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Sample records for high-throughput microarray applications

  1. Microengineering Methods for Cell Based Microarrays and High-Throughput Drug Screening Applications

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Wu, JinHui; Wang, ShuQi; Durmus, Naside Gozde; Gurkan, Umut Atakan; Demirci, Utkan

    2011-01-01

    Screening for effective therapeutic agents from millions of drug candidates is costly, time-consuming and often face ethical concerns due to extensive use of animals. To improve cost-effectiveness, and to minimize animal testing in pharmaceutical research, in vitro monolayer cell microarrays with multiwell plate assays have been developed. Integration of cell microarrays with microfluidic systems have facilitated automated and controlled component loading, significantly reducing the consumption of the candidate compounds and the target cells. Even though these methods significantly increased the throughput compared to conventional in vitro testing systems and in vivo animal models, the cost associated with these platforms remains prohibitively high. Besides, there is a need for three-dimensional (3D) cell based drug-screening models, which can mimic the in vivo microenvironment and the functionality of the native tissues. Here, we present the state-of-the-art microengineering approaches that can be used to develop 3D cell based drug screening assays. We highlight the 3D in vitro cell culture systems with live cell-based arrays, microfluidic cell culture systems, and their application to high-throughput drug screening. We conclude that among the emerging microengineering approaches, bioprinting holds a great potential to provide repeatable 3D cell based constructs with high temporal, spatial control and versatility. PMID:21725152

  2. Analysis of High-Throughput ELISA Microarray Data

    SciTech Connect

    White, Amanda M.; Daly, Don S.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2011-02-23

    Our research group develops analytical methods and software for the high-throughput analysis of quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarrays. ELISA microarrays differ from DNA microarrays in several fundamental aspects and most algorithms for analysis of DNA microarray data are not applicable to ELISA microarrays. In this review, we provide an overview of the steps involved in ELISA microarray data analysis and how the statistically sound algorithms we have developed provide an integrated software suite to address the needs of each data-processing step. The algorithms discussed are available in a set of open-source software tools (http://www.pnl.gov/statistics/ProMAT).

  3. High-Throughput Enzyme Kinetics Using Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Guoxin Lu; Edward S. Yeung

    2007-11-01

    We report a microanalytical method to study enzyme kinetics. The technique involves immobilizing horseradish peroxidase on a poly-L-lysine (PLL)- coated glass slide in a microarray format, followed by applying substrate solution onto the enzyme microarray. Enzyme molecules are immobilized on the PLL-coated glass slide through electrostatic interactions, and no further modification of the enzyme or glass slide is needed. In situ detection of the products generated on the enzyme spots is made possible by monitoring the light intensity of each spot using a scientific-grade charged-coupled device (CCD). Reactions of substrate solutions of various types and concentrations can be carried out sequentially on one enzyme microarray. To account for the loss of enzyme from washing in between runs, a standard substrate solution is used for calibration. Substantially reduced amounts of substrate solution are consumed for each reaction on each enzyme spot. The Michaelis constant K{sub m} obtained by using this method is comparable to the result for homogeneous solutions. Absorbance detection allows universal monitoring, and no chemical modification of the substrate is needed. High-throughput studies of native enzyme kinetics for multiple enzymes are therefore possible in a simple, rapid, and low-cost manner.

  4. Printing Proteins as Microarrays for High-Throughput Function Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacBeath, Gavin; Schreiber, Stuart L.

    2000-09-01

    Systematic efforts are currently under way to construct defined sets of cloned genes for high-throughput expression and purification of recombinant proteins. To facilitate subsequent studies of protein function, we have developed miniaturized assays that accommodate extremely low sample volumes and enable the rapid, simultaneous processing of thousands of proteins. A high-precision robot designed to manufacture complementary DNA microarrays was used to spot proteins onto chemically derivatized glass slides at extremely high spatial densities. The proteins attached covalently to the slide surface yet retained their ability to interact specifically with other proteins, or with small molecules, in solution. Three applications for protein microarrays were demonstrated: screening for protein-protein interactions, identifying the substrates of protein kinases, and identifying the protein targets of small molecules.

  5. Polymer Microarrays for High Throughput Discovery of Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Hook, Andrew L.; Chang, Chien-Yi; Yang, Jing; Scurr, David J.; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.; Atkinson, Steve; Williams, Paul; Davies, Martyn C.; Alexander, Morgan R.

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of novel biomaterials that are optimized for a specific biological application is readily achieved using polymer microarrays, which allows a combinatorial library of materials to be screened in a parallel, high throughput format1. Herein is described the formation and characterization of a polymer microarray using an on-chip photopolymerization technique 2. This involves mixing monomers at varied ratios to produce a library of monomer solutions, transferring the solution to a glass slide format using a robotic printing device and curing with UV irradiation. This format is readily amenable to many biological assays, including stem cell attachment and proliferation, cell sorting and low bacterial adhesion, allowing the ready identification of 'hit' materials that fulfill a specific biological criterion3-5. Furthermore, the use of high throughput surface characterization (HTSC) allows the biological performance to be correlated with physio-chemical properties, hence elucidating the biological-material interaction6. HTSC makes use of water contact angle (WCA) measurements, atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). In particular, ToF-SIMS provides a chemically rich analysis of the sample that can be used to correlate the cell response with a molecular moiety. In some cases, the biological performance can be predicted from the ToF-SIMS spectra, demonstrating the chemical dependence of a biological-material interaction, and informing the development of hit materials5,3. PMID:22314927

  6. High throughput screening of starch structures using carbohydrate microarrays.

    PubMed

    Tanackovic, Vanja; Rydahl, Maja Gro; Pedersen, Henriette Lodberg; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Shaik, Shahnoor Sultana; Mikkelsen, Maria Dalgaard; Krunic, Susanne Langgaard; Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik; Willats, William George Tycho; Blennow, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    In this study we introduce the starch-recognising carbohydrate binding module family 20 (CBM20) from Aspergillus niger for screening biological variations in starch molecular structure using high throughput carbohydrate microarray technology. Defined linear, branched and phosphorylated maltooligosaccharides, pure starch samples including a variety of different structures with variations in the amylopectin branching pattern, amylose content and phosphate content, enzymatically modified starches and glycogen were included. Using this technique, different important structures, including amylose content and branching degrees could be differentiated in a high throughput fashion. The screening method was validated using transgenic barley grain analysed during development and subjected to germination. Typically, extreme branching or linearity were detected less than normal starch structures. The method offers the potential for rapidly analysing resistant and slowly digested dietary starches. PMID:27468930

  7. High throughput screening of starch structures using carbohydrate microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Tanackovic, Vanja; Rydahl, Maja Gro; Pedersen, Henriette Lodberg; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Shaik, Shahnoor Sultana; Mikkelsen, Maria Dalgaard; Krunic, Susanne Langgaard; Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik; Willats, William George Tycho; Blennow, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    In this study we introduce the starch-recognising carbohydrate binding module family 20 (CBM20) from Aspergillus niger for screening biological variations in starch molecular structure using high throughput carbohydrate microarray technology. Defined linear, branched and phosphorylated maltooligosaccharides, pure starch samples including a variety of different structures with variations in the amylopectin branching pattern, amylose content and phosphate content, enzymatically modified starches and glycogen were included. Using this technique, different important structures, including amylose content and branching degrees could be differentiated in a high throughput fashion. The screening method was validated using transgenic barley grain analysed during development and subjected to germination. Typically, extreme branching or linearity were detected less than normal starch structures. The method offers the potential for rapidly analysing resistant and slowly digested dietary starches. PMID:27468930

  8. From High-Throughput Microarray-Based Screening to Clinical Application: The Development of a Second Generation Multigene Test for Breast Cancer Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Brase, Jan C.; Kronenwett, Ralf; Petry, Christoph; Denkert, Carsten; Schmidt, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Several multigene tests have been developed for breast cancer patients to predict the individual risk of recurrence. Most of the first generation tests rely on proliferation-associated genes and are commonly carried out in central reference laboratories. Here, we describe the development of a second generation multigene assay, the EndoPredict test, a prognostic multigene expression test for estrogen receptor (ER) positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2) negative (ER+/HER2−) breast cancer patients. The EndoPredict gene signature was initially established in a large high-throughput microarray-based screening study. The key steps for biomarker identification are discussed in detail, in comparison to the establishment of other multigene signatures. After biomarker selection, genes and algorithms were transferred to a diagnostic platform (reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR)) to allow for assaying formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples. A comprehensive analytical validation was performed and a prospective proficiency testing study with seven pathological laboratories finally proved that EndoPredict can be reliably used in the decentralized setting. Three independent large clinical validation studies (n = 2,257) demonstrated that EndoPredict offers independent prognostic information beyond current clinicopathological parameters and clinical guidelines. The review article summarizes several important steps that should be considered for the development process of a second generation multigene test and offers a means for transferring a microarray signature from the research laboratory to clinical practice.

  9. High-Throughput Analysis of Serum Antigens Using Sandwich ELISAs on Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Servoss, Shannon; Gonzalez, Rachel M.; Varnum, Susan M.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2009-05-11

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarrays promise to be a powerful tool for the detection and validation of disease biomarkers. ELISA microarrays are capable of simultaneous detection of many proteins using a small sample volume. Although there are many potential pitfalls to the use of ELISA microarrays, these can be avoided by careful planning of experiments. In this chapter we describe a high-throughput protocol for processing ELISA microarrays that will result in reliable and reproducible data.

  10. High-throughput allogeneic antibody detection using protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Paul, Jed; Sahaf, Bita; Perloff, Spenser; Schoenrock, Kelsi; Wu, Fang; Nakasone, Hideki; Coller, John; Miklos, David

    2016-05-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) have traditionally been used to detect alloantibodies in patient plasma samples post hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT); however, protein microarrays have the potential to be multiplexed, more sensitive, and higher throughput than ELISAs. Here, we describe the development of a novel and sensitive microarray method for detection of allogeneic antibodies against minor histocompatibility antigens encoded on the Y chromosome, called HY antigens. Six microarray surfaces were tested for their ability to bind recombinant protein and peptide HY antigens. Significant allogeneic immune responses were determined in male patients with female donors by considering normal male donor responses as baseline. HY microarray results were also compared with our previous ELISA results. Our overall goal was to maximize antibody detection for both recombinant protein and peptide epitopes. For detection of HY antigens, the Epoxy (Schott) protein microarray surface was both most sensitive and reliable and has become the standard surface in our microarray platform. PMID:26902899

  11. A high-throughput, precipitating colorimetric sandwich ELISA microarray for shiga toxins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shiga toxins 1 and 2 (Stx1 and Stx2) from Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) bacteria were simultaneously detected with a newly developed, high-throughput antibody microarray platform. The proteinaceous toxins were immobilized and sandwiched between biorecognition elements (monoclonal antibodies)...

  12. Self-Assembled Cell Microarray (SAMcell) for High-Throughput RNAi Screening.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanshuo; Li, Juan

    2016-01-01

    RNAi has now become a valuable research tool for cell-based high-throughput screening. However, traditional RNAi high-throughput methods are based on multi-well plates, relying on expensive instruments and complicated operations. In this chapter, we describe a method termed self-assembled cell microarray (SAMcell), which integrates micro-fabrication, reverse transfection, and RNAi technologies and allows for cell behavior investigations to be performed directly on the cell chip. This method has been successfully employed to perform large-scale functional screening assays to identify gene modulators of cell migration, cell proliferation, and cellular apoptosis. PMID:27581287

  13. GLEAMS: a novel approach to high-throughput genetic microarray image capture and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zheng Z.; Stein, Jaime A.; Ji, Qien Z.

    2001-06-01

    GLEAMS is a robust, stable and accurate image capture and quantification method for microarrays. It is capable of fully and automatically detecting and quantifying the expression spots. This can be done in a batch mode, without human intervention, achieving a high throughput of parallel data processing. Simple to use visual tools are provided to estimate parameters and to submit, monitor and control jobs execution. The un-supervised batch auto-alignment is based on a novel method requiring only knowledge of the number of rows and columns of dots in the array. Distances between dots along rows and columns are estimated from the image's auto- correlation function. This is also used to align the array and the sides of the image. Applying intensity and geometric constraints to the cross-correlation function between the image and a template sub-array, the location of the sub-arrays can be determined. Carefully implemented, the algorithm can approach human vision in its sensitivity and accuracy in finding the general positions of dots in a micro-array image. Subsequent spot quantification uses Ostu's thresholding method followed by some morphological operations, including the application of a constraining shape mask. Segmentation techniques are applied to detect and remove speckles from the targets and to ensure the veracity of the data extracted.

  14. Quantifying protein–protein interactions in high throughput using protein domain microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Kaushansky, Alexis; Allen, John E; Gordus, Andrew; Stiffler, Michael A; Karp, Ethan S; Chang, Bryan H; MacBeath, Gavin

    2011-01-01

    Protein microarrays provide an efficient way to identify and quantify protein–protein interactions in high throughput. One drawback of this technique is that proteins show a broad range of physicochemical properties and are often difficult to produce recombinantly. To circumvent these problems, we have focused on families of protein interaction domains. Here we provide protocols for constructing microarrays of protein interaction domains in individual wells of 96-well microtiter plates, and for quantifying domain–peptide interactions in high throughput using fluorescently labeled synthetic peptides. As specific examples, we will describe the construction of microarrays of virtually every human Src homology 2 (SH2) and phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domain, as well as microarrays of mouse PDZ domains, all produced recombinantly in Escherichia coli. For domains that mediate high-affinity interactions, such as SH2 and PTB domains, equilibrium dissociation constants (KDs) for their peptide ligands can be measured directly on arrays by obtaining saturation binding curves. For weaker binding domains, such as PDZ domains, arrays are best used to identify candidate interactions, which are then retested and quantified by fluorescence polarization. Overall, protein domain microarrays provide the ability to rapidly identify and quantify protein–ligand interactions with minimal sample consumption. Because entire domain families can be interrogated simultaneously, they provide a powerful way to assess binding selectivity on a proteome-wide scale and provide an unbiased perspective on the connectivity of protein–protein interaction networks. PMID:20360771

  15. A New Versatile Microarray-based Method for High Throughput Screening of Carbohydrate-active Enzymes*

    PubMed Central

    Vidal-Melgosa, Silvia; Pedersen, Henriette L.; Schückel, Julia; Arnal, Grégory; Dumon, Claire; Amby, Daniel B.; Monrad, Rune Nygaard; Westereng, Bjørge; Willats, William G. T.

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate-active enzymes have multiple biological roles and industrial applications. Advances in genome and transcriptome sequencing together with associated bioinformatics tools have identified vast numbers of putative carbohydrate-degrading and -modifying enzymes including glycoside hydrolases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. However, there is a paucity of methods for rapidly screening the activities of these enzymes. By combining the multiplexing capacity of carbohydrate microarrays with the specificity of molecular probes, we have developed a sensitive, high throughput, and versatile semiquantitative enzyme screening technique that requires low amounts of enzyme and substrate. The method can be used to assess the activities of single enzymes, enzyme mixtures, and crude culture broths against single substrates, substrate mixtures, and biomass samples. Moreover, we show that the technique can be used to analyze both endo-acting and exo-acting glycoside hydrolases, polysaccharide lyases, carbohydrate esterases, and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. We demonstrate the potential of the technique by identifying the substrate specificities of purified uncharacterized enzymes and by screening enzyme activities from fungal culture broths. PMID:25657012

  16. A new versatile microarray-based method for high throughput screening of carbohydrate-active enzymes.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Melgosa, Silvia; Pedersen, Henriette L; Schückel, Julia; Arnal, Grégory; Dumon, Claire; Amby, Daniel B; Monrad, Rune Nygaard; Westereng, Bjørge; Willats, William G T

    2015-04-01

    Carbohydrate-active enzymes have multiple biological roles and industrial applications. Advances in genome and transcriptome sequencing together with associated bioinformatics tools have identified vast numbers of putative carbohydrate-degrading and -modifying enzymes including glycoside hydrolases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. However, there is a paucity of methods for rapidly screening the activities of these enzymes. By combining the multiplexing capacity of carbohydrate microarrays with the specificity of molecular probes, we have developed a sensitive, high throughput, and versatile semiquantitative enzyme screening technique that requires low amounts of enzyme and substrate. The method can be used to assess the activities of single enzymes, enzyme mixtures, and crude culture broths against single substrates, substrate mixtures, and biomass samples. Moreover, we show that the technique can be used to analyze both endo-acting and exo-acting glycoside hydrolases, polysaccharide lyases, carbohydrate esterases, and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. We demonstrate the potential of the technique by identifying the substrate specificities of purified uncharacterized enzymes and by screening enzyme activities from fungal culture broths. PMID:25657012

  17. Multipurpose high-throughput filtering microarrays (HiFi) for DNA and protein assays.

    PubMed

    Le Goff, Gaelle C; Desmet, Cloé; Brès, Jean-Charles; Rigal, Dominique; Blum, Loïc J; Marquette, Christophe A

    2010-12-15

    We are reporting here a low cost colorimetric device for high-throughput multiplexed blood group genotyping and allergy diagnosis, displayed as an automated 96-well microtiter plate format. A porous polymeric membrane sealed at the bottom of each well accounts for the sensor support. For each sensing unit, a 6×6 matrix of specific probes is spotted on the external surface of the membrane resulting in 5 mm(2) microarrays. Thanks to the membrane porosity, reagents dispensed into the well can be eliminated through vacuum soaking. This unusual design drastically reduces the assay background signal. The system was first validated on robust models composed of either two complementary oligonucleotide sequences or one allergen/specific rabbit IgG pair. The quality of both oligonucleotide and protein immobilisation on the membrane substrate was then demonstrated together with the capacity to use the arrayed biomolecules as probes for the quantitative detection of specific targets (respectively complementary oligonucleotide and specific antibody). On the basis of these good results, two multiplex assays were developed for crude biological samples testing, focussing on two human in vitro diagnosis applications: a hybridisation assay for multiplex blood group genotyping and a multiparametric immunoassay for allergy diagnosis. In both cases, the transfer to crude biological samples testing was successful i.e. high signal to noise ratio of the stained membranes, reproducibility and good correlation with results obtained using routine testing procedures. PMID:20663657

  18. Chromosomal microarray analysis, or comparative genomic hybridization: A high throughput approach

    PubMed Central

    Haeri, Mohammad; Gelowani, Violet; Beaudet, Arthur L.

    2015-01-01

    Pathological copy number variants (CNVs) and point mutations are major genetic causes of hundreds of disorders. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) also known as chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) is the best available tool to detect copy number variations in chromosomal make up. We have optimized several different protocols and introduce a high-throughput approach to perform a cost-effective, fast, high-throughput and high-quality CMA. We managed to reach to high quality arrays with 17 ± 0.04 (mean ± SD, n = 90) Derivative Log Ratio (DLR) spread, a measure of array quality (<0.20 considered as excellent) for our arrays. High-throughput and high-quality arrays are gaining more attention and the current manuscript is a step forward to this increasing demand.•This manuscript introduces a low cost, fast, efficient, high throughput and high-quality aCGH protocol;•This protocol provides specific instructions and crucial detail for processing up to 24 slides which is equal to 48, 96, or 192 arrays by only one person in one day;•This manuscript is accompanied with a step-by-step video. PMID:26862485

  19. Transfection microarrays for high-throughput phenotypic screening of genes involved in cell migration.

    PubMed

    Onuki-Nagasaki, Reiko; Nagasaki, Akira; Hakamada, Kazumi; Uyeda, Taro Q P; Fujita, Satoshi; Miyake, Masato; Miyake, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Cell migration is important in several biological phenomena, such as cancer metastasis. Therefore, the identification of genes involved in cell migration might facilitate the discovery of antimetastatic drugs. However, screening of genes by the current methods can be complicated by factors related to cell stimulation, for example, abolition of contact inhibition and the release inflammatory cytokines from wounded cells during examinations of wound healing in vitro. To overcome these problems and identify genes involved in cell migration, in this chapter we describe the use of transfection microarrays for high-throughput phenotypic screening. PMID:20387151

  20. High-throughput identification of proteins with AMPylation using self-assembled human protein (NAPPA) microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaobo; LaBaer, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Summary AMPylation (adenylylation) has been recognized as an important post translational modification employed by pathogens to regulate host cellular proteins and their associated signaling pathways. AMPylation has potential functions in various cellular processes and is widely conserved across both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. However, despite the identification of many AMPylators, relatively few candidate substrates of AMPylation are known. This is changing with the recent development of a robust and reliable method to identify new substrates using protein microarrays, which can significantly expand the list of potential substrates. Here, we describe procedures to detect AMPylated and auto-AMPylated proteins in a sensitive, high throughput, and non-radioactive manner. The approach employs high-density protein microarrays fabricated using NAPPA (Nucleic Acid Programmable Protein Arrays) technology, which enables the highly successful display of fresh recombinant human proteins in situ. The modification of target proteins is determined via copper-catalyzed azide–alkyne cycloaddition. The assay can be accomplished within 11 hours. PMID:25881200

  1. Development of a high-throughput microfluidic integrated microarray for the detection of chimeric bioweapons.

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppod, Timothy; Satterfield, Brent; Hukari, Kyle W.; West, Jason A. A.; Hux, Gary A.

    2006-10-01

    The advancement of DNA cloning has significantly augmented the potential threat of a focused bioweapon assault, such as a terrorist attack. With current DNA cloning techniques, toxin genes from the most dangerous (but environmentally labile) bacterial or viral organism can now be selected and inserted into robust organism to produce an infinite number of deadly chimeric bioweapons. In order to neutralize such a threat, accurate detection of the expressed toxin genes, rather than classification on strain or genealogical decent of these organisms, is critical. The development of a high-throughput microarray approach will enable the detection of unknowns chimeric bioweapons. The development of a high-throughput microarray approach will enable the detection of unknown bioweapons. We have developed a unique microfluidic approach to capture and concentrate these threat genes (mRNA's) upto a 30 fold concentration. These captured oligonucleotides can then be used to synthesize in situ oligonucleotide copies (cDNA probes) of the captured genes. An integrated microfluidic architecture will enable us to control flows of reagents, perform clean-up steps and finally elute nanoliter volumes of synthesized oligonucleotides probes. The integrated approach has enabled a process where chimeric or conventional bioweapons can rapidly be identified based on their toxic function, rather than being restricted to information that may not identify the critical nature of the threat.

  2. High-Throughput Nano-Biofilm Microarray for Antifungal Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Anand; Leung, Kai P.; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L.; Ramasubramanian, Anand K.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Micro- and nanoscale technologies have radically transformed biological research from genomics to tissue engineering, with the relative exception of microbial cell culture, which is still largely performed in microtiter plates and petri dishes. Here, we present nanoscale culture of the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans on a microarray platform. The microarray consists of 1,200 individual cultures of 30 nl of C. albicans biofilms (“nano-biofilms”) encapsulated in an inert alginate matrix. We demonstrate that these nano-biofilms are similar to conventional macroscopic biofilms in their morphological, architectural, growth, and phenotypic characteristics. We also demonstrate that the nano-biofilm microarray is a robust and efficient tool for accelerating the drug discovery process: (i) combinatorial screening against a collection of 28 antifungal compounds in the presence of immunosuppressant FK506 (tacrolimus) identified six drugs that showed synergistic antifungal activity, and (ii) screening against the NCI challenge set small-molecule library identified three heretofore-unknown hits. This cell-based microarray platform allows for miniaturization of microbial cell culture and is fully compatible with other high-throughput screening technologies. PMID:23800397

  3. Chipster: user-friendly analysis software for microarray and other high-throughput data

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The growth of high-throughput technologies such as microarrays and next generation sequencing has been accompanied by active research in data analysis methodology, producing new analysis methods at a rapid pace. While most of the newly developed methods are freely available, their use requires substantial computational skills. In order to enable non-programming biologists to benefit from the method development in a timely manner, we have created the Chipster software. Results Chipster (http://chipster.csc.fi/) brings a powerful collection of data analysis methods within the reach of bioscientists via its intuitive graphical user interface. Users can analyze and integrate different data types such as gene expression, miRNA and aCGH. The analysis functionality is complemented with rich interactive visualizations, allowing users to select datapoints and create new gene lists based on these selections. Importantly, users can save the performed analysis steps as reusable, automatic workflows, which can also be shared with other users. Being a versatile and easily extendable platform, Chipster can be used for microarray, proteomics and sequencing data. In this article we describe its comprehensive collection of analysis and visualization tools for microarray data using three case studies. Conclusions Chipster is a user-friendly analysis software for high-throughput data. Its intuitive graphical user interface enables biologists to access a powerful collection of data analysis and integration tools, and to visualize data interactively. Users can collaborate by sharing analysis sessions and workflows. Chipster is open source, and the server installation package is freely available. PMID:21999641

  4. Autoantigen Microarray for High-throughput Autoantibody Profiling in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Honglin; Luo, Hui; Yan, Mei; Zuo, Xiaoxia; Li, Quan-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies to a broad range of self-antigens. Profiling the autoantibody repertoire using array-based technology has emerged as a powerful tool for the identification of biomarkers in SLE and other autoimmune diseases. Proteomic microarray has the capacity to hold large number of self-antigens on a solid surface and serve as a high-throughput screening method for the determination of autoantibody specificities. The autoantigen arrays carrying a wide variety of self-antigens, such as cell nuclear components (nucleic acids and associated proteins), cytoplasmic proteins, phospholipid proteins, cell matrix proteins, mucosal/secreted proteins, glomeruli, and other tissue-specific proteins, have been used for screening of autoantibody specificities associated with different manifestations of SLE. Arrays containing synthetic peptides and molecular modified proteins are also being utilized for identification of autoantibodies targeting to special antigenic epitopes. Different isotypes of autoantibodies, including IgG, IgM, IgA, and IgE, as well as other Ig subtypes, can be detected simultaneously with multi-color labeled secondary antibodies. Serum and plasma are the most common biologic materials for autoantibody detection, but other body fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid, synovial fluid, and saliva can also be a source of autoantibody detection. Proteomic microarray as a multiplexed high-throughput screening platform is playing an increasingly-important role in autoantibody diagnostics. In this article, we highlight the use of autoantigen microarrays for autoantibody exploration in SLE. PMID:26415621

  5. Phenotype MicroArrays for High-Throughput Phenotypic Testing and Assay of Gene Function

    PubMed Central

    Bochner, Barry R.; Gadzinski, Peter; Panomitros, Eugenia

    2001-01-01

    The bacterium Escherichia coli is used as a model cellular system to test and validate a new technology called Phenotype MicroArrays (PMs). PM technology is a high-throughput technology for simultaneous testing of a large number of cellular phenotypes. It consists of preconfigured well arrays in which each well tests a different cellular phenotype and an automated instrument that continuously monitors and records the response of the cells in all wells of the arrays. For example, nearly 700 phenotypes of E. coli can be assayed by merely pipetting a cell suspension into seven microplate arrays. PMs can be used to directly assay the effects of genetic changes on cells, especially gene knock-outs. Here, we provide data on phenotypic analysis of six strains and show that we can detect expected phenotypes as well as, in some cases, unexpected phenotypes. PMID:11435407

  6. High-throughput isotopic analysis of RNA microarrays to quantify microbial resource use

    PubMed Central

    Mayali, Xavier; Weber, Peter K; Brodie, Eoin L; Mabery, Shalini; Hoeprich, Paul D; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Most microorganisms remain uncultivated, and typically their ecological roles must be inferred from diversity and genomic studies. To directly measure functional roles of uncultivated microbes, we developed Chip-stable isotope probing (SIP), a high-sensitivity, high-throughput SIP method performed on a phylogenetic microarray (chip). This approach consists of microbial community incubations with isotopically labeled substrates, hybridization of the extracted community rRNA to a microarray and measurement of isotope incorporation—and therefore substrate use—by secondary ion mass spectrometer imaging (NanoSIMS). Laboratory experiments demonstrated that Chip-SIP can detect isotopic enrichment of 0.5 atom % 13C and 0.1 atom % 15N, thus permitting experiments with short incubation times and low substrate concentrations. We applied Chip-SIP analysis to a natural estuarine community and quantified amino acid, nucleic acid or fatty acid incorporation by 81 distinct microbial taxa, thus demonstrating that resource partitioning occurs with relatively simple organic substrates. The Chip-SIP approach expands the repertoire of stable isotope-enabled methods available to microbial ecologists and provides a means to test genomics-generated hypotheses about biogeochemical function in any natural environment. PMID:22158395

  7. High-throughput identification of proteins with AMPylation using self-assembled human protein (NAPPA) microarrays.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaobo; LaBaer, Joshua

    2015-05-01

    AMPylation (adenylylation) has been recognized as an important post-translational modification that is used by pathogens to regulate host cellular proteins and their associated signaling pathways. AMPylation has potential functions in various cellular processes, and it is widely conserved across both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. However, despite the identification of many AMPylators, relatively few candidate substrates of AMPylation are known. This is changing with the recent development of a robust and reliable method for identifying new substrates using protein microarrays, which can markedly expand the list of potential substrates. Here we describe procedures for detecting AMPylated and auto-AMPylated proteins in a sensitive, high-throughput and nonradioactive manner. The approach uses high-density protein microarrays fabricated using nucleic acid programmable protein array (NAPPA) technology, which enables the highly successful display of fresh recombinant human proteins in situ. The modification of target proteins is determined via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC). The assay can be accomplished within 11 h. PMID:25881200

  8. A High-Throughput, Precipitating Colorimetric Sandwich ELISA Microarray for Shiga Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Gehring, Andrew; He, Xiaohua; Fratamico, Pina; Lee, Joseph; Bagi, Lori; Brewster, Jeffrey; Paoli, George; He, Yiping; Xie, Yanping; Skinner, Craig; Barnett, Charlie; Harris, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Shiga toxins 1 and 2 (Stx1 and Stx2) from Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) bacteria were simultaneously detected with a newly developed, high-throughput antibody microarray platform. The proteinaceous toxins were immobilized and sandwiched between biorecognition elements (monoclonal antibodies) and pooled horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated monoclonal antibodies. Following the reaction of HRP with the precipitating chromogenic substrate (metal enhanced 3,3-diaminobenzidine tetrahydrochloride or DAB), the formation of a colored product was quantitatively measured with an inexpensive flatbed page scanner. The colorimetric ELISA microarray was demonstrated to detect Stx1 and Stx2 at levels as low as ~4.5 ng/mL within ~2 h of total assay time with a narrow linear dynamic range of ~1–2 orders of magnitude and saturation levels well above background. Stx1 and/or Stx2 produced by various strains of STEC were also detected following the treatment of cultured cells with mitomycin C (a toxin-inducing antibiotic) and/or B-PER (a cell-disrupting, protein extraction reagent). Semi-quantitative detection of Shiga toxins was demonstrated to be sporadic among various STEC strains following incubation with mitomycin C; however, further reaction with B-PER generally resulted in the detection of or increased detection of Stx1, relative to Stx2, produced by STECs inoculated into either axenic broth culture or culture broth containing ground beef. PMID:24921195

  9. High-throughput microarray technology in diagnostics of enterobacteria based on genome-wide probe selection and regression analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Enterobacteriaceae comprise a large number of clinically relevant species with several individual subspecies. Overlapping virulence-associated gene pools and the high overall genome plasticity often interferes with correct enterobacterial strain typing and risk assessment. Array technology offers a fast, reproducible and standardisable means for bacterial typing and thus provides many advantages for bacterial diagnostics, risk assessment and surveillance. The development of highly discriminative broad-range microbial diagnostic microarrays remains a challenge, because of marked genome plasticity of many bacterial pathogens. Results We developed a DNA microarray for strain typing and detection of major antimicrobial resistance genes of clinically relevant enterobacteria. For this purpose, we applied a global genome-wide probe selection strategy on 32 available complete enterobacterial genomes combined with a regression model for pathogen classification. The discriminative power of the probe set was further tested in silico on 15 additional complete enterobacterial genome sequences. DNA microarrays based on the selected probes were used to type 92 clinical enterobacterial isolates. Phenotypic tests confirmed the array-based typing results and corroborate that the selected probes allowed correct typing and prediction of major antibiotic resistances of clinically relevant Enterobacteriaceae, including the subspecies level, e.g. the reliable distinction of different E. coli pathotypes. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the global probe selection approach based on longest common factor statistics as well as the design of a DNA microarray with a restricted set of discriminative probes enables robust discrimination of different enterobacterial variants and represents a proof of concept that can be adopted for diagnostics of a wide range of microbial pathogens. Our approach circumvents misclassifications arising from the application of virulence

  10. Label-Free and High-Throughput Detection of Protein Microarrays by Oblique-Incidence Reflectivity Difference Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu; Lu, Heng; Wen, Juan; Yuan, Kun; LÜ, Hui-Bin; Jin, Kui-Juan; Zhou, Yue-Liang; Yang, Guo-Zhen

    2010-10-01

    We label-free detected the biological process of preparing a microarray that includes 400 spots of mouse immunoglobulin G (IgG) as well as the specific hybridization between mouse IgG and goat anti-mouse IgG by an oblique-incidence reflectivity difference (OI-RD) method. The detection results after each process including printing, washing, blocking, and hybridization, demonstrate that the OI-RD method can trace the preparation process of a microarray and detect the specific hybridization between antigens and antibodies. OI-RD is a promising method for label-free and high-throughput detection of biological microarrays.

  11. MACRO: a combined microchip-PCR and microarray system for high-throughput monitoring of genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Shao, Ning; Jiang, Shi-Meng; Zhang, Miao; Wang, Jing; Guo, Shu-Juan; Li, Yang; Jiang, He-Wei; Liu, Cheng-Xi; Zhang, Da-Bing; Yang, Li-Tao; Tao, Sheng-Ce

    2014-01-21

    The monitoring of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) is a primary step of GMO regulation. However, there is presently a lack of effective and high-throughput methodologies for specifically and sensitively monitoring most of the commercialized GMOs. Herein, we developed a multiplex amplification on a chip with readout on an oligo microarray (MACRO) system specifically for convenient GMO monitoring. This system is composed of a microchip for multiplex amplification and an oligo microarray for the readout of multiple amplicons, containing a total of 91 targets (18 universal elements, 20 exogenous genes, 45 events, and 8 endogenous reference genes) that covers 97.1% of all GM events that have been commercialized up to 2012. We demonstrate that the specificity of MACRO is ~100%, with a limit of detection (LOD) that is suitable for real-world applications. Moreover, the results obtained of simulated complex samples and blind samples with MACRO were 100% consistent with expectations and the results of independently performed real-time PCRs, respectively. Thus, we believe MACRO is the first system that can be applied for effectively monitoring the majority of the commercialized GMOs in a single test. PMID:24359455

  12. Live Cell Optical Sensing for High Throughput Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ye

    Live cell optical sensing employs label-free optical biosensors to non-invasively measure stimulus-induced dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) in live cells within the sensing volume of the biosensor. The resultant DMR signal is an integrated cellular response, and reflects cell signaling mediated through the cellular target(s) with which the stimulus intervenes. This article describes the uses of live cell optical sensing for probing cell biology and ligand pharmacology, with an emphasis of resonant waveguide grating biosensor cellular assays for high throughput applications.

  13. A multivariate approach for high throughput pectin profiling by combining glycan microarrays with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sousa, António G; Ahl, Louise I; Pedersen, Henriette L; Fangel, Jonatan U; Sørensen, Susanne O; Willats, William G T

    2015-05-29

    Pectin-one of the most complex biomacromolecules in nature has been extensively studied using various techniques. This has been done so in an attempt to understand the chemical composition and conformation of pectin, whilst discovering and optimising new industrial applications of the polymer. For the last decade the emergence of glycan microarray technology has led to a growing capacity of acquiring simultaneous measurements related to various carbohydrate characteristics while generating large collections of data. Here we used a multivariate analysis approach in order to analyse a set of 359 pectin samples probed with 14 different monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS) regression were utilised to obtain the most optimal qualitative and quantitative information from the spotted microarrays. The potential use of microarray technology combined with chemometrics for the accurate determination of degree of methyl-esterification (DM) and degree of blockiness (DB) was assessed. PMID:25950120

  14. Piezo-thermal Probe Array for High Throughput Applications

    PubMed Central

    Gaitas, Angelo; French, Paddy

    2012-01-01

    Microcantilevers are used in a number of applications including atomic-force microscopy (AFM). In this work, deflection-sensing elements along with heating elements are integrated onto micromachined cantilever arrays to increase sensitivity, and reduce complexity and cost. An array of probes with 5–10 nm gold ultrathin film sensors on silicon substrates for high throughput scanning probe microscopy is developed. The deflection sensitivity is 0.2 ppm/nm. Plots of the change in resistance of the sensing element with displacement are used to calibrate the probes and determine probe contact with the substrate. Topographical scans demonstrate high throughput and nanometer resolution. The heating elements are calibrated and the thermal coefficient of resistance (TCR) is 655 ppm/K. The melting temperature of a material is measured by locally heating the material with the heating element of the cantilever while monitoring the bending with the deflection sensing element. The melting point value measured with this method is in close agreement with the reported value in literature. PMID:23641125

  15. Characterizing immune repertoires by high throughput sequencing: strategies and applications

    PubMed Central

    Calis, Jorg J.A.; Rosenberg, Brad R.

    2014-01-01

    As the key cellular effectors of adaptive immunity, T and B lymphocytes utilize specialized receptors to recognize, respond to, and neutralize a diverse array of extrinsic threats. These receptors (immunoglobulins in B lymphocytes, T cell receptors in T lymphocytes) are incredibly variable, the products of specialized genetic diversification mechanisms that generate complex lymphocyte repertoires with extensive collections of antigen specificities. Recent advances in high throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies have transformed our ability to examine antigen receptor repertoires at single nucleotide, and more recently, single cell, resolution. Here we review current approaches to examining antigen receptor repertoires by HTS, and discuss inherent biological and technical challenges. We further describe emerging applications of this powerful methodology for exploring the adaptive immune system. PMID:25306219

  16. Chemically-blocked Antibody Microarray for Multiplexed High-throughput Profiling of Specific Protein Glycosylation in Complex Samples

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chen; Wonsidler, Joshua L.; Li, Jianwei; Du, Yanming; Block, Timothy; Haab, Brian; Chen, Songming

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we describe an effective protocol for use in a multiplexed high-throughput antibody microarray with glycan binding protein detection that allows for the glycosylation profiling of specific proteins. Glycosylation of proteins is the most prevalent post-translational modification found on proteins, and leads diversified modifications of the physical, chemical, and biological properties of proteins. Because the glycosylation machinery is particularly susceptible to disease progression and malignant transformation, aberrant glycosylation has been recognized as early detection biomarkers for cancer and other diseases. However, current methods to study protein glycosylation typically are too complicated or expensive for use in most normal laboratory or clinical settings and a more practical method to study protein glycosylation is needed. The new protocol described in this study makes use of a chemically blocked antibody microarray with glycan-binding protein (GBP) detection and significantly reduces the time, cost, and lab equipment requirements needed to study protein glycosylation. In this method, multiple immobilized glycoprotein-specific antibodies are printed directly onto the microarray slides and the N-glycans on the antibodies are blocked. The blocked, immobilized glycoprotein-specific antibodies are able to capture and isolate glycoproteins from a complex sample that is applied directly onto the microarray slides. Glycan detection then can be performed by the application of biotinylated lectins and other GBPs to the microarray slide, while binding levels can be determined using Dylight 549-Streptavidin. Through the use of an antibody panel and probing with multiple biotinylated lectins, this method allows for an effective glycosylation profile of the different proteins found in a given human or animal sample to be developed. Introduction Glycosylation of protein, which is the most ubiquitous post-translational modification on proteins, modifies

  17. High Throughput Multispectral Image Processing with Applications in Food Science.

    PubMed

    Tsakanikas, Panagiotis; Pavlidis, Dimitris; Nychas, George-John

    2015-01-01

    Recently, machine vision is gaining attention in food science as well as in food industry concerning food quality assessment and monitoring. Into the framework of implementation of Process Analytical Technology (PAT) in the food industry, image processing can be used not only in estimation and even prediction of food quality but also in detection of adulteration. Towards these applications on food science, we present here a novel methodology for automated image analysis of several kinds of food products e.g. meat, vanilla crème and table olives, so as to increase objectivity, data reproducibility, low cost information extraction and faster quality assessment, without human intervention. Image processing's outcome will be propagated to the downstream analysis. The developed multispectral image processing method is based on unsupervised machine learning approach (Gaussian Mixture Models) and a novel unsupervised scheme of spectral band selection for segmentation process optimization. Through the evaluation we prove its efficiency and robustness against the currently available semi-manual software, showing that the developed method is a high throughput approach appropriate for massive data extraction from food samples. PMID:26466349

  18. Validation of high throughput sequencing and microbial forensics applications

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    High throughput sequencing (HTS) generates large amounts of high quality sequence data for microbial genomics. The value of HTS for microbial forensics is the speed at which evidence can be collected and the power to characterize microbial-related evidence to solve biocrimes and bioterrorist events. As HTS technologies continue to improve, they provide increasingly powerful sets of tools to support the entire field of microbial forensics. Accurate, credible results allow analysis and interpretation, significantly influencing the course and/or focus of an investigation, and can impact the response of the government to an attack having individual, political, economic or military consequences. Interpretation of the results of microbial forensic analyses relies on understanding the performance and limitations of HTS methods, including analytical processes, assays and data interpretation. The utility of HTS must be defined carefully within established operating conditions and tolerances. Validation is essential in the development and implementation of microbial forensics methods used for formulating investigative leads attribution. HTS strategies vary, requiring guiding principles for HTS system validation. Three initial aspects of HTS, irrespective of chemistry, instrumentation or software are: 1) sample preparation, 2) sequencing, and 3) data analysis. Criteria that should be considered for HTS validation for microbial forensics are presented here. Validation should be defined in terms of specific application and the criteria described here comprise a foundation for investigators to establish, validate and implement HTS as a tool in microbial forensics, enhancing public safety and national security. PMID:25101166

  19. Validation of high throughput sequencing and microbial forensics applications.

    PubMed

    Budowle, Bruce; Connell, Nancy D; Bielecka-Oder, Anna; Colwell, Rita R; Corbett, Cindi R; Fletcher, Jacqueline; Forsman, Mats; Kadavy, Dana R; Markotic, Alemka; Morse, Stephen A; Murch, Randall S; Sajantila, Antti; Schmedes, Sarah E; Ternus, Krista L; Turner, Stephen D; Minot, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    High throughput sequencing (HTS) generates large amounts of high quality sequence data for microbial genomics. The value of HTS for microbial forensics is the speed at which evidence can be collected and the power to characterize microbial-related evidence to solve biocrimes and bioterrorist events. As HTS technologies continue to improve, they provide increasingly powerful sets of tools to support the entire field of microbial forensics. Accurate, credible results allow analysis and interpretation, significantly influencing the course and/or focus of an investigation, and can impact the response of the government to an attack having individual, political, economic or military consequences. Interpretation of the results of microbial forensic analyses relies on understanding the performance and limitations of HTS methods, including analytical processes, assays and data interpretation. The utility of HTS must be defined carefully within established operating conditions and tolerances. Validation is essential in the development and implementation of microbial forensics methods used for formulating investigative leads attribution. HTS strategies vary, requiring guiding principles for HTS system validation. Three initial aspects of HTS, irrespective of chemistry, instrumentation or software are: 1) sample preparation, 2) sequencing, and 3) data analysis. Criteria that should be considered for HTS validation for microbial forensics are presented here. Validation should be defined in terms of specific application and the criteria described here comprise a foundation for investigators to establish, validate and implement HTS as a tool in microbial forensics, enhancing public safety and national security. PMID:25101166

  20. High Throughput Multispectral Image Processing with Applications in Food Science

    PubMed Central

    Tsakanikas, Panagiotis; Pavlidis, Dimitris; Nychas, George-John

    2015-01-01

    Recently, machine vision is gaining attention in food science as well as in food industry concerning food quality assessment and monitoring. Into the framework of implementation of Process Analytical Technology (PAT) in the food industry, image processing can be used not only in estimation and even prediction of food quality but also in detection of adulteration. Towards these applications on food science, we present here a novel methodology for automated image analysis of several kinds of food products e.g. meat, vanilla crème and table olives, so as to increase objectivity, data reproducibility, low cost information extraction and faster quality assessment, without human intervention. Image processing’s outcome will be propagated to the downstream analysis. The developed multispectral image processing method is based on unsupervised machine learning approach (Gaussian Mixture Models) and a novel unsupervised scheme of spectral band selection for segmentation process optimization. Through the evaluation we prove its efficiency and robustness against the currently available semi-manual software, showing that the developed method is a high throughput approach appropriate for massive data extraction from food samples. PMID:26466349

  1. Accounting For Uncertainty in The Application Of High Throughput Datasets

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of high throughput screening (HTS) datasets will need to adequately account for uncertainties in the data generation process and propagate these uncertainties through to ultimate use. Uncertainty arises at multiple levels in the construction of predictors using in vitro ...

  2. High-throughput prediction of protein antigenicity using protein microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Magnan, Christophe N.; Zeller, Michael; Kayala, Matthew A.; Vigil, Adam; Randall, Arlo; Felgner, Philip L.; Baldi, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Discovery of novel protective antigens is fundamental to the development of vaccines for existing and emerging pathogens. Most computational methods for predicting protein antigenicity rely directly on homology with previously characterized protective antigens; however, homology-based methods will fail to discover truly novel protective antigens. Thus, there is a significant need for homology-free methods capable of screening entire proteomes for the antigens most likely to generate a protective humoral immune response. Results: Here we begin by curating two types of positive data: (i) antigens that elicit a strong antibody response in protected individuals but not in unprotected individuals, using human immunoglobulin reactivity data obtained from protein microarray analyses; and (ii) known protective antigens from the literature. The resulting datasets are used to train a sequence-based prediction model, ANTIGENpro, to predict the likelihood that a protein is a protective antigen. ANTIGENpro correctly classifies 82% of the known protective antigens when trained using only the protein microarray datasets. The accuracy on the combined dataset is estimated at 76% by cross-validation experiments. Finally, ANTIGENpro performs well when evaluated on an external pathogen proteome for which protein microarray data were obtained after the initial development of ANTIGENpro. Availability: ANTIGENpro is integrated in the SCRATCH suite of predictors available at http://scratch.proteomics.ics.uci.edu. Contact: pfbaldi@ics.uci.edu PMID:20934990

  3. Ultra-high-throughput microarray generation and liquid dispensing using multiple disposable piezoelectric ejectors.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Huangpin Ben; Fitch, John; White, Dave; Torres, Frank; Roy, Joy; Matusiak, Robert; Krivacic, Bob; Kowalski, Bob; Bruce, Richard; Elrod, Scott

    2004-03-01

    The authors have constructed an array of 12 piezoelectric ejectors for printing biological materials. A single-ejector footprint is 8 mm in diameter, standing 4 mm high with 2 reservoirs totaling 76 micro L. These ejectors have been tested by dispensing various fluids in several environmental conditions. Reliable drop ejection can be expected in both humidity-controlled and ambient environments over extended periods of time and in hot and cold room temperatures. In a prototype system, 12 ejectors are arranged in a rack, together with an X - Y stage, to allow printing any pattern desired. Printed arrays of features are created with a biological solution containing bovine serum albumin conjugated oligonucleotides, dye, and salty buffer. This ejector system is designed for the ultra-high-throughput generation of arrays on a variety of surfaces. These single or racked ejectors could be used as long-term storage vessels for materials such as small molecules, nucleic acids, proteins, or cell libraries, which would allow for efficient preprogrammed selection of individual clones and greatly reduce the chance of cross-contamination and loss due to transfer. A new generation of design ideas includes plastic injection molded ejectors that are inexpensive and disposable and handheld personal pipettes for liquid transfer in the nanoliter regime. PMID:15006131

  4. Lensfree Holographic Imaging of Antibody Microarrays for High-Throughput Detection of Leukocyte Numbers and Function

    PubMed Central

    Stybayeva, Gulnaz; Mudanyali, Onur; Seo, Sungkyu; Silangcruz, Jaime; Macal, Monica; Ramanculov, Erlan; Dandekar, Satya; Erlinger, Anthony; Ozcan, Aydogan; Revzin, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Characterization of leukocytes is an integral part of blood analysis and blood-based diagnostics. In the present paper we combine lensless holographic imaging with antibody microarrays for rapid and multiparametric analysis of leukocytes from human blood. Monoclonal antibodies (Abs) specific for leukocyte surface antigens (CD4 and CD8) and cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-2) were printed in an array so as to juxtapose cell capture and cytokine detection Ab spots. Integration of Ab microarrays into a microfluidic flow chamber (4 μl volume) followed by incubation with human blood resulted in capture of CD4 and CD8 T-cells on specific Ab spots. On-chip mitogenic activation of these cells induced release of cytokine molecules that were subsequently captured on neighboring anti-cytokine Ab spots. The binding of IL-2, TNF-α and IFN-γ molecules on their respective Ab spots was detected using HRP-labeled anti-cytokine Abs and a visible color reagent. Lensfree holographic imaging was then used to rapidly (∼4 sec) enumerate CD4 and CD8 T-lymphocytes captured on Ab spots and to quantify the cytokine signal emanating from IL-2, TNF-α, and IFN-γ spots on the same chip. To demonstrate the utility of our approach for infectious disease monitoring, blood samples of healthy volunteers and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients were analyzed to determine CD4/CD8 ratio – an important HIV/AIDS diagnostic marker. The ratio obtained by lensfree on-chip imaging of CD4 and CD8 T-cells captured on Ab spots was in close agreement with conventional microscopy-based cell counting. The present paper, describing tandem use of Ab microarrays and lensfree holographic imaging, paves the way for future development of miniature cytometry devices for multiparametric blood analysis at the point of care or in a resource-limited setting. PMID:20359168

  5. ELISA microarray technology as a high-throughput system for cancer biomarker validation

    SciTech Connect

    Zangar, Richard C.; Daly, Don S.; White, Amanda M.

    2006-01-01

    A large gap currently exists between the ability to discover potential biomarkers and the ability to assess the real value of these proteins for cancer screening. One major challenge in biomarker validation is the inherent variability in biomarker levels. This variability stems from the diversity across the human population and the considerable molecular heterogeneity between individual tumors, even those that originate from a single tissue. Another major challenge with cancer screening is that most cancers are rare in the general population, meaning that the specificity of an assay must be very high if the number of false positive is not going to be much greater than the number of true positives. Because of these challenges with biomarker validation, it is necessary to analysis of thousands of samples before a clear idea of the utility of a screening assay can be determined. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarray technology can simultaneously quantify levels of multiple proteins and has the potential to accelerate biomarker validation. In this review, we discuss current ELISA microarray technology and the enabling advances needed to achieve the reproducibility and throughput that are required to evaluate cancer biomarkers.

  6. High-Throughput and High-Intensive Biosensor Microarray Fabrication by Selective Dewetting on a Wettability Controlled Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongsu; Park, Hyunkyu; Kang, Bongchul; Ham, Chulho; Lee, Hyeonhwa; Yang, Minyang

    2013-01-01

    In a microarray biosensor, the surface characteristic for reducing background nonspecific binding is a critical aspect for achieving the high sensitivity and accurate detection. In this paper, we proposed a new high-intensity and reduced nonspecific binding microarray fabrication method with a selective dewetting process on a mixed self-assembled monolayer (SAM), consisting of methyl-terminated and methoxy-[poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)]-terminated silanes. The combination of hydrophobic and hydrophilic properties of the mixed SAM background layer provided the hydrophobicity that allowed the selective dewetting of the protein solution at specific versus nonspecific regions and reduced the nonspecific binding owing to hydrated PEG chains in the mixed SAM. The wiping process was applied for obtaining high throughput and reducing protein usage. Finally, the background non-specific binding was significantly reduced by 78% with a selective dewetting method compared with the standard method using a cover slip. Furthermore, the peak intensity was increased by 20% and the protein usage was reduced versus the standard method.

  7. High-throughput microarray mapping of cell wall polymers in roots and tubers during the viscosity-reducing process.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuhong; Willats, William G; Lange, Lene; Jin, Yanling; Fang, Yang; Salmeán, Armando A; Pedersen, Henriette L; Busk, Peter Kamp; Zhao, Hai

    2016-03-01

    Viscosity reduction has a great impact on the efficiency of ethanol production when using roots and tubers as feedstock. Plant cell wall-degrading enzymes have been successfully applied to overcome the challenges posed by high viscosity. However, the changes in cell wall polymers during the viscosity-reducing process are poorly characterized. Comprehensive microarray polymer profiling, which is a high-throughput microarray, was used for the first time to map changes in the cell wall polymers of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), cassava (Manihot esculenta), and Canna edulis Ker. over the entire viscosity-reducing process. The results indicated that the composition of cell wall polymers among these three roots and tubers was markedly different. The gel-like matrix and glycoprotein network in the C. edulis Ker. cell wall caused difficulty in viscosity reduction. The obvious viscosity reduction of the sweet potato and the cassava was attributed to the degradation of homogalacturonan and the released 1,4-β-d-galactan and 1,5-α-l-arabinan. PMID:25757626

  8. High-throughput microarray profiling of cell wall polymers during hydrothermal pre-treatment of wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Simón, Ana; Kristensen, Jan Bach; Obro, Jens; Felby, Claus; Willats, William G T; Jørgensen, Henning

    2010-02-15

    Lignocellulosic plant material is potentially a sustainable source of fermentable sugars for bioethanol production. However, a barrier to this is the high resistance or recalcitrance of plant cell walls to be hydrolyzed. Therefore, a detailed knowledge of the structural features of plant cell walls that contribute to recalcitrance is important for improving the efficiency of bioethanol production. In this work we have used a technique known as Comprehensive Microarray Polymer Profiling (CoMPP) to analyze wheat straw before and after being subjected to hydrothermal pre-treatments at four different temperatures. The CoMPP technique combines the specificity of monoclonal antibodies with the high-throughput capacity of microarrays. Changes in the relative abundance of cell wall polysaccharides could be tracked during processing, and a reduction in xylan, arabinoxylans, xyloglucan, and mixed-linked glucan epitopes was detected at the two highest temperatures of pre-treatment used. This work demonstrates the potential of CoMPP as a complementally technique to conventional methods for analyzing biomass composition. PMID:19777595

  9. High-throughput investigation of endothelial-to-mesenchymal transformation (EndMT) with combinatorial cellular microarrays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zongjie; Calpe, Blaise; Zerdani, Jalil; Lee, Youngsang; Oh, Jonghyun; Bae, Hojae; Khademhosseini, Ali; Kim, Keekyoung

    2016-07-01

    In the developing heart, a specific subset of endocardium undergoes an endothelial-to-mesenchymal transformation (EndMT) thus forming nascent valve leaflets. Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and growth factors (GFs) play important roles in regulating EndMT but the combinatorial effect of GFs with ECM proteins is less well understood. Here we use microscale engineering techniques to create single, binary, and tertiary component microenvironments to investigate the combinatorial effects of ECM proteins and GFs on the attachment and transformation of adult ovine mitral valve endothelial cells to a mesenchymal phenotype. With the combinatorial microenvironment microarrays, we utilized 60 different combinations of ECM proteins (Fibronectin, Collagen I, II, IV, Laminin) and GFs (TGF-β1, bFGF, VEGF) and were able to identify new microenvironmental conditions capable of modulating EndMT in MVECs. Experimental results indicated that TGF-β1 significantly upregulated the EndMT while either bFGF or VEGF downregulated EndMT process markedly. Also, ECM proteins could influence both the attachment of MVECs and the response of MVECs to GFs. In terms of attachment, fibronectin is significantly better for the adhesion of MVECs among the five tested proteins. Overall collagen IV and fibronectin appeared to play important roles in promoting EndMT process. Great consistency between macroscale and microarrayed experiments and present studies demonstrates that high-throughput cellular microarrays are a promising approach to study the regulation of EndMT in valvular endothelium. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1403-1412. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26666585

  10. Towards High-throughput Immunomics for Infectious Diseases: Use of Next-generation Peptide Microarrays for Rapid Discovery and Mapping of Antigenic Determinants*

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, Santiago J.; Nielsen, Morten; Schafer-Nielsen, Claus; Mucci, Juan; Altcheh, Jaime; Balouz, Virginia; Tekiel, Valeria; Frasch, Alberto C.; Campetella, Oscar; Buscaglia, Carlos A.; Agüero, Fernán

    2015-01-01

    Complete characterization of antibody specificities associated to natural infections is expected to provide a rich source of serologic biomarkers with potential applications in molecular diagnosis, follow-up of chemotherapeutic treatments, and prioritization of targets for vaccine development. Here, we developed a highly-multiplexed platform based on next-generation high-density peptide microarrays to map these specificities in Chagas Disease, an exemplar of a human infectious disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. We designed a high-density peptide microarray containing more than 175,000 overlapping 15mer peptides derived from T. cruzi proteins. Peptides were synthesized in situ on microarray slides, spanning the complete length of 457 parasite proteins with fully overlapped 15mers (1 residue shift). Screening of these slides with antibodies purified from infected patients and healthy donors demonstrated both a high technical reproducibility as well as epitope mapping consistency when compared with earlier low-throughput technologies. Using a conservative signal threshold to classify positive (reactive) peptides we identified 2,031 disease-specific peptides and 97 novel parasite antigens, effectively doubling the number of known antigens and providing a 10-fold increase in the number of fine mapped antigenic determinants for this disease. Finally, further analysis of the chip data showed that optimizing the amount of sequence overlap of displayed peptides can increase the protein space covered in a single chip by at least ∼threefold without sacrificing sensitivity. In conclusion, we show the power of high-density peptide chips for the discovery of pathogen-specific linear B-cell epitopes from clinical samples, thus setting the stage for high-throughput biomarker discovery screenings and proteome-wide studies of immune responses against pathogens. PMID:25922409

  11. High throughput screening of electrocatalysts for fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochaska, Mark; Jin, Jing; Rochefort, Dominic; Zhuang, Lin; DiSalvo, Francis J.; Abruña, Héctor D.; van Dover, R. B.

    2006-05-01

    We describe methodologies for the generation and screening of combinatorial libraries of electrocatalyst materials for fuel cell applications, generated by cosputtering of three elements onto a Si substrate coated with a Ta adhesion underlayer. Screening was carried out via a fluorescence assay as well as by scanning electrochemical microscopy. Whereas the former provided rapid qualitative screening with limited spatial resolution, the latter provided high spatial resolution. The fluorescence screening method was tested on Pt, PtBi, PtPb, and PtRu nanoparticles, while both methods were tested on a film containing a Pt-Bi-Pb ternary composition spread.

  12. Oblique-incidence reflectivity difference microscope for label-free high-throughput detection of biochemical reactions in a microarray format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiangdong; Landry, James P.; Sun, Yung-Shin; Gregg, Jeff P.; Lam, Kit S.; Guo, Xiaowen

    2007-04-01

    We describe a recently developed oblique-incidence reflectivity difference (OI-RD) microscope, a form of polarization-modulated imaging ellipsometer, for label-free-high-throughput detection of biomolecular reactions on DNA and protein microarrays. We present examples of application of this technique to end-point and real-time investigations of DNA-DNA hybridization, antibody-antigen capture, and protein-small-molecule binding reactions. Compared to a conventional imaging ellipsometer based on the polarizer-compensator-sample-analyzer scheme and under the off-null condition, a polarization-modulated OI-RD microscope is inherently more sensitive by at least 1 order of magnitude to thickness changes on a solid surface. Compared with imaging surface plasmon resonance microscopes based on reflectance change on falling or rising slopes of the surface plasmon resonance, the OI-RD microscope (1) has a comparable sensitivity, (2) is applicable to conventional microscope glass slides, and (3) easily covers a field of view as large as the entire surface of a 1 in.×3 in. (2.54 cm×7.62 cm) microscope slide.

  13. High-throughput automated scoring of Ki67 in breast cancer tissue microarrays from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium.

    PubMed

    Abubakar, Mustapha; Howat, William J; Daley, Frances; Zabaglo, Lila; McDuffus, Leigh-Anne; Blows, Fiona; Coulson, Penny; Raza Ali, H; Benitez, Javier; Milne, Roger; Brenner, Herman; Stegmaier, Christa; Mannermaa, Arto; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Sinn, Peter; Couch, Fergus J; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Devilee, Peter; Figueroa, Jonine; Sherman, Mark E; Lissowska, Jolanta; Hewitt, Stephen; Eccles, Diana; Hooning, Maartje J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Wm Martens, John; Hm van Deurzen, Carolien; Investigators, kConFab; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Jones, Michael; Schoemaker, Minouk; Broeks, Annegien; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Van't Veer, Laura; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Orr, Nick; Dowsett, Mitch; Easton, Douglas; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Pharoah, Paul D; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2016-07-01

    Automated methods are needed to facilitate high-throughput and reproducible scoring of Ki67 and other markers in breast cancer tissue microarrays (TMAs) in large-scale studies. To address this need, we developed an automated protocol for Ki67 scoring and evaluated its performance in studies from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We utilized 166 TMAs containing 16,953 tumour cores representing 9,059 breast cancer cases, from 13 studies, with information on other clinical and pathological characteristics. TMAs were stained for Ki67 using standard immunohistochemical procedures, and scanned and digitized using the Ariol system. An automated algorithm was developed for the scoring of Ki67, and scores were compared to computer assisted visual (CAV) scores in a subset of 15 TMAs in a training set. We also assessed the correlation between automated Ki67 scores and other clinical and pathological characteristics. Overall, we observed good discriminatory accuracy (AUC = 85%) and good agreement (kappa = 0.64) between the automated and CAV scoring methods in the training set. The performance of the automated method varied by TMA (kappa range= 0.37-0.87) and study (kappa range = 0.39-0.69). The automated method performed better in satisfactory cores (kappa = 0.68) than suboptimal (kappa = 0.51) cores (p-value for comparison = 0.005); and among cores with higher total nuclei counted by the machine (4,000-4,500 cells: kappa = 0.78) than those with lower counts (50-500 cells: kappa = 0.41; p-value = 0.010). Among the 9,059 cases in this study, the correlations between automated Ki67 and clinical and pathological characteristics were found to be in the expected directions. Our findings indicate that automated scoring of Ki67 can be an efficient method to obtain good quality data across large numbers of TMAs from multicentre studies. However, robust algorithm development and rigorous pre- and post-analytical quality control procedures are

  14. Silicon photonic crystal microarrays for high throughput label-free detection of lung cancer cell line lysates with sensitivity and specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Lai, Wei-Cheng; Zou, Yi; Gemmill, Robert M.; Chen, Ray T.

    2013-03-01

    Detection of biomolecules on microarrays based on label-free on-chip optical biosensors is very attractive since this format avoids complex chemistries caused by steric hindrance of labels. Application areas include the detection of cancers and allergens, and food-borne pathogens to name a few. We have demonstrated photonic crystal microcavity biosensors with high sensitivity down to 1pM concentrations (67pg/ml). High sensitivities were achieved by slow light engineering which reduced the radiation loss and increased the stored energy in the photonic crystal microcavity resonance mode. Resonances with high quality factor Q~26,760 in liquid ambient, coupled with larger optical mode volumes allowed enhanced interaction with the analyte biomolecules which resulted in sensitivities down to 10 cells per micro-liter to lung cancer cell lysates. The specificity of detection was ensured by multiplexed detections from multiple photonic crystal microcavities arrayed on the arms of a multimode interference power splitter. Specific binding interactions and control experiments were performed simultaneously at the same instant of time with the same 60 microliter sample volume. Specificity is further ensured by sandwich assay methods in the multiplexed experiment. Sandwich assay based amplification increased the sensitivity further resulting in the detection of lung cancer cell lysates down to concentrations of 2 cells per micro-liter. The miniaturization enabled by photonic crystal biosensors coupled with waveguide interconnected layout thus offers the potential of high throughput proteomics with high sensitivity and specificity.

  15. Applications of high throughput (combinatorial) methodologies to electronic, magnetic, optical, and energy-related materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Martin L.; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Hattrick-Simpers, Jason R.

    2013-06-01

    High throughput (combinatorial) materials science methodology is a relatively new research paradigm that offers the promise of rapid and efficient materials screening, optimization, and discovery. The paradigm started in the pharmaceutical industry but was rapidly adopted to accelerate materials research in a wide variety of areas. High throughput experiments are characterized by synthesis of a "library" sample that contains the materials variation of interest (typically composition), and rapid and localized measurement schemes that result in massive data sets. Because the data are collected at the same time on the same "library" sample, they can be highly uniform with respect to fixed processing parameters. This article critically reviews the literature pertaining to applications of combinatorial materials science for electronic, magnetic, optical, and energy-related materials. It is expected that high throughput methodologies will facilitate commercialization of novel materials for these critically important applications. Despite the overwhelming evidence presented in this paper that high throughput studies can effectively inform commercial practice, in our perception, it remains an underutilized research and development tool. Part of this perception may be due to the inaccessibility of proprietary industrial research and development practices, but clearly the initial cost and availability of high throughput laboratory equipment plays a role. Combinatorial materials science has traditionally been focused on materials discovery, screening, and optimization to combat the extremely high cost and long development times for new materials and their introduction into commerce. Going forward, combinatorial materials science will also be driven by other needs such as materials substitution and experimental verification of materials properties predicted by modeling and simulation, which have recently received much attention with the advent of the Materials Genome

  16. Stationary phases with special structural properties for high-throughput separation techniques: preparation, characterization and applications.

    PubMed

    Buszewski, Boguslaw; Welerowicz, Tomasz

    2004-06-01

    Stationary phases with specific structural properties for high-throughput liquid chromatographic (LC) techniques are described. Special attention was paid to phases with special structural properties, mainly containing internal functional group (e.g. amide). Such materials are generally called "embedded phases". There are phases created in amidation process of aminopropylated silica gel, especially phases based on biological compounds, like phospholipids and cholesterol, which are called immobilized artificial membranes (IAM's). The synthesis and applications of polar embedded amide LC stationary phases were also reviewed. Methods of characterization of synthesized packing materials were presented, with general focusing on spectroscopic measurements like (13C and 29Si CP/MAS NMR and FT-IR), elemental and thermal analysis as well as chromatographic quantitative structure-retention relationships (QSRR) and extended chemometric tests. The potential applications of various dedicated stationary phases in a high-throughput LC screening procedures were also presented. PMID:15200378

  17. High-throughput three-dimensional (3D) lithographic microfabrication in biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daekeun; So, Peter T. C.

    2010-02-01

    Two-photon excitation microfabrication has been shown to be useful in the field of photonics and biomedicine. It generates 3D microstructures and provides sub-diffraction fabrication resolution. Nevertheless, laser direct writing, the most popular two-photon fabrication technique, has slow fabrication speed, and its applications are limited to prototyping. In this proceeding, we propose high-throughput 3D lithographic microfabrication system based on depthresolved wide-field illumination and build several 3D microstructures with SU-8. Through these fabrications, 3D lithographic microfabrication has scalable function and high-throughput capability. It also has the potential for fabricating 3D microstructure in biomedical applications, such as intertwining channels in 3D microfluidic devices for biomedical analysis and 3D cell patterning in the tissue scaffolds.

  18. High-Throughput Single-Cell Analysis for Wound Healing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Januszyk, Michael; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.

    2013-01-01

    Significance Wound repair is a complex biological process that integrates multiple physiologic pathways to restore skin homeostasis after a wide array of gross and anatomical insults. As such, a scientific examination of the wound typically requires broad sampling of numerous factors and is commonly achieved through DNA microarray analysis. Critical Issues In the last several years, it has become increasingly evident that the granularity afforded by such traditional population-based assays may be insufficient to capture the complex relationships in heterogeneous processes such as those associated with wound healing and stem cell biology. Recent Advances Several emerging technologies have recently become available that permit high-throughput single-cell gene expression analysis in a manner which provides novel insights into the relationships of complex tissue. The most prominent among these employs microfluidic-based devices to achieve a high-resolution analysis of tissue samples. Future Directions The intrinsically heterogeneous nature of injured tissue, in conjunction with its temporal dynamics, makes wound repair and tissue regeneration an attractive target for high-throughput single-cell analysis. Given the staggering costs associated with chronic and non-healing wounds, the development of predictive and diagnostic tools using this technology would likely be attractive to healthcare providers. PMID:24527358

  19. Development and Application of a High Throughput Protein Unfolding Kinetic Assay

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiang; Waterhouse, Nicklas; Feyijinmi, Olusegun; Dominguez, Matthew J.; Martinez, Lisa M.; Sharp, Zoey; Service, Rachel; Bothe, Jameson R.; Stollar, Elliott J.

