results obtained on thin films of the new superconductors realized starting from these alloys are also reported.

  15. Preparation and superconductivity of iron selenide thin films.

    PubMed

    Han, Y; Li, W Y; Cao, L X; Zhang, S; Xu, B; Zhao, B R

    2009-06-10

    FeSe(x) (x = 0.80,0.84,0.88,0.92) thin films were prepared on SrTiO(3)(001)(STO), (La,Sr)(Al,Ta)O(3)(001) (LSAT), and LaAlO(3)(001) (LAO) substrates by a pulsed laser deposition method. All of the thin films show single-phase and c-axis oriented epitaxial growth, and are superconducting. Among them, the FeSe(0.88) thin films show a T(c,onset) of 11.8 K and a T(c,0) of 3.4 K. The upper critical magnetic field is estimated to be 14.0 T. PMID:21825594

  16. Superconducting properties of epitaxial laser ablated thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berling, D.; Del Vecchio, A.; Leggieri, G.; Loegel, B.; Luches, A.; Mehdaoui, A.; Tapfer, L.

    1996-02-01

    We present experimental results obtained for high quality epitaxial thin films (film thicknesses around 5000 Å; rocking curve FWHM down to 0.1°). These films are obtained by laser ablation of REBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ (RE = Y, Er) deposited on SrTio 3 and YSZ substrates. The superconducting properties have been studied by complex susceptibility in an extended AC field range ( hac ≤ 300 Oe) and show sharp magnetic transition width and high critical currents (10 7A cm -2 < jc(77K) < 10 8A cm -2). The loss peak is only weakly depressed by an increasing AC field and the observed shifts are up to an order of magnitude lower than those observed for intragranular contributions in bulk samples. The agreement with the behaviour expected from a critical state model is also discussed.

  17. Insertion loss and noise-temperature contribution of high-temperature superconducting bandpass filters centered at 2.3 and 8.45 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prater, J. L.; Bautista, J. J.

    1993-01-01

    Two superconducting Tl-Ca-Cu-Ba-O bandpass filters were fabricated for JPL by Superconductor Technologies Incorporated, Santa Barbara, California. The filters were designed to operate at 2.3 GHz (S-band) with a 0.5-dB bandwidth of 60 MHz and at 8.45 GHz (X-band) with a 0.5-dB bandwidth of 150 MHz. The structure selected for both filters incorporates half-wavelength thin-film resonators in a stripline configuration. The S-band filter uses an edge-coupled interdigital design and the X-band filter uses an end-coupled design. The insertion loss and the noise-temperature contribution were measured at 12 K for both filters.

  18. Application of indium tin oxide (ITO) thin film as a low emissivity film on Ni-based alloy at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Kewei; Zhou, Wancheng; Tang, Xiufeng; Luo, Fa

    2016-09-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) films as the low emissivity coatings of Ni-based alloy at high temperature were studies. ITO films were deposited on the polished surface of alloy K424 by direct current magnetron sputtering. These ITO-coated samples were heat-treated in air at 600-900 °C for 150 h to explore the effect of high temperature environment on the emissivity. The samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), SEM and EDS. The results show that the surface of sample is integrity after heat processing at 700 °C and below it. A small amount of fine crack is observed on the surface of sample heated at 800 °C and Ti oxide appears. There are lots of fine cracks on the sample annealed at 900 °C and a large number of various oxides are detected. The average infrared emissivities at 3-5 μm and 8-14 μm wavebands were tested by an infrared emissivity measurement instrument. The results show the emissivity of the sample after annealed at 600 and 700 °C is still kept at a low value as the sample before annealed. The ITO film can be used as a low emissivity coating of super alloy K424 up to 700 °C.

  19. Stability of Tl-Ba-Ca-Cu-O Superconducting Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Siegal, M.P.; Overmyer, D.L.; Venturini, E.L.; Padilla, R.R.; Provencio, P.N.

    1999-08-23

    We report the stability of TlBa{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 7} (Tl-1212) and Tl{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} (T1-2212) thin films and by inference, the stability of TlBa{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 9} (Tl-1223) and Tl{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10} (Tl-2223) thin films, under a variety of conditions. In general, we observe that the stability behavior of the single Tl-O layer materials (Tl-1212 and Tl-1223)are similar and the double Tl-O layer materials (Tl-2212 and Tl-2223) are similar. All films are stable with repeated thermal cycling to cryogenic temperatures. Films are also stable in acetone and methanol. Moisture degrades film quality rapidly, especially in the form of vapor. Tl-1212 is more sensitive to vapor than Tl-2212. These materials are stable to high temperatures in either N{sub 2}, similar to vacuum for the cuprates, and O{sub 2} ambients. While total degradation of properties (superconducting and structural) occur at the same temperatures for all phases, 600 C in N{sub 2} and 700 C in O{sub 2}, the onset of degradation occurs at somewhat lower temperatures for Tl-1212 than for Tl-2212 films. In all cases, sample degradation is associated with Tl depletion from the films.

  20. Development and testing of a 2.5 kW synchronous generator with a high temperature superconducting stator and permanent magnet rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Timing; Song, Peng; Yu, Xiaoyu; Gu, Chen; Li, Longnian; Li, Xiaohang; Wang, Dewen; Hu, Boping; Chen, Duxing; Zeng, Pan; Han, Zhenghe

    2014-04-01

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) armature windings have the potential for increasing the electric loading of a synchronous generator due to their high current transport capacity, which could increase the power density of an HTS rotating machine. In this work, a novel synchronous generator prototype with an HTS stator and permanent magnet rotor has been developed. It has a basic structure of four poles and six slots. The armature winding was constructed from six double-pancake race-track coils with 44 turns each. It was designed to deliver 2.5 kW at 300 rpm. A concentrated winding configuration was proposed, to prevent interference at the ends of adjacent HTS coils. The HTS stator was pressure mounted into a hollow Dewar cooled with liquid nitrogen. The whole stator could be cooled down to around 82 K by conduction cooling. In the preliminary testing, the machine worked properly and could deliver 1.8 kW power when the armature current was 14.4 A. Ic for the HTS coils was found to be suppressed due to the influence of the temperature and the leakage field.

