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Sample records for highly reactive fluids

  1. High-Performance Reactive Fluid Flow Simulations Using Adaptive Mesh Refinement on Thousands of Processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calder, A. C.; Curtis, B. C.; Dursi, L. J.; Fryxell, B.; Henry, G.; MacNeice, P.; Olson, K.; Ricker, P.; Rosner, R.; Timmes, F. X.; Tufo, H. M.; Truran, J. W.; Zingale, M.

    We present simulations and performance results of nuclear burning fronts in supernovae on the largest domain and at the finest spatial resolution studied to date. These simulations were performed on the Intel ASCI-Red machine at Sandia National Laboratories using FLASH, a code developed at the Center for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes at the University of Chicago. FLASH is a modular, adaptive mesh, parallel simulation code capable of handling compressible, reactive fluid flows in astrophysical environments. FLASH is written primarily in Fortran 90, uses the Message-Passing Interface library for inter-processor communication and portability, and employs the PARAMESH package to manage a block-structured adaptive mesh that places blocks only where the resolution is required and tracks rapidly changing flow features, such as detonation fronts, with ease. We describe the key algorithms and their implementation as well as the optimizations required to achieve sustained performance of 238 GLOPS on 6420 processors of ASCI-Red in 64-bit arithmetic.

  2. Ascitic Fluid High Sensitive C-Reactive Protein (hs-CRP). A Prognostic Marker in Cirrhosis with Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Kadam, Nakul; Shukla, Samarth; Gupta, Kriti

    2016-01-01

    Introduction C-Reactive Protein (CRP) is an acute phase reactant. Its level increases in the presence of acute or chronic inflammation and infections. High sensitive CRP (hs-CRP) is more sensitive than CRP as an inflammatory marker. High sensitive CRP has been known to be elevated in chronic liver diseases and Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis (SBP). Aim The aim of the study was to establish the role of ascitic fluid high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs –CRP) as a prognostic indicator in patients with SBP. Materials and Methods A total of 100 patients with decompensated cirrhosis admitted in medicine ward and ICU were included, of which 50 patients of acute bacterial peritonitis were used as study group and 50 patients of sterile ascites were used as control group. Hs-CRP level of cases and controls were estimated. SBP cases were treated with its standard recommended antibiotic therapy and hs-CRP level was again estimated after 5 days of antibiotic therapy or at the time of discharge. Results The mean level of hs-CRP before antibiotic therapy of the patients with SBP was significantly higher than that of the patients without spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (t98=17.72; p=0.0001). The mean level of hs-CRP at 5th day or discharge after initiation of antibiotic therapy was significantly lower than that of level of hs-CRP before initiation of antibiotic therapy (p<0.05). The mean hs-CRP of the cases with poor outcome (death and prolonged hospital stay) was significantly higher than others. Conclusion Ascitic fluid hs-CRP level can be considered as a surrogate prognostic marker in cases of Cirrhosis with SBP. PMID:27190862

  3. Method for reactivating catalysts and a method for recycling supercritical fluids used to reactivate the catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Thompson, David N.; Anderson, Raymond P.

    2008-08-05

    A method of reactivating a catalyst, such as a solid catalyst or a liquid catalyst. The method comprises providing a catalyst that is at least partially deactivated by fouling agents. The catalyst is contacted with a fluid reactivating agent that is at or above a critical point of the fluid reactivating agent and is of sufficient density to dissolve impurities. The fluid reactivating agent reacts with at least one fouling agent, releasing the at least one fouling agent from the catalyst. The at least one fouling agent becomes dissolved in the fluid reactivating agent and is subsequently separated or removed from the fluid reactivating agent so that the fluid reactivating agent may be reused. A system for reactivating a catalyst is also disclosed.

  4. High-Density Peptide Microarray Analysis of IgG Autoantibody Reactivities in Serum and Cerebrospinal Fluid of Multiple Sclerosis Patients.

    PubMed

    Hecker, Michael; Fitzner, Brit; Wendt, Matthias; Lorenz, Peter; Flechtner, Kristin; Steinbeck, Felix; Schröder, Ina; Thiesen, Hans-Jürgen; Zettl, Uwe Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Intrathecal immunoglobulin G (IgG) synthesis and oligoclonal IgG bands in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are hallmarks of multiple sclerosis (MS), but the antigen specificities remain enigmatic. Our study is the first investigating the autoantibody repertoire in paired serum and CSF samples from patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), primary progressive MS (PPMS), and other neurological diseases by the use of high-density peptide microarrays. Protein sequences of 45 presumed MS autoantigens (e.g.MOG, MBP, and MAG) were represented on the microarrays by overlapping 15mer peptides. IgG reactivities were screened against a total of 3991 peptides, including also selected viral epitopes. The measured antibody reactivities were highly individual but correlated for matched serum and CSF samples. We found 54 peptides to be recognized significantly more often by serum or CSF antibodies from MS patients compared with controls (pvalues <0.05). The results for RRMS and PPMS clearly overlapped. However, PPMS patients presented a broader peptide-antibody signature. The highest signals were detected for a peptide mapping to a region of the Epstein-Barr virus protein EBNA1 (amino acids 392-411), which is homologous to the N-terminal part of human crystallin alpha-B. Our data confirmed several known MS-associated antigens and epitopes, and they delivered additional potential linear epitopes, which await further validation. The peripheral and intrathecal humoral immune response in MS is polyspecific and includes antibodies that are also found in serum of patients with other diseases. Further studies are required to assess the pathogenic relevance of autoreactive and anti-EBNA1 antibodies as well as their combinatorial value as biomarkers for MS. PMID:26831522

  5. Modelling of reactive fluid transport in deformable porous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarushina, V. M.; Podladchikov, Y. Y.

    2009-04-01

    representative volume element and subsequent averaging of microscopic constitutive laws. Micromechanical and thermodynamic modelling is performed in such a way that the consistency of the obtained rheology and thermodynamically admissible closed system of equations with the exact Gassman's relationship and Terzaghi effective stress law in the simplified case of poroelasticity is guaranteed. In such environments as subduction zones or mid-ocean ridge, metamorphic rocks exhibit a lack of chemical homogenisation. Geochemistry suggests that in order to produce chemical heterogeneity, the fluids generated during high-pressure metamorphism must have been strongly channelled. The following three major mechanisms of fluid flow focusing have been proposed: fluid flow in open fractures and two different types of flow instabilities that do not require the pre-existing fracture network. Of the latter, the first represents a purely mechanical instability of Darcian flow through the deformable porous rock while the second is reactive infiltration instability. Both mechanical and reactive instabilities are expected to occur in the mantle and should probably reinforce each other. However, little research has been done in this direction. In order to investigate how the focusing of a fluid flow occurs, how mechanical and reactive infiltration instabilities influence each other, and what their relative importance in rocks with different rheologies is, linear and non-linear stability analysis is applied to derived governing equations.

  6. Reactive flash volatilization of fluid fuels

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Lanny D.; Dauenhauer, Paul J.; Dreyer, Bradon J.; Salge, James R.

    2013-01-08

    The invention provides methods for the production of synthesis gas. More particularly, various embodiments of the invention relate to systems and methods for volatilizing fluid fuel to produce synthesis gas by using a metal catalyst on a solid support matrix.

  7. Thermostating highly confined fluids.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Stefano; Todd, B D; Searles, Debra J

    2010-06-28

    In this work we show how different use of thermostating devices and modeling of walls influence the mechanical and dynamical properties of confined nanofluids. We consider a two dimensional fluid undergoing Couette flow using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. Because the system is highly inhomogeneous, the density shows strong fluctuations across the channel. We compare the dynamics produced by applying a thermostating device directly to the fluid with that obtained when the wall is thermostated, considering also the effects of using rigid walls. This comparison involves an analysis of the chaoticity of the fluid and evaluation of mechanical properties across the channel. We look at two thermostating devices with either rigid or vibrating atomic walls and compare them with a system only thermostated by conduction through vibrating atomic walls. Sensitive changes are observed in the xy component of the pressure tensor, streaming velocity, and density across the pore and the Lyapunov localization of the fluid. We also find that the fluid slip can be significantly reduced by rigid walls. Our results suggest caution in interpreting the results of systems in which fluid atoms are thermostated and/or wall atoms are constrained to be rigid, such as, for example, water inside carbon nanotubes. PMID:20590213

  8. High temperature drilling fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Stong, R.E.; Walinsky, S.W.

    1986-01-28

    This patent describes an aqueous drilling fluid suitable for high-temperature use. This fluid is composed of a water base. Clay is suspended in the base and from about 0.01-25 pounds per barrel total composition of a hydrolyzed terpolymer of maleic anhydride, styrene and a third monomer selected from acrylamide, methacrylamide, acrylic acid and metacrylic acid. The molar ratio of maleic anhydride to styrene to the third monomer is from about 30:10:60 to 50:40:10, and the alkali metal, ammonium and lower aliphatic amine salts thereof, the weight-average molecular weight of the hydrolyzed terpolymer is from about 500-10,000.

  9. BIOMONITORING OF REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN BIOLOGICAL FLUIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are associated with several disease processes in humans, including cancer, asthma, diabetes, and cardiac disease. We have explored whether ROS can be measured directly in human fluids, and their value as a biomarker of exposure an...

  10. Simple bond length dependence: A correspondence between reactive fluid theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, Kippi M.; Perkyns, John S.; Pettitt, B. M.

    2005-06-01

    Two elementary models of reactive fluids are examined, the first being a standard construction assuming molecular dissociation at infinite separation; the second is an open mixture of nondissociative molecules and free atoms in which the densities of free atoms and molecules are coupled. An approximation to the density of molecules, to low order in site density, is derived in terms of the classical associating fluid theory variously described by Wertheim [J. Chem. Phys. 87, 7323 (1987)] and Stell [Physica A 231, 1 (1996)]. The results are derived for a fluid of dimerizing hard spheres, and predict dependence of the molecular density on the total site density, the hard sphere diameter, and the bond length of the dimer. The results for the two reactive models are shown to be qualitatively similar, and lead to equivalent predictions of the molecular density for the infinitely short and infinitely long bond lengths.

  11. Point kinetics calculations with fully coupled thermal fluids reactivity feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Zou, L.; Andrs, D.; Zhao, H.; Martineau, R.

    2013-07-01

    The point kinetics model has been widely used in the analysis of the transient behavior of a nuclear reactor. In the traditional nuclear reactor system safety analysis codes such as RELAP5, the reactivity feedback effects are calculated in a loosely coupled fashion through operator splitting approach. This paper discusses the point kinetics calculations with the fully coupled thermal fluids and fuel temperature feedback implemented into the RELAP-7 code currently being developed with the MOOSE framework. (authors)

  12. Generation of high reactive fluids by rapid clinopyroxene-seawater interaction: An experimental study at 425 °C, 40 and 100 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beermann, Oliver; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter; Schächinger, Steffen; Arzi, Lisa; Holzheid, Astrid

    2014-05-01

    Submarine hydrothermalism with extensive alteration of oceanic crust is a major process governing energy and mass fluxes from Earth's interior into the oceans. Recent investigations revealed high element fluxes discharging in particular from the generally brittle deformed slow and ultra-slow spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) [1, 2, 3]. This suggests that seawater access to unaltered rocks along juvenile fault systems of the MAR may create hydrothermalism with high fluid and high element fluxes. For example hydrothermal venting at 5° S MAR [4, 5] intensified after a volcano-tectonic event in 2002 [5] and vent fluids constantly emanate here in ~3000 m bsl (~30 MPa) at extreme temperatures above 407 °C [2, 5, 6] and contain high concentrations of transition metals and rare earth elements (REE) [2]. However, geochemical models on mass transfer between oceanic lithosphere and ocean are based upon time integrated mass balance between vent fluid and host rock geochemistry [e.g., 7, 8, 9]. But, none of these models provide estimates for early-stage high-temperature hydrothermalism with unaltered host-rocks as it is evident from the 5°S MAR hydrothermal system. In order to unravel the temporal evolution on element mass transfer between seawater fluid and ocean lithosphere during high-temperature hydrothermalism we started a systematic time-resolved experimental study on seawater-rock interaction processes at variable water-to-rock mass ratios (w/r-ratios). Mixtures of 125-500 µm-sized clinopyroxene (Cpx) and plagioclase (Plag) grains prepared from unaltered gabbro (Atlantis Massif, 30°N MAR, IODP expedition 305, Site U1309D, core sample R211, 1020 m bsf) reacted with two fluid types of similar chlorinity, natural bottom seawater or synthetic 3.2 wt.% NaCl(aq), at 425 °C, 400 and 1000 bar and at w/r ratios from 0.5 to 10 and run durations from 3 to 720 hours. Solid products were analyzed by SEM and XRD, and fluid products were analyzed by ICP-MS and ICP-OES. In all

  13. Quantification of CO2-FLUID-ROCK Reactions Using Reactive and Non-Reactive Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matter, J.; Stute, M.; Hall, J. L.; Mesfin, K. G.; Gislason, S. R.; Oelkers, E. H.; Sigfússon, B.; Gunnarsson, I.; Aradottir, E. S.; Alfredsson, H. A.; Gunnlaugsson, E.; Broecker, W. S.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon dioxide mineralization via fluid-rock reactions provides the most effective and long-term storage option for geologic carbon storage. Injection of CO2 in geologic formations induces CO2 -fluid-rock reactions that may enhance or decrease the storage permanence and thus the long-term safety of geologic carbon storage. Hence, quantitative characterization of critical CO2 -fluid-rock interactions is essential to assess the storage efficiency and safety of geologic carbon storage. In an attempt to quantify in-situ fluid-rock reactions and CO2 transport relevant for geologic carbon storage, we are testing reactive (14C, 13C) and non-reactive (sodium fluorescein, amidorhodamine G, SF5CF3, and SF6) tracers in an ongoing CO2 injection in a basaltic storage reservoir at the CARBFIX pilot injection site in Iceland. At the injection site, CO2 is dissolved in groundwater and injected into a permeable basalt formation located 500-800 m below the surface [1]. The injected CO2 is labeled with 14C by dynamically adding calibrated amounts of H14CO3-solution into the injection stream in addition to the non-reactive tracers. Chemical and isotopic analyses of fluid samples collected in a monitoring well, reveal fast fluid-rock reactions. Maximum SF6 concentration in the monitoring well indicates the bulk arrival of the injected CO2 solution but dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration and pH values close to background, and a potentially lower 14C to SF6 ratio than the injection ratio suggest that most of the injected CO2 has reacted with the basaltic rocks. This is supported by δ13CDIC, which shows a drop from values close to the δ 13C of the injected CO2 gas (-3‰ VPDB) during breakthrough of the CO2 plume to subsequent more depleted values (-11.25‰ VPDB), indicating precipitation of carbonate minerals. Preliminary mass balance calculations using mixing relationships between the background water in the storage formation and the injected solution, suggest that

  14. Fluid-rock interaction: A reactive transport approach

    SciTech Connect

    Steefel, C.; Maher, K.

    2009-04-01

    Fluid-rock interaction (or water-rock interaction, as it was more commonly known) is a subject that has evolved considerably in its scope over the years. Initially its focus was primarily on interactions between subsurface fluids of various temperatures and mostly crystalline rocks, but the scope has broadened now to include fluid interaction with all forms of subsurface materials, whether they are unconsolidated or crystalline ('fluid-solid interaction' is perhaps less euphonious). Disciplines that previously carried their own distinct names, for example, basin diagenesis, early diagenesis, metamorphic petrology, reactive contaminant transport, chemical weathering, are now considered to fall under the broader rubric of fluid-rock interaction, although certainly some of the key research questions differ depending on the environment considered. Beyond the broadening of the environments considered in the study of fluid-rock interaction, the discipline has evolved in perhaps an even more important way. The study of water-rock interaction began by focusing on geochemical interactions in the absence of transport processes, although a few notable exceptions exist (Thompson 1959; Weare et al. 1976). Moreover, these analyses began by adopting a primarily thermodynamic approach, with the implicit or explicit assumption of equilibrium between the fluid and rock. As a result, these early models were fundamentally static rather than dynamic in nature. This all changed with the seminal papers by Helgeson and his co-workers (Helgeson 1968; Helgeson et al. 1969) wherein the concept of an irreversible reaction path was formally introduced into the geochemical literature. In addition to treating the reaction network as a dynamically evolving system, the Helgeson studies introduced an approach that allowed for the consideration of a multicomponent geochemical system, with multiple minerals and species appearing as both reactants and products, at least one of which could be

  15. Isotopic effects in fracture-dominated reactive fluid-rocksystems

    SciTech Connect

    DePaolo, Donald J.

    2005-07-22

    A mathematical model is presented that describes the effectsof pore fluid aqueous diffusion and reaction rate on the isotopicexchange between fluids and rocks in reactive geo-hydrological systemswhere flow is primarily through fractures. The model describes a simplesystem with parallel equidistant fractures, and chemical transport in thematrix slabs between fractures by aqueous diffusion through a stagnantpore fluid. The solid matrix exchanges isotopes with pore fluid bysolution-precipitation at a rate characterized by a time constant, R(yr-1), which is an adjustable parameter. The effects of reaction on theisotopes of a particular element in the fracture fluid are shown todepend on the ratio of the diffusive reaction length for that element (L)to the fracture spacing (b). The reaction length depends on thesolid-fluid exchange rate within the matrix, the partitioning of theelement between the matrix pore fluid and the matrix solid phase, theporosity and density of the matrix, and the aqueous diffusivity. For L/b<0.3, fluid-rock isotopic exchange is effectively reduced by a factorof 2L/b relative to a standard porous flow (single porosity) model. ForL/b>1, the parallel fracture model is no different from a porousflow model. If isotopic data are available for two or more elements withdifferent L values, it may be possible to use the model with appropriateisotopic measurements to estimate the spacing of the primaryfluid-carrying fractures in natural fluid-rock systems. Examples aregiven using Sr and O isotopic data from mid-ocean ridge (MOR)hydrothermal vent fluids and Sr isotopes in groundwater aquifers hostedby fractured basalt. The available data for MOR systems are consistentwith average fracture spacing of 1-4 m. The groundwater data suggestlarger effective fracture spacing, in the range 50-500 m. In general, forfractured rock systems, the effects of fracture-matrix diffusive exchangemust be considered when comparing isotopic exchange effects for

  16. Kerogen-Hydraulic Fracture Fluid Interactions: Reactivity and Contaminant Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dustin, M. K.; Jew, A. D.; Harrison, A. L.; Joe-Wong, C. M.; Thomas, D.; Maher, K.; Brown, G. E.; Bargar, J.

    2015-12-01

    The use of hydraulic fracturing of tight shales to produce oil and natural gas has grown significantly in recent years, yet it remains relatively inefficient, recovering only an estimated 5% and 25% of the oil and gas present, respectively. The need to improve efficiency and diminish environmental impact has prompted research into fundamental geochemical reactions occurring in shales. In particular, reactions between kerogen and fracture fluid components are poorly understood. Kerogen is the precursor of these hydrocarbons and contains metals in addition to organic material; it is also electron rich and therefore susceptible to oxidation and release of a variety of elements. Although some mineral phases in the shales are expected to undergo dissolution-precipitation reactions, kerogen is generally considered to be relatively unreactive [1]. Here we have investigated reactions between isolated kerogen and a hydraulic fracturing fluid typical of that used in the Marcellus shale. These experiments show that kerogen, as well as redox-sensitive minerals within shales, react with fracture fluid. In particular, kerogen exhibited more extensive release of certain metals (e.g. Al, Ba, Cu, among others) than was observed for bulk shale under the same experimental conditions. This evidence suggests that kerogen may be far more reactive to fracture fluids than previously thought. In particular, these results suggest that kerogen may significantly impact the compositions of produced waters, which have previously been attributed solely to mineral reactions. They also emphasize the need for further characterization of kerogen and its reactions with complex hydraulic fracturing fluids. [1] Vandenbroucke and Largeau (2007) Org. Geochem.

  17. Method of measuring reactive acoustic power density in a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1985-01-01

    A method for determining reactive acoustic power density level and its direction in a fluid using a single sensor is disclosed. In the preferred embodiment, an apparatus for conducting the method, which is termed a thermoacoustic couple, consists of a stack of thin, spaced apart polymeric plates, selected ones of which include multiple bimetallic thermocouple junctions positioned along opposite end edges thereof. The thermocouple junctions are connected in series in the nature of a thermopile, and are arranged so as to be responsive to small temperature differences between the opposite edges of the plates. The magnitude of the temperature difference, as represented by the magnitude of the electrical potential difference generated by the thermopile, is found to be directly related to the level of acoustic power density in the gas.

  18. Method of measuring reactive acoustic power density in a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1985-09-03

    A method for determining reactive acoustic power density level and its direction in a fluid using a single sensor is disclosed. In the preferred embodiment, an apparatus for conducting the method, which is termed a thermoacoustic couple, consists of a stack of thin, spaced apart polymeric plates, selected ones of which include multiple bimetallic thermocouple junctions positioned along opposite end edges thereof. The thermocouple junctions are connected in series in the nature of a thermopile, and are arranged so as to be responsive to small temperature differences between the opposite edges of the plates. The magnitude of the temperature difference, as represented by the magnitude of the electrical potential difference generated by the thermopile, is found to be directly related to the level of acoustic power density in the gas. 5 figs.

  19. Fracturing fluid high-temperature breaker for improving well performance

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, B.

    1994-05-01

    Oxidative breakers are currently being used in fracturing treatments to reduce polymeric gel damage in high-temperature reservoirs. Dissolved high-temperature oxidative breakers are very reactive at high temperatures (275 to 350 F), typically requiring less than 0.25 lbm/1,000 gal of fluid. Recent introduction of a new nonpersulfate oxidative high-temperature encapsulated breaker (HTEB) provides controlled degradation of the fracturing fluid polymers. Laboratory tests show viscosity reduction and delayed release of active oxidizer breaker. HTEB conductivity data show a two-fold increase in retained permeability at 300 F in a borate-crosslinked fluid system.

  20. Evaluation of cerebrospinal fluid in Southeast Asian refugees with reactive serologic tests for syphilis.

    PubMed Central

    Buchwald, D; Collier, A C; Lukehart, S A; Kith, P; Goldstein, E; Hooton, T M

    1996-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of cerebrospinal fluid abnormalities in Southeast Asian refugees with reactive serologic tests for syphilis, we evaluated 65 patients, 36 prospectively and 29 retrospectively, in a primary care clinic. Information was collected on history of treponemal infections, neurologic symptoms and signs, and total protein concentration, leukocyte count, and the VDRL test in the cerebrospinal fluid. Neurologic symptoms were reported by all patients for whom data were available. Abnormal neurologic signs were found or noted in medical records in 15 (42%) prospectively evaluated patients and 9 (64%) of 14 retrospectively evaluated patients for whom data were available. No patient had evidence of congenital or non-neurologic sequelae such as cutaneous or cardiovascular manifestations of syphilis. No patient had a positive cerebrospinal fluid VDRL test, 1 had more than 5 x 10(6) leukocytes per liter (5 leukocytes per mm3), and 6 (9%) had elevated total protein levels in the cerebrospinal fluid. Previous therapy for syphilis was not associated with lower serum VDRL reactions, neurologic symptoms and signs, or cerebrospinal fluid findings. In the absence of other indications, routine examination of the cerebrospinal fluid in seropositive Southeast Asian refugees who have nonspecific neurologic symptoms has a low yield, perhaps because of the high prevalence of yaws in this population, and may not be warranted. PMID:8993199

  1. Reactive Fluid Flow in Contact-Metamorphic Aureoles With Variable Permeability - Insights From Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabelek, P.

    2006-05-01

    Numerical simulations of mineral reaction progress in calc-silicate rocks provide information on the temporal evolution of hydrodynamic systems around cooling plutons. Flow of reactive H2O-CO2 fluids and progress of metamorphic reactions in an aureole with a layered permeability structure were simulated using a modified version of the SUTRA code that allows calculation of mineral reaction progress. The intrusion was assumed to be a laccolith, 8 km wide at the base and 4 km high in the middle. Magmatic, metamorphic, and sedimentary fluid sources were considered. The rate of calc-silicate reaction progress was assumed to be related to ΔG's of the considered reactions. Calcareous pelite formations in which metamorphic reactions occurred were assumed to have greater permeability than quartzites and pure marbles. Results show that after magma intrusion, fluid flow is away from the intrusion as the hydrostatic head increases with temperature in the inner aureole and magmatic fluids flow outward. This flow regime remains for several thousand years but becomes less vigorous with time. Local high fluid pressures occur at sites of decarbonation reactions which move away from the intrusion. Fluid composition in the aureole initially becomes heterogeneous as CO2 is evolved into the high-permeability beds, but eventually the heterogeneity diminishes as CO2 is distributed. For a permeability contrast of 100, fluid composition becomes qualitatively homogeneous in most of the aureole by 10 ky, and sooner for a lesser permeability contrast. Progress of mineral reactions is rapid within the first few thousands of years after magma intrusion, but the essential mineral characteristics of the aureole are established by ~10 ky. Further evolution of the hydrodynamic system toward Bénard convective cells after several tens of ky has little effect on the distribution of the model minerals assemblages, which mimic very well assemblages seen in calc-silicate aureoles around laccoliths.

  2. The Association between Heart Rate Reactivity and Fluid Intelligence in Children

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yu; Borlam, Deborah; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine (a) whether findings of increased cardiovascular reactivity in relation to cognitive ability seen in infants, young adults and the elderly can be extended to middle childhood, and (b) which specific aspect(s) of intelligence is related to cardiovascular reactivity. We examined cardiovascular activity in 340 8- and 9-year-old children during a number judgment task and measured fluid and crystalized IQ using the WISC-IV (Wechsler, 2003). Regression analyses revealed that heart rate (HR) reactivity was positively associated with fluid intelligence and perceptual reasoning in particular, after controlling for the effects of sex, age, task performance, social adversity, and resting HR. Intelligence scores were not associated with respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) reactivity. Findings are consistent with prior literature in infants and older populations and for the first time suggest that the association between HR reactivity and cognitive ability is specific for fluid reasoning. PMID:25782406

  3. On reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, J. T.

    2016-01-01

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) is an ionized physical vapor deposition (IPVD) technique that is particularly promising for reactive sputtering applications. However, there are few issues that have to be resolved before the full potential of this technique can be realized. Here we give an overview of the key experimental findings for the reactive HiPIMS discharge. An increase in the discharge current is commonly observed with increased partial pressure of the reactive gas or decreased repetition pulse frequency. There are somewhat conflicting claims regarding the hysteresis effect in the reactive HiPIMS discharge as some report reduction or elimination of the hysteresis effect while others claim a feedback control is essential. The ion energy distribution of the metal ion and the atomic ion of the reactive gas are similar and extend to very high energies while the ion energy distribution of the working gas and the molecular ion of the reactive gas are similar and are much less energetic.

  4. Core-flood experiment for transport of reactive fluids in rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, H.; de Kloe, K.; van Bakel, M.; Vos, F.; van Pelt, A.; Legerstee, P.; Bauer, A.; Eide, K.; van der Linden, A.; Berg, S.; Makurat, A.

    2012-08-01

    Investigation of the transport of reactive fluids in porous rocks is an intriguing but challenging task and relevant in several areas of science and engineering such as geology, hydrogeology, and petroleum engineering. We designed and constructed an experimental setup to investigate physical and chemical processes caused by the flow of reactive and volatile fluids such as supercritical CO2 and/or H2S in geological formations. Potential applications are geological sequestration of CO2 in the frame of carbon capture and storage and acid-gas injection for sulfur disposal and/or enhanced oil recovery. The present paper outlines the design criteria and the realization of reactive transport experiments on the laboratory scale. We focus on the spatial and time evolution of rock and fluid composition as a result of chemical rock fluid interaction and the coupling of chemistry and fluid flow in porous rocks.

  5. HIGH REACTIVITY SORBENTS FOR SO2 CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses studies, relating to air pollution control from coal-fired utility boilers, that show that the primary variable affecting sorbent reactivity at high temperature or at low temperature with water droplets is surface area. For the development of high surface area...

  6. Safe Disposal of Highly Reactive Chemicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunn, George; Sansone, Eric B.

    1994-01-01

    Provides specific procedures for the disposal of a variety of highly reactive chemicals and reports the results of a study of their safe disposal. Disposal of some problematic sulfur-containing compounds are included. Procedures are based on a combination of literature review and author development. (LZ)

  7. Concentration-dependent diffusion instability in reactive miscible fluids.

    PubMed

    Bratsun, Dmitry; Kostarev, Konstantin; Mizev, Aleksey; Mosheva, Elena

    2015-07-01

    We report on chemoconvective pattern formation phenomena observed in a two-layer system of miscible fluids filling a vertical Hele-Shaw cell. We show both experimentally and theoretically that the concentration-dependent diffusion coupled with frontal acid-base neutralization can give rise to the formation of a local unstable zone low in density, resulting in a perfectly regular cell-type convective pattern. The described effect gives an example of yet another powerful mechanism which allows the reaction-diffusion processes to govern the flow of reacting fluids under gravity conditions. PMID:26274115

  8. Chalk-microfluidic: flooding microsystems with reactive fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuville, Amélie; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Li, Lei; Hiorth, Aksel

    2014-05-01

    Experiments on core scale and field tests that have been carried out the last decade have clearly shown that water chemistry affects the final oil recovery. However, there is generally no consensus in the scientific community of why additional oil is released. Part of the reason for this is that there are very few in-situ observations of how the water chemistry affects fluid distributions on the pore scale, and/or the pore surface characteristics. In this work, as a first step, our aim is to focus on in-situ observations of single phase flow and interactions at the pore scale. In order to work at this small scale, we first investigate how to control the flow location. We propose to use the same principle as "paper-microfluidic": some areas of the chalk are chemically treated so that no fluid flows inside while other areas let the fluids flow in the chalk pores. Since chalk and paper obviously has different mechanical behavior, we need to adapt this technique. Custom-made microsystems with chalk and calcite will be presented. We will then show experiments with reacting fluids in these microsystems. These experiments are observed using wide field fluorescence microscopy and white light vertical/phase shift interferometric microscopy.

  9. (Reactive fluid flow models and applications to diagenesis, mineral deposits and crustal rocks)

    SciTech Connect

    Lasaga, A.C.; Rye, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this proposal is to put constraints on fluid and mass flux by combining theoretical and field studies of coupled fluid flow, heat and mass transport, and chemical reaction in hydrothermal and metamorphic systems. We are presently applying the two-dimensional code 2DREACT to the study of reactive flow in hydrothermal system. The code represents a new approach to the modeling of simultaneous reaction and transport which was completed in the first months of this project.

  10. Coupling changes in densities and porosity to fluid pressure variations in reactive porous fluid flow: Local thermodynamic equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvoisin, Benjamin; Podladchikov, Yury Yu.; Vrijmoed, Johannes C.

    2015-12-01

    Mineralogical reactions which generate or consume fluids play a key role during fluid flow in porous media. Such reactions are linked to changes in density, porosity, permeability, and fluid pressure which influence fluid flow and rock deformation. To understand such a coupled system, equations were derived from mass conservation and local thermodynamic equilibrium. The presented mass conservative modeling approach describes the relationships among evolving fluid pressure, porosity, fluid and solid density, and devolatilization reactions in multicomponent systems with solid solutions. This first step serves as a framework for future models including aqueous speciation and transport. The complexity of univariant and multivariant reactions is treated by calculating lookup tables from thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. Simplified cases were also investigated to understand previously studied formulations. For nondeforming systems or systems divided into phases of constant density, the equations can be reduced to porosity wave equations with addition of a reactive term taking the volume change of reaction into account. For closed systems, an expression for the volume change of reaction and the associated pressure increase can be obtained. The key equations were solved numerically for the case of devolatilization of three different rock types that may enter a subduction zone. Reactions with positive Clapeyron slope lead to an increase in porosity and permeability with decreasing fluid pressure resulting in sharp fluid pressure gradients around a negative pressure anomaly. The opposite trend is obtained for reactions having a negative Clapeyron slope during which sharp fluid pressure gradients were only generated around a positive pressure anomaly. Coupling of reaction with elastic deformation induces a more efficient fluid flow for reactions with negative Clapeyron slope than for reactions with positive Clapeyron slope.

  11. Saline breast implant fluid collection and reactive arthritis in a patient with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kohannim, Omid; Rubin, Zachary; Taylor, Mihaela

    2011-03-01

    Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome is a potentially lethal condition with an increasing incidence over the last 30 years. We present the case of a 55-year-old patient with signs and symptoms of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. This patient's presentation was unique in that it was followed by an accumulation of fluid at her breast implant in addition to a polyarticular reactive arthritis. We propose that the patient's reactive arthritis is consistent with the diagnosis of post-streptococcal reactive arthritis, a variant of acute rheumatic fever, which similarly to its variant is immunologically driven. We hypothesize that the fluid collection around the patient's breast implant was triggered by her infection and was also immunologically mediated. PMID:21325958

  12. Geothermal Fluid Interaction with Mafic Rocks in Porous Media - AN Experimental and Reactive Transport Modeling Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefansson, A.

    2013-12-01

    Reaction and reactive transport modeling is becoming an increasingly popular method to study fluid-rock interaction and fluid transport on small to large scales. In this study, fluid-rock experiments were carried out and the observations compared with the results of reaction and reactive transport models. The systems studied included fluid-rock interaction of olivine on one hand and basaltic glass on the other hand with dilute aqueous solutions containing CO2 at acid to neutral pH and temperatures from ambient to 250 °C. The experiments were conducted using batch type experiments in closed reactors and 1-D plug experiments in flow-through reactors and the solution chemistry, the reaction progress, secondary mineralization and porosity changes analyzed as a function of time. The reaction and 1-D reactive transport simulations were conducted with the aid of the PHREEQC program. For the simulations the thermodynamic database for mineral reactions was largely updated and the kinetics of mineral dissolution as well as mineral nucleation and crystal growth was incorporated. According to the experimental results and the reactive transport simulations, olivine and basaltic glass progressively dissolves forming secondary minerals and solutes that are partially transported out of them column (system). The exact reaction path was found to depend on solution composition and pH and reaction progress (time). The mass movement of the system at a particular steady state as well as porosity changes may be divided into three stages. Stage I is characterized by initial olivine or basaltic glass leaching, stage II is characterized by progressive mineral formation and decrease in porosity and stage III is characterized by remobilization of the previously formed secondary minerals and eventual increase in porosity. The reaction and reactive transport modeling was found to simulate reasonable the reaction path as a function of reaction time. However, exact mass movement and time

  13. The analysis of a reactive hydromagnetic internal heat generating poiseuille fluid flow through a channel.

    PubMed

    Hassan, A R; Maritz, R

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the analysis of a reactive hydromagnetic Poiseuille fluid flow under different chemical kinetics through a channel in the presence of a heat source is carried out. An exothermic reaction is assumed while the concentration of the material is neglected. The Adomian decomposition method together with Pade approximation technique are used to obtain the solutions of the governing nonlinear non-dimensional differential equations. Effects of various physical parameters on the velocity and temperature fields of the fluid flow are investigated. The entropy generation analysis, irreversibility distribution ratio, Bejan number and the conditions for thermal criticality for different chemical kinetics are also presented. PMID:27563527

  14. Notes on the KIVA-2 software and chemically reactive fluid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holst, M. J.

    1992-09-01

    Working notes regarding the mechanics of chemically reactive fluids with sprays, and their numerical simulation with the KIVA-2 software are presented. KIVA-2 is a large FORTRAN program developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory for internal combustion engine simulation. It is our hope that these notes summarize some of the necessary background material in fluid mechanics and combustion, explain the numerical methods currently used in KIVA-2 and similar combustion codes, and provide an outline of the overall structure of KIVA-2 as a representative combustion program, in order to aid the researcher in the task of implementing KIVA-2 or a similar combustion code on a massively parallel computer. The notes are organized into three parts as follows. In Part 1, a brief introduction to continuum mechanics, to fluid mechanics, and to the mechanics of chemically reactive fluids with sprays is presented. In Part 2, a close look at the governing equations of KIVA-2 is taken, and the methods employed in the numerical solution of these equations is discussed. Some conclusions are drawn and some observations are made in Part 3.

  15. On the Inclusion of Inorganic Chemical Reactivity in High School Chemistry: The Reactivity Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellon, E. K.

    1989-01-01

    Reports the function of the Reactivity Network which is to translate reactivity data from the primary literature into some 30 reviews for high school teachers and curriculum developers and to disseminate that information nationwide. Discusses a needs assessment done for the project. (MVL)

  16. Inviscid fluid in high frequency excitation field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of high frequency excitations (HFE) on a fluid is investigated. The response to these excitations is decomposed in two parts: 'slow' motion, which practically remains unchanged during the vanishingly small period tau, and 'fast' motion whose value during this period is negligible in terms of displacements, but is essential in terms of the kinetic energy. After such a decomposition the 'slow' and 'fast' motions become nonlinearly coupled by the corresponding governing equations. This coupling leads to an 'effective' potential energy which imparts some 'elastic' properties to the fluid and stabilizes laminar flows.

  17. Nonisothermal Flow of a Reactive Fluid with Simultaneous Impregnation of a Porous Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Consideration is given to the nonisothermal filling of a plane cavity with a Newtonian chemically reactive fluid with simultaneous impregnation of a porous layer. Flow in the plane cavity is described by noninertial Navier-Stokes equations, and in the porous layer, by the Darcy equation; flow in the region adjacent to the boundary between the fluid and the porous layer is defined using the Brinkman equation. The viscosity is taken to be dependent on temperature and on the extent to which the chemical reaction proceeds. A single-temperature model is used as the energy equation. Temperature fields in the region of a channel and in the porous layer are interrelated by conjugate fourth-kind boundary conditions. An example of determining the maximum allowable molding time is shown.

  18. Fluid hydrogen at high density - Pressure dissociation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saumon, Didier; Chabrier, Gilles

    1991-01-01

    A model for the Helmholtz free energy of fluid hydrogen at high density and high temperature is developed. This model aims at describing both pressure and temperature dissociation and ionization and bears directly on equations of state of partially ionized plasmas, as encountered in astrophysical situations and high-pressure experiments. This paper focuses on a mixture of hydrogen atoms and molecules and is devoted to the study of the phenomenon of pressure dissociation at finite temperatures. In the present model, the strong interactions are described with realistic potentials and are computed with a modified Weeks-Chandler-Andersen fluid perturbation theory that reproduces Monte Carlo simulations to better than 3 percent. Theoretical Hugoniot curves derived from the model are in excellent agreement with experimental data.

  19. Substrate degradation in high-Rayleigh-number reactive convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, T. J.; Jensen, O. E.; Power, H.; Riley, D. S.

    2015-11-01

    We study buoyancy-induced convection of a solute in an ideal two-dimensional fluid-saturated porous medium, where the solute undergoes a second-order reaction with a chemical substrate that is fixed in the underlying matrix. Numerical simulations at high Rayleigh number show how a flow is established in which a thin dynamic boundary layer beneath the solute source feeds slender vertical plumes beneath. We examine how the substrate is reactively degraded, at a rate enhanced by convective mixing. For the case when the substrate is abundant, we derive a reduced-order model describing the slow degradation of the substrate, which is formulated as a novel one-dimensional free-boundary problem. Numerical simulations and the reduced model reveal how, when the reaction is rapid compared to the convective time scale, the plumes propagate deep into the flow domain with reaction confined to a narrow region at their base. In contrast, slow reaction allows plumes to fill the domain before degradation of the substrate proceeds homogeneously. An alternative model with a thin reaction front captures the rapid degradation of the substrate when the solute concentration is relatively high.

  20. Implementing fluid dynamics obtained from GeoPET in reactive transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippmann-Pipke, Johanna; Eichelbaum, Sebastian; Kulenkampff, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    Flow and transport simulations in geomaterials are commonly conducted on high-resolution tomograms (μCT) of the pore structure or stochastic models that are calibrated with measured integral quantities, like break through curves (BTC). Yet, there existed virtually no method for experimental verification of the simulated velocity distribution results. Positron emission tomography (PET) has unrivaled sensitivity and robustness for non-destructive, quantitative, spatio-temporal measurement of tracer concentrations in body tissue. In the past decade, we empowered PET for its applicability in opaque/geological media - GeoPET (Kulenkampff et al.; Kulenkampff et al., 2008; Zakhnini et al., 2013) and have developed detailed correction schemes to bring the images into sharp focus. Thereby it is the appropriate method for experimental verification and calibration of computer simulations of pore-scale transport by means of the observed propagation of a tracer pulse, c_PET(x,y,z,t). In parallel, we aimed at deriving velocity and porosity distributions directly from our concentration time series of fluid flow processes in geomaterials. This would allow us to directly benefit from lab scale observations and to parameterize respective numerical transport models. For this we have developed a robust spatiotemporal (3D+t) parameter extraction algorithm. Here, we will present its functionality, and demonstrate the use of obtained velocity distributions in finite element simulations of reactive transport processes on drill core scale. Kulenkampff, J., Gruendig, M., Zakhnini, A., Gerasch, R., and Lippmann-Pipke, J.: Process tomography of diffusion with PET for evaluating anisotropy and heterogeneity, Clay Minerals, in press. Kulenkampff, J., Gründig, M., Richter, M., and Enzmann, F.: Evaluation of positron emission tomography for visualisation of migration processes in geomaterials, Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, 33, 937-942, 2008. Zakhnini, A., Kulenkampff, J., Sauerzapf, S

  1. Highly reactive light-dependent monoterpenes in the Amazon

    SciTech Connect

    Jardine, A. B.; Jardine, K. J.; Fuentes, J. D.; Martin, S. T.; Martins, G.; Durgante, F.; Carneiro, V.; Higuchi, N.; Manzi, A. O.; Chambers, J. Q.

    2015-03-06

    Despite orders of magnitude difference in atmospheric reactivity and great diversity in biological functioning, little is known about monoterpene speciation in tropical forests. Here we report vertically resolved ambient air mixing ratios for 12 monoterpenes in a central Amazon rainforest including observations of the highly reactive cis-β-ocimene (160 ppt), trans-β-ocimene (79 ppt), and terpinolene (32 ppt) which accounted for an estimated 21% of total monoterpene composition yet 55% of the upper canopy monoterpene ozonolysis rate. All 12 monoterpenes showed a mixing ratio peak in the upper canopy, with three demonstrating subcanopy peaks in 7 of 11 profiles. Leaf level emissions of highly reactive monoterpenes accounted for up to 1.9% of photosynthesis confirming light-dependent emissions across several Amazon tree genera. These results suggest that highly reactive monoterpenes play important antioxidant roles during photosynthesis in plants and serve as near-canopy sources of secondary organic aerosol precursors through atmospheric photooxidation via ozonolysis.

  2. Highly reactive light-dependent monoterpenes in the Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, A. B.; Jardine, K. J.; Fuentes, J. D.; Martin, S. T.; Martins, G.; Durgante, F.; Carneiro, V.; Higuchi, N.; Manzi, A. O.; Chambers, J. Q.

    2015-03-01

    Despite orders of magnitude difference in atmospheric reactivity and great diversity in biological functioning, little is known about monoterpene speciation in tropical forests. Here we report vertically resolved ambient air mixing ratios for 12 monoterpenes in a central Amazon rainforest including observations of the highly reactive cis-β-ocimene (160 ppt), trans-β-ocimene (79 ppt), and terpinolene (32 ppt) which accounted for an estimated 21% of total monoterpene composition yet 55% of the upper canopy monoterpene ozonolysis rate. All 12 monoterpenes showed a mixing ratio peak in the upper canopy, with three demonstrating subcanopy peaks in 7 of 11 profiles. Leaf level emissions of highly reactive monoterpenes accounted for up to 1.9% of photosynthesis confirming light-dependent emissions across several Amazon tree genera. These results suggest that highly reactive monoterpenes play important antioxidant roles during photosynthesis in plants and serve as near-canopy sources of secondary organic aerosol precursors through atmospheric photooxidation via ozonolysis.

  3. Injection of colloidal size particles of Fe{sup 0} in porous media with shearthinning fluids as a method to emplace a permeable reactive zone

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, K.J.; Kaplan, D.I.; Gilmore, T.J.

    1997-12-31

    Previous work has demonstrated the feasibility of injecting suspensions of micron-size zero-valent (FeO) particles into porous media as a method to emplace a permeable reactive zone. Further studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of several shearthinning fluids on enhancing the injectability of micron-size FeO particles into porous media. In contrast to Newtonian fluids, whose viscosities are constant with shear rate, certain non-Newtonian fluids are shearthinning, that is, the viscosity of these fluids decreases with increasing shear rate. The primary benefit of using these fluids for this application is that they increase the viscosity of the aqueous phase without adversely decreasing the hydraulic conductivity. A suspension formulated with a shearthinning fluid will maintain a relatively high viscosity in solution near the FeO particles (where the shear stress is low) relative to locations near the surfaces of the porous media, where the shear stress is high. The increased viscosity decreases the rate of gravitational settling of the dense FeO colloids (7.6 9/cm3) while maintaining a relatively high hydraulic conductivity that permits pumping the colloid suspensions into porous media at greater flowrates and distances. Aqueous solutions of three polymers at different concentrations were investigated. It was determined that, the use of shear thinning fluids greatly increases the injectability of the colloidal FeO suspensions in porous media.

  4. Thermal analysis of a reactive generalized Couette flow of power law fluids between concentric cylindrical pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makinde, O. D.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, the steady generalized axial Couette flow of Ostwald-de Waele power law reactive fluids between concentric cylindrical pipes is investigated. It is assumed that the outer cylinder is stationary and exchanges heat with the ambient surrounding following Newton's law of cooling, while the inner cylinder with isothermal surface is set in motion in the axial direction. The model nonlinear differential equations for the momentum and energy balance are obtained and tackled numerically using the shooting method coupled with the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg integration technique. The effects of various embedded thermophysical parameters on the velocity and temperature fields including skin friction, Nusselt number and thermal criticality conditions are presented graphically and discussed quantitatively.

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid profile and seroprevalence of antiganglioside reactivity in patients with neuralgic amyotrophy.

    PubMed

    Stich, Oliver; Glos, Daniela; Brendle, Marie; Dersch, Rick; Rauer, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    Neuralgic amyotrophy (NA), also known as acute brachial plexitis, is postulated as an autoimmune pathogenesis. In a well-defined cohort of patients with NA, we analyzed the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) profile and the prevalence of antiganglioside antibodies. Patients with Varicella zoster-associated radiculitis and healthy blood donors served as controls. An abnormal routine laboratory CSF profile was found in 29% of those with NA, mostly showing a disruption of the blood-brain barrier. Antibodies predominantly from the immunoglobulin M (IgM) isotype against at least one human ganglioside were detected in 36% of sera from patients with NA but in only 2% of controls. An NA-specific reactivity pattern was not detected, and there was no significant association with clinical or CSF parameters. This suggests that the seroprevalence of antiganglioside autoantibodies in patients with NA is nonspecific. PMID:26757215

  6. Chemical reactivity testing of optical fluids and materials in the DEIMOS spectrographic camera for the Keck II telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilyard, David F.; Laopodis, George K.; Faber, Sandra M.

    1999-09-01

    The DEIMOS Spectrograph Camera contains tow doublets and a triplet. Each group contains materials differing in thermal coefficient expansion, mechanical and optical properties. To mate the elements and at the same time accommodate large camera temperature changes, we will fill the space between with an optical fluid couplant. We selected candidate couplants, lens-support materials, and fluid-constraining materials based on published optical, mechanical and chemical properties. We then tested the chemical reactivity between the coupling fluids, lens-support and fluid- constraining materials. We describe here the test configurations, our criteria for reactivity, and the result for various test durations. We describe our conclusions and final choices for couplant and materials.

  7. Shock compression of condensed matter using multimaterial reactive ghost fluid method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki-hong; Yoh, Jack J.

    2008-04-01

    For the flow analysis of reactive compressible media involving energetic materials and deforming metallic boundaries, a HYDRO-SCCM (shock compression of condensed matter) tool is developed for handling multiphysics shock analysis of energetic and inert matters. The highly energetic flows give rise to the strong nonlinear shock waves and the high strain rate deformation of solid boundaries at high pressure and temperature. For handling the large gradients associated with these complex flows in the condensed phase as well as in the reactive gaseous phase, a new Eulerian multifluid method is formulated. The numerical methodology is described in this paper, while the extended applications and the capacity of the tool are discussed in a separate paper [J. J. Yoh and K. H. Kim, "Shock Compression of Condensed Matter using Eulerian Multimaterial Method: Applications to multi-dimensional shocks, deflagration, detonation, and laser ablation," J. Appl. Phys. (accepted)].

  8. High missing OH reactivity in summertime boreal forest environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nölscher, A. C.; Williams, J.; Sinha, V.; Song, W.; Johnson, A.; Yassaa, N.; Phillips, G.; Crowley, J.; Axinte, R.; Fischer, H.; Gonzales, D.; Valverde-Canossa, J.; Vogel, A.; Hoffmann, T.; Rantala, P.; Rinne, J.; Kulmala, M.; Ouwersloot, H.; Vila, J.; Lelieveld, J.

    2012-04-01

    Forest emissions represent a strong potential sink for the main tropospheric oxidant, the hydroxyl radical (OH). Resulting photochemical products can influence ambient ozone, contribute to particle formation and growth processes, and therefore impact climate and air quality. Direct measurements of total OH reactivity in ambient air can reveal gaps in the general understanding of reactive gaseous emissions from the biosphere to the atmosphere. By comparing the contribution from individually measured compounds to the overall OH sink and the directly measured total OH reactivity, the size of any unaccounted for, or "missing" sink can be deduced. In July and August 2010 an intensive field measurement campaign (HUMPPA-COPEC 2010) was performed at the Finnish boreal forest station SMEAR II in Hyytiälä (Latitude 61° 51' N; Longitude 24° 17' E) to investigate the summertime emissions and photochemistry of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) [1]. Speciated VOCs, the key oxidants OH, O3 and NO3, as well as aerosol, ions and other trace gases were quantified. Total OH reactivity was measured directly using the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) [2]. This total OH reactivity method is an in-situ determination of the total loss rate of OH radicals caused by all reactive species in ambient air. During HUMPPA-COPEC 2010, total OH reactivity was monitored both inside and directly above the canopy. The impact of various parameters such as temperature and light dependent biogenic emissions and reaction products in "normal" and "stressed" conditions, the long-range transport of pollution and the boundary layer height development were characterized. For "normal" boreal conditions a missing reactivity of 58% was determined, whereas for "stressed" boreal conditions this increased to 89 %. Possible explanations are proposed to explain the high missing OH reactivity in summertime boreal forest environment. [1] J. Williams et al, 2011, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11, 10599-10618 [2] V. Sinha et

  9. Comparative studies of serum and synovial fluid C reactive protein concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, I F; Sheldon, J; Riches, P G; Keat, A C

    1987-01-01

    The relation between serum and synovial fluid (SF) C reactive protein (CRP) concentrations was investigated in a variety of arthritides, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis, reactive arthritis, and osteoarthritis. SF CRP levels were significantly reduced compared with serum levels in the inflammatory arthritides, but there was good correlation between serum and SF values. SF CRP values were all at the lower limit of the detectable range in osteoarthritis. In patients with RA or psoriatic arthritis followed up serially through an exacerbation of arthritis, changes in SF CRP reflected closely changes in serum CRP. In patients with RA SF/serum ratios of proteins of different molecular weight were used to derive a regression equation between SF/serum ratio and molecular mass. SF/serum values for CRP were significantly less than predicted from its molecular weight, suggesting that CRP is either being selectively bound in synovium or specifically consumed in SF and may be playing an important part in the inflammatory process in RA. PMID:3120655

  10. Direct numerical simulation of fluid-particle mass, momentum, and heat tranfers in reactive systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammouti, Abdelkader; Wachs, Anthony

    2015-11-01

    Many industrial processes like coal combustion, catalytic cracking, gas phase polymerization reactors and more recently biomass gasification and chemical looping involve two-phase reactive flows in which the continuous phase is a fluid and the dispersed phase consists of rigid particles. Improving both the design and the operating conditions of these processes represents a major scientific and industrial challenge in a context of markedly rising energy cost and sustainable development. Thus, it is above all important to better understand the coupling of hydrodynamic, chemical and thermal phenomena in those flows in order to be able to predict them reliably. The aim of our work is to build up a multi-scale modelling approach of reactive particulate flows and at first to focus on the development of a microscopic-scale including heat and mass transfers and chemical reactions for the prediction of particle-laden flows in dense and dilute regimes. A first step is the upgrading and the validation of our numerical tools via analytical solutions or empirical correlations when it is feasible. These couplings are implemented in a massively parallel numerical code that already enable to take a step towards the enhanced design of semi-industrial processes.

  11. Preferred dialysis fluid for the high-performance membrane.

    PubMed

    Tomo, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of hemodialysis (HD) with high-performance membrane filter (HPM-HD) using acetate-free bicarbonate dialysis (AFD) fluid on bioincompatibility as represented by inflammatory markers in patients undergoing maintenance HD therapy and compared it with conventional acetate-containing bicarbonate dialysis (ACD) fluid. A total of 36 maintenance HD patients were registered for study during the 4-month study period (22 males and 14 females, aged 63.5 ± 10.2 years, mean duration of dialysis 12.2 ± 8.6 years, chronic glomerular nephritis in 27 patients, diabetic nephropathy in 6 patients, and nephrosclerosis in 3 patients). These patients were subjected to ACD for the first 2 months followed by AFD fluid for the latter 2 months. Predialysis blood pH and bicarbonate were examined after each of the first and latter 2-month period. Blood variables of C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) or fetuin-A were also determined. The filters (membrane surface area, raw material), the conditions of HD (blood flow rate, dialysate flow rate, dialysis time, dry weight) and drug regimen including erythrocyte-simulating agent (drug type, dosage) were unchanged throughout the study. There appeared to be significantly higher levels of predialysis blood pH and bicarbonate in the AFD phase than in the ACD phase. Blood CRP and IL-6 levels were significantly decreased in the AFD group as compared with those seen in the ACD group. From these results, it can be suggested that HPM-HD using AFD fluid contributes to correcting metabolic acidosis and alleviating microinflammation in HD patients. PMID:21865775

  12. A reactive transport modelling approach to assess the leaching potential of hydraulic fracturing fluids associated with coal seam gas extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallants, Dirk; Simunek, Jirka; Gerke, Kirill

    2015-04-01

    Coal Seam Gas production generates large volumes of "produced" water that may contain compounds originating from the use of hydraulic fracturing fluids. Such produced water also contains elevated concentrations of naturally occurring inorganic and organic compounds, and usually has a high salinity. Leaching of produced water from storage ponds may occur as a result of flooding or containment failure. Some produced water is used for irrigation of specific crops tolerant to elevated salt levels. These chemicals may potentially contaminate soil, shallow groundwater, and groundwater, as well as receiving surface waters. This paper presents an application of scenario modelling using the reactive transport model for variably-saturated media HP1 (coupled HYDRUS-1D and PHREEQC). We evaluate the fate of hydraulic fracturing chemicals and naturally occurring chemicals in soil as a result of unintentional release from storage ponds or when produced water from Coal Seam Gas operations is used in irrigation practices. We present a review of exposure pathways and relevant hydro-bio-geo-chemical processes, a collation of physico-chemical properties of organic/inorganic contaminants as input to a set of generic simulations of transport and attenuation in variably saturated soil profiles. We demonstrate the ability to model the coupled processes of flow and transport in soil of contaminants associated with hydraulic fracturing fluids and naturally occurring contaminants.

  13. How reactive fluids alter fracture walls and affect shale-matrix accessibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitts, J. P.; Deng, H.; Peters, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Predictions of mass transfer across fracture boundaries and fluid flow in fracture networks provide fundamental inputs into risk and life cycle assessments of geologic energy technologies including oil and gas extraction, geothermal energy systems and geologic CO2 storage. However, major knowledge gaps exist due to the lack of experimental observations of how reactive fluids alter the pore structures and accessible surface area within fracture boundaries that control the mass transfer of organics, metals and salts, and influence fluid flow within the fracture. To investigate the fracture and rock matrix properties governing fracture boundary alteration, we developed a new flow-through cell that enables time-dependent 2D x-ray imaging of mineral dissolution and/or precipitation at a fracture surface. The parallel plate design provides an idealized fracture geometry to investigate the relationship between flow rate, reaction rate, and mineral spatial heterogeneity and variation. In the flow-cell, a carbonate-rich sample of Eagle Ford shale was reacted with acidified brine. The extent and rate of mineral dissolution were correlated with calcite abundance relative to less soluble silicate minerals. Three-dimensional x-ray tomography of the reacted fracture wall shows how calcite dissolution left behind a porous network of silicate minerals. And while this silicate network essentially preserved the location of the initial fracture wall, the pore network structures within the fracture boundary were dramatically altered, such that the accessible surface area of matrix components increased significantly. In a second set of experiments with a limestone specimen, however, the extent of dissolution and retreat of the fracture wall was not strictly correlated with the occurrence of calcite. Instead, the pattern and extent of dissolution suggested secondary causes such as calcite morphology, the presence of argillaceous minerals and other diagenetic features. Our experiments

  14. Fluid hydrogen at high density - Pressure ionization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saumon, Didier; Chabrier, Gilles

    1992-01-01

    The Helmholtz-free-energy model for nonideal mixtures of hydrogen atoms and molecules by Saumon and Chabrier (1991) is extended to describe dissociation and ionization in similar mixtures in chemical equilibrium. A free-energy model is given that describes partial ionization in the pressure and temperature ionization region. The plasma-phase transition predicted by the model is described for hydrogen mixtures including such components as H2, H, H(+), and e(-). The plasma-phase transition has a critical point at Tc = 15,300 K and Pc = 0.614 Mbar, and thermodynamic instability is noted in the pressure-ionization regime. The pressure dissociation and ionization of fluid hydrogen are described well with the model yielding information on the nature of the plasma-phase transition. The model is shown to be valuable for studying dissociation and ionization in astrophysical objects and in high-pressure studies where pressure and temperature effects are significant.

  15. The Diagnostic Value of the Pleural Fluid C-Reactive Protein in Parapneumonic Effusions

    PubMed Central

    Izhakian, Shimon; Wasser, Walter G.; Fox, Benjamin D.; Vainshelboim, Baruch; Kramer, Mordechai R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of pleural C-reactive protein (CRP) biomarker levels in identifying parapneumonic effusions. Methods. A single-center, retrospective review of 244 patients diagnosed with pleural effusions was initiated among patients at the Rabin Medical Center, Petah Tikva, Israel, between January 2011 and December 2013. The patients were categorized into 4 groups according to their type of pleural effusion as follows: heart failure, malignant, post-lung transplantation, and parapneumonic effusion. Results. The pleural CRP levels significantly differentiated the four groups (p < 0.001) with the following means: parapneumonic effusion, 5.38 ± 4.85 mg/dL; lung transplant, 2.77 ± 2.66 mg/dL; malignancy, 1.19 ± 1.51 mg/dL; and heart failure, 0.57 ± 0.81 mg/dL. The pleural fluid CRP cut-off value for differentiating among parapneumonic effusions and the other 3 groups was 1.38 mg/dL. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 84.2%, 71.5%, 37%, and 95%, respectively. A backward logistic regression model selected CRP as the single predictor of parapneumonic effusion (OR = 1.59, 95% CI = 1.37–1.89). Conclusions. Pleural fluid CRP levels can be used to distinguish between parapneumonic effusions and other types of exudative effusions. CRP levels < 0.64 mg/dL are likely to indicate a pleural effusion from congestive heart failure, whereas levels ≥ 1.38 mg/dL are suggestive of an infectious etiology. PMID:27194820

  16. Rotational viscometer for high-pressure high-temperature fluids

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Kenneth R.

    1985-01-01

    The invention is a novel rotational viscometer which is well adapted for use with fluids at high temperatures and/or pressures. In one embodiment, the viscometer includes a substantially non-magnetic tube having a closed end and having an open end in communication with a fluid whose viscosity is to be determined. An annular drive magnet is mounted for rotation about the tube. The tube encompasses and supports a rotatable shaft assembly which carries a rotor, or bob, for insertion in the fluid. Affixed to the shaft are (a) a second magnet which is magnetically coupled to the drive magnet and (b) a third magnet. In a typical operation, the drive magnet is rotated to turn the shaft assembly while the shaft rotor is immersed in the fluid. The viscous drag on the rotor causes the shaft assembly to lag the rotation of the drive magnet by an amount which is a function of the amount of viscous drag. A first magnetic pickup generates a waveform whose phase is a function of the angular position of the drive magnet. A second magnetic pickup generates a waveform whose phase is a function of the angular position of the third magnet. An output is generated indicative of the phase difference between the two waveforms.

  17. Rotational viscometer for high-pressure, high-temperature fluids

    DOEpatents

    Carr, K.R.

    1983-06-06

    The invention is a novel rotational viscometer which is well adapted for use with fluids at high temperatures and/or pressures. In one embodiment, the viscometer include a substantially non-magnetic tube having a closed end and having an open end in communication with a fluid whose viscosity is to be determined. An annular drive magnet is mounted for rotation about the tube. The tube encompasses and supports a rotatable shaft assembly which carries a rotor, or bob, for insertion in the fluid. Affixed to the shaft are (a) a second magnet which is magnetically coupled to the drive magnet and (b) a third magnet. In a typical operation, the drive magnet is rotated to turn the shaft assembly while the shaft rotor is immersed in the fluid. The viscous drag on the rotor causes the shaft assembly to lag the rotation of the drive magnet by an amount which is a function of the amount of viscous drag. A first magnetic pickup generates a waveform whose phase is a function of the angular position of the drive magnet. A second magnetic pickup generates a waveform whose phase is a function of the angular position of the third magnet. Means are provided to generate an output indicative of the phase difference between the two waveforms. The viscometer is comparatively simple, inexpensive, rugged, and does not require shaft seals.

  18. Chalk-calcite-microfluidic experiments: construction and flooding of microsystems with reactive fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuville, Amélie; Thuy Luu, Thi; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Vinningland, Jan Ludvig; Hiorth, Aksel

    2015-04-01

    Direct in situ observation of the pore structure changes that occur when chalk is flooded with brines could resolve many of the open questions that remain about the interactions between mineralogical alterations and oil-liberating mechanisms. Experiments on core scale and field tests that have been carried out the last decade have clearly shown that water chemistry affects the final oil recovery. However, there is generally no consensus in the scientific community of why additional oil is released. In this work, our aim is to focus on in-situ observations of single phase flow and interactions at the pore scale. To do so, we create several types of custom-made microsystems with chalk and calcite crystals. We then do experiments with reacting fluids in these microsystems. During these experiments, we realize in-situ observations (geometrical characteristics, reaction rate) using microsopy techniques (white light vertical/phase shift interferometric microscopy, and classical microscopy), and show how they vary as function as the water chemistry. In simple systems made of calcite, we obtain reactive rates that are coherent with the litterature and with numerical simulations based on Lattice-Boltzmann methods.

  19. The Hazards of Reactive Chemicals in High School Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forlin, Peter

    Chemical reactivity is a major area of risk in high school laboratories. This paper reports on a study that has provided a research-based framework for risk management in Australian chemical education. The chemical practice model of risk management is considered with respect to kinetic factors; catalysts; concentrations and proportions;…

  20. Estimation of the reactive mineral surface area during CO2-rich fluid-rock interaction: the influence of neogenic phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scislewski, A.; Zuddas, P.

    2010-12-01

    Mineral dissolution and precipitation reactions actively participate to control fluid chemistry during water-rock interaction. It is however, difficult to estimate and well normalize bulk reaction rates if the mineral surface area exposed to the aqueous solution and effectively participating on the reactions is unknown. We evaluated the changing of the reactive mineral surface area during the interaction between CO2-rich fluids and Albitite/Granitoid rocks (similar mineralogy but different abundances), reacting under flow-through conditions. Our methodology, adopting an inverse modeling approach, is based on the estimation of dissolution rate and reactive surface area of the different minerals participating in the reactions by the reconstruction the chemical evolution of the interacting fluids. The irreversible mass-transfer processes is defined by a fractional degree of advancement, while calculations were carried out for Albite, Microcline, Biotite and Calcite assuming that the ion activity of dissolved silica and aluminium ions was limited by the equilibrium with quartz and kaolinite. Irrespective of the mineral abundance in granite and albitite, we found that mineral dissolution rates did not change significantly in the investigated range of time where output solution’s pH remained in the range between 6 and 8, indicating that the observed variation in fluid composition depends not on pH but rather on the variation of the parent mineral’s reactive surface area. We found that the reactive surface area of Albite varied by more than 2 orders of magnitude, while Microcline, Calcite and Biotite surface areas changed by 1-2 orders of magnitude. We propose that parent mineral chemical heterogeneity and, particularly, the stability of secondary mineral phases may explain the observed variation of the reactive surface area of the minerals. Formation of coatings at the dissolving parent mineral surfaces significantly reduced the amount of surface available to react

  1. Fluid flow and reactive transport around potential nuclear waste emplacement tunnels at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Spycher, N.F.; Sonnenthal, E.L.; Apps, J.A.

    2002-09-01

    The evolution of fluid chemistry and mineral alteration around a potential waste emplacement tunnel (drift) is evaluated using numerical modeling. The model considers the flow of water, gas, and heat, plus reactions between minerals, CO{sub 2} gas, and aqueous species, and porosity permeability-capillary pressure coupling for a dual permeability (fractures and matrix) medium. Two possible operating temperature modes are investigated: a ''high-temperature'' case with temperatures exceeding the boiling point of water for several hundred years, and a ''low-temperature'' case with temperatures remaining below boiling for the entire life of the repository. In both cases, possible seepage waters are characterized by dilute to moderate salinities and mildly alkaline pH values. These trends in fluid composition and mineral alteration are controlled by various coupled mechanisms. For example, upon heating and boiling, CO{sub 2} exsolution from pore waters raises pH and causes calcite precipitation. In condensation zones, this CO{sub 2} redissolves, resulting in a decrease in pH that causes calcite dissolution and enhances feldspar alteration to clays. Heat also enhances dissolution of wallrock minerals leading to elevated silica concentrations. Amorphous silica precipitates through evaporative concentration caused by boiling in the high-temperature case, but does not precipitate in the low-temperature case. Some alteration of feldspars to clays and zeolites is predicted in the high-temperature case. In both cases, calcite precipitates when percolating waters are heated near the drift. The predicted porosity decrease around drifts in the high-temperature case (several percent of the fracture volume) is larger by at least one order of magnitude than in the low temperature case. Although there are important differences between the two investigated temperature modes in the predicted evolution of fluid compositions and mineral alteration around drifts, these differences are

  2. Fluid flow and reactive transport around potential nuclear waste emplacement tunnels at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

    PubMed

    Spycher, N F; Sonnenthal, E L; Apps, J A

    2003-01-01

    The evolution of fluid chemistry and mineral alteration around a potential waste emplacement tunnel (drift) is evaluated using numerical modeling. The model considers the flow of water, gas, and heat, plus reactions between minerals, CO(2) gas, and aqueous species, and porosity-permeability-capillary pressure coupling for a dual permeability (fractures and matrix) medium. Two possible operating temperature modes are investigated: a "high-temperature" case with temperatures exceeding the boiling point of water for several hundred years, and a "low-temperature" case with temperatures remaining below boiling for the entire life of the repository. In both cases, possible seepage waters are characterized by dilute to moderate salinities and mildly alkaline pH values. These trends in fluid composition and mineral alteration are controlled by various coupled mechanisms. For example, upon heating and boiling, CO(2) exsolution from pore waters raises pH and causes calcite precipitation. In condensation zones, this CO(2) redissolves, resulting in a decrease in pH that causes calcite dissolution and enhances feldspar alteration to clays. Heat also enhances dissolution of wall rock minerals leading to elevated silica concentrations. Amorphous silica precipitates through evaporative concentration caused by boiling in the high-temperature case, but does not precipitate in the low-temperature case. Some alteration of feldspars to clays and zeolites is predicted in the high-temperature case. In both cases, calcite precipitates when percolating waters are heated near the drift. The predicted porosity decrease around drifts in the high-temperature case (several percent of the fracture volume) is larger by at least one order of magnitude than in the low temperature case. Although there are important differences between the two investigated temperature modes in the predicted evolution of fluid compositions and mineral alteration around drifts, these differences are largely within to

  3. Fluid flow and reactive transport around potential nuclear waste emplacement tunnels at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spycher, N. F.; Sonnenthal, E. L.; Apps, J. A.

    2003-05-01

    The evolution of fluid chemistry and mineral alteration around a potential waste emplacement tunnel (drift) is evaluated using numerical modeling. The model considers the flow of water, gas, and heat, plus reactions between minerals, CO 2 gas, and aqueous species, and porosity-permeability-capillary pressure coupling for a dual permeability (fractures and matrix) medium. Two possible operating temperature modes are investigated: a "high-temperature" case with temperatures exceeding the boiling point of water for several hundred years, and a "low-temperature" case with temperatures remaining below boiling for the entire life of the repository. In both cases, possible seepage waters are characterized by dilute to moderate salinities and mildly alkaline pH values. These trends in fluid composition and mineral alteration are controlled by various coupled mechanisms. For example, upon heating and boiling, CO 2 exsolution from pore waters raises pH and causes calcite precipitation. In condensation zones, this CO 2 redissolves, resulting in a decrease in pH that causes calcite dissolution and enhances feldspar alteration to clays. Heat also enhances dissolution of wall rock minerals leading to elevated silica concentrations. Amorphous silica precipitates through evaporative concentration caused by boiling in the high-temperature case, but does not precipitate in the low-temperature case. Some alteration of feldspars to clays and zeolites is predicted in the high-temperature case. In both cases, calcite precipitates when percolating waters are heated near the drift. The predicted porosity decrease around drifts in the high-temperature case (several percent of the fracture volume) is larger by at least one order of magnitude than in the low temperature case. Although there are important differences between the two investigated temperature modes in the predicted evolution of fluid compositions and mineral alteration around drifts, these differences are largely within to the

  4. Free impinging jet microreactors: controlling reactive flows via surface tension and fluid viscoelasticity.

    PubMed

    Erni, Philipp; Elabbadi, Amal

    2013-06-25

    We investigate the use of impinging free liquid jets as wall-free continuous microreactors. The collision of two reactant jets forming a free-standing thin liquid sheet allows us to perform rapid precipitation reactions to form colloidal particles, enhance micromixing, and master challenging reactions with very fast kinetics. To control the shape, size, and hydrodynamics of the impingement zone between the two liquid streams, it is crucial to understand the interplay among surface tension, fluid viscoelasticity, and reaction kinetics. Here, we study these aspects using model fluids, each illustrating a different physical effect of surface and bulk fluid properties. First, solutions of sodium dodecyl sulfate below, near, and above the critical micelle concentration are used to assess the role of static and dynamic surface tension. Second, we demonstrate how dilute solutions of high-molecular-weight polymers can be used to control the morphology of the free surface flow. If properly controlled, these effects can enhance the micromixing time scales to the extent that very rapid reactions can be performed with outstanding selectivity. We quantitatively assess the interplay between the free surface flow and reaction kinetics using parallel-competitive reactions and demonstrate how these results can be used to control the particle size in precipitation processes. PMID:23755870

  5. High quality water base fracturing fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.D.; Chen, G.Y.; Zi, X.X.

    1982-01-01

    A new fracturing fluid is presented that contains partially hydrolyzed polymethylene acrylamide crosslinked with polyvalent metal ions as a thickening and friction reducing agent and persulfate, hydrogen peroxide, perborate or hydragine as a gel breaking agent. This fluid offers a number of advantages over conventional fracturing materials as it is free from any residues and possesses better thickening ability, shear stability, salt resistance, temperature-viscosity properties, etc. The new fluid was successfully used for hydraulic fracturing operations in low-permeable formations. 5 refs.

  6. GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON ADSORPTION AND FLUID-BED REACTIVATION AT MANCHESTER, NEW HAMPSHIRE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Treatment performances of virgin and reactivated GAC were evaluated during three reactivation-exhaustion cycles by measuring total organic carbon (TOC), trihalomethanes (THM), and trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP). GAC adsorptive capacity was measured using traditional t...

  7. Highly reactive light-dependent monoterpenes in the Amazon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jardine, A. B.; Jardine, K. J.; Fuentes, J. D.; Martin, S. T.; Martins, G.; Durgante, F.; Carneiro, V.; Higuchi, N.; Manzi, A. O.; Chambers, J. Q.

    2015-03-06

    Despite orders of magnitude difference in atmospheric reactivity and great diversity in biological functioning, little is known about monoterpene speciation in tropical forests. Here we report vertically resolved ambient air mixing ratios for 12 monoterpenes in a central Amazon rainforest including observations of the highly reactive cis-β-ocimene (160 ppt), trans-β-ocimene (79 ppt), and terpinolene (32 ppt) which accounted for an estimated 21% of total monoterpene composition yet 55% of the upper canopy monoterpene ozonolysis rate. All 12 monoterpenes showed a mixing ratio peak in the upper canopy, with three demonstrating subcanopy peaks in 7 of 11 profiles. Leaf level emissionsmore » of highly reactive monoterpenes accounted for up to 1.9% of photosynthesis confirming light-dependent emissions across several Amazon tree genera. These results suggest that highly reactive monoterpenes play important antioxidant roles during photosynthesis in plants and serve as near-canopy sources of secondary organic aerosol precursors through atmospheric photooxidation via ozonolysis.« less

  8. Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas aftertreatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity

    DOEpatents

    Whealton, John H.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Storey, John M.; Raridon, Richard J.; Armfield, Jeffrey S.; Bigelow, Timothy S.; Graves, Ronald L.

