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Sample records for highly ionized gas

  1. Highly ionized gas in the Galactic halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, J. Michael; Slavin, Jonathan D.

    1994-01-01

    We reexamine the values of electron density n(sub e) and gas pressure P/k in the interstellar medium (ISM) of the Galactic halo, as inferred from C IV emission and absorption lines and using current C IV atomic data. In a homogeneous model with 4.7 less than or equal to log T less than or equal to 5.3, the data are consistent with 0.01 less than or equal to n(sub e) less than or equal to 0.02/cu cm and 2200 less than or equal to P/k less than or equal to 3700/cu cm K, a factor of 2-3 higher than advocated by Martin & Bowyer (1990) and comparable to the thermal pressure in the disk. If some of the C IV absorption arises from nonemitting, photoionized gas, then the inferred density and pressure will increase accordingly. The volume filling factor for homogeneous models ranges from 0.5% to 5%. Because of the constraints arising from filling factor and radiated power, most of the C IV must arise from gas near the peak of the cooling curve, at log t less than or equal to 5.6. We relate both emission-line and absorption-line observations to recent models in which turbulent mixing layers and isobarically cooling supernova remnants (SNRs) provide significant amounts of halo gas at approximately 10(exp 5.3) K and process 20-40 solar mass/yr with a power of approximately 10(exp 41) ergs/sec. Since the observed C IV and N V absorption scale heights have been reported to differ, at 4.9 kpc and 1.6 kpc, respectively, we examine inhomogeneous models with different exponential scale heights of T, P, and SN energy input. The ISM may change its character with distance above the Galactic plane, as superbubbles and mixing layers dominate over isolated SNRs as the source of the C IV. For appropiate scale heights, the midplane pressure is twice the homogeneous values quoted above. The O IV lambda 1034 diffuse emission line, which can be used as a temperature diagnostic of the hot gas, is predicted to be comparable in strength to that of C IV lambda 1549 (approximately 6000 photons

  2. Ionization chamber for measurements of high-level tritium gas

    SciTech Connect

    Carstens, D.H.W.; David, W.R.

    1980-01-01

    The construction and calibration of a simple ionization-chamber apparatus for measurement of high level tritium gas is described. The apparatus uses an easily constructed but rugged chamber containing the unknown gas and an inexpensive digital multimeter for measuring the ion current. The equipment after calibration is suitable for measuring 0.01 to 100% tritium gas in hydrogen-helium mixes with an accuracy of a few percent. At both the high and low limits of measurements deviations from the predicted theoretical current are observed. These are briefly discussed.

  3. Ionization front in a high-current gas discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choueiri, Edgar Y.; Randolph, Thomas M.

    2007-02-01

    Spectroscopic measurements of ion/neutral density ratio profiles are made inside the high-current, low-pressure discharge of a coaxial magnetoplasmadynamic thruster and show the existence of a thin ionization front, upstream in the discharge, that effectively ionizes the incoming gas to ionization levels above 50%. The measurements allow an estimate of the width of this ionization front to be on the order of a few millimeters. Due to the known existence of microturbulence in the plasma, which can produce suprathermal electrons, an explanation of the measurements based on the existence of a suprathermal tail in the electron energy distribution function is sought. A theoretical model for the width of the ionization front is combined with a multilevel excitation model for argon and shows that a Maxwellian electron distribution function cannot account for the small length scale of the ionization front, and that the latter is more consistent with an electron distribution function having a suprathermal population, the magnitude of which is estimated by comparing the model to the experiments.

  4. Ionization front in a high-current gas discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Choueiri, Edgar Y.; Randolph, Thomas M.

    2007-03-15

    Spectroscopic measurements of ion/neutral density ratio profiles are made inside the high-current, low-pressure discharge of a coaxial magnetoplasmadynamic thruster and show the existence of a thin ionization front, upstream in the discharge, that effectively ionizes the incoming gas to ionization levels above 50%. The measurements allow an estimate of the width of this ionization front to be on the order of a few millimeters. Due to the known existence of microturbulence in the plasma, which can produce suprathermal electrons, an explanation of the measurements based on the existence of a suprathermal tail in the electron energy distribution function is sought. A theoretical model for the width of the ionization front is combined with a multilevel excitation model for argon and shows that a Maxwellian electron distribution function cannot account for the small length scale of the ionization front, and that the latter is more consistent with an electron distribution function having a suprathermal population, the magnitude of which is estimated by comparing the model to the experiments.

  5. Ionization front in a high-current gas dischargea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choueiri, Edgar Y.; Randolph, Thomas M.

    2007-03-01

    Spectroscopic measurements of ion/neutral density ratio profiles are made inside the high-current, low-pressure discharge of a coaxial magnetoplasmadynamic thruster and show the existence of a thin ionization front, upstream in the discharge, that effectively ionizes the incoming gas to ionization levels above 50%. The measurements allow an estimate of the width of this ionization front to be on the order of a few millimeters. Due to the known existence of microturbulence in the plasma, which can produce suprathermal electrons, an explanation of the measurements based on the existence of a suprathermal tail in the electron energy distribution function is sought. A theoretical model for the width of the ionization front is combined with a multilevel excitation model for argon and shows that a Maxwellian electron distribution function cannot account for the small length scale of the ionization front, and that the latter is more consistent with an electron distribution function having a suprathermal population, the magnitude of which is estimated by comparing the model to the experiments.

  6. Properties of the highly ionized disk and halo gas toward two distant high-latitude stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Blair D.; Sembach, K. R.

    1994-01-01

    Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) intermediate -resolution observations of S III, Si III, Al III, Si IV, C IV, and N V absorption along the sight lines to HD 18100 (l = 217.9 deg, b = -62.7, d = 3.1 kpc, z = -2.8 kpc) and HD 100340 (l = 258.9 deg, b = +61.2 deg, d = 5.3 kpc, z = 4.6 kpc) are presented. These small science aperture spectra have resolutions ranging from 11 to 20 km/s full width at half maximum (FWHM) and S/N from 30 to 65 per diode substep. Strong absorption by moderately and highly ionized gas is seen in each direction. The absorption in the direction of the south Galactic polar region (HD 18100) is kinematically simple, while the absorption in the direction of north Galactic polar region (HD 100304) is kinematically complex. In each case the absorption by the highly ionized gas lies within the velocity range of absorption by neutral and weakly ionized gas. Along each sight line, the velocity dispersion determined from the unsaturated absorption lines increases with the energy required to create each ion. The logarithmic column densities for Al III, Si IV, C IV, and N V are log N(atoms/sq cm = 12.71, 13.10, 13.58, and 12.75 toward HD 18100 and log N = 12.88, 13.31, 13.83, and 13.04 toward HD 100340. Average ionic ratios among these species are very similar along the two sight lines. Differences in profile shape between the absorption for AL II, Si IV, C IV, and N V provide additional support for the claim of Savage, Sembach, & Cardelli (1994) that there exists two types of highly ionized gas in the interstellar medium. One type of highly ionized gas is responsible for the structured Si IV absorption and part of the C IV absorption. In this gas N(C IV)/N(Si IV) approximately 3.0 and N(C IV)/N(N V) greater than 6. The absorption by this gas seems to be associated with some type of self-regulating interface or mixing layer between the warm and hot interstellar medium. The other type of highly ionized gas is responsible for most of the N V

  7. High-field plasma acceleration in a high-ionization-potential gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corde, S.; Adli, E.; Allen, J. M.; An, W.; Clarke, C. I.; Clausse, B.; Clayton, C. E.; Delahaye, J. P.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S.; Green, S. Z.; Hogan, M. J.; Joshi, C.; Litos, M.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Walz, D.; Yakimenko, V.

    2016-06-01

    Plasma accelerators driven by particle beams are a very promising future accelerator technology as they can sustain high accelerating fields over long distances with high energy efficiency. They rely on the excitation of a plasma wave in the wake of a drive beam. To generate the plasma, a neutral gas can be field-ionized by the head of the drive beam, in which case the distance of acceleration and energy gain can be strongly limited by head erosion. Here we overcome this limit and demonstrate that electrons in the tail of a drive beam can be accelerated by up to 27 GeV in a high-ionization-potential gas (argon), boosting their initial 20.35 GeV energy by 130%. Particle-in-cell simulations show that the argon plasma is sustaining very high electric fields, of ~150 GV m-1, over ~20 cm. The results open new possibilities for the design of particle beam drivers and plasma sources.

  8. High-field plasma acceleration in a high-ionization-potential gas

    PubMed Central

    Corde, S.; Adli, E.; Allen, J. M.; An, W.; Clarke, C. I.; Clausse, B.; Clayton, C. E.; Delahaye, J. P.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S.; Green, S. Z.; Hogan, M. J.; Joshi, C.; Litos, M.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Walz, D.; Yakimenko, V.

    2016-01-01

    Plasma accelerators driven by particle beams are a very promising future accelerator technology as they can sustain high accelerating fields over long distances with high energy efficiency. They rely on the excitation of a plasma wave in the wake of a drive beam. To generate the plasma, a neutral gas can be field-ionized by the head of the drive beam, in which case the distance of acceleration and energy gain can be strongly limited by head erosion. Here we overcome this limit and demonstrate that electrons in the tail of a drive beam can be accelerated by up to 27 GeV in a high-ionization-potential gas (argon), boosting their initial 20.35 GeV energy by 130%. Particle-in-cell simulations show that the argon plasma is sustaining very high electric fields, of ∼150 GV m−1, over ∼20 cm. The results open new possibilities for the design of particle beam drivers and plasma sources. PMID:27312720

  9. High-field plasma acceleration in a high-ionization-potential gas.

    PubMed

    Corde, S; Adli, E; Allen, J M; An, W; Clarke, C I; Clausse, B; Clayton, C E; Delahaye, J P; Frederico, J; Gessner, S; Green, S Z; Hogan, M J; Joshi, C; Litos, M; Lu, W; Marsh, K A; Mori, W B; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N; Walz, D; Yakimenko, V

    2016-01-01

    Plasma accelerators driven by particle beams are a very promising future accelerator technology as they can sustain high accelerating fields over long distances with high energy efficiency. They rely on the excitation of a plasma wave in the wake of a drive beam. To generate the plasma, a neutral gas can be field-ionized by the head of the drive beam, in which case the distance of acceleration and energy gain can be strongly limited by head erosion. Here we overcome this limit and demonstrate that electrons in the tail of a drive beam can be accelerated by up to 27 GeV in a high-ionization-potential gas (argon), boosting their initial 20.35 GeV energy by 130%. Particle-in-cell simulations show that the argon plasma is sustaining very high electric fields, of ∼150 GV m(-1), over ∼20 cm. The results open new possibilities for the design of particle beam drivers and plasma sources. PMID:27312720

  10. High-field plasma acceleration in a high-ionization-potential gas

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Corde, S.; Adli, E.; Allen, J. M.; An, W.; Clarke, C. I.; Clausse, B.; Clayton, C. E.; Delahaye, J. P.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S.; et al

    2016-06-17

    Plasma accelerators driven by particle beams are a very promising future accelerator technology as they can sustain high accelerating fields over long distances with high energy efficiency. They rely on the excitation of a plasma wave in the wake of a drive beam. To generate the plasma, a neutral gas can be field-ionized by the head of the drive beam, in which case the distance of acceleration and energy gain can be strongly limited by head erosion. In our research, we overcome this limit and demonstrate that electrons in the tail of a drive beam can be accelerated by upmore » to 27 GeV in a high-ionization-potential gas (argon), boosting their initial 20.35 GeV energy by 130%. Particle-in-cell simulations show that the argon plasma is sustaining very high electric fields, of ~150 GV m-1, over ~20 cm. Lastly, the results open new possibilities for the design of particle beam drivers and plasma sources.« less

  11. Ionization-based detectors for gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Poole, Colin F

    2015-11-20

    The gas phase ionization detectors are the most widely used detectors for gas chromatography. The column and makeup gases commonly used in gas chromatography are near perfect insulators. This facilitates the detection of a minute number of charge carriers facilitating the use of ionization mechanisms of low efficiency while providing high sensitivity. The main ionization mechanism discussed in this report are combustion in a hydrogen diffusion flame (flame ionization detector), surface ionization in a plasma (thermionic ionization detector), photon ionization (photoionization detector and pulsed discharge helium ionization detector), attachment of thermal electrons (electron-capture detector), and ionization by collision with metastable helium species (helium ionization detector). The design, response characteristics, response mechanism, and suitability for fast gas chromatography are the main features summarized in this report. Mass spectrometric detection and atomic emission detection, which could be considered as ionization detectors of a more sophisticated and complex design, are not discussed in this report. PMID:25757823

  12. Energy resolution of gas ionization chamber for high-energy heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yuki; Taketani, Atsushi; Fukuda, Naoki; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Kameda, Daisuke; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Yohei; Nishimura, Daiki; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Inabe, Naohito; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Koichi; Kubo, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    The energy resolution is reported for high-energy heavy ions with energies of nearly 340 MeV/nucleon and was measured using a gas ionization chamber filled with a 90%Ar/10%CH4 gas mixture. We observed that the energy resolution is proportional to the inverse of the atomic number of incident ions and to the inverse-square-root of the gas thickness. These results are consistent with the Bethe-Bloch formula for the energy loss of charged particles and the Bohr expression for heavy ion energy straggling. In addition, the influence of high-energy δ-rays generated in the detector on the energy deposition is discussed.

  13. High performance mini-gas chromatography-flame ionization detector system based on micro gas chromatography column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaofeng; Sun, Jianhai; Ning, Zhanwu; Zhang, Yanni; Liu, Jinhua

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was a very important measure for preventing environmental pollution, therefore, a mini gas chromatography (GC) flame ionization detector (FID) system integrated with a mini H2 generator and a micro GC column was developed for environmental VOC monitoring. In addition, the mini H2 generator was able to make the system explode from far away due to the abandoned use of a high pressure H2 source. The experimental result indicates that the fabricated mini GC FID system demonstrated high repeatability and very good linear response, and was able to rapidly monitor complicated environmental VOC samples.

  14. High performance mini-gas chromatography-flame ionization detector system based on micro gas chromatography column.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaofeng; Sun, Jianhai; Ning, Zhanwu; Zhang, Yanni; Liu, Jinhua

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was a very important measure for preventing environmental pollution, therefore, a mini gas chromatography (GC) flame ionization detector (FID) system integrated with a mini H2 generator and a micro GC column was developed for environmental VOC monitoring. In addition, the mini H2 generator was able to make the system explode from far away due to the abandoned use of a high pressure H2 source. The experimental result indicates that the fabricated mini GC FID system demonstrated high repeatability and very good linear response, and was able to rapidly monitor complicated environmental VOC samples. PMID:27131686

  15. Relativistic ionization fronts in gas jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemos, Nuno; Dias, J. M.; Gallacher, J. G.; Issac, R. C.; Fonseca, R. A.; Lopes, N. C.; Silva, L. O.; Mendonça, J. T.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2006-10-01

    A high-power ultra-short laser pulse propagating through a gas jet, ionizes the gas by tunnelling ionization, creating a relativistic plasma-gas interface. The relativistic ionization front that is created can be used to frequency up-shift electromagnetic radiation either in co-propagation or in counter-propagation configurations. In the counter-propagation configuration, ionization fronts can act as relativistic mirrors for terahertz radiation, leading to relativistic double Doppler frequency up-shift to the visible range. In this work, we identified and explored, the parameters that optimize the key features of relativistic ionization fronts for terahertz radiation reflection. The relativistic ionization front generated by a high power laser (TOPS) propagating in a supersonic gas jet generated by a Laval nozzle has been fully characterized. We have also performed detailed two-dimensional relativistic particle-in-cell simulations with Osiris 2.0 to analyze the generation and propagation of the ionization fronts.

  16. Ionization effects in the generation of wake-fields by ultra-high contrast femtosecond laser pulses in argon gas

    SciTech Connect

    Makito, K.; Shin, J.-H.; Zhidkov, A.; Hosokai, T.; Masuda, S.; Kodama, R.

    2012-10-15

    Difference in mechanisms of wake-field generation and electron self-injection by high contrast femtosecond laser pulses in an initially neutral Argon gas and in pre-ionized plasma without ionization is studied via 2D particle-in-cell simulations including optical ionization of the media. For shorter laser pulses, 40 fs, ionization results only in an increase of the charge of accelerated electrons by factor of {approx}3 with qualitatively the same energy distribution. For longer pulses, 80 fs, a more stable wake field structure is observed in the neutral gas with the maximal energy of the accelerated electrons exceeding that in the fixed density plasma. In higher density Argon, an ionizing laser pulse converts itself to a complex system of solitons at a self-induced, critical density ramp.

  17. Determination of nitrogen monoxide in high purity nitrogen gas with an atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, K.

    1985-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometric (API-MS) method was studied for the determination of residual NO in high purity N2 gas. The API-MS is very sensitive to NO, but the presence of O2 interferes with the NO measurement. Nitrogen gas in cylinders as sample gas was mixed with NO standard gas and/or O2 standard gas, and then introduced into the API-MS. The calibration curves of NO and O2 has linearity in the region of 0 - 2 ppm, but the slopes changed with every cylinder. The effect of O2 on NO+ peak was additive and proportional to O2 concentration in the range of 0 - 0.5 ppm. The increase in NO+ intensity due to O2 was (0.07 - 0.13)%/O2, 1 ppm. Determination of NO and O2 was carried out by the standard addition method to eliminate the influence of variation of slopes. The interference due to O2 was estimated from the product of the O2 concentration and the ratio of slope A to Slope B. Slope A is the change in the NO+ intensity with the O2 concentration. Slope B is the intensity with O2 concentration.

  18. The Properties and the Evolution of the Highly Ionized Gas in MR 2251-178

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaspi, Shai; Netzer, hagai; Chelouche, Doron; George, Ian M.; Nandra, Kirpal; Turner, T. J.

    2004-01-01

    We present the first XMM-Newton observations of the radio-quiet quasar MR 2251-178 obtained in 2000 and 2002. The EPIC-pn spectra show a power-law continuum with a slope of Gamma = 1.6 at high energies absorbed by at least two warm absorbers (WAs) intrinsic to the source. The underlying continuum in the earlier observation shows a soft excess at low X-ray energies which can be modeled as an additional power-law with Gamma = 2.9. The spectra also show a weak narrow iron K alpha emission line. The high-resolution grating spectrum obtained in 2002 shows emission lines from N VI, O VII, O VIII, Ne IX, and Ne X, as well as absorption lines from the low-ionization ions of O III, O IV, and O V, and other confirmed and suspected weaker absorption lines. The O III - O V lines are consistent with the properties of the emission line gas observed as extended optical (O III) emission in this source. The signal-to-noise of the 2000 grating data is too low to detect any lines. We suggest a model for the high-resolution spectrum which consist of two or three warm-absorber (WA) components. The two-components model has a high-ionization WA with a column density of 10(exp 21.5)-10 (exp 21.8) sq cm and a low-ionization absorber with a column density of 10(exp 20.3) sq cm. In the three-components model we add a lower ionization component that produces the observed iron M-shell absorption lines. We investigate the spectral variations in MR 2251-178 over a period of 8.5 years using data from ASCA, BeppoSAX, and XMM-Newton. All X-ray observations can be fitted with the above two power laws and the two absorbers. The observed luminosity variations seems to correlate with variations in the soft X-ray continuum. The 8.5 year history of the source suggests a changing X-ray absorber due to material that enters and disappears from the line-of-sight on timescales of several months. We also present, for the first time, the entire FUSE spectrum of MR 2251-178. We detect emission from N III, C III

  19. Gas amplified ionization detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Huston, Gregg C.

    1992-01-01

    A gas-amplified ionization detector for gas chromatrography which possesses increased sensitivity and a very fast response time. Solutes eluding from a gas chromatographic column are ionized by UV photoionization of matter eluting therefrom. The detector is capable of generating easily measured voltage signals by gas amplification/multiplication of electron products resulting from the UV photoionization of at least a portion of each solute passing through the detector.

  20. Highly Ionized Gas in the Galactic Halo and the High Velocity Clouds Toward PG 1116+215

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, R.; Sembach, K. R.; Tripp, T. M.; Savage, B. D.

    2003-12-01

    Recent observations of extragalactic objects with FUSE have revealed the presence of high ionization OVI absorption associated with high velocity clouds (HVCs), defined as gas which lies at absolute velocities beyond 100 km/s in the Local Standard of Rest. We have acquired high spectral resolution observations with STIS ( ˜ 10 km/s) and FUSE ( ˜ 20 km/s) of the quasar PG 1116+215. The spectra show absorption at Vlsr=184km/s from a wide range of ionization species:CIV, OI, OVI, MgII, SiII, SiIII, SiIV, and FeII. The strong and broad O VI absorption in this HVC extends from ˜ 120 to 230 km/s with a weak wing of absorption to 300km/s. Although the HVC is not seen in HI 21 cm emission down to N(HI) ˜ 2x1018 cm-2, it is seen in the HI Lyman series up to at least the 918.13Å line. In addition, we have non-detection constraints on the column denisties of CI, NI, NV, and SII. We can rule out photoionization in an ultra-low density (n ˜ 10-6 cm-3) Local Group medium adopted by some investigators to explain the O VI and O VII absorption detected in several directions. We are currently in the process of determining if these data either support or rule out other models of HVCs, such as the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium, Dark Matter dominated mini-halos, or interactions with a low density (10-4-10-5 cm-3) Galactic corona or Local Group medium. In addition, we will also use abundance infomation to study the enrichment history and constrain possible sources for the high velocity gas, such as tidal debris from cannibalized galaxies.

  1. Warm and Diffuse Gas and High Ionization Rate Near the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, T.; Morong, C. P.; Geballe, T. R.; Indriolo, N.; McCall, B. J.; Goto, M.; Usuda, T.

    2011-06-01

    Using 12 newly found bright dust-embedded stars distributed from 140 pc West to 120 pc East of Sgr A*, we have observed spectra of H_3^+ and CO in the Central Molecular Zone of the Galactic center. Sightlines toward the 12 stars have been observed at the Gemini South Observatory on Cerro Pachon, Chile, and those for 2 of the stars at the Subaru Telescope on Mauna Kea Hawaii. This has extended our previous longitudinal coverage by a factor of 7. Although complete coverage of various transitions have yet to be made for some stars, almost all sightlines showed high total column densities of H_3^+ and highly populated (J, K) = (3, 3) metastable level, demonstrating the prevalence of the warm and diffuse gas previously observed from the center to 30 pc East and high ionization rate in the environment. A few sightlines did not show strong H_3^+ absorptions. It remains to be seen whether this is due to the radial and transverse location of the stars or lack of H_3^+. While the velocity profiles of H_3^+ toward stars from the center to 30 pc East are similar apart from subtle variations, the velocity profiles of the wider regions vary greatly ^a. A remarkable similarity has been noted between the velocity profile of H_3^+ toward a star nicknamed Iota and those of H_2O^+ and 13CH^+ observed toward Sgr B2 by the HIFI instrument of the Herschel Space Observatory. Although all these ions exist in diffuse environment, this is surprising since H_3^+ favors environments with high H_2 fraction f(H_2) while H_2O^+ and CH^+ favors low f(H_2). Also the peak of Sgr B2 and Iota are separated by 17 pc. Possible interpretations of this will be discussed. T. R. Geballe and T. Oka, ApJ, 709, L70 (2010). M. Goto, T. Usuda, T. R. Geballe, N. Indriolo, B. J. McCall, Th. Henning, and T. Oka, PASJ (2011) in press. P. Schilke, et al., A&A, 521, L11 (2010). E. Falgarone, private communication

  2. Ionized Gas Kinematics at High Resolution. IV. Star Formation and a Rotating Core in the Medusa (NGC 4194)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Sara C.; Lacy, John; Neff, Susan Gale; Turner, Jean; Greathouse, Thomas; Neff, Susan

    2014-01-01

    NGC 4194 is a post-merger starburst known as The Medusa for its striking tidal features.We present here a detailed study of the structure and kinematics of ionized gas in the central 0.65 kpc of the Medusa. The data include radio continuum maps with resolution up to 0".18 (35 pc) and a 12.8 micron [Ne II] data cube with spectral resolution approx. 4 km/s: the first high-resolution, extinction-free observations of this remarkable object. The ionized gas has the kinematic signature of a core in solid-body rotation. The starburst has formed a complex of bright compact H II regions, probably excited by deeply embedded super star clusters, but none of these sources is a convincing candidate for a Galactic nucleus. The nuclei of the merger partners that created the Medusa have not yet been identified.

  3. Ionized gas kinematics at high resolution. IV. Star formation and a rotating core in the Medusa (NGC 4194)

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, Sara C.; Lacy, John; Turner, Jean; Greathouse, Thomas; Neff, Susan

    2014-05-20

    NGC 4194 is a post-merger starburst known as The Medusa for its striking tidal features. We present here a detailed study of the structure and kinematics of ionized gas in the central 0.65 kpc of the Medusa. The data include radio continuum maps with resolution up to 0.''18 (35 pc) and a 12.8 μm [Ne II] data cube with spectral resolution ∼4 km s{sup –1}: the first high-resolution, extinction-free observations of this remarkable object. The ionized gas has the kinematic signature of a core in solid-body rotation. The starburst has formed a complex of bright compact H II regions, probably excited by deeply embedded super star clusters, but none of these sources is a convincing candidate for a Galactic nucleus. The nuclei of the merger partners that created the Medusa have not yet been identified.

  4. Weakly ionized cosmic gas: Ionization and characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, M.; Mendis, D. A.; Chow, V. W.

    1994-01-01

    Since collective plasma behavior may determine important transport processes (e.g., plasma diffusion across a magnetic field) in certain cosmic environments, it is important to delineate the parameter space in which weakly ionized cosmic gases may be characterized as plasmas. In this short note, we do so. First, we use values for the ionization fraction given in the literature, wherein the ionization is generally assumed to be due primarily to ionization by cosmic rays. We also discuss an additional mechanism for ionization in such environments, namely, the photoelectric emission of electrons from cosmic dust grains in an interstellar Far Ultra Violet (FUV) radiation field. Simple estimates suggest that under certain conditions this mechanism may dominate cosmic ray ionization, and possibly also the photoionization of metal atoms by the interstellar FUV field, and thereby lead to an enhanced ionization level.

  5. Present-day Galactic Evolution: Low-metallicity, Warm, Ionized Gas Inflow Associated with High-velocity Cloud Complex A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barger, K. A.; Haffner, L. M.; Wakker, B. P.; Hill, Alex. S.; Madsen, G. J.; Duncan, A. K.

    2012-12-01

    The high-velocity cloud Complex A is a probe of the physical conditions in the Galactic halo. The kinematics, morphology, distance, and metallicity of Complex A indicate that it represents new material that is accreting onto the Galaxy. We present Wisconsin Hα Mapper kinematically resolved observations of Complex A over the velocity range of -250 to -50 km s-1 in the local standard of rest reference frame. These observations include the first full Hα intensity map of Complex A across (\\mathit {l, b}) = (124{^\\circ }, 18{^\\circ }) to (171°, 53°) and deep targeted observations in Hα, [S II] λ6716, [N II] λ6584, and [O I] λ6300 toward regions with high H I column densities, background quasars, and stars. The Hα data imply that the masses of neutral and ionized material in the cloud are similar, both being greater than 106 M ⊙. We find that the Bland-Hawthorn & Maloney model for the intensity of the ionizing radiation near the Milky Way is consistent with the known distance of the high-latitude part of Complex A and an assumed cloud geometry that puts the lower-latitude parts of the cloud at a distance of 7-8 kpc. This compatibility implies a 5% ionizing photon escape fraction from the Galactic disk. We also provide the nitrogen and sulfur upper abundance solutions for a series of temperatures, metallicities, and cloud configurations for purely photoionized gas; these solutions are consistent with the sub-solar abundances found by previous studies, especially for temperatures above 104 K or for gas with a high fraction of singly ionized nitrogen and sulfur.

  6. WHAM Observations of Ionized Gas in High-Velocity Interstellar Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, J. L.; Tufte, S. L.

    2003-12-01

    We have used the Wisconsin Hα Mapper (WHAM) spectrometer to study the C complex of high-velocity interstellar clouds. High-velocity clouds (HVCs) have been well-studied in the 21-cm line of neutral hydrogen and are thought to be located in the galactic halo, but their origins and role in galactic evolution are unknown. We study Hα emission, which gives us information about the ionized hydrogen content of the clouds, and other emission lines that allow us to investigate the temperature, density and other conditions in the clouds. The C complex has been studied extensively using ultraviolet absorption spectra from the FUSE and STIS instruments. By combining this information with our emission line data from the same sightlines, we can gain insight into the metallicity and other physical properties of the clouds. Our sightlines include PG1259+593, Mrk 817, Mrk 279, and PG1351+640. We measured Hα emission between 0.051 and 0.106 R in these directions. We placed 3σ upper limits on our nondetections of emission from [SII] λ 6716, [NII] λ 6583, and [OIII] λ 5007 for all of the sightlines. We find a hydrogen ionizing flux of 1.1 x 105 to 2.2 x 105 photons cm-2. Our observations imply a hydrogen ionization fraction of 0.40 to 0.72, an electron density of 0.006 to 0.25 cm-3, and temperature upper limits of 10,000 to 20,000 K, with Mrk 817 possibly as low as 6,000 K. Our results are consistent with previous metallicity calculations of 0.10 to 0.26 solar. Such a small amount of heavy elements suggests an extragalactic origin for the C complex. We acknowledge funding from the National Science Foundation through grant AST 02-06349, from a Research Corporation Cottrell College Science Award, and from the John S. Rogers Science Research Program at Lewis & Clark College.

  7. Highly ionized gas in the Gum nebula and elsewhere - A comparison of IUE and Copernicus satellite results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgar, Richard J.; Savage, Blair D.

    1992-01-01

    The data from six high-dispersion IUE echelle spectra are averaged in order to obtain an interstellar absorption line spectrum with an S/N of about 30 and a resolution of about 25 km/s. The interstellar lines of C IV and Si IV are very strong and broad and N V is detected. The profiles for these species and Al III are compared to the Copernicus satellite profiles for O VI. The high ionization lines toward HD 64760 are much stronger and broader than those recorded toward Zeta Pup and Gamma super 2 Vel, the two exciting stars of the Gum nebula. The profiles for Al III and Si IV are similar and considerably narrower than the O VI profile. An origin in photoionized Gum nebula gas is suggested as the most likely explanation for Al III and Si IV. The C IV profile has a high positive velocity wing extending to approximately +80 km/s, which is similar in appearance to the positive velocity portion of the O VI profile. It is inferred that a substantial part of the observed C IV has an origin in the collisionally ionized gas most likely rsponsible for the O VI.

  8. Ionization coefficients in gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marić, D.; Šašić, O.; Jovanović, J.; Radmilović-Rađenović, M.; Petrović, Z. Lj.

    2007-03-01

    We have tested the application of the common E/N ( E—electric field, N—gas number density) or Wieland approximation [Van Brunt, R.J., 1987. Common parametrizations of electron transport, collision cross section, and dielectric strength data for binary gas mixtures. J. Appl. Phys. 61 (5), 1773-1787.] and the common mean energy (CME) combination of the data for pure gases to obtain ionization coefficients for mixtures. Test calculations were made for Ar-CH4, Ar-N2, He-Xe and CH4-N2 mixtures. Standard combination procedure gives poor results in general, due to the fact that the electron energy distribution is considerably different in mixtures and in individual gases at the same values of E/N. The CME method may be used for mixtures of gases with ionization coefficients that do not differ by more than two orders of magnitude which is better than any other technique that was proposed [Marić, D., Radmilović-Rađenović, M., Petrović, Z.Lj., 2005. On parametrization and mixture laws for electron ionization coefficients. Eur. Phys. J. D 35, 313-321.].

  9. [S IV] in the NGC 5253 Supernebula: Ionized Gas Kinematics at High Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Sara C.; Lacy, John H.; Turner, Jean L.; Kruger, Andrew; Richter, Matt; Crosthwaite, Lucian P.

    2012-08-01

    The nearby dwarf starburst galaxy NGC 5253 hosts a deeply embedded radio-infrared supernebula excited by thousands of O stars. We have observed this source in the 10.5 μm line of S +3 at 3.8 km s-1 spectral and 1farcs4 spatial resolution, using the high-resolution spectrometer TEXES on the IRTF. The line profile cannot be fit well by a single Gaussian. The best simple fit describes the gas with two Gaussians, one near the galactic velocity with FWHM 33.6 km s-1 and another of similar strength and FWHM 94 km s-1 centered ~20 km s-1 to the blue. This suggests a model for the supernebula in which gas flows toward us out of the molecular cloud, as in a "blister" or "champagne flow" or in the H II regions modelled by Zhu.

  10. Ionization in nearby interstellar gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, P. C.; Welty, D. E.; York, D. G.; Fowler, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    Due to dielectric recombination, neutral magnesium represents an important tracer for the warm low-density gas around the solar system. New Mg I 2852 absorption-line data from IUE are presented, including detections in a few stars within 40 pc of the sun. The absence of detectable Mg I in Alpha CMa and other stars sets limits on the combined size and electron density of the interstellar cloud which gives rise to the local interstellar wind. For a cloud radius greater than 1 pc and density of 0.1/cu cm, the local cloud has a low fractional ionization, n(e)/n(tot) less than 0.05, if magnesium is undepleted, equilibrium conditions prevail, the cloud temperature is 11,750 K, and 80 percent of the magnesium in the sightline is Mg II.

  11. Increase in compact toroid mass by accelerator-region ionization of high-Z noble gas on CTIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, Robert D.; Hwang, David Q.; Liu, Fei; Hong, Sean; Klauser, Ruth; Evans, Russell W.; Buchenauer, Dean A.

    2012-10-01

    A promising technique for runaway electron (RE) mitigation in large-tokamak disruptions is the injection of compact toroid (CT) plasmas of high atomic number. With sufficient kinetic energy density, high-Z CTs can reach the tokamak magnetic axis where RE effects are strongest. At CT velocities of 100 km/s or more, penetration to the axis occurs on a sub-millisecond time scale. In addition to reducing avalanche RE production by collisions, high-Z CTs can cool RE by bremsstrahung effects. From theoretical calculations, using Xe ions, bremsstrahlung cooling exceeds the effect of collisions at RE energy above about 10 MeV, a value expected to be well exceeded in large tokamaks. Past experiments on the CTIX compact-toroid injector have demonstrated increased CT mass using snowplow accretion of puffed noble gas by an initial hydrogenic CT. These experiments will be continued using a higher ratio of accreted high-Z plasma to H plasma, to maximize CT kinetic energy density. Results will be compared with a 1D model using external circuit effects, coaxial railgun kinetics, and ionization. The model will be used to predict performance of CT injectors of greater energy, suitable for RE suppression on mid-sized tokamaks.