  1. High temperature measurement set-up for the electro-mechanical characterization of robust thin film systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fricke, S.; Friedberger, A.; Seidel, H.; Schmid, U.

    2014-01-01

    Due to economic and environmental requirements there is a strong need both to increase the efficiency and to monitor the actual status of gas turbines, rocket engines and deep drilling systems. For these applications, micromachined pressure sensors based on a robust substrate material (e.g. sapphire) as well as strain gauges made of platinum for long-term stable operation are regarded as most promising to withstand harsh environments such as high temperature levels, aggressive media and/or high pressure loads. For pre-evaluation purposes, a novel, custom-built measurement set-up is presented allowing the determination of electro-mechanical thin film properties up to 850 °C. Key components of the measurement set-up are the one-sided clamped beam made of Al2O3 ceramics which is deflected by a quartz rod and a high precision encoder-controlled dc motor to drive the quartz rod. The specific arrangement of the infrared halogen heaters in combination with the gold coated quartz half shells ensures a high degree of temperature homogeneity along the beam axis. When exposed to tensile as well as compressive load conditions, the corresponding gauge factor values of 1 µm thick platinum thin films show a good comparison at room temperature and in the temperature range from 600 up to 850 °C where the effects originating from grain boundaries or from the film surfaces are negligible. Between 150 and 600 °C, however, a strong deviation in the gauge factor determination depending on the mechanical load condition is observed, which is attributed to the gliding of adjacent grains.

  2. Detection of a coherent boson current in the normal state of a high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3Oy film patterned to micrometer-sized rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabata, K.; Tsukui, S.; Shono, Y.; Michikami, O.; Sasakura, H.; Yoshiara, K.; Kakehi, Y.; Yotsuya, T.

    1998-08-01

    The key to clarifying the mechanism of the appearance of high Tc in the high-temperature superconductor seems to be related to the anomalous properties in its normal state [H. Yasuoka, S. Kambe, Y. Itoh, and T. Machi, Physica B 199-200, 278 (1994); H. Ding T. Yokoya, J. C. Campuzano, T. Takahashi, M. Randeria, M. R. Norman, T. Mochiki, K. Kadowaki, and J. Giapintzakis, Nature (London) 382, 51 (1996); and T. Ito, K. Takenaka, and S. Uchida, Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 3995 (1993)]. Related to this is the presence of Bose-electron-type species such as paired holes [V. J. Emery and S. A. Kivelson, Nature (London) 374, 434 (1995)] and holons [P. W. Anderson, G. Bakaran, Z. Zou, and T. Hsu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 2790 (1987)] in the normal state which has been proposed by theoreticians. We have succeeded in detecting the coherent Bose species in the normal state of YBa2Cu3Oy. The idea [L. P. Levy, G. Dolan, J. Dunsmuir, and H. Bouchiat, Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 2074 (1990)] of having the detected oscillation of a fermion persisting current caused by the Aharanov-Bohm effect on magnetic field scanning in the assemblage of the mesoscopic rings of metal was employed in the assemblage of a ring patterned in the YB2Cu3Oy film. The sensitivity of our detection system is not high enough to detect fermions, but it is high enough for detecting coherent bosons if they exist. Oscillations with flux periods corresponding to h/2e have been found at T>Tc, even at temperatures 30 K or more above Tc inserted in the patterned YBa2Cu3Oy film, but have not been found in the patterned Au or Pd films. To explain the coherent current circulating in a ring with a circumference as long as 40 μm, presumably in the prestage to the superconducting stage, the possible coexistence of a minority of coherent bosons and a majority of incoherent bosons is discussed. The detection of minority coherent bosons in the background of a majority of incoherent species is possible in this method.

  3. Interface enhanced superconductivity in single unit-cell FeSe films on SrTiO3(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lili

    The advent of enhanced superconductivity in FeSe/STO(001) has instigated great interests in other interfacial systems both experimentally and theoretically. To figure out the key role of substrate, STO(110) substrate is of great interest because it resembles STO(001) in high density subsurface oxygen vacancies but distinguishes itself by anisotropic in-plane lattice constants and dielectric constant. Here, we investigated molecular beam epitaxy growth of 1-UC FeSe films on STO(110) substrates and studied the superconducting properties by combined in-situ scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) and ex-situ transport measurement. By STS we observed a superconducting gap as large as 17 meV. Transport measurements on 1-UC FeSe/STO(110) capped with FeTe layers reveal superconductivity with an onset transition temperature (TC) of 31.6 K and an upper critical magnetic field of 30.2 T. We also find that TC can be further increased by an external electric field, but the effect is weaker than that on STO(001) substrate. Our study highlights the important roles of interface related charge transfer and electron-phonon coupling in the high temperature superconductivity of FeSe/STO. References: [1] Q. Y. Wang, et al., Chin. Phys. Lett., 29, 037402 (2012). [2] J. J. Lee, Nature 515, 245 (2014).

  4. Superconducting microstrip resonator for pulsed ESR of thin films.

    PubMed

    Benningshof, O W B; Mohebbi, H R; Taminiau, I A J; Miao, G X; Cory, D G

    2013-05-01

    This article describes a superconducting microstrip resonator operating at 9.5 GHz (X-band) that is specially designed for pulsed ESR on thin films. A novel configuration consisting of an array of half-wave length microstrip transmission lines generates a uniform magnetic field over a 2-D region of 100×1000 μm(2) with field homogeneity better than 5×10(-2). Using the device, we demonstrate strong coupling of the resonator to an electron spin ensemble and pulsed ESR on Si:P. PMID:23454577

  5. Cathodic arc grown niobium films for RF superconducting cavity applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catani, L.; Cianchi, A.; Lorkiewicz, J.; Tazzari, S.; Langner, J.; Strzyzewski, P.; Sadowski, M.; Andreone, A.; Cifariello, G.; Di Gennaro, E.; Lamura, G.; Russo, R.