    2016-01-01

    The kinetics of folding and unfolding underlie protein stability and quantification of these rates provides important insights into the folding process. Here, we present a simple high throughput protein unfolding kinetic assay using a plate reader that is applicable to the studies of the majority of 2-state folding proteins. We validate the assay by measuring kinetic unfolding data for the SH3 (Src Homology 3) domain from Actin Binding Protein 1 (AbpSH3) and its stabilized mutants. The results of our approach are in excellent agreement with published values. We further combine our kinetic assay with a plate reader equilibrium assay, to obtain indirect estimates of folding rates and use these approaches to characterize an AbpSH3-peptide hybrid. Our high throughput protein unfolding kinetic assays allow accurate screening of libraries of mutants by providing both kinetic and equilibrium measurements and provide a means for in-depth ϕ-value analyses. PMID:26745729

  20. Design and Application of a Novel High-throughput Screening Technique for 1-Deoxynojirimycin

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Peixia; Mu, Shanshan; Li, Heng; Li, Youhai; Feng, Congmin; Jin, Jian-Ming; Tang, Shuang-Yan

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput screening techniques for small molecules can find intensive applications in the studies of biosynthesis of these molecules. A sensitive, rapid and cost-effective technique that allows high-throughput screening of endogenous production of the natural iminosugar 1-deoxynojirimycin (1-DNJ), an α-glucosidase inhibitor relevant to the pharmaceutical industry, was developed in this study, based on the inhibitory effects of 1-DNJ on the activity of the β-glycosidase LacS from Sulfolobus solfataricus. This technique has been demonstrated effective in engineering both the key enzyme and the expression levels of enzymes in the 1-DNJ biosynthetic pathway from Bacillus atrophaeus cloned in E. coli. Higher biosynthetic efficiency was achieved using directed evolution strategies. PMID:25708517

  1. Design and application of a novel high-throughput screening technique for 1-deoxynojirimycin.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Peixia; Mu, Shanshan; Li, Heng; Li, Youhai; Feng, Congmin; Jin, Jian-Ming; Tang, Shuang-Yan

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput screening techniques for small molecules can find intensive applications in the studies of biosynthesis of these molecules. A sensitive, rapid and cost-effective technique that allows high-throughput screening of endogenous production of the natural iminosugar 1-deoxynojirimycin (1-DNJ), an α-glucosidase inhibitor relevant to the pharmaceutical industry, was developed in this study, based on the inhibitory effects of 1-DNJ on the activity of the β-glycosidase LacS from Sulfolobus solfataricus. This technique has been demonstrated effective in engineering both the key enzyme and the expression levels of enzymes in the 1-DNJ biosynthetic pathway from Bacillus atrophaeus cloned in E. coli. Higher biosynthetic efficiency was achieved using directed evolution strategies. PMID:25708517

  2. A synchronous Gigabit Ethernet protocol stack for high-throughput UDP/IP applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Födisch, P.; Lange, B.; Sandmann, J.; Büchner, A.; Enghardt, W.; Kaever, P.

    2016-01-01

    State of the art detector readout electronics require high-throughput data acquisition (DAQ) systems. In many applications, e. g. for medical imaging, the front-end electronics are set up as separate modules in a distributed DAQ. A standardized interface between the modules and a central data unit is essential. The requirements on such an interface are varied, but demand almost always a high throughput of data. Beyond this challenge, a Gigabit Ethernet interface is predestined for the broad requirements of Systems-on-a-Chip (SoC) up to large-scale DAQ systems. We have implemented an embedded protocol stack for a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) capable of high-throughput data transmission and clock synchronization. A versatile stack architecture for the User Datagram Protocol (UDP) and Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) over Internet Protocol (IP) such as Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) as well as Precision Time Protocol (PTP) is presented. With a point-to-point connection to a host in a MicroTCA system we achieved the theoretical maximum data throughput limited by UDP both for 1000BASE-T and 1000BASE-KX links. Furthermore, we show that the random jitter of a synchronous clock over a 1000BASE-T link for a PTP application is below 60 ps.

  3. SwellGel: a sample preparation affinity chromatography technology for high throughput proteomic applications.

    PubMed

    Haney, Paul J; Draveling, Connie; Durski, Wendy; Romanowich, Kathryn; Qoronfleh, M Walid

    2003-04-01

    Development of high throughput systems for purification and analysis of proteins is essential for the success of today's proteomic research. We have developed an affinity chromatography technology that allows the customization of high capacity/high throughput chromatographic separation of proteins. This technology utilizes selected chromatography media that are dehydrated to form uniform SwellGel discs. Unlike wet resin slurries, these discs are easily adaptable to a variety of custom formats, eliminating problems associated with resin dispensing, equilibration, or leakage. Discs can be made in assorted sizes (resin volume 15 microl-3 ml) dispensed in various formats (384-, 96-, 48-, and 24-well microplates or columns) and different ligands can be attached to the matrix. SwellGel discs rapidly hydrate upon addition of either water or the protein sample, providing dramatically increased capacity compared to coated plates. At the same time, the discs offer greater stability, reproducibility, and ease of handling than standard wet chromatography resins. We previously reported the development of SwellGel for the purification of 6x His- and glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-tagged fusion proteins [Prot. Exp. Purif. 22 (2001) 359-366]. In this paper, we discuss an expanded list of SwellGel stabilized chromatographic methods that have been adapted to high throughput formats for processing protein samples ranging from 10 microl to 10 ml (1 microg to 50 mg protein). Data are presented applying SwellGel discs to high throughput proteomic applications such as affinity tag purification, protein desalting, the removal of abundant proteins from serum including albumin and immunoglobulin, and the isolation of phosphorylated peptides for mass spectrometry. PMID:12699691

  4. Gene expression profiling in mitochondrial disease: assessment of microarray accuracy by high-throughput Q-PCR.

    PubMed

    Beckman, Kenneth B; Lee, Kathleen Y; Golden, Tamara; Melov, Simon

    2004-09-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are a heterogeneous array of disorders with a complex etiology. Use of microarrays as a tool to investigate complex human disease is increasingly common, however, a principle drawback of microarrays is their limited dynamic range, due to the poor quantification of weak signals. Although it is generally understood that low-intensity microarray 'spots' may be unreliable, there exists little documentation of their accuracy. Quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) is frequently used to validate microarray data, yet few Q-PCR validation studies have focused on the accuracy of low-intensity microarray signals. Hence, we have used Q-PCR to systematically assess microarray accuracy as a function of signal strength in a mouse model of mitochondrial disease, the superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) nullizygous mouse. We have focused on a unique category of data--spots with only one weak signal in a two-dye comparative hybridization--and show that such 'high-low' signal intensities are common for differentially expressed genes. This category of differential expression may be more important in mitochondrial disease in which there are often mosaic expression patterns due to the idiosyncratic distribution of mutant mtDNA in heteroplasmic individuals. Using RNA from the SOD2 mouse, we found that when spotted cDNA microarray data are filtered for quality (low variance between many technical replicates) and spot intensity (above a negative control threshold in both channels), there is an excellent quantitative concordance with Q-PCR (R2 = 0.94). The accuracy of gene expression ratios from low-intensity spots (R2 = 0.27) and 'high-low' spots (R2 = 0.32) is considerably lower. Our results should serve as guidelines for microarray interpretation and the selection of genes for validation in mitochondrial disorders. PMID:16120406

  5. Single-cell microarray enables high-throughput evaluation of DNA double-strand breaks and DNA repair inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Weingeist, David M; Ge, Jing; Wood, David K; Mutamba, James T; Huang, Qiuying; Rowland, Elizabeth A; Yaffe, Michael B; Floyd, Scott; Engelward, Bevin P

    2013-03-15

    A key modality of non-surgical cancer management is DNA damaging therapy that causes DNA double-strand breaks that are preferentially toxic to rapidly dividing cancer cells. Double-strand break repair capacity is recognized as an important mechanism in drug resistance and is therefore a potential target for adjuvant chemotherapy. Additionally, spontaneous and environmentally induced DSBs are known to promote cancer, making DSB evaluation important as a tool in epidemiology, clinical evaluation and in the development of novel pharmaceuticals. Currently available assays to detect double-strand breaks are limited in throughput and specificity and offer minimal information concerning the kinetics of repair. Here, we present the CometChip, a 96-well platform that enables assessment of double-strand break levels and repair capacity of multiple cell types and conditions in parallel and integrates with standard high-throughput screening and analysis technologies. We demonstrate the ability to detect multiple genetic deficiencies in double-strand break repair and evaluate a set of clinically relevant chemical inhibitors of one of the major double-strand break repair pathways, non-homologous end-joining. While other high-throughput repair assays measure residual damage or indirect markers of damage, the CometChip detects physical double-strand breaks, providing direct measurement of damage induction and repair capacity, which may be useful in developing and implementing treatment strategies with reduced side effects. PMID:23422001

  6. Single-cell microarray enables high-throughput evaluation of DNA double-strand breaks and DNA repair inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Weingeist, David M.; Ge, Jing; Wood, David K.; Mutamba, James T.; Huang, Qiuying; Rowland, Elizabeth A.; Yaffe, Michael B.; Floyd, Scott; Engelward, Bevin P.

    2013-01-01

    A key modality of non-surgical cancer management is DNA damaging therapy that causes DNA double-strand breaks that are preferentially toxic to rapidly dividing cancer cells. Double-strand break repair capacity is recognized as an important mechanism in drug resistance and is therefore a potential target for adjuvant chemotherapy. Additionally, spontaneous and environmentally induced DSBs are known to promote cancer, making DSB evaluation important as a tool in epidemiology, clinical evaluation and in the development of novel pharmaceuticals. Currently available assays to detect double-strand breaks are limited in throughput and specificity and offer minimal information concerning the kinetics of repair. Here, we present the CometChip, a 96-well platform that enables assessment of double-strand break levels and repair capacity of multiple cell types and conditions in parallel and integrates with standard high-throughput screening and analysis technologies. We demonstrate the ability to detect multiple genetic deficiencies in double-strand break repair and evaluate a set of clinically relevant chemical inhibitors of one of the major double-strand break repair pathways, non-homologous end-joining. While other high-throughput repair assays measure residual damage or indirect markers of damage, the CometChip detects physical double-strand breaks, providing direct measurement of damage induction and repair capacity, which may be useful in developing and implementing treatment strategies with reduced side effects. PMID:23422001

  7. Moving Toward Integrating Gene Expression Profiling Into High-Throughput Testing: A Gene Expression Biomarker Accurately Predicts Estrogen Receptor α Modulation in a Microarray Compendium.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Natalia; Chorley, Brian; Tice, Raymond R; Judson, Richard; Corton, J Christopher

    2016-05-01

    Microarray profiling of chemical-induced effects is being increasingly used in medium- and high-throughput formats. Computational methods are described here to identify molecular targets from whole-genome microarray data using as an example the estrogen receptor α (ERα), often modulated by potential endocrine disrupting chemicals. ERα biomarker genes were identified by their consistent expression after exposure to 7 structurally diverse ERα agonists and 3 ERα antagonists in ERα-positive MCF-7 cells. Most of the biomarker genes were shown to be directly regulated by ERα as determined by ESR1 gene knockdown using siRNA as well as through chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with DNA sequencing analysis of ERα-DNA interactions. The biomarker was evaluated as a predictive tool using the fold-change rank-based Running Fisher algorithm by comparison to annotated gene expression datasets from experiments using MCF-7 cells, including those evaluating the transcriptional effects of hormones and chemicals. Using 141 comparisons from chemical- and hormone-treated cells, the biomarker gave a balanced accuracy for prediction of ERα activation or suppression of 94% and 93%, respectively. The biomarker was able to correctly classify 18 out of 21 (86%) ER reference chemicals including "very weak" agonists. Importantly, the biomarker predictions accurately replicated predictions based on 18 in vitro high-throughput screening assays that queried different steps in ERα signaling. For 114 chemicals, the balanced accuracies were 95% and 98% for activation or suppression, respectively. These results demonstrate that the ERα gene expression biomarker can accurately identify ERα modulators in large collections of microarray data derived from MCF-7 cells. PMID:26865669

  8. High-throughput detection of food-borne pathogenic bacteria using oligonucleotide microarray with quantum dots as fluorescent labels.

    PubMed

    Huang, Aihua; Qiu, Zhigang; Jin, Min; Shen, Zhiqiang; Chen, Zhaoli; Wang, Xinwei; Li, Jun-Wen

    2014-08-18

    Bacterial pathogens are mostly responsible for food-borne diseases, and there is still substantial room for improvement in the effective detection of these organisms. In the present study, we explored a new method to detect target pathogens easily and rapidly with high sensitivity and specificity. This method uses an oligonucleotide microarray combined with quantum dots as fluorescent labels. Oligonucleotide probes targeting the 16SrRNA gene were synthesized to create an oligonucleotide microarray. The PCR products labeled with biotin were subsequently hybridized using an oligonucleotide microarray. Following incubation with CdSe/ZnS quantum dots coated with streptavidin, fluorescent signals were detected with a PerkinElmer Gx Microarray Scanner. The results clearly showed specific hybridization profiles corresponding to the bacterial species assessed. Two hundred and sixteen strains of food-borne bacterial pathogens, including standard strains and isolated strains from food samples, were used to test the specificity, stability, and sensitivity of the microarray system. We found that the oligonucleotide microarray combined with quantum dots used as fluorescent labels can successfully discriminate the bacterial organisms at the genera or species level, with high specificity and stability as well as a sensitivity of 10 colony forming units (CFU)/mL of pure culture. We further tested 105 mock-contaminated food samples and achieved consistent results as those obtained from traditional biochemical methods. Together, these results indicate that the quantum dot-based oligonucleotide microarray has the potential to be a powerful tool in the detection and identification of pathogenic bacteria in foods. PMID:24927399

  9. Manual evaluation of tissue microarrays in a high-throughput research project: The contribution of Indian surgical pathology to the Human Protein Atlas (HPA) project.

    PubMed

    Navani, Sanjay

    2016-04-01

    The Human Protein Atlas (HPA) program (www.proteinatlas.org) is an international program that has been set up to allow for a systematic exploration of the human proteome using antibody-based proteomics. This is accomplished by combining high-throughput generation of affinity-purified (mono-specific) antibodies with protein profiling in a multitude of tissues/cell types assembled in tissue microarrays. Twenty-six surgical pathologists over a seven-and-half year period have annotated and curated approximately sixteen million tissue images derived from immunostaining of normal and cancer tissues by approximately 23 000 antibodies. Web-based annotation software that allows for a basic and rapid evaluation of immunoreactivity in tissues has been utilized. Intensity, fraction of immunoreactive cells and subcellular localization were recorded for each given cell population. A text comment summarizing the characteristics for each antibody was added. The methods used and the challenges encountered for this exercise, the largest effort ever by a single group of surgical pathologists, are discussed. Manual annotation of digital images is an important tool that may be successfully utilized in high-throughput research projects. This is the first time an Indian private pathology laboratory has been associated with cutting-edge research internationally providing a classic example of developed and emerging nation collaboration. PMID:26748468

  10. A New Approach for Surface Energy Calculations Applicable to High-throughput Design of New Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratsch, Christian; Kaminski, Jakub

    In this talk we will present a new approach for the calculation of surface energies of periodic crystal. For non-polar materials slabs (which are terminated by two identical surfaces) the task of calculating the surface energy is trivial. But it is more problematic for polar systems where both terminating surfaces are different, as there is no single established method allowing for equal treatment of a wide range of surface morphologies and orientations. Our proposed new approach addresses this problem. It relies on carefully chosen capping atoms and the assumptions that their bond energy contributions can be used to approximate the total energy of the surface. The choice of the capping atoms is governed by a set of simple guidelines that are applicable for surfaces with different terminations. We present the results for different semiconductor materials and show that our approach leads to surfaces energies with errors as low as 2%. We show that hydrogen is not always the best choice for a capping atom if accurate surface energies are the target of the calculations. Our approach is suitable for high-throughput screening of new material interfaces, as accurate calculations of surface energies can be performed in an unsupervised algorithm. A New Approach for Surface Energy Calculations Applicable to High-throughput Design of New Interfaces.

  11. Examination of a genetic algorithm for the application in high-throughput downstream process development.

    PubMed

    Treier, Katrin; Berg, Annette; Diederich, Patrick; Lang, Katharina; Osberghaus, Anna; Dismer, Florian; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2012-10-01

    Compared to traditional strategies, application of high-throughput experiments combined with optimization methods can potentially speed up downstream process development and increase our understanding of processes. In contrast to the method of Design of Experiments in combination with response surface analysis (RSA), optimization approaches like genetic algorithms (GAs) can be applied to identify optimal parameter settings in multidimensional optimizations tasks. In this article the performance of a GA was investigated applying parameters applicable in high-throughput downstream process development. The influence of population size, the design of the initial generation and selection pressure on the optimization results was studied. To mimic typical experimental data, four mathematical functions were used for an in silico evaluation. The influence of GA parameters was minor on landscapes with only one optimum. On landscapes with several optima, parameters had a significant impact on GA performance and success in finding the global optimum. Premature convergence increased as the number of parameters and noise increased. RSA was shown to be comparable or superior for simple systems and low to moderate noise. For complex systems or high noise levels, RSA failed, while GA optimization represented a robust tool for process optimization. Finally, the effect of different objective functions is shown exemplarily for a refolding optimization of lysozyme. PMID:22700464

  12. Differentiation of whole bacterial cells based on high-throughput microarray chip printing and infrared microspectroscopic readout.

    PubMed

    Al-Khaldi, Sufian F; Mossoba, Magdi M; Burke, Tara L; Fry, Frederick S

    2009-10-01

    Using robotic automation, a microarray printing protocol for whole bacterial cells was developed for subsequent label-free and nondestructive infrared microspectroscopic detection. Using this contact microspotting system, 24 microorganisms were printed on zinc selenide slides; these were 6 species of Listeria, 10 species of Vibrio, 2 strains of Photobacterium damselae, Yersinia enterocolitica 289, Bacillus cereus ATCC 14529, Staphylococcus aureus, ATCC 19075 (serotype 104 B), Shigella sonnei 20143, Klebsiella pneumoniae KP73, Enterobacter cloacae, Citrobacter freundii 200, and Escherichia coli. Microarrays consisting of separate spots of bacterial deposits gave consistent and reproducible infrared spectra, which were differentiated by unsupervised pattern recognition algorithms. Two multivariate analysis algorithms, principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis, successfully separated most, but not all, the bacteria investigated down to the species level. PMID:19630511

  13. High-throughput DNA microarray detection of pathogenic bacteria in shallow well groundwater in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Daisuke; Hinoura, Takuji; Suzuki, Noriko; Pang, Junqin; Malla, Rabin; Shrestha, Sadhana; Chapagain, Saroj Kumar; Matsuzawa, Hiroaki; Nakamura, Takashi; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Ike, Michihiko; Nishida, Kei; Sei, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    Because of heavy dependence on groundwater for drinking water and other domestic use, microbial contamination of groundwater is a serious problem in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. This study investigated comprehensively the occurrence of pathogenic bacteria in shallow well groundwater in the Kathmandu Valley by applying DNA microarray analysis targeting 941 pathogenic bacterial species/groups. Water quality measurements found significant coliform (fecal) contamination in 10 of the 11 investigated groundwater samples and significant nitrogen contamination in some samples. The results of DNA microarray analysis revealed the presence of 1-37 pathogen species/groups, including 1-27 biosafety level 2 ones, in 9 of the 11 groundwater samples. While the detected pathogens included several feces- and animal-related ones, those belonging to Legionella and Arthrobacter, which were considered not to be directly associated with feces, were detected prevalently. This study could provide a rough picture of overall pathogenic bacterial contamination in the Kathmandu Valley, and demonstrated the usefulness of DNA microarray analysis as a comprehensive screening tool of a wide variety of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:25146188

  14. HTSstation: a web application and open-access libraries for high-throughput sequencing data analysis.

    PubMed

    David, Fabrice P A; Delafontaine, Julien; Carat, Solenne; Ross, Frederick J; Lefebvre, Gregory; Jarosz, Yohan; Sinclair, Lucas; Noordermeer, Daan; Rougemont, Jacques; Leleu, Marion

    2014-01-01

    The HTSstation analysis portal is a suite of simple web forms coupled to modular analysis pipelines for various applications of High-Throughput Sequencing including ChIP-seq, RNA-seq, 4C-seq and re-sequencing. HTSstation offers biologists the possibility to rapidly investigate their HTS data using an intuitive web application with heuristically pre-defined parameters. A number of open-source software components have been implemented and can be used to build, configure and run HTS analysis pipelines reactively. Besides, our programming framework empowers developers with the possibility to design their own workflows and integrate additional third-party software. The HTSstation web application is accessible at http://htsstation.epfl.ch. PMID:24475057

  15. HTSstation: A Web Application and Open-Access Libraries for High-Throughput Sequencing Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    David, Fabrice P. A.; Delafontaine, Julien; Carat, Solenne; Ross, Frederick J.; Lefebvre, Gregory; Jarosz, Yohan; Sinclair, Lucas; Noordermeer, Daan; Rougemont, Jacques; Leleu, Marion

    2014-01-01

    The HTSstation analysis portal is a suite of simple web forms coupled to modular analysis pipelines for various applications of High-Throughput Sequencing including ChIP-seq, RNA-seq, 4C-seq and re-sequencing. HTSstation offers biologists the possibility to rapidly investigate their HTS data using an intuitive web application with heuristically pre-defined parameters. A number of open-source software components have been implemented and can be used to build, configure and run HTS analysis pipelines reactively. Besides, our programming framework empowers developers with the possibility to design their own workflows and integrate additional third-party software. The HTSstation web application is accessible at http://htsstation.epfl.ch. PMID:24475057

  16. High-throughput identification of putative receptors for cancer-binding peptides using biopanning and microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ferraro, Daniel J; Bhave, Sandeep R; Kotipatruni, Rama P; Hunn, Jeremy C; Wildman, Scott A; Hong, Charles; Dadey, David Y. A.; Muhoro, Lincoln K.; Jaboin, Jerry J; Thotala, Dinesh; Hallahan, Dennis E

    2013-01-01

    Phage-display peptide biopanning has been successfully used to identify cancer-targeting peptides in multiple models. For cancer-binding peptides, identification of the peptide receptor is necessary to demonstrate mechanism of action and to further optimize specificity and target binding. The process of receptor identification can be slow and some peptides may turn out to bind ubiquitous proteins not suitable for further drug development. In this report, we describe a high-throughput method for screening a large number of peptides in parallel to identify peptide receptors, which we have termed “reverse biopanning,” which can then be selected for further development based on their peptide receptor. To demonstrate this method, we screened a library of 39 peptides previously identified in our laboratory to bind specifically cancers after irradiation. The reverse biopanning process identified 2 peptides, RKFLMTTRYSRV and KTAKKNVFFCSV, as candidate ligands for the protein tax interacting protein 1 (TIP-1), a protein previously identified in our laboratory to be expressed in the cell surface in tumors and upregulated after exposure to ionizing radiation. We used computational modeling as the initial method for rapid validation of peptide-TIP-1 binding. Pseudo-binding energies were calculated to be −360.645 kcal/mol, −487.239 kcal/mol, and −595.328 kcal/mol for HVGGSSV, TTRYSRV, and NVFFCSV respectively, suggesting that the peptides would have at least similar, if not stronger, binding to TIP-1 compared to the known TIP-1 binding peptide HVGGSSV. We validated peptide in vitro via electrophoretic mobility shift assay, which showed strong binding of RKFLMTTRYSRV and the truncated form TTRYSRV. This method allows for the identification of many peptide receptors and subsequent selection of peptides for further drug development based on the peptide receptor. PMID:23147990

  17. Development and Applications of the Lectin Microarray.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Jun; Kuno, Atsushi; Tateno, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    The lectin microarray is an emerging technology for glycomics. It has already found maximum use in diverse fields of glycobiology by providing simple procedures for differential glycan profiling in a rapid and high-throughput manner. Since its first appearance in the literature in 2005, many application methods have been developed essentially on the same platform, comprising a series of glycan-binding proteins immobilized on an appropriate substrate such as a glass slide. Because the lectin microarray strategy does not require prior liberation of glycans from the core protein in glycoprotein analysis, it should encourage researchers not familiar with glycotechnology to use glycan analysis in future work. This feasibility should provide a broader range of experimental scientists with good opportunities to investigate novel aspects of glycoscience. Applications of the technology include not only basic sciences but also the growing fields of bio-industry. This chapter describes first the essence of glycan profiling and the basic fabrication of the lectin microarray for this purpose. In the latter part the focus is on diverse applications to both structural and functional glycomics, with emphasis on the wide applicability now available with this new technology. Finally, the importance of developing advanced lectin engineering is discussed. PMID:25821171

  18. Application of Hadamard spectroscopy to automated structure verification in high-throughput NMR.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Ke; Yang, Shengtian; Van Sant, Karey A; Likos, John J

    2009-08-01

    Combined verification using 1-D proton and HSQC has been proved to be quite successful; the acquisition time of HSQC spectra, however, can be limiting in its high-throughput applications. The replacement with Hadamard HSQC can significantly enhance the throughput. We hereby propose a protocol to optimize the grouping of the predicted carbon chemical shifts from the proposed structure and the associated Hadamard frequencies and bandwidths. The resulting Hadamard HSQC spectra compare favorably with their Fourier-transformed counterparts, and have demonstrated to perform equivalently in terms of combined verification, but with several fold enhancement in throughput, as illustrated for 21 commercial available molecules and 16 prototypical drug compounds. Further improvement of the verification accuracy can be achieved by the cross validation from Hadamard TOCSY, which can be acquired without much sacrifice in throughput. PMID:19496061

  19. High-Throughput Profiling of the Humoral Immune Responses Against Thirteen Human Papillomavirus Types by Proteome Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Luevano, Martha; Bernard, Hans-Ulrich; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo A.; Trevino, Victor; Garcia-Carranca, Alejandro; Villa, Luisa L.; Monk, Bradley J.; Tan, Xiaolin; Davies, D. Huw; Felgner, Phil L.; Kalantari, Mina

    2010-01-01

    We have developed microarrays with all eight proteins encoded by 13 different human papillomavirus types associated with anogenital cancer (HPV-16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 45, 53), genital warts (HPV-6, 11), or skin lesions (HPV-1, 2, 4, 5). We analyzed the seroprevalence of antibodies in 546 patients, which had either cervical carcinomas, or precursor lesions, or which were asymptomatic. All patient groups contained sera ranging from high reactivity against multiple HPV proteins to low or no reactivity. Computational analyses showed the E7 proteins of carcinogenic HPV types as significantly more reactive in cancer patients compared to asymptomatic individuals and discriminating between cancer and HSIL or LSIL patients. Antibodies against E4 and E5 had the highest seroprevalence, but did not exhibit differential reactivity relative to pathology. Our study introduces a new approach to future evaluation of the overall antigenicity of HPV proteins and cross-reaction between homologous proteins. PMID:20554302

  20. Applications in high-content functional protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Moore, Cedric D; Ajala, Olutobi Z; Zhu, Heng

    2016-02-01

    Protein microarray technology provides a versatile platform for characterization of hundreds to thousands of proteins in a parallel and high-throughput manner. Over the last decade, applications of functional protein microarrays in particular have flourished in studying protein function at a systems level and have led to the construction of networks and pathways describing these functions. Relevant areas of research include the detection of various binding properties of proteins, the study of enzyme-substrate relationships, the analysis of host-microbe interactions, and profiling antibody specificity. In addition, discovery of novel biomarkers in autoimmune diseases and cancers is emerging as a major clinical application of functional protein microarrays. In this review, we will summarize the recent advances of functional protein microarrays in both basic and clinical applications. PMID:26599287

  1. Applications of High-Throughput Clonogenic Survival Assays in High-LET Particle Microbeams.

    PubMed

    Georgantzoglou, Antonios; Merchant, Michael J; Jeynes, Jonathan C G; Mayhead, Natalie; Punia, Natasha; Butler, Rachel E; Jena, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Charged particle therapy is increasingly becoming a valuable tool in cancer treatment, mainly due to the favorable interaction of particle radiation with matter. Its application is still limited due, in part, to lack of data regarding the radiosensitivity of certain cell lines to this radiation type, especially to high-linear energy transfer (LET) particles. From the earliest days of radiation biology, the clonogenic survival assay has been used to provide radiation response data. This method produces reliable data but it is not optimized for high-throughput microbeam studies with high-LET radiation where high levels of cell killing lead to a very low probability of maintaining cells' clonogenic potential. A new method, therefore, is proposed in this paper, which could potentially allow these experiments to be conducted in a high-throughput fashion. Cells are seeded in special polypropylene dishes and bright-field illumination provides cell visualization. Digital images are obtained and cell detection is applied based on corner detection, generating individual cell targets as x-y points. These points in the dish are then irradiated individually by a micron field size high-LET microbeam. Post-irradiation, time-lapse imaging follows cells' response. All irradiated cells are tracked by linking trajectories in all time-frames, based on finding their nearest position. Cell divisions are detected based on cell appearance and individual cell temporary corner density. The number of divisions anticipated is low due to the high probability of cell killing from high-LET irradiation. Survival curves are produced based on cell's capacity to divide at least four to five times. The process is repeated for a range of doses of radiation. Validation shows the efficiency of the proposed cell detection and tracking method in finding cell divisions. PMID:26835414

  2. Applications of High-Throughput Clonogenic Survival Assays in High-LET Particle Microbeams

    PubMed Central

    Georgantzoglou, Antonios; Merchant, Michael J.; Jeynes, Jonathan C. G.; Mayhead, Natalie; Punia, Natasha; Butler, Rachel E.; Jena, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Charged particle therapy is increasingly becoming a valuable tool in cancer treatment, mainly due to the favorable interaction of particle radiation with matter. Its application is still limited due, in part, to lack of data regarding the radiosensitivity of certain cell lines to this radiation type, especially to high-linear energy transfer (LET) particles. From the earliest days of radiation biology, the clonogenic survival assay has been used to provide radiation response data. This method produces reliable data but it is not optimized for high-throughput microbeam studies with high-LET radiation where high levels of cell killing lead to a very low probability of maintaining cells’ clonogenic potential. A new method, therefore, is proposed in this paper, which could potentially allow these experiments to be conducted in a high-throughput fashion. Cells are seeded in special polypropylene dishes and bright-field illumination provides cell visualization. Digital images are obtained and cell detection is applied based on corner detection, generating individual cell targets as x–y points. These points in the dish are then irradiated individually by a micron field size high-LET microbeam. Post-irradiation, time-lapse imaging follows cells’ response. All irradiated cells are tracked by linking trajectories in all time-frames, based on finding their nearest position. Cell divisions are detected based on cell appearance and individual cell temporary corner density. The number of divisions anticipated is low due to the high probability of cell killing from high-LET irradiation. Survival curves are produced based on cell’s capacity to divide at least four to five times. The process is repeated for a range of doses of radiation. Validation shows the efficiency of the proposed cell detection and tracking method in finding cell divisions. PMID:26835414

  3. Activity Based High-Throughput Screening for Novel O-GlcNAc Transferase Substrates Using a Dynamic Peptide Microarray.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jie; Sharif, Suhela; Ruijtenbeek, Rob; Pieters, Roland J

    2016-01-01

    O-GlcNAcylation is a reversible and dynamic protein post-translational modification in mammalian cells. The O-GlcNAc cycle is catalyzed by O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) and O-GlcNAcase (OGA). O-GlcNAcylation plays important role in many vital cellular events including transcription, cell cycle regulation, stress response and protein degradation, and altered O-GlcNAcylation has long been implicated in cancer, diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, numerous approaches have been developed to identify OGT substrates and study their function, but there is still a strong demand for highly efficient techniques. Here we demonstrated the utility of the peptide microarray approach to discover novel OGT substrates and study its specificity. Interestingly, the protein RBL-2, which is a key regulator of entry into cell division and may function as a tumor suppressor, was identified as a substrate for three isoforms of OGT. Using peptide Ala scanning, we found Ser 420 is one possible O-GlcNAc site in RBL-2. Moreover, substitution of Ser 420, on its own, inhibited OGT activity, raising the possibility of mechanism-based development for selective OGT inhibitors. This approach will prove useful for both discovery of novel OGT substrates and studying OGT specificity. PMID:26960196

  4. Activity Based High-Throughput Screening for Novel O-GlcNAc Transferase Substrates Using a Dynamic Peptide Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jie; Sharif, Suhela; Ruijtenbeek, Rob; Pieters, Roland J.

    2016-01-01

    O-GlcNAcylation is a reversible and dynamic protein post-translational modification in mammalian cells. The O-GlcNAc cycle is catalyzed by O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) and O-GlcNAcase (OGA). O-GlcNAcylation plays important role in many vital cellular events including transcription, cell cycle regulation, stress response and protein degradation, and altered O-GlcNAcylation has long been implicated in cancer, diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, numerous approaches have been developed to identify OGT substrates and study their function, but there is still a strong demand for highly efficient techniques. Here we demonstrated the utility of the peptide microarray approach to discover novel OGT substrates and study its specificity. Interestingly, the protein RBL-2, which is a key regulator of entry into cell division and may function as a tumor suppressor, was identified as a substrate for three isoforms of OGT. Using peptide Ala scanning, we found Ser 420 is one possible O-GlcNAc site in RBL-2. Moreover, substitution of Ser 420, on its own, inhibited OGT activity, raising the possibility of mechanism-based development for selective OGT inhibitors. This approach will prove useful for both discovery of novel OGT substrates and studying OGT specificity. PMID:26960196

  5. High-throughput development of amphiphile self-assembly materials: fast-tracking synthesis, characterization, formulation, application, and understanding.

    PubMed

    Mulet, Xavier; Conn, Charlotte E; Fong, Celesta; Kennedy, Danielle F; Moghaddam, Minoo J; Drummond, Calum J

    2013-07-16

    Amphiphile self-assembly materials, which contain both a hydrophilic and a hydrophobic domain, have great potential in high-throughput and combinatorial approaches to discovery and development. However, the materials chemistry community has not embraced these ideas to anywhere near the extent that the medicinal chemistry community has. While this situation is beginning to change, extracting the full potential of high-throughput approaches in the development of self-assembling materials will require further development in the synthesis, characterization, formulation, and application domains. One of the key factors that make small molecule amphiphiles prospective building blocks for next generation multifunctional materials is their ability to self-assemble into complex nanostructures through low-energy transformations. Scientists can potentially tune, control, and functionalize these structures, but only after establishing their inherent properties. Because both robotic materials handling and customized rapid characterization equipment are increasingly available, high-throughput solutions are now attainable. These address traditional development bottlenecks associated with self-assembling amphiphile materials, such as their structural characterization and the assessment of end-use functional performance. A high-throughput methodology can help streamline materials development workflows, in accord with existing high-throughput discovery pipelines such as those used by the pharmaceutical industry in drug discovery. Chemists have identified several areas that are amenable to a high-throughput approach for amphiphile self-assembly materials development. These allow an exploration of not only a large potential chemical, compositional, and structural space, but also material properties, formulation, and application variables. These areas of development include materials synthesis and preparation, formulation, characterization, and screening performance for the desired end

  6. High-throughput profiling of tissue and tissue model microarrays: Combined transmitted light and 3-color fluorescence digital pathology

    PubMed Central

    Nederlof, Michel; Watanabe, Shigeo; Burnip, Bill; Taylor, D. Lansing; Critchley-Thorne, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    For many years pathologists have used Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E), single marker immunohistochemistry (IHC) and in situ hybridization with manual analysis by microscopy or at best simple digital imaging. There is a growing trend to update pathology to a digital workflow to improve objectivity and productivity, as has been done in radiology. There is also a need for tissue-based multivariate biomarker assays to improve the accuracy of diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive testing. Multivariate tests are not compatible with the traditional single marker, manual analysis pathology methods but instead require a digital platform with brightfield and fluorescence imaging, quantitative image analysis, and informatics. Here we describe the use of the Hamamatsu NanoZoomer Digital Pathology slide scanner with HCImage software for combined brightfield and multiplexed fluorescence biomarker analysis and highlight its applications in biomarker research and pathology testing. This combined approach will be an important aid to pathologists in making critical diagnoses. PMID:22200032

  7. High throughput fabrication of plasmonic nanostructures in nanofluidic pores for biosensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzotta, Francesco; Höök, Fredrik; Jonsson, Magnus P.

    2012-10-01

    One of the primary advantages of nanoscale sensors is that they often can provide conceptually new ways of performing sensing that are not feasible with their large-scale analogs. For example, the small size of nanoscale sensor elements, such as plasmonic metal nanoparticles, allows them to be combined with nanofluidic systems. Among the potential applications of such a combination is the efficient delivery of analyte to the sensor surface. With this in mind, in this work we look to address the challenge of creating and positioning nanoplasmonic sensor elements within nanofluidic pores. A scheme is presented that allows for the production of arrays of pores in a thin (220 nm) silicon nitride membrane with one plasmonic nanoparticle sensor element in each pore. The high throughput fabrication protocol is parallel and enables multiple sensor chips to be produced simultaneously, yet with accurate tuning of the dimension and shape of the nanoparticles. The presented system is shown to possess polarization-sensitive plasmonic resonances that can be tuned significantly in the visible wavelength range by just varying one process parameter. The thickness of the membrane could be optimized to minimize the influence of the optical membrane interference on the plasmonic readout. The sensitivity of the plasmon resonances to changes in refractive index, which forms the basis for using the system for biosensing, was found to be competitive with other nanoplasmonic sensors.

  8. Development of high-throughput glass inkjet devices for pharmaceutical applications.

    PubMed

    Ehtezazi, Touraj; Dempster, Nicola M; Martin, Graham D; Hoath, Stephen D; Hutchings, Ian M

    2014-11-01

    The application of the inkjet method to pharmaceutical products is promising. To make this realistic, not only does the throughput of this method need to be increased, but also the components should be inert to pharmaceutical preparations. We present designs of glass-based inkjet devices that are capable of producing droplets at high rates. To achieve this, inkjet devices from glass capillary tubes were manufactured with orifice diameters of 5, 10 and 20 μm and were actuated with diaphragm piezoelectric disks. Also, a pressure capsule was formed by creating a manifold at a distance from the orifice tip. Placing the piezoelectric disk at 0.5 mm distance from the tip allowed the formation of a jet at 3.2 MHz in certain designs, but for a short period of time because of overheating. The length of the pressure capsule, its inlet diameter, and the nozzle tip geometry were crucial to lower the required power. Actuating an inkjet device with 10 μm orifice diameter comfortably at 900 kHz and drying the droplets from 1% salbutamol sulphate solution allowed the formation of particles with diameters of 1.76 ± 0.15 μm and the geometric standard deviation of 1.08. In conclusion, optimising internal design of glass inkjet devices allowed the production of high-throughput droplet ejectors. PMID:25266398

  9. High-throughput automated dissolution method applicable for a wide dose range of controlled release pellets.

    PubMed

    Petruševska, Marija; Horvat, Matej; Peternel, Luka; Kristan, Katja

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to demonstrate the application of an automated high-throughput (HT) dissolution method as a useful screening tool for characterization of controlled release pellets in the formulation development phase. Five controlled release pellet formulations with drug substances exhibiting high or low solubility were chosen to investigate the correlation of the automated HT dissolution method with the conventional dissolution testing. Overall, excellent correlations (R(2 )>( )0.96) between the HT and the conventional dissolution method were obtained. In one case the initial unsatisfactory correlation (R(2 )=( )0.84) and poor method agreement (SD = 12.5) was improved by optimizing the HT dissolution method with design of experiment approach. Here in comparison to initial experimental HT dissolution settings, increased amount of pellets (25% of the capsule filling mass), lower temperature (22 °C) and no shaking resulted in significantly better correlation (R(2 )=( )0.97) and method agreement (SD = 5.3). These results show that such optimization is valuable for the development of HT dissolution methods. In conclusion, the high correlation of dissolution profiles obtained from the conventional and the automated HT dissolution method combined with low within-sample and measurement system variability, justifies the utilization of the automated HT dissolution method during development phase of controlled release pellets. PMID:26552838

  10. Development and application of a high-throughput platform for perfusion-based cell culture processes.

    PubMed

    Villiger-Oberbek, Agata; Yang, Yang; Zhou, Weichang; Yang, Jianguo

    2015-10-20

    A high-throughput (HT) cell culture model has been established for the support of perfusion-based cell culture processes operating at high cell densities. To mimic perfusion, the developed platform takes advantage of shake tubes and operates them in a batch-refeed mode with daily medium exchange to supply the cultures with nutrients and remove toxic byproducts. By adjusting the shaking parameters, such as the speed and setting angle, we have adapted the shake tubes to a semi-continuous production of a recombinant enzyme in a perfusion-like mode. We have demonstrated that the developed model can be used to select clones and cell culture media ahead of process optimization studies in bioreactors and confirmed the applicability of shake tubes to a perfusion-like cell culture reaching ∼50E6 viable cells/mL. Furthermore, through regular cell mass removal and periodic medium exchange we have successfully maintained satellite cultures of bench-top perfusion bioreactors, achieving a sustainable cell culture performance at ≥30E6 viable cells/mL and viabilities >80% for over 58 days. The established HT model is a unique and powerful tool that can be used for the development and screening of media formulations, or for testing selected process parameters during both process optimization and manufacturing support campaigns. PMID:26197419

  11. Computer controlled cryo-electron microscopy--TOM² a software package for high-throughput applications.

    PubMed

    Korinek, Andreas; Beck, Florian; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Nickell, Stephan; Plitzko, Jürgen M

    2011-09-01

    Automated data acquisition expedites structural studies by electron microscopy and it allows to collect data sets of unprecedented size and consistent quality. In electron tomography it greatly facilitates the systematic exploration of large cellular landscapes and in single particle analysis it allows to generate data sets for an exhaustive classification of coexisting molecular states. Here we describe a novel software philosophy and architecture that can be used for a great variety of automated data acquisition scenarios. Based on our original software package TOM, the new TOM(2) package has been designed in an object-oriented way. The whole program can be seen as a collection of self-sufficient modules with defined relationships acting in a concerted manner. It subdivides data acquisition into a set of hierarchical tasks, bonding data structure and the operations to be performed tightly together. To demonstrate its capacity for high-throughput data acquisition it has been used in conjunction with instrumentation combining the latest technological achievements in electron optics, cryogenics and robotics. Its performance is demonstrated with a single particle analysis case study and with a batch tomography application. PMID:21704708

  12. Acoustic Droplet Ejection Technology and Its Application in High-Throughput RNA Interference Screening

    PubMed Central

    Nebane, N. Miranda; Coric, Tatjana; McKellip, Sara; Woods, LaKeisha; Sosa, Melinda; Rasmussen, Lynn; Bjornsti, Mary-Ann; White, E. Lucile

    2016-01-01

    The development of acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) technology has resulted in many positive changes associated with the operations in a high-throughput screening (HTS) laboratory. Originally, this liquid transfer technology was used to simply transfer DMSO solutions of primarily compounds. With the introduction of Labcyte’s Echo 555, which has aqueous dispense capability, the application of this technology has been expanded beyond its original use. This includes the transfer of many biological reagents solubilized in aqueous buffers, including siRNAs. The Echo 555 is ideal for siRNA dispensing because it is accurate at low volumes and a step-down dilution is not necessary. The potential for liquid carryover and cross-contamination is eliminated, as no tips are needed. Herein, we describe the siRNA screening platform at Southern Research’s HTS Center using the ADE technology. With this technology, an siRNA library can be dispensed weeks or even months in advance of the assay itself. The protocol has been optimized to achieve assay parameters comparable to small-molecule screening parameters, and exceeding the norm reported for genomewide siRNA screens. PMID:26663785

  13. Advanced photoresist for high-throughput i-line stepper applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canize, Anthony; Spiess, Walter; Ficner, Stanley A.; Lu, Ping-Hung; Dammel, Ralph R.; Perez, Yvette M.

    1995-06-01

    The use of i-line photolithography is finding increased importance in generating today's advanced semiconductor devices. The requirements in this area have led to the recent development of wide field i-line steppers whose large field sizes permit higher device throughput. The introductions of these wide field i-line steppers generate additional demands on the photoresist used in the manufacturing process. This paper describes the development of an advanced i-line photoresist for use in high-throughput applications. The requirements of this photoresist are high photospeed of the order of 75 mJ/cm2 to achieve targeted throughput requirements at low lamp power densities, high resolution of approximately 0.80 micrometers at NA equals 0.24 to satisfy device critical dimension requirements, and high resistance to thermal flow to permit further processing stages. The photoresist's formulation and processing were optimized to produce the desired performance characteristics. Exposure, focus latitude, photosensitivity, and resistance to thermal flow were determined and correlated with resin dissolution characteristics, relative photosensitizer concentration, softbake and post exposure bake temperatures.

  14. Development of a Framework for High-Throughput Calculations and its Application to Energy Storage Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirklin, Scott

    From a historical perspective, the progress of humanity has been measured by the materials that mankind has been able to use. Looking forward, future technological developments will continue to hinge on the development of materials with precisely tailored properties and performance. In pursuit of this goal, this thesis presents a framework for the high-throughput handling of first principles materials modeling. This framework takes the form of the Open Quantum Materials Database (OQMD - www.oqmd.org), a repository of crystal structures, computed materials properties, and a host of tools for data storage, retrieval, and analysis. At present, the OQMD contains over 300,000 materials, and over 1.3 million completed density functional theory calculations. We set forth to demonstrate the usefulness of the OQMD for materials discovery by using it to search for materials for three applications: 1) conversion reaction anode materials for Li-ion batteries, 2) electrode materials for a novel hybrid Li-ion/Li-O2 battery chemistry, and 3) precipitation strengtheners for a suite of structural metals. In each of these materials discovery projects, we first determine the scope of relevant materials to consider, then develop a set of screens based on DFT calculable bulk materials properties, implement the specified filters, and finally consider the apparent advantages and disadvantages of the predicted materials.

  15. Discovery of Novel NOx Catalysts for CIDI Applications by High-throughput Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Blint, Richard

    2007-12-31

    DOE project DE-PS26-00NT40758 has developed very active, lean exhaust, NOx reduction catalysts that have been tested on the discovery system, laboratory reactors and engine dynamometer systems. The goal of this project is the development of effective, affordable NOx reduction catalysts for lean combustion engines in the US light duty vehicle market which can meet Tier II emission standards with hydrocarbons based reductants for reducing NOx. General Motors (prime contractor) along with subcontractors BASF (Engelhard) (a catalytic converter developer) and ACCELRYS (an informatics supplier) carried out this project which began in August of 2002. BASF (Engelhard) has run over 16,000 tests of 6100 possible catalytic materials on a high throughput discovery system suitable for automotive catalytic materials. Accelrys developed a new database informatics system which allowed material tracking and data mining. A program catalyst was identified and evaluated at all levels of the program. Dynamometer evaluations of the program catalyst both with and without additives show 92% NOx conversions on the HWFET, 76% on the US06, 60% on the cold FTP and 65% on the Set 13 heavy duty test using diesel fuel. Conversions of over 92% on the heavy duty FTP using ethanol as a second fluid reductant have been measured. These can be competitive with both of the alternative lean NOx reduction technologies presently in the market. Conversions of about 80% were measured on the EUDC for lean gasoline applications without using active dosing to adjust the C:N ratio for optimum NOx reduction at all points in the certification cycle. A feasibility analysis has been completed and demonstrates the advantages and disadvantages of the technology using these materials compared with other potential technologies. The teaming agreements among the partners contain no obstacles to commercialization of new technologies to any potential catalyst customers.

  16. Clinical application of high-throughput genomic technologies for treatment selection in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale collaborative initiatives using next-generation DNA sequencing and other high-throughput technologies have begun to characterize the genomic landscape of breast cancer. These landmark studies have identified infrequent driver mutations that are potential targets for therapeutic intervention with approved or investigational drug treatments, among other important discoveries. Recently, many institutions have launched molecular screening programs that apply high-throughput genomic technologies to patients with advanced solid malignancies, including breast cancer, to inform clinical decision-making. This article provides an overview of the recent molecular insights in breast cancer, including potentially actionable somatic alterations, the technological platforms currently available in a clinical diagnostics setting to detect these alterations, and ongoing institutional or regional molecular screening programs in advanced breast cancer. PMID:24135425

  17. Ultra-high-throughput Production of III-V/Si Wafer for Electronic and Photonic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geum, Dae-Myeong; Park, Min-Su; Lim, Ju Young; Yang, Hyun-Duk; Song, Jin Dong; Kim, Chang Zoo; Yoon, Euijoon; Kim, Sanghyeon; Choi, Won Jun

    2016-02-01

    Si-based integrated circuits have been intensively developed over the past several decades through ultimate device scaling. However, the Si technology has reached the physical limitations of the scaling. These limitations have fuelled the search for alternative active materials (for transistors) and the introduction of optical interconnects (called “Si photonics”). A series of attempts to circumvent the Si technology limits are based on the use of III-V compound semiconductor due to their superior benefits, such as high electron mobility and direct bandgap. To use their physical properties on a Si platform, the formation of high-quality III-V films on the Si (III-V/Si) is the basic technology ; however, implementing this technology using a high-throughput process is not easy. Here, we report new concepts for an ultra-high-throughput heterogeneous integration of high-quality III-V films on the Si using the wafer bonding and epitaxial lift off (ELO) technique. We describe the ultra-fast ELO and also the re-use of the III-V donor wafer after III-V/Si formation. These approaches provide an ultra-high-throughput fabrication of III-V/Si substrates with a high-quality film, which leads to a dramatic cost reduction. As proof-of-concept devices, this paper demonstrates GaAs-based high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs), solar cells, and hetero-junction phototransistors on Si substrates.

  18. Quantifying the Onset and Progression of Plant Senescence by Color Image Analysis for High Throughput Applications.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jinhai; Okamoto, Mamoru; Atieno, Judith; Sutton, Tim; Li, Yongle; Miklavcic, Stanley J

    2016-01-01

    Leaf senescence, an indicator of plant age and ill health, is an important phenotypic trait for the assessment of a plant's response to stress. Manual inspection of senescence, however, is time consuming, inaccurate and subjective. In this paper we propose an objective evaluation of plant senescence by color image analysis for use in a high throughput plant phenotyping pipeline. As high throughput phenotyping platforms are designed to capture whole-of-plant features, camera lenses and camera settings are inappropriate for the capture of fine detail. Specifically, plant colors in images may not represent true plant colors, leading to errors in senescence estimation. Our algorithm features a color distortion correction and image restoration step prior to a senescence analysis. We apply our algorithm to two time series of images of wheat and chickpea plants to quantify the onset and progression of senescence. We compare our results with senescence scores resulting from manual inspection. We demonstrate that our procedure is able to process images in an automated way for an accurate estimation of plant senescence even from color distorted and blurred images obtained under high throughput conditions. PMID:27348807

  19. Quantifying the Onset and Progression of Plant Senescence by Color Image Analysis for High Throughput Applications

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jinhai; Okamoto, Mamoru; Atieno, Judith; Sutton, Tim; Li, Yongle; Miklavcic, Stanley J.

    2016-01-01

    Leaf senescence, an indicator of plant age and ill health, is an important phenotypic trait for the assessment of a plant’s response to stress. Manual inspection of senescence, however, is time consuming, inaccurate and subjective. In this paper we propose an objective evaluation of plant senescence by color image analysis for use in a high throughput plant phenotyping pipeline. As high throughput phenotyping platforms are designed to capture whole-of-plant features, camera lenses and camera settings are inappropriate for the capture of fine detail. Specifically, plant colors in images may not represent true plant colors, leading to errors in senescence estimation. Our algorithm features a color distortion correction and image restoration step prior to a senescence analysis. We apply our algorithm to two time series of images of wheat and chickpea plants to quantify the onset and progression of senescence. We compare our results with senescence scores resulting from manual inspection. We demonstrate that our procedure is able to process images in an automated way for an accurate estimation of plant senescence even from color distorted and blurred images obtained under high throughput conditions. PMID:27348807

  20. Ultra-high-throughput Production of III-V/Si Wafer for Electronic and Photonic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Geum, Dae-Myeong; Park, Min-Su; Lim, Ju Young; Yang, Hyun-Duk; Song, Jin Dong; Kim, Chang Zoo; Yoon, Euijoon; Kim, SangHyeon; Choi, Won Jun

    2016-01-01

    Si-based integrated circuits have been intensively developed over the past several decades through ultimate device scaling. However, the Si technology has reached the physical limitations of the scaling. These limitations have fuelled the search for alternative active materials (for transistors) and the introduction of optical interconnects (called “Si photonics”). A series of attempts to circumvent the Si technology limits are based on the use of III-V compound semiconductor due to their superior benefits, such as high electron mobility and direct bandgap. To use their physical properties on a Si platform, the formation of high-quality III-V films on the Si (III-V/Si) is the basic technology ; however, implementing this technology using a high-throughput process is not easy. Here, we report new concepts for an ultra-high-throughput heterogeneous integration of high-quality III-V films on the Si using the wafer bonding and epitaxial lift off (ELO) technique. We describe the ultra-fast ELO and also the re-use of the III-V donor wafer after III-V/Si formation. These approaches provide an ultra-high-throughput fabrication of III-V/Si substrates with a high-quality film, which leads to a dramatic cost reduction. As proof-of-concept devices, this paper demonstrates GaAs-based high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs), solar cells, and hetero-junction phototransistors on Si substrates. PMID:26864968

  1. Ultra-high-throughput Production of III-V/Si Wafer for Electronic and Photonic Applications.

    PubMed

    Geum, Dae-Myeong; Park, Min-Su; Lim, Ju Young; Yang, Hyun-Duk; Song, Jin Dong; Kim, Chang Zoo; Yoon, Euijoon; Kim, SangHyeon; Choi, Won Jun

    2016-01-01

    Si-based integrated circuits have been intensively developed over the past several decades through ultimate device scaling. However, the Si technology has reached the physical limitations of the scaling. These limitations have fuelled the search for alternative active materials (for transistors) and the introduction of optical interconnects (called "Si photonics"). A series of attempts to circumvent the Si technology limits are based on the use of III-V compound semiconductor due to their superior benefits, such as high electron mobility and direct bandgap. To use their physical properties on a Si platform, the formation of high-quality III-V films on the Si (III-V/Si) is the basic technology ; however, implementing this technology using a high-throughput process is not easy. Here, we report new concepts for an ultra-high-throughput heterogeneous integration of high-quality III-V films on the Si using the wafer bonding and epitaxial lift off (ELO) technique. We describe the ultra-fast ELO and also the re-use of the III-V donor wafer after III-V/Si formation. These approaches provide an ultra-high-throughput fabrication of III-V/Si substrates with a high-quality film, which leads to a dramatic cost reduction. As proof-of-concept devices, this paper demonstrates GaAs-based high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs), solar cells, and hetero-junction phototransistors on Si substrates. PMID:26864968

  2. A review of the theory, methods and recent applications of high-throughput single-cell droplet microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagus, Todd P.; Edd, Jon F.

    2013-03-01

    Most cell biology experiments are performed in bulk cell suspensions where cell secretions become diluted and mixed in a contiguous sample. Confinement of single cells to small, picoliter-sized droplets within a continuous phase of oil provides chemical isolation of each cell, creating individual microreactors where rare cell qualities are highlighted and otherwise undetectable signals can be concentrated to measurable levels. Recent work in microfluidics has yielded methods for the encapsulation of cells in aqueous droplets and hydrogels at kilohertz rates, creating the potential for millions of parallel single-cell experiments. However, commercial applications of high-throughput microdroplet generation and downstream sensing and actuation methods are still emerging for cells. Using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) as a benchmark for commercially available high-throughput screening, this focused review discusses the fluid physics of droplet formation, methods for cell encapsulation in liquids and hydrogels, sensors and actuators and notable biological applications of high-throughput single-cell droplet microfluidics.

  3. A high-throughput assay of NK cell activity in whole blood and its clinical application

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Saet-byul; Cha, Junhoe; Kim, Im-kyung; Yoon, Joo Chun; Lee, Hyo Joon; Park, Sang Woo; Cho, Sunjung; Youn, Dong-Ye; Lee, Heyja; Lee, Choong Hwan; Lee, Jae Myun; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Jongsun

    2014-03-14

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We demonstrated a simple assay of NK cell activity from whole blood. • The measurement of secreted IFN-γ from NK cell enables high-throughput screening. • The NKA assay was validated by clinical results of colorectal cancer patients. - Abstract: Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system and have the ability to kill tumor cells and virus-infected cells without prior sensitization. Malignant tumors and viruses have developed, however, strategies to suppress NK cells to escape from their responses. Thus, the evaluation of NK cell activity (NKA) could be invaluable to estimate the status and the outcome of cancers, viral infections, and immune-mediated diseases. Established methods that measure NKA, such as {sup 51}Cr release assay and CD107a degranulation assay, may be used to determine NK cell function, but they are complicated and time-consuming because they require isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or NK cells. In some cases these assays require hazardous material such as radioactive isotopes. To overcome these difficulties, we developed a simple assay that uses whole blood instead of PBMC or isolated NK cells. This novel assay is suitable for high-throughput screening and the monitoring of diseases, because it employs serum of ex vivo stimulated whole blood to detect interferon (IFN)-γ secreted from NK cells as an indicator of NKA. After the stimulation of NK cells, the determination of IFNγ concentration in serum samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) provided a swift, uncomplicated, and high-throughput assay of NKA ex vivo. The NKA results microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer patients was showed significantly lower NKA, 263.6 ± 54.5 pg/mL compared with healthy subjects, 867.5 ± 50.2 pg/mL (p value <0.0001). Therefore, the NKA could be utilized as a supportive diagnostic marker for microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer.

  4. Development of Control Applications for High-Throughput Protein Crystallography Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gaponov, Yurii A.; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Honda, Nobuo; Sasajima, Kumiko; Igarashi, Noriyuki; Hiraki, Masahiko; Yamada, Yusuke; Wakatsuki, Soichi

    2007-01-19

    An integrated client-server control system (PCCS) with a unified relational database (PCDB) has been developed for high-throughput protein crystallography experiments on synchrotron beamlines. The major steps in protein crystallographic experiments (purification, crystallization, crystal harvesting, data collection, and data processing) are integrated into the software. All information necessary for performing protein crystallography experiments is stored in the PCDB database (except raw X-ray diffraction data, which is stored in the Network File Server). To allow all members of a protein crystallography group to participate in experiments, the system was developed as a multi-user system with secure network access based on TCP/IP secure UNIX sockets. Secure remote access to the system is possible from any operating system with X-terminal and SSH/X11 (Secure Shell with graphical user interface) support. Currently, the system covers the high-throughput X-ray data collection stages and is being commissioned at BL5A and NW12A (PF, PF-AR, KEK, Tsukuba, Japan)

  5. Robust ridge regression estimators for nonlinear models with applications to high throughput screening assay data.

    PubMed

    Lim, Changwon

    2015-03-30

    Nonlinear regression is often used to evaluate the toxicity of a chemical or a drug by fitting data from a dose-response study. Toxicologists and pharmacologists may draw a conclusion about whether a chemical is toxic by testing the significance of the estimated parameters. However, sometimes the null hypothesis cannot be rejected even though the fit is quite good. One possible reason for such cases is that the estimated standard errors of the parameter estimates are extremely large. In this paper, we propose robust ridge regression estimation procedures for nonlinear models to solve this problem. The asymptotic properties of the proposed estimators are investigated; in particular, their mean squared errors are derived. The performances of the proposed estimators are compared with several standard estimators using simulation studies. The proposed methodology is also illustrated using high throughput screening assay data obtained from the National Toxicology Program. PMID:25490981

  6. Experiment and Modeling of Spatially Indexed Microbead Arrays for High-Throughput Screening Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leary, Thomas; Maldarelli, Charles; Couzis, Alexander

    2011-11-01

    The development of platforms for multiplexed, high throughput screening of the binding interactions of target biomolecules against a library of potential binding probes enables progress in many areas in medicine and biology. Formats in which probes are linked to microbeads arrayed in a microfluidic channel offer high sensitivity, reduced reagent consumption and are easily parallelized for multiplexed detection. This presentation describes a microfluidically assembled microbead array in which beads are streamed through a channel with an array of wells inscribed in the floor of the channel. The beads are captured in the wells via gravity. We demonstrate that an array of beads displaying different receptors can be assembled in this format, indexed by sequential depostion and used for a prototype assay. Solutions for a two dimensional mass transfer model of the conjugation of the probe to the receptor on the bead surface identify kinetically limited regimes which are used to measure the binding kinetics of the prototype assay.

  7. Gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection for high-throughput antisense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalies, S.; Heinemann, D.; Schomaker, M.; Birr, T.; Ripken, T.; Meyer, H.

    2013-06-01

    The delivery of antisense structures, like siRNA, is beneficial for new therapeutic approaches in regenerative sciences. Optical transfection techniques enable high spatial control combined with minimal invasive treatment of cells due to the use of short laser pulses. However, single cell laser transfection by a tightly focused laser beam, for example femtosecond laser transfection, has the major drawback of low throughput. Compared to this, high-throughput in laser transfection is possible by applying gold nanoparticles irradiated by a weakly focused laser beam scanning over the cell sample. Herein, we show the delivery of antisense molecules and demonstrate the minimal cytotoxicity of a method called gold nanoparticle mediated (GNOME) laser transfection. A 532 nm microchip laser in conjugation with 200 nm gold nanoparticles at a concentration of 0.5 μg/cm2 is used. In addition to antisense molecules, the uptake of dextrans of several sizes is analyzed.

  8. Application of a High-throughput Fluorescent Acetyltransferase Assay to Identify Inhibitors of Homocitrate Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Bulfer, Stacie L.; McQuade, Thomas J.; Larsen, Martha J.; Trievel, Raymond C.

    2011-01-01

    Homocitrate synthase (HCS) catalyzes the first step of L-lysine biosynthesis in fungi by condensing acetyl-Coenzyme A and 2-oxoglutarate to form 3R-homocitrate and Coenzyme A. Due to its conservation in pathogenic fungi, HCS has been proposed as a candidate for antifungal drug design. Here we report the development and validation of a robust, fluorescent assay for HCS that is amenable to high-throughput screening for inhibitors in vitro. Using this assay, Schizosaccharomyces pombe HCS was screened against a diverse library of ~41,000 small molecules. Following confirmation, counter screens, and dose-response analysis, we prioritized over 100 compounds for further in vitro and in vivo analysis. This assay can be readily adapted to screen for small molecule modulators of other acyl-CoA-dependent acyltransferases or enzymes that generate a product with a free sulfhydryl group, including histone acetyltransferases, aminoglycoside N-acetyltransferases, thioesterases and enzymes involved in lipid metabolism. PMID:21073853

  9. An Automated Application Framework to Model Disordered Materials Based on a High Throughput First Principles Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oses, Corey; Yang, Kesong; Curtarolo, Stefano; Duke Univ Collaboration; UC San Diego Collaboration

    Predicting material properties of disordered systems remains a long-standing and formidable challenge in rational materials design. To address this issue, we introduce an automated software framework capable of modeling partial occupation within disordered materials using a high-throughput (HT) first principles approach. At the heart of the approach is the construction of supercells containing a virtually equivalent stoichiometry to the disordered material. All unique supercell permutations are enumerated and material properties of each are determined via HT electronic structure calculations. In accordance with a canonical ensemble of supercell states, the framework evaluates ensemble average properties of the system as a function of temperature. As proof of concept, we examine the framework's final calculated properties of a zinc chalcogenide (ZnS1-xSex), a wide-gap oxide semiconductor (MgxZn1-xO), and an iron alloy (Fe1-xCux) at various stoichiometries.

  10. Hi-Plex for high-throughput mutation screening: application to the breast cancer susceptibility gene PALB2

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) has revolutionised biomedical research and offers enormous capacity for clinical application. We previously reported Hi-Plex, a streamlined highly-multiplexed PCR-MPS approach, allowing a given library to be sequenced with both the Ion Torrent and TruSeq chemistries. Comparable sequencing efficiency was achieved using material derived from lymphoblastoid cell lines and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumour. Methods Here, we report high-throughput application of Hi-Plex by performing blinded mutation screening of the coding regions of the breast cancer susceptibility gene PALB2 on a set of 95 blood-derived DNA samples that had previously been screened using Sanger sequencing and high-resolution melting curve analysis (n = 90), or genotyped by Taqman probe-based assays (n = 5). Hi-Plex libraries were prepared simultaneously using relatively inexpensive, readily available reagents in a simple half-day protocol followed by MPS on a single MiSeq run. Results We observed that 99.93% of amplicons were represented at ≥10X coverage. All 56 previously identified variant calls were detected and no false positive calls were assigned. Four additional variant calls were made and confirmed upon re-analysis of previous data or subsequent Sanger sequencing. Conclusions These results support Hi-Plex as a powerful approach for rapid, cost-effective and accurate high-throughput mutation screening. They further demonstrate that Hi-Plex methods are suitable for and can meet the demands of high-throughput genetic testing in research and clinical settings. PMID:24206657

  11. Strategies and applications of combinatorial methods and high throughput screening to the discovery of non-noble metal catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bricker, Maureen L.; Sachtler, J. W. Adriaan; Gillespie, Ralph D.; McGonegal, Charles P.; Vega, Honorio; Bem, Dave S.; Holmgren, Jennifer S.

    2004-02-01

    The integrated End-to-End™ combinatorial process for catalyst preparation and screening, with emphasis on its capability to vary both process and compositional parameters will be demonstrated. Additionally, each step of the combinatorial screening process has been validated against results from traditional screening methods. The greatest challenge of all has been the adherence to the core concepts of the combinatorial approach. Catalyst libraries have been made and tested for naphthalene dehydrogenation chemistry. The preparation of these libraries has included the application of high throughput techniques for: metal impregnation; catalyst finishing; catalyst screening. The catalyst screening system has been used to find a non-noble metal catalyst system that can replace Pt in dehydrogenation applications in the petroleum industry. A proprietary catalytic composition was developed for the dehydrogenation of methylcyclohexane (MCH) to toluene starting with four non-noble metals of different proportions and four different supports (alumina, titania, zirconia and silica) prepared in different ways and applying a statistical design of experiments. These data demonstrate that all steps of catalyst preparation and screening are performed in a rapid, useful, high throughput manner. Data will be presented from the catalyst screening efforts will demonstrate that optimized metal composition is dependent on the support type.

  12. Optimization and application of a custom microarray for the detection and genotyping of E. coli O157:H7 in fresh meat samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA microarrays are promising high-throughput tools for multiple pathogen detection. Currently, the performance and cost of this platform has limited its broad application in identifying microbial contaminants in foods. In this study, an optimized custom DNA microarray with flexibility in design and...

  13. Facile and rapid generation of 3D chemical gradients within hydrogels for high-throughput drug screening applications.