    2002-01-01

    A method for non-thermal plasma aftertreatment of exhaust gases the method comprising the steps of providing short risetime, high frequency, high power bursts of low-duty factor microwaves sufficient to generate a plasma discharge and passing a gas to be treated through the discharge so as to cause dissociative reduction of the exhaust gases and enhanced catalyst reactivity through application of the pulsed microwave fields directly to the catalyst material sufficient to cause a polarizability catastrophe and enhanced heating of the metal crystallite particles of the catalyst, and in the presence or absence of the plasma. The invention also includes a reactor for aftertreatment of exhaust gases.

  9. Pyrite-driven reactive oxygen species formation in simulated lung fluid: implications for coal workers' pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Andrea D; Hylton, Shavonne; Schoonen, Martin A A

    2012-08-01

    The origin of coal worker's pneumoconiosis (CWP) has been long debated. A recent epidemiological study shows a correlation between what is essentially the concentration of pyrite within coal and the prevalence of CWP in miners. Hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical, both reactive oxygen species (ROS), form as byproducts of pyrite oxidative dissolution in air-saturated water. Motivated by the possible importance of ROS in the pathogenesis of CWP, we conducted an experimental study to evaluate if ROS form as byproducts in the oxidative dissolution of pyrite in simulated lung fluid (SLF) under biologically applicable conditions and to determine the persistence of pyrite in SLF. While the rate of pyrite oxidative dissolution in SLF is suppressed by 51% when compared to that in air-saturated water, the initial amount of hydrogen peroxide formed as a byproduct in SLF is nearly doubled. Hydroxyl radical is also formed in the experiments with SLF, but at lower concentrations than in the experiments with water. The formation of these ROS indicates that the reaction mechanism for pyrite oxidative dissolution in SLF is no different from that in water. The elevated hydrogen peroxide concentration in SLF suggests that the decomposition, via the Fenton mechanism to hydroxyl radical or with Fe(III) to form water and molecular oxygen, is initially inhibited by the presence of SLF components. On the basis of the oxidative dissolution rate of pyrite measured in this paper, it is calculated that a respirable two micron pyrite particle will take over 3 years to dissolve completely. PMID:21989857

  10. Reactive Oxygen Species Generation by Lunar Simulants in Simulated Lung Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoonen, M. A.; Kaur, J.; Rickman, D.

    2015-12-01

    The current interest in human exploration of the Moon and other airless planetary bodies has rekindled research into the harmful effects of Lunar dust on human health. Our team has evaluated the spontaneous formation of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS; hydroxyl radicals, superoxide, and hydrogen peroxide) of a suite of lunar simulants when dispersed in deionized water. Of these species, hydroxyl radical reacts almost immediately with any biomolecule leading to oxidative damage. Sustained production of OH radical as a result of mineral exposure can initiate or enhance disease. The results in deionized water indicate that mechanical stress and the absence of molecular oxygen and water, important environmental characteristics of the lunar environment, can lead to enhanced production of ROS in general. On the basis of the results with deionized water, a few of the simulants were selected for additional studies to evaluate the formation of hydrogen peroxide, a precursor of hydroxyl radical in Simulated Lung Fluid. These simulants dispersed in deionized water typically produce a maximum in H2O2 within 10 to 40 minutes. However, experiments in SLF show a slow steady increase in H2O2 concentration that has been documented to continue for as long as 7 hours. Control experiments with one simulant demonstrate that the rise in H2O2 depends on the availability of dissolved O2. We speculate that this continuous rise in oxygenated SLF might be a result of metal ion-mediated oxidation of organic components, such as glycine in SLF. Ion-mediated oxidation essentially allows dissolved molecular oxygen to react with dissolved organic compounds by forming a metal-organic complex. Results of separate experiments with dissolved Fe, Ni, and Cu and speciation calculations support this notion.

  11. High-temperature reactive flow of combustion gases in an expansion turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Godin, T.; Harvey, S.; Stouffs, P.

    1997-07-01

    The analysis of the chemical behavior of the working fluid in gas turbines is usually restricted to the combustion chamber sections. However, the current trend toward higher Turbine Inlet Temperatures (TIT), in order to achieve improved thermal efficiency, will invalidate the assumption of frozen composition of the gases in the first stages of the expansion process. It will become necessary to consider the recombination reactions of the dissociated species, resulting in heat release during expansion. In order to quantify the influence of this reactivity on the performance of high TIT gas turbines, a one-dimensional model of the reactive flow has been developed. Preliminary results were reported in a previous paper. The authors concluded that, in the case of expansion of combustion gases in a subsonic static uncurved distributor nozzle, the residual reactivity must be taken into account above a temperature threshold of around 2,000 K. The present study extend these results by investigating the reactive flow in a complete multistage turbine set, including a transonic first-stage nozzle. A key result of this study is that heat release during the expansion process itself will be considerable in future high-temperature gas turbines, and this will have significant implications for turbine design techniques. Furthermore, they show that, at the turbine exit, the fractions of NO and CO are very different from the values computed at the combustor outlet. In particular, NO production in the early part of the expansion process is very high. Finally, the effects of temperature fluctuations at the turbine inlet are considered. They show that residual chemical reactivity affects the expansion characteristics in gas turbines with TITs comparable to those attained by modern high-performance machines.

  12. High-angle reverse faulting in northern New Brunswick, Canada, and its implications for fluid pressure levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, Richard H.

    The 1982 Miramichi earthquake sequence in northern New Brunswick included four shocks in the magnitude range, 5.7 > m, > 5.0, and extensive aftershock activity. Rupturing occurred within granitic terrain on a pair of NNE—SSW-striking, opposite-facing, high-angle reverse faults which converge at the mainshock focal depth of ≈7 km. It seems probable that the earthquake sequence involved the reactivation under horizontal compression of an existing set of steep normal faults, perhaps derived from Mesozoic rifting of the Atlantic continental margin. The symmetry of the V-shaped profile of faults in WNW—ESE section suggests that the maximum principal compressive stress (σ 1) during reactivation was subhorizontal and the least principal stress (σ 3) was subvertical, so that the reactivation angle between σ 1 and the faults corresponded to the 50-65° dip of the faults. Stress analysis of the conditions for frictional reactivation of existing cohesionless faults shows that pore-fluid pressures approaching or exceeding lithostatic values are required for reshear at such high reactivation angles, with the implication that the earthquake sequence was triggered by locally elevated fluid pressure. While the source and composition of the inferred high pressure fluids are uncertain, a mixed H 2O—CO 2 fluid of mantle origin seems most likely.

  13. Modeling and simulation of pore-scale multiphase fluid flow and reactive transport in fractured and porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meakin, Paul; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2009-07-01

    In the subsurface, fluids play a critical role by transporting dissolved minerals, colloids, and contaminants (sometimes over long distances); by mediating dissolution and precipitation processes; and by enabling chemical transformations in solution and at mineral surfaces. Although the complex geometries of fracture apertures, fracture networks, and pore spaces may make it difficult to accurately predict fluid flow in saturated (single-phase) subsurface systems, well-developed methods are available. The simulation of multiphase fluid flow in the subsurface is much more challenging because of the large density and/or viscosity ratios found in important applications (water/air in the vadose zone; water/oil, water/gas, gas/oil, and water/oil/gas in hydrocarbon reservoirs; water/air/nonaqueous phase liquids (nonaqueous phase liquids/dense nonaqueous phase liquids) in contaminated vadose zone systems; and gas/molten rock in volcanic systems, for example). In addition, the complex behavior of fluid-fluid-solid contact lines and their impact on dynamic contact angles must also be taken into account and coupled with the fluid flow. Here we review the methods that are currently being used to simulate pore-scale multiphase fluid flow and reactive transport in fractured and porous media. After the introduction, the review begins with an overview of the fundamental physics of multiphase fluids flow followed by a more detailed discussion of the complex dynamic behavior of contact lines and contact angles, an important barrier to accurate pore-scale modeling and simulation. The main part of the review focuses on five different approaches: pore network models, lattice gas and lattice Boltzmann methods, Monte Carlo methods, particle methods (molecular dynamics, dissipative particle dynamics, and smoothed particle hydrodynamics), and traditional grid-based computational fluid dynamics coupled with interface tracking and a contact angle model. Finally, the review closes with a

  14. Titanium dioxide nanoswords with highly reactive, photocatalytic facets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosnowchik, Brian D.; Chiamori, Heather C.; Ding, Yong; Ha, Jong-Yoon; Wang, Zhong Lin; Lin, Liwei

    2010-12-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is one of the most widely studied and important materials for catalysis, photovoltaics, and surface science applications, but the ability to consistently control the relative exposure of higher surface energy facets during synthesis remains challenging. Here, we present the repeatable synthesis of highly reactive, rutile {001} or {101} facets on broad, sword-shaped TiO2 nanostructures rapidly synthesized in minutes. Growth occurs along planes of lower surface energy, repeatedly yielding nanostructures with large, high energy facets. The quantitative photocatalytic reactivity of the nanoswords, demonstrated by the photoreduction of silver, is over an order of magnitude higher than reference low energy TiO2{110} substrates. Therefore, the higher surface energy dominated TiO2 nanoswords are ideal structures for characterizing the physicochemical properties of rutile TiO2, and may be used to enhance a variety of catalytic, optical, and clean-technology applications.

  15. Breaker system for high viscosity fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkel, J.J.

    1981-02-10

    A tertiary amine/persulfate breaker system is disclosed which effects complete breaks of polysaccharide based water-gels or fluids in the ambient temperature range. Induction time may be controlled over wide permissible limits. The invention claims improved compositions and methods, particularly advantageously applied to the treatment and stimulation of shallow oil and gas wells (Formation temperatures from about 50 to 125/sup 0/F.).

  16. Breaker system for high viscosity fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkel, J. J.

    1985-12-24

    A tertiary amine/persulfate breaker system is disclosed which effects complete breaks of polysaccharide based water-gels or fluids in the ambient temperature range. Induction time may be controlled over wide permissible limits. The invention claims improved compositions and methods, particularly advantageously applied to the treatment and stimulation of shallow oil and gas wells (formation temperatures from about 50/sup 0/ to 125/sup 0/ F.).

  17. A fully-implicit finite-volume method for multi-fluid reactive and collisional magnetized plasmas on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez Laguna, A.; Lani, A.; Deconinck, H.; Mansour, N. N.; Poedts, S.

    2016-08-01

    We present a Finite Volume scheme for solving Maxwell's equations coupled to magnetized multi-fluid plasma equations for reactive and collisional partially ionized flows on unstructured meshes. The inclusion of the displacement current allows for studying electromagnetic wave propagation in a plasma as well as charge separation effects beyond the standard magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) description, however, it leads to a very stiff system with characteristic velocities ranging from the speed of sound of the fluids up to the speed of light. In order to control the fulfillment of the elliptical constraints of the Maxwell's equations, we use the hyperbolic divergence cleaning method. In this paper, we extend the latter method applying the CIR scheme with scaled numerical diffusion in order to balance those terms with the Maxwell flux vectors. For the fluids, we generalize the AUSM+-up to multiple fluids of different species within the plasma. The fully implicit second-order method is first verified on the Hartmann flow (including comparison with its analytical solution), two ideal MHD cases with strong shocks, namely, Orszag-Tang and the MHD rotor, then validated on a much more challenging case, representing a two-fluid magnetic reconnection under solar chromospheric conditions. For the latter case, a comparison with pioneering results available in literature is provided.

  18. Geochemical Modeling of pH Neutralization of High Alkaline-Saline Waste Fluids in Unsaturated Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G.; Zheng, Z.

    2004-12-01

    Leakage of high alkaline-saline fluids, such as those stored in Hanford, a site of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in Washington State, has raised attention of scientific community. These fluids have unique thermodynamic and physical properties. Chemical components in the fluids are incompletely dissociated, especially those containing divalent or polyvalent ions. A number of laboratory experiments through injecting synthetic high alkaline-saline fluids (up to 10M of sodium nitrate, pH >12) into the sediments sampled from the DOE Hanford site were conducted to study the reactive transport processes of the fluids in subsurface environments. The experimental results observed show that the composition of the high alkaline sodium nitrate fluids can be drastically changed due to fluid-rock interactions, and eventually lead to pH neutralization of the fluid in the plume front. The dominant fluid-rock interactions are cation exchanges (Na+-K+-Ca+2-Mg+2-H+), precipitation of calcium and magnesium minerals, and dissolution of silica. In order to precisely model the reactive transport of these processes, a coupling of the Pitzer's ion-interaction geochemical model and a flow and transport model would be highly needed. The extended existing reactive geochemical transport code, BIO-CORE2Dc, incorporating a comprehensive Pitzer ion-interaction model, is capable of predicting the experimental observations. In addition, the developed model was tested against two reported cases. In both cases, the measured mean ionic activity coefficients were well reproduced by our model, while the Debye-Hückel model, usually used to calculate aqueous species activities in dilute solutions, was unable to predict the experimental data. Finally, modeling study based on our laboratory column experiment was performed. Our simulation is able to capture the observed pH trends, changes in exchangeable cations such as Ca+2, Mg+2, and formation of secondary precipitation phases in the plume front.

  19. High-resolution reactive transport: A coupled parallel hydrogeochemical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beisman, J. J.; Maxwell, R. M.; Steefel, C. I.; Sitchler, A.; Molins, S.

    2013-12-01

    Subsurface hydrogeochemical systems are an especially complex component of the terrestrial environment and play host to a multitude of interactions. Parameterizations of these interactions are perhaps the least understood component of terrestrial systems, presenting uncertainties in the predictive understanding of biogeochemical cycling and transport. Thorough knowledge of biogeochemical transport processes is critical to the quantification of carbon/nutrient fluxes in the subsurface, and to the development of effective contaminant remediation techniques. Here we present a coupled parallel hydrogeochemical model, ParCrunchFlow, as a tool to further our understanding of governing processes and interactions in natural hydrogeochemical systems. ParCrunchFlow is a coupling of the reactive transport simulator CrunchFlow with the hydrologic model ParFlow. CrunchFlow is a multicomponent reactive flow and transport code that can be used to simulate a range of important processes and environments, including reactive contaminant transport, chemical weathering, carbon sequestration, biogeochemical cycling, and water-rock interaction. ParFlow is a parallel, three-dimensional, variably-saturated, coupled surface-subsurface flow and transport code with the ability to simulate complex topography, geology, and heterogeneity. ParCrunchflow takes advantage of the efficient parallelism built into Parflow, allowing the numerical simulation of reactive transport processes in chemically and physically heterogeneous media at high spatial resolutions. This model provides an ability to further examine the interactions and feedbacks between biogeochemical systems and complex subsurface flow fields. In addition to the details of model construction, results will be presented that show floodplain nutrient cycling and the effects of heterogeneity on small-scale mixing reactions at the Department of Energy's Old Rifle Legacy site.

  20. Electrocatalytic Reactivity for Oxygen Reduction of Palladium-Modified Carbon Nanotubes Synthesized in Supercritical Fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yuehe; Cui, Xiaoli; Ye, Xiangrong

    2005-02-02

    The electrocatalytic reactivity of palladium-modified carbon nanotubes (Pd-CNTs) for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) was investigated at the glassy carbon electrode surface in 1 M H2SO4 saturated by oxygen. Carbon nanotubes modified by palladium nanoparticles were synthesized in supercritical carbon dioxide and characterized by transmission electron micrograph. The electrocatalytic activity of the CNTs film and Pd–CNTs film toward oxygen reduction was studied using cyclic voltammetry and linear sweep voltammetry methods. The molecular oxygen reduction at the Pd-CNTs electrode started at a more positive potential than that at the CNTs electrode. A possible reaction mechanism was proposed in which the ORR may proceed through two-step two-electron processes for the Pd-CNTs modified electrode. Experimental results revealed that Pd-CNTs possess a remarkable activity and high stability for oxygen reduction in acid medium, which implies the potential applications of the Pd–CNTs for constructing electrodes of fuel cells.

  1. KIVA reactive hydrodynamics code applied to detonations in high vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, N. Roy

    1989-08-01

    The KIVA reactive hydrodynamics code was adapted for modeling detonation hydrodynamics in a high vacuum. Adiabatic cooling rapidly freezes detonation reactions as a result of free expansion into the vacuum. After further expansion, a molecular beam of the products is admitted without disturbance into a drift tube, where the products are analyzed with a mass spectrometer. How the model is used for interpretation and design of experiments for detonation chemistry is explained. Modeling of experimental hydrodynamic characterization by laser-schlieren imaging and model-aided mapping that will link chemical composition data to particular volume elements in the explosive charge are also discussed.

  2. Flow lasers. [fluid mechanics of high power continuous output operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, W. H.; Russell, D. A.; Hertzberg, A.

    1975-01-01

    The present work reviews the fluid-mechanical aspects of high-power continuous-wave (CW) lasers. The flow characteristics of these devices appear as classical fluid-mechanical phenomena recast in a complicated interactive environment. The fundamentals of high-power lasers are reviewed, followed by a discussion of the N2-CO2 gas dynamic laser. Next, the HF/DF supersonic diffusion laser is described, and finally the CO electrical-discharge laser is discussed.

  3. Long term stability of magnetorheological fluids using high viscosity linear polysiloxane carrier fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Lei; Choi, Young-Tai; Liao, Chang-Rong; Wereley, Norman M.

    2016-07-01

    Stability of magnetorheological fluids (MRFs) or suspensions has been a key issue in the development of various practical applications. In our prior work, it was experimentally confirmed that a high viscosity linear polysiloxane carrier fluid based MRF (hereinafter HVLP MRF) with 26% particle volume fraction (hereinafter 26 vol%) showed high sedimentation stability for 96 days because HVLP carrier fluids have remarkable shear thinning behavior, that is, very high viscosity at low shear rate but low viscosity at high shear rate. In addition, the effects of HVLP carrier fluid viscosity and carbonyl iron (CI) particle concentration on suspension stability were investigated with the objective of synthesizing highly stable HVLP MRFs for practical applications. The HVLP MRFs were synthesized by suspending nominally 32 vol% of CI particles in carrier fluids with different viscosities (i.e., 140, 440, and 800 Pa s). To illustrate the effect of particle concentration on suspension stability, because it is well known that suspension stability increases as particle concentration increases, two low concentrations, 5 and 10 vol%, and two high concentrations, 20 and 32 vol%, were prepared to demonstrate MRFs with relatively severe sedimentation, and stable suspensions, respectively. A vertical axis inductance monitoring system was employed to evaluate the suspension stability of the HVLP MRFs for 365 days by scanning the inductance of the MRF samples in a vertical fluid column, and logging this data with respect to height and time. In addition, the suspension stability of a commercially available MRF (i.e., Lord MRF-132DG) was also measured and compared with similar measurements for HVLP MRFs.

  4. Highly conducting ZnSe films by reactive magnetron sputtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nouhi, A.; Stirn, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an effort to deposit high-conductivity ZnSe on glass and conducting SnO2-coated glass substrates by reactive magnetron sputter deposition, using pure metal sputter targets of Zn and dopants such as In, Ga, and Al. Clear yellow ZnSe films were successfully obtained. By using substrate temperatures as low as 150 C, cosputtered dopants, and sputter parameters and H2Se injection rates which maximize the Zn-to-Se ratio in the films, ZnSe bulk resistivities have been lowered by up to seven orders of magnitude, reaching values as low as 20 ohm cm. The most effective dopant to data has been In, cosputtered with Zn in amounts leading to In atomic concentrations as high as 1.4 percent. Atomic-absorption measurements show an average 49.9/48.9 ratio of Zn to Se.

  5. Numerical Modeling of Coupled Variably-Saturated Fluid Flow and Reactive Transport with Fast and Slow Chemical Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    LI, MING-HSU; SIEGEL, MALCOLM D.; YEH, GOUR-TSYH

    1999-09-20

    The couplings among chemical reaction rates, advective and diffusive transport in fractured media or soils, and changes in hydraulic properties due to precipitation and dissolution within fractures and in rock matrix are important for both nuclear waste disposal and remediation of contaminated sites. This paper describes the development and application of LEHGC2.0, a mechanistically-based numerical model for simulation of coupled fluid flow and reactive chemical transport including both fast and slow reactions invariably saturated media. Theoretical bases and numerical implementations are summarized, and two example problems are demonstrated. The first example deals with the effect of precipitation-dissolution on fluid flow and matrix diffusion in a two-dimensional fractured media. Because of the precipitation and decreased diffusion of solute from the fracture into the matrix, retardation in the fractured medium is not as large as the case wherein interactions between chemical reactions and transport are not considered. The second example focuses on a complicated but realistic advective-dispersive-reactive transport problem. This example exemplifies the need for innovative numerical algorithms to solve problems involving stiff geochemical reactions.

  6. Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas after treatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Whealton, John H.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Storey, John M.; Raridon, Richard J.; Armfield, Jeffrey S.; Bigelow, Timothy S.; Graves, Ronald L.

    2000-07-01

    This patent application describes a method and apparatus of exhaust gas remediation that enhance the reactivity of the material catalysts found within catalytic converters of cars, trucks, and power stations.

  7. How fluids eat their way through rocks: Reactive-transport processes in low-permeability rocks (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluemper, O.

    2013-12-01

    pseudomorphically replaced by a porous product phase, where porosity development is controlled by molar volume changes and relative solubilities of the reagent and product. Porosity development in natural and experimental samples can be evaluated based on three-dimensional reconstructed volumes across reaction interfaces that are coupled with numerical simulations. Fluid-induced mineral reactions may not only produce porosity at the reaction interface during pseudomorphic replacement, but also cause fracturing due to crystal growth. Natural observations of serpentinization/carbonation in mantle rocks indicate that the associated positive solid volume change alone exerts enough stress on the surrounding rock to build up a fracture network and that the influence of external tectonic forces are not required. Through various feedbacks these systems can either become self-sustaining, when an interconnected fracture network is formed, or self-limiting due to fluid pathway obstruction. However, little is known about the positive and negative feedbacks and whether there is a fundamental difference between hydration and carbonation reactions. I will use micro- and nanostructural observations at the reaction-interface scale to provide new insight into this reactive-transport mechanism.

  8. Reactive fluid transport in CO2 reservoir caprocks: constraints from scientific drilling of a natural CO2 reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampman, N.; Bickle, M. J.; Bertier, P.; Busch, A.; Chapman, H.; Evans, J. P.; Graham, C.; Harrington, J.; Maskell, A.

    2013-12-01

    The long-term performance of reservoir caprocks in geological CO2 storage sites remains uncertain due to the poorly constrained nature of field-scale fluid-mineral reaction kinetics and CO2 transport processes in low permeability rocks. Predicting the nature, rates and impacts of CO2 penetration into the caprocks from numerical modelling studies maybe undermined by their reliance on laboratory derived reaction kinetics from short-term experiments, and the complexity of the coupled reactive transport processes at the nano- and micro-scale. We report here on the early results from scientific drilling and laboratory analysis of the caprocks of a stacked sequence of natural CO2 reservoir at Green River, Utah. In summer 2012, diamond drilling to a depth of 325m, adjacent to a CO2 degassing normal fault recovered core from two major CO2 reservoirs in the Entrada and Navajo Sandstones and from the intervening Carmel Formation regional caprock. In-situ pH, CO2 concentrations and fluid element and isotope geochemistry were determined from wireline downhole sampling of pressurized fluids from the reservoirs. The fluid geochemistry provides important constraints on reservoir filling by flow of CO2-charged brines through the fault damage zone, macro-scale fluid flow in the reservoirs and the state of fluid-mineral thermodynamic disequilibrium from which the nature of the fluid-mineral reactions can be interpreted. Mineralogical, geochemical and petrophysical profiles through portions of the caprocks in contact with the CO2-charged reservoirs have been used to constrain the nature and penetration depths of the CO2-promoted fluid-mineral reaction fronts. The major reactions are the dissolution of diagenetic dolomite cements and hematite grain coatings which generate porosity in the caprocks. Analysis of the generated pore structure from a variety of analytical techniques will be discussed. Stable C- and O-isotopic shifts in the composition of the carbonate cements record their

  9. Evaluation of high-pressure drilling fluid supply systems

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, M.C.; Reichman, J.M.; Theimer, K.J.

    1981-10-01

    A study was undertaken to help determine the technical and economic feasibility of developing a high-pressure fluid-jet drilling system for the production of geothermal wells. Three system concepts were developed and analyzed in terms of costs, component availability, and required new-component development. These concepts included a single-conduit system that supplies the downhole cutting nozzles directly via surface-located high-pressure pumps; a single-conduit system utilizing low-pressure surface pumps to supply and operate a high-pressure downhole pump, which in turn supplies the cutting nozzles; and a dual-conduit system supplying surface-generated high-pressure fluid for cutting via one conduit and low-pressure scavenging fluid via the other. It is concluded that the single-conduit downhole pump system concept has the greatest potential for success in this application. 28 figures, 11 tables.

  10. Reactive fluid flow models and applications to diagenesis, mineral deposits and crustal rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Lasaga, A.C.; Rye, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    This project is obtaining new results and developing new techniques along three directions: (a) experimental studies of water-rock reactions (b) theoretical modeling of coupled fluid flow-chemical reactions and (c) isotopic measurements of both regional isotopic compositions as well as isotopic zoning within individual mineral grains. An important part of the project is the integration of all three approaches into a concerted effort aimed at new understanding of the behavior of fluids and their chemical reactions with minerals in the crust. The experimental work pioneered in our laboratories has produced several startling results on the kinetic rate laws of silicate-water reactions. The approach to equilibrium has been shown to follow a non-linear path in rate constant-free energy space. This behavior is quite distinct from most work done by geochemists on modeling silicate behavior in diagenesis, weathering, hydrothermal systems or environmental models. The work to date has involved albite, kaolinite and gibbsite, which together with silica would comprise a kinetic granite system prototype''. The theoretical modeling has produced a state-of-the-art computer code that can efficiently handle dozens of chemical species, many mineral reactions and variations of fluid flow properties and temperature in both one and two dimensions. In addition the code can now treat oxidation-reduction reactions and isotopic exchange between fluids and minerals. The main thrust of the theoretical modeling has been to develop further the differences between equilibrium, steady state, and non-steady-state behavior of the chemical evolution of open fluid-rock systems. These differences have not been fully appreciated in previous models.

  11. Reactive fluid flow models and applications to diagenesis, mineral deposits and crustal rocks. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Lasaga, A.C.; Rye, D.M.

    1992-10-01

    This project is obtaining new results and developing new techniques along three directions: (a) experimental studies of water-rock reactions (b) theoretical modeling of coupled fluid flow-chemical reactions and (c) isotopic measurements of both regional isotopic compositions as well as isotopic zoning within individual mineral grains. An important part of the project is the integration of all three approaches into a concerted effort aimed at new understanding of the behavior of fluids and their chemical reactions with minerals in the crust. The experimental work pioneered in our laboratories has produced several startling results on the kinetic rate laws of silicate-water reactions. The approach to equilibrium has been shown to follow a non-linear path in rate constant-free energy space. This behavior is quite distinct from most work done by geochemists on modeling silicate behavior in diagenesis, weathering, hydrothermal systems or environmental models. The work to date has involved albite, kaolinite and gibbsite, which together with silica would comprise a kinetic ``granite system prototype``. The theoretical modeling has produced a state-of-the-art computer code that can efficiently handle dozens of chemical species, many mineral reactions and variations of fluid flow properties and temperature in both one and two dimensions. In addition the code can now treat oxidation-reduction reactions and isotopic exchange between fluids and minerals. The main thrust of the theoretical modeling has been to develop further the differences between equilibrium, steady state, and non-steady-state behavior of the chemical evolution of open fluid-rock systems. These differences have not been fully appreciated in previous models.

  12. Mixing of two miscible fluids at high Schmidt number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Mark; Alberini, Federico; Pain, Christopher; Matar, Omar

    2013-11-01

    The blending of two miscible liquids at high Schmidt number is an increasingly common industrial problem: as processes push towards shorter timescales yet the rheology of the fluids becomes increasingly complex. This leads to phenomena which resemble a quasi two-phase system with zero interfacial tension. In this study, we compare experimental results with computational fluid dynamics simulations using unstructured-mesh adaptivity for the flow of two Newtonian, or two power-law fluids through a complex geometry representative of a Kenics type static mixer used in industry. The geometry induces a stretching and folding of the fluid elements which causes exponential growth of the interface length down the geometry. The interfacial topology obtained from the simulations is compared with experiments carried out using Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF), which enables the spatial distribution of each phase, and the interfaces between them, to be determined at the outlet of the geometry. EPSRC Programme Grant EP/K003976/1.

  13. Moving Overlapping Grids with Adaptive Mesh Refinement for High-Speed Reactive and Non-reactive Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Henshaw, W D; Schwendeman, D W

    2005-08-30

    We consider the solution of the reactive and non-reactive Euler equations on two-dimensional domains that evolve in time. The domains are discretized using moving overlapping grids. In a typical grid construction, boundary-fitted grids are used to represent moving boundaries, and these grids overlap with stationary background Cartesian grids. Block-structured adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is used to resolve fine-scale features in the flow such as shocks and detonations. Refinement grids are added to base-level grids according to an estimate of the error, and these refinement grids move with their corresponding base-level grids. The numerical approximation of the governing equations takes place in the parameter space of each component grid which is defined by a mapping from (fixed) parameter space to (moving) physical space. The mapped equations are solved numerically using a second-order extension of Godunov's method. The stiff source term in the reactive case is handled using a Runge-Kutta error-control scheme. We consider cases when the boundaries move according to a prescribed function of time and when the boundaries of embedded bodies move according to the surface stress exerted by the fluid. In the latter case, the Newton-Euler equations describe the motion of the center of mass of the each body and the rotation about it, and these equations are integrated numerically using a second-order predictor-corrector scheme. Numerical boundary conditions at slip walls are described, and numerical results are presented for both reactive and non-reactive flows in order to demonstrate the use and accuracy of the numerical approach.

  14. High-speed cylindrical collapse of two perfect fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Ahmad, Zahid

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, the study of the gravitational collapse of cylindrically distributed two perfect fluid system has been carried out. It is assumed that the collapsing speeds of the two fluids are very large. We explore this condition by using the high-speed approximation scheme. There arise two cases, i.e., bounded and vanishing of the ratios of the pressures with densities of two fluids given by c s , d s . It is shown that the high-speed approximation scheme breaks down by non-zero pressures p 1, p 2 when c s , d s are bounded below by some positive constants. The failure of the high-speed approximation scheme at some particular time of the gravitational collapse suggests the uncertainty on the evolution at and after this time. In the bounded case, the naked singularity formation seems to be impossible for the cylindrical two perfect fluids. For the vanishing case, if a linear equation of state is used, the high-speed collapse does not break down by the effects of the pressures and consequently a naked singularity forms. This work provides the generalisation of the results already given by Nakao and Morisawa (Prog Theor Phys 113:73, 2005) for the perfect fluid.

  15. Novel high refractive index fluids for 193nm immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillan, Julius; Otoguro, Akihiko; Itani, Toshiro; Fujii, Kiyoshi; Kagayama, Akifumi; Nakano, Takashi; Nakayama, Norio; Tamatani, Hiroaki; Fukuda, Shin

    2006-03-01

    Despite the early skepticism towards the use of 193-nm immersion lithography as the next step in satisfying Moore's law, it continuous to meet expectations on its feasibility in achieving 65-nm nodes and possibly beyond. And with implementation underway, interest in extending its capability for smaller pattern sizes such as the 32-nm node continues to grow. In this paper, we will discuss the optical, physical and lithographic properties of newly developed high index fluids of low absorption coefficient, 'Babylon' and 'Delphi'. As evaluated in a spectroscopic ellipsometer in the 193.39nm wavelength, the 'Babylon' and 'Delphi' high index fluids were evaluated to have a refractive index of 1.64 and 1.63 with an absorption coefficient of 0.05/cm and 0.08/cm, respectively. Lithographic evaluation results using a 193-nm 2-beam interferometric exposure tool show the imaging capability of both high index fluids to be 32-nm half pitch lines and spaces.

  16. Using toughreact to model reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport in hydrothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

    2003-07-31

    The interaction between hydrothermal fluids and the rocks through which they migrate alters the earlier formed primary minerals and leads to the formation of secondary minerals, resulting in changes in the physical and chemical properties of the system. We have developed a comprehensive numerical simulator, TOUGHREACT, which considers nonisothermal multi-component chemical transport in both liquid and gas phases. A variety of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes is considered under a wide range of conditions of pressure, temperature, water saturation, and ionic strength. The code can be applied to problems in fundamental analysis of the hydrothermal systems and in the exploration of geothermal reservoirs including chemical evolution, mineral alteration, mineral scaling, changes of porosity and permeability, and mineral recovery from geothermal fluids.

  17. Reactive Fluid Flow and Applications to Diagenesis, Mineral Deposits, and Crustal Rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Rye, Danny M.; Bolton, Edward W.

    2002-11-04

    The objective is to initiate new: modeling of coupled fluid flow and chemical reactions of geologic environments; experimental and theoretical studies of water-rock reactions; collection and interpretation of stable isotopic and geochemical field data at many spatial scales of systems involving fluid flow and reaction in environments ranging from soils to metamorphic rocks. Theoretical modeling of coupled fluid flow and chemical reactions, involving kinetics, has been employed to understand the differences between equilibrium, steady-state, and non-steady-state behavior of the chemical evolution of open fluid-rock systems. The numerical codes developed in this project treat multi-component, finite-rate reactions combined with advective and dispersive transport in multi-dimensions. The codes incorporate heat, mass, and isotopic transfer in both porous and fractured media. Experimental work has obtained the kinetic rate laws of pertinent silicate-water reactions and the rates of Sr release during chemical weathering. Ab-initio quantum mechanical techniques have been applied to obtain the kinetics and mechanisms of silicate surface reactions and isotopic exchange between water and dissolved species. Geochemical field-based studies were carried out on the Wepawaug metamorphic schist, on the Irish base-metal sediment-hosted ore system, in the Dalradian metamorphic complex in Scotland, and on weathering in the Columbia River flood basalts. The geochemical and isotopic field data, and the experimental and theoretical rate data, were used as constraints on the numerical models and to determine the length and time scales relevant to each of the field areas.

  18. Reactive fluid flow models and applications to diagenesis, mineral deposits and crustal rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Lasaga, A.C.; Rye, D.M.

    1993-08-01

    Funds are requested for a combined theoretical and field study of coupled fluid flow, heat and mass transport, and chemical reaction in hydrothermal and metamorphic systems. An existing computer code developed by the applicants which numerically treats multi-component, finite-rate reactions combined with advective and dispersive transport in one and two dimensions and which incorporates isotopic exchange and heat and mass transfer will continue to be developed and applied in a variety of geological settings. The code we have developed simultaneously solves for mass transport and reaction, thus offering a significant improvement in computational efficiency over existing ``batch`` reaction path codes. By coupling flow and chemical reaction in a hydrothermal system, we can explicitly investigate the extent to which characteristic flow-reaction paths govern the chemical evolution of the fluids in a hydrothermal system. The concept of a flow-reaction path is particularly important where certain portions of mature hydrothermal systems may exhaust the buffer capacity of the rock as the primary mineralogy is consumed. In these instances 7 fluids traversing distinct regions within the hydrothermal system may experience very different reaction histories, even where the system can be described as nearly isothermal. The study of paleo-hydrothermal systems can yield some important insights into the chemical dynamics of hydrothermal systems in general. As an example of a paleo-hydrothermal system, we have considered the geochemical evolution of ``porphyry-copper`` type mineralization.

  19. High Density Thermal Energy Storage with Supercritical Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganapathi, Gani B.; Wirz, Richard

    2012-01-01

    A novel approach to storing thermal energy with supercritical fluids is being investigated, which if successful, promises to transform the way thermal energy is captured and utilized. The use of supercritical fluids allows cost-affordable high-density storage with a combination of latent heat and sensible heat in the two-phase as well as the supercritical state. This technology will enhance penetration of several thermal power generation applications and high temperature water for commercial use if the overall cost of the technology can be demonstrated to be lower than the current state-of-the-art molten salt using sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate eutectic mixtures.

  20. Highly reactive electrophilic oxidants in cytochrome P450 catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomb, Martin . E-mail: men@uic.edu; Chandrasena, R. Esala P.

    2005-12-09

    The cytochrome P450 enzymes effect a wide range of oxidations in nature including difficult hydroxylation reactions of unactivated C-H. Most of the high energy reactions of these catalysts appear to involve highly electrophilic active species. Attempts to detect the reactive transients in the enzymes have met with limited success, but evidence has accumulated that two distinct electrophilic oxidants are produced in the P450 enzymes. The consensus electrophilic oxidant termed 'iron-oxo' is usually thought to be an analogue of Compound I, an iron(IV)-oxo porphyrin radical cation species, but it is possible that a higher energy electronic isomer of Compound I is required to account for the facility of the C-H oxidation reactions. The second electrophilic oxidant of P450 is speculative; circumstantial evidence suggests that this species is iron-complexed hydrogen peroxide, but this oxidant might be a second spin state of iron-oxo. This overview discusses recent studies directed at detection of the electrophilic oxidants in P450 enzymes and the accumulated evidence for two distinct species.

  1. Synovial Fluid C-reactive Protein as a Diagnostic Marker for Periprosthetic Joint Infection: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chi; Wang, Qi; Li, Rui; Duan, Jin-Yan; Wang, Cheng-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is the main cause of failure following total joint arthroplasty. Until now, the diagnosis of PJI is still confronted with technical limitations, and the question of whether synovial fluid biomarker, C-reactive protein (CRP), can provide high value in the diagnosis of PJI remains unanswered and, therefore, was the aim of the study. Methods: First, we conducted a systematic review on CRP in the diagnosis of PJI by searching online databases using keywords such as “periprosthetic joint infection”, “synovial fluid”, and “C-reactive protein”. Eligible studies providing sufficient data to construct 2 × 2 contingency tables were then selected based on the list of criteria and the quality of included studies was assessed subsequently. Finally, the reported sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curve, and the area under the SROC (AUSROC) were pooled together and used to evaluate overall diagnostic performance. Results: Seven studies were included in our review, six of which comprising a total of 456 participants were further investigated in our meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, and DOR were 0.92 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.86–0.96), 0.90 (95% CI: 0.87–0.93), and 101.40 (95% CI: 48.07–213.93), respectively. The AUSROC was 0.9663 (standard error, 0.0113). Conclusions: Synovial fluid CRP is a good biomarker for the diagnosis of PJI with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:27503025

  2. Calculating Mass Diffusion in High-Pressure Binary Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth

    2004-01-01

    A comprehensive mathematical model of mass diffusion has been developed for binary fluids at high pressures, including critical and supercritical pressures. Heretofore, diverse expressions, valid for limited parameter ranges, have been used to correlate high-pressure binary mass-diffusion-coefficient data. This model will likely be especially useful in the computational simulation and analysis of combustion phenomena in diesel engines, gas turbines, and liquid rocket engines, wherein mass diffusion at high pressure plays a major role.

  3. Coupled processes of fluid flow, solute transport, and geochemical reactions in reactive barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jeongkon; Schwartz, Franklin W.; Xu, Tianfu; Choi, Heechul, and Kim, In S.

    2004-01-02

    A complex pattern of coupling between fluid flow and mass transport develops when heterogeneous reactions occur. For instance, dissolution and precipitation reactions can change a porous medium's physical properties, such as pore geometry and thus permeability. These changes influence fluid flow, which in turn impacts the composition of dissolved constituents and the solid phases, and the rate and direction of advective transport. Two-dimensional modeling studies using TOUGHREACT were conducted to investigate the coupling between flow and transport developed as a consequence of differences in density, dissolution precipitation, and medium heterogeneity. The model includes equilibrium reactions for aqueous species, kinetic reactions between the solid phases and aqueous constituents, and full coupling of porosity and permeability changes resulting from precipitation and dissolution reactions in porous media. In addition, a new permeability relationship is implemented in TOUGHREACT to examine the effects of geochemical reactions and density difference on plume migration in porous media. Generally, the evolutions in the concentrations of the aqueous phase are intimately related to the reaction-front dynamics. Plugging of the medium contributed to significant transients in patterns of flow and mass transport.

  4. Coupled reactive mass transport and fluid flow: Issues in model verification

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Ibaraki, Motomu

    2003-01-03

    Model verification and validation are both important steps in the development of reactive transport models. In this paper, a distinction is made between verification and validation, and the focus is on codifying the issues of verification for a numerical, reactive transport flow model. First, the conceptual basis of model verification is reviewed, which shows that verification should be understood as a first step in model development, and be followed by a protocol that assures that the model accurately represents system behavior. Second, commonly used procedures and methods of model verification are presented. In the third part of this paper, an intercomparison of models is used to demonstrate that model verification can be performed despite differences in hydrogeochemical transport code formulations. Results of an example simulation of transport are presented in which the numerical model is tested against other hydrogeochemical codes. Different kinetic formulations between solid and aqueous phases used among numerical models complicates model verification. This test problem involves uranium transport under conditions of varying pH and oxidation potential, with reversible precipitation of calcium uranate and coffinite. Results between the different hydrogeochemical transport codes show differences in oxidation potentials, but similarities in mineral assemblages and aqueous transport patterns. Because model verification can be further complicated by differences in the approach for solving redox problems, a comparison of a fugacity approach to both the external approach (based on hypothetical electron activity) and effective internal approach (based on conservation of electrons) is performed. The comparison demonstrates that the oxygen fugacity approach produces different redox potentials and mineral assemblages than both the effective internal and external approaches.

  5. High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-12-01

    The University of California, Los Angeles, the University of California, Berkeley, and Yale University is one of the 2012 SunShot CSP R&D awardees for their Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI): High Operating Temperature (HOT) Fluids. This fact sheet explains the motivation, description, and impact of the project.

  6. High rate reactive sputtering of MoN(x) coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudnik, Paul J.; Graham, Michael E.; Sproul, William D.

    1991-01-01

    High rate reactive sputtering of MoN(x) films was performed using feedback control of the nitorgen partial pressure. Coatings were made at four different target powers: 2.5, 5.0, 7.5 and 10 kW. No hysteresis was observed in the nitrogen partial pressure vs. flow plot, as is typically seen for the Ti-N system. Four phases were determined by X-ray diffraction: molybdenum, Mo-N solid solution, Beta-Mo2N and gamma-Mo2N. The hardness of the coatings depended upon composition, substrate bias, and target power. The phases present in the hardest films differed depending upon deposition parameters. For example, the Beta-Mo2N phase was hardest (load 25 gf) at 5.0 kW with a value of 3200 kgf/sq mm, whereas the hardest coatings at 10 kW were the gamma-Mo2N phase (3000 kgf/sq mm). The deposition rate generally decreased with increasing nitrogen partial pressure, but there was a range of partial pressures where the rate was relatively constant. At a target power of 5.0 kW, for example, the deposition rates were 3300 A/min for a N2 partial pressure of 0.05 - 1.0 mTorr.

  7. Strategies for the analysis of highly reactive pinacolboronate esters.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Qiqing; Ngim, Kenley K; Sun, Megan; Li, Jane; Deese, Alan; Chetwyn, Nik P

    2012-03-16

    Pinacolboronate esters (or boronic acid, pinacol esters) are widely used in the Suzuki coupling reaction to connect organic building blocks for the total synthesis of complex molecules. The 2-aminopyrimidine-5-pinacolboronate ester was used as a starting material in the synthesis of a development compound, necessitating a chromatographic purity method to assess its quality. This aryl pinacolboronate ester posed unique analytical challenges due to its facile hydrolysis to the corresponding boronic acid, which is nonvolatile and poorly soluble in organic solvents. This made GC and normal-phase HPLC analysis unsuitable. In reversed-phase mode, typical sample preparation and analysis conditions promoted rapid sample degradation to the boronic acid. To overcome these challenges, unconventional approaches were necessary in order to stabilize 2-aminopyrimidine-5-pinacolboronate ester, adequately solubilize its boronic acid, and produce acceptable separation and retention. The final method employed non-aqueous and aprotic diluent, and a reversed-phase separation using highly basic mobile phases (pH 12.4) with an ion pairing reagent. These strategies were successfully applied to several other reactive pinacolboronate esters for purity analysis, demonstrating broad applicability to this unique class of compounds. PMID:22321949

  8. Physical activity and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Plaisance, Eric P; Grandjean, Peter W

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains one of the leading causes of death and disability in developed countries around the world despite the documented success of lifestyle and pharmacological interventions. This illustrates the multifactorial nature of atherosclerosis and the use of novel inflammatory markers as an adjunct to risk factor reduction strategies. As evidence continues to accumulate that inflammation is involved in all stages of the development and progression of atherosclerosis, markers of inflammation such as high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) may provide additional information regarding the biological status of the atherosclerotic lesion. Recent investigations suggest that physical activity reduces CRP levels. Higher levels of physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness are consistently associated with 6-35% lower CRP levels. Longitudinal training studies that have demonstrated reductions in CRP concentrations range from 16% to 41%, an effect that may be independent of baseline levels of CRP, body composition or weight loss. The average change in CRP associated with physical activity appears to be at least as good, if not better, than currently prescribed pharmacological interventions in similar populations. The primary purpose of this review will be to present evidence from both cross-sectional and longitudinal investigations that physical activity lowers CRP levels in a dose-response manner. Finally, this review will examine factors such as body composition, sex, blood sample timing, diet and smoking, which may influence the CRP response to physical activity. PMID:16646631

  9. Low Dissipative High Order Numerical Simulations of Supersonic Reactive Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sjoegreen, B.; Yee, H. C.; Mansour, Nagi (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate the performance of a newly developed low dissipative sixth-order spatial and fourth-order temporal scheme for viscous reactive flows interacting with shock waves that contain fine scale flow structures. The accuracy and efficiency of the scheme, and to what degree the scheme can capture the correct physical wave speeds of stiff reactive flows will be included.

  10. Deployable Emergency Shutoff Device Blocks High-Velocity Fluid Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nabors, Sammy A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a device and method for blocking the flow of fluid from an open pipe. Motivated by the sea-bed oil-drilling catastrophe in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010, NASA innovators designed the device to plug, control, and meter the flow of gases and liquids. Anchored with friction fittings, spikes, or explosively activated fasteners, the device is well-suited for harsh environments and high fluid velocities and pressures. With the addition of instrumentation, it can also be used as a variable area flow metering valve that can be set based upon flow conditions. With robotic additions, this patent-pending innovation can be configured to crawl into a pipe then anchor and activate itself to block or control fluid flow.

  11. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry determination of selected synthetic cathinones and two piperazines in oral fluid. Cross reactivity study with an on-site immunoassay device.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Ana; Lendoiro, Elena; Fernández-Vega, Hadriana; Steinmeyer, Stefan; López-Rivadulla, Manuel; Cruz, Angelines

    2014-12-29

    Since the past few years, several synthetic cathinones and piperazines have been introduced into the drug market to substitute illegal stimulant drugs such as amphetamine and derivatives or cocaine due to their unregulated situation. These emerging drugs are not usually included in routine toxicological analysis. We developed and validated a LC-MS/MS method for the determination of methedrone, methylone, mephedrone, 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), fluoromethcathinone, fluoromethamphetamine, 1-(3-chlorophenyl)piperazine (mCPP) and 3-trifluoromethylphenylpiperazine (TFMPP) in oral fluid. Sample extraction was performed using Strata X cartridges. Chromatographic separation was achieved in 10min using an Atlantis(®) T3 column (100mm×2.1mm, 3μm), and formic acid 0.1% and acetonitrile as mobile phase. The method was satisfactorily validated, including selectivity, linearity (0.2-0.5 to 200ng/mL), limits of detection (0.025-0.1ng/mL) and quantification (0.2-0.5ng/mL), imprecision and accuracy in neat oral fluid (%CV=0.0-12.7% and 84.8-103.6% of target concentration, respectively) and in oral fluid mixed with Quantisal™ buffer (%CV=7.2-10.3% and 80.2-106.5% of target concentration, respectively), matrix effect in neat oral fluid (-11.6 to 399.7%) and in oral fluid with Quantisal™ buffer (-69.9 to 131.2%), extraction recovery (87.9-134.3%) and recovery from the Quantisal™ (79.6-107.7%), dilution integrity (75-99% of target concentration) and stability at different conditions (-14.8 to 30.8% loss). In addition, cross reactivity produced by the studied synthetic cathinones in oral fluid using the Dräger DrugTest 5000 was assessed. All the analytes produced a methamphetamine positive result at high concentrations (100 or 10μg/mL), and fluoromethamphetamine also at low concentration (0.075μg/mL). PMID:25482853

  12. Assessment of reactivity transient experiments with high burnup fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Ozer, O.; Yang, R.L.; Rashid, Y.R.; Montgomery, R.O.

    1996-03-01

    A few recent experiments aimed at determining the response of high-burnup LWR fuel during a reactivity initiated accident (RIA) have raised concerns that existing failure criteria may be inappropriate for such fuel. In particular, three experiments (SPERT CDC-859, NSRR HBO-1 and CABRI REP Na-1) appear to have resulted in fuel failures at only a fraction of the anticipated enthalpy levels. In evaluating the results of such RIA simulation experiments, however, it is necessary that the following two key considerations be taken into account: (1) Are the experiments representative of conditions that LWR fuel would experience during an in-reactor RIA event? (2) Is the fuel that is being utilized in the tests representative of the present (or anticipated) population of LWR fuel? Conducting experiments under conditions that can not occur in-reactor can trigger response modes that could not take place during in-reactor operation. Similarly, using unrepresentative fuel samples for the tests will produce failure information that is of limited relevance to commercial LWR fuel. This is particularly important for high-burnup fuel since the manner under which the test samples are base-irradiated prior to the test will impact the mechanical properties of the cladding and will therefore affect the RIA response. A good example of this effect can be seen in the results of the SPERT CDC-859 test and in the NSRR JM-4 and JM-5 tests. The conditions under which the fuel used for these tests was fabricated and/or base-irradiated prior to the RIA pulse resulted in the formation of multiple cladding defects in the form of hydride blisters. When this fuel was subjected to the RIA power pulse, it failed by developing multiple cracks that were closely correlated with the locations of the pre-existing hydride blisters. In the case of the JM tests, many of the cracks formed within the blisters themselves and did not propagate beyond the heavily hydrided regions.

  13. High-angle reverse faults, fluid-pressure cycling, and mesothermal gold-quartz deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, Richard H.; Robert, Francois; Poulsen, K. Howard

    1988-06-01

    Many mesothermal gold-quartz deposits are localized along high-angle reverse or reverse-oblique shear zones within greenstone belt terrains. Characteristically, these fault-hosted vein deposits exhibit a mixed "brittle-ductile" style of deformation (discrete shears and vein fractures as well as a schistose shear-zone fabric) developed under greenschist facies metamorphic conditions. Many of the vein systems are of considerable vertical extent (>2 km); they include steeply dipping fault veins (lenticular veins subparallel to the shear-zone schistosity) and, in some cases, associated flats (subhorizontal extensional veins). Textures of both vein sets record histories of incremental deposition. We infer that the vein sets developed near the roofs of active metamorphic/magmatic systems and represent the roots of brittle, high-angle reverse fault systems extending upward through the seismogenic regime. Friction theory and field relations suggest that the high-angle reverse faults acted as valves, promoting cyclic fluctuations in fluid pressure from supralithostatic to hydrostatic values. Because of their unfavorable orientation in the prevailing stress field, reactivation of the faults could only occur when fluid pressure exceeded the lithostatic load. Seismogenic fault failure then created fracture permeability within the rupture zone, allowing sudden draining of the geopressured reservoir at depth. Incremental opening of flats is attributed to the prefailure stage of supralithostatic fluid pressures; deposition within fault veins is attributed to the immediate postfailure discharge phase. Hydrothermal self-sealing leads to reaccumulation of fluid pressure and a repetition of the cycle. Mutual crosscutting relations between the two vein sets are a natural consequence of the cyclicity of the process. Abrupt fluid-pressure fluctuations from this fault-valve behavior of reverse faults seem likely to be integral to the mineralizing process at this

  14. High reactivity of ancient permafrost carbon upon hydrological release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonk, J. E.; Mann, P. J.; Davydov, S.; Davydova, A.; Sobczak, W. V.; Schade, J.; Bulygina, E.; Zimov, S.; Spencer, R. G. M.; Eglinton, T. I.; Holmes, R. M.

    2012-04-01

    Half of the global stock of soil organic carbon (OC) is stored in Arctic permafrost. About one third of this pool consists of so-called yedoma, organic-rich deposits that were formed during the Pleistocene. Previous studies show rapid respiration of yedoma upon thawing, with the potential release of large quantities of relict OC into the contemporary C cycle. The fluvial and coastal reactivity and fate of this OC, however, remain unclear. Duvannyi Yar is a well-studied yedoma exposure on the banks of Kolyma River in Northeastern Siberia. It can serve as a model for the >7000 km long East Siberian Arctic coastline that is dominated by similarly exposed yedoma cliffs, and is increasingly vulnerable to erosion with climate warming-induced decreases in sea-ice, and increases in storms and wave-fetch. Permafrost thaw on the Duvannyi Yar exposure produces thaw streams that are heavily loaded with freshly thawed yedoma sediments (suspended load ca. 650 g/L; particulate OC ca. 8-10 g/L; dissolved OC ca. 150-300 mg/L). We traced organic carbon loss and oxygen utilisation during incubations of Duvannyi Yar stream water, and a series of dilutions of Duvannyi Yar water and Kolyma River and East Siberian Sea water. Concurrent measurements of enzyme activities were taken to investigate the processes limitating degradation. The overall goal of the study was to investigate the relative bioavailability of contemporary versus ancient organic carbon pools over short time scales (days-weeks). Radiocarbon ages of the dissolved OC in the thaw streams were 19-29 ky BP, and particulate OC 19-38 ky BP. These ages are far older than any previously published values and clearly illustrate the mobilization of ancient permafrost organic matter into the contemporary carbon cycle. Incubation experiments showed that the ancient dissolved OC was highly susceptible to degradation, losing 34% of its carbon in 14 days (and 41% in 28 days). River and ocean water samples spiked with ancient carbon

  15. Creating a collimated ultrasound beam in highly attenuating fluids.

    PubMed

    Raeymaekers, Bart; Pantea, Cristian; Sinha, Dipen N

    2012-04-01

    We have devised a method, based on a parametric array concept, to create a low-frequency (300-500 kHz) collimated ultrasound beam in fluids highly attenuating to sound. This collimated beam serves as the basis for designing an ultrasound visualization system that can be used in the oil exploration industry for down-hole imaging in drilling fluids. We present the results of two different approaches to generating a collimated beam in three types of highly attenuating drilling mud. In the first approach, the drilling mud itself was used as a nonlinear mixing medium to create a parametric array. However, the short absorption length in mud limits the mixing length and, consequently, the resulting beam is weak and broad. In the second improved approach, the beam generation process was confined to a separate "frequency mixing tube" that contained an acoustically non-linear, low attenuation medium (e.g., water) that allowed establishing a usable parametric array in the mixing tube. A low-frequency collimated beam was thus created prior to its propagation into the drilling fluid. Using the latter technique, the penetration depth of the low frequency ultrasound beam in the drilling fluid was significantly extended. We also present measurements of acoustic nonlinearity in various types of drilling mud. PMID:22204917

  16. Impacts of Organic Ligands on Forsterite Reactivity in Supercritical CO2 Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Quin R.; Kaszuba, John; Schaef, Herbert T.; Bowden, Mark E.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2015-04-07

    Subsurface injection of CO2 for enhanced hydrocarbon recovery, hydraulic fracturing of unconventional reservoirs, and geologic carbon sequestration produces a complex geochemical setting in which CO2-dominated fluids containing dissolved water and organic compounds interact with rocks and minerals. The details of these reactions are relatively unknown and benefit from additional experimentally derived data. In this study, we utilized an in situ X-ray diffraction technique to examine the carbonation reactions of forsterite (Mg2SiO4) during exposure to supercritical CO2 (scCO2) that had been equilibrated with aqueous solutions of acetate, oxalate, malonate, or citrate at 50 °C and 90 bar. The organics affected the relative abundances of the crystalline reaction products, nesquehonite (MgCO3·3H2O) and magnesite (MgCO3), likely due to enhanced dehydration of the Mg2+ cations by the organic ligands. These results also indicate that the scCO2 solvated and transported the organic ligands to the forsterite surface. This phenomenon has profound implications for mineral transformations and mass transfer in the upper crust.

  17. Impacts of organic ligands on forsterite reactivity in supercritical CO2 fluids.

    PubMed

    Miller, Quin R S; Kaszuba, John P; Schaef, Herbert T; Bowden, Mark E; McGrail, Bernard P

    2015-04-01

    Subsurface injection of CO2 for enhanced hydrocarbon recovery, hydraulic fracturing of unconventional reservoirs, and geologic carbon sequestration produces a complex geochemical setting in which CO2-dominated fluids containing dissolved water and organic compounds interact with rocks and minerals. The details of these reactions are relatively unknown and benefit from additional experimentally derived data. In this study, we utilized an in situ X-ray diffraction technique to examine the carbonation reactions of forsterite (Mg2SiO4) during exposure to supercritical CO2 (scCO2) that had been equilibrated with aqueous solutions of acetate, oxalate, malonate, or citrate at 50 °C and 90 bar. The organics affected the relative abundances of the crystalline reaction products, nesquehonite (MgCO3 · 3H2O) and magnesite (MgCO3), likely due to enhanced dehydration of the Mg(2+) cations by the organic ligands. These results also indicate that the scCO2 solvated and transported the organic ligands to the forsterite surface. This phenomenon has profound implications for mineral transformations and mass transfer in the upper crust. PMID:25807011

  18. Melting and chemical reactivity of hydrocarbons under high pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, S.; Chanyshev, A.; Chen, P.; Litasov, K.; Chen, X.; Goncharov, A.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrocarbons comprise roughly ⅓ of the icy mantles in interiors of icy giant planets and may determine the planetary physical properties. Here we present the results of laser heated diamond anvil cell experiments on hydrocarbon chemical reactivity at P up to 50 GPa and T up to 2000 K. Ethane (C2H6) and n-docosane (C22H46) were chosen as starting materials. Raman spectroscopy at high P was used to probe the C-H systems. Melting lines of the hydrocarbons were found by visual observations of fluid-solid interface. The melting lines lie below 1500 K at P<50 GPa and are indistinguishable (within experimental uncertainties) from each other and that of CH4. Hydrocarbons melt to metastable molecular liquids and decompose to CH4 at T>1000 K and P<20 GPa precipitating carbon (Fig.1). Gradual decomposition of hydrocarbons is evident with increasing T. No molecular hydrogen was observed. However, at P above ~20 GPa Raman spectra of quenched reaction products are different. Complex changes in C-C stretching and C-H bending spectral regions occured upon heating to 2000 K (Fig.2). C=C and C≡C bonds appeared at P>25-30 GPa. Remarkably, free H2 was found in experiments at P>30-35 GPa. The interpretation of Raman spectra of quenched reaction products is uncertain. In general, P and T affect the lifetimes of C-H and C-C bonds. Temperature provides energy to brake C-H and C-C bonds, while stabilization of the bonds with pressure may be more pronounced for C-C bonds. The composition of C-H fluid is determined by the competition between C-C and C-H bonds. This competition can result in hydrocarbons with long C-C network. The role of C=C and C≡C bonds at high P cannot be ruled out from this study. It is possible that unsaturated hydrocarbons appear upon quenching from highly dissociated C-H fluid rather than being present in C-H fluid. n-docosane at 12 GPa Ethane at 34 GPa

  19. Genetic determinants of on-clopidogrel high platelet reactivity.

    PubMed

    Campo, Gianluca; Miccoli, Matteo; Tebaldi, Matteo; Marchesini, Jlenia; Fileti, Luca; Monti, Monia; Valgimigli, Marco; Ferrari, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Clopidogrel has been used (alone or in association with aspirin) to prevent vascular complications in atherothrombotic patients, to prevent stent thrombosis (ST) in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and as a long-term prevention of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events. Unfortunately, it is important to note that there are a number of patients who, during clopidogrel therapy, show and maintain a high platelet reactivity (PR), similar to that observed before the start of antiplatelet therapy. Clopidogrel pro-drug is absorbed in the intestine and this process is influenced by P-glycoprotein-1 (P-GP). Its conversion into 2-oxo clopidogrel is regulated by cytochromes (CYP) called CYP2C19, CYP2B6 and CYP1A2. Whereas, the final transformation into the active metabolite is regulated by CYP called CYP2C19, CYP2C9, CYP2B6, CYP3A4, CYP3A5 and, as recently emerged, by the glycoprotein paraoxonase-1 (PON1). The genes encoding these enzymes are characterized by several polymorphisms. Some of these are able to modify the activity of proteins, reducing the concentration of active metabolite and the values of on-clopidogrel PR. Only one gene polymorphism (CYP2C19*17) increases the clopidogrel metabolization and so the clopidogrel-induced platelet inhibition. Several studies have clearly associated these gene polymorphisms to both ischemic and bleeding complications in patients receiving dual antiplatelet therapy. The aim of this review is to describe the principal gene polymorphisms influencing on-clopidogrel PR and their relationship with long-term clinical outcome. PMID:21627411

  20. 2D fluid simulations of discharges at atmospheric pressure in reactive gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdon, Anne

    2015-09-01

    Since a few years, low-temperature atmospheric pressure discharges have received a considerable interest as they efficiently produce many reactive chemical species at a low energy cost. This potential is of great interest for a wide range of applications as plasma assisted combustion or biomedical applications. Then, in current simulations of atmospheric pressure discharges, there is the need to take into account detailed kinetic schemes. It is interesting to note that in some conditions, the kinetics of the discharge may play a role on the discharge dynamics itself. To illustrate this, we consider the case of the propagation of He-N2 discharges in long capillary tubes, studied for the development of medical devices for endoscopic applications. Simulation results put forward that the discharge dynamics and structure depend on the amount of N2 in the He-N2 mixture. In particular, as the amount of N2 admixture increases, the discharge propagation velocity in the tube increases, reaches a maximum for about 0 . 1 % of N2 and then decreases, in agreement with experiments. For applications as plasma assisted combustion with nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges, there is the need to handle the very different timescales of the nanosecond discharge with the much longer (micro to millisecond) timescales of combustion processes. This is challenging from a computational point of view. It is also important to better understand the coupling of the plasma induced chemistry and the gas heating. To illustrate this, we present the simulation of the flame ignition in lean mixtures by a nanosecond pulsed discharge between two point electrodes. In particular, among the different discharge regimes of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges, a ``spark'' regime has been put forward in the experiments, with an ultra-fast local heating of the gas. For other discharge regimes, the gas heating is much weaker. We have simulated the nanosecond spark regime and have observed shock waves

  1. Dissolution and reactive oxygen species generation of inhaled cemented tungsten carbide particles in artificial human lung fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefaniak, A. B.; Leonard, S. S.; Hoover, M. D.; Virji, M. A.; Day, G. A.

    2009-02-01

    Inhalation of both cobalt (Co) and tungsten carbide (WC) particles is associated with development of hard metal lung disease (HMD) via generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), whereas Co alone is sufficient to cause asthma via solubilization and hapten formation. We characterized bulk and aerodynamically size-separated W, WC, Co, spray dryer (pre-sintered), and chamfer grinder (post-sintered) powders. ROS generation was measured in the murine RAW 264.7 cell line using electron spin resonance. When dose was normalized to surface area, hydroxyl radical generation was independent of particle size, which suggests that particle surface chemistry may be an important exposure factor. Chamfer grinder particles generated the highest levels of ROS, consistent with the hypothesis that intimate contact of metals is important for ROS generation. In artificial extracellular lung fluid, alkylbenzyldimethylammonium chloride (ABDC), added to prevent mold growth during experiments, did not influence dissolution of Co (44.0±5.2 vs. 48.3±6.4%) however, dissolution was higher (p<0.05) in the absence of phosphate (62.0±5.4 vs. 48.3±6.4%). In artificial macrophage phagolysosomal fluid, dissolution of Co (36.2±10.4%) does not appear to be influenced (p=0.30) by the absence of glycine (29.8±2.1%), phosphate (39.6±8.6%), or ABDC (44.0±10.5%). These results aid in assessing and understanding Co and W inhalation dosimetry.

  2. Waveguide sensor for measurement of viscosity of highly viscous fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazys, R.; Sliteris, R.; Raisutis, R.; Zukauskas, E.; Vladisauskas, A.; Mazeika, L.

    2013-11-01

    Ultrasonic waveguide sensor for measurement of viscosity of highly viscous fluids has been developed. The measurement principle is based on application of guided shear-horizontal SH0 mode of the Lamb waves propagating in an aluminium planar waveguide immersed in a viscous liquid. Attenuation of the guided wave depends on viscosity of the surrounding liquid and is used for viscosity estimation. The developed sensor is mechanically robust and may be used for in-line process control of viscous liquids.

  3. Fluid hydrogen at high density - The plasma phase transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saumon, D.; Chabrier, G.

    1989-01-01

    A new model equation of state is applied, based on realistic interparticle potentials and a self-consistent treatment of the internal levels, to fluid hydrogen at high density. This model shows a strong connection between molecular dissociation and pressure ionization. The possibility of a first-order plasma phase transition is considered, and for which both the evolution in temperature and the critical point is given.

  4. The effects of gas-fluid-rock interactions on CO2 injection and storage: Insights from reactive transport modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Y.; Xu, T.; Pruess, K.

    2008-10-15

    Possible means of reducing atmospheric CO{sub 2} emissions include injecting CO{sub 2} in petroleum reservoirs for Enhanced Oil Recovery or storing CO{sub 2} in deep saline aquifers. Large-scale injection of CO{sub 2} into subsurface reservoirs would induce a complex interplay of multiphase flow, capillary trapping, dissolution, diffusion, convection, and chemical reactions that may have significant impacts on both short-term injection performance and long-term fate of CO{sub 2} storage. Reactive Transport Modeling is a promising approach that can be used to predict the spatial and temporal evolution of injected CO{sub 2} and associated gas-fluid-rock interactions. This presentation will summarize recent advances in reactive transport modeling of CO{sub 2} storage and review key technical issues on (1) the short- and long-term behavior of injected CO{sub 2} in geological formations; (2) the role of reservoir mineral heterogeneity on injection performance and storage security; (3) the effect of gas mixtures (e.g., H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}) on CO{sub 2} storage; and (4) the physical and chemical processes during potential leakage of CO{sub 2} from the primary storage reservoir. Simulation results suggest that CO{sub 2} trapping capacity, rate, and impact on reservoir rocks depend on primary mineral composition and injecting gas mixtures. For example, models predict that the injection of CO{sub 2} alone or co-injection with H{sub 2}S in both sandstone and carbonate reservoirs lead to acidified zones and mineral dissolution adjacent to the injection well, and carbonate precipitation and mineral trapping away from the well. Co-injection of CO{sub 2} with H{sub 2}S and in particular with SO{sub 2} causes greater formation alteration and complex sulfur mineral (alunite, anhydrite, and pyrite) trapping, sometimes at a much faster rate than previously thought. The results from Reactive Transport Modeling provide valuable insights for analyzing and assessing the dynamic

  5. Hydroetching of high surface area ceramics using moist supercritical fluids

    DOEpatents

    Fryxell, Glen; Zemanian, Thomas S.

    2004-11-02

    Aerogels having a high density of hydroxyl groups and a more uniform pore size with fewer bottlenecks are described. The aerogel is exposed to a mixture of a supercritical fluid and water, whereupon the aerogel forms a high density of hydroxyl groups. The process also relaxes the aerogel into a more open uniform internal structure, in a process referred to as hydroetching. The hydroetching process removes bottlenecks from the aerogels, and forms the hydrogels into more standard pore sizes while preserving their high surface area.

  6. Geophysical evidence for fluid flow in the Laminaria High, Bonaparte basin, Northwest shelf of Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulkareem, Lamees; Hobbs, Richard; Imber, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Seismic amplitude anomalies ("bright spots") can result from changes in acoustic impedance caused by the presence of fluids and/or lateral changes in lithology. In this study, 3D seismic interpretation and well log data is used to investigate the nature and causes of seismic amplitude anomalies within the shallow subsurface on the Laminaria High on the north-west shelf of Australia. Here, the anomalies are associated with active faults that cut the seabed. Previous studies suggest that fault reactivation and fault geometry have an important role in causing hydrocarbon leakage from a deeper reservoir and that bends on the larger faults will influence the localization of shear strain, increasing the risk of leakage. However, these studies did not examine the influence of fault growth during reactivation on fluid migration, or how post-rift and syn-rift sedimentation may have influenced fluid leakage. In our study, preliminary results suggest that not all active faults are associated with amplitude anomalies or dry/partially-filled hydrocarbon traps at depth, implying that there could be a different mechanism for the creation of the amplitude anomaly observed on the Laminaria High. Specifically, these anomalies may be the result of preferential cementation, or the presence of gas trapped within sediments at or near the seabed, possibly originating from gas generation due to biogenic activity in recently deposited sediment. Detailed amplitude maps are extracted from syn- and pre- faulting seismic horizons down to the top reservoir level in order to understand the spatial extent of the high amplitude anomalies within the stratigraphic succession. The first two amplitude maps for the seismic horizons beneath the seabed show high amplitude anomalies associated with the same active faults that are present on the seabed, but with some different characteristics along these faults. Then we extract number of deeper amplitude maps to the top of reservoir, to reveal whether the

  7. High frequency flow-structural interaction in dense subsonic fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Baw-Lin; Ofarrell, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Prediction of the detailed dynamic behavior in rocket propellant feed systems and engines and other such high-energy fluid systems requires precise analysis to assure structural performance. Designs sometimes require placement of bluff bodies in a flow passage. Additionally, there are flexibilities in ducts, liners, and piping systems. A design handbook and interactive data base have been developed for assessing flow/structural interactions to be used as a tool in design and development, to evaluate applicable geometries before problems develop, or to eliminate or minimize problems with existing hardware. This is a compilation of analytical/empirical data and techniques to evaluate detailed dynamic characteristics of both the fluid and structures. These techniques have direct applicability to rocket engine internal flow passages, hot gas drive systems, and vehicle propellant feed systems. Organization of the handbook is by basic geometries for estimating Strouhal numbers, added mass effects, mode shapes for various end constraints, critical onset flow conditions, and possible structural response amplitudes. Emphasis is on dense fluids and high structural loading potential for fatigue at low subsonic flow speeds where high-frequency excitations are possible. Avoidance and corrective measure illustrations are presented together with analytical curve fits for predictions compiled from a comprehensive data base.

  8. Prolonged Application of High Fluid Shear to Chondrocytes Recapitulates Gene Expression Profiles Associated with Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fei; Wang, Pu; Lee, Norman H.; Goldring, Mary B.; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2010-01-01

    Background Excessive mechanical loading of articular cartilage producing hydrostatic stress, tensile strain and fluid flow leads to irreversible cartilage erosion and osteoarthritic (OA) disease. Since application of high fluid shear to chondrocytes recapitulates some of the earmarks of OA, we aimed to screen the gene expression profiles of shear-activated chondrocytes and assess potential similarities with OA chondrocytes. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a cDNA microarray technology, we screened the differentially-regulated genes in human T/C-28a2 chondrocytes subjected to high fluid shear (20 dyn/cm2) for 48 h and 72 h relative to static controls. Confirmation of the expression patterns of select genes was obtained by qRT-PCR. Using significance analysis of microarrays with a 5% false discovery rate, 71 and 60 non-redundant transcripts were identified to be ≥2-fold up-regulated and ≤0.6-fold down-regulated, respectively, in sheared chondrocytes. Published data sets indicate that 42 of these genes, which are related to extracellular matrix/degradation, cell proliferation/differentiation, inflammation and cell survival/death, are differentially-regulated in OA chondrocytes. In view of the pivotal role of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the pathogenesis and/or progression of OA in vivo and regulation of shear-induced inflammation and apoptosis in vitro, we identified a collection of genes that are either up- or down-regulated by shear-induced COX-2. COX-2 and L-prostaglandin D synthase (L-PGDS) induce reactive oxygen species production, and negatively regulate genes of the histone and cell cycle families, which may play a critical role in chondrocyte death. Conclusions/Significance Prolonged application of high fluid shear stress to chondrocytes recapitulates gene expression profiles associated with osteoarthritis. Our data suggest a potential link between exposure of chondrocytes/cartilage to abnormal mechanical loading and the pathogenesis/progression of OA

  9. High throughput assay for evaluation of reactive carbonyl scavenging capacity☆

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, N.; Cavaille, J.P.; Graziani, F.; Robin, M.; Ouari, O.; Pietri, S.; Stocker, P.