    2006-07-01

    Experimental results on the characterization of the linear and non-linear microwave properties of niobium film produced by UHV cathodic arc deposition are presented. Surface impedance Zs as a function of RF field and intermodulation distortion (IMD) measurement have been carried out by using a dielectrically loaded resonant cavity operating at 7 GHz. The experimental data show that these samples have a lower level of intrinsic non-linearities at low temperature and low circulating power in comparison with Nb samples grown by sputtering. These results make UHV cathodic arc deposition a promising technique for the improvement of RF superconducting cavities for particle accelerators.

  6. Observation of Supercurrent Drag between Normal Metal and Superconducting Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaokang; Bazàn, Greg; Bernstein, Gary H.

    1995-05-01

    We experimentally investigate the Coulomb interaction between normal metal (Au /Ti) and superconducting (AlO x) 2D films separated by an insulating \\(Al2O3\\) layer. We report here the observation of supercurrent drag predicted by Duan and Yip [Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 3647 (1993)]. The drag was observed at temperatures close to Tc, with the ratio of the drag current to the drive current as high as about 1×10-3. Our results are discussed in terms of a model of Coulomb mutual scattering between the normal electrons in the drive wire and the superelectrons in the drag wire.

  7. Superconducting properties of evaporated copper molybdenum sulfide films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollam, J. A.; Chi, K. C.; Dillon, R. O.; Bunshah, R. F.; Alterovitz, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    Films of copper molybdenum sulfide were produced by coevaporation. Those that were superconducting contained only the ternary compound and free molybdenum. The range of copper content in the ternary compound was as large as that in polycrystalline material, that is, it includes either phase alone, or a mixture of the two phases of this material. This is in contrast with sputtered materials where copper concentration has been limited to a narrower range. The upper critical field and the critical current were measured as functions of external magnetic field, and found to be similar to those of sputtered copper molybdenum sulfide, when the comparison was made for samples having the same amount of copper.

  8. Conversion of microwave signals by superconducting films in the resistive state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeru, I. I.; Peskovatskiy, S. A.; Sulima, V. S.

    1984-01-01

    The main characteristics of a superconducting thin film microwave mixer, i.e., conversion efficiency and bandwidth are analyzed. The optimum operating regime of the nonlinear element is determined. Results of calculations are compared with the experimental ones. Experimental data on the noise in the superconducting films in a wide frequency range are presented.

  9. Enhancement of the finite-frequency superfluid response in the pseudogap regime of strongly disordered superconducting films

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Mintu; Kamlapure, Anand; Ganguli, Somesh Chandra; Jesudasan, John; Bagwe, Vivas; Benfatto, Lara; Raychaudhuri, Pratap

    2013-01-01

    The persistence of a soft gap in the density of states above the superconducting transition temperature Tc, the pseudogap, has long been thought to be a hallmark of unconventional high-temperature superconductors. However, in the last few years this paradigm has been strongly revised by increasing experimental evidence for the emergence of a pseudogap state in strongly-disordered conventional superconductors. Nonetheless, the nature of this state, probed primarily through scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) measurements, remains partly elusive. Here we show that the dynamic response above Tc, obtained from the complex ac conductivity, is highly modified in the pseudogap regime of strongly disordered NbN films. Below the pseudogap temperature, T*, the superfluid stiffness acquires a strong frequency dependence associated with a marked slowing down of critical fluctuations. When translated into the length-scale of fluctuations, our results suggest a scenario of thermal phase fluctuations between superconducting domains in a strongly disordered s-wave superconductor. PMID:23446946

  10. Impact of Edge-Barrier Pinning in Superconducting Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, W. A.; Barnes, P.N.; Mullins, M. J.; Baca, F. J.; Emergo, R. L. S.; Wu, J.; Haugan, T. J.; Clem, J. R.

    2010-12-30

    It has been suggested that edge-barrier pinning might cause the critical current density (J{sub c}) in bridged superconducting films to increase. Subsequent work indicated that this edge-barrier effect does not impact bridges larger than 1 {micro}m. However, we provide a theoretical assessment with supporting experimental data suggesting edge-barrier pinning can significantly enhance J{sub c} for bridges of a few microns or even tens of microns thus skewing any comparisons among institutions. As such, when reporting flux pinning and superconductor processing improvements for J{sub c} comparisons, the width of the sample has to be taken into consideration as is currently done with film thickness.

  11. Edge tunneling of vortices in superconducting thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Iengo, R. |; Jug, G. |

    1996-11-01

    We investigate the phenomenon of the decay of a supercurrent due to the zero-temperature quantum tunneling of vortices from the edge in a thin superconducting film in the absence of an external magnetic field. An explicit formula is derived for the tunneling rate of vortices, which are subject to the Magnus force induced by the supercurrent, through the Coulomb-like potential barrier binding them to the film{close_quote}s edge. Our approach ensues from the nonrelativistic version of a Schwinger-type calculation for the decay of the two-dimensional vacuum previously employed for describing vortex-antivortex pair nucleation in the bulk of the sample. In the dissipation-dominated limit, our explicit edge-tunneling formula yields numerical estimates which are compared with those obtained for bulk nucleation to show that both mechanisms are possible for the decay of a supercurrent. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  12. Polycrystalline Superconducting Thin Films: Texture Control and Critical Current Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Feng

    1995-01-01

    The growth processes of polycrystalline rm YBa_2CU_3O_{7-X} (YBCO) and yttria-stabilized-zirconia (YSZ) thin films have been developed. The effectiveness of YSZ buffer layers on suppression of the reaction between YBCO thin films and metallic substrates was carefully studied. Grown on the chemically inert surfaces of YSZ buffer layers, YBCO thin films possessed good quality of c-axis alignment with the c axis parallel to the substrate normal, but without any preferred in-plane orientations. This leads to the existence of a large percentage of the high-angle grain boundaries in the YBCO films. The critical current densities (rm J_{c}'s) found in these films were much lower than those in single crystal YBCO thin films, which was the consequence of the weak -link effect of the high-angle grain boundaries in these films. It became clear that the in-plane alignment is vital for achieving high rm J_{c }s in polycrystalline YBCO thin films. To induce the in-plane alignment, ion beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) technique was integrated into the conventional pulsed laser deposition process for the growth of the YSZ buffer layers. It was demonstrated that using IBAD the in-plane orientations of the YSZ grains could be controlled within a certain range of a common direction. This ion -bombardment induced in-plane texturing was explained using the anisotropic sputtering yield theory. Our observations and analyses have provided valuable information on the optimization of the IBAD process, and shed light on the texturing mechanism in YSZ. With the in-plane aligned YSZ buffer layers, YBCO thin films grown on metallic substrates showed improved rm J_{c}s. It was found that the in-plane alignment of YSZ and that of YBCO were closely related. A direct correlation was revealed between the rm J_{c} value and the degree of the in-plane alignment for the YBCO thin films. To explain this correlation, a numerical model was applied to multi-grain superconducting paths with different