  12. Highly-Ionized Gas in the Galactic Halo: A FUSE Survey of O 6 Absorption toward 22 Halo Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zsargo, J.; Sembach, K. R.; Howk, J. C.; Savage, B. D.

    2002-12-01

    Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) spectra of 22 Galactic halo stars are studied to determine the amount of O 6 in the Galactic halo between ~0.3 and ~10 kpc from the Galactic mid-plane. Strong O 6 λ 1031.93 absorption was detected toward 21 stars, and a reliable 3 σ upper limit was obtained toward HD 97991. The weaker member of the O 6 doublet at 1037.62 Å could be studied toward only six stars. The observed columns are reasonably consistent with a patchy exponential O 6 distribution with a mid-plane density of 1.7x10-8 cm-3 and scale height between 2.3 and 4 kpc. We do not see clear signs of strong high-velocity components in O 6 absorption along the Galactic sight lines, which indicates the general absence of high velocity O 6 within 2-5 kpc of the Galactic mid-plane. The correlation between the H 1 and O 6 intermediate velocity absorption is also poor. The O 6 velocity dispersions are much larger than the value of ~18 km/s expected from thermal broadening for gas at T ~ 3x105 K, the temperature at which O 6 is expected to reach its peak abundance in collisional ionization equilibrium. Turbulence, inflow, and outflow must have an effect on the shape of the O 6 profiles. Kinematical comparisons of O 6 with Ar 1 reveal that 9 of 21 sight lines are closely aligned in LSR velocity (|Δ VLSR| <=5 km/s ), while 8 of 21 exhibit significant velocity differences (|Δ VLSR| >= 15 km/s ). This dual behavior may indicate the presence of two different types of O 6-bearing environments toward the Galactic sight lines. Comparison of O 6 with other highly-ionized species suggests that the high ions are produced primarily by cooling hot gas in the Galactic fountain flow, and that turbulent mixing also has a significant contribution. The role of turbulent mixing is most important toward sight lines that sample supernova remnants like Loop I and IV. We are also able to show that the O 6 enhancement toward the Galactic center region that was observed in the FUSE

  13. IONIZED NITROGEN AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Decarli, R.; Walter, F.; Neri, R.; Cox, P.; Bertoldi, F.; Carilli, C.; Kneib, J. P.; Lestrade, J. F.; Maiolino, R.; Omont, A.; Richard, J.; Riechers, D.; Thanjavur, K.; Weiss, A.

    2012-06-10

    We present secure [N II]{sub 205{mu}m} detections in two millimeter-bright, strongly lensed objects at high redshift, APM 08279+5255 (z = 3.911) and MM 18423+5938 (z = 3.930), using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Due to its ionization energy [N II]{sub 205{mu}m} is a good tracer of the ionized gas phase in the interstellar medium. The measured fluxes are S([N II]{sub 205{mu}m}) = (4.8 {+-} 0.8) Jy km s{sup -1} and (7.4 {+-} 0.5) Jy km s{sup -1}, respectively, yielding line luminosities of L([N II]{sub 205{mu}m}) = (1.8 {+-} 0.3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} {mu}{sup -1} L{sub Sun} for APM 08279+5255 and L([N II]{sub 205{mu}m}) = (2.8 {+-} 0.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} {mu}{sup -1} L{sub Sun} for MM 18423+5938. Our high-resolution map of the [N II]{sub 205{mu}m} and 1 mm continuum emission in MM 18423+5938 clearly resolves an Einstein ring in this source and reveals a velocity gradient in the dynamics of the ionized gas. A comparison of these maps with high-resolution EVLA CO observations enables us to perform the first spatially resolved study of the dust continuum-to-molecular gas surface brightness ({Sigma}{sub FIR}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sup N}{sub CO}, which can be interpreted as the star formation law) in a high-redshift object. We find a steep relation (N = 1.4 {+-} 0.2), consistent with a starbursting environment. We measure a [N II]{sub 205{mu}m}/FIR luminosity ratio in APM 08279+5255 and MM 18423+5938 of 9.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} and 5.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6}, respectively. This is in agreement with the decrease of the [N II]{sub 205{mu}m}/FIR ratio at high FIR luminosities observed in local galaxies.

  14. COMPLETE IONIZATION OF THE NEUTRAL GAS: WHY THERE ARE SO FEW DETECTIONS OF 21 cm HYDROGEN IN HIGH-REDSHIFT RADIO GALAXIES AND QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, S. J.; Whiting, M. T.

    2012-11-10

    From the first published z {approx}> 3 survey of 21 cm absorption within the hosts of radio galaxies and quasars, Curran et al. found an apparent dearth of cool neutral gas at high redshift. From a detailed analysis of the photometry, each object is found to have a {lambda} = 1216 A continuum luminosity in excess of L {sub 1216} {approx} 10{sup 23} W Hz{sup -1}, a critical value above which 21 cm has never been detected at any redshift. At these wavelengths, and below, hydrogen is excited above the ground state so that it cannot absorb in 21 cm. In order to apply the equation of photoionization equilibrium, we demonstrate that this critical value also applies to the ionizing ({lambda} {<=} 912 A) radiation. We use this to show, for a variety of gas density distributions, that upon placing a quasar within a galaxy of gas, there is always an ultraviolet luminosity above which all of the large-scale atomic gas is ionized. While in this state, the hydrogen cannot be detected or engage in star formation. Applying the mean ionizing photon rate of all of the sources searched, we find, using canonical values for the gas density and recombination rate coefficient, that the observed critical luminosity gives a scale length (3 kpc) similar that of the neutral hydrogen (H I) in the Milky Way, a large spiral galaxy. Thus, this simple yet physically motivated model can explain the critical luminosity (L {sub 912} {approx} L {sub 1216} {approx} 10{sup 23} W Hz{sup -1}), above which neutral gas is not detected. This indicates that the non-detection of 21 cm absorption is not due to the sensitivity limits of current radio telescopes, but rather that the lines of sight to the quasars, and probably the bulk of the host galaxies, are devoid of neutral gas.

  15. Evaluation of gas chromatography - electron ionization - full scan high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry for pesticide residue analysis.

    PubMed

    Mol, Hans G J; Tienstra, Marc; Zomer, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Gas chromatography with electron ionization and full scan high resolution mass spectrometry with an Orbitrap mass analyzer (GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS) was evaluated for residue analysis. Pesticides in fruit and vegetables were taken as an example application. The relevant aspects for GC-MS based residue analysis, including the resolving power (15,000 to 120,000 FWHM at m/z 200), scan rate, dynamic range, selectivity, sensitivity, analyte identification, and utility of existing EI-libraries, are assessed and discussed in detail. The optimum acquisition conditions in full scan mode (m/z 50-500) were a resolving power of 60,000 and an automatic-gain-control target value of 3E6. These conditions provided (i) an optimum mass accuracy: within 2 ppm over a wide concentration range, with/without matrix, enabling the use of ±5 ppm mass extraction windows (ii) adequate scan speed: minimum 12 scans/peak, (iii) an intra-scan dynamic range sufficient to achieve LOD/LOQs ≤0.5 pg in fruit/vegetable matrices (corresponding to ≤0.5 μg kg(-1)) for most pesticides. EI-Orbitrap spectra were consistent over a very wide concentration range (5 orders) with good match values against NIST (EI-quadrupole) spectra. The applicability for quantitative residue analysis was verified by validation of 54 pesticides in three matrices (tomato, leek, orange) at 10 and 50 μg/kg. The method involved a QuEChERS-based extraction with a solvent switch into iso-octane, and 1 μL hot splitless injection into the GC-HRMS system. A recovery between 70 and 120% and a repeatability RSD <10% was obtained in most cases. Linearity was demonstrated for the range ≤5-250 μg kg(-1). The pesticides could be identified according to the applicable EU criteria for GC-HRMS (SANTE/11945/2015). GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS was found to be highly suited for quantitative pesticide residue analysis. The potential of qualitative screening to extend the scope makes it an attractive alternative to GC

  16. The distribution of warm ionized gas in NGC 891

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rand, Richard J.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Hester, J. Jeff

    1990-01-01

    Narrow-band imaging is presented of the edge-on spiral NGC 891 in the H-alpha and S II 6716, 6731 A forbidden lines. Emission from H II regions confined to the plane of the galaxy and from diffuse gas up to about 4 kpc off the plane is readily detected. The full radial extent of the diffuse emission in the plane is about 30 kpc. NGC 891 is found to have a surface density of diffuse ionized gas twice the Galactic value, a thicker ionized gas layer, and a larger surface density of ionized gas relative to neutral gas. These are interpreted as consequences of a relatively high level of star formation in this galaxy. Other star formation tracers indicate the same conclusion. Many vertical H-alpha filaments, or 'worms,' extending to over 2 kpc off the plane of the galaxy are seen. These worms are interpreted in terms of chimney models for the interstellar media of spirals.

  17. CO/H2, C/CO, OH/CO, and OH/O2 in dense interstellar gas: from high ionization to low metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialy, Shmuel; Sternberg, Amiel

    2015-07-01

    We present numerical computations and analytic scaling relations for interstellar ion-molecule gas-phase chemistry down to very low metallicities (10-3 × solar), and/or up to high driving ionization rates. Relevant environments include the cool interstellar medium (ISM) in low-metallicity dwarf galaxies, early enriched clouds at the reionization and Pop-II star formation era, and in dense cold gas exposed to intense X-ray or cosmic ray sources. We focus on the behaviour for H2, CO, CH, OH, H2O and O2, at gas temperatures ˜100 K, characteristic of a cooled ISM at low metallicities. We consider shielded or partially shielded one-zone gas parcels, and solve the gas-phase chemical rate equations for the steady-state `metal-molecule abundances for a wide range of ionization parameters, ζ/n, and metallicties, Z '. We find that the OH abundances are always maximal near the H-to-H2 conversion points, and that large OH abundances persist at very low metallicities even when the hydrogen is predominantly atomic. We study the OH/O2, C/CO and OH/CO abundance ratios, from large to small, as functions of ζ/n and Z '. Much of the cold dense ISM for the Pop-II generation may have been OH-dominated and atomic rather than CO-dominated and molecular.

  18. Surface Ionization Gas Detection at SnO2 Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krenkow, A.; Oberhüttinger, C.; Habauzit, A.; Kessler, M.; Göbel, J.; Müller, G.

    2009-05-01

    In surface ionization (SI) gas detection adsorbed analyte molecules are converted into ionic species at a heated solid surface and extracted into free space by an oppositely biased counter electrode. In the present work we consider the formation of positive and negative analyte gas ions at SnO2 surfaces. We find that SI leads to positive ion formation only, with the SI efficiency scaling with the ionization energy of the analyte gas molecules. Aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons with amine functional groups exhibit particularly high SI efficiencies.

  19. High pressure xenon ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Markey, John K.

    1989-01-01

    A method is provided for detecting ionization comprising allowing particles that cause ionization to contact high pressure xenon maintained at or near its critical point and measuring the amount of ionization. An apparatus is provided for detecting ionization, the apparatus comprising a vessel containing a ionizable medium, the vessel having an inlet to allow high pressure ionizable medium to enter the vessel, a means to permit particles that cause ionization of the medium to enter the vessel, an anode, a cathode, a grid and a plurality of annular field shaping rings, the field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another, the anode, cathode, grid and field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another in order to form an electric field between the cathode and the anode, the electric field originating at the anode and terminating at the cathode, the grid being disposed between the cathode and the anode, the field shaping rings being disposed between the cathode and the grid, the improvement comprising the medium being xenon and the vessel being maintained at a pressure of 50 to 70 atmospheres and a temperature of 0.degree. to 30.degree. C.

  20. High pressure xenon ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Markey, J.K.

    1989-11-14

    A method is provided for detecting ionization comprising allowing particles that cause ionization to contact high pressure xenon maintained at or near its critical point and measuring the amount of ionization. An apparatus is provided for detecting ionization, the apparatus comprising a vessel containing a ionizable medium, the vessel having an inlet to allow high pressure ionizable medium to enter the vessel, a means to permit particles that cause ionization of the medium to enter the vessel, an anode, a cathode, a grid and a plurality of annular field shaping rings, the field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another, the anode, cathode, grid and field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another in order to form an electric field between the cathode and the anode, the electric field originating at the anode and terminating at the cathode, the grid being disposed between the cathode and the anode, the field shaping rings being disposed between the cathode and the grid, the improvement comprising the medium being xenon and the vessel being maintained at a pressure of 50 to 70 atmospheres and a temperature of 0 to 30 C. 2 figs.

  1. Enhanced metabolite profiling using a redesigned atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source for gas chromatography coupled to high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wachsmuth, Christian J; Hahn, Thomas A; Oefner, Peter J; Dettmer, Katja

    2015-09-01

    An improved atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI II) source for gas chromatography-high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-HRTOFMS) was compared to its first-generation predecessor for the analysis of fatty acid methyl esters, methoxime-trimethylsilyl derivatives of metabolite standards, and cell culture supernatants. Reductions in gas turbulences and chemical background as well as optimized heating of the APCI II source resulted in narrower peaks and higher repeatability in particular for late-eluting compounds. Further, APCI II yielded a more than fourfold median decrease in lower limits of quantification to 0.002-3.91 μM along with an average 20 % increase in linear range to almost three orders of magnitude with R (2) values above 0.99 for all metabolite standards investigated. This renders the overall performance of GC-APCI-HRTOFMS comparable to that of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC)-electron ionization (EI)-TOFMS. Finally, the number of peaks with signal-to-noise ratios greater than 20 that could be extracted from metabolite fingerprints of pancreatic cancer cell supernatants upon switching from the APCI I to the APCI II source was more than doubled. Concomitantly, the number of identified metabolites increased from 36 to 48. In conclusion, the improved APCI II source makes GC-APCI-HRTOFMS a great alternative to EI-based GC-MS techniques in metabolomics and other fields. PMID:26092404

  2. The kinematics of the diffuse ionized gas in NGC 4666

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigtländer, P.; Kamphuis, P.; Marcelin, M.; Bomans, D. J.; Dettmar, R.-J.

    2013-06-01

    Context. The global properties of the interstellar medium with processes such as infall and outflow of gas and a large scale circulation of matter and its consequences for star formation and chemical enrichment are important for the understanding of galaxy evolution. Aims: In this paper we studied the kinematics and morphology of the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) in the disk and in the halo of the star forming spiral galaxy NGC 4666 to derive information about its kinematical properties. Especially, we searched for infalling and outflowing ionized gas. Methods: We determined surface brightness, radial velocity, and velocity dispersion of the warm ionized gas via high spectral resolution (R ≈ 9000) Fabry-Pérot interferometry. This allows the determination of the global velocity field and the detection of local deviations from this velocity field. We calculated models of the DIG distribution and its kinematics for comparison with the measured data. In this way we determined fundamental parameters such as the inclination and the scale height of NGC 4666, and established the need for an additional gas component to fit our observed data. Results: We found individual areas, especially along the minor axis, with gas components reaching into the halo which we interpret as an outflowing component of the DIG. As the main result of our study, we were able to determine that the vertical structure of the DIG distribution in NGC 4666 is best modeled with two components of ionized gas, a thick and a thin disk with 0.8 kpc and 0.2 kpc scale height, respectively. Therefore, the enhanced star formation in NGC 4666 drives an outflow and also maintains a thick ionized gas layer reminiscent of the Reynold's layer in the Milky Way.

  3. GAS IONIZING AND COMPRESSING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Little, E.M.; Thomson, D.B.; Josephson, V.; Scott, F.R.

    1961-08-22

    A device is described for producing high energy gaseous plasmas. The device consists of a unitary refractory vessel having tapered end portions, a cylindrical middle portion, and means for spontaneously generating oppositely propelled plasma masses from the tapered end portions to a collision zone in the cylindrical middle portion. The means come from the spontaneous generation of diverging magnetic fields in the end portions and an axial magnetic field in the cylindrical portion. (AEC)

  4. Thermal conductivity of partially ionized gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armaly, B. F.; Sutton, K.

    1981-06-01

    A method is proposed for predicting the translational component of the thermal conductivity of partially ionized gas mixtures. It is approximate but simple in form and offers a significant improvement over commonly utilized approximations. It does not require large computer run times nor storage, thus it is suitable for use with complex flow fields and heat transfer calculations. Results for gas mixtures which are representative of the atmosphere of Jupiter, Earth, and Venus are presented and they compare favorably with results from detailed kinetic theory analyses.

  5. Viscosity of multicomponent partially ionized gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armaly, B. F.; Sutton, K.

    1980-07-01

    An approximate method is proposed for predicting the viscosity of partially ionized gas mixtures. This technique expresses the viscosity of a mixture in terms of the viscosities of the individual pure components, is simple in form, and does not require large computer run times or storage. Thus, the technique is suitable for use with complex flowfields and heat-transfer calculations. Results for gas mixtures which are representative of the atmospheres of Jupiter, Earth, and Venus, are presented and it is shown that the results compare favorably with detailed kinetic-theory analyses.

  6. Modification of nitrogen Townsend ionization coefficient in a N2 laser with a weak corona preionization and high gas pressure using laser output power measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarikhani, S.; Hariri, A.

    2013-05-01

    Based on the reported experimental measurements on the output power in a transversely excited nitrogen laser with a weak corona preionization and rate equations, a simulation study was made to describe the laser output power behavior. For the study, we first made a literature survey for the appropriate E/p functional dependences of nitrogen molecules on drift velocity vd, and the Townsend ionization coefficient α, to be applied for the laser operational characteristics of high gas pressures up to 1 atmosphere, and 20 < E/p < 1000 V cm-1 Torr-1. For the study when the corona UV preionization is applied, it was realized that it is necessary to modify the Townsend ionization coefficient to include the effect of the preionization for the laser system. This realization revealed that the Townsend coefficient upon utilizing the corona effect, (α/p)corona, can be viewed as a perturbation to be added to the (α/p)main due to the main gas discharge, where the total (α/p)t = (α/p)main + (α/p)corona was used for the calculation. We also introduced a single α/p relation with A* and B* coefficients to explain the gas discharge due to both the main and corona discharges. The results of the two approaches are introduced and have been compared with each other. The present study indicates that laser optical measurements, by themselves, constitute a reliable approach for understanding the physical quantities that are involved during plasma formation in a gas discharge. Details of the approach will be presented in this paper.

  7. High-temperature Ionization in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desch, Steven J.; Turner, Neal J.

    2015-10-01

    We calculate the abundances of electrons and ions in the hot (≳500 K), dusty parts of protoplanetary disks, treating for the first time the effects of thermionic and ion emission from the dust grains. High-temperature ionization modeling has involved simply assuming that alkali elements such as potassium occur as gas-phase atoms and are collisionally ionized following the Saha equation. We show that the Saha equation often does not hold, because free charges are produced by thermionic and ion emission and destroyed when they stick to grain surfaces. This means the ionization state depends not on the first ionization potential of the alkali atoms, but rather on the grains’ work functions. The charged species’ abundances typically rise abruptly above about 800 K, with little qualitative dependence on the work function, gas density, or dust-to-gas mass ratio. Applying our results, we find that protoplanetary disks’ dead zone, where high diffusivities stifle magnetorotational turbulence, has its inner edge located where the temperature exceeds a threshold value ≈1000 K. The threshold is set by ambipolar diffusion except at the highest densities, where it is set by Ohmic resistivity. We find that the disk gas can be diffusively loaded onto the stellar magnetosphere at temperatures below a similar threshold. We investigate whether the “short-circuit” instability of current sheets can operate in disks and find that it cannot, or works only in a narrow range of conditions; it appears not to be the chondrule formation mechanism. We also suggest that thermionic emission is important for determining the rate of Ohmic heating in hot Jupiters.

  8. Laboratory and Ambient Measurements of Oxidized Organic Compounds in the Gas Phase Using Nitrate Ion Chemical Ionization Coupled with High Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massoli, P.; Stark, H.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Krechmer, J.; Lambe, A. T.; Isaacman-VanWertz, G. A.; Nowak, J. B.; Kimmel, J.; Kroll, J. H.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) is a widely used technique for molecular level characterization of inorganic and organic gas phase species. Here we present laboratory and ambient measurements of gaseous organic compounds by means of a High Resolution Time-of-Flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (HR-ToF-CIMS) using nitrate ion (NO3-) chemistry, which recently has proven capable of selectively detecting oxidized organic molecules in the gas-phase via clustering with NO3- and its high order clusters. Such low and extremely low volatility organic compounds (LVOC, ELVOC) have an important role in particulate phase chemistry and formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The HR-ToF-CIMS was deployed during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) at the forest site in Centreville, AL (June 1 - July 15, 2013), where emissions were dominated by biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC), occasionally mixing with anthropogenic emissions. During SOAS, the HR-ToF-CIMS detected oxidation products of both isoprene (typically C5 LVOC) and terpenes (typically C10 ELVOC). The isoprene-related LVOC showed a diurnal cycle with a day time peak, while two groups of terpene ELVOC were identified, one peaking at night and one peaking during the day. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analyses are applied to the dataset to further interpret these observations. The effect of anthropogenic pollution on the biogenic-dominated environment was also investigated during periods of elevated nitrous and sulfur dioxide levels. To further aid in interpretation of the SOAS dataset, oxidized organic molecules were produced via OH and O3 initiated oxidation of biogenic gas-phase precursors in targeted laboratory studies and detected using the HR-ToF-CIMS. Spectra were obtained in these studies over a range of simulated atmospheric conditions.

  9. The origin of the near-IR line emission from molecular, low and high ionization gas in the inner kiloparsec of NGC 6240

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilha, Gabriele da Silva; Bianchin, Marina; Riffel, Rogemar A.

    2016-06-01

    The understating of the origin of the H2 line emission from the central regions of galaxies represents an important key to improve our knowledge about the excitation and ionization conditions of the gas in these locations. Usually these lines can be produced by Starburst, shocks and/or radiation from an active galactic nucleus (AGN). Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRG) represent ideal and challenging objects to investigate the origin of the H2 emission, as all processes above can be observed in a single object. In this work, we use K-band integral field spectroscopy to map the emission line flux distributions and kinematics and investigate the origin of the molecular and ionized gas line emission from inner 1.4×2.4~kpc2 of the LIRG NGC 6240, known to be the galaxy with strongest H2 line emission. The emission lines show complex profiles at locations between both nuclei and surrounding the northern nucleus, while at locations near the southern nucleus and at 1^'' west of the northern nucleus, they can be reproduced by a single Gaussian component. We found that the H2 emission is originated mainly by thermal processes, possible being dominated by heating of the gas by X-rays from the AGN at locations near both nuclei. For the region between the northern and southern nuclei shocks due to the interacting process may be the main excitation mechanism, as indicated by the high values of the H2 λ2.12 μ m/Brγ line ratio. A contribution of fluorescent excitation may also be important at locations near 1^'' west of the northern nucleus, which show the lowest line ratios. The [Fe ii]λ2.072 μ m/Brγ ratio show a similar trend as observed for H2 λ2.12 μ m/Brγ, suggesting that [Fe ii] and H2 line emission have similar origins. Finally, the [Ca viii]λ2.32 μ m coronal line emission is observed mainly in regions next to the nuclei, suggesting it is originated gas ionized by the radiation from the AGN.

  10. Viscosity Coefficient Curve Fits for Ionized Gas Species Grant Palmer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Grant; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Viscosity coefficient curve fits for neutral gas species are available from many sources. Many do a good job of reproducing experimental and computational chemistry data. The curve fits are usually expressed as a function of temperature only. This is consistent with the governing equations used to derive an expression for the neutral species viscosity coefficient. Ionized species pose a more complicated problem. They are subject to electrostatic as well as intermolecular forces. The electrostatic forces are affected by a shielding phenomenon where electrons shield the electrostatic forces of positively charged ions beyond a certain distance. The viscosity coefficient for an ionized gas species is a function of both temperature and local electron number density. Currently available curve fits for ionized gas species, such as those presented by Gupta/Yos, are a function of temperature only. What they did was to assume an electron number density. The problem is that the electron number density they assumed was unrealistically high. The purpose of this paper is two-fold. First, the proper expression for determining the viscosity coefficient of an ionized species as a function of both temperature and electron number density will be presented. Then curve fit coefficients will be developed using the more realistic assumption of an equilibrium electron number density. The results will be compared against previous curve fits and against highly accurate computational chemistry data.

  11. The distribution of warm ionized gas in NGC 891

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, R.J.; Kulkarni, S.R.; Hester, J.J. Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, Pasadena, CA )

    1990-03-01

    Narrow-band imaging is presented of the edge-on spiral NGC 891 in the H-alpha and S II 6716, 6731 A forbidden lines. Emission from H II regions confined to the plane of the galaxy and from diffuse gas up to about 4 kpc off the plane is readily detected. The full radial extent of the diffuse emission in the plane is about 30 kpc. NGC 891 is found to have a surface density of diffuse ionized gas twice the Galactic value, a thicker ionized gas layer, and a larger surface density of ionized gas relative to neutral gas. These are interpreted as consequences of a relatively high level of star formation in this galaxy. Other star formation tracers indicate the same conclusion. Many vertical H-alpha filaments, or 'worms,' extending to over 2 kpc off the plane of the galaxy are seen. These worms are interpreted in terms of chimney models for the interstellar media of spirals. 19 refs.

  12. Shock wave dispersion in weakly ionized gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessaratikoon, Prasong

    2003-10-01

    Electrodeless microwave (MW) discharge in two straight, circular cylindrical resonant cavities in TE1,1,1 and TM0,1,2 modes were introduced to perform additional experimental studies on shock wave modification in non-equilibrium weakly ionized gases and to clarify the physical mechanisms of the shock wave modification process. The discharge was generated in 99.99% Ar at a gas pressure between 20 and 100 Torr and at a discharge power density less than 10.0 Watts/cm3. Power density used for operating the discharge was rather low in the present work, which was determined by evaluating the power loss inside the resonant cavity. It was found that the shock wave deflection signal amplitude was decreased while the shock wave local velocity was increased in the presence of the discharge. However, there was no apparent evidence of the multiple shock structure or the widening of the shock wave deflection signal, as observed in the d.c. glow discharge [3,5]. The shock wave always retained a more compact structure even in the case of strong dispersion in both the TE and the TM mode. The shock wave propagated faster through the discharge in the TE mode than in the TM mode. Discharge characteristics and local parameters such as gas temperature T g, electron density Ne, local electric field E, and average power density, were determined by using the MW discharge generated from an Argon gas mixture that contains 95% Ar, 5% H2, and traces of N2. The gas temperature was evaluated by using the amplitude reduction technique and the emission spectroscopy of Nitrogen. The gas temperature distribution was flat in the central region of the cavity. By comparing the gas temperature calculated from the shock wave local velocity and from the amplitude reduction technique, the present work was sufficiently accurate to indicate that the thermal effect is dominant. The electron density was obtained from measured line shapes of hydrogen Balmer lines by using the gas temperature and the well

  13. Ionization measurements in small gas samples by single ion counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchemelinin, S.; Breskin, A.; Chechik, R.; Pansky, A.; Colautti, P.; Conte, V.; De Nardo, L.; Tornielli, G.

    1996-01-01

    A new method for highly efficient measurements of the ionization statistics in small, wall-less, well-defined low density gas samples is proposed. It is based on counting ions, induced by radiation in a sensitive gas volume. The high resolution permits the measurement of spatial correlations between the number of ions induced in two distanced small sensitive volumes. Using tissue- or solid-equivalent gases, the method allows the accurate determination of the ionization statistics in the corresponding sub-nanometer volume of condensed matter. These data are of relevance to the modeling of microscopic phenomena related to the interaction of radiation with matter, such as in nanodosimetry and studies of radiation damage to solid state devices.

  14. The Diffuse Ionized Gas in the large telescopes era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo-Gámez, A. M.

    2005-12-01

    In this workshop we summarize the ``state of the art'' of the Diffuse Ionized Gas. We present all the possible situations which can produce ionization outside an H II region, as well as some of the observations that can be performed with the GTC instrumentation and how relevant they can be in the undestanding of the ionization mechanisms of the DIG.

  15. Gas ionization sensors with carbon nanotube/nickel field emitters.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bohr-Ran; Lin, Tzu-Ching; Yang, Ying-Kan; Tzeng, Shien-Der

    2011-12-01

    Gas ionization sensors based on the field emission properties of the carbon nanotube/nickel (CNT/Ni) field emitters were first developed in this work. It is found that the breakdown electric field (E(b)) slightly decreases from 2.2 V/microm to 1.9 V/microm as the pressure of H2 gas increases from 0.5 Torr to 100 Torr. On the contrary, E(b) obviously increases from 2.9 V/microm to 6.5 V/microm as O2 gas pressure increases from 0.5 Torr to 100 Torr. This may be explained by the depression of the electron emission that caused by the adsorption of the O2 gas on the CNT emitters. The Raman spectra of the CNT/Ni emitters also show that more defects were generated on the CNTs after O2 gas sensing. The Joule heating effect under high current density as performing H2 sensing was also observed. These effects may contribute the pressure dependence on the breakdown electric field of the CNT/Ni gas ionization sensors. PMID:22409010

  16. Development of a High-Resolution H3O+ Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer for Gas-phase Hydrocarbons and its Application During the 2015 SONGNEX Aircraft Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koss, A.; Yuan, B.; De Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.; Stark, H.

    2015-12-01

    In-situ time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometers (ToF-CIMS) using H3O+ reagent ion chemistry (PTR-MS) are a relatively new technique in detection of gas-phase hydrocarbons, and recent improvements in instrument sensitivity, mass resolution, and ease of field deployment have expanded their use in atmospheric chemistry. The comparatively low-energy H3O+ ionization technique is ideal for measuring complex mixtures of hydrocarbons, and, compared to conventional quadrupole PTRMS, the newest generation of ToF-CIMS measure many more species simultaneously and with a sensitivity that is as high as a quadrupole PTR-MS. We describe here the development of a commercially available ToF CIMS into an H3O+CIMS suitable for deployment on aircraft, and its application during an aircraft campaign studying emissions from oil and natural gas extraction industry. We provide an overview of instrument development and specifications, including design, characterization, and field operation. We then discuss data processing and interpretation. First, we investigate determination of intensities of poorly resolved peaks. The mass resolution of the present instrument (m/Δm ~4500) enables separate analysis of many isobaric peaks, but peaks are also frequently not fully resolved. Using results from laboratory tests, we quantify how the accuracy can be limited by the overlap in neighboring peaks, and compare to theoretical predictions from literature. We then briefly describe our method for quality assurance of reported compounds, and correction for background and humidity effects. Finally, we present preliminary results from the first field deployment of this instrument during the Spring 2015 SONGNEX aircraft campaign. This campaign sampled emissions from oil and natural gas extraction regions and associated infrastructure in the Western and Central United States. We will highlight results that illustrate (1) new scientific capability from improved mass resolution, which

  17. Ionized gas at the edge of the central molecular zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, W. D.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Pineda, J. L.; Velusamy, T.; Requena-Torres, M. A.; Wiesemeyer, H.

    2015-04-01

    Context. The edge of the central molecular zone (CMZ) is the location where massive dense molecular clouds with large internal velocity dispersions transition to the surrounding more quiescent and lower CO emissivity region of the Galaxy. Little is known about the ionized gas surrounding the molecular clouds and in the transition region. Aims: We determine the properties of the ionized gas at the edge of the CMZ near Sgr E using observations of N+ and C+. Methods: We observed a small portion of the edge of the CMZ near Sgr E with spectrally resolved [C ii] 158 μm and [N ii] 205 μm fine structure lines at six positions with the GREAT instrument on SOFIA and in [C ii] using Herschel HIFI on-the-fly strip maps. We use the [N ii] spectra along with a radiative transfer model to calculate the electron density of the gas and the [C ii] maps to illuminate the morphology of the ionized gas and model the column density of CO-dark H2. Results: We detect two [C ii] and [N ii] velocity components, one along the line of sight to a CO molecular cloud at - 207 km s-1 associated with Sgr E and the other at -174 km s-1 outside the edge of another CO cloud. From the [N ii] emission we find that the average electron density is in the range of ~5 to 21 cm-3 for these features. This electron density is much higher than that of the disk's warm ionized medium, but is consistent with densities determined for bright diffuse H ii nebula. The column density of the CO-dark H2 layer in the -207 km s-1 cloud is ~1-2 × 1021 cm-2 in agreement with theoretical models. The CMZ extends further out in Galactic radius by ~7 to 14 pc in ionized gas than it does in molecular gas traced by CO. Conclusions: The edge of the CMZ likely contains dense hot ionized gas surrounding the neutral molecular material. The high fractional abundance of N+ and high electron density require an intense EUV field with a photon flux of order 106 to 107 photons cm-2 s-1, and/or efficient proton charge exchange with

  18. Turbulence in the Ionized Gas of the Orion Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, S. J.; Medina, S.-N. X.; Henney, W. J.

    2016-08-01

    In order to study the nature, origin, and impact of turbulent velocity fluctuations in the ionized gas of the Orion Nebula, we apply a variety of statistical techniques to observed velocity cubes. The cubes are derived from high resolving power (R ≈ 40 000) longslit spectroscopy of optical emission lines that span a range of ionizations. From Velocity Channel Analysis (VCA), we find that the slope of the velocity power spectrum is consistent with predictions of Kolmogorov theory between scales of 8 and 22 arcsec (0.02 to 0.05 pc). The outer scale, which is the dominant scale of density fluctuations in the nebula, approximately coincides with the autocorrelation length of the velocity fluctuations that we determine from the second order velocity structure function. We propose that this is the principal driving scale of the turbulence, which originates in the autocorrelation length of dense cores in the Orion molecular filament. By combining analysis of the non-thermal line widths with the systematic trends of velocity centroid versus ionization, we find that the global champagne flow and smaller scale turbulence each contribute in equal measure to the total velocity dispersion, with respective root-mean-square widths of 4-5 km s-1. The turbulence is subsonic and can account for only one half of the derived variance in ionized density, with the remaining variance provided by density gradients in photoevaporation flows from globules and filaments. Intercomparison with results from simulations implies that the ionized gas is confined to a thick shell and does not fill the interior of the nebula.