    2014-01-01

    Many carbonyl species from either lipid peroxidation or glycoxidation are extremely reactive and can disrupt the function of proteins and enzymes. 4-hydroxynonenal and methylglyoxal are the most abundant and toxic lipid-derived reactive carbonyl species. The presence of these toxics leads to carbonyl stress and cause a significant amount of macromolecular damages in several diseases. Much evidence indicates trapping of reactive carbonyl intermediates may be a useful strategy for inhibiting or decreasing carbonyl stress-associated pathologies. There is no rapid and convenient analytical method available for the assessment of direct carbonyl scavenging capacity, and a very limited number of carbonyl scavengers have been identified to date, their therapeutic potential being highlighted only recently. In this context, we have developed a new and rapid sensitive fluorimetric method for the assessment of reactive carbonyl scavengers without involvement glycoxidation systems. Efficacy of various thiol- and non-thiol-carbonyl scavenger pharmacophores was tested both using this screening assay adapted to 96-well microplates and in cultured cells. The scavenging effects on the formation of Advanced Glycation End-product of Bovine Serum Albumin formed with methylglyoxal, 4-hydroxynonenal and glucose-glycated as molecular models were also examined. Low molecular mass thiols with an α-amino-β-mercaptoethane structure showed the highest degree of inhibitory activity toward both α,β-unsaturated aldehydes and dicarbonyls. Cysteine and cysteamine have the best scavenging ability toward methylglyoxal. WR-1065 which is currently approved for clinical use as a protective agent against radiation and renal toxicity was identified as the best inhibitor of 4-hydroxynonenal. PMID:24688895

  10. High-temperature organic-fluid fouling unit

    SciTech Connect

    Kuru, W.C.; Panchal, C.B.

    1997-06-01

    A new type of fouling unit is developed for high-temperature (500 C) and high-pressure (70 atmosphere) fouling experiments by modifying a commercial autoclave. Key modifications are the installation of a helical impeller in a flow tube and a fouling probe in the autoclave to simulate the fluid dynamics and heat transfer of typical heat-exchange equipment. A calibration technique is described, and fouling results are presented for experimental runs with indene and kerosene. The results are compared with those obtained using other types of fouling test units. Other potential applications of the fouling unit, such as corrosion and micro-scale reaction experiments, are discussed.

  11. Subsurface Multiphase Flow and Multicomponent Reactive Transport Modeling using High-Performance Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Glenn E.; Lichtner, Peter C.; Lu, Chuan

    2007-07-16

    Numerical modeling has become a critical tool to the U.S. Department of Energy for evaluating the environmental impact of alternative energy sources and remediation strategies for legacy waste sites. Unfortunately, the physical and chemical complexity of many sites overwhelms the capabilities of even most “state of the art” groundwater models. Of particular concern are the representation of highly-heterogeneous stratified rock/soil layers in the subsurface and the biological and geochemical interactions of chemical species within multiple fluid phases. Clearly, there is a need for higher-resolution modeling (i.e. more spatial, temporal, and chemical degrees of freedom) and increasingly mechanistic descriptions of subsurface physicochemical processes. We present SciDAC-funded research being performed in the development of PFLOTRAN, a parallel multiphase flow and multicomponent reactive transport model. Written in Fortran90, PFLOTRAN is founded upon PETSc data structures and solvers. We are employing PFLOTRAN in the simulation of uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area, a contaminated site of major concern to the Department of Energy, the State of Washington, and other government agencies. By leveraging the billions of degrees of freedom available through high-performance computation using tens of thousands of processors, we can better characterize the release of uranium into groundwater and its subsequent transport to the Columbia River, and thereby better understand and evaluate the effectiveness of various proposed remediation strategies.

  12. Subsurface multiphase flow and multicomponent reactive transport modeling using high-performance computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, Glenn; Lichtner, Peter; Lu, Chuan

    2007-07-01

    Numerical modeling is a critical tool to the U.S. Department of Energy for evaluating the environmental impact of remediation strategies for subsurface legacy waste sites. Unfortunately, the physical and chemical complexity of many sites overwhelms the capabilities of even most state of the art groundwater models. Of particular concern is the representation of highly-heterogeneous stratified rock/soil layers in the subsurface and the biological and geochemical interactions of chemical species within multiple fluid phases. There is clearly a need for higher-resolution modeling (i.e. increased spatial and temporal resolution) and increasingly mechanistic descriptions of subsurface physicochemical processes (i.e. increased chemical degrees of freedom). We present SciDAC-funded research being performed in furthering the development of PFLOTRAN, a parallel multiphase flow and multicomponent reactive transport model. Written in Fortran90, PFLOTRAN is founded upon PETSc data structures and solvers. We are employing PFLOTRAN to simulate uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area, a contaminated site of major concern to the Department of Energy, the State of Washington, and other government agencies. By leveraging the billions of degrees of freedom available through high-performance computation using tens of thousands of processors, we can better characterize the release of uranium into groundwater and its subsequent transport to the Columbia River, and thereby better understand and evaluate the effectiveness of various proposed remediation strategies.

  13. High-performance holographic technologies for fluid-dynamics experiments

    PubMed Central

    Orlov, Sergei S.; Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Oh, Se Baek; Barbastathis, George; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2010-01-01

    Modern technologies offer new opportunities for experimentalists in a variety of research areas of fluid dynamics. Improvements are now possible in the state-of-the-art in precision, dynamic range, reproducibility, motion-control accuracy, data-acquisition rate and information capacity. These improvements are required for understanding complex turbulent flows under realistic conditions, and for allowing unambiguous comparisons to be made with new theoretical approaches and large-scale numerical simulations. One of the new technologies is high-performance digital holography. State-of-the-art motion control, electronics and optical imaging allow for the realization of turbulent flows with very high Reynolds number (more than 107) on a relatively small laboratory scale, and quantification of their properties with high space–time resolutions and bandwidth. In-line digital holographic technology can provide complete three-dimensional mapping of the flow velocity and density fields at high data rates (over 1000 frames per second) over a relatively large spatial area with high spatial (1–10 μm) and temporal (better than a few nanoseconds) resolution, and can give accurate quantitative description of the fluid flows, including those of multi-phase and unsteady conditions. This technology can be applied in a variety of problems to study fundamental properties of flow–particle interactions, rotating flows, non-canonical boundary layers and Rayleigh–Taylor mixing. Some of these examples are discussed briefly. PMID:20211881

  14. Effect of Suction/Injection on Unsteady Hydromagnetic Convective Flow of Reactive Viscous Fluid between Vertical Porous Plates with Thermal Diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Uwanta, I. J.; Hamza, M. M.

    2014-01-01

    An investigation is performed to study the effect of suction/injection on unsteady hydromagnetic natural convection flow of viscous reactive fluid between two vertical porous plates in the presence of thermal diffusion. The partial differential equations governing the flow have been solved numerically using semi-implicit finite-difference scheme. For steady case, analytical solutions have been derived using perturbation series method. Suction/injection is used to control the fluid flow in the channel, and an exothermic chemical reaction of Arrhenius kinetic is considered. Numerical results are presented graphically and discussed quantitatively with respect to various parameters embedded in the problem. PMID:27382632

  15. Ionic Liquids and Ionizing Radiation: Reactivity of Highly Energetic Species

    SciTech Connect

    Wishart, J.F.

    2010-11-04

    Due to their unique properties, ionic liquids present many opportunities for basic research on the interactions of radiation with materials under conditions not previously available. At the same time, there are practical applied reasons for characterizing, understanding, and being able to predict how ionic-liquid-based devices and industrial-scale systems will perform under conditions of extreme reactivity, including radiation. This perspective discusses current issues in ionic liquid physical chemistry, provides a brief introduction to radiation chemistry, draws attention to some key findings in ionic liquid radiation chemistry, and identifies some current hot topics and new opportunities.

  16. System for reactivating catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Thompson, David N.; Anderson, Raymond P.

    2010-03-02

    A method of reactivating a catalyst, such as a solid catalyst or a liquid catalyst is provided. The method comprises providing a catalyst that is at least partially deactivated by fouling agents. The catalyst is contacted with a fluid reactivating agent that is at or above a critical point of the fluid reactivating agent and is of sufficient density to dissolve impurities. The fluid reactivating agent reacts with at least one fouling agent, releasing the at least one fouling agent from the catalyst. The at least one fouling agent becomes dissolved in the fluid reactivating agent and is subsequently separated or removed from the fluid reactivating agent so that the fluid reactivating agent may be reused. A system for reactivating a catalyst is also disclosed.

  17. Highly saline fluids from a subducting slab as the source for fluid-rich diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Yaakov; McNeill, John; Pearson, D. Graham; Nowell, Geoff M.; Ottley, Chris J.

    2015-08-01

    The infiltration of fluids into continental lithospheric mantle is a key mechanism for controlling abrupt changes in the chemical and physical properties of the lithospheric root, as well as diamond formation, yet the origin and composition of the fluids involved are still poorly constrained. Such fluids are trapped within diamonds when they form and so diamonds provide a unique means of directly characterizing the fluids that percolate through the deep continental lithospheric mantle. Here we show a clear chemical evolutionary trend, identifying saline fluids as parental to silicic and carbonatitic deep mantle melts, in diamonds from the Northwest Territories, Canada. Fluid-rock interaction along with in situ melting cause compositional transitions, as the saline fluids traverse mixed peridotite-eclogite lithosphere. Moreover, the chemistry of the parental saline fluids--especially their strontium isotopic compositions--and the timing of host diamond formation suggest that a subducting Mesozoic plate under western North America is the source of the fluids. Our results imply a strong association between subduction, mantle metasomatism and fluid-rich diamond formation, emphasizing the importance of subduction-derived fluids in affecting the composition of the deep lithospheric mantle.

  18. Highly saline fluids from a subducting slab as the source for fluid-rich diamonds.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Yaakov; McNeill, John; Pearson, D Graham; Nowell, Geoff M; Ottley, Chris J

    2015-08-20

    The infiltration of fluids into continental lithospheric mantle is a key mechanism for controlling abrupt changes in the chemical and physical properties of the lithospheric root, as well as diamond formation, yet the origin and composition of the fluids involved are still poorly constrained. Such fluids are trapped within diamonds when they form and so diamonds provide a unique means of directly characterizing the fluids that percolate through the deep continental lithospheric mantle. Here we show a clear chemical evolutionary trend, identifying saline fluids as parental to silicic and carbonatitic deep mantle melts, in diamonds from the Northwest Territories, Canada. Fluid-rock interaction along with in situ melting cause compositional transitions, as the saline fluids traverse mixed peridotite-eclogite lithosphere. Moreover, the chemistry of the parental saline fluids--especially their strontium isotopic compositions--and the timing of host diamond formation suggest that a subducting Mesozoic plate under western North America is the source of the fluids. Our results imply a strong association between subduction, mantle metasomatism and fluid-rich diamond formation, emphasizing the importance of subduction-derived fluids in affecting the composition of the deep lithospheric mantle. PMID:26289205

  19. Shape transitions of high-genus fluid vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    The morphologies of genus-2 to -8 fluid vesicles are studied by using dynamically triangulated membrane simulations with area-difference elasticity. It is revealed that the alignments of the membrane pores alter the vesicle shapes and the types of shape transitions for the genus g ≥ 3 . At a high reduced volume, a stomatocyte with a circular alignment of g + 1 pores continuously transforms into a discocyte with a line of g pores with increasing intrinsic area difference. In contrast, at a low volume, a stomatocyte transforms into a (g+1) -hedral shape and subsequently exhibits a discrete phase transition to a discocyte.

  20. Diffusion NMR of Fluids Confined to Mesopores under High Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeigermann, Philipp; Dvoyashkin, Muslim; Gläser, Roger; Valiullin, Rustem

    2011-03-01

    Supercritical fluids are extensively used in various chemical applications including processes involving porous solids. The knowledge of their transport in bulk as well as under spatial confinements is critical for modeling and optimizing chemical reactions. In this contribution, we describe a high-pressure cell designed for pulsed field gradient NMR studies of diffusion of supercritical solvents in mesoporous materials. Some preliminary results on diffusion properties of ethane in bulk phase and confined to pores of mesoporous silicon obtained in a broad range of pressures below and above the critical temperature are reported.

  1. Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas aftertreatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity

    DOEpatents

    Whealton, John H.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Storey, John M.; Raridon, Richard J.; Armfield, Jeffrey S.; Bigelow, Timothy S.; Graves, Ronald L.

    2001-01-01

    A method for non-thermal plasma aftertreatment of exhaust gases the method comprising the steps of providing short risetime (about 40 ps), high frequency (about 5G hz), high power bursts of low-duty factor microwaves sufficient to generate a dielectric barrier discharge and passing a gas to treated through the discharge so as to cause dissociative reduction of the exhaust gases. The invention also includes a reactor for generating the non-thermal plasma.

  2. Final Report: Ionization chemistry of high temperature molecular fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, L E

    2007-02-26

    With the advent of coupled chemical/hydrodynamic reactive flow models for high explosives, understanding detonation chemistry is of increasing importance to DNT. The accuracy of first principles detonation codes, such as CHEETAH, are dependent on an accurate representation of the species present under detonation conditions. Ionic species and non-molecular phases are not currently included coupled chemistry/hydrodynamic simulations. This LDRD will determine the prevalence of such species during high explosive detonations, by carrying out experimental and computational investigation of common detonation products under extreme conditions. We are studying the phase diagram of detonation products such as H{sub 2}O, or NH{sub 3} and mixtures under conditions of extreme pressure (P > 1 GPa) and temperature (T > 1000K). Under these conditions, the neutral molecular form of matter transforms to a phase dominated by ions. The phase boundaries of such a region are unknown.

  3. High-Performance Java Codes for Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Christopher; Chatterjee, Siddhartha; Biswas, Rupak; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The computational science community is reluctant to write large-scale computationally -intensive applications in Java due to concerns over Java's poor performance, despite the claimed software engineering advantages of its object-oriented features. Naive Java implementations of numerical algorithms can perform poorly compared to corresponding Fortran or C implementations. To achieve high performance, Java applications must be designed with good performance as a primary goal. This paper presents the object-oriented design and implementation of two real-world applications from the field of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD): a finite-volume fluid flow solver (LAURA, from NASA Langley Research Center), and an unstructured mesh adaptation algorithm (2D_TAG, from NASA Ames Research Center). This work builds on our previous experience with the design of high-performance numerical libraries in Java. We examine the performance of the applications using the currently available Java infrastructure and show that the Java version of the flow solver LAURA performs almost within a factor of 2 of the original procedural version. Our Java version of the mesh adaptation algorithm 2D_TAG performs within a factor of 1.5 of its original procedural version on certain platforms. Our results demonstrate that object-oriented software design principles are not necessarily inimical to high performance.

  4. Fabrication of liquid-infused surfaces using reactive polymer multilayers: principles for manipulating the behaviors and mobilities of aqueous fluids on slippery liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Manna, Uttam; Lynn, David M

    2015-05-20

    The design of slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces (SLIPS) using nanoporous and chemically reactive polymer multilayers is reported. This approach permits fabrication of slippery anti-fouling coatings on complex surfaces and provides new means to manipulate the mobilities of contacting aqueous fluids. The results expand the range of tools that can be used to manipulate the behaviors of SLIPS and open the door to new applications of this emerging class of soft materials. PMID:25854608

  5. Characteristics of high quality sorbent for fluidized bed combustion and problems of maintaining uniform reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bain, R.J. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Fluidized bed combustion of coal is considered one of the more promising clean coal technologies for the future. While much research has gone into the design and operation of FBC units, there is little concern for what characterizes a high quality sorbent and the source of such a sorbent. Carbonate rocks, limestone and dolomite, have been tested extensively as sorbents and primarily two rock characteristics appear to significantly control reactivity: composition and texture. Calcium carbonate is more reactive than magnesium carbonate where all other rock characteristics are the same. In considering texture, highest reactivity is measured for carbonate rocks which consist of homogeneous, euhedral crystals ranging in size from .05 to .2 mm and which possess uniform intercrystalline porosity. The most reactive material possesses both high calcium content, uniform microcrystalline texture and intercrystalline porosity, however, such material is not very abundant in nature and is not locally available to midcontinent facilities. Sucrosic dolomite, which possesses uniform microcrystalline texture and intercrystalline porosity has high rank reactivity. While this rock is quite common, it occurs as beds, generally less than twenty feet thick, interlayered with less reactive dolomite types. Therefore, without selective quarrying methods, production of sorbent with uniformly high reactivity will be impossible.

  6. Impaired systemic vascular reactivity & raised high-sensitivity C reactive protein levels in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Parul; Talwar, Anjana; Chandran, Dinu; Guleria, Randeep; Jaryal, Ashok Kumar; Kumar, Guresh; Trivedi, Anjali; Deepak, K.K.

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by slowly progressive airflow limitaion, chronic lung inflammation and associated systemic manifestations. The objective of this preliminary study was to investigate the levels of high sensitivity C reactive protein (hs CRP) and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) as markers of systemic inflammation and assessment of systemic vascular reactivity that may play an important role in development of cardiovascular disease in COPD patients. Methods: Systemic vascular reactivity was assessed non-invasively by measuring peripheral pulse waveform changes during reactive hyperemia (RH) in 16 COPD patients and 14 controls by photoplethysmography technique (PPG). Parameters measured were pulse wave amplitude (PWA), slope and pulse transit time (PTT). Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and hs CRP were measured as markers of inflammation. Results: PWA during the 1st, 2nd and 3rd minutes post release of occlusion were significantly higher than the baseline means in controls, whereas in the patient group there was no significant change in the PWA during any of the observed time periods following release of occlusion, in comparison to the baseline means. Similar results were observed in slope values for patients and controls. Maximum percentage change in PWA during RH with reference to baseline was significantly lower in patients as compared to controls (26.78±20.19 vs 57.20±19.80%, P<0.001). Maximum percentage change in slope during RH with reference to baseline was significantly lower in patients as compared to controls (19.77±10.73 vs 39.25±13.49%, P<0.001). A vascular tone response as represented by PTT was also impaired in the 3rd minute of RH as compared to baseline mean values in COPD patients only. Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings showed raised hs CRP levels and impaired systemic vascular reactivity in COPD patients. Whether these may increase the risk of cardiovascular

  7. An experimental study on fluid-loss behavior of fracturing fluids and formation damage in high-permeability porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Parlar, M.; Nelson, E.B.; Walton, I.C.

    1995-12-31

    A recent trend in stimulating high-permeability formations is the development of techniques (such as frac-pack) to create short fractures which bypass formation damage in the near-wellbore region. Analysis and refinement of these techniques are hampered by a lack of knowledge of the leakoff behavior of candidate fluids in high-permeability rocks. In this paper, we present results from static-fluid-loss and formation-damage (reverse-flow) experiments using 12-inch-long cores in the permeability range of 3 to 1,000 md. A Hassler cell, with 6 pressure taps placed at 2-inch intervals, was used. The test fluids included borate-crosslinked-guar, linear-guar, linear-HEC, and viscoelastic-surfactant solutions. The effects of differential pressure, gel concentration, permeability, and temperature on spurt and leakoff coefficients were investigated, and correlations were given. In the absence of fluid-loss-control additives, the internal cake is the controlling factor for spurt and total leakoff for crosslinked fluids. Linear HEC behaves as a shear-thinning fluid during flow through porous media. A nonlinear, algebraic equation generalizing the well-known Williams expression for C{sub vc} to power-law fluids was derived as an approximate method of incorporating the leakoff behavior of power-law fluids into current fracturing simulators.

  8. Birth Weight, Current Anthropometric Markers, and High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein in Brazilian School Children

    PubMed Central

    Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown associations of birth weight with increased concentrations of high sensitivity C-reactive protein. This study assessed the relationship between birth weight, anthropometric and metabolic parameters during childhood, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein. A total of 612 Brazilian school children aged 5–13 years were included in the study. High sensitivity C-reactive protein was measured by particle-enhanced immunonephelometry. Nutritional status was assessed by body mass index, waist circumference, and skinfolds. Total cholesterol and fractions, triglycerides, and glucose were measured by enzymatic methods. Insulin sensitivity was determined by the homeostasis model assessment method. Statistical analysis included chi-square test, General Linear Model, and General Linear Model for Gamma Distribution. Body mass index, waist circumference, and skinfolds were directly associated with birth weight (P < 0.001, P = 0.001, and P = 0.015, resp.). Large for gestational age children showed higher high sensitivity C-reactive protein levels (P < 0.001) than small for gestational age. High birth weight is associated with higher levels of high sensitivity C-reactive protein, body mass index, waist circumference, and skinfolds. Large for gestational age altered high sensitivity C-reactive protein and promoted additional risk factor for atherosclerosis in these school children, independent of current nutritional status. PMID:25874126

  9. Buckling of a beam extruded into highly viscous fluid.

    PubMed

    Gosselin, F P; Neetzow, P; Paak, M

    2014-11-01

    Inspired by microscopic Paramecia which use trichocyst extrusion to propel themselves away from thermal aggression, we propose a macroscopic experiment to study the stability of a slender beam extruded in a highly viscous fluid. Piano wires were extruded axially at constant speed in a tank filled with corn syrup. The force necessary to extrude the wire was measured to increase linearly at first until the compressive viscous force causes the wire to buckle. A numerical model, coupling a lengthening elastica formulation with resistive-force theory, predicts a similar behavior. The model is used to study the dynamics at large time when the beam is highly deformed. It is found that at large time, a large deformation regime exists in which the force necessary to extrude the beam at constant speed becomes constant and length independent. With a proper dimensional analysis, the beam can be shown to buckle at a critical length based on the extrusion speed, the bending rigidity, and the dynamic viscosity of the fluid. Hypothesizing that the trichocysts of Paramecia must be sized to maximize their thrust per unit volume as well as avoid buckling instabilities, we predict that their bending rigidity must be about 3×10^{-9}Nμm^{2}. The verification of this prediction is left for future work. PMID:25493827

  10. Buckling of a beam extruded into highly viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosselin, F. P.; Neetzow, P.; Paak, M.

    2014-11-01

    Inspired by microscopic Paramecia which use trichocyst extrusion to propel themselves away from thermal aggression, we propose a macroscopic experiment to study the stability of a slender beam extruded in a highly viscous fluid. Piano wires were extruded axially at constant speed in a tank filled with corn syrup. The force necessary to extrude the wire was measured to increase linearly at first until the compressive viscous force causes the wire to buckle. A numerical model, coupling a lengthening elastica formulation with resistive-force theory, predicts a similar behavior. The model is used to study the dynamics at large time when the beam is highly deformed. It is found that at large time, a large deformation regime exists in which the force necessary to extrude the beam at constant speed becomes constant and length independent. With a proper dimensional analysis, the beam can be shown to buckle at a critical length based on the extrusion speed, the bending rigidity, and the dynamic viscosity of the fluid. Hypothesizing that the trichocysts of Paramecia must be sized to maximize their thrust per unit volume as well as avoid buckling instabilities, we predict that their bending rigidity must be about 3 ×10-9N μ m2 . The verification of this prediction is left for future work.

  11. High gliding fluid power generation system with fluid component separation and multiple condensers

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmoud, Ahmad M; Lee, Jaeseon; Radcliff, Thomas D

    2014-10-14

    An example power generation system includes a vapor generator, a turbine, a separator and a pump. In the separator, the multiple components of the working fluid are separated from each other and sent to separate condensers. Each of the separate condensers is configured for condensing a single component of the working fluid. Once each of the components condense back into a liquid form they are recombined and exhausted to a pump that in turn drives the working fluid back to the vapor generator.

  12. Solid-phase classical complement activation by C-reactive protein (CRP) is inhibited by fluid-phase CRP-C1q interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sjoewall, Christopher; Askendal, Agneta; Almroth, Gunnel

    2007-01-05

    C-reactive protein (CRP) interacts with phosphorylcholine (PC), Fc{gamma} receptors, complement factor C1q and cell nuclear constituents, yet its biological roles are insufficiently understood. The aim was to characterize CRP-induced complement activation by ellipsometry. PC conjugated with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (PC-KLH) was immobilized to cross-linked fibrinogen. A low-CRP serum with different amounts of added CRP was exposed to the PC-surfaces. The total serum protein deposition was quantified and deposition of IgG, C1q, C3c, C4, factor H, and CRP detected with polyclonal antibodies. The binding of serum CRP to PC-KLH dose-dependently triggered activation of the classical pathway. Unexpectedly, the activation was efficiently down-regulated at CRP levels >150 mg/L. Using radial immunodiffusion, CRP-C1q interaction was observed in serum samples with high CRP concentrations. We propose that the underlying mechanism depends on fluid-phase interaction between C1q and CRP. This might constitute another level of complement regulation, which has implications for systemic lupus erythematosus where CRP is often low despite flare-ups.

  13. Reactive geothermal transport simulation to study the formation mechanism of impermeable barrier between acidic and neutral fluid zones in the Onikobe geothermal field, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Todaka, Noritumi; Akasaka, Chitosi; Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

    2003-03-06

    Two types of fluids are encountered in the Onikobe geothermal reservoir (Japan): One is neutral and the other is acidic. It is hypothesized that acidic fluid might be upwelling along a fault zone from magma and that an impermeable barrier might be present between the acidic and neutral fluid zones. To test such a conceptual model and to study the geochemical behavior due to mixing of the two fluids, reactive geothermal transport simulations under both natural and production conditions were carried out using the code TOUGHREACT. Results indicate Mn-rich smectite precipitates near the mixing front. Precipitation of sphalerite and galena occurs in a similar region as the Mn-rich smectite. Precipitation of these minerals depends on pH and temperature. In addition, quartz, pyrite, and calcite precipitate in the shallow zone resulting in further development of caprock. The changes in porosity and permeability due to precipitation of Mn-rich smectite are small compared with that of quartz, calcite, and pyrite. However, the smectite precipitation is likely to fill open fractures and to form an impermeable barrier between acidic and neutral fluid regions. The simulated mineral assemblage is generally consistent with observations in the Onikobe field. The numerical simulations described here provide useful insight into geochemical behavior and formation of impermeable barriers from fluid mixing. The method presented in this paper may be useful in fundamental analysis of hydrothermal systems and in the exploration of geothermal reservoirs, including chemical evolution, mineral alteration, mineral scaling, and changes in porosity and permeability.

  14. Reactive geothermal transport simulations to study the formation mechanism of an impermeable barrier between acidic and neutral fluid zones in the Onikobe Geothermal Field, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todaka, Norifumi; Akasaka, Chitoshi; Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-05-01

    Two types of fluids are encountered in the Onikobe geothermal reservoir (Japan): one is neutral and the other is acidic. It is hypothesized that acidic fluid might be upwelling along a fault zone from magma and that an impermeable barrier might be present between the acidic and neutral fluid zones. To test such a conceptual model and to study the geochemical behavior due to mixing of the two fluids, reactive geothermal transport simulations under both natural and production conditions were carried out using the code TOUGHREACT. Results indicate Mn-rich smectite precipitates near the mixing front. Precipitation of sphalerite and galena occurs in a similar region as the Mn-rich smectite. Precipitation of these minerals depends on pH and temperature. In addition, quartz, pyrite, and calcite precipitate in the shallow zone resulting in further development of caprock. The changes in porosity and permeability due to precipitation of Mn-rich smectite are small compared with that of quartz, calcite, and pyrite. However, the smectite precipitation is likely to fill open fractures and to form an impermeable barrier between acidic and neutral fluid regions. The simulated mineral assemblage is generally consistent with observations in the Onikobe field. The numerical simulations described here provide useful insight into geochemical behavior and formation of impermeable barriers from fluid mixing. The method presented in this paper may be useful in fundamental analysis of hydrothermal systems and in the exploration of geothermal reservoirs, including chemical evolution, mineral alteration, mineral scaling, and changes in porosity and permeability.

  15. Human antibody responses after dengue virus infection are highly cross-reactive to Zika virus.

    PubMed

    Priyamvada, Lalita; Quicke, Kendra M; Hudson, William H; Onlamoon, Nattawat; Sewatanon, Jaturong; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Pattanapanyasat, Kovit; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Mulligan, Mark J; Wilson, Patrick C; Ahmed, Rafi; Suthar, Mehul S; Wrammert, Jens

    2016-07-12

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus of significant public health concern. ZIKV shares a high degree of sequence and structural homology compared with other flaviviruses, including dengue virus (DENV), resulting in immunological cross-reactivity. Improving our current understanding of the extent and characteristics of this immunological cross-reactivity is important, as ZIKV is presently circulating in areas that are highly endemic for dengue. To assess the magnitude and functional quality of cross-reactive immune responses between these closely related viruses, we tested acute and convalescent sera from nine Thai patients with PCR-confirmed DENV infection against ZIKV. All of the sera tested were cross-reactive with ZIKV, both in binding and in neutralization. To deconstruct the observed serum cross-reactivity in depth, we also characterized a panel of DENV-specific plasmablast-derived monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for activity against ZIKV. Nearly half of the 47 DENV-reactive mAbs studied bound to both whole ZIKV virion and ZIKV lysate, of which a subset also neutralized ZIKV. In addition, both sera and mAbs from the dengue-infected patients enhanced ZIKV infection of Fc gamma receptor (FcγR)-bearing cells in vitro. Taken together, these findings suggest that preexisting immunity to DENV may impact protective immune responses against ZIKV. In addition, the extensive cross-reactivity may have implications for ZIKV virulence and disease severity in DENV-experienced populations. PMID:27354515

  16. Human antibody responses after dengue virus infection are highly cross-reactive to Zika virus

    PubMed Central

    Priyamvada, Lalita; Quicke, Kendra M.; Hudson, William H.; Onlamoon, Nattawat; Sewatanon, Jaturong; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Pattanapanyasat, Kovit; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Mulligan, Mark J.; Wilson, Patrick C.; Ahmed, Rafi; Suthar, Mehul S.; Wrammert, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus of significant public health concern. ZIKV shares a high degree of sequence and structural homology compared with other flaviviruses, including dengue virus (DENV), resulting in immunological cross-reactivity. Improving our current understanding of the extent and characteristics of this immunological cross-reactivity is important, as ZIKV is presently circulating in areas that are highly endemic for dengue. To assess the magnitude and functional quality of cross-reactive immune responses between these closely related viruses, we tested acute and convalescent sera from nine Thai patients with PCR-confirmed DENV infection against ZIKV. All of the sera tested were cross-reactive with ZIKV, both in binding and in neutralization. To deconstruct the observed serum cross-reactivity in depth, we also characterized a panel of DENV-specific plasmablast-derived monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for activity against ZIKV. Nearly half of the 47 DENV-reactive mAbs studied bound to both whole ZIKV virion and ZIKV lysate, of which a subset also neutralized ZIKV. In addition, both sera and mAbs from the dengue-infected patients enhanced ZIKV infection of Fc gamma receptor (FcγR)-bearing cells in vitro. Taken together, these findings suggest that preexisting immunity to DENV may impact protective immune responses against ZIKV. In addition, the extensive cross-reactivity may have implications for ZIKV virulence and disease severity in DENV-experienced populations. PMID:27354515

  17. Raman Scattering from Solid and Fluid Helium at High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, George Henry, Jr.

    Raman spectra were measured in solid helium at two molar volumes: 7.74 cm('3) ("10 kbar") and 9.06 cm('3) ("5 kbar"). The Raman-active E(,2g) phonon has been observed in the hcp phase of each crystal. The volume dependence measured for this phonon frequency is well represented by the mode Gruneisen parameter (gamma) = 1.06 + 0.097 V. Conventional lattice dynamics, using modern helium potentials, predicts a frequency and volume dependence for the E(,2g) phonon in good agreement with the measurements over this range of volume. Temperature dependence of the E(,2g) phonon frequency and linewidth was measured under isochoric conditions. Over the limited range of temperature in which the hcp phase exists, the thermal shift of frequency was measured to be negative by an amount no more than 1 cm('-1). The phonon linewidth was observed to be non-zero at 0 K, increasing in width with increasing temperature. The temperature dependence is compatible with a strong interaction between the E(,2g) phonon and zone-edge phonons, where the optical phonon combines with a transverse acoustic phonon to create a longitudinal acoustic phonon. In addition, second-order Raman spectra were collected for both high-pressure solid phases, hcp and fcc. Structure has been observed in the two-phonon portion of the solid helium spectra and is remarkably similar in both phases. Significant intensity extends beyond the expected cut-off for two-phonon processes, though to a decreasing extent with increasing pressure. Thus multi-phonon processes remain important in helium even at high pressure. Raman scattering from dense fluid helium shows clear departure from the behavior of collision-induced scattering from the more classical fluids. Even at room temperature, a departure from the usual roughly-exponential behavior is observed at low frequency in helium at high pressure. The departure becomes even more pronounced near the freezing temperature, with a dramatic reduction in low-frequency intensity

  18. Static reactive power compensators for high-voltage power systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    A study conducted to summarize the role of static reactive power compensators for high voltage power system applications is described. This information should be useful to the utility system planning engineer in applying static var systems (SVS) to high voltage as (HVAC) systems. The static var system is defined as a form of reactive power compensator. The general need for reactive power compensation in HVAC systems is discussed, and the static var system is compared to other devices utilized to provide reactive power compensation. Examples are presented of applying SVS for specific functions, such as the prevention of voltage collapse. The operating principles of commercially available SVS's are discussed in detail. The perormance and active power loss characteristics of SVS types are compared.

  19. Deposition of highly textured AlN thin films by reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, Milena A.; Törndahl, Tobias; Katardjiev, Ilia; Kubart, Tomas

    2015-03-15

    Aluminum nitride thin films were deposited by reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) and pulsed direct-current on Si (100) and textured Mo substrates, where the same deposition conditions were used for both techniques. The films were characterized by x-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. The results show a pronounced improvement in the AlN crystalline texture for all films deposited by HiPIMS on Si. Already at room temperature, the HiPIMS films exhibited a strong preferred (002) orientation and at 400 °C, no contributions from other orientations were detected. Despite the low film thickness of only 200 nm, an ω-scan full width at half maximum value of 5.1° was achieved on Si. The results are attributed to the high ionization of sputtered material achieved in HiPIMS. On textured Mo, there was no significant difference between the deposition techniques.

  20. Subsurface Multiphase Flow and Multicomponent Reactive Transport Modeling using High-Performance Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Glenn E.; Lichtner, Peter C.; Lu, Chuan

    2007-08-01

    Numerical modeling has become a critical tool to the Department of Energy for evaluating the environmental impact of alternative energy sources and remediation strategies for legacy waste sites. Unfortunately, the physical and chemical complexity of many sites overwhelms the capabilities of even most “state of the art” groundwater models. Of particular concern are the representation of highly-heterogeneous stratified rock/soil layers in the subsurface and the biological and geochemical interactions of chemical species within multiple fluid phases. Clearly, there is a need for higher-resolution modeling (i.e. more spatial, temporal, and chemical degrees of freedom) and increasingly mechanistic descriptions of subsurface physicochemical processes. We present research being performed in the development of PFLOTRAN, a parallel multiphase flow and multicomponent reactive transport model. Written in Fortran90, PFLOTRAN is founded upon PETSc data structures and solvers and has exhibited impressive strong scalability on up to 4000 processors on the ORNL Cray XT3. We are employing PFLOTRAN in the simulation of uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area, a contaminated site of major concern to the Department of Energy, the State of Washington, and other government agencies where overly-simplistic historical modeling erroneously predicted decade removal times for uranium by ambient groundwater flow. By leveraging the billions of degrees of freedom available through high-performance computation using tens of thousands of processors, we can better characterize the release of uranium into groundwater and its subsequent transport to the Columbia River, and thereby better understand and evaluate the effectiveness of various proposed remediation strategies.

  1. High-density fluids and the growth of monocrystalline diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Y.; Kiflawi, I.; Davies, N.; Navon, O.

    2014-09-01

    The chemical nature and composition of the growth medium of monocrystalline (MC) diamonds is still a matter of debate, partially because carbonate-bearing high-density fluids (HDFs) that are common in fibrous diamonds have not been found in MC diamonds. Here we report the first finding of HDF microinclusions in a MC octahedral diamond from Finsch, South Africa and in the MC octahedral core of a coated diamond from Kankan, Guinea; both diamonds carry nitrogen in B-centers. Numerous microinclusions in diamond Finsch_2a_cap1 are restricted to two thin layers parallel to the (1 1 1) face, ∼20 and 200 μm from the diamond rim. Low-Mg carbonatitic HDFs are found along the inner layer while the outer layer trapped saline compositions. The major and trace element compositions of the inclusions and their infrared spectra are highly similar to those of microinclusions found in fibrous diamonds. A few isolated microinclusions of saline compositions are scattered around a sulfide inclusion in the center of the octahedral core of diamond ON-KAN-383. This evidence for the involvement of oxidized fluids in the formation of MC diamonds adds to previous reports on the antiquity of HDFs in fibrous diamonds, the presence of carbonate and halide phases in inclusions in MC diamonds and the similarity of trace element pattern of a MC diamond to those of low-Mg carbonatitic HDF in fibrous diamonds. In addition, we show that the interaction of HDFs with depleted garnets can produce sinusoidal REE patterns which are one of the primary features of lherzolitic and harzburgitic garnet inclusions in MC diamonds. Together, these observations suggest that HDFs are involved in the formation of many types of diamonds from the Archaean to the Phanerozoic. HDFs are trapped in large quantities during rapid, fibrous growth, but must also be present during the growth of many MC diamonds.

  2. Fluid Dynamics of a High Aspect-Ratio Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munro, Scott E.; Ahuja, K. K.

    2003-01-01

    Circulation control wings are a type of pneumatic high-lift device that have been extensively researched as to their aerodynamic benefits. However, there has been little research into the possible airframe noise reduction benefits of a circulation control wing. The key element of noise is the jet noise associated with the jet sheet emitted from the blowing slot. High aspect-ratio jet acoustic results (aspect-ratios from 100 to 3,000) from a related study showed that the jet noise of this type of jet was proportional to the slot height to the 3/2 power and slot width to the 1/2 power. Fluid dynamic experiments were performed in the present study on the high aspect-ratio nozzle to gain understanding of the flow characteristics in an effort to relate the acoustic results to flow parameters. Single hot-wire experiments indicated that the jet exhaust from the high aspect-ratio nozzle was similar to a 2-d turbulent jet. Two-wire space-correlation measurements were performed to attempt to find a relationship between the slot height of the jet and the length-scale of the flow noise generating turbulence structure. The turbulent eddy convection velocity was also calculated, and was found to vary with the local centerline velocity, and also as a function of the frequency of the eddy.

  3. Development of chiral metal amides as highly reactive catalysts for asymmetric [3 + 2] cycloadditions.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yasuhiro; Yoshimoto, Susumu; Dutton, Mark J; Kobayashi, Shū

    2016-01-01

    Highly efficient catalytic asymmetric [3 + 2] cycloadditions using a chiral copper amide are reported. Compared with the chiral CuOTf/Et3N system, the CuHMDS system showed higher reactivity, and the desired reactions proceeded in high yields and high selectivities with catalyst loadings as low as 0.01 mol %. PMID:27559396

  4. Development of chiral metal amides as highly reactive catalysts for asymmetric [3 + 2] cycloadditions

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Yasuhiro; Yoshimoto, Susumu; Dutton, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Summary Highly efficient catalytic asymmetric [3 + 2] cycloadditions using a chiral copper amide are reported. Compared with the chiral CuOTf/Et3N system, the CuHMDS system showed higher reactivity, and the desired reactions proceeded in high yields and high selectivities with catalyst loadings as low as 0.01 mol %. PMID:27559396

  5. Crevicular Fluid and Serum Concentrations of Progranulin and High Sensitivity CRP in Chronic Periodontitis and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Priyanka, N.; Kumari, Minal; Kalra, Nitish; Arjun, P.; Naik, Savitha B.; Pradeep, A. R.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. This study was designed to correlate the serum and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) levels of progranulin (PGRN) and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs CRP) in chronic periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Design. PGRN and hs CRP levels were estimated in 3 groups: healthy, chronic periodontitis, and type 2 DM with chronic periodontitis. Results. The mean PGRN and hs CRP concentrations in serum and GCF were the highest for group 3 followed by group 2 and the least in group 1. Conclusion. PGRN and hs CRP may be biomarkers of the inflammatory response in type 2 DM and chronic periodontitis. PMID:24191130

  6. Quantification of reactive carbonyl compounds in icodextrin-based peritoneal dialysis fluids by combined UHPLC-DAD and -MS/MS detection.

    PubMed

    Gensberger-Reigl, Sabrina; Huppert, Jochen; Pischetsrieder, Monika

    2016-01-25

    During heat sterilization of peritoneal dialysis (PD) fluids, the glucose component is partially degraded. The formed glucose degradation products impair biocompatibility and limit the long-term application of PD fluids. As an alternative to glucose, icodextrin, a polyglucose, is used as osmotic agent in PD fluids. After targeted screening for reactive carbonyl compounds, NMR- and MS-analyses very recently revealed 4-deoxyglucosone (4-DG), 3-deoxyglucosone (3-DG), 3-deoxygalactosone (3-DGal), 3,4-dideoxypentosone (3,4-DDPS), and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) as main polyglucose degradation products (pGDPs) in icodextrin-based PD fluids. Now, the present study established and validated a UHPLC method with DAD as well as a UHPLC-MS/MS method for the first-time quantification of those five major pGDPs in commercial icodextrin PD fluids after derivatization with o-phenylenediamine. Thus, 4-DG was identified to be the main degradation product (in concentrations up to 20 μM). In contrast to the values measured in glucose-based products, the concentration of 3-DGal (≤ 16 μM) was higher than the concentration of 3-DG (≤ 7 μM) indicating different reaction pathways starting from polyglucose compared to glucose. The compounds 3,4-DDPS and 5-HMF were present in minor quantities (≤ 0.3 μM each). PMID:26540628

  7. Modeling and simulation of pore-scale multiphase fluid flow and reactive transport in fractured and porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Meakin, Paul; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2009-07-14

    In the subsurface fluids play a critical role by transporting dissolved minerals, colloids and contaminants (sometimes over long distances), by mediating dissolution and precipitation processes and enabling chemical transformations in solution and at mineral surfaces. Although the complex geometries of fracture apertures, fracture networks and pore spaces may make it difficult to accurately predict fluid flow in saturated (single-phase) subsurface systems, well developed methods are available. The simulation of multiphase fluid flow in the subsurface is much more challenging because of the large density and/or viscosity ratios found in important applications (water/air in the vadose zone, water/oil, water/gas, gas/oil and water/oil/gas in oil reservoirs, water/air/non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL) in contaminated vadose zone systems and gas/molten rock in volcanic systems, for example). In addition, the complex behavior of fluid-fluid-solid contact lines, and its impact on dynamic contact angles, must also be taken into account, and coupled with the fluid flow. Pore network models and simple statistical physics based models such as the invasion percolation and diffusion-limited aggregation models have been used quite extensively. However, these models for multiphase fluid flow are based on simplified models for pore space geometries and simplified physics. Other methods such a lattice Boltzmann and lattice gas models, molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo methods, and particle methods such as dissipative particle dynamics and smoothed particle hydrodynamics are based more firmly on first principles, and they do not require simplified pore and/or fracture geometries. However, they are less (in some cases very much less) computationally efficient that pore network and statistical physics models. Recently a combination of continuum computation fluid dynamics, fluid-fluid interface tracking or capturing and simple models for the dependence of contact angles on fluid velocity

  8. Modeling and Simulation of Pore Scale Multiphase Fluid Flow and Reactive Transport in Fractured and Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Meakin; Alexandre Tartakovsky

    2009-07-01

    In the subsurface fluids play a critical role by transporting dissolved minerals, colloids and contaminants (sometimes over long distances), by mediating dissolution and precipitation processes and enabling chemical transformations in solution and at mineral surfaces. Although the complex geometries of fracture apertures, fracture networks and pore spaces may make it difficult to accurately predict fluid flow in saturated (single-phase) subsurface systems, well developed methods are available. The simulation of multiphase fluid flow in the subsurface is much more challenging because of the large density and/or viscosity ratios found in important applications (water/air in the vadose zone, water/oil, water/gas, gas/oil and water/oil/gas in oil reservoirs, water/air/non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL) in contaminated vadose zone systems and gas/molten rock in volcanic systems, for example). In addition, the complex behavior of fluid-fluid-solid contact lines, and its impact on dynamic contact angles, must also be taken into account, and coupled with the fluid flow. Pore network models and simple statistical physics based models such as the invasion percolation and diffusion-limited aggregation models have been used quite extensively. However, these models for multiphase fluid flow are based on simplified models for pore space geometries and simplified physics. Other methods such a lattice Boltzmann and lattice gas models, molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo methods, and particle methods such as dissipative particle dynamics and smoothed particle hydrodynamics are based more firmly on first principles, and they do not require simplified pore and/or fracture geometries. However, they are less (in some cases very much less) computationally efficient that pore network and statistical physics models. Recently a combination of continuum computation fluid dynamics, fluid-fluid interface tracking or capturing and simple models for the dependence of contact angles on fluid velocity

  9. High-order computational fluid dynamics tools for aircraft design.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z J

    2014-08-13

    Most forecasts predict an annual airline traffic growth rate between 4.5 and 5% in the foreseeable future. To sustain that growth, the environmental impact of aircraft cannot be ignored. Future aircraft must have much better fuel economy, dramatically less greenhouse gas emissions and noise, in addition to better performance. Many technical breakthroughs must take place to achieve the aggressive environmental goals set up by governments in North America and Europe. One of these breakthroughs will be physics-based, highly accurate and efficient computational fluid dynamics and aeroacoustics tools capable of predicting complex flows over the entire flight envelope and through an aircraft engine, and computing aircraft noise. Some of these flows are dominated by unsteady vortices of disparate scales, often highly turbulent, and they call for higher-order methods. As these tools will be integral components of a multi-disciplinary optimization environment, they must be efficient to impact design. Ultimately, the accuracy, efficiency, robustness, scalability and geometric flexibility will determine which methods will be adopted in the design process. This article explores these aspects and identifies pacing items. PMID:25024419

  10. High-order computational fluid dynamics tools for aircraft design

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z. J.

    2014-01-01

    Most forecasts predict an annual airline traffic growth rate between 4.5 and 5% in the foreseeable future. To sustain that growth, the environmental impact of aircraft cannot be ignored. Future aircraft must have much better fuel economy, dramatically less greenhouse gas emissions and noise, in addition to better performance. Many technical breakthroughs must take place to achieve the aggressive environmental goals set up by governments in North America and Europe. One of these breakthroughs will be physics-based, highly accurate and efficient computational fluid dynamics and aeroacoustics tools capable of predicting complex flows over the entire flight envelope and through an aircraft engine, and computing aircraft noise. Some of these flows are dominated by unsteady vortices of disparate scales, often highly turbulent, and they call for higher-order methods. As these tools will be integral components of a multi-disciplinary optimization environment, they must be efficient to impact design. Ultimately, the accuracy, efficiency, robustness, scalability and geometric flexibility will determine which methods will be adopted in the design process. This article explores these aspects and identifies pacing items. PMID:25024419

  11. Faulting processes at high fluid pressures: An example of fault valve behavior from the Wattle Gully Fault, Victoria, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Stephen F.

    1995-07-01

    The internal structures of the Wattle Gully Fault provide insights about the mechanics and dynamics of fault systems exhibiting fault valve behavior in high fluid pressure regimes. This small, high-angle reverse fault zone developed at temperatures near 300°C in the upper crust, late during mid-Devonian regional crustal shortening in central Victoria, Australia. The Wattle Gully Fault forms part of a network of faults that focused upward migration of fluids generated by metamorphism and devolatilisation at deeper crustal levels. The fault has a length of around 800 m and a maximum displacement of 50 m and was oriented at 60° to 80° to the maximum principal stress during faulting. The structure was therefore severely misoriented for frictional reactivation. This factor, together with the widespread development of steeply dipping fault fill quartz veins and associated subhorizontal extension veins within the fault zone, indicates that faulting occurred at low shear stresses and in a near-lithostatic fluid pressure regime. The internal structures of these veins, and overprinting relationships between veins and faults, indicate that vein development was intimately associated with faulting and involved numerous episodes of fault dilatation and hydrothermal sealing and slip, together with repeated hydraulic extension fracturing adjacent to slip surfaces. The geometries, distribution and internal structures of veins in the Wattle Gully Fault Zone are related to variations in shear stress, fluid pressure, and near-field principal stress orientations during faulting. Vein opening is interpreted to have been controlled by repeated fluid pressure fluctuations associated with cyclic, deformation-induced changes in fault permeability during fault valve behavior. Rates of recovery of shear stress and fluid pressure after rupture events are interpreted to be important factors controlling time dependence of fault shear strength and slip recurrence. Fluctuations in shear stress

  12. The importance of narcissism in predicting proactive and reactive aggression in moderately to highly aggressive children.

    PubMed

    Barry, Tammy D; Thompson, Alice; Barry, Christopher T; Lochman, John E; Adler, Kristy; Hill, Kwoneathia

    2007-01-01

    The present study examined the importance of psychopathy-linked narcissism in predicting proactive and reactive aggression and conduct problems in a group of 160 moderately to highly aggressive children (mean age of 10 years, 9 months). Children's self-report of self-esteem and parent and teacher report of dimensions of psychopathy [narcissism, callous-unemotional (CU) traits, and impulsivity], proactive and reactive aggression, and conduct problems were collected. Composites of parent and teacher ratings of children's behavior were used. Consistent with the study's hypotheses, narcissism predicted unique variance in both proactive and reactive aggression, even when controlling for other dimensions of psychopathy, demographic variables associated with narcissism, and the alternative subtype of aggression. As hypothesized, impulsivity was significantly associated with only reactive aggression. CU traits were not related to proactive or reactive aggression once the control variables were entered. All dimensions of psychopathy predicted unique variance in conduct problems. Consistent with prediction, narcissism was not significantly related to general self-esteem, providing support that narcissism and self-esteem are different constructs. Furthermore, narcissism and self-esteem related differentially to proactive aggression, reactive aggression, and conduct problems. Furthermore, narcissism but not self-esteem accounted for unique variance in aggression and conduct problems. The importance of narcissism in the prediction of aggressive behaviors and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:17444525

  13. Li2 - Li reactive collisions at high initial j

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberry, Mark; Marhatta, Ramesh; Stewart, Brian

    2014-05-01

    Inelastic molecular collisions are a fundamental process in astronomy and chemistry. We are studying collisions of 7Li2 with 7Li in a heat pipe oven, and looking for nuclear parity-changing events that signal a chemical reaction. Previous work in our group studied such reactions for low initial j; we are now working to collect data for the case of high initial j, where quasi-resonant phenomena occur. We have also incorporated new corrections for multiple collisions in our analysis. Quasi-classical trajectory calculations are used to model these reactions and extract physical insight.

  14. Implications of an ultramafic body in a basalt-dominated oceanic hydrothermal system on the vent fluid composition and on processes within sediments overlying a hydrothermal discharge zone: results of reactive-transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alt-Epping, P.; Diamond, L. W.

    2009-04-01

    characterized by elevated H2(aq), SiO2(aq), H2S(aq) and a relatively low pH. If the discharge zone is covered by sediments, the infiltrating hydrothermal fluid mixes with the sediment pore-water and entrained seawater and the presence of H2(aq) initiates a series of redox processes such as the reduction of CO2 to CH4 and SO4-2 to H2S. Thus, mixing-induced redox processes involving H2 and SO4-2 provide a mechanism to form metal sulfides and potentially ore deposits. Furthermore, the presence of H2(aq) in the ascending fluid favors the stability of the low-sulfidation form of redox-sensitive minerals, such as pyrrhotite over pyrite. The sediments mark the transition zone that separates the hot, anoxic, low pH hydrothermal basement fluids from the cold, oxic, high pH seawater. Mixing between oxygenated seawater and/or the sediment porewater and the reduced, discharging H2, H2S and CH4-enriched hydrothermal fluid may provide conditions favorable for microbial chemosynthesis and an environment suitable for the growth of microorganisms. However, as the lherzolite becomes progressively altered the reactivity of its primary minerals decreases and hence the production of H2 declines. The decrease in reactivity of the ultramafic is enhanced by the hydrological sealing which is caused by the volume increase of the rock and by the corresponding porosity/permeability reduction associated with serpentinization. The decreasing H2 production changes the oxidation state of the discharging fluid and gradually leads to chemical fingerprints that are consistent with purely basaltic systems. Numerical studies of this type demonstrate that reactive transport simulations are useful in correlating observable changes in chemical parameters (i.e. the composition of the vent fluid or alteration of the sediment column overlying discharge zones) with processes that occur in regions of the system that are not easily accessible by direct seafloor exploration.

  15. User's Guide of TOUGH2-EGS. A Coupled Geomechanical and Reactive Geochemical Simulator for Fluid and Heat Flow in Enhanced Geothermal Systems Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Fakcharoenphol, Perapon; Xiong, Yi; Hu, Litang; Winterfeld, Philip H.; Xu, Tianfu; Wu, Yu-Shu

    2013-05-01

    TOUGH2-EGS is a numerical simulation program coupling geomechanics and chemical reactions for fluid and heat flows in porous media and fractured reservoirs of enhanced geothermal systems. The simulator includes the fully-coupled geomechanical (THM) module, the fully-coupled geochemical (THC) module, and the sequentially coupled reactive geochemistry (THMC) module. The fully-coupled flow-geomechanics model is developed from the linear elastic theory for the thermo-poro-elastic system and is formulated with the mean normal stress as well as pore pressure and temperature. The chemical reaction is sequentially coupled after solution of flow equations, which provides the flow velocity and phase saturation for the solute transport calculation at each time step. In addition, reservoir rock properties, such as porosity and permeability, are subjected to change due to rock deformation and chemical reactions. The relationships between rock properties and geomechanical and chemical effects from poro-elasticity theories and empirical correlations are incorporated into the simulator. This report provides the user with detailed information on both mathematical models and instructions for using TOUGH2-EGS for THM, THC or THMC simulations. The mathematical models include the fluid and heat flow equations, geomechanical equation, reactive geochemistry equations, and discretization methods. Although TOUGH2-EGS has the capability for simulating fluid and heat flows coupled with both geomechanical and chemical effects, it is up to the users to select the specific coupling process, such as THM, THC, or THMC in a simulation. There are several example problems illustrating the applications of this program. These example problems are described in details and their input data are presented. The results demonstrate that this program can be used for field-scale geothermal reservoir simulation with fluid and heat flow, geomechanical effect, and chemical reaction in porous and fractured media.

  16. Carbonated hydroxyapatite starting from calcite and different orthophosphates under moderate hydrothermal conditions: Synthesis and surface reactivity in simulated body fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Pham Minh, Doan Nzihou, Ange; Sharrock, Patrick

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Carbonated apatite (CAP) could be easily obtained from CaCO{sub 3} and orthophosphates. • Highest CaCO{sub 3} dissolution and apatitic carbonate content were obtained with H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. • A-B-type CAP was formed. • The synthesized CAP was thermally stable up to 1000 °C. • This CAP showed high biomineralization activity before and after thermal treatment. - Abstract: The one-step synthesis of carbonated hydroxyapatite (CAP) using calcite and different orthophosphates was investigated in a closed batch reactor. Only orthophosphoric acid could lead to the complete decomposition of calcite particles, when the reaction temperature was set at 80 °C. On the other hand, the reaction time and the dilution of the initial calcite suspension had no significant influence on the formation of the solid products. CAP was formed as the main crystalline calcium phosphate with the carbonate content in the range of 4.2–4.6 wt.%. The thermal decarbonation of the synthesized CAP started at 750 °C but it was only significant at 1000 °C under air atmosphere. This thermal decarbonation was total at 1200 °C or above. All CAP samples and products following thermal treatments were found bioactive in the test using simulated body fluid (SBF) solution.

  17. Premixed direct injection nozzle for highly reactive fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Lacy, Benjamin Paul; York, William David; Uhm, Jong Ho; Zuo, Baifang

    2013-09-24

    A fuel/air mixing tube for use in a fuel/air mixing tube bundle is provided. The fuel/air mixing tube includes an outer tube wall extending axially along a tube axis between an inlet end and an exit end, the outer tube wall having a thickness extending between an inner tube surface having a inner diameter and an outer tube surface having an outer tube diameter. The tube further includes at least one fuel injection hole having a fuel injection hole diameter extending through the outer tube wall, the fuel injection hole having an injection angle relative to the tube axis. The invention provides good fuel air mixing with low combustion generated NOx and low flow pressure loss translating to a high gas turbine efficiency, that is durable, and resistant to flame holding and flash back.

  18. Rheologically stable, nontoxic, high-temperature, water-based drilling fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Elward-Berry, J.; Darby, J.B.

    1997-09-01

    An exceptionally stable, high-temperature, water-based drilling fluid has been developed based on a fundamental redesign of drilling fluid components and functions, while still using commercially available materials. Rheological stability was characterized by extensive Fann 50C low-shear-rate viscosity vs. temperature studies and supporting viscoelastic rheological data. The fluid has been used in offshore and land applications, at temperatures as high as 420 F and densities as high as 15.5 lbm/gal.

  19. Fault structure, stress, or pressure control of the seismicity in shale? Insights from a controlled experiment of fluid-induced fault reactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Barros, Louis; Daniel, Guillaume; Guglielmi, Yves; Rivet, Diane; Caron, Hervé; Payre, Xavier; Bergery, Guillaume; Henry, Pierre; Castilla, Raymi; Dick, Pierre; Barbieri, Ernesto; Gourlay, Maxime

    2016-06-01

    Clay formations are present in reservoirs and earthquake faults, but questions remain on their mechanical behavior, as they can vary from ductile (aseismic) to brittle (seismic). An experiment, at a scale of 10 m, aims to reactivate a natural fault by fluid pressure in shale materials. The injection area was surrounded by a dense monitoring network comprising pressure, deformation, and seismicity sensors, in a well-characterized geological setting. Thirty-two microseismic events were recorded during several injection phases in five different locations within the fault zone. Their computed magnitude ranged between -4.3 and -3.7. Their spatiotemporal distribution, compared with the measured displacement at the injection points, shows that most of the deformation induced by the injection is aseismic. Whether the seismicity is controlled by the fault architecture, mineralogy of fracture filling, fluid, and/or stress state is then discussed. The fault damage zone architecture and mineralogy are of crucial importance, as seismic slip mainly localizes on the sealed-with-calcite fractures which predominate in the fault damage zone. As no seismicity is observed in the close vicinity of the injection areas, the presence of fluid seems to prevent seismic slips. The fault core acts as an impermeable hydraulic barrier that favors fluid confinement and pressurization. Therefore, the seismic behavior seems to be strongly sensitive to the structural heterogeneity (including permeability) of the fault zone, which leads to a heterogeneous stress response to the pressurized volume.

  20. Impact reactivity of materials at very high oxygen pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connor, H. W.; Minchey, J. G.; Crowder, R.; Davidson, R.

    1983-01-01

    The requirements for impact testing of materials in an oxygen atmosphere at pressures from 82.7 MPa (12,000 psi) to 172 MPa (25,000 psi) were evaluated. The impact tester system was evaluated for potential pressure increases from 69 MPa (10,000 psi) to 82.7 MPa (12,000 psi). The low pressure oxygen and nitrogen systems, the impact tower, the impact test cell, and the high pressure oxygen system were evaluated individually. Although the structural integrity of the impact test cell and the compressor were sufficient for operation at 82.7 MPa (12,000 psi), studies revealed possible material incompatibility at that pressure and above. It was recommended that if a component should be replaced for 82.7 MPa (12,000 psi) operation the replacement should meet the final objectives of 172 MPa (25,000 psi). Recommended changes in the system include; use of Monel 400 for pressures above 82.7 MPa (12,000 psi), use of bellows to replace the seal in the impact tester, use of a sapphire window attached to a fiber optic for event sensing, and use of a three diaphragm compressor.

  1. Fracture Reactivation in Chemically Reactive Rock Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhubl, P.; Hooker, J. N.

    2013-12-01

    Reactivation of existing fractures is a fundamental process of brittle failure that controls the nucleation of earthquake ruptures, propagation and linkage of hydraulic fractures in oil and gas production, and the evolution of fault and fracture networks and thus of fluid and heat transport in the upper crust. At depths below 2-3 km, and frequently shallower, brittle processes of fracture growth, linkage, and reactivation compete with chemical processes of fracture sealing by mineral precipitation, with precipitation rates similar to fracture opening rates. We recently found rates of fracture opening in tectonically quiescent settings of 10-20 μm/m.y., rates similar to euhedral quartz precipitation under these conditions. The tendency of existing partially or completely cemented fractures to reactivate will vary depending on strain rate, mineral precipitation kinetics, strength contrast between host rock and fracture cement, stress conditions, degree of fracture infill, and fracture network geometry. Natural fractures in quartzite of the Cambrian Eriboll Formation, NW Scotland, exhibit a complex history of fracture formation and reactivation, with reactivation involving both repeated crack-seal opening-mode failure and shear failure of fractures that formed in opening mode. Fractures are partially to completely sealed with crack-seal or euhedral quartz cement or quartz cement fragmented by shear reactivation. Degree of cementation controls the tendency of fractures for later shear reactivation, to interact elastically with adjacent open fractures, and their intersection behavior. Using kinematic, dynamic, and diagenetic criteria, we determine the sequence of opening-mode fracture formation and later shear reactivation. We find that sheared fracture systems of similar orientation display spatially varying sense of slip We attribute these inconsistent directions of shear reactivation to 1) a heterogeneous stress field in this highly fractured rock unit and 2

  2. THE HIGH TEMPERATURE CHEMICAL REACTIVITY OF LI2O

    SciTech Connect

    Kessinger, G.; Missimer, D.

    2009-11-13

    ) It is likely that some or all of the past high temperature phase behavior and vaporization experiments involving Li{sub 2}O(s) at temperatures above 1250 C have actually involved Li{sub 2}O(l). If these past measurements were actually measurements performed on Li{sub 2}O(l) instead of the solid, the thermochemical data for phases and species in the Li-O system will require reevaluation.

  3. Development of superconducting high gradient magnetic separation system for highly viscous fluid for practical use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, S.; Mishima, F.; Akiyama, Y.; Nishijima, S.

    2011-11-01

    In the industrial plants processing highly viscous fluid such as foods or industrial products, it is necessary to remove the metallic wear debris originating from pipe in manufacturing line which triggers quality loss. In this study, we developed a high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) system which consists of superconducting magnet to remove the metallic wear debris. The magnetic separation experiment and the particle trajectory simulation were conducted with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as a model material (viscosity coefficient was 10 Pa s, which is 10,000 times higher than that in water). In order to develop a magnetic separation system for practical use, the particle trajectory simulation by using solenoidal superconducting magnet was conducted, and the possibility of the magnetic separation for removing ferromagnetic stainless steel (SUS) particles in highly viscous fluid of 10 Pa s was indicated. Based on the results, the number of filters to obtain required separation efficiency was examined to design the practical separation system.

  4. Evaluation of the Chemical Reactivity of the Fluid Phase Through Hard-Soft Acid-Base Concepts in Magmatic Intrusions with Wpplications to Ore Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigneresse, J.

    2009-05-01

    Ore genesis, when associated with felsic magmatism, develops from metals scavenging from the melt into the fluid, gaseous, phase. Its composition includes water, CO2, sulphur under several possible species, and halogens, mainly F and Cl. The respective influence of those elements is examined by computing the theoretical electronegativity and chemical hardness of the fluid phase. Those parameters are commonly larger for the fluid phase than for the silicate melt. Indeed a common hardness value for the melt is around 3.5 eV, whereas the computed values for the fluid phase are around 7.5 eV for pure water, with departure ranging from 6.9 eV in case of S-rich fluid, to 8.8 eV in case of a F-rich fluid. Since metals show tendency to present electronegativity above 15 eV and high hardness, the fluid phase is very attractive for metals. The influence of S, under its various non-detailed species, is to decrease both electronegativity and hardness. It therefore favours segregation of soft metals, as Cu, Ag and Au. Since F- is the hardest base, it increases both electronegativity and hardness, making the fluid phase attractive to Sn and W. Cl- present contrasted effects, since it decreases the hardness, but increases the electronegativity. It could be of influence in the segregation of Fe in iron-oxide- copper-gold (IOCG) porphyry deposits, though mixing between magmatic and evaporitic fluids make the situation quite complex. The chemical character of the fluid phase also explains the discrepancy existing for metal solubility, as well as for the redox conditions, between the melt and the fluid phase. The change in oxidation state induced by a hard fluid, i.e. F-rich, promotes oxidation, for instance from Sn(II) to Sn(IV) or reduction in case of a soft, i.e. S-rich, fluid phase, from Mo(VI) to Mo(IV). The bulk electronegativity and hardness of the fluid phase modify the redox state of the metals during transportation, before condensation. The semi-quantitative model provides

  5. Trace elements in migrating high-temperature fluids: Effects of diffusive exchange with the adjoining solid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenyon, Patricia M.

    1993-01-01

    Trace element concentrations and isotopic ratios are frequently used to study the behavior of high-temperature fluids in both metamorphic and igneous systems. Many theoretical formulations of the effects of fluid migration on trace elements have assumed instantaneous reequilibration between the migrating fluid and the solid material through which it is passing. This paper investigates the additional effects which arise when equilibration is not instantaneous due to a limited rate of diffusion in the solid, using an analytical steady state solution to a set of partial differential equations describing the exchange of trace elements between the fluid and the solid during the migration of the fluid.

  6. Trace elements in migrating high-temperature fluids: Effects of diffusive exchange with the adjoining solid

    SciTech Connect

    Kenyon, P.M.

    1993-12-01

    Trace element concentrations and isotopic ratios are frequently used to study the behavior of high-temperature fluids in both metamorphic and igneous systems. Many theoretical formulations of the effects of fluid migration on trace elements have assumed instantaneous reequilibration between the migrating fluid and the solid material through which it is passing. This paper investigates the additional effects which arise when equilibration is not instantaneous due to a limited rate of diffusion in the solid, using an analytical steady state solution to a set of partial differential equations describing the exchange of trace elements between the fluid and the solid during the migration of the fluid.

  7. EVALUATION OF FGD DRY INJECTION SORBENTS AND ADDITIVES - VOLUME 1 - DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH REACTIVITY SORBENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses recent work addressing lime enhancement by slurrying with siliceous materials and testing in a laboratory packed-bed reactor, as part of EPA's efforts to develop low cost, retrofit flue gas cleaning technology, including the development of highly reactive sor...

  8. EVALUATION OF FGD DRY INJECTION SORBENTS AND ADDITIVES: VOLUME 1. DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH REACTIVITY SORBENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses recent work addressing lime enhancement by slurrying with siliceous materials and testing in a laboratory packed-bed reactor, as part of EPA's efforts to develop low cost, retrofit flue gas cleaning technology, including the development of highly reactive sor...

  9. The effect of frequency-dependent electron swarm parameters on fluid modeling of high-frequency CCP discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Rochan; Mahadevan, Shankar; Sawada, Ikuo; Vukovic, Mirko; Ventzek, Peter; Raja, Laxminarayan

    2012-10-01

    Fluid models are computationally the most feasible approach for the multidimensional simulation of reactive CCPs. Fluid models require the specification of species reaction-rate and transport coefficients. For electrons, these closure terms are dependent on the assumed/computed EEDF that depend on the excitation frequency. However the excitation frequency dependence of these electron properties for fluid models are rarely discussed. Here we explore the significance of frequency-dependent electron transport and reaction rate coefficients for high-frequency CCP discharges. We use pre-computed electron properties from a zero-dimensional electron Boltzmann solver which are used in the simulation of an argon CCP at 60MHz and pressures of 15 mTorr and 100 mTorr. A high-resolution computational mesh is developed and used to overcome any uncertainty associated with numerical discretization. We report significant differences in the pre-computed electron reaction-rate and transport coefficients for a 60 MHz EEDF compared to direct-current EEDF or assumed Maxwellian EEDF. The effects of these differences on the discharge structure are found to be significant; clearly emphasizing the importance of using frequency-dependent electron properties in high-frequency CCP models.

  10. Persisting High Levels of Synovial Fluid Markers after Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Konttinen, Yrjö T.; Peterson, Lars; Lindahl, Anders; Kiviranta, Ilkka

    2008-01-01

    Local attempts to repair a cartilage lesion could cause increased levels of anabolic and catabolic factors in the synovial fluid. After repair with regenerated cartilage, the homeostasis of the cartilage ideally would return to normal. In this pilot study, we first hypothesized levels of synovial fluid markers would be higher in patients with cartilage lesions than in patients with no cartilage lesions, and then we hypothesized the levels of synovial fluid markers would decrease after cartilage repair. We collected synovial fluid samples from 10 patients before autologous chondrocyte transplantation of the knee. One year later, a second set of samples was collected and arthroscopic evaluation of the repair site was performed. Fifteen patients undergoing knee arthroscopy for various symptoms but with no apparent cartilage lesions served as control subjects. We measured synovial fluid matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) and insulinlike growth factor-I (IGF-I) concentrations with specific activity and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, respectively. The levels of MMP-3 and IGF-I were higher in patients having cartilage lesions than in control subjects with no cartilage lesions. One year after cartilage repair, the lesions were filled with repair tissue, but the levels of MMP-3 and IGF-I remained elevated, indicating either graft remodeling or early degeneration. Level of Evidence: Level III, prognostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18709427

  11. Material design for immersion lithography with high refractive index fluid (HIF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamatsu, Takashi; Wang, Yong; Shima, Motoyuki; Kusumoto, Shiro; Chiba, Takashi; Nakagawa, Hiroki; Hieda, Katsuhiko; Shimokawa, Tsutomu

    2005-05-01

    ArF immersion lithography is considered as the most promising next generation technology which enables to a 45 nm node device manufacturing and below. Not only depth of focus enlargement, immersion lithography enables to use hyper numerical aperture (NA) larger than 1.0 and achieve higher resolution capability. For 193nm lithography, water is an ideal immersion fluid, providing suitable refractive index and transmission properties. Furthermore the higher refractive index fluid is expected to provide a potential extension of optical lithography to the 32 nm node. This paper describes the material design for immersion lithography with high refractive index fluid. We have developed promising high refractive index fluids which satisfy the requirement for immersion fluid by screening wide variety of organic compounds. The physical and chemical properties of this high refractive index fluid are discussed in detail. Also the topcoat material which has good matching with high refractive index fluid is developed. While this topcoat material is soluble into aqueous TMAH developer, it does not dissolve into water or high refractive index fluid and gives suitable contact angle for immersion scan exposure. Immersion exposure experiments using high refractive index fluid with and w/o topcoat material was carried out and its lithographic performance is presented in this paper.

  12. The chemical and mechanical behaviors of polymer / reactive metal systems under high strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yubin

    As one category of energetic materials, impact-initiated reactive materials are able to release a high amount of stored chemical energy under high strain rate impact loading, and are used extensively in civil and military applications. In general, polymers are introduced as binder materials to trap the reactive metal powders inside, and also act as an oxidizing agent for the metal ingredient. Since critical attention has been paid on the metal / metal reaction, only a few types of polymer / reactive metal interactions have been studied in the literature. With the higher requirement of materials resistant to different thermal and mechanical environments, the understanding and characterization of polymer / reactive metal interactions are in great demand. In this study, PTFE (Polytetrafluoroethylene) 7A / Ti (Titanium) composites were studied under high strain rates by utilizing the Taylor impact and SHPB tests. Taylor impact tests with different impact velocities, sample dimensions and sample configurations were conducted on the composite, equipped with a high-speed camera for tracking transient images during the sudden process. SHPB and Instron tests were carried out to obtain the stress vs. strain curves of the composite under a wide range of strain rates, the result of which were also utilized for fitting the constitutive relations of the composite based on the modified Johnson-Cook strength model. Thermal analyses by DTA tests under different flow rates accompanied with XRD identification were conducted to study the reaction mechanism between PTFE 7A and Ti when only heat was provided. Numerical simulations on Taylor impact tests and microstructural deformations were also performed to validate the constitutive model built for the composite system, and to investigate the possible reaction mechanism between two components. The results obtained from the high strain rate tests, thermal analyses and numerical simulations were combined to provide a systematic study on

  13. Viscosities of Highly Fluid Melts: Carbonatites and Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingwell, D. B.; Di Genova, D.; Hess, K. U.; Cimarelli, C.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonatites are carbonate-rich and very fluid melts believed to form mainly from primary mantle melting. The mobility of these melts has attracted renewed interest as carbonatites are considered a major transport agent of carbon from the mantle to the crust and may be intimately linked to the generation of kimberlites. The measurement of carbonatite viscosity is a priority in order to understand the carbonatite mobility and reaction rates. Obtaining accurate viscosity measurements of such low viscosity melts is however an experimental challenge due to volatility, very low torques and melt stability in the viscometer. We present preliminary results of a rheological characterization study (Couette viscometry) on a series of very low viscosity natural melts and their analogues. Experiments have been performed using a Modular Compact Rheometer (Anton Paar MCR 502) equipped with 2 custom-made concentric-cylinder narrow gap geometries (steel and Pt-Au). The rheometer is characterized by an air-bearing-supported synchronous motor with torque ranging between 0.01 µNm and 230 mNm (resolution of 0.1 nNm). The instrument has been calibrated in a temperature-viscosity-shear rate window comparable with carbonate melts. Initially, a certified silicone standard (980 and 39000 mPa sec in a temperature interval 100-25°C) at shear rate of 1 to 100 sec-1 has been used. Then the viscosity of distilled water (0.08 - 0.05 mPa sec) at 30 and 60°C has been measured between 30 and 70 sec-1. Finally, high temperature calibration measurements at 1000°C have been performed using a DGG standard glass. Viscosity measurements on carbonate melts have been performed in the temperature range of 730-950°C. Measured values range between 3.4 and 15.2 mPa sec. Results show that in the investigated temperature range the melts exhibit, as expected, Newtonian viscosity. The results will be discussed in the context of all available data from the literature including high pressure determinations.