  13. Correlation of microwave nonlinearity and magnetic pinning in high-temperature superconductor thin film band-pass filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hua; Wang, Xiang; Wu, Judy Z.

    2008-08-01

    Third-order intermodulation has been studied in two-pole X-band microstrip filters made of three high-temperature superconductors (HTS), including HgBa2CaCu2O6+δ (Hg-1212), Tl2Ba2CaCu2Oy (Tl-2212) and YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) at >=77 K. In addition, the dc critical current density Jc was investigated in these three types of HTS films in the same temperature range. Interestingly, the dc Jc and the rf critical current density JIP3 derived from the third-order intercept (IP3) have a similar dependence on the reduced temperature, suggesting that the magnetic vortex depinning in HTS materials dominates the microwave nonlinearity at elevated temperatures. This observation agrees with the recent theoretical discussion on the origin of the microwave nonlinearity. Disagreement between Jc and JIP3, however, has been observed in the trilayer YBCO/CeO2/YBCO filters. Although magnetic flux pinning and hence Jc were improved by the insertion of a 20 nm thin CeO2 layer, the reduced JIP3 is attributed to the high power loss from the extra interfaces between YBCO and CeO2.

  14. Micrometer-Scale Ordering of Silicon-Containing Block Copolymer Thin Films via High-Temperature Thermal Treatments.

    PubMed

    Giammaria, Tommaso Jacopo; Ferrarese Lupi, Federico; Seguini, Gabriele; Perego, Michele; Vita, Francesco; Francescangeli, Oriano; Wenning, Brandon; Ober, Christopher K; Sparnacci, Katia; Antonioli, Diego; Gianotti, Valentina; Laus, Michele

    2016-04-20

    Block copolymer (BCP) self-assembly is expected to complement conventional optical lithography for the fabrication of next-generation microelectronic devices. In this regard, silicon-containing BCPs with a high Flory-Huggins interaction parameter (χ) are extremely appealing because they form high-resolution nanostructures with characteristic dimensions below 10 nm. However, due to their slow self-assembly kinetics and low thermal stability, these silicon-containing high-χ BCPs are usually processed by solvent vapor annealing or in solvent-rich ambient at a low annealing temperature, significantly increasing the complexity of the facilities and of the procedures. In this work, the self-assembly of cylinder-forming polystyrene-block-poly(dimethylsiloxane-random-vinylmethylsiloxane) (PS-b-P(DMS-r-VMS)) BCP on flat substrates is promoted by means of a simple thermal treatment at high temperatures. Homogeneous PS-b-P(DMS-r-VMS) thin films covering the entire sample surface are obtained without any evidence of dewetting phenomena. The BCP arranges in a single layer of cylindrical P(DMS-r-VMS) nanostructures parallel-oriented with respect to the substrate. By properly adjusting the surface functionalization, the heating rate, the annealing temperature, and the processing time, one can obtain correlation length values larger than 1 μm in a time scale fully compatible with the stringent requirements of the microelectronic industry. PMID:27020526

  15. Nucleation and development of dendritic flux avalanches in superconducting films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestgården, Jørn Inge; Shantsev, Daniil; Galperin, Yuri; Henning Johansen, Tom

    2012-02-01

    The stability of superconducting films is threatened by thermomagnetic runaways commonly observed as abrupt dendritic flux avalanches. We report numerical simulations of the electrodynamics and thermal behavior of superconducting films, where the gradual flux penetration is interrupted by such avalanches. The simulation formalism is based on an efficient method for treating the nonlinear and nonlocal electrodynamics, and it handles both the slow flux creep dynamics prior to the avalanches and the transition to the many orders of magnitude faster instability regime. Then the temperature rises quickly above the critical temperature, and the avalanche develops fully in less than 100 nanoseconds, with an initial velocity of approximately 100 km/s. Both the morphology and speed of the avalanches are in excellent agreement with results from magneto-optical imaging experiments. The sample is seeded with randomly distributed disorder, which results in a significantly reduced threshold for onset of avalanches. Interaction with the material disorder also contributes to branching and irreprodusibility of the flux structures. However, disorder is not the main mechanism behind branching and dendritic structures are also found to develop in completely uniform samples.

  16. Microwave response of high transition temperature superconducting thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix Antonio

    1991-01-01

    We have studied the microwave response of YBa2Cu3O(7 - delta), Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O, and Tl-Ba-Ca-Cu-O high transition temperature superconducting (HTS) thin films by performing power transmission measurements. These measurements were carried out in the temperature range of 300 K to 20 K and at frequencies within the range of 30 to 40 GHz. Through these measurements we have determined the magnetic penetration depth (lambda), the complex conductivity (sigma(sup *) = sigma(sub 1) - j sigma(sub 2)) and the surface resistance (R(sub s)). An estimate of the intrinsic penetration depth (lambda approx. 121 nm) for the YBa2Cu3O(7 - delta) HTS has been obtained from the film thickness dependence of lambda. This value compares favorably with the best values reported so far (approx. 140 nm) in single crystals and high quality c-axis oriented thin films. Furthermore, it was observed that our technique is sensitive to the intrinsic anisotropy of lambda in this superconductor. Values of lambda are also reported for Bi-based and Tl-based thin films. We observed that for the three types of superconductors, both sigma(sub 1) and sigma(sub 2) increased when cooling the films below their transition temperature. The measured R(sub s) are in good agreement with other R(sub S) values obtained using resonant activity techniques if we assume a quadratic frequency dependence. Our analysis shows that, of the three types of HTS films studied, the YBa2Cu3O(7 - delta) thin film, deposited by laser ablation and off-axis magnetron sputtering are the most promising for microwave applications.