  19. Development of a portable gas-filled ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, K. Y.; Cha, S. M.; Gwak, M. S.

    2014-02-01

    A new portable gas-filled ionization chamber has been designed and constructed at the Physics Department of Sung Kyun Kwan University. To overcome the maximum count rate of ˜105 particles per second of a conventional ionization chamber, which utilizes a Frisch grid, and to enhance the portability of a detector, we adopted the design of multiple electrodes and modified it from the original designs by Kimura et al. and Chae et al. The new design utilizes a stack of multiple electrodes installed perpendicular to the optical beam axis. This configuration provides a fast response time for the detector, which is essential for high-rate counting. The device has been tested with a 241Am ( t 1/2 = 432.2 years) radioactive α source, which mainly emits 5.486-MeV (branching ratio of 85%) and 5.443-MeV (branching ratio of 13%) α particles. An energy resolution of 6.3% was achieved.

  20. Simultaneous resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization and electron avalanche ionization in gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, Mikhail N.; Zhang Zhili; Miles, Richard B.

    2008-07-15

    Resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and electron avalanche ionization (EAI) are measured simultaneously in Ar:Xe mixtures at different partial pressures of mixture components. A simple theory for combined REMPI+EAI in gas mixture is developed. It is shown that the REMPI electrons seed the avalanche process, and thus the avalanche process amplifies the REMPI signal. Possible applications are discussed.

  1. Fluid hydrogen at high density - Pressure ionization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saumon, Didier; Chabrier, Gilles

    1992-01-01

    The Helmholtz-free-energy model for nonideal mixtures of hydrogen atoms and molecules by Saumon and Chabrier (1991) is extended to describe dissociation and ionization in similar mixtures in chemical equilibrium. A free-energy model is given that describes partial ionization in the pressure and temperature ionization region. The plasma-phase transition predicted by the model is described for hydrogen mixtures including such components as H2, H, H(+), and e(-). The plasma-phase transition has a critical point at Tc = 15,300 K and Pc = 0.614 Mbar, and thermodynamic instability is noted in the pressure-ionization regime. The pressure dissociation and ionization of fluid hydrogen are described well with the model yielding information on the nature of the plasma-phase transition. The model is shown to be valuable for studying dissociation and ionization in astrophysical objects and in high-pressure studies where pressure and temperature effects are significant.

  2. WHAM observations of ionized gas in the inner Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Alex S.; Haffner, L. Matthew; Benjamin, Robert A.; Gostisha, Martin; Barger, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    We present Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) observations of ionized gas in the southern Milky Way. We include spectroscopic maps of H-Alpha, [S II], and [N II]. The data includes the Scutum-Centaurus Arm, for which we measure an exponential scale height about 20% less than that in the Perseus Arm in the outer Galaxy. The H-alpha scale height suggests a lower electron scale height in both arms than is measured locally from pulsar dispersion. The [N II] and [S II] data provide information about the temperature and ionization state of the gas: gas in the warm ionized medium is generally warmer (≈8000 K) and in lower ionization states than gas in classical H II regions. WHAM research and operations are supported through NSF Award AST-1108911.

  3. Gas chromatography fractionation platform featuring parallel flame-ionization detection and continuous high-resolution analyte collection in 384-well plates.

    PubMed

    Jonker, Willem; Clarijs, Bas; de Witte, Susannah L; van Velzen, Martin; de Koning, Sjaak; Schaap, Jaap; Somsen, Govert W; Kool, Jeroen

    2016-09-01

    Gas chromatography (GC) is a superior separation technique for many compounds. However, fractionation of a GC eluate for analyte isolation and/or post-column off-line analysis is not straightforward, and existing platforms are limited in the number of fractions that can be collected. Moreover, aerosol formation may cause serious analyte losses. Previously, our group has developed a platform that resolved these limitations of GC fractionation by post-column infusion of a trap solvent prior to continuous small-volume fraction collection in a 96-wells plate (Pieke et al., 2013 [17]). Still, this GC fractionation set-up lacked a chemical detector for the on-line recording of chromatograms, and the introduction of trap solvent resulted in extensive peak broadening for late-eluting compounds. This paper reports advancements to the fractionation platform allowing flame ionization detection (FID) parallel to high-resolution collection of a full GC chromatograms in up to 384 nanofractions of 7s each. To this end, a post-column split was incorporated which directs part of the eluate towards FID. Furthermore, a solvent heating device was developed for stable delivery of preheated/vaporized trap solvent, which significantly reduced band broadening by post-column infusion. In order to achieve optimal analyte trapping, several solvents were tested at different flow rates. The repeatability of the optimized GC fraction collection process was assessed demonstrating the possibility of up-concentration of isolated analytes by repetitive analyses of the same sample. The feasibility of the improved GC fractionation platform for bioactivity screening of toxic compounds was studied by the analysis of a mixture of test pesticides, which after fractionation were subjected to a post-column acetylcholinesterase (AChE) assay. Fractions showing AChE inhibition could be unambiguously correlated with peaks from the parallel-recorded FID chromatogram. PMID:27485151

  4. Helium Ionization in the Diffuse Ionized Gas surrounding Ultra-compact HII regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anish Roshi, D.; Churchwell, Edward B.

    2016-01-01

    We observed radio recombination lines (RRLs) from regions surrounding three Ultra-compact HII (UCHII) regions at frequencies near 5 GHz. The observations were made with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). From existing observations we know that helium in the diffuse ionized gas (DIR), located far from the ionizing source, is not fully ionized. The objectives of our observations are to determine (a) the distance from the ionizing stars where helium is under ionized for a variety of physical conditions and (b) whether the helium ionization depends on the age of the ionizing star. With these objectives, we observed RRLs towards 16 positions in the envelops of UCHII regions G10.15-0.34, G23.46-0.20 and G29.96-0.02. Helium lines were detected toward 10 of the observed positions and hydrogen RRLs were detected toward all the observed positions. The observed ratio of ionized helium to ionized hydrogen (He^+/H^+) at the positions where helium lines are detected range between 0.03 and 0.09. At positions where helium lines are not detected the upper limit on the ratio is ~ 0.05. We discuss the dependence of He^+/H^+ ratio on the distance from and age of the ionizing star clusters in the observed sources.

  5. Laser induced avalanche ionization in gases or gas mixtures with resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization or femtosecond laser pulse pre-ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, Mikhail N.; Miles, Richard B.

    2012-08-15

    The paper discusses the requirements for avalanche ionization in gas or gas mixtures initiated by REMPI or femtosecond-laser pre-ionization. Numerical examples of dependencies on partial composition for Ar:Xe gas mixture with REMPI of argon and subsequent classic avalanche ionization of Xe are presented.

  6. Large Picture of the Galactic Center Studied by H_3^+: High Ionization Rate, Prevailing Warm and Diffuse Gas, and Non-Rotating Expanding Molecular Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Takeshi; Geballe, Thomas R.; Indriolo, Nick

    2013-06-01

    Following our initial studies of the diffuse interstellar medium in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) of the Galactic center (GC) toward two remarkable sightlines--one 140 pc to the West of Sgr A* near Sgr E, and the other 85 pc to the East of Sgr A* near Sgr B --we are in the process of using newly identified bright stars with smooth continua suitable for H_3^+ spectroscopy to both fill the gap between these sightlines and expand coverage to wider regions of the CMZ. So far we have identified 43 qualified stars, of which 24 have been at least partially observed (i.e., in at least one spectral setting). The high ionization rate (on the order of ζ˜3×10^{-15} s^{-1}) and the existence of warm (T˜250 K) and diffuse (n≤100 cm^{-3}) gas previously reported in the GC have also been observed in some of the new sightlines, indicating these conditions fill a large portion of the CMZ. The velocity profiles observed in the diffuse clouds, some of which show absorption extending ˜ 140 km s^{-1}, allow us to draw a velocity-longitude diagram. The high-velocity fronts of such a diagram reveal the existence of an expanding molecular ring (EMR) with radius of ˜ 140 pc and velocity of ˜ 140 km s^{-1}. This ring is similar to those previously reported but is qualitatively different in that it is not rotating, suggesting an expulsion rather than the gravitational potential as causing the EMR. Possible relations between our observations and other high energy events will be discussed. T. R. Geballe and T. Oka, ApJ, 709, L70 (2010). T. Oka, T. R. Geballe, M. Goto, T. Usuda, and B. J. McCall ApJ, 632, 882 (2005). N. Kaifu, T. Kato, and T. Iguchi, Nature, 238, 105 (1972). N. Z. Scoville, ApJ, 175, L127 (1972). Y. Sofue, PASJ, 47, 551 (1995).

  7. Influence of ionization on ultrafast gas-based nonlinear fiber optics.

    PubMed

    Chang, W; Nazarkin, A; Travers, J C; Nold, J; Hölzer, P; Joly, N Y; Russell, P St J

    2011-10-10

    We numerically investigate the effect of ionization on ultrashort high-energy pulses propagating in gas-filled kagomé-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibers by solving an established uni-directional field equation. We consider the dynamics of two distinct regimes: ionization induced blue-shift and resonant dispersive wave emission in the deep-UV. We illustrate how the system evolves between these regimes and the changing influence of ionization. Finally, we consider the effect of higher ionization stages. PMID:21997110

  8. Characterization of plant materials by pyrolysis-field ionization mass spectrometry: high-resolution mass spectrometry, time-resolved high-resolution mass spectrometry, and Curie-point pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of spruce needles

    SciTech Connect

    Schulten, H.F.; Simmleit, N.; Mueller, R.

    1989-02-01

    In the course of a forest damage research project spruce needles are analyzed, without pretreatment except drying and milling, by in-source pyrolysis-field ionization mass spectrometry. The mass signals are assigned by using high-resolution mass measurements and thermal degradation products identified by Curie-point pyrolysis-gas chromatography. It is demonstrated that the thermal degradation products characterize the main chemical constituents of spruce needs such as polysaccharides and lignin. Furthermore, thermostable constituents such as lipids, steroids, and flavons are detected. The thermal degradation process is studied by temperature-programmed microfurnace pyrolysis in combination with time-resolved high-resolution mass spectrometry. The integrated interpretation of results achieved by the presented methods can be applied for the universal characterization of complex and in particular nonsoluble, polydisperse biological and geochemical materials.

  9. The ionization conditions in the Milky Way halo - Infalling gas toward the North Galactic Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danly, Laura

    1992-01-01

    Observations of gas in the Milky Way halo are studied with an eye toward the theoretical predictions of the Galactic Fountain model for the production of halo gas. Data are shown that indicate significant variations in the ionization conditions in infalling halo gas in the northern galactic hemisphere. Understanding the nature of Milky Way halo gas plays a critical role in interpreting QSO absorption lines in the investigation of galaxies at high redshift.

  10. High power gas laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Leland, Wallace T.; Stratton, Thomas F.

    1981-01-01

    A high power output CO.sub.2 gas laser amplifier having a number of sections, each comprising a plurality of annular pumping chambers spaced around the circumference of a vacuum chamber containing a cold cathode, gridded electron gun. The electron beam from the electron gun ionizes the gas lasing medium in the sections. An input laser beam is split into a plurality of annular beams, each passing through the sections comprising one pumping chamber.

  11. Diffuse Ionized Gas Line Strengths from Echelle Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terndrup, D. M.; Peterson, R. C.

    1996-05-01

    We discuss serendipitous detections of several emission lines from the diffuse interstellar medium in high-resolution spectra of stars in Baade's Window and globular clusters near the Galactic center. Following Lehnert & Heckman (1994, ApJ, 426, L27), we show that the ratios of the strengths of the emission lines of Hα , [N II], and [S II] are inconsistent with those of H II regions, but match those of the diffuse ionized gas, suggesting this as its origin. We discuss these ratios and upper limits to the line strengths of [O I] lambda 6300 and He I lambda 5879. It is difficult to specify where the emitting gas is located along the line of sight to Baade's Window, since this is along the Galaxy's minor axis where the (low) gas velocity poses no constraint. However, we note that the two spectra acquired 1 arcmin apart in Baade's Window are indistinguishable, with equal line strengths and velocity widths. The emission lines are significantly fainter in the sky spectrum of a star in the globular cluster NGC 5927, where the gas velocity indicates that the emission probably does arise in or near the galactic disk.

  12. Ionization of vitamin C in gas phase: Theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Abyar, Fatemeh; Farrokhpour, Hossein

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the gas phase ionization energies and photoelectron spectra of four important conformers of vitamin C were calculated. Symmetry adapted cluster/configuration interaction methodology employing the single and double excitation operators (SAC-CI SD-R) along with D95++(d,p) basis set were used for the calculations. Thermochemistry calculations were also performed on all possible conformers of vitamin C to find the relative stability of conformers in the gas phase. The calculated ionization bands of each conformer were assigned by calculating the contribution of natural bonding orbital (NBO) in the calculated canonical molecular orbitals involved in the ionization. SAC-CI calculations showed that the first ionization band of vitamin C is related to the π electrons of CC bond of the ring of molecule although, there is the lone electron pairs of oxygen atoms and π electrons of CO bond in the molecule. PMID:27092998

  13. Axisymmetric model of the ionized gas in the Orion Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, R. H.; Simpson, J. P.; Haas, M. R.; Erickson, E. F.

    1991-01-01

    New ionization and thermal equilibrium models for the ionized gas in the Orion Nebula with an axisymmetric two-dimensional 'blister' geometry/density distribution are presented. The HII region is represented more realistically than in previous models, while the physical detail of the microphysics and radiative transfer of the earlier spherical modeling is maintained. The predicted surface brightnesses are compared with observations for a large set of lines at different positions to determine the best-fitting physical parameters. The model explains the strong singly ionized line emission along the lines of sight near the Trapezium.

  14. Application of FIGAERO (Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsol) coupled to a high resolution time of flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer to field and chamber organic aerosol: Implications for carboxylic acid formation and gas-particle partitioning from monoterpene oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; Mohr, C.; Ehn, M.; Rubach, F.; Mentel, T. F.; Kleist, E.; Wildt, J.; Thornton, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    We present measurements of a large suite of gas and particle phase carboxylic acid containing compounds made with a Filter Inlet for Gas and AEROsol (FIGAERO) coupled to a high resolution time of flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) developed at the University of Washington. A prototype operated with acetate negative ion proton transfer chemistry was deployed on the Julich Plant Atmosphere Chamber to study a-pinene oxidation, and a modified version was deployed at the SMEAR II forest station in Hyytiälä, Finland and SOAS, in Brent Alabama. We focus here on results from JPAC and Hyytiälä, where we utilized the same ionization method most selective towards carboxylic acids. In all locations, 100's of organic acid compounds were observed in the gas and particles and many of the same composition acids detected in the gas-phase were detected in the particles upon temperature programmed thermal desorption. Particulate organics detected by FIGAERO are highly correlated with organic aerosol mass measured by an AMS, providing additional volatility and molecular level information about collected aerosol. The fraction of a given compound measured in the particle phase follows expected trends with elemental composition, but many compounds would not be well described by an absorptive partitioning model assuming unity activity coefficients. Moreover the detailed structure in the thermal desorption signals reveals a contribution from thermal decomposition of large molecular weight organics and or oligomers with implications for partitioning measurements and model validation

  15. Ionization of NO at high temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. Frederick

    1991-01-01

    Space vehicles flying through the atmosphere at high speed are known to excite a complex set of chemical reactions in the atmospheric gases, ranging from simple vibrational excitation to dissociation, atom exchange, electronic excitation, ionization, and charge exchange. Simple arguments are developed for the temperature dependence of the reactions leading to ionization of NO, including the effect of vibrational electronic thermal nonequilibrium. NO ionization is the most important source of electrons at intermediate temperatures and at higher temperatures provides the trigger electrons that ionize atoms. Based on these arguments, recommendations are made for formulae which fit observed experimental results, and which include a dependence on both a heavy particle temperature and different vibration electron temperatures. In addition, these expressions will presumably provide the most reliable extrapolation of experimental results to much higher temperatures.

  16. Novel analytical approach for brominated flame retardants based on the use of gas chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry with emphasis in highly brominated congeners.

    PubMed

    Portolés, Tania; Sales, Carlos; Gómara, Belén; Sancho, Juan Vicente; Beltrán, Joaquim; Herrero, Laura; González, María José; Hernández, Félix

    2015-10-01

    The analysis of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) commonly relies on the use of gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) operating in electron ionization (EI) and electron capture negative ionization (ECNI) modes using quadrupole, triple quadrupole, ion trap, and magnetic sector analyzers. However, these brominated contaminants are examples of compounds for which a soft and robust ionization technique might be favorable since they show high fragmentation in EI and low specificity in ECNI. In addition, the low limits of quantification (0.01 ng/g) required by European Commission Recommendation 2014/118/EU on the monitoring of traces of BFRs in food put stress on the use of highly sensitive techniques/methods. In this work, a new approach for the extremely sensitive determination of BFRs taking profit of the potential of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) combined with GC and triple quadrupole (QqQ) mass analyzer is proposed. The objective was to explore the potential of this approach for the BFRs determination in samples at pg/g levels, taking marine samples and a cream sample as a model. Ionization and fragmentation behavior of 14 PBDEs (congeners 28, 47, 66, 85, 99, 100, 153, 154, 183, 184, 191, 196, 197, and 209) and two novel BFRs, decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), in the GC-APCI-MS system has been investigated. The formation of highly abundant (quasi) molecular ion was the main advantage observed in relation to EI. Thus, a notable improvement in sensitivity and specificity was observed when using it as precursor ion in tandem MS. The improved detectability (LODs < 10 fg) achieved when using APCI compared to EI has been demonstrated, which is especially relevant for highly brominated congeners. Analysis of samples from an intercomparison exercise and samples from the marine field showed the potential of this approach for the reliable identification and quantification at very low

  17. Shock-wave structure in a partially ionized gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, C. S.; Huang, A. B.

    1974-01-01

    The structure of a steady plane shock in a partially ionized gas has been investigated using the Boltzmann equation with a kinetic model as the governing equation and the discrete ordinate method as a tool. The effects of the electric field induced by the charge separation on the shock structure have also been studied. Although the three species of an ionized gas travel with approximately the same macroscopic velocity, the individual distribution functions are found to be very different. In a strong shock the atom distribution function may have double peaks, while the ion distribution function has only one peak. Electrons are heated up much earlier than ions and atoms in a partially ionized gas. Because the interactions of electrons with atoms and with ions are different, the ion temperature can be different from the atom temperature.

  18. Surface Ionization Gas Detection at SnO{sub 2} Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Krenkow, A.; Oberhuettinger, C.; Habauzit, A.; Kessler, M.; Goebel, J.; Mueller, G.

    2009-05-23

    In surface ionization (SI) gas detection adsorbed analyte molecules are converted into ionic species at a heated solid surface and extracted into free space by an oppositely biased counter electrode. In the present work we consider the formation of positive and negative analyte gas ions at SnO{sub 2} surfaces. We find that SI leads to positive ion formation only, with the SI efficiency scaling with the ionization energy of the analyte gas molecules. Aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons with amine functional groups exhibit particularly high SI efficiencies.

  19. Highly sensitive and selective analysis of urinary steroids by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography combined with positive chemical ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Tobias, Herbert J.; Brenna, J. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) provides greater separation space than conventional GC. Because of fast peak elution, a time of flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) is the usual structure-specific detector of choice. The quantitative capabilities of a novel GC×GC fast quadrupole MS were investigated with electron ionization (EI), and CH4 or NH3 positive chemical ionization (PCI) for analysis of endogenous urinary steroids targeted in anti-doping tests. Average precisions for steroid quantitative analysis from replicate urine extractions were 6% (RSD) for EI and 8% for PCI-NH3. The average limits of detection (LOD) calculated by quantification ions for 12 target steroids spiked into steroid-free urine matrix (SFUM) were 2.6 ng mL−1 for EI, 1.3 ng mL−1 for PCI-CH4, and 0.3 ng mL−1 for PCI-NH3, all in mass scanning mode. The measured limits of quantification (LOQ) with full mass scan GC×GC-qMS were comparable with the LOQ values measured by one-dimensional GC-MS in single ion monitoring (SIM) mode. PCI-NH3 yields fewer fragments and greater (pseudo)molecular ion abundances than EI or PCI-CH4. These data show a benchtop GC×GC-qMS system has the sensitivity, specificity, and resolution to analyze urinary steroids at normal urine concentrations, and that PCI-NH3, not currently available on most GC×GC-TOFMS instruments, is of particular value for generation of structure-specific ions. PMID:22606686

  20. Similarity of ionized gas nebulae around unobscured and obscured quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guilin; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Greene, Jenny E.

    2014-08-01

    Quasar feedback is suspected to play a key role in the evolution of massive galaxies, by removing or reheating gas in quasar host galaxies and thus limiting the amount of star formation. In this paper, we continue our investigation of quasar-driven winds on galaxy-wide scales. We conduct Gemini Integral Field Unit spectroscopy of a sample of luminous unobscured (type 1) quasars, to determine the morphology and kinematics of ionized gas around these objects, predominantly via observations of the [O III] λ5007 Å emission line. We find that ionized gas nebulae extend out to ˜13 kpc from the quasar, that they are smooth and round, and that their kinematics are inconsistent with gas in dynamical equilibrium with the host galaxy. The observed morphological and kinematic properties are strikingly similar to those of ionized gas around obscured (type 2) quasars with matched [O III] luminosity, with marginal evidence that nebulae around unobscured quasars are slightly more compact. Therefore, in samples of obscured and unobscured quasars carefully matched in [O III] luminosity, we find support for the standard geometry-based unification model of active galactic nuclei, in that the intrinsic properties of the quasars, of their hosts and of their ionized gas appear to be very similar. Given the apparent ubiquity of extended ionized regions, we are forced to conclude that either the quasar is at least partially illuminating pre-existing gas or that both samples of quasars are seen during advanced stages of quasar feedback. In the latter case, we may be biased by our [O III]-based selection against quasars in the early `blow-out' phase, for example due to dust obscuration.

  1. The ionization sources of the diffuse ionized gas in nearby disk galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voges, Erica Susan

    Diffuse ionized gas (DIG) has been shown to be an important component of the interstellar medium (ISM), with its large filling factor (>= 20%) and a mass that makes it the most massive component of the Galactic ionized ISM. Given that it has been found to be ubiquitous in both the Galaxy and external disk galaxies, the energy source to create and maintain the DIG must necessarily be large. Massive OB stars are the only known sources with enough energy to power the DIG, and DIG is also linked morphologically to OB stars as it is brightest near bright star forming regions. However, the details of the location and spectral types of the ionizing stars, as well as the relevance of other ionizing mechanisms, are still not clear. I present the results of three different studies aimed at exploring the ionization sources of the DIG. Optical spectroscopy of DIG in M33 and NGC 891 using the Gemini-North telescope has been obtained to compare diagnostic emission line ratios with photoionization models. The first detection of (O I] l6300 was made in the DIG of M33. In M33, models in which ionizing photons leaking from H II regions are responsible for the ionization of the DIG best fit our observed line ratios. In NGC 891, we found evidence that shock ionization may need to be included along with photoionization in order to explain our observed emission line ratios. The diffuse Ha fraction in eight nearby galaxies was studied as a function of radius and star formation rate per unit area. We found no correlation with radius, but we did find that regions with higher star formation rates have lower diffuse fractions. Neither of these results had any dependence on galaxy type. These results have implications regarding the circumstances under which H II regions may be leaking ionizing photons and thus ionizing DIG. We also compared observed and predicted ionizing photon emission rates for 39 H II regions in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Our results indicate that five of the H II

  2. Screening of pesticides and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in feeds and fish tissues by gas chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Nácher-Mestre, Jaime; Serrano, Roque; Portolés, Tania; Berntssen, Marc H G; Pérez-Sánchez, Jaume; Hernández, Félix

    2014-03-12

    This paper reports a wide-scope screening for detection and identification of pesticides and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in feeds and fish tissues. QuEChERS sample treatment was applied, using freezing as an additional cleanup. Analysis was carried out by gas chromatography coupled to hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (GC-(APCI) QTOF MS). The qualitative validation was performed for over 133 representative pesticides and 24 PAHs at 0.01 and 0.05 mg/kg. Subsequent application of the screening method to aquaculture samples made it possible to detect several compounds from the target list, such as chlorpyrifos-methyl, pirimiphos-methyl, and ethoxyquin, among others. Light PAHs (≤4 rings) were found in both animal and vegetable samples. The reliable identification of the compounds was supported by accurate mass measurements and the presence of at least two representative m/z ions in the spectrum together with the retention time of the peak, in agreement with the reference standard. Additionally, the search was widened to include other pesticides for which standards were not available, thanks to the expected presence of the protonated molecule and/or molecular ion in the APCI spectra. This could allow the detection and tentative identification of other pesticides different from those included in the validated target list. PMID:24559176

  3. Miniature triaxial metastable ionization detector for gas chromatographic trace analysis of extraterrestrial volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woeller, F. H.; Kojiro, D. R.; Carle, G. C.

    1984-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with a miniature metastable ionization detector featuring an unconventional electrode configuration, whose performance characteristics parallel those of traditional design. The ionization detector is to be incorporated in a flight gas chromatograph (GC) for use in the Space Shuttle. The design of the detector is discussed, taking into account studies which verified the sensitivity of the detector. The triaxial design of the detector is compared with a flat-plate style. The obtained results show that the principal goal of developing a miniature, highly sensitive ionization detector for flight applications was achieved. Improved fabrication techniques will utilize glass-to-metal seals and brazing procedures.

  4. Plasma wakefield acceleration in self-ionized gas or plasmas.

    PubMed

    Deng, S; Barnes, C D; Clayton, C E; O'Connell, C; Decker, F J; Erdem, O; Fonseca, R A; Huang, C; Hogan, M J; Iverson, R; Johnson, D K; Joshi, C; Katsouleas, T; Krejcik, P; Lu, W; Marsh, K A; Mori, W B; Muggli, P; Tsung, F

    2003-10-01

    Tunnel ionizing neutral gas with the self-field of a charged particle beam is explored as a possible way of creating plasma sources for a plasma wakefield accelerator [Bruhwiler et al., Phys. Plasmas (to be published)]. The optimal gas density for maximizing the plasma wakefield without preionized plasma is studied using the PIC simulation code OSIRIS [R. Hemker et al., in Proceeding of the Fifth IEEE Particle Accelerator Conference (IEEE, 1999), pp. 3672-3674]. To obtain wakefields comparable to the optimal preionized case, the gas density needs to be seven times higher than the plasma density in a typical preionized case. A physical explanation is given. PMID:14683089

  5. The effect of recombination radiation on the temperature and ionization state of partially ionized gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raičević, Milan; Pawlik, Andreas H.; Schaye, Joop; Rahmati, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    A substantial fraction of all ionizing photons originate from radiative recombinations. However, in radiative transfer calculations this recombination radiation is often assumed to be absorbed `on-the-spot' because for most methods the computational cost associated with the inclusion of gas elements as sources is prohibitive. We present a new, CPU and memory efficient implementation for the transport of ionizing recombination radiation in the TRAPHIC radiative transfer scheme. TRAPHIC solves the radiative transfer equation by tracing photon packets at the speed of light and in a photon-conserving manner in spatially adaptive smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations. Our new implementation uses existing features of the TRAPHIC scheme to add recombination radiation at no additional cost in the limit in which the fraction of the simulation box filled with radiation approaches 1. We test the implementation by simulating an H II region in photoionization equilibrium and comparing to reference solutions presented in the literature, finding excellent agreement. We apply our implementation to discuss the evolution of the H II region to equilibrium. We show that the widely used case A and B approximations yield accurate ionization profiles only near the source and near the ionization front, respectively. We also discuss the impact of recombination radiation on the geometry of shadows behind optically thick absorbers. We demonstrate that the shadow region may be completely ionized by the diffuse recombination radiation field and discuss the important role of heating by recombination radiation in the shadow region.

  6. Real-time gas and particle-phase organic acids measurement at a forest site using chemical ionization high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry during BEACHON-RoMBAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatavelli, L. R.; Stark, H.; Kimmel, J.; Cubison, M.; Day, D. A.; Jayne, J.; Thornton, J. A.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    We present measurement of organic acids in gas and aerosol particles conducted in a ponderosa pine forest during July and August 2011 as part of the Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics & Nitrogen - Rocky Mountain Biogenic Aerosol Study (BEACHON-RoMBAS; http://tinyurl.com/BEACHON-RoMBAS). The measurement technique is based on chemical ionization, high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry and utilizes a Micro-Orifice Volatilization Impactor [MOVI-CI-HR-ToFMS; Yatavelli et al., AS&T, 2010] to collect sub-micron aerosol particles while simultaneously measuring the gas-phase composition. The collected particles are subsequently analyzed by temperature-programmed thermal desorption. The reagent ion chosen for this campaign is the acetate anion (CH3C(O)O-, m/z 59), which reacts selectively via proton transfer with compounds that are stronger gas-phase acids than acetic acid [Veres et al., IJMS, 2008]. Preliminary results show substantial particle-phase concentrations of biogenic oxidation products such as hydroxy-glutaric acid, pinic acid, pinonic acid, and hydroxy-pinonic acid along with numerous lower and higher molecular weight organic acids. Correlations of the organic acid concentrations with meteorological, gas and aerosol parameters measured by other instrumentation are investigated in order to understand the formation, transformation, and partitioning of gas and particle-phase organic acids in a forested environment dominated by terpenes.

  7. A new mini gas ionization chamber for IBA applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, A. M.; Cassimi, A.; Döbeli, M.; Mallepell, M.; Monnet, I.; Simon, M. J.; Suter, M.; Synal, H.-A.

    2011-12-01

    Novel prototypes of high resolution gas ionization chambers ( GIC) were designed with increased compactness and simplicity of the setup. They have no Frisch-grid and a simple anode wire. Under certain operating conditions these mini detectors have an energy resolution comparable with that of state-of-the-art GICs of much higher complexity. They can be operated both under vacuum and atmospheric pressure. First measurements were made with protons in the energy range of 0.3-1.0 MeV. For protons at 0.3 MeV an energy resolution of about 12 keV was achieved. With a 72 MeV 129Xe beam a relative resolution of 1.4% was obtained. Due to their versatility and reduced size the detectors can easily be applied in the field of ion beam analysis ( IBA) and accelerator mass spectrometry ( AMS) . Since they are almost completely insensitive to radiation damage they are especially suited for use in high fluence applications such as scanning transmission ion microscopy ( STIM). A comparison of the radiation hardness of the mini GIC with a Si PIN diode was therefore performed. The GIC showed no peak shift or change in energy resolution at all after collecting 10 15 protons per cm 2 while the performance of the Si detector clearly started to degrade at 10 12 particles per cm 2.

  8. Ionized gas characteristics in the cavities of the gas and dust disc of the spiral galaxy NGC 6946

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremov, Yu. N.; Afanasiev, V. L.; Egorov, O. V.

    2011-07-01

    The parameters of the ionized gas in NGC 6946 (in the [NII] λλ6548, 6583, H α and [SII] λλ6717, 6731 lines) are investigated with the SAO RAS BTA telescope along three positions of the long slit of the SCORPIO focal reducer, passing through a number of large and small cavities of the gaseous disc of the galaxy. These cavities correspond exactly to the cavities in warm dust, visible at 5 - 8µm. We found that everywhere in the direction of NGC 6946 the lines of ionized gas are decomposed into two Gaussians, one of which shows almost constant [SII]/H α and [NII]/H α ratios, as well as an almost constant radial velocity within the measurement errors (about -35… - 50 km/s). This component is in fact the foreground radiation from the diffuse ionized gas of our Galaxy, which is not surprising, given the low (12°) latitude of NGC 6946; a similar component is also present in the emission of neutral hydrogen. The analysis of the component of ionized gas, occurring inNGC 6946, has revealed that it shows signs of shock excitation in the cavities of the gaseous disc of the galaxy. This shock excitation is as well typical for the extraplanar diffuse ionized gas (EDIG), observed in a number of spiral galaxies at their high Z-coordinates. This can most likely be explained by low density of the gas in the NGC 6946 disc (with the usual photoionization) inside the cavities, due to what we see the spectral features of the EDIG gas of NGC 6946, projected onto them, and located outside the plane of the galaxy. In the absence of separation of ionized gas into two components by radial velocities, there is an increasing contribution to the integral line parameters by the EDIG of our Galaxy when the gas density in NGC 6946 decreases, which explains some strange results, obtained in the previous studies. Themorphology of warmdust, visible in the infrared range and HI is almost the same (except for the peripheral parts of the galaxy, where there are no sources of dust heating

  9. Observational model of the ionized gas in Seyfert and radio-galaxy nuclei*

    PubMed Central

    Osterbrock, Donald E.

    1978-01-01

    Equivalent widths of the total emission-line Hβ in Seyfert 1, Seyfert 2, and intermediate-type Seyfert galaxies, expressed in terms of the featureless continuum, all have approximately the same frequency distribution. This suggests that the energy-input mechanism to both the narrow-line, low-density gas and the broad-line, high-density gas is photoionization by the featureless continuum. The reason for the weakness of the narrow emission lines in extreme Seyfert 1 galaxies is then the absorption of most of the ionizing photons in the dense gas near the central source. The statistics of line widths can be fitted by a model in which the dense gas has typical rotational velocity 5000 km/sec and typical turbulent velocity 2000 km/sec. A model is proposed in which the dense gas forms a rotating, turbulent disk with dimension ≈0.1 pc and height/diameter ≈2/5. Seyfert 2 galaxies are objects with little dense gas, and intermediate-type Seyfert galaxies are objects in which the dense gas is optically thin to ionizing radiation at least along the poles. Most radio galaxies have strong narrow emission lines, suggesting that escape of radio plasma can only occur where some ionizing photons can also escape from the dense gas. Other predictions, implications, and tests of this model are discussed. Images PMID:16592488

  10. Resonance ionization spectroscopy: counting noble-gas atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, G.S.; Payne, M.G.; Chen, C.H.; Willis, R.D.; Lehmann, B.E.; Kramer, S.D.

