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Sample records for high-throughput reverse genetic

  1. High Throughput siRNA Screening Using Reverse Transfection.

    PubMed

    von Schantz, Carina; Saarela, Jani

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a commonly used technique to knockdown gene function. Here, we describe a high throughput screening method for siRNA mediated gene silencing of the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 using reverse transfection. Furthermore, we describe the setup for two separate methods for detecting viable and dead cells using either homogenous assays or image-based analysis. PMID:27581282

  2. Reverse genetics in high throughput: rapid generation of complete negative strand RNA virus cDNA clones and recombinant viruses thereof

    PubMed Central

    Nolden, T.; Pfaff, F.; Nemitz, S.; Freuling, C. M.; Höper, D.; Müller, T.; Finke, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Reverse genetics approaches are indispensable tools for proof of concepts in virus replication and pathogenesis. For negative strand RNA viruses (NSVs) the limited number of infectious cDNA clones represents a bottleneck as clones are often generated from cell culture adapted or attenuated viruses, with limited potential for pathogenesis research. We developed a system in which cDNA copies of complete NSV genomes were directly cloned into reverse genetics vectors by linear-to-linear RedE/T recombination. Rapid cloning of multiple rabies virus (RABV) full length genomes and identification of clones identical to field virus consensus sequence confirmed the approache’s reliability. Recombinant viruses were recovered from field virus cDNA clones. Similar growth kinetics of parental and recombinant viruses, preservation of field virus characters in cell type specific replication and virulence in the mouse model were confirmed. Reduced titers after reporter gene insertion indicated that the low level of field virus replication is affected by gene insertions. The flexibility of the strategy was demonstrated by cloning multiple copies of an orthobunyavirus L genome segment. This important step in reverse genetics technology development opens novel avenues for the analysis of virus variability combined with phenotypical characterization of recombinant viruses at a clonal level. PMID:27046474

  3. Reverse genetics in high throughput: rapid generation of complete negative strand RNA virus cDNA clones and recombinant viruses thereof.

    PubMed

    Nolden, T; Pfaff, F; Nemitz, S; Freuling, C M; Höper, D; Müller, T; Finke, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Reverse genetics approaches are indispensable tools for proof of concepts in virus replication and pathogenesis. For negative strand RNA viruses (NSVs) the limited number of infectious cDNA clones represents a bottleneck as clones are often generated from cell culture adapted or attenuated viruses, with limited potential for pathogenesis research. We developed a system in which cDNA copies of complete NSV genomes were directly cloned into reverse genetics vectors by linear-to-linear RedE/T recombination. Rapid cloning of multiple rabies virus (RABV) full length genomes and identification of clones identical to field virus consensus sequence confirmed the approache's reliability. Recombinant viruses were recovered from field virus cDNA clones. Similar growth kinetics of parental and recombinant viruses, preservation of field virus characters in cell type specific replication and virulence in the mouse model were confirmed. Reduced titers after reporter gene insertion indicated that the low level of field virus replication is affected by gene insertions. The flexibility of the strategy was demonstrated by cloning multiple copies of an orthobunyavirus L genome segment. This important step in reverse genetics technology development opens novel avenues for the analysis of virus variability combined with phenotypical characterization of recombinant viruses at a clonal level. PMID:27046474

  4. High-throughput neuroimaging-genetics computational infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Dinov, Ivo D; Petrosyan, Petros; Liu, Zhizhong; Eggert, Paul; Hobel, Sam; Vespa, Paul; Woo Moon, Seok; Van Horn, John D; Franco, Joseph; Toga, Arthur W

    2014-01-01

    Many contemporary neuroscientific investigations face significant challenges in terms of data management, computational processing, data mining, and results interpretation. These four pillars define the core infrastructure necessary to plan, organize, orchestrate, validate, and disseminate novel scientific methods, computational resources, and translational healthcare findings. Data management includes protocols for data acquisition, archival, query, transfer, retrieval, and aggregation. Computational processing involves the necessary software, hardware, and networking infrastructure required to handle large amounts of heterogeneous neuroimaging, genetics, clinical, and phenotypic data and meta-data. Data mining refers to the process of automatically extracting data features, characteristics and associations, which are not readily visible by human exploration of the raw dataset. Result interpretation includes scientific visualization, community validation of findings and reproducible findings. In this manuscript we describe the novel high-throughput neuroimaging-genetics computational infrastructure available at the Institute for Neuroimaging and Informatics (INI) and the Laboratory of Neuro Imaging (LONI) at University of Southern California (USC). INI and LONI include ultra-high-field and standard-field MRI brain scanners along with an imaging-genetics database for storing the complete provenance of the raw and derived data and meta-data. In addition, the institute provides a large number of software tools for image and shape analysis, mathematical modeling, genomic sequence processing, and scientific visualization. A unique feature of this architecture is the Pipeline environment, which integrates the data management, processing, transfer, and visualization. Through its client-server architecture, the Pipeline environment provides a graphical user interface for designing, executing, monitoring validating, and disseminating of complex protocols that utilize

  5. High-throughput neuroimaging-genetics computational infrastructure

    PubMed Central

    Dinov, Ivo D.; Petrosyan, Petros; Liu, Zhizhong; Eggert, Paul; Hobel, Sam; Vespa, Paul; Woo Moon, Seok; Van Horn, John D.; Franco, Joseph; Toga, Arthur W.

    2014-01-01

    Many contemporary neuroscientific investigations face significant challenges in terms of data management, computational processing, data mining, and results interpretation. These four pillars define the core infrastructure necessary to plan, organize, orchestrate, validate, and disseminate novel scientific methods, computational resources, and translational healthcare findings. Data management includes protocols for data acquisition, archival, query, transfer, retrieval, and aggregation. Computational processing involves the necessary software, hardware, and networking infrastructure required to handle large amounts of heterogeneous neuroimaging, genetics, clinical, and phenotypic data and meta-data. Data mining refers to the process of automatically extracting data features, characteristics and associations, which are not readily visible by human exploration of the raw dataset. Result interpretation includes scientific visualization, community validation of findings and reproducible findings. In this manuscript we describe the novel high-throughput neuroimaging-genetics computational infrastructure available at the Institute for Neuroimaging and Informatics (INI) and the Laboratory of Neuro Imaging (LONI) at University of Southern California (USC). INI and LONI include ultra-high-field and standard-field MRI brain scanners along with an imaging-genetics database for storing the complete provenance of the raw and derived data and meta-data. In addition, the institute provides a large number of software tools for image and shape analysis, mathematical modeling, genomic sequence processing, and scientific visualization. A unique feature of this architecture is the Pipeline environment, which integrates the data management, processing, transfer, and visualization. Through its client-server architecture, the Pipeline environment provides a graphical user interface for designing, executing, monitoring validating, and disseminating of complex protocols that utilize

  6. Baculovirus expression system and method for high throughput expression of genetic material

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Robin; Davies, Anthony

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides novel recombinant baculovirus expression systems for expressing foreign genetic material in a host cell. Such expression systems are readily adapted to an automated method for expression foreign genetic material in a high throughput manner. In other aspects, the present invention features a novel automated method for determining the function of foreign genetic material by transfecting the same into a host by way of the recombinant baculovirus expression systems according to the present invention.

  7. Discovery in Genetic Skin Disease: The Impact of High Throughput Genetic Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Maruthappu, Thiviyani; Scott, Claire A.; Kelsell, David P.

    2014-01-01

    The last decade has seen considerable advances in our understanding of the genetic basis of skin disease, as a consequence of high throughput sequencing technologies including next generation sequencing and whole exome sequencing. We have now determined the genes underlying several monogenic diseases, such as harlequin ichthyosis, Olmsted syndrome, and exfoliative ichthyosis, which have provided unique insights into the structure and function of the skin. In addition, through genome wide association studies we now have an understanding of how low penetrance variants contribute to inflammatory skin diseases such as psoriasis vulgaris and atopic dermatitis, and how they contribute to underlying pathophysiological disease processes. In this review we discuss strategies used to unravel the genes underlying both monogenic and complex trait skin diseases in the last 10 years and the implications on mechanistic studies, diagnostics, and therapeutics. PMID:25093584

  8. Reverse Engineering of Vaccine Antigens Using High Throughput Sequencing-enhanced mRNA Display

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Nini; Duan, Hongying; Kachko, Alla; Krause, Benjamin W.; Major, Marian E.; Krause, Philip R.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine reverse engineering is emerging as an important approach to vaccine antigen identification, recently focusing mainly on structural characterization of interactions between neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and antigens. Using mAbs that bind unknown antigen structures, we sought to probe the intrinsic features of antibody antigen-binding sites with a high complexity peptide library, aiming to identify conformationally optimized mimotope antigens that capture mAb-specific epitopes. Using a high throughput sequencing-enhanced messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) display approach, we identified high affinity binding peptides for a hepatitis C virus neutralizing mAb. Immunization with the selected peptides induced neutralizing activity similar to that of the original mAb. Antibodies elicited by the most commonly selected peptides were predominantly against specific epitopes. Thus, using mRNA display to interrogate mAbs permits high resolution identification of functional peptide antigens that direct targeted immune responses, supporting its use in vaccine reverse engineering for pathogens against which potent neutralizing mAbs are available. Research in Context We used a large number of randomly produced small proteins (“peptides”) to identify peptides containing specific protein sequences that bind efficiently to an antibody that can prevent hepatitis C virus infection in cell culture. After the identified peptides were injected into mice, the mice produced their own antibodies with characteristics similar to the original antibody. This approach can provide previously unavailable information about antibody binding and could also be useful in developing new vaccines. PMID:26425692

  9. Exploring Genetic Diversity in Plants Using High-Throughput Sequencing Techniques.

    PubMed

    Onda, Yoshihiko; Mochida, Keiichi

    2016-08-01

    Food security has emerged as an urgent concern because of the rising world population. To meet the food demands of the near future, it is required to improve the productivity of various crops, not just of staple food crops. The genetic diversity among plant populations in a given species allows the plants to adapt to various environmental conditions. Such diversity could therefore yield valuable traits that could overcome the food-security challenges. To explore genetic diversity comprehensively and to rapidly identify useful genes and/or allele, advanced high-throughput sequencing techniques, also called next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, have been developed. These provide practical solutions to the challenges in crop genomics. Here, we review various sources of genetic diversity in plants, newly developed genetic diversity-mining tools synergized with NGS techniques, and related genetic approaches such as quantitative trait locus analysis and genome-wide association study. PMID:27499684

  10. Quantitative high-throughput analysis of synthetic genetic interactions in Caenorhabditis elegans by RNA interference

    PubMed Central

    Fortunato, Angelo

    2009-01-01

    Biological processes are highly dynamic but the current representation of molecular networks is static and largely qualitative. To investigate the dynamic property of genetic networks, a novel quantitative high-throughput method based on RNA interference and capable of calculating the relevance of each interaction, was developed. With this approach, it will be possible to identify not only the components of a network, but also to investigate quantitatively how network and biological processes react to perturbations. As a first application of this method, the genetic interactions of a weak loss-of-function mutation in the gene efl-1/E2F with all the genes of chromosome III were investigated during embryonic development of Caenorhabditis elegans. Fifteen synthetic genetic interactions of efl-1/E2F with the genes of chromosome III were detected, measured and ranked by statistical relevance. PMID:19059334

  11. Examination of a genetic algorithm for the application in high-throughput downstream process development.

    PubMed

    Treier, Katrin; Berg, Annette; Diederich, Patrick; Lang, Katharina; Osberghaus, Anna; Dismer, Florian; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2012-10-01

    Compared to traditional strategies, application of high-throughput experiments combined with optimization methods can potentially speed up downstream process development and increase our understanding of processes. In contrast to the method of Design of Experiments in combination with response surface analysis (RSA), optimization approaches like genetic algorithms (GAs) can be applied to identify optimal parameter settings in multidimensional optimizations tasks. In this article the performance of a GA was investigated applying parameters applicable in high-throughput downstream process development. The influence of population size, the design of the initial generation and selection pressure on the optimization results was studied. To mimic typical experimental data, four mathematical functions were used for an in silico evaluation. The influence of GA parameters was minor on landscapes with only one optimum. On landscapes with several optima, parameters had a significant impact on GA performance and success in finding the global optimum. Premature convergence increased as the number of parameters and noise increased. RSA was shown to be comparable or superior for simple systems and low to moderate noise. For complex systems or high noise levels, RSA failed, while GA optimization represented a robust tool for process optimization. Finally, the effect of different objective functions is shown exemplarily for a refolding optimization of lysozyme. PMID:22700464

  12. Droplet-based microfluidics in drug discovery, transcriptomics and high-throughput molecular genetics.

    PubMed

    Shembekar, Nachiket; Chaipan, Chawaree; Utharala, Ramesh; Merten, Christoph A

    2016-04-12

    Droplet-based microfluidics enables assays to be carried out at very high throughput (up to thousands of samples per second) and enables researchers to work with very limited material, such as primary cells, patient's biopsies or expensive reagents. An additional strength of the technology is the possibility to perform large-scale genotypic or phenotypic screens at the single-cell level. Here we critically review the latest developments in antibody screening, drug discovery and highly multiplexed genomic applications such as targeted genetic workflows, single-cell RNAseq and single-cell ChIPseq. Starting with a comprehensive introduction for non-experts, we pinpoint current limitations, analyze how they might be overcome and give an outlook on exciting future applications. PMID:27025767

  13. Genetic and Nongenetic Determinants of Cell Growth Variation Assessed by High-Throughput Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ziv, Naomi; Siegal, Mark L.; Gresham, David

    2013-01-01

    In microbial populations, growth initiation and proliferation rates are major components of fitness and therefore likely targets of selection. We used a high-throughput microscopy assay, which enables simultaneous analysis of tens of thousands of microcolonies, to determine the sources and extent of growth rate variation in the budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) in different glucose environments. We find that cell growth rates are regulated by the extracellular concentration of glucose as proposed by Monod (1949), but that significant heterogeneity in growth rates is observed among genetically identical individuals within an environment. Yeast strains isolated from different geographic locations and habitats differ in their growth rate responses to different glucose concentrations. Inheritance patterns suggest that the genetic determinants of growth rates in different glucose concentrations are distinct. In addition, we identified genotypes that differ in the extent of variation in growth rate within an environment despite nearly identical mean growth rates, providing evidence that alleles controlling phenotypic variability segregate in yeast populations. We find that the time to reinitiation of growth (lag) is negatively correlated with growth rate, yet this relationship is strain-dependent. Between environments, the respirative activity of individual cells negatively correlates with glucose abundance and growth rate, but within an environment respirative activity and growth rate show a positive correlation, which we propose reflects differences in protein expression capacity. Our study quantifies the sources of genetic and nongenetic variation in cell growth rates in different glucose environments with unprecedented precision, facilitating their molecular genetic dissection. PMID:23938868

  14. Analysis of genetic variation and diversity of Rice stripe virus populations through high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lingzhe; Li, Zefeng; Wu, Jianxiang; Xu, Yi; Yang, Xiuling; Fan, Longjiang; Fang, Rongxiang; Zhou, Xueping

    2015-01-01

    Plant RNA viruses often generate diverse populations in their host plants through error-prone replication and recombination. Recent studies on the genetic diversity of plant RNA viruses in various host plants have provided valuable information about RNA virus evolution and emergence of new diseases caused by RNA viruses. We analyzed and compared the genetic diversity of Rice stripe virus (RSV) populations in Oryza sativa (a natural host of RSV) and compared it with that of the RSV populations generated in an infection of Nicotiana benthamiana, an experimental host of RSV, using the high-throughput sequencing technology. From infected O. sativa and N. benthamiana plants, a total of 341 and 1675 site substitutions were identified in the RSV genome, respectively, and the average substitution ratio in these sites was 1.47 and 7.05 %, respectively, indicating that the RSV populations from infected N. benthamiana plant are more diverse than those from infected O. sativa plant. Our result gives a direct evidence that virus might allow higher genetic diversity for host adaptation. PMID:25852724

  15. Reverse causal reasoning: applying qualitative causal knowledge to the interpretation of high-throughput data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gene expression profiling and other genome-scale measurement technologies provide comprehensive information about molecular changes resulting from a chemical or genetic perturbation, or disease state. A critical challenge is the development of methods to interpret these large-scale data sets to identify specific biological mechanisms that can provide experimentally verifiable hypotheses and lead to the understanding of disease and drug action. Results We present a detailed description of Reverse Causal Reasoning (RCR), a reverse engineering methodology to infer mechanistic hypotheses from molecular profiling data. This methodology requires prior knowledge in the form of small networks that causally link a key upstream controller node representing a biological mechanism to downstream measurable quantities. These small directed networks are generated from a knowledge base of literature-curated qualitative biological cause-and-effect relationships expressed as a network. The small mechanism networks are evaluated as hypotheses to explain observed differential measurements. We provide a simple implementation of this methodology, Whistle, specifically geared towards the analysis of gene expression data and using prior knowledge expressed in Biological Expression Language (BEL). We present the Whistle analyses for three transcriptomic data sets using a publically available knowledge base. The mechanisms inferred by Whistle are consistent with the expected biology for each data set. Conclusions Reverse Causal Reasoning yields mechanistic insights to the interpretation of gene expression profiling data that are distinct from and complementary to the results of analyses using ontology or pathway gene sets. This reverse engineering algorithm provides an evidence-driven approach to the development of models of disease, drug action, and drug toxicity. PMID:24266983

  16. Multi-enzyme Screening Using a High-throughput Genetic Enzyme Screening System.

    PubMed

    Kim, Haseong; Kwon, Kil Koang; Seong, Wonjae; Lee, Seung-Goo

    2016-01-01

    The recent development of a high-throughput single-cell assay technique enables the screening of novel enzymes based on functional activities from a large-scale metagenomic library(1). We previously proposed a genetic enzyme screening system (GESS) that uses dimethylphenol regulator activated by phenol or p-nitrophenol. Since a vast amount of natural enzymatic reactions produce these phenolic compounds from phenol deriving substrates, this single genetic screening system can be theoretically applied to screen over 200 different enzymes in the BRENDA database. Despite the general applicability of GESS, applying the screening process requires a specific procedure to reach the maximum flow cytometry signals. Here, we detail the developed screening process, which includes metagenome preprocessing with GESS and the operation of a flow cytometry sorter. Three different phenolic substrates (p-nitrophenyl acetate, p-nitrophenyl-β-D-cellobioside, and phenyl phosphate) with GESS were used to screen and to identify three different enzymes (lipase, cellulase, and alkaline phosphatase), respectively. The selected metagenomic enzyme activities were confirmed only with the flow cytometry but DNA sequencing and diverse in vitro analysis can be used for further gene identification. PMID:27584951

  17. Combining high-throughput phenotyping and genome-wide association studies to reveal natural genetic variation in rice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wanneng; Guo, Zilong; Huang, Chenglong; Duan, Lingfeng; Chen, Guoxing; Jiang, Ni; Fang, Wei; Feng, Hui; Xie, Weibo; Lian, Xingming; Wang, Gongwei; Luo, Qingming; Zhang, Qifa; Liu, Qian; Xiong, Lizhong

    2014-01-01

    Even as the study of plant genomics rapidly develops through the use of high-throughput sequencing techniques, traditional plant phenotyping lags far behind. Here we develop a high-throughput rice phenotyping facility (HRPF) to monitor 13 traditional agronomic traits and 2 newly defined traits during the rice growth period. Using genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of the 15 traits, we identify 141 associated loci, 25 of which contain known genes such as the Green Revolution semi-dwarf gene, SD1. Based on a performance evaluation of the HRPF and GWAS results, we demonstrate that high-throughput phenotyping has the potential to replace traditional phenotyping techniques and can provide valuable gene identification information. The combination of the multifunctional phenotyping tools HRPF and GWAS provides deep insights into the genetic architecture of important traits. PMID:25295980

  18. High-throughput microfluidics and ultrafast optics for in vivo compound/genetic discoveries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohde, Christopher B.; Gilleland, Cody; Samara, Chrysanthi; Yanik, M. Fatih

    2010-02-01

    Therapeutic treatment of spinal cord injuries, brain trauma, stroke, and neurodegenerative diseases will greatly benefit from the discovery of compounds that enhance neuronal regeneration following injury. We previously demonstrated the use of femtosecond laser microsurgery to induce precise and reproducible neural injury in C. elegans, and have developed microfluidic on-chip technologies that allow automated and rapid manipulation, orientation, and non-invasive immobilization of animals for sub-cellular resolution two-photon imaging and femtosecond-laser nanosurgery. These technologies include microfluidic whole-animal sorters, as well as integrated chips containing multiple addressable incubation chambers for exposure of individual animals to compounds and sub-cellular time-lapse imaging of hundreds of animals on a single chip. Our technologies can be used for a variety of highly sophisticated in vivo high-throughput compound and genetic screens, and we performed the first in vivo screen in C. elegans for compounds enhancing neuronal regrowth following femtosecond microsurgery. The compounds identified interact with a wide variety of cellular targets, such as cytoskeletal components, vesicle trafficking, and protein kinases that enhance neuronal regeneration.

  19. Genetic profiles of cervical tumors by high-throughput sequencing for personalized medical care.

    PubMed

    Muller, Etienne; Brault, Baptiste; Holmes, Allyson; Legros, Angelina; Jeannot, Emmanuelle; Campitelli, Maura; Rousselin, Antoine; Goardon, Nicolas; Frébourg, Thierry; Krieger, Sophie; Crouet, Hubert; Nicolas, Alain; Sastre, Xavier; Vaur, Dominique; Castéra, Laurent

    2015-10-01

    Cancer treatment is facing major evolution since the advent of targeted therapies. Building genetic profiles could predict sensitivity or resistance to these therapies and highlight disease-specific abnormalities, supporting personalized patient care. In the context of biomedical research and clinical diagnosis, our laboratory has developed an oncogenic panel comprised of 226 genes and a dedicated bioinformatic pipeline to explore somatic mutations in cervical carcinomas, using high-throughput sequencing. Twenty-nine tumors were sequenced for exons within 226 genes. The automated pipeline used includes a database and a filtration system dedicated to identifying mutations of interest and excluding false positive and germline mutations. One-hundred and seventy-six total mutational events were found among the 29 tumors. Our cervical tumor mutational landscape shows that most mutations are found in PIK3CA (E545K, E542K) and KRAS (G12D, G13D) and others in FBXW7 (R465C, R505G, R479Q). Mutations have also been found in ALK (V1149L, A1266T) and EGFR (T259M). These results showed that 48% of patients display at least one deleterious mutation in genes that have been already targeted by the Food and Drug Administration approved therapies. Considering deleterious mutations, 59% of patients could be eligible for clinical trials. Sequencing hundreds of genes in a clinical context has become feasible, in terms of time and cost. In the near future, such an analysis could be a part of a battery of examinations along the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, helping to detect sensitivity or resistance to targeted therapies and allow advancements towards personalized oncology. PMID:26155992

  20. Genetic profiles of cervical tumors by high-throughput sequencing for personalized medical care

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Etienne; Brault, Baptiste; Holmes, Allyson; Legros, Angelina; Jeannot, Emmanuelle; Campitelli, Maura; Rousselin, Antoine; Goardon, Nicolas; Frébourg, Thierry; Krieger, Sophie; Crouet, Hubert; Nicolas, Alain; Sastre, Xavier; Vaur, Dominique; Castéra, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Cancer treatment is facing major evolution since the advent of targeted therapies. Building genetic profiles could predict sensitivity or resistance to these therapies and highlight disease-specific abnormalities, supporting personalized patient care. In the context of biomedical research and clinical diagnosis, our laboratory has developed an oncogenic panel comprised of 226 genes and a dedicated bioinformatic pipeline to explore somatic mutations in cervical carcinomas, using high-throughput sequencing. Twenty-nine tumors were sequenced for exons within 226 genes. The automated pipeline used includes a database and a filtration system dedicated to identifying mutations of interest and excluding false positive and germline mutations. One-hundred and seventy-six total mutational events were found among the 29 tumors. Our cervical tumor mutational landscape shows that most mutations are found in PIK3CA (E545K, E542K) and KRAS (G12D, G13D) and others in FBXW7 (R465C, R505G, R479Q). Mutations have also been found in ALK (V1149L, A1266T) and EGFR (T259M). These results showed that 48% of patients display at least one deleterious mutation in genes that have been already targeted by the Food and Drug Administration approved therapies. Considering deleterious mutations, 59% of patients could be eligible for clinical trials. Sequencing hundreds of genes in a clinical context has become feasible, in terms of time and cost. In the near future, such an analysis could be a part of a battery of examinations along the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, helping to detect sensitivity or resistance to targeted therapies and allow advancements towards personalized oncology. PMID:26155992

  1. Colored polydimethylsiloxane micropillar arrays for high throughput measurements of forces applied by genetic model organisms.

    PubMed

    Khare, Siddharth M; Awasthi, Anjali; Venkataraman, V; Koushika, Sandhya P

    2015-01-01

    Measuring forces applied by multi-cellular organisms is valuable in investigating biomechanics of their locomotion. Several technologies have been developed to measure such forces, for example, strain gauges, micro-machined sensors, and calibrated cantilevers. We introduce an innovative combination of techniques as a high throughput screening tool to assess forces applied by multiple genetic model organisms. First, we fabricated colored Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micropillars where the color enhances contrast making it easier to detect and track pillar displacement driven by the organism. Second, we developed a semi-automated graphical user interface to analyze the images for pillar displacement, thus reducing the analysis time for each animal to minutes. The addition of color reduced the Young's modulus of PDMS. Therefore, the dye-PDMS composite was characterized using Yeoh's hyperelastic model and the pillars were calibrated using a silicon based force sensor. We used our device to measure forces exerted by wild type and mutant Caenorhabditis elegans moving on an agarose surface. Wild type C. elegans exert an average force of ∼1 μN on an individual pillar and a total average force of ∼7.68 μN. We show that the middle of C. elegans exerts more force than its extremities. We find that C. elegans mutants with defective body wall muscles apply significantly lower force on individual pillars, while mutants defective in sensing externally applied mechanical forces still apply the same average force per pillar compared to wild type animals. Average forces applied per pillar are independent of the length, diameter, or cuticle stiffness of the animal. We also used the device to measure, for the first time, forces applied by Drosophila melanogaster larvae. Peristaltic waves occurred at 0.4 Hz applying an average force of ∼1.58 μN on a single pillar. Our colored microfluidic device along with its displacement tracking software allows us to measure forces

  2. Colored polydimethylsiloxane micropillar arrays for high throughput measurements of forces applied by genetic model organisms

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Siddharth M.; Awasthi, Anjali; Venkataraman, V.; Koushika, Sandhya P.

    2015-01-01

    Measuring forces applied by multi-cellular organisms is valuable in investigating biomechanics of their locomotion. Several technologies have been developed to measure such forces, for example, strain gauges, micro-machined sensors, and calibrated cantilevers. We introduce an innovative combination of techniques as a high throughput screening tool to assess forces applied by multiple genetic model organisms. First, we fabricated colored Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micropillars where the color enhances contrast making it easier to detect and track pillar displacement driven by the organism. Second, we developed a semi-automated graphical user interface to analyze the images for pillar displacement, thus reducing the analysis time for each animal to minutes. The addition of color reduced the Young's modulus of PDMS. Therefore, the dye-PDMS composite was characterized using Yeoh's hyperelastic model and the pillars were calibrated using a silicon based force sensor. We used our device to measure forces exerted by wild type and mutant Caenorhabditis elegans moving on an agarose surface. Wild type C. elegans exert an average force of ∼1 μN on an individual pillar and a total average force of ∼7.68 μN. We show that the middle of C. elegans exerts more force than its extremities. We find that C. elegans mutants with defective body wall muscles apply significantly lower force on individual pillars, while mutants defective in sensing externally applied mechanical forces still apply the same average force per pillar compared to wild type animals. Average forces applied per pillar are independent of the length, diameter, or cuticle stiffness of the animal. We also used the device to measure, for the first time, forces applied by Drosophila melanogaster larvae. Peristaltic waves occurred at 0.4 Hz applying an average force of ∼1.58 μN on a single pillar. Our colored microfluidic device along with its displacement tracking software allows us to measure forces

  3. Development and validation of a 48-target analytical method for high-throughput monitoring of genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofei; Wu, Yuhua; Li, Jun; Li, Yunjing; Long, Likun; Li, Feiwu; Wu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    The rapid increase in the number of genetically modified (GM) varieties has led to a demand for high-throughput methods to detect genetically modified organisms (GMOs). We describe a new dynamic array-based high throughput method to simultaneously detect 48 targets in 48 samples on a Fludigm system. The test targets included species-specific genes, common screening elements, most of the Chinese-approved GM events, and several unapproved events. The 48 TaqMan assays successfully amplified products from both single-event samples and complex samples with a GMO DNA amount of 0.05 ng, and displayed high specificity. To improve the sensitivity of detection, a preamplification step for 48 pooled targets was added to enrich the amount of template before performing dynamic chip assays. This dynamic chip-based method allowed the synchronous high-throughput detection of multiple targets in multiple samples. Thus, it represents an efficient, qualitative method for GMO multi-detection. PMID:25556930

  4. High-throughput sequencing of forensic genetic samples using punches of FTA cards with buccal swabs.

    PubMed

    Kampmann, Marie-Louise; Buchard, Anders; Børsting, Claus; Morling, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate that punches from buccal swab samples preserved on FTA cards can be used for high-throughput DNA sequencing, also known as massively parallel sequencing (MPS). We typed 44 reference samples with the HID-Ion AmpliSeq Identity Panel using washed 1.2 mm punches from FTA cards with buccal swabs and compared the results with those obtained with DNA extracted using the EZ1 DNA Investigator Kit. Concordant profiles were obtained for all samples. Our protocol includes simple punch, wash, and PCR steps, reducing cost and hands-on time in the laboratory. Furthermore, it facilitates automation of DNA sequencing. PMID:27625209

  5. MassCode Liquid Arrays as a Tool for Multiplexed High-Throughput Genetic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, Gregory S.; Khine, Htet; Zhou, Tina T.; Ryan, Daniel E.; Brand, Tony; McBride, Mary T.; Killeen, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Multiplexed detection assays that analyze a modest number of nucleic acid targets over large sample sets are emerging as the preferred testing approach in such applications as routine pathogen typing, outbreak monitoring, and diagnostics. However, very few DNA testing platforms have proven to offer a solution for mid-plexed analysis that is high-throughput, sensitive, and with a low cost per test. In this work, an enhanced genotyping method based on MassCode technology was devised and integrated as part of a high-throughput mid-plexing analytical system that facilitates robust qualitative differential detection of DNA targets. Samples are first analyzed using MassCode PCR (MC-PCR) performed with an array of primer sets encoded with unique mass tags. Lambda exonuclease and an array of MassCode probes are then contacted with MC-PCR products for further interrogation and target sequences are specifically identified. Primer and probe hybridizations occur in homogeneous solution, a clear advantage over micro- or nanoparticle suspension arrays. The two cognate tags coupled to resultant MassCode hybrids are detected in an automated process using a benchtop single quadrupole mass spectrometer. The prospective value of using MassCode probe arrays for multiplexed bioanalysis was demonstrated after developing a 14plex proof of concept assay designed to subtype a select panel of Salmonella enterica serogroups and serovars. This MassCode system is very flexible and test panels can be customized to include more, less, or different markers. PMID:21544191

  6. Novel high-throughput screen identifies an HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor with a unique mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Sheen, Chih-Wei; Alptürk, Onur; Sluis-Cremer, Nicolas

    2014-09-15

    HIV-1 resistance to zidovudine [AZT (azidothymidine)] is associated with selection of the mutations M41L, D67N, K70R, L210W, T215F/Y and K219Q/E in RT (reverse transcriptase). These mutations decrease HIV-1 susceptibility to AZT by augmenting RT's ability to excise the chain-terminating AZT-MP (AZT-monophosphate) moiety from the chain-terminated DNA primer. Although AZT-MP excision occurs at the enzyme's polymerase active site, it is mechanistically distinct from the DNA polymerase reaction. Consequently, this activity represents a novel target for drug discovery, and inhibitors that target this activity may increase the efficacy of nucleoside/nucleotide analogues, and may help to delay the onset of drug resistance. In the present study, we have developed a FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer)-based high-throughput screening assay for the AZT-MP excision activity of RT. This assay is sensitive and robust, and demonstrates a signal-to-noise ratio of 3.3 and a Z' factor of 0.69. We screened three chemical libraries (7265 compounds) using this assay, and identified APEX57219 {3,3'-[(3-carboxy-4-oxo-2,5-cyclohexadien-1-ylidene)methylene]bis[6-hydroxybenzoic acid]} as the most promising hit. APEX57219 displays a unique activity profile against wild-type and drug-resistant HIV-1 RT, and was found to inhibit virus replication at the level of reverse transcription. Mechanistic analyses revealed that APEX57219 blocked the interaction between RT and the nucleic acid substrate. PMID:24969820

  7. Novel high throughput screen identifies an HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor with a unique mechanism of action

    PubMed Central

    Sheen, Chih-Wei; Alptürk, Onur; Sluis-Cremer, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 resistance to zidovudine (AZT) is associated with selection of M41L, D67N, K70R, L210W, T215F/Y and K219Q/E in reverse transcriptase (RT). These mutations decrease HIV-1 susceptibility to AZT by augmenting RT’s ability to excise the chain-terminating AZT-monophosphate (AZT-MP) moiety from the chain-terminated DNA primer. Although AZT-MP excision occurs at the enzyme’s polymerase activ e site, it is mechanistically distinct from the DNA polymerase reaction. Consequently, this activity represents a novel target for drug discovery, and inhibitors that target this activity may increase the efficacy of nucleosid(t)e analogs, and may help to delay the onset of drug resistance. Here, we developed a Förster resonance energy transfer based high throughput screening assay for the AZT-MP excision activity of RT. This assay is sensitive and robust, and demonstrates a signal to noise ratio of 3.3 and a Z’ factor of 0.69. We screened 3 chemical libraries (7265 compounds) using this assay, and identified 3,3'-[(3-carboxy-4-oxo-2,5-cyclohexadien-1-lidene)methylene]bis[6-hydroxy-benzoic acid] (APEX57219) as the most promising hit. APEX57219 displays a unique activity profile against wild-type and drug-resistant HIV-1 RT, and was found to inhibit virus replication at the level of reverse transcription. Mechanistic analyses revealed that APEX57219 blocked the interaction between RT and the nucleic acid substrate. PMID:24969820

  8. Generating information-rich high-throughput experimental materials genomes using functional clustering via multitree genetic programming and information theory.