  17. Tunneling into thin superconducting films: Interface-induced quasiparticle lifetime reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löptien, P.; Zhou, L.; Khajetoorians, A. A.; Wiebe, J.; Wiesendanger, R.

    2016-01-01

    Scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements of superconducting thin lanthanum films grown on a normal metal tungsten substrate reveal an extraordinarily large broadening of the coherence peaks. The observed broadening corresponds to very short electron-like quasiparticle lifetimes in the tunneling process. A thorough analysis considering the different relaxation processes reveals that the dominant mechanism is an efficient quasiparticle relaxation at the interface between the superconducting film and the underlying substrate. This process is of general relevance to scanning tunneling spectroscopy studies on thin superconducting films and enables measurements of film thicknesses via a spectroscopic method.

  18. High-field magnets using high-critical-temperature superconducting thin films

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, F.; Hoard, R.W.

    1994-05-10

    High-field magnets fabricated from high-critical-temperature superconducting ceramic (HTSC) thin films which can generate fields greater than 4 Tesla are disclosed. The high-field magnets are made of stackable disk-shaped substrates coated with HTSC thin films, and involves maximizing the critical current density, superconducting film thickness, number of superconducting layers per substrate, substrate diameter, and number of substrates while minimizing substrate thickness. The HTSC thin films are deposited on one or both sides of the substrates in a spiral configuration with variable line widths to increase the field. 4 figures.

  19. High-field magnets using high-critical-temperature superconducting thin films

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, Fred; Hoard, Ronald W.

    1994-01-01

    High-field magnets fabricated from high-critical-temperature superconducting ceramic (HTSC) thin films which can generate fields greater than 4 Tesla. The high-field magnets are made of stackable disk-shaped substrates coated with HTSC thin films, and involves maximizing the critical current density, superconducting film thickness, number of superconducting layers per substrate, substrate diameter, and number of substrates while minimizing substrate thickness. The HTSC thin films are deposited on one or both sides of the substrates in a spiral configuration with variable line widths to increase the field.

  20. Effects of critical current inhomogeneity in long high-temperature superconducting tapes on the self-field loss, studied by means of numerical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yinshun; Dai, Shaotao; Zhao, Xiang; Xiao, Liye; Lin, Liangzhen; Hui, Dong

    2006-12-01

    The effect of the local critical current on the self-field loss in single tapes and multi-parallel tapes is investigated computationally. Generally, the self-AC loss of a superconductor can be described using the Norris equation based on Bean's critical state model with elliptical, circular or strip cross-sections. However, because of its intrinsic characteristics, the critical current of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) tape is inhomogeneous. It is reasonable to expect the local critical currents to have a Gaussian statistical distribution, according to the central limit theorem; a detailed analysis of self-AC loss is made to develop an interesting calculation procedure for both single tapes and multi-parallel tapes. The results show that the inhomogeneity of local critical currents has an important effect on the self-field loss. One of the goals in this paper is to provide an accurate method for estimating quality, or what level of critical current inhomogeneity in HTS tape is permissible in practical application. As manufacturing processes are refined through powder in tube and coating technologies, and the sources of extrinsic macroscopic defects are decreased, electromagnetic and mechanical performances of Bi2223 and YBCO tapes are greatly improved. Nevertheless, intrinsic microscopic defects such as weak links, microcracks and small second-phase formations still exist in the tapes, which will lead to statistically local critical current variations. Therefore, it is very important to study the effect that variation in local critical currents may have on the self-field losses of practical long single and multi-parallel HTS tapes.

  1. Superconductivity applications for infrared and microwave devices; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 19, 20, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, Kul B. (Editor); Heinen, Vernon O. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Various papers on superconductivity applications for IR and microwave devices are presented. The individual topics addressed include: pulsed laser deposition of Tl-Ca-Ba-Cu-O films, patterning of high-Tc superconducting thin films on Si substrates, IR spectra and the energy gap in thin film YBa2Cu3O(7-delta), high-temperature superconducting thin film microwave circuits, novel filter implementation utilizing HTS materials, high-temperature superconductor antenna investigations, high-Tc superconducting IR detectors, high-Tc superconducting IR detectors from Y-Ba-Cu-O thin films, Y-Ba-Cu0-O thin films as high-speed IR detectors, fabrication of a high-Tc superconducting bolometer, transition-edge microbolometer, photoresponse of YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) granular and epitaxial superconducting thin films, fast IR response of YBCO thin films, kinetic inductance effects in high-Tc microstrip circuits at microwave frequencies.

  2. Observation of Double-Dome Superconductivity in Potassium-Doped FeSe Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Song, Can-Li; Zhang, Hui-Min; Zhong, Yong; Hu, Xiao-Peng; Ji, Shuai-Hua; Wang, Lili; He, Ke; Ma, Xu-Cun; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2016-04-15

    We report on the emergence of two disconnected superconducting domes in alkali-metal potassium- (K-)doped FeSe ultrathin films grown on graphitized SiC(0001). The superconductivity exhibits hypersensitivity to K dosage in the lower-T_{c} dome, whereas in the heavily electron-doped higher-T_{c} dome it becomes spatially homogeneous and robust against disorder, supportive of a conventional Cooper-pairing mechanism. Furthermore, the heavily K-doped multilayer FeSe films all reveal a large superconducting gap of ∼14  meV, irrespective of film thickness, verifying the higher-T_{c} superconductivity only in the topmost FeSe layer. The unusual finding of a double-dome superconducting phase is a step towards the mechanistic understanding of superconductivity in FeSe-derived superconductors. PMID:27127981

  3. Observation of Double-Dome Superconductivity in Potassium-Doped FeSe Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Can-Li; Zhang, Hui-Min; Zhong, Yong; Hu, Xiao-Peng; Ji, Shuai-Hua; Wang, Lili; He, Ke; Ma, Xu-Cun; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2016-04-01

    We report on the emergence of two disconnected superconducting domes in alkali-metal potassium- (K-)doped FeSe ultrathin films grown on graphitized SiC(0001). The superconductivity exhibits hypersensitivity to K dosage in the lower-Tc dome, whereas in the heavily electron-doped higher-Tc dome it becomes spatially homogeneous and robust against disorder, supportive of a conventional Cooper-pairing mechanism. Furthermore, the heavily K-doped multilayer FeSe films all reveal a large superconducting gap of ˜14 meV , irrespective of film thickness, verifying the higher-Tc superconductivity only in the topmost FeSe layer. The unusual finding of a double-dome superconducting phase is a step towards the mechanistic understanding of superconductivity in FeSe-derived superconductors.