    1981-06-01

    New work on the counting of noble gas atoms, using lasers for the selective ionization and detectors for counting individual particles (electrons or positive ions) is reported. When positive ions are counted, various kinds of mass analyzers (magnetic, quadrupole, or time-of-flight) can be incorporated to provide A selectivity. It is shown that a variety of interesting and important applications can be made with atom-counting techniques which are both atomic number (Z) and mass number (A) selective.

  11. Ionizing gas breakdown waves in strong electric fields.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klingbeil, R.; Tidman, D. A.; Fernsler, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    A previous analysis by Albright and Tidman (1972) of the structure of an ionizing potential wave driven through a dense gas by a strong electric field is extended to include atomic structure details of the background atoms and radiative effects, especially, photoionization. It is found that photoionization plays an important role in avalanche propagation. Velocities, electron densities, and temperatures are presented as a function of electric field for both negative and positive breakdown waves in nitrogen.

  12. Galaxy-Scale Clouds of Ionized Gas around AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chojnowski, S. Drew; Keel, William C.

    2012-02-01

    The serendipitous 2007 discovery of the object now known (even by NED) as "Hanny's Voorwerp" (Lintott et al. 2009) set into motion a search for more examples of galaxy-scale clouds of highly-ionized gas in the vicinity of active galactic nuclei (AGN). Using a sample assembled primarily by 'citizen scientists' via a dedicated thread in the Galaxy Zoo Forum, we carried out the first part of a larger long- slit spectroscopic survey of such objects with the 2.1m telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO). Of the 30 objects targeted during seven nights (multiple exposures for several), extended emission clouds were observed in 15 objects, with [OIII]λ5007 emission occasionally extending >30 kpc from galaxy cores. A strong majority (11/15) of the extended emission clouds coincide with merging or otherwise violently disrupted systems, but more relevant to our search were the handful of clouds coinciding with isolated, symmetric galaxies lacking an obvious excitation mechanism. We present the results of part one in the hunt for Voorwerp analogues, much of which served to weed-out the more interesting objects to be targeted for future, multi-wavelength studies.

  13. Supernova remnants and diffuse ionized gas in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walterbos, Rene; Braun, Robert

    1990-07-01

    Researchers have compiled an initial list of radio/optical supernova remnants (SNRs) in M31, by searching for radio identifications of emission-line sources with a high (SII)/H alpha ratio (greater than 0.60). The (SII) filter included both sulfur lines and the H alpha filter did not include (NII). This search revealed 11 SNRs, of which only two were known. In addition, researchers detected radio emission from 3 SNRs that were identified in previous optical surveys (D'Odorico et al., 1980), but that were outside the charge coupled device (CCD) fields. The 14 objects only include the most obvious candidates, but a full search is in progress and the researchers expect to find several more SNRs. Also not all optical SNRs show detectable radio emission and a pure optical list of SNR candidates based only on the ratio of (SII)/H alpha emission contains many more objects. Two conclusions are apparent. First, the radio properties of the SNRs in M31 are quite similar to those of Galactic SNRs as is illustrated. The brightnesses are not systematically lower as has been suggested in the past (Dickel and D'Odorico, 1984). Second, the slope of the relation is close to -2; this slope is expected from the intrinsic dependence between surface brightness and diameter. The radio luminosity of the SNRs does not seem to depend strongly on diameter, or age, contrary to model predictions. Selection effects, however, play an important role in these plots. The CCD images show widespread diffuse ionized gas with a ratio of (SII)/H alpha that is higher than that of discrete HII regions. Discrete HII regions typically show ratios between 0.2 to 0.3, while the diffuse gas in the arms consistently shows ratios of 0.5. Researchers can trace this gas across the spiral arms to emission measures below 5 pc cm (-6). Its properties seem to be similar to that of the diffuse gas in the solar neighborhood.

  14. A compact high resolution electrospray ionization ion mobility spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Reinecke, T; Kirk, A T; Ahrens, A; Raddatz, C-R; Thoben, C; Zimmermann, S

    2016-04-01

    Electrospray is a commonly used ionization method for the analysis of liquids. An electrospray is a dispersed nebular of charged droplets produced under the influence of a strong electrical field. Subsequently, ions are produced in a complex process initiated by evaporation of neutral solvent molecules from these droplets. We coupled an electrospray ionization source to our previously described high resolution ion mobility spectrometer with 75mm drift tube length and a drift voltage of 5kV. When using a tritium source for chemical gas phase ionization, a resolving power of R=100 was reported for this setup. We replaced the tritium source and the field switching shutter by an electrospray needle, a desolvation region with variable length and a three-grid shutter for injecting ions into the drift region. Preliminary measurements with tetraalkylammonium halides show that the current configuration with the electrospray ionization source maintains the resolving power of R=100. In this work, we present the characterization of our setup. One major advantage of our setup is that the desolvation region can be heated separately from the drift region so that the temperature in the drift region stays at room temperature even up to desolvation region temperatures of 100°C. We perform parametric studies for the investigation of the influence of temperature on solvent evaporation with different ratios of water and methanol in the solvent for different analyte substances. Furthermore, the setup is operated in negative mode and spectra of bentazon with different solvents are presented. PMID:26838374

  15. 3D Modeling of Laser Propagation in Ionizing Gas and Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooley, J.; Antonsen, T., Jr.; Huang, C.; Mori, W.

    2003-10-01

    The interaction of a high intensity laser with ionizing gas and plasmas is of current interest for both Laser Wakefield Accelerators and x-ray generation. We have developed a 3D fluid simulation code based on the same quasistatic approximation used in the 2D code WAKE [1]. The object oriented structure of the code also allows it to couple to the quickPIC particle code [2]. We will present 3D studies of the ionization scattering instability [3], which occurs when a laser pulse propagates in an ionizing gas. [1] P. Mora and T. Antonsen, Jr., Phys. Plasmas 4(1), January 1997 [2] J. Cooley, T. Antonsen, Jr., C. Huang, etal., Proceedings, Advanced Accelerator Concepts, 2002 [3] Z. Bian and T. Antonsen, Jr., Phys. Plasmas 8(7), July 2001 * work supported by NSF and DOE

  16. Hot interstellar gas and ionization of embedded clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, K.-P.; Bruhweiler, F.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers present detailed photoionization calculations for the instellar cloud in which the Sun is embedded. They consider the EUV radiation field with contribution from discrete stellar sources and from a thermal bremsstrahlung-radiative recombination spectrum emitted from the surrounding 10 to the 6th power k coronal substrate. They establish lower limits to the fractional ionization of hydrogen and helium of 0.17 and 0.29 respectively. The high He ionization fraction results primarily from very strong line emission below 500 A originating in the surrounding coronal substrate while the H ionization is dominated by the EUV radiation from the discrete stellar sources. The dual effects of thermal conduction and the EUV spectrum of the 10 to the 6th k plasma on ionization in the cloud skin are explored. The EUV radiation field and Auger ionization have insignificant effects on the resulting ionic column densities of Si IV, C IV, N V and O VI through the cloud skin. Calculations show that the abundances of these species are dominated by collisional ionization in the thermal conduction front. Because of a low charge exchange rate with hydrogen, the ionic column density ratios of N (CIII)/N (CII) and N (NII)/N (NI) are dominated by the EUV radiation field in the local interstellar medium. These ratios should be important diagnostics for the EUV radiation field and serve as surrogate indicators of the interstellar He and H ionization fraction respectively. Spacecraft such as Lyman which is designed to obtain high resolution spectral data down to the Lyman limit at 912 A could sample interstellar lines of these ions.

  17. The in-gas-jet laser ion source: Resonance ionization spectroscopy of radioactive atoms in supersonic gas jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Ferrer, R.; Huyse, M.; Van den Bergh, P.; Van Duppen, P.

    2013-02-01

    New approaches to perform efficient and selective step-wise resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS) of radioactive atoms in different types of supersonic gas jets are proposed. This novel application results in a major expansion of the in-gas laser ionization and spectroscopy (IGLIS) method developed at KU Leuven. Implementation of resonance ionization in the supersonic gas jet allows to increase the spectral resolution by one order of magnitude in comparison with the currently performed in-gas-cell ionization spectroscopy. Properties of supersonic beams, obtained from the de Laval-, the spike-, and the free jet nozzles that are important for the reduction of the spectral line broadening mechanisms in cold and low density environments are discussed. Requirements for the laser radiation and for the vacuum pumping system are also examined. Finally, first results of high-resolution spectroscopy in the supersonic free jet are presented for the 327.4 nm 3d104s 2S1/2→ 3d104p 2P1/2 transition in the stable 63Cu isotope using an amplified single mode laser radiation.

  18. Nonlinear optical response of multiply ionized noble-gas atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarazkar(1, 3), Maryam; Romanov(2, 3), Dmitri; Levis(1, 3), Robert

    2016-05-01

    Calculation of dynamic polarizabilities and hyperpolarizabilities of ionized species using ab initio methods presents computational and conceptual difficulties, as these ionized species often have open-shell electronic system. We use multi-configurational self-consistent field (MCSCF) method with extended basis sets for calculating dynamic polarizability and second-order hyperpolarizabilities of atomic noble gases and their multiply charged cations in non-resonant regime. The calculations were performed at wavelengths ranging from about 100 nm to the red of the first multi-photon resonance all the way toward the static regime. The results were benchmarked to those of CCSD calculations for ions of even-number charge. The second-order hyperpolarizability coefficients were found to decrease when the electrons are progressively removed from the system. At higher ionization states, these coefficients become less dispersive as a function of wavelength. The values and even the signs of the γ (2) coefficients were found to depend on the spin of the ionic quantum state. Thus, for Ne+3 and Ne+4, in low-spin states (2 Pu, and 1 Sg, respectively) the sign of γ (2) is positive, whereas in high-spin states (4 Su, and 3 Pg) the sign is negative. The calculated hyperpolarizabilities of multiply ionized atoms relate to experiments on very bright high-order harmonic generation in multiply ionized plasmas.

  19. RESIDUAL-GAS-IONIZATION BEAM PROFILE MONITORS IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    CONNOLLY, R.; MICHNOFF, R.; TEPIKIAN, S.

    2005-05-16

    Four ionization profile monitors (IPMs) in RHIC measure vertical and horizontal beam profiles in the two rings by measuring the distribution of electrons produced by beam ionization of residual gas. During the last three years both the collection accuracy and signal/noise ratio have been improved. An electron source is mounted across the beam pipe from the collector to monitor microchannel plate (MCP) aging and the signal electrons are gated to reduce MCP aging and to allow charge replenishment between single-turn measurements. Software changes permit simultaneous measurements of any number of individual bunches in the ring. This has been used to measure emittance growth rates on six bunches of varying intensities in a single store. Also the software supports FFT analysis of turn-by-turn profiles of a single bunch at injection to detect dipole and quadrupole oscillations.

  20. Aerodynamic Effects in Weakly Ionized Gas: Phenomenology and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Popovic, S.; Vuskovic, L.

    2006-12-01

    Aerodynamic effects in ionized gases, often neglected phenomena, have been subject of a renewed interest in recent years. After a brief historical account, we discuss a selected number of effects and unresolved problems that appear to be relevant in both aeronautic and propulsion applications in subsonic, supersonic, and hypersonic flow. Interaction between acoustic shock waves and weakly ionized gas is manifested either as plasma-induced shock wave dispersion and acceleration or as shock-wave induced double electric layer in the plasma, followed by the localized increase of the average electron energy and density, as well as enhancement of optical emission. We describe the phenomenology of these effects and discuss several experiments that still do not have an adequate interpretation. Critical for application of aerodynamic effects is the energy deposition into the flow. We classify and discuss some proposed wall-free generation schemes with respect to the efficiency of energy deposition and overall generation of the aerodynamic body force.

  1. Residual-gas-ionization beam profile monitors in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, R.; Fite, J.; Jao, S.; Trabocchi, C.

    2010-05-02

    Four ionization profile monitors (IPMs) are in RHIC to measure vertical and horizontal beam profiles in the two rings. These work by measuring the distribution of electrons produced by beam ionization of residual gas. During the last two years both the collection accuracy and signal/noise ratio have been improved. An electron source is mounted across the beam pipe from the collector to monitor microchannel plate (MCP) aging and the signal electrons are gated to reduce MCP aging and to allow charge replenishment between single-turn measurements. Software changes permit simultaneous measurements of any number of individual bunches in the ring. This has been used to measure emittance growth rates on six bunches of varying intensities in a single store. Also the software supports FFT analysis of turn-by-turn profiles of a single bunch at injection to detect dipole and quadrupole oscillations.

  2. Approximate Thermodynamics State Relations in Partially Ionized Gas Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Ramshaw, J D

    2003-12-30

    In practical applications, the thermodynamic state relations of partially ionized gas mixtures are usually approximated in terms of the state relations of the pure partially ionized constituent gases or materials in isolation. Such approximations are ordinarily based on an artificial partitioning or separation of the mixture into its constituent materials, with material k regarded as being confined by itself within a compartment or subvolume with volume fraction {alpha}k and possessing a fraction {beta}k of the total internal energy of the mixture. In a mixture of N materials, the quantities {alpha}k and {beta}k constitute an additional 2N--2 independent variables. The most common procedure for determining these variables, and hence the state relations for the mixture, is to require that the subvolumes all have the same temperature and pressure. This intuitively reasonable procedure is easily shown to reproduce the correct thermal and caloric state equations for a mixture of neutral (non-ionized) ideal gases. Here we wish to point out that (a) this procedure leads to incorrect state equations for a mixture of partially ionized ideal gases, whereas (b) the alternative procedure of requiring that the subvolumes all have the same temperature and free electron density reproduces the correct thermal and caloric state equations for such a mixture. These results readily generalize to the case of partially degenerate and/or relativistic electrons, to a common approximation used to represent pressure ionization effects, and to two-temperature plasmas. This suggests that equating the subvolume electron number densities or chemical potentials instead of pressures is likely to provide a more accurate approximation even in nonideal plasma mixtures.

  3. Kinematics of the Diffuse Ionized Gas Disk of Andromeda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thelen, Alexander; Howley, K.; Guhathakurta, P.; Dorman, C.; SPLASH Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    This research focuses on the flattened rotating diffuse ionized gas (DIG) disk of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31). For this we use spectra from 25 multislit masks obtained by the SPLASH collaboration using the DEIMOS spectrograph on the Keck-II 10-meter telescope. Each mask contains 200 slits covering the region around M32 (S of the center of M31), the major axis of M31, and the SE minor axis. DIG emission was serendipitously detected in the background sky of these slits. By creating a normalized "sky spectrum” to remove various other sources of emission (such as night sky lines) in the background of these slits, we have examined the rotation of the DIG disk using individual line-of-sight velocity measurements of Hα, [NII] and [SII] emission. his emission is probably the result of newly formed stars ionizing the gas in the disk. The measured IG rotation will be compared to the rotation of M31's stellar disk and HI gas disk, as well as models of an infinitely thin rotating disk, to better understand the relationship between the components of the galactic disk and its differential rotation. We wish to acknowledge the NSF for funding on this project.

  4. Ionization Gas Sensor using Aligned Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Array

    SciTech Connect

    Kermany, A. R.; Mohamed, N. M.; Singh, B. S. M.

    2011-05-25

    The challenge with current conventional gas sensors which are operating using semiconducting oxides is their size. After the introduction of nanotechnology and in order to reduce the dimension and consequently the power consumption and cost, new materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are being introduced. From previous works and characterization results, it was proven that the CNTs based gas sensor has better sensitivity, selectivity and faster response time in compared with semiconducting oxides based gas sensors. As in this work, a fabrication and successful testing of an ionization-based gas sensor using aligned Multiwalled CNTs (MWCNTs) as sensing element is discussed, in which MWCNTs array and Al film are used as anode and cathode plates respectively with electrode separation ranging from 80 {mu}m to 140 {mu}m. Aligned MWCNTs array was incorporated into a sensor configuration in the gas chamber for testing of gases such as argon, air, and mixed gas of 2%H{sub 2} in air. Obtained results show that among the three gases, argon has the lowest breakdown voltage whilst air has the highest value and the breakdown voltage was found to decrease as the electrode spacing was reduced from 140 {mu}m to 80 {mu}m for all three gases.

  5. Diffuse Ionized Gas in the Dwarf Galaxy DDO 53

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Fajardo, N.; Hidalgo-Gámez, A. M.

    We study the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) in the M81 group dwarf irregular galaxy DDO 53. We use long-slit spectroscopy in order to determine the most interesting line ratios. We compare these ratios with classical and leaking photoionization, shocks and turbulent layer models. As other dwarf irregular galaxies, the spectral characteristics are very diferent to those of the DIG in spiral galaxies: the excitation is higher and the [SII/Hα] much lower. A combination of leakage photoionization models plus shocks will be able to explain these characteristics.

  6. Neutral Gas and Low-Redshift Starbursts: From Infall to Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaskot, Anne; Oey, M. S.; Salzer, J. J.; Van Sistine, A.; Haynes, M. P.

    2014-01-01

    The interplay of gas inflows, star formation, and feedback drives galaxy evolution, and starburst galaxies provide important laboratories for probing these processes at their most extreme. With two samples of low-redshift starburst galaxies, we examine the conversion of neutral gas into stars and the subsequent effects of stellar feedback on the neutral interstellar medium (ISM). The ALFALFA Hα survey represents a complete, volume-limited sample of HI-selected galaxies with 21 cm spectra and Hα and R-band imaging. By contrasting the starburst galaxies with the rest of the gas-rich galaxy population, we investigate the roles of galaxy morphology, HI kinematics, and the atomic gas supply in triggering extreme levels of star formation. Both an elevated HI gas supply and an external disturbance are necessary to drive the starbursts. While neutral gas may fuel a starburst, it may also increase starbursts' optical depths and hinder the transport of ionizing radiation. In contrast to the expectations for high-redshift star-forming galaxies, neutral gas appears to effectively bar the escape of ionizing radiation in most low-redshift starbursts. To evaluate the impact of radiative feedback in extreme starbursts, we analyze optical spectra of the Green Pea galaxies, a low-redshift sample selected by their intense [O III] λ5007 emission and compact sizes. We use nebular photoionization and stellar population models to constrain the Peas' burst ages, ionizing sources, and optical depths and find that the Peas are likely optically thin to Lyman continuum (LyC) radiation. These young starbursts still generate substantial ionizing radiation, while recent supernovae may have carved holes in the ISM that enhance LyC photon escape into the intergalactic medium. While the ALFALFA survey demonstrates the role of external processes in triggering starbursts, the Green Peas show that starbursts' radiation can escape to affect their external environment.

  7. Diffuse Ionized Gas inside the Dwarf Irregular Galaxy NGC 6822

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo-Gámez, A. M.; Peimbert, A.

    2007-05-01

    We have studied the differences between the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) and the H II regions along a slit position in the local dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 6822. The slit position passes through the two most prominent H II regions: Hubble V and Hubble X. Important differences have been found in the excitation, ionization, and [N II] λ6584/Hα and [S II] λ6717/Hα line ratios between the DIG and the H II locations. Moreover, the values of all the line ratios are not similar to those in the DIG locations of spiral galaxies but are very similar to the values in other irregular galaxies, such as IC 10. We also determined the rate of recombination using the He I λ5875 line. Finally, we obtained a picture of the ionization sources of the DIG. We consider that the leakage of photons from the H II regions might explain most of the line ratios, except [N II]/Hα, which might be explained by turbulence. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, proposal 69.C-0203(A).

  8. IONIZED GAS IN THE FIRST 10 kpc OF THE INTERSTELLAR GALACTIC HALO: METAL ION FRACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Howk, J. Christopher; Consiglio, S. Michelle E-mail: smconsiglio@ucla.edu

    2012-11-10

    We present direct measures of the ionization fractions of several sulfur ions in the Galactic warm ionized medium (WIM). We obtained high-resolution ultraviolet absorption-line spectroscopy of post-asymptotic giant branch stars in the globular clusters Messier 3 [(l, b) = (42.{sup 0}2, +78.{sup 0}7), d = 10.2 kpc, and z = 10.0 kpc] and Messier 5 [(l, b) = (3.{sup 0}9, +46.{sup 0}8), d = 7.5 kpc, and z = +5.3 kpc] with the Hubble Space Telescope and Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer to measure, or place limits on, the column densities of S I, S II, S III, S IV, S VI, and H I. These clusters also house millisecond pulsars, whose dispersion measures give an electron column density from which we infer the H II column in these directions. We find fractions of S{sup +2} in the WIM for the M 3 and M 5 sight lines x(S{sup +2}) {identical_to} N(S{sup +2})/N(S) = 0.33 {+-} 0.07 and 0.47 {+-} 0.09, respectively, with variations perhaps related to location. With negligible quantities of the higher ionization states, we conclude that S{sup +} and S{sup +2} account for all of the S in the WIM. We extend the methodology to study the ion fractions in the warm and hot ionized gas of the Milky Way, including the high ions Si{sup +3}, C{sup +3}, N{sup +4}, and O{sup +5}. The vast majority of the Galactic ionized gas is warm (T {approx} 10{sup 4} K) and photoionized (the WIM) or very hot (T > 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} K) and collisionally ionized. The common tracer of ionized gas beyond the Milky Way, O{sup +5}, traces <1% of the total ionized gas mass of the Milky Way.

  9. Development of an ionization-type gas density monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saaski, E. W.

    1980-12-01

    A battery operated electronic gas density monitor was developed for SF6 service in gas insulated substation equipment that is based on principles similar to ionization type fire alarms. The monitor has a resolution of 0.1 psia at 68 F and exhibits a linearity of from + or - 0.15 to + or - 0.6 psia at 68 F over the pressure range 30 to 75 psia, depending on ion chamber characteristics and operating voltage. A prototype unit exhibited a deviation from ideality of about 0.01% per degree Fahrenheit over the temperature range -30 F to 105 F and was found insensitive to water vapor in SF6 at levels in excess of 1000 ppM.

  10. The properties of spatial resolved ionized gas uncovered by CALIFA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Sebastian

    2015-08-01

    We present here the last results we obtained on the spatial resolved analysis of the the stellar populations and ionized gas of disk-dominated galaxies based on CALIFA data. CALIFA is an ongoing IFS survey of galaxies in the Local Univese (0.005ionized gas identifying the main properties of the HII-regions within the FoV. Both analyisis produce coherent analysis indicating that disk-galaxies growth inside out, with a chemical enrichment dominated by local processes, and limited effects of radial mixing or global outflows.

  11. Photoionized Mixing Layer Models of the Diffuse Ionized Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binette, Luc; Flores-Fajardo, Nahiely; Raga, Alejandro C.; Drissen, Laurent; Morisset, Christophe

    2009-04-01

    It is generally believed that O stars, confined near the galactic midplane, are somehow able to photoionize a significant fraction of what is termed the "diffuse ionized gas" (DIG) of spiral galaxies, which can extend up to 1-2 kpc above the galactic midplane. The heating of the DIG remains poorly understood, however, as simple photoionization models do not reproduce the observed line ratio correlations well or the DIG temperature. We present turbulent mixing layer (TML) models in which warm photoionized condensations are immersed in a hot supersonic wind. Turbulent dissipation and mixing generate an intermediate region where the gas is accelerated, heated, and mixed. The emission spectrum of such layers is compared with observations of Rand of the DIG in the edge-on spiral NGC 891. We generate two sequence of models that fit the line ratio correlations between [S II]/Hα, [O I]/Hα, [N II]/[S II], and [O III]/Hβ reasonably well. In one sequence of models, the hot wind velocity increases, while in the other, the ionization parameter and layer opacity increase. Despite the success of the mixing layer models, the overall efficiency in reprocessing the stellar UV is much too low, much less than 1%, which compels us to reject the TML model in its present form.

  12. A Novel Method for Profiling and Quantifying Short- and Medium-Chain Chlorinated Paraffins in Environmental Samples Using Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Gas Chromatography-Electron Capture Negative Ionization High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xia, Dan; Gao, Lirong; Zheng, Minghui; Tian, Qichang; Huang, Huiting; Qiao, Lin

    2016-07-19

    Chlorinated paraffins (CPs) are complex technical mixtures containing thousands of isomers. Analyzing CPs in environmental matrices is extremely challenging. CPs have broad, unresolved profiles when analyzed by one-dimensional gas chromatography (GC). Comprehensive two-dimensional GC (GC×GC) can separate CPs with a high degree of orthogonality. A novel method for simultaneously profiling and quantifying short- and medium-chain CPs, using GC×GC coupled with electron capture negative ionization high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry, was developed. The method allowed 48 CP formula congener groups to be analyzed highly selectively in one injection through accurate mass measurements of the [M - Cl](-) ions in full scan mode. The correlation coefficients (R(2)) for the linear calibration curves for different chlorine contents were 0.982 for short-chain CPs and 0.945 for medium-chain CPs. The method was successfully used to determine CPs in sediment and fish samples. By using this method, with enhanced chromatographic separation and high mass resolution, interferences between CP congeners and other organohalogen compounds, such as toxaphene, are minimized. New compounds, with the formulas C9H14Cl6 and C9H13Cl7, were found in sediment and biological samples for the first time. The method was shown to be a powerful tool for the analysis of CPs in environmental samples. PMID:27183176

  13. Start-phase ionization dynamics in the laser plasma at low gas target densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belik, V. P.; Demidov, R. A.; Kalmykov, S. G.; Mozharov, A. M.; Petrenko, M. V.; Sasin, M. E.

    2013-12-01

    In Xe laser-produced-plasma sources of short-wave radiation, the laser-energy-to-EUV conversion efficiency (CE) proves substantially less than theoretical expectations. In the present work, a calculated estimate has been made which indicates that a long period of the primary ionization, lasting up to a moment when high-Z ions appear to emit short-wave photons, can be one of main causes for this. During that period the plasma remains low-ionized and absorbs weakly the laser energy. The estimate above has been experimentally confirmed with spectroscopic data and those on the effective ion charge derived from measured absorption of the laser radiation in the plasma. A preionization of the gas target with an ultraviolet (UV) excimer laser pulse is proposed as a method to accelerate the ionization process and consequently, to enhance CE.

  14. Ionization dynamics in the laser plasma in a low pressure gas target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, R. A.; Kalmykov, S. G.; Mozharov, A. M.; Petrenko, M. V.; Sasin, M. E.

    2012-11-01

    In Xe-laser-plasma short-wave-radiation sources, the laser-energy-to-EUV conversion efficiency (CE) turns out to be substantially lower than theoretical expectations. An estimation made in the present work is evidence of what a long period of the primary ionization, lasting up to a moment when high- Z ions appear to emit short-wave photons, can be considered as a main cause for the low CE values. During that period the plasma remains low-ionized and absorbs weakly the laser energy. Data deduced from laser light absorption measurements confirm the estimation above. A preionization of the gas target with the UV excimer laser pulse is proposed as a method to accelerate the ionization process.

  15. In-gas-cell laser ionization studies of plutonium isotopes at IGISOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohjalainen, I.; Moore, I. D.; Kron, T.; Raeder, S.; Sonnenschein, V.; Tomita, H.; Trautmann, N.; Voss, A.; Wendt, K.

    2016-06-01

    In-gas-cell resonance laser ionization has been performed on long-lived isotopes of Pu at the IGISOL facility, Jyväskylä. This initiates a new programme of research towards high-resolution optical spectroscopy of heavy actinide elements which can be produced in sufficient quantities at research reactors and transported to facilities elsewhere. In this work a new gas cell has been constructed for fast extraction of laser-ionized elements. Samples of 238-240,242Pu and 244Pu have been evaporated from Ta filaments, laser ionized, mass separated and delivered to the collinear laser spectroscopy station. Here we report on the performance of the gas cell through studies of the mass spectra obtained in helium and argon, before and after the radiofrequency quadrupole cooler-buncher. This provides valuable insight into the gas phase chemistry exhibited by Pu, which has been additionally supported by measurements of ion time profiles. The resulting monoatomic yields are sufficient for collinear laser spectroscopy. A gamma-ray spectroscopic analysis of the Pu samples shows a good agreement with the assay provided by the Mainz Nuclear Chemistry department.

  16. INTEGRAL Field Spectroscopy of the Extended Ionized Gas in Arp 220

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colina, Luis; Arribas, Santiago; Clements, David

    2004-02-01

    Integral field optical spectroscopy with the INTEGRAL system has been used to investigate for the first time the two-dimensional kinematic and ionization properties of the extended, warm, ionized gas in Arp 220 over an area of 75.0"×40.0" (i.e., 28×15 kpc). The structure of the ionized gas is divided into well-identified regions associated with the X-ray-emitting plumes and extended lobes, previously studied in detail by McDowell and collaborators. The overall ionization state of the warm gas in the plumes and lobes, as traced by the [N II]/Hα line, is consistent with high-velocity shocks expanding in a neutral ambient medium. Changes in the ionization state of the gas along the major axis of the plumes are detected, in particular in the outer regions of the northwestern plume, where the transition between the main stellar body of the galaxy and a broad, low surface brightness tidal tail is located. If the plumes are produced by a starburst-driven galactic wind, the efficiency in the conversion of mechanical to radiation energy is a factor of at least 10 smaller than in galactic winds developed in edge-on spiral galaxies with well-defined rotation and axis of outflow. The kinematic properties of the lobes, with an average velocity of +8 km s-1 (east lobe) and -79 km s-1 (west lobe), are to a first order in agreement with the predictions of the merger scenario, according to which the lobes are tidally induced gas condensations produced during the merging process. The largest velocity gradients of 50 km s-1 kpc-1 and velocity deviations of up to +280 and -320 km s-1 from the systemic velocity are associated not with the plumes but with the outer stellar envelope and broad tidal tails at distances of up to 7.5 kpc, indicating that the large-scale kinematics of the extended ionized gas in Arp 220 is most likely dominated by the tidally induced motions, and not by galactic winds associated with nuclear starbursts. Based on observations with the William Herschel

  17. Astronomical redshifts of highly ionized regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Peter M.

    2014-07-01

    Astronomical or cosmological redshifts are an observable property of extragalactic objects and have historically been wholly attributed to the recessional velocity of that object. The question of other, or intrinsic, components of the redshift has been highly controversial since it was first proposed. This paper investigates one theoretical source of intrinsic redshift that has been identified. The highly ionized regions of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and Quasi-Stellar Objects (QSO) are, by definition, plasmas. All plasmas have electromagnetic scattering characteristics that could contribute to the observed redshift. To investigate this possibility, one region of a generalized AGN was selected, the so called Broad Line Region (BLR). Even though unresolvable with current instrumentation, physical estimates of this region have been published for years in the astronomical literature. These data, selected and then averaged, are used to construct an overall model that is consistent with the published data to within an order of magnitude. The model is then subjected to a theoretical scattering investigation. The results suggest that intrinsic redshifts, derivable from the characteristics of the ambient plasma, may indeed contribute to the overall observed redshift of these objects.

  18. Ionized Gas Observation Toward a Nearby Starburst Galaxy NGC 253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, K.; Sorai, K.; Nakai, N.; Kuno, N.; Matsubayashi, K.; Sugai, H.; Takano, S.; Kohno, K.; Nakajima, T.

    2015-12-01

    ALMA observation of a hydrogen recombination emission line toward NGC 253 was performed. NGC 253 is a prototypical starburst galaxy in the nearby universe. The recombination line was clearly detected in the central region of NGC 253 with a spatial resolution of few dozens of parsecs at the galaxy. The line and thermal free-free continuum emission show quite similar spatial distribution, and this fact shows the recombination line certainly traces ionized gas formed by young massive stars. Estimated electron temperature (6500-9000K) from the data are similar to those of Galactic HII regions. The recombination line has large velocity width at the center of the galaxy, and the velocity structure is quite different from that of molecular emission line.

  19. Chemical Abundances and Properties of the Ionized Gas in NGC 1705

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annibali, F.; Tosi, M.; Pasquali, A.; Aloisi, A.; Mignoli, M.; Romano, D.

    2015-11-01

    We obtained [O iii] narrow-band imaging and multi-slit MXU spectroscopy of the blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxy NGC 1705 with FORS2@VLT to derive chemical abundances of planetary nebulae and H ii regions and, more in general, to characterize the properties of the ionized gas. The auroral [O iii]λ 4363 line was detected in all but 1 of the 11 analyzed regions, allowing for a direct estimate of their electron temperature. The only object for which the [O iii]λ 4363 line was not detected is a possible low-ionization PN, the only one detected in our data. For all the other regions, we derived the abundances of nitrogen, oxygen, neon, sulfur, and argon out to ˜1 kpc from the galaxy center. We detect for the first time in NGC 1705 a negative radial gradient in the oxygen metallicity of -0.24+/- 0.08 dex kpc-1. The element abundances are all consistent with values reported in the literature for other samples of dwarf irregular and BCD galaxies. However, the average (central) oxygen abundance, 12+{log}({{O}}/{{H}})=7.96+/- 0.04, is ˜0.26 dex lower than previous literature estimates for NGC 1705 based on the [O iii]λ 4363 line. From classical emission line diagnostic diagrams, we exclude a major contribution from shock excitation. On the other hand, the radial behavior of the emission line ratios is consistent with the progressive dilution of radiation with increasing distance from the center of NGC 1705. This suggests that the strongest starburst located within the central ˜150 pc is responsible for the ionization of the gas out to at least ˜1 kpc. The gradual dilution of the radiation with increasing distance from the center reflects the gradual and continuous transition from the highly ionized H ii regions in the proximity of the major starburst into the diffuse ionized gas.

  20. Ionizing potential waves and high-voltage breakdown streamers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albright, N. W.; Tidman, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    The structure of ionizing potential waves driven by a strong electric field in a dense gas is discussed. Negative breakdown waves are found to propagate with a velocity proportional to the electric field normal to the wavefront. This causes a curved ionizing potential wavefront to focus down into a filamentary structure, and may provide the reason why breakdown in dense gases propagates in the form of a narrow leader streamer instead of a broad wavefront.

  1. Non-equilibirum ionization and cooling of metal-enriched gas in the presence of a photoionization background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheimer, Benjamin D.; Schaye, Joop

    2013-09-01

    and non-equilibrium scenarios, and both with and without an EGB. Cooling efficiencies and diagnostics of the physical state of diffuse gas can become highly inaccurate if ionization equilibrium is assumed or if the existence of the ionizing background is ignored.