    PubMed

    Ahadian, Samad; Ramón-Azcón, Javier; Estili, Mehdi; Obregón, Raquel; Shiku, Hitoshi; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2014-09-15

    We propose a novel application of dielectrophoresis (DEP) to make three-dimensional (3D) methacrylated gelatin (GelMA) hydrogels with gradients of micro- and nanoparticles. DEP forces were able to manipulate micro- and nanoparticles of different sizes and materials (i.e., C2C12 myoblasts, polystyrene beads, gold microparticles, and carbon nanotubes) within GelMA hydrogels in a rapid and facile way and create 3D gradients of these particles in a microchamber. Immobilization of drugs, such as fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FITC-dextran) and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), on gold microparticles allowed us to investigate the high-throughput release of these drugs from GelMA-gold microparticle gradient systems. The latter gradient constructs were incubated with C2C12 myoblasts for 24h to examine the cell viability through the release of 6-OHDA. The drug was released from the microparticles in a gradient manner, inducing a cell viability gradient. This novel approach to create 3D chemical gradients within hydrogels is scalable to any arbitrary length scale. It is useful for making anisotropic biomimetic materials and high-throughput platforms to investigate cell-microenvironment interactions in a rapid, simple, cost-effective, and reproducible manner. PMID:24727602

  14. Gaussian process test for high-throughput sequencing time series: application to experimental evolution

    PubMed Central

    Topa, Hande; Jónás, Ágnes; Kofler, Robert; Kosiol, Carolin; Honkela, Antti

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing (HTS) have made it possible to monitor genomes in great detail. New experiments not only use HTS to measure genomic features at one time point but also monitor them changing over time with the aim of identifying significant changes in their abundance. In population genetics, for example, allele frequencies are monitored over time to detect significant frequency changes that indicate selection pressures. Previous attempts at analyzing data from HTS experiments have been limited as they could not simultaneously include data at intermediate time points, replicate experiments and sources of uncertainty specific to HTS such as sequencing depth. Results: We present the beta-binomial Gaussian process model for ranking features with significant non-random variation in abundance over time. The features are assumed to represent proportions, such as proportion of an alternative allele in a population. We use the beta-binomial model to capture the uncertainty arising from finite sequencing depth and combine it with a Gaussian process model over the time series. In simulations that mimic the features of experimental evolution data, the proposed method clearly outperforms classical testing in average precision of finding selected alleles. We also present simulations exploring different experimental design choices and results on real data from Drosophila experimental evolution experiment in temperature adaptation. Availability and implementation: R software implementing the test is available at https://github.com/handetopa/BBGP. Contact: hande.topa@aalto.fi, agnes.jonas@vetmeduni.ac.at, carolin.kosiol@vetmeduni.ac.at, antti.honkela@hiit.fi Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25614471

  15. High throughput continuous cryopump

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    A cryocondensation pump with a unique regeneration mechanism that allows continuous operation has been constructed and tested. The pump features a device referred to as the ''Snail'' which removes the cryofrost layer as it is moved over the pumping surfaces. A forepump pumps the sublimed gas generated inside the Snail. The compression ratio of the pump is the ratio of the cryopump speed to the leakage conductance of the Snail. Deuterium had been pumped continuously at 30 torr.L/s at a speed of 2000 L/s and a compression ratio of 100. The pump, being all metal sealed and free of lubricating fluids, has many potential applications where untraclean high throughput pumping is desirable. Since the pump regenerates on a time scale of 60 seconds, the inventory in the pump is minimized - an important consideration when pumping radioactive materials such as tritium. Test data and a videotape of the Snail removing the cryofrost will be shown.

  16. Application of nanostructured biochips for efficient cell transfection microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkamsetty, Yamini; Hook, Andrew L.; Thissen, Helmut; Hayes, Jason P.; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2007-01-01

    Microarrays, high-throughput devices for genomic analysis, can be further improved by developing materials that are able to manipulate the interfacial behaviour of biomolecules. This is achieved both spatially and temporally by smart materials possessing both switchable and patterned surface properties. A system had been developed to spatially manipulate both DNA and cell growth based upon the surface modification of highly doped silicon by plasma polymerisation and polyethylene grafting followed by masked laser ablation for formation of a pattered surface with both bioactive and non-fouling regions. This platform has been successfully applied to transfected cell microarray applications with the parallel expression of genes by utilising its ability to direct and limit both DNA and cell attachment to specific sites. One of the greatest advantages of this system is its application to reverse transfection, whereupon by utilising the switchable adsorption and desorption of DNA using a voltage bias, the efficiency of cell transfection can be enhanced. However, it was shown that application of a voltage also reduces the viability of neuroblastoma cells grown on a plasma polymer surface, but not human embryonic kidney cells. This suggests that the application of a voltage may not only result in the desorption of bound DNA but may also affect attached cells. The characterisation of a DNA microarray by contact printing has also been investigated.

  17. High-Throughput Sequencing, a Versatile Weapon to Support Genome-Based Diagnosis in Infectious Diseases: Applications to Clinical Bacteriology

    PubMed Central

    Caboche, Ségolène; Audebert, Christophe; Hot, David

    2014-01-01

    The recent progresses of high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies enable easy and cost-reduced access to whole genome sequencing (WGS) or re-sequencing. HTS associated with adapted, automatic and fast bioinformatics solutions for sequencing applications promises an accurate and timely identification and characterization of pathogenic agents. Many studies have demonstrated that data obtained from HTS analysis have allowed genome-based diagnosis, which has been consistent with phenotypic observations. These proofs of concept are probably the first steps toward the future of clinical microbiology. From concept to routine use, many parameters need to be considered to promote HTS as a powerful tool to help physicians and clinicians in microbiological investigations. This review highlights the milestones to be completed toward this purpose. PMID:25437800

  18. Readout technologies for highly miniaturized kinase assays applicable to high-throughput screening in a 1536-well format.

    PubMed

    Klumpp, Martin; Boettcher, Andreas; Becker, Damaris; Meder, Gabriele; Blank, Jutta; Leder, Lukas; Forstner, Michael; Ottl, Johannes; Mayr, Lorenz M

    2006-09-01

    This article discusses the development of homogeneous, miniaturized assays for the identification of novel kinase inhibitors from very large compound collections. In particular, the suitability of time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-RET) based on phospho-specific antibodies, an antibody-independent fluorescence polarization (FP) approach using metal-coated beads (IMAP technology), and the determination of adenosine triphosphate consumption through chemiluminescence is evaluated. These readouts are compared with regard to assay sensitivity, compound interference, reagent consumption, and performance in a 1536-well format, and practical considerations for their application in primary screening or in the identification of kinase substrates are discussed. All of the tested technologies were found to be suitable for miniaturized high-throughput screening (HTS) in principle, but each of them has distinct limitations and advantages. Therefore, the target-specific selection of the most appropriate readout technology is recommended to ensure maximal relevance of HTS campaigns. PMID:16760365

  19. Tissue microarrays: applications in genomic research.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Aprill; Cornelison, Robert; Hostetter, Galen

    2005-03-01

    The widespread application of tissue microarrays in cancer research and the clinical pathology laboratory demonstrates a versatile and portable technology. The rapid integration of tissue microarrays into biomarker discovery and validation processes reflects the forward thinking of researchers who have pioneered the high-density tissue microarray. The precise arrangement of hundreds of archival clinical tissue samples into a composite tissue microarray block is now a proven method for the efficient and standardized analysis of molecular markers. With applications in cancer research, tissue microarrays are a valuable tool in validating candidate markers discovered in highly sensitive genome-wide microarray experiments. With applications in clinical pathology, tissue microarrays are used widely in immunohistochemistry quality control and quality assurance. The timeline of a biomarker implicated in prostate neoplasia, which was identified by complementary DNA expression profiling, validated by tissue microarrays and is now used as a prognostic immunohistochemistry marker, is reviewed. The tissue microarray format provides opportunities for digital imaging acquisition, image processing and database integration. Advances in digital imaging help to alleviate previous bottlenecks in the research pipeline, permit computer image scoring and convey telepathology opportunities for remote image analysis. The tissue microarray industry now includes public and private sectors with varying degrees of research utility and offers a range of potential tissue microarray applications in basic research, prognostic oncology and drug discovery. PMID:15833047

  20. A concentration gradient generator on a paper-based microfluidic chip coupled with cell culture microarray for high-throughput drug screening.

    PubMed

    Hong, Bo; Xue, Peng; Wu, Yafeng; Bao, Jingnan; Chuah, Yon Jin; Kang, Yuejun

    2016-02-01

    Inspired by the paper platforms for 3-D cell culture, a paper-based microfluidic device containing drug concentration gradient was designed and constructed for investigating cell response to drugs based on high throughput analysis. This drug gradient generator was applied to generate concentration gradients of doxorubicin (DOX) as the model drug. HeLa cells encapsulated in collagen hydrogel were incubated in the device reservoirs to evaluate the cell viability based on the controlled release of DOX spatially. It was demonstrated that drug diffusion through the paper fibers created a gradient of drug concentration, which influenced cell viability. This drug screening platform has a great opportunity to be applied for drug discovery and diagnostic studies with simultaneous and parallel tests of drugs under various gradient concentrations. PMID:26864970

  1. High throughput instruments, methods, and informatics for systems biology.

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B.; Cowie, Jim R.; Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Wylie, Brian Neil; Davidson, George S.; Haaland, David Michael; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Aragon, Anthony D.; Keenan, Michael Robert; Boyack, Kevin W.; Thomas, Edward Victor; Werner-Washburne, Margaret C.; Mosquera-Caro, Monica P.; Martinez, M. Juanita; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Willman, Cheryl L.

    2003-12-01

    High throughput instruments and analysis techniques are required in order to make good use of the genomic sequences that have recently become available for many species, including humans. These instruments and methods must work with tens of thousands of genes simultaneously, and must be able to identify the small subsets of those genes that are implicated in the observed phenotypes, or, for instance, in responses to therapies. Microarrays represent one such high throughput method, which continue to find increasingly broad application. This project has improved microarray technology in several important areas. First, we developed the hyperspectral scanner, which has discovered and diagnosed numerous flaws in techniques broadly employed by microarray researchers. Second, we used a series of statistically designed experiments to identify and correct errors in our microarray data to dramatically improve the accuracy, precision, and repeatability of the microarray gene expression data. Third, our research developed new informatics techniques to identify genes with significantly different expression levels. Finally, natural language processing techniques were applied to improve our ability to make use of online literature annotating the important genes. In combination, this research has improved the reliability and precision of laboratory methods and instruments, while also enabling substantially faster analysis and discovery.

  2. [Low field nuclear magnetic resonance for rapid quantitation of microalgae lipid and its application in high throughput screening].

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingting; Yang, Yi; Wang, Zejian; Zhuang, Yingping; Chu, Ju; Guoi, Meijin

    2016-03-01

    A rapid and accurate determination method of lipids in microalgae plays a significant role in an efficient breeding process for high-lipid production of microalgae. Using low field nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR), we developed a direct quantitative method for cellular lipids in Chlorella protothecoides cells. The LF-NMR signal had a linear relationship with the lipid content in the microalgae cells for both dry cell samples and algal broth samples (R2 > 0.99). These results indicated that we could use this method for accurate determination of microalgal lipids. Although LF-NMR is a rapid and easy lipid determination method in comparison to conventional methods, low efficiency would limit its application in high throughput screening. Therefore, we developed a novel combined high throughput screening method for high-lipid content mutants of C. protothecoides. Namely, we initially applied Nile red staining method for semi-quantification of lipid in the pre-screening process, and following with LF-NMR method for accurate lipid determination in re-screening process. Finally, we adopted this novel screening method in the breeding process of high-lipid content heterotrophic cells of C. protothecoides. From 3 098 mutated strains 108 high-lipid content strains were selected through pre-screening process, and then 9 mutants with high-lipid production were obtained in the re-screening process. In a consequence, with heterotrophical cultivation of 168 h, the lipid concentration could reach 5 g/L, and the highest lipid content exceeded 20% (W/W), which was almost two-fold to that of the wild strain. All these results demonstrated that the novel breeding process was reliable and feasible for improving the screening efficiency. PMID:27349121

  3. Fully Automated Electro Membrane Extraction Autosampler for LC-MS Systems Allowing Soft Extractions for High-Throughput Applications.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, David; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig; Jensen, Henrik; Rand, Kasper D; Honoré Hansen, Steen; Petersen, Nickolaj Jacob

    2016-07-01

    The current work describes the implementation of electro membrane extraction (EME) into an autosampler for high-throughput analysis of samples by EME-LC-MS. The extraction probe was built into a luer lock adapter connected to a HTC PAL autosampler syringe. As the autosampler drew sample solution, analytes were extracted into the lumen of the extraction probe and transferred to a LC-MS system for further analysis. Various parameters affecting extraction efficacy were investigated including syringe fill strokes, syringe pull up volume, pull up delay and volume in the sample vial. The system was optimized for soft extraction of analytes and high sample throughput. Further, it was demonstrated that by flushing the EME-syringe with acidic wash buffer and reverting the applied electric potential, carry-over between samples can be reduced to below 1%. Performance of the system was characterized (RSD, <10%; R(2), 0.994) and finally, the EME-autosampler was used to analyze in vitro conversion of methadone into its main metabolite by rat liver microsomes and for demonstrating the potential of known CYP3A4 inhibitors to prevent metabolism of methadone. By making use of the high extraction speed of EME, a complete analytical workflow of purification, separation, and analysis of sample could be achieved within only 5.5 min. With the developed system large sequences of samples could be analyzed in a completely automated manner. This high degree of automation makes the developed EME-autosampler a powerful tool for a wide range of applications where high-throughput extractions are required before sample analysis. PMID:27237618

  4. High-Throughput Analysis of Enzyme Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Guoxin Lu

    2007-12-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) techniques have been applied to many research fields nowadays. Robot microarray printing technique and automation microtiter handling technique allows HTS performing in both heterogeneous and homogeneous formats, with minimal sample required for each assay element. In this dissertation, new HTS techniques for enzyme activity analysis were developed. First, patterns of immobilized enzyme on nylon screen were detected by multiplexed capillary system. The imaging resolution is limited by the outer diameter of the capillaries. In order to get finer images, capillaries with smaller outer diameters can be used to form the imaging probe. Application of capillary electrophoresis allows separation of the product from the substrate in the reaction mixture, so that the product doesn't have to have different optical properties with the substrate. UV absorption detection allows almost universal detection for organic molecules. Thus, no modifications of either the substrate or the product molecules are necessary. This technique has the potential to be used in screening of local distribution variations of specific bio-molecules in a tissue or in screening of multiple immobilized catalysts. Another high-throughput screening technique is developed by directly monitoring the light intensity of the immobilized-catalyst surface using a scientific charge-coupled device (CCD). Briefly, the surface of enzyme microarray is focused onto a scientific CCD using an objective lens. By carefully choosing the detection wavelength, generation of product on an enzyme spot can be seen by the CCD. Analyzing the light intensity change over time on an enzyme spot can give information of reaction rate. The same microarray can be used for many times. Thus, high-throughput kinetic studies of hundreds of catalytic reactions are made possible. At last, we studied the fluorescence emission spectra of ADP and obtained the detection limits for ADP under three different

  5. High-throughput spectrometer designs in a compact form-factor: principles and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, S. M.

    2013-05-01

    Many compact, portable Raman spectrometers have entered the market in the past few years with applications in narcotics and hazardous material identification, as well as verification applications in pharmaceuticals and security screening. Often, the required compact form-factor has forced designers to sacrifice throughput and sensitivity for portability and low-cost. We will show that a volume phase holographic (VPH)-based spectrometer design can achieve superior throughput and thus sensitivity over conventional Czerny-Turner reflective designs. We will look in depth at the factors influencing throughput and sensitivity and illustrate specific VPH-based spectrometer examples that highlight these design principles.

  6. High-throughput screening of monoclonal antibodies against plant cell wall glycans by hierarchical clustering of their carbohydrate microarray binding profiles

    PubMed Central

    Moller, Isabel; Marcus, Susan E.; Haeger, Ash; Verhertbruggen, Yves; Verhoef, Rene; Schols, Henk; Ulvskov, Peter; Mikkelsen, Jørn Dalgaard; Knox, J. Paul

    2007-01-01

    Antibody-producing hybridoma cell lines were created following immunisation with a crude extract of cell wall polymers from the plant Arabidopsis thaliana. In order to rapidly screen the specificities of individual monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), their binding to microarrays containing 50 cell wall glycans immobilized on nitrocellulose was assessed. Hierarchical clustering of microarray binding profiles from newly produced mAbs, together with the profiles for mAbs with previously defined specificities allowed the rapid assignments of mAb binding to antigen classes. mAb specificities were further investigated using subsequent immunochemical and biochemical analyses and two novel mAbs are described in detail. mAb LM13 binds to an arabinanase-sensitive pectic epitope and mAb LM14, binds to an epitope occurring on arabinogalactan-proteins. Both mAbs display novel patterns of recognition of cell walls in plant materials. PMID:17629746

  7. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for high-throughput DNA analysis and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. H. Winston; Golovlev, Valeri V.; Taranenko, N. I.; Allman, S. L.; Isola, Narayana R.; Potter, N. T.; Matteson, K. J.; Chang, Linus Y.

    1999-05-01

    Laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) has been developed for DNA sequencing, disease diagnosis, and DNA fingerprinting for forensic applications. With LDMS, the speed of DNA analysis can be much faster than conventional gel electrophoresis. No dye or radioactive tagging to DNA segments for detection is needed. LDMS is emerging as a new alternative technology for DNA analysis.

  8. High-throughput SNP genotyping for breeding applications in rice using the BeadXpress platform

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multiplexed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers have the potential to increase the speed and cost-effectiveness of genotyping, provided that an optimal SNP density is used for each application. To test the efficiency of multiplexed SNP genotyping for diversity, mapping and breeding applicat...

  9. Laser Desorption Mass Spectrometry for High Throughput DNA Analysis and Its Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Allman, S.L.; Chen, C.H.; Golovlev, V.V.; Isola, N.R.; Matteson, K.J.; Potter, N.T.; Taranenko, N.I.

    1999-01-23

    Laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) has been developed for DNA sequencing, disease diagnosis, and DNA Fingerprinting for forensic applications. With LDMS, the speed of DNA analysis can be much faster than conventional gel electrophoresis. No dye or radioactive tagging to DNA segments for detection is needed. LDMS is emerging as a new alternative technology for DNA analysis.

  10. High-throughput assays of leloir-glycosyltransferase reactions: The applications of rYND1 in glycotechnology.

    PubMed

    Li, Yijun; Hou, Jin; Wang, Fengshan; Sheng, Juzheng

    2016-06-10

    Glycosyltransferases (GTs) play a critical role in the enzymatic and chemoenzymatic synthesis of oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates. However, the development of these synthetic approaches has been limited by a lack of sensitive screening methods for the isolation of novel natural GTs or their active variants. Herein, we describe the results of our investigation towards the soluble expression and potential application of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae apyrase YND1. By replacing the hydrophobic transmembrane domain of YND1 with three glycine-serine repeats, this protein was successfully expressed in a soluble form in Escherichia coli. This new protein was then used to develop a two-step nucleoside diphosphate (NDP)-based Leloir-GT high-throughput assay. Purified rYND1 was initially added to a GT reaction to hydrolyze NDP to nucleoside phosphate plus inorganic phosphate, which was determined using a phosphorus molybdenum blue chromogenic reaction. Purified rYND1 was shown to have a positive effect on saccharide synthesis by eliminating the potential by-product inhibition from NDP. Most of the mono-sugar donors used for Leloir-GTs are activated by uridine diphosphate and guanosine diphosphate, which can be catalyzed by rYND1. The rYND1 is amenable to screening methods and could be applied to a wide range of Leloir-GT-catalyzed reactions, therefore representing a remarkable step forward in glycotechnology. PMID:27059478

  11. Automated, high-throughput, motility analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans and parasitic nematodes: Applications in the search for new anthelmintics.

    PubMed

    Buckingham, Steven D; Partridge, Frederick A; Sattelle, David B

    2014-12-01

    The scale of the damage worldwide to human health, animal health and agricultural crops resulting from parasitic nematodes, together with the paucity of treatments and the threat of developing resistance to the limited set of widely-deployed chemical tools, underlines the urgent need to develop novel drugs and chemicals to control nematode parasites. Robust chemical screens which can be automated are a key part of that discovery process. Hitherto, the successful automation of nematode behaviours has been a bottleneck in the chemical discovery process. As the measurement of nematode motility can provide a direct scalar readout of the activity of the neuromuscular system and an indirect measure of the health of the animal, this omission is acute. Motility offers a useful assay for high-throughput, phenotypic drug/chemical screening and several recent developments have helped realise, at least in part, the potential of nematode-based drug screening. Here we review the challenges encountered in automating nematode motility and some important developments in the application of machine vision, statistical imaging and tracking approaches which enable the automated characterisation of nematode movement. Such developments facilitate automated screening for new drugs and chemicals aimed at controlling human and animal nematode parasites (anthelmintics) and plant nematode parasites (nematicides). PMID:25516833

  12. High-throughput design of low-activation, high-strength creep-resistant steels for nuclear-reactor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qi; van der Zwaag, Sybrand; Xu, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels are prime candidate materials for structural applications in nuclear power reactors. However, their creep strength is much lower than that of creep-resistant steel developed for conventional fossil-fired power plants as alloying elements with a high neutron activation cannot be used. To improve the creep strength and to maintain a low activation, a high-throughput computational alloy design model coupling thermodynamics, precipitate-coarsening kinetics and an optimization genetic algorithm, is developed. Twelve relevant alloying elements with either low or high activation are considered simultaneously. The activity levels at 0-10 year after the end of irradiation are taken as optimization parameter. The creep-strength values (after exposure for 10 years at 650 °C) are estimated on the basis of the solid-solution strengthening and the precipitation hardening (taking into account precipitate coarsening). Potential alloy compositions leading to a high austenite fraction or a high percentage of undesirable second phase particles are rejected automatically in the optimization cycle. The newly identified alloys have a much higher precipitation hardening and solid-solution strengthening at the same activity level as existing reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels.

  13. Practical application of DNA markers for high-throughput authentication of Panax ginseng and Panax quinquefolius from commercial ginseng products

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Juyeon; Kim, Kyung Hee; Yang, Kiwoung; Bang, Kyong-Hwan; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2013-01-01

    Korean ginseng (Panax ginseng) and American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) are widely used medicinal plants with similar morphology but different medicinal efficacy. Roots, flowers, and processed products of Korean and American ginseng can be difficult to differentiate from each other, leading to illegal trade in which one species is sold as the other. This study was carried out to develop convenient and reliable chloroplast genome-derived DNA markers for authentication of Korean and American ginseng in commercial processed products. One codominant marker could reproducibly identify both species and intentional mixtures of the two species. We further developed a set of species-unique dominant DNA markers. Each species-specific dominant marker could detect 1% cross contamination with other species by low resolution agarose gel electrophoresis or quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Both markers were successfully applied to evaluate the original species from various processed ginseng products purchased from markets in Korea and China. We believe that high-throughput application of this marker system will eradicate illegal trade and promote confident marketing for both species to increase the value of Korean as well as American ginseng in Korea and worldwide. PMID:24748836

  14. MIPHENO: Data normalization for high throughput metabolic analysis.

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput methodologies such as microarrays, mass spectrometry and plate-based small molecule screens are increasingly used to facilitate discoveries from gene function to drug candidate identification. These large-scale experiments are typically carried out over the course...

  15. Plant seed species identification from chemical fingerprints: a high-throughput application of direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lesiak, Ashton D; Cody, Robert B; Dane, A John; Musah, Rabi A

    2015-09-01

    Plant species identification based on the morphological features of plant parts is a well-established science in botany. However, species identification from seeds has largely been unexplored, despite the fact that the seeds contain all of the genetic information that distinguishes one plant from another. Using seeds of genus Datura plants, we show here that the mass spectrum-derived chemical fingerprints for seeds of the same species are similar. On the other hand, seeds from different species within the same genus display distinct chemical signatures, even though they may contain similar characteristic biomarkers. The intraspecies chemical signature similarities on the one hand, and interspecies fingerprint differences on the other, can be processed by multivariate statistical analysis methods to enable rapid species-level identification and differentiation. The chemical fingerprints can be acquired rapidly and in a high-throughput manner by direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry (DART-MS) analysis of the seeds in their native form, without use of a solvent extract. Importantly, knowledge of the identity of the detected molecules is not required for species level identification. However, confirmation of the presence within the seeds of various characteristic tropane and other alkaloids, including atropine, scopolamine, scopoline, tropine, tropinone, and tyramine, was accomplished by comparison of the in-source collision-induced dissociation (CID) fragmentation patterns of authentic standards, to the fragmentation patterns observed in the seeds when analyzed under similar in-source CID conditions. The advantages, applications, and implications of the chemometric processing of DART-MS derived seed chemical signatures for species level identification and differentiation are discussed. PMID:26237339

  16. High-throughput tetrad analysis.

    PubMed

    Ludlow, Catherine L; Scott, Adrian C; Cromie, Gareth A; Jeffery, Eric W; Sirr, Amy; May, Patrick; Lin, Jake; Gilbert, Teresa L; Hays, Michelle; Dudley, Aimée M

    2013-07-01

    Tetrad analysis has been a gold-standard genetic technique for several decades. Unfortunately, the need to manually isolate, disrupt and space tetrads has relegated its application to small-scale studies and limited its integration with high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies. We have developed a rapid, high-throughput method, called barcode-enabled sequencing of tetrads (BEST), that uses (i) a meiosis-specific GFP fusion protein to isolate tetrads by FACS and (ii) molecular barcodes that are read during genotyping to identify spores derived from the same tetrad. Maintaining tetrad information allows accurate inference of missing genetic markers and full genotypes of missing (and presumably nonviable) individuals. An individual researcher was able to isolate over 3,000 yeast tetrads in 3 h, an output equivalent to that of almost 1 month of manual dissection. BEST is transferable to other microorganisms for which meiotic mapping is significantly more laborious. PMID:23666411

  17. High-throughput continuous cryopump

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    A cryopump with a unique method of regeneration which allows continuous operation at high throughput has been constructed and tested. Deuterium was pumped continuously at a throughput of 30 Torr.L/s at a speed of 2000 L/s and a compression ratio of 200. Argon was pumped at a throughput of 60 Torr.L/s at a speed of 1275 L/s. To produce continuous operation of the pump, a method of regeneration that does not thermally cycle the pump is employed. A small chamber (the ''snail'') passes over the pumping surface and removes the frost from it either by mechanical action with a scraper or by local heating. The material removed is topologically in a secondary vacuum system with low conductance into the primary vacuum; thus, the exhaust can be pumped at pressures up to an effective compression ratio determined by the ratio of the pumping speed to the leakage conductance of the snail. The pump, which is all-metal-sealed and dry and which regenerates every 60 s, would be an ideal system for pumping tritium. Potential fusion applications are for mpmp limiters, for repeating pneumatic pellet injection lines, and for the centrifuge pellet injector spin tank, all of which will require pumping tritium at high throughput. Industrial applications requiring ultraclean pumping of corrosive gases at high throughput, such as the reactive ion etch semiconductor process, may also be feasible.

  18. Convergence of millimeter-wave and photonic interconnect systems for very-high-throughput digital communication applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shu-Hao

    In the past, radio-frequency signals were commonly used for low-speed wireless electronic systems, and optical signals were used for high-speed wired communication systems. However, as the emergence of new millimeter-wave technology, which is capable of providing multi-gigabit transmission over a wireless radio-frequency channel, the borderline between radio-frequency and optical transport systems becomes blurred. As a result, there are ample opportunities to design and develop next-generation broadband systems by combining the advantages of these two technologies to overcome inherent limitations of various broadband end-to-end interconnects, such as signal generation, transportation, data recovery, and synchronization. For the transmission distances of a few centimeters to thousands of kilometers, the integration of radio-frequency electronics and photonics to build radio-over-fiber systems ushers in a new era of research opportunity for the upcoming very-high-throughput broadband services. Recent developments in radio-over-fiber systems have garnered momentum to be recognized as the most promising solution for the backhaul transmission of multi-gigabit wireless access networks, especially for the license-free, very-high-throughput 60-GHz band. Adopting radio-over-fiber systems in local-access or in-building networks can greatly extend 60-GHz signal reach by using ultra-low loss optical fibers. However, systems operating at such high frequency are difficult to generate in an old fashion way. In this dissertation, several novel techniques of homodyne and heterodyne optical-carrier suppressions for radio-over-fiber systems are investigated and various system architectures are designed to overcome these limitations of 60-GHz wireless access networks, bringing the dream of delivering multi-gigabit wireless services of any content, at anytime and anywhere closer to the reality. In addition to the advantages for the access networks, extremely high spectral efficiency

  19. Progress in the application of DNA microarrays.

    PubMed Central

    Lobenhofer, E K; Bushel, P R; Afshari, C A; Hamadeh, H K

    2001-01-01

    Microarray technology has been applied to a variety of different fields to address fundamental research questions. The use of microarrays, or DNA chips, to study the gene expression profiles of biologic samples began in 1995. Since that time, the fundamental concepts behind the chip, the technology required for making and using these chips, and the multitude of statistical tools for analyzing the data have been extensively reviewed. For this reason, the focus of this review will be not on the technology itself but on the application of microarrays as a research tool and the future challenges of the field. PMID:11673116

  20. Complementing high-throughput X-ray powder diffraction data with quantum-chemical calculations: Application to piroxicam form III.

    PubMed

    Naelapää, Kaisa; van de Streek, Jacco; Rantanen, Jukka; Bond, Andrew D

    2012-11-01

    High-throughput crystallisation and characterisation platforms provide an efficient means to carry out solid-form screening during the pre-formulation phase. To determine the crystal structures of identified new solid phases, however, usually requires independent crystallisation trials to produce single crystals or bulk samples of sufficient quantity to carry out high-quality X-ray diffraction measurements. This process could be made more efficient by a robust procedure for crystal structure determination directly from high-throughput X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) data. Quantum-chemical calculations based on dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) have now become feasible for typical small organic molecules used as active pharmaceutical ingredients. We demonstrate how these calculations can be applied to complement high-throughput XRPD data by determining the crystal structure of piroxicam form III. These combined experimental/quantum-chemical methods can provide access to reliable structural information in the course of an intensive experimentally based solid-form screening activity or in other circumstances wherein single crystals might never be viable, for example, for polymorphs obtained only during high-energy processing such as spray drying or milling. PMID:22886472

  1. High-Throughput Sequencing Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Jason A.; Spacek, Damek; Snyder, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The human genome sequence has profoundly altered our understanding of biology, human diversity and disease. The path from the first draft sequence to our nascent era of personal genomes and genomic medicine has been made possible only because of the extraordinary advancements in DNA sequencing technologies over the past ten years. Here, we discuss commonly used high-throughput sequencing platforms, the growing array of sequencing assays developed around them as well as the challenges facing current sequencing platforms and their clinical application. PMID:26000844

  2. High-Throughput Proteomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaorui; Wu, Si; Stenoien, David L.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2014-06-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based high-throughput proteomics is the core technique for large-scale protein characterization. Due to the extreme complexity of proteomes, sophisticated separation techniques and advanced MS instrumentation have been developed to extend coverage and enhance dynamic range and sensitivity. In this review, we discuss the separation and prefractionation techniques applied for large-scale analysis in both bottom-up (i.e., peptide-level) and top-down (i.e., protein-level) proteomics. Different approaches for quantifying peptides or intact proteins, including label-free and stable-isotope-labeling strategies, are also discussed. In addition, we present a brief overview of different types of mass analyzers and fragmentation techniques as well as selected emerging techniques.

  3. Geochip: A high throughput genomic tool for linking community structure to functions

    SciTech Connect

    Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Liang, Yuting; He, Zhili; Li, Guanghe; Zhou, Jizhong

    2009-01-30

    GeoChip is a comprehensive functional gene array that targets key functional genes involved in the geochemical cycling of N, C, and P, sulfate reduction, metal resistance and reduction, and contaminant degradation. Studies have shown the GeoChip to be a sensitive, specific, and high-throughput tool for microbial community analysis that has the power to link geochemical processes with microbial community structure. However, several challenges remain regarding the development and applications of microarrays for microbial community analysis.

  4. Simultaneous determination of multiple angiotensin type 1 receptor antagonists and its application to high-throughput pharmacokinetic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaoyan; Sun, Jianguo; Hao, Haiping; Wang, Guangji; Hu, Xiaoling; Lv, Hua; Gu, Shenghua; Wu, Xiaoming; Xu, Jinyi

    2008-05-01

    A rapid and sensitive high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS) detection was developed for the simultaneous determination of multiple angiotensin type 1 receptor antagonists (AT1RAs) WX472, WX581, 1b and telmisartan in rat plasma for the purpose of high-throughout pharmacokinetic screening. The method was operated under selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode in the positive ion mode. The analytes and the internal standard (pitavastatin) were extracted from 100 [mu]L rat plasma under acidic conditions by liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate. The analytes and internal standard were baseline separated on a Gemini analytical column (3 [mu]m, 150 mm × 2.0 mm) with the adoption of a gradient elution using acetonitrile and 0.05% aqueous formic acid. The standard curves were linear in the concentration ranges of 4.5-900 ng/mL for WX472, 5-1000 ng/mL for WX581 and 0.5-100 ng/mL for 1b and telmisartan. Intra- and inter-batch precisions (R.S.D.%) were all within 15% and the method assessed a quite good accuracy (R.E.%). Recoveries were found to be >65% for all the compounds and no obvious matrix effects were found. This method has been successfully applied to the high-throughput pharmacokinetic screening study for both cassette dosing and cassette analysis of four compounds to rats. Significant drug-drug interactions were observed after cassette dosing. The study suggested that cassette analysis of pooled samples would be a better choice for the high-throughput pharmacokinetic screening of angiotensin type 1 receptor antagonists.

  5. Applications of protein microarrays for biomarker discovery

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Niroshan; Srivastava, Sanjeeva; LaBaer, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    The search for new biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic monitoring of diseases continues in earnest despite dwindling success at finding novel reliable markers. Some of the current markers in clinical use do not provide optimal sensitivity and specificity, with the prostate cancer antigen (PSA) being one of many such examples. The emergence of proteomic techniques and systems approaches to study disease pathophysiology has rekindled the quest for new biomarkers. In particular the use of protein microarrays has surged as a powerful tool for large scale testing of biological samples. Approximately half the reports on protein microarrays have been published in the last two years especially in the area of biomarker discovery. In this review, we will discuss the application of protein microarray technologies that offer unique opportunities to find novel biomarkers. PMID:21136793

  6. Application of Phenotype Microarray technology to soil microbiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocali, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    It is well established that soil microorganisms are extremely diverse and only a small fraction has been successfully cultured in the laboratory. Furthermore, addressing the functionality of genomes is one of the most important and challenging tasks of today's biology. In particular the ability to link genotypes to corresponding phenotypes is of interest in the reconstruction and biotechnological manipulation of metabolic pathways. High-throughput culture in micro wells provides a method for rapid screening of a wide variety of growth conditions and commercially available plates contain a large number of substrates, nutrient sources, and inhibitors, which can provide an assessment of the phenotype of an organism. Thus, over the last years, Phenotype Microarray (PM) technology has been used to address many specific issues related to the metabolic functionality of microorganisms. However, computational tools that could directly link PM data with the gene(s) of interest followed by the extraction of information on gene-phenotype correlation are still missing. Here potential applications of phenotype arrays to soil microorganisms, use of the plates in stress response studies and for assessment of phenotype of environmental communities are described. Considerations and challenges in data interpretation and visualization, including data normalization, statistics, and curve fitting are also discussed. In particular, here we present DuctApe, a suite that allows the analysis of both genomic sequences and PM data, to find metabolic differences among PM experiments and to correlate them with KEGG pathways and gene presence/absence patterns.

  7. A novel application of pattern recognition for accurate SNP and indel discovery from high-throughput data: targeted resequencing of the glucocorticoid receptor co-chaperone FKBP5 in a Caucasian population.

    PubMed

    Pelleymounter, Linda L; Moon, Irene; Johnson, Julie A; Laederach, Alain; Halvorsen, Matt; Eckloff, Bruce; Abo, Ryan; Rossetti, Sandro

    2011-12-01

    The detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and insertion/deletions (indels) with precision from high-throughput data remains a significant bioinformatics challenge. Accurate detection is necessary before next-generation sequencing can routinely be used in the clinic. In research, scientific advances are inhibited by gaps in data, exemplified by the underrepresented discovery of rare variants, variants in non-coding regions and indels. The continued presence of false positives and false negatives prevents full automation and requires additional manual verification steps. Our methodology presents applications of both pattern recognition and sensitivity analysis to eliminate false positives and aid in the detection of SNP/indel loci and genotypes from high-throughput data. We chose FK506-binding protein 51(FKBP5) (6p21.31) for our clinical target because of its role in modulating pharmacological responses to physiological and synthetic glucocorticoids and because of the complexity of the genomic region. We detected genetic variation across a 160 kb region encompassing FKBP5. 613 SNPs and 57 indels, including a 3.3 kb deletion were discovered. We validated our method using three independent data sets and, with Sanger sequencing and Affymetrix and Illumina microarrays, achieved 99% concordance. Furthermore we were able to detect 267 novel rare variants and assess linkage disequilibrium. Our results showed both a sensitivity and specificity of 98%, indicating near perfect classification between true and false variants. The process is scalable and amenable to automation, with the downstream filters taking only 1.5h to analyze 96 individuals simultaneously. We provide examples of how our level of precision uncovered the interactions of multiple loci, their predicted influences on mRNA stability, perturbations of the hsp90 binding site, and individual variation in FKBP5 expression. Finally we show how our discovery of rare variants may change current

  8. Immobilization Techniques for Microarray: Challenges and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Nimse, Satish Balasaheb; Song, Keumsoo; Sonawane, Mukesh Digambar; Sayyed, Danishmalik Rafiq; Kim, Taisun

    2014-01-01

    The highly programmable positioning of molecules (biomolecules, nanoparticles, nanobeads, nanocomposites materials) on surfaces has potential applications in the fields of biosensors, biomolecular electronics, and nanodevices. However, the conventional techniques including self-assembled monolayers fail to position the molecules on the nanometer scale to produce highly organized monolayers on the surface. The present article elaborates different techniques for the immobilization of the biomolecules on the surface to produce microarrays and their diagnostic applications. The advantages and the drawbacks of various methods are compared. This article also sheds light on the applications of the different technologies for the detection and discrimination of viral/bacterial genotypes and the detection of the biomarkers. A brief survey with 115 references covering the last 10 years on the biological applications of microarrays in various fields is also provided. PMID:25429408

  9. Application of Cassette Ultracentrifugation Using Non-labeled Compounds and Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry Analysis for High-Throughput Protein Binding Determination.

    PubMed

    Kieltyka, Kasia; McAuliffe, Brian; Cianci, Christopher; Drexler, Dieter M; Shou, Wilson; Zhang, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Membrane-based devices typically used for serum protein binding determination are not fully applicable to highly lipophilic compounds because of nonspecific binding to the device membrane. Ultracentrifugation, however, completely eliminates the issue by using a membrane-free approach, although its wide application has been limited. This lack of utilization is mainly attributed to 2 factors: the high cost in acquiring and handling of radiolabeled compounds and low assay throughput owing to the difficulties in process automation. To overcome these challenges, we report a high-throughput workflow by cassette ultracentrifugation of nonradiolabeled compounds followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Twenty compounds with diverse physicochemical and protein binding properties were selected for the evaluation of the workflow. To streamline the working process, approaches of matrix balancing for all the samples for LC-MS/MS analysis and determining free fraction without analytical calibration curves were adopted. Both the discrete ultracentrifugation of individual compounds and cassette ultracentrifugation of all the test compounds followed by simultaneous LC-MS/MS analysis exhibited a linear correlation with literature values, demonstrating respectively the validity of the ultracentrifugation process and the cassette approach. The cassette ultracentrifugation using nonradiolabeled compounds followed by LC-MS/MS analysis has greatly facilitated its application for high-throughput protein binding screening in drug discovery. PMID:26886323

  10. High throughput optical scanner

    DOEpatents

    Basiji, David A.; van den Engh, Gerrit J.

    2001-01-01

    A scanning apparatus is provided to obtain automated, rapid and sensitive scanning of substrate fluorescence, optical density or phosphorescence. The scanner uses a constant path length optical train, which enables the combination of a moving beam for high speed scanning with phase-sensitive detection for noise reduction, comprising a light source, a scanning mirror to receive light from the light source and sweep it across a steering mirror, a steering mirror to receive light from the scanning mirror and reflect it to the substrate, whereby it is swept across the substrate along a scan arc, and a photodetector to receive emitted or scattered light from the substrate, wherein the optical path length from the light source to the photodetector is substantially constant throughout the sweep across the substrate. The optical train can further include a waveguide or mirror to collect emitted or scattered light from the substrate and direct it to the photodetector. For phase-sensitive detection the light source is intensity modulated and the detector is connected to phase-sensitive detection electronics. A scanner using a substrate translator is also provided. For two dimensional imaging the substrate is translated in one dimension while the scanning mirror scans the beam in a second dimension. For a high throughput scanner, stacks of substrates are loaded onto a conveyor belt from a tray feeder.

  11. Novel one-step immunoassays to quantify α-synuclein: applications for biomarker development and high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Bidinosti, Michael; Shimshek, Derya R; Mollenhauer, Brit; Marcellin, David; Schweizer, Tatjana; Lotz, Gregor P; Schlossmacher, Michael G; Weiss, Andreas

    2012-09-28

    Familial Parkinson disease (PD) can result from α-synuclein gene multiplication, implicating the reduction of neuronal α-synuclein as a therapeutic target. Moreover, α-synuclein content in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) represents a PD biomarker candidate. However, capture-based assays for α-synuclein quantification in CSF (such as by ELISA) have shown discrepancies and have limited suitability for high-throughput screening. Here, we describe two sensitive, in-solution, time-resolved Förster's resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET)-based immunoassays for total and oligomeric α-synuclein quantification. CSF analysis showed strong concordance for total α-synuclein content between two TR-FRET assays and, in agreement with a previously characterized 36 h protocol-based ELISA, demonstrated lower α-synuclein levels in PD donors. Critically, the assay suitability for high-throughput screening of siRNA constructs and small molecules aimed at reducing endogenous α-synuclein levels was established and validated. In a small-scale proof of concept compound screen using 384 well plates, signals ranged from <30 to >120% of the mean of vehicle-treated cells for molecules known to lower and increase cellular α-synuclein, respectively. Furthermore, a reverse genetic screen of a kinase-directed siRNA library identified seven genes that modulated α-synuclein protein levels (five whose knockdown increased and two that decreased cellular α-synuclein protein). This provides critical new biological insight into cellular pathways regulating α-synuclein steady-state expression that may help guide further drug discovery efforts. Moreover, we describe an inherent limitation in current α-synuclein oligomer detection methodology, a finding that will direct improvement of future assay design. Our one-step TR-FRET-based platform for α-synuclein quantification provides a novel platform with superior performance parameters for the rapid screening of large biomarker cohorts and of

  12. The application of high-throughput AFLP's in assessing genetic diversity in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense.

    PubMed

    Groenewald, Susan; Van Den Berg, Noëlani; Marasas, Walter F O; Viljoen, Altus

    2006-03-01

    Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc) is responsible for fusarium wilt of bananas. The pathogen consists of several variants that are divided into three races and 21 vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs). Several DNA-based techniques have previously been used to analyse the worldwide population of Foc, sometimes yielding results that were not always consistent. In this study, the high-resolution genotyping method of AFLP is introduced as a potentially effective molecular tool to investigate diversity in Foc at a genome-wide level. The population selected for this study included Foc isolates representing different VCGs and races, isolates of F. oxysporum f. sp. dianthi, a putatively non-pathogenic biological control strain F. oxysporum (Fo47), and F. circinatum. High-throughput AFLP analysis was attained using five different infrared dye-labelled primer combinations using a two-dye model 4200s LI-COR automated DNA analyser. An average of approx. 100 polymorphic loci were scored for each primer pair using the SAGA(MX) automated AFLP analysis software. Data generated from five primer pair combinations were combined and subjected to distance analysis, which included the use of neighbour-joining and a bootstrap of 1000 replicates. A tree inferred from AFLP distance analysis revealed the polyphyletic nature of the Foc isolates, and seven genotypic groups could be identified. The results indicate that AFLP is a powerful tool to perform detailed analysis of genetic diversity in the banana pathogen Foc. PMID:16483757

  13. Protein comparability assessments and potential applicability of high throughput biophysical methods and data visualization tools to compare physical stability profiles

    PubMed Central

    Alsenaidy, Mohammad A.; Jain, Nishant K.; Kim, Jae H.; Middaugh, C. Russell; Volkin, David B.

    2014-01-01

    In this review, some of the challenges and opportunities encountered during protein comparability assessments are summarized with an emphasis on developing new analytical approaches to better monitor higher-order protein structures. Several case studies are presented using high throughput biophysical methods to collect protein physical stability data as function of temperature, agitation, ionic strength and/or solution pH. These large data sets were then used to construct empirical phase diagrams (EPDs), radar charts, and comparative signature diagrams (CSDs) for data visualization and structural comparisons between the different proteins. Protein samples with different sizes, post-translational modifications, and inherent stability are presented: acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-1) mutants, different glycoforms of an IgG1 mAb prepared by deglycosylation, as well as comparisons of different formulations of an IgG1 mAb and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF). Using this approach, differences in structural integrity and conformational stability profiles were detected under stress conditions that could not be resolved by using the same techniques under ambient conditions (i.e., no stress). Thus, an evaluation of conformational stability differences may serve as an effective surrogate to monitor differences in higher-order structure between protein samples. These case studies are discussed in the context of potential utility in protein comparability studies. PMID:24659968

  14. DNA MICROARRAYS: GENE EXPRESSION APPLICATIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The advent of whole genome sequencing and the application of bioinformatics tools have heralded a new era in biology. The coming of age of these tools and techniques has engendered a shift from deductive question-specific research to an inductive large-scale analysis research approach. This shift ...

  15. High-throughput Tetrad Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ludlow, Catherine L.; Scott, Adrian C.; Cromie, Gareth A.; Jeffery, Eric W.; Sirr, Amy; May, Patrick; Lin, Jake; Gilbert, Teresa L.; Hays, Michelle; Dudley, Aimée M.

    2013-01-01

    Tetrad analysis has been a gold standard genetic technique for several decades. Unfortunately, the manual nature of the process has relegated its application to small-scale studies and limited its integration with rapidly evolving DNA sequencing technologies. We have developed a rapid, high-throughput method, called Barcode Enabled Sequencing of Tetrads (BEST), that replaces the manual processes of isolating, disrupting and spacing tetrads. BEST uses a meiosis-specific GFP fusion protein to isolate tetrads by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and molecular barcodes that are read during genotyping to identify spores derived from the same tetrad. Maintaining tetrad information allows accurate inference of missing genetic markers and full genotypes of missing (and presumably nonviable) individuals. By removing the bottleneck of manual dissection, hundreds or even thousands of tetrads can be isolated in minutes. We demonstrate the approach in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but BEST is readily transferable to microorganisms in which meiotic mapping is significantly more laborious. PMID:23666411

  16. Marine Invertebrate Xenobiotic-Activated Nuclear Receptors: Their Application as Sensor Elements in High-Throughput Bioassays for Marine Bioactive Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Ingrid; Fidler, Andrew E.

    2014-01-01

    Developing high-throughput assays to screen marine extracts for bioactive compounds presents both conceptual and technical challenges. One major challenge is to develop assays that have well-grounded ecological and evolutionary rationales. In this review we propose that a specific group of ligand-activated transcription factors are particularly well-suited to act as sensors in such bioassays. More specifically, xenobiotic-activated nuclear receptors (XANRs) regulate transcription of genes involved in xenobiotic detoxification. XANR ligand-binding domains (LBDs) may adaptively evolve to bind those bioactive, and potentially toxic, compounds to which organisms are normally exposed to through their specific diets. A brief overview of the function and taxonomic distribution of both vertebrate and invertebrate XANRs is first provided. Proof-of-concept experiments are then described which confirm that a filter-feeding marine invertebrate XANR LBD is activated by marine bioactive compounds. We speculate that increasing access to marine invertebrate genome sequence data, in combination with the expression of functional recombinant marine invertebrate XANR LBDs, will facilitate the generation of high-throughput bioassays/biosensors of widely differing specificities, but all based on activation of XANR LBDs. Such assays may find application in screening marine extracts for bioactive compounds that could act as drug lead compounds. PMID:25421319

  17. The Use of High-Throughput DNA Sequencing in the Investigation of Antigenic Variation: Application to Neisseria Species

    PubMed Central

    Davies, John K.; Harrison, Paul F.; Lin, Ya-Hsun; Bartley, Stephanie; Khoo, Chen Ai; Seemann, Torsten; Ryan, Catherine S.; Kahler, Charlene M.; Hill, Stuart A.

    2014-01-01

    Antigenic variation occurs in a broad range of species. This process resembles gene conversion in that variant DNA is unidirectionally transferred from partial gene copies (or silent loci) into an expression locus. Previous studies of antigenic variation have involved the amplification and sequencing of individual genes from hundreds of colonies. Using the pilE gene from Neisseria gonorrhoeae we have demonstrated that it is possible to use PCR amplification, followed by high-throughput DNA sequencing and a novel assembly process, to detect individual antigenic variation events. The ability to detect these events was much greater than has previously been possible. In N. gonorrhoeae most silent loci contain multiple partial gene copies. Here we show that there is a bias towards using the copy at the 3′ end of the silent loci (copy 1) as the donor sequence. The pilE gene of N. gonorrhoeae and some strains of Neisseria meningitidis encode class I pilin, but strains of N. meningitidis from clonal complexes 8 and 11 encode a class II pilin. We have confirmed that the class II pili of meningococcal strain FAM18 (clonal complex 11) are non-variable, and this is also true for the class II pili of strain NMB from clonal complex 8. In addition when a gene encoding class I pilin was moved into the meningococcal strain NMB background there was no evidence of antigenic variation. Finally we investigated several members of the opa gene family of N. gonorrhoeae, where it has been suggested that limited variation occurs. Variation was detected in the opaK gene that is located close to pilE, but not at the opaJ gene located elsewhere on the genome. The approach described here promises to dramatically improve studies of the extent and nature of antigenic variation systems in a variety of species. PMID:24466206

  18. Dealing with reduced data acquisition times in Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) for High-Throughput Screening (HTS) applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Lloyd M.; Ball, David A.; Williams, Peter E.; Swift, Kerry M.; Matayoshi, Edmund D.

    2003-07-01

    Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) may be used to assay the binding of drug-like ligands to signaling proteins and other bio-particles. For High Throughput Screening (HTS), a competitive format is typically used in which binding of an unlabeled compound results in displacement of a fluorescently labeled ligand. Unweighted curve-fitting of the normalized autocorrelation function (ACF) to a two-diffusion-component model can resolve the fractions of free and bound ligand if the diffusion rates differ sufficiently and if the experimentally estimated ACF has adequate precision. However, for HTS (and also for intracellular FCS studies) it is desirable to minimize the experimental data collection time. In this case, the precision of the ACF is limited and it becomes important to account for the statistical features of the ACF estimate when designing an assay. The errors at different points in the estimated ACF are correlated and hence least-squares fitting methods are not strictly statistically rigorous. We compare different methods for estimating and curve-fitting the ACF from the raw data of short duration FCS measurements. The methods are applied to data from experiments to assay binding of Alexa-488-labeled Bak peptide with Bcl-xL, which is an intracellular protein that acts to protect against programmed cell death. We present results from a detailed Monte Carlo simulation of the experiment, which is useful for validating short-duration assay capabilities. We also discuss the measurement of changes in steady state fluorescence anisotropy due to restricted rotational diffusion upon binding, which provides a complementary assay method.

  19. Versatile protein biotinylation strategies for potential high-throughput proteomics.

    PubMed

    Lue, Rina Y P; Chen, Grace Y J; Hu, Yi; Zhu, Qing; Yao, Shao Q

    2004-02-01

    We present intein-mediated approaches for efficient biotinylation of proteins site-specifically. The reactive C-terminal thioester generated from intein-assisted protein splicing (either in vitro or in live cells) served as an attractive and exclusive site for attaching cysteine-containing biotin. Using these novel biotinylation strategies, we were able to efficiently biotinylate many proteins from different biological sources in a potentially high-throughput, high-content fashion. Some of these proteins were subsequently immobilized, in a very simple manner, onto different avidin-functionalized solid surfaces for applications such as protein microarray and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy, highlighting the numerous advantages of using biotin over other tags (e.g., GST, His-tag, etc.) as the method of choice in protein purification/immobilization. In addition, our intein-mediated strategies provided critical advantages over other protein biotinylation strategies in a number of ways. For the first time, we also successfully demonstrated that intein-mediated protein biotinylation proceeded adequately inside both bacterial and mammalian living cells, as well as in a cell-free protein synthesis system. Taken together, our results indicate the versatility of these intein-mediated strategies for potential high-throughput proteomics applications. They may also serve as useful tools for various biochemical and biophysical studies of proteins both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:14746473

  20. Overview of DNA microarrays: types, applications, and their future.

    PubMed

    Bumgarner, Roger

    2013-01-01

    This unit provides an overview of DNA microarrays. Microarrays are a technology in which thousands of nucleic acids are bound to a surface and are used to measure the relative concentration of nucleic acid sequences in a mixture via hybridization and subsequent detection of the hybridization events. This overview first discusses the history of microarrays and the antecedent technologies that led to their development. This is followed by discussion of the methods of manufacture of microarrays and the most common biological applications. The unit ends with a brief description of the limitations of microarrays and discusses how microarrays are being rapidly replaced by DNA sequencing technologies. PMID:23288464

  1. Application of DNA microarray for screening metagenome library clones.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Je; Chae, Jong-Chan; Rhee, Sung-Keun

    2010-01-01

    Sequence-based screening tools of a metagenome library can expedite metagenome researches considering tremendous metagenome diversities. Several critical disadvantages of activity-based screening of metagenome libraries could be overcome by sequence-based screening approaches. DNA microarray technology widely used for monitoring environmental genes can be employed for screening environmental fosmid and BAC clones harboring target genes due to its high throughput nature. DNAs of fosmid clones are extracted and spotted on a glass slide and fluorescence-labeled probes are hybridized to the microarray. Specific hybridization signals can be obtained only for the fosmid clones that contain the target gene with high sensitivity (10 ng/μL of fosmid clone DNA) and quantitativeness. PMID:20830574

  2. Application of high-throughput mini-bioreactor system for systematic scale-down modeling, process characterization, and control strategy development.

    PubMed

    Janakiraman, Vijay; Kwiatkowski, Chris; Kshirsagar, Rashmi; Ryll, Thomas; Huang, Yao-Ming

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput systems and processes have typically been targeted for process development and optimization in the bioprocessing industry. For process characterization, bench scale bioreactors have been the system of choice. Due to the need for performing different process conditions for multiple process parameters, the process characterization studies typically span several months and are considered time and resource intensive. In this study, we have shown the application of a high-throughput mini-bioreactor system viz. the Advanced Microscale Bioreactor (ambr15(TM) ), to perform process characterization in less than a month and develop an input control strategy. As a pre-requisite to process characterization, a scale-down model was first developed in the ambr system (15 mL) using statistical multivariate analysis techniques that showed comparability with both manufacturing scale (15,000 L) and bench scale (5 L). Volumetric sparge rates were matched between ambr and manufacturing scale, and the ambr process matched the pCO2 profiles as well as several other process and product quality parameters. The scale-down model was used to perform the process characterization DoE study and product quality results were generated. Upon comparison with DoE data from the bench scale bioreactors, similar effects of process parameters on process yield and product quality were identified between the two systems. We used the ambr data for setting action limits for the critical controlled parameters (CCPs), which were comparable to those from bench scale bioreactor data. In other words, the current work shows that the ambr15(TM) system is capable of replacing the bench scale bioreactor system for routine process development and process characterization. PMID:26317495

  3. Microarrays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plomin, Robert; Schalkwyk, Leonard C.

    2007-01-01

    Microarrays are revolutionizing genetics by making it possible to genotype hundreds of thousands of DNA markers and to assess the expression (RNA transcripts) of all of the genes in the genome. Microarrays are slides the size of a postage stamp that contain millions of DNA sequences to which single-stranded DNA or RNA can hybridize. This…

  4. High-throughput single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping for breeding applications in rice using the BeadXpress platform

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multiplexed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers have the potential to increase the speed and cost-effectiveness of genotyping, provided that an optimal SNP density is used for each application. To test the efficiency of multiplexed SNP genotyping for diversity, mapping and breeding applicat...

  5. Surface modification of thermoplastics--towards the plastic biochip for high throughput screening devices.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Quijada, Gerardo A; Peytavi, Régis; Nantel, André; Roy, Emmanuel; Bergeron, Michel G; Dumoulin, Michel M; Veres, Teodor

    2007-07-01

    Microarrays have become one of the most convenient tools for high throughput screening, supporting major advances in genomics and proteomics. Other important applications can be found in medical diagnostics, detection of biothreats, drug discovery, etc. Integration of microarrays with microfluidic devices can be highly advantageous in terms of portability, shorter analysis time and lower consumption of expensive biological analytes. Since fabrication of microfluidic devices using traditional materials such as glass is rather expensive, there is great interest in employing polymeric materials as a low cost alternative that is suitable for mass production. A number of commercially available plastic materials were reviewed for this purpose and poly(methylmethacrylate) Zeonor 1060R and Zeonex E48R were identified as promising candidates, for which methods for surface modification and covalent immobilization of DNA oligonucleotides were developed. In addition, we present proof-of-concept plastic-based microarrays with and without integration with microfluidics. PMID:17594004

  6. A high-throughput fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based endothelial cell apoptosis assay and its application for screening vascular disrupting agents

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xiaoming; Fu, Afu; Luo, Kathy Qian

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An endothelial cell apoptosis assay using FRET-based biosensor was developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fluorescence of the cells changed from green to blue during apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This method was developed into a high-throughput assay in 96-well plates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This assay was applied to screen vascular disrupting agents. -- Abstract: In this study, we developed a high-throughput endothelial cell apoptosis assay using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensor. After exposure to apoptotic inducer UV-irradiation or anticancer drugs such as paclitaxel, the fluorescence of the cells changed from green to blue. We developed this method into a high-throughput assay in 96-well plates by measuring the emission ratio of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) to cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) to monitor the activation of a key protease, caspase-3, during apoptosis. The Z Prime factor for this assay was above 0.5 which indicates that this assay is suitable for a high-throughput analysis. Finally, we applied this functional high-throughput assay for screening vascular disrupting agents (VDA) which could induce endothelial cell apoptosis from our in-house compounds library and dioscin was identified as a hit. As this assay allows real time and sensitive detection of cell apoptosis, it will be a useful tool for monitoring endothelial cell apoptosis in living cell situation and for identifying new VDA candidates via a high-throughput screening.

  7. Bulk Combinatorial Synthesis and High Throughput Characterization for Rapid Assessment of Magnetic Materials: Application of Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS™)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, J.; Nlebedim, I. C.; Besser, M. F.; Simsek, E.; Ott, R. T.

    2016-07-01

    A bulk combinatorial approach for synthesizing alloy libraries using laser engineered net shaping (LENS™; i.e., 3D printing) was utilized to rapidly assess material systems for magnetic applications. The LENS™ system feeds powders in different ratios into a melt pool created by a laser to synthesize samples with bulk (millimeters) dimensions. By analyzing these libraries with autosampler differential scanning calorimeter/thermal gravimetric analysis and vibrating sample magnetometry, we are able to rapidly characterize the thermodynamic and magnetic properties of the libraries. The Fe-Co binary alloy was used as a model system and the results were compared with data in the literature.

  8. Bulk Combinatorial Synthesis and High Throughput Characterization for Rapid Assessment of Magnetic Materials: Application of Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS™)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, J.; Nlebedim, I. C.; Besser, M. F.; Simsek, E.; Ott, R. T.

    2016-04-01

    A bulk combinatorial approach for synthesizing alloy libraries using laser engineered net shaping (LENS™; i.e., 3D printing) was utilized to rapidly assess material systems for magnetic applications. The LENS™ system feeds powders in different ratios into a melt pool created by a laser to synthesize samples with bulk (millimeters) dimensions. By analyzing these libraries with autosampler differential scanning calorimeter/thermal gravimetric analysis and vibrating sample magnetometry, we are able to rapidly characterize the thermodynamic and magnetic properties of the libraries. The Fe-Co binary alloy was used as a model system and the results were compared with data in the literature.

  9. Phototocatalytic Lithography of Poly(Propylene Sulfide) Block Copolymers: Towards High Throughput Nanolithography for Biomolecular Arraying Applications

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Gary; Hiddessen, Amy L.; Dugan, Lawrence C.; Wu, Ligang; Hailey, Philip; Conway, James W.; Kuenzler, Tobias; Feller, Lydia; Cerritelli, Simona; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2009-01-01

    Photocatalytic lithography (PCL) is an inexpensive, fast and robust method of oxidizing surface chemical moieties to produce patterned substrates. This technique has utility in basic biological research, as well as various biochip applications. We report on porphyrin-based PCL for patterning poly(propylene sulfide) block copolymer films on gold substrates at the micron and sub-micron scale. We confirm chemical patterning with imaging ToF-SIMS and low voltage SEM. Biomolecular patterning on micron and submicron scales is demonstrated with proteins, protein-linked beads and fluorescently labeled proteins. PMID:19113808

  10. Protein Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard-Blum, S.

    Proteins are key actors in the life of the cell, involved in many physiological and pathological processes. Since variations in the expression of messenger RNA are not systematically correlated with variations in the protein levels, the latter better reflect the way a cell functions. Protein microarrays thus supply complementary information to DNA chips. They are used in particular to analyse protein expression profiles, to detect proteins within complex biological media, and to study protein-protein interactions, which give information about the functions of those proteins [3-9]. They have the same advantages as DNA microarrays for high-throughput analysis, miniaturisation, and the possibility of automation. Section 18.1 gives a brief overview of proteins. Following this, Sect. 18.2 describes how protein microarrays can be made on flat supports, explaining how proteins can be produced and immobilised on a solid support, and discussing the different kinds of substrate and detection method. Section 18.3 discusses the particular format of protein microarrays in suspension. The diversity of protein microarrays and their applications are then reported in Sect. 18.4, with applications to therapeutics (protein-drug interactions) and diagnostics. The prospects for future developments of protein microarrays are then outlined in the conclusion. The bibliography provides an extensive list of reviews and detailed references for those readers who wish to go further in this area. Indeed, the aim of the present chapter is not to give an exhaustive or detailed analysis of the state of the art, but rather to provide the reader with the basic elements needed to understand how proteins are designed and used.

  11. A Model of Excitotoxic Brain Injury in Larval Zebrafish: Potential Application for High-Throughput Drug Evaluation to Treat Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    McCutcheon, Victoria; Park, Eugene; Liu, Elaine; Wang, Youdong; Wen, Xiao-Yan; Baker, Andrew J

    2016-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and morbidity with no effective therapeutic treatments for secondary injury. Preclinical drug evaluation in rodent models of TBI is a lengthy process. In this regard, the zebrafish has numerous advantages to address the technical and time-dependent obstacles associated with drug evaluation. We developed a reproducible brain injury using glutamate excitoxicity in zebrafish larvae, a known initiator of delayed cell death in TBI. Glutamate challenge resulted in dose-dependent lethality over an 84-h observation period. We report significant decrease in locomotion (p < 0.0001) and mean velocity (p < 0.001) with 10 μM glutamate application as measured through automated 96-well plate behavioral analysis. Application of the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 (400 nM) or the calpain inhibitor, MDL-28170 (20 μM), resulted in significant recovery of locomotor function. A secA5-YFP transgenic line was used to visualize the localization of cell death due to glutamate exposure in vivo using confocal fluorescence microscopy. Our results indicate that zebrafish larvae exhibit responses to excitotoxic injury and pharmacotherapeutic intervention with pathophysiological relevance to mammalian excitotoxic brain injury. This system has potential to be applied as a high-throughput drug screening model to quickly identify candidate lead compounds for further evaluation. PMID:27028704

  12. Fabrication of continuous flow microfluidics device with 3D electrode structures for high throughput DEP applications using mechanical machining.

    PubMed

    Zeinali, Soheila; Çetin, Barbaros; Oliaei, Samad Nadimi Bavil; Karpat, Yiğit

    2015-07-01

    Microfluidics is the combination of micro/nano fabrication techniques with fluid flow at microscale to pursue powerful techniques in controlling and manipulating chemical and biological processes. Sorting and separation of bio-particles are highly considered in diagnostics and biological analyses. Dielectrophoresis (DEP) has offered unique advantages for microfluidic devices. In DEP devices, asymmetric pair of planar electrodes could be employed to generate non-uniform electric fields. In DEP applications, facing 3D sidewall electrodes is considered to be one of the key solutions to increase device throughput due to the generated homogeneous electric fields along the height of microchannels. Despite the advantages, fabrication of 3D vertical electrodes requires a considerable challenge. In this study, two alternative fabrication techniques have been proposed for the fabrication of a microfluidic device with 3D sidewall electrodes. In the first method, both the mold and the electrodes are fabricated using high precision machining. In the second method, the mold with tilted sidewalls is fabricated using high precision machining and the electrodes are deposited on the sidewall using sputtering together with a shadow mask fabricated by electric discharge machining. Both fabrication processes are assessed as highly repeatable and robust. Moreover, the two methods are found to be complementary with respect to the channel height. Only the manipulation of particles with negative-DEP is demonstrated in the experiments, and the throughput values up to 105 particles / min is reached in a continuous flow. The experimental results are compared with the simulation results and the limitations on the fabrication techniques are also discussed. PMID:25808433

  13. Optimization of a Differential Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Tandem Mass Spectrometry Method for High-Throughput Analysis of Nicotine and Related Compounds: Application to Electronic Cigarette Refill Liquids.

    PubMed

    Regueiro, Jorge; Giri, Anupam; Wenzl, Thomas

    2016-06-21

    Fast market penetration of electronic cigarettes is leading to an exponentially growing number of electronic refill liquids with different nicotine contents and an endless list of flavors. Therefore, rapid and simple methods allowing a fast screening of these products are necessary to detect harmful substances which can negatively impact the health of consumers. In this regard, the present work explores the capabilities of differential ion mobility spectrometry coupled to tandem mass spectrometry for high-throughput analysis of nicotine and 11 related compounds in commercial refill liquids for electronic cigarettes. The influence of main factors affecting the ion mobility separation, such as modifier types and concentration, separation voltage, and temperature, was systematically investigated. Despite small molecular weight differences among the studied compounds, a good separation was achieved in the ion mobility cell under the optimized conditions, which involved the use of ethanol as a polar gas-phase chemical modifier. Indeed, differential ion mobility was able to resolve (resolution >4) nicotine from its structural isomer anabasine without the use of any chromatographic separation. The quantitative performance of the proposed method was then evaluated, showing satisfactory precision (RSD ≤ 16%) and recoveries ranging from 85 to 100% for nicotine, and from 84 to 126% for the rest of the target analytes. Several commercial electronic cigarette refill liquids were analyzed to demonstrate the applicability of the method. In some cases, significant differences were found between labeled and measured levels of nicotine. Anatabine, cotinine, myosmine, and nornicotine were also found in some of the analyzed samples. PMID:27173877

  14. High throughput network for multiprocessor interconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raatikainen, Pertti; Zidbeck, Juha

    1993-05-01

    Multiprocessor architectures are needed to support modern broadband applications, since traditional bus structures are not capable of providing high throughput. New bus structures are needed, especially in the area of network components and terminals. A study to find an efficient and cost effective interconnection topology for the future high speed products is presented. The most common bus topologies are introduced, and their characteristics are estimated to decide which one of them offers best performance and lowest implementation cost. The ring topology is chosen to be studied in more detail. Four competing bus access schemes for the high throughput ring are introduced as well as simulation models for each of them. Using transfer delay and throughput results, as well as keeping the implementation point of view in mind, the best candidate is selected to be studied and experimented in the succeeding research project.

  15. A high-throughput fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based endothelial cell apoptosis assay and its application for screening vascular disrupting agents.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoming; Fu, Afu; Luo, Kathy Qian

    2012-02-24

    In this study, we developed a high-throughput endothelial cell apoptosis assay using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensor. After exposure to apoptotic inducer UV-irradiation or anticancer drugs such as paclitaxel, the fluorescence of the cells changed from green to blue. We developed this method into a high-throughput assay in 96-well plates by measuring the emission ratio of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) to cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) to monitor the activation of a key protease, caspase-3, during apoptosis. The Z' factor for this assay was above 0.5 which indicates that this assay is suitable for a high-throughput analysis. Finally, we applied this functional high-throughput assay for screening vascular disrupting agents (VDA) which could induce endothelial cell apoptosis from our in-house compounds library and dioscin was identified as a hit. As this assay allows real time and sensitive detection of cell apoptosis, it will be a useful tool for monitoring endothelial cell apoptosis in living cell situation and for identifying new VDA candidates via a high-throughput screening. PMID:22290227

  16. High-Throughput Investigation of Delafossite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haycock, Barry; Kylee Underwood, M.; Lekse, Jonathan; Matranga, Christopher; Lewis, James P.