  14. Reactive transport model of growth and methane production by high-temperature methanogens in hydrothermal regions of the subseafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, L. C.; Algar, C. K.; Topçuoğlu, B. D.; Fortunato, C. S.; Larson, B. I.; Proskurowski, G. K.; Butterfield, D. A.; Vallino, J. J.; Huber, J. A.; Holden, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogenotrophic methanogens are keystone high-temperature autotrophs in deep-sea hydrothermal vents and tracers of habitability and biogeochemical activity in the hydrothermally active subseafloor. At Axial Seamount, nearly all thermophilic methanogens are Methanothermococcus and Methanocaldococcus species, making this site amenable to modeling through pure culture laboratory experiments coupled with field studies. Based on field microcosm incubations with 1.2 mM, 20 μM, or no hydrogen, the growth of methanogens at 55°C and 80°C is limited primarily by temperature and hydrogen availability, with ammonium amendment showing no consistent effect on total methane output. The Arrhenius constants for methane production by Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (optimum 82°C) and Methanothermococcus thermolithotrophicus (optimum 65°C) were determined in pure culture bottle experiments. The Monod constants for hydrogen concentration were measured by growing both organisms in a 2-liter chemostat at two dilution rates; 55°C, 65°C and 82°C; and variable hydrogen concentrations. M. jannaschii showed higher ks and Vmax constants than M. thermolithotrophicus. In the field, hydrogen and methane concentrations in hydrothermal end-member and low-temperature diffuse fluids were measured, and the concentrations of methanogens that grow at 55°C and 80°C in diffuse fluids were determined using most-probable-number estimates. Methane concentration anomalies in diffuse fluids relative to end-member hydrothermal concentrations and methanogen cell concentrations are being used to constrain a 1-D reactive transport model using the laboratory-determined Arrhenius and Monod constants for methane production by these organisms. By varying flow path length and subseafloor cell concentrations in the model, our goal is to determine solutions for the potential depth of the subseafloor biosphere coupled with the amount of methanogenic biomass it contains.

  15. Solubility of Aragonite in Aqueous Fluids at High Pressure and High Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facq, Sébastien; Daniel, Isabelle; Petitgirard, Sylvain; Cardon, Hervé; Sverjensky, Dimitri

    2014-05-01

    Deep crustal and mantle aqueous fluids play a crucial role in geologic processes occurring in the Earth's interior, especially at high PT conditions. Dissolved carbon appears to be a major element constituting these aqueous fluids, occurring under the form of molecular species (CO2, CO, CH4), ionic species such as carbonate or bicarbonate ions or some more complex organic compounds [1]. However, the nature and the content of the chemical species constituting these C-bearing aqueous fluids may strongly be affected by the environmental geologic conditions such as the pressure and the temperature range. If fluid speciation and solubility of carbonate minerals are well characterized at HT and relatively low pressure, less is evident at pressure above 2 GPa where experimental challenges make trickier speciation and solubility measurements. Thanks to recent advances in theoretical aqueous geochemistry [1-3], combined experimental and theoretical efforts allow now the investigation of speciation and solubility of carbonate minerals with pure water at higher PT conditions than previously feasible [4]. However, direct measurements of solubility of carbonate minerals at HP-HT conditions are still needed to help to the development of quantitative models of carbon transport by aqueous fluids in subduction zones and validate existing aqueous speciation model. In this study, we present recent X-ray fluorescence measurements and thermodynamic model of solubility of carbonate in aqueous fluids at pressure up to 5 GPa. The amount of dissolved aragonite in the fluid has been measured from the intensity of the Ca K-lines at the ESRF-ID27 using an externally-heated membrane-type diamond anvil cell and an incident monochromatic focused X-Ray beam at 20 keV. The combination of the XRF data on dissolution of CaCO3mineral combined to previous speciation results permits now to calculate the solubility KS of aragonite a pressure in excess of 2 GPa. [1] Manning, C. E. et al., Review in

  16. Properties of planetary fluids at high shock pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Nellis, W.J.; Mitchell, A.C.; Holmes, N.C.; McCandless, P.C.

    1991-03-01

    Models of the interiors of Uranus and Neptune are discussed. Pressures and temperatures in the interiors can be achieved in representative constituent molecular fluids by shock compression. Experimental techniques are described and recent results for synthetic Uranus and hydrogen are discussed. 19 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. High resolution geodetic techniques for monitoring fluid levels over time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hare, Jennifer Thompson

    1998-11-01

    In the first study, a novel surveillance technique is developed in which surface gravity observations are used to monitor the progress of a gas cap waterflood in the 8200 ft (2500 m) deep Prudhoe Bay reservoir, Alaska. This cost-effective method requires that high-precision gravity surveys be repeated every 3 to 5 years. Differences in the gravity field with time reflect changes in the reservoir fluid density distribution. A preliminary field test at Prudhoe Bay indicates survey accuracy of 5 to 10 mu Gal can be achieved for gravity data using a modified Lacoste & Romberg "G" type meter or Scintrex CG-3M combined with Global Positioning System (GPS) positioning. Forward gravity modeling of a suite of reservoir simulations of the proposed waterflood predicts variation in surface measurements of 100 mu Gal after 5 years of injection, and 180 to 250 mu Gal after 15 years. A constrained, least-squares method is used to invert synthetic gravity data for subsurface density distributions. The modeling procedure has been formulated to allow testing of the models for sensitivity to gravity sampling patterns, noise characteristics, and various constraints on model parameters such as density range, total mass, and model moment of inertia. Horizontal feature resolution of the waterflood is about 5000 ft (1520 m) for constrained inverse models from synthetic gravity with 5 mu Gal standard deviation noise. Results of the modeling indicate that inversion of time-lapse gravity data is a viable and promising technique for monitoring reservoir gas cap waterfloods. In the second study, the problem of how to estimate ancient lake levels from the geomorphology of remnant shoreline terraces is investigated. High resolution, GPS controlled, topographic data from around the highstand shoreline of Pleistocene Lake Lahontan in western Nevada provide the means for isolating coherent terrace features which are related to the paleoshoreline level. Determination of an unambiguous point or

  18. A parametric model for reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering of films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozák, Tomáš; Vlček, Jaroslav

    2016-02-01

    We present a time-dependent parametric model for reactive HiPIMS deposition of films. Specific features of HiPIMS discharges and a possible increase in the density of the reactive gas in front of the reactive gas inlets placed between the target and the substrate are considered in the model. The model makes it possible to calculate the compound fractions in two target layers and in one substrate layer, and the deposition rate of films at fixed partial pressures of the reactive and inert gas. A simplified relation for the deposition rate of films prepared using a reactive HiPIMS is presented. We used the model to simulate controlled reactive HiPIMS depositions of stoichiometric \\text{Zr}{{\\text{O}}2} films, which were recently carried out in our laboratories with two different configurations of the {{\\text{O}}2} inlets in front of the sputtered target. The repetition frequency was 500 Hz at the deposition-averaged target power densities of 5 Wcm-2and 50 Wcm-2 with a pulse-averaged target power density up to 2 kWcm-2. The pulse durations were 50 μs and 200 μs. Our model calculations show that the to-substrate {{\\text{O}}2} inlet provides systematically lower compound fractions in the target surface layer and higher compound fractions in the substrate surface layer, compared with the to-target {{\\text{O}}2} inlet. The low compound fractions in the target surface layer (being approximately 10% at the deposition-averaged target power density of 50 Wcm-2 and the pulse duration of 200 μs) result in high deposition rates of the films produced, which are in agreement with experimental values.

  19. Amino-terminated biphenylthiol self-assembled monolayers as highly reactive molecular templates

    SciTech Connect

    Meyerbroeker, N.; Waske, P.; Zharnikov, M.

    2015-03-14

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) with amino tail groups are of interest due to their ability of coupling further compounds. Such groups can be, in particular, created by electron irradiation of nitro- or nitrile-substituted aromatic SAMs, which provide a basis for chemical nanolithography and the fabrication of functionalized nanomembranes. An estimate of reactivity of the created amino groups requires a reference system of homogeneous, amino-terminated aromatic SAMs, which can also be used as a highly reactive molecular template. Here, we describe the synthesis of 4′-aminobiphenyl-4-thiol (ABPT) and SAMs prepared from this precursor on Au(111). The monolayers were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, which revealed that they are well defined, chemically uniform, densely packed, and highly ordered. To examine the influence of electron irradiation on the reactivity of the terminal amino groups, ABPT SAMs were exposed to low energy (50 eV) electrons up to a dose of 40 mC/cm{sup 2} and, subsequently, immersed in either trifluoroacetic, pentafluoropropionic, or heptafluorobutyric anhydride. Analysing the amount of the attached anhydride species made it possible to determine the percentage of reactive amino groups as well as the effect of steric hindrance upon the coupling reaction. The above results are compared with those obtained for the well-established nitro-substituted biphenylthiol monolayers.

  20. Reactive power planning under high penetration of wind energy using Benders decomposition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xu, Yan; Wei, Yanli; Fang, Xin; Li, Fangxing; Azim, Riyasat

    2015-11-05

    This study addresses the optimal allocation of reactive power volt-ampere reactive (VAR) sources under the paradigm of high penetration of wind energy. Reactive power planning (RPP) in this particular condition involves a high level of uncertainty because of wind power characteristic. To properly model wind generation uncertainty, a multi-scenario framework optimal power flow that considers the voltage stability constraint under the worst wind scenario and transmission N 1 contingency is developed. The objective of RPP in this study is to minimise the total cost including the VAR investment cost and the expected generation cost. Therefore RPP under this condition ismore » modelled as a two-stage stochastic programming problem to optimise the VAR location and size in one stage, then to minimise the fuel cost in the other stage, and eventually, to find the global optimal RPP results iteratively. Benders decomposition is used to solve this model with an upper level problem (master problem) for VAR allocation optimisation and a lower problem (sub-problem) for generation cost minimisation. Impact of the potential reactive power support from doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) is also analysed. Lastly, case studies on the IEEE 14-bus and 118-bus systems are provided to verify the proposed method.« less

  1. A manganese catalyst for highly reactive yet chemoselective intramolecular C(sp3)-H amination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradine, Shauna M.; Griffin, Jennifer R.; Zhao, Jinpeng; Petronico, Aaron L.; Miller, Shannon M.; Christina White, M.

    2015-12-01

    C-H bond oxidation reactions underscore the existing paradigm wherein high reactivity and high selectivity are inversely correlated. The development of catalysts capable of oxidizing strong aliphatic C(sp3)-H bonds while displaying chemoselectivity (that is, tolerance of more oxidizable functionality) remains an unsolved problem. Here, we describe a catalyst, manganese tert-butylphthalocyanine [Mn(tBuPc)], that is an outlier to the reactivity-selectivity paradigm. It is unique in its capacity to functionalize all types of C(sp3)-H bond intramolecularly, while displaying excellent chemoselectivity in the presence of π functionality. Mechanistic studies indicate that [Mn(tBuPc)] transfers bound nitrenes to C(sp3)-H bonds via a pathway that lies between concerted C-H insertion, observed with reactive noble metals such as rhodium, and stepwise radical C-H abstraction/rebound, as observed with chemoselective base metals such as iron. Rather than achieving a blending of effects, [Mn(tBuPc)] aminates even 1° aliphatic and propargylic C-H bonds, demonstrating reactivity and selectivity unusual for previously known catalysts.

  2. Reactive power planning under high penetration of wind energy using Benders decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yan; Wei, Yanli; Fang, Xin; Li, Fangxing; Azim, Riyasat

    2015-11-05

    This study addresses the optimal allocation of reactive power volt-ampere reactive (VAR) sources under the paradigm of high penetration of wind energy. Reactive power planning (RPP) in this particular condition involves a high level of uncertainty because of wind power characteristic. To properly model wind generation uncertainty, a multi-scenario framework optimal power flow that considers the voltage stability constraint under the worst wind scenario and transmission N 1 contingency is developed. The objective of RPP in this study is to minimise the total cost including the VAR investment cost and the expected generation cost. Therefore RPP under this condition is modelled as a two-stage stochastic programming problem to optimise the VAR location and size in one stage, then to minimise the fuel cost in the other stage, and eventually, to find the global optimal RPP results iteratively. Benders decomposition is used to solve this model with an upper level problem (master problem) for VAR allocation optimisation and a lower problem (sub-problem) for generation cost minimisation. Impact of the potential reactive power support from doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) is also analysed. Lastly, case studies on the IEEE 14-bus and 118-bus systems are provided to verify the proposed method.

  3. Flow of a reactive fluid through partially saturated fractures: Experimental observations of the influence of entrapped phase geometry on evolving flow channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detwiler, R. L.; Fisher, S.

    2008-12-01

    Reactive fluids cause dissolution and precipitation along mineral surfaces that can lead to the development of flow channels in porous and fractured media. In fully saturated fractures, dissolution of fracture surfaces leads to different behaviors depending on the relative magnitudes of advective and diffusive transport of dissolved minerals and surface reaction rates. The resulting alterations of the fracture pore space (apertures) range from relatively uniform dissolution of the fracture surfaces to the formation of distinct dissolution channels that dominate flow through the fracture. These processes are further complicated in many subsurface systems, where multiple fluids/phases interact within pore spaces (e.g., CO2 sequestration, groundwater contamination by organic solvents, oil and gas production). We present experimental results that explore the additional influence of an entrapped nonwetting phase on the formation of dissolution channels in fractures. We fabricated analog fractures by mating a 10x15-cm, smooth, reactive surface (KH2PO4) with a rough, non-reactive surface (glass). The resulting fractures were transparent allowing direct measurement of evolving fracture apertures and fluid phase distribution using established quantitative visualization techniques. Experiments were initiated by slowly injecting (negligible viscous forces) air into a fully saturated fracture followed by slow reinvasion of water. The resulting initial condition for the fracture dissolution experiments was a complex distribution of immobile air bubbles entrapped predominantly within large aperture regions. These bubbles were completely surrounded by flowing water (under-saturated with respect to KH2PO4) within smaller aperture regions. During experiments, mineral dissolution led to localized fracture aperture growth, which in turn caused gradual redistribution of the entrapped air within the fracture. The resulting evolution of dissolution channels differed significantly from

  4. The dissociation and equation of state of dense fluid oxygen at high pressures and high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Q F; Cai, L C; Zhang, Y; Gu, Y J

    2008-03-14

    The dissociation, pressure, and internal energy of dense fluid oxygen at high temperatures and densities have been calculated from the free-energy functions using the self-consistent fluid variational theory. In this paper, we focused on a mixture of oxygen atoms and molecules, and investigated the phenomenon of pressure dissociation at finite temperature. The single-shock Hugoniot derived from this equation of state agrees well with gas-gun experiments for pressure versus density. The equation of state and dissociation degree are predicted in the ranges of temperature of 5000-16,000 K and density of 0.1-4.5 g/cm(3). These data are formulated in the analytical forms of dissociation degree-density-temperature and pressure-density-temperature equation of state. PMID:18345911

  5. Graphene oxide as a high-performance fluid-loss-control additive in water-based drilling fluids.

    PubMed

    Kosynkin, Dmitry V; Ceriotti, Gabriel; Wilson, Kurt C; Lomeda, Jay R; Scorsone, Jason T; Patel, Arvind D; Friedheim, James E; Tour, James M

    2012-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) performs well as a filtration additive in water-based drilling fluids at concentrations as low as 0.2 % (w/w) by carbon content. Standard American Petroleum Institute (API) filtration tests were conducted on pH-adjusted, aqueous dispersions of GO and xanthan gum. It was found that a combination of large-flake GO and powdered GO in a 3:1 ratio performed best in the API tests, allowing an average fluid loss of 6.1 mL over 30 min and leaving a filter cake ~20 μm thick. In comparison, a standard suspension (~12 g/L) of clays and polymers used in the oil industry gave an average fluid loss of 7.2 mL and a filter cake ~280 μm thick. Scanning electron microscopy imaging revealed the extreme pliability of well-exfoliated GO, as the pressure due to filtration crumpled single GO sheets, forcing them to slide through pores with diameters much smaller than the flake's flattened size. GO solutions also exhibited greater shear thinning and higher temperature stability compared to clay-based fluid-loss additives, demonstrating potential for high-temperature well applications. PMID:22136134

  6. Coherent Raman scattering in high-pressure/high-temperature fluids: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, S.C.; Moore, D.S.

    1990-01-01

    The present understanding of high-pressure/high-temperature dense-fluid behavior is derived almost exclusively from hydrodynamic and thermodynamic measurements. Such results average over the microscopic aspects of the materials and are, therefore, insufficient for a complete understanding of fluid behavior. At the present, dense-fluid models can be verified only to the extend that they agree with the macroscopic measurements. Recently, using stimulated Raman scattering, Raman induced Kerr effect scattering, and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, we have been able to probe some of the microscopic phenomenology of these dense fluids. In this paper, we discuss primarily the use of CARS in conjunction with a two-stage light-gas gun to obtain vibrational spectra of shock-compressed liquid N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CO, their mixtures, CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}O. These experimental spectra are compared to synthetic spectra calculated using a semiclassical model for CARS intensities and best fit vibrational frequencies, peak Raman susceptibilities, and Raman linewidths. For O{sub 2}, the possibility of resonance enhancement from collision-induced absorption is addressed. Shifts in the vibrational frequencies reflect the influence of increased density and temperature on the intramolecular motion. The derived parameters suggest thermal equilibrium of the vibrational levels is established less than a few nanoseconds after shock passage. Vibrational temperatures are obtained that agree with those derived from equation-of-state calculations. Measured linewidths suggest that vibrational dephasing times have decreased to subpicosecond values at the highest shock pressures.

  7. Fluid Lensing, Applications to High-Resolution 3D Subaqueous Imaging & Automated Remote Biosphere Assessment from Airborne and Space-borne Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirayath, V.

    2014-12-01

    Fluid Lensing is a theoretical model and algorithm I present for fluid-optical interactions in turbulent flows as well as two-fluid surface boundaries that, when coupled with an unique computer vision and image-processing pipeline, may be used to significantly enhance the angular resolution of a remote sensing optical system with applicability to high-resolution 3D imaging of subaqueous regions and through turbulent fluid flows. This novel remote sensing technology has recently been implemented on a quadcopter-based UAS for imaging shallow benthic systems to create the first dataset of a biosphere with unprecedented sub-cm-level imagery in 3D over areas as large as 15 square kilometers. Perturbed two-fluid boundaries with different refractive indices, such as the surface between the ocean and air, may be exploited for use as lensing elements for imaging targets on either side of the interface with enhanced angular resolution. I present theoretical developments behind Fluid Lensing and experimental results from its recent implementation for the Reactive Reefs project to image shallow reef ecosystems at cm scales. Preliminary results from petabyte-scale aerial survey efforts using Fluid Lensing to image at-risk coral reefs in American Samoa (August, 2013) show broad applicability to large-scale automated species identification, morphology studies and reef ecosystem characterization for shallow marine environments and terrestrial biospheres, of crucial importance to understanding climate change's impact on coastal zones, global oxygen production and carbon sequestration.

  8. High expression of CD26 accurately identifies human bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted MAIT cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Prabhat K; Wong, Emily B; Napier, Ruth J; Bishai, William R; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Kasprowicz, Victoria O; Lewinsohn, Deborah A; Lewinsohn, David M; Gold, Marielle C

    2015-01-01

    Mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells express the semi-invariant T-cell receptor TRAV1–2 and detect a range of bacteria and fungi through the MHC-like molecule MR1. However, knowledge of the function and phenotype of bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted TRAV1–2+ MAIT cells from human blood is limited. We broadly characterized the function of MR1-restricted MAIT cells in response to bacteria-infected targets and defined a phenotypic panel to identify these cells in the circulation. We demonstrated that bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted T cells shared effector functions of cytolytic effector CD8+ T cells. By analysing an extensive panel of phenotypic markers, we determined that CD26 and CD161 were most strongly associated with these T cells. Using FACS to sort phenotypically defined CD8+ subsets we demonstrated that high expression of CD26 on CD8+ TRAV1–2+ cells identified with high specificity and sensitivity, bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted T cells from human blood. CD161hi was also specific for but lacked sensitivity in identifying all bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted T cells, some of which were CD161dim. Using cell surface expression of CD8, TRAV1–2, and CD26hi in the absence of stimulation we confirm that bacteria-reactive T cells are lacking in the blood of individuals with active tuberculosis and are restored in the blood of individuals undergoing treatment for tuberculosis. PMID:25752900

  9. Structure, Dynamics and Reactivity of C-O-H Fluids in Nanoporous Regimes Relevant to Unconventional Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, D. R.; Gautam, S.

    2015-12-01

    Many unconventional reservoir lithologies are comprised of pore regimes ranging from relatively uncommon large macropores at the millimeter scale to more numerous small micropores at the sub-micron and nanometer scale. The size, distribution and connectivity of these confined geometries, the chemistry of the solid, the chemistry of the fluids and their physical properties collectively dictate how fluids migrate into and through these micro- and nano-environments, wet and ultimately react with the solid surfaces. Our current understanding of the rates and mechanisms of fluid and mass transport and interaction within these multiporosity systems at the molecular scale is far less robust than we would like. This presentation will take a two-fold approach to this topic area. First we will provide a brief overview on pore types and their relationship with mineralogy in key gas shale formations with special emphasis on the Utica/Pt. Pleasant and Eagle Ford. We will highlight results from conventional methods such as SEM along with more sophisticated approaches including small- and ultra-small angle neutron scattering that contribute to two key science question areas: (a) What are the size, distribution, connectedness, and contribution to total porosity of nano- to micropores in representative gas shales? and (b) How do these pore features vary with the distributions of clay and carbonate matrix and organic matter? The second more in-depth part of the presentation will focus the application of state-of-the-art experimental, analytical and computational tools to assess key features of the fluid-matrix interaction relevant to shale settings. The multidisciplinary approaches highlighted will include neutron scattering and NMR experiments, thermodynamic measurements and molecular-level simulations to quantitatively assess molecular properties of pure water, aqueous electrolytes and simple immiscible water-hydrocarbon mixtures confined to well-characterized porous media

  10. Distributed control of reactive power flow in a radial distribution circuit with high photovoltaic penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Chertkov, Michael; Turitsyn, Konstantin; Backhaus, Scott; Sule, Petr

    2009-01-01

    We show how distributed control of reactive power can serve to regulate voltage and minimize resistive losses in a distribution circuit that includes a significant level of photovoltaic (PV) generation. To demonstrate the technique, we consider a radial distribution circuit with a single branch consisting of sequentially-arranged residential-scale loads that consume both real and reactive power. In parallel, some loads also have PV generation capability. We postulate that the inverters associated with each PV system are also capable of limited reactive power generation or consumption, and we seek to find the optimal dispatch of each inverter's reactive power to both maintain the voltage within an acceptable range and minimize the resistive losses over the entire circuit. We assume the complex impedance of the distribution circuit links and the instantaneous load and PV generation at each load are known. We compare the results of the optimal dispatch with a suboptimal local scheme that does not require any communication. On our model distribution circuit, we illustrate the feasibility of high levels of PV penetration and a significant (20% or higher) reduction in losses.

  11. A qualitative view of cryogenic fluid injection into high speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Schlumberger, J.; Proctor, M.

    1991-01-01

    The injection of supercritical pressure, subcritical temperature fluids, into a 2-D, ambient, static temperature and static pressure supersonic tunnel and free jet supersonic nitrogen flow field was observed. Observed patterns with fluid air were the same as those observed for fluid nitrogen injected into the tunnel at 90 deg to the supersonic flow. The nominal injection pressure was of 6.9 MPa and tunnel Mach number was 2.7. When injected directly into and opposing the tunnel exhaust flow, the observed patterns with fluid air were similar to those observed for fluid nitrogen but appeared more diffusive. Cryogenic injection creates a high density region within the bow shock wake but the standoff distance remains unchanged from the gaseous value. However, as the temperature reaches a critical value, the shock faded and advanced into the supersonic stream. For both fluids, nitrogen and air, the phenomena was completely reversible.

  12. Dynamic fluid loss in hydraulic fracturing under realistic shear conditions in high-permeability rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Navarrete, R.C.; Cawiezel, K.E.; Constien, V.G.

    1996-08-01

    A study of the dynamic fluid loss of hydraulic fracturing fluids under realistic shear conditions is presented. During a hydraulic fracturing treatment, a polymeric solution is pumped under pressure down the well to create and propagate a fracture. Part of the fluid leaks into the rock formation, leaving a skin layer of polymer or polymer filter cake, at the rock surface or in the pore space. This study focuses on the effects of shear rate and permeability on dynamic fluid-loss behavior of crosslinked and linear fracturing gels. Previous studies of dynamic fluid loss have mainly been with low-permeability cores and constant shear rates. Here, the effect of shear history and fluid-loss additive on the dynamic leakoff of high-permeability cores is examined.

  13. Cavitand-Based Polyphenols as Highly Reactive Organocatalysts for the Coupling of Carbon Dioxide and Oxiranes.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Rodríguez, Luis; Otalora Garmilla, Javier; Kleij, Arjan W

    2016-04-01

    A variety of cavitand-based polyphenols was prepared from cheap and accessible aldehyde and resorcinol/pyrogallol reagents to give the respective resorcin[4]- or pyrogallol[4]arenes. The preorganization of the phenolic units allows intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bond (HB) networks that affect both the reactivity and stability of these HB-donor catalysts. Unexpectedly, we found that the resorcin[4]arenes show cooperative catalysis behavior compared to the parent resorcinol in the catalytic coupling of epoxides and CO2 with a significantly higher turnover. At elevated reaction temperatures, the resorcin[4]arene-based catalyst 3 d displays the best catalytic performance with very high turnover numbers and frequencies, combining increased reactivity and stability compared to pyrogallol, and an ample substrate scope. This type of polyphenol structure thus illustrates the importance of a new, highly competitive organocatalyst design to devise sustainable CO2 conversion processes. PMID:26914250

  14. Asymmetric hydrogenation of ketones: Tactics to achieve high reactivity, enantioselectivity, and wide scope

    PubMed Central

    Ohkuma, Takeshi

    2010-01-01

    Ru complexes with chiral diphosphines and amine-based ligands achieve high catalytic activity and enantioselectivity for the hydrogenation of ketones under neutral to slightly basic conditions. The chiral environment is controllable by changing the combination of these two ligands. A concerted six-membered transition state is proposed to be the origin of the high reactivity. The η6-arene/TsDPEN–Ru and MsDPEN–Cp*Ir catalysts effect the asymmetric reaction under slightly acidic conditions. A variety of chiral secondary alcohols are obtained in high enantiomeric excess. PMID:20228621

  15. Characterization of Electro-Rheologcial Fluids Under High Shear Rate in Parallel Ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. W.; Zhang, C. B.; Yu, T. X.; Wen, W. J.

    Electro-rheological (ER) fluid is a smart suspension which can be changed promptly from Newtonian to Bingham plastic material when subjected to a high-intensity electric field. This property of ER fluid makes it possible to be applied in adaptive energy absorbers. As the impact velocity encountered in applications could be very large, it is necessary to characterize the ERF under high shear rate. In this study, a capillary rheo-meter with parallel duct was designed and manufactured which is capable of producing a shear rate as high as 5000(1/s). Two giant ER fluids with mass concentration C = 51% and 44.5% and a commercial density-matched ER fluid with C = 37.5% were characterized. The experimental results show that when the ER fluids are free of electric field (E = 0kV/mm), they are Newtonian. However, for the former two ER fluids, the deposition effect is very remarkable and stirring has to be made continuously to keep the suspension stable. With the increase of the electric field intensity, the yield shear stresses of ER fluids increase exponentially but their viscosities do not change much. It is also found that within the parallel duct, the flow of ER fluids exhibits notable fluctuations, whose period increases with the increase of electric field intensity and is independent of the shear rate.

  16. MHC restriction of synovial fluid lymphocyte responses to the triggering organism in reactive arthritis. Absence of a class I-restricted response.

    PubMed Central

    Hassell, A B; Pilling, D; Reynolds, D; Life, P F; Bacon, P A; Gaston, J S

    1992-01-01

    Synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMC) from patients with reactive arthritis (ReA) show marked proliferative responses to preparations of the organism triggering the arthritis. Initial studies with MHC-specific MoAbs have indicated that a significant element of these proliferative responses is mediated by class II MHC-restricted CD4+ T cells. It is imperative to establish the presence or absence of a class I-restricted response, for two reasons. Firstly, the association of ReA with the MHC class I molecule, HLA B27, raises the possibility of there being a B27-restricted response to the triggering organism. Secondly, a number of the organisms associated with ReA are intracellular pathogens, whose antigens might be expected to be presented by class I MHC molecules. In an effort to identify a class I MHC-restricted pathogen-specific response in the SFMC of ReA patients, we have assessed the proliferative responses of SFMC depleted of CD4+ T cells. Responses were grossly diminished by CD4+ T cell depletion. We also investigated Chlamydia-specific cytotoxicity in the SFMC of patients with sexually acquired ReA in a system using productive chlamydial infection to produce both targets and effectors. Significant antigen specific cytotoxicity was not seen. These experiments do not provide evidence to support the existence of pathogen-specific responses by CD8+, class I-restricted synovial fluid T cells in ReA. PMID:1606728

  17. High pressure induced phase transition and superdiffusion in anomalous fluid confined in flexible nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Bordin, José Rafael; Krott, Leandro B. Barbosa, Marcia C.

    2014-10-14

    The behavior of a confined spherical symmetric anomalous fluid under high external pressure was studied with Molecular Dynamics simulations. The fluid is modeled by a core-softened potential with two characteristic length scales, which in bulk reproduces the dynamical, thermodynamical, and structural anomalous behavior observed for water and other anomalous fluids. Our findings show that this system has a superdiffusion regime for sufficient high pressure and low temperature. As well, our results indicate that this superdiffusive regime is strongly related with the fluid structural properties and the superdiffusion to diffusion transition is a first order phase transition. We show how the simulation time and statistics are important to obtain the correct dynamical behavior of the confined fluid. Our results are discussed on the basis of the two length scales.

  18. Eolian delivery of highly reactive iron to the glacial ocean of the late Paleozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sur, S.; Soreghan, G. S.; Owens, J. D.; Lyons, T. W.; Soreghan, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    The potential biogeochemical impact of iron-rich dust delivery to the oceans is well recognized for Earth’s recent record but virtually unexplored in deeper time, despite recognition of large ancient dust fluxes. Abundant eolian dust (loess) deposits have been documented in western equatorial Pangaea (western U.S.), dating from the late Paleozoic (300 Ma), a time of known continental-scale glaciation. The role of iron in ancient ecosystems is elucidated by analytical techniques that enable identification of three iron pools within the total iron (FeT) pool: highly reactive (FeHR), poorly reactive, and unreactive. FeHR consists of amorphous and crystalline iron oxides and (oxyhydr)oxides that are readily reactive to H2S on an early diagenetic time scale. FeHR in our ancient sediments is dominated by crystalline oxide forms soluble in a citrate-bicarbonate, Na dithionite (CBD) solution, iron transformed to pyrite (Fepy), and magnetite. If the crystalline oxide phases that we measure in the record at least partially reflect less crystalline, more soluble oxyhydroxide precursors, then ancient FeHR roughly tracks its initial bioavailability and thus can be used as a proxy for potential primary productivity. Here, we report the uniqueness of Fe relationships (enriched FeHR/FeT values and relatively depleted FeT/Al) from a Pennsylvanian (Upper Carboniferous), loess-derived mudrock that accumulated at lowstand (glacial) time within a carbonate buildup of the so-called “Horseshoe Atoll” of the Midland basin (west Texas). This relationship is atypical compared to modern fluvial sediment and soil-derived dust and suggests an enhancement of the reactivity of an internal Fe pool and possible loss of Fe phases through unknown, but extreme biogeochemical processing. Comparisons of our data with other Permo-Carboniferous dusts, pedogenically altered loess, and emerging data on modern dusts suggest that the high values of FeHR/FeT in the mudrock may reflect glacial weathering

  19. Duty cycle control in reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering of hafnium and niobium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, R.; Treverrow, B.; Murdoch, B.; Xie, D.; Ross, A. E.; Partridge, J. G.; Falconer, I. S.; McCulloch, D. G.; McKenzie, D. R.; Bilek, M. M. M.

    2016-06-01

    Instabilities in reactive sputtering have technological consequences and have been attributed to the formation of a compound layer on the target surface (‘poisoning’). Here we demonstrate how the duty cycle of high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) can be used to control the surface conditions of Hf and Nb targets. Variations in the time resolved target current characteristics as a function of duty cycle were attributed to gas rarefaction and to the degree of poisoning of the target surface. As the operation transitions from Ar driven sputtering to metal driven sputtering, the secondary electron emission changes and reduces the target current. The target surface transitions smoothly from a poisoned state at low duty cycles to a quasi-metallic state at high duty cycles. Appropriate selection of duty cycle increases the deposition rate, eliminates the need for active regulation of oxygen flow and enables stable reactive deposition of stoichiometric metal oxide films. A model is presented for the reactive HIPIMS process in which the target operates in a partially poisoned mode with different degrees of oxide layer distribution on its surface that depends on the duty cycle. Finally, we show that by tuning the pulse characteristics, the refractive indices of the metal oxides can be controlled without increasing the absorption coefficients, a result important for the fabrication of optical multilayer stacks.

  20. High-resolution single-molecule fluorescence imaging of zeolite aggregates within real-life fluid catalytic cracking particles.

    PubMed

    Ristanović, Zoran; Kerssens, Marleen M; Kubarev, Alexey V; Hendriks, Frank C; Dedecker, Peter; Hofkens, Johan; Roeffaers, Maarten B J; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2015-02-01

    Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) is a major process in oil refineries to produce gasoline and base chemicals from crude oil fractions. The spatial distribution and acidity of zeolite aggregates embedded within the 50-150 μm-sized FCC spheres heavily influence their catalytic performance. Single-molecule fluorescence-based imaging methods, namely nanometer accuracy by stochastic chemical reactions (NASCA) and super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI) were used to study the catalytic activity of sub-micrometer zeolite ZSM-5 domains within real-life FCC catalyst particles. The formation of fluorescent product molecules taking place at Brønsted acid sites was monitored with single turnover sensitivity and high spatiotemporal resolution, providing detailed insight in dispersion and catalytic activity of zeolite ZSM-5 aggregates. The results point towards substantial differences in turnover frequencies between the zeolite aggregates, revealing significant intraparticle heterogeneities in Brønsted reactivity. PMID:25504139

  1. Natural occurrence and significance of fluids indicating high pressure and temperature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roedder, E.

    1981-01-01

    Most natural minerals have formed from a fluid phase such as a silicate melt or a saline aqueous solution. Fluid inclusions are tiny volumes of such fluids that were trapped within the growing crystals. These inclusions can provide valuable but sometimes ambiguous data on the temperature, pressure, and composition of these fluids, many of which are not available from any other source. They also provide "visual autoclaves" in which it is possible to watch, through the microscope, the actual phase changes take place as the inclusions are heated. This paper reviews the methods of study and the results obtained, mainly on inclusions formed from highly concentrated solutions, at temperatures ???500??C. Many such fluids have formed as a result of immiscibility with silicate melt in igneous or high-temperature metamorphic rocks. These include fluids consisting of CO2, H2O, or hydrosaline melts that were <50% H2O. From the fluid inclusion evidence it is clear that a boiling, very hot, very saline fluid was present during the formation of most of the porphyry copper deposits in the world. Similarly, from the inclusion evidence it is clear that early (common) pegmatites formed from essentially silicate melts and that the late, rare-element-bearing and chamber-type pegmatites formed from a hydrosaline melt or a more dilute water solution. The evidence on whether this change in composition from early to late solutions was generally continuous or involved immiscibility is not as clear. ?? 1981.

  2. Fluid Mechanics of a High Performance Racing Bicycle Wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercat, Jean-Pierre; Cretoux, Brieuc; Huat, Francois-Xavier; Nordey, Benoit; Renaud, Maxime; Noca, Flavio

    2013-11-01

    In 2012, MAVIC released the most aerodynamic bicycle wheel on the market, the CXR 80. The french company MAVIC has been a world leader for many decades in the manufacturing of bicycle wheels for competitive events such as the Olympic Games and the Tour de France. Since 2010, MAVIC has been in a research partnership with the University of Applied Sciences in Geneva, Switzerland, for the aerodynamic development of bicycle wheels. While most of the development up to date has been performed in a classical wind tunnel, recent work has been conducted in an unusual setting, a hydrodynamic towing tank, in order to achieve low levels of turbulence and facilitate quantitative flow visualization (PIV). After a short introduction on the aerodynamics of bicycle wheels, preliminary fluid mechanics results based on this novel setup will be presented.

  3. High Ki-67 Immunohistochemical Reactivity Correlates With Poor Prognosis in Bladder Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yihuan; Zhang, Xin; Mo, Meile; Tan, Zhong; Huang, Lanshan; Zhou, Hong; Wang, Chunqin; Wei, Fanglin; Qiu, Xiaohui; He, Rongquan; Chen, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ki-67 is considered as one of prime biomarkers to reflect cell proliferation and immunohistochemical Ki-67 staining has been widely applied in clinical pathology. To solve the widespread controversy whether Ki-67 reactivity significantly predicts clinical prognosis of bladder carcinoma (BC), we performed a comprehensive meta-analysis by combining results from different literature. A comprehensive search was conducted in the Chinese databases of WanFang, China National Knowledge Infrastructure and Chinese VIP as well as English databases of PubMed, ISI web of science, EMBASE, Science Direct, and Wiley online library. Independent studies linking Ki-67 to cancer-specific survival (CSS), disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and recurrence-free survival (RFS) were included in our meta-analysis. With the cut-off values literature provided, hazard ratio (HR) values between the survival distributions were extracted and later combined with STATA 12.0. In total, 76 studies (n = 13,053 patients) were eligible for the meta-analysis. It was indicated in either univariate or multivariate analysis for survival that high Ki-67 reactivity significantly predicted poor prognosis. In the univariate analysis, the combined HR for CSS, DFS, OS, PFS, and RFS were 2.588 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.623–4.127, P < 0.001), 2.697 (95%CI: 1.874–3.883, P < 0.001), 2.649 (95%CI: 1.632–4.300, P < 0.001), 3.506 (95%CI: 2.231–5.508, P < 0.001), and 1.792 (95%CI: 1.409–2.279, P < 0.001), respectively. The pooled HR of multivariate analysis for CSS, DFS, OS, PFS, and RFS were 1.868 (95%CI: 1.343–2.597, P < 0.001), 2.626 (95%CI: 2.089–3.301, P < 0.001), 1.104 (95%CI: 1.008–1.209, P = 0.032), 1.518 (95%CI: 1.299–1.773, P < 0.001), and 1.294 (95%CI: 1.203–1.392, P < 0.001), respectively. Subgroup analysis of univariate analysis by origin showed that Ki-67 reactivity significantly

  4. Nanometer scale high-aspect-ratio trench etching at controllable angles using ballistic reactive ion etching

    SciTech Connect

    Cybart, Shane; Roediger, Peter; Ulin-Avila, Erick; Wu, Stephen; Wong, Travis; Dynes, Robert

    2012-11-30

    We demonstrate a low pressure reactive ion etching process capable of patterning nanometer scale angled sidewalls and three dimensional structures in photoresist. At low pressure the plasma has a large dark space region where the etchant ions have very large highly-directional mean free paths. Mounting the sample entirely within this dark space allows for etching at angles relative to the cathode with minimal undercutting, resulting in high-aspect ratio nanometer scale angled features. By reversing the initial angle and performing a second etch we create three-dimensional mask profiles.

  5. Use of TOUGHREACT to Simulate Effects of Fluid Chemistry onInjectivity in Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs with High Ionic StrengthFluids

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tianfu; Zhang, Guoxiang; Pruess, Karsten

    2005-02-09

    Recent studies suggest that mineral dissolution/precipitation and clay swelling effects could have a major impact on the performance of hot dry rock (HDR) and hot fractured rock (HFR) reservoirs. A major concern is achieving and maintaining adequate injectivity, while avoiding the development of preferential short-circuiting flow paths. A Pitzer ionic interaction model has been introduced into the publicly available TOUGHREACT code for solving non-isothermal multi-phase reactive geochemical transport problems under conditions of high ionic strength, expected in typical HDR and HFR systems. To explore chemically-induced effects of fluid circulation in these systems, we examine ways in which the chemical composition of reinjected waters can be modified to improve reservoir performance. We performed a number of coupled thermo-hydrologic-chemical simulations in which the fractured medium was represented by a one-dimensional MINC model (multiple interacting continua). Results obtained with the Pitzer activity coefficient model were compared with those using an extended Debye-Hueckel equation. Our simulations show that non-ideal activity effects can be significant even at modest ionic strength, and can have major impacts on permeability evolution in injection-production systems. Alteration of injection water chemistry, for example by dilution with fresh water, can greatly alter precipitation and dissolution effects, and can offer a powerful tool for operating hot dry rock and hot fractured rock reservoirs in a sustainable manner.

  6. Gaining insights into reactive fluid-fractured rock systems using the temporal moments of a tracer breakthrough curve.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Liu, H-H; Spycher, N; Kennedy, B M

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we show that the tracer breakthrough curves (BTCs), when the tracer chemically interacts with the solid matrix of a fractured rock, are considerably different than when it does not. Of particular interest, is the presence of a long pseudo steady state zone in the BTCs, where the tracer concentration is more or less constant over a long period of time. However, such a zone of constant concentration is not visible when either the tracer does not interact with the solid, or does so at an extremely fast rate. We show that these characteristics of the BTCs could be correlated to the parameters of the system. We develop expressions for the mean residence time and its variance for a chemically active and inactive tracer. We show that chemical interaction between the tracer and the solid increases the mean residence time and the increase depends on the distribution coefficient. We also show that the variance of residence time for a chemically active tracer is much larger than that for an inactive tracer, and it depends on both the distribution coefficient and the rate of chemical reaction. We verify these calculations against synthetic tracer BTCs, where the temporal moments are calculated by numerically integrating the tracer evolution curves. Even though we developed the mathematical expressions assuming an idealized fracture-matrix system, we believe that the mathematical expressions developed in this paper can be useful in gaining insights into reactive transport in a real fractured rock system. PMID:24424264

  7. Gaining insights into reactive fluid-fractured rock systems using the temporal moments of a tracer breakthrough curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Liu, H.-H.; Spycher, N.; Kennedy, B. M.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we show that the tracer breakthrough curves (BTCs), when the tracer chemically interacts with the solid matrix of a fractured rock, are considerably different than when it does not. Of particular interest, is the presence of a long pseudo steady state zone in the BTCs, where the tracer concentration is more or less constant over a long period of time. However, such a zone of constant concentration is not visible when either the tracer does not interact with the solid, or does so at an extremely fast rate. We show that these characteristics of the BTCs could be correlated to the parameters of the system. We develop expressions for the mean residence time and its variance for a chemically active and inactive tracer. We show that chemical interaction between the tracer and the solid increases the mean residence time and the increase depends on the distribution coefficient. We also show that the variance of residence time for a chemically active tracer is much larger than that for an inactive tracer, and it depends on both the distribution coefficient and the rate of chemical reaction. We verify these calculations against synthetic tracer BTCs, where the temporal moments are calculated by numerically integrating the tracer evolution curves. Even though we developed the mathematical expressions assuming an idealized fracture-matrix system, we believe that the mathematical expressions developed in this paper can be useful in gaining insights into reactive transport in a real fractured rock system.

  8. Low permeability filter cake limits damage from high-pH drilling fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Z.; Hu, Y.

    1997-02-17

    Changing the particle size distribution in high-pH drilling fluids and perforating underbalanced helped protect sensitive reservoirs from formation damage. In several wells drilled in a carboniferous reservoir system in China, invasion of the high-pH filtrate from the drilling and workover fluids seriously damaged the formation. An in-depth reservoir study determined the cause of the formation damage and led to the development of new field procedures to prevent damage in future wells. Details are described.

  9. High Pressure, Transport Properties of Fluids: Theory and Data from Levitated Fluid-Drops at Combustion-Relevant Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, J.; Ohaska, K.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to derive a set of consistent mixing rules for calculating diffusivities and thermal diffusion factors over a thermodynamic regime encompassing the subcritical and supercritical ranges. These should serve for modeling purposes, and therefore for accurate simulations of high pressure phenomena such as fluid disintegration, turbulent flows and sprays. A particular consequence of this work will be the determination of effective Lewis numbers for supercritical conditions, thus enabling the examination of the relative importance of heat and mass transfer at supercritical pressures.

  10. Extent of antigenic cross-reactivity among highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Ducatez, Mariette F; Cai, Zhipeng; Peiris, Malik; Guan, Yi; Ye, Zhiping; Wan, Xiu-Feng; Webby, Richard J

    2011-10-01

    Highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza viruses emerged in 1996 and have since evolved so extensively that a single strain can no longer be used as a prepandemic vaccine or diagnostic reagent. We therefore sought to identify the H5N1 strains that may best serve as cross-reactive diagnostic reagents. We compared the cross-reactivity of 27 viruses of clades 0, 1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, and 4 and of four computationally designed ancestral H5N1 strains by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and microneutralization (MN) assays. Antigenic cartography was used to analyze the large quantity of resulting data. Cartographs of HI titers with chicken red blood cells were similar to those of MN titers, but HI with horse red blood cells decreased antigenic distances among the H5N1 strains studied. Thus, HI with horse red blood cells seems to be the assay of choice for H5N1 diagnostics. Whereas clade 2.2 antigens were able to detect antibodies raised to most of the tested H5N1 viruses (and clade 2.2-specific antisera detected most of the H5N1 antigens), ancestral strain A exhibited the widest reactivity pattern and hence was the best candidate diagnostic reagent for broad detection of H5N1 strains. PMID:21832017

  11. THC-MP: High performance numerical simulation of reactive transport and multiphase flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaohui; Li, Weishan; Tian, Hailong; Li, Hongliang; Xu, Haixiao; Xu, Tianfu

    2015-07-01

    The numerical simulation of multiphase flow and reactive transport in the porous media on complex subsurface problem is a computationally intensive application. To meet the increasingly computational requirements, this paper presents a parallel computing method and architecture. Derived from TOUGHREACT that is a well-established code for simulating subsurface multi-phase flow and reactive transport problems, we developed a high performance computing THC-MP based on massive parallel computer, which extends greatly on the computational capability for the original code. The domain decomposition method was applied to the coupled numerical computing procedure in the THC-MP. We designed the distributed data structure, implemented the data initialization and exchange between the computing nodes and the core solving module using the hybrid parallel iterative and direct solver. Numerical accuracy of the THC-MP was verified through a CO2 injection-induced reactive transport problem by comparing the results obtained from the parallel computing and sequential computing (original code). Execution efficiency and code scalability were examined through field scale carbon sequestration applications on the multicore cluster. The results demonstrate successfully the enhanced performance using the THC-MP on parallel computing facilities.

  12. Understanding the Composition and Reactivity of Au/Cu Electrocatalyst Nanoparticles in Solution Using Highly Accurate Reactive Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artrith, Nongnuch; Kolpak, Alexie

    2014-03-01

    The shape, size, and composition of catalyst nanoparticles can have a significant influence on their catalytic activity. Understanding such structure-reactivity relationships is crucial for the optimization of industrial catalysts and the design of novel catalysts with enhanced properties. In this work, we investigate the equilibrium shape and surface structure/composition of Au/Cu nanoparticles in solution, which have recently been shown to be stable and efficient catalysts for CO2 reduction. Using a combination of density functional theory calculations and large-scale Monte-Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations with reactive atomistic potentials, we determine how the nanoparticle shape, surface structure, and surface stoichiometry (i.e., fraction of Au at the surface relative to overall composition), evolve as a function of varying catalytic conditions. We discuss the effects of these changes on the surface electronic structure and binding energies of CO2, H2, and CH3OH. Our results emphasize the important relationships between catalytic environment (e.g., solvent effects), catalyst structure, and catalytic activity. We thank the Schlumberger Foundation Faculty for the Future for financial support. Computing time at XSEDE and NERSC clusters are gratefully acknowledged.

  13. Three-Dimensional Magnetic Reconnection Under Low Chromospheric Conditions Using a Two-Fluid Weakly Ionized Reactive Plasma Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez Laguna, A.; Lani, A.; Poedts, S.; Mansour, N. N.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a physical process enabling for the conversion of so-called free (non-potential) magnetic energy into kinetic and thermal energy by breaking the flux conservation law that exists for ideal (i.e. perfectly conducting) plasmas. This ubiquitous phenomenon in magnetized plasma plays an important role in the Sun's chromosphere as likely being responsible for transient plasma phenomena such as solar flares, spicules and chromospheric jets. In this work, we present a computational model that simulates magnetic reconnection under low chromospheric conditions using a two-fluid (plasma + neutrals) approach introduced by Leake et al. (2012). This model considers non-equilibrium partial ionization effects including ionization, recombination reactions and scattering collisions while simulating the interplay between the charged particles with the electromagnetic field. Previous 2D simulations showed that the dynamics of ions and neutrals are decoupled during the reconnection process. Also, the effect of the chemical non-equilibrium in the reconnection region plays a crucial role, yielding faster reconnection rates. We extended these simulations to study different 3D configurations in order to analyze the impact of non-equilibrium partial ionization effects on the neutral sheet configuration(s) and the reconnection rate of more realistic geometries. The results are compared with the two-dimensional simulations.

  14. High fluid pressures and high fluid flow rates in the Megasplay Fault Zone, NanTroSEIZE Kumano Transect, SW Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. Casey; Barrett, Myles; Thu, Moe Kyaw

    2012-08-01

    Annular pressure while drilling data shows high fluid overpressures at Site C0001 in part of the megasplay fault zone of the NanTroSEIZE transect across the subduction zone of SW Japan. Mostly standard annular pressures while drilling occur at three other sites, including two penetrating major faults. The two holes at Site C0001 show a step up to lithostatic annular pressure at about 500 mbsf, following initial indicators of overpressure at about 375 mbsf (meters below seafloor). The annular pressure remains high and increasing to total depth of 1000 mbsf. Seismic lines through the site show bright reflectors in the zone of initial annular pressure increase. Borehole images, sonic velocities, and resistivity all suggest a zone of fractures, from about 490 to 630 mbsf. A hydraulic model of the fluid system explains the observed pressures by influx of formation fluid at about 500 mbsf. The combination of a natural influx of 3300 l/m plus 2200 l/m from the drilling system can explain the observed annular pressures. The highly fractured zone that bleeds fluids to the borehole may be sealed by a localized zone of compressive stress or by overlying gas hydrates.

  15. TMI-2 in-vessel hydraulic systems utilize high water and high boron content fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Baston, V.F.; Hofstetter, K.J.; Hofman, L.A.; Gallagher, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    Choice of a hydraulic fluid for use in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor vessel defueling equipment required consideration of the following constraints for the hydraulic fluid given an accidental spill into the reactor coolant system (RCS). The TMI-2 RCS hydraulic fluid utilized in the hydraulic operations utilized a solution composition of 95 wt% water and 5 wt% of the above base fluid. The TMI-2 hydraulic system utilizes pressures up to 3500 psi. The selected hydraulic fluid has been in use since December 1986 with minimal operational difficulties.

  16. Assessment of controlling processes for field-scale uranium reactive transport under highly transient flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Liu, Chongxuan; Greskowiak, Janek; Prommer, Henning; Zachara, John M.

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents the results of a comprehensive model-based analysis of a uranyl [U(VI)] tracer test conducted at the U.S. DOE Hanford 300 Area (300A) IFRC. Despite the highly complex field conditions the numerical three-dimensional multicomponent reactive transport model was able to capture most of the spatiotemporal variations of the observed U(VI) concentrations. A multimodel analysis was performed to interrogate the relative importance of various processes and factors for controlling field-scale reactive transport during the uranyl tracer test. The results indicate that multirate sorption/desorption, surface complexation reactions, and initial concentration distributions were the most important processes and factors controlling U(VI) migration. On the other hand, cation exchange reactions, the choice of the surface complexation model, and dual-domain mass transfer processes played less important roles under the prevailing field-test conditions. Further analysis of the modeling results demonstrates that these findings are conditioned to the relatively stable groundwater chemistry and the selected length of the field experimental duration (16 days). The model analysis also revealed the crucial role of the intraborehole flow that occurred within the long-screened monitoring wells and thus affected both field measurements and simulated U(VI) concentrations as a combined effect of aquifer heterogeneity and dynamic flow conditions. This study provides the first highly data-constrained uranium transport simulations under highly dynamic flow conditions. It illustrates the value of reactive transport modeling for elucidating the relative importance of individual processes in controlling uranium transport under specific field-scale conditions.

  17. Pragmatic fluid optimization in high-risk surgery patients: when pragmatism dilutes the benefits.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Daniel A

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that hemodynamic optimization by fluid loading, particularly when performed in the early phase of surgery, is beneficial in high-risk surgery patients: it leads to a reduction in postoperative complications and even to improved long-term outcome. However, it is also true that goal- directed strategies of fluid optimization focusing on cardiac output optimization have not been applied in the clinical routine of many institutions. Reasons are manifold: disbelief in the level of evidence and on the accuracy and practicability of the required monitoring systems, and economics. The FOCCUS trial examined perioperative fluid optimization with a very basic approach: a standardized volume load with 25 ml/kg crystalloids over 6 hours immediately prior to scheduled surgery in high-risk patients. The hypothesis was that this intervention would lead to a compensation of preoperative fluid deficit caused by overnight fasting, and would result in improved perioperative fluid homeostasis with less postoperative complications and earlier hospital discharge. However, the primary study endpoints did not improve significantly. This observation points towards the facts that: firstly, the differentiation between interstitial fluid deficit caused by fasting and intravascular volume loss due to acute blood loss must be recognized in treatment strategies; secondly, the type of fluid replacement may play an important role; and thirdly, protocolized treatment strategies should also always be tailored to suit the patients' individual needs in every individual clinical situation. PMID:22410167

  18. Oral Fluids as a Live-Animal Sample Source for Evaluating Cross-Reactivity and Cross-Protection following Intranasal Influenza A Virus Vaccination in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Holly R.; Vincent, Amy L.; Brockmeier, Susan L.; Gauger, Phillip C.; Pena, Lindomar; Santos, Jefferson; Braucher, Douglas R.; Perez, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    In North American swine, there are numerous antigenically distinct H1 influenza A virus (IAV) variants currently circulating, making vaccine development difficult due to the inability to formulate a vaccine that provides broad cross-protection. Experimentally, live-attenuated influenza virus (LAIV) vaccines demonstrate increased cross-protection compared to inactivated vaccines. However, there is no standardized assay to predict cross-protection following LAIV vaccination. Hemagglutination-inhibiting (HI) antibody in serum is the gold standard correlate of protection following IAV vaccination. LAIV vaccination does not induce a robust serum HI antibody titer; however, a local mucosal antibody response is elicited. Thus, a live-animal sample source that could be used to evaluate LAIV immunogenicity and cross-protection is needed. Here, we evaluated the use of oral fluids (OF) and nasal wash (NW) collected after IAV inoculation as a live-animal sample source in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to predict cross-protection in comparison to traditional serology. Both live-virus exposure and LAIV vaccination provided heterologous protection, though protection was greatest against more closely phylogenetically related viruses. IAV-specific IgA was detected in NW and OF samples and was cross-reactive to representative IAV from each H1 cluster. Endpoint titers of cross-reactive IgA in OF from pigs exposed to live virus was associated with heterologous protection. While LAIV vaccination provided significant protection, LAIV immunogenicity was reduced compared to live-virus exposure. These data suggest that OF from pigs inoculated with wild-type IAV, with surface genes that match the LAIV seed strain, could be used in an ELISA to assess cross-protection and the antigenic relatedness of circulating and emerging IAV in swine. PMID:26291090

  19. Mesoscopic simulations of shock-to-detonation transition in reactive liquid high explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maillet, J. B.; Bourasseau, E.; Desbiens, N.; Vallverdu, G.; Stoltz, G.

    2011-12-01

    An extension of the model described in a previous work (see Maillet J. B. et al., EPL, 78 (2007) 68001) based on Dissipative Particle Dynamics is presented and applied to a liquid high explosive (HE), with thermodynamic properties mimicking those of liquid nitromethane. Large scale nonequilibrium simulations of reacting liquid HE with model kinetic under sustained shock conditions allow a better understanding of the shock-to-detonation transition in homogeneous explosives. Moreover, the propagation of the reactive wave appears discontinuous since ignition points in the shocked material can be activated by the compressive waves emitted from the onset of chemical reactions.

  20. Fluidizable zinc titanate materials with high chemical reactivity and attrition resistance

    DOEpatents

    Gupta, R.P.; Gangwal, S.K.; Jain, S.C.

    1993-10-19

    Highly durable and chemically reactive zinc titanate materials are prepared in a particle size range of 50 to 400 [mu]m suitable for a fluidized-bed reactor for removing reduced sulfur species in a gaseous form by granulating a mixture of fine zinc oxide and titanium oxide with inorganic and organic binders and by optional additions of small amounts of activators such as CoO and MoO[sub 3]; and then indurating it at 800 to 900 C for a time sufficient to produce attrition-resistant granules.

  1. Fluidizable zinc titanate materials with high chemical reactivity and attrition resistance

    DOEpatents

    Gupta, Raghubir P.; Gangwal, Santosh K.; Jain, Suresh C.

    1993-01-01

    Highly durable and chemically reactive zinc titanate materials are prepared in a particle size range of 50 to 400 .mu.m suitable for a fluidized-bed reactor for removing reduced sulfur species in a gaseous form by granulating a mixture of fine zinc oxide and titanium oxide with inorganic and organic binders and by optional additions of small amounts of activators such as CoO and MoO.sub.3 ; and then indurating it at 800.degree. to 900.degree. C. for a time sufficient to produce attrition-resistant granules.

  2. Plasma reactivity in high-power impulse magnetron sputtering through oxygen kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Vitelaru, Catalin; Lundin, Daniel; Brenning, Nils; Minea, Tiberiu

    2013-09-02

    The atomic oxygen metastable dynamics in a Reactive High-Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (R-HiPIMS) discharge has been characterized using time-resolved diode laser absorption in an Ar/O{sub 2} gas mixture with a Ti target. Two plasma regions are identified: the ionization region (IR) close to the target and further out the diffusion region (DR), separated by a transition region. The μs temporal resolution allows identifying the main atomic oxygen production and destruction routes, which are found to be very different during the pulse as compared to the afterglow as deduced from their evolution in space and time.

  3. Exploiting the color of Brownian motion for high-frequency microrheology of Newtonian fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez-García, Pablo; Mor, Flavio M.; Forró, László; Jeney, Sylvia

    2013-09-01

    Einstein's stochastic description of the random movement of small objects in a fluid, i.e. Brownian motion, reveals to be quite different, when observed on short timescales. The limitations of Einstein's theory with respect to particle inertia and hydrodynamic memory yield to the apparition of a colored frequency-dependent component in the spectrum of the thermal forces, which is called "the color of Brownian motion". The knowledge of the characteristic timescales of the motion of a trapped microsphere motion in a Newtonian fluid allowed to develop a high-resolution calibration method for optical interferometry. Well-calibrated correlation quantities, such as the mean square displacement or the velocity autocorrelation function, permit to study the mechanical properties of fluids at high frequencies. These properties are estimated by microrheological calculations based on the theoretical relations between the complex mobility of the beads and the rheological properties of a complex fluid.

  4. Evolution of Permeability and Induced Seismicity during Reservoir Stimulation; Role of Fluid Pressure and Thermal Transients on Reactivated Fractured Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izadi, G.; Elsworth, D.

    2012-12-01

    We utilize a continuum model of reservoir behavior subject to coupled THMC (thermal, hydraulic, mechanical and chemical) processes to explore the evolution of stimulation-induced seismicity and of permeability in EGS reservoirs. Our continuum model is capable of accommodating changes in effective stresses that result due to the evolving spatial variations in fluid pressure as well as thermal stress and chemical effects. Discrete penny-shaped fractures (~10-1200m) are seeded within the reservoir volume at prescribed (faults) and random (fractures) orientations and with a Gaussian distribution of lengths and location. Failure is calculated from a continuum model using a Coulomb criterion for friction. Energy release magnitude is utilized to obtain the magnitude-moment relation for induced seismicity by location and with time. This model is applied to a single injector (stimulation) to the proposed Newberry EGS field (USA). We stimulate the reservoir in four zones of differing fracture network properties B, C, D and E (shallow to deep) and at four different depths of 2000, 2500, 2750 and 3000 m. The same network of large fractures (density of 0.003 m-1 and spacing 300 m) is applied in all zones and supplemented by more closely spaced fractures with densities of 0.5 m-1 in the shallow zone B, 0.9 m-1 in the intermediate zones C and D and 0.26 m-1 in the deepest zone E. We show that permeability enhancement is modulated by hydraulic, thermal, and chemical (THMC) processes and that permeability increases by an order of magnitude during stimulation at each depth. For the widely spaced fracture networks, the increase in permeability reaches a smaller radius from the injection point and permeability evolution is slower with time compared to the behavior of the closely spaced fracture network. For seismic events that develop with the stimulation, event magnitude (MS) varies in the range -2 to +1.9 and the largest event size (~1.9) corresponds to the largest fractures (~1200m

  5. Highly mobile and reactive state of hydrogen in metal oxide semiconductors at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wan Ping; He, Ke Feng; Wang, Yu; Chan, Helen Lai Wah; Yan, Zijie

    2013-11-01

    Hydrogen in metal oxides usually strongly associates with a neighboring oxygen ion through an O-H bond and thus displays a high stability. Here we report a novel state of hydrogen with unusually high mobility and reactivity in metal oxides at room temperature. We show that freshly doped hydrogen in Nb2O5 and WO3 polycrystals via electrochemical hydrogenation can reduce Cu2+ ions into Cu0 if the polycrystals are immersed in a CuSO4 solution, while this would not happen if the hydrogenated polycrystals have been placed in air for several hours before the immersion. Time-dependent studies of electrochemically hydrogenated rutile single crystals reveal two distinct states of hydrogen: one as protons covalently bonded to oxygen ions, while the other one is highly unstable with a lifetime of just a few hours. Observation of this mobile and reactive state of hydrogen will provide new insight into numerous moderate and low temperature interactions between metal oxides and hydrogen.

  6. Valve assembly for use with high temperature and high pressure fluids

    DOEpatents

    De Feo, Angelo

    1982-01-01

    The valve assembly for use with high temperature and high pressure fluids has inner and outer spaced shells and a valve actuator support of inner and outer spaced members which are connected at their end portions to the inner and outer shells, respectively, to extend substantially normal to the longitudinal axis of the inner shell. A layer of resilient heat insulating material covers the outer surfaces of the inner shell and the inner actuator support member and is of a thickness to only occupy part of the spaces between the inner and outer shells and inner and outer actuator support members. The remaining portion of the space between the inner and outer shells and the space between the inner and outer members is substantially filled with a body of castable, rigid refractory material. A movable valve member is disposed in the inner shell. A valve actuator assembly is supported in the valve actuator support to extend into the inner shell for connection with the movable valve member for movement of the movable valve member to positions from a fully open to a fully closed position to control flow of fluid through the inner shell. An anchor mneans is disposed adjacent opposite sides of the axis of the valve actuator support and attached to the inner shell so that relative radial movement between the inner and outer shell is permitted by the layer of resilient heat insulating material and relative longitudinal movement of the inner shell to the outer shell is permitted in opposite directions from the anchor means to thereby maintain the functional integrity of the movable valve member by providing an area of the inner shell surrounding the movable valve member longitdinally stationary, but at the same time allowing radial movement.

  7. Relationship between airway reactivity induced by methacholine or ultrasonically nebulized distilled cold water and BAL fluid cellular constituents in patients with sulfur mustard gas-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Emad, Ali; Emad, Yasaman

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this article was to evaluate the relationship between the bronchial reactivity to methacholine and distilled cold water and inflammatory bronchial alveolar lavage (BAL) cells in mustard gas-induced asthma. This was a randomized, crossover clinical study set in a university hospital. The patients were 17 veterans with mustard gas-induced asthma and 17 normal veterans as a control group. Inhalation challenges with ultrasonically nebulized distilled water and methacholine and BAL via bronchoscopy and were performed in all patients and subjects. All patients did sustain a 20% fall in FEV(1) after methacholine, whereas two of them did not with distilled cold water. The patients were sensitive to distilled cold water with a median PD20 of 8.44 +/- 6.55 mL and sensitive to methacholine with the median PC20 of 4.88 +/- 4.22 mg/mL. Significant correlation was found between PC20 of methacholine and PD20 of distilled cold water (r = -0.74, p = 0.005). The proportion of BAL macrophages was significantly lower in patients with asthma than in the control group (p = 0.001). The proportions of lymphocytes and neutrophils were similar in the two groups. The percentage of eosinophils was higher in BAL fluid from the asthmatics compared with that in BAL fluid from the control group (p < 0.001). The percentage of the BAL eosinophils significantly correlated with both PC20 of methacholine (r = - 0.58, p = 0.01) and PD20 of distilled cold water (r = -0.81, p = 0.002). No relationship between PC20 of methacholine or PD20 of distilled cold water was found for other inflammatory BAL cells. This study showed that in patients with mustard gas-induced asthma, the degree of airway responsiveness to both methacholine and distilled water was associated with the percentage of BAL eosinophils. PMID:17894540

  8. Experimental Study on Fluid Distribution at Ultra-High Metamorphic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mönicke, K.; Burchard, M.; Duyster, J.; Maresch, W. V.; Röller, K.; Stöckhert, B.

    2001-12-01

    Ultra-high pressure (UHP) metamorphic rocks record deep subduction of continental crust. Insight into their rheological behavior at UHP metamorphic conditions is important for the understanding of the mechanical state and the kinematics within subduction zones. Amazingly, many exhumed UHP metamorphic rocks do not show evidence of significant deformation. Thus, it has been proposed that deformation is localized in low-strength zones controlled by partially wetting interstitial fluids [1]. Experimental results [2] show that at UHP metamorphic conditions only one homogenous fluid phase with variable composition exists, whose density and viscosity should be intermediate between those of conventional aqueous solutions and hydrous melts. Inclusions of such supercritical fluid have been recently described from a natural UHP metamorphic rock [3]. Motivated by these findings, experiments using a piston-cylinder apparatus were performed to study the fluid distribution in various rock types at pressures of 3.5 GPa and temperatures between 900 ° C and 600 ° C. Starting materials were natural UHP metamorphic specimens of (1) S-type granitic biotite-phengite-gneiss and (2) pyrope-quartzite, both from the Dora Maira Massif (Western Alps, Italy) and (3) a diamond-bearing garnet-mica-gneiss with granodioritic bulk composition from the Saxonian Erzgebirge (Germany), all with 2 wt.% water added. The supercritical fluids formed in these experiments can be quenched to form a silicic glass with demixing of an aqueous solution without changing the UHP fluid topology significantly. The shape of the fluid-filled interstices is irregular and complex, resulting in a low volume/interface area ratio and a potential of high stress concentration at the edges of wedge-shaped offshoots. We propose that the distribution of supercritical fluids has a pronounced effect on the strength of cool subducted crust, allowing deformation by grain boundary sliding and dissolution precipitation creep, or

  9. Retrograde methane-dominated fluid inclusions from high-temperature granulites of Rogaland, southwestern Norway

    SciTech Connect

    Van Den Kerkhof, A.M. ); Touret, J.L.R. ); Maijer, C.; Jansen, J.B.H. )

    1991-09-01

    Non-aqueous inclusions in the high-grade (800-1,000C; 4kbar) metamorphic Rogaland region, southwestern Norway, consist of mixtures of CO{sub 2}-CH{sub 4}-N{sub 2}. In particular the fluid inclusions in quartz veins in migmatites are characterized by high CH{sub 4} concentrations and they were re-equilibrated at temperatures below 500C during isobaric cooling. Observations by microthermometry demonstrated several complicated sequences of phase transitions, including partial and metastable homogenization (at lower temperature than melting), and S-L or S-V transitions. The phase behavior reflects a wide variation in composition and molar volume. Fluid compositions were measured by Raman microspectrometry. By this method, also small amounts of graphite have been detected in CO{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} inclusions. The instantaneous formation of graphite in a CO{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} inclusion by induction of the argon laser beam has been observed which points to the metastability of the CO{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} mixture. The calculated densities of the observed fluid mixtures are relatively low, necessitating a revision of the earlier interpretation of these inclusions as containing pure high-density fluids. Inclusions in quartz, trapped after the peak of metamorphism, record fluid heterogeneity which may present evidence for fluid-deficient metamorphism during the retrograde M2-M3 metamorphism.

  10. Deposition of ultrahard Ti-Si-N coatings by pulsed high-current reactive magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskomov, K. V.; Zakharov, A. N.; Rabotkin, S. V.; Solov'ev, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    We report on the results of investigation of properties of ultrahard Ti-Si-N coatings deposited by pulsed high-current magnetron reactive sputtering (discharge pulse voltage is 300-900 V, discharge pulse current is up to 200 A, pulse duration is 10-100 μs, and pulse repetition rate is 20-2000 Hz). It is shown that for a short sputtering pulse (25 μs) and a high discharge current (160 A), the films exhibit high hardness (66 GPa), wear resistance, better adhesion, and a lower sliding friction coefficient. The reason is an enhancement of ion bombardment of the growing coating due to higher plasma density in the substrate region (1013 cm-3) and a manifold increase in the degree of ionization of the plasma with increasing peak discharge current (mainly due to the material being sputtered).

  11. Subjective and physiological reactivity to chocolate images in high and low chocolate cravers.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Sonia; Fernández, María Carmen; Cepeda-Benito, Antonio; Vila, Jaime

    2005-09-01

    Cue-reactivity to chocolate images was assessed using self-report and physiological measures. From a pre-screening sample of 454, young women were selected and assigned to high and low chocolate craving groups (N = 36/group). The experimental procedure consisted in the elicitation and measurement of the cardiac defense and startle reflexes while viewing chocolate and standard affective images selected from the International Affective Picture System. In response to chocolate images, high cravers reported more pleasure and arousal but less control than low cravers. In high cravers, viewing chocolate images inhibited the cardiac defense but potentiated the startle reflex, as compared to low cravers. The results confirmed at the physiological level that the motivational state that underlies the experience of chocolate craving include both appetitive (inhibition of the defense reflex) and aversive (potentiation of the startle response) components. The findings supported a motivational conflict theory of chocolate craving. PMID:16038770

  12. Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO by highly reactive absorbent containing calcium hypochlorite

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y.; Xu, P.Y.; Wang, L.D.

    2008-12-15

    Fly ash, industrial lime, and an additive (calcium hypochlorite )) were used to prepare a highly reactive absorbent. Simultaneous desulfurization and denitrification were carried out in a flue gas circulating fluidized bed (CFB). The effects of influencing factors on the removal efficiencies of SO{sub 2} and NO were also investigated. Removal efficiencies of 94.5% for SO{sub 2} and 65.5% for NO were obtained under the optimal experimental conditions. The component of the spent absorbent was analyzed with chemical analysis methods. The results indicated that more nitrogen than sulfur species appeared in the spent absorbent. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an accessory X-ray energy spectrometer (EDS) were used to observe the microproperties of the samples, including fly ash, highly reactive absorbent, and spent absorbent. The removal products of spent absorbent were analyzed using ion chromatography and chemical analysis. The simultaneous removal mechanism of SO{sub 2} and NO based on this absorbent was proposed according to the experimental results.

  13. Ticagrelor versus high dose clopidogrel in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction patients with high platelet reactivity post fibrinolysis.