  2. Background studies in gas ionizing x ray detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Hudson B.

    1989-01-01

    The background response of a gas ionizing proportional x ray detector is estimated by solving the one dimensional photon transport equation for two regions using Monte Carlo techniques. The solution was effected using the SSL VAX 780 and the CRAY XMP computers at Marshall Space Flight Center. The isotropic photon energy spectrum encompassing the range from 1 to 1000 KeV incident onto the first region, the shield, is taken so as to represent the measured spectrum at an altitude of 3 mb over Palastine, Texas. The differential energy spectrum deposited in the gas region, xenon, over the range of 0 to 100 KeV is written to an output file. In addition, the photon flux emerging from the shield region, tin, over the range of 1 to 1000 KeV is also tabulated and written to a separate file. Published tabular cross sections for photoelectric, elastic and inelastic Compton scattering as well as the total absorption coefficient are used. Histories of each incident photon as well as secondary photons from Compton and photoelectric interactions are followed until the photon either is absorbed or exits from the regions under consideration. The effect of shielding thickness upon the energy spectrum deposited in the xenon region for this background spectrum incident upon the tin shield was studied.

  3. High Velocity Gas Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A video tape related to orbital debris research is presented. The video tape covers the process of loading a High Velocity Gas Gun and firing it into a mounted metal plate. The process is then repeated in slow motion.

  4. High-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-flame ionization detection characterization of Delta5-polyenoic fatty acids in triacylglycerols from conifer seed oils.

    PubMed

    Lísa, Miroslav; Holcapek, Michal; Rezanka, Tomás; Kabátová, Nadezda

    2007-03-30

    Edible conifer seeds can serve as a source of triacylglycerols (TGs) with unusual Delta5 unsaturated polymethylene interrupted fatty acids (UPIFAs), such as cis-5,9-octadecadienoic (taxoleic), cis-5,9,12-octadecatrienoic (pinolenic), cis-5,11-eicosadienoic (keteleeronic) and cis-5,11,14-eicosatrienoic acids (sciadonic). Conifer seed oils from European Larch (Larix decidua), Norway Spruce (Picea abies) and European Silver Fir (Abies alba) have been analyzed by non-aqueous reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (NARP-HPLC) with atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation (APCI)-MS detection. The influence of different positions of double bonds in Delta5-UPIFAs on the retention and fragmentation behavior is described and used for the successful identification of TGs in each oil. TGs containing Delta5-UPIFAs have a higher retention in comparison with common TGs found in plant oils with single methylene interrupted Delta6(9)-FAs and also significantly changed relative abundances of fragment ions in APCI mass spectra. Results obtained from HPLC/MS analyses are supported by validated GC/FID analyses of fatty acid methyl esters after the transesterification. The total content of Delta5-UPIFAs is about 32% for European Larch, 27% for Norway Spruce and 20% for European Silver Fir. In total, 20 FAs with acyl chain lengths from 16 to 24 carbon atoms and from 0 to 3 double bonds have been identified in 64 triacylglycerols from 3 conifer seed oils. PMID:17307191

  5. The Impact of Diffuse Ionized Gas on Emission-line Ratios and Gas Metallicity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Yan, Renbin; MaNGA Team

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse Ionized Gas (DIG) is prevalent in star-forming galaxies. Using a sample of galaxies observed by MaNGA, we demonstrate how DIG in star-forming galaxies impact the measurements of emission line ratios, hence the gas-phase metallicity measurements and the interpretation of diagnostic diagrams. We demonstrate that emission line surface brightness (SB) is a reasonably good proxy to separate HII regions from regions dominated by diffuse ionized gas. For spatially-adjacent regions or regions at the same radius, many line ratios change systematically with emission line surface brightness, reflecting a gradual increase of dominance by DIG towards low SB. DIG could significantly bias the measurement of gas metallicity and metallicity gradient. Because DIG tend to have a higher temperature than HII regions, at fixed metallicity DIG displays lower [NII]/[OII] ratios. DIG also show lower [OIII]/[OII] ratios than HII regions, due to extended partially-ionized regions that enhance all low-ionization lines ([NII], [SII], [OII], [OI]). The contamination by DIG is responsible for a substantial portion of the scatter in metallicity measurements. At different surface brightness, line ratios and line ratio gradients can differ systematically. As DIG fraction could change with radius, it can affect the metallicity gradient measurements in systematic ways. The three commonly used strong-line metallicity indicators, R23, [NII]/[OII], O3N2, are all affected in different ways. To make robust metallicity gradient measurements, one has to properly isolate HII regions and correct for DIG contamination. In line ratio diagnostic diagrams, contamination by DIG moves HII regions towards composite or LINER-like regions.

  6. High efficiency ionizer using a hollow cathode discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Alessi, J.G.; Prelec, K.

    1984-01-01

    A proposal for an ionizer using a hollow cathode discharge plasma is described. Ionization is via the very high current density electron beam component in the plasma, as well as from charge exchange with plasma ions. Extraction of a He/sup +/ current corresponding to approximately 50% of the incoming atomic beam flux should be possible.

  7. HIGH PRESSURE GAS REGULATOR

    DOEpatents

    Ramage, R.W.

    1962-05-01

    A gas regulator operating on the piston and feedback principle is described. The device is particularly suitable for the delicate regulation of high pressure, i.e., 10,000 psi and above, gas sources, as well as being perfectly adaptable for use on gas supplies as low as 50 psi. The piston is adjustably connected to a needle valve and the movement of the piston regulates the flow of gas from the needle valve. The gas output is obtained from the needle valve. Output pressure is sampled by a piston feedback means which, in turn, regulates the movement of the main piston. When the output is other than the desired value, the feedback system initiates movement of the main piston to allow the output pressure to be corrected or to remain constant. (AEC)

  8. Study of the surface ionization detector for gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiwei; Wu, Dapeng; Chen, Shiheng; Peng, Hong; Guan, Yafeng

    2011-09-23

    The structure of the surface ionization detector (SID) and the operation parameters of GC-SID were investigated to reduce peak tailing and to enhance sensitivity. The performances of the GC-SID, including its repeatability, linearity, sensitivity, selectivity, and tolerance towards water vapor, were evaluated systematically. Compared with nitrogen-phosphorus detector (NPD), the SID was able to detect fg level triethylamine, and selectively respond to alkylamines, some anilines, and some nitrogen heterocyclic compounds. Among alkylamines, the SID sensitivity to diisobutylamine was rather small. Even so, it was also still 10 times higher than that on NPD. The SID selectivity, defined as the sensitivity ratio between triethylamine and various tested non-nitrogen compounds, was higher than 10(6). It was found that the SID is highly tolerant towards water vapor, allowing direct injection of water sample. Finally, the GC-SID was applied to directly measure trace amines in headspace gases of rotted meat and trace simazine in tap water. The SID sensitivity to simazine was proven to be 5 times higher than that on flame ionization detector (FID). This study suggests that the SID is a promising GC detector. PMID:21839459

  9. Plasma channel created by ionization of gas by a surface wave

    SciTech Connect

    Konovalov, V. N.; Kuz’min, G. P.; Minaev, I. M. Rukhadze, A. A.; Tikhonevich, O. V.

    2015-09-15

    Conditions for gas ionization in the field of a slow surface wave excited by a microwave source are considered. The gas ionization rate and the plasma density distribution over the radius of the discharge tube were studied by the optical method. The experiments were conducted in a dielectric tube with a radius much smaller than the tube length, the gas pressure being ∼1–3 Torr. It is shown that the stationary distribution of the plasma density is determined by diffusion processes.

  10. Ionized gas velocity dispersion in nearby dwarf galaxies: looking at supersonic turbulent motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseev, Alexei V.; Lozinskaya, Tatiana A.

    2012-06-01

    We present the results of an ionized gas turbulent motions study in several nearby dwarf galaxies using a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer with the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences (SAO RAS). Combining the ‘intensity-velocity dispersion’ diagrams (?) with two-dimensional maps of radial velocity dispersion, we found a number of common patterns pointing to the relation between the value of chaotic ionized gas motions and processes of current star formation. In five out of the seven analysed galaxies, we identified expanding shells of ionized gas with diameters of 80-350 pc and kinematic ages of 1-4 Myr. We also demonstrate that the ? diagrams may be useful for the search of supernova remnants, other small expanding shells or unique stars in nearby galaxies. As an example, a candidate luminous blue variable (LBV) was found in UGC 8508. We propose some additions to the interpretation, previously used by Muñoz-Tuñón et al. to explain the ? diagrams for giant star formation regions. In the case of dwarf galaxies, a major part of the regions with high velocity dispersion belongs to the diffuse low surface brightness emission, surrounding the star-forming regions. We attribute this to the presence of perturbed low-density gas with high values of turbulent velocities around the giant H II regions. Based on observations obtained with the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The observations were carried out with the financial support of the Ministry of Education and Science of Russian Federation (contracts no. 16.518.11.7073 and 16.552.11.7028).

  11. Ionized gas pressure correlates with star formation intensity in nearby starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tianxing; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Yang, Huan

    2016-06-01

    We estimate the electron density of the ionized gas and thus the thermal pressure in HII regions; and compare that to the SFR (star formation rate) surface density for a combined sample of about 40 green peas and Lyman Break Analogs at z < 0.30. The electron density of the ionized gas is measured from sulfur line ratio ([SII] 6716 / 6731). We find that the SFR surface density is correlated with the electron density and the thermal pressure in HII regions for the star-forming galaxies with SFR surface density above a certain threshold. This work shows quantitatively the correlation between SFR surface density and electron density and that between SFR surface density and the thermal pressure in HII regions for the nearby starburst galaxies. This is consistent with theoretical models of disks (e.g. Kim et al. (2011) if we assume that the thermal pressure in HII regions is comparable to the total diffuse gas pressure at the midplane of the diffuse neutral gas. It is also in agreement with the results from star-forming galaxies at z ~ 2.5. We might infer that the starburst galaxies at low-redshift (z < 0.3) share similar physical properties to the galaxies at high redshift (z ~ 2.5).

  12. Diffuse Ionized Gas in Irregular Galaxies. I. GR 8 and ESO 245-G05

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo-Gámez, A. M.

    2006-04-01

    We have studied the spectral characteristics of the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) in two irregular galaxies with low metallicities and intermediate star formation rates: ESO 245-G05 and GR 8. The [O III]/Hβ ratio in these galaxies is higher than in the DIG of spiral galaxies but not as high as in other irregular galaxies previously studied, such as IC 10 and NGC 6822. The [N II]/Hα and [S II]/Hα ratios have very small values, indicating the absence of shocks as the ionization source for this gas. This ionization can be explained in both galaxies with photon leakage from the H II regions as the only source. The percentage of photons that have escaped from the H II regions is small in ESO 245-G05, only 35%, but varies from 35% up to 60% in GR 8. We also investigated whether the differences found between spiral and irregular galaxies in the [O III]/Hβ and the [N II]/Hα ratios are due to differences in the metal content between these types of galaxies. Although the number of galaxies studied is not very large, it can be concluded that the [O III]/Hβ ratio is not related to the oxygen content, while the situation is more ambiguous for the [N II]/Hα ratio.

  13. Analysis of the diffuse ionized gas database: DIGEDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Fajardo, N.; Morisset, C.; Binette, L.

    2009-10-01

    Studies of the Diffuse Ionized Gas (DIG) have progressed without providing so far any strict criterion to distinguish DIGs from H II regions. In this work, we compile the emission line measurements of 29 galaxies that are available in the scientific literature, thereby setting up the first DIG database (DIGEDA). Making use of this database, we proceed to analyze the global properties of the DIG using the [NII]λ6583/Hα, [O I]λ6300/Hα, [O III]λ5007/Hβ and [SII]λ6716/Hα lines ratios, including the H α emission measure. This analysis leads us to conclude that the [N II]/Hα ratio provides an objective criterion for distinguishing whether an emission region is a DIG or an H II region, while the EM(Hα) is a useful quantity only when the galaxies are considered individually. Finally, we find that the emission regions of Irr galaxies classified as DIG in the literature appear in fact to be much more similar to H II regions than to the DIGs of spiral galaxies.

  14. Theoretical studies of highly ionized species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalgarno, A.; Victor, G. A.

    1980-10-01

    The calculations of the charge transfer recombination and ionization rate coefficients for a wide range of ionic systems in collision with hydrogen and helium at thermal energies were completed. For the carbon ions in hydrogen, the calculations were extended to energies of 100 ev. The importance of the processes in ionized plasmas was demonstrated by studies of the solar corona and of shock waves. Preliminary results were obtained on cross sections for the excitation of fine structure transitions by proton impacts. The mechanisms leading to the photodissociation of alkali metal dimers were identified and quantitative predictions were made for Li2. Calculations using the model potential method of properties of the Cu and Zn sequences were brought to a conclusion. Applications of the relativistic random phase approximation were made to the calculation of photoionization cross sections of magnesium-like and zinc-like ions and of oscillator strengths of mercury.

  15. Spatially resolved integral field spectroscopy of the ionized gas in IZw18

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehrig, C.; Vílchez, J. M.; Pérez-Montero, E.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Hernández-Fernández, J. D.; Duarte Puertas, S.; Brinchmann, J.; Durret, F.; Kunth, D.

    2016-07-01

    We present a detailed 2D study of the ionized ionized interstellar medium (ISM) of IZw18 using new Potsdam Multi-Aperture Spectrophotometer-integral field unit (PMAS-IFU) optical observations. IZw18 is a high-ionization galaxy which is among the most metal-poor starbursts in the local Universe. This makes IZw18 a local benchmark for understanding the properties most closely resembling those prevailing at distant starbursts. Our IFU aperture (˜1.4 × 1.4 kpc2) samples the entire IZw18 main body and an extended region of its ionized gas. Maps of relevant emission lines and emission line ratios show that higher-excitation gas is preferentially located close to the north-west knot and thereabouts. We detect a Wolf-Rayet feature near the north-west knot. We derive spatially resolved and integrated physical-chemical properties for the ionized gas in IZw18. We find no dependence between the metallicity indicator R23 and the ionization parameter (as traced by [O III]/[O II]) across IZw18. Over ˜0.30 kpc2, using the [O III] λ4363 line, we compute Te[O III] values (˜15 000-25 000 K), and oxygen abundances are derived from the direct determinations of Te[O III]. More than 70 per cent of the higher-Te[O III] (≳22 000 K) spaxels are He IIλ4686-emitting spaxels too. From a statistical analysis, we study the presence of variations in the ISM physical-chemical properties. A galaxy-wide homogeneity, across hundreds of parsecs, is seen in O/H. Based on spaxel-by-spaxel measurements, the error-weighted mean of 12 + log(O/H) = 7.11 ± 0.01 is taken as the representative O/H for IZw18. Aperture effects on the derivation of O/H are discussed. Using our IFU data we obtain, for the first time, the IZw18 integrated spectrum.

  16. Alfvén ionization in an MHD-gas interactions code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A. D.; Diver, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    A numerical model of partially ionized plasmas is developed in order to capture their evolving ionization fractions as a result of Alfvén ionization (AI). The mechanism of, and the parameter regime necessary for, AI is discussed and an expression for the AI rate based on fluid parameters, from a gas-MHD model, is derived. This AI term is added to an existing MHD-gas interactions' code, and the result is a linear, 2D, two-fluid model that includes momentum transfer between charged and neutral species as well as an ionization rate that depends on the velocity fields of both fluids. The dynamics of waves propagating through such a partially ionized plasma are investigated, and it is found that AI has a significant influence on the fluid dynamics as well as both the local and global ionization fraction.

  17. A reservoir of ionized gas in the galactic halo to sustain star formation in the Milky Way.

    PubMed

    Lehner, Nicolas; Howk, J Christopher

    2011-11-18

    Without a source of new gas, our Galaxy would exhaust its supply of gas through the formation of stars. Ionized gas clouds observed at high velocity may be a reservoir of such gas, but their distances are key for placing them in the galactic halo and unraveling their role. We have used the Hubble Space Telescope to blindly search for ionized high-velocity clouds (iHVCs) in the foreground of galactic stars. We show that iHVCs with 90 ≤ |v(LSR)| ≲ 170 kilometers per second (where v(LSR) is the velocity in the local standard of rest frame) are within one galactic radius of the Sun and have enough mass to maintain star formation, whereas iHVCs with |v(LSR)| ≳ 170 kilometers per second are at larger distances. These may be the next wave of infalling material. PMID:21868626

  18. Observations of feedback from radio-quiet quasars - I. Extents and morphologies of ionized gas nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guilin; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Greene, Jenny E.; Nesvadba, Nicole P. H.; Liu, Xin

    2013-04-01

    Black hole feedback - the strong interaction between the energy output of supermassive black holes and their surrounding environments - is routinely invoked to explain the absence of overly luminous galaxies, the black hole versus bulge correlations and the similarity of black hole accretion and star formation histories. Yet direct probes of this process in action are scarce and limited to small samples of active nuclei. In this paper, we present Gemini Integral Field Unit observations of the distribution of ionized gas around luminous, obscured, radio-quiet quasars at z ˜ 0.5. We detect extended ionized gas nebulae via [O III] λ5007 Å emission in every case, with a mean diameter of 28 kpc. These nebulae are nearly perfectly round, with Hβ surface brightness declining ∝R-3.5 ± 1.0. The regular morphologies of nebulae around radio-quiet quasars are in striking contrast with lumpy or elongated [O III] nebulae seen around radio galaxies at low and high redshifts. We present the uniformly measured size-luminosity relationship of [O III] nebulae around Seyfert 2 galaxies and type 2 quasars spanning six orders of magnitude in luminosity and confirm the flat slope of the correlation (R_{[O III]}∝ L_{[O III]}^{0.25± 0.02}). We propose a model of clumpy nebulae in which clouds that produce line emission transition from being ionization-bounded at small distances from the quasar to being matter-bounded in the outer parts of the nebula. The model - which has a declining pressure profile - qualitatively explains line ratio profiles and surface brightness profiles seen in our sample. It is striking that we see such smooth and round large-scale gas nebulosities in this sample, which are inconsistent with illuminated merger debris and which we suggest may be the signature of accretion energy from the nucleus reaching gas at large scales.

  19. Intensity correlation of ionizing background at high redshifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuo, Lin

    1993-01-01

    Intensity correlation of ionizing background at high redshifts is discussed. The intensity correlation function xi(sub j) and the absorption line equivalent width correlation xi(sub 1/W) are discussed.

  20. Spatially Resolved Thermodynamics of the Partially Ionized Exciton Gas in GaAs.

    PubMed

    Bieker, S; Henn, T; Kiessling, T; Ossau, W; Molenkamp, L W

    2015-06-01

    We report on the observation of macroscopic free exciton photoluminescence (PL) rings that appear in spatially resolved PL images obtained on a high purity GaAs sample. We demonstrate that a spatial temperature gradient in the photocarrier system, which is due to nonresonant optical excitation, locally modifies the population balance between free excitons and the uncorrelated electron-hole plasma described by the Saha equation and accounts for the experimentally observed nontrivial PL profiles. The exciton ring formation is a particularly instructive manifestation of the spatially dependent thermodynamics of a partially ionized exciton gas in a bulk semiconductor. PMID:26196644

  1. Spatially Resolved Thermodynamics of the Partially Ionized Exciton Gas in GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieker, S.; Henn, T.; Kiessling, T.; Ossau, W.; Molenkamp, L. W.

    2015-06-01

    We report on the observation of macroscopic free exciton photoluminescence (PL) rings that appear in spatially resolved PL images obtained on a high purity GaAs sample. We demonstrate that a spatial temperature gradient in the photocarrier system, which is due to nonresonant optical excitation, locally modifies the population balance between free excitons and the uncorrelated electron-hole plasma described by the Saha equation and accounts for the experimentally observed nontrivial PL profiles. The exciton ring formation is a particularly instructive manifestation of the spatially dependent thermodynamics of a partially ionized exciton gas in a bulk semiconductor.

  2. Galaxy-scale Clouds Of Ionized Gas Around Agn - History And Obscuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chojnowski, Drew; Keel, W. C.

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by the discovery of Hanny's Voorwerp, a 45-kpc highly-ionized cloud near the spiral galaxy IC 2497, and accompanying evidence for strong variability of its AGN over 105 year scales, members of the Galaxy Zoo project have carried out surveys for similar (albeit smaller) ionized clouds around galaxies both with and without spectroscopic AGN. The color-composite SDSS images detect strong [OIII] in the g band at low z, allowing a useful color search of Galaxy Zoo targets. In addition, a targeted search was made of over 16,000 spectroscopic AGN and candidates. We used SDSS data to produce crude [OIII] images of the top candidates, and obtained long-slit optical spectra from KPNO and Lick for 30 of the most promising. Roughly half of the spectra showed extended [OIII]λ5007 emission, some exceeding 30 kpc in radial extent. Of the 16 extended clouds we identified, 11 lie in strongly interacting or merging systems, probably because these events leave cold gas out of the plane to be ionized. Most nuclei of extended cloud hosts are type 2 Seyferts. We consider the energy budgets, between ionizing luminosity required for the most distant line emission and the FIR output of the nucleus, to see whether any suggest strong variability rather than obscuration. Several galaxies have such strong mismatches that obscuration alone becomes implausible as an explanation for the strong ionizing continuum, and are candidates for fading events similar to that in IC 2497 and Hanny's Voorwerp. This project was funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program through grant NSF AST-1004872.

  3. Evaluation of Gas-filled Ionization Chamber Method for Radon Measurement at Two Reference Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Tokonami, Shinji; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Yatabe, Yoshinori; Miyahara, Nobuyuki

    2008-08-07

    For quality assurance, gas-filled ionization chamber method was tested at two reference facilities for radon calibration: EML (USA) and PTB (Germany). Consequently, the radon concentrations estimated by the ionization chamber method were in good agreement with the reference radon concentrations provided by EML as well as PTB.

  4. Preparation of the spacer for narrow electrode gap configuration in ionization-based gas sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Saheed, Mohamed Shuaib Mohamed; Mohamed, Norani Muti; Burhanudin, Zainal Arif

    2012-09-26

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have started to be developed as the sensing element for ionization-based gas sensors due to the demand for improved sensitivity, selectivity, stability and other sensing properties beyond what can be offered by the conventional ones. Although these limitations have been overcome, the problems still remain with the conventional ionization-based gas sensors in that they are bulky and operating with large breakdown voltage and high temperature. Recent studies have shown that the breakdown voltage can be reduced by using nanostructured electrodes and narrow electrode gap. Nanostructured electrode in the form of aligned CNTs array with evenly distributed nanotips can enhance the linear electric field significantly. The later is attributed to the shorter conductivity path through narrow electrode gap. The paper presents the study on the design consideration in order to realize ionization based gas sensor using aligned carbon nanotubes array in an optimum sensor configuration with narrow electrode gap. Several deposition techniques were studied to deposit the spacer, the key component that can control the electrode gap. Plasma spray deposition, electron beam deposition and dry oxidation method were employed to obtain minimum film thickness around 32 {mu}m. For plasma spray method, sand blasting process is required in order to produce rough surface for strong bonding of the deposited film onto the surface. Film thickness, typically about 39 {mu}m can be obtained. For the electron beam deposition and dry oxidation, the film thickness is in the range of nanometers and thus unsuitable to produce the spacer. The deposited multilayer film consisting of copper, alumina and ferum on which CNTs array will be grown was found to be removed during the etching process. This is attributed to the high etching rate on the thin film which can be prevented by reducing the rate and having a thicker conductive copper film.

  5. High pressure gas target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelbart, W.; Johnson, R. R.; Abeysekera, B.

    2012-12-01

    Compact, high pressure, high current gas target features all metal construction and semi-automatic window assembly change. The unique aspect of this target is the domed-shaped window. The Havar alloy window is electron beam welded to a metal ring, thus forming one, interchangeable assembly. The window assembly is sealed by knife-edges locked by a pneumatic toggle allowing a quick, in situ window change.

  6. Determination of Ionization Potential of Calcium by High-Resolution Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyabe, Masabumi; Geppert, Christopher; Kato, Masaaki; Oba, Masaki; Wakaida, Ikuo; Watanabe, Kazuo; Wendt, Klaus D. A.

    2006-03-01

    High-resolution resonance ionization spectroscopy has been utilized to determine a precise ionization potential of Ca. Three-step resonance excitation with single-mode extended-cavity diode lasers populates long and unperturbed Rydberg series of 4snp (1P1) and 4snf (1F3) states in the range of n=20--150. Using an extended Ritz formula for quantum defects, the series convergence limit has been determined to be 49305.9240(20) cm-1 with the accuracy improved one order of magnitude higher than previously reported ones.

  7. Can the Lyman Continuum Leaked Out of H II Regions Explain Diffuse Ionized Gas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seon, Kwang-Il

    2009-09-01

    We present an attempt to explain the diffuse Hα emission of a face-on galaxy M 51 with the "standard" photoionization model, in which the Lyman continuum (Lyc) escaping from H II regions propagates large distances into the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). The diffuse Hα emission of M 51 is analyzed using thin slab models and exponential disk models in the context of the "on-the-spot" approximation. The scale height of the ionized gas needed to explain the diffuse Hα emission with the scenario is found to be of the order of ~1-2 kpc, consistent with those of our Galaxy and edge-on galaxies. The model also provides a vertical profile, when the galaxy is viewed edge-on, consisting of two-exponential components. However, it is found that an incredibly low absorption coefficient of κ0 ≈ 0.4-0.8 kpc-1 at the galactic plane, or, equivalently, an effective cross section as low as σeff ~ 10-5 of the photoionization cross section at 912 Å is required to allow the stellar Lyc photons to travel through the H I disk. Such a low absorption coefficient is out of accord with the properties of the ISM. Furthermore, we found that even the model that has the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) phase only and no H I gas phase shows highly concentrated Hα emissions around H II regions, and can account for only lsim26% of the Hα luminosity of the DIG. This result places a strong constraint on the ionizing source of the DIG. We also report that the Hα intensity distribution functions not only of the DIG, but also of H II regions in M 51, appear to be lognormal.

  8. Jet-driven outflows of ionized gas in the nearby radio galaxy 3C 293

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahony, E. K.; Oonk, J. B. R.; Morganti, R.; Tadhunter, C.; Bessiere, P.; Short, P.; Emonts, B. H. C.; Oosterloo, T. A.

    2016-01-01

    Fast outflows of gas, driven by the interaction between the radio jets and interstellar medium (ISM) of the host galaxy, are being observed in an increasing number of galaxies. One such example is the nearby radio galaxy 3C 293. In this paper we present integral field unit observations taken with OASIS on the William Herschel Telescope, enabling us to map the spatial extent of the ionized gas outflows across the central regions of the galaxy. The jet-driven outflow in 3C 293 is detected along the inner radio lobes with a mass outflow rate ranging from ˜0.05 to 0.17 M⊙ yr-1 (in ionized gas) and corresponding kinetic power of ˜0.5-3.5 × 1040 erg s-1. Investigating the kinematics of the gas surrounding the radio jets (i.e. not directly associated with the outflow), we find linewidths broader than 300 km s-1 up to 5 kpc in the radial direction from the nucleus (corresponding to 3.5 kpc in the direction perpendicular to the radio axis at maximum extent). Along the axis of the radio jet linewidths >400 km s-1 are detected out to 7 kpc from the nucleus and linewidths of >500 km s-1 at a distance of 12 kpc from the nucleus, indicating that the disturbed kinematics clearly extend well beyond the high surface brightness radio structures of the jets. This is suggestive of the cocoon structure seen in simulations of jet-ISM interaction and implies that the radio jets are capable of disturbing the gas throughout the central regions of the host galaxy in all directions.

  9. Ionized gas and planetary nebulae in the bulge of the blue S0 galaxy NGC 5102

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, Russet; Ciardullo, Robin; Jacoby, George H.

    1994-01-01

    We present the results of an investigation into the morphology and dynamics of ionized gas in the bulge of the gas-rich S0 galaxy NGC 5102. We show that the bulge of NGC 5102 contains a ring of ionized gas, approximately 1.3 kpc in diameter, which is centered well away from the nucleus. Through spectroscopy and (O III) lambda-5007 imaging, we show that the gas is excited by a low-velocity shock, which varies from approximately 50 to approximately 70 km/s along the ring. Fabry-Perot images in H-alpha confirm that the gas is moving slowly, and suggest that the structure is a supershell, approximately 10(exp 7) yr old. This age is significantly younger than the galaxy's nuclear starburst, which is approximately 2 x 10(exp 8) yr old. We also use our (O III) lambda-5007 images to identify planetary nebulae (PNs) in the bulge and inner disk of NGC 5102. Using the planetary nebula luminosity function, we derive a distance modulus to the galaxy of (m - M)(sub 0) = 27.47(sup +0.18)(sub -0.27), or 3.1(sup +0.3)(sub -0.4) Mpc, confirming its membership in the NGC 5128 group. Our derived value of 47.2(sup +12.2)(sub -9.2) x 10(exp -9) for the bolometric luminosity-specific PN density, alpha(sub 2.5), is higher than that observed for the bulge of M31 or the giant ellipticals of the Virgo Cluster, but not significantly different from that found for the small, normal ellipticals NGC 3377 or M32. The high value for alpha(sub 2.5) suggests that virtually all of NGC 5102's stars will someday evolve through the planetary nebula stage.

  10. Ionized gas and planetary nebulae in the bulge of the blue S0 galaxy NGC 5102

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, R.; Ciardullo, R.; Jacoby, G. H.

    1994-11-01

    We present the results of an investigation into the morphology and dynamics of ionized gas in the bulge of the gas-rich S0 galaxy NGC 5102. We show that the bulge of NGC 5102 contains a ring of ionized gas, approximately 1.3 kpc in diameter, which is centered well away from the nucleus. Through spectroscopy and (O III) lambda-5007 imaging, we show that the gas is excited by a low-velocity shock, which varies from approximately 50 to approximately 70 km/s along the ring. Fabry-Perot images in H-alpha confirm that the gas is moving slowly, and suggest that the structure is a supershell, approximately 107 yr old. This age is significantly younger than the galaxy's nuclear starburst, which is approximately 2 x 108 yr old. We also use our (O III) lambda-5007 images to identify planetary nebulae (PNs) in the bulge and inner disk of NGC 5102. Using the planetary nebula luminosity function, we derive a distance modulus to the galaxy of (m - M)0 = 27.47+0.18-0.27, or 3.1+0.3-0.4 Mpc, confirming its membership in the NGC 5128 group. Our derived value of 47.2+12.2-9.2 x 10-9 for the bolometric luminosity-specific PN density, alpha2.5, is higher than that observed for the bulge of M31 or the giant ellipticals of the Virgo Cluster, but not significantly different from that found for the small, normal ellipticals NGC 3377 or M32. The high value for alpha2.5 suggests that virtually all of NGC 5102's stars will someday evolve through the planetary nebula stage.

  11. Dynamic self-organization phenomena in complex ionized gas systems: new paradigms and technological aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirov, S. V.; Ostrikov, K.

    2004-04-01

    An overview of dynamic self-organization phenomena in complex ionized gas systems, associated physical phenomena, and industrial applications is presented. The most recent experimental, theoretical, and modeling efforts to understand the growth mechanisms and dynamics of nano- and micron-sized particles, as well as the unique properties of the plasma-particle systems (colloidal, or complex plasmas) and the associated physical phenomena are reviewed and the major technological applications of micro- and nanoparticles are discussed. Until recently, such particles were considered mostly as a potential hazard for the microelectronic manufacturing and significant efforts were applied to remove them from the processing volume or suppress the gas-phase coagulation. Nowadays, fine clusters and particulates find numerous challenging applications in fundamental science as well as in nanotechnology and other leading high-tech industries.

  12. Cosmic ray studies with a gas Cherenkov counter in association with an ionization spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubrahmanyan, V. K.; Ormes, J. F.; Arens, J. F.; Siohan, F.; Yodh, G. B.; Simon, M.; Spiegelhauer, H.

    1980-01-01

    The results from a balloon-borne gas Cherenkov counter (threshold 16.5 GeV/nucleon) and an ionization spectrometer are presented. The gas Cherenkov counter provides an absolute energy distribution for the response of the calorimeter for 5 or = Z 26 nuclei of cosmic rays. The contribution of scintillation to the gas Cherenkov pulse height was obtained by independently selecting particles below the gas Cherenkov threshold using the ionization spectrometer. Energy spectra were derived by minimizing the chi squared between Monte Carlo simulted data and flight data. Best fit power laws, dN/dE = AE-gamma, were determined for C, N, O, Ne, Mg, and Si. The power laws, all consistent with E (-2.7) are not good fits to the data. A better fit is obtained using the spectrum derived from the spectrometer. The data from the ionization calorimeter and the gas Cherenkov are thus completely self-consistent.

  13. Femtosecond interferometry of propagation of a laminar ionization front in a gas

    SciTech Connect

    Gizzi, L. A.; Giulietti, A.; Giulietti, D.; Labate, L.; Tomassini, P.; Galimberti, M.; Koester, P.; Martin, Ph.; Ceccotti, T.; De Oliveira, P.; Monot, P.

    2006-09-15

    We use optical interferometry to investigate ultrafast ionization induced by an intense, ultrashort laser pulse propagating in a helium gas. Besides standard phase shift information, our interferograms show a localized region of fringe visibility depletion (FVD) that moves along the laser propagation axis at luminal velocity. We find that such a loss of visibility can be quantitatively explained by the ultrafast change of refractive index due to the field ionization of the gas in the laser pulse width. We demonstrate that by combining the post facto phase shift distribution with the probe pulse transit effect in the ionizing region, the analysis of the observed FVD yields significant information on the ultrafast dynamics of propagation of the ionization front in the gas.

  14. Femtosecond interferometry of propagation of a laminar ionization front in a gas.

    PubMed

    Gizzi, L A; Galimberti, M; Giulietti, A; Giulietti, D; Koester, P; Labate, L; Tomassini, P; Martin, Ph; Ceccotti, T; De Oliveira, P; Monot, P

    2006-09-01

    We use optical interferometry to investigate ultrafast ionization induced by an intense, ultrashort laser pulse propagating in a helium gas. Besides standard phase shift information, our interferograms show a localized region of fringe visibility depletion (FVD) that moves along the laser propagation axis at luminal velocity. We find that such a loss of visibility can be quantitatively explained by the ultrafast change of refractive index due to the field ionization of the gas in the laser pulse width. We demonstrate that by combining the post facto phase shift distribution with the probe pulse transit effect in the ionizing region, the analysis of the observed FVD yields significant information on the ultrafast dynamics of propagation of the ionization front in the gas. PMID:17025750

  15. Shock Structure Analysis and Aerodynamics in a Weakly Ionized Gas Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saeks, R.; Popovic, S.; Chow, A. S.