    2013-03-01

    We present the application of high-throughput calculations to the intriguing problem of the forbidden optical transition in the CuGa1-xFexO2 delafossites, which is prototypical of many delafossite systems. When 5% or more of the Ga sites are replaced with Fe, there is a sudden shift to an optical band gap of 1.5eV from 2.5eV. Using high-throughput calculations and data mining techniques, we show the most likely positional configurations for x = 0.00 through x = 0.10 of the Fe atoms relative to one another. Implications of this result and applications of the techniques used are discussed, including the development of candidate materials via high-throughput analysis of constituent search-space. Funded by the National Science Foundation through NSF DMR 09-03225 and a subcontract from NETL (URS RES) for Work Activity 0004000.6.600.007.002.420.000.005 ARRA ICMI Project.

  17. Applications of microarray technology in breast cancer research

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Colin S

    2001-01-01

    Microarrays provide a versatile platform for utilizing information from the Human Genome Project to benefit human health. This article reviews the ways in which microarray technology may be used in breast cancer research. Its diverse applications include monitoring chromosome gains and losses, tumour classification, drug discovery and development, DNA resequencing, mutation detection and investigating the mechanism of tumour development. PMID:11305951

  18. DNA Microarrays in Herbal Drug Research

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Preeti; Joshi, Kalpana; Patwardhan, Bhushan

    2006-01-01

    Natural products are gaining increased applications in drug discovery and development. Being chemically diverse they are able to modulate several targets simultaneously in a complex system. Analysis of gene expression becomes necessary for better understanding of molecular mechanisms. Conventional strategies for expression profiling are optimized for single gene analysis. DNA microarrays serve as suitable high throughput tool for simultaneous analysis of multiple genes. Major practical applicability of DNA microarrays remains in DNA mutation and polymorphism analysis. This review highlights applications of DNA microarrays in pharmacodynamics, pharmacogenomics, toxicogenomics and quality control of herbal drugs and extracts. PMID:17173108

  19. Application of Targeted Functional Assays to Assess a Putative Vascular Disruption Developmental Toxicity Pathway Informed By ToxCast High-Throughput Screening Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical perturbation of vascular development is a putative toxicity pathway which may result in developmental toxicity. EPA’s high-throughput screening (HTS) ToxCast program contains assays which measure cellular signals and biological processes critical for blood vessel develop...

  20. Protein–protein interaction inhibition (2P2I) combining high throughput and virtual screening: Application to the HIV-1 Nef protein

    PubMed Central

    Betzi, Stéphane; Restouin, Audrey; Opi, Sandrine; Arold, Stefan T.; Parrot, Isabelle; Guerlesquin, Françoise; Morelli, Xavier; Collette, Yves

    2007-01-01

    Protein–protein recognition is the cornerstone of multiple cellular and pathological functions. Therefore, protein–protein interaction inhibition (2P2I) is endowed with great therapeutic potential despite the initial belief that 2P2I was refractory to small-molecule intervention. Improved knowledge of complex molecular binding surfaces has recently stimulated renewed interest for 2P2I, especially after identification of “hot spots” and first inhibitory compounds. However, the combination of target complexity and lack of starting compound has thwarted experimental results and created intellectual barriers. Here we combined virtual and experimental screening when no previously known inhibitors can be used as starting point in a structure-based research program that targets an SH3 binding surface of the HIV type I Nef protein. High-throughput docking and application of a pharmacophoric filter on one hand and search for analogy on the other hand identified drug-like compounds that were further confirmed to bind Nef in the micromolar range (isothermal titration calorimetry), to target the Nef SH3 binding surface (NMR experiments), and to efficiently compete for Nef–SH3 interactions (cell-based assay, GST pull-down). Initial identification of these compounds by virtual screening was validated by screening of the very same library of compounds in the cell-based assay, demonstrating that a significant enrichment factor was attained by the in silico screening. To our knowledge, our results identify the first set of drug-like compounds that functionally target the HIV-1 Nef SH3 binding surface and provide the basis for a powerful discovery process that should help to speed up 2P2I strategies and open avenues for new class of antiviral molecules. PMID:18042718

  1. Microarrayed Materials for Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells hold remarkable promise for applications in disease modeling, cancer therapy and regenerative medicine. Despite the significant progress made during the last decade, designing materials to control stem cell fate remains challenging. As an alternative, materials microarray technology has received great attention because it allows for high throughput materials synthesis and screening at a reasonable cost. Here, we discuss recent developments in materials microarray technology and their applications in stem cell engineering. Future opportunities in the field will also be reviewed. PMID:24311967

  2. High throughput protein production screening

    DOEpatents

    Beernink, Peter T.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Segelke, Brent W.

    2009-09-08

    Methods, compositions, and kits for the cell-free production and analysis of proteins are provided. The invention allows for the production of proteins from prokaryotic sequences or eukaryotic sequences, including human cDNAs using PCR and IVT methods and detecting the proteins through fluorescence or immunoblot techniques. This invention can be used to identify optimized PCR and WT conditions, codon usages and mutations. The methods are readily automated and can be used for high throughput analysis of protein expression levels, interactions, and functional states.

  3. High-Throughput Cloning and Expression Library Creation for Functional Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Festa, Fernanda; Steel, Jason; Bian, Xiaofang; Labaer, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    The study of protein function usually requires the use of a cloned version of the gene for protein expression and functional assays. This strategy is particular important when the information available regarding function is limited. The functional characterization of the thousands of newly identified proteins revealed by genomics requires faster methods than traditional single gene experiments, creating the need for fast, flexible and reliable cloning systems. These collections of open reading frame (ORF) clones can be coupled with high-throughput proteomics platforms, such as protein microarrays and cell-based assays, to answer biological questions. In this tutorial we provide the background for DNA cloning, discuss the major high-throughput cloning systems (Gateway® Technology, Flexi® Vector Systems, and Creator™ DNA Cloning System) and compare them side-by-side. We also report an example of high-throughput cloning study and its application in functional proteomics. This Tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP12). Details can be found at http://www.proteomicstutorials.org. PMID:23457047

  4. High throughput screening technologies for ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hai-bo; Li, Min; Wang, Wei-ping; Wang, Xiao-liang

    2016-01-01

    Ion channels are involved in a variety of fundamental physiological processes, and their malfunction causes numerous human diseases. Therefore, ion channels represent a class of attractive drug targets and a class of important off-targets for in vitro pharmacological profiling. In the past decades, the rapid progress in developing functional assays and instrumentation has enabled high throughput screening (HTS) campaigns on an expanding list of channel types. Chronologically, HTS methods for ion channels include the ligand binding assay, flux-based assay, fluorescence-based assay, and automated electrophysiological assay. In this review we summarize the current HTS technologies for different ion channel classes and their applications. PMID:26657056

  5. Novel molecular diagnostic tools for malaria elimination: a review of options from the point of view of high-throughput and applicability in resource limited settings.

    PubMed

    Britton, Sumudu; Cheng, Qin; McCarthy, James S

    2016-01-01

    As malaria transmission continues to decrease, an increasing number of countries will enter pre-elimination and elimination. To interrupt transmission, changes in control strategies are likely to require more accurate identification of all carriers of Plasmodium parasites, both symptomatic and asymptomatic, using diagnostic tools that are highly sensitive, high throughput and with fast turnaround times preferably performed in local health service settings. Currently available immunochromatographic lateral flow rapid diagnostic tests and field microscopy are unlikely to consistently detect infections at parasite densities less than 100 parasites/µL making them insufficiently sensitive for detecting all carriers. Molecular diagnostic platforms, such as PCR and LAMP, are currently available in reference laboratories, but at a cost both financially and in turnaround time. This review describes the recent progress in developing molecular diagnostic tools in terms of their capacity for high throughput and potential for performance in non-reference laboratories for malaria elimination. PMID:26879936

  6. High throughput growth and characterization of thin film materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Samuel S.

    2013-09-01

    It usually takes more than 10 years for a new material from initial research to its first commercial application. Therefore, accelerating the pace of discovery of new materials is critical to tackling challenges in areas ranging from clean energy to national security. As discovery of new materials has not kept pace with the product design cycles in many sectors of industry, there is a pressing need to develop and utilize high throughput screening and discovery technologies for the growth and characterization of new materials. This article presents two distinctive types of high throughput thin film material growth approaches, along with a number of high throughput characterization techniques, established in the author's group. These approaches include a second-generation "discrete" combinatorial semiconductor discovery technology that enables the creation of arrays of individually separated thin film semiconductor materials of different compositions, and a "continuous" high throughput thin film material screening technology that enables the realization of ternary alloy libraries with continuously varying elemental ratios.

  7. Robin: An Intuitive Wizard Application for R-Based Expression Microarray Quality Assessment and Analysis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Lohse, Marc; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Krüger, Peter; Nagel, Axel; Hannemann, Jan; Giorgi, Federico M.; Childs, Liam; Osorio, Sonia; Walther, Dirk; Selbig, Joachim; Sreenivasulu, Nese; Stitt, Mark; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Usadel, Björn

    2010-01-01

    The wide application of high-throughput transcriptomics using microarrays has generated a plethora of technical platforms, data repositories, and sophisticated statistical analysis methods, leaving the individual scientist with the problem of choosing the appropriate approach to address a biological question. Several software applications that provide a rich environment for microarray analysis and data storage are available (e.g. GeneSpring, EMMA2), but these are mostly commercial or require an advanced informatics infrastructure. There is a need for a noncommercial, easy-to-use graphical application that aids the lab researcher to find the proper method to analyze microarray data, without this requiring expert understanding of the complex underlying statistics, or programming skills. We have developed Robin, a Java-based graphical wizard application that harnesses the advanced statistical analysis functions of the R/BioConductor project. Robin implements streamlined workflows that guide the user through all steps of two-color, single-color, or Affymetrix microarray analysis. It provides functions for thorough quality assessment of the data and automatically generates warnings to notify the user of potential outliers, low-quality chips, or low statistical power. The results are generated in a standard format that allows ready use with both specialized analysis tools like MapMan and PageMan and generic spreadsheet applications. To further improve user friendliness, Robin includes both integrated help and comprehensive external documentation. To demonstrate the statistical power and ease of use of the workflows in Robin, we present a case study in which we apply Robin to analyze a two-color microarray experiment comparing gene expression in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) leaves, flowers, and roots. PMID:20388663

  8. [Genomic medicine. Polymorphisms and microarray applications].

    PubMed

    Spalvieri, Mónica P; Rotenberg, Rosa G

    2004-01-01

    This update shows new concepts related to the significance of DNA variations among individuals, as well as to their detection by using a new technology. The sequencing of the human genome is only the beginning of what will enable us to understand genetic diversity. The unit of DNA variability is the polymorphism of a single nucleotide (SNP). At present, studies on SNPs are restricted to basic research but the large number of papers on this subject makes feasible their entrance into clinical practice. We illustrate here the use of SNPs as molecular markers in ethnical genotyping, gene expression in some diseases and as potential targets in pharmacological response, and also introduce the technology of arrays. Microarrays experiments allow the quantification and comparison of gene expression on a large scale, at the same time, by using special chips and array designs. Conventional methods provide data from up to 20 genes, while a single microarray may provide information about thousands of them simultaneously, leading to a more rapid and accurate genotyping. Biotechnology improvements will facilitate our knowledge of each gene sequence, the frequency and exact location of SNPs and their influence on cellular behavior. Although experimental efficiency and validity of results from microarrays are still controversial, the knowledge and characterization of a patient's genetic profile will lead, undoubtedly, to advances in prevention, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of human diseases. PMID:15637833

  9. SaDA: From Sampling to Data Analysis—An Extensible Open Source Infrastructure for Rapid, Robust and Automated Management and Analysis of Modern Ecological High-Throughput Microarray Data

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kumar Saurabh; Thual, Dominique; Spurio, Roberto; Cannata, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    One of the most crucial characteristics of day-to-day laboratory information management is the collection, storage and retrieval of information about research subjects and environmental or biomedical samples. An efficient link between sample data and experimental results is absolutely important for the successful outcome of a collaborative project. Currently available software solutions are largely limited to large scale, expensive commercial Laboratory Information Management Systems (LIMS). Acquiring such LIMS indeed can bring laboratory information management to a higher level, but most of the times this requires a sufficient investment of money, time and technical efforts. There is a clear need for a light weighted open source system which can easily be managed on local servers and handled by individual researchers. Here we present a software named SaDA for storing, retrieving and analyzing data originated from microorganism monitoring experiments. SaDA is fully integrated in the management of environmental samples, oligonucleotide sequences, microarray data and the subsequent downstream analysis procedures. It is simple and generic software, and can be extended and customized for various environmental and biomedical studies. PMID:26047146

  10. SaDA: From Sampling to Data Analysis-An Extensible Open Source Infrastructure for Rapid, Robust and Automated Management and Analysis of Modern Ecological High-Throughput Microarray Data.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kumar Saurabh; Thual, Dominique; Spurio, Roberto; Cannata, Nicola

    2015-06-01

    One of the most crucial characteristics of day-to-day laboratory information management is the collection, storage and retrieval of information about research subjects and environmental or biomedical samples. An efficient link between sample data and experimental results is absolutely important for the successful outcome of a collaborative project. Currently available software solutions are largely limited to large scale, expensive commercial Laboratory Information Management Systems (LIMS). Acquiring such LIMS indeed can bring laboratory information management to a higher level, but most of the times this requires a sufficient investment of money, time and technical efforts. There is a clear need for a light weighted open source system which can easily be managed on local servers and handled by individual researchers. Here we present a software named SaDA for storing, retrieving and analyzing data originated from microorganism monitoring experiments. SaDA is fully integrated in the management of environmental samples, oligonucleotide sequences, microarray data and the subsequent downstream analysis procedures. It is simple and generic software, and can be extended and customized for various environmental and biomedical studies. PMID:26047146

  11. A High-Throughput Assay for Arylamine Halogenation Based on a Peroxidase-Mediated Quinone–Amine Coupling with Applications in the Screening of Enzymatic Halogenations

    PubMed Central

    Hosford, Joseph; Shepherd, Sarah A; Micklefield, Jason; Wong, Lu Shin

    2014-01-01

    Arylhalides are important building blocks in many fine chemicals, pharmaceuticals and agrochemicals, and there has been increasing interest in the development of more “green” halogenation methods based on enzyme catalysis. However, the screening and development of new enzymes for biohalogenation has been hampered by a lack of high-throughput screening methods. Described herein is the development of a colorimetric assay for detecting both chemical and enzymatic arylamine halogenation reactions in an aqueous environment. The assay is based on the unique UV/Vis spectrum created by the formation of an ortho-benzoquinone-amine adduct, which is produced by the peroxidase-catalysed benzoquinone generation, followed by Michael addition of either a halogenated or non-halogenated arylamine. This assay is sensitive, rapid and amenable to high-throughput screening platforms. We have also shown this assay to be easily coupled to a flavin-dependent halogenase, which currently lacks any convenient colorimetric assay, in a “one-pot” workflow. PMID:25319801

  12. Applications of high-throughput genomics to antiviral research: evasion of antiviral responses and activation of inflammation during fulminant RNA virus infection.

    PubMed

    Kash, John C

    2009-07-01

    Host responses can contribute to the severity of viral infection, through the failure of innate antiviral mechanisms to recognize and restrict the pathogen, the development of intense systemic inflammation leading to circulatory failure or through tissue injury resulting from overly exuberant cell-mediated immune responses. High-throughput genomics methods are now being used to identify the biochemical pathways underlying ineffective or damaging host responses in a number of acute and chronic viral infections. This article reviews recent gene expression studies of 1918 H1N1 influenza and Ebola hemorrhagic fever in cell culture and animal models, focusing on how genomics experiments can be used to increase our understanding of the mechanisms that permit those viruses to cause rapidly overwhelming infection. Particular attention is paid to how evasion of type I IFN responses in infected cells might contribute to over-activation of inflammatory responses. Reviewing recent research and describing how future studies might be tailored to understand the relationship between the infected cell and its environment, this article discusses how the rapidly growing field of high-throughput genomics can contribute to a more complete understanding of severe, acute viral infections and identify novel targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:19375457

  13. Use of genotyping by sequencing data to develop a high-throughput and multifunctional SNP panel for conservation applications in Pacific lamprey.

    PubMed

    Hess, Jon E; Campbell, Nathan R; Docker, Margaret F; Baker, Cyndi; Jackson, Aaron; Lampman, Ralph; McIlraith, Brian; Moser, Mary L; Statler, David P; Young, William P; Wildbill, Andrew J; Narum, Shawn R

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing data can be mined for highly informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to develop high-throughput genomic assays for nonmodel organisms. However, choosing a set of SNPs to address a variety of objectives can be difficult because SNPs are often not equally informative. We developed an optimal combination of 96 high-throughput SNP assays from a total of 4439 SNPs identified in a previous study of Pacific lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus) and used them to address four disparate objectives: parentage analysis, species identification and characterization of neutral and adaptive variation. Nine of these SNPs are FST outliers, and five of these outliers are localized within genes and significantly associated with geography, run-timing and dwarf life history. Two of the 96 SNPs were diagnostic for two other lamprey species that were morphologically indistinguishable at early larval stages and were sympatric in the Pacific Northwest. The majority (85) of SNPs in the panel were highly informative for parentage analysis, that is, putatively neutral with high minor allele frequency across the species' range. Results from three case studies are presented to demonstrate the broad utility of this panel of SNP markers in this species. As Pacific lamprey populations are undergoing rapid decline, these SNPs provide an important resource to address critical uncertainties associated with the conservation and recovery of this imperiled species. PMID:24842551

  14. Basic Concepts of Microarrays and Potential Applications in Clinical Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Melissa B.; Tang, Yi-Wei

    2009-01-01

    Summary: The introduction of in vitro nucleic acid amplification techniques, led by real-time PCR, into the clinical microbiology laboratory has transformed the laboratory detection of viruses and select bacterial pathogens. However, the progression of the molecular diagnostic revolution currently relies on the ability to efficiently and accurately offer multiplex detection and characterization for a variety of infectious disease pathogens. Microarray analysis has the capability to offer robust multiplex detection but has just started to enter the diagnostic microbiology laboratory. Multiple microarray platforms exist, including printed double-stranded DNA and oligonucleotide arrays, in situ-synthesized arrays, high-density bead arrays, electronic microarrays, and suspension bead arrays. One aim of this paper is to review microarray technology, highlighting technical differences between them and each platform's advantages and disadvantages. Although the use of microarrays to generate gene expression data has become routine, applications pertinent to clinical microbiology continue to rapidly expand. This review highlights uses of microarray technology that impact diagnostic microbiology, including the detection and identification of pathogens, determination of antimicrobial resistance, epidemiological strain typing, and analysis of microbial infections using host genomic expression and polymorphism profiles. PMID:19822891

  15. Application of Eukaryotic Elongation Factor-2 Kinase (eEF-2K) for Cancer Therapy: Expression, Purification, and High-Throughput Inhibitor Screening.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Clint D J; Devkota, Ashwini K; Dalby, Kevin N; Cho, Eun Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinases have emerged as an important class of therapeutic targets, as they are known to be involved in pathological pathways linked to numerous human disorders. Major efforts to discover kinase inhibitors in both academia and pharmaceutical companies have centered on the development of robust assays and cost-effective approaches to isolate them. Drug discovery procedures often start with hit identification for lead development, by screening a library of chemicals using an appropriate assay in a high-throughput manner. Considering limitations unique to each assay technique and screening capability, intelligent integration of various assay schemes and level of throughput, in addition to the choice of chemical libraries, is the key to success of this initial step. Here, we describe the purification of the protein kinase, eEF-2K, and the utilization of three biochemical assays in the course of identifying small molecules that block its enzymatic reaction. PMID:26501899

  16. Diagnostic application of the exponentially modified Gaussian model for peak quality and quantitation in high-throughput liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zabell, Adam P R; Foxworthy, Tyler; Eaton, Kimberly Napoli; Julian, Randall K

    2014-11-21

    Typical area calculation for a chromatographic peak assumes the observed signal strength at every measurement is an exactly accurate count of the signal. We compared that approach to one using the exponentially modified Gaussian (EMG) in an automated, clinical production setting. Peak areas in a 47 analyte high throughput clinical production liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay were compared across four months of production data to determine trends over the lifespan of a chromatographic column. The EMG parameters were superior to traditional quality control methods for monitoring data reproducibility, accuracy and precision. Because the EMG calculations are performed for every peak in the system, a constant monitor of system health is integrated into the operational workflow. Parameter trends confirmed the need for column replacement, and indicated the opportunity for a reduced schedule of preventive and routine maintenance. PMID:25441075

  17. High-throughput cellular RNA device engineering.

    PubMed

    Townshend, Brent; Kennedy, Andrew B; Xiang, Joy S; Smolke, Christina D

    2015-10-01

    Methods for rapidly assessing sequence-structure-function landscapes and developing conditional gene-regulatory devices are critical to our ability to manipulate and interface with biology. We describe a framework for engineering RNA devices from preexisting aptamers that exhibit ligand-responsive ribozyme tertiary interactions. Our methodology utilizes cell sorting, high-throughput sequencing and statistical data analyses to enable parallel measurements of the activities of hundreds of thousands of sequences from RNA device libraries in the absence and presence of ligands. Our tertiary-interaction RNA devices performed better in terms of gene silencing, activation ratio and ligand sensitivity than optimized RNA devices that rely on secondary-structure changes. We applied our method to build biosensors for diverse ligands and determine consensus sequences that enable ligand-responsive tertiary interactions. These methods advance our ability to develop broadly applicable genetic tools and to elucidate the underlying sequence-structure-function relationships that empower rational design of complex biomolecules. PMID:26258292

  18. Expanding the Diversity of Imaging-Based RNAi Screen Applications Using Cell Spot Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Rantala, Juha K.; Kwon, Sunjong; Korkola, James; Gray, Joe W.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, great strides have been made in identifying gene aberrations and deregulated pathways that are associated with specific disease states. These association studies guide experimental studies aimed at identifying the aberrant genes and networks that cause the disease states. This requires functional manipulation of these genes and networks in laboratory models of normal and diseased cells. One approach is to assess molecular and biological responses to high-throughput RNA interference (RNAi)-induced gene knockdown. These responses can be revealed by immunofluorescent staining for a molecular or cellular process of interest and quantified using fluorescence image analysis. These applications are typically performed in multiwell format, but are limited by high reagent costs and long plate processing times. These limitations can be mitigated by analyzing cells grown in cell spot microarray (CSMA) format. CSMAs are produced by growing cells on small (~200 μm diameter) spots with each spot carrying an siRNA with transfection reagent. The spacing between spots is only a few hundred micrometers, thus thousands of cell spots can be arranged on a single cell culture surface. These high-density cell cultures can be immunofluorescently stained with minimal reagent consumption and analyzed quickly using automated fluorescence microscopy platforms. This review covers basic aspects of imaging-based CSMA technology, describes a wide range of immunofluorescence assays that have already been implemented successfully for CSMA screening and suggests future directions for advanced RNAi screening experiments.

  19. High-throughput screening for modulators of cellular contractile force†

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Young; Zhou, Enhua H.; Tambe, Dhananjay; Chen, Bohao; Lavoie, Tera; Dowell, Maria; Simeonov, Anton; Maloney, David J.; Marinkovic, Aleksandar; Tschumperlin, Daniel J.; Burger, Stephanie; Frykenberg, Matthew; Butler, James P.; Stamer, W. Daniel; Johnson, Mark; Solway, Julian; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    When cellular contractile forces are central to pathophysiology, these forces comprise a logical target of therapy. Nevertheless, existing high-throughput screens are limited to upstream signalling intermediates with poorly defined relationships to such a physiological endpoint. Using cellular force as the target, here we report a new screening technology and demonstrate its applications using human airway smooth muscle cells in the context of asthma and Schlemm's canal endothelial cells in the context of glaucoma. This approach identified several drug candidates for both asthma and glaucoma. We attained rates of 1000 compounds per screening day, thus establishing a force-based cellular platform for high-throughput drug discovery. PMID:25953078

  20. Cytochrome P450 expression system for high-throughput real-time detection of genotoxicity: Application to the study of human CYP1A2 variants.

    PubMed

    Palma, Bernardo Brito; Moutinho, Daniela; Urban, Philippe; Rueff, José; Kranendonk, Michel

    2016-08-01

    Individual variations in cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism are believed to contribute to individual susceptibility to chemical carcinogenesis. CYP1A2 is one of the major forms of cytochrome P450 involved in drug metabolism and bioactivation of carcinogens. We have applied a recently developed high-throughput Salmonella typhimurium TA1535 system for detection of DNA damaging agents to the study of CYP1A2 polymorphisms. Non-synonymous variants T83M [CYP1A2*9], S212C [CYP1A2*12], S298R [part of CYP1A2*21], G299S [CYP1A2*13], I314V [no allele designation], I386F [CYP1A2*4], C406Y [CYP1A2*5] and R456H [CYP1A2*8] were examined. The cDNAs for each of these variants and the wild-type were co-expressed with human NADPH cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase in the TA1535-based system. The bioactivation capacity of these CYP1A2 variants was investigated using three CYP1A2-dependent pro-mutagens, 1-aminopyrene (1AP), 2-aminoanthracene (2AA), and 2-amino-3-methylimidazo(4,5-f)quinoline (IQ). All CYP1A2 variants except R456H, T83M, and I386F gave positive responses with all three compounds. Variant R456H generated no detectable holoenzyme and no detectable response for any of the compounds; I386F did not bioactivate IQ; T83M did not bioactivate 1AP. Multivariate analysis indicated variant T83M to be substantially altered in catalytic properties when compared with wild-type CYP1A2; variants G299S and I386F are slightly but significantly different. These results corroborate our previous studies, indicating the effectiveness of this new high-throughput system, not only for examining the effect of CYP1A2 polymorphisms on pro-mutagen bioactivation, but also for obtaining insights on CYP1A2 function at the mechanistic level. PMID:27476332

  1. High-Throughput Method for Rapid Induction of Prophages from Lysogens and Its Application in the Study of Shiga Toxin-Encoding Escherichia coli Strains ▿

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, James E.; Smith, Darren L.; Fogg, Paul C. M.; McCarthy, Alan J.; Allison, Heather E.

    2010-01-01

    A high-throughput 96-well plate-based method for the rapid induction of endogenous prophages from individual bacterial strains was developed. The detection of endogenous prophages was achieved by the filtration of the culture liquor following norfloxacin induction and subsequent PCRs targeting bacteriophage-carried gene markers. The induction method was tested on 188 putative Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains and demonstrated the ability to detect both lambdoid and stx-carrying bacteriophages in strains for which plaques were not observed via plaque assay. Lambdoid bacteriophages were detected in 37% of the induced phage preparations via amplification of the Q gene, and Stx1- and Stx2-encoding phages were detected in 2 and 14% of the strains, respectively. The method therefore provided greater sensitivity for the detection of Stx and other lambdoid bacteriophage populations carried by STEC strains than that for the established method of plaque assay using bacterial indicator strains, enabling, for the first time, large-scale bacteriophage population and diversity studies. PMID:20139312

  2. Analysis of small-sample clinical genomics studies using multi-parameter shrinkage: application to high-throughput RNA interference screening

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput (HT) RNA interference (RNAi) screens are increasingly used for reverse genetics and drug discovery. These experiments are laborious and costly, hence sample sizes are often very small. Powerful statistical techniques to detect siRNAs that potentially enhance treatment are currently lacking, because they do not optimally use the amount of data in the other dimension, the feature dimension. We introduce ShrinkHT, a Bayesian method for shrinking multiple parameters in a statistical model, where 'shrinkage' refers to borrowing information across features. ShrinkHT is very flexible in fitting the effect size distribution for the main parameter of interest, thereby accommodating skewness that naturally occurs when siRNAs are compared with controls. In addition, it naturally down-weights the impact of nuisance parameters (e.g. assay-specific effects) when these tend to have little effects across siRNAs. We show that these properties lead to better ROC-curves than with the popular limma software. Moreover, in a 3 + 3 treatment vs control experiment with 'assay' as an additional nuisance factor, ShrinkHT is able to detect three (out of 960) significant siRNAs with stronger enhancement effects than the positive control. These were not detected by limma. In the context of gene-targeted (conjugate) treatment, these are interesting candidates for further research. PMID:23819807

  3. Disc-based microarrays: principles and analytical applications.

    PubMed

    Morais, Sergi; Puchades, Rosa; Maquieira, Ángel

    2016-07-01

    The idea of using disk drives to monitor molecular biorecognition events on regular optical discs has received considerable attention during the last decade. CDs, DVDs, Blu-ray discs and other new optical discs are universal and versatile supports with the potential for development of protein and DNA microarrays. Besides, standard disk drives incorporated in personal computers can be used as compact and affordable optical reading devices. Consequently, a CD technology, resulting from the audio-video industry, has been used to develop analytical applications in health care, environmental monitoring, food safety and quality assurance. The review presents and critically evaluates the current state of the art of disc-based microarrays with illustrative examples, including past, current and future developments. Special mention is made of the analytical developments that use either chemically activated or raw standard CDs where proteins, oligonucleotides, peptides, haptens or other biological probes are immobilized. The discs are also used to perform the assays and must maintain their readability with standard optical drives. The concept and principle of evolving disc-based microarrays and the evolution of disk drives as optical detectors are also described. The review concludes with the most relevant uses ordered chronologically to provide an overview of the progress of CD technology applications in the life sciences. Also, it provides a selection of important references to the current literature. Graphical Abstract High density disc-based microarrays. PMID:26922341

  4. GENO PROFILER: BATCH PROCESSING OF HIGH THROUGHPUT CAPILLARY FINGERPRINTING DATA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High-throughput fingerprinting techniques employing capillary electrophoresis place new demands on the editing of fingerprint files for the downstream contig assembly program, FPC. A cross-platform software application, GenoProfiler, was developed for automated editing of sized fingerprinting profil...

  5. Advancing a distributed multi-scale computing framework for large-scale high-throughput discovery in materials science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knap, J.; Spear, C. E.; Borodin, O.; Leiter, K. W.

    2015-10-01

    We describe the development of a large-scale high-throughput application for discovery in materials science. Our point of departure is a computational framework for distributed multi-scale computation. We augment the original framework with a specialized module whose role is to route evaluation requests needed by the high-throughput application to a collection of available computational resources. We evaluate the feasibility and performance of the resulting high-throughput computational framework by carrying out a high-throughput study of battery solvents. Our results indicate that distributed multi-scale computing, by virtue of its adaptive nature, is particularly well-suited for building high-throughput applications.

  6. High-throughput antibody microarray for bacteria and toxins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ingestion of pathogenic bacteria in foods often results in illnesses that are of worldwide concern. Hence, our research efforts have focused on developing screening tests capable of multiplexed detection of foodborne bacteria and associated toxins. In this study, we describe the combination of a s...

  7. A high-throughput antibody-based microarray typing platform

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many rapid methods have been developed for screening foods for the presence of pathogenic microorganisms. Rapid methods that have the ability to identify microorganisms via multiplexed immunological recognition have the potential for classification or typing microbial contaminants thus facilitating...

  8. High-throughput and rapid quantification of lipids by nanoflow UPLC-ESI-MS/MS: application to the hepatic lipids of rabbits with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Seul Kee; Lee, Jong Cheol; Chung, Bong Chul; Seo, Hong Seog; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2016-07-01

    A rapid and high-throughput quantification method (approximately 300 lipids within 20 min) was established using nanoflow ultrahigh-pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nUPLC-ESI-MS/MS) with selective reaction monitoring (SRM) and applied to the quantitative profiling of the hepatic lipids of rabbits with different metabolic conditions that stimulate the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Among the metabolic conditions of rabbits in this study [inflammation (I), high-cholesterol diet (HC), and high-cholesterol diet combined with inflammation (HCI)], significant perturbation in hepatic lipidome (>3-fold and p < 0.01) was observed in the HC and HCI groups, while no single lipid showed a significant change in group I. In addition, this study revealed a dramatic increase (>2-fold) in relatively high-abundant monohexosylceramides (MHCs), sphingomyelins (SMs), and triacylglycerols (TGs) in both the HC and HCI groups, especially in MHCs as all 11 MHCs increased by larger than 3- to 12-fold. As the levels of the relatively high-abundant lipids in the above classes increased, the total lipidome level of each class increased significantly by approximately 2-fold to 5-fold. Other classes of lipids also generally increased, which was likely induced by the increase in mitogenic and nonapoptotic MHCs and SMs, as they promote cell proliferation. On the other hand, a slight decrease in the level of apoptotic ceramides (Cers) was observed, which agreed with the general increase in total lipid level. As distinct changes in hepatic lipidome were observed from HC groups, this suggests that HC or HCI is highly associated with NAFLD but not inflammation alone itself. Graphical Abstract Schematic of lipidomic analysis from hepatic tissue using nanoflow LC-ESI-MS/MS and nUPLC-ESI-MS/MS. PMID:27178550

  9. High-Throughput Chiral LC-MS/MS Method Using Overlapping Injection Mode for the Determination of Pantoprazole Enantiomers in Human Plasma with Application to Pharmacokinetic Study.

    PubMed

    Li, Shengni; Jiang, Huafang; Wang, Yiya; Liu, Yinli; Shen, Xiaohang; Liang, Wenzhong; Hong, Zhanying

    2016-07-01

    A sensitive and high-throughput chiral liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for the quantification of R-pantoprazole and S-pantoprazole in human plasma. Sample extraction was carried out by using ethyl acetate liquid-liquid extraction in 96-well plate format. The separation of pantoprazole enantiomers was performed on a CHIRALCEL OJ-RH column and an overlapping injection mode was used to achieve a run time of 5.0 min/sample. The mobile phase consisted of 1) 10 mM ammonium acetate in methanol: acetonitrile (1:1, v/v) and 2) 20 mM ammonium acetate in water. Isocratic elution was used with flow rate at 500 μL/min. The enantiomers were quantified on a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer under multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode with m/z 382.1/230.0 for pantoprazole and m/z 388.4/230.1 for pantoprazole-d7. Linearity from 20.0 to 5000 ng/mL was established for each enantiomer (r(2)  > 0.99). Extraction recovery ranged from 91.7% to 96.4% for R-pantoprazole and from 92.5% to 96.5% for S-pantoprazole and the IS-normalized matrix factor was 0.98 to 1.07 for R-pantoprazole and S-pantoprazole, respectively. The method was demonstrated with acceptable accuracy, precision, selectivity, and stability and the method was applied to support a pharmacokinetic study of a phase I clinical trial of racemic pantoprazole in healthy Chinese subjects. Chirality 28:569-575, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27349958

  10. Microarrays in hematology.

    PubMed

    Walker, Josef; Flower, Darren; Rigley, Kevin

    2002-01-01

    Microarrays are fast becoming routine tools for the high-throughput analysis of gene expression in a wide range of biologic systems, including hematology. Although a number of approaches can be taken when implementing microarray-based studies, all are capable of providing important insights into biologic function. Although some technical issues have not been resolved, microarrays will continue to make a significant impact on hematologically important research. PMID:11753074

  11. Application of phenotypic microarrays to environmental microbiology

    SciTech Connect

    Borglin, sharon; Joyner, Dominique; DeAngelis, Kristen; Khudyakov, Jane; D'haeseleer, Patrik; Joachimiak, Marcin; Hazen, Terry C; Fagan, Lisa Anne

    2012-01-01

    Environmental organisms are extremely diverse and only a small fraction has been successfully cultured in the laboratory. Culture in micro wells provides a method for rapid screening of a wide variety of growth conditions and commercially available plates contain a large number of substrates, nutrient sources, and inhibitors, which can provide an assessment of the phenotype of an organism. This review describes applications of phenotype arrays to anaerobic and thermophilic microorganisms, use of the plates in stress response studies, in development of culture media for newly discovered strains, and for assessment of phenotype of environmental communities. Also discussed are considerations and challenges in data interpretation and visualization, including data normalization, statistics, and curve fitting.

  12. Application of Tissue Microarray Technology to Stem Cell Research

    PubMed Central

    Spada, Alberto La; Rainoldi, Barnaba; Blasio, Andrea De; Biunno, Ida

    2014-01-01

    There is virtually an unlimited number of possible Tissue Microarray (TMA) applications in basic and clinical research and ultimately in diagnostics. However, to assess the functional importance of novel markers, researchers very often turn to cell line model systems. The appropriate choice of a cell line is often a difficult task, but the use of cell microarray (CMA) technology enables a quick screening of several markers in cells of different origins, mimicking a genomic-scale analysis. In order to improve the morphological evaluations of the CMA slides we harvested the cells by conventional trypsinization, mechanical scraping and cells grown on coverslips. We show that mechanical scraping is a good evaluation method since keeps the real morphology very similar to those grown on coverslips. Immunofluorescence images are of higher quality, facilitating the reading of the biomarker cellular and subcellular localization. Here, we describe CMA technology in stem cell research.

  13. Detection of protein microarrays by oblique-incidence reflectivity difference technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Juan; Lu, Heng; Wang, Xu; Yuan, Kun; Lü, Huibin; Zhou, Yueliang; Yin, Kuijuan; Yang, Guozhen; Li, Wei; Ruan, Kangcheng

    2010-02-01

    Biological microarrays with different proteins and different protein concentrations are detected without external labeling by an oblique-incidence reflectivity difference (OIRD) technique. The initial experiment results reveal that the intensities of OIRD signals can distinguish the different proteins and concentrations of protein. The OIRD technique promises feasible applications to life sciences for label-free and high-throughput detection.

  14. A high-throughput label-free nanoparticle analyser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraikin, Jean-Luc; Teesalu, Tambet; McKenney, Christopher M.; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Cleland, Andrew N.

    2011-05-01

    Synthetic nanoparticles and genetically modified viruses are used in a range of applications, but high-throughput analytical tools for the physical characterization of these objects are needed. Here we present a microfluidic analyser that detects individual nanoparticles and characterizes complex, unlabelled nanoparticle suspensions. We demonstrate the detection, concentration analysis and sizing of individual synthetic nanoparticles in a multicomponent mixture with sufficient throughput to analyse 500,000 particles per second. We also report the rapid size and titre analysis of unlabelled bacteriophage T7 in both salt solution and mouse blood plasma, using just ~1 × 10-6 l of analyte. Unexpectedly, in the native blood plasma we discover a large background of naturally occurring nanoparticles with a power-law size distribution. The high-throughput detection capability, scalable fabrication and simple electronics of this instrument make it well suited for diverse applications.

  15. The application of microarray technology to the analysis of the cancer genome.

    PubMed

    Cowell, John K; Hawthorn, Lesleyann

    2007-02-01

    The identification of genetic events that are involved in the development of human cancer has been facilitated through the development and application of a diverse series of high resolution, high throughput microarray platforms. Essentially there are two types of array; those that carry PCR products from cloned nucleic acids (e.g. cDNA, BACs, cosmids) and those that use oligonucleotides. Each has advantages and disadvantages but it is now possible to survey genome wide DNA copy number abnormalities and expression levels to allow correlations between losses, gains and amplifications in tumor cells with genes that are over- and under-expressed in the same samples. The gene expression arrays that provide estimates of mRNA levels in tumors have given rise to exon-specific arrays that can identify both gene expression levels, alternative splicing events and mRNA processing alterations. Oligonucleotide arrays are also being used to interrogate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) throughout the genome for linkage and association studies and these have been adapted to quantify copy number abnormalities and loss of heterozygosity events. To identify as yet unknown transcripts tiling arrays across the genome have been developed which can also identify DNA methylation changes and be used to identify DNA-protein interactions using ChIP on Chip protocols. Ultimately DNA sequencing arrays will allow resequencing of chromosome regions and whole genomes. With all of these capabilities becoming routine in genomics laboratories, the idea of a systematic characterization of the sum genetic events that give rise to a cancer cell is rapidly becoming a reality. PMID:17311536

  16. Benchmarking Procedures for High-Throughput Context Specific Reconstruction Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Maria P.; Pfau, Thomas; Sauter, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in high-throughput data acquisition has shifted the focus from data generation to processing and understanding of how to integrate collected information. Context specific reconstruction based on generic genome scale models like ReconX or HMR has the potential to become a diagnostic and treatment tool tailored to the analysis of specific individuals. The respective computational algorithms require a high level of predictive power, robustness and sensitivity. Although multiple context specific reconstruction algorithms were published in the last 10 years, only a fraction of them is suitable for model building based on human high-throughput data. Beside other reasons, this might be due to problems arising from the limitation to only one metabolic target function or arbitrary thresholding. This review describes and analyses common validation methods used for testing model building algorithms. Two major methods can be distinguished: consistency testing and comparison based testing. The first is concerned with robustness against noise, e.g., missing data due to the impossibility to distinguish between the signal and the background of non-specific binding of probes in a microarray experiment, and whether distinct sets of input expressed genes corresponding to i.e., different tissues yield distinct models. The latter covers methods comparing sets of functionalities, comparison with existing networks or additional databases. We test those methods on several available algorithms and deduce properties of these algorithms that can be compared with future developments. The set of tests performed, can therefore serve as a benchmarking procedure for future algorithms. PMID:26834640

  17. Representation and classification for high-throughput data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessels, Lodewyk F. A.; Reinders, Marcel J. T.; van Welsem, Tibor; Nederlof, Petra M.

    2002-06-01

    Survival prediction and optimal treatment choice for cancer patients are dependent on correct disease classification. This classification can be improved significantly when high- throughput data such as microarray expression analysis is employed. These data sets usually suffer from the dimensionality problem: many features and few patients. Consequently, care must be taken when feature selection is performed and classifiers for disease classification are designed. In this paper we investigate several issues associated with this problem, including 1) data representation; 2) the type of classifier employed and 3) classifier construction, with specific emphasis on feature selection approaches. More specifically, 'filter' and 'wrapper' approaches for feature selection are studied. The different representations, selection criteria, classifiers and feature selection approaches are evaluated with regard to the effect on true classification performance. As test cases we employ a Comparative Genomic Hybridization breast cancer data sets and two publicly available gene expression data sets.

  18. WholePathwayScope: a comprehensive pathway-based analysis tool for high-throughput data

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ming; Horton, Jay D; Cohen, Jonathan C; Hobbs, Helen H; Stephens, Robert M

    2006-01-01

    Background Analysis of High Throughput (HTP) Data such as microarray and proteomics data has provided a powerful methodology to study patterns of gene regulation at genome scale. A major unresolved problem in the post-genomic era is to assemble the large amounts of data generated into a meaningful biological context. We have developed a comprehensive software tool, WholePathwayScope (WPS), for deriving biological insights from analysis of HTP data. Result WPS extracts gene lists with shared biological themes through color cue templates. WPS statistically evaluates global functional category enrichment of gene lists and pathway-level pattern enrichment of data. WPS incorporates well-known biological pathways from KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) and Biocarta, GO (Gene Ontology) terms as well as user-defined pathways or relevant gene clusters or groups, and explores gene-term relationships within the derived gene-term association networks (GTANs). WPS simultaneously compares multiple datasets within biological contexts either as pathways or as association networks. WPS also integrates Genetic Association Database and Partial MedGene Database for disease-association information. We have used this program to analyze and compare microarray and proteomics datasets derived from a variety of biological systems. Application examples demonstrated the capacity of WPS to significantly facilitate the analysis of HTP data for integrative discovery. Conclusion This tool represents a pathway-based platform for discovery integration to maximize analysis power. The tool is freely available at . PMID:16423281

  19. A Multidisciplinary Approach to High Throughput Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pourmodheji, Hossein; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim; Magierowski, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a non-contact, powerful structure-elucidation technique for biochemical analysis. NMR spectroscopy is used extensively in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery. However, existing NMR technology is limited in that it cannot run a large number of experiments simultaneously in one unit. Recent advances in micro-fabrication technologies have attracted the attention of researchers to overcome these limitations and significantly accelerate the drug discovery process by developing the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS). In this paper, we examine this paradigm shift and explore new design strategies for the development of the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using CMOS technology. A CMOS NMR system consists of an array of high sensitivity micro-coils integrated with interfacing radio-frequency circuits on the same chip. Herein, we first discuss the key challenges and recent advances in the field of CMOS NMR technology, and then a new design strategy is put forward for the design and implementation of highly sensitive and high-throughput CMOS NMR spectrometers. We thereafter discuss the functionality and applicability of the proposed techniques by demonstrating the results. For microelectronic researchers starting to work in the field of CMOS NMR technology, this paper serves as a tutorial with comprehensive review of state-of-the-art technologies and their performance levels. Based on these levels, the CMOS NMR approach offers unique advantages for high resolution, time-sensitive and high-throughput bimolecular analysis required in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery. PMID:27294925

  20. A Multidisciplinary Approach to High Throughput Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pourmodheji, Hossein; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim; Magierowski, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a non-contact, powerful structure-elucidation technique for biochemical analysis. NMR spectroscopy is used extensively in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery. However, existing NMR technology is limited in that it cannot run a large number of experiments simultaneously in one unit. Recent advances in micro-fabrication technologies have attracted the attention of researchers to overcome these limitations and significantly accelerate the drug discovery process by developing the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS). In this paper, we examine this paradigm shift and explore new design strategies for the development of the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using CMOS technology. A CMOS NMR system consists of an array of high sensitivity micro-coils integrated with interfacing radio-frequency circuits on the same chip. Herein, we first discuss the key challenges and recent advances in the field of CMOS NMR technology, and then a new design strategy is put forward for the design and implementation of highly sensitive and high-throughput CMOS NMR spectrometers. We thereafter discuss the functionality and applicability of the proposed techniques by demonstrating the results. For microelectronic researchers starting to work in the field of CMOS NMR technology, this paper serves as a tutorial with comprehensive review of state-of-the-art technologies and their performance levels. Based on these levels, the CMOS NMR approach offers unique advantages for high resolution, time-sensitive and high-throughput bimolecular analysis required in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery. PMID:27294925

  1. High-throughput patterning of photonic structures with tunable periodicity

    PubMed Central

    Kempa, Thomas J.; Bediako, D. Kwabena; Kim, Sun-Kyung; Park, Hong-Gyu; Nocera, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    A patterning method termed “RIPPLE” (reactive interface patterning promoted by lithographic electrochemistry) is applied to the fabrication of arrays of dielectric and metallic optical elements. This method uses cyclic voltammetry to impart patterns onto the working electrode of a standard three-electrode electrochemical setup. Using this technique and a template stripping process, periodic arrays of Ag circular Bragg gratings are patterned in a high-throughput fashion over large substrate areas. By varying the scan rate of the cyclically applied voltage ramps, the periodicity of the gratings can be tuned in situ over micrometer and submicrometer length scales. Characterization of the periodic arrays of periodic gratings identified point-like and annular scattering modes at different planes above the structured surface. Facile, reliable, and rapid patterning techniques like RIPPLE may enable the high-throughput and low-cost fabrication of photonic elements and metasurfaces for energy conversion and sensing applications. PMID:25870280

  2. ConservedPrimers 2.0: A high-throughput pipeline for comparative genome referenced intron-flanking PCR primer design and its application in wheat SNP discovery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In some genomic applications it is necessary to design large numbers of PCR primers in exons flanking one or several introns on the basis of orthologous gene sequences in related species. The primer pairs designed by this target gene approach are called "intron-flanking primers" or because they ar...

  3. Establishment and Application of a Visual DNA Microarray for the Detection of Food-borne Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongjin

    2016-01-01

    The accurate detection and identification of food-borne pathogenic microorganisms is critical for food safety nowadays. In the present work, a visual DNA microarray was established and applied to detect pathogens commonly found in food, including Salmonella enterica, Shigella flexneri, E. coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes in food samples. Multiplex PCR (mPCR) was employed to simultaneously amplify specific gene fragments, fimY for Salmonella, ipaH for Shigella, iap for L. monocytogenes and ECs2841 for E. coli O157:H7, respectively. Biotinylated PCR amplicons annealed to the microarray probes were then reacted with a streptavidin-alkaline phosphatase conjugate and nitro blue tetrazolium/5-bromo-4-chloro-3'-indolylphosphate, p-toluidine salt (NBT/BCIP); the positive results were easily visualized as blue dots formatted on the microarray surface. The performance of a DNA microarray was tested against 14 representative collection strains and mock-contamination food samples. The combination of mPCR and a visual micro-plate chip specifically and sensitively detected Salmonella enterica, Shigella flexneri, E. coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes in standard strains and food matrices with a sensitivity of ∼10(2) CFU/mL of bacterial culture. Thus, the developed method is advantageous because of its high throughput, cost-effectiveness and ease of use. PMID:26860568

  4. Search for Improved Host Architectures: Application of de Novo Structure-Based Design and High-Throughput Screening Methods to Identify Optimal Building Blocks for Multidentate Ethers.

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Benjamin P.; Oliferenko, Alex A.; Uddin, Jamal; Zhang, Cungen; Firman, Timothy K.

    2005-12-07

    This paper presents a computational approach to the deliberate design of improved host architectures. The approach, which involves the use of computer-aided design software, is illustrated by application to cation hosts containing multiple aliphatic ether oxygen binding sites. De novo molecule building software, HostDesigner, is interfaced with molecular mechanics software, GMMX, providing a tool for generating and screening millions of potential bidentate building block structures. Enhanced cation binding affinity can be achieved when highly organized building blocks are used to construct macrocyclic hosts.

  5. Living-Cell Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Yarmush, Martin L.; King, Kevin R.

    2011-01-01

    Living cells are remarkably complex. To unravel this complexity, living-cell assays have been developed that allow delivery of experimental stimuli and measurement of the resulting cellular responses. High-throughput adaptations of these assays, known as living-cell microarrays, which are based on microtiter plates, high-density spotting, microfabrication, and microfluidics technologies, are being developed for two general applications: (a) to screen large-scale chemical and genomic libraries and (b) to systematically investigate the local cellular microenvironment. These emerging experimental platforms offer exciting opportunities to rapidly identify genetic determinants of disease, to discover modulators of cellular function, and to probe the complex and dynamic relationships between cells and their local environment. PMID:19413510

  6. Up-to-Date Applications of Microarrays and Their Way to Commercialization

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Sarah; Muekusch, Sandra; Seitz, Harald

    2015-01-01

    This review addresses up-to-date applications of Protein Microarrays. Protein Microarrays play a significant role in basic research as well as in clinical applications and are applicable in a lot of fields, e.g., DNA, proteins and small molecules. Additionally they are on the way to enter clinics in routine diagnostics. Protein Microarrays can be powerful tools to improve healthcare. An overview of basic characteristics to mediate essential knowledge of this technique is given. To reach this goal, some challenges still have to be addressed. A few applications of Protein Microarrays in a medical context are shown. Finally, an outlook, where the potential of Protein Microarrays is depicted and speculations how the future of Protein Microarrays will look like are made.

  7. MARS: Microarray analysis, retrieval, and storage system

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Michael; Molidor, Robert; Sturn, Alexander; Hartler, Juergen; Hackl, Hubert; Stocker, Gernot; Prokesch, Andreas; Scheideler, Marcel; Trajanoski, Zlatko

    2005-01-01

    Background Microarray analysis has become a widely used technique for the study of gene-expression patterns on a genomic scale. As more and more laboratories are adopting microarray technology, there is a need for powerful and easy to use microarray databases facilitating array fabrication, labeling, hybridization, and data analysis. The wealth of data generated by this high throughput approach renders adequate database and analysis tools crucial for the pursuit of insights into the transcriptomic behavior of cells. Results MARS (Microarray Analysis and Retrieval System) provides a comprehensive MIAME supportive suite for storing, retrieving, and analyzing multi color microarray data. The system comprises a laboratory information management system (LIMS), a quality control management, as well as a sophisticated user management system. MARS is fully integrated into an analytical pipeline of microarray image analysis, normalization, gene expression clustering, and mapping of gene expression data onto biological pathways. The incorporation of ontologies and the use of MAGE-ML enables an export of studies stored in MARS to public repositories and other databases accepting these documents. Conclusion We have developed an integrated system tailored to serve the specific needs of microarray based research projects using a unique fusion of Web based and standalone applications connected to the latest J2EE application server technology. The presented system is freely available for academic and non-profit institutions. More information can be found at . PMID:15836795

  8. High-Throughput Intracellular Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Chiaraviglio, Lucius

    2015-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a Gram-negative opportunistic human pathogen that causes a severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease. Notably, in the human host, the organism is believed to replicate solely within an intracellular compartment, predominantly within pulmonary macrophages. Consequently, successful therapy is predicated on antimicrobials penetrating into this intracellular growth niche. However, standard antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods test solely for extracellular growth inhibition. Here, we make use of a high-throughput assay to characterize intracellular growth inhibition activity of known antimicrobials. For select antimicrobials, high-resolution dose-response analysis was then performed to characterize and compare activity levels in both macrophage infection and axenic growth assays. Results support the superiority of several classes of nonpolar antimicrobials in abrogating intracellular growth. Importantly, our assay results show excellent correlations with prior clinical observations of antimicrobial efficacy. Furthermore, we also show the applicability of high-throughput automation to two- and three-dimensional synergy testing. High-resolution isocontour isobolograms provide in vitro support for specific combination antimicrobial therapy. Taken together, findings suggest that high-throughput screening technology may be successfully applied to identify and characterize antimicrobials that target bacterial pathogens that make use of an intracellular growth niche. PMID:26392509

  9. High-Throughput Intracellular Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Chiaraviglio, Lucius; Kirby, James E

    2015-12-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a Gram-negative opportunistic human pathogen that causes a severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease. Notably, in the human host, the organism is believed to replicate solely within an intracellular compartment, predominantly within pulmonary macrophages. Consequently, successful therapy is predicated on antimicrobials penetrating into this intracellular growth niche. However, standard antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods test solely for extracellular growth inhibition. Here, we make use of a high-throughput assay to characterize intracellular growth inhibition activity of known antimicrobials. For select antimicrobials, high-resolution dose-response analysis was then performed to characterize and compare activity levels in both macrophage infection and axenic growth assays. Results support the superiority of several classes of nonpolar antimicrobials in abrogating intracellular growth. Importantly, our assay results show excellent correlations with prior clinical observations of antimicrobial efficacy. Furthermore, we also show the applicability of high-throughput automation to two- and three-dimensional synergy testing. High-resolution isocontour isobolograms provide in vitro support for specific combination antimicrobial therapy. Taken together, findings suggest that high-throughput screening technology may be successfully applied to identify and characterize antimicrobials that target bacterial pathogens that make use of an intracellular growth niche. PMID:26392509

  10. High throughput screening of ferroelectric thin film libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeter, Christian; Wessler, Berit; Schoenecker, Andreas; Keitel, Uwe; Eng, Lukas M.

    2006-12-01

    High throughput methods can significantly speed up the search for advanced materials in a multidimensional configuration space, hence keeping innovation cycles short. In the search for improved materials, high throughput methods are wanted to optimize composition and processing of promising systems, and to find candidate compounds. Such a method is described here which is applicable to the development of ferroelectric thin films. Libraries with samples of varying chemical composition were produced via the sol-gel route on structured and metallized silicon wafers. To determine the permittivity of the films, automated measurements of film thickness and capacity were established. Furthermore, ferroelectric hysterisis measurements were performed on samples with a particularly high permittivity. This high throughput route, which allows for synthesis and characterization of over hundred samples per day, was proved and tested by means of lead zirconate titanate as a standard material. It was possible to obtain films with remarkable high permittivity and low coercive field at optimal lead zirconate/lead titanate ratio and by compensating for lead loss during processing by finding the optimal lead excess added to the precursor solutions.

  11. PCR amplification from single DNA molecules on magnetic beads in emulsion: application for high-throughput screening of transcription factor targets

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Takaaki; Takei, Yoshiaki; Ohtsuka, Miharu; Kawarasaki, Yasuaki; Yamane, Tsuneo; Nakano, Hideo

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a novel method of genetic library construction on magnetic microbeads based on solid-phase single-molecule PCR in a fine and robust water-phase compartment formed in water-in-oil (w/o) emulsions. In this method, critically diluted DNA fragments were distributed over the emulsion as templates, where beads crosslinked with multiple primers and other PCR components were encapsulated to form multiple reaction compartments. The delivered DNA was then amplified and covalently immobilized on the beads in parallel, within individual compartments, to construct a genetic library on beads (GLOBE), which was readily applicable to a genomewide global scanning of genetic elements recognized by a defined DNA-binding protein. We constructed a GLOBE of Paracoccus denitrificans and selected gene beads that were bound to the His-tagged transcription factor PhaR by flow cytometry. As a result of flow cytometry screening with an anti-His fluorescent antibody, the PhaR target fragments were enriched 1200-fold from this library with this system. Therefore, this system is a powerful tool for analyzing the transcription network on a genomewide scale. PMID:16214800

  12. High-throughput screening methods for nitrilases.

    PubMed

    Xue, Ya-Ping; Yang, Yue-Kai; Lv, Sheng-Zhi; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Zheng, Yu-Guo

    2016-04-01

    Nitrilases have been widely acknowledged as important alternatives to chemical catalysts, as they have been proved to transform an immense variety of nitriles under mild conditions and often in a stereoselective or regioselective manner. In the discovery of new nitrilases to establish viable industrial processes, screening plays an important role in identifying which subset of candidates contains a nitrilase of interest from a collection of organisms, clone banks, or enzyme libraries. However, the traditional methods for evaluating the nitrilases are a time-consuming, laborious, and costly process and have been regarded as a bottleneck in developing these nitrilases as industrial biocatalysts. In the past few years, a number of high-throughput screening methods have been developed for rapid evaluation and identification of nitrilases. Here, we review the various methodologies developed for high-throughput screening of nitrilases and focus on their advantages and limitations. PMID:26894402

  13. A Novel High-Throughput Viscometer.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Suraj; Bishop, Matthew T; Dermody, Daniel; Dietsche, Laura; Kuo, Tzu-Chi; Mushrush, Melissa; Harris, Keith; Zieman, Jonathan; Morabito, Paul; Orvosh, Brian; Patrick, Don

    2016-07-11

    A novel, rapid, parallel, and high-throughput system for measuring viscosity of materials under different conditions of shear rate, temperature, time, etc., has been developed. This unique system utilizes the transient flow of a complex fluid through pipettes. This approach offers significant practical advantages over microfluidic-based devices for viscosity screening: no cleanup is required, the method is high throughput (<1 h for 100 samples), and only small sample volumes (<1 mL) are used. This paper details for the first time the experimental and modeling efforts to implement this mass- and pressure-based viscosity measurement concept as a robust viscosity estimation tool. This approach is very well-suited for viscosity measurements in high-throughput formulation workflows, as it is rapid and parallel and operates directly on samples in various microtiter plate formats. We present systematic experimental observations together with numerical and analytical modeling approaches to characterize instrument capabilities and limitations. The complex transient flow of fluids through these pipettes leads to data-rich pressure profiles. Numerical and analytical modeling is then used to extract viscosity and other rheological parameters from these pressure profiles. We have successfully utilized this viscosity screening tool for a multitude of complex fluids including oils, paints, solvents, and detergents. PMID:27259016

  14. Development and application of a high-throughput sample cleanup process based on 96-well plate for simultaneous determination of 16 steroids in biological matrices using liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guanzhong; Li, Youxin; Bao, James J

    2016-02-01

    A novel high-throughput sample pretreatment system was developed by the integration of protein precipitation (PP), phospholipid removal (PPR), and hollow fiber liquid-phase microextraction (HF-LPME) into two simple 96-well plates and a matching 96-grid lid. With this system, 16 steroids were separated from biological matrices of plasma, milk, and urine and analyzed by liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. In the tandem sample cleanup process, the prepositive PP and PPR step preliminarily removed some of the interferences from the biological matrices. The following HF-LPME step kept the residual interference out of the hollow fiber and enriched the steroids in the hollow fiber to achieve high sensitivity. By a series of method optimizations, acetonitrile was chosen as the crash solvent for PP and PPR. A mixture of octanol and toluene (1:1 v/v) was used as the acceptor phase for HF-LPME. The extraction was conducted at 80 rpm for 50 min in a donor phase containing 1 mL 20% sodium chloride at 25 °C. Under these conditions, the limits of detection for the 16 steroids were 3.6-300.0 pg(.)mL(-1) in plasma, 3.0-270.0 pg·mL(-1) in milk, and 2.2-210.0 pg(.)mL(-1) in urine. The recoveries of the 16 steroids were 81.9-97.9% in plasma (relative standard deviation 1.0-8.0%), 80.6-97.7% in milk (relative standard deviation 0.8-5.4%), and 87.3-98.7% in urine (relative standard deviation 1.0-4.9%). Further, the integrated 96-well platform of PP, PPR, and HF-LPME enabled us to run this assay in an automatic and high-throughput fashion. The reliability of the method was further corroborated by evaluation of its applicability in plasma and urine samples from volunteers and fresh bovine milk from local dairy enterprises. PMID:26738495

  15. Diagnostic markers of ovarian cancer by high-throughput antigen cloning and detection on arrays.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Madhumita; Mohapatra, Saroj; Ionan, Alexei; Bawa, Gagandeep; Ali-Fehmi, Rouba; Wang, Xiaoju; Nowak, James; Ye, Bin; Nahhas, Fatimah A; Lu, Karen; Witkin, Steven S; Fishman, David; Munkarah, Adnan; Morris, Robert; Levin, Nancy K; Shirley, Natalie N; Tromp, Gerard; Abrams, Judith; Draghici, Sorin; Tainsky, Michael A

    2006-01-15

    A noninvasive screening test would significantly facilitate early detection of epithelial ovarian cancer. This study used a combination of high-throughput selection and array-based serologic detection of many antigens indicative of the presence of cancer, thereby using the immune system as a biosensor. This high-throughput selection involved biopanning of an ovarian cancer phage display library using serum immunoglobulins from an ovarian cancer patient as bait. Protein macroarrays containing 480 of these selected antigen clones revealed 65 clones that interacted with immunoglobulins in sera from 32 ovarian cancer patients but not with sera from 25 healthy women or 14 patients having other benign or malignant gynecologic diseases. Sequence analysis data of these 65 clones revealed 62 different antigens. Among the markers, we identified some known antigens, including RCAS1, signal recognition protein-19, AHNAK-related sequence, nuclear autoantogenic sperm protein, Nijmegen breakage syndrome 1 (Nibrin), ribosomal protein L4, Homo sapiens KIAA0419 gene product, eukaryotic initiation factor 5A, and casein kinase II, as well as many previously uncharacterized antigenic gene products. Using these 65 antigens on protein microarrays, we trained neural networks on two-color fluorescent detection of serum IgG binding and found an average sensitivity and specificity of 55% and 98%, respectively. In addition, the top 6 of the most specific clones resulted in an average sensitivity and specificity of 32% and 94%, respectively. This global approach to antigenic profiling, epitomics, has applications to cancer and autoimmune diseases for diagnostic and therapeutic studies. Further work with larger panels of antigens should provide a comprehensive set of markers with sufficient sensitivity and specificity suitable for clinical testing in high-risk populations. PMID:16424057

  16. Protein Microarrays--Without a Trace

    SciTech Connect

    Camarero, J A

    2007-04-05

    Many experimental approaches in biology and biophysics, as well as applications in diagnosis and drug discovery, require proteins to be immobilized on solid supports. Protein microarrays, for example, provide a high-throughput format to study biomolecular interactions. The technique employed for protein immobilization is a key to the success of these applications. Recent biochemical developments are allowing, for the first time, the selective and traceless immobilization of proteins generated by cell-free systems without the need for purification and/or reconcentration prior to the immobilization step.

  17. High Throughput Screening For Hazard and Risk of Environmental Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput toxicity testing provides detailed mechanistic information on the concentration response of environmental contaminants in numerous potential toxicity pathways. High throughput screening (HTS) has several key advantages: (1) expense orders of magnitude less than an...

  18. A review of independent component analysis application to microarray gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Wei; Vanderburg, Charles R.; Gunshin, Hiromi; Rogers, Jack T.; Huang, Xudong

    2010-01-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) methods have received growing attention as effective data-mining tools for microarray gene expression data. As a technique of higher-order statistical analysis, ICA is capable of extracting biologically relevant gene expression features from microarray data. Herein we have reviewed the latest applications and the extended algorithms of ICA in gene clustering, classification, and identification. The theoretical frameworks of ICA have been described to further illustrate its feature extraction function in microarray data analysis. PMID:19007336

  19. Application of Microarray Technology to Investigate Salmonella and Antimicrobial Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microarrays have been developed for the study of various aspects of Salmonella, which is a model system for investigating pathogenesis. Microarrays were used to analyze the gene expression of Salmonella in various environments that mimic the host environment and these studies have helped to elucidat...

  20. High-throughput sequencing enhanced phage display enables the identification of patient-specific epitope motifs in serum

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Anders; Kringelum, Jens V.; Hansen, Christian S.; Bøgh, Katrine L.; Sullivan, Eric; Patel, Jigar; Rigby, Neil M.; Eiwegger, Thomas; Szépfalusi, Zsolt; Masi, Federico de; Nielsen, Morten; Lund, Ole; Dufva, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Phage display is a prominent screening technique with a multitude of applications including therapeutic antibody development and mapping of antigen epitopes. In this study, phages were selected based on their interaction with patient serum and exhaustively characterised by high-throughput sequencing. A bioinformatics approach was developed in order to identify peptide motifs of interest based on clustering and contrasting to control samples. Comparison of patient and control samples confirmed a major issue in phage display, namely the selection of unspecific peptides. The potential of the bioinformatic approach was demonstrated by identifying epitopes of a prominent peanut allergen, Ara h 1, in sera from patients with severe peanut allergy. The identified epitopes were confirmed by high-density peptide micro-arrays. The present study demonstrates that high-throughput sequencing can empower phage display by (i) enabling the analysis of complex biological samples, (ii) circumventing the traditional laborious picking and functional testing of individual phage clones and (iii) reducing the number of selection rounds. PMID:26246327

  1. Clustering of High Throughput Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Pirim, Harun; Ekşioğlu, Burak; Perkins, Andy; Yüceer, Çetin

    2012-01-01

    High throughput biological data need to be processed, analyzed, and interpreted to address problems in life sciences. Bioinformatics, computational biology, and systems biology deal with biological problems using computational methods. Clustering is one of the methods used to gain insight into biological processes, particularly at the genomics level. Clearly, clustering can be used in many areas of biological data analysis. However, this paper presents a review of the current clustering algorithms designed especially for analyzing gene expression data. It is also intended to introduce one of the main problems in bioinformatics - clustering gene expression data - to the operations research community. PMID:23144527

  2. Automated High Throughput Drug Target Crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Rupp, B

    2005-02-18

    The molecular structures of drug target proteins and receptors form the basis for 'rational' or structure guided drug design. The majority of target structures are experimentally determined by protein X-ray crystallography, which as evolved into a highly automated, high throughput drug discovery and screening tool. Process automation has accelerated tasks from parallel protein expression, fully automated crystallization, and rapid data collection to highly efficient structure determination methods. A thoroughly designed automation technology platform supported by a powerful informatics infrastructure forms the basis for optimal workflow implementation and the data mining and analysis tools to generate new leads from experimental protein drug target structures.

  3. High throughput chemical munitions treatment system

    DOEpatents

    Haroldsen, Brent L.; Stofleth, Jerome H.; Didlake, Jr., John E.; Wu, Benjamin C-P

    2011-11-01

    A new High-Throughput Explosive Destruction System is disclosed. The new system is comprised of two side-by-side detonation containment vessels each comprising first and second halves that feed into a single agent treatment vessel. Both detonation containment vessels further comprise a surrounding ventilation facility. Moreover, the detonation containment vessels are designed to separate into two half-shells, wherein one shell can be moved axially away from the fixed, second half for ease of access and loading. The vessels are closed by means of a surrounding, clam-shell type locking seal mechanisms.