  4. Isotope analysis of diamond-surface passivation effect of high-temperature H2O-grown atomic layer deposition-Al2O3 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraiwa, Atsushi; Saito, Tatsuya; Matsumura, Daisuke; Kawarada, Hiroshi

    2015-06-01

    The Al2O3 film formed using an atomic layer deposition (ALD) method with trimethylaluminum as Al precursor and H2O as oxidant at a high temperature (450 °C) effectively passivates the p-type surface conduction (SC) layer specific to a hydrogen-terminated diamond surface, leading to a successful operation of diamond SC field-effect transistors at 400 °C. In order to investigate this excellent passivation effect, we carried out an isotope analysis using D2O instead of H2O in the ALD and found that the Al2O3 film formed at a conventional temperature (100 °C) incorporates 50 times more CH3 groups than the high-temperature film. This CH3 is supposed to dissociate from the film when heated afterwards at a higher temperature (550 °C) and causes peeling patterns on the H-terminated surface. The high-temperature film is free from this problem and has the largest mass density and dielectric constant among those investigated in this study. The isotope analysis also unveiled a relatively active H-exchange reaction between the diamond H-termination and H2O oxidant during the high-temperature ALD, the SC still being kept intact. This dynamic and yet steady H termination is realized by the suppressed oxidation due to the endothermic reaction with H2O. Additionally, we not only observed the kinetic isotope effect in the form of reduced growth rate of D2O-oxidant ALD but found that the mass density and dielectric constant of D2O-grown Al2O3 films are smaller than those of H2O-grown films. This is a new type of isotope effect, which is not caused by the presence of isotopes in the films unlike the traditional isotope effects that originate from the presence of isotopes itself. Hence, the high-temperature ALD is very effective in forming Al2O3 films as a passivation and/or gate-insulation layer of high-temperature-operation diamond SC devices, and the knowledge of the aforementioned new isotope effect will be a basis for further enhancing ALD technologies in general.

  5. Sequentially evaporated thin Y-Ba-Co-O superconducting films on microwave substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valco, G. J.; Rohrer, N. J.; Warner, J. D.; Bhasin, K. B.

    1989-01-01

    The development of high T sub c superconducting thin films on various microwave substrates is of major interest in space electronic systems. Thin films of YBa2Cu3O(7-Delta) were formed on SrTiO3, MgO, ZrO2 coated Al2O3, and LaAlO3 substrates by multi-layer sequential evaporation and subsequent annealing in oxygen. The technique allows controlled deposition of Cu, BaF2 and Y layers, as well as the ZrO buffer layers, to achieve reproducibility for microwave circuit fabrication. The three layer structure of Cu/BaF2/Y is repeated a minimum of four times. The films were annealed in an ambient of oxygen bubbled through water at temperatures between 850 C and 900 C followed by slow cooling (-2 C/minute) to 450 C, a low temperature anneal, and slow cooling to room temperature. Annealing times ranged from 15 minutes to 5 hrs. at high temperature and 0 to 6 hr. at 450 C. Silver contacts for four probe electrical measurements were formed by evaporation followed with an anneal at 500 C. The films were characterized by resistance-temperature measurements, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. Critical transition temperatures ranged from 30 K to 87 K as a function of the substrate, composition of the film, thicknesses of the layers, and annealing conditions. Microwave ring resonator circuits were also patterned on these MgO and LaAlO3 substrates.

  6. Superconducting YBCO thin film on multicrystalline Ag film evaporated on MgO substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azoulay, Jacob; Verdyan, Armen; Lapsker, Igor

    Superconducting YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ films were grown by resistive evaporation on multicrystalline silver film which was evaporated on MgO substrate. A simple inexpensive vacuum system equipped with resistively heated boat was used for the whole process. Silver film was first evaporated on MgO substrate kept at 400°C during the evaporation after which with no further annealing a precursor mixture of yttrium small grains and Cu and BaF2 in powder form weighed in the atomic proportion to yield stoichiometric YBa 2Cu 3O 7 was evaporated. The films thus obtained were annealed at 740°C under low oxygen partial pressure of about 1Pa for 30 minutes to form the superconducting phase. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used for texture and surface analysis. Electrical properties were determined using a standard dc four-probe for electrical measurements. The physical and electrical properties of the YBCO films are discussed in light of the fact that X-ray diffraction measurements done on the silver film have revealed a multicrystalline structure

  7. Strong vortex matching effects in YBCO films with periodic modulations of the superconducting order parameter fabricated by masked ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haag, L. T.; Zechner, G.; Lang, W.; Dosmailov, M.; Bodea, M. A.; Pedarnig, J. D.

    2014-08-01

    We report on measurements of the magnetoresistance and of the critical current in thin films of the high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO). A square array of regions with suppressed superconducting order parameter has been created in these films by introducing point defects via irradiation with He+ ions through a silicon stencil mask. In such a structure distinct peaks of the critical current can be observed at commensurate arrangements of magnetic flux quanta with the artificial defect lattice. Concurrently, the magnetoresistance shows pronounced minima. Both observations demonstrate that the strong intrinsic pinning in YBCO can be overcome by a periodic array of ion-damage columns with 300 nm spacing.