    PubMed

    Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Perperis, Angelos; Koniari, Ioanna; Karvounis, Haralambos; Patsilinakos, Sotirios; Ziakas, Antonios; Barampoutis, Nikolaos; Panagiotidis, Theofilos; Akinosoglou, Karolina; Hahalis, George; Xanthopoulou, Ioanna

    2015-10-01

    Limited data are available on high platelet reactivity (HPR) rate early post fibrinolysis, while no effective way to overcome it has been proposed. In this context, we aimed to compare ticagrelor versus high dose clopidogrel in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) who exhibit HPR post fibrinolysis. In a prospective, randomized, parallel design, 3-center study, 56 STEMI patients, out of 83 (67.5 %) screened, who presented with HPR (PRU ≥ 208 by VerifyNow) 3-48 h post fibrinolysis and prior to coronary angiography were allocated to ticagrelor 180 mg loading dose (LD)/90 mg bid maintenance dose (MD) or clopidogrel 600 mg LD/150 mg MD. Platelet reactivity was assessed at randomization (Hour 0), at Hour 2, Hour 24 and pre-discharge. The primary endpoint of platelet reactivity (in PRU) at Hour 2 was significantly lower for ticagrelor compared to clopidogrel with a least square mean difference (95 % confidence interval) of -141.7 (-173.4 to -109.9), p < 0.001. HPR rates at Hour 2 and 24 were significantly lower for ticagrelor versus clopidogrel (14.3 vs. 82.1 %, p < 0.001 and 0 vs. 25.0 %, p = 0.01 respectively), though not significantly different pre-discharge. In-hospital Bleeding Academic Research Consortium type ≥2 bleeding occurred in 1 and 2 clopidogrel and ticagrelor-treated patients, respectively. In STEMI patients, post fibrinolysis HPR is common. Ticagrelor treats HPR more effectively compared to high dose clopidogrel therapy. Although antiplatelet regimens tested in this study were well tolerated, this finding should be considered only exploratory. PMID:25680893

  14. Geochemistry of highly saline fluids in siliciclastic sequences: genetic implications for post-Variscan fluid flow in the Moravosilesian Palaeozoic of the Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kučera, Jan; Muchez, Philippe; Slobodník, Marek; Prochaska, Walter

    2010-03-01

    Ubiquitous post-Variscan dolomites occur in Zn-Pb-Cu veins at the Nízký Jeseník Mountains and the Upper Silesian Basin (Lower and Upper Carboniferous siliciclastics at the eastern part of the Bohemian Massif). Crush-leach, stable isotope (oxygen and carbon) and microthermometry analysis of the fluid inclusions in dolomites enable understanding the geochemistry, origin and possible migration pathways of the fluids. Homogenisation temperatures of fluid inclusions range between 66 and 148°C, with generally higher temperatures in the Nízký Jeseník Mountains area than in the Upper Silesian Basin. The highest homogenisation temperatures (up to 148°C) have been found near major regional faults and the lowest in a distant position or at higher stratigraphic levels. Highly saline (16.6-28.4 eq. wt% NaCl) H2O-NaCl-CaCl2 ± MgCl2 fluids occur in inclusions. Na-Cl-Br systematics of trapped fluids and a calculated oxygen isotopic fluid composition between -0.9 and +3.0‰ V-SMOW indicate that the fluid was derived from evaporated seawater. Stable isotopic modelling has been used to explain stable isotopic trends. Isotopic values (δ13C = -6.0/+2.0‰ V-PDB, δ18O = +15.5/+22.5‰ V-SMOW of dolomites) resulted from fractionation and crystallisation within an open system at temperatures between 80 and 160°C. Rock-buffering explains the isotopic composition at low w/r ratios. Organic matter maturation caused the presence of isotopically light carbon in the fluids and fluid-rock interactions largely controlled the fluid chemistry (K, Li, Br and Na contents, K/Cl, I/Cl and Li/Cl molar ratios). The fluid chemistry reflects well the interaction between the fluid and underlying limestones as well as with clay- and organic-rich siliciclastics. No regional trends in temperature or fluid geochemistry favour a fluid migration model characterised by an important vertical upward migration along major faults. A permeable basement and fractured sedimentary sequence enhanced the

  15. A Dual Regime Reactive Transport Model for Simulation of High Level Waste Tank Closure Scenarios - 13375

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Sohini; Kosson, David S.; Brown, Kevin; Garrabrants, Andrew C.; Meeussen, Hans; Van der Sloot, Hans

    2013-07-01

    A numerical simulation framework is presented in this paper for estimating evolution of pH and release of major species from grout within high-level waste tanks after closure. This model was developed as part of the Cementitious Barriers Partnership. The reactive transport model consists of two parts - (1) transport of species, and (2) chemical reactions. The closure grout can be assumed to have varying extents of cracking and composition for performance assessment purposes. The partially or completely degraded grouted tank is idealized as a dual regime system comprising of a mobile region having solid materials with cracks and macro-pores, and an immobile/stagnant region having solid matrix with micropores. The transport profiles of the species are calculated by incorporating advection of species through the mobile region, diffusion of species through the immobile/stagnant region, and exchange of species between the mobile and immobile regions. A geochemical speciation code in conjunction with the pH dependent test data for a grout material is used to obtain a mineral set that best describes the trends in the test data of the major species. The dual regime reactive transport model predictions are compared with the release data from an up-flow column percolation test. The coupled model is then used to assess effects of crack state of the structure, rate and composition of the infiltrating water on the pH evolution at the grout-waste interface. The coupled reactive transport model developed in this work can be used as part of the performance assessment process for evaluating potential risks from leaching of a cracked tank containing elements of human health and environmental concern. (authors)

  16. Reactivity Accountability Attributed to Reflector Poisons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, David; Maldonado, G Ivan; Primm, Trent

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a methodology to predict the reactivity impact as a function of outage time between cycles of 3He, 6Li, and other poisons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor s (HFIR) beryllium reflector. The reactivity worth at startup of the HFIR has been incorrectly predicted in the past after the reactor has been shut-down for long periods of time. The incorrect prediction was postulated to be due to the erroneous calculation of 3He buildup in the beryllium reflector. It is necessary to develop a better estimate of the start-of-cycle symmetric critical control element positions since if the estimated and actual symmetrical critical control element positions differ by more than $1.55 in reactivity (approximately one-half inch in control element startup position), HFIR is to be shutdown and a technical evaluation is performed to resolve the discrepancy prior to restart. 3He is generated and depleted during operation, but during an outage, the depletion of 3He ceases because it is a stable isotope. 3He is born from the radioactive decay of tritium, and thus the concentration of 3He increases during shutdown. SCALE, specifically the TRITON and CSAS5 control modules including the KENO V.A, COUPLE, and ORIGEN functional modules were utilized in this study. An equation relating the down time (td) to the change in symmetric control element position was generated and validated against measurements for approximately 40 HFIR operating cycles. The newly-derived correlation was shown to improve accuracy of predictions for long periods of down time.

  17. Designing high power targets with computational fluid dynamics (CFD)

    SciTech Connect

    Covrig, S. D.

    2013-11-07

    High power liquid hydrogen (LH2) targets, up to 850 W, have been widely used at Jefferson Lab for the 6 GeV physics program. The typical luminosity loss of a 20 cm long LH2 target was 20% for a beam current of 100 μA rastered on a square of side 2 mm on the target. The 35 cm long, 2500 W LH2 target for the Qweak experiment had a luminosity loss of 0.8% at 180 μA beam rastered on a square of side 4 mm at the target. The Qweak target was the highest power liquid hydrogen target in the world and with the lowest noise figure. The Qweak target was the first one designed with CFD at Jefferson Lab. A CFD facility is being established at Jefferson Lab to design, build and test a new generation of low noise high power targets.

  18. Designing high power targets with computational fluid dynamics (CFD)

    SciTech Connect

    Covrig, Silviu D.

    2013-11-01

    High power liquid hydrogen (LH2) targets, up to 850 W, have been widely used at Jefferson Lab for the 6 GeV physics program. The typical luminosity loss of a 20 cm long LH2 target was 20% for a beam current of 100 {micro}A rastered on a square of side 2 mm on the target. The 35 cm long, 2500 W LH2 target for the Qweak experiment had a luminosity loss of 0.8% at 180 {micro}A beam rastered on a square of side 4 mm at the target. The Qweak target was the highest power liquid hydrogen target in the world and with the lowest noise figure. The Qweak target was the first one designed with CFD at Jefferson Lab. A CFD facility is being established at Jefferson Lab to design, build and test a new generation of low noise high power targets.

  19. Fluid shielding of high-velocity jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodykoontz, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental noise data for a nozzle exhaust system incorporating a thermal acoustic shield (TAS) are presented to show the effect of changes in geometric and flow parameters on attenuation of high-velocity jet exhaust noise in the flyover plane. The results are presented for a 10.00-cm-diameter primary conical nozzle with a TAS configuration consisting of a 2.59- or 5.07-cm-wide annular gap. Shield-stream exhaust velocity was varied from 157 to 248 m/sec to investigate the effect of velocity ratio. The results showed that increasing the annular gap width increases attenuation of high-frequency noise when comparisons are made on the same ideal thrust basis. Varying the velocity ratio had a minor effect on the noise characteristics of the nozzles investigated.

  20. Performance of a high-force controllable MR fluid damper-liquid spring suspension systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Pramod; Wang, Xiaojie; Gordaninejad, Faramarz

    2010-04-01

    In this study a compact compressible magneto-rheological (MR) fluid damper-liquid spring (CMRFD-LS) with high spring rate is designed, developed and tested. The proposed device consists of a cylinder and piston-rod arrangement, with an annular MR fluid valve. The internal pressures in the chambers on either side of the piston develop the spring force, while the pressure difference across the MR valve produces the damping force, when the fluid flows through the MR valve. A fluid mechanics-based model is conducted to predict the behavior of the damper device under sinusoidal input. The device is studied under oscillatory vibrations for various frequencies and applied magnetic fields. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  1. Application of the high-resolution Godunov method to the multi-fluid flow calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Jin-Song; Li, Ping; Zhang, Zhan-Ji; Hua, Jin-Song; Tan, Hua

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, we have numerically solved the multi-fluid problems using an operator-split two-step high-resolution Godunov PPM (parabolic piecewise method) for the flow in complex geometries. By using the front capturing method, the PPM integrator captures the interface in the solution process. The basic multi-fluid integrator is coupled to a Cartesian grid algorithm where a VOF (volume of fluid) representation of the fluid interface is also used. As an application of this method, we test the 2D interfacial advection example and simulate an experimental hypervelocity launcher model from Sandia National Laboratories. The computational design of the hypervelocity launcher is also given in the paper.

  2. Fluid-Structure Interaction Modeling of High-Aspect Ratio Nuclear Fuel Plates Using COMSOL

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, Franklin G; Ekici, Kivanc; Freels, James D

    2013-01-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Lab is in the research stage of converting its fuel from high-enriched uranium to low-enriched uranium. Due to different physical properties of the new fuel and changes to the internal fuel plate design, the current safety basis must be re-evaluated through rigorous computational analyses. One of the areas being explored is the fluid-structure interaction phenomenon due to the interaction of thin fuel plates (50 mils thickness) and the cooling fluid (water). Detailed computational fluid dynamics and fluid-structure interaction simulations have only recently become feasible due to improved numerical algorithms and advancements in computing technology. For many reasons including the already built-in fluid-structure interaction module, COMSOL has been chosen for this complex problem. COMSOL's ability to solve multiphysics problems using a fully-coupled and implicit solution algorithm is crucial in obtaining a stable and accurate solution. Our initial findings show that COMSOL can accurately model such problems due to its ability to closely couple the fluid dynamics and the structural dynamics problems.

  3. Comparison of extraction techniques, including supercritical fluid, high-pressure solvent, and soxhlet, for organophosphorus hydraulic fluids from soil.

    PubMed

    David, M D; Seiber, J N

    1996-09-01

    The efficiencies of three extraction techniques for removal of nonpesticidal organophosphates from soil were determined. Traditional Soxhlet extraction was compared to supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and a low solvent volume flow through technique referred to here as high-pressure solvent extraction (HPSE). SFE, optimized by varying parameters of temperature, pressure, and methanol polarity modifier, showed at least 90% efficiency in the extraction of OPs from both spiked and native soils. HPSE experiments showed efficient and consistent recoveries over a range of temperatures up to 200 °C and pressures up to 170 atm. Recovery of TCP from spiked soils with HPSE depends on the system variables of temperature and pressure, which dictate density and flow rate. HPSE provided extraction efficiencies comparable to those obtained with Soxhlet extraction and SFE but with substantial savings of time and cost. PMID:21619371

  4. Current-voltage-time characteristics of the reactive Ar/N{sub 2} high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Magnus, F.; Sveinsson, O. B.; Olafsson, S.; Gudmundsson, J. T.

    2011-10-15

    The discharge current and voltage waveforms have been measured in a reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) Ar/N{sub 2} discharge with a Ti target for 400 {mu}s long pulses. We observe that the current waveform in the reactive Ar/N{sub 2} HiPIMS discharge is highly dependent on the pulse repetition frequency, unlike the non-reactive Ar discharge. The current is found to increase significantly as the frequency is lowered. This is attributed to an increase in the secondary electron emission yield during the self-sputtering phase, when the nitride forms on the target at low frequencies. In addition, self-sputtering runaway occurs at lower discharge voltages when nitrogen is added to the discharge. This illustrates the crucial role of self-sputtering in the behavior of the reactive HiPIMS discharge.

  5. Successful treatment of reactive airways dysfunction syndrome by high-dose vitamin D.

    PubMed

    Varney, Veronica A; Evans, Jane; Bansal, Amolak S

    2011-01-01

    Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome is a controversial and poorly understood condition produced by inhalational injury from gas, vapors, or fumes. The symptoms mimic asthma, but appear unresponsive to asthma treatments. If symptoms persist for more than 6 months, there is a risk that they can become chronic. For these cases, effective treatments are lacking and quality of life is poor. We describe the first use of high-dose vitamin D in a patient with this condition, who fulfilled the 1995 American College of Chest Physicians criteria for this syndrome. The patient we describe presented an extremely difficult management problem and was refractory to conventional treatments, but responded to high-dose oral vitamin D supplements. PMID:22034572

  6. Trapping a Highly Reactive Nonheme Iron Intermediate That Oxygenates Strong C-H Bonds with Stereoretention.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Plana, Joan; Oloo, Williamson N; Acosta-Rueda, Laura; Meier, Katlyn K; Verdejo, Begoña; García-España, Enrique; Basallote, Manuel G; Münck, Eckard; Que, Lawrence; Company, Anna; Costas, Miquel

    2015-12-23

    An unprecedentedly reactive iron species (2) has been generated by reaction of excess peracetic acid with a mononuclear iron complex [Fe(II)(CF3SO3)2(PyNMe3)] (1) at cryogenic temperatures, and characterized spectroscopically. Compound 2 is kinetically competent for breaking strong C-H bonds of alkanes (BDE ≈ 100 kcal·mol(-1)) through a hydrogen-atom transfer mechanism, and the transformations proceed with stereoretention and regioselectively, responding to bond strength, as well as to steric and polar effects. Bimolecular reaction rates are at least an order of magnitude faster than those of the most reactive synthetic high-valent nonheme oxoiron species described to date. EPR studies in tandem with kinetic analysis show that the 490 nm chromophore of 2 is associated with two S = 1/2 species in rapid equilibrium. The minor component 2a (∼5% iron) has g-values at 2.20, 2.19, and 1.99 characteristic of a low-spin iron(III) center, and it is assigned as [Fe(III)(OOAc)(PyNMe3)](2+), also by comparison with the EPR parameters of the structurally characterized hydroxamate analogue [Fe(III)(tBuCON(H)O)(PyNMe3)](2+) (4). The major component 2b (∼40% iron, g-values = 2.07, 2.01, 1.95) has unusual EPR parameters, and it is proposed to be [Fe(V)(O)(OAc)(PyNMe3)](2+), where the O-O bond in 2a has been broken. Consistent with this assignment, 2b undergoes exchange of its acetate ligand with CD3CO2D and very rapidly reacts with olefins to produce the corresponding cis-1,2-hydroxoacetate product. Therefore, this work constitutes the first example where a synthetic nonheme iron species responsible for stereospecific and site selective C-H hydroxylation is spectroscopically trapped, and its catalytic reactivity against C-H bonds can be directly interrogated by kinetic methods. The accumulated evidence indicates that 2 consists mainly of an extraordinarily reactive [Fe(V)(O)(OAc)(PyNMe3)](2+) (2b) species capable of hydroxylating unactivated alkyl C-H bonds with

  7. Highly deformable and highly fluid vesicles as potential drug delivery systems: theoretical and practical considerations.

    PubMed

    Romero, Eder Lilia; Morilla, Maria Jose

    2013-01-01

    Vesicles that are specifically designed to overcome the stratum corneum barrier in intact skin provide an efficient transdermal (systemic or local) drug delivery system. They can be classified into two main groups according to the mechanisms underlying their skin interaction. The first group comprises those possessing highly deformable bilayers, achieved by incorporating edge activators to the bilayers or by mixing with certain hydrophilic solutes. The vesicles of this group act as drug carriers that penetrate across hydrophilic pathways of the intact skin. The second group comprises those possessing highly fluid bilayers, owing to the presence of permeation enhancers. The vesicles of this group can act as carriers of drugs that permeate the skin after the barrier of the stratum corneum is altered because of synergistic action with the permeation enhancers contained in the vesicle structure. We have included a detailed overview of the different mechanisms of skin interaction and discussed the most promising preclinical applications of the last five years of Transfersomes® (IDEA AG, Munich, Germany), ethosomes, and invasomes as carriers of antitumoral and anti-inflammatory drugs applied by the topical route. PMID:23986634

  8. Highly deformable and highly fluid vesicles as potential drug delivery systems: theoretical and practical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Eder Lilia; Morilla, Maria Jose

    2013-01-01

    Vesicles that are specifically designed to overcome the stratum corneum barrier in intact skin provide an efficient transdermal (systemic or local) drug delivery system. They can be classified into two main groups according to the mechanisms underlying their skin interaction. The first group comprises those possessing highly deformable bilayers, achieved by incorporating edge activators to the bilayers or by mixing with certain hydrophilic solutes. The vesicles of this group act as drug carriers that penetrate across hydrophilic pathways of the intact skin. The second group comprises those possessing highly fluid bilayers, owing to the presence of permeation enhancers. The vesicles of this group can act as carriers of drugs that permeate the skin after the barrier of the stratum corneum is altered because of synergistic action with the permeation enhancers contained in the vesicle structure. We have included a detailed overview of the different mechanisms of skin interaction and discussed the most promising preclinical applications of the last five years of Transfersomes® (IDEA AG, Munich, Germany), ethosomes, and invasomes as carriers of antitumoral and anti-inflammatory drugs applied by the topical route. PMID:23986634

  9. Development of high gradient magnetic separation system for removing the metallic wear debris to be present in highly viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, S.; Mishima, F.; Akiyama, Y.; Nishijima, S.

    2010-11-01

    In the industrial plants processing highly viscous fluid such as foods or industrial materials, there is an issue of contamination by metallic wear debris originating from pipe of manufacturing line. It is necessary to remove the metallic wear debris in highly viscous fluid, since these debris causes quality loss. In this study, we developed a high gradient magnetic separation system by using superconducting magnet to remove the metallic wear debris. The particle trajectory simulation and the magnetic separation experiment were conducted with polyvinyl alcohol as a model material. As a result, ca. 100% and 92.2% of the separation efficiency was achieved respectively for the highly viscous fluid of 1 Pa s and 6 Pa s in viscosity, with 14 and 30 mesh magnetic filters.

  10. Electrothermal Fluid Manipulation of High-Conductivity Samples for Laboratory Automation Applications

    PubMed Central

    Sin, Mandy L. Y.; Gau, Vincent; Liao, Joseph C.; Wong, Pak Kin

    2010-01-01

    Electrothermal flow is a promising technique in microfluidic manipulation toward laboratory automation applications, such as clinical diagnostics and high throughput drug screening. Despite the potential of electrothermal flow in biomedical applications, relative little is known about electrothermal manipulation of highly conductive samples, such as physiological fluids and buffer solutions. In this study, the characteristics and challenges of electrothermal manipulation of fluid samples with different conductivities were investigated systematically. Electrothermal flow was shown to create fluid motion for samples with a wide range of conductivity when the driving frequency was above 100 kHz. For samples with low conductivities (below 1 S/m), the characteristics of the electrothermal fluid motions were in quantitative agreement with the theory. For samples with high conductivities (above 1 S/m), the fluid motion appeared to deviate from the model as a result of potential electrochemical reactions and other electrothermal effects. These effects should be taken into consideration for electrothermal manipulation of biological samples with high conductivities. This study will provide insights in designing microfluidic devices for electrokinetic manipulation of biological samples toward laboratory automation applications in the future. PMID:21180401

  11. Identification of proteins highly expressed in uterine fluid from mice with hydrometra.

    PubMed

    Antonson, Per; Nalvarte, Ivan; Varshney, Mukesh; Xu, Li; Windahl, Sara H; Humire, Patricia; Ohlsson, Claes; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Dahlman-Wright, Karin

    2015-10-30

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is an important regulator of the estrous cycle and mice with global ERα deletion, as well as some conditional knockout mouse lines, have an interruption in the estrous cycle. In this study we observed that conditional ERα knockout mice where the Cre gene is regulated by the rat insulin promoter (RIP), RIP-Cre/ERα(KO) mice, have a 3.7-fold increase in serum 17β-estradiol levels, blocked estrous cycle, and develop a fluid-filled uterus (hydrometra). Using a proteomics approach, we identified three proteins, lactoferrin, complement C3 and chitinase 3-like protein 1 (CHI3L1), as highly expressed proteins in hydrometra fluid. The mRNA levels of the corresponding genes were more than 50-fold higher in RIP-Cre/ERα(KO) uterus compared to controls. High expression of CHI3L1 in the uterine fluid was not reflected as elevated levels in the serum. The high expression of lactoferrin, complement C3 and CHI3L1 in the uterine fluid, in association with elevated estrogen levels, prompted us to address if the expression of these genes is related to reproduction. However, gonadotropin treatment of mice reduced the uterine expression of these genes in a model of in vitro fertilization. Our findings identify lactoferrin, complement C3 and CHI3L1 as highly expressed proteins in hydrometra fluid in association with chronically elevated serum estradiol levels. PMID:26393907

  12. Changes in body fluid compartments on re-induction to high altitude and effect of diuretics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, M. V.; Rawal, S. B.; Tyagi, A. K.; Bhagat, Maj J. K.; Parshad, R.; Divekar, H. M.

    1988-03-01

    Studies were carried out in 29 healthy young adults in the Indian Army stationed in the plains and posted at an elevation of 3500 m for more than 6 months. After exposure to a low elevation in Delhi (260 m) for 3 weeks they were reinduced to a height of 3500 m. The subjects were divided into three groups, each of which was treated with either placebo or acetazolamide or spironolactone. The drug treatment was started immediately after their landing at high altitude and continued for 2 days only. Total body water, extracellular fluid, intracellular fluid, plasma volume, blood pH, PaO2, PaCO2 and blood viscosity were determined on exposure at Delhi and on re-induction to high altitude. Plasma volume was increased after the descent from high altitude and remained high for up to 21 day's study. This increased plasma volume may have some significance in the pathogenesis of pulmonary oedema. Total body water and intracellular fluid content were increased at 260 m elevation, while extracellular fluid decreased. On re-induction there was a decrease in total body water with no change in the extracellular fluid content.

  13. Highly sensitive SnO2 sensor via reactive laser-induced transfer

    PubMed Central

    Palla Papavlu, Alexandra; Mattle, Thomas; Temmel, Sandra; Lehmann, Ulrike; Hintennach, Andreas; Grisel, Alain; Wokaun, Alexander; Lippert, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Gas sensors based on tin oxide (SnO2) and palladium doped SnO2 (Pd:SnO2) active materials are fabricated by a laser printing method, i.e. reactive laser-induced forward transfer (rLIFT). Thin films from tin based metal-complex precursors are prepared by spin coating and then laser transferred with high resolution onto sensor structures. The devices fabricated by rLIFT exhibit low ppm sensitivity towards ethanol and methane as well as good stability with respect to air, moisture, and time. Promising results are obtained by applying rLIFT to transfer metal-complex precursors onto uncoated commercial gas sensors. We could show that rLIFT onto commercial sensors is possible if the sensor structures are reinforced prior to printing. The rLIFT fabricated sensors show up to 4 times higher sensitivities then the commercial sensors (with inkjet printed SnO2). In addition, the selectivity towards CH4 of the Pd:SnO2 sensors is significantly enhanced compared to the pure SnO2 sensors. Our results indicate that the reactive laser transfer technique applied here represents an important technical step for the realization of improved gas detection systems with wide-ranging applications in environmental and health monitoring control. PMID:27118531

  14. Hysteresis-free high rate reactive sputtering of niobium oxide, tantalum oxide, and aluminum oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Särhammar, Erik Berg, Sören; Nyberg, Tomas

    2014-07-01

    This work reports on experimental studies of reactive sputtering from targets consisting of a metal and its oxide. The composition of the targets varied from pure metal to pure oxide of Al, Ta, and Nb. This combines features from both the metal target and oxide target in reactive sputtering. If a certain relation between the metal and oxide parts is chosen, it may be possible to obtain a high deposition rate, due to the metal part, and a hysteresis-free process, due to the oxide part. The aim of this work is to quantify the achievable boost in oxide deposition rate from a hysteresis-free process by using a target consisting of segments of a metal and its oxide. Such an increase has been previously demonstrated for Ti using a homogeneous substoichiometric target. The achievable gain in deposition rate depends on transformation mechanisms from oxide to suboxides due to preferential sputtering of oxygen. Such mechanisms are different for different materials and the achievable gain is therefore material dependent. For the investigated materials, the authors have demonstrated oxide deposition rates that are 1.5–10 times higher than what is possible from metal targets in compound mode. However, although the principle is demonstrated for oxides of Al, Ta, and Nb, a similar behavior is expected for most oxides.

  15. Earle K. Plyler Prize Talk: Using High Resolution Electronic Spectroscopy to Probe Reactive Chemical Intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Terry

    2009-03-01

    Gas phase chemical reactions, such as occur in atmospheric chemistry, combustion, plasma processing, etc. are of great importance to our economy and society. These reactions are typically very complex involving up to 1000's of elementary steps with a corresponding number of reactive chemical intermediates. Spectrospic diagnostics, based upon well analyzed and well understood spectra of the intermediates, are crucial for monitoring such reactions and unraveling their mechanisms. These spectral analyses often benefit from the guidance provided by quantum chemical calculations and conversely the molecular parameters, experimentally determined from the spectra, serve as ``gold standards'' for benchmarking such calculations. Such standards are especially valuable for reactive intermediates whose electronic or geometric structure is particularly complex because of electron-spin interactions, Jahn-Teller effects or other vibronic interactions, hindered internal motions, large molecular size and weight, etc. The organic alkoxy, RO., and peroxy, RO2., (R=alkyl group) free radicals are excellent examples of such species. The talk will focus on our recent characterization of these radicals via their ``high-resolution,'' mostly rotationally resolved, electronic spectra utilizing the techniques of laser induced fluorescence, stimulated emission pumping, and cavity ringdown spectroscopy. Selected spectra, their analysis, and the molecular information resulting therefrom will be discussed.

  16. Highly sensitive SnO2 sensor via reactive laser-induced transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palla Papavlu, Alexandra; Mattle, Thomas; Temmel, Sandra; Lehmann, Ulrike; Hintennach, Andreas; Grisel, Alain; Wokaun, Alexander; Lippert, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Gas sensors based on tin oxide (SnO2) and palladium doped SnO2 (Pd:SnO2) active materials are fabricated by a laser printing method, i.e. reactive laser-induced forward transfer (rLIFT). Thin films from tin based metal-complex precursors are prepared by spin coating and then laser transferred with high resolution onto sensor structures. The devices fabricated by rLIFT exhibit low ppm sensitivity towards ethanol and methane as well as good stability with respect to air, moisture, and time. Promising results are obtained by applying rLIFT to transfer metal-complex precursors onto uncoated commercial gas sensors. We could show that rLIFT onto commercial sensors is possible if the sensor structures are reinforced prior to printing. The rLIFT fabricated sensors show up to 4 times higher sensitivities then the commercial sensors (with inkjet printed SnO2). In addition, the selectivity towards CH4 of the Pd:SnO2 sensors is significantly enhanced compared to the pure SnO2 sensors. Our results indicate that the reactive laser transfer technique applied here represents an important technical step for the realization of improved gas detection systems with wide-ranging applications in environmental and health monitoring control.

  17. Highly sensitive SnO2 sensor via reactive laser-induced transfer.

    PubMed

    Palla Papavlu, Alexandra; Mattle, Thomas; Temmel, Sandra; Lehmann, Ulrike; Hintennach, Andreas; Grisel, Alain; Wokaun, Alexander; Lippert, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Gas sensors based on tin oxide (SnO2) and palladium doped SnO2 (Pd:SnO2) active materials are fabricated by a laser printing method, i.e. reactive laser-induced forward transfer (rLIFT). Thin films from tin based metal-complex precursors are prepared by spin coating and then laser transferred with high resolution onto sensor structures. The devices fabricated by rLIFT exhibit low ppm sensitivity towards ethanol and methane as well as good stability with respect to air, moisture, and time. Promising results are obtained by applying rLIFT to transfer metal-complex precursors onto uncoated commercial gas sensors. We could show that rLIFT onto commercial sensors is possible if the sensor structures are reinforced prior to printing. The rLIFT fabricated sensors show up to 4 times higher sensitivities then the commercial sensors (with inkjet printed SnO2). In addition, the selectivity towards CH4 of the Pd:SnO2 sensors is significantly enhanced compared to the pure SnO2 sensors. Our results indicate that the reactive laser transfer technique applied here represents an important technical step for the realization of improved gas detection systems with wide-ranging applications in environmental and health monitoring control. PMID:27118531

  18. Modeling high gradient magnetic separation from biological fluids.

    SciTech Connect

    Bockenfeld, D.; Chen, H.; Rempfer, D.; Kaminski, M. D.; Rosengart, A. J.; Chemical Engineering; Illinois Inst. of Tech.; Univ. of Chicago, Pritzker School of Medicine

    2006-01-01

    A proposed portable magnetic separator consists of an array of biocompatible capillary tubing and magnetizable wires immersed in an externally applied homogeneous magnetic field. While subject to the homogeneous magnetic field, the wires create high magnetic field gradients, which aid in the collection of blood-borne magnetic nanospheres from blood flow. In this study, a 3-D numerical model was created using COMSOL Multiphysics 3.2 software to determine the configuration of the wire-tubing array from two possible configurations, one being an array with rows alternating between wires and tubing, and the other being an array where wire and tubing alternate in two directions. The results demonstrated that the second configuration would actually capture more of the magnetic spheres. Experimental data obtained by our group support this numerical result.

  19. Assessment of Controlling Processes for Field-Scale Uranium Reactive Transport under Highly Transient Flow Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Liu, Chongxuan; Greskowiak, Janek; Prommer, Henning; Zachara, John M.

    2014-02-06

    This paper presents the results of a comprehensive model-based analysis of a uranium tracer test conducted at the U.S Department of Energy Hanford 300 Area (300A) IFRC site. A three-dimensional multi-component reactive transport model was employed to assess the key factors and processes that control the field-scale uranium reactive transport. Taking into consideration of relevant physical and chemical processes, the selected conceptual/numerical model replicates the spatial and temporal variations of the observed U(VI) concentrations reasonably well in spite of the highly complex field conditions. A sensitivity analysis was performed to interrogate the relative importance of various processes and factors for reactive transport of U(VI) at the field-scale. The results indicate that multi-rate U(VI) sorption/desorption, U(VI) surface complexation reactions, and initial U(VI) concentrations were the most important processes and factors controlling U(VI) migration. On the other hand, cation exchange reactions, the choice of the surface complexation model, and dual-domain mass transfer processes, which were previously identified to be important in laboratory experiments, played less important roles under the field-scale experimental condition at the 300A site. However, the model simulations also revealed that the groundwater chemistry was relatively stable during the uranium tracer experiment and therefore presumably not dynamic enough to appropriately assess the effects of ion exchange reaction and the choice of surface complexation models on U(VI) sorption and desorption. Furthermore, it also showed that the field experimental duration (16 days) was not sufficiently long to precisely assess the role of a majority of the sorption sites that were accessed by slow kinetic processes within the dual domain model. The sensitivity analysis revealed the crucial role of the intraborehole flow that occurred within the long-screened monitoring wells and thus significantly

  20. A high-force controllable MR fluid damper-liquid spring suspension system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Pramod; Wang, Xiaojie; Gordaninejad, Faramarz

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the present research is to investigate the feasibility of incorporating a liquid spring in a semi-active suspension system for use in heavy off-road vehicles. A compact compressible magneto-rheological (MR) fluid damper-liquid spring (CMRFD-LS) with high spring rate is designed, developed and tested. Compressible MR fluids with liquid spring and variable damping characteristics are used. These fluids can offer unique functions in reducing the volume/weight of vehicle struts and improving vehicle dynamic stability and safety. The proposed device consists of a cylinder and piston-rod arrangement with an internal annular MR fluid valve. The internal pressures in the chambers on either side of the piston develop the spring force, while the pressure difference across the MR valve produces the damping force, when the fluid flows through the MR valve. Harmonic characterization of the CMRFD-LS is performed and the force-displacement results are presented. A fluid-mechanics based model is also developed to predict the performance of the system at different operating conditions and compared to the experimental results. Good agreement between the experimental results and theoretical predictions has been achieved.

  1. Characterization of stratification for an opaque highly stable magnetorheological fluid using vertical axis inductance monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Lei; Choi, Young-Tai; Liao, Chang-Rong; Wereley, Norman M.

    2015-05-01

    A key requirement for the commercialization of various magnetorheological fluid (MRF)-based applications is sedimentation stability. In this study, a high viscosity linear polysiloxane (HVLP), which has been used for shock absorbers in heavy equipment, is proposed as a new carrier fluid in highly stable MRFs. The HVLP is known to be a thixotropic (i.e., shear thinning) fluid that shows very high viscosity at very low shear rate and low viscosity at higher shear rate. In this study, using the shear rheometer, the significant thixotropic behavior of the HVLP was experimentally confirmed. In addition, a HVLP carrier fluid-based MRF (HVLP MRF) with 26 vol. % was synthesized and its sedimentation characteristics were experimentally investigated. But, because of the opacity of the HVLP MRF, no mudline can be visually observed. Hence, a vertical axis inductance monitoring system (VAIMS) applied to a circular column of fluid was used to evaluate sedimentation behavior by correlating measured inductance with the volume fraction of dispersed particles (i.e., Fe). Using the VAIMS, Fe concentration (i.e., volume fraction) was monitored for 28 days with a measurement taken every four days, as well as one measurement after 96 days to characterize long-term sedimentation stability. Finally, the concentration of the HVLP MRF as a function of the depth in the column and time, as well as the concentration change versus the depth in the column, are presented and compared with those of a commercially available MRF (i.e., Lord MRF-126CD).

  2. Usefulness of high-resolution thermography in fault diagnosis of fluid power components and systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietola, Matti; Varrio, Jukka P.

    1996-03-01

    Infrared thermography has been used routinely in industrial applications for quite a long time. For example, the condition of electric power lines, district heating networks, electric circuits and components, heat exchangers, pipes and its insulations, cooling towers, and various machines and motors is monitored using infrared imaging techniques. Also the usage of this technology in predictive maintenance has proved successful, mainly because of effective computers and tailored softwares available. However, the usage of thermal sensing technique in fluid power systems and components (or other automation systems in fact) is not as common. One apparent reason is that a fluid power circuit is not (and nor is a hydraulic component) an easy object of making thermal image analyses. Especially the high flow speed, fast pressure changes and fast movements make the diagnosis complex and difficult. Also the number of people whose knowledge is good both in thermography and fluid power systems is not significant. In this paper a preliminary study of how thermography could be used in the condition monitoring, fault diagnosis and predictive maintenance of fluid power components and systems is presented. The shortages and limitations of thermal imaging in the condition monitoring of fluid power are also discussed. Among many other cases the following is discussed: (1) pressure valves (leakage, wrong settings), (2) check valves (leakage); (3) cylinders (leakage and other damages); (4) directional valves and valve assemblies; (5) pumps and motors (leakage in piston or control plate, bearings). The biggest advantage of using thermography in the predictive maintenance and fault diagnosis of fluid power components and systems could be achieved in the process industry and perhaps in the commissioning of fluid power systems in the industry. In the industry the predictive maintenance of fluid power with the aid of an infrared camera could be done as part of a condition monitoring of

  3. IPr3 Si3 Cl5 (+) : A Highly Reactive Cation with Silanide Character.

    PubMed

    Uhlemann, Fabian; Schnepf, Andreas

    2016-07-25

    The reaction of a metastable SiCl2 solution with the sterically less-demanding carbene N,N-diisopropylimidazo-2-ylidene (IPr) yields the salt [(IPr3 Si3 Cl5 )(+) ]Cl(-) (1-Cl), containing a silyl cation with a Si3 backbone. Salt 1 is highly reactive, but it can be used as a reagent in deuterated dichloromethane, whereby dehalogenation with Me3 SiOTf (OTf=O3 SCF3 ) gives the dicationic silyl halide [(IPr3 Si3 Cl4 )](2+) 2. Quantum chemical calculations show that the HOMO is localized at the negatively charged central silicon atom of 1 and 2, and thus although both compounds are cations they are better described as silanides, which was also corroborated by NMR investigations. PMID:27258331

  4. Development of a Sensitive Bioluminogenic Probe for Imaging Highly Reactive Oxygen Species in Living Rats.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Ryosuke; Takakura, Hideo; Kamiya, Mako; Kobayashi, Eiji; Komatsu, Toru; Ueno, Tasuku; Terai, Takuya; Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Nagano, Tetsuo; Urano, Yasuteru

    2015-12-01

    A sensitive bioluminogenic probe for highly reactive oxygen species (hROS), SO3 H-APL, was developed based on the concept of dual control of bioluminescence emission by means of bioluminescent enzyme-induced electron transfer (BioLeT) and modulation of cell-membrane permeability. This probe enables non-invasive visualization of physiologically relevant amounts of hROS generated deep inside the body of living rats for the first time. It is expected to serve as a practical analytical tool for investigating a wide range of biological functions of hROS in vivo. The design concept should be applicable to other in vivo bioluminogenic probes. PMID:26474404

  5. Amine-reactive neutron-encoded labels for highly plexed proteomic quantitation.

    PubMed

    Hebert, Alexander S; Merrill, Anna E; Stefely, Jonathan A; Bailey, Derek J; Wenger, Craig D; Westphall, Michael S; Pagliarini, David J; Coon, Joshua J

    2013-11-01

    We describe a novel amine-reactive chemical label that exploits differential neutron-binding energy between (13)C and (15)N isotopes. These neutron-encoded (NeuCode) chemical labels enable up to 12-plex MS1-based protein quantification. Each structurally identical, but isotopically unique, tag is encoded with a 12.6-mDa mass difference-relative to its nearest neighbor-so that peptides bearing these NeuCode signatures do not increase spectral complexity and are detected only upon analysis with very high mass-resolving powers. We demonstrate that the method provides quantitative performance that is comparable to both metabolic labeling and isobaric tagging while combining the benefits of both strategies. Finally, we employ the tags to characterize the proteome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during the diauxic shift, a metabolic transition from fermentation to aerobic respiration. PMID:23882030

  6. Amine-reactive Neutron-encoded Labels for Highly Plexed Proteomic Quantitation*

    PubMed Central

    Hebert, Alexander S.; Merrill, Anna E.; Stefely, Jonathan A.; Bailey, Derek J.; Wenger, Craig D.; Westphall, Michael S.; Pagliarini, David J.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a novel amine-reactive chemical label that exploits differential neutron-binding energy between 13C and 15N isotopes. These neutron-encoded (NeuCode) chemical labels enable up to 12-plex MS1-based protein quantification. Each structurally identical, but isotopically unique, tag is encoded with a 12.6-mDa mass difference—relative to its nearest neighbor—so that peptides bearing these NeuCode signatures do not increase spectral complexity and are detected only upon analysis with very high mass-resolving powers. We demonstrate that the method provides quantitative performance that is comparable to both metabolic labeling and isobaric tagging while combining the benefits of both strategies. Finally, we employ the tags to characterize the proteome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during the diauxic shift, a metabolic transition from fermentation to aerobic respiration. PMID:23882030

  7. High osmotic pressure increases reactive oxygen species generation in rabbit corneal epithelial cells by endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Sheng, Minjie; Li, Bing; Jiang, Yaping; Chen, Yihui

    2016-01-01

    Tear high osmotic pressure (HOP) has been recognized as the core mechanism underlying ocular surface inflammation, injury and symptoms and is closely associated with many ocular surface diseases, especially dry eye. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a multi-functional organelle responsible for protein synthesis, folding and transport, biological synthesis of lipids, vesicle transport and intracellular calcium storage. Accumulation of unfolded proteins and imbalance of calcium ion in the ER would induce ER stress and protective unfolded protein response (UPR). Many studies have demonstrated that ER stress can induce cell apoptosis. However, the association between tear HOP and ER stress has not been studied systematically. In the present study, rabbit corneal epithelial cells were treated with HOP and results showed that the production of reactive oxygen species increased markedly, which further activated the ER signaling pathway and ultimately induced cell apoptosis. These findings shed new lights on the pathogenesis and clinical treatment of dry eye and other ocular surface diseases. PMID:27158374

  8. High-temperature thermal degradation of polyethylene from reactive molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, J. Matthew D.; Moore, Nathan W.

    Thermal degradation of polyethylene is studied under extremely high-rate temperature ramp rates from 1014 to 1010 K/s in isochoric, condensed phases. The molecular evolution and macroscopic state variables are extracted as a function of density from reactive molecular dynamics simulations using the ReaxFF potential. These results are used to parameterize a kinetic rate model for the dissociation and coalescence of hydrocarbons as a function of temperature, temperature ramp rate, and density. The results are contrasted to first-order random-scission macrokinetic models often assumed for pyrolysis of linear polyethylene under ambient conditions. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04- 94AL85000.

  9. Characteristics of Fluid Composition of Left Displaced Abomasum in Beef Cattle Fed High-Starch Diets

    PubMed Central

    ICHIJO, Toshihiro; SATOH, Hiroshi; YOSHIDA, Yuki; MURAYAMA, Isao; KIKUCHI, Tomoko; SATO, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT To clarify the pathophysiology of left displaced abomasum (LDA), beef cattle fed high-starch diets were examined. The abomasal pH in beef cattle with LDA was lower than that in non-LDA reference animals (data from beef cattle at an abattoir), suggesting that it facilitated acidity. Bacteriological examinations of the abomasal fluid in cattle with LDA revealed the presence of Pseudomonas spp., Clostridium spp. and Candida spp., presumably reflecting the accelerated influx of ruminal fluid into the abomasum. Biochemical analyses of serum revealed that LDA cattle had higher lactic acid and lower vitamin A and E levels than non-LDA reference animals. These results indicate that beef cattle with LDA may suffer from vitamin A and E deficiencies due to maldigestion of starch and the high acidity of abomasal fluid. PMID:24813464

  10. High-rate reactive magnetron sputtering of zirconia films for laser optics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juškevičius, K.; Audronis, M.; Subačius, A.; Drazdys, R.; Juškėnas, R.; Matthews, A.; Leyland, A.

    2014-09-01

    ZrO2 exhibits low optical absorption in the near-UV range and is one of the highest laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) materials; it is, therefore, very attractive for laser optics applications. This paper reports explorations of reactive sputtering technology for deposition of ZrO2 films with low extinction coefficient k values in the UV spectrum region at low substrate temperature. A high deposition rate (64 % of the pure metal rate) process is obtained by employing active feedback reactive gas control which creates a stable and repeatable deposition processes in the transition region. Substrate heating at 200 °C was found to have no significant effect on the optical ZrO2 film properties. The addition of nitrogen to a closed-loop controlled process was found to have mostly negative effects in terms of deposition rate and optical properties. Open-loop O2 gas-regulated ZrO2 film deposition is slow and requires elevated (200 °C) substrate temperature or post-deposition annealing to reduce absorption losses. Refractive indices of the films were distributed in the range n = 2.05-2.20 at 1,000 nm and extinction coefficients were in the range k = 0.6 × 10-4 and 4.8 × 10-3 at 350 nm. X-ray diffraction analysis showed crystalline ZrO2 films consisted of monoclinic + tetragonal phases when produced in Ar/O2 atmosphere and monoclinic + rhombohedral or a single rhombohedral phase when produced in Ar/O2 + N2. Optical and physical properties of the ZrO2 layers produced in this study are suitable for high-power laser applications in the near-UV range.

  11. Genetic predisposition for high stress reactivity amplifies effects of early-life adversity.

    PubMed

    McIlwrick, Silja; Rechenberg, Alexandra; Matthes, Mariana; Burgstaller, Jessica; Schwarzbauer, Thomas; Chen, Alon; Touma, Chadi

    2016-08-01

    A dysregulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis and the experience of early-life adversity are both well-established risk factors for the development of affective disorders, such as major depression. However, little is known about the interaction of these two factors in shaping endophenotypes of the disease. Here, we studied the gene-environment interaction of a genetic predisposition for HPA axis dysregulation with early-life stress (ELS), assessing the short-, as well as the long-lasting consequences on emotional behavior, neuroendocrine functions and gene expression profiles. Three mouse lines, selectively bred for either high (HR), intermediate (IR), or low (LR) HPA axis reactivity, were exposed to one week of ELS using the limited nesting and bedding material paradigm. Measurements collected during or shortly after the ELS period showed that, regardless of genetic background, ELS exposure led to impaired weight gain and altered the animals' coping behavior under stressful conditions. However, only HR mice additionally showed significant changes in neuroendocrine stress responsiveness at a young age. Accordingly, adult HR mice also showed lasting consequences of ELS, including hyperactive stress-coping, HPA axis hyperreactivity, and gene expression changes in the Crh system, as well as downregulation of Fkbp5 in relevant brain regions. We suggest that the genetic predisposition for high stress reactivity interacts with ELS exposure by disturbing the suppression of corticosterone release during a critical period of brain development, thus exerting lasting programming effects on the HPA axis, presumably via epigenetic mechanisms. In concert, these changes lead to the emergence of important endophenotypes associated with affective disorders. PMID:27179233

  12. The change in orientation of subsidiary shears near faults containing pore fluid under high pressure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byerlee, J.

    1992-01-01

    Byerlee, J., 1992. The change in orientation of subsidiary shears near faults containing pore fluid under high pressure. In: T. Mikumo, K. Aki, M. Ohnaka, L.J. Ruff and P.K.P. Spudich (Editors), Earthquake Source Physics and Earthquake Precursors. Tectonophysics, 211: 295-303. The mechanical effects of a fault containing near-lithostatic fluid pressure in which fluid pressure decreases monotonically from the core of the fault zone to the adjacent country rock is considered. This fluid pressure distribution has mechanical implications for the orientation of subsidiary shears around a fault. Analysis shows that the maximum principal stress is oriented at a high angle to the fault in the country rock where the pore pressure is hydrostatic, and rotates to 45?? to the fault within the fault zone where the pore pressure is much higher. This analysis suggests that on the San Andreas fault, where heat flow constraints require that the coefficient of friction for slip on the fault be less than 0.1, the pore fluid pressure on the main fault is 85% of the lithostatic pressure. The observed geometry of the subsidiary shears in the creeping section of the San Andreas are broadly consistent with this model, with differences that may be due to the heterogeneous nature of the fault. ?? 1992.

  13. Partitioned fluid-structure interaction scheme for bodies with high flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, Timothy; Vanella, Marcos; Balaras, Elias; Balachandran, Balakumar

    2013-11-01

    There are many interesting problems involving fluid-structure interaction (FSI) systems such as flapping wings in micro-air-vehicles. In order to better understand these systems, high-fidelity simulation tools are needed to do the following: (i) fully capture the physics and (ii) provide a basis to construct low-fidelity models used in design. Here, a novel FSI strategy is introduced, through which a large scale fluids solver is combined with a solver for solids with high flexibility. The Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible flow are discretized by using standard central finite differences on a staggered mesh. The fluid domain is spatially decomposed through the use of the FLASH modeling framework. The solid body is discretized via geometrically exact Total Lagrangian finite elements. A novel hyperelastic material law that extends the engineering stress-strain law to finite deformations and arbitrary rotations is also implemented. The Lagrangian body is embedded in the Cartesian fluid grid by immersed boundary methods. The time marching predictor-corrector coupling procedure is based on the use of Adams methods for the fluid and the Generalized- α method for the body. We will present examples of flexible oscillating plates and a flapping Manduca Sexta wing.

  14. Nozzle Spray Delivery Studies for High-Viscosity Shear-Thinning Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Smita; Cloeter, Mike; Zhang, Yuxi; Rajan, Jana; Curtis-Fisk, Jaime; Deo, Puspendu; Smith, Billy

    2015-03-01

    Experiments were performed to explore the spray of shear-thinning polymer solutions through various nozzles. High speed images near the nozzle exit, drop size distributions, and spatial mass flux distributions were analyzed with the shear-thinning fluids and deionized water for comparison for seven different nozzles with pressure drops up to 40 psi. The nozzles tested include full cone, hollow cone, and flat fan nozzles. The aim was to identify suitable nozzles that would give droplet sizes in the range of 100-2000 μm for the shear thinning fluids. It was found in general that the shear-thinning fluids led to formation of ligament like structures whereas sheet perforation was more predominant with deionized water. The spray break up was delayed with the shear-thinning fluids. The spray of the shear-thinning fluids also led to an increase in the median drop size with the extent of increase being dependent on the nozzle type. The spray angle was found to be reduced by around 20° at a distance of 12'' when compared to that of distilled water. This study lends fundamental insights into spray characteristics for a wide range of spray nozzles with high viscosity shear-thinning solution as compared to spraying deionized water with the same nozzles.

  15. Burial diagenesis and geochemical alterations and their relationship to high fluid pressures, Frio and Vicksburg shales

    SciTech Connect

    Bott, W.F. Jr.; Tieh, T.T.

    1987-09-01

    Depth-related mineralogic changes in Frio and Vicksburg shales from Ann-Mag field, Brooks County, Texas, were studied to assess the nature and extent of burial diagenesis and geochemical alterations, and to determine their relationship to development of high fluid pressures. Mixed-layer illite-smectite and illite dominate the mineralogy of the shales. Burial diagenesis has transformed randomly interstratified illite/smectite to regularly interstratified illite/smectite and to illite, over a depth range of 6000-10,400 ft (1828-3170 m). The quantity of expandable smectite layers in the fine clay fraction decreases from 70% in the shallowest sample to 22% in the deepest sample, whereas illite increases from 27 to 61%. Alteration of feldspar in the fine silt fraction probably provided the potassium required in this reaction. An abrupt increase of smectite to illite alteration occurs at a depth of approximately 8900 ft (2713 m), corresponding to a temperature of 224/sup 0/F (107/sup 0/C). Fluid pressures estimated from conductivity data and measured pressures show that, at this depth, a significant increase in fluid pressure takes place. Associated with this increase is a decrease in shale density. These relationships suggest that high fluid pressures in this field are caused by clay transformation reactions that expel interlayer water into the pore spaces. Upward movement of pore fluids in thick shales is also suggested by extractable cation determinations.

  16. DESTRUCTION OF PCB-CONTAMINATED SOILS WITH A HIGH-TEMPERATURE FLUID-WALL (HTFW) REACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility of a high temperature fluid-wall (HTFW) Reactor to detoxify biorefractory hazardous substances, as well as soils contaminated with hazardous materials, such as PCBs, dioxins, and organophosphates. A typical HTFW Reac...

  17. Magnetorheological fluid behavior in high-frequency oscillatory squeeze mode: Experimental tests and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng; Bai, Xian-Xu; Qian, Li-Jun

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation on the behavior of magnetorheological (MR) fluids in high-frequency oscillatory squeeze mode and proposes a mathematical model to reveal the MR mechanism. A specific MR squeeze structure avoiding the cavitation effect is designed for the experimental tests. The magnetic field- and gap distance-dependent damping force of the MR squeeze structure is presented and compared with the dramatically large damping force under quasi-static excitations, a moderate damping force is observed at high frequencies. Subsequently, in order to interpret the behavior of MR fluids at high frequencies, employing the continuum media theory, a mathematical model is established with consideration of the fluid inertia and hysteresis property. The damping force comparison between the model and experimental tests indicates that in high-frequency oscillatory squeeze mode, the squeeze-strengthen effect does not work and the shear yield stress can be applied well to characterize the flow property of MR fluids. In addition, the hysteresis property has a significant influence on the damping performance.

  18. Exposure of Athletic Trainers to Potentially Infectious Bodily Fluids in the High School Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middlemas, David A.; Jessee, K. Brian; Mulder, Diane K.; Rehberg, Robb S.

    1997-01-01

    Examined high school athletic trainers' exposure to potentially infectious bodily fluids. Data on number of potential exposures per game and practice, number of athletes removed from competition for bleeding, and number of times athletes changed uniforms indicated that trainers had significant chances of being exposed to potentially infectious…

  19. Aerodynamic Characterization of a Thin, High-Performance Airfoil for Use in Ground Fluids Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Lee, Sam; Clark, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    The FAA has worked with Transport Canada and others to develop allowance times for aircraft operating in ice-pellet precipitation. Wind-tunnel testing has been carried out to better understand the flowoff characteristics and resulting aerodynamic effects of anti-icing fluids contaminated with ice pellets using a thin, high-performance wing section at the National Research Council of Canada Propulsion and Icing Wind Tunnel. The objective of this paper is to characterize the aerodynamic behavior of this wing section in order to better understand the adverse aerodynamic effects of anti-icing fluids and ice-pellet contamination. Aerodynamic performance data, boundary-layer surveys and flow visualization were conducted at a Reynolds number of approximately 6.0 x 10(exp 6) and a Mach number of 0.12. The clean, baseline model exhibited leading-edge stall characteristics including a leading-edge laminar separation bubble and minimal or no separation on the trailing edge of the main element or flap. These results were consistent with expected 2-D aerodynamics and showed no anomalies that could adversely affect the evaluation of anti-icing fluids and ice-pellet contamination on the wing. Tests conducted with roughness and leading-edge flow disturbances helped to explain the aerodynamic impact of the anti-icing fluids and contamination. The stalling characteristics of the wing section with fluid and contamination appear to be driven at least partially by the effects of a secondary wave of fluid that forms near the leading edge as the wing is rotated in the simulated takeoff profile. These results have provided a much more complete understanding of the adverse aerodynamic effects of anti-icing fluids and ice-pellet contamination on this wing section. This is important since these results are used, in part, to develop the ice-pellet allowance times that are applicable to many different airplanes.

  20. Aerodynamic Characterization of a Thin, High-Performance Airfoil for Use in Ground Fluids Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Lee, Sam; Clark, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    The FAA has worked with Transport Canada and others to develop allowance times for aircraft operating in ice-pellet precipitation. Wind-tunnel testing has been carried out to better understand the flowoff characteristics and resulting aerodynamic effects of anti-icing fluids contaminated with ice pellets using a thin, high-performance wing section at the National Research Council of Canada Propulsion and Icing Wind Tunnel. The objective of this paper is to characterize the aerodynamic behavior of this wing section in order to better understand the adverse aerodynamic effects of anti-icing fluids and ice-pellet contamination. Aerodynamic performance data, boundary-layer surveys and flow visualization were conducted at a Reynolds number of approximately 6.0×10(exp 6) and a Mach number of 0.12. The clean, baseline model exhibited leading-edge stall characteristics including a leading-edge laminar separation bubble and minimal or no separation on the trailing edge of the main element or flap. These results were consistent with expected 2-D aerodynamics and showed no anomalies that could adversely affect the evaluation of anti-icing fluids and ice-pellet contamination on the wing. Tests conducted with roughness and leading-edge flow disturbances helped to explain the aerodynamic impact of the anti-icing fluids and contamination. The stalling characteristics of the wing section with fluid and contamination appear to be driven at least partially by the effects of a secondary wave of fluid that forms near the leading edge as the wing is rotated in the simulated takeoff profile. These results have provided a much more complete understanding of the adverse aerodynamic effects of anti-icing fluids and ice-pellet contamination on this wing section. This is important since these results are used, in part, to develop the ice-pellet allowance times that are applicable to many different airplanes.

  1. A fluorescence high throughput screening method for the detection of reactive electrophiles as potential skin sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Avonto, Cristina; Chittiboyina, Amar G; Rua, Diego; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2015-12-01

    Skin sensitization is an important toxicological end-point in the risk assessment of chemical allergens. Because of the complexity of the biological mechanisms associated with skin sensitization, integrated approaches combining different chemical, biological and in silico methods are recommended to replace conventional animal tests. Chemical methods are intended to characterize the potential of a sensitizer to induce earlier molecular initiating events. The presence of an electrophilic mechanistic domain is considered one of the essential chemical features to covalently bind to the biological target and induce further haptenation processes. Current in chemico assays rely on the quantification of unreacted model nucleophiles after incubation with the candidate sensitizer. In the current study, a new fluorescence-based method, 'HTS-DCYA assay', is proposed. The assay aims at the identification of reactive electrophiles based on their chemical reactivity toward a model fluorescent thiol. The reaction workflow enabled the development of a High Throughput Screening (HTS) method to directly quantify the reaction adducts. The reaction conditions have been optimized to minimize solubility issues, oxidative side reactions and increase the throughput of the assay while minimizing the reaction time, which are common issues with existing methods. Thirty-six chemicals previously classified with LLNA, DPRA or KeratinoSens™ were tested as a proof of concept. Preliminary results gave an estimated 82% accuracy, 78% sensitivity, 90% specificity, comparable to other in chemico methods such as Cys-DPRA. In addition to validated chemicals, six natural products were analyzed and a prediction of their sensitization potential is presented for the first time. PMID:26455772

  2. The exceptionally high reactivity of Cys 621 is critical for electrophilic activation of the sensory nerve ion channel TRPA1.

    PubMed

    Bahia, Parmvir K; Parks, Thomas A; Stanford, Katherine R; Mitchell, David A; Varma, Sameer; Stevens, Stanley M; Taylor-Clark, Thomas E

    2016-06-01

    Activation of the sensory nerve ion channel TRPA1 by electrophiles is the key mechanism that initiates nociceptive signaling, and leads to defensive reflexes and avoidance behaviors, during oxidative stress in mammals. TRPA1 is rapidly activated by subtoxic levels of electrophiles, but it is unclear how TRPA1 outcompetes cellular antioxidants that protect cytosolic proteins from electrophiles. Here, using physiologically relevant exposures, we demonstrate that electrophiles react with cysteine residues on mammalian TRPA1 at rates that exceed the reactivity of typical cysteines by 6,000-fold and that also exceed the reactivity of antioxidant enzymes. We show that TRPA1 possesses a complex reactive cysteine profile in which C621 is necessary for electrophile-induced binding and activation. Modeling of deprotonation energies suggests that K620 contributes to C621 reactivity and mutation of K620 alone greatly reduces the effect of electrophiles on TRPA1. Nevertheless, binding of electrophiles to C621 is not sufficient for activation, which also depends on the function of another reactive cysteine (C665). Together, our results demonstrate that TRPA1 acts as an effective electrophilic sensor because of the exceptionally high reactivity of C621. PMID:27241698

  3. A New Method of Obtaining High-Resolution Paleoclimate Records from Speleothem Fluid Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, A. J.; Horton, T. W.

    2010-12-01

    We present a new method for stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope analysis of ancient drip water trapped within cave speleothems. Our method improves on existing fluid inclusion isotopic analytical techniques in that it decreases the sample size by a factor of ten or more, dramatically improving the spatial and temporal precision of fluid inclusion-based paleoclimatology. Published thermal extraction methods require large samples (c. 150 mg) and temperatures high enough (c. 500-900°C) to cause calcite decomposition, which is also associated with isotopic fractionation of the trapped fluids. Extraction by crushing faces similar challenges, where the failure to extract all the trapped fluid can result in isotopic fractionation, and samples in excess of 500 mg are required. Our new method combines the strengths of these published thermal and crushing methods using continuous-flow isotope ratio analytical techniques. Our method combines relatively low-temperature (~250°C) thermal decrepitation with cryogenic trapping across a switching valve sample loop. In brief, ~20 mg carbonate samples are dried (75°C for >1 hour) and heated (250°C for >1 hour) in a quartz sample chamber under a continuously flowing stream of ultra-high purity helium. Heating of the sample chamber is achieved by use of a tube furnace. Fluids released during the heating step are trapped in a coiled stainless steel cold trap (~ -98°C) serving as the sample loop in a 6-way switching valve. Trapped fluids are subsequently injected into a high-temperature conversion elemental analyzer by switching the valve and rapidly thawing the trap. This approach yielded accurate and precise measurements of injected liquid water IAEA reference materials (GISP; SMOW2; SLAP2) for both hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions. Blanking tests performed on the extraction line demonstrate extremely low line-blank peak heights (<50mv). Our tests also demonstrate that complete recovery of liquid water is possible and that

  4. High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein as a Predictor of Cardiovascular Events after ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Daniel Rios Pinto; Ramos, Adriane Monserrat; Vieira, Pedro Lima; Menti, Eduardo; Bordin, Odemir Luiz; de Souza, Priscilla Azambuja Lopes; de Quadros, Alexandre Schaan; Portal, Vera Lúcia

    2014-01-01

    Background The association between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and recurrent major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction who undergo primary percutaneous coronary intervention remains controversial. Objective To investigate the potential association between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and an increased risk of MACE such as death, heart failure, reinfarction, and new revascularization in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Methods This prospective cohort study included 300 individuals aged >18 years who were diagnosed with ST-elevation myocardial infarction and underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention at a tertiary health center. An instrument evaluating clinical variables and the Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) risk scores was used. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein was determined by nephelometry. The patients were followed-up during hospitalization and up to 30 days after infarction for the occurrence of MACE. Student's t, Mann-Whitney, chi-square, and logistic regression tests were used for statistical analyses. P values of ≤0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results The mean age was 59.76 years, and 69.3% of patients were male. No statistically significant association was observed between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and recurrent MACE (p = 0.11). However, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein was independently associated with 30-day mortality when adjusted for TIMI [odds ratio (OR), 1.27; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.07-1.51; p = 0.005] and GRACE (OR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.06-1.49; p = 0.007) risk scores. Conclusion Although high-sensitivity C-reactive protein was not predictive of combined major cardiovascular events within 30 days after ST-elevation myocardial infarction in patients who underwent primary angioplasty and stent

  5. Experimental technique for studying high-temperature phase equilibria in reactive molten metal based systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermoline, Alexandre

    The general objective of this work is to develop an experimental technique for studying the high-temperature phase compositions and phase equilibria in molten metal-based binary and ternary systems, such as Zr-O-N, B-N-O, Al-O, and others. A specific material system of Zr-O-N was selected for studying and testing this technique. The information about the high-temperature phase equilibria in reactive metal-based systems is scarce and their studying is difficult because of chemical reactions occurring between samples and essentially any container materials, and causing contamination of the system. Containerless microgravity experiments for studying equilibria in molten metal-gas systems were designed to be conducted onboard of a NASA KC-135 aircraft flying parabolic trajectories. A uniaxial apparatus suitable for acoustic levitation, laser heating, and splat quenching of small samples was developed and equipped with computer-based controller and optical diagnostics. Normal-gravity tests were conducted to determine the most suitable operating parameters of the levitator by direct observations of the levitated samples, as opposed to more traditional pressure mapping of the acoustic field. The size range of samples that could be reliably heated and quenched in this setup was determined to be on the order of 1--3 mm. In microgravity experiments, small spherical specimens (1--2 mm diameter), prepared as pressed, premixed solid components, ZrO2, ZrN, and Zr powders, were acoustically levitated inside an argon-filled chamber at one atmosphere and heated by a CO2 laser. The levitating samples could be continuously laser heated for about 1 sec, resulting in local sample melting. The sample stability in the vertical direction was undisturbed by simultaneous laser heating. Oscillations of the levitating sample in the horizontal direction increased while it was heated, which eventually resulted in the movement of the sample away from its stable levitation position and the laser

  6. AltitudeOmics: Resetting of Cerebrovascular CO2 Reactivity Following Acclimatization to High Altitude

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jui-Lin; Subudhi, Andrew W.; Duffin, James; Lovering, Andrew T.; Roach, Robert C.; Kayser, Bengt

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies reported enhanced cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity upon ascent to high altitude using linear models. However, there is evidence that this response may be sigmoidal in nature. Moreover, it was speculated that these changes at high altitude are mediated by alterations in acid-base buffering. Accordingly, we reanalyzed previously published data to assess middle cerebral blood flow velocity (MCAv) responses to modified rebreathing at sea level (SL), upon ascent (ALT1) and following 16 days of acclimatization (ALT16) to 5260 m in 21 lowlanders. Using sigmoid curve fitting of the MCAv responses to CO2, we found the amplitude (95 vs. 129%, SL vs. ALT1, 95% confidence intervals (CI) [77, 112], [111, 145], respectively, P = 0.024) and the slope of the sigmoid response (4.5 vs. 7.5%/mmHg, SL vs. ALT1, 95% CIs [3.1, 5.9], [6.0, 9.0], respectively, P = 0.026) to be enhanced at ALT1, which persisted with acclimatization at ALT16 (amplitude: 177, 95% CI [139, 215], P < 0.001; slope: 10.3%/mmHg, 95% CI [8.2, 12.5], P = 0.003) compared to SL. Meanwhile, the sigmoidal response midpoint was unchanged at ALT1 (SL: 36.5 mmHg; ALT1: 35.4 mmHg, 95% CIs [34.0, 39.0], [33.1, 37.7], respectively, P = 0.982), while it was reduced by ~7 mmHg at ALT16 (28.6 mmHg, 95% CI [26.4, 30.8], P = 0.001 vs. SL), indicating leftward shift of the cerebrovascular CO2 response to a lower arterial partial pressure of CO2 (PaCO2) following acclimatization to altitude. Sigmoid fitting revealed a leftward shift in the midpoint of the cerebrovascular response curve which could not be observed with linear fitting. These findings demonstrate that there is resetting of the cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity operating point to a lower PaCO2 following acclimatization to high altitude. This cerebrovascular resetting is likely the result of an altered acid-base buffer status resulting from prolonged exposure to the severe hypocapnia associated with ventilatory acclimatization to high altitude. PMID:26779030

  7. New Method for Production of High-Energy Neutral Molecules of Reactive Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metel, Alexander; Bolbukov, Vasily; Volosova, Marina; Grigoriev, Sergei; Melnik, Yury

    2015-09-01

    For the surface modification of dielectric substrates by reactive gas molecules with energy of 100 keV they are usually produced due to charge exchange collisions of ions extracted from a plasma emitter and accelerated by high-voltage pulses. As generation of the ion plasma emitter at a 100-kV potential is quite difficult, it was proposed to extract the ions from a ground potential emitter, accelerate them by high voltage between the emitter and a negatively biased high-transparency grid and transform them into fast neutral molecules in the positive space charge sheaths of the grid. As the energy of fast molecules is defined by potentials of charge exchange collision points inside the sheath their spectrum ranges from zero to a value corresponding to the pulse amplitude. A reverse beam is always generated due to acceleration of ions from the plasma on the other side of the grid. The lower the latter density, the higher the ratio of the primary to the reverse beam currents. When the grid is composed of parallel flat plates, the charge exchange due to reflections from the plates substantially contributes at low gas pressure to production of molecules with the energy corresponding to the pulse amplitude. The work was supported by the Grant No. 14-29-00297 of the Russian Science Foundation.

  8. High precision during food recruitment of experienced (reactivated) foragers in the stingless bee Scaptotrigona mexicana (Apidae, Meliponini)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Daniel; Nieh, James C.; Hénaut, Yann; Cruz, Leopoldo; Vandame, Rémy

    Several studies have examined the existence of recruitment communication mechanisms in stingless bees. However, the spatial accuracy of location-specific recruitment has not been examined. Moreover, the location-specific recruitment of reactivated foragers, i.e., foragers that have previously experienced the same food source at a different location and time, has not been explicitly examined. However, such foragers may also play a significant role in colony foraging, particularly in small colonies. Here we report that reactivated Scaptotrigona mexicana foragers can recruit with high precision to a specific food location. The recruitment precision of reactivated foragers was evaluated by placing control feeders to the left and the right of the training feeder (direction-precision tests) and between the nest and the training feeder and beyond it (distance-precision tests). Reactivated foragers arrived at the correct location with high precision: 98.44% arrived at the training feeder in the direction trials (five-feeder fan-shaped array, accuracy of at least +/-6° of azimuth at 50 m from the nest), and 88.62% arrived at the training feeder in the distance trials (five-feeder linear array, accuracy of at least +/-5 m or +/-10% at 50 m from the nest). Thus, S. mexicana reactivated foragers can find the indicated food source at a specific distance and direction with high precision, higher than that shown by honeybees, Apis mellifera, which do not communicate food location at such close distances to the nest.

  9. Kinase control prevents HIV-1 reactivation in spite of high levels of induced NF-κB activity.

    PubMed

    Wolschendorf, Frank; Bosque, Alberto; Shishido, Takao; Duverger, Alexandra; Jones, Jennifer; Planelles, Vicente; Kutsch, Olaf

    2012-04-01

    Despite its clinical importance, the molecular biology of HIV-1 latency control is at best partially understood, and the literature remains conflicting. The most recent description that latent HIV-1 is integrated into actively expressed host genes has further confounded the situation. This lack of molecular understanding complicates our efforts to identify therapeutic compounds or strategies that could reactivate latent HIV-1 infection in patients, a prerequisite for the eradication of HIV-1 infection. Currently, many therapeutic development efforts operate under the assumption that a restrictive histone code could govern latent infection and that either dissipation of the histone-based restrictions or NF-κB activation could be sufficient to trigger HIV-1 reactivation. We here present data that suggest an additional, higher level of molecular control. During a high-content drug screening effort, we identified AS601245 as a potent inhibitor of HIV-1 reactivation in latently infected primary T cells and T cell lines. In either system, AS601245 inhibited HIV-1 reactivation despite high levels of induced NF-κB activation. This finding suggests the presence of a gatekeeper kinase activity that controls latent HIV-1 infection even in the presence of high levels of NF-κB activity. Potential therapeutic stimuli that do not target this gatekeeper kinase will likely fail to trigger efficient system-wide HIV-1 reactivation. PMID:22345467

  10. Kinase Control Prevents HIV-1 Reactivation in Spite of High Levels of Induced NF-κB Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wolschendorf, Frank; Bosque, Alberto; Shishido, Takao; Duverger, Alexandra; Jones, Jennifer; Planelles, Vicente

    2012-01-01

    Despite its clinical importance, the molecular biology of HIV-1 latency control is at best partially understood, and the literature remains conflicting. The most recent description that latent HIV-1 is integrated into actively expressed host genes has further confounded the situation. This lack of molecular understanding complicates our efforts to identify therapeutic compounds or strategies that could reactivate latent HIV-1 infection in patients, a prerequisite for the eradication of HIV-1 infection. Currently, many therapeutic development efforts operate under the assumption that a restrictive histone code could govern latent infection and that either dissipation of the histone-based restrictions or NF-κB activation could be sufficient to trigger HIV-1 reactivation. We here present data that suggest an additional, higher level of molecular control. During a high-content drug screening effort, we identified AS601245 as a potent inhibitor of HIV-1 reactivation in latently infected primary T cells and T cell lines. In either system, AS601245 inhibited HIV-1 reactivation despite high levels of induced NF-κB activation. This finding suggests the presence of a gatekeeper kinase activity that controls latent HIV-1 infection even in the presence of high levels of NF-κB activity. Potential therapeutic stimuli that do not target this gatekeeper kinase will likely fail to trigger efficient system-wide HIV-1 reactivation. PMID:22345467

  11. X-ray Compton scattering experiments for fluid alkali metals at high temperatures and pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, K. Fukumaru, T.; Kimura, K.; Yao, M.; Tamura, K.; Katoh, M.; Kajihara, Y.; Inui, M.; Itou, M.; Sakurai, Y.

    2015-08-17

    We have developed a high-pressure vessel and a cell for x-ray Compton scattering measurements of fluid alkali metals. Measurements have been successfully carried out for alkali metal rubidium at elevated temperatures and pressures using synchrotron radiation at SPring-8. The width of Compton profiles (CPs) of fluid rubidium becomes narrow with decreasing fluid density, which indicates that the CPs sensitively detect the effect of reduction in the valence electron density. At the request of all authors of the paper, and with the agreement of the Proceedings Editor, an updated version of this article was published on 10 September 2015. The original article supplied to AIP Publishing was not the final version and contained PDF conversion errors in Formulas (1) and (2). The errors have been corrected in the updated and re-published article.

  12. Reduced carbonic fluid and possible nature of high-K magmas of Tolbachik

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakin, Alexander; Salova, Tamara; Devyatova, Vera; Zelensky, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Historical basaltic eruptions of Tolbachik volcano (Kamchatka) are of a medium to high potassic type. The potassic character of magmatism can be attributed to the influence of CO2-CO-rich fluid at or near the magma generation depths. Decarbonatization reactions in the mantle under Tolbachik producing a column of the carbonic fluids may be connected with the recent accretion of Kronotsky paleoarc with carbonates dragged under the mantle wedge. With thermodynamic modeling, we show that reduced carbonic fluid at fO2 < NNO may be a good carrier of nickel transported in the form of Ni(CO)4. This carbonyl is expected to become thermally stable near the magmatic temperatures at pressures above 1 GPa. In the crust, it is predicted to be thermally stable within the PT field of the amphibolite facies. We connect the particles of native Ni and Ag-Pt alloy observed in the volcanic aerosols from the 2012-13 Tolbachik eruption with flushing of the ascending Tolbachik magma with reduced carbonic fluids enriched with PGE and Ni. Native metals may form by the thermal decomposition of the carbonyls and other carbon-bearing compounds dissolved in the fluid.

  13. Halide and Oxy-Halide Eutectic Systems for High-Performance, High-Temperature Heat Transfer Fluids (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-12-01

    The University of Arizona, Arizona Statue University (ASU), and Georgia Institute of Technology is one of the 2012 SunShot CSP R&D awardees for their Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI): High Operating Temperature (HOT) Fluids. This fact sheet explains the motivation, description, and impact of the project.

  14. How ubiquitous are aftershock sequences driven by high pressure fluids at depth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S. A.