  4. Orchestrating high-throughput genomic analysis with Bioconductor.

    PubMed

    Huber, Wolfgang; Carey, Vincent J; Gentleman, Robert; Anders, Simon; Carlson, Marc; Carvalho, Benilton S; Bravo, Hector Corrada; Davis, Sean; Gatto, Laurent; Girke, Thomas; Gottardo, Raphael; Hahne, Florian; Hansen, Kasper D; Irizarry, Rafael A; Lawrence, Michael; Love, Michael I; MacDonald, James; Obenchain, Valerie; Oleś, Andrzej K; Pagès, Hervé; Reyes, Alejandro; Shannon, Paul; Smyth, Gordon K; Tenenbaum, Dan; Waldron, Levi; Morgan, Martin

    2015-02-01

    Bioconductor is an open-source, open-development software project for the analysis and comprehension of high-throughput data in genomics and molecular biology. The project aims to enable interdisciplinary research, collaboration and rapid development of scientific software. Based on the statistical programming language R, Bioconductor comprises 934 interoperable packages contributed by a large, diverse community of scientists. Packages cover a range of bioinformatic and statistical applications. They undergo formal initial review and continuous automated testing. We present an overview for prospective users and contributors. PMID:25633503

  5. Orchestrating high-throughput genomic analysis with Bioconductor

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Wolfgang; Carey, Vincent J.; Gentleman, Robert; Anders, Simon; Carlson, Marc; Carvalho, Benilton S.; Bravo, Hector Corrada; Davis, Sean; Gatto, Laurent; Girke, Thomas; Gottardo, Raphael; Hahne, Florian; Hansen, Kasper D.; Irizarry, Rafael A.; Lawrence, Michael; Love, Michael I.; MacDonald, James; Obenchain, Valerie; Oleś, Andrzej K.; Pagès, Hervé; Reyes, Alejandro; Shannon, Paul; Smyth, Gordon K.; Tenenbaum, Dan; Waldron, Levi; Morgan, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Bioconductor is an open-source, open-development software project for the analysis and comprehension of high-throughput data in genomics and molecular biology. The project aims to enable interdisciplinary research, collaboration and rapid development of scientific software. Based on the statistical programming language R, Bioconductor comprises 934 interoperable packages contributed by a large, diverse community of scientists. Packages cover a range of bioinformatic and statistical applications. They undergo formal initial review and continuous automated testing. We present an overview for prospective users and contributors. PMID:25633503

  6. Advances, practice, and clinical perspectives in high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Park, S-J; Saito-Adachi, M; Komiyama, Y; Nakai, K

    2016-07-01

    Remarkable advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies have fundamentally changed our understanding of the genetic and epigenetic molecular bases underlying human health and diseases. As these technologies continue to revolutionize molecular biology leading to fresh perspectives, it is imperative to thoroughly consider the enormous excitement surrounding the technologies by highlighting the characteristics of platforms and their global trends as well as potential benefits and limitations. To date, with a variety of platforms, the technologies provide an impressive range of applications, including sequencing of whole genomes and transcriptomes, identifying of genome modifications, and profiling of protein interactions. Because these applications produce a flood of data, simultaneous development of bioinformatics tools is required to efficiently deal with the big data and to comprehensively analyze them. This review covers the major achievements and performances of the high-throughput sequencing and further summarizes the characteristics of their applications along with introducing applicable bioinformatics tools. Moreover, a step-by-step procedure for a practical transcriptome analysis is described employing an analytical pipeline. Clinical perspectives with special consideration to human oral health and diseases are also covered. PMID:26602181

  7. [Application of biochip technology and its application on medical diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhijun; Xu, Wei

    2013-09-01

    Biochip analytical technology shows high throughput property for multi-samples measurement, so can reduce the required amount of samples and time used for determination. The technology quickly developed in recent years and has been applied in medical diagnosis and other analytical areas including gene chip, protein chip, lab-on-a-chip, tissue microarray, cell microarray, carbohydrate microarray and so on. This paper overviewed the current development of biochip technology, and explored the perspective of its application. PMID:24409795

  8. Establishment of local searching methods for orbitrap-based high throughput metabolomics analysis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Haiping; Wang, Xueying; Xu, Lina; Ran, Xiaorong; Li, Xiangjun; Chen, Ligong; Zhao, Xinbin; Deng, Haiteng; Liu, Xiaohui

    2016-08-15

    Our method aims to establish local endogenous metabolite databases economically without purchasing chemical standards, giving strong bases for following orbitrap based high throughput untargeted metabolomics analysis. A new approach here is introduced to construct metabolite databases on the base of biological sample analysis and mathematic extrapolation. Building local metabolite databases traditionally requires expensive chemical standards, which is barely affordable for most research labs. As a result, most labs working on metabolomics analysis have to refer public libraries, which is time consuming and limited for high throughput analysis. Using this strategy, a high throughput orbitrap based metabolomics platform can be established at almost no cost within a couple of months. It enables to facilitate the application of high throughput metabolomics analysis to identify disease-related biomarkers or investigate biological functions using orbitrap. PMID:27260449

  9. Strong and oriented immobilization of single domain antibodies from crude bacterial lysates for high-throughput compatible cost-effective antibody array generation

    PubMed Central

    Even-Desrumeaux, Klervi; Baty, Daniel; Chames, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Antibodies microarrays are among the novel class of rapidly emerging proteomic technologies that will allow us to efficiently perform specific diagnosis and proteome analysis. Recombinant antibody fragments are especially suited for this approach but their stability is often a limiting factor. Camelids produce functional antibodies devoid of light chains (HCAbs) of which the single N-terminal domain is fully capable of antigen binding. When produced as an independent domain, these so-called single domain antibody fragments (sdAbs) have several advantages for biotechnological applications thanks to their unique properties of size (15 kDa), stability, solubility, and expression yield. These features should allow sdAbs to outperform other antibody formats in a number of applications, notably as capture molecule for antibody arrays. In this study, we have produced antibody microarrays using direct and oriented immobilization of sdAbs produced in crude bacterial lysates to generate proof-of-principle of a high-throughput compatible array design. Several sdAb immobilization strategies have been explored. Immobilization of in vivo biotinylated sdAbs by direct spotting of bacterial lysate on streptavidin and sandwich detection was developed to achieve high sensitivity and specificity, whereas immobilization of “multi-tagged” sdAbs via anti-tag antibodies and direct labeled sample detection strategy was optimized for the design of high-density antibody arrays for high-throughput proteomics and identification of potential biomarkers. PMID:20859568

  10. Preliminary High-Throughput Metagenome Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Dusheyko, Serge; Furman, Craig; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Shapiro, Harris; Tu, Hank

    2007-03-26

    Metagenome data sets present a qualitatively different assembly problem than traditional single-organism whole-genome shotgun (WGS) assembly. The unique aspects of such projects include the presence of a potentially large number of distinct organisms and their representation in the data set at widely different fractions. In addition, multiple closely related strains could be present, which would be difficult to assemble separately. Failure to take these issues into account can result in poor assemblies that either jumble together different strains or which fail to yield useful results. The DOE Joint Genome Institute has sequenced a number of metagenomic projects and plans to considerably increase this number in the coming year. As a result, the JGI has a need for high-throughput tools and techniques for handling metagenome projects. We present the techniques developed to handle metagenome assemblies in a high-throughput environment. This includes a streamlined assembly wrapper, based on the JGI?s in-house WGS assembler, Jazz. It also includes the selection of sensible defaults targeted for metagenome data sets, as well as quality control automation for cleaning up the raw results. While analysis is ongoing, we will discuss preliminary assessments of the quality of the assembly results (http://fames.jgi-psf.org).

  11. Economic consequences of high throughput maskless lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, John G.; Govindaraju, Lakshmi

    2005-11-01

    Many people in the semiconductor industry bemoan the high costs of masks and view mask cost as one of the significant barriers to bringing new chip designs to market. All that is needed is a viable maskless technology and the problem will go away. Numerous sites around the world are working on maskless lithography but inevitably, the question asked is "Wouldn't a one wafer per hour maskless tool make a really good mask writer?" Of course, the answer is yes, the hesitation you hear in the answer isn't based on technology concerns, it's financial. The industry needs maskless lithography because mask costs are too high. Mask costs are too high because mask pattern generators (PG's) are slow and expensive. If mask PG's become much faster, mask costs go down, the maskless market goes away and the PG supplier is faced with an even smaller tool demand from the mask shops. Technical success becomes financial suicide - or does it? In this paper we will present the results of a model that examines some of the consequences of introducing high throughput maskless pattern generation. Specific features in the model include tool throughput for masks and wafers, market segmentation by node for masks and wafers and mask cost as an entry barrier to new chip designs. How does the availability of low cost masks and maskless tools affect the industries tool makeup and what is the ultimate potential market for high throughput maskless pattern generators?

  12. Contributions to Statistical Problems Related to Microarray Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Feng

    2009-01-01

    Microarray is a high throughput technology to measure the gene expression. Analysis of microarray data brings many interesting and challenging problems. This thesis consists three studies related to microarray data. First, we propose a Bayesian model for microarray data and use Bayes Factors to identify differentially expressed genes. Second, we…

  13. Improving Microarray Sample Size Using Bootstrap Data Combination

    PubMed Central

    Phan, John H.; Moffitt, Richard A.; Barrett, Andrea B.; Wang, May D.

    2016-01-01

    Microarray technology has enabled us to simultaneously measure the expression of thousands of genes. Using this high-throughput technology, we can examine subtle genetic changes between biological samples and build predictive models for clinical applications. Although microarrays have dramatically increased the rate of data collection, sample size is still a major issue when selecting features. Previous methods show that combining multiple microarray datasets improves feature selection using simple methods such as fold change. We propose a wrapper-based gene selection technique that combines bootstrap estimated classification errors for individual genes across multiple datasets and reduces the contribution of datasets with high variance. We use the bootstrap because it is an unbiased estimator of classification error that is also effective for small sample data. Coupled with data combination across multiple datasets, we show that our meta-analytic approach improves the biological relevance of gene selection using prostate and renal cancer microarray data. PMID:19164001

  14. The Impact of Photobleaching on Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    von der Haar, Marcel; Preuß, John-Alexander; von der Haar, Kathrin; Lindner, Patrick; Scheper, Thomas; Stahl, Frank

    2015-01-01

    DNA-Microarrays have become a potent technology for high-throughput analysis of genetic regulation. However, the wide dynamic range of signal intensities of fluorophore-based microarrays exceeds the dynamic range of a single array scan by far, thus limiting the key benefit of microarray technology: parallelization. The implementation of multi-scan techniques represents a promising approach to overcome these limitations. These techniques are, in turn, limited by the fluorophores’ susceptibility to photobleaching when exposed to the scanner’s laser light. In this paper the photobleaching characteristics of cyanine-3 and cyanine-5 as part of solid state DNA microarrays are studied. The effects of initial fluorophore intensity as well as laser scanner dependent variables such as the photomultiplier tube’s voltage on bleaching and imaging are investigated. The resulting data is used to develop a model capable of simulating the expected degree of signal intensity reduction caused by photobleaching for each fluorophore individually, allowing for the removal of photobleaching-induced, systematic bias in multi-scan procedures. Single-scan applications also benefit as they rely on pre-scans to determine the optimal scanner settings. These findings constitute a step towards standardization of microarray experiments and analysis and may help to increase the lab-to-lab comparability of microarray experiment results. PMID:26378589

  15. Methods of high throughput biophysical characterization in biopharmaceutical development.

    PubMed

    Razinkov, Vladimir I; Treuheit, Michael J; Becker, Gerald W

    2013-03-01

    Discovery and successful development of biopharmaceutical products depend on a thorough characterization of the molecule both before and after formulation. Characterization of a formulated biotherapeutic, typically a protein or large peptide, requires a rigorous assessment of the molecule's physical stability. Stability of a biotherapeutic includes not only chemical stability, i.e., degradation of the molecule to form undesired modifications, but also structural stability, including the formation of aggregates. In this review, high throughput biophysical characterization techniques are described according to their specific applications during biopharmaceutical discovery, development and manufacturing. The methods presented here are classified according to these attributes, and include spectroscopic assays based on absorbance, polarization, intrinsic and extrinsic fluorescence, surface plasmon resonance instrumentation, calorimetric methods, dynamic and static light scattering techniques, several visible particle counting and sizing methods, new viscosity assay, based on light scattering and mass spectrometry. Several techniques presented here are already implemented in industry; but, many high throughput biophysical methods are still in the initial stages of implementation or even in the prototype stage. Each technique in this report is judged by the specific application of the method through the biopharmaceutical development process. PMID:22725690

  16. A High-Throughput Radiometric Kinase Assay.

    PubMed

    Duong-Ly, Krisna C; Peterson, Jeffrey R

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant kinase signaling has been implicated in a number of diseases. While kinases have become attractive drug targets, only a small fraction of human protein kinases have validated inhibitors. Screening of libraries of compounds against a kinase or kinases of interest is routinely performed during kinase inhibitor development to identify promising scaffolds for a particular target and to identify kinase targets for compounds of interest. Screening of more focused compound libraries may also be conducted in the later stages of inhibitor development to improve potency and optimize selectivity. The dot blot kinase assay is a robust, high-throughput kinase assay that can be used to screen a number of small-molecule compounds against one kinase of interest or several kinases. Here, a protocol for a dot blot kinase assay used for measuring insulin receptor kinase activity is presented. This protocol can be readily adapted for use with other protein kinases. PMID:26501904

  17. High-Throughput Cell Toxicity Assays.

    PubMed

    Murray, David; McWilliams, Lisa; Wigglesworth, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Understanding compound-driven cell toxicity is vitally important for all drug discovery approaches. With high-throughput screening (HTS) being the key strategy to find hit and lead compounds for drug discovery projects in the pharmaceutical industry [1], an understanding of the cell toxicity profile of hit molecules from HTS activities is fundamentally important. Recently, there has been a resurgence of interest in phenotypic drug discovery and these cell-based assays are now being run in HTS labs on ever increasing numbers of compounds. As the use of cell assays increases the ability to measure toxicity of compounds on a large scale becomes increasingly important to ensure that false hits are not progressed and that compounds do not carry forward a toxic liability that may cause them to fail at later stages of a project. Here we describe methods employed in the AstraZeneca HTS laboratory to carry out very large scale cell toxicity screening. PMID:27317000

  18. High throughput assays for analyzing transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianqiang; Jiang, Xin; Yaoi, Takuro

    2006-06-01

    Transcription factors are a group of proteins that modulate the expression of genes involved in many biological processes, such as cell growth and differentiation. Alterations in transcription factor function are associated with many human diseases, and therefore these proteins are attractive potential drug targets. A key issue in the development of such therapeutics is the generation of effective tools that can be used for high throughput discovery of the critical transcription factors involved in human diseases, and the measurement of their activities in a variety of disease or compound-treated samples. Here, a number of innovative arrays and 96-well format assays for profiling and measuring the activities of transcription factors will be discussed. PMID:16834538

  19. Micro x-ray fluorescence as a high throughput screening method for metal chelating compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minogue, Edel M.; Havrilla, George J.; Taylor, Tammy P.; Burrell, Anthony K.; Warner, Benjamin P.

    2005-06-01

    Micro X-ray Fluorescence (MXRF) has proven to be a powerful tool in the rapid and quantitative means of screening oliogpeptides. MXRF is a non-destructive method of analysis, which can detect elemental composition of a sample by measuring its characteristic X-ray emission wavelengths or energies. An effective high throughput screening technique is described for the rapid screening of bead-based libraries by MXRF in order to identify suitable chelating agents that will bind metals found in radioactive dispersive devices. It is a sensitive technique which in conjunction with the wide range of chemistry inherent in peptide libraries (e.g. varying charge, length, hydrophobicity, aromaticity etc.), provides a rapid and quantitative means for screening chelator-ion binding. The method involves the selection of a suitable library of ligands; in this case it is a bead-based library of peptides. The library is exposed to the cation of interest and immobilized on to a microarray. The array is then analyzed by MXRF enabling rapid identification of chelating agents. This enables the screening of approximately 27,500 sequences per day. Initial experiments carried out successfully identified sequences that are selective for Co under certain binding conditions. This involved the screening of 8,400 sequences in adverse environmental conditions containing possible interferences (e.g. Ca, Fe, Al, Cs, Ir), which could be encountered in our application.

  20. Origin and evolution of high throughput screening

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, D A; Williams, J A

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews the origin and evolution of high throughput screening (HTS) through the experience of an individual pharmaceutical company, revealing some of the mysteries of the early stages of drug discovery to the wider pharmacology audience. HTS in this company (Pfizer, Groton, USA) had its origin in natural products screening in 1986, by substituting fermentation broths with dimethyl sulphoxide solutions of synthetic compounds, using 96-well plates and reduced assay volumes of 50-100μl. A nominal 30mM source compound concentration provided high μM assay concentrations. Starting at 800 compounds each week, the process reached a steady state of 7200 compounds per week by 1989. Screening in the Applied Biotechnology and Screening Group was centralized with screens operating in lock-step to maximize efficiency. Initial screens were full files run in triplicate. Autoradiography and image analysis were introduced for 125I receptor ligand screens. Reverse transcriptase (RT) coupled with quantitative PCR and multiplexing addressed several targets in a single assay. By 1992 HTS produced ‘hits' as starting matter for approximately 40% of the Discovery portfolio. In 1995, the HTS methodology was expanded to include ADMET targets. ADME targets required each compound to be physically detected leading to the development of automated high throughput LC-MS. In 1996, 90 compounds/week were screened in microsomal, protein binding and serum stability assays. Subsequently, the mutagenic Ames assay was adapted to a 96-well plate liquid assay and novel algorithms permitted automated image analysis of the micronucleus assay. By 1999 ADME HTS was fully integrated into the discovery cycle. PMID:17603542

  1. High-Throughput Methods for Electron Crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, David L.; Ubarretxena-Belandia, Iban; Gonen, Tamir; Engel, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins play a tremendously important role in cell physiology and serve as a target for an increasing number of drugs. Structural information is key to understanding their function and for developing new strategies for combating disease. However, the complex physical chemistry associated with membrane proteins has made them more difficult to study than their soluble cousins. Electron crystallography has historically been a successful method for solving membrane protein structures and has the advantage of providing the natural environment of a lipid membrane. Specifically, when membrane proteins form two-dimensional arrays within a lipid bilayer, images and diffraction can be recorded by electron microscopy. The corresponding data can be combined to produce a three-dimensional reconstruction which, under favorable conditions, can extend to atomic resolution. Like X-ray crystallography, the quality of the structures are very much dependent on the order and size of the crystals. However, unlike X-ray crystallography, high-throughput methods for screening crystallization trials for electron crystallography are not in general use. In this chapter, we describe two alternative and potentially complementary methods for high-throughput screening of membrane protein crystallization within the lipid bilayer. The first method relies on the conventional use of dialysis for removing detergent and thus reconstituting the bilayer; an array of dialysis wells in the standard 96-well format allows the use of a liquid-handling robot and greatly increases throughput. The second method relies on detergent complexation by cyclodextrin; a specialized pipetting robot has been designed not only to titrate cyclodextrin, but to use light scattering to monitor the reconstitution process. In addition, the use of liquid-handling robots for making negatively stained grids and methods for automatically imaging samples in the electron microscope are described. PMID:23132066

  2. Development and application of an oligonucleotide microarray and real-time quantitative PCR for detection of wastewater bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae-Young; Lauder, Heather; Cruwys, Heather; Falletta, Patricia; Beaudette, Lee A

    2008-07-15

    Conventional microbial water quality test methods are well known for their technical limitations, such as lack of direct pathogen detection capacity and low throughput capability. The microarray assay has recently emerged as a promising alternative for environmental pathogen monitoring. In this study, bacterial pathogens were detected in municipal wastewater using a microarray equipped with short oligonucleotide probes targeting 16S rRNA sequences. To date, 62 probes have been designed against 38 species, 4 genera, and 1 family of pathogens. The detection sensitivity of the microarray for a waterborne pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila was determined to be approximately 1.0% of the total DNA, or approximately 10(3)A. hydrophila cells per sample. The efficacy of the DNA microarray was verified in a parallel study where pathogen genes and E. coli cells were enumerated using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) and standard membrane filter techniques, respectively. The microarray and qPCR successfully detected multiple wastewater pathogen species at different stages of the disinfection process (i.e. secondary effluents vs. disinfected final effluents) and at two treatment plants employing different disinfection methods (i.e. chlorination vs. UV irradiation). This result demonstrates the effectiveness of the DNA microarray as a semi-quantitative, high throughput pathogen monitoring tool for municipal wastewater. PMID:18423816

  3. High-throughput analysis of protein-DNA binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Franco-Zorrilla, José M; Solano, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Sequence-specific protein-DNA interactions mediate most regulatory processes underlying gene expression, such as transcriptional regulation by transcription factors (TFs) or chromatin organization. Current knowledge about DNA-binding specificities of TFs is based mostly on low- to medium-throughput methodologies that are time-consuming and often fail to identify DNA motifs recognized by a TF with lower affinity but retaining biological relevance. The use of protein-binding microarrays (PBMs) offers a high-throughput alternative for the identification of protein-DNA specificities. PBM consists in an array of pseudorandomized DNA sequences that are optimized to include all the possible 10- or 11-mer DNA sequences, allowing the determination of binding specificities of most eukaryotic TFs. PBMs that can be synthesized by several manufacturing companies as single-stranded DNA are converted into double-stranded in a simple primer extension reaction. The protein of interest fused to an epitope tag is then incubated onto the PBM, and specific DNA-protein complexes are revealed in a series of immunological reactions coupled to a fluorophore. After scanning and quantifying PBMs, specific DNA motifs recognized by the protein are identified with ready-to-use scripts, generating comprehensive but accessible information about the DNA-binding specificity of the protein. This chapter describes detailed procedures for preparation of double-stranded PBMs, incubation with recombinant protein, and detection of protein-DNA complexes. Finally, we outline some cues for evaluating the biological role of DNA motifs obtained in vitro. PMID:24057393

  4. Robust, high-throughput solution for blood group genotyping.

    PubMed

    Le Goff, Gaelle C; Brès, Jean-Charles; Rigal, Dominique; Blum, Loïc J; Marquette, Christophe A

    2010-07-15

    With the concomitant increase of blood transfusions and safety rules, there is a growing need to integrate high-throughput and multiparametric assays within blood qualification centers. Using a robust and automated solution, we describe a new method for extended blood group genotyping (HiFi-Blood 96) bringing together the throughput possibilities of complete automation and the microarray multiplexed analysis potential. Our approach provides a useful resource for upgrading blood qualification center facilities. A set of six single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with clinically important blood group antigens (Kell, Kidd, Duffy, and MNS systems) were selected and the corresponding genotyping assays developed. A panel of 293 blood samples was used to validate the approach. The resulting genotypes were compared to phenotypes previously determined by standard serologic techniques, and excellent correlations were found for five SNPs out of six. For the Kell, Kidd, Duffy, and MNS3/MNS4 systems, high matching percentages of 100%, 98.9%, 97.7%, and 97.4% were obtained, respectively, whereas a concordance percentage of 83.3% only was attained for the MNS1/MNS2 polymorphism. PMID:20560530

  5. New Lung Cancer Panel for High-Throughput Targeted Resequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Hye; Lee, Sunghoon; Park, Jongsun; Lee, Kyusang; Bhak, Jong

    2014-01-01

    We present a new next-generation sequencing-based method to identify somatic mutations of lung cancer. It is a comprehensive mutation profiling protocol to detect somatic mutations in 30 genes found frequently in lung adenocarcinoma. The total length of the target regions is 107 kb, and a capture assay was designed to cover 99% of it. This method exhibited about 97% mean coverage at 30× sequencing depth and 42% average specificity when sequencing of more than 3.25 Gb was carried out for the normal sample. We discovered 513 variations from targeted exome sequencing of lung cancer cells, which is 3.9-fold higher than in the normal sample. The variations in cancer cells included previously reported somatic mutations in the COSMIC database, such as variations in TP53, KRAS, and STK11 of sample H-23 and in EGFR of sample H-1650, especially with more than 1,000× coverage. Among the somatic mutations, up to 91% of single nucleotide polymorphisms from the two cancer samples were validated by DNA microarray-based genotyping. Our results demonstrated the feasibility of high-throughput mutation profiling with lung adenocarcinoma samples, and the profiling method can be used as a robust and effective protocol for somatic variant screening. PMID:25031567

  6. Caryoscope: An Open Source Java application for viewing microarray data in a genomic context

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Ihab AB; Rees, Christian A; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Ball, Catherine A; Sherlock, Gavin

    2004-01-01

    Background Microarray-based comparative genome hybridization experiments generate data that can be mapped onto the genome. These data are interpreted more easily when represented graphically in a genomic context. Results We have developed Caryoscope, which is an open source Java application for visualizing microarray data from array comparative genome hybridization experiments in a genomic context. Caryoscope can read General Feature Format files (GFF files), as well as comma- and tab-delimited files, that define the genomic positions of the microarray reporters for which data are obtained. The microarray data can be browsed using an interactive, zoomable interface, which helps users identify regions of chromosomal deletion or amplification. The graphical representation of the data can be exported in a number of graphic formats, including publication-quality formats such as PostScript. Conclusion Caryoscope is a useful tool that can aid in the visualization, exploration and interpretation of microarray data in a genomic context. PMID:15488149

  7. Computational analysis of high-throughput flow cytometry data

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, J Paul; Rajwa, Bartek; Patsekin, Valery; Davisson, Vincent Jo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Flow cytometry has been around for over 40 years, but only recently has the opportunity arisen to move into the high-throughput domain. The technology is now available and is highly competitive with imaging tools under the right conditions. Flow cytometry has, however, been a technology that has focused on its unique ability to study single cells and appropriate analytical tools are readily available to handle this traditional role of the technology. Areas covered Expansion of flow cytometry to a high-throughput (HT) and high-content technology requires both advances in hardware and analytical tools. The historical perspective of flow cytometry operation as well as how the field has changed and what the key changes have been discussed. The authors provide a background and compelling arguments for moving toward HT flow, where there are many innovative opportunities. With alternative approaches now available for flow cytometry, there will be a considerable number of new applications. These opportunities show strong capability for drug screening and functional studies with cells in suspension. Expert opinion There is no doubt that HT flow is a rich technology awaiting acceptance by the pharmaceutical community. It can provide a powerful phenotypic analytical toolset that has the capacity to change many current approaches to HT screening. The previous restrictions on the technology, based on its reduced capacity for sample throughput, are no longer a major issue. Overcoming this barrier has transformed a mature technology into one that can focus on systems biology questions not previously considered possible. PMID:22708834

  8. Human transcriptome array for high-throughput clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weihong; Seok, Junhee; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Schweitzer, Anthony C.; Jiang, Hui; Wilhelmy, Julie; Clark, Tyson A.; Kapur, Karen; Xing, Yi; Faham, Malek; Storey, John D.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Maier, Ronald V.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Wong, Wing Hung; Davis, Ronald W.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Toner, Mehmet; Warren, H. Shaw; Schoenfeld, David A.; Rahme, Laurence; McDonald-Smith, Grace P.; Hayden, Douglas; Mason, Philip; Fagan, Shawn; Yu, Yong-Ming; Cobb, J. Perren; Remick, Daniel G.; Mannick, John A.; Lederer, James A.; Gamelli, Richard L.; Silver, Geoffrey M.; West, Michael A.; Shapiro, Michael B.; Smith, Richard; Camp, David G.; Qian, Weijun; Tibshirani, Rob; Lowry, Stephen; Calvano, Steven; Chaudry, Irshad; Cohen, Mitchell; Moore, Ernest E.; Johnson, Jeffrey; Baker, Henry V.; Efron, Philip A.; Balis, Ulysses G. J.; Billiar, Timothy R.; Ochoa, Juan B.; Sperry, Jason L.; Miller-Graziano, Carol L.; De, Asit K.; Bankey, Paul E.; Herndon, David N.; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Minei, Joseph P.; Arnoldo, Brett D.; Hunt, John L.; Horton, Jureta; Cobb, J. Perren; Brownstein, Bernard; Freeman, Bradley; Nathens, Avery B.; Cuschieri, Joseph; Gibran, Nicole; Klein, Matthew; O'Keefe, Grant

    2011-01-01

    A 6.9 million-feature oligonucleotide array of the human transcriptome [Glue Grant human transcriptome (GG-H array)] has been developed for high-throughput and cost-effective analyses in clinical studies. This array allows comprehensive examination of gene expression and genome-wide identification of alternative splicing as well as detection of coding SNPs and noncoding transcripts. The performance of the array was examined and compared with mRNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) results over multiple independent replicates of liver and muscle samples. Compared with RNA-Seq of 46 million uniquely mappable reads per replicate, the GG-H array is highly reproducible in estimating gene and exon abundance. Although both platforms detect similar expression changes at the gene level, the GG-H array is more sensitive at the exon level. Deeper sequencing is required to adequately cover low-abundance transcripts. The array has been implemented in a multicenter clinical program and has generated high-quality, reproducible data. Considering the clinical trial requirements of cost, sample availability, and throughput, the GG-H array has a wide range of applications. An emerging approach for large-scale clinical genomic studies is to first use RNA-Seq to the sufficient depth for the discovery of transcriptome elements relevant to the disease process followed by high-throughput and reliable screening of these elements on thousands of patient samples using custom-designed arrays. PMID:21317363

  9. High-throughput search for improved transparent conducting oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miglio, Anna

    High-throughput methodologies are a very useful computational tool to explore the space of binary and ternary oxides. We use these methods to search for new and improved transparent conducting oxides (TCOs). TCOs exhibit both visible transparency and good carrier mobility and underpin many energy and electronic applications (e.g. photovoltaics, transparent transistors). We find several potential new n-type and p-type TCOs with a low effective mass. Combining different ab initio approaches, we characterize candidate oxides by their effective mass (mobility), band gap (transparency) and dopability. We present several compounds, not considered previously as TCOs, and discuss the chemical rationale for their promising properties. This analysis is useful to formulate design strategies for future high mobility oxides and has led to follow-up studies including preliminary experimental characterization of a p-type TCO candidate with unexpected chemistry. G. Hautier, A. Miglio, D. Waroquiers, G.-M. Rignanese, and X. Gonze, ``How Does Chemistry Influence Electron Effective Mass in Oxides? A High-Throughput Computational Analysis'', Chem. Mater. 26, 5447 (2014). G. Hautier, A. Miglio, G. Ceder, G.-M. Rignanese, and X. Gonze, ``Identification and design principles of low hole effective mass p-type transparent conducting oxides'', Nature Commun. 4, 2292 (2013).

  10. Structuring intuition with theory: The high-throughput way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornari, Marco

    2015-03-01

    First principles methodologies have grown in accuracy and applicability to the point where large databases can be built, shared, and analyzed with the goal of predicting novel compositions, optimizing functional properties, and discovering unexpected relationships between the data. In order to be useful to a large community of users, data should be standardized, validated, and distributed. In addition, tools to easily manage large datasets should be made available to effectively lead to materials development. Within the AFLOW consortium we have developed a simple frame to expand, validate, and mine data repositories: the MTFrame. Our minimalistic approach complement AFLOW and other existing high-throughput infrastructures and aims to integrate data generation with data analysis. We present few examples from our work on materials for energy conversion. Our intent s to pinpoint the usefulness of high-throughput methodologies to guide the discovery process by quantitatively structuring the scientific intuition. This work was supported by ONR-MURI under Contract N00014-13-1-0635 and the Duke University Center for Materials Genomics.

  11. A novel asymmetric-loop molecular beacon-based two-phase hybridization assay for accurate and high-throughput detection of multiple drug resistance-conferring point mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qinghai; Wu, Nan; Xie, Meng; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Ming; Li, Jianjun; Zhuo, Lisha; Kuang, Hong; Fu, Weiling

    2012-01-01

    Summary The accurate and high-throughput detection of drug resistance-related multiple point mutations remains a challenge. Although the combination of molecular beacons with bio-immobilization technology, such as microarray, is promising, its application is difficult due to the ineffective immobilization of molecular beacons on the chip surface. Here, we propose a novel asymmetric-loop molecular beacon in which the loop consists of 2 parts. One is complementary to a target, while the other is complementary to an oligonucleotide probe immobilized on the chip surface. With this novel probe, a two-phase hybridization assay can be used for simultaneously detecting multiple point mutations. This assay will have advantages, such as easy probe availability, multiplex detection, low background, and high-efficiency hybridization, and may provide a new avenue for the immobilization of molecular beacons and high-throughput detection of point mutations. PMID:22460100

  12. M@IA: a modular open-source application for microarray workflow and integrative datamining.

    PubMed

    Le Béchec, Antony; Zindy, Pierre; Sierocinski, Thomas; Petritis, Dimitri; Bihouée, Audrey; Le Meur, Nolwenn; Léger, Jean; Théret, Nathalie

    2008-01-01

    Microarray technology is a widely used approach to gene expression analysis. Many tools for microarray management and data analysis have been developed, and recently new methods have been proposed for deciphering biological pathways by integrating microarray data with other data sources. However, to improve microarray analysis and provide meaningful gene interaction networks, integrated software solutions are still needed. Therefore, we developed M@IA, an environment for DNA microarray data analysis allowing gene network reconstruction. M@IA is a microarray integrated application which includes all of the steps of a microarray study, from MIAME-compliant raw data storage and processing gene expression analysis. Furthermore, M@IA allows automatic gene annotation based on ontology, metabolic/signalling pathways, protein interaction, miRNA and transcriptional factor associations, as well as integrative analysis of gene interaction networks. Statistical and graphical methods facilitate analysis, yielding new hypotheses on gene expression data. To illustrate our approach, we applied M@IA modules to microarray data taken from an experiment on liver tissue. We integrated differentially expressed genes with additional biological information, thus identifying new molecular interaction networks that are associated with fibrogenesis. M@IA is a new application for microarray management and data analysis, offering functional insights into microarray data by the combination of gene expression data and biological knowledge annotation based on interactive graphs. M@IA is an interactive multi-user interface based on a flexible modular architecture and it is freely available for academic users at http://maia.genouest.org. PMID:18430991

  13. High Throughput Screening and Selection Methods for Directed Enzyme Evolution

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Successful evolutionary enzyme engineering requires a high throughput screening or selection method, which considerably increases the chance of obtaining desired properties and reduces the time and cost. In this review, a series of high throughput screening and selection methods are illustrated with significant and recent examples. These high throughput strategies are also discussed with an emphasis on compatibility with phenotypic analysis during directed enzyme evolution. Lastly, certain limitations of current methods, as well as future developments, are briefly summarized. PMID:26074668

  14. Data Analysis for High-Throughput RNAi Screening.

    PubMed

    Azorsa, David O; Turnidge, Megan A; Arora, Shilpi

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput RNA interference (HT-RNAi) screening is an effective technology to help identify important genes and pathways involved in a biological process. Analysis of high-throughput RNAi screening data is a critical part of this technology, and many analysis methods have been described. Here, we summarize the workflow and types of analyses commonly used in high-throughput RNAi screening. PMID:27581298

  15. Application of Microarray Technology to Investigate Salmonella genomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microarrays were developed for the molecular study of various genes in Salmonella species, which may be important in causing illness in both humans and animals. There are over 2400 Salmonella serotypes each of which differs in their ability to cause disease in humans and animals, persist within the ...

  16. High Throughput Screening Method to Explore Protein Interactions with Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Irem; Fatih, Warda; Svensson, Anja; Radu, Dennis; Linse, Sara; Cabaleiro Lago, Celia; Lundqvist, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of biological macromolecules with nanoparticles underlie a wide variety of current and future applications in the fields of biotechnology, medicine and bioremediation. The same interactions are also responsible for mediating potential biohazards of nanomaterials. Some applications require that proteins adsorb to the nanomaterial and that the protein resists or undergoes structural rearrangements. This article presents a screening method for detecting nanoparticle-protein partners and conformational changes on time scales ranging from milliseconds to days. Mobile fluorophores are used as reporters to study the interaction between proteins and nanoparticles in a high-throughput manner in multi-well format. Furthermore, the screening method may reveal changes in colloidal stability of nanomaterials depending on the physicochemical conditions. PMID:26313757

  17. High Throughput Screening Method to Explore Protein Interactions with Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Nasir, Irem; Fatih, Warda; Svensson, Anja; Radu, Dennis; Linse, Sara; Cabaleiro Lago, Celia; Lundqvist, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of biological macromolecules with nanoparticles underlie a wide variety of current and future applications in the fields of biotechnology, medicine and bioremediation. The same interactions are also responsible for mediating potential biohazards of nanomaterials. Some applications require that proteins adsorb to the nanomaterial and that the protein resists or undergoes structural rearrangements. This article presents a screening method for detecting nanoparticle-protein partners and conformational changes on time scales ranging from milliseconds to days. Mobile fluorophores are used as reporters to study the interaction between proteins and nanoparticles in a high-throughput manner in multi-well format. Furthermore, the screening method may reveal changes in colloidal stability of nanomaterials depending on the physicochemical conditions. PMID:26313757

  18. Numerical techniques for high-throughput reflectance interference biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevenler, Derin; Ünlü, M. Selim

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a robust and rapid computational method for processing the raw spectral data collected from thin film optical interference biosensors. We have applied this method to Interference Reflectance Imaging Sensor (IRIS) measurements and observed a 10,000 fold improvement in processing time, unlocking a variety of clinical and scientific applications. Interference biosensors have advantages over similar technologies in certain applications, for example highly multiplexed measurements of molecular kinetics. However, processing raw IRIS data into useful measurements has been prohibitively time consuming for high-throughput studies. Here we describe the implementation of a lookup table (LUT) technique that provides accurate results in far less time than naive methods. We also discuss an additional benefit that the LUT method can be used with a wider range of interference layer thickness and experimental configurations that are incompatible with methods that require fitting the spectral response.

  19. High throughput sample processing and automated scoring.

    PubMed

    Brunborg, Gunnar; Jackson, Petra; Shaposhnikov, Sergey; Dahl, Hildegunn; Azqueta, Amaya; Collins, Andrew R; Gutzkow, Kristine B

    2014-01-01

    The comet assay is a sensitive and versatile method for assessing DNA damage in cells. In the traditional version of the assay, there are many manual steps involved and few samples can be treated in one experiment. High throughput (HT) modifications have been developed during recent years, and they are reviewed and discussed. These modifications include accelerated scoring of comets; other important elements that have been studied and adapted to HT are cultivation and manipulation of cells or tissues before and after exposure, and freezing of treated samples until comet analysis and scoring. HT methods save time and money but they are useful also for other reasons: large-scale experiments may be performed which are otherwise not practicable (e.g., analysis of many organs from exposed animals, and human biomonitoring studies), and automation gives more uniform sample treatment and less dependence on operator performance. The HT modifications now available vary largely in their versatility, capacity, complexity, and costs. The bottleneck for further increase of throughput appears to be the scoring. PMID:25389434

  20. High-Throughput Screening in Primary Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Punita; Ando, D. Michael; Daub, Aaron; Kaye, Julia A.; Finkbeiner, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Despite years of incremental progress in our understanding of diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease (HD), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), there are still no disease-modifying therapeutics. The discrepancy between the number of lead compounds and approved drugs may partially be a result of the methods used to generate the leads and highlights the need for new technology to obtain more detailed and physiologically relevant information on cellular processes in normal and diseased states. Our high-throughput screening (HTS) system in a primary neuron model can help address this unmet need. HTS allows scientists to assay thousands of conditions in a short period of time which can reveal completely new aspects of biology and identify potential therapeutics in the span of a few months when conventional methods could take years or fail all together. HTS in primary neurons combines the advantages of HTS with the biological relevance of intact, fully differentiated neurons which can capture the critical cellular events or homeostatic states that make neurons uniquely susceptible to disease-associated proteins. We detail methodologies of our primary neuron HTS assay workflow from sample preparation to data reporting. We also discuss our adaptation of our HTS system into high-content screening (HCS), a type of HTS that uses multichannel fluorescence images to capture biological events in situ, and is uniquely suited to study dynamical processes in living cells. PMID:22341232

  1. High throughput sample processing and automated scoring

    PubMed Central

    Brunborg, Gunnar; Jackson, Petra; Shaposhnikov, Sergey; Dahl, Hildegunn; Azqueta, Amaya; Collins, Andrew R.; Gutzkow, Kristine B.

    2014-01-01

    The comet assay is a sensitive and versatile method for assessing DNA damage in cells. In the traditional version of the assay, there are many manual steps involved and few samples can be treated in one experiment. High throughput (HT) modifications have been developed during recent years, and they are reviewed and discussed. These modifications include accelerated scoring of comets; other important elements that have been studied and adapted to HT are cultivation and manipulation of cells or tissues before and after exposure, and freezing of treated samples until comet analysis and scoring. HT methods save time and money but they are useful also for other reasons: large-scale experiments may be performed which are otherwise not practicable (e.g., analysis of many organs from exposed animals, and human biomonitoring studies), and automation gives more uniform sample treatment and less dependence on operator performance. The HT modifications now available vary largely in their versatility, capacity, complexity, and costs. The bottleneck for further increase of throughput appears to be the scoring. PMID:25389434

  2. Orthogonal NGS for High Throughput Clinical Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Chennagiri, Niru; White, Eric J.; Frieden, Alexander; Lopez, Edgardo; Lieber, Daniel S.; Nikiforov, Anastasia; Ross, Tristen; Batorsky, Rebecca; Hansen, Sherry; Lip, Va; Luquette, Lovelace J.; Mauceli, Evan; Margulies, David; Milos, Patrice M.; Napolitano, Nichole; Nizzari, Marcia M.; Yu, Timothy; Thompson, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Next generation sequencing is a transformative technology for discovering and diagnosing genetic disorders. However, high-throughput sequencing remains error-prone, necessitating variant confirmation in order to meet the exacting demands of clinical diagnostic sequencing. To address this, we devised an orthogonal, dual platform approach employing complementary target capture and sequencing chemistries to improve speed and accuracy of variant calls at a genomic scale. We combined DNA selection by bait-based hybridization followed by Illumina NextSeq reversible terminator sequencing with DNA selection by amplification followed by Ion Proton semiconductor sequencing. This approach yields genomic scale orthogonal confirmation of ~95% of exome variants. Overall variant sensitivity improves as each method covers thousands of coding exons missed by the other. We conclude that orthogonal NGS offers improvements in variant calling sensitivity when two platforms are used, better specificity for variants identified on both platforms, and greatly reduces the time and expense of Sanger follow-up, thus enabling physicians to act on genomic results more quickly. PMID:27090146

  3. High-throughput screening in primary neurons.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Punita; Ando, D Michael; Daub, Aaron; Kaye, Julia A; Finkbeiner, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Despite years of incremental progress in our understanding of diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease (HD), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), there are still no disease-modifying therapeutics. The discrepancy between the number of lead compounds and approved drugs may partially be a result of the methods used to generate the leads and highlights the need for new technology to obtain more detailed and physiologically relevant information on cellular processes in normal and diseased states. Our high-throughput screening (HTS) system in a primary neuron model can help address this unmet need. HTS allows scientists to assay thousands of conditions in a short period of time which can reveal completely new aspects of biology and identify potential therapeutics in the span of a few months when conventional methods could take years or fail all together. HTS in primary neurons combines the advantages of HTS with the biological relevance of intact, fully differentiated neurons which can capture the critical cellular events or homeostatic states that make neurons uniquely susceptible to disease-associated proteins. We detail methodologies of our primary neuron HTS assay workflow from sample preparation to data reporting. We also discuss the adaptation of our HTS system into high-content screening (HCS), a type of HTS that uses multichannel fluorescence images to capture biological events in situ, and is uniquely suited to study dynamical processes in living cells. PMID:22341232

  4. High-throughput rod-induced electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dezhi; Xiao, Zhiming; Teh, Kwok Siong; Han, Zhibin; Luo, Guoxi; Shi, Chuan; Sun, Daoheng; Zhao, Jinbao; Lin, Liwei

    2016-09-01

    A high throughput electrospinning process, directly from flat polymer solution surfaces induced by a moving insulating rod, has been proposed and demonstrated. Different rods made of either phenolic resin or paper with a diameter of 1–3 cm and a resistance of about 100–500 MΩ, has been successfully utilized in the process. The rod is placed approximately 10 mm above the flat polymer solution surface with a moving speed of 0.005–0.4 m s‑1 this causes the solution to generate multiple liquid jets under an applied voltage of 15–60 kV for the tip-less electrospinning process. The local electric field induced by the rod can boost electrohydrodynamic instability in order to generate Taylor cones and liquid jets. Experimentally, it is found that a large rod diameter and a small solution-to-rod distance can enhance the local electrical field to reduce the magnitude of the applied voltage. In the prototype setup with poly (ethylene oxide) polymer solution, an area of 5 cm  ×  10 cm and under an applied voltage of 60 kV, the maximum throughput of nanofibers is recorded to be approximately144 g m‑2 h‑1.

  5. Recent advances and future applications of microfluidic live-cell microarrays.

    PubMed

    Rothbauer, Mario; Wartmann, David; Charwat, Verena; Ertl, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Microfluidic live-cell microarrays show much promise as screening tools for biomedical research because they could shed light on key biological processes such as cell signaling and cell-to-cell and cell-to-substrate dynamic responses. While miniaturization reduces the need for expensive clinical grade reagents, the integration of functional components including micropumps, biosensors, actuators, mixers and gradient generators results in improved assay reliability, reproducibility and well-defined cell culture conditions. The present review addresses recent technological advances in microfluidic live-cell microarray technology with a special focus on the applications of microfluidic single-cell, multi-cell and 3D cell microarrays. PMID:26133396

  6. [Research progress of probe design software of oligonucleotide microarrays].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Wu, Zaoquan; Liu, Zhengchun

    2014-02-01

    DNA microarray has become an essential medical genetic diagnostic tool for its high-throughput, miniaturization and automation. The design and selection of oligonucleotide probes are critical for preparing gene chips with high quality. Several sets of probe design software have been developed and are available to perform this work now. Every set of the software aims to different target sequences and shows different advantages and limitations. In this article, the research and development of these sets of software are reviewed in line with three main criteria, including specificity, sensitivity and melting temperature (Tm). In addition, based on the experimental results from literatures, these sets of software are classified according to their applications. This review will be helpful for users to choose an appropriate probe-design software. It will also reduce the costs of microarrays, improve the application efficiency of microarrays, and promote both the research and development (R&D) and commercialization of high-performance probe design software. PMID:24804514

  7. Tissue Microarrays in Clinical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Voduc, David; Kenney, Challayne; Nielsen, Torsten O.

    2008-01-01

    The tissue microarray is a recently-implemented, high-throughput technology for the analysis of molecular markers in oncology. This research tool permits the rapid assessment of a biomarker in thousands of tumor samples, using commonly available laboratory assays such as immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridization. Although introduced less than a decade ago, the TMA has proven to be invaluable in the study of tumor biology, the development of diagnostic tests, and the investigation of oncological biomarkers. This review describes the impact of TMA-based research in clinical oncology and its potential future applications. Technical aspects of TMA construction, and the advantages and disadvantages inherent to this technology are also discussed. PMID:18314063

  8. Ultra-Sensitive, High Throughput and Quantitative Proteomics Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Jon M.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Qian, Weijun; Shen, Yufeng; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2005-02-01

    We describe the broad basis and application of an approach for very high throughput, ultra-sensitive, and quantitative proteomic measurements based upon the use of ultra-high performance separations and mass spectrometry. An overview of the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag approach and a description of the incorporated data analysis pipeline necessary for efficient proteomic studies are presented. Adjunct technologies, including stable-isotope labeling methodologies and improvements in the utilization of LC-MS peak intensity information for quantitative purposes are discussed. Related areas include the use of automated sample handling for improving analysis reproducibility, methods for using information from the separation for more confident peptide peak identification, and the utilization of smaller diameter capillary columns having lower volumetric flow rates to increase electrospray ionization efficiency and allow for more predictable and quantitative results. The developments are illustrated in the context of studies of complex biological systems.

  9. High-throughput analysis of behavior for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, Vadim; Brunner, Dani; Hanania, Taleen; Leahy, Emer

    2015-03-01

    Drug testing with traditional behavioral assays constitutes a major bottleneck in the development of novel therapies. PsychoGenics developed three comprehensive high-throughput systems, SmartCube(®), NeuroCube(®) and PhenoCube(®) systems, to increase the efficiency of the drug screening and phenotyping in rodents. These three systems capture different domains of behavior, namely, cognitive, motor, circadian, social, anxiety-like, gait and others, using custom-built computer vision software and machine learning algorithms for analysis. This review exemplifies the use of the three systems and explains how they can advance drug screening with their applications to phenotyping of disease models, drug screening, selection of lead candidates, behavior-driven lead optimization, and drug repurposing. PMID:25592319

  10. High-throughput sequencing in veterinary infection biology and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Belák, S; Karlsson, O E; Leijon, M; Granberg, F

    2013-12-01

    Sequencing methods have improved rapidly since the first versions of the Sanger techniques, facilitating the development of very powerful tools for detecting and identifying various pathogens, such as viruses, bacteria and other microbes. The ongoing development of high-throughput sequencing (HTS; also known as next-generation sequencing) technologies has resulted in a dramatic reduction in DNA sequencing costs, making the technology more accessible to the average laboratory. In this White Paper of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Collaborating Centre for the Biotechnology-based Diagnosis of Infectious Diseases in Veterinary Medicine (Uppsala, Sweden), several approaches and examples of HTS are summarised, and their diagnostic applicability is briefly discussed. Selected future aspects of HTS are outlined, including the need for bioinformatic resources, with a focus on improving the diagnosis and control of infectious diseases in veterinary medicine. PMID:24761741

  11. Predicting Novel Bulk Metallic Glasses via High- Throughput Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perim, E.; Lee, D.; Liu, Y.; Toher, C.; Gong, P.; Li, Y.; Simmons, W. N.; Levy, O.; Vlassak, J.; Schroers, J.; Curtarolo, S.

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are materials which may combine key properties from crystalline metals, such as high hardness, with others typically presented by plastics, such as easy processability. However, the cost of the known BMGs poses a significant obstacle for the development of applications, which has lead to a long search for novel, economically viable, BMGs. The emergence of high-throughput DFT calculations, such as the library provided by the AFLOWLIB consortium, has provided new tools for materials discovery. We have used this data to develop a new glass forming descriptor combining structural factors with thermodynamics in order to quickly screen through a large number of alloy systems in the AFLOWLIB database, identifying the most promising systems and the optimal compositions for glass formation. National Science Foundation (DMR-1436151, DMR-1435820, DMR-1436268).

  12. Biological Processes Discovered by High-Throughput Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Reon, Brian J; Dutta, Anindya

    2016-04-01

    Advances in DNA and RNA sequencing technologies have completely transformed the field of genomics. High-throughput sequencing (HTS) is now a widely used and accessible technology that allows scientists to sequence an entire transcriptome or genome in a timely and cost-effective manner. Application of HTS techniques has led to many key discoveries, including the identification of long noncoding RNAs, microDNAs, a family of small extrachromosomal circular DNA species, and tRNA-derived fragments, which are a group of small non-miRNAs that are derived from tRNAs. Furthermore, public sequencing repositories provide unique opportunities for laboratories to parse large sequencing databases to identify proteins and noncoding RNAs at a scale that was not possible a decade ago. Herein, we review how HTS has led to the discovery of novel nucleic acid species and uncovered new biological processes during the course. PMID:26828742

  13. Fluorescent Approaches to High Throughput Crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Achari, Aniruddha

    2006-01-01

    We have shown that by covalently modifying a subpopulation, less than or equal to 1%, of a macromolecule with a fluorescent probe, the labeled material will add to a growing crystal as a microheterogeneous growth unit. Labeling procedures can be readily incorporated into the final stages of purification, and the presence of the probe at low concentrations does not affect the X-ray data quality or the crystallization behavior. The presence of the trace fluorescent label gives a number of advantages when used with high throughput crystallizations. The covalently attached probe will concentrate in the crystal relative to the solution, and under fluorescent illumination crystals show up as bright objects against a dark background. Non-protein structures, such as salt crystals, will not incorporate the probe and will not show up under fluorescent illumination. Brightly fluorescent crystals are readily found against less bright precipitated phases, which under white light illumination may obscure the crystals. Automated image analysis to find crystals should be greatly facilitated, without having to first define crystallization drop boundaries as the protein or protein structures is all that shows up. Fluorescence intensity is a faster search parameter, whether visually or by automated methods, than looking for crystalline features. We are now testing the use of high fluorescence intensity regions, in the absence of clear crystalline features or "hits", as a means for determining potential lead conditions. A working hypothesis is that kinetics leading to non-structured phases may overwhelm and trap more slowly formed ordered assemblies, which subsequently show up as regions of brighter fluorescence intensity. Preliminary experiments with test proteins have resulted in the extraction of a number of crystallization conditions from screening outcomes based solely on the presence of bright fluorescent regions. Subsequent experiments will test this approach using a wider

  14. High-Throughput Baculovirus Expression System for Membrane Protein Production.

    PubMed

    Kalathur, Ravi C; Panganiban, Marinela; Bruni, Renato

    2016-01-01

    The ease of use, robustness, cost-effectiveness, and posttranslational machinery make baculovirus expression system a popular choice for production of eukaryotic membrane proteins. This system can be readily adapted for high-throughput operations. This chapter outlines the techniques and procedures for cloning, transfection, small-scale production, and purification of membrane protein samples in a high-throughput manner. PMID:27485337

  15. High throughput parametric studies of the structure of complex nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Peng

    The structure of nanoscale materials is difficult to study because crystallography, the gold-standard for structure studies, no longer works at the nanoscale. New tools are needed to study nanostructure. Furthermore, it is important to study the evolution of nanostructure of complex nanostructured materials as a function of various parameters such as temperature or other environmental variables. These are called parametric studies because an environmental parameter is being varied. This means that the new tools for studying nanostructure also need to be extended to work quickly and on large numbers of datasets. This thesis describes the development of new tools for high throughput studies of complex and nanostructured materials, and their application to study the structural evolution of bulk, and nanoparticles of, MnAs as a function of temperature. The tool for high throughput analysis of the bulk material was developed as part of this PhD thesis work and is called SrRietveld. A large part of making a new tool is to validate it and we did this for SrRietveld by carrying out a high-throughput study of uncertainties coming from the program using different ways of estimating the uncertainty. This tool was applied to study structural changes in MnAs as a function of temperature. We were also interested in studying different MnAs nanoparticles fabricated through different methods because of their applications in information storage. PDFgui, an existing tool for analyzing nanoparticles using Pair distribution function (PDF) refinement, was used in these cases. Comparing the results from the analysis by SrRietveld and PDFgui, we got more comprehensive structure information about MnAs. The layout of the thesis is as follows. First, the background knowledge about material structures is given. The conventional crystallographic analysis is introduced in both theoretical and practical ways. For high throughput study, the next-generation Rietveld analysis program: Sr

  16. Towards Chip Scale Liquid Chromatography and High Throughput Immunosensing

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, J.

    2000-09-21

    This work describes several research projects aimed towards developing new instruments and novel methods for high throughput chemical and biological analysis. Approaches are taken in two directions. The first direction takes advantage of well-established semiconductor fabrication techniques and applies them to miniaturize instruments that are workhorses in analytical laboratories. Specifically, the first part of this work focused on the development of micropumps and microvalves for controlled fluid delivery. The mechanism of these micropumps and microvalves relies on the electrochemically-induced surface tension change at a mercury/electrolyte interface. A miniaturized flow injection analysis device was integrated and flow injection analyses were demonstrated. In the second part of this work, microfluidic chips were also designed, fabricated, and tested. Separations of two fluorescent dyes were demonstrated in microfabricated channels, based on an open-tubular liquid chromatography (OT LC) or an electrochemically-modulated liquid chromatography (EMLC) format. A reduction in instrument size can potentially increase analysis speed, and allow exceedingly small amounts of sample to be analyzed under diverse separation conditions. The second direction explores the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) as a signal transduction method for immunoassay analysis. It takes advantage of the improved detection sensitivity as a result of surface enhancement on colloidal gold, the narrow width of Raman band, and the stability of Raman scattering signals to distinguish several different species simultaneously without exploiting spatially-separated addresses on a biochip. By labeling gold nanoparticles with different Raman reporters in conjunction with different detection antibodies, a simultaneous detection of a dual-analyte immunoassay was demonstrated. Using this scheme for quantitative analysis was also studied and preliminary dose-response curves from an immunoassay of a

  17. High-Throughput Genomics Enhances Tomato Breeding Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Barone, A; Di Matteo, A; Carputo, D; Frusciante, L

    2009-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is considered a model plant species for a group of economically important crops, such as potato, pepper, eggplant, since it exhibits a reduced genomic size (950 Mb), a short generation time, and routine transformation technologies. Moreover, it shares with the other Solanaceous plants the same haploid chromosome number and a high level of conserved genomic organization. Finally, many genomic and genetic resources are actually available for tomato, and the sequencing of its genome is in progress. These features make tomato an ideal species for theoretical studies and practical applications in the genomics field. The present review describes how structural genomics assist the selection of new varieties resistant to pathogens that cause damage to this crop. Many molecular markers highly linked to resistance genes and cloned resistance genes are available and could be used for a high-throughput screening of multiresistant varieties. Moreover, a new genomics-assisted breeding approach for improving fruit quality is presented and discussed. It relies on the identification of genetic mechanisms controlling the trait of interest through functional genomics tools. Following this approach, polymorphisms in major gene sequences responsible for variability in the expression of the trait under study are then exploited for tracking simultaneously favourable allele combinations in breeding programs using high-throughput genomic technologies. This aims at pyramiding in the genetic background of commercial cultivars alleles that increase their performances. In conclusion, tomato breeding strategies supported by advanced technologies are expected to target increased productivity and lower costs of improved genotypes even for complex traits. PMID:19721805

  18. PALM and STORM: Into large fields and high-throughput microscopy with sCMOS detectors.

    PubMed

    Almada, Pedro; Culley, Siân; Henriques, Ricardo

    2015-10-15

    Single Molecule Localization Microscopy (SMLM) techniques such as Photo-Activation Localization Microscopy (PALM) and Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (STORM) enable fluorescence microscopy super-resolution: the overcoming of the resolution barrier imposed by the diffraction of light. These techniques are based on acquiring hundreds or thousands of images of single molecules, locating them and reconstructing a higher-resolution image from the high-precision localizations. These methods generally imply a considerable trade-off between imaging speed and resolution, limiting their applicability to high-throughput workflows. Recent advancements in scientific Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (sCMOS) camera sensors and localization algorithms reduce the temporal requirements for SMLM, pushing it toward high-throughput microscopy. Here we outline the decisions researchers face when considering how to adapt hardware on a new system for sCMOS sensors with high-throughput in mind. PMID:26079924

  19. High-throughput parallel SPM for metrology, defect, and mask inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghian, H.; Herfst, R. W.; van den Dool, T. C.; Crowcombe, W. E.; Winters, J.; Kramer, G. F. I. J.

    2014-10-01

    Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is a promising candidate for accurate assessment of metrology and defects on wafers and masks, however it has traditionally been too slow for high-throughput applications, although recent developments have significantly pushed the speed of SPM [1,2]. In this paper we present new results obtained with our previously presented high-throughput parallel SPM system [3,4] that showcase two key advances that are required for a successful deployment of SPM in high-throughput metrology, defect and mask inspection. The first is a very fast (up to 40 lines/s) image acquisition and a comparison of the image quality as function of speed. Secondly, a fast approach method: measurements of the scan-head approaching the sample from 0.2 and 1.0 mm distance in under 1.4 and 6 seconds respectively.

  20. Parallelized ultra-high throughput microfluidic emulsifier for multiplex kinetic assays

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jiseok; Caen, Ouriel; Vrignon, Jérémy; Konrad, Manfred; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Droplet-based microfluidic technologies are powerful tools for applications requiring high-throughput, for example, in biochemistry or material sciences. Several systems have been proposed for the high-throughput production of monodisperse emulsions by parallelizing multiple droplet makers. However, these systems have two main limitations: (1) they allow the use of only a single disperse phase; (2) they are based on multiple layer microfabrication techniques. We present here a pipette-and-play solution offering the possibility of manipulating simultaneously 10 different disperse phases on a single layer device. This system allows high-throughput emulsion production using aqueous flow rates of up to 26 ml/h (>110 000 drops/s) leading to emulsions with user-defined complex chemical composition. We demonstrate the multiplex capabilities of our system by measuring the kinetics of β-galactosidase in droplets using nine different concentrations of a fluorogenic substrate. PMID:26015838

  1. High Throughput Proteomics Using Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Weijun; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2004-06-01

    The advent of high throughput proteomics technology for global detection and quantitation of proteins creates new opportunities and challenges for those seeking to gain greater understanding of cellular machinery. Here, we review recent advances in high-resolution capillary liquid chromatography coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry along with its potential application to high throughput proteomics. These technological advances combined with quantitative stable isotope labeling methodologies provide powerful tools for expanding our understanding of biology at the system-level.

  2. Express primer tool for high-throughput gene cloning and expression.

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, J. R.; Laible, P. D.; Gu, M.; Scott, H. N.; Collart, F. R.; Biosciences Division

    2002-12-01

    High-throughput approaches for gene cloning and expression require the development of new nonstandard tools for molecular biologists and biochemists. We introduce a Web-based tool to design primers specifically for the generation of expression clones for both laboratory-scale and high-throughput projects. The application is designed not only to allow the user complete flexibility to specify primer design parameters but also to minimize the amount of manual intervention needed to generate a large number of primers for the simultaneous amplification of multiple target genes.

  3. EDITORIAL: Combinatorial and High-Throughput Materials Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potyrailo, Radislav A.; Takeuchi, Ichiro

    2005-01-01

    still remain in the rapid characterization of materials in a number of key technological areas. Scientists are taking on the challenges, and we can expect many more innovations in the future. We thank the authors and reviewers for their contributions. Special thanks go to Professor Peter Hauptmann for encouragement and support of this project, and to Natasha Leeper and James Dimond, for their assistance in putting this special issue together. References [1] Borman S 2002 Millennial analysis Chem Eng. News 80 (18) 49-52 [2] Chang H et al 1998 Combinatorial synthesis and high throughput evaluation of ferroelectric/dielectric thin film libraries for microwave applications Appl. Phys. Lett. 72 2185-7 [3] Kyranos J N, Lee H, Goetzinger W K and Li L Y T 2004 One-minute full-gradient HPLC/UV/ELSD/MS analysis to support high-throughput parallel synthesis J. Comb. Chem. 6 796-804 [4] Danielson E et al 1998 A rare-earth phosphor containing one-dimensional chains identified through combinatorial methods Science 279 837-9 [5] Tan D S, Foley M A, Shair M D and Schreiber S L 1998 Stereoselective synthesis of over two million compounds having structural features both reminiscent of natural products and compatible with miniaturized cell-based assays J. Am. Chem. Soc. 120 8565-6

  4. A general approach for discriminative de novo motif discovery from high-throughput data

    PubMed Central

    Grau, Jan; Posch, Stefan; Grosse, Ivo; Keilwagen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    De novo motif discovery has been an important challenge of bioinformatics for the past two decades. Since the emergence of high-throughput techniques like ChIP-seq, ChIP-exo and protein-binding microarrays (PBMs), the focus of de novo motif discovery has shifted to runtime and accuracy on large data sets. For this purpose, specialized algorithms have been designed for discovering motifs in ChIP-seq or PBM data. However, none of the existing approaches work perfectly for all three high-throughput techniques. In this article, we propose Dimont, a general approach for fast and accurate de novo motif discovery from high-throughput data. We demonstrate that Dimont yields a higher number of correct motifs from ChIP-seq data than any of the specialized approaches and achieves a higher accuracy for predicting PBM intensities from probe sequence than any of the approaches specifically designed for that purpose. Dimont also reports the expected motifs for several ChIP-exo data sets. Investigating differences between in vitro and in vivo binding, we find that for most transcription factors, the motifs discovered by Dimont are in good accordance between techniques, but we also find notable exceptions. We also observe that modeling intra-motif dependencies may increase accuracy, which indicates that more complex motif models are a worthwhile field of research. PMID:24057214

  5. Chemically diverse polymer microarrays and high throughput surface characterisation: a method for discovery of materials for stem cell culture† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4bm00054d Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Celiz, A. D.; Smith, J. G. W.; Patel, A. K.; Langer, R.; Anderson, D. G.; Barrett, D. A.; Young, L. E.; Davies, M. C.; Denning, C.

    2014-01-01

    Materials discovery provides the opportunity to identify novel materials that are tailored to complex biological environments by using combinatorial mixing of monomers to form large libraries of polymers as micro arrays. The materials discovery approach is predicated on the use of the largest chemical diversity possible, yet previous studies into human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) response to polymer microarrays have been limited to 20 or so different monomer identities in each study. Here we show that it is possible to print and assess cell adhesion of 141 different monomers in a microarray format. This provides access to the largest chemical space to date, allowing us to meet the regenerative medicine challenge to provide scalable synthetic culture ware. This study identifies new materials suitable for hPSC expansion that could not have been predicted from previous knowledge of cell-material interactions. PMID:25328672

  6. Using Pre-existing Microarray Datasets to Increase Experimental Power: Application to Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Daigle, Bernie J.; Deng, Alicia; McLaughlin, Tracey; Cushman, Samuel W.; Cam, Margaret C.; Reaven, Gerald; Tsao, Philip S.; Altman, Russ B.

    2010-01-01

    software package that is immediately applicable to any human microarray study. PMID:20361040

  7. EMAAS: An extensible grid-based Rich Internet Application for microarray data analysis and management

    PubMed Central

    Barton, G; Abbott, J; Chiba, N; Huang, DW; Huang, Y; Krznaric, M; Mack-Smith, J; Saleem, A; Sherman, BT; Tiwari, B; Tomlinson, C; Aitman, T; Darlington, J; Game, L; Sternberg, MJE; Butcher, SA

    2008-01-01

    Background Microarray experimentation requires the application of complex analysis methods as well as the use of non-trivial computer technologies to manage the resultant large data sets. This, together with the proliferation of tools and techniques for microarray data analysis, makes it very challenging for a laboratory scientist to keep up-to-date with the latest developments in this field. Our aim was to develop a distributed e-support system for microarray data analysis and management. Results EMAAS (Extensible MicroArray Analysis System) is a multi-user rich internet application (RIA) providing simple, robust access to up-to-date resources for microarray data storage and analysis, combined with integrated tools to optimise real time user support and training. The system leverages the power of distributed computing to perform microarray analyses, and provides seamless access to resources located at various remote facilities. The EMAAS framework allows users to import microarray data from several sources to an underlying database, to pre-process, quality assess and analyse the data, to perform functional analyses, and to track data analysis steps, all through a single easy to use web portal. This interface offers distance support to users both in the form of video tutorials and via live screen feeds using the web conferencing tool EVO. A number of analysis packages, including R-Bioconductor and Affymetrix Power Tools have been integrated on the server side and are available programmatically through the Postgres-PLR library or on grid compute clusters. Integrated distributed resources include the functional annotation tool DAVID, GeneCards and the microarray data repositories GEO, CELSIUS and MiMiR. EMAAS currently supports analysis of Affymetrix 3' and Exon expression arrays, and the system is extensible to cater for other microarray and transcriptomic platforms. Conclusion EMAAS enables users to track and perform microarray data management and analysis tasks

  8. The microarray explorer tool for data mining of cDNA microarrays: application for the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Lemkin, P F; Thornwall, G C; Walton, K D; Hennighausen, L

    2000-11-15

    The Microarray Explorer (MAExplorer) is a versatile Java-based data mining bioinformatic tool for analyzing quantitative cDNA expression profiles across multiple microarray platforms and DNA labeling systems. It may be run as either a stand-alone application or as a Web browser applet over the Internet. With this program it is possible to (i) analyze the expression of individual genes, (ii) analyze the expression of gene families and clusters, (iii) compare expression patterns and (iv) directly access other genomic databases for clones of interest. Data may be downloaded as required from a Web server or in the case of the stand-alone version, reside on the user's computer. Analyses are performed in real-time and may be viewed and directly manipulated in images, reports, scatter plots, histograms, expression profile plots and cluster analyses plots. A key feature is the clone data filter for constraining a working set of clones to those passing a variety of user-specified logical and statistical tests. Reports may be generated with hypertext Web access to UniGene, GenBank and other Internet databases for sets of clones found to be of interest. Users may save their explorations on the Web server or local computer and later recall or share them with other scientists in this groupware Web environment. The emphasis on direct manipulation of clones and sets of clones in graphics and tables provides a high level of interaction with the data, making it easier for investigators to test ideas when looking for patterns. We have used the MAExplorer to profile gene expression patterns of 1500 duplicated genes isolated from mouse mammary tissue. We have identified genes that are preferentially expressed during pregnancy and during lactation. One gene we identified, carbonic anhydrase III, is highly expressed in mammary tissue from virgin and pregnant mice and in gene knock-out mice with underdeveloped mammary epithelium. Other genes, which include those encoding milk proteins

  9. High-throughput synthesis and characterization of nanocrystalline porphyrinic zirconium metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Kelty, M L; Morris, W; Gallagher, A T; Anderson, J S; Brown, K A; Mirkin, C A; Harris, T D

    2016-06-14

    We describe and employ a high-throughput screening method to accelerate the synthesis and identification of pure-phase, nanocrystalline metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). We demonstrate the efficacy of this method through its application to a series of porphyrinic zirconium MOFs, resulting in the isolation of MOF-525, MOF-545, and PCN-223 on the nanoscale. PMID:27247981

  10. High-throughput procedure for single pollen grain collection and polymerase chain reaction in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single pollen grain PCR has succeeded in several species, however only a limited number (up to 60) pollen grains were involved due to difficulties in pollen isolation and lysis. This has limited its application in genetic analysis and mapping studies in plants. A high-throughput procedure for dete...

