Science.gov

Sample records for highly exposed group

  1. Grouped exposed metal heaters

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Coit, William George; Griffin, Peter Terry; Hamilton, Paul Taylor; Hsu, Chia-Fu; Mason, Stanley Leroy; Samuel, Allan James; Watkins, Ronnie Wade

    2010-11-09

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

  2. Grouped exposed metal heaters

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Coit, William George; Griffin, Peter Terry; Hamilton, Paul Taylor; Hsu, Chia-Fu; Mason, Stanley Leroy; Samuel, Allan James; Watkins, Ronnie Wade

    2012-07-31

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

  3. Subject groups high and low in urinary selenium levels: workers exposed to heavy metals and patients with cancer and epilepsy

    SciTech Connect

    Hojo, Y.

    1981-04-01

    Selenium was first recognized for its toxicity; its essential nature in animals was discovered and established later. That Se is essential to human nutrition has yet to be confirmed. Recently the selenoenzyme glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) was isolated from human erythrocyte and placenta. In order to discover the role Se plays in human health and disease, Thomson and Robinson emphasized a need for continuing studies of special needs of certain groups such as those exposed to heavy metals and those with certain disease and illness for example, cancer and cardiovascular disease. It is amongst these groups that Se deficiency or Se-responsive conditions may be found. Urinary Se excretion has been mainly used to assess the nutritional Se status. Recently estimation of urinary Se level in the form of its content per creatinine (abbreviated as CT) content using 24-h or random urine samples was shown to be more precise in reducing dilution and variation effects than that per urinary volume using 24-h urines (HOJO). The purpose of this study is to search the subject groups high or low in Se status by employing urinary Se content per CT content or per urine volume.

  4. The pro-inflammatory role of high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB-1) in photoreceptors and retinal explants exposed to elevated pressure.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Michael R R; Schallenberg, Maurice; Brockhaus, Katrin; Melkonyan, Harutyun; Thanos, Solon

    2016-04-01

    To determine the role of high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB-1) in cellular and tissue models of elevated pressure-induced neurodegeneration, regeneration, and inflammation. Mouse retinal photoreceptor-derived cells (661W) and retinal explants were incubated either under elevated pressure or in the presence of recombinant HMGB-1 (rHMGB-1) to investigate the mechanisms of response of photoreceptors. Immunohistochemistry, western blotting, and the quantitative real-time PCR were used to examine the expression levels of immunological factors (eg, HMGB-1, receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE)), Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 (TLR-2, TLR-4), apoptosis-related factors (eg, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), Bcl-2-associated death promoter (Bad)) as well as cytokine expression (eg, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)). The data revealed increased the expression of HMGB-1 and its receptors RAGE, TLR-2, and TLR-4, and TNF-α as well as pro-apoptotic factors (eg, Bad) as well as apoptosis in 661W cells exposed to elevated pressure. Co-cultivation of 661W cells with rHMGB-1 increased the expression levels of pro-apoptotic Bad and cleaved Caspase-3 resulting in apoptosis. Cytokine array studies revealed an increased release of TNF-α, IL-4, IL-6, and VEGF after incubation of 661W cells with rHMGB-1. Upregulation of HMGB-1, TLR-2, and RAGE as well as anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 expression levels was found in the retinal explants exposed to rHMGB-1 or elevated pressure. The results suggest that HMGB-1 promotes an inflammatory response and mediates apoptosis in the pathology of photoreceptors and retinal homeostasis. HMGB-1 may have a key role in ongoing damage of retinal cells under conditions of elevated intraocular pressure. PMID:26779828

  5. [Characterization of chemically exposed groups by immunotoxicological methods].

    PubMed

    Bir, Anna; Pllinger, Eva; Falus, Andrs; Tompa, Anna

    2004-01-01

    At the National Institute of Chemical Safety we have surveyed the immunological status of donors from the oil industry, health services, and metallurgy exposed to different immunotoxic compounds. Their data were compared to those of healthy, non-exposed controls. Our aim was to study the relationship between immunotoxic exposure and immune function, and to establish a system of immunological parameters by which chemical exposure can be specifically monitored. Subpopulations and activation of lymphocytes was measured by flow cytometry, using immunophenotyping of peripheral blood lymphocytes. In the groups exposed to immunotoxic compounds we found an increase in helper, and a decrease in cytotoxic T lymphocytes, leading to a shift in Th/Tc ratios. These phenomena are not substance specific, but relate to chemical exposure. The lymphocytes of exposed groups showed a higher proportion of activated cells, but there was a difference in the expressed activation markers. Our results suggest that characterizing lymphocyte subpopulations and activation markers on PBL of donors is a useful tool in tracking environmental immunotoxic effects. PMID:15351808

  6. Estimated daily intake of phthalates in occupationally exposed groups.

    PubMed

    Hines, Cynthia J; Hopf, Nancy B N; Deddens, James A; Silva, Manori J; Calafat, Antonia M

    2011-01-01

    Improved analytical methods for measuring urinary phthalate metabolites have resulted in biomarker-based estimates of phthalate daily intake for the general population, but not for occupationally exposed groups. In 2003-2005, we recruited 156 workers from eight industries where materials containing diethyl phthalate (DEP), dibutyl phthalate (DBP), and/or di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) were used as part of the worker's regular job duties. Phthalate metabolite concentrations measured in the workers' end-shift urine samples were used in a simple pharmacokinetic model to estimate phthalate daily intake. DEHP intake estimates based on three DEHP metabolites combined were 0.6-850??g/kg/day, with the two highest geometric mean (GM) intakes in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) film manufacturing (17??g/kg/day) and PVC compounding (12??g/kg/day). All industries, except phthalate manufacturing, had some workers whose DEHP exposure exceeded the U.S. reference dose (RfD) of 20??g/kg/day. A few workers also exceeded the DEHP European tolerable daily intake (TDI) of 50??g/kg/day. DEP intake estimates were 0.5-170??g/kg/day, with the highest GM in phthalate manufacturing (27??g/kg/day). DBP intake estimates were 0.1-76??g/kg/day, with the highest GMs in rubber gasket and in phthalate manufacturing (17??g/kg/day, each). No DEP or DBP intake estimates exceeded their respective RfDs. The DBP TDI (10??g/kg/day) was exceeded in three rubber industries and in phthalate manufacturing. These intake estimates are subject to several uncertainties; however, an occupational contribution to phthalate daily intake is clearly indicated in some industries. PMID:20010977

  7. Ethylene thiourea: thyroid function in two groups of exposed workers.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D M

    1984-01-01

    Ethylene thiourea is manufactured at one factory in the United Kingdom and is mixed into masterbatch rubber at another. Clinical examinations and thyroid function tests were carried out over a period of three years on eight process workers and five mixers and on matched controls. The results show that the exposed mixers, but not exposed process workers, have significantly lower levels of total thyroxine (T4) than the controls. One mixer had an appreciably raised level of thyroid stimulation hormone (TSH). PMID:6743584

  8. Individual and grouping track pits etched in the exposed in a free space plastic track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashkarov, L.; Bazhutov, Yu

    2013-02-01

    New results concerned to the investigation of depth-dependent the pit-like surface-average and the grouping track-density distributions in the cosmic ray exposed column of CN-85 and CR-39 plastic solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) are presented. Two main sources: solar cosmic ray protons and recoil nuclei for very short (length <3 μm) track-pit formation are considered. Theoretical estimation of the total, uniform track-pit density indicates on failure of evidence of some additional radiation effects, partially, hypothetically conditioned with the Erzion theory. Some quantitative proofs of this hypothesis have been obtained in the measurements of the pit-groups. Totally, up to this time it was registered near of 30 pit groups with the surface pit-density in the interval of (1-15) × 106 cm2, that is two-three orders of magnitude higher than uniformly distributed track-pits on the same CR-39 plate surface. As a result of layer-by-layer investigation of the exposed CN-85 stock arrangement three pit swarms exactly correlated with the end point of high ionizing primary charge particle tracks were observed. Obtained data are considered in according to submission based on the probability of detection for the negative charged cosmic ray Erzion particles stopping events.

  9. Cancer mortality among a group of fluorspar miners exposed to radon progeny

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, H.I.; Semenciw, R.M.; Mao, Y.; Wigle, D.T.

    1988-12-01

    A cohort study of the mortality experience (1950-1984) of 1,772 Newfoundland underground fluorspar miners occupationally exposed to high levels of radon daughters (mean dose = 382.8 working levels months) has been conducted. Observed numbers of cancers of the lung, salivary gland, and buccal cavity and pharynx were significantly elevated among these miners. A highly significant relation was noted between radon daughter exposure and risk of dying of lung cancer; the small numbers of salivary gland (n = 2) and buccal cavity and pharynx (n = 6) cancers precluded meaningful analysis of dose response. Attributable and relative risk coefficients for lung cancer were estimated as 6.3 deaths per working level month per million person-years and 0.9% per working level month, respectively. Relative risk coefficients were highest for those first exposed before age 20 years. Cigarette smokers had relative and attributable risk coefficients comparable to those of nonsmokers. Relative risks fell sharply with age, whereas attributable risks were lowest in the youngest and oldest age groups. The results suggest that efforts to raise existing occupational exposure standards may be inappropriate.

  10. Nutritional Status among the Children of Age Group 5-14 Years in Selected Arsenic Exposed and Non-Exposed Areas of Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Rezaul Karim, Mohammad; Ahmad, Sk. Akhtar

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess and compare the nutritional status of children aged 5-14 years in arsenic exposed and non- exposed areas. Materials and methods: It was a cross sectional study conducted on 600 children of age 5-14 years from arsenic exposed and non-exposed areas in Bangladesh. Designed questionnaire and check list were used for collection of data. To estimate BMI necessary anthropometric measurements of the studied children were done. Dietary intakes of the study children were assessed using 24-hours recall method. Results: The difference of socio-economic conditions between the children of exposed area and non-exposed area was not significant. On an average the body mass index was found to be significantly (p < 0.01) lower among the children of arsenic exposed area (49%) in comparison to that of children in non-exposed area (38%). Stunting (p < 0.01), wasting (p < 0.05) and underweight (p < 0.05) were significantly higher in exposed group in comparison to non-exposed group. No significant difference of nutrition intake was found between exposed and non-exposed children as well as thin and normal children. Conclusion: In this study children exposed to arsenic contaminated water were found to be suffered from lower nutritional status. PMID:25530768

  11. General guidelines for medically screening mixed population groups potentially exposed to nerve or vesicant agents

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, A.P.; Munro, N.B. ); Sidell, F.R. ); Leffingwell, S.S. . Center for Environmental Health and Injury Control)

    1992-01-01

    A number of state and local planners have requested guidance on screening protocols and have expressed interest in sampling body fluids from exposed or potentially exposed individuals as a means of estimating agent dose. These guidelines have been developed to provide a clear statement that could be used by state and local emergency response personnel in the event of a nerve or vesicant agent incident resulting in off-post contamination; maximum protection from harm is the goal. The assumption is that any population group so exposed would be heterogeneous for age, gender, reproductive status, and state of health.

  12. Increased levels of chromosomal aberrations and DNA damage in a group of workers exposed to formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Costa, Solange; Carvalho, Sandra; Costa, Carla; Coelho, Patrcia; Silva, Susana; Santos, Lus S; Gaspar, Jorge F; Porto, Beatriz; Laffon, Blanca; Teixeira, Joo P

    2015-07-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) is a commonly used chemical in anatomy and pathology laboratories as a tissue preservative and fixative. Because of its sensitising properties, irritating effects and cancer implication, FA accounts probably for the most important chemical-exposure hazard concerning this professional group. Evidence for genotoxic effects and carcinogenic properties in humans is insufficient and conflicting, particularly in regard to the ability of inhaled FA to induce toxicity on other cells besides first contact tissues, such as buccal and nasal cells. To evaluate the effects of exposure to FA in human peripheral blood lymphocytes, a group of 84 anatomy pathology laboratory workers exposed occupationally to FA and 87 control subjects were tested for chromosomal aberrations (CAs) and DNA damage (comet assay). The level of exposure to FA in the workplace air was evaluated. The association between genotoxicity biomarkers and polymorphic genes of xenobiotic-metabolising and DNA repair enzymes were also assessed. The estimated mean level of FA exposure was 0.380.03 ppm. All cytogenetic endpoints assessed by CAs test and comet assay % tail DNA (%TDNA) were significantly higher in FA-exposed workers compared with controls. Regarding the effect of susceptibility biomarkers, results suggest that polymorphisms in CYP2E1 and GSTP1 metabolic genes, as well as, XRCC1 and PARP1 polymorphic genes involved in DNA repair pathways are associated with higher genetic damage in FA-exposed subjects. Data obtained in this study show a potential health risk situation of anatomy pathology laboratory workers exposed to FA (0.38 ppm). Implementation of security and hygiene measures may be crucial to decrease risk. The obtained information may also provide new important data to be used by health care programs and by governmental agencies responsible for occupational health and safety. PMID:25711496

  13. Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors for Reasonably Maximally Exposed Individual and Average Member of Critical Group

    SciTech Connect

    K. Montague

    2000-02-23

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop additional Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCFs) for a reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) for the periods 10,000 years and 1,000,000 years after the repository closure. In addition, Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors for the average member of a critical group are calculated for those additional radionuclides postulated to reach the environment during the period after 10,000 years and up to 1,000,000 years. After the permanent closure of the repository, the engineered systems within the repository will eventually lose their abilities to contain radionuclide inventory, and the radionuclides will migrate through the geosphere and eventually enter the local water table moving toward inhabited areas. The primary release scenario is a groundwater well used for drinking water supply and irrigation, and this calculation takes these postulated releases and follows them through various pathways until they result in a dose to either a member of critical group or a reasonably maximally exposed individual. The pathways considered in this calculation include inhalation, ingestion, and direct exposure.

  14. Immune response to a potyvirus with exposed amino groups available for chemical conjugation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The amino terminus of the tobacco etch virus (TEV) capsid protein is located on the external surface of infectious TEV particles, as proposed by previous studies and an in silico model. The epsilon amino groups on the exposed lysine residues are available for chemical conjugation to any given protein, and can thus act as antigen carriers. The availability of amino groups on the surfaces of TEV particles was determined and the immune response to TEV evaluated. Results Using a biotin-tagged molecule that reacts specifically with amino groups, we found that the TEV capsid protein has amino groups on its surface available for coupling to other molecules via crosslinkers. Intraperitoneal TEV was administered to female BALB/c mice, and both their humoral and cellular responses measured. Different IgG isotypes, particularly IgG2a, directed against TEV were induced. In a cell proliferation assay, only spleen cells from vaccinated mice that were stimulated in vitro with TEV showed significant proliferation of CD3+/CD4+ and CD3+/CD8+ subpopulations and secreted significant amounts of interferon ?. Conclusions TEV has surface amino groups that are available for chemical coupling. TEV induces both humoral and cellular responses when administered alone intraperitoneally to mice. Therefore, TEV should be evaluated as a vaccine adjuvant when chemically coupled to antigens of choice. PMID:22452850

  15. Blistering on tungsten surface exposed to high flux deuterium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H. Y.; Liu, W.; Luo, G. N.; Yuan, Y.; Jia, Y. Z.; Fu, B. Q.; De Temmerman, G.

    2016-04-01

    The blistering behaviour of tungsten surfaces exposed to very high fluxes (1-2 × 1024/m2/s) of low energy (38 eV) deuterium plasmas was investigated as a function of ion fluence (0.2-7 × 1026 D/m2) and surface temperature (423-873 K). Blisters were observed under all conditions, especially up to temperatures of 873 K. The blister parameters are evaluated with blister size, blister density and surface coverage. The blister size always peaked at less than 0.5 μm and no blister larger than 10 μm is observed even at high fluence. The blister densities are found in high magnitude of 106 blisters/m2, with the surface coverages lower than 2%. The formation of cracks in the sub-surface region was observed by cross-section imaging. Changes in blister size and shape with fluence and temperature suggest processes of predominantly nucleation and subsequent growth of blisters. The smaller blister size is considered to be caused by a combination of flux-related effects such as enhanced defect formation in the near surface region, reduced deuterium diffusivity and relatively short exposure times.

  16. Yoga-based Psychotherapy Groups for Boys Exposed to Trauma in Urban Settings.

    PubMed

    Beltran, Monica; Brown-Elhillali, Abena Nyamekye; Held, April Rose; Ryce, Patrice Carlotta; Ofonedu, Mirian Ebere; Hoover, Daniel William; Ensor, Kaitlin Mary; Belcher, Harolyn Millicent Edith

    2016-01-01

    Background • Children who experience abuse and neglect and are exposed to adverse life events are at risk of developing emotional and behavioral problems. They may display variable internalizing and externalizing symptoms, such as posttraumatic stress, depression, anxiety, low self-esteem, and aggression. Yoga may be able to regulate body-brain pathways that cause stress following traumatic experiences, thereby reducing adverse mental and physical sequelae. Objective • The objective of this preliminary study is to examine changes in functioning following meetings of a yoga-based psychotherapy group (YBPG) for boys with a history of interpersonal trauma exposure. Methods/Design • The study was a prospective, intervention cohort study. Setting • The study occurred at an urban-based mental health center focusing on treatment of children exposed to interpersonal trauma in their communities and families. Participants • Participants were 10 boys, aged 8-12 y, who primarily were African-Americans (70%) and who had a history of trauma. Intervention • The YBPG was a 12-wk, yoga-based, group therapy, integrated with mental health treatment that was trauma informed and evidence-based. Outcome Measures • Measures of attendance and interpersonal functioning-the Behavioral and Emotional Rating Scale 2 (BERS-2) and patient satisfaction surveys-were collected. The pre- and post-YBPG, paired t test; Wilcoxon's signed rank test; and effect sizes were calculated to assess change in interpersonal functioning following the YBPG, as reported by the parents and children. Results • The BERS-2 scores yielded clinically and statistically significant mean improvements on the parents' ratings of participants' (1) Interpersonal Strength, Intrapersonal Strength, and Family Involvement scores, with mean improvements on those subscales being 1.4 (P = .007), 1.9 (P = .012), and 1.4 (P = .045) points, respectively; and (2) Strength Index scores, with a mean improvement of 8.7 (P = .004). The effect size was in the large range. In addition to significant improvements posttreatment, the parents' mean rating score of their children's functioning was closer but still lower than the children's self-reports on all subscales. The attendance rate for the YBPG was among the highest for group therapies at the center. Conclusions • The study provided preliminary evidence for the feasibility of YBPG as an effective intervention for boys exposed to trauma in urban settings. PMID:26773320

  17. Urinary arsenic speciation profile in ethnic group of the Atacama desert (Chile) exposed to variable arsenic levels in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Yez, Jorge; Mansilla, Hctor D; Santander, I Paola; Fierro, Vladimir; Cornejo, Lorena; Barnes, Ramn M; Amarasiriwardena, Dulasiri

    2015-01-01

    Ethnic groups from the Atacama Desert (known as Atacameos) have been exposed to natural arsenic pollution for over 5000years. This work presents an integral study that characterizes arsenic species in water used for human consumption. It also describes the metabolism and arsenic elimination through urine in a chronically exposed population in northern Chile. In this region, water contained total arsenic concentrations up to 1250?g L(-1), which was almost exclusively As(V). It is also important that this water was ingested directly from natural water sources without any treatment. The ingested arsenic was extensively methylated. In urine 93% of the arsenic was found as methylated arsenic species, such as monomethylarsonic acid [MMA(V)] and dimethylarsinic acid [DMA(V)]. The original ingested inorganic species [As(V)], represent less than 1% of the total urinary arsenic. Methylation activity among individuals can be assessed by measuring primary [inorganic As/methylated As] and secondary methylation [MMA/DMA] indexes. Both methylation indexes were 0.06, indicating a high biological converting capability of As(V) into MMA and then MMA into DMA, compared with the control population and other arsenic exposed populations previously reported. PMID:25438126

  18. Co3O4 nanocages with highly exposed {110} facets for high-performance lithium storage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dequan; Wang, Xi; Wang, Xuebin; Tian, Wei; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri

    2013-01-01

    Functional materials with both exposed highly reactive planes and hollow structures have attracted considerable attentions with respect to improved catalytic activity and enhanced electrochemical energy storage. Herein, we report the synthesis of unusual single-crystal Co3O4 nanocages with highly exposed {110} reactive facets via a one-step solution method. When tested as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries, these Co3O4 nanocages deliver a high reversible lithium storage capacity of 864?mAh g?1 at 0.2C over 50 cycles and exhibit an excellent rate capability. The dominantly exposed {110} planes, a high density of atomic steps in nanocages, and the large void interiors lead to the regarded superior electrochemical performance. PMID:23995848

  19. Neuropsychological sequelae of exposure to welding fumes in a group of occupationally exposed men.

    PubMed

    Bowler, Rosemarie M; Gysens, Sabine; Diamond, Emily; Booty, Andrew; Hartney, Christopher; Roels, Harry A

    2003-10-01

    This study compares the neuropsychological function, emotional status, visual function, and illness prevalence of 76 former and current chemical industry welders primarily involved in steel welding, and exposed to welding fumes for an average of 24.9 years with that of 42 unexposed, non-welder controls. Health and occupational history questionnaires were administered, as were the neuropsychological tests included in the World Health Organization Neurobehavioral Core Test Battery, Luria Motor Test, and selected tests from the WAIS-III, and WMS-III. Emotional status tests included the BSI, POMS, BAI, and BDI, and vision tests included the Snellen near visual acuity, Lanthony d-15 color vision, Vistech Contrast Sensitivity, and Schirmer strips. While welders and controls performed similarly on tests of verbal skills, verbal retention, and auditory span, welders performed worse than controls on tests of verbal learning, working memory, cognitive flexibility, visuomotor processing speed, and motor efficiency. Welders had poorer color vision and emotional status, and increased prevalence of illnesses and psychiatric symptoms. The increased symptoms in welders were related to decreased scores on tasks measuring verbal learning, visuomotor abilities, visuospatial abilities, and information processing, and motor efficiency. Within the group of welders, the number of hours welding was negatively related to scores on verbal learning, auditory span, working memory, cognitive flexibility, and motor efficiency. PMID:14626899

  20. A histopathological study of Hudson River crayfish, Orconectes virilis, exposed to platinum group metals.

    PubMed

    Wren, Melody; Gagnon, Zofia E

    2014-01-01

    Platinum group metals (PGMs), such as platinum (Pt), palladium (Pd), and rhodium (Rh), are of increasing concern due to rising anthropogenic input to aquatic systems. In this study, PGMs' effects on bioaccumulation and histopathological changes were investigated using Orconectes virilis, a native Hudson River crayfish, as a model. Organisms were exposed to varying concentrations of water-soluble PGM salts for 10 days. The following experimental treatments were established: 0.0, 1.0, 5.0, 10.0 ppm Pt(IV), 1.0 ppm Rh(III), 1.0 ppm Pd(II), and a PGM mix (1.0 ppm Pt(IV), Rh(III), Pd(II) each) dissolved in raw Hudson River water. Metal content in the tissue samples were analyzed by a Spectro Genesis ICP-OES. The relationship between Pt, Pd, and Rh concentrations in different treatments and observed behavioral changes during the experiment was analyzed through One-Way ANOVA Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparison test (P ≤ 0.05). Paraffin sections, 6-μm-thick, were prepared in standard eosin-Y and hematoxylin-2 stain and examined for histological abnormalities within hepatopancreas, exoskeleton, brain, and ganglia tissue. Statistically significant differences in PGM bioaccumulation were observed in all organs, with highest concentrations found in the hepatopancreas, 81.68 mg g(-1) dw in 1.0 ppm Pd treatment, 20.03 mg g(-1) dw Rh in 1.0 ppm Rh treatment, and 81.58 mg g(-1) dw Pt in the 5.0 ppm Pt treatment. Pt bioaccumulation in the hepatopancreas and exoskeleton decreased at the highest Pt exposure treatment, suggesting severe structural damage to tissue. Hyper-segmentation of vacuoles and swelling of the vascular channels were observed in the hepatocyte structure of the hepatopancreas. Exoskeleton exhibited visible bands in the exocuticle indicating demineralization. Brain and ganglia demonstrated extensive vacuolization. Behavioral analysis showed an increase of maximum response intensity over the experimental period within each treatment. Bioaccumulation and cellular abnormalities observed in exposed aquatic organisms raise concern of PGM bio-magnification within the food chain and its effect on the environment and human health. PMID:24171412

  1. Myocardial protection induced by fentanyl in pigs exposed to high-dose adrenaline.

    PubMed

    da Luz, Vinicius Fernando; Otsuki, Denise Aya; Gonzalez, Maria Margarita Castro; Negri, Elnara Marcia; Caldini, Elia Garcia; Damaceno-Rodrigues, Nilsa Regina; Malbouisson, Luiz Marcelo S; Viana, Bruno Gonalves; Vane, Matheus Fachini; Carmona, Maria Jose Carvalho

    2015-10-01

    The use of high doses of adrenaline is common in critical patients, especially during cardiac arrest. During these situations, myocardial dysfunction can be a result of multiple factors, including adrenaline use. In addition, opioids have been shown to have anti-arrhythmic and anti-ischemic mechanisms that may confer cardiac protection. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of fentanyl on myocardial function in pigs exposed to high-dose adrenaline. After institutional ethics committee approval, 26 pigs were randomly allocated to receive either 20 ?g/kg fentanyl (n = 10; fentanyl group) administered 5 min before five doses of adrenaline (20 ?g/kg), equivalent-volume saline (n = 10; saline group) using the same adrenaline dosing protocol, or neither fentanyl nor adrenaline (n = 6; sham group). The fentanyl group showed lower levels of troponin at the end of the sixth hour compared with the saline group (1.91 1.47 vs 5.44 5.35 ng/mL, P = 0.019). Transmission electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry also showed less myocardial injury in the fentanyl group. The conclusion was reached that fentanyl attenuates myocardial injury caused by high-dose adrenaline without blunting the hemodynamic effect of adrenaline. PMID:26173999

  2. Expression of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase in rat kidneys exposed to high +Gz.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Soo; Kim, Youn Wha

    2012-11-01

    Exposure to high gravitational acceleration forces acting along the body axis from the head to the feet (+Gz) severely reduces blood flow to the visceral organs, including the kidneys. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) figures predominantly in mediating kidney cell responses to a wide variety of stress-related stimuli. Though previous studies have shown the activation of ERK in some experimental models, the regulation of ERK associated with +Gz exposure has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of high +Gz exposure on ERK activation in the kidneys. Using a small animal centrifuge, eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to +10Gz or +13Gz three times for 3 minutes each. The bilateral kidneys were obtained from each rat, and the expression levels of phosphorylated ERK (p-ERK) were evaluated using immunohistochemistry. In the control group, the collecting duct epithelium displayed faint cytoplasmic staining with no nuclear staining of p-ERK. By contrast, rats exposed to +10Gz showed strong nuclear staining intensity for p-ERK. In the renal papilla, the epithelial cells of collecting ducts and thin segments of the loop of Henle exhibited strong nuclear immunoreactivity for p-ERK. Rats exposed to +13Gz also showed the same staining intensity and distribution of p-ERK expression as that of rats exposed to +10Gz. This study is the first to describe +Gz exposure-induced alteration in the expression of p-ERK in the kidneys. Our finding suggests that high +Gz exposure leads to the activation of ERK in the renal papilla. PMID:23198944

  3. Differential Therapeutic Outcomes of Community-Based Group Interventions for Women and Children Exposed to Intimate Partner Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWhirter, Paula T.

    2011-01-01

    Two community-based group therapies, emotion focused versus goal oriented, are compared among women exposed to intimate partner violence (n = 46) and their children (n = 48) aged between 6 and 12 years. A series of repeated measures analyses are employed to evaluate the effects of time from baseline to postintervention following random assignment.

  4. Effectiveness of a School-Based Group Psychotherapy Program for War-Exposed Adolescents: A Randomized Control Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Layne, Christopher M.; Saltzman, William R.; Poppleton, Landon; Burlingame, Gary M.; Pasalic, Alma; Durakovic, Elvira; Music, Mirjana; Campara, Nihada; Dapo, Nermin; Arslanagic, Berina; Steinberg, Alan M.; Pynoos, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    The study assesses the comparative efficacy of a classroom-based psycho-education and skills intervention and a school-based trauma- and grief-focused group treatment of a three-tiered mental health program for adolescents exposed to severe war-trauma, traumatic bereavement, and postwar adversity. The two-tier approach, combined with

  5. Avoidance Symptom Presentation of Preschoolers Exposed to Intimate Partner Violence in a Group Therapy Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galano, Maria M.; Miller, Laura E.; Graham-Bermann, Sandra A.

    2014-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a serious problem for children exposed to intimate partner violence (IPV). Recent changes to diagnostic criteria for PTSD include a reduction in avoidance symptom criteria from three to one and the separation of emotional numbing from avoidance symptoms, thus creating a need to better understand how

  6. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN BIOMARKERS OF EXPOSURE AND NEUROLOGICAL EFFECTS IN A GROUP OF WORKERS EXPOSED TO ACRYLAMIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was performed among 41 workers heavily exposed to a mixture of acrylamide and acrylonitrile in Henan province of China. The workers underwent a complete medical and neurological examination and gave blood and urine for the determination of several biomarkers of exposure. ...

  7. Using Creative Group Techniques in High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veach, Laura J.; Gladding, Samuel T.

    2007-01-01

    Groups in high schools that use creative techniques help adolescents express their emotions appropriately, behave differently, and gain insight into themselves and others. This article looks at seven different creative arts media--music, movement, visual art, literature, drama, play, and humor--and offers examples of how they can be used in groups

  8. A Support Group for Home-Quarantined College Students Exposed to SARS: Learning from Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pan, Peter J. D.; Chang, Shih-Hua; Yu, Yen-Yen

    2005-01-01

    This article is an initial description of a meaningful and valuable clinical experience in interacting with SARS home-quarantined college students in a support group in Taiwan. Information about SARS and home quarantine, the tasks of the Counseling Centers and group work after the SARS outbreak, the support group for home-quarantined members, the

  9. Germination of vegetable seeds exposed to very high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Y.; Yokota, S.; Ono, F.

    2012-07-01

    Effects of high hydrostatic pressure were investigated on vegetable seeds in the GPa range to examine the potentialities of breed improvement by high-pressure processing. Specimens of several seeds of broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica), Turnip leaf (Brassica rapa var. perviridis) and Potherb Mustard (Brassica rapa var. nipposinica) were put in a teflon capsule with liquid high pressure medium, fluorinate, and inserted into a pyrophillite cube. By using a cubic anvil press a hydrostatic pressure of 5.5 GP a was applied to these seeds for 15 minutes. After being brought back to ambient pressure, they were seeded on humid soil in a plant pot. Many of these vegetable seeds began to germinate within 6 days after seeded.

  10. Increased Risk for Group B Streptococcus Sepsis in Young Infants Exposed to HIV, Soweto, South Africa, 2004–20081

    PubMed Central

    Schrag, Stephanie J.; Thigpen, Michael C.; Velaphi, Sithembiso C.; Wadula, Jeannette; Adrian, Peter V.; Kuwanda, Locadiah; Groome, Michelle J.; Buchmann, Eckhart; Madhi, Shabir A.

    2015-01-01

    Although group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of severe invasive disease in young infants worldwide, epidemiologic data and knowledge about risk factors for the disease are lacking from low- to middle-income countries. To determine the epidemiology of invasive GBS disease among young infants in a setting with high maternal HIV infection, we conducted hospital-based surveillance during 2004–2008 in Soweto, South Africa. Overall GBS incidence was 2.72 cases/1,000 live births (1.50 and 1.22, respectively, among infants with early-onset disease [EOD] and late-onset [LOD] disease). Risk for EOD and LOD was higher for HIV-exposed than HIV-unexposed infants. GBS serotypes Ia and III accounted for 84.0% of cases, and 16.9% of infected infants died. We estimate that use of trivalent GBS vaccine (serotypes Ia, Ib, and III) could prevent 2,105 invasive GBS cases and 278 deaths annually among infants in South Africa; therefore, vaccination of all pregnant women in this country should be explored. PMID:25812061

  11. Warts and All: Exposing History to High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Gregory

    2003-01-01

    A high school history teacher explains how he tries to make history interesting for his students by suggesting that American history is full of great stories. Talks specifically about teaching about Thomas Jefferson and his relationship with Sally Hemings. Presents a rationale for addressing controversial issues in history instruction. (JOW)

  12. Nanostructures and pinholes on W surfaces exposed to high flux D plasma at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Y. Z.; Liu, W.; Xu, B.; Luo, G.-N.; Li, C.; Fu, B. Q.; De Temmerman, G.

    2015-08-01

    Nanostructures and pinholes formed on tungsten surface exposed to high fluxes (1024 m-2 s-1) deuterium ions at 943 K and 1073 K were studied by scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. Nanostructure formation is observed at 943 K and 1073 K, and exhibits a strong dependence on the surface orientation. With increasing fluence, pinholes appear on the surface and are mainly observed on grains with surface normal near [1 1 1]. The pinholes are speculated to be caused by the rupture of bubbles formed near the surface. The formation of pinholes has no obvious relationship with the surface nanostructures.

  13. Profiling of Brevibacillus borstelensis transcriptome exposed to high temperature shock.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, S; Padhi, S K; Sen, R; Mohanty, S; Samanta, M; Maiti, N K

    2016-01-01

    To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the ability of the bacteria to survive at high temperature, gene expression profile of Brevibacillusborstelensis at 55°C during 5 and 10min heat shock period was carried out by high-throughput sequencing technology. A total of 2555 non-redundant transcripts were annotated. A total of 575 genes at 5min and 400 genes at 10min exhibited significant differential expression in response to temperature upshift from 50 to 55°C. Genes up-regulated under heat shock were associated with metabolism (mtnE), membrane transport, signal transduction, transcriptional regulation (ycxD, codY) and folding and sorting (hsp90). A larger number of genes encoding hypothetical proteins were identified. RT-PCR experimental results carried out on genes expressed under heat shock were found to be consistent with transcriptome data. The results enhance our understanding of adaptation strategy of thermophilic bacteria thereby providing a strong background for in depth research in thermophiles. PMID:26585522

  14. Copper uptake by Eichhornia crassipes exposed at high level concentrations.

    PubMed

    Melignani, Eliana; de Cabo, Laura Isabel; Faggi, Ana María

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the growth of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) and its ability to accumulate Cu from polluted water with high Cu concentrations and a mixture of other contaminants under short-term exposure, in order to use this species for the remediation of highly contaminated sites. Two hydroponic experiments were performed under greenhouse conditions for 7 days. One of them consisted of growing water hyacinth in Hoagland solution supplemented with 15 or 25 mg Cu/L and a control. The other one contained water hyacinth growing in polluted river water supplemented with 15 mg Cu/L and a control. Cu was accumulated principally in roots. The maximum Cu concentration was 23,387.2 mg/kg dw in the treatment of 25 mg Cu/L in Hoagland solution. Cu translocation from roots to leaves was low. The mixture of 15 mg Cu/L with polluted water did not appear to have toxic effects on the water hyacinth. This plant showed a remarkable uptake capacity under elevated Cu concentrations in a mixture of pollutants similar to pure industrial effluents in a short time of exposure. This result has not been reported before, to our knowledge. This species is suitable for phytoremediation of waters subject to discharge of mixed industrial effluents containing elevated Cu concentrations (≥15 mg Cu/L), as well as nutrient-rich domestic wastewaters. PMID:25529492

  15. Strengthening family coping resources: the feasibility of a multifamily group intervention for families exposed to trauma.

    PubMed

    Kiser, Laurel J; Donohue, April; Hodgkinson, Stacy; Medoff, Deborah; Black, Maureen M

    2010-12-01

    Families exposed to urban poverty face a disproportionate risk of exposure to repeated trauma. Repeated exposures can lead to severe and chronic reactions in multiple family members with effects that ripple throughout the family system. Interventions for distressed families residing in traumatic contexts, such as low-income, urban settings are desperately needed. This report presents preliminary data in support of Strengthening Family Coping Resources, a trauma-focused, multifamily, skill-building intervention. Strengthening Family Coping Resources is designed for families living in traumatic contexts with the goal of reducing symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder and other trauma-related disorders in children and caregivers. Results from open trials suggest Strengthening Family Coping Resources is a feasible intervention with positive effects on children's symptoms of trauma-related distress. PMID:21105068

  16. Teaching Art to High Risk Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossol, Monona

    The role of art therapy is considered in working with such high risk groups as the institutionalized, mentally retarded, elderly, visually impaired, physically handicapped, asthmatic, hyper- and hypo-active children, hearing impaired, and patients on mind altering drugs. The special risks of infectious diseases (such as serum hepatitis), and

  17. Using Creative Group Techniques in High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veach, Laura J.; Gladding, Samuel T.

    2007-01-01

    Groups in high schools that use creative techniques help adolescents express their emotions appropriately, behave differently, and gain insight into themselves and others. This article looks at seven different creative arts media--music, movement, visual art, literature, drama, play, and humor--and offers examples of how they can be used in groups…

  18. Scratch This! The IF-AT as a Technique for Stimulating Group Discussion and Exposing Misconceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotner, Sehoya; Baepler, Paul; Kellerman, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Frequent and immediate feedback is critical for learning and retaining content as well as developing effective learning teams (Michaelson, Knight, and Fink 2004). The Immediate Feedback Assessment Technique (IF-AT) provides a single and efficient way for learners to self-assess their progress in a course and to structure significant small-group

  19. Putative novel surface-exposed Streptococcus agalactiae protein frequently expressed by the group B streptococcus from Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Mavenyengwa, Rooyen T; Maeland, Johan A; Moyo, Sylvester R

    2009-09-01

    Group B streptococci (GBS) express a variety of surface-exposed and strain-variable proteins which function as phenotypic markers and as antigens which are able to induce protective immunity in experimental settings. Among these proteins, the chimeric and immunologically cross-reacting alpha-like proteins are particularly important. Another protein, R3, which has been less well studied, occurred at a frequency of 21.5% in GBS from Zimbabwe and, notably, occurred in serotype V strains at a frequency of 75.9%. Working with rabbit antiserum raised against the R3 reference strain ATCC 49447 (strain 10/84; serotype V/R3) to detect the expression of the R3 protein, we recorded findings which suggested that strain 10/84 expressed a strain-variable protein antigen, in addition to R3. The antigen was detected by various enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based tests by using acid extract antigens or GBS whole-cell coats and by whole-cell-based Western blotting. We named the putative novel antigen the Z antigen. The Z antigen was a high-molecular-mass antigen that was susceptible to degradation by pepsin and trypsin but that was resistant to m-periodate oxidation and failed to show immunological cross-reactivity with any of a variety of other GBS protein antigens. The Z antigen was expressed by 33/121 (27.2%) of strains of a Zimbabwean GBS strain collection and by 64.2% and 72.4% of the type Ib and type V strains, respectively, and was occasionally expressed by GBS of other capsular serotypes. Thus, the putative novel GBS protein named Z showed distinct capsular antigen associations and presented as an important phenotypic marker in GBS from Zimbabwe. It may be an important antigen in GBS from larger areas of southern Africa. Its prevalence in GBS from Western countries is not known. PMID:19587152

  20. High dimensional cohomology of discrete groups

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Kenneth S.

    1976-01-01

    For a large class of discrete groups Γ, relations are established between the high dimensional cohomology of Γ and the cohomology of the normalizers of the finite subgroups of Γ. The results are stated in terms of a generalization of Tate cohomology recently constructed by F. T. Farrell. As an illustration of these results, it is shown that one can recover a cohomology calculation of Lee and Szczarba, which they used to calculate the odd torsion in K3(Z). PMID:16592322

  1. Study on the operational safety of high-speed trains exposed to stochastic winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Meng-Ge; Zhang, Ji-Ye; Zhang, Ke-Yue; Zhang, Wei-Hua

    2014-06-01

    The characteristic wind curve (CWC) was commonly used in the previous work to evaluate the operational safety of the high-speed trains exposed to crosswinds. However, the CWC only provide the dividing line between safety state and failure state of high-speed trains, which can not evaluate the risk of derailment of high-speed trains when exposed to natural winds. In the present paper, a more realistic approach taking into account the stochastic characteristics of natural winds is proposed, which can give a reasonable and effective assessment of the operational safety of high-speed trains under stochastic winds. In this approach, the longitudinal and lateral components of stochastic winds are simulated based on the Cooper theory and harmonic superposition. An algorithm is set up for calculating the unsteady aerodynamic forces (moments) of the high-speed trains exposed to stochastic winds. A multi-body dynamic model of the rail vehicle is established to compute the vehicle system dynamic response subjected to the unsteady aerodynamic forces (moments) input. Then the statistical method is used to get the mean characteristic wind curve (MCWC) and spread range of the high-speed trains exposed to stochastic winds. It is found that the CWC provided by the previous analytical method produces over-conservative limits. The methodology proposed in the present paper can provide more significant reference for the safety operation of high-speed trains exposed to stochastic winds.

  2. [Changes in various indicators of nonspecific immunity in operators exposed to high environmental temperature].

    PubMed

    Pozdniakova, V S; Azhaev, A N

    1991-01-01

    30 degrees C temperature conditions caused no vivid changes in the non-specific immunity indices in operators. Temperature levels at 40 degrees C and 60 degrees C caused non-specific immunity marked decrease. The changes registered immediately after exposing to high temperatures were less vivid as compared to those registered three hours later. Repeated exposing to 60 degrees C 1 week later displayed more expressive shifts in the non-specific immunity indices. PMID:1916402

  3. High risk groups in oil shale workforce

    SciTech Connect

    Gratt, L.B.; Perry, B.W.; Marine, W.M.; Savitz, D.A.

    1984-04-01

    The workforce risks of a hypothetical one million barrels-per-day oil shale industry were estimated. The risks for the different workforce segments were compared and high risk groups were identified. Accidents and injuries were statistically described by rates for fatalities, for accidents with days lost from work, and for accidents with no days lost from work. Workforce diseases analyzed were cancers, silicosia, pneumoconiosis, chronic bronchitis, chronic airway obstruction, and high frequency hearing loss. A comparison of the workforce groups under different risk measures (occurrence, fatality, and life-loss expectancy) was performed. The miners represented the group with the largest fatality and the most serious accident rate, although the estimated rates were below the average industry-wide underground mining experience. Lung disease from inhalation exposure of about the nuisance dust threshold limit value presents a significant risk for future concerns. If future environmental dust exposure is at the 100 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/ alpha-quartz level, safety improvements in the mining sector are of prime importance to reduce the oil shale worker's life-loss expectancy. 11 references, 1 figure, 11 tables.

  4. Detection of phosphatidylserine with a modified polar head group in human keratinocytes exposed to the radical generator AAPH.

    PubMed

    Maciel, Elisabete; Neves, Bruno M; Santinha, Deolinda; Reis, Ana; Domingues, Pedro; Teresa Cruz, M; Pitt, Andrew R; Spickett, Corinne M; Domingues, M Rosrio M

    2014-04-15

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) is preferentially located in the inner leaflet of the cell membrane, and translocation of PS oxidized in fatty acyl chains to the outside of membrane has been reported as signaling to macrophage receptors to clear apoptotic cells. It was recently shown that PS can be oxidized in serine moiety of polar head-group. In the present work, a targeted lipidomic approach was applied to detecting OxPS modified at the polar head-group in keratinocytes that were exposed to the radical generator AAPH. Glycerophosphoacetic acid derivatives (GPAA) were found to be the major oxidation products of OxPS modified at the polar head-group during oxidation induced by AAPH-generated radicals, similarly to previous observations for the oxidation induced by OH radical. The neutral loss scan of 58Da and a novel precursor ion scan of m/z 137.1 (HOPO3CH2COOH) allowed the recognition of GPAA derivatives in the total lipid extracts obtained from HaCaT cells treated with AAPH. The positive identification of serine head group oxidation products in cells under controlled oxidative conditions opens new perspectives and justifies further studies in other cellular environments in order to understand fully the role of PS polar head-group oxidation in cell homeostasis and disease. PMID:24560783

  5. Analysis of Vitamin D Status in Men Highly Exposed to Sunlight.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong Hua; He, Deng Hua; Zhou, Biao; Zhu, Yi Bo; Zhao, Dong; Huang, Li Chun; Ding, Gang Qiang

    2015-12-01

    People living near the equator more easily obtain adequate 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]. However, studies indicated that vitamin D deficiency is common even in the sunniest areas. We mainly analyzed the vitamin D status and dietary patterns of men highly exposed to sunlight, and investigated the correlation of vitamin D status with dietary patterns and time for outdoor work or activities. The average vitamin D levels among men highly exposed to sunlight was sufficient, but parts of the population had vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency. Long-term vitamin D deficiency may correlate with obesity and hypertension. These results provide a scientific basis for future research. PMID:26777911

  6. Time may not fully attenuate solvent-associated cognitive deficits in highly exposed workers

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Laure-Anne; Okechukwu, Cassandra A.; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Amieva, Hélène; Goldberg, Marcel; Zins, Marie; Berr, Claudine

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To test the effects of lifetime occupational solvent exposure, as measured by dose and timing, on performance on multiple cognitive tests among retired French utility workers. Methods: A total of 2,143 retirees in the GAZEL cohort underwent cognitive testing in 2010. Lifetime exposure to chlorinated solvents, petroleum solvents, and benzene was assessed using a job exposure matrix. We modeled effects of lifetime solvent dose, timing of last exposure, and a combination of these metrics on risk for cognitive impairment. Results: Thirty-three percent of participants were exposed to chlorinated solvents, 26% to benzene, and 25% to petroleum solvents. High exposure to solvents was significantly associated with poor cognition; for example, those highly exposed to chlorinated solvents were at risk of impairment on the Mini-Mental State Examination (risk ratio 1.18; 95% confidence interval 1.06, 1.31), the Digit Symbol Substitution Test (1.54; 1.31, 1.82), semantic fluency test (1.33; 1.14, 1.55), and the Trail Making Test B (1.49; 1.25, 1.77). Retirees at greatest risk for deficits had both high lifetime exposure to solvents and were last exposed 12 to 30 years before testing. Risk was somewhat elevated among those with high lifetime exposure who were last exposed 31 to 50 years before testing. Those with high, recent exposure exhibited impairment in almost all domains, including those not typically associated with solvent exposure. Conclusions: While risk of cognitive impairment among moderately exposed workers may attenuate with time, this may not be fully true for those with higher exposure. This has implications for physicians working with formerly solvent-exposed patients as well as for workplace exposure limit policies. PMID:24821933

  7. Comparison of high group velocity accelerating structures

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, Z.D.; Wilson, P.B.

    1987-02-01

    It is well known that waveguides with no perturbations have phase velocities greater than the velocity of light c. If the waveguide dimensions are chosen so that the phase velocity is only moderately greater than c, only small perturbations are required to reduce the phase velocity to be synchronous with a high energy particle bunch. Such a lightly loaded accelerator structure will have smaller longitudinal and transverse wake potentials and hence will lead to lower emittance growth in an accelerated beam. Since these structures are lightly loaded, their group velocities are only slightly less than c and not in the order of 0.01c, as is the case for the standard disk-loaded structures. To ascertain that the peak and average power requirements for these structures are not prohibitive, we examine the elastance and the Q for several traveling wave structures: phase slip structures, bellows-like structures, and lightly loaded disk-loaded structures.

  8. Young children's experiences of participating in group treatment for children exposed to intimate partner violence: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Pernebo, Karin; Almqvist, Kjerstin

    2016-01-01

    The risk of exposure to intimate partner violence (IPV) between caregivers is increased during early childhood. The adverse effects on the health and development of the youngest children may be severe. Effective and promising interventions for children who have experienced IPV have been developed and evaluated. However, there is a lack in knowledge about how the children themselves experience the interventions. The aim of this study was to contribute to the evaluation of group treatment designed to improve the psychological health of young children in the aftermath of family violence by elucidating the children's experiences of participating. Nine children, aged 4 to 6?years, were interviewed after participating in group programmes specifically designed for children who have been exposed to intimate partner violence. A semi-structured interview guide with open-ended questions was used. The interviews were transcribed and analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis, to ensure a focus on the children's own views and experiences. Five master themes embracing the children's experiences were identified: joy - positive emotional experience of participation; security - feeling safe; relatedness - relationships within the group; to talk - externalised focus on the violence; and competence - new knowledge and skills. Theoretical and clinical implications and the benefit of including very young children's views and experiences in research are discussed. PMID:25410886

  9. A health examination of railway high-voltage substation workers exposed to ELF electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Baroncelli, P; Battisti, S; Checcucci, A; Comba, P; Grandolfo, M; Serio, A; Vecchia, P

    1986-01-01

    This is a cross-sectional survey on the health conditions of railways workers active in 258 interconnection and conversion substations all over Italy. Measurements performed in both kinds of substations operating at 220 kV have shown that maximum levels of the electric field strength and of the magnetic flux density at 50 Hz are of the order of 5 kV/m and 15 microT, respectively. Three subject groups, differently exposed (1, 10, 20 h/week), and an unexposed control group, for a total number of 627 workers, constitute the population at study. All subjects underwent a general medical examination, laboratory investigations, and a series of selected examinations relative to three systems (nervous, cardiovascular, and haematopoietic) considered at higher risk. No differences have been found between the exposed and the control groups. It is concluded that workers exposed to ELF electromagnetic fields of moderate strength do not show the presence of clear effects on their state of health. PMID:3740067

  10. Impaired Lipid and Glucose Homeostasis in Hexabromocyclododecane-Exposed Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Koike, Eiko; Win-Shwe, Tin-Tin; Yamamoto, Megumi; Takano, Hirohisa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is an additive flame retardant used in the textile industry and in polystyrene foam manufacturing. Because of its lipophilicity and persistency, HBCD accumulates in adipose tissue and thus has the potential of causing metabolic disorders through disruption of lipid and glucose homeostasis. However, the association between HBCD and obesity remains unclear. Objectives: We investigated whether exposure to HBCD contributes to initiation and progression of obesity and related metabolic dysfunction in mice fed a normal diet (ND) or a high-fat diet (HFD). Methods: Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a HFD (62.2 kcal% fat) or a ND and treated orally with HBCD (0, 1.75, 35, or 700 μg/kg body weight) weekly from 6 to 20 weeks of age. We examined body weight, liver weight, blood biochemistry, histopathological changes, and gene expression profiles in the liver and adipose tissue. Results: In HFD-fed mice, body and liver weight were markedly increased in mice treated with the high (700 μg/kg) and medium (35 μg/kg) doses of HBCD compared with vehicle. This effect was more prominent in the high-dose group. These increases were paralleled by increases in random blood glucose and insulin levels and enhancement of microvesicular steatosis and macrophage accumulation in adipose tissue. HBCD-treated HFD-fed mice also had increased mRNA levels of Pparg (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ) in the liver and decreased mRNA levels of Glut4 (glucose transporter 4) in adipose tissue compared with vehicle-treated HFD-fed mice. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that HBCD may contribute to enhancement of diet-induced body weight gain and metabolic dysfunction through disruption of lipid and glucose homeostasis, resulting in accelerated progression of obesity. Citation: Yanagisawa R, Koike E, Win-Shwe TT, Yamamoto M, Takano H. 2014. Impaired lipid and glucose homeostasis in hexabromocyclododecane-exposed mice fed a high-fat diet. Environ Health Perspect 122:277–283; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307421 PMID:24398136

  11. Animal Rights Groups Target High School Dissection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Andrew

    1992-01-01

    Two groups leading the charge against dissection are People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) and the Student Action Corps for Animals (SACA). Protests by student and community members remain the movement's strongest weapon. (MLF)

  12. Effectiveness and specificity of a classroom-based group intervention in children and adolescents exposed to war in Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    KARAM, ELIE G.; FAYYAD, JOHN; NASSER KARAM, AIMEE; CORDAHI TABET, CAROLINE; MELHEM, NADINE; MNEIMNEH, ZEINA; DIMASSI, HANI

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness and specificity of a classroom-based psychosocial intervention after war. All students (n=2500) of six villages in Southern Lebanon designated as most heavily exposed to war received a classroom-based intervention delivered by teachers, consisting of cognitive-behavioural and stress inoculation training strategies. A random sample of treated students (n=101) and a matched control group (n=93) were assessed one month post-war and one year later. Mental disorders and psychosocial stressors were assessed using the Diagnostic Interview for Children and Adolescents - Revised with children and parents. War exposure was measured using the War Events Questionnaire. The prevalence of major depressive disorder (MDD), separation anxiety disorder (SAD) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was examined pre-war, one month post-war (pre-intervention), and one year post-war. Specificity of treatment was determined by rating teachers therapy diaries. The rates of disorders peaked one month post-war and decreased over one year. There was no significant effect of the intervention on the rates of MDD, SAD or PTSD. Post-war MDD, SAD and PTSD were associated with pre-war SAD and PTSD, family violence parameters, financial problems and witnessing war events. These findings have significant policy and public health implications, given current practices of delivering universal interventions immediately post-war. PMID:18560511

  13. Proposed stratigraphic nomenclature and macroscopic identification of lithostratigraphic units of the Paintbrush Group exposed at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Buesch, D.C.; Spengler, R.W.; Moyer, T.C.; Geslin, J.K.

    1996-09-01

    This paper describes the formations of the Paintbrush Group exposed at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, presents a detailed stratigraphic nomenclature for the Tiva Canyon and Topopah spring Tuffs, and discusses the criteria that define lithostratigraphic units. The Tiva Canyon and Topopah Spring Tuffs are divided into zones, subzones, and intervals on the basis of macroscopic features observed in surface exposures and borehole samples. Primary divisions reflect depositional and compositional zoning that is expressed by variations in crystal content, phenocryst assemblage, pumice content and composition, and lithic content. Secondary divisions define welding and crystlalization zones, depositional features, or fracture characteristics. Both formations are divided into crystal-rich and crystal-poor members that have an identical sequency of zones, although subzone designations vary slightly between the two units. The identified lithostratigraphic divisions can be used to approximate thermal-mechanical and hydrogeologic boundaries in the field. Linking these three systems of nomenclature provides a framework within which to correlate these properties through regions of sparse data.

  14. Reproductive Effects in F1 Adult Females Exposed In Utero to Moderate to High Doses of Mono-2-ethylhexylphthalate (MEHP)

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, Benjamin; Hixon, Mary L.

    2012-01-01

    Phthalates are widely used as plasticizers in everyday products. Yet, studies on the effects of phthalates on female reproductive health are limited. In this study, pregnant C57/Bl6 mice were exposed via oral gavage to corn oil, 100, 500, or 1000mg/kg MEHP from gestational days 1719. Reproductive lifespan was decreased by one month in the highest F1 exposure group (9.80.4 versus 11.10.6 months in control F1 females). F1 females exhibited delayed estrous onset at the two higher exposures and prolonged estrus was observed in all MEHP-exposed females. Serum FSH and estradiol were significantly elevated at the highest exposure and altered mRNA expression was found for the steroidogenic genes LHCGR, aromatase, and StAR. At one year of age, mammary gland hyperplasia was observed in high dose MEHP-exposed females. In summary, late gestational exposure to MEHP leads to multiple latent reproductive effects throughout murine life resulting in premature ovarian senescence and mammary hyperplasia. PMID:22401849

  15. Occupational groups potentially exposed to silica dust: a comparative analysis of cancer mortality and incidence based on the Nordic occupational mortality and cancer incidence registers.

    PubMed

    Lynge, E; Kurppa, K; Kristofersen, L; Malker, H; Sauli, H

    1990-01-01

    We have analysed mortality and cancer incidence data available in census-based record-linkage studies from the Nordic countries for males in occupational groups with potential exposure to silica dust. The study showed an excess lung cancer risk for foundry workers in all the Nordic countries, and also for miners in Sweden. These results are consistent with the findings of previous in-depth epidemiological studies. The lung cancer risk did not differ significantly from that of the respective national populations for males working in glass, porcelain, ceramics and tile manufacture, in excavation, and in stone quarries, sand and gravel pits. Stone cutters, who are probably not exposed to known lung carcinogens at the workplace but in some places to high concentrations of silica dust, showed a significant excess lung cancer risk in both Finland and Denmark. PMID:2164505

  16. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of a Group Intervention Approach for Nurses Exposed to Violent Speech or Violence Caused by Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Makoto; Kaneko, Fumiko; Okamura, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a group intervention approach aimed at improving the mental health of psychiatric nurses exposed to violent speech/violence. Sixty-two nurses having experienced serious episodes of violent speech/violence were enrolled in this study. A group intervention approach was used in the intervention group. For both the intervention and the control groups, evaluations were conducted at three time points. Evaluations were conducted using the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) and Profile of Mood States (POMS). The results showed that changes in the flashback, hyper-arousal, avoidance behavior, and total scores on the IES-R and anxiety and depression scores on the POMS differed significantly between the two groups. These results suggest that a group intervention approach can lessen the psychological burden of nurses exposed to violence and reduce their mental stress. PMID:21994892

  17. Mental health service use among high school students exposed to interpersonal violence

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Renee M.; Dunn, Erin C.; Lindsey, Michael; Xuan, Ziming; Zaslavsky, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Violence-exposed youth rarely receive mental health services, even though exposure increases risk for academic and psychosocial problems. This study examines the association between violence exposure and mental health service contact. The four forms of violence exposure were peer, family, sexual, and witnessing. METHODS Data are from 1,534 Boston public high school students who participated in a 2008 self-report survey of violence exposure and its correlates. Multivariate logistic regressions estimated associations between each form of violence with service contact, then examined whether associations persisted when controlling for suicidality and self-injurious behaviors. RESULTS In unadjusted models, violence-exposed students more often reported service contact than their peers. However, in multivariate models, only exposure to family (OR=1.69, CI=1.23–2.31) and sexual violence (OR=2.34, CI=1.29–4.20) were associated with service contact. Associations attenuated when controlling for suicidality and self-injurious behaviors, indicating they were largely explained by self-harm. Sexual violence alone remained associated with mental health service contact in fully adjusted models, but only for girls (OR=3.32, CI=1.30–8.45), suggesting gender-specific pathways. CONCLUSIONS Associations between adolescent violence exposure and mental health service contact vary by form of exposure. Outreach to a broader set of exposed youth may reduce the impact of violence and its consequences for vulnerable students. PMID:25099429

  18. Workplace response of companies exposed to the 9/11 World Trade Center attack: a focus-group study

    PubMed Central

    North, Carol S.; Pfefferbaum, Betty; Hong, Barry A.; Gordon, Mollie R.; Kim, You-Seung; Lind, Lisa; Pollio, David E.

    2014-01-01

    The terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001 (9/11) left workplaces in pressing need of a mental health response capability. Unaddressed emotional sequelae may be devastating to the productivity and economic stability of a companys workforce. In the second year after the attacks, 85 employees of five highly affected agencies participated in 12 focus groups to discuss workplace mental health issues. Managers felt ill prepared to manage the magnitude and the intensity of employees emotional responses. Rapid return to work, provision of workplace mental health services, and peer support were viewed as contributory to emotional recovery. Formal mental health services provided were perceived as insufficient. Drawing on their post-9/11 workplace experience, members of these groups identified practical measures that they found helpful in promoting healing outside of professional mental health services. These measures, consistent with many principles of psychological first aid, may be applied by workplace leaders who are not mental health professionals. PMID:23066661

  19. High energy flare physics group summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. M.; Kurfess, J. D.

    1989-01-01

    The contributions of the High Energy Flare Physics Special Session in the American Astronomical Society Solar Physics Division Meeting are reviewed. Oral and poster papers were presented on observatories and instruments available for the upcoming solar maximum. Among these are the space-based Gamma Ray Observatory, the Solar Flare and Cosmic Burst Gamma Ray Experiment on the Ulysses spacecraft, the Soft X Ray Telescope on the spacecraft Solar-A, and the balloon-based Gamma Ray Imaging Device. Ground based observatories with new capabilities include the BIMA mm-wave interferometer (Univ. of California, Berkeley; Univ. of Illinois; Univ. of Maryland), Owens Valley Radio Observatory and the Very Large Array. The highlights of the various instrument performances are reported and potential data correlations and collaborations are suggested.

  20. Physiological and behavioral responses of poultry exposed to gas-filled high expansion foam.

    PubMed

    McKeegan, D E F; Reimert, H G M; Hindle, V A; Boulcott, P; Sparrey, J M; Wathes, C M; Demmers, T G M; Gerritzen, M A

    2013-05-01

    Disease control measures require poultry to be killed on farms to minimize the risk of disease being transmitted to other poultry and, in some cases, to protect public health. We assessed the welfare implications for poultry of the use of high-expansion gas-filled foam as a potentially humane, emergency killing method. In laboratory trials, broiler chickens, adult laying hens, ducks, and turkeys were exposed to air-, N2-, or CO2-filled high expansion foam (expansion ratio 300:1) under standardized conditions. Birds were equipped with sensors to measure cardiac and brain activity, and measurements of oxygen concentration in the foam were carried out. Initial behavioral responses to foam were not pronounced but included headshakes and brief bouts of wing flapping. Both N2- and CO2-filled foam rapidly induced ataxia/loss of posture and vigorous wing flapping in all species, characteristic of anoxic death. Immersion in air-filled, high expansion foam had little effect on physiology or behavior. Physiological responses to both N2- and CO2-filled foam were characterized by a pronounced bradyarrythymia and a series of consistent changes in the appearance of the electroencephalogram. These were used to determine an unequivocal time to loss of consciousness in relation to submersion. Mean time to loss of consciousness was 30 s in hens and 18 s in broilers exposed to N2-filled foam, and 16 s in broilers, 1 s in ducks, and 15 s in turkeys exposed to CO2-filled foam. Euthanasia achieved with anoxic foam was particularly rapid, which is explained by the very low oxygen concentrations (below 1%) inside the foam. Physiological observations and postmortem examination showed that the mode of action of high expansion, gas-filled foam is anoxia, not occlusion of the airway. These trials provide proof-of-principle that submersion in gas-filled, high expansion foam provides a rapid and highly effective method of euthanasia, which may have potential to provide humane emergency killing or routine depopulation. PMID:23571322

  1. Highly exposed {001} facets of titanium dioxide modified with reduced graphene oxide for dopamine sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    How, Gregory Thien Soon; Pandikumar, Alagarsamy; Ming, Huang Nay; Ngee, Lim Hong

    2014-05-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) with highly exposed {001} facets was synthesized through a facile solvo-thermal method and its surface was decorated by using reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets. The morphology and chemical composition of the prepared rGO/TiO2 {001} nanocomposite were examined by using suitable characterization techniques. The rGO/TiO2 {001} nanocomposite was used to modify glassy carbon electrode (GCE), which showed higher electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of dopamine (DA) and ascorbic acid (AA), when compared to unmodified GCE. The differential pulse voltammetric studies revealed good sensitivity and selectivity nature of the rGO/TiO2 {001} nanocomposite modified GCE for the detection of DA in the presence of AA. The modified GCE exhibited a low electrochemical detection limit of 6 ?M over the linear range of 2-60 ?M. Overall, this work provides a simple platform for the development of GCE modified with rGO/TiO2 {001} nanocomposite with highly exposed {001} facets for potential electrochemical sensing applications.

  2. Highly exposed {001} facets of titanium dioxide modified with reduced graphene oxide for dopamine sensing

    PubMed Central

    How, Gregory Thien Soon; Pandikumar, Alagarsamy; Ming, Huang Nay; Ngee, Lim Hong

    2014-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) with highly exposed {001} facets was synthesized through a facile solvo-thermal method and its surface was decorated by using reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets. The morphology and chemical composition of the prepared rGO/TiO2 {001} nanocomposite were examined by using suitable characterization techniques. The rGO/TiO2 {001} nanocomposite was used to modify glassy carbon electrode (GCE), which showed higher electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of dopamine (DA) and ascorbic acid (AA), when compared to unmodified GCE. The differential pulse voltammetric studies revealed good sensitivity and selectivity nature of the rGO/TiO2 {001} nanocomposite modified GCE for the detection of DA in the presence of AA. The modified GCE exhibited a low electrochemical detection limit of 6??M over the linear range of 260??M. Overall, this work provides a simple platform for the development of GCE modified with rGO/TiO2 {001} nanocomposite with highly exposed {001} facets for potential electrochemical sensing applications. PMID:24853929

  3. CNTs threaded (001) exposed TiO2 with high activity in photocatalytic NO oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Shuning; Zhu, Wei; Liu, Peijue; Liu, Fanfan; Dai, Wenrui; Zhang, Dieqing; Chen, Wei; Li, Hexing

    2016-01-01

    A microwave-ionothermal strategy was developed for in situ synthesis of CNTs threaded TiO2 single crystal with a tunable percentage of surface exposed (001) active facets. The CNTs were used as microwave antennas to create local ``super hot'' dots to induce Ti3+ adsorption and hydrolysis, thereby leading to a good assembly of (001) facets exposed single crystalline TiO2 threaded by the CNTs in the presence of Hmim[BF4] ionic liquid. Due to the high percentage of the active (001) facets of single crystal TiO2 and the direct electron transfer property of the CNTs, the as-prepared CNTs-TiO2 composite showed a photocatalytic NO removal ratio of up to 76.8% under UV irradiation. In addition, with self-doped Ti3+, the CNTs-TiO2 composite also exhibited an enhanced activity under irradiation with either solar lights or visible lights, showing good potential in practical applications for environmental remediation.A microwave-ionothermal strategy was developed for in situ synthesis of CNTs threaded TiO2 single crystal with a tunable percentage of surface exposed (001) active facets. The CNTs were used as microwave antennas to create local ``super hot'' dots to induce Ti3+ adsorption and hydrolysis, thereby leading to a good assembly of (001) facets exposed single crystalline TiO2 threaded by the CNTs in the presence of Hmim[BF4] ionic liquid. Due to the high percentage of the active (001) facets of single crystal TiO2 and the direct electron transfer property of the CNTs, the as-prepared CNTs-TiO2 composite showed a photocatalytic NO removal ratio of up to 76.8% under UV irradiation. In addition, with self-doped Ti3+, the CNTs-TiO2 composite also exhibited an enhanced activity under irradiation with either solar lights or visible lights, showing good potential in practical applications for environmental remediation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: TG, FTIR, Raman, EPR and additional photocatalytic performance data. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07589k

  4. High and dry: high elevations disproportionately exposed to regional climate change in Mediterranean-climate landscapes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCullough, Ian M.; Davis, Frank W.; Dingman, John R.; Flint, Lorraine E.; Flint, Alan L.; Serra-Diaz, Josep M.; Syphard, Alexandra D.; Moritz, Max A.; Hannah, Lee; Franklin, Janet

    2015-01-01

    In moisture-limited, Mediterranean-climate landscapes, high elevations may experience the greatest exposure to climate change in the 21st century. High elevation species may thus be especially vulnerable to continued climate change as habitats shrink and historically energy-limited locations become increasingly moisture-limited in the future. re.

  5. Des-acyl ghrelin prevents heatstroke-like symptoms in rats exposed to high temperature and high humidity.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Hayashi, Yujiro; Kangawa, Kenji; Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Murakami, Noboru; Nakahara, Keiko

    2016-02-26

    We have shown previously that des-acyl ghrelin decreases body temperature in rats through activation of the parasympathetic nervous system. Here we investigated whether des-acyl ghrelin ameliorates heatstroke in rats exposed to high temperature. Peripheral administration of des-acyl ghrelin significantly attenuated hyperthermia induced by exposure to high-temperature (35C) together with high humidity (70-80%). Although biochemical analysis revealed that exposure to high temperature significantly increased hematocrit and the serum levels of aspartate amino transferase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine and electrolytes (Na(+), K(+), Cl(-)), most of these heatstroke-associated reactions were significantly reduced by treatment with des-acyl ghrelin. The level of des-acyl ghrelin in plasma was also found to be significantly increased under high-temperature conditions. These results suggest that des-acyl ghrelin could be useful for preventing heatstroke under high temperature condition. PMID:26773867

  6. A study on the ventilation method for a factory exposed to high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Lee, E.; Jeong, H.; Chung, H.

    2015-09-01

    On this work, the importance of industrial ventilation was investigated and examined the theoretical point and problems about general ventilation of factory exposed on high temperature during summer. As a case study, the ventilation planning of the PCB etching process for an electronic company was carried out and each of those characteristics were compared by installing actual ventilation systems and measuring the changing state of the working environment in accordance with ventilation method during summer. The purpose of the study is to present an efficient ventilation method for a factory with a closed structure under high temperature environment. In summary, for a factory with a sealed structure such as the target PCB manufacturing factory in this study, the forced supply and exhaust method was the most appropriate ventilation method for maintaining a low indoor air temperature and for keeping the contaminated air of the factory below the hazardous level.

  7. Metal dynamics and tolerance of Typha domingensis exposed to high concentrations of Cr, Ni and Zn.

    PubMed

    Mufarrege, M M; Hadad, H R; Di Luca, G A; Maine, M A

    2014-07-01

    Typha domingensis was exposed to a 100mgL(-1) Cr+100mgL(-1) Ni+100mgL(-1) Zn solution. Metal tolerance and metal accumulation in plant tissues and sediment were studied over time. Although removal rates were different, the three metals were efficiently removed from water. Leaf and root tissues showed high metal concentration. However, the sediment showed the highest accumulation. During the first hours of contact, metals were not only accumulated by sediment and roots but they were also taken up by the leaves in direct contact with the solution. Over time, metals were translocated from roots to leaves and vice versa. Metals caused growth inhibition and a decrease in chlorophyll concentration and affected anatomical parameters. Despite these sub-lethal effects, T. domingensis demonstrated that it could accumulate Cr, Ni and Zn efficiently and survive an accidental dump of high concentrations of contaminants in systems such as natural and constructed wetlands. PMID:24793518

  8. Helping Children Exposed to War and Violence: Perspectives from an International Work Group on Interventions for Youth and Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kletter, Hilit; Rialon, Rebecca A.; Laor, Nathaniel; Brom, Daniel; Pat-Horenczyk, Ruth; Shaheen, Mohammed; Hamiel, Daniel; Chemtob, Claude; Weems, Carl F.; Feinstein, Carl; Lieberman, Alicia; Reicherter, Daryn; Song, Suzan; Carrion, Victor G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: This paper outlines conclusions from a three-day workgroup hosting the eight authors as well as others with expertise in the evaluation and treatment of youth exposed to war and violence. Objective: The purpose of this meeting was to bring multiple perspectives together to identify components that comprise effective psychosocial

  9. Cleavable ester linked magnetic nanoparticles for labeling of solvent exposed primary amine groups of peptides/proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to study the solvent exposed lysine residues of peptides/proteins, we previously reported disulfide linked N-hydrosuccinimide ester modified silica coated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (NHS-SS-SiO2@Fe3O4 MNPs). The presence of a disulfide bond in the linker limits the use of disulfide r...

  10. Helping Children Exposed to War and Violence: Perspectives from an International Work Group on Interventions for Youth and Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kletter, Hilit; Rialon, Rebecca A.; Laor, Nathaniel; Brom, Daniel; Pat-Horenczyk, Ruth; Shaheen, Mohammed; Hamiel, Daniel; Chemtob, Claude; Weems, Carl F.; Feinstein, Carl; Lieberman, Alicia; Reicherter, Daryn; Song, Suzan; Carrion, Victor G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: This paper outlines conclusions from a three-day workgroup hosting the eight authors as well as others with expertise in the evaluation and treatment of youth exposed to war and violence. Objective: The purpose of this meeting was to bring multiple perspectives together to identify components that comprise effective psychosocial…

  11. Highly selective enrichment of phosphopeptides with high-index facets exposed octahedral tin dioxide nanoparticles for mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rongna; Hu, Junjie; Cai, Zongwei; Ju, Huangxian

    2014-02-01

    High-index facets exposed octahedral tin dioxide (SnO2) nanoparticles were successfully synthesized and applied to selectively enrich phosphopeptides for mass spectrometric analysis. The high selectivity and capacity of the octahedral SnO2 nanoparticles were demonstrated by effectively enriching phosphopeptides from digests of phosphoprotein (?- or ?-casein), protein mixtures of ?-casein and bovine serum albumin, milk, and human serum samples. The unique octahedral SnO2 with abundant unsaturated coordination Sn atoms exhibited enhanced affinity and selective coordination ability with phosphopeptides due to their high chemical activity. The strong affinity led to highly selective capture and enrichment of phosphopeptides for sensitive detection through the bidentate bonds formed between surface atoms and phosphate. The phosphopeptides could be detected in ?-casein down to 4 10(-9)M or in the mixture of ?-casein and BSA with a molar ratio of even 1:100. The performance in selective enrichment of phosphopeptides from drinking milk and human serum showed powerful evidence of high selectivity and efficiency in identifying the low-abundant phosphopeptides from complicated biological samples. This work provided a way to improve the physical and chemical properties of materials by tailoring their exposed facets for selective enrichment of phosphopeptides. PMID:24401440

  12. Micronuclei Induction in Human Fibroblasts Exposed In Vitro to Los Alamos High-Energy Neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gersey, Brad; Sodolak, John; Hada, Megumi; Saganti, Prem; Wilkins, Richard; Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu

    2006-01-01

    High-energy secondary neutrons, produced by the interaction of galactic cosmic rays with the atmosphere, spacecraft structure and planetary surfaces, contribute to a significant fraction to the dose equivalent in crew members and passengers during commercial aviation travel, and astronauts in space missions. The Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) neutron facility#s ICE House 30L beamline is known to generate neutrons that simulate the secondary neutron spectra of earth#s atmosphere. The neutron spectrum is also similar to that measured onboard spacecraft like the MIR and International Space Station (ISS). To evaluate the biological damage, we exposed human fibroblasts in vitro to the LANSCE neutron beams without degrader at an entrance dose rate of 25 mGy/hr and analyzed the micronuclei (MN) induction. The cells were also placed behind a 9.9 cm water column to study effect of shielding in the protection of neutron induced damages. It was found that the dose response in the MN frequency was linear for the samples with and without shielding and the slope of the MN yield behind the shielding was reduced by a factor of 3.5. Compared to the MN induction in human fibroblasts exposed to a gamma source at a low dose rate, the RBE was found to be 16.7 and 10.0 for the neutrons without and with 9.9 cm water shielding, respectively.

  13. Micronuclei induction in human fibroblasts exposed in vitro to Los Alamos high-energy neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gersey, Brad; Sodolak, John; Hada, Megumi; Saganti, Prem; Wilkins, Richard; Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu

    High-energy secondary neutrons, produced by the interaction of galactic cosmic rays with the atmosphere, spacecraft structure and planetary surfaces, contribute to a significant fraction to the dose equivalent in crew members and passengers during commercial aviation travel, and astronauts in space missions. The Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) neutron facility's ICE House 30L beamline is known to generate neutrons that simulate the secondary neutron spectra of earth's atmosphere. The neutron spectrum is also similar to that measured onboard spacecraft like the MIR and International Space Station (ISS). To evaluate the biological damage, we exposed human fibroblasts in vitro to the LANSCE neutron beams without degrader at an entrance dose rate of 25 mGy/h and analyzed the micronuclei (MN) induction. The cells were also placed behind a 9.9 cm water column to study the effect of shielding in the protection of neutron induced damages. It was found that the dose response in the MN frequency was linear for the samples with and without shielding and the slope of the MN yield behind the shielding was reduced by a factor of 3.5. Compared to the MN induction in human fibroblasts exposed to a ? source at a similar low dose rate, the RBE was found to be 16.7 and 10.0 for the neutrons without and with the 9.9 cm water shielding, respectively.