    2006-01-01

    The structure of a shock wave propagating through a weakly ionized gas is analyzed using an electrofluid dynamics model composed of classical conservation laws and Gauss Law. A viscosity model is included to correctly model the spatial scale of the shock structure, and quasi-neutrality is not assumed. A detailed analysis of the structure of a shock wave propagating in a weakly ionized gas is presented, together with a discussion of the physics underlying the key features of the shock structure. A model for the flow behind a shock wave propagating through a weakly ionized gas is developed and used to analyze the effect of the ionization on the aerodynamics and performance of a two-dimensional hypersonic lifting body.

  16. Detection of trace levels of triclopyr using capillary gas chromatography-electron-capture negative-ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Begley, P; Foulger, B E

    1988-04-01

    Triclopyr, after esterification, is shown to be a suitable candidate for detection by gas chromatography-electron-capture negative-ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry forming a characteristic carboxylate anion which offers a high detection sensitivity. A detection limit of 70 fg reaching the ionizer is indicated. Low backgrounds and an absence of chemical interferences are shown for vegetation extracts, using a simple method of extraction and derivatisation. A similar behaviour is demonstrated for 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T. PMID:3379116

  17. Pulsed Discharge Helium Ionization Detector for Highly Sensitive Aquametry.

    PubMed

    Mowry, Curtis D; Pimentel, Adam S; Sparks, Elizabeth S; Moorman, Matthew W; Achyuthan, Komandoor E; Manginell, Ronald P

    2016-01-01

    Trace moisture quantitation is crucial in medical, civilian and military applications. Current aquametry technologies are limited by the sample volume, reactivity, or interferences, and/or instrument size, weight, power, cost, and complexity. We report for the first time on the use of a pulsed discharge helium ionization detector (PDHID-D2) (∼196 cm(3)) for the sensitive (limit of detection, 0.047 ng; 26 ppm), linear (r(2) >0.99), and rapid (< 2 min) quantitation of water using a small (0.2 - 5.0 μL) volume of liquid or gas. The relative humidity sensitivity was 0.22% (61.4 ppmv) with a limit of detection of less than 1 ng moisture with gaseous samples. The sensitivity was 10 to 100 to fold superior to competing technologies without the disadvantages inherent to these technologies. The PDHID-D2, due to its small footprint and low power requirement, has good size, weight, and power-portability (SWAPP) factors. The relatively low cost (∼$5000) and commercial availability of the PDHID-D2 makes our technique applicable to highly sensitive aquametry. PMID:26860562

  18. Kinematics of ionized gas in the barred Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asif, M. W.; Mundell, C. G.; Pedlar, A.

    2005-05-01

    We have determined the structure and kinematics of ionized gas in the weak oval bar of the archetypal Seyfert 1 galaxy, NGC 4151, using the TAURUS Fabry-Perot interferometer to simultaneously map the distribution and kinematics of Hβ emission. We also present broad-band ultraviolet imaging of the host galaxy, obtained with XMM-Newton, which shows the detailed distribution of star formation in the bar and in the optically faint outer spiral arms. We compare the distribution and kinematics of ionized gas with that previously determined in neutral hydrogen by Mundell & Shone; we suggest that the distribution of bright, patchy ultraviolet emission close to the HI shocks is consistent with ionization by star clusters that have formed in compressed pre-shock gas. These clusters then travel ballistically through the gaseous shock to ionize gas downstream along the leading edge of the bar. In addition, we detect, for the first time, ionized gas within the shock itself, which is streaming to smaller radii in the same manner as the neutral gas.

  19. Investigation of ionized metal flux in enhanced high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Stranak, Vitezslav; Hubicka, Zdenek; Cada, Martin; Drache, Steffen; Hippler, Rainer; Tichy, Milan

    2014-04-21

    The metal ionized flux fraction and production of double charged metal ions Me{sup 2+} of different materials (Al, Cu, Fe, Ti) by High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HiPIMS) operated with and without a pre-ionization assistance is compared in the paper. The Electron Cyclotron Wave Resonance (ECWR) discharge was employed as the pre-ionization agent providing a seed of charge in the idle time of HiPIMS pulses. A modified grid-free biased quartz crystal microbalance was used to estimate the metal ionized flux fraction ξ. The energy-resolved mass spectrometry served as a complementary method to distinguish particular ion contributions to the total ionized flux onto the substrate. The ratio between densities of doubly Me{sup 2+} and singly Me{sup +} charged metal ions was determined. It is shown that ECWR assistance enhances Me{sup 2+} production with respect of absorbed rf-power. The ECWR discharge also increases the metal ionized flux fraction of about 30% especially in the region of lower pressures. Further, the suppression of the gas rarefaction effect due to enhanced secondary electron emission of Me{sup 2+} was observed.

  20. The kinematics of Milky Way halo gas. I - Observations of low-ionization species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danly, Laura

    1989-01-01

    Ultraviolet interstellar line day observed with the IUE toward 70 halo stars and four extragalactic sight lines are analyzed in a study of the large-scale kinematic properties of the Milky Way halo gas. The motions of the low-ionization gas is focused on. Large systematic velocities are found, and a pronounced asymmetry in the absorption characteristics of halo gas toward the Galactic poles is indicated. In the north, substantial amounts of material are falling toward the disk at velocities up to about 120 km/s in the most extreme case. Toward the south, low-ionization material shows no extreme or systematic motions.

  1. Chemical-ionization visible and ultraviolet gas lasers: A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laudenslager, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    Charge-transfer reactions or Penning ionization reactions are used to produce population inversions between electronic states of molecular ions which should result in stimulated emission in ultraviolet and visible regions. Such lasers could be used in study of short-lived reaction intermediates, crystal structure and scattering, and photolysis.

  2. High Rydberg states of DABCO: Spectroscopy, ionization potential, and comparison with mass analyzed threshold ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boogaarts, Maarten G. H.; Holleman, Iwan; Jongma, Rienk T.; Parker, David H.; Meijer, Gerard; Even, Uzi

    1996-03-01

    Doubly-resonant excitation/vibrational autoionization is used to accurately determine the ionization potential (IP) of the highly symmetric caged amine 1,4 diazabicyclo[2,2,2]octane (DABCO). The IP of DABCO excited with one quantum of the ν24(e') vibration lies at (59 048.62±0.03) cm-1, based on fitting 56 components of the npxy Rydberg series (δ=0.406±0.002) to the Rydberg formula. Rydberg state transition energies and linewidths are determined using standard calibration and linefitting techniques. The IP determined from Rydberg state extrapolation is compared with that determined by mass analyzed threshold ionization (MATI). Effects of static electric fields on MATI signals measured for the high Rydberg states are discussed.

  3. Electron impact ionization of highly charged lithiumlike ions

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, K L

    1992-10-01

    Electron impact ionization cross sections can provide valuable information about the charge-state and power balance of highly charged ions in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. In the present work, a novel technique based on x-ray measurements has been used to infer the ionization cross section of highly charged lithiumlike ions on the Livermore electron beam ion trap. In particular, a correspondence is established between an observed x ray and an ionization event. The measurements are made at one energy corresponding to approximately 2.3 times the threshold energy for ionization of lithiumlike ions. The technique is applied to the transition metals between Z=22 (titanium, Ti[sup 19+]) and Z=26 (iron, Fe[sup 23+]) and to Z=56 (barium, Ba[sup 53+]). The results for the transition metals, which have an estimated 17-33% uncertainty, are in good overall agreement with a relativistic distorted-wave calculation. However, less good agreement is found for barium, which has a larger uncertainty. Methods for properly accounting for the polarization in the x-ray intensities and for inferring the charge-state abundances from x-ray observations, which were developed for the ionization measurements, as well as an x-ray model that assists in the proper interpretation of the data are also presented.

  4. Ionization of highly excited helium atoms in an electric field

    SciTech Connect

    van de Water, W.; Mariani, D.R.; Koch, P.M.

    1984-11-01

    We present detailed measurements of ionization of highly excited triplet helium atoms in a static electric field. The atoms were prepared in states with energy E close to the saddle-point threshold E = -2(F(a.u.))/sup 1/2/. The electric field F was sufficiently strong for the states to be characterized by total spin S and absolute value of the magnetic quantum number M/sub L/. For M/sub L/ = 0 states the experiments measured ionization properties of adiabatic states. In another case, Vertical BarM/sub L/Vertical Bar = 2, they predominantly measured those of diabatic states. In both cases the ionization rate was found to be a highly nonmonotonic function of the field strength. The observations are analyzed in terms of a theory of the helium density of states in an electric field. A companion paper (D. A. Harmin, Phys. Rev. A 30, 2413 (1984)) develops in detail the general theory, which uses quantum defects to parametrize the effect of the core interaction. The agreement between measured and calculated ionization curves is good, indicating that the field ionization of a nonhydrogenic atom can now be understood in a detailed, quantitative, and predictive sense.

  5. Prediction of Shock Wave Structure in Weakly Ionized Gas Flow by Solving MGD Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deng, Z. T.; Oviedo-Rojas, Ruben; Chow, Alan; Litchford, Ron J.; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports the recent research results of shockwave structure predictions using a new developed code. The modified Rankine-Hugoniot relations across a standing normal shock wave are discussed and adopted to obtain jump conditions. Coupling a electrostatic body force to the Burnett equations, the weakly ionized flow field across the shock wave was solved. Results indicated that the Modified Rankine-Hugoniot equations for shock wave are valid for a wide range of ionization fraction. However, this model breaks down with small free stream Mach number and with large ionization fraction. The jump conditions also depend on the value of free stream pressure, temperature and density. The computed shock wave structure with ionization provides results, which indicated that shock wave strength may be reduced by existence of weakly ionized gas.

  6. Evolution of a Maxwellian plasma driven by ion-beam-induced ionization of a gas

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, B.V.; Ottinger, P.F.; Rose, D.V.

    1996-09-01

    The ionization of gas by intense (MeV, kA/cm{sup 2}) ion beams is investigated for the purpose of obtaining scaling relations for the rate of rise of the electron density, temperature, and conductivity of the resulting plasma. Various gases including He, N, and Ar at pressures of order 1 torr have been studied. The model is local and assumes a drifting Maxwellian electron distribution. In the limit that the beam to gas density ratio is small, the initial stage of ionization occurs on the beam impact ionization time and lasts on the order of a few nanoseconds. Thereafter, ionization of neutrals by the thermal electrons dominates electron production. The electron density does not grow exponentially, but proceeds linearly on a fast time scale {ital t}{sub th}={ital U}/({ital v}{sub {ital b}}{rho}{ital dE}/{ital dx}) associated with the time taken for the beam to lose energy {ital U} via collisional stopping in the gas, where {ital U} is the ionization potential of the gas, {ital v}{sub {ital b}} is the beam velocity, {rho} is the gas mass density, and {ital dE}/{ital dx} is the mass stopping power in units of eVcm{sup 2}/g. This results in a temperature with a slow time dependence and a conductivity with a linear rise time proportional to {ital t}{sub th}. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Investigating the Diffuse Ionized Gas in the Magellanic Stream with Mapped WHAM Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, Brianna; Haffner, L. Matthew; Barger, Kathleen; Hernandez, Mike

    2016-01-01

    We present early stages of an Hα survey of the Magellanic Stream using the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM). While the neutral component of the Stream may extend 200° across the sky (Nidever et al. 2010), its ionized gas has not yet been studied in detail. Fox et al. 2014 find that the tidal debris in the Magellanic System contains twice as much ionized gas as neutral and may extend 30° away from the H I emission. However, such absorption-line studies are not sensitive to the overall morphology of the ionized gas. Using targeted Hα emission observations of the Magellanic Stream, Barger et al. 2015 find that although the warm ionized gas tracks the neutral gas, it often spans a few degrees away from the H I emission at slightly offset velocities. Using WHAM's unprecedented sensitivity to diffuse emission (~ 10s of mR) and its velocity resolution (12 km/s) to isolate Stream emission, we are now conducting the first full Hα survey of its ionized component. Here we present early results, including spatial and kinematic comparisons to the well-established neutral profile of the Stream. WHAM research and operations are supported through NSF Award AST-1108911.

  8. The Massive Stellar Population in the Diffuse Ionized Gas of M33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoopes, Charles G.; Walterbos, Rene A. M.

    1995-01-01

    We compare Far-UV, H alpha, and optical broadband images of the nearby spiral galaxy M33, to investigate the massive stars associated with the diffuse ionized gas. The H-alpha/FUV ratio is higher in HII regions than in the DIG, possibly indicating that an older population ionizes the DIG. The broad-band colors support this conclusion. The HII region population is consistent with a young burst, while the DIG colors resemble an older population with constant star formation. Our results indicate that there may be enough massive field stars to ionize the DIG, without the need for photon leakage from HII regions.

  9. IONIZATION-DRIVEN FRAGMENTATION OF GAS OUTFLOWS RESPONSIBLE FOR FeLoBALs IN QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Bautista, Manuel A.; Dunn, Jay P.

    2010-07-10

    We show that time variations in the UV ionizing continuum of quasars, on scales of {approx}1 yr, affect the dynamic structure of the plasmas responsible for low-ionization broad absorption lines. Variations of the ionizing continuum produce non-equilibrium photoionization conditions over a significant fraction of the absorbing clouds and supersonically moving ionization fronts. When the flux drops, the contraction of the ionized region drives a supersonic cooling front toward the radiation source and a rarefaction wave in the opposite direction. The pressure imbalance is compensated by an increased speed of the cool gas relative to the front. When the flux recovers, the cool gas is re-ionized and re-heated by a supersonic ionization front traveling away from the radiation source and a forward shock is created. The re-heated clouds equilibrate to a temperature of {approx}10{sup 4} K and are observed to have different radial velocities than the main cloud. Such fragmentation seems consistent with the multicomponent structure of troughs seen in some objects. The velocity differences measured among various components in the quasars QSO 2359-1241 and SDSS J0318-0600 can be reproduced by our model if strong magnetic fields ({approx}10 mG) are present within the clouds.

  10. Ionization-driven Fragmentation of Gas Outflows Responsible for FeLoBALs in Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bautista, Manuel A.; Dunn, Jay P.

    2010-07-01

    We show that time variations in the UV ionizing continuum of quasars, on scales of ~1 yr, affect the dynamic structure of the plasmas responsible for low-ionization broad absorption lines. Variations of the ionizing continuum produce non-equilibrium photoionization conditions over a significant fraction of the absorbing clouds and supersonically moving ionization fronts. When the flux drops, the contraction of the ionized region drives a supersonic cooling front toward the radiation source and a rarefaction wave in the opposite direction. The pressure imbalance is compensated by an increased speed of the cool gas relative to the front. When the flux recovers, the cool gas is re-ionized and re-heated by a supersonic ionization front traveling away from the radiation source and a forward shock is created. The re-heated clouds equilibrate to a temperature of ~104 K and are observed to have different radial velocities than the main cloud. Such fragmentation seems consistent with the multicomponent structure of troughs seen in some objects. The velocity differences measured among various components in the quasars QSO 2359-1241 and SDSS J0318-0600 can be reproduced by our model if strong magnetic fields (~10 mG) are present within the clouds.

  11. Gas-phase chemiluminescence and chemi-ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Fontijn, A.

    1985-01-01

    The phenomena of chemiluminescence (or more broadly chemi-excitation) and chemi-ionization have major similarities from a fundamental kinetic and dynamic point of view. However, since the former has primarily been investigated using optical spectroscopic techniques and the latter largely by mass spectroscopic (and other gaseous electronic) methods, the two phenomena have apparently never, explicitly been discussed together in one volume. In addition to a number of review articles on each individual subject, several meetings and books have had chemiluminescence and bioluminescence as their theme and those have been dominated by condensed phase work. On the other hand, chemi-ionization is often discussed in the contest of gaseous electronics, plasma chemistry and combustion. It is the goal of this book to present a more unified understanding of the two phenomena.

  12. Transfer ionization in collisions with a fast highly charged ion.

    PubMed

    Voitkiv, A B

    2013-07-26

    Transfer ionization in fast collisions between a bare ion and an atom, in which one of the atomic electrons is captured by the ion whereas another one is emitted, crucially depends on dynamic electron-electron correlations. We show that in collisions with a highly charged ion a strong field of the ion has a very profound effect on the correlated channels of transfer ionization. In particular, this field weakens (strongly suppresses) electron emission into the direction opposite (perpendicular) to the motion of the ion. Instead, electron emission is redirected into those parts of the momentum space which are very weakly populated in fast collisions with low charged ions. PMID:23931364

  13. Observations of feedback from radio-quiet quasars - II. Kinematics of ionized gas nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guilin; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Greene, Jenny E.; Nesvadba, Nicole P. H.; Liu, Xin

    2013-12-01

    The prevalence and energetics of quasar feedback is a major unresolved problem in galaxy formation theory. In this paper, we present Gemini Integral Field Unit observations of ionized gas around 11 luminous, obscured, radio-quiet quasars at z ˜ 0.5 out to ˜15 kpc from the quasar; specifically, we measure the kinematics and morphology of [O III] λ5007 Å emission. The round morphologies of the nebulae and the large line-of-sight velocity widths (with velocities containing 80 per cent of the emission as high as 103 km s-1) combined with relatively small velocity difference across them (from 90 to 520 km s-1) point towards wide-angle quasi-spherical outflows. We use the observed velocity widths to estimate a median outflow velocity of 760 km s-1, similar to or above the escape velocities from the host galaxies. The line-of-sight velocity dispersion declines slightly towards outer parts of the nebulae (by 3 per cent kpc-1 on average). The majority of nebulae show blueshifted excesses in their line profiles across most of their extents, signifying gas outflows. For the median outflow velocity, we find dot{E}_kin between 4 × 1044 and 3 × 1045 erg s-1 and dot{M} between 2 × 103 and 2 × 104 M⊙ yr-1. These values are large enough for the observed quasar winds to have a significant impact on their host galaxies. The median rate of converting bolometric luminosity to kinetic energy of ionized gas clouds is ˜2 per cent. We report four new candidates for `superbubbles' - outflows that may have broken out of the denser regions of the host galaxy.

  14. A new in-gas-laser ionization and spectroscopy laboratory for off-line studies at KU Leuven

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Creemers, P.; Ferrer, R.; Granados, C.; Gaffney, L. P.; Huyse, M.; Mogilevskiy, E.; Raeder, S.; Sels, S.; Van den Bergh, P.; Van Duppen, P.; Zadvornaya, A.

    2016-06-01

    The in-gas laser ionization and spectroscopy (IGLIS) technique is used to produce and to investigate short-lived radioactive isotopes at on-line ion beam facilities. In this technique, the nuclear reaction products recoiling out of a thin target are thermalized and neutralized in a high-pressure noble gas, resonantly ionized by the laser beams in a two-step process, and then extracted from the ion source to be finally accelerated and mass separated. Resonant ionization of radioactive species in the supersonic gas jet ensures very high spectral resolution because of essential reduction of broadening mechanisms. To obtain the maximum efficiency and the best spectral resolution, properties of the supersonic jet and the laser beams must be optimized. To perform these studies a new off-line IGLIS laboratory, including a new high-repetition-rate laser system and a dedicated off-line mass separator, has been commissioned. In this article, the specifications of the different components necessary to achieve optimum conditions in laser-spectroscopy studies of radioactive beams using IGLIS are discussed and the results of simulations are presented.

  15. A spiral-like disk of ionized gas in IC 1459: Signature of a merging collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goudfrooij, Paul; Norgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Jorgensen, H. E.; Hansen, L.; Dejong, T.

    1990-01-01

    The authors report the discovery of a large (15 kpc diameter) H alpha + (NII) emission-line disk in the elliptical galaxy IC 1459, showing weak spiral structure. The line flux peaks strongly at the nucleus and is more concentrated than the stellar continuum. The major axis of the disk of ionized gas coincides with that of the stellar body of the galaxy. The mass of the ionized gas is estimated to be approx. 1 times 10 (exp 5) solar mass, less than 1 percent of the total mass of gas present in IC 1459. The total gas mass of 4 times 10(exp 7) solar mass has been estimated from the dust mass derived from a broad-band color index image and the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) data. The authors speculate that the presence of dust and gas in IC 1459 is a signature of a merger event.

  16. Warp of the ionized gas layer in the outer Galaxy, traced by recombination line observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azcárate, I. N.; Cersosimo, J. C.

    We report results of H166α recombination line observations from the outer Galaxy in both the Northern and Southern Galactic Plane. The Southern observations were made with the 30 m antenna of the Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomía in Villa Elisa, Buenos Aires, Argentina, and the Northern ones ( more sensitive, high quality observations, performed with an ``state of the art'' receiver) with the 43 m antenna of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, in Green Bank, West Virginia, USA. >From the two sets of observations we obtain evidence of the warp of the low-density ionized gas layer, traced by the H166α emission in the outer Milky Way, towards positive galactic latitudes in the Northern and towards negative latitudes in the Southern Galaxy. The warp of this tracer qualitatively agrees with that of the HI.

  17. [High Pressure Gas Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quintana, Rolando

    2002-01-01

    Four high-pressure gas tanks, the basis of this study, were especially made by a private contractor and tested before being delivered to NASA Kennedy Space Center. In order to insure 100% reliability of each individual tank the staff at KSC decided to again submit the four tanks under more rigorous tests. These tests were conducted during a period from April 10 through May 8 at KSC. This application further validates the predictive safety model for accident prevention and system failure in the testing of four high-pressure gas tanks at Kennedy Space Center, called Continuous Hazard Tracking and Failure Prediction Methodology (CHTFPM). It is apparent from the variety of barriers available for a hazard control that some barriers will be more successful than others in providing protection. In order to complete the Barrier Analysis of the system, a Task Analysis and a Biomechanical Study were performed to establish the relationship between the degree of biomechanical non-conformities and the anomalies found within the system on particular joints of the body. This relationship was possible to obtain by conducting a Regression Analysis to the previously generated data. From the information derived the body segment with the lowest percentage of non-conformities was the neck flexion with 46.7%. Intense analysis of the system was conducted including Preliminary Hazard Analysis (PHA), Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA), and Barrier Analysis. These analyses resulted in the identification of occurrences of conditions, which may be becoming hazardous in the given system. These conditions, known as dendritics, may become hazards and could result in an accident, system malfunction, or unacceptable risk conditions. A total of 56 possible dendritics were identified. Work sampling was performed to observe the occurrence each dendritic. The out of control points generated from a Weighted c control chart along with a Pareto analysis indicate that the dendritics "Personnel not

  18. A survey of the ISM in early-type galaxies. I. The ionized gas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macchetto, F.; Pastoriza, M.; Caon, N.; Sparks, W. B.; Giavalisco, M.; Bender, R.; Capaccioli, M.

    1996-12-01

    We present results of a CCD optical imaging survey of the ionized gas in 73 luminous elliptical and lenticular galaxies, selected from the RC3 catalog to represent a broad variety of X-ray, radio, infrared and kinematical properties. For each galaxy we have used broad-band R images and narrow-band images centered at the Hα and [NII] emission lines to derive the luminosity and distribution of the ionized gas. We found that a large fraction of E (72%) and S0 (85%) galaxies in our sample contain ionized gas. The gas morphology appears to be rather smooth for most galaxies; however ~12% of the sample galaxies show a very extended filamentary structure. According to the morphology and size of the gas distribution, the galaxies have been classified into three broad groups, named small disk (SD), regular extended (RE) and filamentary structure (F). The mean diameter of the emitting region ranges between 1 and 10kpc; the derived mass of the ionized gas ranges between 10^3^ and 10^5^ solar masses. A significant correlation between Hα+[NII] and X-ray luminosities is found for those galaxies (27% of the sample) for which we have detected ionized gas and are also listed as X-ray sources. However, there are relatively strong X-ray emitting galaxies for which we have not detected Hα+[NII] emission and objects which show emission-lines but are not listed either in the EINSTEIN or in the ROSAT databases. The distribution of datapoint and upper limits in this diagram suggests that galaxies with warm gas are also X-ray emitters, while there are X-ray emitters without measurable Hα+[NII] emission. Similar characteristics are present in the correlation between the infrared luminosity in the 12 μm band and L_Hα+[NII]_; correlations with other infrared wavelengths are weaker. A strong correlation was also found between the Hα+[NII] luminosity and the luminosity in the B band inside the region occupied by the line-emitting gas. We use these correlations to discuss the possible

  19. Black hole mass measurements using ionized gas discs: systematic dust effects

    SciTech Connect

    Baes, Maarten

    2008-10-08

    Using detailed Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations in realistic models for galactic nuclei, we investigate the influence of interstellar dust in ionized gas discs on the rotation curves and the resulting black hole mass measurements. We find that absorption and scattering by interstellar dust leaves the shape of the rotation curves basically unaltered, but slightly decreases the central slope of the rotation curves. As a result, the ''observed'' black hole masses are systematically underestimated by some 10 to 20% for realistic optical depths. We therefore argue that the systematic effect of dust attenuation should be taken into account when estimating SMBH masses using ionized gas kinematics.

  20. Spectacular tails of ionized gas in the Virgo cluster galaxy NGC 4569

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boselli, A.; Cuillandre, J. C.; Fossati, M.; Boissier, S.; Bomans, D.; Consolandi, G.; Anselmi, G.; Cortese, L.; Côté, P.; Durrell, P.; Ferrarese, L.; Fumagalli, M.; Gavazzi, G.; Gwyn, S.; Hensler, G.; Sun, M.; Toloba, E.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Using MegaCam at the CFHT, we obtained a deep narrow band Hα+[NII] wide-field image of NGC 4569 (M90), the brightest late-type galaxy in the Virgo cluster. The image reveals the presence of long tails of diffuse ionized gas, without any associated stellar component extending from the disc of the galaxy up to ≃80 kpc (projected distance) and with a typical surface brightness of a few 10-18 erg s-1 cm-2 arcsec-2. These features provide direct evidence that NGC 4569 is undergoing a ram-presure stripping event. The image also shows a prominent 8 kpc spur of ionized gas that is associated with the nucleus that spectroscopic data identify as an outflow. With some assumptions on the 3D distribution of the gas, we use the Hα surface brightness of these extended low-surface brightness features to derive the density and the mass of the gas that has been stripped during the interaction of the galaxy with the intracluster medium. The comparison with ad hoc chemo-spectrophotometric models of galaxy evolution indicates that the mass of the Hα emitting gas in the tail is a large fraction of that of the cold phase that has been stripped from the disc, suggesting that the gas is ionized within the tail during the stripping process. The lack of star-forming regions suggests that mechanisms other than photoionization are responsible for the excitation of the gas (shocks, heat conduction, magneto hydrodynamic waves). This analysis indicates that ram pressure stripping is efficient in massive (Mstar ≃ 1010.5 M⊙) galaxies located in intermediate-mass (≃1014 M⊙) clusters under formation. It also shows that the mass of gas expelled by the nuclear outflow is only ~1% than that removed during the ram pressure stripping event.Together these results indicate that ram pressure stripping, rather than starvation through nuclear feedback, can be the dominant mechanism that is responsible for the quenching of the star formation activity of galaxies in high density

  1. Ionization heating in rare-gas clusters under intense XUV laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Arbeiter, Mathias; Fennel, Thomas

    2010-07-15

    The interaction of intense extreme ultraviolet (XUV) laser pulses ({lambda}=32 nm, I=10{sup 11}-10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}) with small rare-gas clusters (Ar{sub 147}) is studied by quasiclassical molecular dynamics simulations. Our analysis supports a very general picture of the charging and heating dynamics in finite samples under short-wavelength radiation that is of relevance for several applications of free-electron lasers. First, up to a certain photon flux, ionization proceeds as a series of direct photoemission events producing a jellium-like cluster potential and a characteristic plateau in the photoelectron spectrum as observed in Bostedt et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 133401 (2008)]. Second, beyond the onset of photoelectron trapping, nanoplasma formation leads to evaporative electron emission with a characteristic thermal tail in the electron spectrum. A detailed analysis of this transition is presented. Third, in contrast to the behavior in the infrared or low vacuum ultraviolet range, the nanoplasma energy capture proceeds via ionization heating, i.e., inner photoionization of localized electrons, whereas collisional heating of conduction electrons is negligible up to high laser intensities. A direct consequence of the latter is a surprising evolution of the mean energy of emitted electrons as function of laser intensity.

  2. Electron Injection in Laser Plasma Accelerators by High-Order Field Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.; Esarey, E.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-11-04

    Electron injection and trapping in a laser wakefield accelerator by high-order field ionization is studied theoretically and by particle-in-cell simulations. To obtain low energy spread beams we use a short region of gas mixture (H+N) near the start of the stage to trap electrons, while the remainder of the stage uses pure H and is injection-free. Effects of gas mix parameters, such as concentration and length, on the final electron injection number and beam quality are studied. Laser polarization and shape effects on injection number and final electron emittance are also shown.

  3. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, Albert H.

    1981-01-01

    An ionization chamber has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionize the gas.

  4. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, A.H.

    An ionization chamber is described which has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionizes the gas.

  5. Cosmic distribution of highly ionized metals and their physical conditions in the EAGLE simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmati, Alireza; Schaye, Joop; Crain, Robert A.; Oppenheimer, Benjamin D.; Schaller, Matthieu; Theuns, Tom

    2016-06-01

    We study the distribution and evolution of highly ionized intergalactic metals in the Evolution and Assembly of Galaxies and their Environment (EAGLE) cosmological, hydrodynamical simulations. EAGLE has been shown to reproduce a wide range of galaxy properties while its subgrid feedback was calibrated without considering gas properties. We compare the predictions for the column density distribution functions (CDDFs) and cosmic densities of Si IV, C IV, N V, O VI and Ne VIII absorbers with observations at redshift z = 0 to ˜6 and find reasonable agreement, although there are some differences. We show that the typical physical densities of the absorbing gas increase with column density and redshift, but decrease with the ionization energy of the absorbing ion. The typical metallicity increases with both column density and time. The fraction of collisionally ionized metal absorbers increases with time and ionization energy. While our results show little sensitivity to the presence or absence of AGN feedback, increasing/decreasing the efficiency of stellar feedback by a factor of 2 substantially decreases/increases the CDDFs and the cosmic densities of the metal ions. We show that the impact of the efficiency of stellar feedback on the CDDFs and cosmic densities is largely due to its effect on the metal production rate. However, the temperatures of the metal absorbers, particularly those of strong O VI, are directly sensitive to the strength of the feedback.

  6. Highly ionized region surrounding SN Refsdal revealed by MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karman, W.; Grillo, C.; Balestra, I.; Rosati, P.; Caputi, K. I.; Di Teodoro, E.; Fraternali, F.; Gavazzi, R.; Mercurio, A.; Prochaska, J. X.; Rodney, S.; Treu, T.

    2016-01-01

    Supernova (SN) Refsdal is the first multiply imaged, highly magnified, and spatially resolved SN ever observed. The SN exploded in a highly magnified spiral galaxy at z = 1.49 behind the Frontier Fields cluster MACS1149, and provides a unique opportunity to study the environment of SNe at high z. We exploit the time delay between multiple images to determine the properties of the SN and its environment before, during, and after the SN exploded. We use the integral-field spectrograph MUSE on the VLT to simultaneously target all observed and model-predicted positions of SN Refsdal. We find Mg II emission at all positions of SN Refsdal, accompanied by weak Fe II* emission at two positions. The measured ratios of [O II] to Mg II emission of 10-20 indicate a high degree of ionization with low metallicity. Because the same high degree of ionization is found in all images, and our spatial resolution is too coarse to resolve the region of influence of SN Refsdal, we conclude that this high degree of ionization has been produced by previous SNe or a young and hot stellar population. We find no variability of the [O II] line over a period of 57 days. This suggests that there is no variation in the [O II] luminosity of the SN over this period, or that the SN has a small contribution to the integrated [O II] emission over the scale resolved by our observations.

  7. Mapping the gas kinematics and ionization structure of four ultraluminous IRAS galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilman, R. J.; Crawford, C. S.; Abraham, R. G.

    1999-10-01

    We present a study of the morphology, kinematics and ionization structure of the extended emission-line regions in four intermediate-redshift (0.118gas kinematics in the hyperluminous system IRAS F20460+1925 lack coherent structure, with a full width at half-maximum (FWHM) >1000kms-1 within 1arcsec of the nucleus, suggesting that any merger is well-advanced. Emission-line intensity ratios point to active galactic nucleus (AGN) photoionization for the excitation of this gas at the systemic velocity. An isolated blob ~8kpc from the nucleus with a much smaller velocity dispersion may lie in a structure similar to the photoionization cones seen in lower-luminosity objects. A second, spatially unresolved, narrow-line component is also present on nucleus, blueshifted by ~=990kms-1 from the systemic and plausibly powered by photoionizing shocks. IRAS F23060+0505 has more ordered kinematics, with a region of increased FWHM coincident with the blue half of a dipolar velocity field. The systemic velocity rotation curve is asymmetric in appearance, as a result either of the on-going merger or of nuclear dust obscuration. From a higher-resolution ISIS spectrum, we attribute the blue asymmetry in the narrow-line profiles to a spatially resolved nuclear outflow. Emission-line intensity ratios suggest shock+precursor ionization for the systemic component, consistent with the X-ray view of a heavily obscured AGN. The lower-luminosity objects IRAS F01217+0122 and F01003-2238 complete the sample. The former has a featureless velocity field with a high FWHM, a high-ionization AGN spectrum and a ~1Gyr old starburst continuum. IRAS F01003-2238 has a dipolar velocity field and an Hii region emission-line spectrum with a strong blue continuum. After correction for intrinsic extinction, the latter can be reproduced with ~107 O5 stars, sufficient to power the bolometric luminosity of the

  8. Properties of a weakly ionized NO gas sensor based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jingyuan; Zhang, Yong Pan, Zhigang; Yang, Shuang; Shi, Jinghui; Li, Shengtao; Min, Daomin; Wang, Xiaohua; Liu, Dingxin; Yang, Aijun; Li, Xin

    2015-08-31

    Nitric oxide NO is one of the major targets for environmental monitoring, but the existing NO sensors are limited by their low sensitivity and narrow test range. Here, a NO gas sensor employing multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was fabricated, and its properties in NO–N{sub 2} mixture were investigated from both emission and ionization. The current I{sub e} passing through the nanotubes cathode was found to decrease with increasing NO concentration and increase linearly in different slopes with the extracting voltage U{sub e}. It is shown that the Schottky barrier of the MWCNTs calculated by I{sub e} increased with NO concentration due to the adsorption of NO gas, which restrained the electron emission and consequently weakened the ionization. The positive ion currents I{sub c} passing through the collecting electrode at different voltages of U{sub e} were found to monotonically decrease with increasing NO concentration, which was induced by both of the reduced electron emission and the consumption of the two excited metastable states N{sub 2}(A{sup 3}∑{sub u}{sup +}) and N{sub 2}(a′{sup 1}∑{sub u}{sup −}) by NO. The sensor exhibited high sensitivity at the low temperature of 30 °C. The calculated conductivity was found to be able to take place of I{sub c} for NO detection in a wide voltage range of 80–150 V U{sub e}.