  11. High Resolution Genotyping of Campylobacter Using PCR and High-Throughput Mass Spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this work we report a high throughput mass spectrometry-based technique for rapid high resolution strain identification of Campylobacter jejuni. This method readily distinguishes C. jejuni from C. coli, has comparable resolving power to multi-locus sequence typing (MLST), is applicable to mixtur...

  12. Incorporating Population Variability and Susceptible Subpopulations into Dosimetry for High-Throughput Toxicity Testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    Momentum is growing worldwide to use in vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) to evaluate human health effects of chemicals. However, the integration of dosimetry into HTS assays and incorporation of population variability will be essential before its application in a risk assess...

  13. High-Throughput Screening to Identify Plant Derived Human LDH-A Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Deiab, S.; Mazzio, E.; Messeha, S.; Mack, N.; Soliman, K. F. A.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)-A is highly expressed in diverse human malignant tumors, parallel to aggressive metastatic disease, resistance to radiation/chemotherapy and clinically poor outcome. Although this enzyme constitutes a plausible target in treatment of advanced cancer, there are few known LDH-A inhibitors. Study Design In this work, we utilized a high-throughput enzyme micro-array format to screen and evaluate > 900 commonly used medicinal plant extracts (0.00001-.5 mg/ml) for capacity to inhibit activity of recombinant full length human LDHA; EC .1.1.1.27. Methodology The protein sequence of purified enzyme was confirmed using 1D gel electrophoresis- MALDI-TOF-MS/MS, enzyme activity was validated by oxidation of NADH (500μM) and kinetic inhibition established in the presence of a known inhibitor (Oxalic Acid). Results Of the natural extracts tested, the lowest IC50s [<0.001 mg/ml] were obtained by: Chinese Gallnut (Melaphis chinensis gallnut), Bladderwrack (Fucus vesiculosus), Kelp (Laminaria Japonica) and Babul (Acacia Arabica). Forty-six additional herbs contained significant LDH-A inhibitory properties with IC50s [<0.07 mg/ml], some of which have common names of Arjun, Pipsissewa, Cinnamon, Pink Rose Buds/Petals, Wintergreen, Cat’s Claw, Witch Hazel Root and Rhodiola Root. Conclusion These findings reflect relative potency by rank of commonly used herbs and plants that contain human LDH-A inhibitory properties. Future research will be required to isolate chemical constituents within these plants responsible for LDH-A inhibition and investigate potential therapeutic application. PMID:24478981

  14. High-Throughput Pharmacokinetics for Environmental Chemicals (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput screening (HTS) promises to allow prioritization of thousands of environmental chemicals with little or no in vivo information. For bioactivity identified by HTS, toxicokinetic (TK) models are essential to predict exposure thresholds below which no significant bio...

  15. Evaluating Rapid Models for High-Throughput Exposure Forecasting (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput exposure screening models can provide quantitative predictions for thousands of chemicals; however these predictions must be systematically evaluated for predictive ability. Without the capability to make quantitative, albeit uncertain, forecasts of exposure, the ...

  16. HIGH THROUGHPUT ASSESSMENTS OF CONVENTIONAL AND ALTERNATIVE COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput approaches for quantifying chemical hazard, exposure, and sustainability have the potential to dramatically impact the pace and nature of risk assessments. Integrated evaluation strategies developed at the US EPA incorporate inherency,bioactivity,bioavailability, ...

  17. High-throughput sequencing of cytosine methylation in plant DNA

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cytosine methylation is a significant and widespread regulatory factor in plant systems. Methods for the high-throughput sequencing of methylation have allowed a greatly improved characterisation of the methylome. Here we discuss currently available methods for generation and analysis of high-throughput sequencing of methylation data. We also discuss the results previously acquired through sequencing plant methylomes, and highlight remaining challenges in this field. PMID:23758782

  18. Microarray data classified by artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Linder, Roland; Richards, Tereza; Wagner, Mathias

    2007-01-01

    Systems biology has enjoyed explosive growth in both the number of people participating in this area of research and the number of publications on the topic. The field of systems biology encompasses the in silico analysis of high-throughput data as provided by DNA or protein microarrays. Along with the increasing availability of microarray data, attention is focused on methods of analyzing the expression rates. One important type of analysis is the classification task, for example, distinguishing different types of cell functions or tumors. Recently, interest has been awakened toward artificial neural networks (ANN), which have many appealing characteristics such as an exceptional degree of accuracy. Nonlinear relationships or independence from certain assumptions regarding the data distribution are also considered. The current work reviews advantages as well as disadvantages of neural networks in the context of microarray analysis. Comparisons are drawn to alternative methods. Selected solutions are discussed, and finally algorithms for the effective combination of multiple ANNs are presented. The development of approaches to use ANN-processed microarray data applicable to run cell and tissue simulations may be slated for future investigation. PMID:18220242

  19. Environmental surveillance and monitoring--The next frontiers for high-throughput toxicology.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Anthony L; Ankley, Gerald T; Houck, Keith A; Villeneuve, Daniel L

    2016-03-01

    High-throughput toxicity testing technologies along with the World Wide Web are revolutionizing both generation of and access to data regarding the biological activities that chemicals can elicit when they interact with specific proteins, genes, or other targets in the body of an organism. To date, however, most of the focus has been on the application of such data to assessment of individual chemicals. The authors suggest that environmental surveillance and monitoring represent the next frontiers for high-throughput toxicity testing. Resources already exist in curated databases of chemical-biological interactions, including highly standardized quantitative dose-response data generated from nascent high-throughput toxicity testing programs such as ToxCast and Tox21, to link chemicals detected through environmental analytical chemistry to known biological activities. The emergence of the adverse outcome pathway framework and the associated knowledge base for linking molecular-level or pathway-level perturbations of biological systems to adverse outcomes traditionally considered in risk assessment and regulatory decision-making through a series of measurable biological changes provides a critical link between activity and hazard. Furthermore, environmental samples can be directly analyzed via high-throughput toxicity testing platforms to provide an unprecedented breadth of biological activity characterization that integrates the effects of all compounds present in a mixture, whether known or not. Novel application of these chemical-biological interaction data provides an opportunity to transform scientific characterization of potential hazards associated with exposure to complex mixtures of environmental contaminants. PMID:26923854

  20. Application of Broad-Spectrum Resequencing Microarray for Genotyping Rhabdoviruses▿

    PubMed Central

    Dacheux, Laurent; Berthet, Nicolas; Dissard, Gabriel; Holmes, Edward C.; Delmas, Olivier; Larrous, Florence; Guigon, Ghislaine; Dickinson, Philip; Faye, Ousmane; Sall, Amadou A.; Old, Iain G.; Kong, Katherine; Kennedy, Giulia C.; Manuguerra, Jean-Claude; Cole, Stewart T.; Caro, Valérie; Gessain, Antoine; Bourhy, Hervé

    2010-01-01

    The rapid and accurate identification of pathogens is critical in the control of infectious disease. To this end, we analyzed the capacity for viral detection and identification of a newly described high-density resequencing microarray (RMA), termed PathogenID, which was designed for multiple pathogen detection using database similarity searching. We focused on one of the largest and most diverse viral families described to date, the family Rhabdoviridae. We demonstrate that this approach has the potential to identify both known and related viruses for which precise sequence information is unavailable. In particular, we demonstrate that a strategy based on consensus sequence determination for analysis of RMA output data enabled successful detection of viruses exhibiting up to 26% nucleotide divergence with the closest sequence tiled on the array. Using clinical specimens obtained from rabid patients and animals, this method also shows a high species level concordance with standard reference assays, indicating that it is amenable for the development of diagnostic assays. Finally, 12 animal rhabdoviruses which were currently unclassified, unassigned, or assigned as tentative species within the family Rhabdoviridae were successfully detected. These new data allowed an unprecedented phylogenetic analysis of 106 rhabdoviruses and further suggest that the principles and methodology developed here may be used for the broad-spectrum surveillance and the broader-scale investigation of biodiversity in the viral world. PMID:20610710

  1. Microarray-Based Phospho-Proteomic Profiling of Complex Biological Systems.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, C Rory; Woodard, Crystal L; Zhou, Xin; Pan, Jianbo; Olivi, Alessandro; Xia, Shuli; Bettegowda, Chetan; Sciubba, Daniel M; Pevsner, Jonathan; Zhu, Heng; Laterra, John

    2016-04-01

    Protein microarray technology has been successfully used for identifying substrates of purified activated kinases. We used protein microarrays to globally interrogate the effects of PTEN and Akt activity on the phospho-kinome of in vitro and in vivo glioma models and validated results in clinical pathological specimens. Whole cell lysates extracted from tumor samples can be applied to human kinome chip microarrays to profile the global kinase phosphorylation patterns in a high-throughput manner and identify novel substrates inherent to the tumor cell and the interactions with tumor microenvironment. Our findings identify a novel microarray-based method for assessing intracellular signaling events applicable to human oncogenesis and other pathophysiologic states. PMID:27084428

  2. Microarray-Based Phospho-Proteomic Profiling of Complex Biological Systems12

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, C. Rory; Woodard, Crystal L.; Zhou, Xin; Pan, Jianbo; Olivi, Alessandro; Xia, Shuli; Bettegowda, Chetan; Sciubba, Daniel M.; Pevsner, Jonathan; Zhu, Heng; Laterra, John

    2016-01-01

    Protein microarray technology has been successfully used for identifying substrates of purified activated kinases. We used protein microarrays to globally interrogate the effects of PTEN and Akt activity on the phospho-kinome of in vitro and in vivo glioma models and validated results in clinical pathological specimens. Whole cell lysates extracted from tumor samples can be applied to human kinome chip microarrays to profile the global kinase phosphorylation patterns in a high-throughput manner and identify novel substrates inherent to the tumor cell and the interactions with tumor microenvironment. Our findings identify a novel microarray-based method for assessing intracellular signaling events applicable to human oncogenesis and other pathophysiologic states. PMID:27084428

  3. High Throughput Profiling of Molecular Shapes in Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, Peter R.; Thomas, Sajesh P.; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2016-02-01

    Molecular shape is important in both crystallisation and supramolecular assembly, yet its role is not completely understood. We present a computationally efficient scheme to describe and classify the molecular shapes in crystals. The method involves rotation invariant description of Hirshfeld surfaces in terms of of spherical harmonic functions. Hirshfeld surfaces represent the boundaries of a molecule in the crystalline environment, and are widely used to visualise and interpret crystalline interactions. The spherical harmonic description of molecular shapes are compared and classified by means of principal component analysis and cluster analysis. When applied to a series of metals, the method results in a clear classification based on their lattice type. When applied to around 300 crystal structures comprising of series of substituted benzenes, naphthalenes and phenylbenzamide it shows the capacity to classify structures based on chemical scaffolds, chemical isosterism, and conformational similarity. The computational efficiency of the method is demonstrated with an application to over 14 thousand crystal structures. High throughput screening of molecular shapes and interaction surfaces in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) using this method has direct applications in drug discovery, supramolecular chemistry and materials design.

  4. High Throughput Profiling of Molecular Shapes in Crystals.

    PubMed

    Spackman, Peter R; Thomas, Sajesh P; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2016-01-01

    Molecular shape is important in both crystallisation and supramolecular assembly, yet its role is not completely understood. We present a computationally efficient scheme to describe and classify the molecular shapes in crystals. The method involves rotation invariant description of Hirshfeld surfaces in terms of of spherical harmonic functions. Hirshfeld surfaces represent the boundaries of a molecule in the crystalline environment, and are widely used to visualise and interpret crystalline interactions. The spherical harmonic description of molecular shapes are compared and classified by means of principal component analysis and cluster analysis. When applied to a series of metals, the method results in a clear classification based on their lattice type. When applied to around 300 crystal structures comprising of series of substituted benzenes, naphthalenes and phenylbenzamide it shows the capacity to classify structures based on chemical scaffolds, chemical isosterism, and conformational similarity. The computational efficiency of the method is demonstrated with an application to over 14 thousand crystal structures. High throughput screening of molecular shapes and interaction surfaces in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) using this method has direct applications in drug discovery, supramolecular chemistry and materials design. PMID:26908351

  5. Towards Prebiotic Catalytic Amyloids Using High Throughput Screening

    PubMed Central

    Friedmann, Michael P.; Torbeev, Vladimir; Zelenay, Viviane; Sobol, Alexander; Greenwald, Jason; Riek, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes are capable of directing complex stereospecific transformations and of accelerating reaction rates many orders of magnitude. As even the simplest known enzymes comprise thousands of atoms, the question arises as to how such exquisite catalysts evolved. A logical predecessor would be shorter peptides, but they lack the defined structure and size that are apparently necessary for enzyme functions. However, some very short peptides are able to assemble into amyloids, thereby forming a well-defined tertiary structure called the cross-β-sheet, which bestows unique properties upon the peptides. We have hypothesized that amyloids could have been the catalytically active precursor to modern enzymes. To test this hypothesis, we designed an amyloid peptide library that could be screened for catalytic activity. Our approach, amenable to high-throughput methodologies, allowed us to find several peptides and peptide mixtures that form amyloids with esterase activity. These results indicate that amyloids, with their stability in a wide range of conditions and their potential as catalysts with low sequence specificity, would indeed be fitting precursors to modern enzymes. Furthermore, our approach can be efficiently expanded upon in library size, screening conditions, and target activity to yield novel amyloid catalysts with potential applications in aqueous-organic mixtures, at high temperature and in other extreme conditions that could be advantageous for industrial applications. PMID:26650386

  6. High Throughput Profiling of Molecular Shapes in Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Spackman, Peter R.; Thomas, Sajesh P.; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2016-01-01

    Molecular shape is important in both crystallisation and supramolecular assembly, yet its role is not completely understood. We present a computationally efficient scheme to describe and classify the molecular shapes in crystals. The method involves rotation invariant description of Hirshfeld surfaces in terms of of spherical harmonic functions. Hirshfeld surfaces represent the boundaries of a molecule in the crystalline environment, and are widely used to visualise and interpret crystalline interactions. The spherical harmonic description of molecular shapes are compared and classified by means of principal component analysis and cluster analysis. When applied to a series of metals, the method results in a clear classification based on their lattice type. When applied to around 300 crystal structures comprising of series of substituted benzenes, naphthalenes and phenylbenzamide it shows the capacity to classify structures based on chemical scaffolds, chemical isosterism, and conformational similarity. The computational efficiency of the method is demonstrated with an application to over 14 thousand crystal structures. High throughput screening of molecular shapes and interaction surfaces in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) using this method has direct applications in drug discovery, supramolecular chemistry and materials design. PMID:26908351

  7. Unconventional Architectures for High-Throughput Sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Nieplocha, Jarek; Marquez, Andres; Petrini, Fabrizio; Chavarría-Miranda, Daniel

    2007-06-15

    Science laboratories and sophisticated simulations are producing data of increasing volumes and complexities, and that’s posing significant challenges to current data infrastructures as terabytes to petabytes of data must be processed and analyzed. Traditional computing platforms, originally designed to support model-driven applications, are unable to meet the demands of the data-intensive scientific applications. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) research goes beyond “traditional supercomputing” applications to address emerging problems that need scalable, real-time solutions. The outcome is new unconventional architectures for data-intensive applications specifically designed to process the deluge of scientific data, including FPGAs, multithreaded architectures and IBM's Cell.

  8. The Microarray Explorer tool for data mining of cDNA microarrays: application for the mammary gland

    PubMed Central

    Lemkin, Peter F.; Thornwall, Gregory C.; Walton, Katherine D.; Hennighausen, Lothar

    2000-01-01

    The Microarray Explorer (MAExplorer) is a versatile Java-based data mining bioinformatic tool for analyzing quantitative cDNA expression profiles across multiple microarray platforms and DNA labeling systems. It may be run as either a stand-alone application or as a Web browser applet over the Internet. With this program it is possible to (i) analyze the expression of individual genes, (ii) analyze the expression of gene families and clusters, (iii) compare expression patterns and (iv) directly access other genomic databases for clones of interest. Data may be downloaded as required from a Web server or in the case of the stand-alone version, reside on the user’s computer. Analyses are performed in real-time and may be viewed and directly manipulated in images, reports, scatter plots, histograms, expression profile plots and cluster analyses plots. A key feature is the clone data filter for constraining a working set of clones to those passing a variety of user-specified logical and statistical tests. Reports may be generated with hypertext Web access to UniGene, GenBank and other Internet databases for sets of clones found to be of interest. Users may save their explorations on the Web server or local computer and later recall or share them with other scientists in this groupware Web environment. The emphasis on direct manipulation of clones and sets of clones in graphics and tables provides a high level of interaction with the data, making it easier for investigators to test ideas when looking for patterns. We have used the MAExplorer to profile gene expression patterns of 1500 duplicated genes isolated from mouse mammary tissue. We have identified genes that are preferentially expressed during pregnancy and during lactation. One gene we identified, carbonic anhydrase III, is highly expressed in mammary tissue from virgin and pregnant mice and in gene knock-out mice with underdeveloped mammary epithelium. Other genes, which include those encoding milk proteins

  9. Application of a high-throughput analyzer in evaluating solid adsorbents for post-combustion carbon capture via multicomponent adsorption of CO2, N2, and H2O.

    PubMed

    Mason, Jarad A; McDonald, Thomas M; Bae, Tae-Hyun; Bachman, Jonathan E; Sumida, Kenji; Dutton, Justin J; Kaye, Steven S; Long, Jeffrey R

    2015-04-15

    Despite the large number of metal-organic frameworks that have been studied in the context of post-combustion carbon capture, adsorption equilibria of gas mixtures including CO2, N2, and H2O, which are the three biggest components of the flue gas emanating from a coal- or natural gas-fired power plant, have never been reported. Here, we disclose the design and validation of a high-throughput multicomponent adsorption instrument that can measure equilibrium adsorption isotherms for mixtures of gases at conditions that are representative of an actual flue gas from a power plant. This instrument is used to study 15 different metal-organic frameworks, zeolites, mesoporous silicas, and activated carbons representative of the broad range of solid adsorbents that have received attention for CO2 capture. While the multicomponent results presented in this work provide many interesting fundamental insights, only adsorbents functionalized with alkylamines are shown to have any significant CO2 capacity in the presence of N2 and H2O at equilibrium partial pressures similar to those expected in a carbon capture process. Most significantly, the amine-appended metal organic framework mmen-Mg2(dobpdc) (mmen = N,N'-dimethylethylenediamine, dobpdc (4-) = 4,4'-dioxido-3,3'-biphenyldicarboxylate) exhibits a record CO2 capacity of 4.2 ± 0.2 mmol/g (16 wt %) at 0.1 bar and 40 °C in the presence of a high partial pressure of H2O. PMID:25844924

  10. Application of a High-Throughput Analyzer in Evaluating Solid Adsorbents for Post-Combustion Carbon Capture via Multicomponent Adsorption of CO2, N-2, and H2O

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, JA; McDonald, TM; Bae, TH; Bachman, JE; Sumida, K; Dutton, JJ; Kaye, SS; Long, JR

    2015-04-15

    Despite the large number of metal-organic frameworks that have been studied in the context of post-combustion carbon capture, adsorption equilibria of gas mixtures including CO2, N-2, and H2O, which are the three biggest components of the flue gas emanating from a coal- or natural gas-fired power plant, have never been reported. Here, we disclose the design and validation of a high-throughput multicomponent adsorption instrument that can measure equilibrium adsorption isotherms for mixtures of gases at conditions that are representative of an actual flue gas from a power plant. This instrument is used to study 15 different metal-organic frameworks, zeolites, mesoporous silicas, and activated carbons representative of the broad range of solid adsorbents that have received attention for CO2 capture. While the multicomponent results presented in this work provide many interesting fundamental insights, only adsorbents functionalized with alkylamines are shown to have any significant CO2 capacity in the presence of N-2 and H2O at equilibrium partial pressures similar to those expected in a carbon capture process. Most significantly, the amine-appended metal organic framework mmen-Mg-2(dobpdc) (mmen = N,N'-dimethylethylenediamine, dobpdc (4-) = 4,4'-dioxido-3,3'-biphenyldicarboxylate) exhibits a record CO2 capacity of 4.2 +/- 0.2 mmol/g (16 wt %) at 0.1 bar and 40 degrees C in the presence of a high partial pressure of H2O.

  11. A novel high-throughput irradiator for in vitro radiation sensitivity bioassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, Tyler L.

    Given the emphasis on more personalized radiation therapy there is an ongoing and compelling need to develop high-throughput screening tools to further examine the biological effects of ionizing radiation on cells, tissues and organ systems in either the research or clinical setting. Conventional x-ray irradiators are designed to provide maximum versatility to radiobiology researchers, typically accommodating small animals, tissue or blood samples, and cellular applications. This added versatility often impedes the overall sensitivity and specificity of an experiment resulting in a trade-off between the number of absorbed doses (or dose rates) and biological endpoints that can be investigated in vitro in a reasonable amount of time. Therefore, modern irradiator designs are incompatible with current high-throughput bioassay technologies. Furthermore, important dosimetry and calibration characteristics (i.e. dose build-up region, beam attenuation, and beam scatter) of these irradiators are typically unknown to the end user, which can lead to significant deviation between delivered dose and intended dose to cells that adversely impact experimental results. Therefore, the overarching goal of this research is to design and develop a robust and fully automated high-throughput irradiator for in vitro radiation sensitivity investigations. Additionally, in vitro biological validation of this system was performed by assessing intracellular reactive oxygen species production, physical DNA double strand breaks, and activation of cellular DNA repair mechanisms. Finally, the high-throughput irradiator was used to investigate autophagic flux, a cellular adaptive response, as a potential biomarker of radiation sensitivity.

  12. High-Throughput, Data-Rich Cellular RNA Device Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Townshend, Brent; Kennedy, Andrew B.; Xiang, Joy S.; Smolke, Christina D.

    2015-01-01

    Methods for rapidly assessing sequence-structure-function landscapes and developing conditional gene-regulatory devices are critical to our ability to manipulate and interface with biology. We describe a framework for engineering RNA devices from preexisting aptamers that exhibit ligand-responsive ribozyme tertiary interactions. Our methodology utilizes cell sorting, high-throughput sequencing, and statistical data analyses to enable parallel measurements of the activities of hundreds of thousands of sequences from RNA device libraries in the absence and presence of ligands. Our tertiary interaction RNA devices exhibit improved performance in terms of gene silencing, activation ratio, and ligand sensitivity as compared to optimized RNA devices that rely on secondary structure changes. We apply our method to building biosensors for diverse ligands and determine consensus sequences that enable ligand-responsive tertiary interactions. These methods advance our ability to develop broadly applicable genetic tools and to elucidate understanding of the underlying sequence-structure-function relationships that empower rational design of complex biomolecules. PMID:26258292

  13. High-throughput single-microparticle imaging flow analyzer

    PubMed Central

    Goda, Keisuke; Ayazi, Ali; Gossett, Daniel R.; Sadasivam, Jagannath; Lonappan, Cejo K.; Sollier, Elodie; Fard, Ali M.; Hur, Soojung Claire; Adam, Jost; Murray, Coleman; Wang, Chao; Brackbill, Nora; Di Carlo, Dino; Jalali, Bahram

    2012-01-01

    Optical microscopy is one of the most widely used diagnostic methods in scientific, industrial, and biomedical applications. However, while useful for detailed examination of a small number (< 10,000) of microscopic entities, conventional optical microscopy is incapable of statistically relevant screening of large populations (> 100,000,000) with high precision due to its low throughput and limited digital memory size. We present an automated flow-through single-particle optical microscope that overcomes this limitation by performing sensitive blur-free image acquisition and nonstop real-time image-recording and classification of microparticles during high-speed flow. This is made possible by integrating ultrafast optical imaging technology, self-focusing microfluidic technology, optoelectronic communication technology, and information technology. To show the system’s utility, we demonstrate high-throughput image-based screening of budding yeast and rare breast cancer cells in blood with an unprecedented throughput of 100,000 particles/s and a record false positive rate of one in a million. PMID:22753513

  14. High-throughput automated refolding screening of inclusion bodies

    PubMed Central

    Vincentelli, Renaud; Canaan, Stéphane; Campanacci, Valérie; Valencia, Christel; Maurin, Damien; Frassinetti, Frédéric; Scappucini-Calvo, Loréna; Bourne, Yves; Cambillau, Christian; Bignon, Christophe

    2004-01-01

    One of the main stumbling blocks encountered when attempting to express foreign proteins in Escherichia coli is the occurrence of amorphous aggregates of misfolded proteins, called inclusion bodies (IB). Developing efficient protein native structure recovery procedures based on IB refolding is therefore an important challenge. Unfortunately, there is no “universal” refolding buffer: Experience shows that refolding buffer composition varies from one protein to another. In addition, the methods developed so far for finding a suitable refolding buffer suffer from a number of weaknesses. These include the small number of refolding formulations, which often leads to negative results, solubility assays incompatible with high-throughput, and experiment formatting not suitable for automation. To overcome these problems, it was proposed in the present study to address some of these limitations. This resulted in the first completely automated IB refolding screening procedure to be developed using a 96-well format. The 96 refolding buffers were obtained using a fractional factorial approach. The screening procedure is potentially applicable to any nonmembrane protein, and was validated with 24 proteins in the framework of two Structural Genomics projects. The tests used for this purpose included the use of quality control methods such as circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering, and crystallogenesis. Out of the 24 proteins, 17 remained soluble in at least one of the 96 refolding buffers, 15 passed large-scale purification tests, and five gave crystals. PMID:15388864

  15. Microfluidic system for high throughput characterisation of echogenic particles.

    PubMed

    Rademeyer, Paul; Carugo, Dario; Lee, Jeong Yu; Stride, Eleanor

    2015-01-21

    Echogenic particles, such as microbubbles and volatile liquid micro/nano droplets, have shown considerable potential in a variety of clinical diagnostic and therapeutic applications. The accurate prediction of their response to ultrasound excitation is however extremely challenging, and this has hindered the optimisation of techniques such as quantitative ultrasound imaging and targeted drug delivery. Existing characterisation techniques, such as ultra-high speed microscopy provide important insights, but suffer from a number of limitations; most significantly difficulty in obtaining large data sets suitable for statistical analysis and the need to physically constrain the particles, thereby altering their dynamics. Here a microfluidic system is presented that overcomes these challenges to enable the measurement of single echogenic particle response to ultrasound excitation. A co-axial flow focusing device is used to direct a continuous stream of unconstrained particles through the combined focal region of an ultrasound transducer and a laser. Both the optical and acoustic scatter from individual particles are then simultaneously recorded. Calibration of the device and example results for different types of echogenic particle are presented, demonstrating a high throughput of up to 20 particles per second and the ability to resolve changes in particle radius down to 0.1 μm with an uncertainty of less than 3%. PMID:25367757

  16. High-Throughput Preparation of New Photoactive Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Conterosito, Eleonora; Benesperi, Iacopo; Toson, Valentina; Saccone, Davide; Barbero, Nadia; Palin, Luca; Barolo, Claudia; Gianotti, Valentina; Milanesio, Marco

    2016-06-01

    New low-cost photoactive hybrid materials based on organic luminescent molecules inserted into hydrotalcite (layered double hydroxides; LDH) were produced, which exploit the high-throughput liquid-assisted grinding (LAG) method. These materials are conceived for applications in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) as a co-absorbers and in silicon photovoltaic (PV) panels to improve their efficiency as they are able to emit where PV modules show the maximum efficiency. A molecule that shows a large Stokes' shift was designed, synthesized, and intercalated into LDH. Two dyes already used in DSSCs were also intercalated to produce two new nanocomposites. LDH intercalation allows the stability of organic dyes to be improved and their direct use in polymer melt blending. The prepared nanocomposites absorb sunlight from UV to visible and emit from blue to near-IR and thus can be exploited for light-energy management. Finally one nanocomposite was dispersed by melt blending into a poly(methyl methacrylate)-block-poly(n-butyl acrylate) copolymer to obtain a photoactive film. PMID:27137753

  17. Achieving High Throughput for Data Transfer over ATM Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Marjory J.; Townsend, Jeffrey N.

    1996-01-01

    File-transfer rates for ftp are often reported to be relatively slow, compared to the raw bandwidth available in emerging gigabit networks. While a major bottleneck is disk I/O, protocol issues impact performance as well. Ftp was developed and optimized for use over the TCP/IP protocol stack of the Internet. However, TCP has been shown to run inefficiently over ATM. In an effort to maximize network throughput, data-transfer protocols can be developed to run over UDP or directly over IP, rather than over TCP. If error-free transmission is required, techniques for achieving reliable transmission can be included as part of the transfer protocol. However, selected image-processing applications can tolerate a low level of errors in images that are transmitted over a network. In this paper we report on experimental work to develop a high-throughput protocol for unreliable data transfer over ATM networks. We attempt to maximize throughput by keeping the communications pipe full, but still keep packet loss under five percent. We use the Bay Area Gigabit Network Testbed as our experimental platform.

  18. High-throughput analysis and protein engineering using microcapillary arrays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bob; Lim, Sungwon; Kannan, Arvind; Alford, Spencer C; Sunden, Fanny; Herschlag, Daniel; Dimov, Ivan K; Baer, Thomas M; Cochran, Jennifer R

    2016-02-01

    We describe a multipurpose technology platform, termed μSCALE (microcapillary single-cell analysis and laser extraction), that enables massively parallel, quantitative biochemical and biophysical measurements on millions of protein variants expressed from yeast or bacteria. μSCALE spatially segregates single cells within a microcapillary array, enabling repeated imaging, cell growth and protein expression. We performed high-throughput analysis of cells and their protein products using a range of fluorescent assays, including binding-affinity measurements and dynamic enzymatic assays. A precise laser-based extraction method allows rapid recovery of live clones and their genetic material from microcapillaries for further study. With μSCALE, we discovered a new antibody against a clinical cancer target, evolved a fluorescent protein biosensor and engineered an enzyme to reduce its sensitivity to its inhibitor. These protein analysis and engineering applications each have unique assay requirements and different host organisms, highlighting the flexibility and technical capabilities of the μSCALE platform. PMID:26641932

  19. Multivariate curve resolution for hyperspectral image analysis :applications to microarray technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Sinclair, Michael B.; Haaland, David Michael; Martinez, M. Juanita (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Werner-Washburne, Margaret C. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Aragon, Anthony D. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-01-01

    Multivariate curve resolution (MCR) using constrained alternating least squares algorithms represents a powerful analysis capability for a quantitative analysis of hyperspectral image data. We will demonstrate the application of MCR using data from a new hyperspectral fluorescence imaging microarray scanner for monitoring gene expression in cells from thousands of genes on the array. The new scanner collects the entire fluorescence spectrum from each pixel of the scanned microarray. Application of MCR with nonnegativity and equality constraints reveals several sources of undesired fluorescence that emit in the same wavelength range as the reporter fluorphores. MCR analysis of the hyperspectral images confirms that one of the sources of fluorescence is due to contaminant fluorescence under the printed DNA spots that is spot localized. Thus, traditional background subtraction methods used with data collected from the current commercial microarray scanners will lead to errors in determining the relative expression of low-expressed genes. With the new scanner and MCR analysis, we generate relative concentration maps of the background, impurity, and fluorescent labels over the entire image. Since the concentration maps of the fluorescent labels are relatively unaffected by the presence of background and impurity emissions, the accuracy and useful dynamic range of the gene expression data are both greatly improved over those obtained by commercial microarray scanners.

  20. KARMA: a web server application for comparing and annotating heterogeneous microarray platforms.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Kei-Hoi; Hager, Janet; Pan, Deyun; Srivastava, Ranjana; Mane, Shrikant; Li, Yuli; Miller, Perry; Williams, Kenneth R

    2004-07-01

    We have developed a universal web server application (KARMA) that allows comparison and annotation of user-defined pairs of microarray platforms based on diverse types of genome annotation data (across different species) collected from multiple sources. The application is an effective tool for diverse microarray platforms, including arrays that are provided by (i) the Keck Microarray Resource at Yale, (ii) commercially available Affymetrix GeneChips and spotted arrays and (iii) custom arrays made by individual academics. The tool provides a web interface that allows users to input pairs of test files that represent diverse array platforms for either single or multiple species. The program dynamically identifies analogous DNA fragments spotted or synthesized on multiple microarray platforms based on the following types of information: (i) NCBI-Unigene identifiers, if the platforms being compared are within the same species or (ii) NCBI-Homologene data, if they are cross-species. The single-species comparison is implemented based on set operations: intersection, union and difference. Other forms of retrievable annotation data, including LocusLink, SwissProt and Gene Ontology (GO), are collected from multiple remote sites and stored in an integrated fashion using an Oracle database. The KARMA database, which is updated periodically, is available on line at the following URL: http://ymd.med.yale.edu/karma/cgi-bin/karma.pl. PMID:15215426

  1. Advances in High-Throughput Single-Cell Microtechnologies

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Westbrook M.; Tseng, Peter; Kunze, Anja; Masaeli, Mahdohkht; Chung, Aram J.; Dudani, Jaideep S.; Kittur, Harsha; Kulkarni, Rajan P.; Di Carlo, Dino

    2013-01-01

    Micro-scale biological tools that have allowed probing of individual cells - from the genetic, to proteomic, to phenotypic level - have revealed important contributions of single cells to direct normal and diseased body processes. In analyzing single cells, sample heterogeneity between and within specific cell types drives the need for high-throughput and quantitative measurement of cellular parameters. In recent years, high-throughput single-cell analysis platforms have revealed rare genetic subpopulations in growing tumors, begun to uncover the mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in bacteria, and described the cell-to-cell variations in stem cell differentiation and immune cell response to activation by pathogens. This review surveys these recent technologies, presenting their strengths and contributions to the field, and identifies needs still unmet toward the development of high-throughput single-cell analysis tools to benefit life science research and clinical diagnostics. PMID:24484889

  2. High-throughput sequencing and vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Luciani, F

    2016-04-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have reshaped genome research. The resulting increase in sequencing depth and resolution has led to an unprecedented level of genomic detail and thus an increasing awareness of the complexity of animal, human and pathogen genomes. This has resulted in new approaches to vaccine research. On the one hand, the increase in genome complexity challenges our ability to study and understand pathogen biology and pathogen-host interactions. On the other hand, the increase in genomic data also provides key information for developing and designing improved vaccines against pathogens that were previously extremely difficult to deal with, such as rapidly mutating RNA viruses or bacteria that have complex interactions with the host immune system. This review describes how the broad application of NGS technologies to genome research is affecting vaccine research. It focuses on implications for the field of viral genomics, and includes recent animal and human studies. PMID:27217168

  3. Perspective: Data infrastructure for high throughput materials discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeif, E. A.; Kroenlein, K.

    2016-05-01

    Computational capability has enabled materials design to evolve from trial-and-error towards more informed methodologies that require large amounts of data. Expert-designed tools and their underlying databases facilitate modern-day high throughput computational methods. Standard data formats and communication standards increase the impact of traditional data, and applying these technologies to a high throughput experimental design provides dense, targeted materials data that are valuable for material discovery. Integrated computational materials engineering requires both experimentally and computationally derived data. Harvesting these comprehensively requires different methods of varying degrees of automation to accommodate variety and volume. Issues of data quality persist independent of type.

  4. Implementation of high throughput experimentation techniques for kinetic reaction testing.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Anton J

    2012-02-01

    Successful implementation of High throughput Experimentation (EE) tools has resulted in their increased acceptance as essential tools in chemical, petrochemical and polymer R&D laboratories. This article provides a number of concrete examples of EE systems, which have been designed and successfully implemented in studies, which focus on deriving reaction kinetic data. The implementation of high throughput EE tools for performing kinetic studies of both catalytic and non-catalytic systems results in a significantly faster acquisition of high-quality kinetic modeling data, required to quantitatively predict the behavior of complex, multistep reactions. PMID:21902639

  5. Workflow for High Throughput Screening of Gas Sensing Materials

    PubMed Central

    Koplin, Tobias J.; Siemons, Maike; Océn-Valéntin, César; Sanders, Daniel; Simon, Ulrich

    2006-01-01

    The workflow of a high throughput screening setup for the rapid identification of new and improved sensor materials is presented. The polyol method was applied to prepare nanoparticular metal oxides as base materials, which were functionalised by surface doping. Using multi-electrode substrates and high throughput impedance spectroscopy (HT-IS) a wide range of materials could be screened in a short time. Applying HT-IS in search of new selective gas sensing materials a NO2-tolerant NO sensing material with reduced sensitivities towards other test gases was identified based on iridium doped zinc oxide. Analogous behaviour was observed for iridium doped indium oxide.

  6. Advances in high throughput DNA sequence data compression.

    PubMed

    Sardaraz, Muhammad; Tahir, Muhammad; Ikram, Ataul Aziz

    2016-06-01

    Advances in high throughput sequencing technologies and reduction in cost of sequencing have led to exponential growth in high throughput DNA sequence data. This growth has posed challenges such as storage, retrieval, and transmission of sequencing data. Data compression is used to cope with these challenges. Various methods have been developed to compress genomic and sequencing data. In this article, we present a comprehensive review of compression methods for genome and reads compression. Algorithms are categorized as referential or reference free. Experimental results and comparative analysis of various methods for data compression are presented. Finally, key challenges and research directions in DNA sequence data compression are highlighted. PMID:26846812

  7. Substrate independent ATPase activity may complicate high throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Tuntland, Micheal L; Fung, L W-M

    2016-10-01

    Inorganic phosphate release, [Pi], is often measured in an enzymatic reaction in a high throughput setting. Based on the published mechanism, we designed a protocol for our screening for inhibitors of SAICAR synthetase (PurC), and we found a gradual increase in [Pi] in positive control samples over the course of the day. Further investigation indicated that hydrolysis of ATP catalyzed by PurC, rather than substrate-related phosphate release, was responsible for a partial contribution to the signals in the control samples. Thus substrate-independent ATPase activity may complicate high throughput screening. PMID:27430931

  8. C. elegans in high-throughput drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    O’Reilly, Linda P.; Luke, Cliff J.; Perlmutter, David H.; Silverman, Gary A.; Pak, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    C. elegans has proven to be a useful model organism for investigating molecular and cellular aspects of numerous human diseases. More recently, investigators have explored the use of this organism as a tool for drug discovery. Although earlier drug screens were labor-intensive and low in throughput, recent advances in high-throughput liquid workflows, imaging platforms and data analysis software have made C. elegans a viable option for automated high-throughput drug screens. This review will outline the evolution of C. elegans-based drug screening, discuss the inherent challenges of using C. elegans, and highlight recent technological advances that have paved the way for future drug screens. PMID:24333896

  9. High throughput drug discovery with ESI-FTICR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sannes-Lowery, Kristin A.; Cummins, Lendell L.; Chen, Shuo; Drader, Jared J.; Hofstadler, Steven A.

    2004-11-01

    Ribonucleic acids (RNA) are an attractive target for drug discovery since they play critical roles in cellular functions. Because small structured subdomains are known to mimic the behavior of the entire RNA, it is possible to design RNA drug targets that are amenable to interrogation by high performance mass spectrometry. We have developed a high throughput drug discovery platform that uses electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometry to investigate ligand binding to structured RNA drug targets. This assay is called multitarget affinity/specificity screening (MASS). Using MASS, we show that it is possible to screen synthetic and natural product libraries in a high throughput and robust manner.

  10. Fluorescent labeling of NASBA amplified tmRNA molecules for microarray applications

    PubMed Central

    Scheler, Ott; Glynn, Barry; Parkel, Sven; Palta, Priit; Toome, Kadri; Kaplinski, Lauris; Remm, Maido; Maher, Majella; Kurg, Ants

    2009-01-01

    Background Here we present a novel promising microbial diagnostic method that combines the sensitivity of Nucleic Acid Sequence Based Amplification (NASBA) with the high information content of microarray technology for the detection of bacterial tmRNA molecules. The NASBA protocol was modified to include aminoallyl-UTP (aaUTP) molecules that were incorporated into nascent RNA during the NASBA reaction. Post-amplification labeling with fluorescent dye was carried out subsequently and tmRNA hybridization signal intensities were measured using microarray technology. Significant optimization of the labeled NASBA protocol was required to maintain the required sensitivity of the reactions. Results Two different aaUTP salts were evaluated and optimum final concentrations were identified for both. The final 2 mM concentration of aaUTP Li-salt in NASBA reaction resulted in highest microarray signals overall, being twice as high as the strongest signals with 1 mM aaUTP Na-salt. Conclusion We have successfully demonstrated efficient combination of NASBA amplification technology with microarray based hybridization detection. The method is applicative for many different areas of microbial diagnostics including environmental monitoring, bio threat detection, industrial process monitoring and clinical microbiology. PMID:19445684

  11. An evaluation of the applicability of microarrays for monitoring toxic algae in Irish coastal waters.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Gary R; Touzet, Nicolas; Fleming, Gerard Ta; Raine, Robin

    2013-10-01

    The applicability of microarrays to monitor harmful algae across a broad range of ecological niches and toxic species responsible for harmful algal events has been one of the key tasks in the EU Seventh Framework Programme (FP7)-funded Microarrays for the Detection of Toxic Algae project. The technique has a strong potential for improving speed and accuracy of the identification of harmful algae and their toxins to assist monitoring programmes. Water samples were collected from a number of coastal sites around Ireland, including several that are used in the Irish National Phytoplankton and Biotoxin Monitoring Programme. Ribosomal RNA was extracted from filtered field samples, labelled with a fluorescent dye, and hybridised to probes spotted in a microarray format on a glass slide. The fluorescent signal intensity of the hybridisation to >120 probes on the chip was analysed and compared with actual field counts. There was a general agreement between cell counts and microarray signal. Results are presented for field samples taken from a range of stations along the Irish coastline known for harmful algal events during the first field trial (July 2009-April 2010). PMID:23184126

  12. Importance of high-throughput cell separation technologies for genomics/proteomics-based clinical diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leary, James F.; Szaniszlo, Peter; Prow, Tarl W.; Reece, Lisa M.; Wang, Nan; Asmuth, David M.

    2002-06-01

    Gene expression microarray analyses of mixtures of cells approximate a weighted average of the gene expression profiles (GEPs) of each cell type according to its relative abundance in the overall cell sample being analyzed. If the targeted subpopulation of cells is in the minority, or the expected perturbations are marginal, then such changes will be masked by the GEP of the normal/unaffected cells. We show that the GEP of a minor cell subpopulation is often lost when that cell subpopulation is of a frequency less than 30 percent. The GEP is almost always masked by the other cell subpopulations when that frequency drops to 10 percent or less. Several methodologies can be employed to enrich the target cells submitted for microarray analyses. These include magnetic sorting and laser capture microdissection. However, high-throughput flow cytometry/cell sorting overcomes many restrictions of experimental enrichment conditions. This technology can also be used to sort smaller numbers of cells of specific cell subpopulations and subsequently amplify their mRNAs before microarray analyses. When purification techniques are applied to unfixed samples, the potential for changes in gene levels during the process of collection is an additional concern. High-throughput cell separation technologies are needed that can process the necessary number of cells expeditiously in order to avoid such uncontrolled changes in the target cells GEP. In cases where even the use of HTS yields only a small number of cells, the mRNAs (after reverse transcription to cDNA's) must be amplified to yield enough material for conventional microarray analyses. However, the problem of using microamplification PCR methods to expand the amount of cDNAs (from mRNAs) is that it is very difficult to amplify equally all of the mRNAs. Unequal amplification leads to a distorted gene expression profile on the microarray. Linear amplifications is difficult to achieve. Unfortunately, present-day gene-chips need to

  13. High-throughput proteomics : optical approaches.

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, George S.

    2008-09-01

    Realistic cell models could greatly accelerate our ability to engineer biochemical pathways and the production of valuable organic products, which would be of great use in the development of biofuels, pharmaceuticals, and the crops for the next green revolution. However, this level of engineering will require a great deal more knowledge about the mechanisms of life than is currently available. In particular, we need to understand the interactome (which proteins interact) as it is situated in the three dimensional geometry of the cell (i.e., a situated interactome), and the regulation/dynamics of these interactions. Methods for optical proteomics have become available that allow the monitoring and even disruption/control of interacting proteins in living cells. Here, a range of these methods is reviewed with respect to their role in elucidating the interactome and the relevant spatial localizations. Development of these technologies and their integration into the core competencies of research organizations can position whole institutions and teams of researchers to lead in both the fundamental science and the engineering applications of cellular biology. That leadership could be particularly important with respect to problems of national urgency centered around security, biofuels, and healthcare.

  14. High Throughput Danio Rerio Energy Expenditure Assay.

    PubMed

    Williams, Savannah Y; Renquist, Benjamin J

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish are an important model organism with inherent advantages that have the potential to make zebrafish a widely applied model for the study of energy homeostasis and obesity. The small size of zebrafish allows for assays on embryos to be conducted in a 96- or 384-well plate format, Morpholino and CRISPR based technologies promote ease of genetic manipulation, and drug treatment by bath application is viable. Moreover, zebrafish are ideal for forward genetic screens allowing for novel gene discovery. Given the relative novelty of zebrafish as a model for obesity, it is necessary to develop tools that fully exploit these benefits. Herein, we describe a method to measure energy expenditure in thousands of embryonic zebrafish simultaneously. We have developed a whole animal microplate platform in which we use 96-well plates to isolate individual fish and we assess cumulative NADH2 production using the commercially available cell culture viability reagent alamarBlue. In poikilotherms the relationship between NADH2 production and energy expenditure is tightly linked. This energy expenditure assay creates the potential to rapidly screen pharmacological or genetic manipulations that directly alter energy expenditure or alter the response to an applied drug (e.g. insulin sensitizers). PMID:26863590

  15. Evaluating concentration estimation errors in ELISA microarray experiments

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Don Simone; White, Amanda M; Varnum, Susan M; Anderson, Kevin K; Zangar, Richard C

    2005-01-01

    Background Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is a standard immunoassay to estimate a protein's concentration in a sample. Deploying ELISA in a microarray format permits simultaneous estimation of the concentrations of numerous proteins in a small sample. These estimates, however, are uncertain due to processing error and biological variability. Evaluating estimation error is critical to interpreting biological significance and improving the ELISA microarray process. Estimation error evaluation must be automated to realize a reliable high-throughput ELISA microarray system. In this paper, we present a statistical method based on propagation of error to evaluate concentration estimation errors in the ELISA microarray process. Although propagation of error is central to this method and the focus of this paper, it is most effective only when comparable data are available. Therefore, we briefly discuss the roles of experimental design, data screening, normalization, and statistical diagnostics when evaluating ELISA microarray concentration estimation errors. Results We use an ELISA microarray investigation of breast cancer biomarkers to illustrate the evaluation of concentration estimation errors. The illustration begins with a description of the design and resulting data, followed by a brief discussion of data screening and normalization. In our illustration, we fit a standard curve to the screened and normalized data, review the modeling diagnostics, and apply propagation of error. We summarize the results with a simple, three-panel diagnostic visualization featuring a scatterplot of the standard data with logistic standard curve and 95% confidence intervals, an annotated histogram of sample measurements, and a plot of the 95% concentration coefficient of variation, or relative error, as a function of concentration. Conclusions This statistical method should be of value in the rapid evaluation and quality control of high-throughput ELISA microarray analyses

  16. A high-throughput method for quantifying metabolically active yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Nandy, Subir Kumar; Knudsen, Peter Boldsen; Rosenkjaer, Alexander; Lantz, Anna Eliasson; Thykaer, Jette; Workman, Mhairi

    2015-06-01

    By redesigning the established methylene blue reduction test for bacteria and yeast, we present a cheap and efficient methodology for quantitative physiology of eukaryotic cells applicable for high-throughput systems. Validation of the method in fermenters and high-throughput systems proved equivalent, displaying reduction curves that interrelated directly with CFU counts. For growth rate estimation, the methylene blue reduction test (MBRT) proved superior, since the discriminatory nature of the method allowed for the quantification of metabolically active cells only, excluding dead cells. The drop in metabolic activity associated with the diauxic shift in yeast proved more pronounced for the MBRT-derived curve compared with OD curves, consistent with a dramatic shift in the ratio between live and dead cells at this metabolic event. This method provides a tool with numerous applications, e.g. characterizing the death phase of stationary phase cultures, or in drug screens with pathogenic yeasts. PMID:25773544

  17. High-Throughput and Combinatorial Gene Expression on a Chip for Metabolism-Induced Toxicology Screening

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Seok Joon; Lee, Dong Woo; Shah, Dhiral A.; Ku, Bosung; Jeon, Sang Youl; Solanki, Kusum; Ryan, Jessica D.; Clark, Douglas S.; Dordick, Jonathan S.; Lee, Moo-Yeal

    2014-01-01

    Differential expression of various drug-metabolizing enzymes in the human liver may cause deviations of pharmacokinetic profiles, resulting in inter-individual variability of drug toxicity and/or efficacy. Here we present the “Transfected Enzyme and Metabolism Chip” (TeamChip), which predicts potential metabolism-induced drug or drug-candidate toxicity. The TeamChip is prepared by delivering genes into miniaturized three-dimensional cellular microarrays on a micropillar chip using recombinant adenoviruses in a complementary microwell chip. The device enables users to manipulate the expression of individual and multiple human metabolizing-enzyme genes (such as CYP3A4, CYP2D6, CYP2C9, CYP1A2, CYP2E1, and UGT1A4) in THLE-2 cell microarrays. To identify specific enzymes involved in drug detoxification, we created 84 combinations of metabolic-gene expressions in a combinatorial fashion on a single microarray. Thus, the TeamChip platform can provide critical information necessary for evaluating metabolism-induced toxicity in a high-throughput manner. PMID:24799042

  18. High-throughput classification of clinical populations from natural viewing eye movements.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Po-He; Cameron, Ian G M; Pari, Giovanna; Reynolds, James N; Munoz, Douglas P; Itti, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Many high-prevalence neurological disorders involve dysfunctions of oculomotor control and attention, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD), and Parkinson's disease (PD). Previous studies have examined these deficits with clinical neurological evaluation, structured behavioral tasks, and neuroimaging. Yet, time and monetary costs prevent deploying these evaluations to large at-risk populations, which is critically important for earlier detection and better treatment. We devised a high-throughput, low-cost method where participants simply watched television while we recorded their eye movements. We combined eye-tracking data from patients and controls with a computational model of visual attention to extract 224 quantitative features. Using machine learning in a workflow inspired by microarray analysis, we identified critical features that differentiate patients from control subjects. With eye movement traces recorded from only 15 min of videos, we classified PD versus age-matched controls with 89.6 % accuracy (chance 63.2 %), and ADHD versus FASD versus control children with 77.3 % accuracy (chance 40.4 %). Our technique provides new quantitative insights into which aspects of attention and gaze control are affected by specific disorders. There is considerable promise in using this approach as a potential screening tool that is easily deployed, low-cost, and high-throughput for clinical disorders, especially in young children and elderly populations who may be less compliant to traditional evaluation tests. PMID:22926163

  19. Bioinformatics and Microarray Data Analysis on the Cloud.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Barbara; Cannataro, Mario

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput platforms such as microarray, mass spectrometry, and next-generation sequencing are producing an increasing volume of omics data that needs large data storage and computing power. Cloud computing offers massive scalable computing and storage, data sharing, on-demand anytime and anywhere access to resources and applications, and thus, it may represent the key technology for facing those issues. In fact, in the recent years it has been adopted for the deployment of different bioinformatics solutions and services both in academia and in the industry. Although this, cloud computing presents several issues regarding the security and privacy of data, that are particularly important when analyzing patients data, such as in personalized medicine. This chapter reviews main academic and industrial cloud-based bioinformatics solutions; with a special focus on microarray data analysis solutions and underlines main issues and problems related to the use of such platforms for the storage and analysis of patients data. PMID:25863787

  20. Aspirator Gun for High-Throughput Mosquito Bioassays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We describe an innovative aspirator gun designed to transfer anaesthetized mosquitoes directly into glass bioassay tubes. The gun has been used for thousands of transfers with extremely low associated mortality and is the central component of a high-throughput bioassay system. The gun is constructed...

  1. High-throughput screening, predictive modeling and computational embryology

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput screening (HTS) studies are providing a rich source of data that can be applied to profile thousands of chemical compounds for biological activity and potential toxicity. EPA’s ToxCast™ project, and the broader Tox21 consortium, in addition to projects worldwide,...

  2. High-throughput screening, predictive modeling and computational embryology - Abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput screening (HTS) studies are providing a rich source of data that can be applied to chemical profiling to address sensitivity and specificity of molecular targets, biological pathways, cellular and developmental processes. EPA’s ToxCast project is testing 960 uniq...

  3. Aspirator gun for high-throughput mosquito bioassays.

    PubMed

    Aldridge, Robert L; Wynn, W Wayne; Britch, Seth C; Linthicum, Kenneth J

    2012-03-01

    We describe an innovative aspirator gun designed to transfer individual anesthetized mosquitoes directly into glass bioassay tubes. The gun has been used for thousands of transfers with extremely low associated mortality and is the central component of a high-throughput bioassay system. The gun is constructed using readily obtainable materials and can be modified for a range of insects. PMID:22533090

  4. High Throughput Assays and Exposure Science (ISES annual meeting)

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput screening (HTS) data characterizing chemical-induced biological activity has been generated for thousands of environmentally-relevant chemicals by the US inter-agency Tox21 and the US EPA ToxCast programs. For a limited set of chemicals, bioactive concentrations r...

  5. High Throughput Exposure Estimation Using NHANES Data (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the ExpoCast project, high throughput (HT) exposure models enable rapid screening of large numbers of chemicals for exposure potential. Evaluation of these models requires empirical exposure data and due to the paucity of human metabolism/exposure data such evaluations includ...

  6. High Throughput Sequence Analysis for Disease Resistance in Maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Preliminary results of a computational analysis of high throughput sequencing data from Zea mays and the fungus Aspergillus are reported. The Illumina Genome Analyzer was used to sequence RNA samples from two strains of Z. mays (Va35 and Mp313) collected over a time course as well as several specie...

  7. Environmental Impact on Vascular Development Predicted by High Throughput Screening

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding health risks to embryonic development from exposure to environmental chemicals is a significant challenge given the diverse chemical landscape and paucity of data for most of these compounds. High throughput screening (HTS) in EPA’s ToxCastTM project provides vast d...

  8. Fully Bayesian Analysis of High-throughput Targeted Metabolomics Assays

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput metabolomic assays that allow simultaneous targeted screening of hundreds of metabolites have recently become available in kit form. Such assays provide a window into understanding changes to biochemical pathways due to chemical exposure or disease, and are usefu...

  9. New High Throughput Methods to Estimate Chemical Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has made many recent advances in high throughput bioactivity testing. However, concurrent advances in rapid, quantitative prediction of human and ecological exposures have been lacking, despite the clear importance of both measures for a risk-based approach to prioritizing an...

  10. Towards high throughput screening of electrochemical stability of battery electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Borodin, Oleg; Olguin, Marco; Spear, Carrie E; Leiter, Kenneth W; Knap, Jaroslaw

    2015-09-01

    High throughput screening of solvents and additives with potential applications in lithium batteries is reported. The initial test set is limited to carbonate and phosphate-based compounds and focused on their electrochemical properties. Solvent stability towards first and second reduction and oxidation is reported from density functional theory (DFT) calculations performed on isolated solvents surrounded by implicit solvent. The reorganization energy is estimated from the difference between vertical and adiabatic redox energies and found to be especially important for the accurate prediction of reduction stability. A majority of tested compounds had the second reduction potential higher than the first reduction potential indicating that the second reduction reaction might play an important role in the passivation layer formation. Similarly, the second oxidation potential was smaller for a significant subset of tested molecules than the first oxidation potential. A number of potential sources of errors introduced during screening of the electrolyte electrochemical properties were examined. The formation of lithium fluoride during reduction of semifluorinated solvents such as fluoroethylene carbonate and the H-transfer during oxidation of solvents were found to shift the electrochemical potential by 1.5-2 V and could shrink the electrochemical stability window by as much as 3.5 V when such reactions are included in the screening procedure. The initial oxidation reaction of ethylene carbonate and dimethyl carbonate at the surface of the completely de-lithiated LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 high voltage spinel cathode was examined using DFT. Depending on the molecular orientation at the cathode surface, a carbonate molecule either exhibited deprotonation or was found bound to the transition metal via its carbonyl oxygen. PMID:26266636

  11. Towards high throughput screening of electrochemical stability of battery electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodin, Oleg; Olguin, Marco; Spear, Carrie E.; Leiter, Kenneth W.; Knap, Jaroslaw

    2015-09-01

    High throughput screening of solvents and additives with potential applications in lithium batteries is reported. The initial test set is limited to carbonate and phosphate-based compounds and focused on their electrochemical properties. Solvent stability towards first and second reduction and oxidation is reported from density functional theory (DFT) calculations performed on isolated solvents surrounded by implicit solvent. The reorganization energy is estimated from the difference between vertical and adiabatic redox energies and found to be especially important for the accurate prediction of reduction stability. A majority of tested compounds had the second reduction potential higher than the first reduction potential indicating that the second reduction reaction might play an important role in the passivation layer formation. Similarly, the second oxidation potential was smaller for a significant subset of tested molecules than the first oxidation potential. A number of potential sources of errors introduced during screening of the electrolyte electrochemical properties were examined. The formation of lithium fluoride during reduction of semifluorinated solvents such as fluoroethylene carbonate and the H-transfer during oxidation of solvents were found to shift the electrochemical potential by 1.5-2 V and could shrink the electrochemical stability window by as much as 3.5 V when such reactions are included in the screening procedure. The initial oxidation reaction of ethylene carbonate and dimethyl carbonate at the surface of the completely de-lithiated LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 high voltage spinel cathode was examined using DFT. Depending on the molecular orientation at the cathode surface, a carbonate molecule either exhibited deprotonation or was found bound to the transition metal via its carbonyl oxygen.

  12. High-throughput neuroimaging-genetics computational infrastructure

    PubMed Central

    Dinov, Ivo D.; Petrosyan, Petros; Liu, Zhizhong; Eggert, Paul; Hobel, Sam; Vespa, Paul; Woo Moon, Seok; Van Horn, John D.; Franco, Joseph; Toga, Arthur W.

    2014-01-01

    Many contemporary neuroscientific investigations face significant challenges in terms of data management, computational processing, data mining, and results interpretation. These four pillars define the core infrastructure necessary to plan, organize, orchestrate, validate, and disseminate novel scientific methods, computational resources, and translational healthcare findings. Data management includes protocols for data acquisition, archival, query, transfer, retrieval, and aggregation. Computational processing involves the necessary software, hardware, and networking infrastructure required to handle large amounts of heterogeneous neuroimaging, genetics, clinical, and phenotypic data and meta-data. Data mining refers to the process of automatically extracting data features, characteristics and associations, which are not readily visible by human exploration of the raw dataset. Result interpretation includes scientific visualization, community validation of findings and reproducible findings. In this manuscript we describe the novel high-throughput neuroimaging-genetics computational infrastructure available at the Institute for Neuroimaging and Informatics (INI) and the Laboratory of Neuro Imaging (LONI) at University of Southern California (USC). INI and LONI include ultra-high-field and standard-field MRI brain scanners along with an imaging-genetics database for storing the complete provenance of the raw and derived data and meta-data. In addition, the institute provides a large number of software tools for image and shape analysis, mathematical modeling, genomic sequence processing, and scientific visualization. A unique feature of this architecture is the Pipeline environment, which integrates the data management, processing, transfer, and visualization. Through its client-server architecture, the Pipeline environment provides a graphical user interface for designing, executing, monitoring validating, and disseminating of complex protocols that utilize

  13. High-throughput neuroimaging-genetics computational infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Dinov, Ivo D; Petrosyan, Petros; Liu, Zhizhong; Eggert, Paul; Hobel, Sam; Vespa, Paul; Woo Moon, Seok; Van Horn, John D; Franco, Joseph; Toga, Arthur W

    2014-01-01

    Many contemporary neuroscientific investigations face significant challenges in terms of data management, computational processing, data mining, and results interpretation. These four pillars define the core infrastructure necessary to plan, organize, orchestrate, validate, and disseminate novel scientific methods, computational resources, and translational healthcare findings. Data management includes protocols for data acquisition, archival, query, transfer, retrieval, and aggregation. Computational processing involves the necessary software, hardware, and networking infrastructure required to handle large amounts of heterogeneous neuroimaging, genetics, clinical, and phenotypic data and meta-data. Data mining refers to the process of automatically extracting data features, characteristics and associations, which are not readily visible by human exploration of the raw dataset. Result interpretation includes scientific visualization, community validation of findings and reproducible findings. In this manuscript we describe the novel high-throughput neuroimaging-genetics computational infrastructure available at the Institute for Neuroimaging and Informatics (INI) and the Laboratory of Neuro Imaging (LONI) at University of Southern California (USC). INI and LONI include ultra-high-field and standard-field MRI brain scanners along with an imaging-genetics database for storing the complete provenance of the raw and derived data and meta-data. In addition, the institute provides a large number of software tools for image and shape analysis, mathematical modeling, genomic sequence processing, and scientific visualization. A unique feature of this architecture is the Pipeline environment, which integrates the data management, processing, transfer, and visualization. Through its client-server architecture, the Pipeline environment provides a graphical user interface for designing, executing, monitoring validating, and disseminating of complex protocols that utilize

  14. High-throughput DNA extraction of forensic adhesive tapes.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Christina; Jansson, Linda; Ansell, Ricky; Hedman, Johannes

    2016-09-01

    Tape-lifting has since its introduction in the early 2000's become a well-established sampling method in forensic DNA analysis. Sampling is quick and straightforward while the following DNA extraction is more challenging due to the "stickiness", rigidity and size of the tape. We have developed, validated and implemented a simple and efficient direct lysis DNA extraction protocol for adhesive tapes that requires limited manual labour. The method uses Chelex beads and is applied with SceneSafe FAST tape. This direct lysis protocol provided higher mean DNA yields than PrepFiler Express BTA on Automate Express, although the differences were not significant when using clothes worn in a controlled fashion as reference material (p=0.13 and p=0.34 for T-shirts and button-down shirts, respectively). Through in-house validation we show that the method is fit-for-purpose for application in casework, as it provides high DNA yields and amplifiability, as well as good reproducibility and DNA extract stability. After implementation in casework, the proportion of extracts with DNA concentrations above 0.01ng/μL increased from 71% to 76%. Apart from providing higher DNA yields compared with the previous method, the introduction of the developed direct lysis protocol also reduced the amount of manual labour by half and doubled the potential throughput for tapes at the laboratory. Generally, simplified manual protocols can serve as a cost-effective alternative to sophisticated automation solutions when the aim is to enable high-throughput DNA extraction of complex crime scene samples. PMID:27448236

  15. Potentiometric sensor for the high throughput determination of tetramisole hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vinod Kumar; Singh, Ashok Kumar; Gupta, Barkha

    2007-08-01

    The electrochemical response characteristics of poly(vinyl)chloride (PVC) based membrane sensors for determination of tetramisole hydrochloride (TmCl) is described. The membranes of these electrodes consist of tetramisole-tetraphenyl borate (Tm-TPB), chlorophenyl borate (Tm-ClPB), and phosphotungstate (Tm(3)-PT) ion associations dispersed in a PVC matrix with dibutylpthalate as a plasticizer. The electrodes were fully characterized in terms of composition, life span, usable pH range, and working concentration range and ionic strength. The electrodes showed Nernstian response over the concentration ranges of 7.4 x 10(-7) to 1.0 x 10(-2) M, 1.7 x 10(-6) to 1.0 x 10(-2) M, and 5.6 x 10(-6) to 1.0 x 10(-2) M TmCl, respectively, and were applied to the potentiometric determination of tetramisole ion in pure solutions and pharmaceutical preparations. The potentiometric determination was also used in the determination of tetramisole in pharmaceutical preparations in four batches of different expiration dates. The electrodes exhibited good selectivity for TmCl with respect to a large number of excipients such as inorganic cations, organic cations, amino acids, and sugars. The solubility product of the ion-pair and the formation constant of the precipitation reaction leading to the ion-pair formation were determined conductometrically. The new potentiometric method offers the advantages of high-throughput determination, simplicity, accuracy, automation feasibility, and applicability to turbid and colored sample solutions. PMID:17979641

  16. Optical tools for high-throughput screening of abrasion resistance of combinatorial libraries of organic coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potyrailo, Radislav A.; Chisholm, Bret J.; Olson, Daniel R.; Brennan, Michael J.; Molaison, Chris A.

    2002-02-01

    Design, validation, and implementation of an optical spectroscopic system for high-throughput analysis of combinatorially developed protective organic coatings are reported. Our approach replaces labor-intensive coating evaluation steps with an automated system that rapidly analyzes 8x6 arrays of coating elements that are deposited on a plastic substrate. Each coating element of the library is 10 mm in diameter and 2 to 5 micrometers thick. Performance of coatings is evaluated with respect to their resistance to wear abrasion because this parameter is one of the primary considerations in end-use applications. Upon testing, the organic coatings undergo changes that are impossible to quantitatively predict using existing knowledge. Coatings are abraded using industry-accepted abrasion test methods at single-or multiple-abrasion conditions, followed by high- throughput analysis of abrasion-induced light scatter. The developed automated system is optimized for the analysis of diffusively scattered light that corresponds to 0 to 30% haze. System precision of 0.1 to 2.5% relative standard deviation provides capability for the reliable ranking of coatings performance. While the system was implemented for high-throughput screening of combinatorially developed organic protective coatings for automotive applications, it can be applied to a variety of other applications where materials ranking can be achieved using optical spectroscopic tools.

  17. Cell-based microarrays: current progress, future prospects.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Ella; Freeman, Tom

    2005-07-01

    Cell-based microarrays were first described by Ziauddin and Sabatini in 2001 as a novel method for performing high-throughput screens of gene function. In this study, expression vectors containing the open reading frame of human genes were printed onto glass microscope slides to form a microarray. Transfection reagents were added pre- or post-spotting, and cells grown over the surface of the array. They demonstrated that cells growing in the immediate vicinity of the expression vectors underwent 'reverse transfection', and that subsequent alterations in cell function could then be detected by secondary assays performed on the array. Subsequent publications have adapted the technique to a variety of applications, and have also shown that the approach works when arrays are fabricated using short interfering RNAs and compounds. The potential of this method for performing analyses of gene function and for identifying novel therapeutic agents has been clearly demonstrated, and current efforts are focused on improving and harnessing this technology for high-throughput screening applications. PMID:16014002

  18. Identifying Fishes through DNA Barcodes and Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Kochzius, Marc; Seidel, Christian; Antoniou, Aglaia; Botla, Sandeep Kumar; Campo, Daniel; Cariani, Alessia; Vazquez, Eva Garcia; Hauschild, Janet; Hervet, Caroline; Hjörleifsdottir, Sigridur; Hreggvidsson, Gudmundur; Kappel, Kristina; Landi, Monica; Magoulas, Antonios; Marteinsson, Viggo; Nölte, Manfred; Planes, Serge; Tinti, Fausto; Turan, Cemal; Venugopal, Moleyur N.; Weber, Hannes; Blohm, Dietmar

    2010-01-01

    Background International fish trade reached an import value of 62.8 billion Euro in 2006, of which 44.6% are covered by the European Union. Species identification is a key problem throughout the life cycle of fishes: from eggs and larvae to adults in fisheries research and control, as well as processed fish products in consumer protection. Methodology/Principal Findings This study aims to evaluate the applicability of the three mitochondrial genes 16S rRNA (16S), cytochrome b (cyt b), and cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) for the identification of 50 European marine fish species by combining techniques of “DNA barcoding” and microarrays. In a DNA barcoding approach, neighbour Joining (NJ) phylogenetic trees of 369 16S, 212 cyt b, and 447 COI sequences indicated that cyt b and COI are suitable for unambiguous identification, whereas 16S failed to discriminate closely related flatfish and gurnard species. In course of probe design for DNA microarray development, each of the markers yielded a high number of potentially species-specific probes in silico, although many of them were rejected based on microarray hybridisation experiments. None of the markers provided probes to discriminate the sibling flatfish and gurnard species. However, since 16S-probes were less negatively influenced by the “position of label” effect and showed the lowest rejection rate and the highest mean signal intensity, 16S is more suitable for DNA microarray probe design than cty b and COI. The large portion of rejected COI-probes after hybridisation experiments (>90%) renders the DNA barcoding marker as rather unsuitable for this high-throughput technology. Conclusions/Significance Based on these data, a DNA microarray containing 64 functional oligonucleotide probes for the identification of 30 out of the 50 fish species investigated was developed. It represents the next step towards an automated and easy-to-handle method to identify fish, ichthyoplankton, and fish products. PMID

  19. Microarrays, Integrated Analytical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combinatorial chemistry is used to find materials that form sensor microarrays. This book discusses the fundamentals, and then proceeds to the many applications of microarrays, from measuring gene expression (DNA microarrays) to protein-protein interactions, peptide chemistry, carbodhydrate chemistry, electrochemical detection, and microfluidics.