  14. CNTs threaded (001) exposed TiO2 with high activity in photocatalytic NO oxidation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shuning; Zhu, Wei; Liu, Peijue; Liu, Fanfan; Dai, Wenrui; Zhang, Dieqing; Chen, Wei; Li, Hexing

    2016-01-28

    A microwave-ionothermal strategy was developed for in situ synthesis of CNTs threaded TiO2 single crystal with a tunable percentage of surface exposed (001) active facets. The CNTs were used as microwave antennas to create local "super hot" dots to induce Ti(3+) adsorption and hydrolysis, thereby leading to a good assembly of (001) facets exposed single crystalline TiO2 threaded by the CNTs in the presence of Hmim[BF4] ionic liquid. Due to the high percentage of the active (001) facets of single crystal TiO2 and the direct electron transfer property of the CNTs, the as-prepared CNTs-TiO2 composite showed a photocatalytic NO removal ratio of up to 76.8% under UV irradiation. In addition, with self-doped Ti(3+), the CNTs-TiO2 composite also exhibited an enhanced activity under irradiation with either solar lights or visible lights, showing good potential in practical applications for environmental remediation. PMID:26780690

  15. Vapor Corrosion Response of Low Carbon Steel Exposed to Simulated High Level Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B

    2006-01-26

    A program to resolve the issues associated with potential vapor space corrosion and liquid/air interface corrosion in the Type III high level waste tanks is in place. The objective of the program is to develop understanding of vapor space (VSC) and liquid/air interface (LAIC) corrosion to ensure a defensible technical basis to provide accurate corrosion evaluations with regard to vapor space and liquid/air interface corrosion. The results of the FY05 experiments are presented here. The experiments are an extension of the previous research on the corrosion of tank steel exposed to simple solutions to corrosion of the steel when exposed to complex high level waste simulants. The testing suggested that decanting and the consequent residual species on the tank wall is the predominant source of surface chemistry on the tank wall. The laboratory testing has shown that at the boundary conditions of the chemistry control program for solutions greater than 1M NaNO{sub 3}{sup -}. Minor and isolated pitting is possible within crevices in the vapor space of the tanks that contain stagnant dilute solution for an extended period of time, specifically when residues are left on the tank wall during decanting. Liquid/air interfacial corrosion is possible in dilute stagnant solutions, particularly with high concentrations of chloride. The experimental results indicate that Tank 50 would be most susceptible to the potential for liquid/air interfacial corrosion or vapor space corrosion, with Tank 49 and 41 following, since these tanks are nearest to the chemistry control boundary conditions. The testing continues to show that the combination of well-inhibited solutions and mill-scale sufficiently protect against pitting in the Type III tanks.

  16. Challenges in the Diagnosis of Iron Deficiency in Children Exposed to High Prevalence of Infections

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Ruth; Moraleda, Cinta; Quint, Lloren; Renom, Montse; Mussacate, Lzaro; Macete, Eusebio; Aguilar, Josep L.; Alonso, Pedro L.; Menndez, Clara

    2012-01-01

    Background While WHO guidelines recommend iron supplements to only iron-deficient children in high infection pressure areas, these are rarely implemented. One of the reasons for this is the commonly held view that iron supplementation increases the susceptibility to some infectious diseases including malaria. Secondly, currently used markers to diagnose iron deficiency are also modified by infections. With the objective of improving iron deficiency diagnosis and thus, its management, we evaluated the performance of iron markers in children exposed to high infection pressure. Methodology/Principal Findings Iron markers were compared to bone marrow findings in 180 anaemic children attending a rural hospital in southern Mozambique. Eighty percent (144/180) of the children had iron deficiency by bone marrow examination, 88% (155/176) had an inflammatory process, 66% (119/180) had moderate anaemia, 25% (45/180) severe anaemia and 9% (16/180) very severe anaemia. Mean cell haemoglobin concentration had a sensitivity of 51% and specificity of 71% for detecting iron deficiency. Soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) and soluble transferrin receptor/log ferritin (TfR-F) index (adjusted by C reactive protein) showed the highest areas under the ROC curve (AUCROC) (0.75 and 0.76, respectively), and were the most sensitive markers in detecting iron deficiency (83% and 75%, respectively), but with moderate specificities (50% and 56%, respectively). Conclusions/Significance Iron deficiency by bone marrow examination was extremely frequent in these children exposed to high prevalence of infections. However, even the best markers of bone marrow iron deficiency did not identify around a quarter of iron-deficient children. Tough not directly extrapolated to the community, these findings urge for more reliable, affordable and easy to measure iron indicators to reduce the burden of iron deficiency anaemia in resource-poor settings where it is most prevalent. PMID:23209786

  17. Gene expression profile of Jurkat cells exposed to high power terahertz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundt, Jessica E.; Roth, Caleb C.; Rivest, Benjamin D.; Doroski, Michael L.; Payne, Jason; Ibey, Bennett L.; Wilmink, Gerald J.

    2011-03-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation sources are now being used in a host of military, defense, and medical applications. Widespread employment of these applications has prompted concerns regarding the health effects associated with THz radiation. In this study, we examined the gene expression profile of mammalian cells exposed to THz radiation. We hypothesized that if THz radiation couples directly to cellular constituents, then exposed cells may express a specific gene expression profile indicative of ensuing damage. To test this hypothesis, Jurkat cells were irradiated with a molecular gas THz laser (2.52 THz, 636 mWcm-2, durations: 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, or 50 minutes). Viability was assessed 24 h post-exposure using MTT assays, and gene expression profiles were evaluated 4 h post-exposure using mRNA microarrays. Comparable analyses were also performed for hyperthermic positive controls (44C for 40 minutes). We found that cellular temperatures increased by ~6 C during THz exposures. We also found that cell death increased with exposure duration, and the median lethal dose (LD50) was calculated to be ~44 minutes. The microarray data showed that THz radiation induced the transcriptional activation of genes associated with cellular proliferation, differentiation, transcriptional activation, chaperone protein stabilization, and apoptosis. For most genes, we found that the magnitude of differential expression was comparable for both the THz and thermal exposure groups; however, several genes were specifically activated by the THz exposure. These results suggest that THz radiation may elicit effects that are not exclusively due to the temperature rise created during THz exposures (i.e. thermal effects). In future work, we plan to verify the results of our microarray experiments using qPCR techniques.

  18. Retention of nanocrystalline WNx layers exposed to high-fluence deuterium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassallo, E.; Caniello, R.; Angella, G.; Dellasega, D.; Granucci, G.; Mellera, V.; Minelli, D.; Pedroni, M.; Ricci, D.; Rigato, V.; Passoni, M.

    2015-11-01

    For high-power plasma operation regimes in tokamak fusion devices the power load onto W divertor plates must be kept below acceptable limits for materials. N2 gas is likely to be used to reduce the power load. However, because of erosion phenomena, WNx compounds will be produced in the divertor and tritium retention is issue of concern. We report recent experiments using the GYM linear plasma device that examined D retention in WNx compounds exposed to D plasma at divertor relevant fluence (?1024m-2). It is shown that WNx compounds with different nitrogen concentration have very similar D retention, lower than the case of the tungsten without nitrogen and in any case lower than the acceptable limit for operation in ITER.

  19. Defective titanium dioxide single crystals exposed by high-energy {001} facets for efficient oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Dan-Ni; Gong, Li; Zhang, Ai-Yong; Zhang, Xing; Chen, Jie-Jie; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-10-01

    The cathodic material plays an essential role in oxygen reduction reaction for energy conversion and storage systems. Titanium dioxide, as a semiconductor material, is usually not recognized as an efficient oxygen reduction electrocatalyst owning to its low conductivity and poor reactivity. Here we demonstrate that nano-structured titanium dioxide, self-doped by oxygen vacancies and selectively exposed with the high-energy {001} facets, exhibits a surprisingly competitive oxygen reduction activity, excellent durability and superior tolerance to methanol. Combining the electrochemical tests with density-functional calculations, we elucidate the defect-centred oxygen reduction reaction mechanism for the superiority of the reductive {001}-TiO2-x nanocrystals. Our findings may provide an opportunity to develop a simple, efficient, cost-effective and promising catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction in energy conversion and storage technologies.

  20. Defective titanium dioxide single crystals exposed by high-energy {001} facets for efficient oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Pei, Dan-Ni; Gong, Li; Zhang, Ai-Yong; Zhang, Xing; Chen, Jie-Jie; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-01-01

    The cathodic material plays an essential role in oxygen reduction reaction for energy conversion and storage systems. Titanium dioxide, as a semiconductor material, is usually not recognized as an efficient oxygen reduction electrocatalyst owning to its low conductivity and poor reactivity. Here we demonstrate that nano-structured titanium dioxide, self-doped by oxygen vacancies and selectively exposed with the high-energy {001} facets, exhibits a surprisingly competitive oxygen reduction activity, excellent durability and superior tolerance to methanol. Combining the electrochemical tests with density-functional calculations, we elucidate the defect-centred oxygen reduction reaction mechanism for the superiority of the reductive {001}-TiO2-x nanocrystals. Our findings may provide an opportunity to develop a simple, efficient, cost-effective and promising catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction in energy conversion and storage technologies. PMID:26493365

  1. Early and delayed reproductive death in human cells exposed to high energy iron ion beams.

    PubMed

    Bettega, D; Calzolari, P; Doneda, L; Durante, M; Tallone, L

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the biological effectiveness for early and delayed effects of high energy, high linear energy transfer (LET) charged particles. Survival and delayed reproductive death were measured in AG1522 human fibroblast cells exposed to Fe-ion beams of energies between 0.2 and 1 GeV/n, 0.97 GeV/n Ti-ion and 0.49 GeV/n Si-ion beams. The cells were irradiated at the HIMAC accelerator in Chiba, Japan (0.2 and 0.5 GeV/n Fe and 0.49 GeV/n Si) and at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory in Brookhaven, USA (1 GeV/n Fe and 0.97 GeV/n Ti ions). The dose-effect curves were measured in the dose range between 0.25 and 2 Gy. For comparison cells were exposed to 60Co gamma rays. Analysis of the dose-effect curves show that all the heavy ion beams induce inactivation and delayed reproductive death more effectively than 60Co gamma rays. The only exception is the 0.2 GeV/n Fe-ion beam at low doses. The progeny of the irradiated cells show delayed damage in the form of reproductive death with all the heavy ion beams with the 1 GeV/n Fe-ion beam being the most effective. The relative biological effectiveness at low doses of the iron beams is highest for LET values between 140 and 200 keV/micrometers with values of 1.6 and 3 for early and delayed reproductive death, respectively. Analysis of the fluence-effect curves shows that the cross-sections for early and delayed inactivation increase with increasing LET up to 442 keV/micrometers. PMID:15934207

  2. SCC Initiation in Alloy 600 Heat Affected Zones Exposed to High Temperature Water

    SciTech Connect

    E Richey; DS Morton; RA Etien; GA Young; RB Bucinell

    2006-11-03

    Studies have shown that grain boundary chromium carbides improve the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of nickel based alloys exposed to high temperature, high purity water. However, thermal cycles from welding can significantly alter the microstructure of the base material near the fusion line. In particular, the heat of welding can solutionize grain boundary carbides and produce locally high residual stresses and strains, reducing the SCC resistance of the Alloy 600 type material in the heat affected zone (HAZ). Testing has shown that the SCC growth rate in Alloy 600 heat affected zone samples can be {approx}30x faster than observed in the Alloy 600 base material under identical testing conditions due to fewer intergranular chromium rich carbides and increased plastic strain in the HAZ [1, 2]. Stress corrosion crack initiation tests were conducted on Alloy 600 HAZ samples at 360 C in hydrogenated, deaerated water to determine if these microstructural differences significantly affect the SCC initiation resistance of Alloy 600 heat affected zones compared to the Alloy 600 base material. Alloy 600 to EN82H to Alloy 600 heat-affected-zone (HAZ) specimens where fabricated from an Alloy 600 to Alloy 600 narrow groove weld with EN82H filler metal. The approximate middle third of the specimen gauge region was EN82H such that each specimen had two HAZ regions. Tests were conducted with in-situ monitored smooth tensile specimens under a constant load, and a direct current electric potential drop was used for in-situ detection of SCC. Test results suggest that the SCC initiation resistance of Alloy 600 and its weld metal follows the following order: EN82H > Alloy 600 HAZ > Alloy 600. The high SCC initiation resistance observed to date in Alloy 600 heat affected zones compared to wrought Alloy 600 is unexpected based on the microstructure of HAZ versus wrought material and based on prior SCC growth rate studies. The observed behavior for the HAZ specimens is likely not related to differences in the environment, differences in surface stress/strain between the various specimen regions (weld, HAZ, wrought), differences in surface residual stress, or differences in the microstructure of the various specimen regions (weld, HAZ, wrought). The behavior may be related to differences in the creep behavior of the various weld regions or differences in the surface area of the various materials (weld, HAZ, wrought) exposed to high temperature water.

  3. Distribution of Chromosome Breakpoints in Human Epithelial Cells Exposed to Low- and High-LET Radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu

    2009-01-01

    The advantage of the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique is not only its ability to identify simultaneously both inter- and intrachromosome exchanges, but also the ability to measure the breakpoint location along the length of the chromosome in a precision that is unmatched with other traditional banding techniques. Breakpoints on specific regions of a chromosome have been known to associate with specific cancers. The breakpoint distribution in cells after low- and high-LET radiation exposures will also provide the data for biophysical modeling of the chromatin structure, as well as the data for the modeling the formation of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. In a series of experiments, we studied low- and high-LET radiation-induced chromosome aberrations using the mBAND technique with chromosome 3 painted in 23 different colored bands. Human epithelial cells (CH1 84B5F5/M10) were exposed in vitro to Cs- 137 rays at both low and high dose rates, secondary neutrons with a broad energy spectrum at a low dose rate and 600 MeV/u Fe ions at a high dose rate. The data of both inter- and intrachromosome aberrations involving the painted chromosome have been reported previously. Here we present data of the location of the chromosome breaks along the length of chromosome 3 in the cells after exposures to each of the four radiation scenarios. In comparison to the expected breakpoint distribution based on the length of the bands, the observed distribution appeared to be non-random for both the low- and high-LET radiations. In particular, hot spots towards both ends of the chromosome were found after low-LET irradiations of either low or high dose rates. For both high-LET radiation types (Fe ions and neutrons), the breakpoint distributions were similar, and were much smoother than that for low-LET radiation. The dependence of the breakpoint distribution on the radiation quality requires further investigations.

  4. Effects of High-Butterfat Diet on Embryo Implantation in Female Rats Exposed to Bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Alan M; Cheong, Ana; Ying, Jun; Xue, Jingchuan; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Leung, Yuet-Kin; Thomas, Michael A; Ho, Shuk-Mei

    2015-12-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine disruptor associated with poor pregnancy outcomes in human and rodents. The effects of butterfat diets on embryo implantation and whether it modifies BPA's actions are currently unknown. We aimed to determine the effects of butterfat diet on embryo implantation success in female rats exposed to an environmentally relevant dose of BPA. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to dietary butterfat (10% or 39% kcal/kg body weight [BW]) in the presence or absence of BPA (250 ?g/kg BW) or ethinylestradiol (0.1 ?g/kg BW) shortly before and during pregnancy to assess embryo implantation potentials by preimplantation development and transport, in vitro blastulation, outgrowth, and implantation. On gestational day (GD) 4.5, rats treated with BPA alone had higher serum total BPA level (2.3-3.7 ng/ml). They had more late-stage preimplantation embryos, whereas those receiving high butterfat (HBF) diet had the most advanced-stage embryos; dams cotreated with HBF and BPA had the most number of advanced embryos. BPA markedly delayed embryo transport to the uterus, but neither amount of butterfat had modifying effects. An in vitro implantation assay showed HBF doubled the outgrowth area, with BPA having no effect. In vivo, BPA reduced the number of implanted embryos on GD8, and cotreatment with HBF eliminated this adverse effect. HBF diet overall resulted in more and larger GD8 embryos. This study reveals the implantation disruptive effects of maternal exposure to an environmentally relevant dose of BPA and identifies HBF diet as a modifier of BPA in promoting early embryonic health. PMID:26510865

  5. A genome-wide association study of resistance to HIV infection in highly exposed uninfected individuals with hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Jrme; McLaren, Paul J.; Dorrell, Lucy; Shianna, Kevin V.; Stemke, Amanda; Pelak, Kimberly; Moore, Stephen; Oldenburg, Johannes; Alvarez-Roman, Maria Teresa; Angelillo-Scherrer, Anne; Boehlen, Francoise; Bolton-Maggs, Paula H.B.; Brand, Brigit; Brown, Deborah; Chiang, Elaine; Cid-Haro, Ana Rosa; Clotet, Bonaventura; Collins, Peter; Colombo, Sara; Dalmau, Judith; Fogarty, Patrick; Giangrande, Paul; Gringeri, Alessandro; Iyer, Rathi; Katsarou, Olga; Kempton, Christine; Kuriakose, Philip; Lin, Judith; Makris, Mike; Manco-Johnson, Marilyn; Tsakiris, Dimitrios A.; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Mauser-Bunschoten, Evelien; Neff, Anne; Oka, Shinichi; Oyesiku, Lara; Parra, Rafael; Peter-Salonen, Kristiina; Powell, Jerry; Recht, Michael; Shapiro, Amy; Stine, Kimo; Talks, Katherine; Telenti, Amalio; Wilde, Jonathan; Yee, Thynn Thynn; Wolinsky, Steven M.; Martinson, Jeremy; Hussain, Shehnaz K.; Bream, Jay H.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Carrington, Mary; Goedert, James J.; Haynes, Barton F.; McMichael, Andrew J.; Goldstein, David B.; Fellay, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Human genetic variation contributes to differences in susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. To search for novel host resistance factors, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in hemophilia patients highly exposed to potentially contaminated factor VIII infusions. Individuals with hemophilia A and a documented history of factor VIII infusions before the introduction of viral inactivation procedures (19791984) were recruited from 36 hemophilia treatment centers (HTCs), and their genome-wide genetic variants were compared with those from matched HIV-infected individuals. Homozygous carriers of known CCR5 resistance mutations were excluded. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and inferred copy number variants (CNVs) were tested using logistic regression. In addition, we performed a pathway enrichment analysis, a heritability analysis, and a search for epistatic interactions with CCR5 ?32 heterozygosity. A total of 560 HIV-uninfected cases were recruited: 36 (6.4%) were homozygous for CCR5 ?32 or m303. After quality control and SNP imputation, we tested 1 081 435 SNPs and 3686 CNVs for association with HIV-1 serostatus in 431 cases and 765 HIV-infected controls. No SNP or CNV reached genome-wide significance. The additional analyses did not reveal any strong genetic effect. Highly exposed, yet uninfected hemophiliacs form an ideal study group to investigate host resistance factors. Using a genome-wide approach, we did not detect any significant associations between SNPs and HIV-1 susceptibility, indicating that common genetic variants of major effect are unlikely to explain the observed resistance phenotype in this population. PMID:23372042

  6. Body and organ weights of rats exposed to carbon monoxide at high altitude.

    PubMed

    McGrath, J J

    1988-01-01

    Although chronic exposure to carbon monoxide (CO) or high altitude produces pronounced cardiovascular changes in humans as well as animals, there is little information on the effects elicited by these stressors combined. Theoretical considerations, as well as data from acute studies, suggest that CO inhaled at high altitude may be more detrimental than CO inhaled at low altitude. The purpose of these studies was to construct a system in which CO and altitude could be controlled precisely, and to investigate the effects of continuous exposure to CO and high altitude on body weights and hematocrit ratios, as well as heart, spleen, adrenals, kidneys, and pituitary weights. Male, laboratory rats were exposed for 6 wk in steel barometric chambers to (1) 100 ppm CO, (2) 15,000 ft simulated high altitude (SHA), and (3) CO at SHA. Altitude was simulated by a system of gate valves and a vacuum pump, and measured by an altimeter. CO, from high-pressure cylinders, was introduced into the air supplying each chamber through a mass flow controller and measured by a nondispersive infrared (NDIR) analyzer. Although SHA had no affect on left ventricle plus septum (LV + S), adrenal, spleen, or kidney weights, SHA decreased body weights, and increased hematocrit ratios, as well as right ventricle (RV), total heart (HT), and pituitary weights. CO had no affect on body weights, RV, HT, adrenal, spleen, or kidney weights, but CO increased hematocrit ratios and LV + S weights. There was no significant interaction between SHA and CO on any parameter except kidney weight. These results indicate that, in general, the effects produced by 15,000 ft SHA are not intensified by exposure to 100 ppm CO. PMID:3351978

  7. Prediction of Ablation Rates from Solid Surfaces Exposed to High Temperature Gas Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akyuzlu, Kazim M.; Coote, David

    2013-01-01

    A mathematical model and a solution algorithm is developed to study the physics of high temperature heat transfer and material ablation and identify the problems associated with the flow of hydrogen gas at very high temperatures and velocities through pipes and various components of Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) motors. Ablation and melting can be experienced when the inner solid surface of the cooling channels and the diverging-converging nozzle of a Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) motor is exposed to hydrogen gas flow at temperatures around 2500 degrees Kelvin and pressures around 3.4 MPa. In the experiments conducted on typical NTR motors developed in 1960s, degradation of the cooling channel material (cracking in the nuclear fuel element cladding) and in some instances melting of the core was observed. This paper presents the results of a preliminary study based on two types of physics based mathematical models that were developed to simulate the thermal-hydrodynamic conditions that lead to ablation of the solid surface of a stainless steel pipe exposed to high temperature hydrogen gas near sonic velocities. One of the proposed models is one-dimensional and assumes the gas flow to be unsteady, compressible and viscous. An in-house computer code was developed to solve the conservations equations of this model using a second-order accurate finite-difference technique. The second model assumes the flow to be three-dimensional, unsteady, compressible and viscous. A commercial CFD code (Fluent) was used to solve the later model equations. Both models assume the thermodynamic and transport properties of the hydrogen gas to be temperature dependent. In the solution algorithm developed for this study, the unsteady temperature of the pipe is determined from the heat equation for the solid. The solid-gas interface temperature is determined from an energy balance at the interface which includes heat transfer from or to the interface by conduction, convection, radiation, and ablation. Two different ablation models are proposed to determine the heat loss from the solid surface due to the ablation of the solid material. Both of them are physics based. Various numerical simulations were carried out using both models to predict the temperature distribution in the solid and in the gas flow, and then predict the ablation rates at a typical NTR motor hydrogen gas temperature and pressure. Solid mass loss rate per foot of a pipe was also calculated from these predictions. The results are presented for fully developed turbulent flow conditions in a sample SS pipe with a 6 inch diameter.

  8. Body and organ weights of rats exposed to carbon monoxide at high altitude

    SciTech Connect

    McGrath, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    Male, laboratory rats were exposed for 6 wk in steel barometric chambers to (1) 100 ppm CO, (2) 15,000 ft simulated high altitude (SHA), and (3) CO at SHA. Altitude was simulated by a system of gate valves and a vacuum pump, and measured by an altimeter. CO, from high-pressure cylinders, was introduced into the air supplying each chamber through a mass flow controller and measured by a nondispersive infrared (NDIR) analyzer. Although SHA had no affect on left ventricle plus septum (LV + S), adrenal, spleen, or kidney weights, SHA decreased body weights, and increased hematocrit ratios, as well as right ventricle (RV), total heart (HT), and pituitary weights. CO had no affect on body weights, RV, HT, adrenal, spleen, or kidney weights, but CO increased hematocrit ratios and LV + S weights. There was no significant interaction between SHA and CO on any parameter except kidney weight. These results indicate that, in general, the effects produced by 15,000 ft SHA are not intensified by exposure to 100 ppm CO.

  9. Characterization of large format lithium ion battery exposed to extremely high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xuning; Sun, Jing; Ouyang, Minggao; He, Xiangming; Lu, Languang; Han, Xuebing; Fang, Mou; Peng, Huei

    2014-12-01

    This paper provides a study on the characterizations of large format lithium ion battery cells exposed to extreme high temperature but without thermal runaway. A unique test is set up: an extended volume-accelerating rate calorimetry (EV-ARC) test is terminated at a specific temperature before thermal runaway happens in the battery. The battery was cooled down after an EV-ARC test with early termination. The performances of the battery before and after the EV-ARC test are investigated in detail. The results show that (a) the melting point of the separator dictates the reusability of the 25 Ah NCM battery after a near-runaway event. The battery cannot be reused after being heated to 140 °C or higher because of the exponential rise in ohmic resistance; (b) a battery can lose up to 20% of its capacity after being heated to 120 °C just one time; (c) if a battery is cycled after a thermal event, its lost capacity may be recovered partially. Furthermore, the fading and recovery mechanisms are analyzed by incremental capacity analysis (ICA) and a prognostic/mechanistic model. Model analysis confirms that the capacity loss at extremely high temperature is caused by the increase of the resistance, the loss of lithium ion (LLI) at the anode and the loss of active material (LAM) at the cathode.

  10. Modification of Kraft Lignin to Expose Diazobenzene Groups: Toward pH- and Light-Responsive Biobased Polymers.

    PubMed

    Duval, Antoine; Lange, Heiko; Lawoko, Martin; Crestini, Claudia

    2015-09-14

    A pH- and light-responsive polymer has been synthesized from softwood kraft lignin by a two-step strategy that aimed to incorporate diazobenzene groups. Initially, styrene oxide was reacted with the phenolic hydroxyl groups in lignin, to offer the attachment of benzene rings, thus creating unhindered reactive sites for further modifications. The use of advanced spectroscopic techniques ((1)H and (31)P NMR, UV and FTIR) demonstrated that the reaction was quantitative and selective toward the phenolic hydroxyl groups. In a second step, the newly incorporated benzene rings were reacted with a diazonium cation to form the target diazobenzene motif, whose formation was again thoroughly verified. As anticipated, the diazobenzene-containing kraft lignin derivatives showed a pH-dependent color change in solution and light-responsive properties resulting from the cis-trans photoisomerization of the diazobenzene group. PMID:26288366

  11. Development and Implementation of CHOICES Group to Reduce Drinking, Improve Contraception, and Prevent Alcohol-Exposed Pregnancies in American Indian Women.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Jessica D; Ingersoll, Karen; Pourier, Susan

    2015-12-01

    Public health officials assert that prevention of alcohol-exposed pregnancies (AEP) should begin before conception, by reducing alcohol consumption in women at-risk for or planning pregnancy, and/or preventing pregnancy in women who are drinking at risky levels. One such effort is the Oglala Sioux Tribe (OST) CHOICES Program. While the OST CHOICES Program has been successfully implemented, a community-based needs assessment determined that the OST CHOICES intervention should expand and be delivered in a group setting using group motivational interviewing (MI) techniques. After extensive group MI and CHOICES group trainings, recruitment for CHOICES Group began and within a ten month period, a total of twelve groups with non-pregnant American Indian women were held for this pilot intervention. Evaluations completed by participants indicated that CHOICES Group sessions positively engaged members, had low levels of anger or tension, and had average levels of avoidance of personal responsibility. An evaluation of the CHOICES Group leaders indicated strengths in certain MI skills, although improvement is needed in some core MI and group leadership skills. This is an important expansion of a successful AEP prevention program (CHOICES), as well as a novel application of MI, and recommendations and future plans for this intervention are outlined. PMID:26265591

  12. Cytoprotective responses in HaCaT keratinocytes exposed to high doses of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Lundvig, Ditte M S; Pennings, Sebastiaan W C; Brouwer, Katrien M; Mtaya-Mlangwa, Matilda; Mugonzibwa, Emeria; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie; Wagener, Frank A D T G; Von den Hoff, Johannes W

    2015-08-15

    Wound healing is a complex process that involves the well-coordinated interactions of different cell types. Topical application of high doses of curcumin, a plant-derived polyphenol, enhances both normal and diabetic cutaneous wound healing in rodents. For optimal tissue repair interactions between epidermal keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts are essential. We previously demonstrated that curcumin increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and apoptosis in dermal fibroblasts, which could be prevented by pre-induction of the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase (HO)-1. To better understand the effects of curcumin on wound repair, we now assessed the effects of high doses of curcumin on the survival of HaCaT keratinocytes and the role of the HO system. We exposed HaCaT keratinocytes to curcumin in the presence or absence of the HO-1 inducers heme (FePP) and cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP). We then assessed cell survival, ROS formation, and caspase activation. Curcumin induced caspase-dependent apoptosis in HaCaT keratinocytes via a ROS-dependent mechanism. Both FePP and CoPP induced HO-1 expression, but only FePP protected against curcumin-induced ROS formation and caspase-mediated apoptosis. In the presence of curcumin, FePP but not CoPP induced the expression of the iron scavenger ferritin. Together, our data show that the induction of ferritin, but not HO, protects HaCaT keratinocytes against cytotoxic doses of curcumin. The differential response of fibroblasts and keratinocytes to high curcumin doses may provide the basis for improving curcumin-based wound healing therapies. PMID:26071936

  13. Expression profiles of podocytes exposed to high glucose reveal new insights into early diabetic glomerulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sanjay; De Petris, Laura; Hoshi, Masato; Akilesh, Shreeram; Chatterjee, Rajshekhar; Liapis, Helen

    2010-01-01

    Podocyte injury has been suggested to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of diabetic glomerulopathy. To glean insights intomolecular mechanisms underlying diabetic podocyte injury we generated temporal global gene transcript profiles of podocytes exposed to high glucose for a time interval of 1 or 2 weeks using microarrays. A number of genes were altered at both 1 and 2 weeks of glucose exposure compared to controls grown under normal glucose. These included extracellular matrix modulators, cell cycle regulators, extracellular transduction signals and membrane transport proteins. Novel genes that were altered at both one and two weeks of high glucose exposure included Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (LCN2 or NGAL, decreased by 3.2 fold at 1 week and by 7.2 fold at 2 weeks), Endothelial lipase (EL, increased by 3.6 fold at 1 week and 3.9 fold at 2 week), and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 8 (UGT8, increased by 3.9 fold at 1 week and 5.0 fold at 2 weeks). To further validate these results we used real-time PCR from independent podocyte cultures, immunohistochemistry in renal biopsies and immunoblotting on urine specimens from diabetic patients. A more detailed time course revealed changes in LCN2 and EL mRNA levels as early as 6 hours and in UGT8 mRNA levels at 12 hours post-high glucose exposure. EL immunohistochemistry on human tissues showed markedly increased expression in glomeruli and immunoblotting readily detected EL in a subset of urine samples from diabetic nephropathy patients. In addition to previously implicated roles of these genes in ischemic or oxidative stress, our results further support their importance in hyperglycemic podocyte stress and possibly diabetic glomerulopathy pathogenesis and diagnosis in humans. PMID:21102505

  14. Focused Study on the Quiet Side Effect in Dwellings Highly Exposed to Road Traffic Noise

    PubMed Central

    Renterghem, Timothy Van; Botteldooren, Dick

    2012-01-01

    This study provides additional evidence for the positive effect of the presence of a quiet faade at a dwelling and aims at unraveling potential mechanisms. Locations with dominant road traffic noise and high Lden-levels at the most exposed faade were selected. Dwellings both with and without a quiet faade were deliberately sought out. Face-to-face questionnaires (N = 100) were taken to study the influence of the presence of a quiet side in relation to noise annoyance and sleep disturbance. As a direct effect, the absence of a quiet faade in the dwelling (approached as a front-back faade noise level difference smaller than 10 dBA) leads to an important increase of at least moderately annoyed people (odds-ratio adjusted for noise sensitivity equals 3.3). In an indirect way, a bedroom located at the quiet side leads to an even stronger reduction of the self-reported noise annoyance (odds-ratio equal to 10.6 when adjusted for noise sensitivity and front faade Lden). The quiet side effect seems to be especially applicable for noise sensitive persons. A bedroom located at the quiet side also reduces noise-induced sleep disturbances. On a loud side, bedroom windows are more often closed, however, conflicting with the preference of dwellers. PMID:23330222

  15. Monitoring of circadian waveforms in rodents exposed to high-intensity static magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.; Levy, L.; Veklerov, E.

    1984-10-01

    A system has been developed for the noninvasive monitoring of circadian variables in mice exposed to a 1.50 T (1 Tesla = 10/sup 4/ Gauss) static magnetic field. The ambient light level, temperature and relative humidity within the exposure chamber are closely regulated, and physiological monitoring systems provide simultaneous measurements of seven circadian variables: (1) climbing activity on a triangular bar, (2) migratory activity, (3) body mass, (4) respired carbon dioxide, (5) nutrient consumption, (6) urine excretion, and (7) fecal excretion. Data from the various transducers and environmental monitoring devices within the exposure system are recorded on magnetic tape at 5-min intervals throughout experiments of 50 to 60 days duration, and the circadian waveforms of behavioral and physiological parameters are analyzed by a modification of the cosiner method using a high-speed computer. Exposure of adult female LAF-1 mice to a 1.50-T homogeneous field for 5 continuous days, or for 10 consecutive days with intermittent daily exposures on an 8-hr-on/16-hr-off cycle, has been found to produce no significant alterations in the circadian waveforms of behavioral or physiological parameters. 13 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Ultrastructure of pea and cress root statocytes exposed to high gradient magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyavskaya, N. A.; Chernishov, V. I.; Polishchuk, O. V.; Kondrachuk, A. V.

    As it was demonstrated by Kuznetsov & Hasenstein (1996) the high gradient magnetic field (HGMF) can produce a ponderomotive force that results in displacements of amyloplasts and causes the root response similar to the graviresponse. It was suggested that the HGMF could allow to imitate the effects of gravity in microgravity and/or change them in laboratory conditions correspondingly, as well as to study statolith-related processes in graviperception. Therefore, the correlation between the direction of the ponderomotive force resulting in statolith displacements and the direction of the HGMF-induced plant curvature can be the serious argument to support this suggestion and needs the detailed ultrastructural analysis. Seeds of dicotyledon Pisum sativum L. cv. Damir-2 and monocotyledon Lepidium sativum L. cv. P896 were soaked and grown in a vertical position on moist filter paper in chambers at room temperature. Tips of primary roots of vertical control, gravistimulated and exposed to HGMF seedlings were fixed for electron microscopy using conventional techniques. At ultrastructural level, we observed no significant changes in the volume of the individual statocytes or amyloplasts, relative volumes of cellular organelles (except vacuoles), number of amyloplasts per statocyte or surface area of endoplasmic reticulum. No consistent contacts between amyloplasts and any cellular structures, including plasma membrane, were revealed at any stage of magneto- and gravistimulation. By 5 min after onset of magnetostimulation, amyloplasts were located along cell wall distant from magnets. In HGMF, the locations of amyloplasts in columella cells were similar to those in horizontally-oriented roots up to 1 h stimulation. In the latter case, there were sometimes cytoplasmic spherical bodies with a dense vesicle-rich cytoplasm in pea statocytes, which were absent in seedlings exposed to HGMF. In cress root statocytes, both gravi- and magnetostimulation were found to cause the appearance of significant amounts of electron-dense granules in the cytoplasm and the nucleus (particularly, in the nucleolus); the effect was most evident in HGMF. Testing the chemical composition of such deposits is going on. The data presented statocyte responses indicate similarity the effects of magneto- and gravistimulation at the ultrastructural level. Thus, the root curvature in HGMF is the plant response to displacement of amyloplasts by ponderomotive force, which can serve as tool for investigation of graviperception mechanism and can provide directional stimulus for plant growth in microgravity. (Financial support by STCU: NN-13R).

  17. ANTIOXIDANT SUPPLEMENTATION AND NASAL INFLAMMATORY RESPONSES AMONG YOUNG ASTHMATICS EXPOSED TO HIGH LEVELS OF OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Recent studies examining the inflammatory response in atopic asthma to ozone suggest a release of soluble mediators of inflammation factors that might be related to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Antioxidant could prove useful in subjects exposed to additional oxidati...

  18. Group Work with High-Risk Urban Youths on Probation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Harriet; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes a group work project designed for a large urban probation department. Targets 16- to 20-year-old African American and Latino men on probation at high risk of rearrest. Uses cognitive-behavioral approaches reflecting the culture of contemporary urban youths. A case example illustrates how officers help group members sort out personal…

  19. Group Work with High-Risk Urban Youths on Probation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Harriet; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes a group work project designed for a large urban probation department. Targets 16- to 20-year-old African American and Latino men on probation at high risk of rearrest. Uses cognitive-behavioral approaches reflecting the culture of contemporary urban youths. A case example illustrates how officers help group members sort out personal

  20. Chromosomal Aberrations in Normal and AT Cells Exposed to High Dose of Low Dose Rate Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawata, T.; Shigematsu, N.; Kawaguchi, O.; Liu, C.; Furusawa, Y.; Hirayama, R.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F.

    2011-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a human autosomally recessive syndrome characterized by cerebellar ataxia, telangiectases, immune dysfunction, and genomic instability, and high rate of cancer incidence. A-T cell lines are abnormally sensitive to agents that induce DNA double strand breaks, including ionizing radiation. The diverse clinical features in individuals affected by A-T and the complex cellular phenotypes are all linked to the functional inactivation of a single gene (AT mutated). It is well known that cells deficient in ATM show increased yields of both simple and complex chromosomal aberrations after high-dose-rate irradiation, but, less is known on how cells respond to low-dose-rate irradiation. It has been shown that AT cells contain a large number of unrejoined breaks after both low-dose-rate irradiation and high-dose-rate irradiation, however sensitivity for chromosomal aberrations at low-dose-rate are less often studied. To study how AT cells respond to low-dose-rate irradiation, we exposed confluent normal and AT fibroblast cells to up to 3 Gy of gamma-irradiation at a dose rate of 0.5 Gy/day and analyzed chromosomal aberrations in G0 using fusion PCC (Premature Chromosomal Condensation) technique. Giemsa staining showed that 1 Gy induces around 0.36 unrejoined fragments per cell in normal cells and around 1.35 fragments in AT cells, whereas 3Gy induces around 0.65 fragments in normal cells and around 3.3 fragments in AT cells. This result indicates that AT cells can rejoin breaks less effectively in G0 phase of the cell cycle? compared to normal cells. We also analyzed chromosomal exchanges in normal and AT cells after exposure to 3 Gy of low-dose-rate rays using a combination of G0 PCC and FISH techniques. Misrejoining was detected in the AT cells only? When cells irradiated with 3 Gy were subcultured and G2 chromosomal aberrations were analyzed using calyculin-A induced PCC technique, the yield of unrejoined breaks decreased in both normal and AT cells and misrejoined breaks increased in both cell lines. The present study suggests that AT cells begin to rejoin breaks when a certain number of breaks are accumulated and an increased number of exchanges were observed in G0 AT cells, which is similar situation after high-dose-rate irradiation.

  1. Phenotypic Modifications in Staphylococcus aureus Cells Exposed to High Concentrations of Vancomycin and Teicoplanin

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Fábio D. A.; de Carvalho, Carla C. C. R.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial cells are known to change the fatty acid (FA) composition of the phospholipids as a phenotypic response to environmental conditions and to the presence of toxic compounds such as antibiotics. In the present study, Staphylococcus aureus cells collected during the exponential growth phase were challenged with 50 and 100 mg/L of vancomycin and teicoplanin, which are concentrations high enough to kill the large majority of the cell population. Colony-forming unit counts showed biphasic killing kinetics, typical for persister cell enrichment, in both antibiotics and concentrations tested. However, fluorescence microscopy showed the existence of viable but non-culturable (VBNC) cells in a larger number than that of possible persister cells. The analysis of the FA composition of the cells showed that, following antibiotic exposure up to 6 h, the survivor cells have an increased percentage of saturated FAs, a significant reduced percentage of branched FAs and an increased iso/anteiso branched FA ratio when compared to cells exhibiting a regular phenotype. This should result in lower membrane fluidity. However, cells exposed for 8–24 h presented an increased branched/saturated and lower iso/anteiso branched FA ratios, and thus increased membrane fluidity. Furthermore, the phenotypic changes were transmitted to daughter cells grown in drug-free media. The fact that VBNC cells presented nearly the same FA composition as those obtained after cell growth in drug-free media, which could only be the result of growth of persister cells, suggest that VBNC and persister phenotypes share the same type of response to antibiotics at the lipid level. PMID:26834731

  2. Spatial Cognition in Adult and Aged Mice Exposed to High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Kesby, James P; Kim, Jane J; Scadeng, Miriam; Woods, Gina; Kado, Deborah M; Olefsky, Jerrold M; Jeste, Dilip V; Achim, Cristian L; Semenova, Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with a decline in multiple aspects of cognitive function, with spatial cognition being particularly sensitive to age-related decline. Environmental stressors, such as high-fat diet (HFD) exposure, that produce a diabetic phenotype and metabolic dysfunction may indirectly lead to exacerbated brain aging and promote the development of cognitive deficits. The present work investigated whether exposure to HFD exacerbates age-related cognitive deficits in adult versus aged mice. Adult (5 months old) and aged (15 months old) mice were exposed to control diet or HFD for three months prior to, and throughout, behavioral testing. Anxiety-like behavior in the light-dark box test, discrimination learning and memory in the novel object/place recognition tests, and spatial learning and memory in the Barnes maze test were assessed. HFD resulted in significant gains in body weight and fat mass content with adult mice gaining significantly more weight and adipose tissue due to HFD than aged mice. Weight gain was attributed to food calories sourced from fat, but not total calorie intake. HFD increased fasting insulin levels in all mice, but adult mice showed a greater increase relative to aged mice. Behaviorally, HFD increased anxiety-like behavior in adult but not aged mice without significantly affecting spatial cognition. In contrast, aged mice fed either control or HFD diet displayed deficits in novel place discrimination and spatial learning. Our results suggest that adult mice are more susceptible to the physiological and anxiety-like effects of HFD consumption than aged mice, while aged mice displayed deficits in spatial cognition regardless of dietary influence. We conclude that although HFD induces systemic metabolic dysfunction in both adult and aged mice, overall cognitive function was not adversely affected under the current experimental conditions. PMID:26448649

  3. Spatial Cognition in Adult and Aged Mice Exposed to High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Kesby, James P.; Kim, Jane J.; Scadeng, Miriam; Woods, Gina; Kado, Deborah M.; Olefsky, Jerrold M.; Jeste, Dilip V.; Achim, Cristian L.; Semenova, Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with a decline in multiple aspects of cognitive function, with spatial cognition being particularly sensitive to age-related decline. Environmental stressors, such as high-fat diet (HFD) exposure, that produce a diabetic phenotype and metabolic dysfunction may indirectly lead to exacerbated brain aging and promote the development of cognitive deficits. The present work investigated whether exposure to HFD exacerbates age-related cognitive deficits in adult versus aged mice. Adult (5 months old) and aged (15 months old) mice were exposed to control diet or HFD for three months prior to, and throughout, behavioral testing. Anxiety-like behavior in the light-dark box test, discrimination learning and memory in the novel object/place recognition tests, and spatial learning and memory in the Barnes maze test were assessed. HFD resulted in significant gains in body weight and fat mass content with adult mice gaining significantly more weight and adipose tissue due to HFD than aged mice. Weight gain was attributed to food calories sourced from fat, but not total calorie intake. HFD increased fasting insulin levels in all mice, but adult mice showed a greater increase relative to aged mice. Behaviorally, HFD increased anxiety-like behavior in adult but not aged mice without significantly affecting spatial cognition. In contrast, aged mice fed either control or HFD diet displayed deficits in novel place discrimination and spatial learning. Our results suggest that adult mice are more susceptible to the physiological and anxiety-like effects of HFD consumption than aged mice, while aged mice displayed deficits in spatial cognition regardless of dietary influence. We conclude that although HFD induces systemic metabolic dysfunction in both adult and aged mice, overall cognitive function was not adversely affected under the current experimental conditions. PMID:26448649

  4. Early and delayed reproductive death in human cells exposed to high energy iron-ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettega, D.; Calzolari, P.; Doneda, L.; Durante, M.; Tallone, L.

    For radiation protection of the astronauts it is important to know both the acute and the late effects of charged particles. Iron is the most abundant high charge and energy (HZE) specie in galactic cosmic radiation. (HZE) ions are considered to be the major contributors to equivalent dose in space, but the Relative Biological Effectiveness of HZE particles has large uncertainties, expecially for late effects. We have determined early and delayed reproductive death in human fibroblast cells (AG1522) exposed to iron ion beams of energies between 0.2 and 1 GeV/n. The cells were irradiated at the HIMAC accelerator in Chiba (0.2 and 0.5 GeV/n) and at the AGS accelerator at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory in Brookhaven (1 GeV/n). For each beam the dose--effect curves were measured at least twice in the dose range between 0.5 and 2 Gy. 60 Co gamma rays were used as reference radiation. The following results were obtained: 1) the 1 GeV/n beam effectiveness for inactivation of the AG1522 cells is higher than that of any other beam. 2) the progeny of the irradiated cells show the presence of delayed damage in the form of reproductive death for all the beams with the 1 GeV/n being the most effective. 3) the relative biological effectiveness of the iron beams is higher for delayed compared to early reproductive death. A comparison with preliminary results obtained with 970 MeV/n Ti and 490 MeV/n Si ions will be also reported .

  5. Evaluation of corrosion in cracked high performance concrete exposed to a natural chloride environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Calvo, Herwing Zeth

    Chloride-induced corrosion of reinforcing steel is the most serious maintenance concern facing the construction industry. Although several strategies, such as the use of corrosion inhibiting admixtures (CIAs) and supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) or the application of protective coatings either on the reinforcing steel or the concrete surface have been proposed to control this process, there are still several uncertainties about their effectiveness in cracked high performance concrete (HPC). In this research program, effects of corrosion in cracked HPC exposed to a chloride environment were evaluated. Three phases of investigation in the laboratory and in the field were developed. In the first phase, the effects of the addition of CIAs and SCMs on the compressive strength and certain durability properties of HPC were studied. In the second phase, the performance of CIAs alone or in combination with SCMs, a silane surface pre-treatment and five types of epoxy coated rebars in protecting steel in cracked HPC was evaluated. Finally, the third phase evaluated the effects of chloride-induced corrosion on the tensile properties of reinforcing bars in cracked HPC. Results demonstrated that the addition of CIAs alone or in combination with SCMs, was not detrimental to the HPC properties; in fact, their combination improved both the compressive strength and the durability properties of concrete. It also was found that HPC in its cracked state does not provide corrosion protection to the steel in a chloride environment even when CIAs and SCMs were used. Nevertheless, the combination of two or more corrosion mitigating strategies, selection of adequate water to cementitious materials ratio (w/cm), and an appropriate concrete cover were found to be relatively effective in controlling corrosion in cracked HPC, and thus effective in mitigating the effects of chloride-induced corrosion on the tensile properties of the steel.

  6. Indoor tanning and risk of melanoma: a case-control study in a highly exposed population

    PubMed Central

    Lazovich, DeAnn; Vogel, Rachel Isaksson; Berwick, Marianne; Weinstock, Martin A.; Anderson, Kristin E.; Warshaw, Erin M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Indoor tanning has been only weakly associated with melanoma risk; most reports were unable to adjust for sun exposure, confirm a dose-response, or examine specific tanning devices. A population-based case-control study was conducted to address these limitations. Methods Cases of invasive cutaneous melanoma, diagnosed in Minnesota between 2004-2007 at ages 25-59, were ascertained from a statewide cancer registry; age-, gender-matched controls were randomly selected from state driver's license lists. Self-administered questionnaires and telephone interviews included information on ever use of indoor tanning, device types used, initiation age, period of use, dose, duration, and indoor-tanning related burns. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were adjusted for known melanoma risk factors. Results Among 1167 cases and 1101 controls, 62.9% of cases and 51.1% of controls had tanned indoors (adjusted OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.42-2.14). Melanoma risk was pronounced among users of UVB-enhanced (adjusted OR 2.86, 95% CI 2.03-4.03) and primarily UVA-emitting devices (adjusted OR 4.44, 95% CI 2.45, 8.02). Risk increased with use: years (p<0.006), hours (p<0.0001), or sessions (p=0.0002). Odds ratios were elevated within each initiation age category; among indoor tanners, years used was more relevant for melanoma development. Conclusions In a highly exposed population, frequent indoor tanning increased melanoma risk, regardless of age when indoor tanning began. Elevated risks were observed across devices. Impact This study overcomes some of the limitations of earlier reports and provides strong support for the recent declaration by International Agency for Research on Cancer that tanning devices are carcinogenic in humans. PMID:20507845

  7. Induced CYP1A2 activity as a phenotypic biomarker in humans highly exposed to certain PCBs/PCDFs.

    PubMed

    Lambert, George H; Needham, Larry L; Turner, Wayman; Lai, Te Jen; Patterson, Donald G; Guo, Y Leon

    2006-10-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) continue to be a worldwide public health concern due to their levels in the environment and humans, and associated adverse health effects. In animals, one of the most sensitive effects of physiologically significant body burdens has been the induction of cytochrome P450 1 (CYP1) family of enzymes. This study examined the capacity of CYP1 enzyme induction to be a biomarker of exposure to a mixture of PCBs and PCDFs and of adverse human health effects. We followed a group of people highly exposed to PCBs and PCDFs due to accidental ingestion of contaminated rice oil, the Yucheng cohort. A total of 174 Yucheng and 134 control subjects were studied. The caffeine breath test, a monitor of CYP1A2 activity, was conducted, and its results were compared to serum levels of chemicals and the subjects' medical history. Total dioxin serum toxic equivalency (TEQ) in the Yucheng cohort and their controls were 577 +/- 393 ppt lipid and 21 ppt lipid, respectively. CYP1A2 activity was elevated in Yucheng subjects more than 2-fold and correlated with serum TEQ (R2= 0.62). Manifestations like chloracne, fingernail abnormalities, and headaches were well predicted by P4501A2 activity. It is concluded that CYP1A2 induction seen in the Yucheng cohort is an excellent biomarker of exposure and human health effects in individual subjects and cohort. PMID:17051818

  8. Deuterium retention in tungsten and tungsten-tantalum alloys exposed to high-flux deuterium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayachuk, Y.; 't Hoen, M. H. J.; Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P. A.; Uytdenhouwen, I.; van Oost, G.

    2012-10-01

    A direct comparison of deuterium retention in samples of tungsten and two grades of tungsten-tantalum alloysW-1% Ta and W-5% Ta, exposed to deuterium plasmas (ion flux 1024 m-2 s-1, ion energy at the biased target 50 eV) at the plasma generator Pilot-PSI was performed using thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). No systematic difference in terms of total retention in tungsten and tungsten-tantalum was identified. The measured retention value for each grade did not deviate by more than 24% from the value averaged over the three grades exposed to the same conditions. No additional desorption peaks appeared in the TDS spectra of the W-Ta samples as compared with the W target, indicating that no additional kinds of traps are introduced by the alloying of W with Ta. In the course of the experiment the same samples were exposed to the same plasma conditions several times, and it is demonstrated that samples with the history of prior exposures yield an increase in deuterium retention of up to 130% under the investigated conditions compared with the samples that were not exposed before. We consider this as evidence that exposure of the considered materials to ions with energy below the displacement threshold generates additional traps for deuterium. The positions of the release peaks caused by these traps are similar for W and W-Ta, which indicates that the corresponding traps are of the same kind.

  9. Mental Health Service Use among High School Students Exposed to Interpersonal Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Jennifer Greif; Johnson, Renee M.; Dunn, Erin C.; Lindsey, Michael; Xuan, Ziming; Zaslavsky, Alan M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Violence-exposed youth rarely receive mental health services, even though exposure increases risk for academic and psychosocial problems. This study examines the association between violence exposure and mental health service contact. The 4 forms of violence exposure were peer, family, sexual, and witnessing. Methods: Data are from

  10. Mental Health Service Use among High School Students Exposed to Interpersonal Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Jennifer Greif; Johnson, Renee M.; Dunn, Erin C.; Lindsey, Michael; Xuan, Ziming; Zaslavsky, Alan M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Violence-exposed youth rarely receive mental health services, even though exposure increases risk for academic and psychosocial problems. This study examines the association between violence exposure and mental health service contact. The 4 forms of violence exposure were peer, family, sexual, and witnessing. Methods: Data are from…

  11. Histologic study of the internal organs of rats chronically exposed to a high-intensity electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Seto, Y.J.; Majeau-Chargois, D.; Lymangrover, J.R.; Dunlap, W.P.; Hsieh, S.T.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of 120-day exposure to a high-intensity (80 kV/m), 60-Hz electric field on histology of selected internal organs of Sprague-Dawley rats was investigated. The organs examined were the pituitary, thymus, heart, lungs, liver, spleen, right and left adrenals, right and left kidneys, and right and left testes. Histological examination of 10-micron tissue sections from randomly selected animals revealed no specific evidence of histopathologic differences between field-exposed and sham-exposed animals at the light microscopic level.

  12. The quantification of wound healing as a method to assess late radiation damage in primate skin exposed to high-energy protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, A. B.; Lett, J. T.

    In an experiment examining the effects of space radiations on primates, different groups of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were exposed to single whole-body doses of 32- or 55-MeV protons. Survivors of those exposures, together with age-matched controls, have been monitored continuously since 1964 and 1965. Late effects of nominal proton doses ranging from 2-6 Gray have been measured in vitro using skin fibroblasts from the animals. A logical extension of that study is reported here, and it involves observations of wound healing after 3-mm diameter dermal punches were removed from the ears (pinnae) of control and irradiated monkeys. Tendencies in the reduction of competence to repair cutaneous wound have been revealed by the initial examinations of animals that received doses greater than 2 Gy more than 2 decades earlier. These trends indicate that this method of assessing radiation damage to skin exposed to high-energy radiations warrants further study.

  13. Identification of heat shock proteins via transcriptome profiling of tree peony leaf exposed to high temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y Z; Cheng, Y W; Ya, H Y; Han, J M; Zheng, L

    2015-01-01

    The tree peony leaf is an important vegetative organ that is sensitive to abiotic stress and particularly to high temperature. This sensitivity affects plant growth and restricts tree peony distribution. However, the transcriptomic information currently available on the peony leaf in public databases is limited. In this study, we sequenced the transcriptomes of peony leaves subjected to high temperature using the Illumina HiSeq TM 2000 platform. We performed de novo assembly of 93,714 unigenes (average length of 639.7 bp). By searching the public databases, 22,323 unigenes and 13,107 unigenes showed significant similarities with proteins in the NCBI non-redundant protein database and SWISS-PROT database (E-value < 1e-5), respectively. We assigned 17,340 unigenes to Gene Ontology categories, and we assigned 7618 unigenes to clusters of orthologous groups for eukaryotic complete genomes. By searching the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Pathway database, 8014 unigenes were assigned to 6 main categories, including 290 KEGG pathways. To advance research on improving thermotolerance, we identified 24 potential heat shock protein genes with complete open reading frames from the transcriptomic sequences. This is the first study to characterize the leaf transcriptome of tree peony leaf using high-throughput sequencing. The information obtained from the tree peony leaf is valuable for gene discovery, and the identified heat shock protein genes can be used to improve plant stress-tolerance. PMID:26345770

  14. Metabolomics in Lung Inflammation: A High Resolution 1H NMR Study of Mice Exposed to Silica Dust

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Rommereim, Donald N.; Minard, Kevin R.; Woodstock, Angie; Harrer, Bruce J.; Wind, Robert A.; Phipps, Richard P.; Sime, Patricia J.

    2010-01-01

    Here we report the first 1H NMR metabolomics studies on excised lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from mice exposed to crystalline silica. High resolution 1H NMR metabolic profiling on intact excised lungs was performed using slow magic angle sample spinning (slow-MAS) 1H PASS (phase altered spinning sidebands) at a sample spinning rate of 80 Hz. Metabolic profiling on BALF was completed using fast magic angle spinning at 2kHz. Major findings are that the relative concentrations of choline, phosphocholine (PC) and glycerophosphocholine(GPC) were statistically significantly increased in silica-exposed mice compared to sham controls, indicating an altered membrane choline phospholipids metabolism (MCPM). The relative concentrations of glycogen/glucose, lactate and creatine were also statistically significantly increased in mice exposed to silica dust, suggesting that cellular energy pathways were affected by silica dust. Elevated levels of glycine, lysine, glutamate, proline and 4-hydroxyproline were also increased in exposed mice, suggesting the activation of a collagen pathway. Furthermore, metabolic profiles in mice exposed to silica dust were found to be spatially heterogeneous, in consistent with regional inflammation revealed by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). PMID:20020862

  15. High-order social interactions in groups of mice

    PubMed Central

    Shemesh, Yair; Sztainberg, Yehezkel; Forkosh, Oren; Shlapobersky, Tamar; Chen, Alon; Schneidman, Elad

    2013-01-01

    Social behavior in mammals is often studied in pairs under artificial conditions, yet groups may rely on more complicated social structures. Here, we use a novel system for tracking multiple animals in a rich environment to characterize the nature of group behavior and interactions, and show strongly correlated group behavior in mice. We have found that the minimal models that rely only on individual traits and pairwise correlations between animals are not enough to capture group behavior, but that models that include third-order interactions give a very accurate description of the group. These models allow us to infer social interaction maps for individual groups. Using this approach, we show that environmental complexity during adolescence affects the collective group behavior of adult mice, in particular altering the role of high-order structure. Our results provide new experimental and mathematical frameworks for studying group behavior and social interactions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00759.001 PMID:24015357

  16. Occurrence of trivalent monomethyl arsenic and other urinary arsenic species in a highly exposed juvenile population in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Kalman, David A; Dills, Russell L; Steinmaus, Craig; Yunus, Md; Khan, Al Fazal; Prodhan, Md Mofijuddin; Yuan, Yan; Smith, Allan H

    2014-01-01

    Following reports of high cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of monomethyl arsonous acid (MMA(III)) and early reports of urinary MMA(III) in arsenic-exposed individuals, MMA(III) has often been included in population studies. Use of urinary MMA(III) as an indicator of exposure and/or health risk is challenged by inconsistent results from field studies and stability studies, which indicate potential artifacts. We measured urinary arsenic species in children chronically exposed to arsenic in drinking water, using collection, storage, and analysis methods shown to conserve MMA(III). MMA(III) was easily oxidized in sample storage and processing, but recoveries of 80% or better in spiked urine samples were achieved. Attempts to preserve the distribution of MMA between trivalent and pentavalent forms using complexing agents were unsuccessful and MMA(III) spiked into treated urine samples actually showed lower stability than in untreated samples. In 643 urine samples from a highly exposed population from the Matlab district in Bangladesh stored for 3-6 months at ?-70?C, MMA(III) was detected in 41 samples, with an estimated median value of 0.3??g/l, and levels of MMA(III) above 1??g/l in only two samples. The low urinary concentrations in highly exposed individuals and known difficulties in preserving sample oxidation state indicate that urinary MMA(III) is not suitable for use as an epidemiological biomarker. PMID:23549402

  17. High-performance heterogeneous catalysis with surface-exposed stable metal nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ning; Xu, Yanhong; Jiang, Donglin

    2014-01-01

    Protection of metal nanoparticles from agglomeration is critical for their functions and applications. The conventional method for enhancing their stability is to cover them with passivation layers to prevent direct contact. However, the presence of a protective shell blocks exposure of the metal species to reactants, thereby significantly impeding the nanoparticles' utility as catalysts. Here, we report that metal nanoparticles can be prepared and used in a surface-exposed state that renders them inherently catalytically active. This strategy is realised by spatial confinement and electronic stabilisation with a dual-module mesoporous and microporous three-dimensional π-network in which surface-exposed nanoparticles are crystallised upon in situ reduction. The uncovered palladium nanoparticles serve as heterogeneous catalysts that are exceptionally active in water, catalyse unreactive aryl chlorides for straightforward carbon–carbon bond formation and are stable for repeated use in various types of cross couplings. Therefore, our results open new perspectives in developing practical heterogeneous catalysts. PMID:25427425

  18. Thermal shock behaviour of H and H/He-exposed tungsten at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemahieu, N.; Greuner, H.; Linke, J.; Maier, H.; Pintsuk, G.; Wirtz, M.; Van Oost, G.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    2016-02-01

    Polycrystalline tungsten samples were characterized and exposed to a pure H beam or mixed H/He beam containing 6% He in GLADIS at a surface temperature of 600 C, 1000 C, or 1500 C. After 5400 s of exposure time with a heat flux of 10.5 MW m?2, the total accumulated fluence of 2 1025 m?2 was reached. Thereafter, edge localized mode (ELM)-like thermal shocks with a duration of 1 ms and an absorbed power density of 190 MW m?2 and 380 MW m?2 were applied on the samples in JUDITH 1. During the thermal shocks, the base temperature was kept at 1000 C. The ELM-experiments with the lowest transient power density did not result in any detected damage. The other tests showed the beginning of crack formation for every sample, except the sample pre-exposed with the pure H-beam at 1500 C in GLADIS. This sample was roughened, but did not show any crack initiation. With exception to the roughened sample, the category of ELM-induced damage for the pre-exposed samples is identical to the reference tests without pre-exposure to a particle flux.

  19. High risk groups in an oil shale workforce

    SciTech Connect

    Gratt, L.B.; Marine, W.M.; Perry, B.W.; Savitz, D.A.

    1984-04-01

    The workforce risks of a hypothetical one million barrels-per-day oil shale industry were estimated. The risks for the different workforce segments were compared and high risk groups were identified. Accidents and injuries were statistically described by rates for fatalities, for accidents with days lost from work, and for accidents with no days lost from work. Workforce diseases analyzed were cancers, silicosis, pneumoconiosis, chronic bronchitis, chronic airway obstruction, and high frequency hearing loss. A comparison of the workforce groups under different risk measures (occurrence, fatality, and life-loss expectancy) was performed. The miners represented the group with the largest fatality and the most serious accident rate, although the estimated rates were below the average industry-wide underground mining experience. Lung disease from inhalation exposure of about the nuisance dust threshold limit value presents a significant risk for future concerns.

  20. High-throughput transcriptome analysis of barley (Hordeum vulgare) exposed to excessive boron.

    PubMed

    Tombuloglu, Guzin; Tombuloglu, Huseyin; Sakcali, M Serdal; Unver, Turgay

    2015-02-15

    Boron (B) is an essential micronutrient for optimum plant growth. However, above certain threshold B is toxic and causes yield loss in agricultural lands. While a number of studies were conducted to understand B tolerance mechanism, a transcriptome-wide approach for B tolerant barley is performed here for the first time. A high-throughput RNA-Seq (cDNA) sequencing technology (Illumina) was used with barley (Hordeum vulgare), yielding 208 million clean reads. In total, 256,874 unigenes were generated and assigned to known peptide databases: Gene Ontology (GO) (99,043), Swiss-Prot (38,266), Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG) (26,250), and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) (36,860), as determined by BLASTx search. According to the digital gene expression (DGE) analyses, 16% and 17% of the transcripts were found to be differentially regulated in root and leaf tissues, respectively. Most of them were involved in cell wall, stress response, membrane, protein kinase and transporter mechanisms. Some of the genes detected as highly expressed in root tissue are phospholipases, predicted divalent heavy-metal cation transporters, formin-like proteins and calmodulin/Ca(2+)-binding proteins. In addition, chitin-binding lectin precursor, ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase, and serine/threonine-protein kinase AFC2 genes were indicated to be highly regulated in leaf tissue upon excess B treatment. Some pathways, such as the Ca(2+)-calmodulin system, are activated in response to B toxicity. The differential regulation of 10 transcripts was confirmed by qRT-PCR, revealing the tissue-specific responses against B toxicity and their putative function in B-tolerance mechanisms. PMID:25498907

  1. A layered mixed zirconium phosphate/phosphonate with exposed carboxylic and phosphonic groups: X-ray powder structure and proton conductivity properties.

    PubMed

    Donnadio, Anna; Nocchetti, Morena; Costantino, Ferdinando; Taddei, Marco; Casciola, Mario; da Silva Lisboa, Fábio; Vivani, Riccardo

    2014-12-15

    A novel mixed zirconium phosphate/phosphonate based on glyphosine, of formula Zr2(PO4)H5(L)2·H2O [L = (O3PCH2)2NCH2COO], was synthesized in mild conditions. The compound has a layered structure that was solved ab initio from laboratory PXRD data. It crystallizes in the monoclinic C2/c space group with the following cell parameters: a = 29.925(3), b = 8.4225(5), c = 9.0985(4) Å, and β = 98.474(6)°. Phosphate groups are placed inside the sheets and connect the zirconium atoms in a tetradentate fashion, while uncoordinated carboxylate and P-OH phosphonate groups are exposed on the layer surface. Due to the presence of these acidic groups, the compound showed remarkable proton conductivity properties, which were studied in a wide range of temperature and relative humidity (RH). The conductivity is strongly dependent on RH and reaches 1 × 10(-3) S cm(-1) at 140 °C and 95% RH. At this RH, the activation energy of conduction is 0.15 eV in the temperature range 80-140 °C. The similarities of this structure with related structures already reported in the literature were also discussed. PMID:25423946

  2. Detectability of Local Group Dwarf Galaxy Analogues at High Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patej, Anna; Loeb, Abraham

    2015-12-01

    The dwarf galaxies of the Local Group are believed to be similar to the most abundant galaxies during the epoch of reionization (z ? 6). As a result of their proximity, there is a wealth of information that can be obtained about these galaxies; however, due to their low surface brightnesses, detecting their progenitors at high redshifts is challenging. We compare the physical properties of these dwarf galaxies to those of galaxies detected at high redshifts using Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer observations and consider the promise of the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope on the prospects for detecting high-redshift analogues of these galaxies.

  3. Association between TLR3 rs3775291 and resistance to HIV among highly exposed Caucasian intravenous drug users

    PubMed Central

    Huik, Kristi; Avi, Radko; Pauskar, Merit; Kallas, Eveli; Jgeda, Ene-Ly; Karki, Tnis; Marsh, Kristina; Jarlais, Don Des; Uuskla, Anneli; Lutsar, Irja

    2014-01-01

    Background TLR3 recognizes dsRNA and triggers immune responses against RNA and DNA viruses. A polymorphism in TLR3, rs3775291 (Leu412Phe), has been associated with the increased susceptibility to enteroviral myocarditis, protection against tick-borne encephalitis virus and HIV-1 infection. We investigated Caucasian intravenous drug users (IDUs) and blood donors in order to evaluate the associations between TLR3 genotypes and susceptibility to HIV infection. Materials and methods A total of 345 Caucasian IDUs were recruited, 50% of them were HIV positive, 89% HCV and 77% HBV positive. Based on their history of needle sharing, 20 of the HIV negative IDUs were classified as highly exposed HIV seronegatives (HESNs), 68 as non-HESNs and 85 as unexposed. The control group consisting of 497 blood donors tested negative for all three viruses. TLR3 rs3775291 were determined by using TaqMan Allelic Discrimination Assay. Results The TLR3 rs3775291 T allele frequency was similar among the HIV negative and HIV positive IDUs and blood donors 36%, 31% and 34%, respectively. The frequency of persons possessing at least one TLR3 rs3775291 T allele was significantly higher in HESNs compared with blood donors and HIV positive IDUs (80% vs. 55%; p = 0.037 and 80% vs. 53%; p = 0.031, respectively). In the univariate analysis, persons who possessed at least one T allele had reduced odds of being HIV seropositive (OR = 0.29, 95% CI = 0.090.90). This association remained significant (OR = 0.25, 95% CI = 0.070.87) after the adjustment for other co-variates (HCV, HBV serostatus and duration of intravenous drug use). Conclusions The TLR3 rs3775291 T allele has a protective effect against HIV infection among HESNs IDUs. PMID:23962581

  4. Mice repeatedly exposed to Group-A β-Haemolytic Streptococcus show perseverative behaviors, impaired sensorimotor gating, and immune activation in rostral diencephalon

    PubMed Central

    Macrì, Simone; Ceci, Chiara; Onori, Martina Proietti; Invernizzi, Roberto William; Bartolini, Erika; Altabella, Luisa; Canese, Rossella; Imperi, Monica; Orefici, Graziella; Creti, Roberta; Margarit, Immaculada; Magliozzi, Roberta; Laviola, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Repeated exposure to Group-A β-Haemolytic Streptococcus (GAS) may constitute a vulnerability factor in the onset and course of pediatric motor disturbances. GAS infections/colonization can stimulate the production of antibodies, which may cross the blood brain barrier, target selected brain areas (e.g. basal ganglia), and exacerbate motor alterations. Here, we exposed developing SJL male mice to four injections with a GAS homogenate and evaluated the following domains: motor coordination; general locomotion; repetitive behaviors; perseverative responses; and sensorimotor gating (pre-pulse inhibition, PPI). To demonstrate that behavioral changes were associated with immune-mediated brain alterations, we analyzed, in selected brain areas, the presence of infiltrates and microglial activation (immunohistochemistry), monoamines (HPLC), and brain metabolites (in vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy). GAS-exposed mice showed increased repetitive and perseverative behaviors, impaired PPI, and reduced concentrations of serotonin in prefrontal cortex, a brain area linked to the behavioral domains investigated, wherein they also showed remarkable elevations in lactate. Active inflammatory processes were substantiated by the observation of infiltrates and microglial activation in the white matter of the anterior diencephalon. These data support the hypothesis that repeated GAS exposure may elicit inflammatory responses in brain areas involved in motor control and perseverative behavior, and result in phenotypic abnormalities. PMID:26304458

  5. Orion in a New Light - VISTA exposes high-speed antics of young stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-02-01

    The Orion Nebula reveals many of its hidden secrets in a dramatic image taken by ESO's new VISTA survey telescope. The telescope's huge field of view can show the full splendour of the whole nebula and VISTA's infrared vision also allows it to peer deeply into dusty regions that are normally hidden and expose the curious behaviour of the very active young stars buried there. VISTA - the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy - is the latest addition to ESO's Paranal Observatory (eso0949). It is the largest survey telescope in the world and is dedicated to mapping the sky at infrared wavelengths. The large (4.1-metre) mirror, wide field of view and very sensitive detectors make VISTA a unique instrument. This dramatic new image of the Orion Nebula illustrates VISTA's remarkable powers. The Orion Nebula [1] is a vast stellar nursery lying about 1350 light-years from Earth. Although the nebula is spectacular when seen through an ordinary telescope, what can be seen using visible light is only a small part of a cloud of gas in which stars are forming. Most of the action is deeply embedded in dust clouds and to see what is really happening astronomers need to use telescopes with detectors sensitive to the longer wavelength radiation that can penetrate the dust. VISTA has imaged the Orion Nebula at wavelengths about twice as long as can be detected by the human eye. As in the many visible light pictures of this object, the new wide field VISTA image shows the familiar bat-like form of the nebula in the centre of the picture as well as the fascinating surrounding area. At the very heart of this region lie the four bright stars forming the Trapezium, a group of very hot young stars pumping out fierce ultraviolet radiation that is clearing the surrounding region and making the gas glow. However, observing in the infrared allows VISTA to reveal many other young stars in this central region that cannot be seen in visible light. Looking to the region above the centre of the picture, curious red features appear that are completely invisible except in the infrared. Many of these are very young stars that are still growing and are seen through the dusty clouds from which they form. These youthful stars eject streams of gas with typical speeds of 700 000 km/hour and many of the red features highlight the places where these gas streams collide with the surrounding gas, causing emission from excited molecules and atoms in the gas. There are also a few faint, red features below the Orion Nebula in the image, showing that stars form there too, but with much less vigour. These strange features are of great interest to astronomers studying the birth and youth of stars. This new image shows the power of the VISTA telescope to image wide areas of sky quickly and deeply in the near-infrared part of the spectrum. The telescope is just starting to survey the sky and astronomers are anticipating a rich harvest of science from this unique ESO facility. Notes [1] The Orion Nebula lies in the sword of the famous celestial hunter and is a favourite target both for casual sky watchers and astrophysicists alike. It is faintly visible to the unaided eye and appeared to early telescopic observers as a small cluster of blue-white stars surrounded by a mysterious grey-green mist. The object was first described in the early seventeenth century although the identity of the discoverer is uncertain. The French comet-hunter Messier made an accurate sketch of its main features in the mid-eighteenth century and gave it the number 42 in his famous catalogue. He also allocated the number 43 to the smaller detached region just above the main part of the nebula. Later William Herschel speculated that the nebula might be "the chaotic material of future suns" and astronomers have since discovered that the mist is indeed gas glowing under the fierce ultraviolet light from young hot stars that have recently formed there. More information ESO, the European Southern Observatory, is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world's most productive astronomical observatory. It is supported by 14 countries: Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Finland, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. ESO carries out an ambitious programme focused on the design, construction and operation of powerful ground-based observing facilities enabling astronomers to make important scientific discoveries. ESO also plays a leading role in promoting and organising cooperation in astronomical research. ESO operates three unique world-class observing sites in Chile: La Silla, Paranal and Chajnantor. At Paranal, ESO operates the Very Large Telescope, the world's most advanced visible-light astronomical observatory and VISTA, the world's largest survey telescope. ESO is the European partner of a revolutionary astronomical telescope ALMA, the largest astronomical project in existence. ESO is currently planning a 42-metre European Extremely Large optical/near-infrared Telescope, the E-ELT, which will become "the world's biggest eye on the sky".

  6. Identifying Differences between Two Groups of High-Needs High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Englert, Kerry; Barley, Zoe A.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined differences in nine factors between a group of the highest-performing needs high schools (HPHN) and a group of the lowest performing high-needs (LPHN) high schools using teacher responses from a national dataset. The factors are: (1) shared mission and goals; (2) professional development; (3) collaboration among teachers (4)

  7. Physiological responses of Australian Merino wethers exposed to high heat load.

    PubMed

    Alhidary, I A; Shini, S; Al Jassim, R A M; Gaughan, J B

    2012-01-01

    Twelve 9-mo-old Merino wethers (30.4 3.2 kg of BW) were used in a crossover study to investigate the heat tolerance of Australian Merino sheep by testing their physiological responses to repeated heat loads that occurred during summer months. Wethers were randomly divided into 2 groups of 6 wethers each, housed individually in an environmental chamber, and subjected to 2 d of thermoneutral conditions (TNC) followed by either 7 d of TNC (maximum temperature of 24C, minimum temperature of 16C) or 7 d of hot conditions (maximum temperature of 38C, minimum temperature of 28C), and then 2 d of TNC. These treatments were applied in 2 replicates, with each replicate in a separate environmental chamber. Rectal temperature (RT) and respiration rate were measured daily at 0600, 0800, 1000, 1200, 1400, 1600, and 1800 h. Feed and water intakes were measured daily, and wethers were weighed on d 1 and 11. Blood samples were collected from each whether on d 2 and 6, and serum was assayed for concentrations of creatine, glucose, total protein, cholesterol, NEFA, calcium, sodium, and potassium. Exposure to a high ambient temperature resulted in an 0.8C increase in RT (P < 0.001), an increase in respiration rate (P < 0.001) by 66 breaths/min, and a 2.7 L/d increase in water intake (P < 0.0001). Feed intake decreased by 22% (P < 0.0001), BW decreased by 5.2% (P < 0.03), and creatine concentration was reduced (P < 0.05). No differences (P > 0.05) between treatments were observed for any of the remaining serum variables. These results indicate that Australian Merino sheep were able to maintain RT within the normal range during exposure to a prolonged increase in heat and that they recovered quickly from the negative effect of heat stress within 2 d of conditions returning to TNC. It would appear that they have a high heat tolerance, and further studies are needed to examine the effects of a greater heat load to determine the temperature-humidity index thresholds for Australian Merino sheep. PMID:21841087

  8. Mechanisms of blood pressure regulation that differ in men repeatedly exposed to high-G acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that repeated exposure to high acceleration (G) would be associated with enhanced functions of specific mechanisms of blood pressure regulation. We measured heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (), mean arterial blood pressure, central venous pressure, forearm and leg vascular resistance, catecholamines, and changes in leg volume (%DeltaLV) during various protocols of lower body negative pressure (LBNP), carotid stimulation, and infusions of adrenoreceptor agonists in 10 males after three training sessions on different days over a period of 5-7 days using a human centrifuge (G trained). These responses were compared with the same measurements in 10 males who were matched for height, weight, and fitness but did not undergo G training (controls). Compared with the control group, G-trained subjects demonstrated greater R-R interval response to equal carotid baroreceptor stimulation (7.3 +/- 1.2 vs. 3.9 +/- 0.4 ms/mmHg, P = 0.02), less vasoconstriction to equal low-pressure baroreceptor stimulation (-1.4 +/- 0.2 vs. -2.6 +/- 0.3 U/mmHg, P = 0.01), and higher HR (-1.2 +/- 0.2 vs. -0.5 +/- 0.1 beats. min(-1). mmHg(-1), P = 0.01) and alpha-adrenoreceptor response (32.8 +/- 3.4 vs. 19.5 +/- 4.7 U/mmHg, P = 0.04) to equal dose of phenylephrine. During graded LBNP, G-trained subjects had less decline in and SV, %DeltaLV, and elevation in thoracic impedance. G-trained subjects also had greater total blood (6,497 +/- 496 vs. 5,438 +/- 228 ml, P = 0.07) and erythrocyte (3,110 +/- 364 vs. 2,310 +/- 96 ml, P = 0.06) volumes. These results support the hypothesis that exposure to repeated high G is associated with increased capacities of mechanisms that underlie blood pressure regulation.

  9. The effects of catechin isolated from green tea GMB-4 on NADPH and nitric oxide levels in endothelial cells exposed to high glucose

    PubMed Central

    Peristiowati, Yuly; Indasah, Indasah; Ratnawati, Retty

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study aimed to investigate whether a catechin isolated from GMB-4 green tea is able to increase the reducing equivalent system and nitric oxide (NO) level in endothelial cells exposed to high glucose (HG) level. Materials and Methods: Endothelial cells were obtained from human umbilical vascular tissues. At confluent, human endothelial cells were divided into five groups, which included control (untreated), endothelial cells exposed to HG (30 mM), endothelial cells exposed to HG in the presence of green tea catechin (HG + C) at the following three doses: 0.03; 0.3; and 3 mg/ml. Analysis of NADP+, NADPH, and NO levels were performed colorimetrically. Results: This decrease in NADPH was significantly (P < 0.05) attenuated by both the 0.3 and 3 mg/ml treatments of catechin. HG level significantly decreased NO compared with untreated cells. This increase in NO was significantly attenuated by the 0.3 mg/ml dose of the catechin. Conclusion: In conclusion, catechin isolated from GMB-4 green tea prohibits the decrease in NADPH and NO in endothelial cells induced by HG. Therefore this may provide a natural therapy for attenuating the endothelial dysfunction found in diabetes mellitus. PMID:26401396

  10. Diagnosis and Management of High Risk Group for Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Hyuk; Kim, Nayoung

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is associated with high morbidity and mortality worldwide. To reduce the socioeconomic burden related to gastric cancer, it is very important to identify and manage high risk group for gastric cancer. In this review, we describe the general risk factors for gastric cancer and define high risk group for gastric cancer. We discuss strategies for the effective management of patients for the prevention and early detection of gastric cancer. Atrophic gastritis (AG) and intestinal metaplasia (IM) are the most significant risk factors for gastric cancer. Therefore, the accurate selection of individuals with AG and IM may be a key strategy for the prevention and/or early detection of gastric cancer. Although endoscopic evaluation using enhanced technologies such as narrow band imaging-magnification, the serum pepsinogen test, Helicobacter pylori serology, and trefoil factor 3 have been evaluated, a gold standard method to accurately select individuals with AG and IM has not emerged. In terms of managing patients at high risk of gastric cancer, it remains uncertain whether H. pylori eradication reverses and/or prevents the progression of AG and IM. Although endoscopic surveillance in high risk patients is expected to be beneficial, further prospective studies in large populations are needed to determine the optimal surveillance interval. PMID:25547086

  11. Activation of the Cardiac Renin-Angiotensin System in High Oxygen-Exposed Newborn Rats: Angiotensin Receptor Blockade Prevents the Developmental Programming of Cardiac Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bertagnolli, Mariane; Dios, Anne; Béland-Bonenfant, Sarah; Gascon, Gabrielle; Sutherland, Megan; Lukaszewski, Marie-Amélie; Cloutier, Anik; Paradis, Pierre; Schiffrin, Ernesto L; Nuyt, Anne Monique

    2016-04-01

    Newborn rats exposed to high oxygen (O2), mimicking preterm birth-related neonatal stress, develop later in life cardiac hypertrophy, dysfunction, fibrosis, and activation of the renin-angiotensin system. Cardiac renin-angiotensin system activation in O2-exposed adult rats is characterized by an imbalance in angiotensin (Ang) receptors type 1/2 (AT1/2), with prevailing AT1 expression. To study the role of renin-angiotensin system in the developmental programming of cardiac dysfunction, we assessed Ang receptor expression during neonatal high O2 exposure and whether AT1 receptor blockade prevents cardiac alterations in early adulthood. Sprague-Dawley newborn rats were kept with their mother in 80% O2 or room air (control) from days 3 to 10 (P3-P10) of life. Losartan or water was administered by gavage from P8 to P10 (n=9/group). Rats were studied at P3 (before O2 exposure), P5, P10 (end of O2), and P28. Losartan treatment had no impact on growth or kidney development. AT1 and Ang type 2 receptors were upregulated in the left ventricle by high O2 exposure (P5 and P10), which was prevented by Losartan treatment at P10. Losartan prevented the cardiac AT1/2 imbalance at P28. Losartan decreased cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis and improved left ventricle fraction of shortening in P28 O2-exposed rats, which was associated with decreased oxidation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, inhibition of the transforming growth factor-β/SMAD3 pathway, and upregulation of cardiac angiotensin-converting enzyme 2. In conclusion, short-term Ang II blockade during neonatal high O2 prevents the development of cardiac alterations later in life in rats. These findings highlight the key role of neonatal renin-angiotensin system activation in the developmental programming of cardiac dysfunction induced by deleterious neonatal conditions. PMID:26857347

  12. Safety of combination antiretroviral prophylaxis in high-risk HIV-exposed newborns: a retrospective review of the Canadian experience

    PubMed Central

    Kakkar, Fatima W; Samson, Lindy; Vaudry, Wendy; Brophy, Jason; Le Meur, Jean-Baptiste; Lapointe, Normand; Read, Stanley E; Bitnun, Ari

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The optimal management of infants born to HIV-positive mothers who are untreated or have detectable viral load prior to delivery remains controversial. Despite the increasing use of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) for post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) of neonates at high risk of HIV infection, there is little safety and pharmacokinetic data to support this approach. The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and tolerability of cART for PEP in HIV-exposed neonates. Methods Retrospective study on 148 cART and 145 Zidovudine (ZDV) monotherapy-exposed infants identified from four Canadian centres where cART for PEP has routinely been prescribed in high-risk situations. Physician-reported adverse events and clinical outcomes were extracted by chart review. Haematological and growth parameters at birth, one and six months of age were compared between cART and ZDV-exposed infants using multivariate mixed effects modelling. Results Non-specific signs and symptoms were reported in 10.2% of cART recipients versus none of the ZDV recipients. Treatment was discontinued prematurely in 9.5% of cART recipients versus 2.1% of ZDV recipients (p=0.01). In the multivariate model, cART recipients had lower mean haemoglobin (decrease of 2.07 g/L) over the 6-month period compared with ZDV recipients (p=0.04), but no effect was seen on absolute neutrophil count. cART recipients had lower weight and smaller head circumference at birth and one month of age compared with ZDV-exposed infants; these differences were no longer significant at six months of age. Conclusions cART administered at treatment doses for PEP in neonates was generally well tolerated, though a higher incidence of non-specific signs and symptoms and early treatment discontinuation occurred among cART recipients. PMID:26880241

  13. The benefit of preventive procedures for high risk groups.

    PubMed

    Holloway, P J; Downer, M C

    1979-06-01

    The clinical effectiveness of many caries prophylactic agents has been demonstrated but their public health value questioned from the viewpoint of economic efficiency. However, some groups within the population may have enhanced response to certain agents and for these subjects a more acceptable cost-value situation may occur. The effectiveness of agents may be measured by the extent to which they reduce operative treatment need. Therefore by costing treatment carried out in both groups in a clinical trial and adding, for the test group, the cost of prevention, the cost effectiveness of treatment plus prevention compared with treatment alone can be investigated. A computer was programmed to estimate from DMFS data, maintenance treatment carried out during clinical trials and that needed at the end to render subjects free of caries. Treatment was costed on the Resource Related Index. In an examination of two experimental clinical trials among adolescents it was found that supervised daily brushing in school with MFP dentifrice produced a 25 per cent reduction in DMFS over three years, but cost six and a half times as much as the operative treatment saved. However, for a high risk group of girls the cost was only two and a half times as much. When APF topical applications by hygienists were added to the same brushing programme it became even less economically efficient. Neither experimental programme was cost-effective for any group unless a weighting factor was introduced to take account of the desirablity of a sound as opposed to a filled tooth. PMID:110705

  14. OBSCURED STARBURST ACTIVITY IN HIGH-REDSHIFT CLUSTERS AND GROUPS

    SciTech Connect

    Kocevski, Dale D.; McGrath, Elizabeth J.; Gal, Roy; Squires, Gordon K.; Surace, Jason A.; Lacy, Mark

    2011-07-20

    Using Spitzer-Multiband Imaging Photometer 24 {mu}m imaging and extensive Keck spectroscopy, we examine the nature of the obscured star-forming population in three clusters and three groups at z {approx} 0.9. These six systems are the primary components of the Cl1604 supercluster, the largest structure imaged by Spitzer at redshifts approaching unity. We find that the average density of 24 {mu}m detected galaxies within the Cl1604 clusters is nearly twice that of the surrounding field and that this overdensity scales with the cluster's dynamical state. The 24 {mu}m bright members often appear optically unremarkable and exhibit only moderate [O II] line emission due to severe obscuration. Their spatial distribution suggests that they are an infalling population, but an examination of their spectral properties, morphologies, and optical colors indicates that they are not simply analogs of the field population that have yet to be quenched. Using stacked composite spectra, we find that the 24 {mu}m detected cluster and group galaxies exhibit elevated levels of Balmer absorption compared with galaxies undergoing normal, continuous star formation. A similar excess is not observed in field galaxies with equivalent infrared luminosities, indicating a greater fraction of the detected cluster and group members have experienced a burst of star formation in the recent past compared to their counterparts in the field. Our results suggest that gas-rich galaxies at high redshift experience a temporary increase in their star formation activity as they assemble into denser environments. Using Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging, we find that disturbed morphologies are common among the 24 {mu}m detected cluster and group members and become more prevalent in regions of higher galaxy density. We conclude that mergers are the dominant triggering mechanism responsible for the enhanced star formation found in the Cl1604 groups, while a mix of harassment and mergers are likely driving the activity of the cluster galaxies.

  15. Obscured Starburst Activity in High-redshift Clusters and Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocevski, Dale D.; Lemaux, Brian C.; Lubin, Lori M.; Gal, Roy; McGrath, Elizabeth J.; Fassnacht, Christopher D.; Squires, Gordon K.; Surace, Jason A.; Lacy, Mark

    2011-07-01

    Using Spitzer-Multiband Imaging Photometer 24 ?m imaging and extensive Keck spectroscopy, we examine the nature of the obscured star-forming population in three clusters and three groups at z ~ 0.9. These six systems are the primary components of the Cl1604 supercluster, the largest structure imaged by Spitzer at redshifts approaching unity. We find that the average density of 24 ?m detected galaxies within the Cl1604 clusters is nearly twice that of the surrounding field and that this overdensity scales with the cluster's dynamical state. The 24 ?m bright members often appear optically unremarkable and exhibit only moderate [O II] line emission due to severe obscuration. Their spatial distribution suggests that they are an infalling population, but an examination of their spectral properties, morphologies, and optical colors indicates that they are not simply analogs of the field population that have yet to be quenched. Using stacked composite spectra, we find that the 24 ?m detected cluster and group galaxies exhibit elevated levels of Balmer absorption compared with galaxies undergoing normal, continuous star formation. A similar excess is not observed in field galaxies with equivalent infrared luminosities, indicating a greater fraction of the detected cluster and group members have experienced a burst of star formation in the recent past compared to their counterparts in the field. Our results suggest that gas-rich galaxies at high redshift experience a temporary increase in their star formation activity as they assemble into denser environments. Using Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging, we find that disturbed morphologies are common among the 24 ?m detected cluster and group members and become more prevalent in regions of higher galaxy density. We conclude that mergers are the dominant triggering mechanism responsible for the enhanced star formation found in the Cl1604 groups, while a mix of harassment and mergers are likely driving the activity of the cluster galaxies.

  16. Behavioural Disturbances in a Temperate Fish Exposed to Sustained High-CO2 Levels

    PubMed Central

    Vuylsteke, Amandine; Sturve, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    As atmospheric CO2 levels rise, the CO2 concentration in ocean surface waters increases through a process commonly referred to as ocean acidification. Recently, surprising behavioural modifications has been detected in the early life stages of tropical coral reef fish exposed to ocean acidification-relevant CO2 concentrations, but it has been unclear if this effect could occur in temperate waters. Here we show several severe behavioural disturbances, including effects on boldness, exploratory behaviour, lateralisation, and learning in a temperate fish, the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus). The behavioural effects were consistent throughout the exposure period and increased in effect size with exposure time. We observed the effects on adult sticklebacks, a species known to be tolerant to other environmental stressors. Our findings suggest that behavioural abnormalities that stem from CO2 exposure are not restricted to sensitive tropical species or early life stages and may therefore affect fish on a global scale. The severity of disturbances and the possibility of a serious behavioural problem for fish across the globe is cause for concern. PMID:23750274

  17. Abscisic acid signalling determines susceptibility of bundle sheath cells to photoinhibition in high light-exposed Arabidopsis leaves

    PubMed Central

    Gorecka, Magdalena; Alvarez-Fernandez, Ruben; Slattery, Katie; McAusland, Lorna; Davey, Phillip A.; Karpinski, Stanislaw; Lawson, Tracy; Mullineaux, Philip M.

    2014-01-01

    The rapid induction of the bundle sheath cell (BSC)-specific expression of ASCORBATE PEROXIDASE2 (APX2) in high light (HL)-exposed leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana is, in part, regulated by the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) produced by vascular parenchyma cells. In this study, we provide more details of the ABA signalling that regulates APX2 expression and consider its importance in the photosynthetic responses of BSCs and whole leaves. This was done using a combination of analyses of gene expression and chlorophyll a fluorescence of both leaves and individual BSCs and mesophyll cells. The regulation of APX2 expression occurs by the combination of the protein kinase SnRK2.6 (OST1):protein phosphatase 2C ABI2 and a G? (GPA1)-regulated signalling pathway. The use of an ost1-1/gpa1-4 mutant established that these signalling pathways are distinct but interact to regulate APX2. In HL-exposed leaves, BSC chloroplasts were more susceptible to photoinhibition than those of mesophyll cells. The activity of the ABA-signalling network determined the degree of susceptibility of BSCs to photoinhibition by influencing non-photochemical quenching. By contrast, in HL-exposed whole leaves, ABA signalling did not have any major influence on their transcriptomes nor on their susceptibility to photoinhibition, except where guard cell responses were observed. PMID:24591719

  18. Abscisic acid signalling determines susceptibility of bundle sheath cells to photoinhibition in high light-exposed Arabidopsis leaves.

    PubMed

    Gorecka, Magdalena; Alvarez-Fernandez, Ruben; Slattery, Katie; McAusland, Lorna; Davey, Phillip A; Karpinski, Stanislaw; Lawson, Tracy; Mullineaux, Philip M

    2014-04-19

    The rapid induction of the bundle sheath cell (BSC)-specific expression of ASCORBATE PEROXIDASE2 (APX2) in high light (HL)-exposed leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana is, in part, regulated by the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) produced by vascular parenchyma cells. In this study, we provide more details of the ABA signalling that regulates APX2 expression and consider its importance in the photosynthetic responses of BSCs and whole leaves. This was done using a combination of analyses of gene expression and chlorophyll a fluorescence of both leaves and individual BSCs and mesophyll cells. The regulation of APX2 expression occurs by the combination of the protein kinase SnRK2.6 (OST1):protein phosphatase 2C ABI2 and a G? (GPA1)-regulated signalling pathway. The use of an ost1-1/gpa1-4 mutant established that these signalling pathways are distinct but interact to regulate APX2. In HL-exposed leaves, BSC chloroplasts were more susceptible to photoinhibition than those of mesophyll cells. The activity of the ABA-signalling network determined the degree of susceptibility of BSCs to photoinhibition by influencing non-photochemical quenching. By contrast, in HL-exposed whole leaves, ABA signalling did not have any major influence on their transcriptomes nor on their susceptibility to photoinhibition, except where guard cell responses were observed. PMID:24591719

  19. Flakelike LiCoO2 with Exposed {010} Facets As a Stable Cathode Material for Highly Reversible Lithium Storage.

    PubMed

    Wu, Naiteng; Zhang, Yun; Guo, Yi; Liu, Shengjie; Liu, Heng; Wu, Hao

    2016-02-01

    A thick and dense flakelike LiCoO2 with exposed {010} active facets is synthesized using Co(OH)2 nanoflake as a self-sacrificial template obtained from a simple coprecipitation method, and served as a cathode material for lithium ion batteries. When operated at a high cutoff voltage up to 4.5 V, the resultant LiCoO2 exhibits an outstanding rate capability, delivering a reversible discharge capacity as high as 179, 176, 168, 116, and 96 mA h g(-1) at 25 C under the current rate of 0.1, 0.5, 1, 5, and 10 C, respectively. When charge/discharge cycling at 55 C, a high specific capacity of 148 mA h g(-1) (?88% retention) can be retained after 100 cycles under 1 C, demonstrating excellent cycling and thermal stability. Besides, the flakelike LiCoO2 also shows an impressive low-temperature electrochemical activity with specific capacities of 175 (0.1 C) and 154 mA h g(-1) (1 C) at -10 C, being the highest ever reported for a subzero-temperature lithium storage capability, as well as 52% capacity retention even after 80 cycles under 1 C. Such superior high-voltage electrochemical performances of the flakelike LiCoO2 operated at a wide temperature range are mainly attributed to its unique hierarchical structure with specifically exposed facets. The exposed {010} active facets provide a preferential crystallographic orientation for Li-ion migration, while the micrometer-sized secondary particles agglomerated by submicron primary LiCoO2 flakes endow the electrode with better structural integrity, both of which ensure the LiCoO2 cathode to manifest remarkably enhanced reversible lithium storage properties. PMID:26760433

  20. Indiana University High Energy Physics Group, Task E

    SciTech Connect

    Alyea, E.D. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    This progress report for Task E of the Indiana University High Energy Physics Group covers the period June 1, 1990 to April 15, 1991. All my research effort was devoted to the Large Volume Detector (LVD) at the Gran Sasso Laboratory in Italy. The first of five towers'' of LVD is currently under construction. My primary effort during this time has been to bring to fruition the cabling plans developed by me the previous year. Other activities have included consultations on the design of the tracking trigger electronics, work on several hardware systems for the direct mount tracking modules, and coordination of various projects at the Gran Sasso Lab.

  1. Inhalable particulate matter and mitochondrial DNA copy number in highly exposed individuals in Beijing, China: a repeated-measure study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mitochondria are both a sensitive target and a primary source of oxidative stress, a key pathway of air particulate matter (PM)-associated diseases. Mitochondrial DNA copy number (MtDNAcn) is a marker of mitochondrial damage and malfunctioning. We evaluated whether ambient PM exposure affects MtDNAcn in a highly-exposed population in Beijing, China. Methods The Beijing Truck Driver Air Pollution Study was conducted shortly before the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games (June 15-July 27, 2008) and included 60 truck drivers and 60 office workers. Personal PM2.5 and elemental carbon (EC, a tracer of traffic particles) were measured during work hours using portable monitors. Post-work blood samples were obtained on two different days. Ambient PM10 was averaged from 27 monitoring stations in Beijing. Blood MtDNAcn was determined by real-time PCR and examined in association with particle levels using mixed-effect models. Results In all participants combined, MtDNAcn was negatively associated with personal EC level measured during work hours (?=?0.059, 95% CI: -0.011; -0.0006, p=0.03); and 5-day (?=?0.017, 95% CI: -0.029;-0.005, p=0.01) and 8-day average ambient PM10 (?=?0.008, 95% CI: -0.043; -0.008, p=0.004) after adjusting for possible confounding factors, including study groups. MtDNAcn was also negatively associated among office workers with EC (?=?0.012, 95% CI: -0.022;-0.002, p=0.02) and 8-day average ambient PM10 (?=?0.030, 95% CI: -0.051;-0.008, p=0.007). Conclusions We observed decreased blood MtDNAcn in association with increased exposure to EC during work hours and recent ambient PM10 exposure. Our results suggest that MtDNAcn may be influenced by particle exposures. Further studies are required to determine the roles of MtDNAcn in the etiology of particle-related diseases. PMID:23628000

  2. Potential approaches to the spectroscopic characterization of high performance polymers exposed to energetic protons and heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suleman, Naushadalli K.

    1991-01-01

    A potential limitation to human activity on the lunar surface or in deep space is the exposure of the crew to unacceptably high levels of penetrating space radiations. The radiations of most concerns for such missions are high-energy protons emitted during solar flares, and galactic cosmic rays which are high-energy ions ranging from protons to iron. The development of materials for effective shielding from energetic space radiations will clearly require a greater understanding of the underlying mechanisms of radiation-induced damage in bulk materials. This can be accomplished in part by the detailed spectroscopic characterization of bulk materials that were exposed to simulated space radiations. An experimental data base thus created can then be used in conjunction with existing radiation transport codes in the design and fabrication of effective radiation shielding materials. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy was proven very useful in elucidating radiation effects in polymers (high performance polymers are often an important components of structural composites).

  3. Obscured Starburst Activity in High Redshift Clusters and Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocevski, Dale; Lemaux, B.; Lubin, L.; Gal, R.

    2011-01-01

    Using Spitzer MIPS 24um imaging and extensive Keck spectroscopy we have found evidence for environmentally triggered starburst activity within six clusters and groups at z 0.9. I will show that the density of 24um-detected galaxies in the cluster environment is nearly twice that of the surrounding field at this redshift and that this overdensity scales with the cluster's dynamical state. The 24um-bright members often appear optically unremarkable and exhibit only moderate [OII] line emission due to severe obscuration. Although their spatial distribution suggests they are an infalling population, a close examination of their spectral properties, morphologies and optical colors indicate they are not simply analogs of the field population that have yet to be quenched. Using stacked DEIMOS spectra, we find the 24um-detected cluster and group galaxies exhibit elevated levels of Balmer absorption compared to galaxies undergoing normal, continuous star formation. A similar excess is not observed in field galaxies with equivalent infrared luminosities, indicating a greater fraction of the detected cluster and group members have experienced a burst of star formation in the recent past compared to their counterparts in the field. Our results suggest that gas-rich galaxies at high redshift experience a temporary increase in their star formation activity as they assemble into denser environments. Using HST ACS imaging we find that disturbed morphologies are common among the obscured starburst population and become more prevalent in regions of higher galaxy density. We conclude that mergers are the dominant triggering mechanism responsible for the enhanced star formation found in the group galaxies, while a mix of harassment and mergers are likely driving the activity of the cluster galaxies.

  4. Modulation of lipid metabolism in glycyrrhizic acid-treated rats fed on a high-calorie diet and exposed to short or long-term stress

    PubMed Central

    Yaw, Hui Ping; Ton, So Ha; Chin, Hsien-Fei; Karim, Muhammad Kaiser Abdul; Fernando, Hamish Alexander; Kadir, Khalid Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Stress and high-calorie diets increase the risk of developing metabolic syndrome. Glycyrrhizic acid (GA) has been shown to improve dyslipidaemia in rats fed on a high-calorie diet. This study aimed to examine the effects of GA on lipid metabolism in rats exposed to short- or long-term stress and on a high-calorie diet. The parameters examined included serum lipid profiles, serum free fatty acids and fatty acid profiles in tissues, and expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), elongases and desaturases. Within the 14- or 28-day exposure groups, neither stress nor GA affected the lipid profile and serum free fatty acids. Stress did not affect PPAR-α expression in both the 14- and 28-day exposure groups. However, GA-treated rats from the former group had increased PPAR-α expression only in the kidney while all other tissues from the latter group were unaffected. Stress increased PPAR-γ expression in the heart of the 28-day exposure group but its expression was unaffected in all tissues of the 14-day exposure group. GA elevated PPAR-γ expression in the kidney and the skeletal muscles. Neither stress nor GA affected LPL expressions in all tissues from the 14-day exposure group but its expressions were elevated in the QF of the stressed rats and heart of the GA-treated rats of the 28-day exposure group. As for the elongases and desaturases in the liver, stress down-regulated ELOVL5 in the long-term exposure group while up-regulated ELOVL6 in the short-term exposure group while hepatic desaturases were unaffected by stress. Neither elongase nor desaturase expressions in the liver were affected by GA. This research is the first report of GA on lipid metabolism under stress and high-calorie diet conditions and the results gives evidence for the role of GA in ameliorating MetS via site-specific regulation of lipid metabolism gene expressions and modification of fatty acids. PMID:26069530

  5. Highly exposed surface area of {001} facets dominated BiOBr nanosheets with enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Duan, Fang; Wang, Xiaofeng; Tan, Tingting; Chen, Mingqing

    2016-02-17

    Two groups of BiOBr nanosheets with different sizes and similar exposure percentages of {001} facets were selectively synthesized by simple hydrothermal methods. The obtained samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). The photocatalytic activity was estimated from the degradation of organic pollutants under visible-light irradiation. The results indicated that BiOBr nanosheets with similar exposure percentages of {001} facets but smaller sizes exhibited higher photocatalytic activity. Furthermore, the effects of the size, including the thickness and length, of BiOBr nanosheets were also studied. The results showed that the impact of thickness was more significant than that of length. It was found that reducing the thickness of BiOBr nanosheets can significantly increase the exposed surface areas of {001} facets (S{001}), but not necessarily the exposure percentage of {001} facets. Moreover, in our experiment, the photocatalytic activity of BiOBr nanosheets increased linearly with an increase in S{001} in the range of 0.022 to 0.111 nm(-1). Therefore, the photocatalytic activity of BiOBr nanosheets depended on the exposed surface areas of {001} facets rather than the exposure percentage of {001} facets. The enhancement of the photocatalytic activity of ultrathin BiOBr nanosheets with large exposed surface areas of {001} facets can be mainly ascribed to their enhanced absorption of visible light and improved separation efficiency of charge carriers. PMID:26846847

  6. High-temperature-oxidation-induced ordered structure in Inconel 939 superalloy exposed to oxy-combustion environments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Jingxi; Wise, Adam; Nuhfer, Thomas; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Jablonski, Paul D.; Sridhar, Seetharaman; Laughlin, David E.

    2013-04-20

    In the integrated oxy-fuel combustion and turbine power generation system, turbine alloys are exposed to high temperature and an atmosphere comprised of steam, CO2 and O2. While surface and internal oxidation of the alloy takes place, the microstructure in the subsurface region also changes due to oxidation that results in the loss of the strengthening precipitates. In an earlier study of the oxidation of Inconel 939 Ni-based superalloy exposed to oxy-fuel combustion environment for up to 1000 hours, a high-temperature-oxidation-induced phase transformation in the sub-surface region was noticed and a two-phase region formed at the expense of strengthening γ' phase. While one of the two phases was identified as the Ni-matrix (γ solid solution, face-center-cubic) phase, the other product phase remained unidentified. In this study, the crystal structure of the unknown phase and its orientation relationship with the parent Ni-matrix phase was investigated through electron diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. It was determined that the crystal structure of the unknown phase could be modeled as a ternary derivative of the ordered η-Ni3Ti phase (D024) structure with lattice parameters of a = 0.5092 nm and c = 0.8336 nm, α = 90º, β = 90º and γ = 120º.

  7. Highly exposed Pt nanoparticles supported on porous graphene for electrochemical detection of hydrogen peroxide in living cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Bo, Xiangjie; Zhao, Zheng; Guo, Liping

    2015-12-15

    In this study, we developed a novel biosensor based on highly exposed Pt nanoparticles (Pt NPs) decorated porous graphene (PG) for the reliable detection of extracellular hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) released from living cells. The commercially available low-cost hydrophilic CaCO3 spheres were used as template for preparing PG. The porous structure provided larger surface area and more active sites. Due to the porous structure of PG, the Pt NPs supported on PG were not secluded by aggregated graphene layers and were highly exposed to target molecules. Ultrafine Pt NPs were well dispersed and loaded on PG by a method of microwave assistance. Electrochemical performances of the Pt/PG nanocomposites modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) were investigated. The electrocatalytic reduction of H2O2 showed a wide linear range from 1 to 1477 ?M, with a high sensitivity of 341.14 ?A mM(-1) cm(-2) and a limit of detection (LOD) as low as 0.50 ?M. Moreover, the Pt/PG/GCE exhibited excellent anti-interference property, reproducibility and long-term storage stability. Because of these remarkable analytical advantages, the constructed sensor was used to determine H2O2 released from living cells with satisfactory results. The superior catalytic activity makes Pt/PG nanocomposites a promising candidate for electrochemical sensors and biosensors design. PMID:26120812

  8. Distinct vasopressin content in the hypothalamic supraoptic and paraventricular nucleus of rats exposed to low and high ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Jasnic, N; Dakic, T; Bataveljic, D; Vujovic, P; Lakic, I; Jevdjovic, T; Djurasevic, S; Djordjevic, J

    2015-08-01

    Both high and low ambient temperature represent thermal stressors that, among other physiological responses, induce activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and secretion of arginine-vasopressin (AVP). The exposure to heat also leads to disturbance of osmotic homeostasis. Since AVP, in addition to its well-known peripheral effects, has long been recognized as a hormone involved in the modulation of HPA axis activity, the aim of the present study was to elucidate the hypothalamic AVP amount in the acutely heat/cold exposed rats. Rats were exposed to high (+38C) or low (+4C) ambient temperature for 60min. Western blot was employed for determining hypothalamic AVP levels, and the difference in its content between supraoptic (SON) and paraventricular nucleus (PVN) was detected using immunohistochemical analysis. The results showed that exposure to both high and low ambient temperature increased hypothalamic AVP levels, although the increment was higher under heat conditions. On the other hand, patterns of AVP level changes in PVN and SON were stressor-specific, given that exposure to cold increased the AVP level in both nuclei, while heat exposure affected the PVN AVP content alone. In conclusion, our results revealed that cold and heat stress influence hypothalamic AVP amount with different intensity. Moreover, different pattern of AVP amount changes in the PVN and SON indicates a role of this hormone not only in response to heat as an osmotic/physical threat, but to the non-osmotic stressors as well. PMID:26267492

  9. Ultrasonic and metallographic studies on AISI 4140 steel exposed to hydrogen at high pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oruganti, Malavika

    This thesis conducts an investigation to study the effects of hydrogen exposure at high temperature and pressure on the behavior of AISI 4140 steel. Piezoelectric ultrasonic technique was primarily used to evaluate surface longitudinal wave velocity and defect geometry variations, as related to time after exposure to hydrogen at high temperature and pressure. Critically refracted longitudinal wave technique was used for the former and pulse-echo technique for the latter. Optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to correlate the ultrasonic results with the microstructure of the steel and to provide better insight into the steel behavior. The results of the investigation indicate that frequency analysis of the defect echo, determined using the pulse-echo technique at regular intervals of time, appears to be a promising tool for monitoring defect growth induced by a high temperature and high pressure hydrogen-related attack.

  10. Distribution of Chromosome Breakpoints in Human Epithelial Cells Exposed to Low- and High-LET Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; Zhang, Ye; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Feiveson, Alan; Wu, Honglu

    2010-01-01

    Low-and high-LET radiations produced distinct breakpoint distributions. The difference of the breakpoint distributions between low-and high-LET only appeared in break ends involved in interchromosome exchanges. The breakpoint distributions for break ends participating in intrachromosome exchanges were similar. Gene-rich regions do not necessarily have more chromosome breaks. High-LET appeared to produce long live (data not shown) or longer live breaks that can migrate a longer distance before rejoining with other breaks. Domains occupied by different segments of the chromosomes may be responsible for the breakpoint distribution. The dose responses for interchromosomal exchanges were linear in all four exposures. However, the dose response for intrachromosomal exchanges were none linear. Increasing dose of high dose rate exposure (Fe-ions or -rays) increase the fraction of cells with intrachromosome aberrations, whereas increasing dose of low dose rate exposure (neutrons or -rays) does not affect the fraction of cells with intrachromosome aberrations.

  11. Deuterium-induced nanostructure formation on tungsten exposed to high-flux plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H. Y.; De Temmerman, G.; Luo, G.-N.; Jia, Y. Z.; Yuan, Y.; Fu, B. Q.; Godfrey, A.; Liu, W.

    2015-08-01

    Surface topography of polycrystalline tungsten (W) have been examined after exposure to a low-energy (38 eV/D), high-flux (?1.1-1.5 1024 m-2 s-1) deuterium plasma in the Pilot-PSI linear plasma device. The methods used were scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), positron annihilation Doppler broadening (PADB) and grazing incident X-ray diffraction (GI-XRD). After exposure to high flux D plasma, blisters and nanostructures are formed on the W surface. Generation of defects was evidenced by PADB, while high stress and mixture of phases were detected in depth of 50 nm by GI-XRD. TEM observation revealed fluctuations and disordered microstructure on the outmost surface layer. Based on these results, surface reconstruction is considered as a possible mechanism for the formation of defects and nanostructures.

  12. High mortality rates occur in copper deficient rats exposed to a normally nonlethal endotoxin treatment

    SciTech Connect

    DiSilvestro, R.; Joseph, E.; Yang, F.L. )

    1991-03-15

    Endotoxin hepatotoxicity is proposed to occur by processes which could be retarded by 3 copper enzymes: ceruloplasmin, Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD), and extracellular (EC) SOD. Weanling rats fed low copper for 40 days showed low activity levels of these enzymes, and a very high mortality rate 20 h after endotoxin injection. No rats fed adequate copper died from this treatment. In addition, serum transaminase activities, indicators of liver damage, were elevated by 3 h to a greater extent in the deficient rats than in the adequates. The high susceptibility to endotoxemia in the deficient rats was not associated with low hepatic glutathione, high liver malondialedhyde, nor restricted metallothionein induction 3 h after endotoxin injection. Endotoxin reduced serum EC SOD activities in adequate and deficient rats, but final values were lower in the latter. Studies on roles of specific copper enzymes in resistance to endotoxemia are currently underway.

  13. Optimal group size in a highly social mammal.

    PubMed

    Markham, A Catherine; Gesquiere, Laurence R; Alberts, Susan C; Altmann, Jeanne

    2015-12-01

    Group size is an important trait of social animals, affecting how individuals allocate time and use space, and influencing both an individual's fitness and the collective, cooperative behaviors of the group as a whole. Here we tested predictions motivated by the ecological constraints model of group size, examining the effects of group size on ranging patterns and adult female glucocorticoid (stress hormone) concentrations in five social groups of wild baboons (Papio cynocephalus) over an 11-y period. Strikingly, we found evidence that intermediate-sized groups have energetically optimal space-use strategies; both large and small groups experience ranging disadvantages, in contrast to the commonly reported positive linear relationship between group size and home range area and daily travel distance, which depict a disadvantage only in large groups. Specifically, we observed a U-shaped relationship between group size and home range area, average daily distance traveled, evenness of space use within the home range, and glucocorticoid concentrations. We propose that a likely explanation for these U-shaped patterns is that large, socially dominant groups are constrained by within-group competition, whereas small, socially subordinate groups are constrained by between-group competition and predation pressures. Overall, our results provide testable hypotheses for evaluating group-size constraints in other group-living species, in which the costs of intra- and intergroup competition vary as a function of group size. PMID:26504236

  14. Highly adaptive tests for group differences in brain functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junghi; Pan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) and other technologies have been offering evidence and insights showing that altered brain functional networks are associated with neurological illnesses such as Alzheimer's disease. Exploring brain networks of clinical populations compared to those of controls would be a key inquiry to reveal underlying neurological processes related to such illnesses. For such a purpose, group-level inference is a necessary first step in order to establish whether there are any genuinely disrupted brain subnetworks. Such an analysis is also challenging due to the high dimensionality of the parameters in a network model and high noise levels in neuroimaging data. We are still in the early stage of method development as highlighted by Varoquaux and Craddock (2013) that "there is currently no unique solution, but a spectrum of related methods and analytical strategies" to learn and compare brain connectivity. In practice the important issue of how to choose several critical parameters in estimating a network, such as what association measure to use and what is the sparsity of the estimated network, has not been carefully addressed, largely because the answers are unknown yet. For example, even though the choice of tuning parameters in model estimation has been extensively discussed in the literature, as to be shown here, an optimal choice of a parameter for network estimation may not be optimal in the current context of hypothesis testing. Arbitrarily choosing or mis-specifying such parameters may lead to extremely low-powered tests. Here we develop highly adaptive tests to detect group differences in brain connectivity while accounting for unknown optimal choices of some tuning parameters. The proposed tests combine statistical evidence against a null hypothesis from multiple sources across a range of plausible tuning parameter values reflecting uncertainty with the unknown truth. These highly adaptive tests are not only easy to use, but also high-powered robustly across various scenarios. The usage and advantages of these novel tests are demonstrated on an Alzheimer's disease dataset and simulated data. PMID:26740916

  15. Highly adaptive tests for group differences in brain functional connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junghi; Pan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) and other technologies have been offering evidence and insights showing that altered brain functional networks are associated with neurological illnesses such as Alzheimer's disease. Exploring brain networks of clinical populations compared to those of controls would be a key inquiry to reveal underlying neurological processes related to such illnesses. For such a purpose, group-level inference is a necessary first step in order to establish whether there are any genuinely disrupted brain subnetworks. Such an analysis is also challenging due to the high dimensionality of the parameters in a network model and high noise levels in neuroimaging data. We are still in the early stage of method development as highlighted by Varoquaux and Craddock (2013) that “there is currently no unique solution, but a spectrum of related methods and analytical strategies” to learn and compare brain connectivity. In practice the important issue of how to choose several critical parameters in estimating a network, such as what association measure to use and what is the sparsity of the estimated network, has not been carefully addressed, largely because the answers are unknown yet. For example, even though the choice of tuning parameters in model estimation has been extensively discussed in the literature, as to be shown here, an optimal choice of a parameter for network estimation may not be optimal in the current context of hypothesis testing. Arbitrarily choosing or mis-specifying such parameters may lead to extremely low-powered tests. Here we develop highly adaptive tests to detect group differences in brain connectivity while accounting for unknown optimal choices of some tuning parameters. The proposed tests combine statistical evidence against a null hypothesis from multiple sources across a range of plausible tuning parameter values reflecting uncertainty with the unknown truth. These highly adaptive tests are not only easy to use, but also high-powered robustly across various scenarios. The usage and advantages of these novel tests are demonstrated on an Alzheimer's disease dataset and simulated data. PMID:26740916

  16. The fabrication of BiOClxBr1-x/alumina composite films with highly exposed {001} facets and their superior photocatalytic activities.

    PubMed

    Dandapat, Anirban; Gnayem, Hani; Sasson, Yoel

    2016-01-26

    We report the fabrication of thin films of bismuth oxyhalide solid solution with highly exposed {001} facets with the help of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and aluminium oxyhydroxide. These {001} facet exposed films showed enhanced photocatalytic activities compared to those of randomly oriented facets. PMID:26698367

  17. High-Fidelity Patient Simulators to Expose Undergraduate Students to the Clinical Relevance of Physiology Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, David M.; Bellew, Christine; Cheng, Zixi J.; Cendán, Juan C.; Kibble, Jonathan D.

    2014-01-01

    The use of high-fidelity patient simulators (HFPSs) has expanded throughout medical, nursing, and allied health professions education in the last decades. These manikins can be programmed to represent pathological states and are used to teach clinical skills as well as clinical reasoning. First, the students are typically oriented either to the…

  18. A Public Relations Nightmare: ACLU Class Action Lawsuit Exposes Inaccurate and Inequitable High School Graduation Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Terri N.; Brown, Kathleen M.

    2010-01-01

    Florida's decision to equate a GED to a high school diploma undermines the attempt of No Child Left Behind to close the achievement gap, while infringing on the public's trust. Public trust fosters a culture of systemic equity and social justice, which are necessary for academic excellence (Byrk & Schneider, 2003). Florida's code of ethics for…

  19. A Public Relations Nightmare: ACLU Class Action Lawsuit Exposes Inaccurate and Inequitable High School Graduation Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Terri N.; Brown, Kathleen M.

    2010-01-01

    Florida's decision to equate a GED to a high school diploma undermines the attempt of No Child Left Behind to close the achievement gap, while infringing on the public's trust. Public trust fosters a culture of systemic equity and social justice, which are necessary for academic excellence (Byrk & Schneider, 2003). Florida's code of ethics for

  20. High-Fidelity Patient Simulators to Expose Undergraduate Students to the Clinical Relevance of Physiology Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, David M.; Bellew, Christine; Cheng, Zixi J.; Cendn, Juan C.; Kibble, Jonathan D.

    2014-01-01

    The use of high-fidelity patient simulators (HFPSs) has expanded throughout medical, nursing, and allied health professions education in the last decades. These manikins can be programmed to represent pathological states and are used to teach clinical skills as well as clinical reasoning. First, the students are typically oriented either to the

  1. A follow-up cytogenetic study of workers highly exposed inside the Chernobyl sarcophagus.

    PubMed

    Khvostunov, I K; Snigiryova, G P; Moiseenko, V V; Lloyd, D C

    2015-12-01

    Data are presented on some of the engineers and scientists who regularly entered highly radioactive areas of the sarcophagus chamber constructed around the ruins of the Chernobyl reactor. Previous investigations on six of them by unstable chromosomal aberrations, quartz fibre electrometers and, in some cases, tooth electron spin resonance have all indicated high doses accumulated over several years of work inside the sarcophagus. Here, the authors present the data on eleven of the men who agreed to be monitored cytogenetically although two have since died aged 45 and 66 y. The present data were combined with the previous to examine the time-courses of these individuals' changes in their aberration frequencies. As expected, dicentric aberrations showed a clear drop down to 2-3 per 100 cells since the men ceased working inside the sarcophagus. In contrast, the translocation yields remained at a high level showing no tendency to decrease and so proved reliable for retrospective biodosimetry. These data are particularly useful in demonstrating the value of FISH long after high but protracted and fractionated exposure. PMID:25520376

  2. Activity patterns in elementary and high school students exposed to oxidant pollution.

    PubMed

    Spier, C E; Little, D E; Trim, S C; Johnson, T R; Linn, W S; Hackney, J D

    1992-01-01

    We investigated activity patterns of 17 elementary school students aged 10-12, and 19 high school students aged 13-17, in suburban Los Angeles during the oxidant pollution season. Individuals' relationships between ventilation rate (VR) and heart rate (HR) were "calibrated" in supervised outdoor walking/jogging. Log VR was consistently proportional to HR; although "calibrations" were limited by a restricted range of exercise, and possibly by artifact due to mouthpiece breathing, which may cause overestimation of VR at rest. Each subject then recorded activities in diaries, and recorded HR once per minute by wearing Heart Watches, over 3 days (Saturday-Monday). For each activity the subject estimated a breathing rate--slow (like slow walking), medium (like fast walking), or fast (like running). VR ranges for each breathing rate and activity type were estimated from HR recordings. High-school students' diaries showed their aggregate distribution of waking hours as 68% slow inside, 8% slow outside, 10% medium inside, 9% medium outside, 1.5% fast inside, 1.5% fast outside. Elementary students' distribution was 47% slow inside, 15% slow outside, 20% medium inside, 12% medium outside, 2.5% fast inside, 3.5% fast outside. Sleep occupied 38% of high-school students' and 40% of elementary students' time; HR were generally lower in sleep than in slow waking activity. High school students' mean VR estimates were 13 L/min for slow breathing, 18 for medium, and 23 for fast; elementary students' were 14 slow, 18 medium, and 19 fast. VR distributions were approximately lognormal. Maximum estimated VR were approximately 70 L/min in elementary and approximately 100 L/min in high school students. Compared to adults studied similarly, students reported more medium or fast breathing, and had equal or higher VR estimates during slow and medium breathing despite their smaller size. These results suggest that, relative to body size, young people inhale larger doses of outdoor air pollutants than adults. PMID:1422159

  3. Activity patterns in elementary and high school students exposed to oxidant pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Spier, C.E.; Little, D.E.; Trim, S.C.; Johnson, T.R.; Linn, W.S.; Hackney, J.D. )

    1992-07-01

    We investigated activity patterns of 17 elementary school students aged 10-12, and 19 high school students aged 13-17, in suburban Los Angeles during the oxidant pollution season. Individuals' relationships between ventilation rate (VR) and heart rate (HR) were calibrated' in supervised outdoor walking/jogging. Log VR was consistently proportional to HR; although calibrations' were limited by a restricted range of exercise, and possibly by artifact due to mouthpiece breathing, which may cause overestimation of VR at rest. Each subject then recorded activities in diaries, and recorded HR once per minute by wearing Heart Watches, over 3 days (Saturday-Monday). For each activity the subject estimated a breathing rate--slow (slow walking), medium (fast walking), or fast (running). VR ranges for each breathing rate and activity type were estimated from HR recordings. High-school students' diaries showed their aggregate distribution of waking hours as 68% slow inside, 8% slow outside, 10% medium inside, 9% medium outside, 1.5% fast inside, 1.5% fast outside. Elementary students' distribution was 47% slow inside, 15% slow outside, 20% medium inside, 12% medium outside, 2.5% fast inside, 3.5% fast outside. Sleep occupied 38% of high-school students' and 40% of elementary students' time; HR were generally lower in sleep than in slow waking activity. High school students' mean VR estimates were 13 L/min for slow breathing, 18 for medium, and 23 for fast; elementary students' were 14 slow, 18 medium, and 19 fast. VR distributions were approximately lognormal. Maximum estimated VR were approximately 70 L/min in elementary and approximately 100 L/min in high school students. Compared to adults studied similarly, students reported more medium or fast breathing, and had equal or higher VR estimates during slow and medium breathing despite their smaller size. These results suggest that, relative to body size, young people inhale larger doses of outdoor air pollutants than adults.

  4. High-mobility group box 1 and cancer.

    PubMed

    Tang, Daolin; Kang, Rui; Zeh, Herbert J; Lotze, Michael T

    2010-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), a chromatin associated nuclear protein and extracellular damage associated molecular pattern molecule (DAMP), is an evolutionarily ancient and critical regulator of cell death and survival. Overexpression of HMGB1 is associated with each of the hallmarks of cancer including unlimited replicative potential, ability to develop blood vessels (angiogenesis), evasion of programmed cell death (apoptosis), self-sufficiency in growth signals, insensitivity to inhibitors of growth, inflammation, tissue invasion and metastasis. Our studies and those of our colleagues suggest that HMGB1 is central to cancer (abnormal wound healing) and many of the findings in normal wound healing as well. Here, we focus on the role of HMGB1 in cancer, the mechanisms by which it contributes to carcinogenesis, and therapeutic strategies based on targeting HMGB1. PMID:20123075

  5. Abdominal Obesity and Insulin Resistance in People Exposed to Moderate-to-High Levels of Dioxin

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jung-Wei; Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Su, Huey-Jen; Lee, Ching-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Obesity, a risk factor for developing metabolic complications, is a major public health problem. Abdominal obesity is strongly accompanied by a cluster of metabolic abnormalities characterized by insulin resistance. The link between persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and insulin resistance has been investigated in animal and epidemiological studies. We aimed to examine whether insulin resistance is greater in people with abdominal obesity (AO) and concomitant exposure to serum dioxins (PCDD/Fs). We conducted a cross-sectional descriptive study of 2876 participants living near a PCDD/Fs contaminated area. Seventeen 2,3,7,8-substituted PCDD/Fs congeners were measured, and then the associations between the main predictor variable, serum TEQDF-1998, abdominal obesity (AO), dependent variables, and insulin resistance were examined. Twelve of the 17 congeners, widely distributed among PCDDs, and PCDFs, had trends for associations with abdominal adiposity. In men, the highest quintiles of 1,2,3,7,8-PeCDF; 1,2,3,7,8-PeCDD; 2,3,7,8-TCDD; 2,3,7,8-TCDF; and 2,3,4,7,8-PeCDF had the top five adjusted odds ratios (AORs) + 95% confidence intervals (CIs):[4.2; 2.7–6.4], [3.6; 2.3–5.7], [3.2; 2.1–5.0], [3.0; 2.0–4.5], and [2.9; 1.9–4.7], respectively. In women, the highest quintiles of 1,2,3,4,7,8,9-HpCDF; 1,2,3,6,7,8-HxCDF; and 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-HpCDF had the top three AORs + 95% CIs:[3.0; 1.9–4.7], [2.0; 1.3–3.1], and [1.9; 1.3–2.9], respectively. After confounding factors had been adjusted for, men, but not women, with higher serum TEQDF-1998 levels or abdominal obesity had a significantly (Ptrend < 0.001) greater risk for abnormal insulin resistance. The groups with the highest joint serum TEQDF-1998 and abdominal obesity levels were associated with elevated insulin resistance at 5.0 times the odds of the groups with the lowest joint levels (AOR 5.23; 95% CI: 3.53–7.77). We hypothesize that serum TEQDF-1998 and abdominal obesity affect the association with insulin resistance in general populations. PMID:26752053

  6. Investigation of European tungsten materials exposed to high heat flux H/He neutral beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greuner, H.; Maier, H.; Balden, M.; Linsmeier, Ch.; Bswirth, B.; Lindig, S.; Norajitra, P.; Antusch, S.; Rieth, M.

    2013-11-01

    Tungsten is being considered as a potential plasma-facing material for future fusion devices, primarily due to its low erosion rate and high heat resistance. The intrinsic problem of this material, the brittleness even at elevated temperatures, requires the development and assessment of new tungsten materials. In the frame of the European material development programme for future fusion power plants W containing 5 wt.% Ta as well as uniaxially forged ultra-high purity W and powder injection moulded W were assessed in a neutral beam high heat flux test facility at IPP Garching. The investigation of the morphology modification of tungsten, occurring during heat loading using H and He particles, which simulates the expected divertor operation conditions, is indispensable in order to develop reliable plasma-facing materials. The effects seen, erosion, gas retention and cavity formation, depend on both the loading conditions and the operating temperature. This contribution presents a comparative study of the surface morphology changes of different W materials under hydrogen and helium beam loading to surface temperatures between 1500 C (1773 K) and 2000 C (2273 K), using actively cooled mock-ups. Loading is performed with pure H and mixed 94% H/6% He beams (? = 4 1021 m-2 s-1), resulting in 10 MW m-2 thermal load. Pulse durations of 30 s are applied to achieve fluences up to 3 1025 m-2 under stationary temperature conditions.

  7. High prevalence of chitotriosidase deficiency in Peruvian Amerindians exposed to chitin-bearing food and enteroparasites

    PubMed Central

    Manno, N.; Sherratt, S.; Boaretto, F.; Coico, F. Mejìa; Camus, C. Espinoza; Campos, C. Jara; Musumeci, S.; Battisti, A.; Quinnell, R.J.; León, J. Mostacero; Vazza, G.; Mostacciuolo, M.L.; Paoletti, M.G.; Falcone, F.H.

    2014-01-01

    The human genome encodes a gene for an enzymatically active chitinase (CHIT1) located in a single copy on Chromosome 1, which is highly expressed by activated macrophages and in other cells of the innate immune response. Several dysfunctional mutations are known in CHIT1, including a 24-bp duplication in Exon 10 causing catalytic deficiency. This duplication is a common variant conserved in many human populations, except in West and South Africans. Thus it has been proposed that human migration out of Africa and the consequent reduction of exposure to chitin from environmental factors may have enabled the conservation of dysfunctional mutations in human chitinases. Our data obtained from 85 indigenous Amerindians from Peru, representative of populations characterized by high prevalence of chitin-bearing enteroparasites and intense entomophagy, reveal a very high frequency of the 24-bp duplication (47.06%), and of other single nucleotide polymorphisms which are known to partially affect enzymatic activity (G102S: 42.7% and A442G/V: 25.5%). Our finding is in line with a founder effect, but appears to confute our previous hypothesis of a protective role against parasite infection and sustains the discussion on the redundancy of chitinolytic function. PMID:25256524

  8. Deer exposed to exceptionally high concentrations of lead near the continental mine in Idaho, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beyer, W.N.; Gaston, G.; Brazzle, R.; O'Connell, A.F., Jr.; Audet, D.J.

    2007-01-01

    Habitat surrounding the inactive Continental Mine in northern Idaho, USA, supports bear (Ursus arctos, Ursus americanus), moose (Alces alces), elk (Cervus elaphus), woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou), and abundant mule (Odocoileus hemionus) and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Tailings on the mining site were capped and remediated in 2003 to reduce environmental exposure of surrounding soil and sediments of Blue Joe Creek, downslope of the mine. Before capping, the mean Pb concentration in deer pellets collected on-site was 920 mg/kg of Pb (dry wt). This exposure, if chronic, would be comparable to an exposure that could be lethal to cattle or horses. Surprisingly, the mean pellet Pb concentration of 950 mg/kg in 2004 was as high as it was before remediation, and it was related to a high rate of soil ingestion. Mean soil content of the pellets collected from the capped site in 2004 was 22% dry weight, estimated from the acid-insoluble ash, a marker of soil ingestion. Clumps of sand and bits of rock were observed inside some of the pellets, and Pb concentrations in the pellets were correlated (p < 0.05) with soil content. Although terrestrial risk assessments generally estimate exposure from diets and from incidentally ingested soil, the deer at this site were directly ingesting contaminated soil or mining waste. The mean Pb concentration of this ingested soil was estimated as 6,700 mg/kg and the maximum as 25,000 mg/kg, well above the Pb concentrations measured in the remediated cap. The deer seemed to be ingesting soil or mining waste from one or more small but highly contaminated sources located beyond the remediated cap.

  9. Deer exposed to exceptionally high concentrations of lead near the Continental Mine in Idaho, USA.

    PubMed

    Beyer, W Nelson; Gaston, Greg; Brazzle, Roy; O'Connell, Allan F; Audet, Dan J

    2007-05-01

    Habitat surrounding the inactive Continental Mine in northern Idaho, USA, supports bear (Ursus arctos, Ursus americanus), moose (Alces alces), elk (Cervus elaphus), woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou), and abundant mule (Odocoileus hemionus) and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Tailings on the mining site were capped and remediated in 2003 to reduce environmental exposure of surrounding soil and sediments of Blue Joe Creek, downslope of the mine. Before capping, the mean Pb concentration in deer pellets collected on-site was 920 mg/kg of Pb (dry wt). This exposure, if chronic, would be comparable to an exposure that could be lethal to cattle or horses. Surprisingly, the mean pellet Pb concentration of 950 mg/kg in 2004 was as high as it was before remediation, and it was related to a high rate of soil ingestion. Mean soil content of the pellets collected from the capped site in 2004 was 22% dry weight, estimated from the acid-insoluble ash, a marker of soil ingestion. Clumps of sand and bits of rock were observed inside some of the pellets, and Pb concentrations in the pellets were correlated (p < 0.05) with soil content. Although terrestrial risk assessments generally estimate exposure from diets and from incidentally ingested soil. the deer at this site were directly ingesting contaminated soil or mining waste. The mean Pb concentration of this ingested soil was estimated as 6,700 mg/kg and the maximum as 25,000 mg/kg, well above the Pb concentrations measured in the remediated cap. The deer seemed to be ingesting soil or mining waste from one or more small but highly contaminated sources located beyond the remediated cap. PMID:17521153

  10. Mechanical behavior of precipitation hardenable steels exposed to highly corrosive environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosa, Ferdinand

    1994-01-01

    Unexpected occurrences of failures, due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of structural components, indicate a need for improved characterization of materials and more advanced analytical procedures for reliably predicting structures performance. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to determine the stress corrosion susceptibility of 15 - 5 PH steel over a wide range of applied strain rates in a highly corrosive environment. The selected environment for this investigation was a 3.5 percent NaCl aqueous solution. The material selected for the study was 15 - 5 PH steel in the H 900 condition. The Slow Strain Rate technique was used to test the metallic specimens.

  11. Temperature calculations of heat loads in rotating target wheels exposed to high beam currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, John P.; Gabor, Rachel; Neubauer, Janelle

    2001-07-01

    In heavy-ion physics, high beam currents can eventually melt or destroy the target. Tightly focused beams on stationary targets of modest melting point will exhibit short lifetimes. Defocused or "wobbled" beams are employed to enhance target survival. Rotating targets using large diameter wheels can help overcome target melting and allow for higher beam currents to be used in experiments. The purpose of the calculations in this work is to try and predict the safe maximum beam currents which produce heat loads below the melting point of the target material.

  12. Damage correlations in semiconductor devices exposed to gamma and high energy swift heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Pushpa, N.; Prakash, A. P. Gnana

    2015-05-15

    NPN rf power transistors and N-channel depletion MOSFETs are irradiated by different high energy swift heavy ions and {sup 60}Co gamma radiation in the dose range of 100 krad to 100 Mrad. The damage created by different heavy ions and {sup 60}Co gamma radiation in NPN rf power transistors and N-channel depletion MOSFETs have been correlated and studied in the same dose range. The recoveries in the electrical characteristics of different swift heavy ions and {sup 60}Co gamma irradiated devices have been studied after annihilation.

  13. Temperature calculations of heat loads in rotating target wheels exposed to high beam currents.

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, J. P.; Gabor, R.; Neubauer, J.

    2000-11-29

    In heavy-ion physics, high beam currents can eventually melt or destroy the target. Tightly focused beams on stationary targets of modest melting point will exhibit short lifetimes. Defocused or wobbled beams are employed to enhance target survival. Rotating targets using large diameter wheels can help overcome target melting and allow for higher beam currents to be used in experiments. The purpose of the calculations in this work is to try and predict the safe maximum beam currents which produce heat loads below the melting point of the target material.

  14. Protective Pleiotropic Effect of Flavonoids on NAD+ Levels in Endothelial Cells Exposed to High Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Boesten, Danille M. P. H. J.; von Ungern-Sternberg, Saskia N. I.; den Hartog, Gertjan J. M.; Bast, Aalt

    2015-01-01

    NAD+ is important for oxidative metabolism by serving as an electron transporter. Hyperglycemia decreases NAD+ levels by activation of the polyol pathway and by overactivation of poly(ADP-ribose)-polymerase (PARP). We examined the protective role of three structurally related flavonoids (rutin, quercetin, and flavone) during high glucose conditions in an in vitro model using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Additionally we assessed the ability of these flavonoids to inhibit aldose reductase enzyme activity. We have previously shown that flavonoids can inhibit PARP activation. Extending these studies, we here provide evidence that flavonoids are also able to protect endothelial cells against a high glucose induced decrease in NAD+. In addition, we established that flavonoids are able to inhibit aldose reductase, the key enzyme in the polyol pathway. We conclude that this protective effect of flavonoids on NAD+ levels is a combination of the flavonoids ability to inhibit both PARP activation and aldose reductase enzyme activity. This study shows that flavonoids, by a combination of effects, maintain the redox state of the cell during hyperglycemia. This mode of action enables flavonoids to ameliorate diabetic complications. PMID:26180598

  15. Karyotypes of Human Lymphocytes Exposed to High-Energy Iron Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; George, K.; Wu, H.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2002-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations were analyzed using multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) in human peripheral blood lymphocytes after in vitro exposure to gamma rays or accelerated (56)Fe ions (1 GeV/nucleon, 145 keV/microm) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Upton, NY). Doses of 0.3 and 3 Gy were used for both radiation types. Chromosomes were prematurely condensed by a phosphatase inhibitor (calyculin A) to avoid the population selection bias observed at metaphase as a result of the severe cell cycle delays induced by heavy ions. A total of 1053 karyotypes (G(2) and M phases) were analyzed in irradiated lymphocytes. Results revealed different distribution patterns for chromosomal aberrations after low- and high-LET radiation exposures: Heavy ions induced a much higher fraction of cells with multiple aberrations, while the majority of the aberrant cells induced by low doses of gamma rays contained a single aberration. The high fraction of complex-type exchanges after heavy ions leads to an overestimation of simple-type asymmetrical interchanges (dicentrics) from analysis of Giemsa-stained samples. However, even after a dose of 3 Gy iron ions, about 30% of the cells presented no complex-type exchanges. The involvement of individual chromosomes in exchanges was similar for densely and sparsely ionizing radiation, and no statistically significant evidence of a nonrandom involvement of specific chromosomes was detected.

  16. High-density etching of group III nitride ternary films

    SciTech Connect

    Shul, R.J.; Howard, A.J.; Pearton, S.J.; Abernathy, C.R.; Vartuli, C.B.

    1996-10-01

    Due to their wide bandgaps and high dielectric constants, group III nitrides have made significant impact on the compound semiconductor community as blue, green, and ultraviolet light emitting diodes and for their potential use in laser structures and high temperature electronics. Processing of these materials, in particular wet and dry etching, has proven to be extremely difficult due to their inert chemical nature. The authors report electron cyclotron resonance etching of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}N and In{sub 0.75}Al{sub 0.25}N as a function of temperature, RF power, pressure, and microwave power. Etch conditions were characterized for rate, profile, and sidewall and surface morphology and compared to etch data for GaN, InN, and AlN. Atomic force microscopy was used to quantify root-mean-square roughness of the etched surfaces. The authors observed consistent trends for the InAlN films where the etch rates increased with increasing concentration of In. The trends were less consistent for the InGaN etch rates.

  17. Dynamics of liquid films exposed to high-frequency surface vibration.

    PubMed

    Manor, Ofer; Rezk, Amgad R; Friend, James R; Yeo, Leslie Y

    2015-05-01

    We derive a generalized equation that governs the spreading of liquid films under high-frequency (MHz-order) substrate vibration in the form of propagating surface waves and show that this single relationship is universally sufficient to collectively describe the rich and diverse dynamic phenomena recently observed for the transport of oil films under such substrate excitation, in particular, Rayleigh surface acoustic waves. In contrast to low-frequency (Hz- to kHz-order) vibration-induced wetting phenomena, film spreading at such high frequencies arises from convective drift generated by the viscous periodic flow localized in a region characterized by the viscous penetration depth ?(-1)?(2?/??)(1/2) adjacent to the substrate that is invoked directly by its vibration; ? and ? are the viscosity and the density of the liquid, respectively, and ? is the excitation frequency. This convective drift is responsible for driving the spreading of thin films of thickness h?k(l)(-1), which spread self-similarly as t(1/4) along the direction of the drift corresponding to the propagation direction of the surface wave, k(l) being the wave number of the compressional acoustic wave that forms in the liquid due to leakage of the surface wave energy from the substrate into the liquid and t the time. Films of greater thicknesses h?k(l)(-1)??(-1), in contrast, are observed to spread with constant velocity but in a direction that opposes the drift and surface wave propagation due to the attenuation of the acoustic wave in the liquid. The universal equation derived allows for the collective prediction of the spreading of these thin and thick films in opposing directions. PMID:26066257

  18. Dynamics of liquid films exposed to high-frequency surface vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manor, Ofer; Rezk, Amgad R.; Friend, James R.; Yeo, Leslie Y.

    2015-05-01

    We derive a generalized equation that governs the spreading of liquid films under high-frequency (MHz-order) substrate vibration in the form of propagating surface waves and show that this single relationship is universally sufficient to collectively describe the rich and diverse dynamic phenomena recently observed for the transport of oil films under such substrate excitation, in particular, Rayleigh surface acoustic waves. In contrast to low-frequency (Hz- to kHz-order) vibration-induced wetting phenomena, film spreading at such high frequencies arises from convective drift generated by the viscous periodic flow localized in a region characterized by the viscous penetration depth ?-1?(2? /? ? ) 1 /2 adjacent to the substrate that is invoked directly by its vibration; ? and ? are the viscosity and the density of the liquid, respectively, and ? is the excitation frequency. This convective drift is responsible for driving the spreading of thin films of thickness h ?kl-1 , which spread self-similarly as t1 /4 along the direction of the drift corresponding to the propagation direction of the surface wave, kl being the wave number of the compressional acoustic wave that forms in the liquid due to leakage of the surface wave energy from the substrate into the liquid and t the time. Films of greater thicknesses h kl-1??-1 , in contrast, are observed to spread with constant velocity but in a direction that opposes the drift and surface wave propagation due to the attenuation of the acoustic wave in the liquid. The universal equation derived allows for the collective prediction of the spreading of these thin and thick films in opposing directions.

  19. IGF-1 inhibits the mitochondrial apoptosis program in mesangial cells exposed to high glucose.

    PubMed

    Kang, Barinder P S; Urbonas, Arunas; Baddoo, Andrew; Baskin, Stuart; Malhotra, Ashwani; Meggs, Leonard G

    2003-11-01

    The activated insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) protects cells from a wide range of apoptotic stimuli. Hyperglycemia promotes the intracellular generation of superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide, both of which have been linked to the activation of the mitochondrial apoptosis program. Here, we report for the first time that ligand activation of the IGF-1R protects normal human mesangial cells and SV40 murine mesangial cells from the glycol-oxidant-induced apoptosis program. The IGF-1R antiapoptosis program was dependent on the recruitment of both Akt/PKB and the ERK subfamily of mitogen-activated protein kinases. IGF-1 treatment also protected the redox potential of mesangial cells maintained at high ambient glucose concentration, by inhibiting the generation of reactive oxygen intermediates and preserving mitochondrial transmembrane potential. IGF-1R survival signals targeted the Bcl-2 family of proteins to protect against glucose-induced apoptosis and oxidative stress. IGF-1-treated cells exhibited a decrease in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio; increased phosphorylation/inactivation of Bad at Ser112 and Ser136; inhibition of cytochrome c release; perturbations directionally opposed to the initiation of the apoptosis program. In addition, we demonstrate IGF-1R-activated ERK signaling modules phosphorylate Ser112 of the mitochondrial Bad protein, establishing a direct link between surface IGF-1R and the survival program in mitochondria. Our findings indicate that in mesangial cells maintained at high ambient glucose concentration, IGF-1 activates a survival program that maintains the integrity of mitochondria and prevents the expression of the genetic program for apoptosis. PMID:12876069

  20. Antioxidant responses of Propylaea japonica (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) exposed to high temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shize; Fu, Wenyan; Li, Ning; Zhang, Fan; Liu, Tong-Xian

    2015-02-01

    Temperature is one of the most important environmental factors, and is responsible for a variety of physiological stress responses in organisms. Induced thermal stress is associated with elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation leading to oxidative damage. The ladybeetle, Propylaea japonica (Thunberg) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), is considered a successful natural enemy because of its tolerance to high temperatures in arid and semi-arid areas in China. In this study, we investigated the effect of high temperatures (35, 37, 39, 41 and 43 °C) on the survival and activities of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), peroxidases (POD), glutathione-S-transferases (GST), and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) as well as malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations in P. japonica adults. The results indicated that P. japonica adults could not survive at 43 °C. CAT, GST and TAC were significantly increased when compared to the control (25 °C), and this played an important role in the process of antioxidant response to thermal stress. SOD and POD activity, as well as MDA, did not differ significantly at 35 and 37 °C compared to the control; however, there were increased levels of SOD, POD and MDA when the temperature was above 37 °C. These results suggest that thermal stress leads to oxidative stress and antioxidant enzymes play important roles in reducing oxidative damage in P. japonica adults. This study represents the first comprehensive report on the antioxidant defense system in predaceous coccinellids (the third trophic level). The findings provide useful information for predicting population dynamics and understanding the potential for P. japonica as a natural enemy to control pest insects under varied environmental conditions. PMID:25614965

  1. Surface changes in well-casing pipe exposed to high concentrations of organics in aqueous solution. Special report

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, S.; Parker, L.

    1990-03-01

    This preliminary study was undertaken to assess how the surface structural characteristics of four common well casing materials-polyvinyl chloride (PVC), Teflon (polytetrafluoroethylene, PTFE), stainless steel 304 (SS304) and stainless steel 316 (SS316)-are affected by exposure to an aqueous solution containing tetrachloroethylene, toluene, p-dichlorobenzene and 0-dichlorobenzene in concentrations near their solubility. Casing samples that had been exposed to a test solution for 1 week, 1 month and 6 months were examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and compared with control samples placed in well water for an equivalent time period. Pieces of casing that had not been placed in any aqueous solution were also examined and are assumed to be representative of the initial structure of the casing's surface. These organics are of concern at hazardous waste sites, where they often occur in ground water. The observations indicate that the surface characteristics of PVC, SS316 and SS304 did not change when exposed to the organic aqueous solution. The surface variability and lack of distinguishing features at high magnification made it difficult to tell if the PTFE surface had changed. However, no obvious changes (swelling, pitting etc.) were seen.

  2. Detecting cavitation in mercury exposed to a high-energy pulsed proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Manzi, Nicholas J; Chitnis, Parag V; Holt, Ray G; Roy, Ronald A; Cleveland, Robin O; Riemer, Bernie; Wendel, Mark W

    2010-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source employs a high-energy pulsed proton beam incident on a mercury target to generate short bursts of neutrons. Absorption of the proton beam produces rapid heating of the mercury, resulting in the formation of acoustic shock waves and the nucleation of cavitation bubbles. The subsequent collapse of these cavitation bubbles promote erosion of the steel target walls. Preliminary measurements using two passive cavitation detectors (megahertz-frequency focused and unfocused piezoelectric transducers) installed in a mercury test target to monitor cavitation generated by proton beams with charges ranging from 0.041 to 4.1 C will be reported on. Cavitation was initially detected for a beam charge of 0.082 C by the presence of an acoustic emission approximately 250 s after arrival of the incident proton beam. This emission was consistent with an inertial cavitation collapse of a bubble with an estimated maximum bubble radius of 0.19 mm, based on collapse time. The peak pressure in the mercury for the initiation of cavitation was predicted to be 0.6 MPa. For a beam charge of 0.41 C and higher, the lifetimes of the bubbles exceeded the reverberation time of the chamber (~300 s), and distinct windows of cavitation activity were detected, a phenomenon that likely resulted from the interaction of the reverberation in the chamber and the cavitation bubbles.

  3. Detection of HIV-1 dual infections in highly exposed treated patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genetic characterization of HIV-1 in Argentina has shown that BF recombinants predominate among heterosexuals and injecting drug users, while in men who have sex with men the most prevalent form is subtype B. Objectives The aim of this work was to investigate the presence of HIV dual infections in HIV-infected individuals with high probability of reinfection Study design Blood samples were collected from 23 HIV positive patients with the risk of reinfection from Buenos Aires. A fragment of the HIV gene pol was amplified and phylogenetic analyses were performed. Antiretroviral drug resistance patterns of all the sequences were analyzed. Results Five dual infections were detected with four patients coinfected with subtype B and BF recombinants and one patient was coinfected with two BF recombinants presenting different recombination patterns. Prolonged infection with a stable clinical condition was observed in the five individuals. Resistance mutation patterns were different between the predominant and the minority strains. Conclusions Our results show that HIV dual infection can occur with closely related subtypes, and even with different variants of the same recombinant form in certain populations. Clinical observations showed neither aggressive disease progression nor impact on the resistance patterns in the dually-infected patients. PMID:21824422

  4. High Resolution STEM-EELS Study of Silver Nanoparticles Exposed to Light and Humic Substances.

    PubMed

    Römer, Isabella; Wang, Zhi Wei; Merrifield, Ruth C; Palmer, Richard E; Lead, Jamie

    2016-03-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are defined as particles with at least one dimension between 1 and 100 nm or with properties that differ from their bulk material, which possess unique properties. The extensive use of NPs means that discharge to the environment is likely increasing, but fate, behavior, and effects under environmentally relevant conditions are insufficiently studied. This paper focuses on the transformations of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) under simulated but realistic environmental conditions. High resolution aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF STEM) coupled with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and UV-vis were used within a multimethod approach to study morphology, surface chemistry transformations, and corona formation. Although loss, most likely by dissolution, was observed, there was no direct evidence of oxidation from the STEM-EELS. However, in the presence of fulvic acid (FA), a 1.3 nm oxygen-containing corona was observed around the AgNPs in water; modeled data based on the HAADF signal at near atomic resolution suggest this was an FA corona was formed and was not silver oxide, which was coherent (i.e., fully coated in FA), where observed. The corona further colloidally stabilized the NPs for periods of weeks to months, dependent on the solution conditions. PMID:26792384

  5. Characterization of gypsum crystals exposed to a high CO2 concentration fog using x-ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreo-Mrquez, I. J. A.; Castillo-Sandoval, I.; Esparza-Ponce, H. E.; Fuentes-Cobas, L.; Montero-Cabrera, M. E.

    2015-07-01

    In Chihuahua State, a little town called Naica has the largest gypsum single crystals in the world. The growth of these structures has been described as a long and stable process developed over thousands of years. Due to the change in the environmental conditions, these crystals could suffer alterations on their surface. In this project we study the cause of possible deterioration of the giant crystals and intend to suggest measures for their preservation. For this sake, our first experiment consists on several gypsum crystals that have been subjected in a climate chamber to a fog at high CO2 concentration and 51 C for a period of time of six months, extracting two crystals every 15 days. Then the crystals have been characterized through Grazing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction using a diffractometer PanAlytical X'PertPro with two different detectors; Xe-filled proportional detector and a Pixel 3D detector. The results were compared to determine which technique is the most suitable to study the degradation of gypsum single crystals. In the two cases, we have identified only the gypsum phase, but with different crystal plane orientations.

  6. Magnetotropism of roots and structure of their statocytes exposed to high gradient magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyavskaya, N. A.; Polishchuk, O. V.; Kondrachuk, A. V.

    In most living organisms gravity perception is based on the response of the gravisensing system to displacement of specific mass induced by a gravitational force The amyloplasts in higher plants are known to play the important role as the specific mass in gravisensing cells As was shown by Kuznetsov Hasenstein 1996 the high-gradient magnetic field HGMF exerts a directional ponderomotive force on such diamagnetic structures as amyloplasts This effect of the HGMF results in root curvature similar to that produced by gravity It was suggested that the HGMF could allow to imitate the effects of gravity in microgravity and or to change them in laboratory conditions correspondingly as well as to study statolith-related processes in graviperception Therefore the correlation between the direction of the ponderomotive force resulting in statolith displacements and the direction of the HGMF-induced plant curvature can be the serious argument to support this suggestion and needs the detailed structural analysis We have designed the HGMF facility that allows for generating the HGMF and analyzing its effects on higher plants roots The parameters of kinetics of Lepidium sativum L and Pisum sativum L root curvatures under both the HGMF action and gravistimulation were recorded by video system and measured by means of image analysis software The main results of the study are followings 1 the magnetotropic effect of the HGMF on root growth was found for pea and cress roots 2 the critical value of ponderomotive force that

  7. Molecular Basis of the Behavior of Hepatitis A Virus Exposed to High Hydrostatic Pressure

    PubMed Central

    D'Andrea, Lucía; Pérez-Rodríguez, Francisco J.; Costafreda, M. Isabel; Beguiristain, Nerea; Fuentes, Cristina; Aymerich, Teresa; Guix, Susana; Bosch, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Food-borne hepatitis A outbreaks may be prevented by subjecting foods at risk of virus contamination to moderate treatments of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP). A pretreatment promoting hepatitis A virus (HAV) capsid-folding changes enhances the virucidal effect of HHP, indicating that its efficacy depends on capsid conformation. HAV populations enriched in immature capsids (125S provirions) are more resistant to HHP, suggesting that mature capsids (150S virions) are more susceptible to this treatment. In addition, the monoclonal antibody (MAb) K24F2 epitope contained in the immunodominant site is a key factor for the resistance to HHP. Changes in capsid folding inducing a loss of recognition by MAb K24F2 render more susceptible conformations independently of the origin of such changes. Accordingly, codon usage-associated folding changes and changes stimulated by pH-dependent breathings, provided they confer a loss of recognition by MAb K24F2, induce a higher susceptibility to HHP. In conclusion, the resistance of HAV to HHP treatments may be explained by a low proportion of 150S particles combined with a good accessibility of the epitope contained in the immunodominant site close to the 5-fold axis. PMID:25107980

  8. Surface morphology changes of tungsten exposed to high heat loading with mixed hydrogen/helium beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greuner, H.; Maier, H.; Balden, M.; Bswirth, B.; Elgeti, S.; Schmid, K.; Schwarz-Selinger, T.

    2014-12-01

    We discuss the surface morphology modification of W samples observed after simultaneous heat and particle loading using a mixed H/He particle beam with a He concentration of 1 at.%. The applied heat flux of 10 MW/m2 is representative for the normal operation of the divertor of DEMO or a power plant. The long pulse high heat flux experiments on actively water-cooled W samples were performed in the GLADIS facility at surface temperatures between 600 C and 2000 C. This allows together with the applied total fluences between 1 1024 m-2 and 1 1026 m-2 the temperature- and fluence dependent study of the growing nano-structures. We analyse in detail the surface modifications up to a depth of several ?m by scanning electron microscopy combined with focussed ion beam preparation. The hydrogen and helium release of the samples is analysed by long term thermal desorption spectroscopy and compared with the prediction of a diffusion trapping model.

  9. Response by High Risk Groups to HIV/AIDS Educational Outreach: A Focus Group Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smiley, Nina Feldman

    Twelve focus groups were conducted to determine how various at-risk groups would respond to Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) educational outreach approaches presented via print (posters and comic book), television, and radio media. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding HIV and AIDS were also

  10. The treatment with the probiotic Shewanella putrefaciens Pdp11 of specimens of Solea senegalensis exposed to high stocking densities to enhance their resistance to disease.

    PubMed

    Tapia-Paniagua, S T; Vidal, S; Lobo, C; Prieto-lamo, M J; Jurado, J; Cordero, H; Cerezuela, R; Garca de la Banda, I; Esteban, M A; Balebona, M C; Moriigo, M A

    2014-12-01

    Aquaculture industry exposes fish to acute stress events, such as high stocking density, and a link between stress and higher susceptibility to diseases has been concluded. Several studies have demonstrated increased stress tolerance of fish treated with probiotics, but the mechanisms involved have not been elucidated. Shewanella putrefaciens Pdp11 is a strain isolated from healthy gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.) and it is considered as probiotics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the dietary administration of this probiotics on the stress tolerance of Solea senegalensis specimens farmed under high stocking density (PHD) compared to a group fed a commercial diet and farmed under the same conditions (CHD). In addition, during the experiment, a natural infectious outbreak due to Vibrio species affected fish farmed under crowding conditions. Changes in the microbiota and histology of intestine and in the transcription of immune response genes were evaluated at 19 and 30 days of the experiment. Mortality was observed after 9 days of the beginning of the experiment in CHD and PHD groups, it being higher in the CHD group. Fish farmed under crowding stress showed reduced expression of genes at 19 day probiotic feeding. On the contrary, a significant increase in immune related gene expression was detected in CHD fish at 30 day, whereas the gene expression in fish from PHD group was very similar to that showed in specimens fed and farmed with the conventional conditions. In addition, the dietary administration of S. putrefaciens Pdp11 produced an important modulation of the intestinal microbiota, which was significantly correlated with the high number of goblet cells detected in fish fed the probiotic diet. PMID:25149590

  11. Resilience of a High Latitude Red Sea Frining Corals Exposed to Extreme Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustafa, M.; Moustafa, M. S.; Moustafa, S.; Moustafa, Z. D.

    2013-05-01

    Since 2004, multi-year study set out to establish linkages between fringing coral reefs in the northern Gulf of Suez, Red Sea, and local weather. Insight into local meteorological processes may provide a better understanding of the direct influence weather has on a fringing coral reef. To establish trends, seawater temperature and meteorological record were collected at a small fringing coral reef (Zaki's Reef), located near Ein Sokhna, Egypt (29.5oN & 32.4oE). Monitoring air and water temperature provides evidence of seasonality and interannual variability and may reveal correlations between reef health and climate conditions in this region. Prior to this study, there were no known long-term studies investigating coral reefs in this region. Approximately 35 coral taxa are known to survive the extreme temperature and salinity regime found here, yet only six corals compose 94% of coral cover on Zaki's Reef. Dominant corals include: Acropora humilis, A. microclados, A. hemprichii, Litophyton arboretum, Stylophora pistillata, Porites columna, and P. plantulata. Seawater temperatures were collected at 30 minutes intervals at 5 locations. Seawater temperature data indicate that corals experience 4-6.5oC daily temperature variations and seasonal variations that exceed 29oC. Air temperatures were collected just landward of the reef were compared to Hurghada and Ismailia 400 and 200 km south and north of the study site, respectively. Time series analysis results indicate that air temperature dominant frequencies are half-daily, daily, and yearly cycles, while water temperatures show yearly cycles. A comparison of air temperature with neighboring locations indicates that air temperatures at Ein Sokhna ranged between near 0o C to an excess of 55o C, yet, daily means for Ein Sokhna and Hurghada were very similar (24.2o C and. 25.2o C, respectively). Maximum daily air temperatures at the study site exceeded maximum air temperature at Hurghada (400 km south) by almost 7o C, while minimum daily means at Ein Sokhna were almost equal to those at Ismailia (200 km north). These trends were opposite to what was expected considering each stations geographical locations. The unexpected temperature trends, the daily/half daily dominant frequencies, and the short distance between the mountain range and Zaki's Reef vs. Hurghada (0.5 vs. 35 km), prompted us to hypothesize that a Foehn wind may be responsible for the high air temperatures observed at Ein Sokhna. We applied NOAA's HYSPLIT model to explore local circulation patterns, which suggest that the high mountain range blocks the year-round trade wind and forces it to climb up the western slope, where it loses moisture and reduces its temperature. As this cool, denser air reaches the mountain top, the air parcel starts rolling down the eastern slopes, which causes air temperature to rise and result in an increase in local air temperatures. These warmer than normal air temperatures measured here may aid in securing these northernmost reefs survival. Further scrutiny of the mechanisms by which area reefs are able to thrive extreme environmental conditions continues to be investigated.

  12. A Study of Cavitation Activity in Ex vivo Tissue Exposed to High Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlan, James; Rivens, Ian; ter Haar, Gail

    2007-05-01

    Cavitation is often avoided in Focused Ultrasound Surgery (FUS or HIFU) because it can render lesion formation unpredictable. However, cavitation is known to enhance heating. Emissions used as indicators for cavitation activity in ex vivo tissue are not fully understood. This study investigates a wide range of simultaneous acoustic emissions and other potential indicators of cavitation activity. A high frequency (?50MHz) data acquisition system is used to detect cavitation ex vivo. The passive cavitation detector (PCD) used is a broadband (0.1-10MHz) cavitation sensor. Its broadband nature allows simultaneous measurement of subharmonics, superharmonics and broadband emissions, all potential indicators of either inertial or both types of cavitation. The electrical impedance change of the transducer (1.69MHz, 15cm focal length, 1.79f-number), caused by backscattered ultrasound, has been monitored. Low frequency acoustic signals (<100kHz) have been recorded using a hydrophone (Reson TC4013, 1Hz-170kHz). The ultimate aim of this work is to investigate the possibility of detecting cavitation signals from HIFU during clinical treatments. Results of monitoring multiple cavitation signals during ex vivo HIFU exposure are presented. The relationship between impedance change and superharmonic emissions, indicating discrete acoustic emissions or scattering of ultrasound from bubbles, are discussed. Artefacts in B-mode ultrasound scans taken during HIFU exposures have been seen to correlate with impedance change and acoustic emissions. This is still under investigation. Cavitation thresholds in degassed water and ex vivo tissue have been investigated. This work paves the way for investigation of the enhancement of lesion formation from HIFU exposures by exploiting cavitation activity.

  13. Direct Measurement of Perchlorate Exposure Biomarkers in a Highly Exposed Population: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Michelle; Copan, Lori; Olmedo, Luis; Patton, Sharyle; Haas, Robert; Atencio, Ryan; Xu, Juhua; Valentin-Blasini, Liza

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to perchlorate is ubiquitous in the United States and has been found to be widespread in food and drinking water. People living in the lower Colorado River region may have perchlorate exposure because of perchlorate in ground water and locally-grown produce. Relatively high doses of perchlorate can inhibit iodine uptake and impair thyroid function, and thus could impair neurological development in utero. We examined human exposures to perchlorate in the Imperial Valley among individuals consuming locally grown produce and compared perchlorate exposure doses to state and federal reference doses. We collected 24-hour urine specimen from a convenience sample of 31 individuals and measured urinary excretion rates of perchlorate, thiocyanate, nitrate, and iodide. In addition, drinking water and local produce were also sampled for perchlorate. All but two of the water samples tested negative for perchlorate. Perchlorate levels in 79 produce samples ranged from non-detect to 1816 ppb. Estimated perchlorate doses ranged from 0.02 to 0.51 g/kg of body weight/day. Perchlorate dose increased with the number of servings of dairy products consumed and with estimated perchlorate levels in produce consumed. The geometric mean perchlorate dose was 70% higher than for the NHANES reference population. Our sample of 31 Imperial Valley residents had higher perchlorate dose levels compared with national reference ranges. Although none of our exposure estimates exceeded the U. S. EPA reference dose, three participants exceeded the acceptable daily dose as defined by bench mark dose methods used by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment. PMID:21394205

  14. Individual characteristics and quitting in apprentices exposed to high-molecular-weight agents.

    PubMed

    Mons, E; Malo, J L; Infante-Rivard, C; Ghezzo, H; Magnan, M; L'Archevque, J; Trudeau, C; Gautrin, D

    2000-05-01

    To determine whether specific immunological sensitization (SIS) and symptoms of allergy are associated with quitting apprenticeships with exposure to high-molecular-weight (HMW) agents. In a cohort study of 769 apprentices starting career programs in animal health technology (AHT), pastry-making (PM), and dental hygiene technology (DHT), health status was assessed at baseline and yearly for up to 44 mo. Subjects who quit the apprenticeship were contacted and offered a last series of measurements as if they pursued. The effect of various factors-at baseline and during the career program-on quitting was examined. Eighty-nine of 769 subjects (11.6%) quit, of whom 74 participated in this study. In multivariate analysis, a history of hay fever (OR = 1.66, 95% CI = 1.0 to 2.75) and attending the pastry-making program (OR = 2.33, 95% CI = 1.11 to 4.91) were significant determinants for quitting. In the subgroup of AHT, SIS to laboratory animals, hay fever, and shortness of breath were significant determinants by univariate analysis; in PM, the only determinant was age; and in DHT, hay fever. Work-related symptoms during training were not associated with quitting. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis in AHT, including characteristics at baseline and at follow-up, baseline SIS (OR = 2.8, 95% CI = 0.94 to 8.38) and symptoms of asthma in general during follow-up (OR = 2.2, 95% CI = 0.94 to 5.38) were the main determinants for quitting, though they were of borderline significance. We conclude that health-related self-selection out of an apprenticeship with exposure to HMW agents is likely to occur and to cause an attrition bias. PMID:10806146

  15. Inter- and Intra-Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Exposed in vitro to High and Low LET Radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Wilkins, R.; Saganti, P. B.; Gersey, B.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2006-01-01

    Energetic heavy ions pose a health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future Mars missions. High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects including cell inactivation, genetic mutations and cancer induction. Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults. Previously, we had studied chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes and fibroblasts induced by both low- and high-LET radiation using FISH and multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) techniques. In this study, we exposed human epithelial cells in vitro to gamma rays and energetic particles of varying types and energies and dose rates, and analyzed chromosomal damages using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) procedure. Confluent human epithelial cells (CH184B5F5/M10) were exposed to energetic heavy ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, high energy neutron at the Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) or Cs-137-gamma radiation source at the University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center. After colcemid and Calyculin A treatment, cells were fixed and painted with XCyte3 mBAND kit (MetaSystems) and chromosome aberrations were analyzed with mBAND analysis system (MetaSystems). With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of interchromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intrachromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). The results of the mBAND study showed a higher ratio of inversion involved with interchromosomal exchange in heavy ions compared to -ray irradiation. Analysis of chromosome aberrations using mBAND has the potential to provide useful information on human cell response to space-like radiation.

  16. Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hardage, Bob A; DeAngelo, Michael V; Ermolaeva, Elena; Hardage, Bob A; Remington, Randy; Sava, Diana; Wagner, Donald; Wei, Shuijion

    2013-02-28

    The objective of our research was to develop and demonstrate seismic data-acquisition and data-processing technologies that allow geothermal prospects below high-velocity rock outcrops to be evaluated. To do this, we acquired a 3-component seismic test line across an area of exposed high-velocity rocks in Brewster County, Texas, where there is high heat flow and surface conditions mimic those found at numerous geothermal prospects. Seismic contractors have not succeeded in creating good-quality seismic data in this area for companies who have acquired data for oil and gas exploitation purposes. Our test profile traversed an area where high-velocity rocks and low-velocity sediment were exposed on the surface in alternating patterns that repeated along the test line. We verified that these surface conditions cause non-ending reverberations of Love waves, Rayleigh waves, and shallow critical refractions to travel across the earth surface between the boundaries of the fast-velocity and slow-velocity material exposed on the surface. These reverberating surface waves form the high level of noise in this area that does not allow reflections from deep interfaces to be seen and utilized. Our data-acquisition method of deploying a box array of closely spaced geophones allowed us to recognize and evaluate these surface-wave noise modes regardless of the azimuth direction to the surface anomaly that backscattered the waves and caused them to return to the test-line profile. With this knowledge of the surface-wave noise, we were able to process these test-line data to create P-P and SH-SH images that were superior to those produced by a skilled seismic data-processing contractor. Compared to the P-P data acquired along the test line, the SH-SH data provided a better detection of faults and could be used to trace these faults upward to the boundaries of exposed surface rocks. We expanded our comparison of the relative value of S-wave and P-wave seismic data for geothermal applications by inserting into this report a small part of the interpretation we have done with 3C3D data across Wister geothermal field in the Imperial Valley of California. This interpretation shows that P-SV data reveal faults (and by inference, also fractures) that cannot be easily, or confidently, seen with P-P data, and that the combination of P-P and P-SV data allows VP/VS velocity ratios to be estimated across a targeted reservoir interval to show where an interval has more sandstone (the preferred reservoir facies). The conclusion reached from this investigation is that S-wave seismic technology can be invaluable to geothermal operators. Thus we developed a strong interest in understanding the direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources, particularly vertical vibrators, because if it can be demonstrated that direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources can be used as effectively as the direct-S modes produced by horizontal-force sources, geothermal operators can acquire direct-S data across many more prospect areas than can be done with horizontal-force sources, which presently are limited to horizontal vibrators. We include some of our preliminary work in evaluating direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources.

  17. High dietary levels of biotin and zinc to improve health of foot pads in broilers exposed experimentally to litter with critical moisture content.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Wahab, A; Radko, D; Kamphues, J

    2013-07-01

    Foot pad dermatitis (FPD) is a widespread problem in poultry production and constitutes a welfare issue. The objective of this study was to test potentially prophylactic effects of higher biotin and Zn levels in the diet of broilers exposed to critical litter moisture content (35% water) on the development of FPD. Two trials were performed in each 4 groups of 1-wk-old male broilers (Ross 708) during 33 d. The pens of all groups (25 birds in each) were littered with wood shavings of critical moisture content. Two groups were fed high levels of Zn as zinc-oxide (150 mg/kg of diet), with normal levels of biotin (300 µg/kg of diet) or high biotin (2,000 µg/kg of diet). The other 2 groups were fed Zn as zinc-methionine (150 mg/kg of diet), with normal levels of biotin (300 µg/kg of diet) or high biotin (2,000 µg/kg of diet). External assessment of foot pads and measurements the moisture contents of excreta and litter were performed weekly. The signs of foot pad lesions were recorded on a 7-point scale (0 = normal skin; 7 = more than half of the foot pad is necrotic). High biotin supplementation resulted in a reduction of 30 and 18% of cases of foot pad lesions in trials 1 and 2, respectively. The combination of Zn-methionine and high biotin supplementation led to a decreased severity of FPD in a range of about 50 and 30% in trials 1 and 2, respectively. In broilers fed the diet containing zinc-oxide and normal biotin levels about 28 and 24% of the birds had the scores of 6 and 7 (= high foot pad alterations), whereas in birds fed Zn-methionine and high biotin no high alterations (score = 7) in the foot pad (0%) occurred in either trial. The presented results suggest that it is advisable to combine the maximum levels of Zn (especially of Zn-methionine) and high levels of biotin when clinically relevant alterations in the foot pad occur. PMID:23776264

  18. Indiana University High Energy Physics Group, Task C

    SciTech Connect

    Heinz, R.M.; Mufson, S.L.; Musser, J.

    1991-01-01

    The Indiana University High Energy Physics Group, Task C has been actively involved in the MACRO experiment at Gran Sasso and the SSC experiment L during the current contract year. MACRO is a large US-Italian Monopole, Astrophysics, and Cosmic Ray Observatory being built under the Gran Sasso Mountain outside of Rome. Indiana University is in charge of organizing the United States software effort. We have built a state-of-the-art two-meter spectrophotometer for the MACRO liquid scintillator. We are in charge of ERP, the Event Reconstruction Processor online trigger processor for muons and stellar collapse. We are designing an air Cerenkov array to be placed on top of the Gran Sasso. Our other activity involves participation in the SSC experiment L. As long-standing members of L we have done proposal writing and have worked on important L planning and organization matters. We are now doing development work on the L Central Tracker straw drift tubes, including gas optimization, readout, and Monte Carlos. 12 refs., 20 figs., 1 tab.

  19. High-Mobility Group Box 1, Oxidative Stress, and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Rui; Zeh, Herbert J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Oxidative stress and associated reactive oxygen species can modify lipids, proteins, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids, and induce the mitochondrial permeability transition, providing a signal leading to the induction of autophagy, apoptosis, and necrosis. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein, a chromatin-binding nuclear protein and damage-associated molecular pattern molecule, is integral to oxidative stress and downstream apoptosis or survival. Accumulation of HMGB1 at sites of oxidative DNA damage can lead to repair of the DNA. As a redox-sensitive protein, HMGB1 contains three cysteines (Cys23, 45, and 106). In the setting of oxidative stress, it can form a Cys23-Cys45 disulfide bond; a role for oxidative homo- or heterodimerization through the Cys106 has been suggested for some of its biologic activities. HMGB1 causes activation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase and increased reactive oxygen species production in neutrophils. Reduced and oxidized HMGB1 have different roles in extracellular signaling and regulation of immune responses, mediated by signaling through the receptor for advanced glycation end products and/or Toll-like receptors. Antioxidants such as ethyl pyruvate, quercetin, green tea, N-acetylcysteine, and curcumin are protective in the setting of experimental infection/sepsis and injury including ischemia-reperfusion, partly through attenuating HMGB1 release and systemic accumulation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 13151335. PMID:20969478

  20. High-mobility group box 1 in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Zohara; Sternberg, Daniel; Chichelli, Trevor; Drake, Allison; Patel, Neel; Kolb, Chana; Chadha, Kailash; Yu, Jinhee; Hojnacki, David

    2016-04-01

    This study is one in series determining the potential of RAGE axis (receptor for advanced glycation end products, isoforms, ligands) as a biomarker in multiple sclerosis (MS). We evaluated serum levels of RAGE ligand, the high-mobility group box (HMGB)1 in MS patients, and assessed the correlation between HMGB1 serum levels and the use of disease-modifying drugs (DMDs), and between HMGB1 serum levels and indicators of MS disease severity. HMGB1 serum levels were compared between 96 (23 males) MS patients and 34 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (HCs) using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. DMD-naïve MS patients had significantly higher HMGB1 serum levels compared with DMD-treated (P = 0.04) and compared with HCs (P = 0.01). HMGB1 serum levels were not significantly different between total MS patients (DMD-naïve plus DMD-treated) and HCs (P = 0.09). DMD-naïve MS patients in clinical relapse tended to have lower HMGB1 serum levels than clinically stable RRMS patients (P = 0.07). HMGB1 serum levels showed 0.65 area under the curve (95 % CI 0.55-0.95) sensitivity/specificity for MS clinical relapse. The role of HMGB1 in MS disease pathology and DMD modulation of this protein warrant further investigations. PMID:26100980

  1. Thermal behavior and temperature measurements of melting beryllium plasma-facing components exposed to high heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, E.; Pocheau, C.; Kovari, M.; Barnard, J. M.; Crowley, B.; Godwin, J.; Lane, C.

    2015-08-01

    The emissivity of metallic materials is low and varies with temperature and wavelength inducing errors on surface temperature measurements. High heat flux experiments on beryllium were carried out to investigate the thermal behavior of bulk Be tiles. Thermal modeling aiming at determining the surface and bulk temperatures have been performed using ANSYS. A Be tile was exposed to heat flux with power density ranging between 1 and 7 MW/m2. Surface temperatures were measured using an infrared camera in the 3-5 ?m range and two-color pyrometers, one at short wavelengths (1.5-1.7 ?m) and one at mid IR range wavelengths (2-4 ?m) range. Both the IR camera and two-color pyrometers do not provide accurate temperature measurements on melted Be due to changes in the emissivities and emissivity ratio induced by surface modifications.

  2. CHOICES: an integrated behavioral intervention to prevent alcohol-exposed pregnancies among high-risk women in community settings.

    PubMed

    Velasquez, Mary M; von Sternberg, Kirk; Parrish, Danielle E

    2013-01-01

    CHOICES is an integrated behavioral intervention for prevention of prenatal alcohol exposure in women at high risk for alcohol-exposed pregnancies. The intervention uses motivational interviewing and cognitive-behavioral strategies, and targets adoption of effective contraception and reduction of alcohol use. The CHOICES intervention includes four manual-guided counseling sessions delivered by behavioral health counselors and one contraceptive session with a family planning clinician. CHOICES's efficacy has been established through a series of randomized controlled trials in settings including primary care, university hospital-based obstetrical/gynecology practices, urban jails, substance abuse treatment settings, and a media-recruited sample in three large cities. This article describes the CHOICES line of research including the epidemiology, feasibility, and efficacy studies. It also details the CHOICES intervention and the components of each session. In addition, the authors describe current studies testing modifications of the CHOICES intervention, the dissemination efforts to date, and implications for social work practice. PMID:23731416

  3. Sunflower exposed to high-intensity microwave-frequency electromagnetic field: electrophysiological response requires a mechanical injury to initiate

    PubMed Central

    Roux, David; Catrain, Alexandre; Lallechere, Sébastien; Joly, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    We have monitored the electrical potential variations (EPV) of sunflower plants illuminated by a high-intensity microwave-frequency (2.5 GHz, 1.5 kV/m) electromagnetic field (EMF). We have designed an appropriate set-up that allows parallel temperature and EPV measurements while part of the plant is being exposed to the field. The results show that the considered EMF does not induce plant EPV directly. This electrophysiological response appears only when the EMF leads to a mechanical injury of the tissues via a thermal effect (dielectric heating). Once the plant inner temperature reached a threshold, we systematically observed burn-like lesions associated with the bending of the stem or leaf-stalks. Theses mechanical constraints were rapidly followed by EPVs, moving through the stem. PMID:25482761

  4. Sunflower exposed to high-intensity microwave-frequency electromagnetic field: electrophysiological response requires a mechanical injury to initiate.

    PubMed

    Roux, David; Catrain, Alexandre; Lallechere, Sbastien; Joly, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    We have monitored the electrical potential variations (EPV) of sunflower plants illuminated by a high-intensity microwave-frequency (2.5 GHz, 1.5 kV/m) electromagnetic field (EMF). We have designed an appropriate set-up that allows parallel temperature and EPV measurements while part of the plant is being exposed to the field. The results show that the considered EMF does not induce plant EPV directly. This electrophysiological response appears only when the EMF leads to a mechanical injury of the tissues via a thermal effect (dielectric heating). Once the plant inner temperature reached a threshold, we systematically observed burn-like lesions associated with the bending of the stem or leaf-stalks. Theses mechanical constraints were rapidly followed by EPVs, moving through the stem. PMID:25482761

  5. High interindividual variability in dose-dependent reduction in speed of movement after exposing C. elegans to shock waves

    PubMed Central

    Angstman, Nicholas B.; Kiessling, Maren C.; Frank, Hans-Georg; Schmitz, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    In blast-related mild traumatic brain injury (br-mTBI) little is known about the connections between initial trauma and expression of individual clinical symptoms. Partly due to limitations of current in vitro and in vivo models of br-mTBI, reliable prediction of individual short- and long-term symptoms based on known blast input has not yet been possible. Here we demonstrate a dose-dependent effect of shock wave exposure on C. elegans using shock waves that share physical characteristics with those hypothesized to induce br-mTBI in humans. Increased exposure to shock waves resulted in decreased mean speed of movement while increasing the proportion of worms rendered paralyzed. Recovery of these two behavioral symptoms was observed during increasing post-traumatic waiting periods. Although effects were observed on a population-wide basis, large interindividual variability was present between organisms exposed to the same highly controlled conditions. Reduction of cavitation by exposing worms to shock waves in polyvinyl alcohol resulted in reduced effect, implicating primary blast effects as damaging components in shock wave induced trauma. Growing worms on NGM agar plates led to the same general results in initial shock wave effect in a standard medium, namely dose-dependence and high interindividual variability, as raising worms in liquid cultures. Taken together, these data indicate that reliable prediction of individual clinical symptoms based on known blast input as well as drawing conclusions on blast input from individual clinical symptoms is not feasible in br-mTBI. PMID:25705183

  6. Average Exceptional Lie Group Hierarchy and High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    El Naschie, M. S.

    2008-05-29

    Starting from an invariant total dimension for an exceptional Lie symmetry groups hierarchy, we drive all the essential characteristic and coupling constants of the fundamental interactions of physics. It is shown in a most simplistic fashion that all physical fields are various transfinite scaling transformation and topological deformation of each other. An extended standard model on the other hand turned out to be a compact sub group H of a version of E7 exceptional Lie group E7(-5) with dim H = 69. Thus particle physics, electromagnetism as well as gravity and the bulk are all representable via modular spaces akin to the famous compactified version of F. Klein's modular curve.

  7. Alteration of the Serum N-glycome of Mice Locally Exposed to High Doses of Ionizing Radiation*

    PubMed Central

    Chaze, Thibault; Slomianny, Marie-Christine; Milliat, Fabien; Tarlet, Georges; Lefebvre-Darroman, Tony; Gourmelon, Patrick; Bey, Eric; Benderitter, Marc; Michalski, Jean-Claude; Guipaud, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of the skin to ionizing radiation leads to characteristic reactions that will often turn into a pathophysiological process called the cutaneous radiation syndrome. The study of this disorder is crucial to finding diagnostic and prognostic bioindicators of local radiation exposure or radiation effects. It is known that irradiation alters the serum proteome content and potentially post-translationally modifies serum proteins. In this study, we investigated whether localized irradiation of the skin alters the serum glycome. Two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis of serum proteins from a man and from mice exposed to ionizing radiation showed that potential post-translational modification changes occurred following irradiation. Using a large-scale quantitative mass-spectrometry-based glycomic approach, we performed a global analysis of glycan structures of serum proteins from non-irradiated and locally irradiated mice exposed to high doses of ?-rays (20, 40, and 80 Gy). Non-supervised descriptive statistical analyses (principal component analysis) using quantitative glycan structure data allowed us to discriminate between uninjured/slightly injured animals and animals that developed severe lesions. Decisional statistics showed that several glycan families were down-regulated whereas others increased, and that particular structures were statistically significantly changed in the serum of locally irradiated mice. The observed increases in multiantennary N-glycans and in outer branch fucosylation and sialylation were associated with the up-regulation of genes involved in glycosylation in the liver, which is the main producer of serum proteins, and with an increase in the key proinflammatory serum cytokines IL-1?, IL-6, and TNF?, which can regulate the expression of glycosylation genes. Our results suggest for the first time a role of serum protein glycosylation in response to irradiation. These protein-associated glycan structure changes might signal radiation exposure or effects. PMID:23146835

  8. Peer Group Dynamics Associated with Iatrogenic Effects in Group Interventions with High-Risk Young Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishion, Thomas J.; Poulin, Francois; Burraston, Bert

    2001-01-01

    Studied adolescent participants in a group intervention program to determine the influence of peer reactions to problem behavior. Found that the impact of friendship is not always positive and can lead to unintended iatrogenic consequences. Concludes that adults' role in attending to children's peer contexts is perhaps the most critical for

  9. High Performance Liquid Chromatography Coupled with Pre-column Derivatization for Determination of Oxidized Glutathione Level in Rats Exposed to Paraquat.

    PubMed

    Hami, Zahra; Amini, Mohsen; Kiani, Amir; Ghazi-Khansari, Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is one of the most important antioxidants that plays an essential role in detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which oxidizes to glutathione disulfide (GSSG). Paraquat (PQ), awidely used herbicide, causes pulmonary injury with the productionof ROS. Excessive ROS accumulation as a consequence of PQ exposure are frequently targeted by GSH thereby oxidative stress leads to depletion of cellular GSH by transforming of GSH to glutathione disulfide (GSSG). A precise method of measuring of GSSG concentration in plasma as indicator of oxidative stress is needed. Some analytical techniques such as high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), gas chromatography and capillary electrophoresis have been used for determination of GSSG concentration. In the present study, a new HPLC method with fluorescence detection based on derivatization of the amine group of glutathione with 9-fluorenylmethyl chloroformate (FMOC-Cl) was developed. Male Wistar albino rats exposed to different doses of PQ (20-60 mg/kg) and control group were used and after protein precipitation, their plasma was subjected to derivatization with FMOC in the presence of borate buffer. The derivatized samples were injected to HPLC system with C18 column, mobile phase consisting of methanol and phosphate buffer, ?em= 315 nm, ?ex= 260 nm. Among all experimental groups, the rats which received 60 mg/kg PQ, showed a significant increase in the amount of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) compared to the control group. In this study, the applied derivatization and HPLC method made it possible to measure small amounts of glutathione in plasma using a precise and sensitive technique. PMID:24523771

  10. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor expression is associated with a family history of upper gastrointestinal tract cancer in a high-risk population exposed to aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, M.J.; Wei, W.Q.; Baer, J.; Abnet, C.C.; Wang, G.Q.; Sternberg, L.R.; Warner, A.C.; Johnson, L.L.; Lu, N.; Giffen, C.A.; Dawsey, S.M.; Qiao, Y.L.; Cherry, J.

    2009-09-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure is a risk factor for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and PAHs are ligands of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). This study measured the expression of AhR and related genes in frozen esophageal cell samples from patients exposed to different levels of indoor air pollution, who did or did not have high-grade squamous dysplasia and who did or did not have a family history of upper gastrointestinal tract (UGI) cancer. 147 samples were evaluated, including 23 (16%) from patients with high-grade dysplasia and 48 (33%) from patients without dysplasia who heated their homes with coal, without a chimney (a 'high' indoor air pollution group), and 27 (18%) from patients with high-grade dysplasia and 49 (33%) from patients without dysplasia who did not heat their homes at all (a 'low' indoor air pollution group). Sixty-four (44%) had a family history of UGI cancer. RNA was extracted and quantitative PCR analysis was done. AhR gene expression was detectable in 85 (58%) of the samples and was >9-fold higher in those with a family history of UGI cancer (median expression (interquartile range), -1,964 (-18,000, -610) versus -18,000 (-18,000, -1036); P = 0.02, Wilcoxon rank-sum test). Heating status, dysplasia category, age, gender, and smoking were not associated with AhR expression (linear regression; all P values {ge} 0.1). AhR expression was higher in patients with a family history of UGI cancer. Such individuals may be more susceptible to the deleterious effects of PAH exposure, including PAH-induced cancer.

  11. Effect of Vitamin E Supplementation on Intestinal Barrier Function in Rats Exposed to High Altitude Hypoxia Environment

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Rui; Qiao, Xiangjin; Xu, Cuicui; Shang, Xiaoya; Niu, Weining; Chao, Yu

    2014-01-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the role of vitamin E in the high altitude hypoxia-induced damage to the intestinal barrier in rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into control (Control), high altitude hypoxia (HH), and high altitude hypoxia+vitamin E (250 mg/kg BW*d) (HV) groups. After the third day, the HH and HV groups were placed in a hypobaric chamber at a stimulated elevation of 7000 m for 5 days. The rats in the HV group were given vitamin E by gavage daily for 8 days. The other rats were given equal volume saline. The results showed that high altitude hypoxia caused the enlargement of heart, liver, lung and kidney, and intestinal villi damage. Supplementation with vitamin E significantly alleviated hypoxia-caused damage to the main organs including intestine, increased the serum superoxide dismutase (SOD) (p< 0.05), diamino oxidase (DAO) (p< 0.01) levels, and decreased the serum levels of interleukin-2 (IL-2) (p< 0.01), interleukin-4 (IL-4) (p<0.001), interferon-gamma (IFN-?) (p<0.01) and malondialdehyde (MDA) (p<0.001), and decreased the serum erythropoietin (EPO) activity (p<0.05). Administration of vitamin E significantly increased the S-IgA (p<0.001) in ileum and significantly improved the expression levels of occludin and I?B?, and decreased the expression levels of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha and 2 alpha (HIF-1? and HIF-2?), Toll-like receptors (TLR4), P-I?B? and nuclear factor-?B p65(NF-?B P65) in ileum compared to the HH group. This study suggested that vitamin E protectis from intestinal injury caused by high altitude hypoxia environment. These effects may be related to the HIF and TLR4/NF-?B signaling pathway. PMID:25177163

  12. Engineering single crystalline Mn3O4 nano-octahedra with exposed highly active {011} facets for high performance lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shao-Zhuan; Jin, Jun; Cai, Yi; Li, Yu; Tan, Hai-Yan; Wang, Hong-En; van Tendeloo, G.; Su, Bao-Lian

    2014-05-01

    Well shaped single crystalline Mn3O4 nano-octahedra with exposed highly active {011} facets at different particle sizes have been synthesized and used as anode materials for lithium ion batteries. The electrochemical results show that the smallest sized Mn3O4 nano-octahedra show the best cycling performance with a high initial charge capacity of 907 mA h g-1 and a 50th charge capacity of 500 mA h g-1 at a current density of 50 mA g-1 and the best rate capability with a charge capacity of 350 mA h g-1 when cycled at 500 mA g-1. In particular, the nano-octahedra samples demonstrate a much better electrochemical performance in comparison with irregular shaped Mn3O4 nanoparticles. The best electrochemical properties of the smallest Mn3O4 nano-octahedra are ascribed to the lower charge transfer resistance due to the exposed highly active {011} facets, which can facilitate the conversion reaction of Mn3O4 and Li owing to the alternating Mn and O atom layers, resulting in easy formation and decomposition of the amorphous Li2O and the multi-electron reaction. On the other hand, the best electrochemical properties of the smallest Mn3O4 nano-octahedra can also be attributed to the smallest size resulting in the highest specific surface area, which provides maximum contact with the electrolyte and facilitates the rapid Li-ion diffusion at the electrode/electrolyte interface and fast lithium-ion transportation within the particles. The synergy of the exposed {011} facets and the smallest size (and/or the highest surface area) led to the best performance for the Mn3O4 nano-octahedra. Furthermore, HRTEM observations verify the oxidation of MnO to Mn3O4 during the charging process and confirm that the Mn3O4 octahedral structure can still be partly maintained after 50 discharge-charge cycles. The high Li-ion storage capacity and excellent cycling performance suggest that Mn3O4 nano-octahedra with exposed highly active {011} facets could be excellent anode materials for high-performance lithium-ion batteries.Well shaped single crystalline Mn3O4 nano-octahedra with exposed highly active {011} facets at different particle sizes have been synthesized and used as anode materials for lithium ion batteries. The electrochemical results show that the smallest sized Mn3O4 nano-octahedra show the best cycling performance with a high initial charge capacity of 907 mA h g-1 and a 50th charge capacity of 500 mA h g-1 at a current density of 50 mA g-1 and the best rate capability with a charge capacity of 350 mA h g-1 when cycled at 500 mA g-1. In particular, the nano-octahedra samples demonstrate a much better electrochemical performance in comparison with irregular shaped Mn3O4 nanoparticles. The best electrochemical properties of the smallest Mn3O4 nano-octahedra are ascribed to the lower charge transfer resistance due to the exposed highly active {011} facets, which can facilitate the conversion reaction of Mn3O4 and Li owing to the alternating Mn and O atom layers, resulting in easy formation and decomposition of the amorphous Li2O and the multi-electron reaction. On the other hand, the best electrochemical properties of the smallest Mn3O4 nano-octahedra can also be attributed to the smallest size resulting in the highest specific surface area, which provides maximum contact with the electrolyte and facilitates the rapid Li-ion diffusion at the electrode/electrolyte interface and fast lithium-ion transportation within the particles. The synergy of the exposed {011} facets and the smallest size (and/or the highest surface area) led to the best performance for the Mn3O4 nano-octahedra. Furthermore, HRTEM observations verify the oxidation of MnO to Mn3O4 during the charging process and confirm that the Mn3O4 octahedral structure can still be partly maintained after 50 discharge-charge cycles. The high Li-ion storage capacity and excellent cycling performance suggest that Mn3O4 nano-octahedra with exposed highly active {011} facets could be excellent anode materials for high-performance lithium-ion batteries. Electronic supplementary information (ESI

  13. Investigation of the oxidation behavior of dispersion stabilized alloys when exposed to a dynamic high temperature environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, D. R.

    1974-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of TD-NiCr and TD-NiCrAlY alloys have been studied at 2000 and 2200 F in static and high speed flowing air environments. The TD-NiCrAlY alloys preoxidized to produce an Al2O3 scale on the surface showed good oxidation resistance in both types of environments. The TD-NiCr alloy which had a Cr2O3 oxide scale after preoxidation was found to oxidize more than an order of magnitude faster under the dynamic test conditions than at comparable static test conditions. Although Cr2O3 normally provides good oxidation protection, it was rapidly lost due to formation of volatile CrO3 when exposed to the high speed air stream. The preferred oxide arrangement for the dynamic test consisted of an external layer of NiO with a porous mushroom type morphology, an intermediate duplex layer of NiO and Cr2O3, and a continuous inner layer of Cr2O3 in contact with the alloy substrate. An oxidation model has been developed to explain the observed microstructure and overall oxidation behavior of all alloys.

  14. Developing Psycho-Educational Groups for Japanese High Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Richard L.; Kameguchi, Kenji

    This paper describes the development of comprehensive psycho-educational groups for students in a secondary school attached to a Japanese university. Although deliberate application of psychological knowledge to self-empowerment has been a central component of counseling programs in the United States, such practice is only now emerging in Japan.…

  15. High School Biology: A Group Approach to Concept Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David S.

    2003-01-01

    Explains concept mapping as an instructional method in cooperative learning environments, and describes a study investigating the effectiveness of concept mapping on student learning during a photosynthesis and cellular respiration unit. Reports on the positive effects of concept mapping in the experimental group. (Contains 16 references.) (YDS)

  16. Global and MGMT promoter hypomethylation independently associated with genomic instability of lymphocytes in subjects exposed to high-dose polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon.

    PubMed

    Duan, Huawei; He, Zhini; Ma, Junxiang; Zhang, Bo; Sheng, Zhiguo; Bin, Ping; Cheng, Juan; Niu, Yong; Dong, Haiyan; Lin, Han; Dai, Yufei; Zhu, Benzhan; Chen, Wen; Xiao, Yongmei; Zheng, Yuxin

    2013-11-01

    Global hypomethylation, gene-specific methylation, and genome instability are common events in tumorigenesis. To date, few studies have examined the aberrant DNA methylation patterns in coke oven workers, who are highly at risk of lung cancer by occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). We recruited 82 PAH-exposed workers and 62 unexposed controls, assessed exposure levels by urinary 1-hydroxypyrene, and measured genetic damages by comet assay, bleomycin sensitivity, and micronucleus assay. The PAHs in coke oven emissions (COE) were estimated based on toxic equivalency factors. We used bisulfite-PCR pyrosequencing to quantitate DNA methylation in long interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE-1) and O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT). Further, the methylation alteration was also investigated in COE-treated human bronchial epithelial (16HBE) cells. We found there are higher levels of PAHs in COE. Among PAH-exposed workers, LINE-1 and MGMT methylation levels (with CpG site specificity) were significantly lowered. LINE-1, MGMT, and its hot CpG site-specific methylation were negatively correlated with urinary 1-hydroxypyrene levels (r = -0.329, p < 0.001; r = -0.164, p = 0.049 and r = -0.176, p = 0.034, respectively). In addition, LINE-1 methylation was inversely associated with comet tail moment and micronucleus frequency, and a significant increase of micronucleus in low MGMT methylation group. In vitro study revealed that treatment of COE in 16HBE cells resulted in higher production of BPDE-DNA adducts, LINE-1 hypomethylation, hypomethylation, and suppression of MGMT expression. These findings suggest hypomethylation of LINE-1 and MGMT promoter could be used as markers for PAHs exposure and merit further investigation. PMID:23543013

  17. Groups of diverse problem solvers can outperform groups of high-ability problem solvers

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Lu; Page, Scott E.

    2004-01-01

    We introduce a general framework for modeling functionally diverse problem-solving agents. In this framework, problem-solving agents possess representations of problems and algorithms that they use to locate solutions. We use this framework to establish a result relevant to group composition. We find that when selecting a problem-solving team from a diverse population of intelligent agents, a team of randomly selected agents outperforms a team comprised of the best-performing agents. This result relies on the intuition that, as the initial pool of problem solvers becomes large, the best-performing agents necessarily become similar in the space of problem solvers. Their relatively greater ability is more than offset by their lack of problem-solving diversity. PMID:15534225

  18. Phase and Structural States Formed in Titanium Nickelide Subsurface Layers Exposed to High-Current Pulsed Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neyman, A. A.; Meisner, L. L.; Lotkov, A. I.; Semin, V. O.

    2015-06-01

    The behavior of the non-equilibrium states formed in the subsurface layers of a titanium nickelide-based alloy exposed to electron beams operated in the pulsed surface layer melting mode is investigated experimentally. Using methods of an x-ray diffraction analysis, and optical, scanning, and transmission electron microscopies, an 8-10 ?m thick surface layer is shown to exhibit ?2 phase-based structure undergoing inhomogeneous lattice microstrain. The core layer located at a depth of 10-20 ?m below the irradiated surface contains a small amount (up to 5 vol.%) of a phase with ?19' martensite structure along with a slightly distorted lattice and unmelted Ti2Ni phase particles. Electron beam treatment brings about changes in the chemical composition of the surface-modified layer which becomes enriched in titanium owing to the dissolution of the Ti2Ni phase particles therein. Transmission electron microscopy has not revealed martensite phases in the modified layer. The electron beam exposure of the titanium nickelide surface is assumed to give rise to nonequilibrium highly distorted bcc structure.

  19. Maternal N-acetylcysteine therapy regulates hydrogen sulfide-generating pathway and prevents programmed hypertension in male offspring exposed to prenatal dexamethasone and postnatal high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Tai, I-Hsin; Sheen, Jiunn-Ming; Lin, Yu-Ju; Yu, Hong-Ren; Tiao, Mao-Meng; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Li-Tung; Tain, You-Lin

    2016-02-29

    Nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) pathways are involved in the development of hypertension, a condition that can originate from early life. We examined whether asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor)/NO and H2S generating pathway contributed to programmed hypertension in offspring exposed to prenatal dexamethasone (DEX) and postnatal high-fat (HF) and whether N-acetylcysteine (NAC) therapy prevented this process. We examined 16-week-old male rat offspring from five groups: control, DEX (0.1mg/kg i.p. from gestational day 16-22), HF (58% high-fat diet from weaning to 4 months of age), DEX+HF, and NAC (1% in drinking water during lactation). Prenatal DEX and postnatal HF diet synergistically induced programmed hypertension in adult offspring, which was prevented by maternal NAC therapy. We attributed the protective effects of NAC on two-hit induced programmed hypertension to the reduction of plasma ADMA, restoration of plasma l-arginine-to-ADMA ratio, upregulation of gene expression of H2S-generating enzymes, restoration of renal 3-mercaptopyruvate sulphurtransferase (3MST) protein levels and activity, induction of plasma glutathione level, and reduction of oxidative stress. Manipulation of the ADMA-NO and H2S-generating pathways by maternal NAC therapy may be a potential approach to prevent programmed hypertension induced by two-hit insults. PMID:26743493

  20. DISTRIBUTION OF SATELLITE GALAXIES IN HIGH-REDSHIFT GROUPS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yougang; Chen Xuelei; Park, Changbom; Hwang, Ho Seong

    2010-08-01

    We use galaxy groups at redshifts between 0.4 and 1.0 selected from the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey to study the color-morphological properties of satellite galaxies and investigate possible alignment between the distribution of the satellites and the orientation of their central galaxy. We confirm the bimodal color and morphological-type distribution for satellite galaxies at this redshift range: the red and blue classes correspond to the early and late morphological types, respectively, and the early-type satellites are on average brighter than the late-type ones. Furthermore, there is a morphological conformity between the central and satellite galaxies: the fraction of early-type satellites in groups with an early-type central is higher than those with a late-type central galaxy. This effect is stronger at smaller separations from the central galaxy. We find a marginally significant signal of alignment between the major axis of the early-type central galaxy and its satellite system, while for the late-type centrals no significant alignment signal is found. We discuss the alignment signal in the context of shape evolution of groups.

  1. Mortality after exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls and polychlorinated dibenzofurans: a meta-analysis of two highly exposed cohorts.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming-Chieh; Chen, Pau-Chung; Tsai, Pei-Chien; Furue, Masutaka; Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito; Uchi, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Takesumi; Guo, Yue Leon

    2015-09-15

    Both Yucheng and Yusho were events of accidental exposure to highly doses of polychlorinated biphenyls and dibenzofurans in Asian people. Mortality experiences caused by various diseases were reported in both cohorts with similar and dissimilar findings. We thus conducted a meta-analysis of two cohorts to reevaluate the effects of PCBs and PCDFs on major causes of mortalities. Two recently updated Yucheng and Yusho mortality studies were included. For selected diseases, standardized mortality ratios (SMR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were extracted. Meta-analyses were conducted using a random-effects model only when heterogeneity (I(2) ?>?50% and/or p value <0.10 by the Q test) was not found. A total of 1,803 Yucheng subjects (male, N?=?830; female, N?=?973) with 48,751 person-years of follow-up and 1,664 Yusho subjects (male, N?=?860; female, N?=?804) with 50,773 person-years are included. An increase in all-cause mortality (pooled SMR=1.2, 95% CI: 1.1-1.3, I(2) ?=?0.0%), all cancers (pooled SMR=1.3, 95% CI: 1.1-1.6, I(2) ?=?0.0%), lung cancer (pooled SMR=1.7, 95% CI: 1.2-2.3, I(2) =0.0%), heart disease (pooled SMR=1.3, 95% CI: 1.0-1.7, I(2) ?=?43.4%) and hepatic disease (pooled SMR=1.9, 95% CI: 1.3-2.8, I(2) ?=?0.0%) were found in pooled males. Significant elevation from liver cancer was found in pooled females (pooled SMR=2.0, 95% CI: 1.1-3.6, I(2) ?=?0.0%). This meta-analysis of Yucheng and Yusho cohorts showed similar elevation from all cancer, lung cancer, heart disease and hepatic disease mortalities in exposed men. Furthermore, a new finding of elevated liver cancer mortality in exposed women was identified. PMID:25754105

  2. Noise-induced hearing loss: A possible marker for high blood pressure in older noise-exposed populations

    SciTech Connect

    Talbott, E.O.; Findlay, R.C.; Kuller, L.H.; Lenkner, L.A.; Matthews, K.A.; Day, R.D.; Ishii, E.K. )

    1990-08-01

    The present study assessed the relationships among occupational noise exposure, noise-induced hearing loss, and high blood pressure. The study population consisted of 245 retired metal assembly workers from Pittsburgh aged 56 to 68 with chronic noise exposure of 30 or more years at greater than or equal to 89 dBA. Results of the audiometric testing indicated 52% of the younger workers (ages 56 to 63) have severe noise-induced hearing loss (greater than or equal to 65 dBA loss at 3, 4, or 6 kHz) and 67% of older workers (ages 64 to 68). Body mass index and alcohol intake were significantly related to systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Among older men, there was a marginally significant increased prevalence of high blood pressure (greater than or equal to 90 mm diastolic or taking blood pressure medicine) among those with severe noise-induced hearing loss (P = .05). Moreover, another measure of hearing loss at high frequencies, speech discrimination score in noise (measured in the better ear), referred to as the W-22 MAX score, was also found to be related to the prevalence of high blood pressure in the older (64 to 68) age group (P less than .05). Multiple regression analysis revealed W-22 MAX and severe noise-induced hearing loss were independent predictors of hypertension in the older, but not in the younger group of retired workers.

  3. Phlebotomy Treatment for Elimination of Perfluoroalkyl Acids in a Highly Exposed Family: A Retrospective Case-Series

    PubMed Central

    Genuis, Stephen J.; Liu, Yanna; Genuis, Quentin I. T.; Martin, Jonathan W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are a family of commonly used synthetic chemicals that have become widespread environmental contaminants. In human serum, perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS), perflurooctane sulfonate (PFOS), and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) are most frequently detected, in part owing to their long elimination half-lives of between 3.8 yrs (PFOA) and 8.5 yrs (PFHxS). These PFAAs also cross the placenta and have been associated with developmental toxicity, and some are considered likely human carcinogens. Interventions to eliminate PFAAs in highly contaminated individuals would reduce future health risks, but minimal research has been conducted on methods to facilitate accelerated human clearance of these persistent substances. Methods Six patients with elevated serum concentrations from a single family were treated by intermittent phlebotomy over a 4–5 year period at intervals similar to, or less frequent than what is done for routine blood donation at Canadian Blood Services. The apparent elimination half-life (HLapp) for PFHxS, PFOS, and PFOA in this treated population was calculated in each patient and compared to the intrinsic elimination half-lives (HLin) from a literature reference population of untreated fluorochemical manufacturing plant retirees (n = 26, age >55 yrs). Results For all three PFAAs monitored during phlebotomy, HLapp in each of the family members (except the mother, who had a low rate of venesection) was significantly shorter than the geometric mean HL measured in the reference population, and in some cases were even shorter compared to the fastest eliminator in the reference population. Conclusion This study suggests significantly accelerated PFAA clearance with regular phlebotomy treatment, but the small sample size and the lack of controls in this clinical intervention precludes drawing firm conclusions. Given the minimal risks of intermittent phlebotomy, this may be an effective and safe clinical intervention to diminish the body burden of PFAAs in highly exposed people. PMID:25504057

  4. Animal Welfare Groups Press for Limits on High School Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BioScience, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Discussions from the conference on "The Use of Animals in High School Biology Classes" are highlighted in this article. The list of science fair rules, which resulted from the conference, is included. (SA)

  5. Short Circuits or Superconductors? Effects of Group Composition on High-Achieving Students' Science Assessment Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Noreen M.; Nemer, Kariane Mari; Zuniga, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    Studied the effects of group ability composition (homogeneous versus heterogeneous) on group processes and outcomes for high-ability students completing science assessments. Results for 83 high ability students show the quality of group functioning serves as the strongest predictor of high-ability students' performance and explained much of the

  6. Anabolic Properties of High Mobility Group Box Protein-1 in Human Periodontal Ligament Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Michael; Lossdrfer, Stefan; Rmer, Piero; Bastos Craveiro, Rogerio; Deschner, James; Jger, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    High mobility group box protein-1 (HMGB1) is mainly recognized as a chemoattractant for macrophages in the initial phase of host response to pathogenic stimuli. However, recent findings provide evidence for anabolic properties in terms of enhanced proliferation, migration, and support of wound healing capacity of mesenchymal cells suggesting a dual role of the cytokine in the regulation of immune response and subsequent regenerative processes. Here, we examined potential anabolic effects of HMGB1 on human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells in the regulation of periodontal remodelling, for example, during orthodontic tooth movement. Preconfluent human PDL cells (hPDL) were exposed to HMGB1 protein and the influence on proliferation, migration, osteogenic differentiation, and biomineralization was determined by MTS assay, real time PCR, immunofluorescence cytochemistry, ELISA, and von Kossa staining. HMGB1 protein increased hPDL cell proliferation, migration, osteoblastic marker gene expression, and protein production as well as mineralized nodule formation significantly. The present findings support the dual character of HMGB1 with anabolic therapeutic potential that might support the reestablishment of the structural and functional integrity of the periodontium following periodontal trauma such as orthodontic tooth movement. PMID:25525297

  7. Effect of intermittent hypoxia on the reproduction of rats exposed to high altitude in the Chilean Altiplano.

    PubMed

    Cikutovic, Marcos; Fuentes, Nelson; Bustos-Obregn, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Environmental parameters such as the large day-night temperature differences, high light radiation, and low humidity may have a synergistic effect with low oxygen pressure. To evaluate the effects of the exposure to intermittent chronic hypobaric hypoxia (ICHH) in nature on rat reproduction, a group of rats was alternately moved to a location at 3400 meters over sea level (moml) for 7 days and returned the subsequent week to sea level; this procedure was repeated six times. Hematological and reproductive parameters were measured and analyzed. At the end of the experimental protocol, hematocrit and hemoglobin concentrations were significantly greater in the ICHH group compared to the control group (Nx) (p < 0.05). The diameter of the seminiferous tubule and the height of the spermatogenic epithelium in ICHH rats presented a significant decrease in relation to Nx rats (p < 0.05). Consequently, the number of epididymal spermatozoa in the experimental animals decreased compared to normal rats, with no evidence of recovery after 84 days. The offspring of the different matings between normal and hypoxic animals decreased proportionally to hypoxia exposure. The low oxygen and the changes in testicular temperature homeostasis would provide a novel local mechanism to explain the decrease in sperm cell production and the reduced number of puppies born. The alterations of the reproductive parameters of the hypoxic female, plus testicular injuries and diminished sperm in males, result in a significant decrease in the reproductive activity of the animals. PMID:20039817

  8. Prophylaxis with human serum butyrylcholinesterase protects Gttingen minipigs exposed to a lethal high-dose of sarin vapor.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Ashima; Hastings, Nicholas B; Sun, Wei; Dabisch, Paul A; Hulet, Stanley W; Jakubowski, Edward M; Mioduszewski, Robert J; Doctor, Bhupendra P

    2015-08-01

    Serum-derived human butyrylcholinesterase (Hu BChE) is a stoichiometric bioscavenger that is being developed as a potential prophylactic nerve agent countermeasure. Previously, we reported the prophylactic efficacy of Hu BChE in Gttingen minipigs against a whole-body exposure to 4.1mg/m(3) of sarin (GB) vapor, which produced lethality over 60min. Since the toxicity of nerve agent is concentration-dependent, in the present study, we investigated the toxic effects of an almost 3-fold higher rate of GB vapor exposure and the ability of Hu BChE to protect minipigs against this exposure. Male minipigs were subjected to: (1) air exposure; (2) GB vapor exposure; or (3) pretreatment with 7.5mg/kg of Hu BChE by i.m. injection, 24h prior to whole-body exposure to 11.4mg/m(3) of GB vapor for 10min. Electrocardiogram, electroencephalogram, and pupil size were monitored throughout exposure. Blood drawn before and throughout exposure was analyzed for blood gases, electrolytes, metabolites, acetylcholinesterase and BChE activities, and amount of GB bound to red blood cells and plasma. A novel finding was that saline-treated animals exposed to GB vapor did not develop any seizures, but manifested a variety of cardiac and whole blood toxic signs and rapidly died due to respiratory failure. Strikingly, pre-treatment with 7.5mg/kg of Hu BChE not only prevented lethality, but also avoided all cardiac toxic signs manifested in the non-treated cohort. Thus, Hu BChE alone can serve as an effective prophylactic countermeasure versus a lethal high-dose exposure to GB vapor. PMID:26145887

  9. Chromosome Aberrations in Human Epithelial Cells Exposed Los Alamos High-Energy Secondary Neutrons: M-BAND Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Saganti, P. B.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2007-01-01

    High-energy secondary neutrons, produced by the interaction of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) with the atmosphere, spacecraft structure and planetary surfaces, contribute a significant fraction to the dose equivalent radiation measurement in crew members and passengers of commercial aviation travel as well as astronauts in space missions. The Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) neutron facility's 30L beam line (4FP30L-A/ICE House) is known to generate neutrons that simulate the secondary neutron spectrum of the Earth's atmosphere at high altitude. The neutron spectrum is also similar to that measured onboard spacecrafts like the MIR and the International Space Station (ISS). To evaluate the biological damage, we exposed human epithelial cells in vitro to the LANSCE neutron beams with an entrance dose rate of 2.5 cGy/hr, and studied the induction of chromosome aberrations that were identified with multicolor-banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of inter-chromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intra-chromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Compared to our previous results with gamma-rays and 600 MeV/nucleon Fe ions of high dose rate at NSRL (NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory), the neutron data from the LANSCE experiments showed significantly higher frequency of chromosome aberrations. However, detailed analysis of the inversion type revealed that all of the three radiation types in the study induced a low incidence of simple inversions. Most of the inversions in gamma-ray irradiated samples were accompanied by other types of intrachromosomal aberrations but few inversions were accompanied by interchromosomal aberrations. In contrast, neutrons and Fe ions induced a significant fraction of inversions that involved complex rearrangements of both inter- and intrachromosome exchanges. The distribution of damage sites on chromosome 3 was also compared for different radiation types. The breakpoints were randomly localized on chromosome 3 with neutrons and Fe ions exposure, whereas non-random distribution with clustering breakpoints was observed with gamma-rays exposure. The specific fingerprint of neutron radiations on chromosomal aberrations will be discussed.

  10. High-resolution ?13CO2 soil efflux monitoring in tree girdling experiment exposes large temporal variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egan, J. E.; Risk, D. A.; Nickerson, N. R.

    2011-12-01

    Carbon stable isotopes (?13C) help us link above- and below-ground ecosystem processes, telling us about the temporal speed at which carbon cycles through plants to the soil and the amount of autotrophic respiration contributing to total soil respiration. In the past few years, we have seen rapid advances in the way we measure ?13CO2, using Tunable Diode Lasers (TDL) or Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS), which has helped make us aware of the high isotopic variability in natural soils. There is also growing recognition that most sampling strategies induce gas transport fractionations, which can be of high magnitude. Previous high profile studies using ?13CO2 are increasingly being called into question for these reasons, as variability or transport fractionations may have overprinted the biologic variability of interest. Our aim in this study was to conduct a girdling experiment similar to other widely cited girdling experiments, where we were interested in identifying isotopic signatures and magnitudes of respiration associated with autotrophic and heterotrophic activity, the temporal link between photosynthesis and respiration, and spatial variation within treatment plots. Our study is different from previous studies in that it relies on automated continuous CRDS measurements from several locations, using a sampling methodology that we developed specifically to address previous fractionation issues. The new methodology, called Isotopic-Forced Diffusion (Iso-FD), measures ?13CO2 efflux. It was tested in the lab and using models, and then implemented in the field for the tree girdling experiment in two 400-m2 pine plots in Antigonish County, NS, Canada. In addition to Iso-FD continuous data, spatial ?13CO2 data from gas chambers, and meteorological data were also collected in growing seasons of both 2010 and 2011. Variation was seen in bulk flux rates between the plots, and girdling both resulted in increased CO2 fluxes and decreased temporal variability in ? 13CO2 as compared to the control plot. Overall it was clear that girdling did not have the characteristic effect of decreasing respiratory activity, or shifting the isotopic signature cleanly in one direction. The resolution of the Iso-FD technique was useful, however, in exposing substantial temporal variability, and avoiding possible errors that could have accounted for the variation observed in other oft-cited studies.

  11. Low-temperature synthesis of high-ordered anatase TiO2 nanotube array films coated with exposed {001} nanofacets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jie; Huang, Zhennan; Zhu, Jihao; Kou, Shengzhong; Zhang, Xiaobin; Yang, Hangsheng

    2015-12-01

    High-ordered anatase TiO2 nanotube array films coated with exposed high-reactive {001} nanofacets were fabricated by a modified hydrothermal method using amorphous anodic TiO2 nanotube arrays (ATONAs) as starting materials. It was found that the reaction between gas phase HF and solid ATONAs played a key role in the transformation process from amorphous to anatase TiO2, and the TiO2 tubular structure kept unchanged during the surface modification with an exposed {001} facets up to 76.5%, which could be attributed to the low reaction temperature of 130?C. Our study provided a novel route for the facile preparation of {001} facets exposed anatase TiO2.

  12. Low-temperature synthesis of high-ordered anatase TiO2 nanotube array films coated with exposed {001} nanofacets.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jie; Huang, Zhennan; Zhu, Jihao; Kou, Shengzhong; Zhang, Xiaobin; Yang, Hangsheng

    2015-01-01

    High-ordered anatase TiO2 nanotube array films coated with exposed high-reactive {001} nanofacets were fabricated by a modified hydrothermal method using amorphous anodic TiO2 nanotube arrays (ATONAs) as starting materials. It was found that the reaction between gas phase HF and solid ATONAs played a key role in the transformation process from amorphous to anatase TiO2, and the TiO2 tubular structure kept unchanged during the surface modification with an exposed {001} facets up to 76.5%, which could be attributed to the low reaction temperature of 130?C. Our study provided a novel route for the facile preparation of {001} facets exposed anatase TiO2. PMID:26634815

  13. Low-temperature synthesis of high-ordered anatase TiO2 nanotube array films coated with exposed {001} nanofacets

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jie; Huang, Zhennan; Zhu, Jihao; Kou, Shengzhong; Zhang, Xiaobin; Yang, Hangsheng

    2015-01-01

    High-ordered anatase TiO2 nanotube array films coated with exposed high-reactive {001} nanofacets were fabricated by a modified hydrothermal method using amorphous anodic TiO2 nanotube arrays (ATONAs) as starting materials. It was found that the reaction between gas phase HF and solid ATONAs played a key role in the transformation process from amorphous to anatase TiO2, and the TiO2 tubular structure kept unchanged during the surface modification with an exposed {001} facets up to 76.5%, which could be attributed to the low reaction temperature of 130?C. Our study provided a novel route for the facile preparation of {001} facets exposed anatase TiO2. PMID:26634815

  14. Ethnic characterization of a population of children exposed to high doses of arsenic via drinking water and a possible correlation with metabolic processes

    PubMed Central

    Bobillo, Cecilia; Navoni, Julio A; Olmos, Valentina; Merini, Luciano J; Villaamil Lepori, Edda; Corach, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Because the ratio between the two major arsenic metabolites is related to the adverse health effects of arsenic, numerous studies have been performed to establish a relationship between the ability to metabolically detoxify arsenic and other variables, including exposure level, gender, age and ethnicity. Because ethnicity may play a key role and provide relevant information for heterogeneous populations, we characterized a group of 70 children from rural schools in the Argentinean provinces of Chaco and Santiago del Estero who were exposed to high levels of arsenic. We used genetic markers for maternal, paternal and bi-parental ancestry to achieve this goal. Our results demonstrate that the Amerindian maternal linages are present in 100% of the samples, whereas the Amerindian component transmitted through the paternal line is less than 10%. Informative markers for autosomal ancestry show a predominantly European ancestry, in which 37% of the samples contained between 90 and 99% European ancestry. The native American component ranged from 50 to 80% in 15.7% of the samples, and in all but four samples, the African component was less than 10%. Correlation analysis demonstrated that the ethnicity and the ratio of the excreted arsenic metabolites monomethyl arsenic and dimethyl arsenic are not associated, dismissing a relationship between ethnic origin and differential metabolism. PMID:24596592

  15. Nontargeted Stressful Effects in Normal Human Fibroblast Cultures Exposed to Low Fluences of High Charge, High Energy (HZE) Particles: Kinetics of Biologic Responses and Significance of Secondary Radiations

    PubMed Central

    Gonon, Graldine; Groetz, Jean-Emmanuel; de Toledo, Sonia M.; Howell, Roger W.; Fromm, Michel; Azzam, Edouard I.

    2014-01-01

    The induction of nontargeted stressful effects in cell populations exposed to low fluences of high charge (Z) and high energy (E) particles is relevant to estimates of the health risks of space radiation. We investigated the up-regulation of stress markers in confluent normal human fibroblast cultures exposed to 1,000 MeV/u iron ions [linear energy transfer (LET) ~151 keV/?m] or 600 MeV/u silicon ions (LET ~50 keV/?m) at mean absorbed doses as low as 0.2 cGy, wherein 13% of the cells were targeted through the nucleus by a primary particle. Within 24 h postirradiation, significant increases in the levels of phospho-TP53 (serine 15), p21Waf1 (CDKN1A), HDM2, phospho-ERK1/2, protein carbonylation and lipid peroxidation were detected, which suggested participation in the stress response of cells not targeted by primary particles. This was supported by in situ studies that indicated greater increases in 53BP1 foci formation, a marker of DNA damage. than expected from the number of primary particle traversals. The effect was expressed as early as 15 min after exposure, peaked at 1 h and decreased by 24 h. A similar tendency occurred after exposure of the cell cultures to 0.2 cGy of 3.7 MeV ? particles (LET ~109 keV/?m) that targets ~1.6% of nuclei, but not after 0.2 cGy from 290 MeV/u carbon ions (LET ~13 keV/?m) by which, on average, ~13% of the nuclei were hit, which highlights the importance of radiation quality in the induced effect. Simulations with the FLUKA multi-particle transport code revealed that fragmentation products, other than electrons, in cell cultures exposed to HZE particles comprise <1% of the absorbed dose. Further, the radial spread of dose due to secondary heavy ion fragments is confined to approximately 1020 ?m. Thus, the latter are unlikely to significantly contribute to stressful effects in cells not targeted by primary HZE particles. PMID:23465079

  16. Enhanced Gas-Sensing Properties of the Hierarchical TiO? Hollow Microspheres with Exposed High-Energy {001} Crystal Facets.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Liang, Yan; Wang, Guozhong; Liu, Liangliang; Yuan, Cailei; Yu, Ting; Li, Qinliang; Zeng, Fanyan; Gu, Gang

    2015-11-11

    Anatase hierarchical TiO2 with innovative designs (hollow microspheres with exposed high-energy {001} crystal facets, hollow microspheres without {001} crystal facets, and solid microspheres without {001} crystal facets) were synthesized via a one-pot hydrothermal method and characterized. Based on these materials, gas sensors were fabricated and used for gas-sensing tests. It was found that the sensor based on hierarchical TiO2 hollow microspheres with exposed high-energy {001} crystal facets exhibited enhanced acetone sensing properties compared to the sensors based on the other two materials due to the exposing of high-energy {001} crystal facets and special hierarchical hollow structure. First-principle calculations were performed to illustrate the sensing mechanism, which suggested that the adsorption process of acetone molecule on TiO2 surface was spontaneous, and the adsorption on high-energy {001} crystal facets would be more stable than that on the normally exposed {101} crystal facets. Further characterization indicated that the {001} surface was highly reactive for the adsorption of active oxygen species, which was also responsible for the enhanced sensing performance. The present studies revealed the crystal-facets-dependent gas-sensing properties of TiO2 and provided a new insight into improving the gas sensing performance by designing hierarchical hollow structure with special-crystal-facets exposure. PMID:26497199

  17. High Mobility Group A Proteins as Tumor Markers

    PubMed Central

    Pallante, Pierlorenzo; Sepe, Romina; Puca, Francesca; Fusco, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Almost 30?years ago, overexpression of HMGA proteins was associated with malignant phenotype of rat thyroid cells transformed with murine retroviruses. Thereafter, several studies have analyzed HMGA expression in a wide range of human neoplasias. Here, we summarize all these results that, in the large majority of the cases, confirm the association of HMGA overexpression with high malignant phenotype as outlined by chemoresistance, spreading of metastases, and a global poor survival. Even though HMGA proteins overexpression indicates a poor prognosis in almost all malignancies, their detection may be particularly useful in determining the prognosis of breast, lung, and colon carcinomas, suggesting for the treatment a more aggressive therapy. In particular, the expression of HMGA2 in lung carcinomas is frequently associated with the presence of metastases. Moreover, recent data revealed that often the cause for the high HMGA proteins levels detected in human malignancies is a deregulated expression of non-coding RNA. Therefore, the HMGA proteins represent tumor markers whose detection can be a valid tool for the diagnosis and prognosis of neoplastic diseases. PMID:25859543

  18. One size does not fit all: HIV testing preferences differ among high-risk groups in Northern Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Ostermann, Jan; Njau, Bernard; Mtuy, Tara; Brown, Derek S; Mhlbacher, Axel; Thielman, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    In order to maximize the effectiveness of "Seek, Test, and Treat" strategies for curbing the HIV epidemic, new approaches are needed to increase the uptake of HIV testing services, particularly among high-risk groups. Low HIV testing rates among such groups suggest that current testing services may not align well with the testing preferences of these populations. Female bar workers and male mountain porters have been identified as two important high-risk groups in the Kilimanjaro Region of Tanzania. We used conventional survey methods and a discrete choice experiment (DCE), a preference elicitation method increasingly applied by economists and policy-makers to inform health policy and services, to analyze trade-offs made by individuals and quantify preferences for HIV testing services. Bivariate descriptive statistics were used to analyze differences in survey responses across groups. Compared to 486 randomly selected community members, 162 female bar workers and 194 male Kilimanjaro porters reported 2-3 times as many lifetime sexual partners (p < 0.001), but similar numbers of lifetime HIV tests (median 1-2 across all groups). For the DCE, participants' stated choices across 12,978 hypothetical HIV testing scenarios (422 female and 299 male participants 9 choice tasks 2 alternatives) were analyzed using gender-specific mixed logit models. Direct assessments and the DCE data demonstrated that barworkers were less likely to prefer home testing and were more concerned about disclosure issues compared with their community counterparts. Male porters preferred testing in venues where antiretroviral therapy was readily available. Both high-risk groups were less averse to traveling longer distances to test compared to their community counterparts. These results expose systematic differences in HIV testing preferences across high-risk populations compared to their community peers. Tailoring testing options to the preferences of high-risk populations should be evaluated as a means of improving uptake of testing in these populations. PMID:25616562

  19. High-throughput ethomics in large groups of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Branson, Kristin; Robie, Alice A; Bender, John; Perona, Pietro; Dickinson, Michael H

    2009-06-01

    We present a camera-based method for automatically quantifying the individual and social behaviors of fruit flies, Drosophila melanogaster, interacting in a planar arena. Our system includes machine-vision algorithms that accurately track many individuals without swapping identities and classification algorithms that detect behaviors. The data may be represented as an ethogram that plots the time course of behaviors exhibited by each fly or as a vector that concisely captures the statistical properties of all behaviors displayed in a given period. We found that behavioral differences between individuals were consistent over time and were sufficient to accurately predict gender and genotype. In addition, we found that the relative positions of flies during social interactions vary according to gender, genotype and social environment. We expect that our software, which permits high-throughput screening, will complement existing molecular methods available in Drosophila, facilitating new investigations into the genetic and cellular basis of behavior. PMID:19412169

  20. High-throughput Ethomics in Large Groups of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Branson, Kristin; Robie, Alice; Bender, John; Perona, Pietro; Dickinson, Michael

    2009-01-01

    We present a camera-based method for automatically quantifying the individual and social behaviors of fruit flies, Drosophila melanogaster, interacting within a planar arena. Our system includes machine vision algorithms that accurately track many individuals without swapping identities and classification algorithms that detect behaviors. The data may be represented as an ethogram that plots the time course of behaviors exhibited by each fly, or as a vector that concisely captures the statistical properties of all behaviors displayed within a given period. We found that behavioral differences between individuals are consistent over time and are sufficient to accurately predict gender and genotype. In addition, we show that the relative positions of flies during social interactions vary according to gender, genotype, and social environment. We expect that our software, which permits high-throughput screening, will complement existing molecular methods available in Drosophila, facilitating new investigations into the genetic and cellular basis of behavior. PMID:19412169

  1. Metabolism of hexachlorobenzene in humans: association between serum levels and urinary metabolites in a highly exposed population.

    PubMed Central

    To-Figueras, J; Sala, M; Otero, R; Barrot, C; Santiago-Silva, M; Rodamilans, M; Herrero, C; Grimalt, J; Sunyer, J

    1997-01-01

    Serum and urine from 100 subjects of a general population highly exposed to airborne hexachlorobenzene (HCB) were analyzed to obtain new insights into the metabolism of this ubiquitous compound. HCB was detected in all serum samples with concentrations ranging between 1.1 and 953 ng/ml. The major known metabolites of HCB were investigated in urine collected over 24 hr. Pentachlorophenol (PCP) was detected in all urines with values ranging between 0.58 and 13.9 micrograms excreted in 24 hr [mean +/- standard deviation (SD), 2.52 +/- 2.05; geometric mean, 2.05]. A sulfur derivative that, after hydrolysis, yielded pentachlorobenzenethiol (PCBT) could also be identified and quantified in all the urines with values ranging between 0.18 and 84.0 micrograms of PCBT excreted in 24 hr (mean +/- SD, 3.47 +/- 10.8; geometric mean, 1.39). The sulfur derivative assessed as PCBT appeared to be the main metabolite, with urinary concentrations surpassing those of PCP in the subjects with higher HCB accumulation (HCB in serum > 32 ng/ml). PCBT concentration in urine collected over 24 hr showed a very strong association with HCB concentration in serum; the association was stronger in males than in females. An increase of 1 ng/ml of HCB in serum led to an increase of 2.12 micrograms of PCBT excreted in urine collected over 24 hr in males (95% CI, 1.82-2.44) and to an increase of 0.67 microgram of PCBT in females (CI, 0.33-1.09). A weaker association was found between PCP in urine and HCB in serum, which was only statistically significant in males (an increase of 1 ng/ml of HCB in serum led to an increase of 0.63 microgram of PCP excreted in urine collected over 24 hr; (CI, 0.34-0.95). These results show that the formation of the cysteine conjugate is a quantitatively more important metabolic pathway in humans than the formation of PCP. Moreover, the association found suggests that PCBT is a good urinary marker of HCB internal dose and glutathione-mediated metabolism. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. A Figure 2. B Figure 3. A Figure 3. B PMID:9074885

  2. The epigenetic effects of a high prenatal folate intake in male mouse fetuses exposed in utero to arsenic

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Verne; Fry, Rebecca C.; Niculescu, Mihai D.; Rager, Julia E.; Saunders, Jesse; Paul, David S.; Zeisel, Steven H.; UNC Nutrition Research Institute, Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 ; Waalkes, Michael P.; Stýblo, Miroslav; Drobná, Zuzana

    2012-11-01

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) is a complete transplacental carcinogen in mice. Previous studies have demonstrated that in utero exposure to iAs promotes cancer in adult mouse offspring, possibly acting through epigenetic mechanisms. Humans and rodents enzymatically convert iAs to its methylated metabolites. This reaction requires S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) as methyl group donor. SAM is also required for DNA methylation. Supplementation with folate, a major dietary source of methyl groups for SAM synthesis, has been shown to modify iAs metabolism and the adverse effects of iAs exposure. However, effects of gestational folate supplementation on iAs metabolism and fetal DNA methylation have never been thoroughly examined. In the present study, pregnant CD1 mice were fed control (i.e. normal folate, or 2.2 mg/kg) or high folate diet (11 mg/kg) from gestational day (GD) 5 to 18 and drank water with 0 or 85 ppm of As (as arsenite) from GD8 to 18. The exposure to iAs significantly decreased body weight of GD18 fetuses and increased both SAM and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) concentrations in fetal livers. High folate intake lowered the burden of total arsenic in maternal livers but did not prevent the effects of iAs exposure on fetal weight or hepatic SAM and SAH concentrations. In fact, combined folate-iAs exposure caused further significant body weight reduction. Notably, iAs exposure alone had little effect on DNA methylation in fetal livers. In contrast, the combined folate-iAs exposure changed the CpG island methylation in 2,931 genes, including genes known to be imprinted. Most of these genes were associated with neurodevelopment, cancer, cell cycle, and signaling networks. The canonical Wnt-signaling pathway, which regulates fetal development, was among the most affected biological pathways. Taken together, our results suggest that a combined in utero exposure to iAs and a high folate intake may adversely influence DNA methylation profiles and weight of fetuses, compromising fetal development and possibly increasing the risk for early-onset of disease in offspring. Highlights: ► We used transplacental CD1 mice model for inorganic arsenic (iAs) carcinogenesis. ► We examined the effects of gestational iAs and high folate exposure on DNA methylation. ► iAs–folate interaction resulted in low fetal weights and changes in DNA methylation. ► Epigenetically altered genes were associated with cancer and neurodevelopment. ► We showed that in utero iAs–folate interaction negatively affects fetal development.

  3. Changes in cardiovascular functions, lipid profile, and body composition at high altitude in two different ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Vats, Praveen; Ray, Koushik; Majumadar, Dhurjati; Amitabh; Joseph, Duraisamy Arul; Bayen, Susovon; Akunov, Almaz; Sarbaev, Akpav; Singh, Shashi Bala

    2013-03-01

    High altitude (HA) presents inhospitable environmental conditions that adversely affects human physiology and metabolism. Changes in physiological functions are reported during high altitude exposure, but the changes vary with physical state, culture habits, geographical locations, and genetic variation of individual. The present study was carried out to explore the variation in acclimatization pattern of two different ethnic groups in relation to cardiovascular functions, lipid profile and body composition. The study was carried out on 30 human volunteers (20 Indian and 10 Kyrgyz) initially at Bishkek for basal recording and on day 3, 7, 14, and 21 of high altitude (3200 m) induction and again on day 3 of de-induction. On altitude exposure significant decrease in body weight was observed both in Indian (day 14, p<0.001) and Kyrgyz (day 3, p<0.01) subjects. Decreased levels of total body water, extra cellular and intra cellular body water were also observed in both the groups. Significant reduction in body mass index (p<0.01), fat free mass (p<0.01), body cell mass (p<0.01) and body volume (p<0.01) was also observed in Kyrgyz subjects, whereas in Indian subjects the changes were not significant in these variables on high altitude exposure. Diastolic blood pressure and heart rate increased significantly on day 3 (p<0.001 and p<0.01, respectively) of induction in Indian subjects; whereas in Kyrgyz significant increase was observed on day 14 (p<0.05) in both the cases. High density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels increased significantly on day 7 of HA exposure in both the groups. Results indicate that the Indian and Kyrgyz groups report differently, in relation to changes in cardiovascular functions, lipid profiles, and body composition, when exposed to HA. The difference observed in acclimatization pattern in the two groups may be due to ethnic/genetic variation of two populations. PMID:23537260

  4. Does Homogeneous Ability Grouping for High School Honors English Instruction Benefit the High Achiever?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hostetter, Douglas Paul

    2013-01-01

    Public schools are examining their policies and instructional practices to address the achievement gap exposed by the reporting requirements of NCLB (Wenglinski, 2004). As accountability measures and stakes rise, there is a call for an improved use of scientific evidence to inform educational policymaking (Wiseman, 2010). In terms of the

  5. The Epigenetic Effects of a High Prenatal Folate Intake in Male Mouse Fetuses Exposed In Utero to Arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Verne; Fry, Rebecca C.; Niculescu, Mihai D.; Rager, Julia E.; Saunders, Jesse; Paul, David S.; Zeisel, Steven H.; Waalkes, Michael P.; Stýblo, Miroslav; Drobná, Zuzana

    2012-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) is a complete transplacental carcinogen in mice. Previous studies have demonstrated that in utero exposure to iAs promotes cancer in adult mouse offspring, possibly acting through epigenetic mechanisms. Humans and rodents enzymatically convert iAs to its methylated metabolites. This reaction requires S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) as methyl group donor. SAM is also required for DNA methylation. Supplementation with folate, a major dietary source of methyl groups for SAM synthesis, has been shown to modify iAs metabolism and the adverse effects of iAs exposure. However, effects of gestational folate supplementation on iAs metabolism and fetal DNA methylation have never been thoroughly examined. In the present study, pregnant CD1 mice were fed control (i.e. normal folate, or 2.2 mg/kg) or high folate diet (11 mg/kg) from gestational day (GD) 5 to 18 and drank water with 0 or 85 ppm of As (as arsenite) from GD8 to 18. The exposure to iAs significantly decreased body weight of GD18 fetuses and increased both SAM and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) concentrations in fetal livers. High folate intake lowered the burden of total arsenic in maternal livers but did not prevent the effects of iAs exposure on fetal weight or hepatic SAM and SAH concentrations. In fact, combined folate-iAs exposure caused further significant body weight reduction. Notably, iAs exposure alone had little effect on DNA methylation in fetal livers. In contrast, the combined folate-iAs exposure changed the CpG island methylation in 2,931 genes, including genes known to be imprinted. Most of these genes were associated with neurodevelopment, cancer, cell cycle, and signaling networks. The canonical Wnt-signaling pathway, which regulates fetal development, was among the most affected biological pathways. Taken together, our results suggest that a combined in utero exposure to iAs and a high folate intake may adversely influence DNA methylation profiles and weight of fetuses, compromising fetal development and possibly increasing the risk for early-onset of disease in offspring. PMID:22959928

  6. The epigenetic effects of a high prenatal folate intake in male mouse fetuses exposed in utero to arsenic.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Verne; Fry, Rebecca C; Niculescu, Mihai D; Rager, Julia E; Saunders, Jesse; Paul, David S; Zeisel, Steven H; Waalkes, Michael P; Stýblo, Miroslav; Drobná, Zuzana

    2012-11-01

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) is a complete transplacental carcinogen in mice. Previous studies have demonstrated that in utero exposure to iAs promotes cancer in adult mouse offspring, possibly acting through epigenetic mechanisms. Humans and rodents enzymatically convert iAs to its methylated metabolites. This reaction requires S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) as methyl group donor. SAM is also required for DNA methylation. Supplementation with folate, a major dietary source of methyl groups for SAM synthesis, has been shown to modify iAs metabolism and the adverse effects of iAs exposure. However, effects of gestational folate supplementation on iAs metabolism and fetal DNA methylation have never been thoroughly examined. In the present study, pregnant CD1 mice were fed control (i.e. normal folate, or 2.2 mg/kg) or high folate diet (11 mg/kg) from gestational day (GD) 5 to 18 and drank water with 0 or 85 ppm of As (as arsenite) from GD8 to 18. The exposure to iAs significantly decreased body weight of GD18 fetuses and increased both SAM and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) concentrations in fetal livers. High folate intake lowered the burden of total arsenic in maternal livers but did not prevent the effects of iAs exposure on fetal weight or hepatic SAM and SAH concentrations. In fact, combined folate-iAs exposure caused further significant body weight reduction. Notably, iAs exposure alone had little effect on DNA methylation in fetal livers. In contrast, the combined folate-iAs exposure changed the CpG island methylation in 2,931 genes, including genes known to be imprinted. Most of these genes were associated with neurodevelopment, cancer, cell cycle, and signaling networks. The canonical Wnt-signaling pathway, which regulates fetal development, was among the most affected biological pathways. Taken together, our results suggest that a combined in utero exposure to iAs and a high folate intake may adversely influence DNA methylation profiles and weight of fetuses, compromising fetal development and possibly increasing the risk for early-onset of disease in offspring. PMID:22959928

  7. Ghosts of thermal past: reef fish exposed to historic high temperatures have heightened stress response to further stressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, S. C.; Beldade, R.; Chabanet, P.; Bigot, L.; O'Donnell, J. L.; Bernardi, G.

    2015-12-01

    Individual exposure to stressors can induce changes in physiological stress responses through modulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-interrenal (HPI) axis. Despite theoretical predictions, little is known about how individuals will respond to unpredictable short-lived stressors, such as thermal events. We examine the primary neuroendocrine response of coral reef fish populations from the Îles Eparses rarely exposed to anthropogenic stress, but that experienced different thermal histories. Skunk anemonefish, Amphiprion akallopisos, showed different cortisol responses to a generic stressor between islands, but not along a latitudinal gradient. Those populations previously exposed to higher maximum temperatures showed greater responses of their HPI axis. Archive data reveal thermal stressor events occur every 1.92-6 yr, suggesting that modifications to the HPI axis could be adaptive. Our results highlight the potential for adaptation of the HPI axis in coral reef fish in response to a climate-induced thermal stressor.

  8. High-density lipoproteins attenuate interleukin-6 production in endothelial cells exposed to pro-inflammatory stimuli.

    PubMed

    Gomaraschi, Monica; Basilico, Nicoletta; Sisto, Francesca; Taramelli, Donatella; Eligini, Sonia; Colli, Susanna; Sirtori, Cesare R; Franceschini, Guido; Calabresi, Laura

    2005-09-15

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the ability of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to attenuate endothelial dysfunction, by assessing down-regulation of cytokine-induced interleukin-6 (IL-6) production in cultured endothelial cells, and measuring plasma IL-6 levels in three groups of healthy individuals with low, average, or high plasma HDL-cholesterol. Human plasma HDL caused a concentration-dependent inhibition of TNFalpha-induced IL-6 production in human endothelial cells (by 58.5+/-1.5% at 2 mg of HDL-protein/ml). Reconstituted HDL made with apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) and phosphatidylcholine were as effective as plasma HDL, while lipid-free apoA-I or phosphatidylcholine liposomes had no effect. HDL attenuated IL-6 mRNA levels, an effect which occurs through inhibition of p38 MAP kinase. The median plasma IL-6 concentration was significantly higher in subjects with low HDL-cholesterol (2.54 pg/ml) compared with those with average or high HDL-cholesterol (1.31 pg/ml and 1.47 pg/ml, respectively). When all subjects were considered together, a lower HDL-cholesterol was the strongest independent predictor of higher IL-6 (F=25.38, P<0.001). By inhibiting IL-6 production and lowering plasma IL-6 concentration, HDL may limit the pro-atherogenic effects of both acute and chronic inflammatory states, of which IL-6 is a key orchestrator. PMID:16135414

  9. Eryptosis in lead-exposed workers

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Dorado, Itzel-Citlalli; Hernández, Gerardo; Quintanar-Escorza, Martha-Angelica; Maldonado-Vega, María; Rosas-Flores, Margarita; Calderón-Salinas, José-Víctor

    2014-12-01

    Eryptosis is a physiological phenomenon in which old and damaged erythrocytes are removed from circulation. Erythrocytes incubated with lead have exhibited major eryptosis. In the present work we found evidence of high levels of eryptosis in lead exposed workers possibly via oxidation. Blood samples were taken from 40 male workers exposed to lead (mean blood lead concentration 64.8 μg/dl) and non-exposed workers (4.2 μg/dl). The exposure to lead produced an intoxication characterized by 88.3% less δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (δALAD) activity in lead exposed workers with respect to non-lead exposed workers. An increment of oxidation in lead exposed workers was characterized by 2.4 times higher thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) concentration and 32.8% lower reduced/oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) ratio. Oxidative stress in erythrocytes of lead exposed workers is expressed in 192% higher free calcium concentration [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and 1.6 times higher μ-calpain activity with respect to non-lead exposed workers. The adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration was not significantly different between the two worker groups. No externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS) was found in non-lead exposed workers (< 0.1%), but lead exposed workers showed 2.82% externalization. Lead intoxication induces eryptosis possibly through a molecular pathway that includes oxidation, depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH), increment of [Ca{sup 2+}], μ-calpain activation and externalization of PS in erythrocytes. Identifying molecular signals that induce eryptosis in lead intoxication is necessary to understand its physiopathology and chronic complications. - Graphical abstract: Fig. 1. (A) Blood lead concentration (PbB) and (B) phosphatidylserine externalization on erythrocyte membranes of non-lead exposed (□) and lead exposed workers (■). Values are mean ± SD. *Significantly different (P < 0.001). - Highlights: • Erythrocytes of lead exposed workers showed higher PS externalization • Elevated eryptosis in lead intoxicated workers may be induced by higher oxidation • Lead intoxication induces eryptosis by depletion of GSH • Lead exposition induces eryptosis through an increment of erythrocyte [Cai{sup 2+}]{sub i}.

  10. Protease-Activated Receptor 4 Induces Bladder Pain through High Mobility Group Box-1

    PubMed Central

    Kouzoukas, Dimitrios E.; Ma, Fei; Meyer-Siegler, Katherine L.; Westlund, Karin N.; Hunt, David E.; Vera, Pedro L.

    2016-01-01

    Pain is the significant presenting symptom in Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome (IC/PBS). Activation of urothelial protease activated receptor 4 (PAR4) causes pain through release of urothelial macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). High Mobility Group Box-1 (HMGB1), a chromatin-binding protein, mediates bladder pain (but not inflammation) in an experimental model (cyclophosphamide) of cystitis. To determine if PAR4-induced bladder hypersensitivity depends on HMGB1 downstream, we tested whether: 1) bladder PAR4 stimulation affected urothelial HMGB1 release; 2) blocking MIF inhibited urothelial HMGB1 release; and 3) blocking HMGB1 prevented PAR4-induced bladder hypersensitivity. HMGB1 release was examined in immortalized human urothelial cultures (UROtsa) exposed to PAR4-activating peptide (PAR4-AP; 100 μM; 2 hours) or scrambled control peptide. Female C57BL/6 mice, pretreated with a HMGB1 inhibitor (glycyrrhizin: 50 mg/kg; ip) or vehicle, received intravesical PAR4-AP or a control peptide (100 μM; 1 hour) to determine 1) HMGB1 levels at 1 hour in the intravesical fluid (released HMGB1) and urothelium, and 2) abdominal hypersensitivity to von Frey filament stimulation 24 hours later. We also tested mice pretreated with a MIF blocker (ISO-1: 20 mg/kg; ip) to determine whether MIF mediated PAR4-induced urothelial HMGB1 release. PAR4-AP triggered HMGB1 release from human (in vitro) and mice (in vivo) urothelial cells. Intravesical PAR4 activation elicited abdominal hypersensitivity in mice that was prevented by blocking HMGB1. MIF inhibition prevented PAR4-mediated HMGB1 release from mouse urothelium. Urothelial MIF and HGMB1 represent novel targets for therapeutic intervention in bladder pain conditions. PMID:27010488

  11. Protease-Activated Receptor 4 Induces Bladder Pain through High Mobility Group Box-1.

    PubMed

    Kouzoukas, Dimitrios E; Ma, Fei; Meyer-Siegler, Katherine L; Westlund, Karin N; Hunt, David E; Vera, Pedro L

    2016-01-01

    Pain is the significant presenting symptom in Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome (IC/PBS). Activation of urothelial protease activated receptor 4 (PAR4) causes pain through release of urothelial macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). High Mobility Group Box-1 (HMGB1), a chromatin-binding protein, mediates bladder pain (but not inflammation) in an experimental model (cyclophosphamide) of cystitis. To determine if PAR4-induced bladder hypersensitivity depends on HMGB1 downstream, we tested whether: 1) bladder PAR4 stimulation affected urothelial HMGB1 release; 2) blocking MIF inhibited urothelial HMGB1 release; and 3) blocking HMGB1 prevented PAR4-induced bladder hypersensitivity. HMGB1 release was examined in immortalized human urothelial cultures (UROtsa) exposed to PAR4-activating peptide (PAR4-AP; 100 μM; 2 hours) or scrambled control peptide. Female C57BL/6 mice, pretreated with a HMGB1 inhibitor (glycyrrhizin: 50 mg/kg; ip) or vehicle, received intravesical PAR4-AP or a control peptide (100 μM; 1 hour) to determine 1) HMGB1 levels at 1 hour in the intravesical fluid (released HMGB1) and urothelium, and 2) abdominal hypersensitivity to von Frey filament stimulation 24 hours later. We also tested mice pretreated with a MIF blocker (ISO-1: 20 mg/kg; ip) to determine whether MIF mediated PAR4-induced urothelial HMGB1 release. PAR4-AP triggered HMGB1 release from human (in vitro) and mice (in vivo) urothelial cells. Intravesical PAR4 activation elicited abdominal hypersensitivity in mice that was prevented by blocking HMGB1. MIF inhibition prevented PAR4-mediated HMGB1 release from mouse urothelium. Urothelial MIF and HGMB1 represent novel targets for therapeutic intervention in bladder pain conditions. PMID:27010488

  12. Decreased Serum Free Testosterone in Workers Exposed to High Levels of Di-n-butyl Phthalate (DBP) and Di-2-ethylhexyl Phthalate (DEHP): A Cross-Sectional Study in China

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Guowei; Hanaoka, Tomoyuki; Yoshimura, Mariko; Zhang, Shujuan; Wang, Ping; Tsukino, Hiromasa; Inoue, Koichi; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Takahashi, Ken

    2006-01-01

    Background Observations of adverse developmental and reproductive effects in laboratory animals and wildlife have fueled increasing public concern regarding the potential for various chemicals to impair human fertility. Objective Our objective in this study was to assess the effect of occupational exposure to high levels of phthalate esters on the balance of gonadotropin and gonadal hormones including luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, free testosterone (fT), and estradiol. Methods We examined urine and blood samples of 74 male workers at a factory producing unfoamed polyvinyl chloride flooring exposed to di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) and di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) and compared them with samples from 63 male workers from a construction company, group matched for age and smoking status. Results Compared to the unexposed workers, the exposed workers had substantially and significantly elevated concentrations of mono-n-butyl phthalate (MBP; 644.3 vs. 129.6 ?g/g creatinine, p < 0.001) and mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP; 565.7 vs. 5.7 ?g/g creatinine, p < 0.001). fT was significantly lower (8.4 vs. 9.7 ?g/g creatinine, p = 0.019) in exposed workers than in unexposed workers. fT was negatively correlated to MBP (r = ?0.25, p = 0.03) and MEHP (r = ?0.19, p = 0.095) in the exposed worker group. Regression analyses revealed that fT decreases significantly with increasing total phthalate ester score (the sum of quartiles of MBP and MEHP; r = ?0.26, p = 0.002). Conclusion We observed a modest and significant reduction of serum fT in workers with higher levels of urinary MBP and MEHP compared with unexposed workers. PMID:17107847

  13. Effect of boron as an antidote on dry matter intake, nutrient utilization and fluorine balance in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) exposed to high fluoride ration.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Vijay K; Gupta, Meenakshi; Lall, D

    2008-12-01

    It is well known that excessive accumulation of fluorides can exert toxic effects on various tissues and organs so as to severely damage the health and production of animals. The aim of this study was to determine beneficial effect of boron on nutrient utilization in buffalo calves exposed to high fluoride (F) ration. For this purpose, we used three groups of four male Murrah buffalo calves (body weight 98-100 kg, aged 6-8 month) each. Control animal was given only basal diet and concentrate mixture. However, treatment I animals were fed basal diet, concentrate mixture, and F [as NaF, 60 ppm of dry matter (DM)]. The treatment II animals were fed basal diet, concentrate mixture, F (as NaF, 60 ppm of DM), and B (as sodium tetraborate, 140 ppm of DM). After 90 days of experimental feeding, a metabolism trial of 7 days duration was conducted to study the treatment effect on nutrient utilization of proximate nutrients, absorption, excretion, and retention of N, Ca, P, Fe, Zn, Cu, and F. Dietary F significantly (p < 0.05) depressed the dry matter intake and increased the apparent digestibility, absorption, and retention of F. However, boron supplementation significantly (p < 0.05) decreased the apparent digestibility, absorption, and retention of F and improved the dry matter intake, fecal excretion, and percent of absorbed F excreted via urine. Apparent digestibility of proximate nutrients (viz. DM, crude protein, crude fiber, ether extract, and nitrogen free extract) was unaffected on either F or F+B treatment. However, absorption and excretion of N, Ca, P, Fe, Zn, and Cu were affected significantly (p < 0.05) on F or F+B treatment. These findings suggest that fluoride-containing diet for short duration has effect on nutrient utilization, and boron at 140-ppm dose level, in general, antagonized the absorption and retention of F and also improved the feed intake in buffalo calves. PMID:18781284

  14. Influences on Member Assimilation in Work Groups in High-Reliability Organizations: A Multilevel Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Karen Kroman; McPhee, Robert D.

    2006-01-01

    This multilevel investigation examined the effect of group interaction and its influence on individual-level membership variables and group assimilation. The study is based on a model of group socialization developed by Moreland and Levine (1982) and was modified in this study to investigate the development and maintenance of highly interdependent

  15. Recent High School Graduate Focus Groups. Market Analysis 00-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clagett, Craig A.

    This report summarizes findings of focus groups of recent high school graduates conducted during new student orientation at Carroll Community College (CCC) in fall 1999. Students were invited to participate in focus groups at the conclusion of the all-day orientation. Three focus groups were held, two with six participants and one with five…

  16. A Comparison of Two Group Interventions for Adolescent Aggression: High Process versus Low Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martsch, Martin D.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This study compared two group treatments for aggressive behavior in adjudicated male adolescents: a cognitive-behavioral program (low process) and a program integrating group interaction with cognitive-behavioral training (high process). Method: The court-ordered adolescents were divided into two age groups, younger and older, and

  17. Inter-alu PCR detects high frequency of genetic alterations in glioma cells exposed to sub-lethal cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Tapasya; Seth, Anandita; Datta, Kamal; Chosdol, Kunzang; Chattopadhyay, Parthaprasad; Sinha, Subrata

    2005-11-20

    Increased genomic instability contributes to higher frequency of secondary drug resistance and neoplastic progression in tumors as well as in cells exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of chemotherapeutic agents. We have used PCR based DNA fingerprinting techniques of randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and inter-alu PCR to study this phenomenon in the tumor genome. The choice of the primer, either random (for RAPD) or specific (inter-alu PCR) can determine the nature of alterations being assessed. We have compared the inter-alu PCR and RAPD profiles of U87MG glioblastoma cells exposed to sequentially increasing low doses of cisplatin for 24 passages to that of untreated controls. Inter-alu PCR, with 2 primers, demonstrated a number of alterations in the treated cells, in the form of loss / gain and changes in the intensity of bands. No changes were observed by RAPD analysis with 5 primers, however, indicating a preferential increase in the alu mediated recombination frequency in the treated cells (p = 1.866 x 10(-4)). The number of changes observed with respect to the corresponding leucocyte DNA in the inter-alu PCR profile of 26 primary tumors (Grade II = 13; Grade IV = 13), resected before chemotherapy, for the 2 inter-alu primers was very small. We present a novel application of the inter-alu PCR in detecting alterations in long term cultured cells at low dose exposure to a chemotherapeutic agent. Our results suggest that alu mediated recombination may be important in cells exposed to sub-lethal doses of cisplatin but not in the genesis of primary glioma. PMID:15912534

  18. Inflight resistance measurement on high-T(sub c) superconducting thin films exposed to orbital atomic oxygen on CONCAP-2 (STS-46)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, J. C.; Raiker, G. N.; Bijvoet, J. A.; Nerren, P. D.; Sutherland, W. T.; Mogro-Camperso, A.; Turner, L. G.; Kwok, Hoi; Raistrick, I. D.; Cross, J. B.

    1995-01-01

    In 1992, UAH (University of Alabama in Huntsville) conducted a unique experiment on STS-46 in which YBa2Cu3O7 (commonly known as '1-2-3' superconductor) high-T(c) superconducting thin film samples prepared at three different laboratories were exposed to 5 eV atomic oxygen in low Earth orbit on the ambient and 320 C hot plate during the first flight of the CONCAP-2 (Complex Autonomous Payload) experiment carrier. The resistance of the thin films was measured in flight during the atomic oxygen exposure and heating cycle. Superconducting properties were measured in the laboratory before and after the flight by the individual experimenters. Films with good superconducting properties, and which were exposed to the oxygen flux, survived the flight including those heated to 320 C (600 K) with properties essentially unchanged, while other samples which were heated but not exposed to oxygen were degraded. The properties of other flight controls held at ambient temperature appear unchanged and indistinguishable from those of ground controls, whether exposed to oxygen or not.

  19. Comparisons against baseline within randomised groups are often used and can be highly misleading

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In randomised trials, rather than comparing randomised groups directly some researchers carry out a significance test comparing a baseline with a final measurement separately in each group. Methods We give several examples where this has been done. We use simulation to demonstrate that the procedure is invalid and also show this algebraically. Results This approach is biased and invalid, producing conclusions which are, potentially, highly misleading. The actual alpha level of this procedure can be as high as 0.50 for two groups and 0.75 for three. Conclusions Randomised groups should be compared directly by two-sample methods and separate tests against baseline are highly misleading. PMID:22192231

  20. Hearing parameters in noise exposed industrial workers.

    PubMed

    Celik, O; Yalin, S; Oztrk, A

    1998-12-01

    This paper presents the results of a study carried out in a group of noise-exposed workers in a hydro-electric power plant. Thus, the main focus of the study is on 130 industrial workers who were exposed to high level of noise. The control group was consisted of 33 subjects with normal hearing. Hearing and acoustic reflex thresholds were obtained from all subjects and the results from age-matched subgroups were compared. The sensorineural hearing loss which were detected in 71 workers were bilateral, symmetrical and affected mainly frequencies of 4-6 kHz. In essence, the hearing losses were developed within the first 10 years of noise exposure and associated with slight progress in the following years. When acoustic reflex thresholds derived from the study and control groups were compared, statistically significant difference was determined only for the thresholds obtained at 4 kHz (p < 0.0005). PMID:9853659

  1. Stabilization and highly metallic properties of heavy group-V hydrides at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Kazutaka; Ashcroft, N. W.

    2015-12-01

    Compressed hydrides of the heavy group-15 elements Bi and Sb are investigated using ab initio methods. While the hydrides of Bi and Sb are known to be quite unstable at one atmosphere, our calculations predict that they can be stabilized at high pressures. Thus, at the composition of XH 3 (X =Bi or Sb), possible Bi hydrides are BiH2(P n m a ) + H beyond 105 GPa and BiH3(I 41/a m d ) beyond 250 GPa; for Sb hydrides, SbH2 + H hardly appears, and SbH3(P n m a ) is stabilized beyond 150 GPa. All of these hydrides are metallic with very dispersive electronic structures, this being in accordance with the predictions of the Goldhammer-Herzfeld criterion. Superconducting transition temperatures have also been estimated from the extended McMillan equation, and they turn out to be 39 K for BiH2 at 125 GPa, 65 K for BiH3 at 270 GPa, and 68 K for SbH3 at 170 GPa.

  2. GROUP COUNSELING FOR GIFTED UNDERACHIEVING HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS IN SEQUOIA HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FINNEY, BEN C.; VAN DALSEM, ELIZABETH L.

    BECAUSE OF THE FAR-REACHING IMPLICATIONS OF THE PROBLEMS OF THE UNDERACHIEVER, IT WAS SOUGHT TO DETERMINE WHETHER GROUP COUNSELING ON A LONG-TERM BASIS WOULD HAVE ANY POSITIVE EFFECT. STUDENTS CHOSEN WERE IN THE TOP 25 PERCENT IN APTITUDE, WITH GRADE AVERAGES CONSIDERABLY BELOW THE MEAN. A CONTROL AND AN EXPERIMENTAL GROUP WERE CHOSEN. IT WAS

  3. Solvothermal synthesis of nanostructured BiVO4 with highly exposed (0 1 0) facets and enhanced sunlight-driven photocatalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Zhao, Guosheng; An, Maozhong; Chang, Limin

    2015-12-01

    Nanostructured monoclinic BiVO4 (m-BiVO4) sheets with highly exposed (0 1 0) facets was synthesized by a surfactant-free solvothermal route, during which glycerol aqueous solution was first used as solvent. The effects of volume fraction of glycerol aqueous solution and pH value in the solvothermal process have been studied by means of the XRD, SEM, TEM, HRTEM, EDS, BET, FTIR, and UV-vis techniques. The adoption of glycerol is shown to influence preferential crystal growth of BiVO4 along its (0 1 0) facets to further act as the directing agent, as well as the morphology and crystalline structure. Moreover, the pH value also has significant influence on the crystal growth direction and morphology of the products. The sheet-like m-BiVO4 sample with highly exposed (0 1 0) facets could be obtained by using 15% glycerol aqueous solution as solvent at pH 6, and exhibited the best sunlight-driven photocatalytic performance for methylene blue degradation. It is concluded that the excellent photocatalytic activity on m-BiVO4 can be attributed to the preferentially exposed surfaces of the (0 1 0) facets which increases the separation efficiency of photogenerated electron-hole pairs and improves the surface active sites.

  4. Grain boundary depletion and migration during selective oxidation of Cr in a Ni-5Cr binary alloy exposed to high-temperature hydrogenated water

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, Daniel K.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2014-10-01

    High-resolution microscopy of a high-purity Ni-5Cr alloy exposed to 360°C hydrogenated water reveals intergranular selective oxidation of Cr accompanied by local Cr depletion and diffusion-induced grain boundary migration (DIGM). The corrosion-product oxide consists of a porous, interconnected network of Cr2O3 platelets with no further O ingress into the metal ahead. Extensive grain boundary depletion of Cr (to <0.05at.%) is observed typically 20–100 nm wide as a result of DIGM and reaching depths of many micrometers beyond the oxidation front.

  5. In-Group Ostracism Increases High-Fidelity Imitation in Early Childhood.

    PubMed

    Watson-Jones, Rachel E; Whitehouse, Harvey; Legare, Cristine H

    2016-01-01

    The Cyberball paradigm was used to examine the hypothesis that children use high-fidelity imitation as a reinclusion behavior in response to being ostracized by in-group members. Children (N = 176; 5- to 6-year-olds) were either included or excluded by in- or out-group members and then shown a video of an in-group or an out-group member enacting a social convention. Participants who were excluded by their in-group engaged in higher-fidelity imitation than those who were included by their in-group. Children who were included by an out-group and those who were excluded by an out-group showed no difference in imitative fidelity. Children ostracized by in-group members also displayed increased anxiety relative to children ostracized by out-group members. The data are consistent with the proposal that high-fidelity imitation functions as reinclusion behavior in the context of in-group ostracism. PMID:26573906

  6. Teratogenicity, genotoxicity and oxidative stress in zebrafish embryos (Danio rerio) co-exposed to arsenic and atrazine.

    PubMed

    Adeyemi, Joseph A; da Cunha Martins-Junior, Airton; Barbosa, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic and atrazine are common environmental contaminants probably due to their extensive use as pesticides on agricultural farmlands. In this study, zebrafish embryos were exposed to 0.8mM arsenic, 0.1mM atrazine or mixture of both for 96h, and various indices which are indicative of teratogenicity (egg coagulation, growth retardation, edema formation, hatching success, scoliosis), genotoxicity (DNA tail moments) and oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities) were determined. The negative control were exposed to 0.5% DMSO while the positive control group were exposed to 4mg/L 3,4 dichloroaniline. Egg coagulation was highest in the positive control (85%), followed by the group that was exposed to mixture of arsenic and atrazine (30%) and least in the arsenic-exposed group (20%). The incidences of edema (59%) and growth retardation (35.2%) were more frequent in the group that was exposed to contaminant mixture and least in atrazine-exposed group where incidences of both edema and growth retardation were 15%. The incidence of scoliosis ranged between 20% in arsenic-exposed group and 10% in atrazine-exposed group. Hatching success was generally high in all the groups ranging between 95% in atrazine-exposed group and 88% in the group that was exposed to mixture of arsenic and atrazine. There was no evidence of teratogenic effect in the negative control group. DNA tail moments and lipid peroxidation levels increased significantly while GSH levels and catalase activity decreased significantly in contaminant-exposed groups, especially the mixture compared to the negative control. There was no significant change in GPx activity in the exposed groups compared to the negative control. The results of this study demonstrate that both arsenic and atrazine are potentially teratogenic and genotoxic, and can cause oxidative stress in zebrafish embryos, and these effects are potentiated by toxic interactions between the two contaminants. PMID:25882832

  7. Investigation of fertility and in utero effects in rats chronically exposed to a high-intensity 60-Hz electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Seto, Y.J.; Majeau-Chargois, D.; Lymangrover, J.R.; Dunlap, W.P.; Walker, C.F.

    1984-11-01

    A study was undertaken to investigate subtle bioeffects in Sprague-Dawley rats chronically exposed to a 60-Hz electric field at 80 kV/m unperturbed intensity. The details of our exposure facility, artifact considerations, environmental conditions, and exposure protocol are reported in this paper. Results of electric field exposure on reproduction and prenatal and postnatal development of rats over four generations are discussed. Statistical analysis of data from 305 females, 213 pregnancies, and 2683 births revealed no effects of electric field exposure on fertility, fecundity, nurturing, survival, or sex ratio of off-spring. In the final generation, 51 pregnant females were euthanized between days 16 and 20 of gestation, and 681 fetuses were carefully examined for gross malformations. Statistical analysis indicated that exposure to the electric field produced no significant increase in gross malformations, nor were any differences noted in resorptions, orientation of fetus in utero, sex ratio, or differential frequencies of uterine horn implantation. A detailed discussion of statistical power and sensitivity is included.

  8. Window contamination on Expose-R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demets, R.; Bertrand, M.; Bolkhovitinov, A.; Bryson, K.; Colas, C.; Cottin, H.; Dettmann, J.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Elsaesser, A.; Jaramillo, E.; Lebert, M.; van Papendrecht, G.; Pereira, C.; Rohr, T.; Saiagh, K.

    2015-01-01

    Expose is a multi-user instrument for astrobiological and astrochemical experiments in space. Installed at the outer surface of the International Space Station, it enables investigators to study the impact of the open space environment on biological and biochemical test samples. Two Expose missions have been completed so far, designated as Expose-E (Rabbow et al. 2012) and Expose-R (Rabbow et al. this issue). One of the space-unique environmental factors offered by Expose is full-spectrum, ultraviolet (UV)-rich electromagnetic radiation from the Sun. This paper describes and analyses how on Expose-R, access of the test samples to Solar radiation degraded during space exposure in an unpredicted way. Several windows in front of the Sun-exposed test samples acquired a brown shade, resulting in a reduced transparency in visible light, UV and vacuum UV (VUV). Post-flight investigations revealed the discolouration to be caused by a homogenous film of cross-linked organic polymers at the inside of the windows. The chemical signature varied per sample carrier. No such films were found on windows from sealed, pressurized compartments, or on windows that had been kept out of the Sun. This suggests that volatile compounds originating from the interior of the Expose facility were cross-linked and photo-fixed by Solar irradiation at the rear side of the windows. The origin of the volatiles was not fully identified; most probably there was a variety of sources involved including the biological test samples, adhesives, plastics and printed circuit boards. The outer surface of the windows (pointing into space) was chemically impacted as well, with a probable effect on the transparency in VUV. The reported analysis of the window contamination on Expose-R is expected to help the interpretation of the scientific results and offers possibilities to mitigate this problem on future missions - in particular Expose-R2, the direct successor of Expose-R.

  9. 77 FR 1778 - U.S.-EU High Level Working Group on Jobs and Growth

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-11

    ...At the November 28, 2011, European Union (EU)-United States Summit meeting, President Obama, European Commission President Barroso, and European Council President Von Rompuy directed the Transatlantic Economic Council to establish a High Level Working Group on Jobs and Growth, led by U.S. Trade Representative Ron Kirk and EU Trade Commissioner Karel De Gucht. The Working Group was asked to......

  10. A Question of Effectiveness: Recruitment of Special Educators within High School Peer Support Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zascavage, Victoria; Winterman, Kathy; Armstrong, Philip; Schroeder-Steward, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    The present study combines information about support groups for students with disabilities from 187 East Texas high schools with explanatory variables taken from data of the Texas Education Agency Academic Excellence Indicator System. This study is a tangential section of a larger study on the influence of peer support groups in East Texas…

  11. The Effects of Individual and Group Monetary Incentives on High Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Heather M.; Dickinson, Alyce M.; Huitema, Bradley E.; Culig, Kathryn M.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined whether high performers performed better (a) under individual and group incentive pay than under hourly pay and (b) under individual incentive pay than under group incentive pay. Participants were 11 college students. An ABCDC within-subject design was used in which A was hourly pay with individual feedback, B was individual

  12. Preference for High Status Predicts Implicit Outgroup Bias among Children from Low-Status Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newheiser, Anna-Kaisa; Dunham, Yarrow; Merrill, Anna; Hoosain, Leah; Olson, Kristina R.

    2014-01-01

    Whereas members of high-status racial groups show ingroup preference when attitudes are measured implicitly, members of low-status racial groups--both adults and children--typically show no bias, potentially reflecting awareness of the ingroup's low status. We hypothesized that when status differences are especially pronounced, children from

  13. Compensation for phase mismatch of high harmonics by the group-velocity mismatch

    SciTech Connect

    Kulagin, I A; Kim, V V; Usmanov, T

    2011-09-30

    A mechanism providing an essential enhancement of the conversion efficiency of a single high harmonic in gaseous media is first proposed using an appropriate change in the phase mismatch and group-velocity mismatch in the vicinity of resonance.

  14. Semiconducting Group?15 Monolayers: A Broad Range of Band Gaps and High Carrier Mobilities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shengli; Xie, Meiqiu; Li, Fengyu; Yan, Zhong; Li, Yafei; Kan, Erjun; Liu, Wei; Chen, Zhongfang; Zeng, Haibo

    2016-01-01

    Optoelectronic applications require materials both responsive to objective photons and able to transfer carriers, so new two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors with appropriate band gaps and high mobilities are highly desired. A broad range of band gaps and high mobilities of a 2D semiconductor family, composed of monolayer of Group?15 elements (phosphorene, arsenene, antimonene, bismuthene) is presented. The calculated binding energies and phonon band dispersions of 2D Group?15 allotropes exhibit thermodynamic stability. The energy band gaps of 2D semiconducting Group?15 monolayers cover a wide range from 0.36 to 2.62?eV, which are crucial for broadband photoresponse. Significantly, phosphorene, arsenene, and bismuthene possess carrier mobilities as high as several thousand cm(2) ?V(-1) ?s(-1) . Combining such broad band gaps and superior carrier mobilities, 2D Group?15 monolayers are promising candidates for nanoelectronics and optoelectronics. PMID:26671733

  15. High Frequency and Regular Audiometry among Selected Groups of High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corliss, Leland M.; And Others

    1970-01-01

    Among study findings are: (1) girls seem to have less tendency to acoustic trauma than boys though the sampling groups was smaller; (2) the significant difference exists between those students who subject their ears to loud noises regularly and those who do not. (Author)

  16. Growth condition-dependent sensitivity, photodamage and stress response of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exposed to high light conditions.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Beat B; Wiesendanger, Manuela; Eggen, Rik I L

    2006-08-01

    Different substrate conditions, such as varying CO(2) concentrations or the presence of acetate, strongly influence the efficiency of photosynthesis in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Altered photosynthetic efficiencies affect the susceptibility of algae to the deleterious effects of high light stress, such as the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and PSII photodamage. In this study, we investigated the effect of high light on C. reinhardtii grown under photomixotrophy, i.e. in the presence of acetate, as well as under photoautotrophic growth conditions with either low or high CO(2) concentrations. Different parameters such as growth rate, chlorophyll bleaching, singlet oxygen generation, PSII photodamage and the total genomic stress response were analyzed. Although showing a similar degree of PSII photodamage, a much stronger singlet oxygen-specific response and a broader general stress response was observed in acetate and high CO(2)-supplemented cells compared with CO(2)-limited cells. These different photooxidative stress responses were correlated with the individual cellular PSII content and probably directly influenced the ROS production during exposure to high light. In addition, growth of high CO(2)-supplemented cells was more susceptible to high light stress compared with cells grown under CO(2) limitation. The growth of acetate-supplemented cultures, on the other hand, was less affected by high light treatment than cultures grown under high CO(2) concentrations, despite the similar cellular stress. This suggests that the production of ATP by mitochondrial acetate respiration protects the cells from the deleterious effects of high light stress, presumably by providing energy for an effective defense. PMID:16857695

  17. Directly correlated transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography of grain boundary oxidation in a Ni-Al binary alloy exposed to high-temperature water

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, Daniel K.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2013-06-14

    Intergranular oxidation of a Ni-4Al alloy exposed to hydrogenated, high-temperature water was characterized using directly correlated transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. These combined analyses revealed that discrete, well-separated oxides (NiAl2O4) precipitated along grain boundaries in the metal. Aluminum was depleted from the grain boundary between oxides and also from one side of the boundary as a result of grain boundary migration. The discrete oxide morphology, disconnected from the continuous surface oxidation, suggests intergranular solid-state internal oxidation of Al. Keywords: oxidation; grain boundaries; nickel alloys; atom probe tomography; transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

  18. A Secure Multicast Framework in Large and High-Mobility Network Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-San; Chang, Chin-Chen

    With the widespread use of Internet applications such as Teleconference, Pay-TV, Collaborate tasks, and Message services, how to construct and distribute the group session key to all group members securely is becoming and more important. Instead of adopting the point-to-point packet delivery, these emerging applications are based upon the mechanism of multicast communication, which allows the group member to communicate with multi-party efficiently. There are two main issues in the mechanism of multicast communication: Key Distribution and Scalability. The first issue is how to distribute the group session key to all group members securely. The second one is how to maintain the high performance in large network groups. Group members in conventional multicast systems have to keep numerous secret keys in databases, which makes it very inconvenient for them. Furthermore, in case that a member joins or leaves the communication group, many involved participants have to change their own secret keys to preserve the forward secrecy and the backward secrecy. We consequently propose a novel version for providing secure multicast communication in large network groups. Our proposed framework not only preserves the forward secrecy and the backward secrecy but also possesses better performance than existing alternatives. Specifically, simulation results demonstrate that our scheme is suitable for high-mobility environments.

  19. Hierarchical sulfur-impregnated hydrogenated TiO2 mesoporous spheres comprising anatase nanosheets with highly exposed (001) facets for advanced Li-S batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Changzhou; Zhu, Siqi; Cao, Hui; Hou, Linrui; Lin, Jingdong

    2016-01-01

    In this contribution, we purposefully designed hierarchical hydrogenated TiO2 spheres (HTSs) constructed from ultrathin anatase nanosheets with highly exposed (001) facets, and further utilized them as an efficient encapsulated host of sulfur species for advanced Li-S batteries (LSBs). Strikingly, the as-fabricated hybrid S/HTSs cathode exhibited high Coulombic efficiency (>94%), exceptional long cycling performance (capacity decay of ?0.399% per cycle at 0.5 C), and large reversible discharge capacity (?579 mAh g?1 at 2.0 C) at high C rates, benefiting from better electronic conductivity, smaller charge transfer resistance and strong chemical bonding between {{{{S}}}n}2- and the reduced (001) facets of HTSs, according to experimental measurements and systematical theoretical calculations. More significantly, our in-depth insights into the mechanism involved in the hybrid S/HTSs could efficiently guide future design, optimization and synthesis of other metal oxide-based matrixes with specific exposed crystal facets for next-generation advanced LSBs.

  20. Hierarchical sulfur-impregnated hydrogenated TiO2 mesoporous spheres comprising anatase nanosheets with highly exposed (001) facets for advanced Li-S batteries.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Changzhou; Zhu, Siqi; Cao, Hui; Hou, Linrui; Lin, Jingdong

    2016-01-29

    In this contribution, we purposefully designed hierarchical hydrogenated TiO2 spheres (HTSs) constructed fromultrathin anatase nanosheets with highly exposed (001) facets, and further utilized themas an efficient encapsulated host of sulfur species for advanced Li-S batteries (LSBs). Strikingly, the as-fabricated hybrid S/HTSs cathode exhibited high Coulombic efficiency (>94%), exceptional long cycling performance (capacity decay of ?0.399% per cycle at 0.5 C), and large reversible discharge capacity (?579 mAh g(-1) at 2.0 C) at high C rates, benefiting from better electronic conductivity, smaller charge transfer resistance and strong chemical bonding between [Formula: see text] and the reduced (001) facets of HTSs, according to experimental measurements and systematical theoretical calculations. More significantly, our in-depth insights into the mechanism involved in the hybrid S/HTSs could efficiently guide future design, optimization and synthesis of other metal oxide-based matrixes with specific exposed crystal facets for next-generation advanced LSBs. PMID:26657762

  1. Confirmatory investigations on the flux effect and associated unstable matrix damage in RPV materials exposed to high neutron fluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaouadi, R.; Grard, R.

    2013-06-01

    This paper provides additional experimental data on the neutron flux effect on RPV hardening and embrittlement and on the so-called unstable matrix damage that was suggested to occur at high flux. Six materials taken from the first irradiation surveillance capsules of Belgian PWRs with a fluence not exceeding about 1.5 1019 n/cm2 were further irradiated in the BR2 high flux reactor to additional fluences ranging between about 1 and 1.5 1020 n/cm2 at 290 C. Eight additional RPV materials were selected to investigate the flux effect on irradiation hardening. No statistically-significant difference in irradiation hardening for low and high flux could be evidenced from the null hypothesis test applied with the general linear model. This is confirmed by additional experiments where fourteen irradiated specimens of various RPV materials consisting of low to high Cu and Ni contents were annealed at 350 C for 5 h to eventually reveal some recovery of the unstable matrix damage. The results did not show any recovery upon heat treatment, which indicates that unstable matrix defects did not appear in these materials during irradiation at high flux.

  2. Structural stability of a colloidal solution of Ca(OH)2 nanocrystals exposed to high relative humidity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Villalba, L. S.; Lpez-Arce, P.; Alvarez de Buergo, M.; Fort, R.

    2011-09-01

    The effect of high relative humidity (90% and 75% RH) on phase transformation and stability of CaCO3 polymorphs has been studied based on the structural and morphological changes from a colloidal solution based on Ca(OH)2 nanocrystals. Carbonation process has been confirmed indicating differences in nucleation and stability of CaCO3 polymorphs as a function of RH. Local fluctuations in the water/alcohol ratio significantly affect the precipitation/dissolution of anhydrous and hydrated polymorphs that are reflected in the particle size. Changes in lattice parameters and particle size are related to surface tension fluctuations, release of residual water and time of exposure. These results highly contribute to evaluate the stability of the Ca(OH)2 nanoparticles in high humidity conditions.

  3. High-resolution nuclear microprobe elemental mapping of teeth enamel-dentine interface exposed to acidic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda-Vargas, C. A.; Eisa, M. E.; Chikte, U. M. E.; Conradie, J. L.

    2004-10-01

    The process of demineralisation in tooth erosion due to exposure to acidic media was investigated in a group of test and control healthy human molar teeth. Analysis by micro-PIXE and proton-backscattering showed that the levels of trace elements were enriched and/or depleted according to experimental treatment. The atomic ratios of major constituents in the matrix were characteristic of test or controls with typical ratios: O 5P 1Ca 3F 1 for tests and O 6P 0.5Ca 3F 0.5 for controls. The correlation between maps of Ca and Zn in and around the interface between dentine and enamel in control samples showed two kinds of correlation strengths (for enamel and dentine). The strongest correlation was related to the enamel area.

  4. Ductile-to-brittle transition temperature for high-burnup cladding alloys exposed to simulated drying-storage conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billone, M. C.; Burtseva, T. A.; Einziger, R. E.

    2013-02-01

    Structural analyses of dry casks containing high-burnup fuel require cladding mechanical properties and failure limits to assess fuel behavior. Pre-storage drying-transfer operations and early stage storage subject cladding to higher temperatures and much higher pressure-induced tensile hoop stresses relative to in-reactor operation and pool storage. Under these conditions, radial hydrides may precipitate during slow cooling and provide an additional embrittlement mechanism as the cladding temperature decreases below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT). A test procedure was developed to simulate the effects of drying-storage temperature histories. Following drying-storage simulation, samples were subjected to ring-compression test (RCT) loading, which was used as a ductility screening test and to simulate pinch-type loading that may occur during cask transport. RCT samples with <2% offset strain prior to >50% wall cracking were assessed as brittle. Prior to testing high-burnup cladding, many tests were conducted with pre-hydrided Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) and ZIRLO™ to determine target 400 °C hoop stresses for high-burnup rodlets. Zry-4 cladding segments, from a 67-GWd/MTU fuel rod, with 520-620 wppm hydrogen and ZIRLO™ cladding segments from a 70-GWd/MTU fuel rod, with 350-650 wppm hydrogen were defueled and tested. Following drying-storage simulation, the extent of radial-hydride precipitation was characterized by the radial-hydride continuity factor. It was found that the DBTT was dependent on: cladding material, irradiation conditions, and drying-storage histories (stress at maximum temperature). High-burnup ZIRLO™ exhibited higher susceptible to radial-hydride formation and embrittlement than high-burnup Zry-4. It was also observed that uniformly pre-hydrided, non-irradiated cladding was not a good surrogate for high-burnup cladding because of the high density of circumferential hydrides across the wall and the high metal-matrix ductility for pre-hydrided cladding.

  5. A High-Leverage Language Teaching Practice: Leading an Open-Ended Group Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearney, Erin

    2015-01-01

    In response to calls for more practice-based teacher education, this study investigated the way in which two high-performing novice world language teachers, one in Spanish and one in Latin, implemented a high-leverage teaching practice, leading an open-ended group discussion. Observational data revealed a number of constituent micro-practices. The

  6. High mobility group (HMG-box) genes in the honeybee fungal pathogen Ascosphaera apis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genome of the honey bee fungal pathogen, Ascosphaera apis (Maassen), encodes three putative high mobility group (HMG-box) transcription factors. The predicted proteins (MAT1-2, STE11 and HTF), each of which contain a single strongly conserved HMG-box, exhibit high similarity to mating type prote...

  7. Sense of Belonging among High School Students Representing 4 Ethnic Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faircloth, Beverly S.; Hamm, Jill V.

    2005-01-01

    The authors investigated the dimensions and mechanisms of belonging relevant to motivation and achievement among high school students representing 4 ethnic groups. Using survey data from 9th to 12th grade students (N = 5,494) attending 7 ethnically-diverse high schools, structural equation modeling was employed to explore, independently for each

  8. NEUROBEHAVIORAL EVALUATION OF RATS EXPOSED TO CHLORPYRIFOS VIA CHRONIC DIETARY AND REPEATED HIGH-LEVEL SPIKE EXPOSURE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study aimed to model long-term subtoxic human exposure to an organophosphorus pesticide, chlorpyrifos (CPF), and to examine the influence of that exposure on the response to intermittent high-dose acute challenges. Adult Long-Evans male rats were maintained at 350g body wei...

  9. Microscopic evolution of pre-damaged and undamaged tungsten exposed to low-energy and high-flux helium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qi; Liu, Dongping; Fan, Hongyu; Li, Xin; Niu, Jinhai; Wang, Younian

    2014-04-01

    High-energy (260 keV) He+ pre-damaged and undamaged polycrystalline tungsten samples were irradiated with low-energy (220 eV) and high-flux (1021 ions/m2 s) He+ at a sample temperature of 873 K to a fluence of 1.0 1025 ions/m2. Microscopic evolution of these samples was carried out using non-destructive conductive atomic force microscopy and a nanohardness test. Analysis indicates that a large number of nanometer-sized protuberances of irradiated tungsten samples results from over-high internal pressure of nanometer-sized helium bubbles. Ordered and nanostructured helium bubbles with the same diameter and average spacing can be formed due to the self-trapping and self-organizing of helium atoms in the tungsten materials. In the case of pre-damaged, low-energy He+ irradiation results in a random distribution of nanostructured helium bubbles, indicating that high-energy He+ implantation results in serious irradiation damage of tungsten materials, acting as nuclei for helium bubbles.

  10. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Following the September 11, 2001, Terrorist Attacks: A Review of the Literature among Highly Exposed Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neria, Yuval; Digrande, Laura; Adams, Ben G.

    2011-01-01

    The September 11, 2001 (9/11), terrorist attacks were unprecedented in their magnitude and aftermath. In the wake of the attacks, researchers reported a wide range of mental and physical health outcomes, with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) the one most commonly studied. In this review, we aim to assess the evidence about PTSD among highly

  11. Analysis of unrejoined chromosomal breakage in human fibroblast cells exposed to low- and high-LET radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu; Furusawa, Yoshiya; George, Kerry; Kawata, Tetsuya; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2002-01-01

    Reported studies of DNA breakage induced by radiation of various qualities have generally shown a higher fraction of unrejoined residual breaks after high-LET exposure. This observation is supported by the argument that high-LET radiation induced DNA breaks that are more complex in nature and, thus, less likely to be repaired. In most cases the doses used in these studies were very high. We have studied unrejoined chromosome breaks by analyzing chromosome aberrations using a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with a combination of whole chromosome specific probes and probes specific for the telomere region of the chromosomes. Confluent human fibroblast cells (AG1522) were irradiated with gamma rays, 490 MeV/nucleon Si, or with Fe ions at either 200 and 500 MeV/nucleon, and were allowed to repair at 37 degrees C for 24 hours after exposure. A chemically induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique was used to condense chromosomes in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Results showed that the frequency of unrejoined chromosome breaks was higher after high-LET radiation, and the ratio of unrejoined to misrejoined chromosome breaks increased steadily with LET up a peak value at 440 keV/microm.

  12. Imbalance between oxygen photoreduction and antioxidant capacities in Symbiodinium cells exposed to combined heat and high light stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberty, S.; Fransolet, D.; Cardol, P.; Plumier, J.-C.; Franck, F.

    2015-12-01

    During the last decades, coral reefs have been affected by several large-scale bleaching events, and such phenomena are expected to increase in frequency and severity in the future, thus compromising their survival. High sea surface temperature accompanied by high levels of solar irradiance has been found to be responsible for the induction of oxidative stress ultimately ending with the disruption of the symbiosis between cnidarians and Symbiodinium. For two decades, many studies have pointed to the water-water cycle (WWC) as being one of the primary mediators of this phenomenon, but the impacts of environmental stress on the O2 reduction by PSI and the associated reactive oxygen species (ROS)-detoxifying enzymes remain to be determined. In this study, we analyzed the impacts of acute thermal and light stress on the WWC in the model Symbiodinium strain A1. We observed that the high light treatment at 26 °C resulted in the up-regulation of superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, and glutathione reductase activities and an increased production of ROS with no significant change in O2-dependent electron transport. Under high light and at 33 °C, O2-dependent electron transport was significantly increased relative to total electron transport. This increase was concomitant with a twofold increase in ROS generation compared with the treatment at 26 °C, while enzymes involved in the WWC were largely inactivated. These data show for the first time that combined heat and light stress inactivate antioxidant capacities of the WWC and suggests that its photoprotective functions are overwhelmed under these conditions. This study also indicates that cnidarians may be more prone to bleach if they harbor Symbiodinium cells having a highly active Mehler-type electron transport, unless they are able to quickly up-regulate their antioxidant capacities.

  13. REPORT OF THE SNOWMASS M6 WORKING GROUP ON HIGH INTENSITY PROTON SOURCES.

    SciTech Connect

    CHOU,W.; WEI,J.

    2001-08-14

    The M6 working group had more than 40 active participants (listed in Section 4). During the three weeks at Snowmass, there were about 50 presentations, covering a wide range of topics associated with high intensity proton sources. The talks are listed in Section 5. This group also had joint sessions with a number of other working groups, including E1 (Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders), E5 (Fixed-Target Experiments), M1 (Muon Based Systems), T4 (Particle Sources), T5 (Beam dynamics), T7 (High Performance Computing) and T9 (Diagnostics). The M6 group performed a survey of the beam parameters of existing and proposed high intensity proton sources, in particular, of the proton drivers. The results are listed in Table 1. These parameters are compared with the requirements of high-energy physics users of secondary beams in Working Groups E1 and E5. According to the consensus reached in the E1 and E5 groups, the U.S. HEP program requires an intense proton source, a 1-4 MW Proton Driver, by the end of this decade.

  14. Re-187 Os-187 Isotopic and Highly Siderophile Element Systematics of Group IVB Irons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honesto, J.; McDonough, W. F.; Walker, R. J.; McCoy, T. J.; Ash, R. D.

    2005-01-01

    Study of the magmatic iron meteorite groups permits constraints to be placed on the chemical and isotopic composition of parent bodies, and the timing of, and crystal-liquid fractionation processes involved in the crystallization of asteroidal cores. Here we examine Re-Os isotopic and trace elemental systematics of group IVB irons. Compared to most irons, the irons comprising this group are enriched in some of the most refractory siderophile elements, yet highly-depleted in most volatile siderophile elements. These characteristics have been attributed to processes such as high temperature condensation of precursor materials and oxidation in the parent body. Most recently it has been suggested that both processes may be involved in the chemical complexity of the group. Here, high precision isotopic and highly siderophile element (HSE) concentrations are used to further examine these possible origins, and the crystallization history of the group. In addition, we have begun to assess the possibility of relating certain ungrouped irons with major groups via multi-element, trace element modeling. In a companion abstract, the isotopic and trace element systematics of the ungrouped iron Tishomingo are compared with the IVB irons.

  15. Nanobubble-assisted formation of carbon nanostructures on basal plane highly ordered pyrolytic graphite exposed to aqueous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janda, Pavel; Frank, Otakar; Bastl, Zden?k; Klementov, Mariana; Tarbkov, Hana; Kavan, Ladislav

    2010-03-01

    Ambient gas nanobubbles of size ~ 101-102 nm occupying the hydrophobic surface of basal plane highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) immersed in aqueous media at room temperature cause exfoliation of the top graphene layers, as revealed by both in situ and ex situ atomic force microscope (AFM) imaging. The formation of nanoparticles composed mostly from graphene-based nanoscrolls, nanohorn-like and onion-like nanostructures was resolved by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and examined by diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses. The diameter of nanostructures varied from about 5 nm for single-layered scrolls to tens of nanometres for multishells. Raman spectroscopy confirmed the structural rearrangement of the HOPG basal plane after the above-mentioned treatment. The implications for nanobubble interfacial forces are discussed.

  16. Photosensitivity and UV-induced optical loss of silica optical fibers exposed to very high pressure hydrogen environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, James F., III; Sloan, Diann A.; May, Michael; LaBrake, Dwayne L.

    1999-11-01

    We placed silica optical fibers into hydrogen environments of up to 30,000 psi (2,041 atm) and characterized their photosensitivity and UV-induced optical loss. We detail the relationship between the hydrogen content in the fiber and the UV-induced index change for a delivered radiation dose. We also observed high UV-induced optical loss (greater than 30 dB/cm) in these fibers and studied the cause of this loss.

  17. Increased Enzymatic O-GlcNAcylation of Mitochondrial Proteins Impairs Mitochondrial Function in Cardiac Myocytes Exposed to High Glucose*

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yong; Suarez, Jorge; Fricovsky, Eduardo; Wang, Hong; Scott, Brian T.; Trauger, Sunia A.; Han, Wenlong; Hu, Ying; Oyeleye, Mary O.; Dillmann, Wolfgang H.

    2009-01-01

    Increased nuclear protein O-linked ?-N-acetylglucosamine glycosylation (O-GlcNAcylation) mediated by high glucose treatment or the hyperglycemia of diabetes mellitus contributes to cardiac myocyte dysfunction. However, whether mitochondrial proteins in cardiac myocytes are also submitted to O-GlcNAcylation or excessive O-GlcNAcylation alters mitochondrial function is unknown. In this study, we determined if mitochondrial proteins are O-GlcNAcylated and explored if increased O-GlcNAcylation is linked to high glucose-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. By immunoprecipitation, we found that several mitochondrial proteins, which are members of complexes of the respiratory chain, like subunit NDUFA9 of complex I, subunits core 1 and core 2 of complex III, and the mitochondrial DNA-encoded subunit I of complex IV (COX I) are O-GlcNAcylated. By mass spectrometry, we identified that serine 156 on NDUFA9 is O-GlcNAcylated. High glucose treatment (30 mm glucose) increases mitochondrial protein O-GlcNAcylation, including those of COX I and NDUFA9 which are reduced by expression of O-GlcNAcase (GCA). Increased mitochondrial O-GlcNAcylation is associated with impaired activity of complex I, III, and IV in addition to lower mitochondrial calcium and cellular ATP content. When the excessive O-GlcNAc modification is reduced by GCA expression, mitochondrial function improves; the activity of complex I, III, and IV increases to normal and mitochondrial calcium and cellular ATP content are returned to control levels. From these results we conclude that specific mitochondrial proteins of cardiac myocytes are O-GlcNAcylated and that exposure to high glucose increases mitochondrial protein O-GlcNAcylation, which in turn contributes to impaired mitochondrial function. PMID:19004814

  18. An in-depth look at the lunar crater Copernicus: Exposed mineralogy by high-resolution near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugiolacchi, Roberto; Mall, Urs; Bhatt, Megha; McKenna-Lawlor, Susan; Banaszkiewicz, Marek; Brønstad, Kjell; Nathues, Andreas; Søraas, Finn; Ullaland, Kjetil; Pedersen, Rolf B.

    2011-05-01

    Newly acquired, sequentially spaced, high-resolution near-infrared spectra across the central section of crater Copernicus' interior have been analyzed using a range of complementary techniques and indexes. We have developed a new interpretative method based on a multiple stage normalization process that appears to both confirm and expand on previous mineralogical estimations and mapping. In broad terms, the interpreted distribution of the principle mafic species suggests an overall composition of surface materials dominated by calcium-poor pyroxenes and minor olivine but with notable exceptions: the southern rim displays strong ca-rich pyroxene absorption features and five other locations, the uppermost northern crater wall, opposite rim sections facing the crater floor, and the central peak Pk1 and at the foot of Pk3, show instead strong olivine signatures. We also propose impact glass an alternative interpretation to the source of the weak but widespread olivine-like spectral signature found in low-reflectance samples, since it probably represents a major regolith constituent and component in large craters such as Copernicus. The high quality and performance of the SIR-2 data allows for the detection of diagnostic key mineral species even when investigating spectral samples with very subdued absorption features, confirming the intrinsic high-quality value of the returned data.

  19. High self-control protects the link between social support and positivity ratio for Israeli students exposed to contextual risk.

    PubMed

    Orkibi, Hod; Ronen, Tammie

    2015-08-01

    This study examined how Israeli students, despite exposure to contextual risk factors, may experience a high ratio of self-reported positive to negative emotions (i.e., positivity ratio). Self-control skills and perceived social support were tested as protective factors, where each was posited to moderate the relation between risk status and positivity ratio. The participants were 460 Israeli students (51% girls) in grades 8-10. Contrary to expectations, students attending a school with high contextual risks did not differ from students attending a school with low contextual risks in their scores on self-control skills, perceived social support, or positivity ratio. However, an exploratory follow-up moderation analysis revealed a significant three-way interaction, indicating that while low self-control skills eliminate the link between social support and positivity ratio for students attending the school defined as at-risk, high self-control protects this link. These results suggest that neither contextual risk in itself nor initial differences in self-control or social support account for differences in students' positivity ratio. Rather, it is the way these factors interact with each other that matters. Study limitations and implications are discussed. PMID:26270273

  20. Highly porous organic polymers bearing tertiary amine group and their exceptionally high CO2 uptake capacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Ruth; Bhaumik, Asim

    2015-02-01

    We report a very simple and unique strategy for synthesis of a tertiary amine functionalized high surface area porous organic polymer (POP) PDVTA-1 through the co-polymerization of monomers divinylbenzene (DVB) and triallylamine (TAA) under solvothermal reaction conditions. Two different PDVTA-1 samples have been synthesized by varying the molar ratio of the monomers. The porous polymeric materials have been thoroughly characterized by solid state 13C CP MAS-NMR, FT-IR and UV-vis spectroscopy, N2 sorption, HR TEM and FE SEM to understand its chemical environment, nanostructure, bonding, morphology and related surface properties. PDVTA-1 with higher amine content (DVB/TAA=4.0) showed exceptionally high CO2 uptake capacity of 85.8 wt% (19.5 mmol g-1) at 273 K and 43.69 wt% (9.93 mmol g-1) at 298 K under 3 bar pressure, whereas relatively low amine loaded material (DVB/TAA=7.0) shows uptake capacity of 59.2 wt% (13.45 mmol g-1) at 273 K and 34.36 wt% (7.81 mmol g-1) at 298 K. Highly porous nanostructure together with very high surface area and basicity at the surface due to the presence of abundant basic tertiary amine N-sites in the framework of PDVTA-1 could be responsible for very high CO2 adsorption.

  1. Prevalence of HCV among the high risk groups in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ijaz; Siddique, Lubna; Rehman, Latif U; Khan, Najib U; Iqbal, Aqib; Munir, Iqbal; Rashid, Farzana; Khan, Sana U; Attache, Safira; Swati, Zahoor A; Aslam, Mehwish S

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C is an infectious disease, caused by blood borne pathogen; the Hepatitis C Virus. In this study we analyzed blood samples collected from various risk groups for the prevalence of anti-HCV and active HCV infection with the help of Immunochromtographic tests and nested PCR. The prevalence of active HCV infection among the high risk groups was 15.57% (26/167). The prevalence of HCV in individual risk groups was 15%, 28%, 8%, 14.28% and 14.28% in the case of thalassemics, dialysis, major surgery group, dental surgery group and injection drug users respectively. Our analysis reveals the fact that health care facilities in the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province of Pakistan are contributing a great deal towards the spread of HCV infection. PMID:21663685

  2. Working group report on advanced high-voltage high-power and energy-storage space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, H. A.; Cooke, D. L.; Evans, R. W.; Hastings, D.; Jongeward, G.; Laframboise, J. G.; Mahaffey, D.; Mcintyre, B.; Pfizer, K. A.; Purvis, C.

    1986-01-01

    Space systems in the future will probably include high-voltage, high-power energy-storage and -production systems. Two such technologies are high-voltage ac and dc systems and high-power electrodynamic tethers. The working group identified several plasma interaction phenomena that will occur in the operation of these power systems. The working group felt that building an understanding of these critical interaction issues meant that several gaps in our knowledge had to be filled, and that certain aspects of dc power systems have become fairly well understood. Examples of these current collection are in quiescent plasmas and snap over effects. However, high-voltage dc and almost all ac phenomena are, at best, inadequately understood. In addition, there is major uncertainty in the knowledge of coupling between plasmas and large scale current flows in space plasmas. These gaps in the knowledge are addressed.

  3. Mom Power: preliminary outcomes of a group intervention to improve mental health and parenting among high-risk mothers.

    PubMed

    Muzik, Maria; Rosenblum, Katherine L; Alfafara, Emily A; Schuster, Melisa M; Miller, Nicole M; Waddell, Rachel M; Stanton Kohler, Emily

    2015-06-01

    Maternal psychopathology and traumatic life experiences may adversely impact family functioning, the quality of the parent-child relationship and the attachment bond, placing the child's early social-emotional development at risk. Attachment-based parenting interventions may be particularly useful in decreasing negative outcomes for children exposed to risk contexts, yet high risk families frequently do not engage in programs to address mental health and/or parenting needs. This study evaluated the effects of Mom Power (MP), a 13-session parenting and self-care skills group program for high-risk mothers and their young children (age <6 years old), focused on enhancing mothers' mental health, parenting competence, and engagement in treatment. Mothers were referred from community health providers for a phase 1 trial to assess feasibility, acceptability, and pilot outcomes. At baseline, many reported several identified risk factors, including trauma exposure, psychopathology, poverty, and single parenthood. Ninety-nine mother-child pairs were initially recruited into the MP program with 68 women completing and providing pre- and post-self-report measures assessing demographics and trauma history (pre-assessment only), maternal mental health (depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)), parenting, and intervention satisfaction. Results indicate that MP participation was associated with reduction in depression, PTSD, and caregiving helplessness. A dose response relationship was evident in that, despite baseline equivalence, women who attended ≥70 % of the 10 groups (completers; N = 68) improved on parenting and mental health outcomes, in contrast to non-completers (N = 12). Effects were most pronounced for women with a mental health diagnosis at baseline. The intervention was perceived as helpful and user-friendly. Results indicate that MP is feasible, acceptable, and holds promise for improving maternal mental health and parenting competence among high-risk dyads. Further research is warranted to evaluate the efficacy of MP using randomized controlled designs. PMID:25577336

  4. Mom Power: Preliminary Outcomes of a Group Intervention to Improve Mental Health and Parenting Among High-Risk Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Muzik, Maria; Rosenblum, Katherine L.; Alfafara, Emily A.; Schuster, Melisa M.; Miller, Nicole M.; Waddell, Rachel M.; Kohler, Emily Stanton

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Maternal psychopathology and traumatic life experiences may adversely impact family functioning, the quality of the parent-child relationship and the attachment bond, placing the child’s early social-emotional development at risk. Attachment-based parenting interventions may be particularly useful in decreasing negative outcomes for children exposed to risk contexts, yet high risk families frequently do not engage in programs to address mental health and/or parenting needs. This study evaluated the effects of Mom Power (MP), a 13-session parenting and self-care skills group program for high-risk mothers and their young children (age <6 years old), focused on enhancing mothers’ mental health, parenting competence and engagement in treatment. Methods Mothers were referred from community health providers for a Phase 1 trial to assess feasibility, acceptability and pilot outcomes. At baseline, many reported several identified risk factors, including trauma exposure, psychopathology, poverty and single parenthood. 99 mother-child pairs were initially recruited into the MP program with 68 women completing and providing pre- and post- self-report measures assessing demographics and trauma history (pre-assessment only), maternal mental health (depression and PTSD), parenting and intervention satisfaction. Results Results indicate that MP participation was associated with reduction in depression, PTSD and caregiving helplessness. A dose response relationship was evident in that, despite baseline equivalence, women who attended ≥70% of the 10 groups (completers; N=68) improved on parenting and mental health outcomes, in contrast to non-completers (N=12). Effects were most pronounced for women with a mental health diagnosis at baseline. The intervention was perceived as helpful and user-friendly. Conclusions Results indicate that MP is feasible, acceptable and holds promise for improving maternal mental health and parenting competence among high-risk dyads. Further research is warranted to evaluate the efficacy of MP using randomized controlled designs. PMID:25577336

  5. Using gene expression profiling to evaluate cellular responses in mouse lungs exposed to V2O5 and a group of other mouse lung tumorigens and non-tumorigens.

    PubMed

    Black, Michael B; Dodd, Darol E; McMullen, Patrick D; Pendse, Salil; MacGregor, Judith A; Gollapudi, B Bhaskar; Andersen, Melvin E

    2015-10-01

    Many compounds test positive for lung tumors in two-year NTP carcinogenicity bioassays in B6C3F1 mice. V2O5 was identified as a lung carcinogen in this assay, leading to its IARC (International Agency for Research on Cancer) classification as group 2b or a "possible" human carcinogen. To assess potential tumorigenic mode of action of V2O5, we compared gene expression and gene ontology enrichment in lung tissue of female B6C3F1 mice exposed for 13 weeks to a V2O5 particulate aerosol at a tumorigenic level (2.0 mg/m(3)). Relative to 12 other compounds also tested for carcinogenicity in 2-year bioassays in mice, there were 1026 differentially expressed genes with V2O5, of which 483 were unique to V2O5. Ontology analysis of the 1026 V2O5 differentially expressed genes showed enrichment for hyaluronan and sphingolipid metabolism, adenylate cyclase functions, c-AMP signaling and PKA activation/signaling. Enrichment of lipids/lipoprotein metabolism and inflammatory pathways were consistent with previously reported clinical findings. Enrichment of c-AMP and PKA signaling pathways may arise due to inhibition of phosphatases, a known biological action of vanadate. We saw no enrichment for DNA-damage, oxidative stress, cell cycle, or apoptosis pathway signaling in mouse lungs exposed to V2O5 which is in contrast with past studies evaluating in vivo gene expression in target tissues of other carcinogens (arsenic, formaldehyde, naphthalene and chloroprene). PMID:26210822

  6. Kinetics of chromatid break repair in G2-human fibroblasts exposed to low- and high-LET radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawata, T.; Durante, M.; George, K.; Furusawa, Y.; Gotoh, E.; Takai, N.; Wu, H.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the kinetics of chromatid break rejoining following exposure to radiations of different quality. Exponentially growing human fibroblast cells AG1522 were irradiated with gamma-rays, energetic carbon (290 MeV/u), silicon (490 MeV/u) and iron (200 MeV/u, 600 MeV/u). Chromosomes were prematurely condensed using calyculin A. Prematurely condensed chromosomes were collected after several post-irradiation incubation times, ranging from 5 to 600 minutes, and the number of chromatid breaks and exchanges in G2 cells were scored. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for initial chromatid breaks per unit dose showed LET dependency having a peak at 55 keV/micrometers silicon (2.4) or 80 keV/micrometers carbon particles (2.4) and then decreased with increasing LET. The kinetics of chromatid break rejoining following low- or high-LET irradiation consisted of two exponential components. Chromatid breaks decreased rapidly after exposure, and then continued to decrease at a slower rate. The rejoining kinetics was similar for exposure to each type of radiation, although the rate of unrejoined breaks was higher for high-LET radiation. Chromatid exchanges were also formed quickly.

  7. Restoring redox balance enhances contractility in heart trabeculae from type 2 diabetic rats exposed to high glucose.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Niraj M; Aon, Miguel A; Tocchetti, Carlo G; Shen, Xiaoxu; Dey, Swati; Ramirez-Correa, Genaro; O'Rourke, Brian; Gao, Wei Dong; Cortassa, Sonia

    2015-02-15

    Hearts from type 2 diabetic (T2DM) subjects are chronically subjected to hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia, both thought to contribute to oxidizing conditions and contractile dysfunction. How redox alterations and contractility interrelate, ultimately diminishing T2DM heart function, remains poorly understood. Herein we tested whether the fatty acid palmitate (Palm), in addition to its energetic contribution, rescues function by improving redox [glutathione (GSH), NAD(P)H, less oxidative stress] in T2DM rat heart trabeculae subjected to high glucose. Using cardiac trabeculae from Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats, we assessed the impact of low glucose (EG) and high glucose (HG), in absence or presence of Palm or insulin, on force development, energetics, and redox responses. We found that in EG ZDF and lean trabeculae displayed similar contractile work, yield of contractile work (Ycw), representing the ratio of force time integral over rate of O2 consumption. Conversely, HG had a negative impact on Ycw, whereas Palm, but not insulin, completely prevented contractile loss. This effect was associated with higher GSH, less oxidative stress, and augmented matrix GSH/thioredoxin (Trx) in ZDF mitochondria. Restoration of myocardial redox with GSH ethyl ester also rescued ZDF contractile function in HG, independently from Palm. These results support the idea that maintained redox balance, via increased GSH and Trx antioxidant activities to resist oxidative stress, is an essential protective response of the diabetic heart to keep contractile function. PMID:25485897

  8. Restoring redox balance enhances contractility in heart trabeculae from type 2 diabetic rats exposed to high glucose

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Niraj M.; Aon, Miguel A.; Tocchetti, Carlo G.; Shen, Xiaoxu; Dey, Swati; Ramirez-Correa, Genaro; O′Rourke, Brian; Gao, Wei Dong

    2014-01-01

    Hearts from type 2 diabetic (T2DM) subjects are chronically subjected to hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia, both thought to contribute to oxidizing conditions and contractile dysfunction. How redox alterations and contractility interrelate, ultimately diminishing T2DM heart function, remains poorly understood. Herein we tested whether the fatty acid palmitate (Palm), in addition to its energetic contribution, rescues function by improving redox [glutathione (GSH), NAD(P)H, less oxidative stress] in T2DM rat heart trabeculae subjected to high glucose. Using cardiac trabeculae from Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats, we assessed the impact of low glucose (EG) and high glucose (HG), in absence or presence of Palm or insulin, on force development, energetics, and redox responses. We found that in EG ZDF and lean trabeculae displayed similar contractile work, yield of contractile work (Ycw), representing the ratio of force time integral over rate of O2 consumption. Conversely, HG had a negative impact on Ycw, whereas Palm, but not insulin, completely prevented contractile loss. This effect was associated with higher GSH, less oxidative stress, and augmented matrix GSH/thioredoxin (Trx) in ZDF mitochondria. Restoration of myocardial redox with GSH ethyl ester also rescued ZDF contractile function in HG, independently from Palm. These results support the idea that maintained redox balance, via increased GSH and Trx antioxidant activities to resist oxidative stress, is an essential protective response of the diabetic heart to keep contractile function. PMID:25485897

  9. Protection against oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis of high-glucose-exposed proximal tubular epithelial cells by astaxanthin.

    PubMed

    Kim, You Jung; Kim, Young Ae; Yokozawa, Takako

    2009-10-14

    Astaxanthin is a carotenoid with powerful antioxidant properties that exists naturally in various plants, algae, and seafood. The purpose of the present study is to examine the protective action of astaxanthin against high-glucose-induced oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis in proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTECs). To assess the efficacy of astaxanthin, several key markers and activities were measured, including lipid peroxidation, total reactive species (RS), superoxide (*O(2)), nitric oxide (NO*), and peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)), as well as expressions of inflammatory proteins, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) nuclear translocation, and levels of Bcl2/Bax protein. Results showed that astaxanthin effectively suppressed lipid peroxidation, total RS, *O(2), NO*, ONOO(-), iNOS and COX-2 protein levels, NF-kappaB nuclear translocation, and pro-apototic Bax, whereas it increased anti-apoptotic Bcl2 protein levels. On the basis of these findings, it was concluded that in PTECs, astaxanthin has a protective efficacy against several deleterious effects caused by high glucose exposure and proposed that astaxanthin should be explored further as a potential antidiabetic remedy for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:19731916

  10. Active case finding for tuberculosis among high-risk groups in low-incidence countries.

    PubMed

    Zenner, D; Southern, J; van Hest, R; DeVries, G; Stagg, H R; Antoine, D; Abubakar, I

    2013-05-01

    In low-incidence countries, tuberculosis (TB) is now largely concentrated in high-risk groups such as migrants, homeless people, illicit drug users, alcoholics and prisoners. This has led to increased efforts to implement targeted active case finding for TB among specific populations. This review examines the evidence supporting active case finding in migrants and social risk groups, as well as the cost-effectiveness of interventions. While data from observational studies support active case finding in defined high-risk groups, further research to determine the effectiveness of specific tools and the cost-effectiveness of screening strategies is needed to inform evidence-based control methods in low-incidence countries. Inevitably, addressing TB in low-incidence countries will depend on effective disease control in high-burden countries. PMID:23575321

  11. Thermotolerance of heat-shocked Listeria monocytogenes in milk exposed to high-temperature, short-time pasteurization.

    PubMed Central

    Bunning, V K; Crawford, R G; Tierney, J T; Peeler, J T

    1992-01-01

    The effect of prior heat shock (48 degrees C for 15 min) on the thermotolerance of Listeria monocytogenes at the minimal high-temperature, short-time (71.7 degrees C for 15 s) parameters required by the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance was examined. The mean D71.7 degrees C value for heat-shocked L. monocytogenes was 4.6 +/- 0.5 s (control D = 3.0 +/- 1.0 s); the ratio of D to control D was 1.5. The increased thermotolerance of heat-shocked Listeria cells was not significant and appeared unlikely to have practical implications, in terms of risk assessment, for the safety of pasteurized milk. PMID:1622288

  12. Effects of film thickness on scintillation characteristics of columnar CsI:Tl films exposed to high gamma radiation doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Seema; Singh, S. G.; Sen, S.; Gadkari, S. C.

    2016-02-01

    Oriented columnar films of Tl doped CsI (CsI:Tl) of varying thicknesses from 50 μm to 1000 μm have been deposited on silica glass substrates by a thermal evaporation technique. The SEM micrographs confirmed the columnar structure of the film while the powder X-ray diffraction pattern recorded for the films revealed a preferred orientation of the grown columns along the <200> direction. Effects of high energy gamma exposure up to 1000 Gy on luminescence properties of the films were investigated. Results of radio-luminescence, photo-luminescence and scintillation studies on the films are compared with those of a CsI:Tl single crystal with similar thickness. A possible correlation between the film thicknesses and radiation damage in films has been observed.

  13. EXPOSE-R cosmic radiation time profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dachev, Tsvetan; Horneck, Gerda; Hder, Donat-Peter; Schuster, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to present the time profile of cosmic radiation exposure obtained by the radiation risks radiometer-dosimeter (R3DR) during the ESA exposition facility for EXPOSE-R mission (EXPOSE-R) in the EXPOSE-R facility outside the Russian Zvezda module of the International Space Station (ISS). Another aim is to make the obtained results available to other EXPOSE-R teams for use in their data analysis. R3DR is a low mass and small dimensions automated device, which measures solar radiation in four channels and in addition cosmic ionizing radiation. The main results of cosmic ionizing radiation measurements are: three different radiation sources were detected and quantified: galactic cosmic rays (GCR), energetic protons from the inner radiation belt (IRB) in the region of the South Atlantic anomaly and energetic electrons from the outer radiation belt (ORB). The highest daily averaged absorbed dose rate of 506 ?Gy day-1 came from IRB protons; GCR delivered much smaller daily absorbed dose rates of 81.4 ?Gy day-1 on average, and ORB source delivered on average a dose rate of 89 ?Gy day-1. The IRB and ORB daily averaged absorbed dose rates were higher than those observed during the ESA exposition facility for EXPOSE-E mission (EXPOSE-E), whereas the GCR rate was smaller than that measured during the EXPOSE-E mission. The reason for this difference is much less surrounding constructions shielding of the R3DR instrument in comparison with the R3DE instrument.

  14. Family correlations of arsenic methylation patterns in children and parents exposed to high concentrations of arsenic in drinking water.

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Joyce S; Kalman, David A; Moore, Lee E; Kosnett, Michael J; Arroyo, Alex P; Beeris, Martin; Mazumder, D N Guha; Hernandez, Alexandra L; Smith, Allan H

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the evidence of a familial contribution to urinary methylation patterns in families ingesting arsenic in drinking water. Arsenic methylation can be assessed by measuring urinary levels of inorganic arsenic (InAs) and its methylated metabolites, monomethylarsonate (MMA), and dimethylarsinate (DMA). Methylation activity is reflected in the ratios: InAs/methylated arsenic (InAs/metAs) and MMA/DMA. Eleven families from Chile were selected because of their long-term exposure to very high levels of arsenic in drinking water (735-762 microg/L). Each family consisted of a father, a mother, and two children. We measured urinary arsenic and its methylated metabolites for each participant (n = 44). The intraclass correlation coefficients showed that 13-52% of the variations in the methylation patterns were from being a member of a specific family. Family correlations were calculated for father-mother, parent-child, and sibling-sibling pairs. Methylation patterns correlated strongly between siblings [r = 0.78 for InAs/metAs, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.34-0.94; r = 0.82 for MMA/DMA, 95%CI, 0.43-0.95] compared to lower correlations in father-mother pairs (r = 0.18, r = -0.01, respectively), after adjustment for total urinary arsenic, age, and sex. Family correlations were not notably altered when adjustments were made for specific blood micronutrients (methionine, homocysteine, folate, vitamin B6, selenium, and vitamin B12 potentially related to methylation. We also report on a family pedigree with high prevalence of arsenic-induced effects. Participants from this family had low InAs/metAs values, which is consistent with increased toxicity of trivalent methylated arsenic species. Despite our small sample size, we observed that methylation patterns aggregate in families and are correlated in siblings, providing evidence of a genetic basis for the variation in arsenic methylation. Larger studies with more extensive pedigrees will need to be conducted to confirm these findings. PMID:12117651

  15. Effects of Low-Dose versus High-Dose ?-Tocotrienol on the Bone Cells Exposed to the Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Abd Manan, Nizar; Mohamed, Norazlina; Shuid, Ahmad Nazrun

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress and apoptosis can disrupt the bone formation activity of osteoblasts which can lead to osteoporosis. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of ?-tocotrienol on lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzymes activities, and apoptosis of osteoblast exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). Osteoblasts were treated with 1, 10, and 100??M of ?-tocotrienol for 24 hours before being exposed to 490??M (IC(50)) H(2)O(2) for 2 hours. Results showed that ?-tocotrienol prevented the malondialdehyde (MDA) elevation induced by H(2)O(2) in a dose-dependent manner. As for the antioxidant enzymes assays, all doses of ?-tocotrienol were able to prevent the reduction in SOD and CAT activities, but only the dose of 1??M of GTT was able to prevent the reduction in GPx. As for the apoptosis assays, ?-tocotrienol was able to reduce apoptosis at the dose of 1 and 10??M. However, the dose of 100??M of ?-tocotrienol induced an even higher apoptosis than H(2)O(2). In conclusion, low doses of ?-tocotrienol offered protection for osteoblasts against H(2)O(2) toxicity, but itself caused toxicity at the high doses. PMID:22956976

  16. Zeaxanthin and the Heat Dissipation of Excess Light Energy in Nerium oleander Exposed to a Combination of High Light and Water Stress 1

    PubMed Central

    Demmig, Barbara; Winter, Klaus; Krger, Almuth; Czygan, Franz-Christian

    1988-01-01

    Upon termination of watering of plants of Nerium oleander exposed to high light, photochemical efficiency became reduced as leaf water content decreased. Evidence is presented that this type of photoinhibition reflects to a substantial degree radiationless dissipation of excitation energy, probably mediated by the carotenoid zeaxanthin. During the imposition of water stress, the zeaxanthin content of leaves increased at the expense of violaxanthin and ?-carotene as a water deficit developed over a period of several days. The increase in zeaxanthin content was linearly related to an increase in the rate of radiationless energy dissipation in the antenna chlorophyll as calculated from the characteristics of chlorophyll a fluorescence measured with a pulse amplitude modulated fluorometer at room temperature. The increase in the rate of radiationless dissipation was also linearly related to a decrease in PSII photochemical efficiency as indicated by the ratio of variable to maximum fluorescence. Leaves of well-watered shade plants of N. oleander exposed to strong light showed a similar increase in zeaxanthin content as sun leaves of the same species subjected to drought in strong light. Shade leaves possessed the same capacity as sun leaves to form zeaxanthin at the expense of both violaxanthin and ?-carotene. The resistance of this species to the destructive effects of excess light appears to be related to interconversions between ?-carotene and the three carotenoids of the xanthophyll cycle. PMID:16666096

  17. Stress corrosion cracking of X80 pipeline steel exposed to high pH solutions with different concentrations of bicarbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Lin; Du, Cui-wei; Liu, Zhi-yong; Li, Xiao-gang

    2013-07-01

    Susceptibilities to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of X80 pipeline steel in high pH solutions with various concentrations of HCO{3/-} at a passive potential of -0.2 V vs. SCE were investigated by slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) test. The SCC mechanism and the effect of HCO{3/-} were discussed with the aid of electrochemical techniques. It is indicated that X80 steel shows enhanced susceptibility to SCC with the concentration of HCO{3/-} increasing from 0.15 to 1.00 mol/L, and the susceptibility can be evaluated in terms of current density at -0.2 V vs. SCE. The SCC behavior is controlled by the dissolution-based mechanism in these circumstances. Increasing the concentration of HCO{3/-} not only increases the risk of rupture of passive films but also promotes the anodic dissolution of crack tips. Besides, little susceptibility to SCC is found in dilute solution containing 0.05 mol/L HCO{3/-} for X80 steel. This can be attributed to the inhibited repassivation of passive films, manifesting as a more intensive dissolution in the non-crack tip areas than at the crack tips.

  18. Effect of ethanol injection on cavitation and heating of tissues exposed to high-intensity focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Liu, Y.; Maruvada, S.; Myers, M.; Khismatullin, D.

    2012-02-01

    Cavitation activity and temperature rise have been investigated in a tissue-mimicking material and excised bovine liver treated with ethanol and insonated with a 0.825 MHz focused acoustic transducer. The acoustic power was varied from 1.3 to 26.8 W to find the threshold leading to the onset of inertial cavitation. Cavitation events were quantified by three independent techniques: B-mode ultrasound imaging, needle hydrophone measurements and passive cavitation detection. Temperature in or near the focal zone was measured by thermocouples embedded in the samples. The results of this study indicate that the treatment of tissue phantoms and bovine liver samples with ethanol reduces their threshold power for inertial cavitation. This in turn leads to a sudden rise in temperature in ethanol-treated samples at a lower acoustic power than that in untreated ones. The analysis of passive cavitation detection data shows that once the threshold acoustic power is reached, inertial cavitation becomes a major contributor to acoustic scattering in ethanol-treated phantoms and bovine liver samples as compared to control. This study opens up the possibility of improved tumor ablation therapy via a combination of percutaneous ethanol injection and high-intensity focused ultrasound.

  19. Biosynthesis of lead nanoparticles by the aquatic water fern, Salvinia minima Baker, when exposed to high lead concentration.

    PubMed

    Castro-Longoria, E; Trejo-Guilln, K; Vilchis-Nestor, A R; Avalos-Borja, M; Andrade-Canto, S B; Leal-Alvarado, D A; Santamara, J M

    2014-02-01

    Salvinia minima Baker is a small floating aquatic fern that is efficient for the removal and storage of heavy metals such as lead and cadmium. In this study, we report that lead removal by S. minima causes large accumulation of lead inside the cells in the form of nanoparticles (PbNPs). The accumulation pattern of lead was analyzed in both, submerged root-like modified fronds (here named "roots"), and in its aerial leaf-like fronds ("leaves"). Analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) confirmed the biosynthesis of PbNPs by the plant. In both, roots and leaves, PbNPs were found to accumulate almost exclusively at the cell wall and closely associated to the cell membrane. Two types of PbNPs shapes were found in cells of both tissues, those associated to the cell wall were quasi-spherical with 17.24.2 nm of diameter, while those associated to the cell membrane/cytoplasm were elongated. Elongated particles were 53.729.6 nm in length and 11.12.4 nm wide. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) results indicate that cellulose, lignin and pectin are the major components that may be acting as the reducing agents for lead ions; these findings strongly suggest the potential use of this fern to further explore the bio-assisted synthesis of heavy metal nanostructures. PMID:24211828

  20. Field-dependent critical state of high-Tc superconducting strip simultaneously exposed to transport current and perpendicular magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Cun; He, An; Yong, Huadong; Zhou, Youhe

    2013-12-15

    We present an exact analytical approach for arbitrary field-dependent critical state of high-T{sub c} superconducting strip with transport current. The sheet current and flux-density profiles are derived by solving the integral equations, which agree with experiments quite well. For small transport current, the approximate explicit expressions of sheet current, flux-density and penetration depth for the Kim model are derived based on the mean value theorem for integration. We also extend the results to the field-dependent critical state of superconducting strip in the simultaneous presence of applied field and transport current. The sheet current distributions calculated by the Kim model agree with experiments better than that by the Bean model. Moreover, the lines in the I{sub a}-B{sub a} plane for the Kim model are not monotonic, which is quite different from that the Bean model. The results reveal that the maximum transport current in thin superconducting strip will decrease with increasing applied field which vanishes for the Bean model. The results of this paper are useful to calculate ac susceptibility and ac loss.

  1. The Mt. Perkins block, northwestern Arizona: An exposed cross section of a synextensional volcano in highly extended terrane

    SciTech Connect

    Faulds, J.E. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Despite widespread and voluminous middle to late Tertiary volcanism in the Basin and Range province, relatively few volcanic centers have been located, especially in highly extended regions. Although large-magnitude tilting and structural dismemberment generally obscure conventional exposures of volcanic centers, they can potentially provide cross sectional views of major volcanic edifices. In the northern Colorado River extensional corridor, the steeply (90[degree]) W-tilted Mt. Perkins block incorporates a cross-sectional view of part of a major Miocene volcanic center. In ascending structural order from east to west, the Mt. Perkins block includes (a) a 15.96 Ma quartz monzonite to diorite pluton emplaced in Proterozoic gneiss, (b) a 20 km long, NNW-striking, gently to moderately (0--45[degree]) E-dipping felsic dike swarm (one dike dated at 14.7 Ma), (c) a nonconformity at the base of the Miocene volcanic section, (d) basaltic andesite flows and dacite flows and domes, (e) a 300--1,500 m thick section of rhyolite flows, surges, and tuffs bracketed between 16.4 and 14.4 Ma, and (f) capping basalt flows. Tilts decrease from 90 to 30 W between the base of the rhyolite section and upper basalt flows. Geologic and paleomagnetic data indicate 40--90 of W-tilting of the dike swarm and pluton. The felsic dike swarm invades the lower part of the volcanic section and terminates upward in the coeval sequence of rhyolites. In addition, the dike swarm and rhyolite section terminate along-strike in roughly the same area. Restoration places the rhyolites above the dike swarm, which in turn is situated directly above the pluton. These data indicate a genetic tie between at least the felsic dike swarm and thick sequence of rhyolites. Geochemical fingerprinting of the lavas, dike swarm, and pluton is underway to test the tilted volcano'' hypothesis.

  2. High resolution and dynamic imaging of biopersistence and bioreactivity of extra and intracellular MWNTs exposed to microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Goode, Angela E; Gonzalez Carter, Daniel A; Motskin, Michael; Pienaar, Ilse S; Chen, Shu; Hu, Sheng; Ruenraroengsak, Pakatip; Ryan, Mary P; Shaffer, Milo S P; Dexter, David T; Porter, Alexandra E

    2015-11-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) are increasingly being developed both as neuro-therapeutic drug delivery systems to the brain and as neural scaffolds to drive tissue regeneration across lesion sites. MWNTs with different degrees of acid oxidation may have different bioreactivities and propensities to aggregate in the extracellular environment, and both individualised and aggregated MWNTs may be expected to be found in the brain. Before practical application, it is vital to understand how both aggregates and individual MWNTs will interact with local phagocytic immune cells, the microglia, and ultimately to determine their biopersistence in the brain. The processing of extra- and intracellular MWNTs (both pristine and when acid oxidised) by microglia was characterised across multiple length scales by correlating a range of dynamic, quantitative and multi-scale techniques, including: UV-vis spectroscopy, light microscopy, focussed ion beam scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Dynamic, live cell imaging revealed the ability of microglia to break apart and internalise micron-sized extracellular agglomerates of acid oxidised MWNTs, but not pristine MWNTs. The total amount of MWNTs internalised by, or strongly bound to, microglia was quantified as a function of time. Neither the significant uptake of oxidised MWNTs, nor the incomplete uptake of pristine MWNTs affected microglial viability, pro-inflammatory cytokine release or nitric oxide production. However, after 24h exposure to pristine MWNTs, a significant increase in the production of reactive oxygen species was observed. Small aggregates and individualised oxidised MWNTs were present in the cytoplasm and vesicles, including within multilaminar bodies, after 72h. Some evidence of morphological damage to oxidised MWNT structure was observed including highly disordered graphitic structures, suggesting possible biodegradation. This work demonstrates the utility of dynamic, quantitative and multi-scale techniques in understanding the different cellular processing routes of functionalised nanomaterials. This correlative approach has wide implications for assessing the biopersistence of MWNT aggregates elsewhere in the body, in particular their interaction with macrophages in the lung. PMID:26298523

  3. AP-1 regulates sphingosine kinase 1 expression in a positive feedback manner in glomerular mesangial cells exposed to high glucose.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kaipeng; Huang, Juan; Chen, Cheng; Hao, Jie; Wang, Shaogui; Huang, Junying; Liu, Peiqing; Huang, Heqing

    2014-03-01

    Our previous studies have confirmed that the sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1)-sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) signaling pathway in the kidney under diabetic conditions is closely correlated with the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). The activation of SphK1-S1P pathway by high glucose (HG) can increase the expression of fibronectin (FN), an important fibrotic component, in glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs) by promoting the DNA-binding activity of transcription factor AP-1. However, the mechanism responsible for the sustained activation of SphK1-S1P pathway remains unclear. Given the binding motifs for AP-1 within the first intron of the SphK1 gene, we speculated that the activated AP-1 in the kidney under HG condition possibly regulates SphK1 expression in a positive feedback manner, thereby promoting the sustained activation of SphK1-S1P pathway and mediating the pathological progression of DN. Here, we observed the effect of AP-1 on SphK1 expression in GMCs and explored the molecular mechanism involved in the sustained activation of SphK1-S1P pathway. We found two consensus binding motifs for AP-1 in the promoter sequences and non-coding region downstream of the transcriptional initiation of the rat SphK1 gene by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. The treatment of GMCs with both HG and S1P significantly increased the protein expression of c-Jun and c-Fos, and obviously enhanced the phosphorylation of c-Jun at Ser63 and Ser73, and c-Fos at Ser32. Knockdown of c-Jun and c-Fos with siRNAs substantially inhibited the expression of SphK1 and FN, whereas overexpression of c-Jun and c-Fos significantly increased the expression of SphK1 and FN. Curcumin treatment greatly decreased the levels of c-Jun, c-Fos, SphK1, and FN in the kidney tissues of diabetic rats. SiRNAs targeting SphK1 and S1P2 receptor respectively inhibited the phosphorylation of c-Jun (ser63 and ser73) and c-Fos (ser32), as well as FN expression under both normal and HG conditions. Our data demonstrated that the activated SphK1-S1P signaling pathway in GMCs under diabetic conditions is closely associated with AP-1 to form a positive feedback loop. This positive feedback loop functions as an important molecular basis for the sustained activation of SphK1-S1P pathway and increased FN expression that lead to the initiation and progression of DN. PMID:24342046

  4. High-resolution melting analysis for genotyping Duffy, Kidd and Diego blood group antigens.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Mitsunobu; Takahahi, Junko; Hirayama, Fumiya; Tani, Yoshihiko

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution melting (HRM) analysis is a simpler genotyping method than allele-specific PCR, PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism and multiplex PCR. Duffy, Kidd and Diego are clinically important blood group antigens. We used a novel method to genotype these three blood group antigens. Purified genomic DNA extracts of blood samples (354 Duffy, 347 Kidd and 457 Diego) were amplified using specific amplification primers. HRM curves were obtained by HRM analysis. Results were in complete concordance with those obtained for previous phenotypes and genotypes. Nucleotide substitutions for these blood group antigens were differentiated by the HRM curves. HRM analysis is a simple genotyping method and is an alternative to serological typing. Our results suggest that HRM analysis can also be used for genotyping blood group antigens whose allotype specificity is determined by single nucleotide substitutions. PMID:20864378

  5. Blood Group A Antigen Expression on Cardiac Endothelium is Highly Individualized: Possible Implications for Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Gehrie, Eric A.; Cates, Justin M.; Nian, Hui; Olson, Sandy J.; Young, Pampee P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Outcomes in cases of adult accidental ABO incompatible cardiac transplantation are highly variable, with some patients suffering nearly immediate catastrophic antibody-mediated rejection while others (~37% – 45%) survive. We hypothesize that these disparate outcomes could be influenced by variations in blood group antigen expression on allograft endothelium. Methodology Immunohistochemical stains for blood group A antigen were performed on cardiac tissue from 18 blood type A cadavers. Staining was evaluated by two distinct modalities: semi-quantitative light microscopy, which measured the intensity of antigen expression on endothelium, and quantitative digital analysis, which determined the percent of the total tissue section area staining positive for blood group A antigen. These data were used to compute a Comprehensive Expression Index (CEI) of blood group A antigen expression for each specimen. Results Semi-quantitative light microscopic examination determined that endothelium stained with low intensity in 4 (22%) myocardial samples, intermediate intensity in 5 (28%) samples, and high intensity in 9 (50%) samples. Quantitative digital analysis revealed a range in the percent of total cross sectional area composed of blood group A-positive signal (median 2.69%; interquartile range 1.68% – 2.94%). Increased percent of total cross sectional area composed of blood group A-positive signal was positively associated with patient age (p=.0037). The CEI showed a broad range, with a median of 5.27 and an interquartile range of 2.92 – 8.22. Conclusions There are little data available regarding inter-individual differences in blood group A antigen expression in cardiac endothelium. Here, we report inter-individual variation in endothelial expression of blood group A antigen in 18 specimens. These variations may help to explain disparate outcomes in cases of accidental ABO incompatible cardiac transplantation in adults. PMID:23290353

  6. High Seroprevalence of Neutralizing Capacity against Human Metapneumovirus in All Age Groups Studied in Bonn, Germany▿

    PubMed Central

    Lüsebrink, Jessica; Wiese, Christoph; Thiel, Anne; Tillmann, Ramona-Liza; Ditt, Vanessa; Müller, Andreas; Schildgen, Oliver; Schildgen, Verena

    2010-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) infections occur frequently despite high rates of perpetual seroprevalence for all age groups. Analyses of ∼2,000 archived, randomly selected serum samples demonstrated that neutralizing capacities remain high, with a minor decrease for individuals over 69 years of age, leading to the hypothesis that reinfections occur because humoral immune responses play minor roles in the clearance of hMPV infections. PMID:20042516

  7. Urinary Cortisol Circadian Rhythm in a Group of High-Functioning Children with Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richdale, Amanda L.; Prior, Margot R.

    1992-01-01

    This study found no evidence for abnormal temporal placement of the basal urinary cortisol circadian rhythm in a group of 18 high-functioning children (ages 4-14) with autism. There was a tendency toward cortisol hypersecretion during the day, predominantly in autistic children who were integrated into the normal school system. (Author/JDD)

  8. A Support Group Intervention for At-Risk Female High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houck, Gail M.; Darnell, Susan; Lussman, Sarah

    2002-01-01

    Pre- and post-intervention, female high school students with signs of depression completed surveys about risk and protective factors. Students participated in a weekly support group that enhanced coping skills and provided emotional support. Before the intervention, students were at risk for suicide. At the end, there was a 55 percent reduction in

  9. Review of Social Skills Training Groups for Youth with Asperger Syndrome and High Functioning Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cappadocia, M. Catherine; Weiss, Jonathan A.

    2011-01-01

    Although social skills deficits represent core symptoms of Asperger Syndrome and High Functioning Autism, there is limited research investigating the empirical validity of social skills interventions currently being used with these populations. This literature review compares three types of social skills training groups: traditional, cognitive

  10. Internet-based Group Relations: A High School Peace Educational Project in Israel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yablon, Yaacov B.; Katz, Yaacov J.

    2001-01-01

    Describes how Internet-based group communication was used as the major strategy to promote the societal values of understanding, equality, tolerance, and peace between Jewish and Bedouin Arab high school students in Israel. Discusses changes in student attitudes and considers the prognosis for long-term change and cooperation between the two

  11. Reproduction of PMWS of high mortality with a porcine circovirus type 2-group 1 isolate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction In late 2005, sporadic cases of an acute onset of high mortality disease were observed in growing pigs among USA swine herds. PCV2-group 1 (Gp1) virus was consistently detected among the affected animals. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the PCV2 isolates from the United States until l...

  12. Group Social Skills Instruction for Adolescents with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Susan W.; Koenig, Kathleen; Scahill, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Given the increased recognition of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and the chronic and pervasive nature of associated deficits, there is a pressing need for effective treatments. The feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a structured, group social skills training program for high-functioning youth with ASD was examined in this study. Fifteen…

  13. Group Social Skills Instruction for Adolescents with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Susan W.; Koenig, Kathleen; Scahill, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Given the increased recognition of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and the chronic and pervasive nature of associated deficits, there is a pressing need for effective treatments. The feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a structured, group social skills training program for high-functioning youth with ASD was examined in this study. Fifteen

  14. Electron microscopic evidence of antibody entry into neutrophils after phagocytosis of highly virulent group B streptococci.

    PubMed

    Cleat, P H; Wells, C; Coid, C R

    1984-11-01

    An electron microscopic study was undertaken of the entry of specific antibody into neutrophils containing surviving intracellular highly virulent group B streptococci after phagocytosis of the organisms had occurred. Electron micrographs are presented to demonstrate that specific antibody gains access to the ingested bacteria. This antibody binds to the surface of the streptococci, which subsequently permits the neutrophils to kill these organisms. PMID:6396381

  15. A Support Group Intervention for At-Risk Female High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houck, Gail M.; Darnell, Susan; Lussman, Sarah

    2002-01-01

    Pre- and post-intervention, female high school students with signs of depression completed surveys about risk and protective factors. Students participated in a weekly support group that enhanced coping skills and provided emotional support. Before the intervention, students were at risk for suicide. At the end, there was a 55 percent reduction in…

  16. High-Frequency Heart Rate Variability Linked to Affiliation with a New Group

    PubMed Central

    Sahdra, Baljinder K.; Ciarrochi, Joseph; Parker, Philip D.

    2015-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that high levels of high-frequency heart rate variability (HF-HRV) predisposes individuals to affiliate with new groups. Resting cardiac physiological recordings were taken before and after experimental sessions to measure trait high-frequency heart rate variability as an index of dispositional autonomic influence on heart rate. Following an experimental manipulation of priming of caring-related words, participants engaged in a minimal group paradigm, in which they imagined being a member of one of two arbitrary groups, allocated money to members of the two groups, and rated their affiliation with the groups. High levels of HF-HRV were associated with ingroup favouritism while allocating money, an effect largely attributable to a positive relationship between HF-HRV and allocation of money to the ingroup, and less due to a negative relationship between HF-HRV and money allocation to the outgroup. HF-HRV was also associated with increased self-reported affiliation feelings for the ingroup but was unrelated to feelings towards the outgroup. These effects remained substantial even after controlling for age, gender, BMI, mood, caffeine consumption, time of day of data collection, smoking and alcohol behaviour, and respiration rate. Further, the effects were observed regardless of whether participants were primed with caring-related words or not. This study is the first to bridge a long history of research on ingroup favouritism to the relatively recent body of research on cardiac vagal tone by uncovering a positive association between HF-HRV and affiliation with a novel group. PMID:26106891

  17. High-Frequency Heart Rate Variability Linked to Affiliation with a New Group.

    PubMed

    Sahdra, Baljinder K; Ciarrochi, Joseph; Parker, Philip D

    2015-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that high levels of high-frequency heart rate variability (HF-HRV) predisposes individuals to affiliate with new groups. Resting cardiac physiological recordings were taken before and after experimental sessions to measure trait high-frequency heart rate variability as an index of dispositional autonomic influence on heart rate. Following an experimental manipulation of priming of caring-related words, participants engaged in a minimal group paradigm, in which they imagined being a member of one of two arbitrary groups, allocated money to members of the two groups, and rated their affiliation with the groups. High levels of HF-HRV were associated with ingroup favouritism while allocating money, an effect largely attributable to a positive relationship between HF-HRV and allocation of money to the ingroup, and less due to a negative relationship between HF-HRV and money allocation to the outgroup. HF-HRV was also associated with increased self-reported affiliation feelings for the ingroup but was unrelated to feelings towards the outgroup. These effects remained substantial even after controlling for age, gender, BMI, mood, caffeine consumption, time of day of data collection, smoking and alcohol behaviour, and respiration rate. Further, the effects were observed regardless of whether participants were primed with caring-related words or not. This study is the first to bridge a long history of research on ingroup favouritism to the relatively recent body of research on cardiac vagal tone by uncovering a positive association between HF-HRV and affiliation with a novel group. PMID:26106891

  18. Childhood Adversity Among Institutionalized Male Juvenile Offenders and Other High-Risk Groups Without Offense Records in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Ricardo José; Fernandes, Ana Isabel; Mesquita, Cristina; Maia, Ângela Costa

    2015-01-01

    The literature has shown that delinquent adolescents report high rates of childhood adversity and family dysfunction. However, it is important to know both the degree of adversity among delinquent adolescents in comparison with other high-risk samples and the contribution of each single form of adversity to this comparison. The purpose of this study was to evaluate childhood adversity, psychopathology, and risk behaviors among 4 high-risk groups, including incarcerated delinquent youths. The participants were 120 male youths between 13 and 19 years old (M = 16.18, SD = 1.26), including 30 youths who were arrested and held in detention centers as a consequence of violent crimes; 30 youths who were identified by Child Protective Services (CPS) and remained with their families; 30 youths who were identified by CPS, removed from their homes, and placed in child and youth residential care; and 30 youths who were randomly selected from schools. The incarcerated youths reported significantly more adversity, global psychopathology, and global index of risk behaviors. When considering each risk behavior, the incarcerated youths reported higher percentages of alcohol abuse, drug use, early smoking initiation, physical assault, carrying weapons, early initiation of sexual intercourse, sexual intercourse under the influence of drugs, and sexual intercourse without condom use. The logistic regression analyses showed that only emotional neglect was significantly associated with delinquency. This study suggests that delinquent youths are exposed to a great magnitude of adversities in childhood, with emotional neglect as an independent risk factor for delinquency. In addition, these youths have higher rates of psychopathology and risk behaviors compared to other high-risk samples. PMID:26159627

  19. A prospective study of the potential moderating role of social support in preventing marginalization among individuals exposed to bullying and abuse in junior high school.

    PubMed

    Strøm, Ida Frugård; Thoresen, Siri; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Sagatun, Åse; Dyb, Grete

    2014-10-01

    Negative physical and psychological long-term consequences of abuse and bullying are well documented. It is reasonable to assume that abuse and bullying early in life also may have an impact on the ability to work and stay economically independent later in life, but such prospective studies are lacking. This study investigates the consequences of exposure to abuse and bullying in junior high school, as measured by receiving long-term social welfare benefits in young adulthood. In addition, it explores the potential protective role of social support. Self-reported data from 13,633 (50.3% female) junior high school students were linked to registry data on their use of social welfare benefits from the age of 18 and for eight consecutive years. Cox regression analyses were applied to test the relationship between exposure to life adversities and the use of social welfare benefits, and the potential moderating role of social support. The analyses showed that individuals exposed to abuse and bullying had an increased likelihood of receiving social-welfare benefits compared with individuals not exposed to these types of abuse. Exposure to multiple types of abuse led to a higher likelihood of using social welfare benefits compared with single types of abuse and no abuse. The findings on the potential moderating role of social support were mixed, depending on the source of social support. Family support and classmate relationships were protective in reducing the likelihood of the use of social welfare benefits, whereas peer and teachers' support showed inconsistent patterns. These results are promising in terms of preventing the long-term negative consequences of abuse and bullying. PMID:24985489

  20. The survival of patients with high grade glioma from different ethnic groups in South East England.

    PubMed

    Ratneswaren, T; Jack, R M; Tataru, D; Davies, E A

    2014-12-01

    Studies in the United States (US) have reported varying treatment and survival for patients with high grade glioma from different ethnic groups. This study investigates for the first time whether differences also exist in the United Kingdom (UK). This population-based cohort study used cancer registration data for 4,845 patients diagnosed in South East England between 2000 and 2009. Linked self-assigned ethnicity data within Hospital Episode Statistics were used to define White, Indian, Pakistani, Bangladeshi, Black Caribbean, Black African, Other and Not known groups. Logistic regression was used to generate odds ratios for a record of receipt of treatment (surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy), adjusting for sex, age, morphology, socioeconomic deprivation and comorbidity in each ethnic group. Hazard ratios were generated using Cox regression, adjusting for sex, age, morphology, socioeconomic deprivation, comorbidity and treatment. The overall one-year survival was 28.4%. Ethnicity data was available for 3,793 (78%) patients. Receipt of treatment was generally similar between different ethnic groups after adjustment for sex, age, morphology, socioeconomic deprivation and comorbidity. After adjustment for potential confounders, the Indian (HR 0.72, p=0.037) and Other groups (HR 0.76, p=0.003) had better survival, while the Not known group (HR 1.34, p<0.0001) had worse survival than the White group. Patients from UK Indian groups have better survival than White patients while those from Black ethnic groups appear to have similar survival to White patients. These findings suggest the need to investigate possible contributing factors including the completeness of follow-up, clinical performance status and tumour biology. PMID:25154322

  1. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal-nitrogen coordination.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frdric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon-nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation. PMID:26059552

  2. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal-nitrogen coordination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frdric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-06-01

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon-nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation.

  3. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal–nitrogen coordination

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon–nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation. PMID:26059552

  4. Preference for High Status Predicts Implicit Outgroup Bias among Children from Low-Status Groups

    PubMed Central

    Newheiser, Anna-Kaisa; Dunham, Yarrow; Merrill, Anna; Hoosain, Leah; Olson, Kristina R.

    2014-01-01

    Whereas members of high-status racial groups show ingroup preference when attitudes are measured implicitly, members of low-status racial groups both adults and children typically show no bias, potentially reflecting awareness of the ingroups low status. We hypothesized that when status differences are especially pronounced, children from low-status groups would show an implicit outgroup bias, the strength of which might relate to attitudes toward status. We tested these predictions among 611-year-old Black and Coloured (i.e., multiracial) children from South Africa, a country marked by extreme status differentials among racial groups. As a measure of implicit intergroup bias, children (N=78) completed an Implicit Association Test, a speeded categorization task that assesses the relative strength of association between two target groups (in the present study, either Whites vs. Blacks or Whites vs. Coloureds) and positive versus negative evaluation. Children also completed explicit (i.e., self-report) measures of attitudes toward racial groups, as well as rich and poor people (a measure of attitudes toward status). Both groups of children showed an implicit outgroup-favoring (i.e., pro-White) bias, suggesting that children were sensitive to the extent of status differences. The only instance in which implicit pro-White bias did not emerge involved Black childrens evaluations of Whites versus Coloureds, both higher-status outgroups. Explicit preference for high status predicted implicit pro-White bias, particularly when the IAT contrasted two outgroups. The impact of status on the development of implicit and explicit intergroup bias is discussed. PMID:24219317

  5. Summary report of working group 3: High gradient and laser-structure based acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N.; Cowan, B.M.; /Tech-X, Boulder

    2010-01-01

    The charge for the working group on high gradient and laser-structure based acceleration was to assess the current challenges involved in developing an advanced accelerator based on electromagnetic structures, and survey state-of-the-art methods to address those challenges. The topics of more than 50 presentations in the working group covered a very broad range of issues, from ideas, theoretical models and simulations, to design and manufacturing of accelerating structures and, finally, experimental results on obtaining extremely high accelerating gradients in structures from conventional microwave frequency range up to THz and laser frequencies. Workshop discussion topics included advances in the understanding of the physics of breakdown and other phenomena, limiting high gradient performance of accelerating structures. New results presented in this workshop demonstrated significant progress in the fields of conventional vacuum structure-based acceleration, dielectric wakefield acceleration, and laser-structure acceleration.

  6. Small-world properties emerge in highly compartmentalized networks with intermediate group sizes and numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Louie H.; Holland, Matthew D.

    2005-12-01

    Many recent studies have focused on two statistical properties observed in diverse real-world networks: the small-world property and compartmentalization [D. J. Watts and S. H. Strogatz, Nature 393, 440 (1998); M. Girvan and M. E. J. Newman, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 99, 7821 (2002)]. Models that include group affiliations have been shown to produce networks with high clustering coefficients, a necessary condition for small-world properties [M. E. J. Newman, Phys. Rev. E, 68, 026121 (2003); M. E. J. Newman and J. Park, Phys. Rev. E 68, 036122 (2003)]. However, the consequences of varying the number and size of groups in a network are not well understood. In order to investigate the consequences of group organization, we examined sets of networks that varied simultaneously in the size and number of groups, while maintaining the same overall size and average degree. Here we show that the small-world property arises in maximally compartmentalized and clustered networks that occur in the intermediate region between few, very large groups and many, very small groups.

  7. Anomalous group velocity at the high energy range of a 3D photonic nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Botey, Muriel; Martorell, Jordi; Dorado, Luis A; Depine, Ricardo A; Lozano, Gabriel; Mguez, Hernn

    2010-07-19

    We report on a study of electromagnetic waves propagation in thin periodically ordered photonic nanostructures in the spectral range where the light wavelength is on the order of the lattice parameter. The vector KKR method we use allows us to determine the group index from finite photonic structures including extinction providing confirmation of recently emerged results. We show that for certain frequencies the group velocity of opal slabs can either be superluminal or approach zero depending on the crystal thickness and the unavoidable presence of losses. In some cases, group velocity can be negative. Such behavior can be clearly attributed to the finite character of the three-dimensional structure and reproduces previously reported experimental observations. Calculations show that contrary to the predictions of extraordinary group velocity reductions for infinite periodic structures, the group velocity of real opals may exhibit strong fluctuations at the high energy range. Hence, a direct identification between the calculated anomalous group velocities, for an actual opal film, and the predicted propagating low dispersion modes for an ideal infinite ordered structure seems difficult to establish. PMID:20720950

  8. Bronchial dysplasia induced by radiation in miners exposed to 222Rn progeny.

    PubMed Central

    Michaylov, M A; Pressyanov, D S; Kalinov, K B

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To investigate whether sputum cytology can be used to monitor epithelial cell changes in groups at high risk of lung cancer from exposure to radiation. METHODS--Dysplasia of bronchial cells was investigated by means of sputum cytology in a group of 434 underground miners. 100 of them were not exposed, and 334 were exposed to 222Rn progeny at cumulative exposures < 450 working level months. RESULTS--The frequency of dysplasia in the exposed group was significantly higher than that in the not exposed group (P < 0.0001), and an exposure-response relation was found. This relation was different for smokers and non-smokers. CONCLUSIONS--Possibly the frequencies of dysplasia could be used to assess past exposures of groups of miners. This approach could be applied to cases where data on radiation monitoring are not available or are very scarce. Images p82-a PMID:7757171

  9. Vaccination Rates among the General Adult Population and High-Risk Groups in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Annunziata, Kathy; Rak, Aaron; Del Buono, Heather; DiBonaventura, Marco; Krishnarajah, Girishanthy

    2012-01-01

    Background In order to adequately assess the effectiveness of vaccination in helping to control vaccine-preventable infectious disease, it is important to identify the adherence and uptake of risk-based recommendations. Methods The current project includes data from five consecutive datasets of the National Health and Wellness Survey (NHWS): 2007 through 2011. The NHWS is an annual, Internet-based health questionnaire, administered to a nationwide sample of adults (aged 18 or older) which included items on vaccination history as well as high-risk group status. Vaccination rates and characteristics of vaccinees were reported descriptively. Logistic regressions were conducted to predict vaccination behavior from sociodemographics and risk-related variables. Results The influenza vaccination rate for all adults 18 years and older has increased significantly from 28.0% to 36.2% from 2007 to 2011 (ps<.05). Compared with those not at high risk (25.1%), all high-risk groups were vaccinated at a higher rate, from 36.8% (pregnant women) to 69.7% (those with renal/kidney disease); however, considerable variability among high-risk groups was observed. Vaccination rates among high-risk groups for other vaccines varied considerably though all were below 50%, with the exception of immunocompromised respondents (57.5% for the hepatitis B vaccine and 52.5% for the pneumococcal vaccine) and the elderly (50.4% for the pneumococcal). Multiple risk factors were associated with increased rate of vaccination for most vaccines. Significant racial/ethnic differences with influenza, hepatitis, and herpes zoster vaccination rates were also observed (ps<.05). Conclusions Rates of influenza vaccination have increased over time. Rates varied by high-risk status, demographics, and vaccine. There was a pattern of modest vaccination rate increases for individuals with multiple risk factors. However, there were relatively low rates of vaccination for most risk-based recommendations and all fell below national goals. PMID:23226312

  10. Renormalization group functions of the {phi}{sup 4} theory from high-temperature expansions

    SciTech Connect

    Suslov, I. M.

    2011-02-15

    It has been previously shown that calculation of the renormalization group (RG) functions of scalar {phi}{sup 4} theory reduces to analysis of thermodynamic properties of the Ising model. Using high-temperature expansions for the latter, RG functions of the four-dimensional theory can be calculated for arbitrary coupling constant g with an accuracy of 10{sup -4} for the Gell-Mann-Low function {beta}(g) and with an accuracy of 10{sup -3}-10{sup -2} for anomalous dimensions. The expansions of the renormalization group functions up to the 13th order in g{sup -1/2} have been obtained.

  11. Surface modification of tungsten and tungsten-tantalum alloys exposed to high-flux deuterium plasma and its impact on deuterium retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayachuk, Y.; 't Hoen, M. H. J.; Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P. A.; Terentyev, D.; Uytdenhouwen, I.; van Oost, G.

    2013-01-01

    Samples of tungsten and tungsten-tantalum alloy (with 5 mass per cent of Ta) were exposed to high-flux deuterium plasma at different fluences. The surface modification was studied with scanning electron microscopy, and deuterium retention was measured by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). In the high fluence range of 3.5 1026-1027 m-2, multiple large-size blisters are formed on the W surface, while blisters on the W-Ta surface are considerably smaller in size and number. Deuterium retention in this fluence range was found to be systematically higher in W than in W-Ta. Correlation between the evolution of the blistering patterns and the TDS spectra as a function of fluence suggests that trapping in the sub-surface cavities associated with blisters is the predominant trapping mechanism in tungsten in the case of high fluence exposures. We attribute the lower retention in W-Ta under the investigated conditions to the weaker blistering.

  12. Carbon-wrapped TiO2 nanocubes exposed with (001) active facets for high-rate and long-life lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin; Nie, Zhongyuan; Cao, Chuanbao; Khalid, Syed; Wu, Yu; Xu, Xingyan

    2016-01-01

    A novel method is developed to synthesis TiO2/carbon nanostructured composites (T/CNC) as high-performance anode materials for Li-ion batteries using resorcinol/formaldehyde (RF) as the carbon source. With assistance of hydrofluoric acid (HF) as a shape-controlling agent, TiO2 nanocubes exposed with (001) active facets can be obtained. The T/CNC sample shows higher BET surface area (358 m2 g-1) than the previous materials reported before. When evaluated for lithium storage properties, the T/CNC is able to deliver a capacity of 340.4 mA h g-1 after 90 cycles at 0.59 C, which is superior to those reported in previous work. At a high rate of 15 C, a high reversible discharge capacity of 126.7 mA h g-1 is obtained up to 500 cycles and demonstrates excellent rate performance and long-term cycling stability.

  13. Urinary arsenic metabolism in a Western Chinese population exposed to high-dose inorganic arsenic in drinking water: influence of ethnicity and genetic polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Fu, Songbo; Wu, Jie; Li, Yuanyuan; Liu, Yan; Gao, Yanhui; Yao, Feifei; Qiu, Chuanying; Song, Li; Wu, Yu; Liao, Yongjian; Sun, Dianjun

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the differences in urinary arsenic metabolism patterns of individuals exposed to a high concentration of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in drinking water, an epidemiological investigation was conducted with 155 individuals living in a village where the arsenic concentration in the drinking water was 969?g/L. Blood and urine samples were collected from 66 individuals including 51 cases with skin lesions and 15 controls without skin lesions. The results showed that monomethylated arsenic (MMA), the percentage of MMA (%MMA) and the ratio of MMA to iAs (MMA/iAs) were significantly increased in patients with skin lesions as compared to controls, while dimethylated arsenic (DMA), the percentage of DMA (%DMA) and the ratio of DMA to MMA (DMA/MMA) were significantly reduced. The percent DMA of individuals with the Ala/Asp genotype of glutathione S-transferase omega 1 (GSTO1) was significantly lower than those with Ala/Ala. The percent MMA of individuals with the A2B/A2B genotype of arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) was significantly lower than those with AB/A2B. The iAs and total arsenic (tAs) content in the urine of a Tibetan population were significantly higher than that of Han and Hui ethnicities, whereas MMA/iAs was significantly lower than that of Han and Hui ethnicities. Our results showed that when exposed to the same arsenic environment, different individuals exhibited different urinary arsenic metabolism patterns. Gender and ethnicity affect these differences and above polymorphisms may be effectors too. PMID:24239724

  14. Reduced chromosome aberration complexity in normal human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to low-LET ?-rays and high-LET ?-particles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Cells of the lung are at risk from exposure to low and moderate doses of ionizing radiation from a range of environmental and medical sources. To help assess human health risks from such exposures, a better understanding of the frequency and types of chromosome aberration initially-induced in human lung cell types is required to link initial DNA damage and rearrangements with transmission potential and, to assess how this varies with radiation quality. Materials and methods: We exposed normal human bronchial lung epithelial (NHBE) cells in vitro to 0.5 and 1 Gy low-linear energy transfer (LET) ?-rays and a low fluence of high-LET ?-particles and assayed for chromosome aberrations in premature chromosome condensation (PCC) spreads by 24-color multiplex-fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH). Results: Both simple and complex aberrations were induced in a LET and dose-dependent manner; however, the frequency and complexity observed were reduced in comparison to that previously reported in spherical cell types after exposure to comparable doses or fluence of radiation. Approximately 12% of all exposed cells were categorized as being capable of transmitting radiation-induced chromosomal damage to future NHBE cell generations, irrespective of dose. Conclusion: One possible mechanistic explanation for this reduced complexity is the differing geometric organization of chromosome territories within ellipsoid nuclei compared to spherical nuclei. This study highlights the need to better understand the role of nuclear organization in the formation of exchange aberrations and, the influence three-dimensional (3D) tissue architecture may have on this in vivo. PMID:23679558

  15. The Salience of Lower-Order Features in Highly Self-Similar Wallpaper Groups.

    PubMed

    Vedak, Shivam; Gilmore, Rick; Kohler, Peter; Liu, Yanxi; Norcia, Anthony

    2015-09-01

    Symmetric visual patterns arise frequently in natural images and human cultural artifacts. All 2-D symmetric patterns that tile the plane represent one of 17 "wallpapers" -- combinations of the fundamental symmetries of rotation, translation, glide reflection and reflection. Most research on human perception has focused on two-fold reflection. Here we examine how human observers classify patterns with varying combinations of the fundamental symmetries. Clarke et al. (2011) found that five of the seventeen wallpaper groups (P1, P3M1, P31M, P6, and P6M) had a high degree of self-similarity. We presented adult participants (n=11) with twenty spatial-frequency-normalized exemplars from each of the five highly self-similar wallpaper groups. Each exemplar was generated from a seed region containing random grayscale noise, which was then replicated, rotated, reflected, and translated according to the pattern of regularity reflected in each wallpaper group. Observers were instructed to sort the exemplars into as many subsets as they wished based on any criteria they saw appropriate. We used the Jaccard index to measure the degree to which observers sorted exemplars from the wallpaper patterns into consistent categories. Observers found consistent patterns of self-similarity between the wallpaper groups, p< .001. P1 exemplars were judged to be more self-similar than than the other groups, p< .001, and P6M exemplars were judged to be more self-similar than P6, p< .001. The findings suggest that mirror and translational symmetry influence unconstrained observer judgments about pattern regularity. Visual inspection of the subsets generated by observers suggested that the presence of salient secondary features (i.e. emergent global geometric structures such as striations, grid patterns, and characteristic shapes) influences the detection of self-similarity in wallpaper patterns. The results contribute to an emerging understanding of how group theory may shed light on human and machine pattern detection. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26326527

  16. Multi High-Throughput Approach for Highly Selective Identification of Vaccine Candidates: the Group A Streptococcus Case*

    PubMed Central

    Bensi, Giuliano; Mora, Marirosa; Tuscano, Giovanna; Biagini, Massimiliano; Chiarot, Emiliano; Bombaci, Mauro; Capo, Sabrina; Falugi, Fabiana; Manetti, Andrea G. O.; Donato, Paolo; Swennen, Erwin; Gallotta, Marilena; Garibaldi, Manuela; Pinto, Vittoria; Chiappini, Nico; Musser, James M.; Janulczyk, Robert; Mariani, Massimo; Scarselli, Maria; Telford, John L.; Grifantini, Renata; Norais, Nathalie; Margarit, Immaculada; Grandi, Guido

    2012-01-01

    We propose an experimental strategy for highly accurate selection of candidates for bacterial vaccines without using in vitro and/or in vivo protection assays. Starting from the observation that efficacious vaccines are constituted by conserved, surface-associated and/or secreted components, the strategy contemplates the parallel application of three high throughput technologies, i.e. mass spectrometry-based proteomics, protein array, and flow-cytometry analysis, to identify this category of proteins, and is based on the assumption that the antigens identified by all three technologies are the protective ones. When we tested this strategy for Group A Streptococcus, we selected a total of 40 proteins, of which only six identified by all three approaches. When the 40 proteins were tested in a mouse model, only six were found to be protective and five of these belonged to the group of antigens in common to the three technologies. Finally, a combination of three protective antigens conferred broad protection against a panel of four different Group A Streptococcus strains. This approach may find general application as an accelerated and highly accurate path to bacterial vaccine discovery. PMID:22286755

  17. Highly nutrient-dense spreads: a new approach to delivering multiple micronutrients to high-risk groups.

    PubMed

    Briend, A

    2001-05-01

    Using a highly fortified food is the most attractive option to bringing missing nutrients to vulnerable groups. The recent development of a highly nutrient-dense spread (HNDS) for the treatment of malnourished children may have some relevance for other high-risk groups. Traditionally, severely malnourished children are fed for 3-4 weeks during their recovery with adapted milk feeds prepared by mixing dried skimmed milk, oil and sugar with a vitamin and mineral complex. This approach, however, is difficult to implement, since these feeds are excellent growth media for bacteria, and they must be prepared and fed under close supervision. This constraint led to the development of a HNDS, which is obtained by replacing part of the dried skimmed milk with a mixture of groundnut butter and powdered lactoserum. This spread can be eaten without dilution with water and preliminary trials showed that children preferred this HNDS to traditional liquid diets. In HNDS all powdered ingredients are embedded in fat which protects vitamins against oxidation and increases the shelf life of this product. Spreads also have a very low humidity and bacteria do not grow in it. Attempts to use spreads to supplement other vulnerable groups such as moderately malnourished children and pregnant women are discussed. PMID:11509107

  18. High capacity group-15 alloy anodes for Na-ion batteries: Electrochemical and mechanical insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortazavi, Majid; Ye, Qiongjie; Birbilis, Nick; Medhekar, Nikhil V.

    2015-07-01

    Group-15 elements phosphorus, arsenic, antimony and bismuth offer the prospect of serving as functional alloying elements for developing high-capacity alloy anodes for sodium-ion batteries (NIBs). Here we obtain concentration-dependent electrochemical properties of sodium (Na) alloys with group-15 elements using first principles calculations. Since Na intercalation in these alloys is accompanied by a substantial volume expansion that can lead to mechanical failure and loss of capacity, we have also obtained a full set of concentration-dependent elastic properties for a single crystal as well as a polycrystalline microstructure. We find that sodiation of these alloys results in their significant elastic softening by as large as 60%. In contrast to the group-14 alloys that are also being explored as anodes of NIBs, the elastic softening in group-15 alloys varies in a non-monotonic manner with Na concentration, and more importantly, the maximum degradation of elastic properties does not necessarily occur at full sodiation. Our results provide crucial insights into the electrochemical and mechanical response of these alloys to Na intercalation, thus contributing to the design of failure-resistant architectures of high capacity NIBs.

  19. The effect of individual or group guidelines on the calibration accuracy of high school biology students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walck, Camilla C.

    The effect of individual or group guidelines on the calibration accuracy of high school biology students was investigated. The study was conducted with 102 International Baccalaureate Middle Years Program biology students in a public school setting. The study was carried out over three testing occasions. Students worked in group or individual settings with and without calibration guidelines. Four intact classes were randomly assigned to one of four conditions: groups calibrating without guidelines; groups calibrating with guidelines; individuals calibrating without guidelines; individuals calibrating with guidelines. The students participated in the calibration activities one block before they actually took each of the three tests. On the day of each test, immediately before taking the test, each student made predictions as to what they thought they would score on the test. Immediately after taking the test each student made postdictions on what they thought they scored on the test. Calibration accuracy was determined by calculating the difference between prediction and postdiction scores and the actual test score achieved. The results indicated that students who calibrated in groups showed trends of more accurate calibration predictions. Although one testing intervention showed significant results for postdiction accuracy, the other two testing interventions showed varied results. Students who calibrated in groups achieved higher scores on tests than did students who calibrated individually. In addition, guidelines were shown to be a significant factor in increasing achievement for students who calibrated individually. For students calibrating in groups guidelines had little impact. The results support the need for more research in metacognition and calibration techniques in order to improve student academic success.

  20. Regulation of ATM in DNA double strand break repair accounts for the radiosensitivity in human cells exposed to high linear energy transfer ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Lian; Yu, Dong; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Tong, Jian; Cao, Jianping; Fan, Saijun

    2009-11-01

    High linear energy transfer (LET) radiation shows different biological effects from low-LET radiation. The complex nature of high LET radiation-induced damage, especially the clustered DNA damage, brings about slow repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), which finally lead to higher lethality and chromosome aberration. Ionizing radiation (IR) induced DNA DSBs are repaired by both non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination repair (HRR) pathways in mammalian cells. The novel function of ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) protein is its involvement in the DSB repair of slow kinetics for "dirty" breaks rejoining by NHEJ, this suggests that ATM may play a more important role in high LET radiation-induced DNA damage. We show here that KU55933, an ATM inhibitor could distinctly lower the clonogenic survival in normal human skin fibroblast cells exposed to carbon ion radiation and dramatically impair the normal process for DSB repair. We also implicated the involvement of ATM in the two pathways of DNA DSB repair, with DNA-PKcs and Rad51 as the representative proteins. The phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs at Thr-2609 with both immunoblotting and immunofluorescent staining indicated an ATM-dependent change, while for Rad51, KU55933 pretreatment could postpone the formation of nuclear Rad51 foci. Interestingly, we also found that pretreatment with chloroquine, an ATM stimulator could protect cells from carbon ion radiation only at lower doses. For doses over 1Gy, protection was no longer observed. There was a dose-dependent increase for ATM kinase activity, with saturation at about 1Gy. Chloroquine pretreatment prior to 1Gy of carbon ion radiation did not enhance the autophosphorylation of ATM at serine 1981. The function of ATM in G2/M checkpoint arrest facilitated DSB repair in high-LET irradiation. Our results provide a possible mechanism for the direct involvement of ATM in DSB repair by high-LET irradiation. PMID:19583974

  1. Calculation of intensity of high energy muon groups observed deep underground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vavilov, Y. N.; Dedenko, L. G.

    1985-01-01

    The intensity of narrow muon groups observed in Kolar Gold Field (KGF) at the depth of 3375 m.w.e. was calculated in terms of quark-gluon strings model for high energy hadron - air nuclei interactions by the method of direct modeling of nuclear cascade in the air and muon propagation in the ground for normal primary cosmic ray composition. The calculated intensity has been found to be approx. 10 to the 4 times less than one observed experimentally.

  2. The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 3: High energy astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings of the High Energy Astrophysics working group of the space shuttle payload planning activity are presented. The objectives to be accomplished during space shuttle missions are defined as: (1) X-ray astronomy, (2) hard X-ray and gamma ray astronomy, and (3) cosmic ray astronomy. The instruments and test equipment required to accomplish the mission are identified. Recommendations for managing the installation of the equipment and conducting the missions are included.

  3. Claudin-6 and Occludin Natural Variants Found in a Patient Highly Exposed but Not Infected with Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Do Not Confer HCV Resistance In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Fouquet, Baptiste; Helle, François; Belouzard, Sandrine; Vausselin, Thibaut; Séron, Karin; Delfraissy, Jean-François; Dubuisson, Jean; Misrahi, Micheline; Cocquerel, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    The clinical course of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection is highly variable between infected individual hosts: up to 80% of acutely HCV infected patients develop a chronic infection while 20% clear infection spontaneously. Spontaneous clearance of HCV infection can be predicted by several factors, including symptomatic acute infection, favorable IFNL3 polymorphisms and gender. In our study, we explored the possibility that variants in HCV cell entry factors might be involved in resistance to HCV infection. In a same case patient highly exposed but not infected by HCV, we previously identified one mutation in claudin-6 (CLDN6) and a rare variant in occludin (OCLN), two tight junction proteins involved in HCV entry into hepatocytes. Here, we conducted an extensive functional study to characterize the ability of these two natural variants to prevent HCV entry. We used lentiviral vectors to express Wildtype or mutated CLDN6 and OCLN in different cell lines and primary human hepatocytes. HCV infection was then investigated using cell culture produced HCV particles (HCVcc) as well as HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpp) expressing envelope proteins from different genotypes. Our results show that variants of CLDN6 and OCLN expressed separately or in combination did not affect HCV infection nor cell-to-cell transmission. Hence, our study highlights the complexity of HCV resistance mechanisms supporting the fact that this process probably not primarily involves HCV entry factors and that other unknown host factors may be implicated. PMID:26561856

  4. Cell membrane fatty acid changes and desaturase expression of Saccharomyces bayanus exposed to high pressure homogenization in relation to the supplementation of exogenous unsaturated fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Serrazanetti, Diana I.; Patrignani, Francesca; Russo, Alessandra; Vannini, Lucia; Siroli, Lorenzo; Gardini, Fausto; Lanciotti, Rosalba

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this work was to study the responses of Saccharomyces bayanus cells exposed to sub-lethal high-pressure homogenization (HPH) and determine whether the plasmatic membrane can sense HPH in the presence, or absence, of exogenous unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) in the growth medium. Methods and Results: High-pressure homogenization damaged and caused the collapse of cell walls and membranes of a portion of cells; however, HPH did not significantly affect S. bayanus cell viability (less than 0.3 Log CFU ml-1). HPH strongly affected the membrane fatty acid (FA) composition by increasing the percentage of total UFA when compared with saturated fatty acids. The gene expression showed that the transcription of OLE1, ERG3, and ERG11 increased after HPH. The presence of exogenous UFA abolished HPH-induced effects on the OLE1 and ERG3 genes, increased the percentage of membrane lipids and decreased the expression of OLE1 and ERG3 within 30 min of treatment. Conclusion: The results suggest a key role for UFA in the microbial cell response to sub-lethal stress. In addition, these data provide insight into the molecular basis of the response of S. bayanus to this innovative technology. Significance and Impact of the Study: Elucidation of the mechanism of action for sub-lethal HPH will enable the utilization of this technology to modulate the starter performance at the industrial scale. PMID:26528258

  5. High-k Al 2O 3 MOS structures with Si interface control layer formed on air-exposed GaAs and InGaAs wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akazawa, M.; Hasegawa, H.

    2010-07-01

    This paper attempts to realize unpinned high-k insulator-semiconductor interfaces on air-exposed GaAs and In 0.53Ga 0.47As by using the Si interface control layer (Si ICL). Al 2O 3 was deposited by ex situ atomic layer deposition (ALD) as the high-k insulator. By applying an optimal chemical treatment using HF acid combined with subsequent thermal cleaning below 500 C in UHV, interface bonding configurations similar to those by in situ UHV process were achieved both for GaAs and InGaAs after MBE growth of the Si ICL with no trace of residual native oxide components. As compared with the MIS structures without Si ICL, insertion of Si ICL improved the electrical interface quality, a great deal both for GaAs and InGaAs, reducing frequency dispersion of capacitance, hysteresis effects and interface state density ( Dit). A minimum value of Dit of 2 10 11 eV -1 cm -2 was achieved both for GaAs and InGaAs. However, the range of bias-induced surface potential excursion within the band gap was different, making formation of electron layer by surface inversion possible in InGaAs, but not possible in GaAs. The difference was explained by the disorder induced gap state (DIGS) model.

  6. Importance of Having Low-Density Functional Groups for Generating High-Performance Semiconducting Polymer Dots

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuanjun; Yu, Jiangbo; Wu, Changfeng; Jin, Yuhui; Rong, Yu; Ye, Fangmao

    2012-01-01

    Semiconducting polymers with low-density side-chain carboxylic acid groups were synthesized to form stable, functionalized, and highly fluorescent polymer dots (Pdots). The influence of the molar fraction of hydrophilic side-chains on Pdot properties and performance was systematically investigated. Our results show that the density of side-chain carboxylic acid groups significantly affects Pdot stability, internal structure, fluorescence brightness, and nonspecific binding in cellular labeling. Fluorescence spectroscopy, single-particle imaging, and a dye-doping method were employed to investigate the fluorescence brightness and the internal structure of the Pdots. The results of these experiments indicate that semiconducting polymers with low density of side-chain functional groups can form stable, compact, and highly bright Pdots as compared to those with high density of hydrophilic side-chains. The functionalized polymer dots were conjugated to streptavidin (SA) by carbodiimide-catalyzed coupling and the Pdot-SA probes effectively and specifically labeled the cancer cell-surface marker Her2 in human breast cancer cells. The carboxylate-functionalized polymer could also be covalently modified with small functional molecules to generate Pdot probes for click chemistry-based bioorthogonal labeling. This study presents a promising approach for further developing functional Pdot probes for biological applications. PMID:22607220

  7. Epidemiological modifiers of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: Focus on high-risk groups.

    PubMed

    Lonardo, Amedeo; Bellentani, Stefano; Argo, Curtis K; Ballestri, Stefano; Byrne, Christopher D; Caldwell, Stephen H; Cortez-Pinto, Helena; Grieco, Antonio; Machado, Mariana V; Miele, Luca; Targher, Giovanni

    2015-12-01

    An improved understanding of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease epidemiology would lead to identification of individuals at high risk of developing chronic liver disease and extra-hepatic complications, thus contributing to more effective case finding of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease among selected groups. We aimed to illustrate the epidemiology of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in high-risk groups, which were identified based on existing literature. To this end, PubMed was searched to retrieve original articles published until May 2015 using relevant and pertinent keywords "nonalcoholic fatty liver disease" and "diabetes", "obesity", "hyperlipidaemia", "familial heterozygous hypobetalipoproteinaemia", "hypertension", "metabolic syndrome", "ethnicity", "family history" or "genetic polymorphisms". We found that age, sex and ethnicity are major physiological modifiers of the risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, along with belonging to "non-alcoholic fatty liver disease families" and carrying risk alleles for selected genetic polymorphisms. Metabolic syndrome, diabetes, obesity, mixed hyperlipidaemia and hypocholesterolaemia due to familial hypobetalipoproteinaemia are the major metabolic modifiers of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease risk. Compared with these metabolic conditions, however, arterial hypertension appears to carry a relatively more modest risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. A better understanding of the epidemiology of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease may result in a more liberal policy of case finding among high-risk groups. PMID:26454786

  8. Ethyl pyruvate attenuates murine allergic rhinitis partly by decreasing high mobility group box 1 release.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shan; Wang, Yanjun; Gong, Guoqing; Chen, Jianjun; Niu, Yongzhi; Kong, Weijia

    2015-11-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein, a pro-in?ammatory DNA-binding protein, meditates inflammatory responses through Toll-like receptor-4 signals and amplifies allergic inflammation by interacting with the receptor for advanced glycation end products. Previous studies have shown that HMGB1 is elevated in the nasal lavage fluids (NLF) of children suffering from allergic rhinitis (AR) and is associated with the severity of this disease. Furthermore, HMGB1 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of lower airway allergic diseases, such as asthma. Ethyl pyruvate (EP) has proven to be an effective anti-inflammatory agent for numerous airway diseases. Moreover, EP can inhibit the secretion of HMGB1. However, few studies have examined the effect of EP on AR. We hypothesized that HMGB1 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of AR and studied it using an AR mouse model. Forty BALB/c mice were divided into four groups: the control group, AR group, 50?mg/kg EP group, and 100?mg/kg EP group. The mice in the AR and EP administration groups received ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization and challenge, whereas those in the control group were given sterile saline instead of OVA. The mice in the EP administration group were given an intraperitoneal injection of EP 30?min before each OVA treatment. The number of nasal rubbings and sneezes of each mouse was counted after final treatment. Hematoxylin-eosin staining, AB-PAS staining, interleukin-4 and 13 in NLF, IgE, and the protein expression of HMGB1 were measured. Various features of the allergic in?ammation after OVA exposure, including airway eosinophilia, Th-2 cytokine production, total IgE, and goblet cell hyperplasia were significantly inhibited by treatment with EP and the expression and release of HMGB1 were reduced after EP administration in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that HMGB1 is a potential therapeutic target of AR and that EP attenuates AR by decreasing HMGB1 expression. PMID:25681468

  9. Urinary arsenic metabolism in a Western Chinese population exposed to high-dose inorganic arsenic in drinking water: Influence of ethnicity and genetic polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Songbo; Wu, Jie; Li, Yuanyuan; Liu, Yan; Gao, Yanhui; Yao, Feifei; Qiu, Chuanying; Song, Li; Wu, Yu; Liao, Yongjian; Sun, Dianjun

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the differences in urinary arsenic metabolism patterns of individuals exposed to a high concentration of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in drinking water, an epidemiological investigation was conducted with 155 individuals living in a village where the arsenic concentration in the drinking water was 969 μg/L. Blood and urine samples were collected from 66 individuals including 51 cases with skin lesions and 15 controls without skin lesions. The results showed that monomethylated arsenic (MMA), the percentage of MMA (%MMA) and the ratio of MMA to iAs (MMA/iAs) were significantly increased in patients with skin lesions as compared to controls, while dimethylated arsenic (DMA), the percentage of DMA (%DMA) and the ratio of DMA to MMA (DMA/MMA) were significantly reduced. The percent DMA of individuals with the Ala/Asp genotype of glutathione S-transferase omega 1 (GSTO1) was significantly lower than those with Ala/Ala. The percent MMA of individuals with the A2B/A2B genotype of arsenic (+ 3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) was significantly lower than those with AB/A2B. The iAs and total arsenic (tAs) content in the urine of a Tibetan population were significantly higher than that of Han and Hui ethnicities, whereas MMA/iAs was significantly lower than that of Han and Hui ethnicities. Our results showed that when exposed to the same arsenic environment, different individuals exhibited different urinary arsenic metabolism patterns. Gender and ethnicity affect these differences and above polymorphisms may be effectors too. - Highlights: • We first survey a village with high iAs content in the drinking water (969 μg/L). • 90 villagers suffered typical skin lesions with a morbidity rate of 58%. • Cases exhibited higher %MMA and MMA/iAs, and lower %DMA and DMA/MMA than controls. • Gender and ethnicity affect the differences of iAs methylation metabolism levels. • GSTO1 and AS3MT gene polymorphisms may be factors too.

  10. High-throughput mass finger printing and Lewis blood group assignment of human milk oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Blank, Dennis; Gebhardt, Sabine; Maass, Kai; Lochnit, Gnter; Dotz, Viktoria; Blank, Jennifer; Geyer, Rudolf; Kunz, Clemens

    2011-11-01

    The structural diversity of human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) strongly depends on the Lewis (Le) blood group status of the donor which allows a classification of these glycans into three different groups. Starting from 50 ?L of human milk, a new high-throughput, standardized, and widely automated mass spectrometric approach has been established which can be used for correlation of HMO structures with the respective Lewis blood groups on the basis of mass profiles of the entire mixture of glycans together with selected fragment ion spectra. For this purpose, the relative abundance of diagnostically relevant compositional species, such as Hex(2)Fuc(2) and Hex(3)HexNAc(1)Fuc(2), as well as the relative intensities of characteristic fragment ions obtained thereof are of key importance. For each Lewis blood group, i.e., Le(a-b+), Le(a+b-), and Le(a-b-), specific mass profile and fragment ion patterns could be thus verified. The described statistically proven classification of the derived glycan patterns may be a valuable tool for analysis and comparison of large sets of milk samples in metabolic studies. Furthermore, the outlined protocol may be used for rapid screening in clinical studies and quality control of milk samples donated to milk banks. PMID:21898157

  11. Discovery and role of methylidene imidazolone, a highly electrophilic prosthetic group.

    PubMed

    Rtey, Jnos

    2003-04-11

    The elimination of ammonia from alpha-amino acids is a chemically difficult process. While the non-acidic beta-proton has to be abstracted, the much more acidic ammonium protons must remain untouched to maintain the leaving group ability of this positively charged group. Histidine and phenylalanine ammonia-lyases (HAL and PAL) possess a catalytically essential electrophilic group which has been believed to be dehydroalanine for 30 years. Recently, the X-ray structure of HAL has been solved. The electron density was not consistent with dehydroalanine but showed the presence of methylidene imidazolone (MIO) instead. The high electrophilicity of this prosthetic group as well as the geometry at the active site support a previously proposed mechanism involving a Friedel-Crafts-type attack at the aromatic ring of the substrate. Further biochemical evidence for this unprecedented electrophile-assisted ammonia elimination is also presented. Although no X-ray structure of PAL has been published as yet, spectrophotometrical evidence for the presence of MIO has been provided. Finally, a chemical model for the PAL reaction is described. PMID:12686130

  12. Report of the Snowmass M6 Working Group on high intensity proton sources

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou and J. Wei

    2002-08-20

    The U.S. high-energy physics program needs an intense proton source, a 1-4 MW Proton Driver (PD), by the end of this decade. This machine will serve as a stand-alone facility that will provide neutrino superbeams and other high intensity secondary beams such as kaons, muons, neutrons, and anti-protons (cf. E1 and E5 group reports) and also serve as the first stage of a neutrino factory (cf. M1 group report). It can also be a high brightness source for a VLHC. Based on present accelerator technology and project construction experience, it is both feasible and cost-effective to construct a 1-4 MW Proton Driver. Two recent PD design studies have been made, one at FNAL and the other at the BNL. Both designed PD's for 1 MW proton beams at a cost of about U.S. $200M (excluding contingency and overhead) and both designs were upgradeable to 4 MW. An international collaboration between FNAL, BNL and KEK on high intensity proton facilities is addressing a number of key design issues. The superconducting (sc) RF cavities, cryogenics, and RF controls developed for the SNS can be directly adopted to save R&D efforts, cost, and schedule. PD studies are also actively being pursued at Europe and Japan.

  13. Report of the Snowmass T7 working group on high performance computing

    SciTech Connect

    K. Ko; R. Ryne; P. Spentzouris

    2002-12-05

    The T7 Working Group on High Performance Computing (HPC) had more than 30 participants. During the three weeks at Snowmass there were about 30 presentations. This working group also had joint sessions with a number of other working groups, including E1 (Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders), M1 (Muon Based Systems), M6 (High Intensity Proton Sources), T4 (Particle sources), T5 (Beam dynamics), and T8 (Advanced Accelerators). The topics that were discussed fall naturally into three areas: (1) HPC requirements for next-generation accelerator design, (2) state-of-the-art in HPC simulation of accelerator systems, and (3) applied mathematics and computer science activities related to the development of HPC tools that will be of use to the accelerator community (as well as other communities). This document summarizes the material mentioned above and includes recommendations for future HPC activities in the accelerator community. The relationship of those activities to the HENP/SciDAC project on 21st century accelerator simulation is also discussed.

  14. Closeout Report: Experimental High Energy Physics Group at the University of South Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Charles M; Godang, Romulus

    2013-06-25

    The High Energy Physics group at the University of South Alabama has been supported by this research grant (DE-FG02-96ER40970) since 1996. One researcher, Dr. Merrill Jenkins, has been supported on this grant during this time worked on fixed target experiments at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, west of Chicago, Illinois. These experiments have been E-705, E-771, E-871 (HyperCP) and E-921 (CKM) before it was canceled for budgetary reasons. After the cancellation of CKM, Dr. Jenkins joined the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment as an associate member via the High Energy Physics Group at the Florida State University. A second, recently tenured faculty member, Dr. Romulus Godang joined the group in 2009 and has been supported by this grant since then. Dr. Godang is working on the BaBaR experiment at SLAC and has joined the Belle-II experiment located in Japan at KEK. According to the instructions sent to us by our grant monitor, we are to concentrate on the activities over the last three years in this closeout report.

  15. Deuterium occupation of vacancy-type defects in argon-damaged tungsten exposed to high flux and low energy deuterium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiu-Li; Zhang, Ying; Cheng, Long; Yuan, Yue; De Temmerman, Gregory; Wang, Bao-Yi; Cao, Xing-Zhong; Lu, Guang-Hong

    2016-03-01

    Doppler broadening spectroscopy in the positron annihilation technique (DBS-PA) has been employed to investigate the defect properties in argon-damaged tungsten exposed to low-energy and high flux deuterium plasma. Argon ion irradiations with energy 500 keV are performed for tungsten samples with various levels of damage. The remarkable increment of the S parameter in DBS-PA indicates the introduction of vacancy-type defects in argon irradiated tungsten. An increase of ion fluence results in a continuous increase of the S parameter until saturation. Unexpectedly, a much higher fluence leads to a decrease of the S parameter in the near surface, and the (S,W) slope changes greatly. This should be associated with the formation of argon-vacancy complexes in the near surface produced by the excessive implanted argon ions. With deuterium plasma exposure, a significant decrease of the S parameter occurs in the pre-irradiated tungsten, suggesting the sharp reduction of the number and density of the vacancy-type defects. The thermal desorption spectroscopy results demonstrate that the argon-damaged tungsten, compared to the pristine one, exhibits an enhanced low-temperature desorption peak and an additional and broad high-temperature desorption peak, which indicates that deuterium atoms are trapped in both low-energy and high-energy sites. All these observations directly indicate the deuterium occupation of irradiation-induced vacancy defects in damaged tungsten, which is responsible for the remarkable increase of the deuterium retention in comparison with the pristine one.

  16. National Cooperative Group Trials of High-risk Patients with Lung Cancer: Are They Truly High-risk?

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Varun; Crabtree, Traves D.; Bell, Jennifer M.; Kreisel, Daniel; Krupnick, Alexander S.; Broderick, Stephen; Patterson, G. Alexander; Meyers, Bryan F.

    2014-01-01

    Background The American College of Surgery Oncology Group (ACOSOG) trials z4032 and z4033 prospectively characterized lung cancer patients as high-risk for surgery and these results have appeared frequently in literature. We hypothesized that many patients meeting objective enrollment criteria for these trials (high-risk) have similar perioperative outcomes as normal-risk patients. Methods We reviewed a prospective institutional database, and classified patients undergoing resection for clinical stage I lung cancer as high-risk and normal-risk by ACOSOG major criteria. Results From 2000 2010, 1066 patients underwent surgery for clinical stage I lung cancer. Of these, 194 (18%) met ACOSOG major criteria for risk (preoperative FEV1 or DLCO ?50% predicted). High-risk patients were older (66.4 vs. 64.6 years, p=0.02) but similar to controls in gender, prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, and coronary artery disease (CAD). High-risk patients were less likely than normal patients to undergo a lobectomy (117/194, 60% vs. 665/872, 76%, p<0.001). High-risk and control patients experienced similar morbidity (any complication: 55/194, 28% vs. 230/872, 26%, p=0.59), and 30-day mortality (2/194, 1% vs. 14/872, 2%, p=0.75). In a regression analysis, age (HR 1.04, 95% CI 1.021.06), and CAD (HR 1.58, 95% CI 1.052.40) were associated with an elevated risk of complications in those undergoing lobectomy, while female gender (HR 0.63, 95% CI 0.440.91) was protective. ACOSOG high-risk status was not associated with perioperative morbidity. Conclusions There are no important differences in early outcomes between lung cancer patients characterized as high-risk and normal-risk by ACOSOG trial enrollment criteria, despite a significant proportion of high-risk patients undergoing lobectomy. PMID:24534644

  17. Infection Risk for Persons Exposed to Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza A H5 Virus–Infected Birds, United States, December 2014–March 2015

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Deborah I.; Deliberto, Thomas J.; Blanton, Lenee; Kniss, Krista; Levine, Min Z.; Trock, Susan C.; Finelli, Lyn; Jhung, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Newly emerged highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) A H5 viruses have caused outbreaks among birds in the United States. These viruses differ genetically from HPAI H5 viruses that previously caused human illness, most notably in Asia and Africa. To assess the risk for animal-to-human HPAI H5 virus transmission in the United States, we determined the number of persons with self-reported exposure to infected birds, the number with an acute respiratory infection (ARI) during a 10-day postexposure period, and the number with ARI who tested positive for influenza by real-time reverse transcription PCR or serologic testing for each outbreak during December 15, 2014–March 31, 2015. During 60 outbreaks in 13 states, a total of 164 persons were exposed to infected birds. ARI developed in 5 of these persons within 10 days of exposure. H5 influenza virus infection was not identified in any persons with ARI, suggesting a low risk for animal-to-human HPAI H5 virus transmission. PMID:26583382

  18. Infection Risk for Persons Exposed to Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza A H5 Virus-Infected Birds, United States, December 2014-March 2015.

    PubMed

    Arriola, Carmen S; Nelson, Deborah I; Deliberto, Thomas J; Blanton, Lenee; Kniss, Krista; Levine, Min Z; Trock, Susan C; Finelli, Lyn; Jhung, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    Newly emerged highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) A H5 viruses have caused outbreaks among birds in the United States. These viruses differ genetically from HPAI H5 viruses that previously caused human illness, most notably in Asia and Africa. To assess the risk for animal-to-human HPAI H5 virus transmission in the United States, we determined the number of persons with self-reported exposure to infected birds, the number with an acute respiratory infection (ARI) during a 10-day postexposure period, and the number with ARI who tested positive for influenza by real-time reverse transcription PCR or serologic testing for each outbreak during December 15, 2014-March 31, 2015. During 60 outbreaks in 13 states, a total of 164 persons were exposed to infected birds. ARI developed in 5 of these persons within 10 days of exposure. H5 influenza virus infection was not identified in any persons with ARI, suggesting a low risk for animal-to-human HPAI H5 virus transmission. PMID:26583382

  19. Super-high photocatalytic activity of Fe2O3 nanoparticles anchored on Bi2O2CO3 nanosheets with exposed {0 0 1} active facets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Dandan; Zhang, Kaiyou; Yang, Qi; Wang, Mingjun; Xi, Yi; Hu, Chenguo

    2014-10-01

    Structure engineering enables us to design novel photocatalysts with high efficiency and stability. Here visible light absorbing Fe2O3 semiconductor is chosen as sensitizer to modify wide band-gap Bi2O2CO3 semiconductor in order to enhance its photocatalytic properties by shifting the UV-driven catalytic activity to visible-light-driven catalytic activity. The Bi2O2CO3@Fe2O3 nanosheets with exposed active {0 0 1} facet were fabricated by a facile one-step modified hydrothermal method. The thermal stability, crystal structure, morphology and optical band gap were characterized. The photocatalytic activities of the Bi2O2CO3 and Bi2O2CO3@Fe2O3 with different molar ratio of Fe2O3 to Bi2O2CO3 were compared. It was found that the Bi2O2CO3@Fe2O3 catalyst can degrade rhodamine-B within 25 min under the simulated sunlight, displaying greatly enhanced photocatalytic activity with respect to the Bi2O2CO3 catalyst. The photocatalyst showed good photostability and recyclability. A mixture of multi-colored dyes including rhodamine-B, methylene blue and methyl orange can be completely degraded by the Bi2O2CO3@Fe2O3 catalyst (5 mol% Fe2O3) within 45 min under the simulated sunlight irradiation. The photocatalytic mechanism was discussed in detail.

  20. Characterization of the fecal microbiome in different swine groups by high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Je; Kim, Jinu; Lee, Jong-Soo; Rhee, Sung-Keun; Kim, Hongik

    2014-08-01

    Swine have a complex microbial community within their gastrointestinal tract that plays a critical role in both health and disease. High-throughput 16S rRNA gene-based pyrosequencing was used to identify the possible core microorganisms in the gut of swine groups that differ in meat quality and weight grades (level 1 as higher meat quality and level 2 as lower meat quality). Samples were taken from the rectum and/or stool from ten animals, DNA was extracted, and the V1-V3 regions of the 16S rRNA gene were amplified. Two bacterial populations (Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes) dominated and were shared between the two groups. Significant differences between the groups were found at the genus level. The genera Lactobacillus and Oscillibacter were found in slightly higher proportions in the level 2 group (12.6 and 12.4% of the classified reads, respectively) than those of level 1 (9.6 and 7.7%, respectively). By contrast, the proportion of reads assigned to the genus Roseburia in the level 1 group (13.0%) was higher than that of level 2 (4.8%). The largest differences were related to the genera Clostridium, Oscillibacter, and Roseburia as core microorganisms. Moreover, two genera, Roseburia and Clostridium, related to level 1 produced linoleic acid or short chain fatty acids that might contribute to swine health and development. In conclusion, the presence of core bacteria in the swine gut is associated with meat quality with reduced body fat in swine. PMID:24954845

  1. High-Density Plasma Etching of Group-III Nitride Films for Device Application

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, A.G.; Crawford, M.H.; Han, J.; Lester, L.F.; Pearton, S.J.; Ren, F.; Shul, R.J.; Willison, C.G.; Zhang, L.; Zolper, J.C.

    1999-02-17

    As III-V nitride device structures become more complicated and design rules shrink, well-controlled etch processes are necessary. Due to limited wet chemical etch results for the group-III nitrides, a significant amount of effort has been devoted to the development of dry etch processing. Dry etch development was initially focused on mesa structures where high etch rates, anisotropic profiles, smooth sidewalls, and equi-rate etching of dissimilar materials were required. For example, commercially available LEDs and laser facets for GaN-based laser diodes have been patterned using reactive ion etching (RIE). With the recent interest in high power, high temperature electronic devices, etch characteristics may also require smooth surface morphology, low plasma-induced damage, and selective etching of one layer over another. The principal criteria for any plasma etch process is its utility in the fabrication of a device. In this study, we will report plasma etch results for the group-III nitrides and their application to device structures.

  2. Assessment of health risks with reference to oxidative stress and DNA damage in chromium exposed population.

    PubMed

    Khan, Faizan Haider; Ambreen, Khushboo; Fatima, Ghizal; Kumar, Sudhir

    2012-07-15

    Trivalent chromium [Cr(III)] is widely used in tanning industrial processes. The population living in tanning industrial area is continuously exposed to Cr(III) which appears to be associated with both acute and chronic health problems. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the health risk with special reference to oxidative stress parameters (malondialdehyde - MDA, glutathione - GSH, and superoxide dismutase - SOD) and DNA damage in 100 Cr-exposed and 100 unexposed populations. The total blood Cr level, SOD level, MDA level and DNA damage were significantly (p<0.05) higher and GSH level was significantly (p<0.05) lower in exposed group as compared to the unexposed group. The altered oxidative stress parameters and DNA damage were found to be slightly higher in female population of both groups. In simple and multiple correlation analyses (adjusted with potential confounders), blood Cr level showed negative significant correlation with GSH level and positive significant correlation with level of MDA, SOD and DNA damage in both groups. The overall prevalence of morbidity was found to be significantly (p<0.05) higher in the exposed group as compared to the unexposed group. In the exposed group, the prevalence of respiratory illness is highest, followed by diabetes, gastrointestinal tract problems and dermal problems respectively. Our results concluded that the Cr(III) exposed population is at high risk for health hazards and the female population is slightly more susceptible to Cr(III) exposure. PMID:22634551

  3. A performance-based method for calculating the design thickness of compacted clay liners exposed to high strength leachate under simulated landfill conditions.

    PubMed

    Safari, Edwin; Jalili Ghazizade, Mahdi; Abdoli, Mohammad Ali

    2012-09-01

    Compacted clay liners (CCLs) when feasible, are preferred to composite geosynthetic liners. The thickness of CCLs is typically prescribed by each country's environmental protection regulations. However, considering the fact that construction of CCLs represents a significant portion of overall landfill construction costs; a performance based design of liner thickness would be preferable to 'one size fits all' prescriptive standards. In this study researchers analyzed the hydraulic behaviour of a compacted clayey soil in three laboratory pilot scale columns exposed to high strength leachate under simulated landfill conditions. The temperature of the simulated CCL at the surface was maintained at 40 ± 2 °C and a vertical pressure of 250 kPa was applied to the soil through a gravel layer on top of the 50 cm thick CCL where high strength fresh leachate was circulated at heads of 15 and 30 cm simulating the flow over the CCL. Inverse modelling using HYDRUS-1D indicated that the hydraulic conductivity after 180 days was decreased about three orders of magnitude in comparison with the values measured prior to the experiment. A number of scenarios of different leachate heads and persistence time were considered and saturation depth of the CCL was predicted through modelling. Under a typical leachate head of 30 cm, the saturation depth was predicted to be less than 60 cm for a persistence time of 3 years. This approach can be generalized to estimate an effective thickness of a CCL instead of using prescribed values, which may be conservatively overdesigned and thus unduly costly. PMID:22617473

  4. Working group II report: Production and dynamics of high brightness beams

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, R.L.

    1996-12-31

    This paper summarizes the main discussions of the Working Group on the Production and Dynamics of High Brightness Beams. The following topics are covered in this paper. Proposed new electron sources and needed research on existing sources is covered. The discussions on issues relating to the description of phase space on non-thermalized electron beam distributions and the theoretical modeling on non-thermalized electron beam distributions is presented. Finally, the present status of the theoretical modeling of beam transport in bends is given.

  5. Profiles of Reactivity in Cocaine-Exposed Children.

    PubMed

    Schuetze, Pamela; Molnar, Danielle S; Eiden, Rina D

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the possibility that specific, theoretically consistent profiles of reactivity could be identified in a sample of cocaine-exposed infants and whether these profiles were associated with a range of infant and/or maternal characteristics. Cluster analysis was used to identify distinct groups of infants based on physiological, behavioral and maternal reported measures of reactivity. Five replicable clusters were identified which corresponded to 1) Dysregulated/High Maternal Report Reactors, 2) Low Behavioral Reactors, 3) High Reactors, 4) Optimal Reactors and 5) Dysregulated/Low Maternal Report Reactors. These clusters were associated with differences in prenatal cocaine exposure status, birthweight, maternal depressive symptoms, and maternal negative affect during mother-infant interactions. These results support the presence of distinct reactivity profiles among high risk infants recruited on the basis of prenatal cocaine exposure and demographically similar control group infants not exposed to cocaine. PMID:23204615

  6. Profiles of Reactivity in Cocaine-Exposed Children

    PubMed Central

    Schuetze, Pamela; Molnar, Danielle S.; Eiden, Rina D.

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the possibility that specific, theoretically consistent profiles of reactivity could be identified in a sample of cocaine-exposed infants and whether these profiles were associated with a range of infant and/or maternal characteristics. Cluster analysis was used to identify distinct groups of infants based on physiological, behavioral and maternal reported measures of reactivity. Five replicable clusters were identified which corresponded to 1) Dysregulated/High Maternal Report Reactors, 2) Low Behavioral Reactors, 3) High Reactors, 4) Optimal Reactors and 5) Dysregulated/Low Maternal Report Reactors. These clusters were associated with differences in prenatal cocaine exposure status, birthweight, maternal depressive symptoms, and maternal negative affect during mother-infant interactions. These results support the presence of distinct reactivity profiles among high risk infants recruited on the basis of prenatal cocaine exposure and demographically similar control group infants not exposed to cocaine. PMID:23204615

  7. High temperature fuel cell membranes based on poly(arylene ether)s containing benzimidazole groups

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dae Sik; Kim, Yu Seung; Lee, Kwan - Soo; Boncella, James M; Kuiper, David; Guiver, Michael D

    2009-01-01

    Development of new high-performance polymer membranes that retain their proton conductivity under low humidity conditions is one of the most critical requirements to commercialize PEMFC systems. Current sulfonated proton exchange membranes acquire proton conductivity by water that solvates ion and carries proton. Consequently, a loss of water under low RH conditions immediately results in a loss of proton conductivity. One approach to maintain proton conductivity under low RH conditions is to replace water with a less volatile proton solvent. Kreuer has pointed out the possibility to develop fully polymeric proton-conducting membranes based on nitrogen-containing heterocycles such as imidazole, benzimidazole, and pyrazole. We have attempted to blend those less volatile proton solvent with sulfonated copolymers such as polystyrene sulfonic acid, Nafion, poly(arylene ether sulfone, BPSH-xx). [Ref. DOE review meeting 2007 and 2008] However, we observed that imidazole was slowly sublimated out as temperature and humidity increases which could cause poisoning of electro-catalyst, corrosion and losing conductivity. In this presentation, we report the synthesis of novel poly(arylene ether sulfone)s containing benzimidazole groups These benzimidazole containing polymer was blended with sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone). In the blend system, benzimidazole group attached to the polysulfone acts as a medium through the basic nitrogen for transfer of protons between the sulfonic acid groups. Proton conductivity of the blend membranes was investigated as a function of water content at 80 C and compared the performance with water based proton conduction system.

  8. A novel tissue array technique for high-throughput tissue microarray analysis -- microarray groups.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hui-Yong; Zhang, Xue-Feng; Liu, Li; Li, Hui-Ling; Zhao, Tong

    2007-01-01

    Tissue microarrays are ordered arrays of hundreds to thousands of tissue cores in a single paraffin block. We invented a novel method to make a high-throughput microarray group. Conventional smaller tissue microarrays were made first and then sectioned. Separate paraffin films were arrayed orderly onto a regular-sized glass slide to form a larger microarray group. Sections were not floated in a water bath but, rather, were cut singly using conventional microtome, arrayed orderly onto the glass slide with forceps instead of using a tape-based tissue transfer system, and then unfolded with warm water (46 degrees C) using a micropipette. This not only lowers the difficulty in sectioning but the overall tissue disks can be included in the same section. A microarray group of 2,534 small disks (theoretically, 2,560 disks can be made; 26 fell off during the procedure), the most up to now, was successfully made and may be used in immunohistochemistry, mRNA in situ hybridization, and flourescent in situ hybridization. PMID:17514512

  9. Renormalization group evolution of multi-gluon correlators in high energy QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitru A.; Venugopalan R.; Jalilian-Marian, J.; Lappi, T.; Schenke, B.

    2011-11-06

    Many-body QCD in leading high energy Regge asymptotics is described by the Balitsky-JIMWLK hierarchy of renormalization group equations for the x evolution of multi-point Wilson line correlators. These correlators are universal and ubiquitous in final states in deeply inelastic scattering and hadronic collisions. For instance, recently measured di-hadron correlations at forward rapidity in deuteron-gold collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are sensitive to four and six point correlators of Wilson lines in the small x color fields of the dense nuclear target. We evaluate these correlators numerically by solving the functional Langevin equation that describes the Balitsky-JIMWLK hierarchy. We compare the results to mean-field Gaussian and large Nc approximations used in previous phenomenological studies. We comment on the implications of our results for quantitative studies of multi-gluon final states in high energy QCD.

  10. A simple colorimetric chemosensor bearing a carboxylic acid group with high selectivity for CN-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Gyeong Jin; Choi, Ye Won; Lee, Dongkuk; Kim, Cheal

    2014-11-01

    A new simple ‘naked eye' chemosensor 1 (sodium (E)-2-((2-(3-hydroxy-2-naphthoyl)hydrazono)methyl)benzoate) has been synthesized for detection of CN- in a mixture of DMF/H2O (9:1). The sensor 1 comprises of a naphthoic hydrazide as efficient hydrogen bonding donor group and a benzoic acid as the moiety with the water solubility. The receptor 1 showed high selectivity toward cyanide ions in a 1:1 stoichiometric manner, which induces a fast color change from colorless to yellow for CN- over other anions. Therefore, receptor 1 could be useful for cyanide detection in aqueous environment, displaying a high distinguishable selectivity from hydrogen bonded anions and being clearly visible to the naked eye.

  11. High-temperature mass spectrometry - Vaporization of group 4-B metal carbides. [using Knudsen effusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, C. A.; Kohl, F. J.

    1974-01-01

    The high temperature vaporization of the metal-carbon systems TiC, ZrC, HfC, and ThC was studied by the Knudsen effusion - mass spectrometric method. For each system the metal dicarbide and tetracarbide molecular species were identified in the gas phase. Relative ion currents of the carbides and metals were measured as a function of temperature. Second- and third-law methods were used to determine enthalpies. Maximum values were established for the dissociation energies of the metal monocarbide molecules TiC, ZrC, HfC, and ThC. Thermodynamic functions used in the calculations are discussed in terms of assumed molecular structures and electronic contributions to the partition functions. The trends shown by the dissociation energies of the carbides of Group 4B are compared with those of neighboring groups and discussed in relation to the corresponding oxides and chemical bonding. The high temperature molecular beam inlet system and double focusing mass spectrometer are described.

  12. High prevalence of hypertension among an ethnic group in Sudan: implications for prevention.

    PubMed

    Noor, Sufian K; Elsugud, Nada A; Bushara, Sarra O; Elmadhoun, Wadie M; Ahmed, Mohamed H

    2016-04-01

    Objective Hypertension is an emerging non-communicable disease in developing countries. Due to its silent nature and serious complications, active screening is essential in order to prevent complications. For instance, premature mortality from cardiovascular diseases could be prevented by the effective control of hypertension. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of undiagnosed hypertension among Nuba ethnic group living in Atbara city, north Sudan and to identify the associated risk factors. Subject and methods All consenting 500 adults from Nuba tribe who live in El Wihda District, Atbara were included. Blood pressure (BP) and body mass index were measured. Standard interviewing procedures were used to record medical history, socio-demographic data, and lifestyle characteristics. Results Among the 500 participants, females were 364 (72.8%) and males were 136 (27.2%). The overall prevalence of undiagnosed hypertension was 49.4% (30.8% stage 1 hypertension and 18.6% stage 2 hypertension). In addition, 41% of the population was having prehypertension. The significant risk factors for high BP were: male sex, age above 45 years, overweight, illiteracy, and alcohol consumption. Conclusion Undiagnosed high BP is very common among Nuba ethnic group; therefore, active screening and early management are recommended to prevent complications. PMID:26738696

  13. Exploring the development of classroom group identities in an urban high school chemistry class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macaluso, Stefania

    A key to achieving academic success in science is providing students with meaningful experiences and skills to negotiate how these experiences affect them and the society in which they live. Although students strive for academic success, a challenge that faces many urban science students and their teachers is finding ways to promote student engagement in the science classroom. In order to support students in urban settings and to better identify the ways in which students may better learn science concepts and develop a sense of belonging or affiliation to science, this qualitative research study explores the development of a classroom group identity (CGI) based on the frameworks of social identity theory, interaction ritual chain theory, and communities of practice. The interactions and experiences of eighteen student participants in a Bronx high school chemistry class were studied over the course of a full school year. Using a conceptual lens of classroom group identity, a model construct and definition were built identifying four stages of CGI development. At the culmination of the study, a positive change in perceptions, attitudes, leadership skills, and classroom behaviors in learning science was primarily observed by two students developing a CGI. The study has implications for the teaching and learning of high school sciences.

  14. High-speed Network Environment for Japanese e-VLBI group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uose, Hisao

    Japanese e-VLBI team has been conducting realtime VLBI experiments using very-high-speed network since 1995. For the first phase of the experiments started as KSP and OLIVE (applications for geodesy and radio astronomy respectively) used dedicated networks comprised of Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) technologies at the speed of 256Mbps per data stream (total of 1Gbps for KSP observations). In 1998, KSP and OLIVE were united as one e-VLBI group (GALAXY) interconnecting major radio telescopes around Kanto and Nagano area. Since then every effort has been made to connect more radio telescopes located both in Japan and abroad with higher transmission rates. This paper discusses the communications technologies suitable for e-VLBI and describes the current status of high-speed network environment for GALAXY group. We also mention the new possibility for global e-VLBI by collaborating with other research networks, and the problems need to be solved when a number of networks are used for this very demanding application.

  15. Effect of Solution Focused Group Counseling for High School Students in Order to Struggle with School Burnout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ates, Bnyamin

    2016-01-01

    In this research, the effect of solution focused group counseling upon high school students struggling with school burnout was analyzed. The research was an experimental study in which a pre-test post-test control group random design was used, depending upon the real experimental model. The study group included 30 students that volunteered from

  16. High-Intensity, Unilateral Resistance Training of a Non-Paretic Muscle Group Increases Active Range of Motion in a Severely Paretic Upper Extremity Muscle Group after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Urbin, M. A.; Harris-Love, Michelle L.; Carter, Alex R.; Lang, Catherine E.

    2015-01-01

    Limited rehabilitation strategies are available for movement restoration when paresis is too severe following stroke. Previous research has shown that high-intensity resistance training of one muscle group enhances strength of the homologous, contralateral muscle group in neurologically intact adults. How this “cross education” phenomenon might be exploited to moderate severe weakness in an upper extremity muscle group after stroke is not well understood. The primary aim of this study was to examine adaptations in force-generating capacity of severely paretic wrist extensors resulting from high intensity, dynamic contractions of the non-paretic wrist extensors. A secondary, exploratory aim was to probe neural adaptations in a subset of participants from each sample using a single-pulse, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) protocol. Separate samples of neurologically intact controls (n = 7) and individuals ≥4 months post stroke (n = 6) underwent 16 sessions of training. Following training, one-repetition maximum of the untrained wrist extensors in the control group and active range of motion of the untrained, paretic wrist extensors in the stroke group were significantly increased. No changes in corticospinal excitability, intracortical inhibition, or interhemispheric inhibition were observed in control participants. Both stroke participants who underwent TMS testing, however, exhibited increased voluntary muscle activation following the intervention. In addition, motor-evoked potentials that were unobtainable prior to the intervention were readily elicited afterwards in a stroke participant. Results of this study demonstrate that high-intensity resistance training of a non-paretic upper extremity muscle group can enhance voluntary muscle activation and force-generating capacity of a severely paretic muscle group after stroke. There is also preliminary evidence that corticospinal adaptations may accompany these gains. PMID:26074871

  17. Hubble Space Telescope high resolution spectroscoy of the exposed white dwarf in the dwarf nova VW Hydri in quiescence: A rapidly rotating white dwarf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sion, Edward M.; Huang, Min; Szkody, Paula; Cheng, Fu-Hua

    1995-01-01

    We obtained a far-ultraviolet spectrum of the dwarf nova VW Hyi in quiescence, with the Hubble Space Telescope Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph covering the region of the Si iv lambda(lambda)1393, 1402 resonance doublet. The broad, shallow Si iv doublet feature is fully resolved, has a total equivalent width of 2.8 A, and is the first metal absorption feature to be clearly detected in the exposed white dwarf. Our synthetic spectral analysis, using a model grid constructed with the code TLUSTY, resulted in a reasonable fit to a white dwarf photosphere with T(sub eff) = 22,000 +/- 2000 K, log g = 8.0 +/- 0.3, an approximately solar Si/H abundance, and a rotational velocity, v sin i approximately equal to 600 km/s. This rotation rate, while not definitive because it is based upon just one line transition, is 20% of the Keplerian (breakup) velocity of the white dwarf and hence does not account for the unexpectedly low boundary-layer luminosity inferred from the soft-X-ray/extreme ultra-violet bands where most of the boundary-layer luminosity should be radiated. The predicted boundary-layer luminosity for a 0.6 solar mass white dwarf accreting at the rate 10(exp -10) solar mass/yr and rotating at 600 km/s, corresponding to VW Hyi in quiescence, is 2 x 10(exp 32) ergs/s when proper account is taken of the rotational kinetic energy going into spinning up the white dwarf. If the boundary-layer area is equal to that of the white dwarf, then T(sub bl) = 24,000 K. This is essentially identical to the photspheric luminosity and temperature determined in far-ultraviolet photospheric analyses. If the boundary-layer area is 10(exp -3) of the white dwarf surface area, then T(sub bl) = 136,000 K.

  18. Origin of three-dimensional shapes of chondrules. I. Hydrodynamics simulations of rotating droplet exposed to high-velocity rarefied gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Hitoshi; Nakamoto, Taishi; Doi, Masao

    2008-09-01

    The origin of three-dimensional shapes of chondrules is an important information to identify their formation mechanism in the early solar nebula. The measurement of their shapes by using X-ray computed topography suggested that they are usually close to perfect spheres, however, some of them have rugby-ball-like (prolate) shapes [Tsuchiyama, A., Shigeyoshi, R., Kawabata, T., Nakano, T., Uesugi, K., Shirono, S., 2003. Lunar Planet. Sci. 34, 1271-1272]. We considered that the prolate shapes reflect the deformations of chondrule precursor dust particles when they are heated and melted in the high velocity gas flow. In order to reveal the origin of chondrule shapes, we carried out the three-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations of a rotating molten chondrule exposed to the gas flow in the framework of the shock-wave heating model for chondrule formation. We adopted the gas ram pressure acting on the chondrule surface of p=10 dyncm in a typical shock wave. Considering that the chondrule precursor dust particle has an irregular shape before melting, the ram pressure causes a net torque to rotate the particle. The estimated angular velocity is ω=140 rads for the precursor radius of r=1 mm, though it has a different value depending on the irregularity of the shape. In addition, the rotation axis is likely to be perpendicular to the direction of the gas flow. Our calculations showed that the rotating molten chondrule elongates along the rotation axis, in contrast, shrinks perpendicularly to it. It is a prolate shape. The reason why the molten chondrule is deformed to a prolate shape was clearly discussed. Our study gives a complementary constraint for chondrule formation mechanisms, comparing with conventional chemical analyses and dynamic crystallization experiments that have mainly constrained the thermal evolutions of chondrules.

  19. Application of high performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry in the environmental and biological monitoring of health care personnel occupationally exposed to cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide.

    PubMed

    Minoia, C; Turci, R; Sottani, C; Schiavi, A; Perbellini, L; Angeleri, S; Draicchio, F; Apostoli, P

    1998-01-01

    Twenty four workers (10 involved in the preparation and 14 in administration) exposed to cyclophosphamide (CP) and ifosfamide (IF) in two Italian hospitals were monitored. The extent of exposure was assessed by the analysis of air samples, wipe samples, pads and gloves. Urinary excretion at the beginning and at the end of the work shift was also measured by liquid-liquid extraction and analysis by high performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Three out of 24 air samples were positive for CP or IF. In wipe samples, CP concentrations ranging from < 0.001 to 82.4 micrograms/dm2 in Hospital A (32 samples) and from 0.2 to 383.3 micrograms/dm2 in Hospital B (17 samples), were found. IF concentrations varied from < 0.001 to 90.9 micrograms/dm2 in Hospital A and from 0.01 to 141.5 micrograms/dm2 in Hospital B. Pads (from 11 to 13 for each operator) were contaminated with CP and IF especially on arms, legs and chest. The use of a plastic-backed liner on the working tray in the laminar flow hoods was demonstrated to compromise the containment properties of the hood. Urine samples were positive for CP in 50% of the workers (range: 0.1-2.1 micrograms/L), whereas IF was detected in 2 subjects only (range: 0.1-0.8 microgram/L). The results of this investigation demonstrate that vertical laminar airflow hoods, when incorrectly used, might represent a source of contamination and that higher risk may depend on lack of educational programmes and observance of preventive guidelines. PMID:9796535

  20. Perfluorooctanoate Exposure in a Highly Exposed Community and Parent and Teacher Reports of Behavior in 6 – 12 Year Old Children

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Cheryl R.; Savitz, David A.; Bellinger, David C.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND In toxicology studies, perfluorinated compounds affect fetal growth, development, viability, and postnatal growth. There are limited epidemiologic studies on child development. METHODS We recruited and evaluated 321 children who participated in the C8 Health Project, a 2005–2006 survey in a mid-Ohio-Valley community highly exposed to perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) through contaminated drinking water. We examined associations between measured childhood PFOA serum concentration and mother and teacher reports of executive function (Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function), ADHD-like behavior (Conner’s ADHD DSM-IV Scales), and behavioral problems (Behavior Assessment System for Children) assessed 3–4 years later at ages 6–12 years. RESULTS Overall, neither reports from mothers nor teachers provided clear associations between exposure and child behavior. Mother reports, however, did suggest favorable associations between exposure and behavior among boys and adverse associations among girls. On the composite scale from the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (n=318), PFOA exposure had a favorable association among boys (highest vs. lowest quartile β = −6.39; 95% CI −11.43, −1.35) and an adverse association among girls (highest vs. lowest quartile β = 4.42; 95% CI −0.03, 8.87; interaction p=0.01). Teacher reports (n=189) replicated some but not all of the sex-interactions observed in mothers’ reports. CONCLUSIONS Aggregate results did not suggest adverse effects of PFOA on behavior, but sex-specific results raise the possibility of differing patterns by sex. Results are not consistent between mothers’ and teachers’ reports. Effect modification by sex may warrant further investigation. PMID:24320613

  1. Teaching high-school Geoscience through a group-based activity: the Geotrivia experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakopoulou, Athanasia

    2015-04-01

    Geotrivia is an educational game which aims at the enhancement of geoscience teaching in secondary education, through an interactive group-based activity. As behavioural teaching methods no longer excite students in a multitask society, new approaches should be implemented to keep up with novel learning methodologies and team-based techniques. Thus, the main aim of the experiment was to come up with an alternative learning process on geology and geography in order to upgrade and attract more students to Geosciences. Geotrivia is based on the techniques of motivation (competition to be the winner) and enjoyable educational time (it is funny to play a game) in terms of team-based student collaboration. Pedagogical aims of Geotrivia consist of team-based work, independency, autonomy and initiative, active participation, student self-evaluation and metacognition. Geotrivia is a card game, consisting of about 150 playing cards, a whistle and an hourglass. Each playing card contains a geology- or geography-related question and the answer to the question is given in the lower part of the card. Class students are divided in about 4 groups of about 5 students each. The aim of each group is to collect as many cards as possible. The hourglass is flipped and a member of the team takes the pack of cards and uses it to ask questions to his team; the other members have to answer as many questions. The team wins a card when they give a correct answer. The game is played at the end of each curriculum unit; a comprehensive version of the game is held at end of the school year. Most -but not all- questions are based on the course syllabus, which deals with the geology and geography of Europe at junior high school level (e.g. what is the cause of high seismicity in Greece?). Accordingly, Geotrivia questions can be adjusted to each country school book of geology - geography at any grade. To evaluate the results of Geotrivia, we used the methodology of pretest and posttest, an experimental group of about 50 students, which undertook Geotrivia and a control group of about 50 students, which underwent the usual teaching process. After applying Geotrivia during the last school year, the results obtained were: 1. Students accepted Geotrivia enthusiastically and realized that knowledge can be pleasantly obtained. 2. Students' participation was active and voluntary. 3. Students adhered to the rules of the game by themselves with almost no interference by the teacher, increasing their autonomy and responsibility towards the learning process. 4. Team-based work took place successfully. Team spirit and collaboration were ultimately cultivated, parameters that enforce the learning process. 5. Geotrivia appeared to be a pleasant way for chapter revision. Students were motivated to study for the next game and not for the next test, thus mastering the knowledge voluntarily and not under the fear of tests or grades. 6. Students were able to self-evaluate their knowledge through an enjoyable procedure. 7. Students had the opportunity to reach the level of metacognition purposely. 8. At the end-term exams the majority of students achieved surprisingly high grades. Therefore, the pilot run of Geotrivia has shown that it is a high standard learning process with promising results for geoscience education.

  2. Report of the National High Blood Pressure Education Program Working Group on High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    2000-07-01

    This report updates the 1990 "National High Blood Pressure Education Program Working Group Report on High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy" and focuses on classification, pathophysiologic features, and management of the hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. Through a combination of evidence-based medicine and consensus this report updates contemporary approaches to hypertension control during pregnancy by expanding on recommendations made in "The Sixth Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure." The recommendations to use Korotkoff phase V for determination of diastolic pressure and to eliminate edema as a criterion for diagnosing preeclampsia are discussed. In addition, the use as a diagnostic criterion of blood pressure increases of 30 mm Hg systolic or 15 mm Hg diastolic with blood pressure <140/90 mm Hg has not been recommended, because available evidence shows that women with blood pressures fitting this description are not more likely to have adverse outcomes. Management distinctions are made between chronic hypertension that is present before pregnancy and hypertension that occurs as part of the pregnancy-specific condition of preeclampsia, as well as management considerations for women with comorbid conditions. A discussion of the pharmacologic treatment of hypertension during pregnancy includes recommendations for specific agents. The use of low-dose aspirin, calcium, or other dietary supplements in the prevention of preeclampsia is described, and expanded sections on counseling women for future pregnancies and recommendations for future research are included. PMID:10920346

  3. The Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature: Past, Present and Future.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donlon, Craig; Casey, Kenneth; Minnett, Peter; Corlett, Gary

    2014-05-01

    In the last decade, satellite Agencies, science, operational user/producer and Sea Surface Temperature practitioner communities have come together within the Group for High Resolution SST (GHRSST) to create a new framework for generation, delivery and application of improved common format high-resolution (~1-10 km) satellite SST datasets for the benefit of society. The GHRSST data system is a mature, robust, and highly reliable near real time and delayed mode data system known as the GHRSST Regional/Global Task Sharing framework (R/GTS) and has operated in NRT since 2006. It consists of distributed Regional Data Assembly Centers (RDACs) around the world that submit their data to a Global Data Assembly Center (GDAC) maintained at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (JPL PO.DAAC), where all the data are available for 30 days. After that they are transferred to the GHRSST Long Term Stewardship and Reanalysis Facility (LTSRF) at the U.S. National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC) for long-term preservation and distribution. The extensive user base includes many operational meteorological services, the scientific community, industry and Government. Since the R/GTS has operated, statistics show over 72,000 users have accessed the R/GTS in NRT, accessing over 100 million files amounting to more than 232 Tb of information. GHRSST has an organisation structure that has both fixed and flexible components allowing it to respond effectively and efficiently to new and emerging challenges. GHRSST has often been cited as a model for other Virtual Communities/Constellations. GHRSST is underpinned by an international Science Team and International Project Office together. Long-standing GHRSST Technical Advisory Groups (TAG) and ad hoc Working Groups (WG) are typically at the "cutting edge" of international SST activities delivering real coordination in space-based Earth observations for societal benefit through the prioritized activities. Most recently, GHRSST has formed a strategic alliance with the Committee for Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) SST Virtual Constellation further strengthening the important and active international GHRSST Community. This paper reviews the development of GHRSST since its early inception in 2000 its evolution and future prospects.

  4. Ultra-compact high velocity clouds in the ALFALFA HI survey: Candidate Local Group galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Elizabeth Ann Kovenz

    The increased sensitivity and spatial resolution of the ALFALFA HI survey has resulted in the detection of ultra-compact high velocity clouds (UCHVCs). These objects are good candidates to represent low mass gas-rich galaxies in the Local Group and Local Volume with stellar populations that are too faint to be detected in extant optical surveys. This idea is referred to as the "minihalo hypothesis". We identify the UCHVCs within the ALFALFA dataset via the use of a 3D matched filtering signal identification algorithm. UCHVCs are selected based on a compact size (< 30'), separation from Galactic HI (|upsilon LSR| > 120 km s-1) and isolation. Within the 40% complete ALFALFA survey (alpha.40), 59 UCHVCs are identified; 19 are in a most-isolated subset and are the best galaxy candidates. Due to the presence of large HVC complexes in the fall sky, most notably the Magellanic Stream, the association of UCHVCs with existing structure cannot be ruled out. In the spring sky, the spatial and kinematic distribution of the UCHVCs is consistent with simulations of dark matter halos within the Local Group. In addition, the HI properties of the UCHVCs (if placed at 1 Mpc) are consistent with both theoretical and observational predictions for low mass gas-rich galaxies. Importantly, the HI properties of the UCHVCs are consistent with those of two recently discovered low mass gas-rich galaxies in the Local Group and Local Volume, Leo T and Leo P. Detailed follow-up observations are key for addressing the minihalo hypothesis. High resolution HI observations can constrain the environment of a UCHVC and offer evidence for a hosting dark matter halo through evidence of rotation support and comparison to theoretical models. Observations of one UCHVC at high resolution (15'') reveal the presence of a clumpy HI distribution, similar to both low mass galaxies and circumgalactic compact HVCs. An extended envelope containing 50% of the HI flux is resolved out by the array configuration; observations at lower spatial resolution can recover this envelope and constrain the overall morphology and environment. The most direct way to address the minihalo hypothesis is by detection of a stellar counterpart, immediately identifying a UCHVC as a galaxy and allowing a distance to be measured. We have selected a sample of best galaxy candidates from the UCHVCs based on isolation, compactness, surface brightness, and kinematics. We are undertaking targeted optical observations of these systems in two filters to conduct a focused search for a coherent stellar population. Observations are in-hand for 29 systems, and an analysis of a single system is presented as a test case. These data were obtained via "shared-risk" observing, and analysis for all systems is awaiting further pipeline development. If (some of) the UCHVCs represent nearby low mass galaxies, they will help us understand the evolution of the lowest mass galaxies and address the small scale crisis in cosmology. Understanding the nature of the UCHVCs is a complicated and ongoing project. Both optical and HI synthesis imaging data will continue to be acquired and analyzed in order to address the minihalo hypothesis. Future HI surveys of nearby galaxy groups will be able to robustly address the minihalo hypothesis by being sensitive to UCHVCs in other galaxy groups.

  5. Computational analysis and determination of a highly conserved surface exposed segment in H5N1 avian flu and H1N1 swine flu neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Catalytic activity of influenza neuraminidase (NA) facilitates elution of progeny virions from infected cells and prevents their self-aggregation mediated by the catalytic site located in the body region. Research on the active site of the molecule has led to development of effective inhibitors like oseltamivir, zanamivir etc, but the high rate of mutation and interspecies reassortment in viral sequences and the recent reports of oseltamivir resistant strains underlines the importance of determining additional target sites for developing future antiviral compounds. In a recent computational study of 173 H5N1 NA gene sequences we had identified a 50-base highly conserved region in 3'-terminal end of the NA gene. Results We extend the graphical and numerical analyses to a larger number of H5N1 NA sequences (514) and H1N1 swine flu sequences (425) accessed from GenBank. We use a 2D graphical representation model for the gene sequences and a Graphical Sliding Window Method (GSWM) for protein sequences scanning the sequences as a block of 16 amino acids at a time. Using a protein sequence descriptor defined in our model, the protein sliding scan method allowed us to compare the different strains for block level variability, which showed significant statistical correlation to average solvent accessibility of the residue blocks; single amino acid position variability results in no correlation, indicating the impact of stretch variability in chemical environment. Close to the C-terminal end the GSWM showed less descriptor-variability with increased average solvent accessibility (ASA) that is also supported by conserved predicted secondary structure of 3' terminal RNA and visual evidence from 3D crystallographic structure. Conclusion The identified terminal segment, strongly conserved in both RNA and protein sequences, is especially significant as it is surface exposed and structural chemistry reveals the probable role of this stretch in tetrameric stabilization. It could also participate in other biological processes associated with conserved surface residues. A RNA double hairpin secondary structure found in this segment in a majority of the H5N1 strains also supports this observation. In this paper we propose this conserved region as a probable site for designing inhibitors for broad-spectrum pandemic control of flu viruses with similar NA structure. PMID:20170556

  6. Prenatal Exposure to p,p′-DDE and p,p′-DDT in Relation to Lower Respiratory Tract Infections in Boys From a Highly Exposed Area of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Cupul-Uicab, Lea A.; Terrazas-Medina, Efraín A.; Hernández-Ávila, Mauricio; Longnecker, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Prenatal exposure to 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene (p,p′-DDE), the major breakdown product of DDT, has been associated with recurrent lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) in infants. However, epidemiological investigations are limited. Objective To assess the association of prenatal exposure to p,p′-DDE and p,p′-DDT with the occurrence of LRTI in boys from Chiapas, a highly exposed area of Mexico. Methods We analyzed data from 747 singleton boys whose prenatal exposure to p,p′-DDE and p,p′-DDT was determined in maternal serum drawn at delivery (2002–2003). LRTI (i.e., pneumonia, bronchiolitis, and other illness of the bronchi) experienced by the children were reported by their mothers during in-person interviews. The median age of the children when they were last seen was 21.4 months (quartiles 19.1 and 25.3 months). Results Median exposure to p,p′-DDE in this population was higher (2.7 μg/g lipid) than recent U.S. levels (0.20 μg/g). There were 0.19 episodes of LRTI per child-year. After adjusting for potential confounders, children in the highest category of p,p′-DDE (>9.00 μg/g) exposure compared to those in the lowest (≤3.00 μg/g) had an adjusted incidence rate ratio (aIRR) of LRTI of 0.77 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.41–1.46). The corresponding aIRR for p,p′-DDT (≥2.00 μg/g compared to ≤0.25 μg/g) was 0.65 (95% CI: 0.30–1.39). Conclusion An association of prenatal exposure to p,p′-DDE and p,p′-DDT with LRTI during childhood was not supported in this population with relatively high levels of exposure. PMID:24742723

  7. Isolation of a very high molecular weight polylactosamine from an ovarian cyst mucin of blood group

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, A.S.S.; Bush, C.A.

    1986-05-01

    Treatment of a blood group A active ovarian cyst mucin glycoprotein with alkaline borohydride under conditions expected to cleave-O-glycosidically linked carbohydrate chains releases a polysaccharide of average molecular weight 25,000 daltons. It contains no peptide or mannose at the 1% level and carbohydrate analysis gives fuc:galNAc:gal:glcNAc in the ratio of 1:1:2.5:2.5. The /sup 13/C and /sup 1/H NMR spectra show that the polysaccharide has non-reducing terminal side chains of the structure galNAc(..cap alpha..-1 ..-->.. 3)(fuc(..cap alpha..-1 ..-->.. 2)) gal(..beta..-1 ..-->.. 3) glcNAc (i.e. a type 1 chain). Periodate oxidation removes all the fucose and galNAc from the non-reducing terminal but leaves intact the backbone composed of ..beta..-linked gal and glcNAc as would be expected for a polylactosamine. They conclude that this is a high molecular weight polylactosamine which is related to the asparagine linked polylactosamine chains of cell surface glycoproteins which have been implicated in cell differentiation. However, the blood group A polysaccharide from the ovarian cyst mucin is unique in several respects. It has a much larger molecular weight than even the erythroglycan of the red cell membrane protein, band 3, and is linked to the protein by an -O-glycosidic bond rather than the -N-asparagine linkage of the previously known polylactosamines which have a trimannosyl core. Its blood group A side chains are on a type one core rather than type 2 which is found on other polylactosamines.

  8. The Formation of the Local Group and the High Velocity Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spergel, D. N.; Blitz, L.; Teuben, P. J.; Hartmann, D.; Burton, B.

    1996-12-01

    We simulate the formation and evolution of the Local Group. The dynamics of the Local Group is governed primarily by the its two largest members, Andromeda (M31) and the Galaxy (M0) and secondarily by the tidal effects of neighboring galaxies. In the simulation, a long filament forms which contains M31 and M0. While the gas near M31 and M0 is likely shock heated, we expect that much of the gas in the filament is cold. The kinematics of this gas in the simulation is remarkably similar to the kinematics of the High Velocity Clouds (HVCs). This similarity suggests reinterpreting the HVCs as primarily extragalactic. In this model, the HVCs are similar to the Lyman alpha clouds. Recent work (Hernquist et al. 996) suggests that the Lyman alpha clouds are primarily condensations in the filaments between galaxies. We suggest a similar picture for most of the HVCs: they are gravitationally confined, rather than pressure confined, clouds infalling into the Local Group and are likely associated with a substantial amount of dark matter. In this picture, the two phase structure seen in some of the HVCs (Wakker & Schwarz 1991) would be due to self shielding that arises in gas clouds ionized by external UV (Murakami & Ikeuchi 1990). This model suggests that there is a substantial amount of gas in the HVCs: ~ 1 x 10(10) M_sun. This gas is and was a reservoir of relatively unprocessed gas for both M31 and our Galaxy and likely plays an important role in the evolution of both galaxies. Hernquist, L, Katz, N., Weinberg, D. & Miralda-Escude, J. 1996, ApJ L 457, 51 Murakami, I. & Ikeuchi, S. 1990 PASJ, 41 , L11. Wakker, B.P. & Schwarz, U.J. 1991 A & A, 250, 48.

  9. Detailed Chemical Abundances of Local Group Globular Clusters Using High Resolution Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, R. A.; Cameron, S.; McWilliam, A.; Cohen, J. G.

    2010-01-01

    We present the first detailed chemical abundances of extragalactic globular clusters in the Local Group using a new method for analyzing high-resolution (??? 25,000) integrated light spectra. Here we present new detailed abundances for 20 ?, Fe-peak, and neutron capture elements obtained from individual spectral lines for clusters in M31, the dwarf irregular NGC 6822, and the LMC. Our new analysis method (derived from standard RGB star analysis methods and as accurate) also provides age constraints for unresolved clusters. As we demonstrate on LMC clusters, our analysis methods let us measure accurate abudances and ages for clusters of all ages. The high S/N, high resolution spectra needed for detailed abundance analysis can be obtained for unresolved clusters in galaxies within 4 Mpc with current telescopes. Application of this new method to large samples of globular clusters in a range in environments and of a variety of ages will help to constrain the star formation histories of galaxies of different masses, as well as put constraints on merger history and hierarchical buildup of massive galaxies. As globular clusters form during major episodes of star formation, they are important tracers of the assembly history of galaxies, especially at distances where detailed spectroscopic studies of individual stars are not possible. The detailed abundances presented here for globular clusters in M31 are the first such measurements for old stars in a large galaxy other than the Milky Way.

  10. Continuous glucose monitoring system and new era of early diagnosis of diabetes in high risk groups

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Ashraf; DeSanctis, Vincenzo; Yassin, Mohamed; Elalaily, Rania; Eldarsy, Nagwa E

    2014-01-01

    Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems are an emerging technology that allows frequent glucose measurements to monitor glucose trends in real time. Their use as a diagnostic tool is still developing and appears to be promising. Combining intermittent glucose self-monitoring (SGM) and CGM combines the benefits of both. Significant improvement in the treatment modalities that may prevent the progress of prediabetes to diabetes have been achieved recently and dictates screening of high risk patients for early diagnosis and management of glycemic abnormalities. The use of CGMS in the diagnosis of early dysglycemia (prediabetes) especially in high risk patients appears to be an attractive approach. In this review we searched the literature to investigate the value of using CGMS as a diagnostic tool compared to other known tools, namely oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and measurement of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) in high risk groups. Those categories of patients include adolescents and adults with obesity especially those with family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCO), gestational diabetes, cystic fibrosis, thalassemia major, acute coronary syndrome (ACS), and after renal transplantation. It appears that the ability of the CGMS for frequently monitoring (every 5 min) glucose changes during real-life settings for 3 to 5 days stretches the chance to detect more glycemic abnormalities during basal and postprandial conditions compared to other short-timed methods. PMID:24944918

  11. High burden of invasive group A streptococcal disease in the Northern Territory of Australia.

    PubMed

    Boyd, R; Patel, M; Currie, B J; Holt, D C; Harris, T; Krause, V

    2016-04-01

    Although the incidence of invasive group A streptococcal disease in northern Australia is very high, little is known of the regional epidemiology and molecular characteristics. We conducted a case series of Northern Territory residents reported between 2011 and 2013 with Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from a normally sterile site. Of the 128 reported episodes, the incidence was disproportionately high in the Indigenous population at 69·7/100 000 compared to 8·8/100 000 in the non-Indigenous population. Novel to the Northern Territory is the extremely high incidence in haemodialysis patients of 2205·9/100 000 population; and for whom targeted infection control measures could prevent transmission. The incidences in the tropical north and semi-arid Central Australian regions were similar. Case fatality was 8% (10/128) and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome occurred in 14 (11%) episodes. Molecular typing of 82 isolates identified 28 emm types, of which 63 (77%) were represented by four emm clusters. Typing confirmed transmission between infant twins. While the diverse range of emm types presents a challenge for effective coverage by vaccine formulations, the limited number of emm clusters raises optimism should cluster-specific cross-protection prove efficacious. Further studies are required to determine effectiveness of chemoprophylaxis for contacts and to inform public health response. PMID:26364646

  12. Two high-mobility group box domains act together to underwind and kink DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sánchez-Giraldo, R.; Acosta-Reyes, F. J.; Malarkey, C. S.; Saperas, N.; Churchill, M. E. A.; Campos, J. L.

    2015-06-30

    The crystal structure of HMGB1 box A bound to an unmodified AT-rich DNA fragment is reported at a resolution of 2 Å. A new mode of DNA recognition for HMG box proteins is found in which two box A domains bind in an unusual configuration generating a highly kinked DNA structure. High-mobility group protein 1 (HMGB1) is an essential and ubiquitous DNA architectural factor that influences a myriad of cellular processes. HMGB1 contains two DNA-binding domains, box A and box B, which have little sequence specificity but have remarkable abilities to underwind and bend DNA. Although HMGB1 box A is thought to be responsible for the majority of HMGB1–DNA interactions with pre-bent or kinked DNA, little is known about how it recognizes unmodified DNA. Here, the crystal structure of HMGB1 box A bound to an AT-rich DNA fragment is reported at a resolution of 2 Å. Two box A domains of HMGB1 collaborate in an unusual configuration in which the Phe37 residues of both domains stack together and intercalate the same CG base pair, generating highly kinked DNA. This represents a novel mode of DNA recognition for HMGB proteins and reveals a mechanism by which structure-specific HMG boxes kink linear DNA.

  13. An alternative role for specific antibody in neutrophil bactericidal activity against highly pathogenic group B streptococci.

    PubMed

    Cleat, P H; Coid, C R

    1982-08-01

    An investigation was undertaken into the role of antibody and complement in neutrophil phagocytosis and killing of group B streptococci of low and high pathogenicity. Phagocytosis of both types of organism appears to be a nonspecific event requiring only nonspecific antibody or complement. However, neutrophil bactericidal activity is mediated by the pathogenicity of the infecting organism. Neutrophils alone can kill some streptococci of low pathogenicity, but their killing ability is considerably increased in the presence of specific antibody or complement. An active role for the alternative pathway of complement in the killing process was demonstrated for organisms of low pathogenicity. Neutrophils did not kill the highly pathogenic organisms in the absence of antibody and complement, and required specific antibody, but not complement, to kill these bacteria. The alternative complement pathway is not involved in killing of highly pathogenic organisms. Addition of specific antibody to neutrophils containing ingested bacteria stimulated the neutrophils to kill the intracellular bacteria, suggesting an alternative role for specific antibody in the killing process other than as an opsonin. It is suggested that activation of Fc receptors on the neutrophil surface initiates the bactericidal action of the neutrophils. PMID:6817779

  14. Continuous glucose monitoring system and new era of early diagnosis of diabetes in high risk groups.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Ashraf; DeSanctis, Vincenzo; Yassin, Mohamed; Elalaily, Rania; Eldarsy, Nagwa E

    2014-05-01

    Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems are an emerging technology that allows frequent glucose measurements to monitor glucose trends in real time. Their use as a diagnostic tool is still developing and appears to be promising. Combining intermittent glucose self-monitoring (SGM) and CGM combines the benefits of both. Significant improvement in the treatment modalities that may prevent the progress of prediabetes to diabetes have been achieved recently and dictates screening of high risk patients for early diagnosis and management of glycemic abnormalities. The use of CGMS in the diagnosis of early dysglycemia (prediabetes) especially in high risk patients appears to be an attractive approach. In this review we searched the literature to investigate the value of using CGMS as a diagnostic tool compared to other known tools, namely oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and measurement of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) in high risk groups. Those categories of patients include adolescents and adults with obesity especially those with family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCO), gestational diabetes, cystic fibrosis, thalassemia major, acute coronary syndrome (ACS), and after renal transplantation. It appears that the ability of the CGMS for frequently monitoring (every 5 min) glucose changes during real-life settings for 3 to 5 days stretches the chance to detect more glycemic abnormalities during basal and postprandial conditions compared to other short-timed methods. PMID:24944918

  15. Six year follow up of lung function in men occupationally exposed to formaldehyde.

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, A J; Craigen, A A; Darbyshire, J H; Venables, K M; Newman Taylor, A J

    1990-01-01

    The long term effects of formaldehyde on the respiratory tract have been investigated in a group of 164 workers exposed daily to the chemical during the production of urea formaldehyde resin, together with 129 workers not exposed to free formaldehyde. Exposure was classified as high (corresponding to an eight hour time weighted exposure of more than 2.0 ppm), medium (0.6 to 2.0 ppm), or low (0.1 to 0.5 ppm). Twenty five per cent of workers had had high exposure at some time and 17% moderate exposure. Both the exposed and unexposed groups had an annual assessment that included lung function. The proportion with self reported respiratory symptoms was similar in the two groups, 12% and 16% reporting breathlessness on hurrying and 26% and 20% wheezing. The initial forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) was within 0.5 l (approximately one standard deviation (SD)) of the predicted value (by age and height) in 65% of the exposed and 59% of unexposed workers and more than 0.5 l below the predicted value in 9% of exposed and 11% of unexposed workers. The mean decline in FEV1 was 42 ml a year (SD 45) in the exposed group and 41 ml a year in the unexposed group (SD 40 ml a year). The rate of decline showed the expected association with smoking in the unexposed group, but in the exposed group the mean rate of decline in the never smokers was similar to that in current smokers. There were, however, relatively few never smokers and considerable variation in the rates of decline. In the exposed group no association was found between the rate of decline and indices of exposure to formaldehyde. Thus there is no evidence from this study of an excess of respiratory symptoms or decline in lung function in the workers exposed to formaldehyde. The similar rate of decline of FEV1 however in never smokers and smokers of the exposed group is consistent with findings of other studies for workers exposed to formaldehyde and to toluene di-isocyanate. PMID:2245186

  16. Six year follow up of lung function in men occupationally exposed to formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Nunn, A J; Craigen, A A; Darbyshire, J H; Venables, K M; Newman Taylor, A J

    1990-11-01

    The long term effects of formaldehyde on the respiratory tract have been investigated in a group of 164 workers exposed daily to the chemical during the production of urea formaldehyde resin, together with 129 workers not exposed to free formaldehyde. Exposure was classified as high (corresponding to an eight hour time weighted exposure of more than 2.0 ppm), medium (0.6 to 2.0 ppm), or low (0.1 to 0.5 ppm). Twenty five per cent of workers had had high exposure at some time and 17% moderate exposure. Both the exposed and unexposed groups had an annual assessment that included lung function. The proportion with self reported respiratory symptoms was similar in the two groups, 12% and 16% reporting breathlessness on hurrying and 26% and 20% wheezing. The initial forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) was within 0.5 l (approximately one standard deviation (SD)) of the predicted value (by age and height) in 65% of the exposed and 59% of unexposed workers and more than 0.5 l below the predicted value in 9% of exposed and 11% of unexposed workers. The mean decline in FEV1 was 42 ml a year (SD 45) in the exposed group and 41 ml a year in the unexposed group (SD 40 ml a year). The rate of decline showed the expected association with smoking in the unexposed group, but in the exposed group the mean rate of decline in the never smokers was similar to that in current smokers. There were, however, relatively few never smokers and considerable variation in the rates of decline. In the exposed group no association was found between the rate of decline and indices of exposure to formaldehyde. Thus there is no evidence from this study of an excess of respiratory symptoms or decline in lung function in the workers exposed to formaldehyde. The similar rate of decline of FEV1 however in never smokers and smokers of the exposed group is consistent with findings of other studies for workers exposed to formaldehyde and to toluene di-isocyanate. PMID:2245186

  17. Group Work with High School Students at Risk of School Failure: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steen, Sam; Bemak, Fred

    2008-01-01

    Nine ninth graders at risk of school failure participated in a supportive group counseling intervention. Students' GPA in the treatment group did not significantly improve when compared to a control group. Additionally, the treatment group completed the Critical Incidents Questionnaire (CIQ) at the conclusion of the intervention, and a follow-up

  18. Evolution of High Mobility Group Nucleosome-Binding Proteins and Its Implications for Vertebrate Chromatin Specialization

    PubMed Central

    González-Romero, Rodrigo; Eirín-López, José M.; Ausió, Juan

    2015-01-01

    High mobility group (HMG)-N proteins are a family of small nonhistone proteins that bind to nucleosomes (N). Despite the amount of information available on their structure and function, there is an almost complete lack of information on the molecular evolutionary mechanisms leading to their exclusive differentiation. In the present work, we provide evidence suggesting that HMGN lineages constitute independent monophyletic groups derived from a common ancestor prior to the diversification of vertebrates. Based on observations of the functional diversification across vertebrate HMGN proteins and on the extensive silent nucleotide divergence, our results suggest that the long-term evolution of HMGNs occurs under strong purifying selection, resulting from the lineage-specific functional constraints of their different protein domains. Selection analyses on independent lineages suggest that their functional specialization was mediated by bursts of adaptive selection at specific evolutionary times, in a small subset of codons with functional relevance—most notably in HMGN1, and in the rapidly evolving HMGN5. This work provides useful information to our understanding of the specialization imparted on chromatin metabolism by HMGNs, especially on the evolutionary mechanisms underlying their functional differentiation in vertebrates. PMID:25281808

  19. Highly Fluorescent Group 13 Metal Complexes with Cyclic, Aromatic Hydroxamic Acid Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, Michael; Moore, Evan G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-02-11

    The neutral complexes of two ligands based on the 1-oxo-2-hydroxy-isoquinoline (1,2-HOIQO) motif with group 13 metals (Al, Ga, In) show bright blue-violet luminescence in organic solvents. The corresponding transition can be attributed to ligand-centered singlet emission, characterized by a small Stokes shifts of only a few nm combined with lifetimes in the range between 1-3 ns. The fluorescence efficiency is high, with quantum yields of up to 37% in benzene solution. The crystal structure of one of the indium(III) complexes (trigonal space group R-3, a = b = 13.0384(15) {angstrom}, c = 32.870(8) {angstrom}, ? = {beta} = 90{sup o}, {gamma} = 120{sup o}, V = 4839.3(14) {angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 6) shows a six-coordinate geometry around the indium center which is close to trigonal-prismatic, with a twist angle between the two trigonal faces of 20.7{sup o}. Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations (Al and Ga: B3LYP/6-31G(d)); In: B3LYP/LANL2DZ of the fac and mer isomers with one of the two ligands indicate that there is no clear preference for either one of the isomeric forms of the metal complexes. In addition, the metal centers do not have a significant influence on the electronic structure, and as a consequence, on the predominant intraligand optical transitions.

  20. Halopyrroles: a new group of highly toxic disinfection byproducts formed in chlorinated saline wastewater.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mengting; Zhang, Xiangru

    2014-10-21

    Utilizing seawater for toilet flushing is an effective way to conserve freshwater in coastal cities. During chlorination for disinfecting saline wastewater effluents, the high levels of bromide from seawater are oxidized to hypobromous acid which may then react with effluent organics to form brominated disinfection byproducts (DBPs). In this research, by applying a new precursor ion scan method, we detected and identified a group of halopyrroles in a chlorinated saline wastewater effluent, including tetrabromopyrrole, tribromochloropyrrole, tribromoiodopyrrole, and tribromopyrrole, with tetrabromopyrrole as the predominant species. It is the first time that this group of halopyrroles were identified as wastewater DBPs (though 2,3,5-tribromopyrrole has been found to be a DBP in drinking water before). Detection of halopyrroles was problematic as these compounds in the pretreated samples were found to convert to halonitropyrroles; the problem was successfully solved by diluting the pretreated samples. The formation, occurrence, precursor, and toxicity of tetrabromopyrrole were investigated. This DBP showed significantly higher developmental toxicity than any of the haloaliphatic and haloaromatic DBPs previously tested. PMID:25236171

  1. The Dimerization State of the Mammalian High Mobility Group Protein AT-Hook 2 (HMGA2)

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Lorraine; Baez, Maria A. M.; Harrilal, Christopher; Garabedian, Alyssa; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco; Leng, Fenfei

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian high mobility group protein AT-hook 2 (HMGA2) is a chromosomal architectural transcription factor involved in cell transformation and oncogenesis. It consists of three positively charged “AT-hooks” and a negatively charged C-terminus. Sequence analyses, circular dichroism experiments, and gel-filtration studies showed that HMGA2, in the native state, does not have a defined secondary or tertiary structure. Surprisingly, using combined approaches of 1-Ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) chemical cross-linking, analytical ultracentrifugation, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), and mass spectrometry, we discovered that HMGA2 is capable of self-associating into homodimers in aqueous buffer solution. Our results showed that electrostatic interactions between the positively charged “AT-hooks” and the negatively charged C-terminus greatly contribute to the homodimer formation. PMID:26114780

  2. Recent Developments in the Role of High-Mobility Group Box 1 in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Schaper, Fleur; Westra, Johanna; Bijl, Marc

    2014-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is an important molecule for several nuclear processes. Recently, HMGB1 has gained much attention as a damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several (auto)-immune diseases, in particular, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A main pathogenic feature in SLE is the accumulation of apoptotic cells. Since HMGB1 is released from apoptotic cells it has been hypothesized that HMGB1 might fuel the inflammatory processes, as seen in this disease, and play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis. In this review, we discuss evidence in support of the theory that HMGB1 is an important mediator in SLE and may be considered a new autoantigen. PMID:24531837

  3. Alanine mutagenesis of high-mobility-group-protein-1 box B (HMG1-B).

    PubMed Central

    Taudte, S; Xin, H; Kallenbach, N R

    2000-01-01

    We have generated a set of alanine-scanning substitutions in high-mobility-group protein 1 box B (HMG1-B; the second domain of the HMG1 nuclear protein from the rat) in order to explore the influence of specific surface side chains on its function and folding. Guanidine hydrochloride and thermal unfolding studies have been carried out to investigate the effect of substituted residues on the folding pathway. Binding to four-way junction and linear-duplex DNA has been assayed to determine which residues play an important role in DNA binding. We have identified several mutants that are more stable or bind more tightly to the junction than the wild-type, including the particular phenylalanine side chain that is thought to intercalate into the DNA. Thus the interaction between HMG1-B and branched DNA substrates should exhibit differences from present models based on the structure of the complexes that have been solved to date. PMID:10769186

  4. Viscoplasticity of simulated high-level radioactive waste glass containing platinum group metal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uruga, Kazuyoshi; Usami, Tsuyoshi; Tsukada, Takeshi; Komamine, Satoshi; Ochi, Eiji

    2014-09-01

    The shear rate dependency of the viscosity of three simulated high-level radioactive waste glasses containing 0, 1.2 and 4.5 wt% platinum group metals (PGMs) was examined at a temperature range of 1173-1473 K by a rotating viscometer. Shear stress when the shear rate equals zero, i.e. yield stress, was also measured by capillary method. The viscosity of the glass containing no PGM was shear rate-independent Newtonian fluid. On the other hand, the apparent viscosity of the glasses containing PGMs increased with decreasing shear rate, and nonzero amount of yield stresses were detected from both glasses. The viscosity and yield stress of the glass containing 4.5 wt% PGMs was roughly one to two orders of magnitude greater than the glass containing 1.2 wt% PGMs. These viscoplastic properties were numerically expressed by Casson equation.

  5. High Accuracy Spline Explicit Group (SEG) Approximation for Two Dimensional Elliptic Boundary Value Problems

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Joan; Hj. M. Ali, Norhashidah

    2015-01-01

    Over the last few decades, cubic splines have been widely used to approximate differential equations due to their ability to produce highly accurate solutions. In this paper, the numerical solution of a two-dimensional elliptic partial differential equation is treated by a specific cubic spline approximation in the x-direction and finite difference in the y-direction. A four point explicit group (EG) iterative scheme with an acceleration tool is then applied to the obtained system. The formulation and implementation of the method for solving physical problems are presented in detail. The complexity of computational is also discussed and the comparative results are tabulated to illustrate the efficiency of the proposed method. PMID:26182211

  6. Hydrocarbon group type determination in jet fuels by high performance liquid chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoine, A. C.

    1977-01-01

    Results are given for the analysis of some jet and diesel fuel samples which were prepared from oil shale and coal syncrudes. Thirty-two samples of varying chemical composition and physical properties were obtained. Hydrocarbon types in these samples were determined by fluorescent indicator adsorption (FIA) analysis, and the results from three laboratories are presented and compared. Recently, rapid high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods have been proposed for hydrocarbon group type analysis, with some suggestion for their use as a replacement of the FIA technique. Two of these methods were used to analyze some of the samples, and these results are also presented and compared. Two samples of petroleum-based Jet A fuel are similarly analyzed.

  7. High Accuracy Spline Explicit Group (SEG) Approximation for Two Dimensional Elliptic Boundary Value Problems.

    PubMed

    Goh, Joan; Hj M Ali, Norhashidah

    2015-01-01

    Over the last few decades, cubic splines have been widely used to approximate differential equations due to their ability to produce highly accurate solutions. In this paper, the numerical solution of a two-dimensional elliptic partial differential equation is treated by a specific cubic spline approximation in the x-direction and finite difference in the y-direction. A four point explicit group (EG) iterative scheme with an acceleration tool is then applied to the obtained system. The formulation and implementation of the method for solving physical problems are presented in detail. The complexity of computational is also discussed and the comparative results are tabulated to illustrate the efficiency of the proposed method. PMID:26182211

  8. Optimization of surface plasmon resonance experiments: Case of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) interactions.

    PubMed

    Anggayasti, Wresti L; Mancera, Ricardo L; Bottomley, Steven; Helmerhorst, Erik

    2016-04-15

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a powerful technique for evaluating protein-protein interactions in real time. However, inappropriately optimized experiments can often lead to problems in the interpretation of data, leading to unreliable kinetic constants and binding models. Optimization of SPR experiments involving "sticky" proteins, or proteins that tend to aggregate, represents a typical scenario where it is important to minimize errors in the data and the kinetic analysis of those data. This is the case of High Mobility Group Box 1 and the receptor of advanced glycation end products. A number of improvements in protein purification, buffer composition, immobilization conditions, and the choice of flow rate are shown to result in substantial improvements in the accurate characterization of the interactions of these proteins and the derivation of the corresponding kinetic constants. PMID:26869083

  9. Zaire program expands to cover high-risk groups in two cities.

    PubMed

    1989-01-01

    This article announces the expansion of Zaire's social marketing program for condoms to high-risk groups in the cities of Goma and Matadi. The program will use proven marketing techniques from Kinshasha, printed materials, and direct marketing to retail outlets, emphasizing hotels, bars, and other areas frequented by prostitutes, migrants, and other travelers. In addition to retail outlets such as pharmacies, 50 taxis will be tested as additional retail sources for Prudence condoms. Once under way, this effort could reach as many as 96,000 people/day. 5 new AIDS information spots are being televised, and an anti-AIDS song and jingle are on the air. Condom social marketing representatives report a 357% increase in condom sales through March, 1989, over 1988, and that products are now available in 85% of Kinshasha pharmacies. Medical center coverage has increased to 14 from 9 zones, while products reach 11 additional cities and 5 interior provinces. PMID:12343426

  10. THE EFFECTS OF A HIGH ANIMAL FAT DIET ON THE INDUCTION OF ABERRANT CRYPT FOCI IN THE COLONS OF MALE F344/N RATS EXPOSED TO TRIHALOMETHANES IN THE DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Effects of a High Animal Fat Diet on the Induction of Aberrant Crypt Foci in the Colons of Male F344/N Rats Exposed to Trihalomethanes in the Drinking Water

    Abstract

    Aberrant crypt foci (ACF), identified as the putative precursor lesion in the development of co...

  11. Coordinative properties of highly fluorinated solvents with amino and ether groups.

    PubMed

    Boswell, Paul G; Lugert, Elizabeth C; Rbai, Jzsef; Amin, Elizabeth A; Bhlmann, Philippe

    2005-12-01

    Despite the widespread use of perfluorinated solvents with amino and ether groups in a variety of application fields, the coordinative properties of these compounds are poorly known. It is generally assumed that the electron withdrawing perfluorinated moieties render these functional groups rather inert, but little is known quantitatively about the extent of their inertness. This paper reports on the interactions between inorganic monocations and perfluorotripentylamine and 2H-perfluoro-5,8,11-trimethyl-3,6,9,12-tetraoxapentadecane, as determined with fluorous liquid-membrane cation-selective electrodes doped with tetrakis[3,5-bis(perfluorohexyl)phenyl]borate salts. The amine does not undergo measurable association with any ion tested, and its formal pK(a) is shown to be smaller than -0.5. This is consistent with the nearly planar structure of the amine at its nitrogen center, as obtained with density functional theory calculations. The tetraether interacts very weakly with Na(+) and Li(+). Assuming 1:1 stoichiometry, formal association constants were determined to be 2.3 and 1.5 M(-1), respectively. This disproves an earlier proposition that the Lewis base character in such compounds may be nonexistent. Due to the extremely low polarity of fluorous solvents and the resulting high extent of ion pair formation, a fluorophilic electrolyte salt with perfluoroalkyl substituents on both the cation and the anion had to be developed for these experiments. In its pure form, this first fluorophilic electrolyte salt is an ionic liquid with a glass transition temperature, T(g), of -18.5 degrees C. Interestingly, the molar conductivity of solutions of this salt increases very steeply in the high concentration range, making it a particularly effective electrolyte salt. PMID:16316244

  12. Chemical Derivatization of Peptide Carboxyl Groups for Highly Efficient Electron Transfer Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Brian L.; Ladror, Daniel T.; Sondalle, Samuel B.; Krusemark, Casey J.; Jue, April L.; Coon, Joshua J.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2013-11-01

    The carboxyl groups of tryptic peptides were derivatized with a tertiary or quaternary amine labeling reagent to generate more highly charged peptide ions that fragment efficiently by electron transfer dissociation (ETD). All peptide carboxyl groupsaspartic and glutamic acid side-chains as well as C-terminiwere derivatized with an average reaction efficiency of 99 %. This nearly complete labeling avoids making complex peptide mixtures even more complex because of partially-labeled products, and it allows the use of static modifications during database searching. Alkyl tertiary amines were found to be the optimal labeling reagent among the four types tested. Charge states are substantially higher for derivatized peptides: a modified tryptic digest of bovine serum albumin (BSA) generates ~90% of its precursor ions with z > 2, compared with less than 40 % for the unmodified sample. The increased charge density of modified peptide ions yields highly efficient ETD fragmentation, leading to many additional peptide identifications and higher sequence coverage (e.g., 70 % for modified versus only 43 % for unmodified BSA). The utility of this labeling strategy was demonstrated on a tryptic digest of ribosomal proteins isolated from yeast cells. Peptide derivatization of this sample produced an increase in the number of identified proteins, a >50 % increase in the sequence coverage of these proteins, and a doubling of the number of peptide spectral matches. This carboxyl derivatization strategy greatly improves proteome coverage obtained from ETD-MS/MS of tryptic digests, and we anticipate that it will also enhance identification and localization of post-translational modifications.

  13. Coordinative Properties of Highly Fluorinated Solvents with Amino and Ether Groups

    PubMed Central

    Boswell, Paul G.; Lugert, Elizabeth C.; Rbai, Jzsef; Amin, Elizabeth A.; Bhlmann, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    In spite of the widespread use of perfluorinated solvents with amino and ether groups in a variety of application fields, the coordinative properties of these compounds are poorly known. It is generally assumed that the electron withdrawing perfluorinated moieties render these functional groups rather inert, but little is known quantitatively about the extent of their inertness. This paper reports on the interactions between inorganic monocations and perfluorotripentylamine and 2H-perfluoro-5,8,11-trimethyl-3,6,9,12-tetraoxapentadecane, as determined with fluorous liquid-membrane cation-selective electrodes doped with tetrakis[3,5-bis(perfluorohexyl)phenyl]borate salts. The amine does not undergo measurable association with any ion tested, and its formal pKa is shown to be smaller than -0.5. This is consistent with the nearly planar structure of the amine at its nitrogen center, as obtained with density functional theory calculations. The tetraether interacts very weakly with Na+ and Li+. Assuming 1:1 stoichiometry, formal association constants were determined to be 2.3 and 1.5 M-1, respectively. This disproves an earlier proposition that the Lewis base character in such compounds may be non-existent. Due to the extremely low polarity of fluorous solvents and the resulting high extent of ion pair formation, a fluorophilic electrolyte salt with perfluoroalkyl substituents on both the cation and the anion had to be developed for these experiments. In its pure form, this first fluorophilic electrolyte salt is an ionic liquid with a glass transition temperature, Tg, of -18.5 C. Interestingly, the molar conductivity of solutions of this salt increases very steeply in the high concentration range, making it a particularly effective electrolyte salt. PMID:16316244

  14. High Mobility Group Box Protein-1 correlates with renal function in chronic kidney disease (CKD).

    PubMed

    Bruchfeld, Annette; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Lindholm, Bengt; Barany, Peter; Yang, Lihong; Stenvinkel, Peter; Tracey, Kevin J

    2008-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with inflammation and malnutrition and carries a markedly increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). High Mobility Group Box Protein-1 (HMGB-1) is a 30-kDa nuclear and cytosolic protein known as a transcription and growth factor, recently identified as a proinflammatory mediator of tissue injury. Recent data implicates HMGB-1 in endotoxin lethality, rheumatoid arthritis, and atherosclerosis. The aim of this post-hoc, cross-sectional study was to determine whether HMGB-1 serum levels are elevated in CKD patients. The study groups were categorized as follows: 110 patients starting dialysis defined as CKD 5; 67 patients with moderately to severely reduced renal function or CKD 3-4; and 48 healthy controls. High-sensitivity C-reactive-protein (hs-CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), serum-albumin (S-albumin), hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)), hemoglobin, subjective global nutritional assessment (SGA), and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were analyzed. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare groups and Spearman's rank correlation test was used for continuous variables. HMGB-1, measured by Western blot, was significantly (P < 0.001) elevated in CKD 5 (146.7 +/- 58.6 ng/mL) and CKD 3-4 (85.6 +/- 31.8) compared with controls (10.9 +/- 10.5). HMGB-1 levels were correlated positively with TNF (Rho = 0.52; P < 0.001), hs-CRP (Rho = 0.38; P < 0.001), IL-6 (Rho = 0.30; P < 0.001), HbA(1c) (Rho = 0.14; P = 0.02) and SGA (Rho = 0.21; P = 0.002) and negatively correlated with GFR (Rho = -0.69; P = 0.0001), Hb (Rho = -0.60; P < 0.001), S-albumin (Rho = -0.31; P < 0.001). The current study has revealed that HMGB-1 is elevated significantly in CKD patients and correlates with GFR as well as markers of inflammation and malnutrition. Future studies may delineate whether HMGB-1 is also a marker of disease activity and severity as well as a predictor of outcome in CKD. PMID:18317568

  15. Determinants of Mental Health Care Utilization in a Suicide High-risk Group With Suicidal Ideation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The suicide rate in Korea is increasing every year, and is the highest among the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development countries. Psychiatric patients in particular have a higher risk of suicide than other patients. This study was performed to evaluate determinants of mental health care utilization among individuals at high risk for suicide. Methods: Korea Health Panel data from 2009 to 2011 were used. Subjects were individuals at high risk of suicide who had suicidal ideation, a past history of psychiatric illness, or had utilized outpatient services for a psychiatric disorder associated with suicidal ideation within the past year. The chi-square test and hierarchical logistic regression were used to identify significant determinants of mental health care utilization. Results: The total number of subjects with complete data on the variables in our model was 989. Individuals suffering from three or more chronic diseases used mental health care more frequently. Mental health care utilization was higher in subjects who had middle or high levels of educational attainment, were receiving Medical Aid, or had a large family size. Conclusions: It is important to control risk factors in high-risk groups as part of suicide prevention strategies. The clinical approach, which includes community-based intervention, entails the management of reduction of suicidal risk. Our study identified demographic characteristics that have a significant impact on mental health care utilization and should be considered in the development of suicide prevention strategies. Further studies should examine the effect of mental health care utilization on reducing suicidal ideation. PMID:26841887

  16. Expression of high mobility group box 1 protein predicts a poorer prognosis for patients with osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    HE, JILIANG; ZHANG, PENG; LI, QINGHU; ZHOU, DONGSHENG; LIU, PING

    2016-01-01

    The high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein functions as an extracellular signaling molecule that is critical in inflammation and carcinogenesis. The HMGB1 protein is actively secreted by natural killer cells, monocytes and macrophages, and acts as an inflammatory cytokine. The present study enrolled 174 patients that underwent a tumorectomy between 2006 and 2013 in Shandong Provincial Hospital. The age of the patients ranged between 13 and 74 years, with a median age of 27 years. The tumors of the patients were staged according to the Union for International Cancer Control 2009 tumor-node-metastasis tumor staging system. Nuclear grading was based on the Fuhrman grading system. In the osteosarcoma tissue samples, HMGB1 expression was detected in 84 samples (48.3%) with a low immunoreactivity and in 90 samples (51.7%) with a high immunoreactivity. The association between clinicopathological characteristics and tumor cell HMGB1 expression (low vs. high) was summarized. The association between HMGB1 expression and tumor size, tumor stage and nuclear grade was statistically significant (P=0.034, 0.008 and 0.019, respectively). There was no significant association between HMGB1 expression and the age of the patients (P=0.335; Table I). The current study demonstrated that patients with a high HMGB1 expression (>50% cells expressing HMGB1) had poorer survival rates, and therefore a poorer prognosis, compared with patients with low HMGB1 immunostaining (1050% cells expressing HMGB1). The results of the present study suggest that higher expression levels of HMGB1 are significantly associated with a poorer prognosis and may act as a marker for prognosis in osteosarcoma, particularly osteosarcoma recurrence. Additional studies investigating the biological features of HMGB1 may confirm the potential role of HMGB1 as a novel target for anticancer therapy in osteosarcoma. PMID:26870206

  17. Pathogenesis of highly virulent African swine fever virus in domestic pigs exposed via intraoropharyngeal, intranasopharyngeal, and intramuscular inoculation, and by direct contact with infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Howey, Erin B; O'Donnell, Vivian; de Carvalho Ferreira, Helena C; Borca, Manuel V; Arzt, Jonathan

    2013-12-26

    To investigate the pathogenesis of African swine fever virus (ASFV), domestic pigs (n=18) were challenged with a range (10(2)-10(6) 50% hemadsorbing doses (HAD50)) of the highly virulent ASFV-Malawi strain by inoculation via the intraoropharyngeal (IOP), intranasopharyngeal (INP), or intramuscular (IM) routes. A subsequent contact challenge experiment was performed in which six IOP-inoculated donor pigs were allowed to have direct contact (DC) with six nave pigs for exposure times that varied from 24 to 72 h. All challenge routes resulted in clinical progression and postmortem lesions similar to those previously described in experimental and natural infection. The onset of clinical signs occurred between 1 and 7 days post inoculation (dpi) and included pyrexia with variable progression to obtundation, hematochezia, melena, moribundity and death with a duration of 4-11 days. Viremia was first detected between 4 and 5 dpi in all inoculation groups whereas ASFV shedding from the nasal cavity and tonsil was first detected at 3-9 dpi. IM and DC were the most consistent modes of infection, with 12/12 (100%) of pigs challenged by these routes becoming infected. Several clinical and virological parameters were significantly different between IM and DC groups indicating dissimilarity between these modes of infection. Amongst the simulated natural routes, INP inoculation resulted in the most consistent progression of disease across the widest range of doses whilst preserving simulation of natural exposure and therefore may provide a superior system for pathogenesis and vaccine efficacy investigation. PMID:24076499

  18. Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy in Hyderabad, India: barriers, facilitators and identification of target groups.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, Mark S; Douglas, G W; Sabitha Rani, G P; Chakraborty, Apurba

    2016-03-01

    SummaryWe assessed the barriers and facilitators to highly active antiretroviral therapy adherence and determined their prevalence among HIV/AIDS patients in Hyderabad, India. We conducted a cross-sectional study among HIV-infected adults prescribed highly active antiretroviral therapy and receiving care from nine clinics. Depression was screened using Patient Health Questionnaire 9 and facilitators of HIV medication adherence were assessed using an 11-item scale which yielded a total positive attitude to disease score. Prevalence ratios of non-adherence between different categories of potential risk factors were calculated. We compared mean 'facilitators to adherence' scores between the adherent and non-adherent population. Multivariable Poisson regression with robust variance was used to identify independent risk factors. Among the 211 respondents, nearly 20% were non-adherent, approximately 8% had either moderately severe or severe depression and mean score for combined facilitators to medication adherence was 33.35 (±7.88) out of a possible 44 points. Factors significantly associated with non-adherence included older age, female sex worker, moderate-to-severe depression and the combined facilitators to medication adherence score. These data from a broad range of clinical settings in Hyderabad reveal that key groups to focus on for adherence intervention are female sex workers, older persons and those with depression. PMID:25801316

  19. The high mobility group A1 molecular switch: turning on cancer can we turn it off?

    PubMed Central

    Huso, Tait H

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Emerging evidence demonstrates that the high mobility group A1 (HMGA1) chromatin remodeling protein is a key molecular switch required by cancer cells for tumor progression and a poorly differentiated, stem-like state. Because the HMGA1 gene and proteins are expressed at high levels in all aggressive tumors studied to date, research is needed to determine how to turn off this master regulatory switch in cancer. Areas covered In this review, we describe prior studies that underscore the central role of HMGA1 in refractory cancers and we discuss approaches to target HMGA1 in cancer therapy. Expert opinion Given the widespread overexpression of HMGA1 in diverse, aggressive tumors, further research to develop technology to target HMGA1 holds immense promise as potent anticancer therapy. Previous work in preclinical models indicates that delivery of short hairpin RNA or interfering RNA molecules to switch off HMGA1 expression dramatically impairs cancer cell growth and tumor progression. The advent of nanoparticle technology to systemically deliver DNA or RNA molecules to tumors brings this approach even closer to clinical applications, although further efforts are needed to translate these advances into therapies for cancer patients. PMID:24684280

  20. High-mobility group box 1 protein and its role in severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiao; Li, Wei-Qin

    2015-01-01

    The high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), which belongs to the subfamily of HMG-1/-2, is a highly conserved single peptide chain consisting of 215 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of approximately 24894 Da. HMGB1 is a ubiquitous nuclear protein in mammals and plays a vital role in inflammatory diseases. Acute pancreatitis is one of the most common causes of acute abdominal pain with a poor prognosis. Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammatory process of the pancreas (duration of less than six months), for which the severe form is called severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). More and more studies have shown that HMGB1 has a bidirectional effect in the pathogenesis of SAP. Extracellular HMGB1 can aggravate the pancreatic inflammatory process, whereas intracellular HMGB1 has a protective effect against pancreatitis. The mechanism of HMGB1 is multiple, mainly through the nuclear factor-?B pathway. Receptors for advanced glycation end-products and toll-like receptors (TLR), especially TLR-2 and TLR-4, are two major types of receptors mediating the inflammatory process triggered by HMGB1 and may be also the main mediators in the pathogenesis of SAP. HMGB1 inhibitors, such as ethyl pyruvate, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, can decrease the level of extracellular HMGB1 and are the promising targets in the treatment of SAP. PMID:25663762

  1. High-mobility group box 1 exacerbates CCl?-induced acute liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Maojian; Huang, Wenjian; Wang, Chao; Nie, Hao; Li, Gang; Sun, Ting; Yang, Fei; Zhang, Yanxiang; Shu, Kegang; Wang, Congyi; Gong, Quan

    2014-07-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a nuclear factor that can also serve as an imflammatory mediator once released into extracellular milieu. Therefore, HMGB1 has been recognized to play a pivotal role in inflammatory diseases such as sepsis, acute lung injury, ischemia reperfusion injury and type 1 diabetes. Nevertheless, its impact on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced hepatic injury is yet to be elucidated. In the present report, we demonstrated evidence indicating that high levels of HMGB1 were not only present in the necrotic area of liver but also in the serum after CCl4 challenge. In line with these observations, administration of exogenous recombinant HMGB1 exacerbated CCl4-induced hepatic injury, while HMGB1 blocking antibody provided protection for mice against CCl4-induced acute liver injury as evidenced by the decrease of serum transaminase and reduction of hepatic tissues necrosis. Mechanistic studies revealed that blockade of HMGB1 attenuated CCl4-induced MDA accumulation along with improved SOD and GSH activity. Treatment of mice with HMGB1 neutralizing antibody also significantly inhibited the production of proinflammatory mediators TNF-? and IL-6 along with attenuated HMGB1 expression and its extracellular release. Together, our data suggest an essential role for HMGB1 in CCl4-induced acute liver injury, while HMGB1 neutralizing antibody could be served as an effective regimen for preventing CCl4-induced acute liver injury. PMID:24726765

  2. Screening for celiac disease in the general population and in high-risk groups

    PubMed Central

    Card, Timothy R; Kaukinen, Katri; Bai, Julio; Zingone, Fabiana; Sanders, David S; Murray, Joseph A

    2015-01-01

    Background Celiac disease (CD) occurs in approximately 1% of the Western population. It is a lifelong disorder that is associated with impaired quality of life (QOL) and an excessive risk of comorbidity and death. Objectives To review the literature on screening for CD in relation to the current World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for mass screening. Methods We performed a PubMed search to identify indexed papers on CD screening with a publication date from 1900 until 1 June 2014. When we deemed an abstract relevant, we read the corresponding paper in detail. Results CD fulfills several WHO criteria for mass screening (high prevalence, available treatment and difficult clinical detection), but it has not yet been established that treatment of asymptomatic CD may reduce the excessive risk of severe complications, leading to higher QOL nor that it is cost-effective. Conclusions Current evidence is not sufficient to support mass screening for CD, but active case-finding may be appropriate, as we recognize that most patients with CD will still be missed by this strategy. Although proof of benefit is still lacking, screening for CD may be appropriate in high-risk groups. PMID:25922671

  3. Summary report of Working Group 3: Laser and high-gradient structure-based acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, Michael V.; Anderson, Scott G.

    2012-12-01

    Working Group (WG) 3 assessed current challenges in developing advanced accelerators based on RF and laser-driven electromagnetic (EM) structures and surveyed the state-of-the-art research and methods addressing these challenges. A critical challenge for EM structures is the gradient limitation imposed by RF breakdown, pulsed heating, dark current, quench, thermal breakdown and other factors, depending on structure type, pulse width, duty cycle and regime of operation. Other challenges include developing approaches to reduce cost and size while at the same time greatly increasing performance. WG 3 examined a variety of approaches to the improve gradient, cost, size, and performance of advanced accelerators including dielectric loaded structures, photonic bandgap structures, solid-state crystal structures, terahertz generation technologies, inverse FELs and undulators, micro-accelerators and light sources, high gradient structures, and RF sources. These approaches cover a large range of frequencies and span a considerable parameter space including room temperature and superconducting devices, THz and optical EM, and dielectric-based structures. The state of the art was surveyed in RF source and component development, materials development, advanced micro-and nano-fabrication technologies, and surface coatings for accelerator applications. WG 3 also attempted to address challenges beyond gradient limitation, including simulation challenges, high order mode characterization, measurement, and damping, field distributions producing low emittance, power efficiency, and impact of fabrication tolerances.

  4. Group social skills interventions for adults with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Spain, Debbie; Blainey, Sarah H

    2015-10-01

    Autism spectrum disorders are characterised by impairments in communication and social interaction. Social skills interventions have been found to ameliorate socio-communication deficits in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders. Little is known about the effectiveness of social skills interventions for adults with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders (hf-ASD) - a clinical population who can present with more subtle core deficits, but comparable levels of impairment and secondary difficulties. A systematic review was undertaken to investigate the effectiveness of social skills interventions for adults with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders. Five studies met the pre-specified review inclusion criteria: two quasi-experimental comparative trials and three single-arm interventions. There was a degree of variation in the structure, duration and content of the social skills interventions delivered, as well as several methodological limitations associated with included studies. Nevertheless, narrative analysis tentatively indicates that group social skills interventions may be effective for enhancing social knowledge and understanding, improving social functioning, reducing loneliness and potentially alleviating co-morbid psychiatric symptoms. PMID:26045543

  5. High-fidelity simulation among bachelor students in simulation groups and use of different roles.

    PubMed

    Thidemann, Inger-Johanne; Söderhamn, Olle

    2013-12-01

    Cost limitations might challenge the use of high-fidelity simulation as a teaching-learning method. This article presents the results of a Norwegian project including two simulation studies in which simulation teaching and learning were studied among students in the second year of a three-year bachelor nursing programme. The students were organised into small simulation groups with different roles; nurse, physician, family member and observer. Based on experiences in different roles, the students evaluated the simulation design characteristics and educational practices used in the simulation. In addition, three simulation outcomes were measured; knowledge (learning), Student Satisfaction and Self-confidence in Learning. The simulation was evaluated to be a valuable teaching-learning method to develop professional understanding and insight independent of roles. Overall, the students rated the Student Satisfaction and Self-confidence in Learning as high. Knowledge about the specific patient focus increased after the simulation activity. Students can develop practical, communication and collaboration skills, through experiencing the nurse's role. Assuming the observer role, students have the potential for vicarious learning, which could increase the learning value. Both methods of learning (practical experience or vicarious learning) may bridge the gap between theory and practice and contribute to the development of skills in reflective and critical thinking. PMID:23302256

  6. Two high-mobility group box domains act together to underwind and kink DNA

    PubMed Central

    Snchez-Giraldo, R.; Acosta-Reyes, F. J.; Malarkey, C. S.; Saperas, N.; Churchill, M. E. A.; Campos, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    High-mobility group protein 1 (HMGB1) is an essential and ubiquitous DNA architectural factor that influences a myriad of cellular processes. HMGB1 contains two DNA-binding domains, box A and box B, which have little sequence specificity but have remarkable abilities to underwind and bend DNA. Although HMGB1 box A is thought to be responsible for the majority of HMGB1DNA interactions with pre-bent or kinked DNA, little is known about how it recognizes unmodified DNA. Here, the crystal structure of HMGB1 box A bound to an AT-rich DNA fragment is reported at a resolution of 2?. Two box A domains of HMGB1 collaborate in an unusual configuration in which the Phe37 residues of both domains stack together and intercalate the same CG base pair, generating highly kinked DNA. This represents a novel mode of DNA recognition for HMGB proteins and reveals a mechanism by which structure-specific HMG boxes kink linear DNA. PMID:26143914

  7. Endoscopic gastric cancer screening and surveillance in high-risk groups.

    PubMed

    Choi, Il Ju

    2014-11-01

    Gastric cancer remains a major cancer problem world-wide and future incidence will likely increase due to rapidly aging population demographics. Population-based screening is being undertaken in Korea and Japan, where gastric cancer incidence rates are high, and seems to be effective in reducing mortality from gastric cancer. However, such strategies are difficult to implement in countries with a low incidence or limited resources. Thus, screening strategies should be directed towards high-risk population subgroups. Gastric cancer has a relatively long mean sojourn time, and prognosis of early-stage disease is excellent. In general population, screening at 2-year interval in Korea seems to be effective for early-stage diagnosis. In subjects with atrophic gastritis or intestinal metaplasia, surveillance is recommended at 1 to 3 years intervals according to European and Japanese recommendation. Screening intervals for family members with sporadic gastric cancer has not yet been adequately evaluated, but 1-year interval is recommended for hereditary diffuse gastric cancer family-members. Gastric cancer patients treated by endoscopic resection are the highest-risk group, and 1-year interval surveillance can detect most metachronous gastric cancers at an early stage. Future gastric cancer surveillance strategies using endoscopy should be guided by risk-stratification assessment, and further refinement of optimal surveillance intervals is needed. PMID:25505714

  8. Studies on the high-mobility-group non-histone proteins from hen oviduct.

    PubMed Central

    Teng, C S; Andrews, G K; Teng, C T

    1979-01-01

    Nuclear high-mobility-group (HMG) proteins were isolated from hen oviduct. These were proteins HMG-1, -2, -3, -14 and -17, which are equivalent to the classification of calf thymus HMG proteins. Hen oviduct proteins HMG-1 and -2 were individually isolated by HCIO4.extraction and CM-Sephadex chromatographic separation. Their mol.wts. were determined as 28 000 and 27 000, respectively. The proteins have a high content of acidic and basic amino acids. The association of proteins HMG-1 and -2 with the genome of hen oviduct nuclei was probed by a limited digestion with nucleases. Hen oviduct nuclei were incubated with deoxyribonuclease I or micrococcal nuclease until 10% of the DNA was digested. The nuclear suspension was centrifuged and the contents of proteins HMG-1 and -2 in the supernatant and sediment fractions were analysed by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. HMG proteins were found to be preferentially released by micrococcal-nuclease digestion rather than by deoxyribonuclease I. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:518542

  9. Extracellular High-Mobility Group Box 1 Protein (HMGB1) as a Mediator of Persistent Pain

    PubMed Central

    Agalave, Nilesh M; Svensson, Camilla I

    2014-01-01

    Although originally described as a highly conserved nuclear protein, high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) has emerged as a danger-associated molecular pattern molecule protein (DAMP) and is a mediator of innate and specific immune responses. HMGB1 is passively or actively released in response to infection, injury and cellular stress, providing chemotactic and cytokine-like functions in the extracellular environment, where it interacts with receptors such as receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and several Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Although HMGB1 was first revealed as a key mediator of sepsis, it also contributes to a number of other conditions and disease processes. Chronic pain arises as a direct consequence of injury, inflammation or diseases affecting the somatosensory system and can be devastating for the affected patients. Emerging data indicate that HMGB1 is also involved in the pathology of persistent pain. Here, we give an overview of HMGB1 as a proinflammatory mediator, focusing particularly on the role of HMGB1 in the induction and maintenance of hypersensitivity in experimental models of pain and discuss the therapeutic potential of targeting HMGB1 in conditions of chronic pain. PMID:25222915

  10. Two high-mobility group box domains act together to underwind and kink DNA.

    PubMed

    Snchez-Giraldo, R; Acosta-Reyes, F J; Malarkey, C S; Saperas, N; Churchill, M E A; Campos, J L

    2015-07-01

    High-mobility group protein 1 (HMGB1) is an essential and ubiquitous DNA architectural factor that influences a myriad of cellular processes. HMGB1 contains two DNA-binding domains, box A and box B, which have little sequence specificity but have remarkable abilities to underwind and bend DNA. Although HMGB1 box A is thought to be responsible for the majority of HMGB1-DNA interactions with pre-bent or kinked DNA, little is known about how it recognizes unmodified DNA. Here, the crystal structure of HMGB1 box A bound to an AT-rich DNA fragment is reported at a resolution of 2?. Two box A domains of HMGB1 collaborate in an unusual configuration in which the Phe37 residues of both domains stack together and intercalate the same CG base pair, generating highly kinked DNA. This represents a novel mode of DNA recognition for HMGB proteins and reveals a mechanism by which structure-specific HMG boxes kink linear DNA. PMID:26143914

  11. High Mobility Group Box2 Promoter-controlled Suicide Gene Expression Enables Targeted Glioblastoma Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Balani, Poonam; Boulaire, Jerome; Zhao, Ying; Zeng, Jieming; Lin, Jiakai; Wang, Shu

    2009-01-01

    Achievement of specific tumor cell targeting remains a challenge for glioma gene therapy. We observed that the human high mobility group box2 (HMGB2) gene had a low level of expression in normal human brain tissues, but was significantly upregulated in glioblastoma tissues. With progressive truncation of a 5?-upstream sequence of the HMGB2 gene, we identified a 0.5-kb fragment displaying a high transcriptional activity in glioblastoma cells, but a low activity in normal brain cells. To test the feasibility of using the HMGB2 promoter sequence in targeted cancer therapy, we constructed a baculoviral vector expressing the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) gene driven by the HMGB2 promoter. Transduction with the viral vector induced cell death in glioblastoma cell lines in the presence of ganciclovir (GCV), but did not affect the survival of human astrocytes and neurons. In a mouse xenograft model, intratumor injection of the baculoviral vector suppressed the growth of human glioblastoma cells and prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Our results suggest that the novel 5? sequence of HMGB2 gene has a potential to be used as an efficient, tumor-selective promoter in targeted vectors for glioblastoma gene therapy. PMID:19240692

  12. Compaction of chromatin by diverse Polycomb group proteins requires localized regions of high charge

    PubMed Central

    Grau, Daniel J.; Chapman, Brad A.; Garlick, Joe D.; Borowsky, Mark; Francis, Nicole J.; Kingston, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are required for the epigenetic maintenance of developmental genes in a silent state. Proteins in the Polycomb-repressive complex 1 (PRC1) class of the PcG are conserved from flies to humans and inhibit transcription. One hypothesis for PRC1 mechanism is that it compacts chromatin, based in part on electron microscopy experiments demonstrating that Drosophila PRC1 compacts nucleosomal arrays. We show that this function is conserved between Drosophila and mouse PRC1 complexes and requires a region with an overrepresentation of basic amino acids. While the active region is found in the Posterior Sex Combs (PSC) subunit in Drosophila, it is unexpectedly found in a different PRC1 subunit, a Polycomb homolog called M33, in mice. We provide experimental support for the general importance of a charged region by predicting the compacting capability of PcG proteins from species other than Drosophila and mice and by testing several of these proteins using solution assays and microscopy. We infer that the ability of PcG proteins to compact chromatin in vitro can be predicted by the presence of domains of high positive charge and that PRC1 components from a variety of species conserve this highly charged region. This supports the hypothesis that compaction is a key aspect of PcG function. PMID:22012622

  13. Rapid detection of the "highly virulent" group B Streptococcus ST-17 clone.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Marie-Cécile; Dramsi, Shaynoor; Billoët, Annick; Réglier-Poupet, Hélène; Tazi, Asmaa; Raymond, Josette; Guérin, François; Couvé, Elisabeth; Kunst, Frank; Glaser, Philippe; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Poyart, Claire

    2006-06-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) revealed that the sequence type ST-17 defines a "highly virulent" serotype III clone strongly associated with neonatal invasive infections. Our aim was to identify a target sequence enabling rapid, simple, and specific detection of this clone by a real-time PCR assay. Conventional methods for DNA manipulation and gene analyses were used to characterize the gbs2018 gene variant specific for ST-17 clone and to design ST-17- and GBS-specific primers. Conventional and real-time PCR assays were developed to detect GBS and ST-17 clones in bacterial cultures and directly on clinical samples. One hundred and fifty-six French GBS strains from various geographical areas in France isolated between 1990 and 2005 were screened by PCR with ST-17-specific primers. Forty strains were positive, and all were validated by MLST as ST-17. A representative sampling of 49 ST-17-PCR-negative strains was confirmed by MLST as non-ST-17. Real-time PCR was further used to directly test 85 vaginal samples. Among these, 13 were GBS-positive, and one was identified as ST-17. The association between strain invasiveness and ST-17 lineage in neonates with late onset disease was highly significant: 78% (P<0.0001) of strains isolated were ST-17. In conclusion, an ST-17-specific gbs2018 allele was identified and used to develop a sensitive and specific rapid-screening molecular assay for identifying ST-17 "highly virulent" GBS. Using this technique, accurate identification of women and neonates colonized by ST-17 can be readily achieved within less than 2 h. PMID:16822689

  14. The Local Group as a time machine: studying the high-redshift Universe with nearby galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Weisz, Daniel R.; Johnson, Benjamin D.; Bullock, James S.; Conroy, Charlie; Fitts, Alex

    2015-10-01

    We infer the UV luminosities of Local Group galaxies at early cosmic times (z 2 and z 7) by combining stellar population synthesis modelling with star formation histories derived from deep colour-magnitude diagrams constructed from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations. Our analysis provides a basis for understanding high-z galaxies - including those that may be unobservable even with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) - in the context of familiar, well-studied objects in the very low-z Universe. We find that, at the epoch of reionization, all Local Group dwarfs were less luminous than the faintest galaxies detectable in deep HST observations of blank fields. We predict that JWST will observe z 7 progenitors of galaxies similar to the Large Magellanic Cloud today; however, the HST Frontier Fields initiative may already be observing such galaxies, highlighting the power of gravitational lensing. Consensus reionization models require an extrapolation of the observed blank-field luminosity function (LF) at z ? 7 by at least 2 orders of magnitude in order to maintain reionization. This scenario requires the progenitors of the Fornax and Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxies to be contributors to the ionizing background at z 7. Combined with numerical simulations, our results argue for a break in the UV LF from a faint-end slope of ? -2 at MUV ? -13 to ? -1.2 at lower luminosities. Applied to photometric samples at lower redshifts, our analysis suggests that HST observations in lensing fields at z 2 are capable of probing galaxies with luminosities comparable to the expected progenitor of Fornax.

  15. Dysregulation of cardiac autonomic function in offspring exposed to alcohol during antenatal period.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Sajish; Abhishekh, Hulegar A; Murthy, Pratima; Raju, Trichur R; Sathyaprabha, Talakad N

    2015-10-01

    Several lines of investigations have shown the deleterious effect of an alcohol on the autonomic nervous system. Recent evidence shows that infants exposed to alcohol during the antenatal period displayed aberration in the cardiac autonomic function after the birth. However, there is dearth of literature on the long term influence of antenatal alcohol exposure. In this study we measured the cardiac autonomic functions in children who were exposed to alcohol in the antenatal period and compared them with non-exposed control children. Twenty eight children (age: 92 years) in the antenatal alcohol exposed group and age, gender matched 30 non exposed healthy volunteers as a control (age: 102 years) were recruited. Electrocardiogram was recorded in all subjects at rest in the supine position. HRV parameters were analyzed in the time and frequency domains using customized software. The average heart rate was similar between both the groups. There was no statistical significant difference in the time domain measures between the groups. However, the low frequency power, normalized units and low frequency to high frequency ratio were significantly higher in the antenatal alcohol exposed children compared to the controls. This suggests sympathetic predominance in children who were exposed to alcohol in the antenatal period. In this study we provide evidence for the deleterious long lasting effect of antenatal exposure of alcohol on cardiac autonomic regulation. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm the causal relationship between antenatal alcohol exposure and autonomic dysregulation. PMID:26211431

  16. Development of group IV molecular catalysts for high temperature ethylene-α-olefin copolymerization reactions.

    PubMed

    Klosin, Jerzy; Fontaine, Philip P; Figueroa, Ruth

    2015-07-21

    This Account describes our research related to the development of molecular catalysts for solution phase olefin polymerization. Specifically, a series of constrained geometry and nonmetallocene (imino-amido-type) complexes were developed for high temperature olefin polymerization reactions. We have discovered many highly active catalysts that are capable of operating at temperatures above 120 °C and producing copolymers with a useful range of molecular weights (from medium to ultrahigh depending on precatalyst identity and polymerization conditions) and α-olefin incorporation capability. Constrained geometry catalysts (CGCs) exhibit very high activities and are capable of producing a variety of copolymers including ethylene-propylene and ethylene-1-octene copolymers at high reactor temperatures. Importantly, CGCs have much higher reactivity toward α-olefins than classical Ziegler-Natta catalysts, thus allowing for the production of copolymers with any desired level of comonomer. In search of catalysts with improved performance, we discovered 3-amino-substituted indenyl-based CGCs that exhibit the highest activity and produce copolymers with the highest molecular weight within this family of catalysts. Phenanthrenyl-based CGCs were found to be outstanding catalysts for the effective production of high styrene content ethylene-styrene copolymers under industrially relevant conditions. In contrast to CGC ligands, imino-amido-type ligands are bidentate and monoionic, leading to the use of trialkyl group IV precatalysts. The thermal instability of imino-amido complexes was addressed by the development of imino-enamido and amidoquinoline complexes, which are not only thermally very robust, but also produce copolymers with higher molecular weights, and exhibit improved α-olefin incorporation. Imido-amido and imino-enamido catalysts undergo facile chain transfer reactions with metal alkyls, as evidenced by a sharp decrease in polymer molecular weight when the polymerization reactions were conducted in the presence of diethylzinc, an essential requirement for use in the production of olefin block copolymers via chain shuttling polymerization. Overall, the excellent characteristics of imino-amido-type catalysts, including high catalytic activities and ultrahigh molecular weight capabilities, make them good candidates for high temperature syntheses of block and random ethylene-α-olefin copolymers. Additionally, trialkyl imino-enamido complexes react quickly with various protic and unsaturated organic fragments, leading to a library of dialkyl precatalysts that, in several instances, resulted in superior catalysts. In conjunction with the development of transition metal catalysts, we also synthesized and evaluated activators for olefin polymerization. We found, for example, that, when conducted in coordinating solvents, the reaction between aluminum alkyls and tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane leads to the exclusive formation of alumenium borates, which are excellent activators for CGC complexes. Additionally, we developed a series of highly effective new activators featuring a very weakly coordinating anion composed of two Lewis acids coordinated to an imidazole fragment. PMID:26151395

  17. Effect of exposing two commercial manufacturers' second surface silver/glass mirrors to elevated temperature, mechanical loading, and high-humidity environments

    SciTech Connect

    Dake, L.S.; Lind, M.A.

    1982-04-01

    A preliminary examination of the effect of three accelerated exposure parameters on second surface silver/glass mirrors was performed. The variables studied were temperature (elevated and sub-zero), humidity and mechanical loading. One test consisted of exposing mirror coupons to dry heat (80/sup 0/C) and heat plus water vapor (80/sup 0/C, approx. 100% RH) environments. Another test consisted of subjecting mechanically loaded mirror strips to sub-zero temperature (-20/sup 0/C), dry heat (80/sup 0/C), and heat plus water vapor. Samples were evaluated qualitatively using dark field microscopy (1X and 100X). Quantitative determination of the effects of exposure testing on the mirrors was done with spectrophotometer spectral hemispherical and diffuse reflectance measurements. Degradation that was progressive with time was observed for mirrors exposed to dry heat and heat plus water vapor. The degradation did not have the same visual appearance for the two environments. Mechanical loading at -20/sup 0/C produced no degradation after three months' exposure time. Mechanical loading in dry heat and heat plus water vapor environments resulted in mirror degradation that was the same as that found in unloaded mirrors exposed to the same temperature and humidity. These preliminary tests indicate that the dry heat and heat plus water vapor accelerated tests may provide useful information about mirror degradation, while the mechanical load tests do not. The microscopy and spectrophotometer reflectance measurements were both useful techniques for determining the extent of degradation.

  18. Group-III nitride based high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) with barrier/spacer layer

    DOEpatents

    Chavarkar, Prashant; Smorchkova, Ioulia P.; Keller, Stacia; Mishra, Umesh; Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw; Wu, Yifeng

    2005-02-01

    A Group III nitride based high electron mobility transistors (HEMT) is disclosed that provides improved high frequency performance. One embodiment of the HEMT comprises a GaN buffer layer, with an Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y N (y=1 or y 1) layer on the GaN buffer layer. An Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x N (0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5) barrier layer on to the Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y N layer, opposite the GaN buffer layer, Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y N layer having a higher Al concentration than that of the Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x N barrier layer. A preferred Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y N layer has y=1 or y.about.1 and a preferred Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x N barrier layer has 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5. A 2DEG forms at the interface between the GaN buffer layer and the Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y N layer. Respective source, drain and gate contacts are formed on the Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x N barrier layer. The HEMT can also comprising a substrate adjacent to the buffer layer, opposite the Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y N layer and a nucleation layer between the Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x N buffer layer and the substrate.

  19. Interactions of the high-mobility-group-like Ceratitis capitata C1 proteins with DNA.

    PubMed

    Marquez, G; Rodriguez, A T; Fernandez, B A; Montero, F

    1987-06-01

    We have studied the interactions of the high-mobility-group-like proteins (C1a1, C1a2 and C1b) from the fruit fly Ceratitis capitata with DNA. Nitrocellulose filter binding assays, thermal denaturation studies and spectrofluorimetry of the complexes revealed the existence of specific and nonspecific interactions. Thermal denaturation curves showed that the three proteins stabilized the DNA, thus suggesting a preferential binding to double-stranded DNA. The calculation of the thermodynamic parameters of the interactions showed that the nonspecific bindings were characterized by low association constants (Ka) with values ranging from 2.7 X 10(4) M-1 to 2.0 X 10(6) M-1. Also, the cooperativity of these interactions was relatively high (cooperativity factor, w, values ranging over 20-35), and the number of nucleotides involved was low (1-3 base pairs). On the other hand, the existence of specific interactions between C1 proteins and DNA was suggested by two facts: the retention of C. capitata [3H]DNA in nitrocellulose filters was only a low percentage of total input DNA and there was a marked size dependence of the binding (25% retention of a 40-kb DNA and only 3% retention with a DNA of 1 kb). The specific bindings had higher Ka values than the nonspecific ones, and they also were cooperative. Some differences were observed between C1b and the C1a proteins about the way they interact with C. capitata DNA. PMID:3595593

  20. Socialization of Physical and Social Aggression in Early Adolescents' Peer Groups: High-Status Peers, Individual Status, and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Bing; Xie, Hongling

    2012-01-01

    The influence of high-status peers on a target individual's physical and manipulative social aggression in peer groups was examined in a diverse sample of seventh-grade students. A total of 245 individual members belonging to 65 groups were included in analyses. Aggression was assessed by peer and victim nominations in the fall and spring

  1. Group Intervention as One Facet of a Multi-Component Intervention with High Risk Mothers and Their Babies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarrett, Marian H.; Diamond, Linda T.; El-Mohandes, Ayman

    2000-01-01

    This article describes the Pride in Parenting Group Intervention Curriculum, developed as part of a multicomponent intervention with a population of indigent African American women and their infants. Exit interviews with 57 mothers indicated parent satisfaction was high for developmental and parenting information and for the support of the group

  2. Socialization of Physical and Social Aggression in Early Adolescents' Peer Groups: High-Status Peers, Individual Status, and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Bing; Xie, Hongling

    2012-01-01

    The influence of high-status peers on a target individual's physical and manipulative social aggression in peer groups was examined in a diverse sample of seventh-grade students. A total of 245 individual members belonging to 65 groups were included in analyses. Aggression was assessed by peer and victim nominations in the fall and spring…

  3. The Effects of Individual or Group Guidelines on the Calibration Accuracy and Achievement of High School Biology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bol, Linda; Hacker, Douglas J.; Walck, Camilla C.; Nunnery, John A.

    2012-01-01

    A 2 x 2 factorial design was employed in a quasi-experiment to investigate the effects of guidelines in group or individual settings on the calibration accuracy and achievement of 82 high school biology students. Significant main effects indicated that calibration practice with guidelines and practice in group settings increased prediction and

  4. High Mobility Group B Proteins, Their Partners, and Other Redox Sensors in Ovarian and Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Barreiro-Alonso, Aida; Lamas-Maceiras, Mnica; Rodrguez-Belmonte, Esther; Vizoso-Vzquez, ngel; Quinds, Mara; Cerdn, M Esperanza

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells try to avoid the overproduction of reactive oxygen species by metabolic rearrangements. These cells also develop specific strategies to increase ROS resistance and to express the enzymatic activities necessary for ROS detoxification. Oxidative stress produces DNA damage and also induces responses, which could help the cell to restore the initial equilibrium. But if this is not possible, oxidative stress finally activates signals that will lead to cell death. High mobility group B (HMGB) proteins have been previously related to the onset and progressions of cancers of different origins. The protein HMGB1 behaves as a redox sensor and its structural changes, which are conditioned by the oxidative environment, are associated with different functions of the protein. This review describes recent advances in the role of human HMGB proteins and other proteins interacting with them, in cancerous processes related to oxidative stress, with special reference to ovarian and prostate cancer. Their participation in the molecular mechanisms of resistance to cisplatin, a drug commonly used in chemotherapy, is also revised. PMID:26682011

  5. High-Mobility Group A2 Protein Modulates hTERT Transcription To Promote Tumorigenesis ?

    PubMed Central

    Li, Angela Ying-Jian; Lin, Her Helen; Kuo, Ching-Ying; Shih, Hsiu-Ming; Wang, Clay Chia Chun; Yen, Yun; Ann, David Kong

    2011-01-01

    The high-mobility group A2 gene (HMGA2) is one of the most frequently amplified genes in human cancers. However, functions of HMGA2 in tumorigenesis are not fully understood due to limited knowledge of its targets in tumor cells. Our study reveals a novel link between HMGA2 and the regulation of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), the catalytic subunit of telomerase, which offers critical insight into how HMGA2 contributes to tumorigenesis. The expression of HMGA2 modulates the expression of hTERT, resulting in cells with enhanced telomerase activities and increased telomere length. Treatment with suberoylanilide hydroxamide (SAHA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, causes dose-dependent hTERT reporter activation, mimicking HMGA2 overexpression. By interacting with Sp1, HMGA2 interferes with the recruitment of HDAC2 to the hTERT proximal promoter, enhancing localized histone H3-K9 acetylation and thereby stimulating hTERT expression and telomerase activity. Moreover, HMGA2 knockdown by short hairpin HMGA2 in HepG2 cells leads to progressive telomere shortening and a concurrent decrease of steady-state hTERT mRNA levels, attenuating their ability to form colonies in soft agar. Importantly, HMGA2 partially replaces the function of hTERT during the tumorigenic transformation of normal human fibroblasts. These findings are potentially clinically relevant, because HMGA2 expression is reported to be upregulated in a number of human cancers as telomere maintenance is essential for tumorigenesis. PMID:21536653

  6. High-mobility group box-1 induces vascular remodelling processes via c-Jun activation

    PubMed Central

    Zabini, Diana; Crnkovic, Slaven; Xu, Hui; Tscherner, Maria; Ghanim, Bahil; Klepetko, Walter; Olschewski, Andrea; Kwapiszewska, Grazyna; Marsh, Leigh M

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) acts as a signalling molecule during inflammation, cell differentiation and angiogenesis. Increased abundance of HMGB1 is associated with several pathological disorders such as cancer, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In this study, we investigated the relevance of HMGB1 in the pathological remodelling present in patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) and pulmonary hypertension (PH) associated with COPD. Remodelled vessels present in COPD with PH and IPAH lung samples were often surrounded by HMGB1-positive cells. Increased HMGB1 serum levels were detected in both patient populations compared to control samples. The effects of physiological HMGB1 concentrations were then examined on cellular responses in vitro. HMGB1 enhanced proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC) and primary human arterial endothelial cells (PAEC). HMGB1 stimulated p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation. Furthermore, activation of the downstream AP-1 complex proteins c-Fos and c-Jun was observed. Silencing of c-Jun ablated the HMGB1-induced proliferation in PASMC. Thus, an inflammatory component such as HMGB1 can contribute to PASMC and PAEC proliferation and therefore potentially to vascular remodelling and PH pathogenesis. PMID:25726846

  7. High-mobility group A1 proteins are overexpressed in human leukaemias.

    PubMed Central

    Pierantoni, Giovanna Maria; Agosti, Valter; Fedele, Monica; Bond, Heather; Caliendo, Irene; Chiappetta, Gennaro; Lo Coco, Francesco; Pane, Fabrizio; Turco, Maria Caterina; Morrone, Giovanni; Venuta, Salvatore; Fusco, Alfredo

    2003-01-01

    High-mobility group A (HMGA) proteins are non-histone nuclear proteins that bind DNA and several transcription factors. They are involved in the regulation of chromatin structure and function. HMGA protein expression is low in normal adult tissues, but abundant during embryonic development and in several human tumours. Rearrangements of the HMGA genes have been frequently detected in human benign tumours of mesenchymal origin, e.g. lipomas, lung hamartomas and uterine leiomiomas. HMGA proteins have been implicated in the control of cell growth and differentiation of the pre-adipocytic cell line 3T3-L1. In an attempt to better understand the role of HMGA1 proteins in haematological neoplasias and in the differentiation of haematopietic cells, we have investigated their expression in human leukaemias and in leukaemic cell lines induced to terminal differentiation. Here we report HMGA1 overexpression in most fresh human leukaemias of different origin and in several leukaemic cell lines. Moreover, differentiation of three cell lines towards the megakaryocytic phenotype was associated with HMGA1 protein induction, whereas induction of erythroid and monocytic differentiation generally resulted in reduced HMGA1 expression. PMID:12573034

  8. High-Quality Ultra-Compact Grid Layout of Grouped Networks.

    PubMed

    Yoghourdjian, Vahan; Dwyer, Tim; Gange, Graeme; Kieffer, Steve; Klein, Karsten; Marriott, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Prior research into network layout has focused on fast heuristic techniques for layout of large networks, or complex multi-stage pipelines for higher quality layout of small graphs. Improvements to these pipeline techniques, especially for orthogonal-style layout, are difficult and practical results have been slight in recent years. Yet, as discussed in this paper, there remain significant issues in the quality of the layouts produced by these techniques, even for quite small networks. This is especially true when layout with additional grouping constraints is required. The first contribution of this paper is to investigate an ultra-compact, grid-like network layout aesthetic that is motivated by the grid arrangements that are used almost universally by designers in typographical layout. Since the time when these heuristic and pipeline-based graph-layout methods were conceived, generic technologies (MIP, CP and SAT) for solving combinatorial and mixed-integer optimization problems have improved massively. The second contribution of this paper is to reassess whether these techniques can be used for high-quality layout of small graphs. While they are fast enough for graphs of up to 50 nodes we found these methods do not scale up. Our third contribution is a large-neighborhood search meta-heuristic approach that is scalable to larger networks. PMID:26390477

  9. High mobility group box 1 is a novel deacetylation target of Sirtuin1

    PubMed Central

    Rabadi, May M.; Xavier, Sandhya; Vasko, Radovan; Kaur, Kavneet; Goligorksy, Michael S.; Ratliff, Brian B.

    2014-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) undergoes acetylation, nuclear-to-cytoplasmic translocation and release from stressed kidneys, unleashing a signaling cascade of events leading to systemic inflammation. Here we tested whether the deacetylase activity of Sirtuin1 (SIRT1) participates in regulating nuclear retention of HMGB1 to ultimately modulate damage signaling initiated by HMGB1 secretion during stress. When immunoprecipitated acetylated HMGB1 was incubated with SIRT1, HMGB1 acetylation decreased by 57%. Proteomic analysis showed that SIRT1 deacetylates HMGB1 at four lysine residues (55, 88, 90 and 177) within the pro-inflammatory and nuclear localization signal domains of HMGB1. Genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of SIRT1 in endothelial cells increased HMGB1 acetylation and translocation. In vivo, deletion of SIRT1 reduced nuclear HMGB1 while increasing its acetylation and release into circulation during basal and ischemic conditions causing increased renal damage. Conversely, resveratrol pretreatment led to decreased HMGB1 acetylation, its nuclear retention, decreased systemic release and reduced tubular damage. Thus, a vicious cycle is set into motion in which the inflammation-induced repression of SIRT1 disables deacetylation of HMGB1, facilitates its nuclear-to-cytoplasmic translocation and systemic release, thereby maintaining inflammation. PMID:24940804

  10. High-mobility group box 1 is a novel deacetylation target of Sirtuin1.

    PubMed

    Rabadi, May M; Xavier, Sandhya; Vasko, Radovan; Kaur, Kavneet; Goligorksy, Michael S; Ratliff, Brian B

    2015-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) undergoes acetylation, nuclear-to-cytoplasmic translocation, and release from stressed kidneys, unleashing a signaling cascade of events leading to systemic inflammation. Here, we tested whether the deacetylase activity of Sirtuin1 (SIRT1) participates in regulating nuclear retention of HMGB1 to ultimately modulate damage signaling initiated by HMGB1 secretion during stress. When immunoprecipitated acetylated HMGB1 was incubated with SIRT1, HMGB1 acetylation decreased by 57%. Proteomic analysis showed that SIRT1 deacetylates HMGB1 at four lysine residues (55, 88, 90, and 177) within the proinflammatory and nuclear localization signal domains of HMGB1. Genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of SIRT1 in endothelial cells increased HMGB1 acetylation and translocation. In vivo, deletion of SIRT1 reduced nuclear HMGB1 while increasing its acetylation and release into circulation during basal and ischemic conditions, causing increased renal damage. Conversely, resveratrol pretreatment led to decreased HMGB1 acetylation, its nuclear retention, decreased systemic release, and reduced tubular damage. Thus, a vicious cycle is set into motion in which the inflammation-induced repression of SIRT1 disables deacetylation of HMGB1, facilitates its nuclear-to-cytoplasmic translocation, and systemic release, thereby maintaining inflammation. PMID:24940804

  11. Understanding Patterns Of High-Cost Health Care Use Across Different Substance User Groups.

    PubMed

    Gryczynski, Jan; Schwartz, Robert P; O'Grady, Kevin E; Restivo, Lauren; Mitchell, Shannon G; Jaffe, Jerome H

    2016-01-01

    Substance use contributes to significant societal burdens, including high-cost health care use. However, these burdens may vary by type of substance and level of involvement. Using the 2009-13 National Surveys on Drug Use and Health, we examined all-cause hospitalizations and estimated costs across substance use profiles for alcohol, marijuana, and other illicit drugs. For each substance, we characterized differences between abstainers, nondiagnostic users (people who used the substance but did not meet diagnostic criteria for substance use disorder), and people with substance use disorders. In a multivariate analysis, we found that the odds of hospitalization were 16percent lower for nondiagnostic marijuana users and 11percent lower for nondiagnostic alcohol users, compared to abstainers. Neither alcohol- nor marijuana-specific substance use disorders were associated with hospitalization. In contrast, substance use disorders for other illicit drugs were strongly associated with hospitalization: People with those disorders had 2.2 times higher odds of hospitalization relative to abstainers. A more detailed understanding of health care use in different substance user groups could inform the ongoing expansion of substance use services in the United States. PMID:26733696

  12. High mobility group protein-mediated transcription requires DNA damage marker ?-H2AX.

    PubMed

    Singh, Indrabahadur; Ozturk, Nihan; Cordero, Julio; Mehta, Aditi; Hasan, Diya; Cosentino, Claudia; Sebastian, Carlos; Krger, Marcus; Looso, Mario; Carraro, Gianni; Bellusci, Saverio; Seeger, Werner; Braun, Thomas; Mostoslavsky, Raul; Barreto, Guillermo

    2015-07-01

    The eukaryotic genome is organized into chromatins, the physiological template for DNA-dependent processes including replication, recombination, repair, and transcription. Chromatin-mediated transcription regulation involves DNA methylation, chromatin remodeling, and histone modifications. However, chromatin also contains non-histone chromatin-associated proteins, of which the high-mobility group (HMG) proteins are the most abundant. Although it is known that HMG proteins induce structural changes of chromatin, the processes underlying transcription regulation by HMG proteins are poorly understood. Here we decipher the molecular mechanism of transcription regulation mediated by the HMG AT-hook 2 protein (HMGA2). We combined proteomic, ChIP-seq, and transcriptome data to show that HMGA2-induced transcription requires phosphorylation of the histone variant H2AX at S139 (H2AXS139ph; ?-H2AX) mediated by the protein kinase ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM). Furthermore, we demonstrate the biological relevance of this mechanism within the context of TGF?1 signaling. The interplay between HMGA2, ATM, and H2AX is a novel mechanism of transcription initiation. Our results link H2AXS139ph to transcription, assigning a new function for this DNA damage marker. Controlled chromatin opening during transcription may involve intermediates with DNA breaks that may require mechanisms that ensure the integrity of the genome. PMID:26045162

  13. High mobility group box 1-mediated autophagy promotes neuroblastoma cell chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Zhang, Huiping; Sun, Min; Yin, Zhanghua; Qian, Jihong

    2015-12-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is one of the most common tumors in childhood. Unfortunately, the survival outcomes remain unsatisfactory since NB commonly develops multidrug resistance. Recent studies have demonstrated that the high mobility group box1 (HMGB1)-mediated autophagy promotes chemoresistance in osteosarcoma, lung adenocarcinoma and ovarian cancer, but the exact molecular mechanism underlying HMGB1-mediated autophagy in NB has not been clearly defined. In the present study, we investigated the role of HMGB1 in the development of resistance to anticancer agents in NB. Anticancer agents including doxorubicin, cisplatin and etoposide each induced HMGB1 upregulation, promoted cytosolic HMGB1 translocation and the elevation of autophagic activity in human NBcells. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of HMGB1 restored the chemosensitivity of NBcells. Furthermore, mechanistic investigation revealed that HMGB1 promoted the proliferative activity and invasive potential of NBcells. HMGB1 enhanced drug resistance by inducing Beclin-1-mediated autophagy, an intracellular self-defense mechanism known to confer drug resistance. In addition, we found that HMGB1 facilitated autophagic progression and reduced oxidative stress induced by doxorubicin. Therefore, through its role as a regulator of autophagy, HMGB1 is a critical factor in the development of chemoresistance and tumorigenesis, and it may be a novel target for improving the efficacy of NB therapy. PMID:26397184

  14. Endotoxin tolerance alleviates experimental acute liver failure via inhibition of high mobility group box 1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Nai-Bin; Ni, Shun-Lan; Li, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Sai-Nan; Hu, Dan-Ping; Lu, Ming-Qin

    2015-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) has been widely reported to mediate damage caused by inflammatory responses. The aim of our study is to investigate the role of HMGB1 in endotoxin tolerance (ET) alleviating inflammation of acute liver failure (ALF) rats and its possible signaling mechanism. To mimic ET, male Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with low dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (0.1 mg/kg once a day intraperitoneally for consecutive five days) before subsequent ALF induction. ALF was induced by intraperitoneal administration of D-GalN/LPS. ET induced by LPS pretreatment significantly improved the survival rate of ALF rats. Moreover, after ALF induction, ET+ALF rats exhibited lower serum enzyme (ALT, AST and TBiL) levels, lower production of inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-a and HMGB1) and more minor liver histopathological damage than ALF rats. ET+ALF rats showed enhanced expression levels of HMGB1, decreased levels of STAT1 and p-STAT1, augmented expression of SOCS1 in liver tissues than ALF rats. These results indicated that ET induced by low-dose LPS pretreatment may alleviate inflammation and liver injury in experimental acute liver failure rats mainly through inhibition of hepatic HMGB1 translocation and release. PMID:26464648

  15. Group-type hydrocarbon standards for high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis of middistillate fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterson, D. A.; Seng, G. T.

    1984-01-01

    A new high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method for group-type analysis of middistillate fuels is described. It uses a refractive index detector and standards that are prepared by reacting a portion of the fuel sample with sulfuric acid. A complete analysis of a middistillate fuel for saturates and aromatics (including the preparation of the standard) requires about 15 min if standards for several fuels are prepared simultaneously. From model fuel studies, the method was found to be accurate to within 0.4 vol% saturates or aromatics, and provides a precision of + or - 0.4 vol%. Olefin determinations require an additional 15 min of analysis time. However, this determination is needed only for those fuels displaying a significant olefin response at 200 nm (obtained routinely during the saturated/aromatics analysis procedure). The olefin determination uses the responses of the olefins and the corresponding saturates, as well as the average value of their refractive index sensitivity ratios (1.1). Studied indicated that, although the relative error in the olefins result could reach 10 percent by using this average sensitivity ratio, it was 5 percent for the fuels used in this study. Olefin concentrations as low as 0.1 vol% have been determined using this method.

  16. Dynamical density-matrix renormalization group for the Mott Hubbard insulator in high dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimoto, Satoshi; Gebhard, Florian; Jeckelmann, Eric

    2004-10-01

    We study the Hubbard model at half band-filling on a Bethe lattice with infinite coordination number in the paramagnetic insulating phase at zero temperature. We use the dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) mapping to a single-impurity Anderson model with a bath whose properties have to be determined self-consistently. For a controlled and systematic implementation of the self-consistency scheme we use the fixed-energy approach to the DMFT (FE-DMFT). In FE-DMFT, the onset and the width of the Hubbard bands are adjusted self-consistently but the energies of the bath levels are kept fixed relatively to both band edges during the calculation of self-consistent hybridization strengths between impurity and bath sites. Using the dynamical density-matrix renormalization group method (DDMRG) we calculate the density of states with a resolution ranging from 3% of the bare bandwidth W = 4t at high energies to 0.5% in the vicinity of the gap. The DDMRG resolution and accuracy for the density of states and the gap is superior to those obtained with other numerical methods in previous DMFT investigations. We find that the Mott gap closes at a critical coupling Uc/t = 4.45 0.05. At U = 4.5t, we observe prominent shoulders near the onset of the Hubbard bands. They are the remainders of the quasi-particle resonance in the metallic phase which appears to split when the gap opens at Uc.

  17. High Mobility Group Box Protein 1 (HMGB1): The Prototypical Endogenous Danger Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huan; Wang, Haichao; Chavan, Sangeeta S; Andersson, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    High mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1) is an evolutionary ancient nuclear protein that exerts divergent biological tasks inside and outside of cells. The functions of HMGB1 depend on location, binding partners and redox states of the molecule. In the nucleus, HMGB1 organizes DNA and nucleosomes and regulates gene transcription. Upon cell activation or injury, nuclear HMGB1 can translocate to the cytoplasm, where it is involved in inflammasome activation and pyroptosis, as well as regulation of the autophagy/apoptosis balance. When actively secreted or passively released into the extracellular milieu, HMGB1 has cytokine, chemokine, neuroimmune and metabolic activities. Thus, HMGB1 plays multiple roles in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases and mediates immune responses that range from inflammation and bacterial killing to tissue repair. HMGB1 has been associated with divergent clinical conditions such as sepsis, rheumatoid arthritis and atherosclerosis. HMGB1 initiates and perpetuates immune responses during infectious and sterile inflammation, as the archetypical alarmin and damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecule. We here describe advances in the understanding of HMGB1 biology with focus on recent findings of its mission as a DAMP in danger sensing and as a therapeutic target in inflammatory diseases. PMID:26605648

  18. High Mobility Group B Proteins, Their Partners, and Other Redox Sensors in Ovarian and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barreiro-Alonso, Aida; Lamas-Maceiras, Mónica; Rodríguez-Belmonte, Esther; Vizoso-Vázquez, Ángel; Quindós, María; Cerdán, M. Esperanza

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells try to avoid the overproduction of reactive oxygen species by metabolic rearrangements. These cells also develop specific strategies to increase ROS resistance and to express the enzymatic activities necessary for ROS detoxification. Oxidative stress produces DNA damage and also induces responses, which could help the cell to restore the initial equilibrium. But if this is not possible, oxidative stress finally activates signals that will lead to cell death. High mobility group B (HMGB) proteins have been previously related to the onset and progressions of cancers of different origins. The protein HMGB1 behaves as a redox sensor and its structural changes, which are conditioned by the oxidative environment, are associated with different functions of the protein. This review describes recent advances in the role of human HMGB proteins and other proteins interacting with them, in cancerous processes related to oxidative stress, with special reference to ovarian and prostate cancer. Their participation in the molecular mechanisms of resistance to cisplatin, a drug commonly used in chemotherapy, is also revised. PMID:26682011

  19. Characterization of a high mobility group 1/2 homolog in yeast.

    PubMed

    Lu, J; Kobayashi, R; Brill, S J

    1996-12-27

    A 35-kDa polypeptide belonging to the high mobility group family of proteins was purified from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae on the basis of its association with a DNA helicase activity. Amino acid sequence alignment suggests that this protein, Hmo1p, is related to the HMG1/2 class of chromatin-associated proteins. Consistent with this prediction, the Hmo1 protein immunolocalizes to the nucleus, binds single-stranded DNA, and unwinds DNA in the presence of eukaryotic DNA topoisomerase I. While the purified protein has no DNA helicase activity on its own, immunoprecipitation experiments confirm that Hmo1p associates with a 5' to 3' DNA helicase activity in nuclear extracts. The in vivo role of the protein was investigated by constructing an hmo1 deletion mutant. This strain has a severe growth defect, reduced plasmid stability, and chromatin that is hypersensitive to micrococcal nuclease digestion. Taken together, the data indicate that HMO1 is likely to be the homolog of HMG1/2 in higher cells and that it plays an important role in genome maintenance. PMID:8969238

  20. Emerging role of high mobility group box 1 in ANCA-associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; de Souza, Alexandre W S; Westra, Johanna; Bijl, Marc; Chen, Min; Zhao, Ming-Hui; Kallenberg, Cees G M

    2015-11-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) has been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of many autoimmune diseases. In addition to its nuclear functions, extracellular HMGB1 released from activated, injured or dying cells becomes a proinflammatory mediator via binding to various receptors on the surface of responding cells. HMGB1 interacts with various systems involved in inflammation, such as the complement system and the coagulation system. Thus, HMGB1 could amplify inflammation and enhance immune responses in pathophysiology of certain diseases. In the past years, HMGB1 has been studied in several vasculitides including antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, Kawasaki disease, Henoch-Schnlein purpura, Takayasu arteritis and giant cell arteritis. Several studies showed that circulating HMGB1 levels are higher in patients with active disease compared with healthy controls, and levels are associated with disease severity. Further studies on pathogenetic mechanisms revealed pathogenic roles of HMGB1 in some vasculitides. Here we review clinical and experimental studies dealing with the role of HMGB1 in vascular inflammation, and its relation to the manifestations and prognosis of specific vasculitides, in particular ANCA-associated vasculitis. PMID:26209906

  1. High salinity volatile phases in magmatic Ni-Cu-platinum group element deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanley, J. J.; Mungall, J. E.

    2004-12-01

    The role of "deuteric" fluids (exsolved magmatic volatile phases) in the development of Ni-Cu-PGE (platinum group element) deposits in mafic-ultramafic igneous systems is poorly understood. Although considerable field evidence demonstrates unambiguously that fluids modified most large primary Ni-Cu-PGE concentrations, models which hypothesize that fluids alone were largely responsible for the economic concentration of the base and precious metals are not widely accepted. Determination of the trace element composition of magmatic volatile phases in such ore-forming systems can offer considerable insight into the origin of potentially mineralizing fluids in such igneous environments. Laser ablation ICP-MS microanalysis allows researchers to confirm the original metal budget of magmatic volatile phases and quantify the behavior of trace ore metals in the fluid phase in the absence of well-constrained theoretical or experimental predictions of ore metal solubility. In this study, we present new evidence from major deposits (Sudbury, Ontario, Canada; Stillwater Complex, Montana, U.S.A.) that compositionally distinct magmatic brines and halide melt phases were exsolved from crystallizing residual silicate melt and trapped within high-T fluid conduits now comprised of evolved rock compositions (albite-quartz graphic granite, orthoclase-quartz granophyre). Petrographic evidence demonstrates that brines and halide melts coexisted with immiscible carbonic phases at the time of entrapment (light aliphatic hydrocarbons, CO2). Brine and halide melt inclusions are rich in Na, Fe, Mn, K, Pb, Zn, Ba, Sr, Al and Cl, and homogenize by either halite dissolution at high T ( 450-700 C) or by melting of the salt phase (700-800 C). LA-ICPMS analyses of single inclusions demonstrate that high salinity volatile phases contained abundant base metals (Cu, Fe, Sn, Bi) and precious metals (Pt, Pd, Au, Ag) at the time of entrapment. Notably, precious metal concentrations in the inclusions are comparable to and often exceed the economic concentrations of the metals within the ores themselves. As a consequence of these results, current genetic models must be revised to consider the role played by hydrous saline melts and magmatic brines in deposit development, and the potential for interaction and competition between sulfide liquids (or PGE-bearing sulfide minerals) and hydrosaline volatiles for available PGE and Au in a crystallizing mafic igneous system must be critically evaluated.

  2. The Physics and Applications of High Brightness Beams: Working Group C Summary on Applications to FELS

    SciTech Connect

    Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter

    2003-03-19

    This is the summary of the activities in working group C, ''Application to FELs,'' which was based in the Bithia room at the Joint ICFA Advanced Accelerator and Beam Dynamics Workshop on July 1-6, 2002 in Chia Laguna, Sardinia, Italy. Working group C was small in relation to the other working groups at that workshop. Attendees include Enrica Chiadroni, University of Rome ape with an identical pulse length. ''La Sapienza'', Luca Giannessi, ENEA, Steve Lidia, LBNL, Vladimir Litvinenko, Duke University, Patrick Muggli, UCLA, Alex Murokh, UCLA, Heinz-Dieter Nuhn, SLAC, Sven Reiche, UCLA, Jamie Rosenzweig, UCLA, Claudio Pellegrini, UCLA, Susan Smith, Daresbury Laboratory, Matthew Thompson, UCLA, Alexander Varfolomeev, Russian Research Center, plus a small number of occasional visitors. The working group addressed a total of nine topics. Each topic was introduced by a presentation, which initiated a discussion of the topic during and after the presentation. The speaker of the introductory presentation facilitated the discussion. There were six topics that were treated in stand-alone sessions of working group C. In addition, there were two joint sessions, one with working group B, which included one topic, and one with working group C, which included two topics. The presentations that were given in the joint sessions are summarized in the working group summary reports for groups B and D, respectively. This summary will only discuss the topics that were addressed in the stand-alone sessions, including Start-To-End Simulations, SASE Experiment, PERSEO, ''Optics Free'' FEL Oscillators, and VISA II.

  3. Characterization of transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing high mobility group B proteins under high salinity, drought or cold stress.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Kyung Jin; Kim, Joo Yeol; Kim, Yeon Ok; Kang, Hunseung

    2007-02-01

    High mobility group B (HMGB) proteins found in the nuclei of higher eukaryotes play roles in various cellular processes such as replication, transcription and nucleosome assembly. The Arabidopsis thaliana genome contains eight genes encoding HMGB proteins, the functions of which remain largely unknown in the transcriptional regulation of plant stress responses. To understand better the functions of HMGB proteins in the responses of plants to environmental stimuli, we examined the effect of various abiotic stresses on germination and growth of transgenic Arabidopsis plants that overexpress a single isoform of HMGB. The expression of HMGB2, HMGB3 and HMGB4 was up-regulated by cold stress, whereas the expression of HMGB2 and HMGB3 was markedly down-regulated by drought or salt stress. Under salt or drought stress, the transgenic Arabidopsis plants that overexpress HMGB2 displayed retarded germination and subsequent growth compared with wild-type plants. Overexpression of HMGB4 had no impact on seed germination and seedling growth of the plants under the stress conditions tested. In contrast to no significant stress-related phenotypes of HMGB5-overexpressing plants, loss-of-function mutants of HMGB5 displayed retarded germination and subsequent growth compared with wild-type plants under stress conditions. Although transcript levels of various stress-responsive genes were not modulated by the expression of HMGB2, expression of several germination-responsive genes was modulated by HMGB2 under salt stress. Taken together, these results provide a novel basis for understanding the biological functions of HMGB protein family members that differently affect germination and seedling growth of Arabidopsis plants under various stress conditions. PMID:17169924

  4. Mexico City normal weight children exposed to high concentrations of ambient PM2.5 show high blood leptin and endothelin-1, vitamin D deficiency, and food reward hormone dysregulation versus low pollution controls. Relevance for obesity and Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Franco-Lira, Maricela; D'Angiulli, Amedeo; Rodríguez-Díaz, Joel; Blaurock-Busch, Eleonore; Busch, Yvette; Chao, Chih-kai; Thompson, Charles; Mukherjee, Partha S; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Perry, George

    2015-07-01

    Millions of Mexico, US and across the world children are overweight and obese. Exposure to fossil-fuel combustion sources increases the risk for obesity and diabetes, while long-term exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone (O3) above US EPA standards is associated with increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Mexico City Metropolitan Area children are chronically exposed to PM2.5 and O3 concentrations above the standards and exhibit systemic, brain and intrathecal inflammation, cognitive deficits, and Alzheimer disease neuropathology. We investigated adipokines, food reward hormones, endothelial dysfunction, vitamin D and apolipoprotein E (APOE) relationships in 80 healthy, normal weight 11.1±3.2 year olds matched by age, gender, BMI and SES, low (n: 26) versus high (n:54) PM2.5 exposures. Mexico City children had higher leptin and endothelin-1 (p<0.01 and p<0.000), and decreases in glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP 1), ghrelin, and glucagon (<0.02) versus controls. BMI and leptin relationships were significantly different in low versus high PM2.5 exposed children. Mexico City APOE 4 versus 3 children had higher glucose (p=0.009). Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D<30 ng/mL was documented in 87% of Mexico City children. Leptin is strongly positively associated to PM 2.5 cumulative exposures. Residing in a high PM2.5 and O3 environment is associated with 12h fasting hyperleptinemia, altered appetite-regulating peptides, vitamin D deficiency, and increases in ET-1 in clinically healthy children. These changes could signal the future trajectory of urban children towards the development of insulin resistance, obesity, type II diabetes, premature cardiovascular disease, addiction-like behavior, cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. Increased efforts should be made to decrease pediatric PM2.5 exposures, to deliver health interventions prior to the development of obesity and to identify and mitigate environmental factors influencing obesity and Alzheimer disease. PMID:26037109

  5. SUGGESTED TYPICAL CONTENT OUTLINE FOR JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL GROUP GUIDANCE. APPENDIX E.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1964

    THE SUGGESTED OUTLINE BEGINS WITH AN ORIENTATION TO GROUP GUIDANCE, AN ATTEMPT TO HELP THE STUDENT UNDERSTAND THE FUNCTIONS OF GROUP GUIDANCE AND OF THE GUIDANCE PERSONNEL (THE COUNSELOR, SOCIAL WORKER, PSYCHOLOGIST, AND PSYCHIATRIST). THE OUTLINE ALSO SUGGESTS THAT DISCUSSIONS DEAL WITH PROBLEMS FACED IN ADJUSTING TO SCHOOL, IN GETTING ALONG WITH…

  6. What Determines High- and Low-Performing Groups? The Superstar Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nihalani, Priya K.; Wilson, Hope E.; Thomas, Gregory; Robinson, Daniel H.

    2010-01-01

    The notion that greater learning outcomes will be achieved if the cognitive work is distributed amongst a group of individuals working together versus working alone has received mixed support when explored empirically (e.g., Daiute & Dalton 1993; Johnson & Johnson, 1991). This study examined the relationship between small-group collaborative…

  7. Ability Grouping in New Zealand High Schools: Are Practices Evidence-Based?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornby, Garry; Witte, Chrystal

    2014-01-01

    There is an extensive international research literature on the effect of ability grouping (e.g., tracking, streaming, banding, setting) on children's academic and behavioral outcomes. However, it is questionable to what extent the findings of research on this topic have influenced the practice of ability grouping in New Zealand schools.…

  8. SUGGESTED TYPI