  8. Y-Ba-Cu-O superconducting thin films by simultaneous or sequential evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Mogro-Campero, A.; Hunt, B.D.; Turner, L.G.; Burrell, M.C.; Balz, W.E.

    1988-02-15

    Superconducting thin films of Y-Ba-Cu-O near the 1:2:3 stoichiometry were produced by simultaneous (coevaporation) and sequential (multilayer) evaporation in the same evaporator. The best film obtained on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) had a superconducting onset temperature of 104 K, a midpoint T/sub c/ of 92 K, and zero resistance at Tless than or equal to74 K. Stoichiometry was deduced by inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy, and elemental depth profiles were obtained by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Film stoichiometry changes only near the film/substrate boundary for films on YSZ. Films on Si/SiO/sub 2/ were not superconducting; depth profiling shows severe changes of film composition with depth. A major theme of this work is process reproducibility, which was found to be poor for coevaporation but improved considerably for sequential evaporation.

  9. Loss mechanisms in superconducting thin film microwave resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, Jan; Deppe, Frank; Haeberlein, Max; Wulschner, Friedrich; Zollitsch, Christoph W.; Meier, Sebastian; Fischer, Michael; Eder, Peter; Xie, Edwar; Fedorov, Kirill G.; Menzel, Edwin P.; Marx, Achim; Gross, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    We present a systematic analysis of the internal losses of superconducting coplanar waveguide microwave resonators based on niobium thin films on silicon substrates. In particular, we investigate losses introduced by Nb/Al interfaces in the center conductor, which is important for experiments where Al based Josephson junctions are integrated into Nb based circuits. We find that these interfaces can be a strong source for two-level state (TLS) losses, when the interfaces are not positioned at current nodes of the resonator. In addition to TLS losses, for resonators including Al, quasiparticle losses become relevant above 200 mK. Finally, we investigate how losses generated by eddy currents in conductive material on the backside of the substrate can be minimized by using thick enough substrates or metals with high conductivity on the substrate backside.

  10. Study of high [Tc] superconducting thin films grown by MOCVD

    SciTech Connect

    Erbil, A.

    1990-01-01

    Work is described briefly, which was carried out on development of techniques to grow metal-semiconductor superlattices (artificially layered materials) and on the copper oxide based susperconductors (naturally layered materials). The current growth technique utilized is metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). CdTe, PbTe, La, LaTe, and Bi[sub 2]Te[sub 3] were deposited, mostly on GaAs. Several YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7] compounds were obtained with possible superconductivity at temperatures up to 550 K (1 part in 10[sup 4]). YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7[minus]x] and Tl[sub 2]CaBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 2]O[sub y] thin films were deposited by MOCVD on common substrates such as glass.

  11. Highly textured oxypnictide superconducting thin films on metal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, Kazumasa; Kurth, Fritz; Chihara, Masashi; Sumiya, Naoki; Grinenko, Vadim; Ichinose, Ataru; Tsukada, Ichiro; Hänisch, Jens; Matias, Vladimir; Hatano, Takafumi; Holzapfel, Bernhard; Ikuta, Hiroshi

    2014-10-01

    Highly textured NdFeAs(O,F) thin films have been grown on ion beam assisted deposition-MgO/Y2O3/Hastelloy substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. The oxypnictide coated conductors showed a superconducting transition temperature (Tc) of 43 K with a self-field critical current density (Jc) of 7.0 × 10 4 A / cm 2 at 5 K, more than 20 times higher than powder-in-tube processed SmFeAs(O,F) wires. Albeit higher Tc as well as better crystalline quality than Co-doped BaFe2As2 coated conductors, in-field Jc of NdFeAs(O,F) was lower than that of Co-doped BaFe2As2. These results suggest that grain boundaries in oxypnictides reduce Jc significantly compared to that in Co-doped BaFe2As2 and, hence biaxial texture is necessary for high Jc.

  12. Method of forming superconducting Tl-Ba-Ca-Cu-O films

    DOEpatents

    Wessels, Bruce W.; Marks, Tobin J.; Richeson, Darrin S.; Tonge, Lauren M.; Zhang, Jiming

    1993-01-01

    A method of forming a superconducting Tl-Ba-Ca-Cu-O film is disclosed, which comprises depositing a Ba-Ca-Cu-O film on a substrate by MOCVD, annealing the deposited film and heat-treating the annealed film in a closed circular vessel with TlBa.sub.2 Ca.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x and cooling to form said superconducting film of TlO.sub.m Ba.sub.2 Ca.sub.n-1 Cu.sub.n O.sub.2n+2, wherein m=1,2 and n=1,2,3.

  13. Studies of the Superconducting Transition in the Mo/Au-Bilayer Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadleir, John; Smith, Stephen; Iyomoto, naoko; Bandler, Simon; Chervenak, Jay; Brown, Ari; Brekowsky, Regis; Kilbourne, Caroline; Robinson, Ian

    2007-01-01

    At NASA Goddard, microcalorimeter arrays using superconducting transition edge sensor thermometers (TESs) are under development for high energy resolution X-ray astrophysics applications. We report on our studies of the superconducting transition in our Mo/Au-bilayer TES films including: low current measurements of the superconducting bilayer's resistance transition versus temperature on pixels with different normal metal absorber attachment designs and measured temperature scaling of the critical current and critical magnetic field.

  14. Charge storage phenomenon derived from composition redistribution for single Hf0.8Si0.2Ox film after high-temperature treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhenjie; Li, Rong; Zhang, Xiwei; Hu, Dan

    2016-05-01

    Simple metal-Hf0.8Si0.2Ox-silicon capacitors have been fabricated. It is observed that the capacitor after high-temperature rapid thermal annealing treatment exhibits a significant charge storage phenomenon, with large hysteresis windows of 3.93 V in a ±8 V gate sweeping voltage range, faster operating speed and good data retention characteristics. The occurrence of charge memory should be attributed to the high-temperature treatment, which gives rise to the HfO2 crystallization and elemental composition redistribution in the Hf0.8Si0.2Ox film, forming a typical metal-oxide-high-κ-oxide-silicon memory structure. Therefore, the high-temperature treatment that induced the internal structure transformation is an appealing approach, and provides a guide for future charge-trap memory design.