  20. Label-Free Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering Approach for High-Throughput Screening of Biocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Westley, Chloe; Xu, Yun; Carnell, Andrew J; Turner, Nicholas J; Goodacre, Royston

    2016-06-01

    Biocatalyst discovery and directed evolution are central to many pharmaceutical research programs, yet the lack of robust high-throughput screening methods for large libraries of enzyme variants generated (typically 10(6)-10(8)) has hampered progress and slowed enzyme optimization. We have developed a label-free generally applicable approach based on Raman spectroscopy which results in significant reductions in acquisition times (>30-fold). Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is employed to monitor the enzyme-catalyzed conversion by xanthine oxidase of hypoxanthine to xanthine to uric acid. This approach measures the substrates and products directly and does not require chromogenic substrates or lengthy chromatography, was successfully benchmarked against HPLC, and shows high levels of accuracy and reproducibility. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this SERS approach has utility in monitoring enzyme inhibition illustrating additional medical significance to this high-throughput screening method. PMID:27132981

  1. Flat field correction for high-throughput imaging of fluorescent samples.

    PubMed

    Kask, Peet; Palo, Kaupo; Hinnah, Chris; Pommerencke, Thora

    2016-09-01

    Vignetting of microscopic images impacts both the visual impression of the images and any image analysis applied to it. Especially in high-throughput screening high demands are made on an automated image analysis. In our work we focused on fluorescent samples and found that two profiles (background and foreground) for each imaging channel need to be estimated to achieve a sufficiently flat image after correction. We have developed a method which runs completely unsupervised on a wide range of assays. By adding a reliable internal quality control we mitigate the risk of introducing artefacts into sample images through correction. The method requires hundreds of images for the foreground profile, thus limiting its application to high-throughput screening where this requirement is fulfilled in routine operation. PMID:27028041

  2. A High-Throughput Microfluidic Platform for Mammalian Cell Transfection and Culturing

    PubMed Central

    Woodruff, Kristina; Maerkl, Sebastian J.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian synthetic biology could be augmented through the development of high-throughput microfluidic systems that integrate cellular transfection, culturing, and imaging. We created a microfluidic chip that cultures cells and implements 280 independent transfections at up to 99% efficiency. The chip can perform co-transfections, in which the number of cells expressing each protein and the average protein expression level can be precisely tuned as a function of input DNA concentration and synthetic gene circuits can be optimized on chip. We co-transfected four plasmids to test a histidine kinase signaling pathway and mapped the dose dependence of this network on the level of one of its constituents. The chip is readily integrated with high-content imaging, enabling the evaluation of cellular behavior and protein expression dynamics over time. These features make the transfection chip applicable to high-throughput mammalian protein and synthetic biology studies. PMID:27030663

  3. High-Throughput Metagenomic Technologies for Complex Microbial Community Analysis: Open and Closed Formats

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhili; Yang, Yunfeng; Deng, Ye; Tringe, Susannah G.; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT   Understanding the structure, functions, activities and dynamics of microbial communities in natural environments is one of the grand challenges of 21st century science. To address this challenge, over the past decade, numerous technologies have been developed for interrogating microbial communities, of which some are amenable to exploratory work (e.g., high-throughput sequencing and phenotypic screening) and others depend on reference genes or genomes (e.g., phylogenetic and functional gene arrays). Here, we provide a critical review and synthesis of the most commonly applied “open-format” and “closed-format” detection technologies. We discuss their characteristics, advantages, and disadvantages within the context of environmental applications and focus on analysis of complex microbial systems, such as those in soils, in which diversity is high and reference genomes are few. In addition, we discuss crucial issues and considerations associated with applying complementary high-throughput molecular technologies to address important ecological questions. PMID:25626903

  4. The promise and challenge of high-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Georgiou, George; Ippolito, Gregory C; Beausang, John; Busse, Christian E; Wardemann, Hedda; Quake, Stephen R

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to determine the antibody repertoire encoded by B cells in the blood or lymphoid organs using high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have been advancing at an extremely rapid pace and are transforming our understanding of humoral immune responses. Information gained from high-throughput DNA sequencing of immunoglobulin genes (Ig-seq) can be applied to detect B-cell malignancies with high sensitivity, to discover antibodies specific for antigens of interest, to guide vaccine development and to understand autoimmunity. Rapid progress in the development of experimental protocols and informatics analysis tools is helping to reduce sequencing artifacts, to achieve more precise quantification of clonal diversity and to extract the most pertinent biological information. That said, broader application of Ig-seq, especially in clinical settings, will require the development of a standardized experimental design framework that will enable the sharing and meta-analysis of sequencing data generated by different laboratories. PMID:24441474

  5. A High-Throughput Microfluidic Platform for Mammalian Cell Transfection and Culturing.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, Kristina; Maerkl, Sebastian J

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian synthetic biology could be augmented through the development of high-throughput microfluidic systems that integrate cellular transfection, culturing, and imaging. We created a microfluidic chip that cultures cells and implements 280 independent transfections at up to 99% efficiency. The chip can perform co-transfections, in which the number of cells expressing each protein and the average protein expression level can be precisely tuned as a function of input DNA concentration and synthetic gene circuits can be optimized on chip. We co-transfected four plasmids to test a histidine kinase signaling pathway and mapped the dose dependence of this network on the level of one of its constituents. The chip is readily integrated with high-content imaging, enabling the evaluation of cellular behavior and protein expression dynamics over time. These features make the transfection chip applicable to high-throughput mammalian protein and synthetic biology studies. PMID:27030663

  6. High-throughput miniaturized microfluidic microscopy with radially parallelized channel geometry.

    PubMed

    Jagannadh, Veerendra Kalyan; Bhat, Bindu Prabhath; Nirupa Julius, Lourdes Albina; Gorthi, Sai Siva

    2016-03-01

    In this article, we present a novel approach to throughput enhancement in miniaturized microfluidic microscopy systems. Using the presented approach, we demonstrate an inexpensive yet high-throughput analytical instrument. Using the high-throughput analytical instrument, we have been able to achieve about 125,880 cells per minute (more than one hundred and twenty five thousand cells per minute), even while employing cost-effective low frame rate cameras (120 fps). The throughput achieved here is a notable progression in the field of diagnostics as it enables rapid quantitative testing and analysis. We demonstrate the applicability of the instrument to point-of-care diagnostics, by performing blood cell counting. We report a comparative analysis between the counts (in cells per μl) obtained from our instrument, with that of a commercially available hematology analyzer. PMID:26781098

  7. High-throughput metagenomic technologies for complex microbial community analysis. Open and closed formats

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jizhong; He, Zhili; Yang, Yunfeng; Deng, Ye; Tringe, Susannah G.; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2015-01-27

    Understanding the structure, functions, activities and dynamics of microbial communities in natural environments is one of the grand challenges of 21st century science. To address this challenge, over the past decade, numerous technologies have been developed for interrogating microbial communities, of which some are amenable to exploratory work (e.g., high-throughput sequencing and phenotypic screening) and others depend on reference genes or genomes (e.g., phylogenetic and functional gene arrays). Here, we provide a critical review and synthesis of the most commonly applied “open-format” and “closed-format” detection technologies. We discuss their characteristics, advantages, and disadvantages within the context of environmental applications and focus on analysis of complex microbial systems, such as those in soils, in which diversity is high and reference genomes are few. In addition, we discuss crucial issues and considerations associated with applying complementary high-throughput molecular technologies to address important ecological questions.

  8. BAC TransgeneOmics: a high-throughput method for exploration of protein function in mammals.

    PubMed

    Poser, Ina; Sarov, Mihail; Hutchins, James R A; Hériché, Jean-Karim; Toyoda, Yusuke; Pozniakovsky, Andrei; Weigl, Daniela; Nitzsche, Anja; Hegemann, Björn; Bird, Alexander W; Pelletier, Laurence; Kittler, Ralf; Hua, Sujun; Naumann, Ronald; Augsburg, Martina; Sykora, Martina M; Hofemeister, Helmut; Zhang, Youming; Nasmyth, Kim; White, Kevin P; Dietzel, Steffen; Mechtler, Karl; Durbin, Richard; Stewart, A Francis; Peters, Jan-Michael; Buchholz, Frank; Hyman, Anthony A

    2008-05-01

    The interpretation of genome sequences requires reliable and standardized methods to assess protein function at high throughput. Here we describe a fast and reliable pipeline to study protein function in mammalian cells based on protein tagging in bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs). The large size of the BAC transgenes ensures the presence of most, if not all, regulatory elements and results in expression that closely matches that of the endogenous gene. We show that BAC transgenes can be rapidly and reliably generated using 96-well-format recombineering. After stable transfection of these transgenes into human tissue culture cells or mouse embryonic stem cells, the localization, protein-protein and/or protein-DNA interactions of the tagged protein are studied using generic, tag-based assays. The same high-throughput approach will be generally applicable to other model systems. PMID:18391959

  9. Macro-to-Micro Structural Proteomics: Native Source Proteins for High-Throughput Crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Nanao, Max; Gee, Christine L.; Moskaleva, Alisa; Gradia, Scott; Iavarone, Anthony T.; Berger, James M.; May, Andrew P.; Zubieta, Chloe; Alber, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Structural biology and structural genomics projects routinely rely on recombinantly expressed proteins, but many proteins and complexes are difficult to obtain by this approach. We investigated native source proteins for high-throughput protein crystallography applications. The Escherichia coli proteome was fractionated, purified, crystallized, and structurally characterized. Macro-scale fermentation and fractionation were used to subdivide the soluble proteome into 408 unique fractions of which 295 fractions yielded crystals in microfluidic crystallization chips. Of the 295 crystals, 152 were selected for optimization, diffraction screening, and data collection. Twenty-three structures were determined, four of which were novel. This study demonstrates the utility of native source proteins for high-throughput crystallography. PMID:22393408

  10. Development of a Chemoenzymatic-like and Photoswitchable Method for the High-Throughput creation of Protein Microarrays. Application to the Analysis of the Protein/Protein Interactions Involved in the YOP Virulon from Yersinia pestis.

    SciTech Connect

    Camarero, J A

    2006-12-07

    Protein arrays are ideal tools for the rapid analysis of whole proteomes as well as for the development of reliable and cheap biosensors. The objective of this proposal is to develop a new ligand assisted ligation method based in the naturally occurring protein trans-splicing process. This method has been used for the generation of spatially addressable arrays of multiple protein components by standard micro-lithographic techniques. Key to our approach is the use of the protein trans-splicing process. This naturally occurring process allows the development of a truly generic and highly efficient method for the covalent attachment of proteins through its C-terminus to any solid support. This technology has been used for the creation of protein chips containing several virulence factors from the human pathogen Y. pestis.

  11. High Throughput Label Free Measurement of Cancer Cell Adhesion Kinetics Under Hemodynamic Flow

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Adrianne; Baker, Aaron B.

    2016-01-01

    The kinetics of receptor-mediated cell adhesion to extracellular matrix and adherent cell monolayers plays a key role in many physiological and pathological processes including cancer metastasis. Within this process the presence of fluidic shear forces is a key regulator of binding equilibrium and kinetics of cell adhesion. Current techniques to examine the kinetics of cell adhesion are either performed in the absence of flow or are low throughput, limiting their application to pharmacological compound screening or the high throughput investigation of biological mechanisms. We developed a high throughput flow device that applies flow in a multi-well format and interfaced this system with electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) system to allow label free detection of cell adhesion. We demonstrate that this combined system is capable of making real time measurements of cancer cell adhesion to extracellular matrix and immobilized platelets. In addition, we examined the dependence of the kinetics of binding of cancer cells on the level of shear stress and in the presence of small molecule inhibitors to adhesion-related pathways. This versatile system is broadly adaptable to the high throughput study of cell adhesion kinetics for many applications including drug screening and the investigation of the mechanisms of cancer metastasis. PMID:26816215

  12. A Novel High-Throughput Approach to Measure Hydroxyl Radicals Induced by Airborne Particulate Matter

    PubMed Central

    Son, Yeongkwon; Mishin, Vladimir; Welsh, William; Lu, Shou-En; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Kipen, Howard; Meng, Qingyu

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is one of the key mechanisms linking ambient particulate matter (PM) exposure with various adverse health effects. The oxidative potential of PM has been used to characterize the ability of PM induced oxidative stress. Hydroxyl radical (•OH) is the most destructive radical produced by PM. However, there is currently no high-throughput approach which can rapidly measure PM-induced •OH for a large number of samples with an automated system. This study evaluated four existing molecular probes (disodium terephthalate, 3′-p-(aminophenyl)fluorescein, coumarin-3-carboxylic acid, and sodium benzoate) for their applicability to measure •OH induced by PM in a high-throughput cell-free system using fluorescence techniques, based on both our experiments and on an assessment of the physicochemical properties of the probes reported in the literature. Disodium terephthalate (TPT) was the most applicable molecular probe to measure •OH induced by PM, due to its high solubility, high stability of the corresponding fluorescent product (i.e., 2-hydroxyterephthalic acid), high yield compared with the other molecular probes, and stable fluorescence intensity in a wide range of pH environments. TPT was applied in a high-throughput format to measure PM (NIST 1648a)-induced •OH, in phosphate buffered saline. The formed fluorescent product was measured at designated time points up to 2 h. The fluorescent product of TPT had a detection limit of 17.59 nM. The soluble fraction of PM contributed approximately 76.9% of the •OH induced by total PM, and the soluble metal ions of PM contributed 57.4% of the overall •OH formation. This study provides a promising cost-effective high-throughput method to measure •OH induced by PM on a routine basis. PMID:26516887

  13. Analysis options for high-throughput sequencing in miRNA expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently high-throughput sequencing (HTS) using next generation sequencing techniques became useful in digital gene expression profiling. Our study introduces analysis options for HTS data based on mapping to miRBase or counting and grouping of identical sequence reads. Those approaches allow a hypothesis free detection of miRNA differential expression. Methods We compare our results to microarray and qPCR data from one set of RNA samples. We use Illumina platforms for microarray analysis and miRNA sequencing of 20 samples from benign follicular thyroid adenoma and malignant follicular thyroid carcinoma. Furthermore, we use three strategies for HTS data analysis to evaluate miRNA biomarkers for malignant versus benign follicular thyroid tumors. Results High correlation of qPCR and HTS data was observed for the proposed analysis methods. However, qPCR is limited in the differential detection of miRNA isoforms. Moreover, we illustrate a much broader dynamic range of HTS compared to microarrays for small RNA studies. Finally, our data confirm hsa-miR-197-3p, hsa-miR-221-3p, hsa-miR-222-3p and both hsa-miR-144-3p and hsa-miR-144-5p as potential follicular thyroid cancer biomarkers. Conclusions Compared to microarrays HTS provides a global profile of miRNA expression with higher specificity and in more detail. Summarizing of HTS reads as isoform groups (analysis pipeline B) or according to functional criteria (seed analysis pipeline C), which better correlates to results of qPCR are promising new options for HTS analysis. Finally, data opens future miRNA research perspectives for HTS and indicates that qPCR might be limited in validating HTS data in detail. PMID:24625073

  14. Detection of the specific binding on protein microarrays by oblique-incidence reflectivity difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Heng; Wen, Juan; Wang, Xu; Yuan, Kun; Li, Wei; Lu, Huibin; Zhou, Yueliang; Jin, Kuijuan; Ruan, Kangcheng; Yang, Guozhen

    2010-09-01

    The specific binding between Cy5-labeled goat anti-mouse Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and mouse IgG with a concentration range from 625 to 104 µg ml - 1 has been detected successfully by the oblique-incidence reflectivity difference (OI-RD) method in each procedure of microarray fabrication. The experimental data prove that the OI-RD method can be employed not only to distinguish the different concentrations in label-free fashion but also to detect the antibody-antigen capture. In addition, the differential treatment of the OI-RD signals can decrease the negative influences of glass slide as the microarray upholder. Therefore the OI-RD technique has promising applications for the label-free and high-throughput detection of protein microarrays.

  15. Quasi-confocal, multichannel parallel scan hyperspectral fluorescence imaging method optimized for analysis of multicolor microarrays.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiyi; Ma, Suihua; Ji, Yanhong; Liu, Le; Hu, Zhaoxu; Guo, Jihua; Ma, Hui; He, Yonghong

    2010-09-15

    The microarray technique, which can provide parallel detection with high throughput in biomedical research, has generated considerable interest since the end of the 20th century. A number of instruments have been reported for microarray detection. In this paper, we have developed a quasi-confocal, multichannel parallel scan hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system for multicolor microarray research. Hyperspectral imaging records the entire emission spectrum for every voxel within the imaged area in contrast to recording only fluorescence intensities of filter-based scanners. When coupled with data analysis, the recorded spectral information allows for quantitative identification of the contributions of multiple, spectrally overlapping fluorescent dyes and elimination of unwanted artifacts. This system is improved with a specifically designed, high performance spectrometer which can offer a spectral resolution of 0.2 nm and operates with spatial resolutions ranging from 2 to 30 μm. We demonstrate the application of the system by reading out arrays for identification of bacteria. PMID:20718427

  16. The use of microarrays in microbial ecology

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, G.L.; He, Z.; DeSantis, T.Z.; Brodie, E.L.; Zhou, J.

    2009-09-15

    Microarrays have proven to be a useful and high-throughput method to provide targeted DNA sequence information for up to many thousands of specific genetic regions in a single test. A microarray consists of multiple DNA oligonucleotide probes that, under high stringency conditions, hybridize only to specific complementary nucleic acid sequences (targets). A fluorescent signal indicates the presence and, in many cases, the abundance of genetic regions of interest. In this chapter we will look at how microarrays are used in microbial ecology, especially with the recent increase in microbial community DNA sequence data. Of particular interest to microbial ecologists, phylogenetic microarrays are used for the analysis of phylotypes in a community and functional gene arrays are used for the analysis of functional genes, and, by inference, phylotypes in environmental samples. A phylogenetic microarray that has been developed by the Andersen laboratory, the PhyloChip, will be discussed as an example of a microarray that targets the known diversity within the 16S rRNA gene to determine microbial community composition. Using multiple, confirmatory probes to increase the confidence of detection and a mismatch probe for every perfect match probe to minimize the effect of cross-hybridization by non-target regions, the PhyloChip is able to simultaneously identify any of thousands of taxa present in an environmental sample. The PhyloChip is shown to reveal greater diversity within a community than rRNA gene sequencing due to the placement of the entire gene product on the microarray compared with the analysis of up to thousands of individual molecules by traditional sequencing methods. A functional gene array that has been developed by the Zhou laboratory, the GeoChip, will be discussed as an example of a microarray that dynamically identifies functional activities of multiple members within a community. The recent version of GeoChip contains more than 24,000 50mer

  17. Microarrays--status and prospects.

    PubMed

    Venkatasubbarao, Srivatsa

    2004-12-01

    Microarrays have become an extremely important research tool for life science researchers and are also beginning to be used in diagnostic, treatment and monitoring applications. This article provides a detailed description of microarrays prepared by in situ synthesis, deposition using microspotting methods, nonplanar bead arrays, flow-through microarrays, optical fiber bundle arrays and nanobarcodes. The problems and challenges in the development of microarrays, development of standards and diagnostic microarrays are described. Tables summarizing the vendor list of various derivatized microarray surfaces, commercially sold premade microarrays, bead arrays and unique microarray products in development are also included. PMID:15542153

  18. Flow-pattern Guided Fabrication of High-density Barcode Antibody Microarray.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Lisa S; Wang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Antibody microarray as a well-developed technology is currently challenged by a few other established or emerging high-throughput technologies. In this report, we renovate the antibody microarray technology by using a novel approach for manufacturing and by introducing new features. The fabrication of our high-density antibody microarray is accomplished through perpendicularly oriented flow-patterning of single stranded DNAs and subsequent conversion mediated by DNA-antibody conjugates. This protocol outlines the critical steps in flow-patterning DNA, producing and purifying DNA-antibody conjugates, and assessing the quality of the fabricated microarray. The uniformity and sensitivity are comparable with conventional microarrays, while our microarray fabrication does not require the assistance of an array printer and can be performed in most research laboratories. The other major advantage is that the size of our microarray units is 10 times smaller than that of printed arrays, offering the unique capability of analyzing functional proteins from single cells when interfacing with generic microchip designs. This barcode technology can be widely employed in biomarker detection, cell signaling studies, tissue engineering, and a variety of clinical applications. PMID:26780370

  19. Microarrays for the evaluation of cell-biomaterial surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thissen, H.; Johnson, G.; McFarland, G.; Verbiest, B. C. H.; Gengenbach, T.; Voelcker, N. H.

    2007-01-01

    The evaluation of cell-material surface interactions is important for the design of novel biomaterials which are used in a variety of biomedical applications. While traditional in vitro test methods have routinely used samples of relatively large size, microarrays representing different biomaterials offer many advantages, including high throughput and reduced sample handling. Here, we describe the simultaneous cell-based testing of matrices of polymeric biomaterials, arrayed on glass slides with a low cell-attachment background coating. Arrays were constructed using a microarray robot at 6 fold redundancy with solid pins having a diameter of 375 μm. Printed solutions contained at least one monomer, an initiator and a bifunctional crosslinker. After subsequent UV polymerisation, the arrays were washed and characterised by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Cell culture experiments were carried out over 24 hours using HeLa cells. After labelling with CellTracker ® Green for the final hour of incubation and subsequent fixation, the arrays were scanned. In addition, individual spots were also viewed by fluorescence microscopy. The evaluation of cell-surface interactions in high-throughput assays as demonstrated here is a key enabling technology for the effective development of future biomaterials.

  20. High throughput and multiplex localization of proteins and cells for in situ micropatterning using pneumatic microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Chun; Liu, Wenming; Tu, Qin; Ma, Chao; Zhao, Lei; Wang, Yaolei; Ouyang, Jia; Pang, Long; Wang, Jinyi

    2015-02-01

    Micropatterning technologies are emerging as an enabling tool for various microfluidic-based applications in life sciences. However, the high throughput and multiplex localization of multiple bio-components in a microfluidic device has not yet been well established. In this paper, we describe a simple and in situ micropatterning method using an integrated microfluidic device with pneumatic microstructures (PμSs) for highly controllable immobilization of both proteins and cells in a high throughput, geometry-dynamic, and multi-patterning way. The precise Pluronic F127 passivation of a microchamber surface except the PμS-blocked regions was performed and characterized, and the spatial dynamics and consistency of both the PμSs and protein/cell micropatterning were optically evaluated and quantitatively demonstrated too. Furthermore, a systematic investigation of PμS-assisted micropatterning in microfluidics was carried out. The feature of high throughput and spatial control of micropatterning can be simply realized by using the well-designed PμS arrays. Meanwhile, the co-micropatterning of different proteins (bovine serum albumin and chicken egg albumin) and cells (human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human hepatocellular carcinoma cells) in a microfluidic device was successfully accomplished with the orderly serial manipulation of PμS groups. We demonstrate that PμS-assisted micropatterning can be applied as a convenient microfluidic component for large-scale and diversified protein/cell patterning and manipulation, which could be useful for cell-based tissue organization, high-throughput imaging, protein-related interactions and immunoassays. PMID:25453039

  1. High throughput screening of particle conditioning operations: I. System design and method development.

    PubMed

    Noyes, Aaron; Huffman, Ben; Godavarti, Ranga; Titchener-Hooker, Nigel; Coffman, Jonathan; Sunasara, Khurram; Mukhopadhyay, Tarit

    2015-08-01

    The biotech industry is under increasing pressure to decrease both time to market and development costs. Simultaneously, regulators are expecting increased process understanding. High throughput process development (HTPD) employs small volumes, parallel processing, and high throughput analytics to reduce development costs and speed the development of novel therapeutics. As such, HTPD is increasingly viewed as integral to improving developmental productivity and deepening process understanding. Particle conditioning steps such as precipitation and flocculation may be used to aid the recovery and purification of biological products. In this first part of two articles, we describe an ultra scale-down system (USD) for high throughput particle conditioning (HTPC) composed of off-the-shelf components. The apparatus is comprised of a temperature-controlled microplate with magnetically driven stirrers and integrated with a Tecan liquid handling robot. With this system, 96 individual reaction conditions can be evaluated in parallel, including downstream centrifugal clarification. A comprehensive suite of high throughput analytics enables measurement of product titer, product quality, impurity clearance, clarification efficiency, and particle characterization. HTPC at the 1 mL scale was evaluated with fermentation broth containing a vaccine polysaccharide. The response profile was compared with the Pilot-scale performance of a non-geometrically similar, 3 L reactor. An engineering characterization of the reactors and scale-up context examines theoretical considerations for comparing this USD system with larger scale stirred reactors. In the second paper, we will explore application of this system to industrially relevant vaccines and test different scale-up heuristics. PMID:25728932

  2. High-throughput fabrication and screening improves gold nanoparticle chemiresistor sensor performance.

    PubMed

    Hubble, Lee J; Cooper, James S; Sosa-Pintos, Andrea; Kiiveri, Harri; Chow, Edith; Webster, Melissa S; Wieczorek, Lech; Raguse, Burkhard

    2015-02-01

    Chemiresistor sensor arrays are a promising technology to replace current laboratory-based analysis instrumentation, with the advantage of facile integration into portable, low-cost devices for in-field use. To increase the performance of chemiresistor sensor arrays a high-throughput fabrication and screening methodology was developed to assess different organothiol-functionalized gold nanoparticle chemiresistors. This high-throughput fabrication and testing methodology was implemented to screen a library consisting of 132 different organothiol compounds as capping agents for functionalized gold nanoparticle chemiresistor sensors. The methodology utilized an automated liquid handling workstation for the in situ functionalization of gold nanoparticle films and subsequent automated analyte testing of sensor arrays using a flow-injection analysis system. To test the methodology we focused on the discrimination and quantitation of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, p-xylene, and naphthalene (BTEXN) mixtures in water at low microgram per liter concentration levels. The high-throughput methodology identified a sensor array configuration consisting of a subset of organothiol-functionalized chemiresistors which in combination with random forests analysis was able to predict individual analyte concentrations with overall root-mean-square errors ranging between 8-17 μg/L for mixtures of BTEXN in water at the 100 μg/L concentration. The ability to use a simple sensor array system to quantitate BTEXN mixtures in water at the low μg/L concentration range has direct and significant implications to future environmental monitoring and reporting strategies. In addition, these results demonstrate the advantages of high-throughput screening to improve the performance of gold nanoparticle based chemiresistors for both new and existing applications. PMID:25562398

  3. Flow-Based Single Cell Deposition for High-Throughput Screening of Protein Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Kalber, Tammy; Badar, Adam; Lythgoe, Mark; Pule, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The identification and engineering of proteins having refined or novel characteristics is an important area of research in many scientific fields. Protein modelling has enabled the rational design of unique proteins, but high-throughput screening of large libraries is still required to identify proteins with potentially valuable properties. Here we report on the development and evaluation of a novel fluorescent activated cell sorting based screening platform. Single bacterial cells, expressing a protein library to be screened, are electronically sorted and deposited onto plates containing solid nutrient growth media in a dense matrix format of between 44 and 195 colonies/cm2. We show that this matrix format is readily applicable to machine interrogation (<30 seconds per plate) and subsequent bioinformatic analysis (~60 seconds per plate) thus enabling the high-throughput screening of the protein library. We evaluate this platform and show that bacteria containing a bioluminescent protein can be spectrally analysed using an optical imager, and a rare clone (0.5% population) can successfully be identified, picked and further characterised. To further enhance this screening platform, we have developed a prototype electronic sort stream multiplexer, that when integrated into a commercial flow cytometric sorter, increases the rate of colony deposition by 89.2% to 24 colonies per second. We believe that the screening platform described here is potentially the foundation of a new generation of high-throughput screening technologies for proteins. PMID:26536118

  4. Rapid and high-throughput construction of microbial cell-factories with regulatory noncoding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Amit Kumar; Na, Dokyun; Lee, Eun Yeol

    2015-11-01

    Due to global crises such as pollution and depletion of fossil fuels, sustainable technologies based on microbial cell-factories have been garnering great interest as an alternative to chemical factories. The development of microbial cell-factories is imperative in cutting down the overall manufacturing cost. Thus, diverse metabolic engineering strategies and engineering tools have been established to obtain a preferred genotype and phenotype displaying superior productivity. However, these tools are limited to only a handful of genes with permanent modification of a genome and significant labor costs, and this is one of the bottlenecks associated with biofactory construction. Therefore, a groundbreaking rapid and high-throughput engineering tool is needed for efficient construction of microbial cell-factories. During the last decade, copious small noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) have been discovered in bacteria. These are involved in substantial regulatory roles like transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene regulation by modulating mRNA elongation, stability, or translational efficiency. Because of their vulnerability, ncRNAs can be used as another layer of conditional control over gene expression without modifying chromosomal sequences, and hence would be a promising high-throughput tool for metabolic engineering. Here, we review successful design principles and applications of ncRNAs for high-throughput metabolic engineering or physiological studies of diverse industrially important microorganisms. PMID:26027891

  5. HiTRACE-Web: an online tool for robust analysis of high-throughput capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hanjoo; Cordero, Pablo; Das, Rhiju; Yoon, Sungroh

    2013-07-01

    To facilitate the analysis of large-scale high-throughput capillary electrophoresis data, we previously proposed a suite of efficient analysis software named HiTRACE (High Throughput Robust Analysis of Capillary Electrophoresis). HiTRACE has been used extensively for quantitating data from RNA and DNA structure mapping experiments, including mutate-and-map contact inference, chromatin footprinting, the Eterna RNA design project and other high-throughput applications. However, HiTRACE is based on a suite of command-line MATLAB scripts that requires nontrivial efforts to learn, use and extend. Here, we present HiTRACE-Web, an online version of HiTRACE that includes standard features previously available in the command-line version and additional features such as automated band annotation and flexible adjustment of annotations, all via a user-friendly environment. By making use of parallelization, the on-line workflow is also faster than software implementations available to most users on their local computers. Free access: http://hitrace.org. PMID:23761448

  6. Droplet microfluidic technology for single-cell high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Brouzes, Eric; Medkova, Martina; Savenelli, Neal; Marran, Dave; Twardowski, Mariusz; Hutchison, J Brian; Rothberg, Jonathan M; Link, Darren R; Perrimon, Norbert; Samuels, Michael L

    2009-08-25

    We present a droplet-based microfluidic technology that enables high-throughput screening of single mammalian cells. This integrated platform allows for the encapsulation of single cells and reagents in independent aqueous microdroplets (1 pL to 10 nL volumes) dispersed in an immiscible carrier oil and enables the digital manipulation of these reactors at a very high-throughput. Here, we validate a full droplet screening workflow by conducting a droplet-based cytotoxicity screen. To perform this screen, we first developed a droplet viability assay that permits the quantitative scoring of cell viability and growth within intact droplets. Next, we demonstrated the high viability of encapsulated human monocytic U937 cells over a period of 4 days. Finally, we developed an optically-coded droplet library enabling the identification of the droplets composition during the assay read-out. Using the integrated droplet technology, we screened a drug library for its cytotoxic effect against U937 cells. Taken together our droplet microfluidic platform is modular, robust, uses no moving parts, and has a wide range of potential applications including high-throughput single-cell analyses, combinatorial screening, and facilitating small sample analyses. PMID:19617544

  7. Selection of recombinant anti-SH3 domain antibodies by high-throughput phage display.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haiming; Economopoulos, Nicolas O; Liu, Bernard A; Uetrecht, Andrea; Gu, Jun; Jarvik, Nick; Nadeem, Vincent; Pawson, Tony; Moffat, Jason; Miersch, Shane; Sidhu, Sachdev S

    2015-11-01

    Antibodies are indispensable tools in biochemical research and play an expanding role as therapeutics. While hybridoma technology is the dominant method for antibody production, phage display is an emerging technology. Here, we developed and employed a high-throughput pipeline that enables selection of antibodies against hundreds of antigens in parallel. Binding selections using a phage-displayed synthetic antigen-binding fragment (Fab) library against 110 human SH3 domains yielded hundreds of Fabs targeting 58 antigens. Affinity assays demonstrated that representative Fabs bind tightly and specifically to their targets. Furthermore, we developed an efficient affinity maturation strategy adaptable to high-throughput, which increased affinity dramatically but did not compromise specificity. Finally, we tested Fabs in common cell biology applications and confirmed recognition of the full-length antigen in immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence assays. In summary, we have established a rapid and robust high-throughput methodology that can be applied to generate highly functional and renewable antibodies targeting protein domains on a proteome-wide scale. PMID:26332758

  8. Liquid gradient in two-dimensional matrix for high throughput screening

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shan-Wen; Xu, Bi-Yi; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Based on the ingenious combination of two different gradient generation mechanisms, this work reports a novel approach for a high throughput linear liquid gradient in a two-dimensional (2D) matrix. Specifically, a typical Christmas Tree structure with two inlets was designed as the first mixture gradient generator, upon which the second diffusion gradient generator was coupled to produce the desired concentration series on the basis of the distance difference. Rather than a simple 1D line, the integration of the two generators would result in an innovative 2D matrix of reservoirs, which was then characterized both theoretically and experimentally. Theoretically, calculation of fluid field demonstrated the formation of a concentration gradient, which was then confirmed by the dye solution visualization analysis. For high throughput screening application, doxorubicin (Dox) was then selected as model medicine to treat the acute myeloblastic leukemia (HL-60) cells. Cell viability displayed that cell death rate enhanced with the increase of drug concentration, and this result was higher than that on a 96-well plate, and the corresponding mechanism was properly discussed. Subsequently, Dox and quercetin were employed simultaneously to generate an overlapping gradient and its effect on HL-60 cells was investigated. Due to the automatic formation of concentration gradient that could improve the work efficiency, this work provides a promising tool for future high throughput drug screening. PMID:24396550

  9. Droplet microfluidic technology for single-cell high-throughput screening

    PubMed Central

    Brouzes, Eric; Medkova, Martina; Savenelli, Neal; Marran, Dave; Twardowski, Mariusz; Hutchison, J. Brian; Rothberg, Jonathan M.; Link, Darren R.; Perrimon, Norbert; Samuels, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    We present a droplet-based microfluidic technology that enables high-throughput screening of single mammalian cells. This integrated platform allows for the encapsulation of single cells and reagents in independent aqueous microdroplets (1 pL to 10 nL volumes) dispersed in an immiscible carrier oil and enables the digital manipulation of these reactors at a very high-throughput. Here, we validate a full droplet screening workflow by conducting a droplet-based cytotoxicity screen. To perform this screen, we first developed a droplet viability assay that permits the quantitative scoring of cell viability and growth within intact droplets. Next, we demonstrated the high viability of encapsulated human monocytic U937 cells over a period of 4 days. Finally, we developed an optically-coded droplet library enabling the identification of the droplets composition during the assay read-out. Using the integrated droplet technology, we screened a drug library for its cytotoxic effect against U937 cells. Taken together our droplet microfluidic platform is modular, robust, uses no moving parts, and has a wide range of potential applications including high-throughput single-cell analyses, combinatorial screening, and facilitating small sample analyses. PMID:19617544

  10. Flow-Based Single Cell Deposition for High-Throughput Screening of Protein Libraries.

    PubMed

    Stowe, Cassandra; Pizzey, Arnold; Kalber, Tammy; Badar, Adam; Lythgoe, Mark; Pule, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The identification and engineering of proteins having refined or novel characteristics is an important area of research in many scientific fields. Protein modelling has enabled the rational design of unique proteins, but high-throughput screening of large libraries is still required to identify proteins with potentially valuable properties. Here we report on the development and evaluation of a novel fluorescent activated cell sorting based screening platform. Single bacterial cells, expressing a protein library to be screened, are electronically sorted and deposited onto plates containing solid nutrient growth media in a dense matrix format of between 44 and 195 colonies/cm2. We show that this matrix format is readily applicable to machine interrogation (<30 seconds per plate) and subsequent bioinformatic analysis (~60 seconds per plate) thus enabling the high-throughput screening of the protein library. We evaluate this platform and show that bacteria containing a bioluminescent protein can be spectrally analysed using an optical imager, and a rare clone (0.5% population) can successfully be identified, picked and further characterised. To further enhance this screening platform, we have developed a prototype electronic sort stream multiplexer, that when integrated into a commercial flow cytometric sorter, increases the rate of colony deposition by 89.2% to 24 colonies per second. We believe that the screening platform described here is potentially the foundation of a new generation of high-throughput screening technologies for proteins. PMID:26536118

  11. Image Harvest: an open-source platform for high-throughput plant image processing and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Knecht, Avi C.; Campbell, Malachy T.; Caprez, Adam; Swanson, David R.; Walia, Harkamal

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput plant phenotyping is an effective approach to bridge the genotype-to-phenotype gap in crops. Phenomics experiments typically result in large-scale image datasets, which are not amenable for processing on desktop computers, thus creating a bottleneck in the image-analysis pipeline. Here, we present an open-source, flexible image-analysis framework, called Image Harvest (IH), for processing images originating from high-throughput plant phenotyping platforms. Image Harvest is developed to perform parallel processing on computing grids and provides an integrated feature for metadata extraction from large-scale file organization. Moreover, the integration of IH with the Open Science Grid provides academic researchers with the computational resources required for processing large image datasets at no cost. Image Harvest also offers functionalities to extract digital traits from images to interpret plant architecture-related characteristics. To demonstrate the applications of these digital traits, a rice (Oryza sativa) diversity panel was phenotyped and genome-wide association mapping was performed using digital traits that are used to describe different plant ideotypes. Three major quantitative trait loci were identified on rice chromosomes 4 and 6, which co-localize with quantitative trait loci known to regulate agronomically important traits in rice. Image Harvest is an open-source software for high-throughput image processing that requires a minimal learning curve for plant biologists to analyzephenomics datasets. PMID:27141917

  12. Image Harvest: an open-source platform for high-throughput plant image processing and analysis.

    PubMed

    Knecht, Avi C; Campbell, Malachy T; Caprez, Adam; Swanson, David R; Walia, Harkamal

    2016-05-01

    High-throughput plant phenotyping is an effective approach to bridge the genotype-to-phenotype gap in crops. Phenomics experiments typically result in large-scale image datasets, which are not amenable for processing on desktop computers, thus creating a bottleneck in the image-analysis pipeline. Here, we present an open-source, flexible image-analysis framework, called Image Harvest (IH), for processing images originating from high-throughput plant phenotyping platforms. Image Harvest is developed to perform parallel processing on computing grids and provides an integrated feature for metadata extraction from large-scale file organization. Moreover, the integration of IH with the Open Science Grid provides academic researchers with the computational resources required for processing large image datasets at no cost. Image Harvest also offers functionalities to extract digital traits from images to interpret plant architecture-related characteristics. To demonstrate the applications of these digital traits, a rice (Oryza sativa) diversity panel was phenotyped and genome-wide association mapping was performed using digital traits that are used to describe different plant ideotypes. Three major quantitative trait loci were identified on rice chromosomes 4 and 6, which co-localize with quantitative trait loci known to regulate agronomically important traits in rice. Image Harvest is an open-source software for high-throughput image processing that requires a minimal learning curve for plant biologists to analyzephenomics datasets. PMID:27141917

  13. A versatile toolkit for high throughput functional genomics with Trichoderma reesei

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, Andre; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Collett, James R.; Baker, Scott E.; Seiboth, Bernhard; Kubicek, Christian P.; Schmoll, Monika

    2012-01-02

    The ascomycete fungus, Trichoderma reesei (anamorph of Hypocrea jecorina), represents a biotechnological workhorse and is currently one of the most proficient cellulase producers. While strain improvement was traditionally accomplished by random mutagenesis, a detailed understanding of cellulase regulation can only be gained using recombinant technologies. RESULTS: Aiming at high efficiency and high throughput methods, we present here a construction kit for gene knock out in T. reesei. We provide a primer database for gene deletion using the pyr4, amdS and hph selection markers. For high throughput generation of gene knock outs, we constructed vectors using yeast mediated recombination and then transformed a T. reesei strain deficient in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) by spore electroporation. This NHEJ-defect was subsequently removed by crossing of mutants with a sexually competent strain derived from the parental strain, QM9414.CONCLUSIONS:Using this strategy and the materials provided, high throughput gene deletion in T. reesei becomes feasible. Moreover, with the application of sexual development, the NHEJ-defect can be removed efficiently and without the need for additional selection markers. The same advantages apply for the construction of multiple mutants by crossing of strains with different gene deletions, which is now possible with considerably less hands-on time and minimal screening effort compared to a transformation approach. Consequently this toolkit can considerably boost research towards efficient exploitation of the resources of T. reesei for cellulase expression and hence second generation biofuel production.

  14. High-throughput theoretical design of lithium battery materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi-Gang, Ling; Jian, Gao; Rui-Juan, Xiao; Li-Quan, Chen

    2016-01-01

    The rapid evolution of high-throughput theoretical design schemes to discover new lithium battery materials is reviewed, including high-capacity cathodes, low-strain cathodes, anodes, solid state electrolytes, and electrolyte additives. With the development of efficient theoretical methods and inexpensive computers, high-throughput theoretical calculations have played an increasingly important role in the discovery of new materials. With the help of automatic simulation flow, many types of materials can be screened, optimized and designed from a structural database according to specific search criteria. In advanced cell technology, new materials for next generation lithium batteries are of great significance to achieve performance, and some representative criteria are: higher energy density, better safety, and faster charge/discharge speed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11234013 and 51172274) and the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2015AA034201).

  15. Direct assembling methodologies for high-throughput bioscreening

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Dévora, Jorge I.; Shi, Zhi-dong; Xu, Tao

    2012-01-01

    Over the last few decades, high-throughput (HT) bioscreening, a technique that allows rapid screening of biochemical compound libraries against biological targets, has been widely used in drug discovery, stem cell research, development of new biomaterials, and genomics research. To achieve these ambitions, scaffold-free (or direct) assembly of biological entities of interest has become critical. Appropriate assembling methodologies are required to build an efficient HT bioscreening platform. The development of contact and non-contact assembling systems as a practical solution has been driven by a variety of essential attributes of the bioscreening system, such as miniaturization, high throughput, and high precision. The present article reviews recent progress on these assembling technologies utilized for the construction of HT bioscreening platforms. PMID:22021162

  16. Fusion genes and their discovery using high throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Annala, M J; Parker, B C; Zhang, W; Nykter, M

    2013-11-01

    Fusion genes are hybrid genes that combine parts of two or more original genes. They can form as a result of chromosomal rearrangements or abnormal transcription, and have been shown to act as drivers of malignant transformation and progression in many human cancers. The biological significance of fusion genes together with their specificity to cancer cells has made them into excellent targets for molecular therapy. Fusion genes are also used as diagnostic and prognostic markers to confirm cancer diagnosis and monitor response to molecular therapies. High-throughput sequencing has enabled the systematic discovery of fusion genes in a wide variety of cancer types. In this review, we describe the history of fusion genes in cancer and the ways in which fusion genes form and affect cellular function. We also describe computational methodologies for detecting fusion genes from high-throughput sequencing experiments, and the most common sources of error that lead to false discovery of fusion genes. PMID:23376639

  17. Portable thermo-powered high-throughput visual electrochemiluminescence sensor.

    PubMed

    Hao, Nan; Xiong, Meng; Zhang, Jia-dong; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2013-12-17

    This paper describes a portable thermo-powered high-throughput visual electrochemiluminescence (ECL) sensor for the first time. This sensor is composed of a tiny power supply device based on thermal-electrical conversion and a facile prepared array electrode. The ECL detection could be conducted with thermo-power, which is easily accessible. For example, hot water, a bonfire, or a lighted candle enables the detection to be conducted. And the assay can be directly monitored by the naked eye semiquantitatively or smart phones quantitatively. Combined with transparent electrode and array microreactors, a portable high-throughput sensor was achieved. The portable device, avoiding the use of an electrochemical workstation to generate potential and a photomultiplier tube to receive the signal, is not only a valuable addition for traditional methods but also a suitable device for field operation or point-of-care testing. PMID:24215560

  18. High-throughput screening to identify inhibitors of lysine demethylases

    PubMed Central

    Gale, Molly; Yan, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Lysine demethylases (KDMs) are epigenetic regulators whose dysfunction is implicated in the pathology of many human diseases including various types of cancer, inflammation and X-linked intellectual disability. Particular demethylases have been identified as promising therapeutic targets, and tremendous efforts are being devoted toward developing suitable small-molecule inhibitors for clinical and research use. Several high-throughput screening strategies have been developed to screen for small-molecule inhibitors of KDMs, each with advantages and disadvantages in terms of time, cost, effort, reliability and sensitivity. In this Special Report, we review and evaluate the high-throughput screening methods utilized for discovery of novel small-molecule KDM inhibitors. PMID:25687466

  19. Perspectives on high-throughput technologies applied to protein crystallization.

    PubMed

    Saridakis, Emmanuel

    2012-07-01

    High-throughput crystallisation requires the rapid and accurate dispensing of protein and precipitating agent solutions at nanovolumes, but does not end there. The choice of the initial screens is very important, especially with respect to the availability of protein material. Data from previous crystallisation experiments that are scattered in the literature and only partially available in databases have to be analysed in efficient ways that will maximise their utility for designing new screens. A larger portion of crystallisation parameter space should be made accessible to screening, through the use of nucleants and seeding. Observation, assessment and scaling up of the crystallisation trials should be efficiently performed and, finally yet importantly, optimisation of conditions must also be adapted to the high-throughput environment. The above requirements are briefly addressed in the following paper. PMID:22489783

  20. High-throughput evaluation of synthetic metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Klesmith, Justin R.; Whitehead, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    A central challenge in the field of metabolic engineering is the efficient identification of a metabolic pathway genotype that maximizes specific productivity over a robust range of process conditions. Here we review current methods for optimizing specific productivity of metabolic pathways in living cells. New tools for library generation, computational analysis of pathway sequence-flux space, and high-throughput screening and selection techniques are discussed. PMID:27453919

  1. High Throughput siRNA Screening Using Reverse Transfection.

    PubMed

    von Schantz, Carina; Saarela, Jani

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a commonly used technique to knockdown gene function. Here, we describe a high throughput screening method for siRNA mediated gene silencing of the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 using reverse transfection. Furthermore, we describe the setup for two separate methods for detecting viable and dead cells using either homogenous assays or image-based analysis. PMID:27581282

  2. Rapid Methods for High-Throughput Detection of Sulfoxides▿

    PubMed Central

    Shainsky, Janna; Derry, Netta-Lee; Leichtmann-Bardoogo, Yael; Wood, Thomas K.; Fishman, Ayelet

    2009-01-01

    Enantiopure sulfoxides are prevalent in drugs and are useful chiral auxiliaries in organic synthesis. The biocatalytic enantioselective oxidation of prochiral sulfides is a direct and economical approach for the synthesis of optically pure sulfoxides. The selection of suitable biocatalysts requires rapid and reliable high-throughput screening methods. Here we present four different methods for detecting sulfoxides produced via whole-cell biocatalysis, three of which were exploited for high-throughput screening. Fluorescence detection based on the acid activation of omeprazole was utilized for high-throughput screening of mutant libraries of toluene monooxygenases, but no active variants have been discovered yet. The second method is based on the reduction of sulfoxides to sulfides, with the coupled release and measurement of iodine. The availability of solvent-resistant microtiter plates enabled us to modify the method to a high-throughput format. The third method, selective inhibition of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase, was used to rapidly screen highly active and/or enantioselective variants at position V106 of toluene ortho-monooxygenase in a saturation mutagenesis library, using methyl-p-tolyl sulfide as the substrate. A success rate of 89% (i.e., 11% false positives) was obtained, and two new mutants were selected. The fourth method is based on the colorimetric detection of adrenochrome, a back-titration procedure which measures the concentration of the periodate-sensitive sulfide. Due to low sensitivity during whole-cell screening, this method was found to be useful only for determining the presence or absence of sulfoxide in the reaction. The methods described in the present work are simple and inexpensive and do not require special equipment. PMID:19465532

  3. Condor-COPASI: high-throughput computing for biochemical networks

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mathematical modelling has become a standard technique to improve our understanding of complex biological systems. As models become larger and more complex, simulations and analyses require increasing amounts of computational power. Clusters of computers in a high-throughput computing environment can help to provide the resources required for computationally expensive model analysis. However, exploiting such a system can be difficult for users without the necessary expertise. Results We present Condor-COPASI, a server-based software tool that integrates COPASI, a biological pathway simulation tool, with Condor, a high-throughput computing environment. Condor-COPASI provides a web-based interface, which makes it extremely easy for a user to run a number of model simulation and analysis tasks in parallel. Tasks are transparently split into smaller parts, and submitted for execution on a Condor pool. Result output is presented to the user in a number of formats, including tables and interactive graphical displays. Conclusions Condor-COPASI can effectively use a Condor high-throughput computing environment to provide significant gains in performance for a number of model simulation and analysis tasks. Condor-COPASI is free, open source software, released under the Artistic License 2.0, and is suitable for use by any institution with access to a Condor pool. Source code is freely available for download at http://code.google.com/p/condor-copasi/, along with full instructions on deployment and usage. PMID:22834945

  4. High-Throughput Computational and Experimental Techniques in Structural Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Chance, Mark R.; Fiser, Andras; Sali, Andrej; Pieper, Ursula; Eswar, Narayanan; Xu, Guiping; Fajardo, J. Eduardo; Radhakannan, Thirumuruhan; Marinkovic, Nebojsa

    2004-01-01

    Structural genomics has as its goal the provision of structural information for all possible ORF sequences through a combination of experimental and computational approaches. The access to genome sequences and cloning resources from an ever-widening array of organisms is driving high-throughput structural studies by the New York Structural Genomics Research Consortium. In this report, we outline the progress of the Consortium in establishing its pipeline for structural genomics, and some of the experimental and bioinformatics efforts leading to structural annotation of proteins. The Consortium has established a pipeline for structural biology studies, automated modeling of ORF sequences using solved (template) structures, and a novel high-throughput approach (metallomics) to examining the metal binding to purified protein targets. The Consortium has so far produced 493 purified proteins from >1077 expression vectors. A total of 95 have resulted in crystal structures, and 81 are deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Comparative modeling of these structures has generated >40,000 structural models. We also initiated a high-throughput metal analysis of the purified proteins; this has determined that 10%-15% of the targets contain a stoichiometric structural or catalytic transition metal atom. The progress of the structural genomics centers in the U.S. and around the world suggests that the goal of providing useful structural information on most all ORF domains will be realized. This projected resource will provide structural biology information important to understanding the function of most proteins of the cell. PMID:15489337

  5. Promises and Pitfalls of High-Throughput Biological Assays.

    PubMed

    Finak, Greg; Gottardo, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    This chapter discusses some of the pitfalls encountered when performing biomedical research involving high-throughput "omics" data and presents some strategies and guidelines that researchers should follow when undertaking such studies. We discuss common errors in experimental design and data analysis that lead to irreproducible and non-replicable research and provide some guidelines to avoid these common mistakes so that researchers may have confidence in study outcomes, even if the results are negative. We discuss the importance of ranking and prespecifying hypotheses, performing power analysis, careful experimental design, and preplanning of statistical analyses in order to avoid the "fishing expedition" data analysis strategy, which is doomed to fail. The impact of multiple testing on false-positive rates is discussed, particularly in the context of the analysis of high-throughput data, and methods to correct for it are presented, as well as approaches to detect and correct for experimental biases and batch effects, which often plague high-throughput assays. We highlight the importance of sharing data and analysis code to facilitate reproducibility and present tools and software that are appropriate for this purpose. PMID:27115636

  6. High-Throughput Analysis of RNA Structure and Ribonucleoprotein Assembly

    PubMed Central

    McGinnis, Jennifer L.; Duncan, Caia D. S.; Weeks, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    RNA folds to form complex structures vital to many cellular functions. Proteins facilitate RNA folding at both the secondary and tertiary structure levels. An absolute prerequisite for understanding RNA folding and ribonucleoprotein (RNP) assembly reactions is a complete understanding of the RNA structure at each stage of the folding or assembly process. Here we provide a guide for comprehensive and high-throughput analysis of RNA secondary and tertiary structure using SHAPE and hydroxyl radical footprinting. As an example of the strong and sometimes surprising conclusions that can emerge from high-throughput analysis of RNA folding and RNP assembly, we summarize the structure of the bI3 group I intron RNA in four distinct states. Dramatic structural rearrangements occur in both secondary and tertiary structure as the RNA folds from the free state to the active, six-component, RNP complex. As high-throughput and high-resolution approaches are applied broadly to large protein-RNA complexes, other proteins previously viewed as making simple contributions to RNA folding are also likely to be found to exert multifaceted, long-range, cooperative, and non-additive effects on RNA folding. These protein-induced contributions add another level of control, and potential regulatory function, in RNP complexes. PMID:20946765

  7. High-throughput analysis of growth differences among phage strains.

    PubMed

    Turner, Paul E; Draghi, Jeremy A; Wilpiszeski, Regina

    2012-01-01

    Although methods such as spectrophotometry are useful for identifying growth differences among bacterial strains, it is currently difficult to similarly determine whether bacteriophage strains differ in growth using high throughput methods. Here we use automated spectrophotometry to develop an in vitro method for indirectly distinguishing fitness (growth) differences among virus strains, based on direct measures of their infected bacterial hosts. We used computer simulations of a mathematical model for phage growth to predict which features of bacterial growth curves were best associated with differences in growth among phage strains. We then tested these predictions using the in vitro method to confirm which of the inferred viral growth traits best reflected known fitness differences among genotypes of the RNA phage phi-6, when infecting a Pseudomonas syringae host. Results showed that the inferred phage trait of time-to-extinction (time required to drive bacterial density below detectable optical density) reliably correlated with genotype rankings based on absolute fitness (phage titer per ml). These data suggested that the high-throughput analysis was valuable for identifying growth differences among virus strains, and that the method may be especially useful for high throughput analyses of fitness differences among phage strains cultured and/or evolved in liquid (unstructured) environments. PMID:22101310

  8. High-Throughput Optical Sensing Immunoassays on Smartphone.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Ju; Sun, Rongrong; Vasile, Tina; Chang, Yu-Chung; Li, Lei

    2016-08-16

    We present an optical sensing platform on a smartphone for high-throughput screening immunoassays. For the first time, a designed microprism array is utilized to achieve a one-time screening of 64 samples. To demonstrate the capability and the reliability of this optical sensing platform on smartphone, human interleukin 6 (IL-6) protein and six types of plant viruses are immunoassayed. The ability of quantification is shown by a sigmoidal dose-response curve fitting to analyze IL-6 protein. The accuracy in measuring the concentrations of IL-6 protein achieves 99.1%. On the other hand, to validate on-field immunoassays by our device, a total of 1030 samples are assayed using three immunoassay methods to detect six types of plant viruses. The accuracy is up to 96.2-99.9%; in addition, there is a high degree of agreement with lab instruments. The total cost for this high-throughput optical screening platform is ∼$50 USD. The reading time is only 2 s for 64 samples. The size is just as big as a portable hard drive. Our optical sensing platform on the smartphone offers a route toward in situ high-throughput screening immunoassays for viruses, pathogens, biomarkers, and toxins by decentralizing laboratory tests. With this mobile point-of-care optical platform, the spread of disease can be timely stopped within a very short turnaround time. PMID:27434250

  9. A high-throughput approach to identify genomic variants of bacterial metabolite producers at the single-cell level.

    PubMed

    Binder, Stephan; Schendzielorz, Georg; Stäbler, Norma; Krumbach, Karin; Hoffmann, Kristina; Bott, Michael; Eggeling, Lothar

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel method for visualizing intracellular metabolite concentrations within single cells of Escherichia coli and Corynebacterium glutamicum that expedites the screening process of producers. It is based on transcription factors and we used it to isolate new L-lysine producing mutants of C. glutamicum from a large library of mutagenized cells using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). This high-throughput method fills the gap between existing high-throughput methods for mutant generation and genome analysis. The technology has diverse applications in the analysis of producer populations and screening of mutant libraries that carry mutations in plasmids or genomes. PMID:22640862

  10. A high-throughput approach to identify genomic variants of bacterial metabolite producers at the single-cell level

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel method for visualizing intracellular metabolite concentrations within single cells of Escherichia coli and Corynebacterium glutamicum that expedites the screening process of producers. It is based on transcription factors and we used it to isolate new L-lysine producing mutants of C. glutamicum from a large library of mutagenized cells using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). This high-throughput method fills the gap between existing high-throughput methods for mutant generation and genome analysis. The technology has diverse applications in the analysis of producer populations and screening of mutant libraries that carry mutations in plasmids or genomes. PMID:22640862

  11. Estimating copy numbers of alleles from population-scale high-throughput sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background With the recent development of microarray and high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies, a number of studies have revealed catalogs of copy number variants (CNVs) and their association with phenotypes and complex traits. In parallel, a number of approaches to predict CNV regions and genotypes are proposed for both microarray and HTS data. However, only a few approaches focus on haplotyping of CNV loci. Results We propose a novel approach to infer copy unit alleles and their numbers in each sample simultaneously from population-scale HTS data by variational Bayesian inference on a generative probabilistic model inspired by latent Dirichlet allocation, which is a well studied model for document classification problems. In simulation studies, we evaluated concordance between inferred and true copy unit alleles for lower-, middle-, and higher-copy number dataset, in which precision and recall were ≥ 0.9 for data with mean coverage ≥ 10× per copy unit. We also applied the approach to HTS data of 1123 samples at highly variable salivary amylase gene locus and a pseudogene locus, and confirmed consistency of the estimated alleles within samples belonging to a trio of CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463 with 11 offspring. Conclusions Our proposed approach enables detailed analysis of copy number variations, such as association study between copy unit alleles and phenotypes or biological features including human diseases. PMID:25707811

  12. DNA microarray gene expression analysis technology and its application to neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, S A

    2001-09-11

    DNA microarray technology is currently an area of great interest. Also called "genechip" technology, it incorporates molecular genetics and computer science on a massive scale. This technology can rapidly provide a detailed view of the simultaneous expression of entire genomes and provide new insights into gene function, disease pathophysiology, disease classification, and drug development. In this review, the author discusses the basic theory behind genechip and the other biologic chip technologies, their limitations given the current state of biologic knowledge and computational abilities, and their potential applications to the understanding of neurologic disorders. PMID:11575306

  13. Analysis of antimicrobial resistance mechanisms in MDR bacteria by microarray and high-throughput sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antimicrobial resistance in pathogenic bacteria is a major concern in human and animal health. The National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) was designed by the CDC, FDA, and USDA to monitor antimicrobial resistance in the U.S. The Bacterial Epidemiology and Antimicrobial Resistanc...

  14. Nile Red Detection of Bacterial Hydrocarbons and Ketones in a High-Throughput Format

    SciTech Connect

    Pinzon, NM; Aukema, KG; Gralnick, JA; Wackett, LP

    2011-06-28

    A method for use in high-throughput screening of bacteria for the production of long-chain hydrocarbons and ketones by monitoring fluorescent light emission in the presence of Nile red is described. Nile red has previously been used to screen for polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and fatty acid esters, but this is the first report of screening for recombinant bacteria making hydrocarbons or ketones. The microtiter plate assay was evaluated using wild-type and recombinant strains of Shewanella oneidensis and Escherichia coli expressing the enzyme OleA, previously shown to initiate hydrocarbon biosynthesis. The strains expressing exogenous Stenotrophomonas maltophilia oleA, with increased levels of ketone production as determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, were distinguished with Nile red fluorescence. Confocal microscopy images of S. oneidensis oleA-expressing strains stained with Nile red were consistent with a membrane localization of the ketones. This differed from Nile red staining of bacterial PHB or algal lipid droplets that showed intracellular inclusion bodies. These results demonstrated the applicability of Nile red in a high-throughput technique for the detection of bacterial hydrocarbons and ketones. IMPORTANCE In recent years, there has been renewed interest in advanced biofuel sources such as bacterial hydrocarbon production. Previous studies used solvent extraction of bacterial cultures followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to detect and quantify ketones and hydrocarbons (Beller HR, Goh EB, Keasling JD, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 76: 1212-1223, 2010; Sukovich DJ, Seffernick JL, Richman JE, Gralnick JA, Wackett LP, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 76: 3850-3862, 2010). While these analyses are powerful and accurate, their labor-intensive nature makes them intractable to high-throughput screening; therefore, methods for rapid identification of bacterial strains that are overproducing hydrocarbons are needed. The use of high-throughput

  15. A Robust and Adaptable High Throughput Screening Method to Study Host-Microbiota Interactions in the Human Intestine

    PubMed Central

    de Wouters, Tomas; Ledue, Florence; Nepelska, Malgorzata; Doré, Joël; Blottière, Hervé M.; Lapaque, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota has many beneficial roles for its host. However, the precise mechanisms developed by the microbiota to influence the host intestinal cell responses are only partially known. The complexity of the ecosystem and our inability to culture most of these micro-organisms have led to the development of molecular approaches such as functional metagenomics, i.e. the heterologous expression of a metagenome in order to identify functions. This elegant strategy coupled to high throughput screening allowed to identify novel enzymes from different ecosystems where culture methods have not yet been adapted to isolate the candidate microorganisms. We have proposed to use this functional metagenomic approach in order to model the microbiota’s interaction with the host by combining this heterologous expression with intestinal reporter cell lines. The addition of the cellular component to this functional metagenomic approach introduced a second important source of variability resulting in a novel challenge for high throughput screening. First attempts of high throughput screening with various reporter cell-lines showed a high distribution of the response and consequent difficulties to reproduce the response, impairing an easy and clear identification of confirmed hits. In this study, we developed a robust and reproducible methodology to combine these two biological systems for high throughput application. We optimized experimental setups and completed them by appropriate statistical analysis tools allowing the use this innovative approach in a high throughput manner and on a broad range of reporter assays. We herewith present a methodology allowing a high throughput screening combining two biological systems. Therefore ideal conditions for homogeneity, sensitivity and reproducibility of both metagenomic clones as well as reporter cell lines have been identified and validated. We believe that this innovative method will allow the identification of new

  16. High-Throughput Sequence Analysis of Turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) Transcriptome Using 454-Pyrosequencing for the Discovery of Antiviral Immune Genes

    PubMed Central

    Pereiro, Patricia; Balseiro, Pablo; Romero, Alejandro; Dios, Sonia; Forn-Cuni, Gabriel; Fuste, Berta; Planas, Josep V.; Beltran, Sergi; Novoa, Beatriz; Figueras, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Background Turbot (Scophthalmus maximus L.) is an important aquacultural resource both in Europe and Asia. However, there is little information on gene sequences available in public databases. Currently, one of the main problems affecting the culture of this flatfish is mortality due to several pathogens, especially viral diseases which are not treatable. In order to identify new genes involved in immune defense, we conducted 454-pyrosequencing of the turbot transcriptome after different immune stimulations. Methodology/Principal Findings Turbot were injected with viral stimuli to increase the expression level of immune-related genes. High-throughput deep sequencing using 454-pyrosequencing technology yielded 915,256 high-quality reads. These sequences were assembled into 55,404 contigs that were subjected to annotation steps. Intriguingly, 55.16% of the deduced protein was not significantly similar to any sequences in the databases used for the annotation and only 0.85% of the BLASTx top-hits matched S. maximus protein sequences. This relatively low level of annotation is possibly due to the limited information for this specie and other flatfish in the database. These results suggest the identification of a large number of new genes in turbot and in fish in general. A more detailed analysis showed the presence of putative members of several innate and specific immune pathways. Conclusions/Significance To our knowledge, this study is the first transcriptome analysis using 454-pyrosequencing for turbot. Previously, there were only 12,471 EST and less of 1,500 nucleotide sequences for S. maximus in NCBI database. Our results provide a rich source of data (55,404 contigs and 181,845 singletons) for discovering and identifying new genes, which will serve as a basis for microarray construction, gene expression characterization and for identification of genetic markers to be used in several applications. Immune stimulation in turbot was very effective, obtaining an

  17. Food Microbial Pathogen Detection and Analysis Using DNA Microarray Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Herold, Keith E.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Culture-based methods used for microbial detection and identification are simple to use, relatively inexpensive, and sensitive. However, culture-based methods are too time-consuming for high-throughput testing and too tedious for analysis of samples with multiple organisms and provide little clinical information regarding the pathogen (e.g., antibiotic resistance genes, virulence factors, or strain subtype). DNA-based methods, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), overcome some these limitations since they are generally faster and can provide more information than culture-based methods. One limitation of traditional PCR-based methods is that they are normally limited to the analysis of a single pathogen, a small group of related pathogens, or a small number of relevant genes. Microarray technology enables a significant expansion of the capability of DNA-based methods in terms of the number of DNA sequences that can be analyzed simultaneously, enabling molecular identification and characterization of multiple pathogens and many genes in a single array assay. Microarray analysis of microbial pathogens has potential uses in research, food safety, medical, agricultural, regulatory, public health, and industrial settings. In this article, we describe the main technical elements of microarray technology and the application and potential use of DNA microarrays for food microbial analysis. PMID:18673074

  18. Challenges of microarray applications for microbial detection and gene expression profiling in food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microarray technology represents one of the latest advances in molecular biology. The diverse types of microarrays have been applied to clinical and environmental microbiology, microbial ecology, and in human, veterinary, and plant diagnostics. Since multiple genes can be analyzed simultaneously, ...

  19. Advancing translational research with next-generation protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaobo; Petritis, Brianne; LaBaer, Joshua

    2016-04-01

    Protein microarrays are a high-throughput technology used increasingly in translational research, seeking to apply basic science findings to enhance human health. In addition to assessing protein levels, posttranslational modifications, and signaling pathways in patient samples, protein microarrays have aided in the identification of potential protein biomarkers of disease and infection. In this perspective, the different types of full-length protein microarrays that are used in translational research are reviewed. Specific studies employing these microarrays are presented to highlight their potential in finding solutions to real clinical problems. Finally, the criteria that should be considered when developing next-generation protein microarrays are provided. PMID:26749402

  20. IRAS: High-Throughput Identification of Novel Alternative Splicing Regulators.

    PubMed

    Zheng, S

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a fundamental regulatory process of gene expression. Defects in alternative splicing can lead to various diseases, and modification of disease-causing splicing events presents great therapeutic promise. Splicing outcome is commonly affected by extracellular stimuli and signaling cascades that converge on RNA-binding splicing regulators. These trans-acting factors recognize cis-elements in pre-mRNA transcripts to affect spliceosome assembly and splice site choices. Identification of these splicing regulators and/or upstream modulators has been difficult and traditionally done by piecemeal. High-throughput screening strategies to find multiple regulators of exon splicing have great potential to accelerate the discovery process, but typically confront low sensitivity and low specificity of screening assays. Here we describe a unique screening strategy, IRAS (identifying regulators of alternative splicing), using a pair of dual-output minigene reporters to allow for sensitive detection of exon splicing changes. Each dual-output reporter produces green fluorescent protein (GFP) and red fluorescent protein (RFP) fluorescent signals to assay the two spliced isoforms exclusively. The two complementary minigene reporters alter GFP/RFP output ratios in the opposite direction in response to splicing change. Applying IRAS in cell-based high-throughput screens allows sensitive and specific identification of splicing regulators and modulators for any alternative exons of interest. In comparison to previous high-throughput screening methods, IRAS substantially enhances the specificity of the screening assay. This strategy significantly eliminates false positives without sacrificing sensitive identification of true regulators of splicing. PMID:27241759

  1. Controlling high-throughput manufacturing at the nano-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Khershed P.