    PubMed

    Suram, Santosh K; Haber, Joel A; Jin, Jian; Gregoire, John M

    2015-04-13

    High-throughput experimental methodologies are capable of synthesizing, screening and characterizing vast arrays of combinatorial material libraries at a very rapid rate. These methodologies strategically employ tiered screening wherein the number of compositions screened decreases as the complexity, and very often the scientific information obtained from a screening experiment, increases. The algorithm used for down-selection of samples from higher throughput screening experiment to a lower throughput screening experiment is vital in achieving information-rich experimental materials genomes. The fundamental science of material discovery lies in the establishment of composition-structure-property relationships, motivating the development of advanced down-selection algorithms which consider the information value of the selected compositions, as opposed to simply selecting the best performing compositions from a high throughput experiment. Identification of property fields (composition regions with distinct composition-property relationships) in high throughput data enables down-selection algorithms to employ advanced selection strategies, such as the selection of representative compositions from each field or selection of compositions that span the composition space of the highest performing field. Such strategies would greatly enhance the generation of data-driven discoveries. We introduce an informatics-based clustering of composition-property functional relationships using a combination of information theory and multitree genetic programming concepts for identification of property fields in a composition library. We demonstrate our approach using a complex synthetic composition-property map for a 5 at. % step ternary library consisting of four distinct property fields and finally explore the application of this methodology for capturing relationships between composition and catalytic activity for the oxygen evolution reaction for 5429 catalyst compositions in a

  9. Human Genetics in Rheumatoid Arthritis Guides a High-Throughput Drug Screen of the CD40 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Diogo, Dorothée; Wu, Di; Spoonamore, Jim; Dancik, Vlado; Franke, Lude; Kurreeman, Fina; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Duclos, Grant; Hartland, Cathy; Zhou, Xuezhong; Li, Kejie; Liu, Jun; De Jager, Philip L.; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Bowes, John; Eyre, Steve; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K.; Worthington, Jane; Gupta, Namrata; Clemons, Paul A.; Stahl, Eli; Tolliday, Nicola; Plenge, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Although genetic and non-genetic studies in mouse and human implicate the CD40 pathway in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there are no approved drugs that inhibit CD40 signaling for clinical care in RA or any other disease. Here, we sought to understand the biological consequences of a CD40 risk variant in RA discovered by a previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) and to perform a high-throughput drug screen for modulators of CD40 signaling based on human genetic findings. First, we fine-map the CD40 risk locus in 7,222 seropositive RA patients and 15,870 controls, together with deep sequencing of CD40 coding exons in 500 RA cases and 650 controls, to identify a single SNP that explains the entire signal of association (rs4810485, P = 1.4×10−9). Second, we demonstrate that subjects homozygous for the RA risk allele have ∼33% more CD40 on the surface of primary human CD19+ B lymphocytes than subjects homozygous for the non-risk allele (P = 10−9), a finding corroborated by expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 1,469 healthy control individuals. Third, we use retroviral shRNA infection to perturb the amount of CD40 on the surface of a human B lymphocyte cell line (BL2) and observe a direct correlation between amount of CD40 protein and phosphorylation of RelA (p65), a subunit of the NF-κB transcription factor. Finally, we develop a high-throughput NF-κB luciferase reporter assay in BL2 cells activated with trimerized CD40 ligand (tCD40L) and conduct an HTS of 1,982 chemical compounds and FDA–approved drugs. After a series of counter-screens and testing in primary human CD19+ B cells, we identify 2 novel chemical inhibitors not previously implicated in inflammation or CD40-mediated NF-κB signaling. Our study demonstrates proof-of-concept that human genetics can be used to guide the development of phenotype-based, high-throughput small-molecule screens to identify potential novel therapies in

  10. Human genetics in rheumatoid arthritis guides a high-throughput drug screen of the CD40 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Diogo, Dorothée; Wu, Di; Spoonamore, Jim; Dancik, Vlado; Franke, Lude; Kurreeman, Fina; Rossin, Elizabeth J; Duclos, Grant; Hartland, Cathy; Zhou, Xuezhong; Li, Kejie; Liu, Jun; De Jager, Philip L; Siminovitch, Katherine A; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Bowes, John; Eyre, Steve; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K; Worthington, Jane; Gupta, Namrata; Clemons, Paul A; Stahl, Eli; Tolliday, Nicola; Plenge, Robert M

    2013-05-01

    Although genetic and non-genetic studies in mouse and human implicate the CD40 pathway in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there are no approved drugs that inhibit CD40 signaling for clinical care in RA or any other disease. Here, we sought to understand the biological consequences of a CD40 risk variant in RA discovered by a previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) and to perform a high-throughput drug screen for modulators of CD40 signaling based on human genetic findings. First, we fine-map the CD40 risk locus in 7,222 seropositive RA patients and 15,870 controls, together with deep sequencing of CD40 coding exons in 500 RA cases and 650 controls, to identify a single SNP that explains the entire signal of association (rs4810485, P = 1.4×10(-9)). Second, we demonstrate that subjects homozygous for the RA risk allele have ∼33% more CD40 on the surface of primary human CD19+ B lymphocytes than subjects homozygous for the non-risk allele (P = 10(-9)), a finding corroborated by expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 1,469 healthy control individuals. Third, we use retroviral shRNA infection to perturb the amount of CD40 on the surface of a human B lymphocyte cell line (BL2) and observe a direct correlation between amount of CD40 protein and phosphorylation of RelA (p65), a subunit of the NF-κB transcription factor. Finally, we develop a high-throughput NF-κB luciferase reporter assay in BL2 cells activated with trimerized CD40 ligand (tCD40L) and conduct an HTS of 1,982 chemical compounds and FDA-approved drugs. After a series of counter-screens and testing in primary human CD19+ B cells, we identify 2 novel chemical inhibitors not previously implicated in inflammation or CD40-mediated NF-κB signaling. Our study demonstrates proof-of-concept that human genetics can be used to guide the development of phenotype-based, high-throughput small-molecule screens to identify potential novel therapies in

  11. GLEAMS: a novel approach to high-throughput genetic microarray image capture and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zheng Z.; Stein, Jaime A.; Ji, Qien Z.

    2001-06-01

    GLEAMS is a robust, stable and accurate image capture and quantification method for microarrays. It is capable of fully and automatically detecting and quantifying the expression spots. This can be done in a batch mode, without human intervention, achieving a high throughput of parallel data processing. Simple to use visual tools are provided to estimate parameters and to submit, monitor and control jobs execution. The un-supervised batch auto-alignment is based on a novel method requiring only knowledge of the number of rows and columns of dots in the array. Distances between dots along rows and columns are estimated from the image's auto- correlation function. This is also used to align the array and the sides of the image. Applying intensity and geometric constraints to the cross-correlation function between the image and a template sub-array, the location of the sub-arrays can be determined. Carefully implemented, the algorithm can approach human vision in its sensitivity and accuracy in finding the general positions of dots in a micro-array image. Subsequent spot quantification uses Ostu's thresholding method followed by some morphological operations, including the application of a constraining shape mask. Segmentation techniques are applied to detect and remove speckles from the targets and to ensure the veracity of the data extracted.

  12. Two Different High Throughput Sequencing Approaches Identify Thousands of De Novo Genomic Markers for the Genetically Depleted Bornean Elephant

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Reeta; Goossens, Benoit; Kun-Rodrigues, Célia; Teixeira, Tatiana; Othman, Nurzhafarina; Boone, Jason Q.; Jue, Nathaniel K.; Obergfell, Craig; O'Neill, Rachel J.; Chikhi, Lounès

    2012-01-01

    High throughput sequencing technologies are being applied to an increasing number of model species with a high-quality reference genome. The application and analyses of whole-genome sequence data in non-model species with no prior genomic information are currently under way. Recent sequencing technologies provide new opportunities for gathering genomic data in natural populations, laying the empirical foundation for future research in the field of conservation and population genomics. Here we present the case study of the Bornean elephant, which is the most endangered subspecies of Asian elephant and exhibits very low genetic diversity. We used two different sequencing platforms, the Roche 454 FLX (shotgun) and Illumina, GAIIx (Restriction site associated DNA, RAD) to evaluate the feasibility of the two methodologies for the discovery of de novo markers (single nucleotide polymorphism, SNPs and microsatellites) using low coverage data. Approximately, 6,683 (shotgun) and 14,724 (RAD) SNPs were detected within our elephant sequence dataset. Genotyping of a representative sample of 194 SNPs resulted in a SNP validation rate of ∼ 83 to 94% and 17% of the loci were polymorphic with a low diversity (Ho = 0.057). Different numbers of microsatellites were identified through shotgun (27,226) and RAD (868) techniques. Out of all di-, tri-, and tetra-microsatellite loci, 1,706 loci had sufficient flanking regions (shotgun) while only 7 were found with RAD. All microsatellites were monomorphic in the Bornean but polymorphic in another elephant subspecies. Despite using different sample sizes, and the well known differences in the two platforms used regarding sequence length and throughput, the two approaches showed high validation rate. The approaches used here for marker development in a threatened species demonstrate the utility of high throughput sequencing technologies as a starting point for the development of genomic tools in a non-model species and in particular

  13. Characterization of unknown genetic modifications using high throughput sequencing and computational subtraction

    PubMed Central

    Tengs, Torstein; Zhang, Haibo; Holst-Jensen, Arne; Bohlin, Jon; Butenko, Melinka A; Kristoffersen, Anja Bråthen; Sorteberg, Hilde-Gunn Opsahl; Berdal, Knut G

    2009-01-01

    Background When generating a genetically modified organism (GMO), the primary goal is to give a target organism one or several novel traits by using biotechnology techniques. A GMO will differ from its parental strain in that its pool of transcripts will be altered. Currently, there are no methods that are reliably able to determine if an organism has been genetically altered if the nature of the modification is unknown. Results We show that the concept of computational subtraction can be used to identify transgenic cDNA sequences from genetically modified plants. Our datasets include 454-type sequences from a transgenic line of Arabidopsis thaliana and published EST datasets from commercially relevant species (rice and papaya). Conclusion We believe that computational subtraction represents a powerful new strategy for determining if an organism has been genetically modified as well as to define the nature of the modification. Fewer assumptions have to be made compared to methods currently in use and this is an advantage particularly when working with unknown GMOs. PMID:19814792

  14. High-Throughput Genetic Testing for Thrombotic Microangiopathies and C3 Glomerulopathies.

    PubMed

    Bu, Fengxiao; Borsa, Nicolo Ghiringhelli; Jones, Michael B; Takanami, Erika; Nishimura, Carla; Hauer, Jill J; Azaiez, Hela; Black-Ziegelbein, Elizabeth A; Meyer, Nicole C; Kolbe, Diana L; Li, Yingyue; Frees, Kathy; Schnieders, Michael J; Thomas, Christie; Nester, Carla; Smith, Richard J H

    2016-04-01

    The thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs) and C3 glomerulopathies (C3Gs) include a spectrum of rare diseases such as atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, C3GN, and dense deposit disease, which share phenotypic similarities and underlying genetic commonalities. Variants in several genes contribute to the pathogenesis of these diseases, and identification of these variants may inform the diagnosis and treatment of affected patients. We have developed and validated a comprehensive genetic panel that screens all exons of all genes implicated in TMA and C3G. The closely integrated pipeline implemented includes targeted genomic enrichment, massively parallel sequencing, bioinformatic analysis, and a multidisciplinary conference to analyze identified variants in the context of each patient's specific phenotype. Herein, we present our 1-year experience with this panel, during which time we studied 193 patients. We identified 17 novel and 74 rare variants, which we classified as pathogenic (11), likely pathogenic (12), and of uncertain significance (68). Compared with controls, patients with C3G had a higher frequency of rare and novel variants in C3 convertase (C3 and CFB) and complement regulator (CFH, CFI, CFHR5, and CD46) genes (P<0.05). In contrast, patients with TMA had an increase in rare and novel variants only in complement regulator genes (P<0.01), a distinction consistent with differing sites of complement dysregulation in these two diseases. In summary, we were able to provide a positive genetic diagnosis in 43% and 41% of patients carrying the clinical diagnosis of C3G and TMA, respectively. PMID:26283675

  15. A High-Throughput Regeneration and Transformation Platform for Production of Genetically Modified Banana

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Jaindra N.; Oduor, Richard O.; Tripathi, Leena

    2015-01-01

    Banana (Musa spp.) is an important staple food as well as cash crop in tropical and subtropical countries. Various bacterial, fungal, and viral diseases and pests such as nematodes are major constraints in its production and are currently destabilizing the banana production in sub-Saharan Africa. Genetic engineering is a complementary option used for incorporating useful traits in banana to bypass the long generation time, polyploidy, and sterility of most of the cultivated varieties. A robust transformation protocol for farmer preferred varieties is crucial for banana genomics and improvement. A robust and reproducible system for genetic transformation of banana using embryogenic cell suspensions (ECS) has been developed in this study. Two different types of explants (immature male flowers and multiple buds) were tested for their ability to develop ECS in several varieties of banana locally grown in Africa. ECS of banana varieties “Cavendish Williams” and “Gros Michel” were developed using multiple buds, whereas ECS of “Sukali Ndiizi” was developed using immature male flowers. Regeneration efficiency of ECS was about 20,000–50,000 plantlets per ml of settled cell volume (SCV) depending on variety. ECS of three different varieties were transformed through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation using gusA reporter gene and 20–70 independent transgenic events per ml SCV of ECS were regenerated on selective medium. The presence and integration of gusA gene in transgenic plants was confirmed by PCR, dot blot, and Southern blot analysis and expression by histochemical GUS assays. The robust transformation platform was successfully used to generate hundreds of transgenic lines with disease resistance. Such a platform will facilitate the transfer of technologies to national agricultural research systems (NARS) in Africa. PMID:26635849

  16. The application of high-throughput AFLP's in assessing genetic diversity in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense.

    PubMed

    Groenewald, Susan; Van Den Berg, Noëlani; Marasas, Walter F O; Viljoen, Altus

    2006-03-01

    Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc) is responsible for fusarium wilt of bananas. The pathogen consists of several variants that are divided into three races and 21 vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs). Several DNA-based techniques have previously been used to analyse the worldwide population of Foc, sometimes yielding results that were not always consistent. In this study, the high-resolution genotyping method of AFLP is introduced as a potentially effective molecular tool to investigate diversity in Foc at a genome-wide level. The population selected for this study included Foc isolates representing different VCGs and races, isolates of F. oxysporum f. sp. dianthi, a putatively non-pathogenic biological control strain F. oxysporum (Fo47), and F. circinatum. High-throughput AFLP analysis was attained using five different infrared dye-labelled primer combinations using a two-dye model 4200s LI-COR automated DNA analyser. An average of approx. 100 polymorphic loci were scored for each primer pair using the SAGA(MX) automated AFLP analysis software. Data generated from five primer pair combinations were combined and subjected to distance analysis, which included the use of neighbour-joining and a bootstrap of 1000 replicates. A tree inferred from AFLP distance analysis revealed the polyphyletic nature of the Foc isolates, and seven genotypic groups could be identified. The results indicate that AFLP is a powerful tool to perform detailed analysis of genetic diversity in the banana pathogen Foc. PMID:16483757

  17. MACRO: a combined microchip-PCR and microarray system for high-throughput monitoring of genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Shao, Ning; Jiang, Shi-Meng; Zhang, Miao; Wang, Jing; Guo, Shu-Juan; Li, Yang; Jiang, He-Wei; Liu, Cheng-Xi; Zhang, Da-Bing; Yang, Li-Tao; Tao, Sheng-Ce

    2014-01-21

    The monitoring of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) is a primary step of GMO regulation. However, there is presently a lack of effective and high-throughput methodologies for specifically and sensitively monitoring most of the commercialized GMOs. Herein, we developed a multiplex amplification on a chip with readout on an oligo microarray (MACRO) system specifically for convenient GMO monitoring. This system is composed of a microchip for multiplex amplification and an oligo microarray for the readout of multiple amplicons, containing a total of 91 targets (18 universal elements, 20 exogenous genes, 45 events, and 8 endogenous reference genes) that covers 97.1% of all GM events that have been commercialized up to 2012. We demonstrate that the specificity of MACRO is ~100%, with a limit of detection (LOD) that is suitable for real-world applications. Moreover, the results obtained of simulated complex samples and blind samples with MACRO were 100% consistent with expectations and the results of independently performed real-time PCRs, respectively. Thus, we believe MACRO is the first system that can be applied for effectively monitoring the majority of the commercialized GMOs in a single test. PMID:24359455

  18. Comparative Performance of Four Methods for High-throughput Glycosylation Analysis of Immunoglobulin G in Genetic and Epidemiological Research*

    PubMed Central

    Huffman, Jennifer E.; Pučić-Baković, Maja; Klarić, Lucija; Hennig, René; Selman, Maurice H. J.; Vučković, Frano; Novokmet, Mislav; Krištić, Jasminka; Borowiak, Matthias; Muth, Thilo; Polašek, Ozren; Razdorov, Genadij; Gornik, Olga; Plomp, Rosina; Theodoratou, Evropi; Wright, Alan F.; Rudan, Igor; Hayward, Caroline; Campbell, Harry; Deelder, André M.; Reichl, Udo; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Rapp, Erdmann; Wuhrer, Manfred; Lauc, Gordan

    2014-01-01

    The biological and clinical relevance of glycosylation is becoming increasingly recognized, leading to a growing interest in large-scale clinical and population-based studies. In the past few years, several methods for high-throughput analysis of glycans have been developed, but thorough validation and standardization of these methods is required before significant resources are invested in large-scale studies. In this study, we compared liquid chromatography, capillary gel electrophoresis, and two MS methods for quantitative profiling of N-glycosylation of IgG in the same data set of 1201 individuals. To evaluate the accuracy of the four methods we then performed analysis of association with genetic polymorphisms and age. Chromatographic methods with either fluorescent or MS-detection yielded slightly stronger associations than MS-only and multiplexed capillary gel electrophoresis, but at the expense of lower levels of throughput. Advantages and disadvantages of each method were identified, which should inform the selection of the most appropriate method in future studies. PMID:24719452

  19. High-Throughput Genetic Identification of Functionally Important Regions of the Yeast DEAD-box Protein Mss116p

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Georg; Campo, Mark Del; Turner, Kathryn G.; Gilman, Benjamin; Wolf, Rachel Z.; Lambowitz, Alan M.

    2011-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae DEAD-box protein Mss116p is a general RNA chaperone that functions in splicing mitochondrial group I and group II introns. Recent X-ray crystal structures of Mss116p in complex with ATP analogs and single-stranded RNA show that the helicase core induces a bend in the bound RNA, as in other DEAD-box proteins, while a C-terminal extension induces a second bend, resulting in RNA crimping. Here, we illuminate these structures by using high-throughput genetic selections, unigenic evolution, and analyses of in vivo splicing activity to comprehensively identify functionally important regions and permissible amino acid substitutions throughout Mss116p. The functionally important regions include those containing conserved sequence motifs involved in ATP and RNA binding or interdomain interactions, as well as previously unidentified regions, including surface loops that may function in protein-protein interactions. The genetic selections recapitulate major features of the conserved helicase motifs seen in other DEAD-box proteins, but also show surprising variations, including multiple novel variants of motif III (SAT). Patterns of amino acid substitutions indicate that the RNA bend induced by the helicase core depends upon ionic and hydrogen-bonding interactions with the bound RNA; identify a subset of critically interacting residues; and indicate that the bend induced by the C-terminal extension results primarily from a steric block. Finally, we identified two conserved regions, one the previously noted post-II region in the helicase core and the other in the C-terminal extension, which may help displace or sequester the opposite RNA strand during RNA unwinding. PMID:21945532

  20. High-Throughput Genetic Identification of Functionally Important Regions of the Yeast DEAD-Box Protein Mss116p

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, Georg; Del Campo, Mark; Turner, Kathryn G.; Gilman, Benjamin; Wolf, Rachel Z.; Lambowitz, Alan M.

    2012-03-15

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae DEAD-box protein Mss116p is a general RNA chaperone that functions in splicing mitochondrial group I and group II introns. Recent X-ray crystal structures of Mss116p in complex with ATP analogs and single-stranded RNA show that the helicase core induces a bend in the bound RNA, as in other DEAD-box proteins, while a C-terminal extension (CTE) induces a second bend, resulting in RNA crimping. Here, we illuminate these structures by using high-throughput genetic selections, unigenic evolution, and analyses of in vivo splicing activity to comprehensively identify functionally important regions and permissible amino acid substitutions throughout Mss116p. The functionally important regions include those containing conserved sequence motifs involved in ATP and RNA binding or interdomain interactions, as well as previously unidentified regions, including surface loops that may function in protein-protein interactions. The genetic selections recapitulate major features of the conserved helicase motifs seen in other DEAD-box proteins but also show surprising variations, including multiple novel variants of motif III (SAT). Patterns of amino acid substitutions indicate that the RNA bend induced by the helicase core depends on ionic and hydrogen-bonding interactions with the bound RNA; identify a subset of critically interacting residues; and indicate that the bend induced by the CTE results primarily from a steric block. Finally, we identified two conserved regions - one the previously noted post II region in the helicase core and the other in the CTE - that may help displace or sequester the opposite RNA strand during RNA unwinding.

  1. Reverse genetics of mononegavirales.

    PubMed

    Conzelmann, K K

    2004-01-01

    "Reverse genetics" or de novo synthesis of nonsegmented negative-sense RNA viruses (Mononegavirales) from cloned cDNA has become a reliable technique to study this group of medically important viruses. Since the first generation of a negative-sense RNA virus entirely from cDNA in 1994, reverse genetics systems have been established for members of most genera of the Rhabdo-, Paramyxo-, and Filoviridae families. These systems are based on intracellular transcription of viral full-length RNAs and simultaneous expression of viral proteins required to form the typical viral ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP). These systems are powerful tools to study all aspects of the virus life cycle as well as the roles of virus proteins in virus-host interplay and pathogenicity. In addition, recombinant viruses can be designed to have specific properties that make them attractive as biotechnological tools and live vaccines. PMID:15298166

  2. Development of a high-throughput SNP resource to advance genomic, genetic and breeding research in carrot (Daucus carota L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rapid advancement in high-throughput SNP genotyping technologies along with next generation sequencing (NGS) platforms has decreased the cost, improved the quality of large-scale genome surveys, and allowed specialty crops with limited genomic resources such as carrot (Daucus carota) to access t...

  3. High-throughput 2D root system phenotyping platform facilitates genetic analysis of root growth and development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High-throughput phenotyping of root systems requires a combination of specialized techniques and adaptable plant growth, root imaging and software tools. A custom phenotyping platform was designed to capture images of whole root systems, and novel software tools were developed to process and analyz...

  4. A High-Throughput In Vitro Drug Screen in a Genetically Engineered Mouse Model of Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma Identifies BMS-754807 as a Promising Therapeutic Agent

    PubMed Central

    Halvorson, Kyle G.; Barton, Kelly L.; Schroeder, Kristin; Misuraca, Katherine L.; Hoeman, Christine; Chung, Alex; Crabtree, Donna M.; Cordero, Francisco J.; Singh, Raj; Spasojevic, Ivan; Berlow, Noah; Pal, Ranadip; Becher, Oren J.

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs) represent a particularly lethal type of pediatric brain cancer with no effective therapeutic options. Our laboratory has previously reported the development of genetically engineered DIPG mouse models using the RCAS/tv-a system, including a model driven by PDGF-B, H3.3K27M, and p53 loss. These models can serve as a platform in which to test novel therapeutics prior to the initiation of human clinical trials. In this study, an in vitro high-throughput drug screen as part of the DIPG preclinical consortium using cell-lines derived from our DIPG models identified BMS-754807 as a drug of interest in DIPG. BMS-754807 is a potent and reversible small molecule multi-kinase inhibitor with many targets including IGF-1R, IR, MET, TRKA, TRKB, AURKA, AURKB. In vitro evaluation showed significant cytotoxic effects with an IC50 of 0.13 μM, significant inhibition of proliferation at a concentration of 1.5 μM, as well as inhibition of AKT activation. Interestingly, IGF-1R signaling was absent in serum-free cultures from the PDGF-B; H3.3K27M; p53 deficient model suggesting that the antitumor activity of BMS-754807 in this model is independent of IGF-1R. In vivo, systemic administration of BMS-754807 to DIPG-bearing mice did not prolong survival. Pharmacokinetic analysis demonstrated that tumor tissue drug concentrations of BMS-754807 were well below the identified IC50, suggesting that inadequate drug delivery may limit in vivo efficacy. In summary, an unbiased in vitro drug screen identified BMS-754807 as a potential therapeutic agent in DIPG, but BMS-754807 treatment in vivo by systemic delivery did not significantly prolong survival of DIPG-bearing mice. PMID:25748921

  5. Use of high-throughput targeted exome sequencing in genetic diagnosis of Chinese family with congenital cataract

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ming-Fu; Li, Lian-Bing; Pei, Yun-Qi; Cheng, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    AIM To identify disease-causing mutation in a congenital cataract family using enrichment of targeted genes combined with next-generation sequencing. METHODS A total of 371 known genes related to inherited eye diseases of the proband was selected and captured, followed by high-throughput sequencing. The sequencing data were analyzed by established bioinformatics pipeline. Validation was performed by Sanger sequencing. RESULTS A recurrent heterozygous non-synonymous mutation c.130G>A (p.V44M) in the GJA3 gene was identified in the proband. The result was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. The mutation showed co-segregation with the disease phenotype in the family but was not detected in unaffected controls. CONCLUSION Targeted exome sequencing is a rapid, high-throughput and cost-efficient method for screening known genes and could be applied to the routine gene diagnosis of congenital cataract. PMID:27275416

  6. A High-Throughput Forward Genetic Screen Identifies Genes Required for Virulence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola ES4326 on Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Karl J.; Ye, David; Fich, Eric; Jian, Allen; Lo, Timothy; Desveaux, Darrell

    2012-01-01

    Successful pathogenesis requires a number of coordinated processes whose genetic bases remain to be fully characterized. We utilized a high-throughput, liquid media-based assay to screen transposon disruptants of the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola ES4326 to identify genes required for virulence on Arabidopsis. Many genes identified through this screen were involved in processes such as type III secretion, periplasmic glucan biosynthesis, flagellar motility, and amino acid biosynthesis. A small set of genes did not fall into any of these functional groups, and their disruption resulted in context-specific effects on in planta bacterial growth. PMID:22870224

  7. High-throughput tetrad analysis.

    PubMed

    Ludlow, Catherine L; Scott, Adrian C; Cromie, Gareth A; Jeffery, Eric W; Sirr, Amy; May, Patrick; Lin, Jake; Gilbert, Teresa L; Hays, Michelle; Dudley, Aimée M

    2013-07-01

    Tetrad analysis has been a gold-standard genetic technique for several decades. Unfortunately, the need to manually isolate, disrupt and space tetrads has relegated its application to small-scale studies and limited its integration with high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies. We have developed a rapid, high-throughput method, called barcode-enabled sequencing of tetrads (BEST), that uses (i) a meiosis-specific GFP fusion protein to isolate tetrads by FACS and (ii) molecular barcodes that are read during genotyping to identify spores derived from the same tetrad. Maintaining tetrad information allows accurate inference of missing genetic markers and full genotypes of missing (and presumably nonviable) individuals. An individual researcher was able to isolate over 3,000 yeast tetrads in 3 h, an output equivalent to that of almost 1 month of manual dissection. BEST is transferable to other microorganisms for which meiotic mapping is significantly more laborious. PMID:23666411

  8. Reverse genetics of avian metapneumoviruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An overview of avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) infection in turkeys and development of a reverse genetics system for aMPV subgroup C (aMPV-C) virus will be presented. By using reverse genetics technology, we generated recombinant aMPV-C viruses containing a different length of glycoprotein (G) gene or...

  9. Reversed-Phase Liquid Chromatography-Quadrupole-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry for High-Throughput Molecular Profiling of Sea Cucumber Cerebrosides.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zicai; Cong, Peixu; Zhang, Hongwei; Song, Yu; Li, Zhaojie; Xu, Jie; Xue, Changhu

    2015-07-01

    Usually, the chemical structures of cerebrosides in sea creatures are more complicated than those from terrestrial plants and animals. Very little is known about the method for high-throughput molecular profiling of cerebrosides in sea cucumbers. In this study, cerebrosides from four species of edible sea cucumbers, specifically, Apostichopus japonicas, Thelenota ananas, Acaudina molpadioides and Bohadschia marmorata, were rapidly identified using reversed-phase liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (RPLC-QToF-MS). [M + H](+) in positive electrospray ionization (ESI) mode were used to obtain the product ion spectra. The cerebroside molecules were selected according to the neutral loss fragments of 180 Da and then identified according to pairs of specific products of long-chain bases (LCB) and their precursor ions. A typical predominant LCB was 2-amino-1,3-dihydroxy-4-heptadecene (d17:1), which was acylated to form saturated and monounsaturated non-hydroxy and monohydroxy fatty acids with 17-25 carbon atoms. Simultaneously, the occurrence of 2-hydroxy-tricosenoic acid (C23:1h) was characteristic of sea cucumber cerebrosides, whereas this molecule was rarely discovered in plants, mammals, or fungi. The profiles of LCB and fatty acids (FA) distribution might be related to the genera of sea cucumber. These data will be useful for identification of cerebrosides using RPLC-QToF-MS. PMID:26037520

  10. High-throughput genotyping assay for the large-scale genetic characterization of Cryptosporidium parasites from human and bovine samples.

    PubMed

    Abal-Fabeiro, J L; Maside, X; Llovo, J; Bello, X; Torres, M; Treviño, M; Moldes, L; Muñoz, A; Carracedo, A; Bartolomé, C

    2014-04-01

    The epidemiological study of human cryptosporidiosis requires the characterization of species and subtypes involved in human disease in large sample collections. Molecular genotyping is costly and time-consuming, making the implementation of low-cost, highly efficient technologies increasingly necessary. Here, we designed a protocol based on MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry for the high-throughput genotyping of a panel of 55 single nucleotide variants (SNVs) selected as markers for the identification of common gp60 subtypes of four Cryptosporidium species that infect humans. The method was applied to a panel of 608 human and 63 bovine isolates and the results were compared with control samples typed by Sanger sequencing. The method allowed the identification of species in 610 specimens (90·9%) and gp60 subtype in 605 (90·2%). It displayed excellent performance, with sensitivity and specificity values of 87·3 and 98·0%, respectively. Up to nine genotypes from four different Cryptosporidium species (C. hominis, C. parvum, C. meleagridis and C. felis) were detected in humans; the most common ones were C. hominis subtype Ib, and C. parvum IIa (61·3 and 28·3%, respectively). 96·5% of the bovine samples were typed as IIa. The method performs as well as the widely used Sanger sequencing and is more cost-effective and less time consuming. PMID:24238396

  11. High-throughput, low-cost, and event-specific polymerase chain reaction detection of herbicide tolerance in genetically modified soybean A2704-12.

    PubMed

    Ma, H; Li, H; Li, J; Wang, X F; Wei, P C; Li, L; Yang, J B

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an event-specific qualitative and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method for detection of herbicide-tolerance genetically modified (GM) soybean A2704-12. The event-specific PCR primers were designed, based on the 5'-flanking integration sequence in the soybean genome, to amplify the 239-bp target fragment. Employing the same event-specific primers, qualitative PCR and real-time quantitative PCR detection methods were successfully developed. The results showed that the A2704-12 event could be specifically distinguished from other GM soybean events. In the qualitative PCR assay, the limit of detection was 0.05%, and in the real-time quantitative PCR assay, the limit of detection was less than 0.01%. Moreover, our genomic DNA (gDNA) extraction protocol is high-throughput, safe, and low-cost. The event-specific PCR assay system is cost-efficient by using SYBR Green I in real-time PCR, and by using the same primers in both the qualitative and quantitative PCR assays. We therefore developed a high-throughput, low-cost, and event-specific qualitative and quantitative PCR detection method for GM soybean A2704-12. The method would be useful for market supervision and management of GM soybean A2704-12 due to its high specificity and sensitivity. PMID:24615034

  12. An improved, high-throughput method for detection of bluetongue virus RNA in Culicoides midges utilizing infrared-dye-labeled primers for reverse transcriptase PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new rapid (less than 6 h from insect-to-results) high-throughput assay is reported that is sensitive and specific for detecting BTV RNA in Culicoides biting midges. Homogenization and extraction of nucleic acids from individual Culicoides specimens were performed in a 96-well plate format using sp...

  13. High-throughput root phenotyping screens identify genetic loci associated with root architectural traits in Brassica napus under contrasting phosphate availabilities

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lei; Shi, Taoxiong; Broadley, Martin R.; White, Philip J.; Long, Yan; Meng, Jinling; Xu, Fangsen; Hammond, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Phosphate (Pi) deficiency in soils is a major limiting factor for crop growth worldwide. Plant growth under low Pi conditions correlates with root architectural traits and it may therefore be possible to select these traits for crop improvement. The aim of this study was to characterize root architectural traits, and to test quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with these traits, under low Pi (LP) and high Pi (HP) availability in Brassica napus. Methods Root architectural traits were characterized in seedlings of a double haploid (DH) mapping population (n = 190) of B. napus [‘Tapidor’ × ‘Ningyou 7’ (TNDH)] using high-throughput phenotyping methods. Primary root length (PRL), lateral root length (LRL), lateral root number (LRN), lateral root density (LRD) and biomass traits were measured 12 d post-germination in agar at LP and HP. Key Results In general, root and biomass traits were highly correlated under LP and HP conditions. ‘Ningyou 7’ had greater LRL, LRN and LRD than ‘Tapidor’, at both LP and HP availability, but smaller PRL. A cluster of highly significant QTL for LRN, LRD and biomass traits at LP availability were identified on chromosome A03; QTL for PRL were identified on chromosomes A07 and C06. Conclusions High-throughput phenotyping of Brassica can be used to identify root architectural traits which correlate with shoot biomass. It is feasible that these traits could be used in crop improvement strategies. The identification of QTL linked to root traits under LP and HP conditions provides further insights on the genetic basis of plant tolerance to P deficiency, and these QTL warrant further dissection. PMID:23172414

  14. A High-throughput AFLP-based Method for Constructing Integrated Genetic and Physical Maps: Progress Toward a Sorghum Genome Map

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Patricia E.; Klein, Robert R.; Cartinhour, Samuel W.; Ulanch, Paul E.; Dong, Jianmin; Obert, Jacque A.; Morishige, Daryl T.; Schlueter, Shannon D.; Childs, Kevin L.; Ale, Melissa; Mullet, John E.

    2000-01-01

    Sorghum is an important target for plant genomic mapping because of its adaptation to harsh environments, diverse germplasm collection, and value for comparing the genomes of grass species such as corn and rice. The construction of an integrated genetic and physical map of the sorghum genome (750 Mbp) is a primary goal of our sorghum genome project. To help accomplish this task, we have developed a new high-throughput PCR-based method for building BAC contigs and locating BAC clones on the sorghum genetic map. This task involved pooling 24,576 sorghum BAC clones (∼4× genome equivalents) in six different matrices to create 184 pools of BAC DNA. DNA fragments from each pool were amplified using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) technology, resolved on a LI-COR dual-dye DNA sequencing system, and analyzed using Bionumerics software. On average, each set of AFLP primers amplified 28 single-copy DNA markers that were useful for identifying overlapping BAC clones. Data from 32 different AFLP primer combinations identified ∼2400 BACs and ordered ∼700 BAC contigs. Analysis of a sorghum RIL mapping population using the same primer pairs located ∼200 of the BAC contigs on the sorghum genetic map. Restriction endonuclease fingerprinting of the entire collection of sorghum BAC clones was applied to test and extend the contigs constructed using this PCR-based methodology. Analysis of the fingerprint data allowed for the identification of 3366 contigs each containing an average of 5 BACs. BACs in ∼65% of the contigs aligned by AFLP analysis had sufficient overlap to be confirmed by DNA fingerprint analysis. In addition, 30% of the overlapping BACs aligned by AFLP analysis provided information for merging contigs and singletons that could not be joined using fingerprint data alone. Thus, the combination of fingerprinting and AFLP-based contig assembly and mapping provides a reliable, high-throughput method for building an integrated genetic and physical map

  15. A chemical-genetic interaction map of small molecules using high-throughput imaging in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Breinig, Marco; Klein, Felix A; Huber, Wolfgang; Boutros, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Small molecules often affect multiple targets, elicit off-target effects, and induce genotype-specific responses. Chemical genetics, the mapping of the genotype dependence of a small molecule's effects across a broad spectrum of phenotypes can identify novel mechanisms of action. It can also reveal unanticipated effects and could thereby reduce high attrition rates of small molecule development pipelines. Here, we used high-content screening and image analysis to measure effects of 1,280 pharmacologically active compounds on complex phenotypes in isogenic cancer cell lines which harbor activating or inactivating mutations in key oncogenic signaling pathways. Using multiparametric chemical-genetic interaction analysis, we observed phenotypic gene-drug interactions for more than 193 compounds, with many affecting phenotypes other than cell growth. We created a resource termed the Pharmacogenetic Phenome Compendium (PGPC), which enables exploration of drug mode of action, detection of potential off-target effects, and the generation of hypotheses on drug combinations and synergism. For example, we demonstrate that MEK inhibitors amplify the viability effect of the clinically used anti-alcoholism drug disulfiram and show that the EGFR inhibitor tyrphostin AG555 has off-target activity on the proteasome. Taken together, this study demonstrates how combining multiparametric phenotyping in different genetic backgrounds can be used to predict additional mechanisms of action and to reposition clinically used drugs. PMID:26700849

  16. Performance comparison of genetic markers for high-throughput sequencing-based biodiversity assessment in complex communities.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Aibin; Bailey, Sarah A; Heath, Daniel D; Macisaac, Hugh J

    2014-09-01

    Metabarcode surveys of DNA extracted from environmental samples are increasingly popular for biodiversity assessment in natural communities. Such surveys rely heavily on robust genetic markers. Therefore, analysis of PCR efficiency and subsequent biodiversity estimation for different types of genetic markers and their corresponding primers is important. Here, we test the PCR efficiency and biodiversity recovery potential of three commonly used genetic markers - nuclear small subunit ribosomal DNA (18S), mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and 16S ribosomal RNA (mt16S) - using 454 pyrosequencing of a zooplankton community collected from Hamilton Harbour, Ontario. We found that biodiversity detection power and PCR efficiency varied widely among these markers. All tested primers for COI failed to provide high-quality PCR products for pyrosequencing, but newly designed primers for 18S and 16S passed all tests. Furthermore, multiple analyses based on large-scale pyrosequencing (i.e. 1/2 PicoTiter plate for each marker) showed that primers for 18S recover more (38 orders) groups than 16S (10 orders) across all taxa, and four vs. two orders and nine vs. six families for Crustacea. Our results showed that 18S, using newly designed primers, is an efficient and powerful tool for profiling biodiversity in largely unexplored communities, especially when amplification difficulties exist for mitochondrial markers such as COI. Universal primers for higher resolution markers such as COI are still needed to address the possible low resolution of 18S for species-level identification. PMID:24655333

  17. Marburg Virus Reverse Genetics Systems.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Kristina Maria; Mühlberger, Elke

    2016-01-01

    The highly pathogenic Marburg virus (MARV) is a member of the Filoviridae family and belongs to the group of nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses. Reverse genetics systems established for MARV have been used to study various aspects of the viral replication cycle, analyze host responses, image viral infection, and screen for antivirals. This article provides an overview of the currently established MARV reverse genetic systems based on minigenomes, infectious virus-like particles and full-length clones, and the research that has been conducted using these systems. PMID:27338448

  18. Marburg Virus Reverse Genetics Systems

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Kristina Maria; Mühlberger, Elke

    2016-01-01

    The highly pathogenic Marburg virus (MARV) is a member of the Filoviridae family and belongs to the group of nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses. Reverse genetics systems established for MARV have been used to study various aspects of the viral replication cycle, analyze host responses, image viral infection, and screen for antivirals. This article provides an overview of the currently established MARV reverse genetic systems based on minigenomes, infectious virus-like particles and full-length clones, and the research that has been conducted using these systems. PMID:27338448

  19. Targeted high-throughput growth hormone 1 gene sequencing reveals high within-breed genetic diversity in South African goats.

    PubMed

    Ncube, K T; Mdladla, K; Dzomba, E F; Muchadeyi, F C

    2016-06-01

    This study assessed the genetic diversity in the growth hormone 1 gene (GH1) within and between South African goat breeds. Polymerase chain reaction-targeted gene amplification together with Illumina MiSeq next-generation sequencing (NGS) was used to generate the full length (2.54 kb) of the growth hormone 1 gene and screen for SNPs in the South African Boer (SAB) (n = 17), Tankwa (n = 15) and South African village (n = 35) goat populations. A range of 27-58 SNPs per population were observed. Mutations resulting in amino acid changes were observed at exons 2 and 5. Higher within-breed diversity of 97.37% was observed within the population category consisting of SA village ecotypes and the Tankwa goats. Highest pairwise FST values ranging from 0.148 to 0.356 were observed between the SAB and both the South African village and Tankwa feral goat populations. Phylogenetic analysis indicated nine genetic clusters, which reflected close relationships between the South African populations and the other international breeds with the exception of the Italian Sarda breeds. Results imply greater potential for within-population selection programs, particularly with SA village goats. PMID:26919178

  20. Bridging the gap between high-throughput genetic and transcriptional data reveals cellular pathways responding to alpha-synuclein toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Yeger-Lotem, Esti; Riva, Laura; Su, Linhui Julie; Gitler, Aaron D.; Cashikar, Anil; King, Oliver D.; Auluck, Pavan K.; Geddie, Melissa L.; Valastyan, Julie S.; Karger, David R.; Lindquist, Susan; Fraenkel, Ernest

    2009-01-01

    Cells respond to stimuli by changes in various processes, including signaling pathways and gene expression. Efforts to identify components of these responses increasingly depend on mRNA profiling and genetic library screens, yet the functional roles of the genes identified by these assays often remain enigmatic. By comparing the results of these two assays across various cellular responses, we found that they are consistently distinct. Moreover, genetic screens tend to identify response regulators, while mRNA profiling frequently detects metabolic responses. We developed an integrative approach that bridges the gap between these data using known molecular interactions, thus highlighting major response pathways. We harnessed this approach to reveal cellular pathways related to alpha-synuclein, a small lipid-binding protein implicated in several neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson disease. For this we screened an established yeast model for alpha-synuclein toxicity to identify genes that when overexpressed alter cellular survival. Application of our algorithm to these data and data from mRNA profiling provided functional explanations for many of these genes and revealed novel relations between alpha-synuclein toxicity and basic cellular pathways. PMID:19234470

  1. Integrating high-throughput genetic interaction mapping and high-content screening to explore yeast spindle morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vizeacoumar, Franco J.; van Dyk, Nydia; S.Vizeacoumar, Frederick; Cheung, Vincent; Li, Jingjing; Sydorskyy, Yaroslav; Case, Nicolle; Li, Zhijian; Datti, Alessandro; Nislow, Corey; Raught, Brian; Zhang, Zhaolei; Frey, Brendan; Bloom, Kerry

    2010-01-01

    We describe the application of a novel screening approach that combines automated yeast genetics, synthetic genetic array (SGA) analysis, and a high-content screening (HCS) system to examine mitotic spindle morphogenesis. We measured numerous spindle and cellular morphological parameters in thousands of single mutants and corresponding sensitized double mutants lacking genes known to be involved in spindle function. We focused on a subset of genes that appear to define a highly conserved mitotic spindle disassembly pathway, which is known to involve Ipl1p, the yeast aurora B kinase, as well as the cell cycle regulatory networks mitotic exit network (MEN) and fourteen early anaphase release (FEAR). We also dissected the function of the kinetochore protein Mcm21p, showing that sumoylation of Mcm21p regulates the enrichment of Ipl1p and other chromosomal passenger proteins to the spindle midzone to mediate spindle disassembly. Although we focused on spindle disassembly in a proof-of-principle study, our integrated HCS-SGA method can be applied to virtually any pathway, making it a powerful means for identifying specific cellular functions. PMID:20065090

  2. High-throughput Tetrad Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ludlow, Catherine L.; Scott, Adrian C.; Cromie, Gareth A.; Jeffery, Eric W.; Sirr, Amy; May, Patrick; Lin, Jake; Gilbert, Teresa L.; Hays, Michelle; Dudley, Aimée M.

    2013-01-01

    Tetrad analysis has been a gold standard genetic technique for several decades. Unfortunately, the manual nature of the process has relegated its application to small-scale studies and limited its integration with rapidly evolving DNA sequencing technologies. We have developed a rapid, high-throughput method, called Barcode Enabled Sequencing of Tetrads (BEST), that replaces the manual processes of isolating, disrupting and spacing tetrads. BEST uses a meiosis-specific GFP fusion protein to isolate tetrads by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and molecular barcodes that are read during genotyping to identify spores derived from the same tetrad. Maintaining tetrad information allows accurate inference of missing genetic markers and full genotypes of missing (and presumably nonviable) individuals. By removing the bottleneck of manual dissection, hundreds or even thousands of tetrads can be isolated in minutes. We demonstrate the approach in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but BEST is readily transferable to microorganisms in which meiotic mapping is significantly more laborious. PMID:23666411

  3. The genetic diversity and evolution of field pea (Pisum) studied by high throughput retrotransposon based insertion polymorphism (RBIP) marker analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The genetic diversity of crop species is the result of natural selection on the wild progenitor and human intervention by ancient and modern farmers and breeders. The genomes of modern cultivars, old cultivated landraces, ecotypes and wild relatives reflect the effects of these forces and provide insights into germplasm structural diversity, the geographical dimension to species diversity and the process of domestication of wild organisms. This issue is also of great practical importance for crop improvement because wild germplasm represents a rich potential source of useful under-exploited alleles or allele combinations. The aim of the present study was to analyse a major Pisum germplasm collection to gain a broad understanding of the diversity and evolution of Pisum and provide a new rational framework for designing germplasm core collections of the genus. Results 3020 Pisum germplasm samples from the John Innes Pisum germplasm collection were genotyped for 45 retrotransposon based insertion polymorphism (RBIP) markers by the Tagged Array Marker (TAM) method. The data set was stored in a purpose-built Germinate relational database and analysed by both principal coordinate analysis and a nested application of the Structure program which yielded substantially similar but complementary views of the diversity of the genus Pisum. Structure revealed three Groups (1-3) corresponding approximately to landrace, cultivar and wild Pisum respectively, which were resolved by nested Structure analysis into 14 Sub-Groups, many of which correlate with taxonomic sub-divisions of Pisum, domestication related phenotypic traits and/or restricted geographical locations. Genetic distances calculated between these Sub-Groups are broadly supported by principal coordinate analysis and these, together with the trait and geographical data, were used to infer a detailed model for the domestication of Pisum. Conclusions These data provide a clear picture of the major distinct gene

  4. A low-jitter and high-throughput scheduling based on genetic algorithm in slotted WDM networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Jin, Yaohui; Su, Yikai; Xu, Buwei; Zhang, Chunlei; Zhu, Yi; Hu, Weisheng

    2005-02-01

    Slotted WDM, which achieves higher capacity compared with conventional WDM and SDH networks, has been discussed a lot recently. The ring network for this architecture has been demonstrated experimentally. In slotted WDM ring network, each node is equipped with a wavelength-tunable transmitter and a fixed receiver and assigned with a specific wavelength. A node can send data to every other node by tuning wavelength accordingly in a time slot. One of the important issues for it is scheduling. Scheduling of it can be reduced to input queued switch when synchronization and propagation are solved and many schemes have been proposed to solve these two issues. However, it"s proved that scheduling of such a network taking both jitter and throughput into consideration is NP hard. Greedy algorithm has been proposed to solve it before. The main contribution of this paper lies in a novel genetic algorithm to obtain optimal or near optimal value of this specific NP hard problem. We devise problem specific chromosome codes, fitness function, crossover and mutation operations. Experimental results show that our GA provides better performances in terms of throughput and jitter than a greedy heuristic.

  5. High-Throughput Genetic Screens Identify a Large and Diverse Collection of New Sporulation Genes in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Jacqueline; Lim, Hoong Chuin; Bernhardt, Thomas G.; Rudner, David Z.

    2016-01-01

    The differentiation of the bacterium Bacillus subtilis into a dormant spore is among the most well-characterized developmental pathways in biology. Classical genetic screens performed over the past half century identified scores of factors involved in every step of this morphological process. More recently, transcriptional profiling uncovered additional sporulation-induced genes required for successful spore development. Here, we used transposon-sequencing (Tn-seq) to assess whether there were any sporulation genes left to be discovered. Our screen identified 133 out of the 148 genes with known sporulation defects. Surprisingly, we discovered 24 additional genes that had not been previously implicated in spore formation. To investigate their functions, we used fluorescence microscopy to survey early, middle, and late stages of differentiation of null mutants from the B. subtilis ordered knockout collection. This analysis identified mutants that are delayed in the initiation of sporulation, defective in membrane remodeling, and impaired in spore maturation. Several mutants had novel sporulation phenotypes. We performed in-depth characterization of two new factors that participate in cell–cell signaling pathways during sporulation. One (SpoIIT) functions in the activation of σE in the mother cell; the other (SpoIIIL) is required for σG activity in the forespore. Our analysis also revealed that as many as 36 sporulation-induced genes with no previously reported mutant phenotypes are required for timely spore maturation. Finally, we discovered a large set of transposon insertions that trigger premature initiation of sporulation. Our results highlight the power of Tn-seq for the discovery of new genes and novel pathways in sporulation and, combined with the recently completed null mutant collection, open the door for similar screens in other, less well-characterized processes. PMID:26735940

  6. Targeted high-throughput sequencing for diagnosis of genetically heterogeneous diseases: efficient mutation detection in Bardet-Biedl and Alström Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Redin, Claire; Le Gras, Stéphanie; Mhamdi, Oussema; Geoffroy, Véronique; Stoetzel, Corinne; Vincent, Marie-Claire; Chiurazzi, Pietro; Lacombe, Didier; Ouertani, Ines; Petit, Florence; Till, Marianne; Verloes, Alain; Jost, Bernard; Chaabouni, Habiba Bouhamed; Dollfus, Helene; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Muller, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Background Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a pleiotropic recessive disorder that belongs to the rapidly growing family of ciliopathies. It shares phenotypic traits with other ciliopathies, such as Alström syndrome (ALMS), nephronophthisis (NPHP) or Joubert syndrome. BBS mutations have been detected in 16 different genes (BBS1-BBS16) without clear genotype-to-phenotype correlation. This extensive genetic heterogeneity is a major concern for molecular diagnosis and genetic counselling. While various strategies have been recently proposed to optimise mutation detection, they either fail to detect mutations in a majority of patients or are time consuming and costly. Method We tested a targeted exon-capture strategy coupled with multiplexing and high-throughput sequencing on 52 patients: 14 with known mutations as proof-of-principle and 38 with no previously detected mutation. Thirty genes were targeted in total including the 16 BBS genes, the 12 known NPHP genes, the single ALMS gene ALMS1 and the proposed modifier CCDC28B. Results This strategy allowed the reliable detection of causative mutations (including homozygous/heterozygous exon deletions) in 68% of BBS patients without previous molecular diagnosis and in all proof-of-principle samples. Three probands carried homozygous truncating mutations in ALMS1 confirming the major phenotypic overlap between both disorders. The efficiency of detecting mutations in patients was positively correlated with their compliance with the classical BBS phenotype (mutations were identified in 81% of ‘classical’ BBS patients) suggesting that only a few true BBS genes remain to be identified. We illustrate some interpretation problems encountered due to the multiplicity of identified variants. Conclusion This strategy is highly efficient and cost effective for diseases with high genetic heterogeneity, and guarantees a quality of coverage in coding sequences of target genes suited for diagnosis purposes. PMID:22773737

  7. High-Throughput Proteomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaorui; Wu, Si; Stenoien, David L.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2014-06-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based high-throughput proteomics is the core technique for large-scale protein characterization. Due to the extreme complexity of proteomes, sophisticated separation techniques and advanced MS instrumentation have been developed to extend coverage and enhance dynamic range and sensitivity. In this review, we discuss the separation and prefractionation techniques applied for large-scale analysis in both bottom-up (i.e., peptide-level) and top-down (i.e., protein-level) proteomics. Different approaches for quantifying peptides or intact proteins, including label-free and stable-isotope-labeling strategies, are also discussed. In addition, we present a brief overview of different types of mass analyzers and fragmentation techniques as well as selected emerging techniques.

  8. High throughput continuous cryopump

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    A cryocondensation pump with a unique regeneration mechanism that allows continuous operation has been constructed and tested. The pump features a device referred to as the ''Snail'' which removes the cryofrost layer as it is moved over the pumping surfaces. A forepump pumps the sublimed gas generated inside the Snail. The compression ratio of the pump is the ratio of the cryopump speed to the leakage conductance of the Snail. Deuterium had been pumped continuously at 30 torr.L/s at a speed of 2000 L/s and a compression ratio of 100. The pump, being all metal sealed and free of lubricating fluids, has many potential applications where untraclean high throughput pumping is desirable. Since the pump regenerates on a time scale of 60 seconds, the inventory in the pump is minimized - an important consideration when pumping radioactive materials such as tritium. Test data and a videotape of the Snail removing the cryofrost will be shown.

  9. [Reverse genetics system for flaviviruses].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ryosuke; Konishi, Eiji

    2013-01-01

    Flaviviruses such as Japanese encephalitis virus, West Nile virus, yellow fever virus, dengue virus, and tick-borne encephalitis virus belong to a family Flaviviridae. These viruses are transmitted to vertebrates by infected mosquitoes or ticks, producing diseases, which have a serious impact on global public health. Reverse genetics is a powerful tool for studying the viruses. Although infectious full-length clones have been obtained for multiple flaviviruses, their early-stage development had the difficulty because of the instability problem of the viral cDNA in E. coli. Several strategies have been developed to circumvent the problem of infectious clone instability. The current knowledge accumulated on reverse genetics system of flaviviruses and its application are summarized in this review. PMID:24769573

  10. High throughput optical scanner

    DOEpatents

    Basiji, David A.; van den Engh, Gerrit J.

    2001-01-01

    A scanning apparatus is provided to obtain automated, rapid and sensitive scanning of substrate fluorescence, optical density or phosphorescence. The scanner uses a constant path length optical train, which enables the combination of a moving beam for high speed scanning with phase-sensitive detection for noise reduction, comprising a light source, a scanning mirror to receive light from the light source and sweep it across a steering mirror, a steering mirror to receive light from the scanning mirror and reflect it to the substrate, whereby it is swept across the substrate along a scan arc, and a photodetector to receive emitted or scattered light from the substrate, wherein the optical path length from the light source to the photodetector is substantially constant throughout the sweep across the substrate. The optical train can further include a waveguide or mirror to collect emitted or scattered light from the substrate and direct it to the photodetector. For phase-sensitive detection the light source is intensity modulated and the detector is connected to phase-sensitive detection electronics. A scanner using a substrate translator is also provided. For two dimensional imaging the substrate is translated in one dimension while the scanning mirror scans the beam in a second dimension. For a high throughput scanner, stacks of substrates are loaded onto a conveyor belt from a tray feeder.

  11. Orthogonal NGS for High Throughput Clinical Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Chennagiri, Niru; White, Eric J.; Frieden, Alexander; Lopez, Edgardo; Lieber, Daniel S.; Nikiforov, Anastasia; Ross, Tristen; Batorsky, Rebecca; Hansen, Sherry; Lip, Va; Luquette, Lovelace J.; Mauceli, Evan; Margulies, David; Milos, Patrice M.; Napolitano, Nichole; Nizzari, Marcia M.; Yu, Timothy; Thompson, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Next generation sequencing is a transformative technology for discovering and diagnosing genetic disorders. However, high-throughput sequencing remains error-prone, necessitating variant confirmation in order to meet the exacting demands of clinical diagnostic sequencing. To address this, we devised an orthogonal, dual platform approach employing complementary target capture and sequencing chemistries to improve speed and accuracy of variant calls at a genomic scale. We combined DNA selection by bait-based hybridization followed by Illumina NextSeq reversible terminator sequencing with DNA selection by amplification followed by Ion Proton semiconductor sequencing. This approach yields genomic scale orthogonal confirmation of ~95% of exome variants. Overall variant sensitivity improves as each method covers thousands of coding exons missed by the other. We conclude that orthogonal NGS offers improvements in variant calling sensitivity when two platforms are used, better specificity for variants identified on both platforms, and greatly reduces the time and expense of Sanger follow-up, thus enabling physicians to act on genomic results more quickly. PMID:27090146

  12. Reverse genetics for mammalian reovirus.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Karl W; Ikizler, Miné; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Dermody, Terence S

    2011-10-01

    Mammalian orthoreoviruses (reoviruses) are highly tractable models for studies of viral replication and pathogenesis. The versatility of reovirus as an experimental model has been enhanced by development of a plasmid-based reverse genetics system. Infectious reovirus can be recovered from cells transfected with plasmids encoding cDNAs of each reovirus gene segment using a strategy that does not require helper virus and is independent of selection. In this system, transcription of each gene segment is driven by bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase, which can be supplied transiently by recombinant vaccinia virus (rDIs-T7pol) or by cells that constitutively express the enzyme. Reverse genetics systems have been developed for two prototype reovirus strains, type 1 Lang (T1L) and type 3 Dearing (T3D). Each reovirus cDNA was encoded on an independent plasmid for the first-generation rescue system. The efficiency of virus recovery was enhanced in a second-generation system by combining the cDNAs for multiple reovirus gene segments onto single plasmids to reduce the number of plasmids from 10 to 4. The reduction in plasmid number and the use of baby hamster kidney cells that express T7 RNA polymerase increased the efficiency of viral rescue, reduced the incubation time required to recover infectious virus, and eliminated potential biosafety concerns associated with the use of recombinant vaccinia virus. Reovirus reverse genetics has been used to introduce mutations into viral capsid and nonstructural components to study viral protein-structure activity relationships and can be exploited to engineer recombinant reoviruses for vaccine and oncolytic applications. PMID:21798351

  13. Advances in genetics and molecular breeding of three legume crops of semi-arid tropics using next-generation sequencing and high-throughput genotyping technologies.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Rajeev K; Kudapa, Himabindu; Roorkiwal, Manish; Thudi, Mahendar; Pandey, Manish K; Saxena, Rachit K; Chamarthi, Siva K; Mohan, S Murali; Mallikarjuna, Nalini; Upadhyaya, Hari; Gaur, Pooran M; Krishnamurthy, L; Saxena, K B; Nigam, Shyam N; Pande, Suresh

    2012-11-01

    Molecular markers are the most powerful genomic tools to increase the efficiency and precision of breeding practices for crop improvement. Progress in the development of genomic resources in the leading legume crops of the semi-arid tropics (SAT), namely, chickpea (Cicer arietinum), pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan) and groundnut (Arachis hypogaea), as compared to other crop species like cereals, has been very slow. With the advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) and high-throughput (HTP) genotyping methods, there is a shift in development of genomic resources including molecular markers in these crops. For instance, 2,000 to 3,000 novel simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers have been developed each for chickpea, pigeonpea and groundnut. Based on Sanger, 454/FLX and Illumina transcript reads, transcriptome assemblies have been developed for chickpea (44,845 transcript assembly contigs, or TACs) and pigeonpea (21,434 TACs). Illumina sequencing of some parental genotypes of mapping populations has resulted in the development of 120 million reads for chickpea and 128.9 million reads for pigeonpea. Alignment of these Illumina reads with respective transcriptome assemblies have provided more than 10,000 SNPs each in chickpea and pigeonpea. A variety of SNP genotyping platforms including GoldenGate, VeraCode and Competitive Allele Specific PCR (KASPar) assays have been developed in chickpea and pigeonpea. By using above resources, the first-generation or comprehensive genetic maps have been developed in the three legume speciesmentioned above. Analysis of phenotyping data together with genotyping data has provided candidate markers for drought-tolerance-related root traits in chickpea, resistance to foliar diseases in groundnut and sterility mosaic disease (SMD) and fertility restoration in pigeonpea. Together with these traitassociated markers along with those already available, molecular breeding programmes have been initiated for enhancing drought tolerance, resistance

  14. Fast Gradient Elution Reversed-Phase HPLC with Diode-Array Detection as a High Throughput Screening Method for Drugs of Abuse

    SciTech Connect

    Peter W. Carr; K.M. Fuller; D.R. Stoll; L.D. Steinkraus; M.S. Pasha; Glenn G. Hardin

    2005-12-30

    A new approach has been developed by modifying a conventional gradient elution liquid chromatograph for the high throughput screening of biological samples to detect the presence of regulated intoxicants. The goal of this work was to improve the speed of a gradient elution screening method over current approaches by optimizing the operational parameters of both the column and the instrument without compromising the reproducibility of the retention times, which are the basis for the identification. Most importantly, the novel instrument configuration substantially reduces the time needed to re-equilibrate the column between gradient runs, thereby reducing the total time for each analysis. The total analysis time for each gradient elution run is only 2.8 minutes, including 0.3 minutes for column reequilibration between analyses. Retention times standard calibration solutes are reproducible to better than 0.002 minutes in consecutive runs. A corrected retention index was adopted to account for day-to-day and column-to-column variations in retention time. The discriminating power and mean list length were calculated for a library of 47 intoxicants and compared with previous work from other laboratories to evaluate fast gradient elution HPLC as a screening tool.

  15. Construction of a genetic map based on high-throughput SNP genotyping and genetic mapping of a TuMV resistance locus in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hee; Jeong, Young-Min; Mun, Jeong-Hwan; Lee, Soo-Seong; Chung, Won-Hyong; Yu, Hee-Ju

    2014-04-01

    Brassica rapa is a member of the Brassicaceae family and includes vegetables and oil crops that are cultivated worldwide. The introduction of durable resistance against turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) into agronomically important cultivars has been a significant challenge for genetic and horticultural breeding studies of B. rapa. Based on our previous genome-wide analysis of DNA polymorphisms between the TuMV-resistant doubled haploid (DH) line VC40 and the TuMV-susceptible DH line SR5, we constructed a core genetic map of the VCS-13M DH population, which is composed of 83 individuals derived from microspore cultures of a F1 cross between VC40 and SR5, by analyzing the segregation of 314 sequence-characterized genetic markers. The genetic markers correspond to 221 SNPs and 31 InDels of genes as well as 62 SSRs, covering 1,115.9 cM with an average distance of 3.6 cM between the adjacent marker loci. The alignment and orientation of the constructed map showed good agreement with the draft genome sequence of Chiifu, thus providing an efficient strategy to map genic sequences. Using the genetic map, a novel dominant TuMV resistance locus (TuMV-R) in the VCS-13M DH population was identified as a 0.34 Mb region in the short arm of chromosome A6 in which four CC-NBS-LRR resistance genes and two pathogenesis-related-1 genes reside. The genetic map developed in this study can play an important role in the genetic study of TuMV resistance and the molecular breeding of B. rapa. PMID:24326528

  16. Reverse Genetics in Ecological Research

    PubMed Central

    Schwachtje, Jens; Kutschbach, Susan; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2008-01-01

    By precisely manipulating the expression of individual genetic elements thought to be important for ecological performance, reverse genetics has the potential to revolutionize plant ecology. However, untested concerns about possible side-effects of the transformation technique, caused by Agrobacterium infection and tissue culture, on plant performance have stymied research by requiring onerous sample sizes. We compare 5 independently transformed Nicotiana attenuata lines harboring empty vector control (EVC) T-DNA lacking silencing information with isogenic wild types (WT), and measured a battery of ecologically relevant traits, known to be important in plant-herbivore interactions: phytohormones, secondary metabolites, growth and fitness parameters under stringent competitive conditions, and transcriptional regulation with microarrays. As a positive control, we included a line silenced in trypsin proteinase inhibitor gene (TPI) expression, a potent anti-herbivore defense known to exact fitness costs in its expression, in the analysis. The experiment was conducted twice, with 10 and 20 biological replicates per genotype. For all parameters, we detected no difference between any EVC and WT lines, but could readily detect a fitness benefit of silencing TPI production. A statistical power analyses revealed that the minimum sample sizes required for detecting significant fitness differences between EVC and WT was 2–3 orders of magnitude larger than the 10 replicates required to detect a fitness effect of TPI silencing. We conclude that possible side-effects of transformation are far too low to obfuscate the study of ecologically relevant phenotypes. PMID:18253491

  17. High-throughput multiplex cpDNA resequencing clarifies the genetic diversity and genetic relationships among Brassica napus, Brassica rapa and Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jiangwei; Cai, Mengxian; Yan, Guixin; Wang, Nian; Li, Feng; Chen, Binyun; Gao, Guizhen; Xu, Kun; Li, Jun; Wu, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Brassica napus (rapeseed) is a recent allotetraploid plant and the second most important oilseed crop worldwide. The origin of B. napus and the genetic relationships with its diploid ancestor species remain largely unresolved. Here, chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) from 488 B. napus accessions of global origin, 139 B. rapa accessions and 49 B. oleracea accessions were populationally resequenced using Illumina Solexa sequencing technologies. The intraspecific cpDNA variants and their allelic frequencies were called genomewide and further validated via EcoTILLING analyses of the rpo region. The cpDNA of the current global B. napus population comprises more than 400 variants (SNPs and short InDels) and maintains one predominant haplotype (Bncp1). Whole-genome resequencing of the cpDNA of Bncp1 haplotype eliminated its direct inheritance from any accession of the B. rapa or B. oleracea species. The distribution of the polymorphism information content (PIC) values for each variant demonstrated that B. napus has much lower cpDNA diversity than B. rapa; however, a vast majority of the wild and cultivated B. oleracea specimens appeared to share one same distinct cpDNA haplotype, in contrast to its wild C-genome relatives. This finding suggests that the cpDNA of the three Brassica species is well differentiated. The predominant B. napus cpDNA haplotype may have originated from uninvestigated relatives or from interactions between cpDNA mutations and natural/artificial selection during speciation and evolution. These exhaustive data on variation in cpDNA would provide fundamental data for research on cpDNA and chloroplasts. PMID:26031705

  18. A Comprehensive Analysis of In Vitro and In Vivo Genetic Fitness of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Using High-Throughput Sequencing of Transposon Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Aschard, Hugues; Cattoir, Vincent; Yoder-Himes, Deborah; Lory, Stephen; Pier, Gerald B.

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing of transposon (Tn) libraries created within entire genomes identifies and quantifies the contribution of individual genes and operons to the fitness of organisms in different environments. We used insertion-sequencing (INSeq) to analyze the contribution to fitness of all non-essential genes in the chromosome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA14 based on a library of ∼300,000 individual Tn insertions. In vitro growth in LB provided a baseline for comparison with the survival of the Tn insertion strains following 6 days of colonization of the murine gastrointestinal tract as well as a comparison with Tn-inserts subsequently able to systemically disseminate to the spleen following induction of neutropenia. Sequencing was performed following DNA extraction from the recovered bacteria, digestion with the MmeI restriction enzyme that hydrolyzes DNA 16 bp away from the end of the Tn insert, and fractionation into oligonucleotides of 1,200–1,500 bp that were prepared for high-throughput sequencing. Changes in frequency of Tn inserts into the P. aeruginosa genome were used to quantify in vivo fitness resulting from loss of a gene. 636 genes had <10 sequencing reads in LB, thus defined as unable to grow in this medium. During in vivo infection there were major losses of strains with Tn inserts in almost all known virulence factors, as well as respiration, energy utilization, ion pumps, nutritional genes and prophages. Many new candidates for virulence factors were also identified. There were consistent changes in the recovery of Tn inserts in genes within most operons and Tn insertions into some genes enhanced in vivo fitness. Strikingly, 90% of the non-essential genes were required for in vivo survival following systemic dissemination during neutropenia. These experiments resulted in the identification of the P. aeruginosa strain PA14 genes necessary for optimal survival in the mucosal and systemic environments of a mammalian host. PMID

  19. RNA Virus Reverse Genetics and Vaccine Design

    PubMed Central

    Stobart, Christopher C.; Moore, Martin L.

    2014-01-01

    RNA viruses are capable of rapid spread and severe or potentially lethal disease in both animals and humans. The development of reverse genetics systems for manipulation and study of RNA virus genomes has provided platforms for designing and optimizing viral mutants for vaccine development. Here, we review the impact of RNA virus reverse genetics systems on past and current efforts to design effective and safe viral therapeutics and vaccines. PMID:24967693

  20. High-throughput continuous cryopump

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    A cryopump with a unique method of regeneration which allows continuous operation at high throughput has been constructed and tested. Deuterium was pumped continuously at a throughput of 30 Torr.L/s at a speed of 2000 L/s and a compression ratio of 200. Argon was pumped at a throughput of 60 Torr.L/s at a speed of 1275 L/s. To produce continuous operation of the pump, a method of regeneration that does not thermally cycle the pump is employed. A small chamber (the ''snail'') passes over the pumping surface and removes the frost from it either by mechanical action with a scraper or by local heating. The material removed is topologically in a secondary vacuum system with low conductance into the primary vacuum; thus, the exhaust can be pumped at pressures up to an effective compression ratio determined by the ratio of the pumping speed to the leakage conductance of the snail. The pump, which is all-metal-sealed and dry and which regenerates every 60 s, would be an ideal system for pumping tritium. Potential fusion applications are for mpmp limiters, for repeating pneumatic pellet injection lines, and for the centrifuge pellet injector spin tank, all of which will require pumping tritium at high throughput. Industrial applications requiring ultraclean pumping of corrosive gases at high throughput, such as the reactive ion etch semiconductor process, may also be feasible.

  1. High throughput protein production screening

    DOEpatents

    Beernink, Peter T.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Segelke, Brent W.

    2009-09-08

    Methods, compositions, and kits for the cell-free production and analysis of proteins are provided. The invention allows for the production of proteins from prokaryotic sequences or eukaryotic sequences, including human cDNAs using PCR and IVT methods and detecting the proteins through fluorescence or immunoblot techniques. This invention can be used to identify optimized PCR and WT conditions, codon usages and mutations. The methods are readily automated and can be used for high throughput analysis of protein expression levels, interactions, and functional states.

  2. High-Throughput Sequencing Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Jason A.; Spacek, Damek; Snyder, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The human genome sequence has profoundly altered our understanding of biology, human diversity and disease. The path from the first draft sequence to our nascent era of personal genomes and genomic medicine has been made possible only because of the extraordinary advancements in DNA sequencing technologies over the past ten years. Here, we discuss commonly used high-throughput sequencing platforms, the growing array of sequencing assays developed around them as well as the challenges facing current sequencing platforms and their clinical application. PMID:26000844

  3. Influenza reverse genetics: dissecting immunity and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Siying; Evans, Justin G; Stambas, John

    2014-01-01

    Reverse genetics systems allow artificial generation of non-segmented and segmented negative-sense RNA viruses, like influenza viruses, entirely from cloned cDNA. Since the introduction of reverse genetics systems over a decade ago, the ability to generate 'designer' influenza viruses in the laboratory has advanced both basic and applied research, providing a powerful tool to investigate and characterise host-pathogen interactions and advance the development of novel therapeutic strategies. The list of applications for reverse genetics has expanded vastly in recent years. In this review, we discuss the development and implications of this technique, including the recent controversy surrounding the generation of a transmissible H5N1 influenza virus. We will focus on research involving the identification of viral protein function, development of live-attenuated influenza virus vaccines, host-pathogen interactions, immunity and the generation of recombinant influenza virus vaccine vectors for the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases and cancer. PMID:24528628

  4. Advances in High-Throughput Single-Cell Microtechnologies

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Westbrook M.; Tseng, Peter; Kunze, Anja; Masaeli, Mahdohkht; Chung, Aram J.; Dudani, Jaideep S.; Kittur, Harsha; Kulkarni, Rajan P.; Di Carlo, Dino

    2013-01-01

    Micro-scale biological tools that have allowed probing of individual cells - from the genetic, to proteomic, to phenotypic level - have revealed important contributions of single cells to direct normal and diseased body processes. In analyzing single cells, sample heterogeneity between and within specific cell types drives the need for high-throughput and quantitative measurement of cellular parameters. In recent years, high-throughput single-cell analysis platforms have revealed rare genetic subpopulations in growing tumors, begun to uncover the mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in bacteria, and described the cell-to-cell variations in stem cell differentiation and immune cell response to activation by pathogens. This review surveys these recent technologies, presenting their strengths and contributions to the field, and identifies needs still unmet toward the development of high-throughput single-cell analysis tools to benefit life science research and clinical diagnostics. PMID:24484889

  5. Using High-Throughput Sequencing to Leverage Surveillance of Genetic Diversity and Oseltamivir Resistance: A Pilot Study during the 2009 Influenza A(H1N1) Pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Téllez-Sosa, Juan; Rodríguez, Mario Henry; Gómez-Barreto, Rosa E.; Valdovinos-Torres, Humberto; Hidalgo, Ana Cecilia; Cruz-Hervert, Pablo; Luna, René Santos; Carrillo-Valenzo, Erik; Ramos, Celso; García-García, Lourdes; Martínez-Barnetche, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Background Influenza viruses display a high mutation rate and complex evolutionary patterns. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has been widely used for qualitative and semi-quantitative assessment of genetic diversity in complex biological samples. The “deep sequencing” approach, enabled by the enormous throughput of current NGS platforms, allows the identification of rare genetic viral variants in targeted genetic regions, but is usually limited to a small number of samples. Methodology and Principal Findings We designed a proof-of-principle study to test whether redistributing sequencing throughput from a high depth-small sample number towards a low depth-large sample number approach is feasible and contributes to influenza epidemiological surveillance. Using 454-Roche sequencing, we sequenced at a rather low depth, a 307 bp amplicon of the neuraminidase gene of the Influenza A(H1N1) pandemic (A(H1N1)pdm) virus from cDNA amplicons pooled in 48 barcoded libraries obtained from nasal swab samples of infected patients (n  =  299) taken from May to November, 2009 pandemic period in Mexico. This approach revealed that during the transition from the first (May-July) to second wave (September-November) of the pandemic, the initial genetic variants were replaced by the N248D mutation in the NA gene, and enabled the establishment of temporal and geographic associations with genetic diversity and the identification of mutations associated with oseltamivir resistance. Conclusions NGS sequencing of a short amplicon from the NA gene at low sequencing depth allowed genetic screening of a large number of samples, providing insights to viral genetic diversity dynamics and the identification of genetic variants associated with oseltamivir resistance. Further research is needed to explain the observed replacement of the genetic variants seen during the second wave. As sequencing throughput rises and library multiplexing and automation improves, we foresee that the approach

  6. Genetic Diversity of Clostridium sporogenes PA 3679 Isolates Obtained from Different Sources as Resolved by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis and High-Throughput Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Schill, Kristin M; Wang, Yun; Butler, Robert R; Pombert, Jean-François; Reddy, N Rukma; Skinner, Guy E; Larkin, John W

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium sporogenes PA 3679 is a nonpathogenic, nontoxic model organism for proteolytic Clostridium botulinum used in the validation of conventional thermal food processes due to its ability to produce highly heat-resistant endospores. Because of its public safety importance, the uncertain taxonomic classification and genetic diversity of PA 3679 are concerns. Therefore, isolates of C. sporogenes PA 3679 were obtained from various sources and characterized using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and whole-genome sequencing. The phylogenetic relatedness and genetic variability were assessed based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing and whole-genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. All C. sporogenes PA 3679 isolates were categorized into two clades (clade I containing ATCC 7955 NCA3679 isolates 1961-2, 1990, and 2007 and clade II containing PA 3679 isolates NFL, UW, FDA, and Campbell and ATCC 7955 NCA3679 isolate 1961-4). The 16S maximum likelihood (ML) tree clustered both clades within proteolytic C. botulinum strains, with clade I forming a distinct cluster with other C. sporogenes non-PA 3679 strains. SNP analysis revealed that clade I isolates were more similar to the genomic reference PA 3679 (NCTC8594) genome (GenBank accession number AGAH00000000.1) than clade II isolates were. The genomic reference C. sporogenes PA 3679 (NCTC8594) genome and clade I C. sporogenes isolates were genetically distinct from those obtained from other sources (University of Wisconsin, National Food Laboratory, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and Campbell's Soup Company). Thermal destruction studies revealed that clade I isolates were more sensitive to high temperature than clade II isolates were. Considering the widespread use of C. sporogenes PA 3679 and its genetic information in numerous studies, the accurate identification and genetic characterization of C. sporogenes PA 3679 are of critical importance. PMID:26519392

  7. Genetic Diversity of Clostridium sporogenes PA 3679 Isolates Obtained from Different Sources as Resolved by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis and High-Throughput Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yun; Butler, Robert R.; Reddy, N. Rukma; Skinner, Guy E.; Larkin, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium sporogenes PA 3679 is a nonpathogenic, nontoxic model organism for proteolytic Clostridium botulinum used in the validation of conventional thermal food processes due to its ability to produce highly heat-resistant endospores. Because of its public safety importance, the uncertain taxonomic classification and genetic diversity of PA 3679 are concerns. Therefore, isolates of C. sporogenes PA 3679 were obtained from various sources and characterized using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and whole-genome sequencing. The phylogenetic relatedness and genetic variability were assessed based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing and whole-genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. All C. sporogenes PA 3679 isolates were categorized into two clades (clade I containing ATCC 7955 NCA3679 isolates 1961-2, 1990, and 2007 and clade II containing PA 3679 isolates NFL, UW, FDA, and Campbell and ATCC 7955 NCA3679 isolate 1961-4). The 16S maximum likelihood (ML) tree clustered both clades within proteolytic C. botulinum strains, with clade I forming a distinct cluster with other C. sporogenes non-PA 3679 strains. SNP analysis revealed that clade I isolates were more similar to the genomic reference PA 3679 (NCTC8594) genome (GenBank accession number AGAH00000000.1) than clade II isolates were. The genomic reference C. sporogenes PA 3679 (NCTC8594) genome and clade I C. sporogenes isolates were genetically distinct from those obtained from other sources (University of Wisconsin, National Food Laboratory, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and Campbell's Soup Company). Thermal destruction studies revealed that clade I isolates were more sensitive to high temperature than clade II isolates were. Considering the widespread use of C. sporogenes PA 3679 and its genetic information in numerous studies, the accurate identification and genetic characterization of C. sporogenes PA 3679 are of critical importance. PMID:26519392

  8. High-throughput cellular RNA device engineering.

    PubMed

    Townshend, Brent; Kennedy, Andrew B; Xiang, Joy S; Smolke, Christina D

    2015-10-01

    Methods for rapidly assessing sequence-structure-function landscapes and developing conditional gene-regulatory devices are critical to our ability to manipulate and interface with biology. We describe a framework for engineering RNA devices from preexisting aptamers that exhibit ligand-responsive ribozyme tertiary interactions. Our methodology utilizes cell sorting, high-throughput sequencing and statistical data analyses to enable parallel measurements of the activities of hundreds of thousands of sequences from RNA device libraries in the absence and presence of ligands. Our tertiary-interaction RNA devices performed better in terms of gene silencing, activation ratio and ligand sensitivity than optimized RNA devices that rely on secondary-structure changes. We applied our method to build biosensors for diverse ligands and determine consensus sequences that enable ligand-responsive tertiary interactions. These methods advance our ability to develop broadly applicable genetic tools and to elucidate the underlying sequence-structure-function relationships that empower rational design of complex biomolecules. PMID:26258292

  9. Genetic structure of Trypanosoma cruzi in Colombia revealed by a High-throughput Nuclear Multilocus Sequence Typing (nMLST) approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is a systemic pathology caused by Trypanosoma cruzi. This parasite reveals remarkable genetic variability, evinced in six Discrete Typing Units (DTUs) named from T. cruzi I to T. cruzi VI (TcI to TcVI). Recently newly identified genotypes have emerged such as TcBat in Brazil, Colombia and Panama associated to anthropogenic bats. The genotype with the broadest geographical distribution is TcI, which has recently been associated to severe cardiomyopathies in Argentina and Colombia. Therefore, new studies unraveling the genetic structure and natural history of this DTU must be pursued. Results We conducted a spatial and temporal analysis on 50 biological clones of T. cruzi I (TcI) isolated from humans with different clinical phenotypes, triatomine bugs and mammal reservoirs across three endemic regions for Chagas disease in Colombia. These clones were submitted to a nuclear Multilocus Sequence Typing (nMLST) analysis in order to elucidate its genetic diversity and clustering. After analyzing 13 nuclear housekeeping genes and obtaining a 5821 bp length alignment, we detected two robust genotypes within TcI henceforth named TcIDOM (associated to human infections) and a second cluster associated to peridomestic and sylvatic populations. Additionaly, we detected putative events of recombination and an intriguing lack of linkage disequilibrium. Conclusions These findings reinforce the emergence of an enigmatic domestic T. cruzi genotype (TcIDOM), and demonstrates the high frequency of recombination at nuclear level across natural populations of T. cruzi. Therefore, the need to pursue studies focused on the diferential virulence profiles of TcI strains. The biological and epidemiological implications of these findings are herein discussed. PMID:24079755

  10. Metabolic profiling of plant extracts using direct-injection electrospray ionization mass spectrometry allows for high-throughput phenotypic characterization according to genetic and environmental effects.

    PubMed

    García-Flores, Martín; Juárez-Colunga, Sheila; García-Casarrubias, Adrián; Trachsel, Samuel; Winkler, Robert; Tiessen, Axel

    2015-01-28

    In comparison to the exponential increase of genotyping methods, phenotyping strategies are lagging behind in agricultural sciences. Genetic improvement depends upon the abundance of quantitative phenotypic data and the statistical partitioning of variance into environmental, genetic, and random effects. A metabolic phenotyping strategy was adapted to increase sample throughput while saving reagents, reducing cost, and simplifying data analysis. The chemical profiles of stem extracts from maize plants grown under low nitrogen (LN) or control trial (CT) were analyzed using optimized protocols for direct-injection electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DIESI-MS). Specific ions significantly decreased or increased because of environmental (LN versus CT) or genotypic effects. Biochemical profiling with DIESI-MS had a superior cost-benefit compared to other standard analytical technologies (e.g., ultraviolet, near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy, high-performance liquid chromatography, and gas chromatography with flame ionization detection) routinely used for plant breeding. The method can be successfully applied in maize, strawberry, coffee, and other crop species. PMID:25588121

  11. Origin and evolution of high throughput screening

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, D A; Williams, J A

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews the origin and evolution of high throughput screening (HTS) through the experience of an individual pharmaceutical company, revealing some of the mysteries of the early stages of drug discovery to the wider pharmacology audience. HTS in this company (Pfizer, Groton, USA) had its origin in natural products screening in 1986, by substituting fermentation broths with dimethyl sulphoxide solutions of synthetic compounds, using 96-well plates and reduced assay volumes of 50-100μl. A nominal 30mM source compound concentration provided high μM assay concentrations. Starting at 800 compounds each week, the process reached a steady state of 7200 compounds per week by 1989. Screening in the Applied Biotechnology and Screening Group was centralized with screens operating in lock-step to maximize efficiency. Initial screens were full files run in triplicate. Autoradiography and image analysis were introduced for 125I receptor ligand screens. Reverse transcriptase (RT) coupled with quantitative PCR and multiplexing addressed several targets in a single assay. By 1992 HTS produced ‘hits' as starting matter for approximately 40% of the Discovery portfolio. In 1995, the HTS methodology was expanded to include ADMET targets. ADME targets required each compound to be physically detected leading to the development of automated high throughput LC-MS. In 1996, 90 compounds/week were screened in microsomal, protein binding and serum stability assays. Subsequently, the mutagenic Ames assay was adapted to a 96-well plate liquid assay and novel algorithms permitted automated image analysis of the micronucleus assay. By 1999 ADME HTS was fully integrated into the discovery cycle. PMID:17603542

  12. Genome-wide generation and use of informative intron-spanning and intron-length polymorphism markers for high-throughput genetic analysis in rice.

    PubMed

    Badoni, Saurabh; Das, Sweta; Sayal, Yogesh K; Gopalakrishnan, S; Singh, Ashok K; Rao, Atmakuri R; Agarwal, Pinky; Parida, Swarup K; Tyagi, Akhilesh K

    2016-01-01

    We developed genome-wide 84634 ISM (intron-spanning marker) and 16510 InDel-fragment length polymorphism-based ILP (intron-length polymorphism) markers from genes physically mapped on 12 rice chromosomes. These genic markers revealed much higher amplification-efficiency (80%) and polymorphic-potential (66%) among rice accessions even by a cost-effective agarose gel-based assay. A wider level of functional molecular diversity (17-79%) and well-defined precise admixed genetic structure was assayed by 3052 genome-wide markers in a structured population of indica, japonica, aromatic and wild rice. Six major grain weight QTLs (11.9-21.6% phenotypic variation explained) were mapped on five rice chromosomes of a high-density (inter-marker distance: 0.98 cM) genetic linkage map (IR 64 x Sonasal) anchored with 2785 known/candidate gene-derived ISM and ILP markers. The designing of multiple ISM and ILP markers (2 to 4 markers/gene) in an individual gene will broaden the user-preference to select suitable primer combination for efficient assaying of functional allelic variation/diversity and realistic estimation of differential gene expression profiles among rice accessions. The genomic information generated in our study is made publicly accessible through a user-friendly web-resource, "Oryza ISM-ILP marker" database. The known/candidate gene-derived ISM and ILP markers can be enormously deployed to identify functionally relevant trait-associated molecular tags by optimal-resource expenses, leading towards genomics-assisted crop improvement in rice. PMID:27032371

  13. Genome-wide generation and use of informative intron-spanning and intron-length polymorphism markers for high-throughput genetic analysis in rice

    PubMed Central

    Badoni, Saurabh; Das, Sweta; Sayal, Yogesh K.; Gopalakrishnan, S.; Singh, Ashok K.; Rao, Atmakuri R.; Agarwal, Pinky; Parida, Swarup K.; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.

    2016-01-01

    We developed genome-wide 84634 ISM (intron-spanning marker) and 16510 InDel-fragment length polymorphism-based ILP (intron-length polymorphism) markers from genes physically mapped on 12 rice chromosomes. These genic markers revealed much higher amplification-efficiency (80%) and polymorphic-potential (66%) among rice accessions even by a cost-effective agarose gel-based assay. A wider level of functional molecular diversity (17–79%) and well-defined precise admixed genetic structure was assayed by 3052 genome-wide markers in a structured population of indica, japonica, aromatic and wild rice. Six major grain weight QTLs (11.9–21.6% phenotypic variation explained) were mapped on five rice chromosomes of a high-density (inter-marker distance: 0.98 cM) genetic linkage map (IR 64 x Sonasal) anchored with 2785 known/candidate gene-derived ISM and ILP markers. The designing of multiple ISM and ILP markers (2 to 4 markers/gene) in an individual gene will broaden the user-preference to select suitable primer combination for efficient assaying of functional allelic variation/diversity and realistic estimation of differential gene expression profiles among rice accessions. The genomic information generated in our study is made publicly accessible through a user-friendly web-resource, “Oryza ISM-ILP marker” database. The known/candidate gene-derived ISM and ILP markers can be enormously deployed to identify functionally relevant trait-associated molecular tags by optimal-resource expenses, leading towards genomics-assisted crop improvement in rice. PMID:27032371

  14. Reverse Genetics Approaches to Control Arenavirus.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; Cheng, Benson Yee Hin; de la Torre, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Several arenavirus cause hemorrhagic fever disease in humans and pose a significant public health problem in their endemic regions. To date, no licensed vaccines are available to combat human arenavirus infections, and anti-arenaviral drug therapy is limited to an off-label use of ribavirin that is only partially effective. The development of arenavirus reverse genetics approaches provides investigators with a novel and powerful approach for the investigation of the arenavirus molecular and cell biology. The use of cell-based minigenome systems has allowed examining the cis- and trans-acting factors involved in arenavirus replication and transcription and the identification of novel anti-arenaviral drug targets without requiring the use of live forms of arenaviruses. Likewise, it is now feasible to rescue infectious arenaviruses entirely from cloned cDNAs containing predetermined mutations in their genomes to investigate virus-host interactions and mechanisms of pathogenesis, as well as to facilitate screens to identify anti-arenaviral drugs and development of novel live-attenuated arenavirus vaccines. Recently, reverse genetics have also allowed the generation of tri-segmented arenaviruses expressing foreign genes, facilitating virus detection and opening the possibility of implementing live-attenuated arenavirus-based vaccine vector approaches. Likewise, the development of single-cycle infectious, reporter-expressing, arenaviruses has provided a new experimental method to study some aspects of the biology of highly pathogenic arenaviruses without the requirement of high-security biocontainment required to study HF-causing arenaviruses. In this chapter we summarize the current knowledge on arenavirus reverse genetics and the implementation of plasmid-based reverse genetics techniques for the development of arenavirus vaccines and vaccine vectors. PMID:27076139

  15. Assessing the genetic diversity of Cu resistance in mine tailings through high-throughput recovery of full-length copA genes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaofang; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Shaban, Babak; Bruxner, Timothy J. C.; Bond, Philip L.; Huang, Longbin

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing the genetic diversity of microbial copper (Cu) resistance at the community level remains challenging, mainly due to the polymorphism of the core functional gene copA. In this study, a local BLASTN method using a copA database built in this study was developed to recover full-length putative copA sequences from an assembled tailings metagenome; these sequences were then screened for potentially functioning CopA using conserved metal-binding motifs, inferred by evolutionary trace analysis of CopA sequences from known Cu resistant microorganisms. In total, 99 putative copA sequences were recovered from the tailings metagenome, out of which 70 were found with high potential to be functioning in Cu resistance. Phylogenetic analysis of selected copA sequences detected in the tailings metagenome showed that topology of the copA phylogeny is largely congruent with that of the 16S-based phylogeny of the tailings microbial community obtained in our previous study, indicating that the development of copA diversity in the tailings might be mainly through vertical descent with few lateral gene transfer events. The method established here can be used to explore copA (and potentially other metal resistance genes) diversity in any metagenome and has the potential to exhaust the full-length gene sequences for downstream analyses. PMID:26286020

  16. Assessing the genetic diversity of Cu resistance in mine tailings through high-throughput recovery of full-length copA genes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofang; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Shaban, Babak; Bruxner, Timothy J C; Bond, Philip L; Huang, Longbin

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing the genetic diversity of microbial copper (Cu) resistance at the community level remains challenging, mainly due to the polymorphism of the core functional gene copA. In this study, a local BLASTN method using a copA database built in this study was developed to recover full-length putative copA sequences from an assembled tailings metagenome; these sequences were then screened for potentially functioning CopA using conserved metal-binding motifs, inferred by evolutionary trace analysis of CopA sequences from known Cu resistant microorganisms. In total, 99 putative copA sequences were recovered from the tailings metagenome, out of which 70 were found with high potential to be functioning in Cu resistance. Phylogenetic analysis of selected copA sequences detected in the tailings metagenome showed that topology of the copA phylogeny is largely congruent with that of the 16S-based phylogeny of the tailings microbial community obtained in our previous study, indicating that the development of copA diversity in the tailings might be mainly through vertical descent with few lateral gene transfer events. The method established here can be used to explore copA (and potentially other metal resistance genes) diversity in any metagenome and has the potential to exhaust the full-length gene sequences for downstream analyses. PMID:26286020

  17. Facile high-throughput forward chemical genetic screening by in situ monitoring of glucuronidase-based reporter gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Halder, Vivek; Kombrink, Erich

    2015-01-01

    The use of biologically active small molecules to perturb biological functions holds enormous potential for investigating complex signaling networks. However, in contrast to animal systems, the search for and application of chemical tools for basic discovery in the plant sciences, generally referred to as “chemical genetics,” has only recently gained momentum. In addition to cultured cells, the well-characterized, small-sized model plant Arabidopsis thaliana is suitable for cultivation in microplates, which allows employing diverse cell- or phenotype-based chemical screens. In such screens, a chemical's bioactivity is typically assessed either through scoring its impact on morphological traits or quantifying molecular attributes such as enzyme or reporter activities. Here, we describe a facile forward chemical screening methodology for intact Arabidopsis seedlings harboring the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter by directly quantifying GUS activity in situ with 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-D-glucuronide (4-MUG) as substrate. The quantitative nature of this screening assay has an obvious advantage over the also convenient histochemical GUS staining method, as it allows application of statistical procedures and unbiased hit selection based on threshold values as well as distinction between compounds with strong or weak bioactivity. At the same time, the in situ bioassay is very convenient requiring less effort and time for sample handling in comparison to the conventional quantitative in vitro GUS assay using 4-MUG, as validated with several Arabidopsis lines harboring different GUS reporter constructs. To demonstrate that the developed assays is particularly suitable for large-scale screening projects, we performed a pilot screen for chemical activators or inhibitors of salicylic acid-mediated defense signaling using the Arabidopsis PR1p::GUS line. Importantly, the screening methodology provided here can be adopted for any inducible GUS reporter line. PMID:25688251

  18. High-throughput RAD-SNP genotyping for characterization of sugar beet genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High-throughput SNP genotyping provides a rapid way of developing resourceful set of markers for delineating the genetic architecture and for effective species discrimination. In the presented research, we demonstrate a set of 192 SNPs for effective genotyping in sugar beet using high-throughput mar...

  19. An Assessment of Heavy Ion Irradiation Mutagenesis for Reverse Genetics in Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Timothy L.; Powell, Jonathan J.; Stiller, Jiri; Weese, Terri L.; Abe, Tomoko; Zhao, Guangyao; Jia, Jizeng; McIntyre, C. Lynne; Li, Zhongyi; Manners, John M.; Kazan, Kemal

    2015-01-01

    Reverse genetic techniques harnessing mutational approaches are powerful tools that can provide substantial insight into gene function in plants. However, as compared to diploid species, reverse genetic analyses in polyploid plants such as bread wheat can present substantial challenges associated with high levels of sequence and functional similarity amongst homoeologous loci. We previously developed a high-throughput method to identify deletions of genes within a physically mutagenized wheat population. Here we describe our efforts to combine multiple homoeologous deletions of three candidate disease susceptibility genes (TaWRKY11, TaPFT1 and TaPLDß1). We were able to produce lines featuring homozygous deletions at two of the three homoeoloci for all genes, but this was dependent on the individual mutants used in crossing. Intriguingly, despite extensive efforts, viable lines possessing homozygous deletions at all three homoeoloci could not be produced for any of the candidate genes. To investigate deletion size as a possible reason for this phenomenon, we developed an amplicon sequencing approach based on synteny to Brachypodium distachyon to assess the size of the deletions removing one candidate gene (TaPFT1) in our mutants. These analyses revealed that genomic deletions removing the locus are relatively large, resulting in the loss of multiple additional genes. The implications of this work for the use of heavy ion mutagenesis for reverse genetic analyses in wheat are discussed. PMID:25719507

  20. Reverse genetics: Its origins and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, P. )

    1991-04-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a gene and its flanking segments alone will not tell us how its expression is regulated during development and differentiation, or in response to environmental changes. To comprehend the physiological significance of the molecular details requires biological analysis. Recombinant DNA techniques provide a powerful experimental approach. A strategy termed reverse genetics' utilizes the analysis of the activities of mutant and normal genes and experimentally constructed mutants to explore the relationship between gene structure and function thereby helping elucidate the relationship between genotype and phenotype.

  1. A semi-automated high-throughput approach to the generation of transposon insertion mutants in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Duverger, Yohann; Belougne, Jérôme; Scaglione, Sarah; Brandli, Dominique; Beclin, Christophe; Ewbank, Jonathan J

    2007-01-01

    The generation of a large collection of defined transposon insertion mutants is of general interest to the Caenorhabditis elegans research community and has been supported by the European Union. We describe here a semi-automated high-throughput method for mutant production and screening, using the heterologous transposon Mos1. The procedure allows routine culture of several thousand independent nematode strains in parallel for multiple generations before stereotyped molecular analyses. Using this method, we have already generated >17 500 individual strains carrying Mos1 insertions. It could be easily adapted to forward and reverse genetic screens and may influence researchers faced with making a choice of model organism. PMID:17164286

  2. A high-throughput label-free nanoparticle analyser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraikin, Jean-Luc; Teesalu, Tambet; McKenney, Christopher M.; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Cleland, Andrew N.

    2011-05-01

    Synthetic nanoparticles and genetically modified viruses are used in a range of applications, but high-throughput analytical tools for the physical characterization of these objects are needed. Here we present a microfluidic analyser that detects individual nanoparticles and characterizes complex, unlabelled nanoparticle suspensions. We demonstrate the detection, concentration analysis and sizing of individual synthetic nanoparticles in a multicomponent mixture with sufficient throughput to analyse 500,000 particles per second. We also report the rapid size and titre analysis of unlabelled bacteriophage T7 in both salt solution and mouse blood plasma, using just ~1 × 10-6 l of analyte. Unexpectedly, in the native blood plasma we discover a large background of naturally occurring nanoparticles with a power-law size distribution. The high-throughput detection capability, scalable fabrication and simple electronics of this instrument make it well suited for diverse applications.

  3. Reverse genetics in rice using Tos17.

    PubMed

    Mieulet, Delphine; Diévart, Anne; Droc, Gaëtan; Lanau, Nadège; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Transposon of Oryza sativa 17 (Tos17), a Ty1-Copia Class I retroelement, is one of the few active retroelements identified in rice, the main cereal crop of human consumption and the model genome for cereals. Tos17 exists in two copies in the standard Nipponbare japonica genome (n = 12 and 379 Mb). Tos17 copies are inactive in the plant grown under normal conditions. However, the copy located on chromosome 7 can be activated upon tissue culture. Plants regenerated from 3- and 5-month-old tissue cultures harbor, respectively, an average of 3.5 and 8 newly transposed copies that are stably inserted at new positions in the genome. Due to its favorable features, Tos17 has been extensively used for insertion mutagenesis of the model genome and 31,403 sequence indexed inserts harbored by regenerants/T-DNA plants are available in the databases. The corresponding seed stocks can be ordered from the laboratories which generated them. Both forward genetics and reverse genetics approaches using these lines have allowed the deciphering of gene function in rice. We report here two protocols for ascertaining the presence of a Tos17 insertion in a gene of interest among R2/T2 seeds received from Tos17 mutant stock centers: The first protocol is PCR-based and allows the identification of azygous, heterozygous and homozygous plants among progenies segregating the insertion. The second protocol is based on DNA blot analysis and can be used to identify homozygous plants carrying the Tos17 copy responsible for gene disruption while cleaning the mutant background from other unwitting mutagen inserts. PMID:23918431

  4. Tackling feline infectious peritonitis via reverse genetics

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Volker; Thiel, Heinz-Jürgen; Tekes, Gergely

    2014-01-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is caused by feline coronaviruses (FCoVs) and represents one of the most important lethal infectious diseases of cats. To date, there is no efficacious prevention and treatment, and our limited knowledge on FIP pathogenesis is mainly based on analysis of experiments with field isolates. In a recent study, we reported a promising approach to study FIP pathogenesis using reverse genetics. We generated a set of recombinant FCoVs and investigated their pathogenicity in vivo. The set included the type I FCoV strain Black, a type I FCoV strain Black with restored accessory gene 7b, two chimeric type I/type II FCoVs and the highly pathogenic type II FCoV strain 79–1146. All recombinant FCoVs and the reference strain isolates were found to establish productive infections in cats. While none of the type I FCoVs and chimeric FCoVs induced FIP, the recombinant type II FCoV strain 79–1146 was as pathogenic as the parental isolate. Interestingly, an intact ORF 3c was confirmed to be restored in all viruses (re)isolated from FIP-diseased animals. PMID:25482087

  5. Tackling feline infectious peritonitis via reverse genetics.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Volker; Thiel, Heinz-Jürgen; Tekes, Gergely

    2014-01-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is caused by feline coronaviruses (FCoVs) and represents one of the most important lethal infectious diseases of cats. To date, there is no efficacious prevention and treatment, and our limited knowledge on FIP pathogenesis is mainly based on analysis of experiments with field isolates. In a recent study, we reported a promising approach to study FIP pathogenesis using reverse genetics. We generated a set of recombinant FCoVs and investigated their pathogenicity in vivo. The set included the type I FCoV strain Black, a type I FCoV strain Black with restored accessory gene 7b, two chimeric type I/type II FCoVs and the highly pathogenic type II FCoV strain 79-1146. All recombinant FCoVs and the reference strain isolates were found to establish productive infections in cats. While none of the type I FCoVs and chimeric FCoVs induced FIP, the recombinant type II FCoV strain 79-1146 was as pathogenic as the parental isolate. Interestingly, an intact ORF 3c was confirmed to be restored in all viruses (re)isolated from FIP-diseased animals. PMID:25482087

  6. Reversible gelation of genetically engineered macromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petka, Wendy Ann

    Genetic engineering of protein-based polymers offers distinct advantages over conventional synthesis of polymers. Microorganisms can synthesize high molecular weight materials, in relatively large quantities, that are inherently stereoregular, monodisperse, and of controlled sequence. In addition, specific secondary and higher order structures are determined by this protein sequence. As a result, scientists can design polymers to have unique structural features found in natural protein materials and functional properties that are inherent in certain peptide sequences. For this reason, genetic engineering principles were used to create a set of artificial genes that encode twelve macromolecules having both alpha-helical and disordered coil protein sequences with the last amino acid being cysteine (cys) or tryptophan (trp). Triblock copolymer sequences having coiled-coil protein ends, A or B, where A and B represent alpha-helical acidic and basic leucine zipper proteins, separated by a water soluble flexible spacer coil protein, C, where C represents ((AG)sb3PEG) sbn (n = 10 or 28), showed reversible physical gelation behavior. This behavior is believed to result from the aggregation of two or more helices that form physical crosslinks with the disordered coil domain retaining solvent and preventing precipitation of the chain. Diffising wave spectroscopy was used to investigate the gelation behavior of ACsb{10}Acys in buffer when environmental conditions such as pH, temperature, and concentration were varied. The dynamic intensity autocorrelation function recorded over time for 5% (w/v) ACsb{10}Acys showed that the protein behaved as a gel at pH 6.7-8.0 and that the melting point was between 40sp°C and 48sp°C. In addition to the triblock results, the incorporation of 5sp',5sp',5sp'-trifluoroleucine (Tfl) in place of leucine (Leu) in the A and B blocks was accomplished by synthesizing proteins in bacterial hosts auxotrophic for Leu. The substitution of Tfl for Leu

  7. High throughput network for multiprocessor interconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raatikainen, Pertti; Zidbeck, Juha

    1993-05-01

    Multiprocessor architectures are needed to support modern broadband applications, since traditional bus structures are not capable of providing high throughput. New bus structures are needed, especially in the area of network components and terminals. A study to find an efficient and cost effective interconnection topology for the future high speed products is presented. The most common bus topologies are introduced, and their characteristics are estimated to decide which one of them offers best performance and lowest implementation cost. The ring topology is chosen to be studied in more detail. Four competing bus access schemes for the high throughput ring are introduced as well as simulation models for each of them. Using transfer delay and throughput results, as well as keeping the implementation point of view in mind, the best candidate is selected to be studied and experimented in the succeeding research project.

  8. High-throughput screening methods for nitrilases.

    PubMed

    Xue, Ya-Ping; Yang, Yue-Kai; Lv, Sheng-Zhi; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Zheng, Yu-Guo

    2016-04-01

    Nitrilases have been widely acknowledged as important alternatives to chemical catalysts, as they have been proved to transform an immense variety of nitriles under mild conditions and often in a stereoselective or regioselective manner. In the discovery of new nitrilases to establish viable industrial processes, screening plays an important role in identifying which subset of candidates contains a nitrilase of interest from a collection of organisms, clone banks, or enzyme libraries. However, the traditional methods for evaluating the nitrilases are a time-consuming, laborious, and costly process and have been regarded as a bottleneck in developing these nitrilases as industrial biocatalysts. In the past few years, a number of high-throughput screening methods have been developed for rapid evaluation and identification of nitrilases. Here, we review the various methodologies developed for high-throughput screening of nitrilases and focus on their advantages and limitations. PMID:26894402

  9. High-Throughput Investigation of Delafossite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haycock, Barry; Kylee Underwood, M.; Lekse, Jonathan; Matranga, Christopher; Lewis, James P.

    2013-03-01

    We present the application of high-throughput calculations to the intriguing problem of the forbidden optical transition in the CuGa1-xFexO2 delafossites, which is prototypical of many delafossite systems. When 5% or more of the Ga sites are replaced with Fe, there is a sudden shift to an optical band gap of 1.5eV from 2.5eV. Using high-throughput calculations and data mining techniques, we show the most likely positional configurations for x = 0.00 through x = 0.10 of the Fe atoms relative to one another. Implications of this result and applications of the techniques used are discussed, including the development of candidate materials via high-throughput analysis of constituent search-space. Funded by the National Science Foundation through NSF DMR 09-03225 and a subcontract from NETL (URS RES) for Work Activity 0004000.6.600.007.002.420.000.005 ARRA ICMI Project.

  10. A Novel High-Throughput Viscometer.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Suraj; Bishop, Matthew T; Dermody, Daniel; Dietsche, Laura; Kuo, Tzu-Chi; Mushrush, Melissa; Harris, Keith; Zieman, Jonathan; Morabito, Paul; Orvosh, Brian; Patrick, Don

    2016-07-11

    A novel, rapid, parallel, and high-throughput system for measuring viscosity of materials under different conditions of shear rate, temperature, time, etc., has been developed. This unique system utilizes the transient flow of a complex fluid through pipettes. This approach offers significant practical advantages over microfluidic-based devices for viscosity screening: no cleanup is required, the method is high throughput (<1 h for 100 samples), and only small sample volumes (<1 mL) are used. This paper details for the first time the experimental and modeling efforts to implement this mass- and pressure-based viscosity measurement concept as a robust viscosity estimation tool. This approach is very well-suited for viscosity measurements in high-throughput formulation workflows, as it is rapid and parallel and operates directly on samples in various microtiter plate formats. We present systematic experimental observations together with numerical and analytical modeling approaches to characterize instrument capabilities and limitations. The complex transient flow of fluids through these pipettes leads to data-rich pressure profiles. Numerical and analytical modeling is then used to extract viscosity and other rheological parameters from these pressure profiles. We have successfully utilized this viscosity screening tool for a multitude of complex fluids including oils, paints, solvents, and detergents. PMID:27259016

  11. High Throughput Screening For Hazard and Risk of Environmental Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput toxicity testing provides detailed mechanistic information on the concentration response of environmental contaminants in numerous potential toxicity pathways. High throughput screening (HTS) has several key advantages: (1) expense orders of magnitude less than an...

  12. High throughput screening technologies for ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hai-bo; Li, Min; Wang, Wei-ping; Wang, Xiao-liang

    2016-01-01

    Ion channels are involved in a variety of fundamental physiological processes, and their malfunction causes numerous human diseases. Therefore, ion channels represent a class of attractive drug targets and a class of important off-targets for in vitro pharmacological profiling. In the past decades, the rapid progress in developing functional assays and instrumentation has enabled high throughput screening (HTS) campaigns on an expanding list of channel types. Chronologically, HTS methods for ion channels include the ligand binding assay, flux-based assay, fluorescence-based assay, and automated electrophysiological assay. In this review we summarize the current HTS technologies for different ion channel classes and their applications. PMID:26657056

  13. Automated High Throughput Drug Target Crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Rupp, B

    2005-02-18

    The molecular structures of drug target proteins and receptors form the basis for 'rational' or structure guided drug design. The majority of target structures are experimentally determined by protein X-ray crystallography, which as evolved into a highly automated, high throughput drug discovery and screening tool. Process automation has accelerated tasks from parallel protein expression, fully automated crystallization, and rapid data collection to highly efficient structure determination methods. A thoroughly designed automation technology platform supported by a powerful informatics infrastructure forms the basis for optimal workflow implementation and the data mining and analysis tools to generate new leads from experimental protein drug target structures.

  14. Clustering of High Throughput Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Pirim, Harun; Ekşioğlu, Burak; Perkins, Andy; Yüceer, Çetin

    2012-01-01

    High throughput biological data need to be processed, analyzed, and interpreted to address problems in life sciences. Bioinformatics, computational biology, and systems biology deal with biological problems using computational methods. Clustering is one of the methods used to gain insight into biological processes, particularly at the genomics level. Clearly, clustering can be used in many areas of biological data analysis. However, this paper presents a review of the current clustering algorithms designed especially for analyzing gene expression data. It is also intended to introduce one of the main problems in bioinformatics - clustering gene expression data - to the operations research community. PMID:23144527

  15. High throughput chemical munitions treatment system

    DOEpatents

    Haroldsen, Brent L.; Stofleth, Jerome H.; Didlake, Jr., John E.; Wu, Benjamin C-P

    2011-11-01

    A new High-Throughput Explosive Destruction System is disclosed. The new system is comprised of two side-by-side detonation containment vessels each comprising first and second halves that feed into a single agent treatment vessel. Both detonation containment vessels further comprise a surrounding ventilation facility. Moreover, the detonation containment vessels are designed to separate into two half-shells, wherein one shell can be moved axially away from the fixed, second half for ease of access and loading. The vessels are closed by means of a surrounding, clam-shell type locking seal mechanisms.

  16. Genetic Network Inference: From Co-Expression Clustering to Reverse Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhaeseleer, Patrik; Liang, Shoudan; Somogyi, Roland

    2000-01-01

    Advances in molecular biological, analytical, and computational technologies are enabling us to systematically investigate the complex molecular processes underlying biological systems. In particular, using high-throughput gene expression assays, we are able to measure the output of the gene regulatory network. We aim here to review datamining and modeling approaches for conceptualizing and unraveling the functional relationships implicit in these datasets. Clustering of co-expression profiles allows us to infer shared regulatory inputs and functional pathways. We discuss various aspects of clustering, ranging from distance measures to clustering algorithms and multiple-duster memberships. More advanced analysis aims to infer causal connections between genes directly, i.e., who is regulating whom and how. We discuss several approaches to the problem of reverse engineering of genetic networks, from discrete Boolean networks, to continuous linear and non-linear models. We conclude that the combination of predictive modeling with systematic experimental verification will be required to gain a deeper insight into living organisms, therapeutic targeting, and bioengineering.

  17. Preliminary High-Throughput Metagenome Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Dusheyko, Serge; Furman, Craig; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Shapiro, Harris; Tu, Hank

    2007-03-26

    Metagenome data sets present a qualitatively different assembly problem than traditional single-organism whole-genome shotgun (WGS) assembly. The unique aspects of such projects include the presence of a potentially large number of distinct organisms and their representation in the data set at widely different fractions. In addition, multiple closely related strains could be present, which would be difficult to assemble separately. Failure to take these issues into account can result in poor assemblies that either jumble together different strains or which fail to yield useful results. The DOE Joint Genome Institute has sequenced a number of metagenomic projects and plans to considerably increase this number in the coming year. As a result, the JGI has a need for high-throughput tools and techniques for handling metagenome projects. We present the techniques developed to handle metagenome assemblies in a high-throughput environment. This includes a streamlined assembly wrapper, based on the JGI?s in-house WGS assembler, Jazz. It also includes the selection of sensible defaults targeted for metagenome data sets, as well as quality control automation for cleaning up the raw results. While analysis is ongoing, we will discuss preliminary assessments of the quality of the assembly results (http://fames.jgi-psf.org).

  18. Economic consequences of high throughput maskless lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, John G.; Govindaraju, Lakshmi

    2005-11-01

    Many people in the semiconductor industry bemoan the high costs of masks and view mask cost as one of the significant barriers to bringing new chip designs to market. All that is needed is a viable maskless technology and the problem will go away. Numerous sites around the world are working on maskless lithography but inevitably, the question asked is "Wouldn't a one wafer per hour maskless tool make a really good mask writer?" Of course, the answer is yes, the hesitation you hear in the answer isn't based on technology concerns, it's financial. The industry needs maskless lithography because mask costs are too high. Mask costs are too high because mask pattern generators (PG's) are slow and expensive. If mask PG's become much faster, mask costs go down, the maskless market goes away and the PG supplier is faced with an even smaller tool demand from the mask shops. Technical success becomes financial suicide - or does it? In this paper we will present the results of a model that examines some of the consequences of introducing high throughput maskless pattern generation. Specific features in the model include tool throughput for masks and wafers, market segmentation by node for masks and wafers and mask cost as an entry barrier to new chip designs. How does the availability of low cost masks and maskless tools affect the industries tool makeup and what is the ultimate potential market for high throughput maskless pattern generators?

  19. A High-Throughput Cidality Screen for Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Parvinder; Ghosh, Anirban; Krishnamurthy, Ramya Vadageri; Bhattacharjee, Deepa Gagwani; Achar, Vijayashree; Datta, Santanu; Narayanan, Shridhar; Anbarasu, Anand; Ramaiah, Sudha

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) aerosols is a major threat to tuberculosis (TB) researchers, even in bio-safety level-3 (BSL-3) facilities. Automation and high-throughput screens (HTS) in BSL3 facilities are essential for minimizing manual aerosol-generating interventions and facilitating TB research. In the present study, we report the development and validation of a high-throughput, 24-well ‘spot-assay’ for selecting bactericidal compounds against Mtb. The bactericidal screen concept was first validated in the fast-growing surrogate Mycobacterium smegmatis (Msm) and subsequently confirmed in Mtb using the following reference anti-tubercular drugs: rifampicin, isoniazid, ofloxacin and ethambutol (RIOE, acting on different targets). The potential use of the spot-assay to select bactericidal compounds from a large library was confirmed by screening on Mtb, with parallel plating by the conventional gold standard method (correlation, r2 = 0.808). An automated spot-assay further enabled an MBC90 determination on resistant and sensitive Mtb clinical isolates. The implementation of the spot-assay in kinetic screens to enumerate residual Mtb after either genetic silencing (anti-sense RNA, AS-RNA) or chemical inhibition corroborated its ability to detect cidality. This relatively simple, economical and quantitative HTS considerably minimized the bio-hazard risk and enabled the selection of novel vulnerable Mtb targets and mycobactericidal compounds. Thus, spot-assays have great potential to impact the TB drug discovery process. PMID:25693161

  20. Advances, practice, and clinical perspectives in high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Park, S-J; Saito-Adachi, M; Komiyama, Y; Nakai, K

    2016-07-01

    Remarkable advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies have fundamentally changed our understanding of the genetic and epigenetic molecular bases underlying human health and diseases. As these technologies continue to revolutionize molecular biology leading to fresh perspectives, it is imperative to thoroughly consider the enormous excitement surrounding the technologies by highlighting the characteristics of platforms and their global trends as well as potential benefits and limitations. To date, with a variety of platforms, the technologies provide an impressive range of applications, including sequencing of whole genomes and transcriptomes, identifying of genome modifications, and profiling of protein interactions. Because these applications produce a flood of data, simultaneous development of bioinformatics tools is required to efficiently deal with the big data and to comprehensively analyze them. This review covers the major achievements and performances of the high-throughput sequencing and further summarizes the characteristics of their applications along with introducing applicable bioinformatics tools. Moreover, a step-by-step procedure for a practical transcriptome analysis is described employing an analytical pipeline. Clinical perspectives with special consideration to human oral health and diseases are also covered. PMID:26602181

  1. A high throughput glucocerebrosidase assay using the natural substrate glucosylceramide.

    PubMed

    Motabar, Omid; Goldin, Ehud; Leister, William; Liu, Ke; Southall, Noel; Huang, Wenwei; Marugan, Juan J; Sidransky, Ellen; Zheng, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Glucocerebrosidase is a lysosomal enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of glucosylceramide to form ceramide and glucose. A deficiency of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase due to genetic mutations results in Gaucher disease, in which glucosylceramide accumulates in the lysosomes of certain cell types. Although enzyme replacement therapy is currently available for the treatment of type 1 Gaucher disease, the neuronopathic forms of Gaucher disease are still not treatable. Small molecule drugs that can penetrate the blood-brain barrier, such as pharmacological chaperones and enzyme activators, are new therapeutic approaches for Gaucher disease. Enzyme assays for glucocerebrosidase are used to screen compound libraries to identify new lead compounds for drug development for the treatment of Gaucher disease. But the current assays use artificial substrates that are not physiologically relevant. We developed a glucocerebrosidase assay using the natural substrate glucosylceramide coupled to an Amplex-red enzyme reporting system. This assay is in a homogenous assay format and has been miniaturized in a 1,536-well plate format for high throughput screening. The assay sensitivity and robustness is similar to those seen with other glucocerebrosidase fluorescence assays. Therefore, this new glucocerebrosidase assay is an alternative approach for high throughput screening. PMID:22033823

  2. A high throughput glucocerebrosidase assay using the natural substrate glucosylceramide

    PubMed Central

    Motabar, Omid; Goldin, Ehud; Leister, William; Liu, Ke; Southall, Noel; Huang, Wenwei; Marugan, Juan J.; Sidransky, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Glucocerebrosidase is a lysosomal enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of glucosylceramide to form ceramide and glucose. A deficiency of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase due to genetic mutations results in Gaucher disease, in which glucosylceramide accumulates in the lysosomes of certain cell types. Although enzyme replacement therapy is currently available for the treatment of type 1 Gaucher disease, the neuronopathic forms of Gaucher disease are still not treatable. Small molecule drugs that can penetrate the blood-brain barrier, such as pharmacological chaperones and enzyme activators, are new therapeutic approaches for Gaucher disease. Enzyme assays for glucocerebrosidase are used to screen compound libraries to identify new lead compounds for drug development for the treatment of Gaucher disease. But the current assays use artificial substrates that are not physiologically relevant. We developed a glucocerebrosidase assay using the natural substrate glucosylceramide coupled to an Amplex-red enzyme reporting system. This assay is in a homogenous assay format and has been miniaturized in a 1,536-well plate format for high throughput screening. The assay sensitivity and robustness is similar to those seen with other glucocerebrosidase fluorescence assays. Therefore, this new glucocerebrosidase assay is an alternative approach for high throughput screening. PMID:22033823

  3. High-Throughput Genomics Enhances Tomato Breeding Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Barone, A; Di Matteo, A; Carputo, D; Frusciante, L

    2009-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is considered a model plant species for a group of economically important crops, such as potato, pepper, eggplant, since it exhibits a reduced genomic size (950 Mb), a short generation time, and routine transformation technologies. Moreover, it shares with the other Solanaceous plants the same haploid chromosome number and a high level of conserved genomic organization. Finally, many genomic and genetic resources are actually available for tomato, and the sequencing of its genome is in progress. These features make tomato an ideal species for theoretical studies and practical applications in the genomics field. The present review describes how structural genomics assist the selection of new varieties resistant to pathogens that cause damage to this crop. Many molecular markers highly linked to resistance genes and cloned resistance genes are available and could be used for a high-throughput screening of multiresistant varieties. Moreover, a new genomics-assisted breeding approach for improving fruit quality is presented and discussed. It relies on the identification of genetic mechanisms controlling the trait of interest through functional genomics tools. Following this approach, polymorphisms in major gene sequences responsible for variability in the expression of the trait under study are then exploited for tracking simultaneously favourable allele combinations in breeding programs using high-throughput genomic technologies. This aims at pyramiding in the genetic background of commercial cultivars alleles that increase their performances. In conclusion, tomato breeding strategies supported by advanced technologies are expected to target increased productivity and lower costs of improved genotypes even for complex traits. PMID:19721805

  4. High-Throughput Analysis of Enzyme Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Guoxin Lu

    2007-12-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) techniques have been applied to many research fields nowadays. Robot microarray printing technique and automation microtiter handling technique allows HTS performing in both heterogeneous and homogeneous formats, with minimal sample required for each assay element. In this dissertation, new HTS techniques for enzyme activity analysis were developed. First, patterns of immobilized enzyme on nylon screen were detected by multiplexed capillary system. The imaging resolution is limited by the outer diameter of the capillaries. In order to get finer images, capillaries with smaller outer diameters can be used to form the imaging probe. Application of capillary electrophoresis allows separation of the product from the substrate in the reaction mixture, so that the product doesn't have to have different optical properties with the substrate. UV absorption detection allows almost universal detection for organic molecules. Thus, no modifications of either the substrate or the product molecules are necessary. This technique has the potential to be used in screening of local distribution variations of specific bio-molecules in a tissue or in screening of multiple immobilized catalysts. Another high-throughput screening technique is developed by directly monitoring the light intensity of the immobilized-catalyst surface using a scientific charge-coupled device (CCD). Briefly, the surface of enzyme microarray is focused onto a scientific CCD using an objective lens. By carefully choosing the detection wavelength, generation of product on an enzyme spot can be seen by the CCD. Analyzing the light intensity change over time on an enzyme spot can give information of reaction rate. The same microarray can be used for many times. Thus, high-throughput kinetic studies of hundreds of catalytic reactions are made possible. At last, we studied the fluorescence emission spectra of ADP and obtained the detection limits for ADP under three different

  5. Genetic Dissection of Behavioral Flexibility: Reversal Learning in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Laughlin, Rick E.; Grant, Tara L.; Williams, Robert W.; Jentsch, J. David

    2011-01-01

    Background Behavioral inflexibility is a feature of schizophrenia, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder, and behavior addictions that likely results from heritable deficits in the inhibitory control over behavior. Here, we investigate the genetic basis of individual differences in flexibility, measured using an operant reversal learning task. Methods We quantified discrimination acquisition and subsequent reversal learning in a cohort of 51 BXD strains of mice (2–5 mice/strain, N = 176) for which we have matched data on sequence, gene expression in key CNS regions, and neuroreceptor levels. Results Strain variation in trials to criterion on acquisition and reversal was high, with moderate heritability (~0.3). Acquisition and reversal learning phenotypes did not covary at the strain level, suggesting that these traits are effectively under independent genetic control. Reversal performance did covary with dopamine D2 receptor levels in the ventral midbrain, consistent with a similar observed relationship between impulsivity and D2 receptors in humans. Reversal, but not acquisition, is linked to a locus on mouse chromosome 10 with a peak LRS at 86.2Mb (p <.05 genome-wide). Variance in mRNA levels of select transcripts expressed in neocortex, hippocampus, and striatum correlated with the reversal learning phenotype, including Syn3, Nt5dc3 and Hcfc2. Conclusions This work demonstrates the clear trait independence between, and genetic control of, discrimination acquisition and reversal and illustrates how globally coherent data sets for a single panel of highly-related strains can be interrogated and integrated to uncover genetic sources and molecular and neuropharmacological candidates of complex behavioral traits relevant to human psychopathology. PMID:21392734

  6. Self-Assembled Cell Microarray (SAMcell) for High-Throughput RNAi Screening.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanshuo; Li, Juan

    2016-01-01

    RNAi has now become a valuable research tool for cell-based high-throughput screening. However, traditional RNAi high-throughput methods are based on multi-well plates, relying on expensive instruments and complicated operations. In this chapter, we describe a method termed self-assembled cell microarray (SAMcell), which integrates micro-fabrication, reverse transfection, and RNAi technologies and allows for cell behavior investigations to be performed directly on the cell chip. This method has been successfully employed to perform large-scale functional screening assays to identify gene modulators of cell migration, cell proliferation, and cellular apoptosis. PMID:27581287

  7. A High-Throughput Radiometric Kinase Assay.

    PubMed

    Duong-Ly, Krisna C; Peterson, Jeffrey R

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant kinase signaling has been implicated in a number of diseases. While kinases have become attractive drug targets, only a small fraction of human protein kinases have validated inhibitors. Screening of libraries of compounds against a kinase or kinases of interest is routinely performed during kinase inhibitor development to identify promising scaffolds for a particular target and to identify kinase targets for compounds of interest. Screening of more focused compound libraries may also be conducted in the later stages of inhibitor development to improve potency and optimize selectivity. The dot blot kinase assay is a robust, high-throughput kinase assay that can be used to screen a number of small-molecule compounds against one kinase of interest or several kinases. Here, a protocol for a dot blot kinase assay used for measuring insulin receptor kinase activity is presented. This protocol can be readily adapted for use with other protein kinases. PMID:26501904

  8. High-Throughput Cell Toxicity Assays.

    PubMed

    Murray, David; McWilliams, Lisa; Wigglesworth, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Understanding compound-driven cell toxicity is vitally important for all drug discovery approaches. With high-throughput screening (HTS) being the key strategy to find hit and lead compounds for drug discovery projects in the pharmaceutical industry [1], an understanding of the cell toxicity profile of hit molecules from HTS activities is fundamentally important. Recently, there has been a resurgence of interest in phenotypic drug discovery and these cell-based assays are now being run in HTS labs on ever increasing numbers of compounds. As the use of cell assays increases the ability to measure toxicity of compounds on a large scale becomes increasingly important to ensure that false hits are not progressed and that compounds do not carry forward a toxic liability that may cause them to fail at later stages of a project. Here we describe methods employed in the AstraZeneca HTS laboratory to carry out very large scale cell toxicity screening. PMID:27317000

  9. High throughput assays for analyzing transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianqiang; Jiang, Xin; Yaoi, Takuro

    2006-06-01

    Transcription factors are a group of proteins that modulate the expression of genes involved in many biological processes, such as cell growth and differentiation. Alterations in transcription factor function are associated with many human diseases, and therefore these proteins are attractive potential drug targets. A key issue in the development of such therapeutics is the generation of effective tools that can be used for high throughput discovery of the critical transcription factors involved in human diseases, and the measurement of their activities in a variety of disease or compound-treated samples. Here, a number of innovative arrays and 96-well format assays for profiling and measuring the activities of transcription factors will be discussed. PMID:16834538

  10. High-Throughput Methods for Electron Crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, David L.; Ubarretxena-Belandia, Iban; Gonen, Tamir; Engel, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins play a tremendously important role in cell physiology and serve as a target for an increasing number of drugs. Structural information is key to understanding their function and for developing new strategies for combating disease. However, the complex physical chemistry associated with membrane proteins has made them more difficult to study than their soluble cousins. Electron crystallography has historically been a successful method for solving membrane protein structures and has the advantage of providing the natural environment of a lipid membrane. Specifically, when membrane proteins form two-dimensional arrays within a lipid bilayer, images and diffraction can be recorded by electron microscopy. The corresponding data can be combined to produce a three-dimensional reconstruction which, under favorable conditions, can extend to atomic resolution. Like X-ray crystallography, the quality of the structures are very much dependent on the order and size of the crystals. However, unlike X-ray crystallography, high-throughput methods for screening crystallization trials for electron crystallography are not in general use. In this chapter, we describe two alternative and potentially complementary methods for high-throughput screening of membrane protein crystallization within the lipid bilayer. The first method relies on the conventional use of dialysis for removing detergent and thus reconstituting the bilayer; an array of dialysis wells in the standard 96-well format allows the use of a liquid-handling robot and greatly increases throughput. The second method relies on detergent complexation by cyclodextrin; a specialized pipetting robot has been designed not only to titrate cyclodextrin, but to use light scattering to monitor the reconstitution process. In addition, the use of liquid-handling robots for making negatively stained grids and methods for automatically imaging samples in the electron microscope are described. PMID:23132066

  11. UAV-based high-throughput phenotyping in legume crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaran, Sindhuja; Khot, Lav R.; Quirós, Juan; Vandemark, George J.; McGee, Rebecca J.

    2016-05-01

    In plant breeding, one of the biggest obstacles in genetic improvement is the lack of proven rapid methods for measuring plant responses in field conditions. Therefore, the major objective of this research was to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing high-throughput remote sensing technology for rapid measurement of phenotyping traits in legume crops. The plant responses of several chickpea and peas varieties to the environment were assessed with an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) integrated with multispectral imaging sensors. Our preliminary assessment showed that the vegetation indices are strongly correlated (p<0.05) with seed yield of legume crops. Results endorse the potential of UAS-based sensing technology to rapidly measure those phenotyping traits.

  12. Characterizing immune repertoires by high throughput sequencing: strategies and applications

    PubMed Central

    Calis, Jorg J.A.; Rosenberg, Brad R.

    2014-01-01

    As the key cellular effectors of adaptive immunity, T and B lymphocytes utilize specialized receptors to recognize, respond to, and neutralize a diverse array of extrinsic threats. These receptors (immunoglobulins in B lymphocytes, T cell receptors in T lymphocytes) are incredibly variable, the products of specialized genetic diversification mechanisms that generate complex lymphocyte repertoires with extensive collections of antigen specificities. Recent advances in high throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies have transformed our ability to examine antigen receptor repertoires at single nucleotide, and more recently, single cell, resolution. Here we review current approaches to examining antigen receptor repertoires by HTS, and discuss inherent biological and technical challenges. We further describe emerging applications of this powerful methodology for exploring the adaptive immune system. PMID:25306219

  13. Improved detection of artifactual viral minority variants in high-throughput sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Welkers, Matthijs R A; Jonges, Marcel; Jeeninga, Rienk E; Koopmans, Marion P G; de Jong, Menno D

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing (HTS) of viral samples provides important information on the presence of viral minority variants. However, detection and accurate quantification is limited by the capacity to distinguish biological from artificial variation. In this study, errors related to the Illumina HiSeq2000 library generation and HTS process were investigated by determining minority variant frequencies in an influenza A/WSN/1933(H1N1) virus reverse-genetics plasmid pool. Errors related to amplification and sequencing were determined using the same plasmid pool, by generation of infectious virus using reverse genetics followed by in duplo reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) amplification and HTS in the same sequence run. Results showed that after "best practice" quality control (QC), within the plasmid pool, one minority variant with a frequency >0.5% was identified, while 84 and 139 were identified in the RT-PCR amplified samples, indicating RT-PCR amplification artificially increased variation. Detailed analysis showed that artifactual minority variants could be identified by two major technical characteristics: their predominant presence in a single read orientation and uneven distribution of mismatches over the length of the reads. We demonstrate that by addition of two QC steps 95% of the artifactual minority variants could be identified. When our analysis approach was applied to three clinical samples 68% of the initially identified minority variants were identified as artifacts. Our study clearly demonstrated that, without additional QC steps, overestimation of viral minority variants is very likely to occur, mainly as a consequence of the required RT-PCR amplification step. The improved ability to detect and correct for artifactual minority variants, increases data resolution and could aid both past and future studies incorporating HTS. The source code has been made available through Sourceforge (https://sourceforge.net/projects/mva-ngs). PMID:25657642

  14. High-throughput procedure for single pollen grain collection and polymerase chain reaction in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single pollen grain PCR has succeeded in several species, however only a limited number (up to 60) pollen grains were involved due to difficulties in pollen isolation and lysis. This has limited its application in genetic analysis and mapping studies in plants. A high-throughput procedure for dete...

  15. High Throughput Genotoxicity Profiling of the US EPA ToxCast Chemical Library

    EPA Science Inventory

    A key aim of the ToxCast project is to investigate modern molecular and genetic high content and high throughput screening (HTS) assays, along with various computational tools to supplement and perhaps replace traditional assays for evaluating chemical toxicity. Genotoxicity is a...

  16. A LOW-COST HIGH THROUGHPUT POLYACRYLAMIDE GEL ELECTROPHORESIS SYSTEM FOR GENOTYPING WITH MICROSATELLITE DNA MARKERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microsatellite DNA markers are widely used in genetic research but the genotyping cost with this marker system is high and the throughput is limited with conventional methods. The objective of this paper is to introduce a low-cost, high-throughput system developed in our laboratories for the detect...

  17. High-throughput SNP genotyping with the GoldenGate assay in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are abundant and evenly distributed, and they have become an ideal marker system for genetic research in many organisms. Several high throughput platforms have been developed that allow genotyping thousands to a million markers in parallel. In this study, a cus...

  18. High-throughput genotyping of hop (Humulus lupulus L.) utilising diversity arrays technology (DArT)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Implementation of molecular methods in hop breeding is dependent on the availability of sizeable numbers of polymorphic markers and a comprehensive understanding of genetic variation. Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) is a high-throughput cost-effective method for the discovery of large numbers of...

  19. A genome-enabled, high-throughput, and multiplexed fingerprinting platform for strawberry (Fragaria L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Strawberry (Fragaria L.) genotypes bear remarkable phenotypic similarity, even across ploidy levels. Additionally, breeding programs seek to introgress alleles from wild germplasm, so objective molecular description of genetic variation has great value. In this report, a high-throughput, robust prot...

  20. Data Analysis for High-Throughput RNAi Screening.

    PubMed

    Azorsa, David O; Turnidge, Megan A; Arora, Shilpi

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput RNA interference (HT-RNAi) screening is an effective technology to help identify important genes and pathways involved in a biological process. Analysis of high-throughput RNAi screening data is a critical part of this technology, and many analysis methods have been described. Here, we summarize the workflow and types of analyses commonly used in high-throughput RNAi screening. PMID:27581298

  1. High Throughput Screening and Selection Methods for Directed Enzyme Evolution

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Successful evolutionary enzyme engineering requires a high throughput screening or selection method, which considerably increases the chance of obtaining desired properties and reduces the time and cost. In this review, a series of high throughput screening and selection methods are illustrated with significant and recent examples. These high throughput strategies are also discussed with an emphasis on compatibility with phenotypic analysis during directed enzyme evolution. Lastly, certain limitations of current methods, as well as future developments, are briefly summarized. PMID:26074668

  2. Regulatory steps associated with use of value-added recombinant proteins and peptides screened in high-throughput for expression in genetically engineered starch and cellulosic fuel ethanol yeast strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant proteins expressed in animals have been a public concern as a perceived risk to the consumer. Animals are currently being treated with genetically engineered biologicals, such as growth hormone, or fed genetically modified plants. Similarly, various commercially-valuable proteins or pe...

  3. High throughput sample processing and automated scoring.

    PubMed

    Brunborg, Gunnar; Jackson, Petra; Shaposhnikov, Sergey; Dahl, Hildegunn; Azqueta, Amaya; Collins, Andrew R; Gutzkow, Kristine B

    2014-01-01

    The comet assay is a sensitive and versatile method for assessing DNA damage in cells. In the traditional version of the assay, there are many manual steps involved and few samples can be treated in one experiment. High throughput (HT) modifications have been developed during recent years, and they are reviewed and discussed. These modifications include accelerated scoring of comets; other important elements that have been studied and adapted to HT are cultivation and manipulation of cells or tissues before and after exposure, and freezing of treated samples until comet analysis and scoring. HT methods save time and money but they are useful also for other reasons: large-scale experiments may be performed which are otherwise not practicable (e.g., analysis of many organs from exposed animals, and human biomonitoring studies), and automation gives more uniform sample treatment and less dependence on operator performance. The HT modifications now available vary largely in their versatility, capacity, complexity, and costs. The bottleneck for further increase of throughput appears to be the scoring. PMID:25389434

  4. High-Throughput Screening in Primary Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Punita; Ando, D. Michael; Daub, Aaron; Kaye, Julia A.; Finkbeiner, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Despite years of incremental progress in our understanding of diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease (HD), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), there are still no disease-modifying therapeutics. The discrepancy between the number of lead compounds and approved drugs may partially be a result of the methods used to generate the leads and highlights the need for new technology to obtain more detailed and physiologically relevant information on cellular processes in normal and diseased states. Our high-throughput screening (HTS) system in a primary neuron model can help address this unmet need. HTS allows scientists to assay thousands of conditions in a short period of time which can reveal completely new aspects of biology and identify potential therapeutics in the span of a few months when conventional methods could take years or fail all together. HTS in primary neurons combines the advantages of HTS with the biological relevance of intact, fully differentiated neurons which can capture the critical cellular events or homeostatic states that make neurons uniquely susceptible to disease-associated proteins. We detail methodologies of our primary neuron HTS assay workflow from sample preparation to data reporting. We also discuss our adaptation of our HTS system into high-content screening (HCS), a type of HTS that uses multichannel fluorescence images to capture biological events in situ, and is uniquely suited to study dynamical processes in living cells. PMID:22341232

  5. High-throughput rod-induced electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dezhi; Xiao, Zhiming; Teh, Kwok Siong; Han, Zhibin; Luo, Guoxi; Shi, Chuan; Sun, Daoheng; Zhao, Jinbao; Lin, Liwei

    2016-09-01

    A high throughput electrospinning process, directly from flat polymer solution surfaces induced by a moving insulating rod, has been proposed and demonstrated. Different rods made of either phenolic resin or paper with a diameter of 1–3 cm and a resistance of about 100–500 MΩ, has been successfully utilized in the process. The rod is placed approximately 10 mm above the flat polymer solution surface with a moving speed of 0.005–0.4 m s‑1 this causes the solution to generate multiple liquid jets under an applied voltage of 15–60 kV for the tip-less electrospinning process. The local electric field induced by the rod can boost electrohydrodynamic instability in order to generate Taylor cones and liquid jets. Experimentally, it is found that a large rod diameter and a small solution-to-rod distance can enhance the local electrical field to reduce the magnitude of the applied voltage. In the prototype setup with poly (ethylene oxide) polymer solution, an area of 5 cm  ×  10 cm and under an applied voltage of 60 kV, the maximum throughput of nanofibers is recorded to be approximately144 g m‑2 h‑1.

  6. High-Throughput Enzyme Kinetics Using Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Guoxin Lu; Edward S. Yeung

    2007-11-01

    We report a microanalytical method to study enzyme kinetics. The technique involves immobilizing horseradish peroxidase on a poly-L-lysine (PLL)- coated glass slide in a microarray format, followed by applying substrate solution onto the enzyme microarray. Enzyme molecules are immobilized on the PLL-coated glass slide through electrostatic interactions, and no further modification of the enzyme or glass slide is needed. In situ detection of the products generated on the enzyme spots is made possible by monitoring the light intensity of each spot using a scientific-grade charged-coupled device (CCD). Reactions of substrate solutions of various types and concentrations can be carried out sequentially on one enzyme microarray. To account for the loss of enzyme from washing in between runs, a standard substrate solution is used for calibration. Substantially reduced amounts of substrate solution are consumed for each reaction on each enzyme spot. The Michaelis constant K{sub m} obtained by using this method is comparable to the result for homogeneous solutions. Absorbance detection allows universal monitoring, and no chemical modification of the substrate is needed. High-throughput studies of native enzyme kinetics for multiple enzymes are therefore possible in a simple, rapid, and low-cost manner.

  7. High throughput sample processing and automated scoring

    PubMed Central

    Brunborg, Gunnar; Jackson, Petra; Shaposhnikov, Sergey; Dahl, Hildegunn; Azqueta, Amaya; Collins, Andrew R.; Gutzkow, Kristine B.

    2014-01-01

    The comet assay is a sensitive and versatile method for assessing DNA damage in cells. In the traditional version of the assay, there are many manual steps involved and few samples can be treated in one experiment. High throughput (HT) modifications have been developed during recent years, and they are reviewed and discussed. These modifications include accelerated scoring of comets; other important elements that have been studied and adapted to HT are cultivation and manipulation of cells or tissues before and after exposure, and freezing of treated samples until comet analysis and scoring. HT methods save time and money but they are useful also for other reasons: large-scale experiments may be performed which are otherwise not practicable (e.g., analysis of many organs from exposed animals, and human biomonitoring studies), and automation gives more uniform sample treatment and less dependence on operator performance. The HT modifications now available vary largely in their versatility, capacity, complexity, and costs. The bottleneck for further increase of throughput appears to be the scoring. PMID:25389434

  8. High-throughput screening in primary neurons.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Punita; Ando, D Michael; Daub, Aaron; Kaye, Julia A; Finkbeiner, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Despite years of incremental progress in our understanding of diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease (HD), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), there are still no disease-modifying therapeutics. The discrepancy between the number of lead compounds and approved drugs may partially be a result of the methods used to generate the leads and highlights the need for new technology to obtain more detailed and physiologically relevant information on cellular processes in normal and diseased states. Our high-throughput screening (HTS) system in a primary neuron model can help address this unmet need. HTS allows scientists to assay thousands of conditions in a short period of time which can reveal completely new aspects of biology and identify potential therapeutics in the span of a few months when conventional methods could take years or fail all together. HTS in primary neurons combines the advantages of HTS with the biological relevance of intact, fully differentiated neurons which can capture the critical cellular events or homeostatic states that make neurons uniquely susceptible to disease-associated proteins. We detail methodologies of our primary neuron HTS assay workflow from sample preparation to data reporting. We also discuss the adaptation of our HTS system into high-content screening (HCS), a type of HTS that uses multichannel fluorescence images to capture biological events in situ, and is uniquely suited to study dynamical processes in living cells. PMID:22341232

  9. A high-throughput chemically induced inflammation assay in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Studies on innate immunity have benefited from the introduction of zebrafish as a model system. Transgenic fish expressing fluorescent proteins in leukocyte populations allow direct, quantitative visualization of an inflammatory response in vivo. It has been proposed that this animal model can be used for high-throughput screens aimed at the identification of novel immunomodulatory lead compounds. However, current assays require invasive manipulation of fish individually, thus preventing high-content screening. Results Here we show that specific, noninvasive damage to lateral line neuromast cells can induce a robust acute inflammatory response. Exposure of fish larvae to sublethal concentrations of copper sulfate selectively damages the sensory hair cell population inducing infiltration of leukocytes to neuromasts within 20 minutes. Inflammation can be assayed in real time using transgenic fish expressing fluorescent proteins in leukocytes or by histochemical assays in fixed larvae. We demonstrate the usefulness of this method for chemical and genetic screens to detect the effect of immunomodulatory compounds and mutations affecting the leukocyte response. Moreover, we transformed the assay into a high-throughput screening method by using a customized automated imaging and processing system that quantifies the magnitude of the inflammatory reaction. Conclusions This approach allows rapid screening of thousands of compounds or mutagenized zebrafish for effects on inflammation and enables the identification of novel players in the regulation of innate immunity and potential lead compounds toward new immunomodulatory therapies. We have called this method the chemically induced inflammation assay, or ChIn assay. See Commentary article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/8/148. PMID:21176202

  10. High-throughput concept for tailoring switchable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgschulte, A.; Gremaud, R.; de Man, S.; Westerwaal, R. J.; Rector, J. H.; Dam, B.; Griessen, R.

    2006-11-01

    The optical properties, the switching kinetics and the lifetime of hydrogen switchable mirrors based on Mg-Ni alloys are determined with particular regard to the composition of the optically active metal-hydride layer in combination with the thickness of the catalytic capping layer. For this, a high-throughput experiment is introduced. The switching kinetics and the reversibility of switchable mirrors are strongly thickness dependent, though the details hinge on the fine structure of the clustered capping layer. Therefore, the kinetics is correlated with the surface structures of Pd on Mg yNi 1- y as investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy. The results are explained by the so-called strong metal-support interaction (SMSI) state, characterized by a complete encapsulation of the capping layer clusters by oxidized species originating from the support. The SMSI-effect is less important with increasing Pd-layer thickness, and is suppressed by a good wetting of the Pd-clusters on the optically active film. This explains the critical thickness for the catalyzed hydrogen uptake observed in many switchable mirror systems. Moreover, the degradation of the kinetics during cycling is found to depend on the Pd-layer thickness and on the gas environment. Only films, covered with at least 15 nm Pd, show small degradation caused by the SMSI-effect. The SMSI-effect is partly reversible: after changing the gas environment from hydrogen to oxygen, the oxide on the Pd-clusters can be partly removed.

  11. High Throughput Interrogation of Behavioral Transitions in C. elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mochi; Shaevitz, Joshua; Leifer, Andrew

    We present a high-throughput method to probe transformations from neural activity to behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans to better understand how organisms change behavioral states. We optogenetically deliver white-noise stimuli to target sensory or inter neurons while simultaneously recording the movement of a population of worms. Using all the postural movement data collected, we computationally classify stereotyped behaviors in C. elegans by clustering based on the spectral properties of the instantaneous posture. (Berman et al., 2014) Transitions between these behavioral clusters indicate discrete behavioral changes. To study the neural correlates dictating these transitions, we perform model-driven experiments and employ Linear-Nonlinear-Poisson cascades that take the white-noise stimulus as the input. The parameters of these models are fitted by reverse-correlation from our measurements. The parameterized models of behavioral transitions predict the worm's response to novel stimuli and reveal the internal computations the animal makes before carrying out behavioral decisions. Preliminary results are shown that describe the neural-behavioral transformation between neural activity in mechanosensory neurons and reversal behavior.

  12. Fluorescent Approaches to High Throughput Crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Achari, Aniruddha

    2006-01-01

    We have shown that by covalently modifying a subpopulation, less than or equal to 1%, of a macromolecule with a fluorescent probe, the labeled material will add to a growing crystal as a microheterogeneous growth unit. Labeling procedures can be readily incorporated into the final stages of purification, and the presence of the probe at low concentrations does not affect the X-ray data quality or the crystallization behavior. The presence of the trace fluorescent label gives a number of advantages when used with high throughput crystallizations. The covalently attached probe will concentrate in the crystal relative to the solution, and under fluorescent illumination crystals show up as bright objects against a dark background. Non-protein structures, such as salt crystals, will not incorporate the probe and will not show up under fluorescent illumination. Brightly fluorescent crystals are readily found against less bright precipitated phases, which under white light illumination may obscure the crystals. Automated image analysis to find crystals should be greatly facilitated, without having to first define crystallization drop boundaries as the protein or protein structures is all that shows up. Fluorescence intensity is a faster search parameter, whether visually or by automated methods, than looking for crystalline features. We are now testing the use of high fluorescence intensity regions, in the absence of clear crystalline features or "hits", as a means for determining potential lead conditions. A working hypothesis is that kinetics leading to non-structured phases may overwhelm and trap more slowly formed ordered assemblies, which subsequently show up as regions of brighter fluorescence intensity. Preliminary experiments with test proteins have resulted in the extraction of a number of crystallization conditions from screening outcomes based solely on the presence of bright fluorescent regions. Subsequent experiments will test this approach using a wider

  13. High-Throughput Baculovirus Expression System for Membrane Protein Production.

    PubMed

    Kalathur, Ravi C; Panganiban, Marinela; Bruni, Renato

    2016-01-01

    The ease of use, robustness, cost-effectiveness, and posttranslational machinery make baculovirus expression system a popular choice for production of eukaryotic membrane proteins. This system can be readily adapted for high-throughput operations. This chapter outlines the techniques and procedures for cloning, transfection, small-scale production, and purification of membrane protein samples in a high-throughput manner. PMID:27485337

  14. A Primer on High-Throughput Computing for Genomic Selection

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao-Lin; Beissinger, Timothy M.; Bauck, Stewart; Woodward, Brent; Rosa, Guilherme J. M.; Weigel, Kent A.; Gatti, Natalia de Leon; Gianola, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    High-throughput computing (HTC) uses computer clusters to solve advanced computational problems, with the goal of accomplishing high-throughput over relatively long periods of time. In genomic selection, for example, a set of markers covering the entire genome is used to train a model based on known data, and the resulting model is used to predict the genetic merit of selection candidates. Sophisticated models are very computationally demanding and, with several traits to be evaluated sequentially, computing time is long, and output is low. In this paper, we present scenarios and basic principles of how HTC can be used in genomic selection, implemented using various techniques from simple batch processing to pipelining in distributed computer clusters. Various scripting languages, such as shell scripting, Perl, and R, are also very useful to devise pipelines. By pipelining, we can reduce total computing time and consequently increase throughput. In comparison to the traditional data processing pipeline residing on the central processors, performing general-purpose computation on a graphics processing unit provide a new-generation approach to massive parallel computing in genomic selection. While the concept of HTC may still be new to many researchers in animal breeding, plant breeding, and genetics, HTC infrastructures have already been built in many institutions, such as the University of Wisconsin–Madison, which can be leveraged for genomic selection, in terms of central processing unit capacity, network connectivity, storage availability, and middleware connectivity. Exploring existing HTC infrastructures as well as general-purpose computing environments will further expand our capability to meet increasing computing demands posed by unprecedented genomic data that we have today. We anticipate that HTC will impact genomic selection via better statistical models, faster solutions, and more competitive products (e.g., from design of marker panels to realized

  15. Developments in Plant Negative-Strand RNA Virus Reverse Genetics.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Andrew O; Li, Zhenghe

    2016-08-01

    Twenty years ago, breakthroughs for reverse genetics analyses of negative-strand RNA (NSR) viruses were achieved by devising conditions for generation of infectious viruses in susceptible cells. Recombinant strategies have subsequently been engineered for members of all vertebrate NSR virus families, and research arising from these advances has profoundly increased understanding of infection cycles, pathogenesis, and complexities of host interactions of animal NSR viruses. These strategies also permitted development of many applications, including attenuated vaccines and delivery vehicles for therapeutic and biotechnology proteins. However, for a variety of reasons, it was difficult to devise procedures for reverse genetics analyses of plant NSR viruses. In this review, we discuss advances that have circumvented these problems and resulted in construction of a recombinant system for Sonchus yellow net nucleorhabdovirus. We also discuss possible extensions to other plant NSR viruses as well as the applications that may emanate from recombinant analyses of these pathogens. PMID:27359368

  16. CORONAVIRUS REVERSE GENETIC SYSTEMS: INFECTIOUS CLONES AND REPLICONS

    PubMed Central

    Almazán, Fernando; Sola, Isabel; Zuñiga, Sonia; Marquez-Jurado, Silvia; Morales, Lucia; Becares, Martina; Enjuanes, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) infect humans and many animal species, and are associated with respiratory, enteric, hepatic, and central nervous system diseases. The large size of the CoV genome and the instability of some CoV replicase gene sequences during its propagation in bacteria, represent serious obstacles for the development of reverse genetic systems similar to those used for smaller positive sense RNA viruses. To overcome these limitations, several alternatives to more conventional plasmid-based approaches have been established in the last thirteen years. In this report, we briefly review and discuss the different reverse genetic systems developed for CoVs, paying special attention to the severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV (SARS-CoV). PMID:24930446

  17. CRISPR: a versatile tool for both forward and reverse genetics research.

    PubMed

    Gurumurthy, Channabasavaiah B; Grati, M'hamed; Ohtsuka, Masato; Schilit, Samantha L P; Quadros, Rolen M; Liu, Xue Zhong

    2016-09-01

    Human genetics research employs the two opposing approaches of forward and reverse genetics. While forward genetics identifies and links a mutation to an observed disease etiology, reverse genetics induces mutations in model organisms to study their role in disease. In most cases, causality for mutations identified by forward genetics is confirmed by reverse genetics through the development of genetically engineered animal models and an assessment of whether the model can recapitulate the disease. While many technological advances have helped improve these approaches, some gaps still remain. CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated), which has emerged as a revolutionary genetic engineering tool, holds great promise for closing such gaps. By combining the benefits of forward and reverse genetics, it has dramatically expedited human genetics research. We provide a perspective on the power of CRISPR-based forward and reverse genetics tools in human genetics and discuss its applications using some disease examples. PMID:27384229

  18. Reverse Genetics System for Studying Human Rhinovirus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wai-Ming; Wang, Wensheng; Bochkov, Yury A; Lee, Iris

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Human rhinovirus (HRV) contains a 7.2 Kb messenger-sense RNA genome which is the template for reproducing progeny viruses after it enters the cytoplasm of a host cell. Reverse genetics refers to the regeneration of progeny viruses from an artificial cDNA copy of the RNA genome of an RNA virus. It has been a powerful molecular genetic tool for studying HRV and other RNA viruses because the artificial DNA stage makes it practical to introduce specific mutations into the viral RNA genome. This chapter uses HRV-16 as the model virus to illustrate the strategy and the methods for constructing and cloning the artificial cDNA copy of a full-length HRV genome, identifying the infectious cDNA clone isolates, and selecting the most vigorous cDNA clone isolate to serve as the standard parental clone for future molecular genetic study of the virus. PMID:25261313

  19. Quantitative in vitro-to-in vivo extrapolation in a high-throughput environment.

    PubMed

    Wetmore, Barbara A

    2015-06-01

    High-throughput in vitro toxicity screening provides an efficient way to identify potential biological targets for environmental and industrial chemicals while conserving limited testing resources. However, reliance on the nominal chemical concentrations in these in vitro assays as an indicator of bioactivity may misrepresent potential in vivo effects of these chemicals due to differences in clearance, protein binding, bioavailability, and other pharmacokinetic factors. Development of high-throughput in vitro hepatic clearance and protein binding assays and refinement of quantitative in vitro-to-in vivo extrapolation (QIVIVE) methods have provided key tools to predict xenobiotic steady state pharmacokinetics. Using a process known as reverse dosimetry, knowledge of the chemical steady state behavior can be incorporated with HTS data to determine the external in vivo oral exposure needed to achieve internal blood concentrations equivalent to those eliciting bioactivity in the assays. These daily oral doses, known as oral equivalents, can be compared to chronic human exposure estimates to assess whether in vitro bioactivity would be expected at the dose-equivalent level of human exposure. This review will describe the use of QIVIVE methods in a high-throughput environment and the promise they hold in shaping chemical testing priorities and, potentially, high-throughput risk assessment strategies. PMID:24907440

  20. Identification of Genes Important for Cutaneous Function Revealed by a Large Scale Reverse Genetic Screen in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    DiTommaso, Tia; Jones, Lynelle K.; Cottle, Denny L.; Gerdin, Anna-Karin; Vancollie, Valerie E.; Watt, Fiona M.; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Bradley, Allan; Steel, Karen P.; Sundberg, John P.; White, Jacqueline K.; Smyth, Ian M.

    2014-01-01

    The skin is a highly regenerative organ which plays critical roles in protecting the body and sensing its environment. Consequently, morbidity and mortality associated with skin defects represent a significant health issue. To identify genes important in skin development and homeostasis, we have applied a high throughput, multi-parameter phenotype screen to the conditional targeted mutant mice generated by the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute's Mouse Genetics Project (Sanger-MGP). A total of 562 different mouse lines were subjected to a variety of tests assessing cutaneous expression, macroscopic clinical disease, histological change, hair follicle cycling, and aberrant marker expression. Cutaneous lesions were associated with mutations in 23 different genes. Many of these were not previously associated with skin disease in the organ (Mysm1, Vangl1, Trpc4ap, Nom1, Sparc, Farp2, and Prkab1), while others were ascribed new cutaneous functions on the basis of the screening approach (Krt76, Lrig1, Myo5a, Nsun2, and Nf1). The integration of these skin specific screening protocols into the Sanger-MGP primary phenotyping pipelines marks the largest reported reverse genetic screen undertaken in any organ and defines approaches to maximise the productivity of future projects of this nature, while flagging genes for further characterisation. PMID:25340873

  1. Chromosomal microarray analysis, or comparative genomic hybridization: A high throughput approach

    PubMed Central

    Haeri, Mohammad; Gelowani, Violet; Beaudet, Arthur L.

    2015-01-01

    Pathological copy number variants (CNVs) and point mutations are major genetic causes of hundreds of disorders. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) also known as chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) is the best available tool to detect copy number variations in chromosomal make up. We have optimized several different protocols and introduce a high-throughput approach to perform a cost-effective, fast, high-throughput and high-quality CMA. We managed to reach to high quality arrays with 17 ± 0.04 (mean ± SD, n = 90) Derivative Log Ratio (DLR) spread, a measure of array quality (<0.20 considered as excellent) for our arrays. High-throughput and high-quality arrays are gaining more attention and the current manuscript is a step forward to this increasing demand.•This manuscript introduces a low cost, fast, efficient, high throughput and high-quality aCGH protocol;•This protocol provides specific instructions and crucial detail for processing up to 24 slides which is equal to 48, 96, or 192 arrays by only one person in one day;•This manuscript is accompanied with a step-by-step video. PMID:26862485

  2. High-Throughput, Data-Rich Cellular RNA Device Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Townshend, Brent; Kennedy, Andrew B.; Xiang, Joy S.; Smolke, Christina D.

    2015-01-01

    Methods for rapidly assessing sequence-structure-function landscapes and developing conditional gene-regulatory devices are critical to our ability to manipulate and interface with biology. We describe a framework for engineering RNA devices from preexisting aptamers that exhibit ligand-responsive ribozyme tertiary interactions. Our methodology utilizes cell sorting, high-throughput sequencing, and statistical data analyses to enable parallel measurements of the activities of hundreds of thousands of sequences from RNA device libraries in the absence and presence of ligands. Our tertiary interaction RNA devices exhibit improved performance in terms of gene silencing, activation ratio, and ligand sensitivity as compared to optimized RNA devices that rely on secondary structure changes. We apply our method to building biosensors for diverse ligands and determine consensus sequences that enable ligand-responsive tertiary interactions. These methods advance our ability to develop broadly applicable genetic tools and to elucidate understanding of the underlying sequence-structure-function relationships that empower rational design of complex biomolecules. PMID:26258292

  3. High-throughput analysis and protein engineering using microcapillary arrays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bob; Lim, Sungwon; Kannan, Arvind; Alford, Spencer C; Sunden, Fanny; Herschlag, Daniel; Dimov, Ivan K; Baer, Thomas M; Cochran, Jennifer R

    2016-02-01

    We describe a multipurpose technology platform, termed μSCALE (microcapillary single-cell analysis and laser extraction), that enables massively parallel, quantitative biochemical and biophysical measurements on millions of protein variants expressed from yeast or bacteria. μSCALE spatially segregates single cells within a microcapillary array, enabling repeated imaging, cell growth and protein expression. We performed high-throughput analysis of cells and their protein products using a range of fluorescent assays, including binding-affinity measurements and dynamic enzymatic assays. A precise laser-based extraction method allows rapid recovery of live clones and their genetic material from microcapillaries for further study. With μSCALE, we discovered a new antibody against a clinical cancer target, evolved a fluorescent protein biosensor and engineered an enzyme to reduce its sensitivity to its inhibitor. These protein analysis and engineering applications each have unique assay requirements and different host organisms, highlighting the flexibility and technical capabilities of the μSCALE platform. PMID:26641932

  4. BOOGIE: Predicting Blood Groups from High Throughput Sequencing Data

    PubMed Central

    Giollo, Manuel; Minervini, Giovanni; Scalzotto, Marta; Leonardi, Emanuela; Ferrari, Carlo; Tosatto, Silvio C. E.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, we have witnessed an incredible growth in the amount of available genotype data due to high throughput sequencing (HTS) techniques. This information may be used to predict phenotypes of medical relevance, and pave the way towards personalized medicine. Blood phenotypes (e.g. ABO and Rh) are a purely genetic trait that has been extensively studied for decades, with currently over thirty known blood groups. Given the public availability of blood group data, it is of interest to predict these phenotypes from HTS data which may translate into more accurate blood typing in clinical practice. Here we propose BOOGIE, a fast predictor for the inference of blood groups from single nucleotide variant (SNV) databases. We focus on the prediction of thirty blood groups ranging from the well known ABO and Rh, to the less studied Junior or Diego. BOOGIE correctly predicted the blood group with 94% accuracy for the Personal Genome Project whole genome profiles where good quality SNV annotation was available. Additionally, our tool produces a high quality haplotype phase, which is of interest in the context of ethnicity-specific polymorphisms or traits. The versatility and simplicity of the analysis make it easily interpretable and allow easy extension of the protocol towards other phenotypes. BOOGIE can be downloaded from URL http://protein.bio.unipd.it/download/. PMID:25893845

  5. High-throughput screening of phosphodiesterase activity in living cells.

    PubMed

    Rich, Thomas C; Karpen, Jeffrey W

    2005-01-01

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) hydrolyze the second messengers cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine 5'-monophosphate (cGMP) and play a crucial role in the termination and spatial segregation of cyclic nucleotide signals. Despite a wealth of molecular information, very little is known about how PDEs regulate cAMP and cGMP signals in living cells because conventional methods lack the necessary spatial and temporal resolution. We present here a sensitive optical method for monitoring cAMP levels and PDE activity near the membrane, using cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) ion channels as sensors. These channels are directly opened by the binding of cyclic nucleotides and allow cations to cross the membrane. The olfactory channel A subunit (CNGA2) has been genetically modified to improve its cAMP sensitivity and specificity. Channel activity is assessed by measuring Ca2+ influx using standard fluorometric techniques. In addition to studying PDEs in their native setting, the approach should be particularly useful in high-throughput screening assays to test for compounds that affect PDE activity, as well as the activities of the many G protein-coupled receptors that cause changes in intracellular cAMP. PMID:15988054

  6. [High-throughput functional screening using CRISPR/Cas9 system].

    PubMed

    Wang, Gancheng; Ming, Ma; Ye, Yanzhen; Xi, Jianzhong

    2016-05-01

    High-throughput screening, a powerful tool for the discovery of functionally important genes responsible for certain phenotypes, is performed according to loss-of-function or gain-of-function strategies. RNAi technology or knockout approaches have been widely used in high throughput screening due to their advantages of ease use, low cost and so on. However, imcomplete knockdown activity and off-target effect hindered their utility. More recently, CRISPR/Cas9 technology is becoming a robust tool for genome editing in diverse cells or animals, since it could generate a gene mutation in a target-specific manner. In this review, we first summarize the characterization of CRISPR/Cas9 and make comparison with traditional genetic tools, then describe recent achievements of genetic screen in several model organisms using CRISPR/Cas9, finally discuss on its future challenges and opportunities. PMID:27232487

  7. QTL mapping using high-throughput sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping in plants dates to the 1980’s, but earlier studies were often hindered by the expense and time required to identify large numbers of polymorphic genetic markers that differentiated the parental genotypes and then to genotype them on large segregating mapping po...

  8. High-Throughput Pharmacokinetics for Environmental Chemicals (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput screening (HTS) promises to allow prioritization of thousands of environmental chemicals with little or no in vivo information. For bioactivity identified by HTS, toxicokinetic (TK) models are essential to predict exposure thresholds below which no significant bio...

  9. Evaluating Rapid Models for High-Throughput Exposure Forecasting (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput exposure screening models can provide quantitative predictions for thousands of chemicals; however these predictions must be systematically evaluated for predictive ability. Without the capability to make quantitative, albeit uncertain, forecasts of exposure, the ...

  10. MIPHENO: Data normalization for high throughput metabolic analysis.

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput methodologies such as microarrays, mass spectrometry and plate-based small molecule screens are increasingly used to facilitate discoveries from gene function to drug candidate identification. These large-scale experiments are typically carried out over the course...

  11. HIGH THROUGHPUT ASSESSMENTS OF CONVENTIONAL AND ALTERNATIVE COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput approaches for quantifying chemical hazard, exposure, and sustainability have the potential to dramatically impact the pace and nature of risk assessments. Integrated evaluation strategies developed at the US EPA incorporate inherency,bioactivity,bioavailability, ...

  12. High throughput growth and characterization of thin film materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Samuel S.

    2013-09-01

    It usually takes more than 10 years for a new material from initial research to its first commercial application. Therefore, accelerating the pace of discovery of new materials is critical to tackling challenges in areas ranging from clean energy to national security. As discovery of new materials has not kept pace with the product design cycles in many sectors of industry, there is a pressing need to develop and utilize high throughput screening and discovery technologies for the growth and characterization of new materials. This article presents two distinctive types of high throughput thin film material growth approaches, along with a number of high throughput characterization techniques, established in the author's group. These approaches include a second-generation "discrete" combinatorial semiconductor discovery technology that enables the creation of arrays of individually separated thin film semiconductor materials of different compositions, and a "continuous" high throughput thin film material screening technology that enables the realization of ternary alloy libraries with continuously varying elemental ratios.

  13. High-throughput sequencing of cytosine methylation in plant DNA

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cytosine methylation is a significant and widespread regulatory factor in plant systems. Methods for the high-throughput sequencing of methylation have allowed a greatly improved characterisation of the methylome. Here we discuss currently available methods for generation and analysis of high-throughput sequencing of methylation data. We also discuss the results previously acquired through sequencing plant methylomes, and highlight remaining challenges in this field. PMID:23758782

  14. Forward and reverse genetic analysis of microtubule motors in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Pazour, G J; Witman, G B

    2000-12-01

    The ability to integrate biochemical, cell biological, and genetic approaches makes Chlamydomonas reinhardtii the premier model organism for studies of the eukaryotic flagellum and its associated molecular motors. Hundreds of motility mutations have been identified in Chlamydomonas, including many that affect dyneins and kinesins. These mutations have yielded much information on the structure and function of the motors as well as the roles of individual subunits within the motors. The development of insertional mutagenesis has opened the door to powerful new approaches for genetic analysis in Chlamydomonas. Insertional mutants are created by transforming cells with DNA-containing selectable markers. The DNA is randomly integrated throughout the genome and usually deletes part of the chromosome at the site of insertion, thereby creating mutations that are marked by the integrated DNA. These mutations can be used for forward genetic approaches where one characterizes a mutant phenotype and then clones the relevant gene using the integrated DNA as a tag. The insertional mutants also may be used in a reverse genetic approach in which mutants lacking a gene of interest are identified by DNA hybridization. We describe methods to generate and characterize insertional mutants, using mutations that affect the outer dynein arm as examples. PMID:11133235

  15. High Throughput Danio Rerio Energy Expenditure Assay.

    PubMed

    Williams, Savannah Y; Renquist, Benjamin J

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish are an important model organism with inherent advantages that have the potential to make zebrafish a widely applied model for the study of energy homeostasis and obesity. The small size of zebrafish allows for assays on embryos to be conducted in a 96- or 384-well plate format, Morpholino and CRISPR based technologies promote ease of genetic manipulation, and drug treatment by bath application is viable. Moreover, zebrafish are ideal for forward genetic screens allowing for novel gene discovery. Given the relative novelty of zebrafish as a model for obesity, it is necessary to develop tools that fully exploit these benefits. Herein, we describe a method to measure energy expenditure in thousands of embryonic zebrafish simultaneously. We have developed a whole animal microplate platform in which we use 96-well plates to isolate individual fish and we assess cumulative NADH2 production using the commercially available cell culture viability reagent alamarBlue. In poikilotherms the relationship between NADH2 production and energy expenditure is tightly linked. This energy expenditure assay creates the potential to rapidly screen pharmacological or genetic manipulations that directly alter energy expenditure or alter the response to an applied drug (e.g. insulin sensitizers). PMID:26863590

  16. Development of an improved reverse genetics system for Akabane bunyavirus.

    PubMed

    Takenaka-Uema, Akiko; Sugiura, Keita; Bangphoomi, Norasuthi; Shioda, Chieko; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Kato, Kentaro; Haga, Takeshi; Murakami, Shin; Akashi, Hiroomi; Horimoto, Taisuke

    2016-06-01

    Akabane disease, caused by the insect-transmitted Akabane virus (AKAV), affects livestock by causing life-threatening deformities or mortality of fetuses. Therefore, Akabane disease has led to notable economic losses in numerous countries, including Japan. In this short communication, a new T7 RNA polymerase-based AKAV reverse genetics system was developed. Using this system, in which three plasmids transcribing antigenomic RNAs were transfected into cells stably expressing T7 polymerase, we successfully reconstituted the live attenuated vaccine TS-C2 strain (named rTTT), and also generated a mutant AKAV (rTTTΔNSs) that lacked the gene encoding the nonstructural NSs protein, which is regarded as a virulence factor. Analysis of growth kinetics revealed that rTTTΔNSs grew at a much slower rate than the rTTT and TS-C2 virus. These results suggest that our established reverse genetics system is a powerful tool that can be used for AKAV vaccine studies with gene-manipulated viruses. PMID:26927704

  17. High-Throughput CRISPR Typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex and Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Sola, Christophe; Abadia, Edgar; Le Hello, Simon; Weill, François-Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Spoligotyping was developed almost 18 years ago and still remains a popular first-lane genotyping technique to identify and subtype Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) clinical isolates at a phylogeographic level. For other pathogens, such as Salmonella enterica, recent studies suggest that specifically designed spoligotyping techniques could be interesting for public health purposes. Spoligotyping was in its original format a reverse line-blot hybridization method using capture probes designed on "spacers" and attached to a membrane's surface and a PCR product obtained from clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs). Cowan et al. and Fabre et al. were the first to propose a high-throughput Spoligotyping method based on microbeads for MTC and S. enterica serotype Typhimurium, respectively. The main advantages of the high-throughput Spoligotyping techniques we describe here are their low cost, their robustness, and the existence (at least for MTC) of very large databases that allow comparisons between spoligotypes from anywhere. PMID:25981468

  18. High-throughput sequencing for 1-methyladenosine (m(1)A) mapping in RNA.

    PubMed

    Tserovski, Lyudmil; Marchand, Virginie; Hauenschild, Ralf; Blanloeil-Oillo, Florence; Helm, Mark; Motorin, Yuri

    2016-09-01

    Detection and mapping of modified nucleotides in RNAs is a difficult and laborious task. Several physico-chemical approaches based on differential properties of modified nucleotides can be used, however, most of these methods do not allow high-throughput analysis. Here we describe in details a method for mapping of rather common 1-methyladenosine (m(1)A) residues using high-throughput next generation sequencing (NGS). Since m(1)A residues block primer extension during reverse transcription (RT), the accumulation of abortive products as well as the nucleotide misincorporation can be detected in the sequencing data. The described library preparation protocol allows to capture both types of cDNA products essential for further bioinformatic analysis. We demonstrate that m(1)A residues produce characteristic arrest and mismatch rates and combination of both can be used for their detection as well as for discrimination of m(1)A from other modified A residues present in RNAs. PMID:26922842

  19. High-throughput olfactory conditioning and memory retention test show variation in Nasonia parasitic wasps.

    PubMed

    Hoedjes, K M; Steidle, J L M; Werren, J H; Vet, L E M; Smid, H M

    2012-10-01

    Most of our knowledge on learning and memory formation results from extensive studies on a small number of animal species. Although features and cellular pathways of learning and memory are highly similar in this diverse group of species, there are also subtle differences. Closely related species of parasitic wasps display substantial variation in memory dynamics and can be instrumental to understanding both the adaptive benefit of and mechanisms underlying this variation. Parasitic wasps of the genus Nasonia offer excellent opportunities for multidisciplinary research on this topic. Genetic and genomic resources available for Nasonia are unrivaled among parasitic wasps, providing tools for genetic dissection of mechanisms that cause differences in learning. This study presents a robust, high-throughput method for olfactory conditioning of Nasonia using a host encounter as reward. A T-maze olfactometer facilitates high-throughput memory retention testing and employs standardized odors of equal detectability, as quantified by electroantennogram recordings. Using this setup, differences in memory retention between Nasonia species were shown. In both Nasonia vitripennis and Nasonia longicornis, memory was observed up to at least 5 days after a single conditioning trial, whereas Nasonia giraulti lost its memory after 2 days. This difference in learning may be an adaptation to species-specific differences in ecological factors, for example, host preference. The high-throughput methods for conditioning and memory retention testing are essential tools to study both ultimate and proximate factors that cause variation in learning and memory formation in Nasonia and other parasitic wasp species. PMID:22804968

  20. Infra-red Thermography for High Throughput Field Phenotyping in Solanum tuberosum

    PubMed Central

    Prashar, Ankush; Yildiz, Jane; McNicol, James W.; Bryan, Glenn J.; Jones, Hamlyn G.

    2013-01-01

    The rapid development of genomic technology has made high throughput genotyping widely accessible but the associated high throughput phenotyping is now the major limiting factor in genetic analysis of traits. This paper evaluates the use of thermal imaging for the high throughput field phenotyping of Solanum tuberosum for differences in stomatal behaviour. A large multi-replicated trial of a potato mapping population was used to investigate the consistency in genotypic rankings across different trials and across measurements made at different times of day and on different days. The results confirmed a high degree of consistency between the genotypic rankings based on relative canopy temperature on different occasions. Genotype discrimination was enhanced both through normalising data by expressing genotype temperatures as differences from image means and through the enhanced replication obtained by using overlapping images. A Monte Carlo simulation approach was used to confirm the magnitude of genotypic differences that it is possible to discriminate. The results showed a clear negative association between canopy temperature and final tuber yield for this population, when grown under ample moisture supply. We have therefore established infrared thermography as an easy, rapid and non-destructive screening method for evaluating large population trials for genetic analysis. We also envisage this approach as having great potential for evaluating plant response to stress under field conditions. PMID:23762433

  1. High-throughput olfactory conditioning and memory retention test show variation in Nasonia parasitic wasps

    PubMed Central

    Hoedjes, K M; Steidle, J L M; Werren, J H; Vet, L E M; Smid, H M

    2012-01-01

    Most of our knowledge on learning and memory formation results from extensive studies on a small number of animal species. Although features and cellular pathways of learning and memory are highly similar in this diverse group of species, there are also subtle differences. Closely related species of parasitic wasps display substantial variation in memory dynamics and can be instrumental to understanding both the adaptive benefit of and mechanisms underlying this variation. Parasitic wasps of the genus Nasonia offer excellent opportunities for multidisciplinary research on this topic. Genetic and genomic resources available for Nasonia are unrivaled among parasitic wasps, providing tools for genetic dissection of mechanisms that cause differences in learning. This study presents a robust, high-throughput method for olfactory conditioning of Nasonia using a host encounter as reward. A T-maze olfactometer facilitates high-throughput memory retention testing and employs standardized odors of equal detectability, as quantified by electroantennogram recordings. Using this setup, differences in memory retention between Nasonia species were shown. In both Nasonia vitripennis and Nasonia longicornis, memory was observed up to at least 5 days after a single conditioning trial, whereas Nasonia giraulti lost its memory after 2 days. This difference in learning may be an adaptation to species-specific differences in ecological factors, for example, host preference. The high-throughput methods for conditioning and memory retention testing are essential tools to study both ultimate and proximate factors that cause variation in learning and memory formation in Nasonia and other parasitic wasp species. PMID:22804968

  2. Reverse Genetics System for Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Benjamin; Li, Ping; Zhang, Shuo; Li, Aqian; Liang, Mifang; Li, Dexin

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) is an emerging tick-borne pathogen that was first reported in China in 2009. Phylogenetic analysis of the viral genome showed that SFTS virus represents a new lineage within the Phlebovirus genus, distinct from the existing sandfly fever and Uukuniemi virus groups, in the family Bunyaviridae. SFTS disease is characterized by gastrointestinal symptoms, chills, joint pain, myalgia, thrombocytopenia, leukocytopenia, and some hemorrhagic manifestations with a case fatality rate of about 2 to 15%. Here we report the development of reverse genetics systems to study STFSV replication and pathogenesis. We developed and optimized functional T7 polymerase-based M- and S-segment minigenome assays, which revealed errors in the published terminal sequences of the S segment of the Hubei 29 strain of SFTSV. We then generated recombinant viruses from cloned cDNAs prepared to the antigenomic RNAs both of the minimally passaged virus (HB29) and of a cell culture-adapted strain designated HB29pp. The growth properties, pattern of viral protein synthesis, and subcellular localization of viral N and NSs proteins of wild-type HB29pp (wtHB29pp) and recombinant HB29pp viruses were indistinguishable. We also show that the viruses fail to shut off host cell polypeptide production. The robust reverse genetics system described will be a valuable tool for the design of therapeutics and the development of killed and attenuated vaccines against this important emerging pathogen. IMPORTANCE SFTSV and related tick-borne phleboviruses such as Heartland virus are emerging viruses shown to cause severe disease in humans in the Far East and the United States, respectively. Study of these novel pathogens would be facilitated by technology to manipulate these viruses in a laboratory setting using reverse genetics. Here, we report the generation of infectious SFTSV from cDNA clones and demonstrate that the behavior of recombinant viruses

  3. MPIC: a high-throughput analytical method for multiple DNA targets.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jinchao; Yang, Litao; Chen, Lili; Morisset, Dany; Li, Xiang; Pan, Liangwen; Zhang, Dabing

    2011-03-01

    We describe the development of a novel combined approach for high-throughput analysis of multiple DNA targets based on multiplex Microdroplet PCR Implemented Capillary gel electrophoresis (MPIC), a two-step PCR amplification strategy. In the first step, the multiple target DNAs are preamplified using bipartite primers attached with universal tail sequences on their 5'-ends. Then, the preamplified templates are compartmentalized individually in the microdroplet of the PCR system, and multiple targets can be amplified in parallel, employing primers targeting their universal sequences. Subsequently, the resulting multiple products are analyzed by capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE). Using genetically modified organism (GMO) analysis as a model, 24 DNA targets can be simultaneously detected with a relative limit of detection of 0.1% (w/w) and absolute limit of detection of 39 target DNA copies. The described system provides a promising alternative for high-throughput analysis of multiple DNA targets. PMID:21291179

  4. A high throughput droplet based electroporation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Byeongsun; Ahn, Myungmo; Im, Dojin; Kang, Inseok

    2014-11-01

    Delivery of exogenous genetic materials across the cell membrane is a powerful and popular research tool for bioengineering. Among conventional non-viral DNA delivery methods, electroporation (EP) is one of the most widely used technologies and is a standard lab procedure in molecular biology. We developed a novel digital microfluidic electroporation system which has higher efficiency of transgene expression and better cell viability than that of conventional EP techniques. We present the successful performance of digital EP system for transformation of various cell lines by investigating effects of the EP conditions such as electric pulse voltage, number, and duration on the cell viability and transfection efficiency in comparison with a conventional bulk EP system. Through the numerical analysis, we have also calculated the electric field distribution around the cells precisely to verify the effect of the electric field on the high efficiency of the digital EP system. Furthermore, the parallelization of the EP processes has been developed to increase the transformation productivity. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning (Grant Number: 2013R1A1A2011956).

  5. A multi-layer microchip for high-throughput single-cell gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao

    2016-09-01

    Microfluidics or Bio-MEMS technology offers significant advantages for performing high-throughput screens and sensitive assays. The ability to correlate single-cell genetic information with cellular phenotypes is of great importance to biology and medicine because it holds the potential to gain insight into disease pathways that is unavailable from ensemble measurements. Previously, we reported two kinds of prototypes for integrated on-chip gene expression profiling at the single-cell level, and the throughput was designed to be 6. In this work, we present a five-layer microfluidic system for parallelized, rapid, quantitative analysis of RNA templates with low abundance at the single-cell level. The microchip contains two multiplexors and one partitioning valve group, and it leverages a matrix (6 × 8) of quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) units formed by a set of parallel microchannels concurrently controlled by elastomeric pneumatic valves, thereby enabling parallelized handling and processing of biomolecules in a simplified operation procedure. A comprehensive metallic nanofilm with passivation layer is used to run polymerase chain reaction (PCR) temperature cycles. To demonstrate the utility of the approach, artificial synthesized RNA templates (XenoRNA) and mRNA templates from single cells are employed to perform the 48-readout RT-qPCRs. The PCR products are imaged on a fluorescence microscope using a hydrolysis probe/primer set (TaqMan). Fluorescent intensities of passive reference dye and a fluorescein amidite reporter dye are acquired and measured at the end of PCR cycles. PMID:27255567

  6. Genetics of neurodegenerative diseases: insights from high-throughput resequencing

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Shoji

    2010-01-01

    During the past three decades, we have witnessed remarkable advances in our understanding of the molecular etiologies of hereditary neurodegenerative diseases, which have been accomplished by ‘positional cloning’ strategies. The discoveries of the causative genes for hereditary neurodegenerative diseases accelerated not only the studies on the pathophysiologic mechanisms of diseases, but also the studies for the development of disease-modifying therapies. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) based on the ‘common disease–common variants hypothesis’ are currently undertaken to elucidate disease-relevant alleles. Although GWAS have successfully revealed numerous susceptibility genes for neurodegenerative diseases, odds ratios associated with risk alleles are generally low and account for only a small proportion of estimated heritability. Recent studies have revealed that the effect sizes of the disease-relevant alleles that are identified based on comprehensive resequencing of large data sets of Parkinson disease are substantially larger than those identified by GWAS. These findings strongly argue for the role of the ‘common disease–multiple rare variants hypothesis’ in sporadic neurodegenerative diseases. Given the rapidly improving technologies of next-generation sequencing next-generation sequencing (NGS), we expect that NGS will eventually enable us to identify all the variants in an individual's personal genome, in particular, clinically relevant alleles. Beyond this, whole genome resequencing is expected to bring a paradigm shift in clinical practice, where clinical practice including diagnosis and decision-making for appropriate therapeutic procedures is based on the ‘personal genome’. The personal genome era is expected to be realized in the near future, and society needs to prepare for this new era. PMID:20413655

  7. Marker reconstitution mutagenesis: a simple and efficient reverse genetic approach.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xie; Huang, Junqi; Padmanabhan, Anup; Bakka, Kavya; Bao, Yun; Tan, Brenda Yuelin; Cande, W Zacheus; Balasubramanian, Mohan K

    2011-03-01

    A novel reverse genetic approach termed 'marker reconstitution mutagenesis' was designed to generate mutational allelic series in genes of interest. This approach consists of two simple steps which utilize two selective markers. First, using one selective marker, a partial fragment of another selective marker gene is inserted adjacently to a gene of interest by homologous recombination. Second, random mutations are introduced precisely into the gene of interest, together with the reconstitution of the latter selective marker by homologous recombination. This approach was successfully tested for several genes in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. It circumvents the problems encountered with other methods and should be adaptable to any organism that incorporates exogenous DNA by homologous recombination. PMID:21360732

  8. Forecasting Ecological Genomics: High-Tech Animal Instrumentation Meets High-Throughput Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Shafer, Aaron B A; Northrup, Joseph M; Wikelski, Martin; Wittemyer, George; Wolf, Jochen B W

    2016-01-01

    Recent advancements in animal tracking technology and high-throughput sequencing are rapidly changing the questions and scope of research in the biological sciences. The integration of genomic data with high-tech animal instrumentation comes as a natural progression of traditional work in ecological genetics, and we provide a framework for linking the separate data streams from these technologies. Such a merger will elucidate the genetic basis of adaptive behaviors like migration and hibernation and advance our understanding of fundamental ecological and evolutionary processes such as pathogen transmission, population responses to environmental change, and communication in natural populations. PMID:26745372

  9. Forecasting Ecological Genomics: High-Tech Animal Instrumentation Meets High-Throughput Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Shafer, Aaron B. A.; Northrup, Joseph M.; Wikelski, Martin; Wittemyer, George; Wolf, Jochen B. W.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advancements in animal tracking technology and high-throughput sequencing are rapidly changing the questions and scope of research in the biological sciences. The integration of genomic data with high-tech animal instrumentation comes as a natural progression of traditional work in ecological genetics, and we provide a framework for linking the separate data streams from these technologies. Such a merger will elucidate the genetic basis of adaptive behaviors like migration and hibernation and advance our understanding of fundamental ecological and evolutionary processes such as pathogen transmission, population responses to environmental change, and communication in natural populations. PMID:26745372

  10. Perspective: Data infrastructure for high throughput materials discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeif, E. A.; Kroenlein, K.

    2016-05-01

    Computational capability has enabled materials design to evolve from trial-and-error towards more informed methodologies that require large amounts of data. Expert-designed tools and their underlying databases facilitate modern-day high throughput computational methods. Standard data formats and communication standards increase the impact of traditional data, and applying these technologies to a high throughput experimental design provides dense, targeted materials data that are valuable for material discovery. Integrated computational materials engineering requires both experimentally and computationally derived data. Harvesting these comprehensively requires different methods of varying degrees of automation to accommodate variety and volume. Issues of data quality persist independent of type.

  11. Implementation of high throughput experimentation techniques for kinetic reaction testing.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Anton J

    2012-02-01

    Successful implementation of High throughput Experimentation (EE) tools has resulted in their increased acceptance as essential tools in chemical, petrochemical and polymer R&D laboratories. This article provides a number of concrete examples of EE systems, which have been designed and successfully implemented in studies, which focus on deriving reaction kinetic data. The implementation of high throughput EE tools for performing kinetic studies of both catalytic and non-catalytic systems results in a significantly faster acquisition of high-quality kinetic modeling data, required to quantitatively predict the behavior of complex, multistep reactions. PMID:21902639

  12. High-throughput screening for modulators of cellular contractile force†

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Young; Zhou, Enhua H.; Tambe, Dhananjay; Chen, Bohao; Lavoie, Tera; Dowell, Maria; Simeonov, Anton; Maloney, David J.; Marinkovic, Aleksandar; Tschumperlin, Daniel J.; Burger, Stephanie; Frykenberg, Matthew; Butler, James P.; Stamer, W. Daniel; Johnson, Mark; Solway, Julian; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    When cellular contractile forces are central to pathophysiology, these forces comprise a logical target of therapy. Nevertheless, existing high-throughput screens are limited to upstream signalling intermediates with poorly defined relationships to such a physiological endpoint. Using cellular force as the target, here we report a new screening technology and demonstrate its applications using human airway smooth muscle cells in the context of asthma and Schlemm's canal endothelial cells in the context of glaucoma. This approach identified several drug candidates for both asthma and glaucoma. We attained rates of 1000 compounds per screening day, thus establishing a force-based cellular platform for high-throughput drug discovery. PMID:25953078

  13. Workflow for High Throughput Screening of Gas Sensing Materials

    PubMed Central

    Koplin, Tobias J.; Siemons, Maike; Océn-Valéntin, César; Sanders, Daniel; Simon, Ulrich

    2006-01-01

    The workflow of a high throughput screening setup for the rapid identification of new and improved sensor materials is presented. The polyol method was applied to prepare nanoparticular metal oxides as base materials, which were functionalised by surface doping. Using multi-electrode substrates and high throughput impedance spectroscopy (HT-IS) a wide range of materials could be screened in a short time. Applying HT-IS in search of new selective gas sensing materials a NO2-tolerant NO sensing material with reduced sensitivities towards other test gases was identified based on iridium doped zinc oxide. Analogous behaviour was observed for iridium doped indium oxide.

  14. C. elegans in high-throughput drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    O’Reilly, Linda P.; Luke, Cliff J.; Perlmutter, David H.; Silverman, Gary A.; Pak, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    C. elegans has proven to be a useful model organism for investigating molecular and cellular aspects of numerous human diseases. More recently, investigators have explored the use of this organism as a tool for drug discovery. Although earlier drug screens were labor-intensive and low in throughput, recent advances in high-throughput liquid workflows, imaging platforms and data analysis software have made C. elegans a viable option for automated high-throughput drug screens. This review will outline the evolution of C. elegans-based drug screening, discuss the inherent challenges of using C. elegans, and highlight recent technological advances that have paved the way for future drug screens. PMID:24333896

  15. Advances in high throughput DNA sequence data compression.

    PubMed

    Sardaraz, Muhammad; Tahir, Muhammad; Ikram, Ataul Aziz

    2016-06-01

    Advances in high throughput sequencing technologies and reduction in cost of sequencing have led to exponential growth in high throughput DNA sequence data. This growth has posed challenges such as storage, retrieval, and transmission of sequencing data. Data compression is used to cope with these challenges. Various methods have been developed to compress genomic and sequencing data. In this article, we present a comprehensive review of compression methods for genome and reads compression. Algorithms are categorized as referential or reference free. Experimental results and comparative analysis of various methods for data compression are presented. Finally, key challenges and research directions in DNA sequence data compression are highlighted. PMID:26846812

  16. Substrate independent ATPase activity may complicate high throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Tuntland, Micheal L; Fung, L W-M

    2016-10-01

    Inorganic phosphate release, [Pi], is often measured in an enzymatic reaction in a high throughput setting. Based on the published mechanism, we designed a protocol for our screening for inhibitors of SAICAR synthetase (PurC), and we found a gradual increase in [Pi] in positive control samples over the course of the day. Further investigation indicated that hydrolysis of ATP catalyzed by PurC, rather than substrate-related phosphate release, was responsible for a partial contribution to the signals in the control samples. Thus substrate-independent ATPase activity may complicate high throughput screening. PMID:27430931

  17. High throughput drug discovery with ESI-FTICR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sannes-Lowery, Kristin A.; Cummins, Lendell L.; Chen, Shuo; Drader, Jared J.; Hofstadler, Steven A.

    2004-11-01

    Ribonucleic acids (RNA) are an attractive target for drug discovery since they play critical roles in cellular functions. Because small structured subdomains are known to mimic the behavior of the entire RNA, it is possible to design RNA drug targets that are amenable to interrogation by high performance mass spectrometry. We have developed a high throughput drug discovery platform that uses electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometry to investigate ligand binding to structured RNA drug targets. This assay is called multitarget affinity/specificity screening (MASS). Using MASS, we show that it is possible to screen synthetic and natural product libraries in a high throughput and robust manner.

  18. High-throughput genotyping of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated mutants using fluorescent PCR-capillary gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Ramlee, Muhammad Khairul; Yan, Tingdong; Cheung, Alice M S; Chuah, Charles T H; Li, Shang

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the engineering of sequence-specific synthetic nucleases provide enormous opportunities for genetic manipulation of gene expression in order to study their cellular function in vivo. However, current genotyping methods to detect these programmable nuclease-induced insertion/deletion (indel) mutations in targeted human cells are not compatible for high-throughput screening of knockout clones due to inherent limitations and high cost. Here, we describe an efficient method of genotyping clonal CRISPR/Cas9-mediated mutants in a high-throughput manner involving the use of a direct lysis buffer to extract crude genomic DNA straight from cells in culture, and fluorescent PCR coupled with capillary gel electrophoresis. This technique also allows for genotyping of multiplexed gene targeting in a single clone. Overall, this time- and cost-saving technique is able to circumvent the limitations of current genotyping methods and support high-throughput screening of nuclease-induced mutants. PMID:26498861

  19. High-throughput genotyping of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated mutants using fluorescent PCR-capillary gel electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Ramlee, Muhammad Khairul; Yan, Tingdong; Cheung, Alice M. S.; Chuah, Charles T. H.; Li, Shang

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the engineering of sequence-specific synthetic nucleases provide enormous opportunities for genetic manipulation of gene expression in order to study their cellular function in vivo. However, current genotyping methods to detect these programmable nuclease-induced insertion/deletion (indel) mutations in targeted human cells are not compatible for high-throughput screening of knockout clones due to inherent limitations and high cost. Here, we describe an efficient method of genotyping clonal CRISPR/Cas9-mediated mutants in a high-throughput manner involving the use of a direct lysis buffer to extract crude genomic DNA straight from cells in culture, and fluorescent PCR coupled with capillary gel electrophoresis. This technique also allows for genotyping of multiplexed gene targeting in a single clone. Overall, this time- and cost-saving technique is able to circumvent the limitations of current genotyping methods and support high-throughput screening of nuclease-induced mutants. PMID:26498861

  20. High-throughput analysis of yeast replicative aging using a microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Jo, Myeong Chan; Liu, Wei; Gu, Liang; Dang, Weiwei; Qin, Lidong

    2015-07-28

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been an important model for studying the molecular mechanisms of aging in eukaryotic cells. However, the laborious and low-throughput methods of current yeast replicative lifespan assays limit their usefulness as a broad genetic screening platform for research on aging. We address this limitation by developing an efficient, high-throughput microfluidic single-cell analysis chip in combination with high-resolution time-lapse microscopy. This innovative design enables, to our knowledge for the first time, the determination of the yeast replicative lifespan in a high-throughput manner. Morphological and phenotypical changes during aging can also be monitored automatically with a much higher throughput than previous microfluidic designs. We demonstrate highly efficient trapping and retention of mother cells, determination of the replicative lifespan, and tracking of yeast cells throughout their entire lifespan. Using the high-resolution and large-scale data generated from the high-throughput yeast aging analysis (HYAA) chips, we investigated particular longevity-related changes in cell morphology and characteristics, including critical cell size, terminal morphology, and protein subcellular localization. In addition, because of the significantly improved retention rate of yeast mother cell, the HYAA-Chip was capable of demonstrating replicative lifespan extension by calorie restriction. PMID:26170317

  1. Digital fragment analysis of short tandem repeats by high-throughput amplicon sequencing.

    PubMed

    Darby, Brian J; Erickson, Shay F; Hervey, Samuel D; Ellis-Felege, Susan N

    2016-07-01

    High-throughput sequencing has been proposed as a method to genotype microsatellites and overcome the four main technical drawbacks of capillary electrophoresis: amplification artifacts, imprecise sizing, length homoplasy, and limited multiplex capability. The objective of this project was to test a high-throughput amplicon sequencing approach to fragment analysis of short tandem repeats and characterize its advantages and disadvantages against traditional capillary electrophoresis. We amplified and sequenced 12 muskrat microsatellite loci from 180 muskrat specimens and analyzed the sequencing data for precision of allele calling, propensity for amplification or sequencing artifacts, and for evidence of length homoplasy. Of the 294 total alleles, we detected by sequencing, only 164 alleles would have been detected by capillary electrophoresis as the remaining 130 alleles (44%) would have been hidden by length homoplasy. The ability to detect a greater number of unique alleles resulted in the ability to resolve greater population genetic structure. The primary advantages of fragment analysis by sequencing are the ability to precisely size fragments, resolve length homoplasy, multiplex many individuals and many loci into a single high-throughput run, and compare data across projects and across laboratories (present and future) with minimal technical calibration. A significant disadvantage of fragment analysis by sequencing is that the method is only practical and cost-effective when performed on batches of several hundred samples with multiple loci. Future work is needed to optimize throughput while minimizing costs and to update existing microsatellite allele calling and analysis programs to accommodate sequence-aware microsatellite data. PMID:27386092

  2. High-throughput screening to identify selective inhibitors of microbial sulfate reduction (and beyond)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, H. K.; Coates, J. D.; Deutschbauer, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The selective perturbation of complex microbial ecosystems to predictably influence outcomes in engineered and industrial environments remains a grand challenge for geomicrobiology. In some industrial ecosystems, such as oil reservoirs, sulfate reducing microorganisms (SRM) produce hydrogen sulfide which is toxic, explosive and corrosive. Current strategies to selectively inhibit sulfidogenesis are based on non-specific biocide treatments, bio-competitive exclusion by alternative electron acceptors or sulfate-analogs which are competitive inhibitors or futile/alternative substrates of the sulfate reduction pathway. Despite the economic cost of sulfidogenesis, there has been minimal exploration of the chemical space of possible inhibitory compounds, and very little work has quantitatively assessed the selectivity of putative souring treatments. We have developed a high-throughput screening strategy to target SRM, quantitatively ranked the selectivity and potency of hundreds of compounds and identified previously unrecognized SRM selective inhibitors and synergistic interactions between inhibitors. Once inhibitor selectivity is defined, high-throughput characterization of microbial community structure across compound gradients and identification of fitness determinants using isolate bar-coded transposon mutant libraries can give insights into the genetic mechanisms whereby compounds structure microbial communities. The high-throughput (HT) approach we present can be readily applied to target SRM in diverse environments and more broadly, could be used to identify and quantify the potency and selectivity of inhibitors of a variety of microbial metabolisms. Our findings and approach are relevant for engineering environmental ecosystems and also to understand the role of natural gradients in shaping microbial niche space.

  3. High Throughput Sequence Analysis for Disease Resistance in Maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Preliminary results of a computational analysis of high throughput sequencing data from Zea mays and the fungus Aspergillus are reported. The Illumina Genome Analyzer was used to sequence RNA samples from two strains of Z. mays (Va35 and Mp313) collected over a time course as well as several specie...

  4. Accounting For Uncertainty in The Application Of High Throughput Datasets

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of high throughput screening (HTS) datasets will need to adequately account for uncertainties in the data generation process and propagate these uncertainties through to ultimate use. Uncertainty arises at multiple levels in the construction of predictors using in vitro ...

  5. Environmental Impact on Vascular Development Predicted by High Throughput Screening

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding health risks to embryonic development from exposure to environmental chemicals is a significant challenge given the diverse chemical landscape and paucity of data for most of these compounds. High throughput screening (HTS) in EPA’s ToxCastTM project provides vast d...

  6. Aspirator Gun for High-Throughput Mosquito Bioassays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We describe an innovative aspirator gun designed to transfer anaesthetized mosquitoes directly into glass bioassay tubes. The gun has been used for thousands of transfers with extremely low associated mortality and is the central component of a high-throughput bioassay system. The gun is constructed...

  7. High-throughput screening, predictive modeling and computational embryology

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput screening (HTS) studies are providing a rich source of data that can be applied to profile thousands of chemical compounds for biological activity and potential toxicity. EPA’s ToxCast™ project, and the broader Tox21 consortium, in addition to projects worldwide,...

  8. High-throughput screening, predictive modeling and computational embryology - Abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput screening (HTS) studies are providing a rich source of data that can be applied to chemical profiling to address sensitivity and specificity of molecular targets, biological pathways, cellular and developmental processes. EPA’s ToxCast project is testing 960 uniq...

  9. Aspirator gun for high-throughput mosquito bioassays.

    PubMed

    Aldridge, Robert L; Wynn, W Wayne; Britch, Seth C; Linthicum, Kenneth J

    2012-03-01

    We describe an innovative aspirator gun designed to transfer individual anesthetized mosquitoes directly into glass bioassay tubes. The gun has been used for thousands of transfers with extremely low associated mortality and is the central component of a high-throughput bioassay system. The gun is constructed using readily obtainable materials and can be modified for a range of insects. PMID:22533090

  10. High Throughput Assays and Exposure Science (ISES annual meeting)

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput screening (HTS) data characterizing chemical-induced biological activity has been generated for thousands of environmentally-relevant chemicals by the US inter-agency Tox21 and the US EPA ToxCast programs. For a limited set of chemicals, bioactive concentrations r...

  11. High Throughput Exposure Estimation Using NHANES Data (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the ExpoCast project, high throughput (HT) exposure models enable rapid screening of large numbers of chemicals for exposure potential. Evaluation of these models requires empirical exposure data and due to the paucity of human metabolism/exposure data such evaluations includ...

  12. GENO PROFILER: BATCH PROCESSING OF HIGH THROUGHPUT CAPILLARY FINGERPRINTING DATA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High-throughput fingerprinting techniques employing capillary electrophoresis place new demands on the editing of fingerprint files for the downstream contig assembly program, FPC. A cross-platform software application, GenoProfiler, was developed for automated editing of sized fingerprinting profil...

  13. New High Throughput Methods to Estimate Chemical Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has made many recent advances in high throughput bioactivity testing. However, concurrent advances in rapid, quantitative prediction of human and ecological exposures have been lacking, despite the clear importance of both measures for a risk-based approach to prioritizing an...

  14. Fully Bayesian Analysis of High-throughput Targeted Metabolomics Assays

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput metabolomic assays that allow simultaneous targeted screening of hundreds of metabolites have recently become available in kit form. Such assays provide a window into understanding changes to biochemical pathways due to chemical exposure or disease, and are usefu...

  15. Reverse genetics mediated recovery of infectious murine norovirus.

    PubMed

    Arias, Armando; Ureña, Luis; Thorne, Lucy; Yunus, Muhammad A; Goodfellow, Ian

    2012-01-01

    efficiency of viral recovery by conventional reverse genetics approaches. Here we report two different strategies based on the generation of murine norovirus-1 (referred to as MNV herewith) transcripts capped at the 5' end. One of the methods involves both in vitro synthesis and capping of viral RNA, whereas the second approach entails the transcription of MNV cDNA in cells expressing T7 RNA polymerase. The availability of these reverse genetics systems for the study of MNV and a small animal model has provided an unprecedented ability to dissect the role of viral sequences in replication and pathogenesis (15-17). PMID:22760450

  16. High-throughput sorting of mosquito larvae for laboratory studies and for future vector control interventions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mosquito transgenesis offers new promises for the genetic control of vector-borne infectious diseases such as malaria and dengue fever. Genetic control strategies require the release of large number of male mosquitoes into field populations, whether they are based on the use of sterile males (sterile insect technique, SIT) or on introducing genetic traits conferring refractoriness to disease transmission (population replacement). However, the current absence of high-throughput techniques for sorting different mosquito populations impairs the application of these control measures. Methods A method was developed to generate large mosquito populations of the desired sex and genotype. This method combines flow cytometry and the use of Anopheles gambiae transgenic lines that differentially express fluorescent markers in males and females. Results Fluorescence-assisted sorting allowed single-step isolation of homozygous transgenic mosquitoes from a mixed population. This method was also used to select wild-type males only with high efficiency and accuracy, a highly desirable tool for genetic control strategies where the release of transgenic individuals may be problematic. Importantly, sorted males showed normal mating ability compared to their unsorted brothers. Conclusions The developed method will greatly facilitate both laboratory studies of mosquito vectorial capacity requiring high-throughput approaches and future field interventions in the fight against infectious disease vectors. PMID:22929810

  17. Establishment of an entirely plasmid-based reverse genetics system for Bluetongue virus.

    PubMed

    Pretorius, Jakobus M; Huismans, Henk; Theron, Jacques

    2015-12-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV), the type species of the genus Orbivirus within the family Reoviridae, has a genome consisting of 10 linear double-stranded RNA genome segments. Current reverse genetics approaches for engineering the BTV genome rely upon in vitro synthesis of capped RNA transcripts from cloned cDNA corresponding to viral genome segments. In an effort to expand the utility of BTV reverse genetics, we constructed a reverse genetics vector containing a T7 RNA polymerase promoter, hepatitis delta ribozyme sequence and T7 RNA polymerase terminator sequence. Viable virus was recovered following transfection of mammalian cells, expressing T7 RNA polymerase, with 10 plasmid constructs representing the cloned BTV-1 genome. Furthermore, the plasmid-based reverse genetics system was used successfully to isolate viable cross-serotype reassortant viruses and a mutant virus containing a defined mutation in the replicating viral genome. The new reverse genetics platform established here for BTV is likely applicable to other orbiviruses. PMID:26408855

  18. High throughput modular chambers for rapid evaluation of anesthetic sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yi; Chen, Jingqiu; Pruckmayr, Gregory; Baumgardner, James E; Eckmann, David M; Eckenhoff, Roderic G; Kelz, Max B

    2006-01-01

    Background Anesthetic sensitivity is determined by the interaction of multiple genes. Hence, a dissection of genetic contributors would be aided by precise and high throughput behavioral screens. Traditionally, anesthetic phenotyping has addressed only induction of anesthesia, evaluated with dose-response curves, while ignoring potentially important data on emergence from anesthesia. Methods We designed and built a controlled environment apparatus to permit rapid phenotyping of twenty-four mice simultaneously. We used the loss of righting reflex to indicate anesthetic-induced unconsciousness. After fitting the data to a sigmoidal dose-response curve with variable slope, we calculated the MACLORR (EC50), the Hill coefficient, and the 95% confidence intervals bracketing these values. Upon termination of the anesthetic, Emergence timeRR was determined and expressed as the mean ± standard error for each inhaled anesthetic. Results In agreement with several previously published reports we find that the MACLORR of halothane, isoflurane, and sevoflurane in 8–12 week old C57BL/6J mice is 0.79% (95% confidence interval = 0.78 – 0.79%), 0.91% (95% confidence interval = 0.90 – 0.93%), and 1.96% (95% confidence interval = 1.94 – 1.97%), respectively. Hill coefficients for halothane, isoflurane, and sevoflurane are 24.7 (95% confidence interval = 19.8 – 29.7%), 19.2 (95% confidence interval = 14.0 – 24.3%), and 33.1 (95% confidence interval = 27.3 – 38.8%), respectively. After roughly 2.5 MACLORR • hr exposures, mice take 16.00 ± 1.07, 6.19 ± 0.32, and 2.15 ± 0.12 minutes to emerge from halothane, isoflurane, and sevoflurane, respectively. Conclusion This system enabled assessment of inhaled anesthetic responsiveness with a higher precision than that previously reported. It is broadly adaptable for delivering an inhaled therapeutic (or toxin) to a population while monitoring its vital signs, motor reflexes, and providing precise control over environmental

  19. Live vaccines for human metapneumovirus designed by reverse genetics.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Ursula J; Nagashima, Kunio; Murphy, Brian R; Collins, Peter L

    2006-10-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) was first described in 2001 and has quickly become recognized as an important cause of respiratory tract disease worldwide, especially in the pediatric population. A vaccine against HMPV is required to prevent severe disease associated with infection in infancy. The primary strategy is to develop a live-attenuated virus for intranasal immunization, which is particularly well suited against a respiratory virus. Reverse genetics provides a means of developing highly characterized 'designer' attenuated vaccine candidates. To date, several promising vaccine candidates have been developed, each using a different mode of attenuation. One candidate involves deletion of the G glycoprotein, providing attenuation that is probably based on reduced efficiency of attachment. A second candidate involves deletion of the M2-2 protein, which participates in regulating RNA synthesis and whose deletion has the advantageous property of upregulating transcription and increasing antigen synthesis. A third candidate involves replacing the P protein gene of HMPV with its counterpart from the related avian metapneumovirus, thereby introducing attenuation owing to its chimeric nature and host range restriction. Another live vaccine strategy involves using an attenuated parainfluenza virus as a vector to express HMPV protective antigens, providing a bivalent pediatric vaccine. Additional modifications to provide improved vaccines will also be discussed. PMID:17181442

  20. Genecentric: a package to uncover graph-theoretic structure in high-throughput epistasis data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background New technology has resulted in high-throughput screens for pairwise genetic interactions in yeast and other model organisms. For each pair in a collection of non-essential genes, an epistasis score is obtained, representing how much sicker (or healthier) the double-knockout organism will be compared to what would be expected from the sickness of the component single knockouts. Recent algorithmic work has identified graph-theoretic patterns in this data that can indicate functional modules, and even sets of genes that may occur in compensatory pathways, such as a BPM-type schema first introduced by Kelley and Ideker. However, to date, any algorithms for finding such patterns in the data were implemented internally, with no software being made publically available. Results Genecentric is a new package that implements a parallelized version of the Leiserson et al. algorithm (J Comput Biol 18:1399-1409, 2011) for generating generalized BPMs from high-throughput genetic interaction data. Given a matrix of weighted epistasis values for a set of double knock-outs, Genecentric returns a list of generalized BPMs that may represent compensatory pathways. Genecentric also has an extension, GenecentricGO, to query FuncAssociate (Bioinformatics 25:3043-3044, 2009) to retrieve GO enrichment statistics on generated BPMs. Python is the only dependency, and our web site provides working examples and documentation. Conclusion We find that Genecentric can be used to find coherent functional and perhaps compensatory gene sets from high throughput genetic interaction data. Genecentric is made freely available for download under the GPLv2 from http://bcb.cs.tufts.edu/genecentric. PMID:23331614

  1. Stable transformation and reverse genetic analysis of Penium margaritaceum: a platform for studies of charophyte green algae, the immediate ancestors of land plants.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Iben; Fei, Zhangjun; Andreas, Amanda; Willats, William G T; Domozych, David S; Rose, Jocelyn K C

    2014-02-01

    The charophyte green algae (CGA, Streptophyta, Viridiplantae) occupy a key phylogenetic position as the immediate ancestors of land plants but, paradoxically, are less well-studied than the other major plant lineages. This is particularly true in the context of functional genomic studies, where the lack of an efficient protocol for their stable genetic transformation has been a major obstacle. Observations of extant CGA species suggest the existence of some of the evolutionary adaptations that had to occur for land colonization; however, to date, there has been no robust experimental platform to address this genetically. We present a protocol for high-throughput Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of Penium margaritaceum, a unicellular CGA species. The versatility of Penium as a model for studying various aspects of plant cell biology and development was illustrated through non-invasive visualization of protein localization and dynamics in living cells. In addition, the utility of RNA interference (RNAi) for reverse genetic studies was demonstrated by targeting genes associated with cell wall modification (pectin methylesterase) and biosynthesis (cellulose synthase). This provided evidence supporting current models of cell wall assembly and inter-polymer interactions that were based on studies of land plants, but in this case using direct observation in vivo. This new functional genomics platform has broad potential applications, including studies of plant organismal biology and the evolutionary innovations required for transition from aquatic to terrestrial habitats. PMID:24308430

  2. Lights, camera, action: high-throughput plant phenotyping is ready for a close-up.

    PubMed

    Fahlgren, Noah; Gehan, Malia A; Baxter, Ivan

    2015-04-01

    Anticipated population growth, shifting demographics, and environmental variability over the next century are expected to threaten global food security. In the face of these challenges, crop yield for food and fuel must be maintained and improved using fewer input resources. In recent years, genetic tools for profiling crop germplasm has benefited from rapid advances in DNA sequencing, and now similar advances are needed to improve the throughput of plant phenotyping. We highlight recent developments in high-throughput plant phenotyping using robotic-assisted imaging platforms and computer vision-assisted analysis tools. PMID:25733069

  3. Novel Arenavirus Entry Inhibitors Discovered by Using a Minigenome Rescue System for High-Throughput Drug Screening

    PubMed Central

    Rathbun, Jessica Y.; Droniou, Magali E.; Damoiseaux, Robert; Haworth, Kevin G.; Henley, Jill E.; Exline, Colin M.; Choe, Hyeryun

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Certain members of the Arenaviridae family are category A agents capable of causing severe hemorrhagic fevers in humans. Specific antiviral treatments do not exist, and the only commonly used drug, ribavirin, has limited efficacy and can cause severe side effects. The discovery and development of new antivirals are inhibited by the biohazardous nature of the viruses, making them a relatively poorly understood group of human pathogens. We therefore adapted a reverse-genetics minigenome (MG) rescue system based on Junin virus, the causative agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever, for high-throughput screening (HTS). The MG rescue system recapitulates all stages of the virus life cycle and enables screening of small-molecule libraries under biosafety containment level 2 (BSL2) conditions. The HTS resulted in the identification of four candidate compounds with potent activity against a broad panel of arenaviruses, three of which were completely novel. The target for all 4 compounds was the stage of viral entry, which positions the compounds as potentially important leads for future development. IMPORTANCE The arenavirus family includes several members that are highly pathogenic, causing acute viral hemorrhagic fevers with high mortality rates. No specific effective treatments exist, and although a vaccine is available for Junin virus, the causative agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever, it is licensed for use only in areas where Argentine hemorrhagic fever is endemic. For these reasons, it is important to identify specific compounds that could be developed as antivirals against these deadly viruses. PMID:26041296

  4. Novel one-step immunoassays to quantify α-synuclein: applications for biomarker development and high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Bidinosti, Michael; Shimshek, Derya R; Mollenhauer, Brit; Marcellin, David; Schweizer, Tatjana; Lotz, Gregor P; Schlossmacher, Michael G; Weiss, Andreas

    2012-09-28

    Familial Parkinson disease (PD) can result from α-synuclein gene multiplication, implicating the reduction of neuronal α-synuclein as a therapeutic target. Moreover, α-synuclein content in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) represents a PD biomarker candidate. However, capture-based assays for α-synuclein quantification in CSF (such as by ELISA) have shown discrepancies and have limited suitability for high-throughput screening. Here, we describe two sensitive, in-solution, time-resolved Förster's resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET)-based immunoassays for total and oligomeric α-synuclein quantification. CSF analysis showed strong concordance for total α-synuclein content between two TR-FRET assays and, in agreement with a previously characterized 36 h protocol-based ELISA, demonstrated lower α-synuclein levels in PD donors. Critically, the assay suitability for high-throughput screening of siRNA constructs and small molecules aimed at reducing endogenous α-synuclein levels was established and validated. In a small-scale proof of concept compound screen using 384 well plates, signals ranged from <30 to >120% of the mean of vehicle-treated cells for molecules known to lower and increase cellular α-synuclein, respectively. Furthermore, a reverse genetic screen of a kinase-directed siRNA library identified seven genes that modulated α-synuclein protein levels (five whose knockdown increased and two that decreased cellular α-synuclein protein). This provides critical new biological insight into cellular pathways regulating α-synuclein steady-state expression that may help guide further drug discovery efforts. Moreover, we describe an inherent limitation in current α-synuclein oligomer detection methodology, a finding that will direct improvement of future assay design. Our one-step TR-FRET-based platform for α-synuclein quantification provides a novel platform with superior performance parameters for the rapid screening of large biomarker cohorts and of

  5. A high-throughput method for GMO multi-detection using a microfluidic dynamic array.

    PubMed

    Brod, Fábio Cristiano Angonesi; van Dijk, Jeroen P; Voorhuijzen, Marleen M; Dinon, Andréia Zilio; Guimarães, Luis Henrique S; Scholtens, Ingrid M J; Arisi, Ana Carolina Maisonnave; Kok, Esther J

    2014-02-01

    The ever-increasing production of genetically modified crops generates a demand for high-throughput DNA-based methods for the enforcement of genetically modified organisms (GMO) labelling requirements. The application of standard real-time PCR will become increasingly costly with the growth of the number of GMOs that is potentially present in an individual sample. The present work presents the results of an innovative approach in genetically modified crops analysis by DNA based methods, which is the use of a microfluidic dynamic array as a high throughput multi-detection system. In order to evaluate the system, six test samples with an increasing degree of complexity were prepared, preamplified and subsequently analysed in the Fluidigm system. Twenty-eight assays targeting different DNA elements, GM events and species-specific reference genes were used in the experiment. The large majority of the assays tested presented expected results. The power of low level detection was assessed and elements present at concentrations as low as 0.06 % were successfully detected. The approach proposed in this work presents the Fluidigm system as a suitable and promising platform for GMO multi-detection. PMID:24357010

  6. Research progress of plant population genomics based on high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yunsheng, Wang

    2016-08-01

    Population genomics, a new paradigm for population genetics, combine the concepts and techniques of genomics with the theoretical system of population genetics and improve our understanding of microevolution through identification of site-specific effect and genome-wide effects using genome-wide polymorphic sites genotypeing. With the appearance and improvement of the next generation high-throughput sequencing technology, the numbers of plant species with complete genome sequences increased rapidly and large scale resequencing has also been carried out in recent years. Parallel sequencing has also been done in some plant species without complete genome sequences. These studies have greatly promoted the development of population genomics and deepened our understanding of the genetic diversity, level of linking disequilibium, selection effect, demographical history and molecular mechanism of complex traits of relevant plant population at a genomic level. In this review, I briely introduced the concept and research methods of population genomics and summarized the research progress of plant population genomics based on high-throughput sequencing. I also discussed the prospect as well as existing problems of plant population genomics in order to provide references for related studies. PMID:27531607

  7. Population admixture may appear to mask, change or reverse genetic effects of genes underlying complex traits.

    PubMed Central

    Deng, H W

    2001-01-01

    Association studies using random population samples are increasingly being applied in the identification and inference of genetic effects of genes underlying complex traits. It is well recognized that population admixture may yield false-positive identification of genetic effects for complex traits. However, it is less well appreciated that population admixture can appear to mask, change, or reverse true genetic effects for genes underlying complex traits. By employing a simple population genetics model, we explore the effects and the conditions of population admixture in masking, changing, or even reversing true genetic effects of genes underlying complex traits. PMID:11729172

  8. Fusion genes and their discovery using high throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Annala, M J; Parker, B C; Zhang, W; Nykter, M

    2013-11-01

    Fusion genes are hybrid genes that combine parts of two or more original genes. They can form as a result of chromosomal rearrangements or abnormal transcription, and have been shown to act as drivers of malignant transformation and progression in many human cancers. The biological significance of fusion genes together with their specificity to cancer cells has made them into excellent targets for molecular therapy. Fusion genes are also used as diagnostic and prognostic markers to confirm cancer diagnosis and monitor response to molecular therapies. High-throughput sequencing has enabled the systematic discovery of fusion genes in a wide variety of cancer types. In this review, we describe the history of fusion genes in cancer and the ways in which fusion genes form and affect cellular function. We also describe computational methodologies for detecting fusion genes from high-throughput sequencing experiments, and the most common sources of error that lead to false discovery of fusion genes. PMID:23376639

  9. Portable thermo-powered high-throughput visual electrochemiluminescence sensor.

    PubMed

    Hao, Nan; Xiong, Meng; Zhang, Jia-dong; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2013-12-17

    This paper describes a portable thermo-powered high-throughput visual electrochemiluminescence (ECL) sensor for the first time. This sensor is composed of a tiny power supply device based on thermal-electrical conversion and a facile prepared array electrode. The ECL detection could be conducted with thermo-power, which is easily accessible. For example, hot water, a bonfire, or a lighted candle enables the detection to be conducted. And the assay can be directly monitored by the naked eye semiquantitatively or smart phones quantitatively. Combined with transparent electrode and array microreactors, a portable high-throughput sensor was achieved. The portable device, avoiding the use of an electrochemical workstation to generate potential and a photomultiplier tube to receive the signal, is not only a valuable addition for traditional methods but also a suitable device for field operation or point-of-care testing. PMID:24215560

  10. High-throughput theoretical design of lithium battery materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi-Gang, Ling; Jian, Gao; Rui-Juan, Xiao; Li-Quan, Chen

    2016-01-01

    The rapid evolution of high-throughput theoretical design schemes to discover new lithium battery materials is reviewed, including high-capacity cathodes, low-strain cathodes, anodes, solid state electrolytes, and electrolyte additives. With the development of efficient theoretical methods and inexpensive computers, high-throughput theoretical calculations have played an increasingly important role in the discovery of new materials. With the help of automatic simulation flow, many types of materials can be screened, optimized and designed from a structural database according to specific search criteria. In advanced cell technology, new materials for next generation lithium batteries are of great significance to achieve performance, and some representative criteria are: higher energy density, better safety, and faster charge/discharge speed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11234013 and 51172274) and the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2015AA034201).

  11. Direct assembling methodologies for high-throughput bioscreening

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Dévora, Jorge I.; Shi, Zhi-dong; Xu, Tao

    2012-01-01

    Over the last few decades, high-throughput (HT) bioscreening, a technique that allows rapid screening of biochemical compound libraries against biological targets, has been widely used in drug discovery, stem cell research, development of new biomaterials, and genomics research. To achieve these ambitions, scaffold-free (or direct) assembly of biological entities of interest has become critical. Appropriate assembling methodologies are required to build an efficient HT bioscreening platform. The development of contact and non-contact assembling systems as a practical solution has been driven by a variety of essential attributes of the bioscreening system, such as miniaturization, high throughput, and high precision. The present article reviews recent progress on these assembling technologies utilized for the construction of HT bioscreening platforms. PMID:22021162

  12. High-throughput screening to identify inhibitors of lysine demethylases

    PubMed Central

    Gale, Molly; Yan, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Lysine demethylases (KDMs) are epigenetic regulators whose dysfunction is implicated in the pathology of many human diseases including various types of cancer, inflammation and X-linked intellectual disability. Particular demethylases have been identified as promising therapeutic targets, and tremendous efforts are being devoted toward developing suitable small-molecule inhibitors for clinical and research use. Several high-throughput screening strategies have been developed to screen for small-molecule inhibitors of KDMs, each with advantages and disadvantages in terms of time, cost, effort, reliability and sensitivity. In this Special Report, we review and evaluate the high-throughput screening methods utilized for discovery of novel small-molecule KDM inhibitors. PMID:25687466

  13. High throughput screening of starch structures using carbohydrate microarrays.

    PubMed

    Tanackovic, Vanja; Rydahl, Maja Gro; Pedersen, Henriette Lodberg; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Shaik, Shahnoor Sultana; Mikkelsen, Maria Dalgaard; Krunic, Susanne Langgaard; Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik; Willats, William George Tycho; Blennow, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    In this study we introduce the starch-recognising carbohydrate binding module family 20 (CBM20) from Aspergillus niger for screening biological variations in starch molecular structure using high throughput carbohydrate microarray technology. Defined linear, branched and phosphorylated maltooligosaccharides, pure starch samples including a variety of different structures with variations in the amylopectin branching pattern, amylose content and phosphate content, enzymatically modified starches and glycogen were included. Using this technique, different important structures, including amylose content and branching degrees could be differentiated in a high throughput fashion. The screening method was validated using transgenic barley grain analysed during development and subjected to germination. Typically, extreme branching or linearity were detected less than normal starch structures. The method offers the potential for rapidly analysing resistant and slowly digested dietary starches. PMID:27468930

  14. Perspectives on high-throughput technologies applied to protein crystallization.

    PubMed

    Saridakis, Emmanuel

    2012-07-01

    High-throughput crystallisation requires the rapid and accurate dispensing of protein and precipitating agent solutions at nanovolumes, but does not end there. The choice of the initial screens is very important, especially with respect to the availability of protein material. Data from previous crystallisation experiments that are scattered in the literature and only partially available in databases have to be analysed in efficient ways that will maximise their utility for designing new screens. A larger portion of crystallisation parameter space should be made accessible to screening, through the use of nucleants and seeding. Observation, assessment and scaling up of the crystallisation trials should be efficiently performed and, finally yet importantly, optimisation of conditions must also be adapted to the high-throughput environment. The above requirements are briefly addressed in the following paper. PMID:22489783

  15. High-throughput patterning of photonic structures with tunable periodicity

    PubMed Central

    Kempa, Thomas J.; Bediako, D. Kwabena; Kim, Sun-Kyung; Park, Hong-Gyu; Nocera, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    A patterning method termed “RIPPLE” (reactive interface patterning promoted by lithographic electrochemistry) is applied to the fabrication of arrays of dielectric and metallic optical elements. This method uses cyclic voltammetry to impart patterns onto the working electrode of a standard three-electrode electrochemical setup. Using this technique and a template stripping process, periodic arrays of Ag circular Bragg gratings are patterned in a high-throughput fashion over large substrate areas. By varying the scan rate of the cyclically applied voltage ramps, the periodicity of the gratings can be tuned in situ over micrometer and submicrometer length scales. Characterization of the periodic arrays of periodic gratings identified point-like and annular scattering modes at different planes above the structured surface. Facile, reliable, and rapid patterning techniques like RIPPLE may enable the high-throughput and low-cost fabrication of photonic elements and metasurfaces for energy conversion and sensing applications. PMID:25870280

  16. High throughput screening of starch structures using carbohydrate microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Tanackovic, Vanja; Rydahl, Maja Gro; Pedersen, Henriette Lodberg; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Shaik, Shahnoor Sultana; Mikkelsen, Maria Dalgaard; Krunic, Susanne Langgaard; Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik; Willats, William George Tycho; Blennow, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    In this study we introduce the starch-recognising carbohydrate binding module family 20 (CBM20) from Aspergillus niger for screening biological variations in starch molecular structure using high throughput carbohydrate microarray technology. Defined linear, branched and phosphorylated maltooligosaccharides, pure starch samples including a variety of different structures with variations in the amylopectin branching pattern, amylose content and phosphate content, enzymatically modified starches and glycogen were included. Using this technique, different important structures, including amylose content and branching degrees could be differentiated in a high throughput fashion. The screening method was validated using transgenic barley grain analysed during development and subjected to germination. Typically, extreme branching or linearity were detected less than normal starch structures. The method offers the potential for rapidly analysing resistant and slowly digested dietary starches. PMID:27468930

  17. A Multidisciplinary Approach to High Throughput Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pourmodheji, Hossein; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim; Magierowski, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a non-contact, powerful structure-elucidation technique for biochemical analysis. NMR spectroscopy is used extensively in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery. However, existing NMR technology is limited in that it cannot run a large number of experiments simultaneously in one unit. Recent advances in micro-fabrication technologies have attracted the attention of researchers to overcome these limitations and significantly accelerate the drug discovery process by developing the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS). In this paper, we examine this paradigm shift and explore new design strategies for the development of the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using CMOS technology. A CMOS NMR system consists of an array of high sensitivity micro-coils integrated with interfacing radio-frequency circuits on the same chip. Herein, we first discuss the key challenges and recent advances in the field of CMOS NMR technology, and then a new design strategy is put forward for the design and implementation of highly sensitive and high-throughput CMOS NMR spectrometers. We thereafter discuss the functionality and applicability of the proposed techniques by demonstrating the results. For microelectronic researchers starting to work in the field of CMOS NMR technology, this paper serves as a tutorial with comprehensive review of state-of-the-art technologies and their performance levels. Based on these levels, the CMOS NMR approach offers unique advantages for high resolution, time-sensitive and high-throughput bimolecular analysis required in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery. PMID:27294925

  18. High-throughput evaluation of synthetic metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Klesmith, Justin R.; Whitehead, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    A central challenge in the field of metabolic engineering is the efficient identification of a metabolic pathway genotype that maximizes specific productivity over a robust range of process conditions. Here we review current methods for optimizing specific productivity of metabolic pathways in living cells. New tools for library generation, computational analysis of pathway sequence-flux space, and high-throughput screening and selection techniques are discussed. PMID:27453919

  19. A Multidisciplinary Approach to High Throughput Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pourmodheji, Hossein; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim; Magierowski, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a non-contact, powerful structure-elucidation technique for biochemical analysis. NMR spectroscopy is used extensively in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery. However, existing NMR technology is limited in that it cannot run a large number of experiments simultaneously in one unit. Recent advances in micro-fabrication technologies have attracted the attention of researchers to overcome these limitations and significantly accelerate the drug discovery process by developing the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS). In this paper, we examine this paradigm shift and explore new design strategies for the development of the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using CMOS technology. A CMOS NMR system consists of an array of high sensitivity micro-coils integrated with interfacing radio-frequency circuits on the same chip. Herein, we first discuss the key challenges and recent advances in the field of CMOS NMR technology, and then a new design strategy is put forward for the design and implementation of highly sensitive and high-throughput CMOS NMR spectrometers. We thereafter discuss the functionality and applicability of the proposed techniques by demonstrating the results. For microelectronic researchers starting to work in the field of CMOS NMR technology, this paper serves as a tutorial with comprehensive review of state-of-the-art technologies and their performance levels. Based on these levels, the CMOS NMR approach offers unique advantages for high resolution, time-sensitive and high-throughput bimolecular analysis required in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery. PMID:27294925

  20. Rapid Methods for High-Throughput Detection of Sulfoxides▿

    PubMed Central

    Shainsky, Janna; Derry, Netta-Lee; Leichtmann-Bardoogo, Yael; Wood, Thomas K.; Fishman, Ayelet

    2009-01-01

    Enantiopure sulfoxides are prevalent in drugs and are useful chiral auxiliaries in organic synthesis. The biocatalytic enantioselective oxidation of prochiral sulfides is a direct and economical approach for the synthesis of optically pure sulfoxides. The selection of suitable biocatalysts requires rapid and reliable high-throughput screening methods. Here we present four different methods for detecting sulfoxides produced via whole-cell biocatalysis, three of which were exploited for high-throughput screening. Fluorescence detection based on the acid activation of omeprazole was utilized for high-throughput screening of mutant libraries of toluene monooxygenases, but no active variants have been discovered yet. The second method is based on the reduction of sulfoxides to sulfides, with the coupled release and measurement of iodine. The availability of solvent-resistant microtiter plates enabled us to modify the method to a high-throughput format. The third method, selective inhibition of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase, was used to rapidly screen highly active and/or enantioselective variants at position V106 of toluene ortho-monooxygenase in a saturation mutagenesis library, using methyl-p-tolyl sulfide as the substrate. A success rate of 89% (i.e., 11% false positives) was obtained, and two new mutants were selected. The fourth method is based on the colorimetric detection of adrenochrome, a back-titration procedure which measures the concentration of the periodate-sensitive sulfide. Due to low sensitivity during whole-cell screening, this method was found to be useful only for determining the presence or absence of sulfoxide in the reaction. The methods described in the present work are simple and inexpensive and do not require special equipment. PMID:19465532

  1. Promises and Pitfalls of High-Throughput Biological Assays.

    PubMed

    Finak, Greg; Gottardo, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    This chapter discusses some of the pitfalls encountered when performing biomedical research involving high-throughput "omics" data and presents some strategies and guidelines that researchers should follow when undertaking such studies. We discuss common errors in experimental design and data analysis that lead to irreproducible and non-replicable research and provide some guidelines to avoid these common mistakes so that researchers may have confidence in study outcomes, even if the results are negative. We discuss the importance of ranking and prespecifying hypotheses, performing power analysis, careful experimental design, and preplanning of statistical analyses in order to avoid the "fishing expedition" data analysis strategy, which is doomed to fail. The impact of multiple testing on false-positive rates is discussed, particularly in the context of the analysis of high-throughput data, and methods to correct for it are presented, as well as approaches to detect and correct for experimental biases and batch effects, which often plague high-throughput assays. We highlight the importance of sharing data and analysis code to facilitate reproducibility and present tools and software that are appropriate for this purpose. PMID:27115636

  2. High-Throughput Computational and Experimental Techniques in Structural Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Chance, Mark R.; Fiser, Andras; Sali, Andrej; Pieper, Ursula; Eswar, Narayanan; Xu, Guiping; Fajardo, J. Eduardo; Radhakannan, Thirumuruhan; Marinkovic, Nebojsa

    2004-01-01

    Structural genomics has as its goal the provision of structural information for all possible ORF sequences through a combination of experimental and computational approaches. The access to genome sequences and cloning resources from an ever-widening array of organisms is driving high-throughput structural studies by the New York Structural Genomics Research Consortium. In this report, we outline the progress of the Consortium in establishing its pipeline for structural genomics, and some of the experimental and bioinformatics efforts leading to structural annotation of proteins. The Consortium has established a pipeline for structural biology studies, automated modeling of ORF sequences using solved (template) structures, and a novel high-throughput approach (metallomics) to examining the metal binding to purified protein targets. The Consortium has so far produced 493 purified proteins from >1077 expression vectors. A total of 95 have resulted in crystal structures, and 81 are deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Comparative modeling of these structures has generated >40,000 structural models. We also initiated a high-throughput metal analysis of the purified proteins; this has determined that 10%-15% of the targets contain a stoichiometric structural or catalytic transition metal atom. The progress of the structural genomics centers in the U.S. and around the world suggests that the goal of providing useful structural information on most all ORF domains will be realized. This projected resource will provide structural biology information important to understanding the function of most proteins of the cell. PMID:15489337

  3. High-Throughput Intracellular Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Chiaraviglio, Lucius

    2015-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a Gram-negative opportunistic human pathogen that causes a severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease. Notably, in the human host, the organism is believed to replicate solely within an intracellular compartment, predominantly within pulmonary macrophages. Consequently, successful therapy is predicated on antimicrobials penetrating into this intracellular growth niche. However, standard antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods test solely for extracellular growth inhibition. Here, we make use of a high-throughput assay to characterize intracellular growth inhibition activity of known antimicrobials. For select antimicrobials, high-resolution dose-response analysis was then performed to characterize and compare activity levels in both macrophage infection and axenic growth assays. Results support the superiority of several classes of nonpolar antimicrobials in abrogating intracellular growth. Importantly, our assay results show excellent correlations with prior clinical observations of antimicrobial efficacy. Furthermore, we also show the applicability of high-throughput automation to two- and three-dimensional synergy testing. High-resolution isocontour isobolograms provide in vitro support for specific combination antimicrobial therapy. Taken together, findings suggest that high-throughput screening technology may be successfully applied to identify and characterize antimicrobials that target bacterial pathogens that make use of an intracellular growth niche. PMID:26392509

  4. Condor-COPASI: high-throughput computing for biochemical networks

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mathematical modelling has become a standard technique to improve our understanding of complex biological systems. As models become larger and more complex, simulations and analyses require increasing amounts of computational power. Clusters of computers in a high-throughput computing environment can help to provide the resources required for computationally expensive model analysis. However, exploiting such a system can be difficult for users without the necessary expertise. Results We present Condor-COPASI, a server-based software tool that integrates COPASI, a biological pathway simulation tool, with Condor, a high-throughput computing environment. Condor-COPASI provides a web-based interface, which makes it extremely easy for a user to run a number of model simulation and analysis tasks in parallel. Tasks are transparently split into smaller parts, and submitted for execution on a Condor pool. Result output is presented to the user in a number of formats, including tables and interactive graphical displays. Conclusions Condor-COPASI can effectively use a Condor high-throughput computing environment to provide significant gains in performance for a number of model simulation and analysis tasks. Condor-COPASI is free, open source software, released under the Artistic License 2.0, and is suitable for use by any institution with access to a Condor pool. Source code is freely available for download at http://code.google.com/p/condor-copasi/, along with full instructions on deployment and usage. PMID:22834945

  5. High-Throughput Intracellular Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Chiaraviglio, Lucius; Kirby, James E

    2015-12-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a Gram-negative opportunistic human pathogen that causes a severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease. Notably, in the human host, the organism is believed to replicate solely within an intracellular compartment, predominantly within pulmonary macrophages. Consequently, successful therapy is predicated on antimicrobials penetrating into this intracellular growth niche. However, standard antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods test solely for extracellular growth inhibition. Here, we make use of a high-throughput assay to characterize intracellular growth inhibition activity of known antimicrobials. For select antimicrobials, high-resolution dose-response analysis was then performed to characterize and compare activity levels in both macrophage infection and axenic growth assays. Results support the superiority of several classes of nonpolar antimicrobials in abrogating intracellular growth. Importantly, our assay results show excellent correlations with prior clinical observations of antimicrobial efficacy. Furthermore, we also show the applicability of high-throughput automation to two- and three-dimensional synergy testing. High-resolution isocontour isobolograms provide in vitro support for specific combination antimicrobial therapy. Taken together, findings suggest that high-throughput screening technology may be successfully applied to identify and characterize antimicrobials that target bacterial pathogens that make use of an intracellular growth niche. PMID:26392509

  6. High-throughput analysis of growth differences among phage strains.

    PubMed

    Turner, Paul E; Draghi, Jeremy A; Wilpiszeski, Regina

    2012-01-01

    Although methods such as spectrophotometry are useful for identifying growth differences among bacterial strains, it is currently difficult to similarly determine whether bacteriophage strains differ in growth using high throughput methods. Here we use automated spectrophotometry to develop an in vitro method for indirectly distinguishing fitness (growth) differences among virus strains, based on direct measures of their infected bacterial hosts. We used computer simulations of a mathematical model for phage growth to predict which features of bacterial growth curves were best associated with differences in growth among phage strains. We then tested these predictions using the in vitro method to confirm which of the inferred viral growth traits best reflected known fitness differences among genotypes of the RNA phage phi-6, when infecting a Pseudomonas syringae host. Results showed that the inferred phage trait of time-to-extinction (time required to drive bacterial density below detectable optical density) reliably correlated with genotype rankings based on absolute fitness (phage titer per ml). These data suggested that the high-throughput analysis was valuable for identifying growth differences among virus strains, and that the method may be especially useful for high throughput analyses of fitness differences among phage strains cultured and/or evolved in liquid (unstructured) environments. PMID:22101310

  7. High-Throughput Optical Sensing Immunoassays on Smartphone.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Ju; Sun, Rongrong; Vasile, Tina; Chang, Yu-Chung; Li, Lei

    2016-08-16

    We present an optical sensing platform on a smartphone for high-throughput screening immunoassays. For the first time, a designed microprism array is utilized to achieve a one-time screening of 64 samples. To demonstrate the capability and the reliability of this optical sensing platform on smartphone, human interleukin 6 (IL-6) protein and six types of plant viruses are immunoassayed. The ability of quantification is shown by a sigmoidal dose-response curve fitting to analyze IL-6 protein. The accuracy in measuring the concentrations of IL-6 protein achieves 99.1%. On the other hand, to validate on-field immunoassays by our device, a total of 1030 samples are assayed using three immunoassay methods to detect six types of plant viruses. The accuracy is up to 96.2-99.9%; in addition, there is a high degree of agreement with lab instruments. The total cost for this high-throughput optical screening platform is ∼$50 USD. The reading time is only 2 s for 64 samples. The size is just as big as a portable hard drive. Our optical sensing platform on the smartphone offers a route toward in situ high-throughput screening immunoassays for viruses, pathogens, biomarkers, and toxins by decentralizing laboratory tests. With this mobile point-of-care optical platform, the spread of disease can be timely stopped within a very short turnaround time. PMID:27434250

  8. High-Throughput Analysis of RNA Structure and Ribonucleoprotein Assembly

    PubMed Central

    McGinnis, Jennifer L.; Duncan, Caia D. S.; Weeks, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    RNA folds to form complex structures vital to many cellular functions. Proteins facilitate RNA folding at both the secondary and tertiary structure levels. An absolute prerequisite for understanding RNA folding and ribonucleoprotein (RNP) assembly reactions is a complete understanding of the RNA structure at each stage of the folding or assembly process. Here we provide a guide for comprehensive and high-throughput analysis of RNA secondary and tertiary structure using SHAPE and hydroxyl radical footprinting. As an example of the strong and sometimes surprising conclusions that can emerge from high-throughput analysis of RNA folding and RNP assembly, we summarize the structure of the bI3 group I intron RNA in four distinct states. Dramatic structural rearrangements occur in both secondary and tertiary structure as the RNA folds from the free state to the active, six-component, RNP complex. As high-throughput and high-resolution approaches are applied broadly to large protein-RNA complexes, other proteins previously viewed as making simple contributions to RNA folding are also likely to be found to exert multifaceted, long-range, cooperative, and non-additive effects on RNA folding. These protein-induced contributions add another level of control, and potential regulatory function, in RNP complexes. PMID:20946765

  9. High throughput screening of ferroelectric thin film libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeter, Christian; Wessler, Berit; Schoenecker, Andreas; Keitel, Uwe; Eng, Lukas M.

    2006-12-01

    High throughput methods can significantly speed up the search for advanced materials in a multidimensional configuration space, hence keeping innovation cycles short. In the search for improved materials, high throughput methods are wanted to optimize composition and processing of promising systems, and to find candidate compounds. Such a method is described here which is applicable to the development of ferroelectric thin films. Libraries with samples of varying chemical composition were produced via the sol-gel route on structured and metallized silicon wafers. To determine the permittivity of the films, automated measurements of film thickness and capacity were established. Furthermore, ferroelectric hysterisis measurements were performed on samples with a particularly high permittivity. This high throughput route, which allows for synthesis and characterization of over hundred samples per day, was proved and tested by means of lead zirconate titanate as a standard material. It was possible to obtain films with remarkable high permittivity and low coercive field at optimal lead zirconate/lead titanate ratio and by compensating for lead loss during processing by finding the optimal lead excess added to the precursor solutions.

  10. A Direct Comparison of Remote Sensing Approaches for High-Throughput Phenotyping in Plant Breeding

    PubMed Central

    Tattaris, Maria; Reynolds, Matthew P.; Chapman, Scott C.

    2016-01-01

    Remote sensing (RS) of plant canopies permits non-intrusive, high-throughput monitoring of plant physiological characteristics. This study compared three RS approaches using a low flying UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle), with that of proximal sensing, and satellite-based imagery. Two physiological traits were considered, canopy temperature (CT) and a vegetation index (NDVI), to determine the most viable approaches for large scale crop genetic improvement. The UAV-based platform achieves plot-level resolution while measuring several hundred plots in one mission via high-resolution thermal and multispectral imagery measured at altitudes of 30–100 m. The satellite measures multispectral imagery from an altitude of 770 km. Information was compared with proximal measurements using IR thermometers and an NDVI sensor at a distance of 0.5–1 m above plots. For robust comparisons, CT and NDVI were assessed on panels of elite cultivars under irrigated and drought conditions, in different thermal regimes, and on un-adapted genetic resources under water deficit. Correlations between airborne data and yield/biomass at maturity were generally higher than equivalent proximal correlations. NDVI was derived from high-resolution satellite imagery for only larger sized plots (8.5 × 2.4 m) due to restricted pixel density. Results support use of UAV-based RS techniques for high-throughput phenotyping for both precision and efficiency. PMID:27536304