  15. Unconventional superconductivity in ultrathin superconducting NbN films studied by scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noat, Y.; Cherkez, V.; Brun, C.; Cren, T.; Carbillet, C.; Debontridder, F.; Ilin, K.; Siegel, M.; Semenov, A.; Hübers, H.-W.; Roditchev, D.

    2013-07-01

    Using scanning tunneling spectroscopy, we address the problem of the superconductor-insulator phase transition in homogeneously disordered ultrathin (2-15 nm) films of NbN. Samples thicker than 8 nm, for which the Ioffe-Regel parameter kFl≥5.6, manifest a conventional superconductivity: a spatially homogeneous BCS-like gap, vanishing at the critical temperature, and a disordered vortex lattice in magnetic field. Upon thickness reduction, however, while kFl lowers, the STS reveals striking deviations from the BCS scenario, among which a progressive decrease of the coherence peak height and small spatial inhomogeneities. In addition, the gap below TC develops on a spectral background, which becomes more and more “V-shaped” approaching the localization. The thinnest film (2.16 nm), while not being exactly at the superconductor-insulator transition (SIT) (TC≈0.4TCbulk), showed unconventional signatures such as the vanishing of the coherence peaks and the absence of vortices. This behavior suggests a weakening of long-range phase coherence, when approaching the SIT in this quasi-2D limit.

  16. High temperature superconductor materials and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doane, George B., III. (Editor); Banks, Curtis; Golben, John

    1991-01-01

    One of the areas concerned itself with the investigation of the phenomena involved in formulating and making in the laboratory new and better superconductor material with enhanced values of critical current and temperature. Of special interest were the chemistry, physical processes, and environment required to attain these enhanced desirable characteristics. The other area concerned itself with producing high temperature superconducting thin films by pulsed laser deposition techniques. Such films are potentially very useful in the detection of very low power signals. To perform this research high vacuum is required. In the course of this effort, older vacuum chambers were maintained and used. In addition, a new facility is being brought on line. This latter activity has been replete with the usual problems of bringing a new facility into service. Some of the problems are covered in the main body of this report.

  17. Superconducting thin films of (100) and (111) oriented indium doped topological crystalline insulator SnTe

    SciTech Connect

    Si, W.; Zhang, C.; Wu, L.; Ozaki, T.; Gu, G.; Li, Q.

    2015-09-01

    Recent discovery of the topological crystalline insulator SnTe has triggered a search for topological superconductors, which have potential application to topological quantum computing. The present work reports on the superconducting properties of indium doped SnTe thin films. The (100) and (111) oriented thin films were epitaxially grown by pulsed-laser deposition on (100) and (111) BaF2 crystalline substrates respectively. The onset superconducting transition temperatures are about 3.8 K for (100) and 3.6 K for (111) orientations, slightly lower than that of the bulk. Magneto-resistive measurements indicate that these thin films may have upper critical fields higher than that of the bulk. With large surface-to-bulk ratio, superconducting indium doped SnTe thin films provide a rich platform for the study of topological superconductivity and potential device applications based on topological superconductors.

  18. Superconducting thin films of (100) and (111) oriented indium doped topological crystalline insulator SnTe

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Si, W.; Zhang, C.; Wu, L.; Ozaki, T.; Gu, G.; Li, Q.

    2015-09-01

    Recent discovery of the topological crystalline insulator SnTe has triggered a search for topological superconductors, which have potential application to topological quantum computing. The present work reports on the superconducting properties of indium doped SnTe thin films. The (100) and (111) oriented thin films were epitaxially grown by pulsed-laser deposition on (100) and (111) BaF2 crystalline substrates respectively. The onset superconducting transition temperatures are about 3.8 K for (100) and 3.6 K for (111) orientations, slightly lower than that of the bulk. Magneto-resistive measurements indicate that these thin films may have upper critical fields higher than that of the bulk.more » With large surface-to-bulk ratio, superconducting indium doped SnTe thin films provide a rich platform for the study of topological superconductivity and potential device applications based on topological superconductors.« less

  19. Superconducting thin films of (100) and (111) oriented indium doped topological crystalline insulator SnTe

    SciTech Connect

    Si, Weidong E-mail: qiangli@bnl.gov; Zhang, Cheng; Wu, Lijun; Ozaki, Toshinori; Gu, Genda; Li, Qiang E-mail: qiangli@bnl.gov

    2015-08-31

    Recent discovery of the topological crystalline insulator SnTe has triggered a search for topological superconductors, which have potential application to topological quantum computing. The present work reports on the superconducting properties of indium doped SnTe thin films. The (100) and (111) oriented thin films were epitaxially grown by pulsed-laser deposition on (100) and (111) BaF{sub 2} crystalline substrates, respectively. The onset superconducting transition temperatures are about 3.8 K for (100) and 3.6 K for (111) orientations, slightly lower than that of the bulk. Magneto-resistive measurements indicate that these thin films may have upper critical fields higher than that of the bulk. With large surface-to-bulk ratio, superconducting indium doped SnTe thin films provide a rich platform for the study of topological superconductivity and potential device applications based on topological superconductors.

  20. High temperature-dependent imprint and switching mechanism of poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) copolymer ultrathin films with electroactive interlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiuli; Du, Xiaoli; Liu, Changli; Ji, Xin; Xu, Haisheng

    2015-01-01

    The imprint and switching behaviors at high temperature have been systematically investigated through the study on the poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE)) films without and with in-situ synthesized poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene)-poly(styrene sulfonic) acid, poly(vinyl phosphonic) acid (PVPA), and copper-phthalocyanine as interlayers. The lower imprint rate and the faster switching speed are observed for the sample with PVPA as interlayer even after 107 cycles at 60 °C. Combined with the results for the imprint and switching behaviors at room temperature, the temperature-dependent imprint and switching mechanisms for different electroactive interlayers in this system are proposed. Therefore, the optimum protocol could be designed for FeRAM based on P(VDF-TrFE) film, which would be in favor of the performance and the service life of the related ferroelectric devices even at high temperature.