    2013-09-01

    Interest in nano-scale manufacturing research and development is growing. The reason is to accelerate the translation of discoveries and inventions of nanoscience and nanotechnology into products that would benefit industry, economy and society. Ongoing research in nanomanufacturing is focused primarily on developing novel nanofabrication techniques for a variety of applications—materials, energy, electronics, photonics, biomedical, etc. Our goal is to foster the development of high-throughput methods of fabricating nano-enabled products. Large-area parallel processing and highspeed continuous processing are high-throughput means for mass production. An example of large-area processing is step-and-repeat nanoimprinting, by which nanostructures are reproduced again and again over a large area, such as a 12 in wafer. Roll-to-roll processing is an example of continuous processing, by which it is possible to print and imprint multi-level nanostructures and nanodevices on a moving flexible substrate. The big pay-off is high-volume production and low unit cost. However, the anticipated cost benefits can only be realized if the increased production rate is accompanied by high yields of high quality products. To ensure product quality, we need to design and construct manufacturing systems such that the processes can be closely monitored and controlled. One approach is to bring cyber-physical systems (CPS) concepts to nanomanufacturing. CPS involves the control of a physical system such as manufacturing through modeling, computation, communication and control. Such a closely coupled system will involve in-situ metrology and closed-loop control of the physical processes guided by physics-based models and driven by appropriate instrumentation, sensing and actuation. This paper will discuss these ideas in the context of controlling high-throughput manufacturing at the nano-scale.

  2. Developing High-Throughput HIV Incidence Assay with Pyrosequencing Platform

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Yong; Goeken, Nolan; Lee, Hyo Jin; Bolan, Robert; Dubé, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) incidence is an important measure for monitoring the epidemic and evaluating the efficacy of intervention and prevention trials. This study developed a high-throughput, single-measure incidence assay by implementing a pyrosequencing platform. We devised a signal-masking bioinformatics pipeline, which yielded a process error rate of 5.8 × 10−4 per base. The pipeline was then applied to analyze 18,434 envelope gene segments (HXB2 7212 to 7601) obtained from 12 incident and 24 chronic patients who had documented HIV-negative and/or -positive tests. The pyrosequencing data were cross-checked by using the single-genome-amplification (SGA) method to independently obtain 302 sequences from 13 patients. Using two genomic biomarkers that probe for the presence of similar sequences, the pyrosequencing platform correctly classified all 12 incident subjects (100% sensitivity) and 23 of 24 chronic subjects (96% specificity). One misclassified subject's chronic infection was correctly classified by conducting the same analysis with SGA data. The biomarkers were statistically associated across the two platforms, suggesting the assay's reproducibility and robustness. Sampling simulations showed that the biomarkers were tolerant of sequencing errors and template resampling, two factors most likely to affect the accuracy of pyrosequencing results. We observed comparable biomarker scores between AIDS and non-AIDS chronic patients (multivariate analysis of variance [MANOVA], P = 0.12), indicating that the stage of HIV disease itself does not affect the classification scheme. The high-throughput genomic HIV incidence marks a significant step toward determining incidence from a single measure in cross-sectional surveys. IMPORTANCE Annual HIV incidence, the number of newly infected individuals within a year, is the key measure of monitoring the epidemic's rise and decline. Developing reliable assays differentiating recent from chronic

  3. High-throughput sequencing: a roadmap toward community ecology.

    PubMed

    Poisot, Timothée; Péquin, Bérangère; Gravel, Dominique

    2013-04-01

    High-throughput sequencing is becoming increasingly important in microbial ecology, yet it is surprisingly under-used to generate or test biogeographic hypotheses. In this contribution, we highlight how adding these methods to the ecologist toolbox will allow the detection of new patterns, and will help our understanding of the structure and dynamics of diversity. Starting with a review of ecological questions that can be addressed, we move on to the technical and analytical issues that will benefit from an increased collaboration between different disciplines. PMID:23610649

  4. Adaptive Sampling for High Throughput Data Using Similarity Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Bulaevskaya, V.; Sales, A. P.

    2015-05-06

    The need for adaptive sampling arises in the context of high throughput data because the rates of data arrival are many orders of magnitude larger than the rates at which they can be analyzed. A very fast decision must therefore be made regarding the value of each incoming observation and its inclusion in the analysis. In this report we discuss one approach to adaptive sampling, based on the new data point’s similarity to the other data points being considered for inclusion. We present preliminary results for one real and one synthetic data set.

  5. Creation of a small high-throughput screening facility.

    PubMed

    Flak, Tod

    2009-01-01

    The creation of a high-throughput screening facility within an organization is a difficult task, requiring a substantial investment of time, money, and organizational effort. Major issues to consider include the selection of equipment, the establishment of data analysis methodologies, and the formation of a group having the necessary competencies. If done properly, it is possible to build a screening system in incremental steps, adding new pieces of equipment and data analysis modules as the need grows. Based upon our experience with the creation of a small screening service, we present some guidelines to consider in planning a screening facility. PMID:19551356

  6. High throughput computing: a solution for scientific analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Donnell, M.

    2011-01-01

    handle job failures due to hardware, software, or network interruptions (obviating the need to manually resubmit the job after each stoppage); be affordable; and most importantly, allow us to complete very large, complex analyses that otherwise would not even be possible. In short, we envisioned a job-management system that would take advantage of unused FORT CPUs within a local area network (LAN) to effectively distribute and run highly complex analytical processes. What we found was a solution that uses High Throughput Computing (HTC) and High Performance Computing (HPC) systems to do exactly that (Figure 1).

  7. A probabilistic approach to high throughput drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Labute, Paul; Nilar, Shahul; Williams, Christopher

    2002-03-01

    A methodology is presented in which high throughput screening experimental data are used to construct a probabilistic QSAR model which is subsequently used to select building blocks for a virtual combinatorial library. The methodology is based upon statistical probability estimation and not regression. The methodology is applied to the construction of two focused virtual combinatorial libraries: one for cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase type V inhibitors and one for acyl-CoA:cholesterol O-acyltransferase inhibitors. The results suggest that the methodology is capable of selecting combinatorial substituents that lead to active compounds starting with binary (pass/fail) activity measurements. PMID:11966422

  8. SSFinder: high throughput CRISPR-Cas target sites prediction tool.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar; Sharma, Shailesh

    2014-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) system facilitates targeted genome editing in organisms. Despite high demand of this system, finding a reliable tool for the determination of specific target sites in large genomic data remained challenging. Here, we report SSFinder, a python script to perform high throughput detection of specific target sites in large nucleotide datasets. The SSFinder is a user-friendly tool, compatible with Windows, Mac OS, and Linux operating systems, and freely available online. PMID:25089276

  9. Computational Proteomics: High-throughput Analysis for Systems Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, William R.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.

    2007-01-03

    High-throughput (HTP) proteomics is a rapidly developing field that offers the global profiling of proteins from a biological system. The HTP technological advances are fueling a revolution in biology, enabling analyses at the scales of entire systems (e.g., whole cells, tumors, or environmental communities). However, simply identifying the proteins in a cell is insufficient for understanding the underlying complexity and operating mechanisms of the overall system. Systems level investigations are relying more and more on computational analyses, especially in the field of proteomics generating large-scale global data.

  10. Towards A Fully Automated High-Throughput Phototransfection System

    PubMed Central

    Cappelleri, David J.; Halasz, Adam; Sul, Jai-Yoon; Kim, Tae Kyung; Eberwine, James; Kumar, Vijay

    2010-01-01

    We have designed and implemented a framework for creating a fully automated high-throughput phototransfection system. Integrated image processing, laser target position calculation, and stage movements show a throughput increase of > 23X over the current manual phototransfection method while the potential for even greater throughput improvements (> 110X) is described. A software tool for automated off-line single cell morphological measurements, as well as real-time image segmentation analysis, has also been constructed and shown to be able quantify changes in the cell before and after the process, successfully characterizing them, using metrics such as cell perimeter, area, major and minor axis length, and eccentricity values. PMID:20706617

  11. Extended length microchannels for high density high throughput electrophoresis systems

    DOEpatents

    Davidson, James C.; Balch, Joseph W.

    2000-01-01

    High throughput electrophoresis systems which provide extended well-to-read distances on smaller substrates, thus compacting the overall systems. The electrophoresis systems utilize a high density array of microchannels for electrophoresis analysis with extended read lengths. The microchannel geometry can be used individually or in conjunction to increase the effective length of a separation channel while minimally impacting the packing density of channels. One embodiment uses sinusoidal microchannels, while another embodiment uses plural microchannels interconnected by a via. The extended channel systems can be applied to virtually any type of channel confined chromatography.

  12. High-Throughput Sequencing: A Roadmap Toward Community Ecology

    PubMed Central

    Poisot, Timothée; Péquin, Bérangère; Gravel, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing is becoming increasingly important in microbial ecology, yet it is surprisingly under-used to generate or test biogeographic hypotheses. In this contribution, we highlight how adding these methods to the ecologist toolbox will allow the detection of new patterns, and will help our understanding of the structure and dynamics of diversity. Starting with a review of ecological questions that can be addressed, we move on to the technical and analytical issues that will benefit from an increased collaboration between different disciplines. PMID:23610649

  13. Bias in High-Throughput Analysis of miRNAs and Implications for Biomarker Studies.

    PubMed

    Backes, Christina; Sedaghat-Hamedani, Farbod; Frese, Karen; Hart, Martin; Ludwig, Nicole; Meder, Benjamin; Meese, Eckart; Keller, Andreas

    2016-02-16

    A certain degree of bias in high-throughput molecular technologies including microarrays and next-generation sequencing (NGS) is known. To quantify the actual impact of the biomarker discovery platform on miRNA profiles, we first performed a meta-analysis: raw data of 1 539 microarrays and 705 NGS blood-borne miRNomes were statistically evaluated, suggesting a substantial influence of the technology on biomarker profiles. We observed highly significant dependency of the miRNA nucleotide composition on the expression level. Higher expression in NGS was discovered for uracil-rich miRNAs (p = 7 × 10(-37)), while high expression in microarrays was found predominantly for guanine-rich miRNAs (p = 3 × 10(-33)). To verify the findings, 10 identical replicates of one individual were measured using NGS and microarrays (2 525 miRNAs from miRBase version 21). Overall, we calculated a correlation coefficient of 0.414 for both technologies. Detailed analysis however revealed that the correlation was observed only for miRNAs in the early miRBase versions (<8). The majority of miRNAs (2 013 from miRBase version 8 onward) was not correlated between microarray and NGS. Specifically, we observed 67 miRNAs with a median read count above 10 in NGS, while they were not detected in any of the 10 replicated array experiments. In contrast, 234 miRNAs were discovered in all 10 replicated array measurements but were not found in any of the NGS experiments of the same individual. While the first group had average guanine content of 22%, the latter group consisted of 41% of this nucleotide. Selected concordant and discordant miRNAs were tested in quantitative real-time-polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) experiments again of the same individual, providing further evidence for the substantial bias depending on the base composition. As a consequence, biomarkers that have been discovered by specific high-throughout technologies have to be carefully considered. Especially for validation

  14. Microarray applications to understand the impact of exposure to environmental contaminants in wild dolphins (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    Mancia, Annalaura; Abelli, Luigi; Kucklick, John R; Rowles, Teresa K; Wells, Randall S; Balmer, Brian C; Hohn, Aleta A; Baatz, John E; Ryan, James C

    2015-02-01

    It is increasingly common to monitor the marine environment and establish geographic trends of environmental contamination by measuring contaminant levels in animals from higher trophic levels. The health of an ecosystem is largely reflected in the health of its inhabitants. As an apex predator, the common bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) can reflect the health of near shore marine ecosystems, and reflect coastal threats that pose risk to human health, such as legacy contaminants or marine toxins, e.g. polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and brevetoxins. Major advances in the understanding of dolphin biology and the unique adaptations of these animals in response to the marine environment are being made as a result of the development of cell-lines for use in in vitro experiments, the production of monoclonal antibodies to recognize dolphin proteins, the development of dolphin DNA microarrays to measure global gene expression and the sequencing of the dolphin genome. These advances may play a central role in understanding the complex and specialized biology of the dolphin with regard to how this species responds to an array of environmental insults. This work presents the creation, characterization and application of a new molecular tool to better understand the complex and unique biology of the common bottlenose dolphin and its response to environmental stress and infection. A dolphin oligo microarray representing 24,418 unigene sequences was developed and used to analyze blood samples collected from 69 dolphins during capture-release health assessments at five geographic locations (Beaufort, NC, Sarasota Bay, FL, Saint Joseph Bay, FL, Sapelo Island, GA and Brunswick, GA). The microarray was validated and tested for its ability to: 1) distinguish male from female dolphins; 2) differentiate dolphins inhabiting different geographic locations (Atlantic coasts vs the Gulf of Mexico); and 3) study in detail dolphins resident in one site, the Georgia coast, known to

  15. Microfluidic Impedance Flow Cytometry Enabling High-Throughput Single-Cell Electrical Property Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Xue, Chengcheng; Zhao, Yang; Chen, Deyong; Wu, Min-Hsien; Wang, Junbo

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews recent developments in microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for high-throughput electrical property characterization of single cells. Four major perspectives of microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for single-cell characterization are included in this review: (1) early developments of microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for single-cell electrical property characterization; (2) microfluidic impedance flow cytometry with enhanced sensitivity; (3) microfluidic impedance and optical flow cytometry for single-cell analysis and (4) integrated point of care system based on microfluidic impedance flow cytometry. We examine the advantages and limitations of each technique and discuss future research opportunities from the perspectives of both technical innovation and clinical applications. PMID:25938973

  16. Infrared thermography as a high-throughput tool in catalysis research.

    PubMed

    Loskyll, Jonas; Stoewe, Klaus; Maier, Wilhelm F

    2012-05-14

    The so-called "emissivity corrected infrared thermography" (ecIRT) has been successfully developed and used to great effect in the field of combinatorial high-throughput studies in catalysis. A short introduction to the basics of ecIRT and the description of a typical setup is given. Research efforts from 1998 until present are summarized and selected publications with IRT applications in catalysis are highlighted. The last section of the article covers potential problems, which the observant may misinterpret as activity of the materials. The effects are classified and it is explained why they occur and what can be done to bypass them. PMID:22432458

  17. High-throughput realization of an infrared selective absorber/emitter by DUV microsphere projection lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonakdar, Alireza; Rezaei, Mohsen; Dexheimer, Eric; Mohseni, Hooman

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a low-cost and high-throughput nanofabrication method to realize metasurfaces that have selective absorption/emission in the mid-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. We have developed DUV projection lithography to produce arbitrary patterns with sub-80 nm feature sizes. As examples of practical applications, we experimentally demonstrate structures with single and double spectral absorption/emission features, and in close agreement with numerical simulation. The fundamental mechanism of perfect absorption is discussed as well. Selective infrared absorbers/emitters are critical elements in realizing efficient thermophotovoltaic cells and high-performance biosensors.

  18. High-throughput realization of an infrared selective absorber/emitter by DUV microsphere projection lithography.

    PubMed

    Bonakdar, Alireza; Rezaei, Mohsen; Dexheimer, Eric; Mohseni, Hooman

    2016-01-22

    In this paper, we present a low-cost and high-throughput nanofabrication method to realize metasurfaces that have selective absorption/emission in the mid-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. We have developed DUV projection lithography to produce arbitrary patterns with sub-80 nm feature sizes. As examples of practical applications, we experimentally demonstrate structures with single and double spectral absorption/emission features, and in close agreement with numerical simulation. The fundamental mechanism of perfect absorption is discussed as well. Selective infrared absorbers/emitters are critical elements in realizing efficient thermophotovoltaic cells and high-performance biosensors. PMID:26650855

  19. High-throughput gated photon counter with two detection windows programmable down to 70 ps width

    SciTech Connect

    Boso, Gianluca; Tosi, Alberto Zappa, Franco; Mora, Alberto Dalla

    2014-01-15

    We present the design and characterization of a high-throughput gated photon counter able to count electrical pulses occurring within two well-defined and programmable detection windows. We extensively characterized and validated this instrument up to 100 Mcounts/s and with detection window width down to 70 ps. This instrument is suitable for many applications and proves to be a cost-effective and compact alternative to time-correlated single-photon counting equipment, thanks to its easy configurability, user-friendly interface, and fully adjustable settings via a Universal Serial Bus (USB) link to a remote computer.

  20. HIPMap: A High-Throughput Imaging Method for Mapping Spatial Gene Positions.

    PubMed

    Shachar, Sigal; Pegoraro, Gianluca; Misteli, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The three-dimensional organization of genes inside the cell nucleus affects their functions including DNA transcription, replication, and repair. A major goal in the field of nuclear architecture is to determine what cellular factors establish and maintain the position of individual genes. Here, we describe HIPMap, a high-throughput imaging and analysis pipeline for the mapping of endogenous gene loci within the 3D space of the nucleus. HIPMap can be used for a variety of applications including screening, mapping translocations, validating chromosome conformation capture data, probing DNA-protein interactions, and interrogation of the relationship of gene expression with localization. PMID:26472748

  1. An inexpensive high-throughput nuclear magnetic resonance tube cleaning apparatus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Hodgson, James; Hancock, Walter; Powers, Robert

    2011-09-15

    Large-scale nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) tube cleaning is currently a bottleneck in high-throughput NMR ligand affinity screens. Expensive alternatives include discarding the NMR tubes after a single use (~US $2-$8/tube), using commercial NMR tube cleaners (~$15,000), and abandoning NMR tubes for flow probe technology (~$75,000). Instead, we describe a relatively inexpensive (~$400) and easily constructed apparatus that can clean 180 NMR tubes per hour while using a modest amount of solvent. The application of this apparatus significantly shortens the time to recycle NMR tubes while avoiding cross-contamination and tube damage. PMID:21640698

  2. A Bayesian approach to analyzing phenotype microarray data enables estimation of microbial growth parameters.

    PubMed

    Gerstgrasser, Matthias; Nicholls, Sarah; Stout, Michael; Smart, Katherine; Powell, Chris; Kypraios, Theodore; Stekel, Dov

    2016-06-01

    Biolog phenotype microarrays (PMs) enable simultaneous, high throughput analysis of cell cultures in different environments. The output is high-density time-course data showing redox curves (approximating growth) for each experimental condition. The software provided with the Omnilog incubator/reader summarizes each time-course as a single datum, so most of the information is not used. However, the time courses can be extremely varied and often contain detailed qualitative (shape of curve) and quantitative (values of parameters) information. We present a novel, Bayesian approach to estimating parameters from Phenotype Microarray data, fitting growth models using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods to enable high throughput estimation of important information, including length of lag phase, maximal "growth" rate and maximum output. We find that the Baranyi model for microbial growth is useful for fitting Biolog data. Moreover, we introduce a new growth model that allows for diauxic growth with a lag phase, which is particularly useful where Phenotype Microarrays have been applied to cells grown in complex mixtures of substrates, for example in industrial or biotechnological applications, such as worts in brewing. Our approach provides more useful information from Biolog data than existing, competing methods, and allows for valuable comparisons between data series and across different models. PMID:26762475

  3. Testing for mean and correlation changes in microarray experiments: an application for pathway analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Microarray experiments examine the change in transcript levels of tens of thousands of genes simultaneously. To derive meaningful data, biologists investigate the response of genes within specific pathways. Pathways are comprised of genes that interact to carry out a particular biological function. Existing methods for analyzing pathways focus on detecting changes in the mean or over-representation of the number of differentially expressed genes relative to the total of genes within the pathway. The issue of how to incorporate the influence of correlation among the genes is not generally addressed. Results In this paper, we propose a non-parametric rank test for analyzing pathways that takes into account the correlation among the genes and compared two existing methods, Global and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA), using two publicly available data sets. A simulation study was conducted to demonstrate the advantage of the rank test method. Conclusions The data indicate the advantages of the rank test. The method can distinguish significant changes in pathways due to either correlations or changes in the mean or both. From the simulation study the rank test out performed Global and GSEA. The greatest gain in performance was for the sample size case which makes the application of the rank test ideal for microarray experiments. PMID:20109181

  4. [Differential gene expression analysis by DNA microarrays technology and its application in molecular oncology].

    PubMed

    Frolov, A E; Godwin, A K; Favorova, O O

    2003-01-01

    Accumulation of genetic and epigenetic aberrations leads to malignant transformation of normal cells. Functional studies of cancer using genomic and proteomic tools will help to reveal the true complexity of the processes leading to cancer development in humans. Until recently, diagnosis and prognosis of cancer was based on conventional pathologic criteria and epidemiological evidence. Certain tumors were divided only into relatively broad histological and morphological subcategories. Rapidly developing methods of differential gene expression analysis promote the search for clinically relevant genes changing their expression levels during malignant transformation. DNA microarrays offer a unique possibility to rapidly assess the global expression picture of thousands genes in any given time point and compare the detailed combinatory analysis results of global expression profiles for normal and malignant cells at various functional stages or separate experimental conditions. Acquisition of such "genetic portraits" allows searching for regularity and difference in expression patterns of certain genes, understanding their function and pathological importance, and ultimately developing the "molecular nosology" of cancer. This review describes the basis of DNA microarray technology and methodology, and focuses on their applications in molecular classification of tumors, drug sensitivity and resistance studies, and identification of biological markers of cancer. PMID:12942629

  5. Application of Fluorescent Monocytes for Probing Immune Complexes on Antigen Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Szittner, Zoltán; Papp, Krisztián; Sándor, Noémi; Bajtay, Zsuzsa; Prechl, József

    2013-01-01

    Microarrayed antigens are used for identifying serum antibodies with given specificities and for generating binding profiles. Antibodies bind to these arrayed antigens forming immune complexes and are conventionally identified by secondary labelled antibodies.In the body immune complexes are identified by bone marrow derived phagocytic cells, such as monocytes. In our work we were looking into the possibility of replacing secondary antibodies with monocytoid cells for the generation of antibody profiles. Using the human monocytoid cell line U937, which expresses cell surface receptors for immune complex components, we show that cell adhesion is completely dependent on the interaction of IgG heavy chains and Fcγ receptors, and this recognition is susceptible to differences between heavy chain structures and their glycosylation. We also report data on a possible application of this system in autoimmune diagnostics.Compared to secondary antibodies, fluorescent monocytesas biosensors are superior in reflecting biological functions of microarray-bound antibodies and represent an easy and robust alternative for profiling interactions between serum proteins and antigens. PMID:24039758

  6. A high-throughput, multi-channel photon-counting detector with picosecond timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapington, J. S.; Fraser, G. W.; Miller, G. M.; Ashton, T. J. R.; Jarron, P.; Despeisse, M.; Powolny, F.; Howorth, J.; Milnes, J.

    2009-06-01

    High-throughput photon counting with high time resolution is a niche application area where vacuum tubes can still outperform solid-state devices. Applications in the life sciences utilizing time-resolved spectroscopies, particularly in the growing field of proteomics, will benefit greatly from performance enhancements in event timing and detector throughput. The HiContent project is a collaboration between the University of Leicester Space Research Centre, the Microelectronics Group at CERN, Photek Ltd., and end-users at the Gray Cancer Institute and the University of Manchester. The goal is to develop a detector system specifically designed for optical proteomics, capable of high content (multi-parametric) analysis at high throughput. The HiContent detector system is being developed to exploit this niche market. It combines multi-channel, high time resolution photon counting in a single miniaturized detector system with integrated electronics. The combination of enabling technologies; small pore microchannel plate devices with very high time resolution, and high-speed multi-channel ASIC electronics developed for the LHC at CERN, provides the necessary building blocks for a high-throughput detector system with up to 1024 parallel counting channels and 20 ps time resolution. We describe the detector and electronic design, discuss the current status of the HiContent project and present the results from a 64-channel prototype system. In the absence of an operational detector, we present measurements of the electronics performance using a pulse generator to simulate detector events. Event timing results from the NINO high-speed front-end ASIC captured using a fast digital oscilloscope are compared with data taken with the proposed electronic configuration which uses the multi-channel HPTDC timing ASIC.

  7. Reconfigurable microfluidic dilution for high-throughput quantitative assays.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jinzhen; Li, Baoqing; Xing, Siyuan; Pan, Tingrui

    2015-06-21

    This paper reports a reconfigurable microfluidic dilution device for high-throughput quantitative assays, which can easily produce discrete logarithmic/binary concentration profiles ranging from 1 to 100-fold dilution in parallel from a fixed sample volume (e.g., 10 μL) without any assistance of continuous fluidic pump or robotic automation. The integrated dilution generation chip consists of switchable distribution and collection channels, metering reservoirs, reaction chambers, and pressure-activatable Laplace valves. Following the sequential loading of a sample, a diluent, and a detection reagent into their individual metering chambers, the top microfluidic layer can be reconfigured to collect the metered chemicals into the reaction chambers in parallel, where detection will be conducted. To facilitate mixing and reaction in the microchambers, two acoustic microstreaming actuation mechanisms have been investigated for easy integrability and accessibility. Furthermore, the microfluidic dilution generator has been characterized by both colorimetric and fluorescent means. A further demonstration of the generic usage of the quantitative dilution chip has utilized the commonly available bicinchoninic acid (BCA) assay to analyse the protein concentrations of human tissue extracts. In brief, the microfluidic dilution generator offers a high-throughput high-efficiency quantitative analytical alternative to conventional quantitative assay platforms, by simple manipulation of a minute amount of chemicals in a compact microfluidic device with minimal equipment requirement, which can serve as a facile tool for biochemical and biological analyses in regular laboratories, point-of-care settings and low-resource environments. PMID:25994379

  8. High-throughput protein analysis integrating bioinformatics and experimental assays.

    PubMed

    del Val, Coral; Mehrle, Alexander; Falkenhahn, Mechthild; Seiler, Markus; Glatting, Karl-Heinz; Poustka, Annemarie; Suhai, Sandor; Wiemann, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    The wealth of transcript information that has been made publicly available in recent years requires the development of high-throughput functional genomics and proteomics approaches for its analysis. Such approaches need suitable data integration procedures and a high level of automation in order to gain maximum benefit from the results generated. We have designed an automatic pipeline to analyse annotated open reading frames (ORFs) stemming from full-length cDNAs produced mainly by the German cDNA Consortium. The ORFs are cloned into expression vectors for use in large-scale assays such as the determination of subcellular protein localization or kinase reaction specificity. Additionally, all identified ORFs undergo exhaustive bioinformatic analysis such as similarity searches, protein domain architecture determination and prediction of physicochemical characteristics and secondary structure, using a wide variety of bioinformatic methods in combination with the most up-to-date public databases (e.g. PRINTS, BLOCKS, INTERPRO, PROSITE SWISSPROT). Data from experimental results and from the bioinformatic analysis are integrated and stored in a relational database (MS SQL-Server), which makes it possible for researchers to find answers to biological questions easily, thereby speeding up the selection of targets for further analysis. The designed pipeline constitutes a new automatic approach to obtaining and administrating relevant biological data from high-throughput investigations of cDNAs in order to systematically identify and characterize novel genes, as well as to comprehensively describe the function of the encoded proteins. PMID:14762202

  9. High-throughput technology for novel SO2 oxidation catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loskyll, Jonas; Stoewe, Klaus; Maier, Wilhelm F.

    2011-10-01

    We review the state of the art and explain the need for better SO2 oxidation catalysts for the production of sulfuric acid. A high-throughput technology has been developed for the study of potential catalysts in the oxidation of SO2 to SO3. High-throughput methods are reviewed and the problems encountered with their adaptation to the corrosive conditions of SO2 oxidation are described. We show that while emissivity-corrected infrared thermography (ecIRT) can be used for primary screening, it is prone to errors because of the large variations in the emissivity of the catalyst surface. UV-visible (UV-Vis) spectrometry was selected instead as a reliable analysis method of monitoring the SO2 conversion. Installing plain sugar absorbents at reactor outlets proved valuable for the detection and quantitative removal of SO3 from the product gas before the UV-Vis analysis. We also overview some elements used for prescreening and those remaining after the screening of the first catalyst generations.

  10. High-throughput screening with micro-x-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havrilla, George J.; Miller, Thomasin C.

    2005-06-01

    Micro-x-ray fluorescence (MXRF) is a useful characterization tool for high-throughput screening of combinatorial libraries. Due to the increasing threat of use of chemical warfare (CW) agents both in military actions and against civilians by terrorist extremists, there is a strong push to improve existing methods and develop means for the detection of a broad spectrum of CW agents in a minimal amount of time to increase national security. This paper describes a combinatorial high-throughput screening technique for CW receptor discovery to aid in sensor development. MXRF can screen materials for elemental composition at the mesoscale level (tens to hundreds of micrometers). The key aspect of this work is the use of commercial MXRF instrumentation coupled with the inherent heteroatom elements within the target molecules of the combinatorial reaction to provide rapid and specific identification of lead species. The method is demonstrated by screening an 11-mer oligopeptide library for selective binding of the degradation products of the nerve agent VX. The identified oligopeptides can be used as selective molecular receptors for sensor development. The MXRF screening method is nondestructive, requires minimal sample preparation or special tags for analysis, and the screening time depends on the desired sensitivity.

  11. High-throughput assays for DNA gyrase and other topoisomerases.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Anthony; Burton, Nicolas P; O'Hagan, Natasha

    2006-01-01

    We have developed high-throughput microtitre plate-based assays for DNA gyrase and other DNA topoisomerases. These assays exploit the fact that negatively supercoiled plasmids form intermolecular triplexes more efficiently than when they are relaxed. Two assays are presented, one using capture of a plasmid containing a single triplex-forming sequence by an oligonucleotide tethered to the surface of a microtitre plate and subsequent detection by staining with a DNA-specific fluorescent dye. The other uses capture of a plasmid containing two triplex-forming sequences by an oligonucleotide tethered to the surface of a microtitre plate and subsequent detection by a second oligonucleotide that is radiolabelled. The assays are shown to be appropriate for assaying DNA supercoiling by Escherichia coli DNA gyrase and DNA relaxation by eukaryotic topoisomerases I and II, and E.coli topoisomerase IV. The assays are readily adaptable to other enzymes that change DNA supercoiling (e.g. restriction enzymes) and are suitable for use in a high-throughput format. PMID:16936317

  12. Empirical assessment of sequencing errors for high throughput pyrosequencing data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sequencing-by-synthesis technologies significantly improve over the Sanger method in terms of speed and cost per base. However, they still usually fail to compete in terms of read length and quality. Current high-throughput implementations of the pyrosequencing technique yield reads whose length approach those of the capillary electrophoresis method. A less obvious question is whether their quality is affected by platform-specific sequencing errors. Results We present an empirical study aimed at assessing the quality and characterising sequencing errors for high throughput pyrosequencing data. We have developed a procedure for extracting sequencing error data from genome assemblies and study their characteristics, in particular the length distribution of indel gaps and their relation to the sequence contexts where they occur. We used this procedure to analyse data from three prokaryotic genomes sequenced with the GS FLX technology. We also compared two models previously employed with success for peptide sequence alignment. Conclusions We observed an overall very low error rate in the analysed data, with indel errors being much more abundant than substitutions. We also observed a dependence between the length of the gaps and that of the homopolymer context where they occur. As with protein alignments, a power-law model seems to approximate the indel errors more accurately, although the results are not so conclusive as to justify a depart from the commonly used affine gap penalty scheme. In whichever case, however, our procedure can be used to estimate more realistic error model parameters. PMID:23339526

  13. High-Throughput Screening Uncovers Novel Botulinum Neurotoxin Inhibitor Chemotypes.

    PubMed

    Bompiani, Kristin M; Caglič, Dejan; Krutein, Michelle C; Benoni, Galit; Hrones, Morgan; Lairson, Luke L; Bian, Haiyan; Smith, Garry R; Dickerson, Tobin J

    2016-08-01

    Botulism is caused by potent and specific bacterial neurotoxins that infect host neurons and block neurotransmitter release. Treatment for botulism is limited to administration of an antitoxin within a short time window, before the toxin enters neurons. Alternatively, current botulism drug development targets the toxin light chain, which is a zinc-dependent metalloprotease that is delivered into neurons and mediates long-term pathology. Several groups have identified inhibitory small molecules, peptides, or aptamers, although no molecule has advanced to the clinic due to a lack of efficacy in advanced models. Here we used a homogeneous high-throughput enzyme assay to screen three libraries of drug-like small molecules for new chemotypes that modulate recombinant botulinum neurotoxin light chain activity. High-throughput screening of 97088 compounds identified numerous small molecules that activate or inhibit metalloprotease activity. We describe four major classes of inhibitory compounds identified, detail their structure-activity relationships, and assess their relative inhibitory potency. A previously unreported chemotype in any context of enzyme inhibition is described with potent submicromolar inhibition (Ki = 200-300 nM). Additional detailed kinetic analyses and cellular cytotoxicity assays indicate the best compound from this series is a competitive inhibitor with cytotoxicity values around 4-5 μM. Given the potency and drug-like character of these lead compounds, further studies, including cellular activity assays and DMPK analysis, are justified. PMID:27314875

  14. High resolution hyperspectral imaging with a high throughput virtual slit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooding, Edward A.; Gunn, Thomas; Cenko, Andrew T.; Hajian, Arsen R.

    2016-05-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) device users often require both high spectral resolution, on the order of 1 nm, and high light-gathering power. A wide entrance slit assures reasonable étendue but degrades spectral resolution. Spectrometers built using High Throughput Virtual Slit™ (HTVS) technology optimize both parameters simultaneously. Two remote sensing use cases that require high spectral resolution are discussed. First, detection of atmospheric gases with intrinsically narrow absorption lines, such as hydrocarbon vapors or combustion exhaust gases such as NOx and CO2. Detecting exhaust gas species with high precision has become increasingly important in the light of recent events in the automobile industry. Second, distinguishing reflected daylight from emission spectra in the visible and NIR (VNIR) regions is most easily accomplished using the Fraunhofer absorption lines in solar spectra. While ground reflectance spectral features in the VNIR are generally quite broad, the Fraunhofer lines are narrow and provide a signature of intrinsic vs. extrinsic illumination. The High Throughput Virtual Slit enables higher spectral resolution than is achievable with conventional spectrometers by manipulating the beam profile in pupil space. By reshaping the instrument pupil with reflective optics, HTVS-equipped instruments create a tall, narrow image profile at the exit focal plane, typically delivering 5X or better the spectral resolution achievable with a conventional design.

  15. High-throughput screening to enhance oncolytic virus immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Allan, K J; Stojdl, David F; Swift, S L

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput screens can rapidly scan and capture large amounts of information across multiple biological parameters. Although many screens have been designed to uncover potential new therapeutic targets capable of crippling viruses that cause disease, there have been relatively few directed at improving the efficacy of viruses that are used to treat disease. Oncolytic viruses (OVs) are biotherapeutic agents with an inherent specificity for treating malignant disease. Certain OV platforms - including those based on herpes simplex virus, reovirus, and vaccinia virus - have shown success against solid tumors in advanced clinical trials. Yet, many of these OVs have only undergone minimal engineering to solidify tumor specificity, with few extra modifications to manipulate additional factors. Several aspects of the interaction between an OV and a tumor-bearing host have clear value as targets to improve therapeutic outcomes. At the virus level, these include delivery to the tumor, infectivity, productivity, oncolysis, bystander killing, spread, and persistence. At the host level, these include engaging the immune system and manipulating the tumor microenvironment. Here, we review the chemical- and genome-based high-throughput screens that have been performed to manipulate such parameters during OV infection and analyze their impact on therapeutic efficacy. We further explore emerging themes that represent key areas of focus for future research. PMID:27579293

  16. High-throughput characterization for solar fuels materials discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrovic, Slobodan; Becerra, Natalie; Cornell, Earl; Guevarra, Dan; Haber, Joel; Jin, Jian; Jones, Ryan; Kan, Kevin; Marcin, Martin; Newhouse, Paul; Soedarmadji, Edwin; Suram, Santosh; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John; High-Throughput Experimentation Team

    2014-03-01

    In this talk I will present the status of the High-Throughput Experimentation (HTE) project of the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP). JCAP is an Energy Innovation Hub of the U.S. Department of Energy with a mandate to deliver a solar fuel generator based on an integrated photoelectrochemical cell (PEC). However, efficient and commercially viable catalysts or light absorbers for the PEC do not exist. The mission of HTE is to provide the accelerated discovery through combinatorial synthesis and rapid screening of material properties. The HTE pipeline also features high-throughput material characterization using x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). In this talk I present the currently operating pipeline and focus on our combinatorial XPS efforts to build the largest free database of spectra from mixed-metal oxides, nitrides, sulfides and alloys. This work was performed at Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, a DOE Energy Innovation Hub, supported through the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Award No. DE-SC0004993.

  17. A high throughput glucocerebrosidase assay using the natural substrate glucosylceramide.

    PubMed

    Motabar, Omid; Goldin, Ehud; Leister, William; Liu, Ke; Southall, Noel; Huang, Wenwei; Marugan, Juan J; Sidransky, Ellen; Zheng, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Glucocerebrosidase is a lysosomal enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of glucosylceramide to form ceramide and glucose. A deficiency of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase due to genetic mutations results in Gaucher disease, in which glucosylceramide accumulates in the lysosomes of certain cell types. Although enzyme replacement therapy is currently available for the treatment of type 1 Gaucher disease, the neuronopathic forms of Gaucher disease are still not treatable. Small molecule drugs that can penetrate the blood-brain barrier, such as pharmacological chaperones and enzyme activators, are new therapeutic approaches for Gaucher disease. Enzyme assays for glucocerebrosidase are used to screen compound libraries to identify new lead compounds for drug development for the treatment of Gaucher disease. But the current assays use artificial substrates that are not physiologically relevant. We developed a glucocerebrosidase assay using the natural substrate glucosylceramide coupled to an Amplex-red enzyme reporting system. This assay is in a homogenous assay format and has been miniaturized in a 1,536-well plate format for high throughput screening. The assay sensitivity and robustness is similar to those seen with other glucocerebrosidase fluorescence assays. Therefore, this new glucocerebrosidase assay is an alternative approach for high throughput screening. PMID:22033823

  18. A high throughput glucocerebrosidase assay using the natural substrate glucosylceramide

    PubMed Central

    Motabar, Omid; Goldin, Ehud; Leister, William; Liu, Ke; Southall, Noel; Huang, Wenwei; Marugan, Juan J.; Sidransky, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Glucocerebrosidase is a lysosomal enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of glucosylceramide to form ceramide and glucose. A deficiency of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase due to genetic mutations results in Gaucher disease, in which glucosylceramide accumulates in the lysosomes of certain cell types. Although enzyme replacement therapy is currently available for the treatment of type 1 Gaucher disease, the neuronopathic forms of Gaucher disease are still not treatable. Small molecule drugs that can penetrate the blood-brain barrier, such as pharmacological chaperones and enzyme activators, are new therapeutic approaches for Gaucher disease. Enzyme assays for glucocerebrosidase are used to screen compound libraries to identify new lead compounds for drug development for the treatment of Gaucher disease. But the current assays use artificial substrates that are not physiologically relevant. We developed a glucocerebrosidase assay using the natural substrate glucosylceramide coupled to an Amplex-red enzyme reporting system. This assay is in a homogenous assay format and has been miniaturized in a 1,536-well plate format for high throughput screening. The assay sensitivity and robustness is similar to those seen with other glucocerebrosidase fluorescence assays. Therefore, this new glucocerebrosidase assay is an alternative approach for high throughput screening. PMID:22033823

  19. High-throughput screening with micro-x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Havrilla, George J.; Miller, Thomasin C.

    2005-06-15

    Micro-x-ray fluorescence (MXRF) is a useful characterization tool for high-throughput screening of combinatorial libraries. Due to the increasing threat of use of chemical warfare (CW) agents both in military actions and against civilians by terrorist extremists, there is a strong push to improve existing methods and develop means for the detection of a broad spectrum of CW agents in a minimal amount of time to increase national security. This paper describes a combinatorial high-throughput screening technique for CW receptor discovery to aid in sensor development. MXRF can screen materials for elemental composition at the mesoscale level (tens to hundreds of micrometers). The key aspect of this work is the use of commercial MXRF instrumentation coupled with the inherent heteroatom elements within the target molecules of the combinatorial reaction to provide rapid and specific identification of lead species. The method is demonstrated by screening an 11-mer oligopeptide library for selective binding of the degradation products of the nerve agent VX. The identified oligopeptides can be used as selective molecular receptors for sensor development. The MXRF screening method is nondestructive, requires minimal sample preparation or special tags for analysis, and the screening time depends on the desired sensitivity.

  20. High-throughput screening to enhance oncolytic virus immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Allan, KJ; Stojdl, David F; Swift, SL

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput screens can rapidly scan and capture large amounts of information across multiple biological parameters. Although many screens have been designed to uncover potential new therapeutic targets capable of crippling viruses that cause disease, there have been relatively few directed at improving the efficacy of viruses that are used to treat disease. Oncolytic viruses (OVs) are biotherapeutic agents with an inherent specificity for treating malignant disease. Certain OV platforms – including those based on herpes simplex virus, reovirus, and vaccinia virus – have shown success against solid tumors in advanced clinical trials. Yet, many of these OVs have only undergone minimal engineering to solidify tumor specificity, with few extra modifications to manipulate additional factors. Several aspects of the interaction between an OV and a tumor-bearing host have clear value as targets to improve therapeutic outcomes. At the virus level, these include delivery to the tumor, infectivity, productivity, oncolysis, bystander killing, spread, and persistence. At the host level, these include engaging the immune system and manipulating the tumor microenvironment. Here, we review the chemical- and genome-based high-throughput screens that have been performed to manipulate such parameters during OV infection and analyze their impact on therapeutic efficacy. We further explore emerging themes that represent key areas of focus for future research. PMID:27579293

  1. High-throughput proteomics and the fight against pathogens.

    PubMed

    Horvatić, Anita; Kuleš, Josipa; Guillemin, Nicolas; Galan, Asier; Mrljak, Vladimir; Bhide, Mangesh

    2016-07-19

    Pathogens pose a major threat to human and animal welfare. Understanding the interspecies host-pathogen protein-protein interactions could lead to the development of novel strategies to combat infectious diseases through the rapid development of new therapeutics. The first step in understanding the host-pathogen crosstalk is to identify interacting proteins in order to define crucial hot-spots in the host-pathogen interactome, such as the proposed pharmaceutical targets by means of high-throughput proteomic methodologies. In order to obtain holistic insight into the inter- and intra-species bimolecular interactions, apart from the proteomic approach, sophisticated in silico modeling is used to correlate the obtained large data sets with other omics data and clinical outcomes. Since the main focus in this area has been directed towards human medicine, it is time to extrapolate the existing expertise to a new emerging field: the 'systems veterinary medicine'. Therefore, this review addresses high-throughput mass spectrometry-based technology for monitoring protein-protein interactions in vitro and in vivo and discusses pathogen cultivation, model host cells and available bioinformatic tools employed in vaccine development. PMID:27227577

  2. A High-Throughput Cidality Screen for Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Parvinder; Ghosh, Anirban; Krishnamurthy, Ramya Vadageri; Bhattacharjee, Deepa Gagwani; Achar, Vijayashree; Datta, Santanu; Narayanan, Shridhar; Anbarasu, Anand; Ramaiah, Sudha

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) aerosols is a major threat to tuberculosis (TB) researchers, even in bio-safety level-3 (BSL-3) facilities. Automation and high-throughput screens (HTS) in BSL3 facilities are essential for minimizing manual aerosol-generating interventions and facilitating TB research. In the present study, we report the development and validation of a high-throughput, 24-well ‘spot-assay’ for selecting bactericidal compounds against Mtb. The bactericidal screen concept was first validated in the fast-growing surrogate Mycobacterium smegmatis (Msm) and subsequently confirmed in Mtb using the following reference anti-tubercular drugs: rifampicin, isoniazid, ofloxacin and ethambutol (RIOE, acting on different targets). The potential use of the spot-assay to select bactericidal compounds from a large library was confirmed by screening on Mtb, with parallel plating by the conventional gold standard method (correlation, r2 = 0.808). An automated spot-assay further enabled an MBC90 determination on resistant and sensitive Mtb clinical isolates. The implementation of the spot-assay in kinetic screens to enumerate residual Mtb after either genetic silencing (anti-sense RNA, AS-RNA) or chemical inhibition corroborated its ability to detect cidality. This relatively simple, economical and quantitative HTS considerably minimized the bio-hazard risk and enabled the selection of novel vulnerable Mtb targets and mycobactericidal compounds. Thus, spot-assays have great potential to impact the TB drug discovery process. PMID:25693161

  3. A High Throughput Mechanical Screening Device for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Mohanraj, Bhavana; Hou, Chieh; Meloni, Greg R.; Cosgrove, Brian D.; Dodge, George R.; Mauck, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Articular cartilage enables efficient and near-frictionless load transmission, but suffers from poor inherent healing capacity. As such, cartilage tissue engineering strategies have focused on mimicking both compositional and mechanical properties of native tissue in order to provide effective repair materials for the treatment of damaged or degenerated joint surfaces. However, given the large number design parameters available (e.g. cell sources, scaffold designs, and growth factors), it is difficult to conduct combinatorial experiments of engineered cartilage. This is particularly exacerbated when mechanical properties are a primary outcome given the long time required for testing of individual samples. High throughput screening is utilized widely in the pharmaceutical industry to rapidly and cost-effectively assess the effects of thousands of compounds for therapeutic discovery. Here we adapted this approach to develop a high throughput mechanical screening (HTMS) system capable of measuring the mechanical properties of up to 48 materials simultaneously. The HTMS device was validated by testing various biomaterials and engineered cartilage constructs and by comparing the HTMS results to those derived from conventional single sample compression tests. Further evaluation showed that the HTMS system was capable of distinguishing and identifying ‘hits’, or factors that influence the degree of tissue maturation. Future iterations of this device will focus on reducing data variability, increasing force sensitivity and range, as well as scaling-up to even larger (96-well) formats. This HTMS device provides a novel tool for cartilage tissue engineering, freeing experimental design from the limitations of mechanical testing throughput. PMID:24275442

  4. High-throughput GPU-based LDPC decoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yang-Lang; Chang, Cheng-Chun; Huang, Min-Yu; Huang, Bormin

    2010-08-01

    Low-density parity-check (LDPC) code is a linear block code known to approach the Shannon limit via the iterative sum-product algorithm. LDPC codes have been adopted in most current communication systems such as DVB-S2, WiMAX, WI-FI and 10GBASE-T. LDPC for the needs of reliable and flexible communication links for a wide variety of communication standards and configurations have inspired the demand for high-performance and flexibility computing. Accordingly, finding a fast and reconfigurable developing platform for designing the high-throughput LDPC decoder has become important especially for rapidly changing communication standards and configurations. In this paper, a new graphic-processing-unit (GPU) LDPC decoding platform with the asynchronous data transfer is proposed to realize this practical implementation. Experimental results showed that the proposed GPU-based decoder achieved 271x speedup compared to its CPU-based counterpart. It can serve as a high-throughput LDPC decoder.

  5. High-throughput quantum cascade laser (QCL) spectral histopathology: a practical approach towards clinical translation.

    PubMed

    Pilling, Michael J; Henderson, Alex; Bird, Benjamin; Brown, Mick D; Clarke, Noel W; Gardner, Peter

    2016-06-23

    Infrared microscopy has become one of the key techniques in the biomedical research field for interrogating tissue. In partnership with multivariate analysis and machine learning techniques, it has become widely accepted as a method that can distinguish between normal and cancerous tissue with both high sensitivity and high specificity. While spectral histopathology (SHP) is highly promising for improved clinical diagnosis, several practical barriers currently exist, which need to be addressed before successful implementation in the clinic. Sample throughput and speed of acquisition are key barriers and have been driven by the high volume of samples awaiting histopathological examination. FTIR chemical imaging utilising FPA technology is currently state-of-the-art for infrared chemical imaging, and recent advances in its technology have dramatically reduced acquisition times. Despite this, infrared microscopy measurements on a tissue microarray (TMA), often encompassing several million spectra, takes several hours to acquire. The problem lies with the vast quantities of data that FTIR collects; each pixel in a chemical image is derived from a full infrared spectrum, itself composed of thousands of individual data points. Furthermore, data management is quickly becoming a barrier to clinical translation and poses the question of how to store these incessantly growing data sets. Recently, doubts have been raised as to whether the full spectral range is actually required for accurate disease diagnosis using SHP. These studies suggest that once spectral biomarkers have been predetermined it may be possible to diagnose disease based on a limited number of discrete spectral features. In this current study, we explore the possibility of utilising discrete frequency chemical imaging for acquiring high-throughput, high-resolution chemical images. Utilising a quantum cascade laser imaging microscope with discrete frequency collection at key diagnostic wavelengths, we

  6. High-Throughput Analysis of Ammonia Oxidiser Community Composition via a Novel, amoA-Based Functional Gene Array

    PubMed Central

    Abell, Guy C. J.; Robert, Stan S.; Frampton, Dion M. F.; Volkman, John K.; Rizwi, Farhan; Csontos, József; Bodrossy, Levente

    2012-01-01

    Advances in microbial ecology research are more often than not limited by the capabilities of available methodologies. Aerobic autotrophic nitrification is one of the most important and well studied microbiological processes in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. We have developed and validated a microbial diagnostic microarray based on the ammonia-monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) gene, enabling the in-depth analysis of the community structure of bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidisers. The amoA microarray has been successfully applied to analyse nitrifier diversity in marine, estuarine, soil and wastewater treatment plant environments. The microarray has moderate costs for labour and consumables and enables the analysis of hundreds of environmental DNA or RNA samples per week per person. The array has been thoroughly validated with a range of individual and complex targets (amoA clones and environmental samples, respectively), combined with parallel analysis using traditional sequencing methods. The moderate cost and high throughput of the microarray makes it possible to adequately address broader questions of the ecology of microbial ammonia oxidation requiring high sample numbers and high resolution of the community composition. PMID:23284709

  7. High-throughput 3D tracking of bacteria on a standard phase contrast microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taute, K. M.; Gude, S.; Tans, S. J.; Shimizu, T. S.

    2015-11-01

    Bacteria employ diverse motility patterns in traversing complex three-dimensional (3D) natural habitats. 2D microscopy misses crucial features of 3D behaviour, but the applicability of existing 3D tracking techniques is constrained by their performance or ease of use. Here we present a simple, broadly applicable, high-throughput 3D bacterial tracking method for use in standard phase contrast microscopy. Bacteria are localized at micron-scale resolution over a range of 350 × 300 × 200 μm by maximizing image cross-correlations between their observed diffraction patterns and a reference library. We demonstrate the applicability of our technique to a range of bacterial species and exploit its high throughput to expose hidden contributions of bacterial individuality to population-level variability in motile behaviour. The simplicity of this powerful new tool for bacterial motility research renders 3D tracking accessible to a wider community and paves the way for investigations of bacterial motility in complex 3D environments.

  8. High-throughput 3D tracking of bacteria on a standard phase contrast microscope

    PubMed Central

    Taute, K.M.; Gude, S.; Tans, S.J.; Shimizu, T.S.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria employ diverse motility patterns in traversing complex three-dimensional (3D) natural habitats. 2D microscopy misses crucial features of 3D behaviour, but the applicability of existing 3D tracking techniques is constrained by their performance or ease of use. Here we present a simple, broadly applicable, high-throughput 3D bacterial tracking method for use in standard phase contrast microscopy. Bacteria are localized at micron-scale resolution over a range of 350 × 300 × 200 μm by maximizing image cross-correlations between their observed diffraction patterns and a reference library. We demonstrate the applicability of our technique to a range of bacterial species and exploit its high throughput to expose hidden contributions of bacterial individuality to population-level variability in motile behaviour. The simplicity of this powerful new tool for bacterial motility research renders 3D tracking accessible to a wider community and paves the way for investigations of bacterial motility in complex 3D environments. PMID:26522289

  9. Use of Microarray Test Data for Toxicogenomic Prediction-Multi-Intelligent Systems for Toxicogenomic Applications (MISTA)

    SciTech Connect

    Wasson, J.S.; Lu, P.-Y.

    2005-09-12

    The YAHSGS LLC and Oak Ridge National Laboratory established a CRADA to develop a computational neural network and wavelets software to facilitate providing national needs for toxicity prediction and overcome the voracious drain of resources (money and time) being directed to the development of pharmaceutical agents. The research project was supported through a STTR Phase I task by NIEHS in 2004. The research deploys state-of-the-art computational neural networks and wavelets to make toxicity prediction on three independent bases: (1) quantitative structure-activity relationships, (2) microarray data, and (3) Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing technology. Upon completion of Phase I, a prototype software Multi-Intelligent System for Toxicogenomic and Applications (MISTA) was developed, the utility's feasibility was demonstrated, and a Phase II proposal was jointly prepared and submitted to NIEHS for funding evaluation. The goals and objectives of the program have been achieved.

  10. The RABiT: high-throughput technology for assessing global DSB repair.

    PubMed

    Turner, Helen C; Sharma, P; Perrier, J R; Bertucci, A; Smilenov, L; Johnson, G; Taveras, M; Brenner, D J; Garty, G

    2014-05-01

    At the Center for High-Throughput Minimally Invasive Radiation Biodosimetry, we have developed a rapid automated biodosimetry tool (RABiT); this is a completely automated, ultra-high-throughput robotically based biodosimetry workstation designed for use following a large-scale radiological event, to perform radiation biodosimetry measurements based on a fingerstick blood sample. High throughput is achieved through purpose built robotics, sample handling in filter-bottomed multi-well plates and innovations in high-speed imaging and analysis. Currently, we are adapting the RABiT technologies for use in laboratory settings, for applications in epidemiological and clinical studies. Our overall goal is to extend the RABiT system to directly measure the kinetics of DNA repair proteins. The design of the kinetic/time-dependent studies is based on repeated, automated sampling of lymphocytes from a central reservoir of cells housed in the RABiT incubator as a function of time after the irradiation challenge. In the present study, we have characterized the DNA repair kinetics of the following repair proteins: γ-H2AX, 53-BP1, ATM kinase, MDC1 at multiple times (0.5, 2, 4, 7 and 24 h) after irradiation with 4 Gy γ rays. In order to provide a consistent dose exposure at time zero, we have developed an automated capillary irradiator to introduce DNA DSBs into fingerstick-size blood samples within the RABiT. To demonstrate the scalability of the laboratory-based RABiT system, we have initiated a population study using γ-H2AX as a biomarker. PMID:24477408

  11. The RABiT: High Throughput Technology for Assessing Global DSB Repair

    PubMed Central

    Turner, H.C.; Sharma, P.; Perrier, J.R.; Bertucci, A.; Smilenov, L.; Johnson, Gary; Taveras, M.; Brenner, D.J.; Garty, G.

    2014-01-01

    At the Center for High-Throughput Minimally Invasive Radiation Biodosimetry we have developed a Rapid Automated Biodosimetry Tool (RABiT); this is a completely automated, ultra-high throughput robotically-based biodosimetry workstation designed for use following a large scale radiological event, to perform radiation biodosimetry measurements based on a fingerstick blood sample. High throughput is achieved through purpose built robotics, sample handling in filter-bottomed multi-well plates and innovations in high speed imaging and analysis. Currently, we are adapting the RABiT technologies for use in laboratory settings, for applications in epidemiological and clinical studies. Our overall goal is to extend the RABiT system to directly measure the kinetics of DNA repair proteins. The design of the kinetic/time dependent studies is based on repeated, automated sampling of lymphocytes from a central reservoir of cells housed in the RABiT incubator as a function of time after the irradiation challenge. In the present study, we have characterized the DNA repair kinetics of the following repair proteins: γ-H2AX, 53-BP1, ATM kinase, MDC1 at multiple times (0.5, 2, 4, 7, 24 hours) after irradiation with 4 Gy γ rays. In order to provide a consistent dose exposure at time zero, we have developed an automated capillary irradiator to introduce DNA DSBs into fingerstick-size blood samples within the RABiT. To demonstrate the scalability of the laboratory-based RABiT system, we have initiated a population study using γ-H2AX as a biomarker. PMID:24477408

  12. High-throughput microcavitation bubble induced cellular mechanotransduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compton, Jonathan Lee

    inhibitor to IP 3 induced Ca2+ release. This capability opens the development of a high-throughput screening platform for molecules that modulate cellular mechanotransduction. We have applied this approach to screen the effects of a small set of small molecules, in a 96-well plate in less than an hour. These detailed studies offer a basis for the design, development, and implementation of a novel high-throughput mechanotransduction assay to rapidly screen the effect of small molecules on cellular mechanotransduction at high throughput.

  13. Application of Protein Microarrays for Multiplexed Detection of Antibodies to Tumor Antigens in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Karen S.; Ramachandran, Niroshan; Wong, Jessica; Raphael, Jacob V.; Hainsworth, Eugenie; Demirkan, Gokhan; Cramer, Daniel; Aronzon, Diana; Hodi, F. Stephen; Harris, Lyndsay; Logvinenko, Tanya; LaBaer, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    There is strong preclinical evidence that cancer, including breast cancer, undergoes immune surveillance. This continual monitoring, by both the innate and the adaptive immune systems, recognizes changes in protein expression, mutation, folding, glycosylation, and degradation. Local immune responses to tumor antigens are amplified in draining lymph nodes, and then enter the systemic circulation. The antibody response to tumor antigens, such as p53 protein, are robust, stable, and easily detected in serum, may exist in greater concentrations than their cognate antigens, and are potential highly specific biomarkers for cancer. However, antibodies have limited sensitivities as single analytes, and differences in protein purification and assay characteristics have limited their clinical application. For example, p53 autoantibodies in the sera are highly specific for cancer patients, but are only detected in the sera of 10-20% of patients with breast cancer. Detection of p53 autoantibodies is dependent on tumor burden, p53 mutation, rapidly decreases with effective therapy, but is relatively independent of breast cancer subtype. Although antibodies to hundreds of other tumor antigens have been identified in the sera of breast cancer patients, very little is known about the specificity and clinical impact of the antibody immune repertoire to breast cancer. Recent advances in proteomic technologies have the potential for rapid identification of immune response signatures for breast cancer diagnosis and monitoring. We have adapted programmable protein microarrays for the specific detection of autoantibodies in breast cancer. Here, we present the first demonstration of the application of programmable protein microarray ELISAs for the rapid identification of breast cancer autoantibodies. PMID:18311903

  14. Use of high-throughput protein array for profiling of differentially expressed proteins in normal and malignant breast tissue.

    PubMed

    Hudelist, Gernot; Pacher-Zavisin, Margit; Singer, Christian F; Holper, Tina; Kubista, Ernst; Schreiber, Martin; Manavi, Mahmood; Bilban, Martin; Czerwenka, Klaus

    2004-08-01

    cDNA arrays provide a powerful tool to identify gene expression pattern that are potentially associated with tumor invasion and metastasis. However, genes work at the protein level and, since the transcriptional activity of a gene does not necessarily reflect cellular protein expression, the identification and quantification of proteins is essential for the understanding of molecular events leading to malignant transformation. We have therefore employed a high-throughput protein microarray system which contains 378 well-characterized monoclonal antibodies in order to compare the gene expression pattern of malignant and adjacent normal breast tissue in a patient with primary breast cancer. Using this technique, we have identified a number of proteins that show increased expression levels in malignant breast tissues such as casein kinase Ie, p53, annexin XI, CDC25C, eIF-4E and MAP kinase 7. The expression of other proteins, such as the multifunctional regulator 14-3-3e was found to be decreased in malignant breast tissue, whereas the majority of proteins remained unchanged when compared to the corresponding non-malignant samples. The protein expression pattern was confirmed by immunohistochemistry, in which antibodies against 8 representative proteins known to be involved in carcinogenesis were employed in paraffin-embedded normal and malignant tissue sections deriving from the same patient. In each case, the results obtained by IHC matched the data obtained by antibody microarray system. Taken together, we have described for the first time a tumor cell specificity protein expression pattern by use of a novel commercially available antibody microarray system. We have thus demonstrated the feasibility of high-throughput protein arrays in the proteomic analysis of human breast tissue. We hypothesize that the use of protein arrays will not only increase our understanding of the molecular events, but could prove useful in evaluating prognosis and in determining optimal

  15. ArrayPipe: a flexible processing pipeline for microarray data.

    PubMed

    Hokamp, Karsten; Roche, Fiona M; Acab, Michael; Rousseau, Marc-Etienne; Kuo, Byron; Goode, David; Aeschliman, Dana; Bryan, Jenny; Babiuk, Lorne A; Hancock, Robert E W; Brinkman, Fiona S L

    2004-07-01

    A number of microarray analysis software packages exist already; however, none combines the user-friendly features of a web-based interface with potential ability to analyse multiple arrays at once using flexible analysis steps. The ArrayPipe web server (freely available at www.pathogenomics.ca/arraypipe) allows the automated application of complex analyses to microarray data which can range from single slides to large data sets including replicates and dye-swaps. It handles output from most commonly used quantification software packages for dual-labelled arrays. Application features range from quality assessment of slides through various data visualizations to multi-step analyses including normalization, detection of differentially expressed genes, andcomparison and highlighting of gene lists. A highly customizable action set-up facilitates unrestricted arrangement of functions, which can be stored as action profiles. A unique combination of web-based and command-line functionality enables comfortable configuration of processes that can be repeatedly applied to large data sets in high throughput. The output consists of reports formatted as standard web pages and tab-delimited lists of calculated values that can be inserted into other analysis programs. Additional features, such as web-based spreadsheet functionality, auto-parallelization and password protection make this a powerful tool in microarray research for individuals and large groups alike. PMID:15215429

  16. High-throughput preparation methods of crude extract for robust cell-free protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yong-Chan; Jewett, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Crude extract based cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) has emerged as a powerful technology platform for high-throughput protein production and genetic part characterization. Unfortunately, robust preparation of highly active extracts generally requires specialized and costly equipment and can be labor and time intensive. Moreover, cell lysis procedures can be hard to standardize, leading to different extract performance across laboratories. These challenges limit new entrants to the field and new applications, such as comprehensive genome engineering programs to improve extract performance. To address these challenges, we developed a generalizable and easily accessible high-throughput crude extract preparation method for CFPS based on sonication. To validate our approach, we investigated two Escherichia coli strains: BL21 Star™ (DE3) and a K12 MG1655 variant, achieving similar productivity (defined as CFPS yield in g/L) by varying only a few parameters. In addition, we observed identical productivity of cell extracts generated from culture volumes spanning three orders of magnitude (10 mL culture tubes to 10 L fermentation). We anticipate that our rapid and robust extract preparation method will speed-up screening of genomically engineered strains for CFPS applications, make possible highly active extracts from non-model organisms, and promote a more general use of CFPS in synthetic biology and biotechnology. PMID:25727242

  17. False positives complicate ancient pathogen identifications using high-throughput shotgun sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Identification of historic pathogens is challenging since false positives and negatives are a serious risk. Environmental non-pathogenic contaminants are ubiquitous. Furthermore, public genetic databases contain limited information regarding these species. High-throughput sequencing may help reliably detect and identify historic pathogens. Results We shotgun-sequenced 8 16th-century Mixtec individuals from the site of Teposcolula Yucundaa (Oaxaca, Mexico) who are reported to have died from the huey cocoliztli (‘Great Pestilence’ in Nahautl), an unknown disease that decimated native Mexican populations during the Spanish colonial period, in order to identify the pathogen. Comparison of these sequences with those deriving from the surrounding soil and from 4 precontact individuals from the site found a wide variety of contaminant organisms that confounded analyses. Without the comparative sequence data from the precontact individuals and soil, false positives for Yersinia pestis and rickettsiosis could have been reported. Conclusions False positives and negatives remain problematic in ancient DNA analyses despite the application of high-throughput sequencing. Our results suggest that several studies claiming the discovery of ancient pathogens may need further verification. Additionally, true single molecule sequencing’s short read lengths, inability to sequence through DNA lesions, and limited ancient-DNA-specific technical development hinder its application to palaeopathology. PMID:24568097

  18. Generalized schemes for high throughput manipulation of the Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough genome

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabra, S.R.; Butland, G.; Elias, D.; Chandonia, J.-M.; Fok, V.; Juba, T.; Gorur, A.; Allen, S.; Leung, C.-M.; Keller, K.; Reveco, S.; Zane, G.; Semkiw, E.; Prathapam, R.; Gold, B.; Singer, M.; Ouellet, M.; Sazakal, E.; Jorgens, D.; Price, M.; Witkowska, E.; Beller, H.; Hazen, T.C.; Biggin, M.; Auer, M.; Wall, J.; Keasling, J.

    2011-07-15

    The ability to conduct advanced functional genomic studies of the thousands of sequenced bacteria has been hampered by the lack of available tools for making high- throughput chromosomal manipulations in a systematic manner that can be applied across diverse species. In this work, we highlight the use of synthetic biological tools to assemble custom suicide vectors with reusable and interchangeable DNA “parts” to facilitate chromosomal modification at designated loci. These constructs enable an array of downstream applications including gene replacement and creation of gene fusions with affinity purification or localization tags. We employed this approach to engineer chromosomal modifications in a bacterium that has previously proven difficult to manipulate genetically, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, to generate a library of over 700 strains. Furthermore, we demonstrate how these modifications can be used for examining metabolic pathways, protein-protein interactions, and protein localization. The ubiquity of suicide constructs in gene replacement throughout biology suggests that this approach can be applied to engineer a broad range of species for a diverse array of systems biological applications and is amenable to high-throughput implementation.

  19. Current trends in virtual high throughput screening using ligand-based and structure-based methods.

    PubMed

    Sukumar, Nagamani; Das, Sourav

    2011-12-01

    High throughput in silico methods have offered the tantalizing potential to drastically accelerate the drug discovery process. Yet despite significant efforts expended by academia, national labs and industry over the years, many of these methods have not lived up to their initial promise of reducing the time and costs associated with the drug discovery enterprise, a process that can typically take over a decade and cost hundreds of millions of dollars from conception to final approval and marketing of a drug. Nevertheless structure-based modeling has become a mainstay of computational biology and medicinal chemistry, helping to leverage our knowledge of the biological target and the chemistry of protein-ligand interactions. While ligand-based methods utilize the chemistry of molecules that are known to bind to the biological target, structure-based drug design methods rely on knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of the target, as obtained through crystallographic, spectroscopic or bioinformatics techniques. Here we review recent developments in the methodology and applications of structure-based and ligand-based methods and target-based chemogenomics in Virtual High Throughput Screening (VHTS), highlighting some case studies of recent applications, as well as current research in further development of these methods. The limitations of these approaches will also be discussed, to give the reader an indication of what might be expected in years to come. PMID:21843144

  20. Express Primer Tool for high-throughput gene cloning and expression

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2002-12-01

    A tool to assist in the design of primers for DNA amplification. The Express Primer web-based tool generates primer sequences specifically for the generation of expression clones for both lab scale and high-throughput projects. The application is designed not only to allow the user complete flexibility to specify primer design parameters but also to minimize the amount of manual intervention needed to generate a large number of primers for simultaneous amplification of multiple target genes.more » The Express Primer Tool enables the user to specify various experimental parameters (e.g. optimal Tm, Tm range, maximum Tm difference) for single or multiple candidate sequence(s) in FASTA format input as a flat text (ASCII) file. The application generates condidate primers, selects optimal primer pairs, and writes the forward and reverse primers pairs to an Excel file that is suitable for electronic submission to a synthesis facility. The program parameters emphasize high-throughput but allow for target atrition at various stages of the project.« less