    2008-12-01

    Strong evidence suggests that two earthquake-aftershock episodes, the 2004 Niigata (Japan) sequence and the 1997 Umbria-Marche (Italy) sequence, were driven by high pressure fluids at depth. Since Niigata was in a compressional environment and Umbria-Marche in extension, a question arises about whether such a mechanism is more general than just these two cases. Although it is not clear by what mechanism fluids of sufficient volume can be trapped in the lower crust, if such pockets of high pressure fluids exist, then they must necessarily be expelled when a large earthquake provides the hydraulic connection to the hydrostatically pressured free surface. In this talk, aftershock data is analyzed for a number of different earthquakes in a variety of tectonic settings, including 1992 Landers, 1994 Northridge, and the 2001 Bhuj earthquakes. Comparisons are made between model results of the evolved fluid pressure state from a high pressure source at depth, and the spatio-temporal distributions of aftershocks. The data is further analyzed and compared with model results for differences in the rate of aftershocks (p-value in Omori's Law) and their dependence on the orientation of the mainshock relative to the prevailing regional stress field.

  15. High power densities from high-temperature material interactions. [in thermionic energy conversion and metallic fluid heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    Thermionic energy conversion (TEC) and metallic-fluid heat pipes (MFHPs), offering unique advantages in terrestrial and space energy processing by virtue of operating on working-fluid vaporization/condensation cycles that accept great thermal power densities at high temperatures, share complex materials problems. Simplified equations are presented that verify and solve such problems, suggesting the possibility of cost-effective applications in the near term for TEC and MFHP devices. Among the problems discussed are: the limitation of alkali-metal corrosion, protection against hot external gases, external and internal vaporization, interfacial reactions and diffusion, expansion coefficient matching, and creep deformation.

  16. Shock compression response of highly reactive Ni + Al multilayered thin foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Sean C.; Thadhani, Naresh N.

    2016-03-01

    The shock-compression response of Ni + Al multilayered thin foils is investigated using laser-accelerated thin-foil plate-impact experiments over the pressure range of 2 to 11 GPa. The foils contain alternating Ni and Al layers (parallel but not flat) of nominally 50 nm bilayer spacing. The goal is to determine the equation of state and shock-induced reactivity of these highly reactive fully dense thin-foil materials. The laser-accelerated thin-foil impact set-up involved combined use of photon-doppler-velocimetry to monitor the acceleration and impact velocity of an aluminum flyer, and VISAR interferometry was used to monitor the back free-surface velocity of the impacted Ni + Al multilayered target. The shock-compression response of the Ni + Al target foils was determined using experimentally measured parameters and impedance matching approach, with error bars identified considering systematic and experimental errors. Meso-scale CTH shock simulations were performed using real imported microstructures of the cross-sections of the multilayered Ni + Al foils to compute the Hugoniot response (assuming no reaction) for correlation with their experimentally determined equation of state. It was observed that at particle velocities below ˜150 m/s, the experimentally determined equation of state trend matches the CTH-predicted inert response and is consistent with the observed unreacted state of the recovered Ni + Al target foils from this velocity regime. At higher particle velocities, the experimentally determined equation of state deviates from the CTH-predicted inert response. A complete and self-sustained reaction is also seen in targets recovered from experiments performed at these higher particle velocities. The deviation in the measured equation of state, to higher shock speeds and expanded volumes, combined with the observation of complete reaction in the recovered multilayered foils, confirmed via microstructure characterization, is indicative of the occurrence

  17. High-resolution temporal analysis of deep subseafloor microbial communities inhabiting basement fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungbluth, S.; Lin, H. T.; Hsieh, C. C.; Rappe, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    , demonstrating that high-quality borehole fluid samples may range up to ~45,000 cells x ml-1. This analysis helps to constrain subseafloor biomass estimates, reveals its variability in both short and long temporal scales, and provides a glimpse of the variability in microbial community structure that spans from hours to years.

  18. Reactively-sputtered zinc semiconductor films of high conductivity for heterojunction devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stirn, Richard J. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A high conductivity, n-doped semiconductor film is produced from zinc, or Zn and Cd, and group VI elements selected from Se, S and Te in a reactive magnetron sputtering system having a chamber with one or two targets, a substrate holder, means for heating the substrate holder, and an electric field for ionizing gases in the chamber. Zinc or a compound of Zn and Cd is placed in the position of one of the two targets and doping material in the position of the other of the two targets. Zn and Cd may be placed in separate targets while a dopant is placed in the third target. Another possibility is to place an alloy of Zn and dopant, or Zn, Cd and dopant in one target, thus using only one target. A flow of the inert gas is ionized and directed toward said targets, while a flow of a reactant gas consisting of hydrides of the group VI elements is directed toward a substrate on the holder. The targets are biased to attract negatively ionized inert gas. The desired stochiometry for high conductivity is achieved by controlling the temperature of the substrate, and partial pressures of the gases, and the target power and total pressure of the gases in the chamber.

  19. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein and atherosclerosis: from theory to therapy.

    PubMed

    Yu, H; Rifai, N

    2000-11-01

    Atherosclerosis remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Western countries. Recent evidence has demonstrated that atherosclerosis is not simply a disease of lipid deposition. Inflammation plays a major role in the initiation, progression, and destabilization of atheromas. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is a circulating acute-phase reactant that reflects active systemic inflammation. Large prospective trials have shown hs-CRP to be a strong predictor of future cardiovascular events. Increased hs-CRP concentration is in fact associated with higher cardiovascular events in individuals with and without clinical evidence of atherosclerotic disease. The relative risk associated with hs-CRP is independent of other cardiovascular disease risk factors. Assays for hs-CRP measurement are currently available but must be standardized because patients' results will be interpreted by using population-based cutpoints. A risk-stratifying algorithm incorporating hs-CRP and total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio has been proposed. Further research into the mechanisms and pharmacological treatment of vascular disease will provide novel management strategies in the very near future. PMID:11166006

  20. Incorporating Non-Linear Sorption into High Fidelity Subsurface Reactive Transport Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matott, L. S.; Rabideau, A. J.; Allen-King, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    A variety of studies, including multiple NRC (National Research Council) reports, have stressed the need for simulation models that can provide realistic predictions of contaminant behavior during the groundwater remediation process, most recently highlighting the specific technical challenges of "back diffusion and desorption in plume models". For a typically-sized remediation site, a minimum of about 70 million grid cells are required to achieve desired cm-level thickness among low-permeability lenses responsible for driving the back-diffusion phenomena. Such discretization is nearly three orders of magnitude more than is typically seen in modeling practice using public domain codes like RT3D (Reactive Transport in Three Dimensions). Consequently, various extensions have been made to the RT3D code to support efficient modeling of recently proposed dual-mode non-linear sorption processes (e.g. Polanyi with linear partitioning) at high-fidelity scales of grid resolution. These extensions have facilitated development of exploratory models in which contaminants are introduced into an aquifer via an extended multi-decade "release period" and allowed to migrate under natural conditions for centuries. These realistic simulations of contaminant loading and migration provide high fidelity representation of the underlying diffusion and sorption processes that control remediation. Coupling such models with decision support processes is expected to facilitate improved long-term management of complex remediation sites that have proven intractable to conventional remediation strategies.

  1. Ice sheets as a significant source of highly reactive nanoparticulate iron to the oceans.

    PubMed

    Hawkings, Jon R; Wadham, Jemma L; Tranter, Martyn; Raiswell, Rob; Benning, Liane G; Statham, Peter J; Tedstone, Andrew; Nienow, Peter; Lee, Katherine; Telling, Jon

    2014-01-01

    The Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets cover ~ 10% of global land surface, but are rarely considered as active components of the global iron cycle. The ocean waters around both ice sheets harbour highly productive coastal ecosystems, many of which are iron limited. Measurements of iron concentrations in subglacial runoff from a large Greenland Ice Sheet catchment reveal the potential for globally significant export of labile iron fractions to the near-coastal euphotic zone. We estimate that the flux of bioavailable iron associated with glacial runoff is 0.40-2.54 Tg per year in Greenland and 0.06-0.17 Tg per year in Antarctica. Iron fluxes are dominated by a highly reactive and potentially bioavailable nanoparticulate suspended sediment fraction, similar to that identified in Antarctic icebergs. Estimates of labile iron fluxes in meltwater are comparable with aeolian dust fluxes to the oceans surrounding Greenland and Antarctica, and are similarly expected to increase in a warming climate with enhanced melting. PMID:24845560

  2. Additive Manufacturing of Reactive In Situ Zr Based Ultra-High Temperature Ceramic Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahasrabudhe, Himanshu; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2016-03-01

    Reactive in situ multi-material additive manufacturing of ZrB2-based ultra-high-temperature ceramics in a Zr metal matrix was demonstrated using LENS™. Sound metallurgical bonding was achieved between the Zr metal and Zr-BN composites with Ti6Al4V substrate. Though the feedstock Zr power had α phase, LENS™ processing of the Zr powder and Zr-BN premix powder mixture led to the formation of some β phase of Zr. Microstructure of the Zr-BN composite showed primary grains of zirconium diboride phase in zirconium metal matrix. The presence of ZrB2 ceramic phase was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Hardness of pure Zr was measured as 280 ± 12 HV and, by increasing the BN content in the feedstock, the hardness was found to increase. In Zr-5%BN composite, the hardness was 421 ± 10 HV and the same for Zr-10%BN composite was 562 ± 10 HV. It is envisioned that such multi-materials additive manufacturing will enable products in the future that cannot be manufactured using traditional approaches particularly in the areas of high-temperature metal-ceramic composites with compositional and functional gradation.

  3. Pebble Fuel Handling and Reactivity Control for Salt-Cooled High Temperature Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Per; Greenspan, Ehud

    2015-02-09

    This report documents the work completed on the X-PREX facility under NEUP Project 11- 3172. This project seeks to demonstrate the viability of pebble fuel handling and reactivity control for fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactors (FHRs). The research results also improve the understanding of pebble motion in helium-cooled reactors, as well as the general, fundamental understanding of low-velocity granular flows. Successful use of pebble fuels in with salt coolants would bring major benefits for high-temperature reactor technology. Pebble fuels enable on-line refueling and operation with low excess reactivity, and thus simpler reactivity control and improved fuel utilization. If fixed fuel designs are used, the power density of salt- cooled reactors is limited to 10 MW/m3 to obtain adequate duration between refueling, but pebble fuels allow power densities in the range of 20 to 30 MW/m3. This can be compared to the typical modular helium reactor power density of 5 MW/m3. Pebble fuels also permit radial zoning in annular cores and use of thorium or graphite pebble blankets to reduce neutron fluences to outer radial reflectors and increase total power production. Combined with high power conversion efficiency, compact low-pressure primary and containment systems, and unique safety characteristics including very large thermal margins (>500°C) to fuel damage during transients and accidents, salt-cooled pebble fuel cores offer the potential to meet the major goals of the Advanced Reactor Concepts Development program to provide electricity at lower cost than light water reactors with improved safety and system performance.This report presents the facility description, experimental results, and supporting simulation methods of the new X-Ray Pebble Recirculation Experiment (X-PREX), which is now operational and being used to collect data on the behavior of slow dense granular flows relevant to pebble bed reactor core designs. The X

  4. Streptococcus mutans biofilm transient viscoelastic fluid behaviour during high-velocity microsprays.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, S; Johnston, D A; Rmaile, A; Gottenbos, B; De Jager, M; Aspiras, M; Starke, E M; Ward, M T; Stoodley, P

    2016-06-01

    Using high-speed imaging we assessed Streptococcus mutans biofilm-fluid interactions during exposure to a 60-ms microspray burst with a maximum exit velocity of 51m/s. S. mutans UA159 biofilms were grown for 72h on 10mm-length glass slides pre-conditioned with porcine gastric mucin. Biofilm stiffness was measured by performing uniaxial-compression tests. We developed an in-vitro interproximal model which allowed the parallel insertion of two biofilm-colonized slides separated by a distance of 1mm and enabled high-speed imaging of the removal process at the surface. S. mutans biofilms were exposed to either a water microspray or an air-only microburst. High-speed videos provided further insight into the mechanical behaviour of biofilms as complex liquids and into high-shear fluid-biofilm interaction. We documented biofilms extremely transient fluid behaviour when exposed to the high-velocity microsprays. The presence of time-dependent recoil and residual deformation confirmed the pivotal role of viscoelasticity in biofilm removal. The air-only microburst was effective enough to remove some of the biofilm but created a smaller clearance zone underlying the importance of water and the air-water interface of drops moving over the solid surface in the removal process. Confocal and COMSTAT analysis showed the high-velocity water microspray caused up to a 99.9% reduction in biofilm thickness, biomass and area coverage, within the impact area. PMID:26771168

  5. A preliminary study of cortisol and norepinephrine reactivity to psychosocial stress in borderline personality disorder with high and low dissociation.

    PubMed

    Simeon, Daphne; Knutelska, Margaret; Smith, Lisa; Baker, Bryann R; Hollander, Eric

    2007-01-15

    The goal of the current study was to investigate subjective and neurohormonal reactivity to acute psychosocial stress in borderline personality disorder (BPD) as a function of dissociative symptoms. Five BPD subjects with high dissociation, 8 BPD subjects with low dissociation, and 11 healthy control subjects were compared in basal urinary cortisol and norepinephrine, as well as in plasma cortisol and norepinephrine reactivity to the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST). Subjective stress rating and emotional response to the TSST were also measured. The three groups differed significantly in cortisol stress reactivity, with the high-dissociation BPD group demonstrating the most robust response. The three groups did not significantly differ in norepinephrine stress reactivity. In the combined BPD sample, dissociation severity tended to be inversely correlated with basal urinary norepinephrine, was positively correlated with norepinephrine stress reactivity. Childhood trauma was inversely correlated with basal urinary cortisol. In conclusion, despite its small sample size this pilot study suggests that dissociative symptomatology may be a marker of heightened biological vulnerability to stress in BPD, and merits further study. PMID:17169436

  6. Methanethiol abundance in high-temperature hydrothermal fluids from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, E.; Seewald, J. S.; Saccocia, P.; van der Meer, M.

    2008-12-01

    metabolism in highly-reducing alkaline hydrothermal environments invoke CH3SH as a key reactant leading to Acetyl CoA-based (Wood-Ljungdahl) carbon fixation pathways. Results of this study challenge the notion that high-pH, reducing fluids emanating from serpentinite-hosted hydrothermal systems like Lost City were favorable for the production of CH3SH, the establishment of a primitive metabolic cycle and the emergence of microbial life on Earth.

  7. Physics based simulation of seismicity induced in the vicinity of a high-pressure fluid injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCloskey, J.; NicBhloscaidh, M.; Murphy, S.; O'Brien, G. S.; Bean, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    High-pressure fluid injection into subsurface is known, in some cases, to induce earthquakes in the surrounding volume. The increasing importance of ';fracking' as a potential source of hydrocarbons has made the seismic hazard from this effect an important issue the adjudication of planning applications and it is likely that poor understanding of the process will be used as justification of refusal of planning in Ireland and the UK. Here we attempt to understand some of the physical controls on the size and frequency of induced earthquakes using a physics-based simulation of the process and examine resulting earthquake catalogues The driver for seismicity in our simulations is identical to that used in the paper by Murphy et al. in this session. Fluid injection is simulated using pore fluid movement throughout a permeable layer from a high-pressure point source using a lattice Boltzmann scheme. Diffusivities and frictional parameters can be defined independently at individual nodes/cells allowing us to reproduce 3-D geological structures. Active faults in the model follow a fractal size distribution and exhibit characteristic event size, resulting in a power-law frequency-size distribution. The fluid injection is not hydraulically connected to the fault (i.e. fluid does not come into physical contact with the fault); however stress perturbations from the injection drive the seismicity model. The duration and pressure-time function of the fluid injection can be adjusted to model any given injection scenario and the rate of induced seismicity is controlled by the local structures and ambient stress field as well as by the stress perturbations resulting from the fluid injection. Results from the rate and state fault models of Murphy et al. are incorporated to include the effect of fault strengthening in seismically quite areas. Initial results show similarities with observed induced seismic catalogues. Seismicity is only induced where the active faults have not been

  8. Highly reactive {001} facets of TiO2-based composites: synthesis, formation mechanism and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Wee-Jun; Tan, Lling-Lling; Chai, Siang-Piao; Yong, Siek-Ting; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is one of the most widely investigated metal oxides due to its extraordinary surface, electronic and catalytic properties. However, the large band gap of TiO2 and massive recombination of photogenerated electron-hole pairs limit its photocatalytic and photovoltaic efficiency. Therefore, increasing research attention is now being directed towards engineering the surface structure of TiO2 at the most fundamental and atomic level namely morphological control of {001} facets in the range of microscale and nanoscale to fine-tune its physicochemical properties, which could ultimately lead to the optimization of its selectivity and reactivity. The synthesis of {001}-faceted TiO2 is currently one of the most active interdisciplinary research areas and demonstrations of catalytic enhancement are abundant. Modifications such as metal and non-metal doping have also been extensively studied to extend its band gap to the visible light region. This steady progress has demonstrated that TiO2-based composites with {001} facets are playing and will continue to play an indispensable role in the environmental remediation and in the search for clean and renewable energy technologies. This review encompasses the state-of-the-art research activities and latest advancements in the design of highly reactive {001} facet-dominated TiO2via various strategies, including hydrothermal/solvothermal, high temperature gas phase reactions and non-hydrolytic alcoholysis methods. The stabilization of {001} facets using fluorine-containing species and fluorine-free capping agents is also critically discussed in this review. To overcome the large band gap of TiO2 and rapid recombination of photogenerated charge carriers, modifications are carried out to manipulate its electronic band structure, including transition metal doping, noble metal doping, non-metal doping and incorporating graphene as a two-dimensional (2D) catalyst support. The advancements made in these aspects are

  9. A highly reactive chalcogenide precursor for the synthesis of metal chalcogenide quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Peng; Zhu, Dong-Liang; Zhu, Chun-Nan; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Zhang, Guo-Jun; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2015-11-01

    Metal chalcogenide semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) are ideal inorganic materials for solar cells and biomedical labeling. In consideration of the hazard and instability of alkylphosphines, the phosphine-free synthetic route has become one of the most important trends in synthesizing selenide QDs. Here we report a novel phase transfer strategy to prepare phosphine-free chalcogenide precursors. The anions in aqueous solution were transferred to toluene via electrostatic interactions between the anions and didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB). The obtained chalcogenide precursors show high reactivity with metal ions in the organic phase and could be applied to the low-temperature synthesis of various metal chalcogenide NCs based on a simple reaction between metal ions (e.g. Ag+, Pb2+, Cd2+) and chalcogenide anions (e.g. S2-) in toluene. In addition to chalcogenide anions, other anions such as BH4- ions and AuCl4- ions can also be transferred to the organic phase for synthesizing noble metal NCs (such as Ag and Au NCs).Metal chalcogenide semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) are ideal inorganic materials for solar cells and biomedical labeling. In consideration of the hazard and instability of alkylphosphines, the phosphine-free synthetic route has become one of the most important trends in synthesizing selenide QDs. Here we report a novel phase transfer strategy to prepare phosphine-free chalcogenide precursors. The anions in aqueous solution were transferred to toluene via electrostatic interactions between the anions and didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB). The obtained chalcogenide precursors show high reactivity with metal ions in the organic phase and could be applied to the low-temperature synthesis of various metal chalcogenide NCs based on a simple reaction between metal ions (e.g. Ag+, Pb2+, Cd2+) and chalcogenide anions (e.g. S2-) in toluene. In addition to chalcogenide anions, other anions such as BH4- ions and AuCl4- ions can also be transferred to

  10. Highly reactive {001} facets of TiO2-based composites: synthesis, formation mechanism and characterization.

    PubMed

    Ong, Wee-Jun; Tan, Lling-Lling; Chai, Siang-Piao; Yong, Siek-Ting; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2014-02-21

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is one of the most widely investigated metal oxides due to its extraordinary surface, electronic and catalytic properties. However, the large band gap of TiO2 and massive recombination of photogenerated electron-hole pairs limit its photocatalytic and photovoltaic efficiency. Therefore, increasing research attention is now being directed towards engineering the surface structure of TiO2 at the most fundamental and atomic level namely morphological control of {001} facets in the range of microscale and nanoscale to fine-tune its physicochemical properties, which could ultimately lead to the optimization of its selectivity and reactivity. The synthesis of {001}-faceted TiO2 is currently one of the most active interdisciplinary research areas and demonstrations of catalytic enhancement are abundant. Modifications such as metal and non-metal doping have also been extensively studied to extend its band gap to the visible light region. This steady progress has demonstrated that TiO2-based composites with {001} facets are playing and will continue to play an indispensable role in the environmental remediation and in the search for clean and renewable energy technologies. This review encompasses the state-of-the-art research activities and latest advancements in the design of highly reactive {001} facet-dominated TiO2via various strategies, including hydrothermal/solvothermal, high temperature gas phase reactions and non-hydrolytic alcoholysis methods. The stabilization of {001} facets using fluorine-containing species and fluorine-free capping agents is also critically discussed in this review. To overcome the large band gap of TiO2 and rapid recombination of photogenerated charge carriers, modifications are carried out to manipulate its electronic band structure, including transition metal doping, noble metal doping, non-metal doping and incorporating graphene as a two-dimensional (2D) catalyst support. The advancements made in these aspects are

  11. High-temperature chlorine-rich fluid in the martian crust: A precursor to habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filiberto, Justin; Treiman, Allan H.; Giesting, Paul A.; Goodrich, Cyrena A.; Gross, Juliane

    2014-09-01

    We report scapolite in a melt inclusion in olivine in Nakhla, which is the first occurrence of Cl-scapolite found in a martian meteorite. Using terrestrial metamorphic experiments and modeling we constrain its origin. Cl-rich scapolite in Nakhla is consistent with formation from either a late stage Cl-rich, water-poor magma or magmatic Cl-rich hydrothermal brine at a minimum temperature of 700 °C. The temperature of hydrothermal activity recorded by the Cl-scapolite is significantly higher than the temperatures recorded by alteration minerals in Nakhla, and the fluid was Cl-rich, not CO2-rich. Our results demonstrate that high-temperature Cl-rich fluids were present within the martian crust, and any potential biologic activity would have to survive in these high temperatures and saline fluids. Halophiles can thrive in NaCl-rich systems but at significantly lower temperatures than those recorded by the scapolite. During cooling of the fluid, the system could have reached a habitable state for halophiles. Importantly, halophiles can survive the conditions of space if they are encased in salt crystals, and therefore chlorine-rich phases present an opportunity to investigate for extant life both on the surface of Mars and in martian meteorites.

  12. High accuracy differential pressure measurements using fluid-filled catheters - A feasibility study in compliant tubes.

    PubMed

    Rotman, Oren Moshe; Weiss, Dar; Zaretsky, Uri; Shitzer, Avraham; Einav, Shmuel

    2015-09-18

    High accuracy differential pressure measurements are required in various biomedical and medical applications, such as in fluid-dynamic test systems, or in the cath-lab. Differential pressure measurements using fluid-filled catheters are relatively inexpensive, yet may be subjected to common mode pressure errors (CMP), which can significantly reduce the measurement accuracy. Recently, a novel correction method for high accuracy differential pressure measurements was presented, and was shown to effectively remove CMP distortions from measurements acquired in rigid tubes. The purpose of the present study was to test the feasibility of this correction method inside compliant tubes, which effectively simulate arteries. Two tubes with varying compliance were tested under dynamic flow and pressure conditions to cover the physiological range of radial distensibility in coronary arteries. A third, compliant model, with a 70% stenosis severity was additionally tested. Differential pressure measurements were acquired over a 3 cm tube length using a fluid-filled double-lumen catheter, and were corrected using the proposed CMP correction method. Validation of the corrected differential pressure signals was performed by comparison to differential pressure recordings taken via a direct connection to the compliant tubes, and by comparison to predicted differential pressure readings of matching fluid-structure interaction (FSI) computational simulations. The results show excellent agreement between the experimentally acquired and computationally determined differential pressure signals. This validates the application of the CMP correction method in compliant tubes of the physiological range for up to intermediate size stenosis severity of 70%. PMID:26087881

  13. Application of Filtered Spherical Harmonics Radiation Transport to High-Speed Reactive Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houim, Ryan; Oran, Elaine

    2015-11-01

    Radiative heat transfer is an important, but often neglected, process in high-speed reacting and multiphase flow applications. Some scenarios, such as dust explosions in coal mines, can have regions that are nearly transparent and other regions with high dust concentration that are optically thick. Most approximations to the radiative transfer equation (RTE) are not valid in both limits simultaneously. Issues also arise when solving approximations to the RTE that can often require the solution of elliptic equations. Many compressible hydrodynamic codes use explicit time-marching and block-structured adaptive-mesh-refinement algorithms. Adapting these codes to solve elliptic equations is not always straightforward. Recently, filtered spherical harmonics (FPN) approximations to the RTE have been developed. The FPN equations are hyperbolic and, as a result, can be solved using algorithms that are similar Godunov's method for compressible fluid flow. The FPN model is also valid in optically thick and thin situations provided that the order, N, is high enough. We show that the FPN equations are a promising alternative to traditional RTE approximations. Challenging test cases that involve both free-streaming and optically thick regions will be presented.

  14. Alpha reactivity to first names differs in subjects with high and low dream recall frequency

    PubMed Central

    Ruby, Perrine; Blochet, Camille; Eichenlaub, Jean-Baptiste; Bertrand, Olivier; Morlet, Dominique; Bidet-Caulet, Aurélie

    2013-01-01

    Studies in cognitive psychology showed that personality (openness to experience, thin boundaries, absorption), creativity, nocturnal awakenings, and attitude toward dreams are significantly related to dream recall frequency (DRF). These results suggest the possibility of neurophysiological trait differences between subjects with high and low DRF. To test this hypothesis we compared sleep characteristics and alpha reactivity to sounds in subjects with high and low DRF using polysomnographic recordings and electroencephalography (EEG). We acquired EEG from 21 channels in 36 healthy subjects while they were presented with a passive auditory oddball paradigm (frequent standard tones, rare deviant tones and very rare first names) during wakefulness and sleep (intensity, 50 dB above the subject's hearing level). Subjects were selected as High-recallers (HR, DRF = 4.42 ± 0.25 SEM, dream recalls per week) and Low-recallers (LR, DRF = 0.25 ± 0.02) using a questionnaire and an interview on sleep and dream habits. Despite the disturbing setup, the subjects' quality of sleep was generally preserved. First names induced a more sustained decrease in alpha activity in HR than in LR at Pz (1000–1200 ms) during wakefulness, but no group difference was found in REM sleep. The current dominant hypothesis proposes that alpha rhythms would be involved in the active inhibition of the brain regions not involved in the ongoing brain operation. According to this hypothesis, a more sustained alpha decrease in HR would reflect a longer release of inhibition, suggesting a deeper processing of complex sounds than in LR during wakefulness. A possibility to explain the absence of group difference during sleep is that increase in alpha power in HR may have resulted in awakenings. Our results support this hypothesis since HR experienced more intra sleep wakefulness than LR (30 ± 4 vs. 14 ± 4 min). As a whole our results support the hypothesis of neurophysiological trait differences in high

  15. Alpha reactivity to first names differs in subjects with high and low dream recall frequency.

    PubMed

    Ruby, Perrine; Blochet, Camille; Eichenlaub, Jean-Baptiste; Bertrand, Olivier; Morlet, Dominique; Bidet-Caulet, Aurélie

    2013-01-01

    Studies in cognitive psychology showed that personality (openness to experience, thin boundaries, absorption), creativity, nocturnal awakenings, and attitude toward dreams are significantly related to dream recall frequency (DRF). These results suggest the possibility of neurophysiological trait differences between subjects with high and low DRF. To test this hypothesis we compared sleep characteristics and alpha reactivity to sounds in subjects with high and low DRF using polysomnographic recordings and electroencephalography (EEG). We acquired EEG from 21 channels in 36 healthy subjects while they were presented with a passive auditory oddball paradigm (frequent standard tones, rare deviant tones and very rare first names) during wakefulness and sleep (intensity, 50 dB above the subject's hearing level). Subjects were selected as High-recallers (HR, DRF = 4.42 ± 0.25 SEM, dream recalls per week) and Low-recallers (LR, DRF = 0.25 ± 0.02) using a questionnaire and an interview on sleep and dream habits. Despite the disturbing setup, the subjects' quality of sleep was generally preserved. First names induced a more sustained decrease in alpha activity in HR than in LR at Pz (1000-1200 ms) during wakefulness, but no group difference was found in REM sleep. The current dominant hypothesis proposes that alpha rhythms would be involved in the active inhibition of the brain regions not involved in the ongoing brain operation. According to this hypothesis, a more sustained alpha decrease in HR would reflect a longer release of inhibition, suggesting a deeper processing of complex sounds than in LR during wakefulness. A possibility to explain the absence of group difference during sleep is that increase in alpha power in HR may have resulted in awakenings. Our results support this hypothesis since HR experienced more intra sleep wakefulness than LR (30 ± 4 vs. 14 ± 4 min). As a whole our results support the hypothesis of neurophysiological trait differences in high and

  16. Body fluid status on induction, reinduction and prolonged stay at high altitude of human volunteers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, M. V.; Rawal, S. B.; Tyagi, A. K.

    1990-06-01

    Studies on adaptation to high altitude (HA) of 3500 m in the Himalayas were conducted in three phases, each including 10 normal and healthy males normally resident at sea-level. Phase I subjects had no previous experience of HA, phase II subjects after 4 6 months at HA were airlifted to sea-level and phase III subjects stayed continuously for 6 months at 3500 m. Body fluid compartments and blood gases were determined in all three groups. Plasma volume was highly elevated in the phase II subjects on reinduction to sea-level from HA. In comparison to phase I subjects, the retention of fluid in extracellular compartment was increased at HA leading to increased susceptibility to high altitude illness. Phase III subjects were hyperhydrated with decreased plasma volume and increased PO2 in comparison to the other two groups.

  17. The final stage of gravitational collapse for high density fluid medium

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, R. G.; De Campos, M.

    2013-03-25

    The High density high density fluids can be represented by a stiff matter state equation P={rho} and also by the Hagedorn state equation. The first is constructed using a lagrangian that allows bare nucleons to interact attractively via scalar meson exchange, and repulsively by a more massive vector meson exchange; the second consider that for large mass the spectrum of hadrons grows exponentially, namely {rho}(m) {approx}exp(m/T{sub H}), where T{sub H} is the Hagedorn temperature, resulting the state equation P = P{sub 0}+{rho}{sub 0}ln({rho}/{rho}{sub 0}). We study the gravitational collapse for a high density fluid, considering a Hagedorn state equation in a presence of a vacuum component.

  18. Increased frequency of {gamma}{delta} T cells in cerebrospinal fluid and peripheral blood of patients with multiple sclerosis: Reactivity, cytotoxicity, and T cell receptor V gene rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Stinissen, P.; Vandevyver, C.; Medaer, R.

    1995-05-01

    Infiltrating {gamma}{delta} T cells are potentially involved in the central nervous system demyelination in multiple sclerosis (MS). To further study this hypothesis, we analyzed the frequency and functional properties of {gamma}{delta} T cells in peripheral blood (PB) and paired cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with MS and control subjects, including patients with other neurologic diseases (OND) and healthy individuals. The frequency analysis was performed under limiting dilution condition using rIL-2 and PHA. After PHA stimulation, a significantly increased frequency of {gamma}{delta} T cells was observed in PB and in CSF of MS patients as compared with PB and CSF of patients with OND. The frequency was represented equally in OND patients and normal individuals. Similarly, the IL-2-responsive {gamma}{delta} T cells occurred at a higher frequency in PB of MS than of control subjects. Forty-three percent of the {gamma}{delta} T cell clones isolates from PB and CSF of MS patients responded to heat shock protein (HSP70) but not HSP65, whereas only 2 of 30 control {gamma}{delta} T cell clones reacted to the HSP. The majority of the {gamma}{delta} T cell clones were able to induce non-MHC-restricted cytolysis of Daudi cells. All clones displayed a substantial reactivity to bacterial superantigens staphylococcal enterotoxin B and toxic shock syndrome toxin-1, irrespective of their {gamma}{delta} V gene usage. Furthermore, the {gamma}{delta} T cell clones expressed predominantly TCRDV2 and GV2 genes, whereas the clones derived from CSF of MS patients expressed either DV1 or DV2 genes. The obtained {gamma}{delta} clones, in general, represented rather heterogeneous clonal origins, even though a predominant clonal origin was found in a set of 10 {gamma}{delta} clones derived from one patient with MS. The present study provides new evidence supporting a possible role of {gamma}{delta} T cells in the secondary inflammatory processes in MS. 39 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. High-resolution 3D seismic data characterize fluid flow systems in the SW Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bünz, Stefan; Mienert, Jürgen; Rajan, Anupama

    2010-05-01

    The flow of fluids through marine sediments is one of the most dominant and pervasive processes in continental margins. These processes control the evolution of a sedimentary basin and its seafloor environment, and have implications for hydrocarbon exploration and seabed ecosystems. Many seep sites at the seafloor are associated with large but complex faunal communities that have received significant attention in recent years. However, there is a need for a better understanding of the driving mechanism of fluid flow in various geological settings, the accumulation of fluids in the subsurface and their focused flow through conduits and/or faults to the seabed. The Barents Sea is a large hydrocarbon-prone basin of the Norwegian Arctic region. A significant portion of the hydrocarbons has leaked or migrated into the shallow subsurface and is now trapped in gas-hydrate and shallow-gas reservoirs. Furthermore, there are few places in the Barents Sea, where methane gas is leaking from the seafloor into the oceanosphere. Accumulations of free gas in the shallow subsurface are considered a geohazard. They constitute a risk for safe drilling operations and they may pose a threat to global climate if the seal that is trapping them is breached. P-Cable 3D high-resolution seismic data from the Ringvassøya Fault Complex and the Polheim Sub-Platform provide new and detailed insight into fluid flow controls and accumulation mechanisms. The data shows a wide variety of fluid flow features, mostly in the form of pockmarks, bright spots, wipe-out zones or vertical zones of disturbed reflectivity. Fluids migrate by both diapiric mechanism and channelized along sedimentary layers. Glacigenic sediments generally form a strong boundary for fluid flow in the very shallow section. However, we can recognize pockmarks not only at the seafloor but also at one subsurface layer approximately 50 m below sea floor indicating a former venting period in the SW Barents Sea. At few locations high

  20. Recombinant Salmonella typhimurium outer membrane protein A is recognized by synovial fluid CD8 cells and stimulates synovial fluid mononuclear cells to produce interleukin (IL)-17/IL-23 in patients with reactive arthritis and undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy.

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, S; Shasany, A K; Aggarwal, A; Misra, R

    2016-08-01

    In developing countries, one-third of patients with reactive arthritis (ReA) and undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy (uSpA) are triggered by Salmonella typhimurium. Synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMCs) of patients with ReA and uSpA proliferate to low molecular weight fractions (lmwf) of outer membrane proteins (Omp) of S. typhimurium. To characterize further the immunity of Omp of Salmonella, cellular immune response to two recombinant proteins of lmwf, OmpA and OmpD of S. typhimurium (rOmpA/D-sal) was assessed in 30 patients with ReA/uSpA. Using flow cytometry, 17 of 30 patients' SF CD8(+) T cells showed significant intracellular interferon (IFN)-γ to Omp crude lysate of S. typhimurium. Of these 17, 11 showed significantly more CD8(+) CD69(+) IFN-γ T cells to rOmpA-sal, whereas only four showed reactivity to rOmpD-sal. The mean stimulation index was significantly greater in rOmpA-sal than rOmpD-sal [3·0 (1·5-6·5) versus 1·5 (1·0-2·75), P < 0·005]. Similarly, using enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) in these 17 patients, the mean spots of IFN-γ-producing SFMCs were significantly greater in rOmpA-sal than rOmpD-sal [44·9 (3·5-130·7) versus 19·25 (6-41), P < 0·05]. SFMCs stimulated by rOmpA-sal produced significantly more proinflammatory cytokines than rOmpD-sal: IFN-γ [1·44 (0·39-20·42) versus 0·72 (0·048-9·15) ng/ml, P < 0·05], interleukin (IL)-17 [28·60 (6·15-510·86) versus 11·84 (6·83-252·62) pg/ml, P < 0·05], IL-23 [70·19 (15-1161·16) versus 28·25 (> 15-241·52) pg/ml, P < 0·05] and IL-6 [59·78 (2·03-273·36) versus 10·17 (0·004-190·19) ng/ml, P < 0·05]. The rOmpA-sal-specific CD8(+) T cell response correlated with duration of current synovitis (r = 0·53, P < 0·05). Thus, OmpA of S. typhimurium is a target of SF CD8(+) T cells and drives SFMC to produce increased cytokines of the IL-17/IL-23 axis which contribute to the pathogenesis of Salmonella-triggered ReA. PMID:27060348

  1. Regulatory Behaviors and Stress Reactivity among Infants at High Risk for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jirikowic, Tracy; Chen, Maida; Nash, Jennifer; Gendler, Beth; Olson, Heather Carmichael

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This article examines regulatory behaviors and physiological stress reactivity among 6-15 month-old infants with moderate to heavy prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE), a group at very high risk for fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and self-regulation impairments, compared to low risk infants with no/low exposure. Participants: Eighteen…

  2. The Complementary Role of High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein in the Diagnosis and Severity Assessment of Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khakzad, Mohammad Reza; Javanbakht, Maryam; Shayegan, Mohammad Reza; Kianoush, Sina; Omid, Fatemeh; Hojati, Maryam; Meshkat, Mojtaba

    2012-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a beneficial diagnostic test for the evaluation of inflammatory response. Extremely low levels of CRP can be detected using high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) test. A considerable body of evidence has demonstrated that inflammatory response has an important role in the pathophysiology of autism. In this study, we evaluated…

  3. Changes in cerebral vascular reactivity and structure following prolonged exposure to high altitude in humans.

    PubMed

    Foster, Glen E; Davies-Thompson, Jodie; Dominelli, Paolo B; Heran, Manraj K S; Donnelly, Joseph; duManoir, Gregory R; Ainslie, Philip N; Rauscher, Alexander; Sheel, A William

    2015-12-01

    Although high-altitude exposure can lead to neurocognitive impairment, even upon return to sea level, it remains unclear the extent to which brain volume and regional cerebral vascular reactivity (CVR) are altered following high-altitude exposure. The purpose of this study was to simultaneously determine the effect of 3 weeks at 5050 m on: (1) structural brain alterations; and (2) regional CVR after returning to sea level for 1 week. Healthy human volunteers (n = 6) underwent baseline and follow-up structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at rest and during a CVR protocol (end-tidal PCO2 reduced by -10, -5 and increased by +5, +10, and +15 mmHg from baseline). CVR maps (% mmHg(-1)) were generated using BOLD MRI and brain volumes were estimated. Following return to sea level, whole-brain volume and gray matter volume was reduced by 0.4 ± 0.3% (P < 0.01) and 2.6 ± 1.0% (P < 0.001), respectively; white matter was unchanged. Global gray matter CVR and white matter CVR were unchanged following return to sea level, but CVR was selectively increased (P < 0.05) in the brainstem (+30 ± 12%), hippocampus (+12 ± 3%), and thalamus (+10 ± 3%). These changes were the result of improvement and/or reversal of negative CVR to positive CVR in these regions. Three weeks of high-altitude exposure is reflected in loss of gray matter volume and improvements in negative CVR. PMID:26660556

  4. High metal reactivity and environmental risks at a site contaminated by glass waste.

    PubMed

    Augustsson, A; Åström, M; Bergbäck, B; Elert, M; Höglund, L O; Kleja, D B

    2016-07-01

    This study addresses the reactivity and risks of metals (Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn, As and Sb) at a Swedish site with large glass waste deposits. Old glassworks sites typically have high total metal concentrations, but as the metals are mainly bound within the glass waste and considered relatively inert, environmental investigations at these kinds of sites are limited. In this study, soil and landfill samples were subjected to a sequential chemical extraction procedure. Data from batch leaching tests and groundwater upstream and downstream of the waste deposits were also interpreted. The sequential extraction revealed that metals in <2 mm soil/waste samples were largely associated with geochemically active fractions, indicating that metals are released from pristine glass and subsequently largely retained in the surrounding soil and/or on secondary mineral coatings on fine glass particles. From the approximately 12,000 m(3) of coarse glass waste at the site, almost 4000 kg of Pb is estimated to have been lost through corrosion, which, however, corresponds to only a small portion of the total amount of Pb in the waste. Metal sorption within the waste deposits or in underlying soil layers is supported by fairly low metal concentrations in groundwater. However, elevated concentrations in downstream groundwater and in leachates of batch leaching tests were observed for several metals, indicating on-going leaching. Taken together, the high metal concentrations in geochemically active forms and the high amounts of as yet uncorroded metal-rich glass, indicate considerable risks to human health and the environment. PMID:27077538

  5. Association between high sensitivity C-reactive protein and dietary intake in Vietnamese young women

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Ahra; Kim, Hyesook; Han, Chan-Jung; Kim, Ji-Myung; Chung, Hye-Won

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) is a strong independent predictor of future cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. We evaluated the relationship between hsCRP and dietary intake in apparently healthy young women living in southern Vietnam. SUBJECTS/METHODS Serum hsCRP was measured and dietary intake data were obtained using the 1-day 24-hour recall method in women (n = 956; mean age, 25.0 ± 5.7 years) who participated in the International Collaboration Study for the Construction of Asian Cohort of the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study (KoGES) in 2011. RESULTS Women in the high risk group (> 3 mg/L) consumed fewer fruits and vegetables, total plant food, potassium, and folate than those in the low risk group (< 1 mg/L). A multiple regression analysis after adjusting for covariates revealed a significant negative association between hsCRP and fruit and vegetable consumption. A logistic regression analysis showed that the odds ratio (OR) of having a high hsCRP level in women with the highest quartiles of consumption of fruits and vegetables [OR, 0.391; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.190-0.807], potassium [OR, 0.425; 95% CI, 0.192-0.939] and folate [OR, 0.490; 95% CI, 0.249-0.964] were significantly lower than those in the lowest quartiles. CONCLUSIONS These results suggest that, in young Vietnamese women, an increased consumption of fruit and vegetables might be beneficial for serum hsCRP, a risk factor for future CVD events. PMID:25110566

  6. Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor short term thermal response to flow and reactivity transients

    SciTech Connect

    Cleveland, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    The analyses reported here have been conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) Division of Regulatory Applications of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The short-term thermal response of the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) is analyzed for a range of flow and reactivity transients. These include loss of forced circulation (LOFC) without scram, moisture ingress, spurious withdrawal of a control rod group, hypothetical large and rapid positive reactivity insertion, and a rapid core cooling event. The coupled heat transfer-neutron kinetics model is also described.

  7. [The significance of high sensitive C reactive protein as a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Meguro, Shu; Ishibashi, Midori; Takei, Izumi

    2012-04-01

    Chronic inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Several prospective studies have indicated that an elevated high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) level is a risk factor for CVD. These results were also confirmed by prospective studies in Japan both for primary and secondary prevention. A randomized control study using statins also revealed that lower levels of both LDL cholesterol and hs-CRP were independently related to the incidence of CVD. Recent meta-analysis revealed that hs-CRP was a risk factor not only for CVD but for other diseases including cancers. It revealed that the absolute value of hs-CRP varied among the study populations. The mechanism of how hs-CRP is associated with the pathogenesis of CVD is not fully understood. Generally, inflammation in the vascular wall and the release of inflammatory cytokines from macrophages was considered to the main mechanism, but infection with such as chlamydia or Helicobacter pylori, and periodontal disease have been postulated as the causes of systemic inflammation. Recently, visceral fat accumulation and its cross-interaction with inflammatory cells have been proposed as the cause of systemic inflammation as "innate inflammation". Our original cross sectional studies also showed the correlations of hs-CRP with BMI and triglyceride. Although there is no specific therapy for the reduction of hs-CRP, we have to consider hs-CRP as a risk factor for CVD which complements other classical risk factors. PMID:22686046

  8. Anthropogenic Emissions of Highly Reactive Volatile Organic Compounds (HRVOCs) Inferred from Oversampling of OMI HCHO Columns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Lei; Jacob, Daniel; Mickley, Loretta; Marais, Eloise; Zhang, Aoxing; Cohan, Daniel; Yoshida, Yasuko; Duncan, Bryan; Abad, Gonzalo Gonzalez; Chance, Kelly; DeSmedt, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Satellite observations of formaldehyde (HCHO) columns provide top-down constraints on emissions of highly reactive volatile organic compounds (HRVOCs). This approach has been used previously to constrain emissions of isoprene from vegetation, but application to US anthropogenic emissions has been stymied by lack of a discernable HCHO signal. Here we show that oversampling of HCHO data from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) for 2005 - 2008 enables quantitative detection of urban and industrial plumes in eastern Texas including Houston, Port Arthur, and Dallas-Fort Worth. By spatially integrating the individual urban-industrial HCHO plumes observed by OMI we can constrain the corresponding HCHO-weighted HRVOC emissions. Application to the Houston plume indicates a HCHO source of 260 plus or minus 110 kmol h-1 and implies a factor of 5.5 plus or minus 2.4 underestimate of anthropogenic HRVOC emissions in the US Environmental Protection Agency inventory. With this approach we are able to monitor the trend in HRVOC emissions over the US, in particular from the oil-gas industry, over the past decade.

  9. High rate reactive sputtering in an opposed cathode closed-field unbalanced magnetron sputtering system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sproul, William D.; Rudnik, Paul J.; Graham, Michael E.; Rohde, Suzanne L.

    1990-01-01

    Attention is given to an opposed cathode sputtering system constructed with the ability to coat parts with a size up to 15 cm in diameter and 30 cm in length. Initial trials with this system revealed very low substrate bias currents. When the AlNiCo magnets in the two opposed cathodes were arranged in a mirrored configuration, the plasma density at the substrate was low, and the substrate bias current density was less than 1 mA/sq cm. If the magnets were arranged in a closed-field configuration where the field lines from one set of magnets were coupled with the other set, the substrate bias current density was as high as 5.7 mA/sq cm when NdFeB magnets were used. In the closed-field configuration, the substrate bias current density was related to the magnetic field strength between the two cathodes and to the sputtering pressure. Hard well-adhered TiN coatings were reactively sputtered in the opposed cathode system in the closed-field configuration, but the mirrored configuration produced films with poor adhesion because of etching problems and low plasma density at the substrate.

  10. High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein and Cardiovascular Disease Across Countries and Ethnicities.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Francisco Antonio Helfenstein; Izar, Maria Cristina de Oliveira

    2016-04-01

    Despite substantial differences in ethnicities, habits, cultures, the prevalence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and affordable therapies, atherosclerosis remains the major cause of death in developing and developed countries. However, irrespective of these differences, inflammation is currently recognized as the common pathway for the major complications of atherosclerosis, stroke, and ischemic heart disease. A PubMed search was conducted for "high-sensitivity C-reactive protein" (hs-CRP) in combination with the terms race, ethnicity, gender, prevalence, geographic, epidemiology, cardiovascular, obesity, diabetes, hypertension, cholesterol, smoking, ischemic heart disease, stroke, and mortality. This review includes the articles that pertained to the topic and additional articles identified from the reference lists of relevant publications. This review describes the marked differences in cardiovascular mortality across countries and ethnicities, which may be attributed to inequalities in the prevalence of the classic risk factors and the stage of cardiovascular epidemiological transition. However, hs-CRP appears to contribute to the prognostic information regarding cardiovascular risk and mortality even after multiple adjustments. Considering the perception of cardiovascular disease as an inflammatory disease, the more widespread use of hs-CRP appears to represent a valid tool to identify people at risk, independent of their ancestry or geographic region. In conclusion, this review reports that the complications associated with vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques are triggered by the major mechanisms of dyslipidemia and inflammation; whereas both mechanisms are influenced by classic risk factors, hs-CRP contributes additional information regarding cardiovascular events and mortality. PMID:27166776

  11. A Statistical Hot Spot Reactive Flow Model for Shock Initiation and Detonation of Solid High Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, A L; Tarver, C M

    2002-07-01

    A statistical hot spot reactive flow model for shock initiation and detonation of solid high explosives developed in the ALE3D hydrodynamic computer code is presented. This model is intended to evolve into a physically correct description of the physical and chemical mechanisms that control the onset of shock initiation via hotspot formation, the growth (01 failure to grow) of these hotspots into the surrounding explosive particles, the rapid transition to detonation, and self-sustaining detonation. Mesoscale modeling of the shock compression and temperature dependent chemical decomposition of individual explosive particles are currently yielding accurate predictions of hot spot formation and the subsequent growth (or failure) of these hotspot reactions in the surrounding grains. For two- and three-dimensional simulations of larger scale explosive charges, a statistical hotspot model that averages over thousands of individual hotspot dimensions and temperatures and then allows exothermic chemical reactions to grow (or fail to grow) due to thermal conduction is required. This paper outlines a first approach to constructing a probabilistic hot spot formulation based on the number density of potential hotspot sites. These hotspots can then either ignite or die out if they do not exceed certain ignition criteria, which are based on physical properties of the explosive particles. The growing hot spots spread at burn velocities given by experimentally determined deflagration velocity versus pressure relationships. The mathematics and assumptions involved in formulating the model and practical examples of its usefulness are given.

  12. High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) & cardiovascular disease: An Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Deepak Y; Xavier, Denis; Sigamani, Alben; Pais, Prem

    2015-09-01

    The role of low grade systemic inflammation as evidenced by elevated high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic vascular disease has been intensely investigated through observational studies and clinical trials in the past two decades. On the basis of evidence that has accrued, hsCRP measurement has been integrated into the Reynolds risk scoring system to predict cardiovascular risk. The JUPITER trial proved the benefit of statins in cardiovascular risk reduction in patients with low grades of systemic inflammation and 'normal' cholesterol levels. However, substantial evidence has been generated from western studies. We, therefore, conducted a scoping review for studies done in India with a view to identify gaps in evidence and make further recommendations. Most Indian studies had small sample sizes and short term follow ups. There were no large population based prospective studies where patients were followed up for long periods of time for major cardiovascular end points. An analysis of the hsCRP level from the control arms of case-control studies derived a mean hsCRP value of 1.88 mg/l, which is higher than the western population where values < 1 mg/l are classified as low cardiovascular risk. Further large prospective cohort studies with longer term follow ups are essential before we can make further recommendations to integrate hsCRP into risk prediction models for cardiovascular disease prevention. PMID:26458341

  13. Lipid profile but not highly sensitive C-reactive protein helps distinguish prehypertensives from normal subjects

    PubMed Central

    Bharath, T.; Manjula, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Early identification of the prehypertensive state can greatly improve the disease risk management. Although increased levels of highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and dyslipidemia is reported among patients with hypertension, the correlation of these parameters among prehypertensives in not known. Hence, the present study was designed to compare the levels of serum hsCRP and lipid profile among prehypertensives and normal subjects and correlate it with blood pressure (BP) levels. Materials and Methods: Anthropometric measurements and BP were recorded in 40 prehypertensive and 40 normal subjects. Subjects were assigned to a group based on their BP as per Joint National Committee 7 criteria. Serum hsCRP and lipid profile were measured and correlated with BP levels. Results: Serum hsCRP showed no significant difference between the two groups. There was no significant correlation of BP with hsCRP in both the groups. Total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) were significantly increased in prehypertensives as compared to normal subjects. There was no significant association between BP and lipid parameters in prehypertensives. Conclusions: Significant increase of TC and LDL but not hsCRP was evident among prehypertensives as compared to normal subjects. PMID:26283827

  14. A highly reactive chalcogenide precursor for the synthesis of metal chalcogenide quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Peng; Zhu, Dong-Liang; Zhu, Chun-Nan; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Zhang, Guo-Jun; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2015-12-01

    Metal chalcogenide semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) are ideal inorganic materials for solar cells and biomedical labeling. In consideration of the hazard and instability of alkylphosphines, the phosphine-free synthetic route has become one of the most important trends in synthesizing selenide QDs. Here we report a novel phase transfer strategy to prepare phosphine-free chalcogenide precursors. The anions in aqueous solution were transferred to toluene via electrostatic interactions between the anions and didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB). The obtained chalcogenide precursors show high reactivity with metal ions in the organic phase and could be applied to the low-temperature synthesis of various metal chalcogenide NCs based on a simple reaction between metal ions (e.g. Ag(+), Pb(2+), Cd(2+)) and chalcogenide anions (e.g. S(2-)) in toluene. In addition to chalcogenide anions, other anions such as BH4(-) ions and AuCl4(-) ions can also be transferred to the organic phase for synthesizing noble metal NCs (such as Ag and Au NCs). PMID:26531253

  15. High Resolution Dissection of Reactive Glial Nets in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bouvier, David S.; Jones, Emma V.; Quesseveur, Gaël; Davoli, Maria Antonietta; A. Ferreira, Tiago; Quirion, Rémi; Mechawar, Naguib; Murai, Keith K.

    2016-01-01

    Fixed human brain samples in tissue repositories hold great potential for unlocking complexities of the brain and its alteration with disease. However, current methodology for simultaneously resolving complex three-dimensional (3D) cellular anatomy and organization, as well as, intricate details of human brain cells in tissue has been limited due to weak labeling characteristics of the tissue and high background levels. To expose the potential of these samples, we developed a method to overcome these major limitations. This approach offers an unprecedented view of cytoarchitecture and subcellular detail of human brain cells, from cellular networks to individual synapses. Applying the method to AD samples, we expose complex features of microglial cells and astrocytes in the disease. Through this methodology, we show that these cells form specialized 3D structures in AD that we refer to as reactive glial nets (RGNs). RGNs are areas of concentrated neuronal injury, inflammation, and tauopathy and display unique features around β-amyloid plaque types. RGNs have conserved properties in an AD mouse model and display a developmental pattern coinciding with the progressive accumulation of neuropathology. The method provided here will help reveal novel features of the healthy and diseased human brain, and aid experimental design in translational brain research. PMID:27090093

  16. Maintaining the structure of templated porous materials for reactive and high-temperature applications.

    PubMed

    Rudisill, Stephen G; Wang, Zhiyong; Stein, Andreas

    2012-05-15

    Nanoporous and nanostructured materials are becoming increasingly important for advanced applications involving, for example, bioactive materials, catalytic materials, energy storage and conversion materials, photonic crystals, membranes, and more. As such, they are exposed to a variety of harsh environments and often experience detrimental morphological changes as a result. This article highlights material limitations and recent advances in porous materials--three-dimensionally ordered macroporous (3DOM) materials in particular--under reactive or high-temperature conditions. Examples include systems where morphological changes are desired and systems that require an increased retention of structure, surface area, and overall material integrity during synthesis and processing. Structural modifications, changes in composition, and alternate synthesis routes are explored and discussed. Improvements in thermal or structural stability have been achieved by the isolation of nanoparticles in porous structures through spatial separation, by confinement in a more thermally stable host, by the application of a protective surface or an adhesive interlayer, by alloy or solid solution formation, and by doping to induce solute drag. PMID:22409622

  17. High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein and Cardiovascular Disease Across Countries and Ethnicities

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Francisco Antonio Helfenstein; de Oliveira Izar, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Despite substantial differences in ethnicities, habits, cultures, the prevalence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and affordable therapies, atherosclerosis remains the major cause of death in developing and developed countries. However, irrespective of these differences, inflammation is currently recognized as the common pathway for the major complications of atherosclerosis, stroke, and ischemic heart disease. A PubMed search was conducted for “high-sensitivity C-reactive protein” (hs-CRP) in combination with the terms race, ethnicity, gender, prevalence, geographic, epidemiology, cardiovascular, obesity, diabetes, hypertension, cholesterol, smoking, ischemic heart disease, stroke, and mortality. This review includes the articles that pertained to the topic and additional articles identified from the reference lists of relevant publications. This review describes the marked differences in cardiovascular mortality across countries and ethnicities, which may be attributed to inequalities in the prevalence of the classic risk factors and the stage of cardiovascular epidemiological transition. However, hs-CRP appears to contribute to the prognostic information regarding cardiovascular risk and mortality even after multiple adjustments. Considering the perception of cardiovascular disease as an inflammatory disease, the more widespread use of hs-CRP appears to represent a valid tool to identify people at risk, independent of their ancestry or geographic region. In conclusion, this review reports that the complications associated with vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques are triggered by the major mechanisms of dyslipidemia and inflammation; whereas both mechanisms are influenced by classic risk factors, hs-CRP contributes additional information regarding cardiovascular events and mortality. PMID:27166776

  18. Anthropogenic emissions of highly reactive volatile organic compounds inferred from oversampling of OMI HCHO columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L.; Jacob, D. J.; Mickley, L. J.; Marais, E. A.; Cohan, D. S.; Yoshida, Y.; Duncan, B. N.; Gonzalez Abad, G.; Chance, K.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite observations of formaldehyde (HCHO) columns provide top-down constraints on emissions of highly reactive volatile organic compounds (HRVOCs). This approach has been used previously to constrain emissions of isoprene from vegetation, but application to US anthropogenic emissions has been stymied by lack of a discernable HCHO signal. Here we show that oversampling of HCHO data from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) for 2005-2008 enables quantitative detection of urban and industrial plumes in eastern Texas including Houston, Port Arthur, and Dallas/Fort Worth. By spatially integrating the individual urban/industrial HCHO plumes observed by OMI we can constrain the corresponding HCHO-weighted HRVOC emissions. Application to the Houston plume indicates a HCHO source of 260±110 kmol h-1 and implies a factor of 5.5±2.4 underestimate of anthropogenic HRVOC emissions in the US Environmental Protection Agency inventory. This approach allows us to monitor trends in HRVOC emissions over the US, in particular from the urban areas and oil/gas industry.

  19. Soot Structure and Reactivity Analysis by Raman Microspectroscopy, Temperature-Programmed Oxidation, and High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knauer, Markus; Schuster, Manfred E.; Su, Dangsheng; Schlögl, Robert; Niessner, Reinhard; Ivleva, Natalia P.

    2009-11-01

    Raman microspectroscopy (RM), temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were combined to get comprehensive information on the relationship between structure and reactivity of soot in samples of spark discharge (GfG), heavy duty engine diesel (EURO VI and IV) soot, and graphite powder upon oxidation by oxygen at increasing temperatures. GfG soot and graphite powder represent the higher and lower reactivity limits. Raman microspectroscopic analysis was conducted by determination of spectral parameters using a five band fitting procedure (G, D1-D4) as well as by evaluation of the dispersive character of the D mode. The analysis of spectral parameters shows a higher degree of disorder and a higher amount of molecular carbon for untreated GfG soot samples than for samples of untreated EURO VI and EURO IV soot. The structural analysis based on the dispersive character of the D mode revealed substantial differences in ordering descending from graphite powder, EURO IV, VI to GfG soot. HRTEM images and EELS analysis of EURO IV and VI samples indicated a different morphology and a higher structural order as compared to GfG soot in full agreement with the Raman analysis. These findings are also confirmed by the reactivity of soot during oxidation (TPO), where GfG soot was found to be the most reactive and EURO IV and VI soot samples exhibited a moderate reactivity.

  20. Simulations of compressible, diffusive, reactive flows with detailed chemistry using a high-order hybrid WENO-CD scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Jack L.

    A hybrid weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO)/centered-difference (CD) numerical method, with low numerical dissipation, high-order shock-capturing, and structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR), has been developed for the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the multicomponent, compressive, reactive Navier-Stokes equations. The method enables accurate resolution of diffusive processes within reaction zones. This numerical method is verified with a series of one- and two-dimensional test problems, including a convergence test of a two-dimensional unsteady reactive double Mach reflection problem. Validation of the method is conducted with experimental comparisons of three applications all of which model multi-dimensional, unsteady reactive flow: an irregular propane detonation, shock and detonation bifurcations, and spark ignition deflagrations.

  1. Coupling of high temperature heat transfer and supersonic fluid dynamics studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Kevin Drew

    1998-11-01

    A numerical investigation of time dependent, high speed convective heat transfer has been conducted. A state-of- the-art finite volume fluid dynamic flow solver was selected for modification to predict the effects of convective heat transfer on the surface boundary layer. A finite volume heat transfer program was developed based on the same methodology as the fluid flow solver. These two codes were tied together in a time accurate, weakly coupled form that makes use of an advanced message passaging technique. This message passaging technique passes information at the boundary interface between the two computer codes in a structured format. This information contains the data needed to control the operation of each code in a time accurate mode. The primary objective of the current research program was to understand the time accurate, unsteady, characteristics of a supersonic boundary layer in the presence of convective heat transfer. This research could be used in conjunction with infrared imaging sensors that are mounted in the nose cone of a missile. These sensors receive information that passes through a changing thermal boundary, which affects what the sensor detects. If the boundary layer and the thermal profile of the imaging window could be predicted as a function of time, then the appropriate correction could be made to the imaging sensor. The ability to model a time accurate boundary layer in the presence of heat transfer is demonstrated in this research. Both the fluid flow solver and the heat conduction code are modeled against steady and unsteady theoretical examples. Together, these codes are combined into one working module and validated against a sample case. The sample case modeled is that of a typical sensor window found on a endo-atmospheric interceptor. The surface of the window experiences high temperature stagnating flow, resulting in heat flowing into the sensor window. The window is cooled by an internal layer of cold flowing nitrogen

  2. New densimeter for cryogenic fluids by magnetic levitation of a high-T/sub c/ superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, K.; Takenaka, M.; Nara, K.

    1988-12-01

    A new magnetic densimeter for cryogenic fluids has been developed by adapting a magnetic levitation of a high-T/sub c/ superconductor. In this instrument, a superconducting material made of Y--Ba--Cu--O is sealed in a hollow glass buoy, and a stable levitation of the buoy is carried out with the Meissner effect of the superconductor simply by placing the buoy in the fluid above a ring-shaped permanent magnet. The fluid density is obtained from the magnetic force required to levitate the buoy in the fluid. To measure this force, the magnet is suspended from an electronic balance and the reaction force acting on the magnet is determined directly as a change of the apparent weight of the magnet. Details are given of the theoretical calculation of the force acting on the superconductor in the magnetic field and of the construction of the apparatus. The measurements of the saturated liquid density of nitrogen have shown a standard deviation of 0.014%. The total uncertainty of the measurements is estimated to be less than 0.06%. The results agree with reliable literature values within the experimental uncertainty.

  3. High Order Approximations for Compressible Fluid Dynamics on Unstructured and Cartesian Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy (Editor); Deconinck, Herman (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The development of high-order accurate numerical discretization techniques for irregular domains and meshes is often cited as one of the remaining challenges facing the field of computational fluid dynamics. In structural mechanics, the advantages of high-order finite element approximation are widely recognized. This is especially true when high-order element approximation is combined with element refinement (h-p refinement). In computational fluid dynamics, high-order discretization methods are infrequently used in the computation of compressible fluid flow. The hyperbolic nature of the governing equations and the presence of solution discontinuities makes high-order accuracy difficult to achieve. Consequently, second-order accurate methods are still predominately used in industrial applications even though evidence suggests that high-order methods may offer a way to significantly improve the resolution and accuracy for these calculations. To address this important topic, a special course was jointly organized by the Applied Vehicle Technology Panel of NATO's Research and Technology Organization (RTO), the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, and the Numerical Aerospace Simulation Division at the NASA Ames Research Center. The NATO RTO sponsored course entitled "Higher Order Discretization Methods in Computational Fluid Dynamics" was held September 14-18, 1998 at the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics in Belgium and September 21-25, 1998 at the NASA Ames Research Center in the United States. During this special course, lecturers from Europe and the United States gave a series of comprehensive lectures on advanced topics related to the high-order numerical discretization of partial differential equations with primary emphasis given to computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Additional consideration was given to topics in computational physics such as the high-order discretization of the Hamilton-Jacobi, Helmholtz, and elasticity equations. This volume consists

  4. Dynamics of pulsed laser ablation in high-density carbon dioxide including supercritical fluid state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urabe, Keiichiro; Kato, Toru; Stauss, Sven; Himeno, Shohei; Kato, Satoshi; Muneoka, Hitoshi; Baba, Motoyoshi; Suemoto, Tohru; Terashima, Kazuo

    2013-10-01

    To gain a better understanding of pulsed laser ablation (PLA) processes in high-density fluids, including gases, liquids, and supercritical fluids (SCFs), we have investigated the PLA dynamics in high-density carbon dioxide (CO2) using a time-resolved shadowgraph (SG) observation method. The SG images revealed that the PLA dynamics can be categorized into two domains that are separated by the gas-liquid coexistence curve and the Widom line, which forms a border between the gaslike and liquidlike domains of an SCF. Furthermore, a cavitation bubble observed in liquid CO2 near the critical point exhibited a particular characteristic: the formation of an inner bubble and an outer shell structure. The results indicate that the thermophysical properties of the reaction field generated by PLA can be dynamically tuned by controlling the solvent temperature and pressure, particularly near the critical point.

  5. Experimental apparatus for measuring the thermal diffusivity of pure fluids at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Kruppa, B.; Jany, P.; Straub, J.

    1988-11-01

    Dynamic light scattering represents a suitable method for measuring the thermal diffusivity of optically transparent fluids. The classic application of the method is the immediate vicinity around the critical point due to its dependence upon the intensity of scattered light and its high sensitivity to undesired light scattering. By means of subsequent modifications of the experimental setup, the authors have been able to expand this region of applicability over the last 12 years and could systematically investigate numerous substances and their binary mixtures within a temperature range of 280 K < T < 350 K. Their planned investigation of fluids suitable for ORC-HP-technology necessitates performing measurements at higher temperatures and pressures. The experimental apparatus newly designed for this purpose is capable of sustaining a relatively high temperature constance at temperatures up to 700 K. Factors restricting the measurable range of state and their influence on the design of the sample cell are discussed.

  6. Extended dielectric relaxation scheme for fluid transport simulations of high density plasma discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Deuk-Chul; Song, Mi-Young; Yoon, Jung-Sik

    2014-10-01

    It is well known that the dielectric relaxation scheme (DRS) can efficiently overcome the limitation on the simulation time step for fluid transport simulations of high density plasma discharges. By imitating a realistic and physical shielding process of electric field perturbation, the DRS overcomes the dielectric limitation on time step. However, the electric field was obtained with assuming the drift-diffusion approximation. Although the drift-diffusion expressions are good approximations for both the electrons and ions at high pressure, the inertial term cannot be neglected in the ion momentum equation for low pressure. Therefore, in this work, we developed the extended DRS by introducing an effective electric field. To compare the extended DRS with the previous method, two-dimensional fluid simulations for inductively coupled plasma discharges were performed. This work was supported by the Industrial Strategic Technology Development Program (10041637, Development of Dry Etch System for 10 nm class SADP Process) funded by the Ministry of Knowledge Economy (MKE, Korea).

  7. High work output combined with high ambient temperatures caused heat exhaustion in a wildland firefighter despite high fluid intake.

    PubMed

    Cuddy, John S; Ruby, Brent C

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this case study is to examine the physiological/behavioral factors leading up to heat exhaustion in a male wildland firefighter during wildland fire suppression. The participant (24 years old, 173 cm, 70 kg, and 3 years firefighting experience) experienced heat exhaustion following 7 hours of high ambient temperatures and arduous work on the fire line during the month of August. At the time of the heat-related incident (HRI), core temperature was 40.1 °C (104.2 °F) and skin temperature was 34.4 °C (93.9 °F). His work output averaged 1067 counts·min(-1) (arbitrary units for measuring activity) for the 7 hours prior to the HRI, a very high rate of work over an extended time period during wildfire suppression. In the 2.5 hours leading up to the heat incident, he was exposed to a mean ambient temperature of 44.6 °C (112.3 °F), with a maximum temperature of 59.7 °C (139.5 °F). He consumed an average of 840 mL·h(-1) in the 7 hours leading up to the incident and took an average of 24 ± 11 drinks·h(-1) (total of 170 drinks). The combined effects of a high work rate and high ambient temperatures resulted in an elevated core temperature and a higher volume and frequency of drinking than typically seen in this population, ultimately ending in heat exhaustion and removal from the fire line. The data demonstrate that heat-related incidents can occur even with aggressive fluid intake during wildland fire suppression. PMID:21664560

  8. Parallel technology for numerical modeling of fluid dynamics problems by high-accuracy algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorobets, A. V.

    2015-04-01

    A parallel computation technology for modeling fluid dynamics problems by finite-volume and finite-difference methods of high accuracy is presented. The development of an algorithm, the design of a software implementation, and the creation of parallel programs for computations on large-scale computing systems are considered. The presented parallel technology is based on a multilevel parallel model combining various types of parallelism: with shared and distributed memory and with multiple and single instruction streams to multiple data flows.

  9. Highly simplified lateral flow-based nucleic acid sample preparation and passive fluid flow control

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, Robert E.

    2015-12-08

    Highly simplified lateral flow chromatographic nucleic acid sample preparation methods, devices, and integrated systems are provided for the efficient concentration of trace samples and the removal of nucleic acid amplification inhibitors. Methods for capturing and reducing inhibitors of nucleic acid amplification reactions, such as humic acid, using polyvinylpyrrolidone treated elements of the lateral flow device are also provided. Further provided are passive fluid control methods and systems for use in lateral flow assays.

  10. Influence of age on reactivity to diverse emotional challenges in low- and high-anxiety rats.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Luciana C; Gomes, Margareth Z; Brandão, Marcus L

    2011-02-01

    Studies have revealed that the extent of reactivity of high-anxiety rats to diverse challenges is different than low-anxiety rats and have provided important insights into the psychopathology of anxiety. Various factors intervene to allow defensive mechanisms to react to diverse threatening challenges, including ontogeny and the nature of the emotional challenge (e.g., conditioned vs. unconditioned). The present study investigated the extent to which a particular type of fear extrapolates to other emotional responses to diverse threatening challenges. Groups of 30- and 60-day-old rats were assigned to low freezing behavior (LFB) and high freezing behavior (HFB) groups using the contextual fear conditioning paradigm and subjected to either the fear-potentiated startle (FPS) test, novelty-induced ultrasound vocalizations (USVs) or elevated plus-maze (EPM) tests. At 30 days of age, HFB rats exhibited greater FPS than LFB rats. In contrast, prior selection of HFB and LFB did not affect the performance of 30-day-old animals in the EPM and novelty-induced USVs. Sixty-day-old animals exhibited a performance deficit in all three tests. These data suggest that the performance of young rats in animal models of anxiety parallels their selection as LFB and HFB in the contextual fear conditioning paradigm. However, the increased fear-like behavior exhibited by the 60-day-old HFB rats may elicit performance deficits in conditioned and unconditioned fear tests. These results suggest that the interaction between hyperanxiety and age may cause a performance deficit despite the animals' increased fear-like behavior when facing emotional challenges, thus resembling psychiatric patients in many respects. PMID:20833243

  11. Reactivation of effluent granular sludge from a high-rate Anammox reactor after storage.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang Feng; Jin, Ren Cun

    2013-02-01

    In this study, effluent sludge from a high-rate Anammox reactor was used to re-start new Anammox reactors for the reactivation of Anammox granular sludge. Different start-up strategies were evaluated in six upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors (R(1)-R(6)) for their effect on nitrogen removal performance. Maximal nitrogen removal rates (NRRs) greater than 20 kg N/m(3)/day were obtained in reactors R(3)-R(5), which were seeded with mixed Anammox sludge previously stored for approximately 6 months and 1 month. A modified Boltzmann model describing the evolution of the NRR fit the experimental data well. An amount of sludge added to the UASB reactor or decreasing the loading rate proved effective in relieving the substrate inhibition and increasing the NRR. The modified Stover-Kincannon model fit the nitrogen removal data in the Anammox reactors well, and the simulation results showed that the Anammox process has great nitrogen removal potential. The observed inhibition in the Anammox reactors may have been caused by high levels of free ammonia. The sludge used to seed the reactors did not settle well; sludge flotation was observed even after the reactors were operated for a long time at a floating upward velocity (F(s)) of greater than 100 m/h. The settling sludge, however, exhibited good settling properties. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the Anammox granules consisted mainly of spherical and elliptical bacteria with abundant filaments on their surface. Hollows in the granules were also present, which may have contributed to sludge floatation. PMID:22588612

  12. High-throughput planer glass coating using Laser Reactive Deposition (LRD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Xiangxin; Mosso, Ronald; Chiruvolu, Shiv; Euvrard, Eric; Bryan, Michael A.; Jenks, Tim

    2001-10-01

    Planar Lightwave Circuit (PLC) technology has been considered as a promising route to integrate a greater number of channels and more optical functionalities onto a small foot print, enabling smaller device sizes and lower costs of manufacturing by using existing semiconductor process technologies. Among several planar technology platforms, silica-on-silicon technology comprised of a silica higher index core and lower index clad has taken the lead in this direction. One of the major advantages of silica based PLC technology is its relative ease to couple to a single mode silica fiber because of a close match of the index and dimensions of the waveguide core of planar chip and fiber. In this structure, to completely confine and guide light signals, the silica layer stack, including lower clad, core and top clad can be as thick as 20 - 40 microns, in which the core layer thickness is around 6 - 8 micron. This has presented a major challenge to several major silica film deposition technologies including CVD, FHD, PVD, and Sol-Gel processes. In addition to basic requirements for optical quality of the glass film, low cost manufacture also demands a high deposition rate to reduce process costs in the fabrication of these planar chips. In this paper, we present a high throughput and planar glass coating technology to lay down doped and undoped glass films at unprecedented rates. The technology is comprised of a laser reactive deposition (LRDTM) process developed based on our nanoscale particle manufacture (NPMTM) methods pioneered by NanoGram Corporation. We report results on planar glass films deposited using this technology and describe the concepts employed using this technology in manufacturing. Furthermore, we will compare it with various existing glass film deposition technologies.