  9. Cosmic ray studies with a gas Cerenkov counter in association with an ionization spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubrahmanyan, V. K.; Ormes, J. F.; Arens, J. F.; Siohan, F.; Simon, M.; Spiegelhauer, H.; Yodh, G. B.

    1980-01-01

    The results from a balloon-borne gas Cerenkov counter (threshold 16.5 GeV/nuc) and an ionization spectrometer are presented. The gas Cerenkov counter provides an absolute energy calibration for the response of the calorimeter for the Z range of 5-26 nuclei of cosmic rays. The contribution of scintillation to the gas Cerenkov pulse height has been obtained by independently selecting particles below the gas Cerenkov threshold using the ionization spectrometer. Energy spectra were derived by minimizing the chi-squared between a Monte Carlo simulated data and flight data. Best fit power laws were determined for C, N, O, Ne, Mg, and Si. The power laws, all consistent with E exp-2.7, are not good fits to the data. A better fit is obtained using the spectrum derived from the spectrometer.

  10. Measuring the Obscured Ionized Gas in the Center of the Nearby Face-on Spiral IC 342 with the GBT and EVLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepley, Amanda A.; Balser, D. S.; Chomiuk, L.; Goss, M.; Johnson, K. E.; Meier, D. S.; Pisano, D. J.

    2013-01-01

    Galactic centers represent a unique environment for star formation. Their high gas surface densities and short crossing times may lead to more efficient star formation than found in the disks of galaxies. Measuring the properties of the young massive clusters in galactic centers is critical to understanding star formation in this environment. One way to do this is to measure the properties of the gas ionized by the young massive clusters. Unfortunately, this gas is still obscured by the natal clouds of dust and gas surrounding the young massive clusters. Therefore, measuring the properties of this gas requires the use of an extinction-free ionized gas tracer like radio recombination lines. This poster presents radio recombination line observations of the center of the nearby face-on spiral galaxy IC 342. These observations constrain the density, filling factor, and kinematics of the obscured ionized gas in the center of this galaxy. The properties of the ionized gas are then used to constrain the properties of the young massive clusters and star formation efficiency in the center of IC 342.

  11. Ammonia quantitative analysis model based on miniaturized Al ionization gas sensor and non-linear bistable dynamic model.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rongfei

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, ammonia quantitative analysis based on miniaturized Al ionization gas sensor and non-linear bistable dynamic model was proposed. Al plate anodic gas-ionization sensor was used to obtain the current-voltage (I-V) data. Measurement data was processed by non-linear bistable dynamics model. Results showed that the proposed method quantitatively determined ammonia concentrations. PMID:25975362

  12. Sparsepak Observations of Diffuse Ionized Gas Halo Kinematics in NGC891

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heald, George H.; Rand, Richard J.; Benjamin, Robert A.; Bershady, Matthew A.

    We present WIYN SparsePak observations of the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) hallo of NGC891. Preliminary results of an analysis of the halo velocity field reveal a clear gradient of the azimuthal velocity with z which agrees with results for the neutral gas. The magnitude of the gradient has been determined, using two independent methods, to be approximately 15 km s-1 kpc-1.

  13. 40 CFR 1065.267 - Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector. 1065.267 Section 1065.267 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Hydrocarbon...

  14. 40 CFR 1065.267 - Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector. 1065.267 Section 1065.267 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Hydrocarbon...

  15. 40 CFR 1065.267 - Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector. 1065.267 Section 1065.267 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Hydrocarbon...

  16. Bound-state beta decay of highly ionized atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, K.; Boyd, R.N.; Mathews, G.J.; Yokoi, K.

    1987-10-01

    Nuclear ..beta.. decays of highly ionized atoms under laboratory conditions are studied. Theoretical predictions of ..beta..-decay rates are given for a few cases in which bound-state ..beta.. decay produces particularly interesting effects. A possible storage-ring experiment is proposed for measuring bound-state ..beta..-decay rates, which will be most easily applied to the decay of /sup 3/H/sup +/. .AE

  17. Ionized gas diagnostics from protoplanetary discs in the Orion nebula and the abundance discrepancy problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesa-Delgado, A.; Núñez-Díaz, M.; Esteban, C.; García-Rojas, J.; Flores-Fajardo, N.; López-Martín, L.; Tsamis, Y. G.; Henney, W. J.

    2012-10-01

    We present results from integral field spectroscopy of a field located near the Trapezium Cluster using the Potsdam Multi-Aperture Spectrophotometer (PMAS). The observed field contains a variety of morphological structures: five externally ionized protoplanetary discs (also known as proplyds), the high-velocity jet HH 514 and a bowshock. Spatial distribution maps are obtained for different emission line fluxes, the c(Hβ) extinction coefficient, electron densities and temperatures, ionic abundances of different ions from collisionally excited lines (CELs), C2 + and O2 + abundances from recombination lines (RLs) and the abundance discrepancy factor of O2 +, ADF(O2 +). We distinguish the three most prominent proplyds (177-341, 170-337 and 170-334) and analyse their impact on the spatial distributions of the above mentioned quantities. We find that collisional de-excitation has a major influence on the line fluxes in the proplyds. If this is not properly accounted for then physical conditions deduced from commonly used line ratios will be in error, leading to unreliable chemical abundances for these objects. We obtain the intrinsic emission of the proplyds 177-341, 170-337 and 170-334 by a direct subtraction of the background emission, though the last two present some background contamination due to their small sizes. A detailed analysis of 177-341 spectra making use of suitable density diagnostics reveals the presence of high-density gas (3.8 × 105 cm-3) in contrast to the typical values observed in the background gas of the nebula (3800 cm-3). We also explore how the background subtraction could be affected by the possible opacity of the proplyd and its effect on the derivation of physical conditions and chemical abundances of the proplyd 177-341. We construct a physical model for the proplyd 177-341 finding a good agreement between the predicted and observed line ratios. Finally, we find that the use of reliable physical conditions returns an ADF(O2 +) about zero

  18. Escape fraction of ionizing photons from high-redshift galaxies in cosmological SPH simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yajima, Hidenobu; Choi, Jun-Hwan; Nagamine, Kentaro

    2011-03-01

    Combing the three-dimensional radiative transfer (RT) calculation and cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations, we study the escape fraction of ionizing photons (fesc) of high-redshift galaxies at z= 3-6. Our simulations cover the halo mass range of Mh= 109-1012 M⊙. We post-process several hundred simulated galaxies with the Authentic Radiative Transfer (ART) code to study the halo mass dependence of fesc. In this paper, we restrict ourselves to the transfer of stellar radiation from local stellar population in each dark matter halo. We find that the average fesc steeply decreases as the halo mass increases, with a large scatter for the lower-mass haloes. The low-mass haloes with Mh˜ 109 M⊙ have large values of fesc (with an average of ˜0.4), whereas the massive haloes with Mh˜ 1011 M⊙ show small values of fesc (with an average of ˜0.07). This is because in our simulations, the massive haloes show more clumpy structure in gas distribution, and the star-forming regions are embedded inside these clumps, making it more difficult for the ionizing photons to escape. On the other hand, in low-mass haloes, there are often conical regions of highly ionized gas due to the shifted location of young star clusters from the centre of dark matter halo, which allows the ionizing photons to escape more easily than in the high-mass haloes. By counting the number of escaped ionizing photons, we show that the star-forming galaxies can ionize the intergalactic medium at z= 3-6. The main contributor to the ionizing photons is the haloes with Mh≲ 1010 M⊙ owing to their high fesc. The large dispersion in fesc suggests that there may be various sizes of H II bubbles around the haloes even with the same mass in the early stages of reionization. We also examine the effect of UV background radiation field on fesc using simple, four different treatments of UV background.

  19. H110 alpha observations of Sagittarius A West: Ionized gas at peculiar velocities at the galactic center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad; Zhao, Jun-Hui; Goss, W. M.

    1995-01-01

    We present Very Large Array measurements of H110 alpha radio recombination line emission from Sgr A West with a resolution of 11 x 20 arcsec. These observations detected a number of new kinematic components showing a dramatically different velocity field than expected from circular motion of ionized gas in Sgr A West about the dynamical center of the Galaxy. Recent high-resolution molecular observations show a cloud of absorbing gas at -180 km/s within 30 arcsec of the Galactic center. We find evidence of an ionized counterpart to this highly blueshifted molecular gas. This result places this highly blueshifted neutral gas in a hot UV dominated environment of the Galactic center. We suggest that the blueshifted clouds are photoionized externally by the intense UV radiation field at the Galactic center. We also detect H110 alpha emission from large-scale linear features known as the 'streamers', which run primarily perpendicular to the Galactic plane and lie exterior to the 'three-arm' spiral structure of Sgr A West and the circumstellar disk. These observations support an earlier suggestion that the streamers are thermal features whose kniematics deviate from circular motion.

  20. An Ultra-Trace Analysis Technique for SF6 Using Gas Chromatography with Negative Ion Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jong, Edmund C; Macek, Paul V; Perera, Inoka E; Luxbacher, Kray D; McNair, Harold M

    2015-07-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) is widely used as a tracer gas because of its detectability at low concentrations. This attribute of SF6 allows the quantification of both small-scale flows, such as leakage, and large-scale flows, such as atmospheric currents. SF6's high detection sensitivity also facilitates greater usage efficiency and lower operating cost for tracer deployments by reducing quantity requirements. The detectability of SF6 is produced by its high molecular electronegativity. This property provides a high potential for negative ion formation through electron capture thus naturally translating to selective detection using negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry (NCI-MS). This paper investigates the potential of using gas chromatography (GC) with NCI-MS for the detection of SF6. The experimental parameters for an ultra-trace SF6 detection method utilizing minimal customizations of the analytical instrument are detailed. A method for the detection of parts per trillion (ppt) level concentrations of SF6 for the purpose of underground ventilation tracer gas analysis was successfully developed in this study. The method utilized a Shimadzu gas chromatography with negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry system equipped with an Agilent J&W HP-porous layer open tubular column coated with an alumina oxide (Al2O3) S column. The method detection limit (MDL) analysis as defined by the Environmental Protection Agency of the tracer data showed the method MDL to be 5.2 ppt. PMID:25452581

  1. Ion energies in high power impulse magnetron sputtering with and without localized ionization zones

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yuchen; Tanaka, Koichi; Liu, Jason; Anders, André

    2015-03-23

    High speed imaging of high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges has revealed that ionization is localized in moving ionization zones but localization disappears at high currents for high yield targets. This offers an opportunity to study the effect ionization zones have on ion energies. We measure that ions have generally higher energies when ionization zones are present, supporting the concept that these zones are associated with moving potential humps. We propose that the disappearance of ionization zones is caused by an increased supply of atoms from the target which cools electrons and reduces depletion of atoms to be ionized.

  2. Gas chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry (GC-API-MS): review.

    PubMed

    Li, Du-Xin; Gan, Lin; Bronja, Amela; Schmitz, Oliver J

    2015-09-01

    Although the coupling of GC/MS with atmospheric pressure ionization (API) has been reported in 1970s, the interest in coupling GC with atmospheric pressure ion source was expanded in the last decade. The demand of a "soft" ion source for preserving highly diagnostic molecular ion is desirable, as compared to the "hard" ionization technique such as electron ionization (EI) in traditional GC/MS, which fragments the molecule in an extensive way. These API sources include atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI), atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI), atmospheric pressure laser ionization (APLI), electrospray ionization (ESI) and low temperature plasma (LTP). This review discusses the advantages and drawbacks of this analytical platform. After an introduction in atmospheric pressure ionization the review gives an overview about the history and explains the mechanisms of various atmospheric pressure ionization techniques used in combination with GC such as APCI, APPI, APLI, ESI and LTP. Also new developments made in ion source geometry, ion source miniaturization and multipurpose ion source constructions are discussed and a comparison between GC-FID, GC-EI-MS and GC-API-MS shows the advantages and drawbacks of these techniques. The review ends with an overview of applications realized with GC-API-MS. PMID:26388363

  3. Dust and ionized gas in active radio elliptical galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, D. A.; Sparks, W. B.; Macchetto, F. D.

    1990-01-01

    The authors present broad and narrow bandwidth imaging of three southern elliptical galaxies which have flat-spectrum active radio cores (NGC 1052, IC 1459 and NGC 6958). All three contain dust and extended low excitation optical line emission, particularly extensive in the case of NGC 1052 which has a large H alpha + (NII) luminosity. Both NGC 1052 and IC 1459 have a spiral morphology in emission-line images. All three display independent strong evidence that a merger or infall event has recently occurred, i.e., extensive and infalling HI gas in NGC 1052, a counter-rotating core in IC 1459 and Malin-Carter shells in NGC 6958. This infall event is the most likely origin for the emission-line gas and dust, and the authors are currently investigating possible excitation mechanisms (Sparks et al. 1990).

  4. High-resolution ionization detector and array of such detectors

    DOEpatents

    McGregor, Douglas S.; Rojeski, Ronald A.

    2001-01-16

    A high-resolution ionization detector and an array of such detectors are described which utilize a reference pattern of conductive or semiconductive material to form interaction, pervious and measurement regions in an ionization substrate of, for example, CdZnTe material. The ionization detector is a room temperature semiconductor radiation detector. Various geometries of such a detector and an array of such detectors produce room temperature operated gamma ray spectrometers with relatively high resolution. For example, a 1 cm.sup.3 detector is capable of measuring .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays with room temperature energy resolution approaching 2% at FWHM. Two major types of such detectors include a parallel strip semiconductor Frisch grid detector and the geometrically weighted trapezoid prism semiconductor Frisch grid detector. The geometrically weighted detector records room temperature (24.degree. C.) energy resolutions of 2.68% FWHM for .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays and 2.45% FWHM for .sup.60 Co 1.332 MeV gamma rays. The detectors perform well without any electronic pulse rejection, correction or compensation techniques. The devices operate at room temperature with simple commercially available NIM bin electronics and do not require special preamplifiers or cooling stages for good spectroscopic results.

  5. Numerical studies of the behavior of ionized residual gas in an energy recovering linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöplau, Gisela; van Rienen, Ursula; Meseck, Atoosa

    2015-04-01

    Next generation light sources such as energy recovering linacs (ERLs) are highly sensitive to instabilities due to ionized residual gas, which must be mitigated for successful operation. Vacuum pumps are insufficient for removal of the ions, as the ions are trapped by the beam's electrical potential. Two effective measures are (i) introducing clearing gaps in the bunch train, and (ii) installing clearing electrodes which pull out the trapped ions from the electrical potential of the beam. In this paper, we present numerical studies on the behavior of ion clouds that interact with bunch trains in an ERL taking into account the effects of the clearing gaps and clearing electrodes. We present simulations with different compositions of the residual gas. Simulations are done using the MOEVE PIC Tracking software package developed at Rostock University, which has been upgraded to include the behavior of ion clouds in the environment of additional electromagnetic fields, such as generated by clearing electrodes. The simulations use the parameters of the Berlin Energy Recovery Linac Project (bERLinPro) to allow for the deduction of appropriate measures for bERLinPro 's design and operation.

  6. Kinematics of the Diffuse Ionized Gas Halos of NGC 891 and NGC 5775

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heald, G. H.; Rand, R. J.; Benjamin, R. A.; Bershady, M. A.; Collins, J. A.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.

    2005-12-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to characterize the nature of the disk-halo interaction in spiral galaxies, we present an investigation into the kinematics of the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) halos of two edge-on spirals, NGC 891 and NGC 5775. Observations of optical emission lines were obtained at high spectral resolution with the SparsePak fiber array at WIYN, and the TAURUS-II Fabry-Perot interferometer at the AAT, respectively. Detailed three-dimensional models of the galaxies were created and compared with the data, revealing the presence of a vertical gradient in rotational velocity in each case. The sense of the gradient corresponds to decreasing rotation speed with increasing height above the disk; the magnitude is approximately 15 km s-1 kpc-1 in NGC 891, and 8 km s-1 kpc-1 in NGC 5775. Qualitatively, this behavior is predicted by models of the disk-halo interaction which consider gas being lifted out of the disk, but quantitative agreement has not yet been achieved. We describe the results of our observations, present a comparison with a purely ballistic model of disk-halo flow, and discuss prospects for a better understanding of this critical process in the evolution of galaxies. This material is based on work partially supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. AST 99-86113.

  7. VLT/MUSE view of the highly ionized outflow cones in the nearby starburst ESO338-IG04

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bik, A.; Östlin, G.; Hayes, M.; Adamo, A.; Melinder, J.; Amram, P.

    2015-04-01

    Context. The Lyα line is an important diagnostic for star formation at high redshift, but interpreting its flux and line profile is difficult because of the resonance nature of Lyα. Trends between the escape of Lyα photons and dust and properties of the interstellar medium (ISM) have been found, but detailed comparisons between Lyα emission and the properties of the gas in local high-redshift analogs are vital for understanding the relation between Lyα emission and galaxy properties. Aims: For the first time, we can directly infer the properties of the ionized gas at the same location and similar spatial scales of the extended Lyα halo around the local Lyα emitter and Lyman-break galaxy analog ESO 338-IG04. Methods: We obtained VLT/MUSE integral field spectra. We used ionization parameter mapping of the [S ii]/[O iii] line ratio and the kinematics of Hα to study the ionization state and kinematics of the ISM of ESO 338-IG04. Results: The velocity map reveals two outflows, one toward the north, the other toward the south of ESO 338. The ionization parameter mapping shows that the entire central area of the galaxy is highly ionized by photons leaking from the H ii regions around the youngest star clusters. Three highly ionized cones have been identified, of which one is associated with an outflow detected in the Hα. We propose a scenario where the outflows are created by mechanical feedback of the older clusters, while the highly ionized gas is caused by the hard ionizing photons emitted by the youngest clusters. A comparison with the Lyα map shows that the (approximately bipolar) asymmetries observed in the Lyα emission are consistent with the base of the outflows detected in Hα. No clear correlation with the ionization cones is found. Conclusions: The mechanical and ionization feedback of star clusters significantly changes the state of the ISM by creating ionized cones and outflows. The comparison with Lyα suggests that especially the outflows could

  8. Dissociation and ionization of molecular gas in the spiral arms of M51

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lees, J. F.; Lo, K. Y.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers derive the star formation rate and efficiency in the arm and interarm regions of M51 from observations of the molecular (Lo et al. 1987) and ionized (van der Hulst et al. 1988) phases of the interstellar medium, and show that the HI observations of Tilanus and Allen (1989) are consistent with dissociation of molecular gas by these young, massive stars if n sub H greater than or equal to 200 cm (-2). However, these stars are not able to dissociate or ionize all the gas, and at least 60 percent must remain molecular in the interarm regions. The efficiency of star formation in M51 seems to be similar to that in the Galaxy, and does not appear to be enhanced in the spiral arms. Therefore, the effect of the strong density wave may be only to concentrate the gas, and hence the young stars, to the arm regions.

  9. Hose instability and wake generation by an intense electron beam in a self-ionized gas.

    PubMed

    Deng, S; Barnes, C D; Clayton, C E; O'Connell, C; Decker, F J; Fonseca, R A; Huang, C; Hogan, M J; Iverson, R; Johnson, D K; Joshi, C; Katsouleas, T; Krejcik, P; Lu, W; Mori, W B; Muggli, P; Oz, E; Tsung, F; Walz, D; Zhou, M

    2006-02-01

    The propagation of an intense relativistic electron beam through a gas that is self-ionized by the beam's space charge and wakefields is examined analytically and with 3D particle-in-cell simulations. Instability arises from the coupling between a beam and the offset plasma channel it creates when it is perturbed. The traditional electron hose instability in a preformed plasma is replaced with this slower growth instability depending on the radius of the ionization channel compared to the electron blowout radius. A new regime for hose stable plasma wakefield acceleration is suggested. PMID:16486834

  10. Hose Instability and Wake Generation By An Intense Electron Beam in a Self-Ionized Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, S.; Barnes, C.D.; Clayton, C.E.; O'Connell, C.; Decker, F.J.; Fonseca, R.A.; Huang, C.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.; Johnson, D.K.; Joshi, C.; Katsouleas, T.; Krejcik, P.; Lu, W.; Mori, W.B.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; Tsung, F.; Walz, D.; Zhou, M.; /Southern California U. /UCLA /SLAC

    2006-04-12

    The propagation of an intense relativistic electron beam through a gas that is self-ionized by the beam's space charge and wakefields is examined analytically and with 3D particle-in-cell simulations. Instability arises from the coupling between a beam and the offset plasma channel it creates when it is perturbed. The traditional electron hose instability in a preformed plasma is replaced with this slower growth instability depending on the radius of the ionization channel compared to the electron blowout radius. A new regime for hose stable plasma wakefield acceleration is suggested.

  11. Resonant production of high-lying states in the microwave ionization of Na

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakelyan, A.; Gallagher, T. F.

    2016-01-01

    We report microwave ionization experiments with Rydberg states of Na using several microwave frequencies near 80 GHz. We observe substantial ionization of states as low as n =26 with microwave pulses of 170-V/cm amplitude. Unlike experiments at 38 and 17 GHz, microwave ionization is not always accompanied by the production of the extremely high-lying states just below the limit. It only occurs when the initial Rydberg state is in multiphoton resonance with the high-lying states. The resonance condition is apparent at 80 GHz because the ponderomotive energy shift of the limit, and of the high-lying states, is small compared to the microwave frequency, even at fields strong enough to produce ionization. At the lower microwave frequencies, the ponderomotive shift exceeds the microwave frequency, ensuring that the resonance condition is met and obscuring its importance. The same is true of many laser experiments.

  12. Ionization Processes in the Atmosphere of Titan (Research Note). III. Ionization by High-Z Nuclei Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gronoff, G.; Mertens, C.; Lilensten, J.; Desorgher, L.; Fluckiger, E.; Velinov, P.

    2011-01-01

    Context. The Cassini-Huygens mission has revealed the importance of particle precipitation in the atmosphere of Titan thanks to in-situ measurements. These ionizing particles (electrons, protons, and cosmic rays) have a strong impact on the chemistry, hence must be modeled. Aims. We revisit our computation of ionization in the atmosphere of Titan by cosmic rays. The high-energy high-mass ions are taken into account to improve the precision of the calculation of the ion production profile. Methods. The Badhwahr and O Neill model for cosmic ray spectrum was adapted for the Titan model. We used the TransTitan model coupled with the Planetocosmics model to compute the ion production by cosmic rays. We compared the results with the NAIRAS/HZETRN ionization model used for the first time for a body that differs from the Earth. Results. The cosmic ray ionization is computed for five groups of cosmic rays, depending on their charge and mass: protons, alpha, Z = 8 (oxygen), Z = 14 (silicon), and Z = 26 (iron) nucleus. Protons and alpha particles ionize mainly at 65 km altitude, while the higher mass nucleons ionize at higher altitudes. Nevertheless, the ionization at higher altitude is insufficient to obscure the impact of Saturn s magnetosphere protons at a 500 km altitude. The ionization rate at the peak (altitude: 65 km, for all the different conditions) lies between 30 and 40/cu cm/s. Conclusions. These new computations show for the first time the importance of high Z cosmic rays on the ionization of the Titan atmosphere. The updated full ionization profile shape does not differ significantly from that found in our previous calculations (Paper I: Gronoff et al. 2009, 506, 955) but undergoes a strong increase in intensity below an altitude of 400 km, especially between 200 and 400 km altitude where alpha and heavier particles (in the cosmic ray spectrum) are responsible for 40% of the ionization. The comparison of several models of ionization and cosmic ray spectra (in

  13. Capillary photoionization: a high sensitivity ionization method for mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Haapala, Markus; Suominen, Tina; Kostiainen, Risto

    2013-06-18

    We present a capillary photoionization (CPI) method for mass spectrometric (MS) analysis of liquid and gaseous samples. CPI utilizes a heated transfer capillary with a vacuum ultraviolet transparent MgF2 window, through which vacuum UV light (10 eV) from an external source enters the capillary. The liquid or gaseous sample, together with dopant, is introduced directly into the heated transfer capillary between the atmosphere and the vacuum of the MS. Since the sample is vaporized and photoionized inside the capillary, ion transmission is maximized, resulting in good overall sensitivity for nonpolar and polar compounds. As in atmospheric pressure photoionization, ionization in CPI occurs either by proton transfer or by charge exchange reactions. The feasibility of CPI was demonstrated with selected nonpolar and polar compounds. A particular advantage of CPI is that it enables the analysis of nonvolatile and nonpolar compounds in liquid samples with high ionization efficiency. This is not possible with existing capillary ionization methods. The performance of CPI as an interface between GC and MS and its applicability for the analysis of steroids in biological samples are also demonstrated. The GC-CPI-MS method shows good chromatographic resolution, linearity (R(2) > 0.993), limits of detection (LOD) in the range of 2-6 pg/mL and repeatability of injection with relative standard deviations of 4-15%. PMID:23713722

  14. Molecular Ionization at High Intensities: Characterizing OPA Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAcy, Collin; Karnemaat, Ryan; Marsh, Skyler; Foote, David; Uiterwaal, Cornelis

    2012-06-01

    Ultrashort laser pulses have long been the primary instruments of probing and analyzing intense-field molecular dynamics on femtosecond timescales. In particular, processes involving resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) have provided insight into ionization and dissociation dynamics. Typically the scope of REMPI is limited by the laser properties; namely, REMPI is limited by the transition energies accessible by an integer number of photons. However, the ability to tune the energies of these photons adds flexibility to the available resonances and, for longer wavelengths, makes tunneling the dominant ionization process. Optical parametric amplification (OPA) provides these changes, but the nonlinear processes required for OPA could have complicating effects on pulse duration and focusability, distorting beam quality and compromising experiments. We present the parametric amplification of 800-nm, 50-fs laser pulses in a TOPAS-C system: we use autocorrelation, power measurements, and knife-edging techniques to determine output pulse duration, intensity, and focal characteristics as a function of wavelength. We also report on the effects such changes will have on the practicality of various techniques requiring high-intensity processes.

  15. Multiple ionization of atoms by highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstikhina, Inga Yu; Shevelko, V. P.

    2015-06-01

    A method is suggested for quickly and easily estimating multiple ionization (MI) cross sections of heavy atoms colliding with highly charged ions, using the independent-particle model (IPM). One-electron ionization probabilities p(b) are calculated using the geometrical model for p(0) values at zero impact parameter b and the relativistic Born approximation for one-electron ionization cross sections. Numerical results of MI cross sections are presented for Ne and Ar atoms colliding with Ar8+, Fe20+, Au24+, Bi67+ and U90+ ions at energies 1 MeV u{}-1-10 GeV u{}-1and compared with available experimental data and CTMC (classical trajectory Monte Carlo) calculations. The present method of calculation describes experimental dependencies of MI cross sections on the number of ejected electrons m within a factor of two to three. Numerical calculations show that at intermediate ion energies E = 1 - 10 MeV u{}-1, the contribution of MI cross sections to the total, i.e. summed over all m values, is quite large ˜35% and decreases with increasing energy.

  16. Amonia gas: an improved reagent for chemical ionization mass spectrometry of bile acid methyl ester acetates

    SciTech Connect

    DeMark, B.R.; Klein, P.D.

    1981-01-01

    The ammonia chemical ionization mass spectra of 28 methyl ester acetate derivatives of bile acids and related compounds have been determined by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Advantages of ammonia ionization over the previously studied isobutane ionization include a 130 to 270% enhancement in the sensitivity of base peak monitoring, and direct determination of molecular weight from the base peak (M + NH/sub 4//sup +/) in the mass spectrum of any of the derivatives. Minor ions in the ammonia spectra also allow selective detection of 3-keto compounds and can indicate unsaturation or double bond conjugation in the molecule. The significance of these studies for the detection and quantitation of bile acids is discussed. 2 tables.

  17. Ionization-induced blueshift of high-peak-power guided-wave ultrashort laser pulses in hollow-core photonic-crystal fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A. B.; Serebryannikov, E. E.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2007-11-15

    Ionization-induced change in the refractive index of a gas is shown to give rise to a substantial spectral blueshift of megawatt light pulses transmitted through a gas-filled hollow photonic-crystal fiber (PCF). This effect suggests the ways of controlling not only the rate, but also the sign of the soliton frequency shift for high-peak-power ultrashort light pulses guided in hollow PCFs filled with Raman-active ionizing gases.

  18. Investigation of nonthermal particle effects on ionization dynamics in high current density ion beam transport experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, H. K.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Wang, P.; Moses, G. A.; Bailey, J. E.; Olson, C. L.; Welch, D. R.

    1997-01-01

    Light ion inertial fusion experiments require the presence of a moderate density background gas in the transport region to provide charge and current neutralization for a high current density ion beam. In this article, we investigate the effects of nonthermal particles such as beam ions or non-Maxwellian electron distributions on the ionization dynamics of the background gas. In particular, we focus on the case of Li beams being transported in an argon gas. Nonthermal particles as well as thermal electrons are included in time-dependent collisional-radiative calculations to determine time-dependent atomic level populations and charge state distributions in a beam-produced plasma. We also briefly discuss the effects of beam ions and energetic electrons on the visible and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectral regions. It is found that the mean charge state of the gas, and hence the electron density, is significantly increased by collisions with energetic particles. This higher ionization significantly impacts the VUV spectral region, where numerous resonance lines occur. On the other hand, the visible spectrum tends to be less affected because the closely spaced excited states are populated by lower energy thermal electrons.

  19. Very metal-poor galaxies: ionized gas kinematics in nine objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseev, A. V.; Pustilnik, S. A.; Kniazev, A. Y.

    2010-07-01

    The study of ionized gas morphology and kinematics in nine extremely metal-deficient (XMD) galaxies with the scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer on the Special Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) 6-m telescope is presented. Some of these very rare objects (with currently known range of O/H of 7.12 < 12 + log(O/H) < 7.65, or ) are believed to be the best proxies of `young' low-mass galaxies in the high-redshift Universe. One of the main goals of this study is to look for possible evidence of star formation (SF) activity induced by external perturbations. Recent results from HI mapping of a small subsample of XMD star-forming galaxies provided confident evidence for the important role of interaction-induced SF. Our observations provide complementary or new information that the great majority of the studied XMD dwarfs have strongly disturbed gas morphology and kinematics or the presence of detached components. We approximate the observed velocity fields by simple models of a rotating tilted thin disc, which allows us the robust detection of non-circular gas motions. These data, in turn, indicate the important role of current/recent interactions and mergers in the observed enhanced SF. As a by-product of our observations, we obtained data for two Low Surface Brightness (LSB) dwarf galaxies: Anon J012544+075957 that is a companion of the merger system UGC 993, and SAO 0822+3545 which shows off-centre, asymmetric, low star formation rate star-forming regions, likely induced by the interaction with the companion XMD dwarf HS 0822+3542. Based on observations obtained with the Special Astrophysical Observatory RAS 6-m telescope. E-mail: moisav@gmail.com (AVM); sap@sao.ru (SAP); akniazev@saao.ac.za (AYK)

  20. The use of ionization electron columns for space-charge compensation in high intensity proton accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Alexahin, Y.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Kapin, V.; Kuznetsov, G.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    We discuss a recent proposal to use strongly magnetized electron columns created by beam ionization of the residual gas for compensation of space charge forces of high intensity proton beams in synchrotrons and linacs. The electron columns formed by trapped ionization electrons in a longitudinal magnetic field that assures transverse distribution of electron space charge in the column is the same as in the proton beam. Electrostatic electrodes are used to control the accumulation and release of the electrons. Ions are not magnetized and drift away without affecting the compensation. Possible technical solution for the electron columns is presented. We also discuss the first numerical simulation results for space-charge compensation in the FNAL Booster and results of relevant beam studies in the Tevatron.

  1. The Use of Ionization Electron Columns for Space-Charge Compensation in High Intensity Proton Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Alexahin, Y.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Kapin, V.; Kuznetsov, G.

    2009-01-22

    We discuss a recent proposal to use strongly magnetized electron columns created by beam ionization of the residual gas for compensation of space charge forces of high intensity proton beams in synchrotrons and linacs. The electron columns formed by trapped ionization electrons in a longitudinal magnetic field that assures transverse distribution of electron space charge in the column is the same as in the proton beam. Electrostatic electrodes are used to control the accumulation and release of the electrons. Ions are not magnetized and drift away without affecting the compensation. Possible technical solution for the electron columns is presented. We also discuss the first numerical simulation results for space-charge compensation in the FNAL Booster and results of relevant beam studies in the Tevatron.

  2. High gas flow alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    Bolton, R.D.; Bounds, J.A.; Rawool-Sullivan, M.W.

    1996-05-07

    An alpha detector for application in areas of high velocity gas flows, such as smokestacks and air vents. A plurality of spaced apart signal collectors are placed inside an enclosure, which would include smokestacks and air vents, in sufficient numbers to substantially span said enclosure so that gas ions generated within the gas flow are electrostatically captured by the signal collector means. Electrometer means and a voltage source are connected to the signal collectors to generate an electrical field between adjacent signal collectors, and to indicate a current produced through collection of the gas ions by the signal collectors. 4 figs.

  3. High gas flow alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    Bolton, Richard D.; Bounds, John A.; Rawool-Sullivan, Mohini W.

    1996-01-01

    An alpha detector for application in areas of high velocity gas flows, such as smokestacks and air vents. A plurality of spaced apart signal collectors are placed inside an enclosure, which would include smokestacks and air vents, in sufficient numbers to substantially span said enclosure so that gas ions generated within the gas flow are electrostatically captured by the signal collector means. Electrometer means and a voltage source are connected to the signal collectors to generate an electrical field between adjacent signal collectors, and to indicate a current produced through collection of the gas ions by the signal collectors.

  4. Ionization and heating of the gas in the Galactic center probed by H3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Takeshi

    The 3.5-4.0 mum infrared spectrum of the molecular ion H _{3} (+) has emerged as a powerful probe to study the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ), a region with a radius of ˜150 pc at the center of our Milky Way Galaxy. Because of the ubiquity of cosmic rays, H _{3} (+) , produced by the reaction H _{2} + H _{2} (+) -> H _{3} (+) + H, exists wherever H _{2} abounds. Although H _{3} (+) is ˜ 10 (7) - 10 (8) times less abundant than H _{2}, its infrared spectrum is more readily observable than that of H _{2} because its dipole spectrum is ˜ 10 (9) times stronger than the quadrupole spectrum of H _{2}. In the CMZ H_{3}(+) is not only abundant (Geballe et al. 1999) but also pervasive. We have observed H_{3}(+) with column densities of ˜ 2×10(15) cm(-2) toward over 20 stars distributed from 140 pc West to 120 pc East of Sgr A* (Oka et al. 2005; Goto et al. 2008; Geballe & Oka 2010; Oka 2013). To date it has been detected toward every star in the Galactic center toward which it has been sought, suggesting that the surface-filling factor of H _{3}&^{+} in the CMZ is 100 %. Our observations and analyses exploiting the simple and fundamental natures of physics and chemistry of H _{3}$(+) have led us to the following three conclusions, each of which radically change the previous concept of the gas in the CMZ. The first two conclusions are firm. The third is less definitive but is likely. (1) A large volume of the CMZ is occupied by warm (˜ 250 K) and diffuse (< 100 cm (-3) ) molecular gas. Such gas replaces some or all of the ultra-hot (10 (7) - 10 (8) K) X-ray emitting plasma which some thought to dominate the region. The vast amount of diffuse molecular gas makes the term “Central Molecular Zone” even more fitting. (2) The ionization rate in the CMZ, zeta > 2 × 10 (-15) s (-1) , is higher than in dense clouds and diffuse clouds in the Galactic disk by more than 100 times and 10 times, respectively. The high value is ascribed to high cosmic ray fluxes due to high

  5. STS-39 Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) gas release from OV-103 payload bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A plume of nitrous oxide gas is released from a compressed gas canister mounted on the increased capacity adaptive payload carrier 1 (ICAPC-1) on the forward port side of Discovery's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103's, payload bay (PLB). The gas release is part of the Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) experiment conducted during STS-39. The Shuttle Pallet Satellite II (SPAS-II) 'parked' about two kilometers (km) away, is taking infrared, visible, and ultraviolet radiometric spatial, spectral, and temporal measurements of the gas plumes. Surrounding the CIV ICAPC-1 are: the ICAPC-2 payload support subsystem, radiometer, and Langmuir probe also mounted on the port side; the Space Test Payload 1 (STP-1) multipurpose experiment support structure (MPESS) (just beyond gas beam); and the Air Force Program 675 (AFP-675) experiment support structure (ESS).

  6. Qualitative Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analyses Using Amines as Chemical Ionization Reagent Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, James L.; Howard, Adam S.

    2013-12-01

    Ammonia is a very useful chemical ionization (CI) reagent gas for the qualitative analyses of compounds by positive ion gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS). The gas is readily available, inexpensive, and leaves no carbon contamination in the MS source. Compounds of interest to our laboratory typically yield abundant protonated or ammoniated species, which are indicative of a compound's molecular weight. Nevertheless, some labile compounds fragment extensively by substitution and elimination reactions and yield no molecular weight information. In these cases, a CI reagent gas mixture of methylamine in methane prepared dynamically was found to be very useful in obtaining molecular weight data. Likewise, deuterated ammonia and deuterated methylamine are useful CI reagent gases for determining the exchangeable protons in organic compounds. Deuterated methylamine CI reagent gas is conveniently prepared by dynamically mixing small amounts of methylamine with excess deuterated ammonia.

  7. Ionization steps and phase-space metamorphoses in the pulsed microwave ionization of highly excited hydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Bayfield, J.E.; Luie, S.Y.; Perotti, L.C.; Skrzypkowski, M.P.

    1996-01-01

    As the peak electric field of the microwave pulse is increased, steps in the classical microwave ionization probability of the highly excited hydrogen atom are produced by phase-space metamorphosis. They arise from new layers of Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser (KAM) islands being exposed as KAM surfaces are destroyed. Both quantum numerical calculations and laboratory experiments exhibit the ionization steps, showing that such metamorphoses influence pulsed semiclassical systems. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  8. Highly ionized disc and transient outflows in the Seyfert galaxy IRAS 18325-5926

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasawa, K.; Fabian, A. C.; Kara, E.; Reynolds, C. S.; Miniutti, G.; Tombesi, F.

    2016-08-01

    We report on strong X-ray variability and the Fe K-band spectrum of the Seyfert galaxy IRAS 18325-5926 obtained from the 2001 XMM-Newton EPIC pn observation with a duration of ~120 ks. While the X-ray source is highly variable, the 8-10 keV band shows larger variability than that of the lower energies. Amplified 8-10 keV flux variations are associated with two prominent flares of the X-ray source during the observation. The Fe K emission is peaked at 6.6 keV with moderate broadening. It is likely to originate from a highly ionized disc with an ionization parameter of log ξ ≃ 3. The Fe K line flux responds to the main flare, which supports its disc origin. A short burst of the Fe line flux has no relation to the continuum brightness, for which we have no clear explanation. We also find transient, blueshifted Fe K absorption features that can be identified with high-velocity (~0.2c) outflows of highly ionized gas, as found in other active galaxies. The deepest absorption feature appears only briefly (~1 h) at the onset of the main flare and disappears when the flare declines. The rapid evolution of the absorption spectrum makes this source peculiar among the active galaxies with high-velocity outflows. Another detection of the absorption feature also precedes the other flare. The variability of the absorption feature partly accounts for the excess variability in the 8-10 keV band where the absorption feature appears. Although no reverberation measurement is available, the black hole mass of ~2 × 106M⊙ is inferred from the X-ray variability. When this mass is assumed, the black hole is accreting at around the Eddington limit, which may fit the highly ionized disc and strong outflows observed in this galaxy.

  9. WFPC2 Imaging of the Multiphase Halos of Two Spiral Galaxies: Dust and Ionized Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueff, Katherine; Pitterle, M.; Hirschauer, A.; Lehner, N.; Howk, C.

    2006-12-01

    We present high-resolution optical images of the interstellar medium (ISM) in the thick disks of the spiral galaxies NGC 4013 and NGC 4302. Our broadband (BVI) images acquired with the Hubble Space Telescope’s WFPC2 show extensive extraplanar dust clouds seen in absorption against the background stellar light, while our narrow-band H-alpha images taken with the WIYN 3.5-m telescope show the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) in these galaxies. The dusty, thick disk clouds visible in our WFPC2 images, which can be found to heights approaching 2 kpc from the midplanes of these galaxies, trace a phase of the ISM that shows significant structure on quite small scales. In general this material is seen to be highly filamentary. By contrast, the thick disk DIG in these galaxies has significantly smoother distribution. We note several unresolved knots of H-alpha emission which may represent thick disk H II regions. We discuss the relationship of the dust-bearing clouds and the DIG in these galaxies.

  10. Synthesis of refractory organic matter in the ionized gas phase of the solar nebula

    PubMed Central

    Kuga, Maïa; Marty, Bernard; Marrocchi, Yves; Tissandier, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    In the nascent solar system, primitive organic matter was a major contributor of volatile elements to planetary bodies, and could have played a key role in the development of the biosphere. However, the origin of primitive organics is poorly understood. Most scenarios advocate cold synthesis in the interstellar medium or in the outer solar system. Here, we report the synthesis of solid organics under ionizing conditions in a plasma setup from gas mixtures (H2(O)−CO−N2−noble gases) reminiscent of the protosolar nebula composition. Ionization of the gas phase was achieved at temperatures up to 1,000 K. Synthesized solid compounds share chemical and structural features with chondritic organics, and noble gases trapped during the experiments reproduce the elemental and isotopic fractionations observed in primitive organics. These results strongly suggest that both the formation of chondritic refractory organics and the trapping of noble gases took place simultaneously in the ionized areas of the protoplanetary disk, via photon- and/or electron-driven reactions and processing. Thus, synthesis of primitive organics might not have required a cold environment and could have occurred anywhere the disk is ionized, including in its warm regions. This scenario also supports N2 photodissociation as the cause of the large nitrogen isotopic range in the solar system. PMID:26039983

  11. Synthesis of refractory organic matter in the ionized gas phase of the solar nebula.

    PubMed

    Kuga, Maïa; Marty, Bernard; Marrocchi, Yves; Tissandier, Laurent

    2015-06-01

    In the nascent solar system, primitive organic matter was a major contributor of volatile elements to planetary bodies, and could have played a key role in the development of the biosphere. However, the origin of primitive organics is poorly understood. Most scenarios advocate cold synthesis in the interstellar medium or in the outer solar system. Here, we report the synthesis of solid organics under ionizing conditions in a plasma setup from gas mixtures (H2(O)-CO-N2-noble gases) reminiscent of the protosolar nebula composition. Ionization of the gas phase was achieved at temperatures up to 1,000 K. Synthesized solid compounds share chemical and structural features with chondritic organics, and noble gases trapped during the experiments reproduce the elemental and isotopic fractionations observed in primitive organics. These results strongly suggest that both the formation of chondritic refractory organics and the trapping of noble gases took place simultaneously in the ionized areas of the protoplanetary disk, via photon- and/or electron-driven reactions and processing. Thus, synthesis of primitive organics might not have required a cold environment and could have occurred anywhere the disk is ionized, including in its warm regions. This scenario also supports N2 photodissociation as the cause of the large nitrogen isotopic range in the solar system. PMID:26039983

  12. Photoionization and High Density Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kallman, T.; Bautista, M.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present results of calculations using the XSTAR version 2 computer code. This code is loosely based on the XSTAR v.1 code which has been available for public use for some time. However it represents an improvement and update in several major respects, including atomic data, code structure, user interface, and improved physical description of ionization/excitation. In particular, it now is applicable to high density situations in which significant excited atomic level populations are likely to occur. We describe the computational techniques and assumptions, and present sample runs with particular emphasis on high density situations.

  13. Ionized gas discs in elliptical and S0 galaxies at z < 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffé, Yara L.; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Ziegler, Bodo; Kuntschner, Harald; Zaritsky, Dennis; Rudnick, Gregory; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Hoyos, Carlos; Halliday, Claire; Demarco, Ricardo

    2014-06-01

    We analyse the extended, ionized-gas emission of 24 early-type galaxies (ETGs) at 0 < z < 1 from the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS). We discuss different possible sources of ionization and favour star formation as the main cause of the observed emission. 10 galaxies have disturbed gas kinematics, while 14 have rotating gas discs. In addition, 15 galaxies are in the field, while 9 are in the infall regions of clusters. This implies that, if the gas has an internal origin, this is likely stripped as the galaxies get closer to the cluster centre. If the gas instead comes from an external source, then our results suggest that this is more likely acquired outside the cluster environment, where galaxy-galaxy interactions more commonly take place. We analyse the Tully-Fisher relation of the ETGs with gas discs, and compare them to EDisCS spirals. Taking a matched range of redshifts, MB < -20, and excluding galaxies with large velocity uncertainties, we find that, at fixed rotational velocity, ETGs are 1.7 mag fainter in MB than spirals. At fixed stellar mass, we also find that ETGs have systematically lower specific star formation rates than spirals. This study constitutes an important step forward towards the understanding of the evolution of the complex ISM in ETGs by significantly extending the look-back-time baseline explored so far.

  14. Al III, Si IV, and C IV absorption toward zeta Ophiuchi: Evidence for photionized and collisionally ionized gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sembach, Kenneth R.; Savage, Blair D.; Jenkins, Edward B.

    1994-01-01

    We present Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph observations at 3.5 km/s resolution and signal-to-noise ratios of 30 to 60 for the Al III, Si IV, and N V absorption lines in the far-ultraviolet spectrum of the O9.5 V star zeat Ophiuchi. The measurement reveal three types of highly ionized gas along the 140 pc line of sight. (1) Narrow components of Al III (b = 4.3 km/s, the mean value of (v(helio)) = -7.8 km/s; b = 3.2 km/s, the mean value of (v(sub helio)) = -14.4 km/s) and Si IV (b = 5.3 km/s, the mean value of (v(sub helio)) = -15.0 km/s) trace photionized gas in the expanding H II region surrounding zeta Oph. The observed magnitude and direction of the velocity offset between the Al III and Si IV profiles can be explained by models of H II regions that incorporate expansion. Narrow C IV absorption associated with the H II region is not detected. Predictions of the expected amounts of Si IV and C IV overestimate the column densities of these ions by factors of 30 and more than 10, respectively. The discrepancy may be due to the effects of elemental depletions in the gas and/or to the interaction of the stellar wind with surrounding matter. (2) Broad (b = 15 to 18 km/s) and weak Si IV and C IV absorption components are detected near the mean value of (v(sub helio)) = -26 km/s. The high-ionization species associated with these absorption components are probably produced by electron collisional ionization in a heated gas. This absorption may be physically related to the zeta Oph bow shock ot to a cloud complex situated within the local interstellar medium at d less than 60 pc. The C IV to Si IV column density ratio in this gas is 8, a factor of 6 less than conductive interface models predict, but this discrepancy may be removed by considering the effects of self-photoionization within the cooling gas in the model calculations. (3) A broad (b = 13 km/s) and weak C IV absorption feature detected at the mean value of (v(sub helio)) = -61 km/s is not seen in other

  15. Quantification of dimethindene in plasma by gas chromatography-mass fragmentography using ammonia chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Kauert, G; Herrle, I; Wermeille, M

    1993-08-11

    A gas chromatographic-mass fragmentographic method using ammonia chemical ionization for the determination of dimethindene in human plasma is described. The drug was isolated from plasma by liquid-liquid extraction with hexane-2-methylbutanol. Plasma components were separated on a capillary column coated with chemically bonded methyl silicone. For detection of dimethindene, its quasi-molecular ion (M + H+) was mass fragmentographically monitored after chemical ionization with ammonia as reagent gas. Dimethindene was quantified using methaqualone as the internal standard: the quantification limit in plasma was 0.2 ng/ml, the within-run precision was 8.0% and the inter-run precision 5.6%. The plasma concentration-time profile was established after a single dose of 4 mg of dimethindene with an average maximum concentration of 5.5 ng/ml, detectable up to 48 h post application. PMID:8408399

  16. High-efficiency electron ionizer for a mass spectrometer array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Darrach, Murray R. (Inventor); Orient, Otto J. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides an improved electron ionizer for use in a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The improved electron ionizer includes a repeller plate that ejects sample atoms or molecules, an ionizer chamber, a cathode that emits an electron beam into the ionizer chamber, an exit opening for excess electrons to escape, at least one shim plate to collimate said electron beam, extraction apertures, and a plurality of lens elements for focusing the extracted ions onto entrance apertures.

  17. Investigating the Diffuse Ionized Gas throughout the Magellanic Cloud System with WHAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, Brianna; Haffner, L. Matthew; Barger, Kathleen; Madsen, Gregory J.; Hill, Alex S.

    2015-01-01

    We present early stages of an H-α survey of the Magellanic System using the Wisconsin H-α Mapper (WHAM). Our maps of the Small Magellanic Cloud, Large Magellanic Cloud, and Magellanic Bridge are the most sensitive kinematic maps of ionized gas throughout the System. With a velocity resolution of 12 km/s, WHAM observations can cleanly separate diffuse emission at Magellanic velocities from that of the Milky Way and terrestrial sources. These new maps of the SMC and LMC compliment observations of the Magellanic Bridge by Barger et al. (2013), who found H-alpha emission extending throughout and beyond the observed H I emission. Using WHAM's unprecedented sensitivity to the limit of atmospheric line confusion (~ 10s of mR), we find that ionized gas emission extends at least 5 degrees beyond the traditional boundary of the SMC when compared to recent deep-imaging surveys (e.g., MCELS; Smith et al. 2005). The diffuse ionized emission extent is similar to the neutral gas extent as traced by 21 cm. We present spectra comparing H I and H-alpha kinematic signatures throughout the emission region, which are dominated by galactic rotation. Multi-wavelength observations are also underway in [S II] and [N II] for the SMC and LMC. WHAM research and operations are supported through NSF Award AST-1108911.

  18. High Power Pulsed Gas Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witteman, W. J.

    1987-09-01

    Gas lasers have shown to be capable of delivering tens of terrawatt aspeak power or tens of kilowatt as average power. The efficiencies of most high power gas lasers are relatively high compared with other types of lasers. For instance molecular lasers, oscillating on low lying vibrational levels, and excimer lasers may have intrinsic efficiencies above 10%.The wavelengths of these gas lasers cover the range from the far infrared to the ultra-violet region, say from 12000 to 193 nm. The most important properties are the scalability, optical homogeneity of the excited medium, and the relatively low price per watt of output power. The disadvantages may be the large size of the systems and the relatively narrow line width with limited tunability compared with solid state systems producing the same peak power. High power gas lasers group into three main categories depending on the waste-heat handling capacity.

  19. Breakdown voltage reduction by field emission in multi-walled carbon nanotubes based ionization gas sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Saheed, M. Shuaib M.; Muti Mohamed, Norani; Arif Burhanudin, Zainal

    2014-03-24

    Ionization gas sensors using vertically aligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) are demonstrated. The sharp tips of the nanotubes generate large non-uniform electric fields at relatively low applied voltage. The enhancement of the electric field results in field emission of electrons that dominates the breakdown mechanism in gas sensor with gap spacing below 14 μm. More than 90% reduction in breakdown voltage is observed for sensors with MWCNT and 7 μm gap spacing. Transition of breakdown mechanism, dominated by avalanche electrons to field emission electrons, as decreasing gap spacing is also observed and discussed.

  20. THE CURIOUS CASE OF GLASS I: HIGH IONIZATION AND VARIABILITY OF DIFFERENT TYPES

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Andrew J.; Richter, Matthew J.; Carr, John S.; Najita, Joan R.; Moerchen, Margaret M.; Doppmann, Greg W.; Seifahrt, Andreas

    2013-02-20

    Our Spitzer IRS observation of the infrared companion Glass Ib revealed fine-structure emission with high ionization ([Ne III]/[Ne II] = 2.1 and [S IV]/[S III] = 0.6) that indicates that the gas is likely illuminated by hard radiation. While models suggest that extreme-ultraviolet radiation could be present in T Tauri stars, this is the first detection of [S IV] and such a high [Ne III]/[Ne II] ratio in a young star. We also find that Glass Ib displays the molecules HCN, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O in emission. Here we investigate the Glass I binary system and consider possible mechanisms that may have caused the high ionization, whether from an outflow or disk irradiation. We also model the spectral energy distributions of Glass Ia and Ib to test if the system is a young member of the Chameleon I star-forming region, and we consider other possible classifications for the system. We find that Glass Ib is highly variable, showing changes in continuum strength and emission features at optical, near-infrared, and mid-infrared wavelengths. The optical light curve indicates that a central stellar component in Glass Ib became entirely visible for 2.5 years beginning in mid-2002 and possibly displayed periodic variability with repeated, short-period dimming during that time. As the fine-structure emission was not detected in observations before or after our Spitzer IRS observation, we explore whether the variable nature of Glass Ib is related to the gas being highly ionized, possibly due to variable accretion or an X-ray flare.

  1. Compact ultrafast orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometer for on-line gas analysis by electron impact ionization and soft single photon ionization using an electron beam pumped rare gas excimer lamp as VUV-light source.

    PubMed

    Mühlberger, F; Saraji-Bozorgzad, M; Gonin, M; Fuhrer, K; Zimmermann, R

    2007-11-01

    Orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometers (oaTOFMS), which are exhibiting a pulsed orthogonal extraction of ion bunches into the TOF mass analyzer from a continuous primary ion beam, are well-suited for continuous ionization methods such as electron impact ionization (EI). Recently an electron beam pumped rare gas excimer lamp (EBEL) was introduced, which emits intensive vacuum UV (VUV) radiation at, e.g., 126 nm (argon excimer) and is well suited as the light source for soft single photon ionization (SPI) of organic molecules. In this paper, a new compact oaTOFMS system which allows switching between SPI, using VUV-light from an EBEL-light source, and conventional EI is described. With the oaTOFMS system, EBEL-SPI and EI mass spectral transients can be recorded at very high repetition rates (up to 100 kHz), enabling high duty cycles and therefore good detection efficiencies. By using a transient recorder card with the capability to perform on-board accumulation of the oaTOF transients, final mass spectra with a dynamic range of 106 can be saved to the hard disk at a rate of 10 Hz. As it is possible to change the ionization modes (EI and SPI) rapidly, a comprehensive monitoring of complex gases with highly dynamic compositions, such as cigarette smoke, is possible. In this context, the EI based mass spectra address the bulk composition (compounds such as water, oxygen, carbon dioxide, etc. in the up to percentage concentration range) as well as some inorganic trace gases such as argon, sulfur dioxide, etc. down to the low ppm level. The EBEL-SPI mass spectra on the other hand are revealing the organic composition down to the lower ppb concentration range. PMID:17900147

  2. Separation of low first ionization potential ions from high first ionization potential neutrals in the low chromosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athay, R. Grant

    1994-03-01

    Spectroscopic data from two flights of the Naval Research Laboratory's High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph (HRTS) are analyzed for evidence of variations in relative abundances in the low chromosphere. Comparisons of sunspot, active region, and quiet-Sun data from HRTS II reveal decreases of intensities of sunspot lines from the first ionization stages of elements with low first ionization potential relative to both the active region and the quiet Sun. C I lines, however, are more intense in the sunspot than either the active region or the quiet Sun. Within a sunspot in Spacelab II data, the C I line at 156.1 nm is near its average intensity, whereas the Fe II line at 156.3 is much weaker than average. Both spots suggest a relative high value for the C I/Fe II abundance ratio. Within the zone of the same magnetic polarity as the sunspot (leading polarity) in the Spacelab II data, the brightest plages in C I show large C I/Fe II intensity ratios similar to those found in the sunspot. By contrast, the zones of following polarity on either side of the leading polarity show several well-defined areas of unusually low C I/Fe II intensity ratios associated with dark features in C I. The plages within these same zones have near normal or somewhat enhanced values for the C I/Fe II intensity ratios. It is noteworthy, also, that many of the brightest areas in C I do not coincide spatially with the brightest regions in Fe II. Neither do the darkest areas in C I align well with the darkest areas in Fe II. The association of high C I/Fe II intensity ratios with the zone of leading polarity and low-intensity ratios with zones of following polarity suggests that the iron abundance is dependent on the field polarity and is relatively low in the sunspot and the brighter plages in the zone of leading polarity and relatively high in C I dark flocculi in zones of following polarity. Failure of the brightest and darkest features in C I to align with the brightest and darkest

  3. H-alpha LEGUS: Unveiling the Interplay Between Stars, Star Clusters, and Ionized Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandar, Rupali

    2014-10-01

    We propose to obtain narrow-band, H-alpha observations for a significant subset of the star-forming, nearby galaxies recently targeted by the LEGUS treasury program (GO-13364). LEGUS is observing these galaxies in five broad-band filters: NUV, U, B, V, and I. The new H-alpha observations will reveal thousands of previously undetected HII regions, including those ionized by stellar clusters and single massive stars, allow us to measure their luminosities and sizes, and to separate discrete sources from diffuse ionized gas. We will use our narrow-band imaging survey to: (1) establish the connection between star and cluster formation, and determine the prevelance with which isolated massive stars form in different galaxies; (2) determine whether the initial cluster mass function is universal; (3) investigate the size evolution of ionized gas bubbles, and how this depends on cluster age and mass, as well as on local galactic conditions; and (4) place stringent limits on the leakage of ionizing photons from HII regions, and better understand how the interplay between properties of the ionizing source and the morphology of the HII region impacts leakage. The broad goal of this study is to better understand how feedback from massive stars affects the surrounding medium. Ultimately, the interplay between feedback and the ISM on these scales will enable a better understanding of galaxy-scale outflows in the early universe, a process critical to galaxy evolution. This program naturally lends itself to an improvement of the scientific output by involving the general public via an already established Citizen Science program.

  4. Diamagnetic Effect in a Partially-Ionized High-Beta Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruchtman, Amnon; Shinohara, Shunjiro

    2015-11-01

    Balance between magnetic pressure and plasma pressure is expected in fully ionized plasmas confined by a magnetic field. The magnetic force on the plasma is due to a current carried by the plasma which is diamagnetic. The magnetic field inside the plasma is then lowered by that current. In a partially-ionized plasma, however, the plasma pressure is balanced not only by the magnetic field pressure but also by neural-gas pressure. In that case the diamagnetic effect of the plasma, even if high beta, is expected to be lower. We calculate the steady-state of a cylindrical low temperature magnetized partially-ionized plasma (such as rf plasma source). We solve for the radial dependencies of the plasma density, the neutral density, and the magnetic field profile. Neutral pressure gradient is established by neutral depletion under the plasma pressure. We demonstrate how neutral depletion affects the diamagnetic effect of a high beta plasma. This work was partially supported by JSPS, Japan, and by ISF, Israel.

  5. High-sensitivity elemental ionization for quantitative detection of halogenated compounds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haopeng; Minardi, Carina S; Badiei, Hamid; Kahen, Kaveh; Jorabchi, Kaveh

    2015-12-21

    The rising importance of organohalogens in environmental, pharmaceutical, and biological applications has drawn attention to analysis of these compounds in recent years. Elemental mass spectrometry (MS) is particularly advantageous in this regard because of its ability to quantify without compound-specific standards. However, low sensitivity of conventional elemental MS for halogens has hampered applications of this powerful method in organohalogen analyses. To this end, we have developed a high-sensitivity elemental ion source compatible with widely available atmospheric-sampling mass spectrometers. We utilize a helium-oxygen plasma for atomization followed by negative ion formation in plasma afterglow, a configuration termed as plasma-assisted reaction chemical ionization (PARCI). The effect of oxygen on in-plasma and afterglow reactions is investigated, leading to fundamental understanding of ion generation processes as well as optimized operating conditions. Coupled to a gas chromatograph, PARCI shows constant ionization efficiency for F, Cl, and Br regardless of the chemical structure of the compounds. Negative ionization in the afterglow improves halide ion formation efficiency and eliminates isobaric interferences, offering sub-picogram elemental detection for F, Cl, and Br using low-resolution MS. Notably, the detection limit for F is about one order of magnitude better than other elemental MS techniques. The high sensitivity and facile adoptability of PARCI pave the way for combined elemental-molecular characterization, a comprehensive analytical scheme for rapid identification and quantification of organohalogens. PMID:26549767

  6. INTEGRAL-FIELD STELLAR AND IONIZED GAS KINEMATICS OF PECULIAR VIRGO CLUSTER SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Cortés, Juan R.; Hardy, Eduardo; Kenney, Jeffrey D. P. E-mail: ehardy@nrao.cl

    2015-01-01

    We present the stellar and ionized gas kinematics of 13 bright peculiar Virgo cluster galaxies observed with the DensePak Integral Field Unit at the WIYN 3.5 m telescope in order to look for kinematic evidence that these galaxies have experienced gravitational interactions or gas stripping. Two-dimensional maps of the stellar velocity V, stellar velocity dispersion σ, and the ionized gas velocity (Hβ and/or [O III]) are presented for the galaxies in the sample. The stellar rotation curves and velocity dispersion profiles are determined for 13 galaxies, and the ionized gas rotation curves are determined for 6 galaxies. Misalignments between the optical and kinematical major axes are found in several galaxies. While in some cases this is due to a bar, in other cases it seems to be associated with gravitational interaction or ongoing ram pressure stripping. Non-circular gas motions are found in nine galaxies, with various causes including bars, nuclear outflows, or gravitational disturbances. Several galaxies have signatures of kinematically distinct stellar components, which are likely signatures of accretion or mergers. For all of our galaxies, we compute the angular momentum parameter λ {sub R}. An evaluation of the galaxies in the λ {sub R} ellipticity plane shows that all but two of the galaxies have significant support from random stellar motions, and have likely experienced gravitational interactions. This includes some galaxies with very small bulges and truncated/compact Hα morphologies, indicating that such galaxies cannot be fully explained by simple ram pressure stripping, but must have had significant gravitational encounters. Most of the sample galaxies show evidence for ICM-ISM stripping as well as gravitational interactions, indicating that the evolution of a significant fraction of cluster galaxies is likely strongly impacted by both effects.

  7. Dopant Enriched Nitrogen Gas Combined with Sheathless Capillary Electrophoresis-Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry for Improved Sensitivity and Repeatability in Glycopeptide Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kammeijer, Guinevere S M; Kohler, Isabelle; Jansen, Bas C; Hensbergen, Paul J; Mayboroda, Oleg A; Falck, David; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2016-06-01

    Over the last years, numerous strategies have been proposed to enhance both ionization efficiency and spray stability in electrospray ionization (ESI), in particular for nanospray applications. In nano-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (nano-LC-ESI-MS), a better ESI performance has been observed when a coaxial gas flow is added around the ESI emitter. Moreover, enrichment of the gas with an organic dopant has led to an improved desolvation and ionization efficiency with an overall enhanced sensitivity. In this study, the use of a dopant enriched nitrogen (DEN)-gas combined with sheathless capillary electrophoresis (CE)-ESI-MS was evaluated for glycopeptide analysis. Using acetonitrile as a dopant, an increased sensitivity was observed compared to conventional sheathless CE-ESI-MS. Up to 25-fold higher sensitivities for model glycopeptides were obtained, allowing for limits of detection unachieved by state-of-the-art nano-LC-ESI-MS. The effect of DEN-gas on the repeatability and intermediate precision was also investigated. When compared to previously reported nano-LC-ESI-MS measurements, similar values were found for CE-ESI-MS with DEN-gas. The enhanced repeatability fosters the use of DEN-gas sheathless CE-ESI-MS in protein glycosylation analysis, where precision is essential. The use of DEN-gas opens new avenues for highly sensitive sheathless CE-ESI-MS approaches in glycoproteomics research, by significantly improving sensitivity and precision. PMID:27119460

  8. High efficiency gas burner

    DOEpatents

    Schuetz, Mark A.

    1983-01-01

    A burner assembly provides for 100% premixing of fuel and air by drawing the air into at least one high velocity stream of fuel without power assist. Specifically, the nozzle assembly for injecting the fuel into a throat comprises a plurality of nozzles in a generally circular array. Preferably, swirl is imparted to the air/fuel mixture by angling the nozzles. The diffuser comprises a conical primary diffuser followed by a cusp diffuser.

  9. Atmospheric pressure ionization and gas phase ion mobility studies of isomeric dihalogenated benzenes using different ionization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsdorf, H.; Nazarov, E. G.; Eiceman, G. A.

    2004-03-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) featuring different ionization techniques was used to analyze isomeric ortho-, meta- and para-dihalogenated benzenes in order to assess how structural features affect ion formation and drift behavior. The structure of the product ions formed was investigated by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry (MS) and IMS-MS coupling. Photoionization provided [M]+ ions for chlorinated and fluorinated compounds while bromine was cleaved from isomers of dibromobenzene and bromofluorobenzene. This ionization technique does not permit the different isomers to be distinguished. Comparable ions and additional clustered ions were obtained using 63Ni ionization. Depending on the chemical constitution, different clustered ions were observed in ion mobility spectra for the separate isomers of dichlorobenzene and dibromobenzene. Corona discharge ionization permits the most sensitive detection of dihalogenated compounds. Only clustered product ions were obtained. Corona discharge ionization enables the classification of different structural isomers of dichlorobenzene, dibromobenzene and bromofluorobenzene.

  10. P-MaNGA Galaxies: emission-lines properties - gas ionization and chemical abundances from prototype observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belfiore, F.; Maiolino, R.; Bundy, K.; Thomas, D.; Maraston, C.; Wilkinson, D.; Sánchez, S. F.; Bershady, M.; Blanc, G. A.; Bothwell, M.; Cales, S. L.; Coccato, L.; Drory, N.; Emsellem, E.; Fu, H.; Gelfand, J.; Law, D.; Masters, K.; Parejko, J.; Tremonti, C.; Wake, D.; Weijmans, A.; Yan, R.; Xiao, T.; Zhang, K.; Zheng, T.; Bizyaev, D.; Kinemuchi, K.; Oravetz, D.; Simmons, A.

    2015-05-01

    MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory) is a 6-yr Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) survey that will obtain spatially resolved spectroscopy from 3600 to 10 300 Å for a representative sample of over 10 000 nearby galaxies. In this paper, we present the analysis of nebular emission-line properties using observations of 14 galaxies obtained with P-MaNGA, a prototype of the MaNGA instrument. By using spatially resolved diagnostic diagrams, we find extended star formation in galaxies that are centrally dominated by Seyfert/LINER-like emission, which illustrates that galaxy characterizations based on single fibre spectra are necessarily incomplete. We observe extended low ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINER)-like emission (up to 1Re) in the central regions of three galaxies. We make use of the Hα equivalent width [EW(Hα)] to argue that the observed emission is consistent with ionization from hot evolved stars. We derive stellar population indices and demonstrate a clear correlation between Dn(4000) and EW(HδA) and the position in the ionization diagnostic diagram: resolved galactic regions which are ionized by a Seyfert/LINER-like radiation field are also devoid of recent star formation and host older and/or more metal-rich stellar populations. We also detect extraplanar LINER-like emission in two highly inclined galaxies, and identify it with diffuse ionized gas. We investigate spatially resolved metallicities and find a positive correlation between metallicity and star formation rate surface density. We further study the relation between N/O versus O/H on resolved scales. We find that, at given N/O, regions within individual galaxies are spread towards lower metallicities, deviating from the sequence defined by galactic central regions as traced by Sloan 3-arcsec fibre spectra. We suggest that the observed dispersion can be a tracer for gas flows in galaxies: infalls of pristine gas and/or the effect of a galactic fountain.