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Sample records for highly conserved sequences

  1. High sequence conservation among cucumber mosaic virus isolates from lily.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y K; Derks, A F; Langeveld, S; Goldbach, R; Prins, M

    2001-08-01

    For classification of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) isolates from ornamental crops of different geographical areas, these were characterized by comparing the nucleotide sequences of RNAs 4 and the encoded coat proteins. Within the ornamental-infecting CMV viruses both subgroups were represented. CMV isolates of Alstroemeria and crocus were classified as subgroup II isolates, whereas 8 other isolates, from lily, gladiolus, amaranthus, larkspur, and lisianthus, were identified as subgroup I members. In general, nucleotide sequence comparisons correlated well with geographic distribution, with one notable exception: the analyzed nucleotide sequences of 5 lily isolates showed remarkably high homology despite different origins. PMID:11676424

  2. The tryptophan repressor sequence is highly conserved among the Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed Central

    Arvidson, D N; Arvidson, C G; Lawson, C L; Miner, J; Adams, C; Youderian, P

    1994-01-01

    Tryptophan biosynthesis in Escherichia coli is regulated by the product of the trpR gene, the tryptophan (Trp) repressor. Trp aporepressor binds the corepressor, L-tryptophan, to form a holorepressor complex, which binds trp operator DNA tightly, and inhibits transcription of the tryptophan biosynthetic operon. The conservation of trp operator sequences among enteric Gram-negative bacteria suggests that trpR genes from other bacterial species can be cloned by complementation in E. coli. To clone trpR homologues, a deletion of the E. coli trpR gene, delta trpR504, was made on a plasmid by site-directed mutagenesis, then crossed onto the E. coli genome. Plasmid clones of the trpR genes of Enterobacter aerogenes and Enterobacter cloacae were isolated by complementation of the delta trpR504 allele, scored as the ability to repress beta-galactosidase synthesis from a prophage-borne trpE-lacZ gene fusion. The predicted amino acid sequences of four enteric TrpR proteins show differences, clustered on the backside of the folded repressor, opposite the DNA-binding helix-turn-helix substructures. These differences are predicted to have little effect on the interactions of the aporepressor with tryptophan, holorepressor with operator DNA, or tandemly bound holorepressor dimers with one another. Although there is some variation observed at the dimer interface, interactions predicted to stabilize the interface are conserved. The phylogenetic relationships revealed by the TrpR amino acid sequence alignment agree with the results of others. PMID:8208606

  3. Highly conserved D-loop-like nuclear mitochondrial sequences (Numts) in tiger (Panthera tigris).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenping; Zhang, Zhihe; Shen, Fujun; Hou, Rong; Lv, Xiaoping; Yue, Bisong

    2006-08-01

    Using oligonucleotide primers designed to match hypervariable segments I (HVS-1) of Panthera tigris mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), we amplified two different PCR products (500 bp and 287 bp) in the tiger (Panthera tigris), but got only one PCR product (287 bp) in the leopard (Panthera pardus). Sequence analyses indicated that the sequence of 287 bp was a D-loop-like nuclear mitochondrial sequence (Numts), indicating a nuclear transfer that occurred approximately 4.8-17 million years ago in the tiger and 4.6-16 million years ago in the leopard. Although the mtDNA D-loop sequence has a rapid rate of evolution, the 287-bp Numts are highly conserved; they are nearly identical in tiger subspecies and only 1.742% different between tiger and leopard. Thus, such sequences represent molecular 'fossils' that can shed light on evolution of the mitochondrial genome and may be the most appropriate outgroup for phylogenetic analysis. This is also proved by comparing the phylogenetic trees reconstructed using the D-loop sequence of snow leopard and the 287-bp Numts as outgroup. PMID:17072079

  4. Genomes of sequence type 121 Listeria monocytogenes strains harbor highly conserved plasmids and prophages

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz-Esser, Stephan; Müller, Anneliese; Stessl, Beatrix; Wagner, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The food-borne pathogen Listeria (L.) monocytogenes is often found in food production environments. Thus, controlling the occurrence of L. monocytogenes in food production is a great challenge for food safety. Among a great diversity of L. monocytogenes strains from food production, particularly strains belonging to sequence type (ST)121 are prevalent. The molecular reasons for the abundance of ST121 strains are however currently unknown. We therefore determined the genome sequences of three L. monocytogenes ST121 strains: 6179 and 4423, which persisted for up to 8 years in food production plants in Ireland and Austria, and of the strain 3253 and compared them with available L. monocytogenes ST121 genomes. Our results show that the ST121 genomes are highly similar to each other and show a tremendously high degree of conservation among some of their prophages and particularly among their plasmids. This remarkably high level of conservation among prophages and plasmids suggests that strong selective pressure is acting on them. We thus hypothesize that plasmids and prophages are providing important adaptations for survival in food production environments. In addition, the ST121 genomes share common adaptations which might be related to their persistence in food production environments such as the presence of Tn6188, a transposon responsible for increased tolerance against quaternary ammonium compounds, a yet undescribed insertion harboring recombination hotspot (RHS) repeat proteins, which are most likely involved in competition against other bacteria, and presence of homologs of the L. innocua genes lin0464 and lin0465. PMID:25972859

  5. Evolutionarily conserved sequences on human chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Frazer, Kelly A.; Sheehan, John B.; Stokowski, Renee P.; Chen, Xiyin; Hosseini, Roya; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Fodor, Stephen P.A.; Cox, David R.; Patil, Nila

    2001-09-01

    Comparison of human sequences with the DNA of other mammals is an excellent means of identifying functional elements in the human genome. Here we describe the utility of high-density oligonucleotide arrays as a rapid approach for comparing human sequences with the DNA of multiple species whose sequences are not presently available. High-density arrays representing approximately 22.5 Mb of nonrepetitive human chromosome 21 sequence were synthesized and then hybridized with mouse and dog DNA to identify sequences conserved between humans and mice (human-mouse elements) and between humans and dogs (human-dog elements). Our data show that sequence comparison of multiple species provides a powerful empiric method for identifying actively conserved elements in the human genome. A large fraction of these evolutionarily conserved elements are present in regions on chromosome 21 that do not encode known genes.

  6. High-throughput genomic sequencing of cassava bacterial blight strains identifies conserved effectors to target for durable resistance.

    PubMed

    Bart, Rebecca; Cohn, Megan; Kassen, Andrew; McCallum, Emily J; Shybut, Mikel; Petriello, Annalise; Krasileva, Ksenia; Dahlbeck, Douglas; Medina, Cesar; Alicai, Titus; Kumar, Lava; Moreira, Leandro M; Rodrigues Neto, Júlio; Verdier, Valerie; Santana, María Angélica; Kositcharoenkul, Nuttima; Vanderschuren, Hervé; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Bernal, Adriana; Staskawicz, Brian J

    2012-07-10

    Cassava bacterial blight (CBB), incited by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis (Xam), is the most important bacterial disease of cassava, a staple food source for millions of people in developing countries. Here we present a widely applicable strategy for elucidating the virulence components of a pathogen population. We report Illumina-based draft genomes for 65 Xam strains and deduce the phylogenetic relatedness of Xam across the areas where cassava is grown. Using an extensive database of effector proteins from animal and plant pathogens, we identify the effector repertoire for each sequenced strain and use a comparative sequence analysis to deduce the least polymorphic of the conserved effectors. These highly conserved effectors have been maintained over 11 countries, three continents, and 70 y of evolution and as such represent ideal targets for developing resistance strategies. PMID:22699502

  7. High Sequence Conservation of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Reverse Transcriptase under Drug Pressure despite the Continuous Appearance of Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Gago, Federico; Santoro, Maria; Gori, Caterina; Svicher, Valentina; Rodríguez-Barrios, Fátima; d'Arrigo, Roberta; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Bertoli, Ada; Monforte, Antonella d'Arminio; Balzarini, Jan; Antinori, Andrea; Perno, Carlo-Federico

    2005-01-01

    To define the extent of sequence conservation in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) in vivo, the first 320 amino acids of RT obtained from 2,236 plasma-derived samples from a well-defined cohort of 1,704 HIV-1-infected individuals (457 drug naïve and 1,247 drug treated) were analyzed and examined in structural terms. In naïve patients, 233 out of these 320 residues (73%) were conserved (<1% variability). The majority of invariant amino acids clustered into defined regions comprising between 5 and 29 consecutive residues. Of the nine longest invariant regions identified, some contained residues and domains critical for enzyme stability and function. In patients treated with RT inhibitors, despite profound drug pressure and the appearance of mutations primarily associated with resistance, 202 amino acids (63%) remained highly conserved and appeared mostly distributed in regions of variable length. This finding suggests that participation of consecutive residues in structural domains is strictly required for cooperative functions and sustainability of HIV-1 RT activity. Besides confirming the conservation of amino acids that are already known to be important for catalytic activity, stability of the heterodimer interface, and/or primer/template binding, the other 62 new invariable residues are now identified and mapped onto the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme. This new knowledge could be of help in the structure-based design of novel resistance-evading drugs. PMID:16051864

  8. Highly conserved influenza A virus epitope sequences as candidates of H3N2 flu vaccine targets.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ko-Wen; Chien, Chih-Yi; Li, Shiao-Wen; King, Chwan-Chuen; Chang, Chuan-Hsiung

    2012-08-01

    This study focused on identifying the conserved epitopes in a single subtype A (H3N2)-as candidates for vaccine targets. We identified a total of 32 conserved epitopes in four viral proteins [22 HA, 4PB1, 3 NA, 3 NP]. Evaluation of conserved epitopes in coverage during 1968-2010 revealed that (1) 12 HA conserved epitopes were highly present in the circulating viruses; (2) the remaining 10 HA conserved epitopes appeared with lower percentage but a significantly increasing trend after 1989 [p<0.001]; and (3) the conserved epitopes in NA, NP and PB1 are also highly frequent in wild-type viruses. These conserved epitopes also covered an extremely high percentage of the 16 vaccine strains during the 42 year period. The identification of highly conserved epitopes using our approach can also be applied to develop broad-spectrum vaccines. PMID:22698979

  9. Comparative Mitogenomics of the Genus Odontobutis (Perciformes: Gobioidei: Odontobutidae) Revealed Conserved Gene Rearrangement and High Sequence Variations

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhihong; Yang, Xuefen; Bercsenyi, Miklos; Wu, Junjie; Yu, Yongyao; Wei, Kaijian; Fan, Qixue; Yang, Ruibin

    2015-01-01

    To understand the molecular evolution of mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) in the genus Odontobutis, the mitogenome of Odontobutis yaluensis was sequenced and compared with those of another four Odontobutis species. Our results displayed similar mitogenome features among species in genome organization, base composition, codon usage, and gene rearrangement. The identical gene rearrangement of trnS-trnL-trnH tRNA cluster observed in mitogenomes of these five closely related freshwater sleepers suggests that this unique gene order is conserved within Odontobutis. Additionally, the present gene order and the positions of associated intergenic spacers of these Odontobutis mitogenomes indicate that this unusual gene rearrangement results from tandem duplication and random loss of large-scale gene regions. Moreover, these mitogenomes exhibit a high level of sequence variation, mainly due to the differences of corresponding intergenic sequences in gene rearrangement regions and the heterogeneity of tandem repeats in the control regions. Phylogenetic analyses support Odontobutis species with shared gene rearrangement forming a monophyletic group, and the interspecific phylogenetic relationships are associated with structural differences among their mitogenomes. The present study contributes to understanding the evolutionary patterns of Odontobutidae species. PMID:26492246

  10. The Chinese hamster Alu-equivalent sequence: a conserved highly repetitious, interspersed deoxyribonucleic acid sequence in mammals has a structure suggestive of a transposable element.

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, S R; Toomey, T P; Leinwand, L; Jelinek, W R

    1981-01-01

    A consensus sequence has been determined for a major interspersed deoxyribonucleic acid repeat in the genome of Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO cells). This sequence is extensively homologous to (i) the human Alu sequence (P. L. Deininger et al., J. Mol. Biol., in press), (ii) the mouse B1 interspersed repetitious sequence (Krayev et al., Nucleic Acids Res. 8:1201-1215, 1980) (iii) an interspersed repetitious sequence from African green monkey deoxyribonucleic acid (Dhruva et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77:4514-4518, 1980) and (iv) the CHO and mouse 4.5S ribonucleic acid (this report; F. Harada and N. Kato, Nucleic Acids Res. 8:1273-1285, 1980). Because the CHO consensus sequence shows significant homology to the human Alu sequence it is termed the CHO Alu-equivalent sequence. A conserved structure surrounding CHO Alu-equivalent family members can be recognized. It is similar to that surrounding the human Alu and the mouse B1 sequences, and is represented as follows: direct repeat-CHO-Alu-A-rich sequence-direct repeat. A composite interspersed repetitious sequence has been identified. Its structure is represented as follows: direct repeat-residue 47 to 107 of CHO-Alu-non-Alu repetitious sequence-A-rich sequence-direct repeat. Because the Alu flanking sequences resemble those that flank known transposable elements, we think it likely that the Alu sequence dispersed throughout the mammalian genome by transposition. Images PMID:9279371

  11. Identification of conserved hepatic transcriptomic responses to 17β-estradiol using high-throughput sequencing in brown trout.

    PubMed

    Uren Webster, Tamsyn M; Shears, Janice A; Moore, Karen; Santos, Eduarda M

    2015-09-01

    Estrogenic chemicals are major contaminants of surface waters and can threaten the sustainability of natural fish populations. Characterization of the global molecular mechanisms of toxicity of environmental contaminants has been conducted primarily in model species rather than species with limited existing transcriptomic or genomic sequence information. We aimed to investigate the global mechanisms of toxicity of an endocrine disrupting chemical of environmental concern [17β-estradiol (E2)] using high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) in an environmentally relevant species, brown trout (Salmo trutta). We exposed mature males to measured concentrations of 1.94, 18.06, and 34.38 ng E2/l for 4 days and sequenced three individual liver samples per treatment using an Illumina HiSeq 2500 platform. Exposure to 34.4 ng E2/L resulted in 2,113 differentially regulated transcripts (FDR < 0.05). Functional analysis revealed upregulation of processes associated with vitellogenesis, including lipid metabolism, cellular proliferation, and ribosome biogenesis, together with a downregulation of carbohydrate metabolism. Using real-time quantitative PCR, we validated the expression of eight target genes and identified significant differences in the regulation of several known estrogen-responsive transcripts in fish exposed to the lower treatment concentrations (including esr1 and zp2.5). We successfully used RNA-Seq to identify highly conserved responses to estrogen and also identified some estrogen-responsive transcripts that have been less well characterized, including nots and tgm2l. These results demonstrate the potential application of RNA-Seq as a valuable tool for assessing mechanistic effects of pollutants in ecologically relevant species for which little genomic information is available. PMID:26082144

  12. Identification of conserved hepatic transcriptomic responses to 17β-estradiol using high-throughput sequencing in brown trout

    PubMed Central

    Uren Webster, Tamsyn M.; Shears, Janice A.; Moore, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Estrogenic chemicals are major contaminants of surface waters and can threaten the sustainability of natural fish populations. Characterization of the global molecular mechanisms of toxicity of environmental contaminants has been conducted primarily in model species rather than species with limited existing transcriptomic or genomic sequence information. We aimed to investigate the global mechanisms of toxicity of an endocrine disrupting chemical of environmental concern [17β-estradiol (E2)] using high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) in an environmentally relevant species, brown trout (Salmo trutta). We exposed mature males to measured concentrations of 1.94, 18.06, and 34.38 ng E2/l for 4 days and sequenced three individual liver samples per treatment using an Illumina HiSeq 2500 platform. Exposure to 34.4 ng E2/L resulted in 2,113 differentially regulated transcripts (FDR < 0.05). Functional analysis revealed upregulation of processes associated with vitellogenesis, including lipid metabolism, cellular proliferation, and ribosome biogenesis, together with a downregulation of carbohydrate metabolism. Using real-time quantitative PCR, we validated the expression of eight target genes and identified significant differences in the regulation of several known estrogen-responsive transcripts in fish exposed to the lower treatment concentrations (including esr1 and zp2.5). We successfully used RNA-Seq to identify highly conserved responses to estrogen and also identified some estrogen-responsive transcripts that have been less well characterized, including nots and tgm2l. These results demonstrate the potential application of RNA-Seq as a valuable tool for assessing mechanistic effects of pollutants in ecologically relevant species for which little genomic information is available. PMID:26082144

  13. The highly conserved codon following the slippery sequence supports -1 frameshift efficiency at the HIV-1 frameshift site.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Suneeth F; Crowe-McAuliffe, Caillan; Graves, Ryan; Cardno, Tony S; McKinney, Cushla; Poole, Elizabeth S; Tate, Warren P

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 utilises -1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting to translate structural and enzymatic domains in a defined proportion required for replication. A slippery sequence, U UUU UUA, and a stem-loop are well-defined RNA features modulating -1 frameshifting in HIV-1. The GGG glycine codon immediately following the slippery sequence (the 'intercodon') contributes structurally to the start of the stem-loop but has no defined role in current models of the frameshift mechanism, as slippage is inferred to occur before the intercodon has reached the ribosomal decoding site. This GGG codon is highly conserved in natural isolates of HIV. When the natural intercodon was replaced with a stop codon two different decoding molecules-eRF1 protein or a cognate suppressor tRNA-were able to access and decode the intercodon prior to -1 frameshifting. This implies significant slippage occurs when the intercodon is in the (perhaps distorted) ribosomal A site. We accommodate the influence of the intercodon in a model of frame maintenance versus frameshifting in HIV-1. PMID:25807539

  14. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of expansins--a highly conserved, multigene family of proteins that mediate cell wall extension in plants.

    PubMed Central

    Shcherban, T Y; Shi, J; Durachko, D M; Guiltinan, M J; McQueen-Mason, S J; Shieh, M; Cosgrove, D J

    1995-01-01

    Expansins are unusual proteins discovered by virtue of their ability to mediate cell wall extension in plants. We identified cDNA clones for two cucumber expansins on the basis of peptide sequences of proteins purified from cucumber hypocotyls. The expansin cDNAs encode related proteins with signal peptides predicted to direct protein secretion to the cell wall. Northern blot analysis showed moderate transcript abundance in the growing region of the hypocotyl and no detectable transcripts in the nongrowing region. Rice and Arabidopsis expansin cDNAs were identified from collections of anonymous cDNAs (expressed sequence tags). Sequence comparisons indicate at least four distinct expansin cDNAs in rice and at least six in Arabidopsis. Expansins are highly conserved in size and sequence (60-87% amino acid sequence identity and 75-95% similarity between any pairwise comparison), and phylogenetic trees indicate that this multigene family formed before the evolutionary divergence of monocotyledons and dicotyledons. Sequence and motif analyses show no similarities to known functional domains that might account for expansin action on wall extension. A series of highly conserved tryptophans may function in expansin binding to cellulose or other glycans. The high conservation of this multigene family indicates that the mechanism by which expansins promote wall extensin tolerates little variation in protein structure. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7568110

  15. High-Throughput Sequencing Reveals Diverse Sets of Conserved, Nonconserved, and Species-Specific miRNAs in Jute.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Tariqul; Ferdous, Ahlan Sabah; Najnin, Rifat Ara; Sarker, Suprovath Kumar; Khan, Haseena

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs play a pivotal role in regulating a broad range of biological processes, acting by cleaving mRNAs or by translational repression. A group of plant microRNAs are evolutionarily conserved; however, others are expressed in a species-specific manner. Jute is an agroeconomically important fibre crop; nonetheless, no practical information is available for microRNAs in jute to date. In this study, Illumina sequencing revealed a total of 227 known microRNAs and 17 potential novel microRNA candidates in jute, of which 164 belong to 23 conserved families and the remaining 63 belong to 58 nonconserved families. Among a total of 81 identified microRNA families, 116 potential target genes were predicted for 39 families and 11 targets were predicted for 4 among the 17 identified novel microRNAs. For understanding better the functions of microRNAs, target genes were analyzed by Gene Ontology and their pathways illustrated by KEGG pathway analyses. The presence of microRNAs identified in jute was validated by stem-loop RT-PCR followed by end point PCR and qPCR for randomly selected 20 known and novel microRNAs. This study exhaustively identifies microRNAs and their target genes in jute which will ultimately pave the way for understanding their role in this crop and other crops. PMID:25861616

  16. High-Throughput Sequencing Reveals Diverse Sets of Conserved, Nonconserved, and Species-Specific miRNAs in Jute

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md. Tariqul; Ferdous, Ahlan Sabah; Najnin, Rifat Ara; Sarker, Suprovath Kumar; Khan, Haseena

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs play a pivotal role in regulating a broad range of biological processes, acting by cleaving mRNAs or by translational repression. A group of plant microRNAs are evolutionarily conserved; however, others are expressed in a species-specific manner. Jute is an agroeconomically important fibre crop; nonetheless, no practical information is available for microRNAs in jute to date. In this study, Illumina sequencing revealed a total of 227 known microRNAs and 17 potential novel microRNA candidates in jute, of which 164 belong to 23 conserved families and the remaining 63 belong to 58 nonconserved families. Among a total of 81 identified microRNA families, 116 potential target genes were predicted for 39 families and 11 targets were predicted for 4 among the 17 identified novel microRNAs. For understanding better the functions of microRNAs, target genes were analyzed by Gene Ontology and their pathways illustrated by KEGG pathway analyses. The presence of microRNAs identified in jute was validated by stem-loop RT-PCR followed by end point PCR and qPCR for randomly selected 20 known and novel microRNAs. This study exhaustively identifies microRNAs and their target genes in jute which will ultimately pave the way for understanding their role in this crop and other crops. PMID:25861616

  17. Amplification of human papillomavirus DNA sequences by using conserved primers.

    PubMed Central

    Gregoire, L; Arella, M; Campione-Piccardo, J; Lancaster, W D

    1989-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction has potential for use in the detection of small amounts of human papillomavirus (HPV) viral nucleic acids present in clinical specimens. However, new HPV types for which no probes exist would remain undetected by using type-specific primers for the polymerase chain reaction before hybridization. Primers corresponding to highly conserved HPV sequences may be useful for detecting low amounts of known HPV DNA as well as new HPV types. Here we analyze a pair of primers derived from conserved sequences within the E1 open reading frame for HPV sequence amplification by using the polymerase chain reaction. The longest perfect homology among HPV sequences is a 12-mer within the first exon of E1M. A region of conserved amino acids coded by the E1 open reading frame allowed the detection of another highly conserved region about 850 base pairs downstream. Two 21-mers derived from these conserved regions were used to amplify sequences from all HPV DNAs used as templates. The amplified DNA was shown to be specific for HPV sequences within the E1 open reading frame. DNA from HPVs whose sequences were not available were amplified by using these two primers. HPV DNA sequences in clinical specimens could also be amplified with the primers. Images PMID:2556429

  18. Cytoplasmic protein binding to highly conserved sequences in the 3' untranslated region of mouse protamine 2 mRNA, a translationally regulated transcript of male germ cells.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Y K; Hecht, N B

    1991-05-01

    The expression of the protamines, the predominant nuclear proteins of mammalian spermatozoa, is regulated translationally during male germ-cell development. The 3' untranslated region (UTR) of protamine 1 mRNA has been reported to control its time of translation. To understand the mechanisms controlling translation of the protamine mRNAs, we have sought to identify cis elements of the 3' UTR of protamine 2 mRNA that are recognized by cytoplasmic factors. From gel retardation assays, two sequence elements are shown to form specific RNA-protein complexes. Protein binding sites of the two complexes were determined by RNase T1 mapping, by blocking the putative binding sites with antisense oligonucleotides, and by competition assays. The sequences of these elements, located between nucleotides + 537 and + 572 in protamine 2 mRNA, are highly conserved among postmeiotic translationally regulated nuclear proteins of the mammalian testis. Two closely linked protein binding sites were detected. UV-crosslinking studies revealed that a protein of about 18 kDa binds to one of the conserved sequences. These data demonstrate specific protein binding to a highly conserved 3' UTR of translationally regulated testicular mRNA. PMID:2023906

  19. Sequence conservation on the Y chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, L.H.; Yang-Feng, L.; Lau, C.

    1994-09-01

    The Y chromosome is present in all mammals and is considered to be essential to sex determination. Despite intense genomic research, only a few genes have been identified and mapped to this chromosome in humans. Several of them, such as SRY and ZFY, have been demonstrated to be conserved and Y-located in other mammals. In order to address the issue of sequence conservation on the Y chromosome, we performed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with DNA from a human Y cosmid library as a probe to study the Y chromosomes from other mammalian species. Total DNA from 3,000-4,500 cosmid pools were labeled with biotinylated-dUTP and hybridized to metaphase chromosomes. For human and primate preparations, human cot1 DNA was included in the hybridization mixture to suppress the hybridization from repeat sequences. FISH signals were detected on the Y chromosomes of human, gorilla, orangutan and baboon (Old World monkey) and were absent on those of squirrel monkey (New World monkey), Indian munjac, wood lemming, Chinese hamster, rat and mouse. Since sequence analysis suggested that specific genes, e.g. SRY and ZFY, are conserved between these two groups, the lack of detectable hybridization in the latter group implies either that conservation of the human Y sequences is limited to the Y chromosomes of the great apes and Old World monkeys, or that the size of the syntenic segment is too small to be detected under the resolution of FISH, or that homologeous sequences have undergone considerable divergence. Further studies with reduced hybridization stringency are currently being conducted. Our results provide some clues as to Y-sequence conservation across species and demonstrate the limitations of FISH across species with total DNA sequences from a particular chromosome.

  20. Conserved noncoding sequences (CNSs) in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Freeling, Michael; Subramaniam, Shabarinath

    2009-04-01

    Plant conserved noncoding sequences (CNSs)--a specific category of phylogenetic footprint--have been shown experimentally to function. No plant CNS is conserved to the extent that ultraconserved noncoding sequences are conserved in vertebrates. Plant CNSs are enriched in known transcription factor or other cis-acting binding sites, and are usually clustered around genes. Genes that encode transcription factors and/or those that respond to stimuli are particularly CNS-rich. Only rarely could this function involve small RNA binding. Some transcribed CNSs encode short translation products as a form of negative control. Approximately 4% of Arabidopsis gene content is estimated to be both CNS-rich and occupies a relatively long stretch of chromosome: Bigfoot genes (long phylogenetic footprints). We discuss a 'DNA-templated protein assembly' idea that might help explain Bigfoot gene CNSs. PMID:19249238

  1. Characterization of the Role of a Highly Conserved Sequence in ATP Binding Cassette Transporter G (ABCG) Family in ABCG1 Stability, Oligomerization, and Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1) mediates cholesterol and oxysterol efflux onto lipidated lipoproteins and plays an important role in macrophage reverse cholesterol transport. Here, we identified a highly conserved sequence present in the five ABCG transporter family members. The conserved sequence is located between the nucleotide binding domain and the transmembrane domain and contains five amino acid residues from Asn at position 316 to Phe at position 320 in ABCG1 (NPADF). We found that cells expressing mutant ABCG1, in which Asn316, Pro317, Asp319, and Phe320 in the conserved sequence were replaced with Ala simultaneously, showed impaired cholesterol efflux activity compared with wild type ABCG1-expressing cells. A more detailed mutagenesis study revealed that mutation of Asn316 or Phe 320 to Ala significantly reduced cellular cholesterol and 7-ketocholesterol efflux conferred by ABCG1, whereas replacement of Pro317 or Asp319 with Ala had no detectable effect. To confirm the important role of Asn316 and Phe320, we mutated Asn316 to Asp (N316D) and Gln (N316Q), and Phe320 to Ile (F320I) and Tyr (F320Y). The mutant F320Y showed the same phenotype as wild type ABCG1. However, the efflux of cholesterol and 7-ketocholesterol was reduced in cells expressing ABCG1 mutant N316D, N316Q, or F320I compared with wild type ABCG1. Further, mutations N316Q and F320I impaired ABCG1 trafficking while having no marked effect on the stability and oligomerization of ABCG1. The mutant N316Q and F320I could not be transported to the cell surface efficiently. Instead, the mutant proteins were mainly localized intracellularly. Thus, these findings indicate that the two highly conserved amino acid residues, Asn and Phe, play an important role in ABCG1-dependent export of cellular cholesterol, mainly through the regulation of ABCG1 trafficking. PMID:24320932

  2. A highly conserved DNA replication module from Streptococcus thermophilus phages is similar in sequence and topology to a module from Lactococcus lactis phages.

    PubMed

    Desiere, F; Lucchini, S; Bruttin, A; Zwahlen, M C; Brüssow, H

    1997-08-01

    A highly conserved DNA region extending over 5 kb was observed in Streptococcus thermophilus bacteriophages. Comparative sequencing of one temperate and 26 virulent phages demonstrated in the most extreme case an 18% aa difference for a predicted protein, while the majority of the phages showed fewer, if any aa changes. The relative degree of aa conservation was not homogeneous over the DNA segment investigated. Sequence analysis of the conserved segment revealed genes possibly involved in DNA transactions. Three predicted proteins (orf 233, 443, and 382 gene product (gp)) showed nucleoside triphosphate binding motifs. Orf 443 gp showed in addition a DEAH box motif, characteristically found in a subgroup of helicases, and a variant zinc finger motif known from a phage T7 helicase/primase. Tree analysis classified orf 443 gp as a distant member of the helicase superfamily. Orf 382 gp showed similarity to putative plasmid DNA primases. Downstream of orf 382 a noncoding repeat region was identified that showed similarity to a putative minus origin from a cryptic S. thermophilus plasmid. Four predicted proteins showed not only high degrees of aa identity (34 to 63%) with proteins from Lactococcus lactis phages, but their genes showed a similar topological organization. We interpret this as evidence for a horizontal gene transfer event between phages of the two bacterial genera in the distant past. PMID:9268169

  3. A highly conserved G-rich consensus sequence in hepatitis C virus core gene represents a new anti–hepatitis C target

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shao-Ru; Min, Yuan-Qin; Wang, Jia-Qi; Liu, Chao-Xing; Fu, Bo-Shi; Wu, Fan; Wu, Ling-Yu; Qiao, Zhi-Xian; Song, Yan-Yan; Xu, Guo-Hua; Wu, Zhi-Guo; Huang, Gai; Peng, Nan-Fang; Huang, Rong; Mao, Wu-Xiang; Peng, Shuang; Chen, Yu-Qi; Zhu, Ying; Tian, Tian; Zhang, Xiao-Lian; Zhou, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    G-quadruplex (G4) is one of the most important secondary structures in nucleic acids. Until recently, G4 RNAs have not been reported in any ribovirus, such as the hepatitis C virus. Our bioinformatics analysis reveals highly conserved guanine-rich consensus sequences within the core gene of hepatitis C despite the high genetic variability of this ribovirus; we further show using various methods that such consensus sequences can fold into unimolecular G4 RNA structures, both in vitro and under physiological conditions. Furthermore, we provide direct evidences that small molecules specifically targeting G4 can stabilize this structure to reduce RNA replication and inhibit protein translation of intracellular hepatitis C. Ultimately, the stabilization of G4 RNA in the genome of hepatitis C represents a promising new strategy for anti–hepatitis C drug development. PMID:27051880

  4. A highly conserved G-rich consensus sequence in hepatitis C virus core gene represents a new anti-hepatitis C target.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shao-Ru; Min, Yuan-Qin; Wang, Jia-Qi; Liu, Chao-Xing; Fu, Bo-Shi; Wu, Fan; Wu, Ling-Yu; Qiao, Zhi-Xian; Song, Yan-Yan; Xu, Guo-Hua; Wu, Zhi-Guo; Huang, Gai; Peng, Nan-Fang; Huang, Rong; Mao, Wu-Xiang; Peng, Shuang; Chen, Yu-Qi; Zhu, Ying; Tian, Tian; Zhang, Xiao-Lian; Zhou, Xiang

    2016-04-01

    G-quadruplex (G4) is one of the most important secondary structures in nucleic acids. Until recently, G4 RNAs have not been reported in any ribovirus, such as the hepatitis C virus. Our bioinformatics analysis reveals highly conserved guanine-rich consensus sequences within the core gene of hepatitis C despite the high genetic variability of this ribovirus; we further show using various methods that such consensus sequences can fold into unimolecular G4 RNA structures, both in vitro and under physiological conditions. Furthermore, we provide direct evidences that small molecules specifically targeting G4 can stabilize this structure to reduce RNA replication and inhibit protein translation of intracellular hepatitis C. Ultimately, the stabilization of G4 RNA in the genome of hepatitis C represents a promising new strategy for anti-hepatitis C drug development. PMID:27051880

  5. Sequence conservation of an avian centromeric repeated DNA component.

    PubMed

    Madsen, C S; Brooks, J E; de Kloet, E; de Kloet, S R

    1994-06-01

    The approximately 190-bp centromeric repeat monomers of the spur-winged lapwing (Vanellus spinosus, Charadriidae), the Chilean flamingo (Phoenicopterus chilensis, Phoenicopteridae), the sarus crane (Grus antigone, Gruidae), parrots (Psittacidae), waterfowl (Anatidae), and the merlin (Falco columbarius, Falconidae) contain elements that are interspecifically highly variable, as well as elements (trinucleotides and higher order oligonucleotides) that are highly conserved in sequence and relative location within the repeat. Such conservation suggests that the centromeric repeats of these avian species have evolved from a common ancestral sequence that may date from very early stages of avian radiation. PMID:8034177

  6. Inhibition of Hepatitis C Virus in Mice by a Small Interfering RNA Targeting a Highly Conserved Sequence in Viral IRES Pseudoknot.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jae-Su; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Eun-Jung; Cho, Hee; Lee, Wooseong; Kim, Geon-Woo; Park, Hyun-Ji; Cho, Seung-Woo; Lee, Choongho; Oh, Jong-Won

    2016-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) internal ribosome entry site (IRES) that directs cap-independent viral translation is a primary target for small interfering RNA (siRNA)-based HCV antiviral therapy. However, identification of potent siRNAs against HCV IRES by bioinformatics-based siRNA design is a challenging task given the complexity of HCV IRES secondary and tertiary structures and association with multiple proteins, which can also dynamically change the structure of this cis-acting RNA element. In this work, we utilized siRNA tiling approach whereby siRNAs were tiled with overlapping sequences that were shifted by one or two nucleotides over the HCV IRES stem-loop structures III and IV spanning nucleotides (nts) 277-343. Based on their antiviral activity, we mapped a druggable region (nts 313-343) where the targets of potent siRNAs were enriched. siIE22, which showed the greatest anti-HCV potency, targeted a highly conserved sequence across diverse HCV genotypes, locating within the IRES subdomain IIIf involved in pseudoknot formation. Stepwise target shifting toward the 5' or 3' direction by 1 or 2 nucleotides reduced the antiviral potency of siIE22, demonstrating the importance of siRNA accessibility to this highly structured and sequence-conserved region of HCV IRES for RNA interference. Nanoparticle-mediated systemic delivery of the stability-improved siIE22 derivative gs_PS1 siIE22, which contains a single phosphorothioate linkage on the guide strand, reduced the serum HCV genome titer by more than 4 log10 in a xenograft mouse model for HCV replication without generation of resistant variants. Our results provide a strategy for identifying potent siRNA species against a highly structured RNA target and offer a potential pan-HCV genotypic siRNA therapy that might be beneficial for patients resistant to current treatment regimens. PMID:26751678

  7. Inhibition of Hepatitis C Virus in Mice by a Small Interfering RNA Targeting a Highly Conserved Sequence in Viral IRES Pseudoknot

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Jung; Cho, Hee; Lee, Wooseong; Kim, Geon-Woo; Park, Hyun-Ji; Cho, Seung-Woo; Lee, Choongho; Oh, Jong-Won

    2016-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) internal ribosome entry site (IRES) that directs cap-independent viral translation is a primary target for small interfering RNA (siRNA)-based HCV antiviral therapy. However, identification of potent siRNAs against HCV IRES by bioinformatics-based siRNA design is a challenging task given the complexity of HCV IRES secondary and tertiary structures and association with multiple proteins, which can also dynamically change the structure of this cis-acting RNA element. In this work, we utilized siRNA tiling approach whereby siRNAs were tiled with overlapping sequences that were shifted by one or two nucleotides over the HCV IRES stem-loop structures III and IV spanning nucleotides (nts) 277–343. Based on their antiviral activity, we mapped a druggable region (nts 313–343) where the targets of potent siRNAs were enriched. siIE22, which showed the greatest anti-HCV potency, targeted a highly conserved sequence across diverse HCV genotypes, locating within the IRES subdomain IIIf involved in pseudoknot formation. Stepwise target shifting toward the 5′ or 3′ direction by 1 or 2 nucleotides reduced the antiviral potency of siIE22, demonstrating the importance of siRNA accessibility to this highly structured and sequence-conserved region of HCV IRES for RNA interference. Nanoparticle-mediated systemic delivery of the stability-improved siIE22 derivative gs_PS1 siIE22, which contains a single phosphorothioate linkage on the guide strand, reduced the serum HCV genome titer by more than 4 log10 in a xenograft mouse model for HCV replication without generation of resistant variants. Our results provide a strategy for identifying potent siRNA species against a highly structured RNA target and offer a potential pan-HCV genotypic siRNA therapy that might be beneficial for patients resistant to current treatment regimens. PMID:26751678

  8. Large-scale nucleotide sequence alignment and sequence variability assessment to identify the evolutionarily highly conserved regions for universal screening PCR assay design: an example of influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Alexander; Jiřinec, Tomáš; Černíková, Lenka; Jiřincová, Helena; Havlíčková, Martina

    2015-01-01

    The development of a diagnostic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for universal detection of highly variable viral genomes is always a difficult task. The purpose of this chapter is to provide a guideline on how to align, process, and evaluate a huge set of homologous nucleotide sequences in order to reveal the evolutionarily most conserved positions suitable for universal qPCR primer and hybridization probe design. Attention is paid to the quantification and clear graphical visualization of the sequence variability at each position of the alignment. In addition, specific problems related to the processing of the extremely large sequence pool are highlighted. All of these steps are performed using an ordinary desktop computer without the need for extensive mathematical or computational skills. PMID:25697651

  9. OVINE HERPESVIRUS-2 GLYCOPROTEIN B SEQUENCES FROM TISSUES OF RUMINANT MALIGNANT CATARRHAL FEVER AND HEALTHY SHEEP ARE HIGHLY CONSERVED.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ovine herpesvirus-2 (OHV-2) infection has been associated with malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) in susceptible ruminants. In order to further investigate whether OHV-2 is an aetiological agent for sheep-associated (SA) MCF in cattle and bison, the entire sequences of OHV-2 glycoprotein B (gB) from di...

  10. Genome-Wide Analysis of Stowaway-Like MITEs in Wheat Reveals High Sequence Conservation, Gene Association, and Genomic Diversification1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Yaakov, Beery; Ben-David, Smadar; Kashkush, Khalil

    2013-01-01

    The diversity and evolution of wheat (Triticum-Aegilops group) genomes is determined, in part, by the activity of transposable elements that constitute a large fraction of the genome (up to 90%). In this study, we retrieved sequences from publicly available wheat databases, including a 454-pyrosequencing database, and analyzed 18,217 insertions of 18 Stowaway-like miniature inverted-repeat transposable element (MITE) families previously characterized in wheat that together account for approximately 1.3 Mb of sequence. All 18 families showed high conservation in length, sequence, and target site preference. Furthermore, approximately 55% of the elements were inserted in transcribed regions, into or near known wheat genes. Notably, we observed significant correlation between the mean length of the MITEs and their copy number. In addition, the genomic composition of nine MITE families was studied by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis in 40 accessions of Triticum spp. and Aegilops spp., including diploids, tetraploids, and hexaploids. The quantitative polymerase chain reaction data showed massive and significant intraspecific and interspecific variation as well as genome-specific proliferation and nonadditive quantities in the polyploids. We also observed significant differences in the methylation status of the insertion sites among MITE families. Our data thus suggest a possible role for MITEs in generating genome diversification and in the establishment of nascent polyploid species in wheat. PMID:23104862

  11. Low sequence identity but high structural and functional conservation: The case of Hsp70/Hsp90 organizing protein (Hop/Sti1) of Leishmania braziliensis.

    PubMed

    Batista, Fernanda A H; Seraphim, Thiago V; Santos, Clelton A; Gonzaga, Marisvanda R; Barbosa, Leandro R S; Ramos, Carlos H I; Borges, Júlio C

    2016-06-15

    Parasites belonging to the genus Leishmania are subjected to extensive environmental changes during their life cycle; molecular chaperones/co-chaperones act as protagonists in this scenario to maintain cellular homeostasis. Hop/Sti1 is a co-chaperone that connects the Hsp90 and Hsp70 systems, modulating their ATPase activities and affecting the fate of client proteins because it facilitates their transfer from the Hsp70 to the Hsp90 chaperone. Hop/Sti1 is one of the most prevalent co-chaperones, highlighting its importance despite the relatively low sequence identity among orthologue proteins. This multi-domain protein comprises three tetratricopeptides domains (TPR1, TPR2A and TPR2B) and two Asp/Pro-rich domains. Given the importance of Hop/Sti1 for the chaperone system and for Leishmania protozoa viability, the Leishmania braziliensis Hop (LbHop) and a truncated mutant (LbHop(TPR2AB)) were characterized. Structurally, both proteins are α-helix-rich and highly elongated monomeric proteins. Functionally, they inhibited the ATPase activity of Leishmania braziliensis Hsp90 (LbHsp90) to a similar extent, and the thermodynamic parameters of their interactions with LbHsp90 were similar, indicating that TPR2A-TPR2B forms the functional center for the LbHop interaction with LbHsp90. These results highlight the structural and functional similarity of Hop/Sti1 proteins, despite their low sequence conservation compared to the Hsp70 and Hsp90 systems, which are phylogenetic highly conserved. PMID:27103305

  12. Unusually high conservation of untranslated sequences in cDNAs for Trimeresurus flavoviridis phospholipase A2 isozymes.

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, T; Oda, N; Nakashima, K; Sasaki, H; Hattori, M; Sakaki, Y; Kihara, H; Ohno, M

    1992-01-01

    As a step toward understanding the structure and function of phospholipases A2 (PLA2s), we isolated and sequenced several cDNAs encoding Trimeresurus flavoviridis venom PLA2 isozymes including two [Lys49]PLA2s called basic proteins I and II, [Thr37]PLA2, and PLX'-PLA2. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences of these cDNAs with the previously isolated [Asp49]PLA2 cDNA revealed some interesting findings from the viewpoint of evolution. First, the homologies of the 5' and 3' untranslated regions (98% and 89%, respectively) were much higher than that of the protein-coding regions (67%). The predicted secondary structure showed the characteristic stem-loop structures for both the untranslated regions of the mRNAs, suggesting that these regions play some functional role(s) in translation or stability of mRNAs. Second, base substitutions appeared to have occurred at similar rates for the three positions of codons among these PLA2s. The results are discussed in terms of evolution of PLA2s. Northern blot analysis showed that these PLA2s are specific to venom gland. Images PMID:1528861

  13. Use of genotyping by sequencing data to develop a high-throughput and multifunctional SNP panel for conservation applications in Pacific lamprey.

    PubMed

    Hess, Jon E; Campbell, Nathan R; Docker, Margaret F; Baker, Cyndi; Jackson, Aaron; Lampman, Ralph; McIlraith, Brian; Moser, Mary L; Statler, David P; Young, William P; Wildbill, Andrew J; Narum, Shawn R

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing data can be mined for highly informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to develop high-throughput genomic assays for nonmodel organisms. However, choosing a set of SNPs to address a variety of objectives can be difficult because SNPs are often not equally informative. We developed an optimal combination of 96 high-throughput SNP assays from a total of 4439 SNPs identified in a previous study of Pacific lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus) and used them to address four disparate objectives: parentage analysis, species identification and characterization of neutral and adaptive variation. Nine of these SNPs are FST outliers, and five of these outliers are localized within genes and significantly associated with geography, run-timing and dwarf life history. Two of the 96 SNPs were diagnostic for two other lamprey species that were morphologically indistinguishable at early larval stages and were sympatric in the Pacific Northwest. The majority (85) of SNPs in the panel were highly informative for parentage analysis, that is, putatively neutral with high minor allele frequency across the species' range. Results from three case studies are presented to demonstrate the broad utility of this panel of SNP markers in this species. As Pacific lamprey populations are undergoing rapid decline, these SNPs provide an important resource to address critical uncertainties associated with the conservation and recovery of this imperiled species. PMID:24842551

  14. Properties of Sequence Conservation in Upstream Regulatory and Protein Coding Sequences among Paralogs in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Dale N.; Wiehe, Thomas

    Whole genome duplication (WGD) has catalyzed the formation of new species, genes with novel functions, altered expression patterns, complexified signaling pathways and has provided organisms a level of genetic robustness. We studied the long-term evolution and interrelationships of 5’ upstream regulatory sequences (URSs), protein coding sequences (CDSs) and expression correlations (EC) of duplicated gene pairs in Arabidopsis. Three distinct methods revealed significant evolutionary conservation between paralogous URSs and were highly correlated with microarray-based expression correlation of the respective gene pairs. Positional information on exact matches between sequences unveiled the contribution of micro-chromosomal rearrangements on expression divergence. A three-way rank analysis of URS similarity, CDS divergence and EC uncovered specific gene functional biases. Transcription factor activity was associated with gene pairs exhibiting conserved URSs and divergent CDSs, whereas a broad array of metabolic enzymes was found to be associated with gene pairs showing diverged URSs but conserved CDSs.

  15. A highly conserved N-terminal sequence for teleost vitellogenin with potential value to the biochemistry, molecular biology and pathology of vitellogenesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Folmar, L.D.; Denslow, N.D.; Wallace, R.A.; LaFleur, G.; Gross, T.S.; Bonomelli, S.; Sullivan, C.V.

    1995-01-01

    N-terminal amino acid sequences for vitellogenin (Vtg) from six species of teleost fish (striped bass, mummichog, pinfish, brown bullhead, medaka, yellow perch and the sturgeon) are compared with published N-terminal Vtg sequences for the lamprey, clawed frog and domestic chicken. Striped bass and mummichog had 100% identical amino acids between positions 7 and 21, while pinfish, brown bullhead, sturgeon, lamprey, Xenopus and chicken had 87%, 93%, 60%, 47%, 47-60%) for four transcripts and had 40% identical, respectively, with striped bass for the same positions. Partial sequences obtained for medaka and yellow perch were 100% identical between positions 5 to 10. The potential utility of this conserved sequence for studies on the biochemistry, molecular biology and pathology of vitellogenesis is discussed.

  16. Functionally conserved enhancers with divergent sequences in distant vertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Song; Oksenberg, Nir; Takayama, Sachiko; Heo, Seok -Jin; Poliakov, Alexander; Ahituv, Nadav; Dubchak, Inna; Boffelli, Dario

    2015-10-30

    To examine the contributions of sequence and function conservation in the evolution of enhancers, we systematically identified enhancers whose sequences are not conserved among distant groups of vertebrate species, but have homologous function and are likely to be derived from a common ancestral sequence. In conclusion, our approach combined comparative genomics and epigenomics to identify potential enhancer sequences in the genomes of three groups of distantly related vertebrate species.

  17. High-Throughput Sequencing Identifies Novel and Conserved Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) microRNAs in Response to Cucumber Green Mottle Mosaic Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Liang, C. Q.; Jiang, N.; Liu, P. F.; Li, J. Q.

    2015-01-01

    Seedlings of Cucumis sativus L. (cv. 'Zhongnong 16') were artificially inoculated with Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) at the three-true-leaf stage. Leaf and flower samples were collected at different time points post-inoculation (10, 30 and 50 d), and processed by high throughput sequencing analysis to identify candidate miRNA sequences. Bioinformatic analysis using screening criteria, and secondary structure prediction, indicated that 8 novel and 23 known miRNAs (including 15 miRNAs described for the first time in vivo) were produced by cucumber plants in response to CGMMV infection. Moreover, gene expression profiles (p-value <0.01) validated the expression of 3 of the novel miRNAs and 3 of the putative candidate miRNAs and identified a further 82 conserved miRNAs in CGMMV-infected cucumbers. Gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed that the predicted target genes of these 88 miRNAs, which were screened using the psRNATarget and miRanda algorithms, were involved in three functional categories: 2265 in molecular function, 1362 as cellular components and 276 in biological process. The subsequent Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis revealed that the predicted target genes were frequently involved in metabolic processes (166 pathways) and genetic information processes (40 pathways) and to a lesser degree the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites (12 pathways). These results could provide useful clues to help elucidate host-pathogen interactions in CGMMV and cucumber, as well as for the screening of resistance genes. PMID:26076360

  18. Inhibition of Dengue Virus Infections in Cell Cultures and in AG129 Mice by a Small Interfering RNA Targeting a Highly Conserved Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Stein, David A.; Perry, Stuart T.; Buck, Michael D.; Oehmen, Christopher S.; Fischer, Matthew A.; Poore, Elizabeth; Smith, Jessica L.; Lancaster, Alissa M.; Hirsch, Alec J.; Slifka, Mark K.; Nelson, Jay A.; Shresta, Sujan; Früh, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    The dengue viruses (DENVs) exist as numerous genetic strains that are grouped into four antigenically distinct serotypes. DENV strains from each serotype can cause severe disease and threaten public health in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide. No licensed antiviral agent to treat DENV infections is currently available, and there is an acute need for the development of novel therapeutics. We found that a synthetic small interfering RNA (siRNA) (DC-3) targeting the highly conserved 5′ cyclization sequence (5′CS) region of the DENV genome reduced, by more than 100-fold, the titers of representative strains from each DENV serotype in vitro. To determine if DC-3 siRNA could inhibit DENV in vivo, an “in vivo-ready” version of DC-3 was synthesized and tested against DENV-2 by using a mouse model of antibody-dependent enhancement of infection (ADE)-induced disease. Compared with the rapid weight loss and 5-day average survival time of the control groups, mice receiving the DC-3 siRNA had an average survival time of 15 days and showed little weight loss for approximately 12 days. DC-3-treated mice also contained significantly less virus than control groups in several tissues at various time points postinfection. These results suggest that exogenously introduced siRNA combined with the endogenous RNA interference processing machinery has the capacity to prevent severe dengue disease. Overall, the data indicate that DC-3 siRNA represents a useful research reagent and has potential as a novel approach to therapeutic intervention against the genetically diverse dengue viruses. PMID:21795337

  19. Identification of novel and conserved miRNAs involved in pollen development in Brassica campestris ssp. chinensis by high-throughput sequencing and degradome analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background microRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous, noncoding, small RNAs that have essential regulatory functions in plant growth, development, and stress response processes. However, limited information is available about their functions in sexual reproduction of flowering plants. Pollen development is an important process in the life cycle of a flowering plant and is a major factor that affects the yield and quality of crop seeds. Results This study aims to identify miRNAs involved in pollen development. Two independent small RNA libraries were constructed from the flower buds of the male sterile line (Bcajh97-01A) and male fertile line (Bcajh97-01B) of Brassica campestris ssp. chinensis. The libraries were subjected to high-throughput sequencing by using the Illumina Solexa system. Eight novel miRNAs on the other arm of known pre-miRNAs, 54 new conserved miRNAs, and 8 novel miRNA members were identified. Twenty-five pairs of novel miRNA/miRNA* were found. Among all the identified miRNAs, 18 differentially expressed miRNAs with over two-fold change between flower buds of male sterile line (Bcajh97-01A) and male fertile line (Bcajh97-01B) were identified. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that most of the differentially expressed miRNAs were preferentially expressed in flower buds of the male fertile line (Bcajh97-01B). Degradome analysis showed that a total of 15 genes were predicted to be the targets of seven miRNAs. Conclusions Our findings provide an overview of potential miRNAs involved in pollen development and interactions between miRNAs and their corresponding targets, which may provide important clues on the function of miRNAs in pollen development. PMID:24559317

  20. Bioinformatic Identification of Conserved Cis-Sequences in Coregulated Genes.

    PubMed

    Bülow, Lorenz; Hehl, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Bioinformatics tools can be employed to identify conserved cis-sequences in sets of coregulated plant genes because more and more gene expression and genomic sequence data become available. Knowledge on the specific cis-sequences, their enrichment and arrangement within promoters, facilitates the design of functional synthetic plant promoters that are responsive to specific stresses. The present chapter illustrates an example for the bioinformatic identification of conserved Arabidopsis thaliana cis-sequences enriched in drought stress-responsive genes. This workflow can be applied for the identification of cis-sequences in any sets of coregulated genes. The workflow includes detailed protocols to determine sets of coregulated genes, to extract the corresponding promoter sequences, and how to install and run a software package to identify overrepresented motifs. Further bioinformatic analyses that can be performed with the results are discussed. PMID:27557771

  1. Maize peroxidase Px5 has a highly conserved sequence in inbreds resistant to mycotoxin producing fungi which enhances fungal and insect resistance.

    PubMed

    Dowd, Patrick F; Johnson, Eric T

    2016-01-01

    Mycotoxin presence in maize causes health and economic issues for humans and animals. Although many studies have investigated expression differences of genes putatively governing resistance to producing fungi, few have confirmed a resistance role, or examined putative resistance gene structure in more than a couple of inbreds. The pericarp expression of maize Px5 has previously been associated with resistance to Aspergillus flavus growth and insects in a set of inbreds. Genes from 14 different inbreds that included ones with resistance and susceptibility to A. flavus, Fusarium proliferatum, F. verticillioides and F. graminearum and/or mycotoxin production were cloned using high fidelity enzymes, and sequenced. The sequence of Px5 from all resistant inbreds was identical, except for a single base change in two inbreds, only one of which affected the amino acid sequence. Conversely, the Px5 sequence from several susceptible inbreds had several base variations, some of which affected amino acid sequence that would potentially alter secondary structure, and thus enzyme function. The sequence of the maize peroxidase Px5 common to inbreds resistant to mycotoxigenic fungi was overexpressed in maize callus. Callus transformants overexpressing the gene caused significant reductions in growth for fall armyworms, corn earworms, and F. graminearum compared to transformant callus with a β-glucuronidase gene. This study demonstrates rarer transcripts of potential resistance genes overlooked by expression screens can be identified by sequence comparisons. A role in pest resistance can be verified by callus expression of the candidate genes, which can thereby justify larger scale transformation and regeneration of transgenic plants expressing the resistance gene for further evaluation. PMID:26659597

  2. Polymorphism, monomorphism, and sequences in conserved microsatellites in primate species.

    PubMed

    Blanquer-Maumont, A; Crouau-Roy, B

    1995-10-01

    Dimeric short tandem repeats are a source of highly polymorphic markers in the mammalian genome. Genetic variation at these hypervariable loci is extensively used for linkage analysis, for the identification of individuals, and may be useful for interpopulation and interspecies studies. In this paper, we analyze the variability and the sequences of a segment including three microsatellites, first described in man, in several species of primates (chimpanzee, orangutan, gibbon, and macaque) using the heterologous primers (man primers). This region is located on the human chromosome 6p, near the tumor necrosis factor genes, in the major histocompatibility complex. The fact that these primers work in all species studied indicates that they are conserved throughout the different lineages of the two superfamilies, the Hominoidea and the Cercopithecidea, represented by the macaques. However, the intervening sequence displays intraspecific and interspecific variability. The sites of base substitutions and the insertion/deletion events are not evenly distributed within this region. The data suggest that it is necessary to have a minimal number of repeats to increase the rate of mutation sufficiently to allow the development of polymorphism. In some species, the microsatellites present single base variations which reduce the number of contiguous repeats, thus apparently slowing the rate of additional slippage events. Species with such variations or a low number of repeats are monomorphic. These microsatellite sequences are informative in the comparison of closely related species and reflect the phylogeny of the Old World monkeys, apes, and man. PMID:7563137

  3. Conserved sequence pattern in a wide variety of phosphoesterases.

    PubMed Central

    Koonin, E. V.

    1994-01-01

    A unique sequence pattern, designated the GD/GNH signature, was shown to be conserved in a wide variety of phosphoesterases. The enzymes containing this signature cleave phosphoester bonds in such different substrates as (1) phosphoserine and phosphothreonine in polypeptides; (2) bis(5'-nucleosidyl)-tetraphosphates; (3) nucleoside 5' phosphates; (4) 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide phosphates; (5) polynucleotides; (6) 2'-5' phosphodiesters in RNA (intron) lariats; (7) sphingomyelin; and (7) various phosphomonoesters. Two conserved acidic amino acid residues and a conserved histidine residue may be directly involved in phosphoester bond cleavage. PMID:8003970

  4. Conserved Sequence Preferences Contribute to Substrate Recognition by the Proteasome*

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Houqing; Singh Gautam, Amit K.; Wilmington, Shameika R.; Wylie, Dennis; Martinez-Fonts, Kirby; Kago, Grace; Warburton, Marie; Chavali, Sreenivas; Inobe, Tomonao; Finkelstein, Ilya J.; Babu, M. Madan

    2016-01-01

    The proteasome has pronounced preferences for the amino acid sequence of its substrates at the site where it initiates degradation. Here, we report that modulating these sequences can tune the steady-state abundance of proteins over 2 orders of magnitude in cells. This is the same dynamic range as seen for inducing ubiquitination through a classic N-end rule degron. The stability and abundance of His3 constructs dictated by the initiation site affect survival of yeast cells and show that variation in proteasomal initiation can affect fitness. The proteasome's sequence preferences are linked directly to the affinity of the initiation sites to their receptor on the proteasome and are conserved between Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and human cells. These findings establish that the sequence composition of unstructured initiation sites influences protein abundance in vivo in an evolutionarily conserved manner and can affect phenotype and fitness. PMID:27226608

  5. Molecular cloning of mouse glycolate oxidase. High evolutionary conservation and presence of an iron-responsive element-like sequence in the mRNA.

    PubMed

    Kohler, S A; Menotti, E; Kühn, L C

    1999-01-22

    Iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) control the synthesis of several proteins in iron metabolism by binding to iron-responsive elements (IREs), a hairpin structure in the untranslated region (UTR) of corresponding mRNAs. Binding of IRPs to IREs in the 5' UTR inhibits translation of ferritin heavy and light chain, erythroid aminolevulinic acid synthase, mitochondrial aconitase, and Drosophila succinate dehydrogenase b, whereas IRP binding to IREs in the 3' UTR of transferrin receptor mRNA prolongs mRNA half-life. To identify new targets of IRPs, we devised a method to enrich IRE-containing mRNAs by using recombinant IRP-1 as an affinity matrix. A cDNA library established from enriched mRNA was screened by an RNA-protein band shift assay. This revealed a novel IRE-like sequence in the 3' UTR of a liver-specific mouse mRNA. The newly identified cDNA codes for a protein with high homology to plant glycolate oxidase (GOX). Recombinant protein expressed in bacteria displayed enzymatic GOX activity. Therefore, this cDNA represents the first vertebrate GOX homologue. The IRE-like sequence in mouse GOX exhibited strong binding to IRPs at room temperature. However, it differs from functional IREs by a mismatch in the middle of its upper stem and did not confer iron-dependent regulation in cells. PMID:9891009

  6. The highly conserved amino acid sequence motif Tyr-Gly-Asp-Thr-Asp-Ser in alpha-like DNA polymerases is required by phage phi 29 DNA polymerase for protein-primed initiation and polymerization.

    PubMed Central

    Bernad, A; Lázaro, J M; Salas, M; Blanco, L

    1990-01-01

    The alpha-like DNA polymerases from bacteriophage phi 29 and other viruses, prokaryotes and eukaryotes contain an amino acid consensus sequence that has been proposed to form part of the dNTP binding site. We have used site-directed mutants to study five of the six highly conserved consecutive amino acids corresponding to the most conserved C-terminal segment (Tyr-Gly-Asp-Thr-Asp-Ser). Our results indicate that in phi 29 DNA polymerase this consensus sequence, although irrelevant for the 3'----5' exonuclease activity, is essential for initiation and elongation. Based on these results and on its homology with known or putative metal-binding amino acid sequences, we propose that in phi 29 DNA polymerase the Tyr-Gly-Asp-Thr-Asp-Ser consensus motif is part of the dNTP binding site, involved in the synthetic activities of the polymerase (i.e., initiation and polymerization), and that it is involved particularly in the metal binding associated with the dNTP site. Images PMID:2191296

  7. Local Function Conservation in Sequence and Structure Space

    PubMed Central

    Weinhold, Nils; Sander, Oliver; Domingues, Francisco S.; Lengauer, Thomas; Sommer, Ingolf

    2008-01-01

    We assess the variability of protein function in protein sequence and structure space. Various regions in this space exhibit considerable difference in the local conservation of molecular function. We analyze and capture local function conservation by means of logistic curves. Based on this analysis, we propose a method for predicting molecular function of a query protein with known structure but unknown function. The prediction method is rigorously assessed and compared with a previously published function predictor. Furthermore, we apply the method to 500 functionally unannotated PDB structures and discuss selected examples. The proposed approach provides a simple yet consistent statistical model for the complex relations between protein sequence, structure, and function. The GOdot method is available online (http://godot.bioinf.mpi-inf.mpg.de). PMID:18604264

  8. High-Throughput Sequencing Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Jason A.; Spacek, Damek; Snyder, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The human genome sequence has profoundly altered our understanding of biology, human diversity and disease. The path from the first draft sequence to our nascent era of personal genomes and genomic medicine has been made possible only because of the extraordinary advancements in DNA sequencing technologies over the past ten years. Here, we discuss commonly used high-throughput sequencing platforms, the growing array of sequencing assays developed around them as well as the challenges facing current sequencing platforms and their clinical application. PMID:26000844

  9. HIGHLY CONSERVED N-TERMINAL SEQUENCE FOR TELEOST VITELLOGENIN WITH POTENTIAL VALUE TO THE BIOCHEMISTRY, MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY OF VITELLOGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    N-terminal amino acid sequences for vitellogenin (Vtg) from six species of teleost fish: striped bass, Morone saxatillus; mummichog, Fundulus heteroclitus; pinfish, Lagodon rhomboides; brown bullhead, Ameiurus nebulosus; medaka, Oryzias latipes; yellow perch, Percaflavescens and ...

  10. Conservation patterns in different functional sequence categoriesof divergent Drosophila species

    SciTech Connect

    Papatsenko, Dmitri; Kislyuk, Andrey; Levine, Michael; Dubchak, Inna

    2005-10-01

    We have explored the distributions of fully conservedungapped blocks in genome-wide pairwise alignments of recently completedspecies of Drosophila: D.yakuba, D.ananassae, D.pseudoobscura, D.virilisand D.mojavensis. Based on these distributions we have found that nearlyevery functional sequence category possesses its own distinctiveconservation pattern, sometimes independent of the overall sequenceconservation level. In the coding and regulatory regions, the ungappedblocks were longer than in introns, UTRs and non-functional sequences. Atthe same time, the blocks in the coding regions carried 3N+2 signaturecharacteristic to synonymic substitutions in the 3rd codon positions.Larger block sizes in transcription regulatory regions can be explainedby the presence of conserved arrays of binding sites for transcriptionfactors. We also have shown that the longest ungapped blocks, or'ultraconserved' sequences, are associated with specific gene groups,including those encoding ion channels and components of the cytoskeleton.We discussed how restrained conservation patterns may help in mappingfunctional sequence categories and improving genomeannotation.

  11. Sturgeon conservation genomics: SNP discovery and validation using RAD sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ogden, R; Gharbi, K; Mugue, N; Martinsohn, J; Senn, H; Davey, J W; Pourkazemi, M; McEwing, R; Eland, C; Vidotto, M; Sergeev, A; Congiu, L

    2013-06-01

    Caviar-producing sturgeons belonging to the genus Acipenser are considered to be one of the most endangered species groups in the world. Continued overfishing in spite of increasing legislation, zero catch quotas and extensive aquaculture production have led to the collapse of wild stocks across Europe and Asia. The evolutionary relationships among Adriatic, Russian, Persian and Siberian sturgeons are complex because of past introgression events and remain poorly understood. Conservation management, traceability and enforcement suffer a lack of appropriate DNA markers for the genetic identification of sturgeon at the species, population and individual level. This study employed RAD sequencing to discover and characterize single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) DNA markers for use in sturgeon conservation in these four tetraploid species over three biological levels, using a single sequencing lane. Four population meta-samples and eight individual samples from one family were barcoded separately before sequencing. Analysis of 14.4 Gb of paired-end RAD data focused on the identification of SNPs in the paired-end contig, with subsequent in silico and empirical validation of candidate markers. Thousands of putatively informative markers were identified including, for the first time, SNPs that show population-wide differentiation between Russian and Persian sturgeons, representing an important advance in our ability to manage these cryptic species. The results highlight the challenges of genotyping-by-sequencing in polyploid taxa, while establishing the potential genetic resources for developing a new range of caviar traceability and enforcement tools. PMID:23473098

  12. Conservation patterns in angiosperm rDNA ITS2 sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Hershkovitz, M A; Zimmer, E A

    1996-01-01

    The two internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2) of nuclear ribosomal DNA have become commonly exploited sources of informative variation for interspecific-/intergeneric-level phylogenetic analyses among angiosperms and other eukaryotes. We present an alignment in which one-third to one-half of the ITS2 sequence is alignable above the family level in angiosperms and a phenetic analysis showing that ITS2 contains information sufficient to diagnose lineages at several hierarchical levels. Base compositional analysis shows that angiosperm ITS2 is inherently GC-rich, and that the proportion of T is much more variable than that for other bases. We propose a general model of angiosperm ITS2 secondary structure that shows common pairing relationships for most of the conserved sequence tracts. Variations in our secondary structure predictions for sequences from different taxa indicate that compensatory mutation is not limited to paired positions. PMID:8760866

  13. Conservative Patch Algorithm and Mesh Sequencing for PAB3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, S. P.; Abdol-Hamid, K. S.

    2005-01-01

    A mesh-sequencing algorithm and a conservative patched-grid-interface algorithm (hereafter Patch Algorithm ) have been incorporated into the PAB3D code, which is a computer program that solves the Navier-Stokes equations for the simulation of subsonic, transonic, or supersonic flows surrounding an aircraft or other complex aerodynamic shapes. These algorithms are efficient, flexible, and have added tremendously to the capabilities of PAB3D. The mesh-sequencing algorithm makes it possible to perform preliminary computations using only a fraction of the grid cells (provided the original cell count is divisible by an integer) along any grid coordinate axis, independently of the other axes. The patch algorithm addresses another critical need in multi-block grid situation where the cell faces of adjacent grid blocks may not coincide, leading to errors in calculating fluxes of conserved physical quantities across interfaces between the blocks. The patch algorithm, based on the Stokes integral formulation of the applicable conservation laws, effectively matches each of the interfacial cells on one side of the block interface to the corresponding fractional cell area pieces on the other side. This approach is comprehensive and unified such that all interface topology is automatically processed without user intervention. This algorithm is implemented in a preprocessing code that creates a cell-by-cell database that will maintain flux conservation at any level of full or reduced grid density as the user may choose by way of the mesh-sequencing algorithm. These two algorithms have enhanced the numerical accuracy of the code, reduced the time and effort for grid preprocessing, and provided users with the flexibility of performing computations at any desired full or reduced grid resolution to suit their specific computational requirements.

  14. Conserved Sequences at the Origin of Adenovirus DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Stillman, Bruce W.; Topp, William C.; Engler, Jeffrey A.

    1982-01-01

    The origin of adenovirus DNA replication lies within an inverted sequence repetition at either end of the linear, double-stranded viral DNA. Initiation of DNA replication is primed by a deoxynucleoside that is covalently linked to a protein, which remains bound to the newly synthesized DNA. We demonstrate that virion-derived DNA-protein complexes from five human adenovirus serological subgroups (A to E) can act as a template for both the initiation and the elongation of DNA replication in vitro, using nuclear extracts from adenovirus type 2 (Ad2)-infected HeLa cells. The heterologous template DNA-protein complexes were not as active as the homologous Ad2 DNA, most probably due to inefficient initiation by Ad2 replication factors. In an attempt to identify common features which may permit this replication, we have also sequenced the inverted terminal repeated DNA from human adenovirus serotypes Ad4 (group E), Ad9 and Ad10 (group D), and Ad31 (group A), and we have compared these to previously determined sequences from Ad2 and Ad5 (group C), Ad7 (group B), and Ad12 and Ad18 (group A) DNA. In all cases, the sequence around the origin of DNA replication can be divided into two structural domains: a proximal A · T-rich region which is partially conserved among these serotypes, and a distal G · C-rich region which is less well conserved. The G · C-rich region contains sequences similar to sequences present in papovavirus replication origins. The two domains may reflect a dual mechanism for initiation of DNA replication: adenovirus-specific protein priming of replication, and subsequent utilization of this primer by host replication factors for completion of DNA synthesis. Images PMID:7143575

  15. In Vivo Enhancer Analysis Chromosome 16 Conserved NoncodingSequences

    SciTech Connect

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Ahituv, Nadav; Moses, Alan M.; Nobrega,Marcelo; Prabhakar, Shyam; Shoukry, Malak; Minovitsky, Simon; Visel,Axel; Dubchak, Inna; Holt, Amy; Lewis, Keith D.; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Akiyama, Jennifer; De Val, Sarah; Afzal, Veena; Black, Brian L.; Couronne, Olivier; Eisen, Michael B.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2006-02-01

    The identification of enhancers with predicted specificitiesin vertebrate genomes remains a significant challenge that is hampered bya lack of experimentally validated training sets. In this study, weleveraged extreme evolutionary sequence conservation as a filter toidentify putative gene regulatory elements and characterized the in vivoenhancer activity of human-fish conserved and ultraconserved1 noncodingelements on human chromosome 16 as well as such elements from elsewherein the genome. We initially tested 165 of these extremely conservedsequences in a transgenic mouse enhancer assay and observed that 48percent (79/165) functioned reproducibly as tissue-specific enhancers ofgene expression at embryonic day 11.5. While driving expression in abroad range of anatomical structures in the embryo, the majority of the79 enhancers drove expression in various regions of the developingnervous system. Studying a set of DNA elements that specifically droveforebrain expression, we identified DNA signatures specifically enrichedin these elements and used these parameters to rank all ~;3,400human-fugu conserved noncoding elements in the human genome. The testingof the top predictions in transgenic mice resulted in a three-foldenrichment for sequences with forebrain enhancer activity. These datadramatically expand the catalogue of in vivo-characterized human geneenhancers and illustrate the future utility of such training sets for avariety of iological applications including decoding the regulatoryvocabulary of the human genome.

  16. Genetic mapping of legume orthologs reveals high conservation of synteny between lentil species and the sequenced genomes of Medicago and chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Gujaria-Verma, Neha; Vail, Sally L.; Carrasquilla-Garcia, Noelia; Penmetsa, R. Varma; Cook, Douglas R.; Farmer, Andrew D.; Vandenberg, Albert; Bett, Kirstin E.

    2014-01-01

    Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) is a global food crop with increasing importance for food security in south Asia and other regions. Lens ervoides, a wild relative of cultivated lentil, is an important source of agronomic trait variation. Lens is a member of the galegoid clade of the Papilionoideae family, which includes other important dietary legumes such as chickpea (Cicer arietinum) and pea (Pisum sativum), and the sequenced model legume Medicago truncatula. Understanding the genetic structure of Lens spp. in relation to more fully sequenced legumes would allow leveraging of genomic resources. A set of 1107 TOG-based amplicons were identified in L. ervoides and a subset thereof used to design SNP markers for mapping. A map of L. ervoides consisting of 377 SNP markers spread across seven linkage groups was developed using a GoldenGate genotyping array and single SNP marker assays. Comparison with maps of M. truncatula and L. culinaris documented considerable shared synteny and led to the identification of a few major translocations and a major inversion that distinguish Lens from M. truncatula, as well as a translocation that distinguishes L. culinaris from L. ervoides. The identification of chromosome-level differences among Lens spp. will aid in the understanding of introgression of genes from L. ervoides into cultivated L. culinaris, furthering genetic research and breeding applications in lentil. PMID:25538716

  17. Genomic Investigation Reveals Highly Conserved, Mosaic, Recombination Events Associated with Capsular Switching among Invasive Neisseria meningitidis Serogroup W Sequence Type (ST)-11 Strains

    PubMed Central

    Mustapha, Mustapha M.; Marsh, Jane W.; Krauland, Mary G.; Fernandez, Jorge O.; de Lemos, Ana Paula S.; Hotopp, Julie C. Dunning; Wang, Xin; Mayer, Leonard W.; Lawrence, Jeffrey G.; Hiller, N. Luisa; Harrison, Lee H.

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is an important cause of meningococcal disease globally. Sequence type (ST)-11 clonal complex (cc11) is a hypervirulent meningococcal lineage historically associated with serogroup C capsule and is believed to have acquired the W capsule through a C to W capsular switching event. We studied the sequence of capsule gene cluster (cps) and adjoining genomic regions of 524 invasive W cc11 strains isolated globally. We identified recombination breakpoints corresponding to two distinct recombination events within W cc11: A 8.4-kb recombinant region likely acquired from W cc22 including the sialic acid/glycosyl-transferase gene, csw resulted in a C→W change in capsular phenotype and a 13.7-kb recombinant segment likely acquired from Y cc23 lineage includes 4.5 kb of cps genes and 8.2 kb downstream of the cps cluster resulting in allelic changes in capsule translocation genes. A vast majority of W cc11 strains (497/524, 94.8%) retain both recombination events as evidenced by sharing identical or very closely related capsular allelic profiles. These data suggest that the W cc11 capsular switch involved two separate recombination events and that current global W cc11 meningococcal disease is caused by strains bearing this mosaic capsular switch. PMID:27289093

  18. RNA-Sequencing Analysis of TCDD-Induced Responses in Zebrafish Liver Reveals High Relatedness to In Vivo Mammalian Models and Conserved Biological Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi-Hua; Xu, Hongyan; Zheng, Weiling; Lam, Siew Hong; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2013-01-01

    TCDD is one of the most persistent environmental toxicants in biological systems and its effect through aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) has been well characterized. However, the information on TCDD-induced toxicity in other molecular pathways is rather limited. To fully understand molecular toxicity of TCDD in an in vivo animal model, adult zebrafish were exposed to TCDD at 10 nM for 96 h and the livers were sampled for RNA-sequencing based transcriptomic profiling. A total of 1,058 differently expressed genes were identified based on fold-change>2 and TPM (transcripts per million) >10. Among the top 20 up-regulated genes, 10 novel responsive genes were identified and verified by RT-qPCR analysis on independent samples. Transcriptomic analysis indicated several deregulated pathways associated with cell cycle, endocrine disruptors, signal transduction and immune systems. Comparative analyses of TCDD-induced transcriptomic changes between fish and mammalian models revealed that proteomic pathway is consistently up-regulated while calcium signaling pathway and several immune-related pathways are generally down-regulated. Finally, our study also suggested that zebrafish model showed greater similarity to in vivo mammalian models than in vitro models. Our study indicated that the zebrafish is a valuable in vivo model in toxicogenomic analyses for understanding molecular toxicity of environmental toxicants relevant to human health. The expression profiles associated with TCDD could be useful for monitoring environmental dioxin and dioxin-like contamination. PMID:24204792

  19. Proteome-Wide Discovery of Evolutionary Conserved Sequences in Disordered Regions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen Ba, Alex N.; Yeh, Brian J.; van Dyk, Dewald; Davidson, Alan R.; Andrews, Brenda J.; Weiss, Eric L.; Moses, Alan M.

    2016-01-01

    At least 30% of human proteins are thought to contain intrinsically disordered regions, which lack stable structural conformation. Despite lacking enzymatic functions and having few protein domains, disordered regions are functionally important for protein regulation and contain short linear motifs (short peptide sequences involved in protein-protein interactions), but in most disordered regions, the functional amino acid residues remain unknown. We searched for evolutionarily conserved sequences within disordered regions according to the hypothesis that conservation would indicate functional residues. Using a phylogenetic hidden Markov model (phylo-HMM), we made accurate, specific predictions of functional elements in disordered regions even when these elements are only two or three amino acids long. Among the conserved sequences that we identified were previously known and newly identified short linear motifs, and we experimentally verified key examples, including a motif that may mediate interaction between protein kinase Cbk1 and its substrates. We also observed that hub proteins, which interact with many partners in a protein interaction network, are highly enriched in these conserved sequences. Our analysis enabled the systematic identification of the functional residues in disordered regions and suggested that at least 5% of amino acids in disordered regions are important for function. PMID:22416277

  20. Molecular characterization of a bovine Y-specific DNA sequence conserved in taurine and zebu breeds.

    PubMed

    Alves, Beatriz C A; Mayer, Mário G; Taber, Anna Paula; Egito, Andréa A; Fagundes, Valéria; McElreavey, Ken; Moreira-Filho, Carlos A

    2006-06-01

    The identification of new bovine male-specific DNA sequences is of great interest because the bovine Y chromosome remains poorly characterized in terms of physical and genetic maps. Since taurine and zebu Y chromosomes are structurally different, the identification of Y-specific sequences present in both sub-species is particularly important: these sequences are of evolutionary significance and can be broadly used for embryo sexing. In this work, we initially used the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique to search for male-specific sequences present as monomorphic markers in genomic DNA from zebu and taurine bulls. A male-specific RAPD band was found to be present and highly conserved in both sub-species, as demonstrated by Southern blotting, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and DNA sequencing. In a previous work, a pair of primers derived from this marker was successfully used in taurine and zebu embryo sexing. PMID:17286047

  1. Studying RNA Homology and Conservation with Infernal: From Single Sequences to RNA Families.

    PubMed

    Barquist, Lars; Burge, Sarah W; Gardner, Paul P

    2016-01-01

    Emerging high-throughput technologies have led to a deluge of putative non-coding RNA (ncRNA) sequences identified in a wide variety of organisms. Systematic characterization of these transcripts will be a tremendous challenge. Homology detection is critical to making maximal use of functional information gathered about ncRNAs: identifying homologous sequence allows us to transfer information gathered in one organism to another quickly and with a high degree of confidence. ncRNA presents a challenge for homology detection, as the primary sequence is often poorly conserved and de novo secondary structure prediction and search remain difficult. This unit introduces methods developed by the Rfam database for identifying "families" of homologous ncRNAs starting from single "seed" sequences, using manually curated sequence alignments to build powerful statistical models of sequence and structure conservation known as covariance models (CMs), implemented in the Infernal software package. We provide a step-by-step iterative protocol for identifying ncRNA homologs and then constructing an alignment and corresponding CM. We also work through an example for the bacterial small RNA MicA, discovering a previously unreported family of divergent MicA homologs in genus Xenorhabdus in the process. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27322404

  2. Identification of antimicrobial peptides from teleosts and anurans in expressed sequence tag databases using conserved signal sequences.

    PubMed

    Tessera, Valentina; Guida, Filomena; Juretić, Davor; Tossi, Alessandro

    2012-03-01

    The problem of multidrug resistance requires the efficient and accurate identification of new classes of antimicrobial agents. Endogenous antimicrobial peptides produced by most organisms are a promising source of such molecules. We have exploited the high conservation of signal sequences in teleost and anuran antimicrobial peptides to search cDNA (expressed sequence tag) databases for likely candidates. Subject sequences were then analysed for the presence of potential antimicrobial peptides based on physicochemical properties (amphipathic helical structure, cationicity) and use of the D-descriptor model to predict the therapeutic index (relation between the minimum inhibitory concentration and the concentration giving 50% haemolysis). This analysis also suggested mutations to probe the role of the primary structure in determining potency and selectivity. Selected sequences were chemically synthesized and the antimicrobial activity of the peptides was confirmed. In particular, a short (21-residue) sequence, likely of sticklefish origin, showed potent activity and it was possible to tune the spectrum of action and/or selectivity by combining three directed mutations. Membrane permeabilization studies on both bacterial and host cells indicate that the mode of action was prevalently membranolytic. This method opens up the possibility for more effective searching of the vast and continuously growing expressed sequence tag databases for novel antimicrobial peptides, which are likely abundant, and the efficient identification of the most promising candidates among them. PMID:22188679

  3. The Large Mitochondrial Genome of Symbiodinium minutum Reveals Conserved Noncoding Sequences between Dinoflagellates and Apicomplexans

    PubMed Central

    Shoguchi, Eiichi; Shinzato, Chuya; Hisata, Kanako; Satoh, Nori; Mungpakdee, Sutada

    2015-01-01

    Even though mitochondrial genomes, which characterize eukaryotic cells, were first discovered more than 50 years ago, mitochondrial genomics remains an important topic in molecular biology and genome sciences. The Phylum Alveolata comprises three major groups (ciliates, apicomplexans, and dinoflagellates), the mitochondrial genomes of which have diverged widely. Even though the gene content of dinoflagellate mitochondrial genomes is reportedly comparable to that of apicomplexans, the highly fragmented and rearranged genome structures of dinoflagellates have frustrated whole genomic analysis. Consequently, noncoding sequences and gene arrangements of dinoflagellate mitochondrial genomes have not been well characterized. Here we report that the continuous assembled genome (∼326 kb) of the dinoflagellate, Symbiodinium minutum, is AT-rich (∼64.3%) and that it contains three protein-coding genes. Based upon in silico analysis, the remaining 99% of the genome comprises transcriptomic noncoding sequences. RNA edited sites and unique, possible start and stop codons clarify conserved regions among dinoflagellates. Our massive transcriptome analysis shows that almost all regions of the genome are transcribed, including 27 possible fragmented ribosomal RNA genes and 12 uncharacterized small RNAs that are similar to mitochondrial RNA genes of the malarial parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. Gene map comparisons show that gene order is only slightly conserved between S. minutum and P. falciparum. However, small RNAs and intergenic sequences share sequence similarities with P. falciparum, suggesting that the function of noncoding sequences has been preserved despite development of very different genome structures. PMID:26199191

  4. The Large Mitochondrial Genome of Symbiodinium minutum Reveals Conserved Noncoding Sequences between Dinoflagellates and Apicomplexans.

    PubMed

    Shoguchi, Eiichi; Shinzato, Chuya; Hisata, Kanako; Satoh, Nori; Mungpakdee, Sutada

    2015-08-01

    Even though mitochondrial genomes, which characterize eukaryotic cells, were first discovered more than 50 years ago, mitochondrial genomics remains an important topic in molecular biology and genome sciences. The Phylum Alveolata comprises three major groups (ciliates, apicomplexans, and dinoflagellates), the mitochondrial genomes of which have diverged widely. Even though the gene content of dinoflagellate mitochondrial genomes is reportedly comparable to that of apicomplexans, the highly fragmented and rearranged genome structures of dinoflagellates have frustrated whole genomic analysis. Consequently, noncoding sequences and gene arrangements of dinoflagellate mitochondrial genomes have not been well characterized. Here we report that the continuous assembled genome (∼326 kb) of the dinoflagellate, Symbiodinium minutum, is AT-rich (∼64.3%) and that it contains three protein-coding genes. Based upon in silico analysis, the remaining 99% of the genome comprises transcriptomic noncoding sequences. RNA edited sites and unique, possible start and stop codons clarify conserved regions among dinoflagellates. Our massive transcriptome analysis shows that almost all regions of the genome are transcribed, including 27 possible fragmented ribosomal RNA genes and 12 uncharacterized small RNAs that are similar to mitochondrial RNA genes of the malarial parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. Gene map comparisons show that gene order is only slightly conserved between S. minutum and P. falciparum. However, small RNAs and intergenic sequences share sequence similarities with P. falciparum, suggesting that the function of noncoding sequences has been preserved despite development of very different genome structures. PMID:26199191

  5. Sequence-related human proteins cluster by degree of evolutionary conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrowka, Ralf; Patzak, Andreas; Herzel, Hanspeter; Holste, Dirk

    2004-11-01

    Gene duplication followed by adaptive evolution is thought to be a central mechanism for the emergence of novel genes. To illuminate the contribution of duplicated protein-coding sequences to the complexity of the human genome, we study the connectivity of pairwise sequence-related human proteins and construct a network (N) of linked protein sequences with shared similarities. We find that (i) the connectivity distribution P(k) for k sequence-related proteins decays as a power law P(k)˜k-γ with γ≈1.2 , (ii) the top rank of N consists of a single large cluster of proteins (≈70%) , while bottom ranks consist of multiple isolated clusters, and (iii) structural characteristics of N show both a high degree of clustering and an intermediate connectivity (“small-world” features). We gain further insight into structural properties of N by studying the relationship between the connectivity distribution and the phylogenetic conservation of proteins in bacteria, plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates. We find that (iv) the proportion of sequence-related proteins increases with increasing extent of evolutionary conservation. Our results support that small-world network properties constitute a footprint of an evolutionary mechanism and extend the traditional interpretation of protein families.

  6. Sequence conservation and functional constraint on intergenic spacers in reduced genomes of the obligate symbiont Buchnera.

    PubMed

    Degnan, Patrick H; Ochman, Howard; Moran, Nancy A

    2011-09-01

    Analyses of genome reduction in obligate bacterial symbionts typically focus on the removal and retention of protein-coding regions, which are subject to ongoing inactivation and deletion. However, these same forces operate on intergenic spacers (IGSs) and affect their contents, maintenance, and rates of evolution. IGSs comprise both non-coding, non-functional regions, including decaying pseudogenes at varying stages of recognizability, as well as functional elements, such as genes for sRNAs and regulatory control elements. The genomes of Buchnera and other small genome symbionts display biased nucleotide compositions and high rates of sequence evolution and contain few recognizable regulatory elements. However, IGS lengths are highly correlated across divergent Buchnera genomes, suggesting the presence of functional elements. To identify functional regions within the IGSs, we sequenced two Buchnera genomes (from aphid species Uroleucon ambrosiae and Acyrthosiphon kondoi) and applied a phylogenetic footprinting approach to alignments of orthologous IGSs from a total of eight Buchnera genomes corresponding to six aphid species. Inclusion of these new genomes allowed comparative analyses at intermediate levels of divergence, enabling the detection of both conserved elements and previously unrecognized pseudogenes. Analyses of these genomes revealed that 232 of 336 IGS alignments over 50 nucleotides in length displayed substantial sequence conservation. Conserved alignment blocks within these IGSs encompassed 88 Shine-Dalgarno sequences, 55 transcriptional terminators, 5 Sigma-32 binding sites, and 12 novel small RNAs. Although pseudogene formation, and thus IGS formation, are ongoing processes in these genomes, a large proportion of intergenic spacers contain functional sequences. PMID:21912528

  7. Monoclonal antibody production to human and bovine 2':3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase): high-specificity recognition in whole brain acetone powders and conservation of sequence between CNP1 and CNP2.

    PubMed

    Sprinkle, T J; Agee, J F; Tippins, R B; Chamberlain, C R; Faguet, G B; De Vries, G H

    1987-11-24

    Monoclonal antibodies against human and bovine 2':3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase) were generated by fusing FOX-NY myeloma cells with spleen cells from RBF/Dn mice previously immunized with the purified brain antigens. The enzyme isolated from bovine brain was quite basic, with an isoelectric point of 9.71 and both the bovine and human enzymes consisted of a closely spaced doublet at approximately 44 and 46 kDa on SDS-PAGE. Six monoclonals were were identified as strongly recognizing the enzyme on both ELISA plates and on immunoblots of whole brain protein. Four monoclonals very weakly cross-reacted with guinea pig myelin basic protein. In contrast with two previous reports, some of our monoclonal antibodies did immunostain 2 or 3 protein bands in peripheral nerve, two bands closely corresponding to those immunostained in central nervous system (CNS) myelin, the Wolfgram protein fraction and in acetone powders of whole brain. Each of the 6 monoclonals reacting strongly on immunoblots recognized the enzyme in from 2 to 5 of the species examined (human, bovine, rat, mouse and rabbit). In addition, all 6 monoclonals that immunostained the enzyme in whole brain, myelin and Wolfgram protein immunoblots recognized both CNP1 (44 kDa) and CNP2 (46 kDa). The two closely spaced protein bands observed on SDS-PAGE and previously stained on immunoblots of CNS CNPase using polyvalent rabbit anti-bovine CNPase antisera, and now different monoclonal antibodies, appear to be immunologically related and to contain highly conserved sequences. PMID:2446713

  8. Energy Conservation Featured in Illinois High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modern Schools, 1976

    1976-01-01

    The William Fremd High School in Palatine, Illinois, scheduled to open in 1977, is being built with energy conservation uppermost in mind. In this system, 70 heat pumps will heat and cool 300,000 square feet of educational facilities. (Author/MLF)

  9. Variation in conserved non-coding sequences on chromosome 5q andsusceptibility to asthma and atopy

    SciTech Connect

    Donfack, Joseph; Schneider, Daniel H.; Tan, Zheng; Kurz,Thorsten; Dubchak, Inna; Frazer, Kelly A.; Ober, Carole

    2005-09-10

    Background: Evolutionarily conserved sequences likely havebiological function. Methods: To determine whether variation in conservedsequences in non-coding DNA contributes to risk for human disease, westudied six conserved non-coding elements in the Th2 cytokine cluster onhuman chromosome 5q31 in a large Hutterite pedigree and in samples ofoutbred European American and African American asthma cases and controls.Results: Among six conserved non-coding elements (>100 bp,>70percent identity; human-mouse comparison), we identified one singlenucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in each of two conserved elements and sixSNPs in the flanking regions of three conserved elements. We genotypedour samples for four of these SNPs and an additional three SNPs each inthe IL13 and IL4 genes. While there was only modest evidence forassociation with single SNPs in the Hutterite and European Americansamples (P<0.05), there were highly significant associations inEuropean Americans between asthma and haplotypes comprised of SNPs in theIL4 gene (P<0.001), including a SNP in a conserved non-codingelement. Furthermore, variation in the IL13 gene was strongly associatedwith total IgE (P = 0.00022) and allergic sensitization to mold allergens(P = 0.00076) in the Hutterites, and more modestly associated withsensitization to molds in the European Americans and African Americans (P<0.01). Conclusion: These results indicate that there is overalllittle variation in the conserved non-coding elements on 5q31, butvariation in IL4 and IL13, including possibly one SNP in a conservedelement, influence asthma and atopic phenotypes in diversepopulations.

  10. High-bay Lighting Energy Conservation Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Metzger, Jesse Dean

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple high-bay lighting system inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: 1000 Watt to 750 Watt High-pressure Sodium lighting retrofit, 400 Watt to 360 Watt High Pressure Sodium lighting retrofit, High Intensity Discharge to T5 lighting retrofit, High Intensity Discharge to T8 lighting retrofit, and Daylighting. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.

  11. High resolution schemes for hyperbolic conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harten, A.

    1983-01-01

    A class of new explicit second order accurate finite difference schemes for the computation of weak solutions of hyperbolic conservation laws is presented. These highly nonlinear schemes are obtained by applying a nonoscillatory first order accurate scheme to an appropriately modified flux function. The so-derived second order accurate schemes achieve high resolution while preserving the robustness of the original nonoscillatory first order accurate scheme. Numerical experiments are presented to demonstrate the performance of these new schemes.

  12. Quantification of tertiary structural conservation despite primary sequence drift in the globin fold.

    PubMed

    Aronson, H E; Royer, W E; Hendrickson, W A

    1994-10-01

    The globin family of protein structures was the first for which it was recognized that tertiary structure can be highly conserved even when primary sequences have diverged to a virtually undetectable level of similarity. This principle of structural inertia in molecular evolution is now evident for many other protein families. We have performed a systematic comparison of the sequences and structures of 6 representative hemoglobin subunits as diverse in origin as plants, clams, and humans. Our analysis is based on a 97-residue helical core in common to all 6 structures. Amino acid sequence identities range from 12.4% to 42.3% in pairwise comparisons, and, despite these variations, the maximal RMS deviation in alpha-carbon positions is 3.02 A. Overall, sequence similarity and structural deviation are significantly anticorrelated, with a correlation coefficient of -0.71, but for a set of structures having under 20% pairwise identity, this anticorrelation falls to -0.38, which emphasizes the weak connection between a specific sequence and the tertiary fold. There is substantial variability in structure outside the helical core, and functional characteristics of these globins also differ appreciably. Nevertheless, despite variations in detail that the sequence dissimilarities and functional differences imply, the core structures of these globins remain remarkably preserved. PMID:7849587

  13. Dynamic behavior of an intrinsically unstructured linker domain is conserved in the face of negligible amino acid sequence conservation.

    PubMed

    Daughdrill, Gary W; Narayanaswami, Pranesh; Gilmore, Sara H; Belczyk, Agniezka; Brown, Celeste J

    2007-09-01

    Proteins or regions of proteins that do not form compact globular structures are classified as intrinsically unstructured proteins (IUPs). IUPs are common in nature and have essential molecular functions, but even a limited understanding of the evolution of their dynamic behavior is lacking. The primary objective of this work was to test the evolutionary conservation of dynamic behavior for a particular class of IUPs that form intrinsically unstructured linker domains (IULD) that tether flanking folded domains. This objective was accomplished by measuring the backbone flexibility of several IULD homologues using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The backbone flexibility of five IULDs, representing three kingdoms, was measured and analyzed. Two IULDs from animals, one IULD from fungi, and two IULDs from plants showed similar levels of backbone flexibility that were consistent with the absence of a compact globular structure. In contrast, the amino acid sequences of the IULDs from these three taxa showed no significant similarity. To investigate how the dynamic behavior of the IULDs could be conserved in the absence of detectable sequence conservation, evolutionary rate studies were performed on a set of nine mammalian IULDs. The results of this analysis showed that many sites in the IULD are evolving neutrally, suggesting that dynamic behavior can be maintained in the absence of natural selection. This work represents the first experimental test of the evolutionary conservation of dynamic behavior and demonstrates that amino acid sequence conservation is not required for the conservation of dynamic behavior and presumably molecular function. PMID:17721672

  14. Sequence Conservation, Radial Distance and Packing Density in Spherical Viral Capsids

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi-Wen; Huang, Tsun-Tsao; Shih, Chung-Shiuan; Hwang, Jenn-Kang

    2015-01-01

    The conservation level of a residue is a useful measure about the importance of that residue in protein structure and function. Much information about sequence conservation comes from aligning homologous sequences. Profiles showing the variation of the conservation level along the sequence are usually interpreted in evolutionary terms and dictated by site similarities of a proper set of homologous sequences. Here, we report that, of the viral icosahedral capsids, the sequence conservation profile can be determined by variations in the distances between residues and the centroid of the capsid – with a direct inverse proportionality between the conservation level and the centroid distance – as well as by the spatial variations in local packing density. Examining both the centroid and the packing density models against a dataset of 51 crystal structures of nonhomologous icosahedral capsids, we found that many global patterns and minor features derived from the viral structures are consistent with those present in the sequence conservation profiles. The quantitative link between the level of conservation and structural features like centroid-distance or packing density allows us to look at residue conservation from a structural viewpoint as well as from an evolutionary viewpoint. PMID:26132081

  15. Polyclonal antibody against conserved sequences of mce1A protein blocks MTB infection in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sivagnanam, Sasikala; Namasivayam, Nalini; Chellam, Rajamanickam

    2012-03-01

    The pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is largely due to its ability to enter and survive within human macrophages. It is suggested that a specific protein namely mammalian cell entry protein is involved in the pathogenesis and the specific gene for this protein mce1A has been identified in several pathogenic organisms such as Rickettsia, Shigella, Escherichia coli, Helicobacter, Streptomyces, Klebsiella, Vibrio, Neisseria, Rhodococcus, Nocardioides, Saccharopolyspora erthyrae, and Pseudomonas. Analysis of mce1 operons in the above mentioned organisms through bioinformatics tools has revealed the presence of unique sequences (conserved regions) suggesting that these sequences may be involved in the process of infection. Presently, the mce1A full-length (1,365 bp) region from Mycobacterium bovis and its conserved regions (303 bp) were cloned in to an expression vector and the purified expressed proteins of molecular weight ~47 and ~11 kDa, respectively, were injected to rabbits to raise the polyclonal antibodies. The purified polyclonal antibodies were checked for their ability to inhibit the Mycobacterium infection in cultured human macrophages. In macrophage invasion assay, when antibody added at high concentration, decrease in viable counts was observed in all cell cultures within the first 5 days after infection, where the intracellular bacterial CFU obtained from the infected MTB increased by the 3rd day at low concentration of antibody. The macrophage invasion assay has indicated that the purified antibodies of mce1A conserved region can inhibit the infection of Mycobacterium. PMID:22159737

  16. Evolutionary sequence comparisons using high-density oligonucleotide arrays.

    PubMed

    Hacia, J G; Makalowski, W; Edgemon, K; Erdos, M R; Robbins, C M; Fodor, S P; Brody, L C; Collins, F S

    1998-02-01

    We explored the utility of high-density oligonucleotide arrays (DNA chips) for obtaining sequence information from homologous genes in closely related species. Orthologues of the human BRCA1 exon 11, all approximately 3.4 kb in length and ranging from 98.2% to 83.5% nucleotide identity, were subjected to hybridization-based and conventional dideoxysequencing analysis. Retrospective guidelines for identifying high-fidelity hybridization-based sequence calls were formulated based upon dideoxysequencing results. Prospective application of these rules yielded base-calling with at least 98.8% accuracy over orthologous sequence tracts shown to have approximately 99% identity. For higher primate sequences with greater than 97% nucleotide identity, base-calling was made with at least 99.91% accuracy covering a minimum of 97% of the sequence. Using a second-tier confirmatory hybridization chip strategy, shown in several cases to confirm the identity of predicted sequence changes, the complete sequence of the chimpanzee, gorilla and orangutan orthologues should be deducible solely through hybridization-based methodologies. Analysis of less highly conserved orthologues can still identify conserved nucleotide tracts of at least 15 nucleotides and can provide useful information for designing primers. DNA-chip based assays can be a valuable new technology for obtaining high-throughput cost-effective sequence information from related genomes. PMID:9462745

  17. Forest conservation delivers highly variable coral reef conservation outcomes.

    PubMed

    Klein, Carissa J; Jupiter, Stacy D; Selig, Elizabeth R; Watts, Matthew E; Halpern, Benjamin S; Kamal, Muhammad; Roelfsema, Chris; Possingham, Hugh P

    2012-06-01

    Coral reefs are threatened by human activities on both the land (e.g., deforestation) and the sea (e.g., overfishing). Most conservation planning for coral reefs focuses on removing threats in the sea, neglecting management actions on the land. A more integrated approach to coral reef conservation, inclusive of land-sea connections, requires an understanding of how and where terrestrial conservation actions influence reefs. We address this by developing a land-sea planning approach to inform fine-scale spatial management decisions and test it in Fiji. Our aim is to determine where the protection of forest can deliver the greatest return on investment for coral reef ecosystems. To assess the benefits of conservation to coral reefs, we estimate their relative condition as influenced by watershed-based pollution and fishing. We calculate the cost-effectiveness of protecting forest and find that investments deliver rapidly diminishing returns for improvements to relative reef condition. For example, protecting 2% of forest in one area is almost 500 times more beneficial than protecting 2% in another area, making prioritization essential. For the scenarios evaluated, relative coral reef condition could be improved by 8-58% if all remnant forest in Fiji were protected rather than deforested. Finally, we determine the priority of each coral reef for implementing a marine protected area when all remnant forest is protected for conservation. The general results will support decisions made by the Fiji Protected Area Committee as they establish a national protected area network that aims to protect 20% of the land and 30% of the inshore waters by 2020. Although challenges remain, we can inform conservation decisions around the globe by tackling the complex issues relevant to integrated land-sea planning. PMID:22827132

  18. A search for conserved sequences in coding regions reveals that the let-7 microRNA targets Dicer within its coding sequence

    PubMed Central

    Forman, Joshua J.; Legesse-Miller, Aster; Coller, Hilary A.

    2008-01-01

    Recognition sites for microRNAs (miRNAs) have been reported to be located in the 3′ untranslated regions of transcripts. In a computational screen for highly conserved motifs within coding regions, we found an excess of sequences conserved at the nucleotide level within coding regions in the human genome, the highest scoring of which are enriched for miRNA target sequences. To validate our results, we experimentally demonstrated that the let-7 miRNA directly targets the miRNA-processing enzyme Dicer within its coding sequence, thus establishing a mechanism for a miRNA/Dicer autoregulatory negative feedback loop. We also found computational evidence to suggest that miRNA target sites in coding regions and 3′ UTRs may differ in mechanism. This work demonstrates that miRNAs can directly target transcripts within their coding region in animals, and it suggests that a complete search for the regulatory targets of miRNAs should be expanded to include genes with recognition sites within their coding regions. As more genomes are sequenced, the methodological approach that we used for identifying motifs with high sequence conservation will be increasingly valuable for detecting functional sequence motifs within coding regions. PMID:18812516

  19. Vertebrate paralogous conserved noncoding sequences may be related to gene expressions in brain.

    PubMed

    Matsunami, Masatoshi; Saitou, Naruya

    2013-01-01

    Vertebrate genomes include gene regulatory elements in protein-noncoding regions. A part of gene regulatory elements are expected to be conserved according to their functional importance, so that evolutionarily conserved noncoding sequences (CNSs) might be good candidates for those elements. In addition, paralogous CNSs, which are highly conserved among both orthologous loci and paralogous loci, have the possibility of controlling overlapping expression patterns of their adjacent paralogous protein-coding genes. The two-round whole-genome duplications (2R WGDs), which most probably occurred in the vertebrate common ancestors, generated large numbers of paralogous protein-coding genes and their regulatory elements. These events could contribute to the emergence of vertebrate features. However, the evolutionary history and influences of the 2R WGDs are still unclear, especially in noncoding regions. To address this issue, we identified paralogous CNSs. Region-focused Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) search of each synteny block revealed 7,924 orthologous CNSs and 309 paralogous CNSs conserved among eight high-quality vertebrate genomes. Paralogous CNSs we found contained 115 previously reported ones and newly detected 194 ones. Through comparisons with VISTA Enhancer Browser and available ChIP-seq data, one-third (103) of paralogous CNSs detected in this study showed gene regulatory activity in the brain at several developmental stages. Their genomic locations are highly enriched near the transcription factor-coding regions, which are expressed in brain and neural systems. These results suggest that paralogous CNSs are conserved mainly because of maintaining gene expression in the vertebrate brain. PMID:23267051

  20. BlockLogo: visualization of peptide and sequence motif conservation.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Lars Rønn; Kudahl, Ulrich Johan; Simon, Christian; Sun, Jing; Schönbach, Christian; Reinherz, Ellis L; Zhang, Guang Lan; Brusic, Vladimir

    2013-12-31

    BlockLogo is a web-server application for the visualization of protein and nucleotide fragments, continuous protein sequence motifs, and discontinuous sequence motifs using calculation of block entropy from multiple sequence alignments. The user input consists of a multiple sequence alignment, selection of motif positions, type of sequence, and output format definition. The output has BlockLogo along with the sequence logo, and a table of motif frequencies. We deployed BlockLogo as an online application and have demonstrated its utility through examples that show visualization of T-cell epitopes and B-cell epitopes (both continuous and discontinuous). Our additional example shows a visualization and analysis of structural motifs that determine the specificity of peptide binding to HLA-DR molecules. The BlockLogo server also employs selected experimentally validated prediction algorithms to enable on-the-fly prediction of MHC binding affinity to 15 common HLA class I and class II alleles as well as visual analysis of discontinuous epitopes from multiple sequence alignments. It enables the visualization and analysis of structural and functional motifs that are usually described as regular expressions. It provides a compact view of discontinuous motifs composed of distant positions within biological sequences. BlockLogo is available at: http://research4.dfci.harvard.edu/cvc/blocklogo/ and http://met-hilab.bu.edu/blocklogo/. PMID:24001880

  1. New insights into SRY regulation through identification of 5' conserved sequences

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Diana GF; Bowles, Josephine; Koopman, Peter; Lehnert, Sigrid

    2008-01-01

    Background SRY is the pivotal gene initiating male sex determination in most mammals, but how its expression is regulated is still not understood. In this study we derived novel SRY 5' flanking genomic sequence data from bovine and caprine genomic BAC clones. Results We identified four intervals of high homology upstream of SRY by comparison of human, bovine, pig, goat and mouse genomic sequences. These conserved regions contain putative binding sites for a large number of known transcription factor families, including several that have been implicated previously in sex determination and early gonadal development. Conclusion Our results reveal potentially important SRY regulatory elements, mutations in which might underlie cases of idiopathic human XY sex reversal. PMID:18851760

  2. High-bay Lighting Energy Conservation Measures

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple high-bay lighting system inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: 1000 Watt to 750 Watt High-pressure Sodium lighting retrofit, 400 Watt to 360 Watt High Pressure Sodium lighting retrofit, High Intensity Discharge to T5 lighting retrofit, High Intensity Discharge to T8 lighting retrofit, and Daylighting. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, building lifemore » cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.« less

  3. Readings in Wildlife and Fish Conservation, High School Conservation Curriculum Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ensminger, Jack

    This publication is a tentative edition of readings on Wildlife and Fish Conservation in Louisiana, and as such it forms part of one of the four units of study designed for an experimental high school course, the "High School Conservation Curriculum Project." The other three units are concerned with Forest Conervation, Soil and Water Conservation,…

  4. High speed nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2011-05-17

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid. Each type of labeled nucleotide comprises an acceptor fluorophore attached to a phosphate portion of the nucleotide such that the fluorophore is removed upon incorporation into a growing strand. Fluorescent signal is emitted via fluorescent resonance energy transfer between the donor fluorophore and the acceptor fluorophore as each nucleotide is incorporated into the growing strand. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing strand.

  5. Distinct Functional Constraints Partition Sequence Conservation in a cis-Regulatory Element

    PubMed Central

    Ruvinsky, Ilya

    2011-01-01

    Different functional constraints contribute to different evolutionary rates across genomes. To understand why some sequences evolve faster than others in a single cis-regulatory locus, we investigated function and evolutionary dynamics of the promoter of the Caenorhabditis elegans unc-47 gene. We found that this promoter consists of two distinct domains. The proximal promoter is conserved and is largely sufficient to direct appropriate spatial expression. The distal promoter displays little if any conservation between several closely related nematodes. Despite this divergence, sequences from all species confer robustness of expression, arguing that this function does not require substantial sequence conservation. We showed that even unrelated sequences have the ability to promote robust expression. A prominent feature shared by all of these robustness-promoting sequences is an AT-enriched nucleotide composition consistent with nucleosome depletion. Because general sequence composition can be maintained despite sequence turnover, our results explain how different functional constraints can lead to vastly disparate rates of sequence divergence within a promoter. PMID:21655084

  6. Comparison of mealybug (Planococcus lilacinus) and fruit fly genomes: isolation and analysis of conserved sequences and their utility in studying synteny in the mealybug.

    PubMed

    Mohan, K N; Rani, B S; Selvam, S; Debarshi, S; Kadandale, J S

    2007-01-01

    By using ligation-mediated PCR products from mealybug DNA as tester and biotinylated fly DNA as driver, we recovered a fraction of the tester that remains hybridized to driver following high-stringency washing conditions. This fraction is expected to contain mealybug sequences conserved in the fly (MCF). Reciprocal experiments enabled the isolation of fly sequences conserved in the mealybug (FCM). Coding sequences among MCF show amino acid identities >40% with fly proteins, allowing a reliable identification of orthologs. Three sequences from the fly cytogenetic positions 98-99 were hybridized onto mealybug chromosomes and the results identified differences in synteny between the two species. Taken together, our results present a method for direct isolation of sequences conserved between an 'orphan' (mealybug) genome and a 'reference' (fly) genome and showed that these sequences can be used to study chromosome synteny in the mealybug. PMID:18253039

  7. Accelerated Evolution of Conserved Noncoding Sequences in theHuman Genome

    SciTech Connect

    Prambhakar, Shyam; Noonan, James P.; Paabo, Svante; Rubin, EdwardM.

    2006-07-06

    Genomic comparisons between human and distant, non-primatemammals are commonly used to identify cis-regulatory elements based onconstrained sequence evolution. However, these methods fail to detect"cryptic" functional elements, which are too weakly conserved amongmammals to distinguish from nonfunctional DNA. To address this problem,we explored the potential of deep intra-primate sequence comparisons. Wesequenced the orthologs of 558 kb of human genomic sequence, coveringmultiple loci involved in cholesterol homeostasis, in 6 nonhumanprimates. Our analysis identified 6 noncoding DNA elements displayingsignificant conservation among primates, but undetectable in more distantcomparisons. In vitro and in vivo tests revealed that at least three ofthese 6 elements have regulatory function. Notably, the mouse orthologsof these three functional human sequences had regulatory activity despitetheir lack of significant sequence conservation, indicating that they arecryptic ancestral cis-regulatory elements. These regulatory elementscould still be detected in a smaller set of three primate speciesincluding human, rhesus and marmoset. Since the human and rhesus genomesequences are already available, and the marmoset genome is activelybeing sequenced, the primate-specific conservation analysis describedhere can be applied in the near future on a whole-genome scale, tocomplement the annotation provided by more distant speciescomparisons.

  8. Detection of Weakly Conserved Ancestral Mammalian RegulatorySequences by Primate Comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qian-fei; Prabhakar, Shyam; Chanan, Sumita; Cheng,Jan-Fang; Rubin, Edward M.; Boffelli, Dario

    2006-06-01

    Genomic comparisons between human and distant, non-primatemammals are commonly used to identify cis-regulatory elements based onconstrained sequence evolution. However, these methods fail to detectcryptic functional elements, which are too weakly conserved among mammalsto distinguish from nonfunctional DNA. To address this problem, weexplored the potential of deep intra-primate sequence comparisons. Wesequenced the orthologs of 558 kb of human genomic sequence, coveringmultiple loci involved in cholesterol homeostasis, in 6 nonhumanprimates. Our analysis identified 6 noncoding DNA elements displayingsignificant conservation among primates, but undetectable in more distantcomparisons. In vitro and in vivo tests revealed that at least three ofthese 6 elements have regulatory function. Notably, the mouse orthologsof these three functional human sequences had regulatory activity despitetheir lack of significant sequence conservation, indicating that they arecryptic ancestral cis-regulatory elements. These regulatory elementscould still be detected in a smaller set of three primate speciesincluding human, rhesus and marmoset. Since the human and rhesus genomesequences are already available, and the marmoset genome is activelybeing sequenced, the primate-specific conservation analysis describedhere can be applied in the near future on a whole-genome scale, tocomplement the annotation provided by more distant speciescomparisons.

  9. Conservation of the human telomere sequence (TTAGGG)n among vertebrates.

    PubMed Central

    Meyne, J; Ratliff, R L; Moyzis, R K

    1989-01-01

    To determine the evolutionary origin of the human telomere sequence (TTAGGG)n, biotinylated oligodeoxynucleotides of this sequence were hybridized to metaphase spreads from 91 different species, including representative orders of bony fish, reptiles, amphibians, birds, and mammals. Under stringent hybridization conditions, fluorescent signals were detected at the telomeres of all chromosomes, in all 91 species. The conservation of the (TTAGGG)n sequence and its telomeric location, in species thought to share a common ancestor over 400 million years ago, strongly suggest that this sequence is the functional vertebrate telomere. Images PMID:2780561

  10. The BsaHI restriction-modification system: Cloning, sequencing and analysis of conserved motifs

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Robert K; Roberts, Richard J

    2008-01-01

    Background Restriction and modification enzymes typically recognise short DNA sequences of between two and eight bases in length. Understanding the mechanism of this recognition represents a significant challenge that we begin to address for the BsaHI restriction-modification system, which recognises the six base sequence GRCGYC. Results The DNA sequences of the genes for the BsaHI methyltransferase, bsaHIM, and restriction endonuclease, bsaHIR, have been determined (GenBank accession #EU386360), cloned and expressed in E. coli. Both the restriction endonuclease and methyltransferase enzymes share significant similarity with a group of 6 other enzymes comprising the restriction-modification systems HgiDI and HgiGI and the putative HindVP, NlaCORFDP, NpuORFC228P and SplZORFNP restriction-modification systems. A sequence alignment of these homologues shows that their amino acid sequences are largely conserved and highlights several motifs of interest. We target one such conserved motif, reading SPERRFD, at the C-terminal end of the bsaHIR gene. A mutational analysis of these amino acids indicates that the motif is crucial for enzymatic activity. Sequence alignment of the methyltransferase gene reveals a short motif within the target recognition domain that is conserved among enzymes recognising the same sequences. Thus, this motif may be used as a diagnostic tool to define the recognition sequences of the cytosine C5 methyltransferases. Conclusion We have cloned and sequenced the BsaHI restriction and modification enzymes. We have identified a region of the R. BsaHI enzyme that is crucial for its activity. Analysis of the amino acid sequence of the BsaHI methyltransferase enzyme led us to propose two new motifs that can be used in the diagnosis of the recognition sequence of the cytosine C5-methyltransferases. PMID:18479503

  11. Phylum-Level Conservation of Regulatory Information in Nematodes despite Extensive Non-coding Sequence Divergence

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Kacy L.; Arthur, Robert K.; Ruvinsky, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    Gene regulatory information guides development and shapes the course of evolution. To test conservation of gene regulation within the phylum Nematoda, we compared the functions of putative cis-regulatory sequences of four sets of orthologs (unc-47, unc-25, mec-3 and elt-2) from distantly-related nematode species. These species, Caenorhabditis elegans, its congeneric C. briggsae, and three parasitic species Meloidogyne hapla, Brugia malayi, and Trichinella spiralis, represent four of the five major clades in the phylum Nematoda. Despite the great phylogenetic distances sampled and the extensive sequence divergence of nematode genomes, all but one of the regulatory elements we tested are able to drive at least a subset of the expected gene expression patterns. We show that functionally conserved cis-regulatory elements have no more extended sequence similarity to their C. elegans orthologs than would be expected by chance, but they do harbor motifs that are important for proper expression of the C. elegans genes. These motifs are too short to be distinguished from the background level of sequence similarity, and while identical in sequence they are not conserved in orientation or position. Functional tests reveal that some of these motifs contribute to proper expression. Our results suggest that conserved regulatory circuitry can persist despite considerable turnover within cis elements. PMID:26020930

  12. Whole genome sequencing of Ethiopian highlanders reveals conserved hypoxia tolerance genes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although it has long been proposed that genetic factors contribute to adaptation to high altitude, such factors remain largely unverified. Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing have made it feasible to analyze genome-wide patterns of genetic variation in human populations. Since traditionally such studies surveyed only a small fraction of the genome, interpretation of the results was limited. Results We report here the results of the first whole genome resequencing-based analysis identifying genes that likely modulate high altitude adaptation in native Ethiopians residing at 3,500 m above sea level on Bale Plateau or Chennek field in Ethiopia. Using cross-population tests of selection, we identify regions with a significant loss of diversity, indicative of a selective sweep. We focus on a 208 kbp gene-rich region on chromosome 19, which is significant in both of the Ethiopian subpopulations sampled. This region contains eight protein-coding genes and spans 135 SNPs. To elucidate its potential role in hypoxia tolerance, we experimentally tested whether individual genes from the region affect hypoxia tolerance in Drosophila. Three genes significantly impact survival rates in low oxygen: cic, an ortholog of human CIC, Hsl, an ortholog of human LIPE, and Paf-AHα, an ortholog of human PAFAH1B3. Conclusions Our study reveals evolutionarily conserved genes that modulate hypoxia tolerance. In addition, we show that many of our results would likely be unattainable using data from exome sequencing or microarray studies. This highlights the importance of whole genome sequencing for investigating adaptation by natural selection. PMID:24555826

  13. Conservation of plasmid DNA sequences in coronatine-producing pathovars of Pseudomonas syringae

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, C.L.; Young, S.A. ); Mitchell, R.E. )

    1991-04-01

    In Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato PT23.2, plasmid pPT23A (101 kb) is involved in synthesis of the phytotoxin coronatine. The physical characterization of mutations that abolished coronatine production indicated that at least 30 kb of pPT23A DNA are required for toxin synthesis. In the present study, {sup 32}P-labeled DNA fragments from the 30-kb region of pPT23A hybridized to plasmid DNAs from several coronatine-producing pathovars of P. syringae under conditions of high stringency. These experiments indicated that this region of pPT23A was strongly conserved in large plasmids (90 to 105 kb) that reside in P. syringae pv. atropurpurea, glycinea, and morsprunorum. The functional significance of the observed homology was demonstrated in marker-exchange experiments in which Tn5-inactivated sequences from the 30-kb region of pPT23A were used to mutate coronatine synthesis genes in the three heterologous pathovars. Physical characterization of the Tn5 insertions generated by marker exchange indicated that genes controlling coronatine synthesis in P. syringae pv. atropurpurea 1304, glycinea 4180, and morsprunorum 567 and 3714 were located on the large indigenous plasmids where homology was originally detected. Therefore, coronatine biosynthesis genes are strongly conserved in the plasmid DNAs of four producing pathovars, despite their disparate origins (California, Japan, New Zealand, Great Britain, and Italy).

  14. FRESCO: Referential compression of highly similar sequences.

    PubMed

    Wandelt, Sebastian; Leser, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    In many applications, sets of similar texts or sequences are of high importance. Prominent examples are revision histories of documents or genomic sequences. Modern high-throughput sequencing technologies are able to generate DNA sequences at an ever-increasing rate. In parallel to the decreasing experimental time and cost necessary to produce DNA sequences, computational requirements for analysis and storage of the sequences are steeply increasing. Compression is a key technology to deal with this challenge. Recently, referential compression schemes, storing only the differences between a to-be-compressed input and a known reference sequence, gained a lot of interest in this field. In this paper, we propose a general open-source framework to compress large amounts of biological sequence data called Framework for REferential Sequence COmpression (FRESCO). Our basic compression algorithm is shown to be one to two orders of magnitudes faster than comparable related work, while achieving similar compression ratios. We also propose several techniques to further increase compression ratios, while still retaining the advantage in speed: 1) selecting a good reference sequence; and 2) rewriting a reference sequence to allow for better compression. In addition,we propose a new way of further boosting the compression ratios by applying referential compression to already referentially compressed files (second-order compression). This technique allows for compression ratios way beyond state of the art, for instance,4,000:1 and higher for human genomes. We evaluate our algorithms on a large data set from three different species (more than 1,000 genomes, more than 3 TB) and on a collection of versions of Wikipedia pages. Our results show that real-time compression of highly similar sequences at high compression ratios is possible on modern hardware. PMID:24524158

  15. Novel sequences encoding venom C-type lectins are conserved in phylogenetically and geographically distinct Echis and Bitis viper species.

    PubMed

    Harrison, R A; Oliver, J; Hasson, S S; Bharati, K; Theakston, R D G

    2003-10-01

    Envenoming by Echis saw scaled vipers and Bitis arietans puff adders is the leading cause of death and morbidity in Africa due to snake bite. Despite their medical importance, the composition and constituent functionality of venoms from these vipers remains poorly understood. Here, we report the cloning of cDNA sequences encoding seven clusters or isoforms of the haemostasis-disruptive C-type lectin (CTL) proteins from the venom glands of Echis ocellatus, E. pyramidum leakeyi, E. carinatus sochureki and B. arietans. All these CTL sequences encoded the cysteine scaffold that defines the carbohydrate-recognition domain of mammalian CTLs. All but one of the Echis and Bitis CTL sequences showed greater sequence similarity to the beta than alpha CTL subunits in venoms of related Asian and American vipers. Four of the new CTL clusters showed marked inter-cluster sequence conservation across all four viper species which were significantly different from that of previously published viper CTLs. The other three Echis and Bitis CTL clusters showed varying degrees of sequence similarity to published viper venom CTLs. Because viper venom CTLs exhibit a high degree of sequence similarity and yet exert profoundly different effects on the mammalian haemostatic system, no attempt was made to assign functionality to the new Echis and Bitis CTLs on the basis of sequence alone. The extraordinary level of inter-specific and inter-generic sequence conservation exhibited by the Echis and Bitis CTLs leads us to speculate that antibodies to representative molecules should neutralise the biological function of this important group of venom toxins in vipers that are distributed throughout Africa, the Middle East and the Indian subcontinent. PMID:14557069

  16. Use of a Drosophila Genome-Wide Conserved Sequence Database to Identify Functionally Related cis-Regulatory Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Brody, Thomas; Yavatkar, Amarendra S; Kuzin, Alexander; Kundu, Mukta; Tyson, Leonard J; Ross, Jermaine; Lin, Tzu-Yang; Lee, Chi-Hon; Awasaki, Takeshi; Lee, Tzumin; Odenwald, Ward F

    2012-01-01

    Background: Phylogenetic footprinting has revealed that cis-regulatory enhancers consist of conserved DNA sequence clusters (CSCs). Currently, there is no systematic approach for enhancer discovery and analysis that takes full-advantage of the sequence information within enhancer CSCs. Results: We have generated a Drosophila genome-wide database of conserved DNA consisting of >100,000 CSCs derived from EvoPrints spanning over 90% of the genome. cis-Decoder database search and alignment algorithms enable the discovery of functionally related enhancers. The program first identifies conserved repeat elements within an input enhancer and then searches the database for CSCs that score highly against the input CSC. Scoring is based on shared repeats as well as uniquely shared matches, and includes measures of the balance of shared elements, a diagnostic that has proven to be useful in predicting cis-regulatory function. To demonstrate the utility of these tools, a temporally-restricted CNS neuroblast enhancer was used to identify other functionally related enhancers and analyze their structural organization. Conclusions: cis-Decoder reveals that co-regulating enhancers consist of combinations of overlapping shared sequence elements, providing insights into the mode of integration of multiple regulating transcription factors. The database and accompanying algorithms should prove useful in the discovery and analysis of enhancers involved in any developmental process. Developmental Dynamics 241:169–189, 2012. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Key findings A genome-wide catalog of Drosophila conserved DNA sequence clusters. cis-Decoder discovers functionally related enhancers. Functionally related enhancers share balanced sequence element copy numbers. Many enhancers function during multiple phases of development. PMID:22174086

  17. The Most Deeply Conserved Noncoding Sequences in Plants Serve Similar Functions to Those in Vertebrates Despite Large Differences in Evolutionary Rates[W

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Diane; Freeling, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In vertebrates, conserved noncoding elements (CNEs) are functionally constrained sequences that can show striking conservation over >400 million years of evolutionary distance and frequently are located megabases away from target developmental genes. Conserved noncoding sequences (CNSs) in plants are much shorter, and it has been difficult to detect conservation among distantly related genomes. In this article, we show not only that CNS sequences can be detected throughout the eudicot clade of flowering plants, but also that a subset of 37 CNSs can be found in all flowering plants (diverging ∼170 million years ago). These CNSs are functionally similar to vertebrate CNEs, being highly associated with transcription factor and development genes and enriched in transcription factor binding sites. Some of the most highly conserved sequences occur in genes encoding RNA binding proteins, particularly the RNA splicing–associated SR genes. Differences in sequence conservation between plants and animals are likely to reflect differences in the biology of the organisms, with plants being much more able to tolerate genomic deletions and whole-genome duplication events due, in part, to their far greater fecundity compared with vertebrates. PMID:24681619

  18. Genotyping by sequencing resolves shallow population structure to inform conservation of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha).

    PubMed

    Larson, Wesley A; Seeb, Lisa W; Everett, Meredith V; Waples, Ryan K; Templin, William D; Seeb, James E

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances in population genomics have made it possible to detect previously unidentified structure, obtain more accurate estimates of demographic parameters, and explore adaptive divergence, potentially revolutionizing the way genetic data are used to manage wild populations. Here, we identified 10 944 single-nucleotide polymorphisms using restriction-site-associated DNA (RAD) sequencing to explore population structure, demography, and adaptive divergence in five populations of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) from western Alaska. Patterns of population structure were similar to those of past studies, but our ability to assign individuals back to their region of origin was greatly improved (>90% accuracy for all populations). We also calculated effective size with and without removing physically linked loci identified from a linkage map, a novel method for nonmodel organisms. Estimates of effective size were generally above 1000 and were biased downward when physically linked loci were not removed. Outlier tests based on genetic differentiation identified 733 loci and three genomic regions under putative selection. These markers and genomic regions are excellent candidates for future research and can be used to create high-resolution panels for genetic monitoring and population assignment. This work demonstrates the utility of genomic data to inform conservation in highly exploited species with shallow population structure. PMID:24665338

  19. Genotyping by sequencing resolves shallow population structure to inform conservation of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Wesley A; Seeb, Lisa W; Everett, Meredith V; Waples, Ryan K; Templin, William D; Seeb, James E

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in population genomics have made it possible to detect previously unidentified structure, obtain more accurate estimates of demographic parameters, and explore adaptive divergence, potentially revolutionizing the way genetic data are used to manage wild populations. Here, we identified 10 944 single-nucleotide polymorphisms using restriction-site-associated DNA (RAD) sequencing to explore population structure, demography, and adaptive divergence in five populations of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) from western Alaska. Patterns of population structure were similar to those of past studies, but our ability to assign individuals back to their region of origin was greatly improved (>90% accuracy for all populations). We also calculated effective size with and without removing physically linked loci identified from a linkage map, a novel method for nonmodel organisms. Estimates of effective size were generally above 1000 and were biased downward when physically linked loci were not removed. Outlier tests based on genetic differentiation identified 733 loci and three genomic regions under putative selection. These markers and genomic regions are excellent candidates for future research and can be used to create high-resolution panels for genetic monitoring and population assignment. This work demonstrates the utility of genomic data to inform conservation in highly exploited species with shallow population structure. PMID:24665338

  20. PCR-based study of conserved and variable DNA sequences of Tritrichomonas foetus isolates from Saskatchewan, Canada.

    PubMed Central

    Riley, D E; Wagner, B; Polley, L; Krieger, J N

    1995-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Tritrichomonas foetus causes infertility and spontaneous abortion in cattle. In Saskatchewan, Canada, the culture prevalence of trichomonads was 65 of 1,048 (6%) among 1,048 bulls tested within a 1-year period ending in April 1994. Saskatchewan was previously thought to be free of the parasite. To confirm the culture results, possible T. foetus DNA presence was determined by the PCR. All of the 16 culture-positive isolates tested were PCR positive by a single-band test, but one PCR product was weak. DNA fingerprinting by both T17 PCR and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA PCR revealed genetic variation or polymorphism among the T. foetus isolates. T17 PCR also revealed conserved loci that distinguished these T. foetus isolates from Trichomonas vaginalis, from a variety of other protozoa, and from prokaryotes. TCO-1 PCR, a PCR test designed to sample DNA sequence homologous to the 5' flank of a highly conserved cell division control gene, detected genetic polymorphism at low stringency and a conserved, single locus at higher stringency. These findings suggested that T. foetus isolates exhibit both conserved genetic loci and polymorphic loci detectable by independent PCR methods. Both conserved and polymorphic genetic loci may prove useful for improved clinical diagnosis of T. foetus. The polymorphic loci detected by PCR suggested either a long history of infection or multiple lines of T. foetus infection in Saskatchewan. Polymorphic loci detected by PCR may provide data for epidemiologic studies of T. foetus. PMID:7615746

  1. Auditory sequence processing reveals evolutionarily conserved regions of frontal cortex in macaques and humans.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Benjamin; Kikuchi, Yukiko; Sun, Li; Hunter, David; Dick, Frederic; Smith, Kenny; Thiele, Alexander; Griffiths, Timothy D; Marslen-Wilson, William D; Petkov, Christopher I

    2015-01-01

    An evolutionary account of human language as a neurobiological system must distinguish between human-unique neurocognitive processes supporting language and evolutionarily conserved, domain-general processes that can be traced back to our primate ancestors. Neuroimaging studies across species may determine whether candidate neural processes are supported by homologous, functionally conserved brain areas or by different neurobiological substrates. Here we use functional magnetic resonance imaging in Rhesus macaques and humans to examine the brain regions involved in processing the ordering relationships between auditory nonsense words in rule-based sequences. We find that key regions in the human ventral frontal and opercular cortex have functional counterparts in the monkey brain. These regions are also known to be associated with initial stages of human syntactic processing. This study raises the possibility that certain ventral frontal neural systems, which play a significant role in language function in modern humans, originally evolved to support domain-general abilities involved in sequence processing. PMID:26573340

  2. Auditory sequence processing reveals evolutionarily conserved regions of frontal cortex in macaques and humans

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Benjamin; Kikuchi, Yukiko; Sun, Li; Hunter, David; Dick, Frederic; Smith, Kenny; Thiele, Alexander; Griffiths, Timothy D.; Marslen-Wilson, William D.; Petkov, Christopher I.

    2015-01-01

    An evolutionary account of human language as a neurobiological system must distinguish between human-unique neurocognitive processes supporting language and evolutionarily conserved, domain-general processes that can be traced back to our primate ancestors. Neuroimaging studies across species may determine whether candidate neural processes are supported by homologous, functionally conserved brain areas or by different neurobiological substrates. Here we use functional magnetic resonance imaging in Rhesus macaques and humans to examine the brain regions involved in processing the ordering relationships between auditory nonsense words in rule-based sequences. We find that key regions in the human ventral frontal and opercular cortex have functional counterparts in the monkey brain. These regions are also known to be associated with initial stages of human syntactic processing. This study raises the possibility that certain ventral frontal neural systems, which play a significant role in language function in modern humans, originally evolved to support domain-general abilities involved in sequence processing. PMID:26573340

  3. Genome-wide identification of conserved regulatory function in diverged sequences

    PubMed Central

    Taher, Leila; McGaughey, David M.; Maragh, Samantha; Aneas, Ivy; Bessling, Seneca L.; Miller, Webb; Nobrega, Marcelo A.; McCallion, Andrew S.; Ovcharenko, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Plasticity of gene regulatory encryption can permit DNA sequence divergence without loss of function. Functional information is preserved through conservation of the composition of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in a regulatory element. We have developed a method that can accurately identify pairs of functional noncoding orthologs at evolutionarily diverged loci by searching for conserved TFBS arrangements. With an estimated 5% false-positive rate (FPR) in approximately 3000 human and zebrafish syntenic loci, we detected approximately 300 pairs of diverged elements that are likely to share common ancestry and have similar regulatory activity. By analyzing a pool of experimentally validated human enhancers, we demonstrated that 7/8 (88%) of their predicted functional orthologs retained in vivo regulatory control. Moreover, in 5/7 (71%) of assayed enhancer pairs, we observed concordant expression patterns. We argue that TFBS composition is often necessary to retain and sufficient to predict regulatory function in the absence of overt sequence conservation, revealing an entire class of functionally conserved, evolutionarily diverged regulatory elements that we term “covert.” PMID:21628450

  4. Conserved Non-Coding Sequences are Associated with Rates of mRNA Decay in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Spangler, Jacob B.; Feltus, Frank Alex

    2013-01-01

    Steady-state mRNA levels are tightly regulated through a combination of transcriptional and post-transcriptional control mechanisms. The discovery of cis-acting DNA elements that encode these control mechanisms is of high importance. We have investigated the influence of conserved non-coding sequences (CNSs), DNA patterns retained after an ancient whole genome duplication event, on the breadth of gene expression and the rates of mRNA decay in Arabidopsis thaliana. The absence of CNSs near α duplicate genes was associated with a decrease in breadth of gene expression and slower mRNA decay rates while the presence CNSs near α duplicates was associated with an increase in breadth of gene expression and faster mRNA decay rates. The observed difference in mRNA decay rate was fastest in genes with CNSs in both non-transcribed and transcribed regions, albeit through an unknown mechanism. This study supports the notion that some Arabidopsis CNSs regulate the steady-state mRNA levels through post-transcriptional control mechanisms and that CNSs also play a role in controlling the breadth of gene expression. PMID:23675377

  5. Conservation of uORF repressiveness and sequence features in mouse, human and zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Guo-Liang; Pauli, Andrea; Schier, Alexander F.

    2016-01-01

    Upstream open reading frames (uORFs) are ubiquitous repressive genetic elements in vertebrate mRNAs. While much is known about the regulation of individual genes by their uORFs, the range of uORF-mediated translational repression in vertebrate genomes is largely unexplored. Moreover, it is unclear whether the repressive effects of uORFs are conserved across species. To address these questions, we analyse transcript sequences and ribosome profiling data from human, mouse and zebrafish. We find that uORFs are depleted near coding sequences (CDSes) and have initiation contexts that diminish their translation. Linear modelling reveals that sequence features at both uORFs and CDSes modulate the translation of CDSes. Moreover, the ratio of translation over 5′ leaders and CDSes is conserved between human and mouse, and correlates with the number of uORFs. These observations suggest that the prevalence of vertebrate uORFs may be explained by their conserved role in repressing CDS translation. PMID:27216465

  6. Conservation of uORF repressiveness and sequence features in mouse, human and zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Chew, Guo-Liang; Pauli, Andrea; Schier, Alexander F

    2016-01-01

    Upstream open reading frames (uORFs) are ubiquitous repressive genetic elements in vertebrate mRNAs. While much is known about the regulation of individual genes by their uORFs, the range of uORF-mediated translational repression in vertebrate genomes is largely unexplored. Moreover, it is unclear whether the repressive effects of uORFs are conserved across species. To address these questions, we analyse transcript sequences and ribosome profiling data from human, mouse and zebrafish. We find that uORFs are depleted near coding sequences (CDSes) and have initiation contexts that diminish their translation. Linear modelling reveals that sequence features at both uORFs and CDSes modulate the translation of CDSes. Moreover, the ratio of translation over 5' leaders and CDSes is conserved between human and mouse, and correlates with the number of uORFs. These observations suggest that the prevalence of vertebrate uORFs may be explained by their conserved role in repressing CDS translation. PMID:27216465

  7. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the tubeworm Lamellibrachia satsuma and structural conservation in the mitochondrial genome control regions of Order Sabellida.

    PubMed

    Patra, Ajit Kumar; Kwon, Yong Min; Kang, Sung Gyun; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro; Kim, Sang-Jin

    2016-04-01

    The control region of the mitochondrial genomes shows high variation in conserved sequence organizations, which follow distinct evolutionary patterns in different species or taxa. In this study, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of Lamellibrachia satsuma from the cold-seep region of Kagoshima Bay, as a part of whole genome study and extensively studied the structural features and patterns of the control region sequences. We obtained 15,037 bp of mitochondrial genome using Illumina sequencing and identified the non-coding AT-rich region or control region (354 bp, AT=83.9%) located between trnH and trnR. We found 7 conserved sequence blocks (CSB), scattered throughout the control region of L. satsuma and other taxa of Annelida. The poly-TA stretches, which commonly form the stem of multiple stem-loop structures, are most conserved in the CSB-I and CSB-II regions. The mitochondrial genome of L. satsuma encodes a unique repetitive sequence in the control region, which forms a unique secondary structure in comparison to Lamellibrachia luymesi. Phylogenetic analyses of all protein-coding genes indicate that L. satsuma forms a monophyletic clade with L. luymesi along with other tubeworms found in cold-seep regions (genera: Lamellibrachia, Escarpia, and Seepiophila). In general, the control region sequences of Annelida could be aligned with certainty within each genus, and to some extent within the family, but with a higher rate of variation in conserved regions. PMID:26776396

  8. Highly multiplexed DNA sequencing by capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, E.S.; Ueno, K.; Chang, H.T.

    1994-12-31

    It is obvious that irrespective of whichever basic technology is eventually selected to sequence the entire human genome there are substantial gains to be made if a high degree of multiplexing of parallel runs can be implemented. Such multiplexing should not involve expensive instrumentation and should not require additional personnel, or else the main objective of cost reduction will not be satisfied even though the total time for sequencing is reduced. In the last two years, several research groups have shown that capillary electrophoresis (CE) is an attractive alternative for DNA sequencing. Part of the improvement in sequencing speed in CE is counteracted by the inherent ability of slab gels for accommodating multiple lanes in a single run. Recently, the authors have developed several excitation schemes for highly multiplexed capillary electrophoresis. Detection at the pM level was demonstrated. The authors report here the use of a novel excitation geometry to simultaneously monitor 100 capillary tubes during electrophoresis. This represents a truly parallel multiplexing scheme for high-speed DNA sequencing.

  9. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and 2 envelope glycoproteins oligomerize through conserved sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Center, R J; Kemp, B E; Poumbourios, P

    1997-01-01

    Hetero-oligomerization between human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) envelope glycoprotein (Env) truncation mutants and epitope-tagged gp160 is dependent on the presence of gp41 transmembrane protein (TM) amino acids 552 to 589, a putative amphipathic alpha-helical sequence. HIV-2 Env truncation mutants containing this sequence were also able to form cross-type hetero-oligomers with HIV-1 Env. HIV-2/HIV-1 hetero-oligomerization was, however, more sensitive to disruption by mutagenesis or increased temperature. The conservation of the Env oligomerization function of the HIV-1 and HIV-2 alpha-helical sequences suggests that retroviral TM alpha-helical motifs may have a universal role in oligomerization. PMID:9188654

  10. Reptiles and Mammals Have Differentially Retained Long Conserved Noncoding Sequences from the Amniote Ancestor

    PubMed Central

    Janes, D.E.; Chapus, C.; Gondo, Y.; Clayton, D.F.; Sinha, S.; Blatti, C.A.; Organ, C.L.; Fujita, M.K.; Balakrishnan, C.N.; Edwards, S.V.

    2011-01-01

    Many noncoding regions of genomes appear to be essential to genome function. Conservation of large numbers of noncoding sequences has been reported repeatedly among mammals but not thus far among birds and reptiles. By searching genomes of chicken (Gallus gallus), zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata), and green anole (Anolis carolinensis), we quantified the conservation among birds and reptiles and across amniotes of long, conserved noncoding sequences (LCNS), which we define as sequences ≥500 bp in length and exhibiting ≥95% similarity between species. We found 4,294 LCNS shared between chicken and zebra finch and 574 LCNS shared by the two birds and Anolis. The percent of genomes comprised by LCNS in the two birds (0.0024%) is notably higher than the percent in mammals (<0.0003% to <0.001%), differences that we show may be explained in part by differences in genome-wide substitution rates. We reconstruct a large number of LCNS for the amniote ancestor (ca. 8,630) and hypothesize differential loss and substantial turnover of these sites in descendent lineages. By contrast, we estimated a small role for recruitment of LCNS via acquisition of novel functions over time. Across amniotes, LCNS are significantly enriched with transcription factor binding sites for many developmental genes, and 2.9% of LCNS shared between the two birds show evidence of expression in brain expressed sequence tag databases. These results show that the rate of retention of LCNS from the amniote ancestor differs between mammals and Reptilia (including birds) and that this may reflect differing roles and constraints in gene regulation. PMID:21183607

  11. Protein engineering of selected residues from conserved sequence regions of a novel Anoxybacillus α-amylase.

    PubMed

    Ranjani, Velayudhan; Janeček, Stefan; Chai, Kian Piaw; Shahir, Shafinaz; Abdul Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja; Chan, Kok-Gan; Goh, Kian Mau

    2014-01-01

    The α-amylases from Anoxybacillus species (ASKA and ADTA), Bacillus aquimaris (BaqA) and Geobacillus thermoleovorans (GTA, Pizzo and GtamyII) were proposed as a novel group of the α-amylase family GH13. An ASKA yielding a high percentage of maltose upon its reaction on starch was chosen as a model to study the residues responsible for the biochemical properties. Four residues from conserved sequence regions (CSRs) were thus selected, and the mutants F113V (CSR-I), Y187F and L189I (CSR-II) and A161D (CSR-V) were characterised. Few changes in the optimum reaction temperature and pH were observed for all mutants. Whereas the Y187F (t1/2 43 h) and L189I (t1/2 36 h) mutants had a lower thermostability at 65°C than the native ASKA (t1/2 48 h), the mutants F113V and A161D exhibited an improved t1/2 of 51 h and 53 h, respectively. Among the mutants, only the A161D had a specific activity, k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m) higher (1.23-, 1.17- and 2.88-times, respectively) than the values determined for the ASKA. The replacement of the Ala-161 in the CSR-V with an aspartic acid also caused a significant reduction in the ratio of maltose formed. This finding suggests the Ala-161 may contribute to the high maltose production of the ASKA. PMID:25069018

  12. An approach to delineate primers for a group of poorly conserved sequences incorporating the common motif region.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Mousumi; Sahu, Jagajjit; Sahoo, Smita; Dehury, Budheswar; Sarma, Kishore; Sarmah, Ranjan; Sen, Priyabrata; Modi, Mahendra Kumar; Barooah, Madhumita

    2012-01-01

    Glutathione synthetase (gshB) has previously been reported to confer tolerance to acidic soil condition in Rhizobium species. Cloning the gene coding for this enzyme necessitates the designing of proper primer sets which in turn depends on the identification of high quality sequence similarity in multiple global alignments. In this experiment, a group of homologous gene sequences related to gshB gene (accession no: gi-86355669:327589-328536) of Rhizobium etli CFN 42, were extracted from NCBI nucleotide sequence databases using BLASTN and were analyzed for designing degenerate primers. However, the T-coffee multiple global alignment results did not show any block of conserved region for the above sequence set to design the primers. Therefore, we attempted to identify the location of common motif region based on multiple local alignments employing the MEME algorithm supported with MAST and Primer3. The results revealed some common motif regions that enabled us to design the primer sets for related gshB gene sequences. The result will be validated in wet lab. PMID:22419837

  13. Cytochrome Oxidase I (COI) sequence conservation and variation patterns in the yellowfin and longtail tunas.

    PubMed

    Kunal, Swaraj Priyaranjan; Kumar, Girish

    2013-01-01

    Tunas are commercially important fishery worldwide. There are at least 13 species of tuna belonging to three genera, out of which genus Thunnus has maximum eight species. On the basis of their availability, they can be characterised as oceanic such as Thunnus albacares (yellowfin tuna) or coastal such as Thunnus tonggol (longtail tuna). Although these two are different species, morphological differentiation can only be seen in mature individuals, hence misidentification may result in erroneous data set, which ultimately affect conservation strategies. The mitochondrial DNA cytochrome oxidase c subunit 1 (COI) gene is one of the most popular markers for population genetic and phylogeographic studies across the animal kingdom. The present study aims to study the sequence conservation and variation in mitochondrial Cytochrome Oxidase I (COI) between these two species of tuna. COI sequence analysis of yellowfin and longtail revealed the close relationship between them in Thunnus genera. The present study is the first direct comparison of mitochondrial COI sequences of these two tuna species. PMID:23649742

  14. Lack of evidence of conserved lentiviral sequences in pigs with post weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Bratanich, A; Lairmore, M; Heneine, W; Konoby, C; Harding, J; West, K; Vasquez, G; Allan, G; Ellis, J

    1999-01-01

    In order to investigate the role of retroviruses in the recently described porcine postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) serum and leukocytes were screened for reverse transcriptase (RT) activity, and tissues were examined for the presence of conserved lentiviral sequences using degenerate primers in a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Serum and stimulated leukocytes from the blood and lymph nodes from pigs with PMWS, as well as from control pigs had RT activity that was detected by the sensitive Amp-RT assay. A 257-bp fragment was amplified from DNA from the blood and bone marrow of pigs with PMWS. This fragment was identical in size to conserved lentiviral sequences that were amplified from plasmids containing DNA from several lentiviruses. Cloning and sequencing of the fragment from affected pigs, however, did not reveal homology with the recognized lentiviruses. Together the results of these analyses suggest that the RT activity present in tissues from control and affected pigs is the result of endogenous retrovirus expression, and that a lentivirus is not a primary pathogen in PMWS. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:10480463

  15. Comparative sequence analysis suggests a conserved gating mechanism for TRP channels

    PubMed Central

    Palovcak, Eugene; Delemotte, Lucie; Klein, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) channel superfamily plays a central role in transducing diverse sensory stimuli in eukaryotes. Although dissimilar in sequence and domain organization, all known TRP channels act as polymodal cellular sensors and form tetrameric assemblies similar to those of their distant relatives, the voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels. Here, we investigated the related questions of whether the allosteric mechanism underlying polymodal gating is common to all TRP channels, and how this mechanism differs from that underpinning Kv channel voltage sensitivity. To provide insight into these questions, we performed comparative sequence analysis on large, comprehensive ensembles of TRP and Kv channel sequences, contextualizing the patterns of conservation and correlation observed in the TRP channel sequences in light of the well-studied Kv channels. We report sequence features that are specific to TRP channels and, based on insight from recent TRPV1 structures, we suggest a model of TRP channel gating that differs substantially from the one mediating voltage sensitivity in Kv channels. The common mechanism underlying polymodal gating involves the displacement of a defect in the H-bond network of S6 that changes the orientation of the pore-lining residues at the hydrophobic gate. PMID:26078053

  16. Conserved Noncoding Sequences Highlight Shared Components of Regulatory Networks in Dicotyledonous Plants[W

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Laura; Jironkin, Aleksey; Hickman, Richard; Moore, Jay; Barrington, Christopher; Krusche, Peter; Dyer, Nigel P.; Buchanan-Wollaston, Vicky; Tiskin, Alexander; Beynon, Jim; Denby, Katherine; Ott, Sascha

    2012-01-01

    Conserved noncoding sequences (CNSs) in DNA are reliable pointers to regulatory elements controlling gene expression. Using a comparative genomics approach with four dicotyledonous plant species (Arabidopsis thaliana, papaya [Carica papaya], poplar [Populus trichocarpa], and grape [Vitis vinifera]), we detected hundreds of CNSs upstream of Arabidopsis genes. Distinct positioning, length, and enrichment for transcription factor binding sites suggest these CNSs play a functional role in transcriptional regulation. The enrichment of transcription factors within the set of genes associated with CNS is consistent with the hypothesis that together they form part of a conserved transcriptional network whose function is to regulate other transcription factors and control development. We identified a set of promoters where regulatory mechanisms are likely to be shared between the model organism Arabidopsis and other dicots, providing areas of focus for further research. PMID:23110901

  17. A Collection of Conserved Noncoding Sequences to Study Gene Regulation in Flowering Plants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) regulate gene expression by binding cis-regulatory elements, of which the identification remains an ongoing challenge owing to the prevalence of large numbers of nonfunctional TF binding sites. Powerful comparative genomics methods, such as phylogenetic footprinting, can be used for the detection of conserved noncoding sequences (CNSs), which are functionally constrained and can greatly help in reducing the number of false-positive elements. In this study, we applied a phylogenetic footprinting approach for the identification of CNSs in 10 dicot plants, yielding 1,032,291 CNSs associated with 243,187 genes. To annotate CNSs with TF binding sites, we made use of binding site information for 642 TFs originating from 35 TF families in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). In three species, the identified CNSs were evaluated using TF chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing data, resulting in significant overlap for the majority of data sets. To identify ultraconserved CNSs, we included genomes of additional plant families and identified 715 binding sites for 501 genes conserved in dicots, monocots, mosses, and green algae. Additionally, we found that genes that are part of conserved mini-regulons have a higher coherence in their expression profile than other divergent gene pairs. All identified CNSs were integrated in the PLAZA 3.0 Dicots comparative genomics platform (http://bioinformatics.psb.ugent.be/plaza/versions/plaza_v3_dicots/) together with new functionalities facilitating the exploration of conserved cis-regulatory elements and their associated genes. The availability of this data set in a user-friendly platform enables the exploration of functional noncoding DNA to study gene regulation in a variety of plant species, including crops. PMID:27261064

  18. A Collection of Conserved Noncoding Sequences to Study Gene Regulation in Flowering Plants.

    PubMed

    Van de Velde, Jan; Van Bel, Michiel; Vaneechoutte, Dries; Vandepoele, Klaas

    2016-08-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) regulate gene expression by binding cis-regulatory elements, of which the identification remains an ongoing challenge owing to the prevalence of large numbers of nonfunctional TF binding sites. Powerful comparative genomics methods, such as phylogenetic footprinting, can be used for the detection of conserved noncoding sequences (CNSs), which are functionally constrained and can greatly help in reducing the number of false-positive elements. In this study, we applied a phylogenetic footprinting approach for the identification of CNSs in 10 dicot plants, yielding 1,032,291 CNSs associated with 243,187 genes. To annotate CNSs with TF binding sites, we made use of binding site information for 642 TFs originating from 35 TF families in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). In three species, the identified CNSs were evaluated using TF chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing data, resulting in significant overlap for the majority of data sets. To identify ultraconserved CNSs, we included genomes of additional plant families and identified 715 binding sites for 501 genes conserved in dicots, monocots, mosses, and green algae. Additionally, we found that genes that are part of conserved mini-regulons have a higher coherence in their expression profile than other divergent gene pairs. All identified CNSs were integrated in the PLAZA 3.0 Dicots comparative genomics platform (http://bioinformatics.psb.ugent.be/plaza/versions/plaza_v3_dicots/) together with new functionalities facilitating the exploration of conserved cis-regulatory elements and their associated genes. The availability of this data set in a user-friendly platform enables the exploration of functional noncoding DNA to study gene regulation in a variety of plant species, including crops. PMID:27261064

  19. Comparison of Flavivirus Universal Primer Pairs and Development of a Rapid, Highly Sensitive Heminested Reverse Transcription-PCR Assay for Detection of Flaviviruses Targeted to a Conserved Region of the NS5 Gene Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Scaramozzino, Natale; Crance, Jean-Marc; Jouan, Alain; DeBriel, Dominique A.; Stoll, Françoise; Garin, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Arthropod-transmitted flaviviruses are responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality, causing severe encephalitic, hemorrhagic, and febrile illnesses in humans. Because there are no specific clinical symptoms for infection by a determined virus and because different arboviruses could be present in the same area, a genus diagnosis by PCR would be a useful first-line diagnostic method. The six published Flavivirus genus primer pairs localized in the NS1, NS3, NS5, and 3′ NC regions were evaluated in terms of specificity and sensitivity with flaviviruses (including the main viruses pathogenic for humans) at a titer of 105 50% tissue culture infectious doses (TCID50s) ml−1 with a common identification step by agarose gel electrophoresis. Only one NS5 primer pair allowed the detection of all tested flaviviruses with the sensitivity limit of 105 TCID50s ml−1. Using a heminested PCR with new primers designed in the same region after an alignment of 30 different flaviviruses, the sensitivity of reverse transcription-PCR was improved and allowed the detection of about 200 infectious doses ml−1 with all of the tick- and mosquito-borne flaviviruses tested. It was confirmed that the sequenced amplified products in the NS5 region allowed predictability of flavivirus species by dendrogram, including the New York 99 West Nile strain. This technique was successfully performed with a cerebrospinal fluid sample from a patient hospitalized with West Nile virus encephalitis. PMID:11326014

  20. Expression of cassini, a murine gamma-satellite sequence conserved in evolution, is regulated in normal and malignant hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells treated with drugs can become drug-tolerant if co-cultured with protective stromal mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Results We performed transcriptional profiling on these stromal fibroblasts to investigate if they were affected by the presence of drug-treated ALL cells. These mitotically inactivated MEFs showed few changes in gene expression, but a family of sequences of which transcription is significantly increased was identified. A sequence related to this family, which we named cassini, was selected for further characterization. We found that cassini was highly upregulated in drug-treated ALL cells. Analysis of RNAs from different normal mouse tissues showed that cassini expression is highest in spleen and thymus, and can be further enhanced in these organs by exposure of mice to bacterial endotoxin. Heat shock, but not other types of stress, significantly induced the transcription of this locus in ALL cells. Transient overexpression of cassini in human 293 embryonic kidney cells did not increase the cytotoxic or cytostatic effects of chemotherapeutic drugs but provided some protection. Database searches revealed that sequences highly homologous to cassini are present in rodents, apicomplexans, flatworms and primates, indicating that they are conserved in evolution. Moreover, CASSINI RNA was induced in human ALL cells treated with vincristine. Surprisingly, cassini belongs to the previously reported murine family of γ-satellite/major satellite DNA sequences, which were not known to be present in other species. Conclusions Our results show that the transcription of at least one member of these sequences is regulated, suggesting that this has a function in normal and transformed immune cells. Expression of these sequences may protect cells when they are exposed to specific stress stimuli. PMID:22916712

  1. Sequence of Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy in Breast Cancer After Breast-Conserving Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Jobsen, Jan J.; Palen, Job van der; Brinkhuis, Marieel; Ong, Francisca; Struikmans, Henk

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The optimal sequence of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in breast-conserving therapy is unknown. Methods and Materials: From 1983 through 2007, a total of 641 patients with 653 instances of breast-conserving therapy (BCT), received both chemotherapy and radiotherapy and are the basis of this analysis. Patients were divided into three groups. Groups A and B comprised patients treated before 2005, Group A radiotherapy first and Group B chemotherapy first. Group C consisted of patients treated from 2005 onward, when we had a fixed sequence of radiotherapy first, followed by chemotherapy. Results: Local control did not show any differences among the three groups. For distant metastasis, no difference was shown between Groups A and B. Group C, when compared with Group A, showed, on univariate and multivariate analyses, a significantly better distant metastasis-free survival. The same was noted for disease-free survival. With respect to disease-specific survival, no differences were shown on multivariate analysis among the three groups. Conclusion: Radiotherapy, as an integral part of the primary treatment of BCT, should be administered first, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy.

  2. Conserved Noncoding Sequences Regulate lhx5 Expression in the Zebrafish Forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Liu; Chen, Fengjiao; Peng, Gang

    2015-01-01

    The LIM homeobox family protein Lhx5 plays important roles in forebrain development in the vertebrates. The lhx5 gene exhibits complex temporal and spatial expression patterns during early development but its transcriptional regulation mechanisms are not well understood. Here, we have used transgenesis in zebrafish in order to define regulatory elements that drive lhx5 expression in the forebrain. Through comparative genomic analysis we identified 10 non-coding sequences conserved in five teleost species. We next examined the enhancer activities of these conserved non-coding sequences with Tol2 transposon mediated transgenesis. We found a proximately located enhancer gave rise to robust reporter EGFP expression in the forebrain regions. In addition, we identified an enhancer located at approximately 50 kb upstream of lhx5 coding region that is responsible for reporter gene expression in the hypothalamus. We also identify an enhancer located approximately 40 kb upstream of the lhx5 coding region that is required for expression in the prethalamus (ventral thalamus). Together our results suggest discrete enhancer elements control lhx5 expression in different regions of the forebrain. PMID:26147098

  3. HMMerThread: Detecting Remote, Functional Conserved Domains in Entire Genomes by Combining Relaxed Sequence-Database Searches with Fold Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Charles Richard; Surendranath, Vineeth; Henschel, Robert; Mueller, Matthias Stefan; Habermann, Bianca Hermine

    2011-01-01

    Conserved domains in proteins are one of the major sources of functional information for experimental design and genome-level annotation. Though search tools for conserved domain databases such as Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are sensitive in detecting conserved domains in proteins when they share sufficient sequence similarity, they tend to miss more divergent family members, as they lack a reliable statistical framework for the detection of low sequence similarity. We have developed a greatly improved HMMerThread algorithm that can detect remotely conserved domains in highly divergent sequences. HMMerThread combines relaxed conserved domain searches with fold recognition to eliminate false positive, sequence-based identifications. With an accuracy of 90%, our software is able to automatically predict highly divergent members of conserved domain families with an associated 3-dimensional structure. We give additional confidence to our predictions by validation across species. We have run HMMerThread searches on eight proteomes including human and present a rich resource of remotely conserved domains, which adds significantly to the functional annotation of entire proteomes. We find ∼4500 cross-species validated, remotely conserved domain predictions in the human proteome alone. As an example, we find a DNA-binding domain in the C-terminal part of the A-kinase anchor protein 10 (AKAP10), a PKA adaptor that has been implicated in cardiac arrhythmias and premature cardiac death, which upon stress likely translocates from mitochondria to the nucleus/nucleolus. Based on our prediction, we propose that with this HLH-domain, AKAP10 is involved in the transcriptional control of stress response. Further remotely conserved domains we discuss are examples from areas such as sporulation, chromosome segregation and signalling during immune response. The HMMerThread algorithm is able to automatically detect the presence of remotely conserved domains in proteins based on weak

  4. A search for small noncoding RNAs in Staphylococcus aureus reveals a conserved sequence motif for regulation

    PubMed Central

    Geissmann, Thomas; Chevalier, Clément; Cros, Marie-Josée; Boisset, Sandrine; Fechter, Pierre; Noirot, Céline; Schrenzel, Jacques; François, Patrice; Vandenesch, François; Gaspin, Christine; Romby, Pascale

    2009-01-01

    Bioinformatic analysis of the intergenic regions of Staphylococcus aureus predicted multiple regulatory regions. From this analysis, we characterized 11 novel noncoding RNAs (RsaA‐K) that are expressed in several S. aureus strains under different experimental conditions. Many of them accumulate in the late-exponential phase of growth. All ncRNAs are stable and their expression is Hfq-independent. The transcription of several of them is regulated by the alternative sigma B factor (RsaA, D and F) while the expression of RsaE is agrA-dependent. Six of these ncRNAs are specific to S. aureus, four are conserved in other Staphylococci, and RsaE is also present in Bacillaceae. Transcriptomic and proteomic analysis indicated that RsaE regulates the synthesis of proteins involved in various metabolic pathways. Phylogenetic analysis combined with RNA structure probing, searches for RsaE‐mRNA base pairing, and toeprinting assays indicate that a conserved and unpaired UCCC sequence motif of RsaE binds to target mRNAs and prevents the formation of the ribosomal initiation complex. This study unexpectedly shows that most of the novel ncRNAs carry the conserved C−rich motif, suggesting that they are members of a class of ncRNAs that target mRNAs by a shared mechanism. PMID:19786493

  5. Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Audubon Society, New York, NY.

    This set of teaching aids consists of seven Audubon Nature Bulletins, providing the teacher and student with informational reading on various topics in conservation. The bulletins have these titles: Plants as Makers of Soil, Water Pollution Control, The Ground Water Table, Conservation--To Keep This Earth Habitable, Our Threatened Air Supply,…

  6. CONSERVED SEQUENCE IN THE AGGRECAN INTERGLOBULAR DOMAIN MODULATES CLEAVAGE BY ADAMTS-4 AND ADAMTS-5

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, Hazuki E; Gerken, Thomas A; Huynh, Tru D; Duesler, Lori R; Cotter, Meghan; Hering, Thomas M.

    2008-01-01

    Background Cleavage of aggrecan by ADAMTS proteinases at specific sites within highly conserved regions may be important to normal physiological enzyme functions, as well as pathological degradation. Methods To examine ADAMTS selectivity, we assayed ADAMTS-4 and -5 cleavage of recombinant bovine aggrecan mutated at amino acids N-terminal or C-terminal to the interglobular domain cleavage site. Results Mutations of conserved amino acids from P18 to P12 to increase hydrophilicity resulted in ADAMTS-4 cleavage inhibition. Mutation of Thr, but not Asn within the conserved N-glycosylation motif Asn-Ile-Thr from P6 to P4 enhanced cleavage. Mutation of conserved Thr residues from P22 to P17 to increase hydrophobicity enhanced ADAMTS-4 cleavage. A P4′ Ser377Gln mutant inhibited cleavage by ADAMTS-4 and -5, while a neutral Ser377Ala mutant and species mimicking mutants Ser377Thr, Ser377Asn, and Arg375Leu were cleaved normally by ADAMTS-4. The Ser377Thr mutant, however, was resistant to cleavage by ADAMTS-5. Conclusion We have identified multiple conserved amino acids within regions N- and C-terminal to the site of scission that may influence enzyme-substrate recognition, and may interact with exosites on ADAMTS-4 and ADAMTS-5. General Significance Inhibition of the binding of ADAMTS-4 and ADAMTS-5 exosites to aggrecan should be explored as a therapeutic intervention for osteoarthritis. PMID:19101611

  7. Comparison of C. elegans and C. briggsae Genome Sequences Reveals Extensive Conservation of Chromosome Organization and Synteny

    PubMed Central

    Hillier, LaDeana W; Miller, Raymond D; Baird, Scott E; Chinwalla, Asif; Fulton, Lucinda A; Koboldt, Daniel C; Waterston, Robert H

    2007-01-01

    To determine whether the distinctive features of Caenorhabditis elegans chromosomal organization are shared with the C. briggsae genome, we constructed a single nucleotide polymorphism–based genetic map to order and orient the whole genome shotgun assembly along the six C. briggsae chromosomes. Although these species are of the same genus, their most recent common ancestor existed 80–110 million years ago, and thus they are more evolutionarily distant than, for example, human and mouse. We found that, like C. elegans chromosomes, C. briggsae chromosomes exhibit high levels of recombination on the arms along with higher repeat density, a higher fraction of intronic sequence, and a lower fraction of exonic sequence compared with chromosome centers. Despite extensive intrachromosomal rearrangements, 1:1 orthologs tend to remain in the same region of the chromosome, and colinear blocks of orthologs tend to be longer in chromosome centers compared with arms. More strikingly, the two species show an almost complete conservation of synteny, with 1:1 orthologs present on a single chromosome in one species also found on a single chromosome in the other. The conservation of both chromosomal organization and synteny between these two distantly related species suggests roles for chromosome organization in the fitness of an organism that are only poorly understood presently. PMID:17608563

  8. Strong conservation of non-coding sequences during vertebrates evolution: potential involvement in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Duret, L; Dorkeld, F; Gautier, C

    1993-01-01

    Comparison of nucleotide sequences from different classes of vertebrates that diverged more than 300 million years ago, revealed the existence of highly conserved regions (HCRs) with more than 70% similarity over 100 to 1450 nt in non-coding parts of genes. Such a conservation is unexpected because it is much longer and stronger than what is necessary for specifying the binding of a regulatory protein. HCRs are relatively frequent, particularly in genes that are essential to cell life. In multigene families, conserved regions are specific of each isotype and are probably involved in the control of their specific pattern of expression. Studying HCRs distribution within genes showed that functional constraints are generally much stronger in 3'-non-coding regions than in promoters or introns. The 3'-HCRs are particularly A + T-rich and are always located in the transcribed untranslated regions of genes, which suggests that they are involved in post-transcriptional processes. However, current knowledge of mechanisms that regulate mRNA export, localisation, translation, or degradation is not sufficient to explain the strong functional constraints that we have characterised. PMID:8506129

  9. High compression image and image sequence coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunt, Murat

    1989-01-01

    The digital representation of an image requires a very large number of bits. This number is even larger for an image sequence. The goal of image coding is to reduce this number, as much as possible, and reconstruct a faithful duplicate of the original picture or image sequence. Early efforts in image coding, solely guided by information theory, led to a plethora of methods. The compression ratio reached a plateau around 10:1 a couple of years ago. Recent progress in the study of the brain mechanism of vision and scene analysis has opened new vistas in picture coding. Directional sensitivity of the neurones in the visual pathway combined with the separate processing of contours and textures has led to a new class of coding methods capable of achieving compression ratios as high as 100:1 for images and around 300:1 for image sequences. Recent progress on some of the main avenues of object-based methods is presented. These second generation techniques make use of contour-texture modeling, new results in neurophysiology and psychophysics and scene analysis.

  10. Evolutionary conservation of sequence and secondary structures inCRISPR repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Kunin, Victor; Sorek, Rotem; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2006-09-01

    Clustered Regularly Interspaced Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs) are a novel class of direct repeats, separated by unique spacer sequences of similar length, that are present in {approx}40% of bacterial and all archaeal genomes analyzed to date. More than 40 gene families, called CRISPR-associated sequences (CAS), appear in conjunction with these repeats and are thought to be involved in the propagation and functioning of CRISPRs. It has been proposed that the CRISPR/CAS system samples, maintains a record of, and inactivates invasive DNA that the cell has encountered, and therefore constitutes a prokaryotic analog of an immune system. Here we analyze CRISPR repeats identified in 195 microbial genomes and show that they can be organized into multiple clusters based on sequence similarity. All individual repeats in any given cluster were inferred to form characteristic RNA secondary structure, ranging from non-existent to pronounced. Stable secondary structures included G:U base pairs and exhibited multiple compensatory base changes in the stem region, indicating evolutionary conservation and functional importance. We also show that the repeat-based classification corresponds to, and expands upon, a previously reported CAS gene-based classification including specific relationships between CRISPR and CAS subtypes.

  11. Conservation of Shannon's redundancy for proteins. [information theory applied to amino acid sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatlin, L. L.

    1974-01-01

    Concepts of information theory are applied to examine various proteins in terms of their redundancy in natural originators such as animals and plants. The Monte Carlo method is used to derive information parameters for random protein sequences. Real protein sequence parameters are compared with the standard parameters of protein sequences having a specific length. The tendency of a chain to contain some amino acids more frequently than others and the tendency of a chain to contain certain amino acid pairs more frequently than other pairs are used as randomness measures of individual protein sequences. Non-periodic proteins are generally found to have random Shannon redundancies except in cases of constraints due to short chain length and genetic codes. Redundant characteristics of highly periodic proteins are discussed. A degree of periodicity parameter is derived.

  12. Robust high-order space-time conservative schemes for solving conservation laws on hybrid meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Hua; Wen, Chih-Yung; Liu, Kaixin; Zhang, Deliang

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the second-order space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method proposed by Chang (1995) [3] is implemented on hybrid meshes for solving conservation laws. In addition, the present scheme has been extended to high-order versions including third and fourth order. Most methodologies of proposed schemes are consistent with that of the original CE/SE method, including: (i) a unified treatment of space and time (thereby ensuring good conservation in both space and time); (ii) a highly compact node stencil (the solution node is calculated using only the neighboring mesh nodes) regardless of the order of accuracy at the cost of storing all derivatives. A staggered time marching strategy is adopted and the solutions are updated alternatively between cell centers and vertexes. To construct explicit high-order schemes, second- and third-order derivatives are calculated by a modified finite-difference/weighted-average procedure which is different from that used to calculate the first-order derivatives. The present schemes can be implemented on a wide variety of meshes, including triangular, quadrilateral and hybrid (consisting of both triangular and quadrilateral elements). Beyond that, it can be easily extended to arbitrary-order schemes and arbitrary shape of polygonal elements by using the present methodologies. A series of common benchmark examples are used to confirm the accuracy and robustness of the proposed schemes.

  13. In Silico Structure and Sequence Analysis of Bacterial Porins and Specific Diffusion Channels for Hydrophilic Molecules: Conservation, Multimericity and Multifunctionality

    PubMed Central

    Vollan, Hilde S.; Tannæs, Tone; Vriend, Gert; Bukholm, Geir

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion channels are involved in the selective uptake of nutrients and form the largest outer membrane protein (OMP) family in Gram-negative bacteria. Differences in pore size and amino acid composition contribute to the specificity. Structure-based multiple sequence alignments shed light on the structure-function relations for all eight subclasses. Entropy-variability analysis results are correlated to known structural and functional aspects, such as structural integrity, multimericity, specificity and biological niche adaptation. The high mutation rate in their surface-exposed loops is likely an important mechanism for host immune system evasion. Multiple sequence alignments for each subclass revealed conserved residue positions that are involved in substrate recognition and specificity. An analysis of monomeric protein channels revealed particular sequence patterns of amino acids that were observed in other classes at multimeric interfaces. This adds to the emerging evidence that all members of the family exist in a multimeric state. Our findings are important for understanding the role of members of this family in a wide range of bacterial processes, including bacterial food uptake, survival and adaptation mechanisms. PMID:27110766

  14. Conserved nucleotide sequences in the open reading frame and 3' untranslated region of selenoprotein P mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, K E; Lloyd, R S; Burk, R F

    1993-01-01

    Rat liver selenoprotein P contains 10 selenocysteine residues in its primary structure (deduced). It is the only selenoprotein characterized to date that has more than one selenocysteine residue. Selenoprotein P cDNA has been cloned from human liver and heart cDNA libraries and sequenced. The open reading frames are identical and contain a signal peptide, indicating that the protein is secreted by both organs and is therefore not exclusively produced in the liver. Ten selenocysteine residues (deduced) are present. Comparison of the open reading frame of the human cDNA with the rat cDNA reveals a 69% identity of the nucleotide sequence and 72% identity of the deduced amino acid sequence. Two regions in the 3' untranslated portion have high conservation between human and rat. Each of these regions contains a predicted stable stem-loop structure similar to the single stem-loop structures reported in 3' untranslated regions of type I iodothyronine 5'-deiodinase and glutathione peroxidase. The stem-loop structure of type I iodothyronine 5'-deiodinase has been shown to be necessary for incorporation of the selenocysteine residue at the UGA codon. Because only two stem-loop structures are present in the 3' untranslated region of selenoprotein P mRNA, it can be concluded that a separate stem-loop structure is not required for each selenocysteine residue. Images PMID:8421687

  15. In Silico Structure and Sequence Analysis of Bacterial Porins and Specific Diffusion Channels for Hydrophilic Molecules: Conservation, Multimericity and Multifunctionality.

    PubMed

    Vollan, Hilde S; Tannæs, Tone; Vriend, Gert; Bukholm, Geir

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion channels are involved in the selective uptake of nutrients and form the largest outer membrane protein (OMP) family in Gram-negative bacteria. Differences in pore size and amino acid composition contribute to the specificity. Structure-based multiple sequence alignments shed light on the structure-function relations for all eight subclasses. Entropy-variability analysis results are correlated to known structural and functional aspects, such as structural integrity, multimericity, specificity and biological niche adaptation. The high mutation rate in their surface-exposed loops is likely an important mechanism for host immune system evasion. Multiple sequence alignments for each subclass revealed conserved residue positions that are involved in substrate recognition and specificity. An analysis of monomeric protein channels revealed particular sequence patterns of amino acids that were observed in other classes at multimeric interfaces. This adds to the emerging evidence that all members of the family exist in a multimeric state. Our findings are important for understanding the role of members of this family in a wide range of bacterial processes, including bacterial food uptake, survival and adaptation mechanisms. PMID:27110766

  16. ENERGY CONSERVATION THROUGH POINT SOURCE RECYCLE WITH HIGH TEMPERATURE HYPERFILTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of energy conservation effects of point source recycle with high-temperature hyperfiltration (HF) in the textile industry. (HF and ultrafiltration (UF) are pressure-driven membrane processes which have potential for recycle of water, energy, an...

  17. Regulation of SHOOT MERISTEMLESS genes via an upstream-conserved noncoding sequence coordinates leaf development

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Naoyuki; Townsley, Brad; Chung, Kook-Hyun; Sinha, Neelima

    2007-01-01

    The indeterminate shoot apical meristem of plants is characterized by the expression of the Class 1 KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEOBOX (KNOX1) genes. KNOX1 genes have been implicated in the acquisition and/or maintenance of meristematic fate. One of the earliest indicators of a switch in fate from indeterminate meristem to determinate leaf primordium is the down-regulation of KNOX1 genes orthologous to SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (STM) in Arabidopsis (hereafter called STM genes) in the initiating primordia. In simple leafed plants, this down-regulation persists during leaf formation. In compound leafed plants, however, KNOX1 gene expression is reestablished later in the developing primordia, creating an indeterminate environment for leaflet formation. Despite this knowledge, most aspects of how STM gene expression is regulated remain largely unknown. Here, we identify two evolutionarily conserved noncoding sequences within the 5′ upstream region of STM genes in both simple and compound leafed species across monocots and dicots. We show that one of these elements is involved in the regulation of the persistent repression and/or the reestablishment of STM expression in the developing leaves but is not involved in the initial down-regulation in the initiating primordia. We also show evidence that this regulation is developmentally significant for leaf formation in the pathway involving ASYMMETRIC LEAVES1/2 (AS1/2) gene expression; these genes are known to function in leaf development. Together, these findings reveal a regulatory point of leaf development mediated through a conserved, noncoding sequence in STM genes. PMID:17898165

  18. Hemagglutinin Sequence Conservation Guided Stem Immunogen Design from Influenza A H3 Subtype

    PubMed Central

    Mallajosyula, V. Vamsee Aditya; Citron, Michael; Ferrara, Francesca; Temperton, Nigel J.; Liang, Xiaoping; Flynn, Jessica A.; Varadarajan, Raghavan

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal epidemics caused by influenza A (H1 and H3 subtypes) and B viruses are a major global health threat. The traditional, trivalent influenza vaccines have limited efficacy because of rapid antigenic evolution of the circulating viruses. This antigenic variability mediates viral escape from the host immune responses, necessitating annual vaccine updates. Influenza vaccines elicit a protective antibody response, primarily targeting the viral surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA). However, the predominant humoral response is against the hypervariable head domain of HA, thereby restricting the breadth of protection. In contrast, the conserved, subdominant stem domain of HA is a potential “universal” vaccine candidate. We designed an HA stem-fragment immunogen from the 1968 pandemic H3N2 strain (A/Hong Kong/1/68) guided by a comprehensive H3 HA sequence conservation analysis. The biophysical properties of the designed immunogen were further improved by C-terminal fusion of a trimerization motif, “isoleucine-zipper”, or “foldon”. These immunogens elicited cross-reactive, antiviral antibodies and conferred partial protection against a lethal, homologous HK68 virus challenge in vivo. Furthermore, bacterial expression of these immunogens is economical and facilitates rapid scale-up. PMID:26167164

  19. Comparative Sequence and Structure Analysis Reveals the Conservation and Diversity of Nucleotide Positions and Their Associated Tertiary Interactions in the Riboswitches

    PubMed Central

    Appasamy, Sri D.; Ramlan, Effirul Ikhwan; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2013-01-01

    The tertiary motifs in complex RNA molecules play vital roles to either stabilize the formation of RNA 3D structure or to provide important biological functionality to the molecule. In order to better understand the roles of these tertiary motifs in riboswitches, we examined 11 representative riboswitch PDB structures for potential agreement of both motif occurrences and conservations. A total of 61 unique tertiary interactions were found in the reference structures. In addition to the expected common A-minor motifs and base-triples mainly involved in linking distant regions the riboswitch structures three highly conserved variants of A-minor interactions called G-minors were found in the SAM-I and FMN riboswitches where they appear to be involved in the recognition of the respective ligand’s functional groups. From our structural survey as well as corresponding structure and sequence alignments, the agreement between motif occurrences and conservations are very prominent across the representative riboswitches. Our analysis provide evidence that some of these tertiary interactions are essential components to form the structure where their sequence positions are conserved despite a high degree of diversity in other parts of the respective riboswitches sequences. This is indicative of a vital role for these tertiary interactions in determining the specific biological function of riboswitch. PMID:24040136

  20. Mammalian mitochondrial D-loop region structural analysis: identification of new conserved sequences and their functional and evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Sbisà, E; Tanzariello, F; Reyes, A; Pesole, G; Saccone, C

    1997-12-31

    This paper reports the first comprehensive analysis of Displacement loop (D-loop) region sequences from ten different mammalian orders. It represents a systematic evolutionary study at the molecular level on regulatory homologous regions in organisms belonging to a well defined class, mammalia, which radiated about 150 million years ago (Mya). We have aligned and analyzed 26 complete D-loop region sequences available in the literature and the fat dormouse sequence, recently determined in our laboratory. The novelty of our alignment consists of the extensive manual revision of the preliminary output obtained by computer program to optimize sequence similarity, particularly for the two peripheral domains displaying heterogeneity in length and the presence of repeated sequences. The multialignment is available at the WWW site: http://www.ba.cnr.it/dloop.html. Our comparative study has allowed us to identify new conserved sequence blocks present in all the species under consideration and events of insertion/deletion which have important implications in both functional and evolutionary aspects. In particular we have detected two blocks, about 60 bp long, extended termination associated sequences (ETAS1 and ETAS2) conserved in all the organisms considered. Evaluation against experimental work suggests a possible functional role of ETAS1 and ETAS2 in the regulation of replication and transcription and targeted experimental approaches. The analyses on conserved sequence blocks (CSBs) clearly indicate that CSB1 is the only very essential element, common to all mammalian mt genomes, while CSB2 and CSB3 could be involved in different though related functions, probably species specific, and thus more linked to nuclear mitochondrial coevolutionary processes. Our hypothesis on the different functional implications of the conserved elements, CSBs and TASs, reported so far as main regulatory signals, would explain the different conservation of these elements in evolution. Moreover

  1. The human archain gene, ARCN1, has highly conserved homologs in rice and drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Radice, P.; Jones, C.; Perry, H.

    1995-03-01

    A novel human gene, ARCN1, has been identified in chromosome band 11q23.3. It maps approximately 50 kb telomeric to MLL, a gene that is disrupted in a number of leukemia-associated translocation chromosomes. cDNA clones representing ARCN1 hybridize to 4-kb mRNA species present in all tissues tested. Sequencing of cDNAs suggests that at least two forms of mRNA with alternative 5 {prime} ends are present within the cell. The mRNA with the longest open reading frame gives rise to a protein of 57 kDa. Although the sequence reported is novel, remarkable similarity is observed with two predicted protein sequences from partial DNA sequences generated by rice (Oryza sativa) and fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) genome projects. The degree of sequence conservation is comparable to that observed for highly conserved structural proteins, such as heat shock protein HSP70, and is greater than that of {gamma}-gubulin and heat shock protein HSP60. A more distant relationship to the group of clathrin-associated proteins suggests a possible role in vesicle structure or trafficking. In view of its ancient pedigree and a potential involvement in cellular architecture, the authors propose that the ARCN1 protein be named archain. 20 refs., 5 figs.

  2. High-resolution schemes for hyperbolic conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harten, A.

    1982-01-01

    A class of new explicit second order accurate finite difference schemes for the computation of weak solutions of hyperbolic conservation laws is presented. These highly nonlinear schemes are obtained by applying a nonoscillatory first order accurae scheme to an appropriately modified flux function. The so derived second order accurate schemes achieve high resolution while preserving the robustness of the original nonoscillatory first order accurate scheme.

  3. Lineage-Specific Conserved Noncoding Sequences of Plant Genomes: Their Possible Role in Nucleosome Positioning

    PubMed Central

    Hettiarachchi, Nilmini; Kryukov, Kirill; Sumiyama, Kenta; Saitou, Naruya

    2014-01-01

    Many studies on conserved noncoding sequences (CNSs) have found that CNSs are enriched significantly in regulatory sequence elements. We conducted whole-genome analysis on plant CNSs to identify lineage-specific CNSs in eudicots, monocots, angiosperms, and vascular plants based on the premise that lineage-specific CNSs define lineage-specific characters and functions in groups of organisms. We identified 27 eudicot, 204 monocot, 6,536 grass, 19 angiosperm, and 2 vascular plant lineage-specific CNSs (lengths range from 16 to 1,517 bp) that presumably originated in their respective common ancestors. A stronger constraint on the CNSs located in the untranslated regions was observed. The CNSs were often flanked by genes involved in transcription regulation. A drop of A+T content near the border of CNSs was observed and CNS regions showed a higher nucleosome occupancy probability. These CNSs are candidate regulatory elements, which are expected to define lineage-specific features of various plant groups. PMID:25364802

  4. G-boxes, bigfoot genes, and environmental response: characterization of intragenomic conserved noncoding sequences in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Freeling, Michael; Rapaka, Lakshmi; Lyons, Eric; Pedersen, Brent; Thomas, Brian C

    2007-05-01

    A tetraploidy left Arabidopsis thaliana with 6358 pairs of homoeologs that, when aligned, generated 14,944 intragenomic conserved noncoding sequences (CNSs). Our previous work assembled these phylogenetic footprints into a database. We show that known transcription factor (TF) binding motifs, including the G-box, are overrepresented in these CNSs. A total of 254 genes spanning long lengths of CNS-rich chromosomes (Bigfoot) dominate this database. Therefore, we made subdatabases: one containing Bigfoot genes and the other containing genes with three to five CNSs (Smallfoot). Bigfoot genes are generally TFs that respond to signals, with their modal CNS positioned 3.1 kb 5' from the ATG. Smallfoot genes encode components of signal transduction machinery, the cytoskeleton, or involve transcription. We queried each subdatabase with each possible 7-nucleotide sequence. Among hundreds of hits, most were purified from CNSs, and almost all of those significantly enriched in CNSs had no experimental history. The 7-mers in CNSs are not 5'- to 3'-oriented in Bigfoot genes but are often oriented in Smallfoot genes. CNSs with one G-box tend to have two G-boxes. CNSs were shared with the homoeolog only and with no other gene, suggesting that binding site turnover impedes detection. Bigfoot genes may function in adaptation to environmental change. PMID:17496117

  5. Evolution of a "conserved" amino acid sequence: a model study of an in silico investigation of the phylogenesis of some immune receptors.

    PubMed

    Panaro, M A; Acquafredda, A; Sisto, M; Lisi, S; Saccia, M; Mitolo, V

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we analyze a 55-amino acid (aa) sequence which is relatively well conserved in several seven-transmembrane receptor families (from Insects to Mammals) and in some Viruses. This sequence, which covers the second transmembrane domain, the first extracellular loop and the third transmembrane domain, appears in its complete configuration in most of the seven-transmembrane receptor families, as well as in the protein products of some viruses. Other seven-transmembrane receptors and viruses exhibit reduced configurations of the conserved sequence, lacking either aa 31 or aa 30-31. 53-aa configurations are typically found in most chemokine receptor (CKR) subfamilies, as well as in some viral protein products. However, the CCR1, CCR3, and CCR6 subfamilies comprise a 54-aa configuration and the CKR-related protein products, ChemR23 and RDC1, include the complete 55-aa sequence. For each CKR subfamily the "modal sequence" of the conserved segment was constructed by selecting the most frequently occurring aa at each position. Then, pairwise alignments were made between: (i) the modal CKR sequences, and (ii) the sequence (53-aa) of the Yaba-like disease virus - 7L protein. From the alignments two consensus matrices were derived: (i) the consensus 1 matrix with reference to the whole conserved segment, and (ii) the consensus 2 matrix with reference to aa 22-29, which appear to be the most variable segment of the sequence. Based on the obtained consensus values and with reference to this specific conserved segment, the following conclusions are proposed: (1) ChemR23 and RDC1 are probably the more primitive CKR forms; (2) CCR1 and CCR3 may be grouped in a single cluster; (3) CCRs 2, 4, and 5 are closely related to each other and may be grouped in a cluster; CCR7 is likely to be evolutionarily related to this cluster; (4) CXCRs 2, 3, and 4 and CCX CKR appear to be evolutionarily related to each other and very likely derived from an CCR6-like gene; (5) CCR2/4/5 and

  6. Discovery of Novel ncRNA Sequences in Multiple Genome Alignments on the Basis of Conserved and Stable Secondary Structures.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yinghan; Xu, Zhenjiang Zech; Lu, Zhi J; Zhao, Shan; Mathews, David H

    2015-01-01

    Recently, non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have been discovered with novel functions, and it has been appreciated that there is pervasive transcription of genomes. Moreover, many novel ncRNAs are not conserved on the primary sequence level. Therefore, de novo computational ncRNA detection that is accurate and efficient is desirable. The purpose of this study is to develop a ncRNA detection method based on conservation of structure in more than two genomes. A new method called Multifind, using Multilign, was developed. Multilign predicts the common secondary structure for multiple input sequences. Multifind then uses measures of structure conservation to estimate the probability that the input sequences are a conserved ncRNA using a classification support vector machine. Multilign is based on Dynalign, which folds and aligns two sequences simultaneously using a scoring scheme that does not include sequence identity; its structure prediction quality is therefore not affected by input sequence diversity. Additionally, ensemble defect was introduced to Multifind as an additional discriminating feature that quantifies the compactness of the folding space for a sequence. Benchmarks showed Multifind performs better than RNAz and LocARNATE+RNAz, a method that uses RNAz on structure alignments generated by LocARNATE, on testing sequences extracted from the Rfam database. For de novo ncRNA discovery in three genomes, Multifind and LocARNATE+RNAz had an advantage over RNAz in low similarity regions of genome alignments. Additionally, Multifind and LocARNATE+RNAz found different subsets of known ncRNA sequences, suggesting the two approaches are complementary. PMID:26075601

  7. Precise detection of L. monocytogenes hitting its highly conserved region possessing several specific antibody binding sites.

    PubMed

    Jahangiri, Abolfazl; Rasooli, Iraj; Reza Rahbar, Mohammad; Khalili, Saeed; Amani, Jafar; Ahmadi Zanoos, Kobra

    2012-07-21

    Listeria monocytogenes, a facultative intracellular fast-growing Gram-positive food-borne pathogen, can infect immunocompromised individuals leading to meningitis, meningoencephalitis and septicaemias. From the pool of virulence factors of the organism, ActA, a membrane protein, has a critical role in the life cycle of L. monocytogenes. High mortality rate of listeriosis necessitates a sensitive and rapid diagnostic test for precise identification of L. monocytogenes. We used bioinformatic tools to locate a specific conserved region of ActA for designing and developing an antibody-antigen based diagnostic test for the detection of L. monocytogenes. A number of databases were looked for ActA related sequences. Sequences were analyzed with several online software to find an appropriate region for our purpose. ActA protein was found specific to Listeria species with no homologs in other organisms. We finally introduced a highly conserved region within ActA sequence that possess several antibody binding sites specific to L. monocytogenes. This protein sequence can serve as an antigen for designing a relatively cheap, sensitive, and specific diagnostic test for detection of L. monocytogenes. PMID:22575546

  8. Epidermal surface antigen (MS17S1) is highly conserved between mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Cho, Y J; Chema, D; Moskow, J J; Cho, M; Schroeder, W T; Overbeek, P; Buchberg, A M; Duvic, M

    1995-05-20

    A mouse monoclonal antibody ECS-1 raised to human keratinocytes detects a 35-kDa epidermal surface antigen (ESA) and causes keratinocyte dissociation in vitro. ECS-1 stains skin of 16-day mouse embryo and 8- to 9-week human fetus. Mouse Esa cDNA encodes a 379-amino-acid protein that is 99.2% identical to the human, differing at only 3 amino acids. The gene (M17S1) was mapped to mouse chromosome 11, high-lighting the conserved linkage synteny existing between human chromosome 17 and mouse chromosome 11. Although the nude locus has been mapped to the same region of chromosome 11, no abnormalities in protein, mRNA, or cDNA or genomic sequences were detected in nude mice. However, both nude and control mice were found to have a second Esa mRNA transcript that conserves amino acid sequence and molecular weight. The mouse and human 5' and 3' untranslated sequences are conserved. Similar RNA folding patterns of the 5' untranslated region are predicted despite a 91-bp insertion in the mouse. These data suggest that both the function and the regulation of ESA protein are of importance and that Esa (M17S1) is not the nude locus gene. PMID:7557989

  9. Discovery and profiling of novel and conserved microRNAs during flower development in Carya cathayensis via deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng Jia; Huang, Jian Qin; Huang, You Jun; Li, Zheng; Zheng, Bing Song

    2012-08-01

    Hickory (Carya cathayensis Sarg.) is an economically important woody plant in China, but its long juvenile phase delays yield. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are critical regulators of genes and important for normal plant development and physiology, including flower development. We used Solexa technology to sequence two small RNA libraries from two floral differentiation stages in hickory to identify miRNAs related to flower development. We identified 39 conserved miRNA sequences from 114 loci belonging to 23 families as well as two novel and ten potential novel miRNAs belonging to nine families. Moreover, 35 conserved miRNA*s and two novel miRNA*s were detected. Twenty miRNA sequences from 49 loci belonging to 11 families were differentially expressed; all were up-regulated at the later stage of flower development in hickory. Quantitative real-time PCR of 12 conserved miRNA sequences, five novel miRNA families, and two novel miRNA*s validated that all were expressed during hickory flower development, and the expression patterns were similar to those detected with Solexa sequencing. Finally, a total of 146 targets of the novel and conserved miRNAs were predicted. This study identified a diverse set of miRNAs that were closely related to hickory flower development and that could help in plant floral induction. PMID:22481137

  10. The Internally Self-fertilizing Hermaphroditic Teleost Rivulus marmoratus (Cyprinodontiformes, Rivulidae) beta-Actin Gene: Amplification and Sequence Analysis with Conserved Primers.

    PubMed

    Lee

    2000-03-01

    To determine the ease and feasibility of amplifying the beta-actin gene in fish by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), genomic DNAs of several fish (Rivulus, Southern top mouth minnow, common fat minnow, oily bitterling, carp, Far Eastern catfish, medaka, and European flounder) were extracted and used as a template with conserved primers, designed on the basis of high amino acid homology (approximately 98% or more). Among them, the self-fertilizing hermaphroditic fish Rivulus marmoratus was chosen for further characterization. After amplification of the Rivulus beta-actin PCR product with Taq polymerase, PCR product was subcloned to pCRII vector. After restriction enzyme mapping of Rivulus beta-actin gene, the amplified insert was sequenced using ALF Express automatic DNA sequencer with conserved internal primers. The R. marmoratus beta-actin gene consists of 1763 bp encoding 375 amino acids including 5 exons and 4 introns. The splicing and acceptance sites of the exon and intron boundaries of the Rivulus beta-actin gene were highly conserved with consensus sequences (GT/AG). The amino acid homology of R. marmoratus beta-actin to other species was high: 98.93% to human; 98.93%, Atlantic salmon; 98.93%, common carp; 98.93%, grass carp; 98.93%, zebrafish; 98.67%, medaka; and 98.40%, sea bream. To determine the expression of the R. marmoratus beta-actin gene in liver and ovary, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction was carried out with internal primers. In conclusion, these universal primers are successful in the rapid cloning of the fish beta-actin gene by PCR, based on a high homology of the beta-actin gene conserved through evolution. This approach will be applicable to the isolation of other beta-actin homologues in the investigation of phylogenetic comparisons of fish species, along with a possible application to cloning strategy in other conserved genes. PMID:10811955

  11. Structural and sequence similarities of hydra xeroderma pigmentosum A protein to human homolog suggest early evolution and conservation.

    PubMed

    Barve, Apurva; Ghaskadbi, Saroj; Ghaskadbi, Surendra

    2013-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA) is a protein that binds to damaged DNA, verifies presence of a lesion, and recruits other proteins of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway to the site. Though its homologs from yeast, Drosophila, humans, and so forth are well studied, XPA has not so far been reported from protozoa and lower animal phyla. Hydra is a fresh-water cnidarian with a remarkable capacity for regeneration and apparent lack of organismal ageing. Cnidarians are among the first metazoa with a defined body axis, tissue grade organisation, and nervous system. We report here for the first time presence of XPA gene in hydra. Putative protein sequence of hydra XPA contains nuclear localization signal and bears the zinc-finger motif. It contains two conserved Pfam domains and various characterized features of XPA proteins like regions for binding to excision repair cross-complementing protein-1 (ERCC1) and replication protein A 70 kDa subunit (RPA70) proteins. Hydra XPA shows a high degree of similarity with vertebrate homologs and clusters with deuterostomes in phylogenetic analysis. Homology modelling corroborates the very close similarity between hydra and human XPA. The protein thus most likely functions in hydra in the same manner as in other animals, indicating that it arose early in evolution and has been conserved across animal phyla. PMID:24083246

  12. Structural and Sequence Similarities of Hydra Xeroderma Pigmentosum A Protein to Human Homolog Suggest Early Evolution and Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Ghaskadbi, Saroj

    2013-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA) is a protein that binds to damaged DNA, verifies presence of a lesion, and recruits other proteins of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway to the site. Though its homologs from yeast, Drosophila, humans, and so forth are well studied, XPA has not so far been reported from protozoa and lower animal phyla. Hydra is a fresh-water cnidarian with a remarkable capacity for regeneration and apparent lack of organismal ageing. Cnidarians are among the first metazoa with a defined body axis, tissue grade organisation, and nervous system. We report here for the first time presence of XPA gene in hydra. Putative protein sequence of hydra XPA contains nuclear localization signal and bears the zinc-finger motif. It contains two conserved Pfam domains and various characterized features of XPA proteins like regions for binding to excision repair cross-complementing protein-1 (ERCC1) and replication protein A 70 kDa subunit (RPA70) proteins. Hydra XPA shows a high degree of similarity with vertebrate homologs and clusters with deuterostomes in phylogenetic analysis. Homology modelling corroborates the very close similarity between hydra and human XPA. The protein thus most likely functions in hydra in the same manner as in other animals, indicating that it arose early in evolution and has been conserved across animal phyla. PMID:24083246

  13. A conserved intronic U1 snRNP-binding sequence promotes trans-splicing in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jun-Li; Fan, Yu-Jie; Wang, Xiu-Ye; Zhang, Yu; Pu, Jia; Li, Liang; Shao, Wei; Zhan, Shuai; Hao, Jianjiang

    2015-01-01

    Unlike typical cis-splicing, trans-splicing joins exons from two separate transcripts to produce chimeric mRNA and has been detected in most eukaryotes. Trans-splicing in trypanosomes and nematodes has been characterized as a spliced leader RNA-facilitated reaction; in contrast, its mechanism in higher eukaryotes remains unclear. Here we investigate mod(mdg4), a classic trans-spliced gene in Drosophila, and report that two critical RNA sequences in the middle of the last 5′ intron, TSA and TSB, promote trans-splicing of mod(mdg4). In TSA, a 13-nucleotide (nt) core motif is conserved across Drosophila species and is essential and sufficient for trans-splicing, which binds U1 small nuclear RNP (snRNP) through strong base-pairing with U1 snRNA. In TSB, a conserved secondary structure acts as an enhancer. Deletions of TSA and TSB using the CRISPR/Cas9 system result in developmental defects in flies. Although it is not clear how the 5′ intron finds the 3′ introns, compensatory changes in U1 snRNA rescue trans-splicing of TSA mutants, demonstrating that U1 recruitment is critical to promote trans-splicing in vivo. Furthermore, TSA core-like motifs are found in many other trans-spliced Drosophila genes, including lola. These findings represent a novel mechanism of trans-splicing, in which RNA motifs in the 5′ intron are sufficient to bring separate transcripts into close proximity to promote trans-splicing. PMID:25838544

  14. Comparison of SIV and HIV-1 genomic RNA structures reveals impact of sequence evolution on conserved and non-conserved structural motifs.

    PubMed

    Pollom, Elizabeth; Dang, Kristen K; Potter, E Lake; Gorelick, Robert J; Burch, Christina L; Weeks, Kevin M; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    RNA secondary structure plays a central role in the replication and metabolism of all RNA viruses, including retroviruses like HIV-1. However, structures with known function represent only a fraction of the secondary structure reported for HIV-1(NL4-3). One tool to assess the importance of RNA structures is to examine their conservation over evolutionary time. To this end, we used SHAPE to model the secondary structure of a second primate lentiviral genome, SIVmac239, which shares only 50% sequence identity at the nucleotide level with HIV-1NL4-3. Only about half of the paired nucleotides are paired in both genomic RNAs and, across the genome, just 71 base pairs form with the same pairing partner in both genomes. On average the RNA secondary structure is thus evolving at a much faster rate than the sequence. Structure at the Gag-Pro-Pol frameshift site is maintained but in a significantly altered form, while the impact of selection for maintaining a protein binding interaction can be seen in the conservation of pairing partners in the small RRE stems where Rev binds. Structures that are conserved between SIVmac239 and HIV-1(NL4-3) also occur at the 5' polyadenylation sequence, in the plus strand primer sites, PPT and cPPT, and in the stem-loop structure that includes the first splice acceptor site. The two genomes are adenosine-rich and cytidine-poor. The structured regions are enriched in guanosines, while unpaired regions are enriched in adenosines, and functionaly important structures have stronger base pairing than nonconserved structures. We conclude that much of the secondary structure is the result of fortuitous pairing in a metastable state that reforms during sequence evolution. However, secondary structure elements with important function are stabilized by higher guanosine content that allows regions of structure to persist as sequence evolution proceeds, and, within the confines of selective pressure, allows structures to evolve. PMID:23593004

  15. Automated conserved non-coding sequence (CNS) discovery reveals differences in gene content and promoter evolution among grasses

    PubMed Central

    Turco, Gina; Schnable, James C.; Pedersen, Brent; Freeling, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Conserved non-coding sequences (CNS) are islands of non-coding sequence that, like protein coding exons, show less divergence in sequence between related species than functionless DNA. Several CNSs have been demonstrated experimentally to function as cis-regulatory regions. However, the specific functions of most CNSs remain unknown. Previous searches for CNS in plants have either anchored on exons and only identified nearby sequences or required years of painstaking manual annotation. Here we present an open source tool that can accurately identify CNSs between any two related species with sequenced genomes, including both those immediately adjacent to exons and distal sequences separated by >12 kb of non-coding sequence. We have used this tool to characterize new motifs, associate CNSs with additional functions, and identify previously undetected genes encoding RNA and protein in the genomes of five grass species. We provide a list of 15,363 orthologous CNSs conserved across all grasses tested. We were also able to identify regulatory sequences present in the common ancestor of grasses that have been lost in one or more extant grass lineages. Lists of orthologous gene pairs and associated CNSs are provided for reference inbred lines of arabidopsis, Japonica rice, foxtail millet, sorghum, brachypodium, and maize. PMID:23874343

  16. A comparative genomics strategy for targeted discovery of single-nucleotide polymorphisms and conserved-noncoding sequences in orphan crops.

    PubMed

    Feltus, F A; Singh, H P; Lohithaswa, H C; Schulze, S R; Silva, T D; Paterson, A H

    2006-04-01

    Completed genome sequences provide templates for the design of genome analysis tools in orphan species lacking sequence information. To demonstrate this principle, we designed 384 PCR primer pairs to conserved exonic regions flanking introns, using Sorghum/Pennisetum expressed sequence tag alignments to the Oryza genome. Conserved-intron scanning primers (CISPs) amplified single-copy loci at 37% to 80% success rates in taxa that sample much of the approximately 50-million years of Poaceae divergence. While the conserved nature of exons fostered cross-taxon amplification, the lesser evolutionary constraints on introns enhanced single-nucleotide polymorphism detection. For example, in eight rice (Oryza sativa) genotypes, polymorphism averaged 12.1 per kb in introns but only 3.6 per kb in exons. Curiously, among 124 CISPs evaluated across Oryza, Sorghum, Pennisetum, Cynodon, Eragrostis, Zea, Triticum, and Hordeum, 23 (18.5%) seemed to be subject to rigid intron size constraints that were independent of per-nucleotide DNA sequence variation. Furthermore, we identified 487 conserved-noncoding sequence motifs in 129 CISP loci. A large CISP set (6,062 primer pairs, amplifying introns from 1,676 genes) designed using an automated pipeline showed generally higher abundance in recombinogenic than in nonrecombinogenic regions of the rice genome, thus providing relatively even distribution along genetic maps. CISPs are an effective means to explore poorly characterized genomes for both DNA polymorphism and noncoding sequence conservation on a genome-wide or candidate gene basis, and also provide anchor points for comparative genomics across a diverse range of species. PMID:16607031

  17. Plastid genome sequences of Gymnochlora stellata, Lotharella vacuolata, and Partenskyella glossopodia reveal remarkable structural conservation among chlorarachniophyte species.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shigekatsu; Hirakawa, Yoshihisa; Kofuji, Rumiko; Sugita, Mamoru; Ishida, Ken-Ichiro

    2016-07-01

    Chlorarachniophyte algae have complex plastids acquired by the uptake of a green algal endosymbiont, and this event is called secondary endosymbiosis. Interestingly, the plastids possess a relict endosymbiont nucleus, referred to as the nucleomorph, in the intermembrane space, and the nucleomorphs contain an extremely reduced and compacted genome in comparison with green algal nuclear genomes. Therefore, chlorarachniophyte plastids consist of two endosymbiotically derived genomes, i.e., the plastid and nucleomorph genomes. To date, complete nucleomorph genomes have been sequenced in four different species, whereas plastid genomes have been reported in only two species in chlorarachniophytes. To gain further insight into the evolution of endosymbiotic genomes in chlorarachniophytes, we newly sequenced the plastid genomes of three species, Gymnochlora stellata, Lotharella vacuolata, and Partenskyella glossopodia. Our findings reveal that chlorarachniophyte plastid genomes are highly conserved in size, gene content, and gene order among species, but their nucleomorph genomes are divergent in such features. Accordingly, the current architecture of the plastid genomes of chlorarachniophytes evolved in a common ancestor, and changed very little during their subsequent diversification. Furthermore, our phylogenetic analyses using multiple plastid genes suggest that chlorarachniophyte plastids are derived from a green algal lineage that is closely related to Bryopsidales in the Ulvophyceae group. PMID:26920842

  18. Babesia gibsoni internal transcribed spacer 1 region is highly conserved amongst isolates from dogs across Japan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingming; Cao, Shinuo; Vudriko, Patrick; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Soma, Takehisa; Xuan, Xuenan

    2016-06-01

    Babesia gibsoni is a tick-borne apicomplexan parasite of dogs that often causes fever and hemolytic anemia with highly variable clinical outcome. In this study, we sequenced the 254bp Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 region (ITS1) of 54 B. gibsoni isolates from 14 different geographical regions of Japan. The 54 isolates shared high sequence identity with each other and with B. gibsoni isolates reported in GenBank database (97.2-100%). Consistent with previous reports, phylogenetic analysis showed that B. gibsoni isolates from Japan formed the same clade with those from U.S.A., Australia, India and Taiwan. Our finding indicates that B. gibsoni ITS1 region is highly conserved among isolates from dogs in Japan, making it a useful genetic marker for molecular epidemiology of the parasite. PMID:26806537

  19. Babesia gibsoni internal transcribed spacer 1 region is highly conserved amongst isolates from dogs across Japan

    PubMed Central

    LIU, Mingming; CAO, Shinuo; VUDRIKO, Patrick; SUZUKI, Hiroshi; SOMA, Takehisa; XUAN, Xuenan

    2016-01-01

    Babesia gibsoni is a tick-borne apicomplexan parasite of dogs that often causes fever and hemolytic anemia with highly variable clinical outcome. In this study, we sequenced the 254bp Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 region (ITS1) of 54 B. gibsoni isolates from 14 different geographical regions of Japan. The 54 isolates shared high sequence identity with each other and with B. gibsoni isolates reported in GenBank database (97.2–100%). Consistent with previous reports, phylogenetic analysis showed that B. gibsoni isolates from Japan formed the same clade with those from U.S.A., Australia, India and Taiwan. Our finding indicates that B. gibsoni ITS1 region is highly conserved among isolates from dogs in Japan, making it a useful genetic marker for molecular epidemiology of the parasite. PMID:26806537

  20. Optimal assembly for high throughput shotgun sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We present a framework for the design of optimal assembly algorithms for shotgun sequencing under the criterion of complete reconstruction. We derive a lower bound on the read length and the coverage depth required for reconstruction in terms of the repeat statistics of the genome. Building on earlier works, we design a de Brujin graph based assembly algorithm which can achieve very close to the lower bound for repeat statistics of a wide range of sequenced genomes, including the GAGE datasets. The results are based on a set of necessary and sufficient conditions on the DNA sequence and the reads for reconstruction. The conditions can be viewed as the shotgun sequencing analogue of Ukkonen-Pevzner's necessary and sufficient conditions for Sequencing by Hybridization. PMID:23902516

  1. Integrating bioinformatic resources to predict transcription factors interacting with cis-sequences conserved in co-regulated genes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Using motif detection programs it is fairly straightforward to identify conserved cis-sequences in promoters of co-regulated genes. In contrast, the identification of the transcription factors (TFs) interacting with these cis-sequences is much more elaborate. To facilitate this, we explore the possibility of using several bioinformatic and experimental approaches for TF identification. This starts with the selection of co-regulated gene sets and leads first to the prediction and then to the experimental validation of TFs interacting with cis-sequences conserved in the promoters of these co-regulated genes. Results Using the PathoPlant database, 32 up-regulated gene groups were identified with microarray data for drought-responsive gene expression from Arabidopsis thaliana. Application of the binding site estimation suite of tools (BEST) discovered 179 conserved sequence motifs within the corresponding promoters. Using the STAMP web-server, 49 sequence motifs were classified into 7 motif families for which similarities with known cis-regulatory sequences were identified. All motifs were subjected to a footprintDB analysis to predict interacting DNA binding domains from plant TF families. Predictions were confirmed by using a yeast-one-hybrid approach to select interacting TFs belonging to the predicted TF families. TF-DNA interactions were further experimentally validated in yeast and with a Physcomitrella patens transient expression system, leading to the discovery of several novel TF-DNA interactions. Conclusions The present work demonstrates the successful integration of several bioinformatic resources with experimental approaches to predict and validate TFs interacting with conserved sequence motifs in co-regulated genes. PMID:24773781

  2. THE GRK4 SUBFAMILY OF G PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTOR KINASES: ALTERNATIVE SPLICING, GENE ORGANIZATION, AND SEQUENCE CONSERVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The GRK4 subfamily of G protein-coupled receptor kinases. Alternative splicing, gene organization, and sequence conservation.

    Premont RT, Macrae AD, Aparicio SA, Kendall HE, Welch JE, Lefkowitz RJ.

    Department of Medicine, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Duke Univer...

  3. Advances in high throughput DNA sequence data compression.

    PubMed

    Sardaraz, Muhammad; Tahir, Muhammad; Ikram, Ataul Aziz

    2016-06-01

    Advances in high throughput sequencing technologies and reduction in cost of sequencing have led to exponential growth in high throughput DNA sequence data. This growth has posed challenges such as storage, retrieval, and transmission of sequencing data. Data compression is used to cope with these challenges. Various methods have been developed to compress genomic and sequencing data. In this article, we present a comprehensive review of compression methods for genome and reads compression. Algorithms are categorized as referential or reference free. Experimental results and comparative analysis of various methods for data compression are presented. Finally, key challenges and research directions in DNA sequence data compression are highlighted. PMID:26846812

  4. Nucleotide sequence of a cluster of early and late genes in a conserved segment of the vaccinia virus genome.

    PubMed Central

    Plucienniczak, A; Schroeder, E; Zettlmeissl, G; Streeck, R E

    1985-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 7.6 kb vaccinia DNA segment from a genomic region conserved among different orthopox virus has been determined. This segment contains a tight cluster of 12 partly overlapping open reading frames most of which can be correlated with previously identified early and late proteins and mRNAs. Regulatory signals used by vaccinia virus have been studied. Presumptive promoter regions are rich in A, T and carry the consensus sequences TATA and AATAA spaced at 20-24 base pairs. Tandem repeats of a CTATTC consensus sequence are proposed to be involved in the termination of early transcription. PMID:2987815

  5. Sequence Evaluation of FGF and FGFR Gene Conserved Non-Coding Elements in Non-Syndromic Cleft Lip and Palate Cases

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Bridget M.; Murray, Jeffrey C.

    2009-01-01

    Non-syndromic cleft lip and palate (NS CLP) is a complex birth defect resulting from multiple genetic and environmental factors. We have previously reported the sequencing of the coding region of genes in the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling pathway, in which missense and non-sense mutations contribute to approximately 5%–6% NS CLP cases. In this article we report the sequencing of conserved non-coding elements (CNEs) in and around 11 of the FGF and FGFR genes, which identified 55 novel variants. Seven of variants are highly conserved among ≥8 species and 31 variants alter transcription factor binding sites, 8 of which are important for craniofacial development. Additionally, 15 NS CLP patients had a combination of coding mutations and CNE variants, suggesting that an accumulation of variants in the FGF signaling pathway may contribute to clefting. PMID:17963255

  6. The sexually dimorphic on the Y-chromosome gene (sdY) is a conserved male-specific Y-chromosome sequence in many salmonids

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Ayaka; Nicol, Barbara; Jouanno, Elodie; Quillet, Edwige; Fostier, Alexis; Guyomard, René; Guiguen, Yann

    2013-01-01

    All salmonid species investigated to date have been characterized with a male heterogametic sex-determination system. However, as these species do not share any Y-chromosome conserved synteny, there remains a debate on whether they share a common master sex-determining gene. In this study, we investigated the extent of conservation and evolution of the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) master sex-determining gene, sdY (sexually dimorphic on the Y-chromosome), in 15 different species of salmonids. We found that the sdY sequence is highly conserved in all salmonids and that sdY is a male-specific Y-chromosome gene in the majority of these species. These findings demonstrate that most salmonids share a conserved sex-determining locus and also strongly suggest that sdY may be this conserved master sex-determining gene. However, in two whitefish species (subfamily Coregoninae), sdY was found both in males and females, suggesting that alternative sex-determination systems may have also evolved in this family. Based on the wide conservation of sdY as a male-specific Y-chromosome gene, efficient and easy molecular sexing techniques can now be developed that will be of great interest for studying these economically and environmentally important species. PMID:23745140

  7. 77 FR 74167 - Information Collection Request: Highly Erodible Land Conservation and Wetland Conservation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... information is collected in support of the conservation compliance provisions of Title XII of the Food Security Act of 1985 (the 1985 Farm Bill), as amended by the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008... Security Act of 1985 (16 U.S.C. 3801-3862), as amended by the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of...

  8. Evolutionary divergence and limits of conserved non-coding sequence detection in plant genomes

    PubMed Central

    Reineke, Anna R.; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Gu, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of regulatory motifs embedded in upstream regions of plants is a particularly challenging bioinformatics task. Previous studies have shown that motifs in plants are short compared with those found in vertebrates. Furthermore, plant genomes have undergone several diversification mechanisms such as genome duplication events which impact the evolution of regulatory motifs. In this article, a systematic phylogenomic comparison of upstream regions is conducted to further identify features of the plant regulatory genomes, the component of genomes regulating gene expression, to enable future de novo discoveries. The findings highlight differences in upstream region properties between major plant groups and the effects of divergence times and duplication events. First, clear differences in upstream region evolution can be detected between monocots and dicots, thus suggesting that a separation of these groups should be made when searching for novel regulatory motifs, particularly since universal motifs such as the TATA box are rare. Second, investigating the decay rate of significantly aligned regions suggests that a divergence time of ∼100 mya sets a limit for reliable conserved non-coding sequence (CNS) detection. Insights presented here will set a framework to help identify embedded motifs of functional relevance by understanding the limits of bioinformatics detection for CNSs. PMID:21470961

  9. QColors: an algorithm for conservative viral quasispecies reconstruction from short and non-contiguous next generation sequencing reads.

    PubMed

    Huang, Austin; Kantor, Rami; DeLong, Allison; Schreier, Leeann; Istrail, Sorin

    Next generation sequencing technologies have recently been applied to characterize mutational spectra of the heterogeneous population of viral genotypes (known as a quasispecies) within HIV-infected patients. Such information is clinically relevant because minority genetic subpopulations of HIV within patients enable viral escape from selection pressures such as the immune response and antiretroviral therapy. However, methods for quasispecies sequence reconstruction from next generation sequencing reads are not yet widely used and remains an emerging area of research. Furthermore, the majority of research methodology in HIV has focused on 454 sequencing, while many next-generation sequencing platforms used in practice are limited to shorter read lengths relative to 454 sequencing. Little work has been done in determining how best to address the read length limitations of other platforms. The approach described here incorporates graph representations of both read differences and read overlap to conservatively determine the regions of the sequence with sufficient variability to separate quasispecies sequences. Within these tractable regions of quasispecies inference, we use constraint programming to solve for an optimal quasispecies subsequence determination via vertex coloring of the conflict graph, a representation which also lends itself to data with non-contiguous reads such as paired-end sequencing. We demonstrate the utility of the method by applying it to simulations based on actual intra-patient clonal HIV-1 sequencing data. PMID:23202421

  10. Sequence analysis of the L protein of the Ebola 2014 outbreak: Insight into conserved regions and mutations.

    PubMed

    Ayub, Gohar; Waheed, Yasir

    2016-06-01

    The 2014 Ebola outbreak was one of the largest that have occurred; it started in Guinea and spread to Nigeria, Liberia and Sierra Leone. Phylogenetic analysis of the current virus species indicated that this outbreak is the result of a divergent lineage of the Zaire ebolavirus. The L protein of Ebola virus (EBOV) is the catalytic subunit of the RNA‑dependent RNA polymerase complex, which, with VP35, is key for the replication and transcription of viral RNA. Earlier sequence analysis demonstrated that the L protein of all non‑segmented negative‑sense (NNS) RNA viruses consists of six domains containing conserved functional motifs. The aim of the present study was to analyze the presence of these motifs in 2014 EBOV isolates, highlight their function and how they may contribute to the overall pathogenicity of the isolates. For this purpose, 81 2014 EBOV L protein sequences were aligned with 475 other NNS RNA viruses, including Paramyxoviridae and Rhabdoviridae viruses. Phylogenetic analysis of all EBOV outbreak L protein sequences was also performed. Analysis of the amino acid substitutions in the 2014 EBOV outbreak was conducted using sequence analysis. The alignment demonstrated the presence of previously conserved motifs in the 2014 EBOV isolates and novel residues. Notably, all the mutations identified in the 2014 EBOV isolates were tolerant, they were pathogenic with certain examples occurring within previously determined functional conserved motifs, possibly altering viral pathogenicity, replication and virulence. The phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that all sequences with the exception of the 2014 EBOV sequences were clustered together. The 2014 EBOV outbreak has acquired a great number of mutations, which may explain the reasons behind this unprecedented outbreak. Certain residues critical to the function of the polymerase remain conserved and may be targets for the development of antiviral therapeutic agents. PMID:27082438

  11. Advances in DNA sequencing technologies for high resolution HLA typing.

    PubMed

    Cereb, Nezih; Kim, Hwa Ran; Ryu, Jaejun; Yang, Soo Young

    2015-12-01

    This communication describes our experience in large-scale G group-level high resolution HLA typing using three different DNA sequencing platforms - ABI 3730 xl, Illumina MiSeq and PacBio RS II. Recent advances in DNA sequencing technologies, so-called next generation sequencing (NGS), have brought breakthroughs in deciphering the genetic information in all living species at a large scale and at an affordable level. The NGS DNA indexing system allows sequencing multiple genes for large number of individuals in a single run. Our laboratory has adopted and used these technologies for HLA molecular testing services. We found that each sequencing technology has its own strengths and weaknesses, and their sequencing performances complement each other. HLA genes are highly complex and genotyping them is quite challenging. Using these three sequencing platforms, we were able to meet all requirements for G group-level high resolution and high volume HLA typing. PMID:26423536

  12. Phylogenetic comparison of the pre-mRNA adenosine deaminase ADAR2 genes and transcripts: conservation and diversity in editing site sequence and alternative splicing patterns.

    PubMed

    Slavov, D; Gardiner, K

    2002-10-16

    Adenosine deaminase that acts on RNA -2 (ADAR2) is a member of a family of vertebrate genes that encode adenosine (A)-to-inosine (I) RNA deaminases, enzymes that deaminate specific A residues in specific pre-mRNAs to produce I. Known substrates of ADAR2 include sites within the coding regions of pre-mRNAs of the ionotropic glutamate receptors, GluR2-6, and the serotonin receptor, 5HT2C. Mammalian ADAR2 expression is itself regulated by A-to-I editing and by several alternative splicing events. Because the biological consequences of ADAR2 function are significant, we have undertaken a phylogenetic comparison of these features. Here we report a comparison of cDNA sequences, genomic organization, editing site sequences and patterns of alternative splicing of ADAR2 genes from human, mouse, chicken, pufferfish and zebrafish. Coding sequences and intron/exon organization are highly conserved. All ADAR2 genes show evidence of transcript editing with required sequences and predicted secondary structures very highly conserved. Patterns and levels of editing and alternative splicing vary among organisms, and include novel N-terminal exons and splicing events. PMID:12459255

  13. Two evolutionarily conserved sequence elements for Peg3/Usp29 transcription

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Do; Yu, Sungryul; Choo, Jung Ha; Kim, Joomyeong

    2008-01-01

    Background Two evolutionarily Conserved Sequence Elements, CSE1 and CSE2 (YY1 binding sites), are found within the 3.8-kb CpG island surrounding the bidirectional promoter of two imprinted genes, Peg3 (Paternally expressed gene 3) and Usp29 (Ubiquitin-specific protease 29). This CpG island is a likely ICR (Imprinting Control Region) that controls transcription of the 500-kb genomic region of the Peg3 imprinted domain. Results The current study investigated the functional roles of CSE1 and CSE2 in the transcriptional control of the two genes, Peg3 and Usp29, using cell line-based promoter assays. The mutation of 6 YY1 binding sites (CSE2) reduced the transcriptional activity of the bidirectional promoter in the Peg3 direction in an orientation-dependent manner, suggesting an activator role for CSE2 (YY1 binding sites). However, the activity in the Usp29 direction was not detectable regardless of the presence/absence of YY1 binding sites. In contrast, mutation of CSE1 increased the transcriptional activity of the promoter in both the Peg3 and Usp29 directions, suggesting a potential repressor role for CSE1. The observed repression by CSE1 was also orientation-dependent. Serial mutational analyses further narrowed down two separate 6-bp-long regions within the 42-bp-long CSE1 which are individually responsible for the repression of Peg3 and Usp29. Conclusion CSE2 (YY1 binding sites) functions as an activator for Peg3 transcription, while CSE1 acts as a repressor for the transcription of both Peg3 and Usp29. PMID:19068137

  14. Antibody Recognition of a Highly Conserved Influenza Virus Epitope

    SciTech Connect

    Ekiert, Damian C.; Bhabha, Gira; Elsliger, Marc-André; Friesen, Robert H.E.; Jongeneelen, Mandy; Throsby, Mark; Goudsmit, Jaap; Wilson, Ian A.; Scripps; Crucell

    2009-05-21

    Influenza virus presents an important and persistent threat to public health worldwide, and current vaccines provide immunity to viral isolates similar to the vaccine strain. High-affinity antibodies against a conserved epitope could provide immunity to the diverse influenza subtypes and protection against future pandemic viruses. Cocrystal structures were determined at 2.2 and 2.7 angstrom resolutions for broadly neutralizing human antibody CR6261 Fab in complexes with the major surface antigen (hemagglutinin, HA) from viruses responsible for the 1918 H1N1 influenza pandemic and a recent lethal case of H5N1 avian influenza. In contrast to other structurally characterized influenza antibodies, CR6261 recognizes a highly conserved helical region in the membrane-proximal stem of HA1 and HA2. The antibody neutralizes the virus by blocking conformational rearrangements associated with membrane fusion. The CR6261 epitope identified here should accelerate the design and implementation of improved vaccines that can elicit CR6261-like antibodies, as well as antibody-based therapies for the treatment of influenza.

  15. Taking High Conservation Value from Forests to Freshwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abell, Robin; Morgan, Siân K.; Morgan, Alexis J.

    2015-07-01

    The high conservation value (HCV) concept, originally developed by the Forest Stewardship Council, has been widely incorporated outside the forestry sector into companies' supply chain assessments and responsible purchasing policies, financial institutions' investment policies, and numerous voluntary commodity standards. Many, if not most, of these newer applications relate to production practices that are likely to affect freshwater systems directly or indirectly, yet there is little guidance as to whether or how HCV can be applied to water bodies. We focus this paper on commodity standards and begin by exploring how prominent standards currently address both HCVs and freshwaters. We then highlight freshwater features of high conservation importance and examine how well those features are captured by the existing HCV framework. We propose a new set of freshwater `elements' for each of the six values and suggest an approach for identifying HCV Areas that takes out-of-fence line impacts into account, thereby spatially extending the scope of existing methods to define HCVs. We argue that virtually any non-marine HCV assessment, regardless of the production sector, should be expanded to include freshwater values, and we suggest how to put those recommendations into practice.

  16. A conserved spiral structure for highly diverged phage tail assembly chaperones.

    PubMed

    Pell, Lisa G; Cumby, Nichole; Clark, Teresa E; Tuite, Ashleigh; Battaile, Kevin P; Edwards, Aled M; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y; Davidson, Alan R; Maxwell, Karen L

    2013-07-24

    Tail assembly chaperones (TACs) are a family of proteins likely required for the morphogenesis of all long-tailed phages. In this study, we determined the crystal structure of gp13, the TAC of phage HK97. This structure is similar to that of the TAC from the Lactococcus phage p2 and two unannotated structures of likely TACs encoded in prophage-derived regions of Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus stearothermophilus. Despite the high sequence divergence of these proteins, gp13 forms a ring structure with similar dimensions to the spirals observed in the crystal lattices of these other proteins. Remarkably, these similar quaternary structures are formed through very different interprotomer interactions. We present functional data supporting the biological relevance of these spiral structures and propose that spiral formation has been the primary requirement for these proteins during evolution. This study presents an unusual example of diverged protein sequences and oligomerization mechanisms in the presence of conserved quaternary structure. PMID:23542344

  17. Dominant sequences of human major histocompatibility complex conserved extended haplotypes from HLA-DQA2 to DAXX.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Charles E; Alford, Dennis R; Trautwein, Michael R; Jalloh, Yanoh K; Tarnacki, Jennifer L; Kunnenkeri, Sushruta K; Fici, Dolores A; Yunis, Edmond J; Awdeh, Zuheir L; Alper, Chester A

    2014-10-01

    We resequenced and phased 27 kb of DNA within 580 kb of the MHC class II region in 158 population chromosomes, most of which were conserved extended haplotypes (CEHs) of European descent or contained their centromeric fragments. We determined the single nucleotide polymorphism and deletion-insertion polymorphism alleles of the dominant sequences from HLA-DQA2 to DAXX for these CEHs. Nine of 13 CEHs remained sufficiently intact to possess a dominant sequence extending at least to DAXX, 230 kb centromeric to HLA-DPB1. We identified the regions centromeric to HLA-DQB1 within which single instances of eight "common" European MHC haplotypes previously sequenced by the MHC Haplotype Project (MHP) were representative of those dominant CEH sequences. Only two MHP haplotypes had a dominant CEH sequence throughout the centromeric and extended class II region and one MHP haplotype did not represent a known European CEH anywhere in the region. We identified the centromeric recombination transition points of other MHP sequences from CEH representation to non-representation. Several CEH pairs or groups shared sequence identity in small blocks but had significantly different (although still conserved for each separate CEH) sequences in surrounding regions. These patterns partly explain strong calculated linkage disequilibrium over only short (tens to hundreds of kilobases) distances in the context of a finite number of observed megabase-length CEHs comprising half a population's haplotypes. Our results provide a clearer picture of European CEH class II allelic structure and population haplotype architecture, improved regional CEH markers, and raise questions concerning regional recombination hotspots. PMID:25299700

  18. Dominant Sequences of Human Major Histocompatibility Complex Conserved Extended Haplotypes from HLA-DQA2 to DAXX

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Charles E.; Alford, Dennis R.; Trautwein, Michael R.; Jalloh, Yanoh K.; Tarnacki, Jennifer L.; Kunnenkeri, Sushruta K.; Fici, Dolores A.; Yunis, Edmond J.; Awdeh, Zuheir L.; Alper, Chester A.

    2014-01-01

    We resequenced and phased 27 kb of DNA within 580 kb of the MHC class II region in 158 population chromosomes, most of which were conserved extended haplotypes (CEHs) of European descent or contained their centromeric fragments. We determined the single nucleotide polymorphism and deletion-insertion polymorphism alleles of the dominant sequences from HLA-DQA2 to DAXX for these CEHs. Nine of 13 CEHs remained sufficiently intact to possess a dominant sequence extending at least to DAXX, 230 kb centromeric to HLA-DPB1. We identified the regions centromeric to HLA-DQB1 within which single instances of eight “common” European MHC haplotypes previously sequenced by the MHC Haplotype Project (MHP) were representative of those dominant CEH sequences. Only two MHP haplotypes had a dominant CEH sequence throughout the centromeric and extended class II region and one MHP haplotype did not represent a known European CEH anywhere in the region. We identified the centromeric recombination transition points of other MHP sequences from CEH representation to non-representation. Several CEH pairs or groups shared sequence identity in small blocks but had significantly different (although still conserved for each separate CEH) sequences in surrounding regions. These patterns partly explain strong calculated linkage disequilibrium over only short (tens to hundreds of kilobases) distances in the context of a finite number of observed megabase-length CEHs comprising half a population's haplotypes. Our results provide a clearer picture of European CEH class II allelic structure and population haplotype architecture, improved regional CEH markers, and raise questions concerning regional recombination hotspots. PMID:25299700

  19. Concentration of Specific Amino Acids at the Catalytic/Active Centers of Highly-Conserved ``Housekeeping'' Enzymes of Central Metabolism in Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryota: Is There a Widely Conserved Chemical Signal of Prebiotic Assembly?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollack, J. Dennis; Pan, Xueliang; Pearl, Dennis K.

    2010-06-01

    In alignments of 1969 protein sequences the amino acid glycine and others were found concentrated at most-conserved sites within ˜15 Å of catalytic/active centers (C/AC) of highly conserved kinases, dehydrogenases or lyases of Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryota. Lysine and glutamic acid were concentrated at least-conserved sites furthest from their C/ACs. Logistic-regression analyses corroborated the “movement” of glycine towards and lysine away from their C/ACs: the odds of a glycine occupying a site were decreased by 19%, while the odds for a lysine were increased by 53%, for every 10 Å moving away from the C/AC. Average conservation of MSA consensus sites was highest surrounding the C/AC and directly decreased in transition toward model’s peripheries. Findings held with statistical confidence using sequences restricted to individual Domains or enzyme classes or to both. Our data describe variability in the rate of mutation and likelihoods for phylogenetic trees based on protein sequence data and endorse the extension of substitution models by incorporating data on conservation and distance to C/ACs rather than only using cumulative levels. The data support the view that in the most-conserved environment immediately surrounding the C/AC of taxonomically distant and highly conserved essential enzymes of central metabolism there are amino acids whose identity and degree of occupancy is similar to a proposed amino acid set and frequency associated with prebiotic evolution.

  20. High-throughput sequencing and vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Luciani, F

    2016-04-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have reshaped genome research. The resulting increase in sequencing depth and resolution has led to an unprecedented level of genomic detail and thus an increasing awareness of the complexity of animal, human and pathogen genomes. This has resulted in new approaches to vaccine research. On the one hand, the increase in genome complexity challenges our ability to study and understand pathogen biology and pathogen-host interactions. On the other hand, the increase in genomic data also provides key information for developing and designing improved vaccines against pathogens that were previously extremely difficult to deal with, such as rapidly mutating RNA viruses or bacteria that have complex interactions with the host immune system. This review describes how the broad application of NGS technologies to genome research is affecting vaccine research. It focuses on implications for the field of viral genomics, and includes recent animal and human studies. PMID:27217168

  1. The putative cell cycle gene, enhancer of rudimentary, encodes a highly conserved protein found in plants and animals.

    PubMed

    Gelsthorpe, M; Pulumati, M; McCallum, C; Dang-Vu, K; Tsubota, S I

    1997-02-28

    The enhancer of rudimentary gene, e(r), in Drosophila melanogaster encodes a protein, ER, whose function has been implicated in pyrimidine biosynthesis and the cell cycle (Wojcik et al. (1994) Genetics 138, 1163-1170). In order to identify conserved regions of the protein and potentially important functional domains, the e(r) gene was cloned and sequenced from two other insects (Drosophila virilis and Aedes aegypti) and three vertebrates (Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, and Brachydanio rerio) and sequenced from a flowering plant (Arabidopsis thaliana). These sequences along with those of a nematode (Caenorhabditis elegans) exhibit a high degree of identity. ER of Drosophila melanogaster is 76% identical to the three vertebrate proteins, 49% identical to the nematode protein, and 40% identical to the plant protein. There is high evolutionary conservation among the vertebrates. The mouse and human proteins are identical and differ from that of the zebrafish by a single conservative amino-acid change (valine for isoleucine). A dramatic sequence conservation is seen in the position of the hydrophobic amino acids. Of the 27 positions occupied by hydrophobic amino acids in ER of Drosophila melanogaster, 25 of the corresponding positions in the human protein, 23 of the positions in Caenorhabditis elegans, and 20 of the positions in Arabidopsis thaliana have hydrophobic amino acids. Most of these residues are present in three conserved amphipathic alpha-helices, which are proposed to function in protein-protein interactions. Two phosphorylation sites for casein kinase II (CKII) have also been conserved within the animal groups. Purified ER from Drosophila melanogaster is phosphorylated in vitro by CKII, arguing that these two sites are functional in vivo. A putative shift in the secondary structure of ER caused by the phosphorylation of these sites suggests that CKII may be regulating the activity of the ER in vivo. PMID:9074495

  2. High-throughput sequencing of cytosine methylation in plant DNA

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cytosine methylation is a significant and widespread regulatory factor in plant systems. Methods for the high-throughput sequencing of methylation have allowed a greatly improved characterisation of the methylome. Here we discuss currently available methods for generation and analysis of high-throughput sequencing of methylation data. We also discuss the results previously acquired through sequencing plant methylomes, and highlight remaining challenges in this field. PMID:23758782

  3. Identification of conserved genomic regions and variation therein amongst Cetartiodactyla species using next generation sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Next Generation Sequencing has created an opportunity to genetically characterize an individual both inexpensively and comprehensively. In earlier work produced in our collaboration [1], it was demonstrated that, for animals without a reference genome, their Next Generation Sequence data ...

  4. cDNA sequence, genomic organization, and evolutionary conservation of a novel gene from the WAGR region

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, F.; Eisenman, R.; Knoll, J.; Bruns, G.

    1995-09-20

    A new gene (239FB) with predominant and differential expression in fetal brain has recently been isolated from a chromosome 11p13-p14 boundary area near FSHB. The corresponding mRNA has an open reading frame of 294 amino acids, a 3` untranslated region of 1247 nucleotides, and a highly GC-rich 5` untranslated region. The coding and 3` UT sequence is specified by 6 exons within nearly 87 kb of isolated genomic locus. The 5` end region of the transcript maps adjacent to the only genomically defined CpG island in a chromosomal subregion that may be associated with part of the mental retardation of some WAGR (Wilms tumor, aniridia, genitourinary anomalies, and mental retardation) syndrome patients. In addition to nucleotide and amino acid similarity to an EST from a normalized infant brain cDNA library, the predicted protein has extensive similarity to Caenorhbditis elegans polypeptides of, as yet, unknown function. The 239FB locus is, therefore, likely part of a family of genes with two members expressed in human brain. The extensive conservation of the predicted protein suggests a fundamental function of the gene product and will enable evaluation of the role of the 239FB gene in neurogenesis in model organisms. 48 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Design and analysis of structure-activity relationship of novel antimicrobial peptides derived from the conserved sequence of cecropin.

    PubMed

    Hao, Gang; Shi, Yong-Hui; Han, Jing-Hui; Li, Qi-Hui; Tang, Ya-Li; Le, Guo-Wei

    2008-03-01

    We have de novo designed four antimicrobial peptides AMP-A/B/C/D, the 51-residues peptides, which are based on the conserved sequence of cecropin. In the present study, the four peptides were chemically synthesized and their activities assayed. Their secondary structure, amphipathic property, electric field distribution and transmembrane domain were subsequently predicted by bioinformatics tools. Finally, the structure-activity relationship was analyzed from the results of activity experiments and prediction. The results of activity experiments indicated that AMP-B/C/D clearly possessed excellent broad-spectrum activity against bacteria, whereas AMP-A was almost inactive against most of the bacterial strains tested. AMP-B/C/D showed more potent activity against Gram-positive bacteria than against Gram-negative bacteria. By utilizing bioinformatics analysis tools, we found that the secondary structure of the four cation peptides was mainly alpha-helix, and the result of CD spectrum also displayed that all the peptides had considerable alpha-helix in the presence of either 50% TFE or SDS micelles. AMP-C showed much better activity than other peptides against most of the bacteria tested, owing to its remarkable cation property and the amphipathic character of its N-terminal. The study of structure-activity relationship of the designed peptides confirmed that amphipathic structure and high net positive charge were prerequisites for maintaining their activities. PMID:17929330

  6. Dose-sensitivity, conserved non-coding sequences, and duplicate gene retention through multiple tetraploidies in the grasses.

    PubMed

    Schnable, James C; Pedersen, Brent S; Subramaniam, Sabarinath; Freeling, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Whole genome duplications, or tetraploidies, are an important source of increased gene content. Following whole genome duplication, duplicate copies of many genes are lost from the genome. This loss of genes is biased both in the classes of genes deleted and the subgenome from which they are lost. Many or all classes are genes preferentially retained as duplicate copies are engaged in dose sensitive protein-protein interactions, such that deletion of any one duplicate upsets the status quo of subunit concentrations, and presumably lowers fitness as a result. Transcription factors are also preferentially retained following every whole genome duplications studied. This has been explained as a consequence of protein-protein interactions, just as for other highly retained classes of genes. We show that the quantity of conserved noncoding sequences (CNSs) associated with genes predicts the likelihood of their retention as duplicate pairs following whole genome duplication. As many CNSs likely represent binding sites for transcriptional regulators, we propose that the likelihood of gene retention following tetraploidy may also be influenced by dose-sensitive protein-DNA interactions between the regulatory regions of CNS-rich genes - nicknamed bigfoot genes - and the proteins that bind to them. Using grass genomes, we show that differential loss of CNSs from one member of a pair following the pre-grass tetraploidy reduces its chance of retention in the subsequent maize lineage tetraploidy. PMID:22645525

  7. Dose–Sensitivity, Conserved Non-Coding Sequences, and Duplicate Gene Retention Through Multiple Tetraploidies in the Grasses

    PubMed Central

    Schnable, James C.; Pedersen, Brent S.; Subramaniam, Sabarinath; Freeling, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Whole genome duplications, or tetraploidies, are an important source of increased gene content. Following whole genome duplication, duplicate copies of many genes are lost from the genome. This loss of genes is biased both in the classes of genes deleted and the subgenome from which they are lost. Many or all classes are genes preferentially retained as duplicate copies are engaged in dose sensitive protein–protein interactions, such that deletion of any one duplicate upsets the status quo of subunit concentrations, and presumably lowers fitness as a result. Transcription factors are also preferentially retained following every whole genome duplications studied. This has been explained as a consequence of protein–protein interactions, just as for other highly retained classes of genes. We show that the quantity of conserved noncoding sequences (CNSs) associated with genes predicts the likelihood of their retention as duplicate pairs following whole genome duplication. As many CNSs likely represent binding sites for transcriptional regulators, we propose that the likelihood of gene retention following tetraploidy may also be influenced by dose–sensitive protein–DNA interactions between the regulatory regions of CNS-rich genes – nicknamed bigfoot genes – and the proteins that bind to them. Using grass genomes, we show that differential loss of CNSs from one member of a pair following the pre-grass tetraploidy reduces its chance of retention in the subsequent maize lineage tetraploidy. PMID:22645525

  8. Conservation of sequence in the internal transcribed spacers and 5.8S ribosomal RNA among geographically separated isolates of parasitic scuticociliates (Ciliophora, Orchitophryidae).

    PubMed

    Goggin, C L; Murphy, N E

    2000-02-24

    Nucleotide sequence from the internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2) and the 5.8S gene from the ribosomal RNA gene cluster of isolates of the scuticociliate Orchitophrya stellarum from 4 asteroid hosts were compared. Surprisingly, these data (495 bp) were identical for O. stellarum isolated from the testes of Asterias amurensis from Japan; Pisaster ochraceus from British Columbia, Canada; Asterias rubens from The Netherlands; and Asterias vulgaris from Prince Edward Island, Canada. These sequence data were compared to those from 3 scuticociliates which parasitise crustaceans: Mesanophrys pugettensis, M. chesapeakensis and Anophryoides haemophila. No difference was found in this region between the nucleotide sequence of M. pugettensis and M. chesapeakensis. The sequence of Mesanophrys spp. differed by 9.2% in the ITS1 and 4.7% in the ITS2 from that of O. stellarum. The sequence from the ITS1 (135 bp) and ITS2 (233 bp) of A. haemophila differed by 42.6 and 20.5% respectively from those of O. stellarum. Therefore, nucleotide sequence of the ITS regions in these scuticociliates is highly conserved. PMID:10785865

  9. Conserved sequence-specific lincRNA-steroid receptor interactions drive transcriptional repression and direct cell fate

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, William H.; Pickard, Mark R.; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S.; Kuiper, Emily G.; Mourtada-Maarabouni, Mirna; Conn, Graeme L.; Kojetin, Douglas J.; Williams, Gwyn T.; Ortlund, Eric A.

    2014-12-23

    The majority of the eukaryotic genome is transcribed, generating a significant number of long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs). Although lincRNAs represent the most poorly understood product of transcription, recent work has shown lincRNAs fulfill important cellular functions. In addition to low sequence conservation, poor understanding of structural mechanisms driving lincRNA biology hinders systematic prediction of their function. Here we report the molecular requirements for the recognition of steroid receptors (SRs) by the lincRNA growth arrest-specific 5 (Gas5), which regulates steroid-mediated transcriptional regulation, growth arrest and apoptosis. We identify the functional Gas5-SR interface and generate point mutations that ablate the SR-Gas5 lincRNA interaction, altering Gas5-driven apoptosis in cancer cell lines. Further, we find that the Gas5 SR-recognition sequence is conserved among haplorhines, with its evolutionary origin as a splice acceptor site. This study demonstrates that lincRNAs can recognize protein targets in a conserved, sequence-specific manner in order to affect critical cell functions.

  10. Conserved sequence-specific lincRNA-steroid receptor interactions drive transcriptional repression and direct cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, William H.; Pickard, Mark R.; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S.; Kuiper, Emily G.; Mourtada-Maarabouni, Mirna; Conn, Graeme L.; Kojetin, Douglas J.; Williams, Gwyn T.; Ortlund, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of the eukaryotic genome is transcribed, generating a significant number of long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs). While lincRNAs represent the most poorly understood product of transcription, recent work has shown lincRNAs fulfill important cellular functions. In addition to low sequence conservation, poor understanding of structural mechanisms driving lincRNA biology hinders systematic prediction of their function. Here, we report the molecular requirements for the recognition of steroid receptors (SRs) by the lincRNA Gas5, which regulates steroid-mediated transcriptional regulation, growth arrest, and apoptosis. We identify the functional Gas5-SR interface and generate point mutations that ablate the SR-Gas5 lincRNA interaction, altering Gas5-driven apoptosis in cancer cell lines. Further, we find that the Gas5 SR-recognition sequence is conserved among haplorhines, with its evolutionary origin as a splice acceptor site. This study demonstrates that lincRNAs can recognize protein targets in a conserved, sequence-specific manner in order to affect critical cell functions. PMID:25377354

  11. Control regions for chromosome replication are conserved with respect to sequence and location among Escherichia coli strains

    PubMed Central

    Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Charbon, Godefroid; Krogfelt, Karen A.; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, chromosome replication is initiated from oriC by the DnaA initiator protein associated with ATP. Three non-coding regions contribute to the activity of DnaA. The datA locus is instrumental in conversion of DnaAATP to DnaAADP (datA dependent DnaAATP hydrolysis) whereas DnaA rejuvenation sequences 1 and 2 (DARS1 and DARS2) reactivate DnaAADP to DnaAATP. The structural organization of oriC, datA, DARS1, and DARS2 were found conserved among 59 fully sequenced E. coli genomes, with differences primarily in the non-functional spacer regions between key protein binding sites. The relative distances from oriC to datA, DARS1, and DARS2, respectively, was also conserved despite of large variations in genome size, suggesting that the gene dosage of either region is important for bacterial growth. Yet all three regions could be deleted alone or in combination without loss of viability. Competition experiments during balanced growth in rich medium and during mouse colonization indicated roles of datA, DARS1, and DARS2 for bacterial fitness although the relative contribution of each region differed between growth conditions. We suggest that this fitness advantage has contributed to conservation of both sequence and chromosomal location for datA, DARS1, and DARS2. PMID:26441936

  12. Genomic Locations of Conserved Noncoding Sequences and Their Proximal Protein-Coding Genes in Mammalian Expression Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Babarinde, Isaac Adeyemi; Saitou, Naruya

    2016-07-01

    Experimental studies have found the involvement of certain conserved noncoding sequences (CNSs) in the regulation of the proximal protein-coding genes in mammals. However, reported cases of long range enhancer activities and inter-chromosomal regulation suggest that proximity of CNSs to protein-coding genes might not be important for regulation. To test the importance of the CNS genomic location, we extracted the CNSs conserved between chicken and four mammalian species (human, mouse, dog, and cattle). These CNSs were confirmed to be under purifying selection. The intergenic CNSs are often found in clusters in gene deserts, where protein-coding genes are in paucity. The distribution pattern, ChIP-Seq, and RNA-Seq data suggested that the CNSs are more likely to be regulatory elements and not corresponding to long intergenic noncoding RNAs. Physical distances between CNS and their nearest protein coding genes were well conserved between human and mouse genomes, and CNS-flanking genes were often found in evolutionarily conserved genomic neighborhoods. ChIP-Seq signal and gene expression patterns also suggested that CNSs regulate nearby genes. Interestingly, genes with more CNSs have more evolutionarily conserved expression than those with fewer CNSs. These computationally obtained results suggest that the genomic locations of CNSs are important for their regulatory functions. In fact, various kinds of evolutionary constraints may be acting to maintain the genomic locations of CNSs and protein-coding genes in mammals to ensure proper regulation. PMID:27017584

  13. Comparative sequence analysis of Solanum and Arabidopsis in a hot spot for pathogen resistance on potato chromosome V reveals a patchwork of conserved and rapidly evolving genome segments

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Background Quantitative phenotypic variation of agronomic characters in crop plants is controlled by environmental and genetic factors (quantitative trait loci = QTL). To understand the molecular basis of such QTL, the identification of the underlying genes is of primary interest and DNA sequence analysis of the genomic regions harboring QTL is a prerequisite for that. QTL mapping in potato (Solanum tuberosum) has identified a region on chromosome V tagged by DNA markers GP21 and GP179, which contains a number of important QTL, among others QTL for resistance to late blight caused by the oomycete Phytophthora infestans and to root cyst nematodes. Results To obtain genomic sequence for the targeted region on chromosome V, two local BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) contigs were constructed and sequenced, which corresponded to parts of the homologous chromosomes of the diploid, heterozygous genotype P6/210. Two contiguous sequences of 417,445 and 202,781 base pairs were assembled and annotated. Gene-by-gene co-linearity was disrupted by non-allelic insertions of retrotransposon elements, stretches of diverged intergenic sequences, differences in gene content and gene order. The latter was caused by inversion of a 70 kbp genomic fragment. These features were also found in comparison to orthologous sequence contigs from three homeologous chromosomes of Solanum demissum, a wild tuber bearing species. Functional annotation of the sequence identified 48 putative open reading frames (ORF) in one contig and 22 in the other, with an average of one ORF every 9 kbp. Ten ORFs were classified as resistance-gene-like, 11 as F-box-containing genes, 13 as transposable elements and three as transcription factors. Comparing potato to Arabidopsis thaliana annotated proteins revealed five micro-syntenic blocks of three to seven ORFs with A. thaliana chromosomes 1, 3 and 5. Conclusion Comparative sequence analysis revealed highly conserved collinear regions that flank regions

  14. Large distribution and high sequence identity of a Copia-type retrotransposon in angiosperm families.

    PubMed

    Dias, Elaine Silva; Hatt, Clémence; Hamon, Serge; Hamon, Perla; Rigoreau, Michel; Crouzillat, Dominique; Carareto, Claudia Marcia Aparecida; de Kochko, Alexandre; Guyot, Romain

    2015-09-01

    Retrotransposons are the main component of plant genomes. Recent studies have revealed the complexity of their evolutionary dynamics. Here, we have identified Copia25 in Coffea canephora, a new plant retrotransposon belonging to the Ty1-Copia superfamily. In the Coffea genomes analyzed, Copia25 is present in relatively low copy numbers and transcribed. Similarity sequence searches and PCR analyses show that this retrotransposon with LTRs (Long Terminal Repeats) is widely distributed among the Rubiaceae family and that it is also present in other distantly related species belonging to Asterids, Rosids and monocots. A particular situation is the high sequence identity found between the Copia25 sequences of Musa, a monocot, and Ixora, a dicot species (Rubiaceae). Our results reveal the complexity of the evolutionary dynamics of the ancient element Copia25 in angiosperm, involving several processes including sequence conservation, rapid turnover, stochastic losses and horizontal transfer. PMID:26245353

  15. Sequence conservation of the rad21 Schizosaccharomyces pombe DNA double-strand break repair gene in human and mouse

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, M.J.; Troelstra, C.; Kanaar, R.

    1996-09-01

    The rad21 gene of Schizosaccharomyces pombe is involved in the repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. The isolation of mouse and human putative homologs of rad21 is reported here. Alignment of the predicted amino acid sequence of Rad21 with the mammalian proteins showed that the similarity was distributed across the length of the proteins, with more highly conserved regions at both termini. The mHR21{sup sp} (mouse homolog of Rad21, S. pombe) and hHR21{sup sp} (human homolog of Rad21, S. pombe) predicted proteins were 96% identical, whereas the human and S. pombe proteins were 25% identical and 47% similar. RNA blot analysis showed that mHR21{sup sp} mRNA was abundant in all adult mouse tissues examined, with highest expression in testis and thymus. In addition to a 3.1-kb constitutive mRNA transcript, a 2.2-kb transcript was present at a high level in postmeiotic spermatids, while expression of the 3.1-kb mRNA in testis was confined to the meiotic compartment. hHR21{sup sp} mRNA was cell-cycle regulated in human cells, increasing in late S phase to a peak in G2 phase. The level of hHR21{sup sp} transcripts was not altered by exposure of normal diploid fibroblasts to 10 Gy ionizing radiation. In situ hybridization showed that mHR21{sup sp} resided on chromosome 15D3, whereas hHR21{sup sp} localized to the syntenic 8q24 region. Elevated expression of mHR21{sup sp} in testis and thymus supports a possible role for the rad21 mammalian homologs in V(D)J and meiotic recombination, respectively. Cell cycle regulation of rad21, retained from S. pombe to human, is consistent with a conservation of function between S. pombe and human rad21 genes. 62 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Denoising DNA deep sequencing data—high-throughput sequencing errors and their correction

    PubMed Central

    Laehnemann, David; Borkhardt, Arndt

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing the errors generated by common high-throughput sequencing platforms and telling true genetic variation from technical artefacts are two interdependent steps, essential to many analyses such as single nucleotide variant calling, haplotype inference, sequence assembly and evolutionary studies. Both random and systematic errors can show a specific occurrence profile for each of the six prominent sequencing platforms surveyed here: 454 pyrosequencing, Complete Genomics DNA nanoball sequencing, Illumina sequencing by synthesis, Ion Torrent semiconductor sequencing, Pacific Biosciences single-molecule real-time sequencing and Oxford Nanopore sequencing. There is a large variety of programs available for error removal in sequencing read data, which differ in the error models and statistical techniques they use, the features of the data they analyse, the parameters they determine from them and the data structures and algorithms they use. We highlight the assumptions they make and for which data types these hold, providing guidance which tools to consider for benchmarking with regard to the data properties. While no benchmarking results are included here, such specific benchmarks would greatly inform tool choices and future software development. The development of stand-alone error correctors, as well as single nucleotide variant and haplotype callers, could also benefit from using more of the knowledge about error profiles and from (re)combining ideas from the existing approaches presented here. PMID:26026159

  17. Conservation of the gene for outer membrane protein OprF in the family Pseudomonadaceae: sequence of the Pseudomonas syringae oprF gene.

    PubMed Central

    Ullstrom, C A; Siehnel, R; Woodruff, W; Steinbach, S; Hancock, R E

    1991-01-01

    The conservation of the oprF gene for the major outer membrane protein OprF was determined by restriction mapping and Southern blot hybridization with the Pseudomonas aeruginosa oprF gene as a probe. The restriction map was highly conserved among 16 of the 17 serotype strains and 42 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa. Only the serotype 12 isolate and one clinical isolate showed small differences in restriction pattern. Southern probing of PstI chromosomal digests of 14 species from the family Pseudomonadaceae revealed that only the nine members of rRNA homology group I hybridized with the oprF gene. To reveal the actual extent of homology, the oprF gene and its product were characterized in Pseudomonas syringae. Nine strains of P. syringae from seven different pathovars hybridized with the P. aeruginosa gene to produce five different but related restriction maps. All produced an OprF protein in their outer membranes with the same apparent molecular weight as that of P.aeruginosa OprF. In each case the protein reacted with monoclonal antibody MA4-10 and was similarly heat and 2-mercaptoethanol modifiable. The purified OprF protein of the type strain P. syringae pv. syringae ATCC 19310 reconstituted small channels in lipid bilayer membranes. The oprF gene from this latter strain was cloned and sequenced. Despite the low level of DNA hybridization between P. aeruginosa and P. syringae DNA, the OprF gene was highly conserved between the species with 72% DNA sequence identity and 68% amino acid sequence identity overall. The carboxy terminus-encoding region of P. syringae oprF showed 85 and 33% identity, respectively, with the same regions of the P. aeruginosa oprF and Escherichia coli ompA genes. Images PMID:1898935

  18. High Throughput Sequence Analysis for Disease Resistance in Maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Preliminary results of a computational analysis of high throughput sequencing data from Zea mays and the fungus Aspergillus are reported. The Illumina Genome Analyzer was used to sequence RNA samples from two strains of Z. mays (Va35 and Mp313) collected over a time course as well as several specie...

  19. Chicken interferon consensus sequence-binding protein (ICSBP) and interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 1 genes reveal evolutionary conservation in the IRF gene family.

    PubMed Central

    Jungwirth, C; Rebbert, M; Ozato, K; Degen, H J; Schultz, U; Dawid, I B

    1995-01-01

    Members of the IRF family mediate transcriptional responses to interferons (IFNs) and to virus infection. So far, proteins of this family have been studied only among mammalian species. Here we report the isolation of cDNA clones encoding two members of this family from chicken, interferon consensus sequence-binding protein (ICSBP) and IRF-1. The predicted chicken ICSBP and IRF-1 proteins show high levels of sequence similarity to their corresponding human and mouse counterparts. Sequence identities in the putative DNA-binding domains of chicken and human ICSBP and IRF-1 were 97% and 89%, respectively, whereas the C-terminal regions showed identities of 64% and 51%; sequence relationships with mouse ICSBP and IRF-1 are very similar. Chicken ICSBP was found to be expressed in several embryonic tissues, and both chicken IRF-1 and ICSBP were strongly induced in chicken fibroblasts by IFN treatment, supporting the involvement of these factors in IFN-regulated gene expression. The presence of proteins homologous to mammalian IRF family members, together with earlier observations on the occurrence of functionally homologous IFN-responsive elements in chicken and mammalian genes, highlights the conservation of transcriptional mechanisms in the IFN system, a finding that contrasts with the extensive sequence and functional divergence of the IFNs. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7536924

  20. Multi-species sequence comparison reveals conservation of ghrelin gene-derived splice variants encoding a truncated ghrelin peptide.

    PubMed

    Seim, Inge; Jeffery, Penny L; Thomas, Patrick B; Walpole, Carina M; Maugham, Michelle; Fung, Jenny N T; Yap, Pei-Yi; O'Keeffe, Angela J; Lai, John; Whiteside, Eliza J; Herington, Adrian C; Chopin, Lisa K

    2016-06-01

    The peptide hormone ghrelin is a potent orexigen produced predominantly in the stomach. It has a number of other biological actions, including roles in appetite stimulation, energy balance, the stimulation of growth hormone release and the regulation of cell proliferation. Recently, several ghrelin gene splice variants have been described. Here, we attempted to identify conserved alternative splicing of the ghrelin gene by cross-species sequence comparisons. We identified a novel human exon 2-deleted variant and provide preliminary evidence that this splice variant and in1-ghrelin encode a C-terminally truncated form of the ghrelin peptide, termed minighrelin. These variants are expressed in humans and mice, demonstrating conservation of alternative splicing spanning 90 million years. Minighrelin appears to have similar actions to full-length ghrelin, as treatment with exogenous minighrelin peptide stimulates appetite and feeding in mice. Forced expression of the exon 2-deleted preproghrelin variant mirrors the effect of the canonical preproghrelin, stimulating cell proliferation and migration in the PC3 prostate cancer cell line. This is the first study to characterise an exon 2-deleted preproghrelin variant and to demonstrate sequence conservation of ghrelin gene-derived splice variants that encode a truncated ghrelin peptide. This adds further impetus for studies into the alternative splicing of the ghrelin gene and the function of novel ghrelin peptides in vertebrates. PMID:26792793

  1. Microcollinearity in an ethylene receptor coding gene region of the Coffea canephora genome is extensively conserved with Vitis vinifera and other distant dicotyledonous sequenced genomes

    PubMed Central

    Guyot, Romain; de la Mare, Marion; Viader, Véronique; Hamon, Perla; Coriton, Olivier; Bustamante-Porras, José; Poncet, Valérie; Campa, Claudine; Hamon, Serge; de Kochko, Alexandre

    2009-01-01

    Background Coffea canephora, also called Robusta, belongs to the Rubiaceae, the fourth largest angiosperm family. This diploid species (2x = 2n = 22) has a fairly small genome size of ≈ 690 Mb and despite its extreme economic importance, particularly for developing countries, knowledge on the genome composition, structure and evolution remain very limited. Here, we report the 160 kb of the first C. canephora Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) clone ever sequenced and its fine analysis. Results This clone contains the CcEIN4 gene, encoding an ethylene receptor, and twenty other predicted genes showing a high gene density of one gene per 7.8 kb. Most of them display perfect matches with C. canephora expressed sequence tags or show transcriptional activities through PCR amplifications on cDNA libraries. Twenty-three transposable elements, mainly Class II transposon derivatives, were identified at this locus. Most of these Class II elements are Miniature Inverted-repeat Transposable Elements (MITE) known to be closely associated with plant genes. This BAC composition gives a pattern similar to those found in gene rich regions of Solanum lycopersicum and Medicago truncatula genomes indicating that the CcEIN4 regions may belong to a gene rich region in the C. canephora genome. Comparative sequence analysis indicated an extensive conservation between C. canephora and most of the reference dicotyledonous genomes studied in this work, such as tomato (S. lycopersicum), grapevine (V. vinifera), barrel medic M. truncatula, black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa) and Arabidopsis thaliana. The higher degree of microcollinearity was found between C. canephora and V. vinifera, which belong respectively to the Asterids and Rosids, two clades that diverged more than 114 million years ago. Conclusion This study provides a first glimpse of C. canephora genome composition and evolution. Our data revealed a remarkable conservation of the microcollinearity between C. canephora and V

  2. HIVE-Hexagon: High-Performance, Parallelized Sequence Alignment for Next-Generation Sequencing Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Santana-Quintero, Luis; Dingerdissen, Hayley; Thierry-Mieg, Jean; Mazumder, Raja; Simonyan, Vahan

    2014-01-01

    Due to the size of Next-Generation Sequencing data, the computational challenge of sequence alignment has been vast. Inexact alignments can take up to 90% of total CPU time in bioinformatics pipelines. High-performance Integrated Virtual Environment (HIVE), a cloud-based environment optimized for storage and analysis of extra-large data, presents an algorithmic solution: the HIVE-hexagon DNA sequence aligner. HIVE-hexagon implements novel approaches to exploit both characteristics of sequence space and CPU, RAM and Input/Output (I/O) architecture to quickly compute accurate alignments. Key components of HIVE-hexagon include non-redundification and sorting of sequences; floating diagonals of linearized dynamic programming matrices; and consideration of cross-similarity to minimize computations. Availability https://hive.biochemistry.gwu.edu/hive/ PMID:24918764

  3. The role of evolutionarily conserved germ-line DH sequence in B-1 cell development and natural antibody production.

    PubMed

    Vale, Andre M; Nobrega, Alberto; Schroeder, Harry W

    2015-12-01

    Because of N addition and variation in the site of VDJ joining, the third complementarity-determining region of the heavy chain (CDR-H3) is the most diverse component of the initial immunoglobulin antigen-binding site repertoire. A large component of the peritoneal cavity B-1 cell component is the product of fetal and perinatal B cell production. The CDR-H3 repertoire is thus depleted of N addition, which increases dependency on germ-line sequence. Cross-species comparisons have shown that DH gene sequence demonstrates conservation of amino acid preferences by reading frame. Preference for reading frame 1, which is enriched for tyrosine and glycine, is created both by rearrangement patterns and by pre-BCR and BCR selection. In previous studies, we have assessed the role of conserved DH sequence by examining peritoneal cavity B-1 cell numbers and antibody production in BALB/c mice with altered DH loci. Here, we review our finding that changes in the constraints normally imposed by germ-line-encoded amino acids within the CDR-H3 repertoire profoundly affect B-1 cell development, especially B-1a cells, and thus natural antibody immunity. Our studies suggest that both natural and somatic selection operate to create a restricted B-1 cell CDR-H3 repertoire. PMID:26104486

  4. Conserved hypothetical protein Rv1977 in Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains contains sequence polymorphisms and might be involved in ongoing immune evasion

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yi; Liu, Haican; Wang, Xuezhi; Li, Guilian; Qiu, Yan; Dou, Xiangfeng; Wan, Kanglin

    2015-01-01

    Host immune pressure and associated parasite immune evasion are key features of host-pathogen co-evolution. A previous study showed that human T cell epitopes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are evolutionarily hyperconserved and thus it was deduced that M. tuberculosis lacks antigenic variation and immune evasion. Here, we selected 151 clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from China, amplified gene encoding Rv1977 and compared the sequences. The results showed that Rv1977, a conserved hypothetical protein, is not conserved in M. tuberculosis strains and there are polymorphisms existed in the protein. Some mutations, especially one frameshift mutation, occurred in the antigen Rv1977, which is uncommon in M.tb strains and may lead to the protein function altering. Mutations and deletion in the gene all affect one of three T cell epitopes and the changed T cell epitope contained more than one variable position, which may suggest ongoing immune evasion. PMID:26261576

  5. Characterization of a highly conserved baculovirus structural protein that is specific for occlusion-derived virions.

    PubMed

    Theilmann, D A; Chantler, J K; Stweart, S; Flipsen, H T; Vlak, J M; Crook, N E

    1996-04-01

    A highly conserved baculovirus late gene called odvp-6e was shown to be a structural protein that is specific for occlusion-derived virus (ODV) envelopes. The complete sequence of this gene is presented for both Orgyia pseudotsugata nuclear polyhedrosis virus (OpMNPV) and Cydia pomonella granulosis virus (CpGV). The predicted sizes of the OpMNPV and CpGV ODVP-6E are 40, 241, and 38,655 respectively. The OpMNPV odvp-6e gene was transcriptionally mapped and was shown to initiate from a consensus late gene motif, TTAAG, and is expressed from 18-120 hr postinfection. Polyclonal antiserum was generated against a bacterial fusion protein and used to analyze the cellular steady-state levels of ODVP-6E and to determine if this protein was a component of either budded virus (BV) or ODV. Western blots showed that ODVP-6E is a component of the ODV but not BV. This was confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy of ODV from Autographa californica NPV (AcMNPV) which localized ODVP-6E to the ODV envelope. The sequences of the odvp-6e gene from the baculoviruses Choristoneura fumiferana NPV (CfMNPV), AcMNPV, and Helicoverpa zea NPV (HzSNPV) were obtained from GenBank. Comparisons of the predicted amino acid sequences of OpMNPV, CpGV, AcMNPV, CfMNPV, and HzSNPV show that there are two possible membrane-spanning domains and a cysteine-rich domain that are conserved in all of the proteins. PMID:8615018

  6. Structure-sequence based analysis for identification of conserved regions in proteins

    DOEpatents

    Zemla, Adam T; Zhou, Carol E; Lam, Marisa W; Smith, Jason R; Pardes, Elizabeth

    2013-05-28

    Disclosed are computational methods, and associated hardware and software products for scoring conservation in a protein structure based on a computationally identified family or cluster of protein structures. A method of computationally identifying a family or cluster of protein structures in also disclosed herein.

  7. Species identification using genetic tools: the value of nuclear and mitochondrial gene sequences in whale conservation.

    PubMed

    Palumbi, S R; Cipriano, F

    1998-01-01

    DNA sequence analysis is a powerful tool for identifying the source of samples thought to be derived from threatened or endangered species. Analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from retail whale meat markets has shown consistently that the expected baleen whale in these markets, the minke whale, makes up only about half the products analyzed. The other products are either unregulated small toothed whales like dolphins or are protected baleen whales such as humpback, Bryde's, fin, or blue whales. Independent verification of such mtDNA identifications requires analysis of nuclear genetic loci, but this is technically more difficult than standard mtDNA sequencing. In addition, evolution of species-specific sequences (i.e., fixation of sequence differences to produce reciprocally monophyletic gene trees) is slower in nuclear than in mitochondrial genes primarily because genetic drift is slower at nuclear loci. When will use of nuclear sequences allow forensic DNA identification? Comparison of neutral theories of coalescence of mitochondrial and nuclear loci suggests a simple rule of thumb. The "three-times rule" suggests that phylogenetic sorting at nuclear loci is likely to produce species-specific sequences when mitochondrial alleles are reciprocally monophyletic and the branches leading to the mtDNA sequences of a species are three times longer than the average difference observed within species. A preliminary test of the three-times rule, which depends on many assumptions about the species and genes involved, suggests that blue and fin whales should have species-specific sequences at most neutral nuclear loci, whereas humpback and fin whales should show species-specific sequences at fewer nuclear loci. Partial sequences of actin introns from these species confirm the predictions of the three-times rule and show that blue and fin whales are reciprocally monophyletic at this locus. These intron sequences are thus good tools for the identification of these species

  8. A novel satellite DNA isolated in Pecten jacobaeus shows high sequence similarity among molluscs.

    PubMed

    Petraccioli, Agnese; Odierna, Gaetano; Capriglione, Teresa; Barucca, Marco; Forconi, Mariko; Olmo, Ettore; Biscotti, Maria Assunta

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the sequence conservation and the evolution of repeated DNA in related species. Satellite DNA is a component of eukaryotic genomes and is made up of tandemly repeated sequences. These sequences are affected by high rates of mutation that lead to the occurrence of species-specific satellite DNAs, which are different in terms of both quantity and quality. In this work, a novel repetitive DNA family, named PjHhaI sat, is described in Pecten jacobaeus. The quantitative analyses revealed a different abundance of this element in the molluscan species investigated in agreement with the "library hypothesis" even if, in this case, at a high taxonomic level. In addition, the qualitative analysis demonstrated an astonishing sequence conservation not only among scallops but also in six other molluscan species belonging to three classes. These findings suggest that the PjHhaI sat may be considered as the most ancients of DNA described so far, which remained "frozen" during molluscan evolution. The widespread distribution of this sat DNA in molluscs as well as its long evolutionary preservation open up questions on the functional role of this element. A future challenge might be the identification of proteins or molecules which interact with the PjHhaI sat. PMID:25832354

  9. Mammalian ets-1 and ets-2 genes encode highly conserved proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, D.K.; McWilliams, M.J.; Lapis, P.; Lautenberger, J.A.; Schweinfest, C.W.; Papas, T.S. )

    1988-11-01

    Cellular ets sequences homologous to v-ets of the avian leukemia virus E26 are highly conserved. In mammals the ets sequences are dispersed on two separate chromosomal loci, called ets-1 and ets-2. To determine the structure of these two genes and identify the open reading frames that code for the putative proteins, the authors have sequenced human ets-1 cDNAs and ets-2 cDNA clones obtained from both human and mouse. The human ETS1 gene is capable of encoding a protein of 441 amino acids. This protein is >95% identical to the chicken c-ets-1 gene product. Thus, the human ETS1 gene is homologous to the chicken c-ets-1 gene, the protooncogene that the E26 virus transduced. Human and mouse ets-2 cDNA clones are closely related and contain open reading frames capable of encoding proteins of 469 and 468 residues, respectively. Direct comparison of these data with previously published finding indicates that ets is a family of genes whose members share distinct domains.

  10. Mammalian ets-1 and ets-2 genes encode highly conserved proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, D K; McWilliams, M J; Lapis, P; Lautenberger, J A; Schweinfest, C W; Papas, T S

    1988-01-01

    Cellular ets sequences homologous to v-ets of the avian leukemia virus E26 are highly conserved. In mammals the ets sequences are dispersed on two separate chromosomal loci, called ets-1 and ets-2. To determine the structure of these two genes and identify the open reading frames that code for the putative proteins, we have sequenced human ets-1 cDNAs and ets-2 cDNA clones obtained from both human and mouse. The human ETS1 gene is capable of encoding a protein of 441 amino acids. This protein is greater than 95% identical to the chicken c-ets-1 gene product. Thus, the human ETS1 gene is homologous to the chicken c-ets-1 gene, the protooncogene that the E26 virus transduced. Human and mouse ets-2 cDNA clones are closely related and contain open reading frames capable of encoding proteins of 469 and 468 residues, respectively. Direct comparison of these data with previously published findings indicates that ets is a family of genes whose members share distinct domains. PMID:2847145

  11. Specific binding of eukaryotic ORC to DNA replication origins depends on highly conserved basic residues.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Hironori; Ohashi, Eiji; Kanamoto, Shota; Tsurimoto, Toshiki; Katayama, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the origin recognition complex (ORC) heterohexamer preferentially binds replication origins to trigger initiation of DNA replication. Crystallographic studies using eubacterial and archaeal ORC orthologs suggested that eukaryotic ORC may bind to origin DNA via putative winged-helix DNA-binding domains and AAA+ ATPase domains. However, the mechanisms how eukaryotic ORC recognizes origin DNA remain elusive. Here, we show in budding yeast that Lys-362 and Arg-367 residues of the largest subunit (Orc1), both outside the aforementioned domains, are crucial for specific binding of ORC to origin DNA. These basic residues, which reside in a putative disordered domain, were dispensable for interaction with ATP and non-specific DNA sequences, suggesting a specific role in recognition. Consistent with this, both residues were required for origin binding of Orc1 in vivo. A truncated Orc1 polypeptide containing these residues solely recognizes ARS sequence with low affinity and Arg-367 residue stimulates sequence specific binding mode of the polypeptide. Lys-362 and Arg-367 residues of Orc1 are highly conserved among eukaryotic ORCs, but not in eubacterial and archaeal orthologs, suggesting a eukaryote-specific mechanism underlying recognition of replication origins by ORC. PMID:26456755

  12. Specific binding of eukaryotic ORC to DNA replication origins depends on highly conserved basic residues

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Hironori; Ohashi, Eiji; Kanamoto, Shota; Tsurimoto, Toshiki; Katayama, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the origin recognition complex (ORC) heterohexamer preferentially binds replication origins to trigger initiation of DNA replication. Crystallographic studies using eubacterial and archaeal ORC orthologs suggested that eukaryotic ORC may bind to origin DNA via putative winged-helix DNA-binding domains and AAA+ ATPase domains. However, the mechanisms how eukaryotic ORC recognizes origin DNA remain elusive. Here, we show in budding yeast that Lys-362 and Arg-367 residues of the largest subunit (Orc1), both outside the aforementioned domains, are crucial for specific binding of ORC to origin DNA. These basic residues, which reside in a putative disordered domain, were dispensable for interaction with ATP and non-specific DNA sequences, suggesting a specific role in recognition. Consistent with this, both residues were required for origin binding of Orc1 in vivo. A truncated Orc1 polypeptide containing these residues solely recognizes ARS sequence with low affinity and Arg-367 residue stimulates sequence specific binding mode of the polypeptide. Lys-362 and Arg-367 residues of Orc1 are highly conserved among eukaryotic ORCs, but not in eubacterial and archaeal orthologs, suggesting a eukaryote-specific mechanism underlying recognition of replication origins by ORC. PMID:26456755

  13. Use of ancient sedimentary DNA as a novel conservation tool for high-altitude tropical biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Boessenkool, Sanne; McGlynn, Gayle; Epp, Laura S; Taylor, David; Pimentel, Manuel; Gizaw, Abel; Nemomissa, Sileshi; Brochmann, Christian; Popp, Magnus

    2014-04-01

    Conservation of biodiversity may in the future increasingly depend upon the availability of scientific information to set suitable restoration targets. In traditional paleoecology, sediment-based pollen provides a means to define preanthropogenic impact conditions, but problems in establishing the exact provenance and ecologically meaningful levels of taxonomic resolution of the evidence are limiting. We explored the extent to which the use of sedimentary ancient DNA (sedaDNA) may complement pollen data in reconstructing past alpine environments in the tropics. We constructed a record of afro-alpine plants retrieved from DNA preserved in sediment cores from 2 volcanic crater sites in the Albertine Rift, eastern Africa. The record extended well beyond the onset of substantial anthropogenic effects on tropical mountains. To ensure high-quality taxonomic inference from the sedaDNA sequences, we built an extensive DNA reference library covering the majority of the afro-alpine flora, by sequencing DNA from taxonomically verified specimens. Comparisons with pollen records from the same sediment cores showed that plant diversity recovered with sedaDNA improved vegetation reconstructions based on pollen records by revealing both additional taxa and providing increased taxonomic resolution. Furthermore, combining the 2 measures assisted in distinguishing vegetation change at different geographic scales; sedaDNA almost exclusively reflects local vegetation, whereas pollen can potentially originate from a wide area that in highlands in particular can span several ecozones. Our results suggest that sedaDNA may provide information on restoration targets and the nature and magnitude of human-induced environmental changes, including in high conservation priority, biodiversity hotspots, where understanding of preanthropogenic impact (or reference) conditions is highly limited. PMID:24372820

  14. High-Order Space-Time Methods for Conservation Laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, H. T.

    2013-01-01

    Current high-order methods such as discontinuous Galerkin and/or flux reconstruction can provide effective discretization for the spatial derivatives. Together with a time discretization, such methods result in either too small a time step size in the case of an explicit scheme or a very large system in the case of an implicit one. To tackle these problems, two new high-order space-time schemes for conservation laws are introduced: the first is explicit and the second, implicit. The explicit method here, also called the moment scheme, achieves a Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) condition of 1 for the case of one-spatial dimension regardless of the degree of the polynomial approximation. (For standard explicit methods, if the spatial approximation is of degree p, then the time step sizes are typically proportional to 1/p(exp 2)). Fourier analyses for the one and two-dimensional cases are carried out. The property of super accuracy (or super convergence) is discussed. The implicit method is a simplified but optimal version of the discontinuous Galerkin scheme applied to time. It reduces to a collocation implicit Runge-Kutta (RK) method for ordinary differential equations (ODE) called Radau IIA. The explicit and implicit schemes are closely related since they employ the same intermediate time levels, and the former can serve as a key building block in an iterative procedure for the latter. A limiting technique for the piecewise linear scheme is also discussed. The technique can suppress oscillations near a discontinuity while preserving accuracy near extrema. Preliminary numerical results are shown

  15. Structure of the voltage-dependent potassium channel is highly conserved from Drosophila to vertebrate central nervous systems.

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, A; Grupe, A; Ackermann, A; Pongs, O

    1988-01-01

    Voltage-sensitive potassium channels are found in vertebrate and invertebrate central nervous systems. We have isolated a rat brain cDNA by cross-hybridization with a probe of the Drosophila Shaker gene complex. Structural conservation of domains of the deduced protein indicate that the rat brain cDNA encodes a voltage-sensitive potassium channel. Of the deduced amino acid sequence, 82% is homologous to the Drosophila Shaker protein indicating that voltage-sensitive potassium channels have been highly conserved during evolution. Selective pressure was highest on sequences facing the intracellular side and on proposed transmembrane segments S4-S6, suggesting that these domains are crucial for voltage-dependent potassium channel function. The corresponding rat mRNA apparently belongs to a family of mRNA molecules which are preferentially expressed in the central nervous system. Images PMID:3191911

  16. Biological Processes Discovered by High-Throughput Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Reon, Brian J; Dutta, Anindya

    2016-04-01

    Advances in DNA and RNA sequencing technologies have completely transformed the field of genomics. High-throughput sequencing (HTS) is now a widely used and accessible technology that allows scientists to sequence an entire transcriptome or genome in a timely and cost-effective manner. Application of HTS techniques has led to many key discoveries, including the identification of long noncoding RNAs, microDNAs, a family of small extrachromosomal circular DNA species, and tRNA-derived fragments, which are a group of small non-miRNAs that are derived from tRNAs. Furthermore, public sequencing repositories provide unique opportunities for laboratories to parse large sequencing databases to identify proteins and noncoding RNAs at a scale that was not possible a decade ago. Herein, we review how HTS has led to the discovery of novel nucleic acid species and uncovered new biological processes during the course. PMID:26828742

  17. A Highly Conserved Region within H2B Is Important for FACT To Act on Nucleosomes

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Suting; Crickard, J. Brooks; Srikanth, Abhinaya

    2014-01-01

    Histone N-terminal tails play crucial roles in chromatin-related processes. The tails of histones H3 and H4 are highly conserved and well characterized, but much less is known about the functions of the tails of histones H2A and H2B and their sequences are more divergent among eukaryotes. Here we characterized the function of the only highly conserved region in the H2B tail, the H2B repression (HBR) domain. Once thought to play a role only in repression, it also has an uncharacterized function in gene activation and DNA damage responses. We report that deletion of the HBR domain impairs the eviction of nucleosomes at the promoters and open reading frames of genes. A closer examination of the HBR domain mutants revealed that they displayed phenotypes similar to those of histone chaperone complex FACT mutants, including an increase in intragenic transcription and the accumulation of free histones in cells. Biochemical characterization of recombinant nucleosomes indicates that deletion of the HBR domain impairs FACT-dependent removal of H2A-H2B from nucleosomes, suggesting that the HBR domain plays an important role in allowing FACT to disrupt dimer-DNA interactions. We have uncovered a previously unappreciated role for the HBR domain in regulating chromatin structure and have provided insight into how FACT acts on nucleosomes. PMID:24248595

  18. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase: effect on viral replication of mutations at highly conserved residues.

    PubMed

    Cannon, P M; Wilson, W; Byles, E; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1994-08-01

    Sequence comparisons of the integrase (IN) proteins from different retroviruses have identified several highly conserved residues. We have introduced mutations at 16 of these sites into the integrase gene of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and analyzed the phenotypes of the resulting viruses. The viruses were all normal for p24 content and reverse transcriptase activity. In addition, all of the mutants could infect T-cell lines and undergo reverse transcription, as assessed by PCR analysis. Most of the mutant viruses also had normal Western blot (immunoblot) profiles, although three of the mutations resulted in reduced signals for IN relative to the wild type on the immunoblots and mutation of residue W235 completely abolished recognition of the protein by pooled sera from human immunodeficiency virus type 1-positive patients. Mutations that have previously been shown to abolish activity in in vitro studies produced noninfectious viruses. The substitution of W235 was notable in producing a noninfectious virus, despite previous reports of this residue being nonessential for IN activity in vitro (A.D. Leavitt, L. Shiue, and H.E. Varmus, J. Biol. Chem. 268:2113-2119, 1993). In addition, we have identified four highly conserved residues that can be mutated without any affect on viral replication in T-cell lines. PMID:8035478

  19. Conservation of nucleotide sequences for molecular diagnosis of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, 2015.

    PubMed

    Furuse, Yuki; Okamoto, Michiko; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2015-11-01

    Infection due to the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is widespread. The present study was performed to assess the protocols used for the molecular diagnosis of MERS-CoV by analyzing the nucleotide sequences of viruses detected between 2012 and 2015, including sequences from the large outbreak in eastern Asia in 2015. Although the diagnostic protocols were established only 2 years ago, mismatches between the sequences of primers/probes and viruses were found for several of the assays. Such mismatches could lead to a lower sensitivity of the assay, thereby leading to false-negative diagnosis. A slight modification in the primer design is suggested. Protocols for the molecular diagnosis of viral infections should be reviewed regularly after they are established, particularly for viruses that pose a great threat to public health such as MERS-CoV. PMID:26432410

  20. A New DNA Binding Protein Highly Conserved in Diverse Crenarchaeal Viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, E.T.; Eilers, B.J.; Reiter, D.; Ortmann, A.C.; Young, M.J.; Lawrence, C.M.; /Montana State U. /Tubingen U.

    2007-07-09

    Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV) infects Sulfolobus species found in the hot springs of Yellowstone National Park. Its 37 open reading frames (ORFs) generally lack sequence similarity to other genes. One exception, however, is ORF B116. While its function is unknown, orthologs are found in three additional crenarchaeal viral families. Due to the central importance of this protein family to crenarchaeal viruses, we have undertaken structural and biochemical studies of B116. The structure reveals a previously unobserved fold consisting of a five-stranded beta-sheet flanked on one side by three alpha helices. Two subunits come together to form a homodimer with a 10-stranded mixed beta-sheet, where the topology of the central strands resembles an unclosed beta-barrel. Highly conserved loops rise above the surface of the saddle-shaped protein and suggest an interaction with the major groove of DNA. The predicted B116-DNA interaction is confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assays.

  1. Conservation of the C-type lectin fold for massive sequence variation in a Treponema diversity-generating retroelement

    SciTech Connect

    Le Coq, Johanne; Ghosh, Partho

    2012-06-19

    Anticipatory ligand binding through massive protein sequence variation is rare in biological systems, having been observed only in the vertebrate adaptive immune response and in a phage diversity-generating retroelement (DGR). Earlier work has demonstrated that the prototypical DGR variable protein, major tropism determinant (Mtd), meets the demands of anticipatory ligand binding by novel means through the C-type lectin (CLec) fold. However, because of the low sequence identity among DGR variable proteins, it has remained unclear whether the CLec fold is a general solution for DGRs. We have addressed this problem by determining the structure of a second DGR variable protein, TvpA, from the pathogenic oral spirochete Treponema denticola. Despite its weak sequence identity to Mtd ({approx}16%), TvpA was found to also have a CLec fold, with predicted variable residues exposed in a ligand-binding site. However, this site in TvpA was markedly more variable than the one in Mtd, reflecting the unprecedented approximate 10{sup 20} potential variability of TvpA. In addition, similarity between TvpA and Mtd with formylglycine-generating enzymes was detected. These results provide strong evidence for the conservation of the formylglycine-generating enzyme-type CLec fold among DGRs as a means of accommodating massive sequence variation.

  2. Structure is three to ten times more conserved than sequence--a study of structural response in protein cores.

    PubMed

    Illergård, Kristoffer; Ardell, David H; Elofsson, Arne

    2009-11-15

    Protein structures change during evolution in response to mutations. Here, we analyze the mapping between sequence and structure in a set of structurally aligned protein domains. To avoid artifacts, we restricted our attention only to the core components of these structures. We found that on average, using different measures of structural change, protein cores evolve linearly with evolutionary distance (amino acid substitutions per site). This is true irrespective of which measure of structural change we used, whether RMSD or discrete structural descriptors for secondary structure, accessibility, or contacts. This linear response allows us to quantify the claim that structure is more conserved than sequence. Using structural alphabets of similar cardinality to the sequence alphabet, structural cores evolve three to ten times slower than sequences. Although we observed an average linear response, we found a wide variance. Different domain families varied fivefold in structural response to evolution. An attempt to categorically analyze this variance among subgroups by structural and functional category revealed only one statistically significant trend. This trend can be explained by the fact that beta-sheets change faster than alpha-helices, most likely due to that they are shorter and that change occurs at the ends of the secondary structure elements. PMID:19507241

  3. Storage and retrieval of highly repetitive sequence collections.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, Veli; Navarro, Gonzalo; Sirén, Jouni; Välimäki, Niko

    2010-03-01

    A repetitive sequence collection is a set of sequences which are small variations of each other. A prominent example are genome sequences of individuals of the same or close species, where the differences can be expressed by short lists of basic edit operations. Flexible and efficient data analysis on such a typically huge collection is plausible using suffix trees. However, the suffix tree occupies much space, which very soon inhibits in-memory analyses. Recent advances in full-text indexing reduce the space of the suffix tree to, essentially, that of the compressed sequences, while retaining its functionality with only a polylogarithmic slowdown. However, the underlying compression model considers only the predictability of the next sequence symbol given the k previous ones, where k is a small integer. This is unable to capture longer-term repetitiveness. For example, r identical copies of an incompressible sequence will be incompressible under this model. We develop new static and dynamic full-text indexes that are able of capturing the fact that a collection is highly repetitive, and require space basically proportional to the length of one typical sequence plus the total number of edit operations. The new indexes can be plugged into a recent dynamic fully-compressed suffix tree, achieving full functionality for sequence analysis, while retaining the reduced space and the polylogarithmic slowdown. Our experimental results confirm the practicality of our proposal. PMID:20377446

  4. Empirical assessment of sequencing errors for high throughput pyrosequencing data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sequencing-by-synthesis technologies significantly improve over the Sanger method in terms of speed and cost per base. However, they still usually fail to compete in terms of read length and quality. Current high-throughput implementations of the pyrosequencing technique yield reads whose length approach those of the capillary electrophoresis method. A less obvious question is whether their quality is affected by platform-specific sequencing errors. Results We present an empirical study aimed at assessing the quality and characterising sequencing errors for high throughput pyrosequencing data. We have developed a procedure for extracting sequencing error data from genome assemblies and study their characteristics, in particular the length distribution of indel gaps and their relation to the sequence contexts where they occur. We used this procedure to analyse data from three prokaryotic genomes sequenced with the GS FLX technology. We also compared two models previously employed with success for peptide sequence alignment. Conclusions We observed an overall very low error rate in the analysed data, with indel errors being much more abundant than substitutions. We also observed a dependence between the length of the gaps and that of the homopolymer context where they occur. As with protein alignments, a power-law model seems to approximate the indel errors more accurately, although the results are not so conclusive as to justify a depart from the commonly used affine gap penalty scheme. In whichever case, however, our procedure can be used to estimate more realistic error model parameters. PMID:23339526

  5. Computational identification of riboswitches based on RNA conserved functional sequences and conformations.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tzu-Hao; Huang, Hsien-Da; Wu, Li-Ching; Yeh, Chi-Ta; Liu, Baw-Jhiune; Horng, Jorng-Tzong

    2009-07-01

    Riboswitches are cis-acting genetic regulatory elements within a specific mRNA that can regulate both transcription and translation by interacting with their corresponding metabolites. Recently, an increasing number of riboswitches have been identified in different species and investigated for their roles in regulatory functions. Both the sequence contexts and structural conformations are important characteristics of riboswitches. None of the previously developed tools, such as covariance models (CMs), Riboswitch finder, and RibEx, provide a web server for efficiently searching homologous instances of known riboswitches or considers two crucial characteristics of each riboswitch, such as the structural conformations and sequence contexts of functional regions. Therefore, we developed a systematic method for identifying 12 kinds of riboswitches. The method is implemented and provided as a web server, RiboSW, to efficiently and conveniently identify riboswitches within messenger RNA sequences. The predictive accuracy of the proposed method is comparable with other previous tools. The efficiency of the proposed method for identifying riboswitches was improved in order to achieve a reasonable computational time required for the prediction, which makes it possible to have an accurate and convenient web server for biologists to obtain the results of their analysis of a given mRNA sequence. RiboSW is now available on the web at http://RiboSW.mbc.nctu.edu.tw/. PMID:19460868

  6. Sequence Divergence and Conservation in Genomes of Helicobacter cetorum Strains from a Dolphin and a Whale

    PubMed Central

    Kersulyte, Dangeruta; Rossi, Mirko; Berg, Douglas E.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives Strains of Helicobacter cetorum have been cultured from several marine mammals and have been found to be closely related in 16 S rDNA sequence to the human gastric pathogen H. pylori, but their genomes were not characterized further. Methods The genomes of H. cetorum strains from a dolphin and a whale were sequenced completely using 454 technology and PCR and capillary sequencing. Results These genomes are 1.8 and 1.95 mb in size, some 7–26% larger than H. pylori genomes, and differ markedly from one another in gene content, and sequences and arrangements of shared genes. However, each strain is more related overall to H. pylori and its descendant H. acinonychis than to other known species. These H. cetorum strains lack cag pathogenicity islands, but contain novel alleles of the virulence-associated vacuolating cytotoxin (vacA) gene. Of particular note are (i) an extra triplet of vacA genes with ≤50% protein-level identity to each other in the 5′ two-thirds of the gene needed for host factor interaction; (ii) divergent sets of outer membrane protein genes; (iii) several metabolic genes distinct from those of H. pylori; (iv) genes for an iron-cofactored urease related to those of Helicobacter species from terrestrial carnivores, in addition to genes for a nickel co-factored urease; and (v) members of the slr multigene family, some of which modulate host responses to infection and improve Helicobacter growth with mammalian cells. Conclusions Our genome sequence data provide a glimpse into the novelty and great genetic diversity of marine helicobacters. These data should aid further analyses of microbial genome diversity and evolution and infection and disease mechanisms in vast and often fragile ocean ecosystems. PMID:24358262

  7. 7 CFR 760.821 - Compliance with highly erodible land and wetland conservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance with highly erodible land and wetland... Disaster Program § 760.821 Compliance with highly erodible land and wetland conservation. (a) The highly erodible land and wetland conservation provisions of part 12 of this title apply to the receipt of...

  8. 7 CFR 760.821 - Compliance with highly erodible land and wetland conservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Compliance with highly erodible land and wetland... Disaster Program § 760.821 Compliance with highly erodible land and wetland conservation. (a) The highly erodible land and wetland conservation provisions of part 12 of this title apply to the receipt of...

  9. 7 CFR 760.821 - Compliance with highly erodible land and wetland conservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Compliance with highly erodible land and wetland... Disaster Program § 760.821 Compliance with highly erodible land and wetland conservation. (a) The highly erodible land and wetland conservation provisions of part 12 of this title apply to the receipt of...

  10. 7 CFR 760.821 - Compliance with highly erodible land and wetland conservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Compliance with highly erodible land and wetland... Disaster Program § 760.821 Compliance with highly erodible land and wetland conservation. (a) The highly erodible land and wetland conservation provisions of part 12 of this title apply to the receipt of...

  11. 7 CFR 760.821 - Compliance with highly erodible land and wetland conservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Compliance with highly erodible land and wetland... Disaster Program § 760.821 Compliance with highly erodible land and wetland conservation. (a) The highly erodible land and wetland conservation provisions of part 12 of this title apply to the receipt of...

  12. Sequence Similarity of Clostridium difficile Strains by Analysis of Conserved Genes and Genome Content Is Reflected by Their Ribotype Affiliation

    PubMed Central

    Kurka, Hedwig; Ehrenreich, Armin; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Monot, Marc; Rupnik, Maja; Barbut, Frederic; Indra, Alexander; Dupuy, Bruno; Liebl, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    PCR-ribotyping is a broadly used method for the classification of isolates of Clostridium difficile, an emerging intestinal pathogen, causing infections with increased disease severity and incidence in several European and North American countries. We have now carried out clustering analysis with selected genes of numerous C. difficile strains as well as gene content comparisons of their genomes in order to broaden our view of the relatedness of strains assigned to different ribotypes. We analyzed the genomic content of 48 C. difficile strains representing 21 different ribotypes. The calculation of distance matrix-based dendrograms using the neighbor joining method for 14 conserved genes (standard phylogenetic marker genes) from the genomes of the C. difficile strains demonstrated that the genes from strains with the same ribotype generally clustered together. Further, certain ribotypes always clustered together and formed ribotype groups, i.e. ribotypes 078, 033 and 126, as well as ribotypes 002 and 017, indicating their relatedness. Comparisons of the gene contents of the genomes of ribotypes that clustered according to the conserved gene analysis revealed that the number of common genes of the ribotypes belonging to each of these three ribotype groups were very similar for the 078/033/126 group (at most 69 specific genes between the different strains with the same ribotype) but less similar for the 002/017 group (86 genes difference). It appears that the ribotype is indicative not only of a specific pattern of the amplified 16S–23S rRNA intergenic spacer but also reflects specific differences in the nucleotide sequences of the conserved genes studied here. It can be anticipated that the sequence deviations of more genes of C. difficile strains are correlated with their PCR-ribotype. In conclusion, the results of this study corroborate and extend the concept of clonal C. difficile lineages, which correlate with ribotypes affiliation. PMID:24482682

  13. Sequence similarity of Clostridium difficile strains by analysis of conserved genes and genome content is reflected by their ribotype affiliation.

    PubMed

    Kurka, Hedwig; Ehrenreich, Armin; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Monot, Marc; Rupnik, Maja; Barbut, Frederic; Indra, Alexander; Dupuy, Bruno; Liebl, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    PCR-ribotyping is a broadly used method for the classification of isolates of Clostridium difficile, an emerging intestinal pathogen, causing infections with increased disease severity and incidence in several European and North American countries. We have now carried out clustering analysis with selected genes of numerous C. difficile strains as well as gene content comparisons of their genomes in order to broaden our view of the relatedness of strains assigned to different ribotypes. We analyzed the genomic content of 48 C. difficile strains representing 21 different ribotypes. The calculation of distance matrix-based dendrograms using the neighbor joining method for 14 conserved genes (standard phylogenetic marker genes) from the genomes of the C. difficile strains demonstrated that the genes from strains with the same ribotype generally clustered together. Further, certain ribotypes always clustered together and formed ribotype groups, i.e. ribotypes 078, 033 and 126, as well as ribotypes 002 and 017, indicating their relatedness. Comparisons of the gene contents of the genomes of ribotypes that clustered according to the conserved gene analysis revealed that the number of common genes of the ribotypes belonging to each of these three ribotype groups were very similar for the 078/033/126 group (at most 69 specific genes between the different strains with the same ribotype) but less similar for the 002/017 group (86 genes difference). It appears that the ribotype is indicative not only of a specific pattern of the amplified 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer but also reflects specific differences in the nucleotide sequences of the conserved genes studied here. It can be anticipated that the sequence deviations of more genes of C. difficile strains are correlated with their PCR-ribotype. In conclusion, the results of this study corroborate and extend the concept of clonal C. difficile lineages, which correlate with ribotypes affiliation. PMID:24482682

  14. Co-conservation of rRNA tetraloop sequences and helix length suggests involvement of the tetraloops in higher-order interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedenstierna, K. O.; Siefert, J. L.; Fox, G. E.; Murgola, E. J.

    2000-01-01

    Terminal loops containing four nucleotides (tetraloops) are common in structural RNAs, and they frequently conform to one of three sequence motifs, GNRA, UNCG, or CUUG. Here we compare available sequences and secondary structures for rRNAs from bacteria, and we show that helices capped by phylogenetically conserved GNRA loops display a strong tendency to be of conserved length. The simplest interpretation of this correlation is that the conserved GNRA loops are involved in higher-order interactions, intramolecular or intermolecular, resulting in a selective pressure for maintaining the lengths of these helices. A small number of conserved UNCG loops were also found to be associated with conserved length helices, consistent with the possibility that this type of tetraloop also takes part in higher-order interactions.

  15. The first myriapod genome sequence reveals conservative arthropod gene content and genome organisation in the centipede Strigamia maritima.

    PubMed

    Chipman, Ariel D; Ferrier, David E K; Brena, Carlo; Qu, Jiaxin; Hughes, Daniel S T; Schröder, Reinhard; Torres-Oliva, Montserrat; Znassi, Nadia; Jiang, Huaiyang; Almeida, Francisca C; Alonso, Claudio R; Apostolou, Zivkos; Aqrawi, Peshtewani; Arthur, Wallace; Barna, Jennifer C J; Blankenburg, Kerstin P; Brites, Daniela; Capella-Gutiérrez, Salvador; Coyle, Marcus; Dearden, Peter K; Du Pasquier, Louis; Duncan, Elizabeth J; Ebert, Dieter; Eibner, Cornelius; Erikson, Galina; Evans, Peter D; Extavour, Cassandra G; Francisco, Liezl; Gabaldón, Toni; Gillis, William J; Goodwin-Horn, Elizabeth A; Green, Jack E; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P; Gubbala, Sai; Guigó, Roderic; Han, Yi; Hauser, Frank; Havlak, Paul; Hayden, Luke; Helbing, Sophie; Holder, Michael; Hui, Jerome H L; Hunn, Julia P; Hunnekuhl, Vera S; Jackson, LaRonda; Javaid, Mehwish; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Jiggins, Francis M; Jones, Tamsin E; Kaiser, Tobias S; Kalra, Divya; Kenny, Nathan J; Korchina, Viktoriya; Kovar, Christie L; Kraus, F Bernhard; Lapraz, François; Lee, Sandra L; Lv, Jie; Mandapat, Christigale; Manning, Gerard; Mariotti, Marco; Mata, Robert; Mathew, Tittu; Neumann, Tobias; Newsham, Irene; Ngo, Dinh N; Ninova, Maria; Okwuonu, Geoffrey; Ongeri, Fiona; Palmer, William J; Patil, Shobha; Patraquim, Pedro; Pham, Christopher; Pu, Ling-Ling; Putman, Nicholas H; Rabouille, Catherine; Ramos, Olivia Mendivil; Rhodes, Adelaide C; Robertson, Helen E; Robertson, Hugh M; Ronshaugen, Matthew; Rozas, Julio; Saada, Nehad; Sánchez-Gracia, Alejandro; Scherer, Steven E; Schurko, Andrew M; Siggens, Kenneth W; Simmons, DeNard; Stief, Anna; Stolle, Eckart; Telford, Maximilian J; Tessmar-Raible, Kristin; Thornton, Rebecca; van der Zee, Maurijn; von Haeseler, Arndt; Williams, James M; Willis, Judith H; Wu, Yuanqing; Zou, Xiaoyan; Lawson, Daniel; Muzny, Donna M; Worley, Kim C; Gibbs, Richard A; Akam, Michael; Richards, Stephen

    2014-11-01

    Myriapods (e.g., centipedes and millipedes) display a simple homonomous body plan relative to other arthropods. All members of the class are terrestrial, but they attained terrestriality independently of insects. Myriapoda is the only arthropod class not represented by a sequenced genome. We present an analysis of the genome of the centipede Strigamia maritima. It retains a compact genome that has undergone less gene loss and shuffling than previously sequenced arthropods, and many orthologues of genes conserved from the bilaterian ancestor that have been lost in insects. Our analysis locates many genes in conserved macro-synteny contexts, and many small-scale examples of gene clustering. We describe several examples where S. maritima shows different solutions from insects to similar problems. The insect olfactory receptor gene family is absent from S. maritima, and olfaction in air is likely effected by expansion of other receptor gene families. For some genes S. maritima has evolved paralogues to generate coding sequence diversity, where insects use alternate splicing. This is most striking for the Dscam gene, which in Drosophila generates more than 100,000 alternate splice forms, but in S. maritima is encoded by over 100 paralogues. We see an intriguing linkage between the absence of any known photosensory proteins in a blind organism and the additional absence of canonical circadian clock genes. The phylogenetic position of myriapods allows us to identify where in arthropod phylogeny several particular molecular mechanisms and traits emerged. For example, we conclude that juvenile hormone signalling evolved with the emergence of the exoskeleton in the arthropods and that RR-1 containing cuticle proteins evolved in the lineage leading to Mandibulata. We also identify when various gene expansions and losses occurred. The genome of S. maritima offers us a unique glimpse into the ancestral arthropod genome, while also displaying many adaptations to its specific

  16. The First Myriapod Genome Sequence Reveals Conservative Arthropod Gene Content and Genome Organisation in the Centipede Strigamia maritima

    PubMed Central

    Chipman, Ariel D.; Ferrier, David E. K.; Brena, Carlo; Qu, Jiaxin; Hughes, Daniel S. T.; Schröder, Reinhard; Torres-Oliva, Montserrat; Znassi, Nadia; Jiang, Huaiyang; Almeida, Francisca C.; Alonso, Claudio R.; Apostolou, Zivkos; Aqrawi, Peshtewani; Arthur, Wallace; Barna, Jennifer C. J.; Blankenburg, Kerstin P.; Brites, Daniela; Capella-Gutiérrez, Salvador; Coyle, Marcus; Dearden, Peter K.; Du Pasquier, Louis; Duncan, Elizabeth J.; Ebert, Dieter; Eibner, Cornelius; Erikson, Galina; Evans, Peter D.; Extavour, Cassandra G.; Francisco, Liezl; Gabaldón, Toni; Gillis, William J.; Goodwin-Horn, Elizabeth A.; Green, Jack E.; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J. P.; Gubbala, Sai; Guigó, Roderic; Han, Yi; Hauser, Frank; Havlak, Paul; Hayden, Luke; Helbing, Sophie; Holder, Michael; Hui, Jerome H. L.; Hunn, Julia P.; Hunnekuhl, Vera S.; Jackson, LaRonda; Javaid, Mehwish; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Jiggins, Francis M.; Jones, Tamsin E.; Kaiser, Tobias S.; Kalra, Divya; Kenny, Nathan J.; Korchina, Viktoriya; Kovar, Christie L.; Kraus, F. Bernhard; Lapraz, François; Lee, Sandra L.; Lv, Jie; Mandapat, Christigale; Manning, Gerard; Mariotti, Marco; Mata, Robert; Mathew, Tittu; Neumann, Tobias; Newsham, Irene; Ngo, Dinh N.; Ninova, Maria; Okwuonu, Geoffrey; Ongeri, Fiona; Palmer, William J.; Patil, Shobha; Patraquim, Pedro; Pham, Christopher; Pu, Ling-Ling; Putman, Nicholas H.; Rabouille, Catherine; Ramos, Olivia Mendivil; Rhodes, Adelaide C.; Robertson, Helen E.; Robertson, Hugh M.; Ronshaugen, Matthew; Rozas, Julio; Saada, Nehad; Sánchez-Gracia, Alejandro; Scherer, Steven E.; Schurko, Andrew M.; Siggens, Kenneth W.; Simmons, DeNard; Stief, Anna; Stolle, Eckart; Telford, Maximilian J.; Tessmar-Raible, Kristin; Thornton, Rebecca; van der Zee, Maurijn; von Haeseler, Arndt; Williams, James M.; Willis, Judith H.; Wu, Yuanqing; Zou, Xiaoyan; Lawson, Daniel; Muzny, Donna M.; Worley, Kim C.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Akam, Michael; Richards, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Myriapods (e.g., centipedes and millipedes) display a simple homonomous body plan relative to other arthropods. All members of the class are terrestrial, but they attained terrestriality independently of insects. Myriapoda is the only arthropod class not represented by a sequenced genome. We present an analysis of the genome of the centipede Strigamia maritima. It retains a compact genome that has undergone less gene loss and shuffling than previously sequenced arthropods, and many orthologues of genes conserved from the bilaterian ancestor that have been lost in insects. Our analysis locates many genes in conserved macro-synteny contexts, and many small-scale examples of gene clustering. We describe several examples where S. maritima shows different solutions from insects to similar problems. The insect olfactory receptor gene family is absent from S. maritima, and olfaction in air is likely effected by expansion of other receptor gene families. For some genes S. maritima has evolved paralogues to generate coding sequence diversity, where insects use alternate splicing. This is most striking for the Dscam gene, which in Drosophila generates more than 100,000 alternate splice forms, but in S. maritima is encoded by over 100 paralogues. We see an intriguing linkage between the absence of any known photosensory proteins in a blind organism and the additional absence of canonical circadian clock genes. The phylogenetic position of myriapods allows us to identify where in arthropod phylogeny several particular molecular mechanisms and traits emerged. For example, we conclude that juvenile hormone signalling evolved with the emergence of the exoskeleton in the arthropods and that RR-1 containing cuticle proteins evolved in the lineage leading to Mandibulata. We also identify when various gene expansions and losses occurred. The genome of S. maritima offers us a unique glimpse into the ancestral arthropod genome, while also displaying many adaptations to its specific

  17. Sorting out relationships among the grouse and ptarmigan using intron, mitochondrial, and ultra-conserved element sequences.

    PubMed

    Persons, Nicholas W; Hosner, Peter A; Meiklejohn, Kelly A; Braun, Edward L; Kimball, Rebecca T

    2016-05-01

    The Holarctic phasianid clade of the grouse and ptarmigan has received substantial attention in areas such as evolution of mating systems, display behavior, and population ecology related to their conservation and management as wild game species. There are multiple molecular phylogenetic studies that focus on grouse and ptarmigan. In spite of this, there is little consensus regarding historical relationships, particularly among genera, which has led to unstable and partial taxonomic revisions. We estimated the phylogeny of all currently recognized species using a combination of novel data from seven nuclear loci (largely intron sequences) and published data from one additional autosomal locus, two W-linked loci, and four mitochondrial regions. To explore relationships among genera and assess paraphyly of one genus more rigorously, we then added over 3000 ultra-conserved element (UCE) loci (over 1.7million bp) gathered using Illumina sequencing. The UCE topology agreed with that of the combined nuclear intron and previously published sequence data with 100% bootstrap support for all relationships. These data strongly support previous studies separating Bonasa from Tetrastes and Dendragapus from Falcipennis. However, the placement of Lagopus differed from previous studies, and we found no support for Falcipennis monophyly. Biogeographic analysis suggests that the ancestors of grouse and ptarmigan were distributed in the New World and subsequently underwent at least four dispersal events between the Old and New Worlds. Divergence time estimates from maternally-inherited and autosomal markers show stark differences across this clade, with divergence time estimates from maternally-inherited markers being nearly half that of the autosomal markers at some nodes, and nearly twice that at other nodes. PMID:26879712

  18. High-throughput sequencing in veterinary infection biology and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Belák, S; Karlsson, O E; Leijon, M; Granberg, F

    2013-12-01

    Sequencing methods have improved rapidly since the first versions of the Sanger techniques, facilitating the development of very powerful tools for detecting and identifying various pathogens, such as viruses, bacteria and other microbes. The ongoing development of high-throughput sequencing (HTS; also known as next-generation sequencing) technologies has resulted in a dramatic reduction in DNA sequencing costs, making the technology more accessible to the average laboratory. In this White Paper of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Collaborating Centre for the Biotechnology-based Diagnosis of Infectious Diseases in Veterinary Medicine (Uppsala, Sweden), several approaches and examples of HTS are summarised, and their diagnostic applicability is briefly discussed. Selected future aspects of HTS are outlined, including the need for bioinformatic resources, with a focus on improving the diagnosis and control of infectious diseases in veterinary medicine. PMID:24761741

  19. High-Throughput Sequencing of Complete Mitochondrial Genomes.

    PubMed

    Briscoe, Andrew George; Hopkins, Kevin Peter; Waeschenbach, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing has revolutionized mitogenomics, turning a cottage industry into a high throughput process. This chapter outlines methodologies used to sequence, assemble, and annotate mitogenomes of non-model organisms using Illumina sequencing technology, utilizing either long-range PCR amplicons or gDNA as starting template. Instructions are given on how to extract DNA, conduct long-range PCR amplifications, generate short Sanger barcode tag sequences, prepare equimolar sample pools, construct and assess quality library preparations, assemble Illumina reads using either seeded reference mapping or de novo assembly, and annotate mitogenomes in the absence of an automated pipeline. Notes and recommendations, derived from our own experience, are given throughout this chapter. PMID:27460369

  20. Simian immunodeficiency virus (mac 251-32H) transmembrane protein sequence remains conserved throughout the course of infection in macaques.

    PubMed

    Slade, A; Jones, S; Almond, N; Kitchin, P

    1993-02-01

    Two cynomolgus macaques were infected with a genetically complex challenge stock of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac251-32H). The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to amplify the env gp41, rev, and nef overlapping coding sequences from provirus present in the blood of both animals at 1, 6, and 15 months post infection (p.i.). The predominant, env sequences found in both animals at the three time points were very similar to that found in the original 11/88 challenge stock. The functionally important hydrophobic fusion and membrane-spanning domains within gp41 remained conserved throughout the course of infection. Nucleotide variation within the region corresponding to the REV response element (RRE) was limited to four positions, none of which were predicted to cause any significant disruption to the secondary structure of the RRE. Very little genetic variation was observed in and around the cluster of potential glycosylation sites of the external portion of gp41. However, the existence of a previously assigned variable region elsewhere in the cytoplasmic domain of gp41 was confirmed. The three gene loci (env, rev, and nef) examined varied independently. All changes in the predominant protein sequences were brought about by single nucleotide substitutions only. After 15 months of infection with SIV, 1 animal was sick from SIV-induced disease whereas the other remained healthy. In-frame stop codons within the transmembrane protein occurred with a much greater frequency in the healthy animal. PMID:8457380

  1. High-Resolution Genuinely Multidimensional Solution of Conservation Laws by the Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Himansu, Ananda; Chang, Sin-Chung; Yu, Sheng-Tao; Wang, Xiao-Yen; Loh, Ching-Yuen; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    1999-01-01

    In this overview paper, we review the basic principles of the method of space-time conservation element and solution element for solving the conservation laws in one and two spatial dimensions. The present method is developed on the basis of local and global flux conservation in a space-time domain, in which space and time are treated in a unified manner. In contrast to the modern upwind schemes, the approach here does not use the Riemann solver and the reconstruction procedure as the building blocks. The drawbacks of the upwind approach, such as the difficulty of rationally extending the 1D scalar approach to systems of equations and particularly to multiple dimensions is here contrasted with the uniformity and ease of generalization of the Conservation Element and Solution Element (CE/SE) 1D scalar schemes to systems of equations and to multiple spatial dimensions. The assured compatibility with the simplest type of unstructured meshes, and the uniquely simple nonreflecting boundary conditions of the present method are also discussed. The present approach has yielded high-resolution shocks, rarefaction waves, acoustic waves, vortices, ZND detonation waves, and shock/acoustic waves/vortices interactions. Moreover, since no directional splitting is employed, numerical resolution of two-dimensional calculations is comparable to that of the one-dimensional calculations. Some sample applications displaying the strengths and broad applicability of the CE/SE method are reviewed.

  2. High conservation of a 5' element required for RNA editing of a C target in chloroplast psbE transcripts.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Michael L; Hanson, Maureen R

    2008-09-01

    C-to-U editing modifies 30-40 distinct nucleotides within higher-plant chloroplast transcripts. Many C targets are located at the same position in homologous genes from different plants; these either could have emerged independently or could share a common origin. The 5' sequence GCCGUU, required for editing of C214 in tobacco psbE in vitro, is one of the few identified editing cis-elements. We investigated psbE sequences from many plant species to determine in what lineage(s) editing of psbE C214 emerged and whether the cis-element identified in tobacco is conserved in plants with a C214. The GCCGUU sequence is present at a high frequency in plants that carry a C214 in psbE. However, Sciadopitys verticillata (Pinophyta) edits C214 despite the presence of nucleotide differences compared to the conserved cis-element. The C214 site in psbE genes is represented in members of four branches of spermatophytes but not in gnetophytes, resulting in the parsimonious prediction that editing of psbE C214 was present in the ancestor of spermatophytes. Extracts from chloroplasts from a species that has a difference in the motif and lacks the C target are incapable of editing tobacco psbE C214 substrates, implying that the critical trans-acting protein factors were not retained without a C target. Because noncoding sequences are less constrained than coding regions, we analyzed sequences 5' to two C editing targets located within coding regions to search for possible editing-related conserved elements. Putative editing cis-elements were uncovered in the 5' UTRs near editing sites psbL C2 and ndhD C2. PMID:18696032

  3. Canine Polydactyl Mutations With Heterogeneous Origin in the Conserved Intronic Sequence of LMBR1

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kiyun; Kang, Joohyun; Subedi, Krishna Pd.; Ha, Ji-Hong; Park, Chankyu

    2008-01-01

    Canine preaxial polydactyly (PPD) in the hind limb is a developmental trait that restores the first digit lost during canine evolution. Using a linkage analysis, we previously demonstrated that the affected gene in a Korean breed is located on canine chromosome 16. The candidate locus was further limited to a linkage disequilibrium (LD) block of <213 kb composing the single gene, LMBR1, by LD mapping with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for affected individuals from both Korean and Western breeds. The ZPA regulatory sequence (ZRS) in intron 5 of LMBR1 was implicated in mammalian polydactyly. An analysis of the LD haplotypes around the ZRS for various dog breeds revealed that only a subset is assigned to Western breeds. Furthermore, two distinct affected haplotypes for Asian and Western breeds were found, each containing different single-base changes in the upstream sequence (pZRS) of the ZRS. Unlike the previously characterized cases of PPD identified in the mouse and human ZRS regions, the canine mutations in pZRS lacked the ectopic expression of sonic hedgehog in the anterior limb bud, distinguishing its role in limb development from that of the ZRS. PMID:18689889

  4. Identification and profiling of novel and conserved microRNAs during the flower opening process in Prunus mume via deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Pan, Huitang; Wang, Jia; Yang, Weiru; Cheng, Tangren; Zhang, Qixiang

    2014-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small (20-24 nucleotide) RNAs that are critical regulators of genes involved in diverse plant processes, including development, metabolism, abiotic stress and flowering. Prunus mume is a widely cultivated ornamental plant in East Asia that blooms in early spring, even at temperatures below 0 °C. While miRNAs involved in pistil development have been identified in P. mume, few studies have profiled miRNA expression patterns during flower opening. Here, we used high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatic analysis to identify and profile miRNAs that function during flower opening in P. mume. We identified 47 conserved miRNA sequences belonging to 25 miRNA families from 92 loci in P. mume, along with 33 novel miRNA sequences from 43 loci, including their complementary miRNA* strands. The expression levels of most differentially expressed miRNAs decreased during flower opening, while miR156e-f and miR477b were upregulated at the flowering stage. We predicted 88 target genes for conserved and novel miRNAs using computational analysis and annotated their functions. Seven target genes, encoding squamosa promoter binding protein-like (SPL) and auxin response factor (ARF), scarecrow-like transcription factor (SCL) and APETALA2-like transcription factors (AP2), were verified by 5'-RACE to be the targets of miR156, miR167, miR171 and miR172, respectively. Quantitative real-time PCR validated the expression of the miRNAs and seven target genes. The results help lay the foundation for investigating the roles of miRNAs in the blooming of P. mume. PMID:24343764

  5. Conservative forgetful scholars: How people learn causal structure through sequences of interventions.

    PubMed

    Bramley, Neil R; Lagnado, David A; Speekenbrink, Maarten

    2015-05-01

    Interacting with a system is key to uncovering its causal structure. A computational framework for interventional causal learning has been developed over the last decade, but how real causal learners might achieve or approximate the computations entailed by this framework is still poorly understood. Here we describe an interactive computer task in which participants were incentivized to learn the structure of probabilistic causal systems through free selection of multiple interventions. We develop models of participants' intervention choices and online structure judgments, using expected utility gain, probability gain, and information gain and introducing plausible memory and processing constraints. We find that successful participants are best described by a model that acts to maximize information (rather than expected score or probability of being correct); that forgets much of the evidence received in earlier trials; but that mitigates this by being conservative, preferring structures consistent with earlier stated beliefs. We explore 2 heuristics that partly explain how participants might be approximating these models without explicitly representing or updating a hypothesis space. PMID:25329086

  6. Chromosome-wide mapping of DNA methylation patterns in normal and malignant prostate cells reveals pervasive methylation of gene-associated and conserved intergenic sequences

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background DNA methylation has been linked to genome regulation and dysregulation in health and disease respectively, and methods for characterizing genomic DNA methylation patterns are rapidly emerging. We have developed/refined methods for enrichment of methylated genomic fragments using the methyl-binding domain of the human MBD2 protein (MBD2-MBD) followed by analysis with high-density tiling microarrays. This MBD-chip approach was used to characterize DNA methylation patterns across all non-repetitive sequences of human chromosomes 21 and 22 at high-resolution in normal and malignant prostate cells. Results Examining this data using computational methods that were designed specifically for DNA methylation tiling array data revealed widespread methylation of both gene promoter and non-promoter regions in cancer and normal cells. In addition to identifying several novel cancer hypermethylated 5' gene upstream regions that mediated epigenetic gene silencing, we also found several hypermethylated 3' gene downstream, intragenic and intergenic regions. The hypermethylated intragenic regions were highly enriched for overlap with intron-exon boundaries, suggesting a possible role in regulation of alternative transcriptional start sites, exon usage and/or splicing. The hypermethylated intergenic regions showed significant enrichment for conservation across vertebrate species. A sampling of these newly identified promoter (ADAMTS1 and SCARF2 genes) and non-promoter (downstream or within DSCR9, C21orf57 and HLCS genes) hypermethylated regions were effective in distinguishing malignant from normal prostate tissues and/or cell lines. Conclusions Comparison of chromosome-wide DNA methylation patterns in normal and malignant prostate cells revealed significant methylation of gene-proximal and conserved intergenic sequences. Such analyses can be easily extended for genome-wide methylation analysis in health and disease. PMID:21669002

  7. High Throughput Plasmid Sequencing with Illumina and CLC Bio (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Athavale, Ajay

    2012-06-01

    Ajay Athavale (Monsanto) presents "High Throughput Plasmid Sequencing with Illumina and CLC Bio" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  8. High Throughput Plasmid Sequencing with Illumina and CLC Bio (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Athavale, Ajay [Monsanto

    2013-01-25

    Ajay Athavale (Monsanto) presents "High Throughput Plasmid Sequencing with Illumina and CLC Bio" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  9. Conserved sequences in the carboxyl terminus of integrase that are essential for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication.

    PubMed

    Cannon, P M; Byles, E D; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1996-01-01

    We have previously identified a residue in the carboxyl terminus of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase (HIV-1 IN), W-235, the requirement for which is only revealed in viral assays for integrase function (P. M. Cannon, W. Wilson, E. Byles, S. M. Kingsman, and A. J. Kingsman, J. Virol. 68:4768-4775, 1994). Our further analysis of this region of retroviral IN has now identified several sequence motifs which are conserved in all the retroviruses we examined, apart from human spumaretrovirus. We have made mutations within these motifs in HIV-1 IN and examined their phenotypes when reintroduced into an infectious proviral clone. The deleterious effects of several of these mutations demonstrate the importance of these regions for IN function in vivo. We observed a further discrepancy, at a motif that is only conserved in the lentiviruses, in the ability of mutants to function in in vitro and in vivo assays. Substitutions both in this region and at W-235 abolish HIV-1 infectivity but do not affect particle production, morphology, reverse transcription, or nuclear import in T-cell lines. Taken together with the in vitro data suggesting that neither of these residues is directly involved in the catalytic reactions of IN, it seems likely that we have identified regions of IN that are essential for interactions with other components of the integration machinery. PMID:8523588

  10. Complete mitochondrial DNA sequence of the endangered giant sable antelope (Hippotragus niger variani): insights into conservation and taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Espregueira Themudo, Gonçalo; Rufino, Ana C; Campos, Paula F

    2015-02-01

    The giant sable antelope is one of the most endangered African bovids. Populations of this iconic animal, the national symbol of Angola, were recently rediscovered, after many decades of presumed extinction. Even so, their numbers are scarce and hence conservation plans are essential. However, fundamental information such as its taxonomic position, time of divergence and degree of genetic variation are still lacking. Here, we used a museum preserved horn as a source of DNA to describe, for the first time, the complete mitochondrial genome of the giant sable antelope, and provide insights into its evolutionary history. Reads generated by shotgun sequencing were mapped against the mitochondrial genome of common sable antelope and the nuclear genomes of cow and sheep. Phylogenetic reconstruction and divergence time estimate give support to the monophyly of the giant sable and a maximum divergence time of 170 thousand years to the closest subspecies. About 7% of the nuclear genome was mapped against the reference. The genetic resources reported here are now available for future work in the field of conservation genetics and phylogeny, in this and related species. PMID:25527983