  13. Synthesis of Self-Assembled Multifunctional Nanocomposite Catalysts with Highly Stabilized Reactivity and Magnetic Recyclability.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xu; Cheng, Gong; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a multifunctional Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite catalyst with highly stabilized reactivity and magnetic recyclability was synthesized by a self-assembled method. The magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles were coated with a thin layer of the SiO2 to obtain a negatively charged surface. Then positively charged poly(ethyleneimine) polymer (PEI) was self-assembled onto the Fe3O4@SiO2 by electrostatic interaction. Next, negatively charged glutathione capped gold nanoparticles (GSH-AuNPs) were electrostatically self-assembled onto the Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI. After that, silver was grown on the surface of the nanocomposite due to the reduction of the dopamine in the alkaline solution. An about 5 nm thick layer of polydopamine (PDA) was observed to form the Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite. The Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite was carefully characterized by the SEM, TEM, FT-IR, XRD and so on. The Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite shows a high saturation magnetization (Ms) of 48.9 emu/g, which allows it to be attracted rapidly to a magnet. The Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite was used to catalyze the reduction of p-nitrophenol (4-NP) to p-aminophenol (4-AP) as a model system. The reaction kinetic constant k was measured to be about 0.56 min(-1) (R(2) = 0.974). Furthermore, the as-prepared catalyst can be easily recovered and reused for 8 times, which didn't show much decrease of the catalytic capability. PMID:27147586

  14. Synthesis of Self-Assembled Multifunctional Nanocomposite Catalysts with Highly Stabilized Reactivity and Magnetic Recyclability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xu; Cheng, Gong; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a multifunctional Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite catalyst with highly stabilized reactivity and magnetic recyclability was synthesized by a self-assembled method. The magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles were coated with a thin layer of the SiO2 to obtain a negatively charged surface. Then positively charged poly(ethyleneimine) polymer (PEI) was self-assembled onto the Fe3O4@SiO2 by electrostatic interaction. Next, negatively charged glutathione capped gold nanoparticles (GSH-AuNPs) were electrostatically self-assembled onto the Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI. After that, silver was grown on the surface of the nanocomposite due to the reduction of the dopamine in the alkaline solution. An about 5 nm thick layer of polydopamine (PDA) was observed to form the Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite. The Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite was carefully characterized by the SEM, TEM, FT-IR, XRD and so on. The Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite shows a high saturation magnetization (Ms) of 48.9 emu/g, which allows it to be attracted rapidly to a magnet. The Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite was used to catalyze the reduction of p-nitrophenol (4-NP) to p-aminophenol (4-AP) as a model system. The reaction kinetic constant k was measured to be about 0.56 min‑1 (R2 = 0.974). Furthermore, the as-prepared catalyst can be easily recovered and reused for 8 times, which didn’t show much decrease of the catalytic capability.

  15. Synthesis of Self-Assembled Multifunctional Nanocomposite Catalysts with Highly Stabilized Reactivity and Magnetic Recyclability

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xu; Cheng, Gong; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a multifunctional Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite catalyst with highly stabilized reactivity and magnetic recyclability was synthesized by a self-assembled method. The magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles were coated with a thin layer of the SiO2 to obtain a negatively charged surface. Then positively charged poly(ethyleneimine) polymer (PEI) was self-assembled onto the Fe3O4@SiO2 by electrostatic interaction. Next, negatively charged glutathione capped gold nanoparticles (GSH-AuNPs) were electrostatically self-assembled onto the Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI. After that, silver was grown on the surface of the nanocomposite due to the reduction of the dopamine in the alkaline solution. An about 5 nm thick layer of polydopamine (PDA) was observed to form the Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite. The Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite was carefully characterized by the SEM, TEM, FT-IR, XRD and so on. The Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite shows a high saturation magnetization (Ms) of 48.9 emu/g, which allows it to be attracted rapidly to a magnet. The Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite was used to catalyze the reduction of p-nitrophenol (4-NP) to p-aminophenol (4-AP) as a model system. The reaction kinetic constant k was measured to be about 0.56 min−1 (R2 = 0.974). Furthermore, the as-prepared catalyst can be easily recovered and reused for 8 times, which didn’t show much decrease of the catalytic capability. PMID:27147586

  16. Reduced carbonic fluid and possible nature of high K magmas of Kamchatka.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakin, Alexander; Zelensky, Michael; Salova, Tamara

    2014-05-01

    High potassium magmatism in Kamchatka is usually interpreted as reflection of the small degree mantle melting in back arc environment. Strong eruption of Tolbachik volcano located in typical subduction magmatism setting and lasted for several months in 2012-2013 argues against such interpretation. Erupted basaltic magmas contain up to 2.5-3.5 wt.% of K2O. They bear all attributes of high-K magmas such as high Ba (600 ppm) and Zr (250 ppm) contents [Volynets et al., 2013]. Moreover recent [Ponamareva et al., 2013] estimates of the volume of the compositionally similar early Holocene pyroclastics from located nearby Plosky volcano give significant value of ca 10 km3. Syneruptive probing of the fluid on Tolbachik [Zelensky, in preparation] yields high CO2 and SO2content and reveals micro-inclusions of elemental carbon and native alloys of Ni-Fe, Pt and Pt-Ag. These observations stay for the intrinsic reduced carbon-bearing nature of this fluid. We suggest that nature of the fluid plays decisive role in the potassium magma specialization. New experimental data on the melting with reduced carbon bearing fluid supports this suggestion. Experiments have been performed in IHPV at P=2-5 kbar and T=900-1000oC. Initial content of CO in the dry CO2-CO mixture was about 14 wt.%, maximum final water content of H2O in the final fluid was about 13 wt.%. At dehydration melting through CO2-CO fluid transport of the spilitized basaltic andesite we get melt with up to 330 ppm of ZrO2 and 9 wt.% of K2O (source rock contains only 1 wt.% K2O). With oxidized carbonic fluid normal sodium bearing melt was produced. Carbon enrichment of the mantle fluid can be explained as follows. Current geodynamic regime and volcanism in Kamchatka are affected by geologically recent accretion of Kronotsky paleoarc approximately 5 Myrs ago (northern part). In the new geodynamic model [Simakin, 2013] at the certain rheologic parameters accreted terrains are overstepped by subduction zone with temporary

  17. Method and apparatus for optical Doppler tomographic imaging of fluid flow velocity in highly scattering media

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, John Stuart; Milner, Thomas Edward; Chen, Zhongping

    1999-01-01

    Optical Doppler tomography permits imaging of fluid flow velocity in highly scattering media. The tomography system combines Doppler velocimetry with high spatial resolution of partially coherent optical interferometry to measure fluid flow velocity at discrete spatial locations. Noninvasive in vivo imaging of blood flow dynamics and tissue structures with high spatial resolutions of the order of 2 to 10 microns is achieved in biological systems. The backscattered interference signals derived from the interferometer may be analyzed either through power spectrum determination to obtain the position and velocity of each particle in the fluid flow sample at each pixel, or the interference spectral density may be analyzed at each frequency in the spectrum to obtain the positions and velocities of the particles in a cross-section to which the interference spectral density corresponds. The realized resolutions of optical Doppler tomography allows noninvasive in vivo imaging of both blood microcirculation and tissue structure surrounding the vessel which has significance for biomedical research and clinical applications.

  18. High-resolution fingerprints of past landsliding and spatially explicit, probabilistic assessment of future reactivations: Aiguettes landslide, Southeastern French Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Saez, Jérôme; Corona, Christophe; Stoffel, Markus; Berger, Frédéric

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to reconstruct spatio-temporal patterns of past landslide reactivation and the possible occurrence of future events in a forested area of the Barcelonnette basin (Southeastern French Alps). Analysis of past events on the Aiguettes landslide was based on growth-ring series from 223 heavily affected Mountain pine (Pinus uncinata Mill. ex Mirb.) trees growing on the landslide body. A total of 355 growth disturbances were identified in the samples indicating 14 reactivation phases of the landslide body since AD 1898. Accuracy of the spatio-temporal reconstruction is confirmed by historical records and aerial photographs. Logistic regressions using monthly rainfall data from the HISTALP database indicated that landslide reactivations occurred due to above-average precipitation anomalies in winter. They point to the important role of snow in the triggering of reactivations at the Aiguettes landslide body. In a subsequent step, spatially explicit probabilities of landslide reactivation were computed based on the extensive dendrogeomorphic dataset using a Poisson distribution model for an event to occur in 5, 20, 50, and 100 yr. High-resolution maps indicate highest probabilities of reactivation in the lower part of the landslide body and increase from 0.28 for a 5-yr period to 0.99 for a 100-yr period. In the upper part of the landslide body, probabilities do not exceed 0.57 for a 100-yr period and somehow confirm the more stable character of this segment of the Aiguettes landslide. The approach presented in this paper is considered a valuable tool for land-use planners and emergency cells in charge of forecasting future events and in protecting people and their assets from the negative effects of landslides.

  19. A Manganese Catalyst for Highly Reactive Yet Chemoselective Intramolecular C(sp3)—H Amination

    PubMed Central

    Paradine, Shauna M.; Griffin, Jennifer R.; Zhao, Jinpeng; Petronico, Aaron L.; Miller, Shannon M.; White, M. Christina

    2016-01-01

    C—H bond oxidation reactions underscore the existing paradigm wherein high reactivity and high selectivity are inversely correlated. The development of catalysts capable of oxidizing strong aliphatic C(sp3)—H bonds while displaying chemoselectivity (i.e. tolerance of more oxidizable functionality) remains an unsolved problem. Herein, we describe a catalyst, manganese tert-butylphthalocyanine [Mn(tBuPc)], that is an outlier to the reactivity-selectivity paradigm. It is unique in its capacity to functionalize all types of C(sp3)—H bonds intramolecularly, while displaying excellent chemoselectivity in the presence of π-functionality. Mechanistic studies indicate that [Mn(tBuPc)] transfers bound nitrenes to C(sp3)—H bonds via a pathway that lies between concerted C—H insertion, observed with reactive noble metals (e.g. rhodium), and stepwise radical C—H abstraction/rebound, observed with chemoselective base metals (e.g. iron). Rather than achieving a blending of effects, [Mn(tBuPc)] aminates even 1° aliphatic and propargylic C—H bonds, reactivity and selectivity unusual for previously known catalysts. PMID:26587714

  20. A High Precision Method for Quantitative Measurements of Reactive Oxygen Species in Frozen Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Lindgren, Mikael; Gustafsson, Håkan

    2014-01-01

    Objective An electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique using the spin probe cyclic hydroxylamine 1-hydroxy-3-methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine (CMH) was introduced as a versatile method for high precision quantification of reactive oxygen species, including the superoxide radical in frozen biological samples such as cell suspensions, blood or biopsies. Materials and Methods Loss of measurement precision and accuracy due to variations in sample size and shape were minimized by assembling the sample in a well-defined volume. Measurement was carried out at low temperature (150 K) using a nitrogen flow Dewar. The signal intensity was measured from the EPR 1st derivative amplitude, and related to a sample, 3-carboxy-proxyl (CP•) with known spin concentration. Results The absolute spin concentration could be quantified with a precision and accuracy better than ±10 µM (k = 1). The spin concentration of samples stored at −80°C could be reproduced after 6 months of storage well within the same error estimate. Conclusion The absolute spin concentration in wet biological samples such as biopsies, water solutions and cell cultures could be quantified with higher precision and accuracy than normally achievable using common techniques such as flat cells, tissue cells and various capillary tubes. In addition; biological samples could be collected and stored for future incubation with spin probe, and also further stored up to at least six months before EPR analysis, without loss of signal intensity. This opens for the possibility to store and transport incubated biological samples with known accuracy of the spin concentration over time. PMID:24603936

  1. Subthalamic nucleus high-frequency stimulation modulates neuronal reactivity to cocaine within the reward circuit.

    PubMed

    Hachem-Delaunay, Sabira; Fournier, Marie-Line; Cohen, Candie; Bonneau, Nicolas; Cador, Martine; Baunez, Christelle; Le Moine, Catherine

    2015-08-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a critical component of a complex network controlling motor, associative and limbic functions. High-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the STN is an effective therapy for motor symptoms in Parkinsonian patients and can also reduce their treatment-induced addictive behaviors. Preclinical studies have shown that STN HFS decreases motivation for cocaine while increasing that for food, highlighting its influence on rewarding and motivational circuits. However, the cellular substrates of these effects remain unknown. Our objectives were to characterize the cellular consequences of STN HFS with a special focus on limbic structures and to elucidate how STN HFS may interfere with acute cocaine effects in these brain areas. Male Long-Evans rats were subjected to STN HFS (130 Hz, 60 μs, 50-150 μA) for 30 min before an acute cocaine injection (15 mg/kg) and sacrificed 10 min following the injection. Neuronal reactivity was analyzed through the expression of two immediate early genes (Arc and c-Fos) to decipher cellular responses to STN HFS and cocaine. STN HFS only activated c-Fos in the globus pallidus and the basolateral amygdala, highlighting a possible role on emotional processes via the amygdala, with a limited effect by itself in other structures. Interestingly, and despite some differential effects on Arc and c-Fos expression, STN HFS diminished the c-Fos response induced by acute cocaine in the striatum. By preventing the cellular effect of cocaine in the striatum, STN HFS might thus decrease the reinforcing properties of the drug, which is in line with the inhibitory effect of STN HFS on the rewarding and reinforcing properties of cocaine. PMID:25982833

  2. High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Predicts Mortality and Technique Failure in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shou-Hsuan; Li, Yi-Jung; Wu, Hsin-Hsu; Lee, Cheng-Chia; Lin, Chan-Yu; Weng, Cheng-Hao; Chen, Yung-Chang; Chang, Ming-Yang; Hsu, Hsiang-Hao; Fang, Ji-Tseng; Hung, Cheng-Chieh; Yang, Chih-Wei; Tian, Ya-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Introduction An elevated level of serum C-reactive protein (CRP) is widely considered an indicator of an underlying inflammatory disease and a long-term prognostic predictor for dialysis patients. This cross-sectional cohort study was designed to assess the correlation between the level of high-sensitivity CRP (HS-CRP) and the outcome of peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. Methods A total of 402 patients were stratified into 3 tertiles (lower, middle, upper) according to serum HS-CRP level and and followed up from October 2009 to September 2011. During follow-up, cardiovascular events, infection episodes, technique failure, and mortality rate were recorded. Results During the 24-month follow-up, 119 of 402 patients (29.6%) dropped out from PD, including 28 patients (7.0%) who died, 81 patients (20.1%) who switched to hemodialysis, and 10 patients (2.5%) who underwent kidney transplantation. The results of Kaplan–Meier analysis and log-rank test demonstrated a significant difference in the cumulative patient survival rate across the 3 tertiles (the lowest rate in upper tertile). On multivariate Cox regression analysis, only higher HS-CRP level, older age, the presence of diabetes mellitus (DM), lower serum albumin level, and the occurrence of cardiovascular events during follow-up were identified as independent predictors of mortality. Every 1 mg/L increase in HS-CRP level was independently predictive of a 1.4% increase in mortality. Multivariate Cox regression analysis also showed that higher HS-CRP level, the presence of DM, lower hemoglobin level, lower serum albumin level, higher dialysate/plasma creatinine ratio, and the occurrence of infective episodes and cardiovascular events during follow-up were independent predictors of technique failure. Conclusions The present study shows the importance of HS-CRP in the prediction of 2-year mortality and technique survival in PD patients independent of age, diabetes, hypoalbuminemia, and the occurrence of

  3. High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Can Reflect Small Airway Obstruction in Childhood Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Ko, A Ra; Sol, In Suk; Kim, Min Jung; Yoon, Seo Hee; Kim, Kyung Won; Kim, Kyu-Earn

    2016-01-01

    Purpose High-sensitivity assays enabled the identification of C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) at levels that were previously undetectable. We aimed to determine if hs-CRP could reflect airway inflammation in children, by comparing hs-CRP with spirometry and impulse oscillometry (IOS) parameters and symptomatic severities. Materials and Methods A total of 276 asthmatic children who visited Severance Children's Hospital from 2012–2014 were enrolled. Serum hs-CRP and pulmonary function tests were performed on the same day. Patients were divided into hs-CRP positive and negative groups (cut-off value, 3.0 mg/L). Results Of the 276 asthmatic children [median age 7.5 (5.9/10.1) years, 171 boys (62%)], 39 were hs-CRP positive and 237 were negative. Regarding spirometry parameters, we observed significant differences in maximum mid-expiratory flow, % predicted (FEF25–75) (p=0.010) between hs-CRP positive and negative groups, and a negative correlation between FEF25–75 and hs-CRP. There were significant differences in the reactance area (AX) (p=0.046), difference between resistance at 5 Hz and 20 Hz (R5–R20) (p=0.027), resistance at 5 Hz, % predicted (R5) (p=0.027), and reactance at 5 Hz, % predicted (X5) (p=0.041) between hs-CRP positive and negative groups. There were significant positive correlations between hs-CRP and R5 (r=0.163, p=0.008), and X5 (r=0.164, p=0.007). Spirometry and IOS parameters had more relevance in patients with higher blood neutrophil levels in comparison to hs-CRP. Conclusion Hs-CRP showed significant correlation with FEF25–75, R5, and X5. It can reflect small airway obstruction in childhood asthma, and it is more prominent in neutrophil dominant inflammation. PMID:26996570

  4. Production of a High-affinity Monoclonal Antibody Reactive with Folate Receptors Alpha and Beta.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Taku; Furusho, Yuko; Li, Hua; Hasui, Kazuhisa; Matsukita, Sumika; Sueyoshi, Kazunobu; Yanagi, Masakazu; Hatae, Masaki; Takao, Sonshin; Matsuyama, Takami

    2015-06-01

    Folate receptors α (FRα) and β (FRβ) are two isoforms of the cell surface glycoprotein that binds folate. The expression of FRα is rare in normal cells and elevated in cancer cells. Thus, FRα-based tumor-targeted therapy has been a focus area of laboratory research and clinical trials. Recently, it was shown that a significant fraction of tumor-associated macrophages expresses FRβ and that these cells can enhance tumor growth. Although FRα and FRβ share 70% identity in their deduced amino acid sequence, a monoclonal antibody (MAb) reactive with both receptors has not been developed. A MAb that can target both FRα-expressing cancer cells and FRβ-expressing tumor-associated macrophages may provide a more potent therapeutic tool for cancer than individual anti-FRα or anti-FRβ MAbs. In this study, we developed a MAb that recognizes both FRα and FRβ (anti-FRαβ). The anti-FRαβ specifically stained trophoblasts and macrophages from human placenta, synovial macrophages from rheumatoid arthritis patient, liver macrophages from cynomolgus monkey and common marmoset, and cancer cells and tumor-associated macrophages from ovary and lung carcinomas. Surface plasmon resonance showed that the anti-FRαβ bound to soluble forms of the FRα and FRβ proteins with high affinity (KD=6.26×10(-9) M and 4.33×10(-9) M, respectively). In vitro functional analysis of the anti-FRαβ showed that this MAb mediates complement-dependent cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis of FRα-expressing and FRβ-expressing cell lines. The anti-FRαβ MAb is a promising therapeutic candidate for cancers in which macrophages promote tumor progression. PMID:26090596

  5. Impact of fluorine based reactive chemistry on structure and properties of high moment magnetic material

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaoyu Chen, Lifan; Han, Hongmei; Fu, Lianfeng; Sun, Ming; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Jinqiu

    2014-05-07

    The impact of the fluorine-based reactive ion etch (RIE) process on the structural, electrical, and magnetic properties of NiFe and CoNiFe-plated materials was investigated. Several techniques, including X-ray fluorescence, 4-point-probe, BH looper, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), were utilized to characterize both bulk film properties such as thickness, average composition, Rs, ρ, Bs, Ms, and surface magnetic “dead” layers' properties such as thickness and element concentration. Experimental data showed that the majority of Rs and Bs changes of these bulk films were due to thickness reduction during exposure to the RIE process. ρ and Ms change after taking thickness reduction into account were negligible. The composition of the bulk films, which were not sensitive to surface magnetic dead layers with nano-meter scale, showed minimum change as well. It was found by TEM and EELS analysis that although both before and after RIE there were magnetic dead layers on the top surface of these materials, the thickness and element concentration of the layers were quite different. Prior to RIE, dead layer was actually native oxidation layers (about 2 nm thick), while after RIE dead layer consisted of two sub-layers that were about 6 nm thick in total. Sub-layer on the top was native oxidation layer, while the bottom layer was RIE “damaged” layer with very high fluorine concentration. Two in-situ RIE approaches were also proposed and tested to remove such damaged sub-layers.

  6. A Monolithic Algorithm for High Reynolds Number Fluid-Structure Interaction Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberknecht, Erika; Sheldon, Jason; Pitt, Jonathan

    2013-11-01

    Simulations of fluid-structure interaction problems with high Reynolds number flows are typically approached with partitioned algorithms that leverage the robustness of traditional finite volume method based CFD techniques for flows of this nature. However, such partitioned algorithms are subject to many sub-iterations per simulation time-step, which substantially increases the computational cost when a tightly coupled solution is desired. To address this issue, we present a finite element method based monolithic algorithm for fluid-structure interaction problems with high Reynolds number flow. The use of a monolithic algorithm will potentially reduce the computational cost during each time-step, but requires that all of the governing equations be simultaneously cast in a single Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) frame of reference and subjected to the same discretization strategy. The formulation for the fluid solution is stabilized by implementing a Streamline Upwind Galerkin (SUPG) method, and a projection method for equal order interpolation of all of the solution unknowns; numerical and programming details are discussed. Preliminary convergence studies and numerical investigations are presented, to demonstrate the algorithm's robustness and performance. The authors acknowledge support for this project from the Applied Research Laboratory Eric Walker Graduate Fellowship Program.

  7. Enzymatic analysis of the gingival crevicular fluid in hypoxia of high altitude (Everest).

    PubMed

    Trentini, P; Ferrante, M; Dolci, M; Ciavarelli, L; Tondi, A; Spoto, G

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the qualitative and quantitative changes of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) that occur in the Gingival Crevicular Fluid (GCF) in hypobaric-hypoxic conditions (high altitude). Hypoxia affects systemic adaptation responses in different organs. We examined 17 Caucasians subjects, of whom 13 were mountain climbers (1 female and 12 males), and 4 Tibetans (2 females and 2 males) following exposure to the hypoxia environment of high altitude. The study was conducted at different altitudes (0 m control, 1000 m, 5200 m above sea level) on Mount Everest. The protocol consisted of withdrawing crevicular fluid through the use of cones made of endodontic paper size 30 sectioned to 15 mm from the apex, inserted for 30 seconds in the gingival sulcus (about 2 mm). The analyzed sites were the mesial and distal, buccal and palatal of tooth 1.1 and 2.1. Blood exams were performed on the subjects using I-Stat, furnishing analysis in real time (about 2 mins). In agreement with other results reported in literature, in all the subjects we found an increase in the hematocrit and hemoglobin with a large range of values between them, and with significant differences, as analysed with the Fisher, Scheffe and Bonferroni/Dunn statistical methods. The enzymatic analysis of the GFC showed an increase of the levels of ALP at each altitude studied. With this preliminary study we show that hypoxic environment determines not only the well known cardiovascular systemic responses, but also crevicular fluid adaptation. PMID:17897492

  8. High order numerical simulations of the Richtmyer- Meshkov instability in a relativistic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotti, O.; Dumbser, M.

    2015-07-01

    We study the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability of a relativistic perfect fluid by means of high order numerical simulations with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). The numerical scheme combines a finite volume reconstruction in space, a local space-time discontinuous Galerkin predictor method, a high order one-step time update scheme, and a "cell-by-cell" space-time AMR strategy with time-accurate local time stepping. In this way, third order accurate (both in space and in time) numerical simulations of the RM instability are performed, spanning a wide parameter space. We present results both for the case in which a light fluid penetrates into a higher density one (Atwood number A > 0) and for the case in which a heavy fluid penetrates into a lower density one (Atwood number A < 0). We find that for large Lorentz factors γs of the incident shock wave, the relativistic RM instability is substantially weakened and ultimately suppressed. More specifically, the growth rate of the RM instability in the linear phase has a local maximum which occurs at a critical value of γs ≈ [1.2, 2]. Moreover, we have also revealed a genuinely relativistic effect, absent in Newtonian hydrodynamics, which arises in three dimensional configurations with a non-zero velocity component tangent to the incident shock front. In particular, in A > 0 models, the tangential velocity has a net magnification effect, while in A < 0 models, the tangential velocity has a net suppression effect.

  9. Effect of environment on iodine oxidation state and reactivity with aluminum.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dylan K; McCollum, Jena; Pantoya, Michelle L

    2016-04-28

    Iodine oxide is a highly reactive solid oxidizer and with its abundant generation of iodine gas during reaction, this oxidizer also shows great potential as a biocidal agent. A problem with using I2O5 in an energetic mixture is its highly variable reactive behavior. This study isolates the variable reactivity associated with I2O5 as a function of its chemical reaction in various environments. Specifically, aluminum fuel and iodine oxide powder are combined using a carrier fluid to aid intermixing. The carrier fluid is shown to significantly affect the oxidation state of iodine oxide, thereby affecting the reactivity of the mixture. Four carrier fluids were investigated ranging in polarity and water miscibility in increasing order from hexane < acetone < isopropanol < water as well as untreated, dry-mixed reactants. Oxidation state and reactivity were examined with experimental techniques including X-ray photoelectric spectroscopy (XPS) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Results are compared with thermal equilibrium simulations. Flame speeds increased with polarity of the fluid used to intermix the powder and ranged from 180 to 1202 m s(-1). The I2O5 processed in the polar fluids formed hydrated states of iodine oxide: HIO3 and HI3O8; and, the nonpolar and dry-mixed samples formed: I2O4 and I4O9. During combustion, the hydrated iodine oxides rapidly dehydrated from HIO3 to HI3O8 and from HI3O8 to I2O5. Both steps release 25% of their mass as vapor during combustion. Increased gas generation enhances convective energy transport and accounts for the increase in reactivity seen in the mixtures processed in polar fluids. These results explain the chemical mechanisms underlying the variable reactivity of I2O5 that are a function of the oxide's highly reactive nature with its surrounding environment. These results will significantly impact the selection of carrier fluid in the synthesis approach for iodine containing reactive mixtures. PMID:27052472

  10. On equivalence of high temperature series expansion and coupling parameter series expansion in thermodynamic perturbation theory of fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Sai Venkata Ramana, A.

    2014-04-21

    The coupling parameter series expansion and the high temperature series expansion in the thermodynamic perturbation theory of fluids are shown to be equivalent if the interaction potential is pairwise additive. As a consequence, for the class of fluids with the potential having a hardcore repulsion, if the hard-sphere fluid is chosen as reference system, the terms of coupling parameter series expansion for radial distribution function, direct correlation function, and Helmholtz free energy follow a scaling law with temperature. The scaling law is confirmed by application to square-well fluids.

  11. Highly responsive core-shell microactuator arrays for use in viscous and viscoelastic fluids

    PubMed Central

    Fiser, Briana L.; Shields, Adam R.; Falvo, M. R.; Superfine, R.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new fabrication method to produce arrays of highly responsive polymer-metal core-shell magnetic microactuators. The core-shell fabrication method decouples the elastic and magnetic structural components such that the actuator response can be optimized by adjusting the core-shell geometry. Our microstructures are 10 μm long, 550 nm in diameter, and electrochemically fabricated in particle track-etched membranes, comprising a poly(dimethylsiloxane) core with a 100 nm Ni shell surrounding the upper 3–8 μm. The structures can achieve deflections of nearly 90° with moderate magnetic fields and are capable of driving fluid flow in a fluid 550 times more viscous than water. PMID:26405376

  12. High-frequency vibration effect on the stability of a horizontal layer of ternary fluid.

    PubMed

    Lyubimova, Tatyana

    2015-05-01

    The effect of small-amplitude high-frequency longitudinal vibrations on the stability of a horizontal layer of ternary fluid is studied in the framework of average approach. Long-wave instability is studied analytically and instability to the perturbations with finite wave numbers is studied numerically. It is found that, similar to the case when vibrations are absent, for ternary fluids there exist monotonic and oscillatory long-wave instability modes. The calculations show that the vibrations lead to destabilization in the case of heating from below and to stabilization in the case of heating from above. Additionally, vibrations influence on the parameter range where long-wave instability is most dangerous. New, vibrational, instability modes are found which leads to the existence of convection in zero-gravity conditions. PMID:25998169

  13. An earthquake instability model based on faults containing high fluid-pressure compartments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockner, D.A.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    It has been proposed that large strike-slip faults such as the San Andreas contain water in seal-bounded compartments. Arguments based on heat flow and stress orientation suggest that in most of the compartments, the water pressure is so high that the average shear strength of the fault is less than 20 MPa. We propose a variation of this basic model in which most of the shear stress on the fault is supported by a small number of compartments where the pore pressure is relatively low. As a result, the fault gouge in these compartments is compacted and lithified and has a high undisturbed strength. When one of these locked regions fails, the system made up of the neighboring high and low pressure compartments can become unstable. Material in the high fluid pressure compartments is initially underconsolidated since the low effective confining pressure has retarded compaction. As these compartments are deformed, fluid pressure remains nearly unchanged so that they offer little resistance to shear. The low pore pressure compartments, however, are overconsolidated and dilate as they are sheared. Decompression of the pore fluid in these compartments lowers fluid pressure, increasing effective normal stress and shear strength. While this effect tends to stabilize the fault, it can be shown that this dilatancy hardening can be more than offset by displacement weakening of the fault (i.e., the drop from peak to residual strength). If the surrounding rock mass is sufficiently compliant to produce an instability, slip will propagate along the fault until the shear fracture runs into a low-stress region. Frictional heating and the accompanying increase in fluid pressure that are suggested to occur during shearing of the fault zone will act as additional destabilizers. However, significant heating occurs only after a finite amount of slip and therefore is more likely to contribute to the energetics of rupture propagation than to the initiation of the instability. We present

  14. Magnetic fluid with high dispersion and heating performance using nano-sized Fe3O4 platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, Mikio; Miyamoto, Ryoichi; Oda, Tatsuya; Yanagihara, Hideto; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro; Kita, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fluid with high dispersion and heating performance was developed using 30 to 50 nm platelet Fe3O4 particles. This fluid was prepared by mechanical dispersion in ethyl alcohol with a silane coupling agent, bonding with polyethylene glycol (PEG), and removal of aggregates formed by precipitation. The peak diameter of the resulting Fe3O4 particles, measured by dynamic light scattering, was approximately 150 nm. The fluid exhibited a 300 W/g specific loss power (measured at 114 kHz by a 50.9 kA/m magnetic field). Distribution of the Fe3O4 particles in tissues was observed by intravenously administrating the fluid in mice. The Fe3O4 particles passed through the lungs, and were uniformly distributed throughout the liver and spleen. High dispersion and high heating performance were simultaneously achieved in the magnetic fluid using platelet Fe3O4 particles surface modified with PEG.

  15. High performance shear thickening fluid based on calcinated colloidal silica microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Sheng-Biao; Xuan, Shou-Hu; Jiang, Wan-Quan; Gong, Xing-Long

    2015-08-01

    Here, a novel method to prepare high performance shear thickening fluids (STFs) by dispersing calcinated silica microspheres into ethylene glycol is reported. The silica particles were prepared by hydrolyzing tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS), and then they were treated under high temperature to remove the physically adsorbed water and the -OH groups on the surfaces. The influence of the temperature on the rheological properties of the final STFs was investigated and the STF prepared under the optimum temperature exhibited the best ST effects. A possible mechanism was proposed and it was found that a proper solvation layer adsorbed on the silica surface resulted in lower critical shear rate and higher shear thickening viscosity.

  16. A perspective on high-order methods in computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, ZhiJian

    2016-01-01

    There has been an intensive international effort to develop high-order Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methods into design tools in aerospace engineering during the last one and half decades. These methods offer the potential to significantly improve solution accuracy and efficiency for vortex dominated turbulent flows. Enough progresses have been made in algorithm development, mesh generation and parallel computing that these methods are on the verge of being applied in a production design environment. Since many review papers have been written on the subject, I decide to offer a personal perspective on the state-of-the-art in high-order CFD methods and the challenges that must be overcome.

  17. Light trap with reactive sun tracking for high-efficiency spectrum splitting photovoltaic conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostoleris, H.; Chiesa, M.; Stefancich, M.

    2015-05-01

    We present a design for a modification of a previously proposed light-trapping solar collector that enables reactive solar tracking by the incorporation of an optically activated transparency-switching material. The material forms an entry aperture whose position reactively varies to admit sunlight, which is focused to a point on the receiving surface by a lens or set of lenses, over a wide range of solar angles. An analytic model for assessing device performance based on statistical ray optics is described and confirmed by raytrace simulations on a model system.

  18. Nanopore reactive adsorbents for the high-efficiency removal of waste species

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Arthur Jing-Min; Zhang, Yuehua

    2005-01-04

    A nanoporous reactive adsorbent incorporates a relatively small number of relatively larger reactant, e.g., metal, enzyme, etc., particles (10) forming a discontinuous or continuous phase interspersed among and surrounded by a continuous phase of smaller adsorbent particles (12) and connected interstitial pores (14) therebetween. The reactive adsorbent can effectively remove inorganic or organic impurities in a liquid by causing the liquid to flow through the adsorbent. For example, silver ions may be adsorbed by the adsorbent particles (12) and reduced to metallic silver by reducing metal, such as ions, as the reactant particles (10). The column can be regenerated by backwashing with the liquid effluent containing, for example, acetic acid.

  19. Comparison of interfacial partitioning tracer test and high-resolution microtomography measurements of fluid-fluid interfacial areas for an ideal porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narter, Matt; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2010-08-01

    Fluid-fluid interfacial area for porous media systems can be measured with the aqueous phase interfacial partitioning tracer test (IPTT) method or with high-resolution microtomography. The results of prior studies have shown that interfacial areas measured with the IPTT method are larger than values measured with microtomography. The observed disparity has been hypothesized to result from the impact of porous medium surface roughness on film-associated interfacial area, wherein the influence of surface roughness is characterized to some extent by the IPTT method but not by microtomography due to resolution constraints. This hypothesis was tested by using the two methods to measure interfacial area between an organic immiscible liquid and water for an ideal glass beads medium that has no measurable surface roughness. The tracer tests yielded a mean interfacial area of 2.8 (±5 cm-1), while microtomography produced an interfacial area of 2.7 (±2 cm-1). Maximum specific interfacial areas, equivalent to areas normalized by nonwetting fluid volume, were calculated and compared to measures of the specific solid surface area. The normalized interfacial areas were similar to the specific solid surface area calculated using the smooth sphere assumption and to the specific solid surface area measured using the N2/Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) method. The results presented herein indicate that both the IPTT and microtomography methods provide robust characterization of fluid-fluid interfacial area and that they are comparable in the absence of the impact of surface roughness.

  20. COMPARISON OF INTERFACIAL PARTITIONING TRACER TEST AND HIGH-RESOLUTION MICROTOMOGRAPHY MEASUREMENTS OF FLUID-FLUID INTERFACIAL AREAS FOR AN IDEAL POROUS MEDIUM.

    PubMed

    Narter, Matt; Brusseau, Mark L

    2010-08-01

    Fluid-fluid interfacial area for porous-media systems can be measured with the aqueous-phase interfacial partitioning tracer test (IPTT) method or with high-resolution microtomography. The results of prior studies have shown that interfacial areas measured with the IPTT method are larger than values measured with microtomography. The observed disparity has been hypothesized to result from the impact of porous-medium surface roughness on film-associated interfacial area, wherein the influence of surface roughness is characterized to some extent by the IPTT method but not by microtomography due to resolution constraints. This hypothesis was tested by using the two methods to measure interfacial area between an organic immiscible liquid and water for an ideal glass-beads medium that has no measurable surface roughness. The tracer tests yielded a mean interfacial area of 2.8 (± 5 cm(-1)), while microtomography produced an interfacial area of 2.7 (± 2 cm(-1)). Maximum specific interfacial areas, equivalent to areas normalized by non-wetting fluid volume, were calculated and compared to measures of the specific solid surface area. The normalized interfacial areas were similar to the specific solid surface area calculated using the smooth-sphere assumption, and to the specific solid surface area measured using the N2/BET method. The results presented herein indicate that both the IPTT and microtomography methods provide robust characterization of fluid-fluid interfacial area, and that they are comparable absent the impact of surface roughness. PMID:24604925

  1. Off-fault shear failure potential enhanced by high-stiff/low-permeable damage zone during fluid injection in porous reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohmer, J.; Nguyen, T. K.; Torabi, A.

    2015-09-01

    Several studies have focused on the role of damage zone (DZ) on the hydromechanical behaviour of faults by assuming a fractured DZ (i.e. low stiffness/high permeability). Yet, this vision may not be valid in all geological settings, in particular, in high-porosity reservoirs as targeted by several underground exploitations. We investigate the impact of a high-stiff/low-permeable DZ on the shear reactivation of a blind, undetectable normal fault (1 km long, ≤10 m offset), with a 0.5 m thick low-porosity/permeability fault core during fluid injection into a high-porosity reservoir. The spatial distribution of effective properties (elastic moduli, Biot's coefficients and permeability) of DZ including deformation bands (DB; elliptic inclusions) and intact rock were derived using upscaling analytical expressions. The influence of DZ on the hydromechanical behaviour of the fault zone was numerically explored using 2-D plane-strain finite-element simulations within the framework of fully saturated isothermal porous media by accounting for an orthotropic elastic rheology. The numerical results showed that the presence of DB plays a protective role by reducing the potential for shear reactivation inside the fault core. On the other hand, they favour shear failure in the vicinity of the fault core (off-fault damage) by accelerating the decrease of the minimum principal effective stress while limiting the decrease of the maximum one. This behaviour is strongly enhanced by the fault-parallel DZ effective stiffness, but limited by the combined effect of fault-normal DZ effective permeability and of the Biot's coefficients. This can have implications for the location and size of aftershocks during fault reactivation.

  2. Characterization of combined power plasma jet using AC high voltage and nanosecond pulse for reactive species composition control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, Keisuke; Konishi, Hideaki; Kato, Toshiaki; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2014-10-01

    In the application studies for both bio-medical and agricultural applications, the roles of the reactive oxide and/or nitride species generated in the plasma has been reported as a key to control the effects and ill-effects on the living organism. The correlation between total OH radical exposure from an air atmospheric pressure plasma jet and the sterilization threshold on Botrytis cinerea is presented. With the increase of the OH radical exposure to the Botrytis cinerea, the probability of sterilization is increased. In this study, to resolve the roles of reactive species including OH radicals, a combined power plasma jet using nanosecond pulses and low-frequency sinusoidal AC high voltage (a few kHz) is studied for controlling the composition of the reactive species. The nanosecond pulses are superimposed on the AC voltage which is in synchronization with the AC phase. The undergoing work to characterize the combined power discharge with electric charge and voltage cycle on the plasma jet will also be presented to discuss the discharge characteristics to control the composition of the reactive species.

  3. The Role of Reactivation and Fluid Pressure Cycling in The Development of Late Zeolite-bearing Faults and Fractures From The Adamello Batholith, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dempsey, E. D.; Holdsworth, R. E.; Di Toro, G.

    2011-12-01

    Interconnected networks of faults and veins filled with zeolites and other minerals are a common feature of many crystalline rocks, including basaltic volcanics, deformed granitic plutons and regions of high grade continental basement. Typically the fracture fills formed late in the tectonic history and at relatively low temperatures (100-200°C) and in many cases appear to represent a final phase of fluid flow and mineralisation developed during the final stages of exhumation. In the northern part of the Adamello pluton in the Italian Alps, a geometrically complex and kinematically diverse set of zeolite bearing faults and veins is well exposed in the deformed tonalites associated with the Gole Larghe Fault Zone (GLFZ). These features post date all other deformation structures in the pluton, including cooling joints (formed at >550°C), ductile shear zones (550-450°C) and the well-known assemblage of faults, cataclasites and pseudotachylytes (300-250°C) associated with the GLFZ. Three main groups of zeolite-bearing fractures are recognised based on differences in orientation and kinematics of associated shear fracture displacements. These are: i) E-W sinistral reverse thrusts; ii) NNE-SSW sinistral normal faults; and iii) NNW-SSE normal faults. All three groups are associated with the development of white, yellow and red-orange zeolite-rich veins and fault gouge. Individual fault zones are rarely more than a few metres wide and fault offsets are generally small (mostly < 5m). Minor fractures associated with each group display mutually cross-cutting relationships consistent with them all being broadly contemporaneous features. This is confirmed by thin section and XRD analyses which reveal a fairly uniform set of mineral fills (including laumontite ± scolecite ± prehnite ± clinochlore ± stilbite ± stellerite ± quartz ± microcline ± albite). All three fracture groups are hard linked, locally forming spectacular mineralised fracture meshes. These features

  4. Flow and Geometry Control the Onset of Jamming in Fractures with High Solid-Fraction Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, R.; Elkhoury, J. E.; Shannon, L. J.; Detwiler, R. L.; Morris, J.; Prioul, R.; Desroches, J.

    2013-12-01

    Fluids containing a large fraction of suspended solids are common in the subsurface. Examples include fluids used for environmental remediation, hydraulic fracturing fluids and magma. These fluid-solid mixtures behave as non-Newtonian fluids where interactions between fluid, suspended solids, and pore walls can lead to jamming of the suspended solids. Jamming causes the velocity of the solid to decrease locally to zero causing a rapid decrease in permeability as the fluid is forced to flow through the pore space within the immobilized solid. Here we present results from experiments that quantify the flow of non-Newtonian suspensions in an analog parallel-plate fracture (transparent 15cm x 15cm with ~3-mm aperture) and explore the dependence of jamming on flow conditions, fracture geometry, and the action of gravity. We used guar gum mixed with water (0.75%) as the fluid and added 50% by volume of crushed silica (< 300μm). Flow rates ranged from 0.2ml/min to 6.0ml/min, cell orientation varied from horizontal to vertical (bottom to top) flow and a transducer provided continuous measurement of differential pressure across the cell. A strobed LED panel backlit the cell and a high-resolution CCD camera captured frequent (0.2 Hz) images during all experiments. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) yielded measurements of the evolving velocity field during experiments (see Figure). In the vertical orientation during the initial period of high flow rate, outflow decreased rapidly and the differential pressure increased indicating jamming within the cell. Subsequent efforts to flush solids from the cell suggested that jamming occurred at the inlet of the cell. This was likely due to settling of solids within the flow field indicating that the time scale associated with settling was shorter than the time scale of advection through the cell. In the horizontal orientation, localized jamming occurred at the lowest flow rate in a region near the outlet. This suggests that when

  5. Cr(III) solubility in aqueous fluids at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watenphul, Anke; Schmidt, Christian; Jahn, Sandro

    2014-02-01

    frequencies in the range of the two strongest experimentally observed Raman bands, whereas Cr-O stretching vibrations of hydroxy-chloride complexes occur at wavenumbers above 400 cm-1. Solubility and complexation of Cr(III) depend strongly on the activities of Cl- and H+. At high H+ and Cl- activity, the results are consistent with CrCl(H2O)0-2-1-0 complexes as major Cr(III) species, the Cr coordination number of which increases with pressure by becoming more aquated. At low Cl- activity, i.e. in our study at high-temperature low-pressure conditions, the data indicate mixed CrClx((OH)z3-x-z complexes with Cl-Cr ratios less than three. In situ μ-XRF solubility experiments conducted with eskolaite + (H2O + 29 mass% Na2CO3) and kosmochlor + (H2O + 44 mass% Na2Si3O7) resulted in dissolved Cr concentrations at or below the detection limit of 500 ppm. Thus, acidic chloridic fluids seem to be more efficient agents for Cr(III) mobilization and transport at crustal conditions than aqueous alkali carbonate or silicate solutions.

  6. Fluid/Structure Interaction Studies of Aircraft Using High Fidelity Equations on Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru; VanDalsem, William (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Abstract Aeroelasticity which involves strong coupling of fluids, structures and controls is an important element in designing an aircraft. Computational aeroelasticity using low fidelity methods such as the linear aerodynamic flow equations coupled with the modal structural equations are well advanced. Though these low fidelity approaches are computationally less intensive, they are not adequate for the analysis of modern aircraft such as High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) and Advanced Subsonic Transport (AST) which can experience complex flow/structure interactions. HSCT can experience vortex induced aeroelastic oscillations whereas AST can experience transonic buffet associated structural oscillations. Both aircraft may experience a dip in the flutter speed at the transonic regime. For accurate aeroelastic computations at these complex fluid/structure interaction situations, high fidelity equations such as the Navier-Stokes for fluids and the finite-elements for structures are needed. Computations using these high fidelity equations require large computational resources both in memory and speed. Current conventional super computers have reached their limitations both in memory and speed. As a result, parallel computers have evolved to overcome the limitations of conventional computers. This paper will address the transition that is taking place in computational aeroelasticity from conventional computers to parallel computers. The paper will address special techniques needed to take advantage of the architecture of new parallel computers. Results will be illustrated from computations made on iPSC/860 and IBM SP2 computer by using ENSAERO code that directly couples the Euler/Navier-Stokes flow equations with high resolution finite-element structural equations.

  7. Deep-sea hydrothermal vent animals seek cool fluids in a highly variable thermal environment.

    PubMed

    Bates, Amanda E; Lee, Raymond W; Tunnicliffe, Verena; Lamare, Miles D

    2010-01-01

    The thermal characteristics of an organism's environment affect a multitude of parameters, from biochemical to evolutionary processes. Hydrothermal vents on mid-ocean ridges are created when warm hydrothermal fluids are ejected from the seafloor and mixed with cold bottom seawater; many animals thrive along these steep temperature and chemical gradients. Two-dimensional temperature maps at vent sites have demonstrated order of magnitude thermal changes over centimetre distances and at time intervals from minutes to hours. To investigate whether animals adapt to this extreme level of environmental variability, we examined differences in the thermal behaviour of mobile invertebrates from aquatic habitats that vary in thermal regime. Vent animals were highly responsive to heat and preferred much cooler fluids than their upper thermal limits, whereas invertebrates from other aquatic environments risked exposure to warmer temperatures. Avoidance of temperatures well within their tolerated range may allow vent animals to maintain a safety margin against rapid temperature fluctuations and concomitant toxicity of hydrothermal fluids. PMID:20975681

  8. Enzyme analysis of amniotic fluid for prenatal diagnosis of cystic fibrosis in high-risk pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Peretz, H; Chemke, J; Usher, S; Legum, C; Graff, E

    1988-12-01

    We determined the activity concentrations of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), ALP isoenzymes, gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), and alpha-glucosidase (AGL) in 1200 unselected amniotic fluids and in amniotic fluids from 40 pregnancies at high risk for cystic fibrosis (CF). From the results we established the normal range and CF-predictive cutoff values for these enzymes in the second trimester of pregnancy. In all predicted normal pregnancies that went to term, normal children were born. Among the predicted affected pregnancies, 14 were terminated and two went to term, one resulting in a CF-affected child and the other in a healthy child. Evidence for CF was found in all 13 aborted fetuses examined (the parents of one refused to allow autopsy). We noted no differences in the amniotic fluid enzyme activities for the Arab and various Jewish ethnic groups living in Israel. We conclude that prenatal diagnosis of CF among the Israeli population at risk for CF is feasible by means of a reliable, fast, and economic test in the second trimester of pregnancy. PMID:2904307

  9. Early Fluid Resuscitation and High Volume Hemofiltration Decrease Septic Shock Progression in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ping; Zheng, Ruiqiang; Xue, Lu; Zhang, Min; Wu, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the effects of early fluid resuscitation (EFR) combined with high volume hemofiltration (HVHF) on the cardiopulmonary function and removal of inflammatory mediators in a septic shock swine model. Eighteen swine were randomized into three groups: control (n = 6) (extracorporeal circulating blood only), continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) (n = 6; ultrafiltration volume = 25 mL/Kg/h), and HVHF (n = 6; ultrafiltration volume = 85 mL/Kg/h). The septic shock model was established by intravenous infusion of lipopolysaccharides (50 µg/kg/h). Hemodynamic parameters (arterial pressure, heart rate, cardiac output, stroke volume variability, left ventricular contractility, systemic vascular resistance, and central venous pressure), vasoactive drug parameters (dose and time of norepinephrine and hourly fluid intake), pulmonary function (partial oxygen pressure and vascular permeability), and cytokines (interleukin-6 and interleukin-10) were observed. Treatment resulted in significant changes at 4–6 h. HVHF was beneficial, as shown by the dose of vasoactive drugs, fluid intake volume, left ventricular contractility index, and partial oxygen pressure. Both CRRT and HVHF groups showed improved removal of inflammatory mediators compared with controls. In conclusion, EFR combined with HVHF improved septic shock in this swine model. The combination decreased shock progression, reduced the need for vasoactive drugs, and alleviated the damage to cardiopulmonary functions. PMID:26543849

  10. Rise in extracellular fluid volume during high sodium depends on BMI in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Visser, Folkert W; Krikken, Jan A; Muntinga, Jaap H J; Dierckx, Rudi A; Navis, Gerjan J

    2009-09-01

    A high sodium (HS) intake is associated to increased cardiovascular and renal risk, especially in overweight subjects. We hypothesized that abnormal sodium and fluid handling is involved, independent of hypertension or insulin resistance. Therefore, we studied the relation between BMI and sodium-induced changes in extracellular fluid volume (ECFV; distribution volume of (125)I-iothalamate) in 78 healthy men, not selected for BMI. A total of 78 subjects with a median BMI of 22.5 (range: 19.2-33.9 kg/m(2)) were studied after 1 week on a low sodium (LS) diet (50 mmol Na(+)/d) and after 1 week on HS (200 mmol Na(+)/d). The change from LS to HS resulted in an increase in ECFV of 1.2 +/- 1.8 l. Individual changes in ECFV were correlated to BMI (r = 0.361, P < 0.01). Furthermore, in response to HS, a higher BMI was associated to a higher rise in filtered load of sodium (FL(Na(+)) = [Na(+)] x GFR, r = 0.281, P < 0.05). Thus, a shift to HS leads to a larger rise in ECFV in healthy subjects with higher BMI, associated with an elevated FL(Na(+)) during HS. Although no hypertension occurred in these healthy subjects, our data provide a potential explanation for the interaction of sodium intake and BMI on cardiovascular and renal risk. Exaggerated fluid retention may be an early pathogenic factor in the cardiorenal complications of overweight. PMID:19282825

  11. Struvite Crystallization of Anaerobic Digestive Fluid of Swine Manure Containing Highly Concentrated Nitrogen

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Young; Oh, Min Hwan; Yang, Seung-Hak; Yoon, Tae Han

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the optimal operation factors for struvite crystallization for removing and recovering nitrogen and phosphorus from anaerobic digestive fluid of swine manure containing highly concentrated nitrogen was determined. Every experiment for the struvite crystallization reaction was conducted by placing 1,000 mL of digestion fluid in a 2,000 mL Erlenmeyer flask at various temperatures, pH, and mixing speed. Except for special circumstances, the digestion fluid was centrifuged (10,000 rpm, 10 min) and then the supernatant was used for the experiment at room temperature and 100 rpm. The optimal mole ratio of PO43−:Mg2+ was 1:1.5, and the pH effect ranging from 9 to 11 was similar, when mixed for 1 hour. Under this condition, the removal efficiency of NH4+-N and PO43−-P was 40% and 88.6%, respectively. X-shaped crystal was observed by light and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, struvite crystal structure was confirmed through X-ray diffraction analysis. PMID:26104412

  12. Removal of nitric oxide by the highly reactive anatase TiO2 (001) surface: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenwen; Tian, Feng Hui; Wang, Xiaobin; Zhao, Linghuan; Wang, Yun; Fu, Aiping; Yuan, Shuping; Chu, Tianshu; Xia, Linhua; Yu, Jimmy C; Duan, Yunbo

    2014-09-15

    In this paper, density functional theory (DFT) calculation was employed to study the adsorption of nitric oxide (NO) on the highly reactive anatase TiO2 (001) surface. For comparison, the adsorption of NO on the (101) surface was also considered. Different from the physical adsorption on the (101) surface, NO molecules are found to chemisorb on the TiO2 (001) surface. The twofold coordinate oxygen atoms (O2c) on the anatase (001) surface are the active sites. Where NO is oxidized into a nitrite species (NO2(-)) trapping efficiently on the surface, with one of the surface Ti5c-O2c bonds adjacent to the adsorption site broken. Our results, therefore, supply a theoretical guidance to remove NO pollutants using highly reactive anatase TiO2 (001) facets. PMID:24998049

  13. Profile of Trypanosoma cruzi Reactivity in a Population at High Risk for Endemic Pemphigus Foliaceus (Fogo Selvagem)

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Joaquim X.; Diaz, Luis A.; Eaton, Donald P.; Hans-Filho, Günter; Lanzani de Freitas, Elder; Delgado, Livia; Ichimura, Ligia Maria F.; Cristaldi, Flávia; Orlandi, Renata; Kesper, Norival; Umezawa, Eufrosina S.; Rivitti, Evandro A.; Aoki, Valeria

    2012-01-01

    Fogo Selvagem (FS) is an autoimmune bullous disease with pathogenic IgG autoantibodies recognizing desmoglein 1 (Dsg1), a desmosomal glycoprotein. In certain settlements of Brazil, a high prevalence of FS (3%) is reported, suggesting environmental factors as triggers of the autoimmune response. Healthy individuals from endemic areas recognize nonpathogenic epitopes of Dsg1, and exposure to hematophagous insects is a risk factor for FS. Fogo selvagem and Chagas disease share some geographic sites, and anti-Dsg1 has been detected in Chagas patients. Indeterminate Chagas disease was identified in a Brazilian Amerindian population of high risk for FS. In counterpart, none of the FS patients living in the same geographic region showed reactivity against Trypanosoma cruzi. The profile of anti-Dsg1 antibodies showed positive results in 15 of 40 FS sera and in 33 of 150 sera from healthy individuals from endemic FS sites, and no cross-reactivity between Chagas disease and FS was observed. PMID:22826496

  14. An Incompressible Fluid Model for High-Speed Pellet Propagation in Guide-tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, F. W.

    2006-04-01

    This work reports theoretical models developed to support optimization of pellet-fueling. Experiments show pellet penetration will be optimized by high-field-side, high-speed launch. In present pellet systems, acceleration takes place outside the main tokamak chamber and pellets must propagate at high velocity through curved guide tubes to reach the desired HFS launch point. If the pellet velocity V exceeds a critical value Vc 300m/s, then centrifugal force will breakup the pellet in agreement with observations. In the limit V>>Vc, the pellet material can be modeled as an incompressible granular fluid of DT dust fragments and an equation is developed for its length l along the guide tube. The solution shows that l depends only on the angle the guide tube bends and not on the pellet speed. If a v-notch guide tube is used with a right-angle bend, the pellet as emerges as a highly elongated DT dust cloud, essentially a fluid jet. Further analysis shows this jet to be unstable and breakup into a series of droplets is expected. Ablation calculations based on droplet size result in poor penetration.

  15. Development of Highly Durable and Reactive Regenerable Magnesium-Based Sorbents for CO2 Separation in Coal Gasification Process

    SciTech Connect

    Javad Abbasian; Armin Hassanzadeh Khayyat; Rachid B. Slimane

    2005-06-01

    The specific objective of this project was to develop physically durable and chemically regenerable MgO-based sorbents that can remove carbon dioxide from raw coal gas at operating condition prevailing in IGCC processes. A total of sixty two (62) different sorbents were prepared in this project. The sorbents were prepared either by various sol-gel techniques (22 formulations) or modification of dolomite (40 formulations). The sorbents were prepared in the form of pellets and in granular forms. The solgel based sorbents had very high physical strength, relatively high surface area, and very low average pore diameter. The magnesium content of the sorbents was estimated to be 4-6 % w/w. To improve the reactivity of the sorbents toward CO{sub 2}, The sorbents were impregnated with potassium salts. The potassium content of the sorbents was about 5%. The dolomite-based sorbents were prepared by calcination of dolomite at various temperature and calcination environment (CO{sub 2} partial pressure and moisture). Potassium carbonate was added to the half-calcined dolomite through wet impregnation method. The estimated potassium content of the impregnated sorbents was in the range of 1-6% w/w. In general, the modified dolomite sorbents have significantly higher magnesium content, larger pore diameter and lower surface area, resulting in significantly higher reactivity compared to the sol-gel sorbents. The reactivities of a number of sorbents toward CO{sub 2} were determined in a Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA) unit. The results indicated that at the low CO{sub 2} partial pressures (i.e., 1 atm), the reactivities of the sorbents toward CO{sub 2} are very low. At elevated pressures (i.e., CO{sub 2} partial pressure of 10 bar) the maximum conversion of MgO obtained with the sol-gel based sorbents was about 5%, which corresponds to a maximum CO{sub 2} absorption capacity of less than 1%. The overall capacity of modified dolomite sorbents were at least one order of magnitude

  16. Gaseous bubble oscillations in anisotropic non-Newtonian fluids under influence of high-frequency acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golykh, R. N.

    2016-06-01

    Progress of technology and medicine dictates the ever-increasing requirements (heat resistance, corrosion resistance, strength properties, impregnating ability, etc.) for non-Newtonian fluids and materials produced on their basis (epoxy resin, coating materials, liquid crystals, etc.). Materials with improved properties obtaining is possible by modification of their physicochemical structure. One of the most promising approaches to the restructuring of non-Newtonian fluids is cavitation generated by high-frequency acoustic vibrations. The efficiency of cavitation in non-Newtonian fluid is determined by dynamics of gaseous bubble. Today, bubble dynamics in isotropic non-Newtonian fluids, in which cavitation bubble shape remains spherical, is most full investigated, because the problem reduces to ordinary differential equation for spherical bubble radius. However, gaseous bubble in anisotropic fluids which are most wide kind of non-Newtonian fluids (due to orientation of macromolecules) deviates from spherical shape due to viscosity dependence on shear rate direction. Therefore, the paper presents the mathematical model of gaseous bubble dynamics in anisotropic non-Newtonian fluids. The model is based on general equations for anisotropic non-Newtonian fluid flow. The equations are solved by asymptotic decomposition of fluid flow parameters. It allowed evaluating bubble size and shape evolution depending on rheological properties of liquid and acoustic field characteristics.

  17. [Computational fluid dynamics simulation of different impeller combinations in high viscosity fermentation and its application].

    PubMed

    Dong, Shuhao; Zhu, Ping; Xu, Xiaoying; Li, Sha; Jiang, Yongxiang; Xu, Hong

    2015-07-01

    Agitator is one of the essential factors to realize high efficient fermentation for high aerobic and viscous microorganisms, and the influence of different impeller combination on the fermentation process is very important. Welan gum is a microbial exopolysaccharide produced by Alcaligenes sp. under high aerobic and high viscos conditions. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) numerical simulation was used for analyzing the distribution of velocity, shear rate and gas holdup in the welan fermentation reactor under six different impeller combinations. The best three combinations of impellers were applied to the fermentation of welan. By analyzing the fermentation performance, the MB-4-6 combination had better effect on dissolved oxygen and velocity. The content of welan was increased by 13%. Furthermore, the viscosity of production were also increased. PMID:26647585

  18. Pareto optimal calibration of highly nonlinear reactive transport groundwater models using particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siade, A. J.; Prommer, H.; Welter, D.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater management and remediation requires the implementation of numerical models in order to evaluate the potential anthropogenic impacts on aquifer systems. In many situations, the numerical model must, not only be able to simulate groundwater flow and transport, but also geochemical and biological processes. Each process being simulated carries with it a set of parameters that must be identified, along with differing potential sources of model-structure error. Various data types are often collected in the field and then used to calibrate the numerical model; however, these data types can represent very different processes and can subsequently be sensitive to the model parameters in extremely complex ways. Therefore, developing an appropriate weighting strategy to address the contributions of each data type to the overall least-squares objective function is not straightforward. This is further compounded by the presence of potential sources of model-structure errors that manifest themselves differently for each observation data type. Finally, reactive transport models are highly nonlinear, which can lead to convergence failure for algorithms operating on the assumption of local linearity. In this study, we propose a variation of the popular, particle swarm optimization algorithm to address trade-offs associated with the calibration of one data type over another. This method removes the need to specify weights between observation groups and instead, produces a multi-dimensional Pareto front that illustrates the trade-offs between data types. We use the PEST++ run manager, along with the standard PEST input/output structure, to implement parallel programming across multiple desktop computers using TCP/IP communications. This allows for very large swarms of particles without the need of a supercomputing facility. The method was applied to a case study in which modeling was used to gain insight into the mobilization of arsenic at a deepwell injection site

  19. Large-scale reactive molecular dynamics simulation and kinetic modeling of high-temperature pyrolysis of the Gloeocapsomorphaprisca microfossils.

    PubMed

    Zou, Chenyu; Raman, Sumathy; van Duin, Adri C T

    2014-06-12

    The ability to predict accurately the thermal conversion of complex carbonaceous materials is of value in both petroleum exploration and refining operations. Modeling the thermal cracking of kerogen under basinal heating conditions improves the predrill prediction of oil and gas yields and quality, thereby ultimately lowering the exploration risk. Modeling the chemical structure and reactivity of asphaltene from petroleum vacuum residues enables prediction of coke formation and properties in refinery processes, thereby lowering operating cost. The chemical structure-chemical yield modeling (CS-CYM) developed by Freund et al. is more rigorous, time-consuming, and requires a great deal of chemical insight into reaction network and reaction kinetics. The present work explores the applicability of a more fundamental atomistic simulation using the quantum mechanically based reactive force field to predict the product yield and overall kinetics of decomposition of two biopolymers, namely, the Kukersite and Gutternberg. Reactive molecular dynamics (RMD) simulations were performed on systems consisting of 10(4) to 10(5) atoms at different densities and temperatures to derive the overall kinetic parameters and a lumped kinetic model for pyrolysis. The kinetic parameters derived from the simulated pyrolysis of an individual component and the mixture of all four components in Guttenberg reveal the role of cross-talk between the fragments and enhanced reactivity of component A by radicals from other components. The Arrhenius extrapolation of the model yields reasonable prediction for the overall barrier for cracking. Because simulations were run at very high temperature (T > 1500 K) to study cracking within the simulation time of up to 1 ns, it, however, led to the entropically favored ethylene formation as a dominant decomposition route. Future work will focus on evaluating the applicability of accelerated reactive MD approaches to study cracking. PMID:24821589

  20. Process stabilization by peak current regulation in reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering of hafnium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, T.; Villamayor, M.; Lundin, D.; Helmersson, U.

    2016-02-01

    A simple and cost effective approach to stabilize the sputtering process in the transition zone during reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) is proposed. The method is based on real-time monitoring and control of the discharge current waveforms. To stabilize the process conditions at a given set point, a feedback control system was implemented that automatically regulates the pulse frequency, and thereby the average sputtering power, to maintain a constant maximum discharge current. In the present study, the variation of the pulse current waveforms over a wide range of reactive gas flows and pulse frequencies during a reactive HiPIMS process of Hf-N in an Ar-N2 atmosphere illustrates that the discharge current waveform is a an excellent indicator of the process conditions. Activating the reactive HiPIMS peak current regulation, stable process conditions were maintained when varying the N2 flow from 2.1 to 3.5 sccm by an automatic adjustment of the pulse frequency from 600 Hz to 1150 Hz and consequently an increase of the average power from 110 to 270 W. Hf-N films deposited using peak current regulation exhibited a stable stoichiometry, a nearly constant power-normalized deposition rate, and a polycrystalline cubic phase Hf-N with (1 1 1)-preferred orientation over the entire reactive gas flow range investigated. The physical reasons for the change in the current pulse waveform for different process conditions are discussed in some detail.

  1. Internally supported flexible duct joint. [device for conducting fluids in high pressure systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, R. F., Jr. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    An internally supported, flexible duct joint for use in conducting fluids under relatively high pressures in systems where relatively large deflection angles must be accommodated is presented. The joint includes a flexible tubular bellows and an elongated base disposed within the bellows. The base is connected through radiating struts to the bellows near mid-portion and to each of the opposite end portions of the bellows through a pivotal connecting body. A motion-controlling linkage is provided for linking the connecting bodies, whereby angular displacement of the joint is controlled and uniformity in the instantaneous bend radius of the duct is achieved as deflection is imposed.

  2. Heat transfer for falling film evaporation of industrially relevant fluids up to very high Prandtl numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourdon, Mathias; Karlsson, Erik; Innings, Fredrik; Jongsma, Alfred; Vamling, Lennart

    2016-02-01

    In many industrial applications, falling film evaporation is an attractive technique for solvent removal due to high heat transfer and low residence times. Examples are the powder production in the dairy industry and in kraft pulp production process to remove water from so called black liquor. Common for both applications is that the fluids exhibit high viscosities in industrial practice. In this paper, results from experimental studies on both black liquor and a dairy product are reported for Prandtl numbers up to 800. The results are compared with several existing correlation in literature, and the need for a modified correlation is recognized especially to cover higher Prandtl-numbers. The following correlation for the turbulent flow region with 3 < Pr < 800 was derived from the data: {Nu}t = 0.0085 \\cdot Re^{0.2} \\cdot {Pr^{0.65}} The correlation has been compared to literature data from one additional study on two other fluids (propylene glycol and cyclohexanol) with fairly high Prandtl-numbers, from 40 to 58 and from 45 to 155 respectively and the agreement was within ±40 %.

  3. A new algorithm for fluid simulation of high density plasma discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Seon-Geun; Lee, Young-Jun; Choe, Heehwan; Jeon, Jae-Hong; Seo, Jong-Hyun

    2013-10-01

    Low temperature, high density plasma sources are widely used for the electronic device fabrications such as semiconductor, flat panel display, and solar cell. The inductively coupled plasma or the capacitively coupled plasma reactors are typical ones in these processes. Fluid simulation is one of the methods for transport modeling of high density discharge, because the profiles of plasma quantities are easily obtained. The short shielding time scale of an electric field perturbation is a major restriction on the simulation time step. In most cases, the simulation time step in the explicit method is less than 10-13 sec. To overcome this limitation, a new method for steady-state fluid simulation of high density plasma discharge is suggested. Following the physical origin of restriction on simulation time step, a new method is developed using both analytic and numerical methods. A simple application of the new method with previously known one is given to study the validity of the method. This work was supported in part by the International collaborative R&D program (N0000678), and by the Industrial Strategic Technology Development Program (10041681) funded by the Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy (MOTIE, Korea).

  4. Influence of inert gases on the reactive high power pulsed magnetron sputtering process of carbon-nitride thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Susann; Czigany, Zsolt; Greczynski, Grzegorz; Jensen, Jens; Hultman, Lars

    2013-01-15

    The influence of inert gases (Ne, Ar, Kr) on the sputter process of carbon and carbon-nitride (CN{sub x}) thin films was studied using reactive high power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS). Thin solid films were synthesized in an industrial deposition chamber from a graphite target. The peak target current during HiPIMS processing was found to decrease with increasing inert gas mass. Time averaged and time resolved ion mass spectroscopy showed that the addition of nitrogen, as reactive gas, resulted in less energetic ion species for processes employing Ne, whereas the opposite was noticed when Ar or Kr were employed as inert gas. Processes in nonreactive ambient showed generally lower total ion fluxes for the three different inert gases. As soon as N{sub 2} was introduced into the process, the deposition rates for Ne and Ar-containing processes increased significantly. The reactive Kr-process, in contrast, showed slightly lower deposition rates than the nonreactive. The resulting thin films were characterized regarding their bonding and microstructure by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Reactively deposited CN{sub x} thin films in Ar and Kr ambient exhibited an ordering toward a fullerene-like structure, whereas carbon and CN{sub x} films deposited in Ne atmosphere were found to be amorphous. This is attributed to an elevated amount of highly energetic particles observed during ion mass spectrometry and indicated by high peak target currents in Ne-containing processes. These results are discussed with respect to the current understanding of the structural evolution of a-C and CN{sub x} thin films.

  5. High-Resolution 3D Seismic Imaging of Fluid Flow Anomalies in the Southwest Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planke, S.; Eriksen, F. N.; Eriksen, O. K.; Assad, M.; Stokke, H. H.

    2014-12-01

    Fluid flow features imaged as gas flares in the water column, pockmarks and mud volcanoes on the seabed, and high-amplitude cross-cutting reflections and bright spots in the sub-surface are abundant in the SW Barents Sea offshore northern Norway. This region is covered by extensive conventional 2D and 3D deep penetration seismic reflection data and multibeam bathymetry. High-resolution 3D P-Cable seismic data have been acquired in the SW Barents Sea over the past few years to image the uppermost ca. 500 m of the sub-surface. The P-Cable system consist of 12 to 16 short streamers (25 m) that are towed on a cross-cable perpendicular to the vessel's steaming direction. This configuration allows for acquisition of seismic data with high trace density, typically with 6 m in-line separation. The vertical resolution is a good as 1-2 m using conventional site survey air gun configurations. The sedimentary succession in the SW Barents Sea consists of upper Paleozoic evaporites overlaid by Mesozoic and Cenozoic clastic sediments. There are several organic-rich intervals in the sequence, including Paleozoic coals and Triassic and Jurassic marine source rocks that are locally in the oil or gas maturation windows. Glacial erosion has locally removed kilometer thick Cenozoic and Mesozoic successions, leaving the Mesozoic and Paleozoic strata in shallow sub-surface. The new high-resolution 3D surveys have targeted shallow fluid anomalies in the subsurface. These are imaged as high-amplitude reflections in fault blocks and structural highs, locally cross-cutting well-defined Mesozoic reflections. Commonly, disturbed reflections are present in overlying sequences, or high-amplitude reflections are imaged in the glacial overburden sediments. Locally, hundreds of pockmarks are imaged by the seafloor reflection. The deep cross-cutting reflections are interpreted as hydrocarbon accumulations that locally migrate towards the surface. The fluids are stored in shallow gas pockets or

  6. Speaking under pressure: Low linguistic complexity is linked to high physiological and emotional stress reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Saslow, Laura R.; McCoy, Shannon; van der Löwe, Ilmo; Cosley, Brandon; Vartan, Arbi; Oveis, Christopher; Keltner, Dacher; Moskowitz, Judith T.; Epel, Elissa S.

    2014-01-01

    What can a speech reveal about someone's state? We tested the idea that greater stress reactivity would relate to lower linguistic cognitive complexity while speaking. In Study 1, we tested whether heart rate and emotional stress reactivity to a stressful discussion would relate to lower linguistic complexity. In Studies 2 and 3 we tested whether a greater cortisol response to a standardized stressful task including a speech (Trier Social Stress Test) would be linked to speaking with less linguistic complexity during the task. We found evidence that measures of stress responsivity (emotional and physiological) and chronic stress are tied to variability in the cognitive complexity of speech. Taken together, these results provide evidence that our individual experiences of stress or ‘stress signatures’—how our body and mind react to stress both in the moment and over the longer term—are linked to how complexly we speak under stress. PMID:24354732

  7. [Reactive collisions of high-temperature systems]. [Technical progress report 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Graff, M.M.

    1990-12-31

    The object of this research is to study reactivity at superthermal collision energies using a fast neutral beam that is generated by photodetachment. Systems scheduled for initial study include basic oxygen-hydrogen reactions. Unfortunately, we can not yet report realization of this goal, but during this funding period we have made advances that are anticipated to lead to successful measurements during the next year. The parameters described below refer to the model system O + H{sub 2} {yields} OH + H. The basic design involves the collision of fast neutrals, created by photodetachment of the corresponding negative molecular ion, with a stable reactant gas in a collision cell. Products are detected by ionization and mass analysis. We are equipped to study rotational effects on reactivity by comparing results for rotational levels J = 0 and 1 of H{sub 2}. Highlights during the funding period are given in this report.

  8. Reactive protoplasmic and fibrous astrocytes contain high levels of calpain-cleaved alpha 2 spectrin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung H; Kwon, Soojung J; Stankewich, Michael C; Huh, Gi-Yeong; Glantz, Susan B; Morrow, Jon S

    2016-02-01

    Calpain, a family of calcium-dependent neutral proteases, plays important roles in neurophysiology and pathology through the proteolytic modification of cytoskeletal proteins, receptors and kinases. Alpha 2 spectrin (αII spectrin) is a major substrate for this protease family, and the presence of the αII spectrin breakdown product (αΙΙ spectrin BDP) in a cell is evidence of calpain activity triggered by enhanced intracytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentrations. Astrocytes, the most dynamic CNS cells, respond to micro-environmental changes or noxious stimuli by elevating intracytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration to become activated. As one measure of whether calpains are involved with reactive glial transformation, we examined paraffin sections of the human cerebral cortex and white matter by immunohistochemistry with an antibody specific for the calpain-mediated αΙΙ spectrin BDP. We also performed conventional double immunohistochemistry as well as immunofluorescent studies utilizing antibodies against αΙΙ spectrin BDP as well as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). We found strong immunopositivity in selected protoplasmic and fibrous astrocytes, and in transitional forms that raise the possibility of some of fibrous astrocytes emerging from protoplasmic astrocytes. Immunoreactive astrocytes were numerous in brain sections from cases with severe cardiac and/or respiratory diseases in the current study as opposed to our previous study of cases without significant clinical conditions that failed to reveal such remarkable immunohistochemical alterations. Our study suggests that astrocytes become αΙΙ spectrin BDP immunopositive in various stages of activation, and that spectrin cleavage product persists even in fully reactive astrocytes. Immunohistochemistry for αΙΙ spectrin BDP thus marks reactive astrocytes, and highlights the likelihood that calpains and their proteolytic processing of spectrin participate in the morphologic and physiologic transition from

  9. A rocking multianvil: elimination of chemical segregation in fluid-saturated high-pressure experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Max W.; Ulmer, Peter

    2004-04-01

    Fluid saturated high-pressure experiments often result in strongly zoned experimental charges, this hinders experimentation in chemically homogeneous systems which in turn has serious consequences on equilibration, reaction progress, and (apparent) phase stabilities. In order to overcome these problems, a 600-ton press accommodating either a multianvil or end-loaded piston cylinder module has been mounted in such a way that it can be turned by 180°, thus inverting its position in the gravity field. During turning, hydraulic pressure, heating power, and cooling water remain connected allowing fully controlled pressures and temperatures during experiments. A series of experiments at 13 GPa, 950°C, on a serpentine bulk composition in the MgO-SiO 2-H 2O system demonstrates that continuous turning at a rate of 2 turns/min results in a nearly homogeneous charge composed of phase E + enstatite. The same experiment at static conditions resulted in four mineral zones: quench phase E, enstatite, enstatite + phase E, and phase E + phase A. Phase A disappears in experiments at a turning rate ≥1 turn/min. A static 15-min experiment shows that zonation already forms within this short time span. Placing two short capsules within a single static experiment reveals that the fluid migrates to the hot spot in each capsule and is not gravitationally driven toward the top. The zonation pattern follows isotherms within the capsule, and the degree of zonation increases with temperature gradient (measured as 10 °C within a capsule) and run time. Our preferred interpretation is that Soret diffusion causes a density-stratified fluid within the capsule that does not convect in a static experiment and results in temperature dependant chemical zonation. The aggravation of zonation and appearance of additional phases with run time can be explained with a dissolution-reprecipitation process where the cold spot of the capsule is relatively MgO enriched and the hot spot relatively SiO 2 and H

  10. In situ visualisation and characterisation of the capacity of highly reactive minerals to preserve soil organic matter (SOM) in colloids at submicron scale.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jian; Wen, Yongli; Li, Huan; Hao, Jialong; Shen, Qirong; Ran, Wei; Mei, Xinlan; He, Xinhua; Yu, Guanghui

    2015-11-01

    Mineral-organo associations (MOAs) are a mixture of identifiable biopolymers associated with highly reactive minerals and microorganisms. However, the in situ characterization and correlation between soil organic matter (SOM) and highly reactive Al and Fe minerals are still unclear for the lack of technologies, particularly in the long-term agricultural soil colloids at submicron scale. We combined several novel techniques, including nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to characterise the capacity of highly reactive Al and Fe minerals to preserve SOM in Ferralic Cambisol in south China. Our results demonstrated that: (1) highly reactive minerals were strongly related to SOM preservation, while SOM had a more significant line correlation with the highly reactive Al minerals than the highly reactive Fe minerals, according to the regions of interest correlation analyses using NanoSIMS; (2) allophane and ferrihydrite were the potential mineral species to determine the SOM preservation capability, which was evaluated by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fe K-edge XANES spectroscopy techniques; and (3) soil organic biopolymers with dominant compounds, such as proteins, polysaccharides and lipids, were distributed at the rough and clustered surface of MOAs with high chemical and spatial heterogeneity according to the CLSM observation. Our results also promoted the understanding of the roles played by the highly reactive Al and Fe minerals in the spatial distribution of soil organic biopolymers and SOM sequestration. PMID:26091865

  11. High reactivity of nanosized niobium oxide cluster cations in methane activation: A comparison with vanadium oxides.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xun-Lei; Wang, Dan; Wu, Xiao-Nan; Li, Zi-Yu; Zhao, Yan-Xia; He, Sheng-Gui

    2015-09-28

    The reactions between methane and niobium oxide cluster cations were studied and compared to those employing vanadium oxides. Hydrogen atom abstraction (HAA) reactions were identified over stoichiometric (Nb2O5)N(+) clusters for N as large as 14 with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The reactivity of (Nb2O5)N(+) clusters decreases as the N increases, and it is higher than that of (V 2O5)N(+) for N ≥ 4. Theoretical studies were conducted on (Nb2O5)N(+) (N = 2-6) by density functional calculations. HAA reactions on these clusters are all favorable thermodynamically and kinetically. The difference of the reactivity with respect to the cluster size and metal type (Nb vs V) was attributed to thermodynamics, kinetics, the electron capture ability, and the distribution of the unpaired spin density. Nanosized Nb oxide clusters show higher HAA reactivity than V oxides, indicating that niobia may serve as promising catalysts for practical methane conversion. PMID:26429016

  12. High reactivity of nanosized niobium oxide cluster cations in methane activation: A comparison with vanadium oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Xun-Lei E-mail: chemzyx@iccas.ac.cn; Wang, Dan; Wu, Xiao-Nan; Li, Zi-Yu; Zhao, Yan-Xia E-mail: chemzyx@iccas.ac.cn; He, Sheng-Gui

    2015-09-28

    The reactions between methane and niobium oxide cluster cations were studied and compared to those employing vanadium oxides. Hydrogen atom abstraction (HAA) reactions were identified over stoichiometric (Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}){sub N}{sup +} clusters for N as large as 14 with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The reactivity of (Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}){sub N}{sup +} clusters decreases as the N increases, and it is higher than that of (V {sub 2}O{sub 5}){sub N}{sup +} for N ≥ 4. Theoretical studies were conducted on (Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}){sub N}{sup +} (N = 2–6) by density functional calculations. HAA reactions on these clusters are all favorable thermodynamically and kinetically. The difference of the reactivity with respect to the cluster size and metal type (Nb vs V) was attributed to thermodynamics, kinetics, the electron capture ability, and the distribution of the unpaired spin density. Nanosized Nb oxide clusters show higher HAA reactivity than V oxides, indicating that niobia may serve as promising catalysts for practical methane conversion.

  13. Chemical reactivity of CVC and CVD SiC with UO2 at high temperatures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Silva, Chinthaka M.; Katoh, Yutai; Voit, Stewart L.; Snead, Lance L.

    2015-02-11

    Two types of silicon carbide (SiC) synthesized using two different vapor deposition processes were embedded in UO2 pellets and evaluated for their potential chemical reaction with UO2. While minor reactivity between chemical-vapor-composited (CVC) SiC and UO2 was observed at comparatively low temperatures of 1100 and 1300 C, chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) SiC did not show any such reactivity, according to microstructural investigations. But, both CVD and CVC SiCs showed some reaction with UO2 at a higher temperature (1500 C). Elemental maps supported by phase maps obtained using electron backscatter diffraction indicated that CVC SiC was more reactive than CVD SiC at 1500more » C. Moreover, this investigation indicated the formation of uranium carbides and uranium silicide chemical phases such as UC, USi2, and U3Si2 as a result of SiC reaction with UO2.« less

  14. A method for temperature estimation in high-temperature geothermal reservoirs by using synthetic fluid inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggieri, Giovanni; Orlando, Andrea; Chiarantini, Laura; Borrini, Daniele; Weisenberger, Tobias B.

    2016-04-01

    Super-hot geothermal systems in magmatic areas are a possible target for the future geothermal exploration either for the direct exploitation of fluids or as a potential reservoirs of Enhanced Geothermal Systems. Reservoir temperature measurements are crucial for the assessment of the geothermal resources, however temperature determination in the high-temperature (>380°C) zone of super-hot geothermal systems is difficult or impossible by using either mechanical temperature and pressure gauges (Kuster device) and electronic devices. In the framework of Integrated Methods for Advanced Geothermal Exploration (IMAGE) project, we developed a method to measure high reservoir temperature by the production of synthetic fluid inclusions within an apparatus that will be placed in the high-temperature zone of geothermal wells. First experiments were carried out by placing a gold capsule containing pre-fractured quartz and an aqueous solution (10 wt.% NaCl + 0.4 wt.% NaOH) in an externally heated pressure vessel. Experimental pressure-temperature conditions (i.e. 80-300 bars and 280-400°C) were set close to the liquid/vapour curve of pure H2O or along the H2O critical isochore. The experiments showed that synthetic fluid inclusions form within a relatively short time (even in 48 hours) and that temperatures calculated from homogenization temperatures and isochores of newly formed inclusions are close to experimental temperatures. A second set of laboratory experiments were carried out by using a stainless steel micro-rector in which a gold capsule (containing the pre-fractured quartz and the aqueous solution) was inserted together with an amount of distilled water corresponding to the critical density of water. These experiments were conducted by leaving the new micro-reactor within a furnace at 400°C and were aimed to reproduce the temperature existing in super-hot geothermal wells. Synthetic fluid inclusions formed during the experiments had trapping temperature

  15. In-duct identification of fluid-borne source with high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Yong-Ho; Ih, Jeong-Guon; Bodén, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Source identification of acoustic characteristics of in-duct fluid machinery is required for coping with the fluid-borne noise. By knowing the acoustic pressure and particle velocity field at the source plane in detail, the sound generation mechanism of a fluid machine can be understood. The identified spatial distribution of the strength of major radiators would be useful for the low noise design. Conventional methods for measuring the source in a wide duct have not been very helpful in investigating the source properties in detail because their spatial resolution is improper for the design purpose. In this work, an inverse method to estimate the source parameters with a high spatial resolution is studied. The theoretical formulation including the evanescent modes and near-field measurement data is given for a wide duct. After validating the proposed method to a duct excited by an acoustic driver, an experiment on a duct system driven by an air blower is conducted in the presence of flow. A convergence test for the evanescent modes is performed to find the necessary number of modes to regenerate the measured pressure field precisely. By using the converged modal amplitudes, very-close near-field pressure to the source is regenerated and compared with the measured pressure, and the maximum error was -16.3 dB. The source parameters are restored from the converged modal amplitudes. Then, the distribution of source parameters on the driver and the blower is clearly revealed with a high spatial resolution for kR<1.84 in which range only plane waves can propagate to far field in a duct. Measurement using a flush mounted sensor array is discussed, and the removal of pure radial modes in the modeling is suggested.

  16. High reactive oxygen species in fibrotic and nonfibrotic skin of patients with diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bourji, Khalil; Meyer, Alain; Chatelus, Emmanuel; Pincemail, Joël; Pigatto, Erika; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier; Singh, François; Charlier, Corinne; Geny, Bernard; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Punzi, Leonardo; Cozzi, Franco; Sibilia, Jean

    2015-10-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a chronic multisystemic connective tissue disease characterized by progressive fibrosis affecting skin and internal organs. Despite serious efforts to unveil the pathogenic mechanisms of SSc, they are still unclear. High levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in affected patients have been shown, and ROS are suggested to play a role in fibrosis pathogenesis. In this study we evaluate ROS levels in nonfibrotic and fibrotic skin of patients with SSc and we compare them with those obtained from healthy controls. We enrolled nine SSc patients fulfilling the EULAR/ACR classification criteria and seven healthy controls. Patients included four men and five women with mean age of 46 ± 10 years. Controls were matched by sex and age. All patients were affected by the diffuse cutaneous form of SSc and the ANA pattern anti-Scl70. Mean disease duration was 7.5 ± 5 years. Skin involvement was evaluated by modified Rodnan skin score. Skin samples (4-mm punch biopsy) were taken from fibrotic skin and nonfibrotic skin of patients and from healthy controls as well. To detect ROS, specimens were analyzed immediately after sampling by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Blood samples were drawn from all patients and controls to assess oxidative stress biomarkers. ROS levels (expressed as median and range, in nmol/L/min/mg of dry weight) were 24.7 (10.9-47.0) in fibrotic skin, 18.7 (7.3-34.0) in nonfibrotic skin, and 7.7 (3.5-13.6) in healthy control skin. ROS levels in fibrotic and nonfibrotic skin of SSc patients were significantly higher than in healthy controls (p = 0.002 and p = 0.009, respectively). ROS levels in fibrotic skin were raised in comparison to nonfibrotic skin, when samples related to each patient were compared (p = 0.01). ROS levels in fibrotic skin were correlated with forced vital capacity (r = -0.75, p = 0.02) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (r = 0.70, p = 0.04). All other clinical and lab parameters showed no

  17. Modulation of the interstitial fluid pressure by high intensity focused ultrasound as a way to alter local fluid and solute movement: insights from a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Sassaroli, E; O'Neill, B E

    2014-11-21

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) operated in thermal mode has been reported to reduce interstitial fluid pressure and improve the penetration of large macromolecules and nanoparticles in tumor and normal tissue. Little is understood about how the interstitial fluid pressure and velocity as well as the interstitial macromolecule transport are affected by HIFU exposure. A mathematical model is presented here which sheds light on the initial biophysical changes brought about HIFU. Our continuum model treats tissue as an effective poro-elastic material that reacts to elevated temperatures with a rapid drop in interstitial elastic modulus. Using parameters from the literature, the model is extrapolated to derive information on the effect in tumors, and to predict its impact on the convective and diffusive transport of macromolecular drugs. The model is first solved using an analytical approximation with step-wise changes at each boundary, and then solved numerically starting from a Gaussian beam approximation of the ultrasound treatment. Our results indicate that HIFU causes a rapid drop in interstitial fluid pressure that may be exploited to facilitate convection of macromolecules from vasculature to the exposed region. However, following a short recovery period in which the interstitial fluid pressure is normalized, transport returns to normal and the advantages disappear over time. The results indicate that this effect is strongest for the delivery of large molecules and nanoparticles that are in the circulation at the time of treatment. The model may be easily applied to more complex situations involving effects on vascular permeability and diffusion. PMID:25327766

  18. Modulation of the interstitial fluid pressure by high intensity focused ultrasound as a way to alter local fluid and solute movement: insights from a mathematical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassaroli, E.; O'Neill, B. E.

    2014-11-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) operated in thermal mode has been reported to reduce interstitial fluid pressure and improve the penetration of large macromolecules and nanoparticles in tumor and normal tissue. Little is understood about how the interstitial fluid pressure and velocity as well as the interstitial macromolecule transport are affected by HIFU exposure. A mathematical model is presented here which sheds light on the initial biophysical changes brought about HIFU. Our continuum model treats tissue as an effective poro-elastic material that reacts to elevated temperatures with a rapid drop in interstitial elastic modulus. Using parameters from the literature, the model is extrapolated to derive information on the effect in tumors, and to predict its impact on the convective and diffusive transport of macromolecular drugs. The model is first solved using an analytical approximation with step-wise changes at each boundary, and then solved numerically starting from a Gaussian beam approximation of the ultrasound treatment. Our results indicate that HIFU causes a rapid drop in interstitial fluid pressure that may be exploited to facilitate convection of macromolecules from vasculature to the exposed region. However, following a short recovery period in which the interstitial fluid pressure is normalized, transport returns to normal and the advantages disappear over time. The results indicate that this effect is strongest for the delivery of large molecules and nanoparticles that are in the circulation at the time of treatment. The model may be easily applied to more complex situations involving effects on vascular permeability and diffusion.

  19. Modulation of the interstitial fluid pressure by high intensity focused ultrasound as a way to alter local fluid and solute movement: insights from a mathematical model

    PubMed Central

    Sassaroli, E; O’Neill, B E

    2014-01-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) operated in thermal mode has been reported to reduce interstitial fluid pressure and improve the penetration of large macromolecules and nanoparticles in tumor and normal tissue. Little is understood about how the interstitial fluid pressure and velocity as well as the interstitial macromolecule transport are affected by HIFU exposure. A mathematical model is presented here which sheds light on the initial biophysical changes brought about HIFU. Our continuum model treats tissue as an effective poro-elastic material that reacts to elevated temperatures with a rapid drop in interstitial elastic modulus. Using parameters from the literature, the model is extrapolated to derive information on the effect in tumors, and to predict its impact on the convective and diffusive transport of macromolecular drugs. The model is first solved using an analytical approximation with step-wise changes at each boundary, and then solved numerically starting from a Gaussian beam approximation of the ultrasound treatment. Our results indicate that HIFU causes rapid drop in interstitial fluid pressure that may be exploited to facilitate convection of macromolecules from vasculature to the exposed region. However, following a short recovery period in which the interstitial fluid pressure is normalized, transport returns to normal and the advantages disappear over time. The results indicate that this effect is strongest for the delivery of large molecules and nanoparticles that are in the circulation at the time of treatment. The model may be easily applied to more complex situations involving effects on vascular permeability and diffusion. PMID:25327766

  20. Subduction in high fluid fluxing environment and the origin of high-δ 18O and high- δ 7Li lavas in Mt. Shasta, Cascade arc, California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, E.; Bindeman, I.; Grove, T. L.

    2007-12-01

    This study presents analyses of O-isotopes in olivine and orthopyroxene phenocrysts from representative samples of Mt. Shasta's lavas and correlates them with Li isotopes and trace elemental ratios. The measured δ 18OOl-values range from 5.31‰ to 6.08‰, is up to 1‰ higher than the mantle value. Added to the presence of primitive magnesian andesite and high primary water content (up to 12wt%), the high-δ 18O measured makes the Mt. Shasta exceptional. The composition of the analyzed olivine phenocrysts shows that these crystals are in equilibrium with their host whole rocks, and were derived by melting of a peridotitic source based on trace element ratios in olivine. Minor (<5%) contamination makes these rocks a good assessment to mantle-derived magma. The origin of the high-δ 18O mantle-derived signature results from the interaction with unusually high fluid fluxes from high-δ 18O slab and subducted sediments. A model based on the flux-melting process is proposed in order to explain why in a general case the subduction fluid signature is lost during the magma genesis and why in exceptional cases, such as Mt Shasta, it is partially preserved. Unusual features such as a fracture zone or volcanic chain subduction lead to a fluid flux that is high enough to maintain a high-δ 18O after reacts the mantle wedge and after dilution by mantle-melt when crossing the hydrated mantle solidus. Consequently, by melt re-equilibration with the fluid, high-δ 18O magmas are generated. The comparison between the Li- and O-isotopes compositions of Mt. Shasta and neighboring volcanoes from the rear-arc (i.e., Medicine Lake), show that both stable isotope values decrease from front to the rear arc. This decrease is explained by the slab dehydration process, due to the Rayleigh loss of heavy isotope with subduction progress and the fact that deeper and deeper portions of the slab are dehydrated. The "adakitic" signature (Sr/Y up to 160) of the Mt. Shasta's lavas appears to

  1. Investigation of effect of particle size and rumen fluid addition on specific methane yields of high lignocellulose grass silage.

    PubMed

    Wall, D M; Straccialini, B; Allen, E; Nolan, P; Herrmann, C; O'Kiely, P; Murphy, J D

    2015-09-01

    This work examines the digestion of advanced growth stage grass silage. Two variables were investigated: particle size (greater than 3 cm and less than 1cm) and rumen fluid addition. Batch studies indicated particle size and rumen fluid addition had little effect on specific methane yields (SMYs). In continuous digestion of 3 cm silage the SMY was 342 and 343 L CH4 kg(-1)VS, respectively, with and without rumen fluid addition. However, digester operation was significantly affected through silage floating on the liquor surface and its entanglement in the mixing system. Digestion of 1cm silage with no rumen fluid addition struggled; volatile fatty acid concentrations rose and SMYs dropped. The best case was 1cm silage with rumen fluid addition, offering higher SMYs of 371 L CH4 kg(-1)VS and stable operation throughout. Thus, physical and biological treatments benefited continuous digestion of high fibre grass silage. PMID:26038332

  2. High-pressure and high-temperature mineral-fluid interface cell for high-resolution x-ray reflectivity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Changyong; Kenney-Benson, Curtis

    2013-06-01

    Ordering of water at the mineral-fluid interface is a fundamental process governing mineral hydration, ion-adsorption, dissolution, growth, and charge transfers across the mineral surface. However, the influence of pressure and temperature on this fundamental process is still largely unknown. The experimental determination is limited due to the lack of a sample cell which can properly handle the pressure and temperature of the fluidic component and simultaneously allow measurement of the interfacial structure, e.g., by high-resolution x-ray reflectivity. We recently developed a new high-pressure and high-temperature mineral-fluid interface cell to achieve the high-resolution x-ray reflectivity measurement from single crystalline mineral surfaces under the PT conditions of fluid up to ~750 K and ~40 MPa. The interfacial structures at single crystal mineral surfaces interacting with various hydrothermal fluids will promote our understanding of the molecular aspects of hydrous alteration processes of rocks in deep Earth environments. The application can be extended to mineral surface sciences, geological carbon sequestration, and nuclear engineering. Instrumental development under auspices of Deep Carbon Observatory Deep Energy Directorate and HPCAT (CDAC, GL, LLNL, UNLV).

  3. High-fluid component in some recent lavas from the southern Cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, N. W.; Asmerom, Y.

    2011-12-01

    There is a long-standing fluid paradox in Cascade magmatism. High fluid contributions to Cascade, especially southern Cascade, magmas are inferred from fluid inclusion and trace element data. The U-series isotopic data, which are time-sensitive to fluid addition, so far argue against recent fluid addition. Here we present U-Th and Sr isotopic data on young (Holocene) lavas from Lassen and Mt Shasta volcanic fields and surrounding areas. Andesitic lavas from Shasta have 232Th/238U ratios between 2.6 -2.7 and similar to those reported previously, have (230Th/238U) (activity ratio) close to secular equilibrium, 1.01 -1.03. A Holocene rhyodacite flow from Lassen has a 232Th/238U ratio of 2.9 and (230Th/238U) near secular equilibrium (0.99), similar to lavas from Shasta reported here and elsewhere. In contrast, basaltic andesite lavas from the Cinder Cone at Lassen show large U enrichments, 232Th/238U ratios between 1.4 - 1.7 and (230Th/238U) between 0.61 - 0.74. These are the highest 238U over 230Th enrichments seen in Cascade lavas, similar to many other arc lavas. Lavas from Lassen despite large differences in bulk composition of U/Th and (230Th/238U) have similar 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.703954 - 0.704137). These Sr isotopic ratios are similar to values from other southern Cascade lavas. In contrast, the Shasta lavas have low 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.702905 -0.703118), within the range of local MORB. The salient feature of our data is the large 238U enrichment seen in the young basaltic andesite Lassen lavas. The similarity in Sr isotopic composition between the more evolved lavas and the Cinder Cone lavas argue against source variation to explain the U enrichment in the later. Another possibility is that the differences in the (230Th/238U) reflect magma differentiation - residence time-scales. The magma differentiation - residence time required to explain the difference in (230Th/238U) is unreasonably large, assuming the eruption ages are correct. More importantly, the

  4. The determination of inorganic sulphate in serum and synovial fluid by high performance ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kock, R; Schneider, H; Delvoux, B; Greiling, H

    1997-09-01

    A method for the determination of inorganic sulphate based on high performance ion chromatography is presented. The separation was performed on an anion-exchange column with a 1.8 mmol/l sodium carbonate/ 1.7 mmol/l sodium hydrogen carbonate-buffer, pH 10.35. Conductivity of the eluate was monitored after suppression of the background conductivity caused by the eluent-buffer. Serum and synovial fluid samples were prepared by ultrafiltration through membranes with a molecular mass cutoff of M(r) 10,000. The viscosity of the synovial fluids was reduced by treatment with hyaluronate lyase before ultrafiltration. The method showed a linear response for sulphate concentrations between 0.5 and 1000 mumol/l. The limit of detection was 1 mumol/l for aqueous standards. For serum the coefficient of variation within-run was 2.3%-2.4%, the coefficient of variation between days 2.9%-3.1%. For synovial fluids the coefficient of variation within-run was 3.1%-3.4%, the coefficient of variation between days 4.6%-5.7%. Standard recovery experiments performed by spiking pools of human sera containing low sulphate concentrations with sulphate concentrations between 5 mumol/l and 40 mumol/l showed recoveries between 98.9% and 100.6%. The corresponding experiments with pools of synovial fluids showed recoveries of 98.3% to 100.9%. As determined from 127 serum samples the reference range for sulphate was 262 mumol/l-420 mumol/l, with a mean value of 314 mumol/l. No dependence on age or sex was observed. The sulphate concentration in 36 synovial fluids from knees affected by inflammatory processes showed a mean value of 424 mumol/l and a standard deviation of 70 mumol/l. In 41 synovial fluids from knees affected by chronic degeneration joint disease, the sulphate concentrations were statistically significantly lower, with a mean of 374 mumol/l and a standard deviation of 58 mumol/l. The concentrations of sulphate in the synovial fluids were statistically significantly higher than those in

  5. Self-assembled titanium calcium oxide nanopatterns as versatile reactive nanomasks for dry etching lithographic transfer with high selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faustini, Marco; Drisko, Glenna L.; Letailleur, Alban A.; Montiel, Rafael Salas; Boissière, Cédric; Cattoni, Andrea; Haghiri-Gosnet, Anne Marie; Lerondel, Gilles; Grosso, David

    2013-01-01

    We report the simple preparation of ultra-thin self-assembled nanoperforated titanium calcium oxide films and their use as reactive nanomasks for selective dry etching of silicon. This novel reactive nanomask is composed of TiO2 in which up to 50% of Ti was replaced by Ca (CaxTi(1-x)O(2-x)). The system was prepared by evaporation induced self-assembly of dip-coated solution of CaCl2, TiCl4 and poly(butadiene-block-ethylene oxide) followed by 5 min of thermal treatment at 500 °C in air. The mask exhibits enhanced selectivity by forming a CaF2 protective layer in the presence of a chemically reactive fluorinated plasma. In particular it is demonstrated that ordered nano-arrays of dense Si pillars, or deep cylindrical wells, with high aspect ratio i.e. lateral dimensions as small as 20 nm and height up to 200 nm, can be formed. Both wells and pillars were formed by tuning the morphology and the homogeneity of the deposited mask. The mask preparation is extremely fast and simple, low-cost and easily scalable. Its combination with reactive ion etching constitutes one of the first examples of what can be achieved when sol-gel chemistry is coupled with top-down technologies. The resulting Si nanopatterns and nanostructures are of high interest for applications in many fields of nanotechnology including electronics and optics. This work extends and diversifies the toolbox of nanofabrication methods.

  6. A XANES study of Cu speciation in high-temperature brines using synthetic fluid inclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Andrew J.; Hack, Alistair C.; Mavrogenes, John A.; Newville, Matthew; Sutton, Stephen R.

    2010-12-03

    Cu K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra were recorded from individual synthetic brine fluid inclusions as a function of temperature up to 500 C. The inclusions serve as sample cells for high-temperature spectroscopic studies of aqueous Cu-Cl speciation. Cu{sup +} and Cu{sup 2+} can both be identified from characteristic pre-edge features. Mixed oxidation states can be deconvoluted using linear combinations of Cu{sup +} and Cu{sup 2+} spectra. This work illustrates how complex Cu XANES spectra can be interpreted successfully. Cu{sup 2+} is the stable oxidation state in solution at room temperature and Cu{sup +} at high temperatures. The change in oxidation state with temperature was completely reversible. Cu{sup +} was found to occur exclusively as the linear species [CuCl{sub 2}]{sup -} in solutions containing KCl with Cu:Cl ratios up to 1:6. In the absence of K{sup +}, there is evidence for higher order coordination of Cu{sup +}, in particular the tetrahedral complex [CuCl{sub 4}]{sup 3-}. The importance of such complexes in natural ore-forming fluids is yet to be determined, but may explain the vapor-phase partitioning of Cu as a Cl complex from a Cl-rich brine.

  7. Monte Carlo cluster algorithm for fluid phase transitions in highly size-asymmetrical binary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashton, Douglas J.; Liu, Jiwen; Luijten, Erik; Wilding, Nigel B.

    2010-11-01

    Highly size-asymmetrical fluid mixtures arise in a variety of physical contexts, notably in suspensions of colloidal particles to which much smaller particles have been added in the form of polymers or nanoparticles. Conventional schemes for simulating models of such systems are hamstrung by the difficulty of relaxing the large species in the presence of the small one. Here we describe how the rejection-free geometrical cluster algorithm of Liu and Luijten [J. Liu and E. Luijten, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 035504 (2004)] can be embedded within a restricted Gibbs ensemble to facilitate efficient and accurate studies of fluid phase behavior of highly size-asymmetrical mixtures. After providing a detailed description of the algorithm, we summarize the bespoke analysis techniques of [Ashton et al., J. Chem. Phys. 132, 074111 (2010)] that permit accurate estimates of coexisting densities and critical-point parameters. We apply our methods to study the liquid-vapor phase diagram of a particular mixture of Lennard-Jones particles having a 10:1 size ratio. As the reservoir volume fraction of small particles is increased in the range of 0%-5%, the critical temperature decreases by approximately 50%, while the critical density drops by some 30%. These trends imply that in our system, adding small particles decreases the net attraction between large particles, a situation that contrasts with hard-sphere mixtures where an attractive depletion force occurs.

  8. Coupled Fluids-Radiation Analysis of a High-Mass Mars Entry Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Grant; Allen, Gary; Tang, Chun; Brown, Jim

    2011-01-01

    The NEQAIR line-by-line radiation code has been incorporated into the DPLR Navier-Stokes flow solver such that the NEQAIR subroutines are now callable functions of DPLR. The coupled DPLR-NEQAIR code was applied to compute the convective and radiative heating rates over high-mass Mars entry vehicles. Two vehicle geometries were considered - a 15 m diameter 70-degree sphere cone configuration and a slender, mid-L/D vehicle with a diameter of 5 m called an Ellipsled. The entry masses ranged from 100 to 165 metric tons. Solutions were generated for entry velocities ranging from 6.5 to 9.1 km/s. The coupled fluids-radiation solutions were performed at the peak heating location along trajectories generated by the Traj trajectory analysis code. The impact of fluids-radiation coupling is a function of the level of radiative heating and the freestream density and velocity. For the high-mass Mars vehicles examined in this study, coupling effects were greatest for entry velocities above 8.5 km/s where the surface radiative heating was reduced by up 17%. Generally speaking, the Ellipsled geometry experiences a lower peak radiative heating rate but a higher peak turbulent convective heating rate than the MSL-based vehicle.

  9. High viscosity acidic treating fluids and methods of forming and using the same

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, L.E.

    1982-02-02

    Acidizing and fracture acidizing procedures commonly are conducted in subterranean well formations to increase the recovery of hydrocarbons. High viscosity aqueous acid solutions prevent the acid from becoming prematurely spent and inactive and develops wider fractures so that live acid can be forced further into the formations. Acidic treating fluids are formed by combining a hydratable gelling agent capable of being cross-linked with metal ions and a zirconium cross-linking agent with an aqueous acid solution. When hydrated, the gelling agent increases the viscosity of the acid solution. The zirconium cross-linking agent cross-links the hydrated gelling agent thereby further increasing the viscosity and providing stability to the resulting viscous fluid. Hydratable gelling agents which are suitable for use are hydrophilic organic polymers having a high molecular weight and containing some carboxyl functionality whereby they can be cross-linked with metal ions. Examples of such polymers are substituted cellulose, substituted natural gums, acrylamides, methacrylamides, acrylates, methacrylates, maleic anhydrides, alkylvinyl ethers, vinyl alcohols and xanthan polymers. 14 claims.

  10. Evaluation of serum neopterin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in Egyptian patients with acute coronary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Ragab, M; Hassan, H; Zaytoun, T; Refai, W; Rocks, B; Elsammak, M

    2005-01-01

    The present study evaluated serum neopterin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in Egyptian patients with acute coronary artery disease. Thirty-six patients with unstable angina aged (mean ± SD) 61.3±9.4 years, 29 patients with myocardial infarction aged 58.2±8.7 years and 24 sex- and age-matched control subjects were included in the study. Neopterin levels were significantly higher in patients with myocardial infarction and those with unstable angina than in the healthy control group (P<0.001). The serum level of neopterin in the control group (median [range]) was 3.25 nmol/L (1.25 nmol/L to 5.4 nmol/L), whereas in patients with unstable angina and those with myocardial infarction, neopterin levels were 10.4 nmol/L (3.5 nmol/L to 15.2 nmol/L) and 12.6 nmol/L (3.25 nmol/L to 17.8 nmol/L), respectively. Levels of hs-CRP and TBARS were also significantly higher in patients with unstable angina and those with myocardial infarction than in the healthy control group (P<0.01). The medians (ranges) of hs-CRP were 4.8 mg/L (2.5 mg/L to 9.9 mg/L), 12.0 mg/L (4.6 mg/L to 31.0 mg/L) and 12.3 mg/L (7.5 mg/L to 32.1 mg/L) in the control group, patients with unstable angina and those with myocardial infarction, respectively. The means ± SD of TBARS in the control group, patients with unstable angina and those with myocardial infarction were 0.64±0.17 μmol/L, 1.17±0.31 μmol/L and 1.17±0.49 μmol/L, respectively. TBARS positively correlated with hs-CRP and neopterin levels. Furthermore, when both patients and controls were classified according to their smoking status, significantly higher levels of neopterin and TBARS were found in the smokers of each subgroup than in the nonsmokers. In conclusion, the present study found a higher level of neopterin, hs-CRP and TBARS in patients with coronary artery disease. Serum neopterin and hs-CRP positively correlated with the level of TBARS. The authors suggest that

  11. A compact high-performance low-field NMR apparatus for measurements on fluids at very high pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, R.; Anand, V. Ganesan, K.; Tabrizi, P.; Torres, R.; Grant, B.; Catina, D.; Ryan, D.; Borman, C.; Krueckl, C.

    2014-02-15

    We discuss an innovative new high-performance apparatus for performing low-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) relaxation times and diffusion measurements on fluids at very high pressures and high temperatures. The apparatus sensor design and electronics specifications allow for dual deployment either in a fluid sampling well logging tool or in a laboratory. The sensor and electronics were designed to function in both environments. This paper discusses the use of the apparatus in a laboratory environment. The operating temperature and pressure limits, and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the new system exceed by a very wide margin what is currently possible. This major breakthrough was made possible by a revolutionary new sensor design that breaks many of the rules of conventional high pressure NMR sensor design. A metallic sample holder capable of operating at high pressures and temperatures is provided to contain the fluid under study. The sample holder has been successfully tested for operation up to 36 Kpsi. A solenoid coil wound on a slotted titanium frame sits inside the metallic sample holder and serves as an antenna to transmit RF pulses and receive NMR signals. The metal sample holder is sandwiched between a pair of gradient coils which provide a linear field gradient for pulsed field gradient diffusion measurements. The assembly sits in the bore of a low-gradient permanent magnet. The system can operate over a wide frequency range without the need for tuning the antenna to the Larmor frequency. The SNR measured on a water sample at room temperature is more than 15 times greater than that of the commercial low-field system in our laboratory. Thus, the new system provides for data acquisition more than 200 times faster than was previously possible. Laboratory NMR measurements of relaxations times and diffusion coefficients performed at pressures up to 25 Kpsi and at temperatures up to 175 °C with crude oils enlivened with dissolved hydrocarbon gases

  12. A compact high-performance low-field NMR apparatus for measurements on fluids at very high pressures and temperatures.

    PubMed

    Freedman, R; Anand, V; Grant, B; Ganesan, K; Tabrizi, P; Torres, R; Catina, D; Ryan, D; Borman, C; Krueckl, C

    2014-02-01

    We discuss an innovative new high-performance apparatus for performing low-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) relaxation times and diffusion measurements on fluids at very high pressures and high temperatures. The apparatus sensor design and electronics specifications allow for dual deployment either in a fluid sampling well logging tool or in a laboratory. The sensor and electronics were designed to function in both environments. This paper discusses the use of the apparatus in a laboratory environment. The operating temperature and pressure limits, and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the new system exceed by a very wide margin what is currently possible. This major breakthrough was made possible by a revolutionary new sensor design that breaks many of the rules of conventional high pressure NMR sensor design. A metallic sample holder capable of operating at high pressures and temperatures is provided to contain the fluid under study. The sample holder has been successfully tested for operation up to 36 Kpsi. A solenoid coil wound on a slotted titanium frame sits inside the metallic sample holder and serves as an antenna to transmit RF pulses and receive NMR signals. The metal sample holder is sandwiched between a pair of gradient coils which provide a linear field gradient for pulsed field gradient diffusion measurements. The assembly sits in the bore of a low-gradient permanent magnet. The system can operate over a wide frequency range without the need for tuning the antenna to the Larmor frequency. The SNR measured on a water sample at room temperature is more than 15 times greater than that of the commercial low-field system in our laboratory. Thus, the new system provides for data acquisition more than 200 times faster than was previously possible. Laboratory NMR measurements of relaxations times and diffusion coefficients performed at pressures up to 25 Kpsi and at temperatures up to 175 °C with crude oils enlivened with dissolved hydrocarbon gases

  13. A compact high-performance low-field NMR apparatus for measurements on fluids at very high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, R.; Anand, V.; Grant, B.; Ganesan, K.; Tabrizi, P.; Torres, R.; Catina, D.; Ryan, D.; Borman, C.; Krueckl, C.

    2014-02-01

    We discuss an innovative new high-performance apparatus for performing low-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) relaxation times and diffusion measurements on fluids at very high pressures and high temperatures. The apparatus sensor design and electronics specifications allow for dual deployment either in a fluid sampling well logging tool or in a laboratory. The sensor and electronics were designed to function in both environments. This paper discusses the use of the apparatus in a laboratory environment. The operating temperature and pressure limits, and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the new system exceed by a very wide margin what is currently possible. This major breakthrough was made possible by a revolutionary new sensor design that breaks many of the rules of conventional high pressure NMR sensor design. A metallic sample holder capable of operating at high pressures and temperatures is provided to contain the fluid under study. The sample holder has been successfully tested for operation up to 36 Kpsi. A solenoid coil wound on a slotted titanium frame sits inside the metallic sample holder and serves as an antenna to transmit RF pulses and receive NMR signals. The metal sample holder is sandwiched between a pair of gradient coils which provide a linear field gradient for pulsed field gradient diffusion measurements. The assembly sits in the bore of a low-gradient permanent magnet. The system can operate over a wide frequency range without the need for tuning the antenna to the Larmor frequency. The SNR measured on a water sample at room temperature is more than 15 times greater than that of the commercial low-field system in our laboratory. Thus, the new system provides for data acquisition more than 200 times faster than was previously possible. Laboratory NMR measurements of relaxations times and diffusion coefficients performed at pressures up to 25 Kpsi and at temperatures up to 175 °C with crude oils enlivened with dissolved hydrocarbon gases

  14. High frequencies of circulating melanoma-reactive CD8+ T cells in patients with advanced melanoma.

    PubMed

    Letsch, A; Keilholz, U; Schadendorf, D; Nagorsen, D; Schmittel, A; Thiel, E; Scheibenbogen, C

    2000-09-01

    To determine whether circulating tumor-reactive T cells are present in melanoma patients, unstimulated T cells from peripheral blood were tested for recognition of HLA-A2- or HLA-A1-matched melanoma cell lines using the ELISPOT assay. Eleven out of 19 patients with metastatic melanoma had a T-cell response with up to 0.81%, 0.78%, 0. 53%, 0.12%, 0.10%, 0.09%, 0.07%, 0.06%, 0.06%, 0.04%, and 0.04% of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) secreting IFNgamma upon exposure to various HLA-A2- or HLA-A1-matched melanoma cell lines. These T-cell responses were mediated by CD8+ T cells and could specifically be blocked by an anti-HLA-A2 antibody in HLA-A2-positive patients. Separation experiments performed in one melanoma patient showed tumor-reactive T cells in both the CD8+ effector T cell (CD45RA+/IFNgamma+) as well as the CD8+ memory T-cell compartment (CD45RO+/IFNgamma+). In 3 out of 5 patients, in whom autologous cell lines were available, similar frequencies of T cells in response to HLA-A1- or HLA-A2-matched allogeneic and autologous tumor cells were observed, while 2 patients had a T-cell response restricted to either the autologous or the allogeneic cell lines. These results give evidence for the presence of tumor-reactive CD8+ T cells in more than half of melanoma patients tested. Although some of these patients have clinical evidence for an immunological-mediated tumor control, several patients have growing tumors suggesting presence of escape mechanisms. PMID:10925359

  15. Computational high-throughput screening of fluid permeability in heterogeneous fiber materials.

    PubMed

    Röding, Magnus; Schuster, Erich; Logg, Katarina; Lundman, Malin; Bergström, Per; Hanson, Charlotta; Gebäck, Tobias; Lorén, Niklas

    2016-07-20

    We explore computational high-throughput screening as a design strategy for heterogeneous, isotropic fiber materials. Fluid permeability, a key property in the design of soft porous materials, is systematically studied using a multi-scale lattice Boltzmann framework. After characterizing microscopic permeability as a function of solid volume fraction in the microstructure, we perform high-throughput computational screening of in excess of 35 000 macrostructures consisting of a continuous bulk interrupted by spherical/elliptical domains with either lower or higher microscopic permeability (hence with two distinct microscopic solid volume fractions and therefore two distinct microscopic permeabilities) to assess which parameters determine macroscopic permeability for a fixed average solid volume fraction. We conclude that the fractions of bulk and domains and the distribution of solid volume fraction between them are the primary determinants of macroscopic permeability, and that a substantial increase in permeability compared to the corresponding homogenous material is attainable. PMID:27367292

  16. Diverting Hydrogenations with Wilkinson's Catalyst towards Highly Reactive Rhodium(I) Species.

    PubMed

    Perea-Buceta, Jesus E; Fernández, Israel; Heikkinen, Sami; Axenov, Kirill; King, Alistair W T; Niemi, Teemu; Nieger, Martin; Leskelä, Markku; Repo, Timo

    2015-11-23

    The addition of Barton's base has a dramatic effect on the classic rhodium(III)-mediated hydrogenations promoted by Wilkinson's catalyst. Following the initial oxidative addition, a barrierless reductive elimination of HCl from the traditional rhodium(III) intermediates instantly produces a rhodium(I) monohydride species, which is remarkably reactive in the hydrogenation of several internal alkynes and functionalized trisubstituted alkenes. The direct formation of this species is unprecedented upon addition of molecular hydrogen and its catalytic potential has been hitherto barely explored. PMID:26437764

  17. Patient-Specific Simulations of Reactivity in Models of the Pulmonary Vasculature: A 3-D Numerical Study with Fluid-Structure Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Kendall; Zhang, Yanhang; Lanning, Craig

    2005-11-01

    Insight into the progression of pulmonary hypertension may be obtained from thorough study of vascular flow during reactivity testing, an invasive diagnostic procedure which can dramatically alter vascular hemodynamics. Diagnostic imaging methods, however, are limited in their ability to provide extensive data. Here we present detailed flow and wall deformation results from simulations of pulmonary arteries undergoing this procedure. Patient-specific 3-D geometric reconstructions of the first four branches of the pulmonary vasculature were obtained clinically and meshed for use with computational software. Transient simulations in normal and reactive states were obtained from four such models were completed with patient-specific velocity inlet conditions and flow impedance exit conditions. A microstructurally based orthotropic hyperelastic model that simulates pulmonary artery mechanics under normotensive and hypoxic hypertensive conditions treated wall constitutive changes due to pressure reactivity and arterial remodeling. Pressure gradients, velocity fields, arterial deformation, and complete topography of shear stress were obtained. These models provide richer detail of hemodynamics than can be obtained from current imaging techniques, and should allow maximum characterization of vascular function in the clinical situation.

  18. High abundance synovial fluid proteome: distinct profiles in health and osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gobezie, Reuben; Kho, Alvin; Krastins, Bryan; Sarracino, David A; Thornhill, Thomas S; Chase, Michael; Millett, Peter J; Lee, David M

    2007-01-01

    The development of increasingly high-throughput and sensitive mass spectroscopy-based proteomic techniques provides new opportunities to examine the physiology and pathophysiology of many biologic fluids and tissues. The purpose of this study was to determine protein expression profiles of high-abundance synovial fluid (SF) proteins in health and in the prevalent joint disease osteoarthritis (OA). A cross-sectional study of 62 patients with early OA (n = 21), patients with late OA (n = 21), and control individuals (n = 20) was conducted. SF proteins were separated by using one-dimensional PAGE, and the in-gel digested proteins were analyzed by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 362 spots were examined and 135 high-abundance SF proteins were identified as being expressed across all three study cohorts. A total of 135 SF proteins were identified. Eighteen proteins were found to be significantly differentially expressed between control individuals and OA patients. Two subsets of OA that are not dependent on disease duration were identified using unsupervised analysis of the data. Several novel SF proteins were also identified. Our analyses demonstrate no disease duration-dependent differences in abundant protein composition of SF in OA, and we clearly identified two previously unappreciated yet distinct subsets of protein profiles in this disease cohort. Additionally, our findings reveal novel abundant protein species in healthy SF whose functional contribution to SF physiology was not previously recognized. Finally, our studies identify candidate biomarkers for OA with potential for use as highly sensitive and specific tests for diagnostic purposes or for evaluating therapeutic response. PMID:17407561

  19. Fluid injection induced seismicity reveals a NE dipping fault in the southeastern sector of the High Agri Valley (southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stabile, T. A.; Giocoli, A.; Perrone, A.; Piscitelli, S.; Lapenna, V.

    2014-08-01

    On 2 June 2006 the wastewater produced during the oil and gas field exploitation in High Agri Valley (southern Italy) started to be managed by disposal through pumping the fluids back into the subsurface at the Costa Molina 2 (CM2) injection well, located in the southeastern sector of the valley. The onset of microearthquakes (Ml ≤ 2) after 4 days at about 1.3 km SW of CM2 well suggests fluid injection induced seismicity by the diffusion of pore pressure. Moreover, the space-time evolution of 196 high-resolution relocated events reveals a previously unmapped NE dipping fault. We investigate the physical processes related to the fluid injection induced seismicity and delineate the previously unmapped fault by jointly analyzing seismicity data, geological observations, fluid injection data, the stratigraphic log of the CM2 well, and the electrical resistivity tomography survey carried out in the study area.

  20. Preparation of highly reactive pyridine- and pyrimidine-containing diarylamine antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Hanthorn, Jason J; Valgimigli, Luca; Pratt, Derek A

    2012-08-17

    We recently reported a preliminary account of our efforts to develop novel diarylamine radical-trapping antioxidants (Hanthorn, J. J. et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2012, 134, 8306-8309) wherein we demonstrated that the incorporation of ring nitrogens into diphenylamines affords compounds which display a compromise between H-atom transfer reactivity to peroxyl radicals and stability to one-electron oxidation. Herein we provide the details of the synthetic efforts associated with that report, which have been substantially expanded to produce a library of substituted heterocyclic diarylamines that we have used to provide further insight into the structure-reactivity relationships of these compounds as antioxidants (see the accompanying paper, DOI: 10.1021/jo301012x). The diarylamines were prepared in short, modular sequences from 2-aminopyridine and 2-aminopyrimidine wherein aminations of intermediate pyri(mi)dyl bromides and then Pd-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions of the amines and precursor bromides were the key steps to yield the diarylamines. The cross-coupling reactions were found to proceed best with Pd(η(3)-1-PhC(3)H(4))(η(5)-C(5)H(5)) as precatalyst, which gave higher yields than the conventional Pd source, Pd(2)(dba)(3). PMID:22788575

  1. Scale-up of the production of highly reactive biogenic magnetite nanoparticles using Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    PubMed

    Byrne, J M; Muhamadali, H; Coker, V S; Cooper, J; Lloyd, J R

    2015-06-01

    Although there are numerous examples of large-scale commercial microbial synthesis routes for organic bioproducts, few studies have addressed the obvious potential for microbial systems to produce inorganic functional biomaterials at scale. Here we address this by focusing on the production of nanoscale biomagnetite particles by the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens, which was scaled up successfully from laboratory- to pilot plant-scale production, while maintaining the surface reactivity and magnetic properties which make this material well suited to commercial exploitation. At the largest scale tested, the bacterium was grown in a 50 l bioreactor, harvested and then inoculated into a buffer solution containing Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide and an electron donor and mediator, which promoted the formation of magnetite in under 24 h. This procedure was capable of producing up to 120 g of biomagnetite. The particle size distribution was maintained between 10 and 15 nm during scale-up of this second step from 10 ml to 10 l, with conserved magnetic properties and surface reactivity; the latter demonstrated by the reduction of Cr(VI). The process presented provides an environmentally benign route to magnetite production and serves as an alternative to harsher synthetic techniques, with the clear potential to be used to produce kilogram to tonne quantities. PMID:25972437

  2. Scale-up of the production of highly reactive biogenic magnetite nanoparticles using Geobacter sulfurreducens

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, J. M.; Muhamadali, H.; Coker, V. S.; Cooper, J.; Lloyd, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    Although there are numerous examples of large-scale commercial microbial synthesis routes for organic bioproducts, few studies have addressed the obvious potential for microbial systems to produce inorganic functional biomaterials at scale. Here we address this by focusing on the production of nanoscale biomagnetite particles by the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens, which was scaled up successfully from laboratory- to pilot plant-scale production, while maintaining the surface reactivity and magnetic properties which make this material well suited to commercial exploitation. At the largest scale tested, the bacterium was grown in a 50 l bioreactor, harvested and then inoculated into a buffer solution containing Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide and an electron donor and mediator, which promoted the formation of magnetite in under 24 h. This procedure was capable of producing up to 120 g of biomagnetite. The particle size distribution was maintained between 10 and 15 nm during scale-up of this second step from 10 ml to 10 l, with conserved magnetic properties and surface reactivity; the latter demonstrated by the reduction of Cr(VI). The process presented provides an environmentally benign route to magnetite production and serves as an alternative to harsher synthetic techniques, with the clear potential to be used to produce kilogram to tonne quantities. PMID:25972437

  3. Model for high rate gas flows in deformable and reactive porous beds

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, A M

    1985-01-08

    This report presents the development of a one dimensional planar Lagrange hydrodynamic computer model which describes the processes preceding detonation. The model treats gas flow, deflagration, and compaction in a porous bed of reactive material. The early part of deflagration to detonation experiment with porous HMX is simulated. Sensitivity of the simulation calculation to ignition and burn rate parameters is illustrated and discussed. The effects of changing the mean particle size of the porous material are investigated. There is widespread interest in runaway reaction hazards that may be associated with porosity in propellant and explosive materials. Experimentally, such reactions are initiated and observed in long, thick walled hollow tubes, filled with a granular porous bed of reactive material. We will present comparisons with an experiment on porous HMX to illustrate details of the model and to point out what we believe are important features of the observed phenomenon. A geometric finite element cell is devised that allows gas to flow through a compacting matrix. The experimental simulation considers the DDT process from initial squib burn through the onset of general matrix deflagration (convective burning), to the development of a fully dense compaction wave. While this simulation did not calculate turnover to detonation, it did illustrate that the transition occurred as soon as the compaction wave became fully dense. It is shown that deflagration and gas permeation lags compaction at the time of transition. This suggests that the actual transition involves an additional compaction dependent process. 18 references, 20 figures, 3 tables.

  4. High bandwidth linear viscoelastic properties of complex fluids from the measurement of their free surface fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottier, Basile; Talini, Laurence; Frétigny, Christian

    2012-02-01

    We present a new optical method to measure the linear viscoelastic properties of materials, ranging from complex fluids to soft solids, within a large frequency range (about 0.1--10^4 Hz). The surface fluctuation specular reflection technique is based on the measurement of the thermal fluctuations of the free surfaces of materials at which a laser beam is specularly reflected. The propagation of the thermal surface waves depends on the surface tension, density, and complex viscoelastic modulus of the material. For known surface tension and density, we show that the frequency dependent elastic and loss moduli can be deduced from the fluctuation spectrum. Using a viscoelastic solid (a cross-linked PDMS), which linear viscoelastic properties are known in a large frequency range from rheometric measurements and the time--temperature superposition principle, we show that there is a good agreement between the rheological characterization provided by rheometric and fluctuation measurements. We also present measurements conducted with complex fluids that are supramolecular polymer solutions. The agreement with other low frequency and high frequency rheological measurements is again very good, and we discuss the sensitivity of the technique to surface viscoelasticity.

  5. Hydrous pyrolysis in the field: closed-system diagenesis at high fluid flow

    SciTech Connect

    Hutcheon, I.; Abercrombie, H.; Shevalier, M.; Nahnybida, C.

    1989-03-01

    Diagenetic processes are studied by observing natural systems or by experimental hydrous pyrolysis of water-organic-rock mixtures. Steam-enhanced recovery is similar to hydrous pyrolysis but is done in a previously undisturbed geological setting with mass, time, and temperature closer to natural diagenetic systems. Chemical and isotopic compositions of produced water and gas were determined for wellhead samples obtained from quartz-rich and lithic reservoirs. Estimates of reservoir temperature were made using the silica and Na-K geothermometers and agree with temperatures estimated from /sup 13/C//sup 13/C partitioning between bicarbonate and CO/sub 2/. Temperature and fluid composition data are portrayed on activity diagrams and show that minerals (illite, chalcedony, chlorite, analcime, and smectite) rapidly reach equilibrium with waters. Mineral reactions inferred from produced waters are different in quartz-rich and lithic reservoirs and agree with mineral reactions observed in post-steam cores. Carbon isotopic data indicate that carbonate minerals are the source of produced CO/sub 2/. Comparison of the buffering potential of aqueous carbonate species, carbonate minerals, organic acids, and silicate hydrolysis shows that silicates have the greatest potential to buffer pH. The authors data are consistent with pH control by silicate hydrolysis and indicate that silicate-carbonate reactions may be a major source of CO/sub 2/ during diagenesis. More generally, their results show that a diagenetic system of high fluid flow can be approximated by closed-system behavior.

  6. Fluid source and pressure temperature conditions of high-salinity fluids in syn-tectonic veins from the Northeastern Apuan Alps (Northern Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montomoli, Chiara; Ruggieri, Giovanni; Carosi, Rodolfo; Dini, Andrea; Genovesi, Marianna

    the high-salinity fluids found in the syn-tectonic veins: the high-salinity and NaCl-rich nature of the trapped fluids suggest that the original metamorphic fluids interacted with evaporite levels present at the base of the Tuscan Nappe, overlying Apuan Alps metamorphic Units. These fluids then infiltrated downward, possibly through shear zones crosscutting the stratigraphic sequence, into the syn-tectonic veins and interacted with the host-rocks to produce a local element mobilization and their precipitation in the vein minerals; as a result the latter reflect the mineralogy of the host-rocks.

  7. Rolling-element fatigue life with traction fluids and automatic transmission fluid in a high-speed rolling-contact rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Nahm, A. H.; Loewenthal, S. H.

    1982-01-01

    Rolling-element fatigue tests were run in standard and high-speed rolling-contact rigs at bar speeds from 5000 to 50,000 rpm to determine the effects of speed and lubricant film parameter on rolling-element fatigue life. AISI 52100 test bars were tested at a maximum Hertz stress of 4.83 GPa (700,000 psi) with three traction fluids and an automatic transmission fluid. Rolling-element fatigue life increased with speed, with the greatest increases occurring from 10,000 to 50,000 rpm. The life data tended to follow published life-versus-lubricant-film-parameter data up to a film parameter of approximately 3.

  8. Corrosion mechanism of 13Cr stainless steel in completion fluid of high temperature and high concentration bromine salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Xu, Lining; Lu, Minxu; Meng, Yao; Zhu, Jinyang; Zhang, Lei

    2014-09-01

    A series of corrosion tests of 13Cr stainless steel were conducted in a simulated completion fluid environment of high temperature and high concentration bromine salt. Corrosion behavior of specimens and the component of corrosion products were investigated by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicate that 13Cr steel suffers from severe local corrosion and there is always a passive halo around every pit. The formation mechanism of the passive halo is established. OH- ligand generates and adsorbs in a certain scale because of abundant OH- on the surface around the pits. Passive film forms around each pit, which leads to the occurrence of passivation in a certain region. Finally, the dissimilarities in properties and morphologies of regions, namely the pit and its corresponding passive halo, can result in different corrosion sensitivities and may promote the formation of macroscopic galvanic pairs

  9. Applications of supercritical fluids.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Gerd

    2010-01-01

    This review discusses supercritical fluids in industrial and near-to-industry applications. Supercritical fluids are flexible tools for processing materials. Supercritical fluids have been applied to mass-transfer processes, phase-transition processes, reactive systems, materials-related processes, and nanostructured materials. Some applications are already at industrial capacity, whereas others remain under development. In addition to extraction, application areas include impregnation and cleaning, multistage countercurrent separation, particle formation, coating, and reactive systems such as hydrogenation, biomass gasification, and supercritical water oxidation. Polymers are modified with supercritical fluids, and colloids and emulsions as well as nanostructured materials exhibit interesting phenomena when in contact with supercritical fluids that can be industrially exploited. For these applications to succeed, the properties of supercritical fluids in combination with the materials processed must be clearly determined and fundamental knowledge of the complex behavior must be made readily available. PMID:22432584

  10. Quantitative coupling of supercritical fluid extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography by means of a coated open-tubular interface.

    PubMed

    Stone, M A; Taylor, L T

    2001-10-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction was coupled on-line with reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). An open-tubular column with a 95% methyl-5% phenyl stationary phase was utilized as an interface between the two systems. This phase allowed for good analyte focusing onto the packed analytical column and exhibited low reactivity. Due to the non-polar nature of this phase there was a low tendency for analytes to be prematurely rinsed off the interface by condensed modifier. Using this approach, it was possible to transfer the extracted analytes quantitatively to the HPLC column in the presence of as much as 10% (v/v) methanol. By placing a 10 m guard column at the head of the interface, the same could be accomplished with ethanol as the modifier: allowing the extraction to be conducted entirely with non-toxic fluids. The method also allowed the use of very practical extraction parameters in terms of amount extracted, extraction flow-rate, extraction vessel volume, and extraction time. PMID:11695521

  11. Fluid imbalance

    MedlinePlus

    ... up in the body. This is called fluid overload (volume overload). This can lead to edema (excess fluid in ... Water imbalance; Fluid imbalance - dehydration; Fluid buildup; Fluid overload; Volume overload; Loss of fluids; Edema - fluid imbalance; ...

  12. An original precipitation route toward the preparation and the sintering of highly reactive uranium cerium dioxide powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, J.; Clavier, N.; Mesbah, A.; Audubert, F.; Le Goff, X. F.; Vigier, N.; Dacheux, N.

    2015-07-01

    The preparation of dense U1-xCexO2 mixed dioxides pellets was achieved from the initial precipitation of highly reactive precursors. In a first step, a wet chemistry route, based on the mixture of U4+ and Ce4+ in acidic solution with large excess of NH4OH, was set up to reach the precipitation of the cations. The solid phase was then dried under vacuum to avoid aggregation phenomena. Further characterization of the powders by XRD, EDS and TEM revealed the formation of hydrated U1-xCexO2ṡnH2O that probably resulted from the aging of hydroxide compounds. Also, microscopy investigations evidenced the nanosized character of the powder which was associated to high values of specific surface area, typically in the 100-150 m2 g-1 range. The behavior of U1-xCexO2ṡnH2O versus temperature was investigated in a second part. If the increase of the heat temperature allowed one to observe an improvement of the crystallization state linked with the growth of crystallites, it was also accompanied by a strong decrease of the powders reactivity. On this basis, sintering tests were conducted in reducing atmosphere on the compounds as prepared. Dilatometry experiments indicated a low densification temperature compared to other ways of preparation reported in the literature. Also, the pellets prepared after firing at different temperatures (1350-1550 °C) showed that a wide range of microstructures was achievable. Particularly, bulk materials with densities of 90-95% of the calculated value could be prepared with average grain size ranging from around 100 nm to more than 5 μm. This simple process of elaboration of dense materials from highly reactive hydrated oxide precursor thus appears as a very interesting way to prepare actinide oxides materials.

  13. Reactive laser deposition of high quality YBaCuO and ErBaCuO films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berling, D.; Del Vecchio, A.; Acquaviva, S.; Bolmont, D.; Leggieri, G.; Loegel, B.; Luisa De Giorgi, M.; Luches, A.; Mehdaoui, A.; Tapfer, L.

    1996-04-01

    RE 1Ba 2Cu 3O 7-δ (RE=Er or Y) superconducting films were fabricated by reactive laser deposition, in situ, on YSZ(100), SrTiO 3(100) and Si(001), under various conditions. A complete XRD investigation showed that the films grown with high substrate temperatures ( Ts>740°C) combined with low fluences (1.5 J/cm 2 < 2 J/cm 2) and laser repetition rate (4 Hz) have the best structural characteristics, very good electrical and magnetic properties.

  14. Experimental design for reflection measurements of highly reactive liquid or solid substances with application to liquid sodium

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, S.H.; Gossler, A.A.

    1980-06-30

    A versatile goniometer system with associated electronic components and mechanical instruments has been assembled. It is designed to measure spectral, specular reflectances of highly reactive liquid or solid substances over a spectral range of 0.3 to 9 ..mu.. and incidence angles of 12 to 30/sup 0/ off the normal direction. The capability of measuring reflectances of liquid substances clearly distinguishes this experimental design from conventional systems which are applicable only to solid substances. This design has been used to measure the spectral, specular reflectance of liquid sodium and preliminary results obtained are compared with those of solid sodium measured by other investigators.

  15. Are high-dose toxic exposures always associated with reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS)?

    PubMed

    Hickmann, M A; Nelson, E D; Siegel, E G; Bernstein, J A

    2001-01-01

    Bottling plant workers were evaluated for respiratory symptoms following an accidental exposure to a chlorine dioxide aerosol. Six exposed employees underwent medical and occupational histories, skin testing to common allergens, spirometry before and after use of bronchodilators, and methacholine challenge. The reported exposure to chlorine dioxide ranged from 30 min to 12 hr. Physical examinations were all normal. Four workers had positive prick skin tests to common aeroallergens. None of the workers demonstrated significant changes in forced expiratory volume in 1 sec following use of bronchodilators, and none experienced methacholine hyperresponsiveness. These cases suggest that the occurrence of reactive airways dysfunction syndrome is unpredictable and may not always occur in heavily exposed individuals. PMID:11777025

  16. Mechanism and Experimental Observability of Global Switching Between Reactive and Nonreactive Coordinates at High Total Energies.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, Hiroshi; Toda, Mikito; Takahashi, Masahiko; Kono, Hirohiko; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki

    2015-08-28

    We present a mechanism of global reaction coordinate switching, namely, a phenomenon in which the reaction coordinate dynamically switches to another coordinate as the total energy of the system increases. The mechanism is based on global changes in the underlying phase space geometry caused by a switching of dominant unstable modes from the original reactive mode to another nonreactive mode in systems with more than 2 degrees of freedom. We demonstrate an experimental observability to detect a reaction coordinate switching in an ionization reaction of a hydrogen atom in crossed electric and magnetic fields. For this reaction, the reaction coordinate is a coordinate along which electrons escape and its switching changes the escaping direction from the direction of the electric field to that of the magnetic field and, thus, the switching can be detected experimentally by measuring the angle-resolved momentum distribution of escaping electrons. PMID:26371648

  17. Electron transport and defect structure in highly conducting reactively sputtered ultrathin tin oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Bansal, Shikha; Pandya, Dinesh K. Kashyap, Subhash C.

    2014-02-24

    Electrical conduction behavior of ultrathin (5–110 nm) SnO{sub 2} films reactively sputtered at 150–400 °C substrate temperatures is presented. The surface roughness studies revealed that the films with lower thickness were smoother (≤0.6 nm). Stoichiometry/defect structure of the films obtained from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data and electron mobility are found to be dependent on film thickness and substrate temperature. The observed increase in conductivity of semi-metallic films with decrease in film thickness is attributed to changes in defect structure and surface roughness. Highest value of conductivity of about 715 Ω{sup −1} cm{sup −1} is obtained for 5 nm thick films deposited at 300 °C.

  18. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy of encapsulated proteins dissolved in low-viscosity fluids.

    PubMed

    Nucci, Nathaniel V; Valentine, Kathleen G; Wand, A Joshua

    2014-04-01

    High-resolution multi-dimensional solution NMR is unique as a biophysical and biochemical tool in its ability to examine both the structure and dynamics of macromolecules at atomic resolution. Conventional solution NMR approaches, however, are largely limited to examinations of relatively small (<25kDa) molecules, mostly due to the spectroscopic consequences of slow rotational diffusion. Encapsulation of macromolecules within the protective nanoscale aqueous interior of reverse micelles dissolved in low viscosity fluids has been developed as a means through which the 'slow tumbling problem' can be overcome. This approach has been successfully applied to diverse proteins and nucleic acids ranging up to 100kDa, considerably widening the range of biological macromolecules to which conventional solution NMR methodologies may be applied. Recent advances in methodology have significantly broadened the utility of this approach in structural biology and molecular biophysics. PMID:24656086

  19. Analysis of fluid film lubrication in artificial hip joint replacements with surfaces of high elastic modulus.

    PubMed

    Jin, Z M; Dowson, D; Fisher, J

    1997-01-01

    Lubrication mechanisms and contact mechanics have been analysed for total hip joint replacements made from hard bearing surfaces such as metal-on-metal and ceramic-on-ceramic. A similar analysis for ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) against a hard bearing surface has also been carried out and used as a reference. The most important factor influencing the predicted lubrication film thickness has been found to be the radial clearance between the ball and the socket. Full fluid film lubrication may be achieved in these hard/hard bearings provided that the surface finish of the bearing surface and the radial clearance are chosen correctly and maintained. Furthermore, there is a close relation between the predicted contact half width and the predicted lubrication film thickness. Therefore, it is important to analyse the contact mechanics in artificial hip joint replacements. Practical considerations of manufacturing these bearing surfaces have also been discussed. PMID:9256001

  20. Small-Scale Metal Tanks for High Pressure Storage of Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    London, Adam (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Small scale metal tanks for high-pressure storage of fluids having tank factors of more than 5000 meters and volumes of ten cubic inches or less featuring arrays of interconnected internal chambers having at least inner walls thinner than gage limitations allow. The chambers may be arranged as multiple internal independent vessels. Walls of chambers that are also portions of external tank walls may be arcuate on the internal and/or external surfaces, including domed. The tanks may be shaped adaptively and/or conformally to an application, including, for example, having one or more flat outer walls and/or having an annular shape. The tanks may have dual-purpose inlet/outlet conduits of may have separate inlet and outlet conduits. The tanks are made by fusion bonding etched metal foil layers patterned from slices of a CAD model of the tank. The fusion bonded foil stack may be further machined.

  1. Turbo-alternator-compressor design for supercritical high density working fluids

    DOEpatents

    Wright, Steven A.; Fuller, Robert L.

    2013-03-19

    Techniques for generating power are provided. Such techniques involve a thermodynamic system including a housing, a turbine positioned in a turbine cavity of the housing, a compressor positioned in a compressor cavity of the housing, and an alternator positioned in a rotor cavity between the turbine and compressor cavities. The compressor has a high-pressure face facing an inlet of the compressor cavity and a low-pressure face on an opposite side thereof. The alternator has a rotor shaft operatively connected to the turbine and compressor, and is supported in the housing by bearings. Ridges extending from the low-pressure face of the compressor may be provided for balancing thrust across the compressor. Seals may be positioned about the alternator for selectively leaking fluid into the rotor cavity to reduce the temperature therein.

  2. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy of encapsulated proteins dissolved in low-viscosity fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nucci, Nathaniel V.; Valentine, Kathleen G.; Wand, A. Joshua

    2014-04-01

    High-resolution multi-dimensional solution NMR is unique as a biophysical and biochemical tool in its ability to examine both the structure and dynamics of macromolecules at atomic resolution. Conventional solution NMR approaches, however, are largely limited to examinations of relatively small (<25 kDa) molecules, mostly due to the spectroscopic consequences of slow rotational diffusion. Encapsulation of macromolecules within the protective nanoscale aqueous interior of reverse micelles dissolved in low viscosity fluids has been developed as a means through which the ‘slow tumbling problem' can be overcome. This approach has been successfully applied to diverse proteins and nucleic acids ranging up to 100 kDa, considerably widening the range of biological macromolecules to which conventional solution NMR methodologies may be applied. Recent advances in methodology have significantly broadened the utility of this approach in structural biology and molecular biophysics.

  3. High-Speed Transport of Fluid Drops and Solid Particles via Surface Acoustic Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Bao, Xiaoqi; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Lih, Shyh-shiuh

    2012-01-01

    A compact sampling tool mechanism that can operate at various temperatures, and transport and sieve particle sizes of powdered cuttings and soil grains with no moving parts, has been created using traveling surface acoustic waves (SAWs) that are emitted by an inter-digital transducer (IDT). The generated waves are driven at about 10 MHz, and it causes powder to move towards the IDT at high speed with different speeds for different sizes of particles, which enables these particles to be sieved. This design is based on the use of SAWs and their propelling effect on powder particles and fluids along the path of the waves. Generally, SAWs are elastic waves propagating in a shallow layer of about one wavelength beneath the surface of a solid substrate. To generate SAWs, a piezoelectric plate is used that is made of LiNbO3 crystal cut along the x-axis with rotation of 127.8 along the y-axis. On this plate are printed pairs of fingerlike electrodes in the form of a grating that are activated by subjecting the gap between the electrodes to electric field. This configuration of a surface wave transmitter is called IDT. The IDT that was used consists of 20 pairs of fingers with 0.4-mm spacing, a total length of 12.5 mm. The surface wave is produced by the nature of piezoelectric material to contract or expand when subjected to an electric field. Driving the IDT to generate wave at high amplitudes provides an actuation mechanism where the surface particles move elliptically, pulling powder particles on the surface toward the wavesource and pushing liquids in the opposite direction. This behavior allows the innovation to separate large particles and fluids that are mixed. Fluids are removed at speed (7.5 to 15 cm/s), enabling this innovation of acting as a bladeless wiper for raindrops. For the windshield design, the electrodes could be made transparent so that they do not disturb the driver or pilot. Multiple IDTs can be synchronized to transport water or powder over larger

  4. High-performance liquid chromatography of amino acids in urine and cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Lam, S; Azumaya, H; Karmen, A

    1984-10-19

    Two different methods for analyzing amino acids by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), both of which can separate D- and L- stereoisomers, have been used for studying the amino acid composition of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and urine. One method, by which Dns derivatives of amino acids are separated as mixed chelate complexes with Cu(II) and a single stereoisomer of a second amino acid, was used to analyze CSF. CSF contains ca. 10 mumole/l per amino acid, compared to 100 mumole/l in serum. The high sensitivity of fluorescence detection enabled complete analysis, starting with 50 microliter of fluid. The second method, which uses lower concentrations of both the copper and the second amino acid and detects amino acids by the change in absorbance of the copper complex, was used to measure the urine concentration of the lysine metabolite, pipecolic acid (piperidine-2-carboxylic acid), a secondary amino acid that is difficult to detect by the more usual detection methods. Our procedure involves passing urine through a cation-exchange column, collecting the fraction containing pipecolic acid, and chromatographing it on a reversed-phase HPLC column with a mobile phase containing L-aspartame and Cu(II). To assess the utility of the method, urine samples from a patient given loading doses of D- or L-isomers were analyzed. When either isomer was administered, both D- and L-isomers were detected, but in different proportions. Varying proportions and concentrations of both isomers were also detected in the urines of patients with hyperpipecolatemia from different metabolic abnormalities. PMID:6501504

  5. Laser-assisted inkjet printing of highly viscous fluids with sub-nozzle resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delrot, Paul; Modestino, Miguel A.; Psaltis, Demetri; Moser, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Drop-on-demand inkjet printing is mostly based on thermal and piezo-actuation, allowing for densely packed nozzles in inkjet printers. However, the droplet diameter is typically defined by the nozzle diameter, thus limiting the range of viscosity that can be jetted to 10-100 mPa.s to prevent nozzle clogging. Here, we present a laser-assisted system for the delivery of micro-droplets of highly viscous fluids with sub-nozzle resolution. Highly focused supersonic jets have recently been demonstrated by focusing a nanosecond pulse of light into a micro-capillary filled with dyed water, hence generating a cavitation bubble. The consequent pressure wave impact on the concave free surface of the liquid generated flow-focused micro-jets. We implemented this technique for the production of low velocity micro-droplets with photopolymer inks of increasing viscosity (0.6-148 mPa.s) into a 300 μm-wide glass capillary using low laser energies (3-70 μJ). Time-resolved imaging provided details on the droplet generation. Single micro-droplets of diameter 70-80 μm were produced on demand with inks of viscosity 0.6-9 mPa.s with good controllability and reproducibility, thus enabling to print two-dimensional patterns with a precision of 13 μm. Furthermore, the primary droplet produced with the most viscous fluid was about 66% of the capillary diameter. Preliminary results also showed that the process is linearly scalable to narrower capillaries (100-200 μm), thus paving the way for a compact laser-assisted inkjet printer. A possible application of the device would be additive manufacturing as the printed patterns could be consequently cured.

  6. Fluid Flow through a High Cell Density Fluidized-Bed during Centrifugal Bioreactor Culture

    PubMed Central

    Detzel, Christopher J.; Van Wie, Bernard J.; Ivory, Cornelius F.

    2010-01-01

    An increasing demand for products such as tissues, proteins, and antibodies from mammalian cell suspension cultures is driving interest in increasing production through high-cell density bioreactors. The centrifugal bioreactor (CCBR) retains cells by balancing settling forces with surface drag forces due to medium throughput and is capable of maintaining cell densities above 108 cells/mL. This article builds on a previous study